Science.gov

Sample records for form t-1 trust

  1. 75 FR 74935 - Rescission of Form T-1, Trust Annual Report; Requiring Subsidiary Organization Reporting on the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ... alone or in combination with other labor organizations, had management control or financial dominance. 73 FR at 57411. For purposes of the rule, a labor organization has management control if the labor... Labor Office of Labor-Management Standards 29 CFR Part 403 Rescission of Form T-1, Trust Annual...

  2. 75 FR 75904 - Rescission of Form T-1, Trust Annual Report; Requiring Subsidiary Organization Reporting on the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ..., Trust Annual Report; Requiring Subsidiary Organization Reporting on the Form LM-2, Labor Organization Annual Report; Modifying Subsidiary Organization Reporting on the Form LM-3, Labor Organization Annual Report; LMRDA Coverage of Intermediate Labor Organizations; Final Rule Correction In rule document...

  3. Activated Transport in the Separate Layers that Form the νT=1 Exciton Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersma, R. D.; Lok, J. G.; Kraus, S.; Dietsche, W.; von Klitzing, K.; Schuh, D.; Bichler, M.; Tranitz, H.-P.; Wegscheider, W.

    2004-12-01

    We observe the total filling factor νT=1 quantum Hall state in a bilayer two-dimensional electron system with virtually no tunneling. We find thermally activated transport in the balanced system with a monotonic increase of the activation energy with decreasing d/ℓB below 1.65. In the imbalanced system we find activated transport in each of the layers separately, yet the activation energies show a striking asymmetry around the balance point, implying a different excitation spectrum for the separate layers forming the condensed state.

  4. Transmembrane segment 5 of the dipeptide transporter hPepT1 forms a part of the substrate translocation pathway.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ashutosh A; Haworth, Ian S; Lee, Vincent H L

    2003-06-20

    This study is the first systematic attempt to investigate the role of transmembrane segment 5 of hPepT1, the most conserved segment across different species, in forming a part of the aqueous substrate translocation pathway. We used cysteine-scanning mutagenesis in conjunction with the sulfhydryl-specific reagents, MTSEA and MTSET. Neither of these reagents reduced wild-type-hPepT1 transport activity in HEK293 cells and Xenopus oocytes. Twenty-one single cysteine mutations in hPepT1 were created by replacing each residue within TMS5 with a cysteine. HEK293 cells were then transfected with each mutated protein and the steady-state protein level, [3H]Gly-Sar uptake activity, and sensitivity to the MTS reagents were measured. S164C-, L168C-, G173C-, and I179C-hPepT1 were not expressed on the plasma membrane. Y167C-, N171C-, and S174C-hPepT1 showed T1. P182C-hPepT1 showed approximately 40% specific activity whereas all the remaining transporters, although still sensitive to single cysteine mutations, exhibited more than 50% specific activity when compared to WT-hPepT1. The activity of F166C-, L176C-, S177C-, T178C-, I180C-, T181C-, and P182C-hPepT1 was partially inhibited, while the activity of F163C- and I170C-hPepT1 was completely inhibited by 2.5mM MTSEA. F163C, I165C, F166C, A169C, I170C, S177C, T181C, and P182C were clearly accessible to 1mM MTSET. Overall, these results suggest that TMS5 lines the putative aqueous channel and is slightly tilted from the vertical axis of the channel, with the exofacial half forming a classical amphipathic alpha-helix and the cytoplasmic half being highly solvent accessible.

  5. Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Paul L.

    2007-01-01

    Children rely extensively on others' testimony to learn about the world. However, they are not uniformly credulous toward other people. From an early age, children's reliance on testimony is tempered by selective trust in particular informants. Three- and 4-year-olds monitor the accuracy or knowledge of informants, including those that are…

  6. Forming social capital--does participatory planning foster trust in institutions?

    PubMed

    Menzel, Susanne; Buchecker, Matthias; Schulz, Tobias

    2013-12-15

    Participatory planning that includes interest groups and municipal representatives has been presented as a means to deal with the increasing difficulty to reach arrangements due to progressively scarce land resources. Under dispute is whether collaborative forms of planning augment social capital or whether they might actually cause the destruction of such a valuable social commodity. In this paper we focus on trust in institution as a specific dimension of social capital because we argue that this is one of the effects the convenors of such participatory planning procedures are most interested in. We pursue a pre-post design and survey advisory group members of five on-going river-related planning processes in Switzerland. Controlling for generalised trust, we investigate how trust in institutions is affected over time by the quality of such processes and the degree of participation they offer. We find that generalised trust is highly correlated with initial levels of trust and so is process quality. Particularly the latter finding challenges the usually assumed direction of causality according to which process quality influences trust building. Additionally, we find a positive (non-significant) effect of process quality on changes in trust, while a higher degree of participation rather seems to hinder trust building. We suppose this indicates that under the conditions of limited time and resources more attention should be paid to how to improve the quality of participatory processes than putting much effort in increasing the degree of participation.

  7. Closed-form expressions for flip angle variation that maximize total signal in T1-weighted rapid gradient echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Drobnitzky, Matthias; Klose, Uwe

    2017-03-01

    Magnetization-prepared rapid gradient-echo (MPRAGE) sequences are commonly employed for T1-weighted structural brain imaging. Following a contrast preparation radiofrequency (RF) pulse, the data acquisition proceeds under nonequilibrium conditions of the relaxing longitudinal magnetization. Variation of the flip angle can be used to maximize total available signal. Simulated annealing or greedy algorithms have so far been published to numerically solve this problem, with signal-to-noise ratios optimized for clinical imaging scenarios by adhering to a predefined shape of the signal evolution. We propose an unconstrained optimization of the MPRAGE experiment that employs techniques from resource allocation theory. A new dynamic programming solution is introduced that yields closed-form expressions for optimal flip angle variation. Flip angle series are proposed that maximize total transverse magnetization (Mxy) for a range of physiologic T1 values. A 3D MPRAGE sequence is modified to allow for a controlled variation of the excitation angle. Experiments employing a T1 contrast phantom are performed at 3T. 1D acquisitions without phase encoding permit measurement of the temporal development of Mxy. Image mean signal and standard deviation for reference flip angle trains are compared in 2D measurements. Signal profiles at sharp phantom edges are acquired to access image blurring related to nonuniform Mxy development. A novel closed-form expression for flip angle variation is found that constitutes the optimal policy to reach maximum total signal. It numerically equals previously published results of other authors when evaluated under their simplifying assumptions. Longitudinal magnetization (Mz) is exhaustively used without causing abrupt changes in the measured MR signal, which is a prerequisite for artifact free images. Phantom experiments at 3T verify the expected benefit for total accumulated k-space signal when compared with published flip angle series. Describing

  8. 75 FR 5455 - Rescission of Form T-1, Trust Annual Report; Require Subsidiary Organization Reporting on the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... international labor organization,'' thus establishing coverage over an intermediate body that did not itself include a private sector local labor organization, so long as the national or international labor... only those intermediate bodies that are subordinate to a national or international labor...

  9. 17 CFR 274.11d - Form N-6, registration statement of separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... statement of separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that offer variable life insurance... variable life insurance policies. Form N-6 shall be used as the registration statement to be filed pursuant to section 8(b) of the Investment Company Act of 1940 by separate accounts that offer variable life...

  10. 17 CFR 274.11d - Form N-6, registration statement of separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... statement of separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that offer variable life insurance... variable life insurance policies. Form N-6 shall be used as the registration statement to be filed pursuant to section 8(b) of the Investment Company Act of 1940 by separate accounts that offer variable life...

  11. 17 CFR 274.11d - Form N-6, registration statement of separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... statement of separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that offer variable life insurance... variable life insurance policies. Form N-6 shall be used as the registration statement to be filed pursuant to section 8(b) of the Investment Company Act of 1940 by separate accounts that offer variable life...

  12. 17 CFR 274.11d - Form N-6, registration statement of separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... statement of separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that offer variable life insurance... variable life insurance policies. Form N-6 shall be used as the registration statement to be filed pursuant to section 8(b) of the Investment Company Act of 1940 by separate accounts that offer variable life...

  13. 17 CFR 274.11d - Form N-6, registration statement of separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... statement of separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that offer variable life insurance... variable life insurance policies. Form N-6 shall be used as the registration statement to be filed pursuant to section 8(b) of the Investment Company Act of 1940 by separate accounts that offer variable life...

  14. The T=1 capsid protein of Penicillium chrysogenum virus is formed by a repeated helix-rich core indicative of gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Luque, Daniel; González, José M; Garriga, Damiá; Ghabrial, Said A; Havens, Wendy M; Trus, Benes; Verdaguer, Nuria; Carrascosa, José L; Castón, José R

    2010-07-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum virus (PcV), a member of the Chrysoviridae family, is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) fungal virus with a multipartite genome, with each RNA molecule encapsidated in a separate particle. Chrysoviruses lack an extracellular route and are transmitted during sporogenesis and cell fusion. The PcV capsid, based on a T=1 lattice containing 60 subunits of the 982-amino-acid capsid protein, remains structurally undisturbed throughout the viral cycle, participates in genome metabolism, and isolates the virus genome from host defense mechanisms. Using three-dimensional cryoelectron microscopy, we determined the structure of the PcV virion at 8.0 A resolution. The capsid protein has a high content of rod-like densities characteristic of alpha-helices, forming a repeated alpha-helical core indicative of gene duplication. Whereas the PcV capsid protein has two motifs with the same fold, most dsRNA virus capsid subunits consist of dimers of a single protein with similar folds. The spatial arrangement of the alpha-helical core resembles that found in the capsid protein of the L-A virus, a fungal totivirus with an undivided genome, suggesting a conserved basic fold. The encapsidated genome is organized in concentric shells; whereas the inner dsRNA shells are well defined, the outermost layer is dense due to numerous interactions with the inner capsid surface, specifically, six interacting areas per monomer. The outermost genome layer is arranged in an icosahedral cage, sufficiently well ordered to allow for modeling of an A-form dsRNA. The genome ordering might constitute a framework for dsRNA transcription at the capsid interior and/or have a structural role for capsid stability.

  15. Trust in decision-making authorities dictates the form of the interactive relationship between outcome fairness and procedural fairness.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Emily C; Brockner, Joel; van den Bos, Kees; Seifert, Matthias; Moon, Henry; van Dijke, Marius; De Cremer, David

    2015-01-01

    Reactions to decisions are shaped by both outcome and procedural fairness. Moreover, outcome and procedural fairness interact to influence beliefs and behaviors. However, different types of "process/outcome" interaction effects have emerged. Many studies have shown that people react particularly negatively when they receive unfair or unfavorable outcomes accompanied by unfair procedures (the "low-low" interactive pattern). However, others find that people react especially positively when they receive fair or favorable outcomes accompanied by fair procedures (the "high-high" interactive pattern). We propose that trust in decision-making authorities dictates the form of the process/outcome interaction. Across three studies, when trust was high, the "low-low" interactive pattern emerged. When trust was low, the "high-high" interactive pattern emerged. The findings suggest that when people's experience of outcome and procedural fairness diverged from how they expected to be treated, they reacted in the direction of their experiences; otherwise, their reactions were consistent with their expectations. © 2014 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  16. The Role of Teacher and Faculty Trust in Forming Teachers' Job Satisfaction: Do Years of Experience Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Maele, Dimitri; Van Houtte, Mieke

    2012-01-01

    This study relates trust at the level of both the teacher and the faculty to teachers' job satisfaction. Teaching experience is explored as a moderator of the trust-satisfaction relationship. Multilevel analyses on data of 2091 teachers across 80 secondary schools in Flanders (Belgium) revealed positive associations between teacher trust in…

  17. The Role of Social Trust in Reducing Long-Term Truancy and Forming Human Capital in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamamura, Eiji

    2011-01-01

    This paper attempts to examine how social trust influences human capital formation using prefectural level data in Japan. To this end, I constructed a proxy for social trust, based on the Japanese General Social Surveys. After controlling for socioeconomic factors, I found that social trust plays an important role in reducing the rate of long-term…

  18. The Role of Teacher and Faculty Trust in Forming Teachers' Job Satisfaction: Do Years of Experience Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Maele, Dimitri; Van Houtte, Mieke

    2012-01-01

    This study relates trust at the level of both the teacher and the faculty to teachers' job satisfaction. Teaching experience is explored as a moderator of the trust-satisfaction relationship. Multilevel analyses on data of 2091 teachers across 80 secondary schools in Flanders (Belgium) revealed positive associations between teacher trust in…

  19. Assess and enhance public trust

    Treesearch

    Patricia Winter; James Absher; Alan Watson

    2007-01-01

    Trust is a form of social capital, facilitating effective land management, communication and collaboration. Although trust in the Forest Service is at least moderately high for most publics, evidence of a lack of trust and outright distrust has been found in some communities. However, the amount, types, and conditions of trust necessary for effective management to...

  20. 17 CFR 239.17c - Form N-6, registration statement for separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... statement for separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that offer variable life insurance..., registration statement for separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that offer variable life... of separate accounts that offer variable life insurance policies and that register under the...

  1. 17 CFR 239.17c - Form N-6, registration statement for separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... statement for separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that offer variable life insurance..., registration statement for separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that offer variable life... of separate accounts that offer variable life insurance policies and that register under the...

  2. 17 CFR 239.17c - Form N-6, registration statement for separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... statement for separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that offer variable life insurance..., registration statement for separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that offer variable life... of separate accounts that offer variable life insurance policies and that register under the...

  3. 17 CFR 239.17c - Form N-6, registration statement for separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... statement for separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that offer variable life insurance..., registration statement for separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that offer variable life... of separate accounts that offer variable life insurance policies and that register under the...

  4. 17 CFR 239.17c - Form N-6, registration statement for separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... statement for separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that offer variable life insurance..., registration statement for separate accounts organized as unit investment trusts that offer variable life... of separate accounts that offer variable life insurance policies and that register under the...

  5. Cardiac T1 Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kwong, Raymond Y.

    2014-01-01

    T1 mapping of the heart has evolved into a valuable tool to evaluate myocardial tissue properties, with or without contrast injection, including assessment of myocardial edema and free water content, extra-cellular volume (expansion), and most recently cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. The MRI pulse sequence techniques developed for these applications have had to address at least two important considerations for cardiac applications: measure magnetization inversion recoveries during cardiac motion with sufficient temporal resolution for the shortest expected T1 values, and, secondly, obtain these measurements within a time during which a patient can comfortably suspend breathing. So-called Look-Locker techniques, and variants thereof, which all sample multiple points of a magnetization recovery after each magnetization preparation have therefore become a mainstay in this field. The rapid pace of advances and new findings based on cardiac T1 mapping for assessment of diffuse fibrosis, or myocardial edema show that these techniques enrich the capabilities of MRI for myocardial tissue profiling, which is arguably unmatched by other cardiac imaging modalities. PMID:24509619

  6. The Need to Trust and to Trust More Wisely in Academe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    Where trust is an issue, there is no trust. Trust in diverse organizations has never been lower. A shadow of doubt stalks one's every decision to trust collegially and institutionally. Still, colleagues sense intuitively that institutions cannot function optimally without a bedrock level of trust. In academic life, trust is a form of social…

  7. T-1 Training Area

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  8. T-1 Training Area

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-07

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  9. Impact of signals and experience on trust and trusting behavior.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Hueih; Chien, Shu-Hua; Wu, Jyh-Jeng; Tsai, Pei-Yin

    2010-10-01

    Trust is an essential factor that drives virtual interaction and transactions on the Internet. Researchers have investigated the trust development process, and identified several important factors that form the basis for trust. This research combines the signal perspective and trust theory to examine the impact of market signals and past experience on trust formation and trusting behavior. Three market signals, including brand image, Web-site investment, and privacy policies, are identified and empirically tested to determine their impact on consumer trust. Based on 322 active Web users, the quantitative results suggest that brand image, Web-site investment, privacy policies, and past experience all positively impact trust formation. Furthermore, trust shows a positive effect on Web-site stickiness. Both theoretical and practical implications of the results are also offered.

  10. Trust in interprofessional collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Paul A. M.; Austin, Zubin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trust is integral to effective interprofessional collaboration. There has been scant literature characterizing how trust between practitioners is formed, maintained or lost. The objective of this study was to characterize the cognitive model of trust that exists between pharmacists and family physicians working in collaborative primary care settings. Methods: Pharmacists and family physicians who work collaboratively in primary care were participants in this study. Family health teams were excluded from this study because of the distinct nature of these settings. Through a snowball convenience sampling method, a total of 11 pharmacists and 8 family physicians were recruited. A semistructured interview guide was used to guide discussion around trust, relationships and collaboration. Constant-comparative coding was used to identify themes emerging from these data. Results: Pharmacists and family physicians demonstrate different cognitive models of trust in primary care collaboration. For pharmacists, trust appears to be conferred on physicians based on title, degree, status and positional authority. For family physicians, trust appears to be earned based on competency and performance. These differences may lead to interprofessional tension when expectations of reciprocal trust are not met. Conclusions: Further work in characterizing how trust is developed in interprofessional relationships is needed to support effective team formation and functioning. PMID:27540406

  11. "Doing Trust".

    PubMed

    Guillemin, Marilys; Gillam, Lynn; Barnard, Emma; Stewart, Paul; Walker, Hannah; Rosenthal, Doreen

    2016-10-01

    Trust in research is important but not well understood. We examine the ways that researchers understand and practice trust in research. Using a qualitative research design, we interviewed 19 researchers, including eight researchers involved in Australian Indigenous research. The project design focused on sensitive research including research involving vulnerable participants and sensitive research topics. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. We found that researchers' understanding of trust integrates both the conceptual and concrete; researchers understand trust in terms of how it relates to other similar concepts and how they practice trust in research. This provides a sound basis to better understand trust in research, as well as identifying mechanisms to regain trust when it is lost in research.

  12. Revealing Preconditions for Trustful Collaboration in CSCL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerdes, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses preconditions for trust in virtual learning environments. The concept of trust is discussed with reference to cases reporting trust in cyberspace and through a philosophical clarification holding that trust in the form of self-surrender is a common characteristic of all human co-existence. In virtual learning environments,…

  13. TRUST: TDRSS Resource User Support Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparn, Thomas P.; Gablehouse, R. Daniel

    1991-09-01

    TRUST-TDRSS (Tracking Data and Relay Satellite System) Resource User Support Tool is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: TRUST development cycle; the TRUST system; scheduling window; ODM/GCMR window; TRUST architecture; surpass; and summary.

  14. TRUST: TDRSS Resource User Support Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparn, Thomas P.; Gablehouse, R. Daniel

    1991-01-01

    TRUST-TDRSS (Tracking Data and Relay Satellite System) Resource User Support Tool is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: TRUST development cycle; the TRUST system; scheduling window; ODM/GCMR window; TRUST architecture; surpass; and summary.

  15. Rethinking trust.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Roderick M

    2009-06-01

    Will we ever learn? We'd barely recovered from Enron and WorldCom before we faced the subprime mortgage meltdown and more scandals that shook our trust in businesspeople. Which raises the question: Do we trust too much? In this article, Stanford professor and social psychologist Kramer explores the reasons we trust so easily--and, often, so unwisely. He explains that genetics and childhood learning make us predisposed to trust and that it's been a good survival mechanism. That said, our willingness to trust makes us vulnerable. Our sense of trust kicks in on remarkably simple cues, such as when people look like us or are part of our social group. We also rely on third parties to verify the character of others, sometimes to our detriment (as the victims of Bernard Madoff learned). Add in our illusions of invulnerability and our tendencies to see what we want to see and to overestimate our own judgment, and the bottom line is that we're often easily fooled. We need to develop tempered trust. For those who trust too much, that means reading cues better; for the distrustful, it means developing more receptive behaviors. Everyone should start with small acts of trust that encourage reciprocity and build up. Having a hedge against potential abuses also helps. Hollywood scriptwriters, for instance, register their treatments with the Writers Guild of America to prevent their ideas from being stolen by the executives they pitch. To attract the right relationships, people must strongly signal their own honesty, proactively allay concerns, and, if their trust is abused, retaliate. Trusting individuals in certain roles, which essentially means trusting the system that selects and trains them, also works but isn't foolproof. And don't count on due diligence alone for protection; constant vigilance is needed to make sure the landscape hasn't changed.

  16. Cooperative Trust Games

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    situation, both agents could form a coalition with a mutually trusted third party, such as an escrow agent. The escrow agent would receive the payment from...one agent to verify that the good can be shipped, and then later disperse the payment to the other agent (minus the escrow fee) when the good has...common in real world scenarios, and justifies the importance of various trusted third parties, such as escrow companies, website authentication services

  17. Social Trust of Virtual Identities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seigneur, Jean-Marc

    Most other chapters of this book discuss computational models of trust in broader terms, giving definitions of trust, explaining how trust should evolve over time, surveying the different facets of trust .On the other hand, this chapter has a clear focus on the important element of identity in computational trust mechanisms. Trust and reputation are easier to form in face-to-face situations than in situations involving the use of computers and networks because the identity of the trustee is more difficult to verify. In this chapter, the different means to recognise virtual identities are surveyed. Next, their integration into computational trust engines is discussed, especially according to four main requirements: Adaptability, Security, Usability and Privacy (ASUP).

  18. Chimpanzees Trust Their Friends.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, Jan M; Herrmann, Esther

    2016-01-25

    The identification and recruitment of trustworthy partners represents an important adaptive challenge for any species that relies heavily on cooperation [1, 2]. From an evolutionary perspective, trust is difficult to account for as it involves, by definition, a risk of non-reciprocation and defection by cheaters [3, 4]. One solution for this problem is to form close emotional bonds, i.e., friendships, which enable trust even in contexts where cheating would be profitable [5]. Little is known about the evolutionary origins of the human tendency to form close social bonds to overcome the trust problem. Studying chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), one of our closest living relatives, is one way of identifying these origins. While a growing body of research indicates that at least some of the properties of close human relationships find parallels in the social bonds of chimpanzees [6-10] and that chimpanzees extend favors preferentially toward selected individuals [11-14], it is unclear whether such interactions are based on trust. To fill this gap in knowledge, we observed the social interactions of a group of chimpanzees and established dyadic friendship relations. We then presented chimpanzees with a modified, non-verbal version of the human trust game and found that chimpanzees trust their friends significantly more frequently than their non-friends. These results suggest that trust within closely bonded dyads is not unique to humans but rather has its evolutionary roots in the social relationships of our closest primate relatives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Trust, Conflict and Performance in Scientific Collaborations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shrum, Wesley; Chompalov, Ivan; Genuth, Joel

    2001-01-01

    Examines 53 collaborations in physics and related sciences with two unexpected findings: (1) trust is no higher in projects formed through pre-existing relationships than those without such ties; and (2) there is no relationship between trust and performance. Concludes that more important than trust for an understanding of large scientific…

  20. Trusted Objects

    SciTech Connect

    CAMPBELL,PHILIP L.; PIERSON,LYNDON G.; WITZKE,EDWARD L.

    1999-10-27

    In the world of computers a trusted object is a collection of possibly-sensitive data and programs that can be allowed to reside and execute on a computer, even on an adversary's machine. Beyond the scope of one computer we believe that network-based agents in high-consequence and highly reliable applications will depend on this approach, and that the basis for such objects is what we call ''faithful execution.''

  1. Trust and Influence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-05

    DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Program Trends •Trust in Autonomous Systems •Cross- cultural Trust... Cultural Trust – Identify the antecedents of trust in different cultures •Trust in Autonomous Systems/Autonomy – identify the factors that shape...Trust & trustworthiness are independent (Mayer et al, 1995) •Trust is relational •Humans in cross- cultural interactions •Complex human-machine

  2. From the general to the specific: How social trust motivates relational trust.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Blaine G

    2016-01-01

    When people form beliefs about the trustworthiness of others with respect to particular matters (i.e., when individuals trust), theory suggests that they rely on preexistent cognitive schemas regarding the general cooperativeness of individuals and organizations (i.e., social trust). In spite of prior work, the impact of social trust on relational trust-or what Russell Hardin (2002) calls trust as a three-part relation where actor A trusts actor B with reference to matter Y-is not well established. Four vignette experiments were administered to Amazon.com Mechanical Turk workers (N = 1388 and N = 1419) and to public university undergraduate students (N = 995 and N = 956) in order to investigate the relationship between social trust and relational trust. Measures of general social trust and particular social trust produced statistically equivalent effects that were positively associated with relational trust. Political trust, however, was statistically unrelated to relational trust. These results support the idea that people rely on schemas and stereotypes concerned with the general cooperativeness and helpfulness of others when forming beliefs about another person's trustworthiness with respect to a particular matter at hand.

  3. Trust-based environmental regulation.

    PubMed

    Lange, Bettina; Gouldson, Andy

    2010-10-15

    Within this paper, we examine the contribution that trust-based relationships can make to achieving better-and particularly more effective, efficient and equitable-environmental regulation. While levels of trust in regulators, regulatory processes and outcomes are often discussed, the influence of trust on different actors and on different measures of regulatory performance is poorly understood. Within this paper, we define trust-based environmental regulation as a specific regulatory style that involves openness and cooperation in interaction between regulated, regulators and third-party stakeholders in order to achieve environmental protection objectives. We then discuss the pros and cons of trust relationships between regulators, regulated businesses and citizens for achieving behavioural change towards greater environmental protection. To illustrate the significance of these issues, we then examine three forms of contractual regulatory style where trust relationships are critically important: responsive regulation, self-regulation and environmental agreements. Based on this analysis, we highlight the importance of trust-based relationships, and we argue that one of the greatest contributions of trust-based environmental regulation is to challenge how we think about regulation. Trust is often understood as enabling existing regulatory relationships or in the case of self-regulation as a complement to regulation. However, we argue that the real potential of trust is to open up new ways for participants in regulatory regimes to engage in collective action, to go beyond a perception of regulation as driven by the competing interests of individual actors, and thus, to open up new channels of influence for behavioural change towards greater environmental protection. Our analysis therefore has great relevance for future research and for on-going debates on the future of regulation. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. A medical device-grade T1 and ECV phantom for global T1 mapping quality assurance-the T1 Mapping and ECV Standardization in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (T1MES) program.

    PubMed

    Captur, Gabriella; Gatehouse, Peter; Keenan, Kathryn E; Heslinga, Friso G; Bruehl, Ruediger; Prothmann, Marcel; Graves, Martin J; Eames, Richard J; Torlasco, Camilla; Benedetti, Giulia; Donovan, Jacqueline; Ittermann, Bernd; Boubertakh, Redha; Bathgate, Andrew; Royet, Celine; Pang, Wenjie; Nezafat, Reza; Salerno, Michael; Kellman, Peter; Moon, James C

    2016-09-22

    T1 mapping and extracellular volume (ECV) have the potential to guide patient care and serve as surrogate end-points in clinical trials, but measurements differ between cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) scanners and pulse sequences. To help deliver T1 mapping to global clinical care, we developed a phantom-based quality assurance (QA) system for verification of measurement stability over time at individual sites, with further aims of generalization of results across sites, vendor systems, software versions and imaging sequences. We thus created T1MES: The T1 Mapping and ECV Standardization Program. A design collaboration consisting of a specialist MRI small-medium enterprise, clinicians, physicists and national metrology institutes was formed. A phantom was designed covering clinically relevant ranges of T1 and T2 in blood and myocardium, pre and post-contrast, for 1.5 T and 3 T. Reproducible mass manufacture was established. The device received regulatory clearance by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Conformité Européene (CE) marking. The T1MES phantom is an agarose gel-based phantom using nickel chloride as the paramagnetic relaxation modifier. It was reproducibly specified and mass-produced with a rigorously repeatable process. Each phantom contains nine differently-doped agarose gel tubes embedded in a gel/beads matrix. Phantoms were free of air bubbles and susceptibility artifacts at both field strengths and T1 maps were free from off-resonance artifacts. The incorporation of high-density polyethylene beads in the main gel fill was effective at flattening the B 1 field. T1 and T2 values measured in T1MES showed coefficients of variation of 1 % or less between repeat scans indicating good short-term reproducibility. Temperature dependency experiments confirmed that over the range 15-30 °C the short-T1 tubes were more stable with temperature than the long-T1 tubes. A batch of 69 phantoms was mass-produced with random sampling of ten of

  5. Trust me, I'm a researcher!: The role of trust in biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Kerasidou, Angeliki

    2017-03-01

    In biomedical research lack of trust is seen as a great threat that can severely jeopardise the whole biomedical research enterprise. Practices, such as informed consent, and also the administrative and regulatory oversight of research in the form of research ethics committees and Institutional Review Boards, are established to ensure the protection of future research subjects and, at the same time, restore public trust in biomedical research. Empirical research also testifies to the role of trust as one of the decisive factors in research participation and lack of trust as a barrier for consenting to research. However, what is often missing is a clear definition of trust. This paper seeks to address this gap. It starts with a conceptual analysis of the term trust. It compares trust with two other related terms, those of reliance and trustworthiness, and offers a defence of Baier's attribute of 'good will' a basic characteristic of trust. It, then, proceeds to consider trust in the context of biomedical research by examining two questions: First, is trust necessary in biomedical research?; and second, do increases in regulatory oversight of biomedical research also increase trust in the field? This paper argues that regulatory oversight is important for increasing reliance in biomedical research, but it does not improve trust, which remains important for biomedical research. It finishes by pointing at professional integrity as a way of promoting trust and trustworthiness in this field.

  6. Trust and Online Reputation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Ming; Ramachandran, Deepak

    Web 2.0 technologies provide organizations with unprecedented opportunities to expand and solidify relationships with their customers, partners, and employees—while empowering firms to define entirely new business models focused on sharing information in online collaborative environments. Yet, in and of themselves, these technologies cannot ensure productive online interactions. Leading enterprises that are experimenting with social networks and online communities are already discovering this fact and along with it, the importance of establishing trust as the foundation for online collaboration and transactions. Just as today's consumers must feel secure to bank, exchange personal information and purchase products and services online; participants in Web 2.0 initiatives will only accept the higher levels of risk and exposure inherent in e-commerce and Web collaboration in an environment of trust. Indeed, only by attending to the need to cultivate online trust with customers, partners and employees will enterprises ever fully exploit the expanded business potential posed by Web 2.0. But developing online trust is no easy feat. While various preliminary attempts have occurred, no definitive model for establishing or measuring it has yet been established. To that end, nGenera has identified three, distinct dimensions of online trust: reputation (quantitative-based); relationship (qualitative-based) and process (system-based). When considered together, they form a valuable model for understanding online trust and a toolbox for cultivating it to support Web 2.0 initiatives.

  7. Ultra-low field T1 vs. T1rho at 3T and 7T: study of rotationally immobilized protein gels and animal brain tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hui; Inglis, Ben; Barr, Ian; Clarke, John

    2015-03-01

    Clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines operating in static fields of typically 1.5 T or 3 T can capture information on slow molecular dynamics utilizing the so-called T1rho technique. This technique, in which a radiofrequency (RF) spin-lock field is applied with microtesla amplitude, has been used, for example, to determine the onset time of stroke in studies on rats. The long RF pulse, however, may exceed the specific absorption rate (SAR) limit, putting subjects at risk. Ultra-low-field (ULF) MRI, based on Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs), directly detects proton signals at a static magnetic field of typically 50-250 μT. Using our ULF MRI system with adjustable static field of typically 55 to 240 μT, we systematically measured the T1 and T2 dispersion profiles of rotationally immobilized protein gels (bovine serum albumin), ex vivo pig brains, and ex vivo rat brains with induced stroke. Comparing the ULF results with T1rho dispersion obtained at 3 T and 7 T, we find that the degree of protein immobilization determines the frequency-dependence of both T1 and T1rho. Furthermore, T1rho and ULF T1 show similar results for stroke, suggesting that ULF MRI may be used to image traumatic brain injury with negligible SAR. This research was supported by the Henry H. Wheeler, Jr. Brain Imaging Center and the Donaldson Trust.

  8. Trust and Influence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-06

    how humans establish, maintain, and repair trust of humans and technological systems) and the science of influence (i.e., understanding how to shape...factors that shape reliance in complex human -machine interactions • Cross-Cultural Trust – identify the antecedents of trust in different cultures...actions of others with little ability to monitor their actions (Mayer et al., 1995) Assumptions: •Trust as a human phenomenon •Trust

  9. Trust in Social Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-07

    T. Schlosser, and H. Garcia-Molina. The eigentrust algorithm for reputation management in p2p networks . In Proceedings of the 12th international...demonstrate real-world applications where trust is explicitly used. As a new 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 12...Mining, TrustModeling, Trust Measurements, Trust Applications , Dis-trust REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10

  10. The Value of Trust to Nursing.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Marcella M

    2014-01-01

    Trust, one of nursing's intangible assets, impacts nurses' ability to form meaningful relationships with patients and this connection positively impacts health outcomes. Linking trust to the fabric of nursing and investing in its measurement will become essential to nursing's valuation and the resulting investment in nursing. Trust, as nursing's core value, should be fostered by nurse educators as they prepare the next generation of nurses. Nurse administrators should connect the trust a patient has for his or her nurse and patient cooperation and honest transparent communication between providers and the patient. Banking trust as a valuable nursing asset will substantiate nursing's marketing and support its worth. Nursing's trustworthiness is an intangible asset that warrants protection, as trust once lost is hard to recapture.

  11. Trust in prescription drug brand websites: website trust cues, attitude toward the website, and behavioral intentions.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jisu; Shin, Wonsun

    2014-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer (DTC) prescription drug brand websites, as a form of DTC advertising, are receiving increasing attention due to the growing number and importance as an ad and a consumer information source. This study examined consumer trust in a DTC website as an important factor influencing consumers' attitude toward the website and behavioral intention. Applying the conceptual framework of website trust, the particular focus of investigation was the effect of the website trust cue factor on consumers' perceived DTC website trust and subsequent attitudinal and behavioral responses. Results show a significant relation between the website trust cue factor and consumers' perceived DTC website trust. Perceived DTC website trust, in turn, was found to be significantly associated with consumers' attitude toward the DTC website and behavioral intention.

  12. The T1D Exchange clinic registry.

    PubMed

    Beck, Roy W; Tamborlane, William V; Bergenstal, Richard M; Miller, Kellee M; DuBose, Stephanie N; Hall, Callyn A

    2012-12-01

    The T1D Exchange includes a clinic-based registry, a patient-centric web site called Glu, and a biobank. The aim of the study was to describe the T1D Exchange clinic registry and provide an overview of participant characteristics. Data obtained through participant completion of a questionnaire and chart extraction include diabetes history, management, and monitoring; general health; lifestyle; family history; socioeconomic factors; medications; acute and chronic diabetic complications; other medical conditions; and laboratory results. Data were collected from 67 endocrinology centers throughout the United States. We studied 25,833 adults and children with presumed autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D). Participants ranged in age from less than 1 to 93 yr, 50% were female, 82% were Caucasian, 50% used an insulin pump, 6% used continuous glucose monitoring, and 16% had a first-degree family member with T1D. Glycosylated hemoglobin at enrollment averaged 8.3% and was highest in 13 to 25 yr olds. The prevalence of renal disease was ≤4% until T1D was present for at least 10 yr, and retinopathy treatment was ≤2% until T1D was present for at least 20 yr. A severe hypoglycemic event (seizure or coma) in the prior 12 months was reported by 7% of participants and diabetic ketoacidosis in the prior 12 months by 8%. The T1D Exchange clinic registry provides a database of important information on individuals with T1D in the United States. The rich dataset of the registry provides an opportunity to address numerous issues of relevance to clinicians and patients, including assessments of associations between patient characteristics and diabetes management factors with outcomes.

  13. Why are sweet proteins sweet? Interaction of brazzein, monellin and thaumatin with the T1R2-T1R3 receptor.

    PubMed

    Temussi, Piero Andrea

    2002-08-28

    Sweet tasting proteins interact with the same receptor that binds small molecular weight sweeteners, the T1R2-T1R3 G-protein coupled receptor, but the key groups on the protein surface responsible for the biological activity have not yet been identified. I propose that sweet proteins, contrary to small ligands, do not bind to the 'glutamate-like' pocket but stabilize the free form II of the T1R2-T1R3 receptor by attachment to a secondary binding site. Docking of brazzein, monellin and thaumatin with a model of the T1R2-T1R3 sweet taste receptor shows that the most likely complexes can indeed stabilize the active form of the receptor.

  14. Reliable Design Versus Trust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Melanie; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation focuses on reliability and trust for the users portion of the FPGA design flow. It is assumed that the manufacturer prior to hand-off to the user tests FPGA internal components. The objective is to present the challenges of creating reliable and trusted designs. The following will be addressed: What makes a design vulnerable to functional flaws (reliability) or attackers (trust)? What are the challenges for verifying a reliable design versus a trusted design?

  15. Trust in Consumer Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursawe, Klaus; Katzenbeisser, Stefan

    While Trusted Computing is getting increasing attention in the PC world, consumer electronics devices have limited benefit from the Trusted Computing solutions currently under development. In this paper we outline the different requirements of consumer electronics devices, when compared to the PC world, and point out the technical consequences for standards like the Trusted Computing Group. In addition, we will touch on economic aspects that may inhibit or support Trusted Computing in this domain.

  16. Trust vs. Confidence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    both cognitive and affective factors can be implicated in trust judgements. Moreover, unlike confidence judgements (which can occur in many...occurs in situations without risks. A trust judgement, on the other hand, uses a variety of information beyond the merely cognitive , occurs only when...defined. Although there are many different definitions of trust, our definition (Adams and Webb, 2003) is as follows: Trust is a psychological state

  17. Children's Conceptions of Trust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Peter H., Jr.; Turiel, Elliot

    Aware that children conceive of different types of trust, a study examined 60 children's conception of trust. The subjects comprised three age groups: 6-7 years old, 8-9 years old, and 10-11 years old. Each subject was interviewed on the basis of three stories. The stories depicted a hypothesized violation of trust in a moral context (lying),…

  18. Transfer of hyperpolarization from long T 1 storage nuclei to short T 1 neighbors using FLOPSY-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Karlos X.; Harrison, Crystal; Dean Sherry, A.; Malloy, Craig R.; Merritt, Matthew E.

    2011-12-01

    Nuclei with long T 1s are optimal targets for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). Therefore, most of the agents used in metabolic imaging and spectroscopy studies are based on carboxylic acid moieties that lack protons, a strong source of dipolar relaxation. Metabolic flux information encoded into spectra of small molecule metabolites in the form of the 13C isotopomer data cannot be accessed using standard 13C hyperpolarization methods because protonated carbons relax too quickly through T 1 dipolar relaxation. It is shown here that the longitudinal mixing sequence FLOPSY-8 can be used to transfer polarization from a long T 1 storage nucleus to adjacent protonated carbons so that they may be detected with high sensitivity. We demonstrate that FLOPSY-8 allows a direct readout of isotopomer populations in butyrate and glutamate in vitro.

  19. Do Reputation Systems Undermine Trust? Divergent Effects of Enforcement Type on Generalized Trust and Trustworthiness.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Ko

    2015-03-01

    Research shows that enforcing cooperation using contracts or tangible sanctions can backfire, undermining people's intrinsic motivation to cooperate: when the enforcement is removed, people are less trusting or trustworthy than when there is no enforcement to begin with. The author examines whether reputation systems have similar consequences for generalized trust and trustworthiness. Using a web-based experiment simulating online market transactions (studies 1 and 2), he shows that reputation systems can reinforce generalized trust and trustworthiness, unlike contractual enforcement or relational enforcement based on repeated interactions. In a survey experiment (study 3), he finds that recalling their eBay feedback scores made participants more trusting and trustworthy. These results are predicated on the diffuse nature of reputational enforcement to reinforce perceptions of trust and trustworthiness. These results have implications for understanding how different forms of governance affect generalized trust and trustworthiness.

  20. Taste information derived from T1R-expressing taste cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ryusuke; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2016-03-01

    The taste system of animals is used to detect valuable nutrients and harmful compounds in foods. In humans and mice, sweet, bitter, salty, sour and umami tastes are considered the five basic taste qualities. Sweet and umami tastes are mediated by G-protein-coupled receptors, belonging to the T1R (taste receptor type 1) family. This family consists of three members (T1R1, T1R2 and T1R3). They function as sweet or umami taste receptors by forming heterodimeric complexes, T1R1+T1R3 (umami) or T1R2+T1R3 (sweet). Receptors for each of the basic tastes are thought to be expressed exclusively in taste bud cells. Sweet (T1R2+T1R3-expressing) taste cells were thought to be segregated from umami (T1R1+T1R3-expressing) taste cells in taste buds. However, recent studies have revealed that a significant portion of taste cells in mice expressed all T1R subunits and responded to both sweet and umami compounds. This suggests that sweet and umami taste cells may not be segregated. Mice are able to discriminate between sweet and umami tastes, and both tastes contribute to behavioural preferences for sweet or umami compounds. There is growing evidence that T1R3 is also involved in behavioural avoidance of calcium tastes in mice, which implies that there may be a further population of T1R-expressing taste cells that mediate aversion to calcium taste. Therefore the simple view of detection and segregation of sweet and umami tastes by T1R-expressing taste cells, in mice, is now open to re-examination. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  1. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Brown, Dan; Eustace, John

    2015-01-01

    Increment 45 - 46 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  2. Phosphorus Taste Involves T1R2 and T1R3.

    PubMed

    Tordoff, Michael G

    2017-06-01

    Rodents consume solutions of phosphates and pyrophosphates in preference to water. Recently, we found that the preference for trisodium pyrophosphate (Na3HP2O7) was greater in T1R3 knockout (KO) mice than wild-type (WT) controls, suggesting that T1R3 is a pyrophosphate detector. We now show that this heightened Na3HP2O7 preference of T1R3 KO mice extends to disodium phosphate (Na2HPO4), disodium and tetrasodium pyrophosphate (Na2H2PO4 and Na4H2PO4), a tripolyphosphate (Na5P3O10), a non-sodium phosphate [(NH4)2HPO4], and a non-sodium pyrophosphate (K4P2O7) but not to non-P salts with large anions (sodium gluconate, acetate, or propionate). Licking rates for Na3HP2O7 are higher in T1R2 KO mice than WT controls; Na3HP2O7 preference scores are increased even more in T1R2 KO mice and T1R2+T1R3 double KO mice than in T1R3 KO mice; preference scores for Na3HP2O7 are normal in T1R1 KO mice. These results implicate each subunit of the T1R2+T1R3 dimer in the behavioral response to P-containing taste compounds. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Trust in performance indicators?

    PubMed Central

    Davies, H. T.; Lampel, J.

    1998-01-01

    The 1980s and 90s have seen the proliferation of all forms of performance indicators as part of attempts to command and control health services. The latest area to receive attention is health outcomes. Published league tables of mortality and other health outcomes have been available in the United States for some time and in Scotland since the early 1990s; they have now been developed for England and Wales. Publication of these data has proceeded despite warnings as to their limited meaningfulness and usefulness. The time has come to ask whether the remedy is worse than the malady: are published health outcomes contributing to quality efforts or subverting more constructive approaches? This paper argues that attempts to force improvements through publishing health outcomes can be counterproductive, and outlines an alternative approach which involves fostering greater trust in professionalism as a basis for quality enhancements. PMID:10185142

  4. Personal Trust Increases Cooperation beyond General Trust

    PubMed Central

    Acedo-Carmona, Cristina; Gomila, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a new methodology which, while allowing for anonymous interaction, it also makes possible to compare decisions of cooperating or defecting when playing games within a group, according to whether or not players personally trust each other. The design thus goes beyond standard approaches to the role of trust in fostering cooperation, which is restricted to general trust. It also allows considering the role of the topology of the social network involved may play in the level of cooperation found. The results of this work support the idea that personal trust promotes cooperation beyond the level of general trust. We also found that this effect carries over to the whole group, making it more cohesive, but that higher levels of cohesion rely on a particular topology. As a conclusion, we hypothesize that personal trust is a psychological mechanism evolved to make human social life possible in the small groups our ancestors lived in, and that this mechanism persists and plays a role in sustaining cooperation and social cohesion. PMID:25144539

  5. Validating the Trust in Teams and Trust in Leaders Scales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Work Scale trust scale ( Cook , Hepworth, Wall and Warr , 1981). This scale measures interpersonal trust in the organizational context. The full version...2005) scale .....................................................................30 Table 16: Team Trust Scale and Cook and Wall ...a whole fairly similarly. Another analysis compared the Team Trust Scale with two subscales from the Cook and Wall (1980) Interpersonal Trust at

  6. The functional role of the T1R family of receptors in sweet taste and feeding.

    PubMed

    Treesukosol, Yada; Smith, Kimberly R; Spector, Alan C

    2011-11-30

    The discovery of the T1R family of Class C G protein-coupled receptors in the peripheral gustatory system a decade ago has been a tremendous advance for taste research, and its conceptual reach has extended to other organ systems. There are three proteins in the family, T1R1, T1R2, and T1R3, encoded by their respective genes, Tas1r1, Tas1r2, and Tas1r3. T1R2 combines with T1R3 to form a heterodimer that binds with sugars and other sweeteners. T1R3 also combines with T1R1 to form a heterodimer that binds with l-amino acids. These proteins are expressed not only in taste bud cells, but one or more of these T1Rs have also been identified in the nasal epithelium, gut, pancreas, liver, kidney, testes and brain in various mammalian species. Here we review current perspectives regarding the functional role of these receptors, concentrating on sweet taste and feeding. We also discuss behavioral findings suggesting that a glucose polymer mixture, Polycose, which rodents avidly prefer, appears to activate a receptor that does not depend on the combined expression of T1R2 and T1R3. In addition, although the T1Rs have been implicated as playing a role in glucose sensing, T1R2 knock-out (KO) and T1R3 KO mice display normal chow and fluid intake as well as normal body weight compared with same-sex littermate wild type (WT) controls. Moreover, regardless of whether they are fasted or not, these KO mice do not differ from their WT counterparts in their Polycose intake across a broad range of concentrations in 30-minute intake tests. The functional implications of these results and those in the literature are considered. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Functional Role of the T1R Family of Receptors in Sweet Taste and Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Treesukosol, Yada; Smith, Kimberly R.; Spector, Alan C.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of the T1R family of Class C G protein-coupled receptors in the peripheral gustatory system a decade ago has been a tremendous advance for taste research, and its conceptual reach has extended to other organ systems. There are three proteins in the family, T1R1, T1R2, and T1R3, encoded by their respective genes, Tas1r1, Tas1r2, and Tas1r3. T1R2 combines with T1R3 to form a heterodimer that binds with sugars and other sweeteners. T1R3 also combines with T1R1 to form a heterodimer that binds with L-amino acids. These proteins are expressed not only in taste bud cells, but one or more of these T1Rs have also been identified in the nasal epithelium, gut, pancreas, liver, kidney, testes and brain in various mammalian species. Here we review current perspectives regarding the functional role of these receptors, concentrating on sweet taste and feeding. We also discuss behavioral findings suggesting that a glucose polymer mixture, Polycose, which rodents avidly prefer, appears to activate a receptor that does not depend on the combined expression of T1R2 and T1R3. In addition, although the T1Rs have been implicated as playing a role in glucose sensing, T1R2 knock-out (KO) and T1R3 KO mice display normal chow and fluid intake as well as normal body weight compared with same-sex littermate wild type (WT) controls. Moreover, regardless of whether they are fasted or not, these KO mice do not differ from their WT counterparts in their Polycose intake across a broad range of concentrations in 30-min intake tests. The functional implications of these results and those in the literature are considered. PMID:21376068

  8. T1ρ magnetic resonance: basic physics principles and applications in knee and intervertebral disc imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinwei; Li, Xiaojuan; Chen, Weitian; Ahuja, Anil; Yuan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    T1ρ relaxation time provides a new contrast mechanism that differs from T1- and T2-weighted contrast, and is useful to study low-frequency motional processes and chemical exchange in biological tissues. T1ρ imaging can be performed in the forms of T1ρ-weighted image, T1ρ mapping and T1ρ dispersion. T1ρ imaging, particularly at low spin-lock frequency, is sensitive to B0 and B1 inhomogeneity. Various composite spin-lock pulses have been proposed to alleviate the influence of field inhomogeneity so as to reduce the banding-like spin-lock artifacts. T1ρ imaging could be specific absorption rate (SAR) intensive and time consuming. Efforts to address these issues and speed-up data acquisition are being explored to facilitate wider clinical applications. This paper reviews the T1ρ imaging’s basic physic principles, as well as its application for cartilage imaging and intervertebral disc imaging. Compared to more established T2 relaxation time, it has been shown that T1ρ provides more sensitive detection of proteoglycan (PG) loss at early stages of cartilage degeneration. T1ρ has also been shown to provide more sensitive evaluation of annulus fibrosis (AF) degeneration of the discs. PMID:26807369

  9. T1ρ magnetic resonance: basic physics principles and applications in knee and intervertebral disc imaging.

    PubMed

    Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J; Zhang, Qinwei; Li, Xiaojuan; Chen, Weitian; Ahuja, Anil; Yuan, Jing

    2015-12-01

    T1ρ relaxation time provides a new contrast mechanism that differs from T1- and T2-weighted contrast, and is useful to study low-frequency motional processes and chemical exchange in biological tissues. T1ρ imaging can be performed in the forms of T1ρ-weighted image, T1ρ mapping and T1ρ dispersion. T1ρ imaging, particularly at low spin-lock frequency, is sensitive to B0 and B1 inhomogeneity. Various composite spin-lock pulses have been proposed to alleviate the influence of field inhomogeneity so as to reduce the banding-like spin-lock artifacts. T1ρ imaging could be specific absorption rate (SAR) intensive and time consuming. Efforts to address these issues and speed-up data acquisition are being explored to facilitate wider clinical applications. This paper reviews the T1ρ imaging's basic physic principles, as well as its application for cartilage imaging and intervertebral disc imaging. Compared to more established T2 relaxation time, it has been shown that T1ρ provides more sensitive detection of proteoglycan (PG) loss at early stages of cartilage degeneration. T1ρ has also been shown to provide more sensitive evaluation of annulus fibrosis (AF) degeneration of the discs.

  10. The geography of trust.

    PubMed

    Joni, Saj-nicole A

    2004-03-01

    Leaders who rely forever on the same internal advisers, entrusting them with issues of ever greater sensitivity and consequence, run the risk of being sold short and possibly betrayed. Alternatively, lone-wolf leaders who trust no one may make enormous, yet preventable, mistakes when trying to sort through difficult decisions. A sophisticated understanding of trust can protect leaders from both fates. During the past decade, author and consultant Saj-nicole Joni studied leadership in more than 150 European and North American companies. Her research reveals three fundamental types of trustpersonal trust, expertise trust, and structural trust. Executives may persevere in relationships that are based on personal trust, no matter how exalted their leadership roles become. But such relationships are unlikely to remain static. They also probably won't provide the kinds of deep, often specialized knowledge leaders need. In circumstances where advisers' competence matters as much as their character, expertise trust--reliance on an adviser's ability in a specific subject--enters the picture. In organizations, leaders develop expertise trust by working closely with people who consistently demonstrate their mastery of particular subjects or processes. Structural trust refers to how roles and ambitions influence advisers' perspectives and candor. It shifts constantly as people rise through organizations. High-level structural trust can provide leaders with pure insight and information--but advisers in positions of the highest structural trust generally reside outside organizations. These advisers provide leaders with insights that their organizations cannot. High-performing leaders' most enduring--and most valuable--relationships are characterized by enormous levels of all three kinds of trust.

  11. Trust Discovery in Online Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piorkowski, John

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to discover interpersonal trust in online communities. Two novel trust models are built to explain interpersonal trust in online communities drawing theories and models from multiple relevant areas, including organizational trust models, trust in virtual settings, speech act theory, identity theory, and common bond theory. In…

  12. Neural correlates of trust

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Frank; McCabe, Kevin; Moll, Jorge; Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Zahn, Roland; Strenziok, Maren; Heinecke, Armin; Grafman, Jordan

    2007-01-01

    Trust is a critical social process that helps us to cooperate with others and is present to some degree in all human interaction. However, the underlying brain mechanisms of conditional and unconditional trust in social reciprocal exchange are still obscure. Here, we used hyperfunctional magnetic resonance imaging, in which two strangers interacted online with one another in a sequential reciprocal trust game while their brains were simultaneously scanned. By designing a nonanonymous, alternating multiround game, trust became bidirectional, and we were able to quantify partnership building and maintenance. Using within- and between-brain analyses, an examination of functional brain activity supports the hypothesis that the preferential activation of different neuronal systems implements these two trust strategies. We show that the paracingulate cortex is critically involved in building a trust relationship by inferring another person's intentions to predict subsequent behavior. This more recently evolved brain region can be differently engaged to interact with more primitive neural systems in maintaining conditional and unconditional trust in a partnership. Conditional trust selectively activated the ventral tegmental area, a region linked to the evaluation of expected and realized reward, whereas unconditional trust selectively activated the septal area, a region linked to social attachment behavior. The interplay of these neural systems supports reciprocal exchange that operates beyond the immediate spheres of kinship, one of the distinguishing features of the human species. PMID:18056800

  13. In regulation we trust.

    PubMed

    Wiig, Siri; Tharaldsen, Jorunn Elise

    2012-01-01

    The role of trust has been argued to play an increasingly important role in modern, complex, and ambivalent risk societies. Trust within organizational research is anticipated to have a general strategic impact on aspects such as organizational performance, communication and knowledge exchange, and learning from accidents. Trust is also an important aspect related to regulation of risk. Diverse regulatory regimes, their contexts and risks influence regulators use of trust and distrust in regulatory practice. The aim of this paper is to discuss the relationship between risk regulation and trust across diverse risk regulation regimes. By drawing from studies of risk regulation, risk perception, and trust the purpose is to discuss how regulation and trust are linked and used in practice to control risk across system levels in socio-technical systems in high risk industries. This paper provides new knowledge on 1) how functional and dysfunctional trust and distrust are grounded in the empirical realities of high risk industries, 2) how different perspectives on trust and distrust act together and bring new knowledge on how society control risk.

