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Sample records for fork willamette basins

  1. Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus) Population and Habitat Surveys in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Basins, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Greg

    2000-11-28

    Prior to 1978, Dolly Varden Salvelinus malma were classified into an anadromous and interior form. Cavender (1978) classified the interior form as a distinct species, Salvelinus confluentus, the bull trout. Bull trout are large char weighing up to 18 kg and growing to over one meter in length (Goetz 1989). They are distinguished by a broad flat head, large downward curving maxillaries that extend beyond the eye, a well developed fleshy knob and a notch in the lower terminus of the snout, and light colored spots normally smaller than the pupil of the eye (Cavender 1978). Bull trout are found throughout northwestern North America from lat. 41{sup o}N to lat. 60{sup o}N. In Oregon, bull trout were once distributed throughout 12 basins in the Klamath and Columbia River systems including the Clackamas, Santiam, McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette sub-basins west of the Cascades (Buchanan et al. 1997). However, it is believed bull trout have been extirpated from west of the Cascades with the exception of the McKenzie sub-basin. Before 1963, bull trout in the McKenzie sub-basin were a contiguous population from the mouth to Tamolitch Falls. Following the construction of Cougar and Trail Bridge Reservoirs there are three isolated populations: (1) mainstem McKenzie and tributaries from the mouth to Trail Bridge Reservoir. (2) mainstem McKenzie and tributaries above Trail Bridge Reservoir to Tamolitch Falls. (3) South Fork McKenzie and tributaries above Cougar Reservoir. The study area includes the three aforementioned McKenzie populations, and the Middle Fork Willamette and tributaries above Hills Creek Reservoir. We monitored bull trout populations in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins using a combination of sampling techniques including: spawning surveys, standard pool counts, juvenile trapping, radio tracking, electronic fish counters, and a modified Hankin and Reeves protocol to estimate juvenile abundance and density. In addition, we continued to

  2. Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus) Population and Habitat Surveys in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Basins, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Greg

    2003-02-01

    Prior to 1978, bull trout were commonly known as dolly varden (Salvelinus malma) and were classified into an anadromous and interior form. Cavender (1978) described the interior form as a distinct species, classifying it as Salvelinus confluentus, the bull trout. Bull trout are large char weighing up to 18 kg and growing to over one meter in length (Goetz 1994). They are distinguished by a broad flat head, large downward curving maxillaries that extend beyond the eye, a fleshy knob and a notch in the lower terminus of the snout, and light colored spots normally smaller than the pupil of the eye (Cavender 1978). Bull trout are found throughout northwestern North America from latitude 41{sup o}N to 60{sup o}N. In Oregon, bull trout were once distributed throughout 12 basins in the Klamath and Columbia River systems including the Clackamas, Santiam, McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette subbasins west of the Cascades (Buchanan et al. 1997). However, it is likely that bull trout have been extirpated from west of the Cascades with the exception of the McKenzie sub-basin. McKenzie River bull trout were a contiguous population from the mouth to Tamolitch Falls prior to 1963. Three populations were isolated following the construction of Cougar and Trail Bridge Reservoirs which include the mainstem McKenzie and tributaries from the mouth to Trail Bridge Reservoir, mainstem McKenzie and tributaries above Trail Bridge Reservoir to Tamolitch Falls, and the South Fork McKenzie and tributaries above Cougar Reservoir. On June 10, 1998 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) listed the Columbia River bull trout population segment as Threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act and Buchanan et al. (1997) listed the bull trout population in the mainstem McKenzie as ''of special concern'', the South Fork McKenzie population as ''high risk of extinction,'' and the population above Trail Bridge Reservoir as ''high risk of extinction.'' Bull trout in the Middle Fork Willamette

  3. Bull Trout Population and Habitat Surveys in the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Seals, Jason; Reis, Kelly

    2003-10-01

    Bull trout in the Willamette River Basin were historically distributed throughout major tributaries including the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie rivers. Habitat degradation, over-harvest, passage barriers, fish removal by rotenone, and hybridization and competition with non-native brook trout are all likely factors that have led to the decline of bull trout in the Willamette Basin (Ratliff and Howell 1992). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Columbia River bull trout population segment as Threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act in 1998. Four bull trout populations were isolated in the upper Willamette River following the construction of flood control dams on the South Fork McKenzie River, McKenzie River, and Middle Fork Willamette River that created Cougar, Trail Bridge, and Hills Creek reservoirs. Buchanan et al. (1997) described the population in the main stem McKenzie as 'of special concern', the South Fork McKenzie population as 'high risk of extinction', the population above Trail Bridge Reservoir as 'high risk of extinction', and bull trout in the Middle Fork Willamette as 'probably extinct'. Various management efforts such as strict angling regulations and passage improvement projects have been implemented to stabilize and rehabilitate bull trout habitat and populations in the McKenzie River over the past 10 years. Since 1997, bull trout fry from Anderson Creek on the upper McKenzie River have been transferred to the Middle Fork Willamette basin above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to re-establish a reproducing bull trout population. This project was developed in response to concerns over the population status and management of bull trout in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Rivers by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife during the early 1990s. The project was conducted under measure 9.3G(2) of the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to monitor the status, life history, habitat needs, and limiting factors for

  4. ALTERNATIVE FUTURES FOR THE WILLAMETTE RIVER BASIN, OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alternative futures analysis is an assessment approach designed to inform community decisions regarding land and water use. We conducted an alternative futures analysis in the Willamette River Basin in western Oregon. Based on detailed input from local stakeholders, three alter...

  5. Assessing Geomorphic and Vegetative Responses to Environmental Flows in the Willamette River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangano, J.; Jones, K.; Wallick, R.; Bach, L.; Olson, M.; Bervid, H.

    2015-12-01

    On regulated rivers, restoring flow regimes is a process-based restoration approach that may strongly affect downstream ecosystems. Developing realistic flow targets with meaningful geomorphic and ecological benefits, however, is challenging. For instance, hydraulic, geomorphic and biological processes are affected by more than manipulating water release—sediment supply and transport conditions also require consideration. Also, funding and programmatic directives rarely require the monitoring necessary to adaptively manage environmental flow programs. Recent research in the Willamette River basin in support of the Sustainable Rivers Project (SRP) demonstrates how such a monitoring program can be implemented. At the reach scale, initial efforts have assessed geomorphic and vegetative changes in alluvial sections of the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers using repeat mapping from aerial photographs and flow analyses. Overall, both rivers are largely stable because of reduced discharge, bed-material supply and local revetments, but some reaches of the McKenzie River are more dynamic, perhaps reflecting greater inputs of sediment from unregulated tributaries and higher magnitude peak flows. Repeat, reach-scale mapping on the Middle Fork Willamette River shows that frequent bankfull flows are able to scour minimally vegetated gravel bars and sustain a patchwork of actively shifting bed-material sediment. Repeat mapping on the McKenzie River in summer 2015 will reveal insights about the geomorphic effectiveness of bankfull flows. At the site scale, monitoring at two bars in summer 2015 is linking streamflow with the establishment of black cottonwood. Lastly, a review of hydrographs from 2000-2015 and retrospectively applying stakeholder-defined flow targets showed substantial variability in meeting objectives for the timing and types of flows under traditional regulated conditions and the SRP. Altogether, these related efforts help link streamflow, geomorphic

  6. Processes controlling dissolved oxygen and pH in the upper Willamette River basin, Oregon, 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pogue, Ted R.; Anderson, Chauncey W.

    1995-01-01

    In July and August of 1994, the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) collected data to document the spatial extent and diel variability of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations and pH levels in selected reaches of streams in the upper Willamette River Basin. These data were also collected to identify primary factors that control DO concentrations downstream from major point sources as well as to provide ODEQ with data to refine calibration of their steady-state DO and nutrient models for the upper Willamette River Basin. All of the reaches studied had diel variations in DO and pH. The magnitude of the diel variations in DO ranged from 0.2 to 3.9 milligrams per liter (7 to 50 percent-saturation units based on ambient water temperature and barometric pressure) and in pH from 0.3 to 1.4 units. However, of the reaches studied, only the Coast Fork Willamette River from river mile (RM) 21.7 to 12.5 and the Willamette River from RM 151 to 141.6 had field measured violations of State standards for DO and pH. DO concentration and pH in water depend on many factors. Data were collected to examine several major factors, including BOD (biochemical oxygen demand), carbonaceous BOD, nitrogenous BOD, and measures of photosynthetic activity. Of the four study reaches, only a short stretch of the Coast Fork Willamette River has potential for important levels of oxygen consumption from BOD or nitrification. Additionally, water-column primary-productivity measurements indicated that respiration and photosynthesis by free-floating algae did not explain the observed diel variations in DO in the study reaches. Results from a simple mathematical model incorporating measures of community respiration and net primary productivities indicated that periphyton are capable of producing a diel variation of the order of magnitude observed during the August study period. In the Willamette River near Peoria, the combined periphyton DO

  7. South Fork Holston River basin 1988 biomonitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Saylor, C.F.; Ahlstedt, S.A.

    1990-06-01

    There is concern over the effects of shifts in land use use practices on the aquatic fauna of streams in the South Fork Holston River basin in northwestern North Carolina and southwestern Virginia. Trout reproduction has noticeably declined in the Watauga River subbasin. The Watauga River and Elk River subbasins have been subjected to commercial and resort development. The Middle fork Holston River and the upper South Fork Holston River subbasins have been affected by agricultural and mining activities, respectively (Cox, 1986). To aid reclamation and management of the South Fork Holston basin, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) biologists conducted biomonitoring--including index of biotic integrity and macroinvertebrate sampling--on the Middle Fork Holston, South Fork Holston, Watauga, and Elk Rivers to assess cumulative impairment related to changes in habitat and pollutant loading in these subbasins. Biomonitoring can detect environmental degradation, help document problem areas, and assist in development of strategies for managing water quality. This report discusses the methods and materials and results of the biomonitoring of South Fork Holston River Basin. 13 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs.

  8. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment Summary at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities; Willamette River Basin, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, J.H.

    1986-02-01

    Habitat based assessments were conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin, Oregon, to determine losses or gains to wildlife and/or wildlife habitat resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric-related components of the facilities. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types at the project sites were mapped based on aerial photographs. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected areas and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the projects. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each project for each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the projects. The Willamette projects extensively altered or affected 33,407 acres of land and river in the McKenzie, Middle Fork Willamette, and Santiam river drainages. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 5184 acres of old-growth conifer forest, and 2850 acres of riparian hardwood and shrub cover types. Impacts resulting from the Willamette projects included the loss of critical winter range for black-tailed deer and Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for deer, upland game birds, furbearers, spotted owls, pileated woodpeckers, and many other wildlife species. Bald eagles and ospreys were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected areas to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Willamette projects. Losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the lives of the projects. Cumulative or system-wide impacts of the Willamette projects were not quantitatively assessed.

  9. Ground-water hydrology of the Willamette basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conlon, Terrence D.; Wozniak, Karl C.; Woodcock, Douglas; Herrera, Nora B.; Fisher, Bruce J.; Morgan, David S.; Lee, Karl K.; Hinkle, Stephen R.

    2005-01-01

    The Willamette Basin encompasses a drainage of 12,000 square miles and is home to approximately 70 percent of Oregon's population. Agriculture and population are concentrated in the lowland, a broad, relatively flat area between the Coast and Cascade Ranges. Annual rainfall is high, with about 80 percent of precipitation falling from October through March and less than 5 percent falling in July and August, the peak growing season. Population growth and an increase in cultivation of crops needing irrigation have produced a growing seasonal demand for water. Because many streams are administratively closed to new appropriations in summer, ground water is the most likely source for meeting future water demand. This report describes the current understanding of the regional ground-water flow system, and addresses the effects of ground-water development. This study defines seven regional hydrogeologic units in the Willamette Basin. The highly permeable High Cascade unit consists of young volcanic material found at the surface along the crest of the Cascade Range. Four sedimentary hydrogeologic units fill the lowland between the Cascade and Coast Ranges. Young, highly permeable coarse-grained sediments of the upper sedimentary unit have a limited extent in the floodplains of the major streams and in part of the Portland Basin. Extending over much of the lowland where the upper sedimentary unit does not occur, silts and clays of the Willamette silt unit act as a confining unit. The middle sedimentary unit, consisting of permeable coarse-grained material, occurs beneath the Willamette silt and upper sedimentary units and at the surface as terraces in the lowland. Beneath these units is the lower sedimentary unit, which consists of predominantly fine-grained sediments. In the northern part of the basin, lavas of the Columbia River basalt unit occur at the surface in uplands and beneath the basin-fill sedimentary units. The Columbia River basalt unit contains multiple

  10. Water quality in the Willamette Basin, Oregon, 1991-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wentz, Dennis A.; Bonn, Bernadine A.; Carpenter, Kurt D.; Hinkle, Stephen R.; Janet, Mary L.; Rinella, Frank A.; Uhrich, Mark A.; Waite, Ian R.; Laenen, Antonius; Bencala, Kenneth E.

    1998-01-01

    This report is intended to summarize major findings that emerged between 1991 and 1995 from the water-quality assessment of the Willamette Basin Study Unit and to relate these findings to water-quality issues of regional and national concern. The information is primarily intended for those who are involved in water-resource management. Yet, the information contained here may also interest those who simply wish to know more about the quality of water in the rivers and aquifers in the area where they live.

  11. Dissolved-oxygen and algal conditions in selected locations of the Willamette River basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rinella, F.A.; McKenzie, S.W.; Wille, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    During July and August 1978, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oregon Department of Enviromental Quality, made three intensive river-quality dissolved-oxygen studies in the upper Willamette River basin. Two studies were made on the upper Willamette River and one was made on the Santiam River, a Willamette River tributary. Nitrification, occurring in both the upper Willamette and South Santiam Rivers, accounted for about 62% and 92% of the DO sag in the rivers, respectively. Rates of nitrification were found to be dependent on ammonia concentrations in the rivers. Periphyton and phytoplankton algal samples were collected on the main stem Willamette River and selected tributaries during August 1978. Diatoms were the dominant group in both the periphyton and phytoplankton samples. The most common diatom genera were Melosira, Stephanodiscus, Cymbella, Achnanthes, and Nitzschia. Comparisons with historical data indicate no significant difference from previous years in the total abundance or diversity of the algae. (USGS)

  12. Summary of environmental flow monitoring for the Sustainable Rivers Project on the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers, western Oregon, 2014–15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Krista L.; Mangano, Joseph F.; Wallick, J. Rose; Bervid, Heather D.; Olson, Melissa; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Bach, Leslie

    2016-11-07

    This report presents the results of an ongoing environmental flow monitoring study by The Nature Conservancy (TNC), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), and U.S. Geological Survey in support of the Sustainable Rivers Project (SRP) of TNC and USACE. The overarching goal of this study is to evaluate and characterize relations between streamflow, geomorphic processes, and black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa) recruitment on the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers, western Oregon, that were hypothesized in earlier investigations. The SRP can use this information to plan future monitoring and scientific investigations, and to help mitigate the effects of dam operations on streamflow regimes, geomorphic processes, and biological communities, such as black cottonwood forests, in consultation with regional experts. The four tasks of this study were to:Compare the hydrograph from Water Year (WY) 2015 with hydrographs from WYs 2000–14 and the SRP flow recommendations,Assess short-term and system-wide changes in channel features and vegetation throughout the alluvial valley section of the Middle Fork Willamette River (2005–12),Examine changes in channel features and vegetation over two decades (1994–2014) for two short mapping zones on the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers, andComplete a field investigation of summer stage and the growth of black cottonwood and other vegetation on the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers in summer 2015.

  13. Thermal effects of dams in the Willamette River basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rounds, Stewart A.

    2010-01-01

    where the annual maximum temperature typically occurred in September or October. Without-dam temperatures also tended to have more daily variation than with-dam temperatures. Examination of the without-dam temperature estimates indicated that dam sites could be grouped according to the amount of streamflow derived from high-elevation, spring-fed, and snowmelt-driven areas high in the Cascade Mountains (Cougar, Big Cliff/Detroit, River Mill, and Hills Creek Dams: Group A), as opposed to flow primarily derived from lower-elevation rainfall-driven drainages (Group B). Annual maximum temperatures for Group A ranged from 15 to 20 degree(s)C, expressed as the 7-day average of the daily maximum (7dADM), whereas annual maximum 7dADM temperatures for Group B ranged from 21 to 25 degrees C. Because summertime stream temperature is at least somewhat dependent on the upstream water source, it was important when estimating without-dam temperatures to use correlations to sites with similar upstream characteristics. For that reason, it also is important to maintain long-term, year-round temperature measurement stations at representative sites in each of the Willamette River basin's physiographic regions. Streamflow and temperature estimates downstream of the major dam sites and throughout the Willamette River were generated using existing CE-QUAL-W2 flow and temperature models. These models, originally developed for the Willamette River water-temperature Total Maximum Daily Load process, required only a few modifications to allow them to run under the greatly reduced without-dam flow conditions. Model scenarios both with and without upstream dams were run. Results showed that Willamette River streamflow without upstream dams was reduced to levels much closer to historical pre-dam conditions, with annual minimum streamflows approximately one-half or less of dam-augmented levels. Thermal effects of the dams varied according to the time of year, from cooling in mid-summer to warm

  14. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment at Dexter Dam and Reservoir Project, Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, J.H.

    1985-09-01

    A habitat based assessment was conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Dexter Dam and Reservoir Project on the Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, to determine losses or gains resulting from the development and operation of the project. Preconstruction, post-construction, and recent vegetation cover types of the project site were mapped based on aerial photographs from 1944, 1956, and 1979, respectively. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected area and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Fifteen wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the project. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the project. The Dexter Project extensively altered or affected 4662 acres of land and river in the Middle Fork Willamette River drainage. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 445 acres of riparian habitat. Impacts resulting from the Dexter Project included the loss of year-round habitat for black-tailed deer, red fox, mink, beaver, western gray squirrel, ruffed grouse, ring-necked pheasant, California quail, wood duck and nongame species. Bald eagle, osprey, and greater scaup were benefitted by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected area to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Dexter Project. Losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the life of the project.

  15. MODELING WILDLIFE RESPONSE TO LANDSCAPE CHANGE IN OREGON'S WILLAMETTE RIVER BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The PATCH simulation model was used to predict the response of 17 wildlife species to
    three plausible scenarios of habitat change in Oregon's Willamette River Basin. This 30
    thousand square-kilometer basin comprises about 12% of the state of Oregon, encompasses extensive f...

  16. Simulation of groundwater flow and the interaction of groundwater and surface water in the Willamette Basin and Central Willamette subbasin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herrera, Nora B.; Burns, Erick R.; Conlon, Terrence D.

    2014-01-01

    Full appropriation of tributary streamflow during summer, a growing population, and agricultural needs are increasing the demand for groundwater in the Willamette Basin. Greater groundwater use could diminish streamflow and create seasonal and long-term declines in groundwater levels. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Oregon Water Resources Department (OWRD) cooperated in a study to develop a conceptual and quantitative understanding of the groundwater-flow system of the Willamette Basin with an emphasis on the Central Willamette subbasin. This final report from the cooperative study describes numerical models of the regional and local groundwater-flow systems and evaluates the effects of pumping on groundwater and surface‑water resources. The models described in this report can be used to evaluate spatial and temporal effects of pumping on groundwater, base flow, and stream capture. The regional model covers about 6,700 square miles of the 12,000-square mile Willamette and Sandy River drainage basins in northwestern Oregon—referred to as the Willamette Basin in this report. The Willamette Basin is a topographic and structural trough that lies between the Coast Range and the Cascade Range and is divided into five sedimentary subbasins underlain and separated by basalts of the Columbia River Basalt Group (Columbia River basalt) that crop out as local uplands. From north to south, these five subbasins are the Portland subbasin, the Tualatin subbasin, the Central Willamette subbasin, the Stayton subbasin, and the Southern Willamette subbasin. Recharge in the Willamette Basin is primarily from precipitation in the uplands of the Cascade Range, Coast Range, and western Cascades areas. Groundwater moves downward and laterally through sedimentary or basalt units until it discharges locally to wells, evapotranspiration, or streams. Mean annual groundwater withdrawal for water years 1995 and 1996 was about 400 cubic feet per second; irrigation withdrawals

  17. FUTURE WATER ALLOCATION AND IN-STREAM VALUES IN THE WILLAMETTE RIVER BASIN: A BASIN-WIDE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our research investigated the impact on surface water resources of three different scenarios for the future development of the Willamette River Basin in Oregon (USA). Water rights in the basin, and in the western United States in general, are based on a system of law that binds ...

  18. New interpretation of Clarks Fork field, northern Bighorn basin, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.S.; Lindsley-Griffin, N.

    1986-08-01

    Clarks Fork field is located at the northern edge of the Bighorn basin (T9S, R22E) in Carbon County, Montana. Production was first established in 1944 by General Petroleum Corporation in the Cretaceous Peay Sandstone (basal Frontier) and was later extended to the Cretaceous Greybull (1949) and Lakota (1956) sandstones by British American. Total cumulative hydrocarbons from this field are 1,1789,193 bbl of oil and 3,061,522 mcf of gas, with Lakota sandstones being most productive. Lakota production occurs from a structural-stratigraphic trap in an east-west-trending channel on the axis of Clarks Fork anticline, geographically near the center of the township. Our structural reinterpretation of Clarks Fork field suggests that Elk Basin anticline is a northwest extension of the Elk Basin field anticline. The Elk Basin thrust truncates the north limb of the fold and does not strike to the northwest, as shown by earlier interpretations. They interpret a northwest-striking thrust in the center of the township as a splay off the Elk Basin thrust, and have named it the Clarks Fork thrust. The Clarks Fork anticline is located on the hanging wall of Clarks Fork thrust. Subsurface maps indicate the Clarks Fork area has not been fully developed. Stratigraphic traps in the Lakota and Greybull sandstones are present in several areas of the township. Structural traps in the center and northwest portions of the township may also exist.

  19. Development of a Willingness to Pay Survey for Willamette Basin Spring Chinook and Winter Steelhead Recovery

    EPA Science Inventory

    Salmon fisheries are a high-profile icon of the Pacific Northwest. Spring Chinook and winter-run steelhead are both listed as federally endangered species in the Willamette basin, the most populated and developed watershed in Oregon. Despite being a high profile issue, there are ...

  20. Reservoir-system model for the Willamette River basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shearman, James O.

    1976-01-01

    For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Development of CE-QUAL-W2 models for the Middle Fork Willamette and South Santiam Rivers, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buccola, Norman L.; Stonewall, Adam J.; Sullivan, Annett B.; Kim, Yoonhee; Rounds, Stewart A.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrodynamic (CE-QUAL-W2) models of Hills Creek Lake (HCL), Lookout Point Lake (LOP), and Dexter Lake (DEX) on the Middle Fork Willamette River (MFWR), and models of Green Peter Lake and Foster Lake on the South Santiam River systems in western Oregon were updated and recalibrated for a wide range of flow and meteorological conditions. These CE-QUAL-W2 models originally were developed by West Consultants, Inc., for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. This study by the U.S. Geological Survey included a reassessment of the models’ calibration in more recent years—2002, 2006, 2008, and 2011—categorized respectively as low, normal, high, and extremely high flow calendar years. These years incorporated current dam-operation practices and more available data than the time period used in the original calibration. Modeled water temperatures downstream of both HCL and LOP-DEX on the MFWR were within an average of 0.68 degree Celsius (°C) of measured values; modeled temperatures downstream of Foster Dam on the South Santiam River were within an average of 0.65°C of measured values. A new CE-QUAL-W2 model was developed and calibrated for the riverine MFWR reach between Hills Creek Dam and the head of LOP, allowing an evaluation of the flow and temperature conditions in the entire MFWR system from HCL to Dexter Dam. The complex bathymetry and long residence time of HCL, combined with the relatively deep location of the power and regulating outlet structures at Hills Creek Dam, led to a HCL model that was highly sensitive to several outlet and geometric parameters related to dam structures (STR TOP, STR BOT, STR WIDTH). Release temperatures from HCL were important and often persisted downstream as they were incorporated in the MFWR model and the LOP-DEX model (downstream of MFWR). The models tended to underpredict the measured temperature of water releases from Dexter Dam during the late-September-through-December drawdown period in 2002, and again (to a lesser extent) in

  2. North Fork Snoqualmie River Basin Wildlife Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    more recent origin, never having been a natural lake. 118 Shoreline materials arv still in the process of washing into the depths of the South Fork...10-12 Twin Peaks - Philippa Lake 9 12-24 Bessemer Mountain 13 Total 52-55 44-64 , Estimates provided by John Cook (Olympic Taxidermy, Renton, Wash...organisms which use resources efficient- ly. This process results in wildlife populations which are balanced with their environments. When resources

  3. Water temperature effects from simulated dam operations and structures in the Middle Fork Willamette River, western Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buccola, Norman L.; Turner, Daniel F.; Rounds, Stewart A.

    2016-09-14

    Significant FindingsStreamflow and water temperature in the Middle Fork Willamette River (MFWR), western Oregon, have been regulated and altered since the construction of Lookout Point, Dexter, and Hills Creek Dams in 1954 and 1961, respectively. Each year, summer releases from the dams typically are cooler than pre-dam conditions, with the reverse (warmer than pre-dam conditions) occurring in autumn. This pattern has been detrimental to habitat of endangered Upper Willamette River (UWR) Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and UWR winter steelhead (O. mykiss) throughout multiple life stages. In this study, scenarios testing different dam-operation strategies and hypothetical dam-outlet structures were simulated using CE-QUAL-W2 hydrodynamic/temperature models of the MFWR system from Hills Creek Lake (HCR) to Lookout Point (LOP) and Dexter (DEX) Lakes to explore and understand the efficacy of potential flow and temperature mitigation options.Model scenarios were run in constructed wet, normal, and dry hydrologic calendar years, and designed to minimize the effects of Hills Creek and Lookout Point Dams on river temperature by prioritizing warmer lake surface releases in May–August and cooler, deep releases in September–December. Operational scenarios consisted of a range of modified release rate rules, relaxation of power-generation constraints, variations in the timing of refill and drawdown, and maintenance of different summer maximum lake levels at HCR and LOP. Structural scenarios included various combinations of hypothetical floating outlets near the lake surface and hypothetical new outlets at depth. Scenario results were compared to scenarios using existing operational rules that give temperature management some priority (Base), scenarios using pre-2012 operational rules that prioritized power generation over temperature management (NoBlend), and estimated temperatures from a without-dams condition (WoDams).Results of the tested model scenarios led

  4. Pollution in the lower Columbia Basin in 1948 with particular reference to the Willamette River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fish, F.F.; Rucker, R.R.

    1950-01-01

    Development of the salmon resources of the lower Columbia River Basin appears as sound insurance against the threat of a serious reduction in the runs to the upper river areas through the multiple-purpose programs of water development now under way by the Corps of Engineers, the Bureau of Reclamation, and private interests. Any comprehensive plan for the full development of the fisheries resources in the lower Columbia Basin must be predicated upon accurate knowledge of the waters therein polluted to a degree affecting fish life. Pollution surveys have been made in the lower Columbia Basin at various times in the past -- the most intensive studies having been made in the Willamette Valley.

  5. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment Summary at Lookout Point Dam and Reservoir Project, Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon; 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bedrossian, K.L.; Noyes, J.H.

    1985-09-01

    A habitat based assessment was conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Lookout Point Dam and Reservoir Project on the Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, to determine losses or gains resulting from development and operation of the hydroelectric related components of the project. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types of the project site were mapped based on aerial photographs from 1944, 1956, and 1979, respectively. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected area and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Seventeen wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the project. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the project. The Lookout Point Project extensively altered or affected 6790 acres of land and river in the Middle Fork Willamette River drainage. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 724 acres of old-growth conifer forest and 118 acres of riparian habitat. Impacts resulting from the Lookout Point Project included the loss of winter range for Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for black-tailed deer, western gray squirrel, red fox, mink, beaver, ruffed grouse, ring-necked pheasant, California quail, spotted owl, and other nongame species. Bald eagle and osprey were benefitted by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected area to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Lookout Point Project. Loses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the life of the project.

  6. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment at Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project, Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, J.H.

    1985-09-01

    A habitat based assessment was conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project on the Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, to determine losses or gains resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric related components of the project. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types of the project site were mapped based on aerial photographs from 1944, 1964, and 1979, respectively. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected area and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Fifteen wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the project. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the project. The Hills Creek Project extensively altered or affected 4662 acres of land and river in the Middle Fork Willamette River drainage. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 2694 acres of old-growth forest and 207 acres of riparian habitat. Impacts resulting from the Hills Creek Project included the loss of winter range for Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for black-tailed deer, black bear, cougar, river otter, beaver, ruffed grouse, spotted owl, and other nongame species. Bald eagle and osprey were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected area to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Hills Creek Project, losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the life of the project.

  7. Predicting the Total Abundance of Resident Salmonids within the Willamette River Basin, Oregon - a Macroecological Modeling Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    I present a simple, macroecological model of fish abundance that was used to estimate the total number of non-migratory salmonids within the Willamette River Basin (western Oregon). The model begins with empirical point estimates of net primary production (NPP in g C/m2) in fore...

  8. Fish and Amphibian Use of Vegetated and Non-vegetated Intermittent Channels in the Upper Willamette Basin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intermittent agricultural drainages found in the lowlands of the upper Willamette Basin provide habitat characteristics that may be preferred by native species of fish and amphibians. Vegetated substrates and lack of vegetation growing in the channels are the most common habitat differences amongst ...

  9. Shallow aquifer storage and recovery (SASR): Initial findings from the Willamette Basin, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, P.; Haggerty, R.

    2012-12-01

    A novel mode of shallow aquifer management could increase the volumetric potential and distribution of groundwater storage. We refer to this mode as shallow aquifer storage and recovery (SASR) and gauge its potential as a freshwater storage tool. By this mode, water is stored in hydraulically connected aquifers with minimal impact to surface water resources. Basin-scale numerical modeling provides a linkage between storage efficiency and hydrogeological parameters, which in turn guides rulemaking for how and where water can be stored. Increased understanding of regional groundwater-surface water interactions is vital to effective SASR implementation. In this study we (1) use a calibrated model of the central Willamette Basin (CWB), Oregon to quantify SASR storage efficiency at 30 locations; (2) estimate SASR volumetric storage potential throughout the CWB based on these results and pertinent hydrogeological parameters; and (3) introduce a methodology for management of SASR by such parameters. Of 3 shallow, sedimentary aquifers in the CWB, we find the moderately conductive, semi-confined, middle sedimentary unit (MSU) to be most efficient for SASR. We estimate that users overlying 80% of the area in this aquifer could store injected water with greater than 80% efficiency, and find efficiencies of up to 95%. As a function of local production well yields, we estimate a maximum annual volumetric storage potential of 30 million m3 using SASR in the MSU. This volume constitutes roughly 9% of the current estimated summer pumpage in the Willamette basin at large. The dimensionless quantity lag #—calculated using modeled specific capacity, distance to nearest in-layer stream boundary, and injection duration—exhibits relatively high correlation to SASR storage efficiency at potential locations in the CWB. This correlation suggests that basic field measurements could guide SASR as an efficient shallow aquifer storage tool.

  10. Ground-water and water-chemistry data for the Willamette basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orzol, Leonard L.; Wozniak, Karl C.; Meissner, Tiffany R.; Lee, Douglas B.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents ground-water data collected and compiled as part of a study of the ground-water resources of the Willamette River Basin, Oregon. The report includes tabulated information and a location map for 1,234 field-located water wells and 6 springs, hydrographs showing water-level fluctuations during various time periods for 265 of the wells, borehole geophysical data for 16 wells, and water-chemistry analyses from 125 wells and 6 springs. These data, as well as data for 4,752 additional fieldlocated wells and 1 spring, are included on a CD-ROM. In addition, the locations of the field-located wells and springs are provided in geographic information system formats on the CD-ROM.

  11. Summary of information on aquatic biota and their habitats in the Willamette Basin, Oregon, through 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Altman, Bob; Henson, C.M.; Waite, I.R.

    1997-01-01

    Aquatic toxicological investigations in the basin have focused primarily on fish. These studies have addressed chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dioxins and furans, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and trace elements in aquatic tissue, as well as fish health assessments, skeletal abnormalities, and aquatic toxicological responses. Several pesticides exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and State water-quality criteria for the protection of aquatic life. Elevated PCB, dioxin, and furan concentrations were associated with point sources, such as pulp and paper mills. Elevated concentrations of mercury in aquatic tissue were associated with several reservoirs. Fish health assessments and skeletal abnormality studies detected high levels of abnormalities in fish from the main stem Willamette River. Few investigations have examined aquatic toxicological responses, such as enzyme induction assays, growth assays, and biomarker studies.

  12. Flood-inundation maps for a 9.1-mile reach of the Coast Fork Willamette River near Creswell and Goshen, Lane County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, Glen W.; Haluska, Tana L.

    2016-04-13

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 9.1-mile reach of the Coast Fork Willamette River near Creswell and Goshen, Oregon, were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected stages at the USGS streamgage at Coast Fork Willamette River near Goshen, Oregon (14157500), at State Highway 58. Current stage at the streamgage for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation may be obtained at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/or/nwis/uv/?site_no=14157500&PARAmeter_cd=00065,00060. In addition, the National Weather Service (NWS) forecasted peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation.In this study, areas of inundation were provided by USACE. The inundated areas were developed from flood profiles simulated by a one-dimensional unsteady step‑backwater hydraulic model. The profiles were checked by the USACE using documented high-water marks from a January 2006 flood. The model was compared and quality assured using several other methods. The hydraulic model was then used to determine eight water-surface profiles at various flood stages referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from 11.8 to 19.8 ft, approximately 2.6 ft above the highest recorded stage at the streamgage (17.17 ft) since 1950. The intervals between stages are variable and based on annual exceedance probability discharges, some of which approximate NWS action stages.The areas of inundation and water depth grids provided to USGS by USACE were used to create interactive flood‑inundation maps. The availability of these maps with current stage from USGS streamgage and forecasted stream stages from the NWS provide emergency management

  13. A Three-Dimensional View of the Tualatin and Northern Willamette Basins, Oregon, from Inversion of New Gravity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenheim, V. E.; McPhee, D. K.; Morin, R. L.; Blakely, R. J.; Wells, R. E.

    2004-12-01

    A regional gravity study was initiated during the summer of 2004 over the Tualatin and northern Willamette basins in support of ongoing seismic hazard and ground-water studies. More than 1200 new gravity measurements were acquired over the basins and surrounding areas, increasing the average spacing of 1 station per 25 km2 to 1 station per 5 km2 over much of the lowlands. To first order, the gravity data reflect the substantial density contrast (400 to 600 kg/m3) between dense Eocene oceanic basement rocks (e.g. Tillamook Volcanics and Siletz River Volcanics), exposed extensively in the Coast Range west of the valleys, and overlying Eocene to Miocene marine sedimentary rocks and Quaternary deposits. Isostatic gravity values as high as +70 mGal occur over Eocene basement rocks west of the valleys. Relatively high gravity values of ˜ +20 mGal coincide with a few scattered outcrops of the Tillamook Formation and Basalt of Waverly Heights (considered Eocene volcanic basement) on the eastern margin of the Tualatin basin, suggesting that Eocene basement extends across the Tualatin basin. However, the lower values on the eastern margin may indicate lower-density facies within the volcanic basement (i.e. breccias rather than flows) and/or a deeper oceanic slab. Both the Tualatin basin and the Willamette basin to the south are marked by gravity lows. The lowest gravity values (minus 45 mGal) of the entire region occur in the central part of the Tualatin basin, north of the intrabasinal, east-striking Beaverton Fault, whereas the gravity low over the northern Willamette basin reaches only minus 20 mGal. The two basins are separated by a broad, northeast-trending gravity high along the upthrown side of the Sherwood fault. The western margin of the Tualatin gravity low coincides with the Gales Creek fault and is marked by a steep gravity gradient, which broadens south of the Beaverton Fault. The southward continuation of the Gales Creek fault into the northern Willamette

  14. Associations among fish assemblage structure and environmental variables in Willamette Basin streams, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, I.R.; Carpenter, K.D.

    2000-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program, fish were collected from 24 selected stream sites in the Willamette Basin during 1993-1995 to determine the composition of the fish assemblages and their relation to the chemical and physical environment. Variance in fish relative abundance was greater among all sites than among spatially distinct reaches within a site (spatial variation) or among multiple sampled years at a site (temporal variation). Therefore, data from a single reach in an individual year was considered to be a reliable estimator of the fish assemblage structure at a site when the data were normalized by percent relative abundance. Multivariate classification and ordination were used to examine patterns in environmental variables and fish relative abundance over differing spatial scales (among versus within ecoregions). Across all ecoregions (all sites), fish assemblages were primarily structured along environmental gradients of water temperature and stream gradient (coldwater, high-gradient forested sites versus warmwater, low-gradient Willamette Valley sites); this pattern superseded patterns that were ecoregion specific. Water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and physical habitat (e.g., riparian canopy and percent riffles) were associated with patterns of fish assemblages across all ecoregions; however, pesticide and total phosphorus concentrations were more important than physical habitat within the Willamette Valley ecoregion. Consideration of stream site stratification (e.g., stream size, ecoregion, and stream gradient), identification of fish to species level (particularly the sculpin family), and detailed measurement of habitat, diurnal dissolved oxygen, and water temperature were critical in evaluating the composition of fish assemblages in relation to land use. In general, these low-gradient valley streams typical of other agricultural regions had poor riparian systems and showed increases in water

  15. Climate change impacts on spatial patterns in drought risk in the Willamette River Basin, Oregon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Il Won; Chang, Heejun

    2012-05-01

    Climate change is likely to lead more frequent droughts in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) of America. Rising air temperature will reduce winter snowfall and increase earlier snowmelt, subsequently reducing summer flows. Longer crop-growing season caused by higher temperatures will lead to increases in evapotranspiration and irrigation water demand, which could exacerbate drought damage. However, the impacts of climate change on drought risk will vary over space and time. Thus, spatially explicit drought assessment can help water resource managers and planners to better cope with risk. This study seeks to identify possible drought-vulnerable regions in the Willamette River Basin of the PNW. In order to estimate drought risk in a spatially explicit way, relative Standardized Precipitation Index (rSPI) and relative Standardized Runoff Index (rSRI) were employed. Statistically downscaled climate simulations forcing two greenhouse gas emission scenarios, A1B and B1, were used to investigate the possible changes in drought frequency with 3-, 6-, 12-, and 24-month time scales. The results of rSPI and rSRI showed an increase in the short-term frequency of drought due to decreases in summer precipitation and snowmelt. However, long-term drought showed no change or a slight decreasing pattern due to increases in winter precipitation and runoff. According to the local index of spatial autocorrelation analysis, the Willamette Valley region was more vulnerable (hot spot) to drought risk than the mountainous regions of the Western Cascades and the High Cascades (cold spot). Although the hydrology of the Western Cascades and the High Cascades will be affected by climate change, these regions will remain relatively water-rich. This suggests that improving the water transfer system could be a reasonable climate adaptation option. Additionally, these results showed that the spatial patterns of drought risk change were affected by drought indices, such that appropriate drought index

  16. MODELING WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY IN THE WILLAMETTE BASIN: A COMPARISON OF PAST, PRESENT AND A RANGE OF POSSIBLE FUTURES (CA. 2050)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of three possible land use futures in the Willamette Basin are evaluated with respect to present and historic conditions of wildlife habitat. Basin wide land use/land cover maps were developed by the Pacific Northwest Ecosystem Research Consortium (PNW-ERC) in coopera...

  17. Willamette Basin Comprehensive Study of Water and Related Land Resources: Appendix B--Hydrology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1969-01-01

    The study was undertaken to plan for the proper development of water andrelated land resources of the Willamette Basin in Oregon. Appendix B, along with Appendices A and C, provides supporting data for the functional Appendices D through L. Climate is first discussed, including the climatic significance of geographical features such as the Pacific Ocean, the Columbia Gorge, and the Coast and Cascade Ranges, climatic elements (e.g. , temperature, precipitation, evaporation), and meteorological aspects of major storms--rain, wind, and snow. A description of water resources, their distribution, and their variation at different times are presented. These resources are described in terms of factors influencing the occurrence of water. Specifically reviewed here are surface waters, groundwater, the relationship between surface and groundwater, management programs, and water rights and legal restrictions. Lastly, the adequacy of hydrologic data is reviewed. Statistical and interpretive hydrologic data necessary for broadscale water resources planning are provided. Data assembled are those concerning climate, streamflow, lakes and glaciers, chemical-quality, sediment, stream temperature, and groundwater. Geologic and soils mapping are briefly discussed, and a list of references is provided.

  18. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran concentration profiles in sediment and fish tissue of the Willamette Basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonn, B.A.

    1998-01-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) are highly hydrophobic compounds that have been implicated as carcinogens and, more recently, as estrogen disrupters. An occurrence and distribution study of these compounds in the Willamette Basin, Oregon, was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Bed sediment was collected from 22 sites; fish tissue was collected from eight sites. PCDD/F were found to be ubiquitous in Willamette Basin sediment. A distinct homolog profile, dominated by octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, was observed in sediment throughout the basin. The PCDD homolog profile was consistent at all sites, regardless of total PCDD/F concentration, presence of point sources, subbasin size, geographic location or land use. Principal components analysis revealed a gradient among the homolog profiles that showed increasing dominance of highly chlorinated congeners where human and industrial activity increased. Tissue and bed sediment obtained from the same site did not have similar PCDD/F concentrations or homolog profiles. Fish tissue showed enrichment in less chlorinated congeners and congeners with chlorine substitutions in the 2, 3, 7 and 8 positions.

  19. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Dissolved Organic Matter Characteristics in the Upper Willamette River Basin, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. S.; Lajtha, K.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) leaching through soil affects soil carbon sequestration and the carbon metabolism of receiving water bodies. Improving our understanding of the sources and fate of DOM at varying spatial and temporal patterns is crucial for land management decisions. However, little is known about how DOM sources change with land use types and seasonal flow patterns. In the Willamette River Basin (WRB), which is home to Oregon's major cities including Portland and Salem, forested headwaters transition to agricultural and urban land. The climate of WRB has a distinctive seasonal pattern with dry warm summers and wet winters driven by winter precipitation and snowmelt runoff between November and March. This study examined DOM fluorescence characteristic in stream water from 21 locations collected monthly and 16 locations collected seasonally to identify the sources and fate of DOM in the upper WRB in contrasting land uses. DOC and dissolved organic nitrogen concentrations increased as the flow rate increased during winter precipitation at all sites. This indicates that increased flow rate increased the connectivity between land and nearby water bodies. DOM fluorescent properties varied among land use types. During the first precipitation event after a long dry summer, a microbial DOM signature in agricultural areas increased along with nitrate concentrations. This may be because accumulated nutrients on land during the dry season flowed to nearby streams during the first rain event and promoted microbial growth in the streams. During the month of the highest flow rate in 2014, sampling sites near forest showed evidence of a greater terrestrial DOM signature compared to its signature during the dry season. This indicates fluorescent DOM characteristics in streams vary as the flow connectivity changes even within the same land type.

  20. A Wildlife Habitat Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Plan for Eight Federal Hydroelectric Facilities in the Willamette River Basin: Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, S.K.

    1987-05-01

    The development and operation of eight federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin impacted 30,776 acres of prime wildlife habitat. This study proposes mitigative measures for the losses to wildlife and wildlife habitat resulting from these projects, under the direction of the Columbia River Basin (CRB) Fish and Wildlife Program. The CRB Fish and Wildlife Program was adopted in 1982 by the Northwest Power Planning Council, pursuant to the Northwest Power Planning Act of 1980. The proposed mitigation plan is based on the findings of loss assessments completed in 1985, that used a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) to assess the extent of impact to wildlife and wildlife habitat, with 24 evaluation species. The vegetative structure of the impacted habitat was broken down into three components: big game winter range, riparian habitat and old-growth forest. The mitigation plan proposes implementation of the following, over a period of 20 years: (1) purchase of cut-over timber lands to mitigate, in the long-term, for big game winter range, and portions of the riparian habitat and old-growth forest (approx. 20,000 acres); (2) purchase approximately 4,400 acres of riparian habitat along the Willamette River Greenway; and (3) three options to mitigate for the outstanding old-growth forest losses. Monitoring would be required in the early stages of the 100-year plan. The timber lands would be actively managed for elk and timber revenue could provide O and M costs over the long-term.

  1. Environmental settings of the South Fork Iowa River basin, Iowa, and the Bogue Phalia basin, Mississippi, 2006-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Rose, Claire E.; Kalkhoff, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of the transport and fate of agricultural chemicals in different environmental settings were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program's Agricultural Chemicals Team (ACT) at seven sites across the Nation, including the South Fork Iowa River basin in central Iowa and the Bogue Phalia basin in northwestern Mississippi. The South Fork Iowa River basin is representative of midwestern agriculture, where corn and soybeans are the predominant crops and a large percentage of the cultivated land is underlain by artificial drainage. The Bogue Phalia basin is representative of corn, soybean, cotton, and rice cropping in the humid, subtropical southeastern United States. Details of the environmental settings of these basins and the data-collection activities conducted by the USGS ACT over the 2006-10 study period are described in this report.

  2. Methodology for river-quality assessment with application to the Willamette River basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rickert, David A.; Hines, Walter G.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1976-01-01

    For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. LIFE HISTORY MONITORING OF SALMONIDS IN THE WEST FORK SMITH RIVER, UMPQUA BASIN, OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a life-cycle monitoring basin for the Oregon Salmon Plan, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has estimated adult returns, distribution and smolt outmigration of coho, chinook and winter steelhead in the West Fork Smith River since 1998. In 2001/2002, the Environmenta...

  4. Geologic features of dam sites in the Nehalem, Rogue, and Willamette River basins, Oregon, 1935-37

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piper, A.M.

    1947-01-01

    The present report comprises brief descriptions of geologic features at 19 potential dam sites in the Nehalem, Rogue, and Willamette River basins in western Oregon. The topography of these site and of the corresponding reservoir site was mapped in 1934-36 under an allocation of funds, by the Public Works Administration for river-utilization surveys by the Conservation Branch of the United States Geological Survey. The field program in Oregon has been under the immediate charge of R. O. Helland. The 19 dam sites are distributed as follows: three on the Nehalem River, on the west or Pacific slope of the Oregon Coast range; four on Little Butte Creek and two on Evans Creek, tributaries of the Rogue River in the eastern part of the Klamath Mountains; four on the South and Middle Santiam Rivers, tributaries of the Willamette River from the west slope of the Cascade mountains; and six on tributaries of the Willamette River from the east slope of the Coast Range. Except in the Evans Creek basin, all the rocks in the districts that were studied are of comparatively late geological age. They include volcanic rocks, crystalline rocks of several types, marine and nonmarine sedimentary rocks, and recent stream deposits. The study of geologic features has sought to estimate the bearing power and water-tightness of the rocks at each dam site, also to place rather broad limits on the type of dam for which the respective sites seem best suited. It was not considered necessary to study the corresponding reservoir sites in detail for excessive leakage appears to be unlikely. Except at three of the four site in the Santiam River basin, no test pits have been dug nor exploratory holes drilled, so that geologic features have been interpreted wholly from natural outcrops and from highway and railroad cuts. Because these outcrops and cuts are few, many problems related to the construction and maintenance of dams can not be answered at the this time and all critical features of the sites

  5. Seasonal and spatial variability of nutrients and pesticides in streams of the Willamette Basin, Oregon, 1993-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rinella, F.A.; Janet, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    From April 1993 to September 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study of the occurrence and distribution of nutrients and pesticides in surface water of the Willamette and Sandy River Basins, Oregon, as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. About 260 samples were collected at 51 sites during the study; of these, more than 60 percent of the pesticide samples and more than 70 percent of the nutrient samples were collected at 7 sites in a fixed-station network (primary sites) to characterize seasonal water-quality variability related to a variety of land-use activities. Samples collected at the remain ing 44 sites were used primarily to characterize spatial water- quality variability in agricultural river subbasins located throughout the study area.This report describes concentrations of 4 nutrient species (total nitrogen, filtered nitrite plus nitrate, total phosphorus, and soluble reactive phosphorus) and 86 pesticides and pesticide degradation products in streams, during high- and low-flow conditions, receiving runoff from urban, agricultural, forested, and mixed-use lands. Although most nutrient and pesticide concentrations were relatively low, some concentrations exceeded maximum contaminant levels for drinking water and water-quality criteria for chronic toxicity established for the protection of freshwater aquatic life. The largest number of exceedances generally occurred at sites receiving predominantly agricultural inputs. Total nitrogen, filtered nitrite plus nitrate, total phosphorus, and soluble reactive phosphorus concentrations were detected in 89 to 98 percent of the samples; atrazine, simazine, metolachlor, and desethylatrazine were detected in 72 to 94 percent of the samples. Fifty different pesticides and degradation products was detected during the 2-1/2 year study.Seasonally, peak nutrient and pesticide concentrations at the seven primary sites were observed during winter and spring rains

  6. Quality of shallow ground water in alluvial aquifers of the Willamette Basin, Oregon, 1993-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, Stephen R.

    1997-01-01

    The current (1993?95) quality of shallow ground water (generally, <25 meters below land surface) in Willamette Basin alluvium is described using results from two studies. A Study-Unit Survey, or regional assessment of shallow groundwater quality in alluvium, was done from June through August 1993. During the Study-Unit Survey, data were collected from 70 domestic wells chosen using a random-selection process and located mostly in areas of agricultural land use. An urban Land-Use Study, which was a reconnaissance of shallow urban ground-water quality from 10 monitoring wells installed in areas of residential land use, was done in July 1995. Concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate (henceforth, nitrate, because nitrite concentrations were low) ranged from <0.05 to 26 mg N/L (milligrams nitrogen per liter) in ground water from 70 Study-Unit-Survey wells; concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 10 mg N/L in 9 percent of Study-Unit-Survey samples. Relationships were observed between nitrate concentrations and dissolved-oxygen concentrations, the amount of clay present within and overlying aquifers, overlying geology, and upgradient land use. Tritium (3H) data indicate that 21 percent of Study-Unit-Survey samples represented water recharged prior to 1953. Nitrogen-fertilizer application rates in the basin have increased greatly over the past several decades. Thus, some observed nitrate concentrations may reflect nitrogen loading rates that were smaller than those presently applied in the basin. Concentrations of phosphorus ranged from <0.01 to 2.2 mg/L in 70 Study-Unit-Survey wells and exceeded 0.10 mg/L in 60 percent of the samples. Phosphorus and nitrate concentrations were inversely correlated. From 1 to 5 pesticides and pesticide degradation products (henceforth, pesticides) were detected in ground water from each of 23 Study-Unit-Survey wells (33 percent of 69 wells sampled for pesticides) for a total

  7. Precipitation-runoff and streamflow-routing models for the Willamette River basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius; Risley, John C.

    1997-01-01

    With an input of current streamflow, precipitation, and air temperature data the combined runoff and routing models can provide current estimates of streamflow at almost 500 locations on the main stem and major tributaries of the Willamette River with a high degree of accuracy. Relative contributions of surface runoff, subsurface flow, and ground-water flow can be assessed for 1 to 10 HRU classes in each of 253 subbasins identified for precipitation-runoff modeling. Model outputs were used with a water-quality model to simulate the movement of dye in the Pudding River as an example

  8. Relations of habitat-specific algal assemblages to land use and water chemistry in the Willamette Basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, K.D.; Waite, I.R.

    2000-01-01

    Benthic algal assemblages, water chemistry, and habitat were characterized at 25 stream sites in the Willamette Basin, Oregon, during low flow in 1994. Seventy-three algal samples yielded 420 taxa - Mostly diatoms, blue-green algae, and green algae. Algal assemblages from depositional samples were strongly dominated by diatoms (76% mean relative abundance), whereas erosional samples were dominated by blue-green algae (68% mean relative abundance). Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) of semiquantitative and qualitative (presence/absence) data sets identified four environmental variables (maximum specific conductance, % open canopy, pH, and drainage area) that were significant in describing patterns of algal taxa among sites. Based on CCA, four groups of sites were identified: Streams in forested basins that supported oligotrophic taxa, such as Diatoma mesodon; small streams in agricultural and urban basins that contained a variety of eutrophic and nitrogen-heterotrophic algal taxa; larger rivers draining areas of mixed land use that supported planktonic, eutrophic, and nitrogen-heterotrophic algal taxa; and streams with severely degraded or absent riparian vegetation (> 75% open canopy) that were dominated by other planktonic, eutrophic, and nitrogen-heterotrophic algal taxa. Patterns in water chemistry were consistent with the algal autecological interpretations and clearly demonstrated relationships between land use, water quality, and algal distribution patterns.

