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Sample records for form hemispherical shaped

  1. Free form hemispherical shaped charge

    DOEpatents

    Haselman, L.C. Jr.

    1996-06-04

    A hemispherical shaped charge has been modified such that one side of the hemisphere is spherical and the other is aspherical allowing a wall thickness variation in the liner. A further modification is to use an elongated hemispherical shape. The liner has a thick wall at its pole and a thin wall at the equator with a continually decreasing wall thickness from the pole to the equator. The ratio of the wall thickness from the pole to the equator varies depending on liner material and HE shape. Hemispherical shaped charges have previously been limited to spherical shapes with no variations in wall thicknesses. By redesign of the basic liner thicknesses, the jet properties of coherence, stability, and mass distribution have been significantly improved. 8 figs.

  2. Free form hemispherical shaped charge

    DOEpatents

    Haselman, Jr., Leonard C.

    1996-01-01

    A hemispherical shaped charge has been modified such that one side of the hemisphere is spherical and the other is aspherical allowing a wall thickness variation in the liner. A further modification is to use an elongated hemispherical shape. The liner has a thick wall at its pole and a thin wall at the equator with a continually decreasing wall thickness from the pole to the equator. The ratio of the wall thickness from the pole to the equator varies depending on liner material and HE shape. Hemispherical shaped charges have previously been limited to spherical shapes with no variations in wall thicknesses. By redesign of the basic liner thicknesses, the jet properties of coherence, stability, and mass distribution have been significantly improved.

  3. Particulation in jets from free-form hemispherical shaped charges with copper liners

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, S.C. III; Haselman, L.C. Jr.; Breithaupt, R.D.

    1995-05-01

    Particulation in free-form hemispherical shaped charge jets is considerably different from that in conical shaped charge jets. From the analysis of the particulation data for 23 experiments covering ten free-form hemi designs with copper liners, it is concluded that jets with higher convergence pressures have delayed particulation, sometimes by as much as a factor of two. Breakup is also found to be design dependent, with free-form hemis have delayed breakup compared with cones. Also, in going from the earlier, boat-tail high explosive (HE) designs to later, more efficient hemispherical HE designs, it is found that particulation is delayed in the tail of the jet. These effects indicate the potential for deeper armor penetration based on control of particulation.

  4. Analytical and numerical investigations into hemisphere-shaped electrostatic sensors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jun; Chen, Zhong-Sheng; Hu, Zheng; Yang, Yong-Min; Tang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Electrostatic sensors have been widely used in many applications due to their advantages of low cost and robustness. Their spatial sensitivity and time-frequency characteristics are two important performance parameters. In this paper, an analytical model of the induced charge on a novel hemisphere-shaped electrostatic sensor was presented to investigate its accurate sensing characteristics. Firstly a Poisson model was built for electric fields produced by charged particles. Then the spatial sensitivity and time-frequency response functions were directly derived by the Green function. Finally, numerical calculations were done to validate the theoretical results. The results demonstrate that the hemisphere-shaped sensors have highly 3D-symmetrical spatial sensitivity expressed in terms of elementary function, and the spatial sensitivity is higher and less homogeneous near the hemispherical surface and vice versa. Additionally, the whole monitoring system, consisting of an electrostatic probe and a signal conditioner circuit, acts as a band-pass filter. The time-frequency characteristics depend strongly on the spatial position and velocity of the charged particle, the radius of the probe as well as the equivalent resistance and capacitance of the circuit.

  5. Analytical and Numerical Investigations into Hemisphere-Shaped Electrostatic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jun; Chen, Zhong-Sheng; Hu, Zheng; Yang, Yong-Min; Tang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Electrostatic sensors have been widely used in many applications due to their advantages of low cost and robustness. Their spatial sensitivity and time-frequency characteristics are two important performance parameters. In this paper, an analytical model of the induced charge on a novel hemisphere-shaped electrostatic sensor was presented to investigate its accurate sensing characteristics. Firstly a Poisson model was built for electric fields produced by charged particles. Then the spatial sensitivity and time-frequency response functions were directly derived by the Green function. Finally, numerical calculations were done to validate the theoretical results. The results demonstrate that the hemisphere-shaped sensors have highly 3D-symmetrical spatial sensitivity expressed in terms of elementary function, and the spatial sensitivity is higher and less homogeneous near the hemispherical surface and vice versa. Additionally, the whole monitoring system, consisting of an electrostatic probe and a signal conditioner circuit, acts as a band-pass filter. The time-frequency characteristics depend strongly on the spatial position and velocity of the charged particle, the radius of the probe as well as the equivalent resistance and capacitance of the circuit. PMID:25090419

  6. Flow in the near wake of hemispherical parachute shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jeffrey; Carnasciali, Maria-Isabel; Kandis, Mike

    2012-11-01

    A CFD study was conducted using ANSYS to investigate the pitch-stability of several hemispherical parachute geometries at varying Reynolds numbers. In actuality, the parachute itself is not a rigid body and large variations in the parachute geometry can occur due to the flexibility of the parachute fabric. This factor combined with flow through gaps/open areas provide for a much more complex wake than that of a simple bluff body like a disc or sphere. In some cases, Vortex Shedding or alternating vortices are generated which cause oscillations in the axial (i.e., drag force) and normal (i.e., lift force) forces that lead to pitching/oscillations. This study investigated the flow in the near wake of hemispherical parachute shapes (assumed to be rigid) having various sized gaps/open areas positioned at distinct locations to determine which designs resulted in ``less severe'' Vortex Shedding. The design features (i.e., size and location of the gaps) that provided the smallest variation/fluctuation in the normal forces were identified and compared to actual parachute designs.

  7. The changing shape of Northern Hemisphere summer temperature distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, Karen A.; Rhines, Andrew; Tingley, Martin P.; Huybers, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The occurrence of recent summer temperature extremes in the midlatitudes has raised questions about whether and how the distributions of summer temperature are changing. While it is clear that in most regions the average temperature is increasing, there is less consensus regarding the presence or nature of changes in the shape of the distributions, which can influence the probability of extreme events. Using data from over 4000 weather stations in the Global Historical Climatology Network-Daily database, we quantify the changes in daily maximum and minimum temperature distributions for peak summer in the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes during 1980-2015 using quantile regression. A large majority (87-88%) of the trends across percentiles and stations can be explained by a shift of the distributions with no change in shape. The remaining variability is summarized through projections onto orthogonal basis functions that are closely related to changes in variance, skewness, and kurtosis. North America and Eurasia show significant shifts in the estimated distributions of daily maximum and minimum temperatures. Although no general change in summer variance is found, variance has regionally increased in Eurasia and decreased in most of North America. Changes in shape that project onto the skewness and kurtosis basis functions have a much smaller spatial scale and are generally insignificant.

  8. Hemispheric processing of mental representations during text comprehension: evidence for inhibition of inconsistent shape information.

    PubMed

    Briner, Stephen W; Virtue, Sandra M; Schutzenhofer, Michael C

    2014-08-01

    To successfully understand a text, readers often mentally represent the shape of an object described in a text (e.g., creating a mental image of a sliced tomato when reading about a tomato on a pizza). However, it is currently unclear how the cerebral hemispheres contribute to these mental images during reading. In the current study, participants were presented with sentences consistent with the shape of an object (i.e., the match condition), sentences inconsistent with the shape of an object (i.e., the mismatch condition), or sentences that did not specify the shape of an object (i.e., the neutral condition). Participants read each sentence and then viewed an image of an object that was quickly presented to either the right visual field-left hemisphere (rvf-LH) or the left visual field-right hemisphere (lvf-RH). Results indicate that when the shape of an object was implicitly described in the text (in Experiment 1), response times for images presented to the rvf-LH were longer in the mismatch condition than in the neutral or match conditions. However, no response time differences were evident in the lvf-RH. When the shape of an object was explicitly described in the text (in Experiment 2), response times were longer in the mismatch condition than in the neutral and match conditions in both hemispheres. Thus, hemispheric involvement in mental representation depends on how explicit information is described in a text. Furthermore, these findings suggest that readers inhibit information that does not match an object׳s shape described in a text.

  9. [Delayed development of hemispheric dominance accompanied by a rare form of retarded language development].

    PubMed

    Brunner, M; Wirth, G

    1986-04-01

    A severe and unusual form of retarded speech development in an eight-year old boy is analyzed as "right-hemispheric speech" against the background of neuropsychological theories on the specialisation of the cerebral hemispheres and considered in connection with the development of hemispheric dominance. A plan for therapy and teacher counselling is derived from this analysis. The influence of this retarded speech development on the acquisition of reading and writing is also touched upon.

  10. Shape correction of optical surfaces using plasma chemical vaporization machining with a hemispherical tip electrode.

    PubMed

    Takino, Hideo; Yamamura, Kazuya; Sano, Yasuhisa; Mori, Yuzo

    2012-01-20

    We propose a plasma chemical vaporization machining device with a hemispherical tip electrode for optical fabrication. Radio-frequency plasma is generated close to the electrode under atmospheric conditions, and a workpiece is scanned relative to the stationary electrode under three-axis motion control to remove target areas on a workpiece surface. Experimental results demonstrate that surface removal progresses although process gas is not forcibly supplied to the plasma. The correction of shape errors on conventionally polished spheres is performed. As a result, highly accurate smooth surfaces with the desired rms shape accuracy of 3 nm are successfully obtained, which confirms that the device is effective for the fabrication of optics.

  11. Material cutting, shaping, and forming: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Information is presented concerning cutting, shaping, and forming of materials, and the equipment and techniques required for utilizing these materials. The use of molds, electrical fields, and mechanical devices are related to forming materials. Material cutting methods by devices including borers and slicers are presented along with chemical techniques. Shaping and fabrication techniques are described for tubing, honeycomb panels, and ceramic structures. The characteristics of the materials are described. Patent information is included.

  12. Linear and nonlinear second-order polarizabilities of hemispherical and sector-shaped metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayabalan, J.; Singh, Manoranjan P.; Banerjee, Arup; Rustagi, K. C.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present results of calculations of linear and second-order nonlinear polarizabilities of sector-shaped metallic nanoparticles (hemisphere is a special case) using free electron theory. The dependences of the ground state electron density distribution and polarizabilities on various shape parameters of sector are analyzed. The ground state electron densities near the corners and edges of sector-shaped nanoparticle are very low and do not contribute to the linear and second-order polarizabilities. The second-order polarizability is found to depend strongly on the angle of the sector and is shown to be proportional to the product of an appropriately defined asymmetric volume of the particle and the third power of the electron cloud length.

  13. Cup-shaped superparamagnetic hemispheres for size-selective cell filtration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyonchol; Terazono, Hideyuki; Takei, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new method of size separation of cells exploiting precisely size-controlled hemispherical superparamagnetic microparticles. A three-layered structure of a 2-nm nickel layer inserted between 15-nm silicon dioxide layers was formed on polystyrene cast spheres by vapor deposition. The polystyrene was then removed by burning and the hemispherical superparamagnetic microparticles, "magcups", were obtained. The standard target cells (CCRF-CEM, 12 ± 2 μm) were mixed with a set of different sizes of the fabricated magcups, and we confirmed that the cells were captured in the magcups having cavities larger than 15 μm in diameter, and then gathered by magnetic force. The collected cells were grown in a culture medium without any damage. The results suggest that this method is quick, simple and non-invasive size separation of target cells.

  14. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Visual Word-Form Processing: Progress, Conflict, and Evaluating Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsolek, Chad J.; Deason, Rebecca G.

    2007-01-01

    The ubiquitous left-hemisphere advantage in visual word processing can be accounted for in different ways. Competing theories have been tested recently using cAsE-aLtErNaTiNg words to investigate boundary conditions for the typical effect. We briefly summarize this research and examine the disagreements and commonalities across the theoretical…

  15. A New Closed-Form Information Metric for Shape Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Adrian; Rangarajan, Anand

    2010-01-01

    Shape matching plays a prominent role in the analysis of medical and biological structures. Recently, a unifying framework was introduced for shape matching that uses mixture-models to couple both the shape representation and deformation. Essentially, shape distances were defined as geodesics induced by the Fisher-Rao metric on the manifold of mixture-model represented shapes. A fundamental drawback of the Fisher-Rao metric is that it is NOT available in closed-form for the mixture model. Consequently, shape comparisons are computationally very expensive. Here, we propose a new Riemannian metric based on generalized ϕ- entropy measures. In sharp contrast to the Fisher-Rao metric, our new metric is available in closed-form. Geodesic computations using the new metric are considerably more efficient. Discriminative capabilities of this new metric are studied by pairwise matching of corpus callosum shapes. Comparisons are conducted with the Fisher-Rao metric and the thin-plate spline bending energy. PMID:17354897

  16. Semiconducting wafer form shaping with an electric discharge machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Tung

    1988-09-01

    Gallium can be used as a temporary glue for semiconducting wafer mounting. The good electric contact between the electrode, the gallium layer, and the semiconducting wafer makes the spark cutting and the semiconducting wafer form shaping much easier. After wafer spark cutting, the residual gallium can be easily removed by a cotton swab from the surface of the wafer in warm isopropyl alcohol (IPA). Also, in this report, improved circuitry of the electric discharge machine for easy and economical construction is described. Gallium arsenide wafers have been form shaped by the present method.

  17. Electrohydraulic Forming of Near Net Shape Automotive Panels

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop the electrohydraulic forming (EHF) process as a near net shape automotive panel manufacturing technology that simultaneously reduces the energy embedded in vehicles and the energy consumed while producing automotive structures.

  18. Analysis of the Dynamic Sensitivity of Hemisphere-Shaped Electrostatic Sensors’ Circular Array for Charged Particle Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xin; Chen, Zhong-Sheng; Li, Yue; Hu, Zheng; Yang, Yong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Electrostatic sensor arrays (ESAs) are promising in industrial applications related to charged particle monitoring. Sensitivity is a fundamental and commonly-used sensing characteristic of an ESA. However, the usually used spatial sensitivity, which is called static sensitivity here, is not proper for moving particles or capable of reflecting array signal processing algorithms integrated in an ESA. Besides, reports on ESAs for intermittent particles are scarce yet, especially lacking suitable array signal processing algorithms. To solve the problems, the dynamic sensitivity of ESA is proposed, and a hemisphere-shaped electrostatic sensors’ circular array (HSESCA) along with its application in intermittent particle monitoring are taken as an example. In detail, a sensing model of the HSESCA is built. On this basis, its array signals are analyzed; the dynamic sensitivity is thereupon defined by analyzing the processing of the array signals. Besides, a component extraction-based array signal processing algorithm for intermittent particles is proposed, and the corresponding dynamic sensitivity is analyzed quantitatively. Moreover, simulated and experimental results are discussed, which validate the accuracy of the models and the effectiveness of the relevant approaches. The proposed dynamic sensitivity of ESA, as well as the array signal processing algorithm are expected to provide references in modeling, designing and using ESAs. PMID:27589767

  19. Analysis of the Dynamic Sensitivity of Hemisphere-Shaped Electrostatic Sensors' Circular Array for Charged Particle Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xin; Chen, Zhong-Sheng; Li, Yue; Hu, Zheng; Yang, Yong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Electrostatic sensor arrays (ESAs) are promising in industrial applications related to charged particle monitoring. Sensitivity is a fundamental and commonly-used sensing characteristic of an ESA. However, the usually used spatial sensitivity, which is called static sensitivity here, is not proper for moving particles or capable of reflecting array signal processing algorithms integrated in an ESA. Besides, reports on ESAs for intermittent particles are scarce yet, especially lacking suitable array signal processing algorithms. To solve the problems, the dynamic sensitivity of ESA is proposed, and a hemisphere-shaped electrostatic sensors' circular array (HSESCA) along with its application in intermittent particle monitoring are taken as an example. In detail, a sensing model of the HSESCA is built. On this basis, its array signals are analyzed; the dynamic sensitivity is thereupon defined by analyzing the processing of the array signals. Besides, a component extraction-based array signal processing algorithm for intermittent particles is proposed, and the corresponding dynamic sensitivity is analyzed quantitatively. Moreover, simulated and experimental results are discussed, which validate the accuracy of the models and the effectiveness of the relevant approaches. The proposed dynamic sensitivity of ESA, as well as the array signal processing algorithm are expected to provide references in modeling, designing and using ESAs. PMID:27589767

  20. On The Influence Of The Yield Locus Shape In The Simulation Of Sheet Stretch Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattiasson, Kjell; Sigvant, Mats

    2005-08-01

    In the present paper results from an ongoing project at Volvo Cars and Chalmers University will be presented. The object of this project is to reduce the gap between the research frontier and the industrial practice concerning material modeling. One of the targets of the project is to identify a yield function, which can fulfill the special industrial demands concerning accuracy, easy parameter identification, and computational efficiency. Lately, some new yield functions have been presented, which seem to satisfy these demands. These yield functions belong to a group of non-quadratic yield criteria, sometimes referred to as "the Hosford family". These criteria are characterized by a stress exponent, which has been shown to have a strong coupling to the crystallographic structure of the material. The present paper addresses the issue of how the main parameters controlling the shape of the yield locus are influencing the material flow in sheet forming simulations. Since it is a well established fact that the shape of the yield locus has its major influence in pure stretch forming, i.e. on the right hand side of a FLD, we have chosen stretch forming with a hemispherical punch as a simple demonstration example. The M-K approach will also be used as a means to try to explain some of the observed phenomena.

  1. Process for forming shaped group II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals, and product formed using process

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Peng, Xiaogang; Manna, Liberato

    2001-01-01

    A process for the formation of shaped Group II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals comprises contacting the semiconductor nanocrystal precursors with a liquid media comprising a binary mixture of phosphorus-containing organic surfactants capable of promoting the growth of either spherical semiconductor nanocrystals or rod-like semiconductor nanocrystals, whereby the shape of the semiconductor nanocrystals formed in said binary mixture of surfactants is controlled by adjusting the ratio of the surfactants in the binary mixture.

  2. Process for forming shaped group III-V semiconductor nanocrystals, and product formed using process

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Peng, Xiaogang; Manna, Liberato

    2001-01-01

    A process for the formation of shaped Group III-V semiconductor nanocrystals comprises contacting the semiconductor nanocrystal precursors with a liquid media comprising a binary mixture of phosphorus-containing organic surfactants capable of promoting the growth of either spherical semiconductor nanocrystals or rod-like semiconductor nanocrystals, whereby the shape of the semiconductor nanocrystals formed in said binary mixture of surfactants is controlled by adjusting the ratio of the surfactants in the binary mixture.

  3. How language production shapes language form and comprehension

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Maryellen C.

    2012-01-01

    Language production processes can provide insight into how language comprehension works and language typology—why languages tend to have certain characteristics more often than others. Drawing on work in memory retrieval, motor planning, and serial order in action planning, the Production-Distribution-Comprehension (PDC) account links work in the fields of language production, typology, and comprehension: (1) faced with substantial computational burdens of planning and producing utterances, language producers implicitly follow three biases in utterance planning that promote word order choices that reduce these burdens, thereby improving production fluency. (2) These choices, repeated over many utterances and individuals, shape the distributions of utterance forms in language. The claim that language form stems in large degree from producers' attempts to mitigate utterance planning difficulty is contrasted with alternative accounts in which form is driven by language use more broadly, language acquisition processes, or producers' attempts to create language forms that are easily understood by comprehenders. (3) Language perceivers implicitly learn the statistical regularities in their linguistic input, and they use this prior experience to guide comprehension of subsequent language. In particular, they learn to predict the sequential structure of linguistic signals, based on the statistics of previously-encountered input. Thus, key aspects of comprehension behavior are tied to lexico-syntactic statistics in the language, which in turn derive from utterance planning biases promoting production of comparatively easy utterance forms over more difficult ones. This approach contrasts with classic theories in which comprehension behaviors are attributed to innate design features of the language comprehension system and associated working memory. The PDC instead links basic features of comprehension to a different source: production processes that shape language form

  4. Uniaxial indefinite material formed by helical-shaped wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgado, Tiago A.; Maslovski, Stanislav I.; Silveirinha, Mário G.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate that a racemic array of helical-shaped metallic wires may be regarded as a local uniaxial epsilon-negative (ENG) material even when the metal conductivity is very large (e.g. in the microwave regime) and, as a result, enables strong negative refraction over a wide frequency range. Based on the negative refraction effect, we demonstrate partial focusing of p-polarized electromagnetic radiation using a planar lens formed by such a composite material. The results reported here are supported by full-wave simulations as well as by analytical calculations based on effective medium theory.

  5. Form, shape and function: segmented blood flow in the choriocapillaris

    PubMed Central

    Zouache, M. A.; Eames, I.; Klettner, C. A.; Luthert, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    The development of fluid transport systems was a key event in the evolution of animals and plants. While within vertebrates branched geometries predominate, the choriocapillaris, which is the microvascular bed that is responsible for the maintenance of the outer retina, has evolved a planar topology. Here we examine the flow and mass transfer properties associated with this unusual geometry. We show that as a result of the form of the choriocapillaris, the blood flow is decomposed into a tessellation of functional vascular segments of various shapes delineated by separation surfaces across which there is no flow, and in the vicinity of which the transport of passive substances is diffusion-limited. The shape of each functional segment is determined by the distribution of arterioles and venules and their respective relative flow rates. We also show that, remarkably, the mass exchange with the outer retina is a function of the shape of each functional segment. In addition to introducing a novel framework in which the structure and function of the metabolite delivery system to the outer retina may be investigated in health and disease, the present work provides a general characterisation of the flow and transfers in multipole Hele-Shaw configurations. PMID:27779198

  6. First results from a NIR survey of High Mass Star Forming Regions on the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuernberger, Dieter; Bronfman, Leonardo

    In spite of the lower formation rate and shorter evolutionary time scale of high mass stars (M > 8 M_{\\odot}) in comparison to low mass stars (M < 3 M_{\\odot}) there is no doubt that young OB stars have a more severe impact on their parental environment. On the one hand they are associated both with high energetic winds and massive molecular outflows, on the other hand they emit a large amount of Lyman-Continuum photons, which ionize the circumstellar material resulting in the formation of ultracompact H ii regions (UCHIIs). Here we present first results from a JHK^{'} survey of 42 regions of high mass star formation, showing FIR colour characteristics of UCHIIs (Wood & Churchwell 1989) and strong emission in the CS(2--1) rotational transition (Bronfman etal.\\ 1996). As all regions are mapped at mm wavelengths we are able to study the interplay between the young (deeply embedded) high mass stars and their ambient medium of gas and dust. Furthermore, we investigate the multiplicity of the sources as well as the spatial shape and spectral (NIR) characteristic of the UCHIIs.

  7. Electrohydraulic Forming of Near-Net Shape Automotive Panels

    SciTech Connect

    Golovaschenko, Sergey F.

    2013-09-26

    The objective of this project was to develop the electrohydraulic forming (EHF) process as a near-net shape automotive panel manufacturing technology that simultaneously reduces the energy embedded in vehicles and the energy consumed while producing automotive structures. Pulsed pressure is created via a shockwave generated by the discharge of high voltage capacitors through a pair of electrodes in a liquid-filled chamber. The shockwave in the liquid initiated by the expansion of the plasma channel formed between two electrodes propagates towards the blank and causes the blank to be deformed into a one-sided die cavity. The numerical model of the EHF process was validated experimentally and was successfully applied to the design of the electrode system and to a multi-electrode EHF chamber for full scale validation of the process. The numerical model was able to predict stresses in the dies during pulsed forming and was validated by the experimental study of the die insert failure mode for corner filling operations. The electrohydraulic forming process and its major subsystems, including durable electrodes, an EHF chamber, a water/air management system, a pulse generator and integrated process controls, were validated to be capable to operate in a fully automated, computer controlled mode for forming of a portion of a full-scale sheet metal component in laboratory conditions. Additionally, the novel processes of electrohydraulic trimming and electrohydraulic calibration were demonstrated at a reduced-scale component level. Furthermore, a hybrid process combining conventional stamping with EHF was demonstrated as a laboratory process for a full-scale automotive panel formed out of AHSS material. The economic feasibility of the developed EHF processes was defined by developing a cost model of the EHF process in comparison to the conventional stamping process.

  8. Shaped charges and explosively formed penetrators: background for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Morrison, J J; Mahoney, P F; Hodgetts, T

    2007-09-01

    Shaped Charges (SC) have been used in High Explosive Anti-Tank (HEAT) munitions and the mining industry since World War II. An explosive is used to propel a liner material of low mass at speeds in excess of 5 times the speed of sound. The subsequent projectile is capable of penetrating the steel of armoured vehicles and inflicting significant injury to any enclosed personnel. Explosively Formed Penetrators (EFP) are a variant of a SC, using higher mass at lower speed to deliver their kinetic energy. The Iraq conflict has seen the use of Improvised Explosive Devices utilising EFP (IED-EFP) by insurgent groups attacking military vehicles. The major wounding mechanisms are from fragmentation and burns. This article is a brief overview of the history and science behind SC and EFP.

  9. Milling Of Shaped Grooves - Profile Of Form Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilc, Jozef; Sajgalik, Michal; Stancekova, Dana; Janota, Miroslav; Pitela, David

    2015-12-01

    This paper deals with design of milling tool for milling of shaped groove. Actual industry production requires the large amount of tools and notably the special tools used for example when shaped milling. The requirements on the quality of tools are increasingly demanding. The quality of tools is given by construction, production process, selected material and also heat treatment. Shaped milling requires special tools made for given shape. Main request on the construction of tool is making of shape of cutting edge, which can produce the required shape of workpiece.

  10. Outgoing Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    This mosaic shows the planet Mercury as seen by Mariner 10 as it sped away from the planet on March 29, 1974. The mosaic was made from over 140 individual TV frames taken about two hours after encounter, at a range of 37,300 miles (60,000 kilometers). North is at top. The limb is at right, as is the illuminating sunlight. The equator crosses the planet about two-thirds of the way from the top of the disc. The terminator, line-separating day from night, is about 190 degrees west longitude. The planet shows a gibbous disc-more than half-illuminated. This hemisphere is dominated by smooth plains, rather than heavily cratered terrain, and resembles portions of the Moon's maria in general shape. Half of a very large, multi-ringed basin named Caloris Basin appears near the center of the disc near the terminator. Its surrounding mountain ring is 800 miles (1,300 kilometers) in diameter.

    The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

    Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

  11. Dip molding to form intricately-shaped medical elastomer devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broyles, H. F.

    1975-01-01

    Preshaped mandrel mounted on rotating mechanism is partically immersed in tank filled with liquid elastomer. While mandrel rotates, elastomer film forms om mandrel surface due to surface tension and capillary behavior of liquid. Devices with well-defined flanges can be made using process.

  12. Effects of Processing Parameters on the Forming Quality of C-Shaped Thermosetting Composite Laminates in Hot Diaphragm Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, X. X.; Gu, Y. Z.; Sun, J.; Li, M.; Liu, W. P.; Zhang, Z. G.

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the effects of processing temperature and vacuum applying rate on the forming quality of C-shaped carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin matrix composite laminates during hot diaphragm forming process were investigated. C-shaped prepreg preforms were produced using a home-made hot diaphragm forming equipment. The thickness variations of the preforms and the manufacturing defects after diaphragm forming process, including fiber wrinkling and voids, were evaluated to understand the forming mechanism. Furthermore, both interlaminar slipping friction and compaction behavior of the prepreg stacks were experimentally analyzed for showing the importance of the processing parameters. In addition, autoclave processing was used to cure the C-shaped preforms to investigate the changes of the defects before and after cure process. The results show that the C-shaped prepreg preforms with good forming quality can be achieved through increasing processing temperature and reducing vacuum applying rate, which obviously promote prepreg interlaminar slipping process. The process temperature and forming rate in hot diaphragm forming process strongly influence prepreg interply frictional force, and the maximum interlaminar frictional force can be taken as a key parameter for processing parameter optimization. Autoclave process is effective in eliminating voids in the preforms and can alleviate fiber wrinkles to a certain extent.

  13. An Illustrated Key to the Cyst-Forming Genera and Species of Heteroderidae in the Western Hemisphere with Species Morphometrics and Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Mulvey, R. H.; Golden, A. Morgan

    1983-01-01

    Diagnoses of the cyst-forming genera of Heteroderidae (viz., Heterodera, Sarisodera, Globodera, Punctodera, Cactodera, and Dolichodera) and distribution and morphometrics of the 34 known cyst species in the Western Hemisphere are presented along with an illustrated key for the identification of these genera and species. The key is based mainly on cysts and larvae, and important morphological and diagnostic features are extensively shown by LM and SEM illustrations. The genus Bidera is placed as a new synonym under the genus Heterodera. PMID:19295764

  14. Advanced method and processing technology for complicated shape airframe part forming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miodushevsky, P. V.; Rajevskaya, G. A.

    1994-01-01

    Slow deformation modes of forming give considerably higher residual fatigue life of the airframe part. It has experimentally proven that fatigue life of complicated shape integral airframe panels made of high strength aluminum alloys is significantly increased after creep deformation process. To implement the slow deformation mode forming methods, universal automated equipment was developed. Multichannel forming systems provide high accuracy of airframe part shape eliminating residual stresses and spring effect. Forming process multizone control technology was developed and experimentally proved that static/fatigue properties of formed airframe parts are increased.

  15. Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Right Hemisphere Brain Damage [ en Español ] What is right hemisphere brain ... right hemisphere brain damage ? What is right hemisphere brain damage? Right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) is damage ...

  16. Novel free-form hohlraum shape design and optimization for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Shaoen; Jing, Longfei Ding, Yongkun; Huang, Yunbao

    2014-10-15

    The hohlraum shape attracts considerable attention because there is no successful ignition method for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility. The available hohlraums are typically designed with simple conic curves, including ellipses, parabolas, arcs, or Lame curves, which allow only a few design parameters for the shape optimization, making it difficult to improve the performance, e.g., the energy coupling efficiency or radiation drive symmetry. A novel free-form hohlraum design and optimization approach based on the non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) model is proposed. In the present study, (1) all kinds of hohlraum shapes can be uniformly represented using NURBS, which is greatly beneficial for obtaining the optimal available hohlraum shapes, and (2) such free-form uniform representation enables us to obtain an optimal shape over a large design domain for the hohlraum with a more uniform radiation and higher drive temperature of the fuel capsule. Finally, a hohlraum is optimized and evaluated with respect to the drive temperature and symmetry at the Shenguang III laser facility in China. The drive temperature and symmetry results indicate that such a free-form representation is advantageous over available hohlraum shapes because it can substantially expand the shape design domain so as to obtain an optimal hohlraum with high performance.

  17. Spray Forming of NiTi and NiTiPd Shape-Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mabe, James; Ruggeri, Robert; Noebe, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    In the work to be presented, vacuum plasma spray forming has been used as a process to deposit and consolidate prealloyed NiTi and NiTiPd powders into near net shape actuators. Testing showed that excellent shape memory behavior could be developed in the deposited materials and the investigation proved that VPS forming could be a means to directly form a wide range of shape memory alloy components. The results of DSC characterization and actual actuation test results will be presented demonstrating the behavior of a Nitinol 55 alloy and a higher transition temperature NiTiPd alloy in the form of torque tube actuators that could be used in aircraft and aerospace controls.

  18. The Visual Word Form Area remains in the dominant hemisphere for language in late-onset left occipital lobe epilepsies: A postsurgery analysis of two cases.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Ricardo; Nunes, Rita Gouveia; Simões, Mário Rodrigues; Secca, Mário Forjaz; Leal, Alberto

    2015-05-01

    Automatic recognition of words from letter strings is a critical processing step in reading that is lateralized to the left-hemisphere middle fusiform gyrus in the so-called Visual Word Form Area (VWFA). Surgical lesions in this location can lead to irreversible alexia. Very early left hemispheric lesions can lead to transfer of the VWFA to the nondominant hemisphere, but it is currently unknown if this capability is preserved in epilepsies developing after reading acquisition. In this study, we aimed to determine the lateralization of the VWFA in late-onset left inferior occipital lobe epilepsies and also the effect of surgical disconnection from the adjacent secondary visual areas. Two patients with focal epilepsies with onset near the VWFA underwent to surgery for epilepsy, with sparing of this area. Neuropsychology evaluations were performed before and after surgery, as well as quantitative evaluation of the speed of word reading. Comparison of the surgical localization of the lesion, with the BOLD activation associated with the contrast of words-strings, was performed, as well as a study of the associated main white fiber pathways using diffusion-weighted imaging. Neither of the patients developed alexia after surgery (similar word reading speed before and after surgery) despite the fact that the inferior occipital surgical lesions reached the neighborhood (less than 1cm) of the VWFA. Surgeries partly disconnected the VWFA from left secondary visual areas, suggesting that pathways connecting to the posterior visual ventral stream were severely affected but did not induce alexia. The anterior and superior limits of the resection suggest that the critical connection between the VWFA and the Wernicke's Angular Gyrus cortex was not affected, which is supported by the detection of this tract with probabilistic tractography. Left occipital lobe epilepsies developing after reading acquisition did not produce atypical localizations of the VWFA, even with foci in the

  19. Insect form vision as one potential shaping force of spider web decoration design.

    PubMed

    Cheng, R-C; Yang, E-C; Lin, C-P; Herberstein, M E; Tso, I-M

    2010-03-01

    Properties of prey sensory systems are important factors shaping the design of signals generated by organisms exploiting them. In this study we assessed how prey sensory preference affected the exploiter signal design by investigating the evolutionary relationship and relative attractiveness of linear and cruciate form web decorations built by Argiope spiders. Because insects have an innate preference for bilaterally symmetrical patterns, we hypothesized that cruciate form decorations were evolved from linear form due to their higher visual attractiveness to insects. We first reconstructed a molecular phylogeny of the Asian members of the genus Argiope using mitochondrial markers to infer the evolutionary relationship of two decoration forms. Results of ancestral character state reconstruction showed that the linear form was ancestral and the cruciate form derived. To evaluate the luring effectiveness of two decoration forms, we performed field experiments in which the number and orientation of decoration bands were manipulated. Decoration bands arranged in a cruciate form were significantly more attractive to insects than those arranged in a linear form, no matter whether they were composed of silks or dummies. Moreover, dummy decoration bands arranged in a cruciate form attracted significantly more insects than those arranged in a vertical/horizontal form. Such results suggest that pollinator insects' innate preference for certain bilateral or radial symmetrical patterns might be one of the driving forces shaping the arrangement pattern of spider web decorations.

  20. Words, Hemispheres, and Dissociable Subsystems: The Effects of Exposure Duration, Case Alternation, Priming, and Continuity of Form on Word Recognition in the Left and Right Visual Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Andrew W.; Ansorge, Lydia; Lavidor, Michal

    2007-01-01

    Three experiments explore aspects of the dissociable neural subsystems theory of hemispheric specialisation proposed by Marsolek and colleagues, and in particular a study by [Deason, R. G., & Marsolek, C. J. (2005). A critical boundary to the left-hemisphere advantage in word processing. "Brain and Language," 92, 251-261]. Experiment 1A showed…

  1. Shape Beyond Recognition: Form-derived Directionality and its Effects on Visual Attention and Motion Perception

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdardottir, Heida M.; Michalak, Suzanne M.; Sheinberg, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The shape of an object restricts its movements and therefore its future location. The rules governing selective sampling of the environment likely incorporate any available data, including shape, that provide information about where important things are going to be in the near future so that the object can be located, tracked, and sampled for information. We asked people to assess in which direction several novel objects pointed or directed them. With independent groups of people, we investigated whether their attention and sense of motion were systematically biased in this direction. Our work shows that nearly any novel object has intrinsic directionality derived from its shape. This shape information is swiftly and automatically incorporated into the allocation of overt and covert visual orienting and the detection of motion, processes which themselves are inherently directional. The observed connection between form and space suggests that shape processing goes beyond recognition alone and may help explain why shape is a relevant dimension throughout the visual brain. PMID:23565670

  2. FUNCTION FOLLOWS FORM: ACTIVATION OF SHAPE & FUNCTION FEATURES DURING OBJECT IDENTIFICATION

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Eiling; Huffstetler, Stacy; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.

    2011-01-01

    Most theories of semantic memory characterize knowledge of a given object as comprising a set of semantic features. But how does conceptual activation of these features proceed during object identification? We present the results of a pair of experiments that demonstrate that object recognition is a dynamically unfolding process in which function follows form. We used eye movements to explore whether activating one object’s concept leads to the activation of others that share perceptual (shape) or abstract (function) features. Participants viewed four-picture displays and clicked on the picture corresponding to a heard word. In critical trials, the conceptual representation of one of the objects in the display was similar in shape or function (i.e., its purpose) to the heard word. Importantly, this similarity was not apparent in the visual depictions (e.g., for the target “frisbee,” the shape-related object was a triangular slice of pizza – a shape that a frisbee cannot take); preferential fixations on the related object were therefore attributable to overlap of the conceptual representations on the relevant features. We observed relatedness effects for both shape and function, but shape effects occurred earlier than function effects. We discuss the implications of these findings for current accounts of the representation of semantic memory. PMID:21417543

  3. Effect of temper rolling on final shape defects in a V-section roll forming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abvabi, Akbar; Rolfe, Bernard; Hodgson, Peter D.; Weiss, Matthias

    2013-12-01

    Roll forming is a continuous process in which a flat strip is shaped to the desired profile by sequential bending in a series of roll stands. Because of the large variety of applications of roll forming in the industry, Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is increasingly utilized for roll forming process design. Bending is the dominant deformation mode in roll forming. Sheet materials used in this process are generally temper rolled, roller- or tension- leveled. These processes introduce residual stresses into the material, and recent studies have shown that those affect the material behavior in bending. In this study a numerical model of the temper rolling (skin passing) process was used to determine a residual stress distribution in a dual phase, DP780, steel strip. A 5-stand roll forming process for the forming of a V-section was modeled, and the effect of various thickness reduction levels in the temper rolling process on the final shape defects was analyzed. The results show that a small thickness reduction in the temper rolling process decreases the maximum bow height but the final springback angle increases. It is also shown that reasonable model accuracy can be achieved by including the residual stress information due to temper rolling as initial condition in the numerical modeling of a roll forming process.

  4. The shape of the Neandertal femur is primarily the consequence of a hyperpolar body form

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Timothy D.

    2003-01-01

    Neandertal femora are distinct from contemporaneous near-modern human femora. Traditionally, these contrasts in femoral shape have been explained as the result of the elevated activity levels and limited cultural abilities of Neandertals. More recently, however, researchers have realized that many of these femoral differences may be explained by the cold-adapted bodies of Neandertals vs. the warm-adapted bodies of near-modern humans. This study explicitly tests this proposed link between climate-induced body proportions and femoral shape by considering the entire hip as a unit by using geometric morphometric methods adapted to deal with articulated structures. Based on recent human patterns of variation, most contrasts in shape between the femora of Neandertals and near-modern humans seem to be secondary consequences of differences in climate-induced body proportions. These results, considered in light of hip mechanics during growth, highlight the importance of developmental and functional integration in determining skeletal form. PMID:12761384

  5. Apparatus and method for forming a workpiece surface into a non-rotationally symmetric shape

    DOEpatents

    Dow, Thomas A.; Garrard, Kenneth P.; Moorefield, II, George M.; Taylor, Lauren W.

    1995-11-21

    A turning machine includes a controller for generating both aspherical and non-symmetrical shape components defining the predetermined shape, and a controller for controlling a spindle and a positionable cutting blade to thereby form a predetermined non-rotationally symmetric shape in a workpiece surface. The apparatus includes a rotatable spindle for rotatably mounting the workpiece about an axis, a spindle encoder for sensing an angular position of the rotating workpiece, the cutting blade, and radial and transverse positioners for relatively positioning the cutting blade and workpiece along respective radial and transverse directions. The controller cooperates with a fast transverse positioner for positioning the cutting blade in predetermined varying transverse positions during a revolution of the workpiece.

  6. Laser forming of a bowl shaped surface with a stationary laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Shitanshu Shekhar; More, Harshit; Nath, Ashish Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Despite a lot of research done in the field of laser forming, generation of a symmetric bowl shaped surface by this process is still a challenge mainly because only a portion of the sheet is momentarily deformed in this process, unlike conventional sheet metal forming like deep drawing where the entire blank undergoes forming simultaneously reducing asymmetry to a minimum. The motion of laser beam also makes the process asymmetric. To counter these limitations this work proposes a new approach for laser forming of a bowl shaped surface by irradiating the centre of a flat circular blank with a stationary laser beam. With high power lasers, power density sufficient for laser forming, can be availed at reasonably large spot sizes. This advantage is exploited in this technique. Effects of duration of laser irradiation and beam spot diameter on the amount of bending and asymmetry in the formed surface were investigated. Laser power was kept constant while varying irradiation time. While varying laser spot diameter laser power was chosen so as to keep the surface temperature nearly constant at just below melting. Experimental conditions promoted almost uniform heating through sheet thickness. The amount of bending increased with irradiation time and spot diameter. It was interesting to observe that blanks bent towards the laser beam for smaller laser beam diameters and the reverse happened for larger spot diameters (~10 times of the sheet thickness). Effect of spot diameter variation has been explained with the help of coupled thermal-structural finite element simulations.

  7. Nonaqueous composition for slip casting or cold forming refractory material into solid shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, L.C.

    1993-08-24

    A composition is described for slip casting or cold forming non-oxide refractory material(s) into solid shape comprising finely divided solid refractory materials selected from the group consisting of metal boride, refractory carbide, nitride, silicide and a refractory metal of tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum and chromium suspended in a nonaqueous liquid slip composition consisting essentially of a deflocculent composed of a vinyl chloride-vinyl acetate resin dissolved in an organic solvent.

  8. Near-net-shape manufacturing: Spray-formed metal matrix composites and tooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchugh, Kevin M.

    1994-01-01

    Spray forming is a materials processing technology in which a bulk liquid metal is converted to a spray of fine droplets and deposited onto a substrate or pattern to form a near-net-shape solid. The technology offers unique opportunities for simplifying materials processing without sacrificing, and oftentimes substantially improving, product quality. Spray forming can be performed with a wide range of metals and nonmetals, and offers property improvements resulting from rapid solidification (e.g. refined microstructures, extended solid solubilities and reduced segregation). Economic benefits result from process simplification and the elimination of unit operations. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is developing a unique spray-forming method, the Controlled Aspiration Process (CAP), to produce near-net-shape solids and coatings of metals, polymers, and composite materials. Results from two spray-accompanying technical and economic benefits. These programs involved spray forming aluminum strip reinforced with SiC particulate, and the production of tooling, such as injection molds and dies, using low-melting-point metals.

  9. Neptune's Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This photograph of Neptune's southern hemisphere was taken by the narrow-angle camera on NASA's Voyager 2 when the spacecraft was 4.2 million km (2.6 million miles) from the planet. The smallest features that can be seen are 38 km (24 miles) across. The almond-shaped structure at the left is a large cloud system that has been seen for several weeks. Internal details in the feature have become increasingly apparent as Voyager 2 has approached. Systems with similar shapes in Jupiter's atmosphere rotate about their centers, rolling in the local winds that increase toward the south. However, the wispy nature of the white central clouds in this Neptunian feature make confirmation of the system's rotation difficult. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  10. Entropic effects, shape, and size of mixed micelles formed by copolymers with complex architectures.

    PubMed

    Kalogirou, Andreas; Gergidis, Leonidas N; Moultos, Othonas; Vlahos, Costas

    2015-11-01

    The entropic effects in the comicellization behavior of amphiphilic AB copolymers differing in the chain size of solvophilic A parts were studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, mixtures of miktoarm star copolymers differing in the molecular weight of solvophilic arms were investigated. We found that the critical micelle concentration values show a positive deviation from the analytical predictions of the molecular theory of comicellization for chemically identical copolymers. This can be attributed to the effective interactions between copolymers originated from the arm size asymmetry. The effective interactions induce a very small decrease in the aggregation number of preferential micelles triggering the nonrandom mixing between the solvophilic moieties in the corona. Additionally, in order to specify how the chain architecture affects the size distribution and the shape of mixed micelles we studied star-shaped, H-shaped, and homo-linked-rings-linear mixtures. In the first case the individual constituents form micelles with preferential and wide aggregation numbers and in the latter case the individual constituents form wormlike and spherical micelles. PMID:26651715

  11. Closed-form model for the analysis of W-type shaped charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdian, A.; Ghayour, M.; Liaghat, G. H.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a closed-form model for the analysis of symmetric planar W-type shaped charges (WSCs) with two V-sections, which produce two primary cores and two primary jets. If these two V-sections have proper asymmetry, these primary cores will force two primary jets into a secondary core formed on the axis of symmetry of a planar symmetric WSC. For the analysis of such a planar WSC, a complete generalized model for an asymmetric planar V-shaped charge (VSC) with any desired order of asymmetry is mandatory. In this paper, the model is applied to describe the secondary jet formation in the WSC. By presenting a closed-form analysis of the WSC, the secondary jet specifications can be easily evaluated and, thus, can be compared with respect to the jet quantities in symmetric or asymmetric VSCs. Finally, for the primary and secondary jets, the coherency conditions are investigated, and the critical parameters responsible for these conditions are determined.

  12. Amphiphilic crescent-moon-shaped microparticles formed by selective adsorption of colloids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin-Hyun; Abbaspourrad, Alireza; Weitz, David A

    2011-04-13

    We use a microfluidic device to prepare monodisperse amphiphilic particles in the shape of a crescent-moon and use these particles to stabilize oil droplets in water. The microfluidic device is comprised of a tapered capillary in a theta (θ) shape that injects two oil phases into water in a single receiving capillary. One oil is a fluorocarbon, while the second is a photocurable monomer, which partially wets the first oil drop; silica colloids in the monomer migrate and adsorb to the interface with water but do not protrude into the oil interface. Upon UV-induced polymerization, solid particles with the shape of a crescent moon are formed; removal of fluorocarbon oil yields amphiphilic particles due to the selective adsorption of silica colloids. The resultant amphiphilic microparticles can be used to stabilize oil drops in a mixture of water and ethanol; if they are packed to sufficient surface density on the interface of the oil drop, they become immobilized, preventing direct contact between neighboring drops, thereby providing the stability.

  13. Theory of Brushes Formed by Ψ-Shaped Macromolecules at Solid-Liquid Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhulina, Ekaterina B; Leermakers, Frans A M; Borisov, Oleg V

    2015-06-16

    We present a theoretical analysis targeted to describe the structural properties of brushes formed by Ψ-shaped macromolecules tethered by terminal segment of stem to planar surface while exposing multiple free branches to the surrounding solution. We use an analytical self-consistent field approach based on the strong stretching approximation, and the assumption of Gaussian elasticity for linear chain fragments of the tethered macromolecules. The effect of weak and strong polydispersity of branches is analyzed. In the case of weakly polydisperse macromolecules, variations in length of branches lead to a more uniform polymer density distribution with slight increase in the brush thickness compared to the case of monodisperse chains with the same degree of polymerization. We demonstrate that in contrast to linear chains, strong polydispersity of Ψ-shaped macromolecules does not necessarily lead to strong perturbations in polymer density distribution. In particular, mixed brushes of the so-called "mirror" dendrons (in which number of stem monomers in one component coincides with number of monomers in a branch of the other component, and vice versa) give rise to a unified polymer density distribution with shape independent of the brush composition. The predictions of analytical theory are systematically compared to the results of numerical self-consistent field modeling based on the Scheutjens-Fleer approach.

  14. Net-Shape Forming and Mechanical Properties of MIM418 Turbine Wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Chen, Xiaowei; Li, Dan; Xuanhui, Qu; Mingli, Qin; Li, Zhou

    2016-09-01

    Near-net shape forming of the turbine wheel with a hollow internal structure was realized by adopting the die with side core-pulling mechanism. MIM418 turbine wheel with relative density above 99.5% is obtained by the combination of vacuum sintering and hot isostatic pressing. A high volume fraction (57%) of near cuboidal γ' phase with average particle size of 0.52 μm is formed in γ matrix. Small amount of discrete carbides with size of 0.2-0.4 μm is distributed uniformly on grain boundaries and within grains. The tensile strength, yield strength, and ductility of MIM418 superalloy reach 1425 MPa, 1004 MPa, and 19.4%, respectively, which are much higher than that of the cast K418 superalloy.

  15. A Springback Compensation Method for Complex-Shaped Flange Components in Fluid-Cell Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Dongsheng; Yang, Weijun

    2011-08-01

    The fluid-cell forming process (FFP), one of the main forming technologies in aeronautical manufactories, suffers seriously from the product quality problem due to springback. A springback compensation method is proposed particularly for complex-shaped flange parts. This method is derived from the classic displacement adjustment method, but differs in the way to predict the springback amount and calculate the adjusting vectors. Based on discussion on the relationship between the springback angles and the geometrical parameters of flange parts, a springback distribution function (SDF) is proposed to predict springback angles of curved flanges. The springback angles are mapped to nodal adjusting vectors of the die mesh and then the optimized die is obtained. The above procedures are applied to two fuselage flange parts and the experimental result shows that this method is valid.

  16. Net-Shape Forming and Mechanical Properties of MIM418 Turbine Wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Chen, Xiaowei; Li, Dan; Xuanhui, Qu; Mingli, Qin; Li, Zhou

    2016-07-01

    Near-net shape forming of the turbine wheel with a hollow internal structure was realized by adopting the die with side core-pulling mechanism. MIM418 turbine wheel with relative density above 99.5% is obtained by the combination of vacuum sintering and hot isostatic pressing. A high volume fraction (57%) of near cuboidal γ' phase with average particle size of 0.52 μm is formed in γ matrix. Small amount of discrete carbides with size of 0.2-0.4 μm is distributed uniformly on grain boundaries and within grains. The tensile strength, yield strength, and ductility of MIM418 superalloy reach 1425 MPa, 1004 MPa, and 19.4%, respectively, which are much higher than that of the cast K418 superalloy.

  17. Split-brain, the right hemisphere, and art: fact and fiction.

    PubMed

    Zaidel, Dahlia W

    2013-01-01

    The research studies of complete commissurotomy patients (split-brain) in Roger W. Sperry's psychobiology laboratory at Caltech, Pasadena, galvanized the scientific and intellectual world in the 1960s and 1970s. The findings had an important and enduring impact on brain research in countless areas. Interest in hemispheric specialization in particular was sparked by these studies and paved the way for countless discoveries. Right hemisphere specialization for visuospatial functions and facial processing was confirmed with these patients. The further unraveling of right-hemisphere cognition, the "mute" hemisphere, was a major goal in Sperry's laboratory, and much factual knowledge was learned that was not known previously. However, the linking of art and creativity with the right hemisphere was a nonempirically based inference made not by Sperry's lab but rather by others wishing to "assign" functional hemisphericity. The general assumption was that "art" is anchored in spatial cognition, that it is a nonverbal activity requiring imagery and thus must be controlled by the right, nonlanguage hemisphere. To this day, robust evidence that the right specializes in art expression or art perception is yet to be shown, if for no other reason than that art is not a single, unitary form of expression or cognition. The conjectured right hemisphere-art link turned into a popular story that filtered back into science, shaped future research of brain and art, and overlooked other avenues for insights. This chapter traces and explores this background. PMID:24041316

  18. Split-brain, the right hemisphere, and art: fact and fiction.

    PubMed

    Zaidel, Dahlia W

    2013-01-01

    The research studies of complete commissurotomy patients (split-brain) in Roger W. Sperry's psychobiology laboratory at Caltech, Pasadena, galvanized the scientific and intellectual world in the 1960s and 1970s. The findings had an important and enduring impact on brain research in countless areas. Interest in hemispheric specialization in particular was sparked by these studies and paved the way for countless discoveries. Right hemisphere specialization for visuospatial functions and facial processing was confirmed with these patients. The further unraveling of right-hemisphere cognition, the "mute" hemisphere, was a major goal in Sperry's laboratory, and much factual knowledge was learned that was not known previously. However, the linking of art and creativity with the right hemisphere was a nonempirically based inference made not by Sperry's lab but rather by others wishing to "assign" functional hemisphericity. The general assumption was that "art" is anchored in spatial cognition, that it is a nonverbal activity requiring imagery and thus must be controlled by the right, nonlanguage hemisphere. To this day, robust evidence that the right specializes in art expression or art perception is yet to be shown, if for no other reason than that art is not a single, unitary form of expression or cognition. The conjectured right hemisphere-art link turned into a popular story that filtered back into science, shaped future research of brain and art, and overlooked other avenues for insights. This chapter traces and explores this background.

  19. Helical arrays of U-shaped ATP synthase dimers form tubular cristae in ciliate mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Mühleip, Alexander W; Joos, Friederike; Wigge, Christoph; Frangakis, Achilleas S; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Davies, Karen M

    2016-07-26

    F1Fo-ATP synthases are universal energy-converting membrane protein complexes that synthesize ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate. In mitochondria of yeast and mammals, the ATP synthase forms V-shaped dimers, which assemble into rows along the highly curved ridges of lamellar cristae. Using electron cryotomography and subtomogram averaging, we have determined the in situ structure and organization of the mitochondrial ATP synthase dimer of the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia. The ATP synthase forms U-shaped dimers with parallel monomers. Each complex has a prominent intracrista domain, which links the c-ring of one monomer to the peripheral stalk of the other. Close interaction of intracrista domains in adjacent dimers results in the formation of helical ATP synthase dimer arrays, which differ from the loose dimer rows in all other organisms observed so far. The parameters of the helical arrays match those of the cristae tubes, suggesting the unique features of the P. tetraurelia ATP synthase are directly responsible for generating the helical tubular cristae. We conclude that despite major structural differences between ATP synthase dimers of ciliates and other eukaryotes, the formation of ATP synthase dimer rows is a universal feature of mitochondria and a fundamental determinant of cristae morphology. PMID:27402755

  20. Helical arrays of U-shaped ATP synthase dimers form tubular cristae in ciliate mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Mühleip, Alexander W.; Joos, Friederike; Wigge, Christoph; Frangakis, Achilleas S.; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Davies, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    F1Fo-ATP synthases are universal energy-converting membrane protein complexes that synthesize ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate. In mitochondria of yeast and mammals, the ATP synthase forms V-shaped dimers, which assemble into rows along the highly curved ridges of lamellar cristae. Using electron cryotomography and subtomogram averaging, we have determined the in situ structure and organization of the mitochondrial ATP synthase dimer of the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia. The ATP synthase forms U-shaped dimers with parallel monomers. Each complex has a prominent intracrista domain, which links the c-ring of one monomer to the peripheral stalk of the other. Close interaction of intracrista domains in adjacent dimers results in the formation of helical ATP synthase dimer arrays, which differ from the loose dimer rows in all other organisms observed so far. The parameters of the helical arrays match those of the cristae tubes, suggesting the unique features of the P. tetraurelia ATP synthase are directly responsible for generating the helical tubular cristae. We conclude that despite major structural differences between ATP synthase dimers of ciliates and other eukaryotes, the formation of ATP synthase dimer rows is a universal feature of mitochondria and a fundamental determinant of cristae morphology. PMID:27402755

  1. Laser forming cutting once quenched high-speed tool steel (HSTS) disk-shaped milling cutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhihong; Liu, Yongzhen; Weng, Shiping

    1998-08-01

    Laser cutting technology has been applied to ordinary alloy steel circular sawblade, but it is very rarely used in quenched HSTS disk-shape milling-cutters due to the material particularity. In this paper, the authors systematically explain the advantages of this new technique, respecting the optimum design of HSTS disk-shape milling-cutter, the specific characteristics of laser forming cutting once for all, the technology testing, the analysis of structural performance of tooth and the small batch production for verifying. The article displays its advantages completely as follows: The design for a perfect tooth profile is not bound to the ordinary machining methods; The special laser technique does not lower the hardness on the tooth nose so that this process and needs no follow-up operational sequences, ensures the excellent dynamic-balance performance and operation properties, and prolongs the tools' service time; The new technique also has advantages of high efficiency and good economics. Therefore, this special laser cutting method, an integration of intensified heat-treatment and laser forming cutting once for all technology, will be regarded as a reform in HSTS tools Manufacturing field.

  2. Hemispheric asymmetries in the perceptual representations of words.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, Amy E; Long, Debra L; Swick, Diane; Larsen, Jary; Baynes, Kathleen

    2008-01-10

    The representation of words in sentences can involve the activation and integration of perceptual information. For example, readers who are asked to view pictures of objects relating to a word in a sentence are influenced by perceptual information in the sentence context-readers are faster to respond to a picture of a whole apple after reading, "There is an apple in the bag," than after reading, "There is an apple in the salad." The purpose of this study was to examine how the two cerebral hemispheres use perceptual information about words as a function of sentence context. Patients who had damage to the left or right hemisphere and age-matched control participants read sentences that described, but did not entail, the shape or state of an object. They then made recognition judgments to pictures that either matched or mismatched the perceptual form implied by the sentence. Responses and latencies were examined for a match effect -- faster and more accurate responses to pictures in the match than mismatch condition -- controlling for comprehension ability and lesion size. When comprehension ability and lesion size are properly controlled, left-hemisphere-damaged patients and control participants exhibited the expected match effect, whereas right-hemisphere-damaged participants showed no effect of match condition. These results are consistent with research implicating the right hemisphere in the representation of contextually relevant perceptual information.

  3. Free form fabrication of metallic components using laser engineered net shaping (LENS{trademark})

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, M.L.; Keicher, D.M.; Atwood, C.L.

    1996-09-01

    Solid free form fabrication is one of the fastest growing automated manufacturing technologies that has significantly impacted the length of time between initial concept and actual part fabrication. Starting with CAD renditions of new components, several techniques such as stereolithography and selective laser sintering are being used to fabricate highly accurate complex three-dimensional concept models using polymeric materials. Coupled with investment casting techniques, sacrificial polymeric objects are used to minimize costs and time to fabricate tooling used to make complex metal castings. This paper will describe recent developments in a new technology, known as LENS{sup {trademark}} (Laser Engineered Net Shaping), to fabricate metal components directly from CAD solid models and thus further reduce the lead times for metal part fabrication. In a manner analogous to stereolithography or selective sintering, the LENS{sup {trademark}} process builds metal parts line by line and layer by layer. Metal particles are injected into a laser beam, where they are melted and deposited onto a substrate as a miniature weld pool. The trace of the laser beam on the substrate is driven by the definition of CAD models until the desired net-shaped densified metal component is produced.

  4. A Skeleton-Based 3D Shape Reconstruction of Free-Form Objects with Stereo Vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Deepika; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an efficient approach is proposed for recovering the 3D shape of a free-form object from its arbitrary pair of stereo images. In particular, the reconstruction problem is treated as the reconstruction of the skeleton and the external boundary of the object. The reconstructed skeleton is termed as the line-like representation or curve-skeleton of the 3D object. The proposed solution for object reconstruction is based on this evolved curve-skeleton. It is used as a seed for recovering shape of the 3D object, and the extracted boundary is used for terminating the growing process of the object. NURBS-skeleton is used to extract the skeleton of both views. Affine invariant property of the convex hulls is used to establish the correspondence between the skeletons and boundaries in the stereo images. In the growing process, a distance field is defined for each skeleton point as the smallest distance from that point to the boundary of the object. A sphere centered at a skeleton point of radius equal to the minimum distance to the boundary is tangential to the boundary. Filling in the spheres centered at each skeleton point reconstructs the object. Several results are presented in order to check the applicability and validity of the proposed algorithm.

  5. Multiple Shape Memory Polymers Based on Laminates Formed from Thiol-Click Chemistry Based Polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Podgórski, M.; Wang, C.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation details the formation of polymer network trilayer laminates formed by thiol-X click chemistries, and their subsequent implementation and evaluation for quadruple shape memory behavior. Thiol-Michael addition and thiol-isocyanate-based crosslinking reactions were employed to fabricate each of the laminate’s layers with independent control of the chemistry and properties of each layer and outstanding interlayer adhesion and stability. The characteristic features of step-growth thiol-X reactions, such as excellent network uniformity and narrow thermal transitions as well as their stoichiometric nature, enabled fabrication of trilayer laminates with three distinctly different glass transition temperatures grouped within a narrow range of 100 °C. Through variations in the layer thicknesses, a step-wise modulus drop as a function of temperature was achieved. This behavior allowed multi-step programming and the demonstration and quantification of quadruple shape memory performance. As is critical for this performance, the interface connecting the layers was evaluated in stoichiometric as well as off-stoichiometric systems. It was shown that the laminated structures exhibit strong interfacial binding and hardly suffer any delamination during cyclic material testing and deformation. PMID:26234205

  6. Role of texture in spin formed Cu shaped-charge liners

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, A J; Busche, M J; Becker, R; Kumar, M; Nikkel, D J

    2001-01-10

    Spin formed Cu shaped charge liners are known to produce a rotating jet and are used for the spin compensation effect. The causes of spin compensation can be mechanical in nature or can be grounded in microstructural issues such as texture, residual stress, grain size, and morphology variations. This investigation focuses on determining specific microstructural parameters that influence jet rotation and modeling the jet formation process using anisotropic plasticity in a 3-D finite element framework. The experimental texture has been mapped onto a finite element grid for 3-D modeling to obtain the normal-shear deformation coupling information needed to construct a plastic flow potential. Simulations of a collapsing ring and extending rod demonstrate rotation.

  7. MACHINING ELIMINATION THROUGH APPLICATION OF THREAD FORMING FASTENERS IN NET SHAPED CAST HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Cleaver, Ryan J; Cleaver, Todd H; Talbott, Richard

    2012-05-02

    The ultimate objective of this work was to eliminate approximately 30% of the machining performed in typical automotive engine and transmission plants by using thread forming fasteners in as-cast holes of aluminum and magnesium cast components. The primary issues at the source of engineers reluctance to implementing thread forming fasteners in lightweight castings are: * Little proof of consistency of clamp load vs. input torque in either aluminum or magnesium castings. * No known data to understand the effect on consistency of clamp load as casting dies wear. The clamp load consistency concern is founded in the fact that a portion of the input torque used to create clamp load is also used to create threads. The torque used for thread forming may not be consistent due to variations in casting material, hole size and shape due to tooling wear and process variation (thermal and mechanical). There is little data available to understand the magnitude of this concern or to form the basis of potential solutions if the range of clamp load variation is very high (> +/- 30%). The range of variation that can be expected in as-cast hole size and shape over the full life cycle of a high pressure die casting die was established in previous work completed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, (PNNL). This established range of variation was captured in a set of 12 cast bosses by designing core pins at the size and draft angles identified in the sited previous work. The cast bosses were cut into nuts that could be used in the Ford Fastener Laboratory test-cell to measure clamp load when a thread forming fastener was driven into a cast nut. There were two sets of experiments run. First, a series of cast aluminum nuts were made reflecting the range of shape and size variations to be expected over the life cycle of a die casting die. Taptite thread forming fasteners, (a widely used thread forming fastener suitable for aluminum applications), were driven into the various cored, as

  8. Near net shape forming processes for chemically prepared zinc oxide varistors.

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, Steven John; Voigt, James A.; Tuttle, Bruce Andrew; Bell, Nelson Simmons

    2005-01-01

    Chemically prepared zinc oxide powders are fabricated for the production of high aspect ratio varistor components. Colloidal processing in water was performed to reduce agglomerates to primary particles, form a high solids loading slurry, and prevent dopant migration. The milled and dispersed powder exhibited a viscoelastic to elastic behavioral transition at a volume loading of 43-46%. The origin of this transition was studied using acoustic spectroscopy, zeta potential measurements and oscillatory rheology. The phenomenon occurs due to a volume fraction solids dependent reduction in the zeta potential of the solid phase. It is postulated to result from divalent ion binding within the polyelectrolyte dispersant chain, and was mitigated using a polyethylene glycol plasticizing additive. Chemically prepared zinc oxide powders were processed for the production of high aspect ratio varistor components. Near net shape casting methods including slip casting and agarose gelcasting were evaluated for effectiveness in achieving a uniform green microstructure achieving density values near the theoretical maximum during sintering. The structure of the green parts was examined by mercury porisimetry. Agarose gelcasting produced green parts with low solids loading values and did not achieve high fired density. Isopressing the agarose cast parts after drying raised the fired density to greater than 95%, but the parts exhibited catastrophic shorting during electrical testing. Slip casting produced high green density parts, which exhibited high fired density values. The electrical characteristics of slip cast parts are comparable with dry pressed powder compacts. Alternative methods for near net shape forming of ceramic dispersions were investigated for use with the chemically prepared ZnO material. Recommendations for further investigation to achieve a viable production process are presented.

