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Sample records for forest virus fusion

  1. Membrane fusion of Semliki Forest virus involves homotrimers of the fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Wahlberg, J M; Bron, R; Wilschut, J; Garoff, H

    1992-01-01

    Infection of cells with enveloped viruses is accomplished through membrane fusion. The binding and fusion processes are mediated by the spike proteins in the envelope of the virus particle and usually involve a series of conformational changes in these proteins. We have studied the low-pH-mediated fusion process of the alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV). The spike protein of SFV is composed of three copies of the protein heterodimer E2E1. This structure is resistant to solubilization in mild detergents such as Nonidet P-40 (NP40). We have recently shown that the spike structure is reorganized during virus entry into acidic endosomes (J. M. Wahlberg and H. Garoff, J. Cell Biol. 116:339-348, 1992). The original NP40-resistant heterodimer is dissociated, and the E1 subunits form new NP40-resistant protein oligomers. Here, we show that the new oligomer is represented by an E1 trimer. From studies that use an in vitro assay for fusion of SFV with liposomes, we show that the E1 trimer is efficiently expressed during virus-mediated membrane fusion. Time course studies show that both E1 trimer formation and fusion are fast processes, occurring in seconds. It was also possible to inhibit virus binding and fusion with a monoclonal antibody directed toward the trimeric E1. These results give support for a model in which the E1 trimeric structure is involved in the SFV-mediated fusion reaction. Images PMID:1433520

  2. Pseudorevertants of a Semliki Forest Virus Fusion-Blocking Mutation Reveal a Critical Interchain Interaction in the Core Trimer▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Catherine Y.; Besanceney, Christen; Song, Yifan; Kielian, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Semliki Forest virus (SFV) is an enveloped alphavirus that infects cells by a low-pH-triggered membrane fusion reaction mediated by the viral E1 protein. E1 inserts into target membranes and refolds to a hairpin-like homotrimer containing a central core trimer and an outer layer composed of domain III and the juxtamembrane stem region. The key residues involved in mediating E1 trimerization are not well understood. We recently showed that aspartate 188 in the interface of the core trimer plays a critical role. Substitution with lysine (D188K) blocks formation of the core trimer and E1 trimerization and strongly inhibits virus fusion and infection. Here, we have isolated and characterized revertants that rescued the fusion and growth defects of D188K. These revertants included pseudorevertants containing acidic or polar neutral residues at E1 position 188 and a second-site revertant containing an E1 K176T mutation. Computational analysis using multiconformation continuum electrostatics revealed an important interaction bridging D188 of one chain with K176 of the adjacent chain in the core trimer. E1 K176 is completely conserved among the alphaviruses, and mutations of K176 to threonine (K176T) or isoleucine (K176I) produced similar fusion phenotypes as D188 mutants. Together, our data support a model in which a ring of three salt bridges formed by D188 and K176 stabilize the core trimer, a key intermediate of the alphavirus fusion protein. PMID:20826687

  3. Fusion of Enveloped Viruses in Endosomes.

    PubMed

    White, Judith M; Whittaker, Gary R

    2016-06-01

    Ari Helenius launched the field of enveloped virus fusion in endosomes with a seminal paper in the Journal of Cell Biology in 1980. In the intervening years, a great deal has been learned about the structures and mechanisms of viral membrane fusion proteins as well as about the endosomes in which different enveloped viruses fuse and the endosomal cues that trigger fusion. We now recognize three classes of viral membrane fusion proteins based on structural criteria and four mechanisms of fusion triggering. After reviewing general features of viral membrane fusion proteins and viral fusion in endosomes, we delve into three characterized mechanisms for viral fusion triggering in endosomes: by low pH, by receptor binding plus low pH and by receptor binding plus the action of a protease. We end with a discussion of viruses that may employ novel endosomal fusion-triggering mechanisms. A key take-home message is that enveloped viruses that enter cells by fusing in endosomes traverse the endocytic pathway until they reach an endosome that has all of the environmental conditions (pH, proteases, ions, intracellular receptors and lipid composition) to (if needed) prime and (in all cases) trigger the fusion protein and to support membrane fusion.

  4. The dengue virus type 2 envelope protein fusion peptide is essential for membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Claire Y.-H.; Butrapet, Siritorn; Moss, Kelly J.; Childers, Thomas; Erb, Steven M.; Calvert, Amanda E.; Silengo, Shawn J.; Kinney, Richard M.; Blair, Carol D.; Roehrig, John T.

    2010-01-20

    The flaviviral envelope (E) protein directs virus-mediated membrane fusion. To investigate membrane fusion as a requirement for virus growth, we introduced 27 unique mutations into the fusion peptide of an infectious cDNA clone of dengue 2 virus and recovered seven stable mutant viruses. The fusion efficiency of the mutants was impaired, demonstrating for the first time the requirement for specific FP AAs in optimal fusion. Mutant viruses exhibited different growth kinetics and/or genetic stabilities in different cell types and adult mosquitoes. Virus particles could be recovered following RNA transfection of cells with four lethal mutants; however, recovered viruses could not re-infect cells. These viruses could enter cells, but internalized virus appeared to be retained in endosomal compartments of infected cells, thus suggesting a fusion blockade. Mutations of the FP also resulted in reduced virus reactivity with flavivirus group-reactive antibodies, confirming earlier reports using virus-like particles.

  5. Imaging multiple intermediates of single-virus membrane fusion mediated by distinct fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kye-Il; Tai, April; Lee, Chi-Lin; Wong, Clement; Wang, Pin

    2010-09-01

    Membrane fusion plays an essential role in the entry of enveloped viruses into target cells. The merging of viral and target cell membranes is catalyzed by viral fusion proteins, which involves multiple sequential steps in the fusion process. However, the fusion mechanisms mediated by different fusion proteins involve multiple transient intermediates that have not been well characterized. Here, we report a synthetic virus platform that allows us to better understand the different fusion mechanisms driven by the diverse types fusion proteins. The platform consists of lentiviral particles coenveloped with a surface antibody, which serves as the binding protein, along with a fusion protein derived from either influenza virus (HAmu) or Sindbis virus (SINmu). By using a single virus tracking technique, we demonstrated that both HAmu- and SINmu-bearing viruses enter cells through clathrin-dependent endocytosis, but they required different endosomal trafficking routes to initiate viral fusion. Direct observation of single viral fusion events clearly showed that hemifusion mediated by SINmu upon exposure to low pH occurs faster than that mediated by HAmu. Monitoring sequential fusion processes by dual labeling the outer and inner leaflets of viral membranes also revealed that the SINmu-mediated hemifusion intermediate is relatively long-lived as compared with that mediated by HAmu. Taken together, we have demonstrated that the combination of this versatile viral platform with the techniques of single virus tracking can be a powerful tool for revealing molecular details of fusion mediated by various fusion proteins.

  6. Cholesterol is required in the exit pathway of Semliki Forest virus

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The enveloped alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV) infects cells via a membrane fusion reaction triggered by low pH. For fusion to occur cholesterol is required in the target membrane, as demonstrated both in in vitro fusion assays and in vivo for virus infection of a host cell. In this paper we examine the role of cholesterol in postfusion events in the SFV life cycle. Cholesterol-depleted insect cells were transfected with SFV RNA or infected at very high multiplicities to circumvent the fusion block caused by the absence of cholesterol. Under these conditions, the viral spike proteins were synthesized and transported to the site of p62 cleavage with normal kinetics. Surprisingly, the subsequent exit of virus particles was dramatically slowed compared to cholesterol-containing cells. The inhibition of virus production could be reversed by the addition of cholesterol to depleted cells. In contrast to results with SFV, no cholesterol requirement for virus exit was observed for the production of either the unrelated vesicular stomatitis virus or a cholesterol-independent SFV fusion mutant. Thus, cholesterol was only critical in the exit pathway of viruses that also require cholesterol for fusion. These results demonstrate a specific and unexpected lipid requirement in virus exit, and suggest that in addition to its role in fusion, cholesterol is involved in the assembly or budding of SFV. PMID:8408205

  7. Reduction of Influenza Virus Envelope's Fusogenicity by Viral Fusion Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rowse, Michael; Qiu, Shihong; Tsao, Jun; Yamauchi, Yohei; Wang, Guoxin; Luo, Ming

    2016-01-01

    During cell entry of an enveloped virus, the viral membrane must be fused with the cellular membrane. The virus envelope has a unique structure consisting of viral proteins and a virus-specific lipid composition, whereas the host membrane has its own structure with host membrane proteins. Compound 136 was previously found to bind in close proximity to the viral envelope and inhibit influenza virus entry. We showed here that the 136-treated influenza virus still caused hemolysis. When liposomes were used as the target membrane for 136-treated viruses, aberrant fusion occurred; few liposomes fused per virion, and glycoproteins were not distributed evenly across fusion complexes. Additionally, large fusion aggregates did not form, and in some instances, neck-like structures were found. Based on previous results and hemolysis, fusion inhibition by 136 occurs post-scission but prior to lipid mixing. PMID:27622947

  8. Glomerulonephritis secondary to Barmah Forest virus infection.

    PubMed

    Katz, I A; Hale, G E; Hudson, B J; Ibels, L S; Eckstein, R P; Dermott, P L

    1997-07-01

    Clinical infection with Barmah Forest virus (BFV) is becoming increasingly recognised with serological testing. We report the first case of glomerulonephritis after BFV infection. The patient required diuretic and antihypertensive therapy, but made an almost complete recovery. BFV infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of glomerulonephritis. PMID:9236755

  9. Cryomicroscopy provides structural snapshots of influenza virus membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Calder, Lesley J; Rosenthal, Peter B

    2016-09-01

    The lipid-enveloped influenza virus enters host cells during infection by binding cell-surface receptors and, after receptor-mediated endocytosis, fusing with the membrane of the endosome and delivering the viral genome and transcription machinery into the host cell. These events are mediated by the hemagglutinin (HA) surface glycoprotein. At the low pH of the endosome, an irreversible conformational change in the HA, including the exposure of the hydrophobic fusion peptide, activates membrane fusion. Here we used electron cryomicroscopy and cryotomography to image the fusion of influenza virus with target membranes at low pH. We visualized structural intermediates of HA and their interactions with membranes during the course of membrane fusion as well as ultrastructural changes in the virus that accompany membrane fusion. Our observations are relevant to a wide range of protein-mediated membrane-fusion processes and demonstrate how dynamic membrane events may be studied by cryomicroscopy. PMID:27501535

  10. Fusion of Sendai virus with vesicles of oligomerizable lipids: a microcalorimetric analysis of membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Ravoo, B J; Weringa, W D; Engberts, J B

    2000-01-01

    Sendai virus fuses efficiently with small and large unilamellar vesicles of the lipid 1,2-di-n-hexadecyloxypropyl-4- (beta-nitrostyryl) phosphate (DHPBNS) at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C, as shown by lipid mixing assays and electron microscopy. However, fusion is strongly inhibited by oligomerization of the head groups of DHPBNS in the bilayer vesicles. The enthalpy associated with fusion of Sendai virus with DHPBNS vesicles was measured by isothermal titration microcalorimetry, comparing titrations of Sendai virus into (i) solutions of DHPBNS vesicles (which fuse with the virus) and (ii) oligomerized DHPBNS vesicles (which do not fuse with the virus), respectively. The observed heat effect of fusion of Sendai virus with DHPBNS vesicles is strongly dependent on the buffer medium, reflecting a partial charge neutralization of the Sendai F and HN proteins upon insertion into the negatively-charged vesicle membrane. No buffer effect was observed for the titration of Sendai virus into oligomerized DHPBNS vesicles, indicating that inhibition of fusion is a result of inhibition of insertion of the fusion protein into the target membrane. Fusion of Sendai virus with DHPBNS vesicles is endothermic and entropy-driven. The positive enthalpy term is dominated by heat effects resulting from merging of the protein-rich viral envelope with the lipid vesicle bilayers rather than by the fusion of the viral with the vesicle bilayers per se.

  11. Calorimetric detection of influenza virus induced membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Nebel, S; Bartoldus, I; Stegmann, T

    1995-05-01

    Membrane fusion induced by the hemagglutinin glycoprotein of influenza virus has been extensively characterized, but the mechanism whereby the protein achieves the merger of the viral and target membrane lipids remains enigmatic. Various lipid intermediate structures have been proposed, and the energies required for their formation predicted. Here, we have analyzed the enthalpies of fusion of influenza with liposomes by titration calorimetry. If a small sample of virus in a weak neutral pH buffer was added to an excess of liposomes at low pH, a two-component reaction was seen, composed of an exothermic reaction and a slower endothermic reaction. The exothermic reaction was the result of acid-base reactions between the neutral pH virus sample and low pH buffer and low-pH-induced changes in the virus. The endothermic reaction was not observed in the absence of liposomes and much reduced if acid-inactivated virus, which had lost its fusion but not its binding activity, was added to liposomes. The endothermic reaction was more temperature dependent than the exothermic reaction; its pH dependence corresponded with that of fusion and its enthalpy was higher if fusion was more extensive. These data indicate that most of the endothermic reaction was due to membrane fusion. The experimentally determined enthalpy of fusion, 0.6-0.7 kcal per mol of viral phospholipids, is much higher than expected on the basis of current theories about the formation of lipid intermediates during membrane fusion.

  12. Proteomics computational analyses suggest that hepatitis C virus E1 and pestivirus E2 envelope glycoproteins are truncated class II fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Garry, Robert F; Dash, Srikanta

    2003-03-15

    Class II fusion proteins encoded by tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), dengue virus, and Semliki Forest virus have a fusion peptide located at the end of a rod-like molecule comprised of three antiparallel beta sheet domains. Proteomics computational analyses suggest that hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoprotein E1 and pestivirus envelope glycoprotein E2 are truncated class II fusion proteins. Similarities were also detected between the receptor-binding portion of TBEV E and HCV E2, and between TBEV small membrane protein precursor prM and pestivirus E1. The proposed models of Flaviviridae envelope proteins can facilitate drug and vaccine development.

  13. Influenza Virus-Mediated Membrane Fusion: Determinants of Hemagglutinin Fusogenic Activity and Experimental Approaches for Assessing Virus Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Brian S.; Whittaker, Gary R.; Daniel, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) is the viral protein that facilitates the entry of influenza viruses into host cells. This protein controls two critical aspects of entry: virus binding and membrane fusion. In order for HA to carry out these functions, it must first undergo a priming step, proteolytic cleavage, which renders it fusion competent. Membrane fusion commences from inside the endosome after a drop in lumenal pH and an ensuing conformational change in HA that leads to the hemifusion of the outer membrane leaflets of the virus and endosome, the formation of a stalk between them, followed by pore formation. Thus, the fusion machinery is an excellent target for antiviral compounds, especially those that target the conserved stem region of the protein. However, traditional ensemble fusion assays provide a somewhat limited ability to directly quantify fusion partly due to the inherent averaging of individual fusion events resulting from experimental constraints. Inspired by the gains achieved by single molecule experiments and analysis of stochastic events, recently-developed individual virion imaging techniques and analysis of single fusion events has provided critical information about individual virion behavior, discriminated intermediate fusion steps within a single virion, and allowed the study of the overall population dynamics without the loss of discrete, individual information. In this article, we first start by reviewing the determinants of HA fusogenic activity and the viral entry process, highlight some open questions, and then describe the experimental approaches for assaying fusion that will be useful in developing the most effective therapies in the future. PMID:22852045

  14. C-terminal tyrosine residues modulate the fusion activity of the Hendra virus fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Popa, Andreea; Pager, Cara Teresia; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2011-02-15

    The paramyxovirus family includes important human pathogens such as measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial virus, and the recently emerged, highly pathogenic Hendra and Nipah viruses. The viral fusion (F) protein plays critical roles in infection, promoting both the virus-cell membrane fusion events needed for viral entry as well as cell-cell fusion events leading to syncytia formation. We describe the surprising finding that addition of the short epitope HA tag to the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Hendra virus F protein leads to a significant increase in the extent of cell-cell membrane fusion. This increase was not due to alterations in surface expression, cleavage state, or association with lipid microdomains. Addition of a Myc tag of similar length did not alter Hendra F protein fusion activity, indicating that the observed stimulation was not solely a result of lengthening the CT. Three tyrosine residues within the HA tag were critical for the increase in the extent of fusion, suggesting C-terminal tyrosines may modulate Hendra fusion activity. The effects of addition of the HA tag varied with other fusion proteins, as parainfluenza virus 5 F-HA showed a decreased level of surface expression and no stimulation of fusion. These results indicate that additions to the C-terminal end of the F protein CT can modulate protein function in a sequence specific manner, reinforcing the need for careful analysis of epitope-tagged glycoproteins. In addition, our results implicate C-terminal tyrosine residues in the modulation of the membrane fusion reaction promoted by these viral glycoproteins.

  15. Characterization of Potent Fusion Inhibitors of Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rowse, Michael; Qiu, Shihong; Tsao, Jun; Xian, Tongmei; Khawaja, Sarah; Yamauchi, Yohei; Yang, Zhen; Wang, Guoxin; Luo, Ming

    2015-01-01

    New inhibitors of influenza viruses are needed to combat the potential emergence of novel human influenza viruses. We have identified a class of small molecules that inhibit replication of influenza virus at picomolar concentrations in plaque reduction assays. The compound also inhibits replication of vesicular stomatitis virus. Time of addition and dilution experiments with influenza virus indicated that an early time point of infection was blocked and that inhibitor 136 tightly bound to virions. Using fluorescently labeled influenza virus, inhibition of viral fusion to cellular membranes by blocked lipid mixing was established as the mechanism of action for this class of inhibitors. Stabilization of the neutral pH form of hemagglutinin (HA) was ruled out by trypsin digestion studies in vitro and with conformation specific HA antibodies within cells. Direct visualization of 136 treated influenza virions at pH 7.5 or acidified to pH 5.0 showed that virions remain intact and that glycoproteins become disorganized as expected when HA undergoes a conformational change. This suggests that exposure of the fusion peptide at low pH is not inhibited but lipid mixing is inhibited, a different mechanism than previously reported fusion inhibitors. We hypothesize that this new class of inhibitors intercalate into the virus envelope altering the structure of the viral envelope required for fusion to cellular membranes. PMID:25803288

  16. Molecular mechanism of respiratory syncytial virus fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Battles, Michael B; Langedijk, Johannes P; Furmanova-Hollenstein, Polina; Chaiwatpongsakorn, Supranee; Costello, Heather M; Kwanten, Leen; Vranckx, Luc; Vink, Paul; Jaensch, Steffen; Jonckers, Tim H M; Koul, Anil; Arnoult, Eric; Peeples, Mark E; Roymans, Dirk; McLellan, Jason S

    2016-02-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of pneumonia and bronchiolitis in young children and the elderly. Therapeutic small molecules have been developed that bind the RSV F glycoprotein and inhibit membrane fusion, yet their binding sites and molecular mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Here we show that these inhibitors bind to a three-fold-symmetric pocket within the central cavity of the metastable prefusion conformation of RSV F. Inhibitor binding stabilizes this conformation by tethering two regions that must undergo a structural rearrangement to facilitate membrane fusion. Inhibitor-escape mutations occur in residues that directly contact the inhibitors or are involved in the conformational rearrangements required to accommodate inhibitor binding. Resistant viruses do not propagate as well as wild-type RSV in vitro, indicating a fitness cost for inhibitor escape. Collectively, these findings provide new insight into class I viral fusion proteins and should facilitate development of optimal RSV fusion inhibitors.

  17. La Crosse virus (LACV) Gc fusion peptide mutants have impaired growth and fusion phenotypes, but remain neurotoxic

    SciTech Connect

    Soldan, Samantha S.; Hollidge, Bradley S.; Wagner, Valentina; Weber, Friedemann; Gonzalez-Scarano, Francisco

    2010-09-01

    La Crosse virus is a leading cause of pediatric encephalitis in the Midwestern United States and an emerging pathogen in the American South. The LACV glycoprotein Gc plays a critical role in entry as the virus attachment protein. A 22 amino acid hydrophobic region within Gc (1066-1087) was recently identified as the LACV fusion peptide. To further define the role of Gc (1066-1087) in virus entry, fusion, and neuropathogenesis, a panel of recombinant LACV (rLACV) fusion peptide mutant viruses was generated. Replication of mutant rLACVs was significantly reduced. In addition, the fusion peptide mutants demonstrated decreased fusion phenotypes relative to LACV-WT. Interestingly, these viruses maintained their ability to cause neuronal loss in culture, suggesting that the fusion peptide of LACV Gc is a determinant of properties associated with neuroinvasion (growth to high titer in muscle cells and a robust fusion phenotype), but not necessarily of neurovirulence.

  18. Measles Virus Fusion Protein: Structure, Function and Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Plattet, Philippe; Alves, Lisa; Herren, Michael; Aguilar, Hector C

    2016-04-01

    Measles virus (MeV), a highly contagious member of the Paramyxoviridae family, causes measles in humans. The Paramyxoviridae family of negative single-stranded enveloped viruses includes several important human and animal pathogens, with MeV causing approximately 120,000 deaths annually. MeV and canine distemper virus (CDV)-mediated diseases can be prevented by vaccination. However, sub-optimal vaccine delivery continues to foster MeV outbreaks. Post-exposure prophylaxis with antivirals has been proposed as a novel strategy to complement vaccination programs by filling herd immunity gaps. Recent research has shown that membrane fusion induced by the morbillivirus glycoproteins is the first critical step for viral entry and infection, and determines cell pathology and disease outcome. Our molecular understanding of morbillivirus-associated membrane fusion has greatly progressed towards the feasibility to control this process by treating the fusion glycoprotein with inhibitory molecules. Current approaches to develop anti-membrane fusion drugs and our knowledge on drug resistance mechanisms strongly suggest that combined therapies will be a prerequisite. Thus, discovery of additional anti-fusion and/or anti-attachment protein small-molecule compounds may eventually translate into realistic therapeutic options. PMID:27110811

  19. Measles Virus Fusion Protein: Structure, Function and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Plattet, Philippe; Alves, Lisa; Herren, Michael; Aguilar, Hector C.

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV), a highly contagious member of the Paramyxoviridae family, causes measles in humans. The Paramyxoviridae family of negative single-stranded enveloped viruses includes several important human and animal pathogens, with MeV causing approximately 120,000 deaths annually. MeV and canine distemper virus (CDV)-mediated diseases can be prevented by vaccination. However, sub-optimal vaccine delivery continues to foster MeV outbreaks. Post-exposure prophylaxis with antivirals has been proposed as a novel strategy to complement vaccination programs by filling herd immunity gaps. Recent research has shown that membrane fusion induced by the morbillivirus glycoproteins is the first critical step for viral entry and infection, and determines cell pathology and disease outcome. Our molecular understanding of morbillivirus-associated membrane fusion has greatly progressed towards the feasibility to control this process by treating the fusion glycoprotein with inhibitory molecules. Current approaches to develop anti-membrane fusion drugs and our knowledge on drug resistance mechanisms strongly suggest that combined therapies will be a prerequisite. Thus, discovery of additional anti-fusion and/or anti-attachment protein small-molecule compounds may eventually translate into realistic therapeutic options. PMID:27110811

  20. Semliki Forest virus and Sindbis virus, but not vaccinia virus, require glycolysis for optimal replication.

    PubMed

    Findlay, James S; Ulaeto, David

    2015-09-01

    Viruses are obligate intracellular pathogens which rely on the cell's machinery to produce the energy and macromolecules required for replication. Infection is associated with a modified metabolic profile and one pathway which can be modified is glycolysis. In this study, we investigated if the glycolysis pathway is required for alphavirus replication. Pre-treatment of Vero cells with three different glycolysis inhibitors (2-deoxyglucose, lonidamine and oxamate) resulted in a significant reduction (but not abrogation) of Semliki Forest virus and Sindbis virus replication, but not of the unrelated virus, vaccinia virus. Reduced virus yield was not associated with any significant cytotoxic effect and delayed treatment up to 3 h post-infection still resulted in a significant reduction. This suggested that glycolysis is required for optimal replication of alphaviruses by supporting post-entry life cycle steps.

  1. Intracellular processing of the Newcastle disease virus fusion glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, T.; Ward, L.J.; Semerjian, A.

    1985-03-01

    The fusion glycoprotein (Fo) of Newcastle disease virus is cleaved at an intracellular site into F1 and F2. This result was confirmed by comparing the transit time of the fusion protein to the cell surface with the time course of cleavage of Fo. The time required for cleavage of half of the pulse-labeled Fo protein is ca. 40 min faster than the half time of the transit of the fusion protein to the cell surface. To determine the cell compartment in which cleavage occurs, use was made of inhibitors which block glycoprotein migration at specific points and posttranslational modifications known to occur in specific cell membranes. Cleavage of Fo is inhibited by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone; thus, cleavage does not occur in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Monensin blocks the incorporation of Newcastle disease virus glycoproteins into virions and blocks the cleavage of the fusion glycoprotein. However, Fo cannot be radioactively labeled with (/sup 3/H) fucose, whereas F1 is readily labeled. These results argue that cleavage occurs in the trans Golgi membranes or in a cell compartment occupied by glycoproteins quite soon after their transit through the trans Golgi membranes. The implications of the results presented for the transit times of the fusion protein between subcellular organelles are discussed.

  2. Reciprocal Regulation of AKT and MAP Kinase Dictates Virus-Host Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nishi R.; Mani, Prashant; Nandwani, Neha; Mishra, Rajakishore; Rana, Ajay; Sarkar, Debi P.

    2010-01-01

    Viruses of the Paramyxoviridae family bind to their host cells by using hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), which enhances fusion protein (F)-mediated membrane fusion. Although respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus 5 of this family are suggested to trigger host cell signaling during infection, the virus-induced intracellular signals dictating virus-cell fusion await elucidation. Using an F- or HN-F-containing reconstituted envelope of Sendai virus, another paramyxovirus, we revealed the role and regulation of AKT1 and Raf/MEK/ERK cascades during viral fusion with liver cells. Our observation that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation promotes viral fusion via ezrin-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangements, whereas AKT1 attenuates fusion by promoting phosphorylation of F protein, indicates a counteractive regulation of viral fusion by reciprocal activation of AKT1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, establishing a novel conceptual framework for a therapeutic strategy. PMID:20164223

  3. The heterodimeric association between the membrane proteins of Semliki Forest virus changes its sensitivity to low pH during virus maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Wahlberg, J M; Boere, W A; Garoff, H

    1989-01-01

    The budding and the fusion processes of the enveloped animal virus Semliki Forest virus serve the purpose of transporting its nucleocapsid, containing its genome, from the cytoplasm of an infected cell into that of an uninfected one. We show here that, in the infected cell, the viral membrane (spike) proteins p62 and E1 are organized as heterodimers which are very resistant to dissociation in acidic conditions. In contrast, the mature form of the heterodimer, E2E1, which is found in the virus particle and which is generated by proteolytic processing of p62, is very prone to dissociate upon treatment with mildly acidic buffers. We discuss the possibility that this difference in behavior of the intracellular precursor form and the mature form of the spike protein complex represents an important regulatory mechanism for the processes involving membrane binding around the nucleocapsid during budding and membrane release from the nucleocapsid at the stage of virus fusion. Images PMID:2479769

  4. Crystal Structure of the Pre-fusion Nipah Virus Fusion Glycoprotein Reveals a Novel Hexamer-of-Trimers Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Somnath; Yan, Lianying; Feng, YanRu; Wang, Lin-Fa; Skiniotis, Georgios; Lee, Benhur; Zhou, Z. Hong; Broder, Christopher C.; Aguilar, Hector C.; Nikolov, Dimitar B.

    2015-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a paramyxovirus that infects host cells through the coordinated efforts of two envelope glycoproteins. The G glycoprotein attaches to cell receptors, triggering the fusion (F) glycoprotein to execute membrane fusion. Here we report the first crystal structure of the pre-fusion form of the NiV-F glycoprotein ectodomain. Interestingly this structure also revealed a hexamer-of-trimers encircling a central axis. Electron tomography of Nipah virus-like particles supported the hexameric pre-fusion model, and biochemical analyses supported the hexamer-of-trimers F assembly in solution. Importantly, structure-assisted site-directed mutagenesis of the interfaces between F trimers highlighted the functional relevance of the hexameric assembly. Shown here, in both cell-cell fusion and virus-cell fusion systems, our results suggested that this hexamer-of-trimers assembly was important during fusion pore formation. We propose that this assembly would stabilize the pre-fusion F conformation prior to cell attachment and facilitate the coordinated transition to a post-fusion conformation of all six F trimers upon triggering of a single trimer. Together, our data reveal a novel and functional pre-fusion architecture of a paramyxoviral fusion glycoprotein. PMID:26646856

  5. A neutron study of the feline leukaemia virus fusion peptide: Implications for biological fusion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Sarah M. A.; Darkes, Malcolm J. M.; Bradshaw, Jeremy P.

    Neutron diffraction studies were performed on stacked phospholipid bilayers to determine the effects of the feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) fusion peptide on membrane structure. Bilayers were composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine with 50% (mol) dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol. Neutron scattering profiles with peptide present showed an increase in scattering density in the lipid-tails region, whilst scattering by the lipid headgroup region was decreased. This is interpreted as a lowering of the packing density of the lipid headgroups and an increase in the packing density of the lipid tails. Modelling studies and experimental evidence have suggested that fusion peptides catalyse fusion by increasing the negative curvature of the target membrane's outer monolayer. Our results presented here add support to this hypothesis for the fusion mechanism. The 2H 2O scattering profile was also slightly perturbed in the lipid headgroup region with 1% (mol)FeLV fusion peptide present. The FeLV peptide had no significant effect on the organisation of bilayers containing only dioleoylphosphatidylcholine.

  6. Side chain packing below the fusion peptide strongly modulates triggering of the Hendra virus F protein.

    PubMed

    Smith, Everett Clinton; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2010-10-01

    Triggering of the Hendra virus fusion (F) protein is required to initiate the conformational changes which drive membrane fusion, but the factors which control triggering remain poorly understood. Mutation of a histidine predicted to lie near the fusion peptide to alanine greatly reduced fusion despite wild-type cell surface expression levels, while asparagine substitution resulted in a moderate restoration in fusion levels. Slowed kinetics of six-helix bundle formation, as judged by sensitivity to heptad repeat B-derived peptides, was observed for all H372 mutants. These data suggest that side chain packing beneath the fusion peptide is an important regulator of Hendra virus F triggering.

  7. A generic screening platform for inhibitors of virus induced cell fusion using cellular electrical impedance

    PubMed Central

    Watterson, Daniel; Robinson, Jodie; Chappell, Keith J.; Butler, Mark S.; Edwards, David J.; Fry, Scott R.; Bermingham, Imogen M.; Cooper, Matthew A.; Young, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Fusion of the viral envelope with host cell membranes is an essential step in the life cycle of all enveloped viruses. Despite such a clear target for antiviral drug development, few anti-fusion drugs have progressed to market. One significant hurdle is the absence of a generic, high-throughput, reproducible fusion assay. Here we report that real time, label-free measurement of cellular electrical impedance can quantify cell-cell fusion mediated by either individually expressed recombinant viral fusion proteins, or native virus infection. We validated this approach for all three classes of viral fusion and demonstrated utility in quantifying fusion inhibition using antibodies and small molecule inhibitors specific for dengue virus and respiratory syncytial virus. PMID:26976324

  8. Inhibition of Sendai virus fusion with phospholipid vesicles and human erythrocyte membranes by hydrophobic peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, D.R.; Flanagan, T.D.; Young, J.E.; Yeagle, P.L. )

    1991-06-01

    Hydrophobic di- and tripeptides which are capable of inhibiting enveloped virus infection of cells are also capable of inhibiting at least three different types of membrane fusion events. Large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of N-methyl dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (N-methyl DOPE), containing encapsulated 1-aminonaphthalene-3,6,8-trisulfonic acid (ANTS) and/or p-xylene bis(pyridinium bromide) (DPX), were formed by extrusion. Vesicle fusion and leakage were then monitored with the ANTS/DPX fluorescence assay. Sendai virus fusion with lipid vesicles and Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes were measured by following the relief of fluorescence quenching of virus labeled with octadecylrhodamine B chloride (R18). This study found that the effectiveness of the peptides carbobenzoxy-L-Phe-L-Phe (Z-L-Phe-L-Phe), Z-L-Phe, Z-D-Phe, and Z-Gly-L-Phe-L-Phe in inhibiting N-methyl DOPE LUV fusion or fusion of virus with N-methyl DOPE LUV also paralleled their reported ability to block viral infectivity. Furthermore, Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly and Z-Gly-L-Phe inhibited Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes with the same relative potency with which they inhibited vesicle-vesicle and virus-vesicle fusion. The evidence suggests a mechanism by which these peptides exert their inhibition of plaque formation by enveloped viruses. This class of inhibitors apparently acts by inhibiting fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane, thereby preventing viral infection. The physical pathway by which these peptides inhibit membrane fusion was investigated. {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of proposed intermediates in the pathway for membrane fusion in LUV revealed that the potent fusion inhibitor Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly selectively altered the structure (or dynamics) of the hypothesized fusion intermediates and that the poor inhibitor Z-Gly-L-Phe did not.

  9. Early Events in Chikungunya Virus Infection—From Virus Cell Binding to Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K. S.; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus causing millions of infections in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. CHIKV infection often leads to an acute self-limited febrile illness with debilitating myalgia and arthralgia. A potential long-term complication of CHIKV infection is severe joint pain, which can last for months to years. There are no vaccines or specific therapeutics available to prevent or treat infection. This review describes the critical steps in CHIKV cell entry. We summarize the latest studies on the virus-cell tropism, virus-receptor binding, internalization, membrane fusion and review the molecules and compounds that have been described to interfere with virus cell entry. The aim of the review is to give the reader a state-of-the-art overview on CHIKV cell entry and to provide an outlook on potential new avenues in CHIKV research. PMID:26198242

  10. Early Events in Chikungunya Virus Infection-From Virus Cell Binding to Membrane Fusion.

    PubMed

    van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K S; Hoornweg, Tabitha E; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A; Smit, Jolanda M

    2015-07-07

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus causing millions of infections in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. CHIKV infection often leads to an acute self-limited febrile illness with debilitating myalgia and arthralgia. A potential long-term complication of CHIKV infection is severe joint pain, which can last for months to years. There are no vaccines or specific therapeutics available to prevent or treat infection. This review describes the critical steps in CHIKV cell entry. We summarize the latest studies on the virus-cell tropism, virus-receptor binding, internalization, membrane fusion and review the molecules and compounds that have been described to interfere with virus cell entry. The aim of the review is to give the reader a state-of-the-art overview on CHIKV cell entry and to provide an outlook on potential new avenues in CHIKV research.

  11. Dengue Virus Impairs Mitochondrial Fusion by Cleaving Mitofusins.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chia-Yi; Liang, Jian-Jong; Li, Jin-Kun; Lee, Yi-Ling; Chang, Bi-Lan; Su, Chan-I; Huang, Wei-Jheng; Lai, Michael M C; Lin, Yi-Ling

    2015-12-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic subcellular organelles participating in many signaling pathways such as antiviral innate immunity and cell death cascades. Here we found that mitochondrial fusion was impaired in dengue virus (DENV) infected cells. Two mitofusins (MFN1 and MFN2), which mediate mitochondrial fusion and participate in the proper function of mitochondria, were cleaved by DENV protease NS2B3. By knockdown and overexpression approaches, these two MFNs showed diverse functions in DENV infection. MFN1 was required for efficient antiviral retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptor signaling to suppress DENV replication, while MFN2 participated in maintaining mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) to attenuate DENV-induced cell death. Cleaving MFN1 and MFN2 by DENV protease suppressed mitochondrial fusion and deteriorated DENV-induced cytopathic effects through subverting interferon production and facilitating MMP disruption. Thus, MFNs participate in host defense against DENV infection by promoting the antiviral response and cell survival, and DENV regulates mitochondrial morphology by cleaving MFNs to manipulate the outcome of infection. PMID:26717518

  12. Vaccinia virus recombinants expressing either the measles virus fusion or hemagglutinin glycoprotein protect dogs against canine distemper virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J; Pincus, S; Tartaglia, J; Richardson, C; Alkhatib, G; Briedis, D; Appel, M; Norton, E; Paoletti, E

    1991-08-01

    cDNA clones of the genes encoding either the hemagglutinin (HA) or fusion (F) proteins of the Edmonston strain of measles virus (MV) were expressed in vaccinia virus recombinants. Immunofluorescence analysis detected both proteins on the plasma membranes of unfixed cells as well as internally in fixed cells. Immunoprecipitation of metabolically radiolabeled infected-cell extracts by using specific sera demonstrated a 76-kDa HA polypeptide and gene products of 60, 44, and 23 kDa which correspond to a MV F precursor and cleavage products F0, F1, and F2, respectively. Neither recombinant induced cell fusion of Vero cells when inoculated individually, but efficient cell fusion was readily observed upon coinfection of cells with both recombinants. Inoculation of dogs with the vaccinia virus-MV F recombinant (VV-MVF) did not give rise to detectable MV-neutralizing antibody. Inoculation of dogs with the vaccinia virus-MV HA recombinant (VV-MVHA) or coinoculation with both recombinants (VV-MVF and VV-MVHA) induced significant MV-neutralizing titers that were increased following a booster inoculation. Inoculation of dogs with the vaccinia virus recombinants or with MV failed to induce canine distemper virus (CDV)-neutralizing antibodies. Upon challenge with a lethal dose of virulent CDV, signs of infection were observed in dogs inoculated with (VV-MVF). No symptoms of disease were observed in dogs that had been vaccinated with VV-MVHA or with VV-MVHA and VV-MVF and then challenged with CDV. All dogs vaccinated with the recombinant viruses as well as those inoculated with MV or a vaccine strain of CDV survived CDV challenge. PMID:1830113

  13. Vaccinia virus recombinants expressing either the measles virus fusion or hemagglutinin glycoprotein protect dogs against canine distemper virus challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J; Pincus, S; Tartaglia, J; Richardson, C; Alkhatib, G; Briedis, D; Appel, M; Norton, E; Paoletti, E

    1991-01-01

    cDNA clones of the genes encoding either the hemagglutinin (HA) or fusion (F) proteins of the Edmonston strain of measles virus (MV) were expressed in vaccinia virus recombinants. Immunofluorescence analysis detected both proteins on the plasma membranes of unfixed cells as well as internally in fixed cells. Immunoprecipitation of metabolically radiolabeled infected-cell extracts by using specific sera demonstrated a 76-kDa HA polypeptide and gene products of 60, 44, and 23 kDa which correspond to a MV F precursor and cleavage products F0, F1, and F2, respectively. Neither recombinant induced cell fusion of Vero cells when inoculated individually, but efficient cell fusion was readily observed upon coinfection of cells with both recombinants. Inoculation of dogs with the vaccinia virus-MV F recombinant (VV-MVF) did not give rise to detectable MV-neutralizing antibody. Inoculation of dogs with the vaccinia virus-MV HA recombinant (VV-MVHA) or coinoculation with both recombinants (VV-MVF and VV-MVHA) induced significant MV-neutralizing titers that were increased following a booster inoculation. Inoculation of dogs with the vaccinia virus recombinants or with MV failed to induce canine distemper virus (CDV)-neutralizing antibodies. Upon challenge with a lethal dose of virulent CDV, signs of infection were observed in dogs inoculated with (VV-MVF). No symptoms of disease were observed in dogs that had been vaccinated with VV-MVHA or with VV-MVHA and VV-MVF and then challenged with CDV. All dogs vaccinated with the recombinant viruses as well as those inoculated with MV or a vaccine strain of CDV survived CDV challenge. Images PMID:1830113

  14. The Forest, The Fly, and the Virus?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Compton J.; Pinzon, Jorge E.; Wilson, James M.

    2003-01-01

    All known outbreaks of Ebola have been linked to tropical forests. We undertook a study of environmental conditions associated with Ebola hemorrhagic fever after preliminary reports strongly suggested that simultaneous outbreaks occurred, during two limited time periods in the 1970s and 1990s, immediately following sudden transitions between dry and wet seasons.

  15. Conformational intermediates and fusion activity of influenza virus hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Korte, T; Ludwig, K; Booy, F P; Blumenthal, R; Herrmann, A

    1999-06-01

    Three strains of influenza virus (H1, H2, and H3) exhibited similar characteristics in the ability of their hemagglutinin (HA) to induce membrane fusion, but the HAs differed in their susceptibility to inactivation. The extent of inactivation depended on the pH of preincubation and was lowest for A/Japan (H2 subtype), in agreement with previous studies (A. Puri, F. Booy, R. W. Doms, J. M. White, and R. Blumenthal, J. Virol. 64:3824-3832, 1990). While significant inactivation of X31 (H3 subtype) was observed at 37 degrees C at pH values corresponding to the maximum of fusion (about pH 5.0), no inactivation was seen at preincubation pH values 0.2 to 0.4 pH units higher. Surprisingly, low-pH preincubation under those conditions enhanced the fusion rates and extents of A/Japan as well as those of X31. For A/PR 8/34 (H1 subtype), neither a shift of the pH (to >5.0) nor a decrease of the temperature to 20 degrees C was sufficient to prevent inactivation. We provide evidence that the activated HA is a conformational intermediate distinct from the native structure and from the final structure associated with the conformational change of HA, which is implicated by the high-resolution structure of the soluble trimeric fragment TBHA2 (P. A. Bullough, F. M. Hughson, J. J. Skehel, and D. C. Wiley, Nature 371:37-43, 1994). PMID:10233915

  16. Regional Distribution of Forest Height and Biomass from Multisensor Data Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Yifan; Saatchi, Sassan; Heath, Linda S.; LaPoint, Elizabeth; Myneni, Ranga; Knyazikhin, Yuri

    2010-01-01

    Elevation data acquired from radar interferometry at C-band from SRTM are used in data fusion techniques to estimate regional scale forest height and aboveground live biomass (AGLB) over the state of Maine. Two fusion techniques have been developed to perform post-processing and parameter estimations from four data sets: 1 arc sec National Elevation Data (NED), SRTM derived elevation (30 m), Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM) bands (30 m), derived vegetation index (VI) and NLCD2001 land cover map. The first fusion algorithm corrects for missing or erroneous NED data using an iterative interpolation approach and produces distribution of scattering phase centers from SRTM-NED in three dominant forest types of evergreen conifers, deciduous, and mixed stands. The second fusion technique integrates the USDA Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) ground-based plot data to develop an algorithm to transform the scattering phase centers into mean forest height and aboveground biomass. Height estimates over evergreen (R2 = 0.86, P < 0.001; RMSE = 1.1 m) and mixed forests (R2 = 0.93, P < 0.001, RMSE = 0.8 m) produced the best results. Estimates over deciduous forests were less accurate because of the winter acquisition of SRTM data and loss of scattering phase center from tree ]surface interaction. We used two methods to estimate AGLB; algorithms based on direct estimation from the scattering phase center produced higher precision (R2 = 0.79, RMSE = 25 Mg/ha) than those estimated from forest height (R2 = 0.25, RMSE = 66 Mg/ha). We discuss sources of uncertainty and implications of the results in the context of mapping regional and continental scale forest biomass distribution.

  17. Structural Plasticity of the Semliki Forest Virus Glycome upon Interspecies Transmission

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cross-species viral transmission subjects parent and progeny alphaviruses to differential post-translational processing of viral envelope glycoproteins. Alphavirus biogenesis has been extensively studied, and the Semliki Forest virus E1 and E2 glycoproteins have been shown to exhibit differing degrees of processing of N-linked glycans. However the composition of these glycans, including that arising from different host cells, has not been determined. Here we determined the chemical composition of the glycans from the prototypic alphavirus, Semliki Forest virus, propagated in both arthropod and rodent cell lines, by using ion-mobility mass spectrometry and collision-induced dissociation analysis. We observe that both the membrane-proximal E1 fusion glycoprotein and the protruding E2 attachment glycoprotein display heterogeneous glycosylation that contains N-linked glycans exhibiting both limited and extensive processing. However, E1 contained predominantly highly processed glycans dependent on the host cell, with rodent and mosquito-derived E1 exhibiting complex-type and paucimannose-type glycosylation, respectively. In contrast, the protruding E2 attachment glycoprotein primarily contained conserved under-processed oligomannose-type structures when produced in both rodent and mosquito cell lines. It is likely that glycan processing of E2 is structurally restricted by steric-hindrance imposed by local viral protein structure. This contrasts E1, which presents glycans characteristic of the host cell and is accessible to enzymes. We integrated our findings with previous cryo-electron microscopy and crystallographic analyses to produce a detailed model of the glycosylated mature virion surface. Taken together, these data reveal the degree to which virally encoded protein structure and cellular processing enzymes shape the virion glycome during interspecies transmission of Semliki Forest virus. PMID:24467287

  18. The role of fusion activity of influenza A viruses in their biological properties.

    PubMed

    Jakubcová, L; Hollý, J; Varečková, E

    2016-06-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause acute respiratory infections of humans, which are repeated yearly. Human IAV infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality and therefore they represent a serious health problem. All human IAV strains are originally derived from avian IAVs, which, after their adaptation to humans, can spread in the human population and cause pandemics with more or less severe course of the disease. Presently, however, the potential of avian IAV to infect humans and to cause the disease cannot be predicted. Many studies are therefore focused on factors influencing the virulence and pathogenicity of IAV viruses in a given host. The virus-host interaction starts by virus attachment via the envelope glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) to the receptors on the cell surface. In addition to receptor binding, HA mediates also the fusion of viral and endosomal membranes, which follows the virus endocytosis. The fusion potential of HA trimer, primed by proteolytic cleavage, is activated by low pH in endosomes, resulting in HA refolding into the fusion-active form. The HA conformation change is predetermined by its 3-D structure, is pH-dependent, irreversible and strain-specific. The process of fusion activation of IAV hemagglutinin is crucial for virus entry into the cell and for the ability of the virus to replicate in the host. Here we discuss the known data about the characteristics of fusion activation of HA in relation to IAV virulence and pathogenicity. PMID:27265461

  19. Radiation inactivation analysis of fusion and hemolysis by vesicular stomatitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Bundo-Morita, K.; Gibson, S.; Lenard, J.

    1988-04-01

    Radiation inactivation analysis was used to determine the size of the functional unit responsible for fusion of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) with cardiolipin or phosphatidylcholine-phosphatidylethanolamine (1:1) liposomes, and for VSV-induced hemolysis. When radiation-insensitive background values were subtracted, the calculated functional units for all three activities were similar, ranging from 866 to 957 kDa, equivalent to about 15 G protein molecules. This is in striking contrast to results of similar studies with influenza and Sendai viruses, in which the functional unit corresponded in size to a single fusion protein monomer, and suggests that VSV fusion may occur by a different mechanism.

  20. Estimation by radiation inactivation of the size of functional units governing Sendai and influenza virus fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bundo-Morita, K.; Gibson, S.; Lenard, J.

    1987-09-22

    The target sizes associated with fusion and hemolysis carried out by Sendai virus envelope glycoproteins were determined by radiation inactivation analysis. The target size for influenza virus mediated fusion with erythrocyte ghosts at pH 5.0 was also determined for comparison. Sendai-mediated fusion with erythrocyte ghosts at pH 7.0 was likewise inactivated exponentially with increasing radiation dose, yielding a target size of 60 +/- 6 kDa, a value consistent with the molecular weight of a single F-protein molecule. The inactivation curve for Sendai-mediated fusion with cardiolipin liposomes at pH 7.0, however, was more complex. Assuming a multiple target-single hit model, the target consisted of 2-3 units of ca. 60 kDa each. A similar target was seen if the liposome contained 10% gangliosides or if the reaction was measured at pH 5.0, suggesting that fusion occurred by the same mechanism at high and low pH. A target size of 261 +/- 48 kDa was found for Sendai-induced hemolysis, in contrast with influenza, which had a more complex target size for this activity. Sendai virus fusion thus occurs by different mechanisms depending upon the nature of the target membrane, since it is mediated by different functional units. Hemolysis is mediated by a functional unit different from that associated with erythrocyte ghost fusion or with cardiolipin liposome fusion.

  1. IFITM3 Restricts Influenza A Virus Entry by Blocking the Formation of Fusion Pores following Virus-Endosome Hemifusion

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Christopher R.; Savidis, George; Brass, Abraham L.; Melikyan, Gregory B.

    2014-01-01

    Interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) inhibit infection of diverse enveloped viruses, including the influenza A virus (IAV) which is thought to enter from late endosomes. Recent evidence suggests that IFITMs block virus hemifusion (lipid mixing in the absence of viral content release) by altering the properties of cell membranes. Consistent with this mechanism, excess cholesterol in late endosomes of IFITM-expressing cells has been reported to inhibit IAV entry. Here, we examined IAV restriction by IFITM3 protein using direct virus-cell fusion assay and single virus imaging in live cells. IFITM3 over-expression did not inhibit lipid mixing, but abrogated the release of viral content into the cytoplasm. Although late endosomes of IFITM3-expressing cells accumulated cholesterol, other interventions leading to aberrantly high levels of this lipid did not inhibit virus fusion. These results imply that excess cholesterol in late endosomes is not the mechanism by which IFITM3 inhibits the transition from hemifusion to full fusion. The IFITM3's ability to block fusion pore formation at a post-hemifusion stage shows that this protein stabilizes the cytoplasmic leaflet of endosomal membranes without adversely affecting the lumenal leaflet. We propose that IFITM3 interferes with pore formation either directly, through partitioning into the cytoplasmic leaflet of a hemifusion intermediate, or indirectly, by modulating the lipid/protein composition of this leaflet. Alternatively, IFITM3 may redirect IAV fusion to a non-productive pathway, perhaps by promoting fusion with intralumenal vesicles within multivesicular bodies/late endosomes. PMID:24699674

  2. 5-(Perylen-3-yl)Ethynyl-arabino-Uridine (aUY11), an Arabino-Based Rigid Amphipathic Fusion Inhibitor, Targets Virion Envelope Lipids To Inhibit Fusion of Influenza Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, and Other Enveloped Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Colpitts, Che C.; Ustinov, Alexey V.; Epand, Raquel F.; Epand, Richard M.; Korshun, Vladimir A.

    2013-01-01

    Entry of enveloped viruses requires fusion of viral and cellular membranes. Fusion requires the formation of an intermediate stalk structure, in which only the outer leaflets are fused. The stalk structure, in turn, requires the lipid bilayer of the envelope to bend into negative curvature. This process is inhibited by enrichment in the outer leaflet of lipids with larger polar headgroups, which favor positive curvature. Accordingly, phospholipids with such shape inhibit viral fusion. We previously identified a compound, 5-(perylen-3-yl)ethynyl-2′-deoxy-uridine (dUY11), with overall shape and amphipathicity similar to those of these phospholipids. dUY11 inhibited the formation of the negative curvature necessary for stalk formation and the fusion of a model enveloped virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). We proposed that dUY11 acted by biophysical mechanisms as a result of its shape and amphipathicity. To test this model, we have now characterized the mechanisms against influenza virus and HCV of 5-(perylen-3-yl)ethynyl-arabino-uridine (aUY11), which has shape and amphipathicity similar to those of dUY11 but contains an arabino-nucleoside. aUY11 interacted with envelope lipids to inhibit the infectivity of influenza virus, hepatitis C virus (HCV), herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1/2), and other enveloped viruses. It specifically inhibited the fusion of influenza virus, HCV, VSV, and even protein-free liposomes to cells. Furthermore, aUY11 inhibited the formation of negative curvature in model lipid bilayers. In summary, the arabino-derived aUY11 and the deoxy-derived dUY11 act by the same antiviral mechanisms against several enveloped but otherwise unrelated viruses. Therefore, chemically unrelated compounds of appropriate shape and amphipathicity target virion envelope lipids to inhibit formation of the negative curvature required for fusion, inhibiting infectivity by biophysical, not biochemical, mechanisms. PMID:23283943

  3. The temperature arrested intermediate of virus-cell fusion is a functional step in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Hamani I; Hope, Thomas J

    2006-05-25

    HIV entry occurs via membrane-mediated fusion of virus and target cells. Interactions between gp120 and cellular co-receptors lead to both the formation of fusion pores and release of the HIV genome into target cells. Studies using cell-cell fusion assays have demonstrated that a temperature-arrested state (TAS) can generate a stable intermediate in fusion related events. Other studies with MLV pseudotyped with HIV envelope also found that a temperature sensitive intermediate could be generated as revealed by the loss of a fluorescently labeled membrane. However, such an intermediate has never been analyzed in the context of virus infection. Therefore, we used virus-cell infection with replication competent HIV to gain insights into virus-cell fusion. We find that the TAS is an intermediate in the process culminating in the HIV infection of a target cell. In the virion-cell TAS, CD4 has been engaged, the heptad repeats of gp41 are exposed and the complex is kinetically predisposed to interact with coreceptor to complete the fusion event leading to infection.

  4. Determination of the minimal fusion peptide of bovine leukemia virus gp30

    SciTech Connect

    Lorin, Aurelien; Lins, Laurence; Stroobant, Vincent; Brasseur, Robert . E-mail: brasseur.r@fsagx.ac.be; Charloteaux, Benoit

    2007-04-13

    In this study, we determined the minimal N-terminal fusion peptide of the gp30 of the bovine leukemia virus on the basis of the tilted peptide theory. We first used molecular modelling to predict that the gp30 minimal fusion peptide corresponds to the 15 first residues. Liposome lipid-mixing and leakage assays confirmed that the 15-residue long peptide induces fusion in vitro and that it is the shortest peptide inducing optimal fusion since longer peptides destabilize liposomes to the same extent but not shorter ones. The 15-residue long peptide can thus be considered as the minimal fusion peptide. The effect of mutations reported in the literature was also investigated. Interestingly, mutations related to glycoproteins unable to induce syncytia in cell-cell fusion assays correspond to peptides predicted as non-tilted. The relationship between obliquity and fusogenicity was also confirmed in vitro for one tilted and one non-tilted mutant peptide.

  5. The heads of the measles virus attachment protein move to transmit the fusion-triggering signal

    PubMed Central

    Navaratnarajah, Chanakha K; Oezguen, Numan; Rupp, Levi; Kay, Leah; Leonard, Vincent HJ; Braun, Werner; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The measles virus entry system, constituted of attachment (hemagglutinin, H) and fusion proteins, operates based on a variety of natural and targeted receptors. However, the mechanism triggering fusion of the viral envelope with the plasma membrane is not understood. Here we tested a model considering that the two heads of an H-dimer, which are covalently linked at their base, after binding two receptor molecules, move relative to each other to transmit the fusion-triggering signal. Indeed, stabilizing the H-dimer interface by additional inter-molecular disulfide bonds prevented membrane fusion, an effect reversed by a reducing agent. Moreover, a membrane-anchored designated receptor efficiently triggered fusion, provided it engaged the H-dimer at locations proximal to where the natural receptors bind, and distal to the H-dimer interface. We discuss how receptors may force H-heads to switch partners and transmit the fusion-triggering signal. PMID:21217701

  6. Herpes simplex virus 1 glycoprotein M and the membrane-associated protein UL11 are required for virus-induced cell fusion and efficient virus entry.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Joong; Chouljenko, Vladimir N; Walker, Jason D; Kousoulas, Konstantin G

    2013-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) facilitates virus entry into cells and cell-to-cell spread by mediating fusion of the viral envelope with cellular membranes and fusion of adjacent cellular membranes. Although virus strains isolated from herpetic lesions cause limited cell fusion in cell culture, clinical herpetic lesions typically contain large syncytia, underscoring the importance of cell-to-cell fusion in virus spread in infected tissues. Certain mutations in glycoprotein B (gB), gK, UL20, and other viral genes drastically enhance virus-induced cell fusion in vitro and in vivo. Recent work has suggested that gB is the sole fusogenic glycoprotein, regulated by interactions with the viral glycoproteins gD, gH/gL, and gK, membrane protein UL20, and cellular receptors. Recombinant viruses were constructed to abolish either gM or UL11 expression in the presence of strong syncytial mutations in either gB or gK. Virus-induced cell fusion caused by deletion of the carboxyl-terminal 28 amino acids of gB or the dominant syncytial mutation in gK (Ala to Val at amino acid 40) was drastically reduced in the absence of gM. Similarly, syncytial mutations in either gB or gK did not cause cell fusion in the absence of UL11. Neither the gM nor UL11 gene deletion substantially affected gB, gC, gD, gE, and gH glycoprotein synthesis and expression on infected cell surfaces. Two-way immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that the membrane protein UL20, which is found as a protein complex with gK, interacted with gM while gM did not interact with other viral glycoproteins. Viruses produced in the absence of gM or UL11 entered into cells more slowly than their parental wild-type virus strain. Collectively, these results indicate that gM and UL11 are required for efficient membrane fusion events during virus entry and virus spread.

  7. Chikungunya virus fusion properties elucidated by single-particle and bulk approaches.

    PubMed

    van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K S; Blijleven, Jelle S; van Oijen, Antoine M; Smit, Jolanda M

    2015-08-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly spreading, enveloped alphavirus causing fever, rash and debilitating polyarthritis. No specific treatment or vaccines are available to treat or prevent infection. For the rational design of vaccines and antiviral drugs, it is imperative to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in CHIKV infection. A critical step in the life cycle of CHIKV is fusion of the viral membrane with a host cell membrane. Here, we elucidate this process using ensemble-averaging liposome-virus fusion studies, in which the fusion behaviour of a large virus population is measured, and a newly developed microscopy-based single-particle assay, in which the fusion kinetics of an individual particle can be visualised. The combination of these approaches allowed us to obtain detailed insight into the kinetics, lipid dependency and pH dependency of hemifusion. We found that CHIKV fusion is strictly dependent on low pH, with a threshold of pH 6.2 and optimal fusion efficiency below pH 5.6. At this pH, CHIKV fuses rapidly with target membranes, with typically half of the fusion occurring within 2 s after acidification. Cholesterol and sphingomyelin in the target membrane were found to strongly enhance the fusion process. By analysing our single-particle data using kinetic models, we were able to deduce that the number of rate-limiting steps occurring before hemifusion equals about three. To explain these data, we propose a mechanistic model in which multiple E1 fusion trimers are involved in initiating the fusion process.

  8. Mutant Fusion Proteins with Enhanced Fusion Activity Promote Measles Virus Spread in Human Neuronal Cells and Brains of Suckling Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Shirogane, Yuta; Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Ikegame, Satoshi; Koga, Ritsuko

    2013-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a fatal degenerative disease caused by persistent measles virus (MV) infection in the central nervous system (CNS). From the genetic study of MV isolates obtained from SSPE patients, it is thought that defects of the matrix (M) protein play a crucial role in MV pathogenicity in the CNS. In this study, we report several notable mutations in the extracellular domain of the MV fusion (F) protein, including those found in multiple SSPE strains. The F proteins with these mutations induced syncytium formation in cells lacking SLAM and nectin 4 (receptors used by wild-type MV), including human neuronal cell lines, when expressed together with the attachment protein hemagglutinin. Moreover, recombinant viruses with these mutations exhibited neurovirulence in suckling hamsters, unlike the parental wild-type MV, and the mortality correlated with their fusion activity. In contrast, the recombinant MV lacking the M protein did not induce syncytia in cells lacking SLAM and nectin 4, although it formed larger syncytia in cells with either of the receptors. Since human neuronal cells are mainly SLAM and nectin 4 negative, fusion-enhancing mutations in the extracellular domain of the F protein may greatly contribute to MV spread via cell-to-cell fusion in the CNS, regardless of defects of the M protein. PMID:23255801

  9. Viral fusion protein transmembrane domain adopts β-strand structure to facilitate membrane topological changes for virus-cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hongwei; Lee, Michelle W; Waring, Alan J; Wong, Gerard C L; Hong, Mei

    2015-09-01

    The C-terminal transmembrane domain (TMD) of viral fusion proteins such as HIV gp41 and influenza hemagglutinin (HA) is traditionally viewed as a passive α-helical anchor of the protein to the virus envelope during its merger with the cell membrane. The conformation, dynamics, and lipid interaction of these fusion protein TMDs have so far eluded high-resolution structure characterization because of their highly hydrophobic nature. Using magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we show that the TMD of the parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) fusion protein adopts lipid-dependent conformations and interactions with the membrane and water. In phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) membranes, the TMD is predominantly α-helical, but in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) membranes, the TMD changes significantly to the β-strand conformation. Measured order parameters indicate that the strand segments are immobilized and thus oligomerized. (31)P NMR spectra and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data show that this β-strand-rich conformation converts the PE membrane to a bicontinuous cubic phase, which is rich in negative Gaussian curvature that is characteristic of hemifusion intermediates and fusion pores. (1)H-(31)P 2D correlation spectra and (2)H spectra show that the PE membrane with or without the TMD is much less hydrated than PC and PG membranes, suggesting that the TMD works with the natural dehydration tendency of PE to facilitate membrane merger. These results suggest a new viral-fusion model in which the TMD actively promotes membrane topological changes during fusion using the β-strand as the fusogenic conformation.

  10. A fusion inhibitor prevents spread of immunodeficiency viruses, but not activation of virus-specific T cells, by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Frank, I; Stössel, H; Gettie, A; Turville, S G; Bess, J W; Lifson, J D; Sivin, I; Romani, N; Robbiani, M

    2008-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in innate immune responses, and their interactions with T cells are critical for the induction of adaptive immunity. However, immunodeficiency viruses are efficiently captured by DCs and can be transmitted to and amplified in CD4(+) T cells, with potentially deleterious effects on the induction of immune responses. In DC-T-cell cocultures, contact with CD4(+), not CD8(+), T cells preferentially facilitated virus movement to and release at immature and mature DC-T-cell contact sites. This occurred within 5 min of DC-T-cell contact. While the fusion inhibitor T-1249 did not prevent virus capture by DCs or the release of viruses at the DC-T-cell contact points, it readily blocked virus transfer to and amplification in CD4(+) T cells. Higher doses of T-1249 were needed to block the more robust replication driven by mature DCs. Virus accumulated in DCs within T-1249-treated cocultures but these DCs were actually less infectious than DCs isolated from untreated cocultures. Importantly, T-1249 did not interfere with the stimulation of virus-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses when present during virus-loading of DCs or for the time of the DC-T-cell coculture. These results provide clues to identifying strategies to prevent DC-driven virus amplification in CD4(+) T cells while maintaining virus-specific immunity, an objective critical in the development of microbicides and therapeutic vaccines.

  11. A capsid protein of nonenveloped Bluetongue virus exhibits membrane fusion activity.

    PubMed

    Forzan, Mario; Wirblich, Christoph; Roy, Polly

    2004-02-17

    The outer capsid layer of Bluetongue virus, a member of the nonenveloped Reoviridae family, is composed of two proteins, a receptor-binding protein, VP2, and a second protein, VP5, which shares structural features with class I fusion proteins of enveloped viruses. In the replication cycle of Bluetongue virus VP5 acts as a membrane permeabilization protein that mediates release of viral particles from endosomal compartments into the cytoplasm. Here, we show that VP5 can also act as a fusion protein and induce syncytium formation when it is fused to a transmembrane anchor and expressed on the cell surface. Fusion activity is strictly pH-dependent and is triggered by short exposure to low pH. No cell-cell fusion is observed at neutral pH. Deletion of the first 40 amino acids, which can fold into two amphipathic helices, abolishes fusion activity. Syncytium formation by VP5 is inhibited in the presence of VP2 when it is expressed in a membrane-anchored form. The data indicate an interaction between the outer capsid protein VP2 and VP5 and show that VP5 undergoes pH-dependent conformational changes that render it capable of interacting with cellular membranes. More importantly, our data show that a membrane permeabilization protein of a nonenveloped virus can evolve into a fusion protein by the addition of an appropriate transmembrane anchor. The results strongly suggest that the mechanism of membrane permeabilization by VP5 and membrane fusion by viral fusion proteins require similar structural features and conformational changes.

  12. Residues in the hendra virus fusion protein transmembrane domain are critical for endocytic recycling.

    PubMed

    Popa, Andreea; Carter, James R; Smith, Stacy E; Hellman, Lance; Fried, Michael G; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2012-03-01

    Hendra virus is a highly pathogenic paramyxovirus classified as a biosafety level four agent. The fusion (F) protein of Hendra virus is critical for promoting viral entry and cell-to-cell fusion. To be fusogenically active, Hendra virus F must undergo endocytic recycling and cleavage by the endosomal/lysosomal protease cathepsin L, but the route of Hendra virus F following internalization and the recycling signals involved are poorly understood. We examined the intracellular distribution of Hendra virus F following endocytosis and showed that it is primarily present in Rab5- and Rab4-positive endosomal compartments, suggesting that cathepsin L cleavage occurs in early endosomes. Hendra virus F transmembrane domain (TMD) residues S490 and Y498 were found to be important for correct Hendra virus F recycling, with the hydroxyl group of S490 and the aromatic ring of Y498 important for this process. In addition, changes in association of isolated Hendra virus F TMDs correlated with alterations to Hendra virus F recycling, suggesting that appropriate TMD interactions play an important role in endocytic trafficking.

  13. Fusion mutants of Newcastle disease virus selected with monoclonal antibodies to the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase.

    PubMed Central

    Iorio, R M; Glickman, R L

    1992-01-01

    The Australia-Victoria (AV) isolate of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) induces fusion from within but not fusion from without. L1, a neuraminidase (NA)-deficient virus derived from AV, has the opposite fusion phenotype from the wild-type virus. It fails to induce the former mode of fusion, but has gained a limited ability to promote the latter. Monoclonal antibodies to antigenic site 23 on the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein have previously been shown to select variants of the AV isolate that have altered NA activity or receptor-binding affinity. By using an antibody to this site, variants of L1 have been selected. Three of the variants have gained an increased affinity for sialic acid-containing receptors, as evidenced by the resistance of their hemagglutinating activity to the presence of reduced amounts of sialic acid on the surface of chicken erythrocytes. All four variants still have very low levels of NA activity, comparable to that of the parent virus, L1. The alteration in receptor-binding affinity results in a decreased potential for elution from cellular receptors and correlates with an increased ability to promote both modes of fusion. A single amino acid substitution in the HN protein of each variant, responsible for its escape from neutralization, has been identified. These studies identify two HN residues, 193 and 203, at which monoclonal antibody-selected substitution influences the receptor recognition properties of NDV and may influence its ability to promote syncytium formation. Images PMID:1404607

  14. Vaccinia virus recombinants expressing an 11-kilodalton beta-galactosidase fusion protein incorporate active beta-galactosidase in virus particles.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Samsonoff, W A; Grzelecki, A

    1988-10-01

    Recombinant plasmids in which vaccinia virus transcriptional regulatory sequences were fused to the Escherichia coli lacZ gene were constructed for insertion of the lacZ gene into the vaccinia virus genome. beta-Galactosidase (beta-gal) was found in some purified recombinant vaccinia virions. By enzyme activity, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and microscopic techniques, the evidence suggested that beta-gal accounted for 5% of the total protein in the virion. These recombinant viruses were constructed so that a portion of the coding sequences of a late vaccinia virus structural polypeptide was fused to the amino terminus of beta-gal to produce the fusion protein. Removal of the coding sequences resulted in the complete loss of beta-gal activity. This demonstrated that a vaccinia virus DNA segment from a late structural gene is responsible for the incorporation of beta-gal into the virion.

  15. The Rigid Amphipathic Fusion Inhibitor dUY11 Acts through Photosensitization of Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Vigant, Frederic; Hollmann, Axel; Lee, Jihye; Santos, Nuno C.; Jung, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Rigid amphipathic fusion inhibitors (RAFIs) are lipophilic inverted-cone-shaped molecules thought to antagonize the membrane curvature transitions that occur during virus-cell fusion and are broad-spectrum antivirals against enveloped viruses (Broad-SAVE). Here, we show that RAFIs act like membrane-binding photosensitizers: their antiviral effect is dependent on light and the generation of singlet oxygen (1O2), similar to the mechanistic paradigm established for LJ001, a chemically unrelated class of Broad-SAVE. Photosensitization of viral membranes is a common mechanism that underlies these Broad-SAVE. PMID:24284320

  16. ESTIMATION OF TROPICAL FOREST STRUCTURE AND BIOMASS FROM FUSION OF RADAR AND LIDAR MEASUREMENTS (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saatchi, S. S.; Dubayah, R.; Clark, D. B.; Chazdon, R.

    2009-12-01

    Radar and Lidar instruments are active remote sensing sensors with the potential of measuring forest vertical and horizontal structure and the aboveground biomass (AGB). In this paper, we present the analysis of radar and lidar data acquired over the La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. Radar polarimetry at L-band (25 cm wavelength), P-band (70 cm wavelength) and interferometry at C-band (6 cm wavelength) and VV polarization were acquired by the NASA/JPL airborne synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR) system. Lidar images were provided by a large footprint airborne scanning Lidar known as the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS). By including field measurements of structure and biomass over a variety of forest types, we examined: 1) sensitivity of radar and lidar measurements to forest structure and biomass, 2) accuracy of individual sensors for AGB estimation, and 3) synergism of radar imaging measurements with lidar imaging and sampling measurements for improving the estimation of 3-dimensional forest structure and AGB. The results showed that P-band radar combined with any interformteric measurement of forest height can capture approximately 85% of the variation of biomass in La Selva at spatial scales larger than 1 hectare. Similar analysis at L-band frequency captured only 70% of the variation. However, combination of lidar and radar measurements improved estimates of forest three-dimensional structure and biomass to above 90% for all forest types. We present a novel data fusion approach based on a Baysian estimation model with the capability of incorporating lidar samples and radar imagery. The model was used to simulate the potential of data fusion in future satellite mission scenarios as in BIOMASS (planned by ESA) at P-band and DESDynl (planned by NASA) at L-band. The estimation model was also able to quantify errors and uncertainties associated with the scale of measurements, spatial variability of forest structure, and differences in radar and lidar

  17. Inhibition of endosomal fusion activity of influenza virus by Rheum tanguticum (da-huang).

    PubMed

    Lin, Ta-Jen; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Lee, Ming-Chung; Horng, Jim-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Rhubarb (Rheum tanguticum; da-huang in Chinese medicine) is a herbal medicine that has been used widely for managing fever and removing toxicity. In this study, we investigated how rhubarb inhibits influenza virus during the early stage of the infectious cycle using different functional assays. A non-toxic ethanolic extract of rhubarb (Rex) inhibited several H1N1 subtypes of influenza A viruses in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, including strains that are clinically resistant to oseltamivir. Time course analysis of Rex addition showed that viral entry was one of the steps that was inhibited by Rex. We also confirmed that Rex effectively inhibited viral attachment and penetration into the host cells. The inhibition of red blood cell haemolysis and cell-cell fusion by Rex suggests that Rex may block haemagglutinin-mediated fusion (virus-endosome fusion) during the fusion/uncoating step. Rex has the capacity to inhibit influenza viruses by blocking viral endocytosis. Thus, rhubarb might provide an alternative therapeutic approach when resistant viruses become more prevalent. PMID:27302738

  18. Differences in dispersion of influenza virus lipids and proteins during fusion.

    PubMed

    Lowy, R J; Sarkar, D P; Whitnall, M H; Blumenthal, R

    1995-02-01

    Digitally enhanced low-light-level fluorescence video microscopy and immunochemical staining were used to examine influenza virus envelope lipid and protein redistribution during pH-induced fusion. Video microscopy was performed using viruses labeled with either the lipid analogue octadecylrhodamine B (R18) or fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) covalently linked to envelope proteins. Viruses were bound to human red blood cells, and the pattern and intensity of fluorescence were monitored for 30 min while cell-virus complexes were perfused with pH 7.4 or 4.8 media at temperatures either above or below 20 degrees C. R18 showed complete redistribution and dequenching by 30 min at all incubation temperatures, confirming reports that viral fusion occurs at subphysiological temperatures. FITC-labeled protein showed spatial redistribution at 28 degrees C but no change at low temperature. Electron microscopy observations of immunochemical staining of viral proteins confirmed both that protein redistribution at 37 degrees C was slower than R18 and the failure of movement within 30 min at 16 degrees C. Video microscopy monitoring of RNA staining by acridine orange of virus-cell complexes showed redistribution to the RBCs at all temperatures but only after low pH-induced fusion. The results are consistent with differential dispersion of viral components into the RBC and the existence of relatively long-lived barriers to diffusion subsequent to fusion pore formation.

  19. Fatal measles virus infection prevented by brain-penetrant fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Jeremy C; Talekar, Aparna; Mathieu, Cyrille; Pessi, Antonello; Moscona, Anne; Horvat, Branka; Porotto, Matteo

    2013-12-01

    Measles virus (MV) infection causes an acute childhood disease that can include infection of the central nervous system and can rarely progress to severe neurological disease for which there is no specific treatment. We generated potent antiviral peptide inhibitors of MV entry and spreading and MV-induced cell fusion. Dimers of MV-specific peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat region of the MV fusion protein, conjugated to cholesterol, efficiently protect SLAM transgenic mice from fatal MV infection. Fusion inhibitors hold promise for the prophylaxis of MV infection in unvaccinated and immunocompromised people, as well as potential for the treatment of grave neurological complications of measles.

  20. Identification of Novel Fusion Inhibitors of Influenza A Virus by Chemical Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Kin Kui; Cheung, Nam Nam; Yang, Fang; Dai, Jun; Liu, Li; Chen, Zhiwei; Sze, Kong Hung; Chen, Honglin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A previous screening of more than 50,000 compounds led to the identification of a pool of bioactive small molecules with inhibitory effect on the influenza A virus. One of these compounds, now widely known as nucleozin, is a small molecule that targets the influenza A virus nucleoprotein. Here we identify and characterize two structurally different novel fusion inhibitors of the influenza A virus group 1 hemagglutinin (HA), FA-583 and FA-617, with low nanomolar activities. Escape mutants that are highly resistant to each of these compounds were generated, and both were found to carry mutations localized in close proximity to the B-loop of the hemagglutinin 2 protein, which plays a crucial role in the virion-host cell fusion process. Recombinant virus, generated through reverse genetics, confirmed the resistance phenotype. In addition, the proposed binding pockets predicted by molecular docking studies are in accordance with the resistance-bearing mutation sites. We show through mechanistic studies that FA-583 and FA-617 act as fusion inhibitors by prohibiting the low-pH-induced conformational change of hemagglutinin. Our study has offered concrete biological and mechanistic explorations for the strategic development of novel fusion inhibitors of influenza A viruses. IMPORTANCE Here we report two structurally distinctive novel fusion inhibitors of influenza A virus that act by interfering with the structural change of HA at acidic pH, a process necessary for successful entry of the virus. Mutational and molecular docking studies have identified their binding pockets situated in close proximity to the B-loop region of hemagglutinin 2. The reduced sensitivity of FA-583- or FA-617-associated mutants to another compound suggests a close proximity and even partial overlap of their binding sites on hemagglutinin. Amino acid sequence alignments and crystal structure analyses of group 1 and group 2 hemagglutinins have shed light on the possible binding mode of

  1. Universal antibodies against the highly conserved influenza fusion peptide cross-neutralize several subtypes of influenza A virus

    SciTech Connect

    Hashem, Anwar M.; Van Domselaar, Gary; Li, Changgui; Wang, Junzhi; She, Yi-Min; Cyr, Terry D.; Sui, Jianhua; He, Runtao; Marasco, Wayne A.; Li, Xuguang

    2010-12-10

    Research highlights: {yields} The fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza viral hemagglutinins. {yields} Anti-fusion peptide antibodies are universal antibodies that cross-react with all influenza HA subtypes. {yields} The universal antibodies cross-neutralize different influenza A subtypes. {yields} The universal antibodies inhibit the fusion process between the viruses and the target cells. -- Abstract: The fusion peptide of influenza viral hemagglutinin plays a critical role in virus entry by facilitating membrane fusion between the virus and target cells. As the fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza A and B viruses, it could be an attractive target for vaccine-induced immune responses. We previously reported that antibodies targeting the first 14 amino acids of the N-terminus of the fusion peptide could bind to virtually all influenza virus strains and quantify hemagglutinins in vaccines produced in embryonated eggs. Here we demonstrate that these universal antibodies bind to the viral hemagglutinins in native conformation presented in infected mammalian cell cultures and neutralize multiple subtypes of virus by inhibiting the pH-dependant fusion of viral and cellular membranes. These results suggest that this unique, highly-conserved linear sequence in viral hemagglutinin is exposed sufficiently to be attacked by the antibodies during the course of infection and merits further investigation because of potential importance in the protection against diverse strains of influenza viruses.