  14. Distinct Human and Mouse Membrane Trafficking Systems for Sweet Taste Receptors T1r2 and T1r3

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Madoka; Goto, Masao; Kawai, Takayuki; Yamashita, Atsuko; Kusakabe, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    The sweet taste receptors T1r2 and T1r3 are included in the T1r taste receptor family that belongs to class C of the G protein-coupled receptors. Heterodimerization of T1r2 and T1r3 is required for the perception of sweet substances, but little is known about the mechanisms underlying this heterodimerization, including membrane trafficking. We developed tagged mouse T1r2 and T1r3, and human T1R2 and T1R3 and evaluated membrane trafficking in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. We found that human T1R3 surface expression was only observed when human T1R3 was coexpressed with human T1R2, whereas mouse T1r3 was expressed without mouse T1r2 expression. A domain-swapped chimera and truncated human T1R3 mutant showed that the Venus flytrap module and cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of human T1R3 contain a region related to the inhibition of human T1R3 membrane trafficking and coordinated regulation of human T1R3 membrane trafficking. We also found that the Venus flytrap module of both human T1R2 and T1R3 are needed for membrane trafficking, suggesting that the coexpression of human T1R2 and T1R3 is required for this event. These results suggest that the Venus flytrap module and CRD receive taste substances and play roles in membrane trafficking of human T1R2 and T1R3. These features are different from those of mouse receptors, indicating that human T1R2 and T1R3 are likely to have a novel membrane trafficking system. PMID:25029362

  15. Distinct human and mouse membrane trafficking systems for sweet taste receptors T1r2 and T1r3.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Madoka; Goto, Masao; Kawai, Takayuki; Yamashita, Atsuko; Kusakabe, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    The sweet taste receptors T1r2 and T1r3 are included in the T1r taste receptor family that belongs to class C of the G protein-coupled receptors. Heterodimerization of T1r2 and T1r3 is required for the perception of sweet substances, but little is known about the mechanisms underlying this heterodimerization, including membrane trafficking. We developed tagged mouse T1r2 and T1r3, and human T1R2 and T1R3 and evaluated membrane trafficking in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. We found that human T1R3 surface expression was only observed when human T1R3 was coexpressed with human T1R2, whereas mouse T1r3 was expressed without mouse T1r2 expression. A domain-swapped chimera and truncated human T1R3 mutant showed that the Venus flytrap module and cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of human T1R3 contain a region related to the inhibition of human T1R3 membrane trafficking and coordinated regulation of human T1R3 membrane trafficking. We also found that the Venus flytrap module of both human T1R2 and T1R3 are needed for membrane trafficking, suggesting that the coexpression of human T1R2 and T1R3 is required for this event. These results suggest that the Venus flytrap module and CRD receive taste substances and play roles in membrane trafficking of human T1R2 and T1R3. These features are different from those of mouse receptors, indicating that human T1R2 and T1R3 are likely to have a novel membrane trafficking system.

  16. The trust formula: Trust = fairness + leadership

    SciTech Connect

    Lovenheim, R.

    1995-11-01

    Many state and compact LLW siting processes have been characterized by slippage and failure. The paper focuses on two major {open_quotes}lessons learned{close_quotes} regarding public interaction and trust, and how these lessons are being applied to current siting efforts. The relationship of environmental idealism and trust will be explored further in this paper. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer concludes his 1994 book, Breaking the Vicious Circle by stating: {open_quotes}Finally, this book also reflects a belief that trust in institutions arises not simply as a result of openness in government, responses to local interest groups, or priorities emphasized in the press -- though these attitudes and actions play an important role -- but also from those institutions doing a difficult job well.{close_quotes}

  17. National Education Trust Fund

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapp, Milton J.

    1975-01-01

    A proposal from the governor of Pennsylvania for financing all levels of education through a National Education Trust Fund (NETF) that would operate as the present Federal Highway Trust Fund does on a revolving, self-liquidating basis with the cost of an individual's education repaid through a progressive education tax on income. (JT)

  18. Dimensionality of Organizational Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Samuel H.; Wiswell, Albert K.

    2007-01-01

    Trust facilitates individual and organizational learning, and is often misunderstood by organizations although they must continuously learn in order to attain organizational goals and survive. Leaders of organizations often view trust defensively and their reactions may impede organizational learning This paper builds on prior research concerning…

  19. Trust, trustworthiness and health.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Angus

    2015-01-01

    Trust is an essential component of good healthcare. If patients trust their physicians, then the relationship between them can be a richer and more meaningful one. The patient is more likely to feel confident and able to disclose symptoms, helping diagnosis and future care. If public health and community workers are trusted, not only is it likely that their work will be easier, in that their actions will be respected and accepted, but their advice will also be sought spontaneously. Trust, can, therefore, be thought of as something that is of benefit to all: healthcare workers, individuals and communities. Trust is, generally, something to be prized and we need to do anything we can to strengthen it.

  20. Facial resemblance enhances trust.

    PubMed

    DeBruine, Lisa M

    2002-07-07

    Organisms are expected to be sensitive to cues of genetic relatedness when making decisions about social behaviour. Relatedness can be assessed in several ways, one of which is phenotype matching: the assessment of similarity between others' traits and either one's own traits or those of known relatives. One candidate cue of relatedness in humans is facial resemblance. Here, I report the effects of an experimental manipulation of facial resemblance in a two-person sequential trust game. Subjects were shown faces of ostensible playing partners manipulated to resemble either themselves or an unknown person. Resemblance to the subject's own face raised the incidence of trusting a partner, but had no effect on the incidence of selfish betrayals of the partner's trust. Control subjects playing with identical pictures failed to show such an effect. In a second experiment, resemblance of the playing partner to a familiar (famous) person had no effect on either trusting or betrayals of trust.

  1. Whom should we trust? Trust yourselves!

    SciTech Connect

    Fentiman, A.W.; Mancl, K.M.; Hajek, B.K.

    1995-11-01

    Members of the public, and their elected officials, often feel at a disadvantage when faced with decisions on technical issues such as those related to low-level radioactive waste management. Many have little or no knowledge of the underlying scientific concepts and often lack a clear understanding of the problems or possible solutions. In the case of controversial, highly emotional topics, facts presented by opposing groups often appear contradictory. People ask, {open_quotes}Whom should we trust?{close_quotes} While advocates of various positions shout, {open_quotes}Trust us!{close_quotes} members of the Ohio State University (OSU) Statewide Low-Level Radioactive Waste Education Program are saying, {open_quotes}Trust yourselves!{close_quotes} The goal of the OSU program is to provide Ohio`s citizens and their elected officials with accurate, easy-to-understand, unbiased information they need to prepare themselves to participate in discussions and decisions related to low-level waste. The faculty members on the project team want to encourage people to learn enough about the topic to feel confident in making their own decisions. For such a program to be successful, however, people must first trust the educational materials they are given. Over the past three years, the OSU team has developed materials that have won wide acceptance. Several factors that appear to have contributed to the acceptance are outlined.

  2. Autonomy, Trust, and Respect

    PubMed Central

    Nys, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This article seeks to explore and analyze the relationship between autonomy and trust, and to show how these findings could be relevant to medical ethics. First, I will argue that the way in which so-called “relational autonomy theories” tie the notions of autonomy and trust together is not entirely satisfying Then, I will introduce the so-called Encapsulated Interest Account as developed by Russell Hardin. This will bring out the importance of the reasons for trust. What good reasons do we have for trusting someone? I will criticize Hardin’s business model as insufficiently robust, especially in the context of health care, and then turn to another source of trust, namely, love. It may seem that trust-through-love is much better suited for the vulnerability that is often involved in health care, but I will also show that it has its own deficiencies. Good health care should therefore pay attention to both models of trust, and I will offer some tentative remarks on how to do this. PMID:26668168

  3. Autonomy, Trust, and Respect.

    PubMed

    Nys, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    This article seeks to explore and analyze the relationship between autonomy and trust, and to show how these findings could be relevant to medical ethics. First, I will argue that the way in which so-called "relational autonomy theories" tie the notions of autonomy and trust together is not entirely satisfying Then, I will introduce the so-called Encapsulated Interest Account as developed by Russell Hardin. This will bring out the importance of the reasons for trust. What good reasons do we have for trusting someone? I will criticize Hardin's business model as insufficiently robust, especially in the context of health care, and then turn to another source of trust, namely, love. It may seem that trust-through-love is much better suited for the vulnerability that is often involved in health care, but I will also show that it has its own deficiencies. Good health care should therefore pay attention to both models of trust, and I will offer some tentative remarks on how to do this.

  4. Extending trust to immigrants: Generalized trust, cross-group friendship and anti-immigrant sentiments in 21 European societies.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Meta; Hooghe, Marc; de Vroome, Thomas; Van Laar, Colette

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is twofold. First, we expand on the literature by testing whether generalized trust is negatively related to anti-immigrant sentiments in Europe. Second, we examine to what extent the relation between generalized trust and anti-immigrant sentiments is dependent upon cross-group friendships. We apply multilevel linear regression modeling to representative survey data enriched with levels of ethnic diversity covering 21 European countries. Results show that both generalized trust and cross-group friendship are negatively related to anti-immigrant sentiments. However, there is a negligible positive relation between generalized trust and cross-group friendship (r = .10), and we can clearly observe that they operate independently from one another. Hence, trusting actors are not more likely to form more cross-group friendships, and cross-group friendship do not lead to the development of more generalized trust. Instead, the findings show that generalized trust leads immigrants too to be included in the radius of trusted others and, as a consequence, the benign effects of generalized trust apply to them as well. We conclude that the strength of generalized trust is a form of generalization, beyond the confines of individual variations in intergroup experiences.

  5. T1R2 and T1R3 subunits are individually unnecessary for normal affective licking responses to Polycose: implications for saccharide taste receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Treesukosol, Yada; Blonde, Ginger D; Spector, Alan C

    2009-04-01

    The T1R2 and T1R3 proteins are expressed in taste receptor cells and form a heterodimer binding with compounds described as sweet by humans. We examined whether Polycose taste might be mediated through this heterodimer by testing T1R2 knockout (KO) and T1R3 KO mice and their wild-type (WT) littermate controls in a series of brief-access taste tests (25-min sessions with 5-s trials). Sucrose, Na-saccharin, and Polycose were each tested for three consecutive sessions with order of presentation varied among subgroups in a Latin-Square manner. Both KO groups displayed blunted licking responses and initiated significantly fewer trials of sucrose and Na-saccharin across a range of concentrations. KO mice tested after Polycose exposure demonstrated some degree of concentration-dependent licking of sucrose, likely attributable to learning related to prior postingestive experience. These results are consistent with prior findings in the literature, implicating the T1R2+3 heterodimer as the principal taste receptor for sweet-tasting ligands, and also provide support for the potential of postingestive experience to influence responding in the KO mice. In contrast, T1R2 KO and T1R3 KO mice displayed concentration-dependent licking responses to Polycose that tracked those of their WT controls and in some cases licked midrange concentrations more; the number of Polycose trials initiated overall did not differ between KO and WT mice. Thus, the T1R2 and T1R3 proteins are individually unnecessary for normal concentration-dependent licking of Polycose to be expressed in a brief-access test. Whether at least one of these T1R protein subunits is necessary for normal Polycose responsiveness remains untested. Alternatively, there may be a novel taste receptor(s) that mediates polysaccharide taste.

  6. T1R2 and T1R3 subunits are individually unnecessary for normal affective licking responses to polycose: implications for saccharide taste receptors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Treesukosol, Yada; Blonde, Ginger D.; Spector, Alan C.

    2009-01-01

    The T1R2 and T1R3 proteins are expressed in taste receptor cells and form a heterodimer binding with compounds described as sweet by humans. We examined whether Polycose taste might be mediated through this heterodimer by testing T1R2 knockout (KO) and T1R3 KO mice and their wild-type (WT) littermate controls in a series of brief-access taste tests (25-min sessions with 5-s trials). Sucrose, Na-saccharin, and Polycose were each tested for three consecutive sessions with order of presentation varied among subgroups in a Latin-Square manner. Both KO groups displayed blunted licking responses and initiated significantly fewer trials of sucrose and Na-saccharin across a range of concentrations. KO mice tested after Polycose exposure demonstrated some degree of concentration-dependent licking of sucrose, likely attributable to learning related to prior postingestive experience. These results are consistent with prior findings in the literature, implicating the T1R2+3 heterodimer as the principal taste receptor for sweet-tasting ligands, and also provide support for the potential of postingestive experience to influence responding in the KO mice. In contrast, T1R2 KO and T1R3 KO mice displayed concentration-dependent licking responses to Polycose that tracked those of their WT controls and in some cases licked midrange concentrations more; the number of Polycose trials initiated overall did not differ between KO and WT mice. Thus, the T1R2 and T1R3 proteins are individually unnecessary for normal concentration-dependent licking of Polycose to be expressed in a brief-access test. Whether at least one of these T1R protein subunits is necessary for normal Polycose responsiveness remains untested. Alternatively, there may be a novel taste receptor(s) that mediates polysaccharide taste. PMID:19158407

  7. Saturation-inversion-recovery: A method for T1 measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongzhi; Zhao, Ming; Ackerman, Jerome L.; Song, Yiqiao

    2017-01-01

    Spin-lattice relaxation (T1) has always been measured by inversion-recovery (IR), saturation-recovery (SR), or related methods. These existing methods share a common behavior in that the function describing T1 sensitivity is the exponential, e.g., exp(- τ /T1), where τ is the recovery time. In this paper, we describe a saturation-inversion-recovery (SIR) sequence for T1 measurement with considerably sharper T1-dependence than those of the IR and SR sequences, and demonstrate it experimentally. The SIR method could be useful in improving the contrast between regions of differing T1 in T1-weighted MRI.

  8. MOLLI and AIR T1 mapping pulse sequences yield different myocardial T1 and ECV measurements.

    PubMed

    Hong, KyungPyo; Kim, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Both post-contrast myocardial T1 and extracellular volume (ECV) have been reported to be associated with diffuse interstitial fibrosis. Recently, the cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) field is recognizing that post-contrast myocardial T1 is sensitive to several confounders and migrating towards ECV as a measure of collagen volume fraction. Several recent studies using widely available Modified Look-Locker Inversion-recovery (MOLLI) have reported ECV cutoff values to distinguish between normal and diseased myocardium. It is unclear if these cutoff values are translatable to different T1 mapping pulse sequences such as arrhythmia-insensitive-rapid (AIR) cardiac T1 mapping, which was recently developed to rapidly image patients with cardiac rhythm disorders. We sought to evaluate, in well-controlled canine and pig experiments, the relative accuracy and precision, as well as intra- and inter-observer variability in data analysis, of ECV measured with AIR as compared with MOLLI. In 16 dogs, as expected, the mean T1 was significantly different (p < 0.001) between MOLLI (891 ± 373 ms) and AIR (1071 ± 503 ms), but, surprisingly, the mean ECV between MOLLI (21.8 ± 2.1%) and AIR (19.6 ± 2.4%) was also significantly different (p < 0.001). Both intra- and inter-observer agreements in T1 calculations were higher for MOLLI than AIR, but intra- and inter-observer agreements in ECV calculations were similar between MOLLI and AIR. In six pigs, the coefficient of repeatability (CR), as defined by the Bland-Altman analysis, in T1 calculation was considerably lower for MOLLI (32.5 ms) than AIR (82.3 ms), and the CR in ECV calculation was also lower for MOLLI (1.8%) than AIR (4.5%). In conclusion, this study shows that MOLLI and AIR yield significantly different T1 and ECV values in large animals and that MOLLI yields higher precision than AIR. Findings from this study suggest that CMR researchers must consider the specific pulse sequence when translating published ECV cutoff

  9. MOLLI and AIR T1 Mapping Pulse Sequences Yield Different Myocardial T1 and ECV Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Hong, KyungPyo; Kim, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Both post-contrast myocardial T1 and extracellular volume (ECV) have been reported to be associated with diffuse interstitial fibrosis. Recently, the cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) field is recognizing that post-contrast myocardial T1 is sensitive to several confounders and migrating towards ECV as a measure of collagen volume fraction. Several recent studies using widely available Modified Look-Locker Inversion-recovery (MOLLI) have reported ECV cutoff values to distinguish between normal and diseased myocardium. It is unclear if these cutoff values are translatable to different T1 mapping pulse sequences such as arrhythmia-insensitive-rapid (AIR) cardiac T1 mapping, which was recently developed to rapidly image patients with cardiac rhythm disorders. We sought to evaluate, in well-controlled canine and pig experiments, the relative accuracy and precision, as well as intra- and inter-observer variability in data analysis, of ECV measured with AIR as compared with MOLLI. In 16 dogs, as expected, mean T1 was significantly different (p < 0.001) between MOLLI (891±373 ms) and AIR (1071±503 ms), but, surprisingly, mean ECV between MOLLI (21.8±2.1%) and AIR (19.6±2.4%) was also significantly different (p < 0.001). Both intra- and inter-observer agreements in T1 calculations were higher for MOLLI than AIR, but intra- and inter-observer agreements in ECV calculations were similar between MOLLI and AIR. In 6 pigs, coefficient of repeatability (CR), as defined by Bland-Altman analysis, of T1 was considerably lower for MOLLI (32.5 ms) than AIR (82.3 ms), and CR of ECV was also lower for MOLLI (1.8%) than AIR (4.5%). In conclusion, this study shows that MOLLI and AIR yield significantly different T1 and ECV values in large animals and that MOLLI yields higher precision than AIR. Findings from this study suggest that CMR researchers must consider the specific pulse sequence when translating published ECV cutoff values into their own studies. PMID:25323070

  10. Building trust-business essentials

    Treesearch

    Sandy MacIver

    2008-01-01

    (Please note: This paper only contains the abstract.) Trust is particularly vital in the leadership of organizations. Trust is built by working through "joy, fear, and vulnerability," especially as it relates to trust in others and in teams. Key is learning to trust the right people in the right way in the right circumstances. In addition...

  11. Trusting Crowdsourced Geospatial Semantics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodhue, P.; McNair, H.; Reitsma, F.

    2015-08-01

    The degree of trust one can place in information is one of the foremost limitations of crowdsourced geospatial information. As with the development of web technologies, the increased prevalence of semantics associated with geospatial information has increased accessibility and functionality. Semantics also provides an opportunity to extend indicators of trust for crowdsourced geospatial information that have largely focused on spatio-temporal and social aspects of that information. Comparing a feature's intrinsic and extrinsic properties to associated ontologies provides a means of semantically assessing the trustworthiness of crowdsourced geospatial information. The application of this approach to unconstrained semantic submissions then allows for a detailed assessment of the trust of these features whilst maintaining the descriptive thoroughness this mode of information submission affords. The resulting trust rating then becomes an attribute of the feature, providing not only an indication as to the trustworthiness of a specific feature but is able to be aggregated across multiple features to illustrate the overall trustworthiness of a dataset.

  12. Using Trusted Resources

    MedlinePlus

    ... any risk involved in sharing your information online. Social Media Social media sites (such as Facebook, Twitter) are good ways ... when you're seeking medical information, only follow social media from reputable sources. Many trusted organizations have social ...

  13. Trust and Fertility Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Billari, Francesco C.; Pessin, Léa

    2016-01-01

    We argue that the divergence in fertility trends in advanced societies is influenced by the interaction of long-standing differences in generalized trust with the increase in women’s educational attainment. Our argument builds on the idea that trust enhances individuals’ and couples’ willingness to outsource childcare to outside their extended family. This becomes critically important as women’s increased education enhances the demand for combining work and family life. We test our hypothesis using data from the World Values Survey and European Values Study on 36 industrialized countries between the years 1981 and 2009. Multilevel statistical analyses reveal that the interaction between national-level generalized trust and cohort-level women’s education is positively associated with completed fertility. As education among women expands, high levels of generalized trust moderate fertility decline. PMID:28003707

  14. Some correlates of trust.

    PubMed

    Frost, T; Stimpson, D V; Maughan, M R

    1978-05-01

    Trust has been variously defined by behavioral scientists and not very thoroughly investigated. In this study trust was defined as an expectancy held by an individual that the behavior of another person or a group would be altruistic and personally beneficial. An attempt was made, using this conceptual definition, to identify some personality and behavioral correlates of trust. Seven interpersonal relations groups with approximately 10 male and female undergraduates per group were studied with use of the Janis and Field self-esteem inventory, Schutz's FIRO-B scale, and the Rotter internal-external scale. It was discovered that a trusted person is one who is highly influential, has an internal locus of control, a low need to control others, high self-esteem, and is open to being influenced by others.

  15. Computationally modeling interpersonal trust.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Joo; Knox, W Bradley; Wormwood, Jolie B; Breazeal, Cynthia; Desteno, David

    2013-01-01

    We present a computational model capable of predicting-above human accuracy-the degree of trust a person has toward their novel partner by observing the trust-related nonverbal cues expressed in their social interaction. We summarize our prior work, in which we identify nonverbal cues that signal untrustworthy behavior and also demonstrate the human mind's readiness to interpret those cues to assess the trustworthiness of a social robot. We demonstrate that domain knowledge gained from our prior work using human-subjects experiments, when incorporated into the feature engineering process, permits a computational model to outperform both human predictions and a baseline model built in naiveté of this domain knowledge. We then present the construction of hidden Markov models to investigate temporal relationships among the trust-related nonverbal cues. By interpreting the resulting learned structure, we observe that models built to emulate different levels of trust exhibit different sequences of nonverbal cues. From this observation, we derived sequence-based temporal features that further improve the accuracy of our computational model. Our multi-step research process presented in this paper combines the strength of experimental manipulation and machine learning to not only design a computational trust model but also to further our understanding of the dynamics of interpersonal trust.

  16. Computationally modeling interpersonal trust

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Joo; Knox, W. Bradley; Wormwood, Jolie B.; Breazeal, Cynthia; DeSteno, David

    2013-01-01

    We present a computational model capable of predicting—above human accuracy—the degree of trust a person has toward their novel partner by observing the trust-related nonverbal cues expressed in their social interaction. We summarize our prior work, in which we identify nonverbal cues that signal untrustworthy behavior and also demonstrate the human mind's readiness to interpret those cues to assess the trustworthiness of a social robot. We demonstrate that domain knowledge gained from our prior work using human-subjects experiments, when incorporated into the feature engineering process, permits a computational model to outperform both human predictions and a baseline model built in naiveté of this domain knowledge. We then present the construction of hidden Markov models to investigate temporal relationships among the trust-related nonverbal cues. By interpreting the resulting learned structure, we observe that models built to emulate different levels of trust exhibit different sequences of nonverbal cues. From this observation, we derived sequence-based temporal features that further improve the accuracy of our computational model. Our multi-step research process presented in this paper combines the strength of experimental manipulation and machine learning to not only design a computational trust model but also to further our understanding of the dynamics of interpersonal trust. PMID:24363649

  17. Trusted Computing Technologies, Intel Trusted Execution Technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Guise, Max Joseph; Wendt, Jeremy Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We describe the current state-of-the-art in Trusted Computing Technologies - focusing mainly on Intel's Trusted Execution Technology (TXT). This document is based on existing documentation and tests of two existing TXT-based systems: Intel's Trusted Boot and Invisible Things Lab's Qubes OS. We describe what features are lacking in current implementations, describe what a mature system could provide, and present a list of developments to watch. Critical systems perform operation-critical computations on high importance data. In such systems, the inputs, computation steps, and outputs may be highly sensitive. Sensitive components must be protected from both unauthorized release, and unauthorized alteration: Unauthorized users should not access the sensitive input and sensitive output data, nor be able to alter them; the computation contains intermediate data with the same requirements, and executes algorithms that the unauthorized should not be able to know or alter. Due to various system requirements, such critical systems are frequently built from commercial hardware, employ commercial software, and require network access. These hardware, software, and network system components increase the risk that sensitive input data, computation, and output data may be compromised.

  18. Trust in healthcare settings: Scale development, methods, and preliminary determinants

    PubMed Central

    LoCurto, Jamie; Berg, Gina M

    2016-01-01

    The literature contains research regarding how trust is formed in healthcare settings but rarely discusses trust formation in an emergent care population. A literature review was conducted to determine which of the trust determinants are important for this process as well as how to develop a scale to measure trust. A search generated a total of 155 articles, 65 of which met eligibility criteria. Determinants that were important included the following: honesty, confidentiality, dependability, communication, competency, fiduciary responsibility, fidelity, and agency. The process of developing a scale includes the following: a literature review, qualitative analysis, piloting, and survey validation. Results suggest that physician behaviors are important in influencing trust in patients and should be included in scales measuring trust. Next steps consist of interviewing emergent care patients to commence the process of developing a scale. PMID:27635245

  19. Improving the radiologist-CAD interaction: designing for appropriate trust.

    PubMed

    Jorritsma, W; Cnossen, F; van Ooijen, P M A

    2015-02-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) has great potential to improve radiologists' diagnostic performance. However, the reported performance of the radiologist-CAD team is lower than what might be expected based on the performance of the radiologist and the CAD system in isolation. This indicates that the interaction between radiologists and the CAD system is not optimal. An important factor in the interaction between humans and automated aids (such as CAD) is trust. Suboptimal performance of the human-automation team is often caused by an inappropriate level of trust in the automation. In this review, we examine the role of trust in the radiologist-CAD interaction and suggest ways to improve the output of the CAD system so that it allows radiologists to calibrate their trust in the CAD system more effectively. Observer studies of the CAD systems show that radiologists often have an inappropriate level of trust in the CAD system. They sometimes under-trust CAD, thereby reducing its potential benefits, and sometimes over-trust it, leading to diagnostic errors they would not have made without CAD. Based on the literature on trust in human-automation interaction and the results of CAD observer studies, we have identified four ways to improve the output of CAD so that it allows radiologists to form a more appropriate level of trust in CAD. Designing CAD systems for appropriate trust is important and can improve the performance of the radiologist-CAD team. Future CAD research and development should acknowledge the importance of the radiologist-CAD interaction, and specifically the role of trust therein, in order to create the perfect artificial partner for the radiologist. This review focuses on the role of trust in the radiologist-CAD interaction. The aim of the review is to encourage CAD developers to design for appropriate trust and thereby improve the performance of the radiologist-CAD team. Copyright © 2014 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd

  20. Orosensory detection of sucrose, maltose, and glucose is severely impaired in mice lacking T1R2 or T1R3, but Polycose sensitivity remains relatively normal.

    PubMed

    Treesukosol, Yada; Spector, Alan C

    2012-07-15

    Evidence in the literature supports the hypothesis that the T1R2+3 heterodimer binds to compounds that humans describe as sweet. Here, we assessed the necessity of the T1R2 and T1R3 subunits in the maintenance of normal taste sensitivity to carbohydrate stimuli. We trained and tested water-restricted T1R2 knockout (KO), T1R3 KO and their wild-type (WT) same-sex littermate controls in a two-response operant procedure to sample a fluid and differentially respond on the basis of whether the stimulus was water or a tastant. Correct responses were reinforced with water and incorrect responses were punished with a time-out. Testing was conducted with a modified descending method of limits procedure across daily 25-min sessions. Both KO groups displayed severely impaired performance and markedly decreased sensitivity when required to discriminate water from sucrose, glucose, or maltose. In contrast, when Polycose was tested, KO mice had normal EC(50) values for their psychometric functions, with some slight, but significant, impairment in performance. Sensitivity to NaCl did not differ between these mice and their WT controls. Our findings support the view that the T1R2+3 heterodimer is the principal receptor that mediates taste detection of natural sweeteners, but not of all carbohydrate stimuli. The combined presence of T1R2 and T1R3 appears unnecessary for the maintenance of relatively normal sensitivity to Polycose, at least in this task. Some detectability of sugars at high concentrations might be mediated by the putative polysaccharide taste receptor, the remaining T1R subunit forming either a homodimer or heteromer with another protein(s), or nontaste orosensory cues.

  1. Orosensory detection of sucrose, maltose, and glucose is severely impaired in mice lacking T1R2 or T1R3, but Polycose sensitivity remains relatively normal

    PubMed Central

    Treesukosol, Yada

    2012-01-01

    Evidence in the literature supports the hypothesis that the T1R2+3 heterodimer binds to compounds that humans describe as sweet. Here, we assessed the necessity of the T1R2 and T1R3 subunits in the maintenance of normal taste sensitivity to carbohydrate stimuli. We trained and tested water-restricted T1R2 knockout (KO), T1R3 KO and their wild-type (WT) same-sex littermate controls in a two-response operant procedure to sample a fluid and differentially respond on the basis of whether the stimulus was water or a tastant. Correct responses were reinforced with water and incorrect responses were punished with a time-out. Testing was conducted with a modified descending method of limits procedure across daily 25-min sessions. Both KO groups displayed severely impaired performance and markedly decreased sensitivity when required to discriminate water from sucrose, glucose, or maltose. In contrast, when Polycose was tested, KO mice had normal EC50 values for their psychometric functions, with some slight, but significant, impairment in performance. Sensitivity to NaCl did not differ between these mice and their WT controls. Our findings support the view that the T1R2+3 heterodimer is the principal receptor that mediates taste detection of natural sweeteners, but not of all carbohydrate stimuli. The combined presence of T1R2 and T1R3 appears unnecessary for the maintenance of relatively normal sensitivity to Polycose, at least in this task. Some detectability of sugars at high concentrations might be mediated by the putative polysaccharide taste receptor, the remaining T1R subunit forming either a homodimer or heteromer with another protein(s), or nontaste orosensory cues. PMID:22621968

  2. T1rho MRI and CSF biomarkers in diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Haris, Mohammad; Yadav, Santosh K; Rizwan, Arshi; Singh, Anup; Cai, Kejia; Kaura, Deepak; Wang, Ena; Davatzikos, Christos; Trojanowski, John Q; Melhem, Elias R; Marincola, Francesco M; Borthakur, Arijitt

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, we have evaluated the performance of magnetic resonance (MR) T1rho (T1ρ) imaging and CSF biomarkers (T-tau, P-tau and Aβ-42) in characterization of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and control subjects. With informed consent, AD (n = 27), MCI (n = 17) and control (n = 17) subjects underwent a standardized clinical assessment and brain MRI on a 1.5-T clinical-scanner. T1ρ images were obtained at four different spin-lock pulse duration (10, 20, 30 and 40 ms). T1ρ maps were generated by pixel-wise fitting of signal intensity as a function of the spin-lock pulse duration. T1ρ values from gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) of medial temporal lobe were calculated. The binary logistic regression using T1ρ and CSF biomarkers as variables was performed to classify each group. T1ρ was able to predict 77.3% controls and 40.0% MCI while CSF biomarkers predicted 81.8% controls and 46.7% MCI. T1ρ and CSF biomarkers in combination predicted 86.4% controls and 66.7% MCI. When comparing controls with AD, T1ρ predicted 68.2% controls and 73.9% AD, while CSF biomarkers predicted 77.3% controls and 78.3% for AD. Combination of T1ρ and CSF biomarkers improved the prediction rate to 81.8% for controls and 82.6% for AD. Similarly, on comparing MCI with AD, T1ρ predicted 35.3% MCI and 81.9% AD, whereas CSF biomarkers predicted 53.3% MCI and 83.0% AD. Collectively CSF biomarkers and T1ρ were able to predict 59.3% MCI and 84.6% AD. On receiver operating characteristic analysis T1ρ showed higher sensitivity while CSF biomarkers showed greater specificity in delineating MCI and AD from controls. No significant correlation between T1ρ and CSF biomarkers, between T1ρ and age, and between CSF biomarkers and age was observed. The combined use of T1ρ and CSF biomarkers have promise to improve the early and specific diagnosis of AD. Furthermore, disease progression form MCI to AD might be easily tracked using

  3. Trusting Beliefs: A Functional Measurement Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidotto, Giulio; Massidda, Davide; Noventa, Stefano; Vicentini, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Trust is a fundamental aspect of everyday life. Several authors define trust as the wish to depend on another entity and split the concept of trust into several interconnected components such as trusting beliefs (e.g., benevolence, competence, honesty, and predictability), trusting intentions, trusting behaviors, disposition to trust, and…

  4. 26 CFR 1.401(a)-50 - Puerto Rican trusts; election to be treated as a domestic trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus... general. Section 401(a) requires, among other things, that a trust forming part of a pension, profit-sharing, or stock bonus plan must be created or organized in the United States to be a qualified trust...

  5. Trust Transitivity in Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Richters, Oliver; Peixoto, Tiago P.

    2011-01-01

    Non-centralized recommendation-based decision making is a central feature of several social and technological processes, such as market dynamics, peer-to-peer file-sharing and the web of trust of digital certification. We investigate the properties of trust propagation on networks, based on a simple metric of trust transitivity. We investigate analytically the percolation properties of trust transitivity in random networks with arbitrary in/out-degree distributions, and compare with numerical realizations. We find that the existence of a non-zero fraction of absolute trust (i.e. entirely confident trust) is a requirement for the viability of global trust propagation in large systems: The average pair-wise trust is marked by a discontinuous transition at a specific fraction of absolute trust, below which it vanishes. Furthermore, we perform an extensive analysis of the Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) web of trust, in view of the concepts introduced. We compare different scenarios of trust distribution: community- and authority-centered. We find that these scenarios lead to sharply different patterns of trust propagation, due to the segregation of authority hubs and densely-connected communities. While the authority-centered scenario is more efficient, and leads to higher average trust values, it favours weakly-connected “fringe” nodes, which are directly trusted by authorities. The community-centered scheme, on the other hand, favours nodes with intermediate in/out-degrees, in detriment of the authorities and its “fringe” peers. PMID:21483683

  6. Trusted Translation Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atif, Yacine; Serhani, Mohamed Adel; Campbell, Piers; Mathew, Sujith Samuel

    Administering multilingual Web sites and applications reliably, involves interconnected and multipart tasks, where trust in the involved parties and content translation sources is paramount. Published Web sites may reflect content from databases, content management systems and other repositories to manage related Web content. But a Web site mirrored wholly or selectively onto a target language version requires streamlined trusted processes. Traditionally, files are translated and transferred via FTP, e-mail, or other communication means. Similarly, translation instructions are communicated between involved parties through verbal instruction, e-mail, and instruction files lead to a variety of inconsistencies and lack of trust in the translation process. This paper proposes a Web service approach to streamline the translation processes and an integration of trust properties in the proposed translation Web services. Web Services have been instrumental in handling problems inherent to systems integration, allowing web-based systems to converse and communicate data automatically. The OASIS Translation Web Services Technical Committee has released a standard way for Web Services to serve the translation and localization business. This article proposes a framework to centralize translation services at a reputable source providing a workflow and a mechanism to quantify service trust. An implementation of the framework is also described in the context of a localization case study.

  7. Predictors of associated autoimmune diseases (AAID) in families with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Results from the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC)

    PubMed Central

    Wägner, Ana M; Santana, Ángelo; Hernández, Marta; Wiebe, Julia C; Nóvoa, Javier; Mauricio, Didac

    2011-01-01

    Background Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a clinically heterogeneous disease. The presence of associated autoimmune diseases (AAID) may represent a distinct form of autoimmune diabetes, with involvement of specific mechanisms. The aim of this study was to find predictors of AAID in the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) data set. Methods 3263 families with at least 2 siblings with T1D were included. Clinical information was obtained using questionnaires, anti-GAD and anti-IA-2 were measured and HLA-genotyping was performed. Siblings with T1D with and without AAID were compared and a multivariate regression analysis was performed to find predictors of AAID. T1D-associated HLA haplotypes were defined as the 4 most susceptible and protective, respectively. Results AAID was present in 14.4% of the T1D affected siblings. Age of diabetes onset, current age and time since diagnosis were higher, and there was a female predominance and more family history of AAID in the group with AAID, as well as more frequent anti-GAD and less frequent anti-IA2 positivity. Risk and protective HLA haplotype distributions were similar, though DRB1*0301-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 was more frequent in the group with AAID. In the multivariate analysis, female gender, age of onset, family history of AAID, time since diagnosis and anti-GAD positivity were significantly associated with AAID. Conclusions In patients with T1D, the presence of AAID is associated with female predominance, more frequent family history of AAID, later onset of T1D and more anti-GAD antibodies, despite longer duration of the disease. The predominance of certain HLA haplotypes suggests that specific mechanisms of disease may be involved. PMID:21744463

  8. Trust and obfuscation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sensoy, Murat; Bisdikian, Chatschik; Oren, Nir; Burnett, Chris; Norman, Timothy J.; Srivastava, Mani B.; Kaplan, Lance M.

    2012-06-01

    In modern coalition operations, decision makers must be capable of obtaining and fusing data from diverse sources. The reliability of these sources can vary, and, in order to protect their interests, the data they provide can be obfuscated. The trustworthiness of fused data depends on both the reliability of these sources and their obfuscation strategy. Information consumers must determine how to evaluate trust in the presence of obfuscation, while information providers must determine the appropriate level of obfuscation in order to ensure both that they remain trusted, and do not reveal any private information. In this paper, through a coalition scenario, we discuss and formalise trust and obfuscation in these contexts and the complex relationships between them.

  9. Trust in Anonymity Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassone, Vladimiro; Hamadou, Sardaouna; Yang, Mu

    Anonymity is a security property of paramount importance, as we move steadily towards a wired, online community. Its import touches upon subjects as different as eGovernance, eBusiness and eLeisure, as well as personal freedom of speech in authoritarian societies. Trust metrics are used in anonymity networks to support and enhance reliability in the absence of verifiable identities, and a variety of security attacks currently focus on degrading a user's trustworthiness in the eyes of the other users. In this paper, we analyse the privacy guarantees of the Crowds anonymity protocol, with and without onion forwarding, for standard and adaptive attacks against the trust level of honest users.

  10. TRUST, A Proposed Plan for Trusted Integrated Circuits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-20

    1714 Dean.collins@darpa.mil Summary: This paper outlines a DARPA’s Plan for Producing Trusted, Low Volume, Affordable, Fast Cycle Time, RADHard ...technical nature. The DARPA TRUST effort is not synonymous with RADHard , affordable, low volume and fast cycle time, but many customers for trusted

  11. A simple method for NMR t1 noise suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Huaping; Harwood, John S.; Yang, Danzhou; Post, Carol Beth

    2017-03-01

    t1 noise appears as random or semi-random spurious streaks along the indirect t1 (F1) dimension of a 2D or nD NMR spectrum. It can significantly downgrade spectral quality, especially for spectra with strong diagonal signals such as NOESY, because useful and weak cross-peaks can be easily buried under t1 noise. One of the significant contributing factors to t1 noise is unwanted and semi-random F2 signal modulation during t1 acquisition. As such, t1 noise from different acquisitions is unlikely to correlate with each other strongly. In the case of NOESY, co-addition of multiple spectra significantly reduces t1 noise compared with conventional acquisition with the same amount of total acquisition time and resolution.

  12. Variation in local trust Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) policies: a review of 48 English healthcare trusts.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Karoline; Field, Richard A; Perkins, Gavin D

    2015-01-13

    To explore Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) policies from English acute, community and ambulance service Trusts for evidence of consistency and variation in implementation of national guidelines between healthcare organisations. Acute, community or ambulance National Health Service (NHS) Trusts in England. 48 NHS Trusts. Freedom of information requests for adult DNACPR policies were sent to a random sample of Trusts. DNACPR policies were assessed on aspects identified from national guidelines including documentation, ethical and legal issues, decision-makers and involvement of others in DNACPR decisions as well as practical considerations such as validity, review and portability of decisions. Policies from 26 acute, 12 community and 10 ambulance service Trusts were reviewed. There was variation in terminology used (85% described documents as policies, 6% procedures and 8% guidelines). Only one quarter of Trusts used the recommended Resuscitation Council (UK) record form (or a modification of the form). There was variation in the terminology used which included DNAR, DNACPR, Not for CPR and AND (allow natural death). Accountability for DNACPR decisions rested with consultants at all acute Trusts and the most senior clinician at community Trusts. Most Trusts (74%) recommended discussion of decisions with a multidisciplinary team. Compliance with guidance requiring clinical staff to assess the patient for capacity and when to consult a lasting power of attorney or independent mental capacity advocate occurred less commonly. There was wide variation in the duration of time over which a DNACPR decision was considered valid as well as in the Trusts' approach to reviewing DNACPR decisions. The level of portability of DNACPR decisions between healthcare organisations was one of the greatest sources of variation. There is significant variation in the translation of the national DNACPR guidelines into English healthcare Trusts' DNACPR policies. Published

  13. Trust It or Trash It?

    MedlinePlus

    Trust It or Trash It? About | Contact | Español Tab 1 Tab 2 What is Trust It or Trash It? This is a tool to help you think ... here for the developer version. Home Who Said It? Who wrote it? Think about TRUSTING IT if: ...

  14. Trust Development in Outdoor Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shooter, Wynn; Paisley, Karen; Sibthorp, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Establishing trusting relationships between leaders and participants is one way that outdoor leaders can create an emotionally safe and productive milieu that supports the attainment of desirable outcomes. Multidisciplinary literature offers considerable insight into leader trust development and the outcomes that are linked to trust in a leader.…

  15. Why Teachers Trust School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handford, Victoria; Leithwood, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Trust among teachers in schools is significantly related to student achievement and trust in school leaders is an important influence on such trust. The purpose of this study is to identify leadership practices which teachers interpret as signs of trustworthiness on the part of their principals. Design/methodology/approach: Evidence for…

  16. Why Teachers Trust School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handford, Victoria; Leithwood, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Trust among teachers in schools is significantly related to student achievement and trust in school leaders is an important influence on such trust. The purpose of this study is to identify leadership practices which teachers interpret as signs of trustworthiness on the part of their principals. Design/methodology/approach: Evidence for…

  17. Human Trust in Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    Robert and Bertrand David (Eds.):  Proceedings of the 18th International Conference of the Association Francophone d’Interaction Homme ‐ Machine ...provides us with an avenue of approach; that is, to understand how trust is mediated by technology interfaces and connections. Salamacha and

  18. Four Essential Practices for Building Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, Julie Peterson; Harris, Sandra; Edmonson, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    The presence of trust can enhance an organization's efforts to fulfill its mission, and the lack of trust can constrict those efforts. The authors offer four essential guidelines to help school leaders communicate in a way that builds trust. Build trust by understanding trust. Trusted leaders demonstrate care, character, and competence in their…

  19. Four Essential Practices for Building Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, Julie Peterson; Harris, Sandra; Edmonson, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    The presence of trust can enhance an organization's efforts to fulfill its mission, and the lack of trust can constrict those efforts. The authors offer four essential guidelines to help school leaders communicate in a way that builds trust. Build trust by understanding trust. Trusted leaders demonstrate care, character, and competence in their…

  20. L-Theanine elicits umami taste via the T1R1 + T1R3 umami taste receptor.

    PubMed

    Narukawa, Masataka; Toda, Yasuka; Nakagita, Tomoya; Hayashi, Yukako; Misaka, Takumi

    2014-06-01

    L-Theanine is a unique amino acid present in green tea. It elicits umami taste and has a considerable effect on tea taste and quality. We investigated L-theanine activity on the T1R1 + T1R3 umami taste receptor. L-Theanine activated T1R1 + T1R3-expressing cells and showed a synergistic response with inosine 5'-monophosphate. The site-directed mutagenesis analysis revealed that L-theanine binds to L-amino acid binding site in the Venus flytrap domain of T1R1. This study shows that L-theanine elicits an umami taste via T1R1 + T1R3.

  1. Are All Trust Violations the Same? A Dynamical Examination of Culture, Trust Dissolution, and Trust Recovery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    interdependence grows, understanding how culture affects trust and how we can manage trust in intercultural relations is imperative. However, relatively few...construal and trust violation magnitude on the dynamic of trust changes. Implications for intercultural negotiation will be discussed. Keywords...in their degree; a delay in returning a book is clearly different from failure to keep a marriage vow. Small transgressions, therefore, should not

  2. A Unified Maximum Likelihood Framework for Simultaneous Motion and $T_{1}$ Estimation in Quantitative MR $T_{1}$ Mapping.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Llorden, Gabriel; den Dekker, Arnold J; Van Steenkiste, Gwendolyn; Jeurissen, Ben; Vanhevel, Floris; Van Audekerke, Johan; Verhoye, Marleen; Sijbers, Jan

    2017-02-01

    In quantitative MR T1 mapping, the spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of tissues is estimated from a series of T1 -weighted images. As the T1 estimation is a voxel-wise estimation procedure, correct spatial alignment of the T1 -weighted images is crucial. Conventionally, the T1 -weighted images are first registered based on a general-purpose registration metric, after which the T1 map is estimated. However, as demonstrated in this paper, such a two-step approach leads to a bias in the final T1 map. In our work, instead of considering motion correction as a preprocessing step, we recover the motion-free T1 map using a unified estimation approach. In particular, we propose a unified framework where the motion parameters and the T1 map are simultaneously estimated with a Maximum Likelihood (ML) estimator. With our framework, the relaxation model, the motion model as well as the data statistics are jointly incorporated to provide substantially more accurate motion and T1 parameter estimates. Experiments with realistic Monte Carlo simulations show that the proposed unified ML framework outperforms the conventional two-step approach as well as state-of-the-art model-based approaches, in terms of both motion and T1 map accuracy and mean-square error. Furthermore, the proposed method was additionally validated in a controlled experiment with real T1 -weighted data and with two in vivo human brain T1 -weighted data sets, showing its applicability in real-life scenarios.

  3. Homo economicus belief inhibits trust.

    PubMed

    Xin, Ziqiang; Liu, Guofang

    2013-01-01

    As a foundational concept in economics, the homo economicus assumption regards humans as rational and self-interested actors. In contrast, trust requires individuals to believe partners' benevolence and unselfishness. Thus, the homo economicus belief may inhibit trust. The present three experiments demonstrated that the direct exposure to homo economicus belief can weaken trust. And economic situations like profit calculation can also activate individuals' homo economicus belief and inhibit their trust. It seems that people's increasing homo economicus belief may serve as one cause of the worldwide decline of trust.

  4. Homo Economicus Belief Inhibits Trust

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Ziqiang; Liu, Guofang

    2013-01-01

    As a foundational concept in economics, the homo economicus assumption regards humans as rational and self-interested actors. In contrast, trust requires individuals to believe partners’ benevolence and unselfishness. Thus, the homo economicus belief may inhibit trust. The present three experiments demonstrated that the direct exposure to homo economicus belief can weaken trust. And economic situations like profit calculation can also activate individuals’ homo economicus belief and inhibit their trust. It seems that people’s increasing homo economicus belief may serve as one cause of the worldwide decline of trust. PMID:24146907

  5. Implementing a Portable Trusted Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zic, John; Nepal, Surya

    The development of trusted systems, as envisaged by the Trusted Computing Group, assumed that the computing environments are uniform in terms of their operational environment, including hardware configuration, execution of a standard set of applications, operating system and facilities and procedures that allow the issue, revocation and maintenance of critical encryption keys and authorization certificates. These assumptions may be applicable to a single managed enterprise infrastructure. However, in situations where the users are mobile, or the computing environment is heterogeneous and the Internet provides the connectivity, the management of trust between enterprises becomes overwhelmingly difficult, if not impossible. As a result, deployment and uptake of trusted secure systems based on Trusted Platform Module have not been as successful as first envisaged. In this paper, we report on our experiences in designing and implementing a prototype personal trusted device called the Trust Extension Device, or TED, that provides users with a portable trustworthy environment for conducting transactions on any Internet connected computer.

  6. Trust on the health Internet.

    PubMed

    Kemper, D W

    2001-01-01

    Trust and ethics have become common themes when discussing health on the Internet. By all accounts, trust is the key issue in the consumer's mind when considering whether or not to use a medical Web site. The user has two basic questions: Can I trust this information to be unbiased? Can I trust this site to protect my privacy? Without that trust, people are highly reluctant to become serious users of a health Web site, presenting a problem for managed care organizations whose public image already suffers from a lack of public trust. Health plans can re-earn that trust by providing evidence-based Information Therapy programs that prescribe to their members the information they need to make decisions and avoid medical mistakes.

  7. Human genetic polymorphisms in T1R1 and T1R3 taste receptor subunits affect their function.

    PubMed

    Raliou, Mariam; Grauso, Marta; Hoffmann, Brice; Schlegel-Le-Poupon, Claire; Nespoulous, Claude; Débat, Hélène; Belloir, Christine; Wiencis, Anna; Sigoillot, Maud; Bano, Singh Preet; Trotier, Didier; Pernollet, Jean-Claude; Montmayeur, Jean-Pierre; Faurion, Annick; Briand, Loïc

    2011-07-01

    Umami is the typical taste induced by monosodium glutamate (MSG), which is thought to be detected by the heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptor, T1R1 and T1R3. Previously, we showed that MSG detection thresholds differ substantially between individuals and we further showed that nontaster and hypotaster subjects are associated with nonsynonymous single polymorphisms occurring in the T1R1 and T1R3 genes. Here, we show using functional expression that both amino acid substitutions (A110V and R507Q) in the N-terminal ligand-binding domain of T1R1 and the 2 other ones (F749S and R757C), located in the transmembrane domain of T1R3, severely impair in vitro T1R1/T1R3 response to MSG. A molecular model of the ligand-binding region of T1R1/T1R3 provides a mechanistic explanation supporting functional expression data. The data presented here support causal relations between the genotype and previous in vivo psychophysical studies in human evaluating sensitivity to MSG. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  8. PANDA-T1ρ: Integrating principal component analysis and dictionary learning for fast T1ρ mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanjie; Zhang, Qinwei; Liu, Qiegen; Wang, Yi-Xiang J; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong; Liang, Dong; Yuan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Long scanning time greatly hinders the widespread application of spin-lattice relaxation in rotating frame (T1ρ) in clinics. In this study, a novel method is proposed to reconstruct the T1ρ-weighted images from undersampled k-space data and hence accelerate the acquisition of T1ρ imaging. The proposed approach (PANDA-T1ρ) combined the benefit of PCA and dictionary learning when reconstructing image from undersampled data. Specifically, the PCA transform was first used to sparsify the image series along the parameter direction and then the sparsified images were reconstructed by means of dictionary learning and finally solved the images. A variation of PANDA-T1ρ was also developed for the heavy noise case. Numerical simulation and in vivo experiments were carried out with the accelerating factor from 2 to 4 to verify the performance of PANDA-T1ρ. The reconstructed T1ρ maps using the PANDA-T1ρ method were found to be comparable to the reference at all verified acceleration factors. Moreover, the variation exhibited better performance than the original version when the k-space data were contaminated by heavy noise. PANDA-T1ρ can significantly reduce the scanning time of T1ρ by integrating PCA and dictionary learning and provides better parameter estimation than the state-of-art methods for a fixed acceleration factor. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Trust in the medical profession and patient attachment style.

    PubMed

    Klest, Bridget; Philippon, Olivia

    2016-10-01

    Attachment style is a person's approach to interpersonal relationships, which develops from early experiences with primary caregivers and can remain stable into adulthood. Depending on a person's attachment style, the amount of trust one has in others can vary when forming relationships, and trust is important in formation of the patient-physician relationship. The purpose of this study was to see if there is an association between attachment style and trust in physicians in general. Participants were recruited from an emergency department (ED) and an online university participant pool, and completed short questionnaires assessing attachment style and trust in the medical profession. Results revealed that individuals with a fearful attachment style reported significantly lower levels of trust in the medical profession than those with a secure attachment style. ED participants also reported higher levels of trust in the medical profession in comparison to student participants. This study provides a better understanding of trust in the medical profession, and insight into future care for patients who have low trust.