  9. Focal hemisphere and visuoperceptual categorization.

    PubMed Central

    Bisiach, E; Capitani, E; Spinnler, H

    1975-01-01

    Visuoperceptual categorization was investigated in patients with unilateral brain damage by a task in which meaningless shapes had to be classified with reference to a number of prototype patterns. Right brain-damaged subjects with visual field defect turned out to have a narrower categorization span. As this outcome seems to be scarcely consonant with a lower level disorder of visual processing, a major competence of the right hemisphere is suggested for visuoperceptual categorization. PMID:1206421

  10. Growth Behavior, Geometrical Shape, and Second CMC of Micelles Formed by Cationic Gemini Esterquat Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Bergström, L Magnus; Tehrani-Bagha, Alireza; Nagy, Gergely

    2015-04-28

    Micelles formed by novel gemini esterquat surfactants have been investigated with small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The growth behavior of the micelles is found to differ conspicuously depending on the length of the gemini surfactant spacer group. The gemini surfactant with a long spacer form rather small triaxial ellipsoidal tablet-shaped micelles that grow weakly with surfactant concentration in the entire range of measured concentrations. Geminis with a short spacer, on the other hand, form weakly growing oblates or tablets at low concentrations that start to grow much more strongly into polydisperse rodlike or wormlike micelles at higher concentrations. The latter behavior is consistent with the presence of a second CMC that marks the transition from the weakly to the strongly growing regime. It is found that the growth behavior in terms of aggregation number as a function of surfactant concentration always appear concave in weakly growing regimes, while switching to convex behavior in strongly growing regimes. As a result, we are able to determine the second CMC of the geminis with short spacer by means of suggesting a rather precise definition of it, located at the point of inflection of the growth curve that corresponds to the transition from concave to convex growth behavior. Our SANS results are rationalized by comparison with the recently developed general micelle model. In particular, this theory is able to explain and reproduce the characteristic appearances of the experimental growth curves, including the presence of a second CMC and the convex strongly growing regime beyond. By means of optimizing the agreement between predictions from the general micelle model and results from SANS experiments, we are able to determine the three bending elasticity constants spontaneous curvature, bending rigidity, and saddle-splay constant for each surfactant. PMID:25835031

  11. The Shape of Things: The Origin of Young Children's Knowledge of the Names and Properties of Geometric Forms

    PubMed Central

    Verdine, Brian N.; Lucca, Kelsey R.; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy; Newcombe, Nora S.

    2015-01-01

    How do toddlers learn the names of geometric forms? Past work suggests that preschoolers have fragmentary knowledge and that defining properties are not understood until well into elementary school. The current study investigates when children first begin to understand shape names and how they apply those labels to unusual instances. We tested 25- and 30-month-old children's (N = 30 each) understanding of names for canonical shapes (commonly-encountered instances, e.g., equilateral triangles), non-canonical shapes (more irregular instances, e.g., scalene triangles), and embedded shapes (shapes within a larger picture, e.g., triangular slices of pizza). At 25 months, children know very few names, including those for canonical shapes. By 30 months, however, children have acquired more shape names, and are beginning to apply them to some of the less typical instances of the shapes. Possible mechanisms driving this initial development of shape knowledge and implications of that development for school readiness are explored. PMID:27019647

  12. Dendritic Domains with Hexagonal Symmetry Formed by X-Shaped Bolapolyphiles in Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Stefan; Ebert, Helgard; Lechner, Bob-Dan; Lange, Frank; Achilles, Anja; Bärenwald, Ruth; Poppe, Silvio; Blume, Alfred; Saalwächter, Kay; Tschierske, Carsten; Bacia, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    A novel class of bolapolyphile (BP) molecules are shown to integrate into phospholipid bilayers and self-assemble into unique sixfold symmetric domains of snowflake-like dendritic shapes. The BPs comprise three philicities: a lipophilic, rigid, π–π stacking core; two flexible lipophilic side chains; and two hydrophilic, hydrogen-bonding head groups. Confocal microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, XRD, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy confirm BP-rich domains with transmembrane-oriented BPs and three to four lipid molecules per BP. Both species remain well organized even above the main 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine transition. The BP molecules only dissolve in the fluid membrane above 70 °C. Structural variations of the BP demonstrate that head-group hydrogen bonding is a prerequisite for domain formation. Independent of the head group, the BPs reduce membrane corrugation. In conclusion, the BPs form nanofilaments by π stacking of aromatic cores, which reduce membrane corrugation and possibly fuse into a hexagonal network in the dendritic domains. PMID:25940233

  13. Dendritic domains with hexagonal symmetry formed by x-shaped bolapolyphiles in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Werner, Stefan; Ebert, Helgard; Lechner, Bob-Dan; Lange, Frank; Achilles, Anja; Bärenwald, Ruth; Poppe, Silvio; Blume, Alfred; Saalwächter, Kay; Tschierske, Carsten; Bacia, Kirsten

    2015-06-01

    A novel class of bolapolyphile (BP) molecules are shown to integrate into phospholipid bilayers and self-assemble into unique sixfold symmetric domains of snowflake-like dendritic shapes. The BPs comprise three philicities: a lipophilic, rigid, π-π stacking core; two flexible lipophilic side chains; and two hydrophilic, hydrogen-bonding head groups. Confocal microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, XRD, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy confirm BP-rich domains with transmembrane-oriented BPs and three to four lipid molecules per BP. Both species remain well organized even above the main 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine transition. The BP molecules only dissolve in the fluid membrane above 70 °C. Structural variations of the BP demonstrate that head-group hydrogen bonding is a prerequisite for domain formation. Independent of the head group, the BPs reduce membrane corrugation. In conclusion, the BPs form nanofilaments by π stacking of aromatic cores, which reduce membrane corrugation and possibly fuse into a hexagonal network in the dendritic domains.

  14. Hemispheric sunspot unit area: comparison with hemispheric sunspot number and sunspot area

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K. J.; Xiang, N. B.; Qu, Z. N.; Xie, J. L.

    2014-03-01

    The monthly mean northern and southern hemispheric sunspot numbers (SNs) and sunspot areas (SAs) in the time interval of 1945 January to 2012 December are utilized to construct the monthly northern and southern hemispheric sunspot unit areas (SUAs), which are defined as the ratio of hemispheric SA to SN. Hemispheric SUAs are usually found to rise at the beginning and to fall at the ending time of a solar cycle more rapidly, forming a more irregular cycle profile than hemispheric SNs and SAs, although it also presents Schwabe-cycle-like hemispheric SNs and SAs. Sunspot activity (SN, SA, and SUA) is found asynchronously and is asymmetrically distributed in the northern and southern hemispheres, and hemispheric SNs, SAs, and SUAs are not in phase in the two hemispheres. The similarity of hemispheric SNs and SAs is found to be much more obvious than that of hemispheric SUAs and SNs (or SAs), and also for their north-south asymmetry. A notable feature is found for the behavior of the SUA around the minimum time of cycle 24: the SUA rapidly decreases from the cycle maximum value to the cycle minimum value of sunspot cycles 19-24 within just 22 months.

  15. A unified free-form representation applied to the shape optimization of the hohlraum with octahedral 6 laser entrance holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shaoen; Huang, Yunbao; Jing, Longfei; Li, Haiyan; Huang, Tianxuan; Ding, Yongkun

    2016-01-01

    The hohlraum is very crucial for indirect laser driven Inertial Confinement Fusion. Usually, its shape is designed as sphere, cylinder, or rugby with some kind of fixed functions, such as ellipse or parabola. Recently, a spherical hohlraum with octahedral 6 laser entrance holes (LEHs) has been presented with high flux symmetry [Lan et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 010704 (2014); 21, 052704 (2014)]. However, there is only one shape parameter, i.e., the hohlraum to capsule radius ratio, being optimized. In this paper, we build the hohlraum with octahedral 6LEHs with a unified free-form representation, in which, by varying additional shape parameters: (1) available hohlraum shapes can be uniformly and accurately represented, (2) it can be used to understand why the spherical hohlraum has higher flux symmetry, (3) it allows us to obtain a feasible shape design field satisfying flux symmetry constraints, and (4) a synthetically optimized hohlraum can be obtained with a tradeoff of flux symmetry and other hohlraum performance. Finally, the hohlraum with octahedral 6LEHs is modeled, analyzed, and then optimized based on the unified free-form representation. The results show that a feasible shape design field with flux asymmetry no more than 1% can be obtained, and over the feasible design field, the spherical hohlraum is validated to have the highest flux symmetry, and a synthetically optimal hohlraum can be found with closing flux symmetry but larger volume between laser spots and centrally located capsule.

  16. Fabrication and evaluation results of a micro elliptical collimator lens for a beam shape form of laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, K.; Oohira, F.; Hosogi, M.; Hashiguchi, G.; Mihara, Y.; Ogawa, K.

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes a new fabrication process of a micro elliptical collimator lens to form a beam shape for LD(Laser Diode), and the evaluation results of the optical characteristic for this lens. Beam shape of LD is an ellipse because divergent light angle is different between horizontal and vertical direction, which increases a coupling loss with an optical fiber. In this presentation, we propose the lens to form the divergent light of an elliptical beam shape to the collimated light of a circular beam shape. This lens makes it possible to reduce the coupling loss with the optical fiber. For this purpose, we designed one lens, which has different curvature radiuses between incident and output surfaces. In the incident surface, the divergent light is formed to the convergent light, and in the output surface, the convergent light is formed to the collimated light. We simulated the optical characteristic of this lens, and designed for various parameters. In order to fabricate this lens, we propose a new process using a chemically absorbed monomolecular layer, which has an excellent hydrophobic property. This layer is patterned and deposited by a photolithographic technique. Next, we drop a UV(Ultra Violet) cure material on the hydrophilic area, as the result, we can fabricate a micro elliptical lens shape. The curvature radius of this lens can be controlled by the amount of a dropped UV cure material and an elliptical pattern size in horizontal and vertical direction. The formed lens shapes are transferred by the electro-plating and then the micro dies are fabricated. And they are used for molding the plastic lens.

  17. Method for estimating closed-form solutions of the light diffusion equation for turbid media of any boundary shape

    PubMed Central

    Alqasemi, Umar; Salehi, Hassan S.; Zhu, Quing

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a method of estimating an approximate closed-form solution to the light diffusion equation for any type of geometry involving Dirichlet’s boundary condition with known source location. It is based on estimating the optimum locations of multiple imaginary point sources to cancel the fluence at the extrapolated boundary by constrained optimization using a genetic algorithm. The mathematical derivation of the problem to approach the optimum solution for the direct-current type of diffuse optical systems is described in detail. Our method is first applied to slab geometry and compared with a truncated series solution. After that, it is applied to hemispherical geometry and compared with Monte Carlo simulation results. The method provides a fast and sufficiently accurate fluence distribution for optical reconstruction. PMID:26831771

  18. ShapeShop: Free-Form 3D Design with Implicit Solid Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Ryan; Wyvill, Brian

    A technique is described for inflating 2D contours into rounded three-dimensional implicit volumes. Sketch-based modeling operations are defined that combine these basic shapes using standard blending and CSG operators. Since the underlying volume hierarchy is by definition a construction history, individual sketched components can be non-linearly edited and removed. For example, holes can be interactively dragged through a shape. ShapeShop also provides 2D drawing assistance using a new curve-sketching system based on variational contours. A wide range of models can be sketched with ShapeShop, from cartoon-like characters to detailed mechanical parts. Examples are shown which demonstrate significantly higher model complexity than existing systems.

  19. The Shape of Things: The Origin of Young Children's Knowledge of the Names and Properties of Geometric Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verdine, Brian N.; Lucca, Kelsey R.; Golinkoff, Roberta M.; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathryn; Newcombe, Nora S.

    2016-01-01

    How do toddlers learn the names of geometric forms? Previous work suggests that preschoolers have fragmentary knowledge and that defining properties are not understood until well into elementary school. The current study investigated when children first begin to understand shape names and how they apply those labels to unusual instances. We tested…

  20. Hemispheric specialization for language.

    PubMed

    Josse, Goulven; Tzourio-Mazoyer, Nathalie

    2004-01-01

    Hemispheric specialization for language is one of the most robust findings of cognitive neuroscience. In this review, we first present the main hypotheses about the origins of this important aspect of brain organization. These theories are based in part on the main approaches to hemispheric specialization: studies of aphasia, anatomical asymmetries and, nowadays, neuroimaging. All these approaches uncovered a large inter-individual variability which became the bulk of research on hemispheric specialization. This is why, in a second part of the review, we present the main facts about inter-individual variability, trying to relate findings to the theories presented in the first part. This review focuses on neuroimaging as it has recently given important results, thanks to investigations of both anatomical and functional asymmetries in healthy subjects. Such investigations have confirmed that left-handers, especially "familial left-handers", are more likely to have an atypical pattern of hemispheric specialization for language. Differences between men and women seem less evident although a less marked hemispheric specialization for language was depicted in women. As for the supposed relationship between anatomical and functional asymmetries, it has been shown that the size of the left (not the right) planum temporale could explain part of the variability of left hemispheric specialization for language comprehension. Taken as a whole, findings seem to vary with language tasks and brain regions, therefore showing that hemispheric specialization for language is multi-dimensional. This is not accounted for in the existing models of hemispheric specialization. PMID:14739000

  1. Size reduction of hemispherical explosive shells by waterjet

    SciTech Connect

    Crutchmer, J.A.; Do, B.T.; Goodfellow, P.A.

    1995-02-01

    A water jet process has been developed to reduce hemispherical explosive shells to a form that can be recycled. A funnel shaped wet box was modified to hold the shells in place and contain all the explosive chips and slurry generated by the waterjet process. Size reduction was accomplished by cutting in spiral patterns starting at the center of the shell and moving outward. This method of size reduction produces less than one third the amount of waste water and requires less than one half the time to complete compared to conventional machining methods.

  2. Moon - Western Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This image of the western hemisphere of the Moon was taken through a green filter by the Galileo spacecraft at 9:35 a.m. PST Dec. 9 at a range of about 350,000 miles. In the center is the Orientale Basin, 600 miles in diameter, formed about 3.8 billion years ago by the impact of an asteroid-size body. Orientale's dark center is a small mare. To the right is the lunar nearside with the great, dark Oceanus Procellarum above and the small, circular, dark Mare Humorum below. Maria are broad plains formed mostly over 3 billion years ago as vast basaltic lava flows. To the left is the lunar far side with fewer maria but, at lower left, the South-Pole-Aitken basin, about 1200 miles in diameter, which resembles Orientale but is much older and more weathered and battered by cratering. The intervening cratered highlands of both sides, as well as the maria, are dotted with bright, young craters. This image was 'reprojected' so as to center the Orientale Basin, and was filtered to enhance the visibility of small features. The digital image processing was done by DLR, the German Aerospace Research Establishment near Munich, an international collaborator in the Galileo mission.

  3. Actuation profiles to form Zernike shapes with a thermal active mirror.

    PubMed

    Saathof, Rudolf; Schutten, Gerrit Jan M; Spronck, Jo W; Munnig Schmidt, Robert H

    2015-01-15

    In EUV lithography, the absorption of EUV light causes wavefront distortion that deteriorates the imaging process. An adaptive optics system has been developed ["Adaptive optics to counteract thermal aberrations," Ph.D. thesis (TU Delft, 2013)] to correct for this distortion using an active mirror (AM). This AM is thermally actuated by absorbing an irradiance profile exposed by a projector onto the AM. Due to thermal conductivity and bimorph-like deformation of the AM, the relation between actuation profile and actuated shape is not trivial. Therefore, this Letter describes how actuation profiles are obtained to generate Zernike shapes. These actuation profiles have been obtained by a finite-element-based optimization procedure. Furthermore, these actuation profiles are exposed to the AM, and the resulting deformations are measured. This Letter shows actuated Zernike shapes with purities higher than 0.9 for most actuation profiles. In addition, superimposed actuation profiles resulted in superimposed Zernike shapes, showing linearity needed to apply modal wavefront correction. Therefore, this approach can be used to obtain actuation profiles for this AM concept, which can be used for highly precise wavefront correction. PMID:25679845

  4. Hemispherical spondylosclerosis - a polyetiologic syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Dihlmann, W.

    1981-11-01

    Radiologic examination of 43 patients revealed 47 lesions of a type which we have termed hemispherical spondylosclerosis (HSS). This term describes and includes the following essential and possible radiologic findings of the disease: 1) Hemispherical (or dome - or helmet-shaped ) sclerosis of the vertebra above the intervertebral disk. Thus it is a supradiscal HSS. 2) One or more small erosions of the inferior end plate of the vertebra involved. 3) Periosteal apposition on the anterior border of the vertebra along the length of the sclerosis. 4) New bone formation on the inferior end plate. 5) Anterior vertebral osteophytes. 6) Narrowing of the disk space below the affected vertebra. HSS occurs not only as a sequel of degenerative disk disease, but also in bacterial (tuberculous and non-tuberculous) spondylitis, ankylosing spondylitis, osteoid osteoma, and metastases of neoplasms. The differential diagnosis between inflammatory and non-inflammatory pathogenesis and etiology of HSS is described. The characteristic shape of HSS, its sites of predilection (L4 >> L5 > L3), and the preponderance of female sufferers from this painful condition are due to factors which, as yet, remain unknown.

  5. Southern hemisphere observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, Wayne

    Because of insurmountable problems associated with absolute dating, the non-literate cultures of the Southern Hemisphere can contribute little to Applied Historical Astronomy, although Maori traditions document a possible supernova dating to the period 1000-1770 AD. In contrast, the abundant nineteenth century solar, planetary, cometary and stellar observational data provided by Southern Hemisphere professional and amateur observatories can serve as an invaluable mine of information for present-day astronomers seeking to incorporate historical data in their investigations.

  6. Simulation of the shape of chaperonins using the small-angle x-ray scattering curves and torus form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Amarantov, S. V.; Naletova, I. N.; Kurochkina, L. P.

    2011-08-15

    The inverse scattering problem has been solved for protein complexes whose surfaces can be described by a set of the simplest doubly connected surfaces in the uniform approximation (a scattering potential inside the molecule is a constant). Solutions of two proteins-well-known GroEL bacterial chaperonin and poor-studied bacteriophage chaperonin, which is a product of 146 gene (gp146)-were taken for the experiment. The shapes of protein complexes have been efficiently reconstructed from the experimental scattering curves. The shell method, the method of the rotation of amino acid sequences with the use of the form factor of an amino acid, and the method of seeking the model parameters of a protein complex with the preliminarily obtained form factor of the model have been used to reconstruct the shape of these particles.

  7. Story Telling or Storied Telling? Media's Pedagogical Ability to Shape Narrative as a Form of "Knowing"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blevins, Dean G.

    2007-01-01

    Storytellers know that stories are "formed" in their telling. Stories, whether oral or written, personal or mass communicated, ultimately express the boundaries of their medium (their "embodiment" through mediated forms). Religious Educators must always address the medium as well as the message in any theory of narrative accounting. Media often…

  8. Hemispherical Laue camera

    DOEpatents

    Li, James C. M.; Chu, Sungnee G.

    1980-01-01

    A hemispherical Laue camera comprises a crystal sample mount for positioning a sample to be analyzed at the center of sphere of a hemispherical, X-radiation sensitive film cassette, a collimator, a stationary or rotating sample mount and a set of standard spherical projection spheres. X-radiation generated from an external source is directed through the collimator to impinge onto the single crystal sample on the stationary mount. The diffracted beam is recorded on the hemispherical X-radiation sensitive film mounted inside the hemispherical film cassette in either transmission or back-reflection geometry. The distances travelled by X-radiation diffracted from the crystal to the hemispherical film are the same for all crystal planes which satisfy Bragg's Law. The recorded diffraction spots or Laue spots on the film thereby preserve both the symmetry information of the crystal structure and the relative intensities which are directly related to the relative structure factors of the crystal orientations. The diffraction pattern on the exposed film is compared with the known diffraction pattern on one of the standard spherical projection spheres for a specific crystal structure to determine the orientation of the crystal sample. By replacing the stationary sample support with a rotating sample mount, the hemispherical Laue camera can be used for crystal structure determination in a manner previously provided in conventional Debye-Scherrer cameras.

  9. Free form fabrication using the laser engineered net shaping (LENS{trademark}) process

    SciTech Connect

    Keicher, D.M.; Romero, J.A.; Atwood, C.L.; Griffith, M.L.; Jeantette, F.P.; Harwell, L.D.; Greene, D.L.; Smugeresky, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories is developing a technology called Laser Engineered Net Shaping{trademark} (LENS{trademark}). This process allows complex 3-dimensional solid metallic objects to be directly fabricated for a CAD solid model. Experiments performed demonstrate that complex alloys such as Inconel{trademark} 625 and ANSI stainless steel alloy 316 can be used in the LENS{trademark} process to produce solid metallic-shapes. In fact, the fabricated structures exhibit grain growth across the deposition layer boundaries. Mechanical testing data of deposited 316 stainless steel material indicates that the deposited material strength and elongation are greater than that reported for annealed 316 stainless steel. Electron microprobe analysis of the deposited Inconel{trademark} 625 material shows no compositional degradation of the 625 alloy and that 100% dense structures can be obtained using this technique. High speed imaging used to acquire process data during experimentation shows that the powder particle size range can significantly affect the stability, and subsequently, the performance of the powder deposition process. Finally, dimensional studies suggest that dimensional accuracy to {+-} 0.002 inches (in the horizontal direction) can be maintained.

  10. Hemispheric Asymmetries of the Subauroral Ion Drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, F.; Zhang, X.; Wang, W.; Chen, B.

    2015-12-01

    A large database of subauroral ion drifts (SAID) events from DMSP observations from 1987 to 2012 is used to systematically investigate the features of SAID. SAID occurs mostly at ~ 62° / -60° magnetic latitude (MLAT) and ~ 2215 / 2245 magnetic local time (MLT) for geomagnetically quiet conditions and at ~ 58°/ -56° MLAT and ~ 2215 / 2245 MLT for geomagnetically disturbed conditions in the North Hemisphere (NH) / South Hemisphere (SH), respectively. Significant north-south asymmetries in SAID occurrence, shape, and geomagnetic activity variations are found in this statistical study. The latitudinal width of a SAID is larger in the NH than in the SH. An interesting finding of this work is that the SAID occurrence probability peaks have a ~ 180° difference in longitude between the two hemispheres in the geographic coordinates for both geomagnetically quiet and disturbed conditions. The SAID width peaks in almost the same geomagnetic meridian zone with a geomagnetic longitude of ~ 80°-120° in both hemispheres. Significant hemispheric asymmetries and spike signatures with sharpe dips are found in all the latitudinal profiles of the horizontal velocities of SAIDs.The SAID is highly correlated to geomagnetic activity, indicating that the location and evolution of the SAID might be influenced by global geomagnetic activity, auroral dynamics, and the dynamics of ring currents. The hemispheric asymmetries of SAID may possibly be related with the differences of the hemispheric power, the cross-polar cap potential, and the density of region-2 field-aligned currents in the two hemispheres. Detailed investigations will be presented in future.

  11. A non-invasive heuristic approach to shape optimization in forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landkammer, P.; Steinmann, P.

    2016-02-01

    The aim is to determine—relating to a given forming process—the optimal material (undeformed) configuration of a workpiece when knowing the target spatial (deformed) configuration. Therefore, the nodal positions of a discretized setting based on the finite element method (FEM) are the discrete free parameters of the form finding problem. As a verification, inputting the determined optimal material nodal positions, a subsequent re-computation of the forming process should then result in exactly the target spatial nodal positions. A new, non-invasive iterative algorithm, which is purely based on the nodal data of each iteration, is proposed to determine the discretized optimal material configuration. Specifically, the L^2-smoothed deformation gradient at each discretization node is used to update the discretized material configuration by a transformation of the difference vectors between the currently computed and the target spatial nodal positions. The iterative strategy can be easily coupled in a non-invasive fashion via subroutines with arbitrary external FEM software. Since only the computed positions of the discretization nodes are required for an update step within the form finding algorithm, the procedure does not depend on the specific material modelling and is moreover applicable to arbitrary element types, e. g. solid- or solid-shell-elements. Furthermore the convergence rate for solving the form finding problem is nearly linear. This is demonstrated by examples that are realized by a coupling of Matlab (iterative update procedure) and MSC.Marc (external FEM software). Solving the form finding problem to determine an optimum workpiece design is of great interest especially for metal forming applications.

  12. Excitatory cortical neurons with multipolar shape establish neuronal polarity by forming a tangentially oriented axon in the intermediate zone.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Yumiko; Yamauchi, Kenta

    2013-01-01

    The formation of axon-dendrite polarity is crucial for neuron to make the proper information flow within the brain. Although the processes of neuronal polarity formation have been extensively studied using neurons in dissociated culture, the corresponding developmental processes in vivo are still unclear. Here, we illuminate the initial steps of morphological polarization of excitatory cortical neurons in situ, by sparsely labeling their neuroepithelial progenitors using in utero electroporation and then examining their neuronal progeny in brain sections and in slice cultures. Morphological analysis showed that an axon-like long tangential process formed in progeny cells in the intermediate zone (IZ). Time-lapse imaging analysis using slice culture revealed that progeny cells with multipolar shape, after alternately extending and retracting their short processes for several hours, suddenly elongated a long process tangentially. These cells then transformed into a bipolar shape, extending a pia-directed leading process, and migrated radially leaving the tangential process behind, which gave rise to an "L-shaped" axon. Our findings suggest that neuronal polarity in these cells is established de novo from a nonpolarized stage in vivo and indicate that excitatory cortical neurons with multipolar shape in the IZ initiate axon outgrowth before radial migration into the cortical plate. PMID:22267309

  13. Excitatory cortical neurons with multipolar shape establish neuronal polarity by forming a tangentially oriented axon in the intermediate zone.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Yumiko; Yamauchi, Kenta

    2013-01-01

    The formation of axon-dendrite polarity is crucial for neuron to make the proper information flow within the brain. Although the processes of neuronal polarity formation have been extensively studied using neurons in dissociated culture, the corresponding developmental processes in vivo are still unclear. Here, we illuminate the initial steps of morphological polarization of excitatory cortical neurons in situ, by sparsely labeling their neuroepithelial progenitors using in utero electroporation and then examining their neuronal progeny in brain sections and in slice cultures. Morphological analysis showed that an axon-like long tangential process formed in progeny cells in the intermediate zone (IZ). Time-lapse imaging analysis using slice culture revealed that progeny cells with multipolar shape, after alternately extending and retracting their short processes for several hours, suddenly elongated a long process tangentially. These cells then transformed into a bipolar shape, extending a pia-directed leading process, and migrated radially leaving the tangential process behind, which gave rise to an "L-shaped" axon. Our findings suggest that neuronal polarity in these cells is established de novo from a nonpolarized stage in vivo and indicate that excitatory cortical neurons with multipolar shape in the IZ initiate axon outgrowth before radial migration into the cortical plate.

  14. Analysis of Multi-step Forming of Metallic Bipolar Plate for MCFC Using Various Shapes of Preforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Hwan; Ryu, Seung-Min; Yang, Dong-Yol; Kang, Dong-Woo; Chang, In-Gab; Lee, Tae-Won

    2010-06-01

    The metallic bipolar plates of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) consist of a shielded slot plate and a center plate. Among these, the shielded slot plate (the current collector) supports the Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) mechanically. The anode gases and the cathode gases pass through a space between individual slot patterns. The catalysts are located in the upper part of the shielded slot plate. Therefore, triple phase boundaries can be generated, and carbonate ions can act as the mobile charge carrier for the MCFC. Due to these properties, the shielded slot plate should have a sheared corrugated pattern. In order to form a sheared corrugated pattern, a slitting process is required during the first stage of the forming process. However, it is not possible to obtain a high aspect ratio in a sheared corrugated trapezoidal pattern due to the plastic strain concentration on the upper round region of the pattern. Therefore additional forming processes are required to form a high aspect-ratio pattern. For example, the two additional processes such as a "stretching process using a preform" and a "final forming process" can be done subsequent to the first slitting process. Before the final forming process, a stretching process, which forms an intermediate shape (perform), can make the strain distribution more uniform. Hence, various examples of performs were evaluated by using FEM simulation employing simplified boundary conditions. Finally, experiments involving microscopic and macroscopic observations using the proposed shape of a preform were conducted to characterize the formability of the sheared corrugated pattern. It was found that the numerical simulations are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  15. Methodology development for the sustainability process assessment of sheet metal forming of complex-shaped products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, D. L.; Kashapova, L. R.

    2015-06-01

    A methodology was developed for automated assessment of the reliability of the process of sheet metal forming process to reduce the defects in complex components manufacture. The article identifies the range of allowable values of the stamp parameters to obtain defect-free punching of spars trucks.

  16. Recovering two languages with the right hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Marini, Andrea; Galetto, Valentina; Tatu, Karina; Duca, Sergio; Geminiani, Giuliano; Sacco, Katiuscia; Zettin, Marina

    2016-08-01

    Converging evidence suggests that the right hemisphere (RH) plays an important role in language recovery from aphasia after a left hemisphere (LH) lesion. In this longitudinal study we describe the neurological, cognitive, and linguistic profile of A.C., a bilingual who, after a severe traumatic brain injury, developed a form of fluent aphasia that affected his two languages (i.e., Romanian and Italian). The trauma-induced parenchymal atrophy led to an exceptional ventricular dilation that, gradually, affected the whole left hemisphere. A.C. is now recovering both languages relying only on his right hemisphere. An fMRI experiment employing a bilingual covert verb generation task documented the involvement of the right middle temporal gyrus in processes of lexical selection and access. This case supports the hypothesis that the RH plays a role in language recovery from aphasia when the LH has suffered massive lesions. PMID:27289209

  17. Nanorings and nanocrescents formed via shaped nanosphere lithography: a route toward large areas of infrared metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicka, Zuzanna A.; Li, Yang; Bohloul, Arash; Yu, William W.; Colvin, Vicki L.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a new approach to nanosphere lithography, which overcomes undesirable manufacturing issues such as complex tilted-rotary evaporation and ion beam milling. A key innovation in this process is the use of non-conductive edge strips placed on top of the samples prior to metal removal. Such elements help to direct the flow of reactive ions during plasma etching and produce well-ordered arrays of metallic nanorings and nanocrescents over large areas of ˜1 cm2. The obtained highly uniform nanocrescent array exhibits an electric resonance of 1.7 μm and a magnetic resonance of 3 μm. The absorption resonances of the fabricated nanorings depend on their diameters and shift toward shorter wavelengths (λ = 1.7 μm for do = 308 nm) as compared to larger rings (λ = 2.2 μm do = 351 nm). FDTD-based simulations match well with the experimental results. This ‘shaped nanosphere lithography’ approach creates opportunities to generate nanorings and nanocrescents that promise potential applications in chemical and biological sensing, for surface enhanced spectroscopy and in the field of infrared metamaterials.

  18. Spindle-shaped Microstructures: Potential Models for Planktonic Life Forms on Other Worlds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehler, Dorothy Z.; Walsh, Maud M.; Sugitani, Kenichiro; House, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    Spindle-shaped, organic microstructures ("spindles") are now known from Archean cherts in three localities (Figs. 1-4): The 3 Ga Farrel Quartzite from the Pilbara of Australia [1]; the older, 3.3-3.4 Ga Strelley Pool Formation, also from the Pilbara of Australia [2]; and the 3.4 Ga Kromberg Formation of the Barberton Mountain Land of South Africa [3]. Though the spindles were previously speculated to be pseudofossils or epigenetic organic contaminants, a growing body of data suggests that these structures are bona fide microfossils and further, that they are syngenetic with the Archean cherts in which they occur [1-2, 4-10]. As such, the spindles are among some of the oldest-known organically preserved microfossils on Earth. Moreover, recent delta C-13 study of individual spindles from the Farrel Quartzite (using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry [SIMS]) suggests that the spindles may have been planktonic (living in open water), as opposed to benthic (living as bottom dwellers in contact with muds or sediments) [9]. Since most Precambrian microbiotas have been described from benthic, matforming communities, a planktonic lifestyle for the spindles suggests that these structures could represent a segment of the Archean biosphere that is poorly known. Here we synthesize the recent work on the spindles, and we add new observations regarding their geographic distribution, robustness, planktonic habit, and long-lived success. We then discuss their potential evolutionary and astrobiological significance.

  19. How predation shaped fish: the impact of fin spines on body form evolution across teleosts.

    PubMed

    Price, S A; Friedman, S T; Wainwright, P C

    2015-11-22

    It is well known that predators can induce morphological changes in some fish: individuals exposed to predation cues increase body depth and the length of spines. We hypothesize that these structures may evolve synergistically, as together, these traits will further enlarge the body dimensions of the fish that gape-limited predators must overcome. We therefore expect that the orientation of the spines will predict which body dimension increases in the presence of predators. Using phylogenetic comparative methods, we tested this prediction on the macroevolutionary scale across 347 teleost families, which display considerable variation in fin spines, body depth and width. Consistent with our predictions, we demonstrate that fin spines on the vertical plane (dorsal and anal fins) are associated with a deeper-bodied optimum. Lineages with spines on the horizontal plane (pectoral fins) are associated with a wider-bodied optimum. Optimal body dimensions across lineages without spines paralleling the body dimension match the allometric expectation. Additionally, lineages with longer spines have deeper and wider body dimensions. This evolutionary relationship between fin spines and body dimensions across teleosts reveals functional synergy between these two traits and a potential macroevolutionary signature of predation on the evolutionary dynamics of body shape. PMID:26559954

  20. Reaction-Forming Method for Producing Near Net-Shape Refractory Metal Carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Palmisiano, Marc N.; Jakubenas, Kevin J.; Baranwal, Rita

    2004-07-20

    A method for reaction forming refractory metal carbides. The method involves the fabrication of a glassy carbon preform by casting an organic, resin-based liquid mixture into a mold and subsequently heat treating it in two steps, which cures and pyrolizes the resin resulting in a porous carbon preform. By varying the amounts of the constituents in the organic, resin-based liquid mixture, control over the density of the carbon preform is obtained. Control of the density and microstructure of the carbon preform allows for determination of the microstructure and properties of the refractory metal carbide material produced. The glassy carbon preform is placed on a bed of refractory metal or refractory metal--silicon alloy. The pieces are heated above the melting point of the metal or alloy. The molten metal wicks inside the porous carbon preform and reacts, forming the refractory metal carbide or refractory metal carbide plus a minor secondary phase.

  1. Generalized closed-form model for analysis of asymmetric shaped charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdian, A.; Liaghat, G. H.; Ghayour, M.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a model that has less constraints than similar models and explains the collapse phenomenon in any desired order of geometrical asymmetries and in the presence of symmetric and asymmetric general-form wave fronts. It seems that, in this model, a complete generalized form of the classical jet formation theory has been developed. Available models that describe the symmetric jet and slug formation phenomenon are very good in such conditions. But the liner and confinement asymmetries, detonation wave front asymmetries, and other specifications, such as manufacturing tolerances, can affect the collapse and the behavior of the jet and slug. Some proposed models that describe asymmetric cases are not closed-form models or are only applicable for limited conditions, such as small asymmetries and a planar wave front. With the presented model, effects of concave, plane, and convex wave fronts on the off-axis velocity of the jet, other parameters of the jet and slug, and effects of an asymmetric wave front on jet formation for a completely symmetric liner and confinement geometry can be evaluated.

  2. Oxide Scales Formed on NiTi and NiPtTi Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Garg, Anita; Rogers, Richard B.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2011-01-01

    Ni-49Ti and Ni-30Pt-50Ti (at.%) shape memory alloys were oxidized isothermally in air over the temperature range of 500 to 900 C. The microstructure, composition, and phase content of the scales were studied by SEM, EDS, XRD, and metallography. Extensive plan view SEM/EDS identified various features of intact or spalled scale surfaces. The outer surface of the scale was a relatively pure TiO2 rutile structure, typified by a distinct highly striated and faceted crystal morphology. Crystal size increased significantly with temperature. Spalled regions exhibited some porosity and less distinct features. More detailed information was obtained by correlation of SEM/EDS studies of 700 C/100 hr cross-sections with XRD analyses of serial or taper-polishing of plan surfaces. Overall, multiple layers exhibited graded mixtures of NiO, TiO2, NiTiO3, Ni(Ti) or Pt(Ni,Ti) metal dispersoids, Ni3Ti or Pt3Ti depletion zones, and substrate, in that order. The NiTi alloy contained a 3 at.% Fe impurity that appeared in embedded localized Fe-Ti-rich oxides, while the NiPtTi alloy contained a 2 v/o dispersion of TiC that appeared in lower layers. The oxidation kinetics of both alloys (in a previous report) indicated parabolic growth and an activation energy (250 kJ/mole) near those reported in other Ti and NiTi studies. This is generally consistent with TiO2 existing as the primary scale constituent, as described here.

  3. Hemispheric Differences in Processing Handwritten Cursive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellige, Joseph B.; Adamson, Maheen M.

    2007-01-01

    Hemispheric asymmetry was examined for native English speakers identifying consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) non-words presented in standard printed form, in standard handwritten cursive form or in handwritten cursive with the letters separated by small gaps. For all three conditions, fewer errors occurred when stimuli were presented to the right…

  4. Influence of fourfold anisotropy form on hysteresis loop shape in ferromagnetic nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrmann, Andrea; Blachowicz, Tomasz

    2014-08-15

    The dependence of the form of different mathematical depictions of fourfold magnetic anisotropies has been examined, using a simple macro-spin model. Strong differences in longitudinal and transverse hysteresis loops occur due to deviations from the usual phenomenological model, such as using absolute value functions. The proposed possible models can help understanding measurements on sophisticated magnetic nanosystems, like exchange bias layered structures employed in magnetic hard disk heads or magnetic nano-particles, and support the development of solutions with specific magnetization reversal behavior needed in novel magneto-electronic devices.

  5. Synthesis and new structure shaping mechanism of silica particles formed at high pH

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Henan; Zhao, Yu; Akins, Daniel L.

    2012-10-15

    For the sol-gel synthesis of silica particles under high pH catalytic conditions (pH>12) in water/ethanol solvent, we have deduced that the competing dynamics of chemical etching and sol-gel process can explain the types of silica particles formed and their morphologies. We have demonstrated that emulsion droplets that are generated by adding tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) to a water-ethanol solution serve as soft templates for hollow spherical silica (1-2 {mu}m). And if the emulsion is converted by the sol-gel process, one finds that suspended solid silica spheres of diameter of {approx}900 nm are formed. Moreover, several other factors are found to play fundamental roles in determining the final morphologies of silica particles, such as by variation of the pH (in our case, using OH{sup -}) to a level where condensation dominates; by changing the volume ratios of water/ethanol; and using an emulsifier (specifically, CTAB) - Graphical abstract: 'Local chemical etching' and sol-gel process have been proposed to interpret the control of morphologies of silica particles through varying initial pHs in syntheses. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different initial pHs in our syntheses provides morphological control of silica particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 'Local chemical etching' and sol-gel process describes the formation of silica spheres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of emulsions generates hollow silica particles.

  6. On the Shape of Meissner Solutions to a Limiting Form of Ginzburg-Landau Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xingfei

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we study a semilinear system involving the curl operator, which is a limiting form of the Ginzburg-Landau model for superconductors in R^3 for a large value of the Ginzburg-Landau parameter. We consider the locations of the maximum points of the magnitude of solutions, which are associated with the nucleation of instability of the Meissner state for superconductors when the applied magnetic field is increased in the transition between the Meissner state and the vortex state. For small penetration depth, we prove that the location is not only determined by the tangential component of the applied magnetic field, but also by the normal curvatures of the boundary in some directions. This improves the result obtained by Bates and Pan in Commun. Math. Phys. 276, 571-610 (2007). We also show that the solutions decay exponentially in the normal direction away from the boundary if the penetration depth is small.

  7. Visual Experience Shapes Orthographic Representations in the Visual Word Form Area

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Heinz; Ludersdorfer, Philipp; Richlan, Fabio; Kronbichler, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Current neurocognitive research suggests that the efficiency of visual word recognition rests on abstract memory representations of written letters and words stored in the visual word form area (VWFA) in the left ventral occipitotemporal cortex. These representations are assumed to be invariant to visual characteristics such as font and case. In the present functional MRI study, we tested this assumption by presenting written words and varying the case format of the initial letter of German nouns (which are always capitalized) as well as German adjectives and adverbs (both usually in lowercase). As evident from a Word Type × Case Format interaction, activation in the VWFA was greater to words presented in unfamiliar case formats relative to familiar case formats. Our results suggest that neural representations of written words in the VWFA are not fully abstract and still contain information about the visual format in which words are most frequently perceived. PMID:27435995

  8. Visual Experience Shapes Orthographic Representations in the Visual Word Form Area.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Heinz; Ludersdorfer, Philipp; Richlan, Fabio; Kronbichler, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Current neurocognitive research suggests that the efficiency of visual word recognition rests on abstract memory representations of written letters and words stored in the visual word form area (VWFA) in the left ventral occipitotemporal cortex. These representations are assumed to be invariant to visual characteristics such as font and case. In the present functional MRI study, we tested this assumption by presenting written words and varying the case format of the initial letter of German nouns (which are always capitalized) as well as German adjectives and adverbs (both usually in lowercase). As evident from a Word Type × Case Format interaction, activation in the VWFA was greater to words presented in unfamiliar case formats relative to familiar case formats. Our results suggest that neural representations of written words in the VWFA are not fully abstract and still contain information about the visual format in which words are most frequently perceived. PMID:27435995

  9. Glass forming ability and thermodynamic properties of Ti(Zr,Hf)NiCu shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasko, A.; Kolomytsev, V.; Babanly, M.; Sezonenko, A.; Ochin, P.; Portier, R.; Vermaut, Ph.

    2003-10-01

    Rapidly solidified amorphous and crystalline-amorphous ribbons have been produced from a number of quatemary Ti{50+z-x}(Zr,Hf){ x}Ni{50- z-y}Cu{ y} alloys where z =(-5, 0, 5). Structural states were checked by XRD, crystallization behaviour of amorphous phase and martensitic transformations in crystalline material were studied by DSC. The glass transition and crystallization temperatures have been measured at different heating rates, and the crystallization activation energy for each composition and heat event bas been calculated. Isothermal crystallization gives an alternative method of determining the activation energy according to the Arrhenius equation. Contradictory requirements for the conditions of martensitic transformation and good glass forming ability is discussed.

  10. The Effect of Geometric Parameters of Conical Cups on the Preform Shape in Two-Stage Superplastic Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsi-Sarband, Asghar; Hosseinipour, Seyed Jamal; Bakhshi-Jooybari, Mohammad; Shakeri, Mohsen

    2013-12-01

    A combination of sensitivity analysis and finite element simulation has been developed for the preform design in two-stage superplastic forming process. The aim is to present a simple approach to generate an estimate for the preform shape. In this respect, the commercial finite element software ABAQUS/Standard 6.8 was used as a computational tool and sensitivity analysis was used for preform design by minimizing the mean fractional deviation from the target thickness as an objective function. The predicted preform was verified through comparison with experimental results by investigating the deformation of AA5083 sheet at temperature of 500 °C. The effect of the geometric parameters of conical cups on the preform shape was examined. The results showed that the geometric parameters have a significant effect on the preform shape. By increasing the height and the cone angle of the final cup, the depth of the preform in the inner cavity decreases and the dome region is approached to the center of the preform cup. By increasing the corner radius of the final-die, only the height of the dome region decreases.

  11. Hemispheric lateralization in reasoning.

    PubMed

    Turner, Benjamin O; Marinsek, Nicole; Ryhal, Emily; Miller, Michael B

    2015-11-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that reasoning in humans relies on a number of related processes whose neural loci are largely lateralized to one hemisphere or the other. A recent review of this evidence concluded that the patterns of lateralization observed are organized according to two complementary tendencies. The left hemisphere attempts to reduce uncertainty by drawing inferences or creating explanations, even at the cost of ignoring conflicting evidence or generating implausible explanations. Conversely, the right hemisphere aims to reduce conflict by rejecting or refining explanations that are no longer tenable in the face of new evidence. In healthy adults, the hemispheres work together to achieve a balance between certainty and consistency, and a wealth of neuropsychological research supports the notion that upsetting this balance results in various failures in reasoning, including delusions. However, support for this model from the neuroimaging literature is mixed. Here, we examine the evidence for this framework from multiple research domains, including an activation likelihood estimation analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of reasoning. Our results suggest a need to either revise this model as it applies to healthy adults or to develop better tools for assessing lateralization in these individuals. PMID:26426534

  12. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowski, Lawrence

    1982-01-01

    Hemispheric specialization tasks were given to different-aged boys. Asymmetries were demonstrated on manual, visual, and auditory tasks; however, the degree of asymmetries did not change across age groups. There appears to be a dissociation between visual and auditory perceptual asymmetries. (Author/RD)

  13. Retraining in literal alexia: substitution of a right hemisphere perceptual strategy for impaired left hemispheric processing.

    PubMed

    Carmon, A; Gordon, H W; Bental, E; Harness, B Z

    1977-07-01

    An adult patient with literal alexia, agraphia, slight anomia, and dyscalculia due to a left hemisphere infarct showed lack of sequential skills while pattern recognition remained intact. Some words were recognized as patterns, but could not be read phonetically. Therapy concentrated on forming an association of the visual pattern of the complete word with the retained auditory pattern. In this way the patient learned to read several hundred words and short phrases, even as anomia worsened. The patterns learned could not be generalized to noun declension or verb conjugation, or broken into smaller words. This learning process is characteristic of right hemispheric skills which were utilized as left hemispheric functions deteriorated. PMID:617048

  14. Thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of variations in shapes of ridges formed on l brace 100 r brace lithium fluoride surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, J.W.; Glaeser, A.M.; Searcy, A.W.

    1991-12-01

    channels with widths in the range form 5 {mu}m were formed in {l brace}100{r brace} surfaces of LiF single crystals by a photolithographic technique. Specimens annealed at or above 0.90 T{mu}m, where T{mu} is the melting point, and then quenched showed the channels and the ridges between them develop rounded profiles. Evolution of these profiles was evaluated for the various channel widths and for interchannel ridge spacings of 5 to 100 {mu}m in terms of: (a) an accepted theoretical model for a surface diffusion controlled process, and (b) a model which assumes that shape changes depend only on the relative energies of attachment of atoms in surface sites with various surface curvatures. Either model is consistent with the experimental observations to within the reproducibility in measurements.

  15. Root phototropism: how light and gravity interact in shaping plant form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, John Z.; Correll, Melanie J.; Mullen, Jack L.; Hangarter, Roger P.; Edelmann, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    The interactions among tropisms can be critical in determining the final growth form of plants and plant organs. We have studied tropistic responses in roots as an example of these type of interactions. While gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response in roots, phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth in this organ in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism, but red light induces positive phototropism. In the flowering plant Arabidopsis, the photosensitive pigments phytochrome A (phyA) and phytochrome B (phyB) mediate this positive red-light-based photoresponse in roots since single mutants (and the double phyAB mutant) were severely impaired in this response. While blue-light-based negative phototropism is primarily mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors, the phyA and phyAB mutants (but not phyB) were inhibited in this response relative to the WT. The differences observed in phototropic responses were not due to growth limitations since the growth rates among all the mutants tested were not significantly different from that of the WT. Thus, our study shows that the blue-light and red-light systems interact in plants and that phytochrome plays a key role in integrating multiple environmental stimuli.

  16. Root phototropism: how light and gravity interact in shaping plant form.

    PubMed

    Kiss, John Z; Correll, Melanie J; Mullen, Jack L; Hangarter, Roger P; Edelmann, Richard E

    2003-06-01

    The interactions among tropisms can be critical in determining the final growth form of plants and plant organs. We have studied tropistic responses in roots as an example of these type of interactions. While gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response in roots, phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth in this organ in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism, but red light induces positive phototropism. In the flowering plant Arabidopsis, the photosensitive pigments phytochrome A (phyA) and phytochrome B (phyB) mediate this positive red-light-based photoresponse in roots since single mutants (and the double phyAB mutant) were severely impaired in this response. While blue-light-based negative phototropism is primarily mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors, the phyA and phyAB mutants (but not phyB) were inhibited in this response relative to the WT. The differences observed in phototropic responses were not due to growth limitations since the growth rates among all the mutants tested were not significantly different from that of the WT. Thus, our study shows that the blue-light and red-light systems interact in plants and that phytochrome plays a key role in integrating multiple environmental stimuli.

  17. Different shapes of impurity concentration profiles formed by long-range interstitial migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velichko, O. I.

    2016-09-01

    A model of interstitial impurity migration is proposed which explains the redistribution of ion-implanted boron in low-temperature annealing of nonamorphized silicon layers. It is supposed that nonequilibrium boron interstitials are generated either in the course of ion implantation or at the initial stage of thermal treatment and that they migrate inward and to the surface of a semiconductor in the basic stage of annealing. It is shown that the form of the “tail” in the boron profile with the logarithmic concentration axis changes from a straight line if the average lifetime of impurity interstitials is substantially shorter than the annealing duration to that bending upwards for increasing lifetime. The calculated impurity concentration profiles are in excellent agreement with the experimental data describing the redistribution of implanted boron for low-temperature annealing at 750∘C for 1h and at 800∘C for 35min. Simultaneously, the experimental phenomenon of incomplete electrical activation of boron atoms in the “tail” region is naturally explained.

  18. Experimental evaluation of a new flocculation-filtration model for ceramic shape forming processes

    SciTech Connect

    Haerle, A.G.; Haber, R.A.

    1996-09-01

    The effect of suspension rheology on the casting mechanics of 37 vol% aqueous silicon carbide slips was examined. Slip viscosities of 180, 120,m 90, and 58 mPa{center_dot}s were evaluated. The 58 mPa{center_dot}s slip was considered to be fully deflocculated; the others were underdeflocculated to varying degrees. The fully deflocculated slip cast according to parabolic rate behavior, while the others cast at a faster than parabolic rate behavior, while the others cast at a faster than parabolic rate. Deviations from parabolic rate behavior were correlated with a nonuniform cake structure observed through ultrasound and mercury porosimetry measurements. The observed casting behavior was explained on the basis of a suspension flocculation-filtration model. From rheological measurements, it was found that flocculation of the SiC particles during casting in the underdeflocculated suspensions caused the local void volume within the forming cake to increase as a function of cake thickness. The fully deflocculated slip was rheologically stable, and therefore cast with a uniform microstructure.

  19. Mars life: how Darwinian pressures might have shaped its form and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Gilbert V.

    2005-09-01

    The possible existence of life on Mars is now gaining credence. Evidence consistent with or supporting the presence of extant microbial life, as reported by a life detection experiment on the Viking Mission in 1976, has been rapidly accumulating from spacecraft orbital and lander operations, and from terrestrial observations. Vast oceans of frozen water near the planet's surface are being discovered, with strong indications of recent or present liquid flows, and theory and laboratory experiment have demonstrated that liquid water should exist on the surface of Mars. The biosphere on Earth has been extended into extreme environments until recently thought inimical to life. Places void of life have become rare. No life requirement has been found lacking on Mars. It is possible that, by the time of this 50th Anniversary SPIE Meeting, the paradigm shift accepting life beyond the Earth may have been made. Mankind will then emerge from its ancient fear of loneliness into a new fear of anticipation of what that still unidentified life might portend. The author attempts to apply Darwinian principles of evolution to life on Mars under the selection pressures, opportunities and constraints that have been imposed by past and present Martian conditions. Starting with the type of cell believed to have begun the evolutionary process on Earth, he speculates on what the current life on Mars may be like in form and function, including what threat or promise it might hold for Earth life.

  20. Genetic algorithm optimization of the forming process in case of a U-shaped part made from tailor welded blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurelian, Albut

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents an optimization method to minimize the springback phenomenon, which generate the main dimensional errors in case of sheet metal forming. The present work deals with numerical simulation related to draw bending and springback of U-shaped part made from tailor welded blanks. The base materials from tailor welded blanks have different springback behaviours, fact that must be taken in consideration in the optimisation process. The Dynaform 5.8.1 software was used to simulate the forming process, in which the blank holder is segmented in two parts in order to apply different holding force for each material. In this research the blank holder forces and the deformation speed take different numerical values. The factorial simulations test plan was made using the Design Experts 7.0 software to cover completely the variation domain. The part obtained after each simulation is analyzed and measured to quantify the errors caused by springback. Parameters as: angle between flange and sidewall, angle between sidewall and part bottom are recorded in a data base. The initial simulations plan together with the obtained results is used to understand the influence of the variable parameters on the springback behaviour of the U-shaped part made from tailor welded blanks. The gained knowledge is used to generate the objective function required by the genetic algorithm optimization method.

  1. Geological Mapping of Tectonized Terrains in the Trailing Hemisphere of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow-Willard, E. N.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2009-05-01

    Saturn's moon Enceladus has a currently active South Polar Terrain (SPT) that is intensely tectonized. Other portions of the surface of Enceladus, specifically the trailing hemisphere, have also been intensely tectonized, inviting comparisons to the SPT. Through geological mapping, we recognize seven different geological units and their relative ages on the trailing hemisphere. From oldest to youngest, they are: (1) heavily cratered terrain, at the northern edge of the tectonized region; (2) moderately cratered terrain, to the northeast and northwest of the tectonized region; (3) finely striated ridge and trough terrain, which make up the bulk of Sarandib and Diyar Planitiae; (4) boundary curved terrain, which is similar in shape to the southern curved terrain that comprises the northern edge of the SPT, but with more subdued topography, and is composed of Samarkand, Hamah, and Harran Sulci; (5) ridged terrain, composed of the Cufa Dorsa and Ebony Dorsum, which probably formed through deformation of older finely striated ridge and trough terrain; (6) terrain with linear, widely spaced, smooth depressions, comprising the southern portion of the trailing hemisphere's tectonized region; (7) southern curved terrain of Cashmere Sulci, which forms the northern boundary of the SPT. Fractures that are younger than or contemporaneous with the SPT's southern curved terrain (including Labtayt Sulci and Khorasan Fossa) cut across the trailing hemisphere. We will present a geological map of the region, along with interpretations of the stratigraphy and geological history that our mapping implies. We will address geological and age comparisons relative to the SPT, with implications for whether similar or different processes have shaped the SPT and the tectonized trailing hemisphere.

  2. Right hemispheric dominance of visual phenomena evoked by intracerebral stimulation of the human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Jacques; Frismand, Solène; Vignal, Jean-Pierre; Colnat-Coulbois, Sophie; Koessler, Laurent; Vespignani, Hervé; Rossion, Bruno; Maillard, Louis

    2014-07-01

    Electrical brain stimulation can provide important information about the functional organization of the human visual cortex. Here, we report the visual phenomena evoked by a large number (562) of intracerebral electrical stimulations performed at low-intensity with depth electrodes implanted in the occipito-parieto-temporal cortex of 22 epileptic patients. Focal electrical stimulation evoked primarily visual hallucinations with various complexities: simple (spot or blob), intermediary (geometric forms), or complex meaningful shapes (faces); visual illusions and impairments of visual recognition were more rarely observed. With the exception of the most posterior cortical sites, the probability of evoking a visual phenomenon was significantly higher in the right than the left hemisphere. Intermediary and complex hallucinations, illusions, and visual recognition impairments were almost exclusively evoked by stimulation in the right hemisphere. The probability of evoking a visual phenomenon decreased substantially from the occipital pole to the most anterior sites of the temporal lobe, and this decrease was more pronounced in the left hemisphere. The greater sensitivity of the right occipito-parieto-temporal regions to intracerebral electrical stimulation to evoke visual phenomena supports a predominant role of right hemispheric visual areas from perception to recognition of visual forms, regardless of visuospatial and attentional factors. PMID:24733699

  3. Right hemispheric dominance of visual phenomena evoked by intracerebral stimulation of the human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Jacques; Frismand, Solène; Vignal, Jean-Pierre; Colnat-Coulbois, Sophie; Koessler, Laurent; Vespignani, Hervé; Rossion, Bruno; Maillard, Louis

    2014-07-01

    Electrical brain stimulation can provide important information about the functional organization of the human visual cortex. Here, we report the visual phenomena evoked by a large number (562) of intracerebral electrical stimulations performed at low-intensity with depth electrodes implanted in the occipito-parieto-temporal cortex of 22 epileptic patients. Focal electrical stimulation evoked primarily visual hallucinations with various complexities: simple (spot or blob), intermediary (geometric forms), or complex meaningful shapes (faces); visual illusions and impairments of visual recognition were more rarely observed. With the exception of the most posterior cortical sites, the probability of evoking a visual phenomenon was significantly higher in the right than the left hemisphere. Intermediary and complex hallucinations, illusions, and visual recognition impairments were almost exclusively evoked by stimulation in the right hemisphere. The probability of evoking a visual phenomenon decreased substantially from the occipital pole to the most anterior sites of the temporal lobe, and this decrease was more pronounced in the left hemisphere. The greater sensitivity of the right occipito-parieto-temporal regions to intracerebral electrical stimulation to evoke visual phenomena supports a predominant role of right hemispheric visual areas from perception to recognition of visual forms, regardless of visuospatial and attentional factors.

  4. Net Shape Spin Formed Cryogenic Aluminum Lithium Cryogenic Tank Domes for Lower Cost Higher Performance Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Hoffman, Eric; Domack, Marcia; Brewster, Jeb; Russell, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    With the goal of lower cost (simplified manufacturing and lower part count) and higher performance (higher strength to weight alloys) the NASA Technical Maturation Program in 2006 funded a proposal to investigate spin forming of space launch vehicle cryogenic tank domes. The project funding continued under the NASA Exploration Technology Development Program through completion in FY12. The first phase of the project involved spin forming of eight, 1 meter diameter "path finder" domes. Half of these were processed using a concave spin form process (MT Aerospace, Augsburg Germany) and the other half using a convex process (Spincraft, Boston MA). The convex process has been used to produce the Ares Common Bulkhead and the concave process has been used to produce dome caps for the Space Shuttle light weight external tank and domes for the NASDA H2. Aluminum Lithium material was chosen because of its higher strength to weight ratio than the Aluminum 2219 baseline. Aluminum lithium, in order to obtain the desired temper (T8), requires a cold stretch after the solution heat treatment and quench. This requirement favors the concave spin form process which was selected for scale up. This paper describes the results of processing four, 5.5 meter diameter (upper stage scale) net shaped spin formed Aluminum Lithium domes. In order to allow scalability beyond the limits of foundry and rolling mills (about 12 foot width) the circular blank contained one friction stir weld (heavy lifter scales require a flat blank containing two welds). Mechanical properties data (tensile, fracture toughness, stress corrosion, and simulated service testing) for the parent metal and weld will also be discussed.

  5. Free-form Airfoil Shape Optimization Under Uncertainty Using Maximum Expected Value and Second-order Second-moment Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huyse, Luc; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Free-form shape optimization of airfoils poses unexpected difficulties. Practical experience has indicated that a deterministic optimization for discrete operating conditions can result in dramatically inferior performance when the actual operating conditions are different from the - somewhat arbitrary - design values used for the optimization. Extensions to multi-point optimization have proven unable to adequately remedy this problem of "localized optimization" near the sampled operating conditions. This paper presents an intrinsically statistical approach and demonstrates how the shortcomings of multi-point optimization with respect to "localized optimization" can be overcome. The practical examples also reveal how the relative likelihood of each of the operating conditions is automatically taken into consideration during the optimization process. This is a key advantage over the use of multipoint methods.

  6. Supramolecular columnar liquid crystals formed by hydrogen bonding between a clicked star-shaped s-triazine and benzoic acids.

    PubMed

    Feringán, Beatriz; Romero, Pilar; Serrano, José Luis; Giménez, Raquel; Sierra, Teresa

    2015-06-01

    A star-shaped tris(triazolyl)triazine is shown to establish hydrogen-bond interactions with polycatenar benzoic acids. The formation of hydrogen-bonded triazine/acid complexes has been demonstrated both in solution and in bulk by different techniques. The complexes, mainly formed by nonmesogenic components, all show enantiotropic hexagonal columnar mesomorphism, which relies on the formation of hydrogen-bond complexes in a triazine/acid ratio of 1:3. This approach combines the straightforward synthesis of a nonmesomorphic triazine core by click chemistry, and the preparation of a supramolecular complex, providing a much more convenient route than covalent synthesis to modify the periphery of triazine discotics and thus to modulate their functionality.

  7. Processes for forming exoergic structures with the use of a plasma and for producing dense refractory bodies of arbitrary shape therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Holt, J. Birch; Kelly, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    Plasma spraying methods of forming exoergic structures and coatings, as well as exoergic structures produced by such methods, are provided. The methods include the plasma spraying of reactive exoergic materials that are capable of sustaining a combustion synthesis reaction onto a flat substrate or into molds of arbitrary shape and igniting said plasma sprayed materials, either under an inert gas pressure or not, to form refractory materials of varying densities and of varying shapes.

  8. Triton's Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This polar projection of Triton's southern hemisphere provides a view of the southern polar cap and bright equatorial fringe. The margin of the cap is scalloped and ranges in latitude from +10 degrees to -30 degrees. The bright fringe is closely associated with the cap's margin; from it, diffuse bright rays extend north-northeast for hundreds of kilometers. The bright fringe probably consists of very fresh nitrogen frost or snow, and the rays consist of bright-fringe materials that were redistributed by north-moving Coriolis-deflected winds.

  9. Electroformation of uranium hemispherical shells

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, S.L.; Redey, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Vissers, D.R.

