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Sample records for formation borbon basin

  1. Formation of lunar basin rings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodges, C.A.; Wilhelms, D.E.

    1978-01-01

    The origin of the multiple concentric rings that characterize lunar impact basins, and the probable depth and diameter of the transient crater have been widely debated. As an alternative to prevailing "megaterrace" hypotheses, we propose that the outer scarps or mountain rings that delineate the topographic rims of basins-the Cordilleran at Orientale, the Apennine at Imbrium, and the Altai at Nectaris-define the transient cavities, enlarged relatively little by slumping, and thus are analogous to the rim crests of craters like Copernicus; inner rings are uplifted rims of craters nested within the transient cavity. The magnitude of slumping that occurs on all scarps is insufficient to produce major inner rings from the outer. These conclusions are based largely on the observed gradational sequence in lunar central uplifts:. from simple peaks through somewhat annular clusters of peaks, peak and ring combinations and double ring basins, culminating in multiring structures that may also include peaks. In contrast, belts of slump terraces are not gradational with inner rings. Terrestrial analogs suggest two possible mechanisms for producing rings. In some cases, peaks may expand into rings as material is ejected from their cores, as apparently occurred at Gosses Bluff, Australia. A second process, differential excavation of lithologically diverse layers, has produced nested experimental craters and is, we suspect, instrumental in the formation of terrestrial ringed impact craters. Peak expansion could produce double-ring structures in homogeneous materials, but differential excavation is probably required to produce multiring and peak-in-ring configurations in large lunar impact structures. Our interpretation of the representative lunar multiring basin Orientale is consistent with formation of three rings in three layers detected seismically in part of the Moon-the Cordillera (basin-bounding) ring in the upper crust, the composite Montes Rook ring in the underlying

  2. Formation of the Orientale lunar multiring basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Brandon C.; Blair, David M.; Collins, Gareth S.; Melosh, H. Jay; Freed, Andrew M.; Taylor, G. Jeffrey; Head, James W.; Wieczorek, Mark A.; Andrews-Hanna, Jeffrey C.; Nimmo, Francis; Keane, James T.; Miljković, Katarina; Soderblom, Jason M.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2016-10-01

    Multiring basins, large impact craters characterized by multiple concentric topographic rings, dominate the stratigraphy, tectonics, and crustal structure of the Moon. Using a hydrocode, we simulated the formation of the Orientale multiring basin, producing a subsurface structure consistent with high-resolution gravity data from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) spacecraft. The simulated impact produced a transient crater, ~390 kilometers in diameter, that was not maintained because of subsequent gravitational collapse. Our simulations indicate that the flow of warm weak material at depth was crucial to the formation of the basin’s outer rings, which are large normal faults that formed at different times during the collapse stage. The key parameters controlling ring location and spacing are impactor diameter and lunar thermal gradients.

  3. K-Basin gel formation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, M.A.

    1998-07-23

    A key part of the proposed waste treatment for K Basin sludge is the elimination of reactive uranium metal by dissolution in nitric acid (Fkirnent, 1998). It has been found (Delegard, 1998a) that upon nitric acid dissolution of the sludge, a gel sometimes forms. Gels are known to sometimes impair solid/liquid separation and/or material transfer. The purpose of the work reported here is to determine the cause(s) of the gel formation and to determine operating parameters for the sludge dissolution that avoid formation of gel. This work and related work were planned in (Fkunent, 1998), (Jewett, 1998) and (Beck, 1998a). This report describes the results of the tests in (Beck, 1998a) with non-radioactive surrogates.

  4. Timing of Cenozoic Basin Formation in Northern Sundaland, Southeast Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Liew, K.K. )

    1994-07-01

    The present shorelines of northern Sundaland show preferential northwest-southeast elongation. This trend is parallel for subparallel to major faults and suture in this region. Continental wrench/shear basins developed on the western portion of this region and back-arc basins developed on the western portion of this region and back-arc basins in the rest of the region are also aligned to this trend. Different basin geometries and structural patterns among Cenozoic basins in northern Sundaland indicate different origins and/or timing of basin formation. Wrench faulting has played a significant role in the formation of these Cenozoic basins. The continued collision of the Indian subplate with the Eurasian plate during early Cenozoic has caused a redistribution of stress within this region. Zones of weakness have been reactivated or created with large lateral displacements by these changes, thus initiating the subsidence of these basins. The episodic initiation of Cenozoic basins may have begun as early as Jurassic and continued till Oligocene.

  5. Tectonic model for Eocene Formation of the Columbia basin

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, L.H. ); Fritts, S.G. )

    1990-05-01

    Evidence suggests that a major sedimentary basin underlies the Columbia plateau in Oregon and Washington; however, the Miocene Columbia River Basalts conceal critical structural relationships between adjacent exotic terranes. To date, no interpretations have been published that adequately address the three related questions of the architecture, age, and mechanism of formation of the Columbia basin. The authors interpret residual gravity and aerial photographic data to show, within the basin, a pattern of deep fault architecture consistent with northwest-southeast-oriented rifting. Paleotectonic reconstructions for the Pacific Northwest suggest that rifting may have begun during the Cretaceous, as interpreted previously, but stratigraphic, geophysical and well data point to an early Eocene age for initiation of dramatic rifting and basin subsidence resulting from oblique subduction of the Farallon plate. Their tectonic model for Eocene formation of rift basins underlying the Columbia River Basalt addresses important, previously unanswered questions regarding the tectonics of the Pacific Northwest and rationally relates tectonics and sedimentation over the full extent of the basin from north-central Washington to north-central Oregon. The rifting event(s) they propose explain that the formation of the Columbia basin is consistent in timing and geometry with tectonic events in areas adjacent to the Columbia basin, and thus is but a part of a much larger picture of dramatic extension affecting the entire Pacific Northwest in the Eocene.

  6. Hellas basin, Mars: Formation by oblique impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Gregory J.; Tanaka, Kenneth L.

    1993-01-01

    Hellas, a 2,000-km-diameter, roughly circular multiring impact basin in the southern highlands of Mars, has a pronounced southeastern lobe of rim material that extends for some 1,500 km. This lobe and a system of ridges concentric to the southern part of the basin (including part of the lobe) were interpreted to be formed by an oblique impact that was inclined in the direction of the lobe. Our preliminary geologic mapping of the Hellas region (lat -20 to -65 deg, long 250 to 320 deg) at 1:5,000,000 scale gives this hypothesis additional supporting evidence, including a symmetric distribution of basin ejecta and volcanic centers across the inferred trend of the impact. Furthermore, measurements of relief indicate that the downrange ejecta may be about twice as thick as they are elsewhere around the rim.

  7. Upper Cambrian Intrashelf Basin, Nolichucky formation, southwest Virginia Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Markello, J.R.; Read, J.F.

    1982-07-01

    An intrashelf basin located on the Upper Cambrian carbonate-rimmed shelf (miogeocline) of the Appalachian orogene, appears to have controlled facies distribution during deposition of the Nolichucky Formation (0 to 985 ft; 0 to 300 m thick). The intrashelf basin was bordered along strike and toward the regional shelf edge by a rim of peritidal carbonates and by nearshore clastics toward the craton. The peritidal carbonates passed into the intrashelf basin by way of a gently sloping carbonate ramp. Development of the Late Cambrian carbonate-rimmed shelf and its intrashelf ramp and basin may have been influenced by high carbonate production along the regional shelf edge, by tectonic subsidence associated with a major shelf depocenter, and by influx of terrigenous sediments which suppressed carbonate deposition in the basin. Understanding the Nolichucky facies within a ramp to intrashelf basin model provides a framework for understanding similar continental-shelf facies which are widely distributed in the lower Paleozoic and in the subsurface of the Mesozoic. Recognition of basins located on pericratonic shelves is important because such basins influence the distribution of potential petroleum source beds and reservoir facies whose trends may be unrelated to regional shelf-edge trends. (JMT)

  8. Oil migration examples in Irati Formation, Parana basin, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Espitalie, J.; Mizuta, K.; Carvalho, T.E.M.; Triguis, J.A.

    1983-03-01

    The Irati Formation (Late Permian), in the Parana basin, is a source rock with high oil generating potential. The TOC contents range from 0.5 to 13% according to the quality of the organic matter. Pyrolysis analysis indicates that the area where the Irati has the highest oil-generating source rock is in the north and south of the Parana basin. In these areas petroleum potential can reach 90 kg HC/t of rock. In the central part of the basin the Irati Formation might reach a depth of about 3200 m (10,498 ft). In many wells diabase intrusions have more or less completely cooked this formation, thus generating oil or gas, and leaving residual organic matter. The phenomenon of migration into the Irati Formation has been observed in many wells. In certain places, oil is accumulated in shales embedded between intrusion levels; in other places oil is accumulated into limestone beds, intercalated in the Irati Formation. It seems safe to assume that the oil accumulated in the deeper beds resulted from the effect of thermal intrusions and also from the effects of normal burial. Oil migration occurred after diabase intrusions (Late Cretaceous) during the increasing subsidence of the basin. In the Parana basin, the Irati Formation may be compared to a drain with a lateral oil migration. Vertical migration was hindered by the lack of enough porosity and permeability in the shales above the Irati source rock. Consequently, migration and accumulation of oil above and below the formation might have resulted from changes in facies of the Irati itself, by faulting, or by fractures due to diabase intrusions.