  9. Aquatic Species Responses to Changes in Streamflow and Stream Temperature in the Willamette River Basin of Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, H.; Psaris, A. M.; Strecker, A.

    2014-12-01

    Climate models project less summer precipitation and hotter temperatures in the Pacific Northwest. These changes will bring earlier snowmelt and reduced summer flow, which will increase stream temperature. Many cold water species will be adversely affected by such changes. However, the spatial and temporal extent of how each stream responds to climate change and how fish species respond to varying degrees of changes in flow and stream temperature across multiple streams has not been thoroughly studied. Using a combination of representative downscaled climate data, a watershed hydrologic model, and regression analysis, we projected future changes in streamflow and temperature and the responses of fish habitat to these changes for several tributaries of the Willamette River basin that exhibits distinct hydrologic landscape regions. Our simulation results suggest that streams located in the High Cascades where groundwater input is high will experience less warming and less flow reduction, thus more resilient to warming. In contrast, streams in transient areas where snow cover is projected to decline substantially will experience the most declines in fish diversity as a result of reduction in flow and highest rise in stream temperature. Our results suggest spatially targeted adaptive management strategies for fishes in a large heterogeneous river basin will be necessary in a rapidly changing climate.

  10. Regional Ecorisk Field investigation, upper Clark Fork River Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Pastorok, R.; LaTier, A.; Ginn, T.

    1995-12-31

    The Regional Ecorisk Field Investigation was conducted at the Clark Fork River Superfund Site (Montana) to evaluate the relationships between plant communities and tailings deposits in riparian habitats and to evaluate food-chain transfer of trace elements to selected wildlife species. Stations were selected to represent a range of vegetation biomass (or cover) values and apparent impact of trace elements, with some areas of lush vegetation, some areas of mostly unvegetated soil (e.g., < 30 percent plant cover), and a gradient in between. For the evaluation of risk to wildlife, bioaccumulation of metals was evaluated in native or naturalized plants, terrestrial invertebrates, and the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus). Potential reproductive effects in the deer mouse were evaluated by direct measurements. For other wildlife species, bioaccumulation data were interpreted in the context of food web exposure models. Total biomass and species richness of riparian plant communities are related to tailings content of soil as indicated by pH and metals concentrations. Risk to populations of omnivorous small mammals such as the deer mouse was not significant. Relative abundance and reproductive condition of the deer mouse were normal, even in areas of high metals enrichment. Based on exposure models and site-specific tissue residue data for dietary species, risk to local populations of predators such as red fox and American kestrel that feed on deer mice and terrestrial invertebrates is not significant. Risk to herbivores related to metals bioaccumulation in plant tissues is not significant. Population level effects in deer and other large wildlife are not expected because of the large home ranges of such species and compensatory demographic factors.

  11. Dioxins and furans in bed sediment and fish tissue of the Willamette Basin, Oregon, 1992-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonn, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) are related compounds that are of interest primarily because of their potential toxicity. They are considered carcinogens and have been implicated as hormone disrupters. An occurrence and distribution study of these compounds in the Willamette Basin, Oregon, was done by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1992- 1995. Bed sediment samples were collected at 22 sites, and fish tissue samples were collected from 8 sites. Samples were analyzed for 10 tetra- through octa- congener class totals and for 17 individual 2,3,7,8-substituted congeners. PCDD/Fs were found in bed sediment and fish tissue throughout the basin, including samples from the most remote forested sites. PCDD/F concentrations in bed sediment at most sites in agricultural and forested areas were similar to those at reference sites worldwide and are probably background concentrations due to atmospheric deposition. The highest concentrations in bed sediment were found at sites where industrial or urban inputs were likely. Potential toxicity at these sites (as measured by toxicity equivalents concentration) was high enough to be associated with increased risk to sensitive wildlife. From 30-60 percent of the toxicity equivalents concentration in bed sediment was due to hepta- and octa- congeners. The most toxic congener, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD), was detected at only 6 of 22 sites. Compared to bed sediment from the same site, fish tissue usually had a lower total PCDD/F concentration, but contained a higher proportion of the most toxic congeners, such as 2,3,7,8-TCDD and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran. Because of these differences, toxicity equivalents concentrations in fish were higher than those in bed sediment from the same site at half of the sites where both media were analyzed.

  12. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Willamette River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1995-01-01

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat-surveys, conducted in the Willamette River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power

  13. Ecological interactions between hatchery summer steelhead and wild Oncorhynchus mykiss in the Willamette River basin, 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Harnish, Ryan A.; Green, Ethan D.; Vernon, Christopher R.; Mcmichael, Geoffrey A.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which juvenile hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead overlap in space and time, to evaluate the extent of residualism among hatchery summer steelhead in the South Santiam River, and to evaluate the potential for negative ecological interactions among hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead. Because it is not possible to visually discern juvenile winter steelhead from resident rainbow trout, we treated all adipose-intact juvenile O. mykiss as one group that represented juvenile wild winter steelhead. The 2014 study objectives were to 1) estimate the proportion of hatchery summer steelhead that residualized in the South Santiam River in 2014, 2) determine the extent to which hatchery and naturally produced O. mykiss overlapped in space and time in the South Santiam River, and 3) characterize the behavioral interactions between hatchery-origin juvenile summer steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss. We used a combination of radio telemetry and direct observations (i.e., snorkeling) to determine the potential for negative interactions between hatchery summer and wild winter steelhead juveniles in the South Santiam River. Data collected from these two independent methods indicated that a significant portion of the hatchery summer steelhead released as smolts did not rapidly emigrate from the South Santiam River in 2014. Of the 164 radio-tagged steelhead that volitionally left the hatchery, only 66 (40.2%) were detected outside of the South Santiam River. Forty-four (26.8% of 164) of the radio-tagged hatchery summer steelhead successfully emigrated to Willamette Falls. Thus, the last known location of the majority of the tagged fish (98 of 164 = 59.8%) was in the South Santiam River. Thirty-three of the tagged hatchery steelhead were detected in the South Santiam River during mobile-tracking surveys. Of those, 21 were found to be alive in the South Santiam River over three months after

  14. Modeling Low-Flow Sensitivity to Climate Variability and Forest Harvesting in the Willamette Basin: A Multi-scale Approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choate, J.; Tague, C.; Grant, G.

    2002-12-01

    In the mountainous region of the Pacific Northwest, underlying geologic and vegetation patterns, forest management practices and climate regimes at different elevations mediate the response of low flows occurring in late summer. Low-stream flow conditions, occurring during the warm, dry summers are critical to river ecosystem function and crucial to many aquatic and riparian species life cycles as well as human uses of streams. Understanding the different controls on low flow variability in this region requires a multi-scale perspective. This particular study is part of a larger strategy designed to use both empirical analysis and physically based, hydro-ecological modeling to disentangle the role that climate, geology and forest harvesting play in controlling low flows in 1st to 5th order watersheds within the Willamette basin. Our empirical analysis of summer low flow for a range of streams has shown that summer, unit-area discharge volumes are significantly lower for streams in the geologically distinct and low elevation Western Cascade versus High Cascade areas. This empirical analysis outlines large-scale regional variability. To assess and compare this with smaller scale variability, we use the RHESSys model (Regional Hydro-Ecologic Simulation System) to assess low flow behavior for small 1st order streams within the Western Cascade region. The goal is to examine low flow variability due to both climate and forest harvesting and recovery and place this in the context of regional scale analysis. We use multiple simulations to predict low flow volumes under cut and uncut conditions for wet/dry and warm/cool climate scenarios. Future work will replicate this study to examine 1st order watershed sensitivity within the contrasting High Cascade geologic region. The combined multi-scale empirical and modeling approach will then be used to provide a more comprehensive assessment of low flow patterns and sensitivity within this region.

  15. Reconnaissance of ground-water resources in the North Fork Gunnison River basin, southwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, D.J.; Brooks, Tom

    1986-01-01

    Aquifers of large areal extent in the North Fork Gunnison River basin are found in the alluvium and bedrock. Alluvial aquifers yielded water with dissolved solids concentrations ranging from 43 to 2,300 mg/L. Dissolved solids concentrations of water samples from the Mesaverde Formation of Late Cretaceous age and the Dakota Sandstone and Burro Canyon Formations of Late and Early Cretaceous age ranged from 56 to 3,200 mg/L. Dissolved solids concentrations of water samples from Mancos Shale ranged from 1,800 to 8,200 mg/L. Most wells in the North Fork Gunnison River basin are at altitudes below 7,500 ft, yield from 2 to 40 gal/min and are completed in alluvial sand and gravel, sandstone , or fractured bedrock. Springs generally are at altitudes above 7,000 ft, discharge from perched water tables at geologic contacts, have calcium magnesium bicarbonate water types, and are much less saline than water from wells. (Author 's abstract)

  16. Variation in watershed nitrogen input and export across the Willamette River Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen (N) export from watersheds is influenced by hydrology, land use/cover, and the timing and spatial arrangement of N inputs and removal within basins. We examined the relationship between N input and watershed N export for 25 monitoring stations between 1996 and 2006 with...

  17. Stimulation techniques in the Red Fork Formation in the Anadarko Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Burnette, P.T.

    1983-02-01

    This paper presents the results of fracture stimulation treatments on the Red Fork formation in the Anadarko Basin. All wells studied are located in Roger Mills and Custer counties of Oklahoma. Only data for which valid production information was available are included. Fracturing techniques and their results using five different stimulation fluids are examined; cross-linked water base, gelled water (non cross-linked), gelled diesel, gelled carbon dioxide, and foamed carbon dioxide with water as the liquid phase. Three types of propping agents have been used in various grades in conjunction with the above stimulation fluids; sand, intermediate strength proppant and high strength sintered bauxite. A discussion of various treatment parameters and their possible overall effect on the production results is presented.

  18. Spatial Patterns of Mercury Bioaccumulation in the Upper Clark Fork River Basin, MT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staats, M. F.; Langner, H.; Moore, J. N.

    2010-12-01

    The Upper Clark Fork River Basin (UCFRB) in Montana has a legacy of historic gold/silver mine waste that contributes large quantities of mercury into the watershed. Mercury bioaccumulation at higher levels of the aquatic food chain, such as the mercury concentration in the blood of pre-fledge osprey, exhibit an irregular spatial signature based on the location of the nests throughout the river basin. Here we identify regions with a high concentration of bioavailable mercury and the major factors that allow the mercury to bioaccumulate within trophic levels. This identification is based on the abundance of mercury sources and the potential for mercury methylation. To address the source term, we did a survey of total mercury in fine sediments along selected UCFRB reaches, along with the assessment of environmental river conditions (percentage of backwaters/wetlands, water temperature and pH, etc). In addition, we analyzed the mercury levels of a representative number of macroinvertebrates and fish from key locations. The concentration of total mercury in sediment, which varies from reach to reach (tributaries of the Clark Fork River, <0.05 mg/kg to the main stem of the river, >5mg/kg) affects the concentration of mercury found at various trophic levels. However, reaches with a low supply of mine waste-derived mercury can also yield substantial concentrations of mercury in the biota, due to highly favorable conditions for mercury methylation. We identify that the major environmental factor that affects the methylation potential in the UCFRB is the proximity and connectivity of wetland areas to the river.

  19. Chapter D. Effects of Urbanization on Stream Ecosystems in the Willamette River Basin and Surrounding Area, Oregon and Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, Ian R.; Sobieszczyk, Steven; Carpenter, Kurt D.; Arnsberg, Andrew J.; Johnson, Henry M.; Hughes, Curt A.; Sarantou, Michael J.; Rinella, Frank A.

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the effects of urbanization on physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of stream ecosystems in 28 watersheds along a gradient of urbanization in the Willamette River basin and surrounding area, Oregon and Washington, from 2003 through 2005. The study that generated the report is one of several urban-effects studies completed nationally by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Watersheds were selected to minimize natural variability caused by factors such as geology, elevation, and climate, and to maximize coverage of different stages of urban development among watersheds. Because land use or population density alone often are not a complete measure of urbanization, a combination of land use, land cover, infrastructure, and socioeconomic variables were integrated into a multimetric urban intensity index (UII) to represent the degree of urban development in each watershed. Physical characteristics studied include stream hydrology, stream temperature, and habitat; chemical characteristics studied include sulfate, chloride, nutrients, pesticides, dissolved and particulate organic and inorganic carbon, and suspended sediment; and biological characteristics studied include algal, macroinvertebrate, and fish assemblages. Semipermeable membrane devices, passive samplers that concentrate trace levels of hydrophobic organic contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls, also were used. The objectives of the study were to (1) examine physical, chemical, and biological responses along the gradient of urbanization and (2) determine the major physical, chemical, and landscape variables affecting the structure of aquatic communities. Common effects documented in the literature of urbanization on instream physical, chemical, and biological characteristics, such as increased contaminants, increased streamflow flashiness, increased concentrations of chemicals, and changes in

  20. Mining-related metals in terrestrial food webs of the upper Clark Fork River basin

    SciTech Connect

    Pastorok, R.A.; LaTier, A.J.; Butcher, M.K.; Ginn, T.C.

    1994-12-31

    Fluvial deposits of tailings and other mining-related waste in selected riparian habitats of the Upper Clark Fork River basin (Montana) have resulted in metals enriched soils. The significance of metals exposure to selected wildlife species was evaluated by measuring tissue residues of metals (arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, zinc) in key dietary species, including dominant grasses (tufted hair grass and redtop), willows, alfalfa, barley, invertebrates (grasshoppers, spiders, and beetles), and deer mice. Average metals concentrations in grasses, invertebrates, and deer mice collected from tailings-affected sites were elevated relative to reference to reference levels. Soil-tissue bioconcentration factors for grasses and invertebrates were generally lower than expected based on the range of values in the literature, indicating the reduced bioavailability of metals from mining waste. In general, metals concentrations in willows, alfalfa, and barley were not elevated above reference levels. Using these data and plausible assumptions for other exposure parameters for white-tailed deer, red fox, and American kestrel, metals intake was estimated for soil and diet ingestion pathways. Comparisons of exposure estimates with toxicity reference values indicated that the elevated concentrations of metals in key food web species do not pose a significant risk to wildlife.

  1. Low-flow hydrology of the Sulphur Fork Red River basin, Robertson County, north-central Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, Clarence H.

    1979-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to define (1) the average 3-day natural low-flow with a 20-year recurrence interval for five low-flow partial-record sites and one continuous record station, (2) losing and gaining reaches of the main stem of the Sulphur Fork Red River and major tributaries, and (3) the quality of water during low-flow. An additional objective was the collection of continuous streamflow and temperature data at selected sites for development of a thermal model for use as a guide in design and management of a small reservoir. The quantity of surface water during low-flow varies considerably throughout the basin. Streamflow during periods of drought is groundwater discharging through numerous springs and seeps. The average 3-day, 20-year low-flow of the six study sites range from 0.1 to 2.2 cubic feet per second. Seepage investigations in October 1976 show that as much as 4.4 cubic feet per second are lost from the Sulphur Fork Red River within a reach of 1.7 miles between river mile 30.8 and 29.1. Seepage investigations in July 1977 show that as much as 3.7 cubic feet per second are gained in the Sulphur Fork Red River within a reach of 0.8 miles between river mile 42.6 and 41.8. Measured discharges from the 12 major springs in the basin ranged from less than 1 to 1660 gallons per minute during low-flow. Water quality of streams varies in time and space. Specific conductance ranged from 200 to 1,800 micromhos per centimeter at 25O centigrade during the 1976 seepage investigation on the Sulphur Fork Red River. During the two-year study the specific conductance of water from the springs ranged from 230 to 675 micromhos per centimeter at 25O centigrade.

  2. Water-quality trends for selected sampling sites in the upper Clark Fork Basin, Montana, water years 1996-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sando, Steven K.; Vecchia, Aldo V.; Lorenz, David L.; Barnhart, Elliott P.

    2014-01-01

    A large-scale trend analysis was done on specific conductance, selected trace elements (arsenic, cadmium, copper, iron, lead, manganese, and zinc), and suspended-sediment data for 22 sites in the upper Clark Fork Basin for water years 1996–2010. Trend analysis was conducted by using two parametric methods: a time-series model (TSM) and multiple linear regression on time, streamflow, and season (MLR). Trend results for 1996–2010 indicate moderate to large decreases in flow-adjusted concentrations (FACs) and loads of copper (and other metallic elements) and suspended sediment in Silver Bow Creek upstream from Warm Springs. Deposition of metallic elements and suspended sediment within Warm Springs Ponds substantially reduces the downstream transport of those constituents. However, mobilization of copper and suspended sediment from floodplain tailings and stream banks in the Clark Fork reach from Galen to Deer Lodge is a large source of metallic elements and suspended sediment, which also affects downstream transport of those constituents. Copper and suspended-sediment loads mobilized from within this reach accounted for about 40 and 20 percent, respectively, of the loads for Clark Fork at Turah Bridge (site 20); whereas, streamflow contributed from within this reach only accounted for about 8 percent of the streamflow at Turah Bridge. Minor changes in FACs and loads of copper and suspended sediment are indicated for this reach during 1996–2010. Clark Fork reaches downstream from Deer Lodge are relatively smaller sources of metallic elements than the reach from Galen to Deer Lodge. In general, small decreases in loads and FACs of copper and suspended sediment are indicated for Clark Fork sites downstream from Deer Lodge during 1996–2010. Thus, although large decreases in FACs and loads of copper and suspended sediment are indicated for Silver Bow Creek upstream from Warm Springs, those large decreases are not translated to the more downstream reaches largely

  3. Utilizing Multi-Ensemble of Downscaled CMIP5 GCMs to Investigate Trends and Spatial and Temporal Extent of Drought in Willamette Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadalipour, A.; Beal, B.; Moradkhani, H.

    2015-12-01

    Changing climate and potential future increases in global temperature are likely to have impacts on drought characteristics and hydrologic cylce. In this study, we analyze changes in temporal and spatial extent of meteorological and hydrological droughts in future, and their trends. Three statistically downscaled datasets from NASA Earth Exchange Global Daily Downscaled Projections (NEX-GDDP), Multivariate Adaptive Constructed Analogs (MACA), and Bias Correction and Spatial Disagregation (BCSD-PSU) each consisting of 10 CMIP5 Global Climate Models (GCM) are utilized for RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios. Further, Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) hydrologic model is used to simulate streamflow from GCM inputs and assess the hydrological drought characteristics. Standard Precipitation Index (SPI) and Streamflow Drought Index (SDI) are the two indexes used to investigate meteorological and hydrological drought, respectively. Study is done for Willamette Basin with a drainage area of 29,700 km2 accommodating more than 3 million inhabitants and 25 dams. We analyze our study for annual time scale as well as three future periods of near future (2010-2039), intermediate future (2040-2069), and far future (2070-2099). Large uncertainty is found from GCM predictions. Results reveal that meteorological drought events are expected to increase in near future. Severe to extreme drought with large areal coverage and several years of occurance is predicted around year 2030 with the likelihood of exceptional drought for both drought types. SPI is usually showing positive trends, while SDI indicates negative trends in most cases.

  4. A multiobjective optimization model for dam removal: an example trading off salmon passage with hydropower and water storage in the Willamette basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuby, Michael J.; Fagan, William F.; ReVelle, Charles S.; Graf, William L.

    2005-08-01

    We introduce the use of systematic, combinatorial, multiobjective optimization models to analyse ecological-economic tradeoffs and to support complex decision-making associated with dam removal in a river system. The model's ecological objective enhances salmonid migration and spawning by maximizing drainage area reconnected to the sea. The economic objective minimizes loss of hydropower and storage capacity. We present a proof-of-concept demonstration for the Willamette River watershed (Oregon, USA). The case study shows a dramatic tradeoff in which removing twelve dams reconnects 52% of the basin while sacrificing only 1.6% of hydropower and water-storage capacity. Additional ecological gains, however, come with increasingly steeper economic costs. A second model incorporates existing fish-passage systems. Because of data limitations and model simplifications, these results are intended solely for the purpose of illustrating a novel application of multiobjective programming to dam-removal issues. Far more work would be needed to make policy-relevant recommendations. Nevertheless, this research suggests that the current practice of analysing dam-removal decisions on a dam-by-dam basis be supplemented by evaluation on a river-system basis, trading off economic and ecological goals.

  5. EFFECTS OF HABITAT DEGRADATION ON BIOLOGICAL ENDPOINTS IN THE SOUTH FORK BROAD RIVER BASIN, GEORGIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many of the streams of the lower Piedmont ecoregion in Georgia have been negatively impacted to some degree by habitat degradation due primarily to sedimentation. The South Fork of the Broad River watershed has been designated as sediment impacted under Section 303(d) of the Clea...

  6. Use of a rainfall-runoff model for simulating effects of forest management on streamflow in the east Fork Lobster Creek Basin, Oregon. Water resources investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakama, L.Y.; Risley, J.C.

    1993-12-31

    The report describes the results of model calibration and validation, and evaluates the extent to which runoff response to timber harvesting and increased road densities in East Fork Lobster Creek Basin can be simulated, using Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS), a deterministic, destributed-parameter-modeling system.

  7. Water-quality trends and constituent-transport analysis for selected sampling sites in the Milltown Reservoir/Clark Fork River Superfund Site in the upper Clark Fork Basin, Montana, water years 1996–2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sando, Steven K.; Vecchia, Aldo V.

    2016-07-20

    During the extended history of mining in the upper Clark Fork Basin in Montana, large amounts of waste materials enriched with metallic contaminants (cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc) and the metalloid trace element arsenic were generated from mining operations near Butte and milling and smelting operations near Anaconda. Extensive deposition of mining wastes in the Silver Bow Creek and Clark Fork channels and flood plains had substantial effects on water quality. Federal Superfund remediation activities in the upper Clark Fork Basin began in 1983 and have included substantial remediation near Butte and removal of the former Milltown Dam near Missoula. To aid in evaluating the effects of remediation activities on water quality, the U.S. Geological Survey began collecting streamflow and water-quality data in the upper Clark Fork Basin in the 1980s.Trend analysis was done on specific conductance, selected trace elements (arsenic, copper, and zinc), and suspended sediment for seven sampling sites in the Milltown Reservoir/Clark Fork River Superfund Site for water years 1996–2015. The most upstream site included in trend analysis is Silver Bow Creek at Warm Springs, Montana (sampling site 8), and the most downstream site is Clark Fork above Missoula, Montana (sampling site 22), which is just downstream from the former Milltown Dam. Water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is designated by the year in which it ends. Trend analysis was done by using a joint time-series model for concentration and streamflow. To provide temporal resolution of changes in water quality, trend analysis was conducted for four sequential 5-year periods: period 1 (water years 1996–2000), period 2 (water years 2001–5), period 3 (water years 2006–10), and period 4 (water years 2011–15). Because of the substantial effect of the intentional breach of Milltown Dam on March 28, 2008, period 3 was subdivided into period 3A (October 1, 2005–March 27, 2008

  8. Water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data (October 2011 through September 2012) and statistical summaries of data for streams in the Clark Fork Basin, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dodge, Kent A.; Hornberger, Michelle I.; Dyke, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Water, bed sediment, and biota were sampled in streams from Butte to near Missoula, Montana, as part of a monitoring program in the upper Clark Fork Basin of western Montana. The sampling program was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to characterize aquatic resources in the Clark Fork Basin, with emphasis on trace elements associated with historic mining and smelting activities. Sampling sites were located on the Clark Fork and selected tributaries. Water samples were collected periodically at 20 sites from October 2011 through September 2012. Bed-sediment and biota samples were collected once at 13 sites during August 2012. This report presents the analytical results and quality-assurance data for water-quality, bed-sediment, and biota samples collected at sites from October 2011 through September 2012. Water-quality data include concentrations of selected major ions, trace elements, and suspended sediment. Turbidity was analyzed for water samples collected at the four sites where seasonal daily values of turbidity were being determined. Daily values of suspended-sediment concentration and suspended-sediment discharge were determined for four sites. Bed-sediment data include trace-element concentrations in the fine-grained fraction. Biological data include trace-element concentrations in whole-body tissue of aquatic benthic insects. Statistical summaries of water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data for sites in the upper Clark Fork Basin are provided for the period of record since 1985.

  9. Water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data (October 2009 through September 2010) and statistical summaries of data for streams in the Clark Fork basin, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dodge, Kent A.; Hornberger, Michelle I.; Dyke, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Water, bed sediment, and biota were sampled in streams from Butte to near Missoula, Montana, as part of a monitoring program in the upper Clark Fork basin. The sampling program was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to characterize aquatic resources in the Clark Fork basin of western Montana, with emphasis on trace elements associated with historic mining and smelting activities. Sampling sites were located on the Clark Fork and selected tributaries. Water samples were collected periodically at 20 sites from October 2009 through September 2010. Bed-sediment and biota samples were collected once at 13 sites during August 2010. This report presents the analytical results and quality-assurance data for water-quality, bed-sediment, and biota samples collected at sites from October 2009 through September 2010. Water-quality data include concentrations of selected major ions, trace elements, and suspended sediment. Turbidity was analyzed for water samples collected at the four sites where seasonal daily values of turbidity were being determined. Daily values of suspended-sediment concentration and suspended-sediment discharge were determined for four sites. Bed-sediment data include trace-element concentrations in the fine-grained fraction. Biological data include trace-element concentrations in whole-body tissue of aquatic benthic insects. Statistical summaries of water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data for sites in the upper Clark Fork basin are provided for the period of record since 1985.

  10. Distribution of dissolved pesticides and other water quality constituents in small streams, and their relation to land use, in the Willamette River Basin, Oregon, 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Chauncey W.; Wood, Tamara M.; Morace, Jennifer L.

    1997-01-01

    Water quality samples were collected at sites in 16 randomly selected agricultural and 4 urban subbasins as part of Phase III of the Willamette River Basin Water Quality Study in Oregon during 1996. Ninety-five samples were collected and analyzed for suspended sediment, conventional constituents (temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, specific conductance, nutrients, biochemical oxygen demand, and bacteria) and a suite of 86 dissolved pesticides. The data were collected to characterize the distribution of dissolved pesticide concentrations in small streams (drainage areas 2.6? 13 square miles) throughout the basin, to document exceedances of water quality standards and guidelines, and to identify the relative importance of several upstream land use categories (urban, agricultural, percent agricultural land, percent of land in grass seed crops, crop diversity) and seasonality in affecting these distributions. A total of 36 pesticides (29 herbicides and 7 insecticides) were detected basinwide. The five most frequently detected compounds were the herbicides atrazine (99% of samples), desethylatrazine (93%), simazine (85%), metolachlor (85%), and diuron (73%). Fifteen compounds were detected in 12?35% of samples, and 16 compounds were detected in 1?9% of samples. Water quality standards or criteria were exceeded more frequently for conventional constituents than for pesticides. State of Oregon water quality standards were exceeded at all but one site for the indicator bacteria E. coli, 3 sites for nitrate, 10 sites for water temperature, 4 sites for dissolved oxygen, and 1 site for pH. Pesticide concentrations, which were usually less than 1 part per billion, exceeded State of Oregon or U.S. Environmental Protection Agency aquatic life toxicity criteria only for chlorpyrifos, in three samples from one site; such criteria have been established for only two other detected pesticides. However, a large number of unusually high concentrations (1?90 parts per billion) were

  11. Development of a precipitation-runoff model to simulate unregulated streamflow in the South Fork Flathead River Basin, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chase, K.J.

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the development of a precipitation-runoff model for the South Fork Flathead River Basin, Mont. The Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System model, developed in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, can be used to simulate daily mean unregulated streamflow upstream and downstream from Hungry Horse Reservoir for water-resources planning. Two input files are required to run the model. The time-series data file contains daily precipitation data and daily minimum and maximum air-temperature data from climate stations in and near the South Fork Flathead River Basin. The parameter file contains values of parameters that describe the basin topography, the flow network, the distribution of the precipitation and temperature data, and the hydrologic characteristics of the basin soils and vegetation. A primary-parameter file was created for simulating streamflow during the study period (water years 1967-2005). The model was calibrated for water years 1991-2005 using the primary-parameter file. This calibration was further refined using snow-covered area data for water years 2001-05. The model then was tested for water years 1967-90. Calibration targets included mean monthly and daily mean unregulated streamflow upstream from Hungry Horse Reservoir, mean monthly unregulated streamflow downstream from Hungry Horse Reservoir, basin mean monthly solar radiation and potential evapotranspiration, and daily snapshots of basin snow-covered area. Simulated streamflow generally was in better agreement with observed streamflow at the upstream gage than at the downstream gage. Upstream from the reservoir, simulated mean annual streamflow was within 0.0 percent of observed mean annual streamflow for the calibration period and was about 2 percent higher than observed mean annual streamflow for the test period. Simulated mean April-July streamflow upstream from the reservoir was about 1 percent lower than observed streamflow for the calibration period and about 4

  12. Records of wells, water levels, and chemical quality of water in the lower Santiam River basin, middle Willamette Valley, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helm, Donald C.

    1968-01-01

    Basic water data on the lower Santiam River basin is preliminary to a comprehensive hydrologic study of this productive and intensely irrigated area where expanding population and industry increases the demand for water. Highest yielding wells are in shallow alluvial aquifers near the main streams; yields range from several hundred to more than a thousand gpm. Wells in lacustrine and older alluvial aquifers that underlie low, flat terraces have yields from a few tens to a few hundred gpm. Wells in the Salem Hills and in the Cascade Range foothills yield moderate to small quantities of water and tap a variety of geologic units. Tabulated material includes records of representative wells, drillers' logs, and chemical and spectrographic analyses of the ground water.

  13. Hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the Black Fork Mohican River Basin in and near Shelby, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huitger, Carrie A.; Ostheimer, Chad J.; Koltun, G.F.

    2016-05-06

    Hydrologic and hydraulic analyses were done for selected reaches of five streams in and near Shelby, Richland County, Ohio. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District, conducted these analyses on the Black Fork Mohican River and four tributaries: Seltzer Park Creek, Seltzer Park Tributary, Tuby Run, and West Branch. Drainage areas of the four stream reaches studied range from 0.51 to 60.3 square miles. The analyses included estimation of the 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual-exceedance probability (AEP) flood-peak discharges using the USGS Ohio StreamStats application. Peak discharge estimates, along with cross-sectional and hydraulic structure geometries, and estimates of channel roughness coefficients were used as input to step-backwater models. The step-backwater water models were used to determine water-surface elevation profiles of four flood-peak discharges and a regulatory floodway. This study involved the installation of, and data collection at, a streamflow-gaging station (Black Fork Mohican River at Shelby, Ohio, 03129197), precipitation gage (Rain gage at Reservoir Number Two at Shelby, Ohio, 405209082393200), and seven submersible pressure transducers on six selected river reaches. Two precipitation-runoff models, one for the winter events and one for nonwinter events for the headwaters of the Black Fork Mohican River, were developed and calibrated using the data collected. With the exception of the runoff curve numbers, all other parameters used in the two precipitation-runoff models were identical. The Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficients were 0.737, 0.899, and 0.544 for the nonwinter events and 0.850 and 0.671 for the winter events. Both of the precipitation-runoff models underestimated the total volume of water, with residual runoff ranging from -0.27 inches to -1.53 inches. The results of this study can be used to assess possible mitigation options and define flood hazard areas that

  14. Assessment of undiscovered oil resources in the Bakken and Three Forks Formations, Williston Basin Province, Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Marra, Kristen R.; Cook, Troy A.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Gautier, Donald L.; Higley, Debra K.; Klett, Timothy R.; Lewan, Michael D.; Lillis, Paul G.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Whidden, Katherine J.

    2013-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean undiscovered volumes of 7.4 billion barrels of oil, 6.7 trillion cubic feet of associated/dissolved natural gas, and 0.53 billion barrels of natural gas liquids in the Bakken and Three Forks Formations in the Williston Basin Province of Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota.

  15. Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Fish Enhancement Project, Annual Report for FY 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Macy, Tom L.; James, Gary A.

    2003-03-01

    The CTUIR North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Enhancement Project (NFJDAFEP) identified and prioritized stream reaches in The North Fork John day River basin for habitat improvements during the 2000 project period. Public out reach was emphasized during this first year of the project. We presented multiple funding and enhancement options to landowners. We concentrated on natural recovery methods, riparian fencing and off-stream livestock water developments. Under this BPA contract four riparian easements were signed protecting almost 5 miles of tributary streams. There are nine offstream water developments associated with these easements. Some landowners chose to participate in other programs based on Tribal outreach efforts. Two landowners chose NRCS programs for enhancement and one chose OWEB as a funding source. Two landowners implemented there own enhancement measures protecting 3 miles of stream. Cooperation between the NRCS/FSA/SWCDs and the Tribe to create joint projects and develop alternative funding scenarios for riparian enhancement was a major effort. The Tribe also worked with the North Fork John Day Watershed Council, USFS and ODFW to coordinate projects and support similar projects throughout the John Day Basin. We provided input to the John Day Summary prepared for the NWPPC by ODFW. The Tribe worked with the Umatilla National Forest on the Clear Creek Dredgetailings Rehabilitation project and coordinated regularly with USFS Fisheries, Hydrology and Range staff.

  16. Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Fish Enhancement Project, Annual Report for FY 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Macy, Tom L.; James, Gary A.

    2003-03-01

    The CTUIR North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Enhancement Project (NFJDAFEP) identified and prioritized stream reaches in The North Fork John day River basin for habitat improvements during the 2000 project period. Public outreach was emphasized during this first year of the project. During the past year we concentrated on satisfying landowner needs, providing cost share alternatives, providing joint projects and starting implementation. We presented multiple funding and enhancement options to landowners. We concentrated on natural recovery methods, riparian fencing and offstream livestock water developments. Under this BPA contract four riparian easements have been signed protecting almost 5 miles of tributary streams. There are nine offstream water developments associated with these easements. Some landowners chose to participate in other programs based on Tribal outreach efforts. Some landowners chose NRCS programs for enhancement and others chose OWEB as a funding source. The exact amount of stream protection due to other funding sources probably exceeds that by BPA, however most would not have entered any program without initial Tribal outreach. Cooperation between the NRCS/FSA/SWCDs and the Tribe to create joint projects and develop alternative funding scenarios for riparian enhancement was a major effort. The Tribe also worked with the North Fork John Day Watershed Council, USFS and ODFW to coordinate projects and support similar projects throughout the John Day Basin.

  17. Investigation of Hyporheic Microbial Biofilms as Indicators of Heavy Metal Toxicity in the Clark Fork Basin, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, E. P.; Hwang, C.; Bouskill, N.; Hornberger, M.; Fields, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    Water-saturated sediments that underlie a stream channel contain microbial biofilms that are often responsible for the majority of the metabolic activity in river and stream ecosystems. Metal contamination from mining effluent can modify the biofilm community structure, diversity, and activity. Developing a mechanistic understanding of the biofilm response to metal contamination could provide a useful bioindicator of metal toxicity due to the ease of standard biofilm sampling, environmental ubiquity of biofilms and the rapid response of biofilms to environmental perturbation and metal toxicity. Here we present data on the structure of the biofilm community (e.g., microbial population composition and diversity) and trace metal concentrations in water, bed sediment and biota (benthic insects) across 15 sites in the Clark Fork Basin. Sample sites were selected across a historically-monitored metal pollution gradient at shallow riffles with bed sediment predominantly composed of pebbles, cobbles, and sand. Bed-sediment samples (for biofilm analysis) were obtained from the top 20 centimeters of the hyporheic zone and sieved using sterile sieves to obtain homogeneous sediment samples with particle sizes ranging from 1.70 to 2.36 millimeters. Linear discriminant analysis and effect size statistical methods were used to integrate the metals concentration data (for water and benthic-insects samples) with the microbial community analysis to identify microbial biomarkers of metal toxicity. The development of rapid microbial biomarker tools could provide reproducible and quantitative insights into the effectiveness of remediation activities on metal toxicity and advances in the field of environmental biomonitoring.

  18. Water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data (October 2010 through September 2011) and statistical summaries of data for streams in the Clark Fork basin, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dodge, Kent A.; Hornberger, Michelle I.; Dyke, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Water, bed sediment, and biota were sampled in streams from Butte to near Missoula, Montana, as part of a monitoring program in the upper Clark Fork basin of western Montana; additional water samples were collected from near Galen to near Missoula at select sites as part of a supplemental sampling program. The sampling program was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to characterize aquatic resources in the Clark Fork basin, with emphasis on trace elements associated with historic mining and smelting activities. Sampling sites were located on the Clark Fork and selected tributaries. Water samples were collected periodically at 20 sites from October 2010 through September 2011. Bed-sediment and biota samples were collected once at 14 sites during August 2011. This report presents the analytical results and quality-assurance data for water-quality, bed-sediment, and biota samples collected at sites from October 2010 through September 2011. Water-quality data include concentrations of selected major ions, trace elements, and suspended sediment. Turbidity was analyzed for water samples collected at the four sites where seasonal daily values of turbidity were being determined. Daily values of suspended-sediment concentration and suspended-sediment discharge were determined for four sites. Bed-sediment data include trace-element concentrations in the fine-grained fraction. Biological data include trace-element concentrations in whole-body tissue of aquatic benthic insects. Statistical summaries of water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data for sites in the upper Clark Fork basin are provided for the period of record since 1985.

  19. Water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data (October 2014 through September 2015) and statistical summaries of data for streams in the Clark Fork Basin, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dodge, Kent A.; Hornberger, Michelle I.; Turner, Matthew A.

    2017-01-19

    Water, bed sediment, and biota were sampled in selected streams from Butte to near Missoula, Montana, as part of a monitoring program in the upper Clark Fork Basin of western Montana. The sampling program was led by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, to characterize aquatic resources in the Clark Fork Basin, with emphasis on trace elements associated with historic mining and smelting activities. Sampling sites were located on the Clark Fork and selected tributaries. Water samples were collected periodically at 20 sites from October 2014 through September 2015. Bed-sediment and biota samples were collected once at 13 sites during August 2015.This report presents the analytical results and quality-assurance data for water-quality, bed-sediment, and biota samples collected at sites from October 2014 through September 2015. Water-quality data include concentrations of selected major ions, trace elements, and suspended sediment. At 12 sites, samples for analysis of dissolved organic carbon and turbidity were collected. In addition, samples for analysis of nitrogen (nitrate plus nitrite) were collected at two sites. Daily values of mean suspended-sediment concentration and suspended-sediment discharge were determined for three sites. Seasonal daily values of turbidity were determined for four sites. Bed-sediment data include trace-element concentrations in the fine-grained fraction. Biological data include trace-element concentrations in whole-body tissue of aquatic benthic insects. Statistical summaries of water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data for sites in the upper Clark Fork Basin are provided for the period of record.

  20. Hydrogeologic framework and groundwater/surface-water interactions of the South Fork Nooksack River Basin, northwestern Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gendaszek, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    A hydrogeologic framework of the South Fork (SF) Nooksack River Basin in northwestern Washington was developed and hydrologic data were collected to characterize the groundwater-flow system and its interaction with surface‑water features. In addition to domestic, agricultural, and commercial uses of groundwater within the SF Nooksack River Basin, groundwater has the potential to provide ecological benefits by maintaining late-summer streamflows and buffering stream temperatures. Cold-water refugia, created and maintained in part by groundwater, have been identified by water-resource managers as key elements to restore the health and viability of threatened salmonids in the SF Nooksack River. The SF Nooksack River drains a 183-square mile area of the North Cascades and the Puget Lowland underlain by unconsolidated glacial and alluvial sediments deposited over older sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous bedrock. The primary aquifer that interacts with the SF Nooksack River was mapped within unconsolidated glacial outwash and alluvial sediment. The lower extent of this unit is bounded by bedrock and fine-grained, poorly sorted unconsolidated glaciomarine and glaciolacustrine sediments. In places, these deposits overlie and confine an aquifer within older glacial sediments. The extent and thickness of the hydrogeologic units were assembled from mapped geologic units and lithostratigraphic logs of field-inventoried wells. Generalized groundwater-flow directions within the surficial aquifer were interpreted from groundwater levels measured in August 2012; and groundwater seepage gains and losses to the SF Nooksack River were calculated from synoptic streamflow measurements made in the SF Nooksack River and its tributaries in September 2012. A subset of the field-inventoried wells was measured at a monthly interval to determine seasonal fluctuations in groundwater levels during water year 2013. Taken together, these data provide the foundation for a future groundwater

  1. Input-form data for the U.S. Geological Survey assessment of the Devonian and Mississippian Bakken and Devonian Three Forks Formations of the U.S. Williston Basin Province, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Marra, Kristen R.; Cook, Troy A.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Gautier, Donald L.; Higley, Debra K.; Klett, Timothy R.; Lewan, Michael D.; Lillis, Paul G.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Whidden, Katherine J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey assessed the technically recoverable oil and gas resources of the Bakken and Three Forks Formations of the U.S. portion of the Williston Basin. The Bakken and Three Forks Formations were assessed as continuous and hypothetical conventional oil accumulations using a methodology similar to that used in the assessment of other continuous- and conventional-type assessment units throughout the United States. The purpose of this report is to provide supplemental documentation and information used in the Bakken-Three Forks assessment.

  2. Use of a watershed-modeling approach to assess hydrologic effects of urbanization, North Fork Pheasant Branch basin near Middleton, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steuer, Jeffrey J.; Hunt, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    The North Fork Pheasant Branch Basin in Dane County, Wisconsin is expected to undergo development. There are concerns that development will adversely affect water resources with increased flood peaks, increased runoff volumes, and increased pollutant loads. To provide a scientific basis for evaluating the hydrologic system response to development the Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) was used to model the upper Pheasant Branch Creek watershed with an emphasis on the North Fork Basin. The upper Pheasant Branch Creek (18.3 mi2; 11,700 acres) Basin was represented with 21 Hydrologic Response Units (daily time step) and 50 flow planes (5-minute time steps). Precipitation data from the basin outlet streamflow-gaging station located at Highway 12 and temperature data from a nearby airport were used to drive the model. Continuous discharge records at three gaging stations were used for model calibration. To qualitatively assess model representation of small subbasins, periodic reconnaissance, often including a depth measurement, was made after precipitation to determine the occurrence of flow in ditches and channels from small subbasins. As a further effort to verify the model on a small subbasin scale, continuous-stage sensors (15-minute intervals) measured depth at the outlets of three small subbasins (500 to 1,200 acres). Average annual precipitation for the simulation period from 1993 to 1998 was 35.2 inches. The model simulations showed that, on average, 23.9 inches were intercepted by vegetation, or lost to evapotranspiration, 6.0 inches were infiltrated and moved to the regional ground-water system, and 4.8 inches contributed to the upper Pheasant Branch streamflow. The largest runoff event during the calibration interval was in July 1993 (746 ft3/sec; with a recurrence interval of approximately 25 years). Resulting recharge rates from the calibrated model were subsequently used as input into a ground-water-flow model. Average annual recharge varied

  3. Water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data (October 2008 through September 2009) and statistical summaries of long-term data for streams in the Clark Fork basin, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dodge, Kent A.; Hornberger, Michelle I.; Dyke, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Water, bed sediment, and biota were sampled in streams from Butte to near Missoula, Montana, as part of a long-term monitoring program in the upper Clark Fork basin; additional water samples were collected in the Clark Fork basin from sites near Missoula downstream to near the confluence of the Clark Fork and Flathead River as part of a supplemental sampling program. The sampling programs were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to characterize aquatic resources in the Clark Fork basin of western Montana, with emphasis on trace elements associated with historic mining and smelting activities. Sampling sites were located on the Clark Fork and selected tributaries. Water samples were collected periodically at 24 sites from October 2008 through September 2009. Bed-sediment and biota samples were collected once at 13 sites during August 2009. This report presents the analytical results and quality-assurance data for water-quality, bed-sediment, and biota samples collected at all long-term and supplemental monitoring sites from October 2008 through September 2009. Water-quality data include concentrations of selected major ions, trace elements, and suspended sediment. Turbidity was analyzed for water samples collected at the four sites where seasonal daily values of turbidity were being determined as well as at Clark Fork above Missoula. Nutrients also were analyzed at all the supplemental water-quality sites, except for Clark Fork Bypass, near Bonner. Daily values of suspended-sediment concentration and suspended-sediment discharge were determined for four sites. Bed-sediment data include trace-element concentrations in the fine-grained fraction. Biological data include trace-element concentrations in whole-body tissue of aquatic benthic insects. Statistical summaries of long-term water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data for sites in the upper Clark Fork basin are provided for the period of record

  4. Water-quality, streambed-sediment, and biological data from the Clark Fork-Pend Oreille and Spokane River Basins, Montana, Idaho, and Washington, 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowers, Craig L.; Caldwell, Rodney R.; Dutton, DeAnn M.

    2003-01-01

    Water-quality, streambed-sediment, and biological data were collected in the Clark Fork-Pend Oreille and Spokane River basins as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program and are presented in this report. These river basins compose the Northern Rockies Intermontane Basins study unit which was selected to include a river system that has a mixture of forested, agricultural, urban, and developing areas. Waterquality samples were collected from 28 surface-water sites and 86 ground-water sites from June 1998 to September 2001. Data collected included measurements of physical properties and chemical analyses of concentrations of major ions, trace elements, nutrients, organic carbon, pesticides, volatile organic compounds, and radiochemical constituents. Streambed-sediment and biological tissue samples were collected from 41 sites and analyzed for trace elements and organochlorine compounds. Benthic algae were collected to determine chlorophyll concentration and areal density.

  5. 15. INSIDE VIEW OF FLUME, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM, LEFT FORK TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. INSIDE VIEW OF FLUME, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM, LEFT FORK TO SETTLING BASIN, SHOWING RIGHT FORK WITH GATE IN PLACE AND A FEW NEEDLES IN PLACE - Electron Hydroelectric Project, Along Puyallup River, Electron, Pierce County, WA

  6. Relations of Principal Components Analysis Site Scores to Algal-Biomass, Habitat, Basin-Characteristics, Nutrient, and Biological-Community Data in the Whitewater River and East Fork White River Basins, Indiana, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caskey, Brian J.; Frey, Jeffrey W.; Lowe, B. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Data were gathered from May through September 2002 at 76 randomly selected sites in the Whitewater River and East Fork White River Basins, Indiana, for algal biomass, habitat, nutrients, and biological communities (fish and invertebrates). Basin characteristics (land use and drainage area) and biolog-ical-community attributes and metric scores were determined for the basin of each sampling site. Yearly Principal Compo-nents Analysis site scores were calculated for algal biomass (periphyton and seston). The yearly Principal Components Analysis site scores for the first axis (PC1) were related using Spearman's rho to the seasonal algal-biomass, basin-charac-teristics, habitat, seasonal nutrient, and biological-community attribute and metric score data. The periphyton PC1 site score was not significantly related to the nine habitat or 12 nutrient variables examined. One land-use variable, drainage area, was negatively related to the periphyton PC1. Of the 43 fish-community attributes and metrics examined, the periphyton PC1 was negatively related to one attribute (large-river percent) and one metric score (car-nivore percent metric score). It was positively related to three fish-community attributes (headwater percent, pioneer percent, and simple lithophil percent). The periphyton PC1 was not statistically related to any of the 21 invertebrate-community attributes or metric scores examined. Of the 12 nutrient variables examined two were nega-tively related to the seston PC1 site score in two seasons: total Kjeldahl nitrogen (July and September), and TP (May and September). There were no statistically significant relations between the seston PC1 and the five basin-characteristics or nine habitat variables examined. Of the 43 fish-community attributes and metrics examined, the seston PC1 was positively related to one attribute (headwater percent) and negatively related to one metric score (large-river percent metric score) . Of the 21 invertebrate-community attributes

  7. Water-Quality, Bed-Sediment, and Biological Data (October 2005 through September 2006) and Statistical Summaries of Long-Term Data for Streams in the Clark Fork Basin, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dodge, Kent A.; Hornberger, Michelle I.; Dyke, Jessica

    2007-01-01

    Water, bed sediment, and biota were sampled in streams from Butte to below Milltown Reservoir as part of a long-term monitoring program in the upper Clark Fork basin; additional water-quality samples were collected in the Clark Fork basin from sites near Milltown Reservoir downstream to near the confluence of the Clark Fork and Flathead River as part of a supplemental sampling program. The sampling programs were conducted in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to characterize aquatic resources in the Clark Fork basin of western Montana, with emphasis on trace elements associated with historic mining and smelting activities. Sampling sites were located on the Clark Fork and selected tributaries. Water-quality samples were collected periodically at 22 sites from October 2005 through September 2006. Bed-sediment and biological samples were collected once at 12 sites during August 2006. This report presents the analytical results and quality-assurance data for water-quality, bed-sediment, and biota samples collected at all long-term and supplemental monitoring sites from October 2005 through September 2006. Water-quality data include concentrations of selected major ions, trace ele-ments, and suspended sediment. Nutrients also were analyzed in the supplemental water-quality samples. Daily values of suspended-sed-iment concentration and suspended-sediment discharge were determined for four sites, and seasonal daily values of turbidity were determined for four sites. Bed-sediment data include trace-ele-ment concentrations in the fine-grained fraction. Bio-logical data include trace-element concentrations in whole-body tissue of aquatic benthic insects. Statistical summaries of long-term water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data for sites in the upper Clark Fork basin are provided for the period of record since 1985.

  8. Water-Quality, Bed-Sediment, and Biological Data (October 2004 through September 2005) and Statistical Summaries of Data for Streams in the Upper Clark Fork Basin, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dodge, Kent A.; Hornberger, Michelle I.; Dyke, Jessica

    2006-01-01

    Water, bed sediment, and biota were sampled in streams from Butte to below Missoula as part of a long-term monitoring program, conducted in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, to characterize aquatic resources in the upper Clark Fork basin of western Montana. Sampling sites were located on the Clark Fork, six major tributaries, and three smaller tributaries. Water-quality samples were collected periodically at 18 sites during October 2004 through September 2005 (water year 2005). Bed-sediment and biological samples were collected once in August 2005. The primary constituents analyzed were trace elements associated with tailings from historical mining and smelting activities. This report summarizes the results of water-quality, bed-sediment, and biota samples col-lected in water year 2005 and provides statistical summaries of data collected since 1985. Water-quality data for samples collected periodically from streams include concentrations of selected major ions, trace ele-ments, and suspended sediment. Daily values of suspended-sed-iment concentration and suspended-sediment discharge were determined for three sites. Bed-sediment data include trace-ele-ment concentrations in the fine-grained fraction. Bio-logical data include trace-element concentrations in whole-body tissue of aquatic benthic insects. Quality-assurance data are reported for analytical results of water, bed sediment, and biota. Statistical summaries of water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data are provided for the period of record since 1985 for each site.

  9. Effects of surface mining on streamflow, suspended-sediment, and water quality in the Stony Fork drainage basin, Fayette County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stump, D.E.; Mastrilli, T.M.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the Stony Fork basin in southern Fayette County, Pennsylvania, from 1977 through 1980 determined the impacts of surface coal mining on surface-water quality. Stony Fork was sampled at six sites, during which time the area of surface mines increased from 0.5 to 5.5 percent of the study area. Streamflow, suspended-sediment, and water quality data were collected at gaging stations upstream and downstream of mining. The total runoff between the upstream and downstream stations differed by one percent; this small difference could not be attributed to the effects of mining. The suspended-sediment yield increased during storms due to erosion from the mining sites. The suspended-sediment yield doubled at the downstream site following mining. Specific conductance was highly variable during storm runoff but generally varied inversely with flow and increased slightly during the study period. The pH ranged between 4.8 and 7.9 with values below 6.0 usually occurring during storm runoff. Concentrations of dissolved zinc and sulfate increased between the upstream and downstream sampling sites. Laboratory analysis of a precipitation sample indicates that acid precipitation may be partly responsible for pH depressions during storm runoff periods. (USGS)

  10. Water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data (October 2012 through September 2013) and statistical summaries of data for streams in the Clark Fork Basin, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dodge, Kent A.; Hornberger, Michelle I.; Dyke, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the analytical results and quality-assurance data for water-quality, bed-sediment, and biota samples collected at sites from October 2012 through September 2013. Water-quality data include concentrations of selected major ions, trace elements, and suspended sediment. Turbidity and dissolved organic carbon were analyzed for water samples collected at the four sites where seasonal daily values of turbidity were being determined. Daily values of mean suspended-sediment concentration and suspended-sediment discharge were determined for four sites. Bed-sediment data include trace-element concentrations in the fine-grained fraction. Biological data include trace-element concentrations in whole-body tissue of aquatic benthic insects. Statistical sum-maries of water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data for sites in the upper Clark Fork Basin are provided for the period of record.