  2. Differential cholesterol binding by class II fusion proteins determines membrane fusion properties.

    PubMed

    Umashankar, M; Sánchez-San Martín, Claudia; Liao, Maofu; Reilly, Brigid; Guo, Alice; Taylor, Gwen; Kielian, Margaret

    2008-09-01

    The class II fusion proteins of the alphaviruses and flaviviruses mediate virus infection by driving the fusion of the virus membrane with that of the cell. These fusion proteins are triggered by low pH, and their structures are strikingly similar in both the prefusion dimer and the postfusion homotrimer conformations. Here we have compared cholesterol interactions during membrane fusion by these two groups of viruses. Using cholesterol-depleted insect cells, we showed that fusion and infection by the alphaviruses Semliki Forest virus (SFV) and Sindbis virus were strongly promoted by cholesterol, with similar sterol dependence in laboratory and field isolates and in viruses passaged in tissue culture. The E1 fusion protein from SFV bound cholesterol, as detected by labeling with photocholesterol and by cholesterol extraction studies. In contrast, fusion and infection by numerous strains of the flavivirus dengue virus (DV) and by yellow fever virus 17D were cholesterol independent, and the DV fusion protein did not show significant cholesterol binding. SFV E1 is the first virus fusion protein demonstrated to directly bind cholesterol. Taken together, our results reveal important functional differences conferred by the cholesterol-binding properties of class II fusion proteins.

  3. Inhibition of endosomal fusion activity of influenza virus by Rheum tanguticum (da-huang)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ta-Jen; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Lee, Ming-Chung; Horng, Jim-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Rhubarb (Rheum tanguticum; da-huang in Chinese medicine) is a herbal medicine that has been used widely for managing fever and removing toxicity. In this study, we investigated how rhubarb inhibits influenza virus during the early stage of the infectious cycle using different functional assays. A non-toxic ethanolic extract of rhubarb (Rex) inhibited several H1N1 subtypes of influenza A viruses in Madin–Darby canine kidney cells, including strains that are clinically resistant to oseltamivir. Time course analysis of Rex addition showed that viral entry was one of the steps that was inhibited by Rex. We also confirmed that Rex effectively inhibited viral attachment and penetration into the host cells. The inhibition of red blood cell haemolysis and cell–cell fusion by Rex suggests that Rex may block haemagglutinin-mediated fusion (virus–endosome fusion) during the fusion/uncoating step. Rex has the capacity to inhibit influenza viruses by blocking viral endocytosis. Thus, rhubarb might provide an alternative therapeutic approach when resistant viruses become more prevalent. PMID:27302738

  4. Endocytosis plays a critical role in proteolytic processing of the Hendra virus fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Meulendyke, Kelly Ann; Wurth, Mark Allen; McCann, Richard O; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2005-10-01

    The Hendra virus fusion (F) protein is synthesized as a precursor protein, F(0), which is proteolytically processed to the mature form, F(1) + F(2). Unlike the case for the majority of paramyxovirus F proteins, the processing event is furin independent, does not require the addition of exogenous proteases, is not affected by reductions in intracellular Ca(2+), and is strongly affected by conditions that raise the intracellular pH (C. T. Pager, M. A. Wurth, and R. E. Dutch, J. Virol. 78:9154-9163, 2004). The Hendra virus F protein cytoplasmic tail contains a consensus motif for endocytosis, YXXPhi. To analyze the potential role of endocytosis in the processing and membrane fusion promotion of the Hendra virus F protein, mutation of tyrosine 525 to alanine (Hendra virus F Y525A) or phenylalanine (Hendra virus F Y525F) was performed. The rate of endocytosis of Hendra virus F Y525A was significantly reduced compared to that of the wild-type (wt) F protein, confirming the functional importance of the endocytosis motif. An intermediate level of endocytosis was observed for Hendra virus F Y525F. Surprisingly, dramatic reductions in the rate of proteolytic processing were observed for Hendra virus F Y525A, although initial transport to the cell surface was not affected. The levels of surface expression for both Hendra virus F Y525A and Hendra virus F Y525F were higher than that of the wt protein, and these mutants displayed enhanced syncytium formation. These results suggest that endocytosis is critically important for Hendra virus F protein cleavage, representing a new paradigm for proteolytic processing of paramyxovirus F proteins.

  5. Nonreplicating viral vectors as potential vaccines: recombinant canarypox virus expressing measles virus fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (HA) glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J; Weinberg, R; Tartaglia, J; Richardson, C; Alkhatib, G; Briedis, D; Appel, M; Norton, E; Paoletti, E

    1992-03-01

    The development of canarypox virus (CPV) recombinants expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) and fusion (F) glycoproteins of measles virus (MV) is described. Inoculation of the CPV-MV recombinants into avian or nonavian tissue culture substrates led to the expression of authentic MVF and MVHA as determined by radioimmunoprecipitation and surface immunofluorescence. In contrast to avian-derived tissue culture, no productive replication of the CPV recombinant was evident in tissue culture cells derived from nonavian origin. On inoculation of dogs, a species restricted for avipoxvirus replication, the recombinants elicited a protective immune response against a lethal canine distemper virus (CDV) challenge. The level of MV neutralizing antibodies and the level of protection induced against CDV challenge achieved by the host-restricted CPV vector were equivalent to that obtained by vaccinia virus vectors expressing the same MV antigens. PMID:1736535

  6. Matrix protein 2 of influenza A virus blocks autophagosome fusion with lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gannagé, Monique; Schmid, Dorothee; Albrecht, Randy; Dengjel, Jörn; Torossi, Tania; Rämer, Patrick C.; Lee, Monica; Strowig, Till; Arrey, Frida; Conenello, Gina; Pypaert, Marc; Andersen, Jens; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Münz, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A virus is an important human pathogen causing significant morbidity and mortality every year and threatening the human population with epidemics and pandemics. Therefore, it is important to understand the biology of this virus to develop strategies to control its pathogenicity. Here we demonstrate that live influenza A virus infection causes accumulation of autophagosomes by blocking their fusion with lysosomes. Matrix protein 2 is sufficient and necessary for this inhibition of autophagosome degradation. Macroautophagy inhibition compromises cell survival of influenza virus infected cells, but does not influence viral replication. We propose that influenza A virus, which also encodes pro-apoptotic proteins, is able to determine the death of its host cell by inducing apoptosis and blocking macroautophagy. PMID:19837376

  7. Direct Visualization of Ebola Virus Fusion Triggering in the Endocytic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Jennifer S.; Krause, Tyler B.; Mittler, Eva; Jangra, Rohit K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ebola virus (EBOV) makes extensive and intricate use of host factors in the cellular endosomal/lysosomal pathway to release its genome into the cytoplasm and initiate infection. Following viral internalization into endosomes, host cysteine proteases cleave the EBOV fusion glycoprotein (GP) to unmask the binding site for its intracellular receptor, the cholesterol transporter Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1). GP-NPC1 interaction is required for viral entry. Despite these and other recent discoveries, late events in EBOV entry following GP-NPC1 binding and culminating in GP-catalyzed fusion between viral and cellular lipid bilayers remain enigmatic. A mechanistic understanding of EBOV membrane fusion has been hampered by the failure of previous efforts to reconstitute fusion in vitro or at the cell surface. This report describes an assay to monitor initial steps directly in EBOV membrane fusion—triggering of GP and virus-cell lipid mixing—by single virions in live cells. Fusogenic triggering of GP occurs predominantly in Rab7-positive (Rab7+) endosomes, absolutely requires interaction between proteolytically primed GP and NPC1, and is blocked by key GP-specific neutralizing antibodies with therapeutic potential. Unexpectedly, cysteine protease inhibitors do not inhibit lipid mixing by virions bearing precleaved GP, even though they completely block cytoplasmic entry by these viruses, as shown previously. These results point to distinct cellular requirements for different steps in EBOV membrane fusion and suggest a model in which host cysteine proteases are dispensable for GP fusion triggering after NPC1 binding but are required for the formation of fusion pores that permit genome delivery. PMID:26861015

  8. New Small Molecule Entry Inhibitors Targeting Hemagglutinin-Mediated Influenza A Virus Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Antanasijevic, Aleksandar; Wang, Minxiu; Li, Bing; Mills, Debra M.; Ames, Jessica A.; Nash, Peter J.; Williams, John D.; Peet, Norton P.; Moir, Donald T.; Prichard, Mark N.; Keith, Kathy A.; Barnard, Dale L.; Caffrey, Michael; Rong, Lijun; Bowlin, Terry L.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses are a major public health threat worldwide, and options for antiviral therapy are limited by the emergence of drug-resistant virus strains. The influenza virus glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) plays critical roles in the early stage of virus infection, including receptor binding and membrane fusion, making it a potential target for the development of anti-influenza drugs. Using pseudotype virus-based high-throughput screens, we have identified several new small molecules capable of inhibiting influenza virus entry. We prioritized two novel inhibitors, MBX2329 and MBX2546, with aminoalkyl phenol ether and sulfonamide scaffolds, respectively, that specifically inhibit HA-mediated viral entry. The two compounds (i) are potent (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 0.3 to 5.9 μM); (ii) are selective (50% cytotoxicity concentration [CC50] of >100 μM), with selectivity index (SI) values of >20 to 200 for different influenza virus strains; (iii) inhibit a wide spectrum of influenza A viruses, which includes the 2009 pandemic influenza virus A/H1N1/2009, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus A/H5N1, and oseltamivir-resistant A/H1N1 strains; (iv) exhibit large volumes of synergy with oseltamivir (36 and 331 μM2 % at 95% confidence); and (v) have chemically tractable structures. Mechanism-of-action studies suggest that both MBX2329 and MBX2546 bind to HA in a nonoverlapping manner. Additional results from HA-mediated hemolysis of chicken red blood cells (cRBCs), competition assays with monoclonal antibody (MAb) C179, and mutational analysis suggest that the compounds bind in the stem region of the HA trimer and inhibit HA-mediated fusion. Therefore, MBX2329 and MBX2546 represent new starting points for chemical optimization and have the potential to provide valuable future therapeutic options and research tools to study the HA-mediated entry process. PMID:24198411

  9. Chimeric Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus with Attachment and Fusion Glycoproteins Replaced by Bovine Parainfluenza Virus Type 3 Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase and Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Stope, Matthias B.; Karger, Axel; Schmidt, Ulrike; Buchholz, Ursula J.

    2001-01-01

    Chimeric bovine respiratory syncytial viruses (BRSV) expressing glycoproteins of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV-3) instead of BRSV glycoproteins were generated from cDNA. In the BRSV antigenome cDNA, the open reading frames of the major BRSV glycoproteins, attachment protein G and fusion protein F, were replaced individually or together by those of the BPIV-3 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and/or fusion (F) glycoproteins. Recombinant virus could not be recovered from cDNA when the BRSV F open reading frame was replaced by the BPIV-3 F open reading frame. However, cDNA recovery of the chimeric virus rBRSV-HNF, with both glycoproteins replaced simultaneously, and of the chimeric virus rBRSV-HN, with the BRSV G protein replaced by BPIV-3 HN, was successful. The replication rates of both chimeras were similar to that of standard rBRSV. Moreover, rBRSV-HNF was neutralized by antibodies specific for BPIV-3, but not by antibodies specific to BRSV, demonstrating that the BRSV glycoproteins can be functionally replaced by BPIV-3 glycoproteins. In contrast, rBRSV-HN was neutralized by BRSV-specific antisera, but not by BPIV-3 specific sera, showing that infection of rBRSV-HN is mediated by BRSV F. Hemadsorption of cells infected with rBRSV-HNF and rBRSV-HN proved that BPIV-3 HN protein expressed by rBRSV is functional. Colocalization of the BPIV-3 glycoproteins with BRSV M protein was demonstrated by confocal laser scan microscopy. Moreover, protein analysis revealed that the BPIV-3 glycoproteins were present in chimeric virions. Taken together, these data indicate that the heterologous glycoproteins were not only expressed but were incorporated into the envelope of recombinant BRSV. Thus, the envelope glycoproteins derived from a member of the Respirovirus genus can together functionally replace their homologs in a Pneumovirus background. PMID:11533200

  10. Measles virus attachment proteins with impaired ability to bind CD46 interact more efficiently with the homologous fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Corey, Elizabeth A.; Iorio, Ronald M.

    2009-01-05

    Fusion promotion by measles virus (MV) depends on an interaction between the hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) glycoproteins. Amino acid substitutions in MV H that drastically reduce hemagglutinating activity result in an increase in the amount of H (primarily the 74 kDa isoform) detectable in a complex with F at the cell surface. This is in direct contrast to the loss of the ability to detect a complex between the fusion protein of Newcastle disease virus and most attachment proteins that lack receptor binding activity. These opposing results provide support for the existence of different mechanisms for the regulation of fusion by these two paramyxoviruses.

  11. Structural and Functional Studies on the Marburg Virus GP2 Fusion Loop.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nina; Tao, Yisong; Brenowitz, Michael D; Girvin, Mark E; Lai, Jonathan R

    2015-10-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) and the ebolaviruses belong to the family Filoviridae (the members of which are filoviruses) that cause severe hemorrhagic fever. Infection requires fusion of the host and viral membranes, a process that occurs in the host cell endosomal compartment and is facilitated by the envelope glycoprotein fusion subunit, GP2. The N-terminal fusion loop (FL) of GP2 is a hydrophobic disulfide-bonded loop that is postulated to insert and disrupt the host endosomal membrane during fusion. Here, we describe the first structural and functional studies of a protein corresponding to the MARV GP2 FL. We found that this protein undergoes a pH-dependent conformational change, as monitored by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance. Furthermore, we report that, under low pH conditions, the MARV GP2 FL can induce content leakage from liposomes. The general aspects of this pH-dependent structure and lipid-perturbing behavior are consistent with previous reports on Ebola virus GP2 FL. However, nuclear magnetic resonance studies in lipid bicelles and mutational analysis indicate differences in structure exist between MARV and Ebola virus GP2 FL. These results provide new insight into the mechanism of MARV GP2-mediated cell entry.

  12. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for the six-helix bundle of the human respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein as probes of the protein post-fusion conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Palomo, Concepción; Mas, Vicente; Vázquez, Mónica; Cano, Olga; Luque, Daniel; Terrón, María C.; Calder, Lesley J.; Melero, José A.

    2014-07-15

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) has two major surface glycoproteins (G and F) anchored in the lipid envelope. Membrane fusion promoted by hRSV{sub F} occurs via refolding from a pre-fusion form to a highly stable post-fusion state involving large conformational changes of the F trimer. One of these changes results in assembly of two heptad repeat sequences (HRA and HRB) into a six-helix bundle (6HB) motif. To assist in distinguishing pre- and post-fusion conformations of hRSV{sub F}, we have prepared polyclonal (α-6HB) and monoclonal (R145) rabbit antibodies specific for the 6HB. Among other applications, these antibodies were used to explore the requirements of 6HB formation by isolated protein segments or peptides and by truncated mutants of the F protein. Site-directed mutagenesis and electron microscopy located the R145 epitope in the post-fusion hRSV{sub F} at a site distantly located from previously mapped epitopes, extending the repertoire of antibodies that can decorate the F molecule. - Highlights: • Antibodies specific for post-fusion respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein are described. • Polyclonal antibodies were obtained in rabbit inoculated with chimeric heptad repeats. • Antibody binding required assembly of a six-helix bundle in the post-fusion protein. • A monoclonal antibody with similar structural requirements is also described. • Binding of this antibody to the post-fusion protein was visualized by electron microscopy.

  13. Sequential Monte Carlo tracking of the marginal artery by multiple cue fusion and random forest regression.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Kevin M; Peplinski, Brandon; Kim, Lauren; Wang, Shijun; Lu, Le; Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Jianfei; Wei, Zhuoshi; Summers, Ronald M

    2015-01-01

    Given the potential importance of marginal artery localization in automated registration in computed tomography colonography (CTC), we have devised a semi-automated method of marginal vessel detection employing sequential Monte Carlo tracking (also known as particle filtering tracking) by multiple cue fusion based on intensity, vesselness, organ detection, and minimum spanning tree information for poorly enhanced vessel segments. We then employed a random forest algorithm for intelligent cue fusion and decision making which achieved high sensitivity and robustness. After applying a vessel pruning procedure to the tracking results, we achieved statistically significantly improved precision compared to a baseline Hessian detection method (2.7% versus 75.2%, p<0.001). This method also showed statistically significantly improved recall rate compared to a 2-cue baseline method using fewer vessel cues (30.7% versus 67.7%, p<0.001). These results demonstrate that marginal artery localization on CTC is feasible by combining a discriminative classifier (i.e., random forest) with a sequential Monte Carlo tracking mechanism. In so doing, we present the effective application of an anatomical probability map to vessel pruning as well as a supplementary spatial coordinate system for colonic segmentation and registration when this task has been confounded by colon lumen collapse.

  14. Forest Volume and Biomass estimation from SAR/LIDAR/Optical Fusion in Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellndorfer, J. M.; Walker, W. S.; Goetz, S. J.; Cormier, T.; Kirsch, K.; Gonzalez, S.; Rombach, M.

    2009-12-01

    The paper reports on research to investigate ALOS/PALSAR L-band radar and optical time series data in conjunction with airborne lidar datasets to develop advanced data fusion algorithms for biomass and ecosystem structure measurements in support of the NASA DESDynI mission. The research is based on the acquisition of ALOS/PALSAR time series data beginning in 2007 and the timely confluence of these acquisitions with other highly relevant remote sensing and ground reference data sets in forested areas in Chile. Through collaboration with Digimapas Chile, the project has access to 75,000 km2 of 1-meter resolution full-waveform small footprint lidar (SFPL) data and 0.5 m resolution digital orthophoto imagery covering the commercial forests of Arauco, one of the largest cellulose producers in Latin America. Field inventory data from Arauco are used to test terrain and environmental influences on biomass estimation from empirical regression tree based data fusion approaches. The SAR data acquisitions available from PALSAR during the project time frame will span a five year period from 2007 to 2011, allowing investigations into how L-band time series data, similar to that expected from the DESDynI SAR (backscatter and interferometric coherence), can be used to build (1) the DESDynI biomass map product to be produced at the end of the “designed mission life” (i.e., 3 and/or 5/5+ years) and (2) annual maps of aboveground biomass change.

  15. Gearbox fault diagnosis based on deep random forest fusion of acoustic and vibratory signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan; Sanchez, René-Vinicio; Zurita, Grover; Cerrada, Mariela; Cabrera, Diego; Vásquez, Rafael E.

    2016-08-01

    Fault diagnosis is an effective tool to guarantee safe operations in gearboxes. Acoustic and vibratory measurements in such mechanical devices are all sensitive to the existence of faults. This work addresses the use of a deep random forest fusion (DRFF) technique to improve fault diagnosis performance for gearboxes by using measurements of an acoustic emission (AE) sensor and an accelerometer that are used for monitoring the gearbox condition simultaneously. The statistical parameters of the wavelet packet transform (WPT) are first produced from the AE signal and the vibratory signal, respectively. Two deep Boltzmann machines (DBMs) are then developed for deep representations of the WPT statistical parameters. A random forest is finally suggested to fuse the outputs of the two DBMs as the integrated DRFF model. The proposed DRFF technique is evaluated using gearbox fault diagnosis experiments under different operational conditions, and achieves 97.68% of the classification rate for 11 different condition patterns. Compared to other peer algorithms, the addressed method exhibits the best performance. The results indicate that the deep learning fusion of acoustic and vibratory signals may improve fault diagnosis capabilities for gearboxes.

  16. A suicidal DNA vaccine expressing the fusion protein of peste des petits ruminants virus induces both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Xiaolin; Jin, Hongyan; Liu, Guangqing; Pan, Ling; Wang, Guijun; Guo, Hao; Li, Gang; Li, Yongdong

    2015-12-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), a highly contagious disease induced by PPR virus (PPRV), affects sheep and goats. PPRV fusion (F) protein is important for the induction of immune responses against PPRV. We constructed a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon-vectored DNA vaccine ("suicidal DNA vaccine") and evaluated its immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. The F gene of PPRV was cloned and inserted into the SFV replicon-based vector pSCA1. The antigenicity of the resultant plasmid pSCA1/F was identified by indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting. BALB/c mice were then intramuscularly injected with pSCA1/F three times at 14-d intervals. Specific antibodies and virus-neutralizing antibodies against PPRV were quantified by indirect ELISA and microneutralization tests, respectively. Cell-mediated immune responses were examined by cytokine and lymphocyte proliferation assays. The pSCA1/F expressed F protein in vitro and induced specific and neutralizing antibody production, and lymphocyte proliferation in mice. Mice vaccinated with pSCA1/F had increased IL-2 and IL-10 levels after 24-h post first immunization. IFN-γ and TNF-α levels increased from that time point and gradually decreased thereafter. Thus, the Semliki Forest virus replicon-vectored DNA vaccine expressing the F protein of PPRV induced both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice. This could be considered as a novel strategy for vaccine development against PPR. PMID:26343487

  17. A suicidal DNA vaccine expressing the fusion protein of peste des petits ruminants virus induces both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Xiaolin; Jin, Hongyan; Liu, Guangqing; Pan, Ling; Wang, Guijun; Guo, Hao; Li, Gang; Li, Yongdong

    2015-12-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), a highly contagious disease induced by PPR virus (PPRV), affects sheep and goats. PPRV fusion (F) protein is important for the induction of immune responses against PPRV. We constructed a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon-vectored DNA vaccine ("suicidal DNA vaccine") and evaluated its immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. The F gene of PPRV was cloned and inserted into the SFV replicon-based vector pSCA1. The antigenicity of the resultant plasmid pSCA1/F was identified by indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting. BALB/c mice were then intramuscularly injected with pSCA1/F three times at 14-d intervals. Specific antibodies and virus-neutralizing antibodies against PPRV were quantified by indirect ELISA and microneutralization tests, respectively. Cell-mediated immune responses were examined by cytokine and lymphocyte proliferation assays. The pSCA1/F expressed F protein in vitro and induced specific and neutralizing antibody production, and lymphocyte proliferation in mice. Mice vaccinated with pSCA1/F had increased IL-2 and IL-10 levels after 24-h post first immunization. IFN-γ and TNF-α levels increased from that time point and gradually decreased thereafter. Thus, the Semliki Forest virus replicon-vectored DNA vaccine expressing the F protein of PPRV induced both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice. This could be considered as a novel strategy for vaccine development against PPR.

  18. Mutagenesis of the La Crosse Virus glycoprotein supports a role for Gc (1066-1087) as the fusion peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Plassmeyer, Matthew L.; Soldan, Samantha S.; Stachelek, Karen M.; Roth, Susan M.; Martin-Garcia, Julio; Gonzalez-Scarano, Francisco . E-mail: scarano@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2007-02-20

    The La Crosse Virus (LACV) M segment encodes two glycoproteins (Gn and Gc), and plays a critical role in the neuropathogenesis of LACV infection as the primary determinant of neuroinvasion. A recent study from our group demonstrated that the region comprising the membrane proximal two-thirds of Gc, amino acids 860-1442, is critical in mediating LACV fusion and entry. Furthermore, computational analysis identified structural similarities between a portion of this region, amino acids 970-1350, and the E1 fusion protein of two alphaviruses: Sindbis virus and Semliki Forrest virus (SFV). Within the region 970-1350, a 22-amino-acid hydrophobic segment (1066-1087) is predicted to correlate structurally with the fusion peptides of class II fusion proteins. We performed site-directed mutagenesis of key amino acids in this 22-amino acid segment and determined the functional consequences of these mutations on fusion and entry. Several mutations within this hydrophobic domain affected glycoprotein expression to some extent, but all mutations either shifted the pH threshold of fusion below that of the wild-type protein, reduced fusion efficiency, or abrogated cell-to-cell fusion and pseudotype entry altogether. These results, coupled with the aforementioned computational modeling, suggest that the LACV Gc functions as a class II fusion protein and support a role for the region Gc 1066-1087 as a fusion peptide.

  19. The cowpox virus fusion regulator proteins SPI-3 and hemagglutinin interact in infected and uninfected cells.

    PubMed

    Turner, Peter C; Moyer, Richard W

    2006-03-30

    The serpin SPI-3 and the hemagglutinin (HA) encoded by cowpox virus (CPV) block cell-cell fusion, and colocalize at the cell surface. wtCPV does not fuse cells, but inactivation of either gene leads to fusion. SPI-3 mAb added to wtCPV-infected cells caused fusion, confirming that SPI-3 protein at the cell surface prevents fusion. The SPI-3 mAb epitope mapped to an 85-amino acid region at the C-terminus. Removal of either 44 residues from the SPI-3 C-terminus or 48 residues following the N-terminal signal sequence resulted in fusion. Interaction between SPI-3 and HA proteins in infected cells was shown by coimmunoprecipitation. SPI-3/HA was not associated with the A27L "fusion" protein. SPI-3 and HA were able to associate in uninfected cells in the absence of other viral proteins. The HA-binding domain in SPI-3 resided in the C-terminal 229 residues, and did not include helix D, which mediates cofactor interaction in many other serpins.

  20. Rigid amphipathic fusion inhibitors, small molecule antiviral compounds against enveloped viruses

    PubMed Central

    St.Vincent, Mireille R.; Colpitts, Che C.; Ustinov, Alexey V.; Muqadas, Muhammad; Joyce, Michael A.; Barsby, Nicola L.; Epand, Raquel F.; Epand, Richard M.; Khramyshev, Stanislav A.; Valueva, Olga A.; Korshun, Vladimir A.; Tyrrell, D. Lorne J.; Schang, Luis M.

    2010-01-01

    Antiviral drugs targeting viral proteins often result in prompt selection for resistance. Moreover, the number of viral targets is limited. Novel antiviral targets are therefore needed. The unique characteristics of fusion between virion envelopes and cell membranes may provide such targets. Like all fusing bilayers, viral envelopes locally adopt hourglass-shaped stalks during the initial stages of fusion, a process that requires local negative membrane curvature. Unlike cellular vesicles, however, viral envelopes do not redistribute lipids between leaflets, can only use the energy released by virion proteins, and fuse to the extracellular leaflets of cell membranes. Enrichment in phospholipids with hydrophilic heads larger than their hydrophobic tails in the convex outer leaflet of vesicles favors positive curvature, therefore increasing the activation energy barrier for fusion. Such phospholipids can increase the activation barrier beyond the energy provided by virion proteins, thereby inhibiting viral fusion. However, phospholipids are not pharmacologically useful. We show here that a family of synthetic rigid amphiphiles of shape similar to such phospholipids, RAFIs (rigid amphipathic fusion inhibitors), inhibit the infectivity of several otherwise unrelated enveloped viruses, including hepatitis C and HSV-1 and -2 (lowest apparent IC50 48 nM), with no cytotoxic or cytostatic effects (selectivity index > 3,000) by inhibiting the increased negative curvature required for the initial stages of fusion. PMID:20823220

  1. Discovery of Piperazinylquinoline Derivatives as Novel Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiufang; Wang, Lisha; Wang, Baoxia; Miao, Kun; Xiang, Kunlun; Feng, Song; Gao, Lu; Shen, Hong C; Yun, Hongying

    2016-06-01

    A novel series of piperazinylquinoline derivatives were discovered as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion inhibitors by the ligand-based screening approach. Among 3,000 hits, 1-amino-3-[[2-(4-phenyl-1-piperidyl)-4-quinolyl]amino]propan-2-ol (7) was proven to be active against the RSV long (A) strain. The anti-RSV activity was improved by converting piperidine to benzylcarbonyl substituted piperazine. The basic side chain was also found to be crucial for anti-RSV activity. The selected analogues, 45 and 50, demonstrated anti-RSV activities up to EC50 = 0.028 μM and 0.033 μM, respectively. A direct anti-RSV effect was confirmed by a plaque reduction assay and a fusion inhibition assay. Both 45 and 50 showed promising DMPK properties with good oral bioavailability, and could potentially lead to novel therapeutic agents targeting the RSV fusion process. PMID:27326326

  2. Structure-function analysis of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein B with fusion-from-without activity

    SciTech Connect

    Roller, Devin G.; Dollery, Stephen J.; Doyle, James L.; Nicola, Anthony V.

    2008-12-20

    Fusion-from-without (FFWO) is the rapid induction of cell fusion by virions in the absence of viral protein synthesis. The combination of two amino acid mutations in envelope glycoprotein B (gB), one in the ectodomain and one in the cytoplasmic tail, can confer FFWO activity to wild type herpes simplex virus (HSV). In this report, we analyzed the entry and cell fusion phenotypes of HSV that contains FFWO gB, with emphasis on the cellular receptors for HSV, nectin-1, nectin-2 and HVEM. The ability of an HSV strain with FFWO gB to efficiently mediate FFWO via a specific gD-receptor correlated with its ability to mediate viral entry by that receptor. A FFWO form of gB was not sufficient to switch the entry of HSV from a pH-dependent, endocytic pathway to a direct fusion, pH-independent pathway. The conformation of gB with FFWO activity was not globally altered relative to wild type. However, distinct monoclonal antibodies had reduced reactivity with FFWO gB, suggesting an altered antigenic structure relative to wild type. FFWO was blocked by preincubation of virions with neutralizing antibodies to gB or gD. Together with previous studies, the results indicate that the roles of gB in FFWO and in virus-cell fusion during entry are related but not identical. This study also suggests that the FFWO function of gB is not a specific determinant for the selection of HSV entry pathway and that antigenic differences in FFWO gB may reflect its enhanced fusion activity.

  3. Cathepsin L is involved in proteolytic processing of the Hendra virus fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Pager, Cara Theresia; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2005-10-01

    Proteolytic processing of paramyxovirus fusion (F) proteins is essential for the generation of a mature and fusogenic form of the F protein. Although many paramyxovirus F proteins are proteolytically processed by the cellular protease furin at a multibasic cleavage motif, cleavage of the newly emerged Hendra virus F protein occurs by a previously unidentified cellular protease following a single lysine at residue 109. We demonstrate here that the cellular protease cathepsin L is involved in converting the Hendra virus precursor F protein (F(0)) to the active F(1) + F(2) disulfide-linked heterodimer. To initially identify the class of protease involved in Hendra virus F protein cleavage, Vero cells transfected with pCAGGS-Hendra F or pCAGGS-SV5 F (known to be proteolytically processed by furin) were metabolically labeled and chased in the absence or presence of serine, cysteine, aspartyl, and metalloprotease inhibitors. Nonspecific and specific protease inhibitors known to decrease cathepsin activity inhibited proteolytic processing of Hendra virus F but had no effect on simian virus 5 F processing. We next designed shRNA oligonucleotides to cathepsin L which dramatically reduced cathepsin L protein expression and enzyme activity. Cathepsin L shRNA-expressing Vero cells transfected with pCAGGS-Hendra F demonstrated a nondetectable amount of cleavage of the Hendra virus F protein and significantly decreased membrane fusion activity. Additionally, we found that purified human cathepsin L processed immunopurified Hendra virus F(0) into F(1) and F(2) fragments. These studies introduce a novel mechanism for primary proteolytic processing of viral glycoproteins and also suggest a previously unreported biological role for cathepsin L.

  4. Achieving Accuracy Requirements for Forest Biomass Mapping: A Data Fusion Method for Estimating Forest Biomass and LiDAR Sampling Error with Spaceborne Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montesano, P. M.; Cook, B. D.; Sun, G.; Simard, M.; Zhang, Z.; Nelson, R. F.; Ranson, K. J.; Lutchke, S.; Blair, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    The synergistic use of active and passive remote sensing (i.e., data fusion) demonstrates the ability of spaceborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR), synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and multispectral imagery for achieving the accuracy requirements of a global forest biomass mapping mission. This data fusion approach also provides a means to extend 3D information from discrete spaceborne LiDAR measurements of forest structure across scales much larger than that of the LiDAR footprint. For estimating biomass, these measurements mix a number of errors including those associated with LiDAR footprint sampling over regional - global extents. A general framework for mapping above ground live forest biomass (AGB) with a data fusion approach is presented and verified using data from NASA field campaigns near Howland, ME, USA, to assess AGB and LiDAR sampling errors across a regionally representative landscape. We combined SAR and Landsat-derived optical (passive optical) image data to identify forest patches, and used image and simulated spaceborne LiDAR data to compute AGB and estimate LiDAR sampling error for forest patches and 100m, 250m, 500m, and 1km grid cells. Forest patches were delineated with Landsat-derived data and airborne SAR imagery, and simulated spaceborne LiDAR (SSL) data were derived from orbit and cloud cover simulations and airborne data from NASA's Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (L VIS). At both the patch and grid scales, we evaluated differences in AGB estimation and sampling error from the combined use of LiDAR with both SAR and passive optical and with either SAR or passive optical alone. This data fusion approach demonstrates that incorporating forest patches into the AGB mapping framework can provide sub-grid forest information for coarser grid-level AGB reporting, and that combining simulated spaceborne LiDAR with SAR and passive optical data are most useful for estimating AGB when measurements from LiDAR are limited because they minimized

  5. Membrane fusion-competent virus-like proteoliposomes and proteinaceous supported bilayers made directly from cell plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Costello, Deirdre A; Hsia, Chih-Yun; Millet, Jean K; Porri, Teresa; Daniel, Susan

    2013-05-28

    Virus-like particles are useful materials for studying virus-host interactions in a safe manner. However, the standard production of pseudovirus based on the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) backbone is an intricate procedure that requires trained laboratory personnel. In this work, a new strategy for creating virus-like proteoliposomes (VLPLs) and virus-like supported bilayers (VLSBs) is presented. This strategy uses a cell blebbing technique to induce the formation of nanoscale vesicles from the plasma membrane of BHK cells expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) fusion protein of influenza X-31. These vesicles and supported bilayers contain HA and are used to carry out single particle membrane fusion events, monitored using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The results of these studies show that the VLPLs and VLSBs contain HA proteins that are fully competent to carry out membrane fusion, including the formation of a fusion pore and the release of fluorophores loaded into vesicles. This new strategy for creating spherical and planar geometry virus-like membranes has many potential applications. VLPLs could be used to study fusion proteins of virulent viruses in a safe manner, or they could be used as therapeutic delivery particles to transport beneficial proteins coexpressed in the cells to a target cell. VLSBs could facilitate high throughput screening of antiviral drugs or pathogen-host cell interactions.

  6. Cell fusion by haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) viruses and its application for titration of virus infectivity and neutralizing antibody.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, J; Takashima, I; Hashimoto, N

    1985-01-01

    Haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome viruses, are members of the family Bunyaviridae. They cause cell to cell fusion from within under acidic conditions. This phenomenon was found to occur under a pH range of between 4.9 to 6.3 for all the viruses examined. The pH range which causes cell fusion was similar to that reported for the La Crosse virus of the Bunyaviridae, hence indicating that this property is a common biological characteristic among this family of viruses. Titration of virus infectivity and neutralizing antibody was done by counting the number of fused cell foci produced in infected Vero cell monolayers after low pH treatment. This method was simpler and more rapid than the ordinary plaque formation method or that of counting infected cell foci by IFA or immunoenzyme assay. In addition, this method may also be applicable in the detection of other enveloped viruses which do not cause a typical cytopathic effect.

  7. Development and characterization of a Rift Valley fever virus cell-cell fusion assay using alphavirus replicon vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Filone, Claire Marie; Heise, Mark; Doms, Robert W. . E-mail: doms@mail.med.upenn.edu; Bertolotti-Ciarlet, Andrea . E-mail: aciarlet@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2006-12-20

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the Phlebovirus genus in the Bunyaviridae family, is transmitted by mosquitoes and infects both humans and domestic animals, particularly cattle and sheep. Since primary RVFV strains must be handled in BSL-3+ or BSL-4 facilities, a RVFV cell-cell fusion assay will facilitate the investigation of RVFV glycoprotein function under BSL-2 conditions. As for other members of the Bunyaviridae family, RVFV glycoproteins are targeted to the Golgi, where the virus buds, and are not efficiently delivered to the cell surface. However, overexpression of RVFV glycoproteins using an alphavirus replicon vector resulted in the expression of the glycoproteins on the surface of multiple cell types. Brief treatment of RVFV glycoprotein expressing cells with mildly acidic media (pH 6.2 and below) resulted in rapid and efficient syncytia formation, which we quantified by {beta}-galactosidase {alpha}-complementation. Fusion was observed with several cell types, suggesting that the receptor(s) for RVFV is widely expressed or that this acid-dependent virus does not require a specific receptor to mediate cell-cell fusion. Fusion occurred over a broad temperature range, as expected for a virus with both mosquito and mammalian hosts. In contrast to cell fusion mediated by the VSV-G glycoprotein, RVFV glycoprotein-dependent cell fusion could be prevented by treating target cells with trypsin, indicating that one or more proteins (or protein-associated carbohydrate) on the host cell surface are needed to support membrane fusion. The cell-cell fusion assay reported here will make it possible to study the membrane fusion activity of RVFV glycoproteins in a high-throughput format and to screen small molecule inhibitors for the ability to block virus-specific membrane fusion.

  8. Functional analysis of N-linked glycosylation mutants of the measles virus fusion protein synthesized by recombinant vaccinia virus vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Alkhatib, G; Shen, S H; Briedis, D; Richardson, C; Massie, B; Weinberg, R; Smith, D; Taylor, J; Paoletti, E; Roder, J

    1994-01-01

    The role of N-linked glycosylation in the biological activity of the measles virus (MV) fusion (F) protein was analyzed by expressing glycosylation mutants with recombinant vaccinia virus vectors. There are three potential N-linked glycosylation sites located on the F2 subunit polypeptide of MV F, at asparagine residues 29, 61, and 67. Each of the three potential glycosylation sites was mutated separately as well as in combination with the other sites. Expression of mutant proteins in mammalian cells showed that all three sites are used for the addition of N-linked oligosaccharides. Cell surface expression of mutant proteins was reduced by 50% relative to the wild-type level when glycosylation at either Asn-29 or Asn-61 was abolished. Despite the similar levels of cell surface expression, the Asn-29 and Asn-61 mutant proteins had different biological activities. While the Asn-61 mutant was capable of inducing syncytium formation, the Asn-29 mutant protein did not exhibit any significant cell fusion activity. Inactivation of the Asn-67 glycosylation site also reduced cell surface transport of mutant protein but had little effect on its ability to cause cell fusion. However, when the Asn-67 mutation was combined with mutations at either of the other two sites, cleavage-dependent activation, cell surface expression, and cell fusion activity were completely abolished. Our data show that the loss of N-linked oligosaccharides markedly impaired the proteolytic cleavage, stability, and biological activity of the MV F protein. The oligosaccharide side chains in MV F are thus essential for optimum conformation of the extracellular F2 subunit that is presumed to bind cellular membranes. Images PMID:8107215

  9. GS-5806 Inhibits a Broad Range of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Clinical Isolates by Blocking the Virus-Cell Fusion Process

    PubMed Central

    Stray, Kirsten; Kinkade, April; Theodore, Dorothy; Lee, Gary; Eisenberg, Eugene; Sangi, Michael; Gilbert, Brian E.; Jordan, Robert; Piedra, Pedro A.; Toms, Geoffery L.; Mackman, Richard; Cihlar, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants and young children. In addition, RSV causes significant morbidity and mortality in hospitalized elderly and immunocompromised patients. Currently, only palivizumab, a monoclonal antibody against the RSV fusion (F) protein, and inhaled ribavirin are approved for the prophylactic and therapeutic treatment of RSV, respectively. Therefore, there is a clinical need for safe and effective therapeutic agents for RSV infections. GS-5806, discovered via chemical optimization of a hit from a high-throughput antiviral-screening campaign, selectively inhibits a diverse set of 75 RSV subtype A and B clinical isolates (mean 50% effective concentration [EC50] = 0.43 nM). The compound maintained potency in primary human airway epithelial cells and exhibited low cytotoxicity in human cell lines and primary cell cultures (selectivity > 23,000-fold). Time-of-addition and temperature shift studies demonstrated that GS-5806 does not block RSV attachment to cells but interferes with virus entry. Follow-up experiments showed potent inhibition of RSV F-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. RSV A and B variants resistant to GS-5806, due to mutations in F protein (RSV A, L138F or F140L/N517I, and RSV B, F488L or F488S), were isolated and showed cross-resistance to other RSV fusion inhibitors, such as VP-14637, but remained fully sensitive to palivizumab and ribavirin. In summary, GS-5806 is a potent and selective RSV fusion inhibitor with antiviral activity against a diverse set of RSV clinical isolates. The compound is currently under clinical investigation for the treatment of RSV infection in pediatric, immunocompromised, and elderly patients. PMID:26666922

  10. Crystal Structure of Venezuelan Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Fusion Glycoprotein Reveals a Class 1 Postfusion Architecture with Extensive Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Parsy, Marie-Laure; Harlos, Karl; Huiskonen, Juha T.

    2013-01-01

    Guanarito virus (GTOV) is an emergent and deadly pathogen. We present the crystal structure of the glycosylated GTOV fusion glycoprotein to 4.1-Å resolution in the postfusion conformation. Our structure reveals a classical six-helix bundle and presents direct verification that New World arenaviruses exhibit class I viral membrane fusion machinery. The structure provides visualization of an N-linked glycocalyx coat, and consideration of glycan dynamics reveals extensive coverage of the underlying protein surface, following virus-host membrane fusion. PMID:24049182

  11. Cell fusion assay by expression of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion protein to analyze the mutation of palivizumab-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Yosuke; Yamaji, Yoshiaki; Sawada, Akihito; Ito, Takashi; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) consists of fusion (F), glyco (G), and small hydrophobic (SH) proteins as envelope proteins, and infects through cell fusion. F protein is expressed on the surface of infected cells, and induces cell fusion. In the present report, expression plasmids of the F, G and SH proteins were constructed and cell fusion activity was investigated under T7 RNA polymerase. F protein alone induced cell fusion at a lower concentration than previously reported, and co-expression of F and SH proteins induced cell fusion more efficiently than F protein alone. Palivizumab is the only prophylactic agent against RSV infection. Palivizumab-resistant strains having mutations of the F protein of K272E and S275F were reported. These mutations were introduced into an F-expression plasmid, and exhibited no inhibition of cell fusion with palivizumab. Among the RSV F protein mutants, N276S has been reported to have partial resistance against palivizumab, but the F expression plasmid with the N276S mutation showed a reduction in cell fusion in the presence of palivizumab, showing no resistance to palivizumab. The present expression system was useful for investigating the mechanisms of RSV cell fusion. PMID:26794681

  12. Human keratinocytes restrict chikungunya virus replication at a post-fusion step.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Eric; Hamel, Rodolphe; Neyret, Aymeric; Ekchariyawat, Peeraya; Molès, Jean-Pierre; Simmons, Graham; Chazal, Nathalie; Desprès, Philippe; Missé, Dorothée; Briant, Laurence

    2015-02-01

    Transmission of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) to humans is initiated by puncture of the skin by a blood-feeding Aedes mosquito. Despite the growing knowledge accumulated on CHIKV, the interplay between skin cells and CHIKV following inoculation still remains unclear. In this study we questioned the behavior of human keratinocytes, the predominant cell population in the skin, following viral challenge. We report that CHIKV rapidly elicits an innate immune response in these cells leading to the enhanced transcription of type I/II and type III interferon genes. Concomitantly, we show that despite viral particles internalization into Rab5-positive endosomes and efficient fusion of virus and cell membranes, keratinocytes poorly replicate CHIKV as attested by absence of nonstructural proteins and genomic RNA synthesis. Accordingly, human keratinocytes behave as an antiviral defense against CHIKV infection rather than as a primary targets for initial replication. This picture significantly differs from that reported for Dengue and West Nile mosquito-borne viruses.

  13. Progress in the identification of dengue virus entry/fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    De La Guardia, Carolina; Lleonart, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever, a reemerging disease, is putting nearly 2.5 billion people at risk worldwide. The number of infections and the geographic extension of dengue fever infection have increased in the past decade. The disease is caused by the dengue virus, a flavivirus that uses mosquitos Aedes sp. as vectors. The disease has several clinical manifestations, from the mild cold-like illness to the more serious hemorrhagic dengue fever and dengue shock syndrome. Currently, there is no approved drug for the treatment of dengue disease or an effective vaccine to fight the virus. Therefore, the search for antivirals against dengue virus is an active field of research. As new possible receptors and biological pathways of the virus biology are discovered, new strategies are being undertaken to identify possible antiviral molecules. Several groups of researchers have targeted the initial step in the infection as a potential approach to interfere with the virus. The viral entry process is mediated by viral proteins and cellular receptor molecules that end up in the endocytosis of the virion, the fusion of both membranes, and the release of viral RNA in the cytoplasm. This review provides an overview of the targets and progress that has been made in the quest for dengue virus entry inhibitors.

  14. Sialic Acids on Varicella-Zoster Virus Glycoprotein B Are Required for Cell-Cell Fusion.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Tadahiro; Matsumoto, Maki; Arisawa, Fuminori; Kohyama, Masako; Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Mori, Yasuko; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-08-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a member of the human Herpesvirus family that causes varicella (chicken pox) and zoster (shingles). VZV latently infects sensory ganglia and is also responsible for encephalomyelitis. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), a member of the sialic acid (SA)-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin family, is mainly expressed in neural tissues. VZV glycoprotein B (gB) associates with MAG and mediates membrane fusion during VZV entry into host cells. The SA requirements of MAG when associating with its ligands vary depending on the specific ligand, but it is unclear whether the SAs on gB are involved in the association with MAG. In this study, we found that SAs on gB are essential for the association with MAG as well as for membrane fusion during VZV infection. MAG with a point mutation in the SA-binding site did not bind to gB and did not mediate cell-cell fusion or VZV entry. Cell-cell fusion and VZV entry mediated by the gB-MAG interaction were blocked by sialidase treatment. N-glycosylation or O-glycosylation inhibitors also inhibited the fusion and entry mediated by gB-MAG interaction. Furthermore, gB with mutations in N-glycosylation sites, i.e. asparagine residues 557 and 686, did not associate with MAG, and the cell-cell fusion efficiency was low. Fusion between the viral envelope and cellular membrane is essential for host cell entry by herpesviruses. Therefore, these results suggest that SAs on gB play important roles in MAG-mediated VZV infection.

  15. C-E1 fusion protein synthesized by rubella virus DI RNAs maintained during serial passage

    SciTech Connect

    Tzeng, W.-P.; Frey, Teryl K. . E-mail: tfrey@gsu.edu

    2006-12-20

    Rubella virus (RUB) replicons are derivatives of the RUB infectious cDNA clone that retain the nonstructural open reading frame (NS-ORF) that encodes the replicase proteins but not the structural protein ORF (SP-ORF) that encodes the virion proteins. RUB defective interfering (DI) RNAs contain deletions within the SP-ORF and thus resemble replicons. DI RNAs often retain the 5' end of the capsid protein (C) gene that has been shown to modulate virus-specific RNA synthesis. However, when replicons either with or without the C gene were passaged serially in the presence of wt RUB as a source of the virion proteins, it was found that neither replicon was maintained and DI RNAs were generated. The majority DI RNA species contained in-frame deletions in the SP-ORF leading to a fusion between the 5' end of the C gene and the 3' end of the E1 glycoprotein gene. DI infectious cDNA clones were constructed and transcripts from these DI infectious cDNA clones were maintained during serial passage with wt RUB. The C-E1 fusion protein encoded by the DI RNAs was synthesized and was required for maintenance of the DI RNA during serial passage. This is the first report of a functional novel gene product resulting from deletion during DI RNA generation. Thus far, the role of the C-E1 fusion protein in maintenance of DI RNAs during serial passage remained elusive as it was found that the fusion protein diminished rather than enhanced DI RNA synthesis and was not incorporated into virus particles.

  16. Avian sarcoma and leukosis virus-receptor interactions: From classical genetics to novel insights into virus-cell membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, R.J.O.; Elleder, D.; Young, J.A.T. . E-mail: jyoung@salk.edu

    2006-01-05

    For over 40 years, avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV)-receptor interactions have been employed as a useful model system to study the mechanism of retroviral entry into cells. Pioneering studies on this system focused upon the genetic basis of the differential susceptibilities of different lines of chickens to infection by distinct subgroups of ASLV. These studies led to the definition of three distinct autosomal recessive genes that were predicted to encode cellular receptors for different viral subgroups. They also led to the concept of viral interference, i.e. the mechanism by which infection by one virus can render cells resistant to reinfection by other viruses that use the same cellular receptor. Here, we review the contributions that analyses of the ASLV-receptor system have made in unraveling the mechanisms of retroviral entry into cells and focus on key findings such as identification and characterization of the ASLV receptor genes and the subsequent elucidation of an unprecedented mechanism of virus-cell fusion. Since many of the initial findings on this system were published in the early volumes of Virology, this subject is especially well suited to this special anniversary issue of the journal.

  17. Radiation inactivation analysis of influenza virus reveals different target sizes for fusion, leakage, and neuraminidase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, S.; Jung, C.Y.; Takahashi, M.; Lenard, J.

    1986-10-07

    The size of the functional units responsible for several activities carried out by the influenza virus envelope glycoproteins was determined by radiation inactivation analysis. Neuraminidase activity, which resides in the glycoprotein NA, was inactivated exponentially with an increasing radiation dose, yielding a target size of 94 +/- 5 kilodaltons (kDa), in reasonable agreement with that of the disulfide-bonded dimer (120 kDa). All the other activities studied are properties of the HA glycoprotein and were normalized to the known molecular weight of the neuraminidase dimer. Virus-induced fusion activity was measured by two phospholipid dilution assays: relief of energy transfer between N-(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)dipalmitoyl-L-alpha- phosphatidylethanolamine (N-NBD-PE) and N-(lissamine rhodamine B sulfonyl)-dioleoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylethanolamine (N-Rh-PE) in target liposomes and relief of self-quenching of N-Rh-PE in target liposomes. Radiation inactivation of fusion activity proceeded exponentially with radiation dose, yielding normalized target sizes of 68 +/- 6 kDa by assay i and 70 +/- 4 kDa by assay ii. These values are close to the molecular weight of a single disulfide-bonded (HA1 + HA2) unit (75 kDa), the monomer of the HA trimer. A single monomer is thus inactivated by each radiation event, and each monomer (or some part of it) constitutes a minimal functional unit capable of mediating fusion. Virus-induced leakage of calcein from target liposomes and virus-induced leakage of hemoglobin from erythrocytes (hemolysis) both showed more complex inactivation behavior: a pronounced shoulder was present in both inactivation curves, followed by a steep drop in activity at higher radiation levels.

  18. Quantifying Urban Forest Structure Using Crown-Level Fusion of Imaging Spectroscopy and LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonzo, M.; Bookhagen, B.; McFadden, J. P.; Roberts, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    The magnitude and distribution of ecosystem services provided by urban trees depend largely on canopy fractional cover, leaf area index, and species. Most efforts to quantify the structure and function of urban forests have been limited to measuring canopy extent or extrapolation of forest structure and function from plot sample inventories. Hyperspectral remote sensing has shown promise as a means for discriminating tree species. However, in many urban settings, tree species diversity and within-class spectral variability are both high, resulting in low classification accuracies. Canopy structural variables derived from LiDAR can provide additional information, such as tree height and crown width, that do not duplicate the information contained in the spectral variables. In this research we use crown-level fusion of hyperspectral and airborne LiDAR data to map 29 common tree species in Santa Barbara, California. From a discretized, full-waveform lidar dataset, we isolate canopy and, using watershed segmentation, delineate individual crowns. The crown segments are overlaid on Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data and all suitable vegetation spectra are extracted. These same segments are used to extract lidar variables. The two datasets are fused at the crown-object level and classified using canonical discriminant analysis. Overall accuracy for the 29 species, based on correctly classified canopy area, is 83%. When including species outside of the training set, the overall classification accuracy to the tree type level was 90%. At the pixel level, using only spectral data, the classification accuracy of the trained species was 68%. These results indicate the potential for wall-to-wall mapping of an urban forest to the species or tree type level, depending on species diversity and availability of training data. Further, we find that imperfect segmentation is not an insurmountable obstacle to crown-level analysis.

  19. Effect of forest type on the distribution of Lutzomyia shannoni (Diptera: Psychodidae) and vesicular stomatitis virus on Ossabaw Island, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Comer, J A; Kavanaugh, D M; Stallknecht, D E; Ware, G O; Corn, J L; Nettles, V F

    1993-05-01

    We studied the effects of three forest types on multiple factors that are believed to influence the transmission of the New Jersey serotype of vesicular stomatitis (VSNJ) virus on Ossabaw Island, GA. These factors included availability of tree hole diurnal resting habitat for the presumed sand fly vector, Lutzomyia shannoni Dyar; relative abundance of L. shannoni; prevalence of VSNJ virus infection in sand flies; and prevalence of VSNJ virus antibodies in wild swine. Tree hole availability, sand fly abundance, and antibody prevalence in swine were significantly greater in maritime live oak forest than in other forest types. A single isolate of VSNJ virus was obtained from sand flies collected in maritime live oak forest. These data indicate that the relative abundance of adult L. shannoni is influenced significantly by the availability of tree holes and that VSNJ virus infection in wild swine is linked to forest type and is greatest in areas capable of supporting abundant populations of L. shannoni.

  20. Crystal structure of the conserved herpes virus fusion regulator complex gH-gL

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdary, Tirumala K; Cairns, Tina M; Atanasiu, Doina; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Heldwein, Ekaterina E

    2010-09-13

    Herpesviruses, which cause many incurable diseases, infect cells by fusing viral and cellular membranes. Whereas most other enveloped viruses use a single viral catalyst called a fusogen, herpesviruses, inexplicably, require two conserved fusion-machinery components, gB and the heterodimer gH-gL, plus other nonconserved components. gB is a class III viral fusogen, but unlike other members of its class, it does not function alone. We determined the crystal structure of the gH ectodomain bound to gL from herpes simplex virus 2. gH-gL is an unusually tight complex with a unique architecture that, unexpectedly, does not resemble any known viral fusogen. Instead, we propose that gH-gL activates gB for fusion, possibly through direct binding. Formation of a gB-gH-gL complex is critical for fusion and is inhibited by a neutralizing antibody, making the gB-gH-gL interface a promising antiviral target.

  1. Crystal Structure of the Conserved Herpes Virus Fusion Regulator Complex gH–gL

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdary, T.; Cairns, T; Atanasiu, D; Cohen, G; Eisenberg, R; Heldwein, E

    2010-01-01

    Herpesviruses, which cause many incurable diseases, infect cells by fusing viral and cellular membranes. Whereas most other enveloped viruses use a single viral catalyst called a fusogen, herpesviruses, inexplicably, require two conserved fusion-machinery components, gB and the heterodimer gH-gL, plus other nonconserved components. gB is a class III viral fusogen, but unlike other members of its class, it does not function alone. We determined the crystal structure of the gH ectodomain bound to gL from herpes simplex virus 2. gH-gL is an unusually tight complex with a unique architecture that, unexpectedly, does not resemble any known viral fusogen. Instead, we propose that gH-gL activates gB for fusion, possibly through direct binding. Formation of a gB-gH-gL complex is critical for fusion and is inhibited by a neutralizing antibody, making the gB-gH-gL interface a promising antiviral target.

  2. Evaluation of Measles Vaccine Virus as a Vector to Deliver Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Protein or Epstein-Barr Virus Glycoprotein gp350

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Hoyin; Cheng, Xing; Xu, Qi; Zengel, James R; Parhy, Bandita; Zhao, Jackie; Wang, C. Kathy; Jin, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Live attenuated recombinant measles vaccine virus (MV) Edmonston-Zagreb (EZ) strain was evaluated as a viral vector to express the ectodomains of fusion protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV F) or glycoprotein 350 of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV gp350) as candidate vaccines for prophylaxis of RSV and EBV. The glycoprotein gene was inserted at the 1st or the 3rd position of the measles virus genome and the recombinant viruses were generated. Insertion of the foreign gene at the 3rd position had a minimal impact on viral replication in vitro. RSV F or EBV gp350 protein was secreted from infected cells. In cotton rats, EZ-RSV F and EZ-EBV gp350 induced MV- and insert-specific antibody responses. In addition, both vaccines also induced insert specific interferon gamma (IFN-γ) secreting T cell response. EZ-RSV F protected cotton rats from pulmonary replication of RSV A2 challenge infection. In rhesus macaques, although both EZ-RSV F and EZ-EBV gp350 induced MV specific neutralizing antibody responses, only RSV F specific antibody response was detected. Thus, the immunogenicity of the foreign antigens delivered by measles vaccine virus is dependent on the nature of the insert and the animal models used for vaccine evaluation. PMID:22383906

  3. Human keratinocytes restrict chikungunya virus replication at a post-fusion step

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Eric; Simmons, Graham; Chazal, Nathalie; and others

    2015-02-15

    Transmission of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) to humans is initiated by puncture of the skin by a blood-feeding Aedes mosquito. Despite the growing knowledge accumulated on CHIKV, the interplay between skin cells and CHIKV following inoculation still remains unclear. In this study we questioned the behavior of human keratinocytes, the predominant cell population in the skin, following viral challenge. We report that CHIKV rapidly elicits an innate immune response in these cells leading to the enhanced transcription of type I/II and type III interferon genes. Concomitantly, we show that despite viral particles internalization into Rab5-positive endosomes and efficient fusion of virus and cell membranes, keratinocytes poorly replicate CHIKV as attested by absence of nonstructural proteins and genomic RNA synthesis. Accordingly, human keratinocytes behave as an antiviral defense against CHIKV infection rather than as a primary targets for initial replication. This picture significantly differs from that reported for Dengue and West Nile mosquito-borne viruses. - Highlights: • Human keratinocytes support endocytosis of CHIKV and fusion of viral membranes. • CHIKV replication is blocked at a post entry step in these cells. • Infection upregulates type-I, –II and –III IFN genes expression. • Keratinocytes behave as immune sentinels against CHIKV.

  4. Induction of Cell-Cell Fusion by Ebola Virus Glycoprotein: Low pH Is Not a Trigger

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi-Min; Melikyan, Gregory B.; Liu, Shan-Lu; Cohen, Fredric S.

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is a highly pathogenic filovirus that causes hemorrhagic fever in humans and animals. Currently, how EBOV fuses its envelope membrane within an endosomal membrane to cause infection is poorly understood. We successfully measure cell-cell fusion mediated by the EBOV fusion protein, GP, assayed by the transfer of both cytoplasmic and membrane dyes. A small molecule fusion inhibitor, a neutralizing antibody, as well as mutations in EBOV GP known to reduce viral infection, all greatly reduce fusion. By monitoring redistribution of small aqueous dyes between cells and by electrical capacitance measurements, we discovered that EBOV GP-mediated fusion pores do not readily enlarge—a marked difference from the behavior of other viral fusion proteins. EBOV GP must be cleaved by late endosome-resident cathepsins B or L in order to become fusion-competent. Cleavage of cell surface-expressed GP appears to occur in endosomes, as evidenced by the fusion block imposed by cathepsin inhibitors, agents that raise endosomal pH, or an inhibitor of anterograde trafficking. Treating effector cells with a recombinant soluble cathepsin B or thermolysin, which cleaves GP into an active form, increases the extent of fusion, suggesting that a fraction of surface-expressed GP is not cleaved. Whereas the rate of fusion is increased by a brief exposure to acidic pH, fusion does occur at neutral pH. Importantly, the extent of fusion is independent of external pH in experiments in which cathepsin activity is blocked and EBOV GP is cleaved by thermolysin. These results imply that low pH promotes fusion through the well-known pH-dependent activity of cathepsins; fusion induced by cleaved EBOV GP is a process that is fundamentally independent of pH. The cell-cell fusion system has revealed some previously unappreciated features of EBOV entry, which could not be readily elucidated in the context of endosomal entry. PMID:26730950

  5. Induction of Cell-Cell Fusion by Ebola Virus Glycoprotein: Low pH Is Not a Trigger.

    PubMed

    Markosyan, Ruben M; Miao, Chunhui; Zheng, Yi-Min; Melikyan, Gregory B; Liu, Shan-Lu; Cohen, Fredric S

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is a highly pathogenic filovirus that causes hemorrhagic fever in humans and animals. Currently, how EBOV fuses its envelope membrane within an endosomal membrane to cause infection is poorly understood. We successfully measure cell-cell fusion mediated by the EBOV fusion protein, GP, assayed by the transfer of both cytoplasmic and membrane dyes. A small molecule fusion inhibitor, a neutralizing antibody, as well as mutations in EBOV GP known to reduce viral infection, all greatly reduce fusion. By monitoring redistribution of small aqueous dyes between cells and by electrical capacitance measurements, we discovered that EBOV GP-mediated fusion pores do not readily enlarge-a marked difference from the behavior of other viral fusion proteins. EBOV GP must be cleaved by late endosome-resident cathepsins B or L in order to become fusion-competent. Cleavage of cell surface-expressed GP appears to occur in endosomes, as evidenced by the fusion block imposed by cathepsin inhibitors, agents that raise endosomal pH, or an inhibitor of anterograde trafficking. Treating effector cells with a recombinant soluble cathepsin B or thermolysin, which cleaves GP into an active form, increases the extent of fusion, suggesting that a fraction of surface-expressed GP is not cleaved. Whereas the rate of fusion is increased by a brief exposure to acidic pH, fusion does occur at neutral pH. Importantly, the extent of fusion is independent of external pH in experiments in which cathepsin activity is blocked and EBOV GP is cleaved by thermolysin. These results imply that low pH promotes fusion through the well-known pH-dependent activity of cathepsins; fusion induced by cleaved EBOV GP is a process that is fundamentally independent of pH. The cell-cell fusion system has revealed some previously unappreciated features of EBOV entry, which could not be readily elucidated in the context of endosomal entry.

  6. Difference in Bgp-independent fusion activity among mouse hepatitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, F; Matsuyama, S; Saeki, K

    1999-01-01

    Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) utilizes a mouse biliary glycoprotein (Bgp) as a receptor. Co-cultivation of MHV-nonpermissive hamster BHK cells devoid of mouse Bgp with mouse DBT cells infected with MHV-A59 or JHMV induces syncytia formation on BHK cells (Bgp-independent fusion). This study shows the difference in Bgp-independent fusion activity among various MHV strains. Under a phase contrast microscopy, JHMV (cl-2, sp-4) induced the Bgp-independent syncytia on BHK cells similar to those observed on DBT cells, while such syncytia were not seen with the infection of other MHV strains (MHV-1, MHV-3, MHV-A59, MHV-S, srr7, srr11 and srr18). Tiny syncytia detectable only by immunofluorescence were produced with the latter MHV strains except for srr7 which failed to produce syncytia. MHVs except for srr7 grew in BHK cells after Bgp-independent infection. The Bgp-independent fusion by JHMV was inhibited either by anti-S1 or anti-S2 antibodies. These results showed that the JHMV spike protein had a remarkably high Bgp-independent fusion activity.

  7. Canine Distemper Virus Fusion Activation: Critical Role of Residue E123 of CD150/SLAM

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Mojtaba; Bringolf, Fanny; Röthlisberger, Silvan; Bieringer, Maria; Schneider-Schaulies, Jürgen; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Origgi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Measles virus (MeV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) possess tetrameric attachment proteins (H) and trimeric fusion proteins, which cooperate with either SLAM or nectin 4 receptors to trigger membrane fusion for cell entry. While the MeV H-SLAM cocrystal structure revealed the binding interface, two distinct oligomeric H assemblies were also determined. In one of the conformations, two SLAM units were sandwiched between two discrete H head domains, thus spotlighting two binding interfaces (“front” and “back”). Here, we investigated the functional relevance of both interfaces in activating the CDV membrane fusion machinery. While alanine-scanning mutagenesis identified five critical regulatory residues in the front H-binding site of SLAM, the replacement of a conserved glutamate residue (E at position 123, replaced with A [E123A]) led to the most pronounced impact on fusion promotion. Intriguingly, while determination of the interaction of H with the receptor using soluble constructs revealed reduced binding for the identified SLAM mutants, no effect was recorded when physical interaction was investigated with the full-length counterparts of both molecules. Conversely, although mutagenesis of three strategically selected residues within the back H-binding site of SLAM did not substantially affect fusion triggering, nevertheless, the mutants weakened the H-SLAM interaction recorded with the membrane-anchored protein constructs. Collectively, our findings support a mode of binding between the attachment protein and the V domain of SLAM that is common to all morbilliviruses and suggest a major role of the SLAM residue E123, located at the front H-binding site, in triggering the fusion machinery. However, our data additionally support the hypothesis that other microdomain(s) of both glycoproteins (including the back H-binding site) might be required to achieve fully productive H-SLAM interactions. IMPORTANCE A complete understanding of the measles virus

  8. A bispecific antibody effectively neutralizes all four serotypes of dengue virus by simultaneous blocking virus attachment and fusion.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xin; Deng, Yongqiang; Wang, Huajing; Ji, Guanghui; Tan, Wenlong; Jiang, Tao; Li, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Hui; Xia, Tian; Meng, Yanchun; Wang, Chao; Yu, Xiaojie; Yang, Yang; Li, Bohua; Qin, E-De; Dai, Jianxin; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Guo, Yajun

    2016-01-01

    Although dengue virus (DENV) infection severely threatens the health of humans, no specific antiviral drugs are currently approved for clinical use against DENV infection. Attachment and fusion are 2 critical steps for the flavivirus infection, and the corresponding functional epitopes are located at E protein domain III (E-DIII) and domain II (E-DII), respectively. Here, we constructed a bispecific antibody (DVD-1A1D-2A10) based on the 2 well-characterized anti-DENV monoclonal antibodies 1A1D-2 (1A1D) and 2A10G6 (2A10). The 1A1D antibody binds E-DIII and can block the virus attaching to the cell surface, while the 2A10 antibody binds E-DII and is able to prevent the virus from fusing with the endosomal membrane. Our data showed that DVD-1A1D-2A10 retained the antigen-binding activity of both parental antibodies. Importantly, it was demonstrated to be significantly more effective at neutralizing DENV than its parental antibodies both in vitro and in vivo, even better than the combination of them. To eliminate the potential antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) effect, this bispecific antibody was successfully engineered to prevent Fc-γ-R interaction. Overall, we generated a bispecific anti-DENV antibody targeting both attachment and fusion stages, and this bispecific antibody broadly neutralized all 4 serotypes of DENV without risk of ADE, suggesting that it has great potential as a novel antiviral strategy against DENV. PMID:26905804

  9. Viral fusion efficacy of specific H3N2 influenza virus reassortant combinations at single-particle level

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hung-Lun; Millet, Jean K.; Costello, Deirdre A.; Whittaker, Gary R.; Daniel, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Virus pseudotyping is a useful and safe technique for studying entry of emerging strains of influenza virus. However, few studies have compared different reassortant combinations in pseudoparticle systems, or compared entry kinetics of native viruses and their pseudotyped analogs. Here, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based pseudovirions displaying distinct influenza virus envelope proteins were tested for fusion activity. We produced VSV pseudotypes containing the prototypical X-31 (H3) HA, either alone or with strain-matched or mismatched N2 NAs. We performed single-particle fusion assays using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to compare hemifusion kinetics among these pairings. Results illustrate that matching pseudoparticles behaved very similarly to native virus. Pseudoparticles harboring mismatched HA-NA pairings fuse at significantly slower rates than native virus, and NA-lacking pseudoparticles exhibiting the slowest fusion rates. Relative viral membrane HA density of matching pseudoparticles was higher than in mismatching or NA-lacking pseudoparticles. An equivalent trend of HA expression level on cell membranes of HA/NA co-transfected cells was observed and intracellular trafficking of HA was affected by NA co-expression. Overall, we show that specific influenza HA-NA combinations can profoundly affect the critical role played by HA during entry, which may factor into viral fitness and the emergence of new pandemic influenza viruses. PMID:27752100

  10. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the bovine respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein mRNA and expression from a recombinant vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Lerch, R A; Anderson, K; Amann, V L; Wertz, G W

    1991-03-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial (BRS) virus is an important cause of serious respiratory illness in calves. The disease caused in calves is similar to that caused by human respiratory syncytial (HRS) virus in children. The two viruses, however, have distinct host ranges and the attachment glycoproteins, G, have no antigenic cross-reactivity. The fusion glycoproteins, F, of the HRS and BRS viruses, however, have some antigenic cross-reactivity. To further compare the BRS virus and HRS virus fusion proteins, we determined the nucleotide sequence of cDNA clones to the BRS virus F protein mRNA, deduced the amino acid sequence, and compared these sequences with the HRS virus F protein sequences. The BRS virus F mRNA was 1899 nucleotides in length and had a single major open reading frame which could code for a polypeptide of 574 amino acids with an estimated molecular weight of 63.8 kDa. Structural features predicted from the amino acid sequence included an NH2-terminal signal sequence (residues 1-26), a site for proteolytic cleavage (residues 131-136) to generate the disulfide-linked F1 and F2 subunits, and a hydrophobic transmembrane anchor sequence (residues 522-549). The nucleic acid identity between the BRS virus and the HRS virus F mRNA sequences was 71.5%. The predicted BRS virus F protein shared 80.5% overall amino acid identity with the HRS virus F protein with 89% identity in the F1 polypeptide but only 68% identity in the F2 polypeptide. The position and number of the cysteine residues in the F1 and F2 polypeptides were conserved among all F proteins. However, BRS virus F protein had only three potential N-linked carbohydrate acceptor sites in comparison to four or five for the HRS viruses. A difference in the extent of glycosylation between the BRS and HRS virus F2 polypeptides was shown to be responsible for differences observed in the electrophoretic mobility of these proteins. A cDNA containing the complete open reading frame of the BRS virus F mRNA was

  11. A 45,000-M(r) glycoprotein in the Sendai virus envelope triggers virus-cell fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M; Hassan, M Q; Tyagi, S K; Sarkar, D P

    1997-01-01

    Sendai virus envelopes devoid of hemagglutinin-neuraminidase but containing the fusion protein (F-virosomes) were prepared. F-virosomes exhibited discernible serine protease activity at neutral pH. Electrophoretic analysis of the protein profile of the F-virosomes under nonreducing conditions, by both sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing, led to the identification of a previously unknown glycoprotein with a relative molecular weight of 45,000 (45K protein) associated with the F protein. The identity of the 45K protein, as distinct from F protein, was established by Western blot analysis with F- and 45K-specific antibodies. This 45K protein forms a nexus with the F protein through noncovalent hydrophobic interactions, as proved by its sensitivity to urea treatment, and it is essential for the proteolytic activity of the F-virosomes as well as for the fusion of the viral envelope with host cell membrane. N-terminal sequence analysis (first 11 amino acids) of this protein showed strong homology (> 90%) to flavivirus NS3 serine proteases but no similarity to any of the Sendai viral proteins. On the basis of the N-terminal sequence, oligonucleotides were designed corresponding to the sense and antisense DNA sequences. Dot blot hybridization and primer extension with these oligonucleotides with the viral and the host genome confirmed the host origin of this protein. Further, the limited proteolytic digestion of the target membrane resulted in significant inhibition of viral fusion with it. On the basis of these results, we postulate a model for the molecular mechanism of F protein-induced membrane fusion, which may provide a rationale for other paramyxoviruses. PMID:9261357

  12. Capturing Spontaneous Membrane Insertion of the Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Fusion Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Baylon, Javier L.; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2016-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) is a protein located on the surface of the influenza virus that mediates viral fusion to the host cellular membrane. During the fusion process the HA fusion peptide (HAfp), formed by the first 23 N-terminal residues of HA and structurally characterized by two alpha helices (Helix A and Helix B) tightly packed in a hairpin-like arrangement, is the only part of the virus in direct contact with the host membrane. After encountering the host cell HAfp is believed to insert into the membrane, thereby initiating the fusion of the viral and host membranes. Detailed characterization of the interactions between the HAfp and cellular membrane is therefore of high relevance to the mechanism of viral entry into the host cell. Employing HMMM membrane representation with enhanced lipid mobility, we have performed a large set of independent simulations of unbiased membrane binding of HAfp. We have been able to capture spontaneous binding and insertion of HAfp consistently in nearly all the simulations. A reproducible membrane-bound configuration emerges from these simulations, despite employing a diverse set of initial configurations. Extension of several of the simulations into full membrane systems confirms the stability of the membrane-bound form obtained from HMMM binding simulations. The resulting model allows for the characterization of important interactions between the peptide and the membrane, and the details of the binding process of the peptide for the first time. Upon membrane binding, Helix A inserts much deeper into the membrane than Helix B, suggesting that the former is responsible for hydrophobic anchoring of the peptide into the membrane. Helix B, in contrast, is found to establish major amphipathic interactions at the interfacial region thereby contributing to binding strength of HAfp. PMID:25996559

  13. Structural Characterization of an Early Fusion Intermediate of Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Rui; Wilson, Ian A.

    2011-12-07

    The hemagglutinin (HA) envelope protein of influenza virus mediates viral entry through membrane fusion in the acidic environment of the endosome. Crystal structures of HA in pre- and postfusion states have laid the foundation for proposals for a general fusion mechanism for viral envelope proteins. The large-scale conformational rearrangement of HA at low pH is triggered by a loop-to-helix transition of an interhelical loop (B loop) within the fusion domain and is often referred to as the 'spring-loaded' mechanism. Although the receptor-binding HA1 subunit is believed to act as a 'clamp' to keep the B loop in its metastable prefusion state at neutral pH, the 'pH sensors' that are responsible for the clamp release and the ensuing structural transitions have remained elusive. Here we identify a mutation in the HA2 fusion domain from the influenza virus H2 subtype that stabilizes the HA trimer in a prefusion-like state at and below fusogenic pH. Crystal structures of this putative early intermediate state reveal reorganization of ionic interactions at the HA1-HA2 interface at acidic pH and deformation of the HA1 membrane-distal domain. Along with neutralization of glutamate residues on the B loop, these changes cause a rotation of the B loop and solvent exposure of conserved phenylalanines, which are key residues at the trimer interface of the postfusion structure. Thus, our study reveals the possible initial structural event that leads to release of the B loop from its prefusion conformation, which is aided by unexpected structural changes within the membrane-distal HA1 domain at low pH.

  14. Respiratory syncytial virus fusion inhibitors. Part 4: optimization for oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kuo-Long; Sin, Ny; Civiello, Rita L; Wang, X Alan; Combrink, Keith D; Gulgeze, H Belgin; Venables, Brian L; Wright, J J Kim; Dalterio, Richard A; Zadjura, Lisa; Marino, Anthony; Dando, Sandra; D'Arienzo, Celia; Kadow, Kathleen F; Cianci, Christopher W; Li, Zhufang; Clarke, Junius; Genovesi, Eugene V; Medina, Ivette; Lamb, Lucinda; Colonno, Richard J; Yang, Zheng; Krystal, Mark; Meanwell, Nicholas A

    2007-02-15

    A series of benzimidazole-based inhibitors of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion were optimized for antiviral potency, membrane permeability and metabolic stability in human liver microsomes. 1-Cyclopropyl-1,3-dihydro-3-[[1-(4-hydroxybutyl)-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl]methyl]-2H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridin-2-one (6m, BMS-433771) was identified as a potent RSV inhibitor demonstrating good bioavailability in the mouse, rat, dog and cynomolgus monkey that demonstrated antiviral activity in the BALB/c and cotton rat models of infection following oral administration.