  9. Miocene temblor formation and related basin evolution, southwestern San Joaquin Basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    The southwestern San Joaquin basin is an area of great importance for the energy industry and academic basin analysts. Understanding basin evolution is a key concern for explorationists in this essentially pristine province. Temblor Formatio is exposed in an east-west-trending belt that comprises the north flank of the San Emigdio Mountains. Field and subsurface evidence were used to elucidate the geology, depositional environments, and age of the Temblor Formation. The formation represents sand-rich borderland sedimentation in a predominantly deep-marine setting. Deposition of Temblor clastics reflects deformation due to the impingement of the Farallon Pacific ridge with the California-North American plate margin during the middle Oliocene. As a result, severe uplift along the margins of the southern San Joaquin basin, reinforced by a lowstand of global seal level, caused large volumes of coarse, immature clastics to be shed into the rapidly subsiding deep-marine depocenter. Deposition of the Temblor was thus concurrent with the transformation from a convergent margin tectonic regime to one of dextral strike-slip. This transformation was marked by an episode of transform-extension indicated by volcanism, rapid subsidence, and marine transgression during the early Miocene. The Maricopa trough or oceanic connection from the San Joaquin basin to the Pacific Ocean is inferred to have existed between Recruit Pass and Maricopa. The age of the Temblor Formation is late Oligocene to early Miocene. Petroleum production is limited to the upper member in small oil fields flanking the northern Sam Emigdio Mountains.

  10. Bouse Formation in the Bristol basin near Amboy, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David M.; Reynolds, Robert E.; Bright, Jordan E.; Starratt, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    Limestone beds underlain and overlain by alluvial fan conglomerate near Amboy, California, are very similar in many respects to parts of the Bouse Formation, suggesting that an arm of the Pliocene Bouse water body extended across a wide part of the southern Mojave Desert. The deposits are north of the town of Amboy at and below an elevation of 290 m, along the northern piedmont of the Bristol “dry” Lake basin. The Amboy outcrops contain the Lawlor Tuff (4.83 Ma), which is also found in an outcrop of the Bouse Formation in the Blythe basin near Buzzards Peak in the Chocolate Mountains, 180 km southeast of Amboy. Bouse exposures near Amboy are ∼3.4 m thick, white, distinctly bedded, with limestone and calcareous sandstone as well as stromatolite mounds; we interpret these as nearshore deposits. The Bouse at Amboy contains ostracodes, diatoms, and mollusks that indicate saline lake or estuarine environments with an admixture of fresh-water forms. Along with wading bird tracks and a spine from a marine fish, these fossils suggest that the deposits formed in saline waters near a fresh-water source such as a perennial stream. Beds of the outcrop dip southward and are 113 m above the surface of Bristol Playa, where similar age sediments are buried 270+ m deep, indicating significant faulting and vertical tectonics in this part of the Eastern California Shear Zone during the past 5 m.y. Confirmation of the Bouse Formation at Amboy strengthens previous assignments to the Bouse Formation for mudstones in driller logs at Danby “dry” Lake, California, and suggests that areally extensive arms of the Bouse water body were west of the Blythe basin. The Bristol basin arm of the lower Bouse basin probably was restricted from the main water body by narrow passages, but Bouse sediment there is similar to that in the Blythe basin, suggesting generally similar water chemistry and environmental conditions. Examining the degree to which Bouse deposits in the western arms

  11. GRAIL Gravity Observations of Peak-Ring Basins on the Moon: Implications for Basin Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. M.; Head, J. W.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2012-12-01

    Reassessment of the formation of peak-ring basins on the Moon using image and altimetry data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has yielded a number of morphometric properties of these basin types that are helping to constrain the processes leading to their formation and the formation of larger multi-ring basins [1,2]. These analyses demonstrate the importance of the volume and depth of impact melting in modifying the interior morphology of large impact craters. At the onset diameter of peak-ring basins, the depth of the basin's melted zone approaches the depth of the transient crater, creating a strengthless interior melt cavity that facilitates gravitational collapse of the transient crater. The melt cavity suppresses central peak formation, and peak rings are formed outward from the melt zone boundary by the interaction of deep-seated rotational faults in the collapsing wall of the transient crater and huge vertical uplifts in the central portions of the basin. The final configuration of the peak-ring basin has a kilometers-thick slab of cooled residual impact melt resting on an uplifted mantle plug with little or no unmelted crustal material. Highly faulted and fractured, dilatant and possibly thickened crust should occur below and outward from the peak ring due to inward and upward translation of collapsed transient crater rim material. As a result of this configuration, the gravity structure should reflect an anomalously high density, uplifted impact melt plus mantle zone spatially confined to within the peak ring. Surrounding this should be a highly fractured, low density zone of possibly thickened crust. Bouguer gravity anomalies derived from Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratoy (GRAIL) gravity data and Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) altimetry data show spatial patterns that are consistent with those predicted by the formation model briefly outlined above. Nearly all 17 peak-ring basins that have been cataloged on the Moon show positive Bouguer

  12. Sedimentary environment of the La Rosa Formation, Maracaibo Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, D.; Noel, J.A.

    1993-02-01

    The La Rosa formation, Miocene consists of three facies: basal sand, the Santa Barbara, a middle shale, and the upper La Rosa Sand. The sands are variably productive. Paleontologic studies by others have shown the La Rosa Formation to be of marine origin. The shape of the SP curve of the Santa Barbara in bell shaped, caused by fining upward of the sand. This shape is typical with a beach deposit formed during transgression. The shale, because of its lithology and fossil content, represents shallow marine origin. The wine glass shape of the SP of the La Rosa sand is a beach sand, the result of a coarsening upward grain size during regression. An isopach of the La Rosa Formation and isoliths of the two sand units show a thickening trend from northeast to southwest. The thickest area trends diagonally across the center of the Basin. The study shows that the Miocene sea entered the basin from the northeast, transgressed southwesterly depositing the Santa Barbara sand on top of the unconformity as it went. The movement was constricted by the highlands on three sides of the basin. The shale was then deposited in the resulting shallow marine environment. As the highlands gradually rose, the sea regressed to the northeast depositing the La Rosa sand as it went.

  13. Sedimentation of shelf sandstones in Queen Formation, McFarland and Means fields, central basin platform of Permian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Malicse, A.; Mazzullo, J.; Holley, C.; Mazzullo, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The Queen Formation is a sequence of carbonates, evaporites, and sandstones of Permian (Guadalupian) age that is found across the subsurface of the Central Basin platform of the Permian basin. The formation is a major hydrocarbon reservoir in this region, and its primary reservoir facies are porous shelf sandstones and dolomites. Cores and well logs from McFarland and Means fields (on the northwest margin of the Central Basin platform) were examined to determine the sedimentary history of the shelf sandstones.

  14. Basin Formation and Cratering on Mercury Revealed by MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. R.; Fassett, C.; Marchi, S.; Merline, W. J.; Ostrach, L. R.; Prockter, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Mercury has been bombarded by asteroids and comets throughout its history. The resulting craters and basins are the dominant topographic features on the planet. Although visible basins contain some of the most interesting tectonic features, plains, and evidence of vertical stratigraphy, they fall far short of saturating the surface. Nevertheless, Mercury has a greater spatial density of peak-ring basins and protobasins than any other Solar System body, partly because these morphologies begin at smaller sizes than on most bodies. Cratering at approximately three times the cratering rate on the Moon, combined with likely plains-forming volcanism, prevents recognition of surface features older than 4.0 to 4.1 Ga. Severe losses of craters <50 km in diameter (<20 km in some places) are ascribed to extensive formation of intercrater plains. Estimates of the cratering chronology of Mercury suggest that most plains formation ended about 3.6 to 3.7 Ga, though activity has continued in a few small regions until much more recently (e.g., inside the Rachmaninoff basin). Mercury, compared with other terrestrial bodies, is struck by projectiles impacting at much higher velocities, which is probably responsible for the formation of abundant secondary craters that dominate the numbers of craters <10 km diameter on older plains surfaces. The history of high-velocity bombardment has resulted in the production of abundant impact melts and has churned and processed the regolith, and eroded older topography, more thoroughly than on other Solar System bodies. Although the possible role of Mercury-specific impactors ("vulcanoids") cannot be excluded, imaging searches by MESSENGER have revealed no remaining vulcanoids and no other evidence suggests that Mercury has been bombarded by anything other than the same populations of asteroids and comets that have impacted the Moon and other terrestrial planets from the end of the period of heavy bombardment 3.8 to 3.9 Ga to the present.

  15. Potential for deep basin-centered gas accumulation in Travis Peak (Hosston) Formation, Gulf Coastal Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartberger, Charles E.; Dyman, Thaddeus S.; Condon, Steven M.

    2003-01-01

    The potential of Lower Cretaceous sandstones of the Travis Peak Formation in the northern Gulf Coast Basin to harbor a basin-centered gas accumulation was evaluated by examining (1) the depositional and diagenetic history and reservoir properties of Travis Peak sandstones, (2) the presence and quality of source rocks for generating gas, (3) the burial and thermal history of source rocks and time of gas generation and migration relative to tectonic development of Travis Peak traps, (4) gas and water recoveries from drill-stem and formation tests, (5) the distribution of abnormal pressures based on shut-in-pressure data, and (6) the presence or absence of gas-water contacts associated with gas accumulations in Travis Peak sandstones. The Travis Peak Formation (and correlative Hosston Formation) is a basinward-thickening wedge of terrigenous clastic sedimentary rocks that underlies the northern Gulf Coast Basin from eastern Texas across northern Louisiana to southern Mississippi. Clastic infl ux was focused in two main fl uvial-deltaic depocenters?one located in northeastern Texas and the other in southeastern Mississippi and northeastern Louisiana. Across the main hydrocarbon-productive trend in eastern Texas and northern Louisiana, the Travis Peak Formation is about 2,000 ft thick. Most Travis Peak hydrocarbon production in eastern Texas comes from drilling depths between 6,000 and 10,000 ft. Signifi cant decrease in porosity and permeability occurs through that depth interval. Above 8,000-ft drilling depth in eastern Texas, Travis Peak sandstone matrix permeabilities often are signifi cantly higher than the 0.1-millidarcy (mD) cutoff that characterizes tight-gas reservoirs. Below 8,000 ft, matrix permeability of Travis Peak sandstones is low because of pervasive quartz cementation, but abundant natural fractures impart signifi cant fracture permeability. Although pressure data within the middle and lower Travis Peak Formation are limited in eastern Texas

  16. Mass-movement deposits in the lacustrine Eocene Green River Formation, Piceance Basin, western Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Mercier, Tracey J.