  10. Comparative clinicopathological characteristics of colon and rectal T1 carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ichimasa, Katsuro; Kudo, Shin-Ei; Miyachi, Hideyuki; Kouyama, Yuta; Hayashi, Takemasa; Wakamura, Kunihiko; Hisayuki, Tomokazu; Kudo, Toyoki; Misawa, Masashi; Mori, Yuichi; Matsudaira, Shingo; Hidaka, Eiji; Hamatani, Shigeharu; Ishida, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    Lymph node metastasis significantly influences the management of patients with colorectal carcinoma. It has been observed that the biology of colorectal carcinoma differs by location. The aim of the current study was to retrospectively compare the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with colon and rectal T1 carcinomas, particularly their rates of lymph node metastasis. Of the 19,864 patients who underwent endoscopic or surgical resection of colorectal neoplasms at Showa University Northern Yokohama Hospital, 557 had T1 surgically resected carcinomas, including 457 patients with colon T1 carcinomas and 100 patients with rectal T1 carcinomas. Analysed clinicopathological features included patient age, gender, tumor size, morphology, tumor budding, invasion depth, vascular invasion, histological grade, lymphatic invasion and lymph node metastasis. Rectal T1 carcinomas were significantly larger than colon T1 carcinomas (mean ± standard deviation: 23.7±13.1 mm vs. 19.9±11.0 mm, P<0.01) and were accompanied by significantly higher rates of vascular invasion (48.0% vs. 30.2%, P<0.01). Significant differences were not observed among any other clinicopathological factors. In conclusion, tumor location itself was not a risk factor for lymph node metastasis in colorectal T1 carcinomas, even though on average, rectal T1 carcinomas were larger and accompanied by a significantly higher rate of vascular invasion than colon T1 carcinomas. PMID:28356962

  11. The Condition for Generous Trust

    PubMed Central

    Shinya, Obayashi; Yusuke, Inagaki; Hiroki, Takikawa

    2016-01-01

    Trust has been considered the “cement” of a society and is much studied in sociology and other social sciences. Most studies, however, have neglected one important aspect of trust: it involves an act of forgiving and showing tolerance toward another’s failure. In this study, we refer to this concept as “generous trust” and examine the conditions under which generous trust becomes a more viable option when compared to other types of trust. We investigate two settings. First, we introduce two types of uncertainties: uncertainty as to whether trustees have the intention to cooperate, and uncertainty as to whether trustees have enough competence to accomplish the entrusted tasks. Second, we examine the manner in which trust functions in a broader social context, one that involves matching and commitment processes. Since we expect generosity or forgiveness to work differently in the matching and commitment processes, we must differentiate trust strategies into generous trust in the matching process and that in the commitment process. Our analytical strategy is two-fold. First, we analyze the “modified” trust game that incorporates the two types of uncertainties without the matching process. This simplified setting enables us to derive mathematical results using game theory, thereby giving basic insight into the trust mechanism. Second, we investigate socially embedded trust relationships in contexts involving the matching and commitment processes, using agent-based simulation. Results show that uncertainty about partner’s intention and competence makes generous trust a viable option. In contrast, too much uncertainty undermines the possibility of generous trust. Furthermore, a strategy that is too generous cannot stand alone. Generosity should be accompanied with moderate punishment. As for socially embedded trust relationships, generosity functions differently in the matching process versus the commitment process. Indeed, these two types of generous

  12. Two distinct determinants of ligand specificity in T1R1/T1R3 (the umami taste receptor).

    PubMed

    Toda, Yasuka; Nakagita, Tomoya; Hayakawa, Takashi; Okada, Shinji; Narukawa, Masataka; Imai, Hiroo; Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Misaka, Takumi

    2013-12-27

    Umami taste perception in mammals is mediated by a heteromeric complex of two G-protein-coupled receptors, T1R1 and T1R3. T1R1/T1R3 exhibits species-dependent differences in ligand specificity; human T1R1/T1R3 specifically responds to L-Glu, whereas mouse T1R1/T1R3 responds more strongly to other L-amino acids than to L-Glu. The mechanism underlying this species difference remains unknown. In this study we analyzed chimeric human-mouse receptors and point mutants of T1R1/T1R3 and identified 12 key residues that modulate amino acid recognition in the human- and mouse-type responses in the extracellular Venus flytrap domain of T1R1. Molecular modeling revealed that the residues critical for human-type acidic amino acid recognition were located at the orthosteric ligand binding site. In contrast, all of the key residues for the mouse-type broad response were located at regions outside of both the orthosteric ligand binding site and the allosteric binding site for inosine-5'-monophosphate (IMP), a known natural umami taste enhancer. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the newly identified key residues for the mouse-type responses modulated receptor activity in a manner distinct from that of the allosteric modulation via IMP. Analyses of multiple point mutants suggested that the combination of two distinct determinants, amino acid selectivity at the orthosteric site and receptor activity modulation at the non-orthosteric sites, may mediate the ligand specificity of T1R1/T1R3. This hypothesis was supported by the results of studies using nonhuman primate T1R1 receptors. A complex molecular mechanism involving changes in the properties of both the orthosteric and non-orthosteric sites of T1R1 underlies the determination of ligand specificity in mammalian T1R1/T1R3.

  13. The Dimensionality of Trust

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-30

    possible responses that were worded either positively or negatively for mistrust. Using confirmatory factor analysis , the authors extracted one general...validity of their measure. Lastly, Omodei and McLennan (2000) explored the dimensionality of their measure by using confirmatory factor analysis to...confirmatory factor analysis showed these items to fit the two construct solution. That is, the model depicting trust and suspicion as two distinct

  14. Technology, Intelligence, and TRUST

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    single email or message. The collections team does not have to make an either/or decision about whom to send its intercept or interrogation report...International security studies at the George C. Marshall Center for european security studies in Garmisch- Partenkirchen, Germany. he is a career ... career as an intelligence officer, I was told on numerous occasions, “Trust us, when the balloon goes up, you’ll get all the intelligence you need

  15. Trusted Computer Systems - Glossary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    Trusted Computer Systems- Glossary George A. Huff March 1981 CONTRACTSPONSOR OUSDRE, 0 3T I CONTRACT NO, FT1968-8J1-C-001C PROJECT NO 8120 DEPT. 075...its use for the simultaneous processing of multiple levels of classified or sensitive information. This glossary was prepared for distribution at the...Third Computer Security Initiative Seminar held at the Nati-onal Bureau of Standards, November 18-20, 1980. Emphasis is on terms which relate to the

  16. Microarray gene expression profiling and analysis of bladder cancer supports the sub-classification of T1 tumours into T1a and T1b stages.

    PubMed

    Descotes, Françoise; Dessen, Philippe; Bringuier, Pierre Paul; Decaussin, Myriam; Martin, Pierre Marie; Adams, Marjorie; Villers, Arnauld; Lechevallier, Eric; Rebillard, Xavier; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Devonec, Marian; Paparel, Philippe; Perrin, Paul; Lazar, Vladimir; Ruffion, Alain

    2014-02-01

    To try and identify a molecular signature for pathological staging and/or grading. through microarray analysis. We performed a prospective multicentre study between September 2007 and May 2008 that included 108 bladder tumours (45 pTa, 35 pT1 and 28>pT1). Microarray analysis was performed using Agilent Technologies Human Whole Genome 4 × 44K oligonucleotide microarrays (Agilent, Santa Clara, CA, USA). A 'dual colour' method was used vs a reference pool of tumours. From the lists of genes provided by the Biometric Research Branch class comparison analyses, we validated the microarray results of 38 selected differentially expressed genes using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR in another bladder tumour cohort (n = 95). The cluster 'superficial vs invasive stage' correctly classified 92.9% of invasive stages and 66.3% of superficial stages. Among the superficial tumours, the cluster analysis showed that pT1b tumours were closer to invasive stages than pT1a tumours. We also found molecular differences between low and high grade superficial tumours, but these differences were less well defined than the difference observed for staging. We confirmed that the histopathological classification into subgroups pTa, pT1a and pT1b can be translated into a molecular signature with a continuous progression of deregulation (overexpression or repression of these genes) from superficial (pTa) to more invasive (pT1a then b) stages. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  17. Trust in managed care organizations.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Allen

    2000-09-01

    Two basic criticisms of managed care are that it erodes patient trust in physicians and subjects physicians to incentives and pressures that compromise the physician's fiduciary obligation to the patient. In this article, I first distinguish between status trust and merit trust, and then argue (1) that the value of status trust in physicians is probably over-rated and certainly underdocumented; (2) that erosion of status trust may not be detrimental if accompanied by an increase in well-founded merit trust; and (3) that under conditions of managed care the physician's commitment to traditional medical ethics cannot serve as an adequate basis for merit trust. Next, drawing on an analogy between managed care organzations and politics, I argue that (4) the most appropriate basis for merit trust in managed care is a conception of organizational legitimacy that includes procedural justice, empowerment of constructive criticism within the organization, and organizational accommodation of the noninstrumental commitment to patient well-being that is distinctive of medical professionalism. I then explore the conditions necessary for robust competition for merit trust among managed care organizations and indicate the kinds of public policies needed to facilitate such competition. Finally, I show how the account of organization-based merit trust can accommodate the special fiduciary obligation of medical professionals, without indulging in the delusion that it is the physician's fiduciary obligation always to provide all care that is expected to be of any net benefit to the patient.

  18. From small sweeteners to sweet proteins: anatomy of the binding sites of the human T1R2_T1R3 receptor.

    PubMed

    Morini, Gabriella; Bassoli, Angela; Temussi, Piero A

    2005-08-25

    The sweet taste receptor, a heterodimeric G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) protein, formed by the T1R2 and T1R3 subunits, recognizes several sweet compounds including carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and synthetic sweeteners. Its similarity with the metabotropic glutamate mGluR1 receptor allowed us to build homology models. All possible dimers formed by combinations of the human T1R2 and T1R3 subunits, modeled on the A (closed) or B (open) chains of the extracellular ligand binding domain of the mGluR1 template, yield four ligand binding sites for low-molecular-weight sweeteners. These sites were probed by docking a set of molecules representative of all classes of sweet compounds and calculating the free energy of ligand binding. These sites are not easily accessible to sweet proteins, but docking experiments in silico showed that sweet proteins can bind to a secondary site without entering the deep cleft. Our models account for many experimental observations on the tastes of sweeteners, including sweetness synergy, and can help to design new sweeteners.

  19. A qualitative study of patient (dis)trust in public and private hospitals: the importance of choice and pragmatic acceptance for trust considerations in South Australia.

    PubMed

    Ward, Paul R; Rokkas, Philippa; Cenko, Clinton; Pulvirenti, Mariastella; Dean, Nicola; Carney, Simon; Brown, Patrick; Calnan, Michael; Meyer, Samantha

    2015-07-30

    This paper explores the nature and reasoning for (dis)trust in Australian public and private hospitals. Patient trust increases uptake of, engagement with and optimal outcomes from healthcare services and is therefore central to health practice, policy and planning. A qualitative study in South Australia, including 36 in-depth interviews (18 from public and 18 from private hospitals). 'Private patients' made active choices about both their hospital and doctor, playing the role of the 'consumer', where trust and choice went hand in hand. The reputation of the doctor and hospital were key drivers of trust, under the assumption that a better reputation equates with higher quality care. However, making a choice to trust a doctor led to personal responsibility and the additional requirement for self-trust. 'Public patients' described having no choice in their hospital or doctor. They recognised 'problems' in the public healthcare system but accepted and even excused these as 'part of the system'. In order to justify their trust, they argued that doctors in public hospitals tried to do their best in difficult circumstances, thereby deserving of trust. This 'resigned trust' may stem from a lack of alternatives for free health care and thus a dependence on the system. These two contrasting models of trust within the same locality point to the way different configurations of healthcare systems, hospital experiences, insurance coverage and related forms of 'choice' combine to shape different formats of trust, as patients act to manage their vulnerability within these contexts.

  20. Myocardial T1 Mapping: Techniques and Potential Applications

    PubMed Central

    Burt, Jeremy R.; Zimmerman, Stefan L.; Kamel, Ihab R.; Halushka, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial fibrosis is a common endpoint in a variety of cardiac diseases and a major independent predictor of adverse cardiac outcomes. Short of histopathologic analysis, which is limited by sampling bias, most diagnostic modalities are limited in their depiction of myocardial fibrosis. Cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has the advantage of providing detailed soft-tissue characterization, and a variety of novel quantification methods have further improved its usefulness. Contrast material–enhanced cardiac MR imaging depends on differences in signal intensity between regions of scarring and adjacent normal myocardium. Diffuse myocardial fibrosis lacks these differences in signal intensity. Measurement of myocardial T1 times (T1 mapping) with gadolinium-enhanced inversion recovery–prepared sequences may depict diffuse myocardial fibrosis and has good correlation with ex vivo fibrosis content. T1 mapping calculates myocardial T1 relaxation times with image-based signal intensities and may be performed with standard cardiac MR imagers and radiologic workstations. Myocardium with diffuse fibrosis has greater retention of contrast material, resulting in T1 times that are shorter than those in normal myocardium. Early studies have suggested that diffuse myocardial fibrosis may be distinguished from normal myocardium with T1 mapping. Large multicenter studies are needed to define the role of T1 mapping in developing prognoses and therapeutic assessments. However, given its strengths as a noninvasive method for direct quantification of myocardial fibrosis, T1 mapping may eventually play an important role in the management of cardiac disease. © RSNA, 2014 PMID:24617686

  1. Measurement of intervertebral disc pressure with T 1ρ MRI.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenyang; Witschey, Walter; Elliott, Mark A; Borthakur, Arijitt; Reddy, Ravinder

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate T(1ρ) MRI's capability for measuring intervertebral disc osmotic pressure. Self-coregistered sodium and T(1ρ) -weighted MR images were acquired on ex vivo bovine intervertebral discs (N = 12) on a 3 T clinical MRI scanner. The sodium MR images were used to calculate effective nucleus pulposus fixed-charge-density (mean = 138.2 ± 27.6 mM) and subsequently osmotic pressure (mean = 0.53 ± 0.18 atm), whereas the T(1ρ) -weighted images were used to compute T(1ρ) relaxation maps. A significant linear correlation (R = 0.56, P < 0.01) between nucleus pulposus fixed-charge-density and T(1ρ) relaxation time constant was observed. More importantly, a significant power correlation (R = 0.72, P < 0.01) between nucleus pulposus osmotic pressure as predicted by sodium MRI and T(1ρ) relaxation time constant was also observed. The current clinical method for assessing disc pressure is discography, which is an invasive procedure that has been shown to have negative effects on disc biomechanical and biochemical properties. In contrast, T(1ρ) MRI is noninvasive and can be easily implemented in a clinical setting due to its superior signal-to-noise ratio compared with sodium MRI. Therefore, T(1ρ) MRI may serve as a noninvasive clinical tool for the longitudinal evaluation of disc osmotic pressure. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. 26 CFR 26.2654-1 - Certain trusts treated as separate trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF... States Gift (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax Return (Form 709) the transfer and the extent to which... transfers $100,000 to an irrevocable generation-skipping trust; B simultaneously transfers $50,000 to...

  3. 26 CFR 26.2654-1 - Certain trusts treated as separate trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF... States Gift (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax Return (Form 709) the transfer and the extent to which... transfers $100,000 to an irrevocable generation-skipping trust; B simultaneously transfers $50,000 to...

  4. 26 CFR 26.2654-1 - Certain trusts treated as separate trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF... States Gift (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax Return (Form 709) the transfer and the extent to which... transfers $100,000 to an irrevocable generation-skipping trust; B simultaneously transfers $50,000 to...

  5. TrustRank: a Cold-Start tolerant recommender system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Haitao; Gong, Zhiguo; Zhang, Nan; Zhao, Wei; Guo, Jingzhi

    2015-02-01

    The explosive growth of the World Wide Web leads to the fast advancing development of e-commerce techniques. Recommender systems, which use personalised information filtering techniques to generate a set of items suitable to a given user, have received considerable attention. User- and item-based algorithms are two popular techniques for the design of recommender systems. These two algorithms are known to have Cold-Start problems, i.e., they are unable to effectively handle Cold-Start users who have an extremely limited number of purchase records. In this paper, we develop TrustRank, a novel recommender system which handles the Cold-Start problem by leveraging the user-trust networks which are commonly available for e-commerce applications. A user-trust network is formed by friendships or trust relationships that users specify among them. While it is straightforward to conjecture that a user-trust network is helpful for improving the accuracy of recommendations, a key challenge for using user-trust network to facilitate Cold-Start users is that these users also tend to have a very limited number of trust relationships. To address this challenge, we propose a pre-processing propagation of the Cold-Start users' trust network. In particular, by applying the personalised PageRank algorithm, we expand the friends of a given user to include others with similar purchase records to his/her original friends. To make this propagation algorithm scalable to a large amount of users, as required by real-world recommender systems, we devise an iterative computation algorithm of the original personalised TrustRank which can incrementally compute trust vectors for Cold-Start users. We conduct extensive experiments to demonstrate the consistently improvement provided by our proposed algorithm over the existing recommender algorithms on the accuracy of recommendations for Cold-Start users.

  6. Voltage-dependent gating rearrangements in the intracellular T1-T1 interface of a K+ channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangyu; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2006-04-01

    The intracellular tetramerization domain (T1) of most eukaryotic voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv channels) exists as a "hanging gondola" below the transmembrane regions that directly control activation gating via the electromechanical coupling between the S4 voltage sensor and the main S6 gate. However, much less is known about the putative contribution of the T1 domain to Kv channel gating. This possibility is mechanistically intriguing because the T1-S1 linker connects the T1 domain to the voltage-sensing domain. Previously, we demonstrated that thiol-specific reagents inhibit Kv4.1 channels by reacting in a state-dependent manner with native Zn(2+) site thiolate groups in the T1-T1 interface; therefore, we concluded that the T1-T1 interface is functionally active and not protected by Zn(2+) (Wang, G., M. Shahidullah, C.A. Rocha, C. Strang, P.J. Pfaffinger, and M. Covarrubias. 2005. J. Gen. Physiol. 126:55-69). Here, we co-expressed Kv4.1 channels and auxiliary subunits (KChIP-1 and DPPX-S) to investigate the state and voltage dependence of the accessibility of MTSET to the three interfacial cysteines in the T1 domain. The results showed that the average MTSET modification rate constant (k(MTSET)) is dramatically enhanced in the activated state relative to the resting and inactivated states (approximately 260- and approximately 47-fold, respectively). Crucially, under three separate conditions that produce distinct activation profiles, k(MTSET) is steeply voltage dependent in a manner that is precisely correlated with the peak conductance-voltage relations. These observations strongly suggest that Kv4 channel gating is tightly coupled to voltage-dependent accessibility changes of native T1 cysteines in the intersubunit Zn(2+) site. Furthermore, cross-linking of cysteine pairs across the T1-T1 interface induced substantial inhibition of the channel, which supports the functionally dynamic role of T1 in channel gating. Therefore, we conclude that the complex

  7. Optimal Distinctiveness Signals Membership Trust.

    PubMed

    Leonardelli, Geoffrey J; Loyd, Denise Lewin

    2016-07-01

    According to optimal distinctiveness theory, sufficiently small minority groups are associated with greater membership trust, even among members otherwise unknown, because the groups are seen as optimally distinctive. This article elaborates on the prediction's motivational and cognitive processes and tests whether sufficiently small minorities (defined by relative size; for example, 20%) are associated with greater membership trust relative to mere minorities (45%), and whether such trust is a function of optimal distinctiveness. Two experiments, examining observers' perceptions of minority and majority groups and using minimal groups and (in Experiment 2) a trust game, revealed greater membership trust in minorities than majorities. In Experiment 2, participants also preferred joining minorities over more powerful majorities. Both effects occurred only when minorities were 20% rather than 45%. In both studies, perceptions of optimal distinctiveness mediated effects. Discussion focuses on the value of relative size and optimal distinctiveness, and when membership trust manifests.

  8. Towards a politics of trust.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, T

    1998-05-01

    This paper draws upon sociological theory to demonstrate that the manufacture and deployment of trust is an integral part of the function of complex systems such as health care. The discussion begins by identifying the error within the nursing literature which arises from a rather technical conceptualization of trust. This tends to limit the dimensions to trust which is established, and fails to recognize that trust may be subject to competition and conflict. The paper continues by drawing upon the work of two theorists, Niklas Luhmann and Susan P. Shapiro, to demonstrate how trust functions within systems such as health care and the mechanisms through which it is controlled. The title of this paper, 'Towards a politics of trust', identifies that this is merely the first stage in the analysis. Further stages are necessary which analyse the ways in which power is exercised in the conflict for control within discrete elements of the system.

  9. Three-dimensional ultrashort echo time cones T1ρ (3D UTE-cones-T1ρ ) imaging.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ya-Jun; Carl, Michael; Shao, Hongda; Tadros, Anthony S; Chang, Eric Y; Du, Jiang

    2017-03-20

    We report a novel three-dimensional (3D) ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence employing Cones trajectory and T1ρ preparation (UTE-Cones-T1ρ ) for quantitative T1ρ assessment of short T2 tissues in the musculoskeletal system. A basic 3D UTE-Cones sequence was combined with a spin-locking preparation pulse for T1ρ contrast. A relatively short TR was used to decrease the scan time, which required T1 measurement and compensation using 3D UTE-Cones data acquisitions with variable TRs. Another strategy to reduce the total scan time was to acquire multiple Cones spokes (Nsp ) after each T1ρ preparation and fat saturation. Four spin-locking times (TSL = 0-20 ms) were acquired over 12 min, plus another 7 min for T1 measurement. The 3D UTE-Cones-T1ρ sequence was compared with a two-dimensional (2D) spiral-T1ρ sequence for the imaging of a spherical CuSO4 phantom and ex vivo meniscus and tendon specimens, as well as the knee and ankle joints of healthy volunteers, using a clinical 3-T scanner. The CuSO4 phantom showed a T1ρ value of 76.5 ± 1.6 ms with the 2D spiral-T1ρ sequence, as well as 85.7 ± 3.6 and 89.2 ± 1.4 ms for the 3D UTE-Cones-T1ρ sequences with Nsp of 1 and 5, respectively. The 3D UTE-Cones-T1ρ sequence provided shorter T1ρ values for the bovine meniscus sample relative to the 2D spiral-T1ρ sequence (10-12 ms versus 16 ms, respectively). The cadaveric human Achilles tendon sample could only be imaged with the 3D UTE-Cones-T1ρ sequence (T1ρ  = 4.0 ± 0.9 ms), with the 2D spiral-T1ρ sequence demonstrating near-zero signal intensity. Human studies yielded T1ρ values of 36.1 ± 2.9, 18.3 ± 3.9 and 3.1 ± 0.4 ms for articular cartilage, meniscus and the Achilles tendon, respectively. The 3D UTE-Cones-T1ρ sequence allows volumetric T1ρ measurement of short T2 tissues in vivo.

  10. Building and Understanding Trust Relationships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-17

    interdependence. To meet these challenges, senior military leaders must understand and build internal and external trust. The Ken Blanchard Company, one...Military Review: The Profession of Arms, September 30, 2011, 16. 2 The Ken Blanchard Company, “Building Trust,” 2010,pdf, http...www.kenblanchard.com/img/pub/ Blanchard -Building-Trust.pdf (accessed November 27, 2011). 3 Richard H. Kohn, “The Early Retirement of Gen. Ronald Fogleman, Chief of

  11. Trust-Effectiveness Patterns in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsyth, Patrick B.; Barnes, Laura L. B.; Adams, Curt M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the consequences of relational trust, especially parent measured trust, for desirable school outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: Using a US Midwestern state sample of 79 schools, parent and teacher trust data are used to derive a trust-effectiveness typology. Trust was conceptualized as one party's willingness to be…

  12. A Requisite for Employee Trust: Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Kerry Marshall

    1988-01-01

    Provides background on organizational trust as product of need satisfaction and presents framework for understanding organizational trust with regard to theoretical differentiation of personal trust and system trust. Defines three factors of organizational trust: openness/congruity, shared values, and autonomy/feedback. Discusses how supervisors…

  13. Capturing Young American Trust in National Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menard, Lauren A.

    2011-01-01

    A pattern of decreasing trusting proportions in each consecutive decade and increasing trusting proportions with age was revealed in data. Although trust levels were lower in younger adults and the 2000s, findings did not support hypotheses of more rapidly falling trust levels or a college degree procuring less trust in the 2000s. A hypothesis of…

  14. T1 mapping for diagnosis of mild chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Tirkes, Temel; Lin, Chen; Fogel, Evan L; Sherman, Stuart S; Wang, Qiushi; Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan

    2017-04-01

    To determine if the T1 relaxation time of the pancreas can detect parenchymal changes in mild chronic pancreatitis (CP). This Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant retrospective study analyzed 98 patients with suspected mild CP. Patients were grouped as normal (n = 53) or mild CP (n = 45) based on history, presenting symptomatology, and concordant findings on both the secretin-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (S-MRCP) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). T1 maps were obtained in all patients using the same 3D gradient echo technique on the same 3T scanner. T1 relaxation times, fat signal fraction (FSF), and anterior-posterior (AP) diameter were correlated with the clinical diagnosis of CP. There was a significant difference (P < 0.0001) in the T1 relaxation times between the control (mean = 797 msec, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 730, 865) and mild CP group (mean = 1099 msec, 95% CI: 1032, 1166). A T1 relaxation time threshold value of 900 msec was 80% sensitive (95% CI: 65, 90) and 69% specific (95% CI: 56, 82) for the diagnosis of mild CP (area under the curve [AUC]: 0.81). Multiple regression analysis showed that T1 relaxation time was the only statistically significant variable correlating with the diagnosis of CP (P < 0.0001). T1 relaxation times showed a weak positive correlation with the pancreatic FSF (ρ = 0.33, P = 0.01) in the control group, but not in the mild CP group. The T1 relaxation time of the pancreatic parenchyma was significantly increased in patients with mild CP. Therefore, T1 mapping might be used as a practical quantitative imaging technique for the evaluation of suspected mild CP. 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:1171-1176. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. 78 FR 24814 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8612

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... Undistributed Income of Real Estate Investment Trusts. DATES: Written comments should be received on or before... INFORMATION: Title: Return of Excise Tax on Undistributed Income of Real Estate Investment Trusts. OMB Number: 1545-1013. Form Number: Form 8612. Abstract: Form 8612 is used by real estate investment trusts to...

  16. 75 FR 33887 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8612

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... Undistributed Income of Real Estate Investment Trusts. DATES: Written comments should be received on or before... INFORMATION: Title: Return of Excise Tax on Undistributed Income of Real Estate Investment Trusts. OMB Number: 1545-1013. Form Number: Form 8612. Abstract: Form 8612 is used by real estate investment trusts to...

  17. Generalized Trust and Trust in Institutions in Confucian Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Soo Jiuan; Tambyah, Siok Kuan

    2011-01-01

    This study examines generalized trust and trust in institutions in Confucian Asia, covering six countries namely, China, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam, and one dependent region, Hong Kong. Using data from the 2006 AsiaBarometer Survey, our study affirms the reliability and validity of using a two-item scale to measure…

  18. Generalized Trust and Trust in Institutions in Confucian Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Soo Jiuan; Tambyah, Siok Kuan

    2011-01-01

    This study examines generalized trust and trust in institutions in Confucian Asia, covering six countries namely, China, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam, and one dependent region, Hong Kong. Using data from the 2006 AsiaBarometer Survey, our study affirms the reliability and validity of using a two-item scale to measure…

  19. Variation in local trust Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) policies: a review of 48 English healthcare trusts

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Karoline; Field, Richard A; Perkins, Gavin D

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) policies from English acute, community and ambulance service Trusts for evidence of consistency and variation in implementation of national guidelines between healthcare organisations. Setting Acute, community or ambulance National Health Service (NHS) Trusts in England. Participants 48 NHS Trusts. Interventions Freedom of information requests for adult DNACPR policies were sent to a random sample of Trusts. Outcomes DNACPR policies were assessed on aspects identified from national guidelines including documentation, ethical and legal issues, decision-makers and involvement of others in DNACPR decisions as well as practical considerations such as validity, review and portability of decisions. Results Policies from 26 acute, 12 community and 10 ambulance service Trusts were reviewed. There was variation in terminology used (85% described documents as policies, 6% procedures and 8% guidelines). Only one quarter of Trusts used the recommended Resuscitation Council (UK) record form (or a modification of the form). There was variation in the terminology used which included DNAR, DNACPR, Not for CPR and AND (allow natural death). Accountability for DNACPR decisions rested with consultants at all acute Trusts and the most senior clinician at community Trusts. Most Trusts (74%) recommended discussion of decisions with a multidisciplinary team. Compliance with guidance requiring clinical staff to assess the patient for capacity and when to consult a lasting power of attorney or independent mental capacity advocate occurred less commonly. There was wide variation in the duration of time over which a DNACPR decision was considered valid as well as in the Trusts’ approach to reviewing DNACPR decisions. The level of portability of DNACPR decisions between healthcare organisations was one of the greatest sources of variation. Conclusions There is significant variation in the translation of the national

  20. Achieving Optimal Privacy in Trust-Aware Social Recommender Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokoohaki, Nima; Kaleli, Cihan; Polat, Huseyin; Matskin, Mihhail

    Collaborative filtering (CF) recommenders are subject to numerous shortcomings such as centralized processing, vulnerability to shilling attacks, and most important of all privacy. To overcome these obstacles, researchers proposed for utilization of interpersonal trust between users, to alleviate many of these crucial shortcomings. Till now, attention has been mainly paid to strong points about trust-aware recommenders such as alleviating profile sparsity or calculation cost efficiency, while least attention has been paid on investigating the notion of privacy surrounding the disclosure of individual ratings and most importantly protection of trust computation across social networks forming the backbone of these systems. To contribute to addressing problem of privacy in trust-aware recommenders, within this paper, first we introduce a framework for enabling privacy-preserving trust-aware recommendation generation. While trust mechanism aims at elevating recommender's accuracy, to preserve privacy, accuracy of the system needs to be decreased. Since within this context, privacy and accuracy are conflicting goals we show that a Pareto set can be found as an optimal setting for both privacy-preserving and trust-enabling mechanisms. We show that this Pareto set, when used as the configuration for measuring the accuracy of base collaborative filtering engine, yields an optimized tradeoff between conflicting goals of privacy and accuracy. We prove this concept along with applicability of our framework by experimenting with accuracy and privacy factors, and we show through experiment how such optimal set can be inferred.

  1. Establishment of safety paradigms and trust in emerging adult relationships

    PubMed Central

    Mullinax, Margo; Sanders, Stephanie; Higgins, Jenny; Dennis, Barbara; Reece, Michael; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2016-01-01

    There is a critical need to understand the interplay between relationship trust and public health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to develop an understanding of emerging adult women’s processes of establishing trust in sexual relationships. Twenty-five women aged 18–24 years participated in semi-structured interviews. Throughout the interviews, women compared and contrasted experiences in which they felt comfortable engaging in sexual intercourse with a partner versus times in which they did not feel comfortable. Analysis was based on a critical qualitative research orientation. When asked to speak to instances when they felt comfortable having sex, most women spoke about relationship trust. Many participants conceptualised trust based on past experiences with bad relationships or sexual violence. Based on their previous experiences of feeling unsafe or undervalued, emotional and physical security became prioritised in relationship development. Trust was developed through friendship, communication over time, and through shared life experiences. This research is among the first to qualitatively investigate trust formation and other impersonal dynamics related to sexual health decision-making. Insights from this study should be translated into future action by public health practitioners to promote healthy sexual relationships and communication about sexual health topics as a form of trust building. PMID:26943023

  2. 12 CFR 7.2022 - Voting trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Practices § 7.2022 Voting trusts. The shareholders of a national bank may establish a voting trust under the applicable law of a state selected by the participants and designated in the trust agreement, provided the...

  3. 12 CFR 7.2022 - Voting trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Practices § 7.2022 Voting trusts. The shareholders of a national bank may establish a voting trust under the applicable law of a state selected by the participants and designated in the trust agreement, provided the...

  4. 12 CFR 7.2022 - Voting trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Practices § 7.2022 Voting trusts. The shareholders of a national bank may establish a voting trust under the applicable law of a state selected by the participants and designated in the trust agreement, provided the...

  5. Irreversible change in the T1 temperature dependence with thermal dose using the proton resonance frequency-T1 technique.

    PubMed

    Diakite, Mahamadou; Payne, Allison; Todd, Nick; Parker, Dennis L

    2013-04-01

    Denaturation of macromolecules within the tissues is believed to be the major factor contributing to the damage of tissues upon hyperthermia. As a result, the value of the spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of the tissue water, which is related to the translational and rotational rates of water, represents an intrinsic probe for investigating structural changes in tissues at high temperature. Therefore, the goal of this work is to investigate whether the simultaneous measurement of temperature and T1 using a hybrid proton resonance frequency (PRF)-T1 measurement technique can be used to detect irreversible changes in T1 that might be indicative of tissue damage. A new hybrid PRF-T1 sequence was implemented based on the variable flip angle driven-equilibrium single-pulse observation (DESPOT)1 method from a standard three dimensional segmented echo-planar imaging sequence by alternating two flip angles from measurement to measurement. The structural changes of the heated tissue volumes were analyzed based on the derived T1 values and the corresponding PRF temperatures. Using the hybrid PRF-T1 technique, we demonstrate that the change of spin lattice relaxation time T1 is reversible with temperature for low thermal dose (thermal dose ≤ 240 cumulative equivalent minutes [CEM] 43°C) and irreversible with temperature after significant accumulation of thermal dose in ex vivo chicken breast tissue. These results suggest that the hybrid PRF-T1 method may be a potentially powerful tool to investigate the extent and mechanism of heat damage of biological tissues.

  6. Free-breathing post-contrast three-dimensional T1 mapping: Volumetric assessment of myocardial T1 values.

    PubMed

    Weingärtner, Sebastian; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Roujol, Sébastien; Basha, Tamer; Stehning, Christian; Kissinger, Kraig V; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Manning, Warren J; Nezafat, Reza

    2015-01-01

    To develop a three-dimensional (3D) free-breathing myocardial T1 mapping sequence for assessment of left ventricle diffuse fibrosis after contrast administration. In the proposed sequence, multiple 3D inversion recovery images are acquired in an interleaved manner. A mixed prospective/retrospective navigator scheme is used to obtain the 3D Cartesian k-space data with fully sampled center and randomly undersampled outer k-space. The resulting undersampled 3D k-space data are then reconstructed using compressed sensing. Subsequently, T1 maps are generated by voxel-wise curve fitting of the individual interleaved images. In a phantom study, the accuracy of the 3D sequence was evaluated against two-dimensional (2D) modified Look-Locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) and spin-echo sequences. In vivo T1 times of the proposed method were compared with 2D multislice MOLLI T1 mapping. Subsequently, the feasibility of high-resolution 3D T1 mapping with spatial resolution of 1.7 × 1.7 × 4 mm(3) was demonstrated. The proposed method shows good agreement with 2D MOLLI and the spin-echo reference in phantom. No significant difference was found in the in vivo T1 times estimated using the proposed sequence and the 2D MOLLI technique (myocardium, 330 ± 66 ms versus 319 ± 93 ms; blood pools, 211 ± 68 ms versus 210 ± 98 ms). However, improved homogeneity, as measured using standard deviation of the T1 signal, was observed in the 3D T1 maps. The proposed sequence enables high-resolution 3D T1 mapping after contrast injection during free-breathing with volumetric left ventricle coverage. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Purification of ribonuclease T1 by diethylaminoethylcellulose chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Robert; Dixon, Henry B. F.; Law, Gillian R.; Yui, Chie

    1971-01-01

    A procedure is described for isolating the enzyme ribonuclease T1 from Takadiastase, an extract of the mould Aspergillus oryzae. It involves an initial concentration of the enzyme by adsorption on DEAE-cellulose followed by gradient elution. Later the enzyme is chromatographed on the same adsorbent with an eluent of constant composition. Yields of 350–380mg of ribonuclease T1 from 500g of Takadiastase were obtained. ImagesFig. 4. PMID:5114970

  8. Functional t1ρ imaging in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Magnotta, Vincent A; Johnson, Casey P; Follmer, Robin; Wemmie, John A

    2014-06-01

    Abnormal brain pH has been suggested to play a critical role in panic disorder. To investigate this possibility, we employed a pH-sensitive magnetic resonance (MR) imaging strategy (T1 relaxation in the rotating frame [T1ρ]) and conventional blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) imaging. Thirteen panic disorder participants and 13 matched control subjects were enrolled in the study. T1ρ and BOLD were used to study the functional response to a visual flashing checkerboard and their relationship to panic symptoms assessed using the Beck Anxiety Inventory. In response to visual stimulation, T1ρ imaging revealed a significantly greater increase in the visual cortex of panic disorder participants. T1ρ also detected a stimulus-evoked decrease in the anterior cingulate cortex. Blood oxygen level-dependent imaging detected no functional differences between groups. The correspondence between panic symptoms and functional T1ρ response identified significant relationships within the left inferior parietal lobe, left middle temporal gyrus, and right insula. No relationships were found between panic symptoms and the BOLD signal. The data suggest greater activity-evoked T1ρ changes in the visual cortex and anterior cingulate cortex of panic disorder participants. These observations are consistent with a pH dysregulation in panic disorder. In addition, our data suggest that T1ρ imaging may provide information about panic disorder that is distinct from conventional BOLD imaging and may reflect abnormalities in pH and/or brain metabolism. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry Published by Society of Biological Psychiatry All rights reserved.

  9. The Calcium Channel CaT1 in Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    cell proliferation and survival pathways in prostate and other cancer cells. Finding 4 : LNCaP cells express high levels of CaT1/TRPV6 and high calcium influx...demonstrated that LNCaP cells, a continuous cell line used widely as a prostate cancer model, express high levels of the protein and high calcium influx in...form of the ERK mitogen activated protein kinase. NSE=neuron-specific enolase. Figure 4. LNCaP cells express high levels of CaT1/TRPV6 and high

  10. Obtaining corporate information from NHS foundation trusts.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Valerie; Endacott, Ruth; Sheaff, Rod; Jones, Ray

    Foundation trusts have boards of directors that are responsible for the day-to-day running of the organisation, planning services and developing strategy. Unlike non-foundation trusts and primary care trusts (PCTs), foundation trusts are not obliged to hold directors' board meetings in public. This article describes the online availability and accessibility of the minutes of such meetings in a number of foundation trusts, non-foundation trusts and PCTs. The implications for transparency in the NHS are also discussed.

  11. Trusted Computing Strengthens Cloud Authentication

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new generation of technology which is designed to provide the commercial necessities, solve the IT management issues, and run the appropriate applications. Another entry on the list of cloud functions which has been handled internally is Identity Access Management (IAM). Companies encounter IAM as security challenges while adopting more technologies became apparent. Trust Multi-tenancy and trusted computing based on a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) are great technologies for solving the trust and security concerns in the cloud identity environment. Single sign-on (SSO) and OpenID have been released to solve security and privacy problems for cloud identity. This paper proposes the use of trusted computing, Federated Identity Management, and OpenID Web SSO to solve identity theft in the cloud. Besides, this proposed model has been simulated in .Net environment. Security analyzing, simulation, and BLP confidential model are three ways to evaluate and analyze our proposed model. PMID:24701149

  12. Trusted computing strengthens cloud authentication.

    PubMed

    Ghazizadeh, Eghbal; Zamani, Mazdak; Ab Manan, Jamalul-lail; Alizadeh, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new generation of technology which is designed to provide the commercial necessities, solve the IT management issues, and run the appropriate applications. Another entry on the list of cloud functions which has been handled internally is Identity Access Management (IAM). Companies encounter IAM as security challenges while adopting more technologies became apparent. Trust Multi-tenancy and trusted computing based on a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) are great technologies for solving the trust and security concerns in the cloud identity environment. Single sign-on (SSO) and OpenID have been released to solve security and privacy problems for cloud identity. This paper proposes the use of trusted computing, Federated Identity Management, and OpenID Web SSO to solve identity theft in the cloud. Besides, this proposed model has been simulated in .Net environment. Security analyzing, simulation, and BLP confidential model are three ways to evaluate and analyze our proposed model.

  13. Synchronization can influence trust following virtual interaction.

    PubMed

    Launay, Jacques; Dean, Roger T; Bailes, Freya

    2013-01-01

    Synchronization has recently received attention as a form of interpersonal interaction that may affect the affiliative relationships of those engaged in it. While there is evidence to suggest that synchronized movements lead to increased affiliative behavior (Hove & Risen, 2009; Valdesolo & DeSteno, 2011; Wiltermuth & Heath, 2009), the influence of other interpersonal cues has yet to be fully controlled. The current study controls for these features by using computer algorithms to replace human partners. By removing genuine interpersonal interaction, it also tests whether sounds alone can influence affiliative relationships, when it appears that another human agent has triggered those sounds. Results suggest that subjective experience of synchrony had a positive effect on a measure of trust, but task success was a similarly good predictor. An objective measure of synchrony was only related to trust in conditions where participants were instructed to move at the same time as stimuli.

  14. A longitudinal and experimental study of the impact of knowledge on the bases of institutional trust

    PubMed Central

    Kimbrough, Christopher D.; Shockley, Ellie; Neal, Tess M. S.; Herian, Mitchel N.; Hamm, Joseph A.; Bornstein, Brian H.; Tomkins, Alan J.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined a knowledge-centered theory of institutional trust development. In the context of trust in water regulatory institutions, the moderating impact of knowledge was tested to determine if there were longitudinal changes in the bases of institutional trust as a function of increases in knowledge about a target institution. We hypothesized that as people learn about an institution with which they were previously unfamiliar, they begin to form more nuanced perceptions, distinguishing the new institution from other institutions and relying less upon their generalized trust to estimate their trust in that institution. Prior to having specific, differential information about a new institution, we expected institutional trust to be a function of generalized trust variables such as dispositional trust and trust in government. The longitudinal experiment involved 185 college students randomly assigned to one of three information conditions. Every 3 months for 15 months, participants read information about water regulatory institutions or a control institution. At each time point, participants reported their trust in and perceptions of the trust- and distrust-worthiness of the water regulatory institutions. Participants also completed measures of knowledge of water regulatory institutions, dispositional trust, and governmental trust. Our manipulation check indicated that, as expected, those in the experimental group increased in subjective knowledge of water regulatory institutions to a greater extent than those in the control condition. Consistent with our hypotheses, there was some evidence that, compared to the control group, the experimental group relied less on their general trust in government as a basis for their trust in water regulatory institutions. However, contrary to our hypotheses, there was no evidence the experimental group relied less on dispositional trust as a basis for institutional trust. There also was some evidence the experimental

  15. A longitudinal and experimental study of the impact of knowledge on the bases of institutional trust.

    PubMed

    PytlikZillig, Lisa M; Kimbrough, Christopher D; Shockley, Ellie; Neal, Tess M S; Herian, Mitchel N; Hamm, Joseph A; Bornstein, Brian H; Tomkins, Alan J

    2017-01-01

    This study examined a knowledge-centered theory of institutional trust development. In the context of trust in water regulatory institutions, the moderating impact of knowledge was tested to determine if there were longitudinal changes in the bases of institutional trust as a function of increases in knowledge about a target institution. We hypothesized that as people learn about an institution with which they were previously unfamiliar, they begin to form more nuanced perceptions, distinguishing the new institution from other institutions and relying less upon their generalized trust to estimate their trust in that institution. Prior to having specific, differential information about a new institution, we expected institutional trust to be a function of generalized trust variables such as dispositional trust and trust in government. The longitudinal experiment involved 185 college students randomly assigned to one of three information conditions. Every 3 months for 15 months, participants read information about water regulatory institutions or a control institution. At each time point, participants reported their trust in and perceptions of the trust- and distrust-worthiness of the water regulatory institutions. Participants also completed measures of knowledge of water regulatory institutions, dispositional trust, and governmental trust. Our manipulation check indicated that, as expected, those in the experimental group increased in subjective knowledge of water regulatory institutions to a greater extent than those in the control condition. Consistent with our hypotheses, there was some evidence that, compared to the control group, the experimental group relied less on their general trust in government as a basis for their trust in water regulatory institutions. However, contrary to our hypotheses, there was no evidence the experimental group relied less on dispositional trust as a basis for institutional trust. There also was some evidence the experimental

  16. Hyperpolarized (129)Xe T (1) in oxygenated and deoxygenated blood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, M. S.; Balamore, D.; Kacher, D. F.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Jolesz, F. A.

    2000-01-01

    The viability of the new technique of hyperpolarized (129)Xe MRI (HypX-MRI) for imaging organs other than the lungs depends on whether the spin-lattice relaxation time, T(1), of (129)Xe is sufficiently long in the blood. In previous experiments by the authors, the T(1) was found to be strongly dependent upon the oxygenation of the blood, with T(1) increasing from about 3 s in deoxygenated samples to about 10 s in oxygenated samples. Contrarily, Tseng et al. (J. Magn. Reson. 1997; 126: 79-86) reported extremely long T(1) values deduced from an indirect experiment in which hyperpolarized (129)Xe was used to create a 'blood-foam'. They found that oxygenation decreased T(1). Pivotal to their experiment is the continual and rapid exchange of hyperpolarized (129)Xe between the gas phase (within blood-foam bubbles) and the dissolved phase (in the skin of the bubbles); this necessitated a complicated analysis to extract the T(1) of (129)Xe in blood. In the present study, the experimental design minimizes gas exchange after the initial bolus of hyperpolarized (129)Xe has been bubbled through the sample. This study confirms that oxygenation increases the T(1) of (129)Xe in blood, from about 4 s in freshly drawn venous blood, to about 13 s in blood oxygenated to arterial levels, and also shifts the red blood cell resonance to higher frequency. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Abbreviations used BOLD blood oxygen level dependent NOE nuclear overhouses effect PO(2) oxygen partial pressure RBC red blood cells RF radio frequency SNR signal-to-noise ratio.

  17. Systematic T1 improvement for hyperpolarized 129xenon.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Maricel; Babcock, Earl; Blümler, Peter; Heil, Werner; Karpuk, Sergei; Tullney, Kathlynne

    2015-03-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of hyperpolarized (HP)-(129)Xe was improved at typical storage conditions (i.e. low and homogeneous magnetic fields). Very long wall relaxation times T(1)(wall) of about 18 h were observed in uncoated, spherical GE180 glass cells of ∅=10 cm which were free of rubidium and not permanently sealed but attached to a standard glass stopcock. An "aging" process of the wall relaxation was identified by repeating measurements on the same cell. This effect could be easily removed by repeating the initial cleaning procedure. In this way, a constant wall relaxation was ensured. The Xe nuclear spin-relaxation rate 1/T1(Xe-Xe) due to van der Waals molecules was investigated too, by admixing three different buffer gases (N(2), SF(6) and CO(2)). Especially CO(2) exhibited an unexpected high efficiency (r) in shortening the lifetime of the Xe-Xe dimers and hence prolonging the total T1 relaxation even further. These measurements also yielded an improved accuracy for the van der Waals relaxation for pure Xe (with 85% (129)Xe) of T(1)(Xe-Xe)=(4.6±0.1)h. Repeating the measurements with HP (129)Xe in natural abundance in mixtures with SF6, a strong dependence of T(1)(Xe-Xe) and r on the isotopic enrichment was observed, uncovering a shorter T(1)(Xe-Xe) relaxation for the (129)Xe in natural composition as compared to the 85% isotopically enriched gas.

  18. Hyperpolarized (129)Xe T (1) in oxygenated and deoxygenated blood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, M. S.; Balamore, D.; Kacher, D. F.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Jolesz, F. A.

    2000-01-01

    The viability of the new technique of hyperpolarized (129)Xe MRI (HypX-MRI) for imaging organs other than the lungs depends on whether the spin-lattice relaxation time, T(1), of (129)Xe is sufficiently long in the blood. In previous experiments by the authors, the T(1) was found to be strongly dependent upon the oxygenation of the blood, with T(1) increasing from about 3 s in deoxygenated samples to about 10 s in oxygenated samples. Contrarily, Tseng et al. (J. Magn. Reson. 1997; 126: 79-86) reported extremely long T(1) values deduced from an indirect experiment in which hyperpolarized (129)Xe was used to create a 'blood-foam'. They found that oxygenation decreased T(1). Pivotal to their experiment is the continual and rapid exchange of hyperpolarized (129)Xe between the gas phase (within blood-foam bubbles) and the dissolved phase (in the skin of the bubbles); this necessitated a complicated analysis to extract the T(1) of (129)Xe in blood. In the present study, the experimental design minimizes gas exchange after the initial bolus of hyperpolarized (129)Xe has been bubbled through the sample. This study confirms that oxygenation increases the T(1) of (129)Xe in blood, from about 4 s in freshly drawn venous blood, to about 13 s in blood oxygenated to arterial levels, and also shifts the red blood cell resonance to higher frequency. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Abbreviations used BOLD blood oxygen level dependent NOE nuclear overhouses effect PO(2) oxygen partial pressure RBC red blood cells RF radio frequency SNR signal-to-noise ratio.

  19. Spectroscopic Studies of Perturbed T1 Cu Sites in the Multicopper Oxidases Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Fet3p And Rhus Vernicifera Laccase: Allosteric Coupling Between the T1 And Trinuclear Cu Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, A.J.; Kragh, M.E.; Sarangi, R.; Fujii, S.; Liboiron, B.D.; Stoj, C.S.; Kosman, D.J.; Hodgson, K.O.; Hedman, B.; Solomon, E.I.; /Stanford U., Chem. Dept. /Copenhagen U. /SLAC, SSRL /SUNY, Buffalo

    2009-04-30

    The multicopper oxidases catalyze the 4e{sup -} reduction of O{sub 2} to H{sub 2}O coupled to the 1e{sup -} oxidation of 4 equiv of substrate. This activity requires four Cu atoms, including T1, T2, and coupled binuclear T3 sites. The T2 and T3 sites form a trinuclear cluster (TNC) where O{sub 2} is reduced. The T1 is coupled to the TNC through a T1-Cys-His-T3 electron transfer (ET) pathway. In this study the two T3 Cu coordinating His residues which lie in this pathway in Fet3 have been mutated, H483Q, H483C, H485Q, and H485C, to study how perturbation at the TNC impacts the T1 Cu site. Spectroscopic methods, in particular resonance Raman (rR), show that the change from His to Gln to Cys increases the covalency of the T1 Cu?S Cys bond and decreases its redox potential. This study of T1?TNC interactions is then extended to Rhus vernicifera laccase where a number of well-defined species including the catalytically relevant native intermediate (NI) can be trapped for spectroscopic study. The T1 Cu?S covalency and potential do not change in these species relative to resting oxidized enzyme, but interestingly the differences in the structure of the TNC in these species do lead to changes in the T1 Cu rR spectrum. This helps to confirm that vibrations in the cysteine side chain of the T1 Cu site and the protein backbone couple to the Cu?S vibration. These changes in the side chain and backbone provide a possible mechanism for regulating intramolecular T1 to TNC ET in NI and partially reduced enzyme forms for efficient turnover.

  20. The Business of Trust.

    PubMed

    Frisse, Mark E

    2016-04-01

    New mobile devices, social networks, analytics, and communications technologies are emerging at an unparalleled rate. As a result, academic health centers will face both new opportunities and formidable challenges. Unlike previous transitions from paper-based systems to networked computer systems, these new technologies are the product of new entrepreneurial and commercial interests driven by consumers. As these new commercial products and services are more widely adopted, the likelihood grows that data will be used in unanticipated ways inconsistent with societal norms. Academic health centers will have to understand the implications of these technologies and engage more actively in processes governing the collection, aggregation, and use of health data produced in a new era of consumer-driven health care technology. Maintaining public trust should be a paramount concern.

  1. Trust, Respect, and Reciprocity

    PubMed Central

    Phong, Tran Viet; Nhan, Le Nguyen Thanh; Dung, Nguyen Thanh; Ngan, Ta Thi Dieu; Kinh, Nguyen Van; Parker, Michael; Bull, Susan

    2015-01-01

    International science funders and publishers are driving a growing trend in data sharing. There is mounting pressure on researchers in low- and middle-income settings to conform to new sharing policies, despite minimal empirically grounded accounts of the ethical challenges of implementing the policies in these settings. This study used in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with 48 stakeholders in Vietnam to explore the experiences, attitudes, and expectations that inform ethical and effective approaches to sharing clinical research data. Distinct views on the role of trust, respect, and reciprocity were among those that emerged to inform culturally appropriate best practices. We conclude by discussing the challenges that authors of data-sharing policies should consider in this unique context. PMID:26297747

  2. Never trust a croup…

    PubMed Central

    Nickinson, Andrew; Minhas, Jatinder Singh; Bhalla, Minak; Anwuzia-Iwegbu, Charles; Chapman, John

    2011-01-01

    A 2-year-old girl presented to the James Paget University Hospitals Trust with croup-like symptoms and was later discharged with dexamethasone syrup. The patient re-presented 6 h later following maternal concern with signs of acute respiratory distress. After a period of clinical stability, she acutely decompensated without any prior signs of a life-threatening deterioration. She was managed using nebulised epinephrine and showed signs of clinical improvement. Although improvement persisted, the child showed signs of exhaustion following the preceding events and was later intubed with an endotracheal tube and transferred to the paediatric intensive care unit at Addenbrooke’s University Hospital, Cambridge. Endotracheal aspiration later grew parainfluenza virus, rhinovirus and Staphylococcus aureus and the patient was diagnosed with the exceptionally rare life threatening complications of croup, bacterial tracheitis. The patient was discharged from intensive care 7 days later and has since made a full recovery. PMID:22689599

  3. ComTrustO: Composite Trust-Based Ontology Framework for Information and Decision Fusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-06

    ComTrustO: Composite Trust-based Ontology Framework for Information and Decision Fusion Alessandro Oltramari Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh... ontology -based framework for information fusion, as a support system for human decision makers. In particular, we build upon the concept of composite...multidimensional trust, we construct a composite trust ontology framework, called ComTrustO, that embraces four trust ontologies , one for each trust type. We

  4. T1ρ MR Imaging of Human Musculoskeletal System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ligong; Regatte, Ravinder R.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the direct visualization of human musculoskeletal (MSK) system, especially all diarthrodial tissues including cartilage, bone, menisci, ligaments, tendon, hip, synovium etc. Conventional MR imaging techniques based on T1- and T2-weighted, proton density (PD) contrast are inconclusive in quantifying early biochemically degenerative changes in MSK system in general and articular cartilage in particular. In recent years, quantitative MR parameter mapping techniques have been used to quantify the biochemical changes in articular cartilage with a special emphasis on evaluating joint injury, cartilage degeneration, and soft tissue repair. In this article, we will focus on cartilage biochemical composition, basic principles of T1ρ MR imaging, implementation of T1ρ pulse sequences, biochemical validation, and summarize the potential applications of T1ρ MR imaging technique in MSK diseases including osteoarthritis (OA), anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, and knee joint repair. Finally, we will also review the potential advantages, challenges, and future prospects of T1ρ MR imaging for widespread clinical translation. PMID:24935818

  5. Free-breathing MOLLI: application to myocardial T(1) mapping.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jyun-Ming; Huang, Teng-Yi; Tseng, Yu-Shen; Lin, Yi-Ru

    2012-12-01

    Of the myocardial T(1) mapping techniques, the modified Look-Locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) sequence is accurate and highly reproducible. The MOLLI sequence requires patients to hold their breath for 17 heartbeats during the scanning process to minimize respiratory motion-related artifacts. However, some patients are unable to hold their breath because of illness or limited breath-hold capacity. This study, therefore, aimed to develop a robust myocardial T(1) mapping method based on the MOLLI sequence for patients unable to perform voluntary breath-holds. This study presents a free-breathing MOLLI (FB-MOLLI) sequence and an optimized reconstruction method to allow myocardial T(1) mapping in vivo without breath-hold. Nine healthy volunteers participated in this study after providing institutionally approved consent. The FB-MOLLI sequence acquires 20 images within 29 heartbeats. The reconstruction program employs a two-step automatic image registration technique and an image selection method inspired by the self-gating cardiac imaging method. Results indicate that the proposed reconstruction method increases the accuracy and reproducibility of free-breathing T(1) measurements significantly (p < 0.001). The FB-MOLLI method provides a robust tool for clinical application in free-breathing myocardial T(1) mapping, and could greatly facilitate acquisition procedures during routine examinations.