    1989-11-01

    This effort was directed at developing an electrochemical process for forming uniform and dendrite-free deposits of uranium from molten salts. This process is to be used for the electroformation of free-standing hemispherical shells of uranium for nuclear applications. Electrodeposition of uranium onto a substrate was accomplished with a fused chloride mixture containing 42 wt% UCl{sub 3} and a fused chloride-fluoride mixture containing 4 wt % UF{sub 4}. Under pulsed potential control at 504{degree}C, the chloride-fluoride mixture yielded the widest range of plating conditions for which dendrites could be avoided. Bipolar current pulse plating with both electrolytes gave good results, and successful application of this technique to a large tubular cathode has been demonstrated. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  10. "Janus" supermolecular liquid crystals--giant molecules with hemispherical architectures.

    PubMed

    Saez, Isabel M; Goodby, John W

    2003-10-17

    Liquid crystals represent a unique class of self-organising systems, which although found in many day-to-day practical material applications, such as displays, are also intimately entwined with living processes. They have the potential, just like living systems, to provide us with a unique vehicle for the development of self-ordering nano- and mesoscopic-engineered materials with specific functional properties. In this article we describe a new concept for the design of self-assembling functional liquid crystals as segmented or "Janus" liquid-crystalline supermolecular materials in the form of structures that contain two different types of mesogenic units, which favour different types of mesophase structure, grafted onto the same star-shaped scaffold to create supermolecules that contain different hemispheres. The materials exhibit chiral nematic and chiral smectic C phases.

  11. Thermal softening of metallic shaped-charge jets formed by the collapse of shaped-charge liners in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, S. V.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the possibility of increasing the ultimate stretching and penetration capability of metallic shaped-charge jets in the presence of an axial magnetic field in the shaped-charge liner due to heating and thermal softening of the jet material as a result of a sharp increase in the magnetic-field induction in the jet formation region upon liner collapse. This process is studied by numerical simulation in a quasi-two-dimensional formulation taking into account the inertial stretching of the conductive rigid-plastic rod in the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field in it.

  12. Bio-inspired hemispherical compound eye camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jianliang; Song, Young Min; Xie, Yizhu; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Jung, Inhwa; Choi, Ki-Joong; Liu, Zhuangjian; Park, Hyunsung; Lu, Chaofeng; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Li, Rui; Crozier, Kenneth B.; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2014-03-01

    Compound eyes in arthropods demonstrate distinct imaging characteristics from human eyes, with wide angle field of view, low aberrations, high acuity to motion and infinite depth of field. Artificial imaging systems with similar geometries and properties are of great interest for many applications. However, the challenges in building such systems with hemispherical, compound apposition layouts cannot be met through established planar sensor technologies and conventional optics. We present our recent progress in combining optics, materials, mechanics and integration schemes to build fully functional artificial compound eye cameras. Nearly full hemispherical shapes (about 160 degrees) with densely packed artificial ommatidia were realized. The number of ommatidia (180) is comparable to those of the eyes of fire ants and bark beetles. The devices combine elastomeric compound optical elements with deformable arrays of thin silicon photodetectors, which were fabricated in the planar geometries and then integrated and elastically transformed to hemispherical shapes. Imaging results and quantitative ray-tracing-based simulations illustrate key features of operation. These general strategies seem to be applicable to other compound eye devices, such as those inspired by moths and lacewings (refracting superposition eyes), lobster and shrimp (reflecting superposition eyes), and houseflies (neural superposition eyes).

  13. Prediction and explanation of increases of mean sea levels in northern hemisphere, in southern hemisphere and all ocean of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yu. V.

    2009-04-01

    bottom pressure in the northern ocean must be observed, and in the southern ocean - decreasing. By our theoretical estimations the mean atmospheric pressure in the northern hemisphere accrues with velocity about 0.17 mbar/yr and with similar negative velocity in southern hemisphere. The predicted phenomenon of a slow redistribution of air masses from the southern hemisphere in northern has already obtained a partially confirmation according to the meteorological observations [4]: 0.17-0.22 mbar/yr (northern hemisphere) and -0.18 mbar/yr (southern hemisphere). In the report the mechanisms of the revealed phenomena, their dynamic interrelation are discussed and an possible interpretation to the data of observations is given. 3 Contrast changes of mean sea levels in northern and southern hemispheres. The air masses slowly are transported from a southern hemisphere in northern. They form an original inversion secular atmospheric tide which existence proves to be true by the modern data of observations [4]. The gravitational attraction of the core which is displaced along a polar axis causes the similar tide of oceanic masses [2]. The barometric effect of influence of atmospheric tide will result in reduction of expected secular oceanic tide. Really, an increase of mean atmospheric pressure in the northern hemisphere results in replacement of oceanic masses in the southern hemisphere. Only for this reason the mean sea level in the northern hemisphere decreases with secular velocity -1.98 mm/yr. In turn a decrease of atmospheric pressure in the southern hemisphere results in an increase of the mean sea level in this hemisphere with velocity 1.43 mm/yr. Preliminary estimations have shown, that a oceanic inversion tide, caused by a gravitational attraction of the drifting core, gives the basic contribution to the phenomenon of secular variation of the mean sea level in N and S hemispheres (in northern hemisphere the mean sea level increases with velocity 3.01±0.17 mm/yr and in

  14. Right Hemisphere and Left Hemisphere: Pedagogical Implications for CSL Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickel, Stanley L.

    Students can be taught to read Chinese more efficiently and accurately by using the specific capabilities of the right and left hemispheres of the brain. The right hemisphere is the site of image and pattern recognition, and students can be taught to use those capacities to process individual characters efficiently by watching for the element of…

  15. Callisto Hemispherical Globes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The images used for the base of this globe were chosen from the best image quality and moderate resolution coverage supplied by Galileo SSI and Voyager 1 and 2 (Batson, 1987; Becker and others, 1998; Becker and others, 1999; Becker and others, 2001). The digital map was produced using Integrated Software for Imagers and Spectrometers (ISIS) (Eliason, 1997; Gaddis and others, 1997; Torson and Becker, 1997). The individual images were radiometrically calibrated and photometrically normalized using a Lunar-Lambert function with empirically derived values (McEwen, 1991; Kirk and others, 2000). A linear correction based on the statistics of all overlapping areas was then applied to minimize image brightness variations. The image data were selected on the basis of overall image quality, reasonable original input resolution (from 20 km/pixel for gap fill to as much as 150 m/pixel), and availability of moderate emission/incidence angles for topography. Although consistency was achieved where possible, different filters were included for global image coverage as necessary: clear for Voyager 1 and 2; clear and green (559 nm) for Galileo SSI. Individual images were projected to a Sinusoidal Equal-Area projection at an image resolution of 1.0 kilometer/pixel, and a final global mosaic was constructed in this same projection. The final mosaic was enhanced using commercial software. The global mosaic was then reprojected so that the entire surface of Callisto is portrayed in a manner suitable for the production of a globe. A specialized program was used to create the 'flower petal' appearance of the images; the area of each petal from 0 to 75 degrees latitude is in the Transverse Mercator projection, and the area from 75 to 90 degrees latitude is in the Lambert Azimuthal Equal-Area projection. The projections for adjacent petals overlap by 2 degrees of longitude, so that some features are shown twice. The northern hemisphere is shown on the left, and the southern hemisphere is

  16. Circular single domains in hemispherical Permalloy nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo, Clodoaldo I. L de Fonseca, Jakson M.; Sinnecker, João P.; Delatorre, Rafael G.; Garcia, Nicolas; Pasa, André A.

    2014-11-14

    We have studied ferromagnetic Permalloy clusters obtained by electrodeposition on n-type silicon. Magnetization measurements reveal hysteresis loops almost independent on temperature and very similar in shape to those obtained in nanodisks with diameter bigger than 150 nm. The spin configuration for the ground state, obtained by micromagnetic simulation, shows topological vortices with random chirality and polarization. This behavior in the small diameter clusters (∼80 nm) is attributed to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction that arises in its hemispherical geometries. This magnetization behavior can be utilized to explain the magnetoresistance measured with magnetic field in plane and out of sample plane.

  17. Io's Kanehekili Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This color composite of Io, acquired by Galileo during its ninth orbit (C9) of Jupiter, shows the hemisphere of Io which is centered at longitude 52 degrees. The dark feature just to the lower right of the center of the disk is called Kanehekili. Named after an Hawaiian thunder god, Kanehekili contains two persistent high temperature hot spots and a 'new' active volcanic plume. NASA's Voyager spacecraft returned images of nine active plumes during its 1979 flyby of this dynamic satellite. To date, Galileo's plume monitoring observations have shown continued activity at four of those nine plume locations as well as new activity at six other locations.

    North is to the top of the picture which combines images acquired using violet, green, and near-infrared (756 micrometers) filters. The resolution is 21 kilometers per picture element. The images were taken on June 27, 1997 at a range of 1,033,000 kilometers by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  18. Callisto's Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These views of Callisto's southern hemisphere were taken by the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer just after closest approach in orbit G8 on May 6, 1997. These false color images show surface compositional differences, red = more ice, blue = less ice.

    The upper left view contains Buri, a crater with a diameter of about 60 km. In the infrared spectrum, Buri and the rays that extend from the crater have high abundance of water ice compared to the surrounding region. The center view, a large (200 km or 120 mile diameter) unnamed impact crater with a distinct ring or circle around it reveals a complex mix of ice and non-ice materials. This is possibly due to impact excavation of the ice-rich subsurface which suggests that the darker material is just a thin surface covering caused by impact debris or a lag deposit from which the ice has evaporated away. The infrared data shows spectral signatures for both sulfur and carbon as two potential materials which could play a part in the complicated make-up of Callisto's surface.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  19. Detonation in TATB Hemispheres

    SciTech Connect

    Druce, B; Souers, P C; Chow, C; Roeske, F; Vitello, P; Hrousis, C

    2004-03-17

    Streak camera breakout and Fabry-Perot interferometer data have been taken on the outer surface of 1.80 g/cm{sup 3} TATB hemispherical boosters initiated by slapper detonators at three temperatures. The slapper causes breakout to occur at 54{sup o} at ambient temperatures and 42{sup o} at -54 C, where the axis of rotation is 0{sup o}. The Fabry velocities may be associated with pressures, and these decrease for large timing delays in breakout seen at the colder temperatures. At room temperature, the Fabry pressures appear constant at all angles. Both fresh and decade-old explosive are tested and no difference is seen. The problem has been modeled with reactive flow. Adjustment of the JWL for temperature makes little difference, but cooling to -54 C decreases the rate constant by 1/6th. The problem was run both at constant density and with density differences using two different codes. The ambient code results show that a density difference is probably there but it cannot be quantified.

  20. The Southern Hemisphere VLBI experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.A.; Meier, D.L.; Louie, A.P.; Morabito, D.D.; Skjerve, L.; Slade, M.A.; Niell, A.E.; Wehrle, A.E.; Jauncey, D.L.; Tzioumis, A.K.; Haystack Observatory, Westford, MA; California Univ., Los Angeles; CSIRO, Div. of Radiophysics, Epping; Sydney Univ.; Manchester Victoria Univ., Jodrell Bank )

    1989-07-01

    Six radio telescopes were operated as the first Southern Hemisphere VLBI array in April and May 1982. Observations were made at 2.3 and 8.4 GHz. This array provided VLBI modeling and hybrid imaging of celestial radio sources in the Southern Hemisphere, high-accuracy VLBI geodesy between Southern Hemisphere sites, and subarcsecond radio astrometry of celestial sources south of declination -45 deg. The goals and implementation of the array are discussed, the methods of modeling and hybrid image production are explained, and the VLBI structure of the sources that were observed is summarized. 36 refs.

  1. Analysis of grounding systems in soils with hemispherical layering

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.; Dawalibi, F.P. ); Daily, W.K. )

    1993-10-01

    A theoretical model for the analysis of grounding systems located inside or near hemispherical soil heterogeneities is presented for the first time. Exact closed-form analytical expressions for the earth potential calculations due to current sources in different regions of this soil structure have been obtained. Numerical results are presented for different grounding systems and for different types of hemispherical soil volumes. The results clearly show that these finite hemispherical soil heterogeneities have a significant influence on the performance of grounding systems. The results obtained are in agreement with well known simple case results and converge asymptotically to the uniform soil case.

  2. Heat transfer distributions around nominal ice accretion shapes formed on a cylinder in the NASA Lewis icing research tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanfossen, G. J.; Simoneau, R. J.; Olsen, W. A.; Shaw, R. J.

    Local heat transfer coefficients were obtained on irregular cylindrical shapes which typify the accretion of ice on circular cylinders in cross flow. The ice shapes were grown on a 5.1 cm (2.0 in.) diameter cylinder in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel. The shapes were 2, 5, and 15 min accumulations of glaze ice and 15 min accumulation of rime ice. Heat transfer coefficients were also measured around the cylinder with no ice accretion. These icing shapes were averaged axially to obtain a nominal shape of constant cross section for the heat transfer tests. Heat transfer coefficients around the perimeter of each shape were measured with electrically heated copper strips embedded in the surface of the model which was cast from polyurethane foam. Each strip contained a thermocouple to measure the local surface temperature. The models were run in a 15.2 x 68.6 cm (6 x 27 in.) wind tunnel at several velocities. Background turbulence in the wind tunnel was less than 0.5 percent. The models were also run with a turbulence producing grid which gave about 3.5 percent turbulence at the model location with the model removed. The effect of roughness was also simulated with sand grains glued to the surface. Results are presented as Nusselt number versus angle from the stagnation line for the smooth and rough models for both high and low levels of free stream turblence. Roughness of the surface in the region prior to flow separation plays a major role in determining the heat transfer distribution.

  3. Archimedes and the Magdeburg Hemispheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayn, Carl H.

    1975-01-01

    Weights suspended from a lever arm separate evacuated hemispheres allowing estimation of atmospheric pressure to within five percent of the barometric reading. An illustration and a reference to von Guericke's demonstration are provided. (GH)

  4. Brain Hemispheres and Thinking Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Esther Cappon

    1980-01-01

    The author reviews some research, particularly that of Roger Sperry, substantiating the existence of different thinking styles in the two brain hemispheres and the development of this differentiation in infancy and childhood. She draws some implications for elementary teaching. (SJL)

  5. Disentangling the relationship between hemispheric asymmetry and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Hirnstein, Marco; Leask, Stuart; Rose, Jonas; Hausmann, Markus

    2010-07-01

    It is widely believed that advantages of hemispheric asymmetries originated in better cognitive processing, hence it is often implied that the relationship between hemispheric asymmetry and cognitive performance is linearly positive: the higher the degree of lateralization in a specific cognitive domain, the better the performance in a corresponding task. Yet, the empirical evidence for this notion is mixed and the statistical methods to analyze this relationship have been criticized. The present study therefore investigated the relationship between hemispheric asymmetries and cognitive performance in two behavioral tasks (a left-lateralized word-matching task and a right-lateralized face-decision task) in 230 participants (140 women, 90 men) by using two different approaches. Both methods correspondingly revealed that a relationship between hemispheric asymmetries and cognitive performance does exist. Contrary to a positive (linear) relationship however, the data could be best described by an inverted U-shaped curve. Although the optimal degree of lateralization seemed to be task-specific, a slight or moderate degree of hemispheric asymmetry achieved best cognitive performance in all tasks. Moreover, performances deteriorated towards extreme ends of lateralization (i.e., participants with either extreme left or right hemispheric biases). Taken together, the present study provides evidence against the notion that higher lateralization is related to enhanced cognitive performance.

  6. Western Hemisphere Knowledge Partnerships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, T. F.

    2001-05-01

    , and application of knowledge concerning the nature of -- and interaction among -- matter, living organisms, energy, information, and human behavior. This strategy calls for innovative partnerships among the physical, biological, health, and social sciences, engineering, and the humanities. New kinds of partnership must also be forged among academia, business and industry, governments, and nongovernmental organizations. Geophysicists can play an important role in these partnerships. A focus for these partnerships is to manage the individual economic productivity that drives both human development and global change. As world population approaches stability during the twenty-first century, individual economic productivity will be the critical link between the human and the natural systems on planet Earth. AGU is among a core group of individuals and institutions proposing Western Hemisphere Knowledge Partnerships (WHKP) to test the hypothesis that knowledge, broadly construed, is an important organizing principle in choosing a path into the future. The WHKP agenda includes: (1) life-long learning, (2) the health and resilience of natural ecosystems, (3) eco-efficiency in economic production and consumption, (4) extension of national income accounts, (5) environmentally benign sources of energy, (6) delivery of health care, (7) intellectual property rights, and (8) networks for action by local communities.Collaboratories and distance education technologies will be major tools. A panel of experts will explore this proposal.

  7. Asteroid survivability: The importance of asteroid shape and porosity and their possible influence on the Morokweng crater-forming impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, R. W.; Collins, G. S.

    2012-12-01

    The fate of an impacting asteroid is an important aspect of the cratering process. 'Surviving' asteroidal fragments, which can be used to infer the impactor's structure and composition, have been recovered from terrestrial impact sites. Because small impactors decelerate in the atmosphere, these finds are often associated with small, simple craters where fragments are found within, or proximal to, the impact crater. Impactor fragments have been recovered from large-scale impacts, such as Chicxulub, but from distal locations. Recently though, a collection of unmolten impactor fragments were recovered from within the highly meteoritic impact melt sheet of the large-scale (>70 km diameter) Morokweng crater, South Africa, demonstrating impactor material can survive large-scale impact events without melting and remain within the crater. The aim of this work is to investigate how impactor shape and porosity influence asteroid survivability in large-scale terrestrial impact events. To do this, we use 2D and 3D versions of the iSALE hydrocode to numerically model the first stage of crater formation, contact and compression, which determines whether the impactor remains solid, melts or vaporizes. By altering the ratio of the vertical and horizontal length of the impactors we produce a variety of oblate- (horizontal length > vertical length) and prolate- (vertical length > horizontal length) shaped impactors, keeping impactor volume constant. By defining our dunite impactor (a reasonable proxy for asteriodal material) as surviving if it experiences a peak shock pressure less than that required for incipient melting, we find increasing the oblateness of the impactor decreases survivability. Conversely, increasing the prolateness of the impactor increases survivability. This is likely due to impactor geometry and complex interactions between shock and release waves. The porosity of spherical impactors (with constant mass) was varied between 0% (non-porous) and 67% and showed

  8. Quasi-static axisymmetric eversion hemispherical domes made of elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabrits, Sergey A.; Kolpak, Eugeny P.

    2016-06-01

    The paper considers numerical solution for the problem of quasi-static axisymmetric eversion of a spherical shell (hemisphere) under action of external pressure. Results based on the general nonlinear theory of shells made of elastomers, proposed by K. F. Chernykh. It is used two models of shells based on the hypotheses of the Kirchhoff and Timoshenko, modified K.F. Chernykh for the case of hyperelastic rubber-like material. The article presents diagrams of equilibrium states of eversion hemispheres for both models as well as the shape of the shell at different points in the diagram.

  9. Large Craters in Callisto's Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Galileo spacecraft provides a new view of this heavily cratered region in the southern hemisphere of the icy Jovian satellite Callisto. The region was not observed by NASA's Voyager spacecraft. Craters ranging in diameter from the 1.85 kilometer (1.13 mile) limit of resolution up to more than 70 kilometers (43 miles) can be observed in this image. Although all craters are generally round in outline, details in their structures vary with both size and relative age. Bright spots in the center of smaller craters (up to approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles)) are central peaks. Larger craters (up to the 51 kilometer (31 mile) wide crater in the east central part of the image) exhibit central pits or depressions. The largest crater, called Thrainn, has a diameter of 74 kilometers (45 miles) and is located in the southernmost corner of the image. This crater contains a broad central uplift, or dome, and has a highly eroded rim. In contrast, the 70 kilometer (43 mile) crater Audr, located along the northern margin of the image, is flat-bottomed, and has a less degraded and generally rounder rim. If erosional or degradational forces have been roughly constant with time on Callisto, scientists viewing this image can assume that Audr is relatively younger than Thrainn by noting the less degraded or fresher appearance of its rim. The differences in crater floor features between these two similarly sized craters could have been produced by differences in the impacting bodies that produced them, differences in the crustal materials in which the craters formed, or simply by a gradual evolution of crater floor shape with time.

    North is to the top of the image which was taken by the Galileo spacecraft's solid state imaging (CCD) system during its eighth orbit around Jupiter on May 6th, 1997. The center of the image is located at 34 degrees south latitude, 84 degrees west longitude, and was taken when the spacecraft was approximately 48,430 kilometers (29,542 miles) from

  10. Variation of Space Radiation Exposure inside Spherical and Hemispherical Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Baalla, Younes; Townsend, Lawrence

    2008-10-01

    We calculate the space radiation exposure to blood-forming organs everywhere inside a hemispherical dome that represents a lunar habitat. We derive the analytical path length distribution from any point inside a hemispherical or a spherical shell. Because the average path length increases with the distance from the center, the center of the hemispherical dome on the lunar surface has the largest radiation exposure while locations on the inner surface of the dome have the lowest exposure. This conclusion differs from an earlier study on a hemispherical dome but agrees with another earlier study on a spherical-shell shield. We also find that the reduction in the radiation exposure from the center to the inner edge of the dome can be as large as a factor of 3 or more for the radiation from solar particle events while being smaller for the radiation from galactic cosmic rays.

  11. Sphaerotilus natans encrusted with nanoball-shaped Fe(III) oxide minerals formed by nitrate-reducing mixotrophic Fe(II) oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sunhwa; Kim, Dong-Hun; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2014-01-01

    Ferrous iron has been known to function as an electron source for iron-oxidizing microorganisms in both anoxic and oxic environments. A diversity of bacteria has been known to oxidize both soluble and solid-phase Fe(II) forms coupled to the reduction of nitrate. Here, we show for the first time Fe(II) oxidation by Sphaerotilus natans strain DSM 6575T under mixotrophic condition. Sphaerotilus natans has been known to form a sheath structure enclosing long chains of rod-shaped cells, resulting in a thick biofilm formation under oxic conditions. Here, we also demonstrate that strain DSM 6575T grows mixotrophically with pyruvate, Fe(II) as electron donors and nitrate as an electron acceptor and single cells of strain DSM 6575T are dominant under anoxic conditions. Furthermore, strain DSM 6575T forms nanoball-shaped amorphous Fe(III) oxide minerals encrusting on the cell surfaces through the mixotrophic iron oxidation reaction under anoxic conditions. We propose that cell encrustation results from the indirect Fe(II) oxidation by biogenic nitrite during nitrate reduction and that causes the bacterial morphological change to individual rod-shaped single cells from filamentous sheath structures. This study extends the group of existing microorganisms capable of mixotrophic Fe(II) oxidation by a new strain, S. natans strain DSM 6575T, and could contribute to biogeochemical cycles of Fe and N in the environment. PMID:24965827

  12. Flow past 2-D Hemispherical Rigid Canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnasciali, Maria-Isabel

    2013-11-01

    The flow past a 2-dimensional rigid hemispherical shape is investigated using PIV. Flow field measurements and images were generated with the use of a Thermoflow® apparatus. Results of this study are compared to prior work (APS DFD 2012 Session E9.00003) which employed CFD to investigate the flow in the near wake of hemispherical parachutes. The various sized gaps/open areas were positioned at distinct locations. The work presented here is part of a larger research project to investigate flow fields in deceleration devices and parachutes. Understanding the pitch-stability of parachutes is essential for accurate design and implementation of these deceleration devices but they present a difficult system to analyze. The flexibility of the parachute fabric results in large variations in the parachute geometry leading to complex fluid-structure interactions. Such flow, combined with flow through gaps and open areas, has been postulated to shed alternating vortices causing pitching/oscillations of the canopy. The results presented provide some insight into which geometric features affect vortex shedding and may enable the redesign of the baseline parachute to minimize instabilities.

  13. Dynamic DNA devices and assemblies formed by shape-complementary, non-base pairing 3D components.

    PubMed

    Gerling, Thomas; Wagenbauer, Klaus F; Neuner, Andrea M; Dietz, Hendrik

    2015-03-27

    We demonstrate that discrete three-dimensional (3D) DNA components can specifically self-assemble in solution on the basis of shape-complementarity and without base pairing. Using this principle, we produced homo- and heteromultimeric objects, including micrometer-scale one- and two-stranded filaments and lattices, as well as reconfigurable devices, including an actuator, a switchable gear, an unfoldable nanobook, and a nanorobot. These multidomain assemblies were stabilized via short-ranged nucleobase stacking bonds that compete against electrostatic repulsion between the components' interfaces. Using imaging by electron microscopy, ensemble and single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer spectroscopy, and electrophoretic mobility analysis, we show that the balance between attractive and repulsive interactions, and thus the conformation of the assemblies, may be finely controlled by global parameters such as cation concentration or temperature and by an allosteric mechanism based on strand-displacement reactions. PMID:25814577

  14. Experiments and computer simulations of the dynamic cavity formed by a particulated shaped-charge jet in sand

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, S.C.; Winer, K.A.; Reaugh, J.E.; Breithaupt, R.D.; Baum, D.W.

    1995-02-28

    Experiments have been carried out to measure the dynamic cavity growth of dry sand during penetration by particulated jets from Viper 65-mm-diameter, Cu-lined conical shaped charges at 1,000-mm standoff. The sand target was instrumented with foil switches, piezoelectric pins, and pressure transducers. Flash radiography at 450-keV was used to characterize the jets before impact and to image the target hole during jet penetration. The authors have developed a dry sand equation of state based on existing Hugoniot data as input to a porous material model incorporated in the 2-D arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian hydrocode CALE. They have carried out sand penetration simulations in which the particulated jet is modeled as hot copper rods. By varying parameters in the sand and copper descriptions they identify those features that affect the dynamic cavity formation.

  15. Category Membership and Semantic Coding in the Cerebral Hemispheres.

    PubMed

    Turner, Casey E; Kellogg, Ronald T

    2016-01-01

    Although a gradient of category membership seems to form the internal structure of semantic categories, it is unclear whether the 2 hemispheres of the brain differ in terms of this gradient. The 2 experiments reported here examined this empirical question and explored alternative theoretical interpretations. Participants viewed category names centrally and determined whether a closely related or distantly related word presented to either the left visual field/right hemisphere (LVF/RH) or the right visual field/left hemisphere (RVF/LH) was a member of the category. Distantly related words were categorized more slowly in the LVF/RH relative to the RVF/LH, with no difference for words close to the prototype. The finding resolved past mixed results showing an unambiguous typicality effect for both visual field presentations. Furthermore, we examined items near the fuzzy border that were sometimes rejected as nonmembers of the category and found both hemispheres use the same category boundary. In Experiment 2, we presented 2 target words to be categorized, with the expectation of augmenting the speed advantage for the RVF/LH if the 2 hemispheres differ structurally. Instead the results showed a weakening of the hemispheric difference, arguing against a structural in favor of a processing explanation. PMID:27424416

  16. Prediction of part shape and associated material properties in hot-press forming using Unite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwigeon; Ha, Jinjin; Lee, Myoung-Gyu; Barlat, Frederic

    2016-08-01

    The hot-press forming of a U-channel was conducted on a boron-steel blank. The die consisted of two separate parts in order to perform the partial quenching process. The cold die was initially at 25 °C while the heated die was set to five different temperatures, namely, 25, 120, 220, 320 and 400 °C. The cooling temperature history, Vickers hardness and springback of the channel were measured. A thermo-mechanical-metallurgical model, which accounts for the prior austenite deformation effect, was successfully implemented in the LS-DYNA explicit solver to simulate the hot-press forming process under partial quenching conditions. The predicted and experimental results were compared and found in reasonable agreement.

  17. Shape-Shifting Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-20

    A new plastic developed by ORNL and Washington State University transforms from its original shape through a series of temporary shapes and returns to its initial form. The shape-shifting process is controlled through changes in temperature

  18. Environmental enrichment models a naturalistic form of maternal separation and shapes the anxiety response patterns of offspring.

    PubMed

    Connors, E J; Migliore, M M; Pillsbury, S L; Shaik, A N; Kentner, A C

    2015-02-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) mimics positive life experiences by providing enhanced social and physical stimulation. Placement into EE following weaning, or in later life, confers beneficial outcomes on both emotional and cognitive processes. However, anxiety-like behavior is also reported, particularly in rats exposed to enhanced housing during early development. Notably, the quality of maternal behavior affects stress regulation and emotional stability in offspring, yet the impact of environmental context on maternal care has not been thoroughly evaluated, or are the influences of EE on their offspring understood. To investigate the role of EE on these factors we analyzed the details of mother-neonate interactions, and juvenile offspring performance on several anxiety measures. Additionally, we evaluated neurochemical differences (i.e. serotonin, corticosterone, GABA, glutamate) in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus as a function of EE, Communal Nesting (CN) and Standard Care (SC). Although EE dams spent significantly less time on the nest and had lower nursing frequencies compared to SC dams, there were no differences in maternal licking/grooming. In offspring, EE increased GLUR1 level and GABA concentrations in the prefrontal cortex of both juvenile male and female rats. A similar pattern for glutamate was only observed in males. Although EE offspring spent less time on the open arms of the elevated plus maze and had faster escape latencies in a light-dark test, there were no other indications of anxiety-like behavior on these measures or when engaged in social interaction with a conspecific. In the wild, rats live in complicated and variable environments. Consequently dams must leave their nest to defend and forage, limiting their duration of direct contact. EE exposure in early development may mimic this naturalistic maternal separation, shaping parental behavior and offspring resiliency to stressors.

  19. Numerical and experimental evaluation of laser forming process for the shape correction in ultra high strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Kim, E. Z.; Lee, N. K.; Lee, G. A.; Park, S. J.; Chu, A.

    2013-12-16

    In this paper, laser forming characteristics in ultra high strength steel with ultimate strength of 1200MPa are investigated numerically and experimentally. FE simulation is conducted to identify the response related to deformation and characterize the effect of laser power, beam diameter and scanning speed with respect to the bending angle for a square sheet part. The thermo-mechanical behaviors during the straight-line heating process are presented in terms of temperature, stress and strain. An experimental setup including a fiber laser with maximum mean power of 3.0 KW is used in the experiments. From the results in this work, it would be easily adjustment the laser power and the scanning speed by controlling the line energy for a bending operation of CP1180 steel sheets.

  20. A lysigenic programmed cell death-dependent process shapes schizogenously formed aerenchyma in the stems of the waterweed Egeria densa

    PubMed Central

    Bartoli, G.; Forino, L. M. C.; Durante, M.; Tagliasacchi, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Plant adaptation to submergence can include the formation of prominent aerenchyma to facilitate gas exchange. The aim of this study was to characterize the differentiation of the constitutive aerenchyma in the stem of the aquatic macrophyte Egeria densa (Hydrocharitaceae) and to verify if any form of cell death might be involved. Methods Plants were collected from a pool in a botanical garden. Aerenchyma differentiation and apoptotic hallmarks were investigated by light microscopy and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) assay coupled with genomic DNA extraction and gel electrophoresis (DNA laddering assay). Cell viability and the occurrence of peroxides and nitric oxide (NO) were determined histochemically using specific fluorogenic probes. Key Results Aerenchyma differentiation started from a hexagonally packed pre-aerenchymatic tissue and, following a basipetal and centripetal developmental pattern, produced a honeycomb arrangement. After an early schizogenous differentiation process, a late lysigenous programmed cell death- (PCD) dependent mechanism occurred. This was characterized by a number of typical apoptotic hallmarks, including DNA fragmentation, chromatin condensation, apoptotic-like bodies, partial cell wall lysis and plasmolysis. In addition, local increases in H2O2 and NO were observed and quantified. Conclusions The differentiation of cortical aerenchyma in the stem of E. densa is a complex process, consisting of a combination of an early schizogenous differentiation mechanism and a late lysigenous PCD-dependent process. The PCD remodels the architecture of the gas spaces previously formed schizogenously, and also results in a reduction of O2-consuming cells and in recycling of material derived from the lysigenic dismantling of the cells. PMID:26002256

  1. Superplastic forming of ceramic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieh, T. G.; Wittenauer, J. P.; Wadsworth, J.

    1992-01-01

    Superplasticity has been demonstrated in many fine-grained structural ceramics and ceramic composites, including yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (YTZP), alumina, and Al2O3-reinforced zirconia (Al2O3/YTZ) duplex composites and SiC-reinforced Si3N4. These superplastic ceramics obviously offer the potential benefit of forming net shape or near net shape parts. This could be particularly useful for forming complicated shapes that are difficult to achieve using conventional forming techniques, or require elaborate, subsequent machining. In the present study, we successfully demonstrated the following: (1) superplastic 3Y-TXP and 20 percent Al2O3/YTZ composite have for the first time been successfully deformed into hemispherical caps via a biaxial gas-pressure forming technique; (2) no experimental difficulty was encountered in applying the required gas pressures and temperatures to achieve the results, thus, it is certain that higher rates of deformation than those presented in this study will be possible by using the current test apparatus at higher temperatures and pressures; and (3) an analytical model incorporating material parameters, such as variations during forming in the strain rate sensitivity exponent and grain growth-induced strain hardening, is needed to model accurately and therefore precisely control the biaxial gas-pressure forming of superplastic ceramics. Based on the results of this study, we propose to fabricate zirconia insulation tubes by superplastic extrusion of zirconia polycrystal. This would not only reduce the cost, but also improve the reliability of the tube products.

  2. Hypnosis in the right hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Kihlstrom, John F; Glisky, Martha L; McGovern, Susan; Rapcsak, Steven Z; Mennemeier, Mark S

    2013-02-01

    Speculations about the neural substrates of hypnosis have often focused on the right hemisphere (RH), implying that RH damage should impair hypnotic responsiveness more than left-hemisphere (LH) damage. The present study examined the performance of a patient who suffered a stroke destroying most of his LH, on slightly modified versions of two hypnotizability scales. This patient was at least modestly hypnotizable, as indicated in particular by the arm rigidity and age regression items, suggesting that hypnosis can be mediated by the RH alone - provided that the language capacities normally found in the LH remain available. A further study of 16 patients with unilateral strokes of the LH or RH found no substantial differences in hypnotizability between the two groups. Future neuropsychological studies of hypnosis might explore the dorsal/ventral or anterior/posterior dichotomies, with special emphasis on the role of prefrontal cortex.

  3. Hemispheric ultra-wideband antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2006-04-01

    This report begins with a review of reduced size ultra-wideband (UWB) antennas and the peculiar problems that arise when building a UWB antenna. It then gives a description of a new type of UWB antenna that resolves these problems. This antenna, dubbed the hemispheric conical antenna, is similar to a conventional conical antenna in that it uses the same inverted conical conductor over a ground plane, but it also uses a hemispheric dielectric fill in between the conductive cone and the ground plane. The dielectric material creates a fundamentally new antenna which is reduced in size and much more rugged than a standard UWB conical antenna. The creation of finite-difference time domain (FDTD) software tools in spherical coordinates, as described in SAND2004-6577, enabled this technological advance.

  4. Thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of variations in shapes of ridges formed on {l_brace}100{r_brace} lithium fluoride surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, J.W.; Glaeser, A.M.; Searcy, A.W.

    1991-12-01

    channels with widths in the range form 5 {mu}m were formed in {l_brace}100{r_brace} surfaces of LiF single crystals by a photolithographic technique. Specimens annealed at or above 0.90 T{mu}m, where T{mu} is the melting point, and then quenched showed the channels and the ridges between them develop rounded profiles. Evolution of these profiles was evaluated for the various channel widths and for interchannel ridge spacings of 5 to 100 {mu}m in terms of: (a) an accepted theoretical model for a surface diffusion controlled process, and (b) a model which assumes that shape changes depend only on the relative energies of attachment of atoms in surface sites with various surface curvatures. Either model is consistent with the experimental observations to within the reproducibility in measurements.

  5. Awake right hemisphere brain surgery.

    PubMed

    Hulou, M Maher; Cote, David J; Olubiyi, Olutayo I; Smith, Timothy R; Chiocca, E Antonio; Johnson, Mark D

    2015-12-01

    We report the indications and outcomes of awake right hemispheric brain surgery, as well as a rare patient with crossed aphasia. Awake craniotomies are often performed to protect eloquent cortex. We reviewed the medical records for 35 of 96 patients, in detail, who had awake right hemisphere brain operations. Intraoperative cortical mapping of motor and/or language function was performed in 29 of the 35 patients. A preoperative speech impairment and left hand dominance were the main indicators for awake right-sided craniotomies in patients with right hemisphere lesions. Four patients with lesion proximity to eloquent areas underwent awake craniotomies without cortical mapping. In addition, one patient had a broncho-pulmonary fistula, and another had a recent major cardiac procedure that precluded awake surgery. An eloquent cortex representation was identified in 14 patients (48.3%). Postoperatively, seven of 17 patients (41.1%) who presented with weakness, experienced improvements in their motor functions, 11 of 16 (68.7%) with seizures became seizure-free, and seven of nine (77.7%) with moderate to severe headaches and one of two with a visual field deficit improved significantly. There were also improvements in speech and language functions in all patients who presented with speech difficulties. A right sided awake craniotomy is an excellent option for left handed patients, or those with right sided cortical lesions that result in preoperative speech impairments. When combined with intraoperative cortical mapping, both speech and motor function can be well preserved.

  6. Hemispheric Assymeries in Auroral Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mende, S. B.

    2014-12-01

    It is widely accepted that the space weather related electrodynamic forcing of the geospace environment acts through the high geomagnetic latitude regions. At high latitudes inter-hemispheric asymmetries are largely due to the differences in solar illumination, the direction of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field components and to a lesser extent, due to differences between the two hemispheric internal fields. So far most research regarding interhemispheric differences concentrated on learning about the basic magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling mechanisms. It has been well established that sunlit conditions affect the energy flux of auroral precipitation resulting from the reduction in the mean energy of the auroral electrons in the sunlit summer hemisphere. This can be explained by the partial shorting out of the particle accelerating fields by the sunlight induced conductivity. It has also been found that sunlit conditions reduce the particle fluxes and therefore the associated field aligned currents. Unless the precipitation-induced conductivities overwhelm the sunlit component of conductivity, this would imply that the magnetospheric current generator responds to the ionospheric load in a highly non-linear manner. Interhemispheric currents may also play an important role that has not been fully explored. Interhemispheric asymmetries in substorm morphology have been explored critically because conjugacy implies that substorms have a common source at equatorial latitudes. In some cases the lack of conjugacy of substorms could be explained by considering the magnitude and direction of the IMF.

  7. Hemispheric Laterality in Music and Math

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szirony, Gary Michael; Burgin, John S.; Pearson, L. Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    Hemispheric laterality may be a useful concept in teaching, learning, training, and in understanding more about human development. To address this issue, a measure of hemispheric laterality was compared to musical and mathematical ability. The Human Information Processing Survey (HIPS) instrument, designed to measure hemispheric laterality, was…

  8. Right Hemisphere Dominance in Visual Statistical Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roser, Matthew E.; Fiser, Jozsef; Aslin, Richard N.; Gazzaniga, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies report a right hemisphere advantage for visuospatial integration and a left hemisphere advantage for inferring conceptual knowledge from patterns of covariation. The present study examined hemispheric asymmetry in the implicit learning of new visual feature combinations. A split-brain patient and normal control participants viewed…

  9. Brain Hemispheric Functions and the Native American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Allen Chuck

    1982-01-01

    Uses brain research conducted by Dr. Roger Sperry to show that traditional Native Americans are more dominant in right hemisphere thinking, setting them apart from a modern left hemisphere-oriented society (especially emphasized in schools). Describes some characteristics of Native American thinking that illustrate a right hemisphere orientation…

  10. In situ 3D topographic and shape analysis by synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography for crystal form identification in polymorphic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xian-Zhen; Xiao, Ti-Qiao; Nangia, Ashwini; Yang, Shuo; Lu, Xiao-Long; Li, Hai-Yan; Shao, Qun; He, You; York, Peter; Zhang, Ji-Wen

    2016-04-01

    Polymorphism denotes the existence of more than one crystal structure of a substance, and great practical and theoretical interest for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. In many cases, it is challenging to produce a pure crystal form and establish a sensitive detection method for the identification of crystal form in a mixture of polymorphs. In this study, an accurate and sensitive method based on synchrotron radiation X-ray computed microtomography (SR-μCT) was devised to identify the polymorphs of clopidogrel bisulphate (CLP). After 3D reconstruction, crystal particles were extracted and dozens of structural parameters were calculated. Whilst, the particle shapes of the two crystal forms were all irregular, the surface of CLP II was found to be rougher than CLP I. In order to classify the crystal form based on the quantitative morphological property of particles, Volume Bias Percentage based on Surface Smoothing (VBP) was defined and a new method based on VBP was successfully developed, with a total matching rate of 99.91% for 4544 particles and a lowest detectable limit of 1%. More important for the mixtures in solid pharmaceutical formulations, the interference of excipients can be avoided, a feature cannot achieved by other available analytical methods.

  11. In situ 3D topographic and shape analysis by synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography for crystal form identification in polymorphic mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xian-Zhen; Xiao, Ti-Qiao; Nangia, Ashwini; Yang, Shuo; Lu, Xiao-Long; Li, Hai-Yan; Shao, Qun; He, You; York, Peter; Zhang, Ji-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism denotes the existence of more than one crystal structure of a substance, and great practical and theoretical interest for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. In many cases, it is challenging to produce a pure crystal form and establish a sensitive detection method for the identification of crystal form in a mixture of polymorphs. In this study, an accurate and sensitive method based on synchrotron radiation X-ray computed microtomography (SR-μCT) was devised to identify the polymorphs of clopidogrel bisulphate (CLP). After 3D reconstruction, crystal particles were extracted and dozens of structural parameters were calculated. Whilst, the particle shapes of the two crystal forms were all irregular, the surface of CLP II was found to be rougher than CLP I. In order to classify the crystal form based on the quantitative morphological property of particles, Volume Bias Percentage based on Surface Smoothing (VBP) was defined and a new method based on VBP was successfully developed, with a total matching rate of 99.91% for 4544 particles and a lowest detectable limit of 1%. More important for the mixtures in solid pharmaceutical formulations, the interference of excipients can be avoided, a feature cannot achieved by other available analytical methods. PMID:27097672

  12. Hemispheric differences in the activation of perceptual information during sentence comprehension.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, Amy E; Long, Debra L; Baynes, Kathleen

    2007-01-28

    Previous research has suggested that perceptual information about objects is activated during sentence comprehension [Zwaan, R. A., Stanfield, R. A., & Yaxley, R. H. (2002). Language comprehenders mentally represent the shapes of objects. Psychological Science, 13(2), 168-171]. The goal in the current study was to examine the role of the two hemispheres in the activation of such information. Participants read sentences that conveyed information about the shape of an object (e.g., the egg was in the pan versus the egg was in the carton) and then received a picture of the object that was either consistent or inconsistent with the shape implied by the sentence (e.g., a fried egg versus a whole egg). In Experiment 1, pictures were presented briefly in either the left-visual field or the right-visual field. Participants showed a mismatch effect, slower responses when the picture was inconsistent with the shape of the object implied by the sentence than when it was consistent, but only when the pictures appeared in the right-visual field (left hemisphere). In Experiment 2, the sentences were revised such that the shape of the object was described explicitly. Participants showed a mismatch effect in both visual fields. These findings suggest that the right hemisphere activates shape information during sentence comprehension when a shape description is explicit, whereas the left hemisphere activates such information both when the shape is described explicitly and when it is implied.

  13. Priming Nouns and Verbs: Differential Influences of Semantic and Grammatical Cues in the Two Cerebral Hemispheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arambel, Stella R.; Chiarello, Christine

    2006-01-01

    The current experiment investigated how sentential form-class expectancies influenced lexical-semantic priming within each hemisphere. Sentences were presented that led readers to expect a noun or a verb and the sentence-final target word was presented to one visual field/hemisphere for a lexical decision response. Noun and verb targets in the…

  14. Remembering 1500 Pictures: The Right Hemisphere Remembers Better than the Left

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laeng, Bruno; Overvoll, Morten; Ole Steinsvik, Oddmar

    2007-01-01

    We hypothesized that the right hemisphere would be superior to the left hemisphere in remembering having seen a specific picture before, given its superiority in perceptually encoding specific aspects of visual form. A large set of pictures (N=1500) of animals, human faces, artifacts, landscapes, and art paintings were shown for 2 s in central…

  15. [Vaccines: producers in countries of the Southern hemisphere].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, J J

    2007-08-01

    Vaccine producers in southern hemisphere countries now contribute significantly to global output. In 2006 southern hemisphere countries accounted for more than 10% of the total worldwide production with a progression approximately 70% greater than all producers combined in the two-year period between 2004 and 2006. Though difficult to measure, production in volume is higher due to lower prices practiced in most of these countries. For many years before the 1980s, production was scattered among numerous limited-scale companies. Most were founded at the initiative of governments striving to cover the needs of the population for essential vaccines. A number of institutions and private structures such as Institut Pasteur Production, Connaught Laboratories, and Institut Merieux have also set up production facilities. Today's producers can be divided into two categories, i.e., local producers that produce mainly monovalent vaccines and worldwide producers with strong R&D investment programs. Local producers are located mainly in large southern hemisphere countries such as China, India, Brazil, and Indonesia as well as in eastern countries. For the most dynamic companies, international development is focused on southern hemisphere countries excluding North America and Europe. With the support international organization such as WHO, UNICEF and GAVI, alliances are now being formed and networks are being organized in an effort to ensure reliable supplies of high quality vaccines at affordable prices in developing countries. The contribution of these producers will increase for the greater benefit of the people living in the southern hemisphere. PMID:17926792

  16. On inter-hemispheric coupling in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Bodil; Bailey, S.; Benze, S.; Gumbel, J.; Harvey, V. L.; Kürnich, H.; Lossow, S.; McLandress, D. Marsh, C.; Merkel, A. W.; Mills, M.; Randall, C. E.; Russell, J.; Shepherd, T. G.

    On inter-hemispheric coupling in the middle atmosphere From recent studies it is evident that planetary wave activity in the winter hemisphere influences the high-latitude summer mesosphere on the opposite side of the globe. This is an extraordinary example of multi-scale wave-mean flow interaction. The first indication of this inter-hemispheric coupling came from a model study by Becker and Schmitz (2003). Since then, the results have been reproduced in several models, and observations have confirmed the existence of this link. We present current understanding of inter-hemispheric coupling and its consequences for the middle atmosphere, focusing on the summer mesosphere where polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) form. The results shown are based on year-to-year and intra-seasonal variability in PMCs ob-served by the Odin satellite and the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite, as well as on model results from the extended Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM), the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) and the Kühlungsborn Mechanis-u tic general Circulation Model (KMCM). The latter has been used to pinpoint the proposed mechanism behind the inter-hemispheric coupling.

  17. Measurement of the B0 to pi l nu Form Factor Shape and Branching Fraction, and Determination of |Vub| with a Loose Neutrino Reconstruction Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Cote, D

    2006-09-26

    The authors report the results of a study of the exclusive charmless semileptonic B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu} decay undertaken with approximately 227 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The analysis uses events in which the signal B mesons are reconstructed with a novel loose neutrino reconstruction technique. We obtain partial branching fractions in 12 bins of q{sup 2}, the {ell}{sup +}{nu} invariant mass squared, from which we extract the f{sup +}(q{sup 2}) form factor shape and the total branching fraction: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = 1.44 {+-} 0.08{sub stat} {+-} 0.10{sub syst} x 10{sup -4}. Based on a recent theoretical calculation of the form factor, we find the magnitude of the CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}| to be (4.1 {+-} 0.2{sub stat} {+-} 0.2{sub syst{sub -0.4}{sup +0.6}}FF) x 10{sup -3}, where the last uncertainty is due to the normalization of the form factor.

  18. Fabrication of nano-structured hemispheres and pillars using laterally migrating polymer templates.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hye Jin; Yi, Gi-Ra; Jeong, Seong-Hun; Boo, Jin-Hyo; Jung, Duk-Young

    2009-10-01

    We report herein a reliable method of fabricating 2D periodic gold nanopillars with well-defined anisotropic shapes by the combinational actions of colloidal crystals and gold evaporation. The deposition of gold on a polymer template produced dual functional Janus-like nanopillars up to 633 nm in height as well as hemispherical shells with 120 nm. The thermal-induced active migration of the nanopillars from the pristine position in the lateral direction occurred at the colloidal defects while some cavity space was formed inside the gold pillars. The nano-structured gold pillars exhibited a strong surface plasmon resonance at 598 nm, as compared to that of the solid gold nanospheres at 520 nm, and a noticeable red shift to 640 nm was induced by the removal of the polymer template.

  19. Mitogenomics of southern hemisphere blue mussels (Bivalvia: Pteriomorphia): Insights into the evolutionary characteristics of the Mytilus edulis complex.

    PubMed

    Gaitán-Espitia, Juan Diego; Quintero-Galvis, Julian F; Mesas, Andres; D'Elía, Guillermo

    2016-05-31

    Marine blue mussels (Mytilus spp.) are widespread species that exhibit an antitropical distribution with five species occurring in the Northern Hemisphere (M. trossulus, M. edulis, M. galloprovincialis, M. californianus and M. coruscus) and three in the Southern Hemisphere (M. galloprovincialis, M. chilensis and M. platensis). Species limits in this group remain controversial, in particular for those forms that live in South America. Here we investigated structural characteristics of marine mussels mitogenomes, based on published F mtDNA sequences of Northern Hemisphere species and two newly sequenced South American genomes, one from the Atlantic M. platensis and another from the Pacific M. chilensis. These mitogenomes exhibited similar architecture to those of other genomes of Mytilus, including the presence of the Atp8 gene, which is missing in most of the other bivalves. Our evolutionary analysis of mitochondrial genes indicates that purifying selection is the predominant force shaping the evolution of the coding genes. Results of our phylogenetic analyses supported the monophyly of Pteriomorphia and fully resolved the phylogenetic relationships among its five orders. Finally, the low genetic divergence of specimens assigned to M. chilensis and M. platensis suggests that these South American marine mussels represent conspecific variants rather than distinct species.

  20. Mitogenomics of southern hemisphere blue mussels (Bivalvia: Pteriomorphia): Insights into the evolutionary characteristics of the Mytilus edulis complex

    PubMed Central

    Gaitán-Espitia, Juan Diego; Quintero-Galvis, Julian F.; Mesas, Andres; D’Elía, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Marine blue mussels (Mytilus spp.) are widespread species that exhibit an antitropical distribution with five species occurring in the Northern Hemisphere (M. trossulus, M. edulis, M. galloprovincialis, M. californianus and M. coruscus) and three in the Southern Hemisphere (M. galloprovincialis, M. chilensis and M. platensis). Species limits in this group remain controversial, in particular for those forms that live in South America. Here we investigated structural characteristics of marine mussels mitogenomes, based on published F mtDNA sequences of Northern Hemisphere species and two newly sequenced South American genomes, one from the Atlantic M. platensis and another from the Pacific M. chilensis. These mitogenomes exhibited similar architecture to those of other genomes of Mytilus, including the presence of the Atp8 gene, which is missing in most of the other bivalves. Our evolutionary analysis of mitochondrial genes indicates that purifying selection is the predominant force shaping the evolution of the coding genes. Results of our phylogenetic analyses supported the monophyly of Pteriomorphia and fully resolved the phylogenetic relationships among its five orders. Finally, the low genetic divergence of specimens assigned to M. chilensis and M. platensis suggests that these South American marine mussels represent conspecific variants rather than distinct species. PMID:27241855

  1. Mitogenomics of southern hemisphere blue mussels (Bivalvia: Pteriomorphia): Insights into the evolutionary characteristics of the Mytilus edulis complex.

    PubMed

    Gaitán-Espitia, Juan Diego; Quintero-Galvis, Julian F; Mesas, Andres; D'Elía, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Marine blue mussels (Mytilus spp.) are widespread species that exhibit an antitropical distribution with five species occurring in the Northern Hemisphere (M. trossulus, M. edulis, M. galloprovincialis, M. californianus and M. coruscus) and three in the Southern Hemisphere (M. galloprovincialis, M. chilensis and M. platensis). Species limits in this group remain controversial, in particular for those forms that live in South America. Here we investigated structural characteristics of marine mussels mitogenomes, based on published F mtDNA sequences of Northern Hemisphere species and two newly sequenced South American genomes, one from the Atlantic M. platensis and another from the Pacific M. chilensis. These mitogenomes exhibited similar architecture to those of other genomes of Mytilus, including the presence of the Atp8 gene, which is missing in most of the other bivalves. Our evolutionary analysis of mitochondrial genes indicates that purifying selection is the predominant force shaping the evolution of the coding genes. Results of our phylogenetic analyses supported the monophyly of Pteriomorphia and fully resolved the phylogenetic relationships among its five orders. Finally, the low genetic divergence of specimens assigned to M. chilensis and M. platensis suggests that these South American marine mussels represent conspecific variants rather than distinct species. PMID:27241855

  2. Climate modelling: Northern Hemisphere circulation.

    PubMed

    Gillett, Nathan P

    2005-09-22

    Air pressure at sea level during winter has decreased over the Arctic and increased in the Northern Hemisphere subtropics in recent decades, a change that has been associated with 50% of the Eurasian winter warming observed over the past 30 years, with 60% of the rainfall increase in Scotland and with 60% of the rainfall decrease in Spain. This trend is inconsistent with the simulated response to greenhouse-gas and sulphate-aerosol changes, but it has been proposed that other climate influences--such as ozone depletion--could account for the discrepancy. Here I compare observed Northern Hemisphere sea-level pressure trends with those simulated in response to all the major human and natural climate influences in nine state-of-the-art coupled climate models over the past 50 years. I find that these models all underestimate the circulation trend. This inconsistency suggests that we cannot yet simulate changes in this important property of the climate system or accurately predict regional climate changes.

  3. Mechanism of secular increasing of mean gravity in Northern hemisphere and secular decreasing of mean gravity in Southern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yu. V.; Ferrandiz, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    Mechanism. To present time the observant data in various geosciences more and more confidently testify for the benefit of existence of secular drift of the Earth core in the direction of North Pole. 1). So the superfluous mass of a displaced core relatively to elastic mantle, obviously, results in displacement of the centre of mass of the Earth with respect to basic system of coordinates on a surface of the Earth also in northern direction. Methods of a space geodesy let us confidently to determine drift of the centre of mass to the north with velocity about 0.5 - 1.0 cm/yr. The fundamental phenomenon of drift of the centre of mass and the core of the Earth has been predicted in 1995 (Barkin, 1995) at the analysis of secular change of the pear-shaped form of the Earth in present epoch (velocity of drift of the centre of mass of the Earth was appreciated in 1.8 +/-1.0 cm/yr in the direction of North Pole of the Earth). For an explanation of observably drift of the centre of mass at once the model of drift of the core was offered and the geodynamic model of forced relative displacements and wanderings of interacting shells of the Earth under action of a gravitational attraction of external celestial bodies (Barkin, 1996, 2002) has been developed. 2). The core makes slow secular drift and cyclic displacements. Predicted spectrum of oscillations of the centre of mass of the Earth and its core (Barkin, 2001) has received precise confirmation as a result of the Fourier analysis of temporal series for coordinates of a geocenter (Kaftan, Tatevian, 2003; Barkin, Vilke, 2004; Barkin, Lyubushin, Zotov, 2007). 3). The displaced core makes active all bouquet of natural processes in all shells of the Earth (including an atmosphere, ocean and internal shells), varying in the certain rhythms and styles the tension conditions of shells, their thermodynamic conditions etc. The core as though "conducts" by all planetary processes at once. From here take the origin such fundamental

  4. Shape memory polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2015-06-09

    New shape memory polymer compositions, methods for synthesizing new shape memory polymers, and apparatus comprising an actuator and a shape memory polymer wherein the shape memory polymer comprises at least a portion of the actuator. A shape memory polymer comprising a polymer composition which physically forms a network structure wherein the polymer composition has shape-memory behavior and can be formed into a permanent primary shape, re-formed into a stable secondary shape, and controllably actuated to recover the permanent primary shape. Polymers have optimal aliphatic network structures due to minimization of dangling chains by using monomers that are symmetrical and that have matching amine and hydroxyl groups providing polymers and polymer foams with clarity, tight (narrow temperature range) single transitions, and high shape recovery and recovery force that are especially useful for implanting in the human body.

  5. Hemispheric Asymmetries: The Comparative View

    PubMed Central

    Ocklenburg, Sebastian; Güntürkün, Onur

    2012-01-01

    Hemispheric asymmetries play an important role in almost all cognitive functions. For more than a century, they were considered to be uniquely human but now an increasing number of findings in all vertebrate classes make it likely that we inherited our asymmetries from common ancestors. Thus, studying animal models could provide unique insights into the mechanisms of lateralization. We outline three such avenues of research by providing an overview of experiments on left–right differences in the connectivity of sensory systems, the embryonic determinants of brain asymmetries, and the genetics of lateralization. All these lines of studies could provide a wealth of insights into our own asymmetries that should and will be exploited by future analyses. PMID:22303295

  6. Flow Field and Topological Analysis of Hemispherical Parachute in Low Angles of Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yihua; Song, Qianfu; Wu, Zhuo; Sheridan, John

    For analyzing the flow field and topological structure of hemispherical parachute in low angles of attack, a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulation technique is established to decide the shape of the hemispherical parachute during terminal descent. In the fluid simulation, the semi-implicit method for pressure-linked equations consistent (SIMPLEC) algorithm is introduced to solve shear stress transport (SST) k-ω turbulence Navier-Stokes (N-S) Equations. This method is proved to be efficient and stable by the experiment and corresponding numerical simulation. After obtaining the stable shape of the canopy, the parachute in different angles and velocities are considered.

  7. Homotopic Language Reorganization in the Right Hemisphere after Early Left Hemisphere Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tivarus, Madalina E.; Starling, Sarah J.; Newport, Elissa L.; Langfitt, John T.

    2012-01-01

    To determine the areas involved in reorganization of language to the right hemisphere after early left hemisphere injury, we compared fMRI activation patterns during four production and comprehension tasks in post-surgical epilepsy patients with either left (LH) or right hemisphere (RH) speech dominance (determined by Wada testing) and healthy…

  8. The Origin of Prominences and Their Hemispheric Preferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, P. C.

    2001-05-01

    We present a ``head-to-tail" linkage model for the formation, evolution, and eruption of solar filaments. The magnetic field structure of our model is based upon the observation that filaments form exclusively in filament channels with no apparent magnetic connections above the polarity inversion line. The formation of a filament in this configuration is driven by flux convergence and cancellation, which produces loop-like filaments segments with a half-turn. Filament segments of like chirality may connect and form long quiescent filaments. Such filaments are stabilized through footpoint anchoring until further cancellation at the footpoints causes their eruption. The eruption restores the original filament channel so that filament formation may resume immediately. We demonstrate that the combined workings of Hale's polarity law, Joy's law, and differential rotation introduce a strong hemispheric preference in the chirality of filaments formed poleward of the sunspot belt, in agreement with observations. We analyze the magnetic fine structure of filaments formed through our model and find consistency with the observed hemispheric preference for barb orientation and a simple explanation for barb formation. Finally we show that every cancellation event that generates a filament obeying the hemispheric chirality preference, injects a flux tube below the surface with a poloidal field opposite to that of the ongoing cycle. We suggest that this pattern of submergence of flux represents the specific mechanism for the reversal of the poloidal flux in a Babcock-Leighton-Durney type model for the solar dynamo.

  9. UV Observations of Hemispheric Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, R. K.; Paxton, L. J.; Wolven, B. C.; Zhang, Y.; Romeo, G.

    2015-12-01

    Asymmetry in the auroral patterns can be an important diagnostic for understanding the dynamics of solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system (e.g., Newel and Meng, 1998; Fillingrim et al., 2005). Molecular nitrogen emission in the UV Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands can be used to determine energy flux and electron mean energy (Sotirelis, et al, 2013) and thereby Hall and Pederson integrated conductances (Gjerloev, et al., 2014). UV imagery provided by the 4 SSUSI instruments on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F16-F19 spacecraft provide two dimensional maps of this emission at different local times. Often there are near simultaneous observations of both poles by some combination of the satellites. (see figure 1) The SSUSI auroral data products are well suited to this study, as they have the following features.: - dayglow has been subtracted on dayside aurora - electron energy flux and mean energy are pre-calculated - individual arcs have been identified through image processing. In order to intercompare data from multiple satellites, we must first ensure that the instrument calibrations are consistent. In this work we show that the instruments are consistently calibrated, and that results generated from the SSUSI data products can be trusted. Several examples of storm time asymmetries captured by the SSUSI instruments will be discussed. Fillingim, M. O., G. K. Parks, H. U. Frey, T. J. Immel, and S. B. Mende (2005), Hemispheric asymmetry of the afternoon electron aurora, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L03113, doi:10.1029/2004GL021635. Gjerloev, J., Schaefer, R., Paxton, L, and Zhang, Y. (2014), A comprehensive empirical model of the ionospheric conductivity derived from SSUSI/GUVI, SuperMAG and SuperDARN data, SM51G-4339, Fall 2014 AGU meeting, San Francisco. Newell, P. T., and C.-I. Meng (1988), Hemispherical asymmetry in cusp precipitation near solstices, J. Geophys. Res., 93(A4), 2643-2648, doi:10.1029/JA093iA04p02643

  10. Reciprocal organization of the cerebral hemispheres

    PubMed Central

    McGilchrist, Iain

    2010-01-01

    The cerebral hemispheres are anatomically and neurophysiologically asymmetrical. The evolutionary basis for these differences remains uncertain. There are, however, highly consistent differences between the hemispheres, evident in reptiles, birds, and mammals, as well as in humans, in the nature of the attention each applies to the environment. This permits the simultaneous application of precisely focused, but narrow, attention, needed for grasping food or prey, with broad, open, and uncommitted attention, needed to watch out for predators and to interpret the intentions of conspecifics. These different modes of attention can account for a very wide range of repeated observations relating to hemisphere specialization, and suggest that hemisphere differences lie not in discrete functional domains as such, but distinct modes of functioning within any one domain. These modes of attention are mutually incompatible, and their application depends on inhibitory transmission in the corpus callosum. There is also an asymmetry of interaction between the hemispheres at the phenomenological level. PMID:21319495

  11. The cerebral hemispheres and bilateral neural nets.

    PubMed

    Cook, N D; Beech, A R

    1990-06-01

    A high-level cognitive dichotomy ("language and context") is reviewed in relation to empirical findings concerning the functions of the human cerebral hemispheres. We argue that the right hemisphere's involvement in the generation of connotative and contextual information in parallel with the denotative and literal language functions of the left hemisphere provides an important insight into the organization of viable cognitive systems. The role of the corpus callosum in producing the dichotomy is discussed. Finally, the generation of asymmetrical activity in structurally symmetrical, bilateral neural nets is described. The model demonstrates how complementary memory states can be generated in bilateral nets without assuming different modes of information processing, provided that the nets have inhibitory, homotopic connections. Unlike excitatory connections, inhibitory connections are sufficient to generate asymmetric hemispheric activity without postulating intrinsic differences between the cerebral hemispheres.