  15. Interaction between the Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase and Fusion Glycoproteins of Human Parainfluenza Virus Type III Regulates Viral Growth In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Palmer, Samantha G.; Porotto, Matteo; Palermo, Laura M.; Niewiesk, Stefan; Wilson, Ian A.; Moscona, Anne

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramyxoviruses, enveloped RNA viruses that include human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3), cause the majority of childhood viral pneumonia. HPIV3 infection starts when the viral receptor-binding protein engages sialic acid receptors in the lung and the viral envelope fuses with the target cell membrane. Fusion/entry requires interaction between two viral surface glycoproteins: tetrameric hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion protein (F). In this report, we define structural correlates of the HN features that permit infection in vivo. We have shown that viruses with an HN-F that promotes growth in cultured immortalized cells are impaired in differentiated human airway epithelial cell cultures (HAE) and in vivo and evolve in HAE into viable viruses with less fusogenic HN-F. In this report, we identify specific structural features of the HN dimer interface that modulate HN-F interaction and fusion triggering and directly impact infection. Crystal structures of HN, which promotes viral growth in vivo, show a diminished interface in the HN dimer compared to the reference strain’s HN, consistent with biochemical and biological data indicating decreased dimerization and decreased interaction with F protein. The crystallographic data suggest a structural explanation for the HN’s altered ability to activate F and reveal properties that are critical for infection in vivo. IMPORTANCE Human parainfluenza viruses cause the majority of childhood cases of croup, bronchiolitis, and pneumonia worldwide. Enveloped viruses must fuse their membranes with the target cell membranes in order to initiate infection. Parainfluenza fusion proceeds via a multistep reaction orchestrated by the two glycoproteins that make up its fusion machine. In vivo, viruses adapt for survival by evolving to acquire a set of fusion machinery features that provide key clues about requirements for infection in human beings. Infection of the lung by parainfluenzavirus is determined by

  16. Structural characterizations of fusion peptide analogs of influenza virus hemagglutinin. Implication of the necessity of a helix-hinge-helix motif in fusion activity.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chun-Hua; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Chang, Ding-Kwo; Chen, Chinpan

    2002-06-21

    Infection by enveloped viruses initially involves membrane fusion between viral and host cell membranes. The fusion peptide plays a crucial role in triggering this reaction. To clarify how the fusion peptide exerts this specific function, we carried out biophysical studies of three fusion peptide analogs of influenza virus hemagglutinin HA2, namely E5, G13L, and L17A. E5 exhibits an activity similar to the native fusion peptide, whereas G13L and L17A, which are two point mutants of the E5 analog, possess much less fusion activity. Our CD data showed that the conformations of these three analogs in SDS micelles are pH-dependent, with higher alpha-helical contents at acidic pH. Tryptophan fluorescence emission experiments indicated that these three analogs insert deeper into lipid bilayers at acidic pH. The three-dimensional structure of the E5 analog in SDS micelles at pH 4.0 revealed that two segments, Leu(2)-Glu(11) and Trp(14)-Ile(18), form amphipathic helical conformations, with Gly(12)-Gly(13) forming a hinge. The hydrophobic residues in the N- and C-terminal helices form a hydrophobic cluster. At neutral pH, however, the C-terminal helix of Trp(14)-Ile(18) reduces dramatically, and the hydrophobic core observed at acidic pH is severely disrupted. We suggest that the disruption of the C-terminal helix renders the E5 analog fusion-inactive at neutral pH. Furthermore, the decrease of the hinge and the reduction of fusion activity in G13L reveal the importance of the hinge in fusion activity. Also, the decrease in the C-terminal helix and the reduction of fusion activity in L17A demonstrates the importance of the C-terminal helix in fusion activity. Based on these biophysical studies, we propose a model that illustrates the structural change of the HA2 fusion peptide analog and explains how the analog interacts with the lipid bilayer at different pH values.

  17. Prevention of Measles Virus Infection by Intranasal Delivery of Fusion Inhibitor Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, C.; Huey, D.; Jurgens, E.; Welsch, J. C.; DeVito, I.; Talekar, A.; Horvat, B.; Niewiesk, S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Measles virus (MV) infection is undergoing resurgence and remains one of the leading causes of death among young children worldwide despite the availability of an effective measles vaccine. MV infects its target cells by coordinated action of the MV H and the fusion (F) envelope glycoprotein; upon receptor engagement by H, the prefusion F undergoes a structural transition, extending and inserting into the target cell membrane and then refolding into a postfusion structure that fuses the viral and cell membranes. By interfering with this structural transition of F, peptides derived from the heptad-repeat (HR) regions of F can potently inhibit MV infection at the entry stage. We show here that specific features of H's interaction with its receptors modulate the susceptibility of MV F to peptide fusion inhibitors. A higher concentration of inhibitory peptides is required to inhibit F-mediated fusion when H is engaged to its nectin-4 receptor than when H is engaged to its CD150 receptor. Peptide inhibition of F may be subverted by continued engagement of receptor by H, a finding that highlights the ongoing role of H-receptor interaction after F has been activated and that helps guide the design of more potent inhibitory peptides. Intranasal administration of these peptides results in peptide accumulation in the airway epithelium with minimal systemic levels of peptide and efficiently prevents MV infection in vivo in animal models. The results suggest an antiviral strategy for prophylaxis in vulnerable and/or immunocompromised hosts. IMPORTANCE Measles virus (MV) infection causes an acute illness that may be associated with infection of the central nervous system (CNS) and severe neurological disease. No specific treatment is available. We have shown that parenterally delivered fusion-inhibitory peptides protect mice from lethal CNS MV disease. Here we show, using established small-animal models of MV infection, that fusion-inhibitory peptides delivered

  18. A Mechanistic Paradigm for Broad-Spectrum Antivirals that Target Virus-Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hollmann, Axel; Tanner, Lukas B.; Akyol Ataman, Zeynep; Yun, Tatyana; Shui, Guanghou; Aguilar, Hector C.; Zhang, Dong; Meriwether, David; Roman-Sosa, Gleyder; Robinson, Lindsey R.; Juelich, Terry L.; Buczkowski, Hubert; Chou, Sunwen; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.; Wolf, Mike C.; Smith, Jennifer K.; Banyard, Ashley; Kielian, Margaret; Reddy, Srinivasa; Wenk, Markus R.; Selke, Matthias; Santos, Nuno C.; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Jung, Michael E.; Lee, Benhur

    2013-01-01

    LJ001 is a lipophilic thiazolidine derivative that inhibits the entry of numerous enveloped viruses at non-cytotoxic concentrations (IC50≤0.5 µM), and was posited to exploit the physiological difference between static viral membranes and biogenic cellular membranes. We now report on the molecular mechanism that results in LJ001's specific inhibition of virus-cell fusion. The antiviral activity of LJ001 was light-dependent, required the presence of molecular oxygen, and was reversed by singlet oxygen (1O2) quenchers, qualifying LJ001 as a type II photosensitizer. Unsaturated phospholipids were the main target modified by LJ001-generated 1O2. Hydroxylated fatty acid species were detected in model and viral membranes treated with LJ001, but not its inactive molecular analog, LJ025. 1O2-mediated allylic hydroxylation of unsaturated phospholipids leads to a trans-isomerization of the double bond and concurrent formation of a hydroxyl group in the middle of the hydrophobic lipid bilayer. LJ001-induced 1O2-mediated lipid oxidation negatively impacts on the biophysical properties of viral membranes (membrane curvature and fluidity) critical for productive virus-cell membrane fusion. LJ001 did not mediate any apparent damage on biogenic cellular membranes, likely due to multiple endogenous cytoprotection mechanisms against phospholipid hydroperoxides. Based on our understanding of LJ001's mechanism of action, we designed a new class of membrane-intercalating photosensitizers to overcome LJ001's limitations for use as an in vivo antiviral agent. Structure activity relationship (SAR) studies led to a novel class of compounds (oxazolidine-2,4-dithiones) with (1) 100-fold improved in vitro potency (IC50<10 nM), (2) red-shifted absorption spectra (for better tissue penetration), (3) increased quantum yield (efficiency of 1O2 generation), and (4) 10–100-fold improved bioavailability. Candidate compounds in our new series moderately but significantly (p≤0.01) delayed the

  19. A mature and fusogenic form of the Nipah virus fusion protein requires proteolytic processing by cathepsin L

    SciTech Connect

    Pager, Cara Theresia; Craft, Willie Warren; Patch, Jared; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis . E-mail: rdutc2@uky.edu

    2006-03-15

    The Nipah virus fusion (F) protein is proteolytically processed to F{sub 1} + F{sub 2} subunits. We demonstrate here that cathepsin L is involved in this important maturation event. Cathepsin inhibitors ablated cleavage of Nipah F. Proteolytic processing of Nipah F and fusion activity was dramatically reduced in cathepsin L shRNA-expressing Vero cells. Additionally, Nipah virus F-mediated fusion was inhibited in cathepsin L-deficient cells, but coexpression of cathepsin L restored fusion activity. Both purified cathepsin L and B could cleave immunopurified Nipah F protein, but only cathepsin L produced products of the correct size. Our results suggest that endosomal cathepsins can cleave Nipah F, but that cathepsin L specifically converts Nipah F to a mature and fusogenic form.

  20. Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  1. Structure of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Glycoprotein in the Postfusion Conformation Reveals Preservation of Neutralizing Epitopes

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Jason S.; Yang, Yongping; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2011-09-16

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) invades host cells via a type I fusion (F) glycoprotein that undergoes dramatic structural rearrangements during the fusion process. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, such as 101F, palivizumab, and motavizumab, target two major antigenic sites on the RSV F glycoprotein. The structures of these sites as peptide complexes with motavizumab and 101F have been previously determined, but a structure for the trimeric RSV F glycoprotein ectodomain has remained elusive. To address this issue, we undertook structural and biophysical studies on stable ectodomain constructs. Here, we present the 2.8-{angstrom} crystal structure of the trimeric RSV F ectodomain in its postfusion conformation. The structure revealed that the 101F and motavizumab epitopes are present in the postfusion state and that their conformations are similar to those observed in the antibody-bound peptide structures. Both antibodies bound the postfusion F glycoprotein with high affinity in surface plasmon resonance experiments. Modeling of the antibodies bound to the F glycoprotein predicts that the 101F epitope is larger than the linear peptide and restricted to a single protomer in the trimer, whereas motavizumab likely contacts residues on two protomers, indicating a quaternary epitope. Mechanistically, these results suggest that 101F and motavizumab can bind to multiple conformations of the fusion glycoprotein and can neutralize late in the entry process. The structural preservation of neutralizing epitopes in the postfusion state suggests that this conformation can elicit neutralizing antibodies and serve as a useful vaccine antigen.

  2. Susceptibility to virus-cell fusion at the plasma membrane is reduced through expression of HIV gp41 cytoplasmic domains.

    PubMed

    Malinowsky, Katharina; Luksza, Julia; Dittmar, Matthias T

    2008-06-20

    The cytoplasmic tail of the HIV transmembrane protein plays an important role in viral infection. In this study we analyzed the role of retroviral cytoplasmic tails in modulating the cytoskeleton and interfering with virus-cell fusion. HeLaP4 cells expressing different HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs showed reduced acetylated tubulin levels whereas the cytoplasmic tail of MLV did not alter microtubule stability indicating a unique function for the lentiviral cytoplasmic tail. The effect on tubulin is mediated through the membrane proximal region of the HIV cytoplasmic tail and was independent of membrane localization. Site-directed mutagenesis identified three motifs in the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail required to effect the reduction in acetylated tubulin. Both the YxxPhi domain and amino acids 21 to 45 of the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail need to be present to change the level of acetylated tubulin in transfected cells. T-cells stably expressing one HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail derived construct showed also a reduction in acetylated tubulin thus confirming the importance of this effect not only for HeLaP4 and 293T cells. Challenge experiments using transiently transfected HeLaP4 cells and T cells stably expressing an HIV cytoplasmic tail construct revealed both reduced virus-cell fusion and replication of HIV-1(NL4.3) compared to control cells. In the virus-cell fusion assay only virions pseudotyped with either HIV or MLV envelopes showed reduced fusion efficiency, whereas VSV-G pseudotyped virions where not affected by the expression of HIV derived cytoplasmic tail constructs, indicating that fusion at the plasma but not endosomal membrane is affected. Overexpression of human histone-deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) and constitutively active RhoA resulted in a reduction of acetylated tubulin and reduced virus-cell fusion as significant as that observed following expression of HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs. Inhibition of HDAC6 showed a strong increase in acetylated tubulin and increase of

  3. Susceptibility to virus-cell fusion at the plasma membrane is reduced through expression of HIV gp41 cytoplasmic domains

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowsky, Katharina; Luksza, Julia; Dittmar, Matthias T.

    2008-06-20

    The cytoplasmic tail of the HIV transmembrane protein plays an important role in viral infection. In this study we analyzed the role of retroviral cytoplasmic tails in modulating the cytoskeleton and interfering with virus-cell fusion. HeLaP4 cells expressing different HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs showed reduced acetylated tubulin levels whereas the cytoplasmic tail of MLV did not alter microtubule stability indicating a unique function for the lentiviral cytoplasmic tail. The effect on tubulin is mediated through the membrane proximal region of the HIV cytoplasmic tail and was independent of membrane localization. Site-directed mutagenesis identified three motifs in the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail required to effect the reduction in acetylated tubulin. Both the Yxx{phi} domain and amino acids 21 to 45 of the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail need to be present to change the level of acetylated tubulin in transfected cells. T-cells stably expressing one HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail derived construct showed also a reduction in acetylated tubulin thus confirming the importance of this effect not only for HeLaP4 and 293T cells. Challenge experiments using transiently transfected HeLaP4 cells and T cells stably expressing an HIV cytoplasmic tail construct revealed both reduced virus-cell fusion and replication of HIV-1{sub NL4.3} compared to control cells. In the virus-cell fusion assay only virions pseudotyped with either HIV or MLV envelopes showed reduced fusion efficiency, whereas VSV-G pseudotyped virions where not affected by the expression of HIV derived cytoplasmic tail constructs, indicating that fusion at the plasma but not endosomal membrane is affected. Overexpression of human histone-deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) and constitutively active RhoA resulted in a reduction of acetylated tubulin and reduced virus-cell fusion as significant as that observed following expression of HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs. Inhibition of HDAC6 showed a strong increase in acetylated tubulin and

  4. A Cysteine Zipper Stabilizes a Pre-Fusion F Glycoprotein Vaccine for Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    PubMed

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B E; Thomas, Paul V; Chen, Man; Druz, Aliaksandr; Joyce, M Gordon; Kong, Wing-Pui; Sastry, Mallika; Soto, Cinque; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Chen, Lei; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Georgiev, Ivelin S; McLellan, Jason S; Srivatsan, Sanjay; Zhou, Tongqing; Baxa, Ulrich; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Kwong, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines should contain minimal non-pathogen motifs to reduce potential off-target reactivity. We recently developed a vaccine antigen against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which comprised the fusion (F) glycoprotein stabilized in its pre-fusion trimeric conformation by "DS-Cav1" mutations and by an appended C-terminal trimerization motif or "foldon" from T4-bacteriophage fibritin. Here we investigate the creation of a cysteine zipper to allow for the removal of the phage foldon, while maintaining the immunogenicity of the parent DS-Cav1+foldon antigen. Constructs without foldon yielded RSV F monomers, and enzymatic removal of the phage foldon from pre-fusion F trimers resulted in their dissociation into monomers. Because the native C terminus of the pre-fusion RSV F ectodomain encompasses a viral trimeric coiled-coil, we explored whether introduction of cysteine residues capable of forming inter-protomer disulfides might allow for stable trimers. Structural modeling indicated the introduced cysteines to form disulfide "rings", with each ring comprising a different set of inward facing residues of the coiled-coil. Three sets of rings could be placed within the native RSV F coiled-coil, and additional rings could be added by duplicating portions of the coiled-coil. High levels of neutralizing activity in mice, equivalent to that of the parent DS-Cav1+foldon antigen, were elicited by a 4-ring stabilized RSV F trimer with no foldon. Structure-based alteration of a viral coiled-coil to create a cysteine zipper thus allows a phage trimerization motif to be removed from a candidate vaccine antigen. PMID:26098893

  5. A Cysteine Zipper Stabilizes a Pre-Fusion F Glycoprotein Vaccine for Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    PubMed

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B E; Thomas, Paul V; Chen, Man; Druz, Aliaksandr; Joyce, M Gordon; Kong, Wing-Pui; Sastry, Mallika; Soto, Cinque; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Chen, Lei; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Georgiev, Ivelin S; McLellan, Jason S; Srivatsan, Sanjay; Zhou, Tongqing; Baxa, Ulrich; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Kwong, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines should contain minimal non-pathogen motifs to reduce potential off-target reactivity. We recently developed a vaccine antigen against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which comprised the fusion (F) glycoprotein stabilized in its pre-fusion trimeric conformation by "DS-Cav1" mutations and by an appended C-terminal trimerization motif or "foldon" from T4-bacteriophage fibritin. Here we investigate the creation of a cysteine zipper to allow for the removal of the phage foldon, while maintaining the immunogenicity of the parent DS-Cav1+foldon antigen. Constructs without foldon yielded RSV F monomers, and enzymatic removal of the phage foldon from pre-fusion F trimers resulted in their dissociation into monomers. Because the native C terminus of the pre-fusion RSV F ectodomain encompasses a viral trimeric coiled-coil, we explored whether introduction of cysteine residues capable of forming inter-protomer disulfides might allow for stable trimers. Structural modeling indicated the introduced cysteines to form disulfide "rings", with each ring comprising a different set of inward facing residues of the coiled-coil. Three sets of rings could be placed within the native RSV F coiled-coil, and additional rings could be added by duplicating portions of the coiled-coil. High levels of neutralizing activity in mice, equivalent to that of the parent DS-Cav1+foldon antigen, were elicited by a 4-ring stabilized RSV F trimer with no foldon. Structure-based alteration of a viral coiled-coil to create a cysteine zipper thus allows a phage trimerization motif to be removed from a candidate vaccine antigen.

  6. A Cysteine Zipper Stabilizes a Pre-Fusion F Glycoprotein Vaccine for Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B. E.; Thomas, Paul V.; Chen, Lei; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; McLellan, Jason S.; Srivatsan, Sanjay; Zhou, Tongqing; Baxa, Ulrich; Mascola, John R.; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines should contain minimal non-pathogen motifs to reduce potential off-target reactivity. We recently developed a vaccine antigen against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which comprised the fusion (F) glycoprotein stabilized in its pre-fusion trimeric conformation by “DS-Cav1” mutations and by an appended C-terminal trimerization motif or “foldon” from T4-bacteriophage fibritin. Here we investigate the creation of a cysteine zipper to allow for the removal of the phage foldon, while maintaining the immunogenicity of the parent DS-Cav1+foldon antigen. Constructs without foldon yielded RSV F monomers, and enzymatic removal of the phage foldon from pre-fusion F trimers resulted in their dissociation into monomers. Because the native C terminus of the pre-fusion RSV F ectodomain encompasses a viral trimeric coiled-coil, we explored whether introduction of cysteine residues capable of forming inter-protomer disulfides might allow for stable trimers. Structural modeling indicated the introduced cysteines to form disulfide “rings”, with each ring comprising a different set of inward facing residues of the coiled-coil. Three sets of rings could be placed within the native RSV F coiled-coil, and additional rings could be added by duplicating portions of the coiled-coil. High levels of neutralizing activity in mice, equivalent to that of the parent DS-Cav1+foldon antigen, were elicited by a 4-ring stabilized RSV F trimer with no foldon. Structure-based alteration of a viral coiled-coil to create a cysteine zipper thus allows a phage trimerization motif to be removed from a candidate vaccine antigen. PMID:26098893

  7. Mutational analysis of the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G for membrane fusion domains.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Drone, C; Sat, E; Ghosh, H P

    1993-07-01

    The spike glycoprotein G of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) induces membrane fusion at low pH. We used linker insertion mutagenesis to characterize the domain(s) of G glycoprotein involved in low-pH-induced membrane fusion. Two or three amino acids were inserted in frame into various positions in the extracellular domain of G, and 14 mutants were isolated. All of the mutants expressed fully glycosylated proteins in COS cells. However, only seven mutant G glycoproteins were transported to the cell surface. Two of these mutants, D1 and A6, showed wild-type fusogenic properties. The mutant A2 had a temperature-sensitive defect in the transport of the mutant G glycoprotein to the cell surface. The other four mutants, H2, H5, H10, and A4, although present in cell surface, failed to induce cell fusion when cells expressing these mutant glycoproteins were exposed to acidic pH. These four mutant G proteins could form trimers, indicating that the defect in fusion was not due to defective oligomerization. One of these mutations, H2, is within a region of conserved, uncharged amino acids that has been proposed as a possible fusogenic sequence. The mutation in H5 was about 70 amino acids downstream of the mutation in H2, while mutations in H10 and A4 were about 300 amino acids downstream of the mutation in H2. Conserved sequences were also noted in the H10 and A4 segment. The results suggest that in the case of VSV G glycoprotein, the fusogenic activity may involve several spatially separated regions in the extracellular domain of the protein.

  8. Relating influenza virus membrane fusion kinetics to stoichiometry of neutralizing antibodies at the single-particle level.

    PubMed

    Otterstrom, Jason J; Brandenburg, Boerries; Koldijk, Martin H; Juraszek, Jarek; Tang, Chan; Mashaghi, Samaneh; Kwaks, Ted; Goudsmit, Jaap; Vogels, Ronald; Friesen, Robert H E; van Oijen, Antoine M

    2014-12-01

    The ability of antibodies binding the influenza hemagglutinin (HA) protein to neutralize viral infectivity is of key importance in the design of next-generation vaccines and for prophylactic and therapeutic use. The two antibodies CR6261 and CR8020 have recently been shown to efficiently neutralize influenza A infection by binding to and inhibiting the influenza A HA protein that is responsible for membrane fusion in the early steps of viral infection. Here, we use single-particle fluorescence microscopy to correlate the number of antibodies or antibody fragments (Fab) bound to an individual virion with the capacity of the same virus particle to undergo membrane fusion. To this end, individual, infectious virus particles bound by fluorescently labeled antibodies/Fab are visualized as they fuse to a planar, supported lipid bilayer. The fluorescence intensity arising from the virus-bound antibodies/Fab is used to determine the number of molecules attached to viral HA while a fluorescent marker in the viral membrane is used to simultaneously obtain kinetic information on the fusion process. We experimentally determine that the stoichiometry required for fusion inhibition by both antibody and Fab leaves large numbers of unbound HA epitopes on the viral surface. Kinetic measurements of the fusion process reveal that those few particles capable of fusion at high antibody/Fab coverage display significantly slower hemifusion kinetics. Overall, our results support a membrane fusion mechanism requiring the stochastic, coordinated action of multiple HA trimers and a model of fusion inhibition by stem-binding antibodies through disruption of this coordinated action.

  9. Automated segmentation of the thyroid gland on thoracic CT scans by multiatlas label fusion and random forest classification.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Divya; Liu, Jiamin; Kim, Lauren; Chang, Kevin W; Lu, Le; Yao, Jianhua; Turkbey, Evrim B; Summers, Ronald M

    2015-10-01

    The thyroid is an endocrine gland that regulates metabolism. Thyroid image analysis plays an important role in both diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology treatment planning. Low tissue contrast of the thyroid relative to surrounding anatomic structures makes manual segmentation of this organ challenging. This work proposes a fully automated system for thyroid segmentation on CT imaging. Following initial thyroid segmentation with multiatlas joint label fusion, a random forest (RF) algorithm was applied. Multiatlas label fusion transfers labels from labeled atlases and warps them to target images using deformable registration. A consensus atlas solution was formed based on optimal weighting of atlases and similarity to a given target image. Following the initial segmentation, a trained RF classifier employed voxel scanning to assign class-conditional probabilities to the voxels in the target image. Thyroid voxels were categorized with positive labels and nonthyroid voxels were categorized with negative labels. Our method was evaluated on CT scans from 66 patients, 6 of which served as atlases for multiatlas label fusion. The system with independent multiatlas label fusion method and RF classifier achieved average dice similarity coefficients of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively. The system with sequential multiatlas label fusion followed by RF correction increased the dice similarity coefficient to [Formula: see text] and improved the segmentation accuracy.

  10. Association of the pr Peptides with Dengue Virus at Acidic pH Blocks Membrane Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, I.-M.; Holdaway, H.A.; Chipman, P.R.; Kuhn, R.J.; Rossmann, M.G.; Chen, J.; Purdue

    2010-07-27

    Flavivirus assembles into an inert particle that requires proteolytic activation by furin to enable transmission to other hosts. We previously showed that immature virus undergoes a conformational change at low pH that renders it accessible to furin (I. M. Yu, W. Zhang, H. A. Holdaway, L. Li, V. A. Kostyuchenko, P. R. Chipman, R. J. Kuhn, M. G. Rossmann, and J. Chen, Science 319:1834-1837, 2008). Here we show, using cryoelectron microscopy, that the structure of immature dengue virus at pH 6.0 is essentially the same before and after the cleavage of prM. The structure shows that after cleavage, the proteolytic product pr remains associated with the virion at acidic pH, and that furin cleavage by itself does not induce any major conformational changes. We also show by liposome cofloatation experiments that pr retention prevents membrane insertion, suggesting that pr is present on the virion in the trans-Golgi network to protect the progeny virus from fusion within the host cell.

  11. Mutation analysis of the fusion domain region of St. Louis encephalitis virus envelope protein

    SciTech Connect

    Trainor, Nicole B.; Crill, Wayne D. . E-mail: wcrill@cdc.gov; Roberson, Jill A.; Chang, Gwong-Jen J.

    2007-04-10

    The immune response to flavivirus infections produces both species-specific and flavivirus cross-reactive antibodies. The presence of cross-reactive antibodies complicates serodiagnosis of flavivirus infections, especially secondary infections caused by a heterologous virus. A successful public health response to the growing global threat posed by flaviviruses necessitates the development of virus-specific diagnostic antigens. The flavivirus envelope (E) glycoprotein is the principle antigen stimulating protective immunity during infection. Using recombinant St. Louis encephalitis virus-like particles (VLPs), we have identified amino acid residues involved in flavivirus cross-reactive epitope determinants. Most significant among the residues studied are three highly conserved amino acids in the fusion peptide: Gly104, Gly106, and Leu107. Substitutions of these residues dramatically influenced VLP secretion and cross-reactive monoclonal antibody reactivity. These results provide critical insight into the antigenic structure of the flaviviral E protein and toward development of species-specific diagnostic antigens that should improve both flavivirus diagnosis and estimates of disease burden.

  12. A virus causes cancer by inducing massive chromosomal instability through cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Duelli, Dominik M; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M; Berman, David; Murphy, Kathleen M; Ried, Thomas; Lazebnik, Yuri

    2007-03-01

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) underlies malignant properties of many solid cancers and their ability to escape therapy, and it might itself cause cancer [1, 2]. CIN is sustained by deficiencies in proteins, such as the tumor suppressor p53 [3-5], that police genome integrity, but the primary cause of CIN in sporadic cancers remains uncertain [6, 7]. The primary suspects are mutations that deregulate telomere maintenance, or mitosis, yet such mutations have not been identified in the majority of sporadic cancers [6]. Alternatively, CIN could be caused by a transient event that destabilizes the genome without permanently affecting mechanisms of mitosis or proliferation [5, 8]. Here, we show that an otherwise harmless virus rapidly causes massive chromosomal instability by fusing cells whose cell cycle is deregulated by oncogenes. This synergy between fusion and oncogenes "randomizes" normal diploid human fibroblasts so extensively that each analyzed cell has a unique karyotype, and some produce aggressive, highly aneuploid, heterogeneous, and transplantable epithelial cancers in mice. Because many viruses are fusogenic, this study suggests that viruses, including those that have not been linked to carcinogenesis, can cause chromosomal instability and, consequently, cancer by fusing cells. PMID:17320392

  13. Integrin αvβ1 Modulation Affects Subtype B Avian Metapneumovirus Fusion Protein-mediated Cell-Cell Fusion and Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Yun, Bing-Ling; Guan, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Qi, Xiao-Le; Cui, Hong-Yu; Liu, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Gao, Hong-Lei; Gao, Li; Li, Kai; Gao, Yu-Long; Wang, Xiao-Mei

    2016-07-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) fusion (F) protein mediates virus-cell membrane fusion to initiate viral infection, which requires F protein binding to its receptor(s) on the host cell surface. However, the receptor(s) for aMPV F protein is still not identified. All known subtype B aMPV (aMPV/B) F proteins contain a conserved Arg-Asp-Asp (RDD) motif, suggesting that the aMPV/B F protein may mediate membrane fusion via the binding of RDD to integrin. When blocked with integrin-specific peptides, aMPV/B F protein fusogenicity and viral replication were significantly reduced. Specifically we identified integrin αv and/or β1-mediated F protein fusogenicity and viral replication using antibody blocking, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) knockdown, and overexpression. Additionally, overexpression of integrin αv and β1 in aMPV/B non-permissive cells conferred aMPV/B F protein binding and aMPV/B infection. When RDD was altered to RAE (Arg-Ala-Glu), aMPV/B F protein binding and fusogenic activity were profoundly impaired. These results suggest that integrin αvβ1 is a functional receptor for aMPV/B F protein-mediated membrane fusion and virus infection, which will provide new insights on the fusogenic mechanism and pathogenesis of aMPV. PMID:27226547

  14. Construct design, biophysical, and biochemical characterization of the fusion core from mouse hepatitis virus (a coronavirus) spike protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanhui; Cole, David K; Lou, Zhiyong; Liu, Yiwei; Qin, Lan; Li, Xu; Bai, Zhihong; Yuan, Fang; Rao, Zihe; Gao, George F

    2004-11-01

    Membrane fusion between virus and host cells is the key step for enveloped virus entry and is mediated by the viral envelope fusion protein. In murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), the spike (S) protein mediates this process. Recently, the formation of anti-parallel 6-helix bundle of the MHV S protein heptad repeat (HR) regions (HR1 and HR2) has been confirmed, implying coronavirus has a class I fusion protein. This bundle is also called fusion core. To facilitate the solution of the crystal structure of this fusion core, we deployed an Escherichia coli in vitro expression system to express the HR1 and HR2 regions linked together by a flexible linker as a single chain (named 2-helix). This 2-helix polypeptide subsequently assembled into a typical 6-helix bundle. This bundle has been analyzed by a series of biophysical and biochemical techniques and confirmed that the design technique can be used for coronavirus as we successfully used for members of paramyxoviruses.

  15. Design and analysis of post-fusion 6-helix bundle of heptad repeat regions from Newcastle disease virus F protein.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jieqing; Li, Pengyun; Wu, Tinghe; Gao, Feng; Ding, Yi; Zhang, Catherine W-H; Rao, Zihe; Gao, George F; Tien, Po

    2003-05-01

    Fusion of paramyxovirus to the cell involves receptor binding of the HN glycoprotein and a number of conformational changes of F glycoprotein. The F protein is expressed as a homotrimer on the virus surface. In the present model, there are at least three conformations of F protein, i.e. native form, pre-hairpin intermediate and the post-fusion state. In the post-fusion state, the two highly conserved heptad repeat (HR) regions of F protein form a stable 6-helix coiled-coil bundle. However, no crystal structure is known for this state for the Newcastle disease virus, although the crystal structure of the F protein native form has been solved recently. Here we deployed an Escherichia coli in vitro expression system to engineer this 6-helix bundle by fusion of either the two HR regions (HR1, linker and HR2) or linking the 6-helix [3 x (HR1, linker and HR2)] together as a single chain. Subsequently, both of them form a stable 6-helix bundle in vitro judging by gel filtration and chemical cross-linking and the proteins show salient features of an alpha-helix structure. Crystals diffracting X-rays have been obtained from both protein preparations and the structure determination is under way. This method could be used for crystallization of the post-fusion state HR structures of other viruses.

  16. Is the optimal pH for membrane fusion in host cells by avian influenza viruses related to host range and pathogenicity?

    PubMed

    Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Motohashi, Yurie; Hiono, Takahiro; Tamura, Tomokazu; Nagaya, Kazuki; Matsuno, Keita; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Kida, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Influenza viruses isolated from wild ducks do not replicate in chickens. This fact is not explained solely by the receptor specificity of the hemagglutinin (HA) from such viruses for target host cells. To investigate this restriction in host range, the fusion activities of HA molecules from duck and chicken influenza viruses were examined. Influenza viruses A/duck/Mongolia/54/2001 (H5N2) (Dk/MNG) and A/chicken/Ibaraki/1/2005 (H5N2) (Ck/IBR), which replicate only in their primary hosts, were used. The optimal pH for membrane fusion of Ck/IBR was 5.9, higher than that of Dk/MNG at 4.9. To assess the relationship between the optimal pH for fusion and the host range of avian influenza viruses, the optimal pH for fusion of 55 influenza virus strains isolated from ducks and chickens was examined. No correlation was found between the host range and optimal pH for membrane fusion by the viruses, and this finding applied also to the H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. The optimal pH for membrane fusion for avian influenza viruses was shown to not necessarily be correlated with their host range or pathogenicity in ducks and chickens. PMID:27231009

  17. Reprogramming of somatic cells induced by fusion of embryonic stem cells using hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E)

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Xiao-shan; Fujishiro, Masako; Toyoda, Masashi; Akaike, Toshihiro; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2010-04-16

    In this research, hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) was used to reprogram somatic cells by fusion with mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Neomycin-resistant mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) were used as somatic cells. Nanog-overexpressing puromycin-resistant EB3 cells were used as mouse ES cells. These two cells were fused by exposing to HVJ-E and the generated fusion cells were selected by puromycin and G418 to get the stable fusion cell line. The fusion cells form colonies in feeder-free culture system. Microsatellite analysis of the fusion cells showed that they possessed genes from both ES cells and fibroblasts. The fusion cells were tetraploid, had alkali phosphatase activity, and expressed stem cell marker genes such as Pou5f1, Nanog, and Sox2, but not the fibroblast cell marker genes such as Col1a1 and Col1a2. The pluripotency of fusion cells was confirmed by their expression of marker genes for all the three germ layers after differentiation induction, and by their ability to form teratoma which contained all the three primary layers. Our results show that HVJ-E can be used as a fusion reagent for reprogramming of somatic cells.

  18. Identification of a Potent and Broad-Spectrum Hepatitis C Virus Fusion Inhibitory Peptide from the E2 Stem Domain

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Xiaojing; Niu, Yuqiang; Cheng, Min; Liu, Xiuying; Feng, Yetong; Zheng, Fuxiang; Fan, Jingjing; Li, Xiang; Jin, Qi; Zhong, Jin; Li, Yi-Ping; Yang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope proteins E1 and E2 play an essential role in virus entry. However, the fusion mechanisms of HCV remain largely unclear, hampering the development of efficient fusion inhibitors. Here, we developed two cell-based membrane fusion models that allow for screening a peptide library covering the full-length E1 and E2 amino acid sequences. A peptide from the E2 stem domain, named E27, was found to possess the ability to block E1E2-mediated cell-cell fusion and inhibit cell entry of HCV pseudoparticles and infection of cell culture-derived HCV at nanomolar concentrations. E27 demonstrated broad-spectrum inhibition of the major genotypes 1 to 6. A time-of-addition experiment revealed that E27 predominantly functions in the late steps during HCV entry, without influencing the expression and localization of HCV co-receptors. Moreover, we demonstrated that E27 interfered with hetero-dimerization of ectopically expressed E1E2 in cells, and mutational analysis suggested that E27 might target a conserved region in E1. Taken together, our findings provide a novel candidate as well as a strategy for developing potent and broad-spectrum HCV fusion inhibitors, which may complement the current direct-acting antiviral medications for chronic hepatitis C, and shed light on the mechanism of HCV membrane fusion. PMID:27121372

  19. Structure of a Major Antigenic Site on the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Glycoprotein in Complex with Neutralizing Antibody 101F

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Man; Chang, Jung-San; Yang, Yongping; Kim, Albert; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-11-19

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of pneumonia and bronchiolitis in infants and elderly people. Currently there is no effective vaccine against RSV, but passive prophylaxis with neutralizing antibodies reduces hospitalizations. To investigate the mechanism of antibody-mediated RSV neutralization, we undertook structure-function studies of monoclonal antibody 101F, which binds a linear epitope in the RSV fusion glycoprotein. Crystal structures of the 101F antigen-binding fragment in complex with peptides from the fusion glycoprotein defined both the extent of the linear epitope and the interactions of residues that are mutated in antibody escape variants. The structure allowed for modeling of 101F in complex with trimers of the fusion glycoprotein, and the resulting models suggested that 101F may contact additional surfaces located outside the linear epitope. This hypothesis was supported by surface plasmon resonance experiments that demonstrated 101F bound the peptide epitope {approx}16,000-fold more weakly than the fusion glycoprotein. The modeling also showed no substantial clashes between 101F and the fusion glycoprotein in either the pre- or postfusion state, and cell-based assays indicated that 101F neutralization was not associated with blocking virus attachment. Collectively, these results provide a structural basis for RSV neutralization by antibodies that target a major antigenic site on the fusion glycoprotein.

  20. China Forest Aboveground Biomass Estimation by Fusion of Inventory and Remote Sensing Data: 1st results from Heilongjiang Province and Yunnan Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Y.; Li, Z.; Huang, G.; Sun, G.; Cheng, Z.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, G.

    2013-12-01

    Forests play an irreplaceable role in maintaining regional ecological environment, global carbon balance and mitigating global climate change. Forest aboveground biomass (AGB) is an important indicator of forest carbon stocks. Estimating forest aboveground biomass accurately could significantly reduce the uncertainties in terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycle. LIDAR provides accurate information on the vertical structure of forests (Lefsky et al., 2007; Naesset et al., 2004; Pang et al., 2008). Combining airborne LiDAR and spaceborne LiDAR for regional forest biomass retrieval could provide a more reliable and accurate quantitative information in regional forest biomass estimate (Boudreau et al., 2008; Nelson et al., 2009; Pang et al., 2011; Saatchi et al., 2011). The Heilongjiang Province and Yunnan Province are rich in forest resources and suffers intensive forest management activities for timber products. The Heilongjiang Province is typical in temperate forest and the Yunnan Province contains multiple forest types including tropical forest. These two provinces also have good ground inventory system with thousands of permanent field plots. Two campaign consists of in-situ measurement, airborne Lidar data and spaceborne data fusion were designed and implemented. First results show that i). Both spaceborne lidar and forest inventory data are useful for AGB mapping at province level. ii). The combination of spaceborne lidar and forest inventory data gave better biomass estimation with less bias. iii). A pixel level bias mapping was also proposed and gave spatial explicit map of estimation uncertainties. This method will be investigated further with more reference data and tested in other area.

  1. Amelioration of established Sendai viral pneumonia in the nude mouse using a monoclonal antibody to the virus fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Carthew, P.; Riley, J.; Dinsdale, D.

    1989-01-01

    The pathological effect of parainfluenza type I (Sendai virus) is known to be a bronchopneumonia, which becomes a chronic pneumonia in the immunodeficient athymic (nude) mouse. The severity of this established chronic pneumonia can be dramatically altered by providing the nude mouse with humoral monoclonal antibodies which are neutralizing, and are directed against the fusion protein, of the virus. The alveolitis, which is a significant part of the pathology, is suppressed due to a reduction (greater than 90%) in the number of virus-infected alveolar macrophages present in the alveoli. This clearly identifies the infected alveolar macrophage as the primary effector cell in the pathogenesis of alveolitis caused by parainfluenza virus type I. The implications of using virus-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, which have little immunomodulatory toxicity, in the treatment of viral pneumonias are discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2557882

  2. Structure-Based Design of a Fusion Glycoprotein Vaccine for Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Man; Joyce, M. Gordon; Sastry, Mallika; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B. E.; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Chen, Lei; Srivatsan, Sanjay; Zheng, Anqi; Zhou, Tongqing; Graepel, Kevin W.; Kumar, Azad; Moin, Syed; Boyington, Jeffrey C.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Soto, Cinque; Baxa, Ulrich; Bakker, Arjen Q.; Spits, Hergen; Beaumont, Tim; Zheng, Zizheng; Xia, Ningshao; Ko, Sung-Youl; Todd, John-Paul; Rao, Srinivas; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of hospitalization for children under five years of age. We sought to engineer a viral antigen that provides greater protection than currently available vaccines and focused on antigenic site Ø, a metastable site specific to the prefusion state of the RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein, as this site is targeted by extremely potent RSV-neutralizing antibodies. Structure-based design yielded stabilized versions of RSV F that maintained antigenic site Ø when exposed to extremes of pH, osmolality, and temperature. Six RSV F-crystal structures provided atomic-level data on how introduced cysteine residues and filled hydrophobic cavities improved stability. Immunization with site Ø-stabilized variants of RSV F in mice and macaques elicited levels of RSV-specific neutralizing activity many times the protective threshold. PMID:24179220

  3. Identification of canine helper T-cell epitopes from the fusion protein of canine distemper virus

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Souravi; Walker, John; Jackson, David C

    2001-01-01

    The fusion protein of canine distemper virus (CDV-F), a 662 amino-acid envelope protein, was used as the target molecule for identification of canine T helper (Th) epitopes. A library of 94 peptides, each 17 residues in length overlapping by 10 residues and covering the entire sequence of CDV-F, was screened using a lymphocyte proliferation assay with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained from dogs inoculated with canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccine. Initially we observed low and inconsistent proliferation of PBMC in response to these peptides, even when using cells obtained from dogs that had received multiple doses of CDV. Subsequently, the use of expanded cell populations derived by in vitro stimulation of canine PBMC with pools of peptides allowed the identification of a number of putative canine Th-epitopes within the protein sequence of CDV-F. There were two major clusters of Th-epitopes identified close to the cleavage site of the F0 fusion protein, while some others were scattered in both the F1 and F2 fragments of the protein. Some of these peptides, in particular peptide 35 (p35), were stimulatory in dogs of different breeds and ages. The identification of such promiscuous canine Th-epitopes encouraged us to assemble p35 in tandem with luteinising hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) a 10 amino-acid residue synthetic peptide representing a B-cell epitope which alone induces no antibody in dogs. The totally synthetic immunogen was able to induce the production of very high titres of antibodies against LHRH in all dogs tested. These results indicate that p35 could be an ideal candidate for use as a Th-epitope for use in outbred dogs. PMID:11576221

  4. Adhesion and fusion efficiencies of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) surface proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M.; Rabi, S. Alireza; Nedellec, Rebecca; Daniels, Brian R.; Mullins, James I.; Mosier, Donald E.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Wirtz, Denis

    2013-10-01

    In about half of patients infected with HIV-1 subtype B, viral populations shift from utilizing the transmembrane protein CCR5 to CXCR4, as well as or instead of CCR5, during late stage progression of the disease. How the relative adhesion efficiency and fusion competency of the viral Env proteins relate to infection during this transition is not well understood. Using a virus-cell fusion assay and live-cell single-molecule force spectroscopy, we compare the entry competency of viral clones to tensile strengths of the individual Env-receptor bonds of Env proteins obtained from a HIV-1 infected patient prior to and during coreceptor switching. The results suggest that the genetic determinants of viral entry were predominantly enriched in the C3, HR1 and CD regions rather than V3. Env proteins can better mediate entry into cells after coreceptor switch; this effective entry capacity does not correlate with the bond strengths between viral Env and cellular receptors.

  5. Inhibitory effects of a peptide-fusion protein (Latarcin-PAP1-Thanatin) against chikungunya virus.

    PubMed

    Rothan, Hussin A; Bahrani, Hirbod; Shankar, Esaki M; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd; Yusof, Rohana

    2014-08-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) outbreaks have led to a serious economic burden, as the available treatment strategies can only alleviate disease symptoms, and no effective therapeutics or vaccines are currently available for human use. Here, we report the use of a new cost-effective approach involving production of a recombinant antiviral peptide-fusion protein that is scalable for the treatment of CHIKV infection. A peptide-fusion recombinant protein LATA-PAP1-THAN that was generated by joining Latarcin (LATA) peptide with the N-terminus of the PAP1 antiviral protein, and the Thanatin (THAN) peptide to the C-terminus, was produced in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies. The antiviral LATA-PAP1-THAN protein showed 89.0% reduction of viral plaque formation compared with PAP1 (46.0%), LATA (67.0%) or THAN (79.3%) peptides alone. The LATA-PAP1-THAN protein reduced the viral RNA load that was 0.89-fold compared with the untreated control cells. We also showed that PAP1 resulted in 0.44-fold reduction, and THAN and LATA resulting in 0.78-fold and 0.73-fold reductions, respectively. The LATA-PAP1-THAN protein inhibited CHIKV replication in the Vero cells at an EC50 of 11.2μg/ml, which is approximately half of the EC50 of PAP1 (23.7μg/ml) and protected the CHIKV-infected mice at the dose of 0.75mg/ml. We concluded that production of antiviral peptide-fusion protein in E. coli as inclusion bodies could accentuate antiviral activities, enhance cellular internalisation, and could reduce product toxicity to host cells and is scalable to epidemic response quantities.

  6. Fusion between perinuclear virions and the outer nuclear membrane requires the fusogenic activity of herpes simplex virus gB.

    PubMed

    Wright, Catherine C; Wisner, Todd W; Hannah, Brian P; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H; Johnson, David C

    2009-11-01

    Herpesviruses cross nuclear membranes (NMs) in two steps, as follows: (i) capsids assemble and bud through the inner NM into the perinuclear space, producing enveloped virus particles, and (ii) the envelopes of these virus particles fuse with the outer NM. Two herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoproteins, gB and gH (the latter, likely complexed as a heterodimer with gL), are necessary for the second step of this process. Mutants lacking both gB and gH accumulate in the perinuclear space or in herniations (membrane vesicles derived from the inner NM). Both gB and gH/gL are also known to act directly in fusing the virion envelope with host cell membranes during HSV entry into cells, i.e., both glycoproteins appear to function directly in different aspects of the membrane fusion process. We hypothesized that HSV gB and gH/gL also act directly in the membrane fusion that occurs during virus egress from the nucleus. Previous studies of the role of gB and gH/gL in nuclear egress involved HSV gB and gH null mutants that could potentially also possess gross defects in the virion envelope. Here, we produced recombinant HSV-expressing mutant forms of gB with single amino acid substitutions in the hydrophobic "fusion loops." These fusion loops are thought to play a direct role in membrane fusion by insertion into cellular membranes. HSV recombinants expressing gB with any one of four fusion loop mutations (W174R, W174Y, Y179K, and A261D) were unable to enter cells. Moreover, two of the mutants, W174Y and Y179K, displayed reduced abilities to mediate HSV cell-to-cell spread, and W174R and A261D exhibited no spread. All mutant viruses exhibited defects in nuclear egress, enveloped virions accumulated in herniations and in the perinuclear space, and fewer enveloped virions were detected on cell surfaces. These results support the hypothesis that gB functions directly to mediate the fusion between perinuclear virus particles and the outer NM.

  7. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of Semliki forest virus replicon-based DNA vaccines encoding goatpox virus structural proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Min; Jin Ningyi; Liu Qi; Huo Xiaowei; Li Yang; Hu Bo; Ma Haili; Zhu Zhanbo; Cong Yanzhao; Li Xiao; Jin Minglan; Zhu Guangze

    2009-08-15

    Goatpox, caused by goatpox virus (GTPV), is an acute feverish and contagious disease in goats often associated with high morbidity and high mortality. To resolve potential safety risks and vaccination side effects of existing live attenuated goatpox vaccine (AV41), two Semliki forest virus (SFV) replicon-based bicistronic expression DNA vaccines (pCSm-AAL and pCSm-BAA) which encode GTPV structural proteins corresponding to the Vaccinia virus proteins A27, L1, A33, and B5, respectively, were constructed. Then, theirs ability to induce humoral and cellular response in mice and goats, and protect goats against virulent virus challenge were evaluated. The results showed that, vaccination with pCSm-AAL and pCSm-BAA in combination could elicit strong humoral and cellular responses in mice and goats, provide partial protection against viral challenge in goats, and reduce disease symptoms. Additionally, priming vaccination with the above-mentioned DNA vaccines could significantly reduce the goats' side reactions from boosting vaccinations with current live vaccine (AV41), which include skin lesions at the inoculation site and fevers. Data obtained in this study could not only facilitate improvement of the current goatpox vaccination strategy, but also provide valuable guidance to suitable candidates for evaluation and development of orthopoxvirus vaccines.

  8. Automated segmentation of thyroid gland on CT images with multi-atlas label fusion and random classification forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiamin; Chang, Kevin; Kim, Lauren; Turkbey, Evrim; Lu, Le; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald

    2015-03-01

    The thyroid gland plays an important role in clinical practice, especially for radiation therapy treatment planning. For patients with head and neck cancer, radiation therapy requires a precise delineation of the thyroid gland to be spared on the pre-treatment planning CT images to avoid thyroid dysfunction. In the current clinical workflow, the thyroid gland is normally manually delineated by radiologists or radiation oncologists, which is time consuming and error prone. Therefore, a system for automated segmentation of the thyroid is desirable. However, automated segmentation of the thyroid is challenging because the thyroid is inhomogeneous and surrounded by structures that have similar intensities. In this work, the thyroid gland segmentation is initially estimated by multi-atlas label fusion algorithm. The segmentation is refined by supervised statistical learning based voxel labeling with a random forest algorithm. Multiatlas label fusion (MALF) transfers expert-labeled thyroids from atlases to a target image using deformable registration. Errors produced by label transfer are reduced by label fusion that combines the results produced by all atlases into a consensus solution. Then, random forest (RF) employs an ensemble of decision trees that are trained on labeled thyroids to recognize features. The trained forest classifier is then applied to the thyroid estimated from the MALF by voxel scanning to assign the class-conditional probability. Voxels from the expert-labeled thyroids in CT volumes are treated as positive classes; background non-thyroid voxels as negatives. We applied this automated thyroid segmentation system to CT scans of 20 patients. The results showed that the MALF achieved an overall 0.75 Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) and the RF classification further improved the DSC to 0.81.

  9. Unraveling a Three-Step Spatiotemporal Mechanism of Triggering of Receptor-Induced Nipah Virus Fusion and Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Stone, Jacquelyn A.; Bradel-Tretheway, Birgit; Dabundo, Jeffrey; Benavides Montano, Javier A.; Santos-Montanez, Jennifer; Biering, Scott B.; Nicola, Anthony V.; Iorio, Ronald M.; Lu, Xiaonan; Aguilar, Hector C.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane fusion is essential for entry of the biomedically-important paramyxoviruses into their host cells (viral-cell fusion), and for syncytia formation (cell-cell fusion), often induced by paramyxoviral infections [e.g. those of the deadly Nipah virus (NiV)]. For most paramyxoviruses, membrane fusion requires two viral glycoproteins. Upon receptor binding, the attachment glycoprotein (HN/H/G) triggers the fusion glycoprotein (F) to undergo conformational changes that merge viral and/or cell membranes. However, a significant knowledge gap remains on how HN/H/G couples cell receptor binding to F-triggering. Via interdisciplinary approaches we report the first comprehensive mechanism of NiV membrane fusion triggering, involving three spatiotemporally sequential cell receptor-induced conformational steps in NiV-G: two in the head and one in the stalk. Interestingly, a headless NiV-G mutant was able to trigger NiV-F, and the two head conformational steps were required for the exposure of the stalk domain. Moreover, the headless NiV-G prematurely triggered NiV-F on virions, indicating that the NiV-G head prevents premature triggering of NiV-F on virions by concealing a F-triggering stalk domain until the correct time and place: receptor-binding. Based on these and recent paramyxovirus findings, we present a comprehensive and fundamentally conserved mechanistic model of paramyxovirus membrane fusion triggering and cell entry. PMID:24278018

  10. African Swine Fever Virus Undergoes Outer Envelope Disruption, Capsid Disassembly and Inner Envelope Fusion before Core Release from Multivesicular Endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Hernáez, Bruno; Guerra, Milagros; Salas, María L.

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a nucleocytoplasmic large DNA virus (NCLDV) that causes a highly lethal disease in domestic pigs. As other NCLDVs, the extracellular form of ASFV possesses a multilayered structure consisting of a genome-containing nucleoid successively wrapped by a thick protein core shell, an inner lipid membrane, an icosahedral protein capsid and an outer lipid envelope. This structural complexity suggests an intricate mechanism of internalization in order to deliver the virus genome into the cytoplasm. By using flow cytometry in combination with pharmacological entry inhibitors, as well as fluorescence and electron microscopy approaches, we have dissected the entry and uncoating pathway used by ASFV to infect the macrophage, its natural host cell. We found that purified extracellular ASFV is internalized by both constitutive macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Once inside the cell, ASFV particles move from early endosomes or macropinosomes to late, multivesicular endosomes where they become uncoated. Virus uncoating requires acidic pH and involves the disruption of the outer membrane as well as of the protein capsid. As a consequence, the inner viral membrane becomes exposed and fuses with the limiting endosomal membrane to release the viral core into the cytosol. Interestingly, virus fusion is dependent on virus protein pE248R, a transmembrane polypeptide of the inner envelope that shares sequence similarity with some members of the poxviral entry/fusion complex. Collective evidence supports an entry model for ASFV that might also explain the uncoating of other multienveloped icosahedral NCLDVs. PMID:27110717

  11. Pre-fusion F is absent on the surface of formalin-inactivated respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    Killikelly, April M.; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Graham, Barney S.

    2016-01-01

    The lack of a licensed vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) can be partly attributed to regulatory hurdles resulting from vaccine enhanced respiratory disease (ERD) subsequent to natural RSV infection that was observed in clinical trials of formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) in antigen-naïve infants. To develop an effective vaccine that does not enhance RSV illness, it is important to understand how formalin and heat inactivation affected the antigenicity and immunogenicity of FI-RSV compared to native virus. Informed by atomic structures of RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein in prefusion (pre-F) and postfusion (post-F) conformations, we demonstrate that FI-RSV predominately presents post-F on the virion surface, whereas infectious RSV presents both pre-F and post-F conformations. This significant antigenic distinction has not been previously appreciated. Thus, a stabilized pre-F antigen is more representative of live RSV than F in its post-F conformation, as displayed on the surface of FI-RSV. This finding has major implications for discriminating current pre-F-based immunogens from FI-RSV used in historical vaccine trials. PMID:27682426

  12. Inhibition of Nipah Virus Infectin In Vivo: Targeting an Early Stage of Paramyxovirus Fusion Activation during Viral Entry

    SciTech Connect

    M Porotto; B Rockx; C Yokoyama; A Talekar; I DeVito; l Palermo; J Liu; R Cortese; M Lu; et al.

    2011-12-31

    In the paramyxovirus cell entry process, receptor binding triggers conformational changes in the fusion protein (F) leading to viral and cellular membrane fusion. Peptides derived from C-terminal heptad repeat (HRC) regions in F have been shown to inhibit fusion by preventing formation of the fusogenic six-helix bundle. We recently showed that the addition of a cholesterol group to HRC peptides active against Nipah virus targets these peptides to the membrane where fusion occurs, dramatically increasing their antiviral effect. In this work, we report that unlike the untagged HRC peptides, which bind to the postulated extended intermediate state bridging the viral and cell membranes, the cholesterol tagged HRC-derived peptides interact with F before the fusion peptide inserts into the target cell membrane, thus capturing an earlier stage in the F-activation process. Furthermore, we show that cholesterol tagging renders these peptides active in vivo: the cholesterol-tagged peptides cross the blood brain barrier, and effectively prevent and treat in an established animal model what would otherwise be fatal Nipah virus encephalitis. The in vivo efficacy of cholesterol-tagged peptides, and in particular their ability to penetrate the CNS, suggests that they are promising candidates for the prevention or therapy of infection by Nipah and other lethal paramyxoviruses.

  13. A Structurally Unresolved Head Segment of Defined Length Favors Proper Measles Virus Hemagglutinin Tetramerization and Efficient Membrane Fusion Triggering

    PubMed Central

    Navaratnarajah, Chanakha K.; Rosemarie, Quincy

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramyxoviruses include several insidious and ubiquitous pathogens of humans and animals, with measles virus (MeV) being a prominent one. The MeV membrane fusion apparatus consists of a receptor binding protein (hemagglutinin [H]) tetramer and a fusion (F) protein trimer. Four globular MeV H heads are connected to a tetrameric stalk through flexible linkers. We sought here to characterize the function of a 17-residue H-head segment proximal to the stalk that was unresolved in all five MeV H-head crystal or cocrystal structures. In particular, we assessed whether its primary sequence and length are critical for proper protein oligomerization and intracellular transport or for membrane fusion triggering. Extensive alanine substitutions had no effect on fusion triggering, suggesting that sequence identity is not critical for this function. Excessive shortening of this segment reduced or completely abrogated fusion trigger function, while length compensation restored it. We then characterized the mechanism of function loss. Mutated H proteins were efficiently transported to the cell surface, but certain alterations enhancing linker flexibility resulted in accumulation of high-molecular-weight H oligomers. Some oligomers had reduced fusion trigger capacity, while others retained this function. Thus, length and rigidity of the unresolved head segment favor proper H tetramerization and counteract interactions between subunits from different tetramers. The structurally unresolved H-head segment, together with the top of the stalk, may act as a leash to provide the right degree of freedom for the heads of individual tetramers to adopt a triggering-permissive conformation while avoiding improper contacts with heads of neighboring tetramers. IMPORTANCE Understanding the molecular mechanism of membrane fusion triggering may allow development of new antiviral strategies. The fusion apparatus of paramyxoviruses consists of a receptor binding tetramer and a fusion

  14. Protection of Mice from Fatal Measles Encephalitis by Vaccination with Vaccinia Virus Recombinants Encoding Either the Hemagglutinin or the Fusion Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drillien, Robert; Spehner, Daniele; Kirn, Andre; Giraudon, Pascale; Buckland, Robin; Wild, Fabian; Lecocq, Jean-Pierre

    1988-02-01

    Vaccinia virus recombinants encoding the hemagglutinin or fusion protein of measles virus have been constructed. Infection of cell cultures with the recombinants led to the synthesis of authentic measles proteins as judged by their electrophoretic mobility, recognition by antibodies, glycosylation, proteolytic cleavage, and presentation on the cell surface. Mice vaccinated with a single dose of the recombinant encoding the hemagglutinin protein developed antibodies capable of both inhibiting hemagglutination activity and neutralizing measles virus, whereas animals vaccinated with the recombinant encoding the fusion protein developed measles neutralizing antibodies. Mice vaccinated with either of the recombinants resisted a normally lethal intracerebral inoculation of a cell-associated measles virus subacute sclerosing panencephalitis strain.

  15. Intercellular delivery of a herpes simplex virus VP22 fusion protein from cells infected with lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Zhennan; Han, Ina; Zirzow, Gregory; Brady, Roscoe O.; Reiser, Jakob

    2000-01-01

    Effective gene therapy depends on the efficient transfer of therapeutic genes and their protein products to target cells. Lentiviral vectors appear promising for virus-mediated gene delivery and long-term expression in nondividing cells. The herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument protein VP22 has recently been shown to mediate intercellular transport of proteins, raising the possibility that it may be helpful in a setting where the global delivery of therapeutic proteins is desired. To investigate the effectiveness of lentiviral vectors to deliver genes encoding proteins fused to VP22, and to test whether the system is sufficiently potent to allow protein delivery from transduced cells in vitro and in vivo, fusion constructs of VP22 and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were prepared and delivered into target cells by using HIV-1-based lentiviral vectors. To follow the spread of VP22-EGFP to other cells, transduced COS-7 cells were coplated with a number of different cell types, including brain choroid plexus cells, human endothelial cells, H9 cells, and HeLa cells. We found that VP22-EGFP fusion proteins were transported from transduced cells to recipient cells and that such fusion proteins accumulated in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm of such cells. To determine the ability to deliver fusion proteins in vivo, we injected transduced H9 cells as well as the viral vector directly into the brain of mice. We present evidence that VP22-EGFP fusion proteins were transported effectively from lentivirus transduced cells in vivo. We also show that the VP22-EGFP fusion protein encoded by the lentivirus is transported between cells. Our data indicate that such fusion proteins are present in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm of neighboring cells. Therefore, lentiviral vectors may provide a potent biological system for delivering genes encoding therapeutic proteins fused to VP22. PMID:11027330

  16. Characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus gene products with antisera against bacterially synthesized fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Strebel, K.; Beck, E.; Strohmaier, K.; Schaller, H.

    1986-03-01

    Defined segments of the cloned foot-and-mouth disease virus genome corresponding to all parts of the coding region were expressed in Escherichia coli as fusions to the N-terminal part of the MS2-polymerase gene under the control of the inducible lambdaPL promoter. All constructs yielded large amounts of proteins, which were purified and used to raise sequence-specific antisera in rabbits. These antisera were used to identify the corresponding viral gene products in /sup 35/S-labeled extracts from foot-and-mouth disease virus-infected BHK cells. This allowed us to locate unequivocally all mature foot-and-mouth disease virus gene products in the nucleotide sequence, to identify precursor-product relationships, and to detect several foot-and mouth disease virus gene products not previously identified in vivo or in vitro.

  17. MEPPitope: spatial, electrostatic and secondary structure perturbations in the post-fusion Dengue virus envelope protein highlights known epitopes and conserved residues in the Zika virus

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The dramatic transformation of the Zika virus (ZIKV) from a relatively unknown virus to a pathogen generating global-wide panic has exposed the dearth of detailed knowledge about this virus. Decades of research in the related Dengue virus (DENV), finally culminating in a vaccine registered for use in endemic regions (CYD-TDV), provides key insights in developing strategies for tackling ZIKV. The previously established MEPP methodology compares two conformations of the same protein and identifies residues with significant spatial and electrostatic perturbations. In the current work, MEPP analyzed the pre-and post-fusion DENV type 2 envelope (E) protein, and identified several known epitopes (His317, Tyr299, Glu26, Arg188, etc.) (MEPPitope). These residues are overwhelmingly conserved in ZIKV and all DENV serotypes. Characterization of α-helices in E-proteins show that α1 is not conserved in the sequence space of ZIKV and DENV. Furthermore, perturbation of α1 in the post-fusion DENV structure includes a known epitope Asp215, a residue absent in the pre-fusion α1. A cationic β-sheet in the GAG-binding domain that is stereochemically equivalent in ZIKV and all DENV serotypes is also highlighted due to a residue pair (Arg286-Arg288) that has a significant electrostatic polarity reversal upon fusion. Finally, two highly conserved residues (Thr32 and Thr40), with little emphasis in existing literature, are found to have significant electrostatic perturbation. Thus, a combination of different computational methods enable the rapid and rational detection of critical residues that can be made the target of small drugs, or as epitopes in the search for an elusive therapy or vaccine that neutralizes multiple members of the Flaviviridae family. PMID:27540468

  18. MEPPitope: spatial, electrostatic and secondary structure perturbations in the post-fusion Dengue virus envelope protein highlights known epitopes and conserved residues in the Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The dramatic transformation of the Zika virus (ZIKV) from a relatively unknown virus to a pathogen generating global-wide panic has exposed the dearth of detailed knowledge about this virus. Decades of research in the related Dengue virus (DENV), finally culminating in a vaccine registered for use in endemic regions (CYD-TDV), provides key insights in developing strategies for tackling ZIKV. The previously established MEPP methodology compares two conformations of the same protein and identifies residues with significant spatial and electrostatic perturbations. In the current work, MEPP analyzed the pre-and post-fusion DENV type 2 envelope (E) protein, and identified several known epitopes (His317, Tyr299, Glu26, Arg188, etc.) (MEPPitope). These residues are overwhelmingly conserved in ZIKV and all DENV serotypes. Characterization of α-helices in E-proteins show that α1 is not conserved in the sequence space of ZIKV and DENV. Furthermore, perturbation of α1 in the post-fusion DENV structure includes a known epitope Asp215, a residue absent in the pre-fusion α1. A cationic β-sheet in the GAG-binding domain that is stereochemically equivalent in ZIKV and all DENV serotypes is also highlighted due to a residue pair (Arg286-Arg288) that has a significant electrostatic polarity reversal upon fusion. Finally, two highly conserved residues (Thr32 and Thr40), with little emphasis in existing literature, are found to have significant electrostatic perturbation. Thus, a combination of different computational methods enable the rapid and rational detection of critical residues that can be made the target of small drugs, or as epitopes in the search for an elusive therapy or vaccine that neutralizes multiple members of the Flaviviridae family. PMID:27540468

  19. MEPPitope: spatial, electrostatic and secondary structure perturbations in the post-fusion Dengue virus envelope protein highlights known epitopes and conserved residues in the Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The dramatic transformation of the Zika virus (ZIKV) from a relatively unknown virus to a pathogen generating global-wide panic has exposed the dearth of detailed knowledge about this virus. Decades of research in the related Dengue virus (DENV), finally culminating in a vaccine registered for use in endemic regions (CYD-TDV), provides key insights in developing strategies for tackling ZIKV. The previously established MEPP methodology compares two conformations of the same protein and identifies residues with significant spatial and electrostatic perturbations. In the current work, MEPP analyzed the pre-and post-fusion DENV type 2 envelope (E) protein, and identified several known epitopes (His317, Tyr299, Glu26, Arg188, etc.) (MEPPitope). These residues are overwhelmingly conserved in ZIKV and all DENV serotypes. Characterization of α-helices in E-proteins show that α1 is not conserved in the sequence space of ZIKV and DENV. Furthermore, perturbation of α1 in the post-fusion DENV structure includes a known epitope Asp215, a residue absent in the pre-fusion α1. A cationic β-sheet in the GAG-binding domain that is stereochemically equivalent in ZIKV and all DENV serotypes is also highlighted due to a residue pair (Arg286-Arg288) that has a significant electrostatic polarity reversal upon fusion. Finally, two highly conserved residues (Thr32 and Thr40), with little emphasis in existing literature, are found to have significant electrostatic perturbation. Thus, a combination of different computational methods enable the rapid and rational detection of critical residues that can be made the target of small drugs, or as epitopes in the search for an elusive therapy or vaccine that neutralizes multiple members of the Flaviviridae family.

  20. Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Infection in Primary Human Macrophages; Balancing Higher Fusion against Antiviral Responses.

    PubMed

    Flipse, Jacky; Diosa-Toro, Mayra A; Hoornweg, Tabitha E; van de Pol, Denise P I; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Smit, Jolanda M

    2016-01-01

    The dogma is that the human immune system protects us against pathogens. Yet, several viruses, like dengue virus, antagonize the hosts' antibodies to enhance their viral load and disease severity; a phenomenon called antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. This study offers novel insights in the molecular mechanism of antibody-mediated enhancement (ADE) of dengue virus infection in primary human macrophages. No differences were observed in the number of bound and internalized DENV particles following infection in the absence and presence of enhancing concentrations of antibodies. Yet, we did find an increase in membrane fusion activity during ADE of DENV infection. The higher fusion activity is coupled to a low antiviral response early in infection and subsequently a higher infection efficiency. Apparently, subtle enhancements early in the viral life cycle cascades into strong effects on infection, virus production and immune response. Importantly, and in contrast to other studies, the antibody-opsonized virus particles do not trigger immune suppression and remain sensitive to interferon. Additionally, this study gives insight in how human macrophages interact and respond to viral infections and the tight regulation thereof under various conditions of infection. PMID:27380892

  1. Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Infection in Primary Human Macrophages; Balancing Higher Fusion against Antiviral Responses

    PubMed Central

    Flipse, Jacky; Diosa-Toro, Mayra A.; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; van de Pol, Denise P. I.; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    The dogma is that the human immune system protects us against pathogens. Yet, several viruses, like dengue virus, antagonize the hosts’ antibodies to enhance their viral load and disease severity; a phenomenon called antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. This study offers novel insights in the molecular mechanism of antibody-mediated enhancement (ADE) of dengue virus infection in primary human macrophages. No differences were observed in the number of bound and internalized DENV particles following infection in the absence and presence of enhancing concentrations of antibodies. Yet, we did find an increase in membrane fusion activity during ADE of DENV infection. The higher fusion activity is coupled to a low antiviral response early in infection and subsequently a higher infection efficiency. Apparently, subtle enhancements early in the viral life cycle cascades into strong effects on infection, virus production and immune response. Importantly, and in contrast to other studies, the antibody-opsonized virus particles do not trigger immune suppression and remain sensitive to interferon. Additionally, this study gives insight in how human macrophages interact and respond to viral infections and the tight regulation thereof under various conditions of infection. PMID:27380892

  2. The SNARE protein Syp71 is essential for turnip mosaic virus infection by mediating fusion of virus-induced vesicles with chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Wei, Taiyun; Zhang, Changwei; Hou, Xilin; Sanfaçon, Hélène; Wang, Aiming

    2013-01-01

    All positive-strand RNA viruses induce the biogenesis of cytoplasmic membrane-bound virus factories for viral genome multiplication. We have previously demonstrated that upon plant potyvirus infection, the potyviral 6K2 integral membrane protein induces the formation of ER-derived replication vesicles that subsequently target chloroplasts for robust genome replication. Here, we report that following the trafficking of the Turnip mosaic potyvirus (TuMV) 6K2 vesicles to chloroplasts, 6K2 vesicles accumulate at the chloroplasts to form chloroplast-bound elongated tubular structures followed by chloroplast aggregation. A functional actomyosin motility system is required for this process. As vesicle trafficking and fusion in planta are facilitated by a superfamily of proteins known as SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive-factor attachment protein receptors), we screened ER-localized SNARES or SNARE-like proteins for their possible involvement in TuMV infection. We identified Syp71 and Vap27-1 that colocalize with the chloroplast-bound 6K2 complex. Knockdown of their expression using a Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based virus-induced gene silencing vector showed that Syp71 but not Vap27-1 is essential for TuMV infection. In Syp71-downregulated plant cells, the formation of 6K2-induced chloroplast-bound elongated tubular structures and chloroplast aggregates is inhibited and virus accumulation is significantly reduced, but the trafficking of the 6K2 vesicles from the ER to chloroplast is not affected. Taken together, these data suggest that Syp71 is a host factor essential for successful virus infection by mediating the fusion of the virus-induced vesicles with chloroplasts during TuMV infection.

  3. Quantitative RT-PCR for titration of replication-defective recombinant Semliki Forest virus.

    PubMed

    Puglia, Ana L P; Rezende, Alexandre G; Jorge, Soraia A C; Wagner, Renaud; Pereira, Carlos A; Astray, Renato M

    2013-11-01

    Virus titration may constitute a drawback in the development and use of replication-defective viral vectors like Semliki Forest virus (SFV). The standardization and validation of a reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) method for SFV titration is presented here. The qRT-PCR target is located within the nsp1 gene of the non-structural polyprotein SFV region (SFV RNA), which allows the strategy to be used for several different recombinant SFV constructs. Titer determinations were carried out by performing virus titration and infection assays with SFVs containing an RNA coding region for the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVGP) or green fluorescent protein (GFP). Results showed that the standardized qRT-PCR is applicable for different SFV constructs, and showed good reproducibility. To evaluate the correlation between the amount of functional SFV RNA in a virus lot and its infectivity in BHK-21 cell cultures, a temperature mediated titer decrease was performed and successfully quantitated by qRT-PCR. When used for cell infection at the same multiplicity of infection (MOI), the temperature treated SFV-RVGP samples induced the same levels of RVGP expression. Similarly, when different SFV-GFP lots with different virus titers, as accessed by qRT-PCR, were used for cell infection at the same MOI, the cultures showed comparable amounts of fluorescent cells. The data demonstrate a good correlation between the amount of virus used for infection, as measured by its SFV RNA, and the protein synthesis in the cells. In conclusion, the qRT-PCR method developed here is accurate and enables the titration of replication-defective SFV vectors, an essential aid for viral vector development as well as for establishment of production bioprocesses.

  4. An immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif in varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein B regulates cell fusion and skin pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Stefan L; Brady, Jennifer J; Sommer, Marvin H; Reichelt, Mike; Sung, Phillip; Blau, Helen M; Arvin, Ann M

    2013-01-29

    Herpesvirus entry functions of the conserved glycoproteins gB and gH-gL have been delineated, but their role in regulating cell-cell fusion is poorly understood. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection provides a valuable model for investigating cell-cell fusion because of the importance of this process for pathogenesis in human skin and sensory ganglia. The present study identifies a canonical immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) in the gB cytoplasmic domain (gBcyt) and demonstrates that the gBcyt is a tyrosine kinase substrate. Orbitrap mass spectrometry confirmed that Y881, central to the ITIM, is phosphorylated. To determine whether the gBcyt ITIM regulates gB/gH-gL-induced cell-cell fusion in vitro, tyrosine residues Y881 and Y920 in the gBcyt were substituted with phenylalanine separately or together. Recombinant viruses with these substitutions were generated to establish their effects on syncytia formation in replication in vitro and in the human skin xenograft model of VZV pathogenesis. The Y881F substitution caused significantly increased cell-cell fusion despite reduced cell-surface gB. Importantly, the Y881F or Y881/920F substitutions in VZV caused aggressive syncytia formation, reducing cell-cell spread. These in vitro effects of aggressive syncytia formation translated to severely impaired skin infection in vivo. In contrast, the Y920F substitution did not affect virus replication in vitro or in vivo. These observations suggest that gB modulates cell-cell fusion via an ITIM-mediated Y881 phosphorylation-dependent mechanism, supporting a unique concept that intracellular signaling through this gBcyt motif regulates VZV syncytia formation and is essential for skin pathogenesis.

  5. Protective and therapeutic capacity of human single-chain Fv-Fc fusion proteins against West Nile virus.

    PubMed

    Gould, L Hannah; Sui, Jianhua; Foellmer, Harald; Oliphant, Theodore; Wang, Tian; Ledizet, Michel; Murakami, Akikazu; Noonan, Kristin; Lambeth, Cassandra; Kar, Kalipada; Anderson, John F; de Silva, Aravinda M; Diamond, Michael S; Koski, Raymond A; Marasco, Wayne A; Fikrig, Erol

    2005-12-01

    West Nile virus has spread rapidly across the United States, and there is currently no approved human vaccine or therapy to prevent or treat disease. Passive immunization with antibodies against the envelope protein represents a promising means to provide short-term prophylaxis and treatment for West Nile virus infection. In this study, we identified a panel of 11 unique human single-chain variable region antibody fragments (scFvs) that bind the envelope protein of West Nile virus. Selected scFvs were converted to Fc fusion proteins (scFv-Fcs) and were tested in mice for their ability to prevent lethal West Nile virus infection. Five of these scFv-Fcs, 11, 15, 71, 85, and 95, protected 100% of mice from death when given prior to infection with virus. Two of them, 11 and 15, protected 80% of mice when given at days 1 and 4 after infection. In addition, four of the scFv-Fcs cross-neutralized dengue virus, serotype 2. Binding assays using yeast surface display demonstrated that all of our scFvs bind to sites within domains I and II of West Nile virus envelope protein. These recombinant human scFvs are potential candidates for immunoprophylaxis and therapy of flavivirus infections.

