Science.gov

Sample records for form t-1 trust

  1. 75 FR 5455 - Rescission of Form T-1, Trust Annual Report; Require Subsidiary Organization Reporting on the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... Office of Labor-Management Standards 29 CFR Part 403 Rescission of Form T-1, Trust Annual Report; Require Subsidiary Organization Reporting on the Form LM-2, Labor Organization Annual Report; LMRDA Coverage of... RIN 1215-AB75 Rescission of Form T-1, Trust Annual Report; Require Subsidiary Organization...

  2. 75 FR 75904 - Rescission of Form T-1, Trust Annual Report; Requiring Subsidiary Organization Reporting on the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ..., Trust Annual Report; Requiring Subsidiary Organization Reporting on the Form LM-2, Labor Organization Annual Report; Modifying Subsidiary Organization Reporting on the Form LM-3, Labor Organization Annual Report; LMRDA Coverage of Intermediate Labor Organizations; Final Rule Correction In rule document...

  3. 75 FR 74935 - Rescission of Form T-1, Trust Annual Report; Requiring Subsidiary Organization Reporting on the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ... Organizations; Final Rule AGENCY: Office of Labor-Management Standards, Department of Labor. ACTION: Final rule... Title II jurisdiction. The court reasoned that the Department failed to explain how the test promulgated... required for a trust: Established as a political action committee (PAC) fund if publicly available...

  4. Activated Transport in the Separate Layers that Form the νT=1 Exciton Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersma, R. D.; Lok, J. G.; Kraus, S.; Dietsche, W.; von Klitzing, K.; Schuh, D.; Bichler, M.; Tranitz, H.-P.; Wegscheider, W.

    2004-12-01

    We observe the total filling factor νT=1 quantum Hall state in a bilayer two-dimensional electron system with virtually no tunneling. We find thermally activated transport in the balanced system with a monotonic increase of the activation energy with decreasing d/ℓB below 1.65. In the imbalanced system we find activated transport in each of the layers separately, yet the activation energies show a striking asymmetry around the balance point, implying a different excitation spectrum for the separate layers forming the condensed state.

  5. Transmembrane segment 5 of the dipeptide transporter hPepT1 forms a part of the substrate translocation pathway.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ashutosh A; Haworth, Ian S; Lee, Vincent H L

    2003-06-20

    This study is the first systematic attempt to investigate the role of transmembrane segment 5 of hPepT1, the most conserved segment across different species, in forming a part of the aqueous substrate translocation pathway. We used cysteine-scanning mutagenesis in conjunction with the sulfhydryl-specific reagents, MTSEA and MTSET. Neither of these reagents reduced wild-type-hPepT1 transport activity in HEK293 cells and Xenopus oocytes. Twenty-one single cysteine mutations in hPepT1 were created by replacing each residue within TMS5 with a cysteine. HEK293 cells were then transfected with each mutated protein and the steady-state protein level, [3H]Gly-Sar uptake activity, and sensitivity to the MTS reagents were measured. S164C-, L168C-, G173C-, and I179C-hPepT1 were not expressed on the plasma membrane. Y167C-, N171C-, and S174C-hPepT1 showed T1. P182C-hPepT1 showed approximately 40% specific activity whereas all the remaining transporters, although still sensitive to single cysteine mutations, exhibited more than 50% specific activity when compared to WT-hPepT1. The activity of F166C-, L176C-, S177C-, T178C-, I180C-, T181C-, and P182C-hPepT1 was partially inhibited, while the activity of F163C- and I170C-hPepT1 was completely inhibited by 2.5mM MTSEA. F163C, I165C, F166C, A169C, I170C, S177C, T181C, and P182C were clearly accessible to 1mM MTSET. Overall, these results suggest that TMS5 lines the putative aqueous channel and is slightly tilted from the vertical axis of the channel, with the exofacial half forming a classical amphipathic alpha-helix and the cytoplasmic half being highly solvent accessible.

  6. Forming social capital--does participatory planning foster trust in institutions?

    PubMed

    Menzel, Susanne; Buchecker, Matthias; Schulz, Tobias

    2013-12-15

    Participatory planning that includes interest groups and municipal representatives has been presented as a means to deal with the increasing difficulty to reach arrangements due to progressively scarce land resources. Under dispute is whether collaborative forms of planning augment social capital or whether they might actually cause the destruction of such a valuable social commodity. In this paper we focus on trust in institution as a specific dimension of social capital because we argue that this is one of the effects the convenors of such participatory planning procedures are most interested in. We pursue a pre-post design and survey advisory group members of five on-going river-related planning processes in Switzerland. Controlling for generalised trust, we investigate how trust in institutions is affected over time by the quality of such processes and the degree of participation they offer. We find that generalised trust is highly correlated with initial levels of trust and so is process quality. Particularly the latter finding challenges the usually assumed direction of causality according to which process quality influences trust building. Additionally, we find a positive (non-significant) effect of process quality on changes in trust, while a higher degree of participation rather seems to hinder trust building. We suppose this indicates that under the conditions of limited time and resources more attention should be paid to how to improve the quality of participatory processes than putting much effort in increasing the degree of participation.

  7. 17 CFR 274.11d - Form N-6, registration statement of separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... statement of separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that offer variable life insurance... variable life insurance policies. Form N-6 shall be used as the registration statement to be filed pursuant to section 8(b) of the Investment Company Act of 1940 by separate accounts that offer variable...

  8. 17 CFR 274.11d - Form N-6, registration statement of separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... statement of separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that offer variable life insurance... variable life insurance policies. Form N-6 shall be used as the registration statement to be filed pursuant to section 8(b) of the Investment Company Act of 1940 by separate accounts that offer variable...

  9. The T=1 capsid protein of Penicillium chrysogenum virus is formed by a repeated helix-rich core indicative of gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Luque, Daniel; González, José M; Garriga, Damiá; Ghabrial, Said A; Havens, Wendy M; Trus, Benes; Verdaguer, Nuria; Carrascosa, José L; Castón, José R

    2010-07-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum virus (PcV), a member of the Chrysoviridae family, is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) fungal virus with a multipartite genome, with each RNA molecule encapsidated in a separate particle. Chrysoviruses lack an extracellular route and are transmitted during sporogenesis and cell fusion. The PcV capsid, based on a T=1 lattice containing 60 subunits of the 982-amino-acid capsid protein, remains structurally undisturbed throughout the viral cycle, participates in genome metabolism, and isolates the virus genome from host defense mechanisms. Using three-dimensional cryoelectron microscopy, we determined the structure of the PcV virion at 8.0 A resolution. The capsid protein has a high content of rod-like densities characteristic of alpha-helices, forming a repeated alpha-helical core indicative of gene duplication. Whereas the PcV capsid protein has two motifs with the same fold, most dsRNA virus capsid subunits consist of dimers of a single protein with similar folds. The spatial arrangement of the alpha-helical core resembles that found in the capsid protein of the L-A virus, a fungal totivirus with an undivided genome, suggesting a conserved basic fold. The encapsidated genome is organized in concentric shells; whereas the inner dsRNA shells are well defined, the outermost layer is dense due to numerous interactions with the inner capsid surface, specifically, six interacting areas per monomer. The outermost genome layer is arranged in an icosahedral cage, sufficiently well ordered to allow for modeling of an A-form dsRNA. The genome ordering might constitute a framework for dsRNA transcription at the capsid interior and/or have a structural role for capsid stability.

  10. The Role of Teacher and Faculty Trust in Forming Teachers' Job Satisfaction: Do Years of Experience Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Maele, Dimitri; Van Houtte, Mieke

    2012-01-01

    This study relates trust at the level of both the teacher and the faculty to teachers' job satisfaction. Teaching experience is explored as a moderator of the trust-satisfaction relationship. Multilevel analyses on data of 2091 teachers across 80 secondary schools in Flanders (Belgium) revealed positive associations between teacher trust in…

  11. The Role of Social Trust in Reducing Long-Term Truancy and Forming Human Capital in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamamura, Eiji

    2011-01-01

    This paper attempts to examine how social trust influences human capital formation using prefectural level data in Japan. To this end, I constructed a proxy for social trust, based on the Japanese General Social Surveys. After controlling for socioeconomic factors, I found that social trust plays an important role in reducing the rate of long-term…

  12. The Need to Trust and to Trust More Wisely in Academe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    Where trust is an issue, there is no trust. Trust in diverse organizations has never been lower. A shadow of doubt stalks one's every decision to trust collegially and institutionally. Still, colleagues sense intuitively that institutions cannot function optimally without a bedrock level of trust. In academic life, trust is a form of social…

  13. 17 CFR 239.17c - Form N-6, registration statement for separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... statement for separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that offer variable life insurance..., registration statement for separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that offer variable life... of separate accounts that offer variable life insurance policies and that register under...

  14. 17 CFR 239.17c - Form N-6, registration statement for separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... statement for separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that offer variable life insurance..., registration statement for separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that offer variable life... of separate accounts that offer variable life insurance policies and that register under...

  15. Cardiac T1 Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kwong, Raymond Y.

    2014-01-01

    T1 mapping of the heart has evolved into a valuable tool to evaluate myocardial tissue properties, with or without contrast injection, including assessment of myocardial edema and free water content, extra-cellular volume (expansion), and most recently cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. The MRI pulse sequence techniques developed for these applications have had to address at least two important considerations for cardiac applications: measure magnetization inversion recoveries during cardiac motion with sufficient temporal resolution for the shortest expected T1 values, and, secondly, obtain these measurements within a time during which a patient can comfortably suspend breathing. So-called Look-Locker techniques, and variants thereof, which all sample multiple points of a magnetization recovery after each magnetization preparation have therefore become a mainstay in this field. The rapid pace of advances and new findings based on cardiac T1 mapping for assessment of diffuse fibrosis, or myocardial edema show that these techniques enrich the capabilities of MRI for myocardial tissue profiling, which is arguably unmatched by other cardiac imaging modalities. PMID:24509619

  16. Impact of signals and experience on trust and trusting behavior.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Hueih; Chien, Shu-Hua; Wu, Jyh-Jeng; Tsai, Pei-Yin

    2010-10-01

    Trust is an essential factor that drives virtual interaction and transactions on the Internet. Researchers have investigated the trust development process, and identified several important factors that form the basis for trust. This research combines the signal perspective and trust theory to examine the impact of market signals and past experience on trust formation and trusting behavior. Three market signals, including brand image, Web-site investment, and privacy policies, are identified and empirically tested to determine their impact on consumer trust. Based on 322 active Web users, the quantitative results suggest that brand image, Web-site investment, privacy policies, and past experience all positively impact trust formation. Furthermore, trust shows a positive effect on Web-site stickiness. Both theoretical and practical implications of the results are also offered.

  17. T-1 Training Area

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  18. T-1 Training Area

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-07

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  19. Trust in interprofessional collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Paul A. M.; Austin, Zubin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trust is integral to effective interprofessional collaboration. There has been scant literature characterizing how trust between practitioners is formed, maintained or lost. The objective of this study was to characterize the cognitive model of trust that exists between pharmacists and family physicians working in collaborative primary care settings. Methods: Pharmacists and family physicians who work collaboratively in primary care were participants in this study. Family health teams were excluded from this study because of the distinct nature of these settings. Through a snowball convenience sampling method, a total of 11 pharmacists and 8 family physicians were recruited. A semistructured interview guide was used to guide discussion around trust, relationships and collaboration. Constant-comparative coding was used to identify themes emerging from these data. Results: Pharmacists and family physicians demonstrate different cognitive models of trust in primary care collaboration. For pharmacists, trust appears to be conferred on physicians based on title, degree, status and positional authority. For family physicians, trust appears to be earned based on competency and performance. These differences may lead to interprofessional tension when expectations of reciprocal trust are not met. Conclusions: Further work in characterizing how trust is developed in interprofessional relationships is needed to support effective team formation and functioning. PMID:27540406

  20. Trust and Dialogue in the Army Profession

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-22

    foundational concept, trust, from an organizational perspective, facilitates the lasting commitment to meet strategic aims. Trust involves the expectation...core of the professional military ethi As a foundational concept, trust, from an organizational perspective, facilitates the lasting commitment to meet...forms the core of the professional military ethic. As a foundational concept, trust, from an organizational perspective, facilitates the lasting

  1. TRUST: TDRSS Resource User Support Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparn, Thomas P.; Gablehouse, R. Daniel

    1991-01-01

    TRUST-TDRSS (Tracking Data and Relay Satellite System) Resource User Support Tool is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: TRUST development cycle; the TRUST system; scheduling window; ODM/GCMR window; TRUST architecture; surpass; and summary.

  2. "Doing Trust".

    PubMed

    Guillemin, Marilys; Gillam, Lynn; Barnard, Emma; Stewart, Paul; Walker, Hannah; Rosenthal, Doreen

    2016-10-01

    Trust in research is important but not well understood. We examine the ways that researchers understand and practice trust in research. Using a qualitative research design, we interviewed 19 researchers, including eight researchers involved in Australian Indigenous research. The project design focused on sensitive research including research involving vulnerable participants and sensitive research topics. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. We found that researchers' understanding of trust integrates both the conceptual and concrete; researchers understand trust in terms of how it relates to other similar concepts and how they practice trust in research. This provides a sound basis to better understand trust in research, as well as identifying mechanisms to regain trust when it is lost in research.

  3. Rethinking trust.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Roderick M

    2009-06-01

    Will we ever learn? We'd barely recovered from Enron and WorldCom before we faced the subprime mortgage meltdown and more scandals that shook our trust in businesspeople. Which raises the question: Do we trust too much? In this article, Stanford professor and social psychologist Kramer explores the reasons we trust so easily--and, often, so unwisely. He explains that genetics and childhood learning make us predisposed to trust and that it's been a good survival mechanism. That said, our willingness to trust makes us vulnerable. Our sense of trust kicks in on remarkably simple cues, such as when people look like us or are part of our social group. We also rely on third parties to verify the character of others, sometimes to our detriment (as the victims of Bernard Madoff learned). Add in our illusions of invulnerability and our tendencies to see what we want to see and to overestimate our own judgment, and the bottom line is that we're often easily fooled. We need to develop tempered trust. For those who trust too much, that means reading cues better; for the distrustful, it means developing more receptive behaviors. Everyone should start with small acts of trust that encourage reciprocity and build up. Having a hedge against potential abuses also helps. Hollywood scriptwriters, for instance, register their treatments with the Writers Guild of America to prevent their ideas from being stolen by the executives they pitch. To attract the right relationships, people must strongly signal their own honesty, proactively allay concerns, and, if their trust is abused, retaliate. Trusting individuals in certain roles, which essentially means trusting the system that selects and trains them, also works but isn't foolproof. And don't count on due diligence alone for protection; constant vigilance is needed to make sure the landscape hasn't changed.

  4. Social Trust of Virtual Identities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seigneur, Jean-Marc

    Most other chapters of this book discuss computational models of trust in broader terms, giving definitions of trust, explaining how trust should evolve over time, surveying the different facets of trust .On the other hand, this chapter has a clear focus on the important element of identity in computational trust mechanisms. Trust and reputation are easier to form in face-to-face situations than in situations involving the use of computers and networks because the identity of the trustee is more difficult to verify. In this chapter, the different means to recognise virtual identities are surveyed. Next, their integration into computational trust engines is discussed, especially according to four main requirements: Adaptability, Security, Usability and Privacy (ASUP).

  5. Trust, Conflict and Performance in Scientific Collaborations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shrum, Wesley; Chompalov, Ivan; Genuth, Joel

    2001-01-01

    Examines 53 collaborations in physics and related sciences with two unexpected findings: (1) trust is no higher in projects formed through pre-existing relationships than those without such ties; and (2) there is no relationship between trust and performance. Concludes that more important than trust for an understanding of large scientific…

  6. Trust and Influence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-05

    DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Program Trends •Trust in Autonomous Systems •Cross- cultural Trust... Cultural Trust – Identify the antecedents of trust in different cultures •Trust in Autonomous Systems/Autonomy – identify the factors that shape...Trust & trustworthiness are independent (Mayer et al, 1995) •Trust is relational •Humans in cross- cultural interactions •Complex human-machine

  7. From the general to the specific: How social trust motivates relational trust.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Blaine G

    2016-01-01

    When people form beliefs about the trustworthiness of others with respect to particular matters (i.e., when individuals trust), theory suggests that they rely on preexistent cognitive schemas regarding the general cooperativeness of individuals and organizations (i.e., social trust). In spite of prior work, the impact of social trust on relational trust-or what Russell Hardin (2002) calls trust as a three-part relation where actor A trusts actor B with reference to matter Y-is not well established. Four vignette experiments were administered to Amazon.com Mechanical Turk workers (N = 1388 and N = 1419) and to public university undergraduate students (N = 995 and N = 956) in order to investigate the relationship between social trust and relational trust. Measures of general social trust and particular social trust produced statistically equivalent effects that were positively associated with relational trust. Political trust, however, was statistically unrelated to relational trust. These results support the idea that people rely on schemas and stereotypes concerned with the general cooperativeness and helpfulness of others when forming beliefs about another person's trustworthiness with respect to a particular matter at hand.

  8. Trusted Objects

    SciTech Connect

    CAMPBELL,PHILIP L.; PIERSON,LYNDON G.; WITZKE,EDWARD L.

    1999-10-27

    In the world of computers a trusted object is a collection of possibly-sensitive data and programs that can be allowed to reside and execute on a computer, even on an adversary's machine. Beyond the scope of one computer we believe that network-based agents in high-consequence and highly reliable applications will depend on this approach, and that the basis for such objects is what we call ''faithful execution.''

  9. Chemically Enhanced Trust: Potential Law Enforcement and Military Applications for Oxytocin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    C. TRUST Trust is a fundamental feature of social interaction . The concept of trust is a powerful one, and the importance of trust in society is...human social life and interaction . This would be too obvious.2 Humans are so given to trust that it comprises its own category of knowledge….one...every feature of social interaction depends in some way on trust or distrust. “Basic trust is something we develop in a crude form in infancy and

  10. Trust me, I'm a researcher!: The role of trust in biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Kerasidou, Angeliki

    2017-03-01

    In biomedical research lack of trust is seen as a great threat that can severely jeopardise the whole biomedical research enterprise. Practices, such as informed consent, and also the administrative and regulatory oversight of research in the form of research ethics committees and Institutional Review Boards, are established to ensure the protection of future research subjects and, at the same time, restore public trust in biomedical research. Empirical research also testifies to the role of trust as one of the decisive factors in research participation and lack of trust as a barrier for consenting to research. However, what is often missing is a clear definition of trust. This paper seeks to address this gap. It starts with a conceptual analysis of the term trust. It compares trust with two other related terms, those of reliance and trustworthiness, and offers a defence of Baier's attribute of 'good will' a basic characteristic of trust. It, then, proceeds to consider trust in the context of biomedical research by examining two questions: First, is trust necessary in biomedical research?; and second, do increases in regulatory oversight of biomedical research also increase trust in the field? This paper argues that regulatory oversight is important for increasing reliance in biomedical research, but it does not improve trust, which remains important for biomedical research. It finishes by pointing at professional integrity as a way of promoting trust and trustworthiness in this field.

  11. Trust and Online Reputation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Ming; Ramachandran, Deepak

    Web 2.0 technologies provide organizations with unprecedented opportunities to expand and solidify relationships with their customers, partners, and employees—while empowering firms to define entirely new business models focused on sharing information in online collaborative environments. Yet, in and of themselves, these technologies cannot ensure productive online interactions. Leading enterprises that are experimenting with social networks and online communities are already discovering this fact and along with it, the importance of establishing trust as the foundation for online collaboration and transactions. Just as today's consumers must feel secure to bank, exchange personal information and purchase products and services online; participants in Web 2.0 initiatives will only accept the higher levels of risk and exposure inherent in e-commerce and Web collaboration in an environment of trust. Indeed, only by attending to the need to cultivate online trust with customers, partners and employees will enterprises ever fully exploit the expanded business potential posed by Web 2.0. But developing online trust is no easy feat. While various preliminary attempts have occurred, no definitive model for establishing or measuring it has yet been established. To that end, nGenera has identified three, distinct dimensions of online trust: reputation (quantitative-based); relationship (qualitative-based) and process (system-based). When considered together, they form a valuable model for understanding online trust and a toolbox for cultivating it to support Web 2.0 initiatives.

  12. The Value of Trust to Nursing.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Marcella M

    2014-01-01

    Trust, one of nursing's intangible assets, impacts nurses' ability to form meaningful relationships with patients and this connection positively impacts health outcomes. Linking trust to the fabric of nursing and investing in its measurement will become essential to nursing's valuation and the resulting investment in nursing. Trust, as nursing's core value, should be fostered by nurse educators as they prepare the next generation of nurses. Nurse administrators should connect the trust a patient has for his or her nurse and patient cooperation and honest transparent communication between providers and the patient. Banking trust as a valuable nursing asset will substantiate nursing's marketing and support its worth. Nursing's trustworthiness is an intangible asset that warrants protection, as trust once lost is hard to recapture.

  13. Trust in Social Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-07

    T. Schlosser, and H. Garcia-Molina. The eigentrust algorithm for reputation management in p2p networks . In Proceedings of the 12th international...demonstrate real-world applications where trust is explicitly used. As a new 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 12...Mining, TrustModeling, Trust Measurements, Trust Applications , Dis-trust REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10

  14. Trust and Influence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-06

    how humans establish, maintain, and repair trust of humans and technological systems) and the science of influence (i.e., understanding how to shape...factors that shape reliance in complex human -machine interactions • Cross-Cultural Trust – identify the antecedents of trust in different cultures...actions of others with little ability to monitor their actions (Mayer et al., 1995) Assumptions: •Trust as a human phenomenon •Trust

  15. Ultra-low field T1 vs. T1rho at 3T and 7T: study of rotationally immobilized protein gels and animal brain tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hui; Inglis, Ben; Barr, Ian; Clarke, John

    2015-03-01

    Clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines operating in static fields of typically 1.5 T or 3 T can capture information on slow molecular dynamics utilizing the so-called T1rho technique. This technique, in which a radiofrequency (RF) spin-lock field is applied with microtesla amplitude, has been used, for example, to determine the onset time of stroke in studies on rats. The long RF pulse, however, may exceed the specific absorption rate (SAR) limit, putting subjects at risk. Ultra-low-field (ULF) MRI, based on Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs), directly detects proton signals at a static magnetic field of typically 50-250 μT. Using our ULF MRI system with adjustable static field of typically 55 to 240 μT, we systematically measured the T1 and T2 dispersion profiles of rotationally immobilized protein gels (bovine serum albumin), ex vivo pig brains, and ex vivo rat brains with induced stroke. Comparing the ULF results with T1rho dispersion obtained at 3 T and 7 T, we find that the degree of protein immobilization determines the frequency-dependence of both T1 and T1rho. Furthermore, T1rho and ULF T1 show similar results for stroke, suggesting that ULF MRI may be used to image traumatic brain injury with negligible SAR. This research was supported by the Henry H. Wheeler, Jr. Brain Imaging Center and the Donaldson Trust.

  16. Trust vs. Confidence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    both cognitive and affective factors can be implicated in trust judgements. Moreover, unlike confidence judgements (which can occur in many...occurs in situations without risks. A trust judgement, on the other hand, uses a variety of information beyond the merely cognitive , occurs only when...defined. Although there are many different definitions of trust, our definition (Adams and Webb, 2003) is as follows: Trust is a psychological state

  17. Reliable Design Versus Trust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Melanie; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation focuses on reliability and trust for the users portion of the FPGA design flow. It is assumed that the manufacturer prior to hand-off to the user tests FPGA internal components. The objective is to present the challenges of creating reliable and trusted designs. The following will be addressed: What makes a design vulnerable to functional flaws (reliability) or attackers (trust)? What are the challenges for verifying a reliable design versus a trusted design?

  18. Children's Conceptions of Trust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Peter H., Jr.; Turiel, Elliot

    Aware that children conceive of different types of trust, a study examined 60 children's conception of trust. The subjects comprised three age groups: 6-7 years old, 8-9 years old, and 10-11 years old. Each subject was interviewed on the basis of three stories. The stories depicted a hypothesized violation of trust in a moral context (lying),…

  19. Do Reputation Systems Undermine Trust? Divergent Effects of Enforcement Type on Generalized Trust and Trustworthiness.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Ko

    2015-03-01

    Research shows that enforcing cooperation using contracts or tangible sanctions can backfire, undermining people's intrinsic motivation to cooperate: when the enforcement is removed, people are less trusting or trustworthy than when there is no enforcement to begin with. The author examines whether reputation systems have similar consequences for generalized trust and trustworthiness. Using a web-based experiment simulating online market transactions (studies 1 and 2), he shows that reputation systems can reinforce generalized trust and trustworthiness, unlike contractual enforcement or relational enforcement based on repeated interactions. In a survey experiment (study 3), he finds that recalling their eBay feedback scores made participants more trusting and trustworthy. These results are predicated on the diffuse nature of reputational enforcement to reinforce perceptions of trust and trustworthiness. These results have implications for understanding how different forms of governance affect generalized trust and trustworthiness.

  20. Transfer of hyperpolarization from long T 1 storage nuclei to short T 1 neighbors using FLOPSY-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Karlos X.; Harrison, Crystal; Dean Sherry, A.; Malloy, Craig R.; Merritt, Matthew E.

    2011-12-01

    Nuclei with long T 1s are optimal targets for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). Therefore, most of the agents used in metabolic imaging and spectroscopy studies are based on carboxylic acid moieties that lack protons, a strong source of dipolar relaxation. Metabolic flux information encoded into spectra of small molecule metabolites in the form of the 13C isotopomer data cannot be accessed using standard 13C hyperpolarization methods because protonated carbons relax too quickly through T 1 dipolar relaxation. It is shown here that the longitudinal mixing sequence FLOPSY-8 can be used to transfer polarization from a long T 1 storage nucleus to adjacent protonated carbons so that they may be detected with high sensitivity. We demonstrate that FLOPSY-8 allows a direct readout of isotopomer populations in butyrate and glutamate in vitro.

  1. Validating the Trust in Teams and Trust in Leaders Scales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Work Scale trust scale ( Cook , Hepworth, Wall and Warr , 1981). This scale measures interpersonal trust in the organizational context. The full version...2005) scale .....................................................................30 Table 16: Team Trust Scale and Cook and Wall ...a whole fairly similarly. Another analysis compared the Team Trust Scale with two subscales from the Cook and Wall (1980) Interpersonal Trust at

  2. Trust in performance indicators?

    PubMed Central

    Davies, H. T.; Lampel, J.

    1998-01-01

    The 1980s and 90s have seen the proliferation of all forms of performance indicators as part of attempts to command and control health services. The latest area to receive attention is health outcomes. Published league tables of mortality and other health outcomes have been available in the United States for some time and in Scotland since the early 1990s; they have now been developed for England and Wales. Publication of these data has proceeded despite warnings as to their limited meaningfulness and usefulness. The time has come to ask whether the remedy is worse than the malady: are published health outcomes contributing to quality efforts or subverting more constructive approaches? This paper argues that attempts to force improvements through publishing health outcomes can be counterproductive, and outlines an alternative approach which involves fostering greater trust in professionalism as a basis for quality enhancements. PMID:10185142

  3. Personal Trust Increases Cooperation beyond General Trust

    PubMed Central

    Acedo-Carmona, Cristina; Gomila, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a new methodology which, while allowing for anonymous interaction, it also makes possible to compare decisions of cooperating or defecting when playing games within a group, according to whether or not players personally trust each other. The design thus goes beyond standard approaches to the role of trust in fostering cooperation, which is restricted to general trust. It also allows considering the role of the topology of the social network involved may play in the level of cooperation found. The results of this work support the idea that personal trust promotes cooperation beyond the level of general trust. We also found that this effect carries over to the whole group, making it more cohesive, but that higher levels of cohesion rely on a particular topology. As a conclusion, we hypothesize that personal trust is a psychological mechanism evolved to make human social life possible in the small groups our ancestors lived in, and that this mechanism persists and plays a role in sustaining cooperation and social cohesion. PMID:25144539

  4. Taste information derived from T1R-expressing taste cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ryusuke; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2016-03-01

    The taste system of animals is used to detect valuable nutrients and harmful compounds in foods. In humans and mice, sweet, bitter, salty, sour and umami tastes are considered the five basic taste qualities. Sweet and umami tastes are mediated by G-protein-coupled receptors, belonging to the T1R (taste receptor type 1) family. This family consists of three members (T1R1, T1R2 and T1R3). They function as sweet or umami taste receptors by forming heterodimeric complexes, T1R1+T1R3 (umami) or T1R2+T1R3 (sweet). Receptors for each of the basic tastes are thought to be expressed exclusively in taste bud cells. Sweet (T1R2+T1R3-expressing) taste cells were thought to be segregated from umami (T1R1+T1R3-expressing) taste cells in taste buds. However, recent studies have revealed that a significant portion of taste cells in mice expressed all T1R subunits and responded to both sweet and umami compounds. This suggests that sweet and umami taste cells may not be segregated. Mice are able to discriminate between sweet and umami tastes, and both tastes contribute to behavioural preferences for sweet or umami compounds. There is growing evidence that T1R3 is also involved in behavioural avoidance of calcium tastes in mice, which implies that there may be a further population of T1R-expressing taste cells that mediate aversion to calcium taste. Therefore the simple view of detection and segregation of sweet and umami tastes by T1R-expressing taste cells, in mice, is now open to re-examination.

  5. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Brown, Dan; Eustace, John

    2015-01-01

    Increment 45 - 46 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  6. The Dimensionality of Trust

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    undesired events. Several trust theorists have characterized distrust as that which is feared, and trust as that which is hoped (e.g., Deutsch , 1958...earliest trust theorist, Morton Deutsch (1958, p. 267) defines suspicion (a concept Deutsch has used interchangeably with the distrust concept) as...theorists have conceptualised distrust as a psychological state as well as a choice behaviour. Theorists such as Deutsch (1958) have equated non

  7. In regulation we trust.

    PubMed

    Wiig, Siri; Tharaldsen, Jorunn Elise

    2012-01-01

    The role of trust has been argued to play an increasingly important role in modern, complex, and ambivalent risk societies. Trust within organizational research is anticipated to have a general strategic impact on aspects such as organizational performance, communication and knowledge exchange, and learning from accidents. Trust is also an important aspect related to regulation of risk. Diverse regulatory regimes, their contexts and risks influence regulators use of trust and distrust in regulatory practice. The aim of this paper is to discuss the relationship between risk regulation and trust across diverse risk regulation regimes. By drawing from studies of risk regulation, risk perception, and trust the purpose is to discuss how regulation and trust are linked and used in practice to control risk across system levels in socio-technical systems in high risk industries. This paper provides new knowledge on 1) how functional and dysfunctional trust and distrust are grounded in the empirical realities of high risk industries, 2) how different perspectives on trust and distrust act together and bring new knowledge on how society control risk.

  8. T1ρ magnetic resonance: basic physics principles and applications in knee and intervertebral disc imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinwei; Li, Xiaojuan; Chen, Weitian; Ahuja, Anil; Yuan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    T1ρ relaxation time provides a new contrast mechanism that differs from T1- and T2-weighted contrast, and is useful to study low-frequency motional processes and chemical exchange in biological tissues. T1ρ imaging can be performed in the forms of T1ρ-weighted image, T1ρ mapping and T1ρ dispersion. T1ρ imaging, particularly at low spin-lock frequency, is sensitive to B0 and B1 inhomogeneity. Various composite spin-lock pulses have been proposed to alleviate the influence of field inhomogeneity so as to reduce the banding-like spin-lock artifacts. T1ρ imaging could be specific absorption rate (SAR) intensive and time consuming. Efforts to address these issues and speed-up data acquisition are being explored to facilitate wider clinical applications. This paper reviews the T1ρ imaging’s basic physic principles, as well as its application for cartilage imaging and intervertebral disc imaging. Compared to more established T2 relaxation time, it has been shown that T1ρ provides more sensitive detection of proteoglycan (PG) loss at early stages of cartilage degeneration. T1ρ has also been shown to provide more sensitive evaluation of annulus fibrosis (AF) degeneration of the discs. PMID:26807369

  9. T1ρ magnetic resonance: basic physics principles and applications in knee and intervertebral disc imaging.

    PubMed

    Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J; Zhang, Qinwei; Li, Xiaojuan; Chen, Weitian; Ahuja, Anil; Yuan, Jing

    2015-12-01

    T1ρ relaxation time provides a new contrast mechanism that differs from T1- and T2-weighted contrast, and is useful to study low-frequency motional processes and chemical exchange in biological tissues. T1ρ imaging can be performed in the forms of T1ρ-weighted image, T1ρ mapping and T1ρ dispersion. T1ρ imaging, particularly at low spin-lock frequency, is sensitive to B0 and B1 inhomogeneity. Various composite spin-lock pulses have been proposed to alleviate the influence of field inhomogeneity so as to reduce the banding-like spin-lock artifacts. T1ρ imaging could be specific absorption rate (SAR) intensive and time consuming. Efforts to address these issues and speed-up data acquisition are being explored to facilitate wider clinical applications. This paper reviews the T1ρ imaging's basic physic principles, as well as its application for cartilage imaging and intervertebral disc imaging. Compared to more established T2 relaxation time, it has been shown that T1ρ provides more sensitive detection of proteoglycan (PG) loss at early stages of cartilage degeneration. T1ρ has also been shown to provide more sensitive evaluation of annulus fibrosis (AF) degeneration of the discs.

  10. The trust formula: Trust = fairness + leadership

    SciTech Connect

    Lovenheim, R.

    1995-11-01

    Many state and compact LLW siting processes have been characterized by slippage and failure. The paper focuses on two major {open_quotes}lessons learned{close_quotes} regarding public interaction and trust, and how these lessons are being applied to current siting efforts. The relationship of environmental idealism and trust will be explored further in this paper. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer concludes his 1994 book, Breaking the Vicious Circle by stating: {open_quotes}Finally, this book also reflects a belief that trust in institutions arises not simply as a result of openness in government, responses to local interest groups, or priorities emphasized in the press -- though these attitudes and actions play an important role -- but also from those institutions doing a difficult job well.{close_quotes}

  11. Dimensionality of Organizational Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Samuel H.; Wiswell, Albert K.

    2007-01-01

    Trust facilitates individual and organizational learning, and is often misunderstood by organizations although they must continuously learn in order to attain organizational goals and survive. Leaders of organizations often view trust defensively and their reactions may impede organizational learning This paper builds on prior research concerning…

  12. National Education Trust Fund

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapp, Milton J.

    1975-01-01

    A proposal from the governor of Pennsylvania for financing all levels of education through a National Education Trust Fund (NETF) that would operate as the present Federal Highway Trust Fund does on a revolving, self-liquidating basis with the cost of an individual's education repaid through a progressive education tax on income. (JT)

  13. Trust, trustworthiness and health.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Angus

    2015-01-01

    Trust is an essential component of good healthcare. If patients trust their physicians, then the relationship between them can be a richer and more meaningful one. The patient is more likely to feel confident and able to disclose symptoms, helping diagnosis and future care. If public health and community workers are trusted, not only is it likely that their work will be easier, in that their actions will be respected and accepted, but their advice will also be sought spontaneously. Trust, can, therefore, be thought of as something that is of benefit to all: healthcare workers, individuals and communities. Trust is, generally, something to be prized and we need to do anything we can to strengthen it.

  14. Distinct human and mouse membrane trafficking systems for sweet taste receptors T1r2 and T1r3.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Madoka; Goto, Masao; Kawai, Takayuki; Yamashita, Atsuko; Kusakabe, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    The sweet taste receptors T1r2 and T1r3 are included in the T1r taste receptor family that belongs to class C of the G protein-coupled receptors. Heterodimerization of T1r2 and T1r3 is required for the perception of sweet substances, but little is known about the mechanisms underlying this heterodimerization, including membrane trafficking. We developed tagged mouse T1r2 and T1r3, and human T1R2 and T1R3 and evaluated membrane trafficking in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. We found that human T1R3 surface expression was only observed when human T1R3 was coexpressed with human T1R2, whereas mouse T1r3 was expressed without mouse T1r2 expression. A domain-swapped chimera and truncated human T1R3 mutant showed that the Venus flytrap module and cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of human T1R3 contain a region related to the inhibition of human T1R3 membrane trafficking and coordinated regulation of human T1R3 membrane trafficking. We also found that the Venus flytrap module of both human T1R2 and T1R3 are needed for membrane trafficking, suggesting that the coexpression of human T1R2 and T1R3 is required for this event. These results suggest that the Venus flytrap module and CRD receive taste substances and play roles in membrane trafficking of human T1R2 and T1R3. These features are different from those of mouse receptors, indicating that human T1R2 and T1R3 are likely to have a novel membrane trafficking system.

  15. Distinct Human and Mouse Membrane Trafficking Systems for Sweet Taste Receptors T1r2 and T1r3

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Madoka; Goto, Masao; Kawai, Takayuki; Yamashita, Atsuko; Kusakabe, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    The sweet taste receptors T1r2 and T1r3 are included in the T1r taste receptor family that belongs to class C of the G protein-coupled receptors. Heterodimerization of T1r2 and T1r3 is required for the perception of sweet substances, but little is known about the mechanisms underlying this heterodimerization, including membrane trafficking. We developed tagged mouse T1r2 and T1r3, and human T1R2 and T1R3 and evaluated membrane trafficking in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. We found that human T1R3 surface expression was only observed when human T1R3 was coexpressed with human T1R2, whereas mouse T1r3 was expressed without mouse T1r2 expression. A domain-swapped chimera and truncated human T1R3 mutant showed that the Venus flytrap module and cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of human T1R3 contain a region related to the inhibition of human T1R3 membrane trafficking and coordinated regulation of human T1R3 membrane trafficking. We also found that the Venus flytrap module of both human T1R2 and T1R3 are needed for membrane trafficking, suggesting that the coexpression of human T1R2 and T1R3 is required for this event. These results suggest that the Venus flytrap module and CRD receive taste substances and play roles in membrane trafficking of human T1R2 and T1R3. These features are different from those of mouse receptors, indicating that human T1R2 and T1R3 are likely to have a novel membrane trafficking system. PMID:25029362

  16. Whom should we trust? Trust yourselves!

    SciTech Connect

    Fentiman, A.W.; Mancl, K.M.; Hajek, B.K.

    1995-11-01

    Members of the public, and their elected officials, often feel at a disadvantage when faced with decisions on technical issues such as those related to low-level radioactive waste management. Many have little or no knowledge of the underlying scientific concepts and often lack a clear understanding of the problems or possible solutions. In the case of controversial, highly emotional topics, facts presented by opposing groups often appear contradictory. People ask, {open_quotes}Whom should we trust?{close_quotes} While advocates of various positions shout, {open_quotes}Trust us!{close_quotes} members of the Ohio State University (OSU) Statewide Low-Level Radioactive Waste Education Program are saying, {open_quotes}Trust yourselves!{close_quotes} The goal of the OSU program is to provide Ohio`s citizens and their elected officials with accurate, easy-to-understand, unbiased information they need to prepare themselves to participate in discussions and decisions related to low-level waste. The faculty members on the project team want to encourage people to learn enough about the topic to feel confident in making their own decisions. For such a program to be successful, however, people must first trust the educational materials they are given. Over the past three years, the OSU team has developed materials that have won wide acceptance. Several factors that appear to have contributed to the acceptance are outlined.

  17. Autonomy, Trust, and Respect

    PubMed Central

    Nys, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This article seeks to explore and analyze the relationship between autonomy and trust, and to show how these findings could be relevant to medical ethics. First, I will argue that the way in which so-called “relational autonomy theories” tie the notions of autonomy and trust together is not entirely satisfying Then, I will introduce the so-called Encapsulated Interest Account as developed by Russell Hardin. This will bring out the importance of the reasons for trust. What good reasons do we have for trusting someone? I will criticize Hardin’s business model as insufficiently robust, especially in the context of health care, and then turn to another source of trust, namely, love. It may seem that trust-through-love is much better suited for the vulnerability that is often involved in health care, but I will also show that it has its own deficiencies. Good health care should therefore pay attention to both models of trust, and I will offer some tentative remarks on how to do this. PMID:26668168

  18. Autonomy, Trust, and Respect.

    PubMed

    Nys, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    This article seeks to explore and analyze the relationship between autonomy and trust, and to show how these findings could be relevant to medical ethics. First, I will argue that the way in which so-called "relational autonomy theories" tie the notions of autonomy and trust together is not entirely satisfying Then, I will introduce the so-called Encapsulated Interest Account as developed by Russell Hardin. This will bring out the importance of the reasons for trust. What good reasons do we have for trusting someone? I will criticize Hardin's business model as insufficiently robust, especially in the context of health care, and then turn to another source of trust, namely, love. It may seem that trust-through-love is much better suited for the vulnerability that is often involved in health care, but I will also show that it has its own deficiencies. Good health care should therefore pay attention to both models of trust, and I will offer some tentative remarks on how to do this.

  19. Trust in healthcare settings: Scale development, methods, and preliminary determinants

    PubMed Central

    LoCurto, Jamie; Berg, Gina M

    2016-01-01

    The literature contains research regarding how trust is formed in healthcare settings but rarely discusses trust formation in an emergent care population. A literature review was conducted to determine which of the trust determinants are important for this process as well as how to develop a scale to measure trust. A search generated a total of 155 articles, 65 of which met eligibility criteria. Determinants that were important included the following: honesty, confidentiality, dependability, communication, competency, fiduciary responsibility, fidelity, and agency. The process of developing a scale includes the following: a literature review, qualitative analysis, piloting, and survey validation. Results suggest that physician behaviors are important in influencing trust in patients and should be included in scales measuring trust. Next steps consist of interviewing emergent care patients to commence the process of developing a scale. PMID:27635245

  20. Trusting Crowdsourced Geospatial Semantics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodhue, P.; McNair, H.; Reitsma, F.

    2015-08-01

    The degree of trust one can place in information is one of the foremost limitations of crowdsourced geospatial information. As with the development of web technologies, the increased prevalence of semantics associated with geospatial information has increased accessibility and functionality. Semantics also provides an opportunity to extend indicators of trust for crowdsourced geospatial information that have largely focused on spatio-temporal and social aspects of that information. Comparing a feature's intrinsic and extrinsic properties to associated ontologies provides a means of semantically assessing the trustworthiness of crowdsourced geospatial information. The application of this approach to unconstrained semantic submissions then allows for a detailed assessment of the trust of these features whilst maintaining the descriptive thoroughness this mode of information submission affords. The resulting trust rating then becomes an attribute of the feature, providing not only an indication as to the trustworthiness of a specific feature but is able to be aggregated across multiple features to illustrate the overall trustworthiness of a dataset.

  1. Trust and Fertility Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Billari, Francesco C.; Pessin, Léa

    2016-01-01

    We argue that the divergence in fertility trends in advanced societies is influenced by the interaction of long-standing differences in generalized trust with the increase in women’s educational attainment. Our argument builds on the idea that trust enhances individuals’ and couples’ willingness to outsource childcare to outside their extended family. This becomes critically important as women’s increased education enhances the demand for combining work and family life. We test our hypothesis using data from the World Values Survey and European Values Study on 36 industrialized countries between the years 1981 and 2009. Multilevel statistical analyses reveal that the interaction between national-level generalized trust and cohort-level women’s education is positively associated with completed fertility. As education among women expands, high levels of generalized trust moderate fertility decline. PMID:28003707

  2. Improving the radiologist-CAD interaction: designing for appropriate trust.

    PubMed

    Jorritsma, W; Cnossen, F; van Ooijen, P M A

    2015-02-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) has great potential to improve radiologists' diagnostic performance. However, the reported performance of the radiologist-CAD team is lower than what might be expected based on the performance of the radiologist and the CAD system in isolation. This indicates that the interaction between radiologists and the CAD system is not optimal. An important factor in the interaction between humans and automated aids (such as CAD) is trust. Suboptimal performance of the human-automation team is often caused by an inappropriate level of trust in the automation. In this review, we examine the role of trust in the radiologist-CAD interaction and suggest ways to improve the output of the CAD system so that it allows radiologists to calibrate their trust in the CAD system more effectively. Observer studies of the CAD systems show that radiologists often have an inappropriate level of trust in the CAD system. They sometimes under-trust CAD, thereby reducing its potential benefits, and sometimes over-trust it, leading to diagnostic errors they would not have made without CAD. Based on the literature on trust in human-automation interaction and the results of CAD observer studies, we have identified four ways to improve the output of CAD so that it allows radiologists to form a more appropriate level of trust in CAD. Designing CAD systems for appropriate trust is important and can improve the performance of the radiologist-CAD team. Future CAD research and development should acknowledge the importance of the radiologist-CAD interaction, and specifically the role of trust therein, in order to create the perfect artificial partner for the radiologist. This review focuses on the role of trust in the radiologist-CAD interaction. The aim of the review is to encourage CAD developers to design for appropriate trust and thereby improve the performance of the radiologist-CAD team.

  3. Saturation-inversion-recovery: A method for T1 measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongzhi; Zhao, Ming; Ackerman, Jerome L.; Song, Yiqiao

    2017-01-01

    Spin-lattice relaxation (T1) has always been measured by inversion-recovery (IR), saturation-recovery (SR), or related methods. These existing methods share a common behavior in that the function describing T1 sensitivity is the exponential, e.g., exp(- τ /T1), where τ is the recovery time. In this paper, we describe a saturation-inversion-recovery (SIR) sequence for T1 measurement with considerably sharper T1-dependence than those of the IR and SR sequences, and demonstrate it experimentally. The SIR method could be useful in improving the contrast between regions of differing T1 in T1-weighted MRI.

  4. Trusting Beliefs: A Functional Measurement Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidotto, Giulio; Massidda, Davide; Noventa, Stefano; Vicentini, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Trust is a fundamental aspect of everyday life. Several authors define trust as the wish to depend on another entity and split the concept of trust into several interconnected components such as trusting beliefs (e.g., benevolence, competence, honesty, and predictability), trusting intentions, trusting behaviors, disposition to trust, and…

  5. Trusted Computing Technologies, Intel Trusted Execution Technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Guise, Max Joseph; Wendt, Jeremy Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We describe the current state-of-the-art in Trusted Computing Technologies - focusing mainly on Intel's Trusted Execution Technology (TXT). This document is based on existing documentation and tests of two existing TXT-based systems: Intel's Trusted Boot and Invisible Things Lab's Qubes OS. We describe what features are lacking in current implementations, describe what a mature system could provide, and present a list of developments to watch. Critical systems perform operation-critical computations on high importance data. In such systems, the inputs, computation steps, and outputs may be highly sensitive. Sensitive components must be protected from both unauthorized release, and unauthorized alteration: Unauthorized users should not access the sensitive input and sensitive output data, nor be able to alter them; the computation contains intermediate data with the same requirements, and executes algorithms that the unauthorized should not be able to know or alter. Due to various system requirements, such critical systems are frequently built from commercial hardware, employ commercial software, and require network access. These hardware, software, and network system components increase the risk that sensitive input data, computation, and output data may be compromised.

  6. Trust Transitivity in Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Richters, Oliver; Peixoto, Tiago P.

    2011-01-01

    Non-centralized recommendation-based decision making is a central feature of several social and technological processes, such as market dynamics, peer-to-peer file-sharing and the web of trust of digital certification. We investigate the properties of trust propagation on networks, based on a simple metric of trust transitivity. We investigate analytically the percolation properties of trust transitivity in random networks with arbitrary in/out-degree distributions, and compare with numerical realizations. We find that the existence of a non-zero fraction of absolute trust (i.e. entirely confident trust) is a requirement for the viability of global trust propagation in large systems: The average pair-wise trust is marked by a discontinuous transition at a specific fraction of absolute trust, below which it vanishes. Furthermore, we perform an extensive analysis of the Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) web of trust, in view of the concepts introduced. We compare different scenarios of trust distribution: community- and authority-centered. We find that these scenarios lead to sharply different patterns of trust propagation, due to the segregation of authority hubs and densely-connected communities. While the authority-centered scenario is more efficient, and leads to higher average trust values, it favours weakly-connected “fringe” nodes, which are directly trusted by authorities. The community-centered scheme, on the other hand, favours nodes with intermediate in/out-degrees, in detriment of the authorities and its “fringe” peers. PMID:21483683

  7. T1rho MRI and CSF biomarkers in diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Haris, Mohammad; Yadav, Santosh K; Rizwan, Arshi; Singh, Anup; Cai, Kejia; Kaura, Deepak; Wang, Ena; Davatzikos, Christos; Trojanowski, John Q; Melhem, Elias R; Marincola, Francesco M; Borthakur, Arijitt

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, we have evaluated the performance of magnetic resonance (MR) T1rho (T1ρ) imaging and CSF biomarkers (T-tau, P-tau and Aβ-42) in characterization of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and control subjects. With informed consent, AD (n = 27), MCI (n = 17) and control (n = 17) subjects underwent a standardized clinical assessment and brain MRI on a 1.5-T clinical-scanner. T1ρ images were obtained at four different spin-lock pulse duration (10, 20, 30 and 40 ms). T1ρ maps were generated by pixel-wise fitting of signal intensity as a function of the spin-lock pulse duration. T1ρ values from gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) of medial temporal lobe were calculated. The binary logistic regression using T1ρ and CSF biomarkers as variables was performed to classify each group. T1ρ was able to predict 77.3% controls and 40.0% MCI while CSF biomarkers predicted 81.8% controls and 46.7% MCI. T1ρ and CSF biomarkers in combination predicted 86.4% controls and 66.7% MCI. When comparing controls with AD, T1ρ predicted 68.2% controls and 73.9% AD, while CSF biomarkers predicted 77.3% controls and 78.3% for AD. Combination of T1ρ and CSF biomarkers improved the prediction rate to 81.8% for controls and 82.6% for AD. Similarly, on comparing MCI with AD, T1ρ predicted 35.3% MCI and 81.9% AD, whereas CSF biomarkers predicted 53.3% MCI and 83.0% AD. Collectively CSF biomarkers and T1ρ were able to predict 59.3% MCI and 84.6% AD. On receiver operating characteristic analysis T1ρ showed higher sensitivity while CSF biomarkers showed greater specificity in delineating MCI and AD from controls. No significant correlation between T1ρ and CSF biomarkers, between T1ρ and age, and between CSF biomarkers and age was observed. The combined use of T1ρ and CSF biomarkers have promise to improve the early and specific diagnosis of AD. Furthermore, disease progression form MCI to AD might be easily tracked using

  8. Trusted Translation Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atif, Yacine; Serhani, Mohamed Adel; Campbell, Piers; Mathew, Sujith Samuel

    Administering multilingual Web sites and applications reliably, involves interconnected and multipart tasks, where trust in the involved parties and content translation sources is paramount. Published Web sites may reflect content from databases, content management systems and other repositories to manage related Web content. But a Web site mirrored wholly or selectively onto a target language version requires streamlined trusted processes. Traditionally, files are translated and transferred via FTP, e-mail, or other communication means. Similarly, translation instructions are communicated between involved parties through verbal instruction, e-mail, and instruction files lead to a variety of inconsistencies and lack of trust in the translation process. This paper proposes a Web service approach to streamline the translation processes and an integration of trust properties in the proposed translation Web services. Web Services have been instrumental in handling problems inherent to systems integration, allowing web-based systems to converse and communicate data automatically. The OASIS Translation Web Services Technical Committee has released a standard way for Web Services to serve the translation and localization business. This article proposes a framework to centralize translation services at a reputable source providing a workflow and a mechanism to quantify service trust. An implementation of the framework is also described in the context of a localization case study.