  6. Multiacquisition T1-mapping MRI during tidal respiration for quantification of myocardial T1 in swine with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hood, Maureen N; Song, Ting; Bedocs, Peter; Capacchione, John F; Kasper, Christine E; Haigney, Mark C; Ho, Vincent B

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate a free-breathing pulse sequence to quantify myocardial T1 changes in a swine model of tachycardia-induced heart failure. Yorkshire swine were implanted with pacemakers and were ventricularly paced at 200 beats/min to induce heart failure. Animals were scanned twice with a 1.5-T MRI scanner, once at baseline and once at heart failure. A T1-mapping sequence was performed during tidal respiration before and 5 minutes after the administration of a gadolinium-chelate contrast agent. T1-mapping values were compared between the baseline and heart failure scans. The percentage of fibrosis of heart failure myocardial tissue was compared with similar left ventricular tissue from control animals using trichrome blue histologic analysis. In the study cohort, differences were found between the baseline and heart failure T1-mapping values before the administration of contrast agent (960 ± 96 and 726 ± 94 ms, respectively; p = 0.02) and after contrast agent administration (546 ± 180 and 300 ± 171 ms, respectively; p = 0.005). The animals with heart failure also had a difference histologically in the percentage of myocardial collagen compared with tissue from healthy control animals (control, 5.4% ± 1.0%; heart failure, 9.4% ± 1.6%; p < 0.001). The proposed T1-mapping technique can quantify diffuse myocardial changes associated with heart failure without the use of a contrast agent and without breath-holding. These T1 changes appear to be associated with increases in the percentage of myocardial collagen that in this study were not detected by traditional myocardial delayed enhancement imaging. T1 mapping may be a useful technique for detecting early but clinically significant myocardial fibrosis.

  7. Estimating T1 from Multichannel Variable Flip Angle SPGR Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Trzasko, Joshua D.; Mostardi, Petrice M.; Riederer, Stephen J.; Manduca, Armando

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative estimation of T1 is a challenging but important task inherent to many clinical applications. The most commonly used paradigm for estimating T1 in vivo involves performing a sequence of spoiled gradient-recalled echo acquisitions at different flip angles, followed by fitting of an exponential model to the data. Although there has been substantial work comparing different fitting methods, there has been little discussion on how these methods should be applied for data acquired using multichannel receivers. In this note, we demonstrate that the manner in which multichannel data is handled can have a substantial impact on T1 estimation performance and should be considered equally as important as choice of flip angles or fitting strategy. PMID:22807160

  8. Myocardial T1 mapping: modalities and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Jellis, Christine L.

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial fibrosis appears to be linked to myocardial dysfunction in a multitude of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. Accurate non-invasive quantitation of this extra-cellular matrix has the potential for widespread clinical benefit in both diagnosis and guiding therapeutic intervention. T1 mapping is a cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging technique, which shows early clinical promise particularly in the setting of diffuse fibrosis. This review will outline the evolution of T1 mapping and the various techniques available with their inherent advantages and limitations. Histological validation of this technique remains somewhat limited, however clinical application in a range of pathologies suggests strong potential for future development. PMID:24834410

  9. A novel enterocin T1 with anti-Pseudomonas activity produced by Enterococcus faecium T1 from Chinese Tibet cheese.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Zhang, Lanwei; Yi, Huaxi; Han, Xue; Gao, Wei; Chi, Chunliang; Song, Wei; Li, Haiying; Liu, Chunguang

    2016-02-01

    An enterocin-producing Enterococcus faecium T1 was isolated from Chinese Tibet cheese. The enterocin was purified by SP-Sepharose and reversed phase HPLC. It was identified as unique from other reported bacteriocins based on molecular weight (4629 Da) and amino acid compositions; therefore it was subsequently named enterocin T1. Enterocin T1 was stable at 80-100 °C and over a wide pH range, pH 3.0-10.0. Protease sensitivity was observed to trypsin, pepsin, papain, proteinase K, and pronase E. Importantly, enterocin T1 was observed to inhibit the growth of numerous Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria including Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella flexneri, Shigella sonnei, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes. Take together, these results suggest that enterocin T1 is a novel bacteriocin with the potential to be used as a bio-preservative to control Pseudomonas spp. in food.

  10. The effect of propensity to trust and perceptions of trustworthiness on trust behaviors in dyads.

    PubMed

    Alarcon, Gene M; Lyons, Joseph B; Christensen, James C; Klosterman, Samantha L; Bowers, Margaret A; Ryan, Tyler J; Jessup, Sarah A; Wynne, Kevin T

    2017-09-15

    Research on trust has burgeoned in the last few decades. Despite the growing interest in trust, little is known about trusting behaviors in non-dichotomous trust games. The current study explored propensity to trust, trustworthiness, and trust behaviors in a new computer-mediated trust relevant task. We used multivariate multilevel survival analysis (MMSA) to analyze behaviors across time. Results indicated propensity to trust did not influence trust behaviors. However, trustworthiness perceptions influenced initial trust behaviors and trust behaviors influenced subsequent trustworthiness perceptions. Indeed, behaviors fully mediated the relationship of trustworthiness perceptions over time. The study demonstrated the utility of MMSA and the new trust game, Checkmate, as viable research methods and stimuli for assessing the loci of trust.

  11. 77 FR 39143 - Executive Branch Qualified Trusts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... continues to read as follows: Authority: 5 U.S.C. App. (Ethics in Government Act of 1978); 26 U.S.C. 1043... excess of the diversification standards. (c) Hybrid qualified trust. A qualified trust may contain both a... to this arrangement as a hybrid qualified trust. Sec. 2634.407 Certification of qualified trust...

  12. Trust, Behavior, and High School Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Lisa S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature on student trust and to examine the relationship between student trust, behavior, and academic outcomes in high school. It asks, first, does trust have a positive effect on high school outcomes? Second, does trust influence student behavior, exerting an indirect effect on…

  13. The Complex Relationship between Cyberbullying and Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieschl, Stephanie; Porsch, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    Theoretically, there are strong arguments for a relationship between cyberbullying and trust. On the one hand, trust is built on experiences; thus, experiences of malevolence such as cyberbullying might contribute to low trust. On the other hand, high trust may lead to risky online behavior such as self-disclosures that could increase the risk of…

  14. 43 CFR 426.7 - Trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Trusts. 426.7 Section 426.7 Public Lands... LIMITATION RULES AND REGULATIONS § 426.7 Trusts. (a) Definitions for purposes of this section: Grantor revocable trust means a trust that holds irrigable land or irrigation land that may be revoked at...

  15. 12 CFR 7.2022 - Voting trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voting trusts. 7.2022 Section 7.2022 Banks and... Practices § 7.2022 Voting trusts. The shareholders of a national bank may establish a voting trust under the applicable law of a state selected by the participants and designated in the trust agreement, provided...

  16. 7 CFR 1400.100 - Revocable trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Revocable trust. 1400.100 Section 1400.100... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Limitation § 1400.100 Revocable trust. A revocable trust and the grantor of the trust will be considered to be the same person....

  17. 14 CFR 47.8 - Voting trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voting trusts. 47.8 Section 47.8... REGISTRATION General § 47.8 Voting trusts. (a) If a voting trust is used to qualify a domestic corporation as a... the fully executed voting trust agreement, which must identify each voting interest of the...

  18. Does Trust Beget Trustworthiness? Trust and Trustworthiness in Two Games and Two Cultures: A Research Note

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiyonari, Toko; Yamagishi, Toshio; Cook, Karen S.; Cheshire, Coye

    2006-01-01

    An important unanswered question in the empirical literature on trust is whether trusting begets trustworthiness. In two experimental games, with Japanese and American participants, respectively, we compared trust and trustworthiness to provide an answer to this question. The trustee in the standard Trust Game knows that he or she is trusted,…

  19. Trust is a must: What is involved in trusting those who manage forest fires?

    Treesearch

    Adam Liljeblad; Bill Borrie; Alan Watson

    2010-01-01

    Trust is a complicated emotion. In the past, many social scientists have studied trust. They discovered that trust involves a number of beliefs and emotions. The scientists in this study were interested in learning more about trust. They believed that forest managers can do a better job if people trust them to do what is best for citizens and the environment (figure 1...

  20. T2 can be greater than 2T1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevian, H. M.; Skinner, J. L.

    1989-08-01

    We consider a quantum-mechanical two-level system under the influence of both diagonal and off-diagonal stochastic perturbations, and focus on the decay times T1 and T2, which refer to the relaxation to equilibrium of the populations and relative phase of the two levels, respectively. From both theoretical and experimental viewpoints one traditionally expects that T2≤2T1. On the other hand, from a fourth-order cumulant expansion calculation of the asymptotic time dependence of the density matrix elements, Budimir and Skinner [J. Stat. Phys. 49, 1029 (1987)] showed that, in fact, in some instances T2>2T1. In this paper we solve the stochastic model numerically, which leads to the exact time dependence of the density matrix at all times. We find that the analytic prediction that T2>2T1 is not only correct, but also meaningful, in the sense that the density matrix elements decay exponentially after only a short transient time.

  1. Adiabatic inversion pulses for myocardial T1-mapping

    PubMed Central

    Kellman, Peter; Herzka, Daniel A.; Hansen, Michael Schacht

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the error in T1-estimates using inversion recovery based T1-mapping due to imperfect inversion, and perform a systematic study of adiabatic inversion pulse designs in order to maximize inversion efficiency for values of transverse relaxation (T2) in the myocardium subject to a peak power constraint. Methods The inversion factor for hyperbolic secant (HS) and tangent/hyperbolic tangent (tan/tanh) adiabatic full passage waveforms was calculated using Bloch equations. A brute force search was conducted of design parameters: pulse duration, frequency range, shape parameters, and peak amplitude. A design was selected that maximized the inversion factor over a specified range of amplitude and off-resonance and validated using phantom measurements. Empirical correction for imperfect inversion was performed. Results The tan/tanh adiabatic pulse was found to outperform HS designs, and achieve an inversion factor of 0.96 within ±150 Hz over 25% amplitude range with 14.7 μTesla peak amplitude. T1-mapping errors of the selected design due to imperfect inversion was approx. 4% and could be corrected to <1%. Conclusion Non-ideal inversion leads to significant errors in inversion recovery based T1-mapping. The inversion efficiency of adiabatic pulses is sensitive to transverse relaxation. The tan/tanh design achieved the best performance subject to the peak amplitude constraint. PMID:23722695

  2. Trust and Privacy in Healthcare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, Peter; Kalra, Dipak

    This paper considers issues of trust and privacy in healthcare around increased data-sharing through Electronic Health Records (EHRs). It uses a model structured around different aspects of trust in the healthcare organisation’s reasons for greater data-sharing and their ability to execute EHR projects, particularly any associated confidentiality controls. It reflects the individual’s personal circumstances and attitude to use of health records.

  3. Building Trust Through Servant Leadership

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-10

    standards within the whole organization. Patterson goes on to explain that trust in Servant Leadership nurtures teamwork , confidence, and self...emphasis on teamwork and equality. Patterson has found that when subordinates are trusted and empowered, they are self-accountable for the results they...empowerment include active listening, emphasizing teamwork , and valuing people. Another parallel to Army doctrine is that empowerment promotes critical

  4. Are turns required for the folding of ribonuclease T1?

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, J. B.; Mullins, L. S.; Raushel, F. M.

    1996-01-01

    Ribonuclease T1 (RNase T1) is a small, globular protein of 104 amino acids for which extensive thermodynamic and structural information is known. To assess the specific influence of variations in amino acid sequence on the mechanism for protein folding, circularly permuted variants of RNase T1 were constructed and characterized in terms of catalytic activity and thermodynamic stability. The disulfide bond connecting Cys-2 and Cys-10 was removed by mutation of these residues to alanine (C2, 10A) to avoid potential steric problems imposed by the circular permutations. The original amino-terminus and carboxyl-terminus of the mutant (C2, 10A) were subsequently joined with a tripeptide linker to accommodate a reverse turn and new termini were introduced throughout the primary sequence in regions of solvent-exposed loops at Ser-35 (cp35S1), Asp-49 (cp49D1), Gly-70 (cp70G1), and Ser-96 (cp96S1). These circularly permuted RNase T1 mutants retained 35-100% of the original catalytic activity for the hydrolysis of guanylyl(3'-->5')cytidine, suggesting that the overall tertiary fold of these mutants is very similar to that of wild-type protein. Chemical denaturation curves indicated thermodynamic stabilities at pH 5.0 of 5.7, 2.9, 2.6, and 4.6 kcal/mol for cp35S1, cp49D1, cp70G1, and cp96S1, respectively, compared to a value of 10.1 kcal/mol for wild-type RNase T1 and 6.4 kcal/mol for (C2, 10A) T1. A fifth set of circularly permuted variants was attempted with new termini positioned in a tight beta-turn between Glu-82 and Gln-85. New termini were inserted at Asn-83 (cp83N1), Asn-84 (cp84N1), and Gln-85 (cp85Q1). No detectable amount of protein was ever produced for any of the mutations in this region, suggesting that this turn may be critical for the proper folding and/or thermodynamic stability of RNase T1. PMID:8745397

  5. Birth Weight and Social Trust in Adulthood: Evidence for Early Calibration of Social Cognition.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Michael Bang; Aarøe, Lene

    2015-11-01

    Social trust forms the fundamental basis for social interaction within societies. Understanding the cognitive architecture of trust and the roots of individual differences in trust is of key importance. We predicted that one of the factors calibrating individual levels of trust is the intrauterine flow of nutrients from mother to child as indexed by birth weight. Birth weight forecasts both the future external environment and the internal condition of the individual in multiple ways relevant for social cognition. Specifically, we predicted that low birth weight is utilized as a forecast of a harsh environment, vulnerable condition, or both and, consequently, reduces social trust. The results of the study reported here are consistent with this prediction. Controlling for many confounds through sibling and panel designs, we found that lower birth weight reduced social trust in adulthood. Furthermore, we obtained tentative evidence that this effect is mitigated if adult environments do not induce stress.

  6. High-K,t1/2=1.4(1) ms, isomeric state in Lr255

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauschild, K.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Yeremin, A. V.; Dorvaux, O.; Antalic, S.; Belozerov, A. V.; Briançon, Ch.; Chelnokov, M. L.; Chepigin, V. I.; Curien, D.; Gall, B.; Görgen, A.; Gorshkov, V. A.; Guttormsen, M.; Hanappe, F.; Kabachenko, A. P.; Khalfallah, F.; Larsen, A. C.; Malyshev, O. N.; Minkova, A.; Popeko, A. G.; Rousseau, M.; Rowley, N.; Saro, S.; Shutov, A. V.; Siem, S.; Stuttgè, L.; Svirikhin, A. I.; Syed, N. U. H.; Theisen, Ch.; Venhart, M.

    2008-08-01

    An isomeric state in Lr255 with a half-life of t1/2=1.4(1) ms and Ex>720-keV has been observed for the first time using the GABRIELA setup at the focal plane of the VASSILISSA separator. Based on its K-forbiddeness, the configuration of the state is most probably formed by coupling the valence proton to a two quasiparticle neutron excitation. Possible three quasiparticle configurations are discussed.

  7. An improved 3-D Look--Locker imaging method for T(1) parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Nkongchu, Ken; Santyr, Giles

    2005-09-01

    The 3-D Look-Locker (LL) imaging method has been shown to be a highly efficient and accurate method for the volumetric mapping of the spin lattice relaxation time T(1). However, conventional 3-D LL imaging schemes are typically limited to small tip angle RF pulses (T(1) estimation. In this work, a more generalized form of the 3-D LL imaging method that incorporates an additional and variable delay time between recovery samples is described, which permits the use of larger tip angles (>5 degrees ), thereby improving the SNR and the accuracy of the method. In phantom studies, a mean T(1) measurement accuracy of less than 2% (0.2-3.1%) using a tip angle of 10 degrees was obtained for a range of T(1) from approximately 300 to 1,700 ms with a measurement time increase of only 15%. This accuracy compares favorably with the conventional 3-D LL method that provided an accuracy between 2.2% and 7.3% using a 5 degrees flip angle.

  8. Graphene oxide based theranostic platform for T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengxin; Cao, Yuhua; Chong, Yu; Ma, Yufei; Zhang, Hailu; Deng, Zongwu; Hu, Chunhong; Zhang, Zhijun

    2013-12-26

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful and widely used clinical technique in cancer diagnosis. MRI contrast agents (CAs) are often used to improve the quality of MRI-based diagnosis. In this work, we developed a positive T1 MRI CA based on graphene oxide (GO)-gadolinium (Gd) complexes. In our strategy, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) is chemically conjugated to GO, followed by Gd(III) complexation, to form a T1 MRI CA (GO-DTPA-Gd). We have demonstrated that the GO-DTPA-Gd system significantly improves MRI T1 relaxivity and leads to a better cellular MRI contrast effect than Magnevist, a commercially used CA. Next, an anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX), was loaded on the surface of GO sheets via physisorption. Thus-prepared GO-DTPA-Gd/DOX shows significant cytotoxicity to the cancer cells (HepG2). This work provides a novel strategy to build a GO-based theranostic nanoplatform with T1-weighted MRI, fluorescence imaging, and drug delivery functionalities.

  9. Deformations of T 1 ,1 as Yang-Baxter sigma models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crichigno, P. Marcos; Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2014-12-01

    We consider a family of deformations of T 1,1 in the Yang-Baxter sigma model approach. We first discuss a supercoset description of T 1,1, which makes manifest the full symmetry of the space and leads to the standard Sasaki-Einstein metric. Next, we consider three-parameter deformations of T 1,1 by using classical r-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). The resulting metric and NS-NS two-form agree exactly with the ones obtained via TsT transformations, and contain the Lunin-Maldacena background as a special case. It is worth noting that for AdS5 × T 1,1 , classical integrability for the full sector has been argued to be lost. Hence our result indicates that the Yang-Baxter sigma model approach is applicable even for non-integrable cosets. This observation suggests that the gravity/CYBE correspondence can be extended beyond integrable cases.

  10. Genetic instability promotes the acquisition of chromosomal imbalances in T1b and T1c breast adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Blegen, H; Ghadimi, B M; Jauho, A; Zetterberg, A; Eriksson, E; Auer, G; Ried, T

    2001-01-01

    In order to evaluate biological and genetic properties of early breast carcinomas we analyzed microdissected tissue from 33 primary breast carcinomas stage T1b and T1c with respect to the nuclear DNA content, the expression pattern of Ki-67, cyclin A, p27KIP1, p53 and p21WAF1, and chromosomal gains and losses. The results show that T1b carcinomas (6-10 mm, n=17) were frequently near-diploid (53%) with low proliferative activity and staining patterns of p53 and p21WAF1 that suggest the presence of wild type protein. The majority (12/16) of the T1c tumors (11-20 mm), however, was aneuploid, and proliferative activity and p53 expression were increased. Larger tumor size correlated with an increasing number of chromosomal copy number changes and in particular with regional amplifications. High level copy number increases (amplifications), however, were found exclusively in the aneuploid tumors. Amplification events correlated with elevated cyclin A and reduced p27 expression, respectively. Our results suggest that the sequential acquisition of genomic imbalances during tumor progression is accelerated in aneuploid tumors, and may contribute to the increased malignancy potential.

  11. Genetic Instability Promotes the Acquisition of Chromosomal Imbalances in T1b and T1c Breast Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Blegen, Harald; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Jauho, Annukka; Zetterberg, Anders; Eriksson, Elina; Auer, Gert; Ried, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    In order to evaluate biological and genetic properties of early breast carcinomas we analyzed microdissected tissue from 33 primary breast carcinomas stage T1b and T1c with respect to the nuclear DNA content, the expression pattern of Ki‐67, cyclin A, p27KIP1, p53 and p21WAF1, and chromosomal gains and losses. The results show that T1b carcinomas (6–10 mm, n=17) were frequently near‐diploid (53%) with low proliferative activity and staining patterns of p53 and p21WAF1 that suggest the presence of wild type protein. The majority (12/16) of the T1c tumors (11–20 mm), however, was aneuploid, and proliferative activity and p53 expression were increased. Larger tumor size correlated with an increasing number of chromosomal copy number changes and in particular with regional amplifications. High level copy number increases (amplifications), however, were found exclusively in the aneuploid tumors. Amplification events correlated with elevated cyclin A and reduced p27 expression, respectively. Our results suggest that the sequential acquisition of genomic imbalances during tumor progression is accelerated in aneuploid tumors, and may contribute to the increased malignancy potential. PMID:11455031

  12. 77 FR 52135 - HomeTrust Bank, Clyde, North Carolina; Approval of Conversion Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of the Comptroller of the Currency HomeTrust Bank, Clyde, North Carolina; Approval of Conversion...) approved the application of HomeTrust Bank, Clyde, North Carolina to convert to the stock form of...

  13. Functionally active t1-t1 interfaces revealed by the accessibility of intracellular thiolate groups in kv4 channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangyu; Shahidullah, Mohammad; Rocha, Carmen A; Strang, Candace; Pfaffinger, Paul J; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2005-07-01

    Gating of voltage-dependent K(+) channels involves movements of membrane-spanning regions that control the opening of the pore. Much less is known, however, about the contributions of large intracellular channel domains to the conformational changes that underlie gating. Here, we investigated the functional role of intracellular regions in Kv4 channels by probing relevant cysteines with thiol-specific reagents. We find that reagent application to the intracellular side of inside-out patches results in time-dependent irreversible inhibition of Kv4.1 and Kv4.3 currents. In the absence or presence of Kv4-specific auxiliary subunits, mutational and electrophysiological analyses showed that none of the 14 intracellular cysteines is essential for channel gating. C110, C131, and C132 in the intersubunit interface of the tetramerization domain (T1) are targets responsible for the irreversible inhibition by a methanethiosulfonate derivative (MTSET). This result is surprising because structural studies of Kv4-T1 crystals predicted protection of the targeted thiolate groups by constitutive high-affinity Zn(2+) coordination. Also, added Zn(2+) or a potent Zn(2+) chelator (TPEN) does not significantly modulate the accessibility of MTSET to C110, C131, or C132; and furthermore, when the three critical cysteines remained as possible targets, the MTSET modification rate of the activated state is approximately 200-fold faster than that of the resting state. Biochemical experiments confirmed the chemical modification of the intact alpha-subunit and the purified tetrameric T1 domain by MTS reagents. These results conclusively demonstrate that the T1--T1 interface of Kv4 channels is functionally active and dynamic, and that critical reactive thiolate groups in this interface may not be protected by Zn(2+) binding.

  14. Functionally Active T1-T1 Interfaces Revealed by the Accessibility of Intracellular Thiolate Groups in Kv4 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangyu; Shahidullah, Mohammad; Rocha, Carmen A.; Strang, Candace; Pfaffinger, Paul J.; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Gating of voltage-dependent K+ channels involves movements of membrane-spanning regions that control the opening of the pore. Much less is known, however, about the contributions of large intracellular channel domains to the conformational changes that underlie gating. Here, we investigated the functional role of intracellular regions in Kv4 channels by probing relevant cysteines with thiol-specific reagents. We find that reagent application to the intracellular side of inside-out patches results in time-dependent irreversible inhibition of Kv4.1 and Kv4.3 currents. In the absence or presence of Kv4-specific auxiliary subunits, mutational and electrophysiological analyses showed that none of the 14 intracellular cysteines is essential for channel gating. C110, C131, and C132 in the intersubunit interface of the tetramerization domain (T1) are targets responsible for the irreversible inhibition by a methanethiosulfonate derivative (MTSET). This result is surprising because structural studies of Kv4-T1 crystals predicted protection of the targeted thiolate groups by constitutive high-affinity Zn2+ coordination. Also, added Zn2+ or a potent Zn2+ chelator (TPEN) does not significantly modulate the accessibility of MTSET to C110, C131, or C132; and furthermore, when the three critical cysteines remained as possible targets, the MTSET modification rate of the activated state is ∼200-fold faster than that of the resting state. Biochemical experiments confirmed the chemical modification of the intact α-subunit and the purified tetrameric T1 domain by MTS reagents. These results conclusively demonstrate that the T1T1 interface of Kv4 channels is functionally active and dynamic, and that critical reactive thiolate groups in this interface may not be protected by Zn2+ binding. PMID:15955876

  15. Recombinant expression, in vitro refolding, and biophysical characterization of the N-terminal domain of T1R3 taste receptor.

    PubMed

    Maîtrepierre, Elodie; Sigoillot, Maud; Le Pessot, Laurence; Briand, Loïc

    2012-05-01

    The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimeric receptor composed of the T1R2 and T1R3 subunits, while T1R1 and T1R3 assemble to form the umami taste receptor. T1R receptors belong to the family of class C G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). In addition to a transmembrane heptahelical domain, class C GPCRs have a large extracellular N-terminal domain (NTD), which is the primary ligand-binding site. The T1R2 and T1R1 subunits have been shown to be responsible for ligand binding, via their NTDs. However, little is known about the contribution of T1R3-NTD to receptor functions. To enable biophysical characterization, we overexpressed the human NTD of T1R3 (hT1R3-NTD) using Escherichia coli in the form of inclusion bodies. Using a fractional factorial screen coupled to a functional assay, conditions were determined for the refolding of hT1R3-NTD. Far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopic studies revealed that hT1R3-NTD was well refolded. Using size-exclusion chromatography, we found that the refolded protein behaves as a dimer. Ligand binding quantified by tryptophan fluorescence quenching and microcalorimetry showed that hT1R3-NTD is functional and capable of binding sucralose with an affinity in the millimolar range. This study also provides a strategy to produce functional hT1R3-NTD by heterologous expression in E. coli; this is a prerequisite for structural determination and functional analysis of ligand-binding regions of other class C GPCRs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Management of T1a vocal fold carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Reiter, R; Brosch, S; Smith, E; Pickhard, A

    2013-12-01

    About 2/3 of the larynx carcinomas affect the vocal chords. The main risk factor is smoking. Carcinomas in this localisation often arise from leukoplakias with dysplasia. A typical symptom is dysphonia. Arrest of vibration in microlaryngostroboscopy is a hint that a carcinoma could be present. Transoral laser cordectomy or radiotherapy show equivalent oncological results and results in quality of voice in the treatment of vocal fold carcinoma (T1a). As lymph node and distant metastasis are very rare, follow-up can concentrate on microlaryngoscopy. In case of a suspicious area on the vocal fold, biopsy of the affected tissue is needed to plan correct treatment. The prognosis of the T1 vocal chord carcinoma is quite good with a 5-year survival rate of almost 100%.

  17. T1 Mapping in Characterizing Myocardial Disease: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Puntmann, Valentina O; Peker, Elif; Chandrashekhar, Y; Nagel, Eike

    2016-07-08

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance provides insights into myocardial structure and function noninvasively, with high diagnostic accuracy and without ionizing radiation. Myocardial tissue characterization in particular gives cardiovascular magnetic resonance a prime role among all the noninvasive cardiovascular investigations. Late gadolinium enhancement imaging is an established method for visualizing replacement scar, providing diagnostic and prognostic information in a variety of cardiac conditions. Late gadolinium enhancement, however, relies on the regional segregation of tissue characteristics to generate the imaging contrast. Thus, myocardial pathology that is diffuse in nature and affecting the myocardium in a rather uniform and global distribution is not well visualized with late gadolinium enhancement. Examples include diffuse myocardial inflammation, fibrosis, hypertrophy, and infiltration. T1 mapping is a novel technique allowing to diagnose these diffuse conditions by measurement of T1 values, which directly correspond to variation in intrinsic myocardial tissue properties. In addition to providing clinically meaningful indices, T1-mapping measurements also allow for an estimation of extracellular space by calculation of extracellular volume fraction. Multiple lines of evidence suggest a central role for T1 mapping in detection of diffuse myocardial disease in early disease stages and complements late gadolinium enhancement in visualization of the regional changes in common advanced myocardial disease. As a quantifiable measure, it may allow grading of disease activity, monitoring progress, and guiding treatment, potentially as a fast contrast-free clinical application. We present an overview of clinically relevant technical aspects of acquisition and processing, and the current state of art and evidence, supporting its clinical use. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Clinical Outcomes in cT1 Micropapillary Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Willis, DL; Fernandez, MI; Dickstein, RJ; Parikh, S; Shah, JB; Pisters, LL; Guo, CC; Henderson, S; Czerniak, BA; Grossman, HB; Dinney, CP; Kamat, AM

    2015-01-01

    Purpose While many urologists recommend radical cystectomy for patient with micropapillary bladder cancer (MPBC) invading the lamina propria (cT1), contradictory small reports exist regarding the efficacy of conservative management with intravesical BCG for this disease. Herein we report our updated experience with largest series of patients with cT1 MPBC. Materials and Methods An IRB approved review of our cancer database identified 283 patients with MPBC, including 72 staged as cT1N0M0 at diagnosis and initiation of therapy. Survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier estimator and compared using the log-rank test. Results Within this 72 patient cohort, 40 received primary intravesical BCG and 26 underwent upfront radical cystectomy. Patients receiving BCG experienced high rates of disease recurrence (75%) and progression (45%); 35% developed lymph node metastasis. Patients treated with upfront cystectomy had improved survival compared to patients treated with primary BCG (5 year disease specific survival (DSS) of 100% vs. 60% respectively, p=0.006) or patients undergoing delayed cystectomy after recurrence (5 yr. DSS: 62%, p=0.015). Prognosis was especially poor in patients who waited for progression prior to undergoing radical cystectomy, with an estimated 5-year DSS of only 24% and a median survival of 35 months. In patients treated with upfront cystectomy, pathologic upstaging occurred in 27%, including 20% with lymph node metastasis. Conclusions While certain patients with T1 MPBC may respond to intravesical BCG, improved survival is seen in those patients who undergo early radical cystectomy. Further molecular studies are needed to identify subsets of patients able to spare their bladders safely. PMID:25254936

  19. 75 FR 51876 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 1041-ES

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ...; Comment Request for Form 1041-ES AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and... comments concerning Form 1041-ES, Estimated Income Tax for Estates and Trusts. DATES: Written comments... Trusts. OMB Number: 1545-0971. [[Page 51877

  20. Identification of the cyclamate interaction site within the transmembrane domain of the human sweet taste receptor subunit T1R3.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peihua; Cui, Meng; Zhao, Baohua; Snyder, Lenore A; Benard, Lumie M J; Osman, Roman; Max, Marianna; Margolskee, Robert F

    2005-10-07

    The artificial sweetener cyclamate tastes sweet to humans, but not to mice. When expressed in vitro, the human sweet receptor (a heterodimer of two taste receptor subunits: hT1R2 + hT1R3) responds to cyclamate, but the mouse receptor (mT1R2 + mT1R3) does not. Using mixed-species pairings of human and mouse sweet receptor subunits, we determined that responsiveness to cyclamate requires the human form of T1R3. Using chimeras, we determined that it is the transmembrane domain of hT1R3 that is required for the sweet receptor to respond to cyclamate. Using directed mutagenesis, we identified several amino acid residues within the transmembrane domain of T1R3 that determine differential responsiveness to cyclamate of the human versus mouse sweet receptors. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of residues predicted to line a transmembrane domain binding pocket in hT1R3 identified six residues specifically involved in responsiveness to cyclamate. Using molecular modeling, we docked cyclamate within the transmembrane domain of T1R3. Our model predicts substantial overlap in the hT1R3 binding pockets for the agonist cyclamate and the inverse agonist lactisole. The transmembrane domain of T1R3 is likely to play a critical role in the interconversion of the sweet receptor from the ground state to the active state.

  1. The fair factor in matters of trust.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lauren L

    2006-01-01

    Communities are bound together by trust among their members. Trust thrives when a pervasive sense of fairness exists. Evidence suggests that trust has social, professional, and economic value for today's organizations, making it worthy of attention. Matters of trust and justice are important and timely for nurse leaders to consider given the challenge to improve practice settings in a manner that enhances nurse satisfaction. The aim of this article is to make explicit the value in building organizational justice and trust within an organization's nursing community. Nursing leadership strategies are integrated, thus offering practical guidance in creating a culture of justice, making trust explicit, and establishing trustworthiness.

  2. Disaggregating ethnoracial disparities in physician trust.

    PubMed

    Sewell, Abigail A

    2015-11-01

    Past research yields mixed evidence regarding whether ethnoracial minorities trust physicians less than Whites. Using the 2002 and 2006 General Social Surveys, variegated ethnoracial differences in trust in physicians are identified by disaggregating a multidimensional physician trust scale. Compared to Whites, Blacks are less likely to trust the technical judgment and interpersonal competence of doctors. Latinos are less likely than Whites to trust the fiduciary ethic, technical judgment, and interpersonal competence of doctors. Black-Latino differences in physician trust are a function of ethnoracial differences in parental nativity. The ways ethnoracial hierarchies are inscribed into power-imbalanced clinical exchanges are discussed.

  3. T1 and susceptibility contrast at high fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelavalli, Jaladhar

    Clinical imaging at high magnetic field strengths (≥ 3Tesla) is sought after primarily due to the increased signal strength available at these fields. This increased SNR can be used to perform: (a) high resolution imaging in the same time as at lower field strengths; (b) the same resolution imaging with much faster acquisition; and (c) functional MR imaging (fMRI), dynamic perfusion and diffusion imaging with increased sensitivity. However they are also associated with increased power deposition (SAR) due to increase in imaging frequency and longer T1 relaxation times. Longer T1s mean longer imaging times for generating good T1 contrast images. On the other hand for faster imaging, at high fields fast spin echo or magnetization prepared sequences are conventionally proposed which are, however, associated with high SAR values. Imaging with low SAR is more and more important as we move towards high fields and particularly for patients with metallic implants like pacemakers or deep brain stimulator. The SAR limit acceptable for these patients is much less than the limit acceptable for normal subjects. A new method is proposed for imaging at high fields with good contrast with simultaneous reduction in power deposition. Further, T1 based contrast optimization problem in FLASH imaging is considered for tissues with different T1s but same spin densities. The solution providing optimal imaging parameters is simplified for quick and easy computation in a clinical setting. The efficacy of the simplification is evaluated and practical limits under which the simplification can be applied are worked out. The phase difference due to variation in magnetic susceptibility property among biological tissues is another unique source of contrast which is different from the conventional T1, T2 and T2* contrast. This susceptibility based phase contrast has become more and more important at high fields, partly due to contrast generation issues due to longer T 1s and shorter T2s and

  4. Ultrastructural and cytochemical characterization of T1 and T2 secretory bodies from the tegument of Echinostoma paraensei.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Júlia P; Oliveira-Menezes, Aleksandra; Maldonado Junior, Arnaldo; Carvalho, Técia M U; de Souza, Wanderley

    2016-01-01

    Trematodes are lined by a syncytial layer that is named the tegument and contains small mitochondria and two different kinds of secretory inclusions. The structure and size of these bodies differs among genera and species. In a previous study, we observed many secretory bodies in the tegument of Echinostoma paraensei and named these bodies the T1 and T2 secretory bodies. No previous studies analyzed the secretory bodies of trematodes from the genus Echinostoma. Thus, the aim of this work was to use electron microscopy and cytochemistry to characterize these secretory bodies and to provide a detailed ultrastructural and morphological picture of these bodies, which are found in the tegument of E. paraensei. After ultrastructural cytochemistry analysis, we showed that both the T1 and T2 secretory bodies of E. paraensei were formed by glycoconjugates. 3D reconstruction confirmed the ovoid form of T1 secretory bodies and the biconcave and thin form of T2 secretory bodies.

  5. Direct and indirect effects of third-party relationships on interpersonal trust.

    PubMed

    Ferrin, Donald L; Dirks, Kurt T; Shah, Pri P

    2006-07-01

    Past studies of the determinants of interpersonal trust have focused primarily on how trust forms in isolated dyads. Yet within organizations, trust typically develops between individuals who are embedded in a complex web of existing and potential relationships. In this article, the authors identify 3 alternative ways in which a trustor and trustee may be linked to each other via third parties: network closure (linked via social interactions with third parties), trust transferability (linked via trusted third parties), and structural equivalence (linked via the similarity of their relationships with all potential third parties within the organization). Each of these is argued to influence interpersonal trust via a distinct social mechanism. The authors hypothesized that network closure and structural equivalence would predict interpersonal trust indirectly via their impact on interpersonal organizational citizenship behaviors performed within the interpersonal relationship, whereas trust transferability would predict trust directly. Social network analyses of data gathered from a medium-sized work organization provide substantial support for the hypotheses and also suggest important directions for future research. ((c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Trust, terrorism and public health.

    PubMed

    McKee, Martin; Coker, Richard

    2009-12-01

    Policies to promote public health are based on trust. There is a danger that public trust may be lost, especially where policies are seen to be influenced by vested interests or conflict with available evidence. Although trust in public health policies in the UK is high, some commentators have questioned recent responses to the threat of pandemic flu, suggesting that they may be driven, in part, by those seeking to profit from health scares, and drawing a direct comparison with terrorist scares. We argue that the approach to evidence by the public health and counter-terrorist communities differ markedly. Public health professionals must ensure that their actions do not undermine their credibility, in particular those involved in response to the threat of bioterrorism.

  7. Online trust, trustworthiness, or assurance?

    PubMed

    Cheshire, Coye

    2011-01-01

    Every day, individuals around the world retrieve, share, and exchange information on the Internet. We interact online to share personal information, find answers to questions, make financial transactions, play social games, and maintain professional and personal relationships. Sometimes our online interactions take place between two or more humans. In other cases, we rely on computers to manage information on our behalf. In each scenario, risk and uncertainty are essential for determining possible actions and outcomes. This essay highlights common deficiencies in our understanding of key concepts such as trust, trustworthiness, cooperation, and assurance in online environments. Empirical evidence from experimental work in computer-mediated environments underscores the promises and perils of overreliance on security and assurance structures as replacements for interpersonal trust. These conceptual distinctions are critical because the future shape of the Internet will depend on whether we build assurance structures to limit and control ambiguity or allow trust to emerge in the presence of risk and uncertainty.

  8. The Effect of Instructional Supervision on Principal Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahnee, Robbie L.

    2010-01-01

    Within-school climates and culture are predicated on organizational structures, distributions of power, and roles that are highly interactive. Hierarchical structures and uneven power distributions, primarily those of teacher-principal, have been found to challenge levels of trust. School interaction patterns form the basis of much of the school…

  9. [Trust at the heart of private nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Pivot, Annie

    2013-10-01

    In order to obtain the state nursing diploma nurses must acquire a specific number of skills. Where does trust fit in? Although it is not implicit it forms the core of the nursing relationship with the patient and his or her family. This article presents the personal account of a private nurse practitioner.

  10. Effect of Triplet T 1-State Population on Fluorescence Polarization Kinetics of Organic Fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanishevsky, I. V.; Chernyavskii, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    The fluorescence polarization kinetics of fluorescent organic molecules and molecules with two interconverting photoisomeric forms and fixed molecular skeletons were investigated by numerical methods based on the solution of population balance equations. The depolarizing effect of the lowest triplet T 1 state and the polarization time dependence for quasi-continuous-wave (cw) and pulsed photoexcitation were studied using model compounds. The fluorescence depolarization with cw excitation was characterized by times that were shorter than the T 1-state lifetime; for the isomers, also by times that correlated with the photoisomerization times. Intense pulsed photoexcitation distorted significantly the initial oscillator orientation distribution in the singlet S 0 and S 1 states and could lead to sign reversal of the polarization.

  11. AdS5 vacua from type IIB supergravity on T 1 ,1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Jan; Muranaka, Constantin

    2017-06-01

    We study maximally supersymmetric Anti-de Sitter backgrounds in consistent \\mathcal{N}=2 truncations of type IIB supergravity compactified on the Sasaki-Einstein manifold T 1,1. In particular, we focus on truncations that contain fields coming from the nontrivial second and third cohomology forms on T 1,1. These give rise to \\mathcal{N}=2 super-gravity coupled to two vector- and two hypermultiplets (Betti-vector truncation) or one vector- and three hypermultiplets (Betti-hyper truncation), respectively. We find that both truncations admit AdS5 backgrounds with the gauge group always being broken but containing at least an U(1) R factor. Moreover, in both cases we show that the moduli space of AdS vacua is nontrivial and of maximal dimension. Finally, we explicitly compute the metrics on these moduli spaces.

  12. Zn2+-dependent redox switch in the intracellular T1-T1 interface of a Kv channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangyu; Strang, Candace; Pfaffinger, Paul J; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2007-05-04

    The thiol-based redox regulation of proteins plays a central role in cellular signaling. Here, we investigated the redox regulation at the Zn(2+) binding site (HX(5)CX(20)CC) in the intracellular T1-T1 inter-subunit interface of a Kv4 channel. This site undergoes conformational changes coupled to voltage-dependent gating, which may be sensitive to oxidative stress. The main results show that internally applied nitric oxide (NO) inhibits channel activity profoundly. This inhibition is reversed by reduced glutathione and suppressed by intracellular Zn(2+), and at least two Zn(2+) site cysteines are required to observe the NO-induced inhibition (Cys-110 from one subunit and Cys-132 from the neighboring subunit). Biochemical evidence suggests strongly that NO induces a disulfide bridge between Cys-110 and Cys-132 in intact cells. Finally, further mutational studies suggest that intra-subunit Zn(2+) coordination involving His-104, Cys-131, and Cys-132 protects against the formation of the inhibitory disulfide bond. We propose that the interfacial T1 Zn(2+) site of Kv4 channels acts as a Zn(2+)-dependent redox switch that may regulate the activity of neuronal and cardiac A-type K(+) currents under physiological and pathological conditions.

  13. A Trusted Portable Computing Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming-wei, Fang; Jun-jun, Wu; Peng-fei, Yu; Xin-fang, Zhang

    A trusted portable computing device and its security mechanism were presented to solve the security issues, such as the attack of virus and Trojan horse, the lost and stolen of storage device, in mobile office. It used smart card to build a trusted portable security base, virtualization to create a secure virtual execution environment, two-factor authentication mechanism to identify legitimate users, and dynamic encryption to protect data privacy. The security environment described in this paper is characteristic of portability, security and reliability. It can meet the security requirement of mobile office.

  14. Barometer. Acute trusts February 2005.

    PubMed

    2005-03-17

    Almost two thirds of acute trusts rate the quality of commissioning from their PCTs at three out of 10 or less, according to the latest HSJ Barometer survey. This is the lowest score since we began the survey a year ago. Confidence in their performance against the 98 per cent four-hour A&E target fell sharply from a December high to an average of 6.87. The survey also found that fewer than one in seven trusts were confident of winning foundation status by the end of 2006-07.

  15. Saturation pulse design for quantitative myocardial T1 mapping.

    PubMed

    Chow, Kelvin; Kellman, Peter; Spottiswoode, Bruce S; Nielles-Vallespin, Sonia; Arai, Andrew E; Salerno, Michael; Thompson, Richard B

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative saturation-recovery based T1 mapping sequences are less sensitive to systematic errors than the Modified Look-Locker Inversion recovery (MOLLI) technique but require high performance saturation pulses. We propose to optimize adiabatic and pulse train saturation pulses for quantitative T1 mapping to have <1 % absolute residual longitudinal magnetization (|MZ/M0|) over ranges of B0 and [Formula: see text] (B1 scale factor) inhomogeneity found at 1.5 T and 3 T. Design parameters for an adiabatic BIR4-90 pulse were optimized for improved performance within 1.5 T B0 (±120 Hz) and [Formula: see text] (0.7-1.0) ranges. Flip angles in hard pulse trains of 3-6 pulses were optimized for 1.5 T and 3 T, with consideration of T1 values, field inhomogeneities (B0 = ±240 Hz and [Formula: see text]=0.4-1.2 at 3 T), and maximum achievable B1 field strength. Residual MZ/M0 was simulated and measured experimentally for current standard and optimized saturation pulses in phantoms and in-vivo human studies. T1 maps were acquired at 3 T in human subjects and a swine using a SAturation recovery single-SHot Acquisition (SASHA) technique with a standard 90°-90°-90° and an optimized 6-pulse train. Measured residual MZ/M0 in phantoms had excellent agreement with simulations over a wide range of B0 and [Formula: see text]. The optimized BIR4-90 reduced the maximum residual |MZ/M0| to <1 %, a 5.8× reduction compared to a reference BIR4-90. An optimized 3-pulse train achieved a maximum residual |MZ/M0| <1 % for the 1.5 T optimization range compared to 11.3 % for a standard 90°-90°-90° pulse train, while a 6-pulse train met this target for the wider 3 T ranges of B0 and [Formula: see text]. The 6-pulse train demonstrated more uniform saturation across both the myocardium and entire field of view than other saturation pulses in human studies. T1 maps were more spatially homogeneous with 6-pulse train SASHA than the reference 90°-90°-90° SASHA in both

  16. Adequate trust avails, mistaken trust matters: on the moral responsibility of doctors as proxies for patients' trust in biobank research.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Linus; Helgesson, Gert; Hansson, Mats G; Eriksson, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    In Sweden, most patients are recruited into biobank research by non-researcher doctors. Patients' trust in doctors may therefore be important to their willingness to participate. We suggest a model of trust that makes sense of such transitions of trust between domains and distinguishes adequate trust from mistaken trust. The unique position of doctors implies, we argue, a Kantian imperfect duty to compensate for patients' mistaken trust. There are at least three kinds of mistaken trust, each of which requires a different set of countermeasures. First, trust is mistaken when necessary competence is lacking; the competence must be developed or the illusion dispelled. Second, trust is irrational whenever the patient is mistaken about his actual reasons for trusting. Care must therefore be taken to support the patient's reasoning and moral agency. Third, some patients inappropriately trust doctors to recommend only research that will benefit them directly. Such trust should be counteracted by nurturing a culture where patients expect to be asked occasionally to contribute to the common good.

  17. Race, healthcare access and physician trust among prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Do, Young Kyung; Spain, Pamela; Clark, Jack A.; Hamilton, Robert J.; Galanko, Joseph A.; Jackman, Anne; Talcott, James A.; Godley, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of healthcare access and other characteristics on physician trust among black and white prostate cancer patients. Methods A three-timepoint follow-up telephone survey after cancer diagnosis was conducted. This study analyzed data on 474 patients and their 1,320 interviews over three time periods. Results Among other subpopulations, black patients who delayed seeking care had physician trust levels that were far lower than that of both Caucasians as well as that of the black patients overall. Black patients had greater variability in their levels of physician trust compared to their white counterparts. Conclusions Both race and access are important in explaining overall lower levels and greater variability in physician trust among black prostate cancer patients. Access barriers among black patients may spill over to the clinical encounter in the form of less physician trust, potentially contributing to racial disparities in treatment received and subsequent outcomes. Policy efforts to address the racial disparities in prostate cancer should prioritize improving healthcare access among minority groups. PMID:19777359

  18. Basal Ganglia T1 Hyperintensity in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Parvinian, A; Iyer, V N; Pannu, B S; Apala, D R; Wood, C P; Brinjikji, W

    2017-10-01

    The implications of basal ganglia T1 hyperintensity remain unclear in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. This study was performed to assess the prevalence of this imaging finding in a large cohort of patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and to identify any association between this phenomenon and other disease manifestations. In this retrospective study, we identified all patients at our institution diagnosed with definite hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia from 2001 to 2017. Patients who did not undergo brain MR imaging were excluded. Patient demographics, laboratory results, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia disease characteristics were noted. Basal ganglia hyperintensity was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively relative to the signal intensity in the ipsilateral thalami. Statistical analysis was performed with commercially available software. A total of 312 patients (41% men, 59% women; mean age, 51 ± 18 years) with definite hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia were identified. Basal ganglia T1 hyperintensity was present in 23.4% of patients and demonstrated a statistically significant association with older age (P < .001), increased hepatic AVMs (P < .001), high cardiac output state (P < .001), hepatic failure (P = .01), elevated peak serum alkaline phosphatase level (P = .03), and increased total bilirubin count (P = .03). There was no significant association with sex, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia genetic mutation status, parkinsonism, or serum transaminase levels. Basal ganglia T1 hyperintensity occurs in >23% of patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and is associated with hepatic vascular malformations, hepatic dysfunction, and elevated cardiac output. The presence of this finding on screening MR imaging in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia should prompt further evaluation for visceral lesions causing arteriovenous shunting. © 2017 by American Journal of

  19. 25 CFR 1000.355 - How are trust evaluations conducted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust Evaluations § 1000.355 How are trust evaluations... required by § 1000.365. (b) This section describes the general framework for trust reviews. However,...

  20. 25 CFR 1000.355 - How are trust evaluations conducted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust Evaluations § 1000.355 How are trust evaluations... required by § 1000.365. (b) This section describes the general framework for trust reviews. However,...

  1. 25 CFR 1000.355 - How are trust evaluations conducted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust Evaluations § 1000.355 How are trust evaluations... required by § 1000.365. (b) This section describes the general framework for trust reviews. However,...

  2. 25 CFR 1000.355 - How are trust evaluations conducted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust Evaluations § 1000.355 How are trust evaluations... required by § 1000.365. (b) This section describes the general framework for trust reviews. However,...

  3. T1w dark blood imaging improves detection of contrast enhancing lesions in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Christian; Schneider, Tanja; Sedlacik, Jan; Kutzner, Daniel; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Heesen, Christoph; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS) the sensitivity for detection of contrast enhancing lesions (CEL) in T1-weighted scans is essential for diagnostics and therapy decisions. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the sensitivity of T1w MPRAGE scans in comparison to T1w dark blood technique (T1-DB) for CEL in MS. 3T MR imaging was performed in 37 MS patients, including T2-weighted imaging, T1w MPRAGE before and after gadolinium injection (unenhanced-T1 and T1-CE) and T1-DB imaging. After gadolinium application, the T1-DB scan was performed prior to T1-CE. From unenhanced-T1 and T1-CE scans, subtraction images (T1-SUB) were calculated. The number of CEL was determined separately on T1-CE and T1-DB by two raters independently. Lesions only detected on T1-DB scans then were verified on T1-SUB. Only lesions detected by both raters were included in further analysis. In 16 patients, at least one CEL was detected by both rater, either on T1-CE or T1-DB. All lesions that were detected on T1-CE were also detected on T1-DB images. The total number of contrast enhancing lesions detected on T1-DB images (n = 54) by both raters was significantly higher than the corresponding number of lesions identified on T1-CE (n = 27) (p = 0.01); all of these lesions could be verified on SUB images. In 21 patients, no CEL was detected in any of the sequences. The application of T1-DB technique increases the sensitivity for CEL in MS, especially for those lesions that show only subtle increase in intensity after Gadolinium application but remain hypo- or iso-intense to surrounding tissue.

  4. T-1 Test Program Ver. 6.0.1

    SciTech Connect

    Perlinski, Anthony W.

    2004-05-21

    The software allows for easy setup and testing of a variety of RF Electronic Sensor Platforms (ESPs). The software interprets RF messages from the ESP and displays the information in a graphical user interface. This program is used primarily for testing of the T-1 Electronic Sensor Platform. The software imports Electronic Tag Data files which are created from the Electronic Sensor Platform Programmer (ESPP). The software will automatically add sensors to its database when a RF message s received that the program recognizes. Any data that is generated can be stored to a file for later analysis.

  5. The TOTEM T1 read out card motherboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minutoli, S.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.

    2010-12-01

    This article describes the Read Out Card (ROC) motherboard, which is the main component of the T1 forward telescope front-end electronic system. The ROC main objectives are to acquire tracking data and trigger information from the detector. It performs data conversion from electrical to optical format and transfers the data streams to the next level of the system and it implements Slow Control modules which are able to receive, decode and distribute the LHC machine low jitter clock and fast command. The ROC also provides a spy mezzanine connection based on programmable FPGA and USB2.0 for laboratory and portable DAQ debugging system.

  6. 78 FR 58605 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8453-EMP, Form 8453-F, Form 8453-FE, Form 8879-F...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... comments concerning Form 8453-F, U.S. Estate of Trust Income Tax Declaration and Signature for Electronic...- file Return; Form 8453-EMP, Employment Tax Declaration for an IRS e- file Return; Form 8879-EMP, IRS e... INFORMATION: Title: Employment Tax Declaration for an IRS e-file Return. OMB Number: 1545-0967. Form...

  7. Applying Machine Trust Models to Forensic Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, Marika; Venter, Hein; Eloff, Jan; Olivier, Martin

    Digital forensics involves the identification, preservation, analysis and presentation of electronic evidence for use in legal proceedings. In the presence of contradictory evidence, forensic investigators need a means to determine which evidence can be trusted. This is particularly true in a trust model environment where computerised agents may make trust-based decisions that influence interactions within the system. This paper focuses on the analysis of evidence in trust-based environments and the determination of the degree to which evidence can be trusted. The trust model proposed in this work may be implemented in a tool for conducting trust-based forensic investigations. The model takes into account the trust environment and parameters that influence interactions in a computer network being investigated. Also, it allows for crimes to be reenacted to create more substantial evidentiary proof.