    2015-01-01

    The Eocene Green River Formation was deposited in two large Eocene saline lakes, Lake Uinta in the Uinta and Piceance Basins and Lake Gosiute in the Greater Green River Basin. Here we will discuss mass-movement deposits in just the Piceance Basin part of Lake Uinta.

  17. Geomechanics and elastic anisotropy of the Bakken Formation, Williston Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostadhassan, Mehdi

    Many of the earth's rocks exhibit anisotropic characteristics. Anisotropy is particularly common in many sedimentary rocks, such as shales. Anisotropy is defined as the spatial alignment of mineral grains, layers, fractures and stresses which causes elastic wave velocity and other elastic properties to vary with direction. There are two types of anisotropy: intrinsic and stress-induced. Intrinsic anisotropy is caused by beddings, microstructures or aligned fractures formed during deposition. Stress-induced anisotropy is caused by strain associated with external stresses. Intrinsic anisotropy originates in the absence of external stresses, while stress-induced anisotropy results from tectonic and overburden stresses. The style of earth material alignment causes two simplified, but convenient models of anisotropy: vertically transverse isotropy (VTI), like shale, and horizontally transverse isotropy (HTI), like vertically fractured medium. These models have been used to describe how physical properties of rock vary in a medium. Identifying the anisotropy in a formation is important in reservoir characterization seismic data processing and oil-field development. Deep shales are the most abundant yet least characterized sedimentary rocks in the Williston Basin of North Dakota. They are significant sources of hydrocarbon unconventional resources in this basin. This dissertation aims to fulfill an investigation of anisotropy in this rock type in several different facets through exploiting of field data. I seek to generate key information for better interplay of field in-situ stress and the existing natural fracture systems for the purpose of drilling, well completion, perforating, hydraulic fracturing and defining reservoir properties. In this study advanced sonic logging data has been processed and interpreted to calculate three independent shear moduli. These parameters then will be used to estimate Thomsen (1986) anisotropy parameters, elastic stiffness coefficients

  18. The excavation stage of basin formation - A qualitative model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, S. K.

    1981-01-01

    One of the most complex problems in planetary geology and geophysics is the determination of the nature of the impact cratering processes at scales of tens to thousands of kilometers that produce the complex morphological structures of multiring basins. The cratering process is frequently considered to be divided into three stages, including a short high-pressure stage of initial contact between the projectile and the planetary crust, a longer excavation or cratering flow stage culminating in the formation of a transient crater, and a still longer modification stage during which the transient crater is modified into the observed final geologic form. The transient crater may be considered as the initial boundary condition of the modification stage. In the present investigation, the nature of the transient crater is indicated by the cratering flow field determined from numerical simulations of the excavation stage. Attention is given to empirical and theoretical scaling.

  19. Laramide basin subsidence and fluvial architecture of the Fort Union and Wasatch Formations in the southern greater Green River basin

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.L. )

    1990-05-01

    The late Paleocene Fort Union Formation and early Eocene Wasatch Formation exposed around the Rock Springs uplift demonstrate subsidence variations in the southern greater Green River basin. Total unit thickness and distribution of channel sandstones within overbank deposits record differences in subsidence rate across the basin. On the west flank of the Rock springs uplift, west of the bounding fault, channels have close spacing and thickness is low. On the south flank within the uplift, the thickness values are intermediary but channels are very closely spaced. Away from the uplift on the southeast flank, the thickness is greatest and channels are very widely spaced. Paleocurrents indicate that rivers flowed southward across the central basin to an eastward-flowing axis trunk river at the southern end of the basin. Both the south and southeast flank area were within the basin axis, but the west flank areas was within the central basin. Thickness trends represent subsidence variations across the basin. Subsidence was slowest at the west flank area. On the south flank, subsidence was greater, and the highest subsidence rate was on the southeast flank. Generally, thickness indicates increasing subsidence toward the Uinta uplift, but the south flank area is an exception. Basin subsidence occurred by flexure of the lithosphere under a tectonic load from the Uinta uplift to the south. Thickened lithosphere at the Rock springs uplift bounding fault was resistant to flexure. Thus, on the south flank near the fault, subsidence was slower than on the southeast flank where the lithosphere was not thickened. The closely spaced fluvial architecture on the south flank resulted from a narrow basin axis flood plain. A narrow flood plain possibly resulted from the subsidence resistance of thickened lithosphere at the Rock Springs uplift bounding fault or from topographic expression of the uplift itself.

  20. Provenance and sediment dispersal of the Triassic Yanchang Formation, southwest Ordos Basin, China, and its implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiangyang

    2016-04-01

    The Ordos Basin in north central China records a transition from marine to non-marine deposition during the late Paleozoic to early Mesozoic. As a result, the northern and southern regions of the Ordos Basin show different tectonic histories and very distinctive sedimentation styles. Two deformation belts, the Qinling orogenic belt to the south and the Liupanshan thrust and fold belt to the west, controlled the structural evolution of the southern Ordos Basin during the early Mesozoic. Paleocurrent analysis, net-sand ratio maps, sandstone modal analysis, and U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology were used to document sediment sources and dispersal patterns of the Triassic Yanchang Formation in the southwest Ordos Basin. Paleocurrent measurements suggest that the sediments were mainly derived from the Liupanshan and the Qinling orogenic belts. Net-sand ratio maps show that several fan delta systems controlled sediment delivery in the south Ordos Basin. Both sandstone modal analysis and U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology suggest that the Yanchang Formation is locally sourced from both of the basin marginal deformation belts; the lower and middle sections are recycled Paleozoic sedimentary rocks mainly derived from the north Qinling orogenic belt, whereas for the upper section, the Qilian-Qaidam terranes and possibly the west Qinling orogenic belt began to shed sediments into the southwest Ordos Basin. Results have important implications for basin marginal tectonics and its controls on sedimentation of intracratonic basins in China and similar settings.

  1. Impact Basin Formation on Mars: From Borealis to the Late Heavy Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Erik; Stewart, Sarah; Lillis, Robert

    2015-06-01

    The Martian crust preserves the imprint of 20 large (>1000 km) impact basins and a global dichotomy that is hypothesized to have formed via a planetary-scale impact event. The impact basin record spans the end of the Martian dynamo magnetic field, and the youngest impact basins have the cleanest shock-demagnetization signatures. The youngest basins are also the least degraded and have more pronounced crustal thinning within the structure compared to older basins. Here, we consider the mechanics of impact basin formation under a range of crustal thickness and thermal gradients on Mars. This work will help constrain the possible impact energies and impactor sizes that produced the observed basins. Basin formation is modeled using the CTH shock physics code with a fixed central gravity field in 2D and self-gravity in 3D. Previous numerical models of a Borealis-scale impact did not include the crust or a rock rheology model, however, some important differences arise from the inclusion of strength. Heating of the mantle is significantly higher in the impacted hemisphere when strength is included. Our simulations with material strength provide new insights about the viability of the impact formation hypothesis for the global crustal dichotomy. Support Provided by NASA.

  2. Leveraging Somali Basin Magnetic Anomalies to Constrain Gondwana Breakup and Early Indian Ocean Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. K.; Lawver, L. A.; Norton, I. O.; Gahagan, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Somali Basin, found between the Horn of Africa and Madagascar was formed during the rifting of East and West Gondwana. Understanding the evolution of the basin has historically been hindered by enigmatic seafloor fabric and an apparent paucity of magnetic anomaly data. Recent iterations of satellite gravity data have revealed nearly complete fracture zones as well as a distinct extinct spreading ridge within the basin. Through a thorough compilation of available Somali Basin shiptrack profiles, we have been able to successfully model and interpret magnetic anomalies with exceptional detail. This complication is unrivaled in completeness and provides unprecedented insight into basin formation. Using this high quality data, we have interpreted magnetic anomalies M0r (120.8 Ma) to M24Bn (152.43 Ma) about the extinct ridge. The interpreted Somali Basin spreading rate and spreading direction, through anomaly M15n (135.76 Ma), are similar to those observed in the neighboring coeval Mozambique Basin. This similarity suggests that East Gondwana separated from West Gondwana as a cohesive unit, and that the internal rifting of East Gondwana began later around 135 Ma. Our magnetic anomaly interpretations have been combined with additional magnetic interpretations from around the Indian Ocean to build a regionally consistent plate model of Gondwana breakup and early Indian Ocean formation. This plate model will be crucial for future efforts unraveling a precise history of East Gondwana fragmentation and constraining the formation of the Enderby Basin offshore East Antarctica and Bay of Bengal offshore East India.

  3. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, Ernest A.