  12. Hemispheric competence for auditory spatial representation.

    PubMed

    Spierer, Lucas; Bellmann-Thiran, Anne; Maeder, Philippe; Murray, Micah M; Clarke, Stephanie

    2009-07-01

    Sound localization relies on the analysis of interaural time and intensity differences, as well as attenuation patterns by the outer ear. We investigated the relative contributions of interaural time and intensity difference cues to sound localization by testing 60 healthy subjects: 25 with focal left and 25 with focal right hemispheric brain damage. Group and single-case behavioural analyses, as well as anatomo-clinical correlations, confirmed that deficits were more frequent and much more severe after right than left hemispheric lesions and for the processing of interaural time than intensity difference cues. For spatial processing based on interaural time difference cues, different error types were evident in the individual data. Deficits in discriminating between neighbouring positions occurred in both hemispaces after focal right hemispheric brain damage, but were restricted to the contralesional hemispace after focal left hemispheric brain damage. Alloacusis (perceptual shifts across the midline) occurred only after focal right hemispheric brain damage and was associated with minor or severe deficits in position discrimination. During spatial processing based on interaural intensity cues, deficits were less severe in the right hemispheric brain damage than left hemispheric brain damage group and no alloacusis occurred. These results, matched to anatomical data, suggest the existence of a binaural sound localization system predominantly based on interaural time difference cues and primarily supported by the right hemisphere. More generally, our data suggest that two distinct mechanisms contribute to: (i) the precise computation of spatial coordinates allowing spatial comparison within the contralateral hemispace for the left hemisphere and the whole space for the right hemisphere; and (ii) the building up of global auditory spatial representations in right temporo-parietal cortices.

  13. Ontogenesis of hemispheric specialization: apraxia associated with congenital left hemisphere lesions.

    PubMed

    Nass, R

    1983-12-01

    In adults apraxia is more common after left-hemisphere damage. The engram for control of skilled motor movements has therefore been considered a specialized function of the left hemisphere. The ontogenesis of motor control was studied in a group of prepubertal children with congenital unilateral hemispheric lesions. Left-hemisphere lesions caused greater impairment of rapid independent finger movements, suggesting that specialization for motor control is innately programmed in the left hemisphere. No subject evidenced apraxia to verbal command, but adult-like performance is not yet expected at the age the group was tested, and effects of side of lesion could appear later. PMID:6664762

  14. Left- and right-hemisphere forms of phonological alexia.

    PubMed

    Buiatti, Tania; Skrap, Miran; Shallice, Tim

    2012-01-01

    We studied the ability of patients with lesions arising from operation for an anterior or posterior (left or right) brain tumour to read a set of words and pronounceable nonwords. In line with previous works, we observed that damage to the left posterior or left anterior cortex can give rise to phonological alexia, where the reading performance of nonwords is affected more than that of words. More surprisingly, similar effects were found in the right posterior group. However, there were significant differences in the error types, for both complex and positional errors, between phonological alexic patients in the three location groups. The findings present difficulties for the position held by theorists of the triangle model that phonological alexia arises from impairments in the language production system or in a general-purpose orthographic-phonological translation system. They also pose new questions about the possible role of the right posterior cortex in letter sequence representation.

  15. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-10-31

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) Technology Assessment Program (TAP) was developed to provide detailed, comparable data for environmental technologies and to disseminate this data to D&D professionals in a manner that will facilitate the review and selection of technologies to perform decontamination and decommissioning. The objectives for this project include the following: Determine technology needs through review of the Site Technology Coordination Group (STCG) information and other applicable websites and needs databases; Perform a detailed review of industries that perform similar activities as those required in D&D operations to identify additional technologies; Define the technology assessment program for characterization and waste management problem sets; Define the data management program for characterization, dismantlement, and waste management problem sets; Evaluate baseline and innovative technologies under standard test conditions at Florida International University's Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (FIU-HCET) and other locations and collect data in the areas of performance, cost, health and safety, operations and maintenance, and primary and secondary waste generation; Continue to locate, verify, and incorporate technology performance data from other sources into the multimedia information system; and Develop the conceptual design for a dismantlement technology decision analysis tool for dismantlement technologies.

  16. The Asgard Hemisphere of Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    False color view of a portion of the leading hemisphere of Jupiter's moon Callisto as seen through the infrared filters of the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft. North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the east. More recent impacts have excavated bright, relatively clean ice from beneath Callisto's battered surface. Callisto's dark mottled appearance may be due to contamination by non-ice components contributed by impactors or concentrated in a residue as ice is removed. This color composite image is centered on longitude 139 West and encompasses an area about 1000 miles (1600 kilometers) by 2470 miles (4000 kilometers). The images were obtained on November 3rd, 1996.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  17. Mechanism of secular increasing of mean gravity in Northern hemisphere and secular decreasing of mean gravity in Southern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yu. V.; Ferrandiz, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    Mechanism. To present time the observant data in various geosciences more and more confidently testify for the benefit of existence of secular drift of the Earth core in the direction of North Pole. 1). So the superfluous mass of a displaced core relatively to elastic mantle, obviously, results in displacement of the centre of mass of the Earth with respect to basic system of coordinates on a surface of the Earth also in northern direction. Methods of a space geodesy let us confidently to determine drift of the centre of mass to the north with velocity about 0.5 - 1.0 cm/yr. The fundamental phenomenon of drift of the centre of mass and the core of the Earth has been predicted in 1995 (Barkin, 1995) at the analysis of secular change of the pear-shaped form of the Earth in present epoch (velocity of drift of the centre of mass of the Earth was appreciated in 1.8 +/-1.0 cm/yr in the direction of North Pole of the Earth). For an explanation of observably drift of the centre of mass at once the model of drift of the core was offered and the geodynamic model of forced relative displacements and wanderings of interacting shells of the Earth under action of a gravitational attraction of external celestial bodies (Barkin, 1996, 2002) has been developed. 2). The core makes slow secular drift and cyclic displacements. Predicted spectrum of oscillations of the centre of mass of the Earth and its core (Barkin, 2001) has received precise confirmation as a result of the Fourier analysis of temporal series for coordinates of a geocenter (Kaftan, Tatevian, 2003; Barkin, Vilke, 2004; Barkin, Lyubushin, Zotov, 2007). 3). The displaced core makes active all bouquet of natural processes in all shells of the Earth (including an atmosphere, ocean and internal shells), varying in the certain rhythms and styles the tension conditions of shells, their thermodynamic conditions etc. The core as though "conducts" by all planetary processes at once. From here take the origin such fundamental

  18. Inner core structure - probing the African hemisphere boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irving, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    The inner core is Earth's deepest region and many of its properties still remain elusive - the exact composition of the iron-nickel alloy of which is it formed, the crystalline phase or phases present and its age and dynamical history. One of the more mysterious properties of the inner core is the presence of a seismologically observable hemispherical structure in the inner core, which persists through at least half if its depth. Hemispherical inner core structure requires that there be parts of the inner core where either a gradual or rapid transition between the two hemispheres takes place. A sharp boundary has been observed in the uppermost 100km of the inner core; here I investigate the nature of the boundary under Africa. By using PKPbc-PKPdf differential travel times, I am able to seismologically image the nature of the hemisphere boundary region under Africa. Core sensitive waves generated by earthquakes in the Americas, the polar regions, Asia and the Indian Ocean are used to discern the perturbations to PKPdf travel times though the inner core. The PKPdf waves used sample the inner core under Africa with a range of ray angles, permitting the investigation of the variations present in both anisotropic and isotropic P-wave velocity in the inner core. The PKPdf waves are sensitive to the upper 360km of the inner core, allowing us to image a region which could have been growing for hundreds of millions of years. A stronger understanding of the seismological properties of the inner core will help us to better distinguish between possible mechanisms for the formation of both hemispherical structure and anisotropic texture in the inner core.

  19. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Substorm Recovery Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Chua, D H.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Previous statistical observations have shown that the recovery time scales of substorms occurring in the winter and near equinox (when the nighttime auroral zone was in darkness) are roughly twice as long as the recovery time scales for substorms occurring in the summer (when the nighttime auroral region was sunlit). This suggests that auroral substorms in the northern and southern hemispheres develop asymmetrically during solstice conditions with substorms lasting longer in the winter (dark) hemisphere than in the summer (sunlit) hemisphere. Additionally, this implies that more energy is deposited by electron precipitation in the winter hemisphere than in the summer one during substorms. This result, coupled with previous observations that have shown that auroral activity is more common when the ionosphere is in darkness and is suppressed when the ionosphere is in daylight, strongly suggests that the ionospheric conductivity plays an important role governing how magnetospheric energy is transferred to the ionosphere during substorms. Therefore, the ionosphere itself may dictate how much energy it will accept from the magnetosphere during substorms rather than this being an externally imposed quantity. Here, we extend our earlier work by statistically analyzing the recovery time scales for a large number of substorms observed in the conjugate hemispheres simultaneously by two orbiting global auroral imagers: Polar UVI and IMAGE FUV. Our current results are consistent with previous observations. The recovery time scales are observed to be longer in the winter (dark) hemisphere while the auroral activity has a shorter duration in the summer (sunlit) hemisphere. This leads to an asymmetric energy input from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere with more energy being deposited in the winter hemisphere than in the summer hemisphere.

  20. Transient Ablation of Teflon Hemispheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arai, Norio; Karashima, Kei-ichi; Sato, Kiyoshi

    1997-01-01

    For high-speed entry of space vehicles into atmospheric environments, ablation is a practical method for alleviating severe aerodynamic heating. Several studies have been undertaken on steady or quasi-steady ablation. However, ablation is a very complicated phenomenon in which a nonequilibrium chemical process is associated with an aerodynamic process that involves changes in body shape with time. Therefore, it seems realistic to consider that ablation is an unsteady phenomenon. In the design of an ablative heat-shield system, since the ultimate purpose of the heat shield is to keep the internal temperature of the space vehicle at a safe level during entry, the transient heat conduction characteristics of the ablator may be critical in the selection of the material and its thickness. This note presents an experimental study of transient ablation of Teflon, with particular emphasis on the change in body shape, the instantaneous internal temperature distribution, and the effect of thermal expansion on ablation rate.

  1. Compact Autonomous Hemispheric Vision System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pingree, Paula J.; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Werne, Thomas A.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Walch, Marc J.; Staehle, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Solar System Exploration camera implementations to date have involved either single cameras with wide field-of-view (FOV) and consequently coarser spatial resolution, cameras on a movable mast, or single cameras necessitating rotation of the host vehicle to afford visibility outside a relatively narrow FOV. These cameras require detailed commanding from the ground or separate onboard computers to operate properly, and are incapable of making decisions based on image content that control pointing and downlink strategy. For color, a filter wheel having selectable positions was often added, which added moving parts, size, mass, power, and reduced reliability. A system was developed based on a general-purpose miniature visible-light camera using advanced CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) imager technology. The baseline camera has a 92 FOV and six cameras are arranged in an angled-up carousel fashion, with FOV overlaps such that the system has a 360 FOV (azimuth). A seventh camera, also with a FOV of 92 , is installed normal to the plane of the other 6 cameras giving the system a > 90 FOV in elevation and completing the hemispheric vision system. A central unit houses the common electronics box (CEB) controlling the system (power conversion, data processing, memory, and control software). Stereo is achieved by adding a second system on a baseline, and color is achieved by stacking two more systems (for a total of three, each system equipped with its own filter.) Two connectors on the bottom of the CEB provide a connection to a carrier (rover, spacecraft, balloon, etc.) for telemetry, commands, and power. This system has no moving parts. The system's onboard software (SW) supports autonomous operations such as pattern recognition and tracking.

  2. Inter-hemispheric integration of visual processing during task-driven lateralization

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Klaas E.; Marshall, John C.; Penny, Will D.; Friston, Karl J.; Fink, Gereon R.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying inter-hemispheric integration (IHI) remain poorly understood, particularly for lateralized cognitive processes. To test competing theories of IHI, we constructed and fitted dynamic causal models to functional magnetic resonance data from two visual tasks that operated on identical stimuli but showed opposite hemispheric dominance. Using a systematic Bayesian model selection procedure, we found that in the ventral visual stream, which was activated by letter judgments, inter-hemispheric connections mediated asymmetric information transfer from the non-specialized right to the specialized left hemisphere when the latter did not have direct access to stimulus information. Notably, this form of IHI did not engage all areas activated by the task but was specific for areas in the lingual and fusiform gyri. In the dorsal stream, activated by spatial judgments, it did not matter which hemisphere received the stimulus: Inter-hemispheric coupling increased bidirectionally, reflecting recruitment of the non-specialized left hemisphere. Again, not all areas activated by the task were involved in this form of IHI; instead, it was restricted to interactions between areas in the superior parietal gyrus. Overall, our results provide direct neurophysiological evidence, in terms of effective connectivity, for the existence of context-dependent mechanisms of IHI that are implemented by specific visual areas during task-driven lateralization. PMID:17392467

  3. The Effect of Nose Shape on Water-Entry Cavity Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Jeremy; Truscott, Tadd

    2014-11-01

    We examine the effect of nose shape and wetting angle on the threshold velocity at which an underwater cavity will form in the wake of a slender axisymmetric rigid body. The study covers a range of Reynolds numbers (1 E 4 < Re < 1 . 5 E 5), wetting surface conditions (hydrophilic, hydrophobic and super-hydrophobic), and impacting nose shapes (cone, ogive, flat, and two concave profiles: cusp and hemisphere). Cavity formation is visualized using high-speed cameras and impact forces were determined using an embedded inertial measurement unit (IMU). More streamlined nose shapes require higher impact velocities in order to form a cavity. However, the concave profiles generate a uniquely different cavity due to a strong vortex ring formed in front of the nose at impact. Additional results of this experiment and variable dependence on threshold velocity will be presented during the water entry of rigid slender bodies.

  4. Modeling Hemispheric Detonation Experiments in 2-Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W M; Fried, L E; Vitello, P A; Druce, R L; Phillips, D; Lee, R; Mudge, S; Roeske, F

    2006-06-22

    Experiments have been performed with LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5% Kel-F 800 binder) to study scaling of detonation waves using a dimensional scaling in a hemispherical divergent geometry. We model these experiments using an arbitrary Lagrange-Eulerian (ALE3D) hydrodynamics code, with reactive flow models based on the thermo-chemical code, Cheetah. The thermo-chemical code Cheetah provides a pressure-dependent kinetic rate law, along with an equation of state based on exponential-6 fluid potentials for individual detonation product species, calibrated to high pressures ({approx} few Mbars) and high temperatures (20000K). The parameters for these potentials are fit to a wide variety of experimental data, including shock, compression and sound speed data. For the un-reacted high explosive equation of state we use a modified Murnaghan form. We model the detonator (including the flyer plate) and initiation system in detail. The detonator is composed of LX-16, for which we use a program burn model. Steinberg-Guinan models5 are used for the metal components of the detonator. The booster and high explosive are LX-10 and LX-17, respectively. For both the LX-10 and LX-17, we use a pressure dependent rate law, coupled with a chemical equilibrium equation of state based on Cheetah. For LX-17, the kinetic model includes carbon clustering on the nanometer size scale.

  5. Hemispherical color differences on Pluto and Charon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binzel, Richard P.

    1988-01-01

    Time-resolved multicolor photometric observations of Pluto-Charon mutual events have been used to derive individual colors for these two bodies and to investigate the degree of color differences between their synchronous facing and opposite hemispheres. Pluto is significantly redder than Charon, where direct measurements of the anti-Charon hemisphere of Pluto and the Pluto-facing hemisphere of Charon yield B-V magnitudes of 0.867 + or - 0.008 and 0.700 + or - 0.010, respectively. Both Pluto and Charon are found to have relatively uniform longitudinal color distributions with 1-sigma upper limits of 2 percent and 5 percent, respectively, for any large-scale hemispherical color asymmetries. Thus, a previous suspicion of a significant color asymmetry on Charon is not confirmed. Instead the data may be attributed to a direct detection of polar caps on Pluto.

  6. Hemispherical color differences on pluto and charon.

    PubMed

    Binzel, R P

    1988-08-26

    Time-resolved multicolor photometric observations of Pluto-Charon mutual events have been used to derive individual colors for these two bodies and to investigate the degree of color differences between their synchronous facing and opposite hemispheres. Pluto is significantly redder than Charon, where direct measurements of the anti-Charon hemisphere of Pluto and the Pluto-facing hemisphere of Charon yield B-V magnitudes of 0.867 +/- 0.008 and 0.700 +/- 0.010, respectively. Both Pluto and Charon are found to have relatively uniform longitudinal color distributions with lsigma upper limits of 2% and 5%, respectively, for any large-scale hemispherical color asymmetries. Thus, a previous suspicion of a significant color asymmetry on Charon is not confirmed. Instead the data may be attributed to a direct detection of polar caps on Pluto.

  7. Huge Filament Rises From Sun's Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Video Gallery

    On August 1, 2010 following a C3-class solar flare from sunspot 1092, an enormous magnetic filament stretching across the sun's northern hemisphere erupted. This 304 angstrom video shows that filam...

  8. Fast discharge in a plasma gun with hemispherical insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Antsiferov, P. S.; Dorokhin, L. A.; Sidelnikov, Yu. V.; Koshelev, K. N.

    2009-05-15

    A method of creation of hot dense plasma is proposed. It is based on cumulation of a shockwave, which originates on a hemispherical surface of insulator of plasma gun. The results of first experiments are presented. The shock wave is driven by fast electrical discharge (dI/dt>10{sup 12} A/s). The inductive storage with semiconductor opening switch is used as a current driver. Time resolved pin-hole images and vacuum ultraviolet (vuv) spectra are studied. Shockwaves from hemispherical insulator with 4 mm radius create plasma with a form of column about 1 mm diameter and 3-4 mm length. vuv spectra contain the lines of Ar ions that corresponds to the electron temperature about 20 eV. Possible practical application is discussed.

  9. Homotopic language reorganization in the right hemisphere after early left hemisphere injury.

    PubMed

    Tivarus, Madalina E; Starling, Sarah J; Newport, Elissa L; Langfitt, John T

    2012-10-01

    To determine the areas involved in reorganization of language to the right hemisphere after early left hemisphere injury, we compared fMRI activation patterns during four production and comprehension tasks in post-surgical epilepsy patients with either left (LH) or right hemisphere (RH) speech dominance (determined by Wada testing) and healthy controls. Patient groups were carefully matched for IQ, lesion location and size. RH patients' activation across all tasks was greatest in right hemisphere areas homotopic to areas activated by LH and control participants. Differences in right vs. left dominant hemisphere activation were limited to homologous areas typically activated by language tasks, supporting the hypothesis that language localization following transfer to the RH is the mirror-image of localization in the absence of transfer. The similarity of these findings to those in patients with larger, peri-sylvian lesions suggests that these areas in both hemispheres may be uniquely predisposed to subserve various language functions.

  10. Hemisphere-specific processes in letter matching.

    PubMed

    Kirsner, K

    1980-02-01

    Three experiments were designed to investigate outstanding questions concerning the effect of memory load variations on efficiency and coding processes in the left and right cerebral hemispheres. In Experiment 1 subjects were presented with one, two, or three target letters in uppercase or lowercase in central vision, followed by simultaneous bilateral probes requiring a name match response. Twenty young right-handed adults, 10 males and 10 females, acted as subjects. Two main features of the results were as follows: (a) The slope of the linear function relating mean reaction time (RT) and set size was 30% greater for right visual field (RVF)-left-hemisphere probe stimuli under both physical and name identity conditions, and (b) RT for RVF-left-hemisphere probes was greater when the probe was drawn from preterminal serial position in the target list. Experiments 2 and 3 examined the proposition that the results of Experiment 1 reflected asymmetric interference during list acquisition. The results showed that, first, the LVF-right-hemisphere advantage was eliminated or reversed under unilateral probe presentation conditions, and second, the LVF-right-hemisphere advantage for a single, preterminal serial position was insensitive to variations in the interitem interval. The results are thought to be inconsistent with the interference hypothesis. The general implications of the results for existing theories of hemisphere function are discussed.

  11. Hypothalamic digoxin, hemispheric chemical dominance, and spirituality.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2003-03-01

    The isoprenoid pathway was assessed in atheistic and spiritually inclined individuals. The pathway was also assessed in individuals with differing hemispheric dominance to assess whether hemispheric dominance has a correlation with spiritual and atheistic tendency. HMG CoA reductase activity, serum digoxin, RBC membrane Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity, serum magnesium, and tyrosine/tryptophan catabolic patterns were assessed in spiritual/atheistic individuals and in those differing hemispheric dominance. In spiritually-inclined individuals, there was increased digoxin synthesis, decreased membrane Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity, increased tryptophan catabolites (serotonin, quinolinic acid, and nicotine), and decreased tyrosine catabolites (dopamine, noradrenaline, and morphine). The pattern in spiritually-inclined individuals correlated with right hemispheric chemical dominance. In atheistic individuals there was decreased digoxin synthesis, increased membrane Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity, decreased tryptophan catabolities (serotonin, quinolinic acid, and nicotine), and increased tyrosine catabolites (dopamine, noradrenaline, and morphine). This pattern in atheistic individuals correlated with that obtained in left hemispheric chemical dominance. Hemispheric chemical dominance and hypothalamic digoxin could regulate the predisposition to spirituality or atheism.

  12. Hemispherical map for the human brain cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosun, Duygu; Prince, Jerry L.

    2001-07-01

    Understanding the function of the human brain cortex is a primary goal in human brain mapping. Methods to unfold and flatten the cortical surface for visualization and measurement have been described in previous literature; but comparison across multiple subjects is still difficult because of the lack of a standard mapping technique. We describe a new approach that maps each hemisphere of the cortex to a portion of a sphere in a standard way, making comparison of anatomy and function across different subjects possible. Starting with a three-dimensional magnetic resonance image of the brain, the cortex is segmented and represented as a triangle mesh. Defining a cut around the corpus collosum identifies the left and right hemispheres. Together, the two hemispheres are mapped to the complex plane using a conformal mapping technique. A Mobius transformation, which is conformal, is used to transform the points on the complex plane so that a projective transformation maps each brain hemisphere onto a spherical segment comprising a sphere with a cap removed. We determined the best size of the spherical cap by minimizing the relative area distortion between hemispherical maps and original cortical surfaces. The relative area distortion between the hemispherical maps and the original cortical surfaces for fifteen human brains is analyzed.

  13. Grinding tool for making hemispherical bores in hard materials

    DOEpatents

    Duran, E.L.

    1985-04-03

    A grinding tool for forming hemispherical bores in hard materials such as boron carbide. The tool comprises a hemicircular grinding bit, formed of a metal bond diamond matrix, which is mounted transversely on one end of a tubular tool shaft. The bit includes a spherically curved outer edge surface which is the active grinding surface of the tool. Two coolant fluid ports on opposite sides of the bit enable introduction of coolant fluid through the bore of the tool shaft so as to be emitted adjacent the opposite sides of the grinding bit, thereby providing optimum cooling of both the workpiece and the bit.

  14. Northern Hemisphere forcing of Southern Hemisphere climate during the last deglaciation.

    PubMed

    He, Feng; Shakun, Jeremy D; Clark, Peter U; Carlson, Anders E; Liu, Zhengyu; Otto-Bliesner, Bette L; Kutzbach, John E

    2013-02-01

    According to the Milankovitch theory, changes in summer insolation in the high-latitude Northern Hemisphere caused glacial cycles through their impact on ice-sheet mass balance. Statistical analyses of long climate records supported this theory, but they also posed a substantial challenge by showing that changes in Southern Hemisphere climate were in phase with or led those in the north. Although an orbitally forced Northern Hemisphere signal may have been transmitted to the Southern Hemisphere, insolation forcing can also directly influence local Southern Hemisphere climate, potentially intensified by sea-ice feedback, suggesting that the hemispheres may have responded independently to different aspects of orbital forcing. Signal processing of climate records cannot distinguish between these conditions, however, because the proposed insolation forcings share essentially identical variability. Here we use transient simulations with a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model to identify the impacts of forcing from changes in orbits, atmospheric CO(2) concentration, ice sheets and the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) on hemispheric temperatures during the first half of the last deglaciation (22-14.3 kyr BP). Although based on a single model, our transient simulation with only orbital changes supports the Milankovitch theory in showing that the last deglaciation was initiated by rising insolation during spring and summer in the mid-latitude to high-latitude Northern Hemisphere and by terrestrial snow-albedo feedback. The simulation with all forcings best reproduces the timing and magnitude of surface temperature evolution in the Southern Hemisphere in deglacial proxy records. AMOC changes associated with an orbitally induced retreat of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets is the most plausible explanation for the early Southern Hemisphere deglacial warming and its lead over Northern Hemisphere temperature; the ensuing rise in atmospheric CO(2

  15. The Effects of Multiple Script Priming on Word Recognition by the Two Cerebral Hemispheres: Implications for Discourse Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faust, Miriam; Barak, Ofra; Chiarello, Christine

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined left (LH) and right (RH) hemisphere involvement in discourse processing by testing the ability of each hemisphere to use world knowledge in the form of script contexts for word recognition. Participants made lexical decisions to laterally presented target words preceded by centrally presented script primes (four…

  16. Asymmetrical hemisphere activation enhances global-local processing.

    PubMed

    Gable, Philip A; Poole, Bryan D; Cook, Mary S

    2013-12-01

    Decades of research focusing on the neurophysiological underpinnings related to global-local processing of hierarchical stimuli have associated global processing with the right hemisphere and local processing with the left hemisphere. The current experiment sought to expand this research by testing the causal contributions of hemisphere activation to global-local processing. To manipulate hemisphere activation, participants engaged in contralateral hand contractions. Then, EEG activity and attentional scope were measured. Right-hand contractions caused greater relative left-cortical activity than left-hand contractions. Participants were more narrowly focused after left-hemisphere activation than after right-hemisphere activation. Moreover, N1 amplitudes to local targets in the left hemisphere were larger after left-hemisphere activation than after right-hemisphere activation. Consistent with past research investigating hemispheric asymmetry and attentional scope, the current results suggest that manipulating left (right) hemisphere activity enhanced local (global) attentional processing.

  17. A free-standing, sheet-shaped, "hydrophobic" biomaterial containing polymeric micelles formed from poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) block copolymer for possible incorporation/release of "hydrophilic" compounds.

    PubMed

    Moroishi, Hitomi; Yoshida, Chikara; Murakami, Yoshihiko

    2013-02-01

    Sheet-shaped materials with a large contact area relative to the drug targeting site lead to advantages over conventional particle-shaped drug carriers and have several advantages for their biomedical applications. The present study proposes a methodology for preparing a novel sheet-shaped "hydrophobic" and biocompatible biomaterial in which polymeric micelles are uniformly dispersed for the incorporation of "hydrophilic" compounds into the sheet. The methoxy-terminated poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(lactic acid) block copolymer (CH(3)O-PEG-b-PLA) was successfully synthesized by means of the anionic ring-opening polymerization of both ethylene oxide and dl-lactide. CH(3)O-PEG-b-PLA was self-assembled and formed stable micelle-like w/o emulsion with a hydrophilic inner core in organic solvents. A sheet-shaped material containing a hydrophilic inner space for incorporating hydrophilic compounds was obtained by spin-coating both the micelle solution and a sheet-forming polymer. Fluorescent images of the sheet proved that polymeric micelles providing hydrophilic spaces were uniformly dispersed in the hydrophobic sheet. The facile technique presented in this paper can be a tool for fabricating sheet-shaped biomaterials that have a hydrophilic inner core and, consequently, that are suitable for the sustained release of hydrophilic compounds.

  18. Music Appreciation and Hemisphere Orientation: Visual versus Verbal Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zalanowski, Annette H.

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes effect of brain hemisphere orientation on music appreciation. Reports results from 36 left-hemisphere and 36 right-hemisphere undergraduates who responded to a musical selection verbally or visually. Finds right-hemisphere students show greater appreciation, measured by attention, understanding, and enjoyment scores. Discusses…

  19. Hemispheric lateralization of semantic feature distinctiveness

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, M.; Machado, N.; Blumstein, S. E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent models of semantic memory propose that the semantic representation of concepts is based, in part, on a network of features. In this view, a feature that is distinctive for an object (a zebra has stripes) is processed differently from a feature that is shared across many objects (a zebra has four legs). The goal of this paper is to determine whether there are hemispheric differences in such processing. In a feature verification task, participants responded ‘yes’ or ‘no’ following concepts which were presented to a single visual field (left or right) paired with a shared or distinctive feature. Both hemispheres showed faster reaction times to shared features than to distinctive features, although right hemisphere responses were significantly slower overall and particularly in the processing of distinctive features. These findings support models of semantic processing in which the dominant left hemisphere more efficiently performs highly discriminating ‘fine’ encoding, in contrast to the right hemisphere which performs less discriminating ‘coarse’ encoding. PMID:26022059

  20. Tombusvirus Y-Shaped Translational Enhancer Forms a Complex with eIF4F and Can Be Functionally Replaced by Heterologous Translational Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Beth L.; Zaslaver, Olga; Mayberry, Laura K.; Browning, Karen S.

    2013-01-01

    Certain plus-strand RNA plant viruses that are uncapped and nonpolyadenylated rely on RNA elements in their 3′ untranslated region, termed 3′-cap-independent translational enhancers (3′CITEs), for efficient translation of their proteins. Here, we have investigated the properties of the Y-shaped class of 3′CITE present in the tombusvirus Carnation Italian ringspot virus (CIRV). While some types of 3′CITE have been found to function through recruitment of translation initiation factors to the viral genome, no trans-acting translation-related factors have yet been identified for the Y-shaped 3′CITE. Our results indicate that the CIRV 3′CITE complexes with eIF4F and eIFiso4F, with the former mediating translation more efficiently than the latter. In nature, some classes of 3′CITE are present in several different viral genera, suggesting that these elements hold a high degree of modularity. Here, we test this concept by engineering chimeric viruses containing heterologous 3′CITEs and show that the Y-shaped class of 3′CITE in CIRV can be replaced by two alternative types of 3′CITE, i.e., a Panicum mosaic virus-like 3′CITE or an I-shaped 3′CITE, without any major loss in in vitro translation or replication efficiency in protoplasts. The heterologous 3′CITEs also mediated whole-plant infections of Nicotiana benthamiana, where distinct symptoms were observed for each of the alternative 3′CITEs and 3′CITE evolution occurred during serial passaging. Our results supply new information on Y-shaped 3′CITE function and provide insights into 3′CITE virus-host compatibilities. PMID:23192876

  1. Hemispheric asymmetry in the near-Venusian magnetotail during solar maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, S. D.; Zhang, T. L.; Baumjohann, W.

    2016-05-01

    During solar minimum the near-Venusian magnetotail exhibits a hemispheric asymmetry in the cross-tail field distribution. It implies that the magnetic field lines in the -E hemisphere are wrapped more tightly around Venus than in the +E hemisphere. Therefore, a strong field reversal region occurs in the magnetotail, which is prone to the magnetic reconnection. Since the Venus magnetotail is formed due to the solar wind interaction with the ionosphere and the ionosphere is modulated by the solar activity, it is interesting to study the solar cycle dependence of the induced magnetosphere. Here we statistically examine the Venus Express magnetotail data during solar maximum. We find that the magnetic field configuration asymmetry in Venus magnetotail is very much similar to that during solar minimum. The hemispheric asymmetry in the magnetotail persists through the whole solar cycle and magnetic reconnection in the near-Venusian magnetotail might occur during solar minimum as well as solar maximum conditions.

  2. Sex differences in right hemisphere tasks.

    PubMed

    Crucian, G P; Berenbaum, S A

    1998-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that sex differences in spatial ability and emotional perception are due to sex differences in intrahemispheric organization of the right hemisphere. If the right hemisphere is differently organized by sex-primarily specialized for spatial ability in men, but primarily specialized for emotional perception in women-then there should be a negative correlation between spatial ability and emotional perception within sex, and the greatest disparity between abilities should be found in people with characteristic arousal of the right hemisphere. Undergraduate men (N = 86) and women (N = 132) completed tests of Mental Rotation, Surface Development, Profile of Nonverbal Sensitivity, Progressive Matrices, and Chimeric Faces. Although the expected pattern of sex differences was observed, there was no evidence for the hypothesized negative correlation between spatial ability and emotional perception, even after statistical control of general intelligence. PMID:9647685

  3. Dynamic contribution to hemispheric mean temperature trends

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, J.M.; Zhang, Y.; Renwick, J.A.

    1995-11-03

    On the basis of land station data from the Northern Hemisphere, it was determined that roughly half of the temporal variance of monthly mean hemispheric mean anomalies in surface air temperature during the period from 1900 through 1990 were linearly related to the amplitude of a distinctive spatial pattern in which the oceans are anomalously cold and the continents are anomalously warm poleward of 40 degrees north when the hemisphere is warm. Apart from an upward trend since 1975, to which El Nino has contributed, the amplitude time series associated with this pattern resembles seasonally dependent white noise. it is argued that the variability associated with this pattern is dynamically induced and is not necessarily an integral part of the fingerprint of global warming. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Heat transfer from internally heated hemispherical pools

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor, J.D.; Ellsion, P.G.; Cassulo, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on heat transfer from internally heated ZnSO/sub 4/-H/sub 2/O pools to the walls of hemispherical containers. This experimental technique provides data for a heat transfer system that has to date been only theoretically treated. Three different sizes of copper hemispherical containers were used: 240, 280, 320 mm in diameter. The pool container served both as a heat transfer surface and as an electrode. The opposing electrode was a copper disk, 50 mm in diameter located at the top of the pool in the center. The top surface of the pool was open to the atmosphere.

  5. Right hemisphere grey matter structure and language outcomes in chronic left hemisphere stroke.

    PubMed

    Xing, Shihui; Lacey, Elizabeth H; Skipper-Kallal, Laura M; Jiang, Xiong; Harris-Love, Michelle L; Zeng, Jinsheng; Turkeltaub, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    The neural mechanisms underlying recovery of language after left hemisphere stroke remain elusive. Although older evidence suggested that right hemisphere language homologues compensate for damage in left hemisphere language areas, the current prevailing theory suggests that right hemisphere engagement is ineffective or even maladaptive. Using a novel combination of support vector regression-based lesion-symptom mapping and voxel-based morphometry, we aimed to determine whether local grey matter volume in the right hemisphere independently contributes to aphasia outcomes after chronic left hemisphere stroke. Thirty-two left hemisphere stroke survivors with aphasia underwent language assessment with the Western Aphasia Battery-Revised and tests of other cognitive domains. High-resolution T1-weighted images were obtained in aphasia patients and 30 demographically matched healthy controls. Support vector regression-based multivariate lesion-symptom mapping was used to identify critical language areas in the left hemisphere and then to quantify each stroke survivor's lesion burden in these areas. After controlling for these direct effects of the stroke on language, voxel-based morphometry was then used to determine whether local grey matter volumes in the right hemisphere explained additional variance in language outcomes. In brain areas in which grey matter volumes related to language outcomes, we then compared grey matter volumes in patients and healthy controls to assess post-stroke plasticity. Lesion-symptom mapping showed that specific left hemisphere regions related to different language abilities. After controlling for lesion burden in these areas, lesion size, and demographic factors, grey matter volumes in parts of the right temporoparietal cortex positively related to spontaneous speech, naming, and repetition scores. Examining whether domain general cognitive functions might explain these relationships, partial correlations demonstrated that grey matter

  6. Lateralized word recognition: assessing the role of hemispheric specialization, modes of lexical access, and perceptual asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Jordan, T R; Patching, G R; Milner, A D

    2000-06-01

    The processing advantage for words in the right visual field (RVF) has often been assigned to parallel orthographic analysis by the left hemisphere and sequential by the right. The authors investigated this notion using the Reicher-Wheeler task to suppress influences of guesswork and an eye-tracker to ensure central fixation. RVF advantages obtained for all serial positions and identical U-shaped serial-position curves obtained for both visual fields (Experiments 1-4). These findings were not influenced by lexical constraint (Experiment 2) and were obtained with masked and nonmasked displays (Experiment 3). Moreover, words and nonwords produced similar serial-position effects in each field, but only RVF stimuli produced a word-nonword effect (Experiment 4). These findings support the notion that left-hemisphere function underlies the RVF advantage but not the notion that each hemisphere uses a different mode of orthographic analysis.

  7. A comparison between semi-spheroid- and dome-shaped quantum dots coupled to wetting layer

    SciTech Connect

    Shahzadeh, Mohammadreza; Sabaeian, Mohammad

    2014-06-15

    During the epitaxial growth method, self-assembled semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots (QDs) are formed on the wetting layer (WL). However for sake of simplicity, researchers sometimes assume semi-spheroid-shaped QDs to be dome-shaped (hemisphere). In this work, a detailed and comprehensive study on the difference between electronic and transition properties of dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots is presented. We will explain why the P-to-S intersubband transition behaves the way it does. The calculated results for intersubband P-to-S transition properties of quantum dots show two different trends for dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots. The results are interpreted using the probability of finding electron inside the dome/spheroid region, with emphasis on the effects of wetting layer. It is shown that dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots feature different electronic and transition properties, arising from the difference in lateral dimensions between dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped QDs. Moreover, an analogy is presented between the bound S-states in the quantum dots and a simple 3D quantum mechanical particle in a box, and effective sizes are calculated. The results of this work will benefit researchers to present more realistic models of coupled QD/WL systems and explain their properties more precisely.

  8. Hemispherical micro-resonators from atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Jason M.; Houlton, John P.; Gertsch, Jonas C.; Brown, Joseph J.; Rogers, Charles T.; George, Steven M.; Bright, Victor M.

    2014-12-01

    Hemispherical shell micro-resonators may be used as gyroscopes to potentially enable precision inertial navigation and guidance at low cost and size. Such devices require a high degree of symmetry and large quality factors (Q). Fabricating the devices from atomic layer deposition (ALD) facilitates symmetry through ALD’s high conformality and low surface roughness. To maximize Q, the shells’ geometry is optimized using finite element method (FEM) studies to reduce thermoelastic dissipation and anchor loss. The shells are fabricated by etching hemispherical molds in Si (1 1 1) substrates with a 2:7:1 volumetric ratio of hydrofluoric:nitric:acetic acids, and conformally coating and patterning the molds with ALD Al2O3. The Al2O3 shells are then released from the surrounding Si substrate with an SF6 plasma. The resulting shells typically have radii around 50 µm and thicknesses close to 50 nm. The shells are highly symmetric, with radial deviations between 0.22 and 0.49%, and robust enough to be driven on resonance at amplitudes 10 × their thickness, sufficient to visualize the resonance mode shapes in an SEM. Resonance frequencies are around 60 kHz, with Q values between 1000 and 2000. This Q is lower than the 106 predicted by FEM, implying that Q is being limited by unmodeled sources of energy loss, most likely from surface effects or material defects.

  9. Spin-forming Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, Nathan; Henry, Dick

    2009-03-20

    In a second development order, spin-forming equipment was again evaluated using the test shape, a hemispherical shell. In this second development order, pure vanadium and alloy titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) were spin-formed, as well as additional copper and 21-6-9 stainless. In the first development order the following materials had been spin-formed: copper (alloy C11000 ETP), 6061 aluminum, 304L stainless steel, 21-6-9 stainless steel, and tantalum-2.5% tungsten. Significant challenges included properly adjusting the rotations-per-minute (RPM), cracking at un-beveled edges and laser marks, redressing of notches, surface cracking, non-uniform temperature evolution in the titanium, and cracking of the tailstock. Lessons learned were that 300 RPM worked better than 600 RPM for most materials (at the feed rate of 800 mm/min); beveling the edges to lower the stress reduces edge cracking; notches, laser marks, or edge defects in the preform doom the process to cracking and failure; coolant is required for vanadium spin-forming; increasing the number of passes to nine or more eliminates surface cracking for vanadium; titanium develops a hot zone in front of the rollers; and the tailstock should be redesigned to eliminate the cylindrical stress concentrator in the center.

  10. Rethinking a Right Hemisphere Deficit in ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, T. Sigi; Loo, Sandra K.; Zaidel, Eran; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; Smalley, Susan L.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Early observations from lesion studies suggested right hemisphere (RH) dysfunction in ADHD. However, a strictly right-lateralized deficit has not been well supported. An alternatively view suggests increased R greater than L asymmetry of brain function and abnormal interhemispheric interaction. If true, RH pathology in ADHD should…

  11. Practice makes two hemispheres almost perfect.

    PubMed

    Cherbuin, Nicolas; Brinkman, Cobie

    2005-08-01

    Some tasks produce a performance advantage for conditions that require the processing of stimuli in two visual fields compared to conditions where single hemifield processing is sufficient. This advantage, however, disappears with practice. Although no definitive evidence yet exists, there are several possible mechanisms that might lead to improved performance of within- compared to across-hemisphere processing with practice. These include a shift from a more demanding, algorithmic strategy to a less demanding memory-retrieval strategy (e.g., [G. Logan, Toward an instance theory of automatisation. Psych. Rev. 95 (1988) 492-527]), as discussed by Weissman and Compton [D.H. Weissman, R.J. Compton, Practice makes a hemisphere perfect: the advantage of interhemispheric recruitment is eliminated with practice. Laterality, 8 (4) (2003) 361-375], and/or a more generalised practice effect [K. Kirsner, C. Speelman, Skill acquisition and repetition priming: one principle, many processes? J. Exp. Psychol., Learn. Mem. Cogn., 22 (1996) 563-575]. Contrary to Weissman and Compton findings, our results suggest that although single-hemisphere performance improves with practice, bi-hemispheric performance also improves substantially. Furthermore, these effects do not appear to be due to a shift in strategy but rather due to a general practice effect.

  12. Meaning Apprehension in the Cerebral Hemispheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandhadai, Padmapriya A.

    2009-01-01

    When we hear a word, it is remarkable how we store, activate and rapidly retrieve a vast amount of relevant information within a few hundred milliseconds. This thesis examines how meaning is processed in parallel--but with critical differences--between the two hemispheres of the brain. Event-related brain potentials (ERP) were used to examine…

  13. Right-hemisphere specialization for contour grouping.

    PubMed

    Volberg, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies often revealed a right-hemisphere specialization for processing the global level of compound visual stimuli. Here we explore whether a similar specialization exists for the detection of intersected contours defined by a chain of local elements. Subjects were presented with arrays of randomly oriented Gabor patches that could contain a global path of collinearly arranged elements in the left or in the right visual hemifield. As expected, the detection accuracy was higher for contours presented to the left visual field/right hemisphere. This difference was absent in two control conditions where the smoothness of the contour was decreased. The results demonstrate that the contour detection, often considered to be driven by lateral coactivation in primary visual cortex, relies on higher-level visual representations that differ between the hemispheres. Furthermore, because contour and non-contour stimuli had the same spatial frequency spectra, the results challenge the view that the right-hemisphere advantage in global processing depends on a specialization for processing low spatial frequencies.

  14. Right Hemisphere Specialization for Color Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasaki, Hitoshi; Morimoto, Akiko; Nishio, Akira; Matsuura, Sumie

    2007-01-01

    Three experiments were carried out to investigate hemispheric asymmetry in color processing among normal participants. In Experiment 1, it was shown that the reaction times (RTs) of the dominant and non-dominant hands assessed using a visual target presented at the central visual field, were not significantly different. In Experiment 2, RTs of…

  15. Equilibrium Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo, Dario; Petazzi, Lorenzo

    2006-08-01

    We present a satellite path planning technique able to make identical spacecraft aquire a given configuration. The technique exploits a behaviour-based approach to achieve an autonomous and distributed control over the relative geometry making use of limited sensorial information. A desired velocity is defined for each satellite as a sum of different contributions coming from generic high level behaviours: forcing the final desired configuration the behaviours are further defined by an inverse dynamic calculation dubbed Equilibrium Shaping. We show how considering only three different kind of behaviours it is possible to acquire a number of interesting formations and we set down the theoretical framework to find the entire set. We find that allowing a limited amount of communication the technique may be used also to form complex lattice structures. Several control feedbacks able to track the desired velocities are introduced and discussed. Our results suggest that sliding mode control is particularly appropriate in connection with the developed technique.

  16. Hemispheric Coupling: Comparing Dynamo Simulations and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, A. A.; Charbonneau, P.; Passos, D.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical simulations that reproduce solar-like magnetic cycles can be used to generate long-term statistics. The variations in north-south hemispheric solar cycle synchronicity and amplitude produced in simulations has not been widely compared to observations. The observed limits on solar cycle amplitude and phase asymmetry show that hemispheric sunspot area production is no more than 20 % asymmetric for cycles 17-23 and that phase lags do not exceed 20 % (or two years) of the total cycle period, as determined from Royal Greenwich Observatory sunspot data. Several independent studies have found a long-term trend in phase values as one hemisphere leads the other for, on average, four cycles. Such persistence in phase is not indicative of a stochastic phenomenon. We compare these observational findings to the magnetic cycle found in a numerical simulation of solar convection recently produced with the EULAG-MHD model. This long "millennium simulation" spans more than 1600 years and generated 40 regular, sunspot-like cycles. While the simulated cycle length is too long (˜40 yrs) and the toroidal bands remain at too high of latitudes (>30°), some solar-like aspects of hemispheric asymmetry are reproduced. The model is successful at reproducing the synchrony of polarity inversions and onset of cycle as the simulated phase lags do not exceed 20 % of the cycle period. The simulated amplitude variations between the north and south hemispheres are larger than those observed in the Sun, some up to 40 %. An interesting note is that the simulations also show that one hemisphere can persistently lead the other for several successive cycles, placing an upper bound on the efficiency of transequatorial magnetic coupling mechanisms. These include magnetic diffusion, cross-equatorial mixing within latitudinally-elongated convective rolls (a.k.a. "banana cells") and transequatorial meridional flow cells. One or more of these processes may lead to magnetic flux cancellation whereby

  17. Hemispherical and Longitudinal Asymmetries in the Heliospheric Magnetic Field: Flip-flops of a Bashful Ballerina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltula, T.; Mursula, K.

    2004-12-01

    Several studies during many decennia have studied possible longitudinal and hemispherical asymmetries in various forms of solar activity. E.g., there are well known periods when one of the solar hemispheres has dominated the other in sunspot numbers, flare occurrence or some other form of solar activity. However, the solar asymmetries have not been found to be very conclusive, or to form any clear systematical patterns (e.g., relation to solar cycle). On the contrary, recent studies of similar longitudinal and hemispherical asymmetries in the heliospheric magnetic field have shown a very clear and systematic behaviour. E.g., it was found recently that the dominance of the two HMF sectors experiences an oscillation with a period of about 3.2 years. This new flip-flop periodicity in the heliospheric magnetic field is most likely related to a similar periodicity recently found in sunspots. Also, it has recently been found that the HMF sector coming from the northern solar hemisphere systematically dominates at 1AU during solar minimum times. This leads to a persistent southward shift or coning of the heliospheric current sheet at these times that can be picturesquely described by the concept of a Bashful Ballerina. This result also implies that the Sun has a large-scale quadrupole magnetic moment. Here we review these recent developments concerning the longitudinal and hemispherical asymmetries in the heliospheric magnetic field and study their inter-connection.

  18. Prediction and explanation of increases of mean sea levels in northern hemisphere, in southern hemisphere and all ocean of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yu. V.

    2009-04-01

    bottom pressure in the northern ocean must be observed, and in the southern ocean - decreasing. By our theoretical estimations the mean atmospheric pressure in the northern hemisphere accrues with velocity about 0.17 mbar/yr and with similar negative velocity in southern hemisphere. The predicted phenomenon of a slow redistribution of air masses from the southern hemisphere in northern has already obtained a partially confirmation according to the meteorological observations [4]: 0.17-0.22 mbar/yr (northern hemisphere) and -0.18 mbar/yr (southern hemisphere). In the report the mechanisms of the revealed phenomena, their dynamic interrelation are discussed and an possible interpretation to the data of observations is given. 3 Contrast changes of mean sea levels in northern and southern hemispheres. The air masses slowly are transported from a southern hemisphere in northern. They form an original inversion secular atmospheric tide which existence proves to be true by the modern data of observations [4]. The gravitational attraction of the core which is displaced along a polar axis causes the similar tide of oceanic masses [2]. The barometric effect of influence of atmospheric tide will result in reduction of expected secular oceanic tide. Really, an increase of mean atmospheric pressure in the northern hemisphere results in replacement of oceanic masses in the southern hemisphere. Only for this reason the mean sea level in the northern hemisphere decreases with secular velocity -1.98 mm/yr. In turn a decrease of atmospheric pressure in the southern hemisphere results in an increase of the mean sea level in this hemisphere with velocity 1.43 mm/yr. Preliminary estimations have shown, that a oceanic inversion tide, caused by a gravitational attraction of the drifting core, gives the basic contribution to the phenomenon of secular variation of the mean sea level in N and S hemispheres (in northern hemisphere the mean sea level increases with velocity 3.01±0.17 mm/yr and in

  19. Implications of an impact origin for the martian hemispheric dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Nimmo, F; Hart, S D; Korycansky, D G; Agnor, C B

    2008-06-26

    The observation that one hemisphere of Mars is lower and has a thinner crust than the other (the 'martian hemispheric dichotomy') has been a puzzle for 30 years. The dichotomy may have arisen as a result of internal mechanisms such as convection. Alternatively, it may have been caused by one or several giant impacts, but quantitative tests of the impact hypothesis have not been published. Here we use a high-resolution, two-dimensional, axially symmetric hydrocode to model vertical impacts over a range of parameters appropriate to early Mars. We propose that the impact model, in addition to excavating a crustal cavity of the correct size, explains two other observations. First, crustal disruption at the impact antipode is probably responsible for the observed antipodal decline in magnetic field strength. Second, the impact-generated melt forming the northern lowlands crust is predicted to derive from a deep, depleted mantle source. This prediction is consistent with characteristics of martian shergottite meteorites and suggests a dichotomy formation time approximately 100 Myr after martian accretion, comparable to that of the Moon-forming impact on Earth.

  20. Optimized design of a nanostructured SPCE-based multipurpose biosensing platform formed by ferrocene-tethered electrochemically-deposited cauliflower-shaped gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Argoubi, Wicem; Saadaoui, Maroua

    2015-01-01

    Summary The demand for on-site nanodevices is constantly increasing. The technology development for the design of such devices is highly regarded. In this work, we report the design of a disposable platform that is structured with cauliflower-shaped gold nanoparticles (cfAuNPs) and we show its applications in immunosensing and enzyme-based detection. The electrochemical reduction of Au(III) allows for the electrodeposition of highly dispersed cauliflower-shaped gold nanoparticles on the surface of screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs). The nanostructures were functionalized using ferrocenylmethyl lipoic acid ester which allowed for the tethering of the ferrocene group to gold, which serves as an electrochemical transducer/mediator. The bioconjugation of the surface with anti-human IgG antibody (α-hIgG) or horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme yields biosensors, which have been applied for the selective electrochemical detection of human IgG (hIgG) or H2O2 as model analytes, respectively. Parameters such as the number of sweeps, amount of charge generated from the oxidation of the electrodeposited gold, time of incubation and concentration of the ferrocene derivatives have been studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Selectivity and specificity tests have been also performed in the presence of potentially interfering substances to either hIgG or H2O2. Results showed that the devised immunosensor is endowed with good selectivity and specificity in the presence of several folds of competitive analytes. The enzyme-based platform showed a good catalytic activity towards H2O2 oxidation which predestined it to potential applications pertaining to enzymatic kinetics studies. The levels of hIgG in human serum and H2O2 in honey were successfully determined and served as assessment tools of the applicability of the platforms for real samples analysis. PMID:26425435

  1. Optimized design of a nanostructured SPCE-based multipurpose biosensing platform formed by ferrocene-tethered electrochemically-deposited cauliflower-shaped gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Argoubi, Wicem; Saadaoui, Maroua; Ben Aoun, Sami; Raouafi, Noureddine

    2015-01-01

    The demand for on-site nanodevices is constantly increasing. The technology development for the design of such devices is highly regarded. In this work, we report the design of a disposable platform that is structured with cauliflower-shaped gold nanoparticles (cfAuNPs) and we show its applications in immunosensing and enzyme-based detection. The electrochemical reduction of Au(III) allows for the electrodeposition of highly dispersed cauliflower-shaped gold nanoparticles on the surface of screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs). The nanostructures were functionalized using ferrocenylmethyl lipoic acid ester which allowed for the tethering of the ferrocene group to gold, which serves as an electrochemical transducer/mediator. The bioconjugation of the surface with anti-human IgG antibody (α-hIgG) or horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme yields biosensors, which have been applied for the selective electrochemical detection of human IgG (hIgG) or H2O2 as model analytes, respectively. Parameters such as the number of sweeps, amount of charge generated from the oxidation of the electrodeposited gold, time of incubation and concentration of the ferrocene derivatives have been studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Selectivity and specificity tests have been also performed in the presence of potentially interfering substances to either hIgG or H2O2. Results showed that the devised immunosensor is endowed with good selectivity and specificity in the presence of several folds of competitive analytes. The enzyme-based platform showed a good catalytic activity towards H2O2 oxidation which predestined it to potential applications pertaining to enzymatic kinetics studies. The levels of hIgG in human serum and H2O2 in honey were successfully determined and served as assessment tools of the applicability of the platforms for real samples analysis.

  2. Choosing words: left hemisphere, right hemisphere, or both? Perspective on the lateralization of word retrieval.

    PubMed

    Riès, Stéphanie K; Dronkers, Nina F; Knight, Robert T

    2016-04-01

    Language is considered to be one of the most lateralized human brain functions. Left hemisphere dominance for language has been consistently confirmed in clinical and experimental settings and constitutes one of the main axioms of neurology and neuroscience. However, functional neuroimaging studies are finding that the right hemisphere also plays a role in diverse language functions. Critically, the right hemisphere may also compensate for the loss or degradation of language functions following extensive stroke-induced damage to the left hemisphere. Here, we review studies that focus on our ability to choose words as we speak. Although fluidly performed in individuals with intact language, this process is routinely compromised in aphasic patients. We suggest that parceling word retrieval into its subprocesses-lexical activation and lexical selection-and examining which of these can be compensated for after left hemisphere stroke can advance the understanding of the lateralization of word retrieval in speech production. In particular, the domain-general nature of the brain regions associated with each process may be a helpful indicator of the right hemisphere's propensity for compensation. PMID:26766393

  3. Concave-hemisphere-patterned organic top-light emitting device

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Slootsky, Michael; Lunt, Richard

    2015-06-09

    A first device is provided. The first device includes an organic light emitting device, which further comprises a first electrode, a second electrode, and an organic emissive layer disposed between the first and second electrode. Preferably, the second electrode is more transparent than the first electrode. The organic emissive layer has a first portion shaped to form an indentation in the direction of the first electrode, and a second portion shaped to form a protrusion in the direction of the second electrode. The first device may include a plurality of organic light emitting devices. The indentation may have a shape that is formed from a partial sphere, a partial cylinder, a pyramid, or a pyramid with a mesa, among others. The protrusions may be formed between adjoining indentations or between an indentation and a surface parallel to the substrate.

  4. Concave-hemisphere-patterned organic top-light emitting device

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; Slootsky, Michael; Lunt, Richard

    2014-01-21

    A first device is provided. The first device includes an organic light emitting device, which further comprises a first electrode, a second electrode, and an organic emissive layer disposed between the first and second electrode. Preferably, the second electrode is more transparent than the first electrode. The organic emissive layer has a first portion shaped to form an indentation in the direction of the first electrode, and a second portion shaped to form a protrusion in the direction of the second electrode. The first device may include a plurality of organic light emitting devices. The indentation may have a shape that is formed from a partial sphere, a partial cylinder, a pyramid, or a pyramid with a mesa, among others. The protrusions may be formed between adjoining indentations or between an indentation and a surface parallel to the substrate.

  5. Tuber-specific silencing of asparagine synthetase-1 reduces the acrylamide-forming potential of potatoes grown in the field without affecting tuber shape and yield.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Rekha; Shakya, Roshani; Rommens, Caius M

    2012-10-01

    Simultaneous silencing of asparagine synthetase (Ast)-1 and -2 limits asparagine (ASN) formation and, consequently, reduces the acrylamide-forming potential of tubers. The phenotype of silenced lines appears normal in the greenhouse, but field-grown tubers are small and cracked. Assessing the effects of silencing StAst1 and StAst2 individually, we found that yield drag was mainly linked to down-regulation of StAst2. Interestingly, tubers from untransformed scions grafted onto intragenic StAst1/2-silenced rootstock contained almost the same low ASN levels as those in the original silenced lines, indicating that ASN is mainly formed in tubers rather than being transported from leaves. This conclusion was further supported by the finding that overexpression of StAst2 caused ASN to accumulate in leaves but not tubers. Thus, ASN does not appear to be the main form of organic nitrogen transported from leaves to tubers. Because reduced ASN levels coincided with increased levels of glutamine, it appears likely that this alternative amide amino acid is mobilized to tubers, where it is converted into ASN by StAst1. Indeed, tuber-specific silencing of StAst1, but not of StAst2, was sufficient to substantially lower ASN formation in tubers. Extensive field studies demonstrated that the reduced acrylamide-forming potential achieved by tuber-specific StAst1 silencing did not affect the yield or quality of field-harvested tubers.

  6. Asymmetric auroral intensities in the Earth's Northern and Southern hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laundal, K. M.; Østgaard, N.

    2009-07-01

    It is commonly assumed that the aurora borealis (Northern Hemisphere) and aurora australis (Southern Hemisphere) are mirror images of each other because the charged particles causing the aurora follow the magnetic field lines connecting the two hemispheres. The particles are believed to be evenly distributed between the two hemispheres, from the source region in the equatorial plane of the magnetosphere. Although it has been shown that similar auroral features in the opposite hemispheres can be displaced tens of degree in longitude and that seasonal effects can cause differences in global intensity, the overall auroral patterns were still similar. Here we report observations that clearly contradict the common assumption about symmetric aurora: intense spots are seen at dawn in the Northern summer Hemisphere, and at dusk in the Southern winter Hemisphere. The asymmetry is interpreted in terms of inter-hemispheric currents related to seasons, which have been predicted but hitherto had not been seen.

  7. DISJUNCTIVE NORMAL SHAPE MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Nisha; Mesadi, Fitsum; Cetin, Mujdat; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2016-01-01

    A novel implicit parametric shape model is proposed for segmentation and analysis of medical images. Functions representing the shape of an object can be approximated as a union of N polytopes. Each polytope is obtained by the intersection of M half-spaces. The shape function can be approximated as a disjunction of conjunctions, using the disjunctive normal form. The shape model is initialized using seed points defined by the user. We define a cost function based on the Chan-Vese energy functional. The model is differentiable, hence, gradient based optimization algorithms are used to find the model parameters. PMID:27403233

  8. Mesoscale Temperature Fluctuations in the Southern Hemisphere Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Bruce L.

    2008-01-01

    Isentrope surfaces in the Southern Hemisphere stratosphere reveal that air parcels undergo mesoscale temperature fluctuations that depend on latitude and season. The largest temperature fluctuations occur at high latitude winter, whereas the smallest fluctuations occur at high latitude summer. This is the same pattern found for the Northern Hemisphere stratosphere. However, the amplitude of the seasonal dependence in the Southern Hemisphere is only 37% of the Northern Hemisphere's seasonal amplitude.

  9. Hemispherical sky simulator for daylighting model studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selkowitz, S.

    1981-07-01

    The design of a 24 foot diameter hemispherical sky simulator is described. A facility in which large models is tested, which is suitable for research, teaching, and design which could provide a uniform sky, an overcast sky, and several clear sky luminance distributions, as well as accommodating an artificial sun was produced. Initial operating experience with the facility is described, the sky simulator capabilities are reviewed, and its strengths and weaknesses relative to outdoor modelling tests are discussed.

  10. Hemispheric modulations of the attentional networks.

    PubMed

    Spagna, Alfredo; Martella, Diana; Fuentes, Luis J; Marotta, Andrea; Casagrande, Maria

    2016-10-01

    Although several recent studies investigated the hemispheric contributions to the attentional networks using the Attention Network Test (ANT), the role of the cerebral hemispheres in modulating the interaction among them remains unclear. In this study, two lateralized versions of this test (LANT) were used to investigate theal effects on the attentional networks under different conflict conditions. One version, the LANTI-A, presented arrows as target and flankers, while the other version, the LANTI-F, had fruits as target and flankers. Data collected from forty-seven participants confirmed well-known results on the efficiency and interactions among the attentional networks. Further, a left visual field advantage was found when a target occurred in an unattended location (e.g. invalid trials), only with the LANTI-F, but not with LANTI-A. The present study adds more evidence to the hemispheric asymmetry of the orienting of attention, and further reveals patterns of interactions between the attentional networks and the visual fields across different conflicting conditions, underlying the dynamic control of attention in complex environments.

  11. Hemispheric modulations of the attentional networks.

    PubMed

    Spagna, Alfredo; Martella, Diana; Fuentes, Luis J; Marotta, Andrea; Casagrande, Maria

    2016-10-01

    Although several recent studies investigated the hemispheric contributions to the attentional networks using the Attention Network Test (ANT), the role of the cerebral hemispheres in modulating the interaction among them remains unclear. In this study, two lateralized versions of this test (LANT) were used to investigate theal effects on the attentional networks under different conflict conditions. One version, the LANTI-A, presented arrows as target and flankers, while the other version, the LANTI-F, had fruits as target and flankers. Data collected from forty-seven participants confirmed well-known results on the efficiency and interactions among the attentional networks. Further, a left visual field advantage was found when a target occurred in an unattended location (e.g. invalid trials), only with the LANTI-F, but not with LANTI-A. The present study adds more evidence to the hemispheric asymmetry of the orienting of attention, and further reveals patterns of interactions between the attentional networks and the visual fields across different conflicting conditions, underlying the dynamic control of attention in complex environments. PMID:27566000

  12. Flexible Contrast Gain Control in the Right Hemisphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okubo, Matia; Nicholls, Michael E. R.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates whether the right hemisphere has more flexible contrast gain control settings for the identification of spatial frequency. Right-handed participants identified 1 and 9 cycles per degree sinusoidal gratings presented either to the left visual field-right hemisphere (LVF-RH) or the right visual field-left hemisphere (RVF-LH).…

  13. Hemisphericity Research: An Overview with Some Implications for Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, John T.

    1982-01-01

    Research on cerebral hemisphericity and lateral dominance is reviewed, and relationships between right and left hemispheric modes of information processing as well as problem solving techniques are discussed. Conclusions focus mainly on need for educators to know information processing differences of the two hemispheres to teach children problem…

  14. Teaching ESL from the Right Hemisphere of the Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curt, Carmen Judith Nine

    Based on the idea that the brain consists of hemispheres which control different types of behavior, this paper argues that the Puerto Rican school system is deteriorating because its emphasis on left hemisphere (quantitative) activities does not synchronize with Puerto Rico's cultural orientation toward the right hemisphere (qualitative…

  15. Evidence for Right Hemisphere Phonology in a Backward Masking Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halderman, Laura K.