  6. Rapid determination of neutralizing antibodies to Semliki Forest virus in serum by enzyme immunoassay in cell culture with virus-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    van Tiel, F H; Harmsen, T; Wagenaar, M; Boere, W A; Kraaijeveld, C A; Snippe, H

    1986-10-01

    We describe in this study a rapid enzyme immunoassay for the titration of neutralizing antibodies in serum against Semliki Forest virus. For this assay L cells were added to preincubated virus-antiserum mixtures to form monolayers. Six hours after infection by residual, nonneutralized virus, the monolayers were fixed, and the E2 glycoprotein of Semliki Forest virus on the surface of infected cells was quantified with an E2-specific, peroxidase-labeled monoclonal antibody (UM 5.1). The serum antibody titer was defined arbitrarily as the inverse value of that dilution of serum associated with a 25% inhibition of control absorbance values. These titers of both early and later mouse immune sera were similar to those determined in simultaneously performed 50% plaque reduction tests. The results indicate that the enzyme immunoassay (duration, 9 h) is reliable and compares favorably with the conventional plaque reduction test (duration, 25 h) in rapidity, ease of performance, and objectivity.

  7. Productive infection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in dendritic cells requires fusion-mediated viral entry

    SciTech Connect

    Janas, Alicia M.; Dong, Chunsheng; Wang Jianhua; Wu Li

    2008-06-05

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters dendritic cells (DCs) through endocytosis and viral receptor-mediated fusion. Although endocytosis-mediated HIV-1 entry can generate productive infection in certain cell types, including human monocyte-derived macrophages, productive HIV-1 infection in DCs appears to be dependent on fusion-mediated viral entry. It remains to be defined whether endocytosed HIV-1 in DCs can initiate productive infection. Using HIV-1 infection and cellular fractionation assays to measure productive viral infection and entry, here we show that HIV-1 enters monocyte-derived DCs predominately through endocytosis; however, endocytosed HIV-1 cannot initiate productive HIV-1 infection in DCs. In contrast, productive HIV-1 infection in DCs requires fusion-mediated viral entry. Together, these results provide functional evidence in understanding HIV-1 cis-infection of DCs, suggesting that different pathways of HIV-1 entry into DCs determine the outcome of viral infection.

  8. Structure-Based Design of Head-Only Fusion Glycoprotein Immunogens for Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    PubMed

    Boyington, Jeffrey C; Joyce, M Gordon; Sastry, Mallika; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B E; Chen, Man; Kong, Wing-Pui; Ngwuta, Joan O; Thomas, Paul V; Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Chen, Lei; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Ko, Kiyoon; Zhou, Tongqing; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Kwong, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a significant cause of severe respiratory illness worldwide, particularly in infants, young children, and the elderly. Although no licensed vaccine is currently available, an engineered version of the metastable RSV fusion (F) surface glycoprotein-stabilized in the pre-fusion (pre-F) conformation by "DS-Cav1" mutations-elicits high titer RSV-neutralizing responses. Moreover, pre-F-specific antibodies, often against the neutralization-sensitive antigenic site Ø in the membrane-distal head region of trimeric F glycoprotein, comprise a substantial portion of the human response to natural RSV infection. To focus the vaccine-elicited response to antigenic site Ø, we designed a series of RSV F immunogens that comprised the membrane-distal head of the F glycoprotein in its pre-F conformation. These "head-only" immunogens formed monomers, dimers, and trimers. Antigenic analysis revealed that a majority of the 70 engineered head-only immunogens displayed reactivity to site Ø-targeting antibodies, which was similar to that of the parent RSV F DS-Cav1 trimers, often with increased thermostability. We evaluated four of these head-only immunogens in detail, probing their recognition by antibodies, their physical stability, structure, and immunogenicity. When tested in naïve mice, a head-only trimer, half the size of the parent RSV F trimer, induced RSV titers, which were statistically comparable to those induced by DS-Cav1. When used to boost DS-Cav1-primed mice, two head-only RSV F immunogens, a dimer and a trimer, boosted RSV-neutralizing titers to levels that were comparable to those boosted by DS-Cav1, although with higher site Ø-directed responses. Our results provide proof-of-concept for the ability of the smaller head-only RSV F immunogens to focus the vaccine-elicited response to antigenic site Ø. Decent primary immunogenicity, enhanced physical stability, potential ease of manufacture, and potent immunogenicity upon boosting

  9. Structure-Based Design of Head-Only Fusion Glycoprotein Immunogens for Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    PubMed

    Boyington, Jeffrey C; Joyce, M Gordon; Sastry, Mallika; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B E; Chen, Man; Kong, Wing-Pui; Ngwuta, Joan O; Thomas, Paul V; Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Chen, Lei; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Ko, Kiyoon; Zhou, Tongqing; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Kwong, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a significant cause of severe respiratory illness worldwide, particularly in infants, young children, and the elderly. Although no licensed vaccine is currently available, an engineered version of the metastable RSV fusion (F) surface glycoprotein-stabilized in the pre-fusion (pre-F) conformation by "DS-Cav1" mutations-elicits high titer RSV-neutralizing responses. Moreover, pre-F-specific antibodies, often against the neutralization-sensitive antigenic site Ø in the membrane-distal head region of trimeric F glycoprotein, comprise a substantial portion of the human response to natural RSV infection. To focus the vaccine-elicited response to antigenic site Ø, we designed a series of RSV F immunogens that comprised the membrane-distal head of the F glycoprotein in its pre-F conformation. These "head-only" immunogens formed monomers, dimers, and trimers. Antigenic analysis revealed that a majority of the 70 engineered head-only immunogens displayed reactivity to site Ø-targeting antibodies, which was similar to that of the parent RSV F DS-Cav1 trimers, often with increased thermostability. We evaluated four of these head-only immunogens in detail, probing their recognition by antibodies, their physical stability, structure, and immunogenicity. When tested in naïve mice, a head-only trimer, half the size of the parent RSV F trimer, induced RSV titers, which were statistically comparable to those induced by DS-Cav1. When used to boost DS-Cav1-primed mice, two head-only RSV F immunogens, a dimer and a trimer, boosted RSV-neutralizing titers to levels that were comparable to those boosted by DS-Cav1, although with higher site Ø-directed responses. Our results provide proof-of-concept for the ability of the smaller head-only RSV F immunogens to focus the vaccine-elicited response to antigenic site Ø. Decent primary immunogenicity, enhanced physical stability, potential ease of manufacture, and potent immunogenicity upon boosting

  10. Structure-Based Design of Head-Only Fusion Glycoprotein Immunogens for Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Boyington, Jeffrey C.; Chen, Man; Kong, Wing-Pui; Ngwuta, Joan O.; Thomas, Paul V.; Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Chen, Lei; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Ko, Kiyoon; Zhou, Tongqing; Mascola, John R.; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a significant cause of severe respiratory illness worldwide, particularly in infants, young children, and the elderly. Although no licensed vaccine is currently available, an engineered version of the metastable RSV fusion (F) surface glycoprotein—stabilized in the pre-fusion (pre-F) conformation by “DS-Cav1” mutations—elicits high titer RSV-neutralizing responses. Moreover, pre-F-specific antibodies, often against the neutralization-sensitive antigenic site Ø in the membrane-distal head region of trimeric F glycoprotein, comprise a substantial portion of the human response to natural RSV infection. To focus the vaccine-elicited response to antigenic site Ø, we designed a series of RSV F immunogens that comprised the membrane-distal head of the F glycoprotein in its pre-F conformation. These “head-only” immunogens formed monomers, dimers, and trimers. Antigenic analysis revealed that a majority of the 70 engineered head-only immunogens displayed reactivity to site Ø-targeting antibodies, which was similar to that of the parent RSV F DS-Cav1 trimers, often with increased thermostability. We evaluated four of these head-only immunogens in detail, probing their recognition by antibodies, their physical stability, structure, and immunogenicity. When tested in naïve mice, a head-only trimer, half the size of the parent RSV F trimer, induced RSV titers, which were statistically comparable to those induced by DS-Cav1. When used to boost DS-Cav1-primed mice, two head-only RSV F immunogens, a dimer and a trimer, boosted RSV-neutralizing titers to levels that were comparable to those boosted by DS-Cav1, although with higher site Ø-directed responses. Our results provide proof-of-concept for the ability of the smaller head-only RSV F immunogens to focus the vaccine-elicited response to antigenic site Ø. Decent primary immunogenicity, enhanced physical stability, potential ease of manufacture, and potent immunogenicity

  11. Recombinant fusion protein and DNA vaccines against foot and mouth disease virus infection in guinea pig and swine.

    PubMed

    Huang, H; Yang, Z; Xu, Q; Sheng, Z; Xie, Y; Yan, W; You, Y; Sun, L; Zheng, Z

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we provide evidence that a recombinant fusion protein containing beta-galactosidase and a tandem repeat peptide of immunogenic dominant epitope of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) VP1 protein elicits high levels of neutralizing antibody and protects both guinea pigs and swine against infection. Vaccination with this fusion protein induced a FMDV-specific proliferative T-cell response and a neutralizing antibody response. The immunized guinea pigs and swine were protected against FMD type O virus infection. Two DNA plasmids expressing genes of foot-and-mouth disease were constructed. Both plasmids pBO1 and pCO1 contain a signal sequence of the swine immunoglobulin G (IgG) gene and fusion protein gene of pXZ84. The signal sequence and fusion protein gene were under the control of a metallothionein promoter in the case of the pBO1 plasmid and under the control of a cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter in the case of pCO1 plasmid. When pBO1 and pCO1 were inoculated intramuscularly into guinea pigs, both plasmids elicited a neutralizing antibody response and spleen cell proliferation increased following stimulation with FMDV antigen, but animals were not protected from viral challenge. PMID:10333237

  12. Hemagglutinin-neuraminidase enhances F protein-mediated membrane fusion of reconstituted Sendai virus envelopes with cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bagai, S; Puri, A; Blumenthal, R; Sarkar, D P

    1993-01-01

    Reconstituted Sendai virus envelopes containing both the fusion (F) protein and the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) (F,HN-virosomes) or only the F protein (F-virosomes) were prepared by solubilization of the intact virus with Triton X-100 followed by its removal by using SM2 Bio-Beads. Viral envelopes containing HN whose disulfide bonds were irreversibly reduced (HNred) were also prepared by treating the envelopes with dithiothreitol followed by dialysis (F,HNred-virosomes). Both F-virosomes and F,HNred-virosomes induced hemolysis of erythrocytes in the presence of wheat germ agglutinin, but the rates and extents were markedly lower than those for hemolysis induced by F,HN-virosomes. Using an assay based on the relief of self-quenching of a lipid probe incorporated in the Sendai virus envelopes, we demonstrate the fusion of both F,HN-virosomes and F-virosomes with cultured HepG2 cells containing the asialoglycoprotein receptor, which binds to a terminal galactose moiety of F. By desialylating the HepG2 cells, the entry mediated by HN-terminal sialic acid receptor interactions was bypassed. We show that both F-virosomes and F,HN-virosomes fuse with desialylated HepG2 cells, although the rate was two- to threefold higher if HN was included in the viral envelope. We also observed enhancement of fusion rates when both F and HN envelope proteins were attached to their specific receptors. Images PMID:8388501

  13. The vaccinia virus fusion inhibitor proteins SPI-3 (K2) and HA (A56) expressed by infected cells reduce the entry of superinfecting virus.

    PubMed

    Turner, Peter C; Moyer, Richard W

    2008-10-25

    The orthopoxvirus SPI-3 (K2) and A56 (hemagglutinin, HA) proteins interact and together prevent cell-cell fusion. SPI-3/A56 has been proposed to prevent the superinfection of previously infected cells by reducing virus-cell fusion. Binding of mature virions of vaccinia virus (VV) to VV-infected cells was unaffected by SPI-3 or A56 on the surface of infected cells. Entry of VV into infected cells was assessed using VV-P(T7)-luc carrying the luciferase reporter under T7 control. Cells infected with VV or cowpox virus (CPV) expressing T7 RNA polymerase and lacking SPI-3 and/or A56 were superinfected with VV-P(T7)-luc, and luciferase activity was measured. Inactivation of SPI-3 or A56 from the pre-infecting virus resulted in greater luciferase expression from the superinfecting VV-P(T7)-luc. Antibody against SPI-3 present during infection with wild-type CPV-T7 increased luciferase expression from superinfecting VV-P(T7)-luc. The SPI-3/A56 complex on the infected cell surface therefore appears to reduce the entry of virions into infected cells.

  14. The vaccinia virus fusion inhibitor proteins SPI-3 (K2) and HA (A56) expressed by infected cells reduce the entry of superinfecting virus

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Peter C. Moyer, Richard W.

    2008-10-25

    The orthopoxvirus SPI-3 (K2) and A56 (hemagglutinin, HA) proteins interact and together prevent cell-cell fusion. SPI-3/A56 has been proposed to prevent the superinfection of previously infected cells by reducing virus-cell fusion. Binding of mature virions of vaccinia virus (VV) to VV-infected cells was unaffected by SPI-3 or A56 on the surface of infected cells. Entry of VV into infected cells was assessed using VV-P{sub T7}-luc carrying the luciferase reporter under T7 control. Cells infected with VV or cowpox virus (CPV) expressing T7 RNA polymerase and lacking SPI-3 and/or A56 were superinfected with VV-P{sub T7}-luc, and luciferase activity was measured. Inactivation of SPI-3 or A56 from the pre-infecting virus resulted in greater luciferase expression from the superinfecting VV-P{sub T7}-luc. Antibody against SPI-3 present during infection with wild-type CPV-T7 increased luciferase expression from superinfecting VV-P{sub T7}-luc. The SPI-3/A56 complex on the infected cell surface therefore appears to reduce the entry of virions into infected cells.

  15. Receptor binding, fusion inhibition, and induction of cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies by a soluble G glycoprotein of Hendra virus.

    PubMed

    Bossart, Katharine N; Crameri, Gary; Dimitrov, Antony S; Mungall, Bruce A; Feng, Yan-Ru; Patch, Jared R; Choudhary, Anil; Wang, Lin-Fa; Eaton, Bryan T; Broder, Christopher C

    2005-06-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are closely related emerging viruses comprising the Henipavirus genus of the Paramyxovirinae, which are distinguished by their ability to cause fatal disease in both animal and human hosts. These viruses infect cells by a pH-independent membrane fusion event mediated by their attachment (G) and fusion (F) glycoproteins. Previously, we reported on HeV- and NiV-mediated fusion activities and detailed their host-cell tropism characteristics. These studies also suggested that a common cell surface receptor, which could be destroyed by protease, was utilized by both viruses. To further characterize the G glycoprotein and its unknown receptor, soluble forms of HeV G (sG) were constructed by replacing its cytoplasmic tail and transmembrane domains with an immunoglobulin kappa leader sequence coupled to either an S-peptide tag (sG(S-tag)) or myc-epitope tag (sG(myc-tag)) to facilitate purification and detection. Expression of sG was verified in cell lysates and culture supernatants by specific affinity precipitation. Analysis of sG by size exclusion chromatography and sucrose gradient centrifugation demonstrated tetrameric, dimeric, and monomeric species, with the majority of the sG released as a disulfide-linked dimer. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that sG specifically bound to HeV and NiV infection-permissive cells but not to a nonpermissive HeLa cell line clone, suggesting that it binds to virus receptor on host cells. Preincubation of host cells with sG resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of both HeV and NiV cell fusion as well as infection by live virus. Taken together, these data indicate that sG retains important native structural features, and we further demonstrate that administration of sG to rabbits can elicit a potent cross-reactive neutralizing antibody response against infectious HeV and NiV. This HeV sG glycoprotein will be exceedingly useful for structural studies, receptor identification strategies, and

  16. H1N1 Swine Influenza Viruses Differ from Avian Precursors by a Higher pH Optimum of Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Jan; Kouassi, Nancy Mounogou; Foni, Emanuela; Klenk, Hans-Dieter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The H1N1 Eurasian avian-like swine (EAsw) influenza viruses originated from an avian H1N1 virus. To characterize potential changes in the membrane fusion activity of the hemagglutinin (HA) during avian-to-swine adaptation of the virus, we studied EAsw viruses isolated in the first years of their circulation in pigs and closely related contemporary H1N1 viruses of wild aquatic birds. Compared to the avian viruses, the swine viruses were less sensitive to neutralization by lysosomotropic agent NH4Cl in MDCK cells, had a higher pH optimum of hemolytic activity, and were less stable at acidic pH. Eight amino acid substitutions in the HA were found to separate the EAsw viruses from their putative avian precursor; four substitutions—T492S, N722D, R752K, and S1132F—were located in the structural regions of the HA2 subunit known to play a role in acid-induced conformational transition of the HA. We also studied low-pH-induced syncytium formation by cell-expressed HA proteins and found that the HAs of the 1918, 1957, 1968, and 2009 pandemic viruses required a lower pH for fusion induction than did the HA of a representative EAsw virus. Our data show that transmission of an avian H1N1 virus to pigs was accompanied by changes in conformational stability and fusion promotion activity of the HA. We conclude that distinctive host-determined fusion characteristics of the HA may represent a barrier for avian-to-swine and swine-to-human transmission of influenza viruses. IMPORTANCE Continuing cases of human infections with zoonotic influenza viruses highlight the necessity to understand which viral properties contribute to interspecies transmission. Efficient binding of the HA to cellular receptors in a new host species is known to be essential for the transmission. Less is known about required adaptive changes in the membrane fusion activity of the HA. Here we show that adaptation of an avian influenza virus to pigs in Europe in 1980s was accompanied by mutations in

  17. The conserved glycine-rich segment linking the N-terminal fusion peptide to the coiled coil of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein gp21 is a determinant of membrane fusion function.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kirilee A; Bär, Séverine; Maerz, Anne L; Alizon, Marc; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2005-04-01

    Retroviral transmembrane proteins (TMs) contain an N-terminal fusion peptide that initiates virus-cell membrane fusion. The fusion peptide is linked to the coiled-coil core through a conserved sequence that is often rich in glycines. We investigated the functional role of the glycine-rich segment, Met-326 to Ser-337, of the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) TM, gp21, by alanine and proline scanning mutagenesis. Alanine substitution for the hydrophobic residue Ile-334 caused an approximately 90% reduction in cell-cell fusion activity without detectable effects on the lipid-mixing and pore formation phases of fusion. Alanine substitutions at other positions had smaller effects (Gly-329, Val-330, and Gly-332) or no effect on fusion function. Proline substitution for glycine residues inhibited cell-cell fusion function with position-dependent effects on the three phases of fusion. Retroviral glycoprotein fusion function thus appears to require flexibility within the glycine-rich segment and hydrophobic contacts mediated by this segment. PMID:15767455

  18. Stability Characterization of a Vaccine Antigen Based on the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jessica A.; Durr, Eberhard; Swoyer, Ryan; Cejas, Pedro J.; Horton, Melanie S.; Galli, Jennifer D.; Cosmi, Scott A.; Espeseth, Amy S.; Bett, Andrew J.; Zhang, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) causes both upper and lower respiratory tract disease in humans, leading to significant morbidity and mortality in both young children and older adults. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine available, and therapeutic options are limited. During the infection process, the type I viral fusion (F) glycoprotein on the surface of the RSV particle rearranges from a metastable prefusion conformation to a highly stable postfusion form. In people naturally infected with RSV, most potent neutralizing antibodies are directed to the prefusion form of the F protein. Therefore, an engineered RSV F protein stabilized in the prefusion conformation (DS-Cav1) is an attractive vaccine candidate. Long-term stability at 4°C or higher is a desirable attribute for a commercial subunit vaccine antigen. To assess the stability of DS-Cav1, we developed assays using D25, an antibody which recognizes the prefusion F-specific antigenic site Ø, and a novel antibody 4D7, which was found to bind antigenic site I on the postfusion form of RSV F. Biophysical analysis indicated that, upon long-term storage at 4°C, DS-Cav1 undergoes a conformational change, adopting alternate structures that concomitantly lose the site Ø epitope and gain the ability to bind 4D7. PMID:27764150

  19. Molecular evolution of the fusion protein gene in human respiratory syncytial virus subgroup A.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hirokazu; Nagasawa, Koo; Tsukagoshi, Hiroyuki; Matsushima, Yuki; Fujita, Kiyotaka; Yoshida, Lay Myint; Tanaka, Ryota; Ishii, Haruyuki; Shimojo, Naoki; Kuroda, Makoto; Ryo, Akihide

    2016-09-01

    We studied the molecular evolution of the fusion protein (F) gene in the human respiratory syncytial virus subgroup A (HRSV-A). We performed time-scaled phylogenetic analyses using the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. We also conducted genetic distance (p-distance), positive/negative selection, and Bayesian skyline plot analyses. Furthermore, we mapped the amino acid substitutions of the protein. The MCMC-constructed tree indicated that the HRSV F gene diverged from the bovine RSV (BRSV) gene approximately 550years ago and had a relatively low substitution rate (7.59×10(-4) substitutions/site/year). Moreover, a common ancestor of HRSV-A and -B diverged approximately 280years ago, which has since formed four distinct clusters. The present HRSV-A strains were assigned six genotypes based on F gene sequences and attachment glycoprotein gene sequences. The present strains exhibited high F gene sequence similarity values and low genetic divergence. No positive selection sites were identified; however, 50 negative selection sites were identified. F protein amino acid substitutions at 17 sites were distributed in the F protein. The effective population size of the gene has remained relatively constant, but the population size of the prevalent genotype (GA2) has increased in the last 10years. These results suggest that the HRSV-AF gene has evolved independently and formed some genotypes. PMID:27291709

  20. Development of a subgenomic clone system for Kyasanur Forest disease virus.

    PubMed

    Cook, Bradley W M; Nikiforuk, Aidan M; Cutts, Todd A; Kobasa, Darwyn; Court, Deborah A; Theriault, Steven S

    2016-07-01

    Emerging tropical viruses pose an increasing threat to public health because social, economic and environmental factors such as global trade and deforestation allow for their migration into previously unexposed populations and ecological niches. Among such viruses, Kyasanur Forest disease virus (KFDV) deserves particular recognition because it causes hemorrhagic fever. This work describes the completion of an antiviral testing platform (subgenomic system) for KFDV that could be used to quickly and safely screen compounds capable of inhibiting KFDV replication without the requirement for high containment, as the structural genes have been replaced with a luciferase reporter gene precluding the generation of infectious particles. The coordination of KFDV kinetics with the replication characteristics of the subgenomic system has provided additional insight into the timing of flavivirus replication events, as the genetically engineered KFDV genome began replication as early as 2h post cellular entry. Possession of such antiviral testing platforms by public health agencies should accelerate the testing of antiviral drugs against emerging or recently emerged viruses mitigating the effects of their disease and transmission. PMID:27357207

  1. Development of a subgenomic clone system for Kyasanur Forest disease virus.

    PubMed

    Cook, Bradley W M; Nikiforuk, Aidan M; Cutts, Todd A; Kobasa, Darwyn; Court, Deborah A; Theriault, Steven S

    2016-07-01

    Emerging tropical viruses pose an increasing threat to public health because social, economic and environmental factors such as global trade and deforestation allow for their migration into previously unexposed populations and ecological niches. Among such viruses, Kyasanur Forest disease virus (KFDV) deserves particular recognition because it causes hemorrhagic fever. This work describes the completion of an antiviral testing platform (subgenomic system) for KFDV that could be used to quickly and safely screen compounds capable of inhibiting KFDV replication without the requirement for high containment, as the structural genes have been replaced with a luciferase reporter gene precluding the generation of infectious particles. The coordination of KFDV kinetics with the replication characteristics of the subgenomic system has provided additional insight into the timing of flavivirus replication events, as the genetically engineered KFDV genome began replication as early as 2h post cellular entry. Possession of such antiviral testing platforms by public health agencies should accelerate the testing of antiviral drugs against emerging or recently emerged viruses mitigating the effects of their disease and transmission.

  2. Viruses accumulate in aging infection centers of a fungal forest pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Vainio, Eeva J; Müller, Michael M; Korhonen, Kari; Piri, Tuula; Hantula, Jarkko

    2015-01-01

    Fungal viruses (mycoviruses) with RNA genomes are believed to lack extracellular infective particles. These viruses are transmitted laterally among fungal strains through mycelial anastomoses or vertically via their infected spores, but little is known regarding their prevalence and patterns of dispersal under natural conditions. Here, we examined, in detail, the spatial and temporal changes in a mycovirus community and its host fungus Heterobasidion parviporum, the most devastating fungal pathogen of conifers in the Boreal forest region. During the 7-year sampling period, viruses accumulated in clonal host individuals as a result of indigenous viruses spreading within and between clones as well as novel strains arriving via airborne spores. Viral community changes produced pockets of heterogeneity within large H. parviporum clones. The appearance of novel viral infections in aging clones indicated that transient cell-to-cell contacts between Heterobasidion strains are likely to occur more frequently than what was inferred from genotypic analyses. Intraspecific variation was low among the three partitivirus species at the study site, whereas the unassigned viral species HetRV6 was highly polymorphic. The accumulation of point mutations during persistent infections resulted in viral diversification, that is, the presence of nearly identical viral sequence variants within single clones. Our results also suggest that co-infections by distantly related viral species are more stable than those between conspecific strains, and mutual exclusion may play a role in determining mycoviral communities. PMID:25126757

  3. Vaccinia mature virus fusion regulator A26 protein binds to A16 and G9 proteins of the viral entry fusion complex and dissociates from mature virions at low pH.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Jung; Shih, Ao-Chun; Tang, Yin-Liang; Chang, Wen

    2012-04-01

    Vaccinia mature virus enters cells through either endocytosis or plasma membrane fusion, depending on virus strain and cell type. Our previous results showed that vaccinia virus mature virions containing viral A26 protein enter HeLa cells preferentially through endocytosis, whereas mature virions lacking A26 protein enter through plasma membrane fusion, leading us to propose that A26 acts as an acid-sensitive fusion suppressor for mature virus (S. J. Chang, Y. X. Chang, R. Izmailyan R, Y. L. Tang, and W. Chang, J. Virol. 84:8422-8432, 2010). In the present study, we investigated the fusion suppression mechanism of A26 protein. We found that A26 protein was coimmunoprecipitated with multiple components of the viral entry-fusion complex (EFC) in infected HeLa cells. Transient expression of viral EFC components in HeLa cells revealed that vaccinia virus A26 protein interacted directly with A16 and G9 but not with G3, L5 and H2 proteins of the EFC components. Consistently, a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-A26 fusion protein, but not GST, pulled down A16 and G9 proteins individually in vitro. Together, our results supported the idea that A26 protein binds to A16 and G9 protein at neutral pH contributing to suppression of vaccinia virus-triggered membrane fusion from without. Since vaccinia virus extracellular envelope proteins A56/K2 were recently shown to bind to the A16/G9 subcomplex to suppress virus-induced fusion from within, our results also highlight an evolutionary convergence in which vaccinia viral fusion suppressor proteins regulate membrane fusion by targeting the A16 and G9 components of the viral EFC complex. Finally, we provide evidence that acid (pH 4.7) treatment induced A26 protein and A26-A27 protein complexes of 70 kDa and 90 kDa to dissociate from mature virions, suggesting that the structure of A26 protein is acid sensitive.

  4. Identification of viral membrane proteins required for cell fusion and viral dissemination that are modified during vaccinia virus persistence.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, M A; Paez, E

    1994-01-01

    Wild-type vaccinia virus WR strain forms non-fusogenic (F-) large plaques and is hemagglutinin positive (HA+) under normal conditions of virus infection. We have analyzed a collection of spontaneous, highly attenuated mutants of vaccinia virus isolated from persistently infected Friend erythroleukemia cells (E. Paez, S. Dallo, and M. Esteban, J. Virol. 61, 2642-2647, 1987) for the ability to express HA during virus infection. After 14 cell passages, all the mutants isolated were hemadsorption negative (HAD-) and did not synthesize a HA that could be recognized by anti-HA monoclonal antibodies. All these HA- mutants induced extensive cell-cell fusion (F+), with the exception of two mutants (65-16 and 101-14) isolated from late cell passages. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the HA gene in these two mutants confirmed the HA- phenotype. A frameshift mutation very close to the initiation codon resulted in premature translational termination. The truncated gene now only encodes the first 25 amino acids. Analysis of progeny from "wild-type," like early serial passage virus (5-3) X mutant back crosses, shows that for one late passage non-fusogenic small-plaque mutant (101-14) among large plaque progeny there is good correspondence between the ability to fuse and the absence of a viral HA and that each large plaque mutant contains a normal 14 kDa membrane protein. However, with a second serial passage mutant 65-16, which, like 101-14, is a nonfusogenic small-plaque variant, there is again an excellent correlation between the inability to synthesize HA and the ability to fuse, but there is no correlation of plaque size with a normal 14 kDa viral membrane protein, as most large plaque mutants encode a larger, i.e., 17 kDa protein. Rescue experiments of 65-16 with bona fide cloned 14 kDa protein gene confirm that the ability to regulate plaque size and cell fusion in this mutant is due to a protein other than the 14 kDa protein. Marker rescue experiments indicated that the map

  5. Nuclear envelope breakdown induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 involves the activity of viral fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Maric, Martina; Haugo, Alison C; Dauer, William; Johnson, David; Roller, Richard J

    2014-07-01

    Herpesvirus infection reorganizes components of the nuclear lamina usually without loss of integrity of the nuclear membranes. We report that wild-type HSV infection can cause dissolution of the nuclear envelope in transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not express torsinA. Nuclear envelope breakdown is accompanied by an eight-fold inhibition of virus replication. Breakdown of the membrane is much more limited during infection with viruses that lack the gB and gH genes, suggesting that breakdown involves factors that promote fusion at the nuclear membrane. Nuclear envelope breakdown is also inhibited during infection with virus that does not express UL34, but is enhanced when the US3 gene is deleted, suggesting that envelope breakdown may be enhanced by nuclear lamina disruption. Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the UL34 gene suggesting that mixing of nuclear and cytoplasmic contents is insufficient to bypass loss of the normal nuclear egress pathway.

  6. Dominant negative selection of vaccinia virus using a thymidine kinase/thymidylate kinase fusion gene and the prodrug azidothymidine

    SciTech Connect

    Holzer, Georg W. . E-mail: falknef@baxter.com

    2005-07-05

    The Escherichia coli thymidine kinase/thymidylate kinase (tk/tmk) fusion gene encodes an enzyme that efficiently converts the prodrug 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT) into its toxic triphosphate derivative, a substance which stops DNA chain elongation. Integration of this marker gene into vaccinia virus that normally is not inhibited by AZT allowed the establishment of a powerful selection procedure for recombinant viruses. In contrast to the conventional vaccinia thymidine kinase (tk) selection that is performed in tk-negative cell lines, AZT selection can be performed in normal (tk-positive) cell lines. The technique is especially useful for the generation of replication-deficient vaccinia viruses and may also be used for gene knock-out studies of essential vaccinia genes.

  7. Beyond anchoring: the expanding role of the hendra virus fusion protein transmembrane domain in protein folding, stability, and function.

    PubMed

    Smith, Everett Clinton; Culler, Megan R; Hellman, Lance M; Fried, Michael G; Creamer, Trevor P; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2012-03-01

    While work with viral fusion proteins has demonstrated that the transmembrane domain (TMD) can affect protein folding, stability, and membrane fusion promotion, the mechanism(s) remains poorly understood. TMDs could play a role in fusion promotion through direct TMD-TMD interactions, and we have recently shown that isolated TMDs from three paramyxovirus fusion (F) proteins interact as trimers using sedimentation equilibrium (SE) analysis (E. C. Smith, et al., submitted for publication). Immediately N-terminal to the TMD is heptad repeat B (HRB), which plays critical roles in fusion. Interestingly, addition of HRB decreased the stability of the trimeric TMD-TMD interactions. This result, combined with previous findings that HRB forms a trimeric coiled coil in the prefusion form of the whole protein though HRB peptides fail to stably associate in isolation, suggests that the trimeric TMD-TMD interactions work in concert with elements in the F ectodomain head to stabilize a weak HRB interaction. Thus, changes in TMD-TMD interactions could be important in regulating F triggering and refolding. Alanine insertions between the TMD and HRB demonstrated that spacing between these two regions is important for protein stability while not affecting TMD-TMD interactions. Additional mutagenesis of the C-terminal end of the TMD suggests that β-branched residues within the TMD play a role in membrane fusion, potentially through modulation of TMD-TMD interactions. Our results support a model whereby the C-terminal end of the Hendra virus F TMD is an important regulator of TMD-TMD interactions and show that these interactions help hold HRB in place prior to the triggering of membrane fusion.

  8. The Transmembrane Domain Peptide of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Promotes Both Intermediate and Pore Formation during PEG-Mediated Vesicle Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Tanusree; Chakraborty, Hirak; Lentz, Barry R.

    2014-01-01

    We propose mechanisms by which the transmembrane domain of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-TMD) promotes both initiation of fusion and formation of a fusion pore. Time courses of polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-mediated fusion of 25 nm small unilamellar vesicles composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), bovine brain sphingomyelin, and cholesterol (35:30:15:20 molar ratio) were recorded at pH 7.4 at five different temperatures (from 17°C to 37°C) and compared with time courses obtained with the same vesicles containing the fusion-active TMD of the G protein of VSV. Multiple time courses were fitted globally to a one-intermediate ensemble kinetic model to estimate the rate constants for conversion of the aggregated state to an intermediate hemifused state (k1, stalk, or I1) that rapidly transits to an unstable intermediate (I2 state) that converts to a final fusion pore state with a combined rate k3. The probabilities of lipid mixing, contents mixing, and contents leakage in the three states were also obtained from this analysis. The activation thermodynamics for each step were consistent with previously published models of lipid rearrangements during intermediate and pore formation. The influences of VSV-TMD, hexadecane, and VSV-TMD + hexadecane on the kinetics, activation thermodynamics, and membrane structure support the hypothesis that these two agents do not catalyze fusion by a common mechanism, except possibly at the lowest temperatures examined. VSV-TMD primarily catalyzed initial intermediate formation, although it substantially increased the probability of contents mixing in the intermediate state. Our results support the hypothesis that the catalytic influence of VSV-TMD on the initial-intermediate- and pore-forming steps of PEG-mediated fusion derives from its ability to impose a positive intrinsic curvature and thereby stress small unilamellar vesicle outer leaflets as well as the periphery of intermediate

  9. Different host cell proteases activate the SARS-coronavirus spike-protein for cell-cell and virus-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Graham; Bertram, Stephanie; Glowacka, Ilona; Steffen, Imke; Chaipan, Chawaree; Agudelo, Juliet; Lu Kai; Rennekamp, Andrew J.; Hofmann, Heike; Bates, Paul; Poehlmann, Stefan

    2011-05-10

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) poses a considerable threat to human health. Activation of the viral spike (S)-protein by host cell proteases is essential for viral infectivity. However, the cleavage sites in SARS-S and the protease(s) activating SARS-S are incompletely defined. We found that R667 was dispensable for SARS-S-driven virus-cell fusion and for SARS-S-activation by trypsin and cathepsin L in a virus-virus fusion assay. Mutation T760R, which optimizes the minimal furin consensus motif 758-RXXR-762, and furin overexpression augmented SARS-S activity, but did not result in detectable SARS-S cleavage. Finally, SARS-S-driven cell-cell fusion was independent of cathepsin L, a protease essential for virus-cell fusion. Instead, a so far unknown leupeptin-sensitive host cell protease activated cellular SARS-S for fusion with target cells expressing high levels of ACE2. Thus, different host cell proteases activate SARS-S for virus-cell and cell-cell fusion and SARS-S cleavage at R667 and 758-RXXR-762 can be dispensable for SARS-S activation.

  10. Role of a Transbilayer pH Gradient in the Membrane Fusion Activity of the Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin: Use of the R18 Assay to Monitor Membrane Merging.

    PubMed

    Ramalho-Santos, João; Pedroso De Lima, Maria C.

    1999-03-16

    It had been suggested that influenza virus-mediated membrane fusion might be dependent on a pH gradient across a target membrane. We have designed experiments in which this issue could be addressed. Two populations of liposomes were prepared, both simulating the plasma membrane of target cells, but with the pH of the internal aqueous medium buffered either at pH 7.4 (physiological cytosol pH) or at pH 5.0 (endosomal pH at which influenza virus displays maximal fusion activity). By monitoring fusion using the R18 assay, we found that the internal pH of the target liposomes did not influence membrane merging as mediated by the influenza virus hemagglutinin, thus demonstrating that a transmembrane pH gradient is not required in this fusion process.

  11. Analysis of the selective advantage conferred by a C-E1 fusion protein synthesized by rubella virus DI RNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, Claudia; Tzeng, W.-P.; Liebert, Uwe Gerd; Frey, Teryl K.

    2007-12-05

    During serial passaging of rubella virus (RUB) in cell culture, the dominant species of defective-interfering RNA (DI) generated contains an in-frame deletion between the capsid protein (C) gene and E1 glycoprotein gene resulting in production of a C-E1 fusion protein that is necessary for the maintenance of the DI [Tzeng, W.P., Frey, T.K. (2006). C-E1 fusion protein synthesized by rubella virus DI RNAs maintained during serial passage. Virology 356 198-207.]. A BHK cell line stably expressing the RUB structural proteins was established which was used to package DIs into virus particles following transfection with in vitro transcripts from DI infectious cDNA constructs. Packaging of a DI encoding an in-frame C-GFP-E1 reporter fusion protein corresponding to the C-E1 fusion protein expressed in a native DI was only marginally more efficient than packaging of a DI encoding GFP, indicating that the C-E1 fusion protein did not function by enhancing packaging. However, infection with the DI encoding the C-GFP-E1 fusion protein (in the absence of wt RUB helper virus) resulted in formation of clusters of GFP-positive cells and the percentage of GFP-positive cells in the culture following infection remained relatively constant. In contrast, a DI encoding GFP did not form GFP-positive clusters and the percentage of GFP-positive cells declined by roughly half from 2 to 4 days post-infection. Cluster formation and sustaining the percentage of infected (GFP-positive) cells required the C part of the fusion protein, including the downstream but not the upstream of two arginine clusters (both of which are associated with RNA binding and association with mitochondrial p32 protein) and the E1 part through the transmembrane sequence, but not the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail. Among a collection of mutant DI constructs, cluster formation and sustaining infected cell percentage correlated with maintenance during serial passage with wt RUB. We hypothesize that cluster formation and

  12. New model for cardiomyocyte sheet transplantation using a virus-cell fusion technique

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yuto; Tomotsune, Daihachiro; Takizawa, Sakiko; Yue, Fengming; Nagai, Mika; Yokoyama, Tadayuki; Hirashima, Kanji; Sasaki, Katsunori

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To facilitate close contacts between transplanted cardiomyocytes and host skeletal muscle using cell fusion mediated by hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) and tissue maceration. METHODS: Cardiomyocytes (1.5 × 106) from fetal rats were first cultured. After proliferation, some cells were used for fusion with adult muscle fibers using HVJ-E. Other cells were used to create cardiomyocyte sheets (area: about 3.5 cm2 including 2.1 × 106 cells), which were then treated with Nile blue, separated, and transplanted between the latissimus dorsi and intercostal muscles of adult rats with four combinations of HVJ-E and/or NaOH maceration: G1: HVJ-E(+), NaOH(+), Cardiomyocytes(+); G2: HVJ-E(-), NaOH(+), Cardiomyocytes(+); G3: HVJ-E(+), NaOH(-), Cardiomyocytes(+); G4: HVJ-E(-), NaOH(-), Cardiomyocytes(-). At 1 and 2 wk after transplantation, the four groups were compared by detection of beating domains, motion images using moving target analysis software, action potentials, gene expression of MLC-2v and Mesp1 by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, hematoxylin-eosin staining, and immunostaining for cardiac troponin and skeletal myosin. RESULTS: In vitro cardiomyocytes were fused with skeletal muscle fibers using HVJ-E. Cardiomyocyte sheets remained in the primary transplanted sites for 2 wk. Although beating domains were detected in G1, G2, and G3 rats, G1 rats prevailed in the number, size, motion image amplitudes, and action potential compared with G2 and G3 rats. Close contacts were only found in G1 rats. At 1 wk after transplantation, the cardiomyocyte sheets showed adhesion at various points to the myoblast layer in the latissimus dorsi muscle. At 2 wk after transplantation, close contacts were seen over a broad area. Part of the skeletal muscle sarcoplasma seemed to project into the myocardiocyte plasma and some nuclei appeared to share both sarcoplasmas. CONCLUSION: The present results show that close contacts were acquired and facilitated

  13. Improving the yeast two-hybrid system with permutated fusions proteins: the Varicella Zoster Virus interactome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screens have been among the most powerful methods to detect and analyze protein-protein interactions. However, they suffer from a significant degree of false negatives, i.e. true interactions that are not detected, and to a certain degree from false positives, i.e. interactions that appear to take place only in the context of the Y2H assay. While the fraction of false positives remains difficult to estimate, the fraction of false negatives in typical Y2H screens is on the order of 70-90%. Here we present novel Y2H vectors that significantly decrease the number of false negatives and help to mitigate the false positive problem. Results We have constructed two new vectors (pGBKCg and pGADCg) that allow us to make both C-terminal fusion proteins of DNA-binding and activation domains. Both vectors can be combined with existing vectors for N-terminal fusions and thus allow four different bait-prey combinations: NN, CC, NC, and CN. We have tested all ~4,900 pairwise combinations of the 70 Varicella-Zoster-Virus (VZV) proteins for interactions, using all possible combinations. About ~20,000 individual Y2H tests resulted in 182 NN, 89 NC, 149 CN, and 144 CC interactions. Overlap between screens ranged from 17% (NC-CN) to 43% (CN-CC). Performing four screens (i.e. permutations) instead of one resulted in about twice as many interactions and thus much fewer false negatives. In addition, interactions that are found in multiple combinations confirm each other and thus provide a quality score. This study is the first systematic analysis of such N- and C-terminal Y2H vectors. Conclusions Permutations of C- and N-terminal Y2H vectors dramatically increase the coverage of interactome studies and thus significantly reduce the number of false negatives. We suggest that future interaction screens should use such vector combinations on a routine basis, not the least because they provide a built-in quality score for Y2H interactions that can provide a

  14. The fusion loops and membrane proximal region of Epstein-Barr virus glycoprotein B (gB) can function in the context of herpes simplex virus 1 gB when substituted individually but not in combination.

    PubMed

    Zago, Anna; Connolly, Sarah A; Spear, Patricia G; Longnecker, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Among the herpesvirus glycoprotein B (gB) fusion proteins, the hydrophobic content of fusion loops and membrane proximal regions (MPRs) are inversely correlated with each other. We examined the functional importance of the hydrophobicity of these regions by replacing them in herpes simplex virus type 1 gB with corresponding regions from Epstein-Barr virus gB. We show that fusion activity is dependent on the structural context in which the specific loops and MPR sequences exist, rather than a simple hydrophobic relationship.

  15. Heptad repeat 2-based peptides inhibit avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup a infection and identify a fusion intermediate.

    PubMed

    Netter, Robert C; Amberg, Sean M; Balliet, John W; Biscone, Mark J; Vermeulen, Arwen; Earp, Laurie J; White, Judith M; Bates, Paul

    2004-12-01

    Fusion proteins of enveloped viruses categorized as class I are typified by two distinct heptad repeat domains within the transmembrane subunit. These repeats are important structural elements that assemble into the six-helix bundles characteristic of the fusion-activated envelope trimer. Peptides derived from these domains can be potent and specific inhibitors of membrane fusion and virus infection. To facilitate our understanding of retroviral entry, peptides corresponding to the two heptad repeat domains of the avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup A (ASLV-A) TM subunit of the envelope protein were characterized. Two peptides corresponding to the C-terminal heptad repeat (HR2), offset from one another by three residues, were effective inhibitors of infection, while two overlapping peptides derived from the N-terminal heptad repeat (HR1) were not. Analysis of envelope mutants containing substitutions within the HR1 domain revealed that a single amino acid change, L62A, significantly reduced sensitivity to peptide inhibition. Virus bound to cells at 4 degrees C became sensitive to peptide within the first 5 min of elevating the temperature to 37 degrees C and lost sensitivity to peptide after 15 to 30 min, consistent with a transient intermediate in which the peptide binding site is exposed. In cell-cell fusion experiments, peptide inhibitor sensitivity occurred prior to a fusion-enhancing low-pH pulse. Soluble receptor for ASLV-A induces a lipophilic character in the envelope which can be measured by stable liposome binding, and this activation was found to be unaffected by inhibitory HR2 peptide. Finally, receptor-triggered conformational changes in the TM subunit were also found to be unaffected by inhibitory peptide. These changes are marked by a dramatic shift in mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, from a subunit of 37 kDa to a complex of about 80 kDa. Biotinylated HR2 peptide bound specifically to the 80-kDa complex

  16. The fusion protein of wild-type canine distemper virus is a major determinant of persistent infection

    SciTech Connect

    Plattet, Philippe; Rivals, Jean-Paul; Zuber, BenoIt; Brunner, Jean-Marc; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Wittek, Riccardo . E-mail: Riccardo.Wittek@unil.ch

    2005-07-05

    The wild-type A75/17 canine distemper virus (CDV) strain induces a persistent infection in the central nervous system but infects cell lines very inefficiently. In contrast, the genetically more distant Onderstepoort CDV vaccine strain (OP-CDV) induces extensive syncytia formation. Here, we investigated the roles of wild-type fusion (F{sub WT}) and attachment (H{sub WT}) proteins in Vero cells expressing, or not, the canine SLAM receptor by transfection experiments and by studying recombinants viruses expressing different combinations of wild-type and OP-CDV glycoproteins. We show that low fusogenicity is not due to a defect of the envelope proteins to reach the cell surface and that H{sub WT} determines persistent infection in a receptor-dependent manner, emphasizing the role of SLAM as a potent enhancer of fusogenicity. However, importantly, F{sub WT} reduced cell-to-cell fusion independently of the cell surface receptor, thus demonstrating that the fusion protein of the neurovirulent A75/17-CDV strain plays a key role in determining persistent infection.

  17. A sugar binding protein Cyanovirin-N blocks herpes simplex virus type-1 entry and cell fusion

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Vaibhav; Shukla, Shripaad Y.; Shukla, Deepak

    2009-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) causes significant health problems from periodic skin and corneal lesions to encephalitis. It is also considered a cofactor in the development of age-related secondary glaucoma. Inhibition of HSV-1 at the stage of viral entry generates a unique opportunity for preventative and/or therapeutic intervention. Here we provide evidence that a sugar-binding antiviral protein, cyanovirin-N (CV-N), can act as a potent inhibitor of HSV-1 entry into natural target cells. Inhibition of entry was independent of HSV-1 gD receptor usage and it was observed in transformed as well as primary cell cultures. Evidence presented herein suggests that CV-N can not only block virus entry to cells but also, it is capable of significantly inhibiting membrane fusion mediated by HSV glycoproteins. While CV-N treated virions were significantly deficient in entering into cells, HSV-1 glycoproteins-expressing cells pretreated with CV-N demonstrated reduced cell-to-cell fusion and polykaryocytes formation. The observation that CV-N can block both entry as well as membrane fusion suggests a stronger potential for this compound in anti-viral therapy against HSV-1. PMID:19665490

  18. Revealing the binding mode between respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein and benzimidazole-based inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ji, Dingjue; Ye, Wei; Chen, HaiFeng

    2015-07-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a major respiratory pathogen in newborn infants and young children and can also be a threat to some elderly and high-risk adults with chronic pulmonary disease and the severely immunocompromised. The RSV fusion (RSVF) protein has been an attractive target for vaccine and drug development. Experimental results indicate a series of benzimidazole-based inhibitors which target RSVF protein to inhibit the viral entry of RSV. To reveal the binding mode between these inhibitors and RSVF protein, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the interactions between the inhibitors and the core domain of RSVF protein. MD results suggest that the active molecules have stronger π-π stacking, cation-π, and other interactions than less active inhibitors. The binding free energy between the active inhibitor and RSVF protein is also found to be significantly lower than that of the less active one using MM/GBSA. Then, Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA) methods were used to construct three dimensional quantitative structure-activity (3D-QSAR) models. The cross-validated q(2) values are found to be 0.821 and 0.795 for CoMFA and CoMSIA, respectively. And the non-cross-validated r(2) values are 0.973 and 0.961. Ninety-two test set compounds validated these models. The results suggest that these models are robust with good prediction abilities. Furthermore, these models reveal possible methods to improve the bioactivity of inhibitors. PMID:25872614

  19. Monoclonal Antibodies against the Fusion Peptide of Hemagglutinin Protect Mice from Lethal Influenza A Virus H5N1 Infection ▿

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Nayana; Prabakaran, Mookkan; Ho, Hui-Ting; Velumani, Sumathy; Qiang, Jia; Goutama, Michael; Kwang, Jimmy

    2009-01-01

    The HA2 glycopolypeptide (gp) is highly conserved in all influenza A virus strains, and it is known to play a major role in the fusion of the virus with the endosomal membrane in host cells during the course of viral infection. Vaccines and therapeutics targeting this HA2 gp could induce efficient broad-spectrum immunity against influenza A virus infections. So far, there have been no studies on the possible therapeutic effects of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), specifically against the fusion peptide of hemagglutinin (HA), upon lethal infections with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus. We have identified MAb 1C9, which binds to GLFGAIAGF, a part of the fusion peptide of the HA2 gp. We evaluated the efficacy of MAb 1C9 as a therapy for influenza A virus infections. This MAb, which inhibited cell fusion in vitro when administered passively, protected 100% of mice from challenge with five 50% mouse lethal doses of HPAI H5N1 influenza A viruses from two different clades. Furthermore, it caused earlier clearance of the virus from the lung. The influenza virus load was assessed in lung samples from mice challenged after pretreatment with MAb 1C9 (24 h prior to challenge) and from mice receiving early treatment (24 h after challenge). The study shows that MAb 1C9, which is specific to the antigenically conserved fusion peptide of HA2, can contribute to the cross-clade protection of mice infected with H5N1 virus and mediate more effective recovery from infection. PMID:19109379

  20. Transmitted/Founder Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Envelope Sequences in Vesicular Stomatitis and Semliki Forest Virus Vector Immunized Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Gambhira, Ratish; Keele, Brandon F.; Schell, John B.; Hunter, Meredith J.; Dufour, Jason P.; Montefiori, David C.; Tang, Haili; Rose, John K.; Rose, Nina; Marx, Preston A.

    2014-01-01

    Identification of transmitted/founder simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) envelope sequences responsible for infection may prove critical for understanding HIV/SIV mucosal transmission. We used single genome amplification and phylogenetic analyses to characterize transmitted/founder SIVs both in the inoculum and in immunized-infected rhesus monkeys. Single genome amplification of the SIVsmE660 inoculum revealed a maximum diversity of 1.4%. We also noted that the consensus sequence of the challenge stock differed from the vaccine construct in 10 amino acids including 3 changes in the V4 loop. Viral env was prepared from rhesus plasma in 3 groups of 6 immunized with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vectors and boosted with Semliki forest virus (SFV) replicons expressing (a) SIVsmE660 gag-env (b) SIVsmE660 gag-env plus rhesus GM-CSF and (c) control influenza hemagglutinin protein. Macaques were immunized twice with VSV-vectors and once with SFV vector and challenged intrarectally with 4000 TCID50. Single genome amplification characterized the infections of 2 unprotected animals in the gag-env immunized group, both of which had reduced acute plasma viral loads that ended as transient infections indicating partial immune control. Four of 6 rhesus were infected in the gag-env + GM-CSF group which demonstrated that GM-CSF abrogated protection. All 6 animals from the control group were infected having high plasma viral loads. We obtained 246 full-length envelope sequences from SIVsmE660 infected macaques at the peak of infection and determined the number of transmitted/founder variants per animal. Our analysis found that 2 of 2 gag-env vaccinated but infected macaques exhibited single but distinct virus envelope lineages whereas rhesus vaccinated with gag-env-GM-CSF or HA control exhibited both single and multiple env lineages. Because there were only 2 infected animals in the gag-env vaccinated rhesus compared to 10 infected rhesus in the other 2 groups, the significance

  1. Transmitted/founder simian immunodeficiency virus envelope sequences in vesicular stomatitis and Semliki forest virus vector immunized rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Gambhira, Ratish; Keele, Brandon F; Schell, John B; Hunter, Meredith J; Dufour, Jason P; Montefiori, David C; Tang, Haili; Rose, John K; Rose, Nina; Marx, Preston A

    2014-01-01

    Identification of transmitted/founder simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) envelope sequences responsible for infection may prove critical for understanding HIV/SIV mucosal transmission. We used single genome amplification and phylogenetic analyses to characterize transmitted/founder SIVs both in the inoculum and in immunized-infected rhesus monkeys. Single genome amplification of the SIVsmE660 inoculum revealed a maximum diversity of 1.4%. We also noted that the consensus sequence of the challenge stock differed from the vaccine construct in 10 amino acids including 3 changes in the V4 loop. Viral env was prepared from rhesus plasma in 3 groups of 6 immunized with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vectors and boosted with Semliki forest virus (SFV) replicons expressing (a) SIVsmE660 gag-env (b) SIVsmE660 gag-env plus rhesus GM-CSF and (c) control influenza hemagglutinin protein. Macaques were immunized twice with VSV-vectors and once with SFV vector and challenged intrarectally with 4000 TCID50. Single genome amplification characterized the infections of 2 unprotected animals in the gag-env immunized group, both of which had reduced acute plasma viral loads that ended as transient infections indicating partial immune control. Four of 6 rhesus were infected in the gag-env + GM-CSF group which demonstrated that GM-CSF abrogated protection. All 6 animals from the control group were infected having high plasma viral loads. We obtained 246 full-length envelope sequences from SIVsmE660 infected macaques at the peak of infection and determined the number of transmitted/founder variants per animal. Our analysis found that 2 of 2 gag-env vaccinated but infected macaques exhibited single but distinct virus envelope lineages whereas rhesus vaccinated with gag-env-GM-CSF or HA control exhibited both single and multiple env lineages. Because there were only 2 infected animals in the gag-env vaccinated rhesus compared to 10 infected rhesus in the other 2 groups, the significance

  2. Estimation of aboveground biomass in forests using multi-sensor (LIDAR, IFSAR, ETM+) fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, P.; Dubuyah, R.; Blair, B.; Hofton, M.; Hunsaker, C.; Pierce, L.; Walker, W.

    2002-05-01

    Aboveground biomass in forests, or the dry weight of standing trees, is a key ecosystem parameter for carbon dynamics, fire modeling, and biodiversity studies. Field-based assessments are expensive and methods to scale from field plots to landscapes are not generally accepted. Remote sensing potentially provides a cost-effective alternative, but no single sensor has yet to provide accurate, consistent estimates in all biomes. Passive optical sensors and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) have been proven effective only in young, structurally simple forests. Light detecting and ranging (LIDAR) has been effective in old-growth, structurally complex forests, but data are not widely available. Combining information from these sensors will leverage the high information content, high cost LIDAR data with lower cost, more widely available SAR and passive optical data. In this study, Landsat ETM+, x-band interferometric SAR, and airborne LIDAR from the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) were statistically fused using a decision tree classifier and compared to field-based estimates of biomass in Sierra National Forest, CA, USA. Biomass estimates derived from all sensors combined were more accurate than those derived from any single sensor.

  3. A single amino acid in the F2 subunit of respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein alters growth and fusogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Schickli, Jeanne H.; Tang, Roderick S.

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe lower respiratory tract infection in children, especially in infants less than 1 year of age. There are currently no licensed vaccines against RSV. rA2ΔM2-2 is a promising live-attenuated vaccine candidate that is currently being evaluated in the clinic. Attenuation of rA2ΔM2-2 is achieved by a single deletion of the M2-2 gene, which disrupts the balance between viral transcription and replication. Whilst performing a manufacturing feasibility study in a serum-free adapted Vero cell line, differences in growth kinetics and cytopathic effect (CPE) were identified between two rA2ΔM2-2 vaccine candidates. Comparative sequence analysis identified four amino acid differences between the two vaccine viruses. Recombinant rA2ΔM2-2 viruses carrying each of the four amino acid differences identified a K66E mutation in the F2 fragment of the fusion (F) protein as the cause of the growth and CPE differences. Syncytium-formation experiments with RSV F protein carrying mutations at aa 66 suggested that a change in charge at this residue within the F2 fragment can have a significant impact on fusion. PMID:24092758

  4. Nuclear envelope breakdown induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 involves the activity of viral fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Maric, Martina; Haugo, Alison C.; Dauer, William; Johnson, David; Roller, Richard J.

    2014-07-15

    Herpesvirus infection reorganizes components of the nuclear lamina usually without loss of integrity of the nuclear membranes. We report that wild-type HSV infection can cause dissolution of the nuclear envelope in transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not express torsinA. Nuclear envelope breakdown is accompanied by an eight-fold inhibition of virus replication. Breakdown of the membrane is much more limited during infection with viruses that lack the gB and gH genes, suggesting that breakdown involves factors that promote fusion at the nuclear membrane. Nuclear envelope breakdown is also inhibited during infection with virus that does not express UL34, but is enhanced when the US3 gene is deleted, suggesting that envelope breakdown may be enhanced by nuclear lamina disruption. Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the UL34 gene suggesting that mixing of nuclear and cytoplasmic contents is insufficient to bypass loss of the normal nuclear egress pathway. - Highlights: • We show that wild-type HSV can induce breakdown of the nuclear envelope in a specific cell system. • The viral fusion proteins gB and gH are required for induction of nuclear envelope breakdown. • Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the HSV UL34 gene.

  5. Amino acid changes within the E protein hinge region that affect dengue virus type 2 infectivity and fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Butrapet, Siritorn; Childers, Thomas; Moss, Kelley J.; Erb, Steven M.; Luy, Betty E.; Calvert, Amanda E.; Blair, Carol D.; Roehrig, John T.; Huang, Claire Y.-H.

    2011-04-25

    Fifteen mutant dengue viruses were engineered and used to identify AAs in the molecular hinge of the envelope protein that are critical to viral infection. Substitutions at Q52, A54, or E133 reduced infectivity in mammalian cells and altered the pH threshold of fusion. Mutations at F193, G266, I270, or G281 affected viral replication in mammalian and mosquito cells, but only I270W had reduced fusion activity. T280Y affected the pH threshold for fusion and reduced replication in C6/36 cells. Three different mutations at L135 were lethal in mammalian cells. Among them, L135G abrogated fusion and reduced replication in C6/36 cells, but only slightly reduced the mosquito infection rate. Conversely, L135W replicated well in C6/36 cells, but had the lowest mosquito infection rate. Possible interactions between hinge residues 52 and 277, or among 53, 135, 170, 186, 265, and 276 required for hinge function were discovered by sequence analysis to identify compensatory mutations.

  6. Dual split protein-based fusion assay reveals that mutations to herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein gB alter the kinetics of cell-cell fusion induced by HSV entry glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Atanasiu, Doina; Saw, Wan Ting; Gallagher, John R; Hannah, Brian P; Matsuda, Zene; Whitbeck, J Charles; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J

    2013-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry and cell-cell fusion require glycoproteins gD, gH/gL, and gB. We propose that receptor-activated changes to gD cause it to activate gH/gL, which then triggers gB into an active form. We employed a dual split-protein (DSP) assay to monitor the kinetics of HSV glycoprotein-induced cell-cell fusion. This assay measures content mixing between two cells, i.e., fusion, within the same cell population in real time (minutes to hours). Titration experiments suggest that both gD and gH/gL act in a catalytic fashion to trigger gB. In fact, fusion rates are governed by the amount of gB on the cell surface. We then used the DSP assay to focus on mutants in two functional regions (FRs) of gB, FR1 and FR3. FR1 contains the fusion loops (FL1 and FL2), and FR3 encompasses the crown at the trimer top. All FL mutants initiated fusion very slowly, if at all. However, the fusion rates caused by some FL2 mutants increased over time, so that total fusion by 8 h looked much like that of the WT. Two distinct kinetic patterns, "slow and fast," emerged for mutants in the crown of gB (FR3), again showing differences in initiation and ongoing fusion. Of note are the fusion kinetics of the gB syn mutant (LL871/872AA). Although this mutant was originally included as an ongoing high-rate-of-fusion control, its initiation of fusion is so rapid that it appears to be on a "hair trigger." Thus, the DSP assay affords a unique way to examine the dynamics of HSV glycoprotein-induced cell fusion.

  7. TWELVE ISOLATIONS OF ZIKA VIRUS FROM AEDES (STEGOMYIA) AFRICANUS (THEOBALD) TAKEN IN AND ABOVE A UGANDA FOREST.

    PubMed

    HADDOW, A J; WILLIAMS, M C; WOODALL, J P; SIMPSON, D I; GOMA, L K

    1964-01-01

    In continuation of a series of studies of arboreal mosquitos as virus vectors in Uganda, 12 strains of Zika virus and one strain of another Group B arbovirus were isolated between November 1961 and June 1963 from pools of Aedes (Stegomyia) africanus caught on a 120-foot (36.5-m) tower in Zika forest. For five strains it is known at what height the mosquitos were caught: one was from mosquitos taken at ground level, and the other four were from mosquitos taken in or above the upper canopy after sunset. No small mammal trapped in the forest either on the ground or in the trees showed serum antibody for Zika virus.These findings suggest that in Zika forest, A. (S.) africanus becomes infected from a virus reservoir that is probably not among the small animals tested and that infected mosquitos are liable to be spread widely beyond the forest by convection currents above the tree-tops in the first two or three hours after sunset.

  8. Evidence that maturation of the N-linked glycans of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) glycoproteins is required for virus-mediated cell fusion: The effect of {alpha}-mannosidase inhibitors on RSV infectivity

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Terence P.; Jeffree, Chris E.; Li, Ping; Rixon, Helen W. McL.; Brown, Gaie; Aitken, James D.; MacLellan, Kirsty; Sugrue, Richard J. . E-mail: rjsugrue@ntu.edu.sg

    2006-07-05

    Glycan heterogeneity of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion (F) protein was demonstrated by proteomics. The effect of maturation of the virus glycoproteins-associated glycans on virus infectivity was therefore examined using the {alpha}-mannosidase inhibitors deoxymannojirimycin (DMJ) and swainsonine (SW). In the presence of SW the N-linked glycans on the F protein appeared in a partially mature form, whereas in the presence of DMJ no maturation of the glycans was observed. Neither inhibitor had a significant effect on G protein processing or on the formation of progeny virus. Although the level of infectious virus and syncytia formation was not significantly affected by SW-treatment, DMJ-treatment correlated with a one hundred-fold reduction in virus infectivity. Our data suggest that glycan maturation of the RSV glycoproteins, in particular those on the F protein, is an important step in virus maturation and is required for virus infectivity.

  9. Tin Oxide Nanowires Suppress Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Entry and Cell-to-Cell Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Paulowicz, Ingo; Mishra, Yogendra K.; Adelung, Rainer; Shukla, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    The advent of nanotechnology has ushered in the use of modified nanoparticles as potential antiviral agents against diseases such as herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1) (HSV-2), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), monkeypox virus, and hepatitis B virus. Here we describe the application of tin oxide (SnO2) nanowires as an effective treatment against HSV-1 infection. SnO2 nanowires work as a carrier of negatively charged structures that compete with HSV-1 attachment to cell bound heparan sulfate (HS), therefore inhibiting entry and subsequent cell-to-cell spread. This promising new approach can be developed into a novel form of broad-spectrum antiviral therapy especially since HS has been shown to serve as a cellular co-receptor for a number of other viruses as well, including the respiratory syncytial virus, adeno-associated virus type 2, and human papilloma virus. PMID:23110193

  10. Influenza virus vaccine expressing fusion and attachment protein epitopes of respiratory syncytial virus induces protective antibodies in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Bian, Chengrong; Liu, Shuzhen; Liu, Na; Zhang, Guangzhou; Xing, Li; Song, Yingwei; Duan, Yueqiang; Gu, Hongjing; Zhou, Ya; Zhang, Peirui; Li, Zhiwei; Zhang, Keming; Wang, Zhaohai; Zhang, Shaogeng; Wang, Xiliang; Yang, Penghui

    2014-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important viral pathogen that causes life-threatening respiratory infections in both infants and the elderly; no vaccines are at present available. In this report, we examined the use of influenza virus as a vehicle for production of an experimental RSV vaccine. We used reverse genetics to generate a recombinant influenza A virus with epitopes from the RSV fusion (F) and attachment (G) proteins (rFlu/RSV/F+G) in the influenza virus nonstructural (NS1) protein gene. Expression of RSV F+G epitope proteins was confirmed by Western blotting, and no changes in viral morphology were evident following examination by electron microscopy. BALB/c mice immunized intranasally with rFlu/RSV/F+G showed viral-specific antibody responses against both influenza and RSV. Total IgG, IgG1, IgG2a and IgA were measured in mice immunized with rFlu/RSV/F+G, revealing robust cellular and mucosal immune responses. Furthermore, we found that rFlu/RSV/F+G conferred protection against subsequent influenza and RSV challenges, showing significant decreases in viral replication and obvious attenuation of histopathological changes associated with viral infections. These findings suggest that rFlu/RSV/F+G is a promising vaccine candidate, which should be further assessed using cotton rat and primate models. PMID:24509239

  11. The Pre-Transmembrane Domain of the Autographa californica Multicapsid Nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 Protein Is Critical for Membrane Fusion and Virus Infectivity▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhaofei; Blissard, Gary W.

    2009-01-01

    The envelope glycoprotein, GP64, of the baculovirus Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is a class III viral fusion protein that mediates pH-triggered membrane fusion during virus entry. Viral fusion glycoproteins from many viruses contain a short region in the ectodomain and near the transmembrane domain, referred to as the pre-transmembrane (PTM) domain. In some cases, the PTM domain is rich in aromatic amino acids and plays an important role in membrane fusion. Although the 23-amino-acid (aa) PTM domain of AcMNPV GP64 lacks aromatic amino acids, we asked whether this region might also play a significant role in membrane fusion. We generated alanine scanning and single and multiple amino acid substitutions in the GP64 PTM domain. We specifically focused on amino acid positions conserved between baculovirus GP64 and thogotovirus GP75 proteins, as well as hydrophobic and charged amino acids. For each PTM-modified construct, we examined trimerization, cell surface localization, and membrane fusion activity. Membrane merger and pore formation were also examined. We identified eight aa positions that are important for membrane fusion activity. Critical positions were not clustered in the linear sequence but were distributed throughout the PTM domain. While charged residues were not critical or essential, three hydrophobic amino acids (L465, L476, and L480) played an important role in membrane fusion activity and appear to be involved in formation of the fusion pore. We also asked whether selected GP64 constructs were capable of rescuing a gp64null AcMNPV virus. These studies suggested that several conserved residues (T463, G460, G462, and G474) were not required for membrane fusion but were important for budding and viral infectivity. PMID:19692475

  12. Forest Attributes from Radar Interferometric Structure and its Fusion with Optical Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treuhaft, Robert N.; Law, Beverly E.; Asner, Gregory P.

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of global, three-dimensional remote sensing of forest structure with interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) bears on important forest ecological processes, particularly the carbon cycle. InSAR supplements two-dimensional remote sensing with information in the vertical dimension. Its strengths in potential for global coverage complement those of lidar (light detecting and ranging), which has the potential for high-accuracy vertical profiles over small areas. InSAR derives its sensitivity to forest vertical structure from the differences in signals received by two, spatially separate radar receivers. Estimation of parameters describing vertical structure requires multiple-polarization, multiple-frequency, or multiple-baseline InSAR. Combining InSAR with complementary remote sensing techniques, such as hyperspectral optical imaging and lidar, can enhance vertical-structure estimates and consequent biophysical quantities of importance to ecologists, such as biomass. Future InSAR experiments will supplement recent airborne and spaceborne demonstrations, and together with inputs from ecologists regarding structure, they will suggest designs for future spaceborne strategies for measuring global vegetation structure.

  13. A Novel Peptide Derived from the Fusion Protein Heptad Repeat Inhibits Replication of Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis Virus In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Koichi; Abe, Yusaku; Kodama, Eiichi N.; Nabika, Ryota; Oishi, Shinya; Ohara, Shinichiro; Sato, Masatoki; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Fujii, Nobutaka; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a persistent, progressive, and fatal degenerative disease resulting from persistent measles virus (MV) infection of the central nervous system. Most drugs used to treat SSPE have been reported to have limited effects. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are urgently required. The SSPE virus, a variant MV strain, differs virologically from wild-type MV strain. One characteristic of the SSPE virus is its defective production of cell-free virus, which leaves cell-to-cell infection as the major mechanism of viral dissemination. The fusion protein plays an essential role in this cell-to-cell spread. It contains two critical heptad repeat regions that form a six-helix bundle in the trimer similar to most viral fusion proteins. In the case of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), a synthetic peptide derived from the heptad repeat region of the fusion protein enfuvirtide inhibits viral replication and is clinically approved as an anti-HIV-1 agent. The heptad repeat regions of HIV-1 are structurally and functionally similar to those of the MV fusion protein. We therefore designed novel peptides derived from the fusion protein heptad repeat region of the MV and examined their effects on the measles and SSPE virus replication in vitro and in vivo. Some of these synthetic novel peptides demonstrated high antiviral activity against both the measles (Edmonston strain) and SSPE (Yamagata-1 strain) viruses at nanomolar concentrations with no cytotoxicity in vitro. In particular, intracranial administration of one of the synthetic peptides increased the survival rate from 0% to 67% in an SSPE virus-infected nude mouse model. PMID:27612283

  14. A Novel Peptide Derived from the Fusion Protein Heptad Repeat Inhibits Replication of Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis Virus In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Koichi; Abe, Yusaku; Kodama, Eiichi N; Nabika, Ryota; Oishi, Shinya; Ohara, Shinichiro; Sato, Masatoki; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Fujii, Nobutaka; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a persistent, progressive, and fatal degenerative disease resulting from persistent measles virus (MV) infection of the central nervous system. Most drugs used to treat SSPE have been reported to have limited effects. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are urgently required. The SSPE virus, a variant MV strain, differs virologically from wild-type MV strain. One characteristic of the SSPE virus is its defective production of cell-free virus, which leaves cell-to-cell infection as the major mechanism of viral dissemination. The fusion protein plays an essential role in this cell-to-cell spread. It contains two critical heptad repeat regions that form a six-helix bundle in the trimer similar to most viral fusion proteins. In the case of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), a synthetic peptide derived from the heptad repeat region of the fusion protein enfuvirtide inhibits viral replication and is clinically approved as an anti-HIV-1 agent. The heptad repeat regions of HIV-1 are structurally and functionally similar to those of the MV fusion protein. We therefore designed novel peptides derived from the fusion protein heptad repeat region of the MV and examined their effects on the measles and SSPE virus replication in vitro and in vivo. Some of these synthetic novel peptides demonstrated high antiviral activity against both the measles (Edmonston strain) and SSPE (Yamagata-1 strain) viruses at nanomolar concentrations with no cytotoxicity in vitro. In particular, intracranial administration of one of the synthetic peptides increased the survival rate from 0% to 67% in an SSPE virus-infected nude mouse model. PMID:27612283

  15. Full-length trimeric influenza virus hemagglutinin II membrane fusion protein and shorter constructs lacking the fusion peptide or transmembrane domain: Hyperthermostability of the full-length protein and the soluble ectodomain and fusion peptide make significant contributions to fusion of membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, Punsisi U; Prabodha Ekanayaka, E A; Komanduru, Sweta S; Weliky, David P

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus is a class I enveloped virus which is initially endocytosed into a host respiratory epithelial cell. Subsequent reduction of the pH to the 5-6 range triggers a structural change of the viral hemagglutinin II (HA2) protein, fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes, and release of the viral nucleocapsid into the cytoplasm. HA2 contains fusion peptide (FP), soluble ectodomain (SE), transmembrane (TM), and intraviral domains with respective lengths of ∼ 25, ∼ 160, ∼ 25, and ∼ 10 residues. The present work provides a straightforward protocol for producing and purifying mg quantities of full-length HA2 from expression in bacteria. Biophysical and structural comparisons are made between full-length HA2 and shorter constructs including SHA2 ≡ SE, FHA2 ≡ FP+SE, and SHA2-TM ≡ SE+TM constructs. The constructs are helical in detergent at pH 7.4 and the dominant trimer species. The proteins are highly thermostable in decylmaltoside detergent with Tm>90 °C for HA2 with stabilization provided by the SE, FP, and TM domains. The proteins are likely in a trimer-of-hairpins structure, the final protein state during fusion. All constructs induce fusion of negatively-charged vesicles at pH 5.0 with much less fusion at pH 7.4. Attractive protein/vesicle electrostatics play a role in fusion, as the proteins are positively-charged at pH 5.0 and negatively-charged at pH 7.4 and the pH-dependence of fusion is reversed for positively-charged vesicles. Comparison of fusion between constructs supports significant contributions to fusion from the SE and the FP with little effect from the TM.

  16. [Fusion expression of O type foot-and-mouth diseases virus VP1 gene and HSP70 gene and induction of immune responses in mice].

    PubMed

    Su, Chun-Xia; Duan, Xiang-Guo; Wang, Xiu-Qing; Ren, Xue-Feng; Cao, Rui-Bing; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Pu-Yan

    2006-09-01

    Vp1 gene of O type foot-and-mouth diseases virus and M. tuberculosis HSP70 were expressed in methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris expression system. The results of cellular immune responses and humoral immune response were examined after BALB/c mice were immunized with fusion protein expressed in methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The genes was cloned into the vector pPICZalpha-A by routine molecular technique. The plasmid fusion (pPICZalphaA-vp1-HSP70) was created that HSP70 located downstream of VP1 gene of O type foot-and-mouth disease virus. Vp1 was expressed by fusing to the amino terminus of M. tuberculosis hsp70 in yeast Pichia pastoris. The recombined fusion plasmid was transformed into methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris X-33 by electrophoration. The recombinant transformants were selected by Zeocin and induced by the addition of methanol every 24h. The expressived product analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The result indicated that the fusion protein(vp1-HSP70) has specific antigenicity. Mice were inoculated transcutaneous three times at a two-weeks interval with fusion protein, PBS and conventional inactivated vaccines. To evaluate the prophylaxtic efficacy of fusion protein, Titers of antibodies was detected by ELISA and proliferation of lymphocytes were determined by MTT. The results indicated that fusion protein could elicit specific humoral immune and cellular immune responses. Compared with conventional inactivated vaccines, fusion protein elicited slightly lower FMDV antibody level but stronger T cell proliferation.