  11. Water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data (October 2013 through September 2014) and statistical summaries of data for streams in the Clark Fork Basin, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dodge, Kent A.; Hornberger, Michelle I.

    2015-12-24

    This report presents the analytical results and qualityassurance data for water-quality, bed-sediment, and biota samples collected at sites from October 2013 through September 2014. Water-quality data include concentrations of selected major ions, trace elements, and suspended sediment. At 12 sites, dissolved organic carbon and turbidity samples were collected. In addition, nitrogen (nitrate plus nitrite) samples were collected at two sites. Daily values of mean suspended-sediment concentration and suspended-sediment discharge were determined for four sites. Seasonal daily values of turbidity were determined for four sites. Bed-sediment data include trace-ele­ment concentrations in the fine-grained fraction. Biological data include trace-element concentrations in wholebody tissue of aquatic benthic insects. Statistical summaries of water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data for sites in the upper Clark Fork Basin are provided for the period of record.

  12. High-resolution digital elevation model of Mount St. Helens crater and upper North Fork Toutle River basin, Washington, based on an airborne lidar survey of September 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosbrucker, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The lateral blast, debris avalanche, and lahars of the May 18th, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, dramatically altered the surrounding landscape. Lava domes were extruded during the subsequent eruptive periods of 1980–1986 and 2004–2008. More than three decades after the emplacement of the 1980 debris avalanche, high sediment production persists in the North Fork Toutle River basin, which drains the northern flank of the volcano. Because this sediment increases the risk of flooding to downstream communities on the Toutle and Cowlitz Rivers, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), under the direction of Congress to maintain an authorized level of flood protection, built a sediment retention structure on the North Fork Toutle River in 1989 to help reduce this risk and to prevent sediment from clogging the shipping channel of the Columbia River. From September 16–20, 2009, Watershed Sciences, Inc., under contract to USACE, collected high-precision airborne lidar (light detection and ranging) data that cover 214 square kilometers (83 square miles) of Mount St. Helens and the upper North Fork Toutle River basin from the sediment retention structure to the volcano's crater. These data provide a digital dataset of the ground surface, including beneath forest cover. Such remotely sensed data can be used to develop sediment budgets and models of sediment erosion, transport, and deposition. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used these lidar data to develop digital elevation models (DEMs) of the study area. DEMs are fundamental to monitoring natural hazards and studying volcanic landforms, fluvial and glacial geomorphology, and surface geology. Watershed Sciences, Inc., provided files in the LASer (LAS) format containing laser returns that had been filtered, classified, and georeferenced. The USGS produced a hydro-flattened DEM from ground-classified points at Castle, Coldwater, and Spirit Lakes. Final results averaged about five laser last

  13. General view of structure taken from east bank of willamette, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of structure taken from east bank of willamette, north side of structure - Hawthorne Bridge, Spanning Willamette River at Hawthorne Boulevard & Madison Street, Portland, Multnomah County, OR

  14. General view of structure taken from west bank of willamette, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of structure taken from west bank of willamette, south side structure - Hawthorne Bridge, Spanning Willamette River at Hawthorne Boulevard & Madison Street, Portland, Multnomah County, OR

  15. The 1980 Polallie Creek debris flow and subsequent dam-break flood, East Fork Hood River basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallino, Gary L.; Pierson, Thomas C.

    1984-01-01

    At approximately 9 p.m. on December 25, 1980, intense rainfall and extremely wet antecedent conditions combined to trigger a landslide of approximately 5,000 cubic yards at the head of Polallie Creek Canyon on the northeast flank of Mount Hood. The landslide was transformed rapidly into a debris flow, which surged down the channel at velocities between about 40 and 50 ft/s, eroding and incorporating large volumes of channel fill and uprooted vegetation. When it reached the debris fan at the confluence with the East Fork Hood River, the debris flow deposited approximately 100,000 cubic yards of saturated, poorly sorted debris to a maximum thickness of 35 ft, forming a 750-ft-long temporary dam across the channel. Within approximately 12 minutes, a lake of 85 acre-feet formed behind the blockage, breached the dam, and sent a flood wave down the East Fork Hood River. The combined debris flow and flood resulted in one fatality and over $13 million in damage to a highway, bridges, parks, and a water-supply pipeline. Application of simple momentum- and energy-balance equations, and uniform flow equations resulted in debris flow peak discharges ranging from 50,000 ft3/s to 300,000 ft3/s at different locations in the Polallie Creek Canyon. This wide range is attributed to temporary damming at the boulder- and log-rich flow front in narrow, curving reaches of the channel. When the volume of the solid debris was subtracted out, assuming a minimum peak debris-flow discharge of 100,000 ft3/s at the canyon mouth, a minimum peak-water discharge of 40,000 ft3/s was obtained. A computer dam-break model simulated peak flow for the outbreak flood on the East Fork Hood River in the range of 20,000 to 30,000 ft3/s using various breach shapes and durations of breach between 5 and 15 minutes. A slope conveyance computation 0.25 mi downstream from the dam gave a peak water discharge (solids subtracted out) for the debris-laden flood of 12,000 to 20,000 ft3/s, depending on the channel

  16. Along Middle Fork Road toward North Fork of the Crazy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Along Middle Fork Road toward North Fork of the Crazy Woman Creek Bridge, view to west - North Fork of Crazy Woman Creek Bridge, Spanning North Fork of Crazy Woman Creek at Middle Fork Road, Buffalo, Johnson County, WY

  17. Hydrologic conditions and water-quality conditions following underground coal mining in the North Fork of the Right Fork of Miller Creek drainage basin, Carbon and Emery Counties, Utah, 2004-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkowske, C.D.; Cillessen, J.L.; Brinton, P.N.

    2007-01-01

    In 2004 and 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management, reassessed the hydrologic system in and around the drainage basin of the North Fork of the Right Fork (NFRF) of Miller Creek, in Carbon and Emery Counties, Utah. The reassessment occurred 13 years after cessation of underground coal mining that was performed beneath private land at shallow depths (30 to 880 feet) beneath the NFRF of Miller Creek. This study is a follow-up to a previous USGS study of the effects of underground coal mining on the hydrologic system in the area from 1988 to 1992. The previous study concluded that mining related subsidence had impacted the hydrologic system through the loss of streamflow over reaches of the perennial portion of the stream, and through a significant increase in dissolved solids in the stream. The previous study also reported that no substantial differences in spring-water quality resulted from longwall mining, and that no clear relationship between mining subsidence and spring discharge existed.During the summers of 2004 and 2005, the USGS measured discharge and collected water-quality samples from springs and surface water at various locations in the NFRF of Miller Creek drainage basin, and maintained a streamflow-gaging station in the NFRF of Miller Creek. This study also utilized data collected by Cyprus–Plateau Mining Corporation from 1992 through 2001.Of thirteen monitored springs, five have discharge levels that have not returned to those observed prior to August 1988, which is when longwall coal mining began beneath the NFRF of Miller Creek. Discharge at two of these five springs appears to fluctuate with wet and dry cycles and is currently low due to a drought that occurred from 1999–2004. Discharge at two other of the five springs did not increase with increased precipitation during the mid-1990s, as was observed at other monitored springs. This suggests that flowpaths to these springs may have been altered by

  18. Changes in fish assemblage structure in the main-stem Willamette River, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Willamette River if Oregon’s largest river, with a basin area of 29,800 km² and a mean annual discharge of 680 m³/3. Beginning in the 1890s, the channel was greatly simplified for navigation. By the 1940s, it was polluted by organic wastes, which resulted in low dissolved o...

  19. CHANGES IN FISH ASSEMBLAGE STRUCTURE IN THE MAINSTEM WILLAMETTE RIVER, OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Willamette River has a mean annual discharge of 680 m3s-1. In the 1940s it was polluted by organic wastes, resulting in low dissolved oxygen concentrations and floating and benthic sludge deposits that hindered salmon migration and navigation. Following basin-wide secondary...

  20. Relations of Principal Components Analysis Site Scores to Algal-Biomass, Habitat, Basin-Characteristics, Nutrient, and Biological-Community Data in the West Fork White River Basin, Indiana, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frey, Jeffrey W.; Caskey, Brian J.; Lowe, B. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Data were gathered from July through September 2001 at 34 randomly selected sites in the West Fork White River Basin, Indiana for algal biomass, habitat, nutrients, and biological communities (fish and invertebrates). Basin characteristics (drainage area and land use) and biological-community attributes and metric scores were determined for the basin of each sampling site. Yearly Principal Components Analysis site scores were calculated for algal biomass (periphyton and seston). The yearly Principal Components Analysis site scores for the first axis (PC1) were related, using Spearman's rho, to the seasonal algal-biomass, basin-characteristics, habitat, seasonal nutrient, biological-community attribute and metric score data. The periphyton PC1 site score, which was most influenced by ash-free dry mass, was negatively related to one (percent closed canopy) of nine habitat variables examined. Of the 43 fish-community attributes and metric scores examined, the periphyton PC1 was positively related to one fish-community attribute (percent tolerant). Of the 21 invertebrate-community attributes and metric scores examined, the periphyton PC1 was positively related to one attribute (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPT) index) and one metric score (EPT index metric score). The periphyton PC1 was not related to the five basin-characteristic or 12 nutrient variables examined. The seston PC1 site score, which was most influenced by particulate organic carbon, was negatively related to two of the 12 nutrient variables examined: total Kjeldahl nitrogen (July) and total phosphorus (July). Of the 43 fish-community attributes and metric scores examined, the seston PC1 was negatively related to one attribute (large-river percent). Of the 21 invertebrate-community attributes and metric scores examined, the seston PC1 was negatively related to one attribute (EPT-to-total ratio). The seston PC1 was not related to the five basin-characteristics or nine habitat variables

  1. Procedure for calculating estimated ultimate recoveries of Bakken and Three Forks Formations horizontal wells in the Williston Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cook, Troy A.

    2013-01-01

    Estimated ultimate recoveries (EURs) are a key component in determining productivity of wells in continuous-type oil and gas reservoirs. EURs form the foundation of a well-performance-based assessment methodology initially developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS; Schmoker, 1999). This methodology was formally reviewed by the American Association of Petroleum Geologists Committee on Resource Evaluation (Curtis and others, 2001). The EUR estimation methodology described in this paper was used in the 2013 USGS assessment of continuous oil resources in the Bakken and Three Forks Formations and incorporates uncertainties that would not normally be included in a basic decline-curve calculation. These uncertainties relate to (1) the mean time before failure of the entire well-production system (excluding economics), (2) the uncertainty of when (and if) a stable hyperbolic-decline profile is revealed in the production data, (3) the particular formation involved, (4) relations between initial production rates and a stable hyperbolic-decline profile, and (5) the final behavior of the decline extrapolation as production becomes more dependent on matrix storage.

  2. Summary of surface-water-quality data collected for the Northern Rockies Intermontane Basins National Water-Quality Assessment Program in the Clark Fork-Pend Oreille and Spokane River basins, Montana, Idaho, and Washington, water years 1999-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beckwith, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Water-quality samples were collected at 10 sites in the Clark Fork-Pend Oreille and Spokane River Basins in water years 1999 – 2001 as part of the Northern Rockies Intermontane Basins (NROK) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Sampling sites were located in varied environments ranging from small streams and rivers in forested, mountainous headwater areas to large rivers draining diverse landscapes. Two sampling sites were located immediately downstream from the large lakes; five sites were located downstream from large-scale historical mining and oreprocessing areas, which are now the two largest “Superfund” (environmental remediation) sites in the Nation. Samples were collected during a wide range of streamflow conditions, more frequently during increasing and high streamflow and less frequently during receding and base-flow conditions. Sample analyses emphasized major ions, nutrients, and selected trace elements. Streamflow during the study ranged from more than 130 percent of the long-term average in 1999 at some sites to 40 percent of the long-term average in 2001. River and stream water in the study area exhibited small values for specific conductance, hardness, alkalinity, and dissolved solids. Dissolved oxygen concentrations in almost all samples were near saturation. Median total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations in samples from most sites were smaller than median concentrations reported for many national programs and other NAWQA Program study areas. The only exceptions were two sites downstream from large wastewater-treatment facilities, where median concentrations of total nitrogen exceeded the national median. Maximum concentrations of total phosphorus in samples from six sites exceeded the 0.1 milligram per liter threshold recommended for limiting nuisance aquatic growth. Concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and zinc were largest in samples from sites downstream from historical mining and ore

  3. An Analytical Method for Deriving Reservoir Operation Curves to Maximize Social Benefits from Multiple Uses of Water in the Willamette River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, K. M.; Jaeger, W. K.; Jones, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    A central characteristic of large river basins in the western US is the spatial and temporal disjunction between the supply of and demand for water. Water sources are typically concentrated in forested mountain regions distant from municipal and agricultural water users, while precipitation is super-abundant in winter and deficient in summer. To cope with these disparities, systems of reservoirs have been constructed throughout the West. These reservoir systems are managed to serve two main competing purposes: to control flooding during winter and spring, and to store spring runoff and deliver it to populated, agricultural valleys during the summer. The reservoirs also provide additional benefits, including recreation, hydropower and instream flows for stream ecology. Since the storage capacity of the reservoirs cannot be used for both flood control and storage at the same time, these uses are traded-off during spring, as the most important, or dominant use of the reservoir, shifts from buffering floods to storing water for summer use. This tradeoff is expressed in the operations rule curve, which specifies the maximum level to which a reservoir can be filled throughout the year, apart from real-time flood operations. These rule curves were often established at the time a reservoir was built. However, climate change and human impacts may be altering the timing and amplitude of flood events and water scarcity is expected to intensify with anticipated changes in climate, land cover and population. These changes imply that reservoir management using current rule curves may not match future societal values for the diverse uses of water from reservoirs. Despite a broad literature on mathematical optimization for reservoir operation, these methods are not often used because they 1) simplify the hydrologic system, raising doubts about the real-world applicability of the solutions, 2) exhibit perfect foresight and assume stationarity, whereas reservoir operators face

  4. Influences of summer water temperatures on the movement, distribution, and resources use of fluvial Westslope Cutthroat Trout in the South Fork Clearwater River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dobos, Marika E.; Corsi, Matthew P.; Schill, Daniel J.; DuPont, Joseph M.; Quist, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Although many Westslope Cutthroat Trout Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi populations in Idaho are robust and stable, population densities in some systems remain below management objectives. In many of those systems, such as in the South Fork Clearwater River (SFCR) system, environmental conditions (e.g., summer temperatures) are hypothesized to limit populations of Westslope Cutthroat Trout. Radiotelemetry and snorkeling methods were used to describe seasonal movement patterns, distribution, and habitat use of Westslope Cutthroat Trout in the SFCR during the summers of 2013 and 2014. Sixty-six radio transmitters were surgically implanted into Westslope Cutthroat Trout (170–405 mm TL) from May 30–June 25, 2013, and June 20–July 6, 2014. Sedentary and mobile summer movement patterns by Westslope Cutthroat Trout were observed in the SFCR. Westslope Cutthroat Trout were generally absent from the lower SFCR. In the upper region of the SFCR, fish generally moved from the main-stem SFCR into tributaries as water temperatures increased during the summer. Fish remained in the middle region of the SFCR where water temperatures were cooler than in the upper or lower regions of the SFCR. A spatially explicit water temperature model indicated that the upper and lower regions of the SFCR exceeded thermal tolerance levels of Westslope Cutthroat Trout throughout the summer. During snorkeling, 23 Westslope Cutthroat Trout were observed in 13 sites along the SFCR and at low density (mean ± SD, 0.0003 ± 0.0001 fish/m2). The distribution of fish observed during snorkeling was consistent with the distribution of radio-tagged fish in the SFCR during the summer. Anthropogenic activities (i.e., grazing, mining, road construction, and timber harvest) in the SFCR basin likely altered the natural flow dynamics and temperature regime and thereby limited stream habitat in the SFCR system for Westslope Cutthroat Trout.

  5. Characterization of salinity loads and selenium loads in the Smith Fork Creek region of the Lower Gunnison River Basin, western Colorado, 2008-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards, Rodney J.; Linard, Joshua I.; Hobza, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    The lower Gunnison River Basin of the Colorado River Basin has elevated salinity and selenium levels. The Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Act of June 24, 1974 (Public Law 93–320, amended by Public Law 98–569), authorized investigation of the Lower Gunnison Basin Unit Salinity Control Project by the U.S. Department of the Interior. The Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and the Natural Resources Conservation Service are responsible for assessing and implementing measures to reduce salinity and selenium loading in the Colorado River Basin. Cost-sharing programs help farmers, ranchers, and canal companies improve the efficiency of water delivery systems and irrigation practices. The delivery systems (irrigation canals) have been identified as potential sources of seepage, which can contribute to salinity loading. Reclamation wants to identify seepage from irrigation systems in order to maximize the effectiveness of the various salinity-control methods, such as polyacrylamide lining and piping of irrigation canals programs. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Reclamation, developed a study to characterize the salinity and selenium loading of seven subbasins in the Smith Fork Creek region and identify where control efforts can be maximized to reduce salinity and selenium loading. Total salinity loads ranged from 27.9±19.1 tons per year (t/yr) to 87,500±80,500 t/yr. The four natural subbasins—BkKm, RCG1, RCG2, and SF1—had total salinity loads of 27.9±19.1 t/yr, 371±248 t/yr, 2,180±1,590 t/yr, and 4,200±2,720 t/yr, respectively. The agriculturally influenced sites had salinity loads that ranged from 7,580±6,900 t/yr to 87,500±80,500 t/yr. Salinity loads for the subbasins AL1, B1, CK1, SF2, and SF3 were 7,580±6,900 t/yr; 28,300±26,700 t/yr; 48,700±36,100 t/yr; 87,500±80,900 t/yr; and 52,200±31,800 t/yr, respectively. The agricultural salinity load was separated into three components: tail water, deep percolation, and canal seepage

  6. Changes in streamflow and summary of major-ion chemistry and loads in the North Fork Red River basin upstream from Lake Altus, northwestern Texas and western Oklahoma, 1945-1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, S. Jerrod; Wahl, Kenneth L.

    2003-01-01

    Upstream from Lake Altus, the North Fork Red River drains an area of 2,515 square miles. The quantity and quality of surface water are major concerns at Lake Altus, and water-resource managers and consumers need historical information to make informed decisions about future development. The Lugert-Altus Irrigation District relies on withdrawals from the lake to sustain nearly 46,000 acres of agricultural land. Kendall's tau tests of precipitation data indicated no statistically significant trend over the entire 100 years of available record. However, a significant increase in precipitation occurred in the last 51 years. Four streamflow-gaging stations with more than 10 years of record were maintained in the basin. These stations recorded no significant trends in annual streamflow volume. Two stations, however, had significant increasing trends in the base-flow index, and three had significant decreasing trends in annual peak flows. Major-ion chemistry in the North Fork Red River is closely related to the chemical composition of the underlying bedrock. Two main lithologies are represented in the basin upstream from Lake Altus. In the upper reaches, young and poorly consolidated sediments include a range of sizes from coarse gravel to silt and clay. Nearsurface horizons commonly are cemented as calcium carbonate caliche. Finer-grained gypsiferous sandstones and shales dominate the lower reaches of the basin. A distinct increase in dissolved solids, specifically sodium, chloride, calcium, and sulfate, occurs as the river flows over rocks that contain substantial quantities of gypsum, anhydrite, and dolomite. These natural salts are the major dissolved constituents in the North Fork Red River.

  7. Water quality in Reedy Fork and Buffalo Creek basins in the Greensboro area, North Carolina, 1986-87

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davenport, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    variables to statistically compare water-quality characteristics in selected rural, semideveloped and urban basins. During low-flow sampling, the constituents that differed significantly among all sites were calcium, magnesium, and chloride. During low flows, concentrations of orthophosphate, fluoride, sulfate, and TOC differed at the urban site from the rural and semideveloped and urban sites. There were no significant differences among sites in concentrations of sodium, suspended sediment, nickel, zinc, copper, and mercury during low flows. The Wilcoxon test performed on high-flow data indicated that concentrations of TOC, chloride, sulfate, suspended sediment, and nickel were not significantly different among the sites.

  8. U.S. Geological Survey 2013 assessment of undiscovered resources in the Bakken and Three Forks Formations of the U.S. Williston Basin Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Marra, Kristen R.

    2014-01-01

    The Upper Devonian Three Forks and Upper Devonian to Lower Mississippian Bakken Formations comprise a major United States continuous oil resource. Current exploitation of oil is from horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Member of the Bakken and upper Three Forks, with ongoing exploration of the lower Three Forks, and the Upper, Lower, and Pronghorn Members of the Bakken Formation. In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) estimated a mean of 3.65 billion bbl of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil resource within the Bakken Formation. The USGS recently reassessed the Bakken Formation, which included an assessment of the underlying Three Forks Formation. The Pronghorn Member of the Bakken Formation, where present, was included as part of the Three Forks assessment due to probable fluid communication between reservoirs. For the Bakken Formation, five continuous and one conventional assessment units (AUs) were defined. These AUs are modified from the 2008 AU boundaries to incorporate expanded geologic and production information. The Three Forks Formation was defined with one continuous and one conventional AU. Within the continuous AUs, optimal regions of hydrocarbon recovery, or “sweet spots,” were delineated and estimated ultimate recoveries were calculated for each continuous AU. Resulting undiscovered, technically recoverable resource estimates were 3.65 billion bbl for the five Bakken continuous oil AUs and 3.73 billion bbl for the Three Forks Continuous Oil AU, generating a total mean resource estimate of 7.38 billion bbl. The two conventional AUs are hypothetical and represent a negligible component of the total estimated resource (8 million barrels of oil).

  9. VEGETATION CHARACTERIZATION OF THREE CONTRASTING RIPARIAN SITES, WILLAMETTE VALLEY, OR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Much of the native riparian vegetation of the Willamette Valley, Oregon, has been replaced with agricultural crops or invasive non-native plant species. Detailed information about current Willamette Valley riparian vegetation is generally lacking. Plant species composition data...

  10. Hydraulic geometry and sediment data for the South Fork Salmon River, Idaho, 1985-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Rhea P.; O'Dell, Ivalou; Megahan, Walter F.

    1989-01-01

    Hydraulic geometry, suspended-sediment, and bedload samples were collected at three sites in the upper reach of the South Fork Salmon River drainage basin from April 1985 to June 1986. Sites selected were South Fork Salmon River near Krassel Ranger Station, Buckhorn Creek, and North Fork Lick Creek. Results of the data collection are presented in this report.

  11. Estimated loads of suspended sediment and selected trace elements transported through the Clark Fork basin, Montana, in selected periods before and after the breach of Milltown Dam (water years 1985-2009)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sando, Steven K.; Lambing, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Milltown Reservoir is a National Priorities List Superfund site in the upper Clark Fork basin of western Montana where sediments enriched in trace elements from historical mining and ore processing have been deposited since the completion of Milltown Dam in 1908. Milltown Dam was breached on March 28, 2008, as part of Superfund remediation activities to remove the dam and excavate contaminated sediment that had accumulated in Milltown Reservoir. In preparation for the breach of Milltown Dam, permanent drawdown of Milltown Reservoir began on June 1, 2006, and lowered the water-surface elevation by about 10 to 12 feet. After the breach of Milltown Dam, the water-surface elevation was lowered an additional 17 feet. Hydrologic data-collection activities were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to estimate loads of suspended sediment and trace elements transported through the Clark Fork basin before and after the breach of Milltown Dam. This report presents selected results of the data-collection activities.

  12. Water-power resources in upper Carson River basin, California-Nevada, A discussion of potential development of power and reservoir sites on east and west forks, Carson River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pumphrey, Harold L.

    1955-01-01

    West Fork Carson River offers the best opportunity for power development in the Carson River basin. The Hope Valley reservoir site could be developed to provide adequate storage regulation and concentration of fall would permit utilization of 1,400 feet of head in 51h miles below the clam site, or 1,900 feet of head in about 972 miles below the dam site; however, the average annual runoff susceptible of development is only about 70,000 acre-feet which limits the power that could be developed continuously in an average year with regulation to about 8,700 kilowatts utilizing 1,400 feet of head, or 12,000 kilowatts utilizing 1,900 feet of head. The method and degree of development will be determined to large extent by the method devised to supplement regulated flows from the Hope Valley reservoir to supply the water already appropriated for irrigation. If the Hope Valley site and the Watasheamu site on East Fork Carson River were developed coordinately water could be transferred to the West Fork for distribution through canals leading from that stream thus satisfying the deficiency due to regulation at Hope Valley and release of stored water on a power schedule. This would permit utilization of the entire 1,900 feet of fall. Independent development of the West Fork for optimum power production would require re-regulation of releases from Hope Valley reservoir and storage of a considerable part of the fall and winter flow for use during the irrigation season. Adequate storage capacity is apparently not available on the West Fork below Hope Valley; but offstream storage may be available in Diamond Valley which could be utilized by diversion from the West Fork near Woodfords. This would limit the utilization of the stream for power purposes to the development of the 1,400 feet of head between the Hope Valley dam site and Wood fords. In a year of average discharge East Fork Carson River and three of its principal tributaries could be developed to produce about 13

  13. The impact of snowpack decline on high elevation surface-water flow in the Willamette River: a stable isotope perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, J. R.; Johnson, H.; Cline, S. P.; Rugh, W.

    2015-12-01

    Much of the water that people in Western Oregon rely on comes from the snowpack in the Cascade Range, and this snowpack is expected to decrease in coming years with climate change. In fact, the past five years have shown dramatic variation in snowpack from a high of 174% of normal in 2010-11 to a low of 11% for 2014-15, one of the lowest on record. During this timeframe, we have monitored the stable isotopes of water within the Willamette River twice monthly, and mapped the spatial variation of water isotopes across the basin. Within the Willamette Basin, stable isotopes of water in precipitation vary strongly with elevation and provide a marker for determining the mean elevation from which water in the Willamette River is derived. In the winter when snow accumulates in the mountains, low elevation precipitation (primarily rain) contributes the largest proportion of water to the Willamette River. During summer when rainfall is scarce and demand for water is the greatest, water in the Willamette River is mainly derived from high elevation snowmelt. Our data indicate that the proportion of water from high elevation decreased with decreasing snowpack. We combine this information with the river flow data to estimate the volume reduction related to snow pack reduction during the dry summer. Observed reductions in the contribution of high elevation water to the Willamette River after just two years of diminished snowpack indicate that the hydrologic system responds relatively rapidly to changing snowpack volume. Reconciling the demands between human use and biological instream requirements during summer will be challenging under climatic conditions in which winter snowpack is reduced compared to historical amounts.

  14. The Yampa Bed - A Regionally Extensive Tonstein in the Williams Fork Formation, Northwestern Piceance Creek and Southern Sand Wash Basins, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brownfield, Michael E.; Johnson, Edward A.

    2008-01-01

    A regionally persistent and distinctive unit of Upper Cretaceous age is here formally named the Yampa Bed of the Williams Fork Formation for exposures in the Yampa, Danforth Hills, and Grand Hogback coal fields, Moffat and Routt Counties, northwest Colorado; the name is derived from the Yampa River valley. The type section was measured in the NE? SW? sec. 6, T. 5 N., R. 91 W., about 8 miles south of Craig, Colo., where the bed is 38 inches thick and lies within the C-D coal bed in the lower part of the Williams Fork Formation, about 165 feet above the Trout Creek Sandstone Member of the Iles Formation. The Yampa Bed is dated at 72.2 ? .1 mega-annum using the K-Ar method. Regionally, the Yampa Bed is a 0.5- to 5-ft-thick, regionally persistent tonstein that can be readily identified in several different lithofacies in the lower part of the Williams Fork Formation. The unit is useful as a regional datum in the correlation of facies within the Williams Fork, and it is easily recognized on geophysical logs by its low resistivity response. Evidence suggests that it is a diagenetically altered airfall ash.

  15. 33 CFR 117.897 - Willamette River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Oregon § 117.897 Willamette River. (a) The draws of the Union Pacific railroad bridge, mile 119.6 at Albany; and mile 164.3 near Harrisburg, need not open... months after notification by the District Commander to do so. (b) The draw of the Oregon State...

  16. 33 CFR 117.897 - Willamette River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Oregon § 117.897 Willamette River. (a) The draws of the Union Pacific railroad bridge, mile 119.6 at Albany; and mile 164.3 near Harrisburg, need not open... months after notification by the District Commander to do so. (b) The draw of the Oregon State...

  17. 14. INSIDE VIEW OF FLUME, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM TOWARD SETTLING BASIN, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INSIDE VIEW OF FLUME, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM TOWARD SETTLING BASIN, SHOWING RIGHT FORK TO BYPASS, LEFT FORK TO BASIN - Electron Hydroelectric Project, Along Puyallup River, Electron, Pierce County, WA

  18. Streamflow and water-quality properties in the West Fork San Jacinto River Basin and regression models to estimate real-time suspended-sediment and total suspended-solids concentrations and loads in the West Fork San Jacinto River in the vicinity of Conroe, Texas, July 2008-August 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodkin, Lee J.; Oden, Jeannette H.

    2010-01-01

    To better understand the hydrology (streamflow and water quality) of the West Fork San Jacinto River Basin downstream from Lake Conroe near Conroe, Texas, including spatial and temporal variation in suspended-sediment (SS) and total suspended-solids (TSS) concentrations and loads, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Houston-Galveston Area Council and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, measured streamflow and collected continuous and discrete water-quality data during July 2008-August 2009 in the West Fork San Jacinto River Basin downstream from Lake Conroe. During July 2008-August 2009, discrete samples were collected and streamflow measurements were made over the range of flow conditions at two streamflow-gaging stations on the West Fork San Jacinto River: West Fork San Jacinto River below Lake Conroe near Conroe, Texas (station 08067650) and West Fork San Jacinto River near Conroe, Texas (station 08068000). In addition to samples collected at these two main monitoring sites, discrete sediment samples were also collected at five additional monitoring sites to help characterize water quality in the West Fork San Jacinto River Basin. Discrete samples were collected semimonthly, regardless of flow conditions, and during periods of high flow resulting from storms or releases from Lake Conroe. Because the period of data collection was relatively short (14 months) and low flow was prevalent during much of the study, relatively few samples collected were representative of the middle and upper ranges of historical daily mean streamflows. The largest streamflows tended to occur in response to large rainfall events and generally were associated with the largest SS and TSS concentrations. The maximum SS and TSS concentrations at station 08067650 (180 and 133 milligrams per liter [mg/L], respectively) were on April 19, 2009, when the instantaneous streamflow was the third largest associated with a discrete sample at the station. SS concentrations

  19. Estimated Loads of Suspended Sediment and Selected Trace Elements Transported through Milltown Reservoir in the Upper Clark Fork Basin, Montana, Water Years 2004-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambing, John H.; Sando, Steven K.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present estimated daily and annual loads of suspended sediment and selected trace elements for water years 2004-07 at two sites upstream and one site downstream from Milltown Reservoir. Milltown Reservoir is a National Priorities List Superfund site in the upper Clark Fork basin of western Montana where sediments enriched in trace elements from historical mining and ore processing have been deposited since the construction of Milltown Dam in 1907. The estimated loads were used to quantify annual net gains and losses (mass balance) of suspended sediment and trace elements within Milltown Reservoir before and after June 1, 2006, which was the start of Stage 1 of a permanent drawdown of the reservoir in preparation for removal of Milltown Dam. This study was done in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Daily loads of suspended sediment were estimated for water years 2004-07 by using either high-frequency sampling as part of daily sediment monitoring or regression equations relating suspended-sediment discharge to streamflow. Daily loads of unfiltered-recoverable arsenic, cadmium, copper, iron, lead, manganese, and zinc were estimated by using regression equations relating trace-element discharge to suspended-sediment discharge. Regression equations were developed from data for eriodic water-quality samples collected during water years 2004-07. The equations were applied to daily records of either streamflow or suspended-sediment discharge to produce estimated daily loads. Variations in daily suspended-sediment and trace-element loads generally coincided with variations in streamflow. For most of the period before June 1, 2006, differences in daily loads transported to and from Milltown Reservoir were minor or indicated small amounts of deposition; however, losses of suspended sediment and trace elements from the reservoir occurred during temporary drawdowns in July-August 2004 and October-December 2005. After the

  20. Bedload measurements, East Fork River, Wyoming.

    PubMed

    Leopold, L B; Emmett, W W

    1976-04-01

    A bedload trap in the riverbed provided direct quantitative measurement of debris-transport rate in the East Fork River, Wyoming, a basin of 466 km(2) drainage area. Traction load moves only during the spring snow melt season. Data collected in three spring runoff seasons during which a peak flow of 45 m(3)/s occurred showed that transport rate is correlated with power expenditure of the flowing water and at high flows becomes directly proportional to power as suggested by Bagnold.

  1. 77 FR 20718 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Willamette River, Portland, OR AGENCY... accordance to 33 CFR 117.897 at all other times. Waterway usage on this stretch of the Willamette...

  2. 77 FR 16927 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Willamette River, Portland, OR AGENCY... this stretch of the Willamette River includes vessels ranging from commercial tug and barge to...

  3. 77 FR 3607 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Willamette River, Portland, OR AGENCY... accordance to 33 CFR 117.5 at all other times. Waterway usage on this stretch of the Willamette...

  4. Storm runoff as related to urbanization based on data collected in Salem and Portland, and generalized for the Willamette Valley, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1983-01-01

    Storm runoff as related to urbanization is defined by a series of regression equations for Salem and for the Willamette Valley, Oregon. In addition to data from 17 basins monitored in the Salem area, data from 24 basins gaged in a previous study in Portland, Oregon - Vancouver, Washington were used defining the Willamette Valley equations. Basins used to define equations ranged in size from 0.2 to 26 square miles. Rainfall intensity varied from 1.8 to 2.2 inches for the 6 hour, 0.2 exceedance probability. Sensitivity analyses of equations indicate that urbanization of an undeveloped basin can increase peak discharge more than three times and almost double runoff volume. Much of Portland and Vancouver are located on porous river terraces where dry wells are used to shunt runoff. Much of East Salem is located on previously farmed land where drain tiles used to dewater soils still connect directly to streams. (USGS)

  5. Chemical characteristics, including stable-isotope ratios, of surface water and ground water from selected sources in and near East Fork Armells Creek basin, southeastern Montana, 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferreira, R.F.; Lambing, J.H.; Davis, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    Water samples were collected from 29 sites to provide synoptic chemical data, including stable-isotope ratios, for an area of active surface coal mining and to explore the effectiveness of using the data to chemically distinguish water from different aquifers. Surface-water samples were collected from one spring, four sites on East Armells Creek, one site on Stocker Creek, and two fly-ash ponds. Streamflows in East Fork Armells Creek ranged from no flow in several upstream reaches to 2.11 cu ft/sec downstream from Colstrip, Montana. Only one tributary, Stocker Creek, was observed to contribute surface flow in the study area. Groundwater samples were collected from wells completed in Quaternary alluvium or mine spoils, Rosebud overburden, Rosebud coal bed, McKay coal bed, and sub-McKay deposits of the Tongue River Member, Paleocene Fort Union Formation. Dissolved-solids concentrations, in mg/L, were 840 at the spring, 3,100 to 5,000 in the streams, 13,000 to 22,000 in the ash ponds, and 690 to 4 ,100 in the aquifers. With few exceptions, water from the sampled spring, streams, and wells had similar concentrations of major constituents and trace elements and similar stable-isotope ratios. Water from the fly-ash ponds had larger concentrations of dissolved solids, boron, and manganese and were isotopically more enriched in deuterium and oxygen-18 than water from other sources. Water from individual aquifers could not be distinguished by either ion-composition diagrams or statistical cluster analyses. (USGS)

  6. 78 FR 15879 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ... Roses and the Bridge to Brews Run ] & Walk events. This deviation allows the bridge to remain in the... Brews Run & Walk events. The Broadway Bridge crosses the Willamette River at mile 11.7 and provides...

  7. 78 FR 24676 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... Festival Rock N Roll Half Marathon. ] This deviation allows the upper deck of the Steel Bridge to remain in... associated with the Rose Festival Rock N Roll Half Marathon. The Steel Bridge crosses the Willamette River...

  8. 77 FR 50676 - Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... of meeting. SUMMARY: The Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Salem, Oregon. The... meeting will be held at Salem Office of the Bureau of Land Management Office, 1717 Fabry Road SE.,...

  9. 7. STATION 'L' FROM THE WEST BANK OF THE WILLAMETTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. STATION 'L' FROM THE WEST BANK OF THE WILLAMETTE RIVER LOOKING EAST, SCREEN HOUSES AND TURBINE BUILDINGS IN FOREGROUND - Portland General Electric Company, Station "L", 1841 Southeast Water Street, Portland, Multnomah County, OR

  10. 77 FR 29897 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... efficient movement of light rail and roadway traffic associated with the Rose Parade in Portland, Oregon... roadway traffic associated with the Rose Parade. The Steel Bridge crosses the Willamette River at mile...

  11. 78 FR 18477 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... Rose Parade, and Starlight Parade events. This deviation allows the bridge upper deck to remain in the... Starlight Parade and Rose Parade. The Steel Bridge crosses the Willamette River at mile 12.1 and is a...

  12. 77 FR 50017 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... Pasta foot race event. This deviation allows the bridge to remain in the closed position to allow safe... Pints to Pasta event. The Broadway Bridge crosses the Willamette River at mile 11.7 and provides 90...

  13. Estimated Loads of Suspended Sediment and Selected Trace Elements Transported through the Milltown Reservoir Project Area Before and After the Breaching of Milltown Dam in the Upper Clark Fork Basin, Montana, Water Year 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambing, John H.; Sando, Steven K.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents estimated daily and cumulative loads of suspended sediment and selected trace elements transported during water year 2008 at three streamflow-gaging stations that bracket the Milltown Reservoir project area in the upper Clark Fork basin of western Montana. Milltown Reservoir is a National Priorities List Superfund site where sediments enriched in trace elements from historical mining and ore processing have been deposited since the construction of Milltown Dam in 1907. Milltown Dam was breached on March 28, 2008, as part of Superfund remedial activities to remove the dam and contaminated sediment that had accumulated in Milltown Reservoir. The estimated loads transported through the project area during the periods before and after the breaching of Milltown Dam, and for the entire water year 2008, were used to quantify the net gain or loss (mass balance) of suspended sediment and trace elements within the project area during the transition from a reservoir environment to a free-flowing river. This study was done in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Streamflow during water year 2008 compared to long-term streamflow, as represented by the record for Clark Fork above Missoula (water years 1930-2008), generally was below normal (long-term median) from about October 2007 through April 2008. Sustained runoff started in mid-April, which increased flows to near normal by mid-May. After mid-May, flows sharply increased to above normal, reaching a maximum daily mean streamflow of 16,800 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) on May 21, which essentially equaled the long-term 10th-exceedance percentile for that date. Flows substantially above normal were sustained through June, then decreased through the summer and reached near-normal by August. Annual mean streamflow during water year 2008 (3,040 ft3/s) was 105 percent of the long-term mean annual streamflow (2,900 ft3/s). The annual peak flow (17,500 ft3/s) occurred on May 21 and was 112

  14. Depositional environments, reservoir trends, and diagenesis of Red Fork sandstones in parts of Blaine, Caddo, and Custer counties, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.L.

    1984-04-01

    The Red Fork sandstone was divided into the upper and lower Red Fork which are separated by a consistent marker bed. The Red Fork interval thickens markedly across the study area from 250 ft (75 m) in the northeast to over 1300 ft (400 m) in the southwest. Most of the thickening is within the lower Red Fork. The lower Red Fork is believed to have been deposited in shelf-to-basin transitional terrain. Sands were located in delta-front, submarine-channel-fill, and possible submarine-fan terrain. The upper Red Fork is believed to represent the maximum progradation of a deltaic complex. Sandstones of the lower Red Fork are sublithic to lithic arenites; the upper Red Fork is sublithic arenite. The dominant lithic fraction is mudstone fragments. The main diagenetic alterations of both the upper and lower Red Fork sandstones were destruction of primary porosity by compaction and cementation. Dissolution chiefly of mud fragments has produced well-developed secondary porosity. Clays of the lower Red Fork mainly are authigenic chlorite; clays of the upper Red Fork primarily are authigenic kaolinite. Present oil and gas production from Red Fork sandstones is most abundant from localities on the paleoshelf.

  15. Styles of deposition and diagenesis in the Monahans Clear Fork reservoir: Implications for improved characterization of Leonard reservoirs on the Central basin platform

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, S.C. )

    1992-04-01

    The Leonard Series (Lower Permian) of west Texas contains a substantial hydrocarbon resource; the original oil in place in these predominantly carbonate rocks totaled about 14.5 billion bbl. Recovery of this resource has proven difficult, however. Current recovery efficiencies average about 20%, far below the 35% average for other Permian basin carbonate reservoirs. Detailed characterization of the Leonard in the Monahans field (Ward and Winkler counties, Texas) illustrates that poor reservoir performance in these reservoirs is the result of extreme lithologic heterogeniety resulting from cyclic rise and fall of relative sea level. Patterns of both depositional and diagenetic facies are a function of this cyclicity. Three orders of cyclicity are apparent in the Leonard: high-frequency, fifth-order cycles averaging 1-2 m in thickness, fourth-order cycles averaging 15-20 m in thickness, and third-order cycles averaging 200 m in thickness. Diagenetic patterns reflect control by fourth-order and third-order cyclicity. Both depositional and diagenetic trends are modified by local topography. Porosity and permeability also manifest cycle-related trends. Porosity and permeability exhibit opposite relationships to paleotopography. Porosity, which is encountered in tidal-flat and subtidal facies, is greatest on paleotopographic highs, whereas permeability, which is most commonly developed in subtidal facies, is most common on paleotopographic lows. Preliminary investigation of Leonard carbonate sequences elsewhere in the Permian basin reveals analogous styles and patterns of facies development. The concepts and models developed in the Monahans field should help improve characterization of these sequences as well.

  16. Is It Working? Lysimeter Monitoring in the Southern Willamette Valley Groundwater Management Area

    EPA Science Inventory

    Groundwater nitrate contamination affects thousands of households in the southern Willamette Valley and many more across the Pacific Northwest. The southern Willamette Valley Groundwater Management Area (SWV GWMA) was established in 2004 due to nitrate levels in the groundwater ...

  17. Geomorphic and vegetation processes of the Willamette River floodplain, Oregon: current understanding and unanswered science questions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallick, J. Rose; Jones, Krista L.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Hulse, David; Gregory, Stanley V.

    2013-01-01

    4. How is the succession of native floodplain vegetation shaped by present-day flow and sediment conditions? Answering these questions will produce baseline data on the current distributions of landforms and habitats (question 1), the extent of the functional floodplain (question 2), and the effects of modern flow and sediment regimes on future floodplain landforms, habitats, and vegetation succession (questions 3 and 4). Addressing questions 1 and 2 is a logical next step because they underlie questions 3 and 4. Addressing these four questions would better characterize the modern Willamette Basin and help in implementing and setting realistic targets for ongoing management strategies, demonstrating their effectiveness at the site and basin scales, and anticipating future trends and conditions.

  18. Bedload measurements, East Fork River, Wyoming

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Luna B.; Emmett, William W.

    1976-01-01

    A bedload trap in the riverbed provided direct quantitative measurement of debris-transport rate in the East Fork River, Wyoming, a basin of 466 km2 drainage area. Traction load moves only during the spring snow melt season. Data collected in three spring runoff seasons during which a peak flow of 45 m3/s occurred showed that transport rate is correlated with power expenditure of the flowing water and at high flows becomes directly proportional to power as suggested by Bagnold. PMID:16592302

  19. Concentrations of selected trace elements in fish tissue and streambed sediment in the Clark Fork-Pend Oreille and Spokane River basins, Washington, Idaho, and Montana, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maret, Terry R.; Skinner, K.D.

    2000-01-01

    Fish tissue and bed sediment samples were collected from 16 stream sites in the Northern Rockies Intermontane Basins study area in 1998 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Bed sediment samples were analyzed for 45 trace elements, and fish livers and sportfish fillets were analyzed for 22 elements to characterize the occurrence and distribution of these elements in relation to stream characteristics and land use activities. Nine trace elements of environmental concern—arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, selenium, and zinc—were detected in bed sediment, but not all of these elements were detected in fish tissue. Trace-element concentrations were highest in bed sediment samples collected at sites downstream from significant natural mineral deposits and (or) mining activities. Arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and zinc in bed sediment at some sites were elevated relative to national median concentrations, and some concentrations were at levels that can adversely affect aquatic biota. Although trace-element concentrations in bed sediment exceeded various guidelines, no concentrations in sportfish fillets exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency screening values for the protection of human health. Correlations between most trace-element concentrations in bed sediment and fish tissue (liver and fillet) were not significant (r0.05). Concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, selenium, and zinc in bed sediment were significantly correlated (r=0.53 to 0.88, p2=0.95 and 0.99, p<0.001) that corresponded to trace-element enrichment categories. These strong relations warrant further study using mine density as an explanatory variable to predict trace-element concentrations in bed sediment.

  20. 1. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing west. Panorama ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing west. Panorama showing the entire span of bridge from north shore of the Clark Fork River. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  1. 3. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing southwest. Bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing southwest. Bridge from north shore of Clark Fork River. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  2. 7. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing northwest. Bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing northwest. Bridge from south shore of Clark Fork River showing 4 1/2 spans. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  3. 4. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing northeast. Bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing northeast. Bridge from south shoreof Clark Fork River showing 4 spans. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  4. 2. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing northeast. Bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing northeast. Bridge from south shore of Clark Fork River showing 4 1/2 spans. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  5. Body morphology differs in wild juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Willamette River, Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Billman, E.J.; Whitman, L.D.; Schroeder, R.K.; Sharpe, C.S.; Noakes, David L. G.; Schreck, Carl B.

    2014-01-01

    Body morphology of juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the upper Willamette River, Oregon, U.S.A., was analysed to determine if variation in body shape is correlated with migratory life-history tactics followed by juveniles. Body shape was compared between migrating juveniles that expressed different life-history tactics, i.e. autumn migrants and yearling smolts, and among parr sampled at three sites along a longitudinal river gradient. In the upper Willamette River, the expression of life-history tactics is associated with where juveniles rear in the basin with fish rearing in downstream locations generally completing ocean ward migrations earlier in life than fish rearing in upstream locations. The morphological differences that were apparent between autumn migrants and yearling smolts were similar to differences between parr rearing in downstream and upstream reaches, indicating that body morphology is correlated with life-history tactics. Autumn migrants and parr from downstream sampling sites had deeper bodies, shorter heads and deeper caudal peduncles compared with yearling smolts and parr from the upstream sampling site. This study did not distinguish between genetic and environmental effects on morphology; however, the results suggest that downstream movement of juveniles soon after emergence is associated with differentiation in morphology and with the expression of life-history variation.

  6. Tuning Forks and Monitor Screens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, M. A. T.

    2000-01-01

    Defines the vibrations of a tuning fork against a computer monitor screen as a pattern that can illustrate or explain physical concepts like wave vibrations, wave forms, and phase differences. Presents background information and demonstrates the experiment. (Author/YDS)

  7. Willamette River Basin Streambank Stabilization by Natural Means.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-06-01

    lamette and its tributaries (43). Kudzu and honeysuckle have been effec- tive plantings in cultivated fields near streams in the Southeast (24). Where...for streambank protection in Western Oregon include salal, dwarf, willow, dogwoods, rose, hazel, vine maple, black- berry, poison oak, swordfern...quite adequate to protect the embankment, even though the relative bend curvature is only 3 or 4. Areas densely covered by berry vines are also well

  8. Environmental Assessment: Demolish 452 at Grand Forks Air Force Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    humid with frequent thunderstorms. Winters are long and severe with almost continuous snow cover. The spring and fall seasons are generally short...direction is generally from the northwest during the late fall, winter, and spring , and from the southeast during the summer. Grand Forks County is...to Lake Winnipeg, Canada. The Red River drainage basin is part of the Hudson Bay drainage system. At Manvel, ND, approximately 10 miles northeast

  9. Dissolved-Solids Load in Henrys Fork Upstream from the Confluence with Antelope Wash, Wyoming, Water Years 1970-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Katharine; Kenney, Terry A.

    2010-01-01

    Annual dissolved-solids load at the mouth of Henrys Fork was estimated by using data from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging station 09229500, Henrys Fork near Manila, Utah. The annual dissolved-solids load for water years 1970-2009 ranged from 18,300 tons in 1977 to 123,300 tons in 1983. Annual streamflows for this period ranged from 14,100 acre-feet in 1977 to 197,500 acre-feet in 1983. The 25-percent trimmed mean dissolved-solids load for water years 1970-2009 was 44,300 tons per year at Henrys Fork near Manila, Utah. Previous simulations using a SPAtially Referenced Regression On Watershed attributes (SPARROW) model for dissolved solids specific to water year 1991 conditions in the Upper Colorado River Basin predicted an annual dissolved-solids load of 25,000 tons for the Henrys Fork Basin upstream from Antelope Wash. On the basis of computed dissolved-solids load data from Henrys Fork near Manila, Utah, together with estimated annual dissolved-solids load from Antelope Wash and Peoples Canal, this prediction was adjusted to 37,200 tons. As determined by simulations with the Upper Colorado River Basin SPARROW model, approximately 56 percent (14,000 tons per year) of the dissolved-solids load at Henrys Fork upstream from Antelope Wash is associated with the 21,500 acres of irrigated agricultural lands in the upper Henrys Fork Basin.

  10. 76 FR 14897 - Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... of meeting. SUMMARY: The Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Salem, Oregon. The..., 2011, and begin at 9:30 a.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at Salem Office of the Bureau of Land Management Office; 1717 Fabry Road SE; Salem, Oregon; (503) 375- 5646. Written comments should be sent...

  11. 76 FR 19314 - Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ...: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Salem, Oregon..., and begin at 9:30 a.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Salem Office of the Bureau of Land Management Office; 1717 Fabry Road SE; Salem, Oregon; (503) 375-5646. Written comments should be sent...

  12. A New Hydrogeological Research Site in the Willamette River Floodplain

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Willamette River is a ninth-order tributary of the Columbia which passes through a productive and populous region in northwest Oregon. Where unconstrained by shoreline revetments, the floodplain of this river is a high-energy, dynamic system which supports a variety of ripari...

  13. Community Based Demonstration Projects: Willamette Ecosystem Services Project (WESP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s Ecosystem Services Research Program in the Office of Research and Development is focused on the study of ecosystem services and the benefits to human well-being provided by ecological systems. As part of this research effort, the Willamette Ecosystems Services Project (WE...

  14. Geomorphic Characterization of the Middle Fork Saline River: Garland, Perry, and Saline Counties, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pugh, Aaron L.; Garday, Thomas J.; Redman, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    This report was prepared to help address concerns raised by local residents, State, and Federal agencies about the current geomorphic conditions of the Middle Fork Saline River. Over the past 30 years the Middle Fork Saline River Basin has experienced a marked increase in urbanization. The report summarizes the Middle Fork?s current (2003) channel characteristics at nine stream reaches in the upper 91 square miles of the basin. Assessments at each study reach included comparing measured stream geometry dimensions (cross-sectional area, top width, and mean depth) at bankfull stage to regional hydraulic geometry curves for the Ouachita Mountains Physiographic Province of Arkansas and Oklahoma, evaluations of streambed materials and sinuosity, and classification of individual stream reach types. When compared to the Ouachita Mountains? regional hydraulic geometry curves for natural, stable, stream reaches, five of the nine study reaches had slightly smaller crosssectional areas, longer top widths, and shallower depths. Streambed material analysis indicates that the Middle Fork is a bedrock influenced, gravel dominated stream with lesser amounts of sand and cobbles. Slight increases in sinuosity from 1992 to 2002 at seven of the nine study reaches indicate a slight decrease in stream channel slope. Analyses of the Middle Fork?s hydraulic geometry and sinuosity indicate that the Middle Fork is currently overly wide and shallow, but is slowly adjusting towards a deeper, narrower hydraulic geometry. Using the Rosgen system of channel classification, the two upstream study reaches classified as B4c/1 stream types; which were moderately entrenched, riffle dominated channels, with infrequently spaced pools. The downstream seven study reaches classified as C4/1 stream types; which were slightly entrenched, meandering, gravel-dominated, riffle/ pool channels with well developed flood plains. Analyses of stream reach types suggest that the downstream reaches of the Middle Fork

  15. 22. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing downwest side. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing down-west side. Looking at road deck and vertical laced channel. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  16. 8. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing southwest. Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing southwest. Looking at understructure of northernmost span. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  17. 11. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing northwest. Southernmost ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing northwest. Southernmost span. Plaque was originally located where striped traffic sign is posted. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  18. 21. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing west. Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing west. Looking at bridge deck, guard rail, juncture of two bridge spans. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  19. 12. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing south. Approach ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing south. Approach from the north road. Plaque was originally located where striped traffic sign is posted. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  20. 18. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing north. Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing north. Looking at north concrete abutment and timber stringers. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  1. 20. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing up. Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing up. Looking at understructure of northernmost span. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  2. 19. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing north. Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing north. Looking at north abutment and underside of northernmost span. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  3. Hydrologic, water-quality, and biological characteristics of the North Fork Flathead River, Montana, water years 2007-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mills, Taylor J.; Schweiger, E. William; Mast, M. Alisa; Clow, David W.