    2011-01-01

    The extent to which orthographic and phonological processes are available during the initial moments of word recognition within each hemisphere is under specified, particularly for the right hemisphere. Few studies have investigated whether each hemisphere uses orthography and phonology under constraints that restrict the viewing time of words and…

  16. Hemispheric Asymmetries in the Activation and Monitoring of Memory Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giammattei, Jeannette; Arndt, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Previous research on the lateralization of memory errors suggests that the right hemisphere's tendency to produce more memory errors than the left hemisphere reflects hemispheric differences in semantic activation. However, all prior research that has examined the lateralization of memory errors has used self-paced recognition judgments. Because…

  17. Brain Hemisphere Dominance: Building the Whole-Brain Singer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Amanda R.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of brain hemisphere dominance serves as the basis for many educational learning theories. The dominant brain hemisphere guides the learning process, but both hemispheres are necessary for true learning to take place. This treatise outlines and analyzes the dominance factor, a learning theory developed by Dr. Carla Hannaford, which…

  18. The Influence of Context on Hemispheric Recruitment during Metaphor Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Michele T.; Hogstrom, Larson J.

    2011-01-01

    Although the left hemisphere's prominence in language is well established, less emphasis has been placed on possible roles for the right hemisphere. Behavioral, patient, and neuroimaging research suggests that the right hemisphere may be involved in processing figurative language. Additionally, research has demonstrated that context can modify…

  19. Corneal-shaping electrode

    DOEpatents

    Doss, James D.; Hutson, Richard L.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a circulating saline electrode for changing corneal shape in eyes. The electrode comprises a tubular nonconductive electrode housing having an annular expanded base which has a surface substantially matched to a subject corneal surface. A tubular conductive electrode connected to a radiofrequency generating source is disposed within the electrode housing and longitudinally aligned therewith. The electrode has a generally hemispherical head having at least one orifice. Saline solution is circulated through the apparatus and over the cornea to cool the corneal surface while radiofrequency electric current emitted from the electrode flows therefrom through the cornea to a second electrode, on the rear of the head. This current heats the deep corneal stroma and thereby effects corneal reshaping as a biological response to the heat.

  20. Acoustic change responses to amplitude modulation: a method to quantify cortical temporal processing and hemispheric asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji Hye; Dimitrijevic, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Sound modulation is a critical temporal cue for the perception of speech and environmental sounds. To examine auditory cortical responses to sound modulation, we developed an acoustic change stimulus involving amplitude modulation (AM) of ongoing noise. The AM transitions in this stimulus evoked an acoustic change complex (ACC) that was examined parametrically in terms of rate and depth of modulation and hemispheric symmetry. Methods: Auditory cortical potentials were recorded from 64 scalp electrodes during passive listening in two conditions: (1) ACC from white noise to 4, 40, 300 Hz AM, with varying AM depths of 100, 50, 25% lasting 1 s and (2) 1 s AM noise bursts at the same modulation rate. Behavioral measures included AM detection from an attend ACC condition and AM depth thresholds (i.e., a temporal modulation transfer function, TMTF). Results: The N1 response of the ACC was large to 4 and 40 Hz and small to the 300 Hz AM. In contrast, the opposite pattern was observed with bursts of AM showing larger responses with increases in AM rate. Brain source modeling showed significant hemispheric asymmetry such that 4 and 40 Hz ACC responses were dominated by right and left hemispheres respectively. Conclusion: N1 responses to the ACC resembled a low pass filter shape similar to a behavioral TMTF. In the ACC paradigm, the only stimulus parameter that changes is AM and therefore the N1 response provides an index for this AM change. In contrast, an AM burst stimulus contains both AM and level changes and is likely dominated by the rise time of the stimulus. The hemispheric differences are consistent with the asymmetric sampling in time hypothesis suggesting that the different hemispheres preferentially sample acoustic time across different time windows. Significance: The ACC provides a novel approach to studying temporal processing at the level of cortex and provides further evidence of hemispheric specialization for fast and slow stimuli. PMID:25717291

  1. Hemispheric View of Venus Centered at 270 Degrees East Longitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The hemispheric view of Venus, as revealed by more than a decade of radar investigations culminating in the 1990-1994 Magellan mission, is centered at 270 degrees east longitude. The Magellan spacecraft imaged more than 98% of Venus at a resolution of about 100 meters; the effective resolution of this image is about 3 km. A mosaic of the Magellan images (most with illumination from the west) forms the image base. Gaps in the Magellan coverage were filled with images from the Earth-based Arecibo radar in a region centered roughly on 0 degree latitude and longitude, and with a neutral tone elsewhere (primarily near the south pole). The composite image was processed to improve contrast and to emphasize small features, and was color-coded to represent elevation. Gaps in the elevation data from the Magellan radar altimeter were filled with altimetry from the Venera spacecraft and the U.S. Pioneer Venus missions. An orthographic projection was used, simulating a distant view of one hemisphere of the planet. The Magellan mission was managed for NASA by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA. Data processed by JPL, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, and the U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ.

  2. Hemispheric View of Venus Centered at 180 Degrees East Longitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The hemispheric view of Venus, as revealed by more than a decade of radar investigations culminating in the 1990-1994 Magellan mission, is centered at 180 degrees east longitude. The Magellan spacecraft imaged more than 98% of Venus at a resolution of about 100 meters; the effective resolution of this image is about 3 km. A mosaic of the Magellan images (most with illumination from the west) forms the image base. Gaps in the Magellan coverage were filled with images from the Earth-based Arecibo radar in a region centered roughly on 0 degree latitude and longitude, and with a neutral tone elsewhere (primarily near the south pole). The composite image was processed to improve contrast and to emphasize small features, and was color-coded to represent elevation. Gaps in the elevation data from the Magellan radar altimeter were filled with altimetry from the Venera spacecraft and the U.S. Pioneer Venus missions. An orthographic projection was used, simulating a distant view of one hemisphere of the planet. The Magellan mission was managed for NASA by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA. Data processed by JPL, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, and the U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ.

  3. Hemispheric View of Venus Centered at 0 Degrees East Longitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The hemispheric view of Venus, as revealed by more than a decade of radar investigations culminating in the 1990-1994 Magellan mission, is centered at 0 degrees east longitude. The Magellan spacecraft imaged more than 98% of Venus at a resolution of about 100 meters; the effective resolution of this image is about 3 km. A mosaic of the Magellan images (most with illumination from the west) forms the image base. Gaps in the Magellan coverage were filled with images from the Earth-based Arecibo radar in a region centered roughly on 0 degree latitude and longitude, and with a neutral tone elsewhere (primarily near the south pole). The composite image was processed to improve contrast and to emphasize small features, and was color-coded to represent elevation. Gaps in the elevation data from the Magellan radar altimeter were filled with altimetry from the Venera spacecraft and the U.S. Pioneer Venus missions. An orthographic projection was used, simulating a distant view of one hemisphere of the planet. The Magellan mission was managed for NASA by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA. Data processed by JPL, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, and the U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ.

  4. Hemispheric View of Venus Centered at 90 Degrees East Longitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The hemispheric view of Venus, as revealed by more than a decade of radar investigations culminating in the 1990-1994 Magellan mission, is centered at 90 degrees east longitude. The Magellan spacecraft imaged more than 98% of Venus at a resolution of about 100 meters; the effective resolution of this image is about 3 km. A mosaic of the Magellan images (most with illumination from the west) forms the image base. Gaps in the Magellan coverage were filled with images from the Earth-based Arecibo radar in a region centered roughly on 0 degree latitude and longitude, and with a neutral tone elsewhere (primarily near the south pole). The composite image was processed to improve contrast and to emphasize small features, and was color-coded to represent elevation. Gaps in the elevation data from the Magellan radar altimeter were filled with altimetry from the Venera spacecraft and the U.S. Pioneer Venus missions. An orthographic projection was used, simulating a distant view of one hemisphere of the planet. The Magellan mission was managed for NASA by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA. Data processed by JPL, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, and the U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ.

  5. Words, Hemispheres, and Processing Mechanisms: A Response to Marsolek and Deason (2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Andrew W.; Ansorge, Lydia; Lavidor, Michal

    2007-01-01

    Ellis, Ansorge and Lavidor (2007) [Ellis, A.W., Ansorge, L., & Lavidor, M. (2007). Words, hemispheres, and dissociable subsystems: The effects of exposure duration, case alternation, priming and continuity of form on word recognition in the left and right visual fields. "Brain and Language," 103, 292-303.] presented three experiments investigating…

  6. Testing the Language of German Cerebral Palsy Patients with Right Hemispheric Language Organization after Early Left Hemispheric Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwilling, Eleonore; Krageloh-Mann, Ingeborg; Konietzko, Andreas; Winkler, Susanne; Lidzba, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Language functions are generally represented in the left cerebral hemisphere. After early (prenatally acquired or perinatally acquired) left hemispheric brain damage language functions may be salvaged by reorganization into the right hemisphere. This is different from brain lesions acquired in adulthood which normally lead to aphasia. Right…

  7. Are reptile and amphibian species younger in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere?

    PubMed

    Dubey, Sylvain; Shine, R

    2012-01-01

    A previous analysis of molecular phylogenies suggested that intraspecific diversification had occurred more recently in temperate-zone Northern Hemisphere reptiles and amphibians than in Southern Hemisphere taxa. Here, we test potential explanations for this pattern. We examined published phylogenetic analyses, derived from genetic sequence data, to generate two estimates of the age of species: (i) the oldest intraspecific diversification event within each taxon and (ii) the inferred timing of the split between two sister species. The timing of splits between species shows the same pattern as splits within species, and thus may be due to climatically driven cladogenic and extinction events or may be an artefact of differing levels of taxonomic knowledge about the fauna. Current rates of species descriptions suggest that many more taxa remain to be described in the Southern Hemisphere than the Northern Hemisphere; for that bias to fully explain our results on species age differences, the proportion of undescribed Southern taxa would need to be ≥ 12% in reptiles and ≥ 51% in anurans. For reptiles, taxonomic ignorance plausibly explains the apparent difference in mean age of species between the Southern and Northern Hemispheres; but this explanation can apply to amphibians only if a vast number of Southern taxa remain to be described.

  8. Hemispheric specialization for linguistic processing of sung speech.

    PubMed

    Yelle, Serena K; Grimshaw, Gina M

    2009-02-01

    The two hemispheres of the brain play complementary roles in song perception, with the left hemisphere specialized for processing the linguistic aspects of song and the right hemisphere specialized for the processing of melody. However, very little is known about how language and melody interact. The present study tested the hypothesis that right hemisphere linguistic processing would be facilitated by the presence of melody. In a dichotic listening paradigm, participants (8 men, 43 women) performed a linguistic task while listening to spoken or sung speech. Contrary to the hypothesis, left hemisphere specialization for linguistic processing was identical whether the sentences were spoken or sung.

  9. Optimal shapes for best draining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, J. D.

    2009-11-01

    The container shape that minimizes the volume of draining fluid remaining on the walls of the container after it has been emptied from its base is determined. The film of draining fluid is assumed to wet the walls of the container, and is sufficiently thin so that its curvature may be neglected. Surface tension is ignored. The initial value problem for the thickness of a film of Newtonian fluid is studied, and is shown to lead asymptotically to a similarity solution. From this, and from equivalent solutions for power-law fluids, the volume of the residual film is determined. The optimal container shape is not far from hemispherical, to minimize the surface area, but has a conical base to promote draining. The optimal shape for an axisymmetric mixing vessel, with a hole at the center of its base for draining, is also optimal when inverted in the manner of a washed wine glass inverted and left to drain.

  10. Hemispheric dominance underlying the neural substrate for learned vocalizations develops with experience.

    PubMed

    Chirathivat, Napim; Raja, Sahitya C; Gobes, Sharon M H

    2015-06-22

    Many aspects of song learning in songbirds resemble characteristics of speech acquisition in humans. Genetic, anatomical and behavioural parallels have most recently been extended with demonstrated similarities in hemispheric dominance between humans and songbirds: the avian higher order auditory cortex is left-lateralized for processing song memories in juvenile zebra finches that already have formed a memory of their fathers' song, just like Wernicke's area in the left hemisphere of the human brain is dominant for speech perception. However, it is unclear if hemispheric specialization is due to pre-existing functional asymmetry or the result of learning itself. Here we show that in juvenile male and female zebra finches that had never heard an adult song before, neuronal activation after initial exposure to a conspecific song is bilateral. Thus, like in humans, hemispheric dominance develops with vocal proficiency. A left-lateralized functional system that develops through auditory-vocal learning may be an evolutionary adaptation that could increase the efficiency of transferring information within one hemisphere, benefiting the production and perception of learned communication signals.

  11. Inter-hemispheric competition relieved in both: hypotheses for autism and schizophrenia from problem theory.

    PubMed

    Burnand, Gordon

    2012-07-01

    A logical relationship exists among six general problems that people face in life. Using hope about something for its subjective probability, its expected likelihood, the problems form a series where the method of assessing hope changes in a simple manner from one problem to the next. The central hypothesis is that human beings exploit this. Brain structures and predispositions have evolved accordingly, leading to the hemispheres having different predispositions. The hemispheres are effectively joined at 5 months. Infants will then find that they engage in two unrelated activities. Typical infants label the activities in detail, using visual images, as part of gaining control over them. Hypotheses are: (a) autistic children fail labelling at the start, and hence they encounter uncontrolled competition between the hemispheres; (b) with some, serotonin abnormality impairs sensory information processing and hence the labelling; (c) with some, a delay in myelination from autoimmune effects disrupts labelling; (d) the likelihood of this 'delay autism' is reduced by long chain omega oils; (e) self-pressuring, which underlies taking on challenges and play like Hide and Seek, brings relief from the competition by raising the influence of one side; (f) the same left-right competition occurs in confused episodes and schizophrenia in vulnerable people who encounter pressures to use both hemispheres at the same time; (g) some symptoms raise the influence on one side ideationally. This leads to coherent theories of autism and schizophrenia. In both competition between the hemispheres is relieved primarily by self-pressuring, which raises influence on one side.

  12. Inter-Hemispherical Currents for Realistic Model of Ionospheric Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyatsky, S.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2013-12-01

    We present results of modeling of the global 3-D ionosphere-magnetosphere current system including in addition to the R1 and R2 field-aligned currents also inter-hemispherical currents. The inter-hemispherical currents flow between Northern and Southern conjugate ionospheres in case of a North-South asymmetry in ionospheric conductivity in two hemispheres. These currents link together the ionospheric currents in two hemispheres, so the currents observed in one hemisphere can provide us with information about currents in the opposite hemisphere, which is especially important when their magnitude can not be obtained from direct observation (e.g., in Antarctica). In this study, we investigate the generation of the inter-hemispherical currents for several distributions of ionospheric conductivity in two hemispheres including a simplified model of ionospheric conductivity, which is important for better understanding of the expected distribution and magnitude of these currents, and a more realistic model of ionospheric conductivity, which is observed during magnetospheric substorms, when the geometry of the inter-hemispherical currents is more complicated. Simulation results show that the inter-hemispherical currents during substorms could play a very significant role, and neglecting these currents does not allow obtaining the correct picture of 3-D magnetosphere-ionosphere current system. These currents are an important part of 3-D field-aligned current system, and they are especially strong during summer-winter months, when they are comparable in magnitude with the R2 currents (about ~0.5 MA). Inter-hemispherical currents map. Left panel is related to Northern hemisphere, right panel to Southern. R1 and R2 currents are not shown; their locations are indicated by the red and blue dashed circles, respectively. The inter-hemispherical currents appear inside the auroral zone in the region of conductivity gradient. The currents in both hemispheres are equal in magnitude and

  13. The Role of Family Environment and Multiple Forms of Childhood Abuse in the Shaping of Sexual Function and Satisfaction in Women.

    PubMed

    Seehuus, Martin; Clifton, Jessica; Rellini, Alessandra H

    2015-08-01

    Studies suggest that sexual self-schemas are an important cognitive mechanism in the sexual development of women with a history of childhood abuse. This literature is only beginning to explore how multiple forms of abuse (i.e., physical, emotional, and sexual), rather than sexual abuse alone, can influence the development of adult sexuality. Moreover, the extant literature has not carefully considered important factors other than the severity of the abuse that may relate to sexual self-schemas, including family environment and quality of romantic relationships. Findings from this cross-sectional study conducted on 417 heterosexual women (ages 18-25 years) suggest that family dynamics and different types of childhood abuse contribute both directly and indirectly to adult sexual function and satisfaction and that part of those effects were mediated by other factors such as sexual self-schemas and romantic relationship quality. These results, including an exploration of the direct and indirect effects, were discussed in terms of the pervasive effects of abuse on people's lives and the potential treatment targets that can be addressed when trying to reduce sexual problems in women with a history of abuse. PMID:25339521

  14. Hubble Spots Northern Hemispheric Clouds on Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Using visible light, astronomers for the first time this century have detected clouds in the northern hemisphere of Uranus. The newest images, taken July 31 and Aug. 1, 1997 with NASA Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, show banded structure and multiple clouds. Using these images, Dr. Heidi Hammel (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and colleagues Wes Lockwood (Lowell Observatory) and Kathy Rages (NASA Ames Research Center) plan to measure the wind speeds in the northern hemisphere for the first time.

    Uranus is sometimes called the 'sideways' planet, because its rotation axis tipped more than 90 degrees from the planet's orbit around the Sun. The 'year' on Uranus lasts 84 Earth years, which creates extremely long seasons - winter in the northern hemisphere has lasted for nearly 20 years. Uranus has also been called bland and boring, because no clouds have been detectable in ground-based images of the planet. Even to the cameras of the Voyager spacecraft in 1986, Uranus presented a nearly uniform blank disk, and discrete clouds were detectable only in the southern hemisphere. Voyager flew over the planet's cloud tops near the dead of northern winter (when the northern hemisphere was completely shrouded in darkness).

    Spring has finally come to the northern hemisphere of Uranus. The newest images, both the visible-wavelength ones described here and those taken a few days earlier with the Near Infrared and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) by Erich Karkoschka (University of Arizona), show a planet with banded structure and detectable clouds.

    Two images are shown here. The 'aqua' image (on the left) is taken at 5,470 Angstroms, which is near the human eye's peak response to wavelength. Color has been added to the image to show what a person on a spacecraft near Uranus might see. Little structure is evident at this wavelength, though with image-processing techniques, a small cloud can be seen near the planet's northern limb

  15. HUBBLE SPOTS NORTHERN HEMISPHERIC CLOUDS ON URANUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Using visible light, astronomers for the first time this century have detected clouds in the northern hemisphere of Uranus. The newest images, taken July 31 and Aug. 1, 1997 with NASA Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, show banded structure and multiple clouds. Using these images, Dr. Heidi Hammel (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and colleagues Wes Lockwood (Lowell Observatory) and Kathy Rages (NASA Ames Research Center) plan to measure the wind speeds in the northern hemisphere for the first time. Uranus is sometimes called the 'sideways' planet, because its rotation axis is tipped more than 90 degrees from the planet's orbit around the Sun. The 'year' on Uranus lasts 84 Earth years, which creates extremely long seasons - winter in the northern hemisphere has lasted for nearly 20 years. Uranus has also been called bland and boring, because no clouds have been detectable in ground-based images of the planet. Even to the cameras of the Voyager spacecraft in 1986, Uranus presented a nearly uniform blank disk, and discrete clouds were detectable only in the southern hemisphere. Voyager flew over the planet's cloud tops near the dead of northern winter (when the northern hemisphere was completely shrouded in darkness). Spring has finally come to the northern hemisphere of Uranus. The newest images, both the visible-wavelength ones described here and those taken a few days earlier with the Near Infrared and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) by Erich Karkoschka (University of Arizona), show a planet with banded structure and detectable clouds. Two images are shown here. The 'aqua' image (on the left) is taken at 5,470 Angstroms, which is near the human eye's peak response to wavelength. Color has been added to the image to show what a person on a spacecraft near Uranus might see. Little structure is evident at this wavelength, though with image-processing techniques, a small cloud can be seen near the planet's northern limb (rightmost

  16. Phenological Changes in the Southern Hemisphere

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Lynda E.; Altwegg, Res; Barbraud, Christophe; Barnard, Phoebe; Beaumont, Linda J.; Crawford, Robert J. M.; Durant, Joel M.; Hughes, Lesley; Keatley, Marie R.; Low, Matt; Morellato, Patricia C.; Poloczanska, Elvira S.; Ruoppolo, Valeria; Vanstreels, Ralph E. T.; Woehler, Eric J.; Wolfaardt, Anton C.

    2013-01-01

    Current evidence of phenological responses to recent climate change is substantially biased towards northern hemisphere temperate regions. Given regional differences in climate change, shifts in phenology will not be uniform across the globe, and conclusions drawn from temperate systems in the northern hemisphere might not be applicable to other regions on the planet. We conduct the largest meta-analysis to date of phenological drivers and trends among southern hemisphere species, assessing 1208 long-term datasets from 89 studies on 347 species. Data were mostly from Australasia (Australia and New Zealand), South America and the Antarctic/subantarctic, and focused primarily on plants and birds. This meta-analysis shows an advance in the timing of spring events (with a strong Australian data bias), although substantial differences in trends were apparent among taxonomic groups and regions. When only statistically significant trends were considered, 82% of terrestrial datasets and 42% of marine datasets demonstrated an advance in phenology. Temperature was most frequently identified as the primary driver of phenological changes; however, in many studies it was the only climate variable considered. When precipitation was examined, it often played a key role but, in contrast with temperature, the direction of phenological shifts in response to precipitation variation was difficult to predict a priori. We discuss how phenological information can inform the adaptive capacity of species, their resilience, and constraints on autonomous adaptation. We also highlight serious weaknesses in past and current data collection and analyses at large regional scales (with very few studies in the tropics or from Africa) and dramatic taxonomic biases. If accurate predictions regarding the general effects of climate change on the biology of organisms are to be made, data collection policies focussing on targeting data-deficient regions and taxa need to be financially and logistically

  17. Walter Baade and the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbrock, D. E.

    1993-12-01

    The inception of the European Southern Observatory is generally traced to Walter Baade's discussions with Jan Oort during his visit to Leiden in the spring of 1953. However, these discussions had certainly been underway between them previously, during Oort's visit to Pasadena in early 1952. Furthermore, Baade's great interest in southern-hemisphere astronomy and his strong desire to observe there can be traced far back in his career. In 1927, after his return to Germany from a year in the U.S. under a Rockefeller fellowship, Baade reported that his country had no chance to catch up with American astronomy in the northern hemisphere. He advocated moving the Hamburg 1-meter reflector to the southern hemisphere to get in ahead of the U.S. with an effective telescope there. Baade emphasized the research that could be done on high-luminosity and variable stars in the Magellanic Clouds. Later, after he had joined the Mount Wilson staff, his early attempts to locate the center of our Galaxy and globular clusters near it (in 1937) and his observational study (with Edwin Hubble) of the Sculptor and Fornax dwarf galaxies (in 1939) re-emphasized to him the need for a southern observatory. During and soon after World War II he made many suggestions on a search for ``cluster-type variables'' in the Magellanic Clouds to Enrique Gaviola, director of the new 1.5-meter Bosque Alegre reflector in Argentina. Baade wanted to go there to observe with it himself, but his German citizenship prevented him from leaving the U.S.. Finally, in the last year of his life, he was able to observe NGC 6522 (the globular cluster in ``his'' window), with the Mount Stromlo 1.9-meter reflector.

  18. Spatial disorientation in right-hemisphere infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Meerwaldt, J D; van Harskamp, F

    1982-01-01

    Spatial orientation was tested with the rod orientation test. The subjects were 40 normal controls and 68 brain-damaged patients with cerebral infarcts. Patients in whom the lesion included the post-rolandic region of the right hemisphere performed worse than controls or patients with lesions at other sites. Patients with an exclusively postrolandic (usually occipital) lesion showed higher error rates than patients with a combined prerolandic and postrolandic lesion, but only for the visual part of the test. These patients were re-examined one year after the stroke. Most of them showed an incomplete recovery of spatial function. PMID:7119828

  19. The genus Platychara from the Western Hemisphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, R.E.; Forester, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    The systematics of four species belonging to the genus Platychara (Charophyta) from the Western Hemisphere is discussed. Three of the species, as defined herein, occur in Cretaceous and Paleocene rocks from Mexico through South America. The type species, P. compressa (Peck and Reker) Grambast, also of Cretaceous and Paleocene age, is herein restricted to deposits north of Mexico. These latter restrictions geographically separate P. compressa and P. perlata as presently defined but the relationship between these two species is still uncertain. A new species, P. grambastii, is proposed for specimens from Maestrichtian sediments in Jamaica. ?? 1979.

  20. Hemispheric specialization in dogs for processing different acoustic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Siniscalchi, Marcello; Quaranta, Angelo; Rogers, Lesley J

    2008-01-01

    Considerable experimental evidence shows that functional cerebral asymmetries are widespread in animals. Activity of the right cerebral hemisphere has been associated with responses to novel stimuli and the expression of intense emotions, such as aggression, escape behaviour and fear. The left hemisphere uses learned patterns and responds to familiar stimuli. Although such lateralization has been studied mainly for visual responses, there is evidence in primates that auditory perception is lateralized and that vocal communication depends on differential processing by the hemispheres. The aim of the present work was to investigate whether dogs use different hemispheres to process different acoustic stimuli by presenting them with playbacks of a thunderstorm and their species-typical vocalizations. The results revealed that dogs usually process their species-typical vocalizations using the left hemisphere and the thunderstorm sounds using the right hemisphere. Nevertheless, conspecific vocalizations are not always processed by the left hemisphere, since the right hemisphere is used for processing vocalizations when they elicit intense emotion, including fear. These findings suggest that the specialisation of the left hemisphere for intraspecific communication is more ancient that previously thought, and so is specialisation of the right hemisphere for intense emotions. PMID:18843371

  1. Cognitive correlates of hemispheric performance on dichotic tasks.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R C; Green, P; Ahern, F M; Cole, R E

    Older (age 50+) adults were tested twice on three measures of dichotic memory and once on three measures of cognition. Internal consistencies of all three measures generally were adequate. However, test-retest reliabilities, by ear of presentation, were comparatively low for the three dichotic measures. A measure of vocabulary (a left hemisphere dominant cognitive ability) was related to performance on most dichotic tasks. Years of education (an index of left hemisphere mediated crystallized intelligence) was related to performance on left but not right hemisphere function on two of three dichotic tasks. Performance on tests of spatial ability was related to performance on left ear/right hemisphere but not right ear/left hemisphere function on two of three dichotic memory tasks. Individual differences in accuracy of recall and recognition of stimuli presented via dichotic tasks to the right ear/left hemisphere and the left ear/right hemisphere appear to have different cognitive correlates. Right hemisphere performance on dichotic tasks generally shows a significant negative association with age, as did performance on right hemisphere dominant cognitive tasks. On the other hand, most measures of left hemisphere performance showed no decline associated with age.

  2. Hemispheric specialization in dogs for processing different acoustic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Siniscalchi, Marcello; Quaranta, Angelo; Rogers, Lesley J

    2008-01-01

    Considerable experimental evidence shows that functional cerebral asymmetries are widespread in animals. Activity of the right cerebral hemisphere has been associated with responses to novel stimuli and the expression of intense emotions, such as aggression, escape behaviour and fear. The left hemisphere uses learned patterns and responds to familiar stimuli. Although such lateralization has been studied mainly for visual responses, there is evidence in primates that auditory perception is lateralized and that vocal communication depends on differential processing by the hemispheres. The aim of the present work was to investigate whether dogs use different hemispheres to process different acoustic stimuli by presenting them with playbacks of a thunderstorm and their species-typical vocalizations. The results revealed that dogs usually process their species-typical vocalizations using the left hemisphere and the thunderstorm sounds using the right hemisphere. Nevertheless, conspecific vocalizations are not always processed by the left hemisphere, since the right hemisphere is used for processing vocalizations when they elicit intense emotion, including fear. These findings suggest that the specialisation of the left hemisphere for intraspecific communication is more ancient that previously thought, and so is specialisation of the right hemisphere for intense emotions.

  3. Inter-hemispheric temperature variability over the past millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukom, Raphael; Gergis, Joëlle; Karoly, David J.; Wanner, Heinz; Curran, Mark; Elbert, Julie; González-Rouco, Fidel; Linsley, Braddock K.; Moy, Andrew D.; Mundo, Ignacio; Raible, Christoph C.; Steig, Eric J.; van Ommen, Tas; Vance, Tessa; Villalba, Ricardo; Zinke, Jens; Frank, David

    2014-05-01

    The Earth's climate system is driven by a complex interplay of internal chaotic dynamics and natural and anthropogenic external forcing. Recent instrumental data have shown a remarkable degree of asynchronicity between Northern Hemisphere and Southern Hemisphere temperature fluctuations, thereby questioning the relative importance of internal versus external drivers of past as well as future climate variability. However, large-scale temperature reconstructions for the past millennium have focused on the Northern Hemisphere, limiting empirical assessments of inter-hemispheric variability on multi-decadal to centennial timescales. Here, we introduce a new millennial ensemble reconstruction of annually resolved temperature variations for the Southern Hemisphere based on an unprecedented network of terrestrial and oceanic palaeoclimate proxy records. In conjunction with an independent Northern Hemisphere temperature reconstruction ensemble, this record reveals an extended cold period (1594-1677) in both hemispheres but no globally coherent warm phase during the pre-industrial (1000-1850) era. The current (post-1974) warm phase is the only period of the past millennium where both hemispheres are likely to have experienced contemporaneous warm extremes. Our analysis of inter-hemispheric temperature variability in an ensemble of climate model simulations for the past millennium suggests that models tend to overemphasize Northern Hemisphere-Southern Hemisphere synchronicity by underestimating the role of internal ocean-atmosphere dynamics, particularly in the ocean-dominated Southern Hemisphere. Our results imply that climate system predictability on decadal to century timescales may be lower than expected based on assessments of external climate forcing and Northern Hemisphere temperature variations alone.

  4. Novel hemispheric image formation: concepts and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Simon; Konen, Pierre; Roulet, Patrice; Villegas, Mathieu

    2008-04-01

    Panoramic and hemispheric lens technologies represent new and exciting opportunities in both imaging and projection systems. Such lenses offer intriguing applications for the transportation/automotive industry, in the protection of civilian and military areas, business. In this paper we describe a new optical design technique that provides a greater degree of freedom in producing a variety of hemispheric spatial light distribution areas. This innovative optical design strategy, of generating and controlling image mapping, has been successful in producing high-resolution imaging and projection systems. This success has subsequently generated increased interest in the high-resolution camera/projector and the concept of absolute measurement with high-resolution wide-angle lenses. The new technique described in this paper uses optimization techniques to improve the performance of a customized wide-angle lens optical system for a specific application. By adding a custom angle-to-pixel ratio at the optical design stage, this customized optical system provides ideal image coverage while reducing and optimizing signal processing. This novel image formation technique requires the development of new algorithms in order to view the panoramic image on a display without any residual distortion.

  5. Inter-hemispheric asymmetry of Pedersen conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y.; Lu, Y.; Sheng, C.; Yue, X.

    2015-12-01

    Ionospheric conductance is very important to the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in the high latitude region, since it connects the polar cap potential with the currents. Meanwhile, the altitudinal distribution of Pederson conductance gives us a rough idea about the altitudinal distribution of Joule heating at high latitudes. Based on the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) satellites observations of electron density profiles from 2009-2014, Pedersen conductivity has been calculated. A climatologic study of the height-integrated Pedersen conductivities in both E (100-150 km) and F (150-600 km) regions and their ratio in different seasons, solar and geomagnetic conditions have been conducted. A significant inter-hemispheric asymmetry is identified in the seasonal variation. Meanwhile, the conductance in both regions and the conductance ratio show a strong dependence on F10.7 and Ap indices. This result will strongly help our understanding of the inter-hemispheric difference in the high-latitude electrodynamics.

  6. A Search for Hemispheric Asymmetry on Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, C. M.; Storrs, A. D.

    2004-12-01

    We will present reconstructed images of Neptune's largest satellite Triton as part of an investigation of hemispheric asymmetry. The images we observed from the Hubble Space Telescope in July of 1997, using the Wide Field/Planetary Camera. The images were taken in several filters: F439W, F555W, and F791W. Image restoration was performed using the MISTRAL program (Mugnier, Fusco, and Conan 2003). We present the ratio between the filters to determine if there is any hemispheric color asymmetry at this time. The photometry of Triton appears normal in this data although Hicks and Buratti (2004) observe Triton to be anomalously red in August of 1997. References: Hicks, M.D., and Buratti, B.J. (2004): "The Spectral Variability of Triton from 1997-2000", Icarus 171 pp. 210-218 Mugnier, L.M., T. Fusco, and J.-M. Conan, 2003. "MISTRAL: a Myopic Edge-Preserving Image Restoration Method. Applicaton to Astronomical Adaptive Optics Corrected Long-Exposure Images." JOSA A (submitted)

  7. Unusual size-dependent magnetization in near hemispherical Co nanomagnets on SiO2 from fast pulsed laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, H.; Miller, C.; Longstreth-Spoor, L.; Nussinov, Z.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2008-04-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser melting of ultrathin metal films can lead to self-organized arrays of spherical nanoparticles. We have applied this technique to assemble arrays of nanoparticles of the soft elemental ferromagnet Co on SiO2. Surface morphology studies by using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy established that the nanoparticles were nearly hemispherical with an average contact angle of ˜104±22°. Magnetic properties of these nanoparticles in the size range of 30-250nm diameter were investigated by magnetic force microscopy under zero applied field in conjunction with simulations of the magnetic tip-particle interaction. Particles up to 180nm diameter were found to be single domain with the magnetization direction oriented predominantly in-plane for the smaller particles (⩽75nm ) and out-of-plane for the larger particles (⩽180nm). Multidomain behavior was observed for particles larger than 180nm. Magnetic hysteresis measurements at room temperature confirmed that the arrays consisted of a mixture of in-plane and out-of-plane orientations. Microstructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy revealed that the nanoparticles had a granular microstructure with the average grain size increasing with particle size. This size-dependent magnetic orientation is inconsistent with the expected in-plane orientation due to shape anisotropy. We suggest that a size-dependent residual strain and the microstructure formed by rapid laser processing determine the orientation of nanomagnets. This idea was supported by the significant increase in in-plane orientation of larger particles following thermal annealing. These studies suggest that anisotropic nanomagnets of near hemispherical polycrystalline particles with desired magnetic orientation can be prepared by fast laser thermal processing.

  8. Interannual Variability and Trends of Extratropical Ozone, Part II: Southern Hemisphere. Part 2; Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, Y. L.

    2008-01-01

    A principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to the Southern Hemisphere (SH) total column ozone following the method established for analyzing the data in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) in a companion paper. The interannual variability (IAV) of extratropical O-3 in the SH is characterized by four main modes, which account for 75% of the total variance. The first two leading modes are approximately zonally symmetric and relate to the Southern Hemisphere annular mode and the quasi-biennial oscillation. The third and fourth modes exhibit wavenumber-1 structures. Contrary to the Northern Hemisphere, the third and fourth are nor related to stationary waves. Similar results obtained for the 30 100-hPa geopotential thickness.The decreasing O3 trend in the SH is captured in the first mode. The largest trend is at the South Pole, with value similar to-2 Dobson Units (DU)/yr. Both the spatial pattern and trends in the column ozone are captured by the Goddard Earth Observation System chemistry-climate model (GEOS-CCM) in the SH.

  9. Hemispheric processing of landmark and geometric information in male and female domestic chicks (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Tommasi, Luca; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2004-11-01

    A place learning paradigm was used to assess lateralisation and sex differences in domestic chicks dealing with global (geometric shape) and local (identity of a beacon) aspects of spatial encoding. Male and female domestic chicks were trained binocularly to localise food buried under sawdust in the centre of a square-shaped enclosure. They were then tested binocularly and monocularly (Experiment 1). Training in the same task was also carried out in the presence of a centrally placed visual beacon, so that chicks could then be tested in a number of transformed versions of the training arrangement: after removing the beacon (Experiment 2), after shifting the beacon to a corner (Experiment 3) and after simultaneously shifting the beacon to a corner and replacing it with a second, visually different, beacon (Experiment 4). Results show that the right hemisphere prevalently attends to the geometry of the environment in both male and female chicks. Males rely upon local information (beacon) more than females, also showing stronger encoding of this information in their left hemisphere than their right hemisphere.

  10. Shape memory polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, Loredana

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in shape memory polymer (SMP) foam research are reviewed. The SMPs belong to a new class of smart polymers which can have interesting applications in microelectromechanical systems, actuators and biomedical devices. They can respond to specific external stimulus changing their configuration and then remember the original shape. In the form of foams, the shape memory behaviour can be enhanced because they generally have higher compressibility. Considering also the low weight, and recovery force, the SMP foams are expected to have great potential applications primarily in aerospace. This review highlights the recent progress in characterization, evaluation, and proposed applications of SMP foams mainly for aerospace applications.

  11. Variable left-hemisphere language and orthographic lateralization reduces right-hemisphere face lateralization.

    PubMed

    Dundas, Eva M; Plaut, David C; Behrmann, Marlene

    2015-05-01

    It is commonly believed that, in right-handed individuals, words and faces are processed by distinct neural systems: one in the left hemisphere (LH) for words and the other in the right hemisphere (RH) for faces. Emerging evidence suggests, however, that hemispheric selectivity for words and for faces may not be independent of each other. One recent account suggests that words become lateralized to the LH to interact more effectively with language regions, and subsequently, as a result of competition with words for representational space, faces become lateralized to the RH. On this interactive account, left-handed individuals, who as a group show greater variability with respect to hemispheric language dominance, might be expected to show greater variability in their degree of RH lateralization of faces as well. The current study uses behavioral measures and ERPs to compare the hemispheric specialization for both words and faces in right- and left-handed adult individuals. Although both right- and left-handed groups demonstrated LH over RH superiority in discrimination accuracy for words, only the right-handed group demonstrated RH over LH advantage in discrimination accuracy for faces. Consistent with this, increased right-handedness was related to an increase in RH superiority for face processing, as measured by the strength of the N170 ERP component. Interestingly, the degree of RH behavioral superiority for face processing and the amplitude of the RH N170 for faces could be predicted by the magnitude of the N170 ERP response to words in the LH. These results are discussed in terms of a theoretical account in which the typical RH face lateralization fails to emerge in individuals with atypical language lateralization because of weakened competition from the LH representation of words.

  12. Dominant hemisphere lateralization of cortical parasympathetic control as revealed by frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Guo, Christine C; Sturm, Virginia E; Zhou, Juan; Gennatas, Efstathios D; Trujillo, Andrew J; Hua, Alice Y; Crawford, Richard; Stables, Lara; Kramer, Joel H; Rankin, Katherine; Levenson, Robert W; Rosen, Howard J; Miller, Bruce L; Seeley, William W

    2016-04-26

    The brain continuously influences and perceives the physiological condition of the body. Related cortical representations have been proposed to shape emotional experience and guide behavior. Although previous studies have identified brain regions recruited during autonomic processing, neurological lesion studies have yet to delineate the regions critical for maintaining autonomic outflow. Even greater controversy surrounds hemispheric lateralization along the parasympathetic-sympathetic axis. The behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), featuring progressive and often asymmetric degeneration that includes the frontoinsular and cingulate cortices, provides a unique lesion model for elucidating brain structures that control autonomic tone. Here, we show that bvFTD is associated with reduced baseline cardiac vagal tone and that this reduction correlates with left-lateralized functional and structural frontoinsular and cingulate cortex deficits and with reduced agreeableness. Our results suggest that networked brain regions in the dominant hemisphere are critical for maintaining an adaptive level of baseline parasympathetic outflow. PMID:27071080

  13. Dominant hemisphere lateralization of cortical parasympathetic control as revealed by frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Christine C.; Sturm, Virginia E.; Zhou, Juan; Gennatas, Efstathios D.; Trujillo, Andrew J.; Hua, Alice Y.; Crawford, Richard; Stables, Lara; Kramer, Joel H.; Rankin, Katherine; Levenson, Robert W.; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Seeley, William W.

    2016-01-01

    The brain continuously influences and perceives the physiological condition of the body. Related cortical representations have been proposed to shape emotional experience and guide behavior. Although previous studies have identified brain regions recruited during autonomic processing, neurological lesion studies have yet to delineate the regions critical for maintaining autonomic outflow. Even greater controversy surrounds hemispheric lateralization along the parasympathetic–sympathetic axis. The behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), featuring progressive and often asymmetric degeneration that includes the frontoinsular and cingulate cortices, provides a unique lesion model for elucidating brain structures that control autonomic tone. Here, we show that bvFTD is associated with reduced baseline cardiac vagal tone and that this reduction correlates with left-lateralized functional and structural frontoinsular and cingulate cortex deficits and with reduced agreeableness. Our results suggest that networked brain regions in the dominant hemisphere are critical for maintaining an adaptive level of baseline parasympathetic outflow. PMID:27071080

  14. Transient aphasias after left hemisphere resective surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Stephen M.; Lam, Daniel; Babiak, Miranda; Perry, David; Shih, Tina; Hess, Christopher P.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Chang, Edward F.

    2015-01-01

    Object Transient aphasias are often observed in the first few days in patients who undergo surgical resection in the language-dominant hemisphere. The aims of this prospective study were to characterize the incidence and nature of these aphasias, and to determine whether there are relationships between location of the surgical site and deficits in specific language domains. Methods 110 patients undergoing resection to the language-dominant hemisphere participated in the study. Patients’ language was evaluated prior to surgery, 2-3 days post-surgery, and 1 month post-surgery using the Western Aphasia Battery and the Boston Naming Test. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping was used to identify relationships between the location of the surgical site assessed by MRI, and deficits in fluency, information content, comprehension, repetition, and naming. Results 71% of patients were classified as aphasic based on the Western Aphasia Battery 2-3 days post-surgery, with deficits observed in each of the language domains examined. Fluency deficits were associated with resection of the precentral gyrus and adjacent inferior frontal cortex. Reduced information content of spoken output was associated with resection of the ventral precentral gyrus and posterior inferior frontal gyrus (pars opercularis). Repetition deficits were associated with resection of the posterior superior temporal gyrus. Naming deficits were associated with resection of ventral temporal cortex, with mid temporal and posterior temporal damage more predictive of naming deficits than anterior temporal damage. By 1 month post-surgery, nearly all language deficits were resolved, and no language measure except for naming differed significantly from pre-surgical levels. Conclusions These findings show that transient aphasias are very common after left hemisphere resective surgery, and that the precise nature of the aphasia depends on the specific location of the surgical site. This patient cohort provides a unique

  15. The influence of context on hemispheric recruitment during metaphor processing.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Michele T; Hogstrom, Larson J

    2011-11-01

    Although the left hemisphere's prominence in language is well established, less emphasis has been placed on possible roles for the right hemisphere. Behavioral, patient, and neuroimaging research suggests that the right hemisphere may be involved in processing figurative language. Additionally, research has demonstrated that context can modify language processes and facilitate comprehension. Here we investigated how figurativeness and context influenced brain activation, with a specific interest in right hemisphere function. Previous work in our laboratory indicated that novel stimuli engaged right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and that both novel and familiar metaphors engaged right IFG and right temporal pole. The graded salience hypothesis proposes that context may lessen integration demands, increase the salience of metaphors, and thereby reduce right hemisphere recruitment for metaphors. In the present study, fMRI was used to investigate brain function, whereas participants read literal and metaphoric sentences that were preceded by either a congruent or an incongruent literal sentence. Consistent with prior research, all sentences engaged traditional left hemisphere regions. Differences between metaphors and literal sentences were observed, but only in the left hemisphere. In contrast, a main effect of congruence was found in the right IFG, the right temporal pole, and the dorsal medial pFC. Partially consistent with the graded salience hypothesis, our results highlight the strong influence of context on language, demonstrate the importance of the right hemisphere in discourse, and suggest that, in a wider discourse context, congruence has a greater influence on right hemisphere recruitment than figurativeness.

  16. Enhanced activation of the left hemisphere promotes normative decision making.

    PubMed

    Corser, Ryan; Jasper, John D

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that enhanced activation of the left cerebral hemisphere reduces risky-choice, attribute, and goal-framing effects relative to enhanced activation of the right cerebral hemisphere. The present study sought to extend these findings and show that enhanced activation of the left hemisphere also reduces violations of other normative principles, besides the invariance principle. Participants completed ratio bias (Experiment 1, N = 296) and base rate neglect problems (Experiment 2, N = 145) under normal (control) viewing or with the right or left hemisphere primarily activated by imposing a unidirectional gaze. In Experiment 1 we found that enhanced left hemispheric activation reduced the ratio bias relative to normal viewing and a group experiencing enhanced right hemispheric activation. In Experiment 2 enhanced left hemispheric activation resulted in using base rates more than normal viewing, but not significantly more than enhanced right hemispheric activation. Results suggest that hemispheric asymmetries can affect higher-order cognitive processes, such as decision-making biases. Possible theoretical accounts are discussed as well as implications for dual-process theories.

  17. Atmospheric Motion in Jupiter's Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    True-color (left) and false-color (right) mosaics of Jupiter's northern hemisphere between 10 and 50 degrees latitude. Jupiter's atmospheric motions are controlled by alternating eastward and westward bands of air between Jupiter's equator and polar regions. The direction and speed of these bands influences the color and texture of the clouds seen in this mosaic. The high and thin clouds are represented by light blue, deep clouds are reddish, and high and thick clouds are white. A high haze overlying a clear, deep atmosphere is represented by dark purple. This image was taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft on April 3, 1997 at a distance of 1.4 million kilometers (.86 million miles).

  18. Dynamics of charged hemispherical soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, J. E.; van der Net, A.

    2009-04-01

    Raising the potential of a charged hemispherical soap bubble over a critical limit causes deformation of the bubble into a cone and ejection of a charged liquid jet. This is followed by a mode which has not previously been observed in bubbles, in which a long cylindrical liquid film column is created and collapses due to a Rayleigh-Plateau instability creating child bubbles. We show that the formation of the column and subsequent creation of child bubbles is due to a drop in potential caused by the ejection of charge from the system via the jet. Similar dynamics may occur in microscopic charged liquid droplets (electrospray processes), causing the creation of daughter droplets and long liquid spindles.

  19. Cerebral hemispheric asymmetries in processing lexical metaphors.

    PubMed

    Anaki, D; Faust, M; Kravetz, S

    1998-04-01

    This study investigated semantic priming for literal (stinging-mosquito) and metaphoric (stinging-insult) associates presented to either the left or right visual fields (RVF/LVF) across stimulus-onset-asynchronies (SOA) of 200 and 800 ms. For the short SOA condition, facilitation was found for metaphorically related targets in both visual fields (VFs) while literally related targets were facilitated only in the RVF. For the long SOA condition, metaphorically related targets were facilitated in the LVF whereas literally related targets were facilitated in the RVF. These results support previous findings indicating an enhanced role of the RH in metaphoric comprehension. In addition, the present results are in accordance with current models of hemispheric semantic processing.

  20. Voyager 1 Jupiter Southern Hemisphere Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This movie shows a portion of Jupiter in the southern hemisphere over 17Jupiter days. Above the white belt, notice the series of atmospheric vortices headed west. Even these early approach frames show wild dynamics in the roiling environment south of the white belt. Notice the small tumbling white cloud near the center.

    As Voyager 1 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 17 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). These images were acquired in the Blue filter around Feb. 1, 1979. The spacecraft was about 37 million kilometers from Jupiter at that time.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  1. Antarctic role in Northern Hemisphere glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodard, Stella C.; Rosenthal, Yair; Miller, Kenneth G.; Wright, James D.; Chiu, Beverly K.; Lawrence, Kira T.

    2014-11-01

    Earth’s climate underwent a major transition from the warmth of the late Pliocene, when global surface temperatures were ~2° to 3°C higher than today, to extensive Northern Hemisphere glaciation (NHG) ~2.73 million years ago (Ma). We show that North Pacific deep waters were substantially colder (4°C) and probably fresher than the North Atlantic Deep Water before the intensification of NHG. At ~2.73 Ma, the Atlantic-Pacific temperature gradient was reduced to <1°C, suggesting the initiation of stronger heat transfer from the North Atlantic to the deep Pacific. We posit that increased glaciation of Antarctica, deduced from the 21 ± 10-meter sea-level fall from 3.15 to 2.75 Ma, and the development of a strong polar halocline fundamentally altered deep ocean circulation, which enhanced interhemispheric heat and salt transport, thereby contributing to NHG.

  2. Paleoceanography. Antarctic role in Northern Hemisphere glaciation.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Stella C; Rosenthal, Yair; Miller, Kenneth G; Wright, James D; Chiu, Beverly K; Lawrence, Kira T

    2014-11-14

    Earth's climate underwent a major transition from the warmth of the late Pliocene, when global surface temperatures were ~2° to 3°C higher than today, to extensive Northern Hemisphere glaciation (NHG) ~2.73 million years ago (Ma). We show that North Pacific deep waters were substantially colder (4°C) and probably fresher than the North Atlantic Deep Water before the intensification of NHG. At ~2.73 Ma, the Atlantic-Pacific temperature gradient was reduced to <1°C, suggesting the initiation of stronger heat transfer from the North Atlantic to the deep Pacific. We posit that increased glaciation of Antarctica, deduced from the 21 ± 10-meter sea-level fall from 3.15 to 2.75 Ma, and the development of a strong polar halocline fundamentally altered deep ocean circulation, which enhanced interhemispheric heat and salt transport, thereby contributing to NHG. PMID:25342658

  3. Hemispherical anomaly from asymmetric initial states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashoorioon, Amjad; Koivisto, Tomi

    2016-08-01

    We investigate if the hemispherical asymmetry in the CMB is produced from "asymmetric" excited initial conditions. We show that in the limit where the deviations from the Bunch-Davies vacuum are large and the scale of new physics is maximally separated from the inflationary Hubble parameter, the primordial power spectrum is modulated only by position-dependent dipole and quadrupole terms. Requiring the dipole contribution in the power spectrum to account for the observed power asymmetry, A =0.07 ±0.022 , we show that the amount of quadrupole terms is roughly equal to A2. The mean local bispectrum, which gets enhanced for the excited initial state, is within the 1 σ bound of Planck 2015 results for a large field model, fNL≃4.17 , but is reachable by future CMB experiments. The amplitude of the local non-Gaussianity modulates around this mean value, depending on the angle that the correlated patches on the 2d CMB surface make with the preferred direction. The amount of variation is minimized for the configuration in which the short and long wavelength modes are around the preferred pole and |k→3|≈|k→l ≈10|≪|k→1|≈|k→2|≈|k→l ≈2500| with fNLmin≈3.64 . The maximum occurs when these modes are at the antipode of the preferred pole, fNLmax≈4.81 . The difference of non-Gaussianity between these two configurations is as large as ≃1.17 , which can be used to distinguish this scenario from other scenarios that try to explain the observed hemispherical asymmetry.

  4. The Right Hemisphere in Esthetic Perception

    PubMed Central

    Bromberger, Bianca; Sternschein, Rebecca; Widick, Page; Smith, William; Chatterjee, Anjan

    2011-01-01

    Little about the neuropsychology of art perception and evaluation is known. Most neuropsychological approaches to art have focused on art production and have been anecdotal and qualitative. The field is in desperate need of quantitative methods if it is to advance. Here, we combine a quantitative approach to the assessment of art with modern voxel-lesion-symptom-mapping methods to determine brain–behavior relationships in art perception. We hypothesized that perception of different attributes of art are likely to be disrupted by damage to different regions of the brain. Twenty participants with right hemisphere damage were given the Assessment of Art Attributes, which is designed to quantify judgments of descriptive attributes of visual art. Each participant rated 24 paintings on 6 conceptual attributes (depictive accuracy, abstractness, emotion, symbolism, realism, and animacy) and 6 perceptual attributes (depth, color temperature, color saturation, balance, stroke, and simplicity) and their interest in and preference for these paintings. Deviation scores were obtained for each brain-damaged participant for each attribute based on correlations with group average ratings from 30 age-matched healthy participants. Right hemisphere damage affected participants’ judgments of abstractness, accuracy, and stroke quality. Damage to areas within different parts of the frontal parietal and lateral temporal cortices produced deviation in judgments in four of six conceptual attributes (abstractness, symbolism, realism, and animacy). Of the formal attributes, only depth was affected by inferior prefrontal damage. No areas of brain damage were associated with deviations in interestingness or preference judgments. The perception of conceptual and formal attributes in artwork may in part dissociate from each other and from evaluative judgments. More generally, this approach demonstrates the feasibility of quantitative approaches to the neuropsychology of art. PMID:22016728

  5. Active shape models unleashed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, Matthias; Wesarg, Stefan

    2011-03-01

    Active Shape Models (ASMs) are a popular family of segmentation algorithms which combine local appearance models for boundary detection with a statistical shape model (SSM). They are especially popular in medical imaging due to their ability for fast and accurate segmentation of anatomical structures even in large and noisy 3D images. A well-known limitation of ASMs is that the shape constraints are over-restrictive, because the segmentations are bounded by the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) subspace learned from the training data. To overcome this limitation, we propose a new energy minimization approach which combines an external image energy with an internal shape model energy. Our shape energy uses the Distance From Feature Space (DFFS) concept to allow deviations from the PCA subspace in a theoretically sound and computationally fast way. In contrast to previous approaches, our model does not rely on post-processing with constrained free-form deformation or additional complex local energy models. In addition to the energy minimization approach, we propose a new method for liver detection, a new method for initializing an SSM and an improved k-Nearest Neighbour (kNN)-classifier for boundary detection. Our ASM is evaluated with leave-one-out tests on a data set with 34 tomographic CT scans of the liver and is compared to an ASM with standard shape constraints. The quantitative results of our experiments show that we achieve higher segmentation accuracy with our energy minimization approach than with standard shape constraints.nym

  6. Hemispheric Differences in the Organization of Memory for Text Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Debra L.; Johns, Clinton L.; Jonathan, Eunike

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine hemispheric asymmetries in episodic memory for discourse. Access to previously comprehended information is essential for mapping incoming information to representations of "who did what to whom" in memory. An item-priming-in-recognition paradigm was used to examine differences in how the hemispheres represent…

  7. ERP Evidence of Hemispheric Independence in Visual Word Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemrodov, Dan; Harpaz, Yuval; Javitt, Daniel C.; Lavidor, Michal

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the capability of the left hemisphere (LH) and the right hemisphere (RH) to perform a visual recognition task independently as formulated by the Direct Access Model (Fernandino, Iacoboni, & Zaidel, 2007). Healthy native Hebrew speakers were asked to categorize nouns and non-words (created from nouns by transposing two middle…

  8. Assessment of Hemispheric Dominance for Language at Three Ages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tegano, Deborah Walker

    The purposes of this study were to assess the development of hemispheric dominance for language function among children of 4, 7, and 10 years of age and to determine whether age predicts hemispheric dominance. Within 2 weeks of the beginning of data collection, middle-class subjects selected from private nursery schools and elementary schools…

  9. Hemispheric Asymmetry in a Face Discrimination Task in Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Schonen, Scania; Mathivet, Eric

    1990-01-01

    Confirms the existence of a right-hemisphere advantage in the process of discriminating between face stimuli. The advantage was weaker in females than in males. No hemispheric transfer of learning was observed. Subjects were 18 infants of 42 weeks who were presented with an operant conditioning situation in which they discriminated between their…

  10. Hemispheric Differences in the Effects of Context on Vowel Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sjerps, Matthias J.; Mitterer, Holger; McQueen, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Listeners perceive speech sounds relative to context. Contextual influences might differ over hemispheres if different types of auditory processing are lateralized. Hemispheric differences in contextual influences on vowel perception were investigated by presenting speech targets and both speech and non-speech contexts to listeners' right or left…

  11. Disentangling the Relationship between Hemispheric Asymmetry and Cognitive Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirnstein, Marco; Leask, Stuart; Rose, Jonas; Hausmann, Markus

    2010-01-01

    It is widely believed that advantages of hemispheric asymmetries originated in better cognitive processing, hence it is often implied that the relationship between hemispheric asymmetry and cognitive performance is linearly positive: the higher the degree of lateralization in a specific cognitive domain, the better the performance in a…

  12. The Joint Development of Hemispheric Lateralization for Words and Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dundas, Eva M.; Plaut, David C.; Behrmann, Marlene

    2013-01-01

    Consistent with long-standing findings from behavioral studies, neuroimaging investigations have identified a region of the inferior temporal cortex that, in adults, shows greater face selectivity in the right than left hemisphere and, conversely, a region that shows greater word selectivity in the left than right hemisphere. What has not been…

  13. A Hemispheric Asymmetry for the Unconscious Perception of Emotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Stephen D.; Bulman-Fleming, M. Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that hemispheric asymmetries for conscious visual perception do not lead to asymmetries for unconscious visual perception. These studies utilized emotionally neutral items as stimuli. The current research utilized both emotionally negative and neutral stimuli to assess hemispheric differences for conscious and…

  14. Study of the language functions controlled by the right hemisphere in patients affected by dementia.

    PubMed

    Motta, M

    1993-01-01

    An insertion test (Shift vs. non-Shift) was performed by eight subjects (mean age 69 years, mean schooling 5.87 years) with clinical diagnosis of suspected Alzheimer disease (AD) in order to reveal right hemisphere cerebral distress in concomitance with damage of the left hemisphere which controls language in AD. Their Shift and non-Shift test scores were significantly lower than those of 28 controls, even if they achieved normal or slightly modified classical language test scores. Shift involves insertion of a syntagma or word in a stimulus-sentence that changes the syntactical relationship of some components of the newly formed sentence, whereas in non-Shift the insertion determines only a change in meaning. Statistical analysis revealed that the difference was not caused by age and schooling. Furthermore, the AD patients achieved significantly lower scores in Shift compared with non-Shift. This indicates greater right hemisphere damage in these patients and confirms its physiological decline in the elderly. The results revealed that the insertion test is more sensitive than classical neurolinguistic tests. They also showed that both superficial (non-Shift) and deep (Shift) types of syntaxes are already compromised in early stages of AD and that they mirror the bilateral thinning which is more pronounced in the right hemisphere. PMID:15374327

  15. A time-calibrated phylogeny of southern hemisphere stoneflies: Testing for Gondwanan origins.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Graham A; Wallis, Graham P; Waters, Jonathan M

    2016-03-01

    For more than two centuries biogeographers have attempted to explain why terrestrial or freshwater lineages have geographic distributions broken by oceans, with these disjunct distributions either attributed to vicariance associated with Gondwanan fragmentation or trans-oceanic dispersal. Stoneflies (order: Plecoptera) are a widespread order of freshwater insects whose poor dispersal ability and intolerance for salt water make them ideal candidates for Gondwanan relicts - taxa whose distribution can be explained by vicariant isolation driven by the breakup of Gondwana. Here we reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships among southern hemisphere stoneflies (5 families; 86 genera) using 2864bp of mitochondrial (COI) and nuclear (18S, H3) DNA, with a calibrated relaxed molecular clock used to estimate the chronology of diversification. Our analysis suggests that largely antitropical stonefly sub-orders, Arctoperlaria (northern hemisphere) and Antarctoperlaria (southern hemisphere), were formed approximately 121Ma (95% prior probability distribution 107-143Ma), which may reflect the vicariant rifting of the supercontinent Pangaea. Subsequently, we infer that a single Arctoperlaria lineage has dispersed into southern hemisphere 76Ma (95% range 65-98Ma). The majority of divergences between South American and Australian stonefly lineages appear to coincide with the opening of Drake Passage around 40Ma, suggesting vicariant isolation of these landmasses may be responsible for these biogeographic disjunctions. In contrast, divergences between New Zealand lineages and their sister taxa appear to post-date vicariant timeframes, implying more recent dispersal events.