  17. The Roles of Histidines and Charged Residues as Potential Triggers of a Conformational Change in the Fusion Loop of Ebola Virus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jinwoo; Gregory, Sonia M.; Nelson, Elizabeth A.; White, Judith M.; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) enters cells from late endosomes/lysosomes under mildly acidic conditions. Entry by fusion with the endosomal membrane requires the fusion loop (FL, residues 507–560) of the EBOV surface glycoprotein to undergo a pH-dependent conformational change. To find the pH trigger for this reaction we mutated multiple conserved histidines and charged and uncharged hydrophilic residues in the FL and measured their activity by liposome fusion and cell entry of virus-like particles. The FL location in the membrane was assessed by NMR using soluble and lipid-bound paramagnetic relaxation agents. While we could not identify a single residue to be alone responsible for pH triggering, we propose that a distributed pH effect over multiple residues induces the conformational change that enhances membrane insertion and triggers the fusion activity of the EBOV FL. PMID:27023721

  18. Cysteines in the Stalk of the Nipah Virus G Glycoprotein Are Located in a Distinct Subdomain Critical for Fusion Activation

    PubMed Central

    Maar, Dianna; Harmon, Brooke; Chu, David; Schulz, Belinda; Aguilar, Hector C.; Lee, Benhur

    2012-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses initiate entry through the concerted action of the tetrameric attachment glycoprotein (HN, H, or G) and the trimeric fusion glycoprotein (F). The ectodomains of HN/H/G contain a stalk region important for oligomeric stability and for the F triggering resulting in membrane fusion. Paramyxovirus HN, H, and G form a dimer-of-dimers consisting of disulfide-linked dimers through their stalk domain cysteines. The G attachment protein stalk domain of the highly pathogenic Nipah virus (NiV) contains a distinct but uncharacterized cluster of three cysteine residues (C146, C158, C162). On the basis of a panoply of assays, we report that C158 and C162 of NiV-G likely mediate covalent subunit dimerization, while C146 mediates the stability of higher-order oligomers. For HN or H, mutation of stalk cysteines attenuates but does not abrogate the ability to trigger fusion. In contrast, the NiV-G stalk cysteine mutants were completely deficient in triggering fusion, even though they could still bind the ephrinB2 receptor and associate with F. Interestingly, all cysteine stalk mutants exhibited constitutive exposure of the Mab45 receptor binding-enhanced epitope, previously implicated in F triggering. The enhanced binding of Mab45 to the cysteine mutants relative to wild-type NiV-G, without the addition of the receptor, implicates the stalk cysteines in the stabilization of a pre-receptor-bound conformation and the regulation of F triggering. Sequence alignments revealed that the stalk cysteines were adjacent to a proline-rich microdomain unique to the Henipavirus genus. Our data propose that the cysteine cluster in the NiV-G stalk functions to maintain oligomeric stability but is more importantly involved in stabilizing a unique microdomain critical for triggering fusion. PMID:22496210

  19. Novel innate immune functions for galectin-1: galectin-1 inhibits cell fusion by Nipah virus envelope glycoproteins and augments dendritic cell secretion of proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Levroney, Ernest L; Aguilar, Hector C; Fulcher, Jennifer A; Kohatsu, Luciana; Pace, Karen E; Pang, Mabel; Gurney, Kevin B; Baum, Linda G; Lee, Benhur

    2005-07-01

    Galectin-1 (gal-1), an endogenous lectin secreted by a variety of cell types, has pleiotropic immunomodulatory functions, including regulation of lymphocyte survival and cytokine secretion in autoimmune, transplant disease, and parasitic infection models. However, the role of gal-1 in viral infections is unknown. Nipah virus (NiV) is an emerging pathogen that causes severe, often fatal, febrile encephalitis. The primary targets of NiV are endothelial cells. NiV infection of endothelial cells results in cell-cell fusion and syncytia formation triggered by the fusion (F) and attachment (G) envelope glycoproteins of NiV that bear glycan structures recognized by gal-1. In the present study, we report that NiV envelope-mediated cell-cell fusion is blocked by gal-1. This inhibition is specific to the Paramyxoviridae family because gal-1 did not inhibit fusion triggered by envelope glycoproteins of other viruses, including two retroviruses and a pox virus, but inhibited fusion triggered by envelope glycoproteins of the related Hendra virus and another paramyxovirus. The physiologic dimeric form of gal-1 is required for fusion inhibition because a monomeric gal-1 mutant had no inhibitory effect on cell fusion. gal-1 binds to specific N-glycans on NiV glycoproteins and aberrantly oligomerizes NiV-F and NiV-G, indicating a mechanism for fusion inhibition. gal-1 also increases dendritic cell production of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, known to be protective in the setting of other viral diseases such as Ebola infections. Thus, gal-1 may have direct antiviral effects and may also augment the innate immune response against this emerging pathogen.

  20. Molecular changes of the fusion protein gene of chicken embryo fibroblast-adapted velogenic Newcastle disease virus: effect on its pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Mohan, C Madhan; Dey, Sohini; Kumanan, K

    2005-03-01

    Molecular changes of cell culture-adapted Newcastle disease virus (NDV) were studied by adapting a velogenic NDV isolated from commercial layer chicken-to-chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells. The isolate was passaged 50 times in CEF cells. At every 10th passage the virus was characterized conventionally by mean death time analysis, intracerebral pathogenicity index, and virus titration. As the passage level increased, a gradual reduction in the virulence of the virus was observed. Molecular characterization of the virus included cloning and sequencing of a portion of the fusion gene (1349 bp) encompassing the fusion protein cleavage site (FPCS), which was previously amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Sequence analysis revealed a total of 134 nucleotide substitutions, which resulted in the change of 41 amino acids between the parent and the 50th passage virus. Pathogenicity studies conducted in 20-wk-old seronegative chickens revealed gross and histopathologic changes in the chickens injected with the parent virus and absence of the lesions in chickens injected with the adapted virus. The 50th passage cell culture virus was back-passaged five times in susceptible chickens and was subjected to virulence attribute analysis and sequence analysis of the FPCS region, with minor differences between them.

  1. Computational analysis of perturbations in the post-fusion Dengue virus envelope protein highlights known epitopes and conserved residues in the Zika virus

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The dramatic transformation of the Zika virus (ZIKV) from a relatively unknown virus to a pathogen generating global-wide panic has exposed the dearth of detailed knowledge about this virus. Decades of research in the related Dengue virus (DENV), finally culminating in a vaccine registered for use in endemic regions (CYD-TDV) in three countries, provides key insights in developing strategies for tackling ZIKV, which has caused global panic to microcephaly and Guillain-Barre Syndrome. Dengue virus (DENV), a member of the family Flaviviridae, the causal agent of the self-limiting Dengue fever and the potentially fatal hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome, has been a scourge in tropical countries for many centuries. The recently solved structure of mature ZIKV (PDB ID:5IRE) has provided key insights into the structure of the envelope (E) and membrane (M) proteins, the primary target of neutralizing antibodies. The previously established MEPP methodology compares two conformations of the same protein and identifies residues with significant spatial and electrostatic perturbations. In the current work, MEPP analyzed the pre-and post-fusion DENV type 2 envelope (E) protein, and identified several known epitopes (His317, Tyr299, Glu26, Arg188, etc.) (MEPPitope). These residues are overwhelmingly conserved in ZIKV and all DENV serotypes, and also enumerates residue pairs that undergo significant polarity reversal. Characterization of α-helices in E-proteins show that α1 is not conserved in the sequence space of ZIKV and DENV. Furthermore, perturbation of α1 in the post-fusion DENV structure includes a known epitope Asp215, a residue absent in the pre-fusion α1. A cationic β-sheet in the GAG-binding domain that is stereochemically equivalent in ZIKV and all DENV serotypes is also highlighted due to a residue pair (Arg286-Arg288) that has a significant electrostatic polarity reversal upon fusion. Finally, two highly conserved residues (Thr32 and Thr40), with little

  2. Development of a new noncytopathic Semliki Forest virus vector providing high expression levels and stability

    SciTech Connect

    Casales, Erkuden; Rodriguez-Madoz, Juan R.; Ruiz-Guillen, Marta; Razquin, Nerea; Cuevas, Yolanda; Prieto, Jesus; Smerdou, Cristian

    2008-06-20

    Alphavirus vectors express high levels of recombinant proteins in mammalian cells, but their cytopathic nature makes this expression transient. In order to generate a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) noncytopathic vector we introduced mutations previously described to turn Sindbis virus noncytopathic into a conserved position in an SFV vector expressing LacZ. Interestingly, mutant P718T in replicase nsp2 subunit was able to replicate in only a small percentage of BHK cells, producing {beta}-gal-expressing colonies without selection. Puromycin N-acetyl-transferase (pac) gene was used to replace LacZ in this mutant allowing selection of an SFV noncytopathic replicon containing a second mutation in nsp2 nuclear localization signal (R649H). This latter mutation did not confer a noncytopathic phenotype by itself and did not alter nsp2 nuclear translocation. Replicase synthesis was diminished in the SFV double mutant, leading to genomic and subgenomic RNA levels that were 125-fold and 66-fold lower than in wild-type vector, respectively. Interestingly, this mutant expressed {beta}-gal levels similar to parental vector. By coexpressing pac and LacZ from independent subgenomic promoters this vector was able to generate stable cell lines maintaining high expression levels during at least 10 passages, indicating that it could be used as a powerful system for protein production in mammalian cells.

  3. Development of a new noncytopathic Semliki Forest virus vector providing high expression levels and stability.

    PubMed

    Casales, Erkuden; Rodriguez-Madoz, Juan R; Ruiz-Guillen, Marta; Razquin, Nerea; Cuevas, Yolanda; Prieto, Jesus; Smerdou, Cristian

    2008-06-20

    Alphavirus vectors express high levels of recombinant proteins in mammalian cells, but their cytopathic nature makes this expression transient. In order to generate a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) noncytopathic vector we introduced mutations previously described to turn Sindbis virus noncytopathic into a conserved position in an SFV vector expressing LacZ. Interestingly, mutant P718T in replicase nsp2 subunit was able to replicate in only a small percentage of BHK cells, producing beta-gal-expressing colonies without selection. Puromycin N-acetyl-transferase (pac) gene was used to replace LacZ in this mutant allowing selection of an SFV noncytopathic replicon containing a second mutation in nsp2 nuclear localization signal (R649H). This latter mutation did not confer a noncytopathic phenotype by itself and did not alter nsp2 nuclear translocation. Replicase synthesis was diminished in the SFV double mutant, leading to genomic and subgenomic RNA levels that were 125-fold and 66-fold lower than in wild-type vector, respectively. Interestingly, this mutant expressed beta-gal levels similar to parental vector. By coexpressing pac and LacZ from independent subgenomic promoters this vector was able to generate stable cell lines maintaining high expression levels during at least 10 passages, indicating that it could be used as a powerful system for protein production in mammalian cells.

  4. What variables are important in predicting bovine viral diarrhea virus? A random forest approach.

    PubMed

    Machado, Gustavo; Mendoza, Mariana Recamonde; Corbellini, Luis Gustavo

    2015-07-24

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) causes one of the most economically important diseases in cattle, and the virus is found worldwide. A better understanding of the disease associated factors is a crucial step towards the definition of strategies for control and eradication. In this study we trained a random forest (RF) prediction model and performed variable importance analysis to identify factors associated with BVDV occurrence. In addition, we assessed the influence of features selection on RF performance and evaluated its predictive power relative to other popular classifiers and to logistic regression. We found that RF classification model resulted in an average error rate of 32.03% for the negative class (negative for BVDV) and 36.78% for the positive class (positive for BVDV).The RF model presented area under the ROC curve equal to 0.702. Variable importance analysis revealed that important predictors of BVDV occurrence were: a) who inseminates the animals, b) number of neighboring farms that have cattle and c) rectal palpation performed routinely. Our results suggest that the use of machine learning algorithms, especially RF, is a promising methodology for the analysis of cross-sectional studies, presenting a satisfactory predictive power and the ability to identify predictors that represent potential risk factors for BVDV investigation. We examined classical predictors and found some new and hard to control practices that may lead to the spread of this disease within and among farms, mainly regarding poor or neglected reproduction management, which should be considered for disease control and eradication.

  5. Downregulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag expression by a gp41 cytoplasmic domain fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, W.-E.; Chen, Steve S.-L. . E-mail: schen@ibms.sinica.edu.tw

    2006-05-10

    The cytoplasmic domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) transmembrane protein gp41 interacts with the viral matrix MA protein, which facilitates incorporation of the trimeric Env complex into the virus. It is thus feasible to design an anti-HIV strategy targeting this interaction. We herein describe that Gag expression can be downregulated by a cytoplasmic domain fusion protein of the Env transmembrane protein, {beta}-galactosidase ({beta}-gal)/706-856, which contains the cytoplasmic tail of gp41 fused at the C terminus of Escherichia coli {beta}-gal. This mediator depleted intracellular Gag molecules in a dose-dependent manner. Sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation and confocal microscopy revealed that Gag and {beta}-gal/706-856 had stable interactions and formed aggregated complexes in perinuclear, intracellular sites. Pulse-chase and cycloheximide chase analyses demonstrated that this mediator enhanced unmyristylated Gag degradation. The results demonstrate a novel mode of HIV-1 Gag downregulation by directing Gag to an intracellular site via the interaction of Gag with a gp41 cytoplasmic domain fusion protein.

  6. Effect of specific amino acid substitutions in the putative fusion peptide of structural glycoprotein E2 on Classical Swine Fever Virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández-Sainz, I.J.; Largo, E.; Gladue, D.P.; Fletcher, P.; O’Donnell, V.; Holinka, L.G.; Carey, L.B.; Lu, X.; Nieva, J.L.; Borca, M.V.

    2014-05-15

    E2, along with E{sup rns} and E1, is an envelope glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). E2 is involved in several virus functions: cell attachment, host range susceptibility and virulence in natural hosts. Here we evaluate the role of a specific E2 region, {sup 818}CPIGWTGVIEC{sup 828}, containing a putative fusion peptide (FP) sequence. Reverse genetics utilizing a full-length infectious clone of the highly virulent CSFV strain Brescia (BICv) was used to evaluate how individual amino acid substitutions within this region of E2 may affect replication of BICv. A synthetic peptide representing the complete E2 FP amino acid sequence adopted a β-type extended conformation in membrane mimetics, penetrated into model membranes, and perturbed lipid bilayer integrity in vitro. Similar peptides harboring amino acid substitutions adopted comparable conformations but exhibited different membrane activities. Therefore, a preliminary characterization of the putative FP {sup 818}CPIGWTGVIEC{sup 828} indicates a membrane fusion activity and a critical role in virus replication. - Highlights: • A putative fusion peptide (FP) region in CSFV E2 protein was shown to be critical for virus growth. • Synthetic FPs were shown to efficiently penetrate into lipid membranes using an in vitro model. • Individual residues in the FP affecting virus replication were identified by reverse genetics. • The same FP residues are also responsible for mediating membrane fusion.

  7. Protective Immunity Against Homologous and Heterologous Influenza Virus Lethal Challenge by Immunization with New Recombinant Chimeric HA2-M2e Fusion Protein in BALB/C Mice.

    PubMed

    Ameghi, Ali; Pilehvar-Soltanahmadi, Yones; Baradaran, Behzad; Barzegar, Abolfazl; Taghizadeh, Morteza; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Aghaiypour, Khosrow

    2016-05-01

    Influenza is an acute and highly contagious respiratory disease. The error prone RNA polymerase and segmented nature of the influenza A virus genome allow antigenic drift and shift, respectively. Therefore, most influenza vaccines are inefficient along time and against different viral subtypes. In this study, for the first time, protection properties of a new recombinant fusion of HA2 and M2e peptides originated from influenza virus A/Brisbane/59/2007-like (H1N1) in BALB/c mice model were investigated. After immunization of the BALB/c mice, the protection property of fusion peptide was determined by a neutralizing assay test. For further study, mice were lethal challenged by the (mouse adapted, A/PR8/34 [H1N1]) and heterologous (mouse adapted, A/Brisbane/10/2007 [H3N2]) influenza virus subtypes. Then, the lung viral titers, body weight, and survival rate of the immunized mice were monitored. The results showed that immunization by the M2e-HA2 recombinant fusion peptide provides strong protection against homologous challenge and an infirm protection against heterologous. These protections against homologous and heterologous influenza A virus challenges meant the universal nature of these recombinant peptides in an immunity manner against influenza A virus. However, more studies are needed to optimize this recombinant construction, and this experiment recommends HA2-M2e fusion peptide as a universal influenza A vaccine candidate. PMID:27058011

  8. Dual Mutation Events in the Haemagglutinin-Esterase and Fusion Protein from an Infectious Salmon Anaemia Virus HPR0 Genotype Promote Viral Fusion and Activation by an Ubiquitous Host Protease

    PubMed Central

    Fourrier, Mickael; Lester, Katherine; Markussen, Turhan; Falk, Knut; Secombes, Christopher J.; McBeath, Alastair; Collet, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    In Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV), deletions in the highly polymorphic region (HPR) in the near membrane domain of the haemagglutinin-esterase (HE) stalk, influence viral fusion. It is suspected that selected mutations in the associated Fusion (F) protein may also be important in regulating fusion activity. To better understand the underlying mechanisms involved in ISAV fusion, several mutated F proteins were generated from the Scottish Nevis and Norwegian SK779/06 HPR0. Co-transfection with constructs encoding HE and F were performed, fusion activity assessed by content mixing assay and the degree of proteolytic cleavage by western blot. Substitutions in Nevis F demonstrated that K276 was the most likely cleavage site in the protein. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions at three sites and two insertions, all slightly upstream of K276, increased fusion activity. Co-expression with HE harbouring a full-length HPR produced high fusion activities when trypsin and low pH were applied. In comparison, under normal culture conditions, groups containing a mutated HE with an HPR deletion were able to generate moderate fusion levels, while those with a full length HPR HE could not induce fusion. This suggested that HPR length may influence how the HE primes the F protein and promotes fusion activation by an ubiquitous host protease and/or facilitate subsequent post-cleavage refolding steps. Variations in fusion activity through accumulated mutations on surface glycoproteins have also been reported in other orthomyxoviruses and paramyxoviruses. This may in part contribute to the different virulence and tissue tropism reported for HPR0 and HPR deleted ISAV genotypes. PMID:26517828

  9. Fusion of a fluorescent protein to the pUL25 minor capsid protein of pseudorabies virus allows live-cell capsid imaging with negligible impact on infection.

    PubMed

    Bohannon, Kevin P; Sollars, Patricia J; Pickard, Gary E; Smith, Gregory A

    2012-01-01

    In order to resolve the location and activity of submicroscopic viruses in living cells, viral proteins are often fused to fluorescent proteins (FPs) and visualized by microscopy. In this study, we describe the fusion of FPs to three proteins of pseudorabies virus (PRV) that allowed imaging of capsids in living cells. Included in this study are the first recombinant PRV strains expressing FP-pUL25 fusions based on a design applied to herpes simplex virus type 1 by Homa and colleagues. The properties of each reporter virus were compared in both in vitro and in vivo infection models. PRV strains expressing FP-pUL25 and FP-pUL36 preserved wild-type properties better than traditional FP-pUL35 isolates in assays of plaque size and virulence in mice. The utility of these strains in studies of axon transport, nuclear dynamics and viral particle composition are documented. PMID:21976610

  10. Structure of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Glycoprotein in the Postfusion Conformation Reveals Preservation of Neutralizing Epitopes▿†

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Jason S.; Yang, Yongping; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) invades host cells via a type I fusion (F) glycoprotein that undergoes dramatic structural rearrangements during the fusion process. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, such as 101F, palivizumab, and motavizumab, target two major antigenic sites on the RSV F glycoprotein. The structures of these sites as peptide complexes with motavizumab and 101F have been previously determined, but a structure for the trimeric RSV F glycoprotein ectodomain has remained elusive. To address this issue, we undertook structural and biophysical studies on stable ectodomain constructs. Here, we present the 2.8-Å crystal structure of the trimeric RSV F ectodomain in its postfusion conformation. The structure revealed that the 101F and motavizumab epitopes are present in the postfusion state and that their conformations are similar to those observed in the antibody-bound peptide structures. Both antibodies bound the postfusion F glycoprotein with high affinity in surface plasmon resonance experiments. Modeling of the antibodies bound to the F glycoprotein predicts that the 101F epitope is larger than the linear peptide and restricted to a single protomer in the trimer, whereas motavizumab likely contacts residues on two protomers, indicating a quaternary epitope. Mechanistically, these results suggest that 101F and motavizumab can bind to multiple conformations of the fusion glycoprotein and can neutralize late in the entry process. The structural preservation of neutralizing epitopes in the postfusion state suggests that this conformation can elicit neutralizing antibodies and serve as a useful vaccine antigen. PMID:21613394

  11. Myxoma Virus Expressing a Fusion Protein of Interleukin-15 (IL15) and IL15 Receptor Alpha Has Enhanced Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tosic, Vesna; Thomas, Diana L.; Kranz, David M.; Liu, Jia; McFadden, Grant; Shisler, Joanna L.; MacNeill, Amy L.; Roy, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Myxoma virus, a rabbit poxvirus, can efficiently infect various types of mouse and human cancer cells. It is a strict rabbit-specific pathogen, and is thought to be safe as a therapeutic agent in all non-rabbit hosts tested including mice and humans. Interleukin-15 (IL15) is an immuno-modulatory cytokine with significant potential for stimulating anti-tumor T lymphocytes and NK cells. Co-expression of IL15 with the α subunit of IL15 receptor (IL15Rα) greatly enhances IL15 stability and bioavailability. Therefore, we engineered a new recombinant myxoma virus (vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr), which expresses an IL15Rα-IL15 fusion protein plus tdTomato red fluorescent reporter protein. Permissive rabbit kidney epithelial (RK-13) cells infected with vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr expressed and secreted the IL15Rα-IL15 fusion protein. Functional activity was confirmed by demonstrating that the secreted fusion protein stimulated proliferation of cytokine-dependent CTLL-2 cells. Multi-step growth curves showed that murine melanoma (B16-F10 and B16.SIY) cell lines were permissive to vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr infection. In vivo experiments in RAG1-/- mice showed that subcutaneous B16-F10 tumors treated with vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr exhibited attenuated tumor growth and a significant survival benefit for the treated group compared to the PBS control and the control viruses (vMyx-IL15-tdTr and vMyx-tdTr). Immunohistological analysis of the subcutaneous tumors showed dramatically increased infiltration of NK cells in vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr treated tumors compared to the controls. In vivo experiments with immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice revealed a strong infiltrate of both NK cells and CD8+ T cells in response to vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr, and prolonged survival. We conclude that delivery of IL15Rα-IL15 in a myxoma virus vector stimulates both innate and adaptive components of the immune system. PMID:25329832

  12. Electrostatic Architecture of the Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus (ISAV) Core Fusion Protein Illustrates a Carboxyl-Carboxylate pH Sensor*

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Jonathan D.; Soto-Montoya, Hazel; Korpela, Markus K.; Lee, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    Segment 5, ORF 1 of the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) genome, encodes for the ISAV F protein, which is responsible for viral-host endosomal membrane fusion during a productive ISAV infection. The entry machinery of ISAV is composed of a complex of the ISAV F and ISAV hemagglutinin esterase (HE) proteins in an unknown stoichiometry prior to receptor engagement by ISAV HE. Following binding of the receptor to ISAV HE, dissociation of the ISAV F protein from HE, and subsequent endocytosis, the ISAV F protein resolves into a fusion-competent oligomeric state. Here, we present a 2.1 Å crystal structure of the fusion core of the ISAV F protein determined at low pH. This structure has allowed us to unambiguously demonstrate that the ISAV entry machinery exhibits typical class I viral fusion protein architecture. Furthermore, we have determined stabilizing factors that accommodate the pH-dependent mode of ISAV transmission, and our structure has allowed the identification of a central coil that is conserved across numerous and varied post-fusion viral glycoprotein structures. We then discuss a mechanistic model of ISAV fusion that parallels the paramyxoviral class I fusion strategy wherein attachment and fusion are relegated to separate proteins in a similar fashion to ISAV fusion. PMID:26082488

  13. Electrostatic Architecture of the Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus (ISAV) Core Fusion Protein Illustrates a Carboxyl-Carboxylate pH Sensor.

    PubMed

    Cook, Jonathan D; Soto-Montoya, Hazel; Korpela, Markus K; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2015-07-24

    Segment 5, ORF 1 of the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) genome, encodes for the ISAV F protein, which is responsible for viral-host endosomal membrane fusion during a productive ISAV infection. The entry machinery of ISAV is composed of a complex of the ISAV F and ISAV hemagglutinin esterase (HE) proteins in an unknown stoichiometry prior to receptor engagement by ISAV HE. Following binding of the receptor to ISAV HE, dissociation of the ISAV F protein from HE, and subsequent endocytosis, the ISAV F protein resolves into a fusion-competent oligomeric state. Here, we present a 2.1 Å crystal structure of the fusion core of the ISAV F protein determined at low pH. This structure has allowed us to unambiguously demonstrate that the ISAV entry machinery exhibits typical class I viral fusion protein architecture. Furthermore, we have determined stabilizing factors that accommodate the pH-dependent mode of ISAV transmission, and our structure has allowed the identification of a central coil that is conserved across numerous and varied post-fusion viral glycoprotein structures. We then discuss a mechanistic model of ISAV fusion that parallels the paramyxoviral class I fusion strategy wherein attachment and fusion are relegated to separate proteins in a similar fashion to ISAV fusion.

  14. A yellow fever epizootic in Zika forest, Uganda, during 1972: Part 1: Virus isolation and sentinel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kirya, B G

    1977-01-01

    The results of the yellow fever immunity survey of Central and East Africa reported by SAWYER & WHITMAN in 1936 prompted scientists to undertake well-planned epidemiological studies on yellow fever in eastern Africa. A Yellow Fever Research Institute (the present East African Virus Research Institute) was established at Entebbe in 1936 for this purpose. One of the areas where much work has been carried out is a strip of typical tropical forest, the Zika Forest, 12 kilometres from the Institute. Routine surveillance work, particularly on the biting activity of the yellow fever vector mosquitoes, has been going on since 1946. It was during one of these studies in 1972 that the first yellow fever virus strain was isolated from Aedes africanus collected from the Zika and Sisa forests and one strain was isolated from Coquillettidia fuscopennata, also from the Zika Forest. Three sentinel rhesus monkeys, nomimmune to YF, which were kept in the Zika Forest during the time of the epizootic died of YF disease. The present observations indicate that YF is still present in Africa, and as such it still remains a potential menace to the human population. The epidemiological implications are discussed.

  15. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of recombinant fusion proteins containing spike protein of infectious bronchitis virus and hemagglutinin of H3N2 influenza virus in chickens.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lijuan; Zeng, Yuyao; Wang, Wei; Wei, Ying; Xue, Chunyi; Cao, Yongchang

    2016-09-01

    Infectious bronchitis (IB) is an acute and highly contagious viral respiratory disease of chickens and vaccination is the main method for disease control. The S1 protein, which contains several virus neutralization epitopes, is considered to be a target site of vaccine development. However, although protective immune responses could be induced by recombinant S1 protein, the protection rate in chickens was still low (<50%). Here, we generated fused S1 proteins with HA2 protein (rS1-HA2) or transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail (rS1-H3(TM)) from hemagglutinin of H3N2 influenza virus. After immunization, animals vaccinated with fusion proteins rS1-HA2 and rS1-H3(TM) demonstrated stronger robust humoral and cellular immune responses than that of rS1 and inactivated M41 vaccine. The protection rates of groups immunized with rS1-HA2 (87%) were significantly higher than the groups inoculated with rS1 (47%) and inactivated M41 vaccine (53%). And chickens injected with rS1-H3(TM) had similar level of protection (73%) comparing to chickens vaccinated with rS1 (47%) (P=0.07). Our data suggest that S1 protein fused to the HA2 or TM proteins from hemagglutinin of H3N2 influenza virus may provide a new strategy for high efficacy recombinant vaccine development against IBV. PMID:27497621

  16. Fusion of AIRSAR and TM Data for Parameter Classification and Estimation in Dense and Hilly Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam, Mahta; Dungan, J. L.; Coughlan, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    The expanded remotely sensed data space consisting of coincident radar backscatter and optical reflectance data provides for a more complete description of the Earth surface. This is especially useful where many parameters are needed to describe a certain scene, such as in the presence of dense and complex-structured vegetation or where there is considerable underlying topography. The goal of this paper is to use a combination of radar and optical data to develop a methodology for parameter classification for dense and hilly forests, and further, class-specific parameter estimation. The area to be used in this study is the H. J. Andrews Forest in Oregon, one of the Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites in the US. This area consists of various dense old-growth conifer stands, and contains significant topographic relief. The Andrews forest has been the subject of many ecological studies over several decades, resulting in an abundance of ground measurements. Recently, biomass and leaf-area index (LAI) values for approximately 30 reference stands have also become available which span a large range of those parameters. The remote sensing data types to be used are the C-, L-, and P-band polarimetric radar data from the JPL airborne SAR (AIRSAR), the C-band single-polarization data from the JPL topographic SAR (TOPSAR), and the Thematic Mapper (TM) data from Landsat, all acquired in late April 1998. The total number of useful independent data channels from the AIRSAR is 15 (three frequencies, each with three unique polarizations and amplitude and phase of the like-polarized correlation), from the TOPSAR is 2 (amplitude and phase of the interferometric correlation), and from the TM is 6 (the thermal band is not used). The range pixel spacing of the AIRSAR is 3.3m for C- and L-bands and 6.6m for P-band. The TOPSAR pixel spacing is 10m, and the TM pixel size is 30m. To achieve parameter classification, first a number of parameters are defined which are of interest to

  17. Subcellular localization and calcium and pH requirements for proteolytic processing of the Hendra virus fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Pager, Cara Theresia; Wurth, Mark Allen; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2004-09-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of the Hendra virus fusion (F) protein results in the formation of disulfide-linked F1 and F2 subunits, with cleavage occurring after residue K109 in the sequence GDVK/L. This unusual cleavage site and efficient propagation of Hendra virus in a furin-deficient cell line indicate that the Hendra F protein is not cleaved by furin, the protease responsible for proteolytic activation of many viral fusion proteins. To identify the subcellular site of Hendra F processing, Vero cells transfected with pCAGGS-Hendra F or pCAGGS-SV5 F were metabolically labeled and chased in the absence and presence of inhibitors of exocytosis. The addition of carbonyl-cyanide-3-chlorophenylhydrazone, monensin, brefeldin A, or NaF-AlCl3 or incubation of cells at 20 degrees C all inhibited processing of the Hendra F protein, suggesting that cleavage of Hendra F occurs either in secretory vesicles budding from the trans-Golgi network or at the cell surface. In contrast to proteolytic cleavage of the simian virus 5 (SV5) F protein by the Ca(2+)-dependent protease furin, proteolytic cleavage of the Hendra F protein was not significantly inhibited by decreases in Ca2+ levels following incubation with EGTA or A23187. However, in the presence of weak amines and H+ V-ATPase inhibitors, known to raise intracellular pH, cleavage of Hendra F protein was inhibited while processing of the SV5 F protein was not significantly affected. The subcellular location, sensitivity to pH changes, and decreased Ca2+ requirement suggest that the protease responsible for cleavage of Hendra F protein differs from proteases previously shown to be involved in the processing of other viral glycoproteins.

  18. pH-Dependent Formation and Disintegration of the Influenza A Virus Protein Scaffold To Provide Tension for Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Shilova, L. A.; Kachala, M. V.; Tashkin, V. Y.; Sokolov, V. S.; Fedorova, N. V.; Baratova, L. A.; Knyazev, D. G.; Zimmerberg, J.; Chizmadzhev, Y. A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus is taken up from a pH-neutral extracellular milieu into an endosome, whose contents then acidify, causing changes in the viral matrix protein (M1) that coats the inner monolayer of the viral lipid envelope. At a pH of ∼6, M1 interacts with the viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) in a putative priming stage; at this stage, the interactions of the M1 scaffold coating the lipid envelope are intact. The M1 coat disintegrates as acidification continues to a pH of ∼5 to clear a physical path for the viral genome to transit from the viral interior to the cytoplasm. Here we investigated the physicochemical mechanism of M1's pH-dependent disintegration. In neutral media, the adsorption of M1 protein on the lipid bilayer was electrostatic in nature and reversible. The energy of the interaction of M1 molecules with each other in M1 dimers was about 10 times as weak as that of the interaction of M1 molecules with the lipid bilayer. Acidification drives conformational changes in M1 molecules due to changes in the M1 charge, leading to alterations in their electrostatic interactions. Dropping the pH from 7.1 to 6.0 did not disturb the M1 layer; dropping it lower partially desorbed M1 because of increased repulsion between M1 monomers still stuck to the membrane. Lipid vesicles coated with M1 demonstrated pH-dependent rupture of the vesicle membrane, presumably because of the tension generated by this repulsive force. Thus, the disruption of the vesicles coincident with M1 protein scaffold disintegration at pH 5 likely stretches the lipid membrane to the point of rupture, promoting fusion pore widening for RNP release. IMPORTANCE Influenza remains a top killer of human beings throughout the world, in part because of the influenza virus's rapid binding to cells and its uptake into compartments hidden from the immune system. To attack the influenza virus during this time of hiding, we need to understand the physical forces that allow the internalized virus to

  19. Protective immunity provided by HLA-A2 epitopes for fusion and hemagglutinin proteins of measles virus

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sang Kon . E-mail: sangkono@baylorhealth.edu; Stegman, Brian; Pendleton, C. David; Ota, Martin O.; Pan, C.-H.; Griffin, Diane E.; Burke, Donald S.; Berzofsky, Jay A. . E-mail: berzofsk@helix.nih.gov

    2006-09-01

    Natural infection and vaccination with a live-attenuated measles virus (MV) induce CD8{sup +} T-cell-mediated immune responses that may play a central role in controlling MV infection. In this study, we show that newly identified human HLA-A2 epitopes from MV hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins induced protective immunity in HLA-A2 transgenic mice challenged with recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing F or H protein. HLA-A2 epitopes were predicted and synthesized. Five and four peptides from H and F, respectively, bound to HLA-A2 molecules in a T2-binding assay, and four from H and two from F could induce peptide-specific CD8{sup +} T cell responses in HLA-A2 transgenic mice. Further experiments proved that three peptides from H (H9-567, H10-250, and H10-516) and one from F protein (F9-57) were endogenously processed and presented on HLA-A2 molecules. All peptides tested in this study are common to 5 different strains of MV including Edmonston. In both A2K{sup b} and HHD-2 mice, the identified peptide epitopes induced protective immunity against recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing H or F. Because F and H proteins induce neutralizing antibodies, they are major components of new vaccine strategies, and therefore data from this study will contribute to the development of new vaccines against MV infection.

  20. Using a split luciferase assay (SLA) to measure the kinetics of cell-cell fusion mediated by herpes simplex virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Saw, Wan Ting; Matsuda, Zene; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H; Atanasiu, Doina

    2015-11-15

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry and cell-cell fusion require the envelope proteins gD, gH/gL and gB. We propose that receptor-activated conformational changes to gD activate gH/gL, which then triggers gB (the fusogen) into an active form. To study this dynamic process, we have adapted a dual split protein assay originally developed to study the kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mediated fusion. This assay uses a chimera of split forms of renilla luciferase (RL) and green fluorescent protein (GFP). Effector cells are co-transfected with the glycoproteins and one of the split reporters. Receptor-bearing target cells are transfected with the second reporter. Co-culture results in fusion and restoration of RL, which can convert a membrane permeable substrate into a luminescent product, thereby enabling one to monitor initiation and extent of fusion in live cells in real time. Restoration of GFP can also be studied by fluorescence microscopy. Two sets of split reporters have been developed: the original one allows one to measure fusion kinetics over hours whereas the more recent version was designed to enhance the sensitivity of RL activity allowing one to monitor both initiation and rates of fusion in minutes. Here, we provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol for the optimization of the assay (which we call the SLA for split luciferase assay) using the HSV system. We also show several examples of the power of this assay to examine both the initiation and kinetics of cell-cell fusion by wild type forms of gD, gB, gH/gL of both serotypes of HSV as well as the effect of mutations and antibodies that alter the kinetics of fusion. The SLA can be applied to other viral systems that carry out membrane fusion. PMID:26022509

  1. Using a split luciferase assay (SLA) to measure the kinetics of cell-cell fusion mediated by herpes simplex virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Saw, Wan Ting; Matsuda, Zene; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H; Atanasiu, Doina

    2015-11-15

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry and cell-cell fusion require the envelope proteins gD, gH/gL and gB. We propose that receptor-activated conformational changes to gD activate gH/gL, which then triggers gB (the fusogen) into an active form. To study this dynamic process, we have adapted a dual split protein assay originally developed to study the kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mediated fusion. This assay uses a chimera of split forms of renilla luciferase (RL) and green fluorescent protein (GFP). Effector cells are co-transfected with the glycoproteins and one of the split reporters. Receptor-bearing target cells are transfected with the second reporter. Co-culture results in fusion and restoration of RL, which can convert a membrane permeable substrate into a luminescent product, thereby enabling one to monitor initiation and extent of fusion in live cells in real time. Restoration of GFP can also be studied by fluorescence microscopy. Two sets of split reporters have been developed: the original one allows one to measure fusion kinetics over hours whereas the more recent version was designed to enhance the sensitivity of RL activity allowing one to monitor both initiation and rates of fusion in minutes. Here, we provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol for the optimization of the assay (which we call the SLA for split luciferase assay) using the HSV system. We also show several examples of the power of this assay to examine both the initiation and kinetics of cell-cell fusion by wild type forms of gD, gB, gH/gL of both serotypes of HSV as well as the effect of mutations and antibodies that alter the kinetics of fusion. The SLA can be applied to other viral systems that carry out membrane fusion.

  2. Limited Effects of Type I Interferons on Kyasanur Forest Disease Virus in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Bradley W. M.; Ranadheera, Charlene; Nikiforuk, Aidan M.; Cutts, Todd A.; Kobasa, Darwyn; Court, Deborah A.; Theriault, Steven S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The tick-borne flavivirus, Kyasanur Forest disease virus (KFDV) causes seasonal infections and periodic outbreaks in south-west India. The current vaccine offers poor protection with reported issues of coverage and immunogenicity. Since there are no approved prophylactic therapeutics for KFDV, type I IFN-α/β subtypes were assessed for antiviral potency against KFDV in cell culture. Methodology/Principal Findings The continued passage of KFDV-infected cells with re-administered IFN-α2a treatment did not eliminate KFDV and had little effect on infectious particle production whereas the IFN-sensitive, green fluorescent protein-expressing vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-GFP) infection was controlled. Further evaluation of the other IFN-α/β subtypes versus KFDV infection indicated that single treatments of either IFN-αWA and IFN-αΚ appeared to be more effective than IFN-α2a at reducing KFDV titres. Concentration-dependent analysis of these IFN-α/β subtypes revealed that regardless of subtype, low concentrations of IFN were able to limit cytopathic effects (CPE), while significantly higher concentrations were needed for inhibition of virion release. Furthermore, expression of the KFDV NS5 in cell culture before IFN addition enabled VSV-GFP to overcome the effects of IFN-α/β signalling, producing a robust infection. Conclusions/Significance Treatment of cell culture with IFN does not appear to be suitable for KFDV eradication and the assay used for such studies should be carefully considered. Further, it appears that the NS5 protein is sufficient to permit KFDV to bypass the antiviral properties of IFN. We suggest that other prophylactic therapeutics should be evaluated in place of IFN for treatment of individuals with KFDV disease. PMID:27479197

  3. The membrane-proximal region (MPR) of herpes simplex virus gB regulates association of the fusion loops with lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Shelly, Spencer S; Cairns, Tina M; Whitbeck, J Charles; Lou, Huan; Krummenacher, Claude; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J

    2012-11-20

    Glycoprotein B (gB), gD, and gH/gL constitute the fusion machinery of herpes simplex virus (HSV). Prior studies indicated that fusion occurs in a stepwise fashion whereby the gD/receptor complex activates the entire process, while gH/gL regulates the fusion reaction carried out by gB. Trimeric gB is a class III fusion protein. Its ectodomain of 773 amino acids contains a membrane-proximal region (MPR) (residues 731 to 773) and two fusion loops (FLs) per protomer. We hypothesized that the highly hydrophobic MPR interacts with the FLs, thereby masking them on virions until fusion begins. To test this hypothesis, we made a series of deletion, truncation, and point mutants of the gB MPR. Although the full-length deletion mutants were expressed in transfected cells, they were not transported to the cell surface, suggesting that removal of even small stretches of the MPR was highly detrimental to gB folding. To circumvent this limitation, we used a baculovirus expression system to generate four soluble proteins, each lacking the transmembrane region and cytoplasmic tail. All retained the FLs and decreasing portions of the MPR [gB(773t) (gB truncated at amino acid 773), gB(759t), gB(749t), and gB(739t)]. Despite the presence of the FLs, all were compromised in their ability to bind liposomes compared to the control, gB(730t), which lacks the MPR. We conclude that residues 731 to 739 are sufficient to mask the FLs, thereby preventing liposome association. Importantly, mutation of two aromatic residues (F732 and F738) to alanine restored the ability of gB(739t) to bind liposomes. Our data suggest that the MPR is important for modulating the association of gB FLs with target membranes. IMPORTANCE To successfully cause disease, a virus must infect host cells. Viral infection is a highly regulated, multistep process. For herpesviruses, genetic material transfers from the virus to the target cell through fusion of the viral and host cell lipid membranes. Here, we provide

  4. Protection against lethal measles virus infection in mice by immune-stimulating complexes containing the hemagglutinin or fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Varsanyi, T M; Morein, B; Löve, A; Norrby, E

    1987-01-01

    The importance of each of the two surface glycoproteins of measles virus in active and passive immunization was examined in mice. Infected-cell lysates were depleted of either the hemagglutinin (H) or fusion (F) glycoprotein by using multiple cycles of immunoaffinity chromatography. The products were used to prepare immune-stimulating complexes (iscoms) containing either F or H glycoprotein. Such complexes are highly immunogenic, possibly as a result of effective presentation of viral proteins to the immune system [B. Morein, B. Sundquist, S. Höglund, K. Dalsgaard, and A. Osterhaus, Nature (London) 308:457-460, 1984]. Groups of 3-week-old BALB/c mice were inoculated with the iscom preparations. All animals developed hemolysis-inhibiting antibodies, whereas only sera of animals immunized with the iscoms containing the H glycoprotein had hemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies. Sera from animals immunized with the H or F preparation only precipitated the homologous glycoprotein in radioimmune precipitation assays. The immunized animals were challenged with a lethal dose of the hamster neurotropic variant of measles virus. Of the 7-week-old animals in the nonimmunized control group, 50% died within 10 days after challenge. No animals in the immunized groups showed symptoms of disease throughout the observation period of 3 months. Passive administration of anti-H monoclonal antibodies gave full protection against the 100% lethal acute infection with the hamster neurotropic variant of measles virus in newborn mice, whereas anti-F monoclonal antibodies failed to protect the animals. This study emphasizes that both H and F glycoproteins need to be considered in the development of measles virus subunit vaccines. Images PMID:2960833

  5. [L-Lysine-α-Oxidase in vitro Activity in Experiments on Models of Viruses Sindbis, Forest-Spring Encephalitis, Western Nile, Tyaginya and Dhori].

    PubMed

    Smirnova, I P; Larichev, V F; Shneider, Yu A

    2015-01-01

    The antitumor effect of L-lysine-α-oxidase from the culture fluid of Trichoderma harzianum Rifai F-180 was investigated for the first time. The in vitro studies revealed its high activity on a model of the forest-spring encephalitis virus and no activity against the Sindbis, Western Nile, Tyaginya and Dhori viruses. PMID:26415376

  6. An Open Receptor-Binding Cavity of Hemagglutinin-Esterase-Fusion Glycoprotein from Newly-Identified Influenza D Virus: Basis for Its Broad Cell Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hao; Qi, Jianxun; Khedri, Zahra; Diaz, Sandra; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Varki, Ajit; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause seasonal flu each year and pandemics or epidemic sporadically, posing a major threat to public health. Recently, a new influenza D virus (IDV) was isolated from pigs and cattle. Here, we reveal that the IDV utilizes 9-O-acetylated sialic acids as its receptor for virus entry. Then, we determined the crystal structures of hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion glycoprotein (HEF) of IDV both in its free form and in complex with the receptor and enzymatic substrate analogs. The IDV HEF shows an extremely similar structural fold as the human-infecting influenza C virus (ICV) HEF. However, IDV HEF has an open receptor-binding cavity to accommodate diverse extended glycan moieties. This structural difference provides an explanation for the phenomenon that the IDV has a broad cell tropism. As IDV HEF is structurally and functionally similar to ICV HEF, our findings highlight the potential threat of the virus to public health. PMID:26816272

  7. An Open Receptor-Binding Cavity of Hemagglutinin-Esterase-Fusion Glycoprotein from Newly-Identified Influenza D Virus: Basis for Its Broad Cell Tropism.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Qi, Jianxun; Khedri, Zahra; Diaz, Sandra; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Varki, Ajit; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause seasonal flu each year and pandemics or epidemic sporadically, posing a major threat to public health. Recently, a new influenza D virus (IDV) was isolated from pigs and cattle. Here, we reveal that the IDV utilizes 9-O-acetylated sialic acids as its receptor for virus entry. Then, we determined the crystal structures of hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion glycoprotein (HEF) of IDV both in its free form and in complex with the receptor and enzymatic substrate analogs. The IDV HEF shows an extremely similar structural fold as the human-infecting influenza C virus (ICV) HEF. However, IDV HEF has an open receptor-binding cavity to accommodate diverse extended glycan moieties. This structural difference provides an explanation for the phenomenon that the IDV has a broad cell tropism. As IDV HEF is structurally and functionally similar to ICV HEF, our findings highlight the potential threat of the virus to public health. PMID:26816272

  8. An investigation of the genetic basis of increased susceptibility to neutralization by anti-fusion glycoprotein antibody arising on passage of human respiratory syncytial virus in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Hiriote, W; Gias, E L Michael; Welsh, S H; Toms, G L

    2015-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus isolates have previously been shown to exhibit resistance to neutralization by anti-fusion glycoprotein antibodies that is lost on passage in cell culture. Early passage resistant and late passage susceptible stocks of two virus isolates from different epidemics were cloned by plaque purification. Early passage stocks of both isolates yielded predominantly neutralization resistant clones while late passage stocks yielded predominantly susceptible clones. On further characterization of resistant and susceptible clones, resistant virus yields were lower and they were relatively resistant to both neutralization and fusion inhibition by anti-F murine monoclonal antibodies and were also resistant to neutralization by human sera and by Palivizumab. The full genome of resistant and susceptible clones from one of the isolates was sequenced. Four differences, confirmed by sequencing sister clones, were found between resistant and susceptible clones, one in each of the SH, G, F, and L genes.

  9. Vaccinia virus A25 and A26 proteins are fusion suppressors for mature virions and determine strain-specific virus entry pathways into HeLa, CHO-K1, and L cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Jung; Chang, Yu-Xun; Izmailyan, Roza; Tang, Yin-Liang; Chang, Wen

    2010-09-01

    Mature vaccinia virus enters cells through either fluid-phase endocytosis/macropinocytosis or plasma membrane fusion. This may explain the wide range of host cell susceptibilities to vaccinia virus entry; however, it is not known how vaccinia virus chooses between these two pathways and which viral envelope proteins determine such processes. By screening several recombinant viruses and different strains, we found that mature virions containing the vaccinia virus A25 and A26 proteins entered HeLa cells preferentially through a bafilomycin-sensitive entry pathway, whereas virions lacking these two proteins entered through a bafilomycin-resistant pathway. To investigate whether the A25 and A26 proteins contribute to entry pathway specificity, two mutant vaccinia viruses, WRDeltaA25L and WRDeltaA26L, were subsequently generated from the wild-type WR strain. In contrast to the WR strain, both the WRDeltaA25L and WRDeltaA26L viruses became resistant to bafilomycin, suggesting that the removal of the A25 and A26 proteins bypassed the low-pH endosomal requirement for mature virion entry. Indeed, WRDeltaA25L and WRDeltaA26L virus infections of HeLa, CHO-K1, and L cells immediately triggered cell-to-cell fusion at a neutral pH at 1 to 2 h postinfection (p.i.), providing direct evidence that viral fusion machinery is readily activated after the removal of the A25 and A26 proteins to allow virus entry through the plasma membrane. In summary, our data support a model that on vaccinia mature virions, the viral A25 and A26 proteins are low-pH-sensitive fusion suppressors whose inactivation during the endocytic route results in viral and cell membrane fusion. Our results also suggest that during virion morphogenesis, the incorporation of the A25 and A26 proteins into mature virions may help restrain viral fusion activity until the time of infections.

  10. Fusion protein of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5: nucleotide sequence of mRNA predicts a highly hydrophobic glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, R G; Harris, T J; Lamb, R A

    1984-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the mRNA coding for the fusion glycoprotein (F) of the paramyxovirus, simian virus 5, has been obtained. There is a single large open reading frame on the mRNA that encodes a protein of 529 amino acids with a molecular weight of 56,531. The proteolytic cleavage/activation site of F, to yield F2 and F1, contains five arginine residues. Six potential glycosylation sites were identified in the protein, two on F2 and four on F1. The deduced amino acid sequence indicates that F is extensively hydrophobic over the length of the polypeptide chain. Three regions are very hydrophobic and could interact directly with membranes: these are the NH2-terminal putative signal peptide, the COOH-terminal putative membrane anchorage domain, and the NH2-terminal region of F1. Images PMID:6093114

  11. Antiviral Efficacy of a Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Fusion Inhibitor in a Bovine Model of RSV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Robert; Shao, Matt; Mackman, Richard L.; Perron, Michel; Cihlar, Tomas; Lewis, Sandy A.; Eisenberg, Eugene J.; Carey, Anne; Strickley, Robert G.; Chien, Jason W.; Anderson, Mark L.; McEligot, Heather A.; Behrens, Nicole E.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants. Effective treatment for RSV infection is a significant unmet medical need. While new RSV therapeutics are now in development, there are very few animal models that mimic the pathogenesis of human RSV, making it difficult to evaluate new disease interventions. Experimental infection of Holstein calves with bovine RSV (bRSV) causes a severe respiratory infection that is similar to human RSV infection, providing a relevant model for testing novel therapeutic agents. In this model, viral load is readily detected in nasal secretions by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), and cumulative symptom scoring together with histopathology evaluations of infected tissue allow for the assessment of disease severity. The bovine RSV model was used to evaluate the antiviral activity of an RSV fusion inhibitor, GS1, which blocks virus entry by inhibiting the fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell membrane. The efficacy of GS1, a close structural analog of GS-5806 that is being developed to treat RSV infection in humans was evaluated in two randomized, blind, placebo-controlled studies in bRSV-infected calves. Intravenous administration of GS1 at 4 mg/kg of body weight/day for 7 days starting 24 h or 72 h postinoculation provided clear therapeutic benefit by reducing the viral load, disease symptom score, respiration rate, and lung pathology associated with bRSV infection. These data support the use of the bovine RSV model for evaluation of experimental therapeutics for treatment of RSV. PMID:26055364

  12. Combined virus-like particle and fusion protein-encoding DNA vaccination of cotton rats induces protection against respiratory syncytial virus without causing vaccine-enhanced disease.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Park, Soojin; Kwon, Young-Man; Lee, Youri; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Yu-Jin; Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Cho, Minkyoung; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2016-07-01

    A safe and effective vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) should confer protection without causing vaccine-enhanced disease. Here, using a cotton rat model, we investigated the protective efficacy and safety of an RSV combination vaccine composed of F-encoding plasmid DNA and virus-like particles containing RSV fusion (F) and attachment (G) glycoproteins (FFG-VLP). Cotton rats with FFG-VLP vaccination controlled lung viral replication below the detection limit, and effectively induced neutralizing activity and antibody-secreting cell responses. In comparison with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) causing severe RSV disease after challenge, FFG-VLP vaccination did not cause weight loss, airway hyper-responsiveness, IL-4 cytokines, histopathology, and infiltrates of proinflammatory cells such as eosinophils. FFG-VLP was even more effective in preventing RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation than live RSV infections. This study provides evidence that FFG-VLP can be developed into a safe and effective RSV vaccine candidate. PMID:27123586

  13. Full Inactivation of Human Influenza Virus by High Hydrostatic Pressure Preserves Virus Structure and Membrane Fusion While Conferring Protection to Mice against Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dumard, Carlos H.; Barroso, Shana P. C.; de Oliveira, Guilherme A. P.; Carvalho, Carlos A. M.; Gomes, Andre M. O.; Couceiro, José Nelson S. S.; Ferreira, Davis F.; Nico, Dirlei; Oliveira, Andrea C.; Silva, Jerson L.; Santos, Patrícia S.

    2013-01-01

    Whole inactivated vaccines (WIVs) possess greater immunogenicity than split or subunit vaccines, and recent studies have demonstrated that WIVs with preserved fusogenic activity are more protective than non-fusogenic WIVs. In this work, we describe the inactivation of human influenza virus X-31 by high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) and analyze the effects on the structure by spectroscopic measurements, light scattering, and electron microscopy. We also investigated the effects of HHP on the glycoprotein activity and fusogenic activity of the viral particles. The electron microscopy data showed pore formation on the viral envelope, but the general morphology was preserved, and small variations were seen in the particle structure. The activity of hemagglutinin (HA) during the process of binding and fusion was affected in a time-dependent manner, but neuraminidase (NA) activity was not affected. Infectious activity ceased after 3 hours of pressurization, and mice were protected from infection after being vaccinated. Our results revealed full viral inactivation with overall preservation of viral structure and maintenance of fusogenic activity, thereby conferring protection against infection. A strong response consisting of serum immunoglobulin IgG1, IgG2a, and serum and mucosal IgA was also detected after vaccination. Thus, our data strongly suggest that applying hydrostatic pressure may be an effective method for developing new vaccines against influenza A as well as other viruses. PMID:24282553

  14. Weather variability, tides, and Barmah Forest virus disease in the Gladstone region, Australia.

    PubMed

    Naish, Suchithra; Hu, Wenbiao; Nicholls, Neville; Mackenzie, John S; McMichael, Anthony J; Dale, Pat; Tong, Shilu

    2006-05-01

    In this study we examined the impact of weather variability and tides on the transmission of Barmah Forest virus (BFV) disease and developed a weather-based forecasting model for BFV disease in the Gladstone region, Australia. We used seasonal autoregressive integrated moving-average (SARIMA) models to determine the contribution of weather variables to BFV transmission after the time-series data of response and explanatory variables were made stationary through seasonal differencing. We obtained data on the monthly counts of BFV cases, weather variables (e.g., mean minimum and maximum temperature, total rainfall, and mean relative humidity), high and low tides, and the population size in the Gladstone region between January 1992 and December 2001 from the Queensland Department of Health, Australian Bureau of Meteorology, Queensland Department of Transport, and Australian Bureau of Statistics, respectively. The SARIMA model shows that the 5-month moving average of minimum temperature (b=0.15, p-value<0.001) was statistically significantly and positively associated with BFV disease, whereas high tide in the current month (b=-1.03, p-value=0.04) was statistically significantly and inversely associated with it. However, no significant association was found for other variables. These results may be applied to forecast the occurrence of BFV disease and to use public health resources in BFV control and prevention.

  15. Role for the disulfide-bonded region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 in receptor-triggered activation of membrane fusion function

    SciTech Connect

    Bellamy-McIntyre, Anna K.; Baer, Severine; Ludlow, Louise; Drummer, Heidi E.; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2010-04-16

    The conserved disulfide-bonded region (DSR) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) fusion glycoprotein, gp41, mediates association with the receptor-binding glycoprotein, gp120. Interactions between gp120, CD4 and chemokine receptors activate the fusion activity of gp41. The introduction of W596L and W610F mutations to the DSR of HIV-1{sub QH1549.13} blocked viral entry and hemifusion without affecting gp120-gp41 association. The fusion defect correlated with inhibition of CD4-triggered gp41 pre-hairpin formation, consistent with the DSR mutations having decoupled receptor-induced conformational changes in gp120 from gp41 activation. Our data implicate the DSR in sensing conformational changes in the gp120-gp41 complex that lead to fusion activation.

  16. Detection of closed influenza virus hemagglutinin fusion peptide structures in membranes by backbone (13)CO- (15)N rotational-echo double-resonance solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ujjayini; Xie, Li; Weliky, David P

    2013-02-01

    The influenza virus fusion peptide is the N-terminal ~20 residues of the HA2 subunit of the hemagglutinin protein and this peptide plays a key role in the fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes during initial infection of a cell. The fusion peptide adopts N-helix/turn/C-helix structure in both detergent and membranes with reports of both open and closed interhelical topologies. In the present study, backbone (13)CO-(15)N REDOR solid-state NMR was applied to the membrane-associated fusion peptide to detect the distribution of interhelical distances. The data clearly showed a large fraction of closed and semi-closed topologies and were best-fitted to a mixture of two structures that do not exchange. One of the earlier open structural models may have incorrect G13 dihedral angles derived from TALOS analysis of experimentally correct (13)C shifts.

  17. Interaction between the G3 and L5 proteins of the vaccinia virus entry-fusion complex

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, Cindy L.; Moss, Bernard

    2011-04-10

    The vaccinia virus entry-fusion complex (EFC) consists of 10 to 12 proteins that are embedded in the viral membrane and individually required for fusion with the cell and entry of the core into the cytoplasm. The architecture of the EFC is unknown except for information regarding two pair-wise interactions: A28 with H2 and A16 with G9. Here we used a technique to destabilize the EFC by repressing the expression of individual components and identified a third pair-wise interaction: G3 with L5. These two proteins remained associated under several different EFC destabilization conditions and in each case were immunopurified together as demonstrated by Western blotting. Further evidence for the specific interaction of G3 and L5 was obtained by mass spectrometry. This interaction also occurred when G3 and L5 were expressed in uninfected cells, indicating that no other viral proteins were required. Thus, the present study extends our knowledge of the protein interactions important for EFC assembly and stability.

  18. Crystal Structure of Dengue Virus Type 1 Envelope Protein in the Postfusion Conformation and Its Implications for Membrane Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, Vinod; Dessau, Moshe; Kucera, Kaury; Anthony, Karen; Ledizet, Michel; Modis, Yorgo

    2009-07-31

    Dengue virus relies on a conformational change in its envelope protein, E, to fuse the viral lipid membrane with the endosomal membrane and thereby deliver the viral genome into the cytosol. We have determined the crystal structure of a soluble fragment E (sE) of dengue virus type 1 (DEN-1). The protein is in the postfusion conformation even though it was not exposed to a lipid membrane or detergent. At the domain I-domain III interface, 4 polar residues form a tight cluster that is absent in other flaviviral postfusion structures. Two of these residues, His-282 and His-317, are conserved in flaviviruses and are part of the 'pH sensor' that triggers the fusogenic conformational change in E, at the reduced pH of the endosome. In the fusion loop, Phe-108 adopts a distinct conformation, forming additional trimer contacts and filling the bowl-shaped concavity observed at the tip of the DEN-2 sE trimer.

  19. Vaccinia virus entry/fusion complex subunit A28 is a target of neutralizing and protective antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Gretchen E.; Sisler, Jerry R.; Chandran, Dev; Moss, Bernard

    2008-10-25

    The vaccinia virus entry/fusion complex (EFC) is comprised of at least eight transmembrane proteins that are conserved in all poxviruses. However, neither the physical structure of the EFC nor the immunogenicity of the individual components has been determined. We prepared soluble forms of two EFC components, A28 and H2, by replacing the transmembrane domain with a signal peptide and adding a polyhistidine tail. The proteins were expressed by baculoviruses, secreted from insect cells, purified by affinity chromatography and used to raise antibodies in rabbits. The antibodies recognized the viral proteins but only the antibody to recombinant A28 bound intact virions and neutralized infectivity. Analyses with a set of overlapping peptides revealed a neutralizing epitope between residues 73 and 92 of A28. Passive immunization of mice with IgG purified from the anti-A28 serum provided partial protection against a vaccinia virus intranasal challenge, whereas IgG from the anti-H2 serum did not.

  20. Fusion activity of influenza virus PR8/34 correlates with a temperature-induced conformational change within the hemagglutinin ectodomain detected by photochemical labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, J.; Zugliani, C. ); Mischler, R. )

    1991-03-05

    Fusion of influenza viruses with membranes is catalyzed by the viral spike protein hemagglutinin (HA). Under mildly acidic conditions ({approximately}pH 5) this protein undergoes a conformational change that triggers the exposure of the fusion peptide, the hydrophobic N-terminal segment of the HA2 polypeptide chain. Insertion of this segment into the target membrane (or viral membrane ) is likely to represent a key step along the fusion pathway, but the details are far from being clear. The photoreactive phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-(11-(4-(3-(trifluoromethyl)diazirinyl)phenyl)(2-{sup 3}H)undecanoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (({sup 3}H)PTPC/11), inserted into the bilayer of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs), allowed the authors to investigate both the interaction of viruses with the vesicles under perfusion conditions and the fusion process itself occurring at elevated temperatures only. Despite the observed binding of viruses to LUVs at pH 5 and 0C, labeling of HA2 was very weak. They have studied also the effect of temperature on the acid-induced (pH 5) interaction of bromelain-solubilized HA (BHA) with vesicles.

  1. Characterization of a Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody That Targets the Fusion Domain of Group 2 Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Gene S.; Lee, Peter S.; Hoffman, Ryan M. B.; Mazel-Sanchez, Beryl; Krammer, Florian; Leon, Paul E.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Due to continuous changes to its antigenic regions, influenza viruses can evade immune detection and cause a significant amount of morbidity and mortality around the world. Influenza vaccinations can protect against disease but must be annually reformulated to match the current circulating strains. In the development of a broad-spectrum influenza vaccine, the elucidation of conserved epitopes is paramount. To this end, we designed an immunization strategy in mice to boost the humoral response against conserved regions of the hemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein. Of note, generation and identification of broadly neutralizing antibodies that target group 2 HAs are rare and thus far have yielded only a few monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Here, we demonstrate that mouse MAb 9H10 has broad and potent in vitro neutralizing activity against H3 and H10 group 2 influenza A subtypes. In the mouse model, MAb 9H10 protects mice against two divergent mouse-adapted H3N2 strains, in both pre- and postexposure administration regimens. In vitro and cell-free assays suggest that MAb 9H10 inhibits viral replication by blocking HA-dependent fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes early in the replication cycle and by disrupting viral particle egress in the late stage of infection. Interestingly, electron microscopy reconstructions of MAb 9H10 bound to the HA reveal that it binds a similar binding footprint to MAbs CR8020 and CR8043. IMPORTANCE The influenza hemagglutinin is the major antigenic target of the humoral immune response. However, due to continuous antigenic changes that occur on the surface of this glycoprotein, influenza viruses can escape the immune system and cause significant disease to the host. Toward the development of broad-spectrum therapeutics and vaccines against influenza virus, elucidation of conserved regions of influenza viruses is crucial. Thus, defining these types of epitopes through the generation and characterization of broadly neutralizing

  2. Effects of Mutations in the Rubella Virus E1 Glycoprotein on E1-E2 Interaction and Membrane Fusion Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Decheng; Hwang, Dorothy; Qiu, Zhiyong; Gillam, Shirley

    1998-01-01

    Rubella virus (RV) virions contain two glycosylated membrane proteins, E1 and E2, that exist as a heterodimer and form the viral spike complexes on the virion surface. Formation of an E1-E2 heterodimer is required for transport of E1 out of the endoplasmic reticulum lumen to the Golgi apparatus and plasma membrane. To investigate the nature of the E1-E2 interaction, we have introduced mutations in the internal hydrophobic region (residues 81 to 109) of E1. Substitution of serine at Cys82 (mutant C82S) or deletion of this hydrophobic domain (mutant dt) of E1 resulted in a disruption of the E1 conformation that ultimately affected E1-E2 heterodimer formation and cell surface expression of both E1 and E2. Substitution of either aspartic acid at Gly93 (G93D) or glycine at Pro104 (P104G) was found to impair neither E1-E2 heterodimer formation nor the transport of E1 and E2 to the cell surface. Fusion of RV-infected cells is induced by a brief treatment at a pH below 6.0. To test whether this internal hydrophobic domain is involved in the membrane fusion activity of RV, transformed BHK cell lines expressing either wild-type or mutant spike proteins were exposed to an acidic pH and polykaryon formation was measured. No fusion activity was observed in the C82S, dt, and G93D mutants; however, the wild type and the P104G mutant exhibited fusogenic activities, with greater than 60% and 20 to 40% of the cells being fused, respectively, at pH 4.8. These results suggest that it is likely that the region of E1 between amino acids 81 and 109 is involved in the membrane fusion activity of RV and that it may be important for the interaction of that protein with E2 to form the E1-E2 heterodimer. PMID:9765418

  3. Soluble respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein in the fully cleaved, pretriggered state is triggered by exposure to low-molarity buffer.

    PubMed

    Chaiwatpongsakorn, Supranee; Epand, Raquel F; Collins, Peter L; Epand, Richard M; Peeples, Mark E

    2011-04-01

    The paramyxovirus fusion (F) glycoprotein is anchored in the virion membrane in a metastable, pretriggered form. Once triggered, the F protein undergoes a dramatic conformational extension that inserts its hydrophobic fusion peptide into the target cell membrane, then folds back on itself to bring the membranes together and initiate fusion. Unlike most other paramyxoviruses, the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) F protein alone is sufficient to mediate membrane fusion and virus infection. To study the triggering mechanism of the RSV F protein, we have generated a soluble F (sF) protein by replacing the transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail domains with a 6His tag. The sF protein is secreted efficiently from 293T cells in a fully cleaved form. It is recognized by neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, appears spherical by electron microscopic analysis, and is not aggregated, all consistent with a native, pretriggered trimer. The sF protein was purified on a Ni(+2) column and eluted with 50 mM phosphate buffer containing 500 mM NaCl and 250 mM imidazole. Dialysis against 10 mM buffer caused the sF protein to trigger, forming "hat pin"-shaped molecules that aggregated as rosettes, characteristic of the posttriggered form. Further dialysis experiments indicated that the efficiency of triggering correlated well with the reduction of buffer molarity. Reduction of buffer molarity by dilution also resulted in exposure of the fusion peptide, as detected by liposome association, confirming sF protein triggering. Mutation of the furin cleavage site adjacent to the fusion peptide prevented liposome association, further confirming that association is via the fusion peptide.

  4. A multiepitope fusion antigen elicits neutralizing antibodies against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and homologous bovine viral diarrhea virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hashish, Emad A; Zhang, Chengxian; Ruan, Xiaosai; Knudsen, David E; Chase, Christopher C; Isaacson, Richard E; Zhou, Guoqiang; Zhang, Weiping

    2013-07-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most important bovine diseases. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are the major causes of diarrhea in calves and cattle. ETEC expressing K99 (F5) fimbriae and heat-stable type Ia (STa) toxin are the leading bacteria causing calf diarrhea, and BVDV causes diarrhea and other clinical illnesses in cattle of all ages. It is reported that maternal immunization with K99 fimbrial antigens provides passive protection to calves against K99 fimbrial ETEC and that BVDV major structural protein E2 elicits antibodies neutralizing against BVDV viral infection. Vaccines inducing anti-K99 and anti-STa immunity would protect calves more effectively against ETEC diarrhea, and those also inducing anti-E2 neutralizing antibodies would protect calves and cattle against diarrhea caused by both ETEC and BVDV. In this study, we used the ETEC K99 major subunit FanC as a backbone, genetically embedded the STa toxoid STaP12F and the most-antigenic B-cell epitope and T-cell epitope predicted from the BVDV E2 glycoprotein into FanC for the multivalent antigen FanC-STa-E2, and examined immunogenicity of this multivalent antigen to assess vaccine potential against bovine diarrhea. Mice intraperitoneally (i.p.) immunized with this multivalent antigen developed anti-K99, anti-STa, and anti-BVDV antibodies. Moreover, elicited antibodies showed neutralization activities, as they inhibited adherence of K99 fimbrial E. coli, neutralized STa toxin, and prevented homologous BVDV viral infection in vitro. Results from this study suggest that this multiepitope fusion antigen can potentially be developed as a vaccine for broad protection against bovine diarrhea and that the multiepitope fusion strategy may be generally applied for multivalent vaccine development against heterogeneous pathogens. PMID:23697572

  5. A multiepitope fusion antigen elicits neutralizing antibodies against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and homologous bovine viral diarrhea virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hashish, Emad A; Zhang, Chengxian; Ruan, Xiaosai; Knudsen, David E; Chase, Christopher C; Isaacson, Richard E; Zhou, Guoqiang; Zhang, Weiping

    2013-07-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most important bovine diseases. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are the major causes of diarrhea in calves and cattle. ETEC expressing K99 (F5) fimbriae and heat-stable type Ia (STa) toxin are the leading bacteria causing calf diarrhea, and BVDV causes diarrhea and other clinical illnesses in cattle of all ages. It is reported that maternal immunization with K99 fimbrial antigens provides passive protection to calves against K99 fimbrial ETEC and that BVDV major structural protein E2 elicits antibodies neutralizing against BVDV viral infection. Vaccines inducing anti-K99 and anti-STa immunity would protect calves more effectively against ETEC diarrhea, and those also inducing anti-E2 neutralizing antibodies would protect calves and cattle against diarrhea caused by both ETEC and BVDV. In this study, we used the ETEC K99 major subunit FanC as a backbone, genetically embedded the STa toxoid STaP12F and the most-antigenic B-cell epitope and T-cell epitope predicted from the BVDV E2 glycoprotein into FanC for the multivalent antigen FanC-STa-E2, and examined immunogenicity of this multivalent antigen to assess vaccine potential against bovine diarrhea. Mice intraperitoneally (i.p.) immunized with this multivalent antigen developed anti-K99, anti-STa, and anti-BVDV antibodies. Moreover, elicited antibodies showed neutralization activities, as they inhibited adherence of K99 fimbrial E. coli, neutralized STa toxin, and prevented homologous BVDV viral infection in vitro. Results from this study suggest that this multiepitope fusion antigen can potentially be developed as a vaccine for broad protection against bovine diarrhea and that the multiepitope fusion strategy may be generally applied for multivalent vaccine development against heterogeneous pathogens.

  6. EGFR Interacts with the Fusion Protein of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Strain 2-20 and Mediates Infection and Mucin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Stobart, Christopher C.; Hotard, Anne L.; Villenave, Remi; Meng, Jia; Pretto, Carla D.; Shields, Michael D.; Nguyen, Minh Trang; Todd, Sean O.; Chi, Michael H.; Hammonds, Jason; Krumm, Stefanie A.; Spearman, Paul; Plemper, Richard K.; Sakamoto, Kaori; Peebles, R. Stokes; Power, Ultan F.; Moore, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of viral lower respiratory tract illness in children. In contrast to the RSV prototypic strain A2, clinical isolate RSV 2–20 induces airway mucin expression in mice, a clinically relevant phenotype dependent on the fusion (F) protein of the RSV strain. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a role in airway mucin expression in other systems; therefore, we hypothesized that the RSV 2–20 F protein stimulates EGFR signaling. Infection of cells with chimeric strains RSV A2-2-20F and A2-2-20GF or over-expression of 2–20 F protein resulted in greater phosphorylation of EGFR than infection with RSV A2 or over-expression of A2 F, respectively. Chemical inhibition of EGFR signaling or knockdown of EGFR resulted in diminished infectivity of RSV A2-2-20F but not RSV A2. Over-expression of EGFR enhanced the fusion activity of 2–20 F protein in trans. EGFR co-immunoprecipitated most efficiently with RSV F proteins derived from “mucogenic” strains. RSV 2–20 F and EGFR co-localized in H292 cells, and A2-2-20GF-induced MUC5AC expression was ablated by EGFR inhibitors in these cells. Treatment of BALB/c mice with the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib significantly reduced the amount of RSV A2-2-20F-induced airway mucin expression. Our results demonstrate that RSV F interacts with EGFR in a strain-specific manner, EGFR is a co-factor for infection, and EGFR plays a role in RSV-induced mucin expression, suggesting EGFR is a potential target for RSV disease. PMID:27152417

  7. EGFR Interacts with the Fusion Protein of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Strain 2-20 and Mediates Infection and Mucin Expression.

    PubMed

    Currier, Michael G; Lee, Sujin; Stobart, Christopher C; Hotard, Anne L; Villenave, Remi; Meng, Jia; Pretto, Carla D; Shields, Michael D; Nguyen, Minh Trang; Todd, Sean O; Chi, Michael H; Hammonds, Jason; Krumm, Stefanie A; Spearman, Paul; Plemper, Richard K; Sakamoto, Kaori; Peebles, R Stokes; Power, Ultan F; Moore, Martin L

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of viral lower respiratory tract illness in children. In contrast to the RSV prototypic strain A2, clinical isolate RSV 2-20 induces airway mucin expression in mice, a clinically relevant phenotype dependent on the fusion (F) protein of the RSV strain. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a role in airway mucin expression in other systems; therefore, we hypothesized that the RSV 2-20 F protein stimulates EGFR signaling. Infection of cells with chimeric strains RSV A2-2-20F and A2-2-20GF or over-expression of 2-20 F protein resulted in greater phosphorylation of EGFR than infection with RSV A2 or over-expression of A2 F, respectively. Chemical inhibition of EGFR signaling or knockdown of EGFR resulted in diminished infectivity of RSV A2-2-20F but not RSV A2. Over-expression of EGFR enhanced the fusion activity of 2-20 F protein in trans. EGFR co-immunoprecipitated most efficiently with RSV F proteins derived from "mucogenic" strains. RSV 2-20 F and EGFR co-localized in H292 cells, and A2-2-20GF-induced MUC5AC expression was ablated by EGFR inhibitors in these cells. Treatment of BALB/c mice with the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib significantly reduced the amount of RSV A2-2-20F-induced airway mucin expression. Our results demonstrate that RSV F interacts with EGFR in a strain-specific manner, EGFR is a co-factor for infection, and EGFR plays a role in RSV-induced mucin expression, suggesting EGFR is a potential target for RSV disease. PMID:27152417

  8. Enzootic Arbovirus Surveillance in Forest Habitat and Phylogenetic Characterization of Novel Isolates of Gamboa Virus in Panama.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Gillian; Loaiza, Jose R; Pongsiri, Montira J; Sanjur, Oris I; Pecor, James E; Auguste, Albert J; Kramer, Laura D

    2016-04-01

    Landscape changes occurring in Panama, a country whose geographic location and climate have historically supported arbovirus transmission, prompted the hypothesis that arbovirus prevalence increases with degradation of tropical forest habitats. Investigations at four variably degraded sites revealed a diverse array of potential mosquito vectors, several of which are known vectors of arbovirus pathogens. Overall, 675 pools consisting of 25,787 mosquitoes and representing 29 species from nine genera (collected at ground and canopy height across all habitats) were screened for cytopathic viruses on Vero cells. We detected four isolates of Gamboa virus (family:Bunyaviridae; genus:Orthobunyavirus) from pools of Aedeomyia squamipennis captured at canopy level in November 2012. Phylogenetic characterization of complete genome sequences shows the new isolates to be closely related to each other with strong evidence of reassortment among the M segment of Panamanian Gamboa isolates and several other viruses of this group. At the site yielding viruses, Soberanía National Park in central Panama, 18 mosquito species were identified, and the predominant taxa included A. squamipennis,Coquillettidia nigricans, and Mansonia titillans.