  9. Trust Development in Small Teams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    distinction between trust as a psychological state and as choice behaviour appears to be waning somewhat in favour of trust being conceptualised as a... psychological state. A recent review, for example, selectively excluded articles that focused on trust as only a behaviour in favour of those that involved...the conceptualisation of trust as both a psychological state and a behaviour (Dirks and Ferrin, 2002). This shift will perhaps accommodate some of

  10. Four Essential Practices for Building Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, Julie Peterson; Harris, Sandra; Edmonson, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    The presence of trust can enhance an organization's efforts to fulfill its mission, and the lack of trust can constrict those efforts. The authors offer four essential guidelines to help school leaders communicate in a way that builds trust. Build trust by understanding trust. Trusted leaders demonstrate care, character, and competence in their…

  11. Predictors of associated autoimmune diseases (AAID) in families with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Results from the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC)

    PubMed Central

    Wägner, Ana M; Santana, Ángelo; Hernández, Marta; Wiebe, Julia C; Nóvoa, Javier; Mauricio, Didac

    2011-01-01

    Background Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a clinically heterogeneous disease. The presence of associated autoimmune diseases (AAID) may represent a distinct form of autoimmune diabetes, with involvement of specific mechanisms. The aim of this study was to find predictors of AAID in the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) data set. Methods 3263 families with at least 2 siblings with T1D were included. Clinical information was obtained using questionnaires, anti-GAD and anti-IA-2 were measured and HLA-genotyping was performed. Siblings with T1D with and without AAID were compared and a multivariate regression analysis was performed to find predictors of AAID. T1D-associated HLA haplotypes were defined as the 4 most susceptible and protective, respectively. Results AAID was present in 14.4% of the T1D affected siblings. Age of diabetes onset, current age and time since diagnosis were higher, and there was a female predominance and more family history of AAID in the group with AAID, as well as more frequent anti-GAD and less frequent anti-IA2 positivity. Risk and protective HLA haplotype distributions were similar, though DRB1*0301-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 was more frequent in the group with AAID. In the multivariate analysis, female gender, age of onset, family history of AAID, time since diagnosis and anti-GAD positivity were significantly associated with AAID. Conclusions In patients with T1D, the presence of AAID is associated with female predominance, more frequent family history of AAID, later onset of T1D and more anti-GAD antibodies, despite longer duration of the disease. The predominance of certain HLA haplotypes suggests that specific mechanisms of disease may be involved. PMID:21744463

  12. Trust It or Trash It?

    MedlinePlus

    Trust It or Trash It? About | Contact | Español Tab 1 Tab 2 What is Trust It or Trash It? This is a tool to help you think ... here for the developer version. Home Who Said It? Who wrote it? Think about TRUSTING IT if: ...

  13. Trust Development in Outdoor Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shooter, Wynn; Paisley, Karen; Sibthorp, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Establishing trusting relationships between leaders and participants is one way that outdoor leaders can create an emotionally safe and productive milieu that supports the attainment of desirable outcomes. Multidisciplinary literature offers considerable insight into leader trust development and the outcomes that are linked to trust in a leader.…

  14. Why Teachers Trust School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handford, Victoria; Leithwood, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Trust among teachers in schools is significantly related to student achievement and trust in school leaders is an important influence on such trust. The purpose of this study is to identify leadership practices which teachers interpret as signs of trustworthiness on the part of their principals. Design/methodology/approach: Evidence for…

  15. Human Trust in Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    Robert and Bertrand David (Eds.):  Proceedings of the 18th International Conference of the Association Francophone d’Interaction Homme ‐ Machine ...provides us with an avenue of approach; that is, to understand how trust is mediated by technology interfaces and connections. Salamacha and

  16. A simple method for NMR t1 noise suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Huaping; Harwood, John S.; Yang, Danzhou; Post, Carol Beth

    2017-03-01

    t1 noise appears as random or semi-random spurious streaks along the indirect t1 (F1) dimension of a 2D or nD NMR spectrum. It can significantly downgrade spectral quality, especially for spectra with strong diagonal signals such as NOESY, because useful and weak cross-peaks can be easily buried under t1 noise. One of the significant contributing factors to t1 noise is unwanted and semi-random F2 signal modulation during t1 acquisition. As such, t1 noise from different acquisitions is unlikely to correlate with each other strongly. In the case of NOESY, co-addition of multiple spectra significantly reduces t1 noise compared with conventional acquisition with the same amount of total acquisition time and resolution.

  17. Homo economicus belief inhibits trust.

    PubMed

    Xin, Ziqiang; Liu, Guofang

    2013-01-01

    As a foundational concept in economics, the homo economicus assumption regards humans as rational and self-interested actors. In contrast, trust requires individuals to believe partners' benevolence and unselfishness. Thus, the homo economicus belief may inhibit trust. The present three experiments demonstrated that the direct exposure to homo economicus belief can weaken trust. And economic situations like profit calculation can also activate individuals' homo economicus belief and inhibit their trust. It seems that people's increasing homo economicus belief may serve as one cause of the worldwide decline of trust.

  18. Trust in the medical profession and patient attachment style.

    PubMed

    Klest, Bridget; Philippon, Olivia

    2016-10-01

    Attachment style is a person's approach to interpersonal relationships, which develops from early experiences with primary caregivers and can remain stable into adulthood. Depending on a person's attachment style, the amount of trust one has in others can vary when forming relationships, and trust is important in formation of the patient-physician relationship. The purpose of this study was to see if there is an association between attachment style and trust in physicians in general. Participants were recruited from an emergency department (ED) and an online university participant pool, and completed short questionnaires assessing attachment style and trust in the medical profession. Results revealed that individuals with a fearful attachment style reported significantly lower levels of trust in the medical profession than those with a secure attachment style. ED participants also reported higher levels of trust in the medical profession in comparison to student participants. This study provides a better understanding of trust in the medical profession, and insight into future care for patients who have low trust.

  19. Implementing a Portable Trusted Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zic, John; Nepal, Surya

    The development of trusted systems, as envisaged by the Trusted Computing Group, assumed that the computing environments are uniform in terms of their operational environment, including hardware configuration, execution of a standard set of applications, operating system and facilities and procedures that allow the issue, revocation and maintenance of critical encryption keys and authorization certificates. These assumptions may be applicable to a single managed enterprise infrastructure. However, in situations where the users are mobile, or the computing environment is heterogeneous and the Internet provides the connectivity, the management of trust between enterprises becomes overwhelmingly difficult, if not impossible. As a result, deployment and uptake of trusted secure systems based on Trusted Platform Module have not been as successful as first envisaged. In this paper, we report on our experiences in designing and implementing a prototype personal trusted device called the Trust Extension Device, or TED, that provides users with a portable trustworthy environment for conducting transactions on any Internet connected computer.

  20. The Condition for Generous Trust

    PubMed Central

    Shinya, Obayashi; Yusuke, Inagaki; Hiroki, Takikawa

    2016-01-01

    Trust has been considered the “cement” of a society and is much studied in sociology and other social sciences. Most studies, however, have neglected one important aspect of trust: it involves an act of forgiving and showing tolerance toward another’s failure. In this study, we refer to this concept as “generous trust” and examine the conditions under which generous trust becomes a more viable option when compared to other types of trust. We investigate two settings. First, we introduce two types of uncertainties: uncertainty as to whether trustees have the intention to cooperate, and uncertainty as to whether trustees have enough competence to accomplish the entrusted tasks. Second, we examine the manner in which trust functions in a broader social context, one that involves matching and commitment processes. Since we expect generosity or forgiveness to work differently in the matching and commitment processes, we must differentiate trust strategies into generous trust in the matching process and that in the commitment process. Our analytical strategy is two-fold. First, we analyze the “modified” trust game that incorporates the two types of uncertainties without the matching process. This simplified setting enables us to derive mathematical results using game theory, thereby giving basic insight into the trust mechanism. Second, we investigate socially embedded trust relationships in contexts involving the matching and commitment processes, using agent-based simulation. Results show that uncertainty about partner’s intention and competence makes generous trust a viable option. In contrast, too much uncertainty undermines the possibility of generous trust. Furthermore, a strategy that is too generous cannot stand alone. Generosity should be accompanied with moderate punishment. As for socially embedded trust relationships, generosity functions differently in the matching process versus the commitment process. Indeed, these two types of generous

  1. L-Theanine elicits umami taste via the T1R1 + T1R3 umami taste receptor.

    PubMed

    Narukawa, Masataka; Toda, Yasuka; Nakagita, Tomoya; Hayashi, Yukako; Misaka, Takumi

    2014-06-01

    L-Theanine is a unique amino acid present in green tea. It elicits umami taste and has a considerable effect on tea taste and quality. We investigated L-theanine activity on the T1R1 + T1R3 umami taste receptor. L-Theanine activated T1R1 + T1R3-expressing cells and showed a synergistic response with inosine 5'-monophosphate. The site-directed mutagenesis analysis revealed that L-theanine binds to L-amino acid binding site in the Venus flytrap domain of T1R1. This study shows that L-theanine elicits an umami taste via T1R1 + T1R3.

  2. A Unified Maximum Likelihood Framework for Simultaneous Motion and $T_{1}$ Estimation in Quantitative MR $T_{1}$ Mapping.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Llorden, Gabriel; den Dekker, Arnold J; Van Steenkiste, Gwendolyn; Jeurissen, Ben; Vanhevel, Floris; Van Audekerke, Johan; Verhoye, Marleen; Sijbers, Jan

    2017-02-01

    In quantitative MR T1 mapping, the spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of tissues is estimated from a series of T1 -weighted images. As the T1 estimation is a voxel-wise estimation procedure, correct spatial alignment of the T1 -weighted images is crucial. Conventionally, the T1 -weighted images are first registered based on a general-purpose registration metric, after which the T1 map is estimated. However, as demonstrated in this paper, such a two-step approach leads to a bias in the final T1 map. In our work, instead of considering motion correction as a preprocessing step, we recover the motion-free T1 map using a unified estimation approach. In particular, we propose a unified framework where the motion parameters and the T1 map are simultaneously estimated with a Maximum Likelihood (ML) estimator. With our framework, the relaxation model, the motion model as well as the data statistics are jointly incorporated to provide substantially more accurate motion and T1 parameter estimates. Experiments with realistic Monte Carlo simulations show that the proposed unified ML framework outperforms the conventional two-step approach as well as state-of-the-art model-based approaches, in terms of both motion and T1 map accuracy and mean-square error. Furthermore, the proposed method was additionally validated in a controlled experiment with real T1 -weighted data and with two in vivo human brain T1 -weighted data sets, showing its applicability in real-life scenarios.

  3. Technology, Intelligence, and TRUST

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    single email or message. The collections team does not have to make an either/or decision about whom to send its intercept or interrogation report...International security studies at the George C. Marshall Center for european security studies in Garmisch- Partenkirchen, Germany. he is a career ... career as an intelligence officer, I was told on numerous occasions, “Trust us, when the balloon goes up, you’ll get all the intelligence you need

  4. TrustRank: a Cold-Start tolerant recommender system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Haitao; Gong, Zhiguo; Zhang, Nan; Zhao, Wei; Guo, Jingzhi

    2015-02-01

    The explosive growth of the World Wide Web leads to the fast advancing development of e-commerce techniques. Recommender systems, which use personalised information filtering techniques to generate a set of items suitable to a given user, have received considerable attention. User- and item-based algorithms are two popular techniques for the design of recommender systems. These two algorithms are known to have Cold-Start problems, i.e., they are unable to effectively handle Cold-Start users who have an extremely limited number of purchase records. In this paper, we develop TrustRank, a novel recommender system which handles the Cold-Start problem by leveraging the user-trust networks which are commonly available for e-commerce applications. A user-trust network is formed by friendships or trust relationships that users specify among them. While it is straightforward to conjecture that a user-trust network is helpful for improving the accuracy of recommendations, a key challenge for using user-trust network to facilitate Cold-Start users is that these users also tend to have a very limited number of trust relationships. To address this challenge, we propose a pre-processing propagation of the Cold-Start users' trust network. In particular, by applying the personalised PageRank algorithm, we expand the friends of a given user to include others with similar purchase records to his/her original friends. To make this propagation algorithm scalable to a large amount of users, as required by real-world recommender systems, we devise an iterative computation algorithm of the original personalised TrustRank which can incrementally compute trust vectors for Cold-Start users. We conduct extensive experiments to demonstrate the consistently improvement provided by our proposed algorithm over the existing recommender algorithms on the accuracy of recommendations for Cold-Start users.

  5. Comparative clinicopathological characteristics of colon and rectal T1 carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ichimasa, Katsuro; Kudo, Shin-Ei; Miyachi, Hideyuki; Kouyama, Yuta; Hayashi, Takemasa; Wakamura, Kunihiko; Hisayuki, Tomokazu; Kudo, Toyoki; Misawa, Masashi; Mori, Yuichi; Matsudaira, Shingo; Hidaka, Eiji; Hamatani, Shigeharu; Ishida, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    Lymph node metastasis significantly influences the management of patients with colorectal carcinoma. It has been observed that the biology of colorectal carcinoma differs by location. The aim of the current study was to retrospectively compare the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with colon and rectal T1 carcinomas, particularly their rates of lymph node metastasis. Of the 19,864 patients who underwent endoscopic or surgical resection of colorectal neoplasms at Showa University Northern Yokohama Hospital, 557 had T1 surgically resected carcinomas, including 457 patients with colon T1 carcinomas and 100 patients with rectal T1 carcinomas. Analysed clinicopathological features included patient age, gender, tumor size, morphology, tumor budding, invasion depth, vascular invasion, histological grade, lymphatic invasion and lymph node metastasis. Rectal T1 carcinomas were significantly larger than colon T1 carcinomas (mean ± standard deviation: 23.7±13.1 mm vs. 19.9±11.0 mm, P<0.01) and were accompanied by significantly higher rates of vascular invasion (48.0% vs. 30.2%, P<0.01). Significant differences were not observed among any other clinicopathological factors. In conclusion, tumor location itself was not a risk factor for lymph node metastasis in colorectal T1 carcinomas, even though on average, rectal T1 carcinomas were larger and accompanied by a significantly higher rate of vascular invasion than colon T1 carcinomas. PMID:28356962

  6. 26 CFR 26.2654-1 - Certain trusts treated as separate trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF... States Gift (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax Return (Form 709) the transfer and the extent to which... transfers $100,000 to an irrevocable generation-skipping trust; B simultaneously transfers $50,000 to...

  7. 26 CFR 26.2654-1 - Certain trusts treated as separate trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF... States Gift (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax Return (Form 709) the transfer and the extent to which... transfers $100,000 to an irrevocable generation-skipping trust; B simultaneously transfers $50,000 to...

  8. 26 CFR 26.2654-1 - Certain trusts treated as separate trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF... States Gift (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax Return (Form 709) the transfer and the extent to which... transfers $100,000 to an irrevocable generation-skipping trust; B simultaneously transfers $50,000 to...

  9. 26 CFR 26.2654-1 - Certain trusts treated as separate trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF... States Gift (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax Return (Form 709) the transfer and the extent to which... transfers $100,000 to an irrevocable generation-skipping trust; B simultaneously transfers $50,000 to...

  10. Optimal Distinctiveness Signals Membership Trust.

    PubMed

    Leonardelli, Geoffrey J; Loyd, Denise Lewin

    2016-07-01

    According to optimal distinctiveness theory, sufficiently small minority groups are associated with greater membership trust, even among members otherwise unknown, because the groups are seen as optimally distinctive. This article elaborates on the prediction's motivational and cognitive processes and tests whether sufficiently small minorities (defined by relative size; for example, 20%) are associated with greater membership trust relative to mere minorities (45%), and whether such trust is a function of optimal distinctiveness. Two experiments, examining observers' perceptions of minority and majority groups and using minimal groups and (in Experiment 2) a trust game, revealed greater membership trust in minorities than majorities. In Experiment 2, participants also preferred joining minorities over more powerful majorities. Both effects occurred only when minorities were 20% rather than 45%. In both studies, perceptions of optimal distinctiveness mediated effects. Discussion focuses on the value of relative size and optimal distinctiveness, and when membership trust manifests.

  11. Towards a politics of trust.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, T

    1998-05-01

    This paper draws upon sociological theory to demonstrate that the manufacture and deployment of trust is an integral part of the function of complex systems such as health care. The discussion begins by identifying the error within the nursing literature which arises from a rather technical conceptualization of trust. This tends to limit the dimensions to trust which is established, and fails to recognize that trust may be subject to competition and conflict. The paper continues by drawing upon the work of two theorists, Niklas Luhmann and Susan P. Shapiro, to demonstrate how trust functions within systems such as health care and the mechanisms through which it is controlled. The title of this paper, 'Towards a politics of trust', identifies that this is merely the first stage in the analysis. Further stages are necessary which analyse the ways in which power is exercised in the conflict for control within discrete elements of the system.

  12. A Requisite for Employee Trust: Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Kerry Marshall

    1988-01-01

    Provides background on organizational trust as product of need satisfaction and presents framework for understanding organizational trust with regard to theoretical differentiation of personal trust and system trust. Defines three factors of organizational trust: openness/congruity, shared values, and autonomy/feedback. Discusses how supervisors…

  13. Capturing Young American Trust in National Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menard, Lauren A.

    2011-01-01

    A pattern of decreasing trusting proportions in each consecutive decade and increasing trusting proportions with age was revealed in data. Although trust levels were lower in younger adults and the 2000s, findings did not support hypotheses of more rapidly falling trust levels or a college degree procuring less trust in the 2000s. A hypothesis of…

  14. Building and Understanding Trust Relationships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-17

    interdependence. To meet these challenges, senior military leaders must understand and build internal and external trust. The Ken Blanchard Company, one...Military Review: The Profession of Arms, September 30, 2011, 16. 2 The Ken Blanchard Company, “Building Trust,” 2010,pdf, http...www.kenblanchard.com/img/pub/ Blanchard -Building-Trust.pdf (accessed November 27, 2011). 3 Richard H. Kohn, “The Early Retirement of Gen. Ronald Fogleman, Chief of

  15. Establishment of safety paradigms and trust in emerging adult relationships

    PubMed Central

    Mullinax, Margo; Sanders, Stephanie; Higgins, Jenny; Dennis, Barbara; Reece, Michael; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2016-01-01

    There is a critical need to understand the interplay between relationship trust and public health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to develop an understanding of emerging adult women’s processes of establishing trust in sexual relationships. Twenty-five women aged 18–24 years participated in semi-structured interviews. Throughout the interviews, women compared and contrasted experiences in which they felt comfortable engaging in sexual intercourse with a partner versus times in which they did not feel comfortable. Analysis was based on a critical qualitative research orientation. When asked to speak to instances when they felt comfortable having sex, most women spoke about relationship trust. Many participants conceptualised trust based on past experiences with bad relationships or sexual violence. Based on their previous experiences of feeling unsafe or undervalued, emotional and physical security became prioritised in relationship development. Trust was developed through friendship, communication over time, and through shared life experiences. This research is among the first to qualitatively investigate trust formation and other impersonal dynamics related to sexual health decision-making. Insights from this study should be translated into future action by public health practitioners to promote healthy sexual relationships and communication about sexual health topics as a form of trust building. PMID:26943023

  16. Achieving Optimal Privacy in Trust-Aware Social Recommender Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokoohaki, Nima; Kaleli, Cihan; Polat, Huseyin; Matskin, Mihhail

    Collaborative filtering (CF) recommenders are subject to numerous shortcomings such as centralized processing, vulnerability to shilling attacks, and most important of all privacy. To overcome these obstacles, researchers proposed for utilization of interpersonal trust between users, to alleviate many of these crucial shortcomings. Till now, attention has been mainly paid to strong points about trust-aware recommenders such as alleviating profile sparsity or calculation cost efficiency, while least attention has been paid on investigating the notion of privacy surrounding the disclosure of individual ratings and most importantly protection of trust computation across social networks forming the backbone of these systems. To contribute to addressing problem of privacy in trust-aware recommenders, within this paper, first we introduce a framework for enabling privacy-preserving trust-aware recommendation generation. While trust mechanism aims at elevating recommender's accuracy, to preserve privacy, accuracy of the system needs to be decreased. Since within this context, privacy and accuracy are conflicting goals we show that a Pareto set can be found as an optimal setting for both privacy-preserving and trust-enabling mechanisms. We show that this Pareto set, when used as the configuration for measuring the accuracy of base collaborative filtering engine, yields an optimized tradeoff between conflicting goals of privacy and accuracy. We prove this concept along with applicability of our framework by experimenting with accuracy and privacy factors, and we show through experiment how such optimal set can be inferred.

  17. Voltage-dependent gating rearrangements in the intracellular T1-T1 interface of a K+ channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangyu; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2006-04-01

    The intracellular tetramerization domain (T1) of most eukaryotic voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv channels) exists as a "hanging gondola" below the transmembrane regions that directly control activation gating via the electromechanical coupling between the S4 voltage sensor and the main S6 gate. However, much less is known about the putative contribution of the T1 domain to Kv channel gating. This possibility is mechanistically intriguing because the T1-S1 linker connects the T1 domain to the voltage-sensing domain. Previously, we demonstrated that thiol-specific reagents inhibit Kv4.1 channels by reacting in a state-dependent manner with native Zn(2+) site thiolate groups in the T1-T1 interface; therefore, we concluded that the T1-T1 interface is functionally active and not protected by Zn(2+) (Wang, G., M. Shahidullah, C.A. Rocha, C. Strang, P.J. Pfaffinger, and M. Covarrubias. 2005. J. Gen. Physiol. 126:55-69). Here, we co-expressed Kv4.1 channels and auxiliary subunits (KChIP-1 and DPPX-S) to investigate the state and voltage dependence of the accessibility of MTSET to the three interfacial cysteines in the T1 domain. The results showed that the average MTSET modification rate constant (k(MTSET)) is dramatically enhanced in the activated state relative to the resting and inactivated states (approximately 260- and approximately 47-fold, respectively). Crucially, under three separate conditions that produce distinct activation profiles, k(MTSET) is steeply voltage dependent in a manner that is precisely correlated with the peak conductance-voltage relations. These observations strongly suggest that Kv4 channel gating is tightly coupled to voltage-dependent accessibility changes of native T1 cysteines in the intersubunit Zn(2+) site. Furthermore, cross-linking of cysteine pairs across the T1-T1 interface induced substantial inhibition of the channel, which supports the functionally dynamic role of T1 in channel gating. Therefore, we conclude that the complex

  18. 78 FR 24814 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8612

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... Undistributed Income of Real Estate Investment Trusts. DATES: Written comments should be received on or before... INFORMATION: Title: Return of Excise Tax on Undistributed Income of Real Estate Investment Trusts. OMB Number: 1545-1013. Form Number: Form 8612. Abstract: Form 8612 is used by real estate investment trusts...

  19. 75 FR 33887 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8612

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... Undistributed Income of Real Estate Investment Trusts. DATES: Written comments should be received on or before... INFORMATION: Title: Return of Excise Tax on Undistributed Income of Real Estate Investment Trusts. OMB Number: 1545-1013. Form Number: Form 8612. Abstract: Form 8612 is used by real estate investment trusts...

  20. Generalized Trust and Trust in Institutions in Confucian Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Soo Jiuan; Tambyah, Siok Kuan

    2011-01-01

    This study examines generalized trust and trust in institutions in Confucian Asia, covering six countries namely, China, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam, and one dependent region, Hong Kong. Using data from the 2006 AsiaBarometer Survey, our study affirms the reliability and validity of using a two-item scale to measure…

  1. Three-dimensional ultrashort echo time cones T1ρ (3D UTE-cones-T1ρ ) imaging.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ya-Jun; Carl, Michael; Shao, Hongda; Tadros, Anthony S; Chang, Eric Y; Du, Jiang

    2017-03-20

    We report a novel three-dimensional (3D) ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence employing Cones trajectory and T1ρ preparation (UTE-Cones-T1ρ ) for quantitative T1ρ assessment of short T2 tissues in the musculoskeletal system. A basic 3D UTE-Cones sequence was combined with a spin-locking preparation pulse for T1ρ contrast. A relatively short TR was used to decrease the scan time, which required T1 measurement and compensation using 3D UTE-Cones data acquisitions with variable TRs. Another strategy to reduce the total scan time was to acquire multiple Cones spokes (Nsp ) after each T1ρ preparation and fat saturation. Four spin-locking times (TSL = 0-20 ms) were acquired over 12 min, plus another 7 min for T1 measurement. The 3D UTE-Cones-T1ρ sequence was compared with a two-dimensional (2D) spiral-T1ρ sequence for the imaging of a spherical CuSO4 phantom and ex vivo meniscus and tendon specimens, as well as the knee and ankle joints of healthy volunteers, using a clinical 3-T scanner. The CuSO4 phantom showed a T1ρ value of 76.5 ± 1.6 ms with the 2D spiral-T1ρ sequence, as well as 85.7 ± 3.6 and 89.2 ± 1.4 ms for the 3D UTE-Cones-T1ρ sequences with Nsp of 1 and 5, respectively. The 3D UTE-Cones-T1ρ sequence provided shorter T1ρ values for the bovine meniscus sample relative to the 2D spiral-T1ρ sequence (10-12 ms versus 16 ms, respectively). The cadaveric human Achilles tendon sample could only be imaged with the 3D UTE-Cones-T1ρ sequence (T1ρ  = 4.0 ± 0.9 ms), with the 2D spiral-T1ρ sequence demonstrating near-zero signal intensity. Human studies yielded T1ρ values of 36.1 ± 2.9, 18.3 ± 3.9 and 3.1 ± 0.4 ms for articular cartilage, meniscus and the Achilles tendon, respectively. The 3D UTE-Cones-T1ρ sequence allows volumetric T1ρ measurement of short T2 tissues in vivo.

  2. Systematic T1 improvement for hyperpolarized 129xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, Maricel; Babcock, Earl; Blümler, Peter; Heil, Werner; Karpuk, Sergei; Tullney, Kathlynne

    2015-03-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of hyperpolarized (HP)-129Xe was improved at typical storage conditions (i.e. low and homogeneous magnetic fields). Very long wall relaxation times T1wall of about 18 h were observed in uncoated, spherical GE180 glass cells of ∅ = 10 cm which were free of rubidium and not permanently sealed but attached to a standard glass stopcock. An "aging" process of the wall relaxation was identified by repeating measurements on the same cell. This effect could be easily removed by repeating the initial cleaning procedure. In this way, a constant wall relaxation was ensured. The Xe nuclear spin-relaxation rate 1 /T1Xel -Xe due to van der Waals molecules was investigated too, by admixing three different buffer gases (N2, SF6 and CO2). Especially CO2 exhibited an unexpected high efficiency (r) in shortening the lifetime of the Xe-Xe dimers and hence prolonging the total T1 relaxation even further. These measurements also yielded an improved accuracy for the van der Waals relaxation for pure Xe (with 85% 129Xe) of T1Xe -Xe = (4.6 ± 0.1)h . Repeating the measurements with HP 129Xe in natural abundance in mixtures with SF6, a strong dependence of T1Xe -Xe and r on the isotopic enrichment was observed, uncovering a shorter T1Xe -Xe relaxation for the 129Xe in natural composition as compared to the 85% isotopically enriched gas.

  3. Trusted computing strengthens cloud authentication.

    PubMed

    Ghazizadeh, Eghbal; Zamani, Mazdak; Ab Manan, Jamalul-lail; Alizadeh, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new generation of technology which is designed to provide the commercial necessities, solve the IT management issues, and run the appropriate applications. Another entry on the list of cloud functions which has been handled internally is Identity Access Management (IAM). Companies encounter IAM as security challenges while adopting more technologies became apparent. Trust Multi-tenancy and trusted computing based on a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) are great technologies for solving the trust and security concerns in the cloud identity environment. Single sign-on (SSO) and OpenID have been released to solve security and privacy problems for cloud identity. This paper proposes the use of trusted computing, Federated Identity Management, and OpenID Web SSO to solve identity theft in the cloud. Besides, this proposed model has been simulated in .Net environment. Security analyzing, simulation, and BLP confidential model are three ways to evaluate and analyze our proposed model.

  4. Trusted Computing Strengthens Cloud Authentication

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new generation of technology which is designed to provide the commercial necessities, solve the IT management issues, and run the appropriate applications. Another entry on the list of cloud functions which has been handled internally is Identity Access Management (IAM). Companies encounter IAM as security challenges while adopting more technologies became apparent. Trust Multi-tenancy and trusted computing based on a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) are great technologies for solving the trust and security concerns in the cloud identity environment. Single sign-on (SSO) and OpenID have been released to solve security and privacy problems for cloud identity. This paper proposes the use of trusted computing, Federated Identity Management, and OpenID Web SSO to solve identity theft in the cloud. Besides, this proposed model has been simulated in .Net environment. Security analyzing, simulation, and BLP confidential model are three ways to evaluate and analyze our proposed model. PMID:24701149

  5. Irreversible change in the T1 temperature dependence with thermal dose using the proton resonance frequency-T1 technique.

    PubMed

    Diakite, Mahamadou; Payne, Allison; Todd, Nick; Parker, Dennis L

    2013-04-01

    Denaturation of macromolecules within the tissues is believed to be the major factor contributing to the damage of tissues upon hyperthermia. As a result, the value of the spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of the tissue water, which is related to the translational and rotational rates of water, represents an intrinsic probe for investigating structural changes in tissues at high temperature. Therefore, the goal of this work is to investigate whether the simultaneous measurement of temperature and T1 using a hybrid proton resonance frequency (PRF)-T1 measurement technique can be used to detect irreversible changes in T1 that might be indicative of tissue damage. A new hybrid PRF-T1 sequence was implemented based on the variable flip angle driven-equilibrium single-pulse observation (DESPOT)1 method from a standard three dimensional segmented echo-planar imaging sequence by alternating two flip angles from measurement to measurement. The structural changes of the heated tissue volumes were analyzed based on the derived T1 values and the corresponding PRF temperatures. Using the hybrid PRF-T1 technique, we demonstrate that the change of spin lattice relaxation time T1 is reversible with temperature for low thermal dose (thermal dose ≤ 240 cumulative equivalent minutes [CEM] 43°C) and irreversible with temperature after significant accumulation of thermal dose in ex vivo chicken breast tissue. These results suggest that the hybrid PRF-T1 method may be a potentially powerful tool to investigate the extent and mechanism of heat damage of biological tissues.

  6. The Business of Trust.

    PubMed

    Frisse, Mark E

    2016-04-01

    New mobile devices, social networks, analytics, and communications technologies are emerging at an unparalleled rate. As a result, academic health centers will face both new opportunities and formidable challenges. Unlike previous transitions from paper-based systems to networked computer systems, these new technologies are the product of new entrepreneurial and commercial interests driven by consumers. As these new commercial products and services are more widely adopted, the likelihood grows that data will be used in unanticipated ways inconsistent with societal norms. Academic health centers will have to understand the implications of these technologies and engage more actively in processes governing the collection, aggregation, and use of health data produced in a new era of consumer-driven health care technology. Maintaining public trust should be a paramount concern.

  7. Never trust a croup…

    PubMed Central

    Nickinson, Andrew; Minhas, Jatinder Singh; Bhalla, Minak; Anwuzia-Iwegbu, Charles; Chapman, John

    2011-01-01

    A 2-year-old girl presented to the James Paget University Hospitals Trust with croup-like symptoms and was later discharged with dexamethasone syrup. The patient re-presented 6 h later following maternal concern with signs of acute respiratory distress. After a period of clinical stability, she acutely decompensated without any prior signs of a life-threatening deterioration. She was managed using nebulised epinephrine and showed signs of clinical improvement. Although improvement persisted, the child showed signs of exhaustion following the preceding events and was later intubed with an endotracheal tube and transferred to the paediatric intensive care unit at Addenbrooke’s University Hospital, Cambridge. Endotracheal aspiration later grew parainfluenza virus, rhinovirus and Staphylococcus aureus and the patient was diagnosed with the exceptionally rare life threatening complications of croup, bacterial tracheitis. The patient was discharged from intensive care 7 days later and has since made a full recovery. PMID:22689599

  8. Trust, Respect, and Reciprocity

    PubMed Central

    Phong, Tran Viet; Nhan, Le Nguyen Thanh; Dung, Nguyen Thanh; Ngan, Ta Thi Dieu; Kinh, Nguyen Van; Parker, Michael; Bull, Susan

    2015-01-01

    International science funders and publishers are driving a growing trend in data sharing. There is mounting pressure on researchers in low- and middle-income settings to conform to new sharing policies, despite minimal empirically grounded accounts of the ethical challenges of implementing the policies in these settings. This study used in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with 48 stakeholders in Vietnam to explore the experiences, attitudes, and expectations that inform ethical and effective approaches to sharing clinical research data. Distinct views on the role of trust, respect, and reciprocity were among those that emerged to inform culturally appropriate best practices. We conclude by discussing the challenges that authors of data-sharing policies should consider in this unique context. PMID:26297747

  9. Systematic T1 improvement for hyperpolarized 129xenon.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Maricel; Babcock, Earl; Blümler, Peter; Heil, Werner; Karpuk, Sergei; Tullney, Kathlynne

    2015-03-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of hyperpolarized (HP)-(129)Xe was improved at typical storage conditions (i.e. low and homogeneous magnetic fields). Very long wall relaxation times T(1)(wall) of about 18 h were observed in uncoated, spherical GE180 glass cells of ∅=10 cm which were free of rubidium and not permanently sealed but attached to a standard glass stopcock. An "aging" process of the wall relaxation was identified by repeating measurements on the same cell. This effect could be easily removed by repeating the initial cleaning procedure. In this way, a constant wall relaxation was ensured. The Xe nuclear spin-relaxation rate 1/T1(Xe-Xe) due to van der Waals molecules was investigated too, by admixing three different buffer gases (N(2), SF(6) and CO(2)). Especially CO(2) exhibited an unexpected high efficiency (r) in shortening the lifetime of the Xe-Xe dimers and hence prolonging the total T1 relaxation even further. These measurements also yielded an improved accuracy for the van der Waals relaxation for pure Xe (with 85% (129)Xe) of T(1)(Xe-Xe)=(4.6±0.1)h. Repeating the measurements with HP (129)Xe in natural abundance in mixtures with SF6, a strong dependence of T(1)(Xe-Xe) and r on the isotopic enrichment was observed, uncovering a shorter T(1)(Xe-Xe) relaxation for the (129)Xe in natural composition as compared to the 85% isotopically enriched gas.

  10. Hyperpolarized (129)Xe T (1) in oxygenated and deoxygenated blood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, M. S.; Balamore, D.; Kacher, D. F.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Jolesz, F. A.

    2000-01-01

    The viability of the new technique of hyperpolarized (129)Xe MRI (HypX-MRI) for imaging organs other than the lungs depends on whether the spin-lattice relaxation time, T(1), of (129)Xe is sufficiently long in the blood. In previous experiments by the authors, the T(1) was found to be strongly dependent upon the oxygenation of the blood, with T(1) increasing from about 3 s in deoxygenated samples to about 10 s in oxygenated samples. Contrarily, Tseng et al. (J. Magn. Reson. 1997; 126: 79-86) reported extremely long T(1) values deduced from an indirect experiment in which hyperpolarized (129)Xe was used to create a 'blood-foam'. They found that oxygenation decreased T(1). Pivotal to their experiment is the continual and rapid exchange of hyperpolarized (129)Xe between the gas phase (within blood-foam bubbles) and the dissolved phase (in the skin of the bubbles); this necessitated a complicated analysis to extract the T(1) of (129)Xe in blood. In the present study, the experimental design minimizes gas exchange after the initial bolus of hyperpolarized (129)Xe has been bubbled through the sample. This study confirms that oxygenation increases the T(1) of (129)Xe in blood, from about 4 s in freshly drawn venous blood, to about 13 s in blood oxygenated to arterial levels, and also shifts the red blood cell resonance to higher frequency. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Abbreviations used BOLD blood oxygen level dependent NOE nuclear overhouses effect PO(2) oxygen partial pressure RBC red blood cells RF radio frequency SNR signal-to-noise ratio.

  11. Trust, Behavior, and High School Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Lisa S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature on student trust and to examine the relationship between student trust, behavior, and academic outcomes in high school. It asks, first, does trust have a positive effect on high school outcomes? Second, does trust influence student behavior, exerting an indirect effect on…

  12. 43 CFR 426.7 - Trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Trusts. 426.7 Section 426.7 Public Lands... LIMITATION RULES AND REGULATIONS § 426.7 Trusts. (a) Definitions for purposes of this section: Grantor revocable trust means a trust that holds irrigable land or irrigation land that may be revoked at...

  13. 12 CFR 7.2022 - Voting trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voting trusts. 7.2022 Section 7.2022 Banks and... Practices § 7.2022 Voting trusts. The shareholders of a national bank may establish a voting trust under the applicable law of a state selected by the participants and designated in the trust agreement, provided...

  14. 7 CFR 1400.100 - Revocable trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Revocable trust. 1400.100 Section 1400.100... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Limitation § 1400.100 Revocable trust. A revocable trust and the grantor of the trust will be considered to be the same person....

  15. 14 CFR 47.8 - Voting trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voting trusts. 47.8 Section 47.8... REGISTRATION General § 47.8 Voting trusts. (a) If a voting trust is used to qualify a domestic corporation as a... the fully executed voting trust agreement, which must identify each voting interest of the...

  16. Birth Weight and Social Trust in Adulthood: Evidence for Early Calibration of Social Cognition.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Michael Bang; Aarøe, Lene

    2015-11-01

    Social trust forms the fundamental basis for social interaction within societies. Understanding the cognitive architecture of trust and the roots of individual differences in trust is of key importance. We predicted that one of the factors calibrating individual levels of trust is the intrauterine flow of nutrients from mother to child as indexed by birth weight. Birth weight forecasts both the future external environment and the internal condition of the individual in multiple ways relevant for social cognition. Specifically, we predicted that low birth weight is utilized as a forecast of a harsh environment, vulnerable condition, or both and, consequently, reduces social trust. The results of the study reported here are consistent with this prediction. Controlling for many confounds through sibling and panel designs, we found that lower birth weight reduced social trust in adulthood. Furthermore, we obtained tentative evidence that this effect is mitigated if adult environments do not induce stress.

  17. Estimating T1 from Multichannel Variable Flip Angle SPGR Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Trzasko, Joshua D.; Mostardi, Petrice M.; Riederer, Stephen J.; Manduca, Armando

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative estimation of T1 is a challenging but important task inherent to many clinical applications. The most commonly used paradigm for estimating T1 in vivo involves performing a sequence of spoiled gradient-recalled echo acquisitions at different flip angles, followed by fitting of an exponential model to the data. Although there has been substantial work comparing different fitting methods, there has been little discussion on how these methods should be applied for data acquired using multichannel receivers. In this note, we demonstrate that the manner in which multichannel data is handled can have a substantial impact on T1 estimation performance and should be considered equally as important as choice of flip angles or fitting strategy. PMID:22807160

  18. Trust and Privacy in Healthcare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, Peter; Kalra, Dipak

    This paper considers issues of trust and privacy in healthcare around increased data-sharing through Electronic Health Records (EHRs). It uses a model structured around different aspects of trust in the healthcare organisation’s reasons for greater data-sharing and their ability to execute EHR projects, particularly any associated confidentiality controls. It reflects the individual’s personal circumstances and attitude to use of health records.

  19. Myocardial T1 mapping: modalities and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Jellis, Christine L.

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial fibrosis appears to be linked to myocardial dysfunction in a multitude of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. Accurate non-invasive quantitation of this extra-cellular matrix has the potential for widespread clinical benefit in both diagnosis and guiding therapeutic intervention. T1 mapping is a cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging technique, which shows early clinical promise particularly in the setting of diffuse fibrosis. This review will outline the evolution of T1 mapping and the various techniques available with their inherent advantages and limitations. Histological validation of this technique remains somewhat limited, however clinical application in a range of pathologies suggests strong potential for future development. PMID:24834410

  20. A novel enterocin T1 with anti-Pseudomonas activity produced by Enterococcus faecium T1 from Chinese Tibet cheese.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Zhang, Lanwei; Yi, Huaxi; Han, Xue; Gao, Wei; Chi, Chunliang; Song, Wei; Li, Haiying; Liu, Chunguang

    2016-02-01

    An enterocin-producing Enterococcus faecium T1 was isolated from Chinese Tibet cheese. The enterocin was purified by SP-Sepharose and reversed phase HPLC. It was identified as unique from other reported bacteriocins based on molecular weight (4629 Da) and amino acid compositions; therefore it was subsequently named enterocin T1. Enterocin T1 was stable at 80-100 °C and over a wide pH range, pH 3.0-10.0. Protease sensitivity was observed to trypsin, pepsin, papain, proteinase K, and pronase E. Importantly, enterocin T1 was observed to inhibit the growth of numerous Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria including Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella flexneri, Shigella sonnei, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes. Take together, these results suggest that enterocin T1 is a novel bacteriocin with the potential to be used as a bio-preservative to control Pseudomonas spp. in food.

  1. T2 can be greater than 2T1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevian, H. M.; Skinner, J. L.

    1989-08-01

    We consider a quantum-mechanical two-level system under the influence of both diagonal and off-diagonal stochastic perturbations, and focus on the decay times T1 and T2, which refer to the relaxation to equilibrium of the populations and relative phase of the two levels, respectively. From both theoretical and experimental viewpoints one traditionally expects that T2≤2T1. On the other hand, from a fourth-order cumulant expansion calculation of the asymptotic time dependence of the density matrix elements, Budimir and Skinner [J. Stat. Phys. 49, 1029 (1987)] showed that, in fact, in some instances T2>2T1. In this paper we solve the stochastic model numerically, which leads to the exact time dependence of the density matrix at all times. We find that the analytic prediction that T2>2T1 is not only correct, but also meaningful, in the sense that the density matrix elements decay exponentially after only a short transient time.

  2. Are turns required for the folding of ribonuclease T1?

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, J. B.; Mullins, L. S.; Raushel, F. M.

    1996-01-01

    Ribonuclease T1 (RNase T1) is a small, globular protein of 104 amino acids for which extensive thermodynamic and structural information is known. To assess the specific influence of variations in amino acid sequence on the mechanism for protein folding, circularly permuted variants of RNase T1 were constructed and characterized in terms of catalytic activity and thermodynamic stability. The disulfide bond connecting Cys-2 and Cys-10 was removed by mutation of these residues to alanine (C2, 10A) to avoid potential steric problems imposed by the circular permutations. The original amino-terminus and carboxyl-terminus of the mutant (C2, 10A) were subsequently joined with a tripeptide linker to accommodate a reverse turn and new termini were introduced throughout the primary sequence in regions of solvent-exposed loops at Ser-35 (cp35S1), Asp-49 (cp49D1), Gly-70 (cp70G1), and Ser-96 (cp96S1). These circularly permuted RNase T1 mutants retained 35-100% of the original catalytic activity for the hydrolysis of guanylyl(3'-->5')cytidine, suggesting that the overall tertiary fold of these mutants is very similar to that of wild-type protein. Chemical denaturation curves indicated thermodynamic stabilities at pH 5.0 of 5.7, 2.9, 2.6, and 4.6 kcal/mol for cp35S1, cp49D1, cp70G1, and cp96S1, respectively, compared to a value of 10.1 kcal/mol for wild-type RNase T1 and 6.4 kcal/mol for (C2, 10A) T1. A fifth set of circularly permuted variants was attempted with new termini positioned in a tight beta-turn between Glu-82 and Gln-85. New termini were inserted at Asn-83 (cp83N1), Asn-84 (cp84N1), and Gln-85 (cp85Q1). No detectable amount of protein was ever produced for any of the mutations in this region, suggesting that this turn may be critical for the proper folding and/or thermodynamic stability of RNase T1. PMID:8745397

  3. 75 FR 51876 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 1041-ES

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ...; Comment Request for Form 1041-ES AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and... comments concerning Form 1041-ES, Estimated Income Tax for Estates and Trusts. DATES: Written comments... Trusts. OMB Number: 1545-0971. [[Page 51877

  4. Graphene oxide based theranostic platform for T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengxin; Cao, Yuhua; Chong, Yu; Ma, Yufei; Zhang, Hailu; Deng, Zongwu; Hu, Chunhong; Zhang, Zhijun

    2013-12-26

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful and widely used clinical technique in cancer diagnosis. MRI contrast agents (CAs) are often used to improve the quality of MRI-based diagnosis. In this work, we developed a positive T1 MRI CA based on graphene oxide (GO)-gadolinium (Gd) complexes. In our strategy, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) is chemically conjugated to GO, followed by Gd(III) complexation, to form a T1 MRI CA (GO-DTPA-Gd). We have demonstrated that the GO-DTPA-Gd system significantly improves MRI T1 relaxivity and leads to a better cellular MRI contrast effect than Magnevist, a commercially used CA. Next, an anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX), was loaded on the surface of GO sheets via physisorption. Thus-prepared GO-DTPA-Gd/DOX shows significant cytotoxicity to the cancer cells (HepG2). This work provides a novel strategy to build a GO-based theranostic nanoplatform with T1-weighted MRI, fluorescence imaging, and drug delivery functionalities.

  5. Deformations of T 1 ,1 as Yang-Baxter sigma models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crichigno, P. Marcos; Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2014-12-01

    We consider a family of deformations of T 1,1 in the Yang-Baxter sigma model approach. We first discuss a supercoset description of T 1,1, which makes manifest the full symmetry of the space and leads to the standard Sasaki-Einstein metric. Next, we consider three-parameter deformations of T 1,1 by using classical r-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). The resulting metric and NS-NS two-form agree exactly with the ones obtained via TsT transformations, and contain the Lunin-Maldacena background as a special case. It is worth noting that for AdS5 × T 1,1 , classical integrability for the full sector has been argued to be lost. Hence our result indicates that the Yang-Baxter sigma model approach is applicable even for non-integrable cosets. This observation suggests that the gravity/CYBE correspondence can be extended beyond integrable cases.

  6. An improved 3-D Look--Locker imaging method for T(1) parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Nkongchu, Ken; Santyr, Giles

    2005-09-01

    The 3-D Look-Locker (LL) imaging method has been shown to be a highly efficient and accurate method for the volumetric mapping of the spin lattice relaxation time T(1). However, conventional 3-D LL imaging schemes are typically limited to small tip angle RF pulses (T(1) estimation. In this work, a more generalized form of the 3-D LL imaging method that incorporates an additional and variable delay time between recovery samples is described, which permits the use of larger tip angles (>5 degrees ), thereby improving the SNR and the accuracy of the method. In phantom studies, a mean T(1) measurement accuracy of less than 2% (0.2-3.1%) using a tip angle of 10 degrees was obtained for a range of T(1) from approximately 300 to 1,700 ms with a measurement time increase of only 15%. This accuracy compares favorably with the conventional 3-D LL method that provided an accuracy between 2.2% and 7.3% using a 5 degrees flip angle.