  16. A time-calibrated phylogeny of southern hemisphere stoneflies: Testing for Gondwanan origins.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Graham A; Wallis, Graham P; Waters, Jonathan M

    2016-03-01

    For more than two centuries biogeographers have attempted to explain why terrestrial or freshwater lineages have geographic distributions broken by oceans, with these disjunct distributions either attributed to vicariance associated with Gondwanan fragmentation or trans-oceanic dispersal. Stoneflies (order: Plecoptera) are a widespread order of freshwater insects whose poor dispersal ability and intolerance for salt water make them ideal candidates for Gondwanan relicts - taxa whose distribution can be explained by vicariant isolation driven by the breakup of Gondwana. Here we reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships among southern hemisphere stoneflies (5 families; 86 genera) using 2864bp of mitochondrial (COI) and nuclear (18S, H3) DNA, with a calibrated relaxed molecular clock used to estimate the chronology of diversification. Our analysis suggests that largely antitropical stonefly sub-orders, Arctoperlaria (northern hemisphere) and Antarctoperlaria (southern hemisphere), were formed approximately 121Ma (95% prior probability distribution 107-143Ma), which may reflect the vicariant rifting of the supercontinent Pangaea. Subsequently, we infer that a single Arctoperlaria lineage has dispersed into southern hemisphere 76Ma (95% range 65-98Ma). The majority of divergences between South American and Australian stonefly lineages appear to coincide with the opening of Drake Passage around 40Ma, suggesting vicariant isolation of these landmasses may be responsible for these biogeographic disjunctions. In contrast, divergences between New Zealand lineages and their sister taxa appear to post-date vicariant timeframes, implying more recent dispersal events. PMID:26585029

  17. Atmospheric Blocking in the Northern Hemisphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, John Lewis

    Blocking is generally understood as the obstruction on a large scale of the normal west - to - east motion of mid-latitude pressure systems. It is a persistent phenomenon lasting from one to several weeks and the resulting prolonged weather regimes may have serious economic and social consequences. The recent Northern Hemisphere winters, starting with 1976 -77, featured unusually large circulation anomalies, many of which can be directly related to prolonged episodes of large scale blocking. The intent of this study is to investigate the statistics and certain diagnostics of blocking in the Northern Hemisphere. The first of the three primary objectives is to present and interpret the spatial and temporal distribution of blocking during the past 33 years. We develop objective identification criteria, adaptable to machine processing methods, by relating the blocking anticyclone to its associated positive anomaly of 5-day mean 500MB height. Anomalies meeting the criteria are called 'blocking signatures.' We present the seasonal frequency of occurrence of these signatures by longitude and by area. The results are in good agreement with published studies for the oceans, but they also reveal a high frequency of blocking signatures over the Northeastern Canadian Archipelago. This result, dubbed the 'Baffin Island Paradox' is further investigated and rationalized. A catalogue has been prepared which identifies the date, centre location and magnitude of every blocking signature which occurred from January 1, 1946 to December 31, 1978. A supplementary Catalogue identifies sequences of these signatures corresponding to actual blocking episodes. The second objective is to investigate whether regions with high incidence of blocking, in either the developing or the mature stage, features non-Gaussian distributions of 5-day mean geopotential. During winter, fields of significantly low kurtosis are found in certain mid-latitude regions where the genesis and amplification of

  18. Seismic hazard map of the western hemisphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedlock, K.M.; Tanner, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    Vulnerability to natural disasters increases with urbanization and development of associated support systems (reservoirs, power plants, etc.). Catastrophic earthquakes account for 60% of worldwide casualties associated with natural disasters. Economic damage from earthquakes is increasing, even in technologically advanced countries with some level of seismic zonation, as shown by the 1989 Loma Prieta, CA ($6 billion), 1994 Northridge, CA ($ 25 billion), and 1995 Kobe, Japan (> $ 100 billion) earthquakes. The growth of megacities in seismically active regions around the world often includes the construction of seismically unsafe buildings and infrastructures, due to an insufficient knowledge of existing seismic hazard. Minimization of the loss of life, property damage, and social and economic disruption due to earthquakes depends on reliable estimates of seismic hazard. National, state, and local governments, decision makers, engineers, planners, emergency response organizations, builders, universities, and the general public require seismic hazard estimates for land use planning, improved building design and construction (including adoption of building construction codes), emergency response preparedness plans, economic forecasts, housing and employment decisions, and many more types of risk mitigation. The seismic hazard map of the Americas is the concatenation of various national and regional maps, involving a suite of approaches. The combined maps and documentation provide a useful global seismic hazard framework and serve as a resource for any national or regional agency for further detailed studies applicable to their needs. This seismic hazard map depicts Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) with a 10% chance of exceedance in 50 years for the western hemisphere. PGA, a short-period ground motion parameter that is proportional to force, is the most commonly mapped ground motion parameter because current building codes that include seismic provisions specify the

  19. Western hemisphere of the Moon taken by Galileo spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Galileo spacecraft image of the Moon recorded at 9:35 am Pacific Standard Time (PST), 12-09-90, after completing its first Earth Gravity Assist. Western hemisphere of the Moon was taken through a green filter at a range of about 350,000 miles. In the center is Orientale Basin, 600 miles in diameter, formed about 3.8 billion years ago by the impact of an asteroid-size body. Orientale's dark center is a small mare. To the right is the lunar near side with the great, dark Oceanus Procellarum above the small, circular, dark Mare Humorum below. Maria are broad plains formed mostly over 3 billion years ago as vast basaltic lava flows. To the left is the lunar far side with fewer maria, but, at lower left South-Pole-Aitken basin, about 1200 miles in diameter, which resembles Orientale but is much older and more weathered and battered by cratering. The intervening cratered highlands of both sides, as well as the maria, are dotted with bright young craters. This image was 'reprojected' so as to

  20. North Atlantic Deep Water cools the southern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, Thomas J.

    1992-08-01

    A standard explanation for coupling climate variations in the northern and southern hemispheres involves fluctuations in North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) production. However, I suggest that the "NADW-Antarctic" connection may work opposite to that conjectured by many investigators; that is, when NADW production rates are high, southern hemisphere temperatures decrease rather than increase. The revised interpretation is consistent with observations and ocean modeling studies which demonstrate that, although upwelling of relatively warm NADW water around Antarctica promotes sea ice meltback, a second and more important negative feedback is also operating. In order to conserve volume, southward export of NADW across the equator is accompanied by import of an equivalent volume of considerably warmer water from shallower oceanic layers in the South Atlantic. The southern hemisphere loses heat as a result of this exchange. The hemispherically averaged net heat loss may be as high as 4 W/m², an amount comparable to a CO2 doubling. It is suggested that this more comprehensive view of the role of NADW may explain both decadal-scale variations in South Atlantic sea surface temperatures in this century and two significant problems in Pleistocene climatology: why southern hemisphere temperatures decreased before CO2 levels decreased at the end of the last interglacial and why southern hemisphere temperature changes precede changes in northern hemisphere ice volume. It is shown that when NADW production was reinitiated during the last interglacial (120,000 B.P.), high-latitude southern hemisphere temperatures decreased. The estimated magnitude of altered southern hemisphere heat export is comparable to the ice-age CO2 signal and may be able to account for the observed cooling even when CO2 levels were high. When cast into a frequency domain framework, this interpretation may also help explain why southern hemisphere temperatures lead global ice volume changes.

  1. An aerodynamic model for a hemispherically-capped biconic reentry vehicle with six drag flaps

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, T.M.; Buffington, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    The development of an aerodynamic model for a hemispherically-capped biconic reentry vehicle with six drag flaps is presented. The aerodynamic model is primarily based on wind tunnel test results, with the use of computational fluid dynamic codes. For Mach numbers from 4 to 15, the inviscid axial force coefficient was computed for drag flap deflections from 6 to 36. Axial force coefficient was found to vary significantly with ablating flap shape as well as with changing flight conditions. The aerodynamic model can be used for input to vehicle recovery trajectory simulations.

  2. Beyond Hemispheric Dominance: Brain Regions Underlying the Joint Lateralization of Language and Arithmetic to the Left Hemisphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinel, Philippe; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2010-01-01

    Language and arithmetic are both lateralized to the left hemisphere in the majority of right-handed adults. Yet, does this similar lateralization reflect a single overall constraint of brain organization, such an overall "dominance" of the left hemisphere for all linguistic and symbolic operations? Is it related to the lateralization of specific…

  3. Hemispheric Contributions to Lexical Ambiguity Resolution in a Discourse Context: Evidence from Individuals with Unilateral Left and Right Hemisphere Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grindrod, C.M.; Baum, S.R.

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, a cross-modal semantic priming task was used to investigate the ability of left-hemisphere-damaged (LHD) nonfluent aphasic, right-hemisphere-damaged (RHD) and non-brain-damaged (NBD) control subjects to use a discourse context to resolve lexically ambiguous words. Subjects first heard four-sentence discourse passages ending…

  4. Hemispheric processing of vocal emblem sounds.

    PubMed

    Neumann-Werth, Yael; Levy, Erika S; Obler, Loraine K

    2013-01-01

    Vocal emblems, such as shh and brr, are speech sounds that have linguistic and nonlinguistic features; thus, it is unclear how they are processed in the brain. Five adult dextral individuals with left-brain damage and moderate-severe Wernicke's aphasia, five adult dextral individuals with right-brain damage, and five Controls participated in two tasks: (1) matching vocal emblems to photographs ('picture task') and (2) matching vocal emblems to verbal translations ('phrase task'). Cross-group statistical analyses on items on which the Controls performed at ceiling revealed lower accuracy by the group with left-brain damage (than by Controls) on both tasks, and lower accuracy by the group with right-brain damage (than by Controls) on the picture task. Additionally, the group with left-brain damage performed significantly less accurately than the group with right-brain damage on the phrase task only. Findings suggest that comprehension of vocal emblems recruits more left- than right-hemisphere processing. PMID:22571290

  5. Volcanoes and volcanic provinces - Martian western hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The recognition of some Martian landforms as volcanoes is based on their morphology and geologic setting. Other structures, however, may exhibit classic identifying features to a varying or a less degree; these may be only considered provisionally as having a volcanic origin. Regional geologic mapping of the western hemisphere of Mars from Viking images has revealed many more probable volcanoes and volcanotectonic features than were recognized on Mariner 9 pictures. These abundant volcanoes have been assigned to several distinct provinces on the basis of their areal distribution. Although the Olympus-Tharsis region remains as the principle center of volcanism on Mars, four other important provinces are now also recognized: the lowland plains, Tempe Terra plateau, southern highlands (in the Phaethontis and Thaumasia quadrangles), and a probable ignimbrite province, situated along the highland-lowland boundary in Amazonis Planitia. Volcanoes in any one province vary in morphlogy, size, and age, but volcanoes in each province tend to have common characteristics that distinguish that particular group.

  6. Objectively classifying Southern Hemisphere extratropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catto, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    There has been a long tradition in attempting to separate extratropical cyclones into different classes depending on their cloud signatures, airflows, synoptic precursors, or upper-level flow features. Depending on these features, the cyclones may have different impacts, for example in their precipitation intensity. It is important, therefore, to understand how the distribution of different cyclone classes may change in the future. Many of the previous classifications have been performed manually. In order to be able to evaluate climate models and understand how extratropical cyclones might change in the future, we need to be able to use an automated method to classify cyclones. Extratropical cyclones have been identified in the Southern Hemisphere from the ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset with a commonly used identification and tracking algorithm that employs 850 hPa relative vorticity. A clustering method applied to large-scale fields from ERA-Interim at the time of cyclone genesis (when the cyclone is first detected), has been used to objectively classify identified cyclones. The results are compared to the manual classification of Sinclair and Revell (2000) and the four objectively identified classes shown in this presentation are found to match well. The relative importance of diabatic heating in the clusters is investigated, as well as the differing precipitation characteristics. The success of the objective classification shows its utility in climate model evaluation and climate change studies.

  7. Bright Ray Craters in Ganymede's Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    GANYMEDE COLOR PHOTOS: This color picture as acquired by Voyager 1 during its approach to Ganymede on Monday afternoon (the 5th of March). At ranges between about 230 to 250 thousand km. The images show detail on the surface with a resolution of four and a half km. This picture is of a region in the northern hemisphere near the terminator. It shows a variety of impact structures, including both razed and unrazed craters, and the odd, groove-like structures discovered by Voyager in the lighter regions. The most striking features are the bright ray craters which have a distinctly 'bluer' color appearing white against the redder background. Ganymede's surface is known to contain large amounts of surface ice and it appears that these relatively young craters have spread bright fresh ice materials over the surface. Likewise, the lighter color and reflectivity of the grooved areas suggests that here, too, there is cleaner ice. We see ray craters with all sizes of ray patterns, ranging from extensive systems of the crater in the southern part of this picture, which has rays at least 300-500 kilometers long, down to craters which have only faint remnants of bright ejects patterns (such as several of the craters in the southern half of PIA01516; P21262). This variation suggests that, as on the Moon, there are processes which act to darken ray material, probably 'gardening' by micrometeoroid impact. JPL manages and controls the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  8. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Mercury’s Exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Carl; Baumgardner, J.; Mendillo, M.

    2012-10-01

    Observations of Mercury’s sodium tail by Potter and Killen (2008) frequently show enhanced emission in the northern lobe. Anderson et al. (2011) have established that Mercury’s magnetic dipole is offset from the planet’s center by .2 RM to the north, while approximately aligned with the spin axis. Such a configuration produces an asymmetry in the magnetosphere cusp whereby more plasma has direct access to the planet’s southern hemisphere than in the north (Winslow et al., 2012). Using time-dependent, 3-D simulations, we demonstrate that ion precipitation, enlarged in the south, can actually result in the observed profiles across the tail, which are typically brighter to the north. Additionally, sources located at high latitude cusp footprints at on the dayside were unable match the observed width of the asymmetric profiles across the tail. Instead, our simulations provide evidence for sources near the dawn terminator at lower latitudes, resulting from the accumulation of sodium during the night. Desorption, rather than ion sputtering, is determined to be the responsible mechanism for this sodium population’s release and escape from the planet surface.

  9. Remote Control Southern Hemisphere SSA Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, I.; Pearson, M.; Sang, J.

    2013-09-01

    EOS Space Systems (EOSSS) is a research and development company which has developed custom observatories, camera and telescope systems for space surveillance since 1996, as well as creating several evolutions of systems control software for control of observatories and laser tracking systems. Our primary reserach observatory is the Space Reserach Centre (SRC) at Mount Stromlo Asutralia. The current SRC control systems are designed such that remote control can be offered for real time data collection, noise filtering and flexible session management. Several imaging fields of view are available simultaneously for tracking orbiting objects, with real time imaging to Mag 18. Orbiting objects can have the centroids post processed into orbital determination/ orbital projection (OD/OP) elements. With or without laser tracking of orbiting objects, they can be tracked in terminator conditions and their OD/OP data created, then enhanced by proprietary methods involving ballistic coefficient estimation and OD convergence pinning, using a priori radar elements. Sensors in development include a thermal imager for satellite thermal signature detection. Extending laser tracking range by use of adaptive optics beam control is also in development now. This Southern Hemisphere observatory is in a unique position to facilitate the study of space debris, either stand-alone or as part of a network such as Falcon. Current national and international contracts will enhance the remote control capabilities further, creating a resource ready to go for a wide variety of SSA missions.

  10. Europa's Northern Trailing Hemisphere: Lineament Stratigraphic Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueredo, P. H.; Hare, T.; Ricq, E.; Strom, K.; Greeley, R.; Tanaka, K.; Senske, D.

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge of the global distribution of Europan geologic units in time and space is a necessary step for the synthesis of the results of the Galileo mission and in preparation for future exploration (namely, by JIMO) of the satellite. We have initiated the production of the first Global Geological Map of Europa. As a base map, we use the recently published global photomosaic of Europa (U.S.G.S. Map I-2757) and additional Galileo SSI images at their original resolution. The map is being produced entirely on GIS format for analysis and combination with other datasets [1]. One of the main objectives of this project is to establish a global stratigraphic framework for Europa. In the absence of a well-developed cratering record, this goal will be achieved using the satellite s global network of lineaments (ridges, ridge complexes and bands; cf. [2]). Here we present the preliminary stratigraphic framework synthesized from the sequence of lineaments derived for the northern trailing hemisphere of Europa (Figure 1, below), and we discuss its significance and some emerging implications.

  11. Studying the time histogram of a terrestrial electron beam detected from the opposite hemisphere of its associated TGF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarria, D.; Blelly, P.-L.; Briggs, M. S.; Forme, F.

    2016-05-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes are bursts of X/gamma photons, correlated to thunderstorms. By interacting with the atmosphere, the photons produce a substantial number of electrons and positrons. Some of these reach a sufficiently high altitude that their interactions with the atmosphere become negligible, and they are then guided by geomagnetic field lines, forming a Terrestrial Electron Beam. On 9 December 2009, the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) instrument on board the Fermi Space Telescope made a particularly interesting measurement of such an event. To study this type of event in detail, we perform Monte-Carlo simulations and focus on the resulting time histograms. In agreement with previous work, we show that the histogram measured by Fermi GBM is reproducible from a simulation. We then show that the time histogram resulting from this simulation is only weakly dependent on the production altitude, duration, beaming angle, and spectral shape of the associated terrestrial gamma-ray flash. Finally, we show that the time histogram can be decomposed into three populations of leptons, coming from the opposite hemisphere, and mirroring back to the satellite with or without interacting with the atmosphere, and that these populations can be clearly distinguished by their pitch angles.

  12. A hemisphere array for non-invasive ultrasound brain therapy and surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, G. T.; Sun, Jie; Giesecke, Tonia; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2000-12-01

    Ultrasound phased arrays may offer a method for non-invasive deep brain surgery through the skull. In this study a hemispherical phased array system is developed to test the feasibility of trans-skull surgery. The hemispherical shape is incorporated to maximize the penetration area on the skull surface, thus minimizing unwanted heating. Simulations of a 15 cm radius hemisphere divided into 11, 64, 228 and 512 elements are presented. It is determined that 64 elements are sufficient for correcting scattering and reflection caused by trans-skull propagation. An optimal operating frequency near 0.7 MHz is chosen for the array from numerical and experimental thermal gain measurements comparing the power between the transducer focus and the skull surface. A 0.665 MHz air-backed PZT array is constructed and evaluated. The array is used to focus ultrasound through an ex vivo human skull and the resulting fields are measured before and after phase correction of the transducer elements. Finally, to demonstrate the feasibility of trans-skull therapy, thermally induced lesions are produced through a human skull in fresh tissue placed at the ultrasound focus inside the skull.

  13. Bacteria form tellurium nanocrystals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    A team of researchers have found two bacterial species that produce tellurium oxyanions as respiratory electron acceptors for growth, leaving elemental tellurium in the form of nanoparticles. The crystals from the two organisms exhibit distinctively different structures. Bacillus selenitireducens initially forms nanorods that cluster together to form rosettes. Sulfurospirillum barnesii forms irregularly-shaped nanospheres that coalesce into larger composite aggregates.

  14. Individual differences in hemispheric preference and emotion regulation difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Garima; Dubey, Akanksha; Saxena, Prachi; Pandey, Rakesh

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hemisphericity or individual difference in the preference to use the left or the right hemispheric mode of information processing has been associated with various emotion-related differences. For example, the right hemisphericity has been linked with inhibition of emotional expression, feeling of tension, greater impulsivity etc. These observations suggest that right hemisphericity may be associated with greater difficulties in regulating emotions. However, direct empirical tests of such theoretical proposition are very thin. Aim: In view of this, the present study aims to investigate how and to what extent individual difference in hemispheric preference relate to emotion regulation. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two right-handed male subjects in the age range 18 to 20 years were assessed on self-report measures of hemispheric preference and emotion regulation difficulties. The correlation between dimensions of hemispheric preference and difficulties in regulating emotions was computed. A series of stepwise multiple regression analyses were also done to explore the relative significance of various dimensions of hemispheric preference in predicting emotion regulation difficulties. Results: The findings revealed that in general a preference for the right hemispheric mode of information processing was associated with greater emotion regulation difficulties. The correlation analysis indicated that while impulse control difficulties and difficulties in engaging goal directed behavior was associated with preference for almost all the right hemispheric mode of information processing, the nonacceptance of emotional responses and limited access to emotion regulation was related to preference for only global/synthetic (a right hemispheric) mode of information processing. Similarly, the lack of emotional clarity facet of emotion regulation difficulties correlated significantly with a preference for the emotional mode of information processing (again a right

  15. Numerical investigation of hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer transition mechanism induced by different roughness shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yunlong; Zhao, Yunfei; Xu, Dan; Chai, Zhenxia; Liu, Wei

    2016-10-01

    The roughness-induced laminar-turbulent boundary layer transition is significant for high-speed aerospace applications. The transition mechanism is closely related to the roughness shape. In this paper, high-order numerical method is used to investigate the effect of roughness shape on the flat-plate laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition. Computations are performed in both the supersonic and hypersonic regimes (free-stream Mach number from 3.37 up to 6.63) for the square, cylinder, diamond and hemisphere roughness elements. It is observed that the square and diamond roughness elements are more effective in inducing transition compared with the cylinder and hemisphere ones. The square roughness element has the longest separated region in which strong unsteadiness exists and the absolute instability is formed, thus resulting in the earliest transition. The diamond roughness element has a maximum width of the separated region leading to the widest turbulent wake region far downstream. Furthermore, transition location moves backward as the Mach number increases, which indicates that the compressibility significantly suppresses the roughness-induced boundary layer transition.

  16. Universality of fragment shapes

    PubMed Central

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-01-01

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism. PMID:25772300

  17. Universality of fragment shapes.

    PubMed

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-01-01

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism. PMID:25772300

  18. Reorganization of syntactic processing following left-hemisphere brain damage: does right-hemisphere activity preserve function?

    PubMed

    Tyler, Lorraine K; Wright, Paul; Randall, Billi; Marslen-Wilson, William D; Stamatakis, Emmanuel A

    2010-11-01

    The extent to which the human brain shows evidence of functional plasticity across the lifespan has been addressed in the context of pathological brain changes and, more recently, of the changes that take place during healthy ageing. Here we examine the potential for plasticity by asking whether a strongly left-lateralized system can successfully reorganize to the right-hemisphere following left-hemisphere brain damage. To do this, we focus on syntax, a key linguistic function considered to be strongly left-lateralized, combining measures of tissue integrity, neural activation and behavioural performance. In a functional neuroimaging study participants heard spoken sentences that differentially loaded on syntactic and semantic information. While healthy controls activated a left-hemisphere network of correlated activity including Brodmann areas 45/47 and posterior middle temporal gyrus during syntactic processing, patients activated Brodmann areas 45/47 bilaterally and right middle temporal gyrus. However, voxel-based morphometry analyses showed that only tissue integrity in left Brodmann areas 45/47 was correlated with activity and performance; poor tissue integrity in left Brodmann area 45 was associated with reduced functional activity and increased syntactic deficits. Activity in the right-hemisphere was not correlated with damage in the left-hemisphere or with performance. Reduced neural integrity in the left-hemisphere through brain damage or healthy ageing results in increased right-hemisphere activation in homologous regions to those left-hemisphere regions typically involved in the young. However, these regions do not support the same linguistic functions as those in the left-hemisphere and only indirectly contribute to preserved syntactic capacity. This establishes the unique role of the left hemisphere in syntax, a core component in human language.

  19. Inter-hemispheric competition relieved in both: hypotheses for autism and schizophrenia from problem theory.

    PubMed

    Burnand, Gordon

    2012-07-01

    A logical relationship exists among six general problems that people face in life. Using hope about something for its subjective probability, its expected likelihood, the problems form a series where the method of assessing hope changes in a simple manner from one problem to the next. The central hypothesis is that human beings exploit this. Brain structures and predispositions have evolved accordingly, leading to the hemispheres having different predispositions. The hemispheres are effectively joined at 5 months. Infants will then find that they engage in two unrelated activities. Typical infants label the activities in detail, using visual images, as part of gaining control over them. Hypotheses are: (a) autistic children fail labelling at the start, and hence they encounter uncontrolled competition between the hemispheres; (b) with some, serotonin abnormality impairs sensory information processing and hence the labelling; (c) with some, a delay in myelination from autoimmune effects disrupts labelling; (d) the likelihood of this 'delay autism' is reduced by long chain omega oils; (e) self-pressuring, which underlies taking on challenges and play like Hide and Seek, brings relief from the competition by raising the influence of one side; (f) the same left-right competition occurs in confused episodes and schizophrenia in vulnerable people who encounter pressures to use both hemispheres at the same time; (g) some symptoms raise the influence on one side ideationally. This leads to coherent theories of autism and schizophrenia. In both competition between the hemispheres is relieved primarily by self-pressuring, which raises influence on one side. PMID:22525821

  20. Geologic map of the northern hemisphere of Vesta based on Dawn Framing Camera (FC) images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruesch, Ottaviano; Hiesinger, Harald; Blewett, David T.; Williams, David A.; Buczkowski, Debra; Scully, Jennifer; Yingst, R. Aileen; Roatsch, Thomas; Preusker, Frank; Jaumann, Ralf; Russell, Christopher T.; Raymond, Carol A.

    2014-12-01

    The Dawn Framing Camera (FC) has imaged the northern hemisphere of the Asteroid (4) Vesta at high spatial resolution and coverage. This study represents the first investigation of the overall geology of the northern hemisphere (22-90°N, quadrangles Av-1, 2, 3, 4 and 5) using these unique Dawn mission observations. We have compiled a morphologic map and performed crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) measurements to date the geologic units. The hemisphere is characterized by a heavily cratered surface with a few highly subdued basins up to ∼200 km in diameter. The most widespread unit is a plateau (cratered highland unit), similar to, although of lower elevation than the equatorial Vestalia Terra plateau. Large-scale troughs and ridges have regionally affected the surface. Between ∼180°E and ∼270°E, these tectonic features are well developed and related to the south pole Veneneia impact (Saturnalia Fossae trough unit), elsewhere on the hemisphere they are rare and subdued (Saturnalia Fossae cratered unit). In these pre-Rheasilvia units we observed an unexpectedly high frequency of impact craters up to ∼10 km in diameter, whose formation could in part be related to the Rheasilvia basin-forming event. The Rheasilvia impact has potentially affected the northern hemisphere also with S-N small-scale lineations, but without covering it with an ejecta blanket. Post-Rheasilvia impact craters are small (<60 km in diameter) and show a wide range of degradation states due to impact gardening and mass wasting processes. Where fresh, they display an ejecta blanket, bright rays and slope movements on walls. In places, crater rims have dark material ejecta and some crater floors are covered by ponded material interpreted as impact melt.

  1. Precision study of the η → μ+μ-γ and ω → μ+μ-π0 electromagnetic transition form-factors and of the ρ → μ+μ- line shape in NA60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaldi, R.; Banicz, K.; Borer, K.; Castor, J.; Chaurand, B.; Chen, W.; Cicalò, C.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Damjanovic, S.; David, A.; de Falco, A.; Devaux, A.; Ducroux, L.; En'yo, H.; Fargeix, J.; Ferretti, A.; Floris, M.; Förster, A.; Force, P.; Guettet, N.; Guichard, A.; Gulkanian, H.; Heuser, J. M.; Jarron, P.; Keil, M.; Kluberg, L.; Li, Z.; Lourenço, C.; Lozano, J.; Manso, F.; Martins, P.; Masoni, A.; Neves, A.; Ohnishi, H.; Oppedisano, C.; Parracho, P.; Pillot, P.; Poghosyan, T.; Puddu, G.; Radermacher, E.; Ramalhete, P.; Rosinsky, P.; Scomparin, E.; Seixas, J.; Serci, S.; Shahoyan, R.; Sonderegger, P.; Specht, H. J.; Tieulent, R.; Uras, A.; Usai, G.; Veenhof, R.; Wöhri, H. K.

    2016-06-01

    The NA60 experiment studied low-mass muon pair production in proton-nucleus (p-A) collisions using a 400 GeV proton beam at the CERN SPS. The low-mass dimuon spectrum is well described by the superposition of the two-body and Dalitz decays of the light neutral mesons η, ρ, ω, η‧ and ϕ, and no evidence of in-medium effects is found. A new high-precision measurement of the electromagnetic transition form factors of the η and ω was performed, profiting from a 10 times larger data sample than the peripheral In-In sample previously collected by NA60. Using the pole-parameterisation | F (M)|2 =(1 -M2 /Λ2) - 2 we find Λη-2 = 1.934 ± 0.067 (stat.) ±0.050 (syst.) (GeV /c2)-2 and Λω-2 = 2.223 ± 0.026 (stat.) ±0.037 (syst.) (GeV /c2)-2. An improved value of the branching ratio of the Dalitz decay ω →μ+μ-π0 is also obtained, with BR (ω →μ+μ-π0) = [ 1.41 ± 0.09 (stat.) ± 0.15 (syst.) ] ×10-4. Further results refer to the ρ line shape and a new limit on ρ / ω interference in hadron interactions.

  2. On hemispheric differences in evoked potentials to speech stimuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galambos, R.; Benson, P.; Smith, T. S.; Schulman-Galambos, C.; Osier, H.

    1975-01-01

    Confirmation is provided for the belief that evoked potentials may reflect differences in hemispheric functioning that are marginal at best. Subjects were right-handed and audiologically normal men and women, and responses were recorded using standard EEG techniques. Subjects were instructed to listen for the targets while laying in a darkened sound booth. Different stimuli, speech and tone signals, were used. Speech sounds were shown to evoke a response pattern that resembles that to tone or clicks. Analysis of variances on peak amplitude and latency measures showed no significant differences between hemispheres, however, a Wilcoxon test showed significant differences in hemispheres for certain target tasks.

  3. Young Children's Concepts of Shape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Douglas H.; Swaminathan, Sudha; Hannibal, Mary Anne Zeitler; Sarama, Julie

    1999-01-01

    Investigates, by conducting individual clinical interviews of 97 children ages 3 to 6, the criteria preschool children use to distinguish members of a class of shapes from other figures, emphasizing identification and descriptions of shapes and reasons for these identifications. Concludes that young children initially form schemas on the basis of…

  4. Subtropical dipole mode in the Southern Hemisphere: A global view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.

    2010-05-01

    A global wavenumber-3 dipole SST mode is showed to exist in the Southern Hemisphere subtropical climate variability in austral summer. A positive (negative) phase of the mode is characterized by cool (warm) SST anomalies in the east and warm (cool) SST anomalies in the southwest of the south Indian, Pacific, and Atlantic Oceans, respectively. This coherent dipole structure is largely a response of ocean mixed layer to the atmospheric forcing characterized by migration and modulation of the subtropical high-pressures, in which the latent heat flux play a leading role through wind-induced evaporation, although ocean dynamics may also be crucial in forming SST anomalies attached to the continents. Exploratory analyses suggest that this mode is strongly damped by the negative heat flux feedback, with a persistence time about three months and no spectral peak at interannual to decadal time scales. As the subtropical dipole mode is linearly independent of ENSO and SAM, whether it represents an additional source of climate predictability should be further studied.

  5. 3000 Mile Laser Altimeter Profile Across Northern Hemisphere of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Topographic profile across the northern hemisphere of Mars from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA). The profile was obtained during the Mars Global Surveyor Capture Orbit Calibration Pass on September 15, 1997 and represents 20 minutes of data collection. The profile has a length of approximately 3000 miles (5000 kilometers). The large bulge is the western part of the Elysium rise, the second largest volcanic province on Mars, and shows over 3 miles (5 kilometers) of vertical relief. This area contains deep chasms that reflect tectonic, volcanic and erosional processes. In contrast is the almost 1featureless1 northern plains region of Mars, which shows only hundreds of meters of relief at scales the size of the United States. Plotted for comparison is the elevation of the Viking Lander 2 site, which is located 275 miles (445 kilometers) west of the profile. At the southernmost extent of the trace is the transition from the northern plains to the ancient southern highlands. Characterizing the fine-scale nature of topography in this chaotic region is crucial to testing theories for how the dichotomy between the geologically distinctive northern lowlands and southern uplands formed and subsequently evolved. The spatial resolution of the profile is approximately 1000 feet (330 meters) and the vertical resolution is approximately 3 feet (1 meter). When the Mars Global Surveyor mapping mission commences in March, 1998, the MOLA instrument will collect 72 times as much data every day for a period of two years.

  6. The Influence of Visual and Auditory Information on the Perception of Speech and Non-Speech Oral Movements in Patients with Left Hemisphere Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmid, Gabriele; Thielmann, Anke; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2009-01-01

    Patients with lesions of the left hemisphere often suffer from oral-facial apraxia, apraxia of speech, and aphasia. In these patients, visual features often play a critical role in speech and language therapy, when pictured lip shapes or the therapist's visible mouth movements are used to facilitate speech production and articulation. This demands…

  7. Smelling shapes: crossmodal correspondences between odors and shapes.

    PubMed

    Hanson-Vaux, Grant; Crisinel, Anne-Sylvie; Spence, Charles

    2013-02-01

    Crossmodal correspondences between odors and visual stimuli-particularly colors-are well-established in the literature, but there is a paucity of research involving visual shape correspondences. Crossmodal associations between 20 odors (a selection of those commonly found in wine) and visual shape stimuli ("kiki"/"bouba" forms-Köhler W. 1929. Gestalt psychology. New York: Liveright.) were investigated in a sample of 25 participants (mean age of 21 years). The odors were rated along a form scale anchored by 2 shapes, as well as several descriptive adjective scales. Two of the odors were found to be significantly associated with an angular shape (lemon and pepper) and two others with a rounded shape (raspberry and vanilla). Principal component analysis indicated that the hedonic value and intensity of odors are important in this crossmodal association, with more unpleasant and intense smells associated with more angular forms. These results are discussed in terms of their practical applications, such as in the use of bottle, logo, or label shape by marketers of perfume and wine to convey the prominent notes through congruent odor-shape pairing. In conclusion, these results support the existence of widespread crossmodal associations (or correspondences) between odors and visual shape stimuli.

  8. A large-area nanoscale gold hemisphere pattern as a nanoelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Li, Huaqing; Wu, Nianqiang

    2008-07-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanostructure patterns have extensive applications in photonic devices, nanoelectronics, electrochemical devices, biosensors, catalysts and high-density magnetic recording devices. It remains a challenge to develop low-cost, high-throughput, high-resolution techniques for the fabrication of large-area (wafer-scale) 2D nanostructure array patterns with controlled feature size, shape and pitch. The present work has demonstrated a low-cost, high-throughput, high-resolution approach for the fabrication of large-area, high-quality nanostructure array patterns by nanosphere lithography combined with electroplating. The gold hemisphere array pattern obtained is capable of functioning as a nanoelectrode array (NEA) in which the gold hemispheres act as individual electrodes that are separated with an insulating polypyrrole (PPY) film. Cyclic voltammetry measurement has shown a sigmoid-shaped voltammogram, which is characteristic of electrochemical characteristics of a nanoelectrode array. NEAs are expected to find extensive applications in fundamental electrochemistry studies and electrochemical devices.

  9. Summer Temperature Anomalies for the Northern Hemisphere, 1955-2011

    NASA Video Gallery

    This visualization shows a flat map of the Earth with summertime temperature anomalies for the Northern Hemisphere. This analysis compares observed seasonal mean temperatures (June-July-August) to ...

  10. Geological Mapping of the Encounter Hemisphere on Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, O. L.; Moore, J. M.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Ennico, K.; Young, L. A.; Cheng, A. F.; New Horizons GGI Theme Team

    2016-06-01

    We present mapping of Pluto's encounter hemisphere performed to date (focusing on Sputnik Planum and the immediately surrounding area) and offer preliminary descriptions of terrains further afield that will be the subject of future mapping.

  11. Motivation, affect, and hemispheric asymmetry: power versus affiliation.

    PubMed

    Kuhl, Julius; Kazén, Miguel

    2008-08-01

    In 4 experiments, the authors examined to what extent information related to different social needs (i.e., power vs. affiliation) is associated with hemispheric laterality. Response latencies to a lateralized dot-probe task following lateralized pictures or verbal labels that were associated with positive or negative episodes related to power, affiliation, or achievement revealed clear-cut laterality effects. These effects were a function of need content rather than of valence: Power-related stimuli were associated with right visual field (left hemisphere) superiority, whereas affiliation-related stimuli were associated with left visual field (right hemisphere) superiority. Additional results demonstrated that in contrast to power, affiliation primes were associated with better discrimination between coherent word triads (e.g., goat, pass, and green, all related to mountain) and noncoherent triads, a remote associate task known to activate areas of the right hemisphere. PMID:18665713

  12. Motivation, affect, and hemispheric asymmetry: power versus affiliation.

    PubMed

    Kuhl, Julius; Kazén, Miguel

    2008-08-01

    In 4 experiments, the authors examined to what extent information related to different social needs (i.e., power vs. affiliation) is associated with hemispheric laterality. Response latencies to a lateralized dot-probe task following lateralized pictures or verbal labels that were associated with positive or negative episodes related to power, affiliation, or achievement revealed clear-cut laterality effects. These effects were a function of need content rather than of valence: Power-related stimuli were associated with right visual field (left hemisphere) superiority, whereas affiliation-related stimuli were associated with left visual field (right hemisphere) superiority. Additional results demonstrated that in contrast to power, affiliation primes were associated with better discrimination between coherent word triads (e.g., goat, pass, and green, all related to mountain) and noncoherent triads, a remote associate task known to activate areas of the right hemisphere.

  13. Characteristics of verbal semantic impairment in left hemisphere epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Giovagnoli, Anna Rita

    2005-07-01

    Fifty-two patients with partial epilepsy of left (n=30) or right (n=22) hemisphere origin were compared with 23 healthy subjects to explore the characteristics and mechanisms of verbal semantic deficits. Picture Naming, Picture Pointing, and the Semantic Questionnaire assessed semantic retrieval, comprehension, and judgment, respectively. In comparison with the controls and right hemisphere patients, the left hemisphere patients showed impairments on Picture Naming and the Semantic Questionnaire. On Picture Naming, the left hemisphere patients made significant omissions and intracategorical errors; on the Semantic Questionnaire, they made errors at superordinate and subordinate levels of information, they made more errors in relation to living than nonliving things, and there were significant associations between their Picture Naming and Semantic Questionnaire scores. In this population, the mixed profiles of semantic deficits suggests the coexistence of altered retrieval and information loss. PMID:16060825

  14. Hypothalamic digoxin, hemispheric chemical dominance, and the tridosha theory.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2003-05-01

    Ayurveda, the traditional Indian System of Medicine, deals with the theory of the three tridosha states (both physical and psychological): Vata, Pitta, and Kapha. They are the three major human constitutional types that both depend on psychological and physical characteristics. The Pitta state is described as a critical, discriminative, and rational psychological state of mind, while the Kapha state is described as being dominant for emotional stimuli. The Vata state is an intermediate unstable shifting state. The Pitta types are of average height and built with well developed musculature. The Vata types are thin individuals with low body mass index. The Kapha types are short stocky individuals that tend toward obesity, and who are sedentary. The study assessed the biochemical differences between right hemispheric dominant, bihemispheric dominant, and left hemispheric dominant individuals, and then compared this with the patterns obtained in the Vata, Pitta, and Kapha states. The isoprenoid metabolites (digoxin, dolichol, and ubiquinone), glycoconjugate metabolism, free radical metabolism, and the RBC membrane composition were studied. The hemispheric chemical dominance in various systemic diseases and psychological states was also investigated. The results showed that right hemispheric chemically dominant/Kapha state had elevated digoxin levels, increased free radical production and reduced scavenging, increased tryptophan catabolites and reduced tyrosine catabolites, increased glycoconjugate levels and increased cholesterol: phospholipid ratio of RBC membranes. Left hemispheric chemically dominant/Pitta states had the opposite biochemical patterns. The patterns were normal or intermediate in the bihemispheric chemically dominant/Vata state. This pattern could be correlated with various systemic and neuropsychiatric diseases and personality traits. Right hemispheric chemical dominance/Kapha state represents a hyperdigoxinemic state with membrane sodium

  15. Hypothalamic digoxin, hemispheric chemical dominance, and the tridosha theory.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2003-05-01

    Ayurveda, the traditional Indian System of Medicine, deals with the theory of the three tridosha states (both physical and psychological): Vata, Pitta, and Kapha. They are the three major human constitutional types that both depend on psychological and physical characteristics. The Pitta state is described as a critical, discriminative, and rational psychological state of mind, while the Kapha state is described as being dominant for emotional stimuli. The Vata state is an intermediate unstable shifting state. The Pitta types are of average height and built with well developed musculature. The Vata types are thin individuals with low body mass index. The Kapha types are short stocky individuals that tend toward obesity, and who are sedentary. The study assessed the biochemical differences between right hemispheric dominant, bihemispheric dominant, and left hemispheric dominant individuals, and then compared this with the patterns obtained in the Vata, Pitta, and Kapha states. The isoprenoid metabolites (digoxin, dolichol, and ubiquinone), glycoconjugate metabolism, free radical metabolism, and the RBC membrane composition were studied. The hemispheric chemical dominance in various systemic diseases and psychological states was also investigated. The results showed that right hemispheric chemically dominant/Kapha state had elevated digoxin levels, increased free radical production and reduced scavenging, increased tryptophan catabolites and reduced tyrosine catabolites, increased glycoconjugate levels and increased cholesterol: phospholipid ratio of RBC membranes. Left hemispheric chemically dominant/Pitta states had the opposite biochemical patterns. The patterns were normal or intermediate in the bihemispheric chemically dominant/Vata state. This pattern could be correlated with various systemic and neuropsychiatric diseases and personality traits. Right hemispheric chemical dominance/Kapha state represents a hyperdigoxinemic state with membrane sodium

  16. Determination of the solid angle and response function of a hemispherical spectrograph with injection lens for Auger electrons emitted from long lived projectile states

    SciTech Connect

    Doukas, S.; Madesis, I.; Dimitriou, A.; Zouros, T. J. M.; Laoutaris, A.; Benis, E. P.

    2015-04-15

    We present SIMION 8.1 Monte Carlo type simulations of the response function and detection solid angle for long lived Auger states (lifetime τ ∼ 10{sup −9} − 10{sup −5} s) recorded by a hemispherical spectrograph with injection lens and position sensitive detector used for high resolution Auger spectroscopy of ion beams. Also included in these simulations for the first time are kinematic effects particular to Auger emission from fast moving projectile ions such as line broadening and solid angle limitations allowing for a more accurate and realistic line shape modeling. Our results are found to be in excellent agreement with measured electron line shapes of both long lived 1s2s2p{sup 4}P and prompt Auger projectile states formed by electron capture in collisions of 25.3 MeV F{sup 7+} with H{sub 2} and 12.0 MeV C{sup 4+} with Ne recorded at 0{sup ∘} to the beam direction. These results are important for the accurate evaluation of the 1s2s2p {sup 4}P/{sup 2}P ratio of K-Auger cross sections whose observed non-statistical production by electron capture into He-like ions, recently a field of interesting interpretations, awaits further resolution.

  17. Calibration of hemispherical-head flow angularity probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Edward L.; Henfling, John F.; Aeschliman, Daniel P.

    1992-01-01

    The hemisphere-cylinder flow angularity probes were calibrated over a Mach number range of 0.5 to 2.0 at pitch and yaw angles of -5 to +5 deg. Each probe had five pressure orifices in the hemispherical head - one on the axis and four located 45 deg from the axis and equally spaced circumferentially. The probes were identical within fabrication tolerances. Details of probe design, test procedures and data analysis are described and selected test results are presented.

  18. Elemental Water Impact Test: Phase 1 20-Inch Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft are being designed based on LS-DYNA simulations of water landing impacts. The Elemental Water Impact Test (EWIT) series was undertaken to assess the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact simulations. Phase 1 of the EWIT series featured water impact tests of a 20-inch hemisphere dropped from heights of 5 feet and 10 feet. The hemisphere was outfitted with an accelerometer and three pressure gages. The focus of this report is the correlation of analytical models against test data.

  19. Pulse shaping with transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, R.B.

    1985-08-15

    A method and apparatus for forming shaped voltage pulses uses passive reflection from a transmission line with nonuniform impedance. The impedance of the reflecting line varies with length in accordance with the desired pulse shape. A high voltage input pulse is transmitted to the reflecting line. A reflected pulse is produced having the desired shape and is transmitted by pulse removal means to a load. Light activated photoconductive switches made of silicon can be utilized. The pulse shaper can be used to drive a Pockels cell to produce shaped optical pulses.

  20. Pulse shaping with transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus for forming shaped voltage pulses uses passive reflection from a transmission line with nonuniform impedance. The impedance of the reflecting line varies with length in accordance with the desired pulse shape. A high voltage input pulse is transmitted to the reflecting line. A reflected pulse is produced having the desired shape and is transmitted by pulse removal means to a load. Light activated photoconductive switches made of silicon can be utilized. The pulse shaper can be used to drive a Pockels cell to produce shaped optical pulses.

  1. Metaphors and verbal creativity: the role of the right hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Gold, Rinat; Faust, Miriam; Ben-Artzi, Elisheva

    2012-01-01

    Ample research suggests that the right cerebral hemisphere plays a central role in verbal creativity as well as in novel metaphor comprehension. The aim of the present study was to directly examine the relation between verbal creativity and right hemisphere involvement during novel metaphor comprehension. Thus 30 healthy adults were asked to fill in the Hebrew version of the Remote Association Test to assess their level of creativity. In addition, reaction times and error rates were measured while these participants performed a semantic judgement task on two word expressions presented in a divided visual field paradigm. The word pairs comprised four types of semantic relations: novel metaphors, conventional metaphors, literal word pairs, and meaningless word pairs. Correlations were conducted to assess the relation between level of creativity and processing of the four pair types in the two cerebral hemispheres. The main finding was of a significant negative correlation between degree of creativity and reaction times to novel metaphor processing in the right hemisphere, thus supporting the involvement of this cerebral hemisphere in both tasks. Results are discussed in light of linguistic theories and recent neuroscientific evidence regarding relative hemispheric involvement during semantic processing.

  2. Discourse deficits following right hemisphere damage in deaf signers.

    PubMed

    Hickok, G; Wilson, M; Clark, K; Klima, E S; Kritchevsky, M; Bellugi, U

    1999-02-01

    Previous findings have demonstrated that hemispheric organization in deaf users of American Sign Language (ASL) parallels that of the hearing population, with the left hemisphere showing dominance for grammatical linguistic functions and the right hemisphere showing specialization for non-linguistic spatial functions. The present study addresses two further questions: first, do extra-grammatical discourse functions in deaf signers show the same right-hemisphere dominance observed for discourse functions in hearing subjects; and second, do discourse functions in ASL that employ spatial relations depend upon more general intact spatial cognitive abilities? We report findings from two right-hemisphere damaged deaf signers, both of whom show disruption of discourse functions in absence of any disruption of grammatical functions. The exact nature of the disruption differs for the two subjects, however. Subject AR shows difficulty in maintaining topical coherence, while SJ shows difficulty in employing spatial discourse devices. Further, the two subjects are equally impaired on non-linguistic spatial tasks, indicating that spared spatial discourse functions can occur even when more general spatial cognition is disrupted. We conclude that, as in the hearing population, discourse functions involve the right hemisphere; that distinct discourse functions can be dissociated from one another in ASL; and that brain organization for linguistic spatial devices is driven by its functional role in language processing, rather than by its surface, spatial characteristics.

  3. Hierarchical stimuli and hemispheric specialization: two case studies.

    PubMed

    Polster, M R; Rapcsak, S Z

    1994-09-01

    Local versus global visual processing was examined in two patients with massive unilateral left hemisphere lesions using a directed attention task involving hierarchical stimuli. Previous studies found an impressive global advantage in patients with posterior left hemisphere lesions on similar tasks. In addition, whereas patients with left inferior parietal lobule (IPL) lesions showed the global interference on local processing that is typically observed in normals, patients with lesions centered on the superior temporal gyrus (STG) demonstrated no interference. Paradoxically, our two patients who had complete destruction of both the left IPL and STG regions showed an overall local advantage due to local interference on global processing. We propose that following extensive left hemisphere damage, the isolated right hemisphere may be able to perform efficiently the type of processing usually ascribed to the left hemisphere (i.e., local). However, at least under certain conditions, this apparent functional plasticity seems to occur at the expense of the type of processing normally associated with the right hemisphere (i.e., global). PMID:7805389

  4. The nature of hemispheric specialization for prosody perception.

    PubMed

    Witteman, Jurriaan; Goerlich-Dobre, Katharina S; Martens, Sander; Aleman, André; Van Heuven, Vincent J; Schiller, Niels O

    2014-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests a relative right-hemispheric specialization for emotional prosody perception, whereas linguistic prosody perception is under bilateral control. It is still unknown, however, how the hemispheric specialization for prosody perception might arise. Two main hypotheses have been put forward. Cue-dependent hypotheses, on the one hand, propose that hemispheric specialization is driven by specialization for the non-prosody-specific processing of acoustic cues. The functional lateralization hypothesis, on the other hand, proposes that hemispheric specialization is dependent on the communicative function of prosody, with emotional and linguistic prosody processing being lateralized to the right and left hemispheres, respectively. In the present study, the functional lateralization hypothesis of prosody perception was systematically tested by instructing one group of participants to evaluate the emotional prosody, and another group the linguistic prosody dimension of bidimensional prosodic stimuli in a dichotic-listening paradigm, while event-related potentials were recorded. The results showed that the right-ear advantage was associated with decreased latencies for an early negativity in the contralateral hemisphere. No evidence was found for functional lateralization. These findings suggest that functional lateralization effects for prosody perception are small and support the structural model of dichotic listening.

  5. Phase Relationships of Solar Hemispheric Toroidal and Poloidal Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraközy, J.

    2016-08-01

    The solar northern and southern hemispheres exhibit differences in their intensities and time profiles of the activity cycles. The time variation of these properties was studied in a previous article covering the data from Cycles 12-23. The hemispheric phase lags exhibited a characteristic variation: the leading role was exchanged between hemispheres every four cycles. The present work extends the investigation of this variation using the data of Staudacher and Schwabe in Cycles 1-4 and 7-10 as well as Spörer’s data in Cycle 11. The previously observed variation cannot be clearly recognized using the data of Staudacher, Schwabe, and Spörer. However, it is more interesting that the phase lags of the reversals of the magnetic fields at the poles follow the same variations as those of the hemispheric cycles in Cycles 12-23, i.e., one of the hemispheres leads in four cyles and the leading role jumps to the opposite hemisphere in the next four cycles. This means that this variation is a long-term property of the entire solar dynamo mechanism, for both the toroidal and poloidal fields, which hints at an unidentified component of the process responsible for the long-term memory.

  6. Tone-language speakers show hemispheric specialization and differential cortical processing of contour and interval cues for pitch.

    PubMed

    Bidelman, G M; Chung, W-L

    2015-10-01

    Electrophysiological studies demonstrate that the neural coding of pitch is modulated by language experience and the linguistic relevance of the auditory input; both rightward and leftward asymmetries have been observed in the hemispheric specialization for pitch. In music, pitch is encoded using two primary features: contour (patterns of rises and falls) and interval (frequency separation between tones) cues. Recent evoked potential studies demonstrate that these "global" (contour) and "local" (interval) aspects of pitch are processed automatically (but bilaterally) in trained musicians. Here, we examined whether alternate forms of pitch expertise, namely, tone-language experience (i.e., Chinese), influence the early detection of contour and intervallic deviations within ongoing pitch sequences. Neuroelectric mismatch negativity (MMN) potentials were recorded in Chinese speakers and English-speaking nonmusicians in response to continuous pitch sequences with occasional global or local deviations in the ongoing melodic stream. This paradigm allowed us to explore potential cross-language differences in the hemispheric weighting for contour and interval processing of pitch. Chinese speakers showed differential pitch encoding between hemispheres not observed in English listeners; Chinese MMNs revealed a rightward bias for contour processing but a leftward hemispheric laterality for interval processing. In contrast, no asymmetries were observed in the English group. Collectively, our findings suggest tone-language experience sensitizes auditory brain mechanisms for the detection of subtle global/local pitch changes in the ongoing auditory stream and exaggerates functional asymmetries in pitch processing between cerebral hemispheres.

  7. Method for joining ceramic shapes

    DOEpatents

    Rabin, Barry H.

    1992-01-01

    A method for joining shapes of ceramic materials together to form a unitary ceramic structure. In the method of the invention, a mixture of two or more chemical components which will react exothermically is placed between the surfaces to be joined, and the joined shapes heated to a temperature sufficient to initiate the exothermic reaction forming a joining material which acts to bond the shapes together. Reaction materials are chosen which will react exothermically at temperatures below the degradation temperature of the materials to be joined. The process is particularly suited for joining composite materials of the silicon carbide-silicon carbide fiber type.

  8. Evidence of inter-hemispheric temperature contrasts over the last millennium from a new Southern Hemisphere multi-proxy reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukom, Raphael; Gergis, Joëlle; Karoly, David; Wanner, Heinz; Curran, Mark; Elbert, Julie; González-Rouco, Fidel; Linsley, Braddock; Moy, Andrew; Mundo, Ignacio; Raible, Christoph; Steig, Eric; van Ommen, Tas; Vance, Tessa; Villalba, Ricardo; Zinke, Jens; Frank, David

    2014-05-01

    The instrumental temperature record shows distinct inter-hemispheric temperature differences superimposed on the common warming trend over the last 150 years. Asynchronicity between the hemispheres is also suggested by millennial-scale analyses over the last deglaciation and the Holocene, indicating a significant modulation of the response to external forcing by internal climate system variability on multiple temporal scales. However, on multi-decadal to centennial times-scales, quantitative analyses on inter-hemispheric temperature variability are largely missing due to the lack of hemispheric-scale high-resolution reconstructions from the Southern Hemisphere. We introduce a new annually resolved multi-proxy ensemble reconstruction of Southern Hemisphere mean temperatures over the last 1000 years. The reconstruction is based on an unprecedented network of 325 proxy records yielding 111 temperature sensitive predictors. In 99.7% of the reconstruction ensemble members, the warmest decade of the last millennium occurs after 1970. Comparing our results with an ensemble of Northern Hemisphere mean reconstructions, we identify periods, where both hemispheres simultaneously exhibit extreme temperatures (defined as exceeding ±1 standard deviations of 1000-2000 temperatures). The only pre-industrial period where >33% of ensemble members indicate globally synchronous extremes is the cold phase between 1594 and 1677. Simultaneous warm temperatures are only identified in the years after 1974 (1979) where more than 66% (90%) of ensemble members indicate extreme warmth. This suggests existence of a globally coherent peak 'Little Ice Age', but no consistent 'Medieval Climate Anomaly' during last 1000 years. We then compare our ensemble of temperature reconstructions to an ensemble of 24 climate model simulations. While the simulated globally consistent cold periods coincide with major volcanic eruptions, the simulations do not account for key features of reconstructed

  9. Non-conjugate aurora and inter hemispheric currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reistad, J. P.; Østgaard, N.; Laundal, K. M.; Oksavik, K.

    2012-04-01

    We look at large scale auroral features using global imagers to obtain simultaneous pictures of both the southern and northern auroral ovals in the ultra violet part of the spectra. During the years 2001 and 2002 the IMAGE satellite was in a favourable position for imaging the aurora borealis (Northern Hemisphere) and the POLAR satellite with its large field-of-view VIS Earth camera had a sporadic coverage of the aurora australis (Southern Hemisphere). In total 19 hours of simultaneous global imaging from different seasons are analysed searching for non-conjugacy in the night side sector. By non-conjugate aurora we mean auroral features appearing in one hemisphere only, or significant differences in intensity between the hemispheres for the same auroral feature. We suggest that our observed large scale asymmetries can be explained in terms of inter hemispheric currents (IHC). Coherent with our earlier findings, we list three possible candidates for producing such inter hemispheric currents based on observations. 1) Hemispherical differences in the solar wind dynamo due to IMF Bx and tilt angle producing different strength of region 1 currents in the conjugate he mispheres, 2) Hemispherical differences in conductivity controlled by the tilt angle only giving rise to IHC on closed field lines, and 3) Field-aligned current components induced by the penetration of the IMF By into the closed magnetosphere. Most of the observed non-conjugate aurora in our dataset can be explained by these candidates only. The IMF By penetration candidate is considered closer. We search for evidence in our data that IMF By < 0 (By > 0) can induce an IHC producing stronger aurora on the polar boundary in the Northern (Southern) Hemisphere. Also a second IHC component are predicted from the theory, mapping to the equatorward part of the oval and opposite directed along the magnetic field lines. Using a much larger dataset for one hemisphere only, we show whether these predicted currents can

  10. S-N secular ocean tide: explanation of observably coastal velocities of increase of a global mean sea level and mean sea levels in northern and southern hemispheres and prediction of erroneous altimetry velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yury

    2010-05-01

    solidification of materials at core-mantle boundary in opposite (northern - southern) hemispheres [7]. 2 Atmospheric and oceanic inversion tides. The gravitational attraction of superfluous mass of the drifting to the North core (in 17 masses of the Moon) causes a planetary inversion tide of air masses of the Earth and its oceanic masses, from the southern hemisphere - to the northern hemisphere [8]. On our theoretical estimations the mean atmospheric pressure in the northern hemisphere accrues with velocity about 0.17 mbar/yr and with similar negative velocity in southern hemisphere. Although mentioned estimations are draft the predicted phenomenon of a slow redistribution of air masses from the southern hemisphere in northern partially has already obtained confirmation according to the meteorological observations in period 1.4. 2002 - 1.4. 2005 [9]: 0.17-0.22 mbar/yr (northern hemisphere) and -0.18 mbar/yr (southern hemisphere). On the basis of modern data of satellite altimetry for 1993-2007 years we for the first time appreciate velocities of secular variations of the mean sea level in northern and southern hemispheres of the Earth which, as well as was supposed, appeared various [10]. In the report the mechanisms of the revealed phenomena, their dynamic interrelation are discussed and an possible interpretation to the data of observations is given. 3 Contrast changes of mean sea levels in northern and southern hemispheres. The air masses slowly are transported from a southern hemisphere in northern. They form an original inversion secular atmospheric tide which existence proves to be true by the modern data of observations [9-11]. The gravitational attraction of the core which is displaced along a polar axis causes the similar tide of oceanic masses [5]. The barometric effect of influence of atmospheric tide will result in reduction of expected secular oceanic tide. Really, an increase of mean atmospheric pressure in the northern hemisphere results in replacement of oceanic

  11. Forming of superplastic ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.; Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1994-05-01

    Superplasticity in ceramics has now advanced to the stage that technologically viable superplastic deformation processing can be performed. In this paper, examples of superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of ceramic components are given. Recent work in biaxial gas-pressure forming of several ceramics is provided. These include yttria-stabilized, tetragonal zirconia (YTZP), a 20% alumina/YTZP composite, and silicon. In addition, the concurrent superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of a hybrid ceramic-metal structure are presented. These forming processes offer technological advantages of greater dimensional control and increased variety and complexity of shapes than is possible with conventional ceramic shaping technology.

  12. An Examination of the Right-Hemisphere Hypothesis of the Lateralization of Emotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, S.D.; Bulman-Fleming, M.B.

    2005-01-01

    The Right-Hemisphere Hypothesis posits that emotional stimuli are perceived more efficiently by the right hemisphere than by the left hemisphere. The current research examines this hypothesis by examining hemispheric asymmetries for the conscious and unconscious perception of emotional stimuli. Negative, positive, and neutral words were presented…

  13. Validation of a 3-D hemispheric nested air pollution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohn, L. M.; Christensen, J. H.; Brandt, J.; Geels, C.; Hansen, K. M.

    2003-07-01

    Several air pollution transport models have been developed at the National Environmental Research Institute in Denmark over the last decade (DREAM, DEHM, ACDEP and DEOM). A new 3-D nested Eulerian transport-chemistry model: REGIonal high resolutioN Air pollution model (REGINA) is based on modules and parameterisations from these models as well as new methods. The model covers the majority of the Northern Hemisphere with currently one nest implemented. The horizontal resolution in the mother domain is 150 km × 150 km, and the nesting factor is three. A chemical scheme (originally 51 species) has been extended with a detailed description of the ammonia chemistry and implemented in the model. The mesoscale numerical weather prediction model MM5v2 is used as meteorological driver for the model. The concentrations of air pollutants, such as sulphur and nitrogen in various forms, have been calculated, applying zero nesting and one nest. The model setup is currently being validated by comparing calculated values of concentrations to measurements from approximately 100 stations included in the European Monitoring and Evalutation Programme (EMEP). The present paper describes the physical processes and parameterisations of the model together with the modifications of the chemical scheme. Validation of the model calculations by comparison to EMEP measurements for a summer and a winter month is shown and discussed. Furthermore, results from a sensitivity study of the model performance with respect to resolution in emission and meteorology input data is presented. Finally the future prospects of the model are discussed. The overall validation shows that the model performs well with respect to correlation for both monthly and daily mean values.

  14. Comparison of Northern Hemisphere Snow Cover Data Sets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scialdone, John; Robock, Alan

    1987-01-01

    Four Northern Hemisphere snow cover data sets are compared on a weekly basis for the 25-month period, July 1981 through July 1983. The data sets are the NOAA/NESDIS Weekly Snow and Ice Chart, the Composite Minimum Brightness (CMB) Chart, the U.S. Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin (data only for North America), and Air Form data. The NOAA/NESDIS chart is produced through the use of photo-interpretation of visible satellite imagery and ground observations. The U.S. Crop Bulletin is also done manually, using only ground observations. The CMB chart and the Air Force data are both produced using automated processes, the first by way of visible satellite imagery and the second by way of ground observations, climatology, satellite observations and persistence. Since the NOAA/NESDIS chart is the only standard and complete data set dating back to the mid 1960s, it is used as the basis for the study. The main emphasis of this paper is a comparison of the CMB and the NOAA/NESDIS chart.The CMB frequently overestimated snow cover, especially the southward extent of the main snow boundary and area far from the snow boundary which were not present on the NOAA/NESDIS chart. On numerous occasions, the outline of mountain ranges was either distorted or totally missed by the CMB. The CMB also underestimated snow cover, especially in densely forested areas. Other regions of underestimation by the CMB can be attributed to the bias factor of the NOAA/NESDIS chart. (The NOAA/NESDIS chart uses the latest snow cover information while the CMB is composited over a week.) The U.S. Crop Bulletin agreed fairly well with the NOAA/NESDIS chart cast of the Rockies, but often differed to the west. The Air Force data set, an undocumented operational product, differed quite a bit from the NOAA/NESDIS chart.

  15. Projected climate impacts for the amphibians of the western hemisphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawler, Joshua J.; Shafer, Sarah L.; Bancroft, Betsy A.; Blaustein, Andrew R.

    2010-01-01

    Given their physiological requirements, limited dispersal abilities, and hydrologically sensitive habitats, amphibians are likely to be highly sensitive to future climatic changes. We used three approaches to map areas in the western hemisphere where amphibians are particularly likely to be affected by climate change. First, we used bioclimatic models to project potential climate-driven shifts in the distribution of 413 amphibian species based on 20 climate simulations for 2071–2100. We summarized these projections to produce estimates of species turnover. Second, we mapped the distribution of 1099 species with restricted geographic ranges. Finally, using the 20 future climate-change simulations, we mapped areas that were consistently projected to receive less seasonal precipitation in the coming century and thus were likely to have altered microclimates and local hydrologies. Species turnover was projected to be highest in the Andes Mountains and parts of Central America and Mexico, where, on average, turnover rates exceeded 60% under the lower of two emissions scenarios. Many of the restricted-range species not included in our range-shift analyses were concentrated in parts of the Andes and Central America and in Brazil's Atlantic Forest. Much of Central America, southwestern North America, and parts of South America were consistently projected to experience decreased precipitation by the end of the century. Combining the results of the three analyses highlighted several areas in which amphibians are likely to be significantly affected by climate change for multiple reasons. Portions of southern Central America were simultaneously projected to experience high species turnover, have many additional restricted-range species, and were consistently projected to receive less precipitation. Together, our three analyses form one potential assessment of the geographic vulnerability of amphibians to climate change and as such provide broad-scale guidance for directing

  16. High Q diamond hemispherical resonators: fabrication and energy loss mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Jonathan J.; Bancu, Mirela G.; Bauer, Joseph M.; Cook, Eugene H.; Kumar, Parshant; Newton, Eric; Nyinjee, Tenzin; Perlin, Gayatri E.; Ricker, Joseph A.; Teynor, William A.; Weinberg, Marc S.

    2015-08-01

    We have fabricated polycrystalline diamond hemispheres by hot-filament CVD (HFCVD) in spherical cavities wet-etched into a high temperature glass substrate CTE matched to silicon. Hemispherical resonators 1.4 mm in diameter have a Q of up to 143 000 in the fundamental wineglass mode, for a ringdown time of 2.4 s. Without trimming, resonators have the two degenerate wineglass modes frequency matched as close as 2 Hz, or 0.013% of the resonant frequency (~16 kHz). Laser trimming was used to match resonant modes on hemispheres to 0.3 Hz. Experimental and FEA energy loss studies on cantilevers and hemispheres examine various energy loss mechanisms, showing that surface related losses are dominant. Diamond cantilevers with a Q of 400 000 and a ringdown time of 15.4 s were measured, showing the potential of polycrystalline diamond films for high Q resonators. These resonators show great promise for use as hemispherical resonant gyroscopes (HRGs) on a chip.

  17. [Independent resource of each hemisphere modulates selective attention].