  8. A Unified Theory of Trust and Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Guoray; Squicciarini, Anna

    We consider a type of applications where collaboration and trust are tightly coupled with the need to protect sensitive information. Existing trust management technologies have been limited to offering generic mechanisms for enforcing access control policies based on exchanged credentials, and rarely deal with the situated meaning of trust in a specific collaborative context. Towards trust management for highly dynamic and collaborative activities, this paper describes a theory of trust intention and semantics that makes explicit connections between collaborative activities and trust. The model supports inferring trust state based on knowledge about state of collaborative activity. It is the first step towards a unified approach for computer-mediated trust communication in the context of collaborative work.

  9. Building trusting relationships in online health communities.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Ha, Sejin; Widdows, Richard

    2013-09-01

    This study investigates consumers' use of online health communities (OHCs) for healthcare from a relationship building perspective based on the commitment-trust theory of relationships. The study proposes that perspective taking, empathic concern, self-efficacy, and network density affect the development of both cognitive and affective trust, which together determine OHC members' membership continuance intention (MCI) and knowledge contribution. Data collected from eight existing OHCs (N=255) were utilized to test the hypothesized model. Results show that perspective taking and self-efficacy can increase cognitive trust and affective trust, respectively. Network density contributes to cognitive and affective trust. Both cognitive trust and affective trust influence MCI, while only affective trust impacts members' knowledge contribution behaviors.

  10. 7 CFR 1400.205 - Trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE GENERAL REGULATIONS AND POLICIES PAYMENT LIMITATION AND PAYMENT ELIGIBILITY FOR 2009 AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.205 Trusts. A trust will be considered...

  11. 77 FR 5065 - Preservation Trust Advisors, LLC and Northern Lights Fund Trust; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Preservation Trust Advisors, LLC and Northern Lights Fund Trust; Notice of Application January 26...'') and Northern Lights Fund Trust (the ``Trust''). FILING DATES: The application was filed on...

  12. An Investigation of Children's Peer Trust across Culture: Is the Composition of Peer Trust Universal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betts, Lucy R.; Rotenberg, Ken J.; Petrocchi, Serena; Lecciso, Flavia; Sakai, Atsushi; Maeshiro, Kazumi; Judson, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The components of children's trust in same-gender peers (trust beliefs, ascribed trustworthiness, and dyadic reciprocal trust) were examined in samples of 8-11-year-olds from the UK, Italy, and Japan. Trust was assessed by children's ratings of the extent to which same-gender classmates kept promises and kept secrets. Social relations analyses…

  13. 26 CFR 26.2654-1 - Certain trusts treated as separate trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... trust under which income is to be paid in equal shares for 10 years to T's child, C, and T's grandchild... principal and the distributee's future rights with respect to the trust are correspondingly reduced. T may... children and grandchildren. The trust provides that, when T's youngest child reaches age 21, the trust will...

  14. Assessment of Organizational Trust: Italian Adaptation and Factorial Validity of the Organizational Trust Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidotto, Giulio; Vicentini, Marco; Argentero, Piergiorgio; Bromiley, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Trust influences interactions among individuals and organizations but has been an elusive concept to define and measure. The Organizational Trust Inventory (OTI) measures three dimensions of organizational trust, as defined by Cummings and Bromiley (in: Kramer and Tyler (eds) Trust in Organizations, 1996), believing or feeling that others: keep…

  15. An Investigation of Children's Peer Trust across Culture: Is the Composition of Peer Trust Universal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betts, Lucy R.; Rotenberg, Ken J.; Petrocchi, Serena; Lecciso, Flavia; Sakai, Atsushi; Maeshiro, Kazumi; Judson, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The components of children's trust in same-gender peers (trust beliefs, ascribed trustworthiness, and dyadic reciprocal trust) were examined in samples of 8-11-year-olds from the UK, Italy, and Japan. Trust was assessed by children's ratings of the extent to which same-gender classmates kept promises and kept secrets. Social relations analyses…

  16. Trust or Consequences: The Relationship between Faculty Trust and Faculty Learning Communities in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Gaye R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between FLC membership and faculty trust in higher education colleagues and faculty trust in higher education administration in public and private universities in the United States. This quantitative study examines trust in colleagues and trust in administration in higher education, two…

  17. Inferring Trust Based on Similarity with TILLIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakolifard, Mozhgan; Herrmann, Peter; Knapskog, Svein J.

    A network of people having established trust relations and a model for propagation of related trust scores are fundamental building blocks in many of today’s most successful e-commerce and recommendation systems. However, the web of trust is often too sparse to predict trust values between non-familiar people with high accuracy. Trust inferences are transitive associations among users in the context of an underlying social network and may provide additional information to alleviate the consequences of the sparsity and possible cold-start problems. Such approaches are helpful, provided that a complete trust path exists between the two users. An alternative approach to the problem is advocated in this paper. Based on collaborative filtering one can exploit the like-mindedness resp. similarity of individuals to infer trust to yet unknown parties which increases the trust relations in the web. For instance, if one knows that with respect to a specific property, two parties are trusted alike by a large number of different trusters, one can assume that they are similar. Thus, if one has a certain degree of trust to the one party, one can safely assume a very similar trustworthiness of the other one. In an attempt to provide high quality recommendations and proper initial trust values even when no complete trust propagation path or user profile exists, we propose TILLIT — a model based on combination of trust inferences and user similarity. The similarity is derived from the structure of the trust graph and users’ trust behavior as opposed to other collaborative-filtering based approaches which use ratings of items or user’s profile. We describe an algorithm realizing the approach based on a combination of trust inferences and user similarity, and validate the algorithm using a real large-scale data-set.

  18. The magnetic field dependence of water T1 in tissues.

    PubMed

    Diakova, Galina; Korb, Jean-Pierre; Bryant, Robert G

    2012-07-01

    The magnetic field dependence of the composite (1)H(2)O nuclear magnetic resonance signal T(1) was measured for excised samples of rat liver, muscle, and kidney over the field range from 0.7 to 7 T (35-300 MHz) with a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer using sample-shuttle methods. Based on extensive measurements on simpler component systems, the magnetic field dependence of T(1) of all tissues studied are readily fitted at Larmor frequencies above 1 MHz with a simple relaxation equation consisting of three contributions: a power law, A*ω(-0.60) related to the interaction of water with long-lived-protein binding sites, a logarithmic term B*τ(d) *log(1+1/(ωτ(d))(2)) related to water diffusion at macromolecular interfacial regions, and a constant term associated with the high frequency limit of water-spin-lattice relaxation. The parameters A and B include the concentration and surface area dependences respectively. The logarithmic diffusion term becomes significant at high magnetic fields and is consistent with rapid translational dynamics at macromolecular surfaces. The data are fitted well with translational correlation times of approximately 15 ps for human brain white matter, but with a B value three times larger than gray matter tissues. This analysis suggests that the water-surface translational correlation time is approximately three times longer than in gray matter. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Extended ISIS sequences insensitive to T(1) smearing.

    PubMed

    Ljungberg, M; Starck, G; Vikhoff-Baaz, B; Alpsten, M; Ekholm, S; Forssell-Aronsson, E

    2000-10-01

    Image selected in vivo spectroscopy (ISIS) is a volume selection method often used for in vivo (31)P MRS, since it is suitable for measurements of substances with short T(2). However, ISIS can suffer from significant signal contributions caused by T(1) smearing from regions outside the VOI. A computer model was developed to simulate this contamination. The simulation results for the ISIS experiment order implemented in our MR system (ISIS-0) were in agreement with results obtained from phantom measurements. A new extended ISIS experiment order (E-ISIS) was developed, consisting of four "optimal" ISIS experiment orders (ISIS-1 to ISIS-4) performed consecutively with dummy ISIS experiments in between. The simulation results show that contamination due to T(1) smearing is, effectively, eliminated with E-ISIS and is significantly lower than for ISIS-0 and ISIS-1. E-ISIS offers increased accuracy for quantitative and qualitative determination of substances studied using in vivo MRS. Hence, E-ISIS can be valuable for both clinical and research applications.

  20. Research of trust model in P2P network based on trusted computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rong; Li, Lei

    2013-03-01

    In order to strengthen the security of P2P networks, it is necessary to build trust relationships between nodes of networks. However, the traditional trust evaluation models can't resist the attacks of Pseudospoofing and Pseudostheft effectively. To resolve the problems, in this paper, the trusted computing method is introduced into P2P networks, and an idea of group trust model based on trusted computing methods is proposed. In the process of trust evaluation, the model can realize the anonymous attestation of the node body, which improves the creditability of trust relationships between nodes and resolves the security problems of P2P networks.

  1. Trust in School Principals: Teachers' Opinions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balyer, Aydin

    2017-01-01

    Trust is considered as one of the essential elements at schools. Although it is important, there is relatively little research on trust in educational settings. Research indicate that trust across school affects much of a school's functioning and it is a critical resource as principals embark on improvement plans. In this regard, it is a matter of…

  2. Trust and Schooling in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dincer, Oguzhan C.

    2011-01-01

    I investigate the effects of trust on human capital measured as average years of schooling in U.S. states using data from the 1980s and the 1990s. I find robust evidence that an increase in trust increases schooling across U.S. states. According the results of the seemingly unrelated regression estimation, a 25 percentage point increase in "Trust"…

  3. Trust and Relationship Building in Electronic Commerce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadopoulou, Panagiota; Andreou, Andreas; Kanellis, Panagiotis; Martakos, Drakoulis

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of the need for trust in electronic commerce to build customer relationships focuses on a model drawn from established theoretical work on trust and relationship marketing that highlights differences between traditional and electronic commerce. Considers how trust can be built into virtual environments. (Contains 50 references.)…

  4. 40 CFR 280.102 - Trust fund.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trust fund. 280.102 Section 280.102...) Financial Responsibility § 280.102 Trust fund. (a) An owner or operator may satisfy the requirements of § 280.93 by establishing a trust fund that conforms to the requirements of this section. The...

  5. 14 CFR 47.8 - Voting trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Voting trusts. 47.8 Section 47.8 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRCRAFT REGISTRATION General § 47.8 Voting trusts. (a) If a voting trust is used to qualify a domestic corporation as...

  6. Temperament Constructs Related to Betrayal of Trust

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    disintegrate. The interrelatedness between system trust and interpersonal trust has been noted by Durkheim (1933), who predicted a loss of trust in others...and suspicion. Journal of Conflict Resolution, 2, 265-279. Durkheim , E. (1933). The division of labor in societ’. New York: Free Press of Glencoe

  7. Trust and Relationship Building in Electronic Commerce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadopoulou, Panagiota; Andreou, Andreas; Kanellis, Panagiotis; Martakos, Drakoulis

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of the need for trust in electronic commerce to build customer relationships focuses on a model drawn from established theoretical work on trust and relationship marketing that highlights differences between traditional and electronic commerce. Considers how trust can be built into virtual environments. (Contains 50 references.)…

  8. Animal Behaviour: Friendship Enhances Trust in Chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Silk, Joan

    2016-01-25

    Individuals that participate in exchanges with delayed rewards can be exploited if their partners don't reciprocate. In humans, friendships are built on trust, and trust enhances cooperation. New evidence suggests that close social bonds also enhance trust in chimpanzees.

  9. 46 CFR 67.36 - Trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Trust. 67.36 Section 67.36 Shipping COAST GUARD... Citizenship Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.36 Trust. (a) For the purpose of obtaining a registry or recreational endorsement, a trust arrangement meets citizenship requirements if: (1) Each of...

  10. The structure of the mite allergen Blo t 1 explains the limited antibody cross-reactivity to Der p 1.

    PubMed

    Meno, K H; Kastrup, J S; Kuo, I-C; Chua, K Y; Gajhede, M

    2017-04-01

    The Blomia tropicalis (Blo t) mite species is considered a storage mite in temperate climate zones and an important source of indoor allergens causing allergic asthma and rhinitis in tropical and subtropical regions. Here, we report the crystal structure of one of the allergens from Blo t, recombinant proBlo t 1 (rproBlo t 1), determined at 2.1 Å resolution. Overall, the fold of rproBlo t 1 is characteristic for the pro-form of cysteine proteases from the C1A class. Structural comparison of experimentally mapped Der f 1/Der p1 IgG epitopes to the same surface patch on Blo t 1, as well as of sequence identity of surface-exposed residues, suggests limited cross-reactivity between these allergens and Blo t 1. This is in agreement with ELISA inhibition results showing that, although cross-reactive human IgE epitopes exist, there are unique IgE epitopes for both Blo t 1 and Der p 1.

  11. OXYGEN PROTECTION OF BACTERIOPHAGE T1 AGAINST IONIZING RADIATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Bachofer, C. S.; Pottinger, M. Aelred

    1956-01-01

    Bacteriophage T1 was suspended in distilled water and in phosphate buffer, saturated with oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide, and irradiated with gamma rays and x-rays. Under the same conditions phage was exposed to hydrogen peroxide. Oxygen acted as a protective agent against both irradiation and hydrogen peroxide inactivation. As a protective agent against irradiation, oxygen was more efficient in distilled water than in buffer. The phage was much more sensitive to irradiation in the presence of hydrogen or nitrogen than in the presence of oxygen. Survivals of phage irradiated in suspensions saturated with hydrogen and with nitrogen did not differ significantly. From this it was concluded that oxygen did not protect T1 by removing atomic hydrogen from the irradiated medium, since the hydrogen-saturated medium increased the yield of atomic hydrogen but did not increase the yield of inactivated phage. It was presumed, therefore, that phage is sensitive to OH radicals and this was confirmed by irradiating phage with UV in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and comparing this survival with the survivals obtained from hydrogen peroxide alone and from UV alone. The combined effect of hydrogen peroxide and UV acting simultaneously was greater than the effect attributable to hydrogen peroxide and UV acting separately. Evidence for sensitivity to HO2 radicals was considered, and the effect was attributed chiefly to an oxidizing action since phage sensitivity is greater at higher hydrogen ion concentrations, which favor oxidation by HO2 radicals. Since the OH radical is a more efficient oxidizing agent than O-, the former being favored in an acid medium, the latter in an alkaline medium, and since the phage is more sensitive in the first situation than in the second, the present tests proved the importance of oxidation as the mechanism of inactivation. Since some inactivation was encountered when phage was exposed to reducing agents, independently of

  12. Trust enhances IT service management.

    PubMed

    2007-08-01

    ITIL process adoption may be a prerequisite for the National Programme for IT (NPfIT), but implementation is far from straightforward. IT services company Plan-Net has been assisting Barts and The London NHS Trust with implementing its ambitious ITIL processes deployment.

  13. Review of Interorganizational Trust Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    58 2.24 STEPHENS, FULK , & MONGE (2009) ................................................................................................ 59...trust. 2.24 Stephens, Fulk , & Monge (2009) STEPHENS, K. J., FULK , J., & MONGE, P. R. (2009). Constrained choices in alliance formations: Cupids and...organizational marriages. Human Relations, 62, 501-536. Stephens, Fulk , and Monge (2009) note that the rate at which organizations are entering into

  14. Taxability of Educational Benefits Trusts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Law Quarterly, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Corporations have found the promise of providing a college education to the children of employees--without the recognition of income to the parent-employee--to be a popular fringe benefit. The Internal Revenue Service has attacked educational benefit trusts in Revenue Ruling 75-448. Implications are discussed. (LBH)

  15. The Sutton Trust: Mobility Manifesto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton Trust, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Ahead of the party conference season, the Sutton Trust is urging fairer admissions to comprehensives, grammar schools and independent schools as part of a 10-point Mobility Manifesto setting out ten practical policy steps designed to put social mobility at the heart of the 2015 election campaign. The manifesto urges greater use of ballots (random…

  16. Education and the National Trust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binns, Gareth

    1995-01-01

    Defines the British National Trust as it marks its centenary. Known for its work in protecting historic buildings and places of natural beauty, a major focus is now education. Schoolchildren may attend curriculum-based special programs when visiting historic houses and the countryside. Others use open-space sites with no specific education…

  17. The Administrative Team, Trust & Gender.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfinkel, Elliot Z.

    This paper describes the first phase of a research study that examined (1) how superintendents define and select their administrative teams; (2) how team values are conceptualized by superintendents; (3) how "trust" is defined and its value perceived by superintendents; and (4) whether or not gender influences the way superintendents define "team"…

  18. Trust as a Teaching Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon-Weil, Anica; Hewitt, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Should I stop the conflict or narrate it? Do I redirect or reassure? Two infant/toddler teachers explain how they use trust as a teaching tool, "teaching" less and involving the toddlers in their classroom in the decisions that affect them. They took to heart the philosophy of Magda Gerber, who urged parents to "observe more, do less." The author…

  19. The Sutton Trust: Mobility Manifesto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton Trust, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Ahead of the party conference season, the Sutton Trust is urging fairer admissions to comprehensives, grammar schools and independent schools as part of a 10-point Mobility Manifesto setting out ten practical policy steps designed to put social mobility at the heart of the 2015 election campaign. The manifesto urges greater use of ballots (random…

  20. The Role of Trust in Information Science and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Stephen; Dibben, Mark R.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the notion of trust as it relates to information science and technology, specifically user interfaces, autonomous agents, and information systems. Highlights include theoretical meaning of trust; trust and levels of analysis, including organizational trust; electronic commerce, user interfaces, and static trust; dynamic trust; and trust…

  1. The Role of Trust in Information Science and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Stephen; Dibben, Mark R.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the notion of trust as it relates to information science and technology, specifically user interfaces, autonomous agents, and information systems. Highlights include theoretical meaning of trust; trust and levels of analysis, including organizational trust; electronic commerce, user interfaces, and static trust; dynamic trust; and trust…

  2. The Relationship between Collective Student Trust and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, David Carl

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between collective student trust and student achievement was tested in a sample of 1,748 5th grade students in 34 Title I elementary schools in an urban and urban fringe district. Trust was defined, the conditions of trust described, and the facets of trust discussed. Collective trust was distinguished from relational trust and…

  3. New T1-based superconductor T1PbSrRCuO without Ca with Tc above 100 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Z. Z.; Xin, Y.; Meason, J. M.

    1991-04-01

    Ca-free T1PbSrRCuO samples (R=rare earths) with Tc up to above 100 K were prepared, and studied by resistance and ac susceptibility measurements and by powder x-ray diffraction analyses. A 1212-type phase (Tl1-xPbx)Sr2(Sr1-yRy)Cu2Oz is responsible for the observed supercondcutivity. A rare-earth is required for the formation of the 1212 phase. Pb-dopping is necessary to increase the Tc of the 1212 phase from 90 K to above 100 K.

  4. Ultrafast NMR T1 relaxation measurements: probing molecular properties in real time.

    PubMed

    Smith, Pieter E S; Donovan, Kevin J; Szekely, Or; Baias, Maria; Frydman, Lucio

    2013-09-16

    The longitudinal relaxation properties of NMR active nuclei carry useful information about the site-specific chemical environments and about the mobility of molecular fragments. Molecular mobility is in turn a key parameter reporting both on stable properties, such as size, as well as on dynamic ones, such as transient interactions and irreversible aggregation. In order to fully investigate the latter, a fast sampling of the relaxation parameters of transiently formed molecular species may be needed. Nevertheless, the acquisition of longitudinal relaxation data is typically slow, being limited by the requirement that the time for which the nucleus relaxes be varied incrementally until a complete build-up curve is generated. Recently, a number of single-shot-inversion-recovery methods have been developed capable of alleviating this need; still, these may be challenged by either spectral resolution restrictions or when coping with very fast relaxing nuclei. Here, we present a new experiment to measure the T1s of multiple nuclear spins that experience fast longitudinal relaxation, while retaining full high-resolution chemical shift information. Good agreement is observed between T1s measured with conventional means and T1s measured using the new technique. The method is applied to the real-time investigation of the reaction between D-xylose and sodium borate, which is in turn elucidated with the aid of ancillary ultrafast and conventional 2D TOCSY measurements. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Contrast-enhanced 3T MR Perfusion of Musculoskeletal Tumours: T1 Value Heterogeneity Assessment and Evaluation of the Influence of T1 Estimation Methods on Quantitative Parameters.

    PubMed

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto; Leplat, Christophe; Chen, Bailiang; De Verbizier, Jacques; Beaumont, Marine; Badr, Sammy; Cotten, Anne; Blum, Alain

    2017-06-14

    To evaluate intra-tumour and striated muscle T1 value heterogeneity and the influence of different methods of T1 estimation on the variability of quantitative perfusion parameters. Eighty-two patients with a histologically confirmed musculoskeletal tumour were prospectively included in this study and, with ethics committee approval, underwent contrast-enhanced MR perfusion and T1 mapping. T1 value variations in viable tumour areas and in normal-appearing striated muscle were assessed. In 20 cases, normal muscle perfusion parameters were calculated using three different methods: signal based and gadolinium concentration based on fixed and variable T1 values. Tumour and normal muscle T1 values were significantly different (p = 0.0008). T1 value heterogeneity was higher in tumours than in normal muscle (variation of 19.8% versus 13%). The T1 estimation method had a considerable influence on the variability of perfusion parameters. Fixed T1 values yielded higher coefficients of variation than variable T1 values (mean 109.6 ± 41.8% and 58.3 ± 14.1% respectively). Area under the curve was the least variable parameter (36%). T1 values in musculoskeletal tumours are significantly different and more heterogeneous than normal muscle. Patient-specific T1 estimation is needed for direct inter-patient comparison of perfusion parameters. • T1 value variation in musculoskeletal tumours is considerable. • T1 values in muscle and tumours are significantly different. • Patient-specific T1 estimation is needed for comparison of inter-patient perfusion parameters. • Technical variation is higher in permeability than semiquantitative perfusion parameters.

  6. T1- and T2-weighted imaging at 8 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Kangarlu, A; Abduljalil, A M; Robitaille, P M

    1999-01-01

    In this work, both T1- and T2-weighted fast imaging methods at 8 T are presented. These include the modified driven equilibrium Fourier transform (MDEFT) and rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) methods, respectively. Axial MDEFT images were acquired with large nutation angles, both partially suppressing gray and white matter and permitting the visualization of vascular structures rich in unsaturated spins. Sagittal RARE images, acquired from the same volunteer, were highly T2-weighted, thus highlighting the CSF. At the same time, they provided good visualization of the corpus callosum, cerebellum, and gray and white matter structures. Importantly, both MDEFT and RARE images could be acquired without violating specific absorption rate guidelines.

  7. Internal disruptions and RHF in IR-T1 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoranneviss, M.; Masnavi, M.; Khademian, A.

    1996-12-31

    Sawtooth oscillations are observed on IR-T1 Tokamak during low ql discharge with a disruption time of about 30--60 {micro}s. The q = 1 singular surface occurs at radius 3--3.5 cm and inverted Sawtooth from chords outside this radius. The superimposed (m = 1) oscillation with a frequency of about 19 kHz {approx} 25 kHz, according to the tokamak discharges parameters, preceding the Sawtooth oscillation. One major effect the Sawtooth oscillation is to flatten the temperature and density profiles approximately out to a mixing radius rm = {radical}2 rs,. Furthermore, by applying RHFs (L = 2 and L = 3), the Sawtooth behavior is modified. The magnitude of the weak RHFs used in the experiments did not exceed 1% of Bp. Results showed that the weak RHFs magnetic perturbation would change the MHD instabilities and the Sawtooth behavior, as well as plasma, confinement.

  8. Predators and the public trust.

    PubMed

    Treves, Adrian; Chapron, Guillaume; López-Bao, Jose V; Shoemaker, Chase; Goeckner, Apollonia R; Bruskotter, Jeremy T

    2017-02-01

    Many democratic governments recognize a duty to conserve environmental resources, including wild animals, as a public trust for current and future citizens. These public trust principles have informed two centuries of U.S.A. Supreme Court decisions and environmental laws worldwide. Nevertheless numerous populations of large-bodied, mammalian carnivores (predators) were eradicated in the 20th century. Environmental movements and strict legal protections have fostered predator recoveries across the U.S.A. and Europe since the 1970s. Now subnational jurisdictions are regaining management authority from central governments for their predator subpopulations. Will the history of local eradication repeat or will these jurisdictions adopt public trust thinking and their obligation to broad public interests over narrower ones? We review the role of public trust principles in the restoration and preservation of controversial species. In so doing we argue for the essential roles of scientists from many disciplines concerned with biological diversity and its conservation. We look beyond species endangerment to future generations' interests in sustainability, particularly non-consumptive uses. Although our conclusions apply to all wild organisms, we focus on predators because of the particular challenges they pose for government trustees, trust managers, and society. Gray wolves Canis lupus L. deserve particular attention, because detailed information and abundant policy debates across regions have exposed four important challenges for preserving predators in the face of interest group hostility. One challenge is uncertainty and varied interpretations about public trustees' responsibilities for wildlife, which have created a mosaic of policies across jurisdictions. We explore how such mosaics have merits and drawbacks for biodiversity. The other three challenges to conserving wildlife as public trust assets are illuminated by the biology of predators and the interacting

  9. MAIN-BELT COMET P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Henry H.; Kaluna, Heather M.; Yang Bin; Haghighipour, Nader; Micheli, Marco; Denneau, Larry; Jedicke, Robert; Kleyna, Jan; Veres, Peter; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Ansdell, Megan; Elliott, Garrett T.; Keane, Jacqueline V.; Meech, Karen J.; Riesen, Timm E.; Sonnett, Sarah; Novakovic, Bojan; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Moskovitz, Nicholas A.; Sheppard, Scott S.; and others

    2013-07-01

    We present initial results from observations and numerical analyses aimed at characterizing the main-belt comet P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS). Optical monitoring observations were made between 2012 October and 2013 February using the University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescope, the Keck I telescope, the Baade and Clay Magellan telescopes, Faulkes Telescope South, the Perkins Telescope at Lowell Observatory, and the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope. The object's intrinsic brightness approximately doubles from the time of its discovery in early October until mid-November and then decreases by {approx}60% between late December and early February, similar to photometric behavior exhibited by several other main-belt comets and unlike that exhibited by disrupted asteroid (596) Scheila. We also used Keck to conduct spectroscopic searches for CN emission as well as absorption at 0.7 {mu}m that could indicate the presence of hydrated minerals, finding an upper limit CN production rate of Q{sub CN} < 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 23} mol s{sup -1}, from which we infer a water production rate of Q{sub H{sub 2O}}<5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 25} mol s{sup -1}, and no evidence of the presence of hydrated minerals. Numerical simulations indicate that P/2012 T1 is largely dynamically stable for >100 Myr and is unlikely to be a recently implanted interloper from the outer solar system, while a search for potential asteroid family associations reveals that it is dynamically linked to the {approx}155 Myr old Lixiaohua asteroid family.

  10. Political Trust and Sophistication: Taking Measurement Seriously.

    PubMed

    Turper, Sedef; Aarts, Kees

    2017-01-01

    Political trust is an important indicator of political legitimacy. Hence, seemingly decreasing levels of political trust in Western democracies have stimulated a growing body of research on the causes and consequences of political trust. However, the neglect of potential measurement problems of political trust raises doubts about the findings of earlier studies. The current study revisits the measurement of political trust and re-examines the relationship between political trust and sophistication in the Netherlands by utilizing European Social Survey (ESS) data across five time points and four-wave panel data from the Panel Component of ESS. Our findings illustrate that high and low political sophistication groups display different levels of political trust even when measurement characteristics of political trust are taken into consideration. However, the relationship between political sophistication and political trust is weaker than it is often suggested by earlier research. Our findings also provide partial support for the argument that the gap between sophistication groups is widening over time. Furthermore, we demonstrate that, although the between-method differences between the latent means and the composite score means of political trust for high- and low sophistication groups are relatively minor, it is important to analyze the measurement characteristics of the political trust construct.

  11. Trust, Health Care Relationships, and Chronic Illness

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Carole A.

    2016-01-01

    Trust in health care relationships is a key ingredient of effective, high-quality care. Although the indirect influence of trust on health outcomes has long been recognized, recent research has shown that trust has a direct effect on outcomes of care. Trust is important. However, the research on trust is disparate, organized around differing definitions, and primarily focused on patients’ trust in physicians. Morse’s method of theoretical coalescence was used to further develop and elaborate a grounded theory of the evolution of trust in health care relationships, in the context of chronic illness. This middle-range theory offers a clear conceptual framework for organizing and relating disparate studies, explaining the findings of different studies at a higher conceptual level, and identifying gaps in research and understanding. In addition, the grounded theory is relevant to practice. PMID:28508016

  12. 25 CFR 1000.360 - Is the trust evaluation standard or process different when the trust asset is held in trust for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Is the trust evaluation standard or process different... EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust Evaluations § 1000.360 Is the trust evaluation standard... allottee? No, Tribes/Consortia are under the same obligation as the Secretary to perform trust...

  13. 25 CFR 1000.360 - Is the trust evaluation standard or process different when the trust asset is held in trust for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Is the trust evaluation standard or process different... EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust Evaluations § 1000.360 Is the trust evaluation standard... allottee? No, Tribes/Consortia are under the same obligation as the Secretary to perform trust...

  14. 25 CFR 1000.360 - Is the trust evaluation standard or process different when the trust asset is held in trust for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Is the trust evaluation standard or process different... EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust Evaluations § 1000.360 Is the trust evaluation standard... allottee? No, Tribes/Consortia are under the same obligation as the Secretary to perform trust...

  15. 25 CFR 1000.360 - Is the trust evaluation standard or process different when the trust asset is held in trust for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Is the trust evaluation standard or process different... EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust Evaluations § 1000.360 Is the trust evaluation standard... allottee? No, Tribes/Consortia are under the same obligation as the Secretary to perform trust...

  16. Public knowledge and public trust.

    PubMed

    Cunningham-Burley, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    As health care applications derived from human genetics research are likely to move increasingly from 'clinic to community', there is growing interest not just in how patients understand and take up health-related genetic information but also in the views of the wider population, as well as a range of professional groups. In this paper, issues relating public knowledge and public trust are raised and discussed in an attempt to move forward debates about public involvement in genomic research and the role of sociologists within interdisciplinary teams. As the field of public understanding of science has developed, we have seen a shift from a focus on the lack of scientific literacy as problem to a recognition of the range of different knowledges that people have and use as they confront science and technology in their everyday lives. As a mood for dialogue pervades many institutions in their relations with 'publics', attention must now be paid to the way in which knowledge and expertise is expressed, heard and acted upon in dialogic encounters. There is increasing concern about public trust in science and calls to increase public confidence, particularly through more open engagement with a range of publics. However, lack of trust or loss of confidence may be constructed as problems rather than reflecting empirical reality, where more complex relationships and attitudes prevail. Lack of trust is often privatized, deeply rooted in lived experience and routinely managed. Trust relations are generally characterized by ambivalence, uncertainty and risk, and are always provisional. Drawing on selected literature and empirical research to review and illustrate this field, this paper argues that scepticism or ambivalence on the part of publics are not necessarily problems to be overcome in the interest of scientific progress, but rather should be mobilized to enhance open and public debates about the nature and direction of genomics research, medicine, and the related

  17. Decision support aids with anthropomorphic characteristics influence trust and performance in younger and older adults.

    PubMed

    Pak, Richard; Fink, Nicole; Price, Margaux; Bass, Brock; Sturre, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the use of deliberately anthropomorphic automation on younger and older adults' trust, dependence and performance on a diabetes decision-making task. Research with anthropomorphic interface agents has shown mixed effects in judgments of preferences but has rarely examined effects on performance. Meanwhile, research in automation has shown some forms of anthropomorphism (e.g. etiquette) have effects on trust and dependence on automation. Participants answered diabetes questions with no-aid, a non-anthropomorphic aid or an anthropomorphised aid. Trust and dependence in the aid was measured. A minimally anthropomorphic aide primarily affected younger adults' trust in the aid. Dependence, however, for both age groups was influenced by the anthropomorphic aid. Automation that deliberately embodies person-like characteristics can influence trust and dependence on reasonably reliable automation. However, further research is necessary to better understand the specific aspects of the aid that affect different age groups. Automation that embodies human-like characteristics may be useful in situations where there is under-utilisation of reasonably reliable aids by enhancing trust and dependence in that aid. Practitioner Summary: The design of decision-support aids on consumer devices (e.g. smartphones) may influence the level of trust that users place in that system and their amount of use. This study is the first step in articulating how the design of aids may influence user's trust and use of such systems.

  18. Sinking slowly: Diversity in propensity to trust predicts downward trust spirals in small groups.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Amanda J; Peterson, Randall S

    2015-07-01

    This paper examines the phenomenon of trust spirals in small groups. Drawing on literature on the spiral reinforcement of trust, we theorize that diversity in propensity to trust has affective and cognitive consequences related to trust (i.e., feelings of frustration and perceptions of low similarity), reducing the level of experienced intragroup trust early in a group's development. Reduced experienced trust then fuels relationship conflict and lowers trust even further over time, ultimately having a negative effect on group performance. These ideas are tested using a sample of MBA student groups surveyed at 3 time periods over 4 months. Results confirm our hypothesis that diversity in propensity to trust is sufficient to trigger a downward trust spiral and poor performance in small groups.

  19. Water law - Public Trust Doctrine

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, E.S.

    1984-07-01

    In a case involving California's Mono Lake, the State Supreme Court held that infringement of the values protected by the Public Trust Doctrine is a separate ground for challenging water appropriations, and that the continuing nature of the state's duty as trustee prevents the acquisition of a vested right to appropriations that injure navigation, commerce, and fisheries. The author summarizes the history and the competing claims of the Doctrine and the California Appropriative Water Rights System. The National Audubon suit now makes it possible for any member of the public to challenge any surface water diversion as injurious to the public trust, but it also offers the California courts an opportunity to redirect the state's water policies. 130 references.

  20. Contribution of a conserved asparagine to the conformational stability of ribonucleases Sa, Ba, and T1.

    PubMed

    Hebert, E J; Giletto, A; Sevcik, J; Urbanikova, L; Wilson, K S; Dauter, Z; Pace, C N

    1998-11-17

    The contribution of hydrogen bonding by peptide groups to the conformational stability of globular proteins was studied. One of the conserved residues in the microbial ribonuclease (RNase) family is an asparagine at position 39 in RNase Sa, 44 in RNase T1, and 58 in RNase Ba (barnase). The amide group of this asparagine is buried and forms two similar intramolecular hydrogen bonds with a neighboring peptide group to anchor a loop on the surface of all three proteins. Thus, it is a good model for the hydrogen bonding of peptide groups. When the conserved asparagine is replaced with alanine, the decrease in the stability of the mutant proteins is 2.2 (Sa), 1.8 (T1), and 2.7 (Ba) kcal/mol. When the conserved asparagine is replaced by aspartate, the stability of the mutant proteins decreases by 1.5 and 1.8 kcal/mol for RNases Sa and T1, respectively, but increases by 0.5 kcal/mol for RNase Ba. When the conserved asparagine was replaced by serine, the stability of the mutant proteins was decreased by 2.3 and 1.7 kcal/mol for RNases Sa and T1, respectively. The structure of the Asn 39 --> Ser mutant of RNase Sa was determined at 1.7 A resolution. There is a significant conformational change near the site of the mutation: (1) the side chain of Ser 39 is oriented differently than that of Asn 39 and forms hydrogen bonds with two conserved water molecules; (2) the peptide bond of Ser 42 changes conformation in the mutant so that the side chain forms three new intramolecular hydrogen bonds with the backbone to replace three hydrogen bonds to water molecules present in the wild-type structure; and (3) the loss of the anchoring hydrogen bonds makes the surface loop more flexible in the mutant than it is in wild-type RNase Sa. The results show that burial and hydrogen bonding of the conserved asparagine make a large contribution to microbial RNase stability and emphasize the importance of structural information in interpreting stability studies of mutant proteins.

  1. 77 FR 64378 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 3520-A

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... income and deductions of the foreign trust and provide statements to the U.S. owners and beneficiaries. IRS uses Form 3520-A to determine if the U.S. owner of the trust has included the net income of the trust in its gross income. Current Actions: There are no changes being made to the form at this time...

  2. Trust Development in Small Teams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    for 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, every person is liable to act negatively toward others, to violate their expectations, and perhaps even to break...Humansystems, Incorporated 111 Farquhar St., 2nd floor Guelph, ON N1H 3N4 Project Manager : Kim Iwasa-Madge, P.Eng., CHFP (519) 836 5911 PWGSC...12 2.4 Developments in Understanding Trust in Teams.............................................................. 24 2.5 Role of Attributions

  3. Main-belt Comet P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Henry H.; Kaluna, Heather M.; Novaković, Bojan; Yang, Bin; Haghighipour, Nader; Micheli, Marco; Denneau, Larry; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Jedicke, Robert; Kleyna, Jan; Vereš, Peter; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Ansdell, Megan; Elliott, Garrett T.; Keane, Jacqueline V.; Meech, Karen J.; Moskovitz, Nicholas A.; Riesen, Timm E.; Sheppard, Scott S.; Sonnett, Sarah; Tholen, David J.; Urban, Laurie; Kaiser, Nick; Chambers, K. C.; Burgett, William S.; Magnier, Eugene A.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Price, Paul A.

    2013-07-01

    We present initial results from observations and numerical analyses aimed at characterizing the main-belt comet P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS). Optical monitoring observations were made between 2012 October and 2013 February using the University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescope, the Keck I telescope, the Baade and Clay Magellan telescopes, Faulkes Telescope South, the Perkins Telescope at Lowell Observatory, and the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope. The object's intrinsic brightness approximately doubles from the time of its discovery in early October until mid-November and then decreases by ~60% between late December and early February, similar to photometric behavior exhibited by several other main-belt comets and unlike that exhibited by disrupted asteroid (596) Scheila. We also used Keck to conduct spectroscopic searches for CN emission as well as absorption at 0.7 μm that could indicate the presence of hydrated minerals, finding an upper limit CN production rate of Q CN < 1.5 × 1023 mol s-1, from which we infer a water production rate of Q_H_2O<5\\times 10^{25} mol s-1, and no evidence of the presence of hydrated minerals. Numerical simulations indicate that P/2012 T1 is largely dynamically stable for >100 Myr and is unlikely to be a recently implanted interloper from the outer solar system, while a search for potential asteroid family associations reveals that it is dynamically linked to the ~155 Myr old Lixiaohua asteroid family. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation, the Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inova

  4. Nature's Trust: A Paradigm for Natural Resources Stewardship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, M. C.; Whitelaw, E.; Doppelt, B.; Burchell, A.

    2007-12-01

    Climate change uncertainty puts a premium on all remaining natural resources. Farmland, air, water, wetlands, wildlife, soils, mineral resources and forests must be protected to ensure that Americans - present citizens and future generations - have the fundamental survival resources they need in a future that holds many unknowns. Moreover, in light of the need to manage resources given climate and particle forcing, government must mitigate dangerous carbon loading of the atmosphere. Confronting climate change and protecting natural resources requires a clear sense of government obligation that is inherent to sovereignty, not a matter of political choice. Our government representatives can and must reframe government's discretion into a trustee obligation to protect Nature and ensure natural resource stewardship. Drawing upon enduring legal principles and court decisions, government can be characterized as a trustee of the natural resources essential to human survival. A trust is a fundamental type of ownership whereby one manages property for the benefit of another. Viewed as a trust, the environment consists of a portfolio of quantified natural assets that government manages. As beneficiaries, citizens hold a common property interest in defined, bounded assets that make up Nature's Trust. Such trust principles form the bedrock of statutory law. Trustees have a fiduciary obligation to protect trust assets and may not allow destruction of property they manage. This session will provide a policy frame for current scientific efforts to address climate change and natural resources loss. Under the Nature's Trust frame, U.S. government leaders and agencies at every level inherit a strict fiduciary obligation to protect our collective natural resources, including our water and the atmosphere, as assets in the trust. Their fiduciary standard of care consists of a proportionate responsibility, which ties directly to "Nature's Mandate" as defined by current climate

  5. Money and trust among strangers.

    PubMed

    Camera, Gabriele; Casari, Marco; Bigoni, Maria

    2013-09-10

    What makes money essential for the functioning of modern society? Through an experiment, we present evidence for the existence of a relevant behavioral dimension in addition to the standard theoretical arguments. Subjects faced repeated opportunities to help an anonymous counterpart who changed over time. Cooperation required trusting that help given to a stranger today would be returned by a stranger in the future. Cooperation levels declined when going from small to large groups of strangers, even if monitoring and payoffs from cooperation were invariant to group size. We then introduced intrinsically worthless tokens. Tokens endogenously became money: subjects took to reward help with a token and to demand a token in exchange for help. Subjects trusted that strangers would return help for a token. Cooperation levels remained stable as the groups grew larger. In all conditions, full cooperation was possible through a social norm of decentralized enforcement, without using tokens. This turned out to be especially demanding in large groups. Lack of trust among strangers thus made money behaviorally essential. To explain these results, we developed an evolutionary model. When behavior in society is heterogeneous, cooperation collapses without tokens. In contrast, the use of tokens makes cooperation evolutionarily stable.

  6. Money and trust among strangers

    PubMed Central

    Camera, Gabriele; Casari, Marco; Bigoni, Maria

    2013-01-01

    What makes money essential for the functioning of modern society? Through an experiment, we present evidence for the existence of a relevant behavioral dimension in addition to the standard theoretical arguments. Subjects faced repeated opportunities to help an anonymous counterpart who changed over time. Cooperation required trusting that help given to a stranger today would be returned by a stranger in the future. Cooperation levels declined when going from small to large groups of strangers, even if monitoring and payoffs from cooperation were invariant to group size. We then introduced intrinsically worthless tokens. Tokens endogenously became money: subjects took to reward help with a token and to demand a token in exchange for help. Subjects trusted that strangers would return help for a token. Cooperation levels remained stable as the groups grew larger. In all conditions, full cooperation was possible through a social norm of decentralized enforcement, without using tokens. This turned out to be especially demanding in large groups. Lack of trust among strangers thus made money behaviorally essential. To explain these results, we developed an evolutionary model. When behavior in society is heterogeneous, cooperation collapses without tokens. In contrast, the use of tokens makes cooperation evolutionarily stable. PMID:23980139

  7. Social Collaborative Filtering by Trust.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Lei, Yu; Liu, Jiming; Li, Wenjie

    2016-09-01

    Recommender systems are used to accurately and actively provide users with potentially interesting information or services. Collaborative filtering is a widely adopted approach to recommendation, but sparse data and cold-start users are often barriers to providing high quality recommendations. To address such issues, we propose a novel method that works to improve the performance of collaborative filtering recommendations by integrating sparse rating data given by users and sparse social trust network among these same users. This is a model-based method that adopts matrix factorization technique that maps users into low-dimensional latent feature spaces in terms of their trust relationship, and aims to more accurately reflect the users reciprocal influence on the formation of their own opinions and to learn better preferential patterns of users for high-quality recommendations. We use four large-scale datasets to show that the proposed method performs much better, especially for cold start users, than state-of-the-art recommendation algorithms for social collaborative filtering based on trust.

  8. Review of /sup 1/H nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation in pathology: are T1 and T2 diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Bottomley, P.A.; Hardy, C.J.; Argersinger, R.E.; Allen-Moore, G.

    1987-01-01

    The longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times of pathological human and animal tissues in the frequency range 1-100 MHz are archived, reviewed, and analyzed as a function of tissue of origin, NMR frequency, temperature, species, and in vivo versus in vitro status. T1 data from specific disease states of the bone, brain, breast, kidney, liver, muscle, pancreas, and spleen can be characterized by simple dispersions of the form T1 = AvB in the range 1-100 MHz with A and B empirically determined pathology-dependent constants. Pathological tissue T2 values are essentially independent of NMR frequency. Raw relaxation data, best-fit T1 parameters A and B, and the mean T2 values, are tabulated along with standard deviations and sample size to establish the normal range of pathological tissue relaxation times applicable to NMR imaging or in vitro NMR examination. Statistical analysis of relaxation data, assumed independent, reveals that most tumor and edematous tissue T1 values and some breast, liver, and muscle tumor T2 values are significantly elevated relative to normal, but do not differ significantly from other tumors and pathologies. Statistically significant abnormalities in the T1 values of some brain, breast, and lung tumors, and most pathological tissue T2 values could not, however, be demonstrated in the presence of large statistical errors. Both T1 and T2 in uninvolved tissue from tumor-bearing animals or organs do not demonstrate statistically significant differences from normal when considered as a group, suggesting no appreciable systemic effects associated with the presence of tumors compared to the statistical uncertainty.261 references. (Abstract Truncated)

  9. 77 FR 36608 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 56-A

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... Fiduciary Relationship--Illinois Type Land Trust. DATES: Written comments should be received on or before... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Form 56-A, Notice Concerning Fiduciary Relationship-- Illinois Type Land Trust...

  10. Improvement, trust, and the healthcare workforce

    PubMed Central

    Berwick, D

    2003-01-01

    Although major defects in the performance of healthcare systems are well documented, progress toward remedy remains slow. Accelerating improvement will require large shifts in attitudes toward and strategies for developing the healthcare workforce. At present, prevailing strategies rely largely on outmoded theories of control and standardisation of work. More modern, and much more effective, theories of production seek to harness the imagination and participation of the workforce in reinventing the system. This requires a workforce capable of setting bold aims, measuring progress, finding alternative designs for the work itself, and testing changes rapidly and informatively. It also requires a high degree of trust in many forms, a bias toward teamwork, and a predilection toward shouldering the burden of improvement, rather than blaming external factors. A new healthcare workforce strategy, founded on these principles, will yield much faster improvement than at present. PMID:14645740

  11. 25 CFR 1000.360 - Is the trust evaluation standard or process different when the trust asset is held in trust for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust Evaluations § 1000.360 Is the trust evaluation standard... 1000.360 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...

  12. Flowing Foam: T1 events and solid-liquid transitions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennin, Michael

    2005-11-01

    Flowing aqueous foam is found in many applications ranging from oil recovery, to fire fighting, to spreading shaving cream. Aqueous foam consists of gas bubbles with liquid walls. One of the striking features of foam is that despite being composed entirely of fluids, its mechanical properties are either those of a solid (elastic response) or fluid (viscous flow), depending on the nature of the applied stress and strains. We study the transition between these two regimes using a model foam system: bubble rafts. Bubble rafts are a single layer of bubbles floating on the air-water surface. This allows us to track the motion of all the bubbles during flow. In this talk, we will present two main results. First, we will discuss the observation of the coexistence between a solid-like and fluid-like state during flow. Second, we will discuss the role played by nonlinear, topological rearrangements, known as T1 events, in determining the mechanical response of the system.

  13. Mirnov oscillation analysis in IR-T1 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoranneviss, M.; Khademian, A.

    1996-12-31

    Tokamak discharges are usually rather turbulent with a large spectrum of electric and magnetic fluctuations. Mirnov oscillations are caused by rotating magnetic island inside the plasma column originated by resistive instabilities. Depending on the size of the plasma column, the frequency spectrum of Mirnov oscillation is in the range from a few to tens of kHz. The authors employ the technique to analyze signals measured in the IR-T1 tokamak without and with resonant helical field (RHF). The time-resolved analysis just described applies to the time series of the signal produced by each Mirnov pick-up coil. They see that the resonant helical field has almost no influence on the plasma current and loop voltage and there is a slight decrease of the floating potential at plasma edge. The characteristic frequency of poloidal propagation of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations can be determined by using the correlation techniques described. For this calculation they have used the signals from the coils located on vacuum chamber with low magnetic field because they are better correlated than the one from the coils in the high field side. They have shown that time-resolved spectral analysis can be easily applied to analyze the (MHD) oscillations in tokamak.

  14. The cysteine-rich domain of human T1R3 is necessary for the interaction between human T1R2-T1R3 sweet receptors and a sweet-tasting protein, thaumatin.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Keisuke; Masuda, Tetsuya; Tani, Fumito; Kitabatake, Naofumi

    2011-03-18

    Thaumatin is an intensely sweet-tasting protein perceived by humans but not rodents. Its threshold value of sweetness in humans is 50nM, the lowest of any sweet-tasting protein. In the present study, the sites where sweet receptors interact with thaumatin were investigated using human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells expressing the sweet receptors T1R2-T1R3. Chimeric human- mouse sweet receptors were constructed and their responses to sweeteners were investigated. The human (h) T1R2- mouse (m) T1R3 combination responded to sucralose but not to thaumatin, clearly indicating that a T1R3 subunit from humans is necessary for the interaction with thaumatin. Furthermore, results obtained from using chimeric T1R3s showed that the cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of human T1R3 is important for the interaction with thaumatin. The CRD of T1R3 would be a prominent target for designing new sweeteners. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. 26 CFR 1.401(e)-3 - Requirements for qualification of trusts and plans benefiting owner-employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... qualification of a trust forming part of a pension or profit-sharing plan, or of an annuity plan, which covers... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(e)-3 Requirements for qualification of trusts and plans...

  16. Role of nutrient-sensing taste 1 receptor (T1R) family members in gastrointestinal chemosensing.

    PubMed

    Shirazi-Beechey, Soraya P; Daly, Kristian; Al-Rammahi, Miran; Moran, Andrew W; Bravo, David

    2014-06-01

    Luminal nutrient sensing by G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) expressed on the apical domain of enteroendocrine cells activates intracellular pathways leading to secretion of gut hormones that control vital physiological processes such as digestion, absorption, food intake and glucose homeostasis. The taste 1 receptor (T1R) family of GPCR consists of three members: T1R1; T1R2; T1R3. Expression of T1R1, T1R2 and T1R3 at mRNA and protein levels has been demonstrated in the intestinal tissue of various species. It has been shown that T1R2-T1R3, in association with G-protein gustducin, is expressed in intestinal K and L endocrine cells, where it acts as the intestinal glucose (sweet) sensor. A number of studies have demonstrated that activation of T1R2-T1R3 by natural sugars and artificial sweeteners leads to secretion of glucagon-like peptides 1&2 (GLP-1 and GLP-2) and glucose dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP). GLP-1 and GIP enhance insulin secretion; GLP-2 increases intestinal growth and glucose absorption. T1R1-T1R3 combination co-expressed on the apical domain of cholecystokinin (CCK) expressing cells is a luminal sensor for a number of L-amino acids; with amino acid-activation of the receptor eliciting CCK secretion. This article focuses on the role of the gut-expressed T1R1, T1R2 and T1R3 in intestinal sweet and L-amino acid sensing. The impact of exploiting T1R2-T1R3 as a nutritional target for enhancing intestinal glucose absorption and gut structural maturity in young animals is also highlighted.

  17. Commitment, pro-relationship behavior, and trust in close relationships.

    PubMed

    Wieselquist, J; Rusbult, C E; Foster, C A; Agnew, C R

    1999-11-01

    The present work advances and tests an interdependence-based model of the associations among commitment, pro-relationship behavior, and trust. Findings from two longitudinal studies revealed good support for model predictions. Commitment-inspired acts such as accommodation and willingness to sacrifice provide diagnostic information regarding a partner's pro-relationship motives. Individuals come to trust their partners when they perceive that their partners have enacted pro-relationship behaviors, departing from their direct self-interest for the good of the relationship. The results of mediation analyses are consistent with a model of mutual cyclical growth in which (a) dependence promotes strong commitment, (b) commitment promotes pro-relationship acts, (c) pro-relationship acts are perceived by the partner, (d) the perception of pro-relationship acts enhances the partner's trust, and (e) trust increases the partner's willingness to become dependent on the relationship. Auxiliary analyses revealed that self-reported attachment style does not account for substantial variance beyond the features of interdependence that form the basis for the present model.

  18. Analysis of transmembrane segment 7 of the dipeptide transporter hPepT1 by cysteine-scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ashutosh A; Haworth, Ian S; Uchiyama, Tomomi; Lee, Vincent H L

    2003-12-19

    To investigate the involvement of transmembrane segment 7 (TMS7) of hPepT1 in forming the putative central aqueous channel through which the substrate traverses, we individually mutated each of the 21 amino acids in TMS7 to a cysteine and analyzed the mutated transporters using the scanning cysteine accessibility method. Y287C- and M292C-hPepT1 did not express at the plasma membrane. Out of the remaining 19 transporters, three (F293C-, L296C-, and F297C-hPepT1) showed negligible glycyl-sarcosine (gly-sar) uptake activity and may play an important role in defining the overall hPepT1 structure. K278C-hPepT1 showed approximately 40% activity and the 15 other transporters exhibited more than 50% gly-sar uptake when compared with wild type (WT)-hPepT1. Gly-sar uptake for the 16 active transporters containing cysteine mutations was then measured in the presence of 2.5 mM 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate hydrobromide (MTSEA) or 1 mM [2-(trimethylammonium) ethyl] methanethiosulfonate bromide (MTSET). Gly-sar uptake was significantly inhibited for each of the 16 single cysteine mutants in the presence of 2.5 mM MTSEA. In contrast, significant inhibition of uptake was only observed for K278C-, M279C-, V280C-, T281C-, M284C-, L286C-, P291C-, and D298C-hPepT1 in the presence of 1 mM MTSET. MTSET modification of R282C-hPepT1 resulted in a significant increase in gly-sar uptake. To investigate this further, we mutated WT-hPepT1 to R282A-, R282E-, and R282K-hPepT1. R282E-hPepT1 showed a 43% reduction in uptake activity, whereas R282A- and R282K-hPepT1 had activities comparable with WT-hPepT1, suggesting a role for the Arg-282 positive charge in substrate translocation. Most of the amino acids that were MTSET-sensitive upon cysteine mutation, including R282C, are located toward the intracellular end of TMS7. Hence, our results suggest that TMS7 of hPepT1 is relatively solvent-accessible along most of its length but that the intracellular end of the transmembrane domain is

  19. Increasing interpersonal trust through divergent thinking.

    PubMed

    Sellaro, Roberta; Hommel, Bernhard; de Kwaadsteniet, Erik W; van de Groep, Suzanne; Colzato, Lorenza S

    2014-01-01

    Interpersonal trust is an essential ingredient of many social relationships but how stable is it actually, and how is it controlled? There is evidence that the degree of trust into others might be rather volatile and can be affected by manipulations like drawing attention to personal interdependence or independence. Here we investigated whether the degree of interpersonal trust can be biased by inducing either a more integrative or a more focused/exclusive cognitive control mode by means of a creativity task requiring divergent or convergent thinking, respectively. Participants then performed the trust game, which provides an index of interpersonal trust by assessing the money units one participant (the trustor) transfers to another (the trustee). As expected, trustors transferred significantly more money to trustees after engaging in divergent thinking as compared to convergent thinking. This observation provides support for the idea that interpersonal trust is controlled by domain-general (i.e., not socially dedicated) cognitive states.