  7. High-K,t1/2=1.4(1) ms, isomeric state in Lr255

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauschild, K.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Yeremin, A. V.; Dorvaux, O.; Antalic, S.; Belozerov, A. V.; Briançon, Ch.; Chelnokov, M. L.; Chepigin, V. I.; Curien, D.; Gall, B.; Görgen, A.; Gorshkov, V. A.; Guttormsen, M.; Hanappe, F.; Kabachenko, A. P.; Khalfallah, F.; Larsen, A. C.; Malyshev, O. N.; Minkova, A.; Popeko, A. G.; Rousseau, M.; Rowley, N.; Saro, S.; Shutov, A. V.; Siem, S.; Stuttgè, L.; Svirikhin, A. I.; Syed, N. U. H.; Theisen, Ch.; Venhart, M.

    2008-08-01

    An isomeric state in Lr255 with a half-life of t1/2=1.4(1) ms and Ex>720-keV has been observed for the first time using the GABRIELA setup at the focal plane of the VASSILISSA separator. Based on its K-forbiddeness, the configuration of the state is most probably formed by coupling the valence proton to a two quasiparticle neutron excitation. Possible three quasiparticle configurations are discussed.

  8. The fair factor in matters of trust.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lauren L

    2006-01-01

    Communities are bound together by trust among their members. Trust thrives when a pervasive sense of fairness exists. Evidence suggests that trust has social, professional, and economic value for today's organizations, making it worthy of attention. Matters of trust and justice are important and timely for nurse leaders to consider given the challenge to improve practice settings in a manner that enhances nurse satisfaction. The aim of this article is to make explicit the value in building organizational justice and trust within an organization's nursing community. Nursing leadership strategies are integrated, thus offering practical guidance in creating a culture of justice, making trust explicit, and establishing trustworthiness.

  9. Disaggregating ethnoracial disparities in physician trust.

    PubMed

    Sewell, Abigail A

    2015-11-01

    Past research yields mixed evidence regarding whether ethnoracial minorities trust physicians less than Whites. Using the 2002 and 2006 General Social Surveys, variegated ethnoracial differences in trust in physicians are identified by disaggregating a multidimensional physician trust scale. Compared to Whites, Blacks are less likely to trust the technical judgment and interpersonal competence of doctors. Latinos are less likely than Whites to trust the fiduciary ethic, technical judgment, and interpersonal competence of doctors. Black-Latino differences in physician trust are a function of ethnoracial differences in parental nativity. The ways ethnoracial hierarchies are inscribed into power-imbalanced clinical exchanges are discussed.

  10. Functionally active t1-t1 interfaces revealed by the accessibility of intracellular thiolate groups in kv4 channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangyu; Shahidullah, Mohammad; Rocha, Carmen A; Strang, Candace; Pfaffinger, Paul J; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2005-07-01

    Gating of voltage-dependent K(+) channels involves movements of membrane-spanning regions that control the opening of the pore. Much less is known, however, about the contributions of large intracellular channel domains to the conformational changes that underlie gating. Here, we investigated the functional role of intracellular regions in Kv4 channels by probing relevant cysteines with thiol-specific reagents. We find that reagent application to the intracellular side of inside-out patches results in time-dependent irreversible inhibition of Kv4.1 and Kv4.3 currents. In the absence or presence of Kv4-specific auxiliary subunits, mutational and electrophysiological analyses showed that none of the 14 intracellular cysteines is essential for channel gating. C110, C131, and C132 in the intersubunit interface of the tetramerization domain (T1) are targets responsible for the irreversible inhibition by a methanethiosulfonate derivative (MTSET). This result is surprising because structural studies of Kv4-T1 crystals predicted protection of the targeted thiolate groups by constitutive high-affinity Zn(2+) coordination. Also, added Zn(2+) or a potent Zn(2+) chelator (TPEN) does not significantly modulate the accessibility of MTSET to C110, C131, or C132; and furthermore, when the three critical cysteines remained as possible targets, the MTSET modification rate of the activated state is approximately 200-fold faster than that of the resting state. Biochemical experiments confirmed the chemical modification of the intact alpha-subunit and the purified tetrameric T1 domain by MTS reagents. These results conclusively demonstrate that the T1--T1 interface of Kv4 channels is functionally active and dynamic, and that critical reactive thiolate groups in this interface may not be protected by Zn(2+) binding.

  11. Functionally Active T1-T1 Interfaces Revealed by the Accessibility of Intracellular Thiolate Groups in Kv4 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangyu; Shahidullah, Mohammad; Rocha, Carmen A.; Strang, Candace; Pfaffinger, Paul J.; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Gating of voltage-dependent K+ channels involves movements of membrane-spanning regions that control the opening of the pore. Much less is known, however, about the contributions of large intracellular channel domains to the conformational changes that underlie gating. Here, we investigated the functional role of intracellular regions in Kv4 channels by probing relevant cysteines with thiol-specific reagents. We find that reagent application to the intracellular side of inside-out patches results in time-dependent irreversible inhibition of Kv4.1 and Kv4.3 currents. In the absence or presence of Kv4-specific auxiliary subunits, mutational and electrophysiological analyses showed that none of the 14 intracellular cysteines is essential for channel gating. C110, C131, and C132 in the intersubunit interface of the tetramerization domain (T1) are targets responsible for the irreversible inhibition by a methanethiosulfonate derivative (MTSET). This result is surprising because structural studies of Kv4-T1 crystals predicted protection of the targeted thiolate groups by constitutive high-affinity Zn2+ coordination. Also, added Zn2+ or a potent Zn2+ chelator (TPEN) does not significantly modulate the accessibility of MTSET to C110, C131, or C132; and furthermore, when the three critical cysteines remained as possible targets, the MTSET modification rate of the activated state is ∼200-fold faster than that of the resting state. Biochemical experiments confirmed the chemical modification of the intact α-subunit and the purified tetrameric T1 domain by MTS reagents. These results conclusively demonstrate that the T1T1 interface of Kv4 channels is functionally active and dynamic, and that critical reactive thiolate groups in this interface may not be protected by Zn2+ binding. PMID:15955876

  12. 78 FR 58605 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8453-EMP, Form 8453-F, Form 8453-FE, Form 8879-F...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8453-EMP, Form 8453-F, Form 8453-FE, Form 8879-F, and 8879-EMP. AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request... comments concerning Form 8453-F, U.S. Estate of Trust Income Tax Declaration and Signature for...

  13. [Trust at the heart of private nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Pivot, Annie

    2013-10-01

    In order to obtain the state nursing diploma nurses must acquire a specific number of skills. Where does trust fit in? Although it is not implicit it forms the core of the nursing relationship with the patient and his or her family. This article presents the personal account of a private nurse practitioner.

  14. 26 CFR 1.664-2 - Charitable remainder annuity trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... required to file Form 5227, “Split-Interest Trust Information Return,” (including extensions) for the... satisfy the above rule. Similarly, provisions for an amount to A and B for their joint lives and then to... life an annuity equal to 5 percent of the initial net fair market value of the interest passing...

  15. 26 CFR 1.664-2 - Charitable remainder annuity trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... required to file Form 5227, “Split-Interest Trust Information Return,” (including extensions) for the... satisfy the above rule. Similarly, provisions for an amount to A and B for their joint lives and then to... life an annuity equal to 5 percent of the initial net fair market value of the interest passing...

  16. 26 CFR 1.664-2 - Charitable remainder annuity trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... required to file Form 5227, “Split-Interest Trust Information Return,” (including extensions) for the... satisfy the above rule. Similarly, provisions for an amount to A and B for their joint lives and then to... life an annuity equal to 5 percent of the initial net fair market value of the interest passing...

  17. 26 CFR 1.664-2 - Charitable remainder annuity trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... required to file Form 5227, “Split-Interest Trust Information Return,” (including extensions) for the... satisfy the above rule. Similarly, provisions for an amount to A and B for their joint lives and then to... life an annuity equal to 5 percent of the initial net fair market value of the interest passing...

  18. The Effect of Instructional Supervision on Principal Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahnee, Robbie L.

    2010-01-01

    Within-school climates and culture are predicated on organizational structures, distributions of power, and roles that are highly interactive. Hierarchical structures and uneven power distributions, primarily those of teacher-principal, have been found to challenge levels of trust. School interaction patterns form the basis of much of the school…

  19. [Management of T1a vocal fold carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Reiter, R; Brosch, S; Smith, E; Pickhard, A

    2013-12-01

    About 2/3 of the larynx carcinomas affect the vocal chords. The main risk factor is smoking. Carcinomas in this localisation often arise from leukoplakias with dysplasia. A typical symptom is dysphonia. Arrest of vibration in microlaryngostroboscopy is a hint that a carcinoma could be present. Transoral laser cordectomy or radiotherapy show equivalent oncological results and results in quality of voice in the treatment of vocal fold carcinoma (T1a). As lymph node and distant metastasis are very rare, follow-up can concentrate on microlaryngoscopy. In case of a suspicious area on the vocal fold, biopsy of the affected tissue is needed to plan correct treatment. The prognosis of the T1 vocal chord carcinoma is quite good with a 5-year survival rate of almost 100%.

  20. Clinical Outcomes in cT1 Micropapillary Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Willis, DL; Fernandez, MI; Dickstein, RJ; Parikh, S; Shah, JB; Pisters, LL; Guo, CC; Henderson, S; Czerniak, BA; Grossman, HB; Dinney, CP; Kamat, AM

    2015-01-01

    Purpose While many urologists recommend radical cystectomy for patient with micropapillary bladder cancer (MPBC) invading the lamina propria (cT1), contradictory small reports exist regarding the efficacy of conservative management with intravesical BCG for this disease. Herein we report our updated experience with largest series of patients with cT1 MPBC. Materials and Methods An IRB approved review of our cancer database identified 283 patients with MPBC, including 72 staged as cT1N0M0 at diagnosis and initiation of therapy. Survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier estimator and compared using the log-rank test. Results Within this 72 patient cohort, 40 received primary intravesical BCG and 26 underwent upfront radical cystectomy. Patients receiving BCG experienced high rates of disease recurrence (75%) and progression (45%); 35% developed lymph node metastasis. Patients treated with upfront cystectomy had improved survival compared to patients treated with primary BCG (5 year disease specific survival (DSS) of 100% vs. 60% respectively, p=0.006) or patients undergoing delayed cystectomy after recurrence (5 yr. DSS: 62%, p=0.015). Prognosis was especially poor in patients who waited for progression prior to undergoing radical cystectomy, with an estimated 5-year DSS of only 24% and a median survival of 35 months. In patients treated with upfront cystectomy, pathologic upstaging occurred in 27%, including 20% with lymph node metastasis. Conclusions While certain patients with T1 MPBC may respond to intravesical BCG, improved survival is seen in those patients who undergo early radical cystectomy. Further molecular studies are needed to identify subsets of patients able to spare their bladders safely. PMID:25254936

  1. 25 CFR 1000.355 - How are trust evaluations conducted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust Evaluations § 1000.355 How are trust evaluations... required by § 1000.365. (b) This section describes the general framework for trust reviews. However,...

  2. 25 CFR 1000.355 - How are trust evaluations conducted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust Evaluations § 1000.355 How are trust evaluations... required by § 1000.365. (b) This section describes the general framework for trust reviews. However,...

  3. 25 CFR 1000.355 - How are trust evaluations conducted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust Evaluations § 1000.355 How are trust evaluations... required by § 1000.365. (b) This section describes the general framework for trust reviews. However,...

  4. 25 CFR 1000.355 - How are trust evaluations conducted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust Evaluations § 1000.355 How are trust evaluations... required by § 1000.365. (b) This section describes the general framework for trust reviews. However,...

  5. Race, healthcare access and physician trust among prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Do, Young Kyung; Spain, Pamela; Clark, Jack A.; Hamilton, Robert J.; Galanko, Joseph A.; Jackman, Anne; Talcott, James A.; Godley, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of healthcare access and other characteristics on physician trust among black and white prostate cancer patients. Methods A three-timepoint follow-up telephone survey after cancer diagnosis was conducted. This study analyzed data on 474 patients and their 1,320 interviews over three time periods. Results Among other subpopulations, black patients who delayed seeking care had physician trust levels that were far lower than that of both Caucasians as well as that of the black patients overall. Black patients had greater variability in their levels of physician trust compared to their white counterparts. Conclusions Both race and access are important in explaining overall lower levels and greater variability in physician trust among black prostate cancer patients. Access barriers among black patients may spill over to the clinical encounter in the form of less physician trust, potentially contributing to racial disparities in treatment received and subsequent outcomes. Policy efforts to address the racial disparities in prostate cancer should prioritize improving healthcare access among minority groups. PMID:19777359

  6. Adequate trust avails, mistaken trust matters: on the moral responsibility of doctors as proxies for patients' trust in biobank research.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Linus; Helgesson, Gert; Hansson, Mats G; Eriksson, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    In Sweden, most patients are recruited into biobank research by non-researcher doctors. Patients' trust in doctors may therefore be important to their willingness to participate. We suggest a model of trust that makes sense of such transitions of trust between domains and distinguishes adequate trust from mistaken trust. The unique position of doctors implies, we argue, a Kantian imperfect duty to compensate for patients' mistaken trust. There are at least three kinds of mistaken trust, each of which requires a different set of countermeasures. First, trust is mistaken when necessary competence is lacking; the competence must be developed or the illusion dispelled. Second, trust is irrational whenever the patient is mistaken about his actual reasons for trusting. Care must therefore be taken to support the patient's reasoning and moral agency. Third, some patients inappropriately trust doctors to recommend only research that will benefit them directly. Such trust should be counteracted by nurturing a culture where patients expect to be asked occasionally to contribute to the common good.

  7. A Trusted Portable Computing Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming-wei, Fang; Jun-jun, Wu; Peng-fei, Yu; Xin-fang, Zhang

    A trusted portable computing device and its security mechanism were presented to solve the security issues, such as the attack of virus and Trojan horse, the lost and stolen of storage device, in mobile office. It used smart card to build a trusted portable security base, virtualization to create a secure virtual execution environment, two-factor authentication mechanism to identify legitimate users, and dynamic encryption to protect data privacy. The security environment described in this paper is characteristic of portability, security and reliability. It can meet the security requirement of mobile office.

  8. Barometer. Acute trusts February 2005.

    PubMed

    2005-03-17

    Almost two thirds of acute trusts rate the quality of commissioning from their PCTs at three out of 10 or less, according to the latest HSJ Barometer survey. This is the lowest score since we began the survey a year ago. Confidence in their performance against the 98 per cent four-hour A&E target fell sharply from a December high to an average of 6.87. The survey also found that fewer than one in seven trusts were confident of winning foundation status by the end of 2006-07.

  9. A Unified Theory of Trust and Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Guoray; Squicciarini, Anna

    We consider a type of applications where collaboration and trust are tightly coupled with the need to protect sensitive information. Existing trust management technologies have been limited to offering generic mechanisms for enforcing access control policies based on exchanged credentials, and rarely deal with the situated meaning of trust in a specific collaborative context. Towards trust management for highly dynamic and collaborative activities, this paper describes a theory of trust intention and semantics that makes explicit connections between collaborative activities and trust. The model supports inferring trust state based on knowledge about state of collaborative activity. It is the first step towards a unified approach for computer-mediated trust communication in the context of collaborative work.

  10. Building trusting relationships in online health communities.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Ha, Sejin; Widdows, Richard

    2013-09-01

    This study investigates consumers' use of online health communities (OHCs) for healthcare from a relationship building perspective based on the commitment-trust theory of relationships. The study proposes that perspective taking, empathic concern, self-efficacy, and network density affect the development of both cognitive and affective trust, which together determine OHC members' membership continuance intention (MCI) and knowledge contribution. Data collected from eight existing OHCs (N=255) were utilized to test the hypothesized model. Results show that perspective taking and self-efficacy can increase cognitive trust and affective trust, respectively. Network density contributes to cognitive and affective trust. Both cognitive trust and affective trust influence MCI, while only affective trust impacts members' knowledge contribution behaviors.

  11. Applying Machine Trust Models to Forensic Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, Marika; Venter, Hein; Eloff, Jan; Olivier, Martin

    Digital forensics involves the identification, preservation, analysis and presentation of electronic evidence for use in legal proceedings. In the presence of contradictory evidence, forensic investigators need a means to determine which evidence can be trusted. This is particularly true in a trust model environment where computerised agents may make trust-based decisions that influence interactions within the system. This paper focuses on the analysis of evidence in trust-based environments and the determination of the degree to which evidence can be trusted. The trust model proposed in this work may be implemented in a tool for conducting trust-based forensic investigations. The model takes into account the trust environment and parameters that influence interactions in a computer network being investigated. Also, it allows for crimes to be reenacted to create more substantial evidentiary proof.

  12. 77 FR 5065 - Preservation Trust Advisors, LLC and Northern Lights Fund Trust; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Preservation Trust Advisors, LLC and Northern Lights Fund Trust; Notice of Application January 26...'') and Northern Lights Fund Trust (the ``Trust''). FILING DATES: The application was filed on...

  13. An Investigation of Children's Peer Trust across Culture: Is the Composition of Peer Trust Universal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betts, Lucy R.; Rotenberg, Ken J.; Petrocchi, Serena; Lecciso, Flavia; Sakai, Atsushi; Maeshiro, Kazumi; Judson, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The components of children's trust in same-gender peers (trust beliefs, ascribed trustworthiness, and dyadic reciprocal trust) were examined in samples of 8-11-year-olds from the UK, Italy, and Japan. Trust was assessed by children's ratings of the extent to which same-gender classmates kept promises and kept secrets. Social relations analyses…

  14. Trust or Consequences: The Relationship between Faculty Trust and Faculty Learning Communities in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Gaye R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between FLC membership and faculty trust in higher education colleagues and faculty trust in higher education administration in public and private universities in the United States. This quantitative study examines trust in colleagues and trust in administration in higher education, two…

  15. T1 and susceptibility contrast at high fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelavalli, Jaladhar

    Clinical imaging at high magnetic field strengths (≥ 3Tesla) is sought after primarily due to the increased signal strength available at these fields. This increased SNR can be used to perform: (a) high resolution imaging in the same time as at lower field strengths; (b) the same resolution imaging with much faster acquisition; and (c) functional MR imaging (fMRI), dynamic perfusion and diffusion imaging with increased sensitivity. However they are also associated with increased power deposition (SAR) due to increase in imaging frequency and longer T1 relaxation times. Longer T1s mean longer imaging times for generating good T1 contrast images. On the other hand for faster imaging, at high fields fast spin echo or magnetization prepared sequences are conventionally proposed which are, however, associated with high SAR values. Imaging with low SAR is more and more important as we move towards high fields and particularly for patients with metallic implants like pacemakers or deep brain stimulator. The SAR limit acceptable for these patients is much less than the limit acceptable for normal subjects. A new method is proposed for imaging at high fields with good contrast with simultaneous reduction in power deposition. Further, T1 based contrast optimization problem in FLASH imaging is considered for tissues with different T1s but same spin densities. The solution providing optimal imaging parameters is simplified for quick and easy computation in a clinical setting. The efficacy of the simplification is evaluated and practical limits under which the simplification can be applied are worked out. The phase difference due to variation in magnetic susceptibility property among biological tissues is another unique source of contrast which is different from the conventional T1, T2 and T2* contrast. This susceptibility based phase contrast has become more and more important at high fields, partly due to contrast generation issues due to longer T 1s and shorter T2s and

  16. Inferring Trust Based on Similarity with TILLIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakolifard, Mozhgan; Herrmann, Peter; Knapskog, Svein J.

    A network of people having established trust relations and a model for propagation of related trust scores are fundamental building blocks in many of today’s most successful e-commerce and recommendation systems. However, the web of trust is often too sparse to predict trust values between non-familiar people with high accuracy. Trust inferences are transitive associations among users in the context of an underlying social network and may provide additional information to alleviate the consequences of the sparsity and possible cold-start problems. Such approaches are helpful, provided that a complete trust path exists between the two users. An alternative approach to the problem is advocated in this paper. Based on collaborative filtering one can exploit the like-mindedness resp. similarity of individuals to infer trust to yet unknown parties which increases the trust relations in the web. For instance, if one knows that with respect to a specific property, two parties are trusted alike by a large number of different trusters, one can assume that they are similar. Thus, if one has a certain degree of trust to the one party, one can safely assume a very similar trustworthiness of the other one. In an attempt to provide high quality recommendations and proper initial trust values even when no complete trust propagation path or user profile exists, we propose TILLIT — a model based on combination of trust inferences and user similarity. The similarity is derived from the structure of the trust graph and users’ trust behavior as opposed to other collaborative-filtering based approaches which use ratings of items or user’s profile. We describe an algorithm realizing the approach based on a combination of trust inferences and user similarity, and validate the algorithm using a real large-scale data-set.

  17. Research of trust model in P2P network based on trusted computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rong; Li, Lei

    2013-03-01

    In order to strengthen the security of P2P networks, it is necessary to build trust relationships between nodes of networks. However, the traditional trust evaluation models can't resist the attacks of Pseudospoofing and Pseudostheft effectively. To resolve the problems, in this paper, the trusted computing method is introduced into P2P networks, and an idea of group trust model based on trusted computing methods is proposed. In the process of trust evaluation, the model can realize the anonymous attestation of the node body, which improves the creditability of trust relationships between nodes and resolves the security problems of P2P networks.

  18. The Role of Trust in Information Science and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Stephen; Dibben, Mark R.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the notion of trust as it relates to information science and technology, specifically user interfaces, autonomous agents, and information systems. Highlights include theoretical meaning of trust; trust and levels of analysis, including organizational trust; electronic commerce, user interfaces, and static trust; dynamic trust; and trust…

  19. The Relationship between Collective Student Trust and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, David Carl

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between collective student trust and student achievement was tested in a sample of 1,748 5th grade students in 34 Title I elementary schools in an urban and urban fringe district. Trust was defined, the conditions of trust described, and the facets of trust discussed. Collective trust was distinguished from relational trust and…

  20. Effect of Triplet T 1-State Population on Fluorescence Polarization Kinetics of Organic Fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanishevsky, I. V.; Chernyavskii, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    The fluorescence polarization kinetics of fluorescent organic molecules and molecules with two interconverting photoisomeric forms and fixed molecular skeletons were investigated by numerical methods based on the solution of population balance equations. The depolarizing effect of the lowest triplet T 1 state and the polarization time dependence for quasi-continuous-wave (cw) and pulsed photoexcitation were studied using model compounds. The fluorescence depolarization with cw excitation was characterized by times that were shorter than the T 1-state lifetime; for the isomers, also by times that correlated with the photoisomerization times. Intense pulsed photoexcitation distorted significantly the initial oscillator orientation distribution in the singlet S 0 and S 1 states and could lead to sign reversal of the polarization.

  1. 40 CFR 280.102 - Trust fund.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trust fund. 280.102 Section 280.102...) Financial Responsibility § 280.102 Trust fund. (a) An owner or operator may satisfy the requirements of § 280.93 by establishing a trust fund that conforms to the requirements of this section. The...

  2. 14 CFR 47.8 - Voting trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Voting trusts. 47.8 Section 47.8 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRCRAFT REGISTRATION General § 47.8 Voting trusts. (a) If a voting trust is used to qualify a domestic corporation as...

  3. Trust and Relationship Building in Electronic Commerce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadopoulou, Panagiota; Andreou, Andreas; Kanellis, Panagiotis; Martakos, Drakoulis

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of the need for trust in electronic commerce to build customer relationships focuses on a model drawn from established theoretical work on trust and relationship marketing that highlights differences between traditional and electronic commerce. Considers how trust can be built into virtual environments. (Contains 50 references.)…

  4. Animal Behaviour: Friendship Enhances Trust in Chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Silk, Joan

    2016-01-25

    Individuals that participate in exchanges with delayed rewards can be exploited if their partners don't reciprocate. In humans, friendships are built on trust, and trust enhances cooperation. New evidence suggests that close social bonds also enhance trust in chimpanzees.

  5. 46 CFR 67.36 - Trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Trust. 67.36 Section 67.36 Shipping COAST GUARD... Citizenship Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.36 Trust. (a) For the purpose of obtaining a registry or recreational endorsement, a trust arrangement meets citizenship requirements if: (1) Each of...

  6. Zn2+-dependent redox switch in the intracellular T1-T1 interface of a Kv channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangyu; Strang, Candace; Pfaffinger, Paul J; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2007-05-04

    The thiol-based redox regulation of proteins plays a central role in cellular signaling. Here, we investigated the redox regulation at the Zn(2+) binding site (HX(5)CX(20)CC) in the intracellular T1-T1 inter-subunit interface of a Kv4 channel. This site undergoes conformational changes coupled to voltage-dependent gating, which may be sensitive to oxidative stress. The main results show that internally applied nitric oxide (NO) inhibits channel activity profoundly. This inhibition is reversed by reduced glutathione and suppressed by intracellular Zn(2+), and at least two Zn(2+) site cysteines are required to observe the NO-induced inhibition (Cys-110 from one subunit and Cys-132 from the neighboring subunit). Biochemical evidence suggests strongly that NO induces a disulfide bridge between Cys-110 and Cys-132 in intact cells. Finally, further mutational studies suggest that intra-subunit Zn(2+) coordination involving His-104, Cys-131, and Cys-132 protects against the formation of the inhibitory disulfide bond. We propose that the interfacial T1 Zn(2+) site of Kv4 channels acts as a Zn(2+)-dependent redox switch that may regulate the activity of neuronal and cardiac A-type K(+) currents under physiological and pathological conditions.

  7. Trust as a Teaching Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon-Weil, Anica; Hewitt, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Should I stop the conflict or narrate it? Do I redirect or reassure? Two infant/toddler teachers explain how they use trust as a teaching tool, "teaching" less and involving the toddlers in their classroom in the decisions that affect them. They took to heart the philosophy of Magda Gerber, who urged parents to "observe more, do less." The author…

  8. Taxability of Educational Benefits Trusts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Law Quarterly, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Corporations have found the promise of providing a college education to the children of employees--without the recognition of income to the parent-employee--to be a popular fringe benefit. The Internal Revenue Service has attacked educational benefit trusts in Revenue Ruling 75-448. Implications are discussed. (LBH)

  9. Education and the National Trust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binns, Gareth

    1995-01-01

    Defines the British National Trust as it marks its centenary. Known for its work in protecting historic buildings and places of natural beauty, a major focus is now education. Schoolchildren may attend curriculum-based special programs when visiting historic houses and the countryside. Others use open-space sites with no specific education…

  10. The Sutton Trust: Mobility Manifesto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton Trust, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Ahead of the party conference season, the Sutton Trust is urging fairer admissions to comprehensives, grammar schools and independent schools as part of a 10-point Mobility Manifesto setting out ten practical policy steps designed to put social mobility at the heart of the 2015 election campaign. The manifesto urges greater use of ballots (random…

  11. Trust enhances IT service management.

    PubMed

    2007-08-01

    ITIL process adoption may be a prerequisite for the National Programme for IT (NPfIT), but implementation is far from straightforward. IT services company Plan-Net has been assisting Barts and The London NHS Trust with implementing its ambitious ITIL processes deployment.

  12. The TOTEM T1 read out card motherboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minutoli, S.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.

    2010-12-01

    This article describes the Read Out Card (ROC) motherboard, which is the main component of the T1 forward telescope front-end electronic system. The ROC main objectives are to acquire tracking data and trigger information from the detector. It performs data conversion from electrical to optical format and transfers the data streams to the next level of the system and it implements Slow Control modules which are able to receive, decode and distribute the LHC machine low jitter clock and fast command. The ROC also provides a spy mezzanine connection based on programmable FPGA and USB2.0 for laboratory and portable DAQ debugging system.

  13. T-1 Test Program Ver. 6.0.1

    SciTech Connect

    Perlinski, Anthony W.

    2004-05-21

    The software allows for easy setup and testing of a variety of RF Electronic Sensor Platforms (ESPs). The software interprets RF messages from the ESP and displays the information in a graphical user interface. This program is used primarily for testing of the T-1 Electronic Sensor Platform. The software imports Electronic Tag Data files which are created from the Electronic Sensor Platform Programmer (ESPP). The software will automatically add sensors to its database when a RF message s received that the program recognizes. Any data that is generated can be stored to a file for later analysis.

  14. 25 CFR 1000.360 - Is the trust evaluation standard or process different when the trust asset is held in trust for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Is the trust evaluation standard or process different... EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust Evaluations § 1000.360 Is the trust evaluation standard... allottee? No, Tribes/Consortia are under the same obligation as the Secretary to perform trust...

  15. 25 CFR 1000.360 - Is the trust evaluation standard or process different when the trust asset is held in trust for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Is the trust evaluation standard or process different... EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust Evaluations § 1000.360 Is the trust evaluation standard... allottee? No, Tribes/Consortia are under the same obligation as the Secretary to perform trust...

  16. 25 CFR 1000.360 - Is the trust evaluation standard or process different when the trust asset is held in trust for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Is the trust evaluation standard or process different... EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust Evaluations § 1000.360 Is the trust evaluation standard... allottee? No, Tribes/Consortia are under the same obligation as the Secretary to perform trust...

  17. 25 CFR 1000.360 - Is the trust evaluation standard or process different when the trust asset is held in trust for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Is the trust evaluation standard or process different... EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust Evaluations § 1000.360 Is the trust evaluation standard... allottee? No, Tribes/Consortia are under the same obligation as the Secretary to perform trust...

  18. Extended ISIS sequences insensitive to T(1) smearing.

    PubMed

    Ljungberg, M; Starck, G; Vikhoff-Baaz, B; Alpsten, M; Ekholm, S; Forssell-Aronsson, E

    2000-10-01

    Image selected in vivo spectroscopy (ISIS) is a volume selection method often used for in vivo (31)P MRS, since it is suitable for measurements of substances with short T(2). However, ISIS can suffer from significant signal contributions caused by T(1) smearing from regions outside the VOI. A computer model was developed to simulate this contamination. The simulation results for the ISIS experiment order implemented in our MR system (ISIS-0) were in agreement with results obtained from phantom measurements. A new extended ISIS experiment order (E-ISIS) was developed, consisting of four "optimal" ISIS experiment orders (ISIS-1 to ISIS-4) performed consecutively with dummy ISIS experiments in between. The simulation results show that contamination due to T(1) smearing is, effectively, eliminated with E-ISIS and is significantly lower than for ISIS-0 and ISIS-1. E-ISIS offers increased accuracy for quantitative and qualitative determination of substances studied using in vivo MRS. Hence, E-ISIS can be valuable for both clinical and research applications.

  19. The structure of the mite allergen Blo t 1 explains the limited antibody cross-reactivity to Der p 1.

    PubMed

    Meno, K H; Kastrup, J S; Kuo, I-C; Chua, K Y; Gajhede, M

    2017-04-01

    The Blomia tropicalis (Blo t) mite species is considered a storage mite in temperate climate zones and an important source of indoor allergens causing allergic asthma and rhinitis in tropical and subtropical regions. Here, we report the crystal structure of one of the allergens from Blo t, recombinant proBlo t 1 (rproBlo t 1), determined at 2.1 Å resolution. Overall, the fold of rproBlo t 1 is characteristic for the pro-form of cysteine proteases from the C1A class. Structural comparison of experimentally mapped Der f 1/Der p1 IgG epitopes to the same surface patch on Blo t 1, as well as of sequence identity of surface-exposed residues, suggests limited cross-reactivity between these allergens and Blo t 1. This is in agreement with ELISA inhibition results showing that, although cross-reactive human IgE epitopes exist, there are unique IgE epitopes for both Blo t 1 and Der p 1.

  20. Predators and the public trust.

    PubMed

    Treves, Adrian; Chapron, Guillaume; López-Bao, Jose V; Shoemaker, Chase; Goeckner, Apollonia R; Bruskotter, Jeremy T

    2017-02-01

    Many democratic governments recognize a duty to conserve environmental resources, including wild animals, as a public trust for current and future citizens. These public trust principles have informed two centuries of U.S.A. Supreme Court decisions and environmental laws worldwide. Nevertheless numerous populations of large-bodied, mammalian carnivores (predators) were eradicated in the 20th century. Environmental movements and strict legal protections have fostered predator recoveries across the U.S.A. and Europe since the 1970s. Now subnational jurisdictions are regaining management authority from central governments for their predator subpopulations. Will the history of local eradication repeat or will these jurisdictions adopt public trust thinking and their obligation to broad public interests over narrower ones? We review the role of public trust principles in the restoration and preservation of controversial species. In so doing we argue for the essential roles of scientists from many disciplines concerned with biological diversity and its conservation. We look beyond species endangerment to future generations' interests in sustainability, particularly non-consumptive uses. Although our conclusions apply to all wild organisms, we focus on predators because of the particular challenges they pose for government trustees, trust managers, and society. Gray wolves Canis lupus L. deserve particular attention, because detailed information and abundant policy debates across regions have exposed four important challenges for preserving predators in the face of interest group hostility. One challenge is uncertainty and varied interpretations about public trustees' responsibilities for wildlife, which have created a mosaic of policies across jurisdictions. We explore how such mosaics have merits and drawbacks for biodiversity. The other three challenges to conserving wildlife as public trust assets are illuminated by the biology of predators and the interacting

  1. New T1-based superconductor T1PbSrRCuO without Ca with Tc above 100 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Z. Z.; Xin, Y.; Meason, J. M.

    1991-04-01

    Ca-free T1PbSrRCuO samples (R=rare earths) with Tc up to above 100 K were prepared, and studied by resistance and ac susceptibility measurements and by powder x-ray diffraction analyses. A 1212-type phase (Tl1-xPbx)Sr2(Sr1-yRy)Cu2Oz is responsible for the observed supercondcutivity. A rare-earth is required for the formation of the 1212 phase. Pb-dopping is necessary to increase the Tc of the 1212 phase from 90 K to above 100 K.

  2. Sinking slowly: Diversity in propensity to trust predicts downward trust spirals in small groups.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Amanda J; Peterson, Randall S

    2015-07-01

    This paper examines the phenomenon of trust spirals in small groups. Drawing on literature on the spiral reinforcement of trust, we theorize that diversity in propensity to trust has affective and cognitive consequences related to trust (i.e., feelings of frustration and perceptions of low similarity), reducing the level of experienced intragroup trust early in a group's development. Reduced experienced trust then fuels relationship conflict and lowers trust even further over time, ultimately having a negative effect on group performance. These ideas are tested using a sample of MBA student groups surveyed at 3 time periods over 4 months. Results confirm our hypothesis that diversity in propensity to trust is sufficient to trigger a downward trust spiral and poor performance in small groups.

  3. Nature's Trust: A Paradigm for Natural Resources Stewardship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, M. C.; Whitelaw, E.; Doppelt, B.; Burchell, A.

    2007-12-01

    Climate change uncertainty puts a premium on all remaining natural resources. Farmland, air, water, wetlands, wildlife, soils, mineral resources and forests must be protected to ensure that Americans - present citizens and future generations - have the fundamental survival resources they need in a future that holds many unknowns. Moreover, in light of the need to manage resources given climate and particle forcing, government must mitigate dangerous carbon loading of the atmosphere. Confronting climate change and protecting natural resources requires a clear sense of government obligation that is inherent to sovereignty, not a matter of political choice. Our government representatives can and must reframe government's discretion into a trustee obligation to protect Nature and ensure natural resource stewardship. Drawing upon enduring legal principles and court decisions, government can be characterized as a trustee of the natural resources essential to human survival. A trust is a fundamental type of ownership whereby one manages property for the benefit of another. Viewed as a trust, the environment consists of a portfolio of quantified natural assets that government manages. As beneficiaries, citizens hold a common property interest in defined, bounded assets that make up Nature's Trust. Such trust principles form the bedrock of statutory law. Trustees have a fiduciary obligation to protect trust assets and may not allow destruction of property they manage. This session will provide a policy frame for current scientific efforts to address climate change and natural resources loss. Under the Nature's Trust frame, U.S. government leaders and agencies at every level inherit a strict fiduciary obligation to protect our collective natural resources, including our water and the atmosphere, as assets in the trust. Their fiduciary standard of care consists of a proportionate responsibility, which ties directly to "Nature's Mandate" as defined by current climate

  4. T1- and T2-weighted imaging at 8 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Kangarlu, A; Abduljalil, A M; Robitaille, P M

    1999-01-01

    In this work, both T1- and T2-weighted fast imaging methods at 8 T are presented. These include the modified driven equilibrium Fourier transform (MDEFT) and rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) methods, respectively. Axial MDEFT images were acquired with large nutation angles, both partially suppressing gray and white matter and permitting the visualization of vascular structures rich in unsaturated spins. Sagittal RARE images, acquired from the same volunteer, were highly T2-weighted, thus highlighting the CSF. At the same time, they provided good visualization of the corpus callosum, cerebellum, and gray and white matter structures. Importantly, both MDEFT and RARE images could be acquired without violating specific absorption rate guidelines.

  5. Water law - Public Trust Doctrine

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, E.S.

    1984-07-01

    In a case involving California's Mono Lake, the State Supreme Court held that infringement of the values protected by the Public Trust Doctrine is a separate ground for challenging water appropriations, and that the continuing nature of the state's duty as trustee prevents the acquisition of a vested right to appropriations that injure navigation, commerce, and fisheries. The author summarizes the history and the competing claims of the Doctrine and the California Appropriative Water Rights System. The National Audubon suit now makes it possible for any member of the public to challenge any surface water diversion as injurious to the public trust, but it also offers the California courts an opportunity to redirect the state's water policies. 130 references.

  6. MAIN-BELT COMET P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Henry H.; Kaluna, Heather M.; Yang Bin; Haghighipour, Nader; Micheli, Marco; Denneau, Larry; Jedicke, Robert; Kleyna, Jan; Veres, Peter; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Ansdell, Megan; Elliott, Garrett T.; Keane, Jacqueline V.; Meech, Karen J.; Riesen, Timm E.; Sonnett, Sarah; Novakovic, Bojan; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Moskovitz, Nicholas A.; Sheppard, Scott S.; and others

    2013-07-01

    We present initial results from observations and numerical analyses aimed at characterizing the main-belt comet P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS). Optical monitoring observations were made between 2012 October and 2013 February using the University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescope, the Keck I telescope, the Baade and Clay Magellan telescopes, Faulkes Telescope South, the Perkins Telescope at Lowell Observatory, and the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope. The object's intrinsic brightness approximately doubles from the time of its discovery in early October until mid-November and then decreases by {approx}60% between late December and early February, similar to photometric behavior exhibited by several other main-belt comets and unlike that exhibited by disrupted asteroid (596) Scheila. We also used Keck to conduct spectroscopic searches for CN emission as well as absorption at 0.7 {mu}m that could indicate the presence of hydrated minerals, finding an upper limit CN production rate of Q{sub CN} < 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 23} mol s{sup -1}, from which we infer a water production rate of Q{sub H{sub 2O}}<5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 25} mol s{sup -1}, and no evidence of the presence of hydrated minerals. Numerical simulations indicate that P/2012 T1 is largely dynamically stable for >100 Myr and is unlikely to be a recently implanted interloper from the outer solar system, while a search for potential asteroid family associations reveals that it is dynamically linked to the {approx}155 Myr old Lixiaohua asteroid family.

  7. 25 CFR 1000.360 - Is the trust evaluation standard or process different when the trust asset is held in trust for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust Evaluations § 1000.360 Is the trust evaluation standard... 1000.360 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...

  8. Calibration of Trust and Distrust

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    entrenched beliefs and behaviours, regardless of whether they are positive or negative ( Deutsch , 1973). Any proclivity toward either an exaggerated...Trust in Organizations: Frontiers of Theory and Research (pp. 246-260). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. DEUTSCH , M. (1973). The...Bunker, B., & Rubin, J. (Eds.). Conflict, cooperation, and justice: Essays inspired by the work of Morton Deutsch . (pp.133-173). San Francisco, CA, US

  9. Money and trust among strangers.

    PubMed

    Camera, Gabriele; Casari, Marco; Bigoni, Maria

    2013-09-10

    What makes money essential for the functioning of modern society? Through an experiment, we present evidence for the existence of a relevant behavioral dimension in addition to the standard theoretical arguments. Subjects faced repeated opportunities to help an anonymous counterpart who changed over time. Cooperation required trusting that help given to a stranger today would be returned by a stranger in the future. Cooperation levels declined when going from small to large groups of strangers, even if monitoring and payoffs from cooperation were invariant to group size. We then introduced intrinsically worthless tokens. Tokens endogenously became money: subjects took to reward help with a token and to demand a token in exchange for help. Subjects trusted that strangers would return help for a token. Cooperation levels remained stable as the groups grew larger. In all conditions, full cooperation was possible through a social norm of decentralized enforcement, without using tokens. This turned out to be especially demanding in large groups. Lack of trust among strangers thus made money behaviorally essential. To explain these results, we developed an evolutionary model. When behavior in society is heterogeneous, cooperation collapses without tokens. In contrast, the use of tokens makes cooperation evolutionarily stable.

  10. Social Collaborative Filtering by Trust.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Lei, Yu; Liu, Jiming; Li, Wenjie

    2016-09-01

    Recommender systems are used to accurately and actively provide users with potentially interesting information or services. Collaborative filtering is a widely adopted approach to recommendation, but sparse data and cold-start users are often barriers to providing high quality recommendations. To address such issues, we propose a novel method that works to improve the performance of collaborative filtering recommendations by integrating sparse rating data given by users and sparse social trust network among these same users. This is a model-based method that adopts matrix factorization technique that maps users into low-dimensional latent feature spaces in terms of their trust relationship, and aims to more accurately reflect the users reciprocal influence on the formation of their own opinions and to learn better preferential patterns of users for high-quality recommendations. We use four large-scale datasets to show that the proposed method performs much better, especially for cold start users, than state-of-the-art recommendation algorithms for social collaborative filtering based on trust.

  11. Improvement, trust, and the healthcare workforce

    PubMed Central

    Berwick, D

    2003-01-01

    Although major defects in the performance of healthcare systems are well documented, progress toward remedy remains slow. Accelerating improvement will require large shifts in attitudes toward and strategies for developing the healthcare workforce. At present, prevailing strategies rely largely on outmoded theories of control and standardisation of work. More modern, and much more effective, theories of production seek to harness the imagination and participation of the workforce in reinventing the system. This requires a workforce capable of setting bold aims, measuring progress, finding alternative designs for the work itself, and testing changes rapidly and informatively. It also requires a high degree of trust in many forms, a bias toward teamwork, and a predilection toward shouldering the burden of improvement, rather than blaming external factors. A new healthcare workforce strategy, founded on these principles, will yield much faster improvement than at present. PMID:14645740

  12. Social information influences trust behaviour in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nikki C; Jolles, Jelle; Krabbendam, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    Trust plays an integral role in daily interactions within adolescents' social environment. Using a trust game paradigm, this study investigated the modulating influence of social information about three interaction partners on trust behaviour in adolescents aged 12-18 (N = 845). After receiving information about their interaction partners prior to the task, participants were most likely to share with a 'good' partner and rate this partner as most trustworthy. Over the course of the task all interaction partners showed similar levels of trustworthy behaviour, but overall participants continued to trust and view the good partner as more trustworthy than 'bad' and 'neutral' partners throughout the game. However, with age the ability to overcome prior social information and adapt trust behaviour improved: middle and late adolescents showed a larger decrease in trust of the good partner than early adolescents, and late adolescents were more likely to reward trustworthy behaviour from the negative partner.

  13. Main-belt Comet P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Henry H.; Kaluna, Heather M.; Novaković, Bojan; Yang, Bin; Haghighipour, Nader; Micheli, Marco; Denneau, Larry; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Jedicke, Robert; Kleyna, Jan; Vereš, Peter; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Ansdell, Megan; Elliott, Garrett T.; Keane, Jacqueline V.; Meech, Karen J.; Moskovitz, Nicholas A.; Riesen, Timm E.; Sheppard, Scott S.; Sonnett, Sarah; Tholen, David J.; Urban, Laurie; Kaiser, Nick; Chambers, K. C.; Burgett, William S.; Magnier, Eugene A.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Price, Paul A.

    2013-07-01

    We present initial results from observations and numerical analyses aimed at characterizing the main-belt comet P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS). Optical monitoring observations were made between 2012 October and 2013 February using the University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescope, the Keck I telescope, the Baade and Clay Magellan telescopes, Faulkes Telescope South, the Perkins Telescope at Lowell Observatory, and the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope. The object's intrinsic brightness approximately doubles from the time of its discovery in early October until mid-November and then decreases by ~60% between late December and early February, similar to photometric behavior exhibited by several other main-belt comets and unlike that exhibited by disrupted asteroid (596) Scheila. We also used Keck to conduct spectroscopic searches for CN emission as well as absorption at 0.7 μm that could indicate the presence of hydrated minerals, finding an upper limit CN production rate of Q CN < 1.5 × 1023 mol s-1, from which we infer a water production rate of Q_H_2O<5\\times 10^{25} mol s-1, and no evidence of the presence of hydrated minerals. Numerical simulations indicate that P/2012 T1 is largely dynamically stable for >100 Myr and is unlikely to be a recently implanted interloper from the outer solar system, while a search for potential asteroid family associations reveals that it is dynamically linked to the ~155 Myr old Lixiaohua asteroid family. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation, the Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inova

  14. 17 CFR 240.16a-8 - Trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trusts. 240.16a-8 Section 240...-8 Trusts. (a) Persons subject to section 16—(1) Trusts. A trust shall be subject to section 16 of the Act with respect to securities of the issuer if the trust is a beneficial owner, pursuant to §...

  15. Trust-Building in Electronic Markets: Relative Importance and Interaction Effects of Trust-Building Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tams, Stefan

    We examine the relative and complementary effectiveness of trust-building strategies in online environments. While prior research has examined various antecedents to trust, we investigated two trust-building mechanisms more in depth: Web site trust and vendor reputation. We tried to understand the relative effectiveness of these two important mechanisms to provide online businesses with a clear recommendation of how to establish trust in an effective and efficient manner. Drawing from the literature on trust, we proposed vendor reputation to be more effective than Web site trust. Moreover, we examined a potential complementary effect of these mechanisms so as to provide online businesses with a deeper understanding of how to derive superior trust. We hypothesize a small such effect. The study proposes a laboratory experiment to test the model.

  16. Representing Trust in Cognitive Social Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Shawn S.; Alt, Jonathan K.; Darken, Christian J.

    Trust plays a critical role in communications, strength of relationships, and information processing at the individual and group level. Cognitive social simulations show promise in providing an experimental platform for the examination of social phenomena such as trust formation. This paper describes the initial attempts at representation of trust in a cognitive social simulation using reinforcement learning algorithms centered around a cooperative Public Commodity game within a dynamic social network.

  17. Exploring a Dynamic Model of Trust Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    factors affecting different trust indicators during trust development and acquisition is limited. The goal of this research is to provide a broad view on...how these factors affect trust. The overall goal of the larger research study is to evaluate the relative strength of Mayer’s trustworthiness...distribution unlimited. 88ABW-2014-4087; Cleared 29 August 2014 4.4.6. Positive Affect Negative Affect Scale (PANAS) The 20-item self- report , PANAS

  18. On Propagating Interpersonal Trust in Social Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Cai-Nicolas

    The age of information glut has fostered the proliferation of data and documents on the Web, created by man and machine alike. Hence, there is an enormous wealth of minable knowledge that is yet to be extracted, in particular, on the Semantic Web. However, besides understanding information stated by subjects, knowing about their credibility becomes equally crucial. Hence, trust and trust metrics, conceived as computational means to evaluate trust relationships between individuals, come into play. Our major contribution to Semantic Web trust management through this work is twofold. First, we introduce a classification scheme for trust metrics along various axes and discuss advantages and drawbacks of existing approaches for Semantic Web scenarios. Hereby, we devise an advocacy for local group trust metrics, guiding us to the second part, which presents Appleseed, our novel proposal for local group trust computation. Compelling in its simplicity, Appleseed borrows many ideas from spreading activation models in psychology and relates their concepts to trust evaluation in an intuitive fashion. Moreover, we provide extensions for the Appleseed nucleus that make our trust metric handle distrust statements.

  19. 25 CFR 1000.352 - What are “trust resources” for the purposes of the trust evaluation process?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... assets, trust revenue, royalties, or rental, including natural resources, land, water, minerals, funds... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review § 1000.352 What are “trust resources” for the purposes of the trust evaluation process? (a) Trust resources include property and...

  20. Drawing on a Knowledge-Based Trust Perspective to Examine and Conceptualize within-School Trust Development by Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosner, Shelby

    2010-01-01

    Research has revealed the importance of trust to schools and pointed to the central role that principals play in cultivating within-school trust, yet less is known about the ways that principals cultivate such trust. Moreover, divergent perspectives and varied contexts for examining trust have limited the transfer of trust scholarship to practice…

  1. Trust, Punishment, and Cooperation Across 18 Societies: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Balliet, Daniel; Van Lange, Paul A M

    2013-07-01

    Punishment promotes contributions to public goods, but recent evidence suggests that its effectiveness varies across societies. Prior theorizing suggests that cross-societal differences in trust play a key role in determining the effectiveness of punishment, as a form of social norm enforcement, to promote cooperation. One line of reasoning is that punishment promotes cooperation in low-trust societies, primarily because people in such societies expect their fellow members to contribute only if there are strong incentives to do so. Yet another line of reasoning is that high trust makes punishment work, presumably because in high-trust societies people may count on each other to make contributions to public goods and also enforce norm violations by punishing free riders. This poses a puzzle of punishment: Is punishment more effective in promoting cooperation in high- or low-trust societies? In the present article, we examine this puzzle of punishment in a quantitative review of 83 studies involving 7,361 participants across 18 societies that examine the impact of punishment on cooperation in a public goods dilemma. The findings provide a clear answer: Punishment more strongly promotes cooperation in societies with high trust rather than low trust.