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, Kazuhito; Nishimura, Ritsuko

    2008-06-01

    Based on the load theory and the assumption that each hemisphere has independent resources, we examined the effects of perceptual load in each hemisphere on the compatibility effect. In Experiments 1, and 2ab, two letter-strings were presented to the left and right visual-fields with a distracter, which was presented on the center of the screen. Two conditions were prepared by pairing a letter-string which contained a target with one which did not. Right-handed participants were asked to identify the target in the letter-strings while ignoring the distracter. The results showed that the compatibility effect was larger when the perceptual load of the letter-string which did not contain a target was low. This suggests that the residual resources of the hemisphere where the target was not projected facilitated the processing of the distracter. In Experiment 3, two letter-strings were presented to both hemispheres. The results showed that the compatibility effect was constant, irrespective of the perceptual load of the letter-string. Our findings suggested that selective attention is modulated by the resources of each hemisphere. PMID:18678063

  18. Apraxia and spatial inattention dissociate in left hemisphere stroke.

    PubMed

    Timpert, David C; Weiss, Peter H; Vossel, Simone; Dovern, Anna; Fink, Gereon R

    2015-10-01

    Theories of lateralized cognitive functions propose a dominance of the left hemisphere for motor control and of the right hemisphere for spatial attention. Accordingly, spatial attention deficits (e.g., neglect) are more frequently observed after right-hemispheric stroke, whereas apraxia is a common consequence of left-hemispheric stroke. Clinical reports of spatial attentional deficits after left hemisphere (LH) stroke also exist, but are often neglected. By applying parallel analysis (PA) and voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) to data from a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment of 74 LH stroke patients, we here systematically investigate the relationship between spatial inattention and apraxia and their neural bases. PA revealed that apraxic (and language comprehension) deficits loaded on one common component, while deficits in attention tests were explained by another independent component. Statistical lesion analyses with the individual component scores showed that apraxic (and language comprehension) deficits were significantly associated with lesions of the left superior longitudinal fascicle (SLF). Data suggest that in LH stroke spatial attention deficits dissociate from apraxic (and language comprehension) deficits. These findings contribute to models of lateralised cognitive functions in the human brain. Moreover, our findings strongly suggest that LH stroke patients should be assessed systematically for spatial attention deficits so that these can be included in their rehabilitation regime. PMID:26298504

  19. [The gaze and functional hemispheric activation in normal subjects].

    PubMed

    Gallois, P; Hautecoeur, P; Ovelacq, E; Gras, P; Dereux, J F

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine whether the study of lateral and vertical conjugated eye movement could serve as an indicator of the functional hemispheric activation. Questions of vocabulary, calculation, logic (V.C.L.) and visuo-spatial instructions, as well as music-listening (V.S.M.), were proposed to 60 control subjects (21 men, 39 women). They were divided in 4 groups of 15 according to their laterality (complete right handed, incomplete right handed, ambidextrous, left handed). Eye movements were recorded using a video system. Deviations of the eyes towards the right and left, upwards and downwards, as well as episodes of staring were noted. Concerning V.C.L. questions, there was a significant correlation between conjugated lateral eye movements and the contralateral hemisphere activation. The study of vertical eye movements revealed a correlation only in complete right-handed and left-handed subjects: deviation upwards during the left hemisphere activation, and downwards during the right hemisphere activation. This pattern of response was no longer found during V.S.M. questions which, in the 4 groups, evoked staring episodes in 56 to 72 per cent of the cases. The negative emotional stimuli (emotional words, non verbal stimuli, stressful situations) evoked preferentially, but independently of laterality, deviations towards the left and downwards in favor of the right hemisphere activation. This method of observation of eye movements seems therefore of significant interest in Neuropsychology, provided that methodologic rules are rigorously respected.

  20. Numerical Investigation on the High-Speed Water-Entry Behaviors of Cylindrical, Hemispherical and Conical Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zi-Tao; Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Xin-Ke

    2009-06-01

    The water entry problem is considered as a classic problem which has a research history of more than 70 years, the water-entry process for projectiles with different nose will be significant for related application and experimental design. In this paper, a series of numerical simulations were conducted to study the water-entry behaviors of cylindrical, hemispherical and conical projectiles using the coupled Lagrange-Euler technology in hydro-code AUTODYN-2D. The detailed cavity expansion process and the cavity characteristics of three projectiles in the early stages of water-entry were obtained. The effects of the projectile nose shape and the projectile velocity on the cavity shapes were studied. Simultaneously, the laws of velocity attenuations for three projectiles were also proposed in this study. The results show that the influence of the projectile velocity on the cavity thickness is much larger than that of the projectile nose shapes, but compared with the effect on the cavity length, the nose shape influence shows little difference with that of the impact velocity. For an identical initial projectile velocity, the cylindrical projectile decays the fastest underwater followed by conical projectiles and hemispherical projectiles.

  1. Correlations between neuron activity in the sensorimotor cortex of the right and left hemispheres in rabbits during a defensive dominant and "animal hypnosis".

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, A V; Galashina, A G; Karamysheva, N N

    2010-09-01

    A latent focus of excitation with a rhythmic nature (a defensive dominant focus) was created in the CNS of rabbits. The focus was formed by threshold electrocutaneous stimulation of the left forelimb using series of impulses consisting of 15-20 stimuli with interstimulus intervals of 2 sec. The linked activity of cells in the sensorimotor cortex of the right and left hemispheres was analyzed. When cross-correlation histograms of the spike activity of sensorimotor cortex neurons in the left hemisphere were constructed and analyzed in relation to spikes of high and intermediate amplitude recorded in the right hemisphere, the linked activity of 15% and 23% of neuron pairs, respectively, showed predominance of a rhythm equal or close to the stimulation rhythm used to form the dominant focus. When the appearance times of spikes from neurons in the sensorimotor cortex of the right hemisphere were analyzed in relation to spikes of high and intermediate amplitude recorded in the cortex of the left hemisphere, predominance of 2-sec rhythms was seen in the linked activity of only 3% and 10% of neuron pairs, respectively. After induction of "animal hypnosis," differences between the hemispheres in relation to this measure leveled out.

  2. 7 CFR 51.1317 - Well formed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Winter Pears 1 Definitions § 51.1317 Well formed. Well formed means having the shape characteristic of the variety. Slight irregularities of shape from type which do not appreciably detract from...

  3. 7 CFR 51.1317 - Well formed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Winter Pears 1 Definitions § 51.1317 Well formed. Well formed means having the shape characteristic of the variety. Slight irregularities of shape from type which do not appreciably detract from...

  4. Superordinate Shape Classification Using Natural Shape Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, John; Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the classification of shapes into broad natural categories such as "animal" or "leaf". We asked whether such coarse classifications can be achieved by a simple statistical classification of the shape skeleton. We surveyed databases of natural shapes, extracting shape skeletons and tabulating their parameters within each…

  5. Shape resonances in molecular fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmer, Joseph L.

    1984-01-01

    A shape resonance is a quasibound state in which a particle is temporarily trapped by a potential barrier (i.e., the shape of the potential), through which it may eventually tunnel and escape. This simple mechanism plays a prominent role in a variety of excitation processes in molecules, ranging from vibrational excitation by slow electrons to ionization of deep core levels by x-rays. Moreover, their localized nature makes shape resonances a unifying link between otherwise dissimilar circumstances. One example is the close connection between shape resonances in electron-molecule scattering and in molecular photoionization. Another is the frequent persistence of free-molecule shape resonant behavior upon adsorption on a surface or condensation into a molecular solid. The main focus of this article is a discussion of the basic properties of shape resonances in molecular fields, illustrated by the more transparent examples studied over the last ten years. Other aspects to be discussed are vibrational effects of shape resonances, connections between shape resonances in different physical settings, and examples of shape resonant behavior in more complex cases, which form current challenges in this field.

  6. Spectral sideband produced by a hemispherical concave multilayer on the African shield-bug Calidea panaethiopica (Scutelleridae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneron, Jean Pol; Ouedraogo, Moussa; Colomer, Jean-François; Rassart, Marie

    2009-02-01

    The African shield-backed bug Calidea panaethiopica is a very colorful insect which produces a range of iridescent yellow, green, and blue reflections. The cuticle of the dorsal side of the insect, on the shield, the prothorax and part of the head, is pricked of uniformly distributed hemispherical hollow cavities a few tens micrometers deep. Under normal illumination and viewing the insect’s muffin-tin shaped surface gives rise to two distinct colors: a yellow spot arising from the bottom of the well and a blue annular cloud that appears to float around the yellow spot. This effect is explained by multiple reflections on a hemispherical Bragg mirror with a mesoscopic curvature. A multiscale computing methodology was found to be needed to evaluate the reflection spectrum for such a curved multilayer. This multiscale approach is very general and should be useful for dealing with visual effects in many natural and artificial systems.

  7. Hemispherical Scanning Imaging DOAS: Resolving nitrogen dioxide in the urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, R. J.; Graves, R. R.; Lawrence, J.; Faloon, K.; Monks, P. S.

    2012-12-01

    Imaging DOAS techniques have been used for nitrogen dioxide and sulfer dioxide for a number of years. This presentation describes a novel system which images concentrations of nitrogen dioxide by scanning an imaging spectrometer 360 degrees azimuthally, covering a region from 5 degrees below the horizon, to the zenith. The instrument has been built at the University of Leicester (UK), on optical designs by Surrey Satellite Technologies Ltd, and incorporates an Offner relay with Schwarzchild fore-optics, in a rotating mount. The spectrometer offers high fidelity spectroscopic retrievals of nitrogen dioxide as a result of a reliable Gaussian line shape, zero smile and low chromatic aberration. The full hemispherical scanning provides complete coverage of nitrogen dioxide concentrations above approximately 5 ppbv in urban environments. Through the use of multiple instruments, the three-dimensional structure of nitrogen dioxide can be sampled and tomographically reconstructed, providing valuable information on nitrogen dioxide emissions and downwind exposure, in addition to new understanding of boundary layer dynamics through the use of nitrogen dioxide as a tracer. Furthermore, certain aerosol information can be retrieved through absolute intensity measurements in each azimuthal direction supplemented by traditional techniques of O4 spectroscopy. Such measurements provide a new tool for boundary layer measurement and monitoring at a time when air quality implications on human health and climate are under significant scrutiny. This presentation will describe the instrument and tomographic potential of this technique. First measurements were taken as part of the international PEGASOS campaign in Bologna, Italy. Results from these measurements will be shown, including imaging of enhanced NO2 in the Bologna urban boundary layer during a severe thunderstorm. A Hemispherical Scanning Imaging DOAS instrument operating in Bologna, Italy in June 2012. Visible in the background

  8. Hyper-hemispheric lens distortion model for 3D-imaging SPAD-array-based applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernechele, Claudio; Villa, Federica A.

    2015-09-01

    Panoramic omnidirectional lenses have the typical draw-back effect to obscure the frontal view, producing the classic "donut-shape" image in the focal plane. We realized a panoramic lens in which the frontal field is make available to be imaged in the focal plane together with the panoramic field, producing a FoV of 360° in azimuth and 270° in elevation; it have then the capabilities of a fish eye plus those of a panoramic lens: we call it hyper-hemispheric lens. We built and test an all-spherical hyper-hemispheric lens. The all-spherical configuration suffer for the typical issues of all ultra wide angle lenses: there is a large distortion at high view angles. The fundamental origin of the optical problems resides on the fact that chief rays angles on the object side are not preserved passing through the optics preceding the aperture stop (fore-optics). This effect produce an image distortion on the focal plane, with the focal length changing along the elevation angles. Moreover, the entrance pupil is shifting at large angle, where the paraxial approximation is not more valid, and tracing the rays appropriately require some effort to the optical designer. It has to be noted here as the distortion is not a source-point-aberrations: it is present also in well corrected optical lenses. Image distortion may be partially corrected using aspheric surface. We describe here how we correct it for our original hyper-hemispheric lens by designing an aspheric surface within the optical train and optimized for a Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) array-based imaging applications.

  9. Hemispheric lateralization of singing after intracarotid sodium amylobarbitone1

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, H. W.; Bogen, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Hemispheric lateralization of singing was investigated in patients who had transient hemiplegia after intracarotid injection of sodium amylobarbitone. It was found that after right carotid injection singing was markedly deficient, whereas speech remained relatively intact. Songs were sung in a monotone, devoid of correct pitch rendering; rhythm was much less affected. By contrast, singing was less disturbed than speech after left carotid injection. The observations indicated a double dissociation; the right hemisphere contributed more for singing, whereas the left demonstrated its usual dominance for speech. A model is proposed that encompasses audible stimuli as well as tactual or visual into a scheme of functional lateralization wherein the right hemisphere specializes in processing a complete, time-independent stimulus configuration and the left in a series of successive, time-dependent units. PMID:4844140

  10. Brain hemisphere dominance and vocational preference: a preliminary analysis.

    PubMed

    Szirony, Gary Michael; Pearson, L Carolyn; Burgin, John S; Murray, Gerald C; Elrod, Lisa Marie

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments in split-brain theory add support to the concept of specialization within brain hemispheres. Holland's vocational personality theory may overlap with Human Information Processing (HIP) characteristics. Holland's six RIASEC codes were developed to identify vocational personality characteristics, and HIP scales were designed to measure hemispheric laterality. Relationships between the two scales were evaluated through canonical correlation with some significant results, however not all Holland scale scores correlated with left, right, or integrated hemispheric preference. Additional findings related to participants self-perception of music and math ability were also correlated. Findings on this added analysis revealed a high correlation between perception of musical ability and right brain function but not between mathematical concept and left brain alone. Implications regarding vocational choice and work are discussed.

  11. Hemispherical reflectance model for passive images in an outdoor environment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Charles C; Thai, Bea; Yamaoka, Neil; Aboutalib, Omar

    2015-05-01

    We present a hemispherical reflectance model for simulating passive images in an outdoor environment where illumination is provided by natural sources such as the sun and the clouds. While the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) accurately produces radiance from any objects after the illumination, using the BRDF in calculating radiance requires double integration. Replacing the BRDF by hemispherical reflectance under the natural sources transforms the double integration into a multiplication. This reduces both storage space and computation time. We present the formalism for the radiance of the scene using hemispherical reflectance instead of BRDF. This enables us to generate passive images in an outdoor environment taking advantage of the computational and storage efficiencies. We show some examples for illustration.

  12. Trends in Northern Hemisphere surface cyclone frequency and intensity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Clark, M.P.; Serreze, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    One of the hypothesized effects of global warming from increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases is a change in the frequency and/or intensity of extratropical cyclones. In this study, winter frequencies and intensities of extratropical cyclones in the Northern Hemisphere for the period 1959-97 are examined to determine if identifiable trends are occurring. Results indicate a statistically significant decrease in midlatitude cyclone frequency and a significant increase in high-latitude cyclone frequency. In addition, storm intensity has increased in both the high and midlatitudes. The changes in storm frequency correlate with changes in winter Northern Hemisphere temperature and support hypotheses that global warming may result in a northward shift of storm tracks in the Northern Hemisphere.

  13. Acoustic energy shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A suspended mass is shaped by melting all or a selected portion of the mass and applying acoustic energy in varying amounts to different portions of the mass. In one technique for forming an optical waveguide slug, a mass of oval section is suspended and only a portion along the middle of the cross-section is heated to a largely fluid consistency. Acoustic energy is applied to opposite edges of the oval mass to press the unheated opposite edge portions together so as to form bulges at the middle of the mass. In another technique for forming a ribbon of silicon for constructing solar cells, a cylindrical thread of silicon is drawn from a molten mass of silicon, and acoustic energy is applied to opposite sides of the molten thread to flatten it into a ribbon.

  14. Time variability of hemispherical dynamos: An application to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, W. D.; Wicht, J. W.; Christensen, U. C.

    2012-04-01

    The hemispherical magnetization of the martian crust could be the product of large scale demagnetization processes in the northern hemisphere. Alternative, the ancient martian dynamo, that ceased more than four billion years ago, may have produced an already hemispherical magnetic field. Using numerical simulations we explore the second scenario imposing a sinusoidal core-mantle boundary (CMB) heat flux pattern, putting the minimum at the north pole and the maximum at the south pole. Since Mars likely has never developed an inner core our dynamo model is exclusively driven by secular cooling. The special combination of thermal boundary conditions and driving promotes a flow that is dominated by equatorially anti-symmetric strong thermal winds. These are the consequence of the large temperature differences developing between the norther hemisphere of the core, which remains hot, and the southern hemisphere, which is still cooled by plume like convection. The thermal winds result in a strongω-effect so that the dynamo is of the αω-type rather than of the α2-type more typical for our columnar convection cases. Already rather mild perturbations of the CMB heat flux pattern lead to strong magnetic oscillations that include fast field reversals. Up to moderate perturbation amplitudes the oscillations seems to be the expression of Parker waves. Larger amplitudes, however, lead to more complex behavior. One result of these oscillation is that the magnetic field averages out over relatively short periods in the order of tens of thousand years. We can therefore exclude magnetization scenarios assuming that the crustal magnetization was acquired in several overlying layers over a longer time frame. It seems more likely that the magnetization results from a patchwork of localized lava flows sampling typical magnetic field strengths. This scenario leads to magnetic field amplitudes similar to those deduced from martian meteorites and hemisphericity measures like those

  15. Asymmetric field-aligned currents in the conjugate hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reistad, J. P.; Ostgaard, N.; Oksavik, K.; Laundal, K. M.

    2012-12-01

    Earlier studies using simultaneous imaging from space of the Aurora Borealis (Northern Hemisphere) and Aurora Australis (Southern Hemisphere) have revealed that the aurora can experience a high degree of asymmetry between the two hemispheres. Using 19 hours of simultaneous global imaging from both hemispheres (IMAGE satellite in north and Polar satellite in south) in conjunction with the entire IMAGE WIC database, we investigate the importance of various mechanisms thought to generate the asymmetries seen in global imaging. In terms of asymmetric or interhemispheric field-aligned currents, three candidate mechanisms have been suggested: 1) Hemispheric differences in solar wind dynamo efficiency mainly controlled by IMF Bx leading to asymmetric region 1 currents; 2) conductivity differences in conjugate areas; and 3) penetration of IMF By into the closed magnetosphere possibly generating a pair of oppositely directed interhemispheric currents. From the 19 hour conjugate dataset we find that the solar wind dynamo is likely to be the most important controlling mechanism for asymmetric bright aurora in the polar part of the nightside oval. Here we present statistical analyses of candidates 1) and 3). Using the entire IMAGE WIC database, a statistical analysis of the auroral brightness distribution along and across the Northern Hemisphere oval is carried out. For each candidate, two extreme cases (+/- IMF Bx for 1) and +/- IMF By for 3)) are compared during times non-favorable for the other two mechanisms. Our results indicate that solar wind dynamo induced currents play an important role for the nightside auroral brightness in an average sense. Also, signatures of interhemispheric currents due to IMF By penetration are seen in our statistics, although this effect is somehow weaker.

  16. Hemispheric lateralization of verbal and spatial working memory during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Bonnie J; Herting, Megan M; Maxwell, Emily C; Bruno, Richard; Fair, Damien

    2013-06-01

    Adult functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) literature suggests that a left-right hemispheric dissociation may exist between verbal and spatial working memory (WM), respectively. However, investigation of this type has been obscured by incomparable verbal and spatial WM tasks and/or visual inspection at arbitrary thresholds as means to assess lateralization. Furthermore, it is unclear whether this hemispheric lateralization is present during adolescence, a time in which WM skills are improving, and whether there is a developmental association with laterality of brain functioning. This study used comparable verbal and spatial WM n-back tasks during fMRI and a bootstrap analysis approach to calculate lateralization indices (LIs) across several thresholds to examine the potential of a left-right WM hemispheric dissociation in healthy adolescents. We found significant left hemispheric lateralization for verbal WM, most notably in the frontal and parietal lobes, as well as right hemisphere lateralization for spatial WM, seen in frontal and temporal cortices. Although no significant relationships were observed between LI and age or LI and performance, significant age-related patterns of brain activity were demonstrated during both verbal and spatial WM. Specifically, increased adolescent age was associated with less activity in the default mode brain network during verbal WM. In contrast, increased adolescent age was associated with greater activity in task-positive posterior parietal cortex during spatial working memory. Our findings highlight the importance of utilizing non-biased statistical methods and comparable tasks for determining patterns of functional lateralization. Our findings also suggest that, while a left-right hemispheric dissociation of verbal and spatial WM is apparent by early adolescence, age-related changes in functional activation during WM are also present.

  17. Hemispheric lateralization of verbal and spatial working memory during adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Bonnie J.; Herting, Megan M.; Maxwell, Emily C.; Bruno, Richard; Fair, Damien

    2013-01-01

    Adult functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) literature suggests that a left-right hemispheric dissociation may exist between verbal and spatial working memory (WM), respectively. However, investigation of this type has been obscured by incomparable verbal and spatial WM tasks and/or visual inspection at arbitrary thresholds as means to assess lateralization. Furthermore, it is unclear whether this hemispheric lateralization is present during adolescence, a time in which WM skills are improving, and whether there is a developmental association with laterality of brain functioning. This study used comparable verbal and spatial WM n-back tasks during fMRI and a bootstrap analysis approach to calculate lateralization indices (LI) across several thresholds to examine the potential of a left-right WM hemispheric dissociation in healthy adolescents. We found significant left hemispheric lateralization for verbal WM, most notably in the frontal and parietal lobes, as well as right hemisphere lateralization for spatial WM, seen in frontal and temporal cortices. Although no significant relationships were observed between LI and age or LI and performance, significant age-related patterns of brain activity were demonstrated during both verbal and spatial WM. Specifically, increased adolescent age was associated with less activity in the default mode brain network during verbal WM. In contrast, increased adolescent age was associated with greater activity in task-positive posterior parietal cortex during spatial working memory. Our findings highlight the importance of utilizing non-biased statistical methods and comparable tasks for determining patterns of functional lateralization. Our findings also suggest that, while a left-right hemispheric dissociation of verbal and spatial WM is apparent by early adolescence, age-related changes in functional activation during WM are also present. PMID:23511846

  18. Northern Hemisphere sea level pressure synchronization and its effect on Northern Hemisphere temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeten, Joshua D.

    We consider monthly anomalies of zonally averaged sea level pressure (SLP) in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) from two reanalysis products. A measure of synchronization utilizing correlation coefficient in a five-year sliding window across all latitude pairs is computed over this data. It is found that there have been two NH SLP synchronization episodes since the 1890s, which are significant to approximately three standard deviations. Similar statistically significant synchronization events are seen in simulations of 42 global climate models (GCM) with the dominant synchronization pattern in GCMs proving dynamically consistent with observations. Furthermore, a GCM-based NH temperature anomaly composite shows a flattening of temperature time series in a decade prior to the synchronization episodes, a brief warming trend just after episodes, and a cooling trend thereafter, all of which agrees with the temperature structure around the observed synchronization episode seen in the 1890s. NH sea ice concentration anomalies are also composited from global climate models and show a decrease in ice concentration approximately one to two years after the maximum increase in temperature and an increase in ice concentration one to two years after the maximum decrease in temperature. These results have substantial implications for climate prediction up to a decade in advance.

  19. Mixing with piecewise isometries on a hemispherical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Paul P.; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Ottino, Julio M.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce mixing with piecewise isometries (PWIs) on a hemispherical shell, which mimics features of mixing by cutting and shuffling in spherical shells half-filled with granular media. For each PWI, there is an inherent structure on the hemispherical shell known as the exceptional set E, and a particular subset of E, E+, provides insight into how the structure affects mixing. Computer simulations of PWIs are used to visualize mixing and approximations of E+ to demonstrate their connection. While initial conditions of unmixed materials add a layer of complexity, the inherent structure of E+ defines fundamental aspects of mixing by cutting and shuffling.

  20. Geology of the southern hemisphere of Triton: No polar cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, P.; Moore, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    The bright southern hemisphere, comprising Uhlanga Regio, is perhaps the most poorly understood geologic province on Triton. The entire bright southern hemisphere has been described as a bright polar 'cap', implying a seasonal origin, or as a permanent geologic terrain distinct from the equatorial terrains. Also, thermal models have predicted seasonal migration of frosts and ices from the presently sun-lit south latitudes to the dark northern latitudes. The distribution of frosts and geologic history of this region must be determined observationally. We reexamine the geology of this terrain with the goal of answering these questions.

  1. [Hemispheric hydroxyapatite coated cups in total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Blacha, J; Bednarek, A; Gagała, J

    1998-01-01

    The paper presents principles of implantation as well as clinical and radiological results of hemispheric hydroxyapatite coated cups use in total hip replacement. Eighty-seven patients (60 females, 27 males) aged from 16 to 72 years (mean 49 years) underwent 96 total hip replacements with the use of 51 ABG and 45 OCTOFIT hemispheric cups. Clinical results were satisfactory with an average Harris Hip Score of 89 to 91 at final follow-up. We have found total ingrowth and osteointegration of nearly all cups. In one case of acetabular reconstruction with bone grafts cup migration has been observed and revision was necessary.

  2. Multiple planetary flow regimes in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoden, Shigeo; Shiotani, Masato; Hirota, Isamu

    1987-01-01

    Low-frequency variations in the general circulation of the Southern Hemisphere during 1983 were studied using daily geopotential height and temperature analyses for 12 pressure levels from 1000 mb up to 50 mb, performed by the National Meteorological Center of Japan. Results disclosed the presence, in the Southern Hemisphere troposphere, of an irregular fluctuation of two zonal mean geostrophic wind patterns (named single-jet and double-jet regimes) during wintertime. The fluctuation is characterized by the persistence of one geostrophic wind regime, with characteristic duration of a month, followed by a rather rapid transition to another regime.

  3. Cerebral melioidosis for the first time in the western hemisphere

    PubMed Central

    Vestal, Matthew L.; Wong, Emily B.; Milner, Dan A.; Gormley, William B.; Dunn, Ian F.

    2015-01-01

    This report is the first published case of cerebral melioidosis in the western hemisphere. In this paper the authors review the literature on neurological melioidosis and its presentation and treatment in endemic areas, describe the clinical course of this unique case of a presentation of the disease with cranial abscess in the US, review the pathological and radiological findings associated with this seminal case, and put forth recommendations for recognizing and treating possible future instances of the disease within the western hemisphere. PMID:23767895

  4. Two distinct forms of functional lateralization in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Gotts, Stephen J; Jo, Hang Joon; Wallace, Gregory L; Saad, Ziad S; Cox, Robert W; Martin, Alex

    2013-09-01

    The hemispheric lateralization of certain faculties in the human brain has long been held to be beneficial for functioning. However, quantitative relationships between the degree of lateralization in particular brain regions and the level of functioning have yet to be established. Here we demonstrate that two distinct forms of functional lateralization are present in the left vs. the right cerebral hemisphere, with the left hemisphere showing a preference to interact more exclusively with itself, particularly for cortical regions involved in language and fine motor coordination. In contrast, right-hemisphere cortical regions involved in visuospatial and attentional processing interact in a more integrative fashion with both hemispheres. The degree of lateralization present in these distinct systems selectively predicted behavioral measures of verbal and visuospatial ability, providing direct evidence that lateralization is associated with enhanced cognitive ability.

  5. Design and Verification of a Digital Controller for a 2-Piece Hemispherical Resonator Gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungshin; Yun, Sung Wook; Rhim, Jaewook

    2016-04-20

    A Hemispherical Resonator Gyro (HRG) is the Coriolis Vibratory Gyro (CVG) that measures rotation angle or angular velocity using Coriolis force acting the vibrating mass. A HRG can be used as a rate gyro or integrating gyro without structural modification by simply changing the control scheme. In this paper, differential control algorithms are designed for a 2-piece HRG. To design a precision controller, the electromechanical modelling and signal processing must be pre-performed accurately. Therefore, the equations of motion for the HRG resonator with switched harmonic excitations are derived with the Duhamel Integral method. Electromechanical modeling of the resonator, electric module and charge amplifier is performed by considering the mode shape of a thin hemispherical shell. Further, signal processing and control algorithms are designed. The multi-flexing scheme of sensing, driving cycles and x, y-axis switching cycles is appropriate for high precision and low maneuverability systems. The differential control scheme is easily capable of rejecting the common mode errors of x, y-axis signals and changing the rate integrating mode on basis of these studies. In the rate gyro mode the controller is composed of Phase-Locked Loop (PLL), amplitude, quadrature and rate control loop. All controllers are designed on basis of a digital PI controller. The signal processing and control algorithms are verified through Matlab/Simulink simulations. Finally, a FPGA and DSP board with these algorithms is verified through experiments.

  6. A hemispheric hetero-core fiber optic tactile sensor for texture and hardness detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Nishiyama, Michiko; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a hemispheric tactile sensor based on a hetero-core optical fiber for texture and hardness detection in a small contact area. The hetero-core fiber optic sensors developed in our laboratory have been proved to have several attractive advantages such as high sensitivity to soft bending, immunity to temperature fluctuation and cost-effective scheme. The hemisphere-shaped hetero-core fiber optic tactile sensor converts the applied force into the bending curvature on a hetero-core optical fiber. To evaluate the detection performance of minute-structured rough surface, the proposed sensor was tested for scanning on a cloth with the periodic pattern of 0.74 mm. Additionally, it was confirmed that the sensor was able to detect local hardness distributions of hard plastic lumps which were embedded into silicone rubbers. It was furthermore discussed that the sensor can be applied for precise discrimination of such household objects as several kinds of papers with different texture and hardness.

  7. Design and Verification of a Digital Controller for a 2-Piece Hemispherical Resonator Gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungshin; Yun, Sung Wook; Rhim, Jaewook

    2016-01-01

    A Hemispherical Resonator Gyro (HRG) is the Coriolis Vibratory Gyro (CVG) that measures rotation angle or angular velocity using Coriolis force acting the vibrating mass. A HRG can be used as a rate gyro or integrating gyro without structural modification by simply changing the control scheme. In this paper, differential control algorithms are designed for a 2-piece HRG. To design a precision controller, the electromechanical modelling and signal processing must be pre-performed accurately. Therefore, the equations of motion for the HRG resonator with switched harmonic excitations are derived with the Duhamel Integral method. Electromechanical modeling of the resonator, electric module and charge amplifier is performed by considering the mode shape of a thin hemispherical shell. Further, signal processing and control algorithms are designed. The multi-flexing scheme of sensing, driving cycles and x, y-axis switching cycles is appropriate for high precision and low maneuverability systems. The differential control scheme is easily capable of rejecting the common mode errors of x, y-axis signals and changing the rate integrating mode on basis of these studies. In the rate gyro mode the controller is composed of Phase-Locked Loop (PLL), amplitude, quadrature and rate control loop. All controllers are designed on basis of a digital PI controller. The signal processing and control algorithms are verified through Matlab/Simulink simulations. Finally, a FPGA and DSP board with these algorithms is verified through experiments. PMID:27104539

  8. NO PLIF Study of Hypersonic Transition Over a Discrete Hemispherical Roughness Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett F.; Ivey, Christopher; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) has been use to investigate the hypersonic flow over a flat plate with and without a 2-mm (0.08-in) radius hemispherical trip. In the absence of the trip, for all angles of attack and two different Reynolds numbers, the flow was observed to be laminar and mostly steady. Boundary layer thicknesses based on the observed PLIF intensity were measured and compared with a CFD computation, showing agreement. The PLIF boundary layer thickness remained constant while the NO flowrate was varied by a factor of 3, indicating non-perturbative seeding of NO. With the hemispherical trip in place, the flow was observed to be laminar but unsteady at the shallowest angle of attack and lowest Reynolds number and appeared vigorously turbulent at the steepest angle of attack and highest Reynolds number. Laminar corkscrew-shaped vortices oriented in the streamwise direction were frequently observed to transition the flow to more turbulent structures.

  9. Design and Verification of a Digital Controller for a 2-Piece Hemispherical Resonator Gyroscope

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungshin; Yun, Sung Wook; Rhim, Jaewook

    2016-01-01

    A Hemispherical Resonator Gyro (HRG) is the Coriolis Vibratory Gyro (CVG) that measures rotation angle or angular velocity using Coriolis force acting the vibrating mass. A HRG can be used as a rate gyro or integrating gyro without structural modification by simply changing the control scheme. In this paper, differential control algorithms are designed for a 2-piece HRG. To design a precision controller, the electromechanical modelling and signal processing must be pre-performed accurately. Therefore, the equations of motion for the HRG resonator with switched harmonic excitations are derived with the Duhamel Integral method. Electromechanical modeling of the resonator, electric module and charge amplifier is performed by considering the mode shape of a thin hemispherical shell. Further, signal processing and control algorithms are designed. The multi-flexing scheme of sensing, driving cycles and x, y-axis switching cycles is appropriate for high precision and low maneuverability systems. The differential control scheme is easily capable of rejecting the common mode errors of x, y-axis signals and changing the rate integrating mode on basis of these studies. In the rate gyro mode the controller is composed of Phase-Locked Loop (PLL), amplitude, quadrature and rate control loop. All controllers are designed on basis of a digital PI controller. The signal processing and control algorithms are verified through Matlab/Simulink simulations. Finally, a FPGA and DSP board with these algorithms is verified through experiments. PMID:27104539

  10. Contrail radiative forcing over the Northern Hemisphere from 2006 Aqua MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Minnis, Patrick; Bedka, Sarah T.; Palikonda, Rabindra; Duda, David P.; Rose, Fred G.