    2003-02-06

    The project objectives are improving access to information for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin by inventorying data files and records of the major information repositories in the region, making these inventories easily accessible in electronic format, increasing the amount of information available on domestic sedimentary basins through a comprehensive analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, and enhancing the understanding of the petroleum systems operating in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  4. The transition from complex crater to peak-ring basin on Mercury: New observations from MESSENGER flyby data and constraints on basin formation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, David M. H.; Head, James W.; Schon, Samuel C.; Ernst, Carolyn M.; Prockter, Louise M.; Murchie, Scott L.; Denevi, Brett W.; Solomon, Sean C.; Strom, Robert G.

    2011-12-01

    The study of peak-ring basins and other impact crater morphologies transitional between complex craters and multi-ring basins is important to our understanding of the mechanisms for basin formation on the terrestrial planets. Mercury has the largest population, and the largest population per area, of peak-ring basins and protobasins in the inner solar system and thus provides important data for examining questions surrounding peak-ring basin formation. New flyby images from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft have more than doubled the area of Mercury viewed at close range, providing nearly complete global coverage of the planet's surface when combined with flyby data from Mariner 10. We use this new near-global dataset to compile a catalog of peak-ring basins and protobasins on Mercury, including measurements of the diameters of the basin rim crest, interior ring, and central peak (if present). Our catalog increases the population of peak-ring basins by ˜150% and protobasins by ˜100% over previous catalogs, including 44 newly identified peak-ring basins (total=74) and 17 newly identified protobasins (total=32). A newly defined transitional basin type, the ringed peak-cluster basin (total=9), is also described. The new basin catalog confirms that Mercury has the largest population of peak-ring basins of the terrestrial planets and also places the onset rim-crest diameter for peak-ring basins at 126-26+33km, which is intermediate between the onset diameter for peak-ring basins on the Moon and those for the other terrestrial planets. The ratios of ring diameter to rim-crest diameter further emphasize that protobasins and peak-ring basins are parts of a continuum of basin morphologies relating to their processes of formation, in contrast to previous views that these forms are distinct. Comparisons of the predictions of peak-ring basin-formation models with the characteristics of the basin catalog for Mercury

  5. Flow of formation waters in the cretaceous-miocene succession of the Llanos basin, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Villegas, M.E.; Ramon, J.C.; Bachu, S.; Underschultz, J.R.

    1994-12-01

    This study presents the hydrogeological characteristics and flow of formation waters in the post-Paleozoic succession of the Llanos basin, a mainly siliciclastic foreland sub-Andean sedimentary basin located in Columbia between the Cordillera Oriental and the Guyanan Precambrian shield. The porosity of the sandy formations is generally high, in the range of 16-20% on average, with a trend of decreasing values with depth. Permeabilities are also relatively high, in the 10{sup 2} and 10{sup 3} md range. THe salinity (total dissolved solids) of formation waters is generally low, in the 10,000-20,000 mg/L range, suggesting that at least some strata in the basin have been flushed by metoeoric water. The shaly units in the sedimentary succession are weak aquitards in the eastern and southern parts of the basin, but are strong in the central-western part. The pressure in the basin is close to or slightly subdepth, particularly in the central-western area. The flow of formation waters in the upper units is driven mainly by topography from highs in the southwest to lows in the northeast. Local systems from the foothills and from local topographic highs in the east feed into this flow system. The flow of formation waters in the lower units is driven by topography only in the southern, eastern, and northern parts of the basin. In the central-western part, the flow is downdip toward the thrust-fold belt, driven probably by pore-space rebound induced by erosional unloading, which also is the cause of underpressuring. Hydrocarbons generated in the Cretaceous organic-rich, shaly Gacheta Formation probably have migrated updip and to the north-northeast, driven by buoyancy and entrained by the topography-driven flow of formation waters in Cretaceous-Oligocene strata in the central-western part of the basin could have created conditions for hydrodynamic entrapment of hydrocarbons.

  6. Mineral occurrence data for the Eocene Green River Formation in the Piceance and Uinta Basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Brownfield, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    This legacy database lists occurrences of minerals identified in the Green River Formation in the Uinta and Piceance Basins, Utah and Colorado using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The database was compiled from data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and former U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM). The database includes 1200 samples from 14 cores in the Uinta Basin and 9443 samples from 30 cores in the Piceance Basin; within that dataset over 40 mineral phases are represented between the two basins. Quartz, dolomite, and feldspars are the most common minerals. For nearly a century, these two agencies conducted extensive research on the oil shale deposits of the Eocene Green River Formation, Utah, Colorado, and Wyoming. Beginning in the early 1950s, this research included XRD mineral identification analysis from core and cuttings samples taken to assess oil shale resources.

  7. Deep Water Compositions From the Los Angeles Basin and the Origin of Formation Water Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boles, J.; Giles, G.; Lockman, D.

    2005-12-01

    Deep basin formation waters represent original depositional waters that have been modified by diagenetic processes at elevated temperatures and pressures. In addition, they may be diluted by meteoric incursion from elevated structural blocks along basin flanks. It has long been thought that deep basin formation waters have salinities greater than sea water due to various processes like clay membrane filtration or other types of water-rock interaction. However, our work and similar studies in the San Joaquin basin show that formation waters in deep basins are more likely to become diluted rather than concentrated in the absence of soluble evaporite deposits that might underlie the basin. The idea of increased salinity with depth arose from studies in which the underpinning of the basin consisted of soluble evaporate deposits such as the Texas Gulf Coast, Illinois, Michigan, and some North Sea areas. There are very few deep formation water analyses from the Los Angeles Basin. Furthermore, very few of the current produced waters from any depth can be considered pristine because of the widespread formation water injection programs and commingling of fluids from different levels. Here, we describe the first analyses from a deep, previously untouched part of the basin that is currently being developed in the Inglewood Oil Field. We have analyzed a suite of formation waters from the mid-Miocene marine Sentous sandstone from sub-sea level depths of 2250 m to 2625 m at temperatures of about 110 to 126°C and pressures of about 27 MPa. The original depositional waters in the Sentous Formation were sea water whereas the sampled waters are diluted by about 20% from sea water and some show as much as 50% dilution. Based on comparison of oxygen and deuterium isotopes between the meteoric water trend and these waters, we conclude that the smectite to illite dehydration reaction is the major cause of dilution to the original formation water. Other notable differences include

  8. Effects of basin bottom slope on jet hydrodynamics and river mouth bar formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Robles, A. M.; Ortega-Sánchez, M.; Losada, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    River mouth bars are strategic morphological units primarily responsible for the development of entire deltaic systems. This paper addresses the role of receiving basin slope in the hydrodynamics of an exiting sediment-laden turbulent jet and in resulting mouth bar morphodynamics. We use Delft3D, a coupled hydrodynamic and morphodynamic numerical model, along with a theoretical formulation to reproduce the physics of the problem, characterized by a fluvially dominated inlet free of waves and tides. We propose an updated theoretical model with a slope-dependent entrainment coefficient, showing that the rate at which ambient fluid is incorporated into a jet increases with higher basin slopes. Transient results reveal that the magnitude of a basin slope can alter the stability of a jet, favoring the formation of an unstable meandering jet. While a stable jet gives rise to "middle-ground" bars accompanied by diverging channels, a "lunate" mouth bar results from unstable jets. Additional morphodynamic simulations demonstrate that the time required for mouth bar stagnation in its final position increases linearly with the basin slope. In contrast, the distance at which the mouth bar eventually forms decreases until reaching an asymptotic value for slopes higher than 2%. Moreover, the basin slope highly influences sedimentary processes responsible for bar formation: for milder slopes, progradation processes prevail, while in steeper basins aggradation is more relevant. Finally, the minimum relative water depth over a bar crest that forces the flow to bifurcate around a fully developed bar decreases with the basin slope.

  9. Modes of sedimentary basin formation in the north-eastern Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Randell; Starostenko, Vitaly; Sydorenko, Grygoriy; Yegorova, Tamara

    2016-04-01

    The Greater Caucasus and Black Sea sedimentary basins developed in a Mesozoic back-arc setting, the former older than the latter (Jurassic v. Cretaceous). Compressional shortening of the former and accompanying ongoing development of marginal basin depocentres in the north-eastern Black Sea - which is closely tied to the formation of the Crimea-Greater Caucasus orogen - is a Cenozoic phenomenon, starting in the Eocene and proceeding until the present day. Recently, the sedimentary basin/crust/lithosphere geometry of the study area has been characterised across a range of scales using regional seismic reflection profiling, long-offset refraction/wide-angle reflection profiling and local earthquake tomography. These provide a new integrated image of the present-day crustal structure and sedimentary basin architecture of the northern margin of the eastern Black Sea, north across the Azov Sea and provide evidence of the deeper expression of sedimentary basins and the processes controlling the geometry of their inversion during the Cenozoic. It is inferred that the Greater Caucasus paleo-Basin, lying stratigraphically below the Black Sea and younger sedimentary successions, extends further to the west than previously known. This basin has significant thickness in the area between the Azov and Black seas and probably forms the deeper core of the Crimea-Caucasus inversion zone. The Crimea-Greater Caucasus orogenic belt is the expression of "basin inversion" of the Jurassic Greater Caucasus paleo-Basin, the degree of inversion of which varies along strike. The Greater Caucasus foredeep basins - Indolo-Kuban and Sorokin-Tuapse troughs -represent syn-inversional marginal troughs to the main inversion zone. The Shatsky Ridge - the northern flank of the main East Black Sea Basin - may also be mainly a syn-inversional structure, underlain by a blind thrust zone expressed as a northward dipping zone of seismicity on the northern margin of the eastern Black Sea.