  2. A Trust Evaluation Algorithm for Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Node Behaviors and D-S Evidence Theory

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Renjian; Xu, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Xiang; Wan, Jiangwen

    2011-01-01

    For wireless sensor networks (WSNs), many factors, such as mutual interference of wireless links, battlefield applications and nodes exposed to the environment without good physical protection, result in the sensor nodes being more vulnerable to be attacked and compromised. In order to address this network security problem, a novel trust evaluation algorithm defined as NBBTE (Node Behavioral Strategies Banding Belief Theory of the Trust Evaluation Algorithm) is proposed, which integrates the approach of nodes behavioral strategies and modified evidence theory. According to the behaviors of sensor nodes, a variety of trust factors and coefficients related to the network application are established to obtain direct and indirect trust values through calculating weighted average of trust factors. Meanwhile, the fuzzy set method is applied to form the basic input vector of evidence. On this basis, the evidence difference is calculated between the indirect and direct trust values, which link the revised D-S evidence combination rule to finally synthesize integrated trust value of nodes. The simulation results show that NBBTE can effectively identify malicious nodes and reflects the characteristic of trust value that ‘hard to acquire and easy to lose’. Furthermore, it is obvious that the proposed scheme has an outstanding advantage in terms of illustrating the real contribution of different nodes to trust evaluation. PMID:22319355

  3. A trust evaluation algorithm for wireless sensor networks based on node behaviors and D-S evidence theory.

    PubMed

    Feng, Renjian; Xu, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Xiang; Wan, Jiangwen

    2011-01-01

    For wireless sensor networks (WSNs), many factors, such as mutual interference of wireless links, battlefield applications and nodes exposed to the environment without good physical protection, result in the sensor nodes being more vulnerable to be attacked and compromised. In order to address this network security problem, a novel trust evaluation algorithm defined as NBBTE (Node Behavioral Strategies Banding Belief Theory of the Trust Evaluation Algorithm) is proposed, which integrates the approach of nodes behavioral strategies and modified evidence theory. According to the behaviors of sensor nodes, a variety of trust factors and coefficients related to the network application are established to obtain direct and indirect trust values through calculating weighted average of trust factors. Meanwhile, the fuzzy set method is applied to form the basic input vector of evidence. On this basis, the evidence difference is calculated between the indirect and direct trust values, which link the revised D-S evidence combination rule to finally synthesize integrated trust value of nodes. The simulation results show that NBBTE can effectively identify malicious nodes and reflects the characteristic of trust value that 'hard to acquire and easy to lose'. Furthermore, it is obvious that the proposed scheme has an outstanding advantage in terms of illustrating the real contribution of different nodes to trust evaluation.

  4. A Model of Trust for Developing Trustworthy Systems From Untrustworthy Actors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    Major components of the trust management system in- clude a database engine to store and manage trust data, a trust specification engine for defining and...managing trust relationships, a trust analysis engine to process results of a trust query, a trust eval- uation engine for evaluating trust...expressions and a trust monitor for updating trust relationship information in the database engine . We have also developed an SQL like language, called TrustQL

  5. Analysis of transmembrane segment 7 of the dipeptide transporter hPepT1 by cysteine-scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ashutosh A; Haworth, Ian S; Uchiyama, Tomomi; Lee, Vincent H L

    2003-12-19

    To investigate the involvement of transmembrane segment 7 (TMS7) of hPepT1 in forming the putative central aqueous channel through which the substrate traverses, we individually mutated each of the 21 amino acids in TMS7 to a cysteine and analyzed the mutated transporters using the scanning cysteine accessibility method. Y287C- and M292C-hPepT1 did not express at the plasma membrane. Out of the remaining 19 transporters, three (F293C-, L296C-, and F297C-hPepT1) showed negligible glycyl-sarcosine (gly-sar) uptake activity and may play an important role in defining the overall hPepT1 structure. K278C-hPepT1 showed approximately 40% activity and the 15 other transporters exhibited more than 50% gly-sar uptake when compared with wild type (WT)-hPepT1. Gly-sar uptake for the 16 active transporters containing cysteine mutations was then measured in the presence of 2.5 mM 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate hydrobromide (MTSEA) or 1 mM [2-(trimethylammonium) ethyl] methanethiosulfonate bromide (MTSET). Gly-sar uptake was significantly inhibited for each of the 16 single cysteine mutants in the presence of 2.5 mM MTSEA. In contrast, significant inhibition of uptake was only observed for K278C-, M279C-, V280C-, T281C-, M284C-, L286C-, P291C-, and D298C-hPepT1 in the presence of 1 mM MTSET. MTSET modification of R282C-hPepT1 resulted in a significant increase in gly-sar uptake. To investigate this further, we mutated WT-hPepT1 to R282A-, R282E-, and R282K-hPepT1. R282E-hPepT1 showed a 43% reduction in uptake activity, whereas R282A- and R282K-hPepT1 had activities comparable with WT-hPepT1, suggesting a role for the Arg-282 positive charge in substrate translocation. Most of the amino acids that were MTSET-sensitive upon cysteine mutation, including R282C, are located toward the intracellular end of TMS7. Hence, our results suggest that TMS7 of hPepT1 is relatively solvent-accessible along most of its length but that the intracellular end of the transmembrane domain is

  6. Evolution of Trust in Economic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossomaier, Terry; Harré, Michael; Thompson, James

    When ET in the eponymous Spielberg movie follows a trail of Smarties to meet his new human friends, we find this entirely plausible — that a baby alien will quickly form a bond with human kids and for each to quickly learn to trust the other. This surely reflects the way trust is such a fundamental part of human nature that its absence would be more remarkable than its presence, even where one of the protagonists is a not overly attractive alien species! Another, less plausible, fictional character which has often been employed in economic settings is Homo Economicus. The character played by this economic actor is that of the perfectly informed, perfectly rational, self interested individual trying to maximise their personal utility. This view of the economic actor, particularly as it is used in decision theory, inspired Herbert Simon in his Nobel Prize award speech to criticise models of economic microphenomena [29]: "Thus economists who are zealous in insisting that economic actors maximize turn around and become satisficers when the evaluation of their own theories is concerned. They believe that businessmen maximize, but they know that economic theorists satisfice." However, in the three decades since Simon's speech there has been a large body of evidence accumulating which demonstrates the lack of universality of the assumptions of economic man [6] and has contributed to the advancement of more reasonable models, as described by Daniel Kahneman [14], another Nobel Laureate: "... proposed that an automatic affective valuation — the emotional core of an attitude — is the main determinant of many judgements and behaviours."

  7. Trust in Culturally Diverse Teams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    DRDC Toronto CR 2008-097 Trust in Culturally Diverse Teams by: Andrea L. Brown, Barbara D. Adams, Julie J. Famewo and Cheryl L. Karthaus...prendre des risques ont été évaluées uniquement après la mission. D’après les résultats, une culture commune a une incidence sur la confiance et les...attentes dès avant une mission; autrement dit , les participants ont manifesté une plus grande confiance envers leur coéquipier et une confiance

  8. If You Can’t Trust, Stick to Hierarchy: Structure and Trust as Contingency Factors in Threat Assessment Contexts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    contingency perspective of organizations (Burns & Stalker, 1961; Woodward, 1965; Lawrence & Lorsch , 1967) suggests that there is no single, best...Organizations. Greenwich, CT: JAI Press. Bradach, J. L., & Eccles, R. G. (1989). Price, authority, and trust: From ideal types to plural forms. Annual Review...13: 241–281. Lawrence, R. R., & Lorsch , J. W. (1967). Organization and environment: Managing differentiation and integration. Boston: Harvard Business

  9. Keys to Heart Disease Care: Communication and Trust

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_164421.html Keys to Heart Disease Care: Communication and Trust These factors linked to patients' greater ... trusted the medical profession. It's no secret that communication and trust are important in any doctor-patient ...

  10. A Strategic Model of Trust Management in Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junqing; Sun, Zhaohao; Li, Yuanzhe; Zhao, Shuliang

    This article examines trust and trust management in web services and proposes a multiagent model of trust relationship in web services. It looks at the hierarchical structure of trust management in web services and proposes a strategic model of trust management in web services. The proposed approach in this article will facilitate research and development of trust management in e-commerce, web services and social networking.

  11. The interplay of T1- and T2-relaxation on T1-weighted MRI of hMSCs induced by Gd-DOTA-peptides.

    PubMed

    Cao, Limin; Li, Binbin; Yi, Peiwei; Zhang, Hailu; Dai, Jianwu; Tan, Bo; Deng, Zongwu

    2014-04-01

    Three Gd-DOTA-peptide complexes with different peptide sequence are synthesized and used as T1 contrast agent to label human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) for magnetic resonance imaging study. The peptides include a universal cell penetrating peptide TAT, a linear MSC-specific peptide EM7, and a cyclic MSC-specific peptide CC9. A significant difference in labeling efficacy is observed between the Gd-DOTA-peptides as well as a control Dotarem. All Gd-DOTA-peptides as well as Dotarem induce significant increase in T1 relaxation rate which is in favor of T1-weighted MR imaging. Gd-DOTA-CC9 yields the maximum labeling efficacy but poor T1 contrast enhancement. Gd-DOTA-EM7 yields the minimum labeling efficacy but better T1 contrast enhancement. Gd-DOTA-TAT yields a similar labeling efficacy as Gd-DOTA-CC9 and similar T1 contrast enhancement as Gd-DOTA-EM7. The underlying mechanism that governs T1 contrast enhancement effect is discussed. Our results suggest that T1 contrast enhancement induced by Gd-DOTA-peptides depends not only on the introduced cellular Gd content, but more importantly on the effect that Gd-DOTA-peptides exert on the T1-relaxation and T2-relaxation processes/rates. Both T1 and particularly T2 relaxation rate have to be taken into account to interpret T1 contrast enhancement. In addition, the interpretation has to be based on cellular instead of aqueous longitudinal and transverse relaxivities of Gd-DOTA-peptides.

  12. Activation of the umami taste receptor (T1R1/T1R3) initiates the peristaltic reflex and pellet propulsion in the distal colon.

    PubMed

    Kendig, Derek M; Hurst, Norman R; Bradley, Zachary L; Mahavadi, Sunila; Kuemmerle, John F; Lyall, Vijay; DeSimone, John; Murthy, Karnam S; Grider, John R

    2014-12-01

    Intraluminal nutrients in the gut affect the peristaltic reflex, although the mechanism is not well defined. Recent evidence supports the presence of taste receptors and their signaling components in enteroendocrine cells, although their function is unclear. This study aimed to determine if nutrients modify colonic motility through activation of taste receptors. Colonic sections were immunostained for the umami taste receptor T1R1/T1R3, which mediates the response to umami ligands, such as monosodium glutamate (MSG), in taste cells. Ascending contraction, descending relaxation, and calcitonin gene-related peptide release were measured in three-chamber flat-sheet preparations of rat colon in response to MSG alone or with inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP). Velocity of artificial fecal pellet propulsion was measured by video recording in guinea pig distal colon. T1R1/T1R3 receptors were present in enteroendocrine cells of colonic sections from human, rat, mouse, and guinea pig. MSG initiated ascending contraction and descending relaxation components of the peristaltic reflex and calcitonin gene-related peptide release in flat-sheet preparations. IMP augmented the MSG-induced effects, suggesting activation of T1R1/T1R3 receptors. In T1R1(-/-) mice, mucosal stroking, but not MSG, elicited a peristaltic reflex. Intraluminal perfusion of MSG enhanced the velocity of artificial fecal pellet propulsion, which was also augmented by IMP. Propulsion was also increased by l-cysteine, but not l-tryptophan, supporting a role of T1R1/T1R3 receptors. We conclude that T1R1/T1R3 activation by luminal MSG or l-cysteine elicits a peristaltic reflex and CGRP release and increases the velocity of pellet propulsion in distal colon. This mechanism may explain how nutrients regulate colonic propulsion.

  13. Price transparency: building community trust.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Richard L

    2007-01-01

    With the push from policymakers, payers, and consumers for hospitals to make their prices public, healthcare executives need to recognize two central issues related to price transparency: 1) meaningful price transparency involves helping patients and consumers understand their financial obligation for an episode of care, and 2) price transparency is key to the most critical success strategy for healthcare providers: building trust. This article reviews the history of pricing and billing practices and explores why price transparency is not easily achieved in today's environment. Pricing is a mystery even to those of us who work in the field, yet despite its complexity, the call for price transparency is not going to go away. For transparency, the goal should be to establish a rational pricing system that is easily explainable and justified to all stakeholders. Healthcare executives must make pricing a priority, understand cost, develop a pricing philosophy, understand the overall revenue requirements, examine market conditions and prices, and set up systems for review. A rational process of price setting should enhance community trust. In this matter there is nothing less at stake than the hearts of our community members.

  14. Young Children and Trust in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alat, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine differences in children's generalised trust and the maternal behaviour, child temperament, and demographic factors on the levels of trust in children. A total of 314 mothers and their children participated in the study. Results showed no evidence of sex differences in children's beliefs. Children living in urban…

  15. Further Exploration of Organizational Trust Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Samuel H.; Wiswell, Albert K.

    2008-01-01

    Trust facilitates individual and organizational learning, and is often misunderstood by organizations although they must continuously learn in order to attain strategic goals and survive. Furthermore, leaders of organizations often view trust defensively and their reactions may impede organizational learning. This paper builds on prior research…

  16. 12 CFR 7.2022 - Voting trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Voting trusts. 7.2022 Section 7.2022 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Corporate... applicable law of a state selected by the participants and designated in the trust agreement, provided...

  17. The Winston Churchill Memorial Trust of Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Nicolette

    2013-01-01

    The Churchill Trust was established in 1965 to honour the memory of Sir Winston Churchill by awarding overseas research Fellowships known as "Churchill Fellowships". Since its inception, The Churchill Trust has awarded Churchill Fellowships to more than 3,700 Australians who, like Churchill, are innovative, filled with a spirit of…

  18. New Superintendents: Trust, Networking, and Social Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripley, Joan; Mitchell, Roxanne M.; Richman, John A.

    2013-01-01

    This instrumental case study explored how five newly appointed superintendents identified key stakeholders and built trust and social capital with stakeholders in their districts. Stakeholder, trust, and social capital theory were the lenses that guided this study. We utilized a pragmatic research design and thematic data analysis to interpret our…

  19. The Importance of Trust in Electronic Commerce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratnasingham, Pauline

    1998-01-01

    Introduces the new concept of trust and how it influences the process of managing the security of an organization operating in an electronic commerce environment. Theoretically, the study aims to develop a framework of trust and security to provide a set of guidelines for secure electronic commerce. (Author/LRW)

  20. Development of Trust and Reciprocity in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Bos, Wouter; Westenberg, Michiel; van Dijk, Eric; Crone, Eveline A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the development of two types of prosocial behavior, trust and reciprocity, as defined using a game-theoretical task that allows investigation of real-time social interaction, among 4 age groups from 9 to 25 years. By manipulating the possible outcome alternatives, we could distinguish among important determinants of trust and…

  1. 26 CFR 301.7701-4 - Trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... federal, state, or local environmental laws; all contributors to the trust have (at the time of... federal, state, or local environmental laws for environmental remediation of the waste site; and the trust... environmental laws for remediation of the existing waste site if there is authority under a federal, state,...

  2. 26 CFR 301.7701-4 - Trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... federal, state, or local environmental laws; all contributors to the trust have (at the time of... federal, state, or local environmental laws for environmental remediation of the waste site; and the trust... environmental laws for remediation of the existing waste site if there is authority under a federal, state,...

  3. 26 CFR 301.7701-4 - Trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... federal, state, or local environmental laws; all contributors to the trust have (at the time of... federal, state, or local environmental laws for environmental remediation of the waste site; and the trust... environmental laws for remediation of the existing waste site if there is authority under a federal, state,...

  4. 26 CFR 301.7701-4 - Trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... federal, state, or local environmental laws; all contributors to the trust have (at the time of... federal, state, or local environmental laws for environmental remediation of the waste site; and the trust... environmental laws for remediation of the existing waste site if there is authority under a federal, state,...

  5. 76 FR 60757 - Executive Branch Qualified Trusts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... make a few minor substantive changes, but would primarily put the regulation in a more logical order... most universally adaptable qualified trust. An interested party may put most types of assets (such as... may put only readily marketable securities into a qualified diversified trust. In addition,...

  6. 77 FR 39143 - Executive Branch Qualified Trusts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... put the regulation in a more logical order, make it more readable, and eliminate redundant provisions... qualified trust. An interested party may put most types of assets (such as cash, stocks, bonds, mutual funds... duties by those interests. (b) Qualified diversified trust. (1) An interested party may put only...

  7. Explaining Math Achievement: Personality, Motivation, and Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilic-Bebek, Ebru

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the statistical significance of student trust next to the well-tested constructs of personality and motivation to determine whether trust is a significant predictor of course achievement in college math courses. Participants were 175 students who were taking undergraduate math courses in an urban public university. The…

  8. Social capital and trust in providers.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Melissa M; Hendryx, Michael S

    2003-10-01

    Trust in providers has been in decline in recent decades. This study attempts to identify sources of trust in characteristics of health care systems and the wider community. The design is cross-sectional. Data are from (1) the 1996 Household Survey of the Community Tracking Study, drawn from 24 Metropolitan Statistical Areas; (2) a 1996 multi-city broadcast media marketing database including key social capital indicators; (3) Interstudy; (4) the American Hospital Association; and (5) the American Medical Association. Independent variables include individual socio-demographic variables, HMO enrollment, community-level health sector variables, and social capital. The dependent variable is self-reported trust in physicians. Data are merged from the various sources and analyzed using SUDAAN. Subjects include adults in the Household Survey who responded to the items on trust in physicians (N=17,653). Trust in physicians is independently predicted by community social capital (p<0.001). Trust is also negatively related to HMO enrollment and to many individual characteristics. The effect of HMOs is not uniform across all communities. Social capital plays a role in how health care is perceived by citizens, and how health care is delivered by providers. Efforts to build trust and collaboration in a community may improve trust in physicians, health care quality, access, and preserve local health care control.

  9. Effects of Cognitive Load on Trust

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    27 5. Operational Processes ...the person’s benevolence. 3.1. Cognitive Load and Trust Cognitive load is a key component of the four-stage model of human information processing ...capacity of working memory and processing of novel information (Baddeley, 2003; Paas et al., 2003). It is clear that, like trust, cognitive load plays

  10. Perceptions of Trust in Public Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Lucy; Baird, Jo-Anne

    2013-01-01

    Over recent years, the credibility of public examinations in England has increasingly come to the fore. Government agencies have invested time and money into researching public perceptions of the reliability and validity of examinations. Whilst such research overlaps into the conceptual domain of trust, trust in examinations remains an elusive…

  11. Trusting Facebook in Crisis Situations: The Role of General Use and General Trust Toward Facebook.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Hermann; Kücükbalaban, Pinar; Lemanski, Sandra; Knuth, Daniela; Schmidt, Silke

    2016-01-01

    An important concept that has been rather neglected in research on social media is the concept of trust. Although there is a considerable amount of research on online trust in general, little has been done in the area of social media. As a situation of risk is necessary for trust, the perceived trustworthiness of Facebook in crisis situations was examined in this study. A sample of 340 European Facebook users were questioned as part of a large European study about social media in the context of emergency situations. We found that participants' general trust toward Facebook as a medium predicted to a significant degree how much they would trust Facebook in a crisis situation. General use of Facebook and dispositional trust were also significantly associated with trust toward Facebook in a crisis situation.

  12. Trust in the workplace: factors affecting trust formation between team members.

    PubMed

    Spector, Michele D; Jones, Gwen E

    2004-06-01

    The authors used survey data from 127 professional-level employees working in 8 industries to assess the effects of respondent's trusting stance and (a) the trustee's organization membership (internal or external), (b) the hierarchical relationship (supervisor or peer), and (c) the gender of the trustee, on initial trust level for a new project team member. The authors found that trusting stance was positively related to initial trust level. The authors also found an interaction effect between respondent gender and trustee gender on initial trust. Specifically, male initial trust level was higher for a new male team member and lower for a new female team member. The present study provided additional understanding of the formation of initial trust levels and its importance for team functioning.

  13. DualTrust: A Distributed Trust Model for Swarm-Based Autonomic Computing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maiden, Wendy M.; Dionysiou, Ioanna; Frincke, Deborah A.; Fink, Glenn A.; Bakken, David E.

    2011-02-01

    For autonomic computing systems that utilize mobile agents and ant colony algorithms for their sensor layer, trust management is important for the acceptance of the mobile agent sensors and to protect the system from malicious behavior by insiders and entities that have penetrated network defenses. This paper examines the trust relationships, evidence, and decisions in a representative system and finds that by monitoring the trustworthiness of the autonomic managers rather than the swarming sensors, the trust management problem becomes much more scalable and still serves to protect the swarm. We then propose the DualTrust conceptual trust model. By addressing the autonomic manager’s bi-directional primary relationships in the ACS architecture, DualTrust is able to monitor the trustworthiness of the autonomic managers, protect the sensor swarm in a scalable manner, and provide global trust awareness for the orchestrating autonomic manager.

  14. An improved prognostic model for stage T1a and T1b prostate cancer by assessments of cancer extent

    PubMed Central

    Rajab, Ramzi; Fisher, Gabrielle; Kattan, Michael W; Foster, Christopher S; Møller, Henrik; Oliver, Tim; Reuter, Victor; Scardino, Peter T; Cuzick, Jack; Berney, Daniel M

    2013-01-01

    Treatment decisions on prostate cancer diagnosed by trans-urethral resection (TURP) of the prostate are difficult. The current TNM staging system for pT1 prostate cancer has not been re-evaluated for 25 years. Our objective was to optimise the predictive power of tumor extent measurements in TURP of the prostate specimens. A total of 914 patients diagnosed by TURP of the prostate between 1990 and 1996, managed conservatively were identified. The clinical end point was death from prostate cancer. Diagnostic serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and contemporary Gleason grading was available. Cancer extent was measured by the percentage of chips infiltrated by cancer. Death rates were compared by univariate and multivariate proportional hazards models, including baseline PSA and Gleason score. The percentage of positive chips was highly predictive of prostate cancer death when assessed as a continuous variable or as a grouped variable on the basis of and including the quintiles, quartiles, tertiles and median groups. In the univariate model, the most informative variable was a four group-split (≤ 10%, >10–25%, > 25–75% and > 75%); (HR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.8–2.4, P < 0.0001). The same was true in a multivariate model (ΔX2 (1 d.f.) = 15.0, P = 0.0001). The current cutoff used by TNM (< = 5%) was sub-optimal (ΔX2 (1 d.f.) = 4.8, P = 0.023). The current TNM staging results in substantial loss of information. Staging by a four-group subdivision would substantially improve prognostication in patients with early stage disease and also may help to refine management decisions in patients who would do well with conservative treatments. PMID:20834240

  15. Generation of insulin-producing cells from C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Jian, Ruo-Lei; Mao, Li-Bin; Xu, Yao; Li, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Feng-Po; Luo, Xue-Gang; Zhou, Hao; He, Hong-Peng; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Tong-Cun

    2015-05-10

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been reported to be an attractive source for the generation of transplantable surrogate β cells. A murine embryonic mesenchymal progenitor cell line C3H10T1/2 has been recognized as a model for MSCs, because of its multi-lineage differentiation potential. The purpose of this study was to explore whether C3H/10T1/2 cells have the potential to differentiate into insulin-producing cells (IPCs). Here, we investigated and compared the in vitro differentiation of rat MSCs and C3H10T1/2 cells into IPCs. After the cells underwent IPC differentiation, the expression of differentiation markers were detected by immunocytochemistry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting. The insulin secretion was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Furthermore, these differentiated cells were transplanted into streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice and their biological functions were tested in vivo. This study reports a 2-stage method to generate IPCs from C3H10T1/2 cells. Under specific induction conditions for 7-8 days, C3H10T1/2 cells formed three-dimensional spheroid bodies (SBs) and secreted insulin, while generation of IPCs derived from rat MSCs required a long time (more than 2 weeks). Furthermore, these IPCs derived from C3H10T1/2 cells were injected into diabetic mice and improves basal glucose, body weight and exhibited normal glucose tolerance test. The present study provided a simple and faithful in vitro model for further investigating the mechanism underlying IPC differentiation of MSCs and cell replacement therapy for diabetes.

  16. Quantitative T1 mapping under precisely controlled graded hyperoxia at 7T.

    PubMed

    Bhogal, Alex A; Siero, Jeroen Cw; Zwanenburg, Jaco; Luijten, Peter R; Philippens, Marielle Ep; Hoogduin, Hans

    2017-04-01

    Increasing the concentration of oxygen dissolved in water is known to increase the recovery rate (R1 = 1/T1) of longitudinal magnetization (T1 relaxation). Direct T1 changes in response to precise hyperoxic gas challenges have not yet been quantified and the actual effect of increasing arterial oxygen concentration on the T1 of brain parenchyma remains unclear. The aim of this work was to use quantitative T1 mapping to measure tissue T1 changes in response to precisely targeted hyperoxic respiratory challenges ranging from baseline end-tidal oxygen (PetO2) to approximately 500 mmHg. We did not observe measureable T1 changes in either gray matter or white matter parenchymal tissue. The T1 of peripheral cerebrospinal fluid located within the sulci, however, was reduced as a function of PetO2. No significant T1 changes were observed in the ventricular cerebrospinal fluid under hyperoxia. Our results indicate that care should be taken to distinguish actual T1 changes from those which may be related to partial volume effects with cerebrospinal fluid, or regions with increased fluid content such as edema when examining hyperoxia-induced changes in T1 using methods based on T1-weighted imaging.

  17. Native T1 Mapping Demonstrating Apical Thrombi in Eosinophilic Myocarditis Associated with Churg-Strauss Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Kyongmin Sarah; Jeong, Soh Yong; Lee, Kyo Young; Chang, Kiyuk

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic myocarditis is a disease characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the myocardium, consisting of acute necrotic stage, thrombotic stage, and fibrotic stage. Although T1 mapping has been increasingly used in various cardiac pathologies, there has been no report of T1 mapping in eosinophilic myocarditis. We report a case of 75-year-old female with eosinophilic myocarditis, whose cardiac magnetic resonance imaging included native T1 mapping, in which apical thrombi were distinctly seen as areas with decreased T1 values, next to areas of inflammation seen as increased T1 value in subendocardium. PMID:27826352

  18. Reproducibility and comparison of oxygen-enhanced T1 quantification in COPD and asthma patients

    PubMed Central

    Jobst, Bertram J.; Anjorin, Angela; Sedlaczek, Oliver; Wolf, Ursula; Terekhov, Maxim; Hoffmann, Christian; Ley, Sebastian; Düber, Christoph; Biederer, Jürgen; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Jakob, Peter M.; Wielpütz, Mark O.

    2017-01-01

    T1 maps have been shown to yield useful diagnostic information on lung function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma, both for native T1 and ΔT1, the relative reduction while breathing pure oxygen. As parameter quantification is particularly interesting for longitudinal studies, the purpose of this work was both to examine the reproducibility of lung T1 mapping and to compare T1 found in COPD and asthma patients using IRSnapShotFLASH embedded in a full MRI protocol. 12 asthma and 12 COPD patients (site 1) and further 15 COPD patients (site 2) were examined on two consecutive days. In each patient, T1 maps were acquired in 8 single breath-hold slices, breathing first room air, then pure oxygen. Maps were partitioned into 12 regions each to calculate average values. In asthma patients, the average T1,RA = 1206ms (room air) was reduced to T1,O2 = 1141ms under oxygen conditions (ΔT1 = 5.3%, p < 5⋅10−4), while in COPD patients both native T1,RA = 1125ms was significantly shorter (p < 10−3) and the relative reduction to T1,O2 = 1081ms on average ΔT1 = 4.2%(p < 10−5). On the second day, with T1,RA = 1186ms in asthma and T1,RA = 1097ms in COPD, observed values were slightly shorter on average in all patient groups. ΔT1 reduction was the least repeatable parameter and varied from day to day by up to 23% in individual asthma and 30% in COPD patients. While for both patient groups T1 was below the values reported for healthy subjects, the T1 and ΔT1 found in asthmatics lies between that of the COPD group and reported values for healthy subjects, suggesting a higher blood volume fraction and better ventilation. However, it could be demonstrated that lung T1 quantification is subject to notable inter-examination variability, which here can be attributed both to remaining contrast agent from the previous day and the increased dependency of lung T1 on perfusion and thus current lung state. PMID:28207845

  19. Sarcosine-Based Glycine Transporter Type-1 (GlyT-1) Inhibitors Containing Pyridazine Moiety: A Further Search for Drugs with Potential to Influence Schizophrenia Negative Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Harsing, Laszlo G; Timar, Julia; Szabo, Geza; Udvari, Szabolcs; Nagy, Katalin M; Marko, Bernadett; Zsilla, Gabriella; Czompa, Andrea; Tapolcsanyi, Pal; Kocsis, Akos; Matyus, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We have synthesized a novel series of N-substituted sarcosines, analogues of NFPS (N-[3-(biphenyl-4- yloxy)-3-(4-fluorophenyl)propyl]-N-methylglycine), as type-1 glycine transporter (GlyT-1) inhibitors. Several compounds incorporated a diazine ring inhibited recombinant hGlyT-1b expressed permanently in CHO cells and GlyT-1 in rat brain synaptosomal preparations. A structure-activity relationship for the newly synthesized compounds was obtained and discussed on the ground of their GlyT-1 inhibitory potencies. Replacement of the biphenyl-4-yloxy moiety in NFPS with a 5-pyridazinylphenoxy moiety (compounds 3, 4, 5, and 6) or a 2-phenyl-5- pyridazinyloxy moiety (compounds 10, 11, and 12) afforded compounds exhibiting potent inhibition on GlyT-1 activity. The GlyT-1 inhibitory properties of NFPS analogues, in which sarcosine was closed into a ring forming (methylamino)pyridazine-3-(2H)-one, were markedly reduced (compounds 13 and 14). The pyridazine-containing GlyT-1 inhibitors with in vitro GlyT-1 inhibitory potency also enhanced extracellular glycine concentrations in conscious rat striatum as was measured by microdialysis technique. In contrast to NFPS, sarcosine-based pyridazine containing GlyT-1 inhibitors failed to evoke compulsive running behavior whereas they inhibited phencyclidine- induced hypermotility in mice. It is believed that increase of extracellular concentrations of glycine by inhibition of its reuptake may probably influence positively glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type ionotropic receptors in the central nervous system. This may have importance in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders associated with hypofunctional NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic neurochemical transmission. Thus, impaired NMDA receptor functions have been shown to be involved in the development of the negative symptoms and the cognitive deficit of schizophrenia and the treatment of these symptoms is the possible clinical indication of GlyT-1 inhibitors including

  20. High Resolution X-Ray Microangiography of 4T1 Tumor in Mouse Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Jianqi; Liu Ping; Gu Xiang; Liu Xiaoxia; Zhao Jun; Xiao Tiqiao; Xu, Lisa X.

    2010-07-23

    Angiogenesis is very important in tumor growth and metastasis. But in clinic, only vessels lager than 200 {mu}m in diameter, can be observed using conventional medical imaging. Synchrotron radiation (SR) phase contrast imaging, whose spatial resolution can reach as high as 1 {mu}m, has great advantages in imaging soft tissue structures, such as blood vessels and tumor tissues. In this paper, the morphology of newly formed micro-vessels in the mouse 4T1 tumor samples was firstly studied with contrast agent. Then, the angiogenesis in nude mice tumor window model was observed without contrast agent using the SR phase contrast imaging at the beamline for X-ray imaging and biomedical applications, Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). The images of tumors showed dense, irregular and tortuous tumor micro-vessels with the smallest size of 20-30 {mu}m in diameter.

  1. Quantifying Temperature-Dependent T1 Changes in Cortical Bone Using Ultrashort Echo-Time MRI

    PubMed Central

    Han, Misung; Rieke, Viola; Scott, Serena J; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Salgaonkar, Vasant A; Jones, Peter D; Larson, Peder E Z; Diederich, Chris J; Krug, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of using ultrashort echo-time (UTE) MRI to quantify T1 changes in cortical bone due to heating. Methods Variable flip-angle T1 mapping combined with 3D UTE imaging was used to measure T1 in cortical bone. A calibration experiment was performed to detect T1 changes with temperature in ex vivo cortical bone samples from a bovine femur. Ultrasound heating experiments were performed using an interstitial applicator in ex vivo bovine femur specimens, and heat-induced T1 changes were quantified. Results The calibration experiment demonstrated that T1 increases with temperature in cortical bone. We observed a linear relationship between temperature and T1 with a linear coefficient of 0.67–0.84 ms/°C over a range of 25–70°C. The ultrasound heating experiments showed increased T1 changes in the heated regions, and the relationship between the temperature changes and T1 changes was similar to that of the calibration. Conclusion We demonstrated a temperature dependence of T1 in ex vivo cortical bone using a variable flip-angle UTE T1 mapping method. PMID:26390357

  2. Hype and Public Trust in Science

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Social scientists have begun elucidating the variables that influence public trust in science, yet little is known about hype in biotechnology and its effects on public trust. Many scholars claim that hyping biotechnology results in a loss of public trust, and possibly public enthusiasm or support for science, because public expectations of the biotechnological promises will be unmet. We argue for the need for empirical research that examines the relationships between hype, public trust, and public enthusiasm/support. We discuss the complexities in designing empirical studies that provide evidence for a causal link between hype, public trust, and public enthusiasm/support, but also illustrate how this may be remedied. Further empirical research on hype and public trust is needed in order to improve public communication of science and to design evidence-based education on the responsible conduct of research for scientists. We conclude that conceptual arguments made on hype and public trust must be nuanced to reflect our current understanding of this relationship. PMID:22045550

  3. Genetic Influences Are Virtually Absent for Trust

    PubMed Central

    Van Lange, Paul A. M.; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E.; Posthuma, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades, numerous twin studies have revealed moderate to high heritability estimates for individual differences in a wide range of human traits, including cognitive ability, psychiatric disorders, and personality traits. Even factors that are generally believed to be environmental in nature have been shown to be under genetic control, albeit modest. Is such heritability also present in social traits that are conceptualized as causes and consequences of social interactions or in other ways strongly shaped by behavior of other people? Here we examine a population-based sample of 1,012 twins and relatives. We show that the genetic influence on generalized trust in other people (trust-in-others: h2 = 5%, ns), and beliefs regarding other people’s trust in the self (trust-in-self: h2 = 13%, ns), is virtually absent. As test-retest reliability for both scales were found to be moderate or high (r = .76 and r = .53, respectively) in an independent sample, we conclude that all variance in trust is likely to be accounted for by non-shared environmental influences. We show that, relative to cognitive abilities, psychiatric disorders, and classic personality variables, genetic influences are smaller for trust, and propose that experiences with or observations of the behavior of other people shape trust more strongly than other traits. PMID:24709897

  4. Trust, regulatory processes and NICE decision-making: Appraising cost-effectiveness models through appraising people and systems.

    PubMed

    Brown, Patrick; Hashem, Ferhana; Calnan, Michael

    2016-02-01

    This article presents an ethnographic study of regulatory decision-making regarding the cost-effectiveness of expensive medicines at the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in England. We explored trust as one important mechanism by which problems of complexity and uncertainty were resolved. Existing studies note the salience of trust for regulatory decisions, by which the appraisal of people becomes a proxy for appraising technologies themselves. Although such (dis)trust in manufacturers was one important influence, we describe a more intricate web of (dis)trust relations also involving various expert advisors, fellow committee members and committee Chairs. Within these complex chains of relations, we found examples of both more blind-acquiescent and more critical-Investigative forms of trust as well as, at times, pronounced distrust. Difficulties in overcoming uncertainty through other means obliged trust in some contexts, although not in others. (Dis)trust was constructed through inferences involving abstract systems alongside actors' oral and written presentations-of-self. Systemic features and 'forced options' to trust indicate potential insidious processes of regulatory capture.

  5. Food risks and consumer trust. Avian influenza and the knowing and non-knowing on UK shopping floors.

    PubMed

    de Krom, Michiel P M M; Mol, Arthur P J

    2010-12-01

    Irrespective of major food crises in the 2000s consumer trust in food seems to remain high in Western Europe. Transparent information provision to consumers on food risks is a central strategy of the EU, its Member States and private food providers to build food trust among consumers. But can the interpretation of such information by consumers explain high levels of trust in food safety? Following recent outbreaks of avian influenza in the UK, this paper investigates the constitution of food trust among UK poultry consumers by focusing on the place where consumer decisions are made: the shopping floor. In-store qualitative interviews with consumers of a variety of poultry products at different shops are used to reveal the use of information in constructing trust. Besides on knowledge inducted from information provision, trust depends as much on consumer strategies to handle non-knowing of food risks. Three main forms of trust relations are distinguished, which together at a system level result in high levels of consumer trust in food.

  6. Detection of Leptomeningeal Metastasis by Contrast-Enhanced 3D T1-SPACE: Comparison with 2D FLAIR and Contrast-Enhanced 2D T1-Weighted Images

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Bomi; Hwang, Eo-Jin; Lee, Song; Jang, Jinhee; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Kim, Bum-soo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To compare the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced 3D(dimensional) T1-weighted sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts by using different flip angle evolutions (T1-SPACE), 2D fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image in detection of leptomeningeal metastasis except for invasive procedures such as a CSF tapping. Materials and Methods Three groups of patients were included retrospectively for 9 months (from 2013-04-01 to 2013-12-31). Group 1 patients with positive malignant cells in CSF cytology (n = 22); group 2, stroke patients with steno-occlusion in ICA or MCA (n = 16); and group 3, patients with negative results on MRI, whose symptom were dizziness or headache (n = 25). A total of 63 sets of MR images are separately collected and randomly arranged: (1) CE 3D T1-SPACE; (2) 2D FLAIR; and (3) CE T1-GRE using a 3-Tesla MR system. A faculty neuroradiologist with 8-year-experience and another 2nd grade trainee in radiology reviewed each MR image- blinded by the results of CSF cytology and coded their observations as positives or negatives of leptomeningeal metastasis. The CSF cytology result was considered as a gold standard. Sensitivity and specificity of each MR images were calculated. Diagnostic accuracy was compared using a McNemar’s test. A Cohen's kappa analysis was performed to assess inter-observer agreements. Results Diagnostic accuracy was not different between 3D T1-SPACE and CSF cytology by both raters. However, the accuracy test of 2D FLAIR and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE was inconsistent by the two raters. The Kappa statistic results were 0.657 (3D T1-SPACE), 0.420 (2D FLAIR), and 0.160 (2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE). The 3D T1-SPACE images showed the highest inter-observer agreements between the raters. Conclusions Compared to 2D FLAIR and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE, contrast-enhanced 3D T1 SPACE showed a better detection rate of

  7. A Novel Trust Service Provider for Internet Based Commerce Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siyal, M. Y.; Barkat, B.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a framework for enhancing trust in Internet commerce. Shows how trust can be provided through a network of Trust Service Providers (TSp). Identifies a set of services that should be offered by a TSp. Presents a distributed object-oriented implementation of trust services using CORBA, JAVA and XML. (Author/AEF)

  8. Trust Matters: Leadership for Successful Schools, 2nd Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschannen-Moran, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Make your school soar by escalating trust between teachers, students, and families. Trust is an essential element in all healthy relationships, and the relationships that exist in your school are no different. How can your school leaders or teachers cultivate trust? How can your institution maintain trust once it is established? These are the…

  9. 49 CFR 1013.2 - The irrevocability of the trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false The irrevocability of the trust. 1013.2 Section... BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS GUIDELINES FOR THE PROPER USE OF VOTING TRUSTS § 1013.2 The irrevocability of the trust. (a) The trust and the nomination of the...

  10. The Nature and Function of Trust in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Curt M.; Forsyth, Patrick B.

    2009-01-01

    Our purpose was to advance and test a theoretical model of the nature and function of trust in schools. Unlike other studies, ours specified school trust as a latent construct manifested through parent and teacher trust perceptions. We hypothesized that trust would have a larger direct effect on collective teacher efficacy and achievement…

  11. 26 CFR 1.851-7 - Certain unit investment trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of $100 and a short- term capital gain of $50, computed as follows: (1) B is treated as owning 110... trust will be treated as directly owning the assets of such trust for taxable years of such holder which... proportionate share of the trust assets in exchange for his interest in the trust. Also, no gain or loss will...

  12. Guide to the Administration of Charitable Remainder Trusts. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David W.; And Others

    This is the third edition of a workbook prepared as a kind of primer for those responsible for the administration of charitable remainder trusts in accordance with the Tax Reform Act of 1969. The topics covered include: trust administration in general; pooled income fund; unitrust; annuity trust; gift annuity; short term income (lead) trust; gift…

  13. 25 CFR 1000.354 - What is a trust evaluation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... evaluation is an annual review and evaluation of trust functions performed by a Tribe/Consortium to ensure that the functions are performed in accordance with trust standards as defined by Federal law. Trust evaluations address trust functions performed by the Tribe/Consortium on its own behalf as well as...

  14. 25 CFR 1000.354 - What is a trust evaluation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... evaluation is an annual review and evaluation of trust functions performed by a Tribe/Consortium to ensure that the functions are performed in accordance with trust standards as defined by Federal law. Trust evaluations address trust functions performed by the Tribe/Consortium on its own behalf as well as...

  15. 25 CFR 1000.354 - What is a trust evaluation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... evaluation is an annual review and evaluation of trust functions performed by a Tribe/Consortium to ensure that the functions are performed in accordance with trust standards as defined by Federal law. Trust evaluations address trust functions performed by the Tribe/Consortium on its own behalf as well as...

  16. 25 CFR 1000.354 - What is a trust evaluation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... evaluation is an annual review and evaluation of trust functions performed by a Tribe/Consortium to ensure that the functions are performed in accordance with trust standards as defined by Federal law. Trust evaluations address trust functions performed by the Tribe/Consortium on its own behalf as well as...

  17. Teacher Trust in District Administration: A Promising Line of Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Curt M.; Miskell, Ryan C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We set out in this study to establish a foundation for a line of inquiry around teacher trust in district administration by (1) describing the role of trust in capacity building, (2) conceptualizing trust in district administration, (3) developing a scale to measure teacher trust in district administration, and (4) testing the…

  18. 49 CFR 1013.2 - The irrevocability of the trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false The irrevocability of the trust. 1013.2 Section... BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS GUIDELINES FOR THE PROPER USE OF VOTING TRUSTS § 1013.2 The irrevocability of the trust. (a) The trust and the nomination of the...

  19. 49 CFR 1013.2 - The irrevocability of the trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false The irrevocability of the trust. 1013.2 Section... BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS GUIDELINES FOR THE PROPER USE OF VOTING TRUSTS § 1013.2 The irrevocability of the trust. (a) The trust and the nomination of the...

  20. Dynamic Trust Management for Mobile Networks and Its Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bao, Fenye

    2013-01-01

    Trust management in mobile networks is challenging due to dynamically changing network environments and the lack of a centralized trusted authority. In this dissertation research, we "design" and "validate" a class of dynamic trust management protocols for mobile networks, and demonstrate the utility of dynamic trust management…

  1. 12 CFR 745.9-1 - Trust accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Trust accounts. 745.9-1 Section 745.9-1 Banks... AND APPENDIX Clarification and Definition of Account Insurance Coverage § 745.9-1 Trust accounts. (a) For purposes of this section, “trust” refers to an irrevocable trust. (b) All trust interests...

  2. 26 CFR 1.47-5 - Estates and trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Estates and trusts. 1.47-5 Section 1.47-5... Computing Credit for Investment in Certain Depreciable Property § 1.47-5 Estates and trusts. (a) In general—(1) Disposition or cessation in hands of estate or trust. If an estate or trust disposes of...

  3. 26 CFR 8.1 - Charitable remainder trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Charitable remainder trusts. 8.1 Section 8.1... Charitable remainder trusts. (a) Certain wills and trusts in existence on September 21, 1974. In the case of a will executed before September 21, 1974, or a trust created (within the meaning of...

  4. 24 CFR 92.500 - The HOME Investment Trust Fund.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false The HOME Investment Trust Fund. 92... Investment Trust Fund. (a) General. A HOME Investment Trust Fund consists of the accounts described in this... Investment Trust Fund United States Treasury account for each participating jurisdiction. Each...

  5. DualTrust: A Trust Management Model for Swarm-Based Autonomic Computing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maiden, Wendy M.

    2010-05-01

    Trust management techniques must be adapted to the unique needs of the application architectures and problem domains to which they are applied. For autonomic computing systems that utilize mobile agents and ant colony algorithms for their sensor layer, certain characteristics of the mobile agent ant swarm -- their lightweight, ephemeral nature and indirect communication -- make this adaptation especially challenging. This thesis looks at the trust issues and opportunities in swarm-based autonomic computing systems and finds that by monitoring the trustworthiness of the autonomic managers rather than the swarming sensors, the trust management problem becomes much more scalable and still serves to protect the swarm. After analyzing the applicability of trust management research as it has been applied to architectures with similar characteristics, this thesis specifies the required characteristics for trust management mechanisms used to monitor the trustworthiness of entities in a swarm-based autonomic computing system and describes a trust model that meets these requirements.

  6. Combinations of social participation and trust, and association with health status-an Australian perspective.

    PubMed

    Williams, Susan L; Ronan, Kevin

    2014-12-01

    A limited number of studies have examined the 'miniaturization of community' model which is based on belief that 'new' individualistic, and narrower forms of social participation, do not promote generalized trust in others. Little is known about miniaturization of community and self-reported health, physical health and psychological health in Australia. Data from a 2009 computer-assisted-telephone-interview survey was used to investigate generalized trust, social participation and health-related quality of life in a regional Australian population (n = 1273; mean age 51.2 years). Logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the associations between generalized trust, social participation and poor self-reported health (global self-rated, psychological and physical), and included four social participation/trust categories. A majority (67%) reported high generalized trust of others, 54% were categorized as high social participators. Miniaturization of community was a risk factor for poor self-rated psychological health across genders, and a risk factor for poor self-rated health for males. For women, low social participation (irrespective of trust level) was associated with poor self-reported health. Given current and previous findings, there is a need for further research in a range of contexts which explores the underlying concept of miniaturization of community, that is, the changes in social participation and social networks which may negatively impact community health.

  7. The Impact of Third-Party Information on Trust: Valence, Source, and Reliability

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Economic exchange between strangers happens extremely frequently due to the growing number of internet transactions. In trust situations like online transactions, a trustor usually does not know whether she encounters a trustworthy trustee. However, the trustor might form beliefs about the trustee's trustworthiness by relying on third-party information. Different kinds of third-party information can vary dramatically in their importance to the trustor. We ran a factorial design to study how the different characteristics of third-party information affect the trustor’s decision to trust. We systematically varied unregulated third-party information regarding the source (friend or a stranger), the reliability (gossip or experiences), and the valence (positive or negative) of the information. The results show that negative information is more salient for withholding trust than positive information is for placing trust. If third-party information is positive, experience of a friend has the strongest effect on trusting followed by friend’s gossip. Positive information from a stranger does not matter to the trustor. With respect to negative information, the data show that even the slightest hint of an untrustworthy trustee leads to significantly less placed trust irrespective of the source or the reliability of the information. PMID:26882013

  8. Ethnic diversity, trust, and the mediating role of positive and negative interethnic contact: a priming experiment.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, Ruud; Veit, Susanne

    2014-09-01

    This study not only shows that the empirically well-established negative relationship between residential diversity and trust in neighbors holds for the case of Germany, but goes beyond existing research by providing experimental evidence on the causal nature of the diversity effect. Respondents exposed to experimental stimuli that made salient the ethnic or religious heterogeneity of their neighborhoods display significantly lower levels of trust in their neighbors than do respondents in the control group. Further, we explore the role of interethnic contact in mediating the relationship between diversity and trust in a degree of detail unmatched by earlier studies. We consider not only positive forms of interethnic contact such as friendships, but also neutral and negative encounters between people of native and immigrant origin. We find that interethnic contacts mediate negative diversity effects on trust in different ways for both groups. For natives, distant encounters and negative experiences with immigrants in diverse contexts reduce trust, whereas for people of immigrant origin trust in neighbors suffers from the relatively small number of native acquaintances in diverse neighborhoods.

  9. Distinct Contributions of T1R2 and T1R3 Taste Receptor Subunits to the Detection of Sweet Stimuli

    SciTech Connect

    Nie,Y.; Vigues, S.; Hobbs, J.; Conn, G.; Munger, S.

    2005-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-type chemosensory receptors of animals selectively interact with their cognate ligands remain poorly understood. There is growing evidence that many chemosensory receptors exist in multimeric complexes, though little is known about the relative contributions of individual subunits to receptor functions. This study showed that each of the two subunits in the mammalian heteromeric T1R2:T1R3 sweet taste receptor binds sweet stimuli, though with distinct affinities and conformational changes. Furthermore, ligand affinities for T1R3 are drastically reduced by the introduction of a single amino acid change associated with decreased sweet taste sensitivity in mice. Thus, individual T1R subunits increase the receptive range of the sweet taste receptor, offering a functional mechanism for phenotypic variations in sweet taste.