  20. Increasing interpersonal trust through divergent thinking

    PubMed Central

    Sellaro, Roberta; Hommel, Bernhard; de Kwaadsteniet, Erik W.; van de Groep, Suzanne; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2014-01-01

    Interpersonal trust is an essential ingredient of many social relationships but how stable is it actually, and how is it controlled? There is evidence that the degree of trust into others might be rather volatile and can be affected by manipulations like drawing attention to personal interdependence or independence. Here we investigated whether the degree of interpersonal trust can be biased by inducing either a more integrative or a more focused/exclusive cognitive control mode by means of a creativity task requiring divergent or convergent thinking, respectively. Participants then performed the trust game, which provides an index of interpersonal trust by assessing the money units one participant (the trustor) transfers to another (the trustee). As expected, trustors transferred significantly more money to trustees after engaging in divergent thinking as compared to convergent thinking. This observation provides support for the idea that interpersonal trust is controlled by domain-general (i.e., not socially dedicated) cognitive states. PMID:24936194

  1. Social information influences trust behaviour in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nikki C; Jolles, Jelle; Krabbendam, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    Trust plays an integral role in daily interactions within adolescents' social environment. Using a trust game paradigm, this study investigated the modulating influence of social information about three interaction partners on trust behaviour in adolescents aged 12-18 (N = 845). After receiving information about their interaction partners prior to the task, participants were most likely to share with a 'good' partner and rate this partner as most trustworthy. Over the course of the task all interaction partners showed similar levels of trustworthy behaviour, but overall participants continued to trust and view the good partner as more trustworthy than 'bad' and 'neutral' partners throughout the game. However, with age the ability to overcome prior social information and adapt trust behaviour improved: middle and late adolescents showed a larger decrease in trust of the good partner than early adolescents, and late adolescents were more likely to reward trustworthy behaviour from the negative partner.

  2. The pT1a and pT1b category subdivision in renal cell carcinoma: is it reflected by differences in tumour biology?

    PubMed

    Langner, Cord; Ratschek, Manfred; Rehak, Peter; Tsybrovskyy, Oleksiy; Zigeuner, Richard

    2005-02-01

    To assess systematically the possible differences in pathology between pT1a and pT1b renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), as the sixth edition of the Tumour-Nodes-Metastasis (TNM) system implemented a subdivision of category pT1 into pT1a (<4 cm) and pT1b (4-7 cm), based on clinical outcome analysis and the approach to therapy. Conventional histopathology and immunohistochemical expression of several biomarkers were analysed in 66 patients with pT1a and 29 with pT1b RCCs, using a tissue microarray technique. After 2 years of follow-up, none of the 66 patients with pT1a and three of the 29 with pT1b tumours developed progressive disease. The tumour was grade 3 in four (6%) pT1a and 11 (38%) pT1b RCCs. Immunohistochemically, pT1a RCCs were characterized by strong expression of p27 (79%), bcl-2 (67%), MUC1 (87%), insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I (71%) and CD10 (88%), as well as moderate expression of IGF-I receptor (43%) and low expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, 20%). During progression to category pT1b, expression of p27 significantly decreased (54%) and EGFR expression increased (38%). Moreover, membranous staining patterns of MUC1 and CD10 changed from apical to circumferential in clear cell RCCs. p53 (pT1a 23%, pT1b 28%), E-cadherin (10% and 17%), MIB-1 (1.2% and 1.5%) and Skp2 (2% and none) expression seemed to be of minor importance. This is the first study to show that the subdivision of category pT1 implemented in the latest issue of the TNM system is reflected by differences in conventional histopathology and expression of biomarkers.

  3. Trust-Building in Electronic Markets: Relative Importance and Interaction Effects of Trust-Building Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tams, Stefan

    We examine the relative and complementary effectiveness of trust-building strategies in online environments. While prior research has examined various antecedents to trust, we investigated two trust-building mechanisms more in depth: Web site trust and vendor reputation. We tried to understand the relative effectiveness of these two important mechanisms to provide online businesses with a clear recommendation of how to establish trust in an effective and efficient manner. Drawing from the literature on trust, we proposed vendor reputation to be more effective than Web site trust. Moreover, we examined a potential complementary effect of these mechanisms so as to provide online businesses with a deeper understanding of how to derive superior trust. We hypothesize a small such effect. The study proposes a laboratory experiment to test the model.

  4. The Dyadic Trust Scale: Toward Understanding Interpersonal Trust in Close Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larzelere, Robert E.; Huston, Ted L.

    1980-01-01

    Dyadic trust proved to be associated with love and with intimacy of self-disclosure, especially for longer married partners. It varied by level of commitment. Partners reciprocated trust more than either love or depth of self-disclosure. (Author)

  5. Trust Restoration in International Military Missions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    health care and road/travel conditions, an educational system, and political infrastructure. Embedded within the scenario were the trust violation and...presence of trust has been found to offer several benefits ; for instance, trust promotes the ability to establish new and maintain existing...Safia in dealing with the terrorist threat and re-building the country, specifically by providing improved health care and road/travel conditions

  6. Representing Trust in Cognitive Social Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Shawn S.; Alt, Jonathan K.; Darken, Christian J.

    Trust plays a critical role in communications, strength of relationships, and information processing at the individual and group level. Cognitive social simulations show promise in providing an experimental platform for the examination of social phenomena such as trust formation. This paper describes the initial attempts at representation of trust in a cognitive social simulation using reinforcement learning algorithms centered around a cooperative Public Commodity game within a dynamic social network.

  7. 5 CFR 2634.409 - Pre-existing trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pre-existing trusts. 2634.409 Section... FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE, QUALIFIED TRUSTS, AND CERTIFICATES OF DIVESTITURE Qualified Trusts § 2634.409 Pre-existing trusts. An interested party may place a pre-existing irrevocable trust into a qualified...

  8. Trust in automation: integrating empirical evidence on factors that influence trust.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Kevin Anthony; Bashir, Masooda

    2015-05-01

    We systematically review recent empirical research on factors that influence trust in automation to present a three-layered trust model that synthesizes existing knowledge. Much of the existing research on factors that guide human-automation interaction is centered around trust, a variable that often determines the willingness of human operators to rely on automation. Studies have utilized a variety of different automated systems in diverse experimental paradigms to identify factors that impact operators' trust. We performed a systematic review of empirical research on trust in automation from January 2002 to June 2013. Papers were deemed eligible only if they reported the results of a human-subjects experiment in which humans interacted with an automated system in order to achieve a goal. Additionally, a relationship between trust (or a trust-related behavior) and another variable had to be measured. All together, 101 total papers, containing 127 eligible studies, were included in the review. Our analysis revealed three layers of variability in human-automation trust (dispositional trust, situational trust, and learned trust), which we organize into a model. We propose design recommendations for creating trustworthy automation and identify environmental conditions that can affect the strength of the relationship between trust and reliance. Future research directions are also discussed for each layer of trust. Our three-layered trust model provides a new lens for conceptualizing the variability of trust in automation. Its structure can be applied to help guide future research and develop training interventions and design procedures that encourage appropriate trust. © 2014, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  9. On Propagating Interpersonal Trust in Social Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Cai-Nicolas

    The age of information glut has fostered the proliferation of data and documents on the Web, created by man and machine alike. Hence, there is an enormous wealth of minable knowledge that is yet to be extracted, in particular, on the Semantic Web. However, besides understanding information stated by subjects, knowing about their credibility becomes equally crucial. Hence, trust and trust metrics, conceived as computational means to evaluate trust relationships between individuals, come into play. Our major contribution to Semantic Web trust management through this work is twofold. First, we introduce a classification scheme for trust metrics along various axes and discuss advantages and drawbacks of existing approaches for Semantic Web scenarios. Hereby, we devise an advocacy for local group trust metrics, guiding us to the second part, which presents Appleseed, our novel proposal for local group trust computation. Compelling in its simplicity, Appleseed borrows many ideas from spreading activation models in psychology and relates their concepts to trust evaluation in an intuitive fashion. Moreover, we provide extensions for the Appleseed nucleus that make our trust metric handle distrust statements.

  10. Different functional roles of T1R subunits in the heteromeric taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Staszewski, Lena; Tang, Huixian; Adler, Elliot; Zoller, Mark; Li, Xiaodong

    2004-09-28

    The T1R receptors, a family of taste-specific class C G protein-coupled receptors, mediate mammalian sweet and umami tastes. The structure-function relationships of T1R receptors remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate the different functional roles of T1R extracellular and transmembrane domains in ligand recognition and G protein coupling. Similar to other family C G protein-coupled receptors, the N-terminal Venus flytrap domain of T1R2 is required for recognizing sweeteners, such as aspartame and neotame. The G protein coupling requires the transmembrane domain of T1R2. Surprisingly, the C-terminal transmembrane domain of T1R3 is required for recognizing sweetener cyclamate and sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. Because T1R3 is the common subunit in the sweet taste receptor and the umami taste receptor, we tested the interaction of lactisole and cyclamate with the umami taste receptor. Lactisole inhibits the activity of the human T1R1/T1R3 receptor, and, as predicted, blocked the umami taste of l-glutamate in human taste tests. Cyclamate does not activate the T1R1/T1R3 receptor by itself, but potentiates the receptor's response to l-glutamate. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the different functional roles of T1R3 and T1R2 and the presence of multiple ligand binding sites on the sweet taste receptor.

  11. Different functional roles of T1R subunits in the heteromeric taste receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Staszewski, Lena; Tang, Huixian; Adler, Elliot; Zoller, Mark; Li, Xiaodong

    2004-01-01

    The T1R receptors, a family of taste-specific class C G proteincoupled receptors, mediate mammalian sweet and umami tastes. The structure–function relationships of T1R receptors remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate the different functional roles of T1R extracellular and transmembrane domains in ligand recognition and G protein coupling. Similar to other family C G protein-coupled receptors, the N-terminal Venus flytrap domain of T1R2 is required for recognizing sweeteners, such as aspartame and neotame. The G protein coupling requires the transmembrane domain of T1R2. Surprisingly, the C-terminal transmembrane domain of T1R3 is required for recognizing sweetener cyclamate and sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. Because T1R3 is the common subunit in the sweet taste receptor and the umami taste receptor, we tested the interaction of lactisole and cyclamate with the umami taste receptor. Lactisole inhibits the activity of the human T1R1/T1R3 receptor, and, as predicted, blocked the umami taste of l-glutamate in human taste tests. Cyclamate does not activate the T1R1/T1R3 receptor by itself, but potentiates the receptor's response to l-glutamate. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the different functional roles of T1R3 and T1R2 and the presence of multiple ligand binding sites on the sweet taste receptor. PMID:15353592

  12. A Provenance-based Trust Model for Delay Tolerant Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-21

    evaluation in DTNs; the challenges are due to the attackers who may modify or drop messages including provenance information or disseminate fake ...of node i towards the previous MC k about its integrity. We use three attack behaviors to form the trust opinion: no identity or fake identity...Model The use of a symmetric key prevents outside attackers, but not inside attackers. We consider the following insider attacks:  Fake identity

  13. Behavioral evidence for a glucose polymer taste receptor that is independent of the T1R2+3 heterodimer in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Treesukosol, Yada; Smith, Kimberly R; Spector, Alan C

    2011-09-21

    Although it is clear that the heterodimer formed by the T1R2 and T1R3 proteins serves as the primary taste receptor for sweeteners, there is growing evidence that responses to glucose polymers may be mediated by a different taste receptor. Here we report that although T1R2 knock-out (KO) and T1R3 KO mice displayed severely impaired responding to glucose, maltose, and maltotriose in an initial session of a brief-access taste test (5 s trials, 25 min sessions) relative to wild-type (WT) mice, they subsequently increased their licking as a function of concentration for maltose and maltotriose with continued testing, presumably due to associating weak oral cues with positive post-ingestive consequences. Interestingly, these KO mice displayed relatively normal concentration-dependent licking to Polycose, a mixture of glucose polymers, even in the first session. Importantly, the experience-dependent increase in responsiveness to the sugars observed with the T1R2 and T1R3 single KO mice was not statistically significant in the T1R2/3 double KO mice. The double KO mice, however, still displayed significant concentration-dependent responding to Polycose in the first test session, albeit lick rates were slightly lower than those seen for WT mice, perhaps because small amounts of glucose, maltose, and maltotriose found in Polycose were enhancing the signal in WT mice or because T1R2 or T1R3 can possibly heteromerize with another protein to form a fully functional glucose polymer receptor. These findings provide behavioral evidence that glucose polymers, with an optimal chain length greater than three glucose moieties, stimulate a taste receptor independent of the T1R2+3 heterodimer.

  14. Behavioral Evidence for a Glucose Polymer Taste Receptor that is Independent of the T1R2+3 Heterodimer in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed Central

    Treesukosol, Yada; Smith, Kimberly R.; Spector, Alan C.

    2011-01-01

    Although it is clear that the heterodimer formed by the T1R2 and T1R3 proteins serves as the primary taste receptor for sweeteners, there is growing evidence that responses to glucose polymers may be mediated by a different taste receptor. Here we report that although T1R2 knock-out (KO) and T1R3 KO mice displayed severely impaired responding to glucose, maltose, and maltotriose in an initial session of a brief access taste test (5-s trials, 25-min sessions) relative to wild-type (WT) mice, they subsequently increased their licking as a function of concentration for maltose and maltotriose with continued testing, presumably due to associating weak oral cues with positive postingestive consequences. Interestingly, these KO mice displayed relatively normal concentration-dependent licking to Polycose, a mixture of glucose polymers, even in the first session. Importantly, the experience-dependent increase in responsiveness to the sugars observed with the T1R2 and T1R3 single KO mice, was not statistically significant in the T1R2/3 double KO mice. The double KO mice, however, still displayed significant concentration-dependent responding to Polycose in the first test session, albeit lick rates were slightly lower than those seen for WT mice, perhaps because small amounts of glucose, maltose, and maltotriose found in Polycose were enhancing the signal in WT mice or that T1R2 or T1R3 can possibly heteromerize with another protein to form a fully functional glucose polymer receptor. These findings provide behavioral evidence that glucose polymers, with an optimal chain length greater than 3 glucose moieties, stimulate a taste receptor independent of the T1R2+3 heterodimer. PMID:21940444

  15. Reference values for healthy human myocardium using a T1 mapping methodology: results from the International T1 Multicenter cardiovascular magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Dabir, Darius; Child, Nicholas; Kalra, Ashwin; Rogers, Toby; Gebker, Rolf; Jabbour, Andrew; Plein, Sven; Yu, Chung-Yao; Otton, James; Kidambi, Ananth; McDiarmid, Adam; Broadbent, David; Higgins, David M; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Foote, Lucy; Cummins, Ciara; Nagel, Eike; Puntmann, Valentina O

    2014-10-21

    T1 mapping is a robust and highly reproducible application to quantify myocardial relaxation of longitudinal magnetisation. Available T1 mapping methods are presently site and vendor specific, with variable accuracy and precision of T1 values between the systems and sequences. We assessed the transferability of a T1 mapping method and determined the reference values of healthy human myocardium in a multicenter setting. Healthy subjects (n=102; mean age 41 years (range 17-83), male, n=53 (52%)), with no previous medical history, and normotensive low risk subjects (n=113) referred for clinical cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) were examined. Further inclusion criteria for all were absence of regular medication and subsequently normal findings of routine CMR. All subjects underwent T1 mapping using a uniform imaging set-up (modified Look- Locker inversion recovery, MOLLI, using scheme 3(3)3(3)5)) on 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3 T Philips scanners. Native T1-maps were acquired in a single midventricular short axis slice and repeated 20 minutes following gadobutrol. Reference values were obtained for native T1 and gadolinium-based partition coefficients, λ and extracellular volume fraction (ECV) in a core lab using standardized postprocessing. In healthy controls, mean native T1 values were 950±21 msec at 1.5 T and 1052±23 at 3 T. λ and ECV values were 0.44±0.06 and 0.25±0.04 at 1.5 T, and 0.44±0.07 and 0.26±0.04 at 3 T, respectively. There were no significant differences between healthy controls and low risk subjects in routine CMR parameters and T1 values. The entire cohort showed no correlation between age, gender and native T1. Cross-center comparisons of mean values showed no significant difference for any of the T1 indices at any field strength. There were considerable regional differences in segmental T1 values. λ and ECV were found to be dose dependent. There was excellent inter- and intraobserver reproducibility for measurement of native septal T1. We

  16. Hardware Support for Malware Defense and End-to-End Trust

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-01

    10 Figure 4 Design flow of ACM Bluespec FPGA model ................................................................ 11 Figure 5 ACM concept...may be insufficient for continuation of trust at an arbitrary point in the future. If the design of the system permits undetectable attacks against...formed IoT division, and with selected partners.  Standards: “Trust Dust”, the early prototype of the value of embedded TPM for cyber- physical systems

  17. Activation of the umami taste receptor (T1R1/T1R3) initiates the peristaltic reflex and pellet propulsion in the distal colon.

    PubMed

    Kendig, Derek M; Hurst, Norman R; Bradley, Zachary L; Mahavadi, Sunila; Kuemmerle, John F; Lyall, Vijay; DeSimone, John; Murthy, Karnam S; Grider, John R

    2014-12-01

    Intraluminal nutrients in the gut affect the peristaltic reflex, although the mechanism is not well defined. Recent evidence supports the presence of taste receptors and their signaling components in enteroendocrine cells, although their function is unclear. This study aimed to determine if nutrients modify colonic motility through activation of taste receptors. Colonic sections were immunostained for the umami taste receptor T1R1/T1R3, which mediates the response to umami ligands, such as monosodium glutamate (MSG), in taste cells. Ascending contraction, descending relaxation, and calcitonin gene-related peptide release were measured in three-chamber flat-sheet preparations of rat colon in response to MSG alone or with inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP). Velocity of artificial fecal pellet propulsion was measured by video recording in guinea pig distal colon. T1R1/T1R3 receptors were present in enteroendocrine cells of colonic sections from human, rat, mouse, and guinea pig. MSG initiated ascending contraction and descending relaxation components of the peristaltic reflex and calcitonin gene-related peptide release in flat-sheet preparations. IMP augmented the MSG-induced effects, suggesting activation of T1R1/T1R3 receptors. In T1R1(-/-) mice, mucosal stroking, but not MSG, elicited a peristaltic reflex. Intraluminal perfusion of MSG enhanced the velocity of artificial fecal pellet propulsion, which was also augmented by IMP. Propulsion was also increased by l-cysteine, but not l-tryptophan, supporting a role of T1R1/T1R3 receptors. We conclude that T1R1/T1R3 activation by luminal MSG or l-cysteine elicits a peristaltic reflex and CGRP release and increases the velocity of pellet propulsion in distal colon. This mechanism may explain how nutrients regulate colonic propulsion.

  18. The interplay of T1- and T2-relaxation on T1-weighted MRI of hMSCs induced by Gd-DOTA-peptides.

    PubMed

    Cao, Limin; Li, Binbin; Yi, Peiwei; Zhang, Hailu; Dai, Jianwu; Tan, Bo; Deng, Zongwu

    2014-04-01

    Three Gd-DOTA-peptide complexes with different peptide sequence are synthesized and used as T1 contrast agent to label human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) for magnetic resonance imaging study. The peptides include a universal cell penetrating peptide TAT, a linear MSC-specific peptide EM7, and a cyclic MSC-specific peptide CC9. A significant difference in labeling efficacy is observed between the Gd-DOTA-peptides as well as a control Dotarem. All Gd-DOTA-peptides as well as Dotarem induce significant increase in T1 relaxation rate which is in favor of T1-weighted MR imaging. Gd-DOTA-CC9 yields the maximum labeling efficacy but poor T1 contrast enhancement. Gd-DOTA-EM7 yields the minimum labeling efficacy but better T1 contrast enhancement. Gd-DOTA-TAT yields a similar labeling efficacy as Gd-DOTA-CC9 and similar T1 contrast enhancement as Gd-DOTA-EM7. The underlying mechanism that governs T1 contrast enhancement effect is discussed. Our results suggest that T1 contrast enhancement induced by Gd-DOTA-peptides depends not only on the introduced cellular Gd content, but more importantly on the effect that Gd-DOTA-peptides exert on the T1-relaxation and T2-relaxation processes/rates. Both T1 and particularly T2 relaxation rate have to be taken into account to interpret T1 contrast enhancement. In addition, the interpretation has to be based on cellular instead of aqueous longitudinal and transverse relaxivities of Gd-DOTA-peptides.

  19. Sensory Metrics of Neuromechanical Trust.

    PubMed

    Softky, William; Benford, Criscillia

    2017-09-01

    Today digital sources supply a historically unprecedented component of human sensorimotor data, the consumption of which is correlated with poorly understood maladies such as Internet addiction disorder and Internet gaming disorder. Because both natural and digital sensorimotor data share common mathematical descriptions, one can quantify our informational sensorimotor needs using the signal processing metrics of entropy, noise, dimensionality, continuity, latency, and bandwidth. Such metrics describe in neutral terms the informational diet human brains require to self-calibrate, allowing individuals to maintain trusting relationships. With these metrics, we define the trust humans experience using the mathematical language of computational models, that is, as a primitive statistical algorithm processing finely grained sensorimotor data from neuromechanical interaction. This definition of neuromechanical trust implies that artificial sensorimotor inputs and interactions that attract low-level attention through frequent discontinuities and enhanced coherence will decalibrate a brain's representation of its world over the long term by violating the implicit statistical contract for which self-calibration evolved. Our hypersimplified mathematical understanding of human sensorimotor processing as multiscale, continuous-time vibratory interaction allows equally broad-brush descriptions of failure modes and solutions. For example, we model addiction in general as the result of homeostatic regulation gone awry in novel environments (sign reversal) and digital dependency as a sub-case in which the decalibration caused by digital sensorimotor data spurs yet more consumption of them. We predict that institutions can use these sensorimotor metrics to quantify media richness to improve employee well-being; that dyads and family-size groups will bond and heal best through low-latency, high-resolution multisensory interaction such as shared meals and reciprocated touch; and

  20. Are Blacks Really Less Trusting than Whites? Revisiting the Race and Trust Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Brent; McGrimmon, Tucker; Irwin, Kyle

    2007-01-01

    Many scholars have concluded that blacks are less trusting than whites. The research presented here calls that conclusion into question. Previous research has been based on the standard trust measure, which may not be well suited to understanding how trust varies with social categories such as race. Building on theories of self-categorization and…

  1. Fear, Trust, and Negotiating Safety

    PubMed Central

    Epperson, Matthew W.; Platais, Ingrida; Valera, Pamela; Barbieri, Raye; Gilbert, Louisa; El-Bassel, Nabila

    2010-01-01

    Through in-depth interviews, this study examined the relational context of sexual HIV risk for 10 Black women aged 18–30 who were defendants in a community court setting. A qualitative data analysis identified themes of actual and feared intimate partner violence (IPV) and the expectations of demonstrating trust in a relationship as obstacles to negotiating the use of condoms. The findings speak to the broader structural factors and consequences of IPV and drug use. The article discusses the implications for HIV prevention for Black women who are involved in the criminal justice system. PMID:20445827

  2. Evolution of Trust in Economic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossomaier, Terry; Harré, Michael; Thompson, James

    When ET in the eponymous Spielberg movie follows a trail of Smarties to meet his new human friends, we find this entirely plausible — that a baby alien will quickly form a bond with human kids and for each to quickly learn to trust the other. This surely reflects the way trust is such a fundamental part of human nature that its absence would be more remarkable than its presence, even where one of the protagonists is a not overly attractive alien species! Another, less plausible, fictional character which has often been employed in economic settings is Homo Economicus. The character played by this economic actor is that of the perfectly informed, perfectly rational, self interested individual trying to maximise their personal utility. This view of the economic actor, particularly as it is used in decision theory, inspired Herbert Simon in his Nobel Prize award speech to criticise models of economic microphenomena [29]: "Thus economists who are zealous in insisting that economic actors maximize turn around and become satisficers when the evaluation of their own theories is concerned. They believe that businessmen maximize, but they know that economic theorists satisfice." However, in the three decades since Simon's speech there has been a large body of evidence accumulating which demonstrates the lack of universality of the assumptions of economic man [6] and has contributed to the advancement of more reasonable models, as described by Daniel Kahneman [14], another Nobel Laureate: "... proposed that an automatic affective valuation — the emotional core of an attitude — is the main determinant of many judgements and behaviours."

  3. Drawing on a Knowledge-Based Trust Perspective to Examine and Conceptualize within-School Trust Development by Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosner, Shelby

    2010-01-01

    Research has revealed the importance of trust to schools and pointed to the central role that principals play in cultivating within-school trust, yet less is known about the ways that principals cultivate such trust. Moreover, divergent perspectives and varied contexts for examining trust have limited the transfer of trust scholarship to practice…

  4. An improved prognostic model for stage T1a and T1b prostate cancer by assessments of cancer extent

    PubMed Central

    Rajab, Ramzi; Fisher, Gabrielle; Kattan, Michael W; Foster, Christopher S; Møller, Henrik; Oliver, Tim; Reuter, Victor; Scardino, Peter T; Cuzick, Jack; Berney, Daniel M

    2013-01-01

    Treatment decisions on prostate cancer diagnosed by trans-urethral resection (TURP) of the prostate are difficult. The current TNM staging system for pT1 prostate cancer has not been re-evaluated for 25 years. Our objective was to optimise the predictive power of tumor extent measurements in TURP of the prostate specimens. A total of 914 patients diagnosed by TURP of the prostate between 1990 and 1996, managed conservatively were identified. The clinical end point was death from prostate cancer. Diagnostic serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and contemporary Gleason grading was available. Cancer extent was measured by the percentage of chips infiltrated by cancer. Death rates were compared by univariate and multivariate proportional hazards models, including baseline PSA and Gleason score. The percentage of positive chips was highly predictive of prostate cancer death when assessed as a continuous variable or as a grouped variable on the basis of and including the quintiles, quartiles, tertiles and median groups. In the univariate model, the most informative variable was a four group-split (≤ 10%, >10–25%, > 25–75% and > 75%); (HR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.8–2.4, P < 0.0001). The same was true in a multivariate model (ΔX2 (1 d.f.) = 15.0, P = 0.0001). The current cutoff used by TNM (< = 5%) was sub-optimal (ΔX2 (1 d.f.) = 4.8, P = 0.023). The current TNM staging results in substantial loss of information. Staging by a four-group subdivision would substantially improve prognostication in patients with early stage disease and also may help to refine management decisions in patients who would do well with conservative treatments. PMID:20834240

  5. Gurmarin sensitivity of sweet taste responses is associated with co-expression patterns of T1r2, T1r3, and gustducin.

    PubMed

    Shigemura, Noriatsu; Nakao, Kazuko; Yasuo, Toshiaki; Murata, Yoshihiro; Yasumatsu, Keiko; Nakashima, Akihiko; Katsukawa, Hideo; Sako, Noritaka; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2008-03-07

    Gurmarin (Gur) is a peptide that selectively suppresses sweet taste responses in rodents. The inhibitory effect of Gur differs among tongue regions and mouse strains. Recent studies demonstrated that co-expression levels of genes controlling sweet receptors (T1r2/T1r3 heterodimer) versus Galpha-protein, gustducin, are much lower in Gur-insensitive posterior circumvallate papillae than in Gur-sensitive anterior fungiform papillae. Here, we investigated the potential link of Gur-sensitivity with the co-expression for T1r2/T1r3 receptors and gustducin by comparing those of taste tissues of Gur-sensitive (B6, dpa congenic strains) and Gur-weakly-sensitive (BALB) strains. The results indicated that co-expression ratios among T1r2, T1r3, and gustducin in the fungiform papillae were significantly lower in Gur-weakly-sensitive BALB mice than in Gur-sensitive B6 and dpa congenic mice. This linkage between Gur-sensitivity and co-expression for T1r2/T1r3 receptors versus gustducin suggests that gustducin may be a key molecule involved in the pathway for Gur-sensitive sweet responses.

  6. Multi-parametric MR assessment of T(1) black holes in multiple sclerosis : evidence that myelin loss is not greater in hypointense versus isointense T(1) lesions.

    PubMed

    Vavasour, I M; Li, D K B; Laule, C; Traboulsee, A L; Moore, G R W; Mackay, A L

    2007-12-01

    Chronic T(1) hypointense lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS) are areas of severe tissue destruction. The purpose of this study was to compare total water content (WC),myelin water content (MWC), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR), T(1) relaxation time (T(1)), mean T(2) relaxation time (GMT(2)) between stable MS lesions that are hypointense and isointense on T(1)-weighted images. Six MS patients were scanned five times over one year. WC, MWC, MTR, T(1) and GMT(2) were calculated for 15 isointense and 15 hypointense chronically stable T(1) lesions, as well as contralateral normal appearing white matter (NAWM). All MR measurements from both iso- and hypointense stable lesion types were significantly different from NAWM. WC, T(1) and GMT(2) were significantly higher and MTR significantly lower in hypointense T(1) lesions compared to isointense lesions. MWC was not significantly different between iso- and hypointense lesions. This work suggests that myelin loss occurs equally in both the chronic isointense and hypointense lesions but hypointense lesions are distinguished by increased extracellular water.

  7. Trust, Punishment, and Cooperation Across 18 Societies: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Balliet, Daniel; Van Lange, Paul A M

    2013-07-01

    Punishment promotes contributions to public goods, but recent evidence suggests that its effectiveness varies across societies. Prior theorizing suggests that cross-societal differences in trust play a key role in determining the effectiveness of punishment, as a form of social norm enforcement, to promote cooperation. One line of reasoning is that punishment promotes cooperation in low-trust societies, primarily because people in such societies expect their fellow members to contribute only if there are strong incentives to do so. Yet another line of reasoning is that high trust makes punishment work, presumably because in high-trust societies people may count on each other to make contributions to public goods and also enforce norm violations by punishing free riders. This poses a puzzle of punishment: Is punishment more effective in promoting cooperation in high- or low-trust societies? In the present article, we examine this puzzle of punishment in a quantitative review of 83 studies involving 7,361 participants across 18 societies that examine the impact of punishment on cooperation in a public goods dilemma. The findings provide a clear answer: Punishment more strongly promotes cooperation in societies with high trust rather than low trust. © The Author(s) 2013.

  8. Generation of insulin-producing cells from C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Jian, Ruo-Lei; Mao, Li-Bin; Xu, Yao; Li, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Feng-Po; Luo, Xue-Gang; Zhou, Hao; He, Hong-Peng; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Tong-Cun

    2015-05-10

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been reported to be an attractive source for the generation of transplantable surrogate β cells. A murine embryonic mesenchymal progenitor cell line C3H10T1/2 has been recognized as a model for MSCs, because of its multi-lineage differentiation potential. The purpose of this study was to explore whether C3H/10T1/2 cells have the potential to differentiate into insulin-producing cells (IPCs). Here, we investigated and compared the in vitro differentiation of rat MSCs and C3H10T1/2 cells into IPCs. After the cells underwent IPC differentiation, the expression of differentiation markers were detected by immunocytochemistry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting. The insulin secretion was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Furthermore, these differentiated cells were transplanted into streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice and their biological functions were tested in vivo. This study reports a 2-stage method to generate IPCs from C3H10T1/2 cells. Under specific induction conditions for 7-8 days, C3H10T1/2 cells formed three-dimensional spheroid bodies (SBs) and secreted insulin, while generation of IPCs derived from rat MSCs required a long time (more than 2 weeks). Furthermore, these IPCs derived from C3H10T1/2 cells were injected into diabetic mice and improves basal glucose, body weight and exhibited normal glucose tolerance test. The present study provided a simple and faithful in vitro model for further investigating the mechanism underlying IPC differentiation of MSCs and cell replacement therapy for diabetes.

  9. Trust in African Americans' Healthcare Experiences.

    PubMed

    Murray, Traci M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to clarify the concept of trust, identify its defining attributes, antecedents, and consequences, and apply to the healthcare experiences of African Americans. For African Americans, mistrust in the healthcare system is the result of unequal treatment that began in slavery. Fear and negative experiences engender a reluctance to trust healthcare providers, which contributes to health disparities. Walker and Avant's method of concept analysis was used to clarify the concept of trust. The concept was applied to African Americans' healthcare experiences with discussion of opportunities for trust building. Data support for concept development was done using Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Medline, and online reference sources. Literature review was guided by using the keyword trust. Further contextual explication was done by adding a review of literature from sociology and history regarding the evolution of African American mistrust of the U.S. healthcare system. The defining attributes of trust are dependence, willingness, and met expectations. Antecedents to trust include a need requiring the help of another and prior knowledge or experience. The consequence of trust is an evaluation of the congruence between expected and actual behaviors of the trusted person or thing. Literature review of the African American culture adds a dynamic aspect for nurses to consider when developing relationships in minority communities. Trust is the willingness to enter a dependent relationship to have the needs addressed, and is maintained by met expectations. Rebuilding trusting relationships between providers and African American patients is a vital step toward reducing health disparities. Murray. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A trust evaluation algorithm for wireless sensor networks based on node behaviors and D-S evidence theory.

    PubMed

    Feng, Renjian; Xu, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Xiang; Wan, Jiangwen

    2011-01-01

    For wireless sensor networks (WSNs), many factors, such as mutual interference of wireless links, battlefield applications and nodes exposed to the environment without good physical protection, result in the sensor nodes being more vulnerable to be attacked and compromised. In order to address this network security problem, a novel trust evaluation algorithm defined as NBBTE (Node Behavioral Strategies Banding Belief Theory of the Trust Evaluation Algorithm) is proposed, which integrates the approach of nodes behavioral strategies and modified evidence theory. According to the behaviors of sensor nodes, a variety of trust factors and coefficients related to the network application are established to obtain direct and indirect trust values through calculating weighted average of trust factors. Meanwhile, the fuzzy set method is applied to form the basic input vector of evidence. On this basis, the evidence difference is calculated between the indirect and direct trust values, which link the revised D-S evidence combination rule to finally synthesize integrated trust value of nodes. The simulation results show that NBBTE can effectively identify malicious nodes and reflects the characteristic of trust value that 'hard to acquire and easy to lose'. Furthermore, it is obvious that the proposed scheme has an outstanding advantage in terms of illustrating the real contribution of different nodes to trust evaluation.

  11. A Trust Evaluation Algorithm for Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Node Behaviors and D-S Evidence Theory

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Renjian; Xu, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Xiang; Wan, Jiangwen

    2011-01-01

    For wireless sensor networks (WSNs), many factors, such as mutual interference of wireless links, battlefield applications and nodes exposed to the environment without good physical protection, result in the sensor nodes being more vulnerable to be attacked and compromised. In order to address this network security problem, a novel trust evaluation algorithm defined as NBBTE (Node Behavioral Strategies Banding Belief Theory of the Trust Evaluation Algorithm) is proposed, which integrates the approach of nodes behavioral strategies and modified evidence theory. According to the behaviors of sensor nodes, a variety of trust factors and coefficients related to the network application are established to obtain direct and indirect trust values through calculating weighted average of trust factors. Meanwhile, the fuzzy set method is applied to form the basic input vector of evidence. On this basis, the evidence difference is calculated between the indirect and direct trust values, which link the revised D-S evidence combination rule to finally synthesize integrated trust value of nodes. The simulation results show that NBBTE can effectively identify malicious nodes and reflects the characteristic of trust value that ‘hard to acquire and easy to lose’. Furthermore, it is obvious that the proposed scheme has an outstanding advantage in terms of illustrating the real contribution of different nodes to trust evaluation. PMID:22319355

  12. Magnetic Resonance Water Proton Relaxation in Protein Solutions and Tissue: T1ρ Dispersion Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Enn-Ling; Kim, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Image contrast in clinical MRI is often determined by differences in tissue water proton relaxation behavior. However, many aspects of water proton relaxation in complex biological media, such as protein solutions and tissue are not well understood, perhaps due to the limited empirical data. Principal Findings Water proton T1, T2, and T1ρ of protein solutions and tissue were measured systematically under multiple conditions. Crosslinking or aggregation of protein decreased T2 and T1ρ, but did not change high-field T1. T1ρ dispersion profiles were similar for crosslinked protein solutions, myocardial tissue, and cartilage, and exhibited power law behavior with T1ρ(0) values that closely approximated T2. The T1ρ dispersion of mobile protein solutions was flat above 5 kHz, but showed a steep curve below 5 kHz that was sensitive to changes in pH. The T1ρ dispersion of crosslinked BSA and cartilage in DMSO solvent closely resembled that of water solvent above 5 kHz but showed decreased dispersion below 5 kHz. Conclusions Proton exchange is a minor pathway for tissue T1 and T1ρ relaxation above 5 kHz. Potential models for relaxation are discussed, however the same molecular mechanism appears to be responsible across 5 decades of frequencies from T1ρ to T1. PMID:20052404

  13. Quantitative T1 mapping under precisely controlled graded hyperoxia at 7T.

    PubMed

    Bhogal, Alex A; Siero, Jeroen Cw; Zwanenburg, Jaco; Luijten, Peter R; Philippens, Marielle Ep; Hoogduin, Hans

    2017-04-01

    Increasing the concentration of oxygen dissolved in water is known to increase the recovery rate (R1 = 1/T1) of longitudinal magnetization (T1 relaxation). Direct T1 changes in response to precise hyperoxic gas challenges have not yet been quantified and the actual effect of increasing arterial oxygen concentration on the T1 of brain parenchyma remains unclear. The aim of this work was to use quantitative T1 mapping to measure tissue T1 changes in response to precisely targeted hyperoxic respiratory challenges ranging from baseline end-tidal oxygen (PetO2) to approximately 500 mmHg. We did not observe measureable T1 changes in either gray matter or white matter parenchymal tissue. The T1 of peripheral cerebrospinal fluid located within the sulci, however, was reduced as a function of PetO2. No significant T1 changes were observed in the ventricular cerebrospinal fluid under hyperoxia. Our results indicate that care should be taken to distinguish actual T1 changes from those which may be related to partial volume effects with cerebrospinal fluid, or regions with increased fluid content such as edema when examining hyperoxia-induced changes in T1 using methods based on T1-weighted imaging.

  14. Keys to Heart Disease Care: Communication and Trust

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_164421.html Keys to Heart Disease Care: Communication and Trust These factors linked to patients' greater ... trusted the medical profession. It's no secret that communication and trust are important in any doctor-patient ...

  15. Price transparency: building community trust.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Richard L

    2007-01-01

    With the push from policymakers, payers, and consumers for hospitals to make their prices public, healthcare executives need to recognize two central issues related to price transparency: 1) meaningful price transparency involves helping patients and consumers understand their financial obligation for an episode of care, and 2) price transparency is key to the most critical success strategy for healthcare providers: building trust. This article reviews the history of pricing and billing practices and explores why price transparency is not easily achieved in today's environment. Pricing is a mystery even to those of us who work in the field, yet despite its complexity, the call for price transparency is not going to go away. For transparency, the goal should be to establish a rational pricing system that is easily explainable and justified to all stakeholders. Healthcare executives must make pricing a priority, understand cost, develop a pricing philosophy, understand the overall revenue requirements, examine market conditions and prices, and set up systems for review. A rational process of price setting should enhance community trust. In this matter there is nothing less at stake than the hearts of our community members.

  16. A Strategic Model of Trust Management in Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junqing; Sun, Zhaohao; Li, Yuanzhe; Zhao, Shuliang

    This article examines trust and trust management in web services and proposes a multiagent model of trust relationship in web services. It looks at the hierarchical structure of trust management in web services and proposes a strategic model of trust management in web services. The proposed approach in this article will facilitate research and development of trust management in e-commerce, web services and social networking.

  17. Development of Trust and Reciprocity in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Bos, Wouter; Westenberg, Michiel; van Dijk, Eric; Crone, Eveline A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the development of two types of prosocial behavior, trust and reciprocity, as defined using a game-theoretical task that allows investigation of real-time social interaction, among 4 age groups from 9 to 25 years. By manipulating the possible outcome alternatives, we could distinguish among important determinants of trust and…

  18. Explaining Math Achievement: Personality, Motivation, and Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilic-Bebek, Ebru

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the statistical significance of student trust next to the well-tested constructs of personality and motivation to determine whether trust is a significant predictor of course achievement in college math courses. Participants were 175 students who were taking undergraduate math courses in an urban public university. The…

  19. The Winston Churchill Memorial Trust of Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Nicolette

    2013-01-01

    The Churchill Trust was established in 1965 to honour the memory of Sir Winston Churchill by awarding overseas research Fellowships known as "Churchill Fellowships". Since its inception, The Churchill Trust has awarded Churchill Fellowships to more than 3,700 Australians who, like Churchill, are innovative, filled with a spirit of…

  20. The Importance of Trust in Electronic Commerce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratnasingham, Pauline

    1998-01-01

    Introduces the new concept of trust and how it influences the process of managing the security of an organization operating in an electronic commerce environment. Theoretically, the study aims to develop a framework of trust and security to provide a set of guidelines for secure electronic commerce. (Author/LRW)

  1. 26 CFR 301.7701-4 - Trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... federal, state, or local environmental laws; all contributors to the trust have (at the time of... federal, state, or local environmental laws for environmental remediation of the waste site; and the trust... environmental laws for remediation of the existing waste site if there is authority under a federal, state,...

  2. 26 CFR 301.7701-4 - Trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... federal, state, or local environmental laws; all contributors to the trust have (at the time of... federal, state, or local environmental laws for environmental remediation of the waste site; and the trust... environmental laws for remediation of the existing waste site if there is authority under a federal, state,...

  3. 26 CFR 301.7701-4 - Trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... federal, state, or local environmental laws; all contributors to the trust have (at the time of... federal, state, or local environmental laws for environmental remediation of the waste site; and the trust... environmental laws for remediation of the existing waste site if there is authority under a federal, state,...

  4. 26 CFR 301.7701-4 - Trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... federal, state, or local environmental laws; all contributors to the trust have (at the time of... federal, state, or local environmental laws for environmental remediation of the waste site; and the trust... environmental laws for remediation of the existing waste site if there is authority under a federal, state,...

  5. Principles of Trust for Embedded Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    3 Principles of Trust 5 4 Implications for Software Engineering 8 5 Implications for Platform Infrastructure 10 6 Summary and Conclusions 11...automated systems and to embedded systems in particular. Principles of trust are identified. Some of their implications for software engineering practice

  6. Representing Trust in Cognitive Social Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    A. FOUNDATIONS OF TRUST The first rule of simulation is to know what is being simulated. If you want to draw an 800-pound gorilla , you must...first know what an 800-pound gorilla looks like. Trust is a concept that is easy to talk about casually but extraordinarily difficult to define

  7. Social capital and trust in providers.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Melissa M; Hendryx, Michael S

    2003-10-01

    Trust in providers has been in decline in recent decades. This study attempts to identify sources of trust in characteristics of health care systems and the wider community. The design is cross-sectional. Data are from (1) the 1996 Household Survey of the Community Tracking Study, drawn from 24 Metropolitan Statistical Areas; (2) a 1996 multi-city broadcast media marketing database including key social capital indicators; (3) Interstudy; (4) the American Hospital Association; and (5) the American Medical Association. Independent variables include individual socio-demographic variables, HMO enrollment, community-level health sector variables, and social capital. The dependent variable is self-reported trust in physicians. Data are merged from the various sources and analyzed using SUDAAN. Subjects include adults in the Household Survey who responded to the items on trust in physicians (N=17,653). Trust in physicians is independently predicted by community social capital (p<0.001). Trust is also negatively related to HMO enrollment and to many individual characteristics. The effect of HMOs is not uniform across all communities. Social capital plays a role in how health care is perceived by citizens, and how health care is delivered by providers. Efforts to build trust and collaboration in a community may improve trust in physicians, health care quality, access, and preserve local health care control.

  8. The Importance of Trust in Electronic Commerce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratnasingham, Pauline

    1998-01-01

    Introduces the new concept of trust and how it influences the process of managing the security of an organization operating in an electronic commerce environment. Theoretically, the study aims to develop a framework of trust and security to provide a set of guidelines for secure electronic commerce. (Author/LRW)

  9. Young Children and Trust in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alat, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine differences in children's generalised trust and the maternal behaviour, child temperament, and demographic factors on the levels of trust in children. A total of 314 mothers and their children participated in the study. Results showed no evidence of sex differences in children's beliefs. Children living in urban…

  10. Further Exploration of Organizational Trust Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Samuel H.; Wiswell, Albert K.

    2008-01-01

    Trust facilitates individual and organizational learning, and is often misunderstood by organizations although they must continuously learn in order to attain strategic goals and survive. Furthermore, leaders of organizations often view trust defensively and their reactions may impede organizational learning. This paper builds on prior research…

  11. New Superintendents: Trust, Networking, and Social Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripley, Joan; Mitchell, Roxanne M.; Richman, John A.

    2013-01-01

    This instrumental case study explored how five newly appointed superintendents identified key stakeholders and built trust and social capital with stakeholders in their districts. Stakeholder, trust, and social capital theory were the lenses that guided this study. We utilized a pragmatic research design and thematic data analysis to interpret our…

  12. Social Trust and the Growth of Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjornskov, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The paper develops a simple model to examine how social trust might affect the growth of schooling through lowering transaction costs associated with employing educated individuals. In a sample of 52 countries, the paper thereafter provides empirical evidence that trust has led to faster growth of schooling in the period 1960-2000. The findings…

  13. New Superintendents: Trust, Networking, and Social Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripley, Joan; Mitchell, Roxanne M.; Richman, John A.

    2013-01-01

    This instrumental case study explored how five newly appointed superintendents identified key stakeholders and built trust and social capital with stakeholders in their districts. Stakeholder, trust, and social capital theory were the lenses that guided this study. We utilized a pragmatic research design and thematic data analysis to interpret our…

  14. 43 CFR 2532.2 - Trust patent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Trust patent. 2532.2 Section 2532.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) INDIAN ALLOTMENTS Allotments § 2532.2 Trust patent. (a) To enable an Indian allottee to...

  15. 43 CFR 2532.2 - Trust patent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Trust patent. 2532.2 Section 2532.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) INDIAN ALLOTMENTS Allotments § 2532.2 Trust patent. (a) To enable an Indian allottee to...

  16. Young Children and Trust in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alat, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine differences in children's generalised trust and the maternal behaviour, child temperament, and demographic factors on the levels of trust in children. A total of 314 mothers and their children participated in the study. Results showed no evidence of sex differences in children's beliefs. Children living in urban…

  17. The Winston Churchill Memorial Trust of Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Nicolette

    2013-01-01

    The Churchill Trust was established in 1965 to honour the memory of Sir Winston Churchill by awarding overseas research Fellowships known as "Churchill Fellowships". Since its inception, The Churchill Trust has awarded Churchill Fellowships to more than 3,700 Australians who, like Churchill, are innovative, filled with a spirit of…

  18. Bootstrapping and Maintaining Trust in the Cloud

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-16

    system that will receive the encryption key). In an IaaS cloud en- vironment, there is neither a trusted console where a user can enter a password nor...Xiao, LaurenceT. Yang, Jianhua Ma, Christian Muller-Schloer, and Yu Hua, edi- tors, Autonomic and Trusted Computing, volume 4610 of Lecture Notes in

  19. Explaining Math Achievement: Personality, Motivation, and Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilic-Bebek, Ebru

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the statistical significance of student trust next to the well-tested constructs of personality and motivation to determine whether trust is a significant predictor of course achievement in college math courses. Participants were 175 students who were taking undergraduate math courses in an urban public university. The…

  20. Attachment Relationships: Self-Disclosure and Trust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistole, M. Carole

    1993-01-01

    Examined differences in trust and self-disclosure associated with secure, anxious/ambivalent, and avoidant attachment. Findings from 98 undergraduate students revealed that, in general, subjects who reported themselves as securely attached also reported, in comparison with avoidant attachment, higher levels of trust in partner, amount of…

  1. Factor Analysis of the Interpersonal Trust Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Thomas L.; Tedeschi, Richard G.

    1975-01-01

    Separate factor analyses of four large samples of respondents to Rotter's Interpersonal Trust Scale produced three orthogonal factors that cross-validated over all samples. Results indicate there may be relatively independent dimensions of trust and factor scores may yield greater prediction than the general scale in many research applications.…

  2. Development of Trust and Reciprocity in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Bos, Wouter; Westenberg, Michiel; van Dijk, Eric; Crone, Eveline A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the development of two types of prosocial behavior, trust and reciprocity, as defined using a game-theoretical task that allows investigation of real-time social interaction, among 4 age groups from 9 to 25 years. By manipulating the possible outcome alternatives, we could distinguish among important determinants of trust and…

  3. Perceptions of Trust in Public Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Lucy; Baird, Jo-Anne

    2013-01-01

    Over recent years, the credibility of public examinations in England has increasingly come to the fore. Government agencies have invested time and money into researching public perceptions of the reliability and validity of examinations. Whilst such research overlaps into the conceptual domain of trust, trust in examinations remains an elusive…

  4. Development of Trust in an Online Breast Cancer Forum: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Lovatt, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    Background Online health forums provide peer support for a range of medical conditions including life-threatening and terminal illnesses. Trust is an important component of peer-to-peer support, although relatively little is known about how trust forms within online health forums. Objective The aim of this paper is to examine how trust develops and influences sharing among users of an online breast cancer forum. Methods An interpretive qualitative approach was adopted. Data were collected from forum posts from 135 threads on 9 boards on the UK charity, Breast Cancer Care (BCC). Semistructured interviews were conducted with 14 BCC forum users. Both datasets were analyzed thematically using Braun and Clarke’s approach and combined to triangulate analysis. Results Trust operates in 3 dimensions, structural, relational, and temporal, and these intersect with each other and do not operate in isolation. The structural dimension relates to how the affordances and formal rules of the site affected trust. The relational dimension refers to how trust was necessarily experienced in interactions with other forum users: it emerged within relationships and was a social phenomenon. The temporal dimension relates to how trust changed over time and was influenced by the length of time users spent on the forum. Conclusions Trust is a process that changes over time and which is influenced by structural features of the forum, as well as informal but collectively understood relational interactions among forum users. The study provides a better understanding of how the intersecting structural, relational, and temporal aspects that support the development of trust facilitate sharing in online environments. These findings will help organizations developing online health forums. PMID:28536093

  5. Development of Trust in an Online Breast Cancer Forum: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Lovatt, Melanie; Bath, Peter A; Ellis, Julie

    2017-05-23

    Online health forums provide peer support for a range of medical conditions including life-threatening and terminal illnesses. Trust is an important component of peer-to-peer support, although relatively little is known about how trust forms within online health forums. The aim of this paper is to examine how trust develops and influences sharing among users of an online breast cancer forum. An interpretive qualitative approach was adopted. Data were collected from forum posts from 135 threads on 9 boards on the UK charity, Breast Cancer Care (BCC). Semistructured interviews were conducted with 14 BCC forum users. Both datasets were analyzed thematically using Braun and Clarke's approach and combined to triangulate analysis. Trust operates in 3 dimensions, structural, relational, and temporal, and these intersect with each other and do not operate in isolation. The structural dimension relates to how the affordances and formal rules of the site affected trust. The relational dimension refers to how trust was necessarily experienced in interactions with other forum users: it emerged within relationships and was a social phenomenon. The temporal dimension relates to how trust changed over time and was influenced by the length of time users spent on the forum. Trust is a process that changes over time and which is influenced by structural features of the forum, as well as informal but collectively understood relational interactions among forum users. The study provides a better understanding of how the intersecting structural, relational, and temporal aspects that support the development of trust facilitate sharing in online environments. These findings will help organizations developing online health forums.

  6. Trusting Facebook in Crisis Situations: The Role of General Use and General Trust Toward Facebook.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Hermann; Kücükbalaban, Pinar; Lemanski, Sandra; Knuth, Daniela; Schmidt, Silke

    2016-01-01

    An important concept that has been rather neglected in research on social media is the concept of trust. Although there is a considerable amount of research on online trust in general, little has been done in the area of social media. As a situation of risk is necessary for trust, the perceived trustworthiness of Facebook in crisis situations was examined in this study. A sample of 340 European Facebook users were questioned as part of a large European study about social media in the context of emergency situations. We found that participants' general trust toward Facebook as a medium predicted to a significant degree how much they would trust Facebook in a crisis situation. General use of Facebook and dispositional trust were also significantly associated with trust toward Facebook in a crisis situation.

  7. DualTrust: A Distributed Trust Model for Swarm-Based Autonomic Computing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maiden, Wendy M.; Dionysiou, Ioanna; Frincke, Deborah A.; Fink, Glenn A.; Bakken, David E.

    2011-02-01

    For autonomic computing systems that utilize mobile agents and ant colony algorithms for their sensor layer, trust management is important for the acceptance of the mobile agent sensors and to protect the system from malicious behavior by insiders and entities that have penetrated network defenses. This paper examines the trust relationships, evidence, and decisions in a representative system and finds that by monitoring the trustworthiness of the autonomic managers rather than the swarming sensors, the trust management problem becomes much more scalable and still serves to protect the swarm. We then propose the DualTrust conceptual trust model. By addressing the autonomic manager’s bi-directional primary relationships in the ACS architecture, DualTrust is able to monitor the trustworthiness of the autonomic managers, protect the sensor swarm in a scalable manner, and provide global trust awareness for the orchestrating autonomic manager.