    2013-02-01

    Abstract Radiative forcing due to linear-<span class="hlt">shaped</span> jet contrails is calculated over the Northern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> for four seasonal months using 2006 Aqua Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer cloud and contrail property retrieval data in a radiative transfer model. The 4 month mean shortwave, longwave, and net radiative forcings normalized to 100% contrail cover are -5.7, 14.2, and 8.5 Wm-2. Mean total net forcing over the northern half of the globe varies from 9.1 mW m-2 during October to 12.1 mW m-2 in January and is only representative at 01:30 and 13:30 LT in nonpolar regions. In some dense flight traffic corridors, the mean net forcing approaches 80 mW m-2. Scaling the 4 month average of 10.6 mW m-2 to the Southern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> air traffic yields global mean net forcing of 5.7 mW m-2, which is smaller than most model estimates. Nighttime net forcing is 3.6 times greater than during daytime, when net forcing is greatest over low clouds. Effects from contrail cirrus clouds that evolve from linear contrails are not considered in these results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10189054','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10189054"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Shape</span> memory metals. Final report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Dworak, T.D.</p> <p>1993-09-01</p> <p>The ability to define a manufacturing process to <span class="hlt">form</span>, heat-treat, and join parts made of nickel-titanium and/or copper-zinc-aluminum <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory alloys was investigated. The specific emphasis was to define a process that would produce <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory alloy parts in the configuration of helical coils emulating the appearance of compression springs. In addition, the mechanical strength of the finished parts along with the development of a electrical lead attachment method using <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory alloy wire was investigated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008RaSc...43.6S06K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008RaSc...43.6S06K"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of a <span class="hlt">hemi-spherical</span> wideband antenna array for breast cancer imaging</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Klemm, M.; Craddock, I. J.; Preece, A.; Leendertz, J.; Benjamin, R.</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p>Using similar techniques to ground penetrating radars, microwave detection of breast tumors is a potential nonionizing and noninvasive alternative to traditional body-imaging techniques. In order to develop an imaging system, the team at Bristol have been working on a number of antenna array prototypes, based around a stacked-patch element, starting with simple pairs of elements and progressing to fully populated planar arrays. As the system commences human subject trials, a curved breast phantom has been developed along with an approximately <span class="hlt">hemi-spherical</span> conformal array. This contribution will present details of the conformal array design and initial results from this unique experimental imaging system as applied to an anatomically <span class="hlt">shaped</span> breast phantom.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ERL.....2d5008G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ERL.....2d5008G"><span id="translatedtitle">EDITORIAL: Northern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> high latitude climate and environmental change</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Groisman, Pavel; Soja, Amber</p> <p>2007-10-01</p> <p>High Northern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> latitudes are undergoing rapid and significant change associated with climate warming. Climatic change in this region interacts with and affects the rate of the global change through atmospheric circulation, biogeophysical, and biogeochemical feedbacks. Changes in the surface energy balance, hydrologic cycle, and carbon budget feedback to regional and global weather and climate systems. Two-thirds of the Northern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> high latitude land mass resides in Northern Eurasia (~20% of the global land mass), and this region has undergone sweeping socio-economic change throughout the 20th century. How this carbon-rich, cold region component of the Earth system functions as a regional entity and interacts with and feeds back to the greater global system is to a large extent unknown. To mitigate the deficiencies in understanding these feedbacks, which may in turn hamper our understanding of the global change rates and patterns, an initiative was <span class="hlt">formed</span>. Three years ago the Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI) was established to address large-scale and long-term manifestations of climate and environmental change in this region. The NEESPI Science Plan and its Executive Summary have been published at the NEESPI web site (neespi.org). Since 2004, NEESPI participants have been able to seed several waves of research proposals to international and national funding agencies and institutions and also contribute to the International Polar Year. Currently, NEESPI is widely recognized and endorsed by several Earth System Science Partnership (ESSP) programmes and projects: the International Geosphere and Biosphere Programme, the World Climate Research Programme through the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment and Climate and Cryosphere Projects, the Global Water System Project, Global Carbon Project, Global Land Project, and the Integrated Land Ecosystem—Atmosphere Processes Study. Through NEESPI, more than 100 individually</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2398315','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2398315"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span>-specific treatment of dyslexia subtypes: a field experiment.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bakker, D J; Bouma, A; Gardien, C J</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Evidence is discussed to show that so-called L- and P-type dyslexia result from deviations in the development of <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> subservience in learning to read. Investigations into the validity of the L/P classification are reviewed, as are laboratory experiments on the effects of so-called <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>-specific stimulation (HSS). In the present field experiment, 28 L-dyslexic children (mean chronological and reading age 10.6 and 7.5 years, respectively) received HSS of the right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> by the presentation of words to the fingers of the left hand, and 26 P-dyslexic children (mean chronological and reading age 9.4 and 7.2 years, respectively) received HSS of the left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> by the presentation of words to the fingers of the right hand. Control L and P subjects were treated according to the discretion of the remedial teacher. The results underscore the findings of previous laboratory experiments in that (a) HSS-treated L-dyslexics, relative to controls, tended to show larger improvement of accuracy in text reading; and (b) HSS-treated P-dyslexics, relative to controls, showed larger improvement of fluency in word reading. PMID:2398315</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22RFTS%22&pg=3&id=EJ243379','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22RFTS%22&pg=3&id=EJ243379"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> Correlates of the Rod-And-Frame Test.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Berlin, Donna F.; Languis, Marlin L.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Right-handed sixth graders were administered the WISC Block Design and verbal and nonverbal versions of the Rod-and-Frame Test (RFT), measuring field dependence/independence. Results seemed to reflect a right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> processing for the nonverbal RFT and a possible sex bias against girls in its traditional verbal administration. (Author/SJL)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25617529','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25617529"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> asymmetries and the control of motor sequences.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Serrien, Deborah J; Sovijärvi-Spapé, Michiel M</p> <p>2015-04-15</p> <p>Sequencing of finger positions reflects a prototype of skilled behaviour. In order to perform sequencing, cognitive control supports the requirements and postural transitions. In this electroencephalography (EEG) study, we evaluate the effects of hand dominance and assess the neural correlates of unimanual and bimanual sequencing in left- and right-handers. The behavioural measurements provided an index of response planning (response time to first key press) and response execution (time between successive key presses, taps/s and percentage of correct responses), whereas the neural dynamics was determined by means of EEG coherence, expressing the functional connectivity between brain areas. Correlations between brain activity and behaviour were calculated for exploring the neural correlates that are functionally relevant for sequencing. Brain-behavioural correlations during response planning and execution revealed the significance of circuitry in the left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>, underlining its significant role in the organisation of goal-directed behaviour. This lateralisation profile was independent of intrinsic constraints (hand dominance) and extrinsic demands (task requirements), suggesting essential higher-order computations in the left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>. Overall, the observations highlight that the left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> is specialised for sequential motor organisation in left- and right-handers, suggesting an endogenous <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> asymmetry for compound actions and the representation of skill; processes that can be separated from those that are involved in hand dominance. PMID:25617529</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=rh+AND+negative&id=EJ892473','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=rh+AND+negative&id=EJ892473"><span id="translatedtitle">Emotional Valence and Arousal Effects on Memory and <span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> Asymmetries</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mneimne, Malek; Powers, Alice S.; Walton, Kate E.; Kosson, David S.; Fonda, Samantha; Simonetti, Jessica</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This study examined predictions based upon the right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> (RH) model, the valence-arousal model, and a recently proposed integrated model (Killgore & Yurgelun-Todd, 2007) of emotion processing by testing immediate recall and recognition memory for positive, negative, and neutral verbal stimuli among 35 right-handed women. Building upon…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=chimera&id=EJ797419','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=chimera&id=EJ797419"><span id="translatedtitle">Gender Differences in Empathy: The Role of the Right <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rueckert, Linda; Naybar, Nicolette</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The relationship between activation of the right cerebral <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> (RH) and empathy was investigated. Twenty-two men and 73 women participated by completing a chimeric face task and empathy questionnaire. For the face task, participants were asked to pick which of the two chimeric faces looked happier. Both men and women were significantly more…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JGRA..120.9943C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JGRA..120.9943C"><span id="translatedtitle">New <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> geomagnetic indices α with 15 min time resolution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chambodut, Aude; Marchaudon, Aurélie; Lathuillère, Chantal; Menvielle, Michel; Foucault, Etienne</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>New subauroral α15 indices are proposed. They are based on a simple reproducible algorithm which relies on an as dense as possible network of magnetic observatories in each <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>. At first, the variation with time of local geomagnetic activity is determined at each magnetic station. Gathering all obtained stations' precomputed values, a normalization with corrected geomagnetic latitude is determined. Then, for each 15 min interval, magnetic activity on the horizontal component is averaged out over 15 min and corrected using this normalization, before a spline modeling of the longitudinal variation in each <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> is applied. <span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> and planetary 15 min indices are then computed by arithmetic means. Preliminary statistical results, from probability distribution function over a solar cycle and superposed epoch analysis during storms conditions, show, by comparison with am geomagnetic index series, that new α15 indices are reliable in describing subauroral magnetic activity. These new indices will suit any future user, allowing either to choose the spatial description (planetary versus <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span>) and/or to choose the temporal resolution, knowing unambiguously all their strengths and caveats.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=macaque&id=EJ913157','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=macaque&id=EJ913157"><span id="translatedtitle">Right <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> Dominance for Emotion Processing in Baboons</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Wallez, Catherine; Vauclair, Jacques</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Asymmetries of emotional facial expressions in humans offer reliable indexes to infer brain lateralization and mostly revealed right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> dominance. Studies concerned with oro-facial asymmetries in nonhuman primates largely showed a left-sided asymmetry in chimpanzees, marmosets and macaques. The presence of asymmetrical oro-facial…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=315196&keyword=biomass&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=68473697&CFTOKEN=47148161','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=315196&keyword=biomass&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=68473697&CFTOKEN=47148161"><span id="translatedtitle">Characterizing the Influence of <span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> Transport on Regional Air Pollution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Expansion of the coupled WRF-CMAQ modeling system to <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> scales is pursued to enable the development of a robust modeling framework in which the interactions between atmospheric processes occurring at various spatial and temporal scales can be examined in a consistent man...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Cerebral+AND+dominance&pg=5&id=EJ697676','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Cerebral+AND+dominance&pg=5&id=EJ697676"><span id="translatedtitle">About <span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> Differences in the Processing of Temporal Intervals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Grondin, S.; Girard, C.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of the present study was to identify differences between cerebral <span class="hlt">hemispheres</span> for processing temporal intervals ranging from .9 to 1.4s. The intervals to be judged were marked by series of brief visual signals located in the left or the right visual field. Series of three (two standards and one comparison) or five intervals (four…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Cerebral+AND+dominance&pg=5&id=ED226464','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Cerebral+AND+dominance&pg=5&id=ED226464"><span id="translatedtitle">Brain <span class="hlt">Hemispheres</span>: Administrators Must Look Also to the Right.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Dalili, Farid</p> <p></p> <p>In relating brain <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> differences to education and educational administration, the author reviews literature on the issue and discusses the concepts involved. For background, he briefly goes over the history of brain and cognition studies and the advent of "split-brain" studies and the "triune" brain theory. Definitions are then given of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=suppression+AND+adults&pg=4&id=EJ730611','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=suppression+AND+adults&pg=4&id=EJ730611"><span id="translatedtitle">Conflicting Strategies and <span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> Suppression in a Lexical Decision Task</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rutherford, Barbara J.; Lutz, Kevin T.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>The research tests the prediction of the inhibitory-interaction hypothesis (Wey, Cook, Landis, Regard, & Graves, 1993) that experience with a task accentuates the functional imbalance between the <span class="hlt">hemispheres</span>. Right-handed males who were experienced readers were presented a letter string to the centre visual field for lexical decision. The string…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Wagner%2c+AND+E.+AND+C.&id=EJ876805','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Wagner%2c+AND+E.+AND+C.&id=EJ876805"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> Cognitive Style: A Comparison of Three Instruments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Genovese, Jeremy E. C.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>In this study, the author tested the reliability, concurrent validity, and predictive validity of three <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> cognitive style instruments: (a) the Preference Test (PT; R. Zenhausern, 1978), (b) the Polarity Questionnaire (PQ; B. E. Morton, 2002), and (c) the Wagner Preference Inventory II (WAPI II; R. F. Wagner & K. A. Wells, 1985).…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=memory+AND+fMRI&pg=2&id=EJ1006439','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=memory+AND+fMRI&pg=2&id=EJ1006439"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> Lateralization of Verbal and Spatial Working Memory during Adolescence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Nagel, Bonnie J.; Herting, Megan M.; Maxwell, Emily C.; Bruno, Richard; Fair, Damien</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Adult functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) literature suggests that a left-right <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> dissociation may exist between verbal and spatial working memory (WM), respectively. However, investigation of this type has been obscured by incomparable verbal and spatial WM tasks and/or visual inspection at arbitrary thresholds as means to…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=know+AND+brain&pg=6&id=EJ921680','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=know+AND+brain&pg=6&id=EJ921680"><span id="translatedtitle">What Does the Right <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> Know about Phoneme Categories?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Wolmetz, Michael; Poeppel, David; Rapp, Brenda</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Innate auditory sensitivities and familiarity with the sounds of language give rise to clear influences of phonemic categories on adult perception of speech. With few exceptions, current models endorse highly left-<span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>-lateralized mechanisms responsible for the influence of phonemic category on speech perception, based primarily on results…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED443326.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED443326.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Brain <span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> Consensus and the Quality of Investment Decisions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Boyd, Michael</p> <p></p> <p>This on-going study explores the hypothesis that stock fund managers who underperform do so because they make bad decisions, and examines whether their choices can be improved by using a decision model that invokes principles of brain <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> consensus. The study, begun in fall 1999, involves two groups of business students: the control group…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mask+AND+facial&id=EJ746391','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mask+AND+facial&id=EJ746391"><span id="translatedtitle">Right <span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> Dominance in Processing of Unconscious Negative Emotion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sato, Wataru; Aoki, Satoshi</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Right <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> dominance in unconscious emotional processing has been suggested, but remains controversial. This issue was investigated using the subliminal affective priming paradigm combined with unilateral visual presentation in 40 normal subjects. In either left or right visual fields, angry facial expressions, happy facial expressions, or…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED537715.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED537715.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Brain <span class="hlt">Hemisphericity</span> and Mathematics Achievement of High School Students</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fernandez, Sanny F.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This study aimed to find out the brain <span class="hlt">hemisphericity</span> and mathematics achievement of high school students. The respondents of the study were the 168 first year high school students of Colegio de San Jose, during school year 2010-2011 who were chosen through stratified random sampling. The descriptive and interview methods of research were used in…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=information+AND+asymmetry&pg=7&id=EJ904431','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=information+AND+asymmetry&pg=7&id=EJ904431"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> Differences in the Recruitment of Semantic Processing Mechanisms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kandhadai, Padmapriya; Federmeier, Kara D.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This study examined how the two cerebral <span class="hlt">hemispheres</span> recruit semantic processing mechanisms by combining event-related potential measures and visual half-field methods in a word priming paradigm in which semantic strength and predictability were manipulated using lexically associated word pairs. Activation patterns on the late positive complex…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=processing+AND+speed+AND+human+AND+brain&id=EJ766110','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=processing+AND+speed+AND+human+AND+brain&id=EJ766110"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> Differences in Indexical Specificity Effects in Spoken Word Recognition</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gonzalez, Julio; McLennan, Conor T.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Variability in talker identity, one type of indexical variation, has demonstrable effects on the speed and accuracy of spoken word recognition. Furthermore, neuropsychological evidence suggests that indexical and linguistic information may be represented and processed differently in the 2 cerebral <span class="hlt">hemispheres</span>, and is consistent with findings from…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED085455.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED085455.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Spanish Heritage and Influence in the Western <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>San Francisco Unified School District, CA.</p> <p></p> <p>This is a selected bibliography of some good and some outstanding audio-visual educational materials in the library of the Educational Materials Bureau, Audio-Visual Educational Section, that may be considered of particular interest in the study of Spanish heritage and influence in the Western <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span>. The bibliography is arranged…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cow&pg=6&id=EJ752441','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cow&pg=6&id=EJ752441"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> Asymmetry and Pun Comprehension: When Cowboys Have Sore Calves</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Coulson, Seana; Severens, Els</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded as healthy participants listened to puns such as ''During branding, cowboys have sore calves.'' To assess <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> differences in pun comprehension, visually presented probes that were either highly related (COW), moderately related (LEG), or unrelated, were presented in either the left or right…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=composite&pg=2&id=EJ947858','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=composite&pg=2&id=EJ947858"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span>-Dependent Holistic Processing of Familiar Faces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ramon, Meike; Rossion, Bruno</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>In two behavioral experiments involving lateralized stimulus presentation, we tested whether one of the most commonly used measures of holistic face processing--the composite face effect--would be more pronounced for stimuli presented to the right as compared to the left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>. In experiment 1, we investigated the composite face effect in a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cp&pg=3&id=EJ993244','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cp&pg=3&id=EJ993244"><span id="translatedtitle">Does Categorical Perception in the Left <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> Depend on Language?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Holmes, Kevin J.; Wolff, Phillip</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Categorical perception (CP) refers to the influence of category knowledge on perception and is revealed by a superior ability to discriminate items across categories relative to items within a category. In recent years, the finding that CP is lateralized to the left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> in adults has been interpreted as evidence for a kind of CP driven by…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20636586','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20636586"><span id="translatedtitle">13.56 MHz radio frequency plasma properties on <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> electrodes and diamond-like carbon films deposition on three-dimensional polyurethane diaphragms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ohgoe, Yasuharu; Hirakuri, Kenji K.</p> <p>2004-09-01</p> <p>The characteristics of the radio frequency (rf) plasma that could hold an entire <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> polyurethane diaphragm generated using the <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span>-type electrode were investigated. The plasma states were measured using Langmuir probe. Although the common rf plasma chemical vapor deposition technique using planar electrodes makes it difficult to apply uniform plasma to three-dimensional structures, the <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span>-type electrode process could uniformly hold a <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> polyurethane diaphragm at self-bias voltage. As a result, this process could uniformly keep the ion sheath on the diaphragm. In case of using this process for diamond-like carbon (DLC) film deposition, the DLC film was deposited uniformly on the diaphragm at approximately 300 nm. Besides electron temperatures and electron number of densities were similar to the behavior of common rf plasma. This means that the characteristics of plasma are kept in the same states even if the plasma <span class="hlt">form</span> is controlled using such a <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span>-type electrode. Based on these results, this <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span>-type electrode process was observed to be quite applicable to three-dimensional insulator structures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27343688','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27343688"><span id="translatedtitle">Right: Left:: East: West. Evidence that individuals from East Asian and South Asian cultures emphasize right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> functions in comparison to Euro-American cultures.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rozin, Paul; Moscovitch, Morris; Imada, Sumio</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>We present evidence that individuals from East or South Asian cultures (Japanese college students in Japan and East or South Asian born and raised college students in the USA) tend to exhibit default thinking that corresponds to right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> holistic functions, as compared to Caucasian individuals from a Western culture (born and raised in the USA). In two lateralized tasks (locating the nose in a scrambled face, and global-local letter task), both Asian groups showed a greater right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> bias than the Western group. In a third lateralized task, judging similarity in terms of visual <span class="hlt">form</span> versus functional/semantic categorizations, there was not a reliable difference between the groups. On a classic, ambiguous face composed of vegetables, both Eastern groups displayed a greater right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> (holistic face processing) bias than the Western group. These results support an "East - Right <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span>, West - Left <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span>" hypothesis, as originally proposed by Ornstein (1972). This hypothesis is open as to the degree to which social-cultural forces were involved in <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> specialization, or the opposite, or both. Our aim is to encourage a more thorough analysis of this hypothesis, suggesting both lateralization studies corresponding to documented East-West differences, and East-West studies corresponding to lateralization differences. PMID:27343688</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMGC41C1006H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMGC41C1006H"><span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> climatology of monsoon depressions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hurley, J. V.; Boos, W.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Monsoon depressions are large (1000-2000 km diameter) cyclonic low pressure systems having organized deep convection, best known for <span class="hlt">forming</span> in the Bay of Bengal and migrating northwest over northern India in the monsoon trough. About 3 to 5 of these systems occur during each monsoon season, contributing about half of the Indian summer rainfall. Despite their importance as a precipitation source, their dynamics are poorly constrained. Furthermore, although they do occur elsewhere, such as around Australia and in the southern Indian Ocean, there does not exist a collective inventory of these systems outside of the Bay of Bengal region. Here we present a climatology of monsoon depressions produced from the ERA-Interim Reanalysis. Feature tracks are identified using an automated tracking algorithm (K. Hodges' TRACK code) applied to the 850 hPa relative vorticity field for local summer, 1989 to 2003. Using criteria based on relative vorticity and sea level pressure, cyclonic low pressure systems are separated into different intensity categories, one of which corresponds to the definition for monsoon depressions used by the India Meteorological Department. The resultant distribution of storms obtained for the Bay of Bengal region compares well with a previously compiled climatology of monsoon depressions that was limited to the region surrounding India. Having validated our ability to identify monsoon depressions in their classic genesis region near India, we then extend the methods to include the western Pacific, Australia, and the southern Indian Ocean. Track distributions and composite structures of monsoon depressions for these different regions will be presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23707866','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23707866"><span id="translatedtitle">An overview of Fukushima radionuclides measured in the northern <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Thakur, P; Ballard, S; Nelson, R</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>The Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011 resulted in the tragic accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) and subsequently uncontrolled release of radioactive contaminants into the atmosphere. This review article attempts to compile and interpret data collected by various national and international monitoring networks in response to the Fukushima releases across the northern <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>. The majority of the releases occurred during the period March 12-22 with a maximum release phase from March 14-17, 2011. The radioactivity released was dominated by volatile fission products including isotopes of the noble gases (xenon and krypton), iodine, cesium, and tellurium. The radioactive gases and particles released in the accident were dispersed over the middle latitudes of the entire northern <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> and for the first time also measured in the southern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span>. Isotopes of iodine and cesium were detected in air, water, milk and food samples collected across the entire northern <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>. Elevated levels of fission products were detected from March to May 2011 at many locations over the northern <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>. This article focuses on the most prevalent cesium and iodine isotopes, but other secondary isotopes are also discussed. Spatial and temporal patterns and differences are contrasted. The activity ratios of (131)I/(137)Cs and (134)Cs/(137)Cs measured at several locations are evaluated to gain an insight into the fuel burn-up, the inventory of radionuclides in the reactor and the isotopic signature of the accident. It is important to note that all of the radiation levels detected outside of Japan have been very low and are well below any level of public and environmental hazard. PMID:23707866</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27291455','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27291455"><span id="translatedtitle">Inter-<span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> plasticity in patients with median nerve injury.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fornander, Lotta; Nyman, Torbjörn; Hansson, Thomas; Brismar, Tom; Engström, Maria</p> <p>2016-08-15</p> <p>Peripheral nerve injuries result in reorganization within the contralateral <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>. Furthermore, recent animal and human studies have suggested that the plastic changes in response to peripheral nerve injury also include several areas of the ipsilateral <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>. The objective of this study was to map the inter-<span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> plasticity in response to median nerve injury, to investigate normal differences in contra- and ipsilateral activation, and to study the impact of event-related or blocked functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design on ipsilateral activation. Four patients with median nerve injury at the wrist (injured and epineurally sutured >2 years earlier) and ten healthy volunteers were included. 3T fMRI was used to map the hemodynamic response to brain activity during tactile stimulation of the fingers, and a laterality index (LI) was calculated. Stimulation of Digits II-III of the injured hand resulted in a reduction in contralateral activation in the somatosensory area SI. Patients had a lower LI (0.21±0.15) compared to healthy controls (0.60±0.26) indicating greater ipsilateral activation of the primary somatosensory cortex. The spatial dispersion of the coordinates for areas SI and SII was larger in the ipsilateral than in the contralateral <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> in the healthy controls, and was increased in the contralateral <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> of the patients compared to the healthy controls. There was no difference in LI between the event-related and blocked paradigms. In conclusion, patients with median nerve injury have increased ipsilateral SI area activation, and spatially more dispersed contralateral SI activation during tactile stimulation of their injured hand. In normal subjects ipsilateral activation has larger spatial distribution than the contralateral. Previous findings in patients performed with the blocked fMRI paradigm were confirmed. The increase in ipsilateral SI activation may be due to an interhemispheric disinhibition associated with</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27283036','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27283036"><span id="translatedtitle">Right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> dominance for language in a woman with schizophrenia and a porencephalic cyst of the left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Monteiro, Myriam; Pacheco, Paula; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Mattos, Paulo; Moll, Jorge; Nazar, Bruno Palazzo</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>A large left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> porencephalic cyst was incidentally found in a 48-year-old woman (MS) with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM)-5 diagnosis of schizophrenia. The encephaloclastic characteristics of the cyst indicated that it was acquired between the 22nd and 24th gestational weeks, after the major waves of neuronal migration had tapered off. The cyst destroyed the left temporal and occipital lobes, and the inferior parietal lobule. Surprisingly, MS had no evidence of aphasia, alexia, agraphia, or ideational apraxia; in contrast, cognitive functions dependent on the integrity of the right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> were severely impaired. To test the hypothesis that the development of language in MS took place at the expense of functions that are normally carried out by the right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>, we investigated MS's correlates of oral comprehension with fMRI as a proxy for auditory comprehension and other cognitive functions strongly lateralized to the posterior left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>, such as ideational praxis and reading. Comprehension of spoken language engaged the homologous of Wernicke's area in the right planum temporale. Porencephaly may represent a natural model of neuroplasticity supervening at predictable epochs of prenatal development. PMID:27283036</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4221202','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4221202"><span id="translatedtitle">Snout <span class="hlt">Shape</span> in Extant Ruminants</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Tennant, Jonathan P.; MacLeod, Norman</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Snout <span class="hlt">shape</span> is a prominent aspect of herbivore feeding ecology, interacting with both forage selectivity and intake rate. Previous investigations have suggested ruminant feeding styles can be discriminated via snout <span class="hlt">shape</span>, with grazing and browsing species characterised by ‘blunt’ and ‘pointed’ snouts respectively, often with specification of an ‘intermediate’ sub-grouping to represent ambiguous feeding styles and/or morphologies. Snout <span class="hlt">shape</span> morphology is analysed here using a geometric morphometric approach to compare the two-dimensional profiles of the premaxilla in ventral aspect for a large sample of modern ruminant species, for which feeding modes are known from secondary criteria. Results suggest that, when browsing and grazing ruminants are classified ecologically based on a range of feeding style indicators, they cannot be discriminated unambiguously on the basis of snout profile <span class="hlt">shape</span> alone. Profile <span class="hlt">shapes</span> in our sample <span class="hlt">form</span> a continuum with substantial overlap between groupings and a diverse range of morphologies. Nevertheless, we obtained an 83.8 percent ratio of correct post hoc feeding style categorisations based on the proximity of projected profile <span class="hlt">shapes</span> to group centroids in the discriminant space. Accordingly, this procedure for identifying species whose feeding strategy is ‘unknown’ can be used with a reasonable degree of confidence, especially if backed-up by additional information. Based on these results we also refine the definitions of snout <span class="hlt">shape</span> varieties, taking advantage of the descriptive power that geometric morphometrics offers to characterize the morphological disparities observed. The <span class="hlt">shape</span> variance exhibited by both browsing and grazing ruminants corresponds strongly to body mass, providing further evidence for an interaction between snout <span class="hlt">shape</span>, feeding style, and body size evolution. Finally, by exploring the role of phylogenetic similarity in snout <span class="hlt">shape</span>, we find a slight increase in successful categorisation</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25372878','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25372878"><span id="translatedtitle">Snout <span class="hlt">shape</span> in extant ruminants.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tennant, Jonathan P; MacLeod, Norman</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Snout <span class="hlt">shape</span> is a prominent aspect of herbivore feeding ecology, interacting with both forage selectivity and intake rate. Previous investigations have suggested ruminant feeding styles can be discriminated via snout <span class="hlt">shape</span>, with grazing and browsing species characterised by 'blunt' and 'pointed' snouts respectively, often with specification of an 'intermediate' sub-grouping to represent ambiguous feeding styles and/or morphologies. Snout <span class="hlt">shape</span> morphology is analysed here using a geometric morphometric approach to compare the two-dimensional profiles of the premaxilla in ventral aspect for a large sample of modern ruminant species, for which feeding modes are known from secondary criteria. Results suggest that, when browsing and grazing ruminants are classified ecologically based on a range of feeding style indicators, they cannot be discriminated unambiguously on the basis of snout profile <span class="hlt">shape</span> alone. Profile <span class="hlt">shapes</span> in our sample <span class="hlt">form</span> a continuum with substantial overlap between groupings and a diverse range of morphologies. Nevertheless, we obtained an 83.8 percent ratio of correct post hoc feeding style categorisations based on the proximity of projected profile <span class="hlt">shapes</span> to group centroids in the discriminant space. Accordingly, this procedure for identifying species whose feeding strategy is 'unknown' can be used with a reasonable degree of confidence, especially if backed-up by additional information. Based on these results we also refine the definitions of snout <span class="hlt">shape</span> varieties, taking advantage of the descriptive power that geometric morphometrics offers to characterize the morphological disparities observed. The <span class="hlt">shape</span> variance exhibited by both browsing and grazing ruminants corresponds strongly to body mass, providing further evidence for an interaction between snout <span class="hlt">shape</span>, feeding style, and body size evolution. Finally, by exploring the role of phylogenetic similarity in snout <span class="hlt">shape</span>, we find a slight increase in successful categorisation when repeating the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/0131c/report.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/0131c/report.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">shapes</span> of beach pebbles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Wentworth, Chester K.</p> <p>1923-01-01</p> <p>There is much confusion in geologic literature as to the <span class="hlt">shapes</span> of fluvial and beach pebbles and the differences between them, if differences exist. Though the contrary has been asserted, most geologists who have written on the subject appear to hold the view that beach pebbles are generally flatter than river pebbles, having discoid, lozenge-<span class="hlt">shaped</span>, ellipsoid, or oval <span class="hlt">forms</span>. It is asserted by some that these <span class="hlt">forms</span> are produced by pushing of the rock fragments to and fro by the waves. Others have considered that the <span class="hlt">shapes</span> of the original fragments and the inherent structure of the rock are dominant in determining the <span class="hlt">shapes</span> of beach pebbles, and with this view the writer is in accord. That beach pebbles, even those composed of massive igneous rocks are commonly of a flattened oval <span class="hlt">form</span> seems certain, as has been stated elsewhere, but this fact is probably to be attributed to the development of such <span class="hlt">forms</span> from original flat fragments or from rocks of schistose structure or to the segregation of such <span class="hlt">forms</span> under the peculiar action of the waves, rather than to their production by a specialized wave abrasion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27221149','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27221149"><span id="translatedtitle">The left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> learns what is right: Hemispatial reward learning depends on reinforcement learning processes in the contralateral <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aberg, Kristoffer Carl; Doell, Kimberly Crystal; Schwartz, Sophie</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Orienting biases refer to consistent, trait-like direction of attention or locomotion toward one side of space. Recent studies suggest that such hemispatial biases may determine how well people memorize information presented in the left or right hemifield. Moreover, lesion studies indicate that learning rewarded stimuli in one hemispace depends on the integrity of the contralateral striatum. However, the exact neural and computational mechanisms underlying the influence of individual orienting biases on reward learning remain unclear. Because reward-based behavioural adaptation depends on the dopaminergic system and prediction error (PE) encoding in the ventral striatum, we hypothesized that <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> asymmetries in dopamine (DA) function may determine individual spatial biases in reward learning. To test this prediction, we acquired fMRI in 33 healthy human participants while they performed a lateralized reward task. Learning differences between hemispaces were assessed by presenting stimuli, assigned to different reward probabilities, to the left or right of central fixation, i.e. presented in the left or right visual hemifield. <span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> differences in DA function were estimated through differential fMRI responses to positive vs. negative feedback in the left vs. right ventral striatum, and a computational approach was used to identify the neural correlates of PEs. Our results show that spatial biases favoring reward learning in the right (vs. left) hemifield were associated with increased reward responses in the left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> and relatively better neural encoding of PEs for stimuli presented in the right (vs. left) hemifield. These findings demonstrate that trait-like spatial biases implicate <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>-specific learning mechanisms, with individual differences between <span class="hlt">hemispheres</span> contributing to reinforcing spatial biases. PMID:27221149</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27221149','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27221149"><span id="translatedtitle">The left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> learns what is right: Hemispatial reward learning depends on reinforcement learning processes in the contralateral <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aberg, Kristoffer Carl; Doell, Kimberly Crystal; Schwartz, Sophie</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Orienting biases refer to consistent, trait-like direction of attention or locomotion toward one side of space. Recent studies suggest that such hemispatial biases may determine how well people memorize information presented in the left or right hemifield. Moreover, lesion studies indicate that learning rewarded stimuli in one hemispace depends on the integrity of the contralateral striatum. However, the exact neural and computational mechanisms underlying the influence of individual orienting biases on reward learning remain unclear. Because reward-based behavioural adaptation depends on the dopaminergic system and prediction error (PE) encoding in the ventral striatum, we hypothesized that <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> asymmetries in dopamine (DA) function may determine individual spatial biases in reward learning. To test this prediction, we acquired fMRI in 33 healthy human participants while they performed a lateralized reward task. Learning differences between hemispaces were assessed by presenting stimuli, assigned to different reward probabilities, to the left or right of central fixation, i.e. presented in the left or right visual hemifield. <span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> differences in DA function were estimated through differential fMRI responses to positive vs. negative feedback in the left vs. right ventral striatum, and a computational approach was used to identify the neural correlates of PEs. Our results show that spatial biases favoring reward learning in the right (vs. left) hemifield were associated with increased reward responses in the left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> and relatively better neural encoding of PEs for stimuli presented in the right (vs. left) hemifield. These findings demonstrate that trait-like spatial biases implicate <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>-specific learning mechanisms, with individual differences between <span class="hlt">hemispheres</span> contributing to reinforcing spatial biases.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23423634','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23423634"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Shape</span>-changing shell-like structures.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pagitz, M; Bold, J</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>Plants such as Dionaea muscipula (Venus Flytrap) can change the <span class="hlt">shape</span> of their shell-like leaves by actively altering the cell pressures. These leaves are hydraulic actuators that do not require any complex controls and that possess an energy efficiency that is unmatched by natural or artificial muscles (Huber et al 1997 Proc. R. Soc. A 453 2185-205). We extend our previous work (Pagitz et al 2012 Bioinspir. Biomim. 7 016007) on pressure-actuated cellular structures by introducing a concept for <span class="hlt">shape</span>-changing shell-like structures that can significantly alter their Gaussian curvature. The potential of this concept is demonstrated by a <span class="hlt">hemispherical</span> shell that can reversibly change the sign of its Gaussian curvature. Furthermore, it is shown that a snap-through behaviour, similar to the one known from Dionaea muscipula, can be achieved by lowering the pressure in a single layer of cells.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/960607','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/960607"><span id="translatedtitle">Performance evaluation of booster materials in the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 in a <span class="hlt">hemispherical</span> wave breakout test</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hooks, Daniel E; Morris, John S; Hill, Larry G; Francois, Elizabeth</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>An explosive booster is normally required to initiate detonation in an insensitive high explosive (lHE). Booster materials must be ignitable by a conventional detonator and deliver sufficient energy and favorable pulse <span class="hlt">shape</span> to initiate the IHE charge. The explosive booster should be as insensitive as reasonably possible to maintain the overall safety margin of the explosive assembly. A <span class="hlt">hemispherical</span> wave breakout test termed the on ionskin test is one of the methods of testing the performance of booster materials in an initiation train assembly. There are several variations of this basic test which are known by other names. In this test, the wave breakout time-position history at the surface of a <span class="hlt">hemispherical</span> IHE acceptor charge is recorded, and the relative uniformity of breakout allows qualitative comparison between booster candidates and quantitative comparison of several metrics. The results of a series of onionskin experiments evaluating the performance of some new booster formulations in the triaminotrinitrobenzene (TA TB) -based plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 will be presented. The boosters were tested in an onionskin arrangement in which the booster pellet was cylindrical, and the tests were performed at a temperature of-55{sup o}C to emphasize variations in spreading performance. The modification from the traditional <span class="hlt">hemispherical</span> geometry facilitated efficient explosive fabrication and charge assembly, but the results indicate that this geometry was not ideal for several reasons. Despite the complications arising from geometry, promising performance was observed from booster formulations including 3,3' -diamino-4,4'azoxyfurazan.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JMiMi..25l5010I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JMiMi..25l5010I"><span id="translatedtitle">Fabrication of <span class="hlt">hemispherical</span> liquid encapsulated structures based on droplet molding</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ishizuka, Hiroki; Miki, Norihisa</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>We have developed and demonstrated a method for <span class="hlt">forming</span> spherical structures of a thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane encapsulating a liquid. Liquid encapsulation can enhance the performance of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices by providing deformability and improved dielectric properties. Parylene deposition and wafer bonding are applied to encapsulate liquid into a MEMS device. In parylene deposition, a parylene membrane is directly <span class="hlt">formed</span> onto a liquid droplet. However, since the parylene membrane is stiff, the membrane is fragile. Although wafer bonding can encapsulate liquid between two substrates, the surface of the fabricated structure is normally flat. We propose a new liquid encapsulation method by dispensing liquid droplets. At first, a 20 μl PDMS droplet is dispensed on ethylene glycol. A 70 μl glycerin droplet is dispensed into a PDMS casting solution layer. The droplet <span class="hlt">forms</span> a layer on heated ethylene glycol. Glycerin and ethylene glycol are chosen for their high boiling points. Additionally, a glycerin droplet is dispensed on the layer and surrounded by a thin PDMS casting solution film. The film is baked for 1 h at 75 °C. As the result, a structure encapsulating a liquid in a flexible PDMS membrane is obtained. We investigate the effects of the volume, surface tension, and guide thickness on the <span class="hlt">shape</span> of the <span class="hlt">formed</span> structures. We also evaluated the effect of the structure diameter on miniaturization. The structure can be adapted for various functions by changing the encapsulated liquid. We fabricated a stiffness-tunable structure by dispensing a magnetorheoligical fluid droplet with a stiffness that can be changed by an external magnetic field. We also confirmed that the proposed structure can produce stiffness differences that are distinguishable by humans.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015OptEn..54k1309S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015OptEn..54k1309S"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Shaping</span> propagation invariant laser beams</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Soskind, Michael; Soskind, Rose; Soskind, Yakov</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Propagation-invariant structured laser beams possess several unique properties and play an important role in various photonics applications. The majority of propagation invariant beams are produced in the <span class="hlt">form</span> of laser modes emanating from stable laser cavities. Therefore, their spatial structure is limited by the intracavity mode formation. We show that several types of anamorphic optical systems (AOSs) can be effectively employed to <span class="hlt">shape</span> laser beams into a variety of propagation invariant structured fields with different <span class="hlt">shapes</span> and phase distributions. We present a propagation matrix approach for designing AOSs and defining mode-matching conditions required for preserving propagation invariance of the output <span class="hlt">shaped</span> fields. The propagation matrix approach was selected, as it provides a more straightforward approach in designing AOSs for <span class="hlt">shaping</span> propagation-invariant laser beams than the alternative technique based on the Gouy phase evolution, especially in the case of multielement AOSs. Several practical configurations of optical systems that are suitable for <span class="hlt">shaping</span> input laser beams into a diverse variety of structured propagation invariant laser beams are also presented. The laser beam <span class="hlt">shaping</span> approach was applied by modeling propagation characteristics of several input laser beam types, including Hermite-Gaussian, Laguerre-Gaussian, and Ince-Gaussian structured field distributions. The influence of the Ince-Gaussian beam semifocal separation parameter and the azimuthal orientation between the input laser beams and the AOSs onto the resulting <span class="hlt">shape</span> of the propagation invariant laser beams is presented as well.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010Icar..206..691Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010Icar..206..691Z"><span id="translatedtitle">Distribution and evolution of scalloped terrain in the southern <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>, Mars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zanetti, Michael; Hiesinger, Harald; Reiss, Dennis; Hauber, Ernst; Neukum, Gerhard</p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>Scalloped depressions are a unique martian surface morphology found in the northern and southern <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> latitude-dependent dust and ice-rich surface mantles. These features exhibit a distinct asymmetric north-south slope profile, characterized by steep pole-facing scarps, flat floors and gentle equator-facing slopes. We examined High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) images of the southern <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> to determine their longitudinal distribution, which revealed that a majority of scalloped terrain is located in the region of the southern wall of the Hellas Basin and northern Malea Planum. A detailed map of this area was produced where scallops were found to contour the southern wall of the basin, and where the ice-rich mantle was seen to be thickest. Scalloped terrain is concentrated along the topographic highs near the Amphitrites and Peneus Paterae and areal extent and depth decreases with increasing depth into the basin. We also examined existing hypothesis for the formation and evolution of scalloped depressions using High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images and data from the Thermal Emission Imaging System-Infrared (THEMIS-IR) and the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). Our approach provides regional context for the development of scalloped terrains within the southern <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>, and offers detailed evidence of scallop depressions <span class="hlt">forming</span> around small cracks, presumably caused by thermal contraction. Morphometric measurements show that scalloped depressions can be as much as 40 m deep, with typical depths of between 10 and 20 m. Our observations of scallop formation and development in the southern <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> support a solar-insolation model proposed by previous researchers (e.g. [Morgenstern, A., Hauber, E., Reiss, D., van Gasselt, S., Grosse, G., Schirrmeister, L., 2007. J. Geophys. Res. 112, CiteID E06010; Lefort, A., Russell, P.S., Thomas, N., McEwen, A.S., Dundas, C.M., Kirk, R.L., 2009a. J. Geophys. Res. 114, E04005; Lefort, A</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003064.htm','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003064.htm"><span id="translatedtitle">Tooth - abnormal <span class="hlt">shape</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth <span class="hlt">shape</span>; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth <span class="hlt">shape</span>, tooth ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-11-03/pdf/2010-27695.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-11-03/pdf/2010-27695.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 67753 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Haitian <span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> Opportunity Through Partnership...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-11-03</p> <p>... of 2006 (``Haiti HOPE Act''). This request for comment is being made pursuant to the Paperwork...: Title: Haitian <span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> Opportunity through Partnership Encouragement (``Haiti HOPE'') Act of 2006... additional trade benefits to Haiti. This trade program, the Haitian <span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> Opportunity...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ChJME..27..595J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ChJME..27..595J"><span id="translatedtitle">Theoretical analysis and experimental verification on valve-less piezoelectric pump with <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>-segment bluff-body</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ji, Jing; Zhang, Jianhui; Xia, Qixiao; Wang, Shouyin; Huang, Jun; Zhao, Chunsheng</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Existing researches on no-moving part valves in valve-less piezoelectric pumps mainly concentrate on pipeline valves and chamber bottom valves, which leads to the complex structure and manufacturing process of pump channel and chamber bottom. Furthermore, position fixed valves with respect to the inlet and outlet also makes the adjustability and controllability of flow rate worse. In order to overcome these shortcomings, this paper puts forward a novel implantable structure of valve-less piezoelectric pump with <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>-segments in the pump chamber. Based on the theory of flow around bluff-body, the flow resistance on the spherical and round surface of <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>-segment is different when fluid flows through, and the macroscopic flow resistance differences thus <span class="hlt">formed</span> are also different. A novel valve-less piezoelectric pump with <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>-segment bluff-body (HSBB) is presented and designed. HSBB is the no-moving part valve. By the method of volume and momentum comparison, the stress on the bluff-body in the pump chamber is analyzed. The essential reason of unidirectional fluid pumping is expounded, and the flow rate formula is obtained. To verify the theory, a prototype is produced. By using the prototype, experimental research on the relationship between flow rate, pressure difference, voltage, and frequency has been carried out, which proves the correctness of the above theory. This prototype has six <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>-segments in the chamber filled with water, and the effective diameter of the piezoelectric bimorph is 30mm. The experiment result shows that the flow rate can reach 0.50 mL/s at the frequency of 6 Hz and the voltage of 110 V. Besides, the pressure difference can reach 26.2 mm H2O at the frequency of 6 Hz and the voltage of 160 V. This research proposes a valve-less piezoelectric pump with <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>-segment bluff-body, and its validity and feasibility is verified through theoretical analysis and experiment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22224074','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22224074"><span id="translatedtitle">ON THE STRENGTH OF THE <span class="hlt">HEMISPHERIC</span> RULE AND THE ORIGIN OF ACTIVE-REGION HELICITY</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wang, Y.-M.</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>Vector magnetograph and morphological observations have shown that the solar magnetic field tends to have negative (positive) helicity in the northern (southern) <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>, although only ∼60%-70% of active regions appear to obey this '<span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> rule'. In contrast, at least ∼80% of quiescent filaments and filament channels that <span class="hlt">form</span> during the decay of active regions follow the rule. We attribute this discrepancy to the difficulty in determining the helicity sign of newly emerged active regions, which are dominated by their current-free component; as the transverse field is canceled at the polarity inversion lines, however, the axial component becomes dominant there, allowing a more reliable determination of the original active-region chirality. We thus deduce that the <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> rule is far stronger than generally assumed, and cannot be explained by stochastic processes. Earlier studies have shown that the twist associated with the axial tilt of active regions is too small to account for the observed helicity; here, both tilt and twist are induced by the Coriolis force acting on the diverging flow in the emerging flux tube. However, in addition to this east-west expansion about the apex of the loop, each of its legs must expand continually in cross section during its rise through the convection zone, thereby acquiring a further twist through the Coriolis force. Since this transverse pressure effect is not limited by drag or tension forces, the final twist depends mainly on the rise time, and may be large enough to explain the observed active-region helicity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19980228304','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19980228304"><span id="translatedtitle">Measurements of Total <span class="hlt">Hemispherical</span> Emissivity of Several Stably Oxidized Metals and Some Refractory Oxide Coatings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Wade, William R.</p> <p>1959-01-01</p> <p>A description of the apparatus and methods used for obtaining total <span class="hlt">hemispherical</span> emissivity is presented, and data for several stably oxidized metals are included. The metals which were tested included type 347 stainless steel, tungsten, and Haynes alloys B, C, X, and 25. No values of emissivity were obtained for tungsten or Haynes alloy B because of the nature of the oxides produced. The refractory oxide coatings tested were flame-sprayed alumina and zirconia. The results of the investigation indicate that strongly adherent, oxidized surfaces of a high stable emissivity can be produced on type 347 stainless steel for which the total <span class="hlt">hemispherical</span> emissivity varied from 0.87 to 0.91 for temperatures from 600 F to 2,000 F. For this same temperature range, the Haynes alloys tested showed values of total <span class="hlt">hemispherical</span> emissivity from 0.90 to 0.96 for alloy C, from 0.85 to 0.88 for alloy X, and from 0.85 to 0.89 for alloy 25. Haynes alloy B and tungsten <span class="hlt">formed</span> nonadherent oxides at elevated temperatures and, therefore, stable emissivities were not obtained. The results obtained for the flame-sprayed ceramics (alumina and zirconia) showed considerably higher values of total emissivity than those measured for coatings applied by other methods. Emissivity values ranging from 0.69 to 0.44 for aluminum oxide and from 0.62 to 0.44 for zirconium oxide were measured for temperatures from 800 F to 2,000 F.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhDT.......204L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhDT.......204L"><span id="translatedtitle">A New Sheet Metal <span class="hlt">Forming</span> System Based on Incremental Punching</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Luo, Yuanxin</p> <p></p> <p>Stamping is one of the most commonly used manufacturing processes. Everyday, millions of parts are <span class="hlt">formed</span> by this process. The conventional stamping is to <span class="hlt">form</span> a part in one or several operations with a press machine and a set/sets of dies. It is very efficient but is not cost effective for small batch production parts and prototypes as the dies are expensive and time consuming to make. Recently, with the increasing demands for low-volume and customer-made products, a die-less <span class="hlt">forming</span> method, Incremental Sheet Metal <span class="hlt">Forming</span> (ISMF), has become one of the leading R&D topics in the industry. ISMF uses a small generic tool to apply a sequence of operations along the given path to deform the sheet incrementally. These small deformations accumulate to <span class="hlt">form</span> the final <span class="hlt">shape</span> of the part. As a result, different parts can be made by the same setup. Despite of some 30 years of research and development, however, ISMF technology is still premature for industrial applications due to the following reasons: The accuracy of the part is limited; the surface roughness is poor; and the productivity is low. This motivates the presented research. In this research, a new incremental <span class="hlt">forming</span> system based on incremental punching is designed and built. The system consists of a 3-axes CNC platform, a high speed hydraulic cylinder with a <span class="hlt">hemispherical</span> <span class="hlt">forming</span> tool, and a PC-based CNC control system. The hydraulic system provides the <span class="hlt">forming</span> force to deform the sheet metal with constant stokes, while the CNC system positions the part. When <span class="hlt">forming</span> a part, the <span class="hlt">forming</span> tool punches the sheet metal along the given contour of the part punch by punch; when one layer of the part is completed, the <span class="hlt">forming</span> tool moves down to the next layer; and the process is finished till all layers are completed. The CNC control system works with standard NC code, and hence, is easy to use. In order to ensure the desirable performance of the machine, dynamic analysis of the machine is necessary. The analysis is</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4083253','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4083253"><span id="translatedtitle">Do temporal processes underlie left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> dominance in speech perception?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Scott, Sophie K; McGettigan, Carolyn</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>It is not unusual to find it stated as a fact that the left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> is specialized for the processing of rapid, or temporal aspects of sound, and that the dominance of the left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> in the perception of speech can be a consequence of this specialisation. In this review we explore the history of this claim and assess the weight of this assumption. We will demonstrate that instead of a supposed sensitivity of the left temporal lobe for the acoustic properties of speech, it is the right temporal lobe which shows a marked preference for certain properties of sounds, for example longer durations, or variations in pitch. We finish by outlining some alternative factors that contribute to the left lateralization of speech perception. PMID:24125574</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016DPS....4821006B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016DPS....4821006B"><span id="translatedtitle">The Energetics of Transient Eddies in the Martian Northern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Battalio, Joseph Michael; Szunyogh, Istvan; Lemmon, Mark T.</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>The energetics of northern <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> transient waves in the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation is analyzed. Three periods between the fall and spring equinoxes (Ls=200°-230°, 255°-285°, and 330°-360°) during three Mars Years are selected to exemplify the fall, winter, and spring wave activity. Fall and spring eddy energetics is similar with some inter-annual and inter-seasonal variability, but winter eddy kinetic energy and its transport are strongly reduced in intensity as a result of the solsticial pause in eddy activity. Barotropic energy conversion acts as a sink of eddy kinetic energy throughout the northern <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> eddy period with little reduction in amplitude during the solsticial pause. Baroclinic energy conversion acts as a source in fall and spring but disappears during the winter period as a result of the stabilized vertical shear profile of the westerly jet around winter solstice.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005PhRvE..71a6138E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005PhRvE..71a6138E"><span id="translatedtitle">Agents with left and right dominant <span class="hlt">hemispheres</span> and quantum statistics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ezhov, Alexandr A.; Khrennikov, Andrei Yu.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>We present a multiagent model illustrating the emergence of two different quantum statistics, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac, in a friendly population of individuals with the right-brain dominance and in a competitive population of individuals with the left-brain <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> dominance, correspondingly. Doing so, we adduce the arguments that Lefebvre’s “algebra of conscience” can be used in a natural way to describe decision-making strategies of agents simulating people with different brain dominance. One can suggest that the emergence of the two principal statistical distributions is able to illustrate different types of society organization and also to be used in order to simulate market phenomena and psychic disorders, when a switching of <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> dominance is involved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20457937','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20457937"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Hemispherical</span> anisotropic patterns of the Earth's inner core.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mattesini, Maurizio; Belonoshko, Anatoly B; Buforn, Elisa; Ramírez, María; Simak, Sergei I; Udías, Agustín; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Ahuja, Rajeev</p> <p>2010-05-25</p> <p>It has been shown that the Earth's inner core has an axisymmetric anisotropic structure with seismic waves traveling approximately 3% faster along polar paths than along equatorial directions. <span class="hlt">Hemispherical</span> anisotropic patterns of the solid Earth's core are rather complex, and the commonly used hexagonal-close-packed iron phase might be insufficient to account for seismological observations. We show that the data we collected are in good agreement with the presence of two anisotropically specular east and west core <span class="hlt">hemispheres</span>. The detected travel-time anomalies can only be disclosed by a lattice-preferred orientation of a body-centered-cubic iron aggregate, having a fraction of their [111] crystal axes parallel to the Earth's rotation axis. This is compelling evidence for the presence of a body-centered-cubic Fe phase at the top of the Earth's inner core. PMID:20457937</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21204307','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21204307"><span id="translatedtitle">Left face matching bias: right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> dominance or scanning habits?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Megreya, Ahmed M; Havard, Catriona</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>A large body of work report a leftward bias in face processing. However, it is not clear whether this leftward bias purely reflects the dominance of the right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> or is influenced by scanning habits developed by reading directions. Here, we report two experiments examining how well native readers of right to left Arabic scripts (Egyptians) could match (for identity) a target face that appeared with a companion to a line-up of 10 faces. There was a significant advantage for matching faces that appeared on the left. However, Experiment 2 found that the magnitude of this left face matching bias was almost three times weaker than the magnitude of the leftward bias shown by native readers of left to right English scripts (British). Accordingly, we suggest that the right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> dominance for face processing underlies the leftward face perception bias, but with the interaction of scanning habits.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24125574','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24125574"><span id="translatedtitle">Do temporal processes underlie left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> dominance in speech perception?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Scott, Sophie K; McGettigan, Carolyn</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>It is not unusual to find it stated as a fact that the left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> is specialized for the processing of rapid, or temporal aspects of sound, and that the dominance of the left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> in the perception of speech can be a consequence of this specialization. In this review we explore the history of this claim and assess the weight of this assumption. We will demonstrate that instead of a supposed sensitivity of the left temporal lobe for the acoustic properties of speech, it is the right temporal lobe which shows a marked preference for certain properties of sounds, for example longer durations, or variations in pitch. We finish by outlining some alternative factors that contribute to the left lateralization of speech perception. PMID:24125574</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMDI22A..01M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMDI22A..01M"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Hemispherical</span> Anisotropic Patterns of the Earth's Inner Core</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mattesini, M.; Belonoshko, A. B.; Buforn, E.; Ramirez, M.; Simak, S. I.; Udias, A.; Mao, H.; Ahuja, R.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>It has been shown that the Earth's inner core has an axisymmetric anisotropic structure with seismic waves travelling ˜3% faster along polar paths than along equatorial directions. However, <span class="hlt">hemispherical</span> anisotropic patterns of solid Earth's core are rather complex, and the commonly used hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) iron phase might be insufficient to account for seismological observations. We show that the data we collected are in good agreement with the presence of two anisotropically specular east and west core <span class="hlt">hemispheres</span>. The detected travel-time anomalies can only be disclosed by a lattice preferred orientation of a body-centered-cubic iron aggregate (bcc), having a fraction of their [111] crystal axes parallel to the Earth's rotation axis. This is a compelling evidence for the presence of a body-centered-cubic Fe phase at the top 100 km of the Earth's inner core.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23911943','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23911943"><span id="translatedtitle">FOXP2 variation modulates functional <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> asymmetries for speech perception.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ocklenburg, Sebastian; Arning, Larissa; Gerding, Wanda M; Epplen, Jörg T; Güntürkün, Onur; Beste, Christian</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>Left-<span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> language dominance is a well-known characteristic of the human language system, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this crucial feature of vocal communication are still far from being understood. The forkhead box P2 gene FOXP2, which has been related to speech development, constitutes an interesting candidate gene in this regard. Therefore, the present study was aimed at investigating effects of variation in FOXP2 on individual language dominance. To this end, we used a dichotic listening and a visual half-field task in a sample of 456 healthy adults. The FOXP2 SNPs rs2396753 and rs12533005 were found to be significantly associated with the distribution of correct answers on the dichotic listening task. These results show that variation in FOXP2 may contribute to the inter-individual variability in <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> asymmetries for speech perception.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/910808','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/910808"><span id="translatedtitle">Film Boiling on Downward Quenching <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> of Varying Sizes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Chan S. Kim; Kune Y. Suh; Joy L. Rempe; Fan-Bill Cheung; Sang B. Kim</p> <p>2004-04-01</p> <p>Film boiling heat transfer coefficients for a downward-facing <span class="hlt">hemispherical</span> surface are measured from the quenching tests in DELTA (Downward-boiling Experimental Laminar Transition Apparatus). Two test sections are made of copper to maintain low Biot numbers. The outer diameters of the <span class="hlt">hemispheres</span> are 120 mm and 294 mm, respectively. The thickness of all the test sections is 30 mm. The effect of diameter on film boiling heat transfer is quantified utilizing results obtained from the test sections. The measured data are compared with the numerical predictions from laminar film boiling analysis. The measured heat transfer coefficients are found to be greater than those predicted by the conventional laminar flow theory on account of the interfacial wavy motion incurred by the Helmholtz instability. Incorporation of the wavy motion model considerably improves the agreement between the experimental and numerical results in terms of heat transfer coefficient. In addition, the interfacial wavy motion and the quenching process are visualized through a digital camera.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011noao.prop..161Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011noao.prop..161Z"><span id="translatedtitle">Hunting the Coolest Substellar Dwarfs in the Northern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zuckerman, Ben; Rodriguez, David; Melis, Carl; Song, Inseok</p> <p>2011-02-01</p> <p>The few lowest mass substellar objects discovered in previous imaging surveys are found to have large semi-major axes, typically hundreds of AU. We show that at such large separations and toward old stars one has the best chance to detect the coolest dwarfs, with effective temperatures of <=500 K (the so-called ``Y dwarfs''). Effective temperatures of 500 K represent a region of temperature space that has yet to be probed. As such, the discovery of such cool objects will illuminate their physics and chemistry and will provide observational data to test planetary models. To discover one or more Y dwarfs, we are proposing to continue our survey with FLAMINGOS of northern <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> white dwarfs with ages >2 Gyr that lie within 25 pc of Earth. These observations will complement our southern <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> survey with ISPI and NEWFIRM at CTIO.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2293197','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2293197"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> laterality on color-information processing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Berry, L H</p> <p>1990-12-01</p> <p>This study investigated the interaction between <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> laterality and recognition memory for pictures presented in three different color modes: realistic, nonrealistic, and monochrome (black and white). Stimulus materials were 180 scenic slides (120 stimulus and 60 distractor) produced in three color modes. Materials were presented to a group of 26 graduate volunteers via the list learning procedure for a duration of 500 msec. each. During one-half of the materials an arithmetic masking task was performed to inhibit left-<span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> processing. Signal-detection parameters, compared in a 2 x 3 repeated-measures design, produced significant interactions for the probability of hits, error, and d' measures. Post hoc tests indicated significantly higher hit probability and d' scores for nonrealistic color and higher error rates for realistic color under the right localized condition. Findings suggest that color processing is bilocational, realistic information is processed more deeply than nonrealistic, and nonrealistic color supplies unique color codes for storage and retrieval.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7066216','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7066216"><span id="translatedtitle">The effects of orography on midlatitude Northern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> dry climates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Broccoli, A.J.; Manabe, S. )</p> <p>1992-11-01</p> <p>The role of mountains in maintaining extensive midlatitude arid regions in the Northern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> was studied utilizing simulations from the GFDL GMC with and without orography. In the integration with mountains, dry climates were simulated over the interior of North America and central Asia, in good agreement with the observed climate. The results from these experiments indicate that midlatitude dryness is due largely to the existence of orography. 38 refs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002ESASP.500..809T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002ESASP.500..809T"><span id="translatedtitle">A NEO survey in the southern <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> "BUSCA"</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tancredi, Gonzalo; Sosa, Andrea; Acosta, Edgardo; Ceretta, Alberto</p> <p>2002-11-01</p> <p>The efforts to discover NEOs have been concentrated up to now in the Northern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> where there are already 6 big NEO surveys functioning. The Observatorio Astronómico "Los Molinos" got a grant to install a new observatory fully dedicated to the NEO survey in the countryside of Uruguay (South America). The new telescope is expected to be operational in early 2002. The program is named "Búsqueda Uruguaya de Supernovas, Cometas y Asteroides - BUSCA".</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3651512','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3651512"><span id="translatedtitle">Shifting Attentional Priorities: Control of Spatial Attention through <span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> Competition</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Szczepanski, Sara M.; Kastner, Sabine</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Regions of frontal and posterior parietal cortex are known to control the allocation of spatial attention across the visual field. However, the neural mechanisms underlying attentional control in the intact human brain remain unclear, with some studies supporting a hemispatial theory emphasizing a dominant function of the right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> and others supporting an interhemispheric competition theory. We previously found neural evidence to support the latter account, in which topographically organized frontoparietal areas each generate a spatial bias, or “attentional weight,” toward the contralateral hemifield, with the sum of the weights constituting the overall bias that can be exerted across visual space. Here, we used a multimodal approach consisting of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of spatial attention signals, behavioral measures of spatial bias, and fMRI-guided single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to causally test this interhemispheric competition account. Across the group of fMRI subjects, we found substantial individual differences in the strengths of the frontoparietal attentional weights in each <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>, which predicted subjects’ respective behavioral preferences when allocating spatial attention, as measured by a landmark task. Using TMS to interfere with attentional processing within specific topographic frontoparietal areas, we then demonstrated that the attentional weights of individual subjects, and thus their spatial attention behavior, could be predictably shifted toward one visual field or the other, depending on the site of interference. The results of our multimodal approach, combined with an emphasis on neural and behavioral individual differences, provide compelling evidence that spatial attention is controlled through competitive interactions between <span class="hlt">hemispheres</span> rather than a dominant right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> in the intact human brain. PMID:23516306</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21528369','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21528369"><span id="translatedtitle">Differential diagnosis of cerebral <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> pathology: multimodal approach.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Moritani, T; Smoker, W R K; Lee, H K; Sato, Y</p> <p>2011-06-01</p> <p>This article gives a comprehensive review and illustrations of the imaging features of various pathological conditions and clinical syndromes associated with cerebral <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> involvement. The various conditions are described and defined to provide a basis for the differential diagnostics. The hypotheses relating to the pathology of the various syndromes are discussed with special emphasis on excitotoxic mechanisms for explaining the subsequent cerebral hemiatrophy. PMID:21528369</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AIPC..599..570C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AIPC..599..570C"><span id="translatedtitle">Very high energy gamma ray observations of southern <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> AGNs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chadwick, P. M.; Lyons, K.; McComb, T. J. L.; Orford, K. J.; Osborne, J. L.; Rayner, S. M.; Shaw, S. E.; Turver, K. E.</p> <p>2001-12-01</p> <p>A range of AGNs visible from the Southern <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> has been observed with the University of Durham Mark 6 very high energy gamma ray telescope. Results of observations of 1ES 0323+022, PKS 0829+046, 1ES 1101-232, Cen A, PKS 1514-24, RKJ 10578-275, 1ES 2316-423, PKS 2005-489 and PKS 0548-322 are presented. .</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4157552','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4157552"><span id="translatedtitle">Task specific inter-<span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> coupling in human subthalamic nuclei</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Darvas, Felix; Hebb, Adam O.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Cortical networks and quantitative measures of connectivity are integral to the study of brain function. Despite lack of direct connections between left and right subthalamic nuclei (STN), there are apparent physiological connections. During clinical examination of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), this connectivity is exploited to enhance signs of PD, yet our understanding of this connectivity is limited. We hypothesized that movement leads to synchronization of neural oscillations in bilateral STN, and we implemented phase coherence, a measure of phase-locking between cortical sites in a narrow frequency band, to demonstrate this synchronization. We analyzed task specific phase synchronization and causality between left and right STN local field potentials (LFPs) recorded from both <span class="hlt">hemispheres</span> simultaneously during a cued movement task in four subjects with PD who underwent Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) surgery. We used a data driven approach to determine inter-<span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> channel pairs and frequencies with a task specific increase in phase locking.We found significant phase locking between <span class="hlt">hemispheres</span> in alpha frequency (8–12 Hz) in all subjects concurrent with movement of either hand. In all subjects, phase synchronization increased over baseline upon or prior to hand movement onset and lasted until the motion ceased. Left and right hand movement showed similar patterns. Granger causality (GC) at the phase-locking frequencies between synchronized electrodes revealed a unidirectional causality from right to left STN regardless of which side was moved.Phase synchronization across <span class="hlt">hemispheres</span> between basal ganglia supports existence of a bilateral network having lateralized regions of specialization for motor processing. Our results suggest this bilateral network is activated by a unilateral motor program. Understanding phase synchronization in natural brain functions is critical to development of future DBS systems that augment goal directed behavioral</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8047248','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8047248"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> representation of the central retina of commissurotomized subjects.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sugishita, M; Hamilton, C R; Sakuma, I; Hemmi, I</p> <p>1994-04-01</p> <p>It is controversial whether a stimulus projected within 1 to 3 degrees from the boundary between the right and left hemiretina is transmitted to only one cerebral <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> or to both cerebral <span class="hlt">hemispheres</span>. In order to resolve this issue, letter- and word-stimuli were presented for 200 msec with a new type of tachistoscope, called the fundus tachistoscope, in and about the central retina, (i.e. fovea, 1.2 degrees in horizontal diameter) of the right eyes of two commissurotomized subjects (N.G. and A.A.). During stimulus presentation the subjects were attempting to fixate a fixation target. The fundus tachistoscope combined with image analysis of the fundus enables us to measure the position of the stimulus on the retina, relative to the foveal center, as well as whether or not the eye moved during stimulus presentation. The results indicate that the region of the right (temporal) hemiretina represented by both <span class="hlt">hemispheres</span> in letter processing, if it exists, was estimated as less than 0.6 degrees from the foveal center. The two subjects frequently (27% in N.G. and 46% in A.A.) fixated the fixation target eccentrically, i.e. with a retinal point other than the foveal center, during fixation, namely stimulus presentation. Their eccentric fixations were small with magnitude almost all falling between 1.35 degrees right and 1.25 degrees left of the foveal center. It is therefore recommended that letter-stimuli be presented at least 2.0 degrees from the foveal center in ordinary tachistoscopic studies of cerebral <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> differences. Eye movements, which varied in 0.11 degrees and 1.43 degrees horizontally, occurred in about 8% of all the trials during fixation. On the average of the two subjects, the eye movements caused or worsened eccentric fixation in only about one third of the trials, and corrected eccentric fixation in about two thirds of the trials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMPP53C2028L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMPP53C2028L"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> Symmetries of Plio-Pleistocene Surface Ocean Conditions: Insights from Southern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> ODP Sites 1125 and 1088</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lawrence, K. T.; Peterson, L.; Kelly, C.; Miller, H.; Seidenstein, J.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>For decades, most studies of Plio-Pleistocene climate and of the transition from the warmth of the Pliocene to the colder and more variable conditions of the Pleistocene have focused solely on northern <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> climate processes and responses. Here, we explore the southern <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> response to this major climate transition by documenting ocean surface conditions at Ocean Drilling Program Sites 1125 (42οS, 178οW, 1360m) and 1088 (40οS, 15οE, 2082m) through the Plio-Pleistocene. Secular trends in alkenone-derived sea surface temperature (SST) records indicate that these mid-latitude southern <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> sites cooled ~3-4οC over the past 3 Myrs, a magnitude comparable to sites located at similar latitudes in both the North Atlantic and North Pacific. This observation suggests that contraction of the low latitude warm pool was <span class="hlt">hemispherically</span> symmetric. Our highly resolved (3 kyr resolution) Site 1125 SST record bears considerable structural similarity to SST records from nearby site 1123 (42οS,171οW) as well as sites 846 (3οS, 91οW) in the eastern equatorial Pacific and U1313 (41οN, 33οW) in the North Atlantic. Most of these SST records are dominated by 100k power and contain strong secondary 41k peaks throughout the past 3 million years. North Atlantic site U1313 is the exception, mirroring the shift in dominant periodicity from 41k to 100k associated with the mid-Pleistocene transition, that has long been observed in benthic oxygen isotope records. Finally, in southern <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> SST records as well as at site U1313 from the north Atlantic we observe weak precessional power that is not evident in benthic oxygen isotope record. These results suggest a fairly <span class="hlt">hemispherically</span>-coordinated response of ocean surface temperature to changing global climate conditions during the Plio-Pleistocene in terms of both secular trends and dominant orbital frequencies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4709093','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4709093"><span id="translatedtitle">Post-Stroke Longitudinal Alterations of Inter-<span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> Correlation and <span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> Dominance in Mouse Pre-Motor Cortex</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Panarese, Alessandro; Alia, Claudia; Micera, Silvestro; Caleo, Matteo; Di Garbo, Angelo</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Purpose Limited restoration of function is known to occur spontaneously after an ischemic injury to the primary motor cortex. Evidence suggests that Pre-Motor Areas (PMAs) may “take over” control of the disrupted functions. However, little is known about functional reorganizations in PMAs. Forelimb movements in mice can be driven by two cortical regions, Caudal and Rostral Forelimb Areas (CFA and RFA), generally accepted as primary motor and pre-motor cortex, respectively. Here, we examined longitudinal changes in functional coupling between the two RFAs following unilateral photothrombotic stroke in CFA (mm from Bregma: +0.5 anterior, +1.25 lateral). Methods Local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded from the RFAs of both <span class="hlt">hemispheres</span> in freely moving injured and naïve mice. Neural signals were acquired at 9, 16 and 23 days after surgery (sub-acute period in stroke animals) through one bipolar electrode per <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> placed in the center of RFA, with a ground screw over the occipital bone. LFPs were pre-processed through an efficient method of artifact removal and analysed through: spectral,cross-correlation, mutual information and Granger causality analysis. Results Spectral analysis demonstrated an early decrease (day 9) in the alpha band power in both the RFAs. In the late sub-acute period (days 16 and 23), inter-<span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> functional coupling was reduced in ischemic animals, as shown by a decrease in the cross-correlation and mutual information measures. Within the gamma and delta bands, correlation measures were already reduced at day 9. Granger analysis, used as a measure of the symmetry of the inter-<span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> causal connectivity, showed a less balanced activity in the two RFAs after stroke, with more frequent oscillations of <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> dominance. Conclusions These results indicate robust electrophysiological changes in PMAs after stroke. Specifically, we found alterations in transcallosal connectivity, with reduced inter-<span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> functional</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/988699','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/988699"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Shape</span> memory system with integrated actuation using embedded particles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Buckley, Patrick R.; Maitland, Duncan J.</p> <p>2009-09-22</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material with integrated actuation using embedded particles. One embodiment provides a <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material apparatus comprising a <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material body and magnetic pieces in the <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material body. Another embodiment provides a method of actuating a device to perform an activity on a subject comprising the steps of positioning a <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material body in a desired position with regard to the subject, the <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material body capable of being <span class="hlt">formed</span> in a specific primary <span class="hlt">shape</span>, reformed into a secondary stable <span class="hlt">shape</span>, and controllably actuated to recover the specific primary <span class="hlt">shape</span>; including pieces in the <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material body; and actuating the <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material body using the pieces causing the <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material body to be controllably actuated to recover the specific primary <span class="hlt">shape</span> and perform the activity on the subject.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1129070','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1129070"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Shape</span> memory system with integrated actuation using embedded particles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Buckley, Patrick R; Maitland, Duncan J</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material with integrated actuation using embedded particles. One embodiment provides a <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material apparatus comprising a <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material body and magnetic pieces in the <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material body. Another embodiment provides a method of actuating a device to perform an activity on a subject comprising the steps of positioning a <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material body in a desired position with regard to the subject, the <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material body capable of being <span class="hlt">formed</span> in a specific primary <span class="hlt">shape</span>, reformed into a secondary stable <span class="hlt">shape</span>, and controllably actuated to recover the specific primary <span class="hlt">shape</span>; including pieces in the <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material body; and actuating the <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material body using the pieces causing the <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material body to be controllably actuated to recover the specific primary <span class="hlt">shape</span> and perform the activity on the subject.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1041259','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1041259"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Shape</span> memory system with integrated actuation using embedded particles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Buckley, Patrick R.; Maitland, Duncan J.</p> <p>2012-05-29</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material with integrated actuation using embedded particles. One embodiment provides a <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material apparatus comprising a <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material body and magnetic pieces in the <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material body. Another embodiment provides a method of actuating a device to perform an activity on a subject comprising the steps of positioning a <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material body in a desired position with regard to the subject, the <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material body capable of being <span class="hlt">formed</span> in a specific primary <span class="hlt">shape</span>, reformed into a secondary stable <span class="hlt">shape</span>, and controllably actuated to recover the specific primary <span class="hlt">shape</span>; including pieces in the <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material body; and actuating the <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material body using the pieces causing the <span class="hlt">shape</span> memory material body to be controllably actuated to recover the specific primary <span class="hlt">shape</span> and perform the activity on the subject.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19720000025','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19720000025"><span id="translatedtitle">Simple method for <span class="hlt">forming</span> thin-wall pressure vessels</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Erickson, A. L.; Guist, L. R.</p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>Application of internal hydrostatic pressure to seam-welded circular cylindrical tanks having corner-welded, flat, circular ends <span class="hlt">forms</span> large thin-walled high quality tanks. <span class="hlt">Form</span> limits expansion of cylindrical portion of final tank while <span class="hlt">hemispherical</span> ends develop freely; no external <span class="hlt">form</span> or restraint is required to fabricate spherical tanks.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14687873','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14687873"><span id="translatedtitle">Digit length pattern in schizophrenia suggests disturbed prenatal <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> lateralization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Arató, Mihaly; Frecska, Ede; Beck, Cindy; An, Mary; Kiss, Huba</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>The differentiation of the human brain is triggered by sexual steroid hormones in the fetus. The development of both the urogenital system and the appendicular skeleton are under common control by the HOX genes. Generally men have longer ring fingers than index fingers, whereas in women these fingers are close to equal. The inborn digit pattern may reflect fetal estrogen/androgen influences on <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> brain specialization. Reduced <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> asymmetry has been found in schizophrenia. Gender differences in schizophrenia also suggest a possible endocrine component in the complex pathogenesis of the illness. To test this hypothesis the authors have measured the relative digit lengths of patients with schizophrenia and healthy comparison subjects. The distance of the tip of the index and ring finger was measured from the tip of the third digit in 80 male and 80 female, right-handed patients with DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia and in 80 right-handed healthy comparison men and women. Schizophrenic men and women showed a more "feminine" phenotype of the index and ring fingers in both hands than same-sex controls. This finding implies that low fetal androgen/estrogen ratio may have a predisposing role in the development of schizophrenia and points toward involvement of endocrine factors in the disturbed <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> lateralization attributed to the illness. PMID:14687873</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26952051','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26952051"><span id="translatedtitle">Role of brain <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> dominance in anticipatory postural control strategies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cioncoloni, David; Rosignoli, Deborah; Feurra, Matteo; Rossi, Simone; Bonifazi, Marco; Rossi, Alessandro; Mazzocchio, Riccardo</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>Most of the cerebral functions are asymmetrically represented in the two <span class="hlt">hemispheres</span>. Moreover, dexterity and coordination of the distal segment of the dominant limbs depend on cortico-motor lateralization. In this study, we investigated whether postural control may be also considered a lateralized <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> brain function. To this aim, 15 young subjects were tested in standing position by measuring center of pressure (COP) shifts along the anteroposterior axis (COP-Y) during dynamic posturography before and after continuous Theta Burst Stimulation (cTBS) intervention applied to the dominant or non-dominant M1 hand area as well as to the vertex. We show that when subjects were expecting a forward platform translation, the COP-Y was positioned significantly backward or forward after dominant or non-dominant M1 stimulation, respectively. We postulate that cTBS applied on M1 may have disrupted the functional connectivity between intra- and interhemispheric areas implicated in the anticipatory control of postural stability. This study suggests a functional asymmetry between the two homologous primary motor areas, with the dominant <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> playing a critical role in the selection of the appropriate postural control strategy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4650511','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4650511"><span id="translatedtitle">Obliquity Control On Southern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> Climate During The Last Glacial</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Fogwill, C.J.; Turney, C.S.M.; Hutchinson, D.K.; Taschetto, A.S.; England, M.H.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Recent paleoclimate reconstructions have challenged the traditional view that Northern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> insolation and associated feedbacks drove synchronous global climate and ice-sheet volume during the last glacial cycle. Here we focus on the response of the Patagonian Ice Sheet, and demonstrate that its maximum expansion culminated at 28,400 ± 500 years before present (28.4 ± 0.5 ka), more than 5,000 years before the minima in 65°N summer insolation and the formally-defined Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 21,000 ± 2,000 years before present. To investigate the potential drivers of this early LGM (eLGM), we simulate the effects of orbital changes using a suite of climate models incorporating prescribed and evolving sea-ice anomalies. Our analyses suggest that Antarctic sea-ice expansion at 28.5 ka altered the location and intensity of the Southern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> storm track, triggering regional cooling over Patagonia of 5°C that extends across the wider mid-southern latitudes. In contrast, at the LGM, continued sea-ice expansion reduced regional temperature and precipitation further, effectively starving the ice sheet and resulting in reduced glacial expansion. Our findings highlight the dominant role that orbital changes can play in driving Southern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> glacial climate via the sensitivity of mid-latitude regions to changes in Antarctic sea-ice extent. PMID:26115344</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26952051','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26952051"><span id="translatedtitle">Role of brain <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> dominance in anticipatory postural control strategies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cioncoloni, David; Rosignoli, Deborah; Feurra, Matteo; Rossi, Simone; Bonifazi, Marco; Rossi, Alessandro; Mazzocchio, Riccardo</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>Most of the cerebral functions are asymmetrically represented in the two <span class="hlt">hemispheres</span>. Moreover, dexterity and coordination of the distal segment of the dominant limbs depend on cortico-motor lateralization. In this study, we investigated whether postural control may be also considered a lateralized <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> brain function. To this aim, 15 young subjects were tested in standing position by measuring center of pressure (COP) shifts along the anteroposterior axis (COP-Y) during dynamic posturography before and after continuous Theta Burst Stimulation (cTBS) intervention applied to the dominant or non-dominant M1 hand area as well as to the vertex. We show that when subjects were expecting a forward platform translation, the COP-Y was positioned significantly backward or forward after dominant or non-dominant M1 stimulation, respectively. We postulate that cTBS applied on M1 may have disrupted the functional connectivity between intra- and interhemispheric areas implicated in the anticipatory control of postural stability. This study suggests a functional asymmetry between the two homologous primary motor areas, with the dominant <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> playing a critical role in the selection of the appropriate postural control strategy. PMID:26952051</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22385142','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22385142"><span id="translatedtitle">Sex and <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> differences in facial invariants extraction.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Godard, Ornella; Fiori, Nicole</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This present study investigates sex differences in <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> cooperation during a facial identity matching task. The method used was a divided visual field paradigm in which the probe face was neutral or expressive and the target face was always neutral. Probe and target faces were presented both unilaterally and sequentially. A total of 28 right-handed women and 32 right-handed men participated in this study. The results confirm the women's advantage in face recognition and reveal symmetrical interhemispheric cooperation in women only. In men, processing time was faster when the probe face appeared in the left visual field-and encoded by the right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>-and the target in the right visual field-projected to the left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>-compared to the reverse direction. Interestingly, the data also show that women were not influenced by the expression of the probe face when matching identity, whereas men were always faster when the probe face was neutral, like the target, than when it was expressive. These results are discussed in light of Bruce and Young's (1986) model, and in terms of view-dependent and view-independent processes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25761654','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25761654"><span id="translatedtitle">Learning-related brain <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> dominance in sleeping songbirds.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Moorman, Sanne; Gobes, Sharon M H; van de Kamp, Ferdinand C; Zandbergen, Matthijs A; Bolhuis, Johan J</p> <p>2015-03-12</p> <p>There are striking behavioural and neural parallels between the acquisition of speech in humans and song learning in songbirds. In humans, language-related brain activation is mostly lateralised to the left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>. During language acquisition in humans, brain <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> lateralisation develops as language proficiency increases. Sleep is important for the formation of long-term memory, in humans as well as in other animals, including songbirds. Here, we measured neuronal activation (as the expression pattern of the immediate early gene ZENK) during sleep in juvenile zebra finch males that were still learning their songs from a tutor. We found that during sleep, there was learning-dependent lateralisation of spontaneous neuronal activation in the caudomedial nidopallium (NCM), a secondary auditory brain region that is involved in tutor song memory, while there was right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> dominance of neuronal activation in HVC (used as a proper name), a premotor nucleus that is involved in song production and sensorimotor learning. Specifically, in the NCM, birds that imitated their tutors well were left dominant, while poor imitators were right dominant, similar to language-proficiency related lateralisation in humans. Given the avian-human parallels, lateralised neural activation during sleep may also be important for speech and language acquisition in human infants.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ClDy..tmp..304A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ClDy..tmp..304A"><span id="translatedtitle">Are Karakoram temperatures out of phase compared to <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> trends?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Asad, Fayaz; Zhu, Haifeng; Zhang, Hui; Liang, Eryuan; Muhammad, Sher; Farhan, Suhaib Bin; Hussain, Iqtidar; Wazir, Muhammad Atif; Ahmed, Moinuddin; Esper, Jan</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>In contrast to a global retreating trend, glaciers in the Karakoram showed stability and/or mass gaining during the past decades. This "Karakoram Anomaly" has been assumed to result from an out-of-phase temperature trend compared to <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> scales. However, the short instrumental observations from the Karakoram valley bottoms do not support a quantitative assessment of long-term temperature trends in this high mountain area. Here, we presented a new April-July temperature reconstruction from the Karakoram region in northern Pakistan based on a high elevation (~3600 m a.s.l.) tree-ring chronology covering the past 438 years (AD 1575-2012). The reconstruction passes all statistical calibration and validation tests and represents 49 % of the temperature variance recorded over the 1955-2012 instrumental period. It shows a substantial warming accounting to about 1.12 °C since the mid-twentieth century, and 1.94 °C since the mid-nineteenth century, and agrees well with the Northern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> temperature reconstructions. These findings provide evidence that the Karakoram temperatures are in-phase, rather than out-of-phase, compared to <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> scales since the AD 1575. The synchronous temperature trends imply that the anomalous glacier behavior reported from the Karakoram may need further explanations beyond basic regional thermal anomaly.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMPP43B2274F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMPP43B2274F"><span id="translatedtitle">Obliquity Control on Southern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> Climate during the Last Glacial</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fogwill, C. J.; Hutchinson, D. K.; Turney, C. S.; Taschetto, A.; England, M. H.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Recent paleoclimate reconstructions have challenged the traditional view that Northern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> insolation and associated feedbacks drove synchronous global climate and ice-sheet volume during the last glacial cycle. Here we focus on the response of the Patagonian Ice Sheet, and demonstrate that its maximum expansion culminated at 28,400 ± 500 years before present (28.4 ± 0.5 ka), more than 5,000 years before the minima in 65°N summer insolation and the formally-defined Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 21,000 ± 2,000 years before present. To investigate the potential drivers of this early LGM (eLGM), we simulate the effects of orbital changes using a suite of climate models incorporating prescribed and evolving sea-ice anomalies. Our analyses suggest that Antarctic sea-ice expansion at 28.5 ka altered the location and intensity of the Southern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> storm track, triggering regional cooling over Patagonia of 5°C that extends across the wider mid-southern latitudes. In contrast, at the LGM, continued sea-ice expansion reduced regional temperature and precipitation further, effectively starving the ice sheet and resulting in reduced glacial expansion. Our findings highlight the dominant role that orbital changes can play in driving Southern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> glacial climate via the sensitivity of mid-latitude regions to changes in Antarctic sea-ice extent.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22513341','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22513341"><span id="translatedtitle">Visuospatial deficits and <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> perfusion asymmetries in posterior cortical atrophy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Andrade, Katia; Kas, Aurélie; Samri, Dalila; Sarazin, Marie; Dubois, Bruno; Habert, Marie-Odile; Bartolomeo, Paolo</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>We studied visuospatial performance and obtained brain perfusion scintigraphy in 27 patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) and 24 healthy controls, with two aims: (1) to determine inter-<span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> perfusion imbalances underlying signs of spatial neglect and (2) to establish the functional substrates of patients' performance on distinct visuospatial tasks (line bisection and target cancellation). Between-groups and correlation analyses were performed on a voxel-wise basis with Statistical Parametric Mapping, and right-to-left <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> perfusion ratios were calculated in anatomical regions of interest. Nineteen patients had pathological spatial biases. Compared with controls, patients with signs of left-sided and right-sided neglect presented prominent hypoperfusion in the right and left parietal cortex, respectively. Importantly, hypoperfusion extended to the ipsilateral prefrontal regions. Correlation analyses between task scores and brain perfusion showed that shifts in line bisection correlated with hypoperfusion in parieto-frontal regions, whereas omissions on target cancellation mainly correlated with hypoperfusion in prefrontal structures. Overall, the results indicate that spatial neglect in PCA is related to inter-<span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> perfusion asymmetries in fronto-parietal networks, with partially different neural correlates for line bisection and target cancellation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4356971','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4356971"><span id="translatedtitle">Learning-related brain <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> dominance in sleeping songbirds</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Moorman, Sanne; Gobes, Sharon M. H.; van de Kamp, Ferdinand C.; Zandbergen, Matthijs A.; Bolhuis, Johan J.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>There are striking behavioural and neural parallels between the acquisition of speech in humans and song learning in songbirds. In humans, language-related brain activation is mostly lateralised to the left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>. During language acquisition in humans, brain <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> lateralisation develops as language proficiency increases. Sleep is important for the formation of long-term memory, in humans as well as in other animals, including songbirds. Here, we measured neuronal activation (as the expression pattern of the immediate early gene ZENK) during sleep in juvenile zebra finch males that were still learning their songs from a tutor. We found that during sleep, there was learning-dependent lateralisation of spontaneous neuronal activation in the caudomedial nidopallium (NCM), a secondary auditory brain region that is involved in tutor song memory, while there was right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> dominance of neuronal activation in HVC (used as a proper name), a premotor nucleus that is involved in song production and sensorimotor learning. Specifically, in the NCM, birds that imitated their tutors well were left dominant, while poor imitators were right dominant, similar to language-proficiency related lateralisation in humans. Given the avian-human parallels, lateralised neural activation during sleep may also be important for speech and language acquisition in human infants. PMID:25761654</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.A41E3081B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.A41E3081B"><span id="translatedtitle">Potential Dust Emissions from Sources in the Southern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bhattachan, A.; D'Odorico, P.; Okin, G. S.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The Southern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> currently exhibits low levels of atmospheric dust concentrations relative to the Northern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span>. Recent research suggests that dust concentrations could, however, increase as a result of loss of vegetation cover in the Southern Kalahari and the Mallee. Disturbances resulting from grazing and agriculture are identified as such drivers of land use change in these regions. While studies on the importance of atmospheric dust in global-scale processes are abundant, little has been done to locate the potential dust sources in the Southern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> because potential new sources are by definition inactive and are undetected in satellite images. To this end, using a combination of laboratory experiments and field observations, we assess that the sediments collected from the dunefields in the Southern Kalahari and Mallee can emit substantial amount of dust, are rich in soluble iron and dust from these sources would reach the Southern Ocean. It is suggested that the supply of soluble iron through atmospheric dust deposition limits the productivity of the Southern Ocean. Thus intensification of land use can potentially make these regions an important source of iron given their proximity to the Southern Ocean. This iron-rich dust could stimulate ocean productivity in future as more areas are reactivated as a result of land-use and droughts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9533383','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9533383"><span id="translatedtitle">The left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> and the selection of learned actions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rushworth, M F; Nixon, P D; Wade, D T; Renowden, S; Passingham, R E</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>The left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span>'s dominance for movement is well known. The basis of its dominance is less clear. We have tested 16 left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> (LH) patients, 17 right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> (RH) patients and 12 neurologically normal controls on a battery of five tasks. The tasks were based on animal lesion and recording studies, and human imaging and magnetic stimulation studies that identified two distributed systems that are important for the selection of motor responses and object-oriented responses. The LH patients were impaired on three response selection tasks: learning to select between joystick movement responses instructed by visual cues; learning to select between analogous object-oriented responses instructed by visual cues; learning to select movements in a sequence. Although we replicated the finding that LH damage impairs sequencing, some of the impaired tasks had no sequencing element. We therefore argue that the LH deficits are best explained as an impairment of response selection. This was confirmed by showing that LH subjects were unimpaired on a more demanding task-object discrimination learning-which imposed a greater memory load but had no response selection element. Moreover, the LH deficits could not be attributed to disorganization of movement kinematics. The lesions of the impaired LH group were widespread but always included the distributed systems known to be important for response selection-the dorsolateral frontal and parietal cortices, striatum, thalamus and white matter fascicles. PMID:9533383</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013GeoRL..40..612D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013GeoRL..40..612D"><span id="translatedtitle">Estimation of 2006 Northern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> contrail coverage using MODIS data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Duda, David P.; Minnis, Patrick; Khlopenkov, Konstantin; Chee, Thad L.; Boeke, Robyn</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p><title type="main">Abstract A modified automated contrail detection algorithm (CDA) using five infrared channels available from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer onboard the Aqua satellite is used to determine linear contrail coverage over the Northern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> during 2006. Commercial aircraft flight data are employed to filter false contrail detections by the CDA. The Northern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> annual mean linear contrail coverage ranges from 0.07% to 0.40% for three different CDA sensitivities. Based on visual analyses, the medium sensitivity CDA provides the best estimate of linear contrail coverage, which averages 0.13%. If scaled to the Southern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span>, the global mean coverage would be 0.07%. Coverage is greatest during winter and least during the summer with maximum coverage over the North Atlantic. Less coverage is observed over heavy European and American traffic areas, likely as a result of difficulties in detecting linear contrails that overlap with each other and with older contrail cirrus. These results are valuable for evaluating the representation of contrails and contrail cirrus within global climate models and for retrieving contrail optical properties and radiative forcing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ERL....11i4028D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ERL....11i4028D"><span id="translatedtitle">Changes in meandering of the Northern <span class="hlt">Hemisphere</span> circulation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Di Capua, Giorgia; Coumou, Dim</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Strong waves in the mid-latitude circulation have been linked to extreme surface weather and thus changes in waviness could have serious consequences for society. Several theories have been proposed which could alter waviness, including tropical sea surface temperature anomalies or rapid climate change in the Arctic. However, so far it remains unclear whether any changes in waviness have actually occurred. Here we propose a novel meandering index which captures the maximum waviness in geopotential height contours at any given day, using all information of the full spatial position of each contour. Data are analysed on different time scale (from daily to 11 day running means) and both on <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> and regional scales. Using quantile regressions, we analyse how seasonal distributions of this index have changed over 1979-2015. The most robust changes are detected for autumn which has seen a pronounced increase in strongly meandering patterns at the <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> level as well as over the Eurasian sector. In summer for both the <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> and the Eurasian sector, significant downward trends in meandering are detected on daily timescales which is consistent with the recently reported decrease in summer storm track activity. The American sector shows the strongest increase in meandering in the warm season: in particular for 11 day running mean data, indicating enhanced amplitudes of quasi-stationary waves. Our findings have implications for both the occurrence of recent cold spells and persistent heat waves in the mid-latitudes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=rh+AND+negative&id=EJ903627','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=rh+AND+negative&id=EJ903627"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> Specialization for Emotional Word Processing Is a Function of SSRI Responsiveness</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Walsh, Amy; McDowall, John; Grimshaw, Gina M.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Vulnerability to depression and non-response to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are associated with specific neurophysiological characteristics including greater right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> (RH) relative to left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> (LH) activity. The present study investigated the relationship between <span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> specialization and processing of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=rh&pg=4&id=EJ909568','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=rh&pg=4&id=EJ909568"><span id="translatedtitle">Knowledge-Based Inferences across the <span class="hlt">Hemispheres</span>: Domain Makes a Difference</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Shears, Connie; Hawkins, Amanda; Varner, Andria; Lewis, Lindsey; Heatley, Jennifer; Twachtmann, Lisa</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Language comprehension occurs when the left-<span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> (LH) and the right-<span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> (RH) share information derived from discourse [Beeman, M. J., Bowden, E. M., & Gernsbacher, M. A. (2000). Right and left <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> cooperation for drawing predictive and coherence inferences during normal story comprehension. "Brain and Language, 71", 310-336].…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=rights+AND+author&pg=5&id=EJ827107','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=rights+AND+author&pg=5&id=EJ827107"><span id="translatedtitle">When Side Matters: <span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> Processing and the Visual Specificity of Emotional Memories</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kensinger, Elizabeth A.; Choi, Elizabeth S.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Previous studies have shown that the right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> processes the visual details of objects and the emotionality of information. These two roles of the right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> have not been examined concurrently. In the present study, the authors examined whether right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> processing would lead to particularly good memory for the visual details…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=therapy+AND+constraint+AND+induced&pg=2&id=EJ793241','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=therapy+AND+constraint+AND+induced&pg=2&id=EJ793241"><span id="translatedtitle">Association between Therapy Outcome and Right-<span class="hlt">Hemispheric</span> Activation in Chronic Aphasia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Richter, Maria; Miltner, Wolfgang H. R.; Straube, Thomas</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The role of the right <span class="hlt">hemisphere</span> for language processing and successful therapeutic interventions in aphasic patients is a matter of debate. This study explored brain activation in right-<span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> areas and left-<span class="hlt">hemispheric</span> perilesional areas in response to language tasks in chronic non-fluent aphasic patients before and after constraint-induced…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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