  10. Fully automatic detection of deep white matter T1 hypointense lesions in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Spies, Lothar; Tewes, Anja; Suppa, Per; Opfer, Roland; Buchert, Ralph; Winkler, Gerhard; Raji, Alaleh

    2013-12-07

    A novel method is presented for fully automatic detection of candidate white matter (WM) T1 hypointense lesions in three-dimensional high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. By definition, T1 hypointense lesions have similar intensity as gray matter (GM) and thus appear darker than surrounding normal WM in T1-weighted images. The novel method uses a standard classification algorithm to partition T1-weighted images into GM, WM and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). As a consequence, T1 hypointense lesions are assigned an increased GM probability by the standard classification algorithm. The GM component image of a patient is then tested voxel-by-voxel against GM component images of a normative database of healthy individuals. Clusters (≥0.1 ml) of significantly increased GM density within a predefined mask of deep WM are defined as lesions. The performance of the algorithm was assessed on voxel level by a simulation study. A maximum dice similarity coefficient of 60% was found for a typical T1 lesion pattern with contrasts ranging from WM to cortical GM, indicating substantial agreement between ground truth and automatic detection. Retrospective application to 10 patients with multiple sclerosis demonstrated that 93 out of 96 T1 hypointense lesions were detected. On average 3.6 false positive T1 hypointense lesions per patient were found. The novel method is promising to support the detection of hypointense lesions in T1-weighted images which warrants further evaluation in larger patient samples.

  11. Fully automatic detection of deep white matter T1 hypointense lesions in multiple sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spies, Lothar; Tewes, Anja; Suppa, Per; Opfer, Roland; Buchert, Ralph; Winkler, Gerhard; Raji, Alaleh

    2013-12-01

    A novel method is presented for fully automatic detection of candidate white matter (WM) T1 hypointense lesions in three-dimensional high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. By definition, T1 hypointense lesions have similar intensity as gray matter (GM) and thus appear darker than surrounding normal WM in T1-weighted images. The novel method uses a standard classification algorithm to partition T1-weighted images into GM, WM and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). As a consequence, T1 hypointense lesions are assigned an increased GM probability by the standard classification algorithm. The GM component image of a patient is then tested voxel-by-voxel against GM component images of a normative database of healthy individuals. Clusters (≥0.1 ml) of significantly increased GM density within a predefined mask of deep WM are defined as lesions. The performance of the algorithm was assessed on voxel level by a simulation study. A maximum dice similarity coefficient of 60% was found for a typical T1 lesion pattern with contrasts ranging from WM to cortical GM, indicating substantial agreement between ground truth and automatic detection. Retrospective application to 10 patients with multiple sclerosis demonstrated that 93 out of 96 T1 hypointense lesions were detected. On average 3.6 false positive T1 hypointense lesions per patient were found. The novel method is promising to support the detection of hypointense lesions in T1-weighted images which warrants further evaluation in larger patient samples.

  12. T1/ST2 promotes T helper 2 cell activation and polyfunctionality in bronchopulmonary mycosis.

    PubMed

    Piehler, D; Grahnert, A; Eschke, M; Richter, T; Köhler, G; Stenzel, W; Alber, G

    2013-03-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33 enhances T helper (Th)2 immunity via its receptor T1/ST2. Infection with the yeast-like pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is usually controlled by a Th1-mediated immune response. The mechanisms responsible for nonprotective Th2 immunity leading to allergic inflammation in pulmonary cryptococcosis are still not fully understood. Using a murine pulmonary model of C. neoformans infection, we report that T1/ST2 expression correlates with the intensity of Th2 activation, as demonstrated by the expression of CD25 and CD44 and downregulation of CD62L. Antigen-specific T1/ST2(+) Th cells are the primary source of the Th2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 as compared with wild-type T1/ST2(-) Th cells or Th cells from T1/ST2(-/-) mice. In addition, T1/ST2(+) Th cells almost exclusively contain bi- and trifunctional Th2 cytokine-producing Th cells compared with T1/ST2(-) Th cells or Th cells from T1/ST2(-/-) mice. Finally, T1/ST2-driven Th2 development resulted in defective pulmonary fungal control. These data demonstrate that T1/ST2 directs Th2 cell activation and polyfunctionality in allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis.

  13. Sugar-induced cephalic-phase insulin release is mediated by a T1r2+T1r3-independent taste transduction pathway in mice

    PubMed Central

    Stano, Sarah; Holter, Marlena; Azenkot, Tali; Goldman, Olivia; Margolskee, Robert F.; Vasselli, Joseph R.; Sclafani, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Sensory stimulation from foods elicits cephalic phase responses, which facilitate digestion and nutrient assimilation. One such response, cephalic-phase insulin release (CPIR), enhances glucose tolerance. Little is known about the chemosensory mechanisms that activate CPIR. We studied the contribution of the sweet taste receptor (T1r2+T1r3) to sugar-induced CPIR in C57BL/6 (B6) and T1r3 knockout (KO) mice. First, we measured insulin release and glucose tolerance following oral (i.e., normal ingestion) or intragastric (IG) administration of 2.8 M glucose. Both groups of mice exhibited a CPIR following oral but not IG administration, and this CPIR improved glucose tolerance. Second, we examined the specificity of CPIR. Both mouse groups exhibited a CPIR following oral administration of 1 M glucose and 1 M sucrose but not 1 M fructose or water alone. Third, we studied behavioral attraction to the same three sugar solutions in short-term acceptability tests. B6 mice licked more avidly for the sugar solutions than for water, whereas T1r3 KO mice licked no more for the sugar solutions than for water. Finally, we examined chorda tympani (CT) nerve responses to each of the sugars. Both mouse groups exhibited CT nerve responses to the sugars, although those of B6 mice were stronger. We propose that mice possess two taste transduction pathways for sugars. One mediates behavioral attraction to sugars and requires an intact T1r2+T1r3. The other mediates CPIR but does not require an intact T1r2+T1r3. If the latter taste transduction pathway exists in humans, it should provide opportunities for the development of new treatments for controlling blood sugar. PMID:26157055

  14. Sugar-induced cephalic-phase insulin release is mediated by a T1r2+T1r3-independent taste transduction pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Glendinning, John I; Stano, Sarah; Holter, Marlena; Azenkot, Tali; Goldman, Olivia; Margolskee, Robert F; Vasselli, Joseph R; Sclafani, Anthony

    2015-09-01

    Sensory stimulation from foods elicits cephalic phase responses, which facilitate digestion and nutrient assimilation. One such response, cephalic-phase insulin release (CPIR), enhances glucose tolerance. Little is known about the chemosensory mechanisms that activate CPIR. We studied the contribution of the sweet taste receptor (T1r2+T1r3) to sugar-induced CPIR in C57BL/6 (B6) and T1r3 knockout (KO) mice. First, we measured insulin release and glucose tolerance following oral (i.e., normal ingestion) or intragastric (IG) administration of 2.8 M glucose. Both groups of mice exhibited a CPIR following oral but not IG administration, and this CPIR improved glucose tolerance. Second, we examined the specificity of CPIR. Both mouse groups exhibited a CPIR following oral administration of 1 M glucose and 1 M sucrose but not 1 M fructose or water alone. Third, we studied behavioral attraction to the same three sugar solutions in short-term acceptability tests. B6 mice licked more avidly for the sugar solutions than for water, whereas T1r3 KO mice licked no more for the sugar solutions than for water. Finally, we examined chorda tympani (CT) nerve responses to each of the sugars. Both mouse groups exhibited CT nerve responses to the sugars, although those of B6 mice were stronger. We propose that mice possess two taste transduction pathways for sugars. One mediates behavioral attraction to sugars and requires an intact T1r2+T1r3. The other mediates CPIR but does not require an intact T1r2+T1r3. If the latter taste transduction pathway exists in humans, it should provide opportunities for the development of new treatments for controlling blood sugar.

  15. Security policies and trust in ubiquitous computing.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Anupam; Finin, Tim; Kagal, Lalana; Parker, Jim; Patwardhan, Anand

    2008-10-28

    Ubiquitous environments comprise resource-constrained mobile and wearable devices and computational elements embedded in everyday artefacts. These are connected to each other using both infrastructure-based as well as short-range ad hoc networks. Limited Internet connectivity limits the use of conventional security mechanisms such as public key infrastructures and other forms of server-centric authentication. Under these circumstances, peer-to-peer interactions are well suited for not just information interchange, but also managing security and privacy. However, practical solutions for protecting mobile devices, preserving privacy, evaluating trust and determining the reliability and accuracy of peer-provided data in such interactions are still in their infancy. Our research is directed towards providing stronger assurances of the reliability and trustworthiness of information and services, and the use of declarative policy-driven approaches to handle the open and dynamic nature of such systems. This paper provides an overview of some of the challenges and issues, and points out directions for progress.

  16. Trust in health care providers: factors predicting trust among homeless veterans over time.

    PubMed

    van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; McGuire, James

    2014-08-01

    We examined whether a combination of predisposing, enabling, need, and primary care experience variables would predict trust in medical health care providers for homeless veterans over 18 months. Linear mixed model analysis indicated that, among these variables, race, social support, service-connected disability status, and satisfaction and continuity with providers predicted trust in provider over time. Trust in providers improved during the initial stages of the relationship between patient and provider and then declined to slightly below baseline levels over time. Further research is needed to determine generalizability and effects of provider trust on patient health care status over longer periods of time.

  17. Online trust building through third party trust transfer and third party protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandoko, Wanda; Saleh Abbas, Bahtiar; Budiastuti, Dyah; Kosala, Raymond

    2017-03-01

    The primary objective of this research is to develop an online trust building mechanism for SME (Small Medium Enterprise). Trust is very important in e-commerce. The nature of online shopping has a greater uncertainty than offline shopping. Seeing as there is an uncertainty that can produce risks, a prospective buyer’s trust is needed. A lot of people’s unwillingness to shop online is caused by their lack of trust toward e-commerce. E-commerce is said to be one of the ways for SME to compete with bigger companies. However, building trust requires immense time and cost. SME with limited resources may experience difficulties in building trust just with their own resources. Base on literature research that needs to be validated in next research, we found that trust can be built through trust transfer from the reputable and well-known trust-mark issuer, and third party protection such as escrow account service and credit card issuer.

  18. High levels of the type III inorganic phosphate transporter PiT1 (SLC20A1) can confer faster cell adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Kongsfelt, Iben Boutrup; Byskov, Kristina; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Pedersen, Lene

    2014-08-01

    The inorganic phosphate transporter PiT1 (SLC20A1) is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian cells. We recently showed that overexpression of human PiT1 was sufficient to increase proliferation of two strict density-inhibited cell lines, murine fibroblastic NIH3T3 and pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells, and allowed the cultures to grow to higher cell densities. In addition, upon transformation NIH3T3 cells showed increased ability to form colonies in soft agar. The cellular regulation of PiT1 expression supports that cells utilize the PiT1 levels to control proliferation, with non-proliferating cells showing the lowest PiT1 mRNA levels. The mechanism behind the role of PiT1 in increased cell proliferation is not known. We, however, found that compared to control cells, cultures of NIH3T3 cells overexpressing PiT1 upon seeding showed increased cell number after 24 h and had shifted more cells from G0/G1 to S+G2/M within 12 h, suggesting that an early event may play a role. We here show that expression of human PiT1 in NIH3T3 cells led to faster cell adhesion; this effect was not cell type specific in that it was also observed when expressing human PiT1 in MC3T3-E1 cells. We also show for NIH3T3 that PiT1 overexpression led to faster cell spreading. The final total numbers of attached cells did, however, not differ between cultures of PiT1 overexpressing cells and control cells of neither cell type. We suggest that the PiT1-mediated fast adhesion potentials allow the cells to go faster out of G0/G1 and thereby contribute to their proliferative advantage within the first 24 h after seeding. - Highlights: • Effects of elevated levels of the inorganic phosphate transporter PiT1 were studied. • The density-inhibited murine cell lines NIH3T3 and MC3T3-E1 showed faster adhesion. • NIH3T3 cells showed faster spreading. • We suggest that the faster adhesion/spreading contributes to faster proliferation.

  19. Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) Trust Fund

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In 1986, Congress created the Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) Trust Fund to address releases from federally regulated underground storage tanks (USTs) by amending Subtitle I of the Solid Waste Disposal Act.

  20. Usability and trust in e-banking.

    PubMed

    Pravettoni, Gabriella; Leotta, Salvatore Nuccio; Lucchiari, Claudio; Misuraca, Raffaella

    2007-12-01

    This study assessed the role of usability in trust of e-banking services. A questionnaire was administered to 185 Italian undergraduate working students who volunteered for the experiment (M age = 30.5 yr., SD = 3.1). Participants were differentiated on computer ability (Expert, n = 104; Nonexpert, n = 81) and e-banking use (User, n = 93; Nonusers, n = 92). Analysis showed that the website usability of e-banking services did not play a very important role for the User group. Instead, institution-based trust, e.g., the trust in the security policy of the Web merchant, customers, and the overall trust of the bank were the crucial factors in the adoption of e-banking.

  1. Environmental Education at The Wildfowl Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadsby, Brian

    1975-01-01

    Describes the work of Wildfowl Trust in the areas of research, education, recreation and conservation. Presents the advantages of the wetland habitat for biological study and describes the facilities available to educational bodies at Martin Mere. (Author/GS)

  2. A General Framework of Human Trust in Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    information dominance and complete mission objectives. Soldiers must possess a sufficient amount of trust in networks for adequate mission performance. We are investigating human trust in tactical networks by establishing a theoretical framework for analysis and an approach for validation of the framework. We identify reliability and availability as network parameters that define the relationship between quality of service performance and human trust in networks. A general framework is being developed for human trust in networks, which combines singular elements of trust

  3. Obesity-related abnormalities couple environmental triggers with genetic susceptibility in adult-onset T1D.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, K Hoa; Ande, Sudharsana R; Mishra, Suresh

    2016-01-29

    The incidence of adult-onset T1D in low-risk non-HLA type has increased several folds, whereas the contemporaneous incidence in high-risk HLA-type remains stable. Various factors behind this selective increase in T1D in young adults remain unclear. Obesity and its associated abnormalities appear to be an important determinant; however, the underlying mechanism involved is not understood. Recently, we have developed two novel transgenic obese mice models, Mito-Ob and m-Mito-Ob, by expressing a pleiotropic protein prohibitin (PHB) and a phospho mutant form of PHB (Y114F-PHB or m-PHB) from the aP2 gene promoter, respectively. Both mice models develop obesity in a sex-neutral manner, independent of diet; but obesity associated chronic low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance in a male sex-specific manner. Interestingly, on a high fat diet (HFD) only male m-Mito-Ob mice displayed marked mononuclear cell infiltration in pancreas and developed insulitis that mimic adult-onset T1D. Male Mito-Ob mice that share the metabolic phenotype of male m-Mito-Ob mice, and female m-Mito-Ob that harbor m-PHB similar to male m-Mito-Ob mice, did not develop insulitis. Thus, insulitis development in male m-Mito-Ob in response to HFD requires both, obesity-related abnormalities and m-PHB. Collectively, this data provides a proof-of-concept that obesity-associated abnormalities couple environmental triggers with genetic susceptibility in adult-onset T1D and reveals PHB as a potential susceptibility gene for T1D.

  4. Temperament Constructs Related to Betrayal of Trust

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    empirical evidence for the use of such tests in identifying potential betrayers within organizations. It is argued that white-collar crimes such as...psychometric instruments provided some empirical evidence for the use of such tests in identifying potential trust betrayers within organizations. This research...workplace attitudes should be included in any empirical design to predict trust betrayal; (e) integrity tests have demonstrated an ability to distinguish

  5. Patient care: Is interpersonal trust missing?

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Paul A.; Francis, Cynthia G.; Kerr-Campbell, Maureen D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Health statistics and studies in the Caribbean have omitted interpersonal trust in their investigations. Aims: This study will examine the effect of interpersonal trust and other conditions on psychosocial subjective wellbeing and self-reported health, in order to assess the significance of interpersonal trust, as well as other socio-demographic factors on health. Materials and Method: The current study utilized primary data commissioned by the Centre of Leadership and Governance, Department of Government, the University of West Indies, Mona, Jamaica, between July and August 2006. It was a nationally representative probability sampling survey. A sample of 1,338 respondents was interviewed with a detailed 166-item questionnaire. Results: Generally, the psychosocial subjective wellbeing of Jamaicans was high (mean = 6.8 ± 1.8), and self-reported health was moderately high (mean = 6.3 ± 2.6). The current study has revealed that income, political system, subjective social class, employment status, and interpersonal trust determine psychosocial subjective wellbeing as well as self-reported health. Interpersonal trust accounted for between 9.4 to 10.4% of the explanatory power of the wellbeing and self-reported health of Jamaicans. Conclusion: The current study highlights that the determinants of health include interpersonal trust. It is critical to point out here that trust must be taken into consideration in any evaluation of health statistics, as it is a factor of subjective wellbeing and health. It is within this context that clinicians need to incorporate interpersonal trust along with other conditions, as it is a part of the psychosocial determinants of health, subjective wellbeing, and health treatment. PMID:22624126

  6. More Anonymous Onion Routing Through Trust

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    attempt to compromise his anonymity . How should he take this trust into account when he selects his paths? 2.1. The model To make this question concrete...It also does not take into account the total effect of an adversary’s actions on a user’s anonymity , such as the analysis performed in [24]. The...More Anonymous Onion Routing Through Trust Aaron Johnson Computer Science Department Yale University New Haven, CT 06520 USA aaron.johnson@yale.edu

  7. RGD-functionalized ultrasmall iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted T1-weighted MR imaging of gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yu; Yang, Jia; Yan, Yu; Li, Jingchao; Shen, Mingwu; Zhang, Guixiang; Mignani, Serge; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-08-01

    We report a convenient approach to prepare ultrasmall Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with an arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) peptide for in vitro and in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of gliomas. In our work, stable sodium citrate-stabilized Fe3O4 NPs were prepared by a solvothermal route. Then, the carboxylated Fe3O4 NPs stabilized with sodium citrate were conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-linked RGD. The formed ultrasmall RGD-functionalized nanoprobe (Fe3O4-PEG-RGD) was fully characterized using different techniques. We show that these Fe3O4-PEG-RGD particles with a size of 2.7 nm are water-dispersible, stable, cytocompatible and hemocompatible in a given concentration range, and display targeting specificity to glioma cells overexpressing αvβ3 integrin in vitro. With the relatively high r1 relaxivity (r1 = 1.4 mM-1 s-1), the Fe3O4-PEG-RGD particles can be used as an efficient nanoprobe for targeted T1-weighted positive MR imaging of glioma cells in vitro and the xenografted tumor model in vivo via an active RGD-mediated targeting pathway. The developed RGD-functionalized Fe3O4 NPs may hold great promise to be used as a nanoprobe for targeted T1-weighted MR imaging of different αvβ3 integrin-overexpressing cancer cells or biological systems.We report a convenient approach to prepare ultrasmall Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with an arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) peptide for in vitro and in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of gliomas. In our work, stable sodium citrate-stabilized Fe3O4 NPs were prepared by a solvothermal route. Then, the carboxylated Fe3O4 NPs stabilized with sodium citrate were conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-linked RGD. The formed ultrasmall RGD-functionalized nanoprobe (Fe3O4-PEG-RGD) was fully characterized using different techniques. We show that these Fe3O4-PEG-RGD particles with a size of 2.7 nm are water-dispersible, stable, cytocompatible and hemocompatible in a given concentration

  8. Interpersonal Trust across Six Asia-Pacific Countries: Testing and Extending the ‘High Trust Society’ and ‘Low Trust Society’ Theory

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Paul R.; Mamerow, Loreen; Meyer, Samantha B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Trust is regarded as a necessary component for the smooth running of society, although societal and political modernising processes have been linked to an increase in mistrust, potentially signalling social and economic problems. Fukuyama developed the notion of ‘high trust’ and ‘low trust’ societies, as a way of understanding trust within different societies. The purpose of this paper is to empirically test and extend Fukuyama’s theory utilising data on interpersonal trust in Taiwan, Hong Kong, South Korea, Japan, Australia and Thailand. This paper focuses on trust in family, neighbours, strangers, foreigners and people with a different religion. Methods Cross-sectional surveys were undertaken in 2009–10, with an overall sample of 6331. Analyses of differences in overall levels of trust between countries were undertaken using Chi square analyses. Multivariate binomial logistic regression analysis was undertaken to identify socio-demographic predictors of trust in each country. Results Our data indicate a tripartite trust model: ‘high trust’ in Australia and Hong Kong; ‘medium trust’ in Japan and Taiwan; and ‘low trust’ in South Korea and Thailand. Trust in family and neighbours were very high across all countries, although trust in people with a different religion, trust in strangers and trust in foreigners varied considerably between countries. The regression models found a consistent group of subpopulations with low trust across the countries: people on low incomes, younger people and people with poor self-rated health. The results were conflicting for gender: females had lower trust in Thailand and Hong Kong, although in Australia, males had lower trust in strangers, whereas females had lower trust in foreigners. Conclusion This paper identifies high, medium and low trust societies, in addition to high and low trusting population subgroups. Our analyses extend the seminal work of Fukuyama, providing both corroboration and

  9. Dispositional Pathways to Trust: Self-Esteem and Agreeableness Interact to Predict Trust and Negative Emotional Disclosure.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Megan H; Wood, Joanne V; Holmes, John G

    2017-03-30

    Expressing our innermost thoughts and feelings is critical to the development of intimacy (Reis & Shaver, 1988), but also risks negative evaluation and rejection. Past research suggests that people with high self-esteem are more expressive and self-disclosing because they trust that others care for them and will not reject them (Gaucher et al., 2012). However, feeling good about oneself may not always be enough; disclosure may also depend on how we feel about other people. Drawing on the principles of risk regulation theory (Murray et al., 2006), we propose that agreeableness-a trait that refers to the positivity of interpersonal motivations and behaviors-is a key determinant of trust in a partner's caring and responsiveness, and may work in conjunction with self-esteem to predict disclosure. We examined this possibility by exploring how both self-esteem and agreeableness predict a particularly risky and intimate form of self-disclosure, the disclosure of emotional distress. In 6 studies using correlational, partner-report, and experimental methods, we demonstrate that self-esteem and agreeableness interact to predict disclosure: People who are high in both self-esteem and agreeableness show higher emotional disclosure. We also found evidence that trust mediates this effect. People high in self-esteem and agreeableness are most self-revealing, it seems, because they are especially trusting of their partners' caring. Self-esteem and agreeableness were particularly important for the disclosure of vulnerable emotions (i.e., sadness; Study 5) and disclosures that were especially risky (Study 6). These findings illustrate how dispositional variables can work together to explain behavior in close relationships. (PsycINFO Database Record

  10. Identification of {ital T}=0 and {ital T}=1 bands in the {ital N}={ital Z}=37 nucleus {sup 74}Rb

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, D.; Gross, C.J.; Sheikh, J.A.; Warner, D.D.; Bearden, I.G.; Cunningham, R.A.; Foltescu, D.; Gelletly, W.; Hannachi, F.; Harder, A.; Johnson, T.D.; Jungclaus, A.; Kabadiyski, M.K.; Kast, D.; Lieb, K.P.; Roth, H.A.; Shizuma, T.; Simpson, J.; Skeppstedt, O.; Varley, B.J.; Weiszflog, M. ||||||||

    1996-01-01

    The {gamma} decay of excited states in the {ital N}={ital Z} odd-odd nucleus {sup 74}Rb has been observed for the first time. The reaction {sup 40}Ca({sup 40}Ca,{alpha}{ital pn}){sup 74}Rb at 128 MeV beam energy was used. The ground state rotational band can be interpreted as being formed from the {ital T}=1 isobaric analog states of {sup 74}Kr with pairing correlations based on {ital T}=1, {ital M}{sub {ital T}}=0 neutron-proton pairs. At higher rotational frequency, a {ital T}=0 rotational band becomes energetically favored over the {ital T}=1 ground state band, in agreement with the predictions of cranked shell model calculations which explicitly include {ital T}=0 and {ital T}=1pairs. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  11. Connexin 43-targeted T1 contrast agent for MRI diagnosis of glioma.

    PubMed

    Abakumova, Tatiana; Abakumov, Maxim; Shein, Sergey; Chelushkin, Pavel; Bychkov, Dmitry; Mukhin, Vladimir; Yusubalieva, Gaukhar; Grinenko, Nadezhda; Kabanov, Alexander; Nukolova, Natalia; Chekhonin, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most aggressive form of brain tumor. Early and accurate diagnosis of glioma and its borders is an important step for its successful treatment. One of the promising targets for selective visualization of glioma and its margins is connexin 43 (Cx43), which is highly expressed in reactive astrocytes and migrating glioma cells. The purpose of this study was to synthesize a Gd-based contrast agent conjugated with specific antibodies to Cx43 for efficient visualization of glioma C6 in vivo. We have prepared stable nontoxic conjugates of monoclonal antibody to Cx43 and polylysine-DTPA ligands complexed with Gd(III), which are characterized by higher T1 relaxivity (6.5 mM(-1) s(-1) at 7 T) than the commercial agent Magnevist® (3.4 mM(-1) s(-1)). Cellular uptake of Cx43-specific T1 contrast agent in glioma C6 cells was more than four times higher than the nonspecific IgG-contrast agent, as detected by flow cytometry and confocal analysis. MRI experiments showed that the obtained agents could markedly enhance visualization of glioma C6 in vivo after their intravenous administration. Significant accumulation of Cx43-targeted contrast agents in glioma and the peritumoral zone led not only to enhanced contrast but also to improved detection of the tumor periphery. Fluorescence imaging confirmed notable accumulation of Cx43-specific conjugates in the peritumoral zone compared with nonspecific IgG conjugates at 24 h after intravenous injection. All these features of Cx43-targeted contrast agents might be useful for more precise diagnosis of glioma and its borders by MRI.

  12. Increased native T1-values at the interventricular insertion regions in precapillary pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Spruijt, Onno A; Vissers, Loek; Bogaard, Harm-Jan; Hofman, Mark B M; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; Marcus, J Tim

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of the pressure overloaded right ventricle (RV) of precapillary pulmonary hypertension (PH) patients, exhibits late gadolinium enhancement at the interventricular insertion regions, a phenomenon which has been linked to focal fibrosis. Native T1-mapping is an alternative technique to characterize myocardium and has the advantage of not requiring the use of contrast agents. The aim of this study was to characterize the myocardium of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), systemic scleroderma related PH (PAH-Ssc) and chronic thromboembolic PH (CTEPH) patients using native T1-mapping and to see whether native T1-values were related to disease severity. Furthermore, we compared native T1-values between the different precapillary PH categories. Native T1-mapping was performed in 46 IPAH, 14 PAH-SSc and 10 CTEPH patients and 10 control subjects. Native T1-values were assessed using regions of interest at the RV and LV free wall, interventricular septum and interventricular insertion regions. In PH patients, native T1-values of the interventricular insertion regions were significantly higher than the native T1-values of the RV free wall, LV free wall and interventricular septum. Native T1-values at the insertion regions were significantly related to disease severity. Native T1-values were not different between IPAH, PAH-Ssc and CTEPH patients. Native T1-values of the interventricular insertion regions are significantly increased in precapillary PH and are related to disease severity. Native T1-mapping can be developed as an alternative technique for the characterization of the interventricular insertion regions and has the advantage of not requiring the use of contrast agents.

  13. Trust makers, breakers and brokers: building trust in the Australian food system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of consumer trust in the food supply has previously been identified, and dimensions of consumer trust in food—who they trust and the type of trust that they exhibit—has been explored. However, there is a lack of research about the mechanisms through which consumer trust in the food supply is developed, maintained, broken and repaired. This study seeks to address this gap by exploring if, and how, consumer trust in the food supply is considered by the media, food industry and governments when responding to food scares. The aim of the research is to develop models of trust building that can be implemented following food scares. Methods Semi-structured interviews will be undertaken with media, public relations officials and policy makers in Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom. Participants will be recruited through purposive sampling and will be asked to discuss a hypothetical case study outlining a food incident, and any experiences of specific food scares. Models of trust development, maintenance and repair will be developed from interview data. Comment on these models will be sought from experts in food-related organizations through a Delphi study, where participants will be asked to consider the usefulness of the models. Participants’ comments will be used to revise the models until consensus is reached on the suitability and usability of the models. Discussion This study will contribute to the literature about systems-based trust, and explore trust as a social and regulatory process. The protocol and results will be of interest and use to the food industry, food regulators, consumer advocate groups, media seeking to report food-related issues and policy makers concerned with public health and consumer health and well-being. This research represents an important contribution to the translation of the theoretical conceptualizations of trust into practical use in the context of food. PMID:23496819

  14. Phenoxy herbicides and fibrates potently inhibit the human chemosensory receptor subunit T1R3

    PubMed Central

    Maillet, Emeline L.; Margolskee, Robert F.; Mosinger, Bedrich

    2009-01-01

    We show that phenoxy-auxin herbicides and lipid-lowering fibrates inhibit human but not rodent T1R3. T1R3 as a co-receptor in taste cells responds to sweet compounds and amino-acids; in endocrine cells of gut and pancreas T1R3 contributes to glucose sensing. Thus, certain effects of fibrates in treating hyperlipidemia and type II diabetes may be via actions on T1R3. Likewise, phenoxy-herbicides may have adverse metabolic effects in humans that would have gone undetected in studies on rodents. PMID:19817384

  15. The Influence of Trust in Physicians and Trust in the Healthcare System on Linkage, Retention, and Adherence to HIV Care.

    PubMed

    Graham, James L; Shahani, Lokesh; Grimes, Richard M; Hartman, Christine; Giordano, Thomas P

    2015-12-01

    Lack of trust by the patient in the physicians or the healthcare system has been associated with poorer health outcomes. The present study was designed to determine if trust in physicians and the healthcare system among persons newly diagnosed with HIV infection was predictive of patients' subsequent linkage, retention, and adherence to HIV care. 178 newly diagnosed HIV infected patients were administered the trust-in-physicians and trust-in-healthcare system scales. Median trust-in-physicians and trust-in-healthcare system scores were compared for all the mentioned subsequent linkage, retention, and adherence to HIV care. Univariate logistic regression using the trust-in-physician scale confirmed significant association with retention in care (p = 0.04), which persisted in multivariate analyses (p = 0.04). No significant association was found between trust-in-physicians and linkage to care or adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Trust in the healthcare system was not associated with any of the outcomes. Patients with higher trust in physicians were more likely to be retained in HIV care. Trust at diagnosis may not be a barrier to better clinical outcomes, either because trust changes based on subsequent interactions, or because trust is not a determining feature. Interventions to improve retention in care could include improving trust in physicians or target persons with low trust in physicians.

  16. Probing water environment of Trp59 in ribonuclease T1: insight of the structure-water network relationship.

    PubMed

    Chao, Wei-Chih; Shen, Jiun-Yi; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Wang, Jinn-Shyan; Yang, Hsiao-Ching; Wee, Kevin; Lin, Li-Ju; Kuo, Yi-Ching; Yang, Cheng-Han; Weng, Shih-Hui; Huang, Huai-Ching; Chen, You-Hua; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2015-02-12

    In this study, we used the tryptophan analogue, (2,7-aza)Trp, which exhibits water catalyzed proton transfer isomerization among N(1)-H, N(7)-H, and N(2)-H isomers, to probe the water environment of tryptophan-59 (Trp59) near the connecting loop region of ribonuclease Tl (RNase T1) by replacing the tryptophan with (2,7-aza)Trp. The resulting (2,7-aza)Trp59 triple emission bands and their associated relaxation dynamics, together with relevant data of 7-azatryptophan and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, lead us to propose two Trp59 containing conformers in RNase T1, namely, the loop-close and loop-open forms. Water is rich in the loop-open form around the proximity of (2,7-aza)Trp59, which catalyzes (2,7-aza)Trp59 proton transfer in the excited state, giving both N(1)-H and N(7)-H isomer emissions. The existence of N(2)-H isomer in the loop-open form, supported by the MD simulation, is mainly due to the specific hydrogen bonding between N(2)-H proton and water molecule that bridges N(2)-H and the amide oxygen of Pro60, forming a strong network. The loop-close form is relatively tight in space, which squeezes water molecules out of the interface of α-helix and β2 strand, joined by the connecting loop region; accordingly, the water-scant environment leads to the sole existence of the N(1)-H isomer emission. MD simulation also points out that the Trp-water pairs appear to preferentially participate in a hydrogen bond network incorporating polar amino acid moieties on the protein surface and bulk waters, providing the structural dynamic features of the connecting loop region in RNase T1.

  17. Consumer trust in the Australian food system - The everyday erosive impact of food labelling.

    PubMed

    Tonkin, Emma; Webb, Trevor; Coveney, John; Meyer, Samantha B; Wilson, Annabelle M

    2016-08-01

    Consumer trust in food system actors is foundational for ensuring consumer confidence in food safety. As food labelling is a direct communication between consumers and food system actors, it may influence consumer perceptions of actor trustworthiness. This study explores the judgements formed about the trustworthiness of the food system and its actors through labelling, and the expectations these judgements are based on. In-depth, semi-structured interviews with 24 Australian consumers were conducted. Theoretical sampling focussed on shopping location, dietary requirements, rurality, gender, age and educational background. The methodological approach used (adaptive theory) enabled emerging data to be examined through the lens of a set of guiding theoretical concepts, and theory reconsidered in light of emerging data. Food labelling acted as a surrogate for personal interaction with industry and government for participants. Judgements about the trustworthiness of these actors and the broader food system were formed through interaction with food labelling and were based on expectations of both competence and goodwill. Interaction with labelling primarily reduced trust in actors within the food system, undermining trust in the system as a whole. Labelling has a role as an access point to the food system. Access points are points of vulnerability for systems, where trust can be developed, reinforced or broken down. For the participants in this study, in general labelling demonstrates food system actors lack goodwill and violate their fiduciary responsibility. This paper provides crucial insights for industry and policy actors to use this access point to build, rather than undermine, trust in food systems.

  18. Hypothesized predictors of patient–physician trust and distrust in the elderly: implications for health and disease management

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, Oswald AJ; Cardozo, Lavoisier J; Afonso, Nelia M; Siddique, Mohamed; Steinberg, Joel; Lepczyk, Marybeth; Aranha, Anil NF

    2006-01-01

    This study notes the differences between trust and distrust perceptions by the elderly as compared with younger populations. Given the importance of trust and distrust in compliance, changing behaviors, and forming partnerships for both health and disease management, it is necessary to be able to measure patient–doctor trust and distrust (PDTD). Following recent conceptualizations on trust and distrust as coexistent states, this study hypothesizes predictors of PDTD. We are proposing that these predictors form the basis for designing, developing and validating a PDTD scale (PDTDS). It is important to capture the trust–distrust perceptions of older patients as they confront the complexities and vulnerabilities of the modern healthcare delivery system. This is necessary if we are to design interventions to change behaviors of both the healthcare provider and the older patient. PMID:18044114

  19. In Public Education Expenditures We Trust: Does Trust Increase Support for Public Education Expenditures?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gur, Nurullah; Boyaci, Israfil; Ozcan, Yunus

    2015-01-01

    Trust is one crucial prerequisite for the welfare state. However, very few empirical studies exist that help us understand the mechanisms through which trust affects the welfare state. Influencing public support for developing friendly public policies might be one of these mechanisms. In this study, we use unique micro data from 34 countries to…

  20. Trust and Its Role in Principal Succession: A Preliminary Examination of a Continuum of Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macmillan, Robert B.; Meyer, Matthew J.; Northfield, Shawn

    2004-01-01

    Trust is a critical factor in determining whether principal-teacher working relationships are positive or negative. This article begins to explore the concept of trust and its development in twelve Canadian secondary schools that experienced frequent principal turnover in a period of eight years. The authors found that the development of trust…

  1. 26 CFR 26.2654-1 - Certain trusts treated as separate trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... death of the grantor if the trust is includible in its entirety in the grantor's gross estate for... of a pecuniary amount at the death of the transferor from an inter vivos trust that is includible in... death $500,000 is payable to T's spouse, S, with the balance of the principal to be held for the...

  2. Building a Culture of Trust: Trust in the Use of Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkman, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the place of trust in a school context and its importance in achieving the aims of schooling, "namely high academic performance and positive affects among members of the school community" (Forsyth, 2008). The role of trust in the use of technology and technological change is examined. Literature is surveyed in the…

  3. Trust in health information websites: A systematic literature review on the antecedents of trust.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeolib

    2016-06-01

    Health websites are important sources of information for consumers. In choosing websites, trust in websites largely determines which website to access and how to best utilize the information. Thus, it is critical to understand why consumers trust certain websites and distrust others. A systematic literature review was conducted with the goal of identifying the antecedents of trust in health information websites. After four rounds of screening process, 20 articles between 2000 and 2013 were harvested. Factors that determine trust are classified into individual difference antecedents, website-related antecedents, and consumer-to-website interaction-related antecedents. The most frequently studied antecedents were socio-demographics, information quality, appearance, and perceived reputation of the website. Each antecedent of trust are discussed in detail and future research directions are proposed.

  4. Can one trust quantum simulators?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauke, Philipp; Cucchietti, Fernando M.; Tagliacozzo, Luca; Deutsch, Ivan; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2012-08-01

    Various fundamental phenomena of strongly correlated quantum systems such as high-Tc superconductivity, the fractional quantum-Hall effect and quark confinement are still awaiting a universally accepted explanation. The main obstacle is the computational complexity of solving even the most simplified theoretical models which are designed to capture the relevant quantum correlations of the many-body system of interest. In his seminal 1982 paper (Feynman 1982 Int. J. Theor. Phys. 21 467), Richard Feynman suggested that such models might be solved by ‘simulation’ with a new type of computer whose constituent parts are effectively governed by a desired quantum many-body dynamics. Measurements on this engineered machine, now known as a ‘quantum simulator,’ would reveal some unknown or difficult to compute properties of a model of interest. We argue that a useful quantum simulator must satisfy four conditions: relevance, controllability, reliability and efficiency. We review the current state of the art of digital and analog quantum simulators. Whereas so far the majority of the focus, both theoretically and experimentally, has been on controllability of relevant models, we emphasize here the need for a careful analysis of reliability and efficiency in the presence of imperfections. We discuss how disorder and noise can impact these conditions, and illustrate our concerns with novel numerical simulations of a paradigmatic example: a disordered quantum spin chain governed by the Ising model in a transverse magnetic field. We find that disorder can decrease the reliability of an analog quantum simulator of this model, although large errors in local observables are introduced only for strong levels of disorder. We conclude that the answer to the question ‘Can we trust quantum simulators?’ is … to some extent.

  5. Improving the trust in results of numerical simulations and scientific data analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Cappello, Franck; Constantinescu, Emil; Hovland, Paul; Peterka, Tom; Phillips, Carolyn; Snir, Marc; Wild, Stefan

    2015-04-30

    This white paper investigates several key aspects of the trust that a user can give to the results of numerical simulations and scientific data analytics. In this document, the notion of trust is related to the integrity of numerical simulations and data analytics applications. This white paper complements the DOE ASCR report on Cybersecurity for Scientific Computing Integrity by (1) exploring the sources of trust loss; (2) reviewing the definitions of trust in several areas; (3) providing numerous cases of result alteration, some of them leading to catastrophic failures; (4) examining the current notion of trust in numerical simulation and scientific data analytics; (5) providing a gap analysis; and (6) suggesting two important research directions and their respective research topics. To simplify the presentation without loss of generality, we consider that trust in results can be lost (or the results’ integrity impaired) because of any form of corruption happening during the execution of the numerical simulation or the data analytics application. In general, the sources of such corruption are threefold: errors, bugs, and attacks. Current applications are already using techniques to deal with different types of corruption. However, not all potential corruptions are covered by these techniques. We firmly believe that the current level of trust that a user has in the results is at least partially founded on ignorance of this issue or the hope that no undetected corruptions will occur during the execution. This white paper explores the notion of trust and suggests recommendations for developing a more scientifically grounded notion of trust in numerical simulation and scientific data analytics. We first formulate the problem and show that it goes beyond previous questions regarding the quality of results such as V&V, uncertainly quantification, and data assimilation. We then explore the complexity of this difficult problem, and we sketch complementary general

  6. Joint Brain Parametric T1-Map Segmentation and RF Inhomogeneity Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ping-Feng; Steen, R. Grant; Yezzi, Anthony; Krim, Hamid

    2009-01-01

    We propose a constrained version of Mumford and Shah's (1989) segmentation model with an information-theoretic point of view in order to devise a systematic procedure to segment brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data for parametric T1-Map and T1-weighted images, in both 2-D and 3D settings. Incorporation of a tuning weight in particular adds a probabilistic flavor to our segmentation method, and makes the 3-tissue segmentation possible. Moreover, we proposed a novel method to jointly segment the T1-Map and calibrate RF Inhomogeneity (JSRIC). This method assumes the average T1 value of white matter is the same across transverse slices in the central brain region, and JSRIC is able to rectify the flip angles to generate calibrated T1-Maps. In order to generate an accurate T1-Map, the determination of optimal flip-angles and the registration of flip-angle images are examined. Our JSRIC method is validated on two human subjects in the 2D T1-Map modality and our segmentation method is validated by two public databases, BrainWeb and IBSR, of T1-weighted modality in the 3D setting. PMID:19710938

  7. PeaT1-induced systemic acquired resistance in tobacco follows salicylic acid-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Yang, Xiufen; Qiu, Dewen; Guo, Lihua; Zeng, Hongmei; Mao, Jianjun; Gao, Qiufeng

    2011-04-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is an inducible defense mechanism which plays a central role in protecting plants from pathogen attack. A new elicitor, PeaT1 from Alternaria tenuissima, was expressed in Escherichia coil and characterized with systemic acquired resistance to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). PeaT1-treated plants exhibited enhanced systemic resistance with a significant reduction in number and size of TMV lesions on wild tobacco leaves as compared with control. The quantitative analysis of TMV CP gene expression with real-time quantitative PCR showed there was reduction in TMV virus concentration after PeaT1 treatment. Similarly, peroxidase (POD) activity and lignin increased significantly after PeaT1 treatment. The real-time quantitative PCR revealed that PeaT1 also induced the systemic accumulation of pathogenesis-related gene, PR-1a and PR-1b which are the markers of systemic acquired resistance (SAR), NPR1 gene for salicylic acid (SA) signal transduction pathway and PAL gene for SA synthesis. The accumulation of SA and the failure in development of similar level of resistance as in wild type tobacco plants in PeaT1 treated nahG transgenic tobacco plants indicated that PeaT1-induced resistance depended on SA accumulation. The present work suggested that the molecular mechanism of PeaT1 inducing disease resistance in tobacco was likely through the systemic acquired resistance pathway mediated by salicylic acid and the NPR1 gene.

  8. 76 FR 36620 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8453-F and Form 8879-F

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8453-F and Form 8879-F AGENCY... U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A)). Currently, the IRS is soliciting comments concerning Form 8453-F, U.S. Estate of Trust Income Tax Declaration and Signature for Electronic and Magnetic Made Filing and Form...

  9. Loss of PiT-1 results in abnormal endocytosis in the yolk sac visceral endoderm.

    PubMed

    Wallingford, Mary C; Giachelli, Cecilia M

    2014-08-01

    PiT-1 protein is a transmembrane sodium-dependent phosphate (Pi) transporter. PiT-1 knock out (KO) embryos die from largely unknown causes by embryonic day (E) 12.5. We tested the hypothesis that PiT-1 is required for endocytosis in the embryonic yolk sac (YS) visceral endoderm (VE). Here we present data supporting that PiT-1 KO results in a YS remodeling defect and decreased endocytosis in the YS VE. The remodeling defect is not due to an upstream cardiomyocyte requirement for PiT-1, as SM22αCre-specific KO of PiT-1 in the developing heart and the YS mesodermal layer (ME) does not recapitulate the PiT-1 global KO phenotype. Furthermore, we find that high levels of PiT-1 protein localize to the YS VE apical membrane. Together these data support that PiT-1 is likely required in YS VE. During normal development maternal immunoglobulin (IgG) is endocytosed into YS VE and accumulates in the apical side of the VE in a specialized lysosome termed the apical vacuole (AV). We have identified a reduction in PiT-1 KO VE cell height and a striking loss of IgG accumulation in the PiT-1 KO VE. The endocytosis genes Tfeb, Lamtor2 and Snx2 are increased at the RNA level. Lysotracker Red staining reveals a loss of distinct AVs, and yolk sacs incubated ex vivo with phRODO Green Dextran for Endocytosis demonstrate a functional loss of endocytosis. As yolk sac endocytosis is controlled in part by microautophagy, but expression of LC3 had not been examined, we investigated LC3 expression during yolk sac development and found stage-specific LC3 RNA expression that is predominantly from the YS VE layer at E9.5. Normalized LC3-II protein levels are decreased in the PiT-1 KO YS, supporting a requirement for PiT-1 in autophagy in the YS. Therefore, we propose the novel idea that PiT-1 is central to the regulation of endocytosis and autophagy in the YS VE.

  10. Morphological transformation of C3H/10T1/2 CL8 cells by procarcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Oshiro, Y.; Balwierz, P.S.

    1982-01-01

    In order to increase the sensitivity of the C3H/10T1/2 CL8 (10T1/2) cell transformation system, the chemical exposure period was increased to a total of 6 days (two consecutive 3-day exposures). Using this modified procedure, we transformed 10T1/2 cells with procarcinogens such as aflatoxin B/sub 1/, benz(a)anthracene, and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide which have been negative in the standard 10T1/2 cell transformation assay. However, ..beta..-naphthylamine was inconclusive and 2-acetylaminofluorine was negative in this modified assay system. Results demonstrate that a simple modification of the 10T1/2 cell transformation method can increase the sensitivity to some procarcinogens that require metabolic activation.

  11. T 1 Relaxation Measurement of Ex-Vivo Breast Cancer Tissues at Ultralow Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Joo; Shim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kiwoong; Hwang, Seong-min; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Lim, Sanghyun; Han, Jae Ho; Yim, Hyunee; Kim, Jang-Hee; Jung, Yong Sik; Kim, Ku Sang

    2015-01-01

    We investigated T1 relaxations of ex-vivo cancer tissues at low magnetic fields in order to check the possibility of achieving a T1 contrast higher than those obtained at high fields. The T1 relaxations of fifteen pairs (normal and cancerous) of breast tissue samples were measured at three magnetic fields, 37, 62, and 122 μT, using our superconducting quantum interference device-based ultralow field nuclear magnetic resonance setup, optimally developed for ex-vivo tissue studies. A signal reconstruction based on Bayesian statistics for noise reduction was exploited to overcome the low signal-to-noise ratio. The ductal and lobular-type tissues did not exhibit meaningful T1 contrast values between normal and cancerous tissues at the three different fields. On the other hand, an enhanced T1 contrast was obtained for the mucinous cancer tissue. PMID:25705658

  12. SirT1 Regulates Energy Metabolism and Response to Caloric Restriction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boily, Gino; Seifert, Erin L.; Bevilacqua, Lisa; He, Xiao Hong; Sabourin, Guillaume; Estey, Carmen; Moffat, Cynthia; Crawford, Sean; Saliba, Sarah; Jardine, Karen; Xuan, Jian; Evans, Meredith; Harper, Mary-Ellen; McBurney, Michael W.

    2008-01-01

    The yeast sir2 gene and its orthologues in Drosophila and C. elegans have well-established roles in lifespan determination and response to caloric restriction. We have studied mice carrying two null alleles for SirT1, the mammalian orthologue of sir2, and found that these animals inefficiently utilize ingested food. These mice are hypermetabolic, contain inefficient liver mitochondria, and have elevated rates of lipid oxidation. When challenged with a 40% reduction in caloric intake, normal mice maintained their metabolic rate and increased their physical activity while the metabolic rate of SirT1-null mice dropped and their activity did not increase. Moreover, CR did not extend lifespan of SirT1-null mice. Thus, SirT1 is an important regulator of energy metabolism and, like its orthologues from simpler eukaryotes, the SirT1 protein appears to be required for a normal response to caloric restriction. PMID:18335035

  13. Rotational dynamics of benzene and water in an ionic liquid explored via molecular dynamics simulations and NMR T1 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasaka, Yoshiro; Klein, Michael L.; Nakahara, Masaru; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2012-02-01

    The rotational dynamics of benzene and water in the ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride are studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and NMR T1 measurements. MD trajectories based on an effective potential are used to calculate the 2H NMR relaxation time, T1 via Fourier transform of the relevant rotational time correlation function, C2R(t). To compensate for the lack of polarization in the standard fixed-charge modeling of the IL, an effective ionic charge, which is smaller than the elementary charge is employed. The simulation results are in closest agreement with NMR experiments with respect to the temperature and Larmor frequency dependencies of T1 when an effective charge of ±0.5e is used for the anion and the cation, respectively. The computed C2R(t) of both solutes shows a bi-modal nature, comprised of an initial non-diffusive ps relaxation plus a long-time ns tail extending to the diffusive regime. Due to the latter component, the solute dynamics is not under the motional narrowing condition with respect to the prevalent Larmor frequency. It is shown that the diffusive tail of the C2R(t) is most important to understand frequency and temperature dependencies of T1 in ILs. On the other hand, the effect of the initial ps relaxation is an increase of T1 by a constant factor. This is equivalent to an "effective" reduction of the quadrupolar coupling constant (QCC). Thus, in the NMR T1 analysis, the rotational time correlation function can be modeled analytically in the form of aexp (-t/τ) (Lipari-Szabo model), where the constant a, the Lipari-Szabo factor, contains the integrated contribution of the short-time relaxation and τ represents the relaxation time of the exponential (diffusive) tail. The Debye model is a special case of the Lipari-Szabo model with a = 1, and turns out to be inappropriate to represent benzene and water dynamics in ILs since a is as small as 0.1. The use of the Debye model would result in an underestimation

  14. Power decreases trust in social exchange.

    PubMed

    Schilke, Oliver; Reimann, Martin; Cook, Karen S

    2015-10-20

    How does lacking vs. possessing power in a social exchange affect people's trust in their exchange partner? An answer to this question has broad implications for a number of exchange settings in which dependence plays an important role. Here, we report on a series of experiments in which we manipulated participants' power position in terms of structural dependence and observed their trust perceptions and behaviors. Over a variety of different experimental paradigms and measures, we find that more powerful actors place less trust in others than less powerful actors do. Our results contradict predictions by rational actor models, which assume that low-power individuals are able to anticipate that a more powerful exchange partner will place little value on the relationship with them, thus tends to behave opportunistically, and consequently cannot be trusted. Conversely, our results support predictions by motivated cognition theory, which posits that low-power individuals want their exchange partner to be trustworthy and then act according to that desire. Mediation analyses show that, consistent with the motivated cognition account, having low power increases individuals' hope and, in turn, their perceptions of their exchange partners' benevolence, which ultimately leads them to trust.