    2012-01-01

    In water year 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, began a 2-year study to collect hydrologic, water-quality, and biological data to provide a baseline characterization of the North Fork Flathead River from the United States-Canada border to its confluence with the Middle Fork of the Flathead River near Columbia Falls, Montana. Although mining in the Canadian portion of the North Fork Basin was banned in 2010 by a Memorandum of Understanding issued by the Province of British Columbia, baseline characterization was deemed important for the evaluation of any potential future changes in hydrology, water quality, or aquatic biology in the basin. The North Fork Basin above Columbia Falls (including Canada) drains an area of 1,564 square miles, and the study area encompasses the portion of the basin in Montana, which is 1,126 square miles. Seasonal patterns in the hydrology of the North Fork are dominated by the accumulation and melting of seasonal snowpack in the basin. Low-flow conditions occurred during the late-summer, fall, and winter months, and high-flow conditions coincided with the spring snowmelt. Substantial gains in streamflow occurred along the study reach of the North Fork, 85 percent of which were accounted for by tributary inflows during low-flow conditions, indicating unmeasured streamflow inputs along the main stem were 15 percent or less.

  4. Is it working? A look at the changing nutrient practices in the Southern Willamette Valley's Groundwater Management Area

    EPA Science Inventory

    Groundwater nitrate contamination affects thousands of households in the southern Willamette Valley and many more across the Pacific Northwest. The southern Willamette Valley Groundwater Management Area (SWV GWMA) was established in 2004 due to nitrate levels in the groundwater ...

  5. Is it working? A look at the changing nutrient practices in the Southern Willamette Valley’s Groundwater Management Area

    EPA Science Inventory

    Groundwater nitrate contamination affects thousands of households in the southern Willamette Valley and many more across the Pacific Northwest. The southern Willamette Valley Groundwater Management Area (SWV GWMA) was established in 2004 to address the occurrence of high groundw...

  6. Multiple pathways process stalled replication forks.

    PubMed

    Michel, Bénédicte; Grompone, Gianfranco; Florès, Maria-Jose; Bidnenko, Vladimir

    2004-08-31

    Impairment of replication fork progression is a serious threat to living organisms and a potential source of genome instability. Studies in prokaryotes have provided evidence that inactivated replication forks can restart by the reassembly of the replication machinery. Several strategies for the processing of inactivated replication forks before replisome reassembly have been described. Most of these require the action of recombination proteins, with different proteins being implicated, depending on the cause of fork arrest. The action of recombination proteins at blocked forks is not necessarily accompanied by a strand-exchange reaction and may prevent rather than repair fork breakage. These various restart pathways may reflect different structures at stalled forks. We review here the different strategies of fork processing elicited by different kinds of replication impairments in prokaryotes and the variety of roles played by recombination proteins in these processes.

  7. Depositional environments of the Red Fork Sandstone in Custer and Roger Mills Counties, southwestern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tolson, P.M. )

    1993-09-01

    The Desmoinesian Red Fork formation is a prolific, overpressured gas-producing sequence of interbedded sandstones and shales. Total thickness ranges from less than 100 ft (northeast) to more than 1100 ft (south). Isopach maps suggest that syndepositional faulting controlled major depositional trends. The lower Red Fork, whose base is defined by a persistent, hot, black shale (sequence boundary ), is mainly deep-marine shale and siltstone. Two major shallowing-upward deltaic sequences separated by a marine transgression are evident in the middle (50-400-ft thick) and upper (30-250-ft thick) Red Fork. The middle Red Fork is marine dominated and was deposited into a relatively deep basin on a steep, unstable delta-front slope. In contrast, the upper Red Fork deltaic sequence is more fluvial dominated and was deposited in shallower water. The upper Red Fork is overlain by the Pink lime interval which appears to be shallow-marine/lagoonal black shale. The Pink lime contains fish scales, coffee-ground to branch-size lignitic plant debris, and brackish to shallow-marine ostracodes, linguloid brachiopods, Tasmanites algae, and gastropods. Most of the Red Fork has an easterly, possibly Ouachita Mountain area source. The prolific Southwest Leedey field has a different mineral assemblage and diagenetic sequence and may have a northern source.

  8. East Fork Watershed Cooperative: Toward better system-scale ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The East Fork Watershed Cooperative is a group intent on understanding how to best manage water quality in a large mixed-use Midwestern watershed system. The system contains a reservoir that serves as a source of drinking water and is popular for water recreation. The reservoir is experience harmful algal blooms. The system including the reservoir has become a significant case study for EPA ORD research and development. The Cooperative includes affiliates from the USACE, the OHIO EPA, the USGS, the USDA, and local Soil and Water Conservation districts as well as utility operators and water quality protection offices. The presentation includes a description of the water quality monitoring and modeling program in the watershed, followed by the results of using the watershed model to estimate the costs associated with nutrient reduction to Harsha Lake, and then ends with an explanation of temporal changes observed for important factors controlling harmful algae in Harsha Lake and how this lake relates to other reservoirs in the Ohio River Basin. This presentation is an invited contribution to the Ohio River Basin Water Quality Workshop sponsored by the US ACE and the US EPA. The presentation describes the activities of the East Fork Watershed Cooperative and the knowledge it has gained to help better manage a case study watershed system over the last few years. The East Fork of the Little Miami River is the focal watershed. It is a significant tributary to the Lit

  9. Comparison of peak discharges among sites with and without valley fills for the July 8-9, 2001 flood in the headwaters of Clear Fork, Coal River basin, mountaintop coal-mining region, southern West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiley, Jeffrey B.; Brogan, Freddie D.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of mountaintop-removal mining practices on the peak discharges of streams were investigated in six small drainage basins within a 7-square-mile area in southern West Virginia. Two of the small basins had reclaimed valley fills, one basin had reclaimed and unreclaimed valley fills, and three basins did not have valley fills. Indirect measurements of peak discharge for the flood of July 8-9, 2001, were made at six sites on streams draining the small basins. The sites without valley fills had peak discharges with 10- to 25-year recurrence intervals, indicating that rainfall intensities and totals varied among the study basins. The flood-recurrence intervals for the three basins with valley fills were determined as though the peak discharges were those from rural streams without the influence of valley fills, and ranged from less than 2 years to more than 100 years.

  10. Assessment of Aquatic Biological Communities Along a Gradient of Urbanization in the Willamette Valley Ecoregion, Oregon and Washington.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, I. R.; Arnsberg, A.; Carpenter, K. D.; Rinella, F.; Sobieszczyk, S.; Wigger, I.; Sarantou, M.

    2005-05-01

    From late 2003 through summer 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Quality Assessment Program sampled 28 streams within the Willamette Basin to investigate effects of urbanization on aquatic biology (fish, macroinvertebrates and algae), habitat, and water chemistry. The 28 watersheds fall along an urban land use gradient index (0 to 100, lowest to highest) based on land use and census data developed for this region. Watershed areas range from 13 to 96 square kilometers and contain greater than 20 percent of the Willamette Valley ecoregion. Ten streams were sampled for water chemistry six times during study period. The other 18 streams were sampled twice for water chemistry-once during high sustained flow, and once during summer low flow. The data will be analyzed to determine relationships to the urban gradient index and for possible detection of threshold responses. Preliminary results indicate that 57 percent of the most urbanized streams contained nonnative fish species, but only 43 percent contained salmonids. Conversely, nonnative fish species were present in 14 percent of the least urbanized streams, whereas salmonids were present in 79 percent of these streams. Population density and water chemistry variables were highly correlated with fish assemblage patterns among sites.

  11. Passage and behavior of radio-tagged adult Pacific lampreys (Entosphenus tridentatus) at the Willamette Falls Project, Oregon.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, Matthew G.; Magie, Robert J.; Copeland, Elizabeth S.

    2010-01-01

    Populations of Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) in the Columbia River basin have declined and passage problems at dams are a contributing factor. We used radio telemetry to monitor the passage of adult Pacific lampreys at the Willamette Falls Project (a hydroelectric dam integrated into a natural falls) on the Willamette River near Portland, Oregon. In 2005 and 2006, fish were captured at the Project, implanted with a radio tag, and released downstream. We tagged 136 lampreys in 2005 and 107 in 2006. Over 90% of the fish returned to the Project in 7 – 9 h and most were detected from 2000 – 2300 h. In 2005, 43 fish (34%) passed the dam via the fishway, with peak passage in August. No fish passed over the falls, but 13% ascended at least partway up the falls. In 2006, 24 fish (23%) passed the Project using the fishway, with most prior to 9 June when the powerhouse was off. Although 19 lampreys ascended the falls, only two passed via this route. The time for fish to pass through the fishway ranged from 4 – 74 h, depending on route. Many fish stayed in the tailrace for hours to almost a year and eventually moved downstream. Our results indicate that passage of lampreys at the Project is lower than that for lampreys at dams on the Columbia River. Low passage success may result from low river flows, impediments in fishways, delayed tagging effects, changing environmental conditions, or performance or behavioral constraints.

  12. BASINS

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Better Assessment Science Integrating Point and Nonpoint Sources (BASINS) is a multipurpose environmental analysis system designed to help regional, state, and local agencies perform watershed- and water quality-based studies.

  13. 33 CFR 165.T13-207 - Safety Zones; Sellwood Bridge project, Willamette River; Portland, OR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety Zones; Sellwood Bridge project, Willamette River; Portland, OR. 165.T13-207 Section 165.T13-207 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Coast Guard District § 165.T13-207 Safety Zones; Sellwood Bridge project, Willamette River; Portland,...

  14. 33 CFR 165.T13-207 - Safety Zones; Sellwood Bridge project, Willamette River; Portland, OR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety Zones; Sellwood Bridge project, Willamette River; Portland, OR. 165.T13-207 Section 165.T13-207 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Coast Guard District § 165.T13-207 Safety Zones; Sellwood Bridge project, Willamette River; Portland,...

  15. 33 CFR 165.T13-207 - Safety Zones; Sellwood Bridge project, Willamette River; Portland, OR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety Zones; Sellwood Bridge project, Willamette River; Portland, OR. 165.T13-207 Section 165.T13-207 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Coast Guard District § 165.T13-207 Safety Zones; Sellwood Bridge project, Willamette River; Portland,...

  16. 78 FR 45863 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Willamette River at Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Willamette River at Portland, OR... all other times. Waterway usage on this stretch of the Willamette River includes vessels ranging...

  17. 78 FR 4331 - Safety Zone; Sellwood Bridge Move; Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    .... The bridge construction contractor was constrained by the completion of the temporary structures and... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Sellwood Bridge Move; Willamette River... establishing of a temporary safety zone around the Sellwood Bridge, located on the Willamette River in...

  18. 77 FR 25080 - Safety Zones; TriMet Bridge Project, Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zones; TriMet Bridge Project, Willamette River... of the TriMet Bridge on the Willamette River, in Portland, OR. This action is necessary to ensure the... established for the TriMet Bridge construction site and are more focused in nature than the previous...

  19. 77 FR 38723 - Safety Zones; Sellwood Bridge Project, Willamette River; Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... new bridge piers which will each require a cofferdam. The temporary structures will be constructed to... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zones; Sellwood Bridge Project, Willamette River... the Sellwood Bridge located on the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon. This action is necessary...

  20. 75 FR 20523 - Regulated Navigation Areas; Port of Portland Terminal 4, Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Areas; Port of Portland Terminal 4... establishing two Regulated Navigation Areas (RNA) at the Port of Portland Terminal 4 on the Willamette River in... rulemaking (NPRM) entitled ``Regulated Navigation Areas; Port of Portland Terminal 4, Willamette...

  1. 76 FR 28315 - Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River AGENCY... Portland Rose Festival Security Zone in 33 CFR 165.1312 from 11 a.m. on June 8, 2011 until 11 a.m. on June... vessels present, on the Willamette River during the Portland Rose festival. During the enforcement...

  2. 33 CFR 165.1312 - Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River. 165.1312 Section 165.1312 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.1312 Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River. (a) Location. The following...

  3. 33 CFR 165.1312 - Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River. 165.1312 Section 165.1312 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.1312 Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River. (a) Location. The following...

  4. 33 CFR 165.1312 - Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River. 165.1312 Section 165.1312 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.1312 Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River. (a) Location. The following...

  5. 77 FR 15263 - Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River; Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River; Portland... will enforce the Portland Rose Festival Security Zone in 33 CFR 165.1312 from 11 a.m. on June 6, 2012..., including the public vessels present on the Willamette River during the Portland Rose festival. During...

  6. 33 CFR 165.1312 - Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River. 165.1312 Section 165.1312 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.1312 Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River. (a) Location. The following...

  7. 33 CFR 165.1312 - Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River. 165.1312 Section 165.1312 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.1312 Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival on Willamette River. (a) Location. The following...

  8. Hemoglobin Willamette (β51Pro → Arg): Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa Dias, Matheus Martins; Távora, Saymon Medeiros; de Galiza Neto, Gentil Claudino; de Souza, Jacqueline Holanda; da Silva, Herivaldo Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of hemoglobin (Hb) Willamette (β51 Pro → Arg) in the Hematology Department of a tertiary hospital in Fortaleza, Northeast of Brazil. A literature review of the cases described in health sciences databases using as a descriptor Hb Willamette was performed, revealing 12 reported cases, of which only one presented with anemia. Herein, we describe a case of a female 29 years old, with hemoglobinopathy Willamette presenting clinically with anemia, having the lowest hemoglobin rate of the published cases. The relatives of the patient were evaluated andthe patient’s mother corresponded to the first description of the association between Hb Willamette and HbC. Among the hemoglobinopathies, hemoglobin Willamette is an extremely rare disease; therefore it is important to analyze its clinical and laboratory manifestations for accurate diagnosis and assessment of potential interactions with other genetic variants. PMID:28286631

  9. Replication fork instability and the consequences of fork collisions from rereplication

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jessica L.; Orr-Weaver, Terry L.

    2016-01-01

    Replication forks encounter obstacles that must be repaired or bypassed to complete chromosome duplication before cell division. Proteomic analysis of replication forks suggests that the checkpoint and repair machinery travels with unperturbed forks, implying that they are poised to respond to stalling and collapse. However, impaired fork progression still generates aberrations, including repeat copy number instability and chromosome rearrangements. Deregulated origin firing also causes fork instability if a newer fork collides with an older one, generating double-strand breaks (DSBs) and partially rereplicated DNA. Current evidence suggests that multiple mechanisms are used to repair rereplication damage, yet these can have deleterious consequences for genome integrity. PMID:27898391

  10. 5. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing east. Bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing east. Bridge from south shore of Clark Fork River-southernmost span. 1900-era Northern Pacific Railway Bridge in background. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  11. Evaluating turbidity and suspended-sediment concentration relations from the North Fork Toutle River basin near Mount St. Helens, Washington; annual, seasonal, event, and particle size variations - a preliminary analysis.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uhrich, Mark A.; Spicer, Kurt R.; Mosbrucker, Adam; Christianson, Tami

    2015-01-01

    Regression of in-stream turbidity with concurrent sample-based suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) has become an accepted method for producing unit-value time series of inferred SSC (Rasmussen et al., 2009). Turbidity-SSC regression models are increasingly used to generate suspended-sediment records for Pacific Northwest rivers (e.g., Curran et al., 2014; Schenk and Bragg, 2014; Uhrich and Bragg, 2003). Recent work developing turbidity-SSC models for the North Fork Toutle River in Southwest Washington (Uhrich et al., 2014), as well as other studies (Landers and Sturm, 2013, Merten et al., 2014), suggests that models derived from annual or greater datasets may not adequately reflect shorter term changes in turbidity-SSC relations, warranting closer inspection of such relations. In-stream turbidity measurements and suspended-sediment samples have been collected from the North Fork Toutle River since 2010. The study site, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamgage 14240525 near Kid Valley, Washington, is 13 river km downstream of the debris avalanche emplaced by the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens (Lipman and Mullineaux, 1981), and 2 river km downstream of the large sediment retention structure (SRS) built from 1987–1989 to mitigate the associated sediment hazard. The debris avalanche extends roughly 25 km down valley from the edifice of the volcano and is the primary source of suspended sediment moving past the streamgage (NF Toutle-SRS). Other significant sources are debris flow events and sand deposits upstream of the SRS, which are periodically remobilized and transported downstream. Also, finer material often is derived from the clay-rich original debris avalanche deposit, while coarser material can derive from areas such as fluvially reworked terraces.

  12. Effects of controlled burning of chaparral on streamflow and sediment characteristics, East Fork Sycamore Creek, central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldys, Stanley; Hjalmarson, H.W.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of controlled burning of part of a chaparral-covered drainage basin on streamflow and sediment characteristics were studied in the upper reaches of the Sycamore Creek basin in central Arizona. A paired-watershed method was used to analyze data collected in two phases separated by the controlled burning of 45 percent of the East Fork Sycamore Creek drainage basin by the U.S. Forest Service on October 31, 1981. Statistically significant increases in streamflow in East Fork occurred from October 26, 1982, through August 25, 1984. Streamflow for August 26, 1984, through the end of data collection for the study on May 31, 1986, was generally at or less than preburn levels. An increase in the percentage of time that flow occurred in East Fork was noted for water years 1983 and 1984. No increase in the magnitude of instantaneous peak flows as a result of the burn was discernable at statistically significant levels. Suspended-sediment yields computed for data collected during water year 1983 were significantly greater in the East Fork drainage basin, 546 tons per square mile, than in the West Fork drainage basin, 22.6 tons per square mile. Suspended-sediment yields computed for East Fork and West Fork for water year 1985, 38.3 and 13.3 tons per square mile, respectively, were much closer in yield. These more uniform yields indicate a possible return to preburn conditions. Data collection did not begin until 11 months after the burn; therefore, the largest increases in streamflow and sediment yields, which commonly occur during the year after a burn, may not have been measured. During the second through fourth years after the burn, smaller increases in stream- flow and sediment yields were found in this study than were found in similar studies in this region.

  13. Pathways of mammalian replication fork restart.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Eva; Helleday, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Single-molecule analyses of DNA replication have greatly advanced our understanding of mammalian replication restart. Several proteins that are not part of the core replication machinery promote the efficient restart of replication forks that have been stalled by replication inhibitors, suggesting that bona fide fork restart pathways exist in mammalian cells. Different models of replication fork restart can be envisaged, based on the involvement of DNA helicases, nucleases, homologous recombination factors and the importance of DNA double-strand break formation.

  14. Maps Showing Inundation Depths, Ice-Rafted Erratics, and Sedimentary Facies of Late Pleistocene Missoula Floods in the Willamette Valley, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minervini, J.M.; O'Connor, J. E.; Wells, R.E.

    2003-01-01

    Glacial Lake Missoula, impounded by the Purcell Trench lobe of the late Pleistocene Cordilleran Icesheet, repeatedly breached its ice dam, sending floods as large as 2,500 cubic kilometers racing across the Channeled Scabland and down the Columbia River valley to the Pacific Ocean. Peak discharges for some floods exceeded 20 million cubic meters per second. At valley constrictions along the flood route, floodwaters temporarily ponded behind each narrow zone. One such constriction at Kalama Gap-northwest of Portland-backed water 120-150 meters high in the Portland basin, and backflooded 200 km south into Willamette Valley. Dozens of floods backed up into the Willamette Valley, eroding 'scabland' channels, and depositing giant boulder gravel bars in areas of vigorous currents as well as bedded flood sand and silt in backwater areas. Also, large chunks of ice entrained from the breached glacier dam rafted hundreds of 'erratic' rocks, leaving them scattered among the flanking foothills and valley bottom. From several sources and our own mapping, we have compiled information on many of these features and depict them on physiographic maps derived from digital elevation models of the Portland Basin and Willamette Valley. These maps show maximum flood inundation levels, inundation levels associated with stratigraphic evidence of repeated floodings, distribution of flood deposits, and sites of ice-rafted erratics. Accompanying these maps, a database lists locations, elevations, and descriptions of approximately 400 ice-rafted erratics-most compiled from early 20th-century maps and notes of A.M. Piper and I.S. Allison.

  15. Migratory Characteristics of Spring Chinook Salmon in the Willamette River : Annual Report 1991.

    SciTech Connect

    Snelling, John C.

    1993-05-01

    This report documents our research to examine in detail the migration of juvenile and adult spring chinook salmon in the Willamette River. We seek to determine characteristics of seaward migration of spring chinook smolts in relation to oxygen supplementation practices at Willamette Hatchery, and to identify potential sources of adult spring chinook mortality in the Willamette River above Willamette Falls and use this information towards analysis of the study on efficiency of oxygen supplementation. The majority of juvenile spring chinook salmon released from Willamette hatchery in 1991 begin downstream movement immediately upon liberation. They travel at a rate of 1.25 to 3.5 miles per hour during the first 48 hours post-release. Considerably slower than the water velocities available to them. Juveniles feed actively during migration, primarily on aquatic insects. Na{sup +}/K{sup +} gill ATPase and cortisol are significantly reduced in juveniles reared in the third pass of the Michigan series with triple density and oxygen supplementation, suggesting that these fish were not as well developed as those reared under other treatments. Returning adult spring chinook salmon migrate upstream at an average rate of about 10 to 20 miles per day, but there is considerable between fish variation. Returning adults exhibit a high incidence of wandering in and out of the Willamette River system above and below Willamette Falls.

  16. 2. PLANK COVERED BRANCH FLUME ON THE SOUTH FORK OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. PLANK COVERED BRANCH FLUME ON THE SOUTH FORK OF THE TULE RIVER MIDDLE FORK AND CONCRETE DIVERSION DAM SPILLING WATER. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Tule River Hydroelectric Project, Water Conveyance System, Middle Fork Tule River, Springville, Tulare County, CA

  17. 16 CFR 1512.13 - Requirements for front fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Regulations § 1512.13 Requirements for front fork. The front fork shall... fork test, § 1512.18(k)(1), without visible evidence of fracture. Sidewalk bicycles need not meet...

  18. Integrating Economic Models with Biophysical Models in the Willamette Water 2100 Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, W. K.; Plantinga, A.

    2013-12-01

    This paper highlights the human system modeling components for Willamette Water 2100, a comprehensive, highly integrated study of hydrological, ecological, and human factors affecting water scarcity in the Willamette River Basin (WRB). The project is developing a spatiotemporal simulation model to predict future trajectories of water scarcity, and to evaluate mitigation policies. Economic models of land use and water use are the main human system models in WW2100. Water scarcity depends on both supply and demand for water, and varies greatly across time and space (Jaeger et al., 2013). Thus, the locations of human water use can have enormous influence on where and when water is used, and hence where water scarcity may arise. Modeling the locations of human uses of water (e.g., urban versus agricultural) as well as human values and choices, are the principal quantitative ways that social science can contribute to research of this kind. Our models are empirically-based models of human resource allocation. Each model reflects private behavior (choices by households, farms, firms), institutions (property rights, laws, markets, regulations), public infrastructure (dams, canals, highways), and also 'external drivers' that influence the local economy (migration, population growth, national markets and policies). This paper describes the main model components, emphasizing similarities between human and biophysical components of the overall project, and the model's linkages and feedbacks relevant to our predictions of changes in water scarcity between now and 2100. Results presented include new insights from individual model components as well as available results from the integrated system model. Issues include water scarcity and water quality (temperature) for out-of-stream and instream uses, the impact of urban expansion on water use and potential flood damage. Changes in timing and variability of spring discharge with climate change, as well as changes in human uses of

  19. Oregon Trust Agreement Planning Project : Potential Mitigations to the Impacts on Oregon Wildlife Resources Associated with Relevant Mainstem Columbia River and Willamette River Hydroelectric Projects.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-10-01

    A coalition of the Oregon wildlife agencies and tribes (the Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Coalition) have forged a cooperative effort to promote wildlife mitigation from losses to Oregon wildlife resources associated with the four mainstream Columbia River and the eight Willamette River Basin hydroelectric projects. This coalition formed a Joint Advisory Committee, made up of technical representatives from all of the tribes and agencies, to develop this report. The goal was to create a list of potential mitigation opportunities by priority, and to attempt to determine the costs of mitigating the wildlife losses. The information and analysis was completed for all projects in Oregon, but was gathered separately for the Lower Columbia and Willamette Basin projects. The coalition developed a procedure to gather information on potential mitigation projects and opportunities. All tribes, agencies and interested parties were contacted in an attempt to evaluate all proposed or potential mitigation. A database was developed and minimum criteria were established for opportunities to be considered. These criteria included the location of the mitigation site within a defined area, as well as other criteria established by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Costs were established for general habitats within the mitigation area, based on estimates from certified appraisers. An analysis of the cost effectiveness of various types of mitigation projects was completed. Estimates of operation and maintenance costs were also developed. The report outlines strategies for gathering mitigation potentials, evaluating them, determining their costs, and attempting to move towards their implementation.

  20. Research reactor fork users manual

    SciTech Connect

    Hsue, S.T.; Menlove, H.O.; Bosler, G.E.; Dye, H.R.; Walton, G.; Halbig, J.K.; Siebelist, R.

    1993-11-01

    This manual describes the design features and operating characteristics of the research reactor fork. The system includes an ion chamber for gross gamma-ray counting, fission chambers for neutron counting, and a collimated high-resolution spectroscopy system for gamma-ray measurements. The neutron and ion chamber measurements are designed to be made underwater in spent-fuel cooling ponds. The neutron and gamma-ray detectors have been designed with high efficiencies to accommodate the relatively low emission rates of neutrons and gamma rays from low-burnup, research-type reactor fuel. This manual presents the design, performance, and test results for the system.

  1. Fifth-wheel fork truck adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. L.

    1969-01-01

    Standard fifth wheel mounted on a rectangular steel structure adapted for use with a fork lift truck provides a fast, safe, and economical way of maneuvering semitrailers in close quarters at plants and warehouses. One operator can move and locate a semitrailer without dismounting from a fork lift truck.

  2. Training Guidelines: Fork Lift Truck Driving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceramics, Glass, and Mineral Products Industry Training Board, Harrow (England).

    This manual of operative training guidelines for fork lift truck driving has been developed by the Ceramics, Glass and Mineral Products Industry Training Board (Great Britain) in consultation with a number of firms which manufacture fork lift trucks or which already have training--programs for their use. The purpose of the guidelines is to assist…

  3. 21 CFR 882.1525 - Tuning fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tuning fork. 882.1525 Section 882.1525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1525 Tuning fork. (a) Identification. A tuning...

  4. 21 CFR 882.1525 - Tuning fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tuning fork. 882.1525 Section 882.1525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1525 Tuning fork. (a) Identification. A tuning...

  5. 21 CFR 882.1525 - Tuning fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tuning fork. 882.1525 Section 882.1525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1525 Tuning fork. (a) Identification. A tuning...

  6. 21 CFR 882.1525 - Tuning fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tuning fork. 882.1525 Section 882.1525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1525 Tuning fork. (a) Identification. A tuning...

  7. 21 CFR 882.1525 - Tuning fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tuning fork. 882.1525 Section 882.1525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1525 Tuning fork. (a) Identification. A tuning...

  8. A New Hydrogeological Research Site in the Willamette River Floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, B. R.; Cline, S. P.; Landers, D. H.; Forshay, K. J.

    2008-12-01

    The Willamette River is a ninth-order tributary of the Columbia which passes through a productive and populous region in northwest Oregon. Where unconstrained by shoreline revetments, the floodplain of this river is a high-energy, dynamic system which supports a variety of riparian forests and floodplain habitats. On the Green Island Restoration Site, north of the city of Eugene, several geomorphological features common to much of the Willamette floodplain are present. These features, ranging from young bare gravel bars, islands supporting mature forest stands, to agricultural areas bounded by levees. As part of a Memorandum of Understanding with the McKenzie River Trust, USEPA has constructed a network of fifty shallow monitoring wells on the Green Island site. Among the purposes are to characterize the hydrogeology of the multiple- island floodplain, the extent of hyporheic flow, and the temperature regime. The monitoring wells are located in areas ranging from a few meters from the river edge to several hundred meters away, within the agricultural areas. By automatic data-logging, flow nets will be developed using numerical modeling. Water quality data will be collected to measure the degee to which subsurface biogeochemistry is influenced by geomorphologic features that are determined by the processes of river channel migration, island formation, and colonization by riparian forest. The monitoring network will also be used to measure the groundwater quality effects of restoration projects currently underway. These include reforestation of previously agricultural areas, and levee removal.

  9. Willamette Oxygen Supplementation Studies : Annual Report 1994.

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.D.; Ewing, S.K.; Sheahan, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    Hydropower development and operations in the Columbia River basin have caused the loss of 5 million to 11 million salmonids. An interim goal of the Northwest Power Planning Council is to reestablish these historical numbers by doubling the present runs from 2.5 million adult fish to 5.0 million adult fish. This increase in production will be accomplished through comprehensive management of both wild and hatchery fish, but artificial propagation will play a major role in the augmentation process. The current husbandry techniques in existing hatcheries require improvements that may include changes in rearing densities, addition of oxygen, removal of excess nitrogen, and improvement in raceway design. Emphasis will be placed on the ability to increase the number of fish released from hatcheries that survive to return as adults. Rearing density is one of the most important elements in fish culture. Fish culturists have attempted to rear fish in hatchery ponds at densities that most efficiently use the rearing space available. Such efficiency studies require a knowledge of cost of rearing and the return of adults to the fisheries and to the hatchery.

  10. 76 FR 18397 - Safety Zones; M/V Davy Crockett, Columbia and Willamette Rivers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... Willamette Rivers surrounding the M/V DAVY CROCKETT. The Coast Guard is also reducing the size of the stationary emergency safety zone surrounding the M/V DAVY CROCKETT at approximately river mile 117 on...

  11. Patterns of Ground Water Movement in a Portion of the Willamette River Floodplain, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    In reaches unconstrained by revetments, the Willamette River and its floodplain along its lowland mainstem is a continually evolving system. Several channel reconstruction and restoration projects have been implemented or planned in order to obtain beneficial services along the r...

  12. Environment of deposition of Clear Fork Formation: Yoakum County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.K.

    1987-05-01

    The Clear Fork Formation is Permian (Leonardian) in age and constitutes a major oil-bearing unit in the Permian basin of west Texas. In Yoakum County, west Texas, the upper Clear Fork carbonates record a subtidal upward-shoaling sequence of deposition. A small bryozoan-algal patch reef is situated within these carbonates near the southern edge of the North Basin platform. The reef is completely dolomitized, but paramorphic replacement has facilitated a study of the paleoecology, lateral variations, and community succession within this buildup. Build-ups of this type are scarcely known in strata of Permian age. The reef was apparently founded on a coquina horizon at the base of the buildup. The reef apparently had a low-relief, dome-shaped morphology. The trapping and binding of sediment by bryozoa appear to have been the main constructional process. A significant role was also played by encrusting forams and the early precipitation of submarine cements, both of which added rigidity to the structure. The reef also contains a low-diversity community of other invertebrates. Algal constituents predominate at the basinward edge of the buildup. The reef was formed entirely subaqueously on a broad, relatively shallow tropical marine carbonate shelf environment. An understanding of the lithofacies distribution and paragenesis within this sequence will provide information on porosity variations and the nature and distribution of permeability barriers. Such information is useful in reservoir modeling studies and for secondary recovery techniques in shelf-edge carbonate reservoirs of this type.

  13. Fluvial Landforms and Landscape Transformations on a Large River Floodplain: Willamette River, Oregon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallick, R.

    2015-12-01

    Recent detailed mapping of the Willamette River floodplain in northwestern Oregon reveals insights into the floodplain landforms, their formative processes, and historical landscape transformations. Hierarchical mapping classification based mainly upon lidar topography, supplemented by aerial photographs, historical channel and soil maps, and targeted coring of floodplain soils, was carried out for 200 km of the mainstem Willamette River floodplain above Willamette Falls where floodplain landforms mainly reflect fluvial and anthropogenic influences. Stark differences in the character and distribution of floodplain landforms and their underlying stratigraphy give rise to three distinct process regimes along the fluvial portion of the Willamette River. Floodplain surfaces along 60 km of the Upper Willamette River floodplain generally rise 1-2 m above the low-flow water surface and are bisected by complex assemblage of overflow channels and large-amplitude abandoned bends formed by avulsions along this historically multi-thread anastomosing reach. Downstream, the 90 km-long Middle Willamette River between Corvallis and Newburg Pool becomes increasingly entrenched within its floodplain, with floodplains gradually rising up to 8 m above the low flow water surface. These floodplain surfaces are dominated by ridge and swale topography with occasional floodbasins reflecting gradual meander migration and floodplain aggradation. The 50 km-long Newberg Pool is entrenched and confined by Pleistocene Missoula flood deposits and bedrock valley walls. This low-gradient reach extends to the lip of the15-m high Willamette Falls. Historical declines in flood magnitude, bed-material supply, large wood, and bank erodibility result in a more stable modern-day floodplain with narrower active-channel corridor flanked by relict landforms formed by historical flow and sediment regime. Landscape transformations vary across the three process regimes but are greatest along Upper Willamette

  14. Migratory Behavior of Adult Spring Chinook Salmon in the Willamette River and its Tributaries: Completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Schreck, Carl B.

    1994-01-01

    Migration patterns of adult spring chinook salmon above Willamette Falls differed depending on when the fish passed the Falls, with considerable among-fish variability. Early-run fish often terminated their migration for extended periods of time, in association with increased flows and decreased temperatures. Mid-run fish tended to migrate steadily upstream at a rate of 30-40 km/day. Late-run fish frequently ceased migrating or fell back downstream after migrating 10-200 km up the Willamette River or its tributaries; this appeared to be associated with warming water during summer and resulted in considerable mortality. Up to 40% of the adult salmon entering the Willamette River System above Willamette Falls (i.e. counted at the ladder) may die before reaching upriver spawning areas. Up to 10% of the fish passing up over Willamette Falls may fall-back below the Falls; some migrate to the Columbia River or lower Willamette River tributaries. If rearing conditions at hatcheries affect timing of adult returns because of different juvenile development rates and improper timing of smolt releases, then differential mortality in the freshwater segment of the adult migrations may confound interpretation of studies evaluating rearing practices.

  15. 23. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing upwest side. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing up-west side. Looking at structural connection of top chord, vertical laced channel and diagonal bars. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  16. 13. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing south. Concrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing south. Concrete barrier blocks access. Plaque was originally located where strioed traffic sign is posted at right. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  17. 14. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing north. Approach ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing north. Approach from the south. Concrete barrier blocks access. Plaque was originally located where striped traffic sign is posted at right. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  18. 24. View of one of the plaques from Clark Fork ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. View of one of the plaques from Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge. Presently located at the Bonner County Historical Museum in Sandpoint, Idaho. A plaque was attached at each end of the bridge. Only one remains. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  19. Environmental stresses and skeletal deformities in fish from the Willamette River, Oregon.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Daniel L; Curtis, Lawrence R; Jenkins, Jeffrey J; Warner, Kara E; Tilton, Fred; Kent, Michael L; Watral, Virginia G; Cunningham, Michael E; Markle, Douglas F; Sethajintanin, Doolalai; Krissanakriangkrai, Oraphin; Johnson, Eugene R; Grove, Robert; Anderson, Kim A

    2005-05-15

    The Willamette River, one of 14 American Heritage Rivers, flows through the most densely populated and agriculturally productive region of Oregon. Previous biological monitoring of the Willamette River detected elevated frequencies of skeletal deformities in fish from certain areas of the lower (Newberg pool [NP], rivermile [RM] 26 - 55) and middle (Wheatland Ferry [WF], RM 72 - 74) river, relative to those in the upper river (Corvallis [CV], RM 125-138). The objective of this study was to determine the likely cause of these skeletal deformities. In 2002 and 2003, deformity loads in Willamette River fishes were 2-3 times greater at the NP and WF locations than at the CV location. There were some differences in water quality parameters between the NP and CV sites, but they did not readily explain the difference in deformity loads. Concentrations of bioavailable metals were below detection limits (0.6 - 1 microg/ L). Concentrations of bioavailable polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and chlorinated pesticides were generally below 0.25 ng/L. Concentrations of bioavailable polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were generally less than 5 ng/L. Concentrations of most persistent organic pollutants were below detection limits in ovary/oocyte tissue samples and sediments, and those that were detected were not significantly different among sites. Bioassay of Willamette River water extracts provided no evidence that unidentified compounds or the complex mixture of compounds present in the extracts could induce skeletal deformities in cyprinid fish. However, metacercariae of a digenean trematode were directly associated with a large percentage of deformities detected in two Willamette River fishes, and similar deformities were reproduced in laboratoryfathead minnows exposed to cercariae extracted from Willamette River snails. Thus, the weight of evidence suggests that parasitic infection, not chemical contaminants, was the primary cause of skeletal deformities observed in Willamette

  20. Streamflow and Suspended-Sediment Loads Before, During, and After H-3 Highway Construction, North Halawa, Haiku, South Fork Kapunahala, and Kamooalii Drainage Basins, Oahu, Hawaii, 1983-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, Michael F.; Yeatts, Daniel S.

    2002-01-01

    before construction increased by 58 percent only at Luluku Stream. All increases in observed high flows are attributed to increased runoff from land-use changes caused by the highway construction. Instantaneous peak flows increased significantly at Luluku Stream. Luluku Stream had significant increases in low and high flows both during and after construction. Suspended-sediment loads changed significantly at six out of seven sediment-gaging stations during highway construction. Construction activities increased observed suspended-sediment yields by 222, 426, 60, and 148 percent at North Halawa Stream near Kaneohe, North Halawa Stream near Honolulu, Right Branch Kamooalii Stream, and Haiku Stream, respectively. At Luluku Stream, observed suspended-sediment yields were lower during construction than before construction by 62 percent. After construction, suspended-sediment loads also changed significantly at six out of seven stream-gaging stations. Observed after-construction yields increased at North Halawa Stream near Kaneohe, North Halawa Stream near Honolulu, and Right Branch Kamooalii Stream by 49, 205, and 36 percent, respectively, and decreased at Kamooalii Stream and South Fork Kapunahala Stream by 62 and 71 percent. The observed increases in yields are smaller after construction than during construction indicating that suspended-sediment loads are likely returning to before-construction levels. The effects of H-3 Highway construction on suspended-sediment loads were generally similar to studies of the effects of highway construction in other areas of the United States where 50 to 85 percent of the sediment loads were attributed to construction activities. The percentages of the observed yields attributable to H-3 Highway construction are similar to the above percentages, ranging from 37 to 81 percent. Decreases in suspended-sediment loads due to highway construction are unique and have not been widely reported in the literature. Where decrease in s

  1. Body morphology differs in wild juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that express different migratory phenotypes in the Willamette River, Oregon, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Billman, E J; Whitman, L D; Schroeder, R K; Sharpe, C S; Noakes, D L G; Schreck, C B

    2014-10-01

    Body morphology of juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the upper Willamette River, Oregon, U.S.A., was analysed to determine if variation in body shape is correlated with migratory life-history tactics followed by juveniles. Body shape was compared between migrating juveniles that expressed different life-history tactics, i.e. autumn migrants and yearling smolts, and among parr sampled at three sites along a longitudinal river gradient. In the upper Willamette River, the expression of life-history tactics is associated with where juveniles rear in the basin with fish rearing in downstream locations generally completing ocean ward migrations earlier in life than fish rearing in upstream locations. The morphological differences that were apparent between autumn migrants and yearling smolts were similar to differences between parr rearing in downstream and upstream reaches, indicating that body morphology is correlated with life-history tactics. Autumn migrants and parr from downstream sampling sites had deeper bodies, shorter heads and deeper caudal peduncles compared with yearling smolts and parr from the upstream sampling site. This study did not distinguish between genetic and environmental effects on morphology; however, the results suggest that downstream movement of juveniles soon after emergence is associated with differentiation in morphology and with the expression of life-history variation.

  2. 77 FR 62442 - Safety Zone; Oregon City Bridge Grand Opening Fireworks Display; Willamette River, Oregon City, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Oregon City Bridge Grand Opening Fireworks Display; Willamette River, Oregon City, OR AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a safety zone on the Willamette River between the Oregon City...

  3. 33 CFR 165.1323 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. 165.1323 Section 165.1323 Navigation and Navigable... Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1323 Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Captain of the...

  4. 33 CFR 165.1323 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. 165.1323 Section 165.1323 Navigation and Navigable... Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1323 Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Captain of the...

  5. 33 CFR 165.1323 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. 165.1323 Section 165.1323 Navigation and Navigable... Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1323 Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Captain of the...

  6. Migratory Characteristics of Juvenile Spring Chinook Salmon in the Willamette River : Completion Report 1994.

    SciTech Connect

    Schreck, Carl B.; Snelling, J.C.; Ewing, R.E.; Bradford, C.S.; Davis, L.E.; Slater, C.H.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this research was to examine in detail the migration of juvenile spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Willamette River, Oregon. The authors wanted to determine characteristics of seaward migration of spring chinook smolts in relation to the oxygen supplementation practices at the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Willamette Hatchery and use this information to strengthen the design of the oxygen supplementation project. There is little information available on the effects of oxygen supplementation at hatcheries on the migratory characteristics of juvenile salmon. Such information is required to assess the use of oxygen supplementation as a means of improving hatchery production, its effect on imprinting of juveniles, and finally the return of adults. In the event that oxygen supplementation provides for improved production and survival of juvenile chinook salmon at Willamette Hatchery, background information on the migration characteristics of these fish will be required to effectively utilize the increased production within the goals of the Willamette Fish Management Plan. Furthermore this technology may be instrumental in the goal of doubling the runs of spring Chinook salmon in the Columbia River. While evaluation of success is dependent on evaluation of the return of adults with coded wire tags, examination of the migratory characteristics of hatchery smolts may prove to be equally informative. Through this research it is possible to determine the rate at which individuals from various oxygenation treatment groups leave the Willamette River system, a factor which may be strongly related to adult return rate.

  7. DNA REPAIR. Mus81 and converging forks limit the mutagenicity of replication fork breakage.

    PubMed

    Mayle, Ryan; Campbell, Ian M; Beck, Christine R; Yu, Yang; Wilson, Marenda; Shaw, Chad A; Bjergbaek, Lotte; Lupski, James R; Ira, Grzegorz

    2015-08-14

    Most spontaneous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) result from replication-fork breakage. Break-induced replication (BIR), a genome rearrangement-prone repair mechanism that requires the Pol32/POLD3 subunit of eukaryotic DNA Polδ, was proposed to repair broken forks, but how genome destabilization is avoided was unknown. We show that broken fork repair initially uses error-prone Pol32-dependent synthesis, but that mutagenic synthesis is limited to within a few kilobases from the break by Mus81 endonuclease and a converging fork. Mus81 suppresses template switches between both homologous sequences and diverged human Alu repetitive elements, highlighting its importance for stability of highly repetitive genomes. We propose that lack of a timely converging fork or Mus81 may propel genome instability observed in cancer.

  8. Mus81 and converging forks limit the mutagenicity of replication fork breakage

    PubMed Central

    Mayle, Ryan; Campbell, Ian M.; Beck, Christine R.; Yu, Yang; Wilson, Marenda; Shaw, Chad A.; Bjergbaek, Lotte; Lupski, James R.; Ira, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Most spontaneous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) result from replication-fork breakage. Break-induced replication (BIR), a genome rearrangement-prone repair mechanism that requires the Pol32/POLD3 subunit of eukaryotic DNA Polδ, was proposed to repair broken forks, but how genome destabilization is avoided was unknown. We show that broken fork repair initially uses error-prone Pol32-dependent synthesis, but that mutagenic synthesis is limited to within a few kilobases from the break by Mus81 endonuclease and a converging fork. Mus81 suppresses template switches between both homologous sequences and diverged human Alu repetitive elements, highlighting its importance for stability of highly repetitive genomes. We propose that lack of a timely converging fork or Mus81 may propel genome instability observed in cancer. PMID:26273056

  9. 5. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, vista at stop three. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, vista at stop three. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  10. 2. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, road view before first ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, road view before first stop. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  11. 1. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, entrance sign. Great ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, entrance sign. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  12. 7. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, rocks along edge of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, rocks along edge of road. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  13. 3. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, view between second and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, view between second and third stops - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  14. 11. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, boulders along road after ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, boulders along road after stop 13. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  15. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Title Sheet Great Smoky ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Title Sheet - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  16. 9. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Reagan House. Great ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Reagan House. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  17. 6. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, road view after stop ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, road view after stop four. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  18. 12. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, place of a thousand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, place of a thousand drips, view from road. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  19. 12. PLANK BRIDGE ON OLD ROAD NEAR NORTH FORK VIRGIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. PLANK BRIDGE ON OLD ROAD NEAR NORTH FORK VIRGIN RIVER BRIDGE, FACING EAST - Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, Virgin River Bridge, Spanning North Fork of Virgin River on Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, Springdale, Washington County, UT

  20. South Fork Latrine showing north and west sides, general view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South Fork Latrine showing north and west sides, general view to southeast - Fort McKinley, South Fork Latrine, West side of East Side Drive, approximately 225 feet south of Weymouth Way, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  1. South Fork Latrine, east elevation showing structure in context, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South Fork Latrine, east elevation showing structure in context, view west - Fort McKinley, South Fork Latrine, West side of East Side Drive, approximately 225 feet south of Weymouth Way, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  2. South Fork Latrine, oblique view showing south and east sides; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South Fork Latrine, oblique view showing south and east sides; view northwest - Fort McKinley, South Fork Latrine, West side of East Side Drive, approximately 225 feet south of Weymouth Way, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  3. 8. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, handbuilt rock pile. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, hand-built rock pile. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  4. Resonant tuning fork detector for electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Pohlkötter, Andreas; Willer, Ulrike; Bauer, Christoph; Schade, Wolfgang

    2009-02-01

    A mechanical quartz microresonator (tuning fork) is used to detect electromagnetic radiation. The detection scheme is based on forces created due to the incident electromagnetic radiation on the piezoelectric tuning fork. A force can be created due to the transfer of the photon momentum of the incident electromagnetic radiation. If the surfaces of the tuning fork are nonuniformly heated, a second force acts on it, the so-called photophoretic force. These processes occur for all wavelengths of the incident radiation, making the detector suitable for sensing of ultraviolet, visible, and mid-infrared light, even THz-radiation. Here the detector is characterized in the visible range; noise analysis is performed for 650 nm and 5.26 microm. A linear power characteristic and the dependence on pulse lengths of the incoming light are shown. Examples for applications for the visible and mid-infrared spectral region are given by 2f and absorption spectroscopy of oxygen and nitric oxide, respectively.

  5. 27 CFR 9.113 - North Fork of Long Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false North Fork of Long Island... North Fork of Long Island. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “North Fork of Long Island.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries...

  6. 27 CFR 9.113 - North Fork of Long Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false North Fork of Long Island... North Fork of Long Island. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “North Fork of Long Island.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries...

  7. 27 CFR 9.113 - North Fork of Long Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false North Fork of Long Island... North Fork of Long Island. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “North Fork of Long Island.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries...

  8. 27 CFR 9.113 - North Fork of Long Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false North Fork of Long Island... North Fork of Long Island. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “North Fork of Long Island.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries...

  9. 27 CFR 9.113 - North Fork of Long Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false North Fork of Long Island... North Fork of Long Island. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “North Fork of Long Island.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries...

  10. Stream Habitat Modeling to Support Water Management Decisions for the North Fork Shenandoah River, Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averett, A.; Persinger, J. W.; Orth, D. J.

    2005-05-01

    The Shenandoah River and its tributaries, the North Fork and South Fork, represent an excellent model of a multiple use river. Due to documented fish kills, frequent low flow events, and proximity to the Washington D.C. metropolitan area, there is growing concern regarding the sustainability of this natural resource. In 1999, a four-year IFIM (Instream Flow Incremental Methodology) study was initiated to evaluate the response of hydraulics and fish habitat to low flow conditions in the North Fork Shenandoah River (NFSR) basin. Habitat suitability criteria were developed onsite for guilds of riffle, fast generalist, pool-run, and pool-cover fishes. Habitat responses to stream flows were quantified for these habitat guilds and habitat conditions conducive to nuisance algal blooms. In addition, we compared usable habitat conditions under baseline and alternative hydrologic time series corresponding to water use restrictions. Model results were used to identify aquatic conservation flows and establish a stepwise process for implementing aquatic conservation flow management in the NFSR basin. This process will facilitate the adoption of water use conservation measures at appropriate times during future extreme droughts.

  11. Principal Facts of Gravity data in the Northern Willamette Valley and Vicinity, Northwestern Oregon and Southwestern Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, Robert L.; Wheeler, Karen L.; McPhee, Darcy K.; Dinterman, Philip A.; Watt, Janet T.

    2007-01-01

    Gravity data were collected from 2004 through 2006 to assist in mapping subsurface geology in the northern Willamette Valley and vicinity, northwestern Oregon and southwestern Washington. Prior to this effort to improve the gravity data coverage in the study area, very little regional data were available. This report gives the principle facts for 2710 new gravity stations and 1446 preexisting gravity stations. Much of the study area is now covered with data of sufficient density to define basin boundaries and correlate with many of the larger fault systems. ,p> The study area lies between 44? 52.5 and 46? N latitude and between 122? 15 and 123? 37.5 W longitude. Although this is a continuing project and more gravity data is expected to be collected, this report is being published to show the progress of the data collection. The majority of these data are spaced at about 1.6 km (1 mile), but three closely spaced profiles were measured in the Portland area across several faults. To obtain a 1.6 km grid of data points would require about 5120 gravity stations. To date we have collected 2710 stations. Including the preexisting data points, the total number of stations is 4156, and complete regional coverage is about 80 percent at this time.

  12. Grand Forks - East Grand Forks Urban Water Resources Study. Social and Environmental Inventory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    Utilities 107-108 FIGUR~ES Figure Number Title Pag 14 Projected Population - Region 67 1 5 Projected Population - Grand Forks County 68 Study Area 16...Projected Population - Polk County Study Area 68 17 Planning Regions 105 TABLES Tale Number Title Pg 21 Historic Sites in the Grand Forks Area 61I 22...of Indians, traders and settlers; and those related to the populations which currently reside in the area. The information on archeology and history

  13. 78 FR 60220 - Safety Zone; Fireworks Display, Willamette River, Oregon City, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... City, OR AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a safety zone in Oregon City, OR. This safety zone is necessary to help ensure the safety of the... encompass all waters of the Willamette River south of the I-205 Bridge and north of the Oregon City...

  14. 76 FR 25278 - Safety Zone; TriMet Bridge Project, Willamette River; Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; TriMet Bridge Project, Willamette River... is proposing the establishment of a safety zone during the construction of the TriMet Bridge on the..., will be starting construction of the new Portland-Milwaukie Light Rail Bridge on July 1, 2011 (with...

  15. 77 FR 64722 - Safety Zone: Leukemia & Lymphoma Light the Night Walk Fireworks Display; Willamette River...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone: Leukemia & Lymphoma Light the Night Walk... Steele Bridge and the Burnside Bridge, and will be enforced during the Leukemia & Lymphoma Light the... Light the Night Walk Fireworks Display; Willamette River, Portland, OR. (a) Location. The following...

  16. LONGITUDINAL AND LATERAL PATTERNS IN PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ATTRIBUTES OF WILLAMETTE RIVERINE HABITAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Willamette River in western Oregon is the tenth largest river in the conterminous U. S. Plans are being developed to restore ecological function to the main corridor of the river. Our riverine research has developed a basic understanding of some of the ecological functions ...

  17. DISTRIBUTION OF AQUATIC OFF-CHANNEL HABITATS AND ASSOCIATED RIPARIAN VEGETATION, WILLAMETTE RIVER, OREGON, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extent of aquatic off-channel habitats such as secondary and side channels, sloughs, and alcoves, have been reduced more than 50% since the 1850s along the upper main stem of the Willamette River, Oregon, USA. Concurrently, the hydrogeomorphic potential, and associated flood...

  18. ESTIMATED CHANGES IN NATIVE FISH RICHNESS AND THE INDEX OF BIOTIC INTEGRITY IN WILLAMETTE VALLEY STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The landscape of the Willamette Valley differs greatly from that prior to European settlement. Forty-three percent of the Valley Ecoregion has been converted to agricultural uses; 13% for urban and residential development. How have these changes in land use/land cover (LULC) af...