  9. Critical Role of the Fusion Protein Cytoplasmic Tail Sequence in Parainfluenza Virus Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Raychel; Takimoto, Toru

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between viral glycoproteins, matrix protein and nucleocapsid sustain assembly of parainfluenza viruses at the plasma membrane. Although the protein interactions required for virion formation are considered to be highly specific, virions lacking envelope glycoprotein(s) can be produced, thus the molecular interactions driving viral assembly and production are still unclear. Sendai virus (SeV) and human parainfluenza virus type 1 (hPIV1) are highly similar in structure, however, the cytoplasmic tail sequences of the envelope glycoproteins (HN and F) are relatively less conserved. To unveil the specific role of the envelope glycoproteins in viral assembly, we created chimeric SeVs whose HN (rSeVhHN) or HN and F (rSeVh(HN+F)) were replaced with those of hPIV1. rSeVhHN grew as efficiently as wt SeV or hPIV1, suggesting that the sequence difference in HN does not have a significant impact on SeV replication and virion production. In sharp contrast, the growth of rSeVh(HN+F) was significantly impaired compared to rSeVhHN. rSeVh(HN+Fstail) which expresses a chimeric hPIV1 F with the SeV cytoplasmic tail sequence grew similar to wt SeV or rSeVhHN. Further analysis indicated that the F cytoplasmic tail plays a critical role in cell surface expression/accumulation of HN and F, as well as NP and M association at the plasma membrane. Trafficking of nucelocapsids in infected cells was not significantly affected by the origin of F, suggesting that F cytoplasmic tail is not involved in intracellular movement. These results demonstrate the role of the F cytoplasmic tail in accumulation of structural components at the plasma membrane assembly sites. PMID:23593451

  10. A single amino acid in the stalk region of the H1N1pdm influenza virus HA protein affects viral fusion, stability and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Christopher R; Jin, Hong; Chen, Zhongying

    2014-01-01

    The 2009 H1N1 pandemic (H1N1pdm) viruses have evolved to contain an E47K substitution in the HA2 subunit of the stalk region of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein. The biological significance of this single amino acid change was investigated by comparing A/California/7/2009 (HA2-E47) with a later strain, A/Brisbane/10/2010 (HA2-K47). The E47K change was found to reduce the threshold pH for membrane fusion from 5.4 to 5.0. An inter-monomer salt bridge between K47 in HA2 and E21 in HA1, a neighboring highly conserved residue, which stabilized the trimer structure, was found to be responsible for the reduced threshold pH for fusion. The higher structural and acid stability of the HA trimer caused by the E47K change also conferred higher viral thermal stability and infectivity in ferrets, suggesting a fitness advantage for the E47K evolutionary change in humans. Our study indicated that the pH of HA fusion activation is an important factor for influenza virus replication and host adaptation. The identification of this genetic signature in the HA stalk region that influences vaccine virus thermal stability also has significant implications for influenza vaccine production.

  11. Immunogenicity of a neutralizing epitope from porcine epidemic diarrhea virus: M cell targeting ligand fusion protein expressed in transgenic rice calli.

    PubMed

    Huy, Nguyen-Xuan; Kim, Sae-Hae; Yang, Moon-Sik; Kim, Tae-Geum

    2012-10-01

    To increase immune responses of plant-based vaccines in intestine mucosal immune systems, a synthetic neutralizing epitope (sCOE) gene of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was fused with M cell-targeting ligand (Co1) and introduced into a plant expression vector under the control of rice amylase 3D promoter. The sCOE-Co1 fusion gene was introduced into rice calli via the particle bombardment-mediated transformation method. The stable integration and transcriptional expression of the sCOE-Co1 fusion gene was confirmed by genomic DNA PCR amplification and Northern blot analysis, respectively. The expression of the COE-Co1 fusion protein was confirmed by immunoblot analysis. The highest expression level of the COE-Co1 fusion protein reached 0.083 % of the total soluble protein according to quantitative densitometry of Western blot analysis. Mice immunized with transgenic rice calli protein extracts induced significant serum IgG and fecal IgA antibody levels against purified bacterial COE. The systemic and mucosal immune responses were confirmed by measuring COE-specific IgG and IgA antibody-secreting cells in the lymphocytes extracted from the spleen and COE-specific IgA antibody-secreting cells in the Peyer's patches from immunized mice. These results indicated that oral immunization of plant-produced COE-Co1 fusion protein could elicit efficient systemic and mucosal immune responses against the COE antigen. Key message Neutralizing epitope from porcine epidemic diarrhea virus-M cell targeting ligand fusion protein was produced in transgenic rice calli and elicited systemic and mucosal immune responses by oral administration in mice. PMID:22736145

  12. Viral membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Stephen C

    2015-05-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a "fusion loop" or "fusion peptide") engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics.

  13. A soluble form of Epstein-Barr virus gH/gL inhibits EBV-induced membrane fusion and does not function in fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Cynthia L.; Connolly, Sarah A.; Chen, Jia; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Longnecker, Richard

    2013-02-05

    We investigated whether soluble EBV gH/gL (sgH/gL) functions in fusion and made a series of truncations of gH/gL domains based on the gH/gL crystal structure. We found sgH/gL failed to mediate cell-cell fusion both when co-expressed with the other entry glycoproteins and when added exogenously to fusion assays. Interestingly, sgH/gL inhibited cell-cell fusion in a dose dependent manner when co-expressed. sgH/gL from HSV was unable to inhibit EBV fusion, suggesting the inhibition was specific to EBV gH/gL. sgH/gL stably binds gp42, but not gB nor gH/gL. The domain mutants, DI/gL, DI-II/gL and DI-II-III/gL were unable to bind gp42. Instead, DI-II/gL, DI-II-III/gL and sgH/gL but not DI/gL decreased the expression of gp42, resulting in decreased overall fusion. Overall, our results suggest that domain IV may be required for proper folding and the transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail of EBV gH/gL are required for the most efficient fusion.

  14. RT-PCR and sequence analysis of the full-length fusion protein of Canine Distemper Virus from domestic dogs.

    PubMed

    Romanutti, Carina; Gallo Calderón, Marina; Keller, Leticia; Mattion, Nora; La Torre, José

    2016-02-01

    During 2007-2014, 84 out of 236 (35.6%) samples from domestic dogs submitted to our laboratory for diagnostic purposes were positive for Canine Distemper Virus (CDV), as analyzed by RT-PCR amplification of a fragment of the nucleoprotein gene. Fifty-nine of them (70.2%) were from dogs that had been vaccinated against CDV. The full-length gene encoding the Fusion (F) protein of fifteen isolates was sequenced and compared with that of those of other CDVs, including wild-type and vaccine strains. Phylogenetic analysis using the F gene full-length sequences grouped all the Argentinean CDV strains in the SA2 clade. Sequence identity with the Onderstepoort vaccine strain was 89.0-90.6%, and the highest divergence was found in the 135 amino acids corresponding to the F protein signal-peptide, Fsp (64.4-66.7% identity). In contrast, this region was highly conserved among the local strains (94.1-100% identity). One extra putative N-glycosylation site was identified in the F gene of CDV Argentinean strains with respect to the vaccine strain. The present report is the first to analyze full-length F protein sequences of CDV strains circulating in Argentina, and contributes to the knowledge of molecular epidemiology of CDV, which may help in understanding future disease outbreaks. PMID:26611227

  15. RT-PCR and sequence analysis of the full-length fusion protein of Canine Distemper Virus from domestic dogs.

    PubMed

    Romanutti, Carina; Gallo Calderón, Marina; Keller, Leticia; Mattion, Nora; La Torre, José

    2016-02-01

    During 2007-2014, 84 out of 236 (35.6%) samples from domestic dogs submitted to our laboratory for diagnostic purposes were positive for Canine Distemper Virus (CDV), as analyzed by RT-PCR amplification of a fragment of the nucleoprotein gene. Fifty-nine of them (70.2%) were from dogs that had been vaccinated against CDV. The full-length gene encoding the Fusion (F) protein of fifteen isolates was sequenced and compared with that of those of other CDVs, including wild-type and vaccine strains. Phylogenetic analysis using the F gene full-length sequences grouped all the Argentinean CDV strains in the SA2 clade. Sequence identity with the Onderstepoort vaccine strain was 89.0-90.6%, and the highest divergence was found in the 135 amino acids corresponding to the F protein signal-peptide, Fsp (64.4-66.7% identity). In contrast, this region was highly conserved among the local strains (94.1-100% identity). One extra putative N-glycosylation site was identified in the F gene of CDV Argentinean strains with respect to the vaccine strain. The present report is the first to analyze full-length F protein sequences of CDV strains circulating in Argentina, and contributes to the knowledge of molecular epidemiology of CDV, which may help in understanding future disease outbreaks.

  16. Sequence motif upstream of the Hendra virus fusion protein cleavage site is not sufficient to promote efficient proteolytic processing

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, Willie Warren; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis . E-mail: rdutc2@uky.edu

    2005-10-10

    The Hendra virus fusion (HeV F) protein is synthesized as a precursor, F{sub 0}, and proteolytically cleaved into the mature F{sub 1} and F{sub 2} heterodimer, following an HDLVDGVK{sub 109} motif. This cleavage event is required for fusogenic activity. To determine the amino acid requirements for processing of the HeV F protein, we constructed multiple mutants. Individual and simultaneous alanine substitutions of the eight residues immediately upstream of the cleavage site did not eliminate processing. A chimeric SV5 F protein in which the furin site was substituted for the VDGVK{sub 109} motif of the HeV F protein was not processed but was expressed on the cell surface. Another chimeric SV5 F protein containing the HDLVDGVK{sub 109} motif of the HeV F protein underwent partial cleavage. These data indicate that the upstream region can play a role in protease recognition, but is neither absolutely required nor sufficient for efficient processing of the HeV F protein.

  17. Palmitoylation of the feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein and its effect on fusion activity and envelope incorporation into virions

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Silvia A.; Paladino, Monica G.; Affranchino, Jose L.

    2012-06-20

    The feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) envelope glycoprotein (Env) possesses a short cytoplasmic domain of 53 amino acids containing four highly conserved cysteines at Env positions 804, 811, 815 and 848. Since palmitoylation of transmembrane proteins occurs at or near the membrane anchor, we investigated whether cysteines 804, 811 and 815 are acylated and analyzed the relevance of these residues for Env functions. Replacement of cysteines 804, 811 and 815 individually or in combination by serine residues resulted in Env glycoproteins that were efficiently expressed and processed. However, mutations C804S and C811S reduced Env fusogenicity by 93% and 84%, respectively, compared with wild-type Env. By contrast, mutant C815S exhibited a fusogenic capacity representing 50% of the wild-type value. Remarkably, the double mutation C804S/C811S abrogated both Env fusion activity and Env incorporation into virions. Finally, by means of Click chemistry assays we demonstrated that the four FIV Env cytoplasmic cysteines are palmitoylated.

  18. Structural basis for immunization with postfusion respiratory syncytial virus fusion F glycoprotein (RSV F) to elicit high neutralizing antibody titers

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Kurt A.; Settembre, Ethan C.; Shaw, Christine A.; Dey, Antu K.; Rappuoli, Rino; Mandl, Christian W.; Dormitzer, Philip R.; Carfi, Andrea

    2012-02-07

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the main cause of infant bronchiolitis, remains a major unmet vaccine need despite more than 40 years of vaccine research. Vaccine candidates based on a chief RSV neutralization antigen, the fusion (F) glycoprotein, have foundered due to problems with stability, purity, reproducibility, and potency. Crystal structures of related parainfluenza F glycoproteins have revealed a large conformational change between the prefusion and postfusion states, suggesting that postfusion F antigens might not efficiently elicit neutralizing antibodies. We have generated a homogeneous, stable, and reproducible postfusion RSV F immunogen that elicits high titers of neutralizing antibodies in immunized animals. The 3.2-{angstrom} X-ray crystal structure of this substantially complete RSV F reveals important differences from homology-based structural models. Specifically, the RSV F crystal structure demonstrates the exposure of key neutralizing antibody binding sites on the surface of the postfusion RSV F trimer. This unanticipated structural feature explains the engineered RSV F antigen's efficiency as an immunogen. This work illustrates how structural-based antigen design can guide the rational optimization of candidate vaccine antigens.

  19. Isotopically Labeled Expression in E. coli, Purification, and Refolding of the Full Ectodomain of the Influenza Virus Membrane Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Curtis-Fisk, Jaime; Spencer, Ryan M.; Weliky, David P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes methods to produce an isotopically labeled 23 kDa viral membrane protein with purified yield of 20 mg/L of E. coli shake flask culture. This yield is sufficient for NMR structural studies and the protein production methods are simple, straightforward, and rapid and likely applicable to other recombinant membrane proteins expressed in E. coli. The target FHA2 protein is the full ectodomain construct of the influenza virus hemagglutinin protein which catalyzes fusion between the viral and the cellular endosomal membranes during infection. The high yield of FHA2 was achieved by: (1) initial growth in rich medium to A600 ~ 8 followed by a switch to minimal medium and induction of protein expression; and (2) obtaining protein both from purification of the detergent-soluble lysate and from solubilization, purification, and refolding of inclusion bodies. The high cell density was achieved after optimization of pH, oxygenation, and carbon source and concentration, and the refolding protocol was optimized using circular dichroism spectroscopy. For a single residue of membrane-associated FHA2 that was obtained from purification and refolding of inclusion bodies, native conformation was verified by the 13CO chemical shift measured using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. PMID:18640277

  20. Mutations of two transmembrane cysteines of hemagglutinin (HA) from influenza A H3N2 virus affect HA thermal stability and fusion activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shun; Zhou, Jianqiang; Liu, Kang; Liu, Qiliang; Xue, Chunyi; Li, Xiaoming; Zheng, Jing; Luo, Dongyu; Cao, Yongchang

    2013-08-01

    Influenza A H3N2 virus caused 1968 Hong Kong influenza pandemic, and has since been one of the most prevalent seasonal influenza viruses in global populations, representing a credible pandemic candidate in future. Previous studies have established that the hemagglutinin (HA) protein is the predominant antigen and executes receptor binding and membrane fusion. Homologous sequence analysis of all HA subtypes of influenza viruses revealed that two cysteine residues (540 and 544) are uniquely present in the transmembrane domain (TM) of HA proteins from all influenza A H3N2 viruses. However, the functions of these two cysteines have not been fully studied. Here, we generated three mutants (C540S, C544L, and 2C/SL) to investigate the effects of the two TM cysteines on the biological functions of H3 HA. We herein presented evidences that the mutations of one or two of the cysteines did not affect the proper expressions of HA proteins in cells, and more importantly all mutant H3 HAs showed decreased thermal stability but increased fusion activity in comparison with wildtype HA. Our results taken together demonstrated that the two TM cysteines are important for the biological functions of H3 HA proteins.

  1. Protection against influenza A virus by vaccination with a recombinant fusion protein linking influenza M2e to human serum albumin (HSA).

    PubMed

    Mu, Xupeng; Hu, Kebang; Shen, Mohan; Kong, Ning; Fu, Changhao; Yan, Weiqun; Wei, Anhui

    2016-02-01

    The highly conserved extracellular domain of M2 protein (M2e) of influenza A viruses has limited immunogenicity on its own. Hence, aiming to enhance immunogenicity of M2e protein, optimal approaches remain to be established. In this study, we created recombinant fusion protein vaccines by linking M2e consensus sequence of influenza A viruses with C-terminal domain of human serum albumin (HSA). Then HSA/M2e recombinant fusion protein was studied. Our results showed that HSA/M2e could induce strong anti-M2e specific humoral immune responses in the established mice model. Administration of HSA/M2e with Freund's adjuvant resulted in a higher number of IFN-γ-producing cells compared to HSA/M2e or M2e peptide emulsified in Freund's adjuvant. Furthermore, HSA/M2e was able to reduce viral load in the mice lungs and provide significant protection against lethal challenge with an H1N1 or an H3N2 virus compared to controls. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated a potential vaccine that could provide protection in preventing the threat of influenza outbreak because of rapid variation of the influenza virus.

  2. Ross River virus and Barmah Forest virus infections: a review of history, ecology, and predictive models, with implications for tropical northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Jacups, Susan P; Whelan, Peter I; Currie, Bart J

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of the present article is to present a review of the Ross River virus (RRV) and Barmah Forest virus (BFV) literature in relation to potential implications for future disease in tropical northern Australia. Ross River virus infection is the most common and most widespread arboviral disease in Australia, with an average of 4,800 national notifications annually. Of recent concern is the sudden rise in BFV infections; the 2005-2006 summer marked the largest BFV epidemic on record in Australia, with 1,895 notifications. Although not life-threatening, infection with either virus can cause arthritis, myalgia, and fatigue for 6 months or longer, resulting in substantial morbidity and economic impact. The geographic distribution of mosquito species and their seasonal activity is determined in large part by temperature and rainfall. Predictive models can be useful tools in providing early warning systems for epidemics of RRV and BFV infection. Various models have been developed to predict RRV outbreaks, but these appear to be mostly only regionally valid, being dependent on local ecological factors. Difficulties have arisen in developing useful models for the tropical northern parts of Australia, and to date no models have been developed for the Northern Territory. Only one model has been developed for predicting BFV infections using climate and tide variables. It is predicted that the exacerbation of current greenhouse conditions will result in longer periods of high mosquito activity in the tropical regions where RRV and BFV are already common. In addition, the endemic locations may expand further within temperate regions, and epidemics may become more frequent in those areas. Further development of predictive models should benefit public health planning by providing early warning systems of RRV and BFV infection outbreaks in different geographical locations.

  3. Comparative analysis of the fusion efficiency elicited by the envelope glycoprotein V1-V5 regions derived from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmitted perinatally.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongyan; Abrahamyan, Levon G; Liu, Chang; Waltke, Mackenzie; Geng, Yunqi; Chen, Qimin; Wood, Charles; Kong, Xiaohong

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the properties of viruses preferentially establishing infection during perinatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is critical for the development of effective measures to prevent transmission. A previous study demonstrated that the newly transmitted viruses (in infants) of chronically infected mother-infant pairs (MIPs) were fitter in terms of growth, which was imparted by their envelope (Env) glycoprotein V1-V5 regions, than those in the corresponding chronically infected mothers. In order to investigate whether the higher fitness of transmitted viruses was conferred by their higher entry efficiency directed by the V1-V5 regions during perinatal transmission, the fusogenicity of Env containing V1-V5 regions derived from transmitted and non-tranmsmitted viruses of five chronically infected MIPs and two acutely infected MIPs was analysed using two different cell-cell fusion assays. The results showed that, in one chronically infected MIP, a higher fusion efficiency was induced by the infant Env V1-V5 compared with that of the corresponding mother. Moreover, the V4-V5 regions played an important role in discriminating the transmitted and non-transmitted viruses in this pair. However, neither a consistent pattern nor significant differences in fusogenicity mediated by the V1-V5 regions between maternal and infant variants was observed in the other MIPs. This study suggests that there is no consistent and significant correlation between viral fitness selection and entry efficiency directed by the V1-V5 regions during perinatal transmission. Other factors such as the route and timing of transmission may also be involved.

  4. Immunization of DNA vaccine encoding C3d-VP1 fusion enhanced protective immune response against foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Fan, Huiying; Tong, Tiezhu; Chen, Huanchun; Guo, Aizhen

    2007-10-01

    Because foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) remains a great problem to many livestock of agricultural importance, safe, effective vaccines are in great need. DNA vaccine would be a promising candidate but the design remains to be optimized. VP1 gene of FMDV strain O/ES/2001 was linked to three copies of either porcine or murine C3d or four copies of a 28-aa fragment of murine C3d containing the CR2 receptor binding domain (M28). The resultant plasmids encoding C3d/M28-VP1 fusion or only VP1 as control were immunized guinea pigs. Both cellular and humoral immune responses were evaluated and protection was observed after virus challenge. As a result, although the plasmid encoding only VP1 could elicit virus-binding antibody detected by ELISA, splenocyte proliferation, IL-4 and IFN-gamma production, the levels were significantly less than C3d/M28-VP1 fusion. Furthermore, VP1 failed to induce neutralization antibody and protect animals against virus challenge, while murine C3d-VP1 fusion efficiently induced neutralization antibody response and provided 87.50% of the animals with complete protection and 12.50% with partial protection. Among murine C3d, M28, and porcine C3d, the adjuvant effect of murine C3d is strongest, followed by porcine C3d, and last murine M28. In conclusion, the fact that C3d genes, when coupled to VP1 gene, are able to greatly enhance the protective immune response of VP1 DNA in guinea pigs suggests that C3d-VP1 DNA chimera has a significant potential for use as a novel DNA vaccine against FMDV. PMID:17497212

  5. Screening Analogs of β-OG Pocket Binder as Fusion Inhibitor of Dengue Virus 2

    PubMed Central

    Tambunan, Usman SF; Zahroh, Hilyatuz; Parikesit, Arli A; Idrus, Syarifuddin; Kerami, Djati

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is an infectious disease caused by dengue virus (DENV) and transmitted between human hosts by mosquitoes. Recently, Indonesia was listed as a country with the highest cases of dengue by the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. The current treatment for dengue disease is supportive therapy; there is no antiviral drug available in the market against dengue. Therefore, a research on antiviral drug against dengue is very important, especially to prevent outbreak explosion. In this research, the development of dengue antiviral is performed through the inhibition of n-octyl-β-D-glucoside (β-OG) binding pocket on envelope protein of DENV by using analogs of β-OG pocket binder. There are 828 compounds used in this study, and all of them were screened based on the analysis of molecular docking, pharmacological character prediction of the compounds, and molecular dynamics simulation. The result of these analyses revealed that the compound that can be used as an antiviral candidate against DENV is 5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-N-[2-(p-tolyl) benzotriazol-5-yl]furan-2-carboxamide. PMID:26617459

  6. Sequestration of G3BP coupled with efficient translation inhibits stress granules in Semliki Forest virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Panas, Marc D.; Varjak, Margus; Lulla, Aleksei; Er Eng, Kai; Merits, Andres; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.; McInerney, Gerald M.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic, mRNA-containing stress granules (SGs) form in the cytoplasm of cells under environmental stresses, including viral infection. Many viruses appear to employ mechanisms to disrupt the formation of SGs on their mRNAs, suggesting that they represent a cellular defense against infection. Here, we report that early in Semliki Forest virus infection, the C-terminal domain of the viral nonstructural protein 3 (nsP3) forms a complex with Ras-GAP SH3-domain–binding protein (G3BP) and sequesters it into viral RNA replication complexes in a manner that inhibits the formation of SGs on viral mRNAs. A viral mutant carrying a C-terminal truncation of nsP3 induces more persistent SGs and is attenuated for propagation in cell culture. Of importance, we also show that the efficient translation of viral mRNAs containing a translation enhancer sequence also contributes to the disassembly of SGs in infected cells. Furthermore, we show that the nsP3/G3BP interaction also blocks SGs induced by other stresses than virus infection. This is one of few described viral mechanisms for SG disruption and underlines the role of SGs in antiviral defense. PMID:23087212

  7. Samba virus: a novel mimivirus from a giant rain forest, the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The identification of novel giant viruses from the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses group and their virophages has increased in the last decade and has helped to shed light on viral evolution. This study describe the discovery, isolation and characterization of Samba virus (SMBV), a novel giant virus belonging to the Mimivirus genus, which was isolated from the Negro River in the Brazilian Amazon. We also report the isolation of an SMBV-associated virophage named Rio Negro (RNV), which is the first Mimivirus virophage to be isolated in the Americas. Methods/results Based on a phylogenetic analysis, SMBV belongs to group A of the putative Megavirales order, possibly a new virus related to Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV). SMBV is the largest virus isolated in Brazil, with an average particle diameter about 574 nm. The SMBV genome contains 938 ORFs, of which nine are ORFans. The 1,213.6 kb SMBV genome is one of the largest genome of any group A Mimivirus described to date. Electron microscopy showed RNV particle accumulation near SMBV and APMV factories resulting in the production of defective SMBV and APMV particles and decreasing the infectivity of these two viruses by several logs. Conclusion This discovery expands our knowledge of Mimiviridae evolution and ecology. PMID:24886672

  8. Inhibition of Semliki Forest virus multiplication in L-cells by combinations of interferon and ribavirin as measured by plaque titration and direct enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Harmsen, T; Van Veenendaal, D; Kraaijeveld, C A

    1994-01-01

    Inhibition of Semliki Forest virus (SFV) multiplication in L-cell monolayers by combinations of mouse interferon (IFN) and ribavirin was measured by plaque titration and by direct enzyme immunoassay of SFV in L-cells. When critically inhibitory quantities of IFN and ribavirin were combined, an additive inhibitory effect was observed in either assay.

  9. Evidence for an inhibitory feedback loop regulating simian virus 40 large T-antigen fusion protein nuclear transport.

    PubMed Central

    Seydel, U; Jans, D A

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear protein import is central to eukaryotic cell function. It is dependent on ATP, temperature and cytosolic factors, and requires specific targeting sequences called nuclear localization signals (NLSs). Nuclear import kinetics was studied in vitro using digitonin-permeabilized cells of the HTC rat hepatoma cell line and a fluorescently labelled beta-galactosidase fusion protein carrying amino acids 111-135 of the simian virus 40 large T-antigen (T-ag), including the NLS. Nuclear accumulation was rapid, reaching steady-state after about 80 min at 37 degrees C (t1/2 at about 17 min). Surprisingly, maximal nuclear concentration was found to be directly proportional to the concentration of the cytosolic extract and of cytoplasmic T-ag protein. Neither preincubation of cells for 1 h at 37 degrees C before the addition of T-ag protein nor the addition of fresh transport medium after 1 h and continuation of the incubation for another hour affected the maximal nuclear concentration. If cells were allowed to accumulate T-ag protein for 1 h before the addition of fresh transport medium containing different concentrations of T-ag protein and incubated for a further hour, the maximal nuclear concentration did not change unless the concentration of T-ag protein in the second transport mixture exceeded that in the first, in which case the nuclear concentration increased. Nuclear import of T-ag thus appeared (i) to be strictly unidirectional over 2 h at 37 degrees C and (ii) to be regulated by an inhibitory feedback loop, whereby the cytosolic concentration of protein appears to determine directly the precise end point of nuclear accumulation. This study represents the first characterization of this previously undescribed mechanism of regulation of nuclear protein import. PMID:8670127

  10. Sequence analysis of the fusion protein gene from infectious salmon anemia virus isolates: evidence of recombination and reassortment.

    PubMed

    Devold, M; Karlsen, M; Nylund, A

    2006-07-01

    Studies of infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV; genus Isavirus, family Orthomyxoviridae) haemagglutinin-esterase (HE) gene sequences have shown that this gene provides a tool for genotyping and, hence, a tool to follow the dissemination of ISAV. The problem with using only the HE gene is that ISAV has a segmented genome and one segment may not tell the whole story about the origin and history of ISAV from outbreaks. To achieve a better genotyping system, the present study has focused on segment 5, the fusion (F) protein gene, which contains sequence variation at about the same level as the HE gene. The substitution rates of the HE and F gene sequences, based on 54 Norwegian ISAV isolates, are 6.1(+/-0.3)x10(-6) and 8.6(+/-5.0)x10(-5) nt per site per year, respectively. The results of phylogenetic analysis of the two gene segments have been compared and, with the exception of a few cases of reassortment, they tell the same story about the ISAV isolates. A combination of the two segments is recommended as a tool for future genotyping of ISAV. Inserts (INs) of 8-11 aa may occur close to the cleavage site of the precursor F(0) protein in some ISAV isolates. The nucleotide sequence of two of these INs shows 100% sequence identity to parts of the 5' end of the F protein gene, whilst the third IN is identical to a part of the nucleoprotein gene. This shows that recombination is one of the evolutionary mechanisms shaping the genome of ISAV. The possible importance of the INs with respect to virulence remains uncertain. PMID:16760406

  11. Using multi-satellite data fusion to estimate daily high spatial resolution evapotranspiration over a forested site in North Carolina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse model and associated disaggregation scheme (ALEXI/DisALEXI). Satellite-based ET retrievals from both the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectoradiometer (MODIS; 1km, daily) and Landsat (30m, bi-weekly) are fused with The Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflective Fusion ...

  12. Mutation of the dengue virus type 2 envelope protein heparan sulfate binding sites or the domain III lateral ridge blocks replication in Vero cells prior to membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Roehrig, John T.; Butrapet, Siritorn; Liss, Nathan M.; Bennett, Susan L.; Luy, Betty E.; Childers, Thomas; Boroughs, Karen L.; Stovall, Janae L.; Calvert, Amanda E.; Blair, Carol D.; Huang, Claire Y.-H.

    2013-07-05

    Using an infectious cDNA clone we engineered seven mutations in the putative heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of the envelope protein of dengue virus serotype 2, strain 16681. Four mutant viruses, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, and KKK305/307/310EEE, were recovered following transfection of C6/36 cells. A fifth mutant, KK291/295EE, was recovered from C6/36 cells with a compensatory E295V mutation. All mutants grew in and mediated fusion of virus-infected C6/36 cells, but three of the mutants, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, did not grow in Vero cells without further modification. Two Vero cell lethal mutants, KK291/295EV and KKK307/307/310EEE, failed to replicate in DC-SIGN-transformed Raji cells and did not react with monoclonal antibodies known to block DENV attachment to Vero cells. Additionally, both mutants were unable to initiate negative-strand vRNA synthesis in Vero cells by 72 h post-infection, suggesting that the replication block occurred prior to virus-mediated membrane fusion. - Highlights: • Heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of DENV2 envelope protein were mutated. • Four mutant viruses were isolated—all could fuse C6/36 cells. • Two of these mutants were lethal in Vero cells without further modification. • Lethal mutations were KK291/295EV and KKK305/307/310EEE. • Cell attachment was implicated as the replication block for both mutants.

  13. The Membrane-Proximal Region (MPR) of Herpes Simplex Virus gB Regulates Association of the Fusion Loops with Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Shelly, Spencer S.; Cairns, Tina M.; Whitbeck, J. Charles; Lou, Huan; Krummenacher, Claude; Cohen, Gary H.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycoprotein B (gB), gD, and gH/gL constitute the fusion machinery of herpes simplex virus (HSV). Prior studies indicated that fusion occurs in a stepwise fashion whereby the gD/receptor complex activates the entire process, while gH/gL regulates the fusion reaction carried out by gB. Trimeric gB is a class III fusion protein. Its ectodomain of 773 amino acids contains a membrane-proximal region (MPR) (residues 731 to 773) and two fusion loops (FLs) per protomer. We hypothesized that the highly hydrophobic MPR interacts with the FLs, thereby masking them on virions until fusion begins. To test this hypothesis, we made a series of deletion, truncation, and point mutants of the gB MPR. Although the full-length deletion mutants were expressed in transfected cells, they were not transported to the cell surface, suggesting that removal of even small stretches of the MPR was highly detrimental to gB folding. To circumvent this limitation, we used a baculovirus expression system to generate four soluble proteins, each lacking the transmembrane region and cytoplasmic tail. All retained the FLs and decreasing portions of the MPR [gB(773t) (gB truncated at amino acid 773), gB(759t), gB(749t), and gB(739t)]. Despite the presence of the FLs, all were compromised in their ability to bind liposomes compared to the control, gB(730t), which lacks the MPR. We conclude that residues 731 to 739 are sufficient to mask the FLs, thereby preventing liposome association. Importantly, mutation of two aromatic residues (F732 and F738) to alanine restored the ability of gB(739t) to bind liposomes. Our data suggest that the MPR is important for modulating the association of gB FLs with target membranes. PMID:23170000

  14. Expression and purification of chimeric peptide comprising EGFR B-cell epitope and measles virus fusion protein T-cell epitope in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meizhi; Zhao, Lin; Zhu, Lei; Chen, Zhange; Li, Huangjin

    2013-03-01

    Chimeric peptide MVF-EGFR(237-267), comprising a B-cell epitope from the dimerization interface of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and a promiscuous T-cell epitope from measles virus fusion protein (MVF), is a promising candidate antigen peptide for therapeutic vaccine. To establish a high-efficiency preparation process of this small peptide, the coding sequence was cloned into pET-21b and pET-32a respectively, to be expressed alone or in the form of fusion protein with thioredoxin (Trx) and His(6)-tag in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The chimeric peptide failed to be expressed alone, but over-expressed in the fusion form, which presented as soluble protein and took up more than 30% of total proteins of host cells. The fusion protein was seriously degraded during the cell disruption, in which endogenous metalloproteinase played a key role. Degradation of target peptide was inhibited by combined application of EDTA in the cell disruption buffer and a step of Source 30Q anion exchange chromatography (AEC) before metal-chelating chromatography (MCAC) for purifying His(6)-tagged fusion protein. The chimeric peptide was recovered from the purified fusion protein by enterokinase digestion at a yield of 3.0 mg/L bacteria culture with a purity of more than 95%. Immunogenicity analysis showed that the recombinant chimeric peptide was able to arouse more than 1×10(4) titers of specific antibody in BALB/c mice. Present work laid a solid foundation for the development of therapeutic peptide vaccine targeting EGFR dimerization and provided a convenient and low-cost preparation method for small peptides.

  15. A Fusion Protein Based on the Second Subunit of Hemagglutinin of Influenza A/H2N2 Viruses Provides Cross Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Stepanova, L. A.; Sergeeva, M. V.; Shuklina, M. A.; Shaldzhyan, A. A.; Potapchuk, M. V.; Korotkov, A. V.; Tsybalova, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Conserved fragments of the second subunit of hemagglutinin (HA2) are of great interest for the design of vaccine constructs that can provide protective immunity against influenza A viruses of different subtypes. A recombinant fusion protein, FlgMH, was constructed on the basis of flagellin and a highly conserved HA2 fragment (35–107) of influenza viruses of the subtype A/H2N2, containing B cell, CD4+ T cell, and CD8+ T cell epitopes. The native conformation of the HA2 fragment was partially preserved upon its attachment to the C-terminus of flagellin within the recombinant fusion protein FlgMH. FlgMH was shown to stimulate a mixed Th1/Th2 response of cross-reactive antibodies, which bind to influenza viruses of the first phylogenetic group (H1, H2, H5), to the target sequence as well as the induction of specific cytotoxic T cells (CD3+CD8+IFNγ+). Immunization with the recombinant protein protected animals from a lethal influenza infection. The developed FlgMH protein is a promising agent that may be included in an influenza vaccine with a wide spectrum of action which will be able to stimulate the T and B cell immune responses. PMID:27437146

  16. A Fusion Protein Based on the Second Subunit of Hemagglutinin of Influenza A/H2N2 Viruses Provides Cross Immunity.

    PubMed

    Stepanova, L A; Sergeeva, M V; Shuklina, M A; Shaldzhyan, A A; Potapchuk, M V; Korotkov, A V; Tsybalova, L M

    2016-01-01

    Conserved fragments of the second subunit of hemagglutinin (HA2) are of great interest for the design of vaccine constructs that can provide protective immunity against influenza A viruses of different subtypes. A recombinant fusion protein, FlgMH, was constructed on the basis of flagellin and a highly conserved HA2 fragment (35-107) of influenza viruses of the subtype A/H2N2, containing B cell, CD4+ T cell, and CD8+ T cell epitopes. The native conformation of the HA2 fragment was partially preserved upon its attachment to the C-terminus of flagellin within the recombinant fusion protein FlgMH. FlgMH was shown to stimulate a mixed Th1/Th2 response of cross-reactive antibodies, which bind to influenza viruses of the first phylogenetic group (H1, H2, H5), to the target sequence as well as the induction of specific cytotoxic T cells (CD3+CD8+IFNγ+). Immunization with the recombinant protein protected animals from a lethal influenza infection. The developed FlgMH protein is a promising agent that may be included in an influenza vaccine with a wide spectrum of action which will be able to stimulate the T and B cell immune responses. PMID:27437146

  17. Enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion proteins of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase and cytochrome P450 4B1: applications for prodrug-activating gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Steffens, S; Frank, S; Fischer, U; Heuser, C; Meyer, K L; Dobberstein, K U; Rainov, N G; Kramm, C M

    2000-05-01

    To monitor therapeutic transgene expression, we developed fusion genes of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) with two different prodrug-activating enzyme genes: herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) and rabbit cytochrome P450 4B1 (cyp4b1). Expression of the resulting fusion proteins, TK-EGFP and 4B1-EGFP, rendered transduced human and rodent glioma cells sensitive to cytotoxic treatment with the corresponding prodrugs ganciclovir and 4-ipomeanol. Ganciclovir and 4-ipomeanol sensitivity was comparable with that achieved with the native HSV-TK and CYP4B1 proteins. As shown by fluorescence microscopy, TK-EGFP was expressed predominantly intranuclearly, whereas 4B1-EGFP was detectable in the cytoplasm, thereby displaying the orthotopic subcellular distribution of the corresponding native enzymes. The fluorescence intensity correlated well with the corresponding prodrug sensitivity, as shown by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis. EGFP expression was also used for the selection of stably HSV-tk-transduced cells by flow cytometric cell sorting. Resulting cell populations showed a homogeneity of fluorescence intensity similar to single-cell clones after antibiotic selection. In conclusion, tk-egfp and 4b1-egfp fusion genes are valuable tools for monitoring prodrug-activating gene therapy in living cells. EGFP fusion genes/proteins provide a simple and reproducible means for the detection, selection, and characterization of cells expressing enzyme genes for prodrug activation.

  18. Herpes simplex virus glycoproteins gB and gH function in fusion between the virion envelope and the outer nuclear membrane.

    PubMed

    Farnsworth, Aaron; Wisner, Todd W; Webb, Michael; Roller, Richard; Cohen, Gary; Eisenberg, Roselyn; Johnson, David C

    2007-06-12

    Herpesviruses must traverse the nuclear envelope to gain access to the cytoplasm and, ultimately, to exit cells. It is believed that herpesvirus nucleocapsids enter the perinuclear space by budding through the inner nuclear membrane (NM). To reach the cytoplasm these enveloped particles must fuse with the outer NM and the unenveloped capsids then acquire a second envelope in the trans-Golgi network. Little is known about the process by which herpesviruses virions fuse with the outer NM. Here we show that a herpes simplex virus (HSV) mutant lacking both the two putative fusion glycoproteins gB and gH failed to cross the nuclear envelope. Enveloped virions accumulated in the perinuclear space or in membrane vesicles that bulged into the nucleoplasm (herniations). By contrast, mutants lacking just gB or gH showed only minor or no defects in nuclear egress. We concluded that either HSV gB or gH can promote fusion between the virion envelope and the outer NM. It is noteworthy that fusion associated with HSV entry requires the cooperative action of both gB and gH, suggesting that the two types of fusion (egress versus entry) are dissimilar processes.

  19. Different receptors binding to distinct interfaces on herpes simplex virus gD can trigger events leading to cell fusion and viral entry

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, Patricia G. . E-mail: p-spear@northwestern.edu; Manoj, Sharmila; Yoon, Miri; Jogger, Cheryl R.; Zago, Anna; Myscofski, Dawn

    2006-01-05

    One of the herpes simplex virus envelope glycoproteins, designated gD, is the principal determinant of cell recognition for viral entry. Other viral glycoproteins, gB, gH and gL, cooperate with gD to mediate the membrane fusion that is required for viral entry and cell fusion. Membrane fusion is triggered by the binding of gD to one of its receptors. These receptors belong to three different classes of cell surface molecules. This review summarizes recent findings on the structure and function of gD. The results presented indicate that gD may assume more than one conformation, one in the absence of receptor, another when gD is bound to the herpesvirus entry mediator, a member of the TNF receptor family, and a third when gD is bound to nectin-1, a cell adhesion molecule in the immunoglobulin superfamily. Finally, information and ideas are presented about a membrane-proximal region of gD that is required for membrane fusion, but not for receptor binding, and that may have a role in activating the fusogenic activity of gB, gH and gL.

  20. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of the protein module (BIV2-Helix) in the fusion core of bovine immunodeficiency-like virus (BIV) gp40

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaodong; Li, Ming; Xu, Yanhui; Lou, Zhiyong; Meng, Zhaohui; Li, Shu; Tian, Bo; Gao, George F.; Rao, Zihe

    2005-01-01

    The fusion core of bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) gp40 is proposed to be involved in membrane fusion. However, no crystal structures are yet available. A predicted protein module BIV2-Helix of BIVgp40 has been expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatography. Recombinant BIV2-Helix was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique at 291 K. The crystals were grown in MPD and belonged to the primitive rhombohedral space group R3, with unit-cell parameters a = 39.17, b = 39.17, c = 295.05 Å and two molecules per asymmetric unit. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.76 Å in the home laboratory from a single crystal. PMID:16511008

  1. Fever from the forest: prospects for the continued emergence of sylvatic dengue virus and its impact on public health

    PubMed Central

    Vasilakis, Nikos; Cardosa, Jane; Hanley, Kathryn A.; Holmes, Edward C.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    The four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes that circulate among humans emerged independently from ancestral sylvatic progenitors that were present in non–human primates, following the establishment of human populations that were large and dense enough to support continuous inter-human transmission by mosquitoes. This ancestral sylvatic–DENV transmission cycle still exists and is maintained in non-human primates and Aedes mosquitoes in the forests of Southeast Asia and West Africa. Here, we provide an overview of the ecology and molecular evolution of sylvatic DENV and its potential for adaptation to human transmission. We also emphasize how the study of sylvatic DENV will improve our ability to understand, predict and, ideally, avert further DENV emergence. PMID:21666708

  2. Inhibition of Semliki Forest virus multiplication by ribavirin: a potential method for the monitoring of antiviral agents in serum.

    PubMed

    van Tiel, F H; Harmsen, M; Kraaijeveld, C A; Snippe, H

    1986-09-01

    An enzyme immunoassay (EIA) to determine 50% inhibitory concentrations of ribavirin which suppresses Semliki Forest virus (SFV) multiplication in L-cells is described. Inhibition of SFV replication by ribavirin was measured by detection of viral glycoprotein, on the surface of infected L-cell monolayers, with a horseradish peroxidase labeled monoclonal antibody with specificity for the E2 glycoprotein of SFV. The concentration of ribavirin in culture fluid associated with 50% reduction of control absorbance values was defined as the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50). The IC50 of ribavirin measured with EIA was mainly influenced by the multiplicity of infection (MOI). At MOI values of 3, 6 and 12 reduction of absorbance values was already obvious at 4.5 h of infection. Furthermore reduction of absorbance values correlated with inhibition of virus production as determined by plaque titration of culture fluids. When the EIA was used for the determination of active ribavirin in serum from treated animals the drug was detectable 1 h after intravenous administration of 4 mg of ribavirin to a concentration of 8 micrograms per ml serum. The results indicate that this simple EIA is suitable for the monitoring of active antiviral drugs in body fluids.

  3. Long-Term Sterilizing Immunity to Rinderpest in Cattle Vaccinated with a Recombinant Vaccinia Virus Expressing High Levels of the Fusion and Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Verardi, Paulo H.; Aziz, Fatema H.; Ahmad, Shabbir; Jones, Leslie A.; Beyene, Berhanu; Ngotho, Rosemary N.; Wamwayi, Henry M.; Yesus, Mebratu G.; Egziabher, Berhe G.; Yilma, Tilahun D.

    2002-01-01

    Rinderpest is an acute and highly contagious viral disease of ruminants, often resulting in greater than 90% mortality. We have constructed a recombinant vaccinia virus vaccine (v2RVFH) that expresses both the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) genes of rinderpest virus (RPV) under strong synthetic vaccinia virus promoters. v2RVFH-infected cells express high levels of the F and H glycoproteins and show extensive syncytium formation. Cattle vaccinated intramuscularly with as little as 103 PFU of v2RVFH and challenged 1 month later with a lethal dose of RPV were completely protected from clinical disease; the 50% protective dose was determined to be 102 PFU. Animals vaccinated with v2RVFH did not develop pock lesions and did not transmit the recombinant vaccinia virus to contact animals. Intramuscular vaccination of cattle with 108 PFU of v2RVFH provided long-term sterilizing immunity against rinderpest. In addition to being highly safe and efficacious, v2RVFH is a heat-stable, inexpensive, and easily administered vaccine that allows the serological differentiation between vaccinated and naturally infected animals. Consequently, mass vaccination of cattle with v2RVFH could eradicate rinderpest. PMID:11752138

  4. Antiviral Activity of TMC353121, a Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Fusion Inhibitor, in a Non-Human Primate Model

    PubMed Central

    Ispas, Gabriela; Koul, Anil; Verbeeck, Johan; Sheehan, Jennifer; Sanders-Beer, Brigitte; Roymans, Dirk; Andries, Koen; Rouan, Marie-Claude; De Jonghe, Sandra; Bonfanti, Jean-François; Vanstockem, Marc; Simmen, Kenneth; Verloes, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Background The study assessed the antiviral activity of TMC353121, a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion inhibitor, in a preclinical non-human primate challenge model with a viral shedding pattern similar to that seen in humans, following continuous infusion (CI). Methods African green monkeys were administered TMC353121 through CI, in 2 studies. Study 1 evaluated the prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy of TMC353121 at a target plasma level of 50 ng/mL (n=15; Group 1: prophylactic arm [Px50], 0.033 mg/mL TMC353121, flow rate 2.5 mL/kg/h from 24 hours pre-infection to 10 days; Group 2: therapeutic arm [Tx50], 0.033mg/mL TMC353121 from 24 hours postinfection to 8 days; Group 3: control [Vh1] vehicle, 24 hours post-infection to 8 days). Study 2 evaluated the prophylactic efficacy of TMC353121 at target plasma levels of 5 and 500 ng/mL (n=12; Group 1: prophylactic 5 arm [Px5], 0.0033 mg/mL TMC353121, flow rate 2.5 mL/kg/h from 72 hours pre-infection to 14 days; Group 2: prophylactic 500 arm [Px500], 0.33 mg/mL TMC353121; Group 3:control [Vh2] vehicle, 14 days). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma were collected every 2 days from day 1 postinfection for pharmacokinetics and safety analysis. Findings TMC353121 showed a dose-dependent antiviral activity, varying from 1log10 reduction of peak viral load to complete inhibition of the RSV replication. Complete inhibition of RSV shedding was observed for a relatively low plasma exposure (0.39 μg/mL) and was associated with a dose-dependent reduction in INFγ, IL6 and MIP1α. TMC353121 administered as CI for 16 days was generally well-tolerated. Conclusion TMC353121 exerted dose-dependent antiviral effect ranging from full inhibition to absence of antiviral activity, in a preclinical model highly permissive for RSV replication. No new safety findings emerged from the study. PMID:26010881

  5. Viral membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  6. Patawa Virus, a New Arenavirus Hosted by Forest Rodents in French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, Anne; de Thoisy, Benoit; Donato, Damien; Guidez, Amandine; Matheus, Séverine; Catzeflis, François; Lacoste, Vincent

    2015-06-01

    Molecular screening of rodents from French Guiana has detected a new arenavirus, named "Patawa," in two Oecomys species (Muridae, Sigmodontinae). Further investigations are needed to better understand the circulation of this virus in rodent and human populations and its public health impact.

  7. Diagnostic potential and antigenic properties of recombinant tick-borne encephalitis virus subviral particles expressed in mammalian cells from Semliki Forest virus replicons.

    PubMed

    Levanov, Lev; Kuivanen, Suvi; Matveev, Andrey; Swaminathan, Sathyamangalam; Jääskeläinen-Hakala, Anu; Vapalahti, Olli

    2014-03-01

    The precursor membrane envelope (prME) proteins of all three tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) subtypes were produced based on expression from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicons transcribed from recombinant plasmids. Vero E6 cells transfected by these plasmids showed specific reactivities in immunofluorescence and immunoblot assays by monoclonal antibodies against European and Far-Eastern subtype strains of TBEV, indicating proper folding of the expressed glycoproteins. The prME glycoproteins were secreted into the cell culture supernatant, forming TBEV subviral particles of 20 to 30 nm in diameter. IgM μ-capture and IgG monoclonal antibody (MAb)-capture enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) were developed based on prME Karelia-94 (Siberian subtype) particles. Altogether, 140 human serum samples were tested using these assays, and the results were compared to those obtained with a commercial IgM EIA, an in-house μ-capture IgM assay based on baculovirus-expressed antigen, a commercial IgG EIA, and a hemagglutination inhibition test. Compared to reference enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), the sensitivities of the generated μ-capture IgM SFV-prME and IgG MAb-capture SFV-prME EIAs were 97.4 to 100% and 98.7%, respectively, and the specificities of the two assays were 100%. IgM and IgG immunofluorescence assays (IFAs) were created based on Vero E6 cells transfected with the recombinant plasmid carrying the TBEV Karelia-94 prME glycoproteins. The IgM IFA was 100% concordant with the μ-capture IgM bac-prME ELISA. The IgG IFA sensitivity and specificity were 98.7% and 100%, respectively, compared to those of the commercial ELISA. In conclusion, the tests developed based on SFV replicon-driven expression of TBEV glycoproteins provide safe and robust alternatives for conducting TBEV serology. PMID:24371235

  8. Tandem fusion of hepatitis B core antigen allows assembly of virus-like particles in bacteria and plants with enhanced capacity to accommodate foreign proteins.

    PubMed

    Peyret, Hadrien; Gehin, Annick; Thuenemann, Eva C; Blond, Donatienne; El Turabi, Aadil; Beales, Lucy; Clarke, Dean; Gilbert, Robert J C; Fry, Elizabeth E; Stuart, David I; Holmes, Kris; Stonehouse, Nicola J; Whelan, Mike; Rosenberg, William; Lomonossoff, George P; Rowlands, David J

    2015-01-01

    The core protein of the hepatitis B virus, HBcAg, assembles into highly immunogenic virus-like particles (HBc VLPs) when expressed in a variety of heterologous systems. Specifically, the major insertion region (MIR) on the HBcAg protein allows the insertion of foreign sequences, which are then exposed on the tips of surface spike structures on the outside of the assembled particle. Here, we present a novel strategy which aids the display of whole proteins on the surface of HBc particles. This strategy, named tandem core, is based on the production of the HBcAg dimer as a single polypeptide chain by tandem fusion of two HBcAg open reading frames. This allows the insertion of large heterologous sequences in only one of the two MIRs in each spike, without compromising VLP formation. We present the use of tandem core technology in both plant and bacterial expression systems. The results show that tandem core particles can be produced with unmodified MIRs, or with one MIR in each tandem dimer modified to contain the entire sequence of GFP or of a camelid nanobody. Both inserted proteins are correctly folded and the nanobody fused to the surface of the tandem core particle (which we name tandibody) retains the ability to bind to its cognate antigen. This technology paves the way for the display of natively folded proteins on the surface of HBc particles either through direct fusion or through non-covalent attachment via a nanobody. PMID:25830365

  9. Effects of movement protein mutations on the formation of tubules in plant protoplasts expressing a fusion between the green fluorescent protein and Cauliflower mosaic virus movement protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Z; Han, Y; Howell, S H

    2001-08-01

    Fusions between the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) movement protein (MP) induce the formation of fluorescent foci and surface tubules in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf mesophyll protoplasts. Tubules elongate coordinately and progressively in an assembly process approximately 6 to 12 h following transfection of protoplasts with GFP-MP constructs. Tubules are not formed in protoplasts transfected by GFP-MP(ER2A), a MP mutation that renders CaMV noninfectious. A small number of short tubules are formed on protoplasts transfected by GFP-MP(N6) and GFP-MP(N13), two second-site revertants of ER2A that partially restore infectivity. Protoplasts cotransfected with cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-MP(WT) and GFP-MP(ER2A) form tubules containing both MP fusions, indicating that although the GFP-MP(ER2A) cannot induce tubule formation, GFP-MP(ER2A) can coassemble or colocalize with CFP-MP(WT) in tubules. Thus, CaMV MP-induced tubule formation in protoplasts correlates closely with the infectivity of mutation ER2A and its revertants, suggesting that tubule-forming capacity in plant protoplasts reflects a process required for virus infection or movement.

  10. The UL24 protein of herpes simplex virus 1 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Abdeljelil, Nawel; Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Pearson, Angela

    2013-09-15

    Mutations in UL24 of herpes simplex virus type 1 can lead to a syncytial phenotype. We hypothesized that UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion. In non-immortalized human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) we detected viral glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH and gL present in extended blotches throughout the cytoplasm with limited nuclear membrane staining; however, in HFFs infected with a UL24-deficient virus (UL24X), staining for the viral glycoproteins appeared as long, thin streaks running across the cell. Interestingly, there was a decrease in co-localized staining of gB and gD with F-actin at late times in UL24X-infected HFFs. Treatment with chemical agents that perturbed the actin cytoskeleton hindered the formation of UL24X-induced syncytia in these cells. These data support a model whereby the UL24 syncytial phenotype results from a mislocalization of viral glycoproteins late in infection. - Highlights: • UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins required for fusion. • Sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins varies in cell-type dependent manner. • Drugs targeting actin microfilaments affect formation of UL24-related syncytia in HFFs.

  11. Endothelial Galectin-1 Binds to Specific Glycans on Nipah Virus Fusion Protein and Inhibits Maturation, Mobility, and Function to Block Syncytia Formation

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Omai B.; Aguilar, Hector C.; Fulcher, Jennifer A.; Levroney, Ernest L.; Harrison, Rebecca; Wright, Lacey; Robinson, Lindsey R.; Aspericueta, Vanessa; Panico, Maria; Haslam, Stuart M.; Morris, Howard R.; Dell, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Nipah virus targets human endothelial cells via NiV-F and NiV-G envelope glycoproteins, resulting in endothelial syncytia formation and vascular compromise. Endothelial cells respond to viral infection by releasing innate immune effectors, including galectins, which are secreted proteins that bind to specific glycan ligands on cell surface glycoproteins. We demonstrate that galectin-1 reduces NiV-F mediated fusion of endothelial cells, and that endogenous galectin-1 in endothelial cells is sufficient to inhibit syncytia formation. Galectin-1 regulates NiV-F mediated cell fusion at three distinct points, including retarding maturation of nascent NiV-F, reducing NiV-F lateral mobility on the plasma membrane, and directly inhibiting the conformational change in NiV-F required for triggering fusion. Characterization of the NiV-F N-glycome showed that the critical site for galectin-1 inhibition is rich in glycan structures known to bind galectin-1. These studies identify a unique set of mechanisms for regulating pathophysiology of NiV infection at the level of the target cell. PMID:20657665

  12. Protective and immunogenic effects of Escherichia coli-expressed infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) VP2-VP3 fusion protein in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Dadar, Maryam; Memari, Hamid Rajabi; Vakharia, Vikram N; Peyghan, Rahim; Shapouri, MasodReza Seifi Abad; Mohammadian, Takavar; Hasanzadeh, Reza; Ghasemi, Mohades

    2015-11-01

    Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus (IPNV) is a member of the family Birnaviridae which causes significant losses in the aquaculture industry. To develop a recombinant vaccine for IPNV, a cDNA construct of IPNV VP2-VP3 fusion gene was prepared and cloned into an Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression vector (pET-26b) to obtain recombinant protein products. A study was conducted to determine the antibody responses and protective capacity of this recombinant vaccine expressing VP2-VP3 fusion protein. Subsequently, juvenile rainbow trout were inoculated by injecting purified recombinant IPNV VP2-VP3 proteins, followed by challenge with virulent IPNV in rainbow trout. Our results demonstrate that recombinant E. coli derived VP2-VP3 fusion protein induced a strong and significantly (P < 0.05) higher IgM antibody response in serum samples compared to control groups. Following intraperitoneal challenge, the relative percent survival (RPS) rate of survivors was 83% for the vaccinated group. Statistical analysis of IgM levels indicated that immunogenicity of recombinant VP2-VP3 protein, combined with adjuvant, was much higher than any other groups of rainbow trout challenged with virulent IPNV. This result was confirmed by measuring the viral loads of IPNV in immunized rainbow trout which was drastically reduced, as analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. In summary, we demonstrate that E. coli-expressed IPNV VP2-VP3 injectable vaccine is highly immunogenic and protective against IPNV infection.

  13. Mapping regions of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) glycoprotein B (gB) important for fusion function with gH/gL

    SciTech Connect

    Plate, Aileen E.; Reimer, Jessica J.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Longnecker, Richard

    2011-04-25

    Glycoproteins gB and gH/gL are required for entry of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) into cells, but the role of each glycoprotein and how they function together to mediate fusion is unclear. Analysis of the functional homology of gB from the closely related primate gammaherpesvirus, rhesus lymphocryptovirus (Rh-LCV), showed that EBV gB could not complement Rh gB due to a species-specific dependence between gB and gL. To map domains of gB required for this interaction, we constructed a panel of EBV/Rh gB chimeric proteins. Analysis showed that insertion of Rh gB from residues 456 to 807 restored fusion function of EBV gB with Rh gH/gL, suggesting this region of gB is important for interaction with gH/gL. Split YFP bimolecular complementation (BiFC) provided evidence of an interaction between EBV gB and gH/gL. Together, our results suggest the importance of a gB-gH/gL interaction in EBV-mediated fusion with B cells requiring the region of EBV gB from 456 to 807.

  14. Fusion of full waveform Laserscanning and airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data for the characterization of forest stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buddenbaum, Henning

    2010-05-01

    Hyperspectral data offer the maximum spectral reflectance information available from remote sensing. A continuous spectrum of narrow bands with near-laboratory quality is recorded for each pixel. This data can be used for difficult classification tasks or detailed quantitative analyses, e.g. determination of chlorophyll or water content in leaves. But in forested areas, discerning between different age classes of the same tree species is still error-prone. Airborne Laserscanning measures the three-dimensional position of every reflecting object and can be used to map tree heights and crown volumes. These are highly correlated with tree age and timber volume. In addition, Laserscanner data can be used to differentiate between coniferous and deciduous trees either by analysing crown shapes that lead to different surface roughness or by exploiting the intensity information of laser echoes from the crowns. But a more detailed determination of tree species is not possible using Laserscanning alone. The combination of hyperspectral and Laserscanning data promises the possibility to map both tree species and age classes. We used a HyMap data set with 122 bands recorded in 2003 and a full waveform Laserscanning recorded in 2005 in the same area, Idarwald Forest in South-western Germany. To combine both datasets, we defined voxels above the HyMap pixels, containing the mean laser intensity in slices of 50 cm height. These voxels form a second hyperspectral dataset of 76 bands with the same geometry as the HyMap image, so that they could be fused into a 198 band image. The joined image performed better in a classification of tree species and age classes than each of the single images and also better than a dataset consisting of the hyperspectral image and a tree height map. Apart from classification, it can also be used to derive tree heights and crown base heights and to estimate biomass, leaf area index and timber volume and to characterize the vertical forest structure.

  15. Alteration of a second putative fusion peptide of structural glycoprotein E2 of Classical Swine Fever Virus alters virus replication and virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E2, the major envelope glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV), is involved in several critical virus functions including cell attachment, host range susceptibility, and virulence in natural hosts. Functional structural analysis of E2 based on Wimley-White interfacial hydrophobicity dis...

  16. Herpesvirus gB-induced fusion between the virion envelope and outer nuclear membrane during virus egress is regulated by the viral US3 kinase.

    PubMed

    Wisner, Todd W; Wright, Catherine C; Kato, Akihisa; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Mou, Fan; Baines, Joel D; Roller, Richard J; Johnson, David C

    2009-04-01

    Herpesvirus capsids collect along the inner surface of the nuclear envelope and bud into the perinuclear space. Enveloped virions then fuse with the outer nuclear membrane (NM). We previously showed that herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoproteins gB and gH act in a redundant fashion to promote fusion between the virion envelope and the outer NM. HSV mutants lacking both gB and gH accumulate enveloped virions in herniations, vesicles that bulge into the nucleoplasm. Earlier studies had shown that HSV mutants lacking the viral serine/threonine kinase US3 also accumulate herniations. Here, we demonstrate that HSV gB is phosphorylated in a US3-dependent manner in HSV-infected cells, especially in a crude nuclear fraction. Moreover, US3 directly phosphorylated the gB cytoplasmic (CT) domain in in vitro assays. Deletion of gB in the context of a US3-null virus did not add substantially to defects in nuclear egress. The majority of the US3-dependent phosphorylation of gB involved the CT domain and amino acid T887, a residue present in a motif similar to that recognized by US3 in other proteins. HSV recombinants lacking gH and expressing either gB substitution mutation T887A or a gB truncated at residue 886 displayed substantial defects in nuclear egress. We concluded that phosphorylation of the gB CT domain is important for gB-mediated fusion with the outer NM. This suggested a model in which the US3 kinase is incorporated into the tegument layer (between the capsid and envelope) in HSV virions present in the perinuclear space. By this packaging, US3 might be brought close to the gB CT tail, leading to phosphorylation and triggering fusion between the virion envelope and the outer NM.

  17. Structural properties of the putative fusion peptide of hepatitis B virus upon interaction with phospholipids. Circular dichroism and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy studies.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Crespo, I; Gómez-Gutiérrez, J; Encinar, J A; González-Ros, J M; Albar, J P; Peterson, D L; Gavilanes, F

    1996-12-01

    A peptide corresponding to the N-terminal sequence of the S protein from hepatitis B virus (Met-Glu-Asn-Ile-Thr-Ser-Gly-Phe-Leu-Gly-Pro-Leu-Leu-Val-Leu-Gln) has been previously shown to interact with phospholipids and promote vesicle aggregation, phospholipid mixing, and liposome leakage, as well as erythrocyte lysis [Rodríguez-Crespo, I., Núñez, E., Gómez-Gutiérrez, J., Yélamos, B., Albar, J. P., Peterson, D. L. & Gavilanes, F. (1995) J. Gen. Virol. 76, 301-308]. The conformation of this putative fusion peptide has been studied, both at low and high peptide concentrations, by means of circular dichroism and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. When the peptide is dissolved in trifluoroethanol, a significant population of alpha-helical structure is found in spite of the proline residue at position 11. In contrast, this hydrophobic oligopeptide has a high tendency to form large beta-sheet aggregates in aqueous buffers. Most of these aggregates can be eliminated by centrifugation. The peptide remaining in the supernatant adopts a non-ordered conformation. The aggregates can be dissociated by the anionic detergent sodium cholate, but the peptide still maintains an extended conformation. In the presence of acidic phospholipid vesicles, the putative fusion peptide adopts a highly stable beta-sheet conformation. Thus, unlike the fusion peptides of other viruses, an extended conformation seems to be the preferred structure when interacting with phospholipids. Such a conformation should be responsible for its membrane destabilization properties.

  18. Rapid Construction of Stable Infectious Full-Length cDNA Clone of Papaya Leaf Distortion Mosaic Virus Using In-Fusion Cloning.

    PubMed

    Tuo, Decai; Shen, Wentao; Yan, Pu; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV) is becoming a threat to papaya and transgenic papaya resistant to the related pathogen, papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). The generation of infectious viral clones is an essential step for reverse-genetics studies of viral gene function and cross-protection. In this study, a sequence- and ligation-independent cloning system, the In-Fusion(®) Cloning Kit (Clontech, Mountain View, CA, USA), was used to construct intron-less or intron-containing full-length cDNA clones of the isolate PLDMV-DF, with the simultaneous scarless assembly of multiple viral and intron fragments into a plasmid vector in a single reaction. The intron-containing full-length cDNA clone of PLDMV-DF was stably propagated in Escherichia coli. In vitro intron-containing transcripts were processed and spliced into biologically active intron-less transcripts following mechanical inoculation and then initiated systemic infections in Carica papaya L. seedlings, which developed similar symptoms to those caused by the wild-type virus. However, no infectivity was detected when the plants were inoculated with RNA transcripts from the intron-less construct because the instability of the viral cDNA clone in bacterial cells caused a non-sense or deletion mutation of the genomic sequence of PLDMV-DF. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the construction of an infectious full-length cDNA clone of PLDMV and the splicing of intron-containing transcripts following mechanical inoculation. In-Fusion cloning shortens the construction time from months to days. Therefore, it is a faster, more flexible, and more efficient method than the traditional multistep restriction enzyme-mediated subcloning procedure. PMID:26633465

  19. The effects of an ActRIIb receptor Fc fusion protein ligand trap in juvenile simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Karyn E.; Guo, Wen; Serra, Carlo; Beck, Matthew; Wachtman, Lynn; Hoggatt, Amber; Xia, Dongling; Pearson, Chris; Knight, Heather; O’Connell, Micheal; Miller, Andrew D.; Westmoreland, Susan V.; Bhasin, Shalender

    2015-01-01

    There are no approved therapies for muscle wasting in children infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which portends poor disease outcomes. To determine whether a soluble ActRIIb receptor Fc fusion protein (ActRIIB.Fc), a ligand trap for TGF-β/activin family members including myostatin, can prevent or restore loss of lean body mass and body weight in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected juvenile rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Fourteen pair-housed, juvenile male rhesus macaques were inoculated with SIVmac239 and, 4 wk postinoculation (WPI) treated with intramuscular injections of 10 mg ⋅ kg−1 ⋅ wk−1 ActRIIB.Fc or saline placebo. Body weight, lean body mass, SIV titers, and somatometric measurements were assessed monthly for 16 wk. Age-matched SIV-infected rhesus macaques were injected with saline. Intervention groups did not differ at baseline. Gains in lean mass were significantly greater in the ActRIIB.Fc group than in the placebo group (P < 0.001). Administration of ActRIIB.Fc was associated with greater gains in body weight (P = 0.01) and upper arm circumference than placebo. Serum CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts and SIV copy numbers did not differ between groups. Administration of ActRIIB.Fc was associated with higher muscle expression of myostatin than placebo. ActRIIB.Fc effectively blocked and reversed loss of body weight, lean mass, and fat mass in juvenile SIV-infected rhesus macaques.—O’Connell, K. E., Guo, W., Serra, C., Beck, M., Wachtman, L., Hoggatt, A., Xia, D., Pearson, C., Knight, H., O’Connell, M., Miller, A. D., Westmoreland, S. V., Bhasin, S. The effects of an ActRIIb receptor Fc fusion protein ligand trap in juvenile simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus macaques. PMID:25466897

  20. Rapid Construction of Stable Infectious Full-Length cDNA Clone of Papaya Leaf Distortion Mosaic Virus Using In-Fusion Cloning.

    PubMed

    Tuo, Decai; Shen, Wentao; Yan, Pu; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV) is becoming a threat to papaya and transgenic papaya resistant to the related pathogen, papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). The generation of infectious viral clones is an essential step for reverse-genetics studies of viral gene function and cross-protection. In this study, a sequence- and ligation-independent cloning system, the In-Fusion(®) Cloning Kit (Clontech, Mountain View, CA, USA), was used to construct intron-less or intron-containing full-length cDNA clones of the isolate PLDMV-DF, with the simultaneous scarless assembly of multiple viral and intron fragments into a plasmid vector in a single reaction. The intron-containing full-length cDNA clone of PLDMV-DF was stably propagated in Escherichia coli. In vitro intron-containing transcripts were processed and spliced into biologically active intron-less transcripts following mechanical inoculation and then initiated systemic infections in Carica papaya L. seedlings, which developed similar symptoms to those caused by the wild-type virus. However, no infectivity was detected when the plants were inoculated with RNA transcripts from the intron-less construct because the instability of the viral cDNA clone in bacterial cells caused a non-sense or deletion mutation of the genomic sequence of PLDMV-DF. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the construction of an infectious full-length cDNA clone of PLDMV and the splicing of intron-containing transcripts following mechanical inoculation. In-Fusion cloning shortens the construction time from months to days. Therefore, it is a faster, more flexible, and more efficient method than the traditional multistep restriction enzyme-mediated subcloning procedure.

  1. The Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Protein Targets to the Perimeter of Inclusion Bodies and Facilitates Filament Formation by a Cytoplasmic Tail-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Baviskar, Pradyumna S.; Hotard, Anne L.; Moore, Martin L.

    2013-01-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) fusion (F) protein cytoplasmic tail (CT) and matrix (M) protein are key mediators of viral assembly, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. A complementation assay was developed to systematically examine the role of the F protein CT in infectious virus production. The ability of F mutants with alanine substitutions in the CT to complement an F-null virus in generating infectious progeny was quantitated by flow cytometry. Two CT regions with impact on infectious progeny production were identified: residues 557 to 566 (CT-R1) and 569 to 572 (CT-R2). Substitutions in CT-R1 decreased infectivity by 40 to 85% and increased the level of F-induced cell-cell fusion but had little impact on assembly of viral surface filaments, which are believed to be virions. Substitutions in CT-R2, as well as deletion of the entire CT, abrogated infectious progeny production and impaired viral filament formation. However, CT-R2 mutations did not block but rather delayed the formation of viral filaments, which continued to form at a low rate and contained the viral M protein and nucleoprotein (N). Microscopy analysis revealed that substitutions in CT-R2 but not CT-R1 led to accumulation of M and F proteins within and at the perimeter of viral inclusion bodies (IBs), respectively. The accumulation of M and F at IBs and coincident strong decrease in filament formation and infectivity upon CT-R2 mutations suggest that F interaction with IBs is an important step in the virion assembly process and that CT residues 569 to 572 act to facilitate release of M-ribonucleoprotein complexes from IBs. PMID:23903836

  2. Rapid Construction of Stable Infectious Full-Length cDNA Clone of Papaya Leaf Distortion Mosaic Virus Using In-Fusion Cloning

    PubMed Central

    Tuo, Decai; Shen, Wentao; Yan, Pu; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV) is becoming a threat to papaya and transgenic papaya resistant to the related pathogen, papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). The generation of infectious viral clones is an essential step for reverse-genetics studies of viral gene function and cross-protection. In this study, a sequence- and ligation-independent cloning system, the In-Fusion® Cloning Kit (Clontech, Mountain View, CA, USA), was used to construct intron-less or intron-containing full-length cDNA clones of the isolate PLDMV-DF, with the simultaneous scarless assembly of multiple viral and intron fragments into a plasmid vector in a single reaction. The intron-containing full-length cDNA clone of PLDMV-DF was stably propagated in Escherichia coli. In vitro intron-containing transcripts were processed and spliced into biologically active intron-less transcripts following mechanical inoculation and then initiated systemic infections in Carica papaya L. seedlings, which developed similar symptoms to those caused by the wild-type virus. However, no infectivity was detected when the plants were inoculated with RNA transcripts from the intron-less construct because the instability of the viral cDNA clone in bacterial cells caused a non-sense or deletion mutation of the genomic sequence of PLDMV-DF. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the construction of an infectious full-length cDNA clone of PLDMV and the splicing of intron-containing transcripts following mechanical inoculation. In-Fusion cloning shortens the construction time from months to days. Therefore, it is a faster, more flexible, and more efficient method than the traditional multistep restriction enzyme-mediated subcloning procedure. PMID:26633465

  3. Daily High Spatial Resolution Evapotranspiration Estimation Using Multi-Satellite Data Fusion Approach in Agricultural and Forested Sites in the U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Anderson, M. C.; Semmens, K. A.; Gao, F.; Kustas, W. P.; Hain, C.; Schull, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET), as a major part of the water balance, is a key indicator of vegetation stress and also represents various types of water usage strategies. High spatial and temporal resolution ET mapping can provide detailed information about daily vegetation water use and soil moisture status at finer scales, which is important to water management and vegetation condition monitoring. This research employs a multi-scale ET modeling system which is based on the two source surface energy balance (TSEB) model. We discuss the utility of applying this modeling system over an irrigated agriculture area in California and a forested site in North Carolina. The multi-scale ET modeling system integrates the Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse model and associated disaggregation scheme (ALEXI/DisALEXI) and fuses the ET estimations from both MODIS (1km, daily) and Landsat (30m, bi-weekly). The Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflective Fusion Model (STARFM) is used to retrieve high spatial and temporal resolution ET. A Data Mining Sharpener (DMS) methodology is used in the system to sharpen the native Landsat thermal infrared band (TIR) to 30m resolution. Comparing with Landsat only ET retrievals, this ET modeling system can optimize the usage of multi-satellite data, which are in different temporal and spatial resolution, to maximize the utility of high spatial and temporal ET estimation. Daily high spatial resolution ET retrievals are compared with observations from local flux towers. Determining how model output of daily water use information can be employed in irrigation and forest management applications will be discussed.

  4. Closed and Semiclosed Interhelical Structures in Membrane vs Closed and Open Structures in Detergent for the Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Fusion Peptide and Correlation of Hydrophobic Surface Area with Fusion Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ujjayini; Xie, Li; Jia, Lihui; Liang, Shuang; Weliky, David P

    2015-06-24

    The ∼25 N-terminal "HAfp" residues of the HA2 subunit of the influenza virus hemagglutinin protein are critical for fusion between the viral and endosomal membranes at low pH. Earlier studies of HAfp in detergent support (1) N-helix/turn/C-helix structure at pH 5 with open interhelical geometry and N-helix/turn/C-coil structure at pH 7; or (2) N-helix/turn/C-helix at both pHs with closed interhelical geometry. These different structures led to very different models of HAfp membrane location and different models of catalysis of membrane fusion by HAfp. In this study, the interhelical geometry of membrane-associated HAfp is probed by solid-state NMR. The data are well-fitted to a population mixture of closed and semiclosed structures. The two structures have similar interhelical geometries and are planar with hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces. The different structures of HAfp in detergent vs membrane could be due to the differences in interaction with the curved micelle vs flat membrane with better geometric matching between the closed and semiclosed structures and the membrane. The higher fusogenicity of longer sequences and low pH is correlated with hydrophobic surface area and consequent increased membrane perturbation.

  5. Exchange of Newcastle disease virus fusion and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase genes into a vaccine backbone: effects on virulence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) is the causative agent of Newcastle disease (ND), a very important infection that causes significant economic losses to the poultry industry. Currently, viruses of genotypes V, VI, and VII circulate worldwide causing significant mortality in poorly vaccinated chickens....

  6. Revertant analysis of a temperature-sensitive mutant of Newcastle disease virus with defective glycoproteins: implication of the fusion glycoprotein in cell killing and isolation of a neuraminidase-deficient hemagglutinating virus.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G W; Hightower, L E

    1982-01-01

    Biological and molecular properties of a temperature-sensitive mutant (C1) of Newcastle disease virus and its revertants were analyzed. C1 exhibited three temperature-sensitive alterations (plaque formation, virion assembly, and cytopathogenicity) and several defects which were also present at the permissive temperature. C1 virions contained low amounts of hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycopeptides and consequently were deficient in hemagglutinating and neuraminidase activities. These virions also contained defective fusion glycoproteins which rendered them poorly hemolytic and slow to penetrate cultured chicken embryo cells. The biological activities of the membrane glycoproteins were recovered sequentially in a series of plaque-forming revertants. The coreversion of hemolysis, membrane-penetrating activities, and cytopathogenicity in the first-step revertant (S1) suggested that fusion glycoproteins were major contributors to cellular destruction. This revertant also provided evidence of a role for fusion glycoproteins in virion assembly. From S1 we isolated a large-plaque-forming revertant (L1) that assembled wild-type amounts of biologically active hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoproteins into virions. Although it was normal for hemagglutination, L1 had less than 3% of the neuraminidase activity of the wild type, demonstrating that these two activities can be uncoupled genetically. The neuraminidase deficiency of L1 did not impair its virulence in ovo or its reproduction in cultured cells. PMID:6896347

  7. Spinal fusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anterior spinal fusion; Spine surgery - spinal fusion; Low back pain - fusion; Herniated disk - fusion ... If you had chronic back pain before surgery, you will likely still have some pain afterward. Spinal fusion is unlikely to take away all your pain ...

  8. 13C-13C and 15N-13C correlation spectroscopy of membrane-associated and uniformly labeled human immunodeficiency virus and influenza fusion peptides: Amino acid-type assignments and evidence for multiple conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodner, Michele L.; Gabrys, Charles M.; Struppe, Jochem O.; Weliky, David P.

    2008-02-01

    Many viruses which cause disease including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and influenza are "enveloped" by a membrane and infection of a host cell begins with joining or "fusion" of the viral and target cell membranes. Fusion is catalyzed by viral proteins in the viral membrane. For HIV and for the influenza virus, these fusion proteins contain an ˜20-residue apolar "fusion peptide" that binds to target cell membranes and plays a critical role in fusion. For this study, the HIV fusion peptide (HFP) and influenza virus fusion peptide (IFP) were chemically synthesized with uniform C13, N15 labeling over large contiguous regions of amino acids. Two-dimensional C13-C13 and N15-C13 spectra were obtained for the membrane-bound fusion peptides and an amino acid-type C13 assignment was obtained for the labeled residues in HFP and IFP. The membrane used for the HFP sample had a lipid headgroup and cholesterol composition comparable to that of host cells of the virus, and the C13 chemical shifts were more consistent with β strand conformation than with helical conformation. The membrane used for the IFP sample did not contain cholesterol, and the chemical shifts of the dominant peaks were more consistent with helical conformation than with β strand conformation. There were additional peaks in the IFP spectrum whose shifts were not consistent with helical conformation. An unambiguous C13 and N15 assignment was obtained in an HFP sample with more selective labeling, and two shifts were identified for the Leu-9 CO, Gly-10 N, and Gly-10 Cα nuclei. These sets of two shifts may indicate two β strand registries such as parallel and antiparallel. Although most spectra were obtained on a 9.4T instrument, one C13-C13 correlation spectrum was obtained on a 16.4T instrument and was better resolved than the comparable 9.4T spectrum. More selective labeling and higher field may, therefore, be approaches to obtaining unambiguous assignments for membrane-associated fusion peptides.