  8. Trust in the workplace: factors affecting trust formation between team members.

    PubMed

    Spector, Michele D; Jones, Gwen E

    2004-06-01

    The authors used survey data from 127 professional-level employees working in 8 industries to assess the effects of respondent's trusting stance and (a) the trustee's organization membership (internal or external), (b) the hierarchical relationship (supervisor or peer), and (c) the gender of the trustee, on initial trust level for a new project team member. The authors found that trusting stance was positively related to initial trust level. The authors also found an interaction effect between respondent gender and trustee gender on initial trust. Specifically, male initial trust level was higher for a new male team member and lower for a new female team member. The present study provided additional understanding of the formation of initial trust levels and its importance for team functioning.

  9. Native T1 Mapping Demonstrating Apical Thrombi in Eosinophilic Myocarditis Associated with Churg-Strauss Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Kyongmin Sarah; Jeong, Soh Yong; Lee, Kyo Young; Chang, Kiyuk

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic myocarditis is a disease characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the myocardium, consisting of acute necrotic stage, thrombotic stage, and fibrotic stage. Although T1 mapping has been increasingly used in various cardiac pathologies, there has been no report of T1 mapping in eosinophilic myocarditis. We report a case of 75-year-old female with eosinophilic myocarditis, whose cardiac magnetic resonance imaging included native T1 mapping, in which apical thrombi were distinctly seen as areas with decreased T1 values, next to areas of inflammation seen as increased T1 value in subendocardium. PMID:27826352

  10. Reproducibility and comparison of oxygen-enhanced T1 quantification in COPD and asthma patients

    PubMed Central

    Jobst, Bertram J.; Anjorin, Angela; Sedlaczek, Oliver; Wolf, Ursula; Terekhov, Maxim; Hoffmann, Christian; Ley, Sebastian; Düber, Christoph; Biederer, Jürgen; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Jakob, Peter M.; Wielpütz, Mark O.

    2017-01-01

    T1 maps have been shown to yield useful diagnostic information on lung function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma, both for native T1 and ΔT1, the relative reduction while breathing pure oxygen. As parameter quantification is particularly interesting for longitudinal studies, the purpose of this work was both to examine the reproducibility of lung T1 mapping and to compare T1 found in COPD and asthma patients using IRSnapShotFLASH embedded in a full MRI protocol. 12 asthma and 12 COPD patients (site 1) and further 15 COPD patients (site 2) were examined on two consecutive days. In each patient, T1 maps were acquired in 8 single breath-hold slices, breathing first room air, then pure oxygen. Maps were partitioned into 12 regions each to calculate average values. In asthma patients, the average T1,RA = 1206ms (room air) was reduced to T1,O2 = 1141ms under oxygen conditions (ΔT1 = 5.3%, p < 5⋅10−4), while in COPD patients both native T1,RA = 1125ms was significantly shorter (p < 10−3) and the relative reduction to T1,O2 = 1081ms on average ΔT1 = 4.2%(p < 10−5). On the second day, with T1,RA = 1186ms in asthma and T1,RA = 1097ms in COPD, observed values were slightly shorter on average in all patient groups. ΔT1 reduction was the least repeatable parameter and varied from day to day by up to 23% in individual asthma and 30% in COPD patients. While for both patient groups T1 was below the values reported for healthy subjects, the T1 and ΔT1 found in asthmatics lies between that of the COPD group and reported values for healthy subjects, suggesting a higher blood volume fraction and better ventilation. However, it could be demonstrated that lung T1 quantification is subject to notable inter-examination variability, which here can be attributed both to remaining contrast agent from the previous day and the increased dependency of lung T1 on perfusion and thus current lung state. PMID:28207845

  11. Trust method for multi-agent consensus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulski, Dariusz G.; Lewis, Frank L.; Gu, Edward Y.; Hudas, Greg R.

    2012-06-01

    The consensus problem in multi-agent systems often assumes that all agents are equally trustworthy to seek agreement. But for multi-agent military applications - particularly those that deal with sensor fusion or multi-robot formation control - this assumption may create the potential for compromised network security or poor cooperative performance. As such, we present a trust-based solution for the discrete-time multi-agent consensus problem and prove its asymptotic convergence in strongly connected digraphs. The novelty of the paper is a new trust algorithm called RoboTrust, which is used to calculate trustworthiness in agents using observations and statistical inferences from various historical perspectives. The performance of RoboTrust is evaluated within the trust-based consensus protocol under different conditions of tolerance and confirmation.

  12. High Resolution X-Ray Microangiography of 4T1 Tumor in Mouse Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Jianqi; Liu Ping; Gu Xiang; Liu Xiaoxia; Zhao Jun; Xiao Tiqiao; Xu, Lisa X.

    2010-07-23

    Angiogenesis is very important in tumor growth and metastasis. But in clinic, only vessels lager than 200 {mu}m in diameter, can be observed using conventional medical imaging. Synchrotron radiation (SR) phase contrast imaging, whose spatial resolution can reach as high as 1 {mu}m, has great advantages in imaging soft tissue structures, such as blood vessels and tumor tissues. In this paper, the morphology of newly formed micro-vessels in the mouse 4T1 tumor samples was firstly studied with contrast agent. Then, the angiogenesis in nude mice tumor window model was observed without contrast agent using the SR phase contrast imaging at the beamline for X-ray imaging and biomedical applications, Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). The images of tumors showed dense, irregular and tortuous tumor micro-vessels with the smallest size of 20-30 {mu}m in diameter.

  13. Sarcosine-Based Glycine Transporter Type-1 (GlyT-1) Inhibitors Containing Pyridazine Moiety: A Further Search for Drugs with Potential to Influence Schizophrenia Negative Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Harsing, Laszlo G; Timar, Julia; Szabo, Geza; Udvari, Szabolcs; Nagy, Katalin M; Marko, Bernadett; Zsilla, Gabriella; Czompa, Andrea; Tapolcsanyi, Pal; Kocsis, Akos; Matyus, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We have synthesized a novel series of N-substituted sarcosines, analogues of NFPS (N-[3-(biphenyl-4- yloxy)-3-(4-fluorophenyl)propyl]-N-methylglycine), as type-1 glycine transporter (GlyT-1) inhibitors. Several compounds incorporated a diazine ring inhibited recombinant hGlyT-1b expressed permanently in CHO cells and GlyT-1 in rat brain synaptosomal preparations. A structure-activity relationship for the newly synthesized compounds was obtained and discussed on the ground of their GlyT-1 inhibitory potencies. Replacement of the biphenyl-4-yloxy moiety in NFPS with a 5-pyridazinylphenoxy moiety (compounds 3, 4, 5, and 6) or a 2-phenyl-5- pyridazinyloxy moiety (compounds 10, 11, and 12) afforded compounds exhibiting potent inhibition on GlyT-1 activity. The GlyT-1 inhibitory properties of NFPS analogues, in which sarcosine was closed into a ring forming (methylamino)pyridazine-3-(2H)-one, were markedly reduced (compounds 13 and 14). The pyridazine-containing GlyT-1 inhibitors with in vitro GlyT-1 inhibitory potency also enhanced extracellular glycine concentrations in conscious rat striatum as was measured by microdialysis technique. In contrast to NFPS, sarcosine-based pyridazine containing GlyT-1 inhibitors failed to evoke compulsive running behavior whereas they inhibited phencyclidine- induced hypermotility in mice. It is believed that increase of extracellular concentrations of glycine by inhibition of its reuptake may probably influence positively glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type ionotropic receptors in the central nervous system. This may have importance in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders associated with hypofunctional NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic neurochemical transmission. Thus, impaired NMDA receptor functions have been shown to be involved in the development of the negative symptoms and the cognitive deficit of schizophrenia and the treatment of these symptoms is the possible clinical indication of GlyT-1 inhibitors including

  14. Quantifying Temperature-Dependent T1 Changes in Cortical Bone Using Ultrashort Echo-Time MRI

    PubMed Central

    Han, Misung; Rieke, Viola; Scott, Serena J; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Salgaonkar, Vasant A; Jones, Peter D; Larson, Peder E Z; Diederich, Chris J; Krug, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of using ultrashort echo-time (UTE) MRI to quantify T1 changes in cortical bone due to heating. Methods Variable flip-angle T1 mapping combined with 3D UTE imaging was used to measure T1 in cortical bone. A calibration experiment was performed to detect T1 changes with temperature in ex vivo cortical bone samples from a bovine femur. Ultrasound heating experiments were performed using an interstitial applicator in ex vivo bovine femur specimens, and heat-induced T1 changes were quantified. Results The calibration experiment demonstrated that T1 increases with temperature in cortical bone. We observed a linear relationship between temperature and T1 with a linear coefficient of 0.67–0.84 ms/°C over a range of 25–70°C. The ultrasound heating experiments showed increased T1 changes in the heated regions, and the relationship between the temperature changes and T1 changes was similar to that of the calibration. Conclusion We demonstrated a temperature dependence of T1 in ex vivo cortical bone using a variable flip-angle UTE T1 mapping method. PMID:26390357

  15. T1ρ MRI Quantification of Arthroscopically-Confirmed Cartilage Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Witschey, Walter RT; Borthakur, Arijitt; Fenty, Matt; Kneeland, J Bruce; Lonner, Jess H; McArdle, Erin L.; Sochor, Matt; Reddy, Ravinder

    2010-01-01

    9 asymptomatic subjects and 6 patients underwent T1ρ MRI to determine whether Outerbridge grade 1 or 2 cartilage degeneration observed during arthroscopy could be detected noninvasively. MRI was performed 2–3 months post-arthroscopy using sagittal T1-weighted and axial and coronal T1ρ MRI from which spatial T1ρ relaxation maps were calculated from segmented T1-weighted images. Median T1ρ relaxation times of patients with arthroscopically documented cartilage degeneration and asymptomatic subjects were significantly different (p < 0.001) and median T1ρ exceeded asymptomatic articular cartilage median T1ρ by 2.5 to 9.2 ms. In 8 observations of mild cartilage degeneration at arthroscopy (Outerbridge grades 1 and 2), mean compartment T1ρ was elevated in 5, but in all observations, large foci of increased T1ρ were observed. It was determined that T1ρ could detect some, but not all, Outerbridge grade 1 and 2 cartilage degeneration but that a larger patient population is needed to determine the sensitivity to these changes. PMID:20432308

  16. Medical bribery and the ethics of trust: the Romanian case.

    PubMed

    Manea, Teodora

    2015-02-01

    Medical bribery seems to be a global problem from Eastern Europe and the Balkans to China, a diffuse phenomenon, starting with morally acceptable gratitude and ending with institutional bribery. I focus my attention on Romania and analyze similar cases in Eastern European and postcommunist countries. Medical bribery can be regarded as a particular form of human transaction, a kind of primitive contract that occurs when people do not trust institutions or other forms of social contract that are meant to guarantee their rights and protect their interests. Concluding with strategies to fight medical bribery, I will underline better public policies for financing health and social care, and an ethic of trust that may help to restore trustworthiness of institutions and to rebuild interpersonal trust. This should be complemented by an educational program dedicated to understanding the negative consequences and mechanisms of corruption and the importance of ethical behavior. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Autophagy in the brains of young patients with poorly controlled T1DM and fatal diabetic ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, William H.; Shacka, John J.; Andjelkovic, Anuska V.

    2017-01-01

    Semi-quantitative neuroradiologic studies, quantitative neuron density studies and immunocytochemistry markers of oxidative stress and neuroinflammation indicate neuronal injury and deficits in young patients with chronic poorly controlled type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Present data suggest that pathogenesis of the neuronal deficits in young patients, who die as the result of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and brain edema (BE), does not involve apoptosis, a prominent form of regulated cell death in many disease states. To further address this we studied mediators of macroautophagy, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and apoptosis. In all areas studied we demonstrated increased levels of macroautophagy-associated proteins including light chain-3 (LC3) and autophagy related protein-4 (Atg4), as well as increased levels of the ER-associated glucose-regulated protein78/binding immunoglobulin protein (GRP78/BiP) in T1DM. In contrast, cleaved caspase-3 was rarely detected in any T1DM brain regions. These results suggest that chronic metabolic instability and oxidative stress may cause alterations in the autophagy-lysosomal pathway but not apoptosis, and macroautophagy-associated molecules may serve as useful candidates for further study in the pathogenesis of early neuronal deficits in T1DM. PMID:22079479

  18. Detection of Leptomeningeal Metastasis by Contrast-Enhanced 3D T1-SPACE: Comparison with 2D FLAIR and Contrast-Enhanced 2D T1-Weighted Images

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Bomi; Hwang, Eo-Jin; Lee, Song; Jang, Jinhee; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Kim, Bum-soo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To compare the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced 3D(dimensional) T1-weighted sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts by using different flip angle evolutions (T1-SPACE), 2D fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image in detection of leptomeningeal metastasis except for invasive procedures such as a CSF tapping. Materials and Methods Three groups of patients were included retrospectively for 9 months (from 2013-04-01 to 2013-12-31). Group 1 patients with positive malignant cells in CSF cytology (n = 22); group 2, stroke patients with steno-occlusion in ICA or MCA (n = 16); and group 3, patients with negative results on MRI, whose symptom were dizziness or headache (n = 25). A total of 63 sets of MR images are separately collected and randomly arranged: (1) CE 3D T1-SPACE; (2) 2D FLAIR; and (3) CE T1-GRE using a 3-Tesla MR system. A faculty neuroradiologist with 8-year-experience and another 2nd grade trainee in radiology reviewed each MR image- blinded by the results of CSF cytology and coded their observations as positives or negatives of leptomeningeal metastasis. The CSF cytology result was considered as a gold standard. Sensitivity and specificity of each MR images were calculated. Diagnostic accuracy was compared using a McNemar’s test. A Cohen's kappa analysis was performed to assess inter-observer agreements. Results Diagnostic accuracy was not different between 3D T1-SPACE and CSF cytology by both raters. However, the accuracy test of 2D FLAIR and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE was inconsistent by the two raters. The Kappa statistic results were 0.657 (3D T1-SPACE), 0.420 (2D FLAIR), and 0.160 (2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE). The 3D T1-SPACE images showed the highest inter-observer agreements between the raters. Conclusions Compared to 2D FLAIR and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE, contrast-enhanced 3D T1 SPACE showed a better detection rate of

  19. Public Trust in Health Information Sharing: A Measure of System Trust.

    PubMed

    Platt, Jodyn E; Jacobson, Peter D; Kardia, Sharon L R

    2017-01-18

    To measure public trust in a health information sharing in a broadly defined health system (system trust), inclusive of health care, public health, and research; to identify individual characteristics that predict system trust; and to consider these findings in the context of national health initiatives (e.g., learning health systems and precision medicine) that will expand the scope of data sharing. Survey data (n = 1,011) were collected in February 2014. We constructed a composite index of four dimensions of system trust-competency, fidelity, integrity, and trustworthiness. The index was used in linear regression evaluating demographic and psychosocial predictors of system trust. Data were collected by GfK Custom using a nationally representative sample and analyzed in Stata 13.0. Our findings suggest the public's trust may not meet the needs of health systems as they enter an era of expanded data sharing. We found that a majority of the U.S. public does not trust the organizations that have health information and share it (i.e., the health system) in one or more dimensions. Together, demographic and psychosocial factors accounted for ~18 percent of the observed variability in system trust. Future research should consider additional predictors of system trust such as knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs to inform policies and practices for health data sharing. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  20. Distinct contributions of T1R2 and T1R3 taste receptor subunits to the detection of sweet stimuli.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yiling; Vigues, Stephan; Hobbs, Jeanette R; Conn, Graeme L; Munger, Steven D

    2005-11-08

    Animals utilize hundreds of distinct G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-type chemosensory receptors to detect a diverse array of chemical signals in their environment, including odors, pheromones, and tastants. However, the molecular mechanisms by which these receptors selectively interact with their cognate ligands remain poorly understood. There is growing evidence that many chemosensory receptors exist in multimeric complexes, though little is known about the relative contributions of individual subunits to receptor functions. Here, we report that each of the two subunits in the heteromeric T1R2:T1R3 sweet taste receptor binds sweet stimuli though with distinct affinities and conformational changes. Furthermore, ligand affinities for T1R3 are drastically reduced by the introduction of a single amino acid change associated with decreased sweet taste sensitivity in behaving mice. Thus, individual T1R subunits increase the receptive range of the sweet taste receptor, offering a functional mechanism for phenotypic variations in sweet taste.

  1. Distinct Contributions of T1R2 and T1R3 Taste Receptor Subunits to the Detection of Sweet Stimuli

    SciTech Connect

    Nie,Y.; Vigues, S.; Hobbs, J.; Conn, G.; Munger, S.

    2005-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-type chemosensory receptors of animals selectively interact with their cognate ligands remain poorly understood. There is growing evidence that many chemosensory receptors exist in multimeric complexes, though little is known about the relative contributions of individual subunits to receptor functions. This study showed that each of the two subunits in the mammalian heteromeric T1R2:T1R3 sweet taste receptor binds sweet stimuli, though with distinct affinities and conformational changes. Furthermore, ligand affinities for T1R3 are drastically reduced by the introduction of a single amino acid change associated with decreased sweet taste sensitivity in mice. Thus, individual T1R subunits increase the receptive range of the sweet taste receptor, offering a functional mechanism for phenotypic variations in sweet taste.

  2. Fully automatic detection of deep white matter T1 hypointense lesions in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Spies, Lothar; Tewes, Anja; Suppa, Per; Opfer, Roland; Buchert, Ralph; Winkler, Gerhard; Raji, Alaleh

    2013-12-07

    A novel method is presented for fully automatic detection of candidate white matter (WM) T1 hypointense lesions in three-dimensional high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. By definition, T1 hypointense lesions have similar intensity as gray matter (GM) and thus appear darker than surrounding normal WM in T1-weighted images. The novel method uses a standard classification algorithm to partition T1-weighted images into GM, WM and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). As a consequence, T1 hypointense lesions are assigned an increased GM probability by the standard classification algorithm. The GM component image of a patient is then tested voxel-by-voxel against GM component images of a normative database of healthy individuals. Clusters (≥0.1 ml) of significantly increased GM density within a predefined mask of deep WM are defined as lesions. The performance of the algorithm was assessed on voxel level by a simulation study. A maximum dice similarity coefficient of 60% was found for a typical T1 lesion pattern with contrasts ranging from WM to cortical GM, indicating substantial agreement between ground truth and automatic detection. Retrospective application to 10 patients with multiple sclerosis demonstrated that 93 out of 96 T1 hypointense lesions were detected. On average 3.6 false positive T1 hypointense lesions per patient were found. The novel method is promising to support the detection of hypointense lesions in T1-weighted images which warrants further evaluation in larger patient samples.

  3. T1/ST2 promotes T helper 2 cell activation and polyfunctionality in bronchopulmonary mycosis.

    PubMed

    Piehler, D; Grahnert, A; Eschke, M; Richter, T; Köhler, G; Stenzel, W; Alber, G

    2013-03-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33 enhances T helper (Th)2 immunity via its receptor T1/ST2. Infection with the yeast-like pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is usually controlled by a Th1-mediated immune response. The mechanisms responsible for nonprotective Th2 immunity leading to allergic inflammation in pulmonary cryptococcosis are still not fully understood. Using a murine pulmonary model of C. neoformans infection, we report that T1/ST2 expression correlates with the intensity of Th2 activation, as demonstrated by the expression of CD25 and CD44 and downregulation of CD62L. Antigen-specific T1/ST2(+) Th cells are the primary source of the Th2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 as compared with wild-type T1/ST2(-) Th cells or Th cells from T1/ST2(-/-) mice. In addition, T1/ST2(+) Th cells almost exclusively contain bi- and trifunctional Th2 cytokine-producing Th cells compared with T1/ST2(-) Th cells or Th cells from T1/ST2(-/-) mice. Finally, T1/ST2-driven Th2 development resulted in defective pulmonary fungal control. These data demonstrate that T1/ST2 directs Th2 cell activation and polyfunctionality in allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis.

  4. Structural basis for perception of diverse chemical substances by T1r taste receptors

    PubMed Central

    Nuemket, Nipawan; Yasui, Norihisa; Kusakabe, Yuko; Nomura, Yukiyo; Atsumi, Nanako; Akiyama, Shuji; Nango, Eriko; Kato, Yukinari; Kaneko, Mika K.; Takagi, Junichi; Hosotani, Maiko; Yamashita, Atsuko

    2017-01-01

    The taste receptor type 1 (T1r) family perceives ‘palatable' tastes. These receptors function as T1r2-T1r3 and T1r1-T1r3 heterodimers to recognize a wide array of sweet and umami (savory) tastes in sugars and amino acids. Nonetheless, it is unclear how diverse tastes are recognized by so few receptors. Here we present crystal structures of the extracellular ligand-binding domains (LBDs), the taste recognition regions of the fish T1r2-T1r3 heterodimer, bound to different amino acids. The ligand-binding pocket in T1r2LBD is rich in aromatic residues, spacious and accommodates hydrated percepts. Biophysical studies show that this binding site is characterized by a broad yet discriminating chemical recognition, contributing for the particular trait of taste perception. In contrast, the analogous pocket in T1r3LBD is occupied by a rather loosely bound amino acid, suggesting that the T1r3 has an auxiliary role. Overall, we provide a structural basis for understanding the chemical perception of taste receptors. PMID:28534491

  5. Structural basis for perception of diverse chemical substances by T1r taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Nuemket, Nipawan; Yasui, Norihisa; Kusakabe, Yuko; Nomura, Yukiyo; Atsumi, Nanako; Akiyama, Shuji; Nango, Eriko; Kato, Yukinari; Kaneko, Mika K; Takagi, Junichi; Hosotani, Maiko; Yamashita, Atsuko

    2017-05-23

    The taste receptor type 1 (T1r) family perceives 'palatable' tastes. These receptors function as T1r2-T1r3 and T1r1-T1r3 heterodimers to recognize a wide array of sweet and umami (savory) tastes in sugars and amino acids. Nonetheless, it is unclear how diverse tastes are recognized by so few receptors. Here we present crystal structures of the extracellular ligand-binding domains (LBDs), the taste recognition regions of the fish T1r2-T1r3 heterodimer, bound to different amino acids. The ligand-binding pocket in T1r2LBD is rich in aromatic residues, spacious and accommodates hydrated percepts. Biophysical studies show that this binding site is characterized by a broad yet discriminating chemical recognition, contributing for the particular trait of taste perception. In contrast, the analogous pocket in T1r3LBD is occupied by a rather loosely bound amino acid, suggesting that the T1r3 has an auxiliary role. Overall, we provide a structural basis for understanding the chemical perception of taste receptors.

  6. On- and off-resonance T(1rho) MRI in acute cerebral ischemia of the rat.

    PubMed

    Gröhn, Olli H J; Mäkelä, Heidi I; Lukkarinen, Jouko A; DelaBarre, Lance; Lin, Joseph; Garwood, Michael; Kauppinen, Risto A

    2003-01-01

    The ability of on-resonance T(1rho) (T(1rho)) and off-resonance T(1rho) (T(1rho)(off)) measurements to indicate acute cerebral ischemia in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion was investigated at 4.7 T. T(1rho) was determined with B(1) fields of 0.4, 0.8, and 1.6 G, and T(1rho)(off) with five offset frequencies ((Delta)omega) ranging from 0-7.5 kHz at B(1) of 0.4 G, yielding effective B(1) (B(eff)) from 0.4 to 1.8 G. Diffusion, T(1), and T(2) were also quantified. Both T(1rho) and T(1rho)(off) acquired with (Delta)(o)< 2.5 kHz showed positive contrast during the first hours of MCA occlusion in the ischemic tissue delineated by low diffusion. Interestingly, T(1rho)(off) contrast acquired with (Delta)omega > 2.5 kHz was clearly less sensitive to ischemic alterations, and developed with a delayed time course. This discrepancy is thought to be a consequence of the frequency dependency of cross-relaxation during irradiation with spin-lock pulses. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Fully automatic detection of deep white matter T1 hypointense lesions in multiple sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spies, Lothar; Tewes, Anja; Suppa, Per; Opfer, Roland; Buchert, Ralph; Winkler, Gerhard; Raji, Alaleh

    2013-12-01

    A novel method is presented for fully automatic detection of candidate white matter (WM) T1 hypointense lesions in three-dimensional high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. By definition, T1 hypointense lesions have similar intensity as gray matter (GM) and thus appear darker than surrounding normal WM in T1-weighted images. The novel method uses a standard classification algorithm to partition T1-weighted images into GM, WM and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). As a consequence, T1 hypointense lesions are assigned an increased GM probability by the standard classification algorithm. The GM component image of a patient is then tested voxel-by-voxel against GM component images of a normative database of healthy individuals. Clusters (≥0.1 ml) of significantly increased GM density within a predefined mask of deep WM are defined as lesions. The performance of the algorithm was assessed on voxel level by a simulation study. A maximum dice similarity coefficient of 60% was found for a typical T1 lesion pattern with contrasts ranging from WM to cortical GM, indicating substantial agreement between ground truth and automatic detection. Retrospective application to 10 patients with multiple sclerosis demonstrated that 93 out of 96 T1 hypointense lesions were detected. On average 3.6 false positive T1 hypointense lesions per patient were found. The novel method is promising to support the detection of hypointense lesions in T1-weighted images which warrants further evaluation in larger patient samples.

  8. Genetic Influences Are Virtually Absent for Trust

    PubMed Central

    Van Lange, Paul A. M.; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E.; Posthuma, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades, numerous twin studies have revealed moderate to high heritability estimates for individual differences in a wide range of human traits, including cognitive ability, psychiatric disorders, and personality traits. Even factors that are generally believed to be environmental in nature have been shown to be under genetic control, albeit modest. Is such heritability also present in social traits that are conceptualized as causes and consequences of social interactions or in other ways strongly shaped by behavior of other people? Here we examine a population-based sample of 1,012 twins and relatives. We show that the genetic influence on generalized trust in other people (trust-in-others: h2 = 5%, ns), and beliefs regarding other people’s trust in the self (trust-in-self: h2 = 13%, ns), is virtually absent. As test-retest reliability for both scales were found to be moderate or high (r = .76 and r = .53, respectively) in an independent sample, we conclude that all variance in trust is likely to be accounted for by non-shared environmental influences. We show that, relative to cognitive abilities, psychiatric disorders, and classic personality variables, genetic influences are smaller for trust, and propose that experiences with or observations of the behavior of other people shape trust more strongly than other traits. PMID:24709897

  9. Hype and Public Trust in Science

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Social scientists have begun elucidating the variables that influence public trust in science, yet little is known about hype in biotechnology and its effects on public trust. Many scholars claim that hyping biotechnology results in a loss of public trust, and possibly public enthusiasm or support for science, because public expectations of the biotechnological promises will be unmet. We argue for the need for empirical research that examines the relationships between hype, public trust, and public enthusiasm/support. We discuss the complexities in designing empirical studies that provide evidence for a causal link between hype, public trust, and public enthusiasm/support, but also illustrate how this may be remedied. Further empirical research on hype and public trust is needed in order to improve public communication of science and to design evidence-based education on the responsible conduct of research for scientists. We conclude that conceptual arguments made on hype and public trust must be nuanced to reflect our current understanding of this relationship. PMID:22045550

  10. Detection of Maltodextrin and Its Discrimination from Sucrose are Independent of the T1R2+T1R3 Heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kimberly R; Spector, Alan Craig

    2017-08-02

    Maltodextrins, such as Maltrin and Polycose, are glucose polymer mixtures of varying chain lengths that are palatable to rodents. Although glucose and other sugars activate the T1R2+T1R3 "sweet" taste receptor, recent evidence from T1R2 or T1R3 knockout (KO) mice suggests that maltodextrins, despite their glucose polymer composition, activate a separate receptor mechanism to generate a taste percept qualitatively distinguishable from that of sweeteners. However, explicit discrimination of maltodextrins from prototypical sweeteners has not yet been psychophysically tested in any murine model. Therefore, mice lacking T1R2+T1R3 and wild-type controls were tested in a two-response taste discrimination task to determine if maltodextrins are 1) detectable when both receptor subunits are absent, and 2) perceptually distinct from that of sucrose irrespective of viscosity, intensity, and hedonics. Most KO mice displayed similar Polycose sensitivity as controls. However, some KO mice were only sensitive to the higher Polycose concentrations, implicating potential allelic variation in the putative polysaccharide receptor or downstream pathways unmasked by the absence of T1R2+T1R3. Varied Maltrin and sucrose concentrations of approximately matched viscosities were then presented to render the oral somatosensory features, intensity, and hedonic value of the solutions irrelevant. While both genotypes competently discriminated Maltrin from sucrose, performance was apparently driven by the different orosensory percepts of the two stimuli in control mice and the presence of a Maltrin but not sucrose orosensory cue in KO mice. These data support the proposed presence of an orosensory receptor mechanism that gives rise to a qualitatively distinguishable sensation from that of sucrose. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

  11. Sugar-induced cephalic-phase insulin release is mediated by a T1r2+T1r3-independent taste transduction pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Glendinning, John I; Stano, Sarah; Holter, Marlena; Azenkot, Tali; Goldman, Olivia; Margolskee, Robert F; Vasselli, Joseph R; Sclafani, Anthony

    2015-09-01

    Sensory stimulation from foods elicits cephalic phase responses, which facilitate digestion and nutrient assimilation. One such response, cephalic-phase insulin release (CPIR), enhances glucose tolerance. Little is known about the chemosensory mechanisms that activate CPIR. We studied the contribution of the sweet taste receptor (T1r2+T1r3) to sugar-induced CPIR in C57BL/6 (B6) and T1r3 knockout (KO) mice. First, we measured insulin release and glucose tolerance following oral (i.e., normal ingestion) or intragastric (IG) administration of 2.8 M glucose. Both groups of mice exhibited a CPIR following oral but not IG administration, and this CPIR improved glucose tolerance. Second, we examined the specificity of CPIR. Both mouse groups exhibited a CPIR following oral administration of 1 M glucose and 1 M sucrose but not 1 M fructose or water alone. Third, we studied behavioral attraction to the same three sugar solutions in short-term acceptability tests. B6 mice licked more avidly for the sugar solutions than for water, whereas T1r3 KO mice licked no more for the sugar solutions than for water. Finally, we examined chorda tympani (CT) nerve responses to each of the sugars. Both mouse groups exhibited CT nerve responses to the sugars, although those of B6 mice were stronger. We propose that mice possess two taste transduction pathways for sugars. One mediates behavioral attraction to sugars and requires an intact T1r2+T1r3. The other mediates CPIR but does not require an intact T1r2+T1r3. If the latter taste transduction pathway exists in humans, it should provide opportunities for the development of new treatments for controlling blood sugar. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Sugar-induced cephalic-phase insulin release is mediated by a T1r2+T1r3-independent taste transduction pathway in mice

    PubMed Central

    Stano, Sarah; Holter, Marlena; Azenkot, Tali; Goldman, Olivia; Margolskee, Robert F.; Vasselli, Joseph R.; Sclafani, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Sensory stimulation from foods elicits cephalic phase responses, which facilitate digestion and nutrient assimilation. One such response, cephalic-phase insulin release (CPIR), enhances glucose tolerance. Little is known about the chemosensory mechanisms that activate CPIR. We studied the contribution of the sweet taste receptor (T1r2+T1r3) to sugar-induced CPIR in C57BL/6 (B6) and T1r3 knockout (KO) mice. First, we measured insulin release and glucose tolerance following oral (i.e., normal ingestion) or intragastric (IG) administration of 2.8 M glucose. Both groups of mice exhibited a CPIR following oral but not IG administration, and this CPIR improved glucose tolerance. Second, we examined the specificity of CPIR. Both mouse groups exhibited a CPIR following oral administration of 1 M glucose and 1 M sucrose but not 1 M fructose or water alone. Third, we studied behavioral attraction to the same three sugar solutions in short-term acceptability tests. B6 mice licked more avidly for the sugar solutions than for water, whereas T1r3 KO mice licked no more for the sugar solutions than for water. Finally, we examined chorda tympani (CT) nerve responses to each of the sugars. Both mouse groups exhibited CT nerve responses to the sugars, although those of B6 mice were stronger. We propose that mice possess two taste transduction pathways for sugars. One mediates behavioral attraction to sugars and requires an intact T1r2+T1r3. The other mediates CPIR but does not require an intact T1r2+T1r3. If the latter taste transduction pathway exists in humans, it should provide opportunities for the development of new treatments for controlling blood sugar. PMID:26157055

  13. High levels of the type III inorganic phosphate transporter PiT1 (SLC20A1) can confer faster cell adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Kongsfelt, Iben Boutrup; Byskov, Kristina; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Pedersen, Lene

    2014-08-01

    The inorganic phosphate transporter PiT1 (SLC20A1) is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian cells. We recently showed that overexpression of human PiT1 was sufficient to increase proliferation of two strict density-inhibited cell lines, murine fibroblastic NIH3T3 and pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells, and allowed the cultures to grow to higher cell densities. In addition, upon transformation NIH3T3 cells showed increased ability to form colonies in soft agar. The cellular regulation of PiT1 expression supports that cells utilize the PiT1 levels to control proliferation, with non-proliferating cells showing the lowest PiT1 mRNA levels. The mechanism behind the role of PiT1 in increased cell proliferation is not known. We, however, found that compared to control cells, cultures of NIH3T3 cells overexpressing PiT1 upon seeding showed increased cell number after 24 h and had shifted more cells from G0/G1 to S+G2/M within 12 h, suggesting that an early event may play a role. We here show that expression of human PiT1 in NIH3T3 cells led to faster cell adhesion; this effect was not cell type specific in that it was also observed when expressing human PiT1 in MC3T3-E1 cells. We also show for NIH3T3 that PiT1 overexpression led to faster cell spreading. The final total numbers of attached cells did, however, not differ between cultures of PiT1 overexpressing cells and control cells of neither cell type. We suggest that the PiT1-mediated fast adhesion potentials allow the cells to go faster out of G0/G1 and thereby contribute to their proliferative advantage within the first 24 h after seeding. - Highlights: • Effects of elevated levels of the inorganic phosphate transporter PiT1 were studied. • The density-inhibited murine cell lines NIH3T3 and MC3T3-E1 showed faster adhesion. • NIH3T3 cells showed faster spreading. • We suggest that the faster adhesion/spreading contributes to faster proliferation.

  14. Specific HIV-1 TAR RNA loop sequence and functional groups are required for human cyclin T1-Tat-TAR ternary complex formation.

    PubMed

    Richter, Sara; Cao, Hong; Rana, Tariq M

    2002-05-21

    Replication of human immunodeficiency virus requires Tat protein which activates elongation of RNA polymerase II transcription at the HIV-1 promoter through interaction with the cyclin T1 (CycT1) subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor complex (P-TEFb). Tat binds directly through its transactivation domain to the CycT1 subunit of the P-TEFb and induces loop sequence specific binding of the P-TEFb onto nascent HIV-1 TAR RNA. By using a gel electrophoresis method and a comprehensive set of TAR loop mutants, we have identified the sequence and structural determinants for high-affinity CycT1-Tat-TAR ternary complex formation. Our results show that CycT1 and Tat binding to TAR RNA is highly cooperative, and a capacity of 85%, a Hill coefficient of 2.7, and a dissociation constant (K(D)) of 2.45 nM were observed. These results indicate that there are three binding sites on TAR RNA. CycT1 does not bind TAR RNA in the absence of Tat, and Tat binding to TAR, while detectable, is very inefficient in the absence of CycT1. It is conceivable that the CycT1-Tat heterodimer directly binds to TAR RNA in the U-rich RNA bulge region and this binding facilitates the interactions of the CycT1-Tat heterodimer at the other two sites in the RNA loop region. On the basis of our results, we suggest a model where CycT1 interacts with Tat protein and positions the protein complex to make contacts with the G34 region of the loop sequence; G34 is critical for CycT1-Tat binding and forms a C30.G34 base pair. Two functional groups, O6 and N7, at nucleotide positions 32 and 34 in the TAR loop are essential for CycT1-Tat interactions with TAR RNA. The identity of two nucleotides, U31 and G33, is not critical, but they contribute to the stabilization of the RNA-protein complex. The presence of a single-nucleotide bulge of A35 or C35 is essential for distortion of the backbone RNA structure as well as the accessibility of functional groups in the major groove of the double

  15. The T1R2/T1R3 sweet receptor and TRPM5 ion channel taste targets with therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Sprous, Dennis; Palmer, Kyle R

    2010-01-01

    Taste signaling is a critical determinant of ingestive behaviors and thereby linked to obesity and related metabolic dysfunctions. Recent evidence of taste signaling pathways in the gut suggests the link to be more direct, raising the possibility that taste receptor systems could be regarded as therapeutic targets. T1R2/T1R3, the G protein coupled receptor that mediates sweet taste, and the TRPM5 ion channel have been the focus of discovery programs seeking novel compounds that could be useful in modifying taste. We review in this chapter the hypothesis of gastrointestinal taste signaling and discuss the potential for T1R2/T1R3 and TRPM5 as targets of therapeutic intervention in obesity and diabetes. Critical to the development of a drug discovery program is the creation of libraries that enhance the likelihood of identifying novel compounds that modulate the target of interest. We advocate a computer-based chemoinformatic approach for assembling natural and synthetic compound libraries as well as for supporting optimization of structure activity relationships. Strategies for discovering modulators of T1R2/T1R3 and TRPM5 using methods of chemoinformatics are presented herein. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Obesity-related abnormalities couple environmental triggers with genetic susceptibility in adult-onset T1D.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, K Hoa; Ande, Sudharsana R; Mishra, Suresh

    2016-01-29

    The incidence of adult-onset T1D in low-risk non-HLA type has increased several folds, whereas the contemporaneous incidence in high-risk HLA-type remains stable. Various factors behind this selective increase in T1D in young adults remain unclear. Obesity and its associated abnormalities appear to be an important determinant; however, the underlying mechanism involved is not understood. Recently, we have developed two novel transgenic obese mice models, Mito-Ob and m-Mito-Ob, by expressing a pleiotropic protein prohibitin (PHB) and a phospho mutant form of PHB (Y114F-PHB or m-PHB) from the aP2 gene promoter, respectively. Both mice models develop obesity in a sex-neutral manner, independent of diet; but obesity associated chronic low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance in a male sex-specific manner. Interestingly, on a high fat diet (HFD) only male m-Mito-Ob mice displayed marked mononuclear cell infiltration in pancreas and developed insulitis that mimic adult-onset T1D. Male Mito-Ob mice that share the metabolic phenotype of male m-Mito-Ob mice, and female m-Mito-Ob that harbor m-PHB similar to male m-Mito-Ob mice, did not develop insulitis. Thus, insulitis development in male m-Mito-Ob in response to HFD requires both, obesity-related abnormalities and m-PHB. Collectively, this data provides a proof-of-concept that obesity-associated abnormalities couple environmental triggers with genetic susceptibility in adult-onset T1D and reveals PHB as a potential susceptibility gene for T1D.

  17. RGD-functionalized ultrasmall iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted T1-weighted MR imaging of gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yu; Yang, Jia; Yan, Yu; Li, Jingchao; Shen, Mingwu; Zhang, Guixiang; Mignani, Serge; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-08-01

    We report a convenient approach to prepare ultrasmall Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with an arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) peptide for in vitro and in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of gliomas. In our work, stable sodium citrate-stabilized Fe3O4 NPs were prepared by a solvothermal route. Then, the carboxylated Fe3O4 NPs stabilized with sodium citrate were conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-linked RGD. The formed ultrasmall RGD-functionalized nanoprobe (Fe3O4-PEG-RGD) was fully characterized using different techniques. We show that these Fe3O4-PEG-RGD particles with a size of 2.7 nm are water-dispersible, stable, cytocompatible and hemocompatible in a given concentration range, and display targeting specificity to glioma cells overexpressing αvβ3 integrin in vitro. With the relatively high r1 relaxivity (r1 = 1.4 mM-1 s-1), the Fe3O4-PEG-RGD particles can be used as an efficient nanoprobe for targeted T1-weighted positive MR imaging of glioma cells in vitro and the xenografted tumor model in vivo via an active RGD-mediated targeting pathway. The developed RGD-functionalized Fe3O4 NPs may hold great promise to be used as a nanoprobe for targeted T1-weighted MR imaging of different αvβ3 integrin-overexpressing cancer cells or biological systems.We report a convenient approach to prepare ultrasmall Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with an arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) peptide for in vitro and in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of gliomas. In our work, stable sodium citrate-stabilized Fe3O4 NPs were prepared by a solvothermal route. Then, the carboxylated Fe3O4 NPs stabilized with sodium citrate were conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-linked RGD. The formed ultrasmall RGD-functionalized nanoprobe (Fe3O4-PEG-RGD) was fully characterized using different techniques. We show that these Fe3O4-PEG-RGD particles with a size of 2.7 nm are water-dispersible, stable, cytocompatible and hemocompatible in a given concentration

  18. Taste responses in mice lacking taste receptor subunit T1R1

    PubMed Central

    Kusuhara, Yoko; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Ohkuri, Tadahiro; Yasumatsu, Keiko; Voigt, Anja; Hübner, Sandra; Maeda, Katsumasa; Boehm, Ulrich; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2013-01-01

    The T1R1 receptor subunit acts as an umami taste receptor in combination with its partner, T1R3. In addition, metabotropic glutamate receptors (brain and taste variants of mGluR1 and mGluR4) are thought to function as umami taste receptors. To elucidate the function of T1R1 and the contribution of mGluRs to umami taste detection in vivo, we used newly developed knock-out (T1R1−/−) mice, which lack the entire coding region of the Tas1r1 gene and express mCherry in T1R1-expressing cells. Gustatory nerve recordings demonstrated that T1R1−/− mice exhibited a serious deficit in inosine monophosphate-elicited synergy but substantial residual responses to glutamate alone in both chorda tympani and glossopharyngeal nerves. Interestingly, chorda tympani nerve responses to sweeteners were smaller in T1R1−/− mice. Taste cell recordings demonstrated that many mCherry-expressing taste cells in T1R1+/− mice responded to sweet and umami compounds, whereas those in T1R1−/− mice responded to sweet stimuli. The proportion of sweet-responsive cells was smaller in T1R1−/− than in T1R1+/− mice. Single-cell RT-PCR demonstrated that some single mCherry-expressing cells expressed all three T1R subunits. Chorda tympani and glossopharyngeal nerve responses to glutamate were significantly inhibited by addition of mGluR antagonists in both T1R1−/− and T1R1+/− mice. Conditioned taste aversion tests demonstrated that both T1R1−/− and T1R1+/− mice were equally capable of discriminating glutamate from other basic taste stimuli. Avoidance conditioned to glutamate was significantly reduced by addition of mGluR antagonists. These results suggest that T1R1-expressing cells mainly contribute to umami taste synergism and partly to sweet sensitivity and that mGluRs are involved in the detection of umami compounds. PMID:23339178

  19. Connexin 43-targeted T1 contrast agent for MRI diagnosis of glioma.

    PubMed

    Abakumova, Tatiana; Abakumov, Maxim; Shein, Sergey; Chelushkin, Pavel; Bychkov, Dmitry; Mukhin, Vladimir; Yusubalieva, Gaukhar; Grinenko, Nadezhda; Kabanov, Alexander; Nukolova, Natalia; Chekhonin, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most aggressive form of brain tumor. Early and accurate diagnosis of glioma and its borders is an important step for its successful treatment. One of the promising targets for selective visualization of glioma and its margins is connexin 43 (Cx43), which is highly expressed in reactive astrocytes and migrating glioma cells. The purpose of this study was to synthesize a Gd-based contrast agent conjugated with specific antibodies to Cx43 for efficient visualization of glioma C6 in vivo. We have prepared stable nontoxic conjugates of monoclonal antibody to Cx43 and polylysine-DTPA ligands complexed with Gd(III), which are characterized by higher T1 relaxivity (6.5 mM(-1) s(-1) at 7 T) than the commercial agent Magnevist® (3.4 mM(-1) s(-1)). Cellular uptake of Cx43-specific T1 contrast agent in glioma C6 cells was more than four times higher than the nonspecific IgG-contrast agent, as detected by flow cytometry and confocal analysis. MRI experiments showed that the obtained agents could markedly enhance visualization of glioma C6 in vivo after their intravenous administration. Significant accumulation of Cx43-targeted contrast agents in glioma and the peritumoral zone led not only to enhanced contrast but also to improved detection of the tumor periphery. Fluorescence imaging confirmed notable accumulation of Cx43-specific conjugates in the peritumoral zone compared with nonspecific IgG conjugates at 24 h after intravenous injection. All these features of Cx43-targeted contrast agents might be useful for more precise diagnosis of glioma and its borders by MRI.

  20. Identification of {ital T}=0 and {ital T}=1 bands in the {ital N}={ital Z}=37 nucleus {sup 74}Rb

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, D.; Gross, C.J.; Sheikh, J.A.; Warner, D.D.; Bearden, I.G.; Cunningham, R.A.; Foltescu, D.; Gelletly, W.; Hannachi, F.; Harder, A.; Johnson, T.D.; Jungclaus, A.; Kabadiyski, M.K.; Kast, D.; Lieb, K.P.; Roth, H.A.; Shizuma, T.; Simpson, J.; Skeppstedt, O.; Varley, B.J.; Weiszflog, M. ||||||||

    1996-01-01

    The {gamma} decay of excited states in the {ital N}={ital Z} odd-odd nucleus {sup 74}Rb has been observed for the first time. The reaction {sup 40}Ca({sup 40}Ca,{alpha}{ital pn}){sup 74}Rb at 128 MeV beam energy was used. The ground state rotational band can be interpreted as being formed from the {ital T}=1 isobaric analog states of {sup 74}Kr with pairing correlations based on {ital T}=1, {ital M}{sub {ital T}}=0 neutron-proton pairs. At higher rotational frequency, a {ital T}=0 rotational band becomes energetically favored over the {ital T}=1 ground state band, in agreement with the predictions of cranked shell model calculations which explicitly include {ital T}=0 and {ital T}=1pairs. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  1. A Minimal Chimera of Human Cyclin T1 and Tat Binds TAR and Activates Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transcription in Murine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fujinaga, Koh; Irwin, Dan; Taube, Ran; Zhang, Fan; Geyer, Matthias; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2002-01-01

    The transcriptional elongation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is mediated by the virally encoded transactivator Tat and its cellular cofactor, positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). The human cyclin T1 (hCycT1) subunit of P-TEFb forms a stable complex with Tat and the transactivation response element (TAR) RNA located at the 5′ end of all viral transcripts. Previous studies have demonstrated that hCycT1 binds Tat in a Zn2+-dependent manner via the cysteine at position 261, which is a tyrosine in murine cyclin T1. In the present study, we mutated all other cysteines and histidines that could be involved in this Zn2+-dependent interaction. Because all of these mutant proteins except hCycT1(C261Y) activated viral transcription in murine cells, no other cysteine or histidine in hCycT1 is responsible for this interaction. Next, we fused the N-terminal 280 residues in hCycT1 with Tat. Not only the full-length chimera but also the mutant hCycT1 with an N-terminal deletion to position 249, which retained the Tat-TAR recognition motif, activated HIV-1 transcription in murine cells. This minimal hybrid mutant hCycT1-Tat protein bound TAR RNA as well as human and murine P-TEFb in vitro. We conclude that this minimal chimera not only reproduces the high-affinity binding among P-TEFb, Tat, and TAR but also will be invaluable for determining the three-dimensional structure of this RNA-protein complex. PMID:12438619

  2. DualTrust: A Trust Management Model for Swarm-Based Autonomic Computing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maiden, Wendy M.

    2010-05-01

    Trust management techniques must be adapted to the unique needs of the application architectures and problem domains to which they are applied. For autonomic computing systems that utilize mobile agents and ant colony algorithms for their sensor layer, certain characteristics of the mobile agent ant swarm -- their lightweight, ephemeral nature and indirect communication -- make this adaptation especially challenging. This thesis looks at the trust issues and opportunities in swarm-based autonomic computing systems and finds that by monitoring the trustworthiness of the autonomic managers rather than the swarming sensors, the trust management problem becomes much more scalable and still serves to protect the swarm. After analyzing the applicability of trust management research as it has been applied to architectures with similar characteristics, this thesis specifies the required characteristics for trust management mechanisms used to monitor the trustworthiness of entities in a swarm-based autonomic computing system and describes a trust model that meets these requirements.

  3. Assessing Technology in the Absence of Proof: Trust Based on the Interplay of Others' Opinions and the Interaction Process.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Peter W; van den Berg, Stéphanie M; Midden, Cees

    2015-12-01

    The present research addresses the question of how trust in systems is formed when unequivocal information about system accuracy and reliability is absent, and focuses on the interaction of indirect information (others' evaluations) and direct (experiential) information stemming from the interaction process. Trust in decision-supporting technology, such as route planners, is important for satisfactory user interactions. Little is known, however, about trust formation in the absence of outcome feedback, that is, when users have not yet had opportunity to verify actual outcomes. Three experiments manipulated others' evaluations ("endorsement cues") and various forms of experience-based information ("process feedback") in interactions with a route planner and measured resulting trust using rating scales and credits staked on the outcome. Subsequently, an overall analysis was conducted. Study 1 showed that effectiveness of endorsement cues on trust is moderated by mere process feedback. In Study 2, consistent (i.e., nonrandom) process feedback overruled the effect of endorsement cues on trust, whereas inconsistent process feedback did not. Study 3 showed that although the effects of consistent and inconsistent process feedback largely remained regardless of face validity, high face validity in process feedback caused higher trust than those with low face validity. An overall analysis confirmed these findings. Experiential information impacts trust even if outcome feedback is not available, and, moreover, overrules indirect trust cues-depending on the nature of the former. Designing systems so that they allow novice users to make inferences about their inner workings may foster initial trust. © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  4. Trust, regulatory processes and NICE decision-making: Appraising cost-effectiveness models through appraising people and systems.

    PubMed

    Brown, Patrick; Hashem, Ferhana; Calnan, Michael

    2016-02-01

    This article presents an ethnographic study of regulatory decision-making regarding the cost-effectiveness of expensive medicines at the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in England. We explored trust as one important mechanism by which problems of complexity and uncertainty were resolved. Existing studies note the salience of trust for regulatory decisions, by which the appraisal of people becomes a proxy for appraising technologies themselves. Although such (dis)trust in manufacturers was one important influence, we describe a more intricate web of (dis)trust relations also involving various expert advisors, fellow committee members and committee Chairs. Within these complex chains of relations, we found examples of both more blind-acquiescent and more critical-Investigative forms of trust as well as, at times, pronounced distrust. Difficulties in overcoming uncertainty through other means obliged trust in some contexts, although not in others. (Dis)trust was constructed through inferences involving abstract systems alongside actors' oral and written presentations-of-self. Systemic features and 'forced options' to trust indicate potential insidious processes of regulatory capture.

  5. Food risks and consumer trust. Avian influenza and the knowing and non-knowing on UK shopping floors.

    PubMed

    de Krom, Michiel P M M; Mol, Arthur P J

    2010-12-01

    Irrespective of major food crises in the 2000s consumer trust in food seems to remain high in Western Europe. Transparent information provision to consumers on food risks is a central strategy of the EU, its Member States and private food providers to build food trust among consumers. But can the interpretation of such information by consumers explain high levels of trust in food safety? Following recent outbreaks of avian influenza in the UK, this paper investigates the constitution of food trust among UK poultry consumers by focusing on the place where consumer decisions are made: the shopping floor. In-store qualitative interviews with consumers of a variety of poultry products at different shops are used to reveal the use of information in constructing trust. Besides on knowledge inducted from information provision, trust depends as much on consumer strategies to handle non-knowing of food risks. Three main forms of trust relations are distinguished, which together at a system level result in high levels of consumer trust in food.

  6. 49 CFR 1013.2 - The irrevocability of the trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false The irrevocability of the trust. 1013.2 Section... BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS GUIDELINES FOR THE PROPER USE OF VOTING TRUSTS § 1013.2 The irrevocability of the trust. (a) The trust and the nomination of the trustee...

  7. 49 CFR 1013.2 - The irrevocability of the trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false The irrevocability of the trust. 1013.2 Section... BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS GUIDELINES FOR THE PROPER USE OF VOTING TRUSTS § 1013.2 The irrevocability of the trust. (a) The trust and the nomination of the trustee...

  8. Dynamic Trust Management for Mobile Networks and Its Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bao, Fenye

    2013-01-01

    Trust management in mobile networks is challenging due to dynamically changing network environments and the lack of a centralized trusted authority. In this dissertation research, we "design" and "validate" a class of dynamic trust management protocols for mobile networks, and demonstrate the utility of dynamic trust management…

  9. Trust Matters: Leadership for Successful Schools, 2nd Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschannen-Moran, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Make your school soar by escalating trust between teachers, students, and families. Trust is an essential element in all healthy relationships, and the relationships that exist in your school are no different. How can your school leaders or teachers cultivate trust? How can your institution maintain trust once it is established? These are the…

  10. A Novel Trust Service Provider for Internet Based Commerce Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siyal, M. Y.; Barkat, B.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a framework for enhancing trust in Internet commerce. Shows how trust can be provided through a network of Trust Service Providers (TSp). Identifies a set of services that should be offered by a TSp. Presents a distributed object-oriented implementation of trust services using CORBA, JAVA and XML. (Author/AEF)

  11. 26 CFR 1.664-1 - Charitable remainder trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... not a charity, for life or for a term of years, with an irrevocable remainder interest to be held for... governing the creation and administration of a charitable remainder trust, and rules governing the taxation... charitable remainder trust from its creation. In order for a trust to be a charitable remainder trust, it...