  19. 33 CFR 162.225 - Columbia and Willamette Rivers, Washington and Oregon; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Columbia and Willamette Rivers, Washington and Oregon; administration and navigation. 162.225 Section 162.225 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND...

  20. 77 FR 14970 - Safety Zones; Sellwood Bridge Project, Willamette River; Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ... obsolete. The project will renew the bridge with a new deck arch structure compliant with current loading... structures and two new bridge piers which will each require a cofferdam. The temporary structures will be... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zones; Sellwood Bridge Project, Willamette...

  1. Vegetation dynamics of restored and remnant Willamette Valley, OR wet prairie wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wet prairie wetlands are now one of the rarest habitat types in the Willamette Valley of Oregon, USA. Less than two percent of their historic extent remains, with most having been converted into agricultural fields (Christy and Alverson 2011, ONHP 1983). This habitat is the obl...

  2. Historical wetlands in Oregon's Willamette Valley: Implications for restoration of winter waterbird habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taft, Oriane W.; Haig, Susan M.

    2003-01-01

    Before agricultural expansion in the 19th century, river valleys of North America supported expanses of wetland habitat. In restoring these landscapes, it is important to understand their historical condition and biological function. Synthesizing historical primary accounts (from explorers, travelers, settlers, and farmers) with contemporary knowledge of these wetland systems, we developed a profile of the wetlands and their use by nonbreeding waterbirds (e.g., waterfowl, wading birds, and shorebirds) within the Willamette Valley, Oregon, ca. 1840. We found evidence for three types of wetlands used by non-breeding waterbirds in fall, winter, and spring: emergent wetlands, riverine wetlands, and wetland prairie. The most extensive wetland type was wetland prairie, which functioned as fall/winter habitat for waterbirds, but only while native Kalapuyans managed the region with fire. Since the mid-1800s, four species, in particular, have decreased their use of the Willamette Valley: trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator), snow goose (Chen caerulescens), sandhill crane (Grus canadensis), and long-billed curlew (Numenius americanus). Information suggests that ca. 1840, waterbirds and their habitats were more abundant in the Willamette Valley than today. Restoration of the Willamette Valley landscape is warranted, and today's agricultural wetlandsa??former wetland prairiea??hold highest restoration potential.

  3. 77 FR 19544 - Regulated Navigation Area, Zidell Waterfront Property, Willamette River, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area, Zidell Waterfront Property... Regulated Navigation Area (RNA) at the Zidell Waterfront Property located on the Willamette River in... Information On August 8, 2011, we published a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) titled Regulated...

  4. Homologous recombination as a replication fork escort: fork-protection and recovery.

    PubMed

    Costes, Audrey; Lambert, Sarah A E

    2012-12-27

    Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows DNA repair and ensures the efficiency of DNA replication. The substrate initiating the process of homologous recombination is a single-stranded DNA that promotes a strand exchange reaction resulting in a genetic exchange that promotes genetic diversity and DNA repair. The molecular mechanisms by which homologous recombination repairs a double-strand break have been extensively studied and are now well characterized. However, the mechanisms by which homologous recombination contribute to DNA replication in eukaryotes remains poorly understood. Studies in bacteria have identified multiple roles for the machinery of homologous recombination at replication forks. Here, we review our understanding of the molecular pathways involving the homologous recombination machinery to support the robustness of DNA replication. In addition to its role in fork-recovery and in rebuilding a functional replication fork apparatus, homologous recombination may also act as a fork-protection mechanism. We discuss that some of the fork-escort functions of homologous recombination might be achieved by loading of the recombination machinery at inactivated forks without a need for a strand exchange step; as well as the consequence of such a model for the stability of eukaryotic genomes.

  5. Prey of nesting ospreys on the Willamette and Columbia Rivers, Oregon and Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, B.L.; Kaiser, J.L.; Henny, C.J.; Grove, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    To more effectively use ospreys as a biomonitoring tool and to better assess contaminant pathways, the diet of nesting ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) was studied along the lower Columbia and upper mainstem Willamette rivers by evaluating prey remains collected from wire baskets constructed under artificial feeding perches installed near nest sites and from the ground beneath natural feeding perches and nests. Prey remains from 1997-2004 on the Columbia River and 1993 (previously published) and 2001 on the Willamette River were evaluated and compared. Largescale suckers (Catostomus macrocheilus) were the predominate fish species identified in collections from the Columbia River (61.5% [84.3% biomass]) and Willamette River (76.0% [92.7% biomass]). Prey fish diversity, when based only on ground collections, was higher in the Columbia (2.45) than the Willamette river (1.92) (P = 0.038). Prey fish diversity in collections from the Willamette River did not differ between this study (2001) and previous study (1993) (P = 0.62). Fishbones recovered in wire baskets are likely more representative of osprey diet compared to bones recovered from the ground, because prey diversity was higher among basket samples compared to ground collections (wire basket diversity = 5.25 vs. ground collection diversity = 2.45, P = 0.011). Soft-boned salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.), American shad (Alosa sapidissima), and mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni) were probably underrepresented in collections obtained from the ground. Study results suggest that baskets provide a better method for assessing osprey diet than other indirect methods. These findings augment available osprey food-habits information and provide additional biological and ecological information to better assess potential impacts of various environmental contaminants on nesting ospreys.

  6. Economic analysis of temperature reduction in a large river floodplain: An exploratory study of the WIllamette River, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper examines ecosystem restoration practices that focus on water temperature reductions in the upper mainstem Willamette River, Oregon, for the benefit of endangered salmonids and other native cold-water species. The analysis integrates hydrologic, natural science and eco...

  7. RELATIONSIPS BETWEEN AQUATIC INVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES AND REACH AND LANDSCAPE ATTRIBUTES ON WADEABLE, WILLAMETTE VALLEY STREAMS IN AGRICULTURAL WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In summer 1997, we sampled reaches in 24 wadeable, Willamette Valley ecoregion streams draining agriculturally-infiuenced watersheds. Within these reaches, physical habitat, water chemistry, aquatic invertebrate and fish data and samples were collected. Low-level air photos were ...

  8. AMPHIBIAN OCCURRENCE AND AQUATIC INVADERS IN A CHANGING LANDSCAPE: IMPLICATIONS FOR WETLAND MITIGATION IN THE WILLAMETTE VALLEY, OREGON, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite concern about the conservation status of amphibians in western North America, few field studies have documented occurrence patterns of amphibians relative to potential stressors. We surveyed wetland fauna in Oregon Willamette Valley and used an information theoretic appro...

  9. The Late Cretaceous Middle Fork caldera, its resurgent intrusion, and enduring landscape stability in east-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, Charles R.; Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Aleinikoff, John N.; Slack, John F.

    2014-01-01

    The Middle Fork is a relatively well preserved caldera within a broad region of Paleozoic metamorphic rocks and Mesozoic plutons bounded by northeast-trending faults. In the relatively downdropped and less deeply exhumed crustal blocks, Cretaceous–Early Tertiary silicic volcanic rocks attest to long-term stability of the landscape. Within the Middle Fork caldera, the granite porphyry is interpreted to have been exposed by erosion of thick intracaldera tuff from an asymmetric resurgent dome. The Middle Fork of the North Fork of the Fortymile River incised an arcuate valley into and around the caldera fill on the west and north and may have cut down from within an original caldera moat. The 70 Ma land surface is preserved beneath proximal outflow tuff at the west margin of the caldera structure and beneath welded outflow tuff 16–23 km east-southeast of the caldera in a paleovalley. Within ∼50 km of the Middle Fork caldera are 14 examples of Late Cretaceous (?)–Tertiary felsic volcanic and hypabyssal intrusive rocks that range in area from <1 km2 to ∼100 km2. Rhyolite dome clusters north and northwest of the caldera occupy tectonic basins associated with northeast-trending faults and are relatively little eroded. Lava of a latite complex, 12–19 km northeast of the caldera, apparently flowed into the paleovalley of the Middle Fork of the North Fork of the Fortymile River. To the northwest of the Middle Fork caldera, in the Mount Harper crustal block, mid-Cretaceous plutonic rocks are widely exposed, indicating greater total exhumation. To the southeast of the Middle Fork block, the Mount Veta block has been uplifted sufficiently to expose a ca. 68–66 Ma equigranular granitic pluton. Farther to the southeast, in the Kechumstuk block, the flat-lying outflow tuff remnant in Gold Creek and a regionally extensive high terrace indicate that the landscape there has been little modified since 70 Ma other than entrenchment of tributaries in response to post–2

  10. EFFECTS OF RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT ON WATER QUALITY IN THE BIG SOUTH FORK NATIONAL RIVER AND RECREATION AREA, TENNESSEE AND KENTUCKY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carey, William P.; ,

    1984-01-01

    The South Fork Cumberland River begins in Tennessee at the confluence of the New River and Clear Fork. Strip mining for coal in the New River basin has been ongoing for decades with little reclamation prior to 1977. Water-quality data show that suspended-sediment and dissolved-constituent loads from the New River dominate the water quality in the National River and Recreation Area. The suspended sediment can impart a highly turbid and aesthetically displeasing appearance to the water during low-flow periods which are times of maximum recreational use. High suspended-sediment concentrations are also potentially harmful to the aquatic habitat in the Recreation Area. In addition to the suspended-sediment load, a large supply of coarse material is slowly moving through the channels of the New River basin toward the Recreation Area.

  11. Water Quality and Biological Characteristics of the Middle Fork of the Saline River, Arkansas, 2003-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galloway, Joel M.; Petersen, James C.; Shelby, Erica L.; Wise, Jim A.

    2008-01-01

    The Middle Fork of the Saline River has many qualities that have been recognized by State and Federal agencies. The Middle Fork provides habitat for several rare aquatic species and is part of a larger stream system (the Upper Saline River) that is known for relatively high levels of species richness and relatively high numbers of species of concern. Water-quality samples were collected and streamflow was measured by the U.S. Geological Survey at three sites in the Middle Fork Basin between October 2003 and October 2006. The Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality collected discrete synoptic water-quality samples from eight sites between January 2004 and October 2006. The Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality also sampled fish (September-October 2003) and benthic macroinvertebrate communities (September 2003-December 2005) at five sites. Streamflow varied annually among the three streamflow sites from October 2003 to October 2006. The mean annual streamflow for Brushy Creek near Jessieville (MFS06) was 0.72 cubic meters per second for water years 2004-2006. The Middle Fork below Jessieville (MFS05) had a mean annual streamflow of 1.11 cubic meters per second for water years 2004-2006. The Middle Fork near Owensville (MFS02), the most downstream site, had a mean annual streamflow of 3.01 cubic meters per second. The greatest streamflows at the three sites generally occurred in the winter and spring and the least in the summer. Nutrient dynamics in the Middle Fork are controlled by activities in the basin and processes that occur in the stream. Point sources and nonpoint sources of nutrients occur in the Middle Fork Basin that could affect the water-quality. Nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations generally were greatest in Mill Creek (MFS04E) and in the Middle Fork immediately downstream from the confluence with Mill Creek (MFS04) with decreasing concentrations at sites farther downstream in Middle Fork. The site in Mill Creek is located downstream from a

  12. Environmental Inventory: Little South Fork Cumberland River.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    28 2.2.4.1 Paleo-Indian Tradition ---------- 28 2.2.4.2 Archaic Tradition --------------- 29 2.2.4.3 Woodland Tradition...Soils as Woodland ----------- 128 3.7.4.1 Woodland Suitability Grouping of Soils ------------- 129 3.7.5 Use of the Soils for Wildlife ---------- 133...Stations on the Little South Fork Cumberland River in June and September 1978 and July 1979 - 94 12. Woodland Management Interpretations by Woodland

  13. Oxbow Conservation Area; Middle Fork John Day River, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Shaun; Smith, Brent; Cochran, Brian

    2003-04-01

    In early 2001, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, through their John Day Basin Office, concluded the acquisition of the Middle Fork Oxbow Ranch. Under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Tribes are required to provided BPA an 'annual written report generally describing the real property interests in the Project, HEP analyses undertaken or in progress, and management activities undertaken or in progress'. This report is to be provided to the BPA by 30 April of each year. This is the first annual report filed for the Oxbow Ranch property.

  14. Needs assessment for the Greenway Grand Forks-East Grand Forks development and public education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munski, Laura

    Following the flood of 1997, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers included the Greenway Grand Forks---East Grand Forks (the Greenway) as a flood control measure for Grand Forks, North Dakota and East Grand Forks, Minnesota. It extends along both the Red River of the North and the Red Lake River, encompassing 2200 acres of land. The cities of Grand Forks and East Grand Forks hired consultants to assist with the postflood planning process. The planning process culminated with the Red River of the North Greenway Final Report (Flink, 1998). The purpose of this study was to determine if the development of the Greenway addressed the objectives of the planning report. The history of the land adjacent to the rivers was reviewed to document the progression of riverfront development. Anecdotal evidence was collected, field observations were made, city council minutes were reviewed, Greenway Technical Committee members were interviewed, Greenway Technical Committee minutes were reviewed, and the Greenway Grand Forks---East Grand Forks survey results were reviewed to determine if the objectives of the Red River of the North Greenway Final Report were addressed. A cross section survey was designed by Laura Munski for this dissertation research. The survey was approved by the Greenway Technical Committee. The survey collected both quantitative and qualitative data from the community. The purpose of the survey portion of the research project was to ascertain how residents were kept informed of activities on the Greenway and what amenities residents were using on the Greenway and to solicit their comments regarding the Greenway. The results of the survey research were used in both marketing and event planning for the Greenway. The singular qualitative survey question gave respondents an opportunity to share their comments regarding the Greenway. The qualitative data analysis provided insight to the amenities and educational programs desired by respondents, their concerns regarding the

  15. Hydrogeologic framework of the Willamette Lowland aquifer system, Oregon and Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodward, D.G.; Gannett, Marshall W.; Vaccaro, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the hydraulic characteristics of the materials that make up the Willamette Lowland aquifer system, ground-water movement in the aquifer system, estimates of ground-water recharge, ground-water quality characteristics, construction and use of cross-sectional numerical ground-water flow models, hydrologic controls on ground-water movement, water budgets and flow paths, and a description and application of a conceptual model.

  16. Initial Geomorphic Responses to Removal of Milltown Dam, Clark Fork River, Montana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, A. C.; Brinkerhoff, D.; Woelfle-Erskine, C.

    2008-12-01

    The removal of Milltown Dam on the Clark Fork River, Montana, USA, is creating a field-scale experiment on upstream and downstream responses to dam removal and on how gravel-bed rivers respond to sediment pulses. Milltown Dam was removed in 2008, reconnecting the Clark Fork River to its upstream basin in terms of sediment transport and fish passage. This dam removal is especially notable because (1) it is the largest dam removal to date in the United States in terms of the volume of reservoir sediment potentially available for downstream transport (over 3 million m3; 1.7 million m3 are being mechanically removed); and (2) the dam is the downstream end of the largest Superfund site in the United States, the Clark Fork Complex, and reservoir sediments are composed largely of contaminated mine tailings. Data collection on pre- and post-dam removal channel morphology, bed sediment characteristics, and sediment loads are being used to investigate spatial and temporal patterns of sediment transport and deposition associated with this dam removal. In the first several months following breaching of the dam, snowmelt runoff with a 3-year recurrence interval peak caused substantial erosion and downstream transport of metals-laden sediments from Milltown reservoir. Reservoir sediments in the Clark Fork arm of Milltown reservoir eroded at levels far exceeding modeling predictions as a result of both incision to the new base level created by dam removal and bank retreat of over 200 m in reaches upstream of a constructed bypass reach and remediation area. Copper and other metals in these eroded reservoir sediments provide a tracer for identifying whether sediment deposits observed downstream of the dam originated from Milltown reservoir or uncontaminated tributaries and indicate that Milltown sediments have reached over 200 km downstream. Downstream deposition has been greatest along channel margins and in side-channel areas, whereas the transport capacity of the active channel

  17. Algal conditions and the potential for future algal problems in the Willamette River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rickert, David A.; Petersen, R.R.; McKenzie, S.W.; Hines, W.G.; Wille, S.A.

    1977-01-01

    For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. Dissolved-oxygen regimen of the Willamette River, Oregon, under conditions of basinwide secondary treatment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hines, Walter G.; McKenzie, S.W.; Rickert, D.A.; Rinella, F.A.

    1977-01-01

    For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

  19. Project development and data programs for assessing the quality of the Willamette River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rickert, David A.; Hines, Walter G.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1976-01-01

    For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. Evaluation of planning alternatives for maintaining desirable dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the Willamette River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rickert, David A.; Rinella, F.A.; Hines, W.G.; McKenzie, S.W.

    1980-01-01

    For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Steady-state dissolved oxygen model of the Willamette River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, Stuart W.; Hines, W.G.; Rickert, D.A.; Rinella, F.A.

    1979-01-01

    For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

  2. A synoptic survey of trace metals in bottom sediments of the Willamette River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rickert, David A.; Kennedy, V.C.; McKenzie, S.W.; Hines, W.G.

    1977-01-01

    For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. Bioactivity of Meeker and Willamette raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) pomace extracts.

    PubMed

    Cetojević-Simin, Dragana D; Velićanski, Aleksandra S; Cvetković, Dragoljub D; Markov, Siniša L; Cetković, Gordana S; Tumbas Šaponjac, Vesna T; Vulić, Jelena J; Canadanović-Brunet, Jasna M; Djilas, Sonja M

    2015-01-01

    Taking into account the substantial potential of raspberry processing by-products, pomace extracts from two raspberry cultivars, Meeker and Willamette, were investigated. Total phenolic, flavonoid and anthocyanin contents were determined. Willamette pomace extract (EC₅₀=0.042 mg/ml) demonstrated stronger 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl DPPH radical-scavenging activity than did Meeker pomace extract (EC₅₀=0.072 mg/ml). The most pronounced cell growth inhibition effect was obtained in the breast adenocarcinoma cell line, reaching EC50 values of 34.8 and 60.3 μg/ml for Willamette and Meeker extracts, respectively. Both extracts demonstrated favourable non-tumor/tumor cell growth ratios and potently increased the apoptosis/necrosis ratio in breast adenocarcinoma and cervix carcinoma cells. In reference and wild bacterial strains, minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were achieved in a concentration range from 0.29 to 0.59 mg/ml, and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC) in a range from 0.39 to 0.78 mg/ml. The results indicate significant antioxidant, antiproliferative, proapoptotic and antibacterial activities of raspberry pomace and favour its use as a functional food ingredient.

  4. Willamette: A Chipping Cultivar with High Yield and Specific Gravity, Low Incidence of Hollow Heart and Brown Center, and Suitability for Fresh-Market Usage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Willamette (AO91812-1), a high-yielding, round, white-skinned variety with good chipping qualities, was released in 2003 by the Oregon, Idaho and Washington Agricultural Experiment Stations and the United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service. Willamette was selected at Powe...

  5. Microsatellite diversity in sympatric reproductive ecotypes of pacific steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from the Middle Fork Eel River, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielsen, J.L.; Fountain, Monique C.

    1999-01-01

    Genetic differentiation between two reproductive ecotypes of anadromous steelhead found in the Middle Fork Eel River in northern California was tested using 16 microsatellite loci. Twelve of these loci showed significant differences in allelic frequency between the two Middle Fork Eel River steelhead populations (Fisher's exact P<0.05). Fisher's combined test for independence also supported significant genetic separation between the two reproductive ecotype (P<0.001). Analysis of molecular variance indicated that only 1% of the overall microsatellite allelic variation contributed to differences between summer- and winter-run steelhead in the Middle Fork Eel River. Variation found among individuals within the two runs equaled 18.2%. Analyses showed less genetic distance between the two populations of steelhead in the Middle Fork Eel River than in comparisons made with geographically proximate coastal winter-run fish. Divergence time based on genetic distance for the two within-basin reproductive ecotypes was estimated to be 16,000-28,000 years ago.

  6. 14. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Place of a thousand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Place of a thousand drips, view with three culvert pipes. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  7. 33 CFR 117.315 - New River, South Fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false New River, South Fork. 117.315 Section 117.315 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.315 New River, South Fork. (a) The...

  8. South Fork Telephone Switchboard Building, oblique view of (W) and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South Fork Telephone Switchboard Building, oblique view of (W) and (S) sides, view to northeast - Fort McKinley, South Fork Telephone Switchboard Building, South side of Weymouth Way, approximately 100 feet west of East Side Drive, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  9. South Fork Telephone Switchboard Building, interior west room showing hardwood ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South Fork Telephone Switchboard Building, interior west room showing hardwood floor; view south - Fort McKinley, South Fork Telephone Switchboard Building, South side of Weymouth Way, approximately 100 feet west of East Side Drive, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  10. South Fork Telephone Switchboard Building, oblique view of east side; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South Fork Telephone Switchboard Building, oblique view of east side; view northwest - Fort McKinley, South Fork Telephone Switchboard Building, South side of Weymouth Way, approximately 100 feet west of East Side Drive, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  11. South Fork Latrine, interior showing head with steel tank mounted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South Fork Latrine, interior showing head with steel tank mounted to wall; view south - Fort McKinley, South Fork Latrine, West side of East Side Drive, approximately 225 feet south of Weymouth Way, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  12. South Fork Telephone Switchboard Building, general view in setting showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South Fork Telephone Switchboard Building, general view in setting showing (N) side; view (S) - Fort McKinley, South Fork Telephone Switchboard Building, South side of Weymouth Way, approximately 100 feet west of East Side Drive, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  13. Temperature Effects of Point Sources, Riparian Shading, and Dam Operations on the Willamette River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rounds, Stewart A.

    2007-01-01

    Water temperature is an important factor influencing the migration, rearing, and spawning of several important fish species in rivers of the Pacific Northwest. To protect these fish populations and to fulfill its responsibilities under the Federal Clean Water Act, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality set a water temperature Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) in 2006 for the Willamette River and the lower reaches of its largest tributaries in northwestern Oregon. As a result, the thermal discharges of the largest point sources of heat to the Willamette River now are limited at certain times of the year, riparian vegetation has been targeted for restoration, and upstream dams are recognized as important influences on downstream temperatures. Many of the prescribed point-source heat-load allocations are sufficiently restrictive that management agencies may need to expend considerable resources to meet those allocations. Trading heat allocations among point-source dischargers may be a more economical and efficient means of meeting the cumulative point-source temperature limits set by the TMDL. The cumulative nature of these limits, however, precludes simple one-to-one trades of heat from one point source to another; a more detailed spatial analysis is needed. In this investigation, the flow and temperature models that formed the basis of the Willamette temperature TMDL were used to determine a spatially indexed 'heating signature' for each of the modeled point sources, and those signatures then were combined into a user-friendly, spreadsheet-based screening tool. The Willamette River Point-Source Heat-Trading Tool allows the user to increase or decrease the heating signature of each source and thereby evaluate the effects of a wide range of potential point-source heat trades. The predictions of the Trading Tool were verified by running the Willamette flow and temperature models under four different trading scenarios, and the predictions typically were accurate

  14. Origin, Extent, and Thickness of Quaternary Geologic Units in the Willamette Valley, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connor, Jim E.; Sarna-Wojcicki, Andrei M.; Wozniak, Karl C.; Polette, Danial J.; Fleck, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    Stratigraphic and chronologic information collected for Quaternary deposits in the Willamette Valley, Oregon, provides a revised stratigraphic framework that serves as a basis for a 1:250,000-scale map, as well as for thickness estimates of widespread Quaternary geologic units. We have mapped 11 separate Quaternary units that are differentiated on the basis of stratigraphic, topographic, pedogenic, and hydrogeologic properties. In summation, these units reflect four distinct episodes in the Quaternary geologic development of the Willamette Valley: 1) Fluvial sands and gravels that underlie terraces flanking lowland margins and tributary valleys were probably deposited between 2.5 and 0.5 million years ago. They are the oldest widespread surficial Quaternary deposits in the valley. Their present positions and preservation are undoubtedly due to postdepositional tectonic deformation - either by direct tectonic uplift of valley margins, or by regional tectonic controls on local base level. 2) Tertiary and Quaternary excavation or tectonic lowering of the Willamette Valley accommodated as much as 500 m (meters) of lacustrine and fluvial fill. Beneath the lowland floor, much of the upper 10 to 50 m of fill is Quaternary sand and gravel deposited by braided channel systems in subhorizontal sheets 2 to 10 m thick. These deposits grade to gravel fans 40 to 100 m thick where major Cascade Range rivers enter the valley and are traced farther upstream as much thinner valley trains of coarse gravel. The sand and gravel deposits have ages that range from greater than 420,000 to about 12,000 years old. A widely distributed layer of sand and gravel deposited at about 12 ka (kiloannum, thousands of years before the present) is looser and probably more permeable than older sand and gravel. Stratigraphic exposures and drillers' logs indicate that this late Pleistocene unit is mostly between 5 and 20 m thick where it has not been subsequently eroded by the Willamette River and its

  15. Regulation of Replication Fork Advance and Stability by Nucleosome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Felix; Maya, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    The advance of replication forks to duplicate chromosomes in dividing cells requires the disassembly of nucleosomes ahead of the fork and the rapid assembly of parental and de novo histones at the newly synthesized strands behind the fork. Replication-coupled chromatin assembly provides a unique opportunity to regulate fork advance and stability. Through post-translational histone modifications and tightly regulated physical and genetic interactions between chromatin assembly factors and replisome components, chromatin assembly: (1) controls the rate of DNA synthesis and adjusts it to histone availability; (2) provides a mechanism to protect the integrity of the advancing fork; and (3) regulates the mechanisms of DNA damage tolerance in response to replication-blocking lesions. Uncoupling DNA synthesis from nucleosome assembly has deleterious effects on genome integrity and cell cycle progression and is linked to genetic diseases, cancer, and aging. PMID:28125036

  16. DNA Copy Number Control Through Inhibition of Replication Fork Progression

    PubMed Central

    Nordman, Jared T.; Kozhevnikova, Elena N.; Verrijzer, C. Peter; Pindyurin, Alexey V.; Andreyeva, Evgeniya N.; Shloma, Victor V.; Zhimulev, Igor F.; Orr-Weaver, Terry L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Proper control of DNA replication is essential to ensure faithful transmission of genetic material and to prevent chromosomal aberrations that can drive cancer progression and developmental disorders. DNA replication is regulated primarily at the level of initiation and is under strict cell cycle regulation. Importantly, DNA replication is highly influenced by developmental cues. In Drosophila, specific regions of the genome are repressed for DNA replication during differentiation by the SNF2 domain-containing protein SUUR through an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate that SUUR is recruited to active replication forks and mediates repression of DNA replication by directly inhibiting replication fork progression instead of functioning as a replication fork barrier. Mass-spec identification of SUUR associated proteins identified the replicative helicase member CDC45 as a SUUR-associated protein, supporting a role for SUUR directly at replication forks. Our results reveal that control of eukaryotic DNA copy number can occur through inhibition of replication fork progression. PMID:25437540

  17. Regulation of Replication Fork Advance and Stability by Nucleosome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Prado, Felix; Maya, Douglas

    2017-01-24

    The advance of replication forks to duplicate chromosomes in dividing cells requires the disassembly of nucleosomes ahead of the fork and the rapid assembly of parental and de novo histones at the newly synthesized strands behind the fork. Replication-coupled chromatin assembly provides a unique opportunity to regulate fork advance and stability. Through post-translational histone modifications and tightly regulated physical and genetic interactions between chromatin assembly factors and replisome components, chromatin assembly: (1) controls the rate of DNA synthesis and adjusts it to histone availability; (2) provides a mechanism to protect the integrity of the advancing fork; and (3) regulates the mechanisms of DNA damage tolerance in response to replication-blocking lesions. Uncoupling DNA synthesis from nucleosome assembly has deleterious effects on genome integrity and cell cycle progression and is linked to genetic diseases, cancer, and aging.

  18. Seasonal and annual watershed nitrogen export within the Willamette River Basin (Water in Columia conference)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) enrichment is recognized as one of the leading threats to aquatic ecosystems and water quality. In order to manage this threat, we need to understand patterns of N input to the landscape and export from watersheds. Nitrogen export from watersheds is i...

  19. Willingness to Pay for Willamette Basin Spring Chinook and Winter Steelhead Recovery

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two of the primary goals of conducting economic valuation studies should be to improve the way in which communities frame choices regarding the allocation of scarce resources and to clarify the trade-offs between alternative outcomes. The challenge of quantifying public preferen...

  20. South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project : Adopted Portions of a 1987 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-07-01

    The South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project that world produce 6.55 average megawatts of firm energy per year and would be sited in the Snohomish River Basin, Washington, was evaluated by the Federal Energy Regulatory commission (FERC) along with six other proposed projects for environmental effects and economic feasibility Based on its economic analysis and environmental evaluation of the project, the FERC staff found that the South Fork Tolt River Project would be economically feasible and would result in insignificant Impacts if sedimentation issues could be resolved. Upon review, the BPA is adopting portions of the 1987 FERC FEIS that concern the South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project and updating specific sections in an Attachment.

  1. Twelve Years of Monitoring Phosphorus and Suspended-Solids Concentrations and Yields in the North Fork Ninnescah River above Cheney Reservoir, South-Central Kansas 1997-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Mandy L.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2009-01-01

    Cheney Reservoir, located on the North Fork Ninnescah River in south-central Kansas, is the primary water supply for the city of Wichita and an important recreational resource. Concerns about taste-and-odor occurrences in Cheney Reservoir have drawn attention to potential pollutants, including total phosphorus (TP) and total suspended solids (TSS). July 2009 was the 15th anniversary of the establishment of the Cheney Reservoir Watershed pollution management plan. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the city of Wichita, has collected water-quality data in the basin since 1996, and has monitored water quality continuously on the North Fork Ninnescah River since 1998. This fact sheet describes 12 years (1997-2008) of computed TP and TSS data and compares these data with water-quality goals for the North Fork Ninnescah River, the main tributary to Cheney Reservoir.

  2. The Fork+ burnup measurement system: Design and first measurement campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C.E.; Bronowski, D.R.; McMurtry, W.; Ewing, R.; Jordan, R.; Rivard, D.

    1998-12-31

    Previous work with the original Fork detector showed that burnup as determined by reactor records could be accurately allocated to spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The original Fork detector, designed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, used an ion chamber to measure gross gamma count and a fission chamber to measure neutrons from an activation source, {sup 244}Cm. In its review of the draft Topical Report on Burnup Credit, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission indicated it felt uncomfortable with a measurement system that depended on reactor records for calibration. The Fork+ system was developed at Sandia National Laboratories under the sponsorship of the Electric Power Research Institute with the aim of providing this independent measurement capability. The initial Fork+ prototype was used in a measurement campaign at the Maine Yankee reactor. The campaign confirmed the applicability of the sensor approach in the Fork+ system and the efficiency of the hand-portable Fork+ prototype in making fuel assembly measurements. It also indicated potential design modifications that will be necessary before the Fork+ can be used effectively on high-burnup spent fuel.

  3. Fork gratings based on ferroelectric liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y; Wei, B Y; Shi, L Y; Srivastava, A K; Chigrinov, V G; Kwok, H-S; Hu, W; Lu, Y Q

    2016-03-21

    In this article, we disclose a fork grating (FG) based on the photo-aligned ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC). The Digital Micro-mirror Device based system is used as a dynamic photomask to generated different holograms. Because of controlled anchoring energy, the photo alignment process offers optimal conditions for the multi-domain FLC alignment. Two different electro-optical modes namely DIFF/TRANS and DIFF/OFF switchable modes have been proposed where the diffraction can be switched either to no diffraction or to a completely black state, respectively. The FLC FG shows high diffraction efficiency and fast response time of 50µs that is relatively faster than existing technologies. Thus, the FLC FG may pave a good foundation toward optical vertices generation and manipulation that could find applications in a variety of devices.

  4. Chemical and biological sensing using tuning forks

    DOEpatents

    Tao, Nongjian; Boussaad, Salah

    2012-07-10

    A device for sensing a chemical analyte is disclosed. The device is comprised of a vibrating structure having first and second surfaces and having an associated resonant frequency and a wire coupled between the first and second surfaces of the vibrating structure, wherein the analyte interacts with the wire and causes a change in the resonant frequency of the vibrating structure. The vibrating structure can include a tuning fork. The vibrating structure can be comprised of quartz. The wire can be comprised of polymer. A plurality of vibrating structures are arranged in an array to increase confidence by promoting a redundancy of measurement or to detect a plurality of chemical analytes. A method of making a device for sensing a chemical analyte is also disclosed.

  5. Determining Absolute Zero Using a Tuning Fork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldader, Jeffrey D.

    2008-04-01

    The Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales, we tell our students, are related. We explain that a change in temperature of 1°C corresponds to a change of 1 Kelvin and that atoms and molecules have zero kinetic energy at zero Kelvin, -273°C. In this paper, we will show how students can derive the relationship between the Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales using a simple, well-known physics experiment. By making multiple measurements of the speed of sound at different temperatures, using the classic physics experiment of determining the speed of sound with a tuning fork and variable-length tube, they can determine the temperature at which the speed of sound is zero—absolute zero.

  6. Wireless tuning fork gyroscope for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Jose K.; Varadan, Vijay K.; Whitchurch, Ashwin K.; Sarukesi, K.

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents the development of a Bluetooth enabled wireless tuning fork gyroscope for the biomedical applications, including gait phase detection system, human motion analysis and physical therapy. This gyroscope is capable of measuring rotation rates between -90 and 90 and it can read the rotation information using a computer. Currently, the information from a gyroscope can trigger automobile airbag deployment during rollover, improve the accuracy and reliability of GPS navigation systems and stabilize moving platforms such as automobiles, airplanes, robots, antennas, and industrial equipment. Adding wireless capability to the existing gyroscope could help to expand its applications in many areas particularly in biomedical applications, where a continuous patient monitoring is quite difficult. This wireless system provides information on several aspects of activities of patients for real-time monitoring in hospitals.

  7. Chemical and Isotopical Patterns of Nitrate Contamination in the Southern Willamette Valley, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vick, C. F.; Selker, J.

    2004-12-01

    A persistent problem with elevated NO3 concentrations in rural drinking wells in the southern Willamette Valley, Oregon has been documented since the 1930's. We explore the origin of this contaminant. The objective of this study was to use isotopes of NO3 and other ionic chemical indicators to determine the sources of NO3 in drinking water wells in the southern Willamette Valley, OR. Many non-point sources were found to contribute to the elevated levels of NO3 in ground water, including high-density residential and high-intensity agricultural. 466 wells met the criteria to be included in the study: (1) less than 75 feet in depth (2) installed after 1960 (3) domestic use and (4) be located in the southern Willamette Valley. 120 wells were sampled during the summer of 2003. Geologic units, dominant land use and soil types were determined for each well in an attempt to determine vulnerability of wells for NO3 contamination. 20 drinking water wells were selected to undergo isotopic and further chemical analyses. In order to determine the chemical and isotopic fingerprints of the dominant sources of NO3 contamination soil samples were augered from 10 septic drain fields and water samples were collected below 10 agricultural fields. NO3-N concentrations in the study area ranged from below detection (<0.20 mg/L) to 13.70 mg/L, with a mean concentration of 4.81 mg/L. There was a statistically significant trend (i.e. P < 0.05) in NO3-N with well depth, well age, pH and SO4. Findings suggest that geologic setting is an important factor in predicting vulnerability, with land use also being important but less so. Determination of septic and agricultural sources of NO3 contamination were inconclusive, though various chemical indicators were found to suggest the origin of the NO3.

  8. Nitrate and Pesticide Transport From Tile-Drained Fields in the Willamette Valley, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, K. L.; Rupp, D. E.; Selker, J. S.; Dragila, M. I.; Peachey, R. E.

    2002-12-01

    Tile drainage affects the hydrology and thus the solute transport on agricultural fields by increasing the volume of water that drains from the subsurface. Previous NAWQA studies have shown elevated nitrate levels in wells and high detection frequencies for selected pesticides in Willamette Valley streams. As a substantial area of Willamette Valley agricultural land is tile-drained, it is important to determine the role of tile drains in surface water and ground water pollution. Four fields in the Willamette Valley were instrumented to monitor tile effluent for two winter seasons. On two fields, surface runoff was also monitored for the second season. Field areas ranged from 3 to 30 acres and were cropped in grass, corn, or a grass/corn rotation. Tile effluent nitrate concentrations frequently exceeded 10 ppm on some fields. Flow-weighted averages for each field were 0.87 ppm and 1.36 ppm for two established grass fields, and 8.1 ppm and 14.4 ppm for grass fields that had recently grown corn. Mass losses ranged from 1.15%-6.45% of the applied nitrate through the tile drains. Diuron, Metolachlor, and Chlorpyrifos were tested in selected surface runoff and tile effluent samples. On one field, Metolachlor concentrations were similar in the tile drains and surface runoff. Concentrations in both sources were 10 times lower than the drinking water advisory for Metolachlor. In a second field, Chlorpyrifos concentrations were two orders of magnitude lower than drinking water advisories in both sources. On the same field, Diuron concentrations were significantly higher in the surface runoff than in the tile effluent. Diuron concentrations were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher during the first precipitation events after application in the surface runoff. On a third field, Diuron was at least 10 times lower than drinking water advisories in the tile effluent, with the highest concentrations found in samples collected within 21 days of pesticide application.

  9. Using Macroscopic Charcoal to Reconstruct the Holocene Fire Activity of the Willamette Valley, Oregon and Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, M. K.; Whitlock, C.; Bartlein, P. J.; Pearl, C. A.

    2006-12-01

    High-resolution macroscopic charcoal analysis of two lacustrine records has revealed the Holocene fire activity of the Willamette Valley, located between the Coast and Cascade ranges of southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. The Willamette Valley experienced major environmental and cultural changes during the Holocene, however, its long-term fire history is poorly known. Of particular interest are shifts in fire activity that occurred in response to (1) millennial- and centennial-scale climate and vegetation changes (e.g., the Early Holocene warm period, the Little Ice Age) and (2) major shifts in human activity and population size (e.g., Native American population decline, Euro-American settlement). Macroscopic charcoal analysis of contiguous core samples was used to reconstruct fire activity at each site. Charcoal source (i.e., herbaceous or woody) was also determined based on particle morphology. Charcoal influx was decomposed into a peak component (which indicates fire episodes) and a background component (which indicates changes in burnable biomass). Charcoal records from Battle Ground Lake and Beaver Lake reveal major shifts in fire activity that are consistent with known changes in regional climate on orbital time scales. The Battle Ground Lake charcoal data, for example, show a general increase in fire frequency from the beginning of the Holocene to a maximum of ~18 fire episodes/1000 years at 6500 cal yr BP, associated with the early Holocene insolation maximum and its influence on summer drought, followed by a decrease to ~5 fire episodes/1000 years at present. Similar trends are indicated by the Beaver Lake charcoal data. Both records also indicate shifts in fire activity that suggest the possibility of anthropogenic burning, but at different times at each site. Additional records are being analyzed to examine the spatial and temporal patterns of fire activity across the Willamette Valley as a whole.

  10. Major-ion, nutrient, and trace-element concentrations in the Steamboat Creek basin, Oregon, 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rinella, Frank A.

    1998-01-01

    Bottom-sediment concentrations of antimony, arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, zinc, and organic carbon were largest in City Creek. In City Creek and Horse Heaven Creek, concentrations for 11 constituents--antimony, arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, manganese (Horse Heaven Creek only), mercury, selenium, silver, zinc, and organic carbon (City Creek only)--exceeded concentrations considered to be enriched in streams of the nearby Willamette River Basin, whereas in Steamboat Creek only two trace elements--antimony and nickel--exceeded Willamette River enriched concentrations. Bottom-sediment concentrations for six of these constituents in City Creek and Horse Heaven Creek--arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and zinc--also exceeded interim Canadian threshold effect level (TEL) concentrations established for the protection of aquatic life, whereas only four constituents between Singe Creek and Steamboat Creek--arsenic, chromium, copper (Singe Creek only), and nickel--exceeded the TEL concentrations.

  11. Willamette Hatchery Oxygen Supplementation Studies : Annual Report 1993.

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.D.; Ewing, S.K.; Sheahan, J.E.

    1993-11-01

    Hydropower development and operations in the Columbia River basin have caused the loss of 5 million to 11 million salmonids. An interim goal of the Northwest Power Planning Council is to reestablish these historical numbers by doubling the present adult runs from 2.5 million to 5.0 million fish. This increase in production will be accomplished through comprehensive management of both wild and hatchery fish, but artificial propagation will play a major role in the augmentation process. The current husbandry techniques in existing hatcheries require improvements that may include changes in rearing densities, addition of oxygen, removal of excess nitrogen, and improvement in raceway design. Emphasis will be placed on the ability to increase the number of fish released from hatcheries that survive to return as adults.

  12. Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 1999-2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schwabe, Lawrence; Tiley, Mark; Perkins, Raymond R.

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to document the seasonal distribution of adult/sub-adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Malheur River basin. Due to the decline of bull trout in the Columbia Basin, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service listed bull trout as a threatened species in June 1998. Past land management activities; construction of dams; and fish eradication projects in the North Fork and Middle Fork Malheur River by poisoning have worked in concert to cumulatively impact native species in the Malheur Basin (Bowers et. al. 1993). Survival of the remaining bull trout populations is severely threatened (Buchanan 1997). 1999 Research Objects are: (1) Document the migratory patterns of adult/sub-adult bull trout in the North Fork Malheur River; (2) Determine the seasonal bull trout use of Beulah Reservoir and bull trout entrainment; and (3) Timing and location of bull trout spawning in the North Fork Malheur River basin. The study area includes the Malheur basin from the mouth of the Malheur River located near Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur River (Map 1). All fish collected and most of the telemetry effort was done on the North Fork Malheur River subbasin (Map 2). Fish collection was conducted on the North Fork Malheur River at the tailwaters of Beulah Reservoir (RK 29), Beulah Reservoir (RK 29-RK 33), and in the North Fork Malheur River at Crane Crossing (RK 69) to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. Radio telemetry was done from the mouth of the Malheur River in Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. This report will reflect all migration data collected from 3/1/99 to 12/31/99.

  13. Little Known Facts about the Common Tuning Fork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, P. P.

    2002-01-01

    Explains the physical principles of the tuning fork which has a common use in teaching laboratories. Includes information on its vibration, frequency of vibration, elasticity, and reasons for having two prongs. (YDS)

  14. 17. DETAIL VIEW OF WHAT APPEARS TO BE STIRRING FORK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL VIEW OF WHAT APPEARS TO BE STIRRING FORK THAT MIXED COFFEE BEANS AS THEY WERE HUSKED - Hacienda Cafetalera Santa Clara, Coffee Mill, KM 19, PR Route 372, Hacienda La Juanita, Yauco Municipio, PR

  15. 9. VIEW OF WHEEL RACK FOR BORING MILL. Fork loading ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF WHEEL RACK FOR BORING MILL. Fork loading crane, manufactured by Cleveland Tramrail, 2-1/2 ton capacity. - Juniata Shops, Erecting Shop & Machine Shop, East of Fourth Avenue, between Fourth & Fifth Streets, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  16. 8. VIEW OF WHEEL RACK FOR BORING MILL. Fork loading ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF WHEEL RACK FOR BORING MILL. Fork loading crane, manufactured by Cleveland Tramrail, 2-1/2 ton capacity. - Juniata Shops, Erecting Shop & Machine Shop, East of Fourth Avenue, between Fourth & Fifth Streets, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  17. TRAIP regulates replication fork recovery and progression via PCNA

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Wanjuan; Guo, Yingying; Huang, Jun; Deng, Yiqun; Zang, Jianye; Huen, Michael Shing-Yan

    2016-01-01

    PCNA is a central scaffold that coordinately assembles replication and repair machineries at DNA replication forks for faithful genome duplication. Here, we describe TRAIP (RNF206) as a novel PCNA-interacting factor that has important roles during mammalian replicative stress responses. We show that TRAIP encodes a nucleolar protein that migrates to stalled replication forks, and that this is accomplished by its targeting of PCNA via an evolutionarily conserved PIP box on its C terminus. Accordingly, inactivation of TRAIP or its interaction with the PCNA clamp compromised replication fork recovery and progression, and leads to chromosome instability. Together, our findings establish TRAIP as a component of the mammalian replicative stress response network, and implicate the TRAIP-PCNA axis in recovery of stalled replication forks. PMID:27462463

  18. 9. EEL RIVER SOUTH FORK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. EEL RIVER SOUTH FORK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH OF LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING W. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  19. 8. EEL RIVER SOUTH FORK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. EEL RIVER SOUTH FORK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH OF LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING N. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  20. 117. Laurel Fork Viaduct. Elevation view of this 545 1939 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    117. Laurel Fork Viaduct. Elevation view of this 545 1939 steel girder viaduct. Example of structure with plain reinforced concrete arches. Looking northwest. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  1. Assembly of Slx4 signaling complexes behind DNA replication forks.

    PubMed

    Balint, Attila; Kim, TaeHyung; Gallo, David; Cussiol, Jose Renato; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco M; Yimit, Askar; Ou, Jiongwen; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Gurevich, Alexey; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Smolka, Marcus B; Zhang, Zhaolei; Brown, Grant W

    2015-08-13

    Obstructions to replication fork progression, referred to collectively as DNA replication stress, challenge genome stability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells lacking RTT107 or SLX4 show genome instability and sensitivity to DNA replication stress and are defective in the completion of DNA replication during recovery from replication stress. We demonstrate that Slx4 is recruited to chromatin behind stressed replication forks, in a region that is spatially distinct from that occupied by the replication machinery. Slx4 complex formation is nucleated by Mec1 phosphorylation of histone H2A, which is recognized by the constitutive Slx4 binding partner Rtt107. Slx4 is essential for recruiting the Mec1 activator Dpb11 behind stressed replication forks, and Slx4 complexes are important for full activity of Mec1. We propose that Slx4 complexes promote robust checkpoint signaling by Mec1 by stably recruiting Dpb11 within a discrete domain behind the replication fork, during DNA replication stress.

  2. Women in Non-Traditional Jobs in the Mid-Willamette Valley Manpower Consortium. A Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Governor's Commission for Women, Salem, OR.

    This study discusses the presence of women in non-traditional positions funded by CETA II and VI and the CETA programs, policies, and procedures offering opportunities for women to enter non-traditional occupations. Information was collected via interviews and questionnaires to determine the status of CETA workers in the Mid-Willamette Valley…

  3. 33 CFR 165.T13-209 - Safety Zones; TriMet Bridge Project, Willamette River; Portland, OR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety Zones; TriMet Bridge... Coast Guard District § 165.T13-209 Safety Zones; TriMet Bridge Project, Willamette River; Portland, OR... directions, and within 140 feet, in all directions, of the TriMet bridge construction cranes. (b)...

  4. 33 CFR 165.1322 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. 165.1322 Section 165.1322 Navigation and..., Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. (a) Location. The following is a regulated navigation area...

  5. 33 CFR 165.1322 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Oregon Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Oregon Captain of the Port Zone. 165.1322 Section 165.1322 Navigation and..., Oregon Captain of the Port Zone. (a) Location. The following is a regulated navigation area (RNA):...

  6. 33 CFR 165.1322 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. 165.1322 Section 165.1322 Navigation and..., Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. (a) Location. The following is a regulated navigation area...

  7. 33 CFR 165.1322 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. 165.1322 Section 165.1322 Navigation and..., Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. (a) Location. The following is a regulated navigation area...

  8. 33 CFR 165.1322 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. 165.1322 Section 165.1322 Navigation and..., Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone. (a) Location. The following is a regulated navigation area...

  9. 33 CFR 165.1323 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Captain of the Port Columbia River Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area... NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1323 Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Captain of the...

  10. 33 CFR 165.1323 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Oregon Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area... REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1323 Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River...

  11. Plant succession after hydrologic disturbance: Inferences from contemporary vegetation on a chronosequence of bars, Willamette River, Oregon, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Historic unconstrained, unregulated streamflow along the upper mainstem of the Willamette River, Oregon, produced a floodplain of coalescent bars supporting a mosaic of vegetation patches. We sampled the contemporary vegetation of 42 bars formed 3 to 64 + years ago in four, 1 km...

  12. Ecological Functions of Off-Channel Habitats of the Willamette River, Oregon, Database and Documentation (1997-2001)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The database from the Ecological Functions of Off-Channel Habitats of the Willamette River, Oregon project (OCH Project) contains data collected from 1997 through 2001 from multiple research areas of the project, and project documents such as the OCH Research Plan, Quality Assura...

  13. Summer distribution and species richness of non-native fishes in the mainstem Willamette River, oregon, 1944-2006

    EPA Science Inventory

    We reviewed the results of seven extensive and two reach-specific fish surveys conducted on the mainstem Willamette River between 1944 and 2006 to document changes in the summer distribution and species richness of non-native fishes through time and the relative abundances of the...

  14. Environmental Assessment Deicer Recovery at Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-15

    completed application to this office for further review. We also request the opportunity for complete review of applications for renewal or...NO 58205~6434 September 30, 2004 ND SHPO Ref.: 97 .. Q527av, Draft FONSI, Deicer Recovery Operation, Grand Forks AFB, NO. Dear Ms. Strom: We have...reviewed the Finding ofNo Significant Impact for a deicer recovery operation (draft version) at the Grand Forks Air Force Base, NO. We have no

  15. Environmental Assessment Tent City at Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-15

    thunderstorms. Winters are long and severe with almost continuous snow cover. The spring and fall seasons are generally short transition periods. The...from the northwest during the late fall, winter, and spring , and from the southeast during the summer. Grand Forks County is included in the ND Air...drainage system. At Manvel, ND, approximately 10 miles northeast of Grand Forks AFB, the mean discharge of the Turtle River is 50.3 feet cubed per

  16. Force regulated dynamics of RPA on a DNA fork

    PubMed Central

    Kemmerich, Felix E.; Daldrop, Peter; Pinto, Cosimo; Levikova, Maryna; Cejka, Petr; Seidel, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a single-stranded DNA binding protein, involved in most aspects of eukaryotic DNA metabolism. Here, we study the behavior of RPA on a DNA substrate that mimics a replication fork. Using magnetic tweezers we show that both yeast and human RPA can open forked DNA when sufficient external tension is applied. In contrast, at low force, RPA becomes rapidly displaced by the rehybridization of the DNA fork. This process appears to be governed by the binding or the release of an RPA microdomain (toehold) of only few base-pairs length. This gives rise to an extremely rapid exchange dynamics of RPA at the fork. Fork rezipping rates reach up to hundreds of base-pairs per second, being orders of magnitude faster than RPA dissociation from ssDNA alone. Additionally, we show that RPA undergoes diffusive motion on ssDNA, such that it can be pushed over long distances by a rezipping fork. Generally the behavior of both human and yeast RPA homologs is very similar. However, in contrast to yeast RPA, the dissociation of human RPA from ssDNA is greatly reduced at low Mg2+ concentrations, such that human RPA can melt DNA in absence of force. PMID:27016742

  17. Ground-water pumpage in the Willamette lowland regional aquifer system, Oregon and Washington, 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, Charles A.; Broad, Tyson M.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water pumpage for 1990 was estimated for an area of about 5,700 square miles in northwestern Oregon and southwestern Washington as part of the Puget-Willamette Lowland Regional Aquifer System Analysis study. The estimated total ground-water pumpage in 1990 was about 340,000 acre-feet. Ground water in the study area is pumped mainly from Quaternary sediment; lesser amounts are withdrawn from Tertiary volcanic materials. Large parts of the area are used for agriculture, and about two and one-half times as much ground water was pumped for irrigation as for either public- supply or industrial needs. Estimates of ground- water pumpage for irrigation in the central part of the Willamette Valley were generated by using image-processing techniques and Landsat Thematic Mapper data. Field data and published reports were used to estimate pumpage for irrigation in other parts of the study area. Information on public- supply and industrial pumpage was collected from Federal, State, and private organizations and individuals.