  9. Identification of FactorsInfluencing the Puumala Virus Seroprevalence within Its Reservoir in aMontane Forest Environment

    PubMed Central

    Thoma, Bryan R.; Müller, Jörg; Bässler, Claus; Georgi, Enrico; Osterberg, Anja; Schex, Susanne; Bottomley, Christian; Essbauer, Sandra S.

    2014-01-01

    Puumala virus (PUUV) is a major cause of mild to moderate haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and is transmitted by the bank vole (Myodes glareolus). There has been a high cumulative incidence of recorded human cases in South-eastern Germany since 2004 when the region was first recognized as being endemic for PUUV. As the area is well known for outdoor recreation and the Bavarian Forest National Park (BFNP) is located in the region, the increasing numbers of recorded cases are of concern. To understand the population and environmental effects on the seroprevalence of PUUV in bank voles we trapped small mammals at 23 sites along an elevation gradient from 317 to 1420m above sea level. Generalized linear mixed effects models(GLMEM) were used to explore associations between the seroprevalence of PUUV in bank voles and climate and biotic factors. We found that the seroprevalence of PUUV was low (6%–7%) in 2008 and 2009, and reached 29% in 2010. PUUV seroprevalence was positively associated with the local species diversity and deadwood layer, and negatively associated with mean annual temperature, mean annual solar radiation, and herb layer. Based on these findings, an illustrative risk map for PUUV seroprevalence prediction in bank voles was created for an area of the national park. The map will help when planning infrastructure in the national park (e.g., huts, shelters, and trails). PMID:25341661

  10. Potential for forest tree improvement via tissue culture

    SciTech Connect

    Karnosky, D.F.

    1981-02-01

    The culture of cells, tissues, and organs in vitro offers unparalleled opportunity for forest tree improvement. Vegetative propagation of selected superior genotypes and hybrids, production and culture of haploids, asexual hybridization via protoplast fusion, freeze preservation of valuable genotypes, and the selection of cell lines tolerant to stresses such as diseases, drought, heavy metals, or salts through tissue culture may someday provide forest geneticists efficient and economical methods to supplement tree improvement programs. Heat treatments and meristem culture currently provide a pratical means of eliminating harmful virus and mycoplasma diseases from vegatively propagated trees. For the most part, however, the forest tree tissue culture research is only in its infancy. Research must be expanded to realize the full potential available from tissue culture. Considerable effort will be necessary to solve the many problems now deterring practical use of tissue culture in forest tree improvement and reforestation programs. (Refs. 93).

  11. Coupling between carbon cycling and climate in a high-elevation, subalpine forest: a model-data fusion analysis.

    PubMed

    Sacks, William J; Schimel, David S; Monson, Russell K

    2007-02-01

    Fundamental questions exist about the effects of climate on terrestrial net ecosystem CO(2) exchange (NEE), despite a rapidly growing body of flux observations. One strategy to clarify ecosystem climate-carbon interactions is to partition NEE into its component fluxes, gross ecosystem CO(2) exchange (GEE) and ecosystem respiration (R (E)), and evaluate the responses to climate of each component flux. We separated observed NEE into optimized estimates of GEE and R (E) using an ecosystem process model combined with 6 years of continuous flux data from the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site. In order to gain further insight into the processes underlying NEE, we partitioned R (E) into its components: heterotrophic (R (H)) and autotrophic (R (A)) respiration. We were successful in separating GEE and R (E), but less successful in accurately partitioning R (E) into R (A) and R (H). Our failure in the latter was due to a lack of adequate contrasts in the assimilated data set to distinguish between R (A) and R (H). We performed most model runs at a twice-daily time step. Optimizing on daily-aggregated data severely degraded the model's ability to separate GEE and R (E). However, we gained little benefit from using a half-hourly time step. The model-data fusion showed that most of the interannual variability in NEE was due to variability in GEE, and not R (E). In contrast to several previous studies in other ecosystems, we found that longer growing seasons at Niwot Ridge were correlated with less net CO(2) uptake, due to a decrease of available snow-melt water during the late springtime photosynthetic period. Warmer springtime temperatures resulted in increased net CO(2) uptake only if adequate moisture was available; when warmer springtime conditions led into mid-summer drought, the annual net uptake declined. PMID:17013598

  12. Micropipette manipulation technique for the monitoring of pH-dependent membrane lysis as induced by the fusion peptide of influenza virus.

    PubMed Central

    Soltesz, S A; Hammer, D A

    1995-01-01

    We have assembled a micropipette aspiration assay to measure membrane destabilization events in which large (20-30 microns diameter) unilamellar vesicles are manipulated and exposed to membrane destabilizing agents. Single events can be seen with a light microscope and are recorded using both a video camera and a photomultiplier tube. We have performed experiments with a wild-type fusion peptide from influenza virus (X31) and found that it induces pH-dependent, stochastic lysis of large unilamellar vesicles. The rate and extent of lysis are both maximum at pH 5; the maximum rate of lysis is 0.018 s-1 at pH 5. An analysis of our data indicates that the lysis is not correlated either to the size of the vesicles or to the tension created in the vesicle membranes by aspiration. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:7711257

  13. Trans-activation function of a 3 prime truncated X gene-cell fusion product from integrated hepatitis B virus DNA in chronic hepatitis tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, Shinako; Koike, Katsuro )

    1990-08-01

    To investigate the expression and transactivation function of the X gene in integrated hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA from chronic hepatitis tissues, a series of transfectants containing cloned integrated HBV DNAs was made and analyzed for X mRNA expression and trans-activation activity by using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay. Most of the integrated HBV DNAs expressed X mRNA and encoded a product with trans-activation activity in spite of the loss of the 3{prime} end region of the X gene due to integration. From cDNA cloning and sequence analysis of X mRNA transcribed from native or integrated HBV DNA, the X protein was found to be translated from the X open reading frame without splicing. For integrated HBV DNA, transcription was extended to a cellular flanking DNA and an X gene-cell fusion transcript was terminated by using a cellular poly(A) signal. The amino acid sequence deduced from an X-cell fusion transcript indicated truncation of the carboxyl-terminal five amino acids, but the upstream region of seven amino acids conserved among hepadnaviruses was retained in the integrated HBV DNA, suggesting that this conserved region is essential for the transactivation function of the X protein. These findings support the following explanation for hepatocarcinogenesis by HBV DNA integration: the expression of a cellular oncogene(s) is transactivated at the time of chronic infection by the increasing amounts of the integrated HBV gene product(s), such as the X-cell fusion product.

  14. Escape from neutralization by the respiratory syncytial virus-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibody palivizumab is driven by changes in on-rate of binding to the fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, John T.; Keefer, Christopher J.; Slaughter, James C.; Kulp, Daniel W.; Schief, William R.

    2014-04-15

    The role of binding kinetics in determining neutralizing potency for antiviral antibodies is poorly understood. While it is believed that increased steady-state affinity correlates positively with increased virus-neutralizing activity, the relationship between association or dissociation rate and neutralization potency is unclear. We investigated the effect of naturally-occurring antibody resistance mutations in the RSV F protein on the kinetics of binding to palivizumab. Escape from palivizumab-mediated neutralization of RSV occurred with reduced association rate (K{sub on}) for binding to RSV F protein, while alteration of dissociation rate (K{sub off}) did not significantly affect neutralizing activity. Interestingly, linkage of reduced K{sub on} with reduced potency mirrored the effect of increased K{sub on} found in a high-affinity enhanced potency palivizumab variant (motavizumab). These data suggest that association rate is the dominant factor driving neutralization potency for antibodies to RSV F protein antigenic site A and determines the potency of antibody somatic variants or efficiency of escape of viral glycoprotein variants. - Highlights: • The relationship of affinity to neutralization for virus antibodies is uncertain. • Palivizumab binds to RSV escape mutant fusion proteins, but with reduced affinity. • Association rate (K{sub on}) correlated well with the potency of neutralization.

  15. Conformational studies of a short linear peptide corresponding to a major conserved neutralizing epitope of human respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Toiron, C; López, J A; Rivas, G; Andreu, D; Melero, J A; Bruix, M

    1996-10-01

    The conformational properties of a 21-residue peptide, corresponding to amino acids 255 to 275 (F255-275) of the human respiratory syncytial virus fusion (F) glycoprotein have been studied by CD and nmr spectroscopy. This peptide includes residues 262, 268, and 272 of the F polypeptide that are essential for integrity of most epitopes that mapped into a major antigenic site of the F molecule. CD data indicate that F255-275 adopts a random coil conformation in aqueous solution at low peptide concentrations. However, as the concentration of peptide is increased, a higher percentage of peptide molecules adopts an organized structure. This effect can be more easily observed when trifluoroethanol (30%) is added to peptide solutions, giving rise to CD spectra that resemble those of alpha-helix structures. These conformational changes were confirmed by nmr spectroscopy. The nuclear Overhauser effects observed in 30% trifluoroethanol/ water together with the conformational H alpha chemical shift data allowed us to propose a structural model of helix-loop-helix for the peptide in solution. In addition, these helical regions contain the amino acid residues essential for epitope integrity in the native F molecule. These results give new insights into the antigenic structure of the respiratory syncytical virus F glycoprotein. PMID:8837519

  16. Reduction of liver macrophage transduction by pseudotyping lentiviral vectors with a fusion envelope from Autographa californica GP64 and Sendai virus F2 domain

    PubMed Central

    Markusic, David M; van Til, Niek P; Hiralall, Johan K; Elferink, Ronald PJ Oude; Seppen, Jurgen

    2009-01-01

    Background Lentiviral vectors are well suited for gene therapy because they can mediate long-term expression in both dividing and nondividing cells. However, lentiviral vectors seem less suitable for liver gene therapy because systemically administered lentiviral vectors are preferentially sequestered by liver macrophages. This results in a reduction of available virus and might also increase the immune response to the vector and vector products. Reduction of macrophage sequestration is therefore essential for efficient lentiviral liver gene therapy. Results Fusions were made of Autographa californica GP64 and the hepatocyte specific Sendai Virus envelope proteins. Lentiviral vectors were produced with either wild type GP64, Sendai-GP64, or both wild type GP64 and Sendai-GP64 and tested in vitro and in vivo for hepatocyte and macrophage gene transfer. Sendai-GP64 pseudotyped vectors showed specific gene transfer to HepG2 hepatoma cells, with no detectable transduction of HeLa cervical carcinoma cells, and a decreased affinity for RAW mouse macrophages. Co-expression of wild type GP64 and Sendai-GP64 resulted in improved viral titers while retaining increased affinity for HepG2 cells. In vivo, the Sendai-GP64 vectors also showed decreased transduction of murine liver macrophages. Conclusion We demonstrate reduced macrophage transduction in vitro and in vivo with GP64/Sendai chimeric envelope proteins. PMID:19811629

  17. Evaluating total inorganic nitrogen in coastal waters through fusion of multi-temporal RADARSAT-2 and optical imagery using random forest algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Meiling; Liu, Xiangnan; Li, Jin; Ding, Chao; Jiang, Jiale

    2014-12-01

    Satellites routinely provide frequent, large-scale, near-surface views of many oceanographic variables pertinent to plankton ecology. However, the nutrient fertility of water can be challenging to detect accurately using remote sensing technology. This research has explored an approach to estimate the nutrient fertility in coastal waters through the fusion of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images and optical images using the random forest (RF) algorithm. The estimation of total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) in the Hong Kong Sea, China, was used as a case study. In March of 2009 and May and August of 2010, a sequence of multi-temporal in situ data and CCD images from China's HJ-1 satellite and RADARSAT-2 images were acquired. Four sensitive parameters were selected as input variables to evaluate TIN: single-band reflectance, a normalized difference spectral index (NDSI) and HV and VH polarizations. The RF algorithm was used to merge the different input variables from the SAR and optical imagery to generate a new dataset (i.e., the TIN outputs). The results showed the temporal-spatial distribution of TIN. The TIN values decreased from coastal waters to the open water areas, and TIN values in the northeast area were higher than those found in the southwest region of the study area. The maximum TIN values occurred in May. Additionally, the estimation accuracy for estimating TIN was significantly improved when the SAR and optical data were used in combination rather than a single data type alone. This study suggests that this method of estimating nutrient fertility in coastal waters by effectively fusing data from multiple sensors is very promising.

  18. Construction of eukaryotic expression vector with mBD1-mBD3 fusion genes and exploring its activity against influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanyi; Feng, Yan; Kuang, Yu; Zeng, Wei; Yang, Yuan; Li, Hong; Jiang, Zhonghua; Li, Mingyuan

    2014-01-01

    Influenza (flu) pandemics have exhibited a great threat to human health throughout history. With the emergence of drug-resistant strains of influenza A virus (IAV), it is necessary to look for new agents for treatment and transmission prevention of the flu. Defensins are small (2-6 kDa) cationic peptides known for their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. Beta-defensins (β-defensins) are mainly produced by barrier epithelial cells and play an important role in attacking microbe invasion by epithelium. In this study, we focused on the anti-influenza A virus activity of mouse β-defensin 1 (mBD1) and β defensin-3 (mBD3) by synthesizing their fusion peptide with standard recombinant methods. The eukaryotic expression vectors pcDNA3.1(+)/mBD1-mBD3 were constructed successfully by overlap-PCR and transfected into Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. The MDCK cells transfected by pcDNA3.1(+)/mBD1-mBD3 were obtained by G₄₁₈ screening, and the mBD1-mBD3 stable expression pattern was confirmed in MDCK cells by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence assay. The acquired stable transfected MDCK cells were infected with IAV (A/PR/8/34, H1N1, 0.1 MOI) subsequently and the virus titers in cell culture supernatants were analyzed by TCID5₅₀ 72 h later. The TCID₅₀ titer of the experimental group was clearly lower than that of the control group (p < 0.001). Furthermore, BALB/C mice were injected with liposome-encapsulated pcDNA3.1(+)/mBD1-mBD3 through muscle and then challenged with the A/PR/8/34 virus. Results showed the survival rate of 100% and lung index inhibitory rate of 32.6% in pcDNA3.1(+)/mBD1-mBD3group; the TCID₅₀ titer of lung homogenates was clearly lower than that of the control group (p < 0.001). This study demonstrates that mBD1-mBD3 expressed by the recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1(+)/mBD1-mBD3 could inhibit influenza A virus replication both in vitro and in vivo. These observations suggested that the recombinant mBD1-mBD3 might be developed into an agent

  19. DNA polymerase gene sequences indicate western and forest tent caterpillar viruses form a new taxonomic group within baculoviruses.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Cydney B; Cooper, Dawn; Short, Steven M; Myers, Judith H; Suttle, Curtis A

    2002-11-01

    Baculoviruses infect larval lepidopterans, and thus have potential value as microbial controls of agricultural and forest pests. Understanding their genetic relatedness and host specificity is relevant to the risk assessment of viral insecticides if non-target impacts are to be avoided. DNA polymerase gene sequences have been demonstrated to be useful for inferring genetic relatedness among dsDNA viruses. We have adopted this approach to examine the relatedness among natural isolates of two uncharacterized caterpillar-infecting baculoviruses, Malacosoma californicum pluviale nucleopolyhedrovirus (McplMNPV) and Malacosoma disstria nucleopolyhedrovirus (MadiMNPV), which infect two closely related host species with little to no cross-infectivity. We designed two degenerate primers (BVP1 and BVP2) based on protein motifs conserved among baculoviruses. McplMNPV and MadiMNPV viral DNA was obtained from naturally infected caterpillars collected from geographically distinct sites in the Southern Gulf Islands and Prince George regions of British Columbia, Canada. Sequencing of 0.9 kb PCR amplicons from six McplMNPV and six MadiMNPV isolates obtained from a total of eight sites, revealed very low nucleotide variation among McplMNPV isolates (99.2-100% nucleotide identity) and among MadiMNPV isolates (98.9-100% nucleotide identity). Greater nucleotide variation was observed between viral isolates from the two different caterpillar species (only 84.7-86.1% nucleotide identity). Both maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses support placement of McplMNPV and MadiMNPV in a clade that is distinct from other groups of baculoviruses.

  20. Sulfated polysaccharide, curdlan sulfate, efficiently prevents entry/fusion and restricts antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection in vitro: a possible candidate for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Ichiyama, Koji; Gopala Reddy, Sindhoora Bhargavi; Zhang, Li Feng; Chin, Wei Xin; Muschin, Tegshi; Heinig, Lars; Suzuki, Youichi; Nanjundappa, Haraprasad; Yoshinaka, Yoshiyuki; Ryo, Akihide; Nomura, Nobuo; Ooi, Eng Eong; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Yoshida, Takashi; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    Curdlan sulfate (CRDS), a sulfated 1→3-β-D glucan, previously shown to be a potent HIV entry inhibitor, is characterized in this study as a potent inhibitor of the Dengue virus (DENV). CRDS was identified by in silico blind docking studies to exhibit binding potential to the envelope (E) protein of the DENV. CRDS was shown to inhibit the DENV replication very efficiently in different cells in vitro. Minimal effective concentration of CRDS was as low as 0.1 µg/mL in LLC-MK2 cells, and toxicity was observed only at concentrations over 10 mg/mL. CRDS can also inhibit DENV-1, 3, and 4 efficiently. CRDS did not inhibit the replication of DENV subgenomic replicon. Time of addition experiments demonstrated that the compound not only inhibited viral infection at the host cell binding step, but also at an early post-attachment step of entry (membrane fusion). The direct binding of CRDS to DENV was suggested by an evident reduction in the viral titers after interaction of the virus with CRDS following an ultrafiltration device separation, as well as after virus adsorption to an alkyl CRDS-coated membrane filter. The electron microscopic features also showed that CRDS interacted directly with the viral envelope, and caused changes to the viral surface. CRDS also potently inhibited DENV infection in DC-SIGN expressing cells as well as the antibody-dependent enhancement of DENV-2 infection. Based on these data, a probable binding model of CRDS to DENV E protein was constructed by a flexible receptor and ligand docking study. The binding site of CRDS was predicted to be at the interface between domains II and III of E protein dimer, which is unique to this compound, and is apparently different from the β-OG binding site. Since CRDS has already been tested in humans without serious side effects, its clinical application can be considered.

  1. Hepatitis virus protein X-Phenylalanine Hydroxylase fusion proteins identified in PKU mice treated with AAV-WPRE vectors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Utilizing the Pahenu2 mouse model for phenylketonuria (PKU), we developed an improved expression vector containing the Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus post-transcriptional regulatory element inserted into a rAAV-mPAH construct (rAAV-mPAH-WPRE) for treatment of PKU. Following portal vein delivery of these ...

  2. The C Terminus of the Core β-Ladder Domain in Japanese Encephalitis Virus Nonstructural Protein 1 Is Flexible for Accommodation of Heterologous Epitope Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Li-Chen; Liao, Jia-Teh; Lee, Hwei-Jen; Chou, Wei-Yuan; Chen, Chun-Wei; Lin, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT NS1 is the only nonstructural protein that enters the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where NS1 is glycosylated, forms a dimer, and is subsequently secreted during flavivirus replication as dimers or hexamers, which appear to be highly immunogenic to the infected host, as protective immunity can be elicited against homologous flavivirus infections. Here, by using a trans-complementation assay, we identified the C-terminal end of NS1 derived from Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), which was more flexible than other regions in terms of housing foreign epitopes without a significant impact on virus replication. This mapped flexible region is located in the conserved tip of the core β-ladder domain of the multimeric NS1 structure and is also known to contain certain linear epitopes, readily triggering specific antibody responses from the host. Despite becoming attenuated, recombinant JEV with insertion of a neutralizing epitope derived from enterovirus 71 (EV71) into the C-terminal end of NS1 not only could be normally released from infected cells, but also induced dual protective immunity for the host to counteract lethal challenge with either JEV or EV71 in neonatal mice. These results indicated that the secreted multimeric NS1 of flaviviruses may serve as a natural protein carrier to render epitopes of interest more immunogenic in the C terminus of the core β-ladder domain. IMPORTANCE The positive-sense RNA genomes of mosquito-borne flaviviruses appear to be flexible in terms of accommodating extra insertions of short heterologous antigens into their virus genes. Here, we illustrate that the newly identified C terminus of the core β-ladder domain in NS1 could be readily inserted into entities such as EV71 epitopes, and the resulting NS1-epitope fusion proteins appeared to maintain normal virus replication, secretion ability, and multimeric formation from infected cells. Nonetheless, such an insertion attenuated the recombinant JEV in mice

  3. Membrane fusion by an RGD-containing sequence from the core protein VP3 of hepatitis A virus and the RGA-analogue: implications for viral infection.

    PubMed

    Chávez, A; Pujol, M; Haro, I; Alsina, M A; Cajal, Y

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of an RGD-containing epitope from the hepatitis A virus VP3 capsid protein and its RGA-analogue with lipid membranes was studied by biophysical methods. Two types of model membrane were used: vesicles and monolayers spread at the air/water interface, with a composition that closely resembles the lipid moiety of hepatocyte membranes: PC/SM/PE/PC (40:33:12:15; PC: 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-sn-3-phosphocholine; SM: sphingomyelin from chicken egg yolk; PE, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine; PS: L-alpha-phosphatidyl-L-serine from bovine brain). In addition, zwitterionic PC/SM/PE (47:39:14) and cationic PC/SM/PE/DOTAP (40:33:12:15; DOTAP: 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) membranes were also prepared in order to dissect the electrostatic and hydrophobic components in the interaction. Changes in tryptophan fluorescence, acrylamide quenching, and resonance energy transfer experiments in the presence of vesicles, as well as the kinetics of insertion in monolayers, indicate that both peptides bind to the three types of membrane at neutral and acidic pH; however, binding is irreversible only at low pH. Membrane-destabilizing and fusogenic activities are triggered by acidification at pH 4-6, characteristic of the endosome. Fluorescence experiments show that VP3-RGD and VP3-RGA induce mixing of lipids and leakage or mixing of aqueous contents in anionic and cationic vesicles at pH 4-6, indicating leaky fusion. Interaction with zwitterionic vesicles (PC/SM/PE) results in leakage without lipid mixing, indicating pore formation. Replacement of aspartic acid in the RGD motif by alanine maintains the membrane-destabilizing properties of the peptide at low pH, but not its antigenicity. Since the RGD tripeptide is related to receptor-mediated cell adhesion and antigenicity, results suggest that receptor binding is not a molecular requirement for fusion. The possible involvement of peptide-induced membrane destabilization in the mechanism of hepatitis A

  4. Positive reinforcement for viruses

    PubMed Central

    Vigant, Frederic; Jung, Michael; Lee, Benhur

    2010-01-01

    Summary Virus-cell membrane fusion requires a critical transition from positive to negative membrane curvature. St. Vincent et al., in PNAS (St Vincent, et al., 2010), designed a class of antivirals that targets this transition. These Rigid Amphipathic Fusion Inhibitors are active against an array of enveloped viruses. PMID:21035726

  5. Positive reinforcement for viruses.

    PubMed

    Vigant, Frederic; Jung, Michael; Lee, Benhur

    2010-10-29

    Virus-cell membrane fusion requires a critical transition from positive to negative membrane curvature. St. Vincent et al. (2010), in PNAS, designed a class of antivirals that targets this transition. These rigid amphipathic fusion inhibitors are active against an array of enveloped viruses.

  6. Recombinant low-seroprevalent adenoviral vectors Ad26 and Ad35 expressing the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion protein induce protective immunity against RSV infection in cotton rats.

    PubMed

    Widjojoatmodjo, Myra N; Bogaert, Lies; Meek, Bob; Zahn, Roland; Vellinga, Jort; Custers, Jerome; Serroyen, Jan; Radošević, Katarina; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2015-10-01

    RSV is an important cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children, the elderly and in those with underlying medical conditions. Although the high disease burden indicates an urgent need for a vaccine against RSV, no licensed RSV vaccine is currently available. We developed an RSV vaccine candidate based on the low-seroprevalent human adenovirus serotypes 26 and 35 (Ad26 and Ad35) encoding the RSV fusion (F) gene. Single immunization of mice with either one of these vectors induced high titers of RSV neutralizing antibodies and high levels of F specific interferon-gamma-producing T cells. A Th1-type immune response was indicated by a high IgG2a/IgG1 ratio of RSV-specific antibodies, strong induction of RSV-specific interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha cytokine producing CD8 Tcells, and low RSV-specific CD4 T-cell induction. Both humoral and cellular responses were increased upon a boost with RSV-F expressing heterologous adenovirus vector (Ad35 boost after Ad26 prime or vice versa). Both single immunization and prime-boost immunization of cotton rats induced high and long-lasting RSV neutralizing antibody titers and protective immunity against lung and nasal RSV A2 virus load up to at least 30 weeks after immunization. Cotton rats were also completely protected against challenge with a RSV B strain (B15/97) after heterologous prime-boost immunization. Lungs from vaccinated animals showed minimal damage or inflammatory infiltrates post-challenge, in contrast to animals vaccinated with formalin-inactivated virus. Our results suggest that recombinant human adenoviral Ad26 and Ad35 vectors encoding the RSV F gene have the potential to provide broad and durable protection against RSV in humans, and appear safe to be investigated in infants.

  7. The Fusion Protein Signal-Peptide-Coding Region of Canine Distemper Virus: A Useful Tool for Phylogenetic Reconstruction and Lineage Identification

    PubMed Central

    Sarute, Nicolás; Calderón, Marina Gallo; Pérez, Ruben; La Torre, José; Hernández, Martín; Francia, Lourdes; Panzera, Yanina

    2013-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV; Paramyxoviridae, Morbillivirus) is the etiologic agent of a multisystemic infectious disease affecting all terrestrial carnivore families with high incidence and mortality in domestic dogs. Sequence analysis of the hemagglutinin (H) gene has been widely employed to characterize field strains, permitting the identification of nine CDV lineages worldwide. Recently, it has been established that the sequences of the fusion protein signal-peptide (Fsp) coding region are extremely variable, suggesting that analysis of its sequence might be useful for strain characterization studies. However, the divergence of Fsp sequences among worldwide strains and its phylogenetic resolution has not yet been evaluated. We constructed datasets containing the Fsp-coding region and H gene sequences of the same strains belonging to eight CDV lineages. Both datasets were used to evaluate their phylogenetic resolution. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that both datasets clustered the same strains into eight different branches, corresponding to CDV lineages. The inter-lineage amino acid divergence was fourfold greater for the Fsp peptide than for the H protein. The likelihood mapping revealed that both datasets display strong phylogenetic signals in the region of well-resolved topologies. These features indicate that Fsp-coding region sequence analysis is suitable for evolutionary studies as it allows for straightforward identification of CDV lineages. PMID:23675493

  8. Intranasal immunization with a replication-deficient adenoviral vector expressing the fusion glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus elicits protective immunity in BALB/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yuanhui; He, Jinsheng; Zheng, Xianxian; Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Mei; Wang, Xiaobo; Wang, Yan; Xie, Can; Tang, Qian; Wei, Wei; Wang, Min; Song, Jingdong; Qu, Jianguo; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Xin; Hong, Tao

    2009-04-17

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a serious pediatric pathogen of the lower respiratory tract worldwide. There is currently no clinically approved vaccine against RSV infection. Recently, it has been shown that a replication-deficient first generation adenoviral vector (FGAd), which encodes modified RSV attachment glycoprotein (G), elicits long-term protective immunity against RSV infection in mice. The major problem in developing such a vaccine is that G protein lacks MHC-I-restricted epitopes. However, RSV fusion glycoprotein (F) is a major cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope in humans and mice, therefore, an FGAd-encoding F (FGAd-F) was constructed and evaluated for its potential as an RSV vaccine in a murine model. Intranasal (i.n.) immunization with FGAd-F generated serum IgG, bronchoalveolar lavage secretory IgA, and RSV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in BALB/c mice, with characteristic balanced or mixed Th1/Th2 CD4+ T-cell responses. Serum IgG was significantly elevated after boosting with i.n. FGAd-F. Upon challenge, i.n. immunization with FGAd-F displayed an effective protective role against RSV infection. These results demonstrate FGAd-F is able to induce effective protective immunity and is a promising vaccine regimen against RSV infection.

  9. Human HLA class I- and HLA class II-restricted cloned cytotoxic T lymphocytes identify a cluster of epitopes on the measles virus fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    van Binnendijk, R S; Versteeg-van Oosten, J P; Poelen, M C; Brugghe, H F; Hoogerhout, P; Osterhaus, A D; Uytdehaag, F G

    1993-01-01

    The transmembrane fusion (F) glycoprotein of measles virus is an important target antigen of human HLA class I- and class II-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Genetically engineered F proteins and nested sets of synthetic peptides spanning the F protein were used to determine sequences of F recognized by a number of F-specific CTL clones. Combined N- and C-terminal deletions of the respective peptides revealed that human HLA class I and HLA class II-restricted CTL efficiently recognize nonapeptides or decapeptides representing epitopes of F. Three distinct sequences recognized by three different HLA class II (DQw1, DR2, and DR4/w53)-restricted CTL clones appear to cluster between amino acids 379 and 466 of F, thus defining an important T-cell epitope area of F. Within this same region, a nonamer peptide of F was found to be recognized by an HLA-B27-restricted CTL clone, as expected on the basis of the structural homology between this peptide and other known HLA-B27 binding peptides. PMID:7680390

  10. Cloning, expression and purification of full length Rep78 of adeno-associated virus as a fusion protein with maltose binding protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Batchu, R B; Miles, D A; Rechtin, T M; Drake, R R; Hermonat, P L

    1995-03-17

    The adeno-associated virus (AAV) Rep78 protein is required for many aspects of AAV's life cycle including its DNA replication and the regulation of its gene expression. Because of increasing utilization of AAV as a gene therapy vector and its possible use as an anti-cancer/anti-viral agent, the complete characterization of its Rep78 regulatory protein is important. In order to study various functional aspects of Rep78, we have cloned and expressed the Rep78 gene in Escherichia coli using an inducible expression plasmid. The entire Rep78 open reading frame (nt 321 to 2185) was cloned into the LacZ inducible expression vector pMALc2. Upon induction of the Ptac promoter with isopropyl thio-beta-D-galactopyranoside (IPTG), Rep78 is produced as a fusion protein with maltose binding protein (MBP). This recombinant MBP-Rep78 protein displayed all the biochemical activities which are described for the wild type protein including binding to the AAV terminal repeats (TR), endonuclease activity, and helicase activity. Furthermore, for the first time, ATP binding by Rep78 is demonstrated.

  11. Big fusion, little fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Frank; ddtuttle

    2016-08-01

    In reply to correspondence from George Scott and Adam Costley about the Physics World focus issue on nuclear energy, and to news of construction delays at ITER, the fusion reactor being built in France.

  12. Broad-spectrum antivirals against viral fusion

    PubMed Central

    Vigant, Frederic; Santos, Nuno C.; Lee, Benhur

    2015-01-01

    Effective antivirals have been developed against specific viruses, such as HIV, Hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This ‘one bug–one drug’ approach to antiviral drug development can be successful, but it may be inadequate for responding to an increasing diversity of viruses that cause significant diseases in humans. The majority of viral pathogens that cause emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases are membrane-enveloped viruses, which require the fusion of viral and cell membranes for virus entry. Therefore, antivirals that target the membrane fusion process represent new paradigms for broad-spectrum antiviral discovery. In this Review, we discuss the mechanisms responsible for the fusion between virus and cell membranes and explore how broad-spectrum antivirals target this process to prevent virus entry. PMID:26075364

  13. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ODV-E56 is a per os infectivity factor, but is not essential for binding and fusion of occlusion-derived virus to the host midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, Wendy O.; Harrison, Robert L.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2011-01-05

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) occlusion-derived virus (ODV) envelope protein ODV-E56 is essential for oral infection of larvae of Heliothis virescens. Bioassays with recombinant clones of AcMNPV lacking a functional odv-e56 gene showed that ODV-E56 was required for infectivity of both polyhedra and to a lesser extent, purified ODV. However, binding and fusion assays showed that ODV lacking ODV-E56 bound and fused to midgut cells at levels similar to ODV of wild-type virus. Fluorescence microscopy of midguts from larvae inoculated with ODV-E56-positive and -negative viruses that express GFP indicated that ODV-E56 was required for infection of the midgut epithelium. Purified ODV-E56 bound to several proteins in midgut-derived brush border membrane vesicles, but failed to rescue infectivity of ODV-E56-negative viruses in trans. These results indicate that ODV-E56 is a per os infectivity factor (pif-5) required for primary midgut infection at a point before or after virion binding and fusion.

  14. Construction and immunogenicity in a prime-boost regimen of a Semliki Forest virus-vectored experimental HIV clade A vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hanke, Tomás; Barnfield, Christina; Wee, Edmund G-T; Agren, Lena; Samuel, Rachel V; Larke, Natasha; Liljeström, Peter

    2003-02-01

    A novel, experimental subunit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine, SFV.HIVA, was constructed. This consists of Semliki Forest virus (SFV), which is a suitable vaccine vector for use in humans, and a passenger gene encoding HIVA, which is an immunogen derived from HIV-1 clade A that is being currently tested in clinical trials of combined DNA- and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)-vectored vaccines in Oxford (UK) and Nairobi (Kenya). In the mouse, the SFV.HIVA vaccine was highly immunogenic for T cell-mediated immune responses and induced T cell memory that lasted for at least 6 months. SFV.HIVA was also compared to the vaccines currently used in the clinical trials and was shown to be as effective in T cell induction as pTHr.HIVA DNA but less immunogenic than MVA.HIVA. When tested in a prime-boost regimen, SFV.HIVA-induced responses could be boosted by MVA.HIVA. This work is a part of a long-term effort to build a panel of subunit vaccines expressing a common immunogen, which will allow both a direct comparison of various vaccine vectors and combined vaccination regimens in humans and provide more flexibility and/or a potential optimization of vaccinations for individuals based on their pre-existing anti-vector immunity.

  15. Construction, expression and immunoassay detection of recombinant plasmid encoding fusion protein of Roman chicken complement C3d and Newcastle disease virus F gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, D; Niu, Z-X

    2008-12-01

    The terminal degradation product (C3d) of mammalian complement component C3 plays an important role in modulation of the adaptive immune response through the interaction with complement receptor type 2 (CR2) on B cells. In this study, the gene fragment coding for the complement protein C3d (chC3d) from Roman chicken was cloned and expressed as a fusion protein for its application in the vaccine study of chicken, and for in vitro experiments. The chC3d fragment strengthened B-cell responses when complexed with antigen. Three potential vaccine construct units were engineered to contain two, four and six copies of chC3d coding gene linked to the F gene of Newcastle disease virus (NDV), an economically important pathogen of chicken that is classified as a list A contagious disease of poultry by the Office International des Epizooties. The cloned chC3d protein and different repeats of C3d proteins in addition to the F gene of NDV were generated separately in Escherichia coli and chicken embryo fibroblast cells with the help of expression vectors. All recombinant proteins were analysed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Analysis of the immunogenicity of different repeats of C3d revealed that chC3d had an enhancing effect on the immunogenicity of antigens, and that six or more repeats of C3d may be necessary for efficient enhancement of antigen-specific immune responses. To date, published research into the adjuvant activities of C3d has been limited to experiments in mice, rabbits and cattle. The adjuvant properties of C3d have not been assessed in poultry using homologous C3d in association with antigens relevant to the target species. The Roman chicken C3d fusion proteins described in this study is the first report and will provide a basis for immunization trials in chicken, studies of receptor binding and cell activation of chicken lymphocytes, and investigations of new types of vaccines, including recombinant vaccines and DNA vaccines for future use against other

  16. Foot-and-mouth disease virus-like particles produced by a SUMO fusion protein system in Escherichia coli induce potent protective immune responses in guinea pigs, swine and cattle.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui-Chen; Sun, Shi-Qi; Jin, Ye; Yang, Shun-Li; Wei, Yan-Quan; Sun, De-Hui; Yin, Shuang-Hui; Ma, Jun-Wu; Liu, Zai-Xin; Guo, Jian-Hong; Luo, Jian-Xun; Yin, Hong; Liu, Xiang-Tao; Liu, Ding Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious infection in cloven-hoofed animals. The format of FMD virus-like particles (VLP) as a non-replicating particulate vaccine candidate is a promising alternative to conventional inactivated FMDV vaccines. In this study, we explored a prokaryotic system to express and assemble the FMD VLP and validated the potential of VLP as an FMDV vaccine candidate. VLP composed entirely of FMDV (Asia1/Jiangsu/China/2005) capsid proteins (VP0, VP1 and VP3) were simultaneously produced as SUMO fusion proteins by an improved SUMO fusion protein system in E. coli. Proteolytic removal of the SUMO moiety from the fusion proteins resulted in the assembly of VLP with size and shape resembling the authentic FMDV. Immunization of guinea pigs, swine and cattle with FMD VLP by intramuscular inoculation stimulated the FMDV-specific antibody response, neutralizing antibody response, T-cell proliferation response and secretion of cytokine IFN-γ. In addition, immunization with one dose of the VLP resulted in complete protection of these animals from homologous FMDV challenge. The 50% protection dose (PD50) of FMD VLP in cattle is up to 6.34. These results suggest that FMD VLP expressed in E. coli are an effective vaccine in guinea pigs, swine and cattle and support further development of these VLP as a vaccine candidate for protection against FMDV. PMID:23826638

  17. Foot-and-mouth disease virus-like particles produced by a SUMO fusion protein system in Escherichia coli induce potent protective immune responses in guinea pigs, swine and cattle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious infection in cloven-hoofed animals. The format of FMD virus-like particles (VLP) as a non-replicating particulate vaccine candidate is a promising alternative to conventional inactivated FMDV vaccines. In this study, we explored a prokaryotic system to express and assemble the FMD VLP and validated the potential of VLP as an FMDV vaccine candidate. VLP composed entirely of FMDV (Asia1/Jiangsu/China/2005) capsid proteins (VP0, VP1 and VP3) were simultaneously produced as SUMO fusion proteins by an improved SUMO fusion protein system in E. coli. Proteolytic removal of the SUMO moiety from the fusion proteins resulted in the assembly of VLP with size and shape resembling the authentic FMDV. Immunization of guinea pigs, swine and cattle with FMD VLP by intramuscular inoculation stimulated the FMDV-specific antibody response, neutralizing antibody response, T-cell proliferation response and secretion of cytokine IFN-γ. In addition, immunization with one dose of the VLP resulted in complete protection of these animals from homologous FMDV challenge. The 50% protection dose (PD50) of FMD VLP in cattle is up to 6.34. These results suggest that FMD VLP expressed in E. coli are an effective vaccine in guinea pigs, swine and cattle and support further development of these VLP as a vaccine candidate for protection against FMDV. PMID:23826638

  18. Importance of the short cytoplasmic domain of the feline immunodeficiency virus transmembrane glycoprotein for fusion activity and envelope glycoprotein incorporation into virions

    SciTech Connect

    Celma, Cristina C.P.; Paladino, Monica G.; Gonzalez, Silvia A.; Affranchino, Jose L.

    2007-09-30

    The mature form of the envelope (Env) glycoprotein of lentiviruses is a heterodimer composed of the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) subunits. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) possesses a TM glycoprotein with a cytoplasmic tail of approximately 53 amino acids which is unusually short compared with that of the other lentiviral glycoproteins (more than 100 residues). To investigate the relevance of the FIV TM cytoplasmic domain to Env-mediated viral functions, we characterized the biological properties of a series of Env glycoproteins progressively shortened from the carboxyl terminus. All the mutant Env proteins were efficiently expressed in feline cells and processed into the SU and TM subunits. Deletion of 5 or 11 amino acids from the TM C-terminus did not significantly affect Env surface expression, fusogenic activity or Env incorporation into virions, whereas removal of 17 or 23 residues impaired Env-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. Further truncation of the FIV TM by 29 residues resulted in an Env glycoprotein that was poorly expressed at the cell surface, exhibited only 20% of the wild-type Env fusogenic capacity and was inefficiently incorporated into virions. Remarkably, deletion of the TM C-terminal 35 or 41 amino acids restored or even enhanced Env biological functions. Indeed, these mutant Env glycoproteins bearing cytoplasmic domains of 18 or 12 amino acids were found to be significantly more fusogenic than the wild-type Env and were efficiently incorporated into virions. Interestingly, truncation of the TM cytoplasmic domain to only 6 amino acids did not affect Env incorporation into virions but abrogated Env fusogenicity. Finally, removal of the entire TM cytoplasmic tail or deletion of as many as 6 amino acids into the membrane-spanning domain led to a complete loss of Env functions. Our results demonstrate that despite its relatively short length, the FIV TM cytoplasmic domain plays an important role in modulating Env-mediated viral functions.

  19. Determinants of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Baseline Susceptibility to the Fusion Inhibitors Enfuvirtide and T-649 Reside outside the Peptide Interaction Site

    PubMed Central

    Heil, Marintha L.; Decker, Julie M.; Sfakianos, Jeffrey N.; Shaw, George M.; Hunter, Eric; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    The peptide fusion inhibitor (PFI) enfuvirtide is the first of a new class of entry inhibitors to receive FDA approval. We previously determined the susceptibility of 55 PFI-naïve-patient isolates to enfuvirtide and a second peptide inhibitor, T-649. Seven of the 55 viral isolates were insusceptible to enfuvirtide, T-649, or both inhibitors in the absence of prior exposure. To determine the molecular basis of the insusceptible phenotypes, we PCR amplified and cloned five PFI-insusceptible and one PFI-susceptible, full-length, biologically functional env genes and characterized viruses pseudotyped with the Env proteins in a single-round drug sensitivity assay. Overall, the mean 50% inhibitory concentrations of enfuvirtide and T-649 for the PFI-insusceptible Env pseudotypes were 1.4 to 1.7 log10 and 1.2 to 1.8 log10 greater, respectively, than those for a PFI-susceptible lab strain, NLHX; however, all of the PFI-insusceptible Env proteins conserved the sequence of a critical enfuvirtide interaction site (residues 36 to 38 of gp41, GIV) in HR-1. In contrast, multiple amino acid changes were observed C-terminal to HR-1, many of which were located in regions of HR-2 corresponding to the PFI. Nevertheless, peptides based on patient-derived HR-2 sequences were not more potent inhibitors than enfuvirtide or T-649, arguing that the basis of PFI susceptibility is not a higher-affinity, competitive HR-1/HR-2 interaction. These results demonstrate that regions of Env outside the enfuvirtide interaction site can significantly impact the PFI susceptibility of patient-derived Env, even prior to drug exposure. We hypothesize that both gp120 gene- and gp41 gene-encoded determinants that minimize the window of opportunity for PFI to bind provide a growth advantage and possibly a predisposition to resistance to this new class of drugs in vivo. PMID:15220433

  20. A single amino acid change resulting in loss of fluorescence of eGFP in a viral fusion protein confers fitness and growth advantage to the recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, Phat X.; Panda, Debasis; Das, Phani B.; Das, Subash C.; Das, Anshuman; Pattnaik, Asit K.

    2012-10-25

    Using a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus encoding eGFP fused in-frame with an essential viral replication protein, the phosphoprotein P, we show that during passage in culture, the virus mutates the nucleotide C289 within eGFP of the fusion protein PeGFP to A or T, resulting in R97S/C amino acid substitution and loss of fluorescence. The resultant non-fluorescent virus exhibits increased fitness and growth advantage over its fluorescent counterpart. The growth advantage of the non-fluorescent virus appears to be due to increased transcription and replication activities of the PeGFP protein carrying the R97S/C substitution. Further, our results show that the R97S/C mutation occurs prior to accumulation of mutations that can result in loss of expression of the gene inserted at the G-L gene junction. These results suggest that fitness gain is more important for the recombinant virus than elimination of expression of the heterologous gene.

  1. Induction of protection against divergent H5N1 influenza viruses using a recombinant fusion protein linking influenza M2e to Onchocerca volvulus activation associated protein-1 (ASP-1) adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangyu; Du, Lanying; Xiao, Wenjun; Sun, Shihui; Lin, Yongping; Chen, Min; Kou, Zhihua; He, Yuxian; Lustigman, Sara; Jiang, Shibo; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Zhou, Yusen

    2010-10-18

    Our previous studies have shown the adjuvanticity of an Onchocerca volvulus recombinant protein, Ov-ASP-1 (ASP-1), when administered in an aqueous formulation with bystander vaccine antigens or commercial vaccines. In this study, we reported a novel formulation that took advantage of the protein nature of the ASP-1 adjuvant by creating recombinant fusion protein vaccines linking the highly conserved extracellular domain of M2 protein (M2e) consensus sequence of H5N1 influenza viruses with the ASP-1 adjuvant. Two recombinant fusion proteins designated M2e-ASP-1 and M2e3-ASP-1 were studied, in which ASP-1 was fused with one or three tandem copies of the M2e antigen. Our results show that these novel recombinant influenza vaccines, particularly M2e3-ASP-1, induced strong anti-M2e-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in the established mouse model. Furthermore, M2e3-ASP-1 was able to provide significant cross-clade protection against divergent H5N1 viruses. Consequently, this study has demonstrated a potential novel vaccine formulation that could provide a complementary prophylactic strategy in preventing the threat of future influenza outbreak resulting from rapid evolution of the H5N1 virus and co-circulation of multiple antigenic variants in various regions.

  2. Assessing fire effects on forest spatial structure using a fusion of Landsat and airborne LiDAR data in Yosemite National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, Van R.; North, Malcolm P.; Lutz, James A.; Churchill, Derek J.; Roberts, Susan L.; Smith, Douglas F.; McGaughey, Robert J.; Kane, Jonathan T.; Brooks, Matthew L.

    2014-01-01

    Mosaics of tree clumps and openings are characteristic of forests dominated by frequent, low- and moderate-severity fires. When restoring these fire-suppressed forests, managers often try to reproduce these structures to increase ecosystem resilience. We examined unburned and burned forest structures for 1937 0.81 ha sample areas in Yosemite National Park, USA. We estimated severity for fires from 1984 to 2010 using the Landsat-derived Relativized differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (RdNBR) and measured openings and canopy clumps in five height strata using airborne LiDAR data. Because our study area lacked concurrent field data, we identified methods to allow structural analysis using LiDAR data alone. We found three spatial structures, canopy-gap, clump-open, and open, that differed in spatial arrangement and proportion of canopy and openings. As fire severity increased, the total area in canopy decreased while the number of clumps increased, creating a patchwork of openings and multistory tree clumps. The presence of openings > 0.3 ha, an approximate minimum gap size needed to favor shade-intolerant pine regeneration, increased rapidly with loss of canopy area. The range and variation of structures for a given fire severity were specific to each forest type. Low- to moderate-severity fires best replicated the historic clump-opening patterns that were common in forests with frequent fire regimes. Our results suggest that managers consider the following goals for their forest restoration: 1) reduce total canopy cover by breaking up large contiguous areas into variable-sized tree clumps and scattered large individual trees; 2) create a range of opening sizes and shapes, including ~ 50% of the open area in gaps > 0.3 ha; 3) create multistory clumps in addition to single story clumps; 4) retain historic densities of large trees; and 5) vary treatments to include canopy-gap, clump-open, and open mosaics across project areas to mimic the range of patterns found for each

  3. Comparison of immune responses against foot-and-mouth disease virus induced by fusion proteins using the swine IgG heavy chain constant region or beta-galactosidase as a carrier of immunogenic epitopes.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangjin; Chen, Weizao; Yan, Weiyao; Zhao, Kai; Liu, Mingqiu; Zhang, Jun; Fei, Liang; Xu, Quanxing; Sheng, Zutian; Lu, Yonggan; Zheng, Zhaoxin

    2004-10-25

    Previously, we demonstrated that a fusion protein (Gal-FMDV) consisting of beta-galactosidase and an immunogenic peptide, amino acids (141-160)-(21-40)-(141-160), of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) VP1 protein induced protective immune responses in guinea pigs and swine. We now designed a new potential recombinant protein vaccine against FMDV in swine. The immunogenic peptide, amino acids (141-160)-(21-40)-(141-160) from the VP1 protein of serotype O FMDV, was fused to the carboxy terminus of a swine immunoglobulin G single heavy chain constant region and expressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed fusion protein (IgG-FMDV) was purified and emulsified with oil adjuvant. Vaccination twice at an interval of 3 weeks with the emulsified IgG-FMDV fusion protein induced an FMDV-specific spleen proliferative T-cell response in guinea pigs and elicited high levels of neutralizing antibody in guinea pigs and swine. All of the immunized animals were efficiently protected against FMDV challenge. There was no significant difference between IgG-FMDV and Gal-FMDV in eliciting immunity after vaccination twice in swine. However, when evaluating the efficacy of a single inoculation of the fusion proteins, we found that IgG-FMDV could elicit a protective immune response in swine, while Gal-FMDV only elicited a weak neutralizing activity and could not protect the swine against FMDV challenge. Our results suggest that the IgG-FMDV fusion protein is a promising vaccine candidate for FMD in swine. PMID:15464847

  4. The ectodomains but not the transmembrane domains of the fusion proteins of subtypes A and B avian pneumovirus are conserved to a similar extent as those of human respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Naylor, C J; Britton, P; Cavanagh, D

    1998-06-01

    The fusion glycoprotein (F(B)) gene of five strains of the B subtype of avian pneumovirus (APV; turkey rhinotracheitis virus) has been sequenced. The length of the F(B) protein was 538 amino acids, identical to that of the F protein of subtype A virus, with which it had 74% and 83% overall nucleotide and deduced amino acid identities, respectively. The F(B) and F(A) ectodomains had 90% amino acid identity, very similar to the 91% identity between the ectodomains of the F proteins of subtype A and B human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV). As with HRSV, the F2 polypeptide was less conserved (83% identity) than F1 (94%). In contrast to the ectodomain, the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the two APV subtypes were much less conserved (30% and 48% identity, respectively) than those of HRSV (92% and 87%, respectively). Comparisons within all the genera of the Paramyxoviridae (Pneumovirus, Morbillivirus, Paramyxovirus and Rubullavirus) show that low amino acid identity between F protein transmembrane domains is a feature of different species of virus rather than of strain differences. This may indicate that the two subtypes of APV have evolved in different geographical regions and/or different avian species. This is the first report of an F gene sequence from a subtype B APV.

  5. Nuclear Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, G.

    This chapter is devoted to the fundamental concepts of nuclear fusion. To be more precise, it is devoted to the theoretical basics of fusion reactions between light nuclei such as hydrogen, helium, boron, and lithium. The discussion is limited because our purpose is to focus on laboratory-scale fusion experiments that aim at gaining energy from the fusion process. After discussing the methods of calculating the fusion cross section, it will be shown that sustained fusion reactions with energy gain must happen in a thermal medium because, in beam-target experiments, the energy of the beam is randomized faster than the fusion rate. Following a brief introduction to the elements of plasma physics, the chapter is concluded with the introduction of the most prominent fusion reactions ongoing in the Sun.

  6. Realms of the Viruses Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Viruses have evolved strategies for infecting all taxa, but most viruses are highly specific about their cellular host. In humans, viruses cause diverse diseases, from chronic but benign warts, to acute and deadly hemorrhagic fever. Viruses have entertaining names like Zucchini Yellow Mosaic, Semliki Forest, Coxsackie, and the original terminator,…

  7. The Domain I-Domain III Linker Plays an Important Role in the Fusogenic Conformational Change of the Alphavirus Membrane Fusion Protein▿

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yan; Sánchez-San Martín, Claudia; Qin, Zhao-ling; Kielian, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    The alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV) infects cells through a low-pH-dependent membrane fusion reaction mediated by the virus fusion protein E1. Acidic pH initiates a series of E1 conformational changes that culminate in membrane fusion and include dissociation of the E1/E2 heterodimer, insertion of the E1 fusion loop into the target membrane, and refolding of E1 to a stable trimeric hairpin conformation. A highly conserved histidine (H3) on the E1 protein was previously shown to promote low-pH-dependent E1 refolding. An SFV mutant with an alanine substitution at this position (H3A) has a lower pH threshold and reduced efficiency of virus fusion and E1 trimer formation than wild-type SFV. Here we addressed the mechanism by which H3 promotes E1 refolding and membrane fusion. We identified E1 mutations that rescue the H3A defect. These revertants implicated a network of interactions that connect the domain I-domain III (DI-DIII) linker region with the E1 core trimer, including H3. In support of the importance of these interactions, mutation of residues in the network resulted in more acidic pH thresholds and reduced efficiencies of membrane fusion. In vitro studies of truncated E1 proteins demonstrated that the DI-DIII linker was required for production of a stable E1 core trimer on target membranes. Together, our results suggest a critical and previously unidentified role for the DI-DIII linker region during the low-pH-dependent refolding of E1 that drives membrane fusion. PMID:21543498

  8. The 3;21 translocation in myelodysplasia results in a fusion transcript between the AML1 gene and the gene for EAP, a highly conserved protein associated with the Epstein-Barr virus small RNA EBER 1.

    PubMed Central

    Nucifora, G; Begy, C R; Erickson, P; Drabkin, H A; Rowley, J D

    1993-01-01

    In the 8;21 translocation, the AML1 gene, located at chromosome band 21q22, is translocated to chromosome 8 (q22), where it is fused to the ETO gene and transcribed as a chimeric gene. AML1 is the human homolog of the recently cloned mouse gene pebp2 alpha B, homologous to the DNA binding alpha subunit of the polyoma enhancer factor pebp2. AML1 is also involved in a translocation with chromosome 3 that is seen in patients with therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome and in chronic myelogenous leukemia in blast crisis. We have isolated a fusion cDNA clone from a t(3;21) library derived from a patient with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome; this clone contains sequences from AML1 and from EAP, which we have now localized to band 3q26. EAP has previously been characterized as a highly expressed small nuclear protein of 128 residues (EBER 1) associated with Epstein-Barr virus small RNA. The fusion clone contains the DNA binding 5' part of AML1 that is fused to ETO in the t(8;21) and, in addition, at least one other exon. The translocation replaces the last nine codons of AML1 with the last 96 codons of EAP. The fusion does not maintain the correct reading frame of EAP and may not lead to a functional chimeric protein. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8395054

  9. Differences in Processing Determinants of Nonstructural Polyprotein and in the Sequence of Nonstructural Protein 3 Affect Neurovirulence of Semliki Forest Virus

    PubMed Central

    Saul, Sirle; Ferguson, Mhairi; Cordonin, Colette; Fragkoudis, Rennos; Ool, Margit; Tamberg, Nele; Sherwood, Karen; Fazakerley, John K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The A7(74) strain of Semliki Forest virus (SFV; genus Alphavirus) is avirulent in adult mice, while the L10 strain is virulent in mice of all ages. It has been previously demonstrated that this phenotypic difference is associated with nonstructural protein 3 (nsP3). Consensus clones of L10 (designated SFV6) and A7(74) (designated A774wt) were used to construct a panel of recombinant viruses. The insertion of nsP3 from A774wt into the SFV6 backbone had a minor effect on the virulence of the resulting recombinant virus. Conversely, insertion of nsP3 from SFV6 into the A774wt backbone or replacement of A774wt nsP3 with two copies of nsP3 from SFV6 resulted in virulent viruses. Unexpectedly, duplication of nsP3-encoding sequences also resulted in elevated levels of nsP4, revealing that nsP3 is involved in the stabilization of nsP4. Interestingly, replacement of nsP3 of SFV6 with that of A774wt resulted in a virulent virus; the virulence of this recombinant was strongly reduced by functionally coupled substitutions for amino acid residues 534 (P4 position of the cleavage site between nsP1 and nsP2) and 1052 (S4 subsite residue of nsP2 protease) in the nonstructural polyprotein. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that A774wt and avirulent recombinant virus were characterized by increased processing speed of the cleavage site between nsP1 and nsP2. A His534-to-Arg substitution specifically activated this cleavage, while a Val1052-to-Glu substitution compensated for this effect by reducing the basal protease activity of nsP2. These findings provide a link between nonstructural polyprotein processing and the virulence of SFV. IMPORTANCE SFV infection of mice provides a well-characterized model to study viral encephalitis. SFV also serves as a model for studies of alphavirus molecular biology and host-pathogen interactions. Thus far, the genetic basis of different properties of SFV strains has been studied using molecular clones, which often contain mistakes

  10. A novel system for the production of high levels of functional human therapeutic proteins in stable cells with a Semliki Forest virus noncytopathic vector.

    PubMed

    Casales, Erkuden; Aranda, Alejandro; Quetglas, Jose I; Ruiz-Guillen, Marta; Rodriguez-Madoz, Juan R; Prieto, Jesus; Smerdou, Cristian

    2010-05-31

    Semliki Forest virus (SFV) vectors lead to high protein expression in mammalian cells, but expression is transient due to vector cytopathic effects, inhibition of host cell proteins and RNA-based expression. We have used a noncytopathic SFV mutant (ncSFV) RNA vector to generate stable cell lines expressing two human therapeutic proteins: insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1). Therapeutic genes were fused at the carboxy-terminal end of Puromycin N-acetyl-transferase gene by using as a linker the sequence coding for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A autoprotease. These cassettes were cloned into the ncSFV vector. Recombinant ncSFV vectors allowed rapid and efficient selection of stable BHK cell lines with puromycin. These cells expressed IGF-I and CT-1 in supernatants at levels reaching 1.4 and 8.6 microg/10(6)cells/24 hours, respectively. Two cell lines generated with each vector were passaged ten times during 30 days, showing constant levels of protein expression. Recombinant proteins expressed at different passages were functional by in vitro signaling assays. Stability at RNA level was unexpectedly high, showing a very low mutation rate in the CT-1 sequence, which did not increase at high passages. CT-1 was efficiently purified from supernatants of ncSFV cell lines, obtaining a yield of approximately 2mg/L/24 hours. These results indicate that the ncSFV vector has a great potential for the production of recombinant proteins in mammalian cells.

  11. Mutations in the nuclear localization signal of nsP2 influencing RNA synthesis, protein expression and cytotoxicity of Semliki Forest virus.

    PubMed

    Tamm, Kristi; Merits, Andres; Sarand, Inga

    2008-03-01

    The cytotoxicity of Semliki Forest virus (SFV) infection is caused partly by the non-structural protein nsP2, an essential component of the SFV replicase complex. Due to the presence of a nuclear localization signal (NLS), nsP2 also localizes in the nucleus of infected cells. The present study analysed recombinant SFV replicons and genomes with various deletions or substitutions in the NLS, or with a proline-to-glycine mutation at position 718 of nsP2 (P718G). Deletion of one or two arginine residues from the NLS or substitution of two of the arginines with aspartic acid resulted in a virus with a temperature-sensitive phenotype, and substitution of all three arginines was lethal. Thus, most of the introduced mutations severely affected nsP2 functioning in viral replication; in addition, they inhibited the ability of SFV to induce translational shut-off and kill infected cells. SFV replicons with a P718G mutation or replacement of the NLS residues (648)RRR(650) with RDD were found to be the least cytotoxic. Corresponding replicons expressed non-structural proteins at normal levels, but had severely reduced genomic RNA synthesis and were virtually unable to replicate and transcribe co-electroporated helper RNA. The non-cytotoxic phenotype was maintained in SFV full-length genomes harbouring the corresponding mutations; however, during a single cycle of cell culture, these were converted to a cytotoxic phenotype, probably due to the accumulation of compensatory mutations. PMID:18272758

  12. Fusion of LiDAR and Imagery to Estimate Stand-level Tree Mortality Following Wildfire in a Coast Redwood Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, B. D.; Dietterick, B. C.; White, R. A.; Mastin, T.

    2013-12-01

    Discrete-return airborne LiDAR and digital orthophotography are commonly used to assess the condition of vegetation, including change detection following disturbance events, such as wildland fire. Forest managers have a need for information about fire effects and the spatial distribution of mortality following wildfire, but direct assessment from the field is time-consuming and expensive. Remote sensing may be used to estimate varying levels of mortality and provide a more efficient, timely, scalable, and potentially more cost-effective means for post-fire assessment. Similar past studies have generally used an index of fire 'severity' rather than estimating mortality directly. While useful, estimates of severity are not generally sufficient to make stand-level forest management decisions about post-fire response. This study modeled mortality of trees following the Lockheed fire, which burned 3,163 ha in the Santa Cruz Mountains in California from August 12-23, 2009. All trees in forty-seven 0.08 ha continuous forest inventory plots were assessed in the field for three years following the fire. Plot percent mortality of trees 25.4 cm DBH and greater was sorted into three categories: <25%, 25-50%, and >50%. A variety of predictor variables derived from pre- and post-fire airborne LiDAR and 1m resolution color infrared aerial imagery (NAIP) were evaluated. A model using four variables: the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) from 2010 NAIP imagery, change in ratio of 95th percentile to mean height, and change in percent of points in two height bins, 11-12 and 14-15m, classified plots with 83% accuracy. All plots in the most severe class (mortality >50%) were correctly classified. Models with variables derived from post-fire LiDAR alone, and NDVI alone, were also examined, and had overall accuracies of 76.6 and 68.1%, respectively. These findings indicate that remote sensing data can be used to estimate and map the distribution of tree mortality following

  13. Effect of specific amino acid substitutions in the putative fusion peptide of structural glycoprotein E2 on Classical Swine Fever Virus replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E2, along with E^rns and E1, is an envelope glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). E2 is involved in several virus functions including cell attachment, host range susceptibility and virulence in natural hosts. In infected cells, E2 forms homodimers as well as heterodimers with E1, media...

  14. Cross-Sectional Survey of Rift Valley Fever Virus Exposure in Bodhei Village Located in a Transitional Coastal Forest Habitat in Lamu County, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Muiruri, Samuel; Kabiru, Ephantus W.; Muchiri, Eric M.; Hussein, Hassan; Kagondu, Frederick; LaBeaud, A. Desirée; King, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have focused on Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) transmission in less arid, transitional landscapes surrounding known high-risk regions. The objective of this study was to identify evidence of RVFV exposure in Bodhei Village in a forested area at the edge of the RVFV-epidemic Garissa region. In a household cluster-based survey conducted between epidemics in early 2006, 211 participants were enrolled. Overall seroprevalence for anti-RVFV was high (18%) and comparable with rates in the more arid, dense brush regions farther north. Seroprevalence of adults was 28%, whereas that of children was significantly lower (3%; P < 0.001); the youngest positive child was age 3 years. Males were more likely to be seropositive than females (25% versus 11%; P < 0.01), and animal husbandry activities (birthing, sheltering, and butchering) were strongly associated with seropositivity. The results confirm that significant RVFV transmission occurs outside of recognized high-risk areas and independent of known epidemic periods. PMID:25535309

  15. Differential Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase-Akt-mTOR Activation by Semliki Forest and Chikungunya Viruses Is Dependent on nsP3 and Connected to Replication Complex Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Biasiotto, Roberta; Eng, Kai; Neuvonen, Maarit; Götte, Benjamin; Rheinemann, Lara; Mutso, Margit; Utt, Age; Varghese, Finny; Balistreri, Giuseppe; Merits, Andres; Ahola, Tero; McInerney, Gerald M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many viruses affect or exploit the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, a crucial prosurvival signaling cascade. We report that this pathway was strongly activated in cells upon infection with the Old World alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV), even under conditions of complete nutrient starvation. We mapped this activation to the hyperphosphorylated/acidic domain in the C-terminal tail of SFV nonstructural protein nsP3. Viruses with a deletion of this domain (SFV-Δ50) but not of other regions in nsP3 displayed a clearly delayed and reduced capacity of Akt stimulation. Ectopic expression of the nsP3 of SFV wild type (nsP3-wt), but not nsP3-Δ50, equipped with a membrane anchor was sufficient to activate Akt. We linked PI3K-Akt-mTOR stimulation to the intracellular dynamics of viral replication complexes, which are formed at the plasma membrane and subsequently internalized in a process blocked by the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. Replication complex internalization was observed upon infection of cells with SFV-wt and SFV mutants with deletions in nsP3 but not with SFV-Δ50, where replication complexes were typically accumulated at the cell periphery. In cells infected with the closely related chikungunya virus (CHIKV), the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway was only moderately activated. Replication complexes of CHIKV were predominantly located at the cell periphery. Exchanging the hypervariable C-terminal tail of nsP3 between SFV and CHIKV induced the phenotype of strong PI3K-Akt-mTOR activation and replication complex internalization in CHIKV. In conclusion, infection with SFV but not CHIKV boosts PI3K-Akt-mTOR through the hyperphosphorylated/acidic domain of nsP3 to drive replication complex internalization. IMPORTANCE SFV and CHIKV are very similar in terms of molecular and cell biology, e.g., regarding replication and molecular interactions, but are strikingly different regarding pathology: CHIKV is a relevant human

  16. Fusion Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Schmidt

    2002-02-20

    If a fusion DEMO reactor can be brought into operation during the first half of this century, fusion power production can have a significant impact on carbon dioxide production during the latter half of the century. An assessment of fusion implementation scenarios shows that the resource demands and waste production associated with these scenarios are manageable factors. If fusion is implemented during the latter half of this century it will be one element of a portfolio of (hopefully) carbon dioxide limiting sources of electrical power. It is time to assess the regional implications of fusion power implementation. An important attribute of fusion power is the wide range of possible regions of the country, or countries in the world, where power plants can be located. Unlike most renewable energy options, fusion energy will function within a local distribution system and not require costly, and difficult, long distance transmission systems. For example, the East Coast of the United States is a prime candidate for fusion power deployment by virtue of its distance from renewable energy sources. As fossil fuels become less and less available as an energy option, the transmission of energy across bodies of water will become very expensive. On a global scale, fusion power will be particularly attractive for regions separated from sources of renewable energy by oceans.

  17. Image fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavel, M.

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: a system overview of the basic components of a system designed to improve the ability of a pilot to fly through low-visibility conditions such as fog; the role of visual sciences; fusion issues; sensor characterization; sources of information; image processing; and image fusion.

  18. Fusion of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1-derived glycine-alanine repeat to trans-dominant HIV-1 Gag increases inhibitory activities and survival of transduced cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Diana; Wild, Jens; Ludwig, Christine; Asbach, Benedikt; Notka, Frank; Wagner, Ralf

    2008-06-01

    Trans-dominant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag derivatives have been shown to efficiently inhibit late steps of HIV-1 replication in vitro by interfering with Gag precursor assembly, thus ranking among the interesting candidates for gene therapy approaches. However, efficient antiviral activities of corresponding transgenes are likely to be counteracted in particular by cell-mediated host immune responses toward the transgene-expressing cells. To decrease this potential immunogenicity, a 24-amino acid Gly-Ala (GA) stretch derived from Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA1) and known to overcome proteasomal degradation was fused to a trans-dominant Gag variant (sgD1). To determine the capacity of this fusion polypeptide to repress viral replication, PM-1 cells were transduced with sgD1 and GAsgD1 transgenes, using retroviral gene transfer. Challenge of stably transfected permissive cell lines with various viral strains indicated that N-terminal GA fusion even enhanced the inhibitory properties of sgD1. Further studies revealed that the GA stretch increased protein stability by blocking proteasomal degradation of Gag proteins. Immunization of BALB/c mice with a DNA vaccine vector expressing sgD1 induced substantial Gag-specific immune responses that were, however, clearly diminished in the presence of GA. Furthermore, recognition of cells expressing the GA-fused transgene by CD8(+) T cells was drastically reduced, both in vitro and in vivo, resulting in prolonged survival of the transduced cells in recipient mice.

  19. Study on the occurrence of tick-borne encephalitis virus RNA in European bison (Bison bonasus) eliminated at Białowieza Primeval Forest (north-eastern Poland) in 2005-2009.

    PubMed

    Biernat, Beata; Karbowiak, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) (Flaviviridae, Flavivirus) is an arthropod-borne virus, an etiologic agent of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), an infection involving the central nervous system. The disease is endemic in a large region in Eurasia where it is transmitted mainly by Ixodes ricinus in Europe and I. persulcatus ticks in Asia. This is the most important tick-transmitted arbovirus of human pathogenicity in Europe. The Białowieza Primeval Forest is a well-known endemic focus of tick-borne encephalitis. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of tickborne encephalitis virus (TBEV) in European bison, the important hosts of ticks in the Białowieza Primeval Forest. In the years 2005-2009, 95 blood samples were collected from European bison and examined for the presence of TBEV using nRT-PCR method. No positive results were obtained. For better understanding of TBEV vertebrate reservoir hosts in Poland, further investigations are needed.

  20. Epstein-Barr Virus Glycoprotein gB and gHgL Can Mediate Fusion and Entry in trans, and Heat Can Act as a Partial Surrogate for gHgL and Trigger a Conformational Change in gB

    PubMed Central

    Chesnokova, Liudmila S.; Ahuja, Munish K.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) fusion with an epithelial cell requires virus glycoproteins gHgL and gB and is triggered by an interaction between gHgL and integrin αvβ5, αvβ6, or αvβ8. Fusion with a B cell requires gHgL, gp42, and gB and is triggered by an interaction between gp42 and human leukocyte antigen class II. We report here that, like alpha- and betaherpesviruses, EBV, a gammaherpesvirus, can mediate cell fusion if gB and gHgL are expressed in trans. Entry of a gH-null virus into an epithelial cell is possible if the epithelial cell expresses gHgL, and entry of the same virus, which phenotypically lacks gHgL and gp42, into a B cell expressing gHgL is possible in the presence of a soluble integrin. Heat is capable of inducing the fusion of cells expressing only gB, and the proteolytic digestion pattern of gB in virions changes in the same way following the exposure of virus to heat or to soluble integrins. It is suggested that the Gibbs free energy released as a result of the high-affinity interaction of gHgL with an integrin contributes to the activation energy required to cause the refolding of gB from a prefusion to a postfusion conformation. IMPORTANCE The core fusion machinery of herpesviruses consists of glycoproteins gB and gHgL. We demonstrate that as in alpha- and betaherpesvirus, gB and gHgL of the gammaherpesvirus EBV can mediate fusion and entry when expressed in trans in opposing membranes, implicating interactions between the ectodomains of the proteins in the activation of fusion. We further show that heat and exposure to a soluble integrin, both of which activate fusion, result in the same changes in the proteolytic digestion pattern of gB, possibly representing the refolding of gB from its prefusion to its postfusion conformation. PMID:25142593

  1. Discovery of Novel Hepatitis C Virus NS5B Polymerase Inhibitors by Combining Random Forest, Multiple e-Pharmacophore Modeling and Docking

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yu; Li, Jinlong; Qing, Jie; Huang, Mingjie; Wu, Ming; Gao, Fenghua; Li, Dongmei; Hong, Zhangyong; Kong, Lingbao; Huang, Weiqiang; Lin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The NS5B polymerase is one of the most attractive targets for developing new drugs to block Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We describe the discovery of novel potent HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors by employing a virtual screening (VS) approach, which is based on random forest (RB-VS), e-pharmacophore (PB-VS), and docking (DB-VS) methods. In the RB-VS stage, after feature selection, a model with 16 descriptors was used. In the PB-VS stage, six energy-based pharmacophore (e-pharmacophore) models from different crystal structures of the NS5B polymerase with ligands binding at the palm I, thumb I and thumb II regions were used. In the DB-VS stage, the Glide SP and XP docking protocols with default parameters were employed. In the virtual screening approach, the RB-VS, PB-VS and DB-VS methods were applied in increasing order of complexity to screen the InterBioScreen database. From the final hits, we selected 5 compounds for further anti-HCV activity and cellular cytotoxicity assay. All 5 compounds were found to inhibit NS5B polymerase with IC50 values of 2.01–23.84 μM and displayed anti-HCV activities with EC50 values ranging from 1.61 to 21.88 μM, and all compounds displayed no cellular cytotoxicity (CC50 > 100 μM) except compound N2, which displayed weak cytotoxicity with a CC50 value of 51.3 μM. The hit compound N2 had the best antiviral activity against HCV, with a selective index of 32.1. The 5 hit compounds with new scaffolds could potentially serve as NS5B polymerase inhibitors through further optimization and development. PMID:26845440

  2. Immunotherapeutic Synergy Between Anti-CD137 mAb and Intratumoral Administration of a Cytopathic Semliki Forest Virus Encoding IL-12

    PubMed Central

    Quetglas, José I; Dubrot, Juan; Bezunartea, Jaione; Sanmamed, Miguel F; Hervas-Stubbs, Sandra; Smerdou, Cristian; Melero, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Intratumoral injection of Semliki Forest virus encoding interleukin-12 (SFV-IL-12) combines acute expression of IL-12 and stressful apoptosis of infected malignant cells. Agonist antibodies directed to costimulatory receptor CD137 (4-1BB) strongly amplify pre-existing cellular immune responses toward weak tumor antigens. In this study, we provide evidence for powerful synergistic effects of a combined strategy consisting of intratumoral injection of SFV-IL-12 and systemic delivery of agonist anti-CD137 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which was substantiated against poorly immunogenic B16 melanomas (B16-OVA and B16.F10) and TC-1 lung carcinomas. Effector CD8β+ T cells were sufficient to mediate complete tumor eradications. Accordingly, there was an intensely synergistic in vivo enhancement of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL)-mediated immunity against the tumor antigens OVA and tyrosine-related protein-2 (TRP-2). This train of phenomena led to long-lasting tumor-specific immunity against rechallenge, attained transient control of the progression of concomitant tumor lesions that were not directly treated with SFV-IL-12 and caused autoimmune vitiligo. Importantly, we found that SFV-IL-12 intratumoral injection induces bright expression of CD137 on most tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T lymphocytes, thereby providing more abundant targets for the action of the agonist antibody. This efficacious combinatorial immunotherapy strategy offers feasibility for clinical translation since anti-CD137 mAbs are already undergoing clinical trials and development of clinical-grade SFV-IL-12 vectors is in progress. PMID:22735380

  3. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus entry mechanism requires late endosome formation and resists cell membrane cholesterol depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Kolokoltsov, Andrey A.; Fleming, Elisa H.; Davey, Robert A. . E-mail: radavey@utmb.edu

    2006-04-10

    Virus envelope proteins determine receptor utilization and host range. The choice of receptor not only permits specific targeting of cells that express it, but also directs the virus into specific endosomal trafficking pathways. Disrupting trafficking can result in loss of virus infectivity due to redirection of virions to non-productive pathways. Identification of the pathway or pathways used by a virus is, thus, important in understanding virus pathogenesis mechanisms and for developing new treatment strategies. Most of our understanding of alphavirus entry has focused on the Old World alphaviruses, such as Sindbis and Semliki Forest virus. In comparison, very little is known about the entry route taken by more pathogenic New World alphaviruses. Here, we use a novel contents mixing assay to identify the cellular requirements for entry of a New World alphavirus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV). Expression of dominant negative forms of key endosomal trafficking genes shows that VEEV must access clathrin-dependent endocytic vesicles for membrane fusion to occur. Unexpectedly, the exit point is different from Old World alphaviruses that leave from early endosomes. Instead, VEEV also requires functional late endosomes. Furthermore, unlike the Old World viruses, VEEV entry is insensitive to cholesterol sequestration from cell membranes and may reflect a need to access an endocytic compartment that lacks cholesterol. This indicates fundamental differences in the entry route taken by VEEV compared to Old World alphaviruses.