  15. The motivation and behaviour of hospital Trusts.

    PubMed

    Crilly, Tessa; Le Grand, J Julian

    2004-05-01

    This paper explores the motivation and behaviour of hospitals, using data from UK hospital Trusts. Managers and consultants (hospital specialists) are identified as the main alternative sources of power within Trusts. It is hypothesised that consultants are interested in production or service (volume and quality) while managers are interested primarily in financial break-even, and that in the long run consultants will dominate. A survey of 1500 consultants and managers and a statistical analysis of the behaviour of 100 Trusts over 3 years yielded the empirical results that were largely but not entirely consistent with these hypotheses. Consultants did indeed consider production goals to be more important than financial breakeven, but within those goals, considered quality to be more important than service volume. While the break-even target was found to be the primary goal of managers on average, they proved to be a heterogeneous group with quality ranking as the main priority among those managers who are closest to service delivery. This is at odds with the apparent objective of Trusts, which both groups perceive as being the single-minded pursuit of financial targets, consistent with the formal, government-set requirements. We find that this strong and unequivocal financial driver is not owned or acted upon by either consultants or managers and it is inferred that, in accordance with the dominant motivation of consultants, the Trust's primary objective is to maintain service quality.

  16. Power decreases trust in social exchange

    PubMed Central

    Schilke, Oliver; Reimann, Martin; Cook, Karen S.

    2015-01-01

    How does lacking vs. possessing power in a social exchange affect people’s trust in their exchange partner? An answer to this question has broad implications for a number of exchange settings in which dependence plays an important role. Here, we report on a series of experiments in which we manipulated participants’ power position in terms of structural dependence and observed their trust perceptions and behaviors. Over a variety of different experimental paradigms and measures, we find that more powerful actors place less trust in others than less powerful actors do. Our results contradict predictions by rational actor models, which assume that low-power individuals are able to anticipate that a more powerful exchange partner will place little value on the relationship with them, thus tends to behave opportunistically, and consequently cannot be trusted. Conversely, our results support predictions by motivated cognition theory, which posits that low-power individuals want their exchange partner to be trustworthy and then act according to that desire. Mediation analyses show that, consistent with the motivated cognition account, having low power increases individuals’ hope and, in turn, their perceptions of their exchange partners’ benevolence, which ultimately leads them to trust. PMID:26438869

  17. Measurement of diffuse ventricular fibrosis with myocardial T1 in patients with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Jay A.; Abdallah, Wissam; Yoneda, Zachary T.; Brittain, Evan; Aznaurov, Sam G.; Parvez, Babar; Adkins, Keith; Whalen, S. Patrick; Estrada, J.C.; Shen, Sharon; Crossley, George H.; Kanagasundram, Arvindh; Saavedra, Pablo; Ellis, Christopher R.; Lawson, Mark; Darbar, Dawood; Shoemaker, M. Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with cardiac fibrosis, which can now be measured noninvasively using T1-mapping with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI). This study aimed to assess the impact of AF on ventricular T1 at the time of CMRI. Methods Subjects with AF scheduled for AF ablation underwent CMRI with standard electrocardiography gating and breath-hold protocols on a 1.5 T scanner with post-contrast ventricular T1 recorded from 6 regions of interest at the mid-ventricle. Baseline demographic, clinical, and imaging characteristics were examined using univariate and multivariable linear regression modeling for an association with myocardial T1. Results One hundred fifty-seven patients were studied (32% women; median age, 61 years [interquartile range {IQR}, 55–67], 50% persistent AF [episodes>7 days or requiring electrical or pharmacologic cardioversion], 30% in AF at the time of the CMRI). The median global T1 was 404 ms (IQR, 381–428). AF at the time of CMRI was associated with a 4.4% shorter T1 (p=0.000) compared to sinus rhythm when adjusted for age, sex, persistent AF, body mass index, congestive heart failure, and renal dysfunction (estimated glomerular filtration rate<60). A post-hoc multivariate model adjusted for heart rate suggested that heart rate elevation (p=0.009) contributes to the reduction in T1 observed in patients with AF at the time of CMRI. No association between ventricular T1 and AF recurrence after ablation was demonstrated. Conclusion AF at the time of CMRI was associated with lower post-contrast ventricular T1 compared with sinus rhythm. This effect was at least partly due to elevated heart rate. T1 was not associated with the recurrence of AF after ablation. PMID:26949431

  18. T1BT* structural study of an anti-plasmodial peptide through NMR and molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background T1BT* is a peptide construct containing the T1 and B epitopes located in the 5’ minor repeat and the 3’ major repeat of the central repeat region of the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP), respectively, and the universal T* epitope located in the C-terminus of the same protein. This peptide construct, with B = (NANP)3, has been found to elicit antisporozoite antibodies and gamma-interferon-screening T-cell responses in inbred strains of mice and in outbred nonhuman primates. On the other hand, NMR and CD spectroscopies have identified the peptide B’ = (NPNA)3 as the structural unit of the major repeat in the CSP, rather than the more commonly quoted NANP. With the goal of assessing the structural impact of the NPNA cadence on a proven anti-plasmodial peptide, the solution structures of T1BT* and T1B’T* were determined in this work. Methods NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics calculations were used to determine the solution structures of T1BT* and T1B’T*. These structures were compared to determine the main differences and similarities between them. Results Both peptides exhibit radically different structures, with the T1B’T* showing strong helical tendencies. NMR and CD data, in conjunction with molecular modelling, provide additional information about the topologies of T1BT* and T1B’T*. Knowing the peptide structures required to elicit the proper immunogenic response can help in the design of more effective, conformationally defined malaria vaccine candidates. If peptides derived from the CSP are required to have helical structures to interact efficiently with their corresponding antibodies, a vaccine based on the T1B’T* construct should show higher efficiency as a pre-erythrocyte vaccine that would prevent infection of hepatocytes by sporozoites. PMID:23506240

  19. Evaluation of the pituitary gland using magnetic resonance imaging: T1-weighted vs. VIBE imaging.

    PubMed

    Davis, M A; Castillo, M

    2013-06-01

    Volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) is used for abdominal imaging as a fast and efficient modality. Evaluation of brain lesions using VIBE is not common and its use for the pituitary gland has not yet been addressed. Our goal was to compare coronal T1-weighted (T1W) and VIBE images in patients undergoing studies of the pituitary gland. We hypothesized that, for this purpose, VIBE is superior to T1W images. T1W and VIBE images of the pituitary gland in 32 patients were evaluated. The two sequences were compared with specific attention to: contrast enhancement (gland and cavernous sinuses) and ability to view the anatomy of the cavernous sinuses. In patients with macroadenomas, visualization of the optic chiasm was also assessed. Images were rated as: VIBE being better, equal, or worse in comparison to T1W images. We also compared VIBE and T1W images specifically looking at micro/macro-adenomas and post-surgical patients. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square statistics. Of the 32 patients, the VIBE sequence showed superior contrast enhancement in 18 patients, six were found as being equal to T1W, and in eight instances VIBE was found to be worse than T1W. These results were statistically significant (p=.02). When looking at micro/macro-adenomas and post-surgical patients specifically, there was a trend to VIBE being superior to T1W but these data were not statistically significant. Visualization of chiasm in macroadenomas was similar for both techniques. VIBE was significantly superior to T1W with respect to pituitary and cavernous sinus contrast enhancement and cavernous sinus anatomy. A trend towards VIBE being superior in the evaluation of adenomas (pre- and post-operative) was seen, but it was not statistically significant. This is likely due to the small population size.

  20. Towards the gravity/CYBE correspondence beyond integrability — Yang-Baxter deformations of T1,1 —

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcos Crichigno, P.; Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2016-01-01

    Yang-Baxter sigma models, proposed by Klimcik and Delduc-Magro-Vicedo, have been recognized as a powerful framework for studying integrable deformations of two dimensional non-linear sigma models. In this short article, as an important generalization, we review a non-integrable sigma model in the Yang-Baxter sigma model approach based on [arXiv:1406.2249]. In particular, we discuss a family of deformations of the 5D Sasaki-Einstein manifold T1,1, instead of the standard deformations of the 5-sphere S5. For this purpose, we first describe a novel construction of T1,1 as a supercoset, and provide a physical interpretation of this construction from viewpoint of the dual Klebanov-Witten field theory. Secondly, we consider a 3-parameter deformation of T1,1 by using classical r-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). The resulting metric and NS-NS two-form completely agree with the ones previously obtained via TsT (T-dual - shift - T-dual) transformations, and contain the Lunin-Maldacena background as a special case. Our result indicates that what we refer to as the gravity/CYBE(Classical Yang-Baxter Equation) correspondence can be extended beyond integrable cosets.

  1. Conformational analysis of N-methylformamide in ground S0 and excited S1 and T1 electronic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tukachev, N. V.; Bataev, V. A.; Godunov, I. A.

    2016-07-01

    For conformers of the N-methylformamide (HCONHCH3) molecule, calculations of equilibrium geometry parameters, harmonic vibration frequencies, energy differences and potential barriers to conformational transitions were performed in the ground (S0) and lowest excited singlet (S1) and triplet (T1) electronic states. In the S0 state, the molecule exists in trans and cis stable conformations (having Cs symmetry). Our calculations show that the electronic excitations T1←S0 and S1←S0 cause changes in the structure of conformers: both HCON and HNCC fragments become pyramidal and rotate around the CN bond. As a result, in each excited electronic state under consideration, there are 12 minima forming six pairs of equivalent conformers separated by relatively small potential barriers. One- and two-dimensional potential energy surface sections corresponding to different intramolecular large-amplitude motions were calculated using the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ (S0) and CASPT2/cc-pVTZ (S1 and T1) methods. Anharmonic vibrational problems for large-amplitude motions were solved, and the corresponding frequencies were estimated.

  2. 76 FR 20061 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Depository Trust Company; Order Granting Approval of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ... Rule Change To Amend Rules Relating to the Requirement To Maintain a Balance Certificate in the Fast... Trust & Clearing Corporation (February 22, 2011). II. Description Under DTC's FAST program, transfer agents participating in FAST (``FAST transfer agents'') hold DTC securities in the form of...

  3. 17 CFR 210.3-15 - Special provisions as to real estate investment trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Financial Statements § 210.3-15 Special provisions as to real estate investment trusts. (a)(1) The income... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special provisions as to real... EXCHANGE COMMISSION FORM AND CONTENT OF AND REQUIREMENTS FOR FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, SECURITIES ACT OF...

  4. Too Little and Too Much Trust: Performance Measurement in Australian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woelert, Peter; Yates, Lyn

    2015-01-01

    A striking feature of contemporary Australian higher education governance is the strong emphasis on centralized, template style, metric-based, and consequential forms of performance measurement. Such emphasis is indicative of a low degree of political trust among the central authorities in Australia in the intrinsic capacity of universities and…

  5. Least Privilege Separation Kernel Storage Hierarchy Prototype for the Trusted Computing Exemplar Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Cynthia E. Irvine Paul C. Clark THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public...specification. vi THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK vii TABLE OF CONTENTS I . INTRODUCTION...Kernel Protection Profile TCX Trusted Computing Exemplar xiv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK xv ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like

  6. Trust and health: testing the reverse causality hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Giuseppe Nicola; Lindström, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background Social capital research has consistently shown positive associations between generalised trust and health outcomes over 2 decades. Longitudinal studies attempting to test causal relationships further support the theory that trust is an independent predictor of health. However, as the reverse causality hypothesis has yet to be empirically tested, a knowledge gap remains. The aim of this study, therefore, was to investigate if health status predicts trust. Methods Data employed in this study came from 4 waves of the British Household Panel Survey between years 2000 and 2007 (N=8114). The sample was stratified by baseline trust to investigate temporal relationships between prior self-rated health (SRH) and changes in trust. We used logistic regression models with random effects, as trust was expected to be more similar within the same individuals over time. Results From the ‘Can trust at baseline’ cohort, poor SRH at time (t−1) predicted low trust at time (t) (OR=1.38). Likewise, good health predicted high trust within the ‘Cannot’ trust cohort (OR=1.30). These patterns of positive association remained after robustness checks, which adjusted for misclassification of outcome (trust) status and the existence of other temporal pathways. Conclusions This study offers empirical evidence to support the circular nature of trust/health relationship. The stability of association between prior health status and changes in trust over time differed between cohorts, hinting at the existence of complex pathways rather than a simple positive feedback loop. PMID:26546287

  7. Examining Competing Models of Transformational Leadership, Leadership Trust, Change Commitment, and Job Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Feng

    2016-08-01

    This study discusses the influence of transformational leadership on job satisfaction through assessing six alternative models related to the mediators of leadership trust and change commitment utilizing a data sample (N = 341; M age = 32.5 year, SD = 5.2) for service promotion personnel in Taiwan. The bootstrap sampling technique was used to select the better fitting model. The tool of hierarchical nested model analysis was applied, along with the approaches of bootstrapping mediation, PRODCLIN2, and structural equation modeling comparison. The results overall demonstrate that leadership is important and that leadership role identification (trust) and workgroup cohesiveness (commitment) form an ordered serial relationship.

  8. Origin and Spread of Bos taurus: New Clues from Mitochondrial Genomes Belonging to Haplogroup T1

    PubMed Central

    Bonfiglio, Silvia; Ginja, Catarina; De Gaetano, Anna; Achilli, Alessandro; Olivieri, Anna; Colli, Licia; Tesfaye, Kassahun; Agha, Saif Hassan; Gama, Luis T.; Cattonaro, Federica; Penedo, M. Cecilia T; Ajmone-Marsan, Paolo; Torroni, Antonio; Ferretti, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Background Most genetic studies on modern cattle have established a common origin for all taurine breeds in the Near East, during the Neolithic transition about 10 thousand years (ka) ago. Yet, the possibility of independent and/or secondary domestication events is still debated and is fostered by the finding of rare mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups like P, Q and R. Haplogroup T1, because of its geographic distribution, has been the subject of several investigations pointing to a possible independent domestication event in Africa and suggesting a genetic contribution of African cattle to the formation of Iberian and Creole cattle. Whole mitochondrial genome sequence analysis, with its proven effectiveness in improving the resolution of phylogeographic studies, is the most appropriate tool to investigate the origin and structure of haplogroup T1. Methodology A survey of >2200 bovine mtDNA control regions representing 28 breeds (15 European, 10 African, 3 American) identified 281 subjects belonging to haplogroup T1. Fifty-four were selected for whole mtDNA genome sequencing, and combined with ten T1 complete sequences from previous studies into the most detailed T1 phylogenetic tree available to date. Conclusions Phylogenetic analysis of the 64 T1 mitochondrial complete genomes revealed six distinct sub-haplogroups (T1a–T1f). Our data support the overall scenario of a Near Eastern origin of the T1 sub-haplogroups from as much as eight founding T1 haplotypes. However, the possibility that one sub-haplogroup (T1d) arose in North Africa, in domesticated stocks, shortly after their arrival from the Near East, can not be ruled out. Finally, the previously identified “African-derived American" (AA) haplotype turned out to be a sub-clade of T1c (T1c1a1). This haplotype was found here for the first time in Africa (Egypt), indicating that it probably originated in North Africa, reached the Iberian Peninsula and sailed to America, with the first European settlers

  9. Distributed Trust Management for Validating SLA Choreographies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, Irfan Ul; Alnemr, Rehab; Paschke, Adrian; Schikuta, Erich; Boley, Harold; Meinel, Christoph

    For business workflow automation in a service-enriched environment such as a grid or a cloud, services scattered across heterogeneous Virtual Organizations (VOs) can be aggregated in a producer-consumer manner, building hierarchical structures of added value. In order to preserve the supply chain, the Service Level Agreements (SLAs) corresponding to the underlying choreography of services should also be incrementally aggregated. This cross-VO hierarchical SLA aggregation requires validation, for which a distributed trust system becomes a prerequisite. Elaborating our previous work on rule-based SLA validation, we propose a hybrid distributed trust model. This new model is based on Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) and reputation-based trust systems. It helps preventing SLA violations by identifying violation-prone services at service selection stage and actively contributes in breach management at the time of penalty enforcement.

  10. Scientific research and the public trust.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B

    2011-09-01

    This essay analyzes the concept of public trust in science and offers some guidance for ethicists, scientists, and policymakers who use this idea defend ethical rules or policies pertaining to the conduct of research. While the notion that public trusts science makes sense in the abstract, it may not be sufficiently focused to support the various rules and policies that authors have tried to derive from it, because the public is not a uniform body with a common set of interests. Well-focused arguments that use public trust to support rules or policies for the conduct of research should specify (a) which public is being referred to (e.g. the general public or a specific public, such as a particular community or group); (b) what this public expects from scientists; (c) how the rule or policy will ensure that these expectations are met; and (d) why is it important to meet these expectations.

  11. Scientific Research and the Public Trust

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.

    2011-01-01

    This essay analyzes the concept of public trust in science and offers some guidance for ethicists, scientists, and policymakers who use this idea defend ethical rules or policies pertaining to the conduct of research. While the notion the public trusts science makes sense in the abstract, it may not be sufficiently focused to support the various rules and policies that authors have tried to derive from it, because the public is not a uniform body with a common set of interests. Well-focused arguments that use public trust to support rules or policies for the conduct of research should specify a) which public is being referred to (e.g. the general public or a specific public, such as a particular community or group); b) what this public expects from scientists; c) how the rule or policy will ensure that these expectations are met; and d) why is it important to meet these expectations. PMID:20803259

  12. Redefining Genomic Privacy: Trust and Empowerment

    PubMed Central

    Erlich, Yaniv; Williams, James B.; Glazer, David; Yocum, Kenneth; Farahany, Nita; Olson, Maynard; Narayanan, Arvind; Stein, Lincoln D.; Witkowski, Jan A.; Kain, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Fulfilling the promise of the genetic revolution requires the analysis of large datasets containing information from thousands to millions of participants. However, sharing human genomic data requires protecting subjects from potential harm. Current models rely on de-identification techniques in which privacy versus data utility becomes a zero-sum game. Instead, we propose the use of trust-enabling techniques to create a solution in which researchers and participants both win. To do so we introduce three principles that facilitate trust in genetic research and outline one possible framework built upon those principles. Our hope is that such trust-centric frameworks provide a sustainable solution that reconciles genetic privacy with data sharing and facilitates genetic research. PMID:25369215

  13. Trust--can it be controlled?

    PubMed

    Box, Debra; Pottas, Dalenca

    2010-01-01

    Trust is an important component in the security of an information system. The advent of the electronic health record (EHR) and the health information system (HIS) have raised it to greater prominence. These systems and their intended benefits are rendered less effective through a low level of trust between the stakeholders. The potential reciprocal relationship between accountability and trust is investigated. A literature study examines both concepts and their interrelationship. The accountability and audit controls provided by the NIST SP 800-53 security guide and the ISO 27799 security standard are extracted, collated and expanded to strengthen the accountability mechanisms within an HIS security program. A dedicated set of accountability controls (NIM) which is specific to the healthcare environment is produced. It is proposed that through the strengthening of the accountability function of the HIS, its level of trustworthiness may be improved.

  14. Trust but verify: the interactive effects of trust and autonomy preferences on health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yin-Yang; Lin, Julia L

    2009-09-01

    Patients' trust in their physicians improves their health outcomes because of better compliance, more disclosure, stronger placebo effect, and more physicians' trustworthy behaviors. Patients' autonomy may also impact on health outcomes and is increasingly being emphasized in health care. However, despite the critical role of trust and autonomy, patients that naïvely trust their physicians may become overly dependent and lack the motivation to participate in medical care. In this article, we argue that increased trust does not necessarily imply decreased autonomy. Furthermore, patients with high levels of trust and autonomy preferences are most likely to have the best health outcomes. We propose a framework for understanding simultaneous trust and autonomy preferences and for recognizing their interactive effects on health outcomes in the dynamic medical encounter. This framework argues that policy makers and health care providers should make efforts to foster not only patients' trust but also their preferences for autonomy and thus gain the best position for achieving health-related goals.

  15. A Marketing Perspective: Try Looking at Charitable Trusts from the Donor's Point of View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoren, Linda J.

    1979-01-01

    Charitable remainder trusts and charitable income trusts are discussed as essentials in any "marketing mix" of gift-giving options. Unitrusts and annuity trusts are described and tax benefits of the charitable income trust are explained. (MLW)

  16. Disappearing "T1 black holes" in an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pirko, Istvan; Johnson, Aaron; Gamez, Jeff; Macura, Slobodan I; Rodriguez, Moses

    2004-05-01

    Brain MRI in multiple sclerosis (MS) frequently shows areas of hypointensity in the white matter on T1 weighted sequences ("T1 black holes"). These areas are thought to be consistent with irreversible axonal loss. In this study T1 black holes were characterized in Theiler's Murine Encephalitis Virus infection, an established model of demyelinating diseases in mice. The spectrum of TMEV is broad in different strains. C57BL/6J mice develop a self-limited brain disease, which resolves within 4-6 weeks. We followed six mice with serial MRI and MRS on days 0, 3,7,21 and 45. The studies were performed in a 7 Tesla magnet. Periventricular and parahippocampal T1 black holes seen as early as 3 days, with decreasing NAA/Cre ratio on MRS. The extent of pathology was most severe on days 3 and 7. T1 black holes are thought to be consistent with areas of irreversible axonal loss. This is challenged by our observations of resolution of T1 black holes by day 45. This was concomitant with the normalization of MRS findings in the areas of interest. We conclude that T1 black holes may represent a transient phenomenon in this model of MS. The recovery of these areas studied suggests an active repair mechanism.

  17. Brain abnormalities in bipolar disorder detected by quantitative T1ρ mapping.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C P; Follmer, R L; Oguz, I; Warren, L A; Christensen, G E; Fiedorowicz, J G; Magnotta, V A; Wemmie, J A

    2015-02-01

    Abnormal metabolism has been reported in bipolar disorder, however, these studies have been limited to specific regions of the brain. To investigate whole-brain changes potentially associated with these processes, we applied a magnetic resonance imaging technique novel to psychiatric research, quantitative mapping of T1 relaxation in the rotating frame (T1ρ). This method is sensitive to proton chemical exchange, which is affected by pH, metabolite concentrations and cellular density with high spatial resolution relative to alternative techniques such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy and positron emission tomography. Study participants included 15 patients with bipolar I disorder in the euthymic state and 25 normal controls balanced for age and gender. T1ρ maps were generated and compared between the bipolar and control groups using voxel-wise and regional analyses. T1ρ values were found to be elevated in the cerebral white matter and cerebellum in the bipolar group. However, volumes of these areas were normal as measured by high-resolution T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Interestingly, the cerebellar T1ρ abnormalities were normalized in participants receiving lithium treatment. These findings are consistent with metabolic or microstructural abnormalities in bipolar disorder and draw attention to roles of the cerebral white matter and cerebellum. This study highlights the potential utility of high-resolution T1ρ mapping in psychiatric research.

  18. Dynamic Quantitative T1 Mapping in Orthotopic Brain Tumor Xenografts1

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Kelsey; Erokwu, Bernadette O.; Johansen, Mette L.; Basilion, James P.; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A.; Flask, Chris A.; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M.

    2016-01-01

    Human brain tumors such as glioblastomas are typically detected using conventional, nonquantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as T2-weighted and contrast enhanced T1-weighted MRI. In this manuscript, we tested whether dynamic quantitative T1 mapping by MRI can localize orthotopic glioma tumors in an objective manner. Quantitative T1 mapping was performed by MRI over multiple time points using the conventional contrast agent Optimark. We compared signal differences to determine the gadolinium concentration in tissues over time. The T1 parametric maps made it easy to identify the regions of contrast enhancement and thus tumor location. Doubling the typical human dose of contrast agent resulted in a clearer demarcation of these tumors. Therefore, T1 mapping of brain tumors is gadolinium dose dependent and improves detection of tumors by MRI. The use of T1 maps provides a quantitative means to evaluate tumor detection by gadolinium-based contrast agents over time. This dynamic quantitative T1 mapping technique will also enable future quantitative evaluation of various targeted MRI contrast agents. PMID:27084431

  19. Swift Trust in Distributed Ad Hoc Teams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-04

    team at risk. Questionnaires assessed the impact of regimental identity and potential trust violations on levels of team trust before the mission...personnellement. Cette notion est de plus en plus utilisée dans les ouvrages spécialisés pour expliquer comment les membres des équipes spéciales... questionnaires distribués aux participants ont permis d’évaluer l’impact de l’identité régimentaire et des abus de confiance sur le niveau de confiance

  20. Capturing Trust in Social Web Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donovan, John

    The Social Web constitutes a shift in information flow from the traditional Web. Previously, content was provided by the owners of a website, for consumption by the end-user. Nowadays, these websites are being replaced by Social Web applications which are frameworks for the publication of user-provided content. Traditionally, Web content could be `trusted' to some extent based on the site it originated from. Algorithms such as Google's PageRank were (and still are) used to compute the importance of a website, based on analysis of underlying link topology. In the Social Web, analysis of link topology merely tells us about the importance of the information framework which hosts the content. Consumers of information still need to know about the importance/reliability of the content they are reading, and therefore about the reliability of the producers of that content. Research into trust and reputation of the producers of information in the Social Web is still very much in its infancy. Every day, people are forced to make trusting decisions about strangers on the Web based on a very limited amount of information. For example, purchasing a product from an eBay seller with a `reputation' of 99%, downloading a file from a peer-to-peer application such as Bit-Torrent, or allowing Amazon.com tell you what products you will like. Even something as simple as reading comments on a Web-blog requires the consumer to make a trusting decision about the quality of that information. In all of these example cases, and indeed throughout the Social Web, there is a pressing demand for increased information upon which we can make trusting decisions. This chapter examines the diversity of sources from which trust information can be harnessed within Social Web applications and discusses a high level classification of those sources. Three different techniques for harnessing and using trust from a range of sources are presented. These techniques are deployed in two sample Social Web

  1. Savings in its sights for Somerset Trust.

    PubMed

    Russell, Colin

    2011-10-01

    Colin Russell, healthcare specialist at Schneider Electric (pictured), explains how the company has recently worked with Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust to implement a major energy-saving project at the Trust's Musgrove Park Hospital in Taunton. He argues that, at a time when all areas of the service are being asked to reduce costs, such partnerships can potentially save the institution millions of pounds and significantly reduce carbon emissions, while "revitalising" parts of the NHS estate, and ensuring continuity of vital hospital services for facilities managers.

  2. Trust and Partnering with the Joint Team

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    ways shown in Figure 1 can improve trust within the Joint team. Notes 1 Barbara D. Adams, Ph.D. and Robert D.G. Webb, Ph.D., Trust in Small Military...decade after Vietnam, (Washington D.C.: Air Force History and Museums Program), 2001, xi. 5 Major Bruce H. McClintock , The Transformation Trinity: A...2002, 15. http://www.au.af.mil/au/aul/aupress/saas_Theses/ McClintock /McClintock.pdf 6 David Knott, Stephen Muers and Stephen Aldridge, Achieving

  3. Macroeconomic Dynamics of Assets, Leverage and Trust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozendaal, Jeroen C.; Malevergne, Yannick; Sornette, Didier

    A macroeconomic model based on the economic variables (i) assets, (ii) leverage (defined as debt over asset) and (iii) trust (defined as the maximum sustainable leverage) is proposed to investigate the role of credit in the dynamics of economic growth, and how credit may be associated with both economic performance and confidence. Our first notable finding is the mechanism of reward/penalty associated with patience, as quantified by the return on assets. In regular economies where the EBITA/Assets ratio is larger than the cost of debt, starting with a trust higher than leverage results in the highest long-term return on assets (which can be seen as a proxy for economic growth). Therefore, patient economies that first build trust and then increase leverage are positively rewarded. Our second main finding concerns a recommendation for the reaction of a central bank to an external shock that affects negatively the economic growth. We find that late policy intervention in the model economy results in the highest long-term return on assets. However, this comes at the cost of suffering longer from the crisis until the intervention occurs. The phenomenon that late intervention is most effective to attain a high long-term return on assets can be ascribed to the fact that postponing intervention allows trust to increase first, and it is most effective to intervene when trust is high. These results are derived from two fundamental assumptions underlying our model: (a) trust tends to increase when it is above leverage; (b) economic agents learn optimally to adjust debt for a given level of trust and amount of assets. Using a Markov Switching Model for the EBITA/Assets ratio, we have successfully calibrated our model to the empirical data of the return on equity of the EURO STOXX 50 for the time period 2000-2013. We find that dynamics of leverage and trust can be highly nonmonotonous with curved trajectories, as a result of the nonlinear coupling between the variables. This

  4. Trust Networks on the Semantic Web

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    to show trust levels for the mail sender either on a general level or with respect to a certain topic. To generate ratings, TrustMail makes a call to...attention to? Since the name is unfamiliar, the message is not distinguishable from other, not-so-important mail in the inbox . This scenario is exactly...the web service, passing in the email address of the sender and the address of the mailbox to where the message was delivered. It is necessary to use

  5. FAQs for Beneficiaries to the VW Mitigation Trust Agreement

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The November 2016 partial Volkswagen settlement requires the defendant, Volkswagen, to establish and fund a $2.7 billion environmental mitigation trust. The trust will be administered by an independent trustee.

  6. [Trust and palliative care, the risk of vulnerability].

    PubMed

    Miniac, Véronique

    2013-10-01

    Patients receiving palliative care experience extreme vulnerability reminding them of the fragility of their human condition. How are they to trust nurses bearing bad news in these crucial moments? Trust is built on team coherence and rigorous support.

  7. Sodium and T1ρ MRI for molecular and diagnostic imaging of articular cartilage†

    PubMed Central

    Borthakur, Arijitt; Mellon, Eric; Niyogi, Sampreet; Witschey, Walter; Kneeland, J. Bruce; Reddy, Ravinder

    2010-01-01

    In this article, both sodium magnetic resonance (MR) and T1ρ relaxation mapping aimed at measuring molecular changes in cartilage for the diagnostic imaging of osteoarthritis are reviewed. First, an introduction to structure of cartilage, its degeneration in osteoarthritis (OA) and an outline of diagnostic imaging methods in quantifying molecular changes and early diagnostic aspects of cartilage degeneration are described. The sodium MRI section begins with a brief overview of the theory of sodium NMR of biological tissues and is followed by a section on multiple quantum filters that can be used to quantify both bi-exponential relaxation and residual quadrupolar interaction. Specifically, (i) the rationale behind the use of sodium MRI in quantifying proteoglycan (PG) changes, (ii) validation studies using biochemical assays, (iii) studies on human OA specimens, (iv) results on animal models and (v) clinical imaging protocols are reviewed. Results demonstrating the feasibility of quantifying PG in OA patients and comparison with that in healthy subjects are also presented. The section concludes with the discussion of advantages and potential issues with sodium MRI and the impact of new technological advancements (e.g. ultra-high field scanners and parallel imaging methods). In the theory section on T1ρ, a brief description of (i) principles of measuring T1ρ relaxation, (ii) pulse sequences for computing T1ρ relaxation maps, (iii) issues regarding radio frequency power deposition, (iv) mechanisms that contribute to T1ρ in biological tissues and (v) effects of exchange and dipolar interaction on T1ρ dispersion are discussed. Correlation of T1ρ relaxation rate with macromolecular content and biomechanical properties in cartilage specimens subjected to trypsin and cytokine-induced glycosaminoglycan depletion and validation against biochemical assay and histopathology are presented. Experimental T1ρ data from osteoarthritic specimens, animal models, healthy human

  8. TU-EF-BRA-02: Longitudinal Proton Spin Relaxation and T1-Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lemen, L.

    2015-06-15

    NMR, and Proton Density MRI of the 1D Patient - Anthony Wolbarst Net Voxel Magnetization, m(x,t). T1-MRI; The MRI Device - Lisa Lemen ‘Classical’ NMR; FID Imaging in 1D via k-Space - Nathan Yanasak Spin-Echo; S-E/Spin Warp in a 2D Slice - Ronald Price Magnetic resonance imaging not only reveals the structural, anatomic details of the body, as does CT, but also it can provide information on the physiological status and pathologies of its tissues, like nuclear medicine. It can display high-quality slice and 3D images of organs and vessels viewed from any perspective, with resolution better than 1 mm. MRI is perhaps most extraordinary and notable for the plethora of ways in which it can create unique forms of image contrast, reflective of fundamentally different biophysical phenomena. As with ultrasound, there is no risk from ionizing radiation to the patient or staff, since no X-rays or radioactive nuclei are involved. Instead, MRI harnesses magnetic fields and radio waves to probe the stable nuclei of the ordinary hydrogen atoms (isolated protons) occurring in water and lipid molecules within and around cells. MRI consists, in essence, of creating spatial maps of the electromagnetic environments around these hydrogen nuclei. Spatial variations in the proton milieus can be related to clinical differences in the biochemical and physiological properties and conditions of the associated tissues. Imaging of proton density (PD), and of the tissue proton spin relaxation times known as T1 and T2, all can reveal important clinical information, but they do so with approaches so dissimilar from one another that each is chosen for only certain clinical situations. T1 and T2 in a voxel are determined by different aspects of the rotations and other motions of the water and lipid molecules involved, as constrained by the local biophysical surroundings within and between its cells – and they, in turn, depend on the type of tissue and its state of health. Three other common

  9. Error reduction and parameter optimization of the TAPIR method for fast T1 mapping.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, M; Steinhoff, S; Shah, N J

    2003-06-01

    A methodology is presented for the reduction of both systematic and random errors in T(1) determination using TAPIR, a Look-Locker-based fast T(1) mapping technique. The relations between various sequence parameters were carefully investigated in order to develop recipes for choosing optimal sequence parameters. Theoretical predictions for the optimal flip angle were verified experimentally. Inversion pulse imperfections were identified as the main source of systematic errors in T(1) determination with TAPIR. An effective remedy is demonstrated which includes extension of the measurement protocol to include a special sequence for mapping the inversion efficiency itself.

  10. 26 CFR 1.50A-6 - Estates and trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Estates and trusts. 1.50A-6 Section 1.50A-6... Computing Credit for Expenses of Work Incentive Programs § 1.50A-6 Estates and trusts. (a) In general—(1) Termination of employment by an estate or trust. If an estate or trust terminates (in a termination subject...

  11. 26 CFR 1.679-2 - Trusts treated as having a U.S. beneficiary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Trusts treated as having a U.S. beneficiary. 1... the trust income. The trust instrument further provides that in 2011, the trust will terminate and the... trust terminates unexpectedly prior to 2011, all trust assets must be distributed to C. Because it...

  12. 12 CFR 303.242 - Exercise of trust powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exercise of trust powers. 303.242 Section 303... PROCEDURES Other Filings § 303.242 Exercise of trust powers. (a) Scope. This section contains the procedures to be followed by a state nonmember bank to seek the FDIC's prior consent to exercise trust...

  13. 12 CFR 303.242 - Exercise of trust powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exercise of trust powers. 303.242 Section 303... PROCEDURES Other Filings § 303.242 Exercise of trust powers. (a) Scope. This section contains the procedures to be followed by a state nonmember bank to seek the FDIC's prior consent to exercise trust...

  14. 12 CFR 303.242 - Exercise of trust powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exercise of trust powers. 303.242 Section 303... PROCEDURES Other Filings § 303.242 Exercise of trust powers. (a) Scope. This section contains the procedures to be followed by a state nonmember bank to seek the FDIC's prior consent to exercise trust...

  15. 36 CFR 401.10 - Monument Trust Fund Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monument Trust Fund Program... MONUMENTS AND MEMORIALS § 401.10 Monument Trust Fund Program. Pursuant to the provisions of 36 U.S.C. 2106(d), the Commission operates a Monument Trust Fund Program (MTFP) in countries where there is a...

  16. 77 FR 67689 - Fidelity Aberdeen Street Trust, et al.;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... COMMISSION Fidelity Aberdeen Street Trust, et al.; Notice of Application November 6, 2012. AGENCY: Securities... certain joint arrangements (``Prior Order'').\\1\\ \\1\\ Colchester Street Trust, et al., Investment Company..., Colchester Street Trust, et al., Investment Company Act Release Nos. 23787 (Apr. 15, 1999) (notice) and...

  17. 26 CFR 1.851-7 - Certain unit investment trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Certain unit investment trusts. 1.851-7 Section... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Regulated Investment Companies and Real Estate Investment Trusts § 1.851-7 Certain unit investment trusts. (a) In general. For purposes of the Internal Revenue Code, a...

  18. Trust in School: A Pathway to Inhibit Teacher Burnout?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Maele, Dimitri; Van Houtte, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to consider trust as an important relational source in schools by exploring whether trust lowers teacher burnout. The authors examine how trust relationships with different school parties such as the principal relate to distinct dimensions of teacher burnout. The authors further analyze whether school-level…

  19. Paying a Price: Culture, Trust, and Negotiation Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunia, Brian C.; Brett, Jeanne M.; Nandkeolyar, Amit K.; Kamdar, Dishan

    2011-01-01

    Three studies contrasting Indian and American negotiators tested hypotheses derived from theory proposing why there are cultural differences in trust and how cultural differences in trust influence negotiation strategy. Study 1 (a survey) documented that Indian negotiators trust their counterparts less than American negotiators. Study 2 (a…

  20. 76 FR 44625 - Northern Lights Variable Trust, et al.;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... COMMISSION Northern Lights Variable Trust, et al.; Notice of Application July 19, 2011. AGENCY: Securities.... APPLICANTS: Northern Lights Variable Trust (the ``Fund'') and Gemini Fund Services, LLC (``Gemini.... Northern Lights Variable Trust, c/o Emile Molineaux, Esquire, Gemini Fund Services, LLC, 450...

  1. Trusting Relationships and Emotional Epistemologies: A Foundational Leadership Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Brenda R.; Brew, Christine R.

    2004-01-01

    The connections among relational trust, learning and development are implicit in transformational leadership theory. They have also been established empirically in recent studies. Leadership preparation programs often endorse the need for leaders to build effective collaborative relationships that rely on trust. Trust is an emotional phenomenon.…

  2. 12 CFR 303.242 - Exercise of trust powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exercise of trust powers. 303.242 Section 303... PROCEDURES Other Filings § 303.242 Exercise of trust powers. (a) Scope. This section contains the procedures to be followed by a state nonmember bank to seek the FDIC's prior consent to exercise trust...

  3. Exploring the Antecedents of Trust in Virtual Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Meng-Hsiang; Chang, Chun-Ming; Yen, Chia-Hui

    2011-01-01

    Although previous research has established that interpersonal trust and system trust are critical in shaping individual behaviour in virtual settings, the two perspectives have not been examined by IS researchers in virtual communities (VCs) simultaneously. Drawing from prior literature on trust and VCs, a research model for understanding the…

  4. 7 CFR 3550.72 - Community land trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Community land trusts. 3550.72 Section 3550.72... AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Section 502 Origination § 3550.72 Community land trusts. Eligible dwellings located on land owned by a community land trust may be financed if: (a)...

  5. 26 CFR 25.2702-5 - Personal residence trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... governing instrument must provide that the right of the term holder to receive the annuity amount begins on... right to use the condominium during L's lifetime. The trust is a qualified personal residence trust... enclosures for confinement of farm animals. W transfers the farm to an irrevocable trust, retaining the...

  6. 12 CFR 303.242 - Exercise of trust powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exercise of trust powers. 303.242 Section 303... PROCEDURES Other Filings § 303.242 Exercise of trust powers. (a) Scope. This section contains the procedures to be followed by a state nonmember bank to seek the FDIC's prior consent to exercise trust...

  7. A Trust That Can't Be Breached.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Nick

    1990-01-01

    Children's Investment Trust is a proposed trust fund for children's services (nutrition, health, education, and social services) similar in design to Social Security fund. The trust would be funded by a small, progressive payroll tax levied on both employer and employee on wages greater than $5 per hour. The tax would raise $25 billion more every…

  8. Conceptions of Trust: How Designers Approach Usable Privacy and Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birge, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Designers who create user interfaces are frequently required to ask users for personal information. For the user, this is a "trust question": Do I, the user, trust the system or entity that is asking me for this information? The creation and management of these trust questions is an important aspect of the research field called usable…

  9. Teachers' Beliefs about the Development of Teacher-Adolescent Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Shannon L.; Wentzel, Kathryn R.; Donlan, Alice E.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examined teachers' beliefs concerning the meaning and nature of teacher--student trust in a diverse sample of secondary-school teachers (n = 34). Using a grounded-theory approach, a process model of teacher-adolescent trust emerged based on semi-structured interviews and focus groups. Antecedents of trust could be categorised as…

  10. The Relationship between Loneliness and Interpersonal Trust during Middle Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotenberg, Ken J.; MacDonald, Keltie J.; King, Emily V.

    2004-01-01

    The authors administered measures of loneliness, generalized trust beliefs in peers, and trust beliefs in specific familiar peers (i.e., opposite-gender peers, same-gender peers, close same-gender peers) to a sample of 63 children (33 girls, 30 boys) from 4th and 5th grades (M age = 10 years, 6 months). They assessed children's trusting behavior…

  11. Investigation of the Relationship between Organizational Trust and Organizational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastug, Gülsüm; Pala, Adem; Kumartasli, Mehmet; Günel, Ilker; Duyan, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Organizational trust and organizational commitment are considered as the most important entraining factors for organizational success. The most important factor in the formation of organizational commitment is trust that employees have in their organizations. In this study, the relationship between organizational trust and organizational…

  12. 7 CFR 3550.72 - Community land trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Community land trusts. 3550.72 Section 3550.72... AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Section 502 Origination § 3550.72 Community land trusts. Eligible dwellings located on land owned by a community land trust may be financed if: (a)...

  13. 7 CFR 3550.72 - Community land trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Community land trusts. 3550.72 Section 3550.72... AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Section 502 Origination § 3550.72 Community land trusts. Eligible dwellings located on land owned by a community land trust may be financed if: (a)...

  14. 77 FR 17091 - Trust Land Consolidation Draft Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... Office of the Secretary Trust Land Consolidation Draft Plan AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior... Agreement established a trust land consolidation fund to be used for consolidating Indian trust and restricted lands and acquiring fractional interests in these lands. We are reopening the period...

  15. 7 CFR 3550.72 - Community land trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Community land trusts. 3550.72 Section 3550.72... AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Section 502 Origination § 3550.72 Community land trusts. Eligible dwellings located on land owned by a community land trust may be financed if: (a)...

  16. Collective Trust: A Social Indicator of Instructional Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Curt M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to test the validity of using collective trust as a social indicator of instructional capacity. Design/methodology/approach: A hypothesized model was advanced for the empirical investigation. Collective trust was specified as a latent construct with observable indicators being principal trust in faculty (PTF),…

  17. Revisiting the Trust Effect in Urban Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Curt M.; Forsyth, Patrick B.

    2013-01-01

    More than a decade after Goddard, Tschannen-Moran, and Hoy (2001) found that collective faculty trust in clients predicts student achievement in urban elementary schools, we sought to identify a plausible link for this relationship. Our purpose in revisiting the trust effect was twofold: (1) to test the main effect of collective faculty trust on…

  18. 9 CFR 201.42 - Custodial accounts for trust funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Custodial accounts for trust funds... STOCKYARDS ACT Proceeds of Sale § 201.42 Custodial accounts for trust funds. (a) Payments for livestock are trust funds. Each payment that a livestock buyer makes to a market agency selling on commission is...

  19. 26 CFR 1.678(c)-1 - Trusts for support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trusts for support. 1.678(c)-1 Section 1.678(c... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.678(c)-1 Trusts for support... cotrustee, to apply the income of the trust to the support or maintenance of a person whom the holder...

  20. 26 CFR 1.318-3 - Estates, trusts, and options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Estates, trusts, and options. 1.318-3 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Definitions; Constructive Ownership of Stock § 1.318-3 Estates, trusts, and options... of section 318(a)(2)(B) stock owned by a trust will be considered as being owned by its...

  1. 24 CFR 203.434 - Declaration of trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Declaration of trust. 203.434... Mortgage § 203.434 Declaration of trust. A sale of a beneficial interest in a group of insured mortgages... interest in a specific mortgage shall be made only pursuant to a declaration of trust, which has...

  2. 43 CFR 12.937 - Property trust relationship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Property trust relationship. 12.937... Requirements § 12.937 Property trust relationship. Real property, equipment, intangible property and debt instruments that are acquired or improved with Federal funds shall be held in trust by the recipient...

  3. The Lifecycle of Trust in Educational Leadership: An Ecological Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutsyuruba, Benjamin; Walker, Keith

    2015-01-01

    As establishing and fostering trust are imperative activities for school leaders, cognizance of the fundamental importance of trust is essential for the leader's moral agency and ethical decision-making. In this article, we use an ecological perspective to uncover the dynamics of the lifecycle of trust as evident from extant literature on…

  4. 78 FR 70959 - Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... Office of the Secretary Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Renewal of the Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform... Secretary of the Interior is renewing the Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform. FOR...

  5. 26 CFR 1.1493-1 - Definition of foreign trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of foreign trust. 1.1493-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Tax on Transfers to Avoid Income Tax § 1.1493-1 Definition of foreign trust. For taxable years beginning before January 1, 1967, a trust is to be considered a “foreign trust” within...

  6. 7 CFR 795.9 - Estate or trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Estate or trust. 795.9 Section 795.9 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.9 Estate or trust. (a) An estate or irrevocable trust shall be considered as one person except that, where two or more estates...

  7. 17 CFR 240.16b-8 - Voting trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Voting trusts. 240.16b-8... Exchange Act of 1934 Exemption of Certain Transactions from Section 16(b) § 240.16b-8 Voting trusts. Any... deposit or withdrawal from a voting trust or deposit agreement shall be exempt from section 16(b) of...

  8. 26 CFR 1.677(b)-1 - Trusts for support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trusts for support. 1.677(b)-1 Section 1.677(b... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.677(b)-1 Trusts for support. (a) Section 677(b) provides that a grantor is not treated as the owner of a trust merely because...

  9. 12 CFR 330.13 - Irrevocable trust accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Irrevocable trust accounts. 330.13 Section 330... POLICY DEPOSIT INSURANCE COVERAGE § 330.13 Irrevocable trust accounts. (a) General rule. Funds representing the “non-contingent trust interest(s)” (as defined in § 330.1(l)) of a beneficiary deposited...

  10. 24 CFR 203.493 - Declaration of trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Declaration of trust. 203.493... Declaration of trust. A sale of a beneficial interest in a group of insured loans, where the interest to be... be made only pursuant to a declaration of trust, which has been approved by the Commissioner prior...

  11. 5 CFR 2634.405 - Certification of trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE, QUALIFIED TRUSTS, AND CERTIFICATES OF DIVESTITURE Qualified Trusts § 2634.405... must be certified by the Director of the Office of Government Ethics. (1) A trust will be certified for purposes of this subpart only if: (i) It is established to the Director's satisfaction that...

  12. 25 CFR 1000.354 - What is a trust evaluation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ANNUAL FUNDING AGREEMENTS UNDER THE TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNMENT ACT AMENDMENTS TO THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust Evaluations § 1000.354 What is a trust evaluation? A...