  18. Ground water in the Eola-Amity Hills area, northern Willamette Valley, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, Don

    1967-01-01

    The Eola-Amity Hills area ,comprises about 230 square miles on the west side of the Willamette Valley between Salem and McMinnville, Oreg. The area is largely rural, and agriculture is the principal occupation. Rocks ranging in age from Eocene to Recent underlie the area. The oldest rocks are a sequence more than 5,000 feet thick of marine-deposited shale and siltstone strata, with thin interbeds of sandstone that range in age from Eocene to middle Oligocene. They are widely exposed in and west of the Eola-Amity Hills and underlie younger sedimentary and volcanic rocks throughout the study area. In the Eola-Amity Hills and Red Hills of Dundee, the Columbia River Group, a series of eastward-dipping basaltic lava flows locally of Miocene age, and conformably overlies the marine sedimentary rocks. The Columbia River Group ranges in thickness from less than 1 foot to about 900 feet and has an average thickness of about 200 feet. The formation is exposed in the Eola-Amity Hills and Red Hills of Dundee and, at places, extends to the east beneath younger rocks. Overlying the Columbia River Group and marine sedimentary rocks are nonmarine sedimentary deposits that range in thickness from less than 1 foot, where they lap up (to an altitude of about 200 ft) on the flanks of the higher hills, to several hundred feet along the east margin of the study area. These deposits include the Troutdale Formation of Pliocene age, the Willamette Silt of late Pleistocene age, and alluvium of the Willamette River and its tributaries. The Troutdale Formation and the alluvium of the Willamette River contain the most productive aquifers in the Eola-Amity Hills area. These aquifers, which consist mainly of sand and gravel, generally yield moderate to large quantities of water to properly constructed wells. Basalt of the Columbia River Group yields small to moderate quantities of water to wells, and the marine sedimentary rocks and Willamette Silt generally yield small but adequate quantities

  19. General Reevaluation and Supplement to Environmental Impact Statement for Flood Control and Related Purposes. Red and Red Lake Rivers at East Grand Forks, Minnesota.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    transmitted to citiy officials, newspapers, and radio and television stations in the basin. These media disseminate the information to residents of the...telephone to news media and community officials and law enforcement agencies. The Weather Service Office issues flash flood warnings as required for...activity, lower taxes, a military facility, passenger air and rail service, and more extensive media to emphasize the benefits of Grand Forks. The

  20. Anadronous Fish Habitat Enhancement for the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, John

    1990-01-01

    The wild and natural salmon and steelhead populations in the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River are at a critical low. Habitat enhancement through decreasing sediment loads, increasing vegetative cover, removing passage barriers, and providing habitat diversity is imperative to the survival of these specially adapted fish, until passage problems over the Columbia River dams are solved. Personnel from the Boise and Sawtooth National Forests completed all construction work planned for 1988. In Bear Valley, 1573 feet of juniper revetment was constructed at eleven sites, cattle were excluded from 1291 feet of streambanks to prevent bank breakdown, and a small ephemeral gully was filled with juniper trees. Work in the Upper Salmon Drainage consisted of constructing nine rock sills/weirs, two rock deflectors, placing riprap along forty feet of streambank, construction of 2.1 miles of fence on private lands, and opening up the original Valley Creek channel to provide spring chinook passage to the upper watershed. A detailed stream survey of anadromous fish habitat covering 72.0 miles of streams in the Middle Fork Sub-basin was completed.

  1. Postwildfire debris-flow hazard assessment of the area burned by the 2013 West Fork Fire Complex, southwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verdin, Kristine L.; Dupree, Jean A.; Stevens, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary emergency assessment of the debris-flow hazards from drainage basins burned by the 2013 West Fork Fire Complex near South Fork in southwestern Colorado. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned basins throughout the intermountain western United States were used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence, potential volume of debris flows, and the combined debris-flow hazard ranking along the drainage network within and just downstream from the burned area, and to estimate the same for 54 drainage basins of interest within the perimeter of the burned area. Input data for the debris-flow models included topographic variables, soil characteristics, burn severity, and rainfall totals and intensities for a (1) 2-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, referred to as a 2-year storm; (2) 10-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, referred to as a 10-year storm; and (3) 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, referred to as a 25-year storm. Estimated debris-flow probabilities at the pour points of the 54 drainage basins of interest ranged from less than 1 to 65 percent in response to the 2-year storm; from 1 to 77 percent in response to the 10-year storm; and from 1 to 83 percent in response to the 25-year storm. Twelve of the 54 drainage basins of interest have a 30-percent probability or greater of producing a debris flow in response to the 25-year storm. Estimated debris-flow volumes for all rainfalls modeled range from a low of 2,400 cubic meters to a high of greater than 100,000 cubic meters. Estimated debris-flow volumes increase with basin size and distance along the drainage network, but some smaller drainages also were predicted to produce substantial debris flows. One of the 54 drainage basins of interest had the highest combined hazard ranking, while 9 other basins had the second highest combined hazard ranking. Of these 10 basins with the 2 highest

  2. Selected elements and organic chemicals in bed sediment and fish tissue of the Tualatin River basin, Oregon, 1992-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonn, Bernadine A.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the results of a reconnaissance survey of elements and organic compounds found in bed sediment and fish tissue in streams of the Tualatin River Basin. The basin is in northwestern Oregon to the west of the Portland metropolitan area (fig. 1). The Tualatin River flows for about 80 miles, draining an area of about 712 square miles, before it enters the Willamette River. Land use in the basin changes from mostly forested in the headwaters, to mixed forest and agriculture, to predominately urban. The basin supports a growing population of more than 350,000 people, most of whom live in lower parts of the basin. Water quality in the Tualatin River and its tributaries is expected to be affected by the increasing urbanization of the basin.

  3. Single strand transposition at the host replication fork

    PubMed Central

    Lavatine, Laure; He, Susu; Caumont-Sarcos, Anne; Guynet, Catherine; Marty, Brigitte; Chandler, Mick; Ton-Hoang, Bao

    2016-01-01

    Members of the IS200/IS605 insertion sequence family differ fundamentally from classical IS essentially by their specific single-strand (ss) transposition mechanism, orchestrated by the Y1 transposase, TnpA, a small HuH enzyme which recognizes and processes ss DNA substrates. Transposition occurs by the ‘peel and paste’ pathway composed of two steps: precise excision of the top strand as a circular ss DNA intermediate; and subsequent integration into a specific ssDNA target. Transposition of family members was experimentally shown or suggested by in silico high-throughput analysis to be intimately coupled to the lagging strand template of the replication fork. In this study, we investigated factors involved in replication fork targeting and analysed DNA-binding properties of the transposase which can assist localization of ss DNA substrates on the replication fork. We showed that TnpA interacts with the β sliding clamp, DnaN and recognizes DNA which mimics replication fork structures. We also showed that dsDNA can facilitate TnpA targeting ssDNA substrates. We analysed the effect of Ssb and RecA proteins on TnpA activity in vitro and showed that while RecA does not show a notable effect, Ssb inhibits integration. Finally we discuss the way(s) in which integration may be directed into ssDNA at the replication fork. PMID:27466393

  4. Chk1 promotes replication fork progression by controlling replication initiation.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Eva; Woodcock, Mick; Helleday, Thomas

    2010-09-14

    DNA replication starts at initiation sites termed replication origins. Metazoan cells contain many more potential origins than are activated (fired) during each S phase. Origin activation is controlled by the ATR checkpoint kinase and its downstream effector kinase Chk1, which suppresses origin firing in response to replication blocks and during normal S phase by inhibiting the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk2. In addition to increased origin activation, cells deficient in Chk1 activity display reduced rates of replication fork progression. Here we investigate the causal relationship between increased origin firing and reduced replication fork progression. We use the Cdk inhibitor roscovitine or RNAi depletion of Cdc7 to inhibit origin firing in Chk1-inhibited or RNAi-depleted cells. We report that Cdk inhibition and depletion of Cdc7 can alleviate the slow replication fork speeds in Chk1-deficient cells. Our data suggest that increased replication initiation leads to slow replication fork progression and that Chk1 promotes replication fork progression during normal S phase by controlling replication origin activity.

  5. Replication fork dynamics and the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rebecca M; Petermann, Eva

    2012-04-01

    Prevention and repair of DNA damage is essential for maintenance of genomic stability and cell survival. DNA replication during S-phase can be a source of DNA damage if endogenous or exogenous stresses impair the progression of replication forks. It has become increasingly clear that DNA-damage-response pathways do not only respond to the presence of damaged DNA, but also modulate DNA replication dynamics to prevent DNA damage formation during S-phase. Such observations may help explain the developmental defects or cancer predisposition caused by mutations in DNA-damage-response genes. The present review focuses on molecular mechanisms by which DNA-damage-response pathways control and promote replication dynamics in vertebrate cells. In particular, DNA damage pathways contribute to proper replication by regulating replication initiation, stabilizing transiently stalled forks, promoting replication restart and facilitating fork movement on difficult-to-replicate templates. If replication fork progression fails to be rescued, this may lead to DNA damage and genomic instability via nuclease processing of aberrant fork structures or incomplete sister chromatid separation during mitosis.

  6. Willamette Valley Ecoregion: Chapter 3 in Status and trends of land change in the Western United States--1973 to 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Tamara S.; Sorenson, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    The Willamette Valley Ecoregion (as defined by Omernik, 1987; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1997) covers approximately 14,458 km² (5,582 mi2), making it one of the smallest ecoregions in the conterminous United States. The long, alluvial Willamette Valley, which stretches north to south more than 193 km and ranges from 32 to 64 km wide, is nestled between the sedimentary and metamorphic Coast Ranges (Coast Range Ecoregion) to the west and the basaltic Cascade Range (Cascades Ecoregion) to the east (fig. 1). The Lewis and Columbia Rivers converge at the ecoregion’s northern boundary in Washington state; however, the majority of the ecoregion falls within northwestern Oregon. Interstate 5 runs the length of the valley to its southern boundary with the Klamath Mountains Ecoregion. Topography here is relatively flat, with elevations ranging from sea level to 122 m. This even terrain, coupled with mild, wet winters, warm, dry summers, and nutrient-rich soil, makes the Willamette Valley the most important agricultural region in Oregon. Population centers are concentrated along the valley floor. According to estimates from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (2006), over 2.3 million people lived in Willamette Valley in 2000. Portland, Oregon, is the largest city, with 529,121 residents (U.S. Census Bureau, 2000). Other sizable cities include Eugene, Oregon; Salem (Oregon’s state capital); and Vancouver, Washington. Despite the large urban areas dotting the length of the Willamette Valley Ecoregion, agriculture and forestry products are its economic foundation (figs. 2,3). The valley is a major producer of grass seed, ornamental plants, fruits, nuts, vegetables, and grains, as well as poultry, beef, and dairy products. The forestry and logging industries also are primary employers of the valley’s rural residents (Rooney, 2008). These activities have affected the watershed significantly, with forestry and agricultural runoff contributing to river

  7. 77 FR 47058 - Middle Fork American River Hydroelectric Project Placer County Water Agency; Notice of Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Middle Fork American River Hydroelectric Project Placer County Water Agency... comments on the draft environmental impact statement for the Middle Fork American River Project No. 2079... project. This meeting is posted on the Commission's calendar located at...

  8. Detection of Cryptococcus gattii in selected urban parks of the Willamette Valley, Oregon.

    PubMed

    Mortenson, Jack A; Bartlett, Karen H; Wilson, Randy W; Lockhart, Shawn R

    2013-04-01

    Human and animal infections of the fungus Cryptococcus gattii have been recognized in Oregon since 2006. Transmission is primarily via airborne environmental spores and now thought to be locally acquired due to infection in non-migratory animals and humans with no travel history. Previous published efforts to detect C. gattii from tree swabs and soil samples in Oregon have been unsuccessful. This study was conducted to determine the presence of C. gattii in selected urban parks of Oregon cities within the Willamette Valley where both human and animal cases of C. gattii have been diagnosed. Urban parks were sampled due to spatial and temporal overlap of humans, companion animals and wildlife. Two of 64 parks had positive samples for C. gattii. One park had a positive tree and the other park, 60 miles away, had positive bark mulch samples from a walkway. Genotypic subtypes identified included C. gattii VGIIa and VGIIc, both considered highly virulent in murine host models.

  9. Water surface elevations recorded by submerged pressure transducers along the upper Willamette River, Oregon, Spring, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lind, Greg D.; Wellman, Roy E.; Mangano, Joseph F.

    2017-01-01

    Water-surface elevations were recorded by submerged pressure transducers in Spring, 2015 along the upper Willamette River, Oregon, between Eugene and Corvallis. The water-surface elevations were surveyed by using a real-time kinematic global positioning system (RTK-GPS) at each pressure sensor location. These water-surface elevations were logged over a small range of discharges, from 4,600 cubic feet per second to 10,800 cubic feet per second at Harrisburg, OR. These datasets were collected for equipment calibration and validation for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission. This is one of multiple datasets that will be released for this effort.

  10. Development of an Environmental Flow Framework for the McKenzie River Basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risley, John; Wallick, J. Rose; Waite, Ian; Stonewall, Adam J.

    2010-01-01

    The McKenzie River is a tributary to the Willamette River in northwestern Oregon. The McKenzie River is approximately 90 miles in length and has a drainage area of approximately 1,300 square miles. Two major flood control dams, a hydropower dam complex, and two hydropower canals significantly alter streamflows in the river. The structures reduce the magnitude and frequency of large and small floods while increasing the annual 7-day minimum streamflows. Stream temperatures also have been altered by the dams and other anthropogenic factors, such as the removal of riparian vegetation and channel simplification. Flow releases from one of the flood control dams are cooler in the summer and warmer in the fall in comparison to unregulated flow conditions before the dam was constructed. In 2006, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality listed a total of 112.4, 6.3, and 55.7 miles of the McKenzie River basin mainstem and tributary stream reaches as thermally impaired for salmonid rearing, salmonid spawning, and bull trout, respectively. The analyses in this report, along with previous studies, indicate that dams have altered downstream channel morphology and ecologic communities. In addition to reducing the magnitude and frequency of floods, dams have diminished sediment transport by trapping bed material. Other anthropogenic factors, such as bank stabilization, highway construction, and reductions of in-channel wood, also have contributed to the loss of riparian habitat. A comparison of aerial photography taken in 1939 and 2005 showed substantial decreases in secondary channels, gravel bars, and channel sinuosity, particularly along the lower alluvial reaches of the McKenzie River. In addition, bed armoring and incision may contribute to habitat degradation, although further study is needed to determine the extent of these processes. Peak streamflow reduction has led to vegetation colonization and stabilization of formerly active bar surfaces. The large flood control

  11. Geology and ground water resources of Grand Forks County

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Dan E.; Kume, Jack; Kelly, T.E.; Paulson, Q.F.

    1970-01-01

    Grand Forks County in northeastern North Dakota is underlain by glacial drift, westward-dipping Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks and Precambrian igneous and metamorphic rocks. Glacial drift that covers the bedrock reaches a maximum thickness of 455 feet. It can be differentiated into 5 drift sheets, each of which in turn can be separated into till units, lake clay and silt units, and sand and gravel units. Relief on the bedrock surface is much greater than that on the present glacial topography. In western Grand Forks County, the bedrock rises 600 feet from east to west at the Pembina escarpment, whereas the surface elevations rise only 300 feet.

  12. Bank stability and channel width adjustment, East Fork River, Wyoming.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    Frequent surveys of eight cross sections located in self-formed reaches of the East Fork River, Wyoming, during the 1974 snowmelt flood showed a close relation between channel morphology and scour and fill. Those cross sections narrower than the mean reach width filled at discharges less than bankfull and scoured at discharges greater than bankfull. Those cross sections wider than the mean reach width scoured at discharges less than bankfull and filled at discharges greater than bankfull. Bank stability, and to some extent the adjustment of stream channel width, in the East Fork River study reach appears to be controlled by the processes of scour and fill. -from Author

  13. Replication Termination: Containing Fork Fusion-Mediated Pathologies in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Dimude, Juachi U.; Midgley-Smith, Sarah L.; Stein, Monja; Rudolph, Christian J.

    2016-01-01

    Duplication of bacterial chromosomes is initiated via the assembly of two replication forks at a single defined origin. Forks proceed bi-directionally until they fuse in a specialised termination area opposite the origin. This area is flanked by polar replication fork pause sites that allow forks to enter but not to leave. The precise function of this replication fork trap has remained enigmatic, as no obvious phenotypes have been associated with its inactivation. However, the fork trap becomes a serious problem to cells if the second fork is stalled at an impediment, as replication cannot be completed, suggesting that a significant evolutionary advantage for maintaining this chromosomal arrangement must exist. Recently, we demonstrated that head-on fusion of replication forks can trigger over-replication of the chromosome. This over-replication is normally prevented by a number of proteins including RecG helicase and 3’ exonucleases. However, even in the absence of these proteins it can be safely contained within the replication fork trap, highlighting that multiple systems might be involved in coordinating replication fork fusions. Here, we discuss whether considering the problems associated with head-on replication fork fusion events helps us to better understand the important role of the replication fork trap in cellular metabolism. PMID:27463728

  14. 16 CFR 1512.14 - Requirements for fork and frame assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for fork and frame assembly... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Regulations § 1512.14 Requirements for fork and frame assembly. The fork and frame assembly shall be tested for strength by application of a load of 890 N...

  15. 16 CFR 1512.14 - Requirements for fork and frame assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirements for fork and frame assembly... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Regulations § 1512.14 Requirements for fork and frame assembly. The fork and frame assembly shall be tested for strength by application of a load of 890 N...

  16. 77 FR 39675 - Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, Baker County, OR; North Fork Burnt River Mining

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ...-Whitman National Forest, Baker County, OR; North Fork Burnt River Mining AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... North Fork Burnt River Mining Record of Decision will replace and supercede the 2004 North Fork Burnt River Mining Record of Decision only where necessary to address the inadequacies identified by the...

  17. Geology, Streamflow, and Water Chemistry of the Talufofo Stream Basin, Saipan, Northern Mariana Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izuka, Scot K.; Ewart, Charles J.

    1995-01-01

    A study of the geology, streamflow, and water chemistry of Talufofo Stream Basin, Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, was undertaken to determine the flow characteristics of Talufofo Stream and the relation to the geology of the drainage basin. The Commonwealth government is exploring the feasibility of using water from Talufofo Stream to supplement Saipan's stressed municipal water supply. Streamflow records from gaging stations on the principal forks of Talufofo Stream indicate that peak streamflows and long-term average flow are higher at the South Fork gaging station than at the Middle Fork gaging station because the drainage area of the South Fork gaging station is larger, but persistent base flow from ground-water discharge during dry weather is greater in the Middle Fork gaging station. The sum of the average flows at the Middle Fork and South Fork gaging stations, plus an estimate of the average flow at a point in the lower reaches of the North Fork, is about 2.96 cubic feet per second or 1.91 million gallons per day. Although this average represents the theoretical maximum long-term draft rate possible from the Talufofo Stream Basin if an adequate reservoir can be built, the actual amount of surface water available will be less because of evaporation, leaks, induced infiltration, and reservoir-design constraints. Base-flow characteristics, such as stream seepage and spring discharge, are related to geology of the basin. Base flow in the Talufofo Stream Basin originates as discharge from springs near the base of limestones located in the headwaters of Talufofo Stream, flows over low-permeability volcanic rocks in the middle reaches, and seeps back into the high-permeability limestones in the lower reaches. Water sampled from Talufofo Stream during base flow had high dissolved-calcium concentrations (between 35 and 98 milligrams per liter), characteristic of water from a limestone aquifer. Concentrations of potassium, sodium, and chloride

  18. Mechanism of DNA Replication in Drosophila Chromosomes: Structure of Replication Forks and Evidence for Bidirectionality

    PubMed Central

    Kriegstein, Henry J.; Hogness, David S.

    1974-01-01

    The replicating chromosomal DNA in Drosophila melanogaster cleavage nuclei has been visualized in the electron microscope as a serial array of closely spaced replicated regions created by pairs of diverging replication forks. The fine structure of the forks is very similar to that observed for the replication forks of bidirectionally replicating bacteriophage DNAs. However, the mean length of the single-stranded gaps in Drosophila forks is less than 200 nucleotide residues, much shorter than the gaps in phage forks. This difference in gap length corresponds to the observed difference in the size of Okazaki fragments from Drosophila and phage. Images PMID:4204203

  19. 80. Laurel Fork Creek Bridge #2. Example of a concrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    80. Laurel Fork Creek Bridge #2. Example of a concrete slab bridge with T beams. It was built in 1937 and the wing walls were faced with stone to blend with its surroundings. Looking northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  20. Forks and combs and DNA: the synthesis of branched oligodeoxyribonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Horn, T; Urdea, M S

    1989-01-01

    Nucleoside phosphoramidite derivatives containing two protected primary hydroxyl functions have been incorporated into synthetic oligonucleotides as 'branching monomers'. With selective deprotection, multiple identical copies of an additional oligonucleotide can be incorporated to form fork- or comb-like structures for use as signal amplification materials in nucleic acid hybridization assays. Images PMID:2780317

  1. New histone supply regulates replication fork speed and PCNA unloading

    PubMed Central

    Mejlvang, Jakob; Feng, Yunpeng; Alabert, Constance; Neelsen, Kai J.; Jasencakova, Zuzana; Zhao, Xiaobei; Lees, Michael; Sandelin, Albin; Pasero, Philippe; Lopes, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Correct duplication of DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin is central to genome function and stability. However, it remains unclear how cells coordinate DNA synthesis with provision of new histones for chromatin assembly to ensure chromosomal stability. In this paper, we show that replication fork speed is dependent on new histone supply and efficient nucleosome assembly. Inhibition of canonical histone biosynthesis impaired replication fork progression and reduced nucleosome occupancy on newly synthesized DNA. Replication forks initially remained stable without activation of conventional checkpoints, although prolonged histone deficiency generated DNA damage. PCNA accumulated on newly synthesized DNA in cells lacking new histones, possibly to maintain opportunity for CAF-1 recruitment and nucleosome assembly. Consistent with this, in vitro and in vivo analysis showed that PCNA unloading is delayed in the absence of nucleosome assembly. We propose that coupling of fork speed and PCNA unloading to nucleosome assembly provides a simple mechanism to adjust DNA replication and maintain chromatin integrity during transient histone shortage. PMID:24379417

  2. NEW APPROACHES: Speed of sound in tuning fork metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, V. Anantha; Narayanan, Radha

    1996-11-01

    A procedure to find the speed of sound in tuning fork metal is described. The formula needed is extracted from the literature and explained. Since the equipment needed for this project is readily available in most high school and introductory level college science laboratories, this exercise can be done without any additional cost.

  3. 27 CFR 9.65 - North Fork of Roanoke.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false North Fork of Roanoke. 9.65 Section 9.65 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas §...

  4. 27 CFR 9.65 - North Fork of Roanoke.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false North Fork of Roanoke. 9.65 Section 9.65 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas §...

  5. 134. FORKS DIVERSION, HIGH LINE AND LOW LINE CANALS, TWIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    134. FORKS DIVERSION, HIGH LINE AND LOW LINE CANALS, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF HANSEN, IDAHO; VIEW OF LOW LINE AND POWER GATES, WEST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  6. 132. FORKS DIVERSION, HIGH LINE AND LOW LINE CANALS, TWIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    132. FORKS DIVERSION, HIGH LINE AND LOW LINE CANALS, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF HANSEN, IDAHO; POWER GATES FOR HYDRO-ELECTRIC. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  7. An allocation of undiscovered oil and gas resources to Big South Fork National Recreation Area and Obed Wild and Scenic River, Kentucky and Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Christopher J.; Klett, Timothy R.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Pollastro, Richard M.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) estimated volumes of undiscovered oil and gas resources that may underlie Big South Fork National Recreation Area and Obed Wild and Scenic River in Kentucky and Tennessee. Applying the results of existing assessments of undiscovered resources from three assessment units in the Appalachian Basin Province and three plays in the Cincinnati Arch Province that include these land parcels, the USGS allocated approximately (1) 16 billion cubic feet of gas, 15 thousand barrels of oil, and 232 thousand barrels of natural gas liquids to Big South Fork National Recreation Area; and (2) 0.5 billion cubic feet of gas, 0.6 thousand barrels of oil, and 10 thousand barrels of natural gas liquids to Obed Wild and Scenic River. These estimated volumes of undiscovered resources represent potential volumes in new undiscovered fields, but do not include potential additions to reserves within existing fields.

  8. Application of a Hydrodynamic Model for Assessing the Hydraulic Capacity and Flow Field at Willamette Falls Dam, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Cheegwan; Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Divers, Arya-Behbehani

    2006-08-03

    The Willamette Falls Hydroelectric Power Dam, operated by Portland General Electric (PGE), is located on the Willamette River, Oregon. The Project site consists of T.W. Sullivan Power Plant and a 2,950-ft-long spillway located on the top of the Willamette Falls Dam. As part of the effort of protection and enhancement of environmental resources, a flow control structure at the dam was proposed to improve the flow field and enhance the downstream juvenile fish passage in the region just upstream of the forebay (pre-forebay). The flow in the pre-forebay of Willamette Falls Dam is affected by the complex geometry and bathymetry, powerhouse flow, fish ladder flow and the spillway around the dam. The expectation was that the flow would be sensitive to the proposed flow control structures and could be modified to enhance downstream migration. In this study, a three-dimensional, free-surface hydrodynamic model (EFDC) was developed for the pre-forebay region of Willamette Falls to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed alternative and its effect on the flow field in two different flow regimes (low and high river flow), as well as to assess the hydraulic capacity of flow control structures. One of the key challenges in this modeling study was to properly specify the free open boundary conditions along the 2,950-feet-long spillway. In this study, a pressure boundary condition based on hydraulic head rating curves was applied to the free spillway boundary. The numerical model was calibrated with ADP velocity measurements at 17 stations for the existing low flow condition. Good agreements between model results and measured data were obtained, indicating the successful application of pressure boundary condition on the free spillway boundary. The calibrated model was applied to simulate the flow field and free surface elevation in the high flow region near the control flow structures under different alternative conditions. The model results were used to evaluate the

  9. Endonuclease EEPD1 Is a Gatekeeper for Repair of Stressed Replication Forks*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Suk; Nickoloff, Jac A.; Wu, Yuehan; Williamson, Elizabeth A.; Sidhu, Gurjit Singh; Reinert, Brian L.; Jaiswal, Aruna S.; Srinivasan, Gayathri; Patel, Bhavita; Kong, Kimi; Burma, Sandeep; Lee, Suk-Hee; Hromas, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Replication is not as continuous as once thought, with DNA damage frequently stalling replication forks. Aberrant repair of stressed replication forks can result in cell death or genome instability and resulting transformation to malignancy. Stressed replication forks are most commonly repaired via homologous recombination (HR), which begins with 5′ end resection, mediated by exonuclease complexes, one of which contains Exo1. However, Exo1 requires free 5′-DNA ends upon which to act, and these are not commonly present in non-reversed stalled replication forks. To generate a free 5′ end, stalled replication forks must therefore be cleaved. Although several candidate endonucleases have been implicated in cleavage of stalled replication forks to permit end resection, the identity of such an endonuclease remains elusive. Here we show that the 5′-endonuclease EEPD1 cleaves replication forks at the junction between the lagging parental strand and the unreplicated DNA parental double strands. This cleavage creates the structure that Exo1 requires for 5′ end resection and HR initiation. We observed that EEPD1 and Exo1 interact constitutively, and Exo1 repairs stalled replication forks poorly without EEPD1. Thus, EEPD1 performs a gatekeeper function for replication fork repair by mediating the fork cleavage that permits initiation of HR-mediated repair and restart of stressed forks. PMID:28049724

  10. Fork rotation and DNA precatenation are restricted during DNA replication to prevent chromosomal instability.

    PubMed

    Schalbetter, Stephanie A; Mansoubi, Sahar; Chambers, Anna L; Downs, Jessica A; Baxter, Jonathan

    2015-08-18

    Faithful genome duplication and inheritance require the complete resolution of all intertwines within the parental DNA duplex. This is achieved by topoisomerase action ahead of the replication fork or by fork rotation and subsequent resolution of the DNA precatenation formed. Although fork rotation predominates at replication termination, in vitro studies have suggested that it also occurs frequently during elongation. However, the factors that influence fork rotation and how rotation and precatenation may influence other replication-associated processes are unknown. Here we analyze the causes and consequences of fork rotation in budding yeast. We find that fork rotation and precatenation preferentially occur in contexts that inhibit topoisomerase action ahead of the fork, including stable protein-DNA fragile sites and termination. However, generally, fork rotation and precatenation are actively inhibited by Timeless/Tof1 and Tipin/Csm3. In the absence of Tof1/Timeless, excessive fork rotation and precatenation cause extensive DNA damage following DNA replication. With Tof1, damage related to precatenation is focused on the fragile protein-DNA sites where fork rotation is induced. We conclude that although fork rotation and precatenation facilitate unwinding in hard-to-replicate contexts, they intrinsically disrupt normal chromosome duplication and are therefore restricted by Timeless/Tipin.

  11. Homologous recombination restarts blocked replication forks at the expense of genome rearrangements by template exchange.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Sarah; Mizuno, Ken'ichi; Blaisonneau, Joël; Martineau, Sylvain; Chanet, Roland; Fréon, Karine; Murray, Johanne M; Carr, Antony M; Baldacci, Giuseppe

    2010-08-13

    Template switching induced by stalled replication forks has recently been proposed to underlie complex genomic rearrangements. However, the resulting models are not supported by robust physical evidence. Here, we analyzed replication and recombination intermediates in a well-defined fission yeast system that blocks replication forks. We show that, in response to fork arrest, chromosomal rearrangements result from Rad52-dependent nascent strand template exchange occurring during fork restart. This template exchange occurs by both Rad51-dependent and -independent mechanisms. We demonstrate that Rqh1, the BLM homolog, limits Rad51-dependent template exchange without affecting fork restart. In contrast, we report that the Srs2 helicase promotes both fork restart and template exchange. Our data demonstrate that template exchange occurs during recombination-dependent fork restart at the expense of genome rearrangements.

  12. Termination of DNA replication forks: "Breaking up is hard to do".

    PubMed

    Bailey, Rachael; Priego Moreno, Sara; Gambus, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    To ensure duplication of the entire genome, eukaryotic DNA replication initiates from thousands of replication origins. The replication forks move through the chromatin until they encounter forks from neighboring origins. During replication fork termination forks converge, the replisomes disassemble and topoisomerase II resolves the daughter DNA molecules. If not resolved efficiently, terminating forks result in genomic instability through the formation of pathogenic structures. Our recent findings shed light onto the mechanism of replisome disassembly upon replication fork termination. We have shown that termination-specific polyubiquitylation of the replicative helicase component - Mcm7, leads to dissolution of the active helicase in a process dependent on the p97/VCP/Cdc48 segregase. The inhibition of terminating helicase disassembly resulted in a replication termination defect. In this extended view we present hypothetical models of replication fork termination and discuss remaining and emerging questions in the DNA replication termination field.

  13. Oak Grove Fork Habitat Improvement Project, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bettin, Scott

    1989-04-01

    The Lower Oak Grove Fork of the Clackamas River is a fifth-order tributary of the Clackamas River drainage supporting depressed runs of coho and chinook salmon, and summer and winter steelhead. Habitat condition rating for the Lower Oak Grove is good, but smelt production estimates are below the average for Clackamas River tributaries. Limiting factors in the 3.8 miles of the Lower Oak Grove supporting anadromous fish include an overall lack of quality spawning and rearing habitat. Beginning in 1986. measures to improve fish habitat in the Lower Oak Grove were developed in coordination with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODF&W) and Portland General Electric (PGE) fisheries biologists. Prior to 1986, no measures had been applied to the stream to mitigate for PGE's storage and regulation of flows in the Oak Grove Fork (Timothy Lake, Harriet Lake). Catchable rainbow trout are stocked by ODF&W two or three times a year during the trout fishing season in the lowermost portion of the Oak Grove Fork near two Forest Service campgrounds (Ripplebrook and Rainbow). The 1987 field season marked the third year of efforts to improve fish habitat of the Lower Oak Grove Fork and restore anadromous fish production. The efforts included the development of an implementation plan for habitat improvement activities in the Lower Oak Grove Fork. post-project monitoring. and maintenance of the 1986 improvement structures. No new structures were constructed or placed in 1987. Fiscal year 1988 brought a multitude of changes which delayed implementation of plans developed in 1987. The most prominent change was the withdrawal of the proposed Spotted Owl Habitat Area (SOHA) which overlapped the Oak Grove project implementation area. Another was the change in the Forest Service biologist responsible for implementation and design of this project.

  14. Tectonic evolution of the Tualatin basin, northwest Oregon, as revealed by inversion of gravity data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPhee, Darcy K.; Langenheim, Victoria E.; Wells, Ray; Blakely, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    The Tualatin basin, west of Portland (Oregon, USA), coincides with a 110 mGal gravity low along the Puget-Willamette lowland. New gravity measurements (n = 3000) reveal a three-dimensional (3-D) subsurface geometry suggesting early development as a fault-bounded pull-apart basin. A strong northwest-trending gravity gradient coincides with the Gales Creek fault, which forms the southwestern boundary of the Tualatin basin. Faults along the northeastern margin in the Portland Hills and the northeast-trending Sherwood fault along the southeastern basin margin are also associated with gravity gradients, but of smaller magnitude. The gravity low reflects the large density contrast between basin fill and the mafic crust of the Siletz terrane composing basement. Inversions of gravity data indicate that the Tualatin basin is ∼6 km deep, therefore 6 times deeper than the 1 km maximum depth of the Miocene Columba River Basalt Group (CRBG) in the basin, implying that the basin contains several kilometers of low-density pre-CRBG sediments and so formed primarily before the 15 Ma emplacement of the CRBG. The shape of the basin and the location of parallel, linear basin-bounding faults along the southwest and northeast margins suggest that the Tualatin basin originated as a pull-apart rhombochasm. Pre-CRBG extension in the Tualatin basin is consistent with an episode of late Eocene extension documented elsewhere in the Coast Ranges. The present fold and thrust geometry of the Tualatin basin, the result of Neogene compression, is superimposed on the ancestral pull-apart basin. The present 3-D basin geometry may imply stronger ground shaking along basin edges, particularly along the concealed northeast edge of the Tualatin basin beneath the greater Portland area.

  15. INTEGRATED OUTCROP AND SUBSURFACE STUDIES OF THE INTERWELL ENVIRONMENT OF CARBONATE RESERVOIRS: CLEAR FORK (LEONARDIAN-AGE) RESERVOIRS, WEST TEXAS AND NEW MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    F. Jerry Lucia

    2002-01-31

    This is the final report of the project ''Integrated Outcrop and Subsurface Studies of the Interwell Environment of Carbonate Reservoirs: Clear Fork (Leonardian-Age) Reservoirs, West Texas and New Mexico'', Department of Energy contract no. DE-AC26-98BC15105 and is the third in a series of similar projects funded jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy and The University of Texas at Austin, Bureau of Economic Geology, Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonates. All three projects focus on the integration of outcrop and subsurface data for the purpose of developing improved methods for modeling petrophysical properties in the interwell environment. The first project, funded by contract no. DE-AC22-89BC14470, was a study of San Andres outcrops in the Algerita Escarpment, Guadalupe Mountains, Texas and New Mexico, and the Seminole San Andres reservoir, Permian Basin. This study established the basic concepts for constructing a reservoir model using sequence-stratigraphic principles and rock-fabric, petrophysical relationships. The second project, funded by contract no. DE-AC22-93BC14895, was a study of Grayburg outcrops in the Brokeoff Mountains, New Mexico, and the South Cowden Grayburg reservoir, Permian Basin. This study developed a sequence-stratigraphic succession for the Grayburg and improved methods for locating remaining hydrocarbons in carbonate ramp reservoirs. The current study is of the Clear Fork Group in Apache Canyon, Sierra Diablo Mountains, West Texas, and the South Wasson Clear Fork reservoir, Permian Basin. The focus was on scales of heterogeneity, imaging high- and low-permeability layers, and the impact of fractures on reservoir performance. In this study (1) the Clear Fork cycle stratigraphy is defined, (2) important scales of petrophysical variability are confirmed, (3) a unique rock-fabric, petrophysical relationship is defined, (4) a porosity method for correlating high-frequency cycles and defining rock-fabric flow layers

  16. Top1- and Top2-mediated topological transitions at replication forks ensure fork progression and stability and prevent DNA damage checkpoint activation.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Rodrigo; Doksani, Ylli; Capra, Thelma; Katou, Yuki-Mori; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Foiani, Marco

    2007-08-01

    DNA topoisomerases solve topological problems during chromosome metabolism. We investigated where and when Top1 and Top2 are recruited on replicating chromosomes and how their inactivation affects fork integrity and DNA damage checkpoint activation. We show that, in the context of replicating chromatin, Top1 and Top2 act within a 600-base-pair (bp) region spanning the moving forks. Top2 exhibits additional S-phase clusters at specific intergenic loci, mostly containing promoters. TOP1 ablation does not affect fork progression and stability and does not cause activation of the Rad53 checkpoint kinase. top2 mutants accumulate sister chromatid junctions in S phase without affecting fork progression and activate Rad53 at the M-G1 transition. top1 top2 double mutants exhibit fork block and processing and phosphorylation of Rad53 and gamma H2A in S phase. The exonuclease Exo1 influences fork processing and DNA damage checkpoint activation in top1 top2 mutants. Our data are consistent with a coordinated action of Top1 and Top2 in counteracting the accumulation of torsional stress and sister chromatid entanglement at replication forks, thus preventing the diffusion of topological changes along large chromosomal regions. A failure in resolving fork-related topological constrains during S phase may therefore result in abnormal chromosome transitions, DNA damage checkpoint activation, and chromosome breakage during segregation.

  17. Quality of surface waters in the lower Columbia River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Santos, John F.

    1965-01-01

    This report, made during 1959-60, provides reconnaissance data on the quality of waters in the lower Columbia River basin ; information on present and future water problems in the basin; and data that can be employed both in water-use studies and in planning future industrial, municipal, and agricultural expansion within this area. The lower Columbia River basin consists of approximately 46,000 square miles downstream from the confluence of the Snake and Columbia Rivers The region can be divided into three geographic areas. The first is the heavily forested, sparsely populated mountain regions in which quality of water in general is related to geologic and climatological factors. The second is a semiarid plateau east of the Cascade Mountains; there differences in geology and precipitation, together with more intensive use of available water for irrigation, bring about marked differences in water quality. The third is the Willamette-Puget trough area in which are concentrated most of the industry and population and in which water quality is influenced by sewage and industrial waste disposal. The majority of the streams in the lower Columbia River basin are calcium magnesium bicarbonate waters. In general, the rivers rising in the. Coast Range and on the west slope of the Cascade Range contain less than 100 parts per million of dissolved solids, and hardness of the water is less than 50 parts per million. Headwater reaches of the streams on the east slope of the Cascade Range are similar to those on the west slope; but, downstream, irrigation return flows cause the dissolved-solids content and hardness to increase. Most of the waters, however, remain calcium magnesium bicarbonate in type. The highest observed dissolved-solids concentrations and also some changes in chemical composition occur in the streams draining the more arid parts of the area. In these parts, irrigation is chiefly responsible for increasing the dissolved-solids concentration and altering the

  18. Computed and estimated pollutant loads, West Fork Trinity River, Fort Worth, Texas, 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, Paul W.; McWreath, Harry C.

    2001-01-01

    In 1998 the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Trinity River Authority, did a study to estimate storm-runoff pollutant loads using two models—a deterministic model and a statistical model; the estimated loads were compared to loads computed from measured data for a large (118,000 acres) basin in the Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas, metropolitan area. Loads were computed and estimated for 12 properties and constituents in runoff from two 1997 storms at streamflow-gaging station 08048543 West Fork Trinity River at Beach Street in Fort Worth. Each model uses rainfall as a primary variable to estimate pollutant load. In addition to using point rainfall at the Beach Street station to estimate pollutant loads, areal-averaged rainfall for the basin was computed to obtain a more representative estimate of rainfall over the basin. Loads estimated by the models for the two storms, using both point and areal-averaged rainfall, generally did not compare closely to computed loads for the 12 water-quality properties and constituents. Both models overestimated loads more frequently than they underestimated loads. The models tended to yield similar estimates for the same property or constituent. In general, areal-averaged rainfall data yielded better estimates of loads than point rainfall data for both models. Neither the deterministic model nor the statistical model (both using areal-averaged rainfall) was consistently better at estimating loads. Several factors could account for the inability of the models to estimate loads closer to computed loads. Chief among them is the fact that neither model was designed for the specific application of this study.

  19. Chronology and ecology of late Pleistocene megafauna in the northern Willamette Valley, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilmour, Daniel M.; Butler, Virginia L.; O'Connor, James E.; Davis, Edward Byrd; Culleton, Brendan J.; Kennett, Douglas J.; Hodgins, Gregory W. L.

    2015-01-01

    Since the mid-19th century, western Oregon's Willamette Valley has been a source of remains from a wide variety of extinct megafauna. Few of these have been previously described or dated, but new chronologic and isotopic analyses in conjunction with updated evaluations of stratigraphic context provide substantial new information on the species present, timing of losses, and paleoenvironmental conditions. Using subfossil material from the northern valley, we use AMS radiocarbon dating, stable isotope (δ13C and δ15N) analyses, and taxonomic dietary specialization and habitat preferences to reconstruct environments and to develop a local chronology of events that we then compare with continental and regional archaeological and paleoenvironmental data. Analysis of twelve bone specimens demonstrates the presence of bison, mammoth, horse, sloth, and mastodon from ~ 15,000–13,000 cal yr BP. The latest ages coincide with changing regional climate corresponding to the onset of the Younger Dryas. It is suggested that cooling conditions led to increased forest cover, and, along with river aggradation, reduced the area of preferred habitat for the larger bodied herbivores, which contributed to the demise of local megafauna. Archaeological evidence for megafauna–human interactions in the Pacific Northwest is scarce, limiting our ability to address the human role in causing extinction.

  20. Residency and movement patterns of wintering dunlin in the Willamette Valley of Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzenbacher, Peter; Haig, Susan M.

    2002-01-01

    In the winters of 1998a??1999 and 1999a??2000, we tracked 67 radio-marked Dunlin (Calidris alpina) throughout the complex agricultural landscape of the Willamette Valley of Oregon. Individual birds were tracked across 8-week sampling periods and indicated a high degree of regional fidelity throughout the three winter sampling periods. Birds exhibited varied degrees of fidelity to specific wetland sites and were detected at an average of nine different sites. Distances traveled within the region were extensive and greatest during late winter. Females ranged farther from capture sites than males, and movement from capture sites for all birds was greatest during late winter. Mean home-range size (95% minimum convex polygons) of birds was 258.2 A? 44.8 km2 (SE) and was greatest during late winter. Diurnal roosts were identified as centers of activities and daily movements were most pronounced during crepuscular periods. These data represent the most extensive documentation of winter movements for a shorebird at an inland site. Findings indicate Dunlin were winter residents, and extensive local movements suggest a high degree of functional connectivity of habitats.

  1. Residency and movement patterns of wintering Dunlin in the Willamette Valley of Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzenbacher, P.M.; Haig, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    In the winters of 1998-1999 and 1999-2000, we tracked 67 radio-marked Dunlin (Calidris alpina) throughout the complex agricultural landscape of the Willamette Valley of Oregon. Individual birds were tracked across 8-week sampling periods and indicated a high degree of regional fidelity throughout the three winter sampling periods. Birds exhibited varied degrees of fidelity to specific wetland sites and were detected at an average of nine different sites. Distances traveled within the region were extensive and greatest during late winter. Females ranged farther from capture sites than males, and movement from capture sites for all birds was greatest during late winter. Mean home-range size (95% minimum convex polygons) of birds was 258.2 ?? 44.8 km2 (SE) and was greatest during late winter. Diurnal roosts were identified as centers of activities and daily movements were most pronounced during crepuscular periods. These data represent the most extensive documentation of winter movements for a shorebird at an inland site. Findings indicate Dunlin were winter residents, and extensive local movements suggest a high degree of functional connectivity of habitats.

  2. Ground-water data in the Corvallis-Albany area, central Willamette Valley, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frank, F.J.; Johnson, N.A.

    1972-01-01

    THE CORVALLIS-ALBANY AREA IS PART OF THE ALLUVIAL PLAIN THAT LIES BETWEEN THE CASCADE AND COAST RANGES IN THE CENTRAL WILLAMETTE VALLEY IN NORTHWESTERN OREGON. THE ALLUVIAL DEPOSITS (SAND AND GRAVEL) OF THE VALLEY PLAIN CONTAIN THE MOST PRODUCTIVE AQUIFERS IN THE AREA AND ARE CONSIDERED TO BE THE ONLY UNITS FEASIBLE FOR LARGE-SCALE DEVELOPMENT OF GROUNDWATER SUPPLIES. DURING 1971 THE SEASONAL DECLINE OF WATER LEVELS FROM WINTER TO LATE SUMMER AVERAGED ABOUT 10 FEET FOR THE ALLUVIAL DEPOSITS. THE SEASONAL CHANGE OF STORAGE WAS ESTIMATED TO BE ABOUT 130,000 ACRE-FEET. OF THIS VOLUME, ABOUT 14,000 ACRE-FEET WAS PUMPED FROM WELLS; THE REST WAS DISCHARGED THROUGH SEEPS AND SPRINGS BY EVAPOTRANSPIRATION. THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PUMPAGE AND NATURAL DISCHARGE INDICATES THAT A GREAT QUANTITY OF ADDITIONAL WATER IS AVAILABLE FOR DEVELOPMENT. THE STORAGE CAPACITY OF THE ALLUVIAL AQUIFERS IS ESTIMATED TO BE ABOUT 750,000 ACRE-FEET BETWEEN DEPTHS OF 10 AND 100 FEET. WATER FROM THE ALLUVIAL DEPOSITS IS CHEMICALLY SUITABLE FOR ALL USES, AS IS MOST OF THE WATER FROM PERCHED-WATER BODIES IN THE OLDER SEDIMENTARY AND VOLCANIC ROCKS.

  3. Use of health services among vineyard and winery workers in the North Willamette Valley, Oregon.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Cevallos, Daniel F; Garside, Leda I; Vazquez, Leticia; Polanco, Kristty

    2012-02-01

    Although agricultural work is considered one of the most dangerous and physically demanding jobs, the majority of farmworkers remain vulnerable to disease and injury, while use of health services is limited. The present study analyzes the use of health care services among vineyard and winery workers in the North Willamette Valley, Oregon. Data from 513 foreign-born workers collected during the summer of 2009 by ¡Salud! Services, was used to test the influence of relevant predisposing and enabling factors of the Behavioral Model of Health Care Utilization among Vulnerable Populations. The majority of participants were males (87%) with an average age of 33 years. Over half of the workers were either married or living with a partner (54%) and had children living with them (58%). Very few spoke English (5%) and only a third had more than 6 years of formal education. Two-thirds of workers (65%) had a full time job and shared housing (67%). Only one of every five workers (19%) had health insurance. Multivariate analyses show that use of health services in the past 2 years is more likely among females, those who have children, have more than 6 years of education, work full time, are insured, and are currently attending school. This study provides further insight for health care provision initiatives to reduce the many barriers faced by farmworkers and their families.

  4. Floodplain Formation and Cottonwood Colonization Patterns on the Willamette River, Oregon, USA.

    PubMed

    Dykaar; Wigington

    2000-01-01

    / Using a series of aerial photographs taken between 1936 and 1996, we trace coevolution of floodplain and riparian forest on the Willamette River. Within-channel barforms appear to be the predominant incipient floodplain landform and habitat for primary succession. Interlinked development of bar(s) and erosion of near banks, filling of channels, and establishment and growth of cottonwoods and willows results in coalescence with older floodplain. Sizeand internal structure of riparian forest patches reflect evolution of underlying barforms or channel beds. Floodplain matures as the active channel migrates away by repetition of the bar formation and near-bank erosion process, or is progressively abandoned by infilling and/or constriction with a bar. Other parts of the floodplain are recycled as eroding banks provide the coarse sediment and large woody debris for building new bars. A multichannel planform is maintained as building bars split flow; channels lengthen as bars and islands join into larger assemblages. Avulsion appears to cut new channels only short distances. Given the central role of bars and islands in building new floodplain habitat, we identify their area as a geomorphic indicator of river-floodplain integrity. We measure an 80% decline in bar and island area between 1910 and 1988 within a 22-km section. Dams, riprap, logging, and gravel mining may all be contributing to diminished bar formation rates. Removing obstacles to natural riparian forest creation mechanisms is necessary to regenerate the river-floodplain system and realize its productive potential.

  5. Scanning Probe Microscopy of DNA with a Quartz Tuning Fork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, G. M.; Nunes, G., Jr.

    2001-03-01

    Quartz tuning-forks have recently been put to use as highly sensitive force detectors in atomic force microscopy (AFM).(F.J.Giessibl et al.), Science 289, 422 (2000). In this study we have applied a home-built, tuning-fork based AFM to the investigation of single and double stranded DNA (ssDNA and dsDNA). We operate the microscope in the non-contact mode (typical tip amplitude ~1 nm) with a variety of tips (e.g. Si, Si_3N_4, W). Here we report on recent results showing that the apparent height of plasmid dsDNA on mica substrates depends on both the tip material and imaging frequency shift. This talk will also review our efforts to probe ssDNA with a chemically functionalized tip. Current and future prospects for this dynamic-mode, chemically-sensitive force microscopy technique will be discussed.

  6. A single-element tuning fork piezoelectric linear actuator.

    PubMed

    Friend, James R; Satonobu, Jun; Nakamura, Kentaro; Ueha, Sadayuki; Stutts, Daniel S

    2003-02-01

    This paper describes the design of a piezoelectric tuning-fork, dual-mode motor. The motor uses a single multilayer piezoelectric element in combination with tuning fork and shearing motion to form an actuator using a single drive signal. Finite-element analysis was used in the design of the motor, and the process is described along with the selection of the device's materials and its performance. Swaging was used to mount the multilayer piezoelectric element within the stator. Prototypes of the 25-mm long bidirectional actuator achieved a maximum linear no-load speed of 16.5 cm/s, a maximum linear force of 1.86 N, and maximum efficiency of 18.9%.

  7. Optimal information provision for maximizing flow in a forked lattice.

    PubMed

    Imai, Takeaki; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2015-06-01

    In a forked road, the provision of inappropriate information to car drivers sometimes leads to undesirable situations such as one-sided congestion, which is called the hunting phenomenon in real traffic. To address such problems, we propose a forked exclusion model and investigate the behavior of traffic flow in two routes, providing various types of information to a limited number of traveling particles according to the share rate of information. To analytically understand the phenomena, we develop a coarse-grained representation of the model. By analyzing the model, we find the most effective types of information to minimize particles' travel time and the existence of an optimal share rate according to route conditions.

  8. Optimal information provision for maximizing flow in a forked lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Takeaki; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2015-06-01

    In a forked road, the provision of inappropriate information to car drivers sometimes leads to undesirable situations such as one-sided congestion, which is called the hunting phenomenon in real traffic. To address such problems, we propose a forked exclusion model and investigate the behavior of traffic flow in two routes, providing various types of information to a limited number of traveling particles according to the share rate of information. To analytically understand the phenomena, we develop a coarse-grained representation of the model. By analyzing the model, we find the most effective types of information to minimize particles' travel time and the existence of an optimal share rate according to route conditions.

  9. South Fork Clearwater River Habitat Enhancement, Nez Perce National Forest.

    SciTech Connect

    Siddall, Phoebe

    1992-04-01

    In 1984, the Nez Perce National forest and the Bonneville Power Administration entered into a contractual agreement which provided for improvement of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead trout habitat in south Fork Clearwater River tributaries. Project work was completed in seven main locations: Crooked River, Red River, Meadow Creek Haysfork Gloryhole, Cal-Idaho Gloryhole, Fisher Placer and Leggett Placer. This report describes restoration activities at each of these sites.

  10. Geomorphological Analysis of North Fork, Toutle River, Washington: 1980- 1984

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    north flank of Mount St. Helens and included glacial ice, modern dacite dome, and a mixture of andesite and minor amounts of basalt lava flows...and basalt form the former domes. During emplacement this deposit also consisted of snow and large blocks of ice from the glaciers on the north flank of...north side of Mount St. Helens. Consequently,the North Fork Unit features as its dominant 23 materials the dark colored mixed basalt deposits and the

  11. Environmental Assessment Housing Transfer at Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-27

    tallgrass prairie that once was dominant in this region. Plants thriving in this preserve include western wheatgrass, slender wheatgrass, big bluestem...Palustrine Forested type wetlands. Vegetation is robust at GFAFB wetlands, and they are characterized as typical prairie potholes found within the...grassland and wetland habitats for wildlife in Grand Forks County. Pastures, meadows, and other non-cultivated areas create a prairie -land mosaic

  12. Replication patterns and organization of replication forks in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Stokke, Caroline; Waldminghaus, Torsten; Skarstad, Kirsten

    2011-03-01

    We have investigated the replication patterns of the two chromosomes of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae grown in four different media. By combining flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR with computer simulations, we show that in rich media, V. cholerae cells grow with overlapping replication cycles of both the large chromosome (ChrI) and the small chromosome (ChrII). In Luria-Bertani (LB) medium, initiation occurs at four copies of the ChrI origin and two copies of the ChrII origin. Replication of ChrII was found to occur at the end of the ChrI replication period in all four growth conditions. Novel cell-sorting experiments with marker frequency analysis support these conclusions. Incubation with protein synthesis inhibitors indicated that the potential for initiation of replication of ChrII was present at the same time as that of ChrI, but was actively delayed until much of ChrI was replicated. Investigations of the localization of SeqA bound to new DNA at replication forks indicated that the forks were co-localized in pairs when cells grew without overlapping replication cycles and in higher-order structures during more rapid growth. The increased degree of fork organization during rapid growth may be a means by which correct segregation of daughter molecules is facilitated.