  4. Poxvirus entry and membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, Bernard . E-mail: bmoss@nih.gov

    2006-01-05

    The study of poxvirus entry and membrane fusion has been invigorated by new biochemical and microscopic findings that lead to the following conclusions: (1) the surface of the mature virion (MV), whether isolated from an infected cell or by disruption of the membrane wrapper of an extracellular virion, is comprised of a single lipid membrane embedded with non-glycosylated viral proteins; (2) the MV membrane fuses with the cell membrane, allowing the core to enter the cytoplasm and initiate gene expression; (3) fusion is mediated by a newly recognized group of viral protein components of the MV membrane, which are conserved in all members of the poxvirus family; (4) the latter MV entry/fusion proteins are required for cell to cell spread necessitating the disruption of the membrane wrapper of extracellular virions prior to fusion; and furthermore (5) the same group of MV entry/fusion proteins are required for virus-induced cell-cell fusion. Future research priorities include delineation of the roles of individual entry/fusion proteins and identification of cell receptors.

  5. Fusion of mApple and Venus fluorescent proteins to the Sindbis virus E2 protein leads to different cell-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkova, Irina B; Cheng, Fan; Ma, Xiang; Moore, Alan W; Howard, Benny; Mukhopadhyay, Suchetana; Dragnea, Bogdan

    2013-11-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are widely used in real-time single virus particle studies to visualize, track and quantify the spatial and temporal parameters of viral pathways. However, potential functional differences between the wild type and the FP-tagged virus may specifically affect particular stages in the virus life-cycle. In this work, we genetically modified the E2 spike protein of Sindbis virus (SINV) with two FPs. We inserted mApple, a red FP, or Venus, a yellow FP, at the N-terminus of the E2 protein of SINV to make SINV-Apple and SINV-Venus. Our results indicate that SINV-Apple and SINV-Venus have similar levels of infectivity and are morphologically similar to SINV-wild-type by negative stain transmission electron microscopy. Both mutants are highly fluorescent and have excellent single-particle tracking properties. However, despite these similarities, when measuring cell entry at the single-particle level, we found that SINV-Apple and SINV-Venus are different in their interaction with the cell surface and FPs are not always interchangeable. We went on to determine that the FP changes the net surface charge on the virus particles, the folding of the spike proteins, and the conformation of the spikes on the virus particle surface, ultimately leading to different cell-binding properties between SINV-Apple and SINV-Venus. Our results are consistent with recent findings that FPs may alter the biological and cellular localization properties of bacterial proteins to which they are fused.

  6. Fusion Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dingee, David A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the extraordinary potential, the technical difficulties, and the financial problems that are associated with research and development of fusion power plants as a major source of energy. (GA)

  7. Protection against morbillivirus-induced encephalitis by immunization with a rationally designed synthetic peptide vaccine containing B- and T-cell epitopes from the fusion protein of measles virus.

    PubMed Central

    Obeid, O E; Partidos, C D; Howard, C R; Steward, M W

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides representing T- and B-cell epitopes from the fusion (F) protein of measles virus (MV) were tested for their ability to induce a protective immune response against intracerebral challenge with neuroadapted strains of MV and canine distemper virus (CDV) in mice. Of the panel of peptides tested, only a chimeric peptide consisting of two copies of a promiscuous T-cell epitope (representing residues 288 to 302 of MV F protein) synthesized at the amino terminus of a B-cell epitope (representing residues 404 to 414 of MV F protein) was able to induce a protective response against challenge with MV and CDV in inbred mice. The protective response induced by this peptide (TTB) was associated with a significant reduction in mortality, histological absence of acute encephalitis, and greatly reduced titers of virus in the brains of TTB-immune mice following challenge compared with the results for nonimmunized controls. A chimeric peptide comprising one copy of the T-cell epitope and one copy of the B-cell epitope (TB) did not induce a protective response. A comparison of the antibody responses induced by the two chimeras suggested that differences in protective efficacy following immunization may be a result of the higher affinity of the antibody induced by the TTB peptide than that of the antibody induced by the TB peptide. In addition, differences in the immunoglobulin G subclass of the antipeptide antibody responses were observed, and these may play a role in the differences in protection observed. These results indicate that appropriately designed synthetic peptides have potential as vaccines for the induction of cross-reactive protection against morbilliviruses. PMID:7531779

  8. Evaluation of different hemagglutinin-neuraminidase and fusion protein chimeras using a reverse genetic system based on the mesogenic anhinga Newcastle disease virus strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Newcastle disease (ND) is one of the most serious infectious diseases of poultry, and virulent ND outbreaks require reporting to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). Newcastle disease virus (NDV), the causative agent of ND, is a non-segmented, single-stranded, negative sense...

  9. Deployment of membrane fusion protein domains during fusion.

    PubMed

    Bentz, J; Mittal, A

    2000-01-01

    It is clear that both viral and intracellular membrane fusion proteins contain a minimal set of domains which must be deployed at the appropriate time during the fusion process. An account of these domains and their functions is given here for the four best-described fusion systems: influenza HA, sendai virus F1, HIV gp120/41 and the neuronal SNARE core composed of synaptobrevin (syn), syntaxin (stx) and the N- and C-termini of SNAP25 (sn25), together with the Ca(2+)binding protein synaptotagmin (syt). Membrane fusion begins with the binding of the virion or vesicle to the target membrane via receptors. The committed step in influenza HA- mediated fusion begins with an aggregate of HAs (at least eight) with some of their HA2 N-termini, a.k.a. fusion peptides, embedded into the viral bilayer (Bentz, 2000 a). The hypothesis presented in Bentz (2000 b) is that the conformational change of HA to the extended coiled coil extracts the fusion peptides from the viral bilayer. When this extraction occurs from the center of the site of restricted lipid flow, it exposes acyl chains and parts of the HA transmembrane domains to the aqueous media, i.e. a hydrophobic defect is formed. This is the 'transition state' of the committed step of fusion. It is stabilized by a 'dam' of HAs, which are inhibited from diffusing away by the rest of the HAs in the aggregate and because that would initially expose more acyl chains to water. Recruitment of lipids from the apposed target membrane can heal this hydrophobic defect, initiating lipid mixing and fusion. The HA transmembrane domains are required to be part of the hydrophobic defect, because the HA aggregate must be closely packed enough to restrict lipid flow. This hypothesis provides a simple and direct coupling between the energy released by the formation of the coiled coil to the energy needed to create and stabilize the high energy intermediates of fusion. Several of these essential domains have been described for the viral fusion

  10. Laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, W.A.; Boskma, P.

    1980-12-01

    Unrestricted laser fusion offers nations an opportunity to circumvent arms control agreements and develop thermonuclear weapons. Early laser weapons research sought a clean radiation-free bomb to replace the fission bomb, but this was deceptive because a fission bomb was needed to trigger the fusion reaction and additional radioactivity was induced by generating fast neutrons. As laser-implosion experiments focused on weapons physics, simulating weapons effects, and applications for new weapons, the military interest shifted from developing a laser-ignited hydrogen bomb to more sophisticated weapons and civilian applications for power generation. Civilian and military research now overlap, making it possible for several countries to continue weapons activities and permitting proliferation of nuclear weapons. These countries are reluctant to include inertial confinement fusion research in the Non-Proliferation Treaty. 16 references. (DCK)

  11. Forest Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weicherding, Patrick J.; And Others

    This bulletin deals with forest management and provides an overview of forestry for the non-professional. The bulletin is divided into six sections: (1) What Is Forestry Management?; (2) How Is the Forest Measured?; (3) What Is Forest Protection?; (4) How Is the Forest Harvested?; (5) What Is Forest Regeneration?; and (6) What Is Forest…

  12. Development of an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Based on Fusion VP2332-452 Antigen for Detecting Antibodies against Aleutian Mink Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaowei; Song, Cailing; Liu, Yun; Qu, Liandong; Liu, Dafei; Zhang, Yun; Liu, Ming

    2016-02-01

    For detection of Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) antibodies, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed using the recombinant VP2332-452 protein as an antigen. Counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP) was used as a reference test to compare the results of the ELISA and Western blotting (WB); the specificity and sensitivity of the VP2332-452 ELISA were 97.9% and 97.3%, respectively, which were higher than those of WB. Therefore, this VP2332-452 ELISA may be a preferable method for detecting antibodies against AMDV.

  13. Development of an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Based on Fusion VP2332-452 Antigen for Detecting Antibodies against Aleutian Mink Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaowei; Song, Cailing; Liu, Yun; Qu, Liandong; Liu, Dafei

    2015-01-01

    For detection of Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) antibodies, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed using the recombinant VP2332-452 protein as an antigen. Counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP) was used as a reference test to compare the results of the ELISA and Western blotting (WB); the specificity and sensitivity of the VP2332-452 ELISA were 97.9% and 97.3%, respectively, which were higher than those of WB. Therefore, this VP2332-452 ELISA may be a preferable method for detecting antibodies against AMDV. PMID:26582828

  14. Development of an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Based on Fusion VP2332-452 Antigen for Detecting Antibodies against Aleutian Mink Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaowei; Song, Cailing; Liu, Yun; Qu, Liandong; Liu, Dafei; Zhang, Yun; Liu, Ming

    2016-02-01

    For detection of Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) antibodies, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed using the recombinant VP2332-452 protein as an antigen. Counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP) was used as a reference test to compare the results of the ELISA and Western blotting (WB); the specificity and sensitivity of the VP2332-452 ELISA were 97.9% and 97.3%, respectively, which were higher than those of WB. Therefore, this VP2332-452 ELISA may be a preferable method for detecting antibodies against AMDV. PMID:26582828

  15. Influenza A virus targets a cGAS-independent STING pathway that controls enveloped RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Holm, Christian K; Rahbek, Stine H; Gad, Hans Henrik; Bak, Rasmus O; Jakobsen, Martin R; Jiang, Zhaozaho; Hansen, Anne Louise; Jensen, Simon K; Sun, Chenglong; Thomsen, Martin K; Laustsen, Anders; Nielsen, Camilla G; Severinsen, Kasper; Xiong, Yingluo; Burdette, Dara L; Hornung, Veit; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Duch, Mogens; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Bahrami, Shervin; Mikkelsen, Jakob Giehm; Hartmann, Rune; Paludan, Søren R

    2016-02-19

    Stimulator of interferon genes (STING) is known be involved in control of DNA viruses but has an unexplored role in control of RNA viruses. During infection with DNA viruses STING is activated downstream of cGAMP synthase (cGAS) to induce type I interferon. Here we identify a STING-dependent, cGAS-independent pathway important for full interferon production and antiviral control of enveloped RNA viruses, including influenza A virus (IAV). Further, IAV interacts with STING through its conserved hemagglutinin fusion peptide (FP). Interestingly, FP antagonizes interferon production induced by membrane fusion or IAV but not by cGAMP or DNA. Similar to the enveloped RNA viruses, membrane fusion stimulates interferon production in a STING-dependent but cGAS-independent manner. Abolishment of this pathway led to reduced interferon production and impaired control of enveloped RNA viruses. Thus, enveloped RNA viruses stimulate a cGAS-independent STING pathway, which is targeted by IAV.

  16. Influenza A virus targets a cGAS-independent STING pathway that controls enveloped RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Christian K.; Rahbek, Stine H.; Gad, Hans Henrik; Bak, Rasmus O.; Jakobsen, Martin R.; Jiang, Zhaozaho; Hansen, Anne Louise; Jensen, Simon K.; Sun, Chenglong; Thomsen, Martin K.; Laustsen, Anders; Nielsen, Camilla G.; Severinsen, Kasper; Xiong, Yingluo; Burdette, Dara L.; Hornung, Veit; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Duch, Mogens; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Bahrami, Shervin; Mikkelsen, Jakob Giehm; Hartmann, Rune; Paludan, Søren R.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulator of interferon genes (STING) is known be involved in control of DNA viruses but has an unexplored role in control of RNA viruses. During infection with DNA viruses STING is activated downstream of cGAMP synthase (cGAS) to induce type I interferon. Here we identify a STING-dependent, cGAS-independent pathway important for full interferon production and antiviral control of enveloped RNA viruses, including influenza A virus (IAV). Further, IAV interacts with STING through its conserved hemagglutinin fusion peptide (FP). Interestingly, FP antagonizes interferon production induced by membrane fusion or IAV but not by cGAMP or DNA. Similar to the enveloped RNA viruses, membrane fusion stimulates interferon production in a STING-dependent but cGAS-independent manner. Abolishment of this pathway led to reduced interferon production and impaired control of enveloped RNA viruses. Thus, enveloped RNA viruses stimulate a cGAS-independent STING pathway, which is targeted by IAV. PMID:26893169

  17. Influenza A virus targets a cGAS-independent STING pathway that controls enveloped RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Holm, Christian K; Rahbek, Stine H; Gad, Hans Henrik; Bak, Rasmus O; Jakobsen, Martin R; Jiang, Zhaozaho; Hansen, Anne Louise; Jensen, Simon K; Sun, Chenglong; Thomsen, Martin K; Laustsen, Anders; Nielsen, Camilla G; Severinsen, Kasper; Xiong, Yingluo; Burdette, Dara L; Hornung, Veit; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Duch, Mogens; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Bahrami, Shervin; Mikkelsen, Jakob Giehm; Hartmann, Rune; Paludan, Søren R

    2016-01-01

    Stimulator of interferon genes (STING) is known be involved in control of DNA viruses but has an unexplored role in control of RNA viruses. During infection with DNA viruses STING is activated downstream of cGAMP synthase (cGAS) to induce type I interferon. Here we identify a STING-dependent, cGAS-independent pathway important for full interferon production and antiviral control of enveloped RNA viruses, including influenza A virus (IAV). Further, IAV interacts with STING through its conserved hemagglutinin fusion peptide (FP). Interestingly, FP antagonizes interferon production induced by membrane fusion or IAV but not by cGAMP or DNA. Similar to the enveloped RNA viruses, membrane fusion stimulates interferon production in a STING-dependent but cGAS-independent manner. Abolishment of this pathway led to reduced interferon production and impaired control of enveloped RNA viruses. Thus, enveloped RNA viruses stimulate a cGAS-independent STING pathway, which is targeted by IAV. PMID:26893169

  18. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

  19. Fusion proteins with multiple copies of the major antigenic determinant of foot-and-mouth disease virus protect both the natural host and laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Broekhuijsen, M P; van Rijn, J M; Blom, A J; Pouwels, P H; Enger-Valk, B E; Brown, F; Francis, M J

    1987-12-01

    Proteins consisting of one, two or four copies of the amino acid sequence 137 to 162, which contains the major immunogenic site of VP1 of foot-and-mouth disease virus, attached to the N-terminus of beta-galactosidase have been expressed in Escherichia coli cells. In guinea-pigs the protein containing one copy (P71) of the viral determinant elicited only low levels of neutralizing antibody whereas protective levels were elicited by the proteins containing two (P72) or four (P74) copies of the determinant. Single inoculations of the P72 and P74 proteins containing as little as 2 micrograms or 0.8 micrograms of peptide respectively were sufficient to protect all the animals against challenge infection. Moreover, the equivalent of 40 micrograms of peptide in P74 protected pigs against challenge infection after one inoculation. PMID:2447225

  20. Escape from neutralization by the respiratory syncytial virus-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibody palivizumab is driven by changes in on-rate of binding to the fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Bates, John T; Keefer, Christopher J; Slaughter, James C; Kulp, Daniel W; Schief, William R; Crowe, James E

    2014-04-01

    The role of binding kinetics in determining neutralizing potency for antiviral antibodies is poorly understood. While it is believed that increased steady-state affinity correlates positively with increased virus-neutralizing activity, the relationship between association or dissociation rate and neutralization potency is unclear. We investigated the effect of naturally-occurring antibody resistance mutations in the RSV F protein on the kinetics of binding to palivizumab. Escape from palivizumab-mediated neutralization of RSV occurred with reduced association rate (Kon) for binding to RSV F protein, while alteration of dissociation rate (Koff) did not significantly affect neutralizing activity. Interestingly, linkage of reduced Kon with reduced potency mirrored the effect of increased Kon found in a high-affinity enhanced potency palivizumab variant (motavizumab). These data suggest that association rate is the dominant factor driving neutralization potency for antibodies to RSV F protein antigenic site A and determines the potency of antibody somatic variants or efficiency of escape of viral glycoprotein variants.

  1. A suite of modular fluorescence assays interrogate the human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein-41 coiled coil and assist in determining binding mechanism of low molecular weight fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gochin, Miriam

    2012-10-01

    Several different segments of the gp41 N-heptad repeat coiled coil have been constructed using N-terminal bipyridyl modification of composite peptides and inducing trimerization by adding ferrous ions. These metallopeptides act as receptors in fluorescence-binding assays with corresponding fluorescently labeled C-peptide probes. The Fe(II) coordination complex quenches C-peptide fluorescence upon binding, and reversal of quenching by a small molecule inhibitor can be used to obtain the inhibitor-binding constant. A total of 10 peptide pairs targeting 25-46 residue segments of the coiled coil were constructed, with C-peptide probes of different lengths and binding affinities. The result is a suite of assays for exploring binding in the mM to nM range to any desired region of the coiled coil, including the hydrophobic pocket (HP), extended regions on either side of the pocket, or a region associated with T20 resistance mutations. These assays are high-throughput ready, and could be used to discover novel compounds binding along various regions of the gp41 coiled coil groove. They were used to evaluate a sub-μM low molecular weight fusion inhibitor, resulting in the finding that the molecule bound specifically to the HP and attained its potency from a low off-rate.

  2. Constancy and diversity in the flavivirus fusion peptide

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    Background Flaviviruses include the mosquito-borne dengue, Japanese encephalitis, yellow fever and West Nile and the tick-borne encephalitis viruses. They are responsible for considerable world-wide morbidity and mortality. Viral entry is mediated by a conserved fusion peptide containing 16 amino acids located in domain II of the envelope protein E. Highly orchestrated conformational changes initiated by exposure to acidic pH accompany the fusion process and are important factors limiting amino acid changes in the fusion peptide that still permit fusion with host cell membranes in both arthropod and vertebrate hosts. The cell-fusing related agents, growing only in mosquitoes or insect cell lines, possess a different homologous peptide. Results Analysis of 46 named flaviviruses deposited in the Entrez Nucleotides database extended the constancy in the canonical fusion peptide sequences of mosquito-borne, tick-borne and viruses with no known vector to include more recently-sequenced viruses. The mosquito-borne signature amino acid, G104, was also found in flaviviruses with no known vector and with the cell-fusion related viruses. Despite the constancy in the canonical sequences in pathogenic flaviviruses, mutations were surprisingly frequent with a 27% prevalence of nonsynonymous mutations in yellow fever virus fusion peptide sequences, and 0 to 7.4% prevalence in the others. Six of seven yellow fever patients whose virus had fusion peptide mutations died. In the cell-fusing related agents, not enough sequences have been deposited to estimate reliably the prevalence of fusion peptide mutations. However, the canonical sequences homologous to the fusion peptide and the pattern of disulfide linkages in protein E differed significantly from the other flaviviruses. Conclusion The constancy of the canonical fusion peptide sequences in the arthropod-borne flaviviruses contrasts with the high prevalence of mutations in most individual viruses. The discrepancy may be the

  3. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of human immunodeficiency virus gp41 protein that includes the fusion peptide: NMR detection of recombinant Fgp41 in inclusion bodies in whole bacterial cells and structural characterization of purified and membrane-associated Fgp41.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Erica P; Curtis-Fisk, Jaime; Young, Kaitlin M; Weliky, David P

    2011-11-22

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of a host cell begins with fusion of the HIV and host cell membranes and is mediated by the gp41 protein, a single-pass integral membrane protein of HIV. The 175 N-terminal residues make up the ectodomain that lies outside the virus. This work describes the production and characterization of an ectodomain construct containing the 154 N-terminal gp41 residues, including the fusion peptide (FP) that binds to target cell membranes. The Fgp41 sequence was derived from one of the African clade A strains of HIV-1 that have been less studied than European/North American clade B strains. Fgp41 expression at a level of ~100 mg/L of culture was evidenced by an approach that included amino acid type (13)CO and (15)N labeling of recombinant protein and solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy of lyophilized whole cells. The approach did not require any protein solubilization or purification and may be a general approach for detection of recombinant protein. The purified Fgp41 yield was ~5 mg/L of culture. SSNMR spectra of membrane-associated Fgp41 showed high helicity for the residues C-terminal of the FP. This was consistent with a "six-helix bundle" (SHB) structure that is the final gp41 state during membrane fusion. This observation and negligible Fgp41-induced vesicle fusion supported a function for SHB gp41 of membrane stabilization and fusion arrest. SSNMR spectra of residues in the membrane-associated FP provided evidence of a mixture of molecular populations with either helical or β-sheet FP conformation. These and earlier SSNMR data strongly support the existence of these populations in the SHB state of membrane-associated gp41.

  4. Escape from neutralization by the respiratory syncytial virus-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibody palivizumab is driven by changes in on-rate of binding to the fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Bates, John T.; Keefer, Christopher J.; Slaughter, James C.; Kulp, Daniel W.; Schiefd, William R.; Crowe, James E.

    2014-01-01

    The role of binding kinetics in determining neutralizing potency for antiviral antibodies is poorly understood. While it is believed that increased steady-state affinity correlates positively with increased virus-neutralizing activity, the relationship between association or dissociation rate and neutralization potency is unclear. We investigated the effect of naturally-occurring antibody resistance mutations in the RSV F protein on the kinetics of binding to palivizumab. Escape from palivizumab-mediated neutralization of RSV occurred with reduced association rate (Kon) for binding to RSV F protein, while alteration of dissociation rate (Koff) did not significantly affect neutralizing activity. Interestingly, linkage of reduced Kon with reduced potency mirrored the effect of increased Kon found in a high-affinity enhanced potency palivizumab variant (motavizumab). These data suggest that association rate is the dominant factor driving neutralization potency for antibodies to RSV F protein antigenic site A and determines the potency of antibody somatic variants or efficiency of escape of viral glycoprotein variants. PMID:24725940

  5. Hendra virus

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Hendra virus infection of horses occurred sporadically between 1994 and 2010 as a result of spill-over from the viral reservoir in Australian mainland flying-foxes, and occasional onward transmission to people also followed from exposure to affected horses. For reasons that are not well understood an unprecedented number of outbreaks were recorded in 2011, including the first recorded field infection of a dog, leading to heightened community concern. Increasingly, pressure mounted to instigate measures for control of flying-fox numbers, and equine health care workers started to leave the industry on account of risk and liability concerns. Release of an inactivated subunit vaccine for horses against Hendra virus represents the first commercially available product that is focused on mitigating the impact of a Biosafety Level 4 pathogen. Through preventing the development of acute Hendra virus disease in horses, vaccine use is also expected to reduce the risk of transmission of infection to people. This approach to emerging infectious disease management focuses on the role of horses as the proximal cause of human Hendra virus disease, and may assist in redirecting community concerns away from the flying-fox reservoirs, keystone species for the ongoing health of Australia’s native forests. PMID:25281398

  6. Protoplast Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Hara, Yasuhiro; Katagi, Hiroaki; Senda, Mitsugi

    1980-01-01

    The relation between the composition of the phospholipid molecular species in a cell membrane and the velocity of protoplast fusion was studied using cells cultured at a low temperature (10 C). Cells cultured at a low temperature contained larger proportions of phospholipids of low phase transition point, the 1,2-dilinoleoyl-type, than those cultured at a normal temperature (25 C). When treated with polyethylene glycol 6000, protoplasts from cells cultured at 10 C fused and progressed to the fused sphere stage more rapidly than did those from cells cultured at 25 C. PMID:16661339

  7. Splenogonadal fusion.

    PubMed

    Tsingoglou, S; Wilkinson, A W

    1976-04-01

    The fusion between splenic tissue and the left gonad or the derivatives of the left mesonephros is a rare congenital anomaly first described in detail by Pommer in 1887/9 and divided into two forms by Putschar and Manion in 1956. In the first or continuous type a cord of splenic or fibrous tissue connects the spleen and the gonadalmesonephric structures. In the second type the fused splenomesonephric structures have lost continuity with the main spleen. An example of the continuous form is presented and the previous reports are briefly reviewed.

  8. Formulation of the respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein with a polymer-based combination adjuvant promotes transient and local innate immune responses and leads to improved adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Indranil; Garg, Ravendra; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2016-09-30

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes serious upper and lower respiratory tract infections in newborns and infants. Presently, there is no licensed vaccine against RSV. We previously reported the safety and efficacy of a novel vaccine candidate (ΔF/TriAdj) in rodent and lamb models following intranasal immunization. However, the effects of the vaccine on the innate immune system in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, when delivered intranasally, have not been characterized. In the present study, we found that ΔF/TriAdj triggered transient production of chemokines, cytokines and interferons in the nasal tissues and lungs of BALB/c mice. The types of chemokines produced were consistent with the populations of immune cells recruited, i.e. dendritic cells, macrophages and neutrophils, in the nose-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT), lung and their draining lymph nodes of the ΔF/TriAdj-immunized group. In addition, ΔF/TriAdj stimulated cellular activation with generation of mucosal and systemic antibody responses, and conferred complete protection from viral infection in the lungs upon RSV challenge. The effect of ΔF/TriAdj was short-lived in the nasal tissues and more prolonged in the lungs. In addition, both innate and adaptive immune responses were lower when mice were immunized with ΔF alone. These results suggest that ΔF/TriAdj modulates the innate mucosal environment in both upper and lower respiratory tracts, which contributes to robust adaptive immune responses and long-term protective efficacy of this novel vaccine formulation. PMID:27591951

  9. Neutron diffraction studies of viral fusion peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Jeremy P.; J. M. Darkes, Malcolm; Katsaras, John; Epand, Richard M.

    2000-03-01

    Membrane fusion plays a vital role in a large and diverse number of essential biological processes. Despite this fact, the precise molecular events that occur during fusion are still not known. We are currently engaged on a study of membrane fusion as mediated by viral fusion peptides. These peptides are the N-terminal regions of certain viral envelope proteins that mediate the process of fusion between the viral envelope and the membranes of the host cell during the infection process. As part of this study, we have carried out neutron diffraction measurements at the ILL, BeNSC and Chalk River, on a range of viral fusion peptides. The peptides, from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), influenza A and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV), were incorporated into stacked phospholipid bilayers. Some of the peptides had been specifically deuterated at key amino acids. Lamellar diffraction data were collected and analysed to yield information on the peptide conformation, location and orientation relative to the bilayer.

  10. Construction and biological characterization of an interleukin-12 fusion protein (Flexi-12): delivery to acute myeloid leukemic blasts using adeno-associated virus.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R; Macdonald, I; Corbett, T; Hacking, G; Lowdell, M W; Prentice, H G

    1997-06-10

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a cytokine that exhibits pleiotropic effects on lymphocytes and natural killer cells and has been shown to have promise for the immunotherapy of cancer. The combination of the immune costimulatory molecule B7.1 and IL-12 has been shown to be synergistic for T cell activation. By transfecting tumor cells with both IL-12 and B7.1 cDNAs, it may be possible to use these modified targets as vaccines. A major obstacle in designing a vector to deliver these genes results from the structure of IL-12. Functional IL-12 is a heterodimer composed of two distinct subunits that are encoded by separate genes on different chromosomes. Production of functional IL-12 requires the coordinated expression of both genes. This presents several problems in vectors, particularly those in which additional genes, either a co-stimulatory gene or a selectable marker, are inserted. Therefore, we have constructed a single cDNA that encodes a single-chain protein, called Flexi-12, which retains all of the biological characteristics of recombinant IL-12 (rIL-12). The monomeric polypeptide Flexi-12 is able to induce the proliferation of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) blasts, induce PHA blasts to secrete interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and additionally, by preincubation, enhance the killing of K562 targets by PBLs. These phenomena are in a dose-dependent manner comparable to that seen with rIL-12. We have also shown that tyrosine phosphorylation of the STAT 4 transcription factor, which has been shown to be unique to the IL-12 signaling pathway, occurs with Flexi-12 at levels similar to those seen with rIL-12. We have packaged Flexi-12 into a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) and used this vector to infect acute myeloid leukemic (AML) blasts. Infected AML blasts produced between 2 and 6 ng of IL-12/10(6) cells per ml per 48 hr. These studies also confirm that AAV is an efficient delivery vehicle for cytokines to leukemic cells. Direct analysis of these modified cells acting

  11. Rainbow Trout Sleeping Disease Virus Is an Atypical Alphavirus

    PubMed Central

    Villoing, Stéphane; Béarzotti, Monique; Chilmonczyk, Stefan; Castric, Jeannette; Brémont, Michel

    2000-01-01

    Sleeping disease (SD) is currently a matter of concern for salmonid fish farmers in most parts of the world. A viral etiology of SD has recently been suspected, since virus-like particles have been observed in infected rainbow trout cells. In salmonid-derived cell lines, the maximal rate of virus production was observed at 10°C, while little virus was produced at 14°C. Through biochemical, physicochemical, and morphological studies, SD virus (SDV) was shown to be an enveloped virus of roughly 60 nm in diameter. The genome consists of 12 kb of RNA, with the appearance of a 26S subgenomic RNA during the time course of SDV replication. The screening of a random-primed cDNA library constructed from the genomic RNA of semipurified virions facilitated the identification of a specific SDV cDNA clone having an open reading frame related to the alphavirus E2 glycoproteins. To extend the comparison between SDV structural proteins and the alphavirus protein counterparts, the nucleotide sequence of the total 4.1-kb subgenomic RNA has been determined. The 26S RNA encodes a 1,324-amino-acid polyprotein exhibiting typical alphavirus structural protein organization. SDV structural proteins showed several remarkable features compared to other alphaviruses: (i) unusually large individual proteins, (ii) very low homology (ranging from 30 to 34%) (iii) an unglycosylated E3 protein, and (iv) and E1 fusion domain sharing mutations implicated in the pH threshold. Although phylogenetically related to the Semliki Forest virus group of alphaviruses, SDV should be considered an atypical member, able to naturally replicate in lower vertebrates. PMID:10590104

  12. Effect of the β-propiolactone treatment on the adsorption and fusion of influenza A/Brisbane/59/2007 and A/New Caledonia/20/1999 virus H1N1 on a dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/ganglioside GM3 mixed phospholipids monolayer at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Desbat, Bernard; Lancelot, Eloïse; Krell, Tino; Nicolaï, Marie-Claire; Vogel, Fred; Chevalier, Michel; Ronzon, Frédéric

    2011-11-15

    The production protocol of many whole cell/virion vaccines involves an inactivation step with β-propiolactone (BPL). Despite the widespread use of BPL, its mechanism of action is poorly understood. Earlier work demonstrated that BPL alkylates nucleotide bases, but its interaction with proteins has not been studied in depth. In the present study we use ellipsometry to analyze the influence of BPL treatment of two H1N1 influenza strains, A/Brisbane/59/2007 and A/New Caledonia/20/1999, which are used for vaccine production on an industrial scale. Analyses were conducted using a mixed lipid monolayer containing ganglioside GM3, which functions as the viral receptor. Our results show that BPL treatment of both strains reduces viral affinity for the mixed monolayer and also diminishes the capacity of viral domains to self-assemble. In another series of experiments, the pH of the subphase was reduced from 7.4 to 5 to provoke the pH-induced conformational change of hemagglutinin, which occurs following endocytosis into the endosome. In the presence of the native virus the pH decrease caused a reduction in domain size, whereas lipid layer thickness and surface pressure were increased. These observations are consistent with a fusion of the viral membrane with the lipid monolayer. Importantly, this fusion was not observed with adsorbed inactivated virus, which indicates that BPL treatment inhibits the first step of virus-membrane fusion. Our data also indicate that BPL chemically modifies hemagglutinin, which mediates the interaction with GM3.

  13. Evolutionary dynamics of Newcastle disease virus

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Patti J.; Kim, L. Mia; Ip, Hon S.; Afonso, Claudio L.

    2009-08-15

    A comprehensive dataset of NDV genome sequences was evaluated using bioinformatics to characterize the evolutionary forces affecting NDV genomes. Despite evidence of recombination in most genes, only one event in the fusion gene of genotype V viruses produced evolutionarily viable progenies. The codon-associated rate of change for the six NDV proteins revealed that the highest rate of change occurred at the fusion protein. All proteins were under strong purifying (negative) selection; the fusion protein displayed the highest number of amino acids under positive selection. Regardless of the phylogenetic grouping or the level of virulence, the cleavage site motif was highly conserved implying that mutations at this site that result in changes of virulence may not be favored. The coding sequence of the fusion gene and the genomes of viruses from wild birds displayed higher yearly rates of change in virulent viruses than in viruses of low virulence, suggesting that an increase in virulence may accelerate the rate of NDV evolution.

  14. Fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-09-01

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989 to 1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R and D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R and D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase.

  15. Fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the MaxPlanck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989--1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase.

  16. Structural changes of envelope proteins during alphavirus fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Long; Jose, Joyce; Xiang, Ye; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-12-08

    Alphaviruses are enveloped RNA viruses that have a diameter of about 700 {angstrom} and can be lethal human pathogens. Entry of virus into host cells by endocytosis is controlled by two envelope glycoproteins, E1 and E2. The E2-E1 heterodimers form 80 trimeric spikes on the icosahedral virus surface, 60 with quasi-three-fold symmetry and 20 coincident with the icosahedral three-fold axes arranged with T = 4 quasi-symmetry. The E1 glycoprotein has a hydrophobic fusion loop at one end and is responsible for membrane fusion. The E2 protein is responsible for receptor binding and protects the fusion loop at neutral pH. The lower pH in the endosome induces the virions to undergo an irreversible conformational change in which E2 and E1 dissociate and E1 forms homotrimers, triggering fusion of the viral membrane with the endosomal membrane and then releasing the viral genome into the cytoplasm. Here we report the structure of an alphavirus spike, crystallized at low pH, representing an intermediate in the fusion process and clarifying the maturation process. The trimer of E2-E1 in the crystal structure is similar to the spikes in the neutral pH virus except that the E2 middle region is disordered, exposing the fusion loop. The amino- and carboxy-terminal domains of E2 each form immunoglobulin-like folds, consistent with the receptor attachment properties of E2.

  17. Zika Virus Disease.

    PubMed

    Slenczka, Werner

    2016-06-01

    The history of Zika virus disease serves as a paradigm of a typical emerging viral infection. Zika virus disease, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, was first isolated in 1947 in the Zika forest of Uganda. The same virus was also isolated from jungle-dwelling mosquitoes (Aedes [Stegomyia] africanus). In many areas of Africa and South Asia human infections with Zika virus were detected by both serology and virus isolation. About 80% of infections are asymptomatic, and in 20% a mostly mild disease with fever, rash, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis may occur. Fetal infections with malformations were not recorded in Africa or Asia. Zika virus was imported to northern Brazil possibly during the world soccer championship that was hosted by Brazil in June through July 2014. A cluster of severe fetal malformations with microcephaly and ocular defects was noted in 2015 in the northeast of Brazil, and intrauterine infections with Zika virus were confirmed. The dramatic change in Zika virus pathogenicity upon its introduction to Brazil has remained an enigma.

  18. Zika Virus Disease.

    PubMed

    Slenczka, Werner

    2016-06-01

    The history of Zika virus disease serves as a paradigm of a typical emerging viral infection. Zika virus disease, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, was first isolated in 1947 in the Zika forest of Uganda. The same virus was also isolated from jungle-dwelling mosquitoes (Aedes [Stegomyia] africanus). In many areas of Africa and South Asia human infections with Zika virus were detected by both serology and virus isolation. About 80% of infections are asymptomatic, and in 20% a mostly mild disease with fever, rash, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis may occur. Fetal infections with malformations were not recorded in Africa or Asia. Zika virus was imported to northern Brazil possibly during the world soccer championship that was hosted by Brazil in June through July 2014. A cluster of severe fetal malformations with microcephaly and ocular defects was noted in 2015 in the northeast of Brazil, and intrauterine infections with Zika virus were confirmed. The dramatic change in Zika virus pathogenicity upon its introduction to Brazil has remained an enigma. PMID:27337468

  19. Transient domains induced by influenza haemagglutinin during membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, R; Pak, C C; Raviv, Y; Krumbiegel, M; Bergelson, L D; Morris, S J; Lowy, R J

    1995-01-01

    During low pH-induced fusion of influenza virus with erythrocytes we have observed differential dispersion of viral lipid and haemagglutinin (HA) into the erythrocyte membrane, and viral RNA into the erythrocyte using fluorescence video microscopy. The movement of both viral lipid and HA from virus to cell was restricted during the initial stages of fusion relative to free diffusion. This indicates the existence of relatively long-lived barriers to diffusion subsequent to fusion pore formation. Fluorescence anisotropy of phospholipid analogues incorporated into the viral membrane decreased when the pH was lowered to levels required for optimum fusion. This indicates that the restricted motion of viral membrane components was not due to rigidification of membrane lipids. The movement of HA from the fusion site was also assessed by photosensitized labelling by means of a fluorescent substrate (NBD-taurine) passing through the band 3 sialoglycoprotein (the erythrocyte anion transporter). We also examined the flow of lipid and aqueous markers during fusion of HA-expressing cells with labelled erythrocytes. During this cell-cell fusion, movement of lipid between fusing membranes begins before the fusion pore is wide enough to allow diffusion of aqueous molecules (M(r) > 500). The data indicate that HA is capable of creating domains in the membrane and controlling continuity of aqueous compartments which are bounded by such domains.

  20. Cross-Neutralization between Human and African Bat Mumps Viruses.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Ihara, Toshiaki; Maeda, Ken; Takeda, Makoto; Kidokoro, Minoru

    2016-04-01

    Recently, a new paramyxovirus closely related to human mumps virus (MuV) was detected in bats. We generated recombinant MuVs carrying either or both of the fusion and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase bat virus glycoproteins. These viruses showed replication kinetics similar to human MuV in cultured cells and were neutralized efficiently by serum from healthy humans. PMID:26982800

  1. Immunological Properties of Hepatitis B Core Antigen Fusion Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Michael J.; Hastings, Gillian Z.; Brown, Alan L.; Grace, Ken G.; Rowlands, David J.; Brown, Fred; Clarke, Berwyn E.

    1990-04-01

    The immunogenicity of a 19 amino acid peptide from foot-and-mouth disease virus has previously been shown to approach that of the inactivated virus from which it was derived after multimeric particulate presentation as an N-terminal fusion with hepatitis B core antigen. In this report we demonstrate that rhinovirus peptide-hepatitis B core antigen fusion proteins are 10-fold more immunogenic than peptide coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin and 100-fold more immunogenic than uncoupled peptide with an added helper T-cell epitope. The fusion proteins can be readily administered without adjuvant or with adjuvants acceptable for human and veterinary application and can elicit a response after nasal or oral dosing. The fusion proteins can also act as T-cell-independent antigens. These properties provide further support for their suitability as presentation systems for "foreign" epitopes in the development of vaccines.

  2. Disentangling Viral Membrane Fusion from Receptor Binding Using Synthetic DNA-Lipid Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Rawle, Robert J; Boxer, Steven G; Kasson, Peter M

    2016-07-12

    Enveloped viruses must bind to a receptor on the host membrane to initiate infection. Membrane fusion is subsequently initiated by a conformational change in the viral fusion protein, triggered by receptor binding, an environmental change, or both. Here, we present a strategy to disentangle the two processes of receptor binding and fusion using synthetic DNA-lipid conjugates to bind enveloped viruses to target membranes in the absence of receptor. This permits direct testing of whether receptor engagement affects the fusion mechanism as well as a comparison of fusion behavior across viruses with different receptor binding specificities. We demonstrate this approach by binding X-31 influenza virus to target vesicles and measuring the rates of individual pH-triggered lipid mixing events using fluorescence microscopy. Influenza lipid mixing kinetics are found to be independent of receptor binding, supporting the common yet previously unproven assumption that receptor binding does not produce any clustering or spatial rearrangement of viral hemagglutinin, which affects the rate-limiting step of pH-triggered fusion. This DNA-lipid tethering strategy should also allow the study of viruses where challenging receptor reconstitution has previously prevented single-virus fusion experiments. PMID:27410740

  3. Disentangling Viral Membrane Fusion from Receptor Binding Using Synthetic DNA-Lipid Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Rawle, Robert J; Boxer, Steven G; Kasson, Peter M

    2016-07-12

    Enveloped viruses must bind to a receptor on the host membrane to initiate infection. Membrane fusion is subsequently initiated by a conformational change in the viral fusion protein, triggered by receptor binding, an environmental change, or both. Here, we present a strategy to disentangle the two processes of receptor binding and fusion using synthetic DNA-lipid conjugates to bind enveloped viruses to target membranes in the absence of receptor. This permits direct testing of whether receptor engagement affects the fusion mechanism as well as a comparison of fusion behavior across viruses with different receptor binding specificities. We demonstrate this approach by binding X-31 influenza virus to target vesicles and measuring the rates of individual pH-triggered lipid mixing events using fluorescence microscopy. Influenza lipid mixing kinetics are found to be independent of receptor binding, supporting the common yet previously unproven assumption that receptor binding does not produce any clustering or spatial rearrangement of viral hemagglutinin, which affects the rate-limiting step of pH-triggered fusion. This DNA-lipid tethering strategy should also allow the study of viruses where challenging receptor reconstitution has previously prevented single-virus fusion experiments.

  4. Display of neutralizing epitopes of Canine parvovirus and a T-cell epitope of the fusion protein of Canine distemper virus on chimeric tymovirus-like particles and its use as a vaccine candidate both against Canine parvo and Canine distemper.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Dev; Shahana, Pallichera Vijayan; Rani, Gudavelli Sudha; Sugumar, Parthasarthy; Shankar, Chinchkar Ramchandra; Srinivasan, Villuppanoor Alwar

    2009-12-10

    Expression of Physalis mottle tymovirus coat protein in Escherichia coli was earlier shown to self-assemble into empty capsids that were nearly identical to the capsids formed in vivo. Amino acid substitutions were made at the N-terminus of wild-type Physalis mottle virus coat protein with neutralizing epitopes of Canine parvovirus containing the antigenic sites 1-2, 4 and 6-7 and T-cell epitope of the fusion protein of Canine distemper virus in various combinations to yield PhMV1, PhMV2, PhMV3, PhMV4 and PhMV5. These constructs were cloned and expressed in E. coli. The chimeric proteins self-assembled into chimeric tymovirus-like particles (TVLPs) as determined by electron microscopy. The TVLPs were purified by ultracentrifugation and injected into guinea pigs and dogs to determine their immunogenicity. Initial immunogenicity studies in guinea pigs indicated that PhMV3 gave a higher response in comparison to the other TVLPs for both CPV and CDV and hence all further experiments in dogs were done with PhMV3. HI was done against different isolates obtained from various parts of the country. Protective titres indicated the broad spectrum of the vaccine. In conclusion the study indicated that the above chimeric VLP based vaccine could be used in dogs to generate a protective immune response against diseases caused by both Canine parvo and Canine distemper virus. PMID:19818723

  5. Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wurden, G. A.; Hsu, S. C.; Intrator, T. P.; Grabowski, T. C.; Degnan, J. H.; Domonkos, M.; Turchi, P. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Sinars, D. B.; Herrmann, M. C.; et al

    2015-11-17

    In this community white paper, we describe an approach to achieving fusion which employs a hybrid of elements from the traditional magnetic and inertial fusion concepts, called magneto-inertial fusion (MIF). The status of MIF research in North America at multiple institutions is summarized including recent progress, research opportunities, and future plans.

  6. Hot and cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This article presents an overview of research in cold fusion research and development in cold fusion at the Tokomak Fusion Test Reactor at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, and at the inertial containment facility at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. is described.

  7. Distinct functional determinants of influenza hemagglutinin-mediated membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Ivanovic, Tijana; Harrison, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is the critical step for infectious cell penetration by enveloped viruses. We have previously used single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics to study the molecular mechanism of influenza-virus envelope fusion. Published data on fusion inhibition by antibodies to the 'stem' of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) now allow us to incorporate into simulations the provision that some HAs are inactive. We find that more than half of the HAs are unproductive even for virions with no bound antibodies, but that the overall mechanism is extremely robust. Determining the fraction of competent HAs allows us to determine their rates of target-membrane engagement. Comparison of simulations with data from H3N2 and H1N1 viruses reveals three independent functional variables of HA-mediated membrane fusion closely linked to neutralization susceptibility. Evidence for compensatory changes in the evolved mechanism sets the stage for studies aiming to define the molecular constraints on HA evolvability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11009.001 PMID:26613408

  8. Cell entry of enveloped viruses.

    PubMed

    Cosset, François-Loic; Lavillette, Dimitri

    2011-01-01

    Enveloped viruses penetrate their cell targets following the merging of their membrane with that of the cell. This fusion process is catalyzed by one or several viral glycoproteins incorporated on the membrane of the virus. These envelope glycoproteins (EnvGP) evolved in order to combine two features. First, they acquired a domain to bind to a specific cellular protein, named "receptor." Second, they developed, with the help of cellular proteins, a function of finely controlled fusion to optimize the replication and preserve the integrity of the cell, specific to the genus of the virus. Following the activation of the EnvGP either by binding to their receptors and/or sometimes the acid pH of the endosomes, many changes of conformation permit ultimately the action of a specific hydrophobic domain, the fusion peptide, which destabilizes the cell membrane and leads to the opening of the lipidic membrane. The comprehension of these mechanisms is essential to develop medicines of the therapeutic class of entry inhibitor like enfuvirtide (Fuzeon) against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In this chapter, we will summarize the different envelope glycoprotein structures that viruses develop to achieve membrane fusion and the entry of the virus. We will describe the different entry pathways and cellular proteins that viruses have subverted to allow infection of the cell and the receptors that are used. Finally, we will illustrate more precisely the recent discoveries that have been made within the field of the entry process, with a focus on the use of pseudoparticles. These pseudoparticles are suitable for high-throughput screenings that help in the development of natural or artificial inhibitors as new therapeutics of the class of entry inhibitors.

  9. Epidemiology of hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    LeDuc, J W

    1989-01-01

    Twelve distinct viruses associated with hemorrhagic fever in humans are classified among four families: Arenaviridae, which includes Lassa, Junin, and Machupo viruses; Bunyaviridae, which includes Rift Valley fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and Hantaan viruses; Filoviridae, which includes Marburg and Ebola viruses; and Flaviviridae, which includes yellow fever, dengue, Kyasanur Forest disease, and Omsk viruses. Most hemorrhagic fever viruses are zoonoses, with the possible exception of the four dengue viruses, which may continually circulate among humans. Hemorrhagic fever viruses are found in both temperate and tropical habitats and generally infect both sexes and all ages, although the age and sex of those infected are frequently influenced by the possibility of occupational exposure. Transmission to humans is frequently by bite of an infected tick or mosquito or via aerosol from infected rodent hosts. Aerosol and nosocomial transmission are especially important with Lassa, Junin, Machupo, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, Marburg, and Ebola viruses. Seasonality of hemorrhagic fever among humans is influenced for the most part by the dynamics of infected arthropod or vertebrate hosts. Mammals, especially rodents, appear to be important natural hosts for many hemorrhagic fever viruses. The transmission cycle for each hemorrhagic fever virus is distinct and is dependent upon the characteristics of the primary vector species and the possibility for its contact with humans.

  10. Paramyxovirus membrane fusion: Lessons from the F and HN atomic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, Robert A. . E-mail: ralamb@northwestern.edu; Paterson, Reay G.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2006-01-05

    Paramyxoviruses enter cells by fusion of their lipid envelope with the target cell plasma membrane. Fusion of the viral membrane with the plasma membrane allows entry of the viral genome into the cytoplasm. For paramyxoviruses, membrane fusion occurs at neutral pH, but the trigger mechanism that controls the viral entry machinery such that it occurs at the right time and in the right place remains to be elucidated. Two viral glycoproteins are key to the infection process-an attachment protein that varies among different paramyxoviruses and the fusion (F) protein, which is found in all paramyxoviruses. For many of the paramyxoviruses (parainfluenza viruses 1-5, mumps virus, Newcastle disease virus and others), the attachment protein is the hemagglutinin/neuraminidase (HN) protein. In the last 5 years, atomic structures of paramyxovirus F and HN proteins have been reported. The knowledge gained from these structures towards understanding the mechanism of viral membrane fusion is described.

  11. [Molecular Mechanism of Glycoprotein-induced Cell-Cell Fusion of Herpesviruses].

    PubMed

    Feng, Daishen; Jia, Renyong

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviridae is a large family comprising linear, double-stranded DNA viruses. Herpesviridae contains three subfamilies: α-, β- and γ-herpesviruses. The glycoproteins gB, gH and gL of each subfamily form the "core fusion function" in cell-cell fusion. Other herpesviruses also need additional glycoproteins to promote fusion, such as gD of the Herpes simplex virus, gp42 of the Epstein-Barr virus, and gO or UL128-131 of the Human cytomegalovirus. In contrast, glycoproteins gM or gM/gN of herpesvirus inhibit fusion. We describe the molecular mechanisms of glycoprotein-induced fusion and entry of herpesviruses. It will be helpful to further study the pathogenic mechanism of herpesvirus.

  12. Generation of New M2e-HA2 Fusion Chimeric Peptide to Development of a Recombinant Fusion Protein Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ameghi, Ali; Baradaran, Behzad; Aghaiypour, Khosrow; Barzegar, Abolfazl; Pilehvar-Soltanahmadi, Yones; Moghadampour, Masood; Taghizadeh, Morteza; Zarghami, Nosratollah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to design a new construction containing influenza virus (H1N1) M2e gene and HA2 gene by bioinformatics approach, cloning the construct in to Escherichia coli and produce M2e-HA2 peptide. Methods: The procedure was done by virus cultivation in SPF eggs, hemagglutination assay (HA), RNA isolation, RT-PCR, primers designed (DNAMAN 4 and Oligo7), virtual fusion construction translation (ExPASy), N-Glycosylated sites prediction (Ensemblegly-Iowa), complete open reading frame (ORF), stop codon studied (NCBI ORF Finder), rare codon determination (GenScript), Solvent accessibility of epitopes (Swiss-PdbViewer), antigenic sites prediction (Protean), fusion PCR of M2e-HA2 gene, sequence analysis, nested PCR, gel electrophoresis, double digestion of pET22b(+) plasmid and the fusion construct, ligation of them, transformation of the ligated vector (pET22b-M2e-HA2) to E.coli (BL21), mass culture the cloned bacterium ,induction the expression by isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG), sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), purification the fusion peptide by Ni-NTA column, western blot to verify the purification. Results: In this study we developed a new approach for fusion of Influenza virus M2e (96 nucleotides) and HA2 (663 nucleotides) genes based on fusion PCR strategy and produced a fused fragment with 793 nucleotides. The construct was successfully cloned and expressed. Conclusion: This construct is a 261 amino acid chimeric fusion peptide with about 30 KD molecular weight. According on the latest information; this is the first case of expression and purification M2e-HA2 fusion chimeric peptide, which could be used for development of a recombinant M2e-HA2 fusion protein vaccine. PMID:26793615

  13. The fusion breeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, Ralph W.

    1982-10-01

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the U.S. fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the U.S. fusion program and the U.S. nuclear energy program. There is wide agreement that many approaches will work and will produce fuel for five equal-sized LWRs, and some approach as many as 20 LWRs at electricity costs within 20% of those at today's price of uranium (30/lb of U3O8). The blankets designed to suppress fissioning, called symbiotes, fusion fuel factories, or just fusion breeders, will have safety characteristics more like pure fusion reactors and will support as many as 15 equal power LWRs. The blankets designed to maximize fast fission of fertile material will have safety characteristics more like fission reactors and will support 5 LWRs. This author strongly recommends development of the fission suppressed blanket type, a point of view not agreed upon by everyone. There is, however, wide agreement that, to meet the market price for uranium which would result in LWR electricity within 20% of today's cost with either blanket type, fusion components can cost severalfold more than would be allowed for pure fusion to meet the goal of making electricity alone at 20% over today's fission costs. Also widely agreed is that the critical-path-item for the fusion breeder is fusion development itself; however, development of fusion breeder specific items (blankets, fuel cycle) should be started now in order to have the fusion breeder by the time the rise in uranium prices forces other more costly choices.

  14. Modelling the standing timber volume of Baden-Württemberg-A large-scale approach using a fusion of Landsat, airborne LiDAR and National Forest Inventory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maack, Joachim; Lingenfelder, Marcus; Weinacker, Holger; Koch, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    Remote sensing-based timber volume estimation is key for modelling the regional potential, accessibility and price of lignocellulosic raw material for an emerging bioeconomy. We used a unique wall-to-wall airborne LiDAR dataset and Landsat 7 satellite images in combination with terrestrial inventory data derived from the National Forest Inventory (NFI), and applied generalized additive models (GAM) to estimate spatially explicit timber distribution and volume in forested areas. Since the NFI data showed an underlying structure regarding size and ownership, we additionally constructed a socio-economic predictor to enhance the accuracy of the analysis. Furthermore, we balanced the training dataset with a bootstrap method to achieve unbiased regression weights for interpolating timber volume. Finally, we compared and discussed the model performance of the original approach (r2 = 0.56, NRMSE = 9.65%), the approach with balanced training data (r2 = 0.69, NRMSE = 12.43%) and the final approach with balanced training data and the additional socio-economic predictor (r2 = 0.72, NRMSE = 12.17%). The results demonstrate the usefulness of remote sensing techniques for mapping timber volume for a future lignocellulose-based bioeconomy.

  15. Characterization of [(3)H]-LY354740 binding to rat mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors expressed in CHO cells using semliki forest virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, C; Kratzeisen, C; Adam, G; Lundstrom, K; Malherbe, P; Ohresser, S; Stadler, H; Wichmann, J; Woltering, T; Mutel, V

    2000-07-24

    The binding properties of [(3)H]-LY354740 were characterized on rat metabotropic glutamate receptors mGlu2 and mGlu3 expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using Semliki Forest virus vectors. The saturation isotherm gave K(D) values of 20+/-5 and 53+/-8 nM and B(max) values of 474+/-161 and 667+/-89 fmol/mg protein for mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors, respectively. NMDA, CaCl(2), DHPG and kainate were inactive up to 1 mM, whereas LY341495, DCG IV and ibotenate inhibited [(3)H]-LY354740 binding with similar potencies on both receptors. L-CCG I, L-AP4, L-AP5, LY354740 and 1S,3R-ACPD were 2- to 4-fold more potent inhibitors of [(3)H]-LY354740 binding to mGlu2 than mGlu3 receptors. However, MPPG and L-AP3 had a 6-fold and DTT a 28-fold preference for mGlu2 over mGlu3. ZnCl(2), at 10 mM, inhibited more than 70% of [(3)H]-LY354740 binding to mGlu2 receptors. At the same concentration it did not affect significantly [(3)H]-LY354740 binding to mGlu3 receptors. On the contrary, glutamate, quisqualate, EGLU and NAAG showed a 3-, 5-, 7- and 12-fold preference for mGlu3 over mGlu2. Finally, GTPgammaS, which partially inhibited the binding on mGlu2 receptors, was inactive to inhibit [(3)H]-LY354740 binding on mGlu3 receptors. PMID:10884552

  16. Acidification triggers Andes hantavirus membrane fusion and rearrangement of Gc into a stable post-fusion homotrimer.

    PubMed

    Acuña, Rodrigo; Bignon, Eduardo A; Mancini, Roberta; Lozach, Pierre-Yves; Tischler, Nicole D

    2015-11-01

    The hantavirus membrane fusion process is mediated by the Gc envelope glycoprotein from within endosomes. However, little is known about the specific mechanism that triggers Gc fusion activation, and its pre- and post-fusion conformations. We established cell-free in vitro systems to characterize hantavirus fusion activation. Low pH was sufficient to trigger the interaction of virus-like particles with liposomes. This interaction was dependent on a pre-fusion glycoprotein arrangement. Further, low pH induced Gc multimerization changes leading to non-reversible Gc homotrimers. These trimers were resistant to detergent, heat and protease digestion, suggesting characteristics of a stable post-fusion structure. No acid-dependent oligomerization rearrangement was detected for the trypsin-sensitive Gn envelope glycoprotein. Finally, acidification induced fusion of glycoprotein-expressing effector cells with non-susceptible CHO cells. Together, the data provide novel information on the Gc fusion trigger and its non-reversible activation involving lipid interaction, multimerization changes and membrane fusion which ultimately allow hantavirus entry into cells.

  17. Single residue deletions along the length of the influenza HA fusion peptide lead to inhibition of membrane fusion function

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, William A.; Thoennes, Sudha; Bradley, Konrad C.; Galloway, Summer E.; Talekar, Ganesh R.; Cummings, Sandra F.; Vareckova, Eva; Russell, Rupert J.; Steinhauer, David A.

    2009-11-25

    A panel of eight single amino acid deletion mutants was generated within the first 24 residues of the fusion peptide domain of the of the hemagglutinin (HA) of A/Aichi/2/68 influenza A virus (H3N2 subtype). The mutant HAs were analyzed for folding, cell surface transport, cleavage activation, capacity to undergo acid-induced conformational changes, and membrane fusion activity. We found that the mutant DELTAF24, at the C-terminal end of the fusion peptide, was expressed in a non-native conformation, whereas all other deletion mutants were transported to the cell surface and could be cleaved into HA1 and HA2 to activate membrane fusion potential. Furthermore, upon acidification these cleaved HAs were able to undergo the characteristic structural rearrangements that are required for fusion. Despite this, all mutants were inhibited for fusion activity based on two separate assays. The results indicate that the mutant fusion peptide domains associate with target membranes in a non-functional fashion, and suggest that structural features along the length of the fusion peptide are likely to be relevant for optimal membrane fusion activity.

  18. Premature activation of the paramyxovirus fusion protein before target cell attachment with corruption of the viral fusion machinery.

    PubMed

    Farzan, Shohreh F; Palermo, Laura M; Yokoyama, Christine C; Orefice, Gianmarco; Fornabaio, Micaela; Sarkar, Aurijit; Kellogg, Glen E; Greengard, Olga; Porotto, Matteo; Moscona, Anne

    2011-11-01

    Paramyxoviruses, including the childhood pathogen human parainfluenza virus type 3, enter host cells by fusion of the viral and target cell membranes. This fusion results from the concerted action of its two envelope glycoproteins, the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and the fusion protein (F). The receptor-bound HN triggers F to undergo conformational changes that render it competent to mediate fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. We proposed that, if the fusion process could be activated prematurely before the virion reaches the target host cell, infection could be prevented. We identified a small molecule that inhibits paramyxovirus entry into target cells and prevents infection. We show here that this compound works by an interaction with HN that results in F-activation prior to receptor binding. The fusion process is thereby prematurely activated, preventing fusion of the viral membrane with target cells and precluding viral entry. This first evidence that activation of a paramyxovirus F can be specifically induced before the virus contacts its target cell suggests a new strategy with broad implications for the design of antiviral agents.

  19. Analysis of residues near the fusion peptide in the influenza hemagglutinin structure for roles in triggering membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Thoennes, Sudha; Li Zhunan; Lee, Byeong-Jae; Langley, William A.; Skehel, John J.; Russell, Rupert J.; Steinhauer, David A.

    2008-01-20

    Influenza virus entry occurs in endosomes, where acidification triggers irreversible conformational changes of the hemagglutinin glycoprotein (HA) that are required for membrane fusion. The acid-induced HA structural rearrangements have been well documented, and several models have been proposed to relate these to the process of membrane fusion. However, details regarding the role of specific residues in the initiation of structural rearrangements and membrane fusion are lacking. Here we report the results of studies on the HA of A/Aichi/2/68 virus (H3 subtype), in which mutants with changes at several ionizable residues in the vicinity of the 'fusion peptide' were analyzed for their effects on the pH at which conformational changes and membrane fusion occur. A variety of phenotypes was obtained, including examples of substitutions that lead to an increase in HA stability at reduced pH. Of particular note was the observation that a histidine to tyrosine substitution at HA1 position 17 resulted in a decrease in pH at which HA structural changes and membrane fusion take place by 0.3 relative to WT. The results are discussed in relation to possible mechanisms by which HA structural rearrangements are initiated at low pH and clade-specific differences near the fusion peptide.

  20. Antiviral activity of a Rac GEF inhibitor characterized with a sensitive HIV/SIV fusion assay

    SciTech Connect

    Pontow, Suzanne; Harmon, Brooke; Campbell, Nancy; Ratner, Lee

    2007-11-10

    A virus-dependent fusion assay was utilized to examine the activity of a panel of HIV-1, -2, and SIV isolates of distinct coreceptor phenotypes. This assay allowed identification of entry inhibitors, and characterization of an antagonist of a Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor, as an inhibitor of HIV-mediated fusion.

  1. Materials research for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaster, J.; Moeslang, A.; Muroga, T.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion materials research started in the early 1970s following the observation of the degradation of irradiated materials used in the first commercial fission reactors. The technological challenges of fusion energy are intimately linked with the availability of suitable materials capable of reliably withstanding the extremely severe operational conditions of fusion reactors. Although fission and fusion materials exhibit common features, fusion materials research is broader. The harder mono-energetic spectrum associated with the deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons (14.1 MeV compared to <2 MeV on average for fission neutrons) releases significant amounts of hydrogen and helium as transmutation products that might lead to a (at present undetermined) degradation of structural materials after a few years of operation. Overcoming the historical lack of a fusion-relevant neutron source for materials testing is an essential pending step in fusion roadmaps. Structural materials development, together with research on functional materials capable of sustaining unprecedented power densities during plasma operation in a fusion reactor, have been the subject of decades of worldwide research efforts underpinning the present maturity of the fusion materials research programme.

  2. Dynamic Viral Glycoprotein Machines: Approaches for Probing Transient States That Drive Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Natalie K.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2016-01-01

    The fusion glycoproteins that decorate the surface of enveloped viruses undergo dramatic conformational changes in the course of engaging with target cells through receptor interactions and during cell entry. These refolding events ultimately drive the fusion of viral and cellular membranes leading to delivery of the genetic cargo. While well-established methods for structure determination such as X-ray crystallography have provided detailed structures of fusion proteins in the pre- and post-fusion fusion states, to understand mechanistically how these fusion glycoproteins perform their structural calisthenics and drive membrane fusion requires new analytical approaches that enable dynamic intermediate states to be probed. Methods including structural mass spectrometry, small-angle X-ray scattering, and electron microscopy have begun to provide new insight into pathways of conformational change and fusion protein function. In combination, the approaches provide a significantly richer portrait of viral fusion glycoprotein structural variation and fusion activation as well as inhibition by neutralizing agents. Here recent studies that highlight the utility of these complementary approaches will be reviewed with a focus on the well-characterized influenza virus hemagglutinin fusion glycoprotein system. PMID:26761026

  3. Dynamic Viral Glycoprotein Machines: Approaches for Probing Transient States That Drive Membrane Fusion.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Natalie K; Lee, Kelly K

    2016-01-11

    The fusion glycoproteins that decorate the surface of enveloped viruses undergo dramatic conformational changes in the course of engaging with target cells through receptor interactions and during cell entry. These refolding events ultimately drive the fusion of viral and cellular membranes leading to delivery of the genetic cargo. While well-established methods for structure determination such as X-ray crystallography have provided detailed structures of fusion proteins in the pre- and post-fusion fusion states, to understand mechanistically how these fusion glycoproteins perform their structural calisthenics and drive membrane fusion requires new analytical approaches that enable dynamic intermediate states to be probed. Methods including structural mass spectrometry, small-angle X-ray scattering, and electron microscopy have begun to provide new insight into pathways of conformational change and fusion protein function. In combination, the approaches provide a significantly richer portrait of viral fusion glycoprotein structural variation and fusion activation as well as inhibition by neutralizing agents. Here recent studies that highlight the utility of these complementary approaches will be reviewed with a focus on the well-characterized influenza virus hemagglutinin fusion glycoprotein system.

  4. Novel hemagglutinin-based influenza virus inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xintian; Zhang, Xuanxuan

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus has caused seasonal epidemics and worldwide pandemics, which caused tremendous loss of human lives and socioeconomics. Nowadays, only two classes of anti-influenza drugs, M2 ion channel inhibitors and neuraminidase inhibitors respectively, are used for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza virus infection. Unfortunately, influenza virus strains resistant to one or all of those drugs emerge frequently. Hemagglutinin (HA), the glycoprotein in influenza virus envelope, plays a critical role in viral binding, fusion and entry processes. Therefore, HA is a promising target for developing anti-influenza drugs, which block the initial entry step of viral life cycle. Here we reviewed recent understanding of conformational changes of HA in protein folding and fusion processes, and the discovery of HA-based influenza entry inhibitors, which may provide more choices for preventing and controlling potential pandemics caused by multi-resistant influenza viruses. PMID:23977436

  5. Forested wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Lugo, A.E.; Brinson, M.; Brown, S.

    1990-01-01

    Forested wetlands have important roles in global biogeochemical cycles, supporting freshwater and saltwater commercial fisheries, and in providing a place for wildlife of all kinds to flourish. Scientific attention towards these ecosystems has lagged with only a few comprehensive works on forested wetlands of the world. A major emphasis of this book is to develop unifying principles and data bases on the structure and function of forested wetlands, in order to stimulate scientific study of them. Wetlands are areas that are inundated or saturated by surface-water or ground-water, at such a frequency and duration that under natural conditions they support organisms adapted to poorly aerated and/or saturated soil. The strategy of classifying the conditions that control the structure and behavior of forested wetlands by assuming that the physiognomy and floristic composition of the system will reflect the total energy expenditure of the ecosystem; and the structural and functional characteristics of forested wetlands from different parts of the world are the major topics covered.

  6. Muon Catalyzed Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armour, Edward A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Muon catalyzed fusion is a process in which a negatively charged muon combines with two nuclei of isotopes of hydrogen, e.g, a proton and a deuteron or a deuteron and a triton, to form a muonic molecular ion in which the binding is so tight that nuclear fusion occurs. The muon is normally released after fusion has taken place and so can catalyze further fusions. As the muon has a mean lifetime of 2.2 microseconds, this is the maximum period over which a muon can participate in this process. This article gives an outline of the history of muon catalyzed fusion from 1947, when it was first realised that such a process might occur, to the present day. It includes a description of the contribution that Drachrnan has made to the theory of muon catalyzed fusion and the influence this has had on the author's research.

  7. Subtropical Forest Biomass Estimation Using Airborne LiDAR and Hyperspectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yong; Li, Zengyuan

    2016-06-01

    Forests have complex vertical structure and spatial mosaic pattern. Subtropical forest ecosystem consists of vast vegetation species and these species are always in a dynamic succession stages. It is very challenging to characterize the complexity of subtropical forest ecosystem. In this paper, CAF's (The Chinese Academy of Forestry) LiCHy (LiDAR, CCD and Hyperspectral) Airborne Observation System was used to collect waveform Lidar and hyperspectral data in Puer forest region, Yunnan province in the Southwest of China. The study site contains typical subtropical species of coniferous forest, evergreen broadleaf forest, and some other mixed forests. The hypersectral images were orthorectified and corrected into surface reflectance with support of Lidar DTM product. The fusion of Lidar and hyperspectral can classify dominate forest types. The lidar metrics improved the classification accuracy. Then forest biomass estimation was carried out for each dominate forest types using waveform Lidar data, which get improved than single Lidar data source.

  8. Fusion facility siting considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussell, G. T.

    1985-02-01

    Inherent in the fusion program's transition from hydrogen devices to commercial power machines is a general increase in the size and scope of succeeding projects. This growth will lead to increased emphasis on safety, environmental impact, and the external effects of fusion in general, and of each new device in particular. An important consideration in this regard is site selection. Major siting issues that may affect the economics, safety, and environmental impact of fusion are examined.

  9. Status of fusion maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Effective maintenance will be an essential ingredient in determining fusion system productivity. This level of productivity will result only after close attention is paid to the entire system as an entity and appropriate integration of the elements is made. The status of fusion maintenance is reviewed in the context of the entire system. While there are many challenging developmental tasks ahead in fusion maintenance, the required technologies are available in several high-technology industries, including nuclear fission.

  10. Fusion: The controversy continues

    SciTech Connect

    1989-07-01

    Nuclear fusion-the power of the stars that promises mankind an inexhaustible supply of energy-seems concurrently much closer and still distant this month. The recent flurry of announcements concerning the achievement of a cold fusion reaction has-if nothing else-underscored the historic importance of the basic fusion reaction which uses hydrogen ions to fuel an energy-producing reaction.

  11. Magnetic-confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongena, J.; Koch, R.; Wolf, R.; Zohm, H.

    2016-05-01

    Our modern society requires environmentally friendly solutions for energy production. Energy can be released not only from the fission of heavy nuclei but also from the fusion of light nuclei. Nuclear fusion is an important option for a clean and safe solution for our long-term energy needs. The extremely high temperatures required for the fusion reaction are routinely realized in several magnetic-fusion machines. Since the early 1990s, up to 16 MW of fusion power has been released in pulses of a few seconds, corresponding to a power multiplication close to break-even. Our understanding of the very complex behaviour of a magnetized plasma at temperatures between 150 and 200 million °C surrounded by cold walls has also advanced substantially. This steady progress has resulted in the construction of ITER, a fusion device with a planned fusion power output of 500 MW in pulses of 400 s. ITER should provide answers to remaining important questions on the integration of physics and technology, through a full-size demonstration of a tenfold power multiplication, and on nuclear safety aspects. Here we review the basic physics underlying magnetic fusion: past achievements, present efforts and the prospects for future production of electrical energy. We also discuss questions related to the safety, waste management and decommissioning of a future fusion power plant.

  12. Meteorite fusion crust variability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaisen, Kevin G.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2009-06-01

    Two assumptions commonly employed in meteorite interpretation are that fusion crust compositions represent the bulk-rock chemistry of the interior meteorite and that the vesicles within the fusion crust result from the release of implanted solar wind volatiles. Electron microprobe analyses of thin sections from lunar meteorite Miller Range (MIL) 05035 and eucrite Bates Nunataks (BTN) 00300 were performed to determine if the chemical compositions of the fusion crust varied and/or represented the published bulk rock composition. It was determined that fusion crust compositions are significantly influenced by the incorporation of fragments from the substrate, and by the composition and grain size of those minerals. Because of compositional heterogeneities throughout the meteorite, one cannot assume that fusion crust composition represents the bulk rock composition. If the compositional variability within the fusion crust and mineralogical differences among thin sections goes unnoticed, then the perceived composition and petrogenetic models of formation will be incorrect. The formation of vesicles within these fusion crusts were also compared to current theories attributing vesicles to a solar wind origin. Previous work from the STONE-5 experiment, where terrestrial rocks were exposed on the exterior of a spacecraft heatshield, produced a vesicular fusion crust without prolonged exposure to solar wind suggesting that the high temperatures experienced by a meteorite during passage through the Earth's atmosphere are sufficient to cause boiling of the melt. Therefore, the assumption that all vesicles found within a fusion crust are due to the release of implanted volatiles of solar wind may not be justified.

  13. Hantavirus Gc glycoprotein: evidence for a class II fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Tischler, Nicole D; Gonzalez, Angel; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Rosemblatt, Mario; Valenzuela, Pablo D T

    2005-11-01

    Hantavirus cell entry is promoted by its envelope glycoproteins, Gn and Gc, through cell attachment and by fusion between viral and endosomal membranes at low pH. However, the role of Gn and Gc in receptor binding and cell fusion has not yet been defined. In this work, a sequence presenting characteristics similar to those of class II fusion peptides (FPs) of alphavirus E1 and flavivirus E proteins is identified within the hantavirus Gc glycoprotein. A three-dimensional comparative molecular model based on crystallographic data of tick-borne encephalitis virus E protein is proposed for the Andes virus (ANDV) Gc ectodomain, which supports a feasible class II fusion-protein fold. In vitro experimental evidence is provided for the binding activity of the ANDV FP candidate to artificial membranes, as demonstrated by fluorescence anisotropy assays. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that the Gc glycoprotein of hantaviruses and of other members of the family Bunyaviridae directs the viral fusion activity and that it may be classified as a class II viral fusion protein.

  14. Forests & Trees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Susan

    1989-01-01

    This newsletter discusses the disappearance of the world's forests and the resulting environmental problems of erosion and flooding; loss of genetic diversity; climatic changes such as less rainfall, and intensifying of the greenhouse effect; and displacement and destruction of indigenous cultures. The articles, lessons, and activities are…

  15. Forest Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA's Technology Applications Center, with other government and academic agencies, provided technology for improved resources management to the Cibola National Forest. Landsat satellite images enabled vegetation over a large area to be classified for purposes of timber analysis, wildlife habitat, range measurement and development of general vegetation maps.

  16. Coatings for laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lowdermilk, W.H.

    1981-12-18

    Optical coatings are used in lasers systems for fusion research to control beam propagation and reduce surface reflection losses. The performance of coatings is important in the design, reliability, energy output, and cost of the laser systems. Significant developments in coating technology are required for future lasers for fusion research and eventual power reactors.

  17. Fusion Science Education Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, C. A.; DIII-D Education Group

    1996-11-01

    This presentation will focus on education outreach activities at General Atomics that have been expanded to include the general population on science education with a focus on fusion energy. Outreach materials are distributed upon request both nationally and internationally. These materials include a notebook containing copies of DIII--D tour panels, fusion poster, new fusion energy video, new fusion energy brochure, and the electromagnetic spectrum curriculum. The 1996 Fusion Forum (held in the House Caucus Room) included a student/ teacher lunch with Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary and a private visit to the Forum exhibits. The continuing partnership with Kearny High School includes lectures, job shadowing, internship, equipment donations and an award-winning electric car-racing program. Development of distribution by CD of the existing interactive fusion energy kiosk and a virtual reality tour of the DIII--D facility are underway. The DIII--D fusion education WWW site includes e-mail addresses to ``Ask the Wizard,'' and/or receive GA's outreach materials. Steve Rodecker, a local science teacher, aided by DIII--D fusion staff, won his second Tapestry Award; he also was named the ``1995 National Science Teacher of the Year'' and will be present to share his experiences with the DIII--D educational outreach program.

  18. Controlled Nuclear Fusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasstone, Samuel

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by The United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Importance of Fusion Energy; Conditions for Nuclear Fusion; Thermonuclear Reactions in Plasmas; Plasma Confinement by Magnetic Fields; Experiments With Plasmas; High-Temperature…

  19. Two Horizons of Fusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Mun Ling; Chik, Pakey Pui Man

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to differentiate the internal and external horizons of "fusion." "Fusion" in the internal horizon relates to the structure and meaning of the object of learning as experienced by the learner. It clarifies the interrelationships among an object's critical features and aspects. It also illuminates the…

  20. Structure of the uncleaved ectodomain of the paramyxovirus (hPIV3) fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hsien-Sheng; Paterson, Reay G.; Wen, Xiaolin; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2005-01-01

    Class I viral fusion proteins share common mechanistic and structural features but little sequence similarity. Structural insights into the protein conformational changes associated with membrane fusion are based largely on studies of the influenza virus hemagglutinin in pre- and postfusion conformations. Here, we present the crystal structure of the secreted, uncleaved ectodomain of the paramyxovirus, human parainfluenza virus 3 fusion (F) protein, a member of the class I viral fusion protein group. The secreted human parainfluenza virus 3 F forms a trimer with distinct head, neck, and stalk regions. Unexpectedly, the structure reveals a six-helix bundle associated with the postfusion form of F, suggesting that the anchor-minus ectodomain adopts a conformation largely similar to the postfusion state. The transmembrane anchor domains of F may therefore profoundly influence the folding energetics that establish and maintain a metastable, prefusion state. PMID:15964978