  12. 26 CFR 1.664-1 - Charitable remainder trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... not a charity, for life or for a term of years, with an irrevocable remainder interest to be held for... governing the creation and administration of a charitable remainder trust, and rules governing the taxation... charitable remainder trust from its creation. In order for a trust to be a charitable remainder trust, it...

  13. 26 CFR 1.664-1 - Charitable remainder trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... not a charity, for life or for a term of years, with an irrevocable remainder interest to be held for... governing the creation and administration of a charitable remainder trust, and rules governing the taxation... charitable remainder trust from its creation. In order for a trust to be a charitable remainder trust, it...

  14. 76 FR 58849 - Legg Mason Partners Equity Trust, et al.;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... COMMISSION Legg Mason Partners Equity Trust, et al.; Notice of Application September 15, 2011. AGENCY... relying on rule 12d1-2 under the Act to invest in certain financial instruments. Applicants: Legg Mason Partners Equity Trust (``LMP Equity Trust''), Legg Mason Partners Variable Equity Trust (``LMP Variable...

  15. Teacher Trust in District Administration: A Promising Line of Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Curt M.; Miskell, Ryan C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We set out in this study to establish a foundation for a line of inquiry around teacher trust in district administration by (1) describing the role of trust in capacity building, (2) conceptualizing trust in district administration, (3) developing a scale to measure teacher trust in district administration, and (4) testing the…

  16. Trust Matters: Leadership for Successful Schools, 2nd Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschannen-Moran, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Make your school soar by escalating trust between teachers, students, and families. Trust is an essential element in all healthy relationships, and the relationships that exist in your school are no different. How can your school leaders or teachers cultivate trust? How can your institution maintain trust once it is established? These are the…

  17. Dynamic Trust Management for Mobile Networks and Its Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bao, Fenye

    2013-01-01

    Trust management in mobile networks is challenging due to dynamically changing network environments and the lack of a centralized trusted authority. In this dissertation research, we "design" and "validate" a class of dynamic trust management protocols for mobile networks, and demonstrate the utility of dynamic trust management…

  18. Teacher Trust in District Administration: A Promising Line of Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Curt M.; Miskell, Ryan C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We set out in this study to establish a foundation for a line of inquiry around teacher trust in district administration by (1) describing the role of trust in capacity building, (2) conceptualizing trust in district administration, (3) developing a scale to measure teacher trust in district administration, and (4) testing the…

  19. Guide to the Administration of Charitable Remainder Trusts. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David W.; And Others

    This is the third edition of a workbook prepared as a kind of primer for those responsible for the administration of charitable remainder trusts in accordance with the Tax Reform Act of 1969. The topics covered include: trust administration in general; pooled income fund; unitrust; annuity trust; gift annuity; short term income (lead) trust; gift…

  20. 49 CFR 1013.2 - The irrevocability of the trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false The irrevocability of the trust. 1013.2 Section... BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS GUIDELINES FOR THE PROPER USE OF VOTING TRUSTS § 1013.2 The irrevocability of the trust. (a) The trust and the nomination of the trustee...

  1. Guide to the Administration of Charitable Remainder Trusts. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David W.; And Others

    This is the third edition of a workbook prepared as a kind of primer for those responsible for the administration of charitable remainder trusts in accordance with the Tax Reform Act of 1969. The topics covered include: trust administration in general; pooled income fund; unitrust; annuity trust; gift annuity; short term income (lead) trust; gift…

  2. Trust Building via Risk Taking: A Cross-Societal Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Karen S.; Yamagishi, Toshio; Cheshire, Coye; Cooper, Robin; Matsuda, Masafumi; Mashima, Rie

    2005-01-01

    The role of risk taking in building trust relations has largely been overlooked in the burgeoning literature on trust in the social sciences; yet it is central to understanding how trust develops. We argue that a series of risk-taking behaviors is indispensable to building a trust relation. We conducted experiments in Japan and the United States…

  3. 26 CFR 1.851-7 - Certain unit investment trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of $100 and a short- term capital gain of $50, computed as follows: (1) B is treated as owning 110... trust will be treated as directly owning the assets of such trust for taxable years of such holder which... proportionate share of the trust assets in exchange for his interest in the trust. Also, no gain or loss will...

  4. 25 CFR 1000.354 - What is a trust evaluation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... evaluation is an annual review and evaluation of trust functions performed by a Tribe/Consortium to ensure that the functions are performed in accordance with trust standards as defined by Federal law. Trust evaluations address trust functions performed by the Tribe/Consortium on its own behalf as well as...

  5. 25 CFR 1000.354 - What is a trust evaluation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... evaluation is an annual review and evaluation of trust functions performed by a Tribe/Consortium to ensure that the functions are performed in accordance with trust standards as defined by Federal law. Trust evaluations address trust functions performed by the Tribe/Consortium on its own behalf as well as...

  6. 25 CFR 1000.354 - What is a trust evaluation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... evaluation is an annual review and evaluation of trust functions performed by a Tribe/Consortium to ensure that the functions are performed in accordance with trust standards as defined by Federal law. Trust evaluations address trust functions performed by the Tribe/Consortium on its own behalf as well as...

  7. 25 CFR 1000.354 - What is a trust evaluation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... evaluation is an annual review and evaluation of trust functions performed by a Tribe/Consortium to ensure that the functions are performed in accordance with trust standards as defined by Federal law. Trust evaluations address trust functions performed by the Tribe/Consortium on its own behalf as well as...

  8. The Nature and Function of Trust in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Curt M.; Forsyth, Patrick B.

    2009-01-01

    Our purpose was to advance and test a theoretical model of the nature and function of trust in schools. Unlike other studies, ours specified school trust as a latent construct manifested through parent and teacher trust perceptions. We hypothesized that trust would have a larger direct effect on collective teacher efficacy and achievement…

  9. An Investigation of Teacher Trust in the Principal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makiewicz, Monica Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to understand the concept of trust, its meaning, antecedents, and outcomes as they applied to teacher trust in principals. Since there are very few in-depth studies specifically on trust in a school principal, research on trust from an organizational perspective was consulted. This body of research has numerous and…

  10. The Nature and Function of Trust in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Curt M.; Forsyth, Patrick B.

    2009-01-01

    Our purpose was to advance and test a theoretical model of the nature and function of trust in schools. Unlike other studies, ours specified school trust as a latent construct manifested through parent and teacher trust perceptions. We hypothesized that trust would have a larger direct effect on collective teacher efficacy and achievement…

  11. 12 CFR 745.9-1 - Trust accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Trust accounts. 745.9-1 Section 745.9-1 Banks... AND APPENDIX Clarification and Definition of Account Insurance Coverage § 745.9-1 Trust accounts. (a) For purposes of this section, “trust” refers to an irrevocable trust. (b) All trust interests...

  12. 26 CFR 1.47-5 - Estates and trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Estates and trusts. 1.47-5 Section 1.47-5... Computing Credit for Investment in Certain Depreciable Property § 1.47-5 Estates and trusts. (a) In general—(1) Disposition or cessation in hands of estate or trust. If an estate or trust disposes of...

  13. 26 CFR 8.1 - Charitable remainder trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Charitable remainder trusts. 8.1 Section 8.1... Charitable remainder trusts. (a) Certain wills and trusts in existence on September 21, 1974. In the case of a will executed before September 21, 1974, or a trust created (within the meaning of...

  14. 24 CFR 92.500 - The HOME Investment Trust Fund.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false The HOME Investment Trust Fund. 92... Investment Trust Fund. (a) General. A HOME Investment Trust Fund consists of the accounts described in this... Investment Trust Fund United States Treasury account for each participating jurisdiction. Each...

  15. Generation and characterization of T1R2-LacZ knock-in mouse.

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki, Ken; Nomura, Masatoshi; Shibata, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Reiko; Enciso, Patricio L M; Wang, Lixiang; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Torii, Kunio; Uneyama, Hisayuki

    2010-11-19

    Taste cells are chemosensory epithelial cells that sense distinct taste quality such as umami, sweet, bitter, sour and salty. Taste cells utilize G protein-coupled receptors to detect umami, sweet and bitter taste whereas ion channels are responsible for detecting salty and sour taste. Among these taste receptors, taste receptor type 2, T1R2 (or Tas1r2), has been identified as a sole sweet taste receptor in mammals that mediates sweet signals upon dimerization with T1R3. However, because of limited availability of reliable antibodies and low expression level of G protein-coupled receptors, it is uneasy to identify the cell-types that express these receptors in non-taste tissues. In this study, we have generated a T1R2-LacZ reporter knock-in mouse to investigate tissue distribution of T1R2 at a single-cell level. We found that the LacZ gene expression in these mice was faithful to the expression of T1R2 in the taste tissue and in the gastrointestinal tract where T1R3 expression has been reported. Surprisingly, T1R2 expression was also found in the testis. Mice homozygous for T1R2 deletion lacked T1R2 protein analyzed by the antibody raised against T1R2 peptide sequences. In summary, the T1R2 knock-in mouse is a powerful tool to analyze the putative targets for sweeteners as well as to study the physiological roles of T1R2 in detecting sugars. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Improved visibility of brain tumors in synthetic MP-RAGE anatomies with pure T1 weighting.

    PubMed

    Nöth, Ulrike; Hattingen, Elke; Bähr, Oliver; Tichy, Julia; Deichmann, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    Conventional MRI for brain tumor diagnosis employs T2 -weighted and contrast-enhanced T1 -weighted sequences. Non-enhanced T1 -weighted images provide improved anatomical details for precise tumor location, but reduced tumor-to-background contrast as elevated T1 and proton density (PD) values in tumor tissue affect the signal inversely. Radiofrequency (RF) coil inhomogeneities may further mask tumor and edema outlines. To overcome this problem, the aims of this work were to employ quantitative MRI techniques to create purely T1 -weighted synthetic anatomies which can be expected to yield improved tissue and tumor-to-background contrasts, to compare the quality of conventional and synthetic anatomies, and to investigate optical contrast and visibility of brain tumors and edema in synthetic anatomies. Conventional magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition of gradient echoes (MP-RAGE) anatomies and maps of T1 , PD and RF coil profiles were acquired in comparable and clinically feasible times. Three synthetic MP-RAGE anatomies (PD T1 weighting both with and without RF bias; pure T1 weighting) were calculated for healthy subjects and 32 patients with brain tumors. In healthy subjects, the PD T1 -weighted synthetic anatomies with RF bias precisely matched the conventional anatomies, yielding high signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios. Pure T1 weighting yielded lower SNR, but high CNR, because of increased optical contrasts. In patients with brain tumors, synthetic anatomies with pure T1 weighting yielded significant increases in optical contrast and improved visibility of tumor and edema in comparison with anatomies reflecting conventional T1 contrasts. In summary, the optimized purely T1 -weighted synthetic anatomy with an isotropic resolution of 1 mm, as proposed in this work, considerably enhances optical contrast and visibility of brain tumors and edema. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Increased native T1-values at the interventricular insertion regions in precapillary pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Spruijt, Onno A; Vissers, Loek; Bogaard, Harm-Jan; Hofman, Mark B M; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; Marcus, J Tim

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of the pressure overloaded right ventricle (RV) of precapillary pulmonary hypertension (PH) patients, exhibits late gadolinium enhancement at the interventricular insertion regions, a phenomenon which has been linked to focal fibrosis. Native T1-mapping is an alternative technique to characterize myocardium and has the advantage of not requiring the use of contrast agents. The aim of this study was to characterize the myocardium of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), systemic scleroderma related PH (PAH-Ssc) and chronic thromboembolic PH (CTEPH) patients using native T1-mapping and to see whether native T1-values were related to disease severity. Furthermore, we compared native T1-values between the different precapillary PH categories. Native T1-mapping was performed in 46 IPAH, 14 PAH-SSc and 10 CTEPH patients and 10 control subjects. Native T1-values were assessed using regions of interest at the RV and LV free wall, interventricular septum and interventricular insertion regions. In PH patients, native T1-values of the interventricular insertion regions were significantly higher than the native T1-values of the RV free wall, LV free wall and interventricular septum. Native T1-values at the insertion regions were significantly related to disease severity. Native T1-values were not different between IPAH, PAH-Ssc and CTEPH patients. Native T1-values of the interventricular insertion regions are significantly increased in precapillary PH and are related to disease severity. Native T1-mapping can be developed as an alternative technique for the characterization of the interventricular insertion regions and has the advantage of not requiring the use of contrast agents.

  18. Security policies and trust in ubiquitous computing.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Anupam; Finin, Tim; Kagal, Lalana; Parker, Jim; Patwardhan, Anand

    2008-10-28

    Ubiquitous environments comprise resource-constrained mobile and wearable devices and computational elements embedded in everyday artefacts. These are connected to each other using both infrastructure-based as well as short-range ad hoc networks. Limited Internet connectivity limits the use of conventional security mechanisms such as public key infrastructures and other forms of server-centric authentication. Under these circumstances, peer-to-peer interactions are well suited for not just information interchange, but also managing security and privacy. However, practical solutions for protecting mobile devices, preserving privacy, evaluating trust and determining the reliability and accuracy of peer-provided data in such interactions are still in their infancy. Our research is directed towards providing stronger assurances of the reliability and trustworthiness of information and services, and the use of declarative policy-driven approaches to handle the open and dynamic nature of such systems. This paper provides an overview of some of the challenges and issues, and points out directions for progress.

  19. How Much Do You Trust Me? Learning a Case-Based Model of Inverse Trust

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    learn from previous adaptations so it can perform trustworthy behaviors more quickly. We use case-based reasoning ( CBR ) to allow the robot to learn...interruption because the robot injured a human). 4 Trust-guided Behavior Adaptation Using CBR The robot uses the inverse trust estimate to infer if its...the other requires expert-authored rules [12]. The topic of trust models in CBR is generally examined in the context of recommendation systems [13] or

  20. Service user governors in mental health foundation trusts: accountability or business as usual?

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Dee; Barnes, Marian; Crawford, Mike; Omeni, Edward; Wilson, Aaron; Rose, Diana

    2015-12-01

    National Health Foundation Trusts present opportunities for individual mental health service users to be active in the governance of trusts. This is one of a range of mechanisms for patient and public involvement and one which promotes an individual rather than collective approach to involvement. Within the context of a broader study of the impact of service user involvement in mental health services, the objective of this article was to explore the experience of service user governors in foundation trusts and their capacity to hold boards to account. The Council of Governors in three foundation trusts were observed for a year. Focus groups with service user governors were undertaken in each trust. Service users had different expectations and understandings of the role and approached it in different ways. Key themes that emerged concerned: the role of a governor, conduct and content of meetings, agenda setting, relationships and representation. The experiences of mental health service user governors need to be understood within the complex environment of patient and public involvement in general and of mental health service user involvement in particular. The dislocation of the service user governor role from other forms of service user activity and involvement result in confusion about how notions of holding a trust to account and representation of other service users can be addressed within a boundaried institutional environment. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The Impact of Third-Party Information on Trust: Valence, Source, and Reliability

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Economic exchange between strangers happens extremely frequently due to the growing number of internet transactions. In trust situations like online transactions, a trustor usually does not know whether she encounters a trustworthy trustee. However, the trustor might form beliefs about the trustee's trustworthiness by relying on third-party information. Different kinds of third-party information can vary dramatically in their importance to the trustor. We ran a factorial design to study how the different characteristics of third-party information affect the trustor’s decision to trust. We systematically varied unregulated third-party information regarding the source (friend or a stranger), the reliability (gossip or experiences), and the valence (positive or negative) of the information. The results show that negative information is more salient for withholding trust than positive information is for placing trust. If third-party information is positive, experience of a friend has the strongest effect on trusting followed by friend’s gossip. Positive information from a stranger does not matter to the trustor. With respect to negative information, the data show that even the slightest hint of an untrustworthy trustee leads to significantly less placed trust irrespective of the source or the reliability of the information. PMID:26882013

  2. Combinations of social participation and trust, and association with health status-an Australian perspective.

    PubMed

    Williams, Susan L; Ronan, Kevin

    2014-12-01

    A limited number of studies have examined the 'miniaturization of community' model which is based on belief that 'new' individualistic, and narrower forms of social participation, do not promote generalized trust in others. Little is known about miniaturization of community and self-reported health, physical health and psychological health in Australia. Data from a 2009 computer-assisted-telephone-interview survey was used to investigate generalized trust, social participation and health-related quality of life in a regional Australian population (n = 1273; mean age 51.2 years). Logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the associations between generalized trust, social participation and poor self-reported health (global self-rated, psychological and physical), and included four social participation/trust categories. A majority (67%) reported high generalized trust of others, 54% were categorized as high social participators. Miniaturization of community was a risk factor for poor self-rated psychological health across genders, and a risk factor for poor self-rated health for males. For women, low social participation (irrespective of trust level) was associated with poor self-reported health. Given current and previous findings, there is a need for further research in a range of contexts which explores the underlying concept of miniaturization of community, that is, the changes in social participation and social networks which may negatively impact community health.

  3. Trust and Perceptions of Physicians' Nonverbal Behavior Among Women with Immigrant Backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Hillen, Marij A; de Haes, Hanneke C J M; Verdam, Mathilde G E; Smets, Ellen M A

    2017-04-08

    Previous findings suggest immigrant patients have lower trust in their physicians, and perceive nonverbal communication differently compared to non-immigrant patients. We tested discrepancies in trust and the impact of non-verbal behavior between immigrants and non-immigrants in The Netherlands. Nonverbal communication of an oncologist was systematically varied in an experimental video vignettes design. Breast cancer patients (n = 34) and healthy women (n = 34) viewed one of eight video versions and evaluated trust and perceived friendliness of the oncologist. In a matched control design, women with immigrant and non-immigrant backgrounds were paired. Immigrant women reported stronger trust. Nonverbal communication by the oncologist did not influence trust differently for immigrants compared to for non-immigrants. However, smiling strongly enhanced perceived friendliness for non-immigrants, but not for immigrants. Immigrant patients' strong trust levels may be formed a priori, instead of based on physicians' communication. Physicians may need to make extra efforts to optimize their communication.

  4. Ethnic diversity, trust, and the mediating role of positive and negative interethnic contact: a priming experiment.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, Ruud; Veit, Susanne

    2014-09-01

    This study not only shows that the empirically well-established negative relationship between residential diversity and trust in neighbors holds for the case of Germany, but goes beyond existing research by providing experimental evidence on the causal nature of the diversity effect. Respondents exposed to experimental stimuli that made salient the ethnic or religious heterogeneity of their neighborhoods display significantly lower levels of trust in their neighbors than do respondents in the control group. Further, we explore the role of interethnic contact in mediating the relationship between diversity and trust in a degree of detail unmatched by earlier studies. We consider not only positive forms of interethnic contact such as friendships, but also neutral and negative encounters between people of native and immigrant origin. We find that interethnic contacts mediate negative diversity effects on trust in different ways for both groups. For natives, distant encounters and negative experiences with immigrants in diverse contexts reduce trust, whereas for people of immigrant origin trust in neighbors suffers from the relatively small number of native acquaintances in diverse neighborhoods.

  5. Taste substance binding elicits conformational change of taste receptor T1r heterodimer extracellular domains.

    PubMed

    Nango, Eriko; Akiyama, Shuji; Maki-Yonekura, Saori; Ashikawa, Yuji; Kusakabe, Yuko; Krayukhina, Elena; Maruno, Takahiro; Uchiyama, Susumu; Nuemket, Nipawan; Yonekura, Koji; Shimizu, Madoka; Atsumi, Nanako; Yasui, Norihisa; Hikima, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kobayashi, Yuji; Yamashita, Atsuko

    2016-05-10

    Sweet and umami tastes are perceived by T1r taste receptors in oral cavity. T1rs are class C G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and the extracellular ligand binding domains (LBDs) of T1r1/T1r3 and T1r2/T1r3 heterodimers are responsible for binding of chemical substances eliciting umami or sweet taste. However, molecular analyses of T1r have been hampered due to the difficulties in recombinant expression and protein purification, and thus little is known about mechanisms for taste perception. Here we show the first molecular view of reception of a taste substance by a taste receptor, where the binding of the taste substance elicits a different conformational state of T1r2/T1r3 LBD heterodimer. Electron microscopy has showed a characteristic dimeric structure. Förster resonance energy transfer and X-ray solution scattering have revealed the transition of the dimerization manner of the ligand binding domains, from a widely spread to compactly organized state upon taste substance binding, which may correspond to distinct receptor functional states.

  6. Phenoxy herbicides and fibrates potently inhibit the human chemosensory receptor subunit T1R3

    PubMed Central

    Maillet, Emeline L.; Margolskee, Robert F.; Mosinger, Bedrich

    2009-01-01

    We show that phenoxy-auxin herbicides and lipid-lowering fibrates inhibit human but not rodent T1R3. T1R3 as a co-receptor in taste cells responds to sweet compounds and amino-acids; in endocrine cells of gut and pancreas T1R3 contributes to glucose sensing. Thus, certain effects of fibrates in treating hyperlipidemia and type II diabetes may be via actions on T1R3. Likewise, phenoxy-herbicides may have adverse metabolic effects in humans that would have gone undetected in studies on rodents. PMID:19817384

  7. T1 bright appendix sign to exclude acute appendicitis in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ilah; An, Chansik; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Chung, Yong Eun

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of the T1 bright appendix sign for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in pregnant women. This retrospective study included 125 pregnant women with suspected appendicitis who underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The T1 bright appendix sign was defined as a high intensity signal filling more than half length of the appendix on T1-weighted imaging. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of the T1 bright appendix sign for normal appendix identification were calculated in all patients and in those with borderline-sized appendices (6-7 mm). The T1 bright appendix sign was seen in 51% of patients with normal appendices, but only in 4.5% of patients with acute appendicitis. The overall sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of the T1 bright appendix sign for normal appendix diagnosis were 44.9%, 95.5%, 97.6%, and 30.0%, respectively. All four patients with borderline sized appendix with appendicitis showed negative T1 bright appendix sign. The T1 bright appendix sign is a specific finding for the diagnosis of a normal appendix in pregnant women with suspected acute appendicitis. • Magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used in emergency settings. • Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdomen. • Magnetic resonance imaging is widely used in pregnant population. • T1 bright appendix sign can be a specific sign representing normal appendix.

  8. Change in the proton T(1) of fat and water in mixture.

    PubMed

    Hu, Houchun H; Nayak, Krishna S

    2010-02-01

    This work describes observed changes in the proton T(1) relaxation time of both water and lipid when they are in relatively homogeneous mixtures. Results obtained from vegetable oil-water emulsions, pork kidney and lard mixtures, and excised samples of white and brown adipose tissues are presented to demonstrate this change in T(1) as a function of mixture fat fraction. As an initial proof of concept, a simpler acetone-water experiment was performed to take advantage of complete miscibility between acetone and water and both components' single chemical shift peaks. Single-voxel MR spectroscopy was used to measure the T(1) of predominant methylene spins in fat and the T(1) of water spins in each setup. In the vegetable oil-water emulsions, the T(1) of fat varied by as much as 3-fold when water was the dominant mixture component. The T(1) of pure lard increased by 170 msec (+37%) when it was blended with lean kidney tissue in a 16% fatty mixture. The fat T(1) of lipid-rich white adipose tissue was 312 msec. In contrast, the fat T(1) of leaner brown adipose tissue (fat fraction 53%) was 460 msec. A change in the water T(1) from that of pure water was also observed in the experiments.

  9. Change in the Proton T1 of Fat and Water in Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Houchun H.; Nayak, Krishna S.

    2010-01-01

    This work describes observed changes in the proton T1 relaxation time of both water and lipid when they are in relatively homogeneous mixtures. Results obtained from vegetable oil–water emulsions, pork kidney and lard mixtures, and excised samples of white and brown adipose tissues are presented to demonstrate this change in T1 as a function of mixture fat fraction. As an initial proof of concept, a simpler acetone-water experiment was performed to take advantage of complete miscibility between acetone and water and both components’ single chemical shift peaks. Single-voxel MR spectroscopy was used to measure the T1 of predominant methylene spins in fat and the T1 of water spins in each setup. In the vegetable oil–water emulsions, the T1 of fat varied by as much as 3-fold when water was the dominant mixture component. The T1 of pure lard increased by 170 msec (+37%) when it was blended with lean kidney tissue in a 16% fatty mixture. The fat T1 of lipid-rich white adipose tissue was 312 msec. In contrast, the fat T1 of leaner brown adipose tissue (fat fraction 53%) was 460 msec. A change in the water T1 from that of pure water was also observed in the experiments. PMID:19918888

  10. Can We Trust Measures of Political Trust? Assessing Measurement Equivalence in Diverse Regime Types.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Irena

    2017-01-01

    Do standard "trust in government" survey questions deliver measures which are reliable and equivalent in meaning across diverse regime types? I test for the measurement equivalence of political trust in a sample of 35 former Soviet and European countries using the 2010 Life in Transition Survey II conducted by the World Bank and European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. Employing multiple group confirmatory factor analysis, I find that trust perceptions in central political institutions differ from (1) trust in regional and local political institutions, (2) trust in protective institutions like the armed forces and police and (3) trust in order institutions like the courts and police. Four measurement models achieve partial metric invariance and two reach partial scalar invariance in most countries, allowing for comparisons of correlates using latent factors from each model. I also found some clustering of measurement error and variation in the dimensionality of political trust between democratic and autocratic portions of the sample. On some measurement parameters, therefore, respondents in diverse cultures and regime types do not have equivalent understandings of political trust. The findings offer both optimism and a note of caution for researchers using political trust measures in cross-regime contexts.

  11. Trust in health care providers: factors predicting trust among homeless veterans over time.

    PubMed

    van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; McGuire, James

    2014-08-01

    We examined whether a combination of predisposing, enabling, need, and primary care experience variables would predict trust in medical health care providers for homeless veterans over 18 months. Linear mixed model analysis indicated that, among these variables, race, social support, service-connected disability status, and satisfaction and continuity with providers predicted trust in provider over time. Trust in providers improved during the initial stages of the relationship between patient and provider and then declined to slightly below baseline levels over time. Further research is needed to determine generalizability and effects of provider trust on patient health care status over longer periods of time.

  12. Online trust building through third party trust transfer and third party protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandoko, Wanda; Saleh Abbas, Bahtiar; Budiastuti, Dyah; Kosala, Raymond

    2017-03-01

    The primary objective of this research is to develop an online trust building mechanism for SME (Small Medium Enterprise). Trust is very important in e-commerce. The nature of online shopping has a greater uncertainty than offline shopping. Seeing as there is an uncertainty that can produce risks, a prospective buyer’s trust is needed. A lot of people’s unwillingness to shop online is caused by their lack of trust toward e-commerce. E-commerce is said to be one of the ways for SME to compete with bigger companies. However, building trust requires immense time and cost. SME with limited resources may experience difficulties in building trust just with their own resources. Base on literature research that needs to be validated in next research, we found that trust can be built through trust transfer from the reputable and well-known trust-mark issuer, and third party protection such as escrow account service and credit card issuer.

  13. Trust in technology-mediated collaborative health encounters: constructing trust in passive user interactions with technologies.

    PubMed

    Montague, Enid; Asan, Onur

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated factors that explain patient trust in health technology and the relationship between patient trust in technology and trust in their care provider. Sociotechnical systems theory states that changes in one part of the system are likely related to other parts of the system. Therefore, attitudes about technologies, like trust, are likely related to other aspects of the system. Contributing to appropriate trust at the technological, interpersonal, and system levels can potentially lead to positive health outcomes. The study described in this manuscript used data collected from 101 patients with a Trust in Medical Technology instrument. The instrument measured patients' trust in (1) their providers, (2) the technology, and (3) how their providers used the technology. Measure 3 was positively associated with measures 1 and 2, while measures 1 and 2 were not positively or negatively associated with one another. These results may indicate that patient assessments of the trustworthiness of care providers and technologies are based on their observations of how providers use technologies. Though patients are not active users of technologies in health care, the results of this study show that their perceptions of how providers use technology are related to their trust in both technology and the care provider. Study findings have implications for how trust is conceptualised and measured in interpersonal relationships and in technologies.

  14. Testosterone inhibits trust but promotes reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Boksem, Maarten A S; Mehta, Pranjal H; Van den Bergh, Bram; van Son, Veerle; Trautmann, Stefan T; Roelofs, Karin; Smidts, Ale; Sanfey, Alan G

    2013-11-01

    The steroid hormone testosterone has been associated with behavior intended to obtain or maintain high social status. Although such behavior is typically characterized as aggressive and competitive, it is clear that high social status is achieved and maintained not only through antisocial behavior but also through prosocial behavior. In the present experiment, we investigated the impact of testosterone administration on trust and reciprocity using a double-blind randomized control design. We found that a single dose of 0.5 mg of testosterone decreased trust but increased generosity when repaying trust. These findings suggest that testosterone may mediate different types of status-seeking behavior. It may increase competitive, potentially aggressive, and antisocial behavior when social challenges and threats (i.e., abuse of trust and betrayal) need to be considered; however, it may promote prosocial behavior in the absence of these threats, when high status and good reputation may be best served by prosocial behavior.

  15. Environmental Education at The Wildfowl Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadsby, Brian

    1975-01-01

    Describes the work of Wildfowl Trust in the areas of research, education, recreation and conservation. Presents the advantages of the wetland habitat for biological study and describes the facilities available to educational bodies at Martin Mere. (Author/GS)

  16. Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) Trust Fund

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In 1986, Congress created the Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) Trust Fund to address releases from federally regulated underground storage tanks (USTs) by amending Subtitle I of the Solid Waste Disposal Act.

  17. Environmental Education at The Wildfowl Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadsby, Brian

    1975-01-01

    Describes the work of Wildfowl Trust in the areas of research, education, recreation and conservation. Presents the advantages of the wetland habitat for biological study and describes the facilities available to educational bodies at Martin Mere. (Author/GS)

  18. Usability and trust in e-banking.

    PubMed

    Pravettoni, Gabriella; Leotta, Salvatore Nuccio; Lucchiari, Claudio; Misuraca, Raffaella

    2007-12-01

    This study assessed the role of usability in trust of e-banking services. A questionnaire was administered to 185 Italian undergraduate working students who volunteered for the experiment (M age = 30.5 yr., SD = 3.1). Participants were differentiated on computer ability (Expert, n = 104; Nonexpert, n = 81) and e-banking use (User, n = 93; Nonusers, n = 92). Analysis showed that the website usability of e-banking services did not play a very important role for the User group. Instead, institution-based trust, e.g., the trust in the security policy of the Web merchant, customers, and the overall trust of the bank were the crucial factors in the adoption of e-banking.

  19. Trust and communicated attributions in close relationships.

    PubMed

    Rempel, J K; Ross, M; Holmes, J G

    2001-07-01

    The attributional statements intimate partners communicate to one another were examined as a function of trust. In discussions by 35 married couples, 850 attributions and corresponding events were coded on dimensions of valence, globality, and locus. Results of regression and contingency analyses indicate that attributional statements expressed in high-trust relationships emphasized positive aspects of the relationship. Medium-trust couples actively engaged issues but focused more on negative events and explanations. Low-trust couples expressed more specific, less affectively extreme attributional statements that minimized the potential for increased conflict. Results could not be accounted for by relationship satisfaction. These findings also highlight the importance of focusing on features of the events for which attributions are expressed.

  20. Trust Based Routing in Ad Hoc Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talati, Mikita V.; Valiveti, Sharada; Kotecha, K.

    Ad Hoc network often termed as an infrastructure-less, self- organized or spontaneous network.The execution and survival of an ad-hoc network is solely dependent upon the cooperative and trusting nature of its nodes. However, this naive dependency on intermediate nodes makes the ad-hoc network vulnerable to passive and active attacks by malicious nodes and cause inflict severe damage. A number of protocols have been developed to secure ad-hoc networks using cryptographic schemes, but all rely on the presence of trust authority. Due to mobility of nodes and limitation of resources in wireless network one interesting research area in MANET is routing. This paper offers various trust models and trust based routing protocols to improve the trustworthiness of the neighborhood.Thus it helps in selecting the most secure and trustworthy route from the available ones for the data transfer.

  1. Probing water environment of Trp59 in ribonuclease T1: insight of the structure-water network relationship.

    PubMed

    Chao, Wei-Chih; Shen, Jiun-Yi; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Wang, Jinn-Shyan; Yang, Hsiao-Ching; Wee, Kevin; Lin, Li-Ju; Kuo, Yi-Ching; Yang, Cheng-Han; Weng, Shih-Hui; Huang, Huai-Ching; Chen, You-Hua; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2015-02-12

    In this study, we used the tryptophan analogue, (2,7-aza)Trp, which exhibits water catalyzed proton transfer isomerization among N(1)-H, N(7)-H, and N(2)-H isomers, to probe the water environment of tryptophan-59 (Trp59) near the connecting loop region of ribonuclease Tl (RNase T1) by replacing the tryptophan with (2,7-aza)Trp. The resulting (2,7-aza)Trp59 triple emission bands and their associated relaxation dynamics, together with relevant data of 7-azatryptophan and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, lead us to propose two Trp59 containing conformers in RNase T1, namely, the loop-close and loop-open forms. Water is rich in the loop-open form around the proximity of (2,7-aza)Trp59, which catalyzes (2,7-aza)Trp59 proton transfer in the excited state, giving both N(1)-H and N(7)-H isomer emissions. The existence of N(2)-H isomer in the loop-open form, supported by the MD simulation, is mainly due to the specific hydrogen bonding between N(2)-H proton and water molecule that bridges N(2)-H and the amide oxygen of Pro60, forming a strong network. The loop-close form is relatively tight in space, which squeezes water molecules out of the interface of α-helix and β2 strand, joined by the connecting loop region; accordingly, the water-scant environment leads to the sole existence of the N(1)-H isomer emission. MD simulation also points out that the Trp-water pairs appear to preferentially participate in a hydrogen bond network incorporating polar amino acid moieties on the protein surface and bulk waters, providing the structural dynamic features of the connecting loop region in RNase T1.

  2. More Anonymous Onion Routing Through Trust

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    attempt to compromise his anonymity . How should he take this trust into account when he selects his paths? 2.1. The model To make this question concrete...It also does not take into account the total effect of an adversary’s actions on a user’s anonymity , such as the analysis performed in [24]. The...More Anonymous Onion Routing Through Trust Aaron Johnson Computer Science Department Yale University New Haven, CT 06520 USA aaron.johnson@yale.edu

  3. Patient care: Is interpersonal trust missing?

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Paul A.; Francis, Cynthia G.; Kerr-Campbell, Maureen D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Health statistics and studies in the Caribbean have omitted interpersonal trust in their investigations. Aims: This study will examine the effect of interpersonal trust and other conditions on psychosocial subjective wellbeing and self-reported health, in order to assess the significance of interpersonal trust, as well as other socio-demographic factors on health. Materials and Method: The current study utilized primary data commissioned by the Centre of Leadership and Governance, Department of Government, the University of West Indies, Mona, Jamaica, between July and August 2006. It was a nationally representative probability sampling survey. A sample of 1,338 respondents was interviewed with a detailed 166-item questionnaire. Results: Generally, the psychosocial subjective wellbeing of Jamaicans was high (mean = 6.8 ± 1.8), and self-reported health was moderately high (mean = 6.3 ± 2.6). The current study has revealed that income, political system, subjective social class, employment status, and interpersonal trust determine psychosocial subjective wellbeing as well as self-reported health. Interpersonal trust accounted for between 9.4 to 10.4% of the explanatory power of the wellbeing and self-reported health of Jamaicans. Conclusion: The current study highlights that the determinants of health include interpersonal trust. It is critical to point out here that trust must be taken into consideration in any evaluation of health statistics, as it is a factor of subjective wellbeing and health. It is within this context that clinicians need to incorporate interpersonal trust along with other conditions, as it is a part of the psychosocial determinants of health, subjective wellbeing, and health treatment. PMID:22624126

  4. Assessing Interpersonal Trust in Networked Teams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    was made possible by the Mission Command Battle Lab and facilitated by Ms. Diane Ungvarsky, Mr. Jeff From, Mr. Ralph Reed, Ms. Mary Welborn, and Mr...for their support in developing role play exercise scenario materials for our trust experiments. The technical expertise of Ms. Susan Potter , Mrs...31 REFERENCES Adams, B . D. (2005). Trust vs. confidence (Report No. CR-2005-203). Toronto, Canada: Defence Research and Development

  5. Building Trust-Based Sustainable Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-05

    Linking the definitions of sus- tainability with trust, economists or engineers have discussed the rela- tionship between these two concepts...Thesis, university of Stirling , 1994. [13] J. McNamara, P. Stephens, S. Dall, and A. Houston, “Evolution of trust and trustwor- thiness: social...Science and Engineering , Scottsdale, AZ, uSA, Sept. 22–25, 2007. [16] r. Trivers, “The evolution of reciprocal altruism,” Quart. Rev. Biology, vol

  6. Proton NMR T1, T2, and T1 rho relaxation studies of native and reconstituted sarcoplasmic reticulum and phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Deese, A J; Dratz, E A; Hymel, L; Fleischer, S

    1982-01-01

    The phospholipids protons of native and reconstituted sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane vesicles yield well-resolved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. Resonance area measurements, guided by the line shape theory of Bloom and co-workers, imply that we are observing a large fraction of the lipid intensity and that the protein does not appear to reduce the percent of the signal that is well resolved. We have measured the spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation rates of the choline, methylene, and terminal methyl protons at 360 MHz and the spin-lattice relaxation rate in the rotating frame (T1 rho) at 100 MHz. Both the T1 and T2 relaxation rates are single exponential processes for all of the resonances if the residual water proton signal is thoroughly eliminated by selective saturation. The T1 and T2 relaxation rates increase as the protein concentration increases, and T2 rate decrease with increasing temperature. This implies that the protein is reducing both high frequency (e.g., trans-gauche methylene isomerizations) and low frequency (e.g., large amplitude, chain wagging) lipid motions, from the center of the bilayer to the surface. It is possible that spin diffusion contributes to the effect of protein on lipid T1's although some of the protein-induced T1 change is due to motional effects. The T2 relaxation times are observed to be near 1 ms for the membranes with highest protein concentration and approximately 10 ms for the lipids devoid of protein. This result, combined with the observation that the T2 rates are monophasic, suggests that at least two lipid environments exist in the presence of protein, and that the lipids are exchanging between these environments at a rate greater than 1/T2 or 10(3) s-1. The choline resonance yields single exponential T1 rho relaxation in the presence and absence of protein, whereas the other resonances measured exhibit biexponential relaxation. Protein significantly increases the single T1 rho relaxation

  7. A General Framework of Human Trust in Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    information dominance and complete mission objectives. Soldiers must possess a sufficient amount of trust in networks for adequate mission performance. We are investigating human trust in tactical networks by establishing a theoretical framework for analysis and an approach for validation of the framework. We identify reliability and availability as network parameters that define the relationship between quality of service performance and human trust in networks. A general framework is being developed for human trust in networks, which combines singular elements of trust

  8. Establishing trust in decentralized smart sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagts, H.; Cosar, T.; Beyerer, J.

    2011-06-01

    Smart sensors can gather all kind of information and process it. Cameras are still dominating and smart cameras can offer services for face recognition or person tracking. Operators are building collaborations to cover a larger area, to save costs and to add more and different sensors. Cryptographic methods may achieve integrity and confidentiality between operators, but not trust. Even if a partner or one of his sensors is authenticated, no statements can be made about the quality of the sensor data. Hence, trust must be established between the partners and their sensors. Trust can be built based on past experience. A reputation system collects opinions of operators about the behavior of sensors and calculates trust based on these opinions. Many reputation systems have been proposed, e.g., for authentication of files in peer-topeer networks. This work presents a new reputation system, which is designed to calculate the trustworthiness of smart sensors and smart sensor systems. A new trust model, including functions to calculate and update trust on past experiences, is proposed. When fusing information of multiple sensors, it cannot always be reconstructed, which information led to a bad result. Hence, an approach for fair rating is shown. The proposed system has been realized in a Service-Oriented Architecture for easy integration in existing smart sensor systems, e.g., smart surveillance systems. The model itself can be used in every decentralized heterogeneous smart sensor network.

  9. Dispositional Pathways to Trust: Self-Esteem and Agreeableness Interact to Predict Trust and Negative Emotional Disclosure.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Megan H; Wood, Joanne V; Holmes, John G

    2017-03-30

    Expressing our innermost thoughts and feelings is critical to the development of intimacy (Reis & Shaver, 1988), but also risks negative evaluation and rejection. Past research suggests that people with high self-esteem are more expressive and self-disclosing because they trust that others care for them and will not reject them (Gaucher et al., 2012). However, feeling good about oneself may not always be enough; disclosure may also depend on how we feel about other people. Drawing on the principles of risk regulation theory (Murray et al., 2006), we propose that agreeableness-a trait that refers to the positivity of interpersonal motivations and behaviors-is a key determinant of trust in a partner's caring and responsiveness, and may work in conjunction with self-esteem to predict disclosure. We examined this possibility by exploring how both self-esteem and agreeableness predict a particularly risky and intimate form of self-disclosure, the disclosure of emotional distress. In 6 studies using correlational, partner-report, and experimental methods, we demonstrate that self-esteem and agreeableness interact to predict disclosure: People who are high in both self-esteem and agreeableness show higher emotional disclosure. We also found evidence that trust mediates this effect. People high in self-esteem and agreeableness are most self-revealing, it seems, because they are especially trusting of their partners' caring. Self-esteem and agreeableness were particularly important for the disclosure of vulnerable emotions (i.e., sadness; Study 5) and disclosures that were especially risky (Study 6). These findings illustrate how dispositional variables can work together to explain behavior in close relationships. (PsycINFO Database Record

  10. Measurement of myocardial native T1 in cardiovascular diseases and norm in 1291 subjects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Joanna M; Liu, Alexander; Leal, Joana; McMillan, Fiona; Francis, Jane; Greiser, Andreas; Rider, Oliver J; Myerson, Saul; Neubauer, Stefan; Ferreira, Vanessa M; Piechnik, Stefan K

    2017-09-28

    Native T1-mapping provides quantitative myocardial tissue characterization for cardiovascular diseases (CVD), without the need for gadolinium. However, its translation into clinical practice is hindered by differences between techniques and the lack of established reference values. We provide typical myocardial T1-ranges for 18 commonly encountered CVDs using a single T1-mapping technique - Shortened Look-Locker Inversion Recovery (ShMOLLI), also used in the large UK Biobank and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Registry study. We analyzed 1291 subjects who underwent CMR (1.5-Tesla, MAGNETOM-Avanto, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) between 2009 and 2016, who had a single CVD diagnosis, with mid-ventricular T1-map assessment. A region of interest (ROI) was placed on native T1-maps in the "most-affected myocardium", characterized by the presence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), or regional wall motion abnormalities (RWMA) on cines. Another ROI was placed in the "reference myocardium" as far as possible from LGE/RWMA, and in the septum if no focal abnormality was present. To further define normality, we included native T1 of healthy subjects from an existing dataset after sub-endocardial pixel-erosions. Native T1 of patients with normal CMR (938 ± 21 ms) was similar compared to healthy subjects (941 ± 23 ms). Across all patient groups (57 ± 19 yrs., 65% males), focally affected myocardium had significantly different T1 value compared to reference myocardium (all p < 0.001). In the affected myocardium, cardiac amyloidosis (1119 ± 61 ms) had the highest native T1 compared to normal and all other CVDs, while iron-overload (795 ± 58 ms) and Anderson-Fabry disease (863 ± 23 ms) had the lowest native reference T1 (all p < 0.001). Future studies designed to detect the large T1 differences between affected and reference myocardium are estimated to require small sample-sizes (n < 50). However, studies designed to detect the small T1

  11. T1- Thresholds in Black Holes Increase Clinical-Radiological Correlation in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Christian; Faizy, Tobias; Sedlacik, Jan; Holst, Brigitte; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Young, Kim Lea; Heesen, Christoph; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an established tool in diagnosing and evaluating disease activity in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). While clinical-radiological correlations are limited in general, hypointense T1 lesions (also known as Black Holes (BH)) have shown some promising results. The definition of BHs is very heterogeneous and depends on subjective visual evaluation. Objective We aimed to improve clinical-radiological correlations by defining BHs using T1 relaxation time (T1-RT) thresholds to achieve best possible correlation between BH lesion volume and clinical disability. Method 40 patients with mainly relapsing-remitting MS underwent MRI including 3-dimensional fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (MPRAGE) before and after Gadolinium (GD) injection and double inversion-contrast magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (MP2RAGE) sequences. BHs (BHvis) were marked by two raters on native T1-weighted (T1w)-MPRAGE, contrast-enhancing lesions (CE lesions) on T1w-MPRAGE after GD and FLAIR lesions (total-FLAIR lesions) were detected separately. BHvis and total-FLAIR lesion maps were registered to MP2RAGE images, and the mean T1-RT were calculated for all lesion ROIs. Mean T1 values of the cortex (CTX) were calculated for each patient. Subsequently, Spearman rank correlations between clinical scores (Expanded Disability Status Scale and Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite) and lesion volume were determined for different T1-RT thresholds. Results Significant differences in T1-RT were obtained between all different lesion types with highest T1 values in visually marked BHs (BHvis: 1453.3±213.4 ms, total-FLAIR lesions: 1394.33±187.38 ms, CTX: 1305.6±35.8 ms; p<0.05). Significant correlations between BHvis/total-FLAIR lesion volume and clinical disability were obtained for a wide range of T1-RT thresholds. The highest correlation for BHvis and total-FLAIR lesion masks were found at T1-RT>1500 ms

  12. T1- Thresholds in Black Holes Increase Clinical-Radiological Correlation in Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Christian; Faizy, Tobias; Sedlacik, Jan; Holst, Brigitte; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Young, Kim Lea; Heesen, Christoph; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an established tool in diagnosing and evaluating disease activity in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). While clinical-radiological correlations are limited in general, hypointense T1 lesions (also known as Black Holes (BH)) have shown some promising results. The definition of BHs is very heterogeneous and depends on subjective visual evaluation. We aimed to improve clinical-radiological correlations by defining BHs using T1 relaxation time (T1-RT) thresholds to achieve best possible correlation between BH lesion volume and clinical disability. 40 patients with mainly relapsing-remitting MS underwent MRI including 3-dimensional fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (MPRAGE) before and after Gadolinium (GD) injection and double inversion-contrast magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (MP2RAGE) sequences. BHs (BHvis) were marked by two raters on native T1-weighted (T1w)-MPRAGE, contrast-enhancing lesions (CE lesions) on T1w-MPRAGE after GD and FLAIR lesions (total-FLAIR lesions) were detected separately. BHvis and total-FLAIR lesion maps were registered to MP2RAGE images, and the mean T1-RT were calculated for all lesion ROIs. Mean T1 values of the cortex (CTX) were calculated for each patient. Subsequently, Spearman rank correlations between clinical scores (Expanded Disability Status Scale and Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite) and lesion volume were determined for different T1-RT thresholds. Significant differences in T1-RT were obtained between all different lesion types with highest T1 values in visually marked BHs (BHvis: 1453.3±213.4 ms, total-FLAIR lesions: 1394.33±187.38 ms, CTX: 1305.6±35.8 ms; p<0.05). Significant correlations between BHvis/total-FLAIR lesion volume and clinical disability were obtained for a wide range of T1-RT thresholds. The highest correlation for BHvis and total-FLAIR lesion masks were found at T1-RT>1500 ms (Expanded Disability Status Scale vs

  13. 25 CFR 115.813 - Is there a limit to the amount of trust funds OTFM will disburse from a tribal trust account?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Investing and Managing Tribal Trust Funds § 115.813 Is there a limit to the amount of trust funds OTFM will... a tribal trust account. If a tribe's trust funds are invested in securities that have not matured...

  14. 25 CFR 115.813 - Is there a limit to the amount of trust funds OTFM will disburse from a tribal trust account?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Investing and Managing Tribal Trust Funds § 115.813 Is there a limit to the amount of trust funds OTFM will... a tribal trust account. If a tribe's trust funds are invested in securities that have not matured...

  15. 25 CFR 115.813 - Is there a limit to the amount of trust funds OTFM will disburse from a tribal trust account?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Investing and Managing Tribal Trust Funds § 115.813 Is there a limit to the amount of trust funds OTFM will... a tribal trust account. If a tribe's trust funds are invested in securities that have not matured...

  16. 25 CFR 115.813 - Is there a limit to the amount of trust funds OTFM will disburse from a tribal trust account?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Investing and Managing Tribal Trust Funds § 115.813 Is there a limit to the amount of trust funds OTFM will... a tribal trust account. If a tribe's trust funds are invested in securities that have not matured...

  17. 25 CFR 115.813 - Is there a limit to the amount of trust funds OTFM will disburse from a tribal trust account?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Investing and Managing Tribal Trust Funds § 115.813 Is there a limit to the amount of trust funds OTFM will... a tribal trust account. If a tribe's trust funds are invested in securities that have not matured...

  18. Impact of T1 slope on surgical and adjacent segment degeneration after Bryan cervical disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Li, Yongqian; Li, Jia; Shen, Yong

    2017-01-01

    This retrospective study investigated an association between preoperative T1 slope and surgical and adjacent segment degeneration (SASD) after Bryan cervical disc arthroplasty (BCDA) in patients with cervical degenerative disc disease. Based on preoperative standing lateral radiographs, 90 patients were classified according to T1 slope that was higher or lower than the 50th percentile (high T1 or low T1, 28 and 62 patients, respectively). Patients were also classified as SASD or non-SASD (38 and 52 patients, respectively) determined by radiographs at final follow-up. Visual analog scale (VAS) and Neck Disability Index (NDI) scores for neck and arm pain were noted, and changes in the sagittal alignment of the cervical spine (SACS), functional spinal unit (FSU) angle, and FSU range of motion (ROM) were also noted. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the risk factors for SASD. The overall rate of SASD was 42.2% (38/90). The SACS, FSU angle, FSU ROM, and SASD rates of the high T1 and low T1 slope groups were significantly different at the last follow-up. The NDI and VAS scores of the high T1 slope group were significantly greater than those of the low T1 slope. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that high T1 slope and endplate coverage discrepancy (ie, residual space behind the prosthesis) were significant risk factors for SASD after BCDA. High T1 slope and endplate coverage discrepancy were associated with SASD after BCDA. Patients with a high preoperative T1 slope have a smaller FSU angle and more neck pain after BCDA.

  19. Expression of the oligopeptide transporter, PepT1, in larval Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Amberg, J J; Myr, C; Kamisaka, Y; Jordal, A-E O; Rust, M B; Hardy, R W; Koedijk, R; Rønnestad, I

    2008-06-01

    The intestinal absorption of di- and tri-peptides generally occurs via the oligopeptide transporter, PepT1. This study evaluates the expression of PepT1 in larval Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) during the three weeks following the onset of exogenous feeding. Larval Atlantic cod were fed either wild captured zooplankton or enriched rotifers. cDNA was prepared from whole cod larvae preceding first feeding and at 1000 each Tuesday and Thursday for the following three weeks. Spatial and temporal expression patterns of PepT1 mRNA were compared between fish consuming the two prey types using in situ hybridization and quantitative real-time PCR. Results indicated that PepT1 mRNA was expressed prior to the onset of exogenous feeding. In addition, PepT1 was expressed throughout the digestive system except the esophagus and sphincter regions. Expression slightly increased following first-feeding and continued to increase throughout the study for larvae feeding on both prey types. When comparing PepT1 expression in larvae larger than 0.15-mg dry mass with expression levels in larvae prior to feeding, no differences were detected for larvae fed rotifers, but the larvae fed zooplankton had significantly greater PepT1 expression at the larger size. In addition, PepT1 expression in the zooplankton fed larvae larger than 0.15-mg dry mass had significantly greater expression than rotifer fed larvae of a similar weight. Switching prey types did not affect PepT1 expression. These results indicate that Atlantic cod PepT1 expression was slightly different relative to dietary treatment during the three weeks following first-feeding. In addition, PepT1 may play an important role in the larval nutrition since it is widely expressed in the digestive tract.

  20. Interpersonal Trust across Six Asia-Pacific Countries: Testing and Extending the ‘High Trust Society’ and ‘Low Trust Society’ Theory

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Paul R.; Mamerow, Loreen; Meyer, Samantha B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Trust is regarded as a necessary component for the smooth running of society, although societal and political modernising processes have been linked to an increase in mistrust, potentially signalling social and economic problems. Fukuyama developed the notion of ‘high trust’ and ‘low trust’ societies, as a way of understanding trust within different societies. The purpose of this paper is to empirically test and extend Fukuyama’s theory utilising data on interpersonal trust in Taiwan, Hong Kong, South Korea, Japan, Australia and Thailand. This paper focuses on trust in family, neighbours, strangers, foreigners and people with a different religion. Methods Cross-sectional surveys were undertaken in 2009–10, with an overall sample of 6331. Analyses of differences in overall levels of trust between countries were undertaken using Chi square analyses. Multivariate binomial logistic regression analysis was undertaken to identify socio-demographic predictors of trust in each country. Results Our data indicate a tripartite trust model: ‘high trust’ in Australia and Hong Kong; ‘medium trust’ in Japan and Taiwan; and ‘low trust’ in South Korea and Thailand. Trust in family and neighbours were very high across all countries, although trust in people with a different religion, trust in strangers and trust in foreigners varied considerably between countries. The regression models found a consistent group of subpopulations with low trust across the countries: people on low incomes, younger people and people with poor self-rated health. The results were conflicting for gender: females had lower trust in Thailand and Hong Kong, although in Australia, males had lower trust in strangers, whereas females had lower trust in foreigners. Conclusion This paper identifies high, medium and low trust societies, in addition to high and low trusting population subgroups. Our analyses extend the seminal work of Fukuyama, providing both corroboration and