  13. Characterizing Sediment Flux Using Reconstructed Topography and Bathymetry from Historical Aerial Imagery on the Willamette River, OR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langston, T.; Fonstad, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Willamette is a gravel-bed river that drains ~28,800 km^2 between the Coast Range and Cascade Range in northwestern Oregon before entering the Columbia River near Portland. In the last 150 years, natural and anthropogenic drivers have altered the sediment transport regime, drastically reducing the geomorphic complexity of the river. Previously dynamic multi-threaded reaches have transformed into stable single channels to the detriment of ecosystem diversity and productivity. Flow regulation by flood-control dams, bank revetments, and conversion of riparian forests to agriculture have been key drivers of channel change. To date, little has been done to quantitatively describe temporal and spatial trends of sediment transport in the Willamette. This knowledge is critical for understanding how modern processes shape landforms and habitats. The goal of this study is to describe large-scale temporal and spatial trends in the sediment budget by reconstructing historical topography and bathymetry from aerial imagery. The area of interest for this project is a reach of the Willamette stretching from the confluence of the McKenzie River to the town of Peoria. While this reach remains one of the most dynamic sections of the river, it has exhibited a great loss in geomorphic complexity. Aerial imagery for this section of the river is available from USDA and USACE projects dating back to the 1930's. Above water surface elevations are extracted using the Imagine Photogrammetry package in ERDAS. Bathymetry is estimated using a method known as Hydraulic Assisted Bathymetry in which hydraulic parameters are used to develop a regression between water depth and pixel values. From this, pixel values are converted to depth below the water surface. Merged together, topography and bathymetry produce a spatially continuous digital elevation model of the geomorphic floodplain. Volumetric changes in sediment stored along the study reach are then estimated for different historic periods

  14. Integration of high-resolution seismic and aeromagnetic data for earthquake hazards evaluations: An example from the Willamette Valley, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liberty, L.M.; Trehu, A.M.; Blakely, R.J.; Dougherty, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Aeromagnetic and high-resolution seismic reflection data were integrated to place constraints on the history of seismic activity and to determine the continuity of the possibly active, yet largely concealed Mount Angel fault in the Willamette Valley, Oregon. Recent seismic activity possibly related to the 20-km-long fault includes a swarm of small earthquakes near Woodburn in 1990 and the magnitude 5.6 Scotts Mills earthquake in 1993. Newly acquired aeromagnetic data show several large northwest-trending anomalies, including one associated with the Mount Angel fault. The magnetic signature indicates that the fault may actually extend 70 km across the Willamette Valley to join the Newberg and Gales Creek faults in the Oregon Coast Range. We collected 24-fold high-resolution seismic reflection data along two transects near Woodburn, Oregon, to image the offset of the Miocene-age Columbia River Basalts (CRB) and overlying sediments at and northwest of the known mapped extent of the Mount Angel fault. The seismic data show a 100-200-m offset in the CRB reflector at depths from 300 to 700 m. Folded or offset sediments appear above the CRB with decreasing amplitude to depths as shallow as were imaged (approximately 40 m). Modeling experiments based on the magnetic data indicate, however, that the anomaly associated with the Mount Angel fault is not caused solely by an offset of the CRB and overlying sediments. Underlying magnetic sources, which we presume to be volcanic rocks of the Siletz terrane, must have vertical offsets of at least 500 m to fit the observed data. We conclude that the Mount Angel fault appears to have been active since Eocene age and that the Gales Creek, Newberg, and Mount Angel faults should be considered a single potentially active fault system. This fault, as well as other parallel northwest-trending faults in the Willamette Valley, should be considered as risks for future potentially damaging earthquakes.

  15. Human RECQ1 promotes restart of replication forks reversed by DNA topoisomerase I inhibition.

    PubMed

    Berti, Matteo; Ray Chaudhuri, Arnab; Thangavel, Saravanabhavan; Gomathinayagam, Shivasankari; Kenig, Sasa; Vujanovic, Marko; Odreman, Federico; Glatter, Timo; Graziano, Simona; Mendoza-Maldonado, Ramiro; Marino, Francesca; Lucic, Bojana; Biasin, Valentina; Gstaiger, Matthias; Aebersold, Ruedi; Sidorova, Julia M; Monnat, Raymond J; Lopes, Massimo; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2013-03-01

    Topoisomerase I (TOP1) inhibitors are an important class of anticancer drugs. The cytotoxicity of TOP1 inhibitors can be modulated by replication fork reversal through a process that requires poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activity. Whether regressed forks can efficiently restart and what factors are required to restart fork progression after fork reversal are still unknown. We have combined biochemical and EM approaches with single-molecule DNA fiber analysis to identify a key role for human RECQ1 helicase in replication fork restart after TOP1 inhibition that is not shared by other human RecQ proteins. We show that the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation activity of PARP1 stabilizes forks in the regressed state by limiting their restart by RECQ1. These studies provide new mechanistic insights into the roles of RECQ1 and PARP in DNA replication and offer molecular perspectives to potentiate chemotherapeutic regimens based on TOP1 inhibition.

  16. Human RECQ1 promotes restart of replication forks reversed by DNA topoisomerase I inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Berti, Matteo; Chaudhuri, Arnab Ray; Thangavel, Saravanabhavan; Gomathinayagam, Shivasankari; Kenig, Sasa; Vujanovic, Marko; Odreman, Federico; Glatter, Timo; Graziano, Simona; Mendoza-Maldonado, Ramiro; Marino, Francesca; Lucic, Bojana; Biasin, Valentina; Gstaiger, Matthias; Aebersold, Ruedi; Sidorova, Julia M.; Monnat, Raymond J.; Lopes, Massimo; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Topoisomerase I (TOP1) inhibitors are an important class of anticancer drugs. The cytotoxicity of TOP1 inhibitors can be modulated by replication fork reversal, in a process that requires PARP activity. Whether regressed forks can efficiently restart and the factors required to restart fork progression after fork reversal are still unknown. Here we combined biochemical and electron microscopy approaches with single-molecule DNA fiber analysis, to identify a key role for human RECQ1 helicase in replication fork restart after TOP1 inhibition, not shared by other human RecQ proteins. We show that the poly(ADPribosyl)ation activity of PARP1 stabilizes forks in their regressed state by limiting their restart by RECQ1. These studies provide new mechanistic insights into the roles of RECQ1 and PARP in DNA replication and offer molecular perspectives to potentiate chemotherapeutic regimens based on TOP1 inhibition. PMID:23396353

  17. Fiscal Year 2014 United States Army Corps of Engineers -Civil Works Annual Financial Report: Maintaining Readiness Through Fiscal Responsibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Supply Hartwell Lake , GA & SC; Beaver Lake , AR; Greers Ferry Dam and Lake , AR; Willamette River Basin Review, OR (Coast Fork); and Sulphur River Basin, TX...training near Savannah, GA. (Photo courtesy of the Georgia National Guard) Army Reserve Soldiers and competitors listen to a class on rifle...manner that is both economically and technically sound. Eagles perched near Longview Lake . (Photo courtesy of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

  18. Boat-based water-surface cross sectional elevation surveys along the upper Willamette River, Oregon, in Spring, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lind, Greg D.; Wellman, Roy; Mangano, Joseph F.

    2016-01-01

    Water-surface elevation measurements were collected in Spring, 2015 along the upper Willamette River, Oregon, between Harrisburg and Corvallis. These surveys were collected over a small range of discharges, from 6,900 cubic feet per second to 8,300 cubic feet per second, using a real-time kinematic global positioning system (RTK-GPS) on a motorboat at various cross sections along the river. These datasets were collected for equipment calibration and validation for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission. This is one of multiple survey datasets that will be released for this effort.

  19. Nature's complex flume - Using a diagnostic state-and-transition framework to understand post-restoration channel adjustment of the Clark Fork River, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dyke, Chris

    2016-02-01

    There is an imperfect symmetry between the patterns of channel evolution observed during laboratory flume experiments and those which materialize in rivers exposed to ambient environmental conditions that produce hydrogeomorphic fluxes which are more complex, contingent, and unpredictable. One strategy to improve our understanding of short- to medium-term channel evolution is to study landscapes that have undergone significant disturbance and have had their biogeomorphic templates reset to a known condition - in effect, creating a flume in nature. This study adopts a diagnostic state-and-transition framework to narrate and document baseline hypotheses for the potential evolutionary trajectories Clark Fork River, near Milltown, Montana. Following dam removal and remediation, a 5-km stretch of the Clark Fork River and its adjoining floodplain were reconstructed. Since flow was introduced to the newly constructed channel in December 2010, complex evolutionary trajectories have been observed on the Clark Fork's mainstem, its secondary channels, and floodplain. Focusing particularly on the river's secondary channels, this paper develops a typology of channel states that have been observed and demonstrates that multiple adjustment trajectories have materialized, sometimes within the same channel. A diagnostic state-and-transition framework offers a parsimonious strategy to quantitatively or qualitatively anticipate the influence of water, sediment, and ecological fluxes on channel evolution at the basin, reach, or segment scale. It provides environmental agencies with a robust method to devise spatially explicit scenario-based management plans for rivers in a variety of geomorphic settings.

  20. Rad51-mediated replication fork reversal is a global response to genotoxic treatments in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Zellweger, Ralph; Dalcher, Damian; Mutreja, Karun; Berti, Matteo; Schmid, Jonas A.; Herrador, Raquel; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork reversal protects forks from breakage after poisoning of Topoisomerase 1. We here investigated fork progression and chromosomal breakage in human cells in response to a panel of sublethal genotoxic treatments, using other topoisomerase poisons, DNA synthesis inhibitors, interstrand cross-linking inducers, and base-damaging agents. We used electron microscopy to visualize fork architecture under these conditions and analyzed the association of specific molecular features with checkpoint activation. Our data identify replication fork uncoupling and reversal as global responses to genotoxic treatments. Both events are frequent even after mild treatments that do not affect fork integrity, nor activate checkpoints. Fork reversal was found to be dependent on the central homologous recombination factor RAD51, which is consistently present at replication forks independently of their breakage, and to be antagonized by poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase/RECQ1-regulated restart. Our work establishes remodeling of uncoupled forks as a pivotal RAD51-regulated response to genotoxic stress in human cells and as a promising target to potentiate cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25733714

  1. The fork and the kinase: a DNA replication tale from a CHK1 perspective.

    PubMed

    González Besteiro, Marina A; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork progression is being continuously hampered by exogenously introduced and naturally occurring DNA lesions and other physical obstacles. Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is activated at replication forks that encounter damaged DNA. Subsequently, Chk1 inhibits the initiation of new replication factories and stimulates the firing of dormant origins (those in the vicinity of stalled forks). Chk1 also avoids fork collapse into DSBs (double strand breaks) and promotes fork elongation. At the molecular level, the current model considers stalled forks as the site of Chk1 activation and the nucleoplasm as the location where Chk1 phosphorylates target proteins. This model certainly serves to explain how Chk1 modulates origin firing, but how Chk1 controls the fate of stalled forks is less clear. Interestingly, recent reports demonstrating that Chk1 phosphorylates chromatin-bound proteins and even holds kinase-independent functions might shed light on how Chk1 contributes to the elongation of damaged DNA. Indeed, such findings have unveiled a puzzling connection between Chk1 and DNA lesion bypass, which might be central to promoting fork elongation and checkpoint attenuation. In summary, Chk1 is a multifaceted and versatile signaling factor that acts at ongoing forks and replication origins to determine the extent and quality of the cellular response to replication stress.

  2. Baseline channel morphology and bank erosion inventory of South Fork Campbell Creek at Campbell Tract, Anchorage, Alaska, 1999 and 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curran, Janet H.

    2001-01-01

    South Fork Campbell Creek drains largely undeveloped land in Anchorage, Alaska, but supports heavy use near the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Campbell Tract facility for recreation and environmental education. To help assess the impacts of human activities in the basin on biological communities, particularly aquatic and terrestrial biota, morphological changes to the channel bed and banks were monitored for 2 years. Erosion conditions and rates of change were measured and 11 transects were surveyed in three reaches of Campbell Creek near the BLM Campbell Creek Science Center in 1999. Repeat measurements at these 33 transects in 2000 documented noticeable differences between horizontal or vertical channel position at eight transects. Repeat measurements of 51 erosion pins at the survey transects provided details of bank erosion between the 2 years. Annual erosion rates at the erosion pins ranged from 0.81 foot per year of erosion to 0.16 foot per year of deposition.

  3. EXAMINATION OF HABITAT USE AND DISPERSAL OF EXOTIC BULLFROGS AND THEIR POTENTIAL IMPACT ON NATIVE AMPHIBIAN COMMUNITIES IN THE WILLAMETTE VALLEY, OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) are exotic in the west and have been implicated in the decline of western pond turtles and native ranids. Habitat alterations that favor bullfrogs have enhanced populations, particularly in agricultural areas such as the Willamette Valley. I will pres...

  4. USING INTERNAL RADIO TRANSMITTERS TO DETERMINE THE BEHAVIORAL RESPONSE OF BULLFROGS, RANA CATESBEIANA, TO SEASONAL POND DRYING IN THE WILLAMETTE VALLEY, OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    We implanted radio tags in adult bullfrogs from three ponds located in a Willamette Valley game reserve to determine their behavior and habitat use as the ponds dried during late summer. We used radio telemetry and a Global Position System (GPS) to locate and record the position ...

  5. Seasonal and elevational variation of δ18O and δ2H in the Willamette River basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate change is expected to dramatically alter the timing and quantity of water within the nation’s river systems. These changes are driven by variation in the form, location and amount of precipitation that will affect the temporal and spatial distribution of river source wat...

  6. Quality of bottom material and elutriates in the lower Willamette River, Portland Harbor, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuhrer, Gregory J.

    1989-01-01

    In October 1983 the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, collected bottom-material and water samples from Portland Harbor, Oregon to determine concentrations of trace metals and organic compounds in elutriate-test filtrate and bottom material. Of the trace metals examined in bottom material, concentrations of cadmium slightly exceed those of local rocks, whereas lead and zinc exceedance is substantially larger. Of the organochlorine compounds examined in bottom material chlordane, DDD, DDE, DDT, dieldrin, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) were detected and quantified in at least 30% of the samples tested. A large DDT concentration (2,700 microgram/kilogram) near Doane Lake outlet is indicative of recent contamination. Polychlorinated biphenyls are ubiquitous in bottom sediments; median concentrations are nearly 65 micrograms/kilogram and as large as 550 microgram/kilogram. PCB loading to the Columbia River from Willamette River suspended sediment has been estimated to be 72 kilograms/year, nearly five times the PCB dredge load of 15 kilogram/year. The acid and base-neutral extractable di-n-butyl phthalate and bis (2-ethylhexyl)phthalate occur in sediments of Terminal No. 2 in concentrations as large as 1,965 and 2,200 micrograms/kilogram, respectively. Of the trace metals examined in both standard and oxic elutriate-test filtrate, only copper concentration in an oxic elutriate-test filtrate (19 micrograms/L) exceeded the water quality criteria (5.7 micrograms/L). (USGS)

  7. North Fork John Day Dredge Tailings Restoration Project Final Report 1997-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, John A.

    2002-12-01

    The USDA Forest Service (USFS) and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) worked together to rehabilitate 2.1 miles of Clear Creek floodplain, a tributary of the North Fork John Day River Basin. Dredge tailing were deposited from mining operations on Clear Creek's floodplain from the 1930's to the 1950's. These tailing confined the stream channel and degraded the floodplain. The work was completed by moving dredge tailing piles adjacent to the Clear Creek channel, using track-mounted excavators and dump trucks. A caterpillar tractor was used to contour the material placed outside the immediate floodplain, blending it into the hillside. The restored floodplain was very near channel bankfull level following excavation and contoured to accept future flood flows. Monitoring was initiated through pre and post-project photo points and cross-section measurements. Work was completed in two efforts. In 1997 and 1998 floodplain restoration was adjacent to the reconstruction of Road 13 from the junction with Road 10 from Clear Creek River Mile 1.9 to 3.1 for a distance of 1.2 miles. In 1999 the Environmental Assessment for Lower Clear Creek--Granite Creek Floodplain Restoration Project was completed for work proposed on Clear Creek from the mouth up to River mile 1.9 and the Granite Creek floodplain from River miles 5.9 to 7.7. Restoration proposed in the 1999 Environmental Assessment is the subject of this report.

  8. Oxbow Conservation Area; Middle Fork John Day River, Annual Report 2003-2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, Brian

    2004-02-01

    In early 2001, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, through their John Day Basin Office, concluded the acquisition of the Oxbow Ranch, now know as the Oxbow Conservation Area (OCA). Under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Tribes are required to provided BPA an 'annual written report generally describing the real property interests in the Project, HEP analyses undertaken or in progress, and management activities undertaken or in progress'. The project during 2003 was crippled due to the aftermath of the BPA budget crisis. Some objectives were not completed during the first half of this contract because of limited funds in the 2003 fiscal year. The success of this property purchase can be seen on a daily basis. Water rights were utilized only in the early, high water season and only from diversion points with functional fish screens. After July 1, all of the OCA water rights were put instream. Riparian fences on the river, Ruby and Granite Boulder creeks continued to promote important vegetation to provide shade and bank stabilization. Hundreds of willow, dogwood, Douglas-fir, and cottonwood were planted along the Middle Fork John Day River. Livestock grazing on the property was carefully managed to ensure the protection of fish and wildlife habitat, while promoting meadow vigor and producing revenue for property taxes. Monitoring of property populations, resources, and management activities continued in 2003 to build a database for future management of this and other properties in the region.

  9. Physical habitat classification and instream flow modeling to determine habitat availability during low-flow periods, North Fork Shenandoah River, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krstolic, Jennifer L.; Hayes, Donald C.; Ruhl, Peter M.

    2006-01-01

    Increasing development and increasing water withdrawals for public, industrial, and agricultural water supply threaten to reduce streamflows in the Shenandoah River basin in Virginia. Water managers need more information to balance human water-supply needs with the daily streamflows necessary for maintaining the aquatic ecosystems. To meet the need for comprehensive information on hydrology, water supply, and instream-flow requirements of the Shenandoah River basin, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Northern Shenandoah Valley Regional Commission conducted a cooperative investigation of habitat availability during low-flow periods on the North Fork Shenandoah River. Historic streamflow data and empirical data on physical habitat, river hydraulics, fish community structure, and recreation were used to develop a physical habitat simulation model. Hydraulic measurements were made during low, medium, and high flows in six reaches at a total of 36 transects that included riffles, runs, and pools, and that had a variety of substrates and cover types. Habitat suitability criteria for fish were developed from detailed fish-community sampling and microhabitat observations. Fish were grouped into four guilds of species and life stages with similar habitat requirements. Simulated habitat was considered in the context of seasonal flow regimes to show the availability of flows that sustain suitable habitat during months when precipitation and streamflow are scarce. The North Fork Shenandoah River basin was divided into three management sections for analysis purposes: the upper section, middle section, and lower section. The months of July, August, and September were chosen to represent a low-flow period in the basin with low mean monthly flows, low precipitation, high temperatures, and high water withdrawals. Exceedance flows calculated from the combined data from these three months describe low-flow periods on the North Fork Shenandoah River. Long-term records from three

  10. MIDDLE FORK OF THE JUDITH RIVER WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Mitchell W.; Hamilton, Michael

    1984-01-01

    The Middle Fork of the Judith River Wilderness Study Area in Montana has several prospects containing local small inferred resources and several exposed mineral occurrences bearing silver, lead, copper, and gold along its north and west edges with no identified resource potential. Geologic, geophysical, and geochemical studies, conducted to appraise the mineral resources of the study area, identified no other anomalous concentrations of metallic elements. A gem-quality sapphire resource, present near the east boundary, cannot be identified within the study area. The area holds little promise for the occurrence of other mineral or energy resources.

  11. 78 FR 48292 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Grand Forks AFB, ND

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class D Airspace; Grand Forks AFB, ND AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action amends Class D... Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend Class D airspace for Grand Forks AFB,...

  12. HLTF's Ancient HIRAN Domain Binds 3' DNA Ends to Drive Replication Fork Reversal.

    PubMed

    Kile, Andrew C; Chavez, Diana A; Bacal, Julien; Eldirany, Sherif; Korzhnev, Dmitry M; Bezsonova, Irina; Eichman, Brandt F; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2015-06-18

    Stalled replication forks are a critical problem for the cell because they can lead to complex genome rearrangements that underlie cell death and disease. Processes such as DNA damage tolerance and replication fork reversal protect stalled forks from these events. A central mediator of these DNA damage responses in humans is the Rad5-related DNA translocase, HLTF. Here, we present biochemical and structural evidence that the HIRAN domain, an ancient and conserved domain found in HLTF and other DNA processing proteins, is a modified oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide (OB) fold that binds to 3' ssDNA ends. We demonstrate that the HIRAN domain promotes HLTF-dependent fork reversal in vitro through its interaction with 3' ssDNA ends found at forks. Finally, we show that HLTF restrains replication fork progression in cells in a HIRAN-dependent manner. These findings establish a mechanism of HLTF-mediated fork reversal and provide insight into the requirement for distinct fork remodeling activities in the cell.

  13. 76 FR 35909 - Temporary Concession Contract for Big South Fork National Recreation Area, TN/KY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ... National Recreation Area, TN/KY. SUMMARY: Pursuant to 36 CFR 51.24, public notice is hereby given that the...] Temporary Concession Contract for Big South Fork National Recreation Area, TN/KY AGENCY: National Park... visitor services within Big South Fork National Recreation Area, Tennessee and Kentucky, for a term not...

  14. 33 CFR 208.26 - Altus Dam and Reservoir, North Fork Red River, Okla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Fork Red River, Okla. 208.26 Section 208.26 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS..., North Fork Red River, Okla. The Bureau of Reclamation, or its designated agent, shall operate the Altus... of runoff from the area above the dam exceeds the volume of water necessary to raise the...

  15. 33 CFR 208.26 - Altus Dam and Reservoir, North Fork Red River, Okla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Fork Red River, Okla. 208.26 Section 208.26 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS..., North Fork Red River, Okla. The Bureau of Reclamation, or its designated agent, shall operate the Altus... of runoff from the area above the dam exceeds the volume of water necessary to raise the...

  16. First report of anther smut caused by Microbotryum violaceum on forked catchfly in Turkey

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forked catchfly (Silene dichotoma Ehrh.), family Caryophyllaceae, is a common and native plant in rangelands and pastures in Turkey. It is also an introduced plant that is widely distributed in North America. In May, 2007 about 20 forked catchfly plants on the campus of Ondokuz Mayis University, i...

  17. Origin & Evolution of the Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, 1970-90

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the early 1960s William E Cornatzer, MD, PhD, suggested the need for increased USDA research concerning human nutrition, and creation of the Grand Forks Human Nutrition Laboratory (Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center). He shared ideas with Senator Milton R. Young of North Dakota, who requ...

  18. Active Control of Repetitive Structural Transitions between Replication Forks and Holliday Junctions by Werner Syndrome Helicase

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soochul; Lee, Jinwoo; Yoo, Sangwoon; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Ahn, Byungchan; Hohng, Sungchul

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The reactivation of stalled DNA replication via fork regression invokes Holliday junction formation, branch migration, and the recovery of the replication fork after DNA repair or error-free DNA synthesis. The coordination mechanism for these DNA structural transitions by molecular motors, however, remains unclear. Here we perform single-molecule fluorescence experiments with Werner syndrome protein (WRN) and model replication forks. The Holliday junction is readily formed once the lagging arm is unwound, and migrated unidirectionally with 3.2 ± 0.03 bases/s velocity. The recovery of the replication fork was controlled by branch migration reversal of WRN, resulting in repetitive fork regression. The Holliday junction formation, branch migration, and migration direction reversal are all ATP dependent, revealing that WRN uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to actively coordinate the structural transitions of DNA. PMID:27427477

  19. 77 FR 64125 - Notice of Proposed Withdrawal Extension and Notification of a Public Meeting for the East Fork...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ... for the East Fork Elk Winter Range; WY AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice... States mining laws, to protect the East Fork Elk Winter Range and elk natural feeding grounds in Fremont... mineral estate from location or entry under the United States mining laws, to protect the East Fork...

  20. 59 FR- Prohibited Acts in West Little and North Fork Owyhee National Wild and Scenic River Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-12-15

    ... INTERIOR [OR-030-03-1220-04: GS-043] Prohibited Acts in West Little and North Fork Owyhee National Wild and... and restrictions within the boundaries of the West Little and North Fork Owyhee Rivers as established in the Main, West Little and North Fork Owyhee National Wild and Scenic Rivers Management...

  1. CtIP mediates replication fork recovery in a FANCD2-regulated manner.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Jung Eun; Lee, Eu Han; Hendrickson, Eric A; Sobeck, Alexandra

    2014-07-15

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a chromosome instability syndrome characterized by increased cancer predisposition. Within the FA pathway, an upstream FA core complex mediates monoubiquitination and recruitment of the central FANCD2 protein to sites of stalled replication forks. Once recruited, FANCD2 fulfills a dual role towards replication fork recovery: (i) it cooperates with BRCA2 and RAD51 to protect forks from nucleolytic degradation and (ii) it recruits the BLM helicase to promote replication fork restart while suppressing new origin firing. Intriguingly, FANCD2 and its interaction partners are also involved in homologous recombination (HR) repair of DNA double-strand breaks, hinting that FANCD2 utilizes HR proteins to mediate replication fork recovery. One such candidate is CtIP (CtBP-interacting protein), a key HR repair factor that functions in complex with BRCA1 and MRE11, but has not been investigated as putative player in the replication stress response. Here, we identify CtIP as a novel interaction partner of FANCD2. CtIP binds and stabilizes FANCD2 in a DNA damage- and FA core complex-independent manner, suggesting that FANCD2 monoubiquitination is dispensable for its interaction with CtIP. Following cellular treatment with a replication inhibitor, aphidicolin, FANCD2 recruits CtIP to transiently stalled, as well as collapsed, replication forks on chromatin. At stalled forks, CtIP cooperates with FANCD2 to promote fork restart and the suppression of new origin firing. Both functions are dependent on BRCA1 that controls the step-wise recruitment of MRE11, FANCD2 and finally CtIP to stalled replication forks, followed by their concerted actions to promote fork recovery.

  2. Quartz tuning fork as a probe of surface oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoshchenko, I.; Savin, A.; Haataja, M.; Kaikkonen, J.-P.; Hakonen, P. J.

    2017-02-01

    Quartz tuning forks are high-quality mechanical oscillators widely used in low temperature physics as viscometers, thermometers, and pressure sensors. We demonstrate that a fork placed in liquid helium near the surface of solid helium is very sensitive to the oscillations of the solid-liquid interface. We developed a double-resonance read-out technique, which allowed us to detect oscillations of the surface with an accuracy of 1 Å in 10 s. Using this technique, we have investigated crystallization waves in 4He down to 10 mK. In contrast to previous studies of crystallization waves, our measurement scheme has very low dissipation, on the order of 20 pW, which allows us to carry out experiments even at sub-mK temperatures. We propose to use this scheme in the search for crystallization waves in 3He, which exist only at temperatures well below 0.5 mK. The suggested technique can also be used for accurate displacement detection in a large variety of systems.

  3. Forked grating coupler optical vortex beam interface for silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadovich, Christopher T.; Kosciolek, Derek J.; Jemison, William D.; Crouse, David T.

    2016-09-01

    The forked grating coupler (FGC) is a novel low-profile device compatible with silicon photonics that is capable of sensitive detection or efficient radiation of Optical Vortex (OV) light beams conveying orbital optical angular momentum (OAM). The FGC device combines the idea of a Bragg coupler with the forked hologram to create an integrated optics device that can selectively and efficiently couple selected optical vortex modes at near-normal incidence into planar confined dielectric waveguide modes of a photonic IC. FGCs retain many of the advantages of Bragg couplers, including convenience of placement and fabrication, reasonable bandwidth, small size, and CMOS process compatibility. In this work, prototype designs of FGC structures for 1550 nm wavelength have been developed for implementation on silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate. Fully vectorial three-dimensional (3D) electromagnetic simulation has allowed performance to be optimized over a range of structural parameters. Results have been evaluated against optical performance metrics including overall efficiency, mode match efficiency, and crosstalk between OV modes. Candidate FGC devices have been fabricated on SOI with e-beam lithography and tested optically. Tolerance to etch depth error has been evaluated.

  4. Replication Fork Stability Confers Chemoresistance in BRCA-deficient Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Arnab Ray; Callen, Elsa; Ding, Xia; Gogola, Ewa; Duarte, Alexandra A.; Lee, Ji-Eun; Wong, Nancy; Lafarga, Vanessa; Calvo, Jennifer A.; Panzarino, Nicholas J.; John, Sam; Day, Amanda; Crespo, Anna Vidal; Shen, Binghui; Starnes, Linda M.; de Ruiter, Julian R.; Daniel, Jeremy A.; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A.; Cortez, David; Cantor, Sharon B.; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Ge, Kai; Jonkers, Jos; Rottenberg, Sven; Sharan, Shyam K.; Nussenzweig, André

    2016-01-01

    Brca1- and Brca2-deficient cells have reduced capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination (HR) and consequently are hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents, including cisplatin and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Here we show that loss of the MLL3/4 complex protein, PTIP, protects Brca1/2-deficient cells from DNA damage and rescues the lethality of Brca2-deficient embryonic stem cells. However, PTIP deficiency does not restore HR activity at DSBs. Instead, its absence inhibits the recruitment of the MRE11 nuclease to stalled replication forks, which in turn protects nascent DNA strands from extensive degradation. More generally, acquisition of PARPi and cisplatin resistance is associated with replication fork (RF) protection in Brca2-deficient tumor cells that do not develop Brca2 reversion mutations. Disruption of multiple proteins, including PARP1 and CHD4, leads to the same end point of RF protection, highlighting the complexities by which tumor cells evade chemotherapeutic interventions and acquire drug resistance. PMID:27443740

  5. Surface-water quality of coal-mine lands in Raccoon Creek Basin, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, K.S.

    1985-01-01

    The Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Reclamation, plans to reclaim abandoned surface mines in the Raccoon Creek watershed in southern Ohio. Historic water-quality data collected between 1975 and 1983 were complied and analyzed in terms of eight selected mine-drainage characteristics to develop a data base for individual subbasin reclamation projects. Areas of mine drainage affecting Raccoon Creek basin, the study Sandy Run basin, the Hewett Fork basin, and the Little raccoon Creek basin. Surface-water-quality samples were collected from a 41-site network from November 1 through November 3, 1983, Results of the sampling reaffirmed that the major sources of mine drainage to Raccoon Creek are in the Little Raccoon Creek basin, and the Hewett Fork basin. However, water quality at the mouth of Sandy Run indicated that it is not a source of mine drainage to Raccoon Creek. Buffer Run, Goose Run, an unnamed tributary to Little Raccoon Creek, Mulga Run, and Sugar Run were the main sources of mine drainage sampled in the Little Raccoon Creek basin. All sites sampled in the East Branch Raccoon Creek basin were affected by mine drainage. This information was used to prepare a work plan for additional data collection before, during, and after reclamation. The data will be used to define the effectiveness of reclamation effects in the basin.

  6. Linking hyporheic flow and nitrogen cycling near the Willamette River - A large river in Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, S.R.; Duff, J.H.; Triska, F.J.; Laenen, A.; Gates, E.B.; Bencala, K.E.; Wentz, D.A.; Silva, S.R.

    2001-01-01

    Several approaches were used to characterize ground water/surface water interactions near the Willamette River - A large (ninth order) river in Oregon, USA. A series of potentiometric surface maps demonstrated the presence of highly dynamic hydraulic gradients between rivers and the adjacent aquifer. Hyporheic zone gradients extended on the order of hundreds of meters. River gains and losses at the river stretch scale (tens of kilometers) were consistent with fluxes implied by the potentiometric surface maps, and apparently reflect regional ground water/surface water interactions. Gains and losses of up to 5-10% of streamflow were observed at this scale. On the river reach scale (1-2 km), gains and losses on the order of 5% of streamflow were interpreted as representing primarily local hyporheic exchange. Isotopic and chemical data collected from shallow hyporheic zone wells demonstrated interaction between regional ground water and river water. The origin of sampled hyporheic zone water ranged from a mixture dominated by regional ground water to water containing 100% river water. The common assumption that ground and river water mix primarily in the river channel is not applicable in this system. Isotopic and chemical data also indicated that significant (nearly complete) vegetative nitrate uptake and/or nitrate reduction occurred in water from 4 of 12 hyporheic zone sites. In these cases, it was primarily nitrate transported to the hyporheic zone in regional ground water that was removed from solution. Isotopes of water and nitrate indicated that hyporheic zone water sampled at two sites was composed of water originating as river water and demonstrated that significant vegetative nitrate uptake and nitrate reduction occurred along these hyporheic zone flowpaths. Thus, the hyporheic zone may, in some instances, serve to remove nitrate from river water. Additional investigations with chemical tools and microbial enzyme assays were conducted at one hyporheic site. A

  7. Ground water in the Corvallis-Albany area, central Willamette Valley, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frank, Frank J.

    1974-01-01

    The Corvallis-Albany area is part of the alluvial plain that lies between the Cascade and Coast Ranges in the central Willamette Valley in northwestern Oregon. As used in this report, the Corvallis-Albany area consists of approximately 210 square miles and includes a part of the lower foothills of the Coast and Cascade Ranges. Volcanic and marine sedimentary units exposed in the foothills range in age from Eocene to Oligocene or Miocene. The volcanic rocks are primarily pillow lavas and basalt flows, which yield only small quantities of water generally adequate for domestic and stock use. Marine-deposited sandstone, siltstone, and shale of the older sedimentary units are fine grained, poorly permeable, and generally yield small volumes of water to wells. In the valley plain the older units are overlain by Pleistocene and Holocene alluvial deposits. The alluvial deposits (sand and gravel) of the valley plain contain the most productive aquifers in the area and are considered to be the only units feasible for large-scale development of ground-water supplies. Aquifers in the area are recharged principally by direct infiltration of precipitation. Most of the precipitation (about 38 in. per yr avg) occurs during late autumn and winter. Ground water is discharged naturally from the area by seepage and spring flow to streams, by evapotranspiration, by underflow, and artificially through wells. During 1971 the seasonal decline of water levels from winter to late summer averaged about 10 feet for the alluvial deposits. The seasonal change of storage in that year was estimated to be about 130,000 acre-feet. Of this volume, about 14,000 acre-feet was pumped from wells; the rest (about 116,000 acre-feet) was discharged through seeps and springs by evapotranspiration. The difference between pumpage and natural discharge indicates that a great quantity of additional water is available for development. The storage capacity of the alluvial aquifers in the area is estimated to be

  8. Ground water in the Harrisburg-Halsey area, southern Willamette Valley, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frank, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    The Harrisburg-Halsey area lies between the Cascade and Coast Ranges in the southern Willamette Valley in northwestern Oregon. The area consists of approximately 350 square miles (910 km2) and includes a part of the lower foothills of the Coast and Cascade Ranges. Volcanic and marine sedimentary units exposed in the foothills range in age from Eocene to Miocene. The volcanic rocks are primarily of dacitic and andesitic composition and yield only small quantities of water that are generally adequate only for domestic and stock use. The alluvial deposits (sand and gravel) of the valley plain contain the more productive aquifers in the area and yield most of the water that is pumped from wells in the area. Aquifers in the area are recharged principally by direct infiltration of precipitation. Most of the precipitation, which averages about 40 in. (1,020 mm) per year occurs during late autumn and winter. During 1974 the seasonal decline of water levels from winter to late summer averaged about 10 ft 13 m) for the alluvial deposits. The seasonal change of storage for 1974 was estimated to be about 170,000 acre-ft (210 hm3). Of this volume, about 14,300 acre-ft (17.6 hm3) was pumped from wells; the rest, about 156,000 acre-ft (190 hm3), was discharged naturally by seepage and spring flow to streams and by evapotranspiration. The difference between pumpage and natural discharge indicates that a large quantity of additional water is available for development. The storage capacity of the alluvial aquifers is estimated to be about 800,000 acre-ft (1,000 hm3) in the zone 10-100 ft (3-30 m} below land surface. Ground water from the alluvial deposits is chemically suitable for irrigation and other uses, as is most of the water obtained from perched-water bodies in the older sedimentary and volcanic rocks. However, the mineral concentration of water from the older sedimentary rocks, particularly from deeper producing zones beneath the valley plain, is greater than that of water

  9. Flood of June 4-5, 2002, in the Maquoketa River Basin, east-central Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eash, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Severe flooding occurred on June 4-5, 2002, in the Maquoketa River Basin in Delaware, Dubuque, Jackson, and Jones Counties, following thunderstorm activity over east-central Iowa. The rain gage at Cascade, Iowa, recorded a 14-hour rainfall of 6.0 inches at noon on June 4. Radar indications estimated as much as 8 to 10 inches of rain fell in the upper-middle part of the Maquoketa River Basin. Peak discharges on the Maquoketa River at Monticello of 47,500 cubic feet per second (recurrence interval estimated to be greater than 500 years as computed using flood-estimation equations developed by the U.S. Geological Survey), and at the Maquoketa River near Maquoketa streamflow-gaging station of 47,900 cubic feet per second (recurrence interval about 50 years), were determined for the flood. The peak discharge of the 2002 flood is nearly equal that of the 1944 flood (48,000 cubic feet per second), the largest flood on record in the Maquoketa River Basin. The 2002 flood is the largest known flood in the North Fork Maquoketa River Basin. A peak discharge of 22,600 cubic feet per second (recurrence interval about 110 years) was determined for the flood at the North Fork Maquoketa River near Fulton gaging station. Information about the basin and flood history, the 2002 thunderstorms and associated flooding, and a profile of high-water marks are presented for selected reaches along the Maquoketa and North Fork Maquoketa Rivers.

  10. Amphibian occurrence and aquatic invaders in a changing landscape: Implications for wetland mitigation in the Willamette Valley, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearl, Christopher A.; Adams, Michael J.; Leuthold, N.; Bury, R. Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Despite concern about the conservation status of amphibians in western North America, few field studies have documented occurrence patterns of amphibians relative to potential stressors. We surveyed wetland fauna in Oregon's Willamette Valley and used an information theoretic approach (AIC) to rank the associations between native amphibian breeding occurrence and wetland characteristics, non-native aquatic predators, and landscape characteristics in a mixed urban-agricultural landscape. Best predictors varied among the five native amphibians and were generally consistent with life history differences. Pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla) and long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum) occurrence was best predicted by the absence of non-native fish. Northern red-legged frog (Rana a. aurora) and northwestern salamander (Ambystoma gracile) were most strongly related to wetland vegetative characteristics. The occurrence of rough-skinned newts (Taricha granulosa), a migratory species that makes extensive use of terrestrial habitats, was best predicted by greater forest cover within 1 km. The absence of non-native fish was a strong predictor of occurrence for four of the five native species. In contrast, amphibians were not strongly related to native fish presence. We found little evidence supporting negative effects of the presence of breeding populations of bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) on any native species. Only the two Ambystoma salamanders were associated with wetland permanence. Northwestern salamanders (which usually have a multi-year larval stage) were associated with permanent waters, while long-toed salamanders were associated with temporary wetlands. Although all the species make some use of upland habitats, only one (rough-skinned newt) was strongly associated with surrounding landscape conditions. Instead, our analysis suggests that within-wetland characteristics best predict amphibian occurrence in this region. We recommend that wetland preservation and

  11. Effects of Transposable Elements on the Expression of the Forked Gene of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, K. K.; Chien, A. J.; Corces, V. G.

    1993-01-01

    The products of the forked gene are involved in the formation and/or maintenance of a temporary fibrillar structure within the developing bristle rudiment of Drosophila melanogaster. Mutations in the forked locus alter this structure and result in aberrant development of macrochaetae, microchaetae and trichomes. The locus has been characterized at the molecular level by walking, mutant characterization and transcript analysis. Expression of the six forked transcripts is temporally restricted to midlate pupal development. At this time, RNAs of 6.4, 5.6, 5.4, 2.5, 1.9 and 1.1 kilobases (kb) are detected by Northern analysis. The coding region of these RNAs has been found to be within a 21-kb stretch of genomic DNA. The amino terminus of the proteins encoded by the 5.4- and 5.6-kb forked transcripts contain tandem copies of ankyrin-like repeats that may play an important role in the function of forked-encoded products. The profile of forked RNA expression is altered in seven spontaneous mutations characterized during this study. Three forked mutations induced by the insertion of the gypsy retrotransposon contain a copy of this element inserted into an intron of the gene. In these mutants, the 5.6-, 5.4- and 2.5-kb forked mRNAs are truncated via recognition of the polyadenylation site in the 5' long terminal repeat of the gypsy retrotransposon. These results help explain the role of the forked gene in fly development and further our understanding of the role of transposable elements in mutagenesis. PMID:8244011

  12. Pesticides and pesticide degradates in the East Fork Little Miami River and William H. Harsha Lake, southwestern Ohio, 1999-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Funk, Jason M.; Reutter, David C.; Rowe, Gary L.

    2003-01-01

    In 1999 and 2000, the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program conducted a national pilot study of pesticides and degradates in drinking-water supplies, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). William H. Harsha Lake, which provides drinking water for several thousand people in southwestern Ohio, was selected as one of the drinking-water supplies for this study. East Fork Little Miami River is the main source of water to Harsha Lake and drains a predominantly agricultural basin. Samples were collected from the East Fork Little Miami River upstream from Harsha Lake, at the drinking-water intake at Harsha Lake, at the outfall just below Harsha Lake, and from treated water at the Bob McEwen Treatment Plant. These samples were analyzed using standardized methods developed for the NAWQA Program. In all, 42 pesticide compounds (24 herbicides, 4 insecticides, 1 fungicide, and 13 degradates) were detected at least once in samples collected during this study. No compound in the treated water samples exceeded any drinking-water standard, although atrazine concentrations in untreated water exceeded the USEPA Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for drinking water (3 ?g/L) on four occasions. At least eight compounds were detected with greater than 60 percent frequency at each sampling location. Herbicides, such as atrazine, alachlor, acetochlor, cyanazine, metolachlor, and simazine, were detected most frequently. Rainfall affected the pesticide concentrations in surface waters of the East Fork Little Miami River Basin. Drought conditions from May through November 1999 led to lower streamflow and pesticide concentrations throughout southwestern Ohio. More normal climate conditions during 2000 resulted in higher streamflows and seasonally higher concentrations in the East Fork Little Miami River and Harsha Lake for some pesticides Comparison of pesticide concentrations in untreated lake water and treated drinking water

  13. Magnitude and timing of annual maximum floods: Trends and large-scale climatic associations for the Blacksmith Fork River, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Shaleen; Lall, Upmanu

    2000-12-01

    The magnitude and timing of spring snowmelt floods reflects seasonal snow accumulation and spring temperature patterns. Consequently, interannual variations in regions such as the intermountain West, with snowmelt annual maximum floods, may be related to low-frequency variations in winter/spring large-scale climate variability. Changes in the seasonality of basin precipitation and temperature consequent to slow changes in the baseline climate state (e.g., owing to natural climate variations and/or potential global warming trends) may have significant impacts on such floods. A case study of the Blacksmith Fork River in northern Utah that explores such a hypothesis is presented here. Trends and associations in the magnitude and timing of annual maximum floods are documented, their impact on time-varying estimates of the 100 year flood is assessed, and relationships with known large-scale, quasi-oscillatory patterns of climate variability are explored. Evidence for structured low-frequency variation in flood timing and magnitude and its relation to winter/spring precipitation and temperature and to tropical (El Niño- Southern Oscillation) and extratropical (Pacific Decadal Oscillation) Pacific climate precursors is presented. Mechanisms for these ocean-atmosphere teleconnections to basin precipitation, temperature, and flood potential are discussed.

  14. Mercury Contributions from Flint Creek and other Tributaries to the Upper Clark Fork River in Northwestern Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langner, H.; Young, M.; Staats, M. F.

    2013-12-01

    Flint Creek and the Clark Fork River basin.

  15. Linking habitat quality with trophic performance of steelhead along forest gradients in the South Fork Trinity River Watershed, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Sarah G.; Duda, Jeffrey J.; Emlen, John M.; Hodgson, Garth R.; Beauchamp, David A.

    2009-01-01

    We examined invertebrate prey, fish diet, and energy assimilation in relation to habitat variation for steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss (anadromous rainbow trout) and rainbow trout in nine low-order tributaries of the South Fork Trinity River, northern California. These streams spanned a range of environmental conditions, which allowed us to use bioenergetics modeling to determine the relative effects of forest cover, stream temperature, season, and fish age on food consumption and growth efficiency. Evidence of seasonal shifts in reliance on aquatic versus terrestrial food sources was detected among forest cover categories and fish ages, although these categories were not robust indicators of O. mykiss condition and growth efficiency. Consumption estimates were generally less than 20% of maximum consumption, and fish lost weight in some streams during summer low-flow conditions when stream temperatures exceeded 15°C. Current 100-year climate change projections for California threaten to exacerbate negative growth patterns and may undermine the productivity of this steelhead population, which is currently not listed as endangered or threatened. To demonstrate the potential effect of global warming on fish growth, we ran three climate change scenarios in two representative streams. Simulated temperature increases ranging from 1.4°C to 5.5°C during the summer and from 1.5°C to 2.9C during the winter amplified the weight loss; estimated average growth for age-1 fish was 0.4–4.5 times lower than normal (low to high estimated temperature increase) in the warm stream and 0.05–0.8 times lower in the cool stream. We conclude that feeding rate and temperature during the summer currently limit the growth and productivity of steelhead and rainbow trout in low-order streams in the South Fork Trinity River basin and predict that climate change will have detrimental effects on steelhead growth as well as on macroinvertebrate communities and stream ecosystems in general.

  16. Finite Element Analysis of Electrically Excited Quartz Tuning Fork Devices

    PubMed Central

    Oria, Roger; Otero, Jorge; González, Laura; Botaya, Luis; Carmona, Manuel; Puig-Vidal, Manel

    2013-01-01

    Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF)-based Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) is an important field of research. A suitable model for the QTF is important to obtain quantitative measurements with these devices. Analytical models have the limitation of being based on the double cantilever configuration. In this paper, we present an electromechanical finite element model of the QTF electrically excited with two free prongs. The model goes beyond the state-of-the-art of numerical simulations currently found in the literature for this QTF configuration. We present the first numerical analysis of both the electrical and mechanical behavior of QTF devices. Experimental measurements obtained with 10 units of the same model of QTF validate the finite element model with a good agreement. PMID:23722828

  17. Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy exploiting tuning fork overtone modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaolo, A.; Patimisco, P.; Dong, L.; Geras, A.; Scamarcio, G.; Starecki, T.; Tittel, F. K.; Spagnolo, V.

    2015-12-01

    We report on a quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensor (QEPAS) based on a custom-made quartz tuning fork (QTF) to operate in both the fundamental and the first overtone vibrational mode resonances. The QTF fundamental mode resonance falls at ˜3 kHz and the first overtone at ˜18 kHz. Electrical tests showed that the first overtone provides a higher quality factor and increased piezoelectric current peak values, with respect to the fundamental flexural mode. To evaluate the QTF acousto-electric energy conversion efficiency, we operated the QEPAS in the near-IR and selected water vapor as the target gas. The first overtone resonance provides a QEPAS signal-to-noise ratio ˜5 times greater with respect to that measured for the fundamental mode. These results open the way to employing QTF overtone vibrational modes for QEPAS based trace gas sensing.

  18. Geochemical map of the North Fork John Day River Roadless Area, Grant County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, James G.

    1986-01-01

    The North Fork John Day River Roadless Area comprised 21,210 acres in the Umatilla and Wallowa-Whitman National Forests, Grant County, Oregon, about 30 miles northwest of Baker, Oregon. The irregularly shaped area extends for about 1 mile on both sides of a 25-mile segment of the North Fork John Day River from Big Creek on the west to North Fork John Day Campground on the east. Most of the roadless area is in the northern half of the Desolation Butte 15-minute quadrangle. The eastern end of the area is in parts of the Granite and Trout Meadows 7½-minute quadrangles.

  19. Foundation Report on Stonewall Jackson Dam, West Fork River Basin, Weston, West Virginia. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-21

    ci last ucvate 05/01𔄂t I E C 1e I d raPe T,.oe Width Ce; 1 CFJ haracter 25 - LOCHTION Character 25 " STATION Character Iv 4 r",PELEV Numeric 7 H E r...I __ 9 7 9.b parting, shalv :am. gr., v/scat. cisc. no d’s. otm fHe EMG PORN 18 36 EPVOI DITIONS API O3LOLIETE STONECAL 1AKO DAE 220 MAR7 STNWLLJCSO

  20. Temporal Dynamics and Spatial Variation of Azoxystrobin and Propiconazole Resistance in Zymoseptoria tritici: A Hierarchical Survey of Commercial Winter Wheat Fields in the Willamette Valley, Oregon.

    PubMed

    Hagerty, Christina H; Anderson, Nicole P; Mundt, Christopher C

    2017-03-01

    Fungicide resistance can cause disease control failure in agricultural systems, and is particularly concerning with Zymoseptoria tritici, the causal agent of Septoria tritici blotch of wheat. In North America, the first quinone outside inhibitor resistance in Z. tritici was discovered in the Willamette Valley of Oregon in 2012, which prompted this hierarchical survey of commercial winter wheat fields to monitor azoxystrobin- and propiconazole-resistant Z. tritici. Surveys were conducted in June 2014, January 2015, May 2015, and January 2016. The survey was organized in a hierarchical scheme: regions within the Willamette Valley, fields within the region, transects within the field, and samples within the transect. Overall, frequency of azoxystrobin-resistant isolates increased from 63 to 93% from June 2014 to January 2016. Resistance to azoxystrobin increased over time even within fields receiving no strobilurin applications. Propiconazole sensitivity varied over the course of the study but, overall, did not significantly change. Sensitivity to both fungicides showed no regional aggregation within the Willamette Valley. Greater than 80% of spatial variation in fungicide sensitivity was at the smallest hierarchical scale (within the transect) of the survey for both fungicides, and the resistance phenotypes were randomly distributed within sampled fields. Results suggest a need for a better understanding of the dynamics of fungicide resistance at the landscape level.

  1. An environmental streamflow assessment for the Santiam River basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risley, John C.; Wallick, J. Rose; Mangano, Joseph F.; Jones, Krista L.

    2012-01-01

    The Santiam River is a tributary of the Willamette River in northwestern Oregon and drains an area of 1,810 square miles. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) operates four dams in the basin, which are used primarily for flood control, hydropower production, recreation, and water-quality improvement. The Detroit and Big Cliff Dams were constructed in 1953 on the North Santiam River. The Green Peter and Foster Dams were completed in 1967 on the South Santiam River. The impacts of the structures have included a decrease in the frequency and magnitude of floods and an increase in low flows. For three North Santiam River reaches, the median of annual 1-day maximum streamflows decreased 42–50 percent because of regulated streamflow conditions. Likewise, for three reaches in the South Santiam River basin, the median of annual 1-day maximum streamflows decreased 39–52 percent because of regulation. In contrast to their effect on high flows, the dams increased low flows. The median of annual 7-day minimum flows in six of the seven study reaches increased under regulated streamflow conditions between 60 and 334 percent. On a seasonal basis, median monthly streamflows decreased from February to May and increased from September to January in all the reaches. However, the magnitude of these impacts usually decreased farther downstream from dams because of cumulative inflow from unregulated tributaries and groundwater entering the North, South, and main-stem Santiam Rivers below the dams. A Wilcox rank-sum test of monthly precipitation data from Salem, Oregon, and Waterloo, Oregon, found no significant difference between the pre-and post-dam periods, which suggests that the construction and operation of the dams since the 1950s and 1960s are a primary cause of alterations to the Santiam River basin streamflow regime. In addition to the streamflow analysis, this report provides a geomorphic characterization of the Santiam River basin and the associated conceptual

  2. Cancer therapy and replication stress: forks on the road to perdition.

    PubMed

    Kotsantis, Panagiotis; Jones, Rebecca M; Higgs, Martin R; Petermann, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Deregulated DNA replication occurs in cancer where it contributes to genomic instability. This process is a target of cytotoxic therapies. Chemotherapies exploit high DNA replication in cancer cells by modifying the DNA template or by inhibiting vital enzymatic activities that lead to slowing or stalling replication fork progression. Stalled replication forks can be converted into toxic DNA double-strand breaks resulting in cell death, i.e., replication stress. While likely crucial for many cancer treatments, replication stress is poorly understood due to its complexity. While we still know relatively little about the role of replication stress in cancer therapy, technical advances in recent years have shed new light on the effect that cancer therapeutics have on replication forks and the molecular mechanisms that lead from obstructed fork progression to cell death. This chapter will give an overview of our current understanding of replication stress in the context of cancer therapy.