  13. Myocardial T1 and T2 Mapping: Techniques and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pan Ki; Im, Dong Jin; Suh, Young Joo; Park, Chul Hwan; Kim, Jin Young; Chang, Suyon; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Hur, Jin; Kim, Young Jin; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is widely used in various medical fields related to cardiovascular diseases. Rapid technological innovations in magnetic resonance imaging in recent times have resulted in the development of new techniques for CMR imaging. T1 and T2 image mapping sequences enable the direct quantification of T1, T2, and extracellular volume fraction (ECV) values of the myocardium, leading to the progressive integration of these sequences into routine CMR settings. Currently, T1, T2, and ECV values are being recognized as not only robust biomarkers for diagnosis of cardiomyopathies, but also predictive factors for treatment monitoring and prognosis. In this study, we have reviewed various T1 and T2 mapping sequence techniques and their clinical applications. PMID:28096723

  14. Gamma-ray spectrometer experiment, Apollo 17: NaI(T1) detector crystal activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trombka, J. I.; Schmadebeck, R. L.; Bielefeld, M.; Okelley, G. D.; Eldridge, J. S.; Northcutt, K. J.; Metzger, A. E.; Schonfeld, E.; Peterson, L. E.; Arnold, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    An attempt was made to obtain experimental data on proton induced activity and its effect on gamma ray spectral measurements. A NaI(T1) crystal flown in Apollo 17 command module was used for the experiment.

  15. Dimensions of trust: the tensions and challenges in provider--interpreter trust.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Elaine; Ju, Hyejung; Kong, Haiying

    2010-02-01

    In this study we examined the challenges to providers' and interpreters' collaboration in bilingual health care. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups with 26 medical interpreters (speaking 17 languages) and 32 providers (from four specialties) in the United States to provide an empirically based framework of provider-interpreter trust. Constant comparative analysis was used for data analysis. We identified four dimensions of trust, theoretical constructs that can strengthen or compromise provider-interpreter trust: interpreter competence, shared goals, professional boundaries, and established patterns of collaboration. In this article we describe how these dimensions highlight tensions and challenges that are unique in provider-interpreter relationships. We conclude with practical guidelines that can enhance provider-interpreter trust, and propose future research directions in bilingual health care.

  16. Security and Trust Management for Virtual Organisations: GridTrust Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, Syed; Mori, Paolo

    The GridTrust Security Framework (GSF) offers security and trust management for the next generation Grids (NGG). It follows a vertical approach for Grid security from requirements level right down to application and middleware levels. New access control models for collaborative computing, such as the usage control model (UCON), are implemented for securing the Grid systems. The GSF is composed of security and trust services and tools provided at the middleware and Grid foundation middleware layers. GSF addresses three layers of the NGG architecture: the Grid application layer, the Grid service middleware layer, and the Grid foundation layer. The framework is composed of security and trust services and tools provided at the middleware and Grid foundation middleware layers. GSF provides policy-driven autonomic access control solutions that provide a continuous monitoring of the usage of resources by users.

  17. Study of Trust as an Organizational Contingency, Part II: Examining Four Dimensions of Trust in ELICIT Experimentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    several interrelated cognitive processes and orientations” (p. 571). Zand (1972) is more emphatic, stating that trust “is not a global feeling of warmth ...economic activity overwhelm interpersonal trust relations” (p. 411). Schoorman et al. (2007) take a different view, asserting that the bureaucracy... Interpersonal Trust. Journal of Personality, 35 (4), 651-665. Rotter J. B. (1980). Interpersonal trust, trustworthiness, and gullibility. American Psychology

  18. Principles of Trust for Embedded Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, AS TO ANY MATTER INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, WARRANTY OF FITNESS FOR PURPOSE OR MERCHANTABILITY, EXCLUSIVITY, OR RESULTS... punctual on Wednesdays may say little about their tardiness on Fridays. CMU/SEI-2012-TN-007 | 6 Evidence of trust is only needed for those functions

  19. Trust and Transitions in Modes of Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheshire, Coye; Gerbasi, Alexandra; Cook, Karen S.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the relationship between uncertainty and trust in exogenous shifts in modes of social exchange (i.e., those that are not initiated by the individuals in a given exchange system). We explore how transitions from a high uncertainty environment (reciprocal exchange) to lower-uncertainty environments (nonbinding or…

  20. The Devon NUT Campaign against Trust Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clinch, Dave

    2008-01-01

    When the Devon County Council announced that six secondary schools in the South Devon area were to become "Pathfinder Schools" for trust status, the Devon National Union of Teachers set about organising a campaign to defend the county's comprehensive schools. This campaign has proved successful in the case of Tavistock College, causing…

  1. Keeping "Community" in a Community Land Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Karen A.; Galande, Mugdha

    2011-01-01

    This instrumental case study examined the role of grassroots community organizing in a community land trust (CLT) in a southern U.S. city. Twenty-nine homeowners, renters, board members, community members, and current and former CLT employees were interviewed. In addition, two focus groups of 11 and six participants composed of CLT residents and…

  2. Predicting Social Trust with Binary Logistic Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adwere-Boamah, Joseph; Hufstedler, Shirley

    2015-01-01

    This study used binary logistic regression to predict social trust with five demographic variables from a national sample of adult individuals who participated in The General Social Survey (GSS) in 2012. The five predictor variables were respondents' highest degree earned, race, sex, general happiness and the importance of personally assisting…

  3. Do Higher Education Institutes Communicate Trust Well?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Paul; Dean, Aftab

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between trust and information sources for new purchasers of higher education is discussed. A range of sources is evaluated by potential entrants into UK higher education, and indicates that universities tend to be regarded as the most trustworthy when information is directly associated with them and social networks, and friends…

  4. The Importance of Trust in Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mineo, David L.

    2014-01-01

    If one looks at the different philosophies on leadership, each espouses various attributes that are essential to create a bond between the leader and the followers who are being led. This article is intended to focus on how the bond is created that provides the leader with the vehicle for success. Trust is the glue which binds the leader to…

  5. Information Hiding based Trusted Computing System Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-18

    This has also been identified in the Defense Science Board study on High Performance Microchip Supply, “Trust cannot be added to integrated circuits...Science Board Task Force on High Performance Microchip Supply, February 2005. [27] B.S. Cohen. “On Integrated Circuits Supply Chain Issues in a Global

  6. Trust and the Client-Consultant Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomonson, William L.

    2012-01-01

    This study seeks to improve the contributions of performance consultants, instructional design consultants, and training consultants by explaining the effect that several variables have on trust as a mediator to relationship commitment within the context of the client-consultant relationship. The participants were 228 college students from two…

  7. The Role of Trust in Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dovey, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of trust in the collaborative learning processes that underpin innovation as a competitive strategy in organizations. Design/methodology/approach: As a conceptual paper, the argument is framed by academic perspectives, drawn from the academic literature on the topic and by professional and…

  8. 17 CFR 300.104 - Trust accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trust accounts. 300.104 Section 300.104 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) Schedule A to Part 285 RULES OF THE SECURITIES INVESTOR PROTECTION CORPORATION Accounts of...

  9. 17 CFR 300.104 - Trust accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Trust accounts. 300.104 Section 300.104 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) Schedule A to Part 285 RULES OF THE SECURITIES INVESTOR PROTECTION CORPORATION Accounts of...

  10. 17 CFR 300.104 - Trust accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Trust accounts. 300.104 Section 300.104 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) Schedule A to Part 285 RULES OF THE SECURITIES INVESTOR PROTECTION CORPORATION Accounts of...

  11. 17 CFR 300.104 - Trust accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Trust accounts. 300.104 Section 300.104 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) Schedule A to Part 285 RULES OF THE SECURITIES INVESTOR PROTECTION CORPORATION Accounts of...

  12. 17 CFR 300.104 - Trust accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Trust accounts. 300.104 Section 300.104 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) Schedule A to Part 285 RULES OF THE SECURITIES INVESTOR PROTECTION CORPORATION Accounts of...

  13. 7 CFR 1400.205 - Trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... to be actively engaged in farming with respect to a farming operation if: (a) The trust independently and separately makes a significant contribution to the farming operation of capital, equipment, or... personal labor and active personal management to the farming operation. The combined interest of all...

  14. Cooperation under Indirect Reciprocity and Imitative Trust

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, Serguei; Smith, David; Reed-Tsochas, Felix

    2010-01-01

    Indirect reciprocity, a key concept in behavioral experiments and evolutionary game theory, provides a mechanism that allows reciprocal altruism to emerge in a population of self-regarding individuals even when repeated interactions between pairs of actors are unlikely. Recent empirical evidence show that humans typically follow complex assessment strategies involving both reciprocity and social imitation when making cooperative decisions. However, currently, we have no systematic understanding of how imitation, a mechanism that may also generate negative effects via a process of cumulative advantage, affects cooperation when repeated interactions are unlikely or information about a recipient's reputation is unavailable. Here we extend existing evolutionary models, which use an image score for reputation to track how individuals cooperate by contributing resources, by introducing a new imitative-trust score, which tracks whether actors have been the recipients of cooperation in the past. We show that imitative trust can co-exist with indirect reciprocity mechanisms up to a threshold and then cooperation reverses -revealing the elusive nature of cooperation. Moreover, we find that when information about a recipient's reputation is limited, trusting the action of third parties towards her (i.e. imitating) does favor a higher collective cooperation compared to random-trusting and share-alike mechanisms. We believe these results shed new light on the factors favoring social imitation as an adaptive mechanism in populations of cooperating social actors. PMID:21048950

  15. 7 CFR 46.46 - Statutory trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... inventories of food or other products derived from such perishable agricultural commodities, and all... trust benefits. (1) The times for prompt accounting and prompt payment are set out in § 46.2(z) and (aa... payment must be disclosed on invoices, accountings, and other documents relating to the transaction....

  16. 7 CFR 1400.205 - Trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to be actively engaged in farming with respect to a farming operation if: (a) The trust independently and separately makes a significant contribution to the farming operation of capital, equipment, or... personal labor and active personal management to the farming operation. The combined interest of all...

  17. 7 CFR 1400.205 - Trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... to be actively engaged in farming with respect to a farming operation if: (a) The trust independently and separately makes a significant contribution to the farming operation of capital, equipment, or... personal labor and active personal management to the farming operation. The combined interest of all...

  18. 7 CFR 1400.205 - Trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to be actively engaged in farming with respect to a farming operation if: (a) The trust independently and separately makes a significant contribution to the farming operation of capital, equipment, or... personal labor and active personal management to the farming operation. The combined interest of all...

  19. 7 CFR 1400.205 - Trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to be actively engaged in farming with respect to a farming operation if: (a) The trust independently and separately makes a significant contribution to the farming operation of capital, equipment, or... personal labor and active personal management to the farming operation. The combined interest of all...

  20. Errors in quantitative T1rho imaging and the correction methods

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time constant in rotating frame (T1rho) is useful for assessment of the properties of macromolecular environment inside tissue. Quantification of T1rho is found promising in various clinical applications. However, T1rho imaging is prone to image artifacts and quantification errors, which remains one of the greatest challenges to adopt this technique in routine clinical practice. The conventional continuous wave spin-lock is susceptible to B1 radiofrequency (RF) and B0 field inhomogeneity, which appears as banding artifacts in acquired images. A number of methods have been reported to modify T1rho prep RF pulse cluster to mitigate this effect. Adiabatic RF pulse can also be used for spin-lock with insensitivity to both B1 RF and B0 field inhomogeneity. Another source of quantification error in T1rho imaging is signal evolution during imaging data acquisition. Care is needed to affirm such error does not take place when specific pulse sequence is used for imaging data acquisition. Another source of T1rho quantification error is insufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which is common among various quantitative imaging approaches. Measurement of T1rho within an ROI can mitigate this issue, but at the cost of reduced resolution. Noise-corrected methods are reported to address this issue in pixel-wise quantification. For certain tissue type, T1rho quantification can be confounded by magic angle effect and the presence of multiple tissue components. Review of these confounding factors from inherent tissue properties is not included in this article. PMID:26435922

  1. Native Myocardial T1 as a Biomarker of Cardiac Structure in Non-Ischemic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ravi V; Kato, Shingo; Roujol, Sebastien; Murthy, Venkatesh; Bellm, Steven; Kashem, Abyaad; Basha, Tamer; Jang, Jihye; Eisman, Aaron S; Manning, Warren J; Nezafat, Reza

    2016-01-15

    Diffuse myocardial fibrosis is involved in the pathology of nonischemic cardiomyopathy (NIC). Recently, the application of native (noncontrast) myocardial T1 measurement has been proposed as a method for characterizing diffuse interstitial fibrosis. To determine the association of native T1 with myocardial structure and function, we prospectively studied 39 patients with NIC (defined as left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 50% without cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) evidence of previous infarction) and 27 subjects with normal LVEF without known overt cardiovascular disease. T1, T2, and extracellular volume fraction (ECV) were determined over 16 segments across the base, mid, and apical left ventricular (LV). NIC participants (57 ± 15 years) were predominantly men (74%), with a mean LVEF 34 ± 10%. Subjects with NIC had a greater native T1 (1,131 ± 51 vs 1,069 ± 29 ms; p <0.0001), a greater ECV (0.28 ± 0.04 vs 0.25 ± 0.02, p = 0.002), and a longer myocardial T2 (52 ± 8 vs 47 ± 5 ms; p = 0.02). After multivariate adjustment, a lower global native T1 time in NIC was associated with a greater LVEF (β = -0.59, p = 0.0003), greater right ventricular ejection fraction (β = -0.47, p = 0.006), and smaller left atrial volume index (β = 0.51, p = 0.001). The regional distribution of native myocardial T1 was similar in patients with and without NIC. In NIC, native myocardial T1 is elevated in all myocardial segments, suggesting a global (not regional) abnormality of myocardial tissue composition. In conclusion, native T1 may represent a rapid, noncontrast alternative to ECV for delineating myocardial tissue remodeling in NIC.

  2. Environmental Consequences of Nanotechnologies: Nanoparticle Dispersion in Aqueous Media: SOP-T-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    ER D C/ EL S R- 15 -2 Environmental Consequences of Nanotechnologies Nanoparticle Dispersion in Aqueous Media: SOP-T-1 En vi ro nm en...Consequences of Nanotechnologies Scientific Operating Procedure SOP-T-1 Jessica G. Coleman, Alan J. Kennedy, and Ashley R. Harmon Environmental...EQT) Research Program titled “Environmental Consequences of Nanotechnologies .” Procedures link to the ERDC NanoGRID (Guidance for Risk Informed

  3. T1rho Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3T Detects Knee Cartilage Changes After Viscosupplementation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Roshan P; Stambough, Jeffrey B; Fenty, Matthew; Mauck, Robert L; Kelly, John D; Reddy, Ravinder; Tjoumakaris, Fotios P

    2015-07-01

    Viscosupplementation may affect cartilage. Changes in T1rho magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) relaxation times correlate with proteoglycan changes in cartilage. The authors hypothesized that T1rho MRI will show an improvement in proteoglycan content at 6 weeks and 3 months after viscosupplementation and that this improvement will correlate with functional outcome scores. Ten patients (mean age, 56 years; Kellgren-Lawrence grade 1 or 2) underwent T1rho MRI at baseline, 6 weeks, and 3 months after viscosupplementation. Volumetric T1rho means were calculated by depth and region. Visual analog scale (VAS), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores were obtained. Mean T1rho values decreased in the superficial patella at 6 weeks (10.3%, P=.002) and 3 months (7.9%, P=.018) and in the middle patella at 6 weeks (7.0%, P=.014) compared with baseline values. Deep patella T1rho values increased at 3 months compared with 6 weeks (9.9%, P=.033), returning to values similar to baseline. Mean T1rho values increased in the deep tibia at 6 weeks (4.7%, P=.048) and in the middle tibia (5.2%, P=.004) and deep tibia (11.2%, P=.002) at 3 months compared with baseline. At 6 weeks, improvement was seen in VAS (5.9 to 3.9, P<.01), IKDC-9 (55.3 to 63.7, P=.03), and WOMAC (43.9 to 32.8, P=.03) scores. Functional VAS (4.0, P=.02), IKDC-9 (67.8, P=.04), and WOMAC (30.0, P=.04) scores remained better at 3 months. T1rho MRI is a feasible noninvasive method of studying molecular changes in cartilage. Some segments improved after viscosupplementation, and others worsened, possibly reflecting natural history or symptom relief and subsequent increase in activity-related wear.

  4. Taking Trust to the Field: Pilot Study on Trust and Communication in Teams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-23

    The first iteration of the team trust scale seemed to perform relatively well, and we received positive feedback about the scale from participants...tailoring of the experimental context to data collection (e.g. performance data) and the time intensity of content analysis. Recommendations for...Teams Scale seemed to perform relatively well, and we received positive feedback about the scale from participants. More importantly, the Trust in

  5. 78 FR 59098 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 5300 and Schedule Q (Form 5300)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ..., Application for Determination for Employee Benefit Plan, and Schedule Q (Form 5300), Elective Determination... Determination for Employee Benefit Plan (Form 5300), and Elective Determination Requests (Schedule Q (Form 5300... Code sections 401(a) and 501(a) set out requirements for qualification of employee benefit trusts...

  6. CTX Correlation to Disease Duration and Adiponectin in Egyptian Children with T1DM

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Amel A.; Emara, Ibrahim A.; El-Hefnawy, Mohamed H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background In this study, we investigated the relationship of adiponectin with bone marker changes in Egyptian children and adolescents with T1DM and the effect of disease duration on these markers, as well as the possible correlations between adiponectin and bone markers in these patients. Methods Sixty Egyptian children and adolescent patients with T1DM were studied. Serum adiponectin and collagen breakdown products (cross-linked C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type l »CTX«) were measured and compared to the results of 20 age-matched healthy controls. Results After adjustment for age, BMI, Tanner stage and gender; (total) adiponectin was significantly higher in all T1DM patients. Serum level of CTX and 25(OH)D showed a marked decrease in diabetics with disease duration > 5 years. Serum level of (total) calcium and inorganic phosphorus (Pi) did not show significant difference from control. CTX was inversely correlated to FBG and T1DM duration. Pi was inversely, while 25(OH)D was directly correlated to FBG. Total calcium showed an inverse correlation with HbA1c. FBG, TC, TAG, LDL-C were independent predictors of CTX in T1DM. Conclusions Adiponectin showed no correlation with either CTX or bone homeostatic indices. FBG, TC, TAG, LDL-C were independent predictors of CTX in T1DM. We recommend further investigation of adiponectin isoforms in a population-based study, to establish a good age- and sex-related reference.

  7. Effects of pulmonary inhalation on hyperpolarized krypton-83 magnetic resonance T1 relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupic, K. F.; Elkins, N. D.; Pavlovskaya, G. E.; Repine, J. E.; Meersmann, T.

    2011-07-01

    The 83Kr magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation time T1 of krypton gas in contact with model surfaces was previously found to be highly sensitive to surface composition, surface-to-volume ratio, and surface temperature. The work presented here explored aspects of pulmonary 83Kr T1 relaxation measurements in excised lungs from healthy rats using hyperpolarized (hp) 83Kr with approximately 4.4% spin polarization. MR spectroscopy without spatial resolution was applied to the ex vivo lungs that actively inhale hp 83Kr through a custom designed ventilation system. Various inhalation schemes were devised to study the influence of anatomical dead space upon the measured 83Kr T1 relaxation times. The longitudinal 83Kr relaxation times in the distal airways and the respiratory zones were independent of the lung inhalation volume, with T1 = 1.3 s and T1 = 1.0 s, depending only on the applied inhalation scheme. The obtained data were highly reproducible between different specimens. Further, the 83Kr T1 relaxation times in excised lungs were unaffected by the presence of up to 40% oxygen in the hp gas mixture. The results support the possible importance of 83Kr as a biomarker for evaluating lung function.

  8. QIN: Practical Considerations in T1 Mapping of Prostate for Dynamic Contrast Enhancement Pharmacokinetic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Fennessy, Fiona M; Fedorov, Andriy; Gupta, Sandeep N; Schmidt, Ehud J; Tempany, Clare M; Mulkern, Robert V

    2012-01-01

    There are many challenges in developing robust imaging biomarkers that can be reliably applied in a clinical trial setting. In the case of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE) MRI, one such challenge is to obtain accurate pre-contrast T1 maps for subsequent use in two-compartment pharmacokinetic models commonly used to fit the MR enhancement time courses. In the prostate, a convenient and common approach for this task has been to use the same 3D SPGR sequence used to collect the DCE data, but with variable flip angles (VFA’s) to collect data suitable for T1 mapping prior to contrast injection. However, inhomogeneous radiofrequency conditions within the prostate have been found to adversely affect the accuracy of this technique. Herein we demonstrate the sensitivity of DCE pharmacokinetic parameters to pre-contrast T1 values and examine methods to improve the accuracy of T1 mapping with flip angle corrected VFA SPGR methods, comparing T1 maps from such methods with reference T1 maps generated with saturation recovery experiments performed with fast spin echo (FSE) sequences. PMID:22898681

  9. Effects of pulmonary inhalation on hyperpolarized krypton-83 magnetic resonance T1 relaxation.

    PubMed

    Stupic, K F; Elkins, N D; Pavlovskaya, G E; Repine, J E; Meersmann, T

    2011-07-07

    The (83)Kr magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation time T(1) of krypton gas in contact with model surfaces was previously found to be highly sensitive to surface composition, surface-to-volume ratio, and surface temperature. The work presented here explored aspects of pulmonary (83)Kr T(1) relaxation measurements in excised lungs from healthy rats using hyperpolarized (hp) (83)Kr with approximately 4.4% spin polarization. MR spectroscopy without spatial resolution was applied to the ex vivo lungs that actively inhale hp (83)Kr through a custom designed ventilation system. Various inhalation schemes were devised to study the influence of anatomical dead space upon the measured (83)Kr T(1) relaxation times. The longitudinal (83)Kr relaxation times in the distal airways and the respiratory zones were independent of the lung inhalation volume, with T(1) = 1.3 s and T(1) = 1.0 s, depending only on the applied inhalation scheme. The obtained data were highly reproducible between different specimens. Further, the (83)Kr T(1) relaxation times in excised lungs were unaffected by the presence of up to 40% oxygen in the hp gas mixture. The results support the possible importance of (83)Kr as a biomarker for evaluating lung function.

  10. 25 CFR 1000.353 - What are “trust functions” for the purposes of the trust evaluation process?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... management of assets held in trust by the United States for an Indian Tribe or individual Indian. Annual..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ANNUAL FUNDING AGREEMENTS UNDER THE TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNMENT ACT AMENDMENTS TO THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review § 1000.353 What are “trust...

  11. 25 CFR 1000.353 - What are “trust functions” for the purposes of the trust evaluation process?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... management of assets held in trust by the United States for an Indian Tribe or individual Indian. Annual..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ANNUAL FUNDING AGREEMENTS UNDER THE TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNMENT ACT AMENDMENTS TO THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review § 1000.353 What are “trust...

  12. 25 CFR 1000.353 - What are “trust functions” for the purposes of the trust evaluation process?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... management of assets held in trust by the United States for an Indian Tribe or individual Indian. Annual..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ANNUAL FUNDING AGREEMENTS UNDER THE TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNMENT ACT AMENDMENTS TO THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review § 1000.353 What are “trust...

  13. "Do You Trust Him?" Children's Trust Beliefs and Developmental Trajectories of Aggressive Behavior in an Ethnically Diverse Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malti, Tina; Averdijk, Margit; Ribeaud, Denis; Rotenberg, Ken J.; Eisner, Manuel P.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the role of trust beliefs (i.e., trustworthiness, trustfulness) on aggression trajectories in a four-wave longitudinal study using an ethnically diverse sample of 8- to 11-year-old children (N = 1,028), as well as the risk profiles of low trust beliefs and low socioeconomic status on aggression trajectories. At Time 1 to…

  14. Trust Me, Principal, or Burn Out! The Relationship between Principals' Burnout and Trust in Students and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozer, Niyazi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the primary school principals' views on trust in students and parents and also, to explore the relationships between principals' levels of professional burnout and their trust in students and parents. To this end, Principal Trust Survey and Friedman Principal Burnout scales were administered on 119…

  15. Partnership as a Product of Trust: Parent-Teacher Relational Trust in a Low-Income Urban School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Heather Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Trust is an important factor affecting parent-teacher relationships. In urban schools, the lack of trust between parents and teachers is exacerbated by racial and social class differences (Bryk and Schneider, 2002). This paper examines how relational trust was both fostered and inhibited between low-income parents and their children's…

  16. Being trusted: How team generational age diversity promotes and undermines trust in cross‐boundary relationships

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary We examine how demographic context influences the trust that boundary spanners experience in their dyadic relationships with clients. Because of the salience of age as a demographic characteristic as well as the increasing prevalence of age diversity and intergenerational conflict in the workplace, we focus on team age diversity as a demographic social context that affects trust between boundary spanners and their clients. Using social categorization theory and theories of social capital, we develop and test our contextual argument that a boundary spanner's experience of being trusted is influenced by the social categorization processes that occur in dyadic interactions with a specific client and, simultaneously, by similar social categorization processes that influence the degree to which the client team as a whole serves as a cooperative resource for demographically similar versus dissimilar boundary spanner–client dyads. Using a sample of 168 senior boundary spanners from the consulting industry, we find that generational diversity among client team members from a client organization undermines the perception of being trusted within homogeneous boundary spanner–client dyads while it enhances the perception of being trusted within heterogeneous dyads. The perception of being trusted is an important aspect of cross‐boundary relationships because it influences coordination and the costs associated with coordination. © 2015 The Author Journal of Organizational Behavior Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd PMID:27721558

  17. A classical description of relaxation of interacting pairs of unlike spins: Extension to T1 ϱ, T2, and T1 ϱoff, including contact interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konig, Seymour H.

    A novel derivation of the equations that describe the spin-lattice magnetic relaxation of nuclear spin moments, in liquids, resulting from magnetic dipolar interactions with neighboring paramagnetic ions, the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan equations was previously presented (S. H. Koenig, J. Magn. Reson.31, 1 (1978)). The derivation involves a computation of the dissipative energy flow from the nuclear spins to the lattice rather than a computation of the lattice-produced fluctuations of the local field at the nuclear spins. Two advantages accrue: (1) the spectral densities that enter into the relaxation expressions can be directly related to well-defined absorption transitions and relaxation processes of the paramagnetic ions, clarifying the physical processes that produce relaxation, and (2) the derivation can be readily generalized to paramagnetic ions with arbitrary spin Hamiltonian, and to deviations of their susceptibility from Curie law behavior. The derivation is extended to include relaxation in liquids in the rotating frame: the on resonance T1 ϱ which reduces to T2 for small amplitude radiofrequency fields; and the off resonance T1 ϱoff, which reduces to T1. The results, which are given for contact as well as dipolar interactions, also describe relaxation of 13C and 15N nuclei by protons under conditions of proton-decoupling, a situation becoming increasingly important in the study of biological macromolecules by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy.

  18. Trusted Silicon Stratus (TSS) Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    Budget, Paperwork Reduction Project (0704-0188) Washington, DC 20503. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE ( DD -MM...Portal Flows •Customized Sub-Portal-Flows ( SPFs ) •Reduce cost impact leveraging a standardized model for SoC design-to-release-manufacturing Cloud

  19. Marrying Heterogeneous Circles of Trust: No Silver Bullet Yet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ates, Mikaël; Gravier, Christophe; Fayolle, Jacques; Sauviac, Bruno

    2008-11-01

    Numerous business and state-owned entities assert the need of secured information exchanges on digital identities based on trusted third parties. Entities trusting each other create a federation. At first, it is necessary for them to formalize this alliance with legal documents. In a second time, an architecture of identity federation will allow them to establish technical trust links, creating a circle of trust, most often with a public key infrastructure. The real challenge for the identity federation domain is the interoperability of information systems thanks to normalized and standardized protocols, that is to say, realize interconnection of circles of trust.

  20. Investigating Trust, Expertise, and Epistemic Injustice in Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Buchman, Daniel Z; Ho, Anita; Goldberg, Daniel S

    2017-03-01

    Trust is central to the therapeutic relationship, but the epistemic asymmetries between the expert healthcare provider and the patient make the patient, the trustor, vulnerable to the provider, the trustee. The narratives of pain sufferers provide helpful insights into the experience of pain at the juncture of trust, expert knowledge, and the therapeutic relationship. While stories of pain sufferers having their testimonies dismissed are well documented, pain sufferers continue to experience their testimonies as being epistemically downgraded. This kind of epistemic injustice has received limited treatment in bioethics. In this paper, we examine how a climate of distrust in pain management may facilitate what Fricker calls epistemic injustice. We critically interrogate the processes through which pain sufferers are vulnerable to specific kinds of epistemic injustice, such as testimonial injustice. We also examine how healthcare institutions and practices privilege some kinds of evidence and ways of knowing while excluding certain patient testimonies from epistemic consideration. We argue that providers ought to avoid epistemic injustice in pain management by striving toward epistemic humility. Epistemic humility, as a form of epistemic justice, may be the kind disposition required to correct the harmful prejudices that may arise through testimonial exchange in chronic pain management.

  1. Measurement of Myocardial T1ρ with a Motion Corrected, Parametric Mapping Sequence in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Mohammed; Han, Yuchi; Witschey, Walter R. T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a robust T1ρ magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence for assessment of myocardial disease in humans. Materials and Methods We developed a breath-held T1ρ mapping method using a single-shot, T1ρ-prepared balanced steady-state free-precession (bSSFP) sequence. The magnetization trajectory was simulated to identify sources of T1ρ error. To limit motion artifacts, an optical flow-based image registration method was used to align T1ρ images. The reproducibility and accuracy of these methods was assessed in phantoms and 10 healthy subjects. Results are shown in 1 patient with pre-ventricular contractions (PVCs), 1 patient with chronic myocardial infarction (MI) and 2 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Results In phantoms, the mean bias was 1.0 ± 2.7 msec (100 msec phantom) and 0.9 ± 0.9 msec (60 msec phantom) at 60 bpm and 2.2 ± 3.2 msec (100 msec) and 1.4 ± 0.9 msec (60 msec) at 80 bpm. The coefficient of variation (COV) was 2.2 (100 msec) and 1.3 (60 msec) at 60 bpm and 2.6 (100 msec) and 1.4 (60 msec) at 80 bpm. Motion correction improved the alignment of T1ρ images in subjects, as determined by the increase in Dice Score Coefficient (DSC) from 0.76 to 0.88. T1ρ reproducibility was high (COV < 0.05, intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.85–0.97). Mean myocardial T1ρ value in healthy subjects was 63.5 ± 4.6 msec. There was good correspondence between late-gadolinium enhanced (LGE) MRI and increased T1ρ relaxation times in patients. Conclusion Single-shot, motion corrected, spin echo, spin lock MRI permits 2D T1ρ mapping in a breath-hold with good accuracy and precision. PMID:27003184

  2. Post-Contrast Myocardial T1 and ECV Disagree in a Longitudinal Canine Study

    PubMed Central

    Koopmann, Matthias; Hong, Kyung Pyo; Kholmovski, Eugene G.; Huang, Eric C.; Hu, Nan; Ying, Jian; Levenson, Richard; Vijayakumar, Sathya; Dosdall, Derek J.; Ranjan, Ravi; Kim, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Both post-contrast myocardial T1 and extracellular volume (ECV) measurements have been associated with interstitial fibrosis. The cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) field is migrating towards ECV, because it is largely insensitive to confounders that affect post-contrast myocardial T1. Despite the theoretical advantages of myocardial ECV over post-contrast myocardial T1, systematic experimental studies comparing the two measurements are largely lacking. We sought to measure the temporal changes in post-contrast myocardial T1 and ECV in an established canine model with chronic atrial fibrillation. Seventeen mongrel dogs, implanted with a pacemaker to induce chronic atrial fibrillation via rapid atrial pacing, were scanned multiple times for a total of 46 CMR scans at 3T. These dogs with different disease durations (0–22 months) were part of a separate longitudinal study aimed at studying the relationship between AF and patho-physiology. In each animal, we measured native and post-contrast T1s and hematocrit. Temporal changes in post-contrast myocardial T1 and ECV, as well as other CMR parameters, were modeled with linear mixed effect models to account for repeated measurements over disease duration. In 17 animals, post-contrast myocardial T1 decreased significantly from 872 to 698 ms (p< 0.001), which corresponds to a 24.9% relative reduction. In contrast, ECV increased from 21.0 to 22.0% (p=0.38), which corresponds to only a 4.5% relative increase. To partially investigate this discrepancy, we quantified collagen volume fraction (CVF) in post-mortem heart tissues of 6 canines sacrificed at different disease duration (0–22 months). CVF quantified by histology increased from 0.9 to 1.9% (p=0.56), which agrees more with ECV than post-contrast myocardial T1. This study shows that post-contrast myocardial T1 and ECV may disagree in a longitudinal canine study. A more comprehensive study, including histologic, cardiac, and renal functional analyses, is warranted

  3. Characterization and use of HapT1-derived homologous tumors as a preclinical model to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of drugs against pancreatic tumor desmoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Suklabaidya, Sujit; Das, Biswajit; Ali, Syed Azmal; Jain, Sumeet; Swaminathan, Sharada; Mohanty, Ashok K.; Panda, Susen K.; Dash, Pujarini; Chakraborty, Subhankar; Batra, Surinder K.; Senapati, Shantibhusan

    2016-01-01

    Desmoplasia in human pancreatic cancer (PC) promotes cancer progression and hinders effective drug delivery. The objectives of this study were to characterize a homologous orthotopic model of PC in Syrian golden hamster and investigate the effect of anti-fibrotic (pirfenidone), antioxidant (N-acetyl cysteine, NAC) and anti-addiction (disulfiram, DSF) drugs on desmoplasia and tumor growth in this model. The HapT1 PC cells when implanted orthotopically into hamsters formed tumors with morphological, cellular and molecular similarities to human PC. Protein profiling of activated hamster pancreatic stellate cells (ha-PSCs) revealed expression of proteins involved in fibrosis, cancer cells growth and metastasis. Pirfenidone, suppressed growth of HapT1 cells and the desmoplastic response in vivo; these effects were enhanced by co-administration of NAC. Disulfiram alone or in combination with copper (Cu) was toxic to HapT1 cells and PSCs in vitro; but co-administration of DSF and Cu accelerated growth of HapT1 cells in vivo. Moreover, DSF had no effect on tumor-associated desmoplasia. Overall, this study identifies HapT1-derived orthotopic tumors as a useful model to study desmoplasia and tumor-directed therapeutics in PC. Pirfenidone in combination with NAC could be a novel combination therapy for PC and warrants investigation in human subjects. PMID:27259232

  4. CYP96T1 of Narcissus sp. aff. pseudonarcissus Catalyzes Formation of the Para-Para' C-C Phenol Couple in the Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Kilgore, Matthew B.; Augustin, Megan M.; May, Gregory D.; Crow, John A.; Kutchan, Toni M.

    2016-01-01

    The Amaryllidaceae alkaloids are a family of amino acid derived alkaloids with many biological activities; examples include haemanthamine, haemanthidine, galanthamine, lycorine, and maritidine. Central to the biosynthesis of the majority of these alkaloids is a C-C phenol-coupling reaction that can have para-para', para-ortho', or ortho-para' regiospecificity. Through comparative transcriptomics of Narcissus sp. aff. pseudonarcissus, Galanthus sp., and Galanthus elwesii we have identified a para-para' C-C phenol coupling cytochrome P450, CYP96T1, capable of forming the products (10bR,4aS)-noroxomaritidine and (10bS,4aR)-noroxomaritidine from 4′-O-methylnorbelladine. CYP96T1 was also shown to catalyzed formation of the para-ortho' phenol coupled product, N-demethylnarwedine, as less than 1% of the total product. CYP96T1 co-expresses with the previously characterized norbelladine 4′-O-methyltransferase. The discovery of CYP96T1 is of special interest because it catalyzes the first major branch in Amaryllidaceae alkaloid biosynthesis. CYP96T1 is also the first phenol-coupling enzyme characterized from a monocot. PMID:26941773

  5. CYP96T1 of Narcissus sp. aff. pseudonarcissus Catalyzes Formation of the Para-Para' C-C Phenol Couple in the Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Kilgore, Matthew B; Augustin, Megan M; May, Gregory D; Crow, John A; Kutchan, Toni M

    2016-01-01

    The Amaryllidaceae alkaloids are a family of amino acid derived alkaloids with many biological activities; examples include haemanthamine, haemanthidine, galanthamine, lycorine, and maritidine. Central to the biosynthesis of the majority of these alkaloids is a C-C phenol-coupling reaction that can have para-para', para-ortho', or ortho-para' regiospecificity. Through comparative transcriptomics of Narcissus sp. aff. pseudonarcissus, Galanthus sp., and Galanthus elwesii we have identified a para-para' C-C phenol coupling cytochrome P450, CYP96T1, capable of forming the products (10bR,4aS)-noroxomaritidine and (10bS,4aR)-noroxomaritidine from 4'-O-methylnorbelladine. CYP96T1 was also shown to catalyzed formation of the para-ortho' phenol coupled product, N-demethylnarwedine, as less than 1% of the total product. CYP96T1 co-expresses with the previously characterized norbelladine 4'-O-methyltransferase. The discovery of CYP96T1 is of special interest because it catalyzes the first major branch in Amaryllidaceae alkaloid biosynthesis. CYP96T1 is also the first phenol-coupling enzyme characterized from a monocot.

  6. Damage to the insula is associated with abnormal interpersonal trust

    PubMed Central

    Belfi, Amy M.; Koscik, Timothy R.; Tranel, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Reciprocal trust is a crucial component of cooperative, mutually beneficial social relationships. Previous research using tasks that require judging and developing interpersonal trust has suggested that the insula may be an important brain region underlying these processes (King-Casas et al., 2008). Here, using a neuropsychological approach, we investigated the role of the insula in reciprocal trust during the Trust Game (TG), an interpersonal economic exchange. Consistent with previous research, we found that neurologically normal adults reciprocate trust in kind, i.e., they increase trust in response to increases from their partners, and decrease trust in response to decreases. In contrast, individuals with damage to the insula displayed abnormal expressions of trust. Specifically, these individuals behaved benevolently (expressing misplaced trust) when playing the role of investor, and malevolently (violating their partner’s trust) when playing the role of the trustee. Our findings lend further support to the idea that the insula is important for expressing normal interpersonal trust, perhaps because the insula helps to recognize risk during decision-making and to identify social norm violations. PMID:25846668

  7. The virtual maze: A behavioural tool for measuring trust.

    PubMed

    Hale, Joanna; Payne, Madeleine E M; Taylor, Kathryn M; Paoletti, Davide; Hamilton, Antonia F De C

    2017-03-17

    Trusting another person may depend on our level of generalised trust in others, as well as perceptions of that specific person's trustworthiness. However, many studies measuring trust outcomes have not discussed generalised versus specific trust. To measure specific trust in others, we developed a novel behavioural task. Participants navigate a virtual maze and make a series of decisions about how to proceed. Before each decision, they may ask for advice from two virtual characters they have briefly interviewed earlier. We manipulated the virtual characters' trustworthiness during the interview phase and measured how often participants approached and followed advice from each character. We also measured trust through ratings and an investment game. Across three studies we found participants followed advice from a trustworthy character significantly more than an untrustworthy character, demonstrating the validity of the maze task. Behaviour in the virtual maze reflected specific trust rather than generalised trust, whereas the investment game picked up on generalised trust as well as specific trust. Our data suggests the virtual maze task may provide an alternative behavioural approach to measuring specific trust in future research, and we demonstrate how the task may be used in traditional laboratories.

  8. Damage to the insula is associated with abnormal interpersonal trust.

    PubMed

    Belfi, Amy M; Koscik, Timothy R; Tranel, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Reciprocal trust is a crucial component of cooperative, mutually beneficial social relationships. Previous research using tasks that require judging and developing interpersonal trust has suggested that the insula may be an important brain region underlying these processes (King-Casas et al., 2008). Here, using a neuropsychological approach, we investigated the role of the insula in reciprocal trust during the Trust Game (TG), an interpersonal economic exchange. Consistent with previous research, we found that neurologically normal adults reciprocate trust in kind, i.e., they increase trust in response to increases from their partners, and decrease trust in response to decreases. In contrast, individuals with damage to the insula displayed abnormal expressions of trust. Specifically, these individuals behaved benevolently (expressing misplaced trust) when playing the role of investor, and malevolently (violating their partner's trust) when playing the role of the trustee. Our findings lend further support to the idea that the insula is important for expressing normal interpersonal trust, perhaps because the insula helps to recognize risk during decision-making and to identify social norm violations.

  9. T1 mapping and survival in systemic light-chain amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Banypersad, Sanjay M.; Fontana, Marianna; Maestrini, Viviana; Sado, Daniel M.; Captur, Gabriella; Petrie, Aviva; Piechnik, Stefan K.; Whelan, Carol J.; Herrey, Anna S.; Gillmore, Julian D.; Lachmann, Helen J.; Wechalekar, Ashutosh D.; Hawkins, Philip N.; Moon, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To assess the prognostic value of myocardial pre-contrast T1 and extracellular volume (ECV) in systemic amyloid light-chain (AL) amyloidosis using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) T1 mapping. Methods and results One hundred patients underwent CMR and T1 mapping pre- and post-contrast. Myocardial ECV was calculated at contrast equilibrium (ECVi) and 15 min post-bolus (ECVb). Fifty-four healthy volunteers served as controls. Patients were followed up for a median duration of 23 months and survival analyses were performed. Mean ECVi was raised in amyloid (0.44 ± 0.12) as was ECVb (mean 0.44 ± 0.12) compared with healthy volunteers (0.25 ± 0.02), P < 0.001. Native pre-contrast T1 was raised in amyloid (mean 1080 ± 87 ms vs. 954 ± 34 ms, P < 0.001). All three correlated with pre-test probability of cardiac involvement, cardiac biomarkers, and systolic and diastolic dysfunction. During follow-up, 25 deaths occurred. An ECVi of >0.45 carried a hazard ratio (HR) for death of 3.84 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.53–9.61], P = 0.004 and pre-contrast T1 of >1044 ms = HR 5.39 (95% CI: 1.24–23.4), P = 0.02. Extracellular volume after primed infusion and ECVb performed similarly. Isolated post-contrast T1 was non-predictive. In Cox regression models, ECVi was independently predictive of mortality (HR = 4.41, 95% CI: 1.35–14.4) after adjusting for E:E′, ejection fraction, diastolic dysfunction grade, and NT-proBNP. Conclusion Myocardial ECV (bolus or infusion technique) and pre-contrast T1 are biomarkers for cardiac AL amyloid and they predict mortality in systemic amyloidosis. PMID:25411195

  10. 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells Enhance Macrophage-Mediated Innate Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Madera, Laurence; Greenshields, Anna; Coombs, Melanie R. Power; Hoskin, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor progression and the immune response are intricately linked. While it is known that cancers alter macrophage inflammatory responses to promote tumor progression, little is known regarding how cancers affect macrophage-dependent innate host defense. In this study, murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) were exposed to murine carcinoma-conditioned media prior to assessment of the macrophage inflammatory response. BMDMs exposed to 4T1 mammary carcinoma-conditioned medium demonstrated enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6, and CCL2 in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) while production of interleukin-10 remained unchanged. The increased LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was transient and correlated with enhanced cytokine production in response to other Toll-like receptor agonists, including peptidoglycan and flagellin. In addition, 4T1-conditioned BMDMs exhibited strengthened LPS-induced nitric oxide production and enhanced phagocytosis of Escherichia coli. 4T1-mediated augmentation of macrophage responses to LPS was partially dependent on the NFκB pathway, macrophage-colony stimulating factor, and actin polymerization, as well as the presence of 4T1-secreted extracellular vesicles. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages obtained from 4T1 tumor-bearing mice displayed enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in response to LPS. These results suggest that uptake of 4T1-secreted factors and actin-mediated ingestion of 4T1-secreted exosomes by macrophages cause a transient enhancement of innate inflammatory responses. Mammary carcinoma-mediated regulation of innate immunity may have significant implications for our understanding of host defense and cancer progression. PMID:26177198

  11. Regional T1 relaxation time constants in Ex vivo human brain: Longitudinal effects of formalin exposure

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Mekala R.; Shu, Yunhong; Lesnick, Timothy G.; Jack, Clifford R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Relaxation time constants are useful as markers of tissue properties. Imaging ex vivo tissue is done for research purposes; however, T1 relaxation time constants are altered by tissue fixation in a time‐dependent manner. This study investigates regional changes in T1 relaxation time constants in ex vivo brain tissue over 6 months of fixation. Methods Five ex vivo human brain hemispheres in 10% formalin were scanned over 6 months. Mean T1 relaxation time constants were measured in regions of interest (ROIs) representing gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) regions and analyzed as a function of fixation time. Results Cortical GM ROIs had longer T1 relaxation time constants than WM ROIs; the thalamus had T1 relaxation time constants similar to those of WM ROIs. T1 relaxation time constants showed rapid shortening within the first 6 weeks after fixation followed by a slower rate of decline. Conclusion Both GM and WM T1 relaxation time constants of fixed brain tissue show rapid decline within the first 6 weeks after autopsy and slow by 6 months. This information is useful for optimizing MR imaging acquisition parameters according to fixation time for ex vivo brain imaging studies. Magn Reson Med 77:774–778, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID:26888162

  12. Trust and Public Participation in Risk Policy Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Judith A. ); Branch, Kristi M. ); Focht, Will; Ragnar E. Lofstedt and George Cvetkovich

    1999-12-01

    Recent social science literature has paid increasing attention to the concept of trust, albeit with differing definitions and constituents and also with differing emphases on societal origins, functions, and implications. Recently, discussion has shifted to the role of trust in hazard management and, more broadly, to the fundamental role of trust in modern society. In this paper, we provide answers to the following questions, in an attempt to refocus the discussion and identify a more productive research approach to the relationship of trust and public participation in risk policy issues: -What is trust? What are the differing conceptions and dimensions of trust that have been identified in the literature? -What are the social functions of trust? -What is the relationship between trust and public participation in risk policy issues? Why is trust particularly important for agencies such as the Department of Energy (DOE) that are responsible for development and implementation of policies involving technological risk? -How should we define the research problem in examining the relationship between trust and public participation in risk policy issues? What are the key research questions to be addressed? Federal agencies have introduced public participation as a means of addressing public distrust and enhancing their ability to make decisions that can be implemented. In some cases, such as the Secretary of Energy's Advisory Board, public participation was explicitly identified as an organizational response that was needed to re-establish public trust and confidence in the Department of Energy (DOE). However, our review of the literature on both trust and public participation and our experience in developing criteria for evaluating public participation initiatives have resulted in our questioning the wisdom of establishing trust as a goal of public participation and caused us to examine the relationship between trust and public participation.

  13. 78 FR 23981 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 1041 and Related Schedules D, J, and K-1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 1041 and Related Schedules D, J, and... Form 1041 and related Schedules D, J, and K-1, U.S. Income Tax Return for Estates and Trusts. DATES... and Trusts (Form 1041), Capital Gains and Losses (Schedule D), Accumulation Distribution for...

  14. 75 FR 10018 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 1041 and Related Schedules D, J, and K-1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 1041 and Related Schedules D, J, and... Form 1041 and related Schedules D, J, and K-1, U.S. Income Tax Return for Estates and Trusts. DATES... Trusts (Form 1041), Capital Gains and Losses (Schedule D), Accumulation Distribution for Certain...

  15. Trust Management - Building Trust for International Cross Disciplinary Collaboration on Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakley, K. V.; Gurney, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Successful communication and collaboration entails mutual understanding, and transfer, of information. The risk of misunderstanding and/or miscommunication between collaborating groups is tackled in different ways around the globe; some are well documented whereas others may be unknown outside particular groups, whether defined geographically or by specialism. For example; in some countries legally binding contracts define the terms of collaboration. Some regions place greater emphasis on developing trust relationships, and sometimes an official agreement is implied, such as many electronic data transfers on the web. International collaboration on climate change increasingly involves electronic data exchange (e.g. open access publications, shared documents, data repositories etc.) and with this increased reliance on electronic data a need has arisen for scientists to collaborate both internationally and cross-disciplinarily particularly with information technology and data management specialists. Trust of data and metadata on the internet (e.g. privacy, legitimacy etc.) varies, possibly due to a lack of internationally agreed standards for data governance and management, leaving many national, regional and institutional practices tailored to the needs of that group only. It is proposed that building trust relationships between cross-disciplinary and international groups could help facilitate further communication, understanding and benefits from the relationship, while still maintaining independence as separate groups. Complex international cross-disciplinary group relationship dynamics are not easily mapped and producing a set of trust building rules that can be applied to any current and future collaboration with equal validity may be unfeasible. An alternative to such a set of rules may be found in a Trust Manager, whose role is to improve mutually beneficial knowledge exchange between groups, build trust and increase future collaborative potential. This

  16. Routine daily physical activity and glucose variations are strongly coupled in adults with T1DM.

    PubMed

    Farabi, Sarah S; Carley, David W; Cinar, Ali; Quinn, Lauretta

    2015-12-01

    Type 1 Diabetes (T1DM) is characterized by altered glucose homeostasis resulting in wide glucose variations throughout a 24-h period. The relationship between routine daily physical activity and glucose variations has not been systematically investigated in adults with T1DM. The objectives of this study were to characterize and quantify the relationship between routine daily activity and glucose variations in a small group of adults with T1DM. Adults with T1DM treated with an insulin pump were recruited for the study. Over a 3-day period, glucose variations were monitored with a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) and routine daily physical activity was assessed using an accelerometer-based physical activity-monitoring band. Simultaneous glucose and physical activity data for one 24-h period were used for analysis. Cross-correlation function and wavelet coherence analyses were employed to quantify the coupling between physical activity and glucose. Twelve subjects were included in the analysis. Cross-correlation function analysis revealed strong coupling between activity and glucose. Wavelet Coherence demonstrated that slower oscillations (120-340 min) of glucose and physical activity exhibited significantly greater coherence (F = 12.6, P < 0.0001) than faster oscillations (10 and 120 min). Physical activity and glucose demonstrate strong time and frequency-dependent coupling throughout a 24-h time period in adults with T1DM.