  10. The formation of deep basins in High Arctic from metamorphism in continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyushkov, Eugene; Belyaev, Igor; Chekhovich, Peter; Petrov, Eugene; Poselov, Viktor

    2014-05-01

    In the East Barents and North Chukchi basins, 16-20 km deep, the crystalline crust is attenuated to 12-18 km (reference profiles 2-AR, 4-AR and 5-AR). P-wave velocities and densities in this layer are characteristic of the oceanic crust. However, the subsidence history in the basins is quite different from that typical of the oceanic crust. In both basins the subsidence continued for several hundred million years and one half of the deposits or more was formed long after the start of the subsidence when cooling of the oceanic plate would be already over. Moreover, the basins are 4-5 km deeper than it could be expected according to the thickness of the crystalline crust above the Moho boundary. In the absence of large free-air gravity anomalies, joint analysis of the gravity and seismic data indicates the existence under the Moho of thick layers of high-density and high-velocity eclogites. As can be seen in high resolution seismic profiles, the intensity of crustal stretching did not exceed 10% in the basins, and their formation can be predominantly attributed to a high-grade metamorphism in the mafic lower part of continental crust. At some episodes, strong increase in the rate of subsidence occurred in the basins. This indicates acceleration of metamorphism catalyzed by infiltration of mantle fluids. A set of the above features, abnormally large depth, long subsidence history with its acceleration at the late stages, and episodes of pronounced acceleration of the subsidence represent characteristic features of some other large hydrocarbon basins, e.g., of the North and South Caspian basins. These features can be used for prospecting new prolific provinces on the Arctic shelf. The Lomonosov ridge, Mendeleev high and the Makarov basin pertain to the same structural type. In the Oligocene they underwent erosion near to sea level with the formation of pronounced unconformity. Then at the end of Oligocene deep-water basins were formed in these regions. Rapid crustal

  11. The formation of lunar mascon basins from impact to contemporary form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Andrew M.; Johnson, Brandon C.; Blair, David M.; Melosh, H. J.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.; Wieczorek, Mark A.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2014-11-01

    Positive free-air gravity anomalies associated with large lunar impact basins represent a superisostatic mass concentration or "mascon." High-resolution lunar gravity data from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory spacecraft reveal that these mascons are part of a bulls-eye pattern in which the central positive anomaly is surrounded by an annulus of negative anomalies, which in turn is surrounded by an outer annulus of positive anomalies. To understand the origin of this gravity pattern, we modeled numerically the entire evolution of basin formation from impact to contemporary form. With a hydrocode, we simulated impact excavation and collapse and show that during the major basin-forming era, the preimpact crust and mantle were sufficiently weak to enable a crustal cap to flow back over and cover the mantle exposed by the impact within hours. With hydrocode results as initial conditions, we simulated subsequent cooling and viscoelastic relaxation of topography using a finite element model, focusing on the mare-free Freundlich-Sharonov and mare-infilled Humorum basins. By constraining these models with measured free-air and Bouguer gravity anomalies as well as surface topography, we show that lunar basins evolve by isostatic adjustment from an initially subisostatic state following the collapse stage. The key to the development of a superisostatic inner basin center is its mechanical coupling to the outer basin that rises in response to subisostatic stresses, enabling the inner basin to rise above isostatic equilibrium. Our calculations relate basin size to impactor diameter and velocity, and they constrain the preimpact lunar thermal structure, crustal thickness, viscoelastic rheology, and, for the Humorum basin, the thickness of its postimpact mare fill.

  12. Basin Analysis of Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest Mancini

    2001-03-01

    Part 3 (Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation) objectives are to provide an analysis of the Smackover petroleum system in Years 4 and 5 of the project and to transfer effectively the research results to producers through workshops and topical reports. Work Accomplished (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - Basin flow modeling has been completed and the topical report has been submitted to the U.S. DOE for review. Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum source rocks has been integrated into the basin flow model. The information on the source rocks is being prepared for inclusion in the final report. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum reservoirs continues. The cores to be described have been identified and many of the cores for the eastern and western parts of the basin have been described. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Work on reservoir diagenesis continues. Samples from the cores selected for the reservoir characterization are being used for this task. Task 5 - Underdeveloped Reservoirs - Two underdeveloped Smackover reservoirs have been identified. They are the microbial reef and shoal reservoirs. Work Planned (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - This task has been completed and the topical report has been submitted to the U.S. DOE. Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Petroleum source rock information will continue to be prepared for the final report. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Characterization of petroleum reservoirs will continue through core studies. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Characterization of reservoir diagenesis will continue through petrographic analysis. Task 5 - Underdeveloped Reservoirs - Study of Smackover underdeveloped reservoirs will continue with focus on the microbial reef and shoal reservoirs.

  13. Preliminary Stratigraphic Cross Sections of Oil Shale in the Eocene Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyni, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Oil shale units in the Eocene Green River Formation are shown on two east-west stratigraphic sections across the Uinta Basin in northeastern Utah. Several units have potential value for recovery of shale oil, especially the Mahogany oil shale zone, which is a high grade oil shale that can be traced across most of the Uinta Basin and into the Piceance Basin in northwestern Colorado. Many thin medium to high grade oil shale beds above the Mahogany zone can also be traced for many miles across the basin. Several units below the Mahogany that have slow velocities on sonic logs may be low grade oil shale. These may have value as a source for shale gas.

  14. Speculations on the formation of cratons and cratonic basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Dan; Priestley, Keith

    2016-02-01

    Surface wave tomography using Rayleigh waves has shown that Tibet and the surrounding mountain ranges that are now being shortened are underlain by thick lithosphere, of similar thickness to that beneath cratons. Both their elevation and lithospheric thickness can result from pure shear shortening of normal thickness continental lithosphere by about a factor of two. The resulting thermal evolution of the crust and lithosphere is dominated by radioactive decay in the crust. It raises the temperature of the lower part of the crust and of the upper part of the lithosphere to above their solidus temperatures, generating granites and small volumes of mafic alkaline rocks from beneath the Moho, as well as generating high temperature metamorphic assemblages in the crust. Thermal models of this process show that it can match the P, T estimates determined from metamorphic xenoliths from Tibet and the Pamirs, and can also match the compositions of the alkaline rocks. The seismological properties of the upper part of the lithosphere beneath northern Tibet suggest that it has already been heated by the blanketing effect and radioactivity of the thick crust on top. If the crustal thickness is reduced by erosion alone to its normal value at low elevations, without any tectonic extension, over a time scale that is short compared to the thermal time constant of thick lithosphere, of ∼250 Ma, thermal subsidence will produce a basin underlain by thick lithosphere. Though this simple model accounts for the relevant observations, there is not yet sufficient information available to be able to model in detail the resulting thermal evolution of the sediments deposited in such cratonic basins.

  15. Late Cretaceous biostratigraphy of the La Luna Formation, Maracaibo basin

    SciTech Connect

    Truskowski, I.; Galeaalvarez, F.; Sliter, W.V.

    1996-08-01

    Micropaleontological analysis, sedimentological studies, and geochemical data are presented for the Upper Cretaceous {open_quote}black shales{close_quote} of the La Luna Formation of Western Venezuela. The detailed planktonic foraminiferal studies allowed the establishment of the first biozonation, determination of sedimentation rates, and documentation of occurrences of benthic foraminifers for these unusually thick black shales that extend stratigraphically nearly 100 m. Hedbergellids, whiteinellids and Heterohelix characterize the lower part of the La Luna Formation, dated from the late Cenomanian Rotalipora cushmani Zone to middle Turonian Helvetoglobotruncana belvetica Zone. The high productivity of these groups associated with phosphatized fish remains suggest upwelling and a poorly stratified water column. The presence of buliminids and Favreina sp. at some levels, imply disoxic conditions in this anoxic interval. Planktonic foraminifers in the middle and upper parts of the formation range in age from the late Turonian Marginotruncana sigali- Dicarinella primitiva Zone to the early Campanian Globotruncanita elevata Zone. The increase in keeled planktonic foraminifers toward the top of the formation suggest more stratified, oligotrophic surface waters. Benthic foraminifers found at the top are indicative of dysaerobic conditions. This study provides new opportunities for utilizing the petroleum system in the La Luna Formation, arguably the most prolific source rock in northern South America.

  16. Stresses and fractures in the Frontier Formation, Green River Basin, predicted from basin-margin tectonic element interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    Natural fractures and in situ stresses commonly dictate subsurface reservoir permeability and permeability anisotropy, as well as the effectiveness of stimulation techniques in low-permeability, natural gas reservoirs. This paper offers an initial prediction for the orientations of the fracture and stress systems in the tight gas reservoirs of the Frontier Formation, in the Green River basin of southwestern Wyoming. It builds on a previous report that addressed fractures and stresses in the western part of the basin and on ideas developed for the rest of the basin, using the principle that thrust faults are capable of affecting the stress magnitudes and orientations in little-deformed strata several hundreds of kilometers in front of a thrust. The prediction of subsurface stresses and natural fracture orientations is an undertaking that requires the willingness to revise models as definitive data are acquired during drilling. The predictions made in this paper are offered with the caveat that geology in the subsurface is always full of surprises.