  3. The DNA helicase Pfh1 promotes fork merging at replication termination sites to ensure genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Steinacher, Roland; Osman, Fekret; Dalgaard, Jacob Z.; Lorenz, Alexander; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    Bidirectionally moving DNA replication forks merge at termination sites composed of accidental or programmed DNA–protein barriers. If merging fails, then regions of unreplicated DNA can result in the breakage of DNA during mitosis, which in turn can give rise to genome instability. Despite its importance, little is known about the mechanisms that promote the final stages of fork merging in eukaryotes. Here we show that the Pif1 family DNA helicase Pfh1 plays a dual role in promoting replication fork termination. First, it facilitates replication past DNA–protein barriers, and second, it promotes the merging of replication forks. A failure of these processes in Pfh1-deficient cells results in aberrant chromosome segregation and heightened genome instability. PMID:22426535

  4. Water resources of the upper Big Wood River basin, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frenzel, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Mean annual water yields, estimated using a water-budget method, for the upper Big Wood River basin above Glendale Road and for Trail Creek, Warm Springs Creek, and East Fork Big Wood River, Idaho were 410,000, 50,000, 60,000 and 50,000 acre-ft, respectively. Yields also were estimated for 1986 and 1987 water years when data were collected for comparison with long-term average values. During 1986, yields estimated for upper Big Wood River basin, Trail Creek, Warm Springs Creek, and East Fork Big Wood were 580,000, 61,000, 83,000 and 60,000 acre-ft, respectively. During 1987, yields estimated for the respective basins were 230,000, 26,000, 32,000 and 28,000 acre-ft. Availability of surface and groundwater varies seasonally; the greatest quantity is available during spring snowmelt, and the least is available during mid-winter to late winter. Nutrient concentrations in sampled ground and surface water were near or below detection levels throughout the basin, which indicates that water quality has not been impaired by increased development. Fluoride concentrations were elevated in Warm Springs Creek, probably due to inflow of thermal water.

  5. Probing Liquid ^4He with Quartz Tuning Forks Using a Novel Multifrequency Lock-in Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, D. I.; Haley, R. P.; Kafanov, S.; Noble, M. T.; Pickett, G. R.; Tsepelin, V.; Vonka, J.; Wilcox, T.

    2016-09-01

    We report on a novel technique to measure quartz tuning forks, and possibly other vibrating objects, in a quantum fluid using a multifrequency lock-in amplifier. The multifrequency technique allows to measure the resonance curve of a vibrating object much faster than a conventional single frequency lock-in amplifier technique. Forks with resonance frequencies of 12 kHz and 16 kHz were excited and measured electro-mechanically either at a single frequency or at up to 40 different frequencies simultaneously around the same mechanical mode. The response of each fork was identical for both methods and validates the use of the multifrequency lock-in technique to probe properties of liquid helium at low fork velocities. Using both methods we measured the resonance frequency and drag of two 25-μ m-wide quartz tuning forks immersed in liquid ^4He in the temperature range from 4.2 K to 1.5 K at saturated vapour pressure. The damping and shift of resonance frequency experienced by both tuning forks at low velocities are well described by hydrodynamic contributions in the framework of the two-fluid model. The sensitivity of the 25-μ m-wide tuning forks is larger compared to similar 75-μ m-wide forks and in combination with the faster multifrequency lock-in technique could be used to improve thermometry in liquid ^4He. The multifrequency technique could also be used for studies of the onset of non-linear phenomena such as quantum turbulence and cavitation in superfluids.

  6. Environmental Assessment: Demolish CASS Switch Stations Buildings 644, 645, 646 at Grand Forks Air Force Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    Winters are long and severe with almost continuous snow cover. The spring and fall seasons are generally short transition periods. The average...during the late fall, winter, and spring , and from the southeast during the summer. Grand Forks County is included in the ND Air Quality Control...approximately 10 miles northeast of Grand Forks AFB, the mean discharge of the Turtle River is 50.3 feet cubed per second (ft3/s). Peak flows result from

  7. Environmental Assessment: Construct Airfield Lighting Vault and Demolish Building 531 at Grand Forks Air Force Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    frequent thunderstorms. Winters are long and severe with almost continuous snow cover. The spring and fall seasons are generally short transition periods...from the northwest during the late fall, winter, and spring , and from the southeast during the summer. Grand Forks County is included in the ND Air...Manvel, ND, approximately 10 miles northeast of Grand Forks AFB, the mean discharge of the Turtle River is 50.3 feet cubed per second (ft3/s). Peak

  8. Environmental Assessment: Demolish Buildings 212, 218, 819, 820 at Grand Forks Air Force Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-31

    Winters are long and severe with almost continuous snow cover. The spring and fall seasons are generally short transition periods. The average annual...during the late fall, winter, and spring , and from the southeast during the summer. Grand Forks County is included in the ND Air Quality Control...approximately 10 miles northeast of Grand Forks AFB, the mean discharge of the Turtle River is 50.3 feet cubed per second (ft3/s). Peak flows result from

  9. The Sound Field around a Tuning Fork and the Role of a Resonance Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogacz, Bogdan F.; Pedziwiatr, Antoni T.

    2015-01-01

    Atypical two-tine tuning fork is barely audible when held vibrating at an arm's length. It is enough, however, to touch its base to a table or, better, to a resonance box and the emitted sound becomes much louder. An inquiring student may pose questions: (1) Why is a bare tuning fork such a weak emitter of sound? (2) What is the role of the…

  10. DNA2 drives processing and restart of reversed replication forks in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Thangavel, Saravanabhavan; Berti, Matteo; Levikova, Maryna; Pinto, Cosimo; Gomathinayagam, Shivasankari; Vujanovic, Marko; Zellweger, Ralph; Moore, Hayley; Lee, Eu Han; Hendrickson, Eric A.; Cejka, Petr; Stewart, Sheila; Lopes, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Accurate processing of stalled or damaged DNA replication forks is paramount to genomic integrity and recent work points to replication fork reversal and restart as a central mechanism to ensuring high-fidelity DNA replication. Here, we identify a novel DNA2- and WRN-dependent mechanism of reversed replication fork processing and restart after prolonged genotoxic stress. The human DNA2 nuclease and WRN ATPase activities functionally interact to degrade reversed replication forks with a 5′-to-3′ polarity and promote replication restart, thus preventing aberrant processing of unresolved replication intermediates. Unexpectedly, EXO1, MRE11, and CtIP are not involved in the same mechanism of reversed fork processing, whereas human RECQ1 limits DNA2 activity by preventing extensive nascent strand degradation. RAD51 depletion antagonizes this mechanism, presumably by preventing reversed fork formation. These studies define a new mechanism for maintaining genome integrity tightly controlled by specific nucleolytic activities and central homologous recombination factors. PMID:25733713

  11. Multiple mechanisms contribute to double-strand break repair at rereplication forks in Drosophila follicle cells

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jessica L.; Beagan, Kelly; Orr-Weaver, Terry L.; McVey, Mitch

    2016-01-01

    Rereplication generates double-strand breaks (DSBs) at sites of fork collisions and causes genomic damage, including repeat instability and chromosomal aberrations. However, the primary mechanism used to repair rereplication DSBs varies across different experimental systems. In Drosophila follicle cells, developmentally regulated rereplication is used to amplify six genomic regions, two of which contain genes encoding eggshell proteins. We have exploited this system to test the roles of several DSB repair pathways during rereplication, using fork progression as a readout for DSB repair efficiency. Here we show that a null mutation in the microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ) component, polymerase θ/mutagen-sensitive 308 (mus308), exhibits a sporadic thin eggshell phenotype and reduced chorion gene expression. Unlike other thin eggshell mutants, mus308 displays normal origin firing but reduced fork progression at two regions of rereplication. We also find that MMEJ compensates for loss of nonhomologous end joining to repair rereplication DSBs in a site-specific manner. Conversely, we show that fork progression is enhanced in the absence of both Drosophila Rad51 homologs, spindle-A and spindle-B, revealing homologous recombination is active and actually impairs fork movement during follicle cell rereplication. These results demonstrate that several DSB repair pathways are used during rereplication in the follicle cells and their contribution to productive fork progression is influenced by genomic position and repair pathway competition. Furthermore, our findings illustrate that specific rereplication DSB repair pathways can have major effects on cellular physiology, dependent upon genomic context. PMID:27849606

  12. Note: Enhanced energy harvesting from low-frequency magnetic fields utilizing magneto-mechano-electric composite tuning-fork.

    PubMed

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei; Yang, Chao; Wang, Decai; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Jiajia

    2015-06-01

    A magnetic-field energy harvester using a low-frequency magneto-mechano-electric (MME) composite tuning-fork is proposed. This MME composite tuning-fork consists of a copper tuning fork with piezoelectric Pb(Zr(1-x)Ti(x))O3 (PZT) plates bonded near its fixed end and with NdFeB magnets attached at its free ends. Due to the resonance coupling between fork prongs, the MME composite tuning-fork owns strong vibration and high Q value. Experimental results show that the proposed magnetic-field energy harvester using the MME composite tuning-fork exhibits approximately 4 times larger maximum output voltage and 7.2 times higher maximum power than the conventional magnetic-field energy harvester using the MME composite cantilever.

  13. Mcm10: A Dynamic Scaffold at Eukaryotic Replication Forks

    PubMed Central

    Baxley, Ryan M.; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin

    2017-01-01

    To complete the duplication of large genomes efficiently, mechanisms have evolved that coordinate DNA unwinding with DNA synthesis and provide quality control measures prior to cell division. Minichromosome maintenance protein 10 (Mcm10) is a conserved component of the eukaryotic replisome that contributes to this process in multiple ways. Mcm10 promotes the initiation of DNA replication through direct interactions with the cell division cycle 45 (Cdc45)-minichromosome maintenance complex proteins 2-7 (Mcm2-7)-go-ichi-ni-san GINS complex proteins, as well as single- and double-stranded DNA. After origin firing, Mcm10 controls replication fork stability to support elongation, primarily facilitating Okazaki fragment synthesis through recruitment of DNA polymerase-α and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Based on its multivalent properties, Mcm10 serves as an essential scaffold to promote DNA replication and guard against replication stress. Under pathological conditions, Mcm10 is often dysregulated. Genetic amplification and/or overexpression of MCM10 are common in cancer, and can serve as a strong prognostic marker of poor survival. These findings are compatible with a heightened requirement for Mcm10 in transformed cells to overcome limitations for DNA replication dictated by altered cell cycle control. In this review, we highlight advances in our understanding of when, where and how Mcm10 functions within the replisome to protect against barriers that cause incomplete replication. PMID:28218679

  14. Bioavailability of mercury in East Fork Poplar Creek soils

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, M.O.; Turner, R.R.

    1995-05-01

    The initial risk assessment for the East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) floodplain in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, a superfund site heavily contaminated with mercury, was based upon a reference dose for mercuric chloride, a soluble mercury compound not expected to be present in the floodplain, which is frequently saturated with water. Previous investigations had suggested mercury in the EFPC floodplain was less soluble and therefore less bioavailable than mercuric chloride, possibly making the results of the risk assessment unduly conservative. A bioavailability study, designed to measure the amount of mercury available for absorption in a child`s digestive tract, the most critical risk endpoint and pathway, was performed on twenty soils from the EFPC floodplain. The average percentage of mercury released during the study for the twenty soils was 5.3%, compared to 100% of the compound mercuric chloride subjected to the same conditions. Alteration of the procedure to test additional conditions possible during soil digestion did not appreciably alter the results. Therefore, use of a reference dose for mercuric chloride in the EFPC risk assessment without inclusion of a corresponding bioavailability factor may be unduly conservative.

  15. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR EAST FORK POPLAR CREEK

    SciTech Connect

    ADAMS, S.M.; ASHWOOD, T.L.; BEATY, T.W.; BRANDT, C.C.

    1997-10-24

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y- 12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Lear et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities.

  16. Biological monitoring program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.; Ashwood, T.L.; Beaty, T.W.; Brandt, C.C.; Christensen, S.W.; Cicerone, D.S.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.; Hill, W.R.; Kszos, L.S.

    1997-04-18

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Lear et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities.

  17. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR EAST FORK POPLAR CREEK

    SciTech Connect

    ADAMS, S.M.; BEATY, T.W.; BRANDT, C.C.; CHRISTENSEN, S.W.; CICERONE, D.S.

    1998-09-09

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Lear et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities.

  18. CDK1 phosphorylates WRN at collapsed replication forks

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Valentina; Rinalducci, Sara; Sanchez, Massimo; Grillini, Francesca; Sommers, Joshua A.; Brosh, Robert M.; Zolla, Lello; Franchitto, Annapaola; Pichierri, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of end-processing is critical for accurate repair and to switch between homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). End resection is a two-stage process but very little is known about regulation of the long-range resection, especially in humans. WRN participates in one of the two alternative long-range resection pathways mediated by DNA2 or EXO1. Here we demonstrate that phosphorylation of WRN by CDK1 is essential to perform DNA2-dependent end resection at replication-related DSBs, promoting HR, replication recovery and chromosome stability. Mechanistically, S1133 phosphorylation of WRN is dispensable for relocalization in foci but is involved in the interaction with the MRE11 complex. Loss of WRN phosphorylation negatively affects MRE11 foci formation and acts in a dominant negative manner to prevent long-range resection altogether, thereby licensing NHEJ at collapsed forks. Collectively, we unveil a CDK1-dependent regulation of the WRN-DNA2-mediated resection and identify an undescribed function of WRN as a DSB repair pathway switch. PMID:27634057

  19. Characterization of selenium in the lower Gunnison River basin, Colorado, 1988-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, David L.; Leib, Kenneth J.

    2002-01-01

    Selenium concentrations in certain water bodies in the lower Gunnison River Basin, including the lower Gunnison River and lower Uncompahgre River, have exceeded the Colorado water-quality standard of 5 micrograms per liter for selenium. A task force was formed in 1998 that consists of various government agencies, private irrigation companies, and local residents to address the selenium concerns in the lower Gunnison River Basin. The task force, working with the National Irrigation Water Quality Program, needed more detailed information on selenium loading in the basin to develop viable alternatives for remediating selenium in the lower Gunnison River Basin. In 1999-2000, the U.S. Geological Survey collected selenium data for tributaries of the Gunnison River downstream from the North Fork of the Gunnison and in the North Fork Basin. The largest selenium load in a tributary stream was in the Uncompahgre River, which accounted for about 38 percent of the selenium load in the Gunnison River at Whitewater. The North Fork of the Gunnison River accounted for about 7 percent of the selenium load in the Gunnison River. Two tributaries east of Delta, Sunflower Drain and Bonafide Ditch, consist primarily of irrigation return flows and were other major selenium sources to the Gunnison River. Some tributaries in the lower North Fork Basin had selenium concentrations exceeding 5 micrograms per liter. Except for several streams draining the Uncompahgre Plateau, many tributaries to the Gunnison River downstream from the North Fork had selenium concentrations exceeding 5 micrograms per liter. Except during occasional rain and snowmelt events, selenium loading from nonirrigated desert areas was minimal. Detailed characterization studies were done in 1999-2000 on Cedar Creek and Loutzenhizer Arroyo, which contribute the largest tributary selenium loads to the Uncompahgre River. Selenium concentrations in Cedar Creek downstream from Miguel Road ranged from 12 to 28 micrograms per

  20. Continuous water-quality monitoring and regression analysis to estimate constituent concentrations and loads in the Red River of the North at Fargo and Grand Forks, North Dakota, 2003-12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galloway, Joel M.

    2014-01-01

    The Red River of the North (hereafter referred to as “Red River”) Basin is an important hydrologic region where water is a valuable resource for the region’s economy. Continuous water-quality monitors have been operated by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the North Dakota Department of Health, Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, City of Fargo, City of Moorhead, City of Grand Forks, and City of East Grand Forks at the Red River at Fargo, North Dakota, from 2003 through 2012 and at Grand Forks, N.Dak., from 2007 through 2012. The purpose of the monitoring was to provide a better understanding of the water-quality dynamics of the Red River and provide a way to track changes in water quality. Regression equations were developed that can be used to estimate concentrations and loads for dissolved solids, sulfate, chloride, nitrate plus nitrite, total phosphorus, and suspended sediment using explanatory variables such as streamflow, specific conductance, and turbidity. Specific conductance was determined to be a significant explanatory variable for estimating dissolved solids concentrations at the Red River at Fargo and Grand Forks. The regression equations provided good relations between dissolved solid concentrations and specific conductance for the Red River at Fargo and at Grand Forks, with adjusted coefficients of determination of 0.99 and 0.98, respectively. Specific conductance, log-transformed streamflow, and a seasonal component were statistically significant explanatory variables for estimating sulfate in the Red River at Fargo and Grand Forks. Regression equations provided good relations between sulfate concentrations and the explanatory variables, with adjusted coefficients of determination of 0.94 and 0.89, respectively. For the Red River at Fargo and Grand Forks, specific conductance, streamflow, and a seasonal component were statistically significant explanatory variables for estimating chloride. For the Red River at Grand Forks, a time

  1. INTEGRATED OUTCROP AND SUBSURFACE STUDIES OF THE INTERWELL ENVIRONMENT OF CARBONATE RESERVOIRS: CLEAR FORK (LEONARADIAN AGE) RESERVOIRS, WEST TEXAS AND NEW MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    James W. Jennings, Jr.; F. Jerry Lucia

    2001-10-01

    Petrophysical heterogeneity in the South Wasson Clear Fork (SWCF) reservoir and other shallow-water platform carbonates in the Permian Basin and elsewhere is composed of a large-scale stratigraphically controlled component and a small-scale poorly correlated component. The large-scale variability exists as a flow-unit scale petrophysical layering that is laterally persistent at interwell scales and produces highly stratified reservoir behavior. Capturing the rate-enhancing effect of the small-scale variability requires carefully controlled averaging procedures at four levels of scaleup. Porosity can be easily scaled using arithmetic averaging procedures. Permeability, however, requires carefully controlled power-averaging procedures. Effective permeability is increased at every scaleup level.

  2. Hydrologic data for computation of sediment discharge : Toutle and North Fork Toutle Rivers near Mount St. Helens, Washington, water years 1980-84

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childers, Dallas; Hammond, Stephen E.; Johnson, William P.

    1988-01-01

    Immediately after the devastating May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, a program was initiated by the U.S. Geological Survey to study the streamflow and sediment characteristics of streams impacted by the eruption. Some of the data gathered in that program are presented in this report. Data are presented for two key sites in the Toutle River basin: North Fork Toutle River near Kid Valley, and Toutle River at Tower Road, near Silver Lake. The types of data presented are appropriate for use with sediment transport formulas; however, the data are also intended for use in a wide variety of additional applications. The data presented in this report are unique because they delineate flow conditions possessing great potential fo sediment transport. The data define unusually high suspended-sediment concentration. Data defining hydraulic, peak discharge, suspended-sediment, and bed-material characteristics are presented. (USGS)

  3. National Water-Quality Assessment Program; summary of pesticide data collected on East Fork Double Bayou, near Anahuac, Texas, March to September 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1995-01-01

    The Trinity River Basin study-unit assessment began in October 1991, with 2 years dedicated to planning, analyzing existing information, and designing data-collection networks, surveys, and studies. Then, a 3-year intensive data-collection program was initiated. The assessment followed guidelines provided by the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program National Synthesis team and considered suggestions made by the study unit's liaison committee. One of the issues selected for study concerned the quality of runoff in the coastal prairie. The study includes collecting streamflow, water-quality and watershed data on three streams, each representing watersheds in different parts of the coastal prairie. This fact sheet presents a summary of the pesticide data collected on East Fork Double Bayou from March to September 1994.

  4. Terroir, the Relationship of Geology, Soils, and Climate to Wine: An Example from the Northern Willamette Valley of Oregon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, S. F.

    2012-12-01

    Wines differ from each other based on seven different factors: the type of grape; the bedrock geology and resulting soils; the climate; the soil hydrology; the physiography of the site; the winemaker; and the vineyard management techniques. The first five of these factors make up what the French call terroir, "the taste of the place". Bedrocks weather into soils which then liberate chemical nutrients to the grape vines. Twelve of the sixteen essential elements for wine grapes come from the soil. All around the world the geology and soils make up an important component of the terroir of the wine. Using examples from the Willamette Valley of Oregon, terroir of the region will be discussed because it is strongly influenced by the bedrock geology and soils. The four dominant groups are the volcanic soils, the Jory Soil Series, which developed on the Columbia River Basalts, the Willakenzie Soil Series, developed on uplifted marine sedimentary rocks in the foothills of the Oregon Coast Range, the Laurelwood Soil Series, developed from loess soils developed on basalt bedrock, and Woodburn Soil Series developed in Missoula Flood deposits on the valley bottoms. The wines made from the grapes of these four soils are very different.

  5. Environmental contaminants in great blue herons (Ardea herodias) from the lower Columbia and Willamette Rivers, Oregon and Washington, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C.M.; Anthony, R.G.

    1999-12-01

    Great blue heron (Ardea herodias) eggs and prey items were collected from six colonies in Oregon and Washington, USA, during 1994 to 1995. Contaminant concentrations, reproductive success, and biomagnification factors were determined and effects of residue levels were measured by H4IIE rat hepatoma bioassays. Mean residue concentrations in heron eggs and prey items were generally low. However, elevated concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were detected in eggs and prey from Ross Island on the Willamette River. Biomagnification factors varied among sites. Sites were not significantly different in H4IIE tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TCDD-EQs), although the TCDD-EQ for Karlson Island was 9 to 20 times greater than that of any other site. Large differences existed between toxic equivalents calculated from egg residue concentrations and TCDD-EQs, which indicated nonadditive interactions among the compounds. Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents and nest failure were positively correlated with TCDD concentration. Fledging and reproductive rates were similar to those determined for healthy heron populations, however, indicating that any adverse effects were occurring at the individual level and not at the colony level. Their results support the use of great blue herons as a biomonitor for contamination in aquatic ecosystems. Their relatively low sensitivity to organochlorine contaminants and high trophic position allows contaminant accumulation and biomagnification without immediate adverse effects that are often seen in other, more sensitive species.

  6. Organic compounds in Elm Fork Trinity River water used for public supply near Carrollton, Texas, 2002-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ging, Patricia B.; Delzer, Gregory C.; Hamilton, Pixie A.

    2009-01-01

    Organic compounds studied in this U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessment generally are man-made, including pesticides, solvents, gasoline hydrocarbons, personal-care and domestic-use products, refrigerants, and propellants. A total of 103 of 277 compounds were detected at least once among the 30 samples of source water for a community water system on the Elm Fork Trinity River near Carrollton, Texas, collected approximately monthly during 2002-05. The diversity of compounds detected indicates a variety of different sources and uses (including wastewater discharge, industrial, agricultural, domestic, and others) and different pathways (including overland runoff and groundwater discharge) to drinking-water supplies. Nine compounds were detected year-round in source-water samples, including chloroform, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), and selected herbicide compounds commonly used in the Trinity River Basin and in other urban areas across the United States. About 90 percent of the 42 compounds detected most frequently in source water (in at least 20 percent of the samples) also were detected most frequently in finished water (after treatment but before distribution). Concentrations for all detected compounds in source and finished water generally were less than 0.1 microgram per liter and always less than human-health benchmarks, which are available for about one-half of the detected compounds.

  7. Water-resources data for North Fork Bens Creek, Somerset County, Pennsylvania, August 1983 through September 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witt, Emitt C.

    1991-01-01

    Basin and climatological characteristics, quality-assurance data and results, and water-resources data for North Fork Bens Creek, in Somerset County, Pennsylvania are available from August 1983 through September 1988. The lowest temperature (-30. 0 C) was recorded during January 1985, and the highest temperature (36.7 C) was recorded during July 1988. Snowfall accumulates mostly during January and February and averages about 69 in annually. Solar radiation is most intense from late May to early June. Pan evaporation averages 0.17 in/day during the growing season and 0.02 in/day during the nongrowing season. Sulfur dioxide and sulfate contaminants in the air have declined since 1977; nitrogen dioxide and nitrates have remained constant. Average volume-weighted pH for precipitation in western Pennsylvania is about 4.0. Quality assurance analyses show that chemical data collected from August 1983 through February 1986 were satisfactory. Precision of data quality for March 1986 through September 1988 are marginal to satisfactory. Monthly base flow water-quality data are available from August 1983 through September 1988. Continuous precipitation data are available from October 1983 through September 1988. Precipitation was typically higher than normal for the 1984, 1985, and 1986 water years. Continuous streamflow data are available for water years 1985 and 1988. The maximum recorded discharge of 92 cu ft/sec was observed on March 31, 1985. (USGS)

  8. Long-term water-quality changes in East Fork Poplar Creek, Tennessee: background, trends, and potential biological consequences.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Arthur J; Smith, John G; Loar, James M

    2011-06-01

    We review long-term changes that have occurred in factors affecting water quality in East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC; in East Tennessee) over a nearly 25-year monitoring period. Historically, the stream has received wastewaters and pollutants from a major United States Department of Energy (DOE) facility on the headwaters of the stream. Early in the monitoring program, EFPC was perturbed chemically, especially within its headwaters; evidence of this perturbation extended downstream for many kilometers. The magnitude of this perturbation, and the concentrations of many biologically significant water-quality factors, has lessened substantially through time. The changes in water-quality factors resulted from a large number of operational changes and remedial actions implemented at the DOE facility. Chief among these were consolidation and elimination of many effluents, elimination of an unlined settling/flow equalization basin, reduction in amount of blow-down from cooling tower operations, dechlorination of effluents, and implementation of flow augmentation. Although many water-quality characteristics in upper EFPC have become more similar to those of reference streams, conditions remain far from pristine. Nutrient enrichment may be one of the more challenging problems remaining before further biological improvements occur.

  9. Quartz tuning-fork oscillations in He II and drag coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsenko, I. A.; Zadorozhko, A. A.; Neoneta, A. S.; Chagovets, V. K.; Sheshin, G. A.

    2011-07-01

    The temperature dependencies of drag coefficient for quartz tuning forks of various geometric dimensions, immersed in the He II, were determined experimentally in the temperature range 0.1-3 K. It is identified, that these dependencies are similar, but the values of drag coefficient are different for tuning forks with different geometric dimensions. It is shown, that the obtained specific drag coefficient depends only on the temperature and frequency of vibrations, when the value of drag coefficient is normalized to the surface area of moving tuning-fork prong. The temperature dependencies of normalized drag coefficient for the tuning forks of various dimensions, wire, and microsphere, oscillating in the Не II, are compared. It is shown, that in the ballistic regime of scattering of quasiparticles, these dependencies are identical and have a slope proportional to T4, which is determined by the density of thermal excitations. In the hydrodynamic regime at T > 0.5 K, the behavior of the temperature dependence of specific drag coefficient is affected by the size and frequency of vibrating body. The empirical relation, which allows to describe the behavior of specific drag coefficient for vibrating tuning forks, microsphere, and wire everywhere over the temperature region and at various frequencies, is proposed.

  10. Triplex structures induce DNA double strand breaks via replication fork collapse in NER deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik Tiwari, Meetu; Adaku, Nneoma; Peart, Natoya; Rogers, Faye A.

    2016-01-01

    Structural alterations in DNA can serve as natural impediments to replication fork stability and progression, resulting in DNA damage and genomic instability. Naturally occurring polypurine mirror repeat sequences in the human genome can create endogenous triplex structures evoking a robust DNA damage response. Failures to recognize or adequately process these genomic lesions can result in loss of genomic integrity. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) proteins have been found to play a prominent role in the recognition and repair of triplex structures. We demonstrate using triplex-forming oligonucleotides that chromosomal triplexes perturb DNA replication fork progression, eventually resulting in fork collapse and the induction of double strand breaks (DSBs). We find that cells deficient in the NER damage recognition proteins, XPA and XPC, accumulate more DSBs in response to chromosomal triplex formation than NER-proficient cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that XPC-deficient cells are particularly prone to replication-associated DSBs in the presence of triplexes. In the absence of XPA or XPC, deleterious consequences of triplex-induced genomic instability may be averted by activating apoptosis via dual phosphorylation of the H2AX protein. Our results reveal that damage recognition by XPC and XPA is critical to maintaining replication fork integrity and preventing replication fork collapse in the presence of triplex structures. PMID:27298253

  11. NEK8 regulates DNA damage-induced RAD51 foci formation and replication fork protection

    PubMed Central

    Abeyta, Antonio; Castella, Maria; Jacquemont, Celine; Taniguchi, Toshiyasu

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Proteins essential for homologous recombination play a pivotal role in the repair of DNA double strand breaks, DNA inter-strand crosslinks and replication fork stability. Defects in homologous recombination also play a critical role in the development of cancer and the sensitivity of these cancers to chemotherapy. RAD51, an essential factor for homologous recombination and replication fork protection, accumulates and forms immunocytochemically detectable nuclear foci at sites of DNA damage. To identify kinases that may regulate RAD51 localization to sites of DNA damage, we performed a human kinome siRNA library screen, using DNA damage-induced RAD51 foci formation as readout. We found that NEK8, a NIMA family kinase member, is required for efficient DNA damage-induced RAD51 foci formation. Interestingly, knockout of Nek8 in murine embryonic fibroblasts led to cellular sensitivity to the replication inhibitor, hydroxyurea, and inhibition of the ATR kinase. Furthermore, NEK8 was required for proper replication fork protection following replication stall with hydroxyurea. Loading of RAD51 to chromatin was decreased in NEK8-depleted cells and Nek8-knockout cells. Single-molecule DNA fiber analyses revealed that nascent DNA tracts were degraded in the absence of NEK8 following treatment with hydroxyurea. Consistent with this, Nek8-knockout cells showed increased chromosome breaks following treatment with hydroxyurea. Thus, NEK8 plays a critical role in replication fork stability through its regulation of the DNA repair and replication fork protection protein RAD51. PMID:27892797

  12. South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    BPA proposes to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic Management Plan to compensate for losses of wildlife and wildlife habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam. The Idaho Department of Fish and Game drafted the plan, which was completed in May 1993. This plan recommends land and conservation easement acquisition and wildlife habitat enhancement measures. These measures would be implemented on selected lands along the South Fork of the Snake River between Palisades Dam and the confluence with the Henry`s Fork, and on portions of the Henry`s Fork located in Bonneville, Madison, and Jefferson Counties, Idaho. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment evaluating the proposed project. The EA also incorporates by reference the analyses in the South Fork Snake River Activity/Operations Plan and EA prepared jointly in 1991 by the Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  13. Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S.jr; Hill, W.R.; Kszos, L.A.; McCarthy, J.F.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    1998-10-15

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biologicai Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Lear et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the compiex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC, These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumuiation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macro invertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five sites, although sites maybe excluded and/or others added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the adjacent floodplain, (5) appropriate habitat distribution, and (6

  14. Origin of Meter-Size Granite Basins in the Southern Sierra Nevada, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, James G.; Gorden, Mary A.; Robinson, Joel E.; Moring, Barry C.

    2008-01-01

    Meter-size granite basins are found in a 180-km belt extending south from the South Fork of the Kings River to Lake Isabella on the west slope of the southern Sierra Nevada, California. Their origin has long been debated. A total of 1,033 basins have been inventoried at 221 sites. The basins occur on bedrock granitic outcrops at a median elevation of 1,950 m. Median basin diameter among 30 of the basin sites varies from 89 to 170 cm, median depth is 12 to 63 cm. Eighty percent of the basin sites also contain smaller bedrock mortars (~1-2 liters in capacity) of the type used by Native Americans (American Indians) to grind acorns. Features that suggest a manmade origin for the basins are: restricted size, shape, and elevation range; common association with Indian middens and grinding mortars; a south- and west-facing aspect; presence of differing shapes in distinct localities; and location in a food-rich belt with pleasant summer weather. Volcanic ash (erupted A.D. 1240+-60) in the bottom of several of the basins indicates that they were used shortly before ~760 years ago but not thereafter. Experiments suggest that campfires built on the granite will weaken the bedrock and expedite excavation of the basins. The primary use of the basins was apparently in preparing food, including acorns and pine nuts. The basins are among the largest and most permanent artifacts remaining from the California Indian civilization.

  15. BASINS Publications

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Although BASINS has been in use for the past 10 years, there has been limited modeling guidance on its applications for complex environmental problems, such as modeling impacts of hydro modification on water quantity and quality.

  16. Multiple critical velocities in oscillatory flow of superfluid 4He due to quartz tuning forks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmoranzer, D.; Jackson, M. J.; Tsepelin, V.; Poole, M.; Woods, A. J.; Človečko, M.; Skrbek, L.

    2016-12-01

    We report recent investigations into the transition to turbulence in superfluid 4He, realized experimentally by measuring the drag forces acting on two custom-made quartz tuning forks with fundamental resonances at 6.5 kHz and 55.5 kHz, in the temperature range 10 mK to 2.17 K. In pure superfluid in the zero temperature limit, three distinct critical velocities were observed with both tuning forks. We discuss the significance of all critical velocities and associate the third critical velocity reported here with the development of large vortical structures in the flow, which thus starts to mimic turbulence in classical fluids. The interpretation of our results is directly linked to previous experimental work with oscillators such as tuning forks, grids, and vibrating wires, focusing on the behavior of purely superfluid 4He at very low temperatures.

  17. Replication Fork Protection Factors Controlling R-Loop Bypass and Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Emily Yun-Chia; Stirling, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Replication–transcription conflicts have been a well-studied source of genome instability for many years and have frequently been linked to defects in RNA processing. However, recent characterization of replication fork-associated proteins has revealed that defects in fork protection can directly or indirectly stabilize R-loop structures in the genome and promote transcription–replication conflicts that lead to genome instability. Defects in essential DNA replication-associated activities like topoisomerase, or the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase complex, as well as fork-associated protection factors like the Fanconi anemia pathway, both appear to mitigate transcription–replication conflicts. Here, we will highlight recent advances that support the concept that normal and robust replisome function itself is a key component of mitigating R-loop coupled genome instability. PMID:28098815

  18. FANCD2 regulates BLM complex functions independently of FANCI to promote replication fork recovery.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Indrajit; Sareen, Archana; Raghunandan, Maya; Sobeck, Alexandra

    2013-07-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) and Bloom Syndrome share overlapping phenotypes including spontaneous chromosomal abnormalities and increased cancer predisposition. The FA protein pathway comprises an upstream core complex that mediates recruitment of two central players, FANCD2 and FANCI, to sites of stalled replication forks. Successful fork recovery depends on the Bloom's helicase BLM that participates in a larger protein complex ('BLMcx') containing topoisomerase III alpha, RMI1, RMI2 and replication protein A. We show that FANCD2 is an essential regulator of BLMcx functions: it maintains BLM protein stability and is crucial for complete BLMcx assembly; moreover, it recruits BLMcx to replicating chromatin during normal S-phase and mediates phosphorylation of BLMcx members in response to DNA damage. During replication stress, FANCD2 and BLM cooperate to promote restart of stalled replication forks while suppressing firing of new replication origins. In contrast, FANCI is dispensable for FANCD2-dependent BLMcx regulation, demonstrating functional separation of FANCD2 from FANCI.

  19. Maps showing mines, quarries, prospects, and exposures in the Devils Fork Roadless Area, Scott County, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behum, Paul T.

    1984-01-01

    The Devils Fork Roadless Area is located at the eastern edge of the Appalachian coal region and is within the Cumberland Mountain section of the Appalachian Plateau physiographic province. Most of the area is drained by Devil Fork and its tributaries. Clinch Rock Branch of Straight Creek, Roddy Branch of Valley Creek, and Stinking Creek, all tributary to the Clinch River, drain small fringe tracts. Altitudes range from about 1,550 ft on the lower part of Straight Fork to about 3,490 ft at Cox Place on Little Mountain. Vegetation varies from mixed hardwoods in the uplands to thickets of conifer, rhododendron, and laurel in moist protected areas, as in coves along drainage courses.

  20. Replication Fork Protection Factors Controlling R-Loop Bypass and Suppression.

    PubMed

    Chang, Emily Yun-Chia; Stirling, Peter C

    2017-01-14

    Replication-transcription conflicts have been a well-studied source of genome instability for many years and have frequently been linked to defects in RNA processing. However, recent characterization of replication fork-associated proteins has revealed that defects in fork protection can directly or indirectly stabilize R-loop structures in the genome and promote transcription-replication conflicts that lead to genome instability. Defects in essential DNA replication-associated activities like topoisomerase, or the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase complex, as well as fork-associated protection factors like the Fanconi anemia pathway, both appear to mitigate transcription-replication conflicts. Here, we will highlight recent advances that support the concept that normal and robust replisome function itself is a key component of mitigating R-loop coupled genome instability.

  1. South Fork Clearwater River Habitat Enhancement, Crooked and Red Rivers : Annual Report, 1989.

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, William H.

    1990-01-01

    In 1983, the Nez Perce National Forest and the Bonneville Power Administration entered into an interagency agreement to enhance and improve habitat for two anadromous fish species, spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawyscha) and summer steelhead trout (Onchorhyncus mykiss), in the South Fork Clearwater River tributaries. The South Fork Clearwater River was dammed in 1927 for hydroelectric development. Anadromous fish runs were virtually eliminated until the dam was removed in 1962. To complicate the problem, upstream spawning and rearing habitats were severely impacted by dredge and hydraulic mining, road building, timber harvest, and over-grazing. Fish habitat improvement projects under the above contract are being carried out in two major tributaries to the South Fork Clearwater River. Both the Red River and the Crooked River projects began in 1983 and will be completed in 1990. 12 figures., 1 tab.

  2. Pathological Changes of von Economo Neuron and Fork Neuron in Neuropsychiatric Diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Lu-ning; Arzberger, Thomas; Zhu, Ming-wei

    2016-02-01

    von Economo neuron (VEN) is a bipolar neuron characterized by a large spindle-shaped soma. VEN is generally distributed in the layer V of anterior insular lobe and anterior cingulate cortex. Fork neuron is another featured bipolar neuron. In recent years,many studies have illustrated that VEN and fork neurons are correlated with complicated cognition such as self-consciousness and social emotion. Studies in the development and morpholigies of these two neurons as well as their pathological changes in various neurological and psychiatric disorders have found that the abnormal number and functions of VEN can cause corresponding dysfunctions in social recognition and emotions both during the neuro-developmental stages of childhood and during the nerve degeneration in old age stage. Therefore, more attentions should be paid on the research of VEN and fork neurons in neuropsychiatric diseases.

  3. 76 FR 50171 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Henrys Fork Salinity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ... the Henrys Fork Salinity Control Project Plan, Sweetwater and Uinta Counties, WY; Daggett and Summit... Statement (EIS) for the Henrys Fork Salinity Control Project Plan (SCPP). The NRCS will be the lead agency... Improvements'' alternative assumes a salinity control project will be implemented. Existing financial...

  4. 77 FR 66865 - Record of Decision for the Oil and Gas Management Plan, Big South Fork National River and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... National Park Service Record of Decision for the Oil and Gas Management Plan, Big South Fork National River... (ROD) for the Oil and Gas Management Plan (Plan) for Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area and Obed Wild and Scenic River. On September 5, 2012, the Southeast Regional Director, approved...

  5. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey. 165.552 Section 165.552 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River,...

  6. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey. 165.552 Section 165.552 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River,...

  7. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey. 165.552 Section 165.552 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River,...

  8. HLTF’s Ancient HIRAN Domain Binds 3′-DNA Ends to Drive Replication Fork Reversal

    PubMed Central

    Kile, Andrew C.; Chavez, Diana A.; Bacal, Julien; Eldirany, Sherif; Korzhnev, Dmitry M.; Bezsonova, Irina; Eichman, Brandt F.; Cimprich, Karlene A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Stalled replication forks are a critical problem for the cell because they can lead to complex genome rearrangements that underlie cell death and disease. Processes such as DNA damage tolerance and replication fork reversal protect stalled forks from these events. A central mediator of these DNA damage responses in humans is the Rad5-related DNA translocase, HLTF. Here, we present biochemical and structural evidence that the HIRAN domain, an ancient and conserved domain found in HLTF and other DNA processing proteins, is a modified oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide (OB) fold that binds to 3′-ssDNA ends. We demonstrate that the HIRAN domain promotes HLTF-dependent fork reversal in vitro, through its interaction with 3′-ssDNA ends found at forks. Finally, we show that HLTF restrains replication fork progression in cells in a HIRAN-dependent manner. These findings establish a mechanism of HLTF-mediated fork reversal and provide insight into the requirement for distinct fork remodeling activities in the cell. PMID:26051180

  9. Integrating Salmon Recovery, Clean Water Act Compliance, Restoration, and Climate Change Impacts in the South Fork Nooksack River

    EPA Science Inventory

    "The South Fork Nooksack River (SFNR) is an important tributary to the Nooksack River, Bellingham Bay, and the Salish Sea. The South Fork Nooksack River comprises one of the 22 independent populations of spring Chinook in the Puget Sound Chinook Evolutionarily Significant Un...

  10. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey. 165.552 Section 165.552 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River,...

  11. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey. 165.552 Section 165.552 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River,...

  12. Recombination occurs within minutes of replication blockage by RTS1 producing restarted forks that are prone to collapse

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Michael O; Jalan, Manisha; Morrow, Carl A; Osman, Fekret; Whitby, Matthew C

    2015-01-01

    The completion of genome duplication during the cell cycle is threatened by the presence of replication fork barriers (RFBs). Following collision with a RFB, replication proteins can dissociate from the stalled fork (fork collapse) rendering it incapable of further DNA synthesis unless recombination intervenes to restart replication. We use time-lapse microscopy and genetic assays to show that recombination is initiated within ∼10 min of replication fork blockage at a site-specific barrier in fission yeast, leading to a restarted fork within ∼60 min, which is only prevented/curtailed by the arrival of the opposing replication fork. The restarted fork is susceptible to further collapse causing hyper-recombination downstream of the barrier. Surprisingly, in our system fork restart is unnecessary for maintaining cell viability. Seemingly, the risk of failing to complete replication prior to mitosis is sufficient to warrant the induction of recombination even though it can cause deleterious genetic change. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04539.001 PMID:25806683

  13. Assessment of surface-water quality and water-quality control alternatives, Johnson Creek Basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, T.K.

    1994-01-01

    Johnson Creek flows through a basin of approximately 51 square miles with mixed land uses over a reach of approximately 24 river miles from southeast of Gresham, Oregon, to its confluence with the Willamette River in Milwaukie, Oregon. Land uses within the basin include forested and agricultural lands, suburban residential, urban, and light industrial. Surface runoff and ground-water flow from the basin's areas of various land-use contain concentrations of some nutrients, trace elements, and organic compounds at levels exceeding U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) criteria. Concentrations of dissolved cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and silver, total recoverable chlordane, dieldrin, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) plus metabolites indicate that sources of at least one or more of these constituents exist in virtually every reach of Johnson Creek. Crystal Springs Creek is a major source of nutrients in lower Johnson Creek. Concentrations of dissolved nitrate and orthophosphorus in Johnson Creek are elevated at low flow, and are reduced by dilution when urban runoff flows into the creek during storms. Total-phosphorus concentrations exceed USEPA criteria at several sites in Johnson Creek during low flow, and at all sites during periods of storm runoff. The low-flow concentration of dissolved silver exceeded the USEPA Fresh Water Chronic Toxicity (FWCT) criterion only in Crystal Springs Creek. Concentrations of dissolved cadmium, copper, lead, and mercury exceeded FWCT criteria at selected sites in Johnson creek basin during storm runoff.

  14. Evaluation of persistent hydrophobic organic compounds in the Columbia River Basin using semipermeable-membrane devices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, K.A.; Gale, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    Persistent hydrophobic organic compounds are of concern in the Columbia River because they have been correlated with adverse effects on wildlife. We analysed samples from nine main-stem and six tributary sites throughout the Columbia River Basin (Washington and Oregon) for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, and priority-pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Because these compounds may have important biological consequences at aqueous concentrations well below the detection limits associated with conventional sampling methods, we used semipermeable-membrane devices to sample water and achieved parts-per-quintillion detection limits. All of these compound classes were prevalent within the basin, but concentrations of many analytes were highest in the vicinity of Portland-Vancouver, indicating that the Willamette subbasin-and perhaps the urban area in particular-is an important source of these compounds. Data collected during basin low-flow conditions in 1997 and again during basin high-flow conditions in 1998 indicate that in-stream processes such as dilution by relatively clean inflow, and flow through island hyporheic zones may be important mechanisms for attenuating dissolved concentrations of hydrophobic compounds.

  15. Properties of basin-fill deposits, a 1971–2000 water budget, and surface-water-groundwater interactions in the upper Humboldt River basin, northeastern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plume, Russell W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2013-01-01

    This study was done in cooperation with Elko County, Nevada in response to concerns over growing demand for water within the county and increasing external demands that are occurring statewide. The upper Humboldt River basin encompasses 4,360 square miles in northeastern Nevada and includes the headwaters area of the Humboldt River. Nearly all of the mean annual flow of the Humboldt River originates in this area. Basin-fill deposits function as the principal aquifers in the upper Humboldt River basin. Over much of the basin lowlands, the upper 200 feet of basin fill consists of clay, silt, sand, and gravel deposited in a lake of middle to late Pliocene age. Fine-grained lacustrine sediments compose from 30 to more than 70 percent of the deposits. Mean values of transmissivity are less than 1,000 feet squared per day. Total inflow to the upper Humboldt River basin, about 3,330,000 acre-feet per year, is entirely from annual precipitation. Total outflow from the basin, about 3,330,000 acre-feet per year, occurs as evapotranspiration, streamflow, subsurface flow, and pumpage. The uncertainty of these values of inflow and outflow is estimated to be 25 percent. Baseflow of the Humboldt River is minimal upstream of the Elko Hills and in downstream reaches almost all baseflow comes from tributary inflow of the North Fork and South Fork Humboldt Rivers. However, the baseflow of these two tributaries comes from groundwater discharge to their respective channels in canyons incised in volcanic rocks along the North Fork and in carbonate rocks along the South Fork. Water levels in the shallow water-table aquifer along the Humboldt River flood plain fluctuate with changes in stage of the river. During high rising river stage in spring and early summer, streamflow enters the aquifer as bank storage. As stage begins to decline in early to mid-summer groundwater in bank storage begins discharging back into the river channel and this continues through late summer. In years of below

  16. Geohydrologic appraisal of water resources of the South Fork, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nemickas, Bronius; Koszalka, Edward J.

    1982-01-01

    The ground-water resources of the South Fork of Long Island, N.Y., were investigated from April 1974 to September 1977. The study area encompasses 137 square miles and includes the eastern part of the Town of Southampton and the entire Town of East Hampton. The South Fork consists of a Paleozoic basement complex that is overlain by Cretaceous and Pleistocene sediments. The surficial material is composed of Late Wisconsinan glacial and glaciofluvial deposits in association with beach and marsh deposits of Recent age. Till underlies most of the eastern part of the South Fork. Precipitation is the sole source of fresh ground water on the South Fork. Average annual precipitation recorded at Bridgehampton from 1931-76 is 45 inches; about half this amount reaches the ground-water reservoir. It is estimated that overland runoff amounts to 0.5 inches per year, and evapotranspiration is 23 inches per year. Thus, recharge equals approximately 22 inches per year. Hydraulic conductivity and transmissivity of the Magothy (Cretaceous) and upper glacial (Pleistocene) aquifers on the South Fork were estimated from aquifer tests and specific-capacity data. The average horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the Magothy aquifer is 70 feet per day, and of the upper glacial aquifer 350 feet per day. Transmissivity of the Magothy aquifer on the South Fork ranges from 600 to 24,100 feet squared per day; transmissivity of the upper glacial aquifer ranges from 5,400 feet to 22,700 feet squared per day. No potable water is available from the underlying Lloyd aquifer. The position of the freshwater to saline-water interface is depicted in maps. In the southern part of the area, the freshwater reservoir follows the Ghyben-Herzberg principle, but in the northern part, the depth to interface is less than expected owing to a greater degree of anisotropy of the geologic units. Total public-supply pumpage on the South Fork is estimated to be about 3 Mgal/day, (million gallons per day). Public

  17. Regulating telomere length from the inside out: the replication fork model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length is regulated around an equilibrium set point. Telomeres shorten during replication and are lengthened by telomerase. Disruption of the length equilibrium leads to disease; thus, it is important to understand the mechanisms that regulate length at the molecular level. The prevailing protein-counting model for regulating telomerase access to elongate the telomere does not explain accumulating evidence of a role of DNA replication in telomere length regulation. Here I present an alternative model: the replication fork model that can explain how passage of a replication fork and regulation of origin firing affect telomere length. PMID:27401551

  18. The Sound Field Around a Tuning Fork and the Role of a Resonance Box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogacz, Bogdan F.; Pedziwiatr, Antoni T.

    2015-02-01

    Atypical two-tine tuning fork is barely audible when held vibrating at an arm's length. It is enough, however, to touch its base to a table or, better, to a resonance box and the emitted sound becomes much louder. An inquiring student may pose questions: Why is a bare tuning fork such a weak emitter of sound?What is the role of the resonance box?Where does energy connected with larger intensity of emitted acoustic waves come from?

  19. Endonuclease cleavage of blocked replication forks: An indirect pathway of DNA damage from antitumor drug-topoisomerase complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, George; Kreuzer, Kenneth N.

    2003-04-01

    The cytotoxicity of several important antitumor drugs depends on formation of the covalent topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex. However, cellular processes such as DNA replication are necessary to convert the cleavage complex into a cytotoxic lesion, but the molecular mechanism of this conversion and the precise nature of the cytotoxic lesion are unknown. Using a bacteriophage T4 model system, we have previously shown that antitumor drug-induced cleavage complexes block replication forks in vivo. In this report, we show that these blocked forks can be cleaved by T4 endonuclease VII to create overt DNA breaks. The accumulation of blocked forks increased in endonuclease VII-deficient infections, suggesting that endonuclease cleavage contributes to fork processing in vivo. Furthermore, purified endonuclease VII cleaved the blocked forks in vitro close to the branch points. These results suggest that an indirect pathway of branched-DNA cleavage contributes to the cytotoxicity of antitumor drugs that target DNA topoisomerases.

  20. Fluvial sediment in Salem Fork watershed, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, R.F.

    1972-01-01

    Suspended sediment discharged from the 8.32-square-mile Salem Fork study area in Harrison County, W. Va., averaged 3,500 tons per year during the first 4-year period of investigation and 1,770 tons per year during the second 4-year period. The difference as attributed to increased flow control, effected by the completion of detention structures and other conservation measures, the absence of appreciable sediment-producing construction activities, and a reduction of the amounts of rainfall and runoff during the second 4-year period. Particle-size distribution of the suspended sediment discharged from the watershed remained unchanged during the two 4-year periods. Although sand and some silt were deposited in upstream reservoirs, sands and other sediments were evidently entrained in the flow below the reservoirs. During the 7.75-year period, reservoir 11A had a trap efficiency of 88 percent. The average annual sediment yield of subwatershed 11A was 1.31 tons per acre, or 837 tons per square mile. Outflow from reservoir 11A occurred during 81 percent of the investigation 'period, October 1954 to June 1962, and 78 percent of the sediment discharge from the reservoir occurred during less than 6 percent of the investigation period. A comparison of particle-size distribution of inflow sediment with that of outflow sediment revealed that practically all sands and some silts entering reservoir 11A were deposited in the reservoir. Chemical analyses of inflow water and the particle-size analyses suggested that flocculation of fine sediments occurred in the reservoir. Analysis of the sediment data collected at the outflow of reservoir 9 during 1956-62 revealed that the average annual sediment discharge was 128,000 pounds per year. Limited particle-size data suggested that practically no sand was discharged from reservoir 9, even though the inflow contained sand. Average annual inflow to reservoirs 11A and 9 compared favorably with average annual runoff for the entire watershed