  17. Stable CoT-1 repeat RNA is abundant and associated with euchromatic interphase chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Lisa L.; Carone, Dawn M.; Gomez, Alvin; Kolpa, Heather J.; Byron, Meg; Mehta, Nitish; Fackelmayer, Frank O.; Lawrence, Jeanne B.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Recent studies recognize a vast diversity of non-coding RNAs with largely unknown functions, but few have examined interspersed repeat sequences, which constitute almost half our genome. RNA hybridization in situ using CoT-1 (highly repeated) DNA probes detects surprisingly abundant euchromatin-associated RNA comprised predominantly of repeat sequences (“CoT-1 RNA”), including LINE-1. CoT-1-hybridizing RNA strictly localizes to the interphase chromosome territory in cis, and remains stably associated with the chromosome territory following prolonged transcriptional inhibition. The CoT-1 RNA territory resists mechanical disruption and fractionates with the non-chromatin scaffold, but can be experimentally released. Loss of repeat-rich, stable nuclear RNAs from euchromatin corresponds to aberrant chromatin distribution and condensation. CoT-1 RNA has several properties similar to XIST chromosomal RNA, but is excluded from chromatin condensed by XIST. These findings impact two “black boxes” of genome science: the poorly understood diversity of non-coding RNA and the unexplained abundance of repetitive elements. PMID:24581492

  18. An analysis of relationships among transformational leadership, job satisfaction, organizational commitment and organizational trust in two Turkish hospitals.

    PubMed

    Top, Mehmet; Tarcan, Menderes; Tekingündüz, Sabahattin; Hikmet, Neşet

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among employee organizational commitment, organizational trust, job satisfaction and employees' perceptions of their immediate supervisors' transformational leadership behaviors in Turkey. First, this study examined the relationships among organizational commitment, organizational trust, job satisfaction and transformational leadership in two Turkish public hospitals. Second, this investigation examined how job satisfaction, organizational trust and transformational leadership affect organizational commitment. Moreover, it was aimed to investigate how organizational commitment, job satisfaction and transformational leadership affect organizational trust. A quantitative, cross-sectional method, self-administered questionnaire was used for this study. Eight hundred four employees from two public hospitals in Turkey were recruited for collecting data. The overall response rate was 38.14%. The measurement instruments of survey were the Job Satisfaction Survey (developed by P. Spector), the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire (developed by J. Meyer and N. Allen), the Organizational Trust Inventory-short form (developed by L. Cummings and P. Bromiley) and the Transformational Leadership Inventory (TLI) (developed by P. M. Podsakoff). Five-point Likert scales were used in these measurement instruments. Correlation test (the Pearson's rank test) was used to examine relationships between variables. Also, multiple regression analysis was used to determine the regressors for organizational commitment and organizational trust. There were significant relationships among overall job satisfaction, overall transformational leadership and organizational trust. Regression analyses showed that organizational trust and two job satisfaction dimensions (contingent rewards and communication) were significant predictors for organizational commitment. It was found that one transformational leadership dimension (articulating

  19. Evidence that human class Theta glutathione S-transferase T1-1 can catalyse the activation of dichloromethane, a liver and lung carcinogen in the mouse. Comparison of the tissue distribution of GST T1-1 with that of classes Alpha, Mu and Pi GST in human.

    PubMed Central

    Sherratt, P J; Pulford, D J; Harrison, D J; Green, T; Hayes, J D

    1997-01-01

    The cDNA encoding human glutathione S-transferase (GST) T1 has been expressed as two recombinant forms in Escherichia coli that could be purified by affinity chromatography on either IgG-Sepharose or nickel-agarose; one form of the transferase was synthesized from the pALP 1 expression vector as a Staphylococcus aureus protein A fusion, whereas the other form was synthesized from the pET-20b expression vector as a C-terminal polyhistidine-tagged recombinant. The yields of the two purified recombinant proteins from E. coli cultures were approx. 15 mg/l for the protein A fusion and 25 mg/l for the C-terminal polyhistidine-tagged GST T1-1. The purified recombinant proteins were catalytically active, although the protein A fusion was typically only 5-30% as active as the histidine-tagged GST. Both recombinant forms could catalyse the conjugation of glutathione with the model substrates 1,2-epoxy-3-(4'-nitrophenoxy)propane,4-nitrobenzyl chloride and 4-nitrophenethyl bromide but were inactive towards 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, ethacrynic acid and 1-menaphthyl sulphate. Recombinant human GST T1-1 was found to exhibit glutathione peroxidase activity and could catalyse the reduction of cumene hydroperoxide. In addition, recombinant human GST T1-1 was found to conjugate glutathione with dichloromethane, a pulmonary and hepatic carcinogen in the mouse. Immunoblotting with antibodies raised against different transferase isoenzymes showed that GST T1-1 is expressed in a large number of human organs in a tissue-specific fashion that differs from the pattern of expression of classes Alpha, Mu and Pi GST. Most significantly, GST T1-1 was found in only low levels in human pulmonary soluble extract of cells, suggesting that in man the lung has little capacity to activate the volatile dichloromethane. PMID:9307035

  20. Trusted Measurement Model Based on Multitenant Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Zhen-Hu; Shen, Chang-Xiang; Zhao, Yong; Liang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    With a fast growing pervasive computing, especially cloud computing, the behaviour measurement is at the core and plays a vital role. A new behaviour measurement tailored for Multitenants in cloud computing is needed urgently to fundamentally establish trust relationship. Based on our previous research, we propose an improved trust relationship scheme which captures the world of cloud computing where multitenants share the same physical computing platform. Here, we first present the related work on multitenant behaviour; secondly, we give the scheme of behaviour measurement where decoupling of multitenants is taken into account; thirdly, we explicitly explain our decoupling algorithm for multitenants; fourthly, we introduce a new way of similarity calculation for deviation control, which fits the coupled multitenants under study well; lastly, we design the experiments to test our scheme. PMID:24987731

  1. Trifluoroethanol effects on helix propensity and electrostatic interactions in the helical peptide from ribonuclease T1.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, J. K.; Pace, C. N.; Scholtz, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    Trifluoroethanol (TFE) is often used to increase the helicity of peptides to make them usable as models of helices in proteins. We have measured helix propensities for all 20 amino acids in water and two concentrations of trifluoroethanol, 15 and 40% (v/v) using, as a model system, a peptide derived from the sequence of the alpha-helix of ribonuclease T1. There are three main conclusions from our studies. (1) TFE alters electrostatic interactions in the ribonuclease T1 helical peptide such that the dependence of the helical content on pH is lost in 40% TFE. (2) Helix propensities measured in 15% TFE correlate well with propensities measured in water, however, the correlation with propensities measured in 40% TFE is significantly worse. (3) Propensities measured in alanine-based peptides and the ribonuclease T1 peptide in TFE show very poor agreement, revealing that TFE greatly increases the effect of sequence context. PMID:9521115

  2. Cerebral abnormalities: use of calculated T1 and T2 magnetic resonance images for diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, C.M.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1984-01-01

    The potential clinical importance of T1 and T2 relaxation times in distinguishing normal and pathologic tissue with magnetic resonance (MR) is discussed and clinical examples of cerebral abnormalities are given. Five patients with cerebral infarction, 15 with multiple sclerosis, two with Wilson disease, and four with tumors were imaged. Hemorrhagic and ischemic cerebrovascular accidents were distinguished using the spin echo technique. In the patients with multiple sclerosis, lesions had prolonged T1 and T2 times, but the definition of plaque was limited by spatial resolution. No abnormalities in signal intensity were seen in the patient with Wilson disease who was no longer severly disabled; abnormal increased signal intensity in the basal ganglia was found in the second patient with Wilson disease. Four tumors produced abnormal T1 and T2 relaxation times but these values alone were not sufficient for tumor characterization.

  3. Cell progression and radiosensitivity of T1-prospermatogonia in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Hilscher, W M; Trott, K R; Hilscher, W

    1982-05-01

    T1-prospermatogonia pass through a quiescent stage which lasts from before birth until day 4 after birth (p.n.). They progress into DNA synthesis and mitosis in two synchronous waves which are separated by 24 hours in the evenings of day 4 and 5. The first wave contains about 25 per cent of the total population, the second 75 per cent. The mean duration of S-phase is 10 hours, the mean duration of G2-phase is 4 hours. After irradiation, the capacity of T1-prospermatogonia to produce the normal number of proliferating and differentiating cells in the testes is reduced. During maturation, between day 21 post-conception (p.c.) and day 5 p.n. the radiosensitivity of T1-prospermatogonia decreases by a factor of over 5.

  4. Hybrid Nanotrimers for Dual T1 and T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Development of multifunctional nanoparticle-based probes for dual T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could allow us to image and diagnose the tumors or other abnormalities in an exceptionally accurate and reliable manner. In this study, by fusing distinct nanocrystals via solid-state interfaces, we built hybrid heteronanostructures to combine both T1 and T2- weighted contrast agents together for MRI with high accuracy and reliability. The resultant hybrid heterotrimers showed high stability in physiological conditions and could induce both simultaneous positive and negative contrast enhancements in MR images. Small animal positron emission tomography imaging study revealed that the hybrid heterostructures displayed favorable biodistribution and were suitable for in vivo imaging. Their potential as dual contrast agents for T1 and T2-weighted MRI was further demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo imaging and relaxivity measurements. PMID:25283972

  5. An improved model of the Earth's gravitational field: GEM-T1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, J. G.; Lerch, F. J.; Christodoulidis, D. C.; Putney, B. H.; Felsentreger, T. L.; Sanchez, B. V.; Smith, D. E.; Klosko, S. M.; Martin, T. V.; Pavlis, E. C.

    1987-01-01

    Goddard Earth Model T1 (GEM-T1), which was developed from an analysis of direct satellite tracking observations, is the first in a new series of such models. GEM-T1 is complete to degree and order 36. It was developed using consistent reference parameters and extensive earth and ocean tidal models. It was simultaneously solved for gravitational and tidal terms, earth orientation parameters, and the orbital parameters of 580 individual satellite arcs. The solution used only satellite tracking data acquired on 17 different satellites and is predominantly based upon the precise laser data taken by third generation systems. In all, 800,000 observations were used. A major improvement in field accuracy was obtained. For marine geodetic applications, long wavelength geoidal modeling is twice as good as in earlier satellite-only GEM models. Orbit determination accuracy has also been substantially advanced over a wide range of satellites that have been tested.

  6. Social Trust Prediction Using Heterogeneous Networks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Nie, Feiping; Huang, Heng; Tu, Yi-Cheng; Lei, Yu

    2013-11-01

    Along with increasing popularity of social websites, online users rely more on the trustworthiness information to make decisions, extract and filter information, and tag and build connections with other users. However, such social network data often suffer from severe data sparsity and are not able to provide users with enough information. Therefore, trust prediction has emerged as an important topic in social network research. Traditional approaches are primarily based on exploring trust graph topology itself. However, research in sociology and our life experience suggest that people who are in the same social circle often exhibit similar behaviors and tastes. To take advantage of the ancillary information for trust prediction, the challenge then becomes what to transfer and how to transfer. In this article, we address this problem by aggregating heterogeneous social networks and propose a novel joint social networks mining (JSNM) method. Our new joint learning model explores the user-group-level similarity between correlated graphs and simultaneously learns the individual graph structure; therefore, the shared structures and patterns from multiple social networks can be utilized to enhance the prediction tasks. As a result, we not only improve the trust prediction in the target graph but also facilitate other information retrieval tasks in the auxiliary graphs. To optimize the proposed objective function, we use the alternative technique to break down the objective function into several manageable subproblems. We further introduce the auxiliary function to solve the optimization problems with rigorously proved convergence. The extensive experiments have been conducted on both synthetic and real- world data. All empirical results demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.

  7. Wireless Emergency Alerts: Trust Model Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    service, for- merly known as the Commercial Mobile Alert Service (CMAS). Alert originators (AOs) working at emergency management agencies ( EMAs ...Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the EMAs , and the AOs must all strive to maximize and maintain trust in the WEA ser- vice if it is to be an effective...Alert Service (CMAS), enhances public safety by providing authorized emergency management agen- cies ( EMAs ) with the capability to issue alerts and

  8. Trusted computation through biologically inspired processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Gustave W.

    2013-05-01

    Due to supply chain threats it is no longer a reasonable assumption that traditional protections alone will provide sufficient security for enterprise systems. The proposed cognitive trust model architecture extends the state-of-the-art in enterprise anti-exploitation technologies by providing collective immunity through backup and cross-checking, proactive health monitoring and adaptive/autonomic threat response, and network resource diversity.

  9. We trust in government, just not in yours: race, partisanship, and political trust, 1958-2012.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that political trust is reflective of satisfaction with the performance of the incumbent administration, this is only considered true for White Americans. Because their trust reflects a larger discontent with the political system, Black Americans, it is held, do not respond in the same way in the short term. This argument has yet to be tested with over-time data. Time matters. Not only does the race gap in trust change over time but the impact of partisanship and political winning is, by definition, time-dependent. The results of an analysis of the 1958-2012 American National Election Studies data show that Black Americans and White Americans are equally likely to tie short-term performance to trust in government. However, the relationship between partisanship and political trust and, therefore, system discontent, clearly differs for the two groups. Aggregate models that do not take race-partisan sub-group differences into account will therefore be misleading.

  10. T1DBase: update 2011, organization and presentation of large-scale data sets for type 1 diabetes research.

    PubMed

    Burren, Oliver S; Adlem, Ellen C; Achuthan, Premanand; Christensen, Mikkel; Coulson, Richard M R; Todd, John A

    2011-01-01

    T1DBase (http://www.t1dbase.org) is web platform, which supports the type 1 diabetes (T1D) community. It integrates genetic, genomic and expression data relevant to T1D research across mouse, rat and human and presents this to the user as a set of web pages and tools. This update describes the incorporation of new data sets, tools and curation efforts as well as a new website design to simplify site use. New data sets include curated summary data from four genome-wide association studies relevant to T1D, HaemAtlas-a data set and tool to query gene expression levels in haematopoietic cells and a manually curated table of human T1D susceptibility loci, incorporating genetic overlap with other related diseases. These developments will continue to support T1D research and allow easy access to large and complex T1D relevant data sets.

  11. A Secure Trust Establishment Scheme for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ishmanov, Farruh; Kim, Sung Won; Nam, Seung Yeob

    2014-01-01

    Trust establishment is an important tool to improve cooperation and enhance security in wireless sensor networks. The core of trust establishment is trust estimation. If a trust estimation method is not robust against attack and misbehavior, the trust values produced will be meaningless, and system performance will be degraded. We present a novel trust estimation method that is robust against on-off attacks and persistent malicious behavior. Moreover, in order to aggregate recommendations securely, we propose using a modified one-step M-estimator scheme. The novelty of the proposed scheme arises from combining past misbehavior with current status in a comprehensive way. Specifically, we introduce an aggregated misbehavior component in trust estimation, which assists in detecting an on-off attack and persistent malicious behavior. In order to determine the current status of the node, we employ previous trust values and current measured misbehavior components. These components are combined to obtain a robust trust value. Theoretical analyses and evaluation results show that our scheme performs better than other trust schemes in terms of detecting an on-off attack and persistent misbehavior. PMID:24451471

  12. Trust-based learning and behaviors for convoy obstacle avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulski, Dariusz G.; Karlsen, Robert E.

    2015-05-01

    In many multi-agent systems, robots within the same team are regarded as being fully trustworthy for cooperative tasks. However, the assumption of trustworthiness is not always justified, which may not only increase the risk of mission failure, but also endanger the lives of friendly forces. In prior work, we addressed this issue by using RoboTrust to dynamically adjust to observed behaviors or recommendations in order to mitigate the risks of illegitimate behaviors. However, in the simulations in prior work, all members of the convoy had knowledge of the convoy goal. In this paper, only the lead vehicle has knowledge of the convoy goals and the follow vehicles must infer trustworthiness strictly from lead vehicle performance. In addition, RoboTrust could only respond to observed performance and did not dynamically learn agent behavior. In this paper, we incorporate an adaptive agent-specific bias into the RoboTrust algorithm that modifies its trust dynamics. This bias is learned incrementally from agent interactions, allowing good agents to benefit from faster trust growth and slower trust decay and bad agents to be penalized with slower trust growth and faster trust decay. We then integrate this new trust model into a trust-based controller for decentralized autonomous convoy operations. We evaluate its performance in an obstacle avoidance mission, where the convoy attempts to learn the best speed and following distances combinations for an acceptable obstacle avoidance probability.

  13. Trying to trust: Brain activity during interpersonal social attitude change.

    PubMed

    Filkowski, Megan M; Anderson, Ian W; Haas, Brian W

    2016-04-01

    Interpersonal trust and distrust are important components of human social interaction. Although several studies have shown that brain function is associated with either trusting or distrusting others, very little is known regarding brain function during the control of social attitudes, including trust and distrust. This study was designed to investigate the neural mechanisms involved when people attempt to control their attitudes of trust or distrust toward another person. We used a novel control-of-attitudes fMRI task, which involved explicit instructions to control attitudes of interpersonal trust and distrust. Control of trust or distrust was operationally defined as changes in trustworthiness evaluations of neutral faces before and after the control-of-attitudes fMRI task. Overall, participants (n = 60) evaluated faces paired with the distrust instruction as being less trustworthy than faces paired with the trust instruction following the control-of-distrust task. Within the brain, both the control-of-trust and control-of-distrust conditions were associated with increased temporoparietal junction, precuneus (PrC), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), and medial prefrontal cortex activity. Individual differences in the control of trust were associated with PrC activity, and individual differences in the control of distrust were associated with IFG activity. Together, these findings identify a brain network involved in the explicit control of distrust and trust and indicate that the PrC and IFG may serve to consolidate interpersonal social attitudes.

  14. Modeling T1 and T2 relaxation in bovine white matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barta, R.; Kalantari, S.; Laule, C.; Vavasour, I. M.; MacKay, A. L.; Michal, C. A.

    2015-10-01

    The fundamental basis of T1 and T2 contrast in brain MRI is not well understood; recent literature contains conflicting views on the nature of relaxation in white matter (WM). We investigated the effects of inversion pulse bandwidth on measurements of T1 and T2 in WM. Hybrid inversion-recovery/Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill experiments with broad or narrow bandwidth inversion pulses were applied to bovine WM in vitro. Data were analysed with the commonly used 1D-non-negative least squares (NNLS) algorithm, a 2D-NNLS algorithm, and a four-pool model which was based upon microscopically distinguishable WM compartments (myelin non-aqueous protons, myelin water, non-myelin non-aqueous protons and intra/extracellular water) and incorporated magnetization exchange between adjacent compartments. 1D-NNLS showed that different T2 components had different T1 behaviours and yielded dissimilar results for the two inversion conditions. 2D-NNLS revealed significantly more complicated T1/T2 distributions for narrow bandwidth than for broad bandwidth inversion pulses. The four-pool model fits allow physical interpretation of the parameters, fit better than the NNLS techniques, and fits results from both inversion conditions using the same parameters. The results demonstrate that exchange cannot be neglected when analysing experimental inversion recovery data from WM, in part because it can introduce exponential components having negative amplitude coefficients that cannot be correctly modeled with nonnegative fitting techniques. While assignment of an individual T1 to one particular pool is not possible, the results suggest that under carefully controlled experimental conditions the amplitude of an apparent short T1 component might be used to quantify myelin water.

  15. T1ρ Imaging in Premanifest Huntington Disease Reveals Changes Associated with Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Wassef, Shafik N.; Wemmie, John; Johnson, Casey P.; Johnson, Hans; Paulsen, Jane S.; Long, Jeffrey D.; Magnotta, Vincent A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Imaging biomarkers sensitive to Huntington’s disease (HD) during the premanifest phase preceding motor diagnosis may accelerate identification and evaluation of potential therapies. For this purpose, quantitative MRI sensitive to tissue microstructure and metabolism may hold great potential. We investigated the potential value of T1ρ relaxation to detect pathological changes in premanifest HD (preHD) relative to other quantitative relaxation parameters. Methods Quantitative MR parametric mapping was used to assess differences between 50 preHD subjects and 26 age- and sex-matched controls. Subjects with preHD were classified into two progression groups based on their CAG-age product (CAP) score; a high and a low/moderate CAP group. Voxel-wise and region-of-interest analyses were used to assess changes in the quantitative relaxation times. Results T1ρ showed a significant increase in the relaxation times in the high-CAP group, as compared to controls, largely in the striatum. The T1ρ changes in the preHD subjects showed a significant relationship with CAP score. No significant changes in T2 or T2* relaxation times were found in the striatum. T2* relaxation changes were found in the globus pallidus, but no significant changes with disease progression were found. Conclusion These data suggest that quantitative T1ρ mapping may provide a useful marker for assessing disease progression in HD. The absence of T2 changes suggests that the T1ρ abnormalities are unlikely owing to altered water content or tissue structure. The established sensitivity of T1ρ to pH and glucose suggests that these factors are altered in HD perhaps owing to abnormal mitochondrial function. PMID:25820773

  16. Prevalence and outcomes of peritumor fat involvement following partial nephrectomy for radiologic T1 renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Mohamed; Elfaramawi, Mohamed; Jadhav, Supria; Davis, Rodney; Saafan, Ahmed; Sher, Annashia

    2015-01-01

    Context: Partial nephrectomy is becoming the standard of care in management of small renal tumors and excision of the peritumor fat is recommended for accurate staging. During the surgery, the overlying fat may be excised for accurate visualization of margins or maybe inadvertently left behind when performing a partial nephrectomy in an obese patient. We investigated the prevalence of fat involvement in these patients. Aims: The aim was to document the prevalence of peritumor fat involvement discovered after partial nephrectomy performed for radiologic T1 renal cancer. Settings and Design: Between 2005 and 2011, 107 partial nephrectomy procedures were performed for radiologic T1 disease. Statistical Analysis: All analyses were performed using SAS 9.2. Subjects and Methods: Patients were classified as: Group A (n = 88 patients), patients with stage T1a (tumor size ≤4 cm) and Group B (n = 24 patients) patients with stage T1b (tumor size 4-7 cm). Results: The overall prevalence of peritumor fat involvement was 1.86% (n = 2). The two patients had tumor ≤4 cm in size of the papillary subtype and were followed for 61 and 57 months, respectively. Both were living and without recurrence. Patient demographics and tumor characteristics did not differ between the two groups except, Fuhrman Grades 3 and 4 were statistically more prevalent in Group B (<0.01). Tumor grade, clear cell type cancer and stage T1b did not correlate with peritumor fat involvement in the study population. Conclusions: Our study revealed a low prevalence of peritumor fat involvement in radiologic pT1 renal cancer; however, peritumor fat removal is still recommended. PMID:26692661

  17. Determinants of public trust in complementary and alternative medicine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the Netherlands, public trust in conventional medicine is relatively high. There is reason to believe that public trust in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is rated lower. The aim of this study is to gain insight into public trust in CAM and the determinants that lie at the root of it. We hypothesized that public trust in CAM is related to (perceived) institutional guarantees, media information on CAM, information from people's social network, personal experiences, the role of general practitioners (GPs) and trust in conventional medicine. Methods A postal questionnaire on public trust in CAM was mailed to 1358 members of the Health Care Consumer Panel. 65% of the questionnaires were returned. Data were analysed using frequencies, ANOVA, post hoc testing and linear regression analyses. Results In the total sample, the level of public trust in CAM was a 5.05 on average on a scale of 1-10. 40.7% was CAM user (current or past) and displayed significantly higher levels of trust toward CAM than CAM non users. In the total sample, public trust in CAM was related to institutional guarantees, negative media information, positive and negative information reported by their social network and people's personal experiences with CAM. For non users, trust is mostly associated with institutional guarantees. For users, personal experiences are most important. For both users and non users, trust levels in CAM are affected by negative media information. Public trust in CAM is for CAM users related to positive information and for non users to negative information from their network. Conclusions In the Netherlands, CAM is trusted less than conventional medicine. The hypotheses on institutional guarantees, media information, information from the network and people's personal experiences are confirmed by our study for the total sample, CAM non users and users. The other hypotheses are rejected. PMID:20226015

  18. Young children's selective trust in informants

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Paul L.; Corriveau, Kathleen H.

    2011-01-01

    Young children readily act on information from adults, setting aside their own prior convictions and even continuing to trust informants who make claims that are manifestly false. Such credulity is consistent with a long-standing philosophical and scientific conception of young children as prone to indiscriminate trust. Against this conception, we argue that children trust some informants more than others. In particular, they use two major heuristics. First, they keep track of the history of potential informants. Faced with conflicting claims, they endorse claims made by someone who has provided reliable care or reliable information in the past. Second, they monitor the cultural standing of potential informants. Faced with conflicting claims, children endorse claims made by someone who belongs to a consensus and whose behaviour abides by, rather than deviating from, the norms of their group. The first heuristic is likely to promote receptivity to information offered by familiar caregivers, whereas the second heuristic is likely to promote a broader receptivity to informants from the same culture. PMID:21357240

  19. The Impact of Trust on Organization Commitment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Kimberly; Stinson, Thomas N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As the global economy continues to spawn competitive forces, organizations have sought to become more competitive by cutting costs, eliminating non-value added work, and using more automation. Jobs have become broader and more flexible leading to a leaner workforce with higher-level knowledge and skills and more responsibility for day-to-day decisions. More than ever, organizations depend on employees as the innovators and designers of products and processes and as a source of strategic advantage. Therefore employee commitment among knowledge workers is needed to maintain organizational viability. It would seem that stronger relationships due to greater dependency, involvement, and investment would develop between employers and high-technology workers resulting in more committed employees. However, the opposite has been evidenced as key knowledge workers are changing jobs frequently. This may be due to a perceived lack of commitment by management to its employees. The notion of exchange may dominate the development of organizational commitment whereby an individual decides what to give a firm (commitment, extra effort, better performance, etc.) based on what the firm gives them (e.g., trust and security). It is the relationship between an employee's organizational commitment and the responding level of trust in the organization that is examined in this paper. An experiment is described that will seek to identify this relationship. Preliminary results are expected to show a positive relationship whereby employee commitment is positively correlated with organizational trust.

  20. The synthesis and SAR of 2-arylsulfanylphenyl-1-oxyalkylamino acids as GlyT-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Garrick; Mikkelsen, Gitte; Eskildsen, Jørgen; Bundgaard, Christoffer

    2006-08-01

    Elevation of glycine levels by inhibition of the glycine transporter-1 (GlyT-1) and activation of the NMDA receptor is a potential strategy for the treatment of schizophrenia. A novel series of 2-arylsulfanylphenyl-1-oxyalkyl amino acids have been identified. The most prominent member of this series S-1-{2-[3-(3-fluoro-phenylsulfanyl)biphenyl-4-yloxy]ethyl}pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid (38) is a potent GlyT-1 inhibitor (IC50=59 nM). In vitro and in vivo assessment of CNS exposure indicates this compound is a likely substrate for active efflux transporters.

  1. Characterization of Benign Myocarditis Using Quantitative Delayed-Enhancement Imaging Based on Molli T1 Mapping.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Marcel; Gilles, Raymond J; Azzabou, Noura; Marty, Benjamin; Vignaud, Alexandre; Greiser, Andreas; Carlier, Pierre G

    2015-10-01

    Delayed contrast enhancement after injection of a gadolinium-chelate (Gd-chelate) is a reference imaging method to detect myocardial tissue changes. Its localization within the thickness of the myocardial wall allows differentiating various pathological processes such as myocardial infarction (MI), inflammatory myocarditis, and cardiomyopathies. The aim of the study was first to characterize benign myocarditis using quantitative delayed-enhancement imaging and then to investigate whether the measure of the extracellular volume fraction (ECV) can be used to discriminate between MI and myocarditis.In 6 patients with acute benign myocarditis (32.2 ± 13.8 year-old, subepicardial late gadolinium enhancement [LGE]) and 18 patients with MI (52.3 ± 10.9 year-old, subendocardial/transmural LGE), myocardial T1 was determined using the Modified Look-Locker Imaging (MOLLI) sequence at 3 Tesla before and after Gd-chelate injection. T1 values were compared in LGE and normal regions of the myocardium. The myocardial T1 values were normalized to the T1 of blood, and the ECV was calculated from T1 values of myocardium and blood pre- and post-Gd injection.In both myocarditis and MI, the T1 was lower in LGE regions than in normal regions of the left ventricle. T1 of LGE areas was significantly higher in myocarditis than in MI (446.8 ± 45.8 vs 360.5 ± 66.9 ms, P = 0.003) and ECV was lower in myocarditis than in MI (34.5 ± 3.3 vs 53.8 ± 13.0 %, P = 0.004).Both inflammatory process and chronic fibrosis induce LGE (subepicardial in myocarditis and subendocardial in MI). The present study demonstrates that the determination of T1 and ECV is able to differentiate the 2 histological patterns.Further investigation will indicate whether the severity of ECV changes might help refine the predictive risk of LGE in myocarditis.

  2. Reduced Right Ventricular Native Myocardial T1 in Anderson-Fabry Disease: Comparison to Pulmonary Hypertension and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Joseph J.; Chow, Kelvin; Khan, Aneal; Michelakis, Evangelos; Paterson, Ian; Oudit, Gavin Y.; Thompson, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is characterized by progressive multiorgan accumulation of intracellular sphingolipids due to α-galactosidase A enzyme deficiency, resulting in progressive ventricular hypertrophy, heart failure, arrhythmias, and death. Decreased native (non-contrast) left ventricular (LV) T1 (longitudinal relaxation time) with MRI discriminates AFD from healthy controls or other presentations of concentric hypertrophy, but the right ventricle (RV) has not been studied. The aims of the current study were to evaluate native RV T1 values in AFD, with a goal of better understanding the pathophysiology of RV involvement. Methods and Results Native T1 values were measured in the inferior RV wall (RVI), interventricular septum (IVS), and inferior LV (LVI) in patients with AFD, patients with pulmonary hypertension, who provided an alternative RV pathological process for comparison, and healthy controls. A minimum wall thickness of 4 mm was selected to minimize partial volume errors in tissue T1 analysis. T1 analysis was performed in 6 subjects with AFD, 6 subjects with PH, and 21 controls. Native T1 values were shorter (adjusted p<0.05 for all comparisons), independent of location, in subjects with AFD (RVI-T1 = 1096±49 ms, IVS-T1 = 1053±41 ms, LVI-T1 = 1072±44 ms) compared to both PH (RVI-T1 = 1239±41 ms, IVS-T1 = 1280±123 ms, LVI-T1 = 1274±57 ms) and HC (IVS-T1 = 1180±60 ms, LVI-T1 = 1183±45 ms). RVI measurements were not possible in controls due to insufficient wall thickness. Conclusion Native T1 values appear similarly reduced in the left and right ventricles of individuals with AFD and RV wall thickening, suggesting a common pathology. In contrast, individuals with PH and thickened RVs showed increased native T1 values in both ventricles, suggestive of fibrosis. PMID:27305064

  3. The Ssr protein (T1E_1405) from Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E enables oligonucleotide-based recombineering in platform strain P. putida EM42.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Tomás; Jensen, Sheila I; Nielsen, Alex T; de Lorenzo, Victor; Martínez-García, Esteban

    2016-10-01

    Some strains of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida have become in recent years platforms of choice for hosting biotransformations of industrial interest. Despite availability of many genetic tools for this microorganism, genomic editing of the cell factory P. putida EM42 (a derivative of reference strain KT2440) is still a time-consuming endeavor. In this work we have investigated the in vivo activity of the Ssr protein encoded by the open reading frame T1E_1405 from Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E, a plausible functional homologue of the β protein of the Red recombination system of λ phage of Escherichia coli. A test based on the phenotypes of pyrF mutants of P. putida (the yeast's URA3 ortholog) was developed for quantifying the ability of Ssr to promote invasion of the genomic DNA replication fork by synthetic oligonucleotides. The efficiency of the process was measured by monitoring the inheritance of the changes entered into pyrF by oligonucleotides bearing mutated sequences. Ssr fostered short and long genomic deletions/insertions at considerable frequencies as well as single-base swaps not affected by mismatch repair. These results not only demonstrate the feasibility of recombineering in P. putida, but they also enable a suite of multiplexed genomic manipulations in this biotechnologically important bacterium.

  4. Pharmacological characterisation of the GlyT-1 glycine transporter using two novel radioligands.

    PubMed

    Herdon, Hugh J; Roberts, Jennifer C; Coulton, Steve; Porter, Rod A

    2010-11-01

    Inhibitors of the glycine transporter GlyT-1 are being developed as potential treatments for schizophrenia. Here we report on the use of two novel radioligands, [(3)H]-SB-733993 and [(3)H]-GSK931145, for the characterisation of GlyT-1 in both cells and native tissue. Binding was evaluated in membranes either from HEK293 cells expressing recombinant human GlyT-1 (hGlyT-1) or from rat cerebral cortex. Specific binding of both [(3)H]-SB-733993 and [(3)H]-GSK931145 to hGlyT-1 HEK293 cell membranes and rat cerebral cortex membranes was saturable and comprised >90% of total binding. K(d) and B(max) values for the two radioligands were fairly similar, with K(d) values of 1-2 nM and B(max) values of around 7000 fmol/mg protein in hGlyT-1 membranes and 3000 fmol/mg protein in rat cortex membranes. Association of [(3)H]-SB-733993 was faster, with binding reaching equilibrium within 30 min compared with 90 min for [(3)H]-GSK931145. Dissociation was also much slower for [(3)H]-GSK931145 than for [(3)H]-SB-733993, with 50% of specific binding being dissociated by approximately 40 min and 5 min, respectively. Autoradiography studies with [(3)H]-GSK931145 showed widespread distribution of binding in rat brain, with generally higher binding in caudal compared with rostral areas. Initial studies in human frontal cortex membranes showed clear specific binding of [(3)H]-GSK931145, though with much lower density (B(max) 570 fmol/mg protein) and slightly lower affinity (K(d) 4.5 nM) compared with rat cortex. A human brain autoradiography study showed higher specific binding in cerebellum compared with frontal cortex. All GlyT-1 inhibitors tested, as well as glycine itself, competed fully for the binding of both [(3)H]-SB-733993 and [(3)H]-GSK931145 in both hGlyT-1 and rat cortex membranes. Studies on the effect of varying NaCl concentration showed that [(3)H]-SB-733993 binding was reduced by >90% in the absence of added Na(+) ions, whilst [(3)H]-GSK931145 binding was unaffected

  5. Erosion of Trust in the Medical Profession in India: Time for Doctors to Act

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Sumit; Calnan, Michael

    2017-01-01

    In India, over the last decade, a series of stewardship failures in the health system, particularly in the medical profession, have led to a massive erosion of trust in these institutions. In many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), the situation is similar and has reached crisis proportions; this crisis requires urgent attention. This paper draws on the insights from the recent developments in India, to argue that a purely control-based regulatory response to this crisis in the medical profession, as is being currently envisaged by the Parliament and the Supreme Court of India, runs the risk of undermining the trusting interpersonal relations between doctors and their patients. A more balanced approach which takes into account the differences between system and interpersonal forms of trust and distrust is warranted. Such an approach should on one hand strongly regulate the institutions mandated with the stewardship and qualities of care functions, and simultaneously on the other hand, initiate measures to nurture the trusting interpersonal relations between doctors and patients. The paper concludes by calling for doctors, and those mandated with the stewardship of the profession, to individually and collectively, critically self-reflect upon the state of their profession, its priorities and its future direction. PMID:28005537

  6. Erosion of Trust in the Medical Profession in India: Time for Doctors to Act.

    PubMed

    Kane, Sumit; Calnan, Michael

    2016-11-02

    In India, over the last decade, a series of stewardship failures in the health system, particularly in the medical profession, have led to a massive erosion of trust in these institutions. In many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), the situation is similar and has reached crisis proportions; this crisis requires urgent attention. This paper draws on the insights from the recent developments in India, to argue that a purely control-based regulatory response to this crisis in the medical profession, as is being currently envisaged by the Parliament and the Supreme Court of India, runs the risk of undermining the trusting interpersonal relations between doctors and their patients. A more balanced approach which takes into account the differences between system and interpersonal forms of trust and distrust is warranted. Such an approach should on one hand strongly regulate the institutions mandated with the stewardship and qualities of care functions, and simultaneously on the other hand, initiate measures to nurture the trusting interpersonal relations between doctors and patients. The paper concludes by calling for doctors, and those mandated with the stewardship of the profession, to individually and collectively, critically self-reflect upon the state of their profession, its priorities and its future direction.

  7. Trust Management in Swarm-Based Autonomic Computing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maiden, Wendy M.; Haack, Jereme N.; Fink, Glenn A.; McKinnon, Archibald D.; Fulp, Errin W.

    2009-07-07

    Reputation-based trust management techniques can address issues such as insider threat as well as quality of service issues that may be malicious in nature. However, trust management techniques must be adapted to the unique needs of the architectures and problem domains to which they are applied. Certain characteristics of swarms such as their lightweight ephemeral nature and indirect communication make this adaptation especially challenging. In this paper we look at the trust issues and opportunities in mobile agent swarm-based autonomic systems and find that by monitoring the trustworthiness of the autonomic managers rather than the swarming sensors, the trust management problem becomes much more scalable and still serves to protect the swarms. We also analyze the applicability of trust management research as it has been applied to architectures with similar characteristics. Finally, we specify required characteristics for trust management mechanisms to be used to monitor the trustworthiness of the entities in a swarm-based autonomic computing system.

  8. The social aspects of safety management: trust and safety climate.

    PubMed

    Luria, Gil

    2010-07-01

    This study tested the contribution of trust between leaders and subordinates to safety. It is suggested that leaders who create a relationship of trust with their subordinates are more likely to create a safe working environment, and to achieve higher and stronger safety-climate perceptions among their subordinates. Hence, trust should be negatively related to injuries and positively related to safety climate. Questionnaires distributed among 2524 soldiers in three army brigades tested for trust and safety-climate variables and were then crossed with injury rate according to medical records at the platoon level of analysis (N=105). Trust was found to be negatively related to injuries and positively related both to level and strength of safety climate. Furthermore, safety-climate level was found to mediate the relationship between trust and injury rates. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  9. Paying a price: culture, trust, and negotiation consequences.

    PubMed

    Gunia, Brian C; Brett, Jeanne M; Nandkeolyar, Amit K; Kamdar, Dishan

    2011-07-01

    Three studies contrasting Indian and American negotiators tested hypotheses derived from theory proposing why there are cultural differences in trust and how cultural differences in trust influence negotiation strategy. Study 1 (a survey) documented that Indian negotiators trust their counterparts less than American negotiators. Study 2 (a negotiation simulation) linked American and Indian negotiators' self-reported trust and strategy to their insight and joint gains. Study 3 replicated and extended Study 2 using independently coded negotiation strategy data, allowing for stronger causal inference. Overall, the strategy associated with Indian negotiators' reluctance to extend interpersonal (as opposed to institutional) trust produced relatively poor outcomes. Our data support an expanded theoretical model of negotiation, linking culture to trust, strategies, and outcomes.

  10. 75 FR 16529 - Legg Mason Partners Equity Trust, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... COMMISSION Legg Mason Partners Equity Trust, et al.; Notice of Application March 26, 2010. AGENCY: Securities... group of investment companies. APPLICANTS: Legg Mason Partners Equity Trust (``LMP Equity Trust''), Legg Mason Partners Variable Equity Trust (``LMP Variable Equity Trust,'' and together with LMP Equity...

  11. 78 FR 79519 - IndexIQ ETF Trust, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ... COMMISSION IndexIQ ETF Trust, et al.; Notice of Application December 23, 2013. AGENCY: Securities and... invest in certain financial instruments. Applicants: IndexIQ ETF Trust, IndexIQ Active ETF Trust (each, a ``Trust,'' and collectively, the ``Trusts''), IndexIQ Advisors LLC (``IndexIQ Advisors'') and...

  12. Water-mediated recognition of t1-adenosine anchors Argonaute2 to microRNA targets

    PubMed Central

    Schirle, Nicole T; Sheu-Gruttadauria, Jessica; Chandradoss, Stanley D; Joo, Chirlmin; MacRae, Ian J

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) direct post-transcriptional regulation of human genes by guiding Argonaute proteins to complementary sites in messenger RNAs (mRNAs) targeted for repression. An enigmatic feature of many conserved mammalian miRNA target sites is that an adenosine (A) nucleotide opposite miRNA nucleotide-1 confers enhanced target repression independently of base pairing potential to the miRNA. In this study, we show that human Argonaute2 (Ago2) possesses a solvated surface pocket that specifically binds adenine nucleobases in the 1 position (t1) of target RNAs. t1A nucleotides are recognized indirectly through a hydrogen-bonding network of water molecules that preferentially interacts with the N6 amine on adenine. t1A nucleotides are not utilized during the initial binding of Ago2 to its target, but instead function by increasing the dwell time on target RNA. We also show that N6 adenosine methylation blocks t1A recognition, revealing a possible mechanism for modulation of miRNA target site potency. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07646.001 PMID:26359634

  13. A new carotenoid glycosyl ester isolated from a marine microorganism, Fusarium strain T-1.

    PubMed

    Sakaki, Hideyuki; Kaneno, Hirokazu; Sumiya, Yasuji; Tsushima, Miyuki; Miki, Wataru; Kishimoto, Noriaki; Fujita, Tokio; Matsumoto, Sadayoshi; Komemushi, Sadao; Sawabe, Akiyoshi

    2002-11-01

    A new carotenoid glycosyl ester, neurosporaxanthin beta-D-glucopyranoside (2), together with neurosporaxanthin (1), beta-carotene, gamma-carotene, and torulene were isolated from cultured cells of a marine microorganism, strain T-1, which was identified as Fusarium sp. Their structures were determined by chemical and spectral data.

  14. A new linear least squares method for T1 estimation from SPGR signals with multiple TRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lin-Ching; Koay, Cheng Guan; Basser, Peter J.; Pierpaoli, Carlo

    2009-02-01

    The longitudinal relaxation time, T1, can be estimated from two or more spoiled gradient recalled echo x (SPGR) images with two or more flip angles and one or more repetition times (TRs). The function relating signal intensity and the parameters are nonlinear; T1 maps can be computed from SPGR signals using nonlinear least squares regression. A widely-used linear method transforms the nonlinear model by assuming a fixed TR in SPGR images. This constraint is not desirable since multiple TRs are a clinically practical way to reduce the total acquisition time, to satisfy the required resolution, and/or to combine SPGR data acquired at different times. A new linear least squares method is proposed using the first order Taylor expansion. Monte Carlo simulations of SPGR experiments are used to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the estimated T1 from the proposed linear and the nonlinear methods. We show that the new linear least squares method provides T1 estimates comparable in both precision and accuracy to those from the nonlinear method, allowing multiple TRs and reducing computation time significantly.

  15. Aerial T1 EMP (electromagnetic pulse) effects assessment. Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-05-15

    The Office of the Manager, National Communications System (OMNCS) has undertaken the Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Mitigation program to support the survivability objectives addressed by National Security Decision Directive 97 (NSDD-97) and Executive Order 12472. The objective of this program is to mitigate the damaging effects of nuclear weapons on regional and national telecommunications capabilities. To meet this objective, the OMNCS has sponsored efforts to create a network-level model to assess the effects of high-altitude EMP (HEMP). In addition, the OMNCS has sponsored various efforts to collect the system-level HEMP effects data required to support the network-level model. The products of this model assist the NCS in identifying potential vulnerabilities of national telecommunications capabilities to HEMP and supporting National Security and Emergency Preparedness (NSEP) initiatives. This report presents an assessment of the survivability of aerial T1 systems in a HEMP environment. This effort includes a test program to collect the data required to assess coupling of incident electromagnetic fields to aerial T1 cables. Also this report documents the test activities and the data collected. It also reviews the results of the buried T1 system assessment and summarizes the relevant data. Based on these data, conclusions are drawn concerning the survivability of typical aerial T1 cable systems. Finally, recommendations are presented for addressing remaining issues relevant to this assessment.

  16. Non-small cell lung cancer: the new T1 categories

    PubMed Central

    Van Schil, Paul E.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, major changes have occurred in the staging, diagnosis, and treatment of early stage lung cancer. By screening high-risk populations, we are now able to detect lung cancers at an early stage, but the false-positive rate is high. A new pathological classification was published in 2011 and fully incorporated in the 2015 World Health Organisation (WHO) Classification of Tumours of the Lung, Pleura, Thymus, and Heart. The new eighth edition of the tumour–node–metastasis (TNM) staging system has been fully published and will be in use from January 2017. T1 lesions are subdivided into T1a, T1b, and T1c lesions corresponding to lung cancers up to 10 mm, between 11 and 20 mm, and between 21 and 30 mm, respectively. To determine the size, only the solid part on computed tomographic scanning of the chest and the invasive part on pathological examination will be considered. Prognosis is significantly better for the smallest lesions. For some specific subgroups, sublobar resection may be oncologically valid and yield good long-term outcome, but the results of recently performed randomised trials are awaited. PMID:28299198

  17. Motion Correction for Myocardial T1 Mapping using Image Registration with Synthetic Image Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hui; Shah, Saurabh; Greiser, Andreas; Guetter, Christoph; Littmann, Arne; Jolly, Marie-Pierre; Arai, Andrew E; Zuehlsdorff, Sven; Guehring, Jens; Kellman, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Quantification of myocardial T1 relaxation has potential value in the diagnosis of both ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. Image acquisition using the Modified Look-Locker Inversion Recovery technique is clinically feasible for T1 mapping. However, respiratory motion limits its applicability and degrades the accuracy of T1 estimation. The robust registration of acquired inversion recovery images is particularly challenging due to the large changes in image contrast, especially for those images acquired near the signal null point of the inversion recovery and other inversion times for which there is little tissue contrast. In this paper, we propose a novel motion correction algorithm. This approach is based on estimating synthetic images presenting contrast changes similar to the acquired images. The estimation of synthetic images is formulated as a variational energy minimization problem. Validation on a consecutive patient data cohort shows that this strategy can perform robust non-rigid registration to align inversion recovery images experiencing significant motion and lead to suppression of motion induced artifacts in the T1 map. PMID:22135227

  18. A comparative analysis of microgravity and earth grown thermostable T1 lipase crystals using HDPCG apparatus.

    PubMed

    Abd Rahman, Raja N Z R; Ali, Mohd S Mohamad; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Leow, Adam T C; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Basri, Mahiran; Salleh, Abu B; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus zalihae sp. nov., which produces a putative thermostable lipase, represents a novel species, with type strain T1. The characterisation of this intrinsically thermostable T1 lipase either physicochemically or structurally is an important task. The crystallisation of T1lipase in space was carried out using a High-Density Protein Crystal Growth (HDPCG) apparatus with the vapour diffusion method, and X-ray diffraction data were collected. The microgravity environment has improved the size and quality of the crystals as compared to earth grown crystal. The effect of microgravity on the crystallisation of T1 lipase was clearly evidenced by the finer atomic details at 1.35 A resolution. Better electron densities were observed overall compared with the Earth-grown crystals, and comparison shows the subtle but distinct conformations around Na(+) ion binding site stabilized via cation-π interactions. This approach could be useful for solving structure and function of lipases towards exploiting its potentials to various industrial applications.

  19. Pollution reduction technology program for small jet aircraft engines: Class T1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, T. W.; Davis, F. G.; Mongia, H. C.

    1977-01-01

    Small jet aircraft engines (EPA class T1, turbojet and turbofan engines of less than 35.6 kN thrust) were evaluated with the objective of attaining emissions reduction consistent with performance constraints. Configurations employing the technological advances were screened and developed through full scale rig testing. The most promising approaches in full-scale engine testing were evaluated.

  20. Activation of vagal afferents in the rat duodenum by protein digests requires PepT1.

    PubMed

    Darcel, N P; Liou, A P; Tomé, D; Raybould, H E

    2005-06-01

    Intestinal infusion of protein digests activates a vago-vagal reflex inhibition of gastric motility. Protein digests release cholecystokinin (CCK) from enteroendocrine cells; however, the precise cellular mechanisms leading to vagal afferent activation is unclear. The hypothesis that the oligopeptide transporter PepT1 plays a major role in the initiation of this vago-vagal reflex was tested by recording activation of duodenal vagal afferent activity and inhibition of gastric motility in response to protein hydrolysates in the presence of 4-aminomethylbenzoic acid (4-AMBA), a competitive inhibitor of PepT1, or 4-aminophenylacetic acid (4-APAA), an inactive 4-AMBA analog. Duodenal infusion of the protein hydrolysate increased vagal afferent discharge and inhibited gastric motility; these responses were abolished by concomitant infusion of 4-AMBA, but not 4-APAA. Duodenal infusion with Cefaclor, a substrate of PepT1, increased duodenal vagal afferent activity; Cefaclor and protein hydrolysates selectively activated CCK-responsive vagal afferents. This study demonstrates that products of protein digestion increase spontaneous activity of CCK-sensitive duodenal vagal afferents via a mechanism involving the oligopeptide transporter PepT1.