  17. Visan miospore biostratigraphy and correlation of the Poti Formation (Parnaba Basin, northern Brazil).

    PubMed

    Melo; Loboziak

    2000-10-01

    The Poti Formation, which consists mainly of sandstones with minor proportions of carbonaceous shales and other siliciclastic lithologies, represents all the Viséan strata thus far recorded in the Parnaíba Basin, northern Brazil.Well-preserved miospores featuring species with both Southern Euramerican and Gondwanan affinities have been recovered from this formation in four well sections. The most characteristic species are listed in this paper, and brief systematic descriptions are presented for the most significant species, along with comments on their biostratigraphy. A new generic combination is proposed: Cordylosporites magnidictyus (Playford and Helby) Loboziak and Melo comb. nov. Comparisons with miospores illustrated from the Grand Erg Occidental, Algerian Sahara, are tentatively proposed.In terms of the Western European Carboniferous palynozonation, miospore assemblages from the Poti Formation are assignable to the Perotrilites tessellatus-Schulzospora campyloptera (TC)-Raistrickia nigra-Triquitrites marginatus (NM) zonal range. This corresponds to the upper part of the Holkerian and the whole Asbian, which are British regional stages for the lower to middle parts of the upper Viséan. The Viséan age formerly attributed to biostratigraphic interval XII of Petrobras' regional palynostratigraphic scheme is therefore confirmed. As already noted in our recent investigations of the Faro Formation in the Amazon Basin and equivalent strata of the Solimões Basin, latest Tournaisian and early to middle Viséan sections are either absent or barren of characteristic miospores in the Parnaíba Basin as well.

  18. Organic petrology and geochemistry of mudrocks from the lacustrine Lucaogou Formation, Santanghu Basin, northwest China: Application to lake basin evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Paul C.; Fishman, Neil; Wu, Tao; Baugher, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Exploration for tight oil in the frontier Santanghu Basin of northwest China has resulted in recent commercial discoveries sourced from the lacustrine Upper Permian Lucaogou Formation, already considered a “world class source rock” in the Junggar Basin to the west. Here we apply an integrated analytical program to carbonate-dominated mudrocks from the Lucaogou Formation in Santanghu Basin to document the nature of organic matter (OM) in the context of an evolving lake system. The organic-rich samples (TOC 2.8–11.4 wt%; n = 10) were widely spaced from an ~ 200 m cored section, interpreted from textural and mineralogical evidence to document transition from a lower under-filled to an overlying balanced-filled lake. Organic matter is dominated by moderate to strongly fluorescent amorphous material with Type I geochemical signature (HI values 510–755; n = 10) occurring in a continuum from lamellar stringers, 10–20 μm thick, some ≥ 1 mm in length (possible microbial mat; preserved only in lower under-filled section) to finely-disseminated amorphous groundmass intimately intermixed with mineral matrix. Biomarkers for methanotrophs and photosynthetic cyanobacteria indicate a complex microbial consortium. A unicellular prasinophyte green alga(?), similar to Tasmanites in marine rocks, is present as discrete flattened discs 50–100 μm in diameter. Type III OM including vitrinite (some fluorescent) and inertinite also is abundant. Solid bitumen, indicating local kerogen conversion, fills voids and occurs throughout the cored section. Vitrinite reflectance values are 0.47–0.58%, consistent with strong OM fluorescence but may be “suppressed”. Other proxies, e.g., biomarker parameters, indicate the Lucaogou Formation is in the early oil window at this location. On average, slightly more amorphous OM and telalginite are present in the lower section, consistent with a shallow, stratified, saline environment with low sediment dilution. More

  19. Petrochemical constraints on lateral transport during lunar basin formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, P. H.; Taylor, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    Lunar ANT petrochemistry correlates with longitude, allowing the sampled region of the moon to be divided into three geochemical provinces: western (Apollo 12 and 14), near-eastern (Apollo 11, 15, 16 and 17) and far-eastern (Luna 16, 20 and 24). A western ANT rock has a far greater Eu anomaly for a given Sm content than does a near-eastern ANT rock, which is in turn has a somewhat greater Eu anomaly than does a far-eastern ANT rock. Distinct differences are also observed in Sc/Sm and Ti/Sm ratios (western ANT rocks have lower ratios) and in the abundances of alkali-rich anorthosites (five of the six known anorthosites from the west are approximately four times richer in Na and K than are ferroan anorthosites, whereas none of the 40 known anorthosites from the near east is alkali-rich). The existence of this distinct correlation of ANT geochemical properties with longitude implies that even during the first few hundred m.y. of lunar history basin-forming impacts were not capable of efficiently redistributing material laterally across the lunar surface.

  20. Giant polygons and circular graben in western Utopia basin, Mars: Exploring possible formation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczkowski, Debra L.; Seelos, Kim D.; Cooke, Michele L.

    2012-08-01

    Large-scale fracture systems surrounding the Utopia basin include giant polygons and circular graben. Data covering the northern Utopia basin now allow high-resolution mapping of these features in all regions of the basin. Giant polygons to the north and south of the basin are different in both size and morphology, leading to the polygon classifications (1) S-style, (2) subdued S-style, (3) northern S-style and (4) N-style. Also, ten circular graben have been identified to the north of the Utopia basin. These have generally larger diameters than southern circular graben, and their fracture morphology is similar to N-style giant polygons. As with southern circular graben, the surface relief of the depression inside the northern circular graben scales directly with diameter. However, northern circular graben have less steep trend slopes, larger average diameters and greater ring spacing compared to southern circular graben of the same diameter and similar distance to the center of the Utopia basin. Both the giant polygons and circular graben of Utopia Planitia are consistent with formation by volumetric compaction of a fine-grained sedimentary material covering an uneven buried surface. Giant polygon size variations can be explained by the material being wet to the south but frozen or partially frozen to the north, while differences between northern and southern circular graben may be attributed to changes in cover thickness. Differences in fracture morphology can be explained by subsequent alteration of the northern troughs due to polar processes.

  1. Experimental and Theoretical Study of Strata Formation in Sedimentary Basins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-30

    GOALS The long-term goals of our stratigraphy project are to obtain experimental evidence and to develop quantitative models of the formation of...1 only 14. ABSTRACT The long-term goals of our stratigraphy project are to obtain experimental evidence and to develop quantitative models of the...experimental program should provide new insight and data on how processes average across time scales to produce stratigraphy . Our physically- based

  2. Palynology of the Kashafrud Formation, Koppeh Dagh basin, Northeastern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, H.; Sajjadi, F.; Dehbozorgi, A.

    2009-04-01

    Diverse and moderately well-preserved palynofloras occur in Middle Jurassic sediments of the Kashafrud Formation at the Senjedak section, southeast of Mashhad, northeastern Iran. Trilete and monolete spores and pollen dominate the assemblages, whereas dinoflagellate cysts, foraminiferal test linings, and fungal spores are minor components. Forty-seven species of spores (30 genera) and 15 species of pollen (eight genera) are identified. Representatives of Dictyophyllidites and Klukisporites are particularly abundant. Based on the stratigraphic distribution of miospores, three distinctive stratigraphically successive palynofloras informally termed in ascending order, Assemblages A, B, and C are identified within the Kashafrud Formation. These are compared with palynozones known from Iran and elsewhere. Based on the presence of certain miospore species, the Kashafrud palynofloras are collectively dated as Middle Jurassic (Bajocian-Bathonian), thus corroborating the faunal (ammonoid) evidence. The appearance of a key miospore species, Contignisporites burgeri, within the succession has been used to attribute a late Bajocian age and early Bathonian age to the lower and upper parts of the studied interval, respectively. Inferred natural relationships of the miospores imply derivation from a diverse parental flora of Pterophyta and gymnosperms, such as Coniferophyta, Cycadophyta, and Ginkgophyta, growing under warm, humid conditions during the Bajocian-Bathonian. The associated marine fauna (ammonites), marine palynomorphs (proximate dinoflagellate cysts, and acritarchs such as Micrhystridium), and foraminiferal test linings, along with terrestrial palynomorphs (spores and pollen) collectively indicate an open marine, nearshore depositional setting for the Kashafrud Formation at the section studied.

  3. Heat flow, deep formation temperature and thermal structure of the Tarim Basin, northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaowen; Lei, Xiao; Feng, Changge; Li, Xianglan

    2016-04-01

    Geothermal regime of a sedimentary basin not only provides constraint on understanding the basin formation and evolution, but also offers fundamental parameters for hydrocarbon resources assessment. As one of three Precambrian blocks in China, the Tarim craton is also a current hydrocarbon exploration target where the largest sedimentary basin (Tarim Basin) develops with great potential. Although considerable advancement of geothermal regime of this basin has been made during the past decades, nearly all the temperature data in previous studies are from the exploration borehole formation testing temperatures. Recently, we have conducted the steady-state temperature logging in the Tarim basin, and measured abundant rock thermal properties, enabling us to re-visit the thermal regime of this area with more confidence. Our results show that the present-day geothermal gradients for the Tarim Basin vary from 23 K/km to 27 K/km, with a mean of 22 K/km; the values of heat flow range from 40 mW/m2 to 49 mW/m2, with a mean of 43 mW/m2. These new data confirmed that the Tarim Basin has relatively low heat flow and shares similar geothermal regime with other Precambrian cratons in the world. In addition, the new temperatures from the steady-state logs are larger than the bottom hole temperatures (BHT) as 22 degree Celsius, indicating the thermal non-equilibrium for the BHTs used in previous studies. Spatial distribution of the estimated formation temperatures-at-depth of 1~5km within the basin is similar and mainly controlled by crystalline basement pattern. Generally, the temperatures at the depth of 1km range from 29 to 41 degree Celsius, with a mean of 35 degree Celsius; while the temperatures at 3km vary from 63 to 100 degree Celsius, and the mean is 82 degree Celsius; at 5km below the surface, the temperatures fall into a range between 90 and 160 degree Celsius, with a mean of 129 degree Celsius. We further proposed the long-term low geothermal background and large burial

  4. Formation of the Sputnik Planum basin and the thickness of Pluto's subsurface ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Brandon C.; Bowling, Timothy J.; Trowbridge, Alexander J.; Freed, Andrew M.

    2016-10-01

    We simulate the formation of the large elliptical impact basin associated with Pluto's Sputnik Planum (SP; informal name). The location of SP suggests that it represents a large positive mass anomaly. To find the conditions necessary for SP to have a positive mass anomaly, we consider impacts into targets with a range of thermal states and ocean thicknesses. Assuming the basin evolves to its current-day configuration, we calculate the mass and gravity anomalies associated with SP. We find that SP can only achieve a large positive mass anomaly if Pluto has a more than 100 km thick salty ocean. This conclusion may help us better understand the composition and thermal evolution of Pluto. Furthermore, our work supports the hypothesis that SP basin has an impact origin.

  5. New fossil record of a Jurassic pterosaur from Neuquen Basin, Vaca Muerta Formation, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codorniú, Laura; Garrido, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    Discoveries of Jurassic pterosaurs in the Southern Hemisphere are extremely unusual. In Argentina, pterosaurs from the Upper Jurassic (Tithonian) have only been found in the Northwest of Patagonia (Neuquén Basin). These come from marine deposits and three specimens have been discovered up to the present. In this paper, we report a new finding from the Neuquén Basin. This material is identified as a tibiotarsus, which probably belonged to an osteologically adult individual and represents a new species of a pterodactyloid pterosaur of medium size. This discovery provides new evidence that at least two different species of pterodactyloid pterosaurs may have coexisted in Los Catutos Member, Vaca Muerta Formation, from the shallow marine deposits of the Neuquén Basin.

  6. Role of extensional tectonics in the formation of Talladega belt--Blue Ridge successor basins

    SciTech Connect

    Tull, J.F. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Polydeformed and metamorphosed sequences occurring unconformably above the Cambrian-Ordovician (C-O) miogeoclinal sequence are nested within the Talladega belt (Talladega Group-TG) and Blue Ridge (Mineral Bluff Group-MBG). These successor basin sequences are 2.5--3 km thick and have a possible age range from Ordovician to Devonian, representing the youngest stratigraphic units east of the foreland. They are dominated by turbiditic metaclastic rocks derived from erosion of Grenville basement and its overlying cover of clastic and carbonate rock. Bimodal volcanic rocks occur in the TG, and within-plate mafic extrusive rocks are found in the MBG. The TG consists of a coarsening, thickening, and shallowing upward sequence with a submarine fan-like unit (Lay Dam Formation-LDF) at the base. The LDF contains a thick proximal boulder-bearing olistostromal facies with debris fan lobes stacked vertically and shed from a proximal fault scarp to the SE or S. The vertical stacking of olistostromal deposits, absence of crystalline-cored thrust sheets of this age at the structural top of the basin, and other relationships indicate that the basin did not result from detached deformation to the SE or transcurrent faulting, but rather from extensional faulting. Relationships within the C-O carbonate sequence (Sylacauga Marble Group) unconformably below the TG indicate that the TG basin developed above shallow shelf miogeoclinal rocks inboard of the continental margin hinge line, and thus indicate that Silurian-Devonian extensional structures affected relatively thick Laurentian crust. Similarities in lithofacies and stratigraphic sequence between the TG and MBG indicate that the settling of the MBG may have also been within an extensional basin but basin boundary faults have not yet been identified within the structural block below the pre-MBG unconformity. This basin developed above Laurentian crust previously thinned during late Protozoic rifting.

  7. Stratigraphic correlations of the Vaca Muerta formation in the southern Neuquén basin, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesma, Krim; Patrice, Imbert; Cedric, Bonnel; Charles, Aubourg

    2013-04-01

    The petroleum Neuquén basin, south west Argentina, contains a continuous late Triassic to Cenozoic succession including continental and marine sediments, deposited under a variety of tectonic regimes. The Vaca Muerta formation is one of the major source rocks of the Neuquén basin and was deposited during the Andic cycle. This formation consists of organic-rich dark brown to black shales and mudstones deposited during a major transgression, in euxinic conditions on a shelf and slope during the Tithonian. Over most of the basin, the Vaca Muerta formation overlies the continental deposits of the Tordillo formation. The contact between the two formations is isochronous throughout the basin and marks the Tithonian transgression (Leanza, 1981). After this transgression, prograding bodies were deposited and the Vaca Muerta corresponds to the distal part of this latest. It includes stages from Middle Tithonian in the south to Valanginian in the north (Leanza & Hugo, 1977). The Vaca Muerta formation is well exposed in the southern part of the Neuquén basin, from the Picun Leufu Anticline to the north of the town of Las Lajas. It corresponds in these two areas to a succession of dark to brown shales and carbonate beds. In details, we can divide it into two parts: the Lower Vaca Muerta and the Upper Vaca Muerta. Above, the Picun Leufu formation overlies the Vaca Muerta formation and consists of carbonaceous and siliciclastics prograditional bodies. This unit is absent in the "North Zapala Zone" and its lateral equivalent is less carbonaceous. In this poster; we propose eight detailed sedimentological logs, which are correlated along 120 km north-south trend (from the Picun Leufu Anticline to the south west to the Agrio thrust Belt (ATB) to the north). This correlation will be used to assess the vertical and lateral variability of the Vaca Muerta deposits and to define the palaeogeographic evolution of that region. This allowed us to identify two major prograding sequences

  8. Cassiopidae gastropods, influence of Tethys Sea of the Romualdo Formation (Aptian-Albian), Araripe Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Priscilla Albuquerque; Cassab, Rita de Cassia Tardin; Barreto, Alcina Magnólia Franca

    2016-10-01

    The Cassiopidae family belongs to a group of gastropods of the Tethyan Realm, whose origin and dispersion are related a transgression of the Tethys Sea during the Early Cretaceous. The Romualdo Formation in the Araripe Basin, located in Northeast Brazil, presents fossil assemblages with echinoids, bivalves and cassiopid gastropods, indicating a marine sedimentation at the top of the formation. This research reveals three new species of this fauna: Gymnentome (Craginia) beurleni sp. nov., 'Pseudomesalia' ('Pseudomesalia') mennessieri sp. nov and 'Pseudomesalia' ('Pseudomesalia') santanensis sp. nov. We also review two other species: Craginia araripensisBeurlen, 1964 and Gymnentome romualdoiBeurlen, 1964, which we reclassify taxonomically as Paraglauconia (Diglauconia) araripensis and Gymnentome (Gymnentome) romualdoi, respectively; Paraglauconia (Diglauconia) lyrica Maury, 1936 and Gymnentome (Gymnentome) carregozica Maury, 1936 were the first recorded species in the Araripe Basin. The occurrence of these cassiopid gastropod fauna in other basins, such as Sergipe, Potiguar and Parnaíba, indicate the influence of waters coming from the north through the Tethys Sea in the Aptian-Albian and in the marginal continental basins of the Brazilian Northeast.

  9. Depositional environments and regional sedimentological control of Caseyville Formation, southern Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.J.; Pius Weibel, C. )

    1989-08-01

    During the Morrowan Epoch (earliest Pennsylvanian), the Eastern Interior basins of the US were characterized by a fluviatile system draining generally southwestward from central Pennsylvanian to the Arkoma basin of northern Arkansas. In the southern Illinois basin, the system deposited the Casevylle Formation, consisting of two prominent cliff-forming quartzose sandstones with common quartz gravel, separated and succeeded by finer-grained, clastic intervals. Outcrop mapping in southernmost Illinois indicates that these cliff formers, the Battery Rock and Pounds Sandstone members, are laterally widespread and generally continuous, but variable in thickness. The underlying Wayside Sandstone Member, the intervening Drury Shale Member, and strata immediately succeeding the Caseyville consist of variable sequences of shales, siltstones, thin-bedded sandstones, and local ledge-forming sandstones. Rare lenticular coals are scattered through the Caseyville. The authors interpret the sandstone members to be dominantly of fluviatile-deltaic origin and the intervening, finger-grained intervals to be of deltaic and, at least in part, marginal-marine origin. Marine strata within the Drury Shale Member and the strata immediately overlying the Caseyville Formation contain scattered body fossils and trace fossils suggesting marine deposition. The Wayside/Battery Rock and Drury/Pounds cycles are tentatively correlated with similar cycles in the Appalachian and Arkoma basins. This correlation suggests regional sedimentological control.

  10. Evidence for deep-water evaporite deposition in the Miocene Kareem Formation, Gemsa basin, eastern Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    May, J.A.; Stonecipher, S.A.; Steinmetz, J.C. ); Dyess, J.N. )

    1991-03-01

    The correct interpretation of intercalated Miocene siliciclastics and evaporites of Gemsa basin is crucial for understanding early rift tectonics of the Gulf of Suez, pinpointing the timing of isolation of the Gulf from the Mediterranean, and developing exploration plays. Evaporites of the Kareem Formation comprise celestites and massive, 'chicken-wire,' and laminated anhydrites. Although previously interpreted as sabkha deposits; sedimentologic, petrographic, and paleontologic analyses indicate these evaporites more likely formed in a submarine setting. Marls that encase the evaporites contain a diverse and abundant assemblage of nannoplankton, planktonic foraminifera, diatoms, pteropods, and fish scales indicative of basinal deposition. Associated turbidites also denote deep-water sedimentation. The paucity of benthic diatoms and foraminifera, plus the presence of unburrowed shales, phosphate nodules, early ferroan carbonate cements, and authigenic pyrite, suggest periodic anoxic, or at least disaerobic, bottom waters. These sequences probably represent partial isolation of the Gulf of Suez by middle Miocene, producing periodic basin restriction and evaporative drawdown. Episodes of increasing salinity likely caused the progressive decreases in foram abundance and diversity in marls beneath the anhydrites, culminating in subaqueous evaporite formation. Diverse, indigenous nannoplankton assemblages from shale seams within the anhydrites suggest Gemsa basin was stratified; shallow open-marine conditions coexisted with anhydrite crystallization from deeper hypersaline waters.

  11. An assessment on CO2 geosequestration in deep saline formations in the Taihsi Basin, central Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Mo-Si; Lin, Andrew T.; Fan, Jhen-Huei

    2015-04-01

    Geological storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) is to inject and store a large amount of anthropogenic CO2 in deep and sealed porous rocks in order to mitigate the aggravated threat of global climate changes. Borehole and reflection seismic data are used to understand the spatial distribution of suitable CO2 reservoirs and cap rocks in the Taihsi Basin, central Taiwan, where the level of seismicity is low. The Taihsi Basin was a rift basin during the Paleocene to Eocene, followed by a phase of post-rift subsidence during late Oligocene to late Miocene. The loading of the Taiwan mountain belt since late Miocene has turned the Taihsi Basin into a peripheral foreland basin, with strata gently dipping toward the mountain belts in the east. The coastal plain in central Taiwan (Changhua and Yunlin Counties) and its adjacent offshore areas are close to major CO2 emission sources and no active geological structures are found in these areas, making the study area a favorable CO2 storage site. Spatial distribution of formation thickness and depth for CO2 reservoirs and cap rocks indicates three CO2 storage systems existed in the study area. They are: (1) late Miocene to Pliocene Nanchuang Formation and Kueichulin Formation (reservoirs)-Chinshui Shale (seals) system (hereafter abbreviated as NK-C system), (2) early to middle Miocene Shihti Formation and Peiliao Formation (reservoirs)-Talu Shale (seals) system (SP-T system), (3) early Miocene Mushan Formation (reservoirs)-Piling Shale (seals) system (M-P system). The NK-C system contains multiple layers of porous sandstones from Nanchuang and Kueichulin formations, with total thickness around 210-280 m. In the vicinity of the northern bank of the Jhuoshuei River, reservoir top reaches a depth around 1850 m, with 60 m thick seal formation, the Chinshui Shale. However, the Chinshui Shale becomes sand-prone in the Changhua coastal and nearshore areas due to facies changes. The SP-T system consists of two porous sandstone layers from

  12. Altered tuffaceous rocks of the Green River Formation in the Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griggs, Roy Lee

    1968-01-01

    More than 50 ash-fall tuff beds which have altered to analcitized or feldspathized rocks have been found in the upper 500-600 feet of the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation in the Piceance Creek Basin of northwestern Colorado. Similarly altered water-washed tuff occurs as tongues in the uppermost part of this member, and forms most of the lower 400-600 feet of the overlying Evacuation Creek Member of the Green River Formation. 'The altered ash-fall beds of the Parachute Creek Member are all thin and show a characteristic pattern of alteration. Most beds range in thickness from a fraction of an inch to a few inches. One bed reaches a maximum thickness of 5 feet, and, unlike the other beds, is composed of several successive ash falls. The pattern of alteration changes from the outer part to the center of the basin. Most beds in the outer part of the basin contain about 50 to 65 percent analcite,with the interstices between the crystals filled mainly by microlites of feldspar, opal, and quartz, and small amounts of carbonate. At the center of the basin .essentially all the beds -are composed of microlites of feldspar, opal, and quartz, and small amounts of carbonate. The tongues of water-washed tuff in the uppermost part of the Parachute Creek Member and the similar rocks composing the lower 400-600 feet of the Evacuation Creek Mewber are feldspathized rocks composed mainly of microlites of feldspar, opal, and quartz, varying amounts of carbonate, and in some specimens tiny subrounded crystals of analcite. The general trend in alteration of the tuffaceous rocks from analcitization near the margin to feidspathization near the center of the Piceance Creek Basin is believed to have taken place at shallow depth during diagenesis , as indicated by field observations and laboratory work. It is believed that during sedimentation and diagenesis the waters of the central part of the basin were more alkaline and following the breakdown of the original

  13. Depositional history of Lower Triassic Dinwoody Formation, Bighorn basin, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Paull, R.A.; Paull, R.K.

    1986-08-01

    The Lower Triassic Dinwoody Formation in the Bighorn basin of Wyoming and Montana records the northeasternmost extent of the widespread and rapid Griesbachian transgression onto the Wyoming shelf. Depositional patterns document a progressive change from sparsely fossiliferous, inner-shelf marine conditions in the southwest and west to restricted, marginal-marine environments to the north and east. Characteristic lithologies include greenish-gray calcareous or dolomitic mudstone and siltstone, very thin to thick beds of gypsum, and thin-bedded, commonly laminated dolomite. A formation thickness of approximately 20 m persists throughout most of the basin but diminishes abruptly near the northern and eastern limits of deposition. The Dinwoody is disconformable on the Ervay Member of the Permian Park City Formation except in the northeasternmost part of the basin, where it locally overlies the Pennsylvanian Tensleep Sandstone. Considering the significant time interval involved, physical evidence at the Permian-Triassic boundary is generally limited to an abrupt lithologic change from light-colored shallow marine or intertidal Permian dolomite to greenish-gray Dinwoody siltstone. The Dinwoody grades vertically as well as laterally to the east and north into red beds of the Lower Triassic Red Peak Formation of the Chugwater Group. The Early Triassic depositional environment in the present-day Bighorn basin was hostile. A sparse molluscan fauna was observed at only one of the 20 sections studied, and no conodonts were recovered from Dinwoody carbonates. Significant amounts of gypsum within the Dinwoody suggest periodic high evaporation from hypersaline waters on a low-energy shallow shelf during intervals of reduced terrigenous sediment supply from the north and east. However, sufficient organic material was present to create reducing conditions, as evidenced by greenish rock color and abundant pyrite.

  14. Soft-Sediment Deformation Structures Interpreted as Seismites in the Kolankaya Formation, Denizli Basin (SW Turkey)

    PubMed Central

    Topal, Savaş; Özkul, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The NW-trending Denizli basin of the SW Turkey is one of the neotectonic grabens in the Aegean extensional province. It is bounded by normal faults on both southern and northern margins. The basin is filled by Neogene and Quaternary terrestrial deposits. Late Miocene- Late Pliocene aged Kolankaya formation crops out along the NW trending Karakova uplift in the Denizli basin. It is a typical fluviolacustrine succession that thickens and coarsens upward, comprising poorly consolidated sand, gravelly sand, siltstone and marl. Various soft-sediment deformation structures occur in the formation, especially in fine- to medium grained sands, silts and marls: load structures, flame structures, clastic dikes (sand and gravely-sand dike), disturbed layers, laminated convolute beds, slumps and synsedimentary faulting. The deformation mechanism and driving force for the soft-sediment deformation are related essentially to gravitational instability, dewatering, liquefaction-liquidization, and brittle deformation. Field data and the wide lateral extent of the structures as well as regional geological data show that most of the deformation is related to seismicity and the structures are interpreted as seismites. The existence of seismites in the Kolankaya Formation is evidence for continuing tectonic activity in the study area during the Neogene and is consistent with the occurrence of the paleoearthquakes of magnitude >5. PMID:25152909

  15. Formation of the enigmatic Matoush uranium deposit in the Paleoprotozoic Otish Basin, Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, Paul; Kyser, Kurt; Layton-Matthews, Daniel; Beyer, Steve R.; Hiatt, Eric E.; Lafontaine, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    The Matoush uranium deposit is situated in the Paleoproterozoic Otish Basin, northern Quebec, Canada, and is hosted by the Indicator Formation sandstones. Its sheet-like ore bodies are closely associated with the steeply dipping Matoush Fracture, which hosts mafic dykes and minor quartz-feldspar-tourmaline pegmatites. Regional diagenesis, involving oxidizing basinal fluids (δ2H ˜-15‰, δ18O ˜8‰), produced mostly illite and possibly leached U from accessory phases in the Indicator Formation sandstones. The bimodal Matoush dyke intruded the Indicator Formation along the Matoush Fracture, and the related metasomatism produced Cr-rich dravite and muscovite in both the dyke and the proximal sandstones. Uraninite formed when U6+ in the basinal brine was reduced to U4+ in contact with the mafic dyke and by Fe2+ in Cr-dravite and Cr-muscovite, and precipitated together with eskolaite and hematite. Because of its unique characteristics, the Matoush deposit cannot be easily classified within the generally accepted classification of uranium deposits. Two of its main characteristics (unusual reduction mechanism, structural control) do not correspond to the sandstone-hosted group of deposits (unconformity type, tabular, roll front), in spite of uranium being derived from the Otish Group sandstones.

  16. Stratigraphy, depositional history, and petroleum geology of Lower Cretaceous Fall River formation, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Ryer, T.A.; Gustason, E.R.

    1985-05-01

    The middle Albian Fall River Formation, better know to petroleum geologists as the Dakota Sandstone, constitutes a northwestward-thinning wedge of predominantly sandy strata under and overlain by marine shale. Two major episodes of deltaic progradation can be recognized in the formation, permitting mapping of lower and upper deltaic members. Study of outcrops, cores, and subsurface relationships indicates that the Fall River consists predominantly of fluvial strata in the southeastern part of the Powder River basin; delta-front and delta-plain facies, which are cut out and replaced locally by northwest-trending meander belts, predominate in an area that tends northeastward across the central part of the basin; the delta-front facies pinches out into offshore marine shale in the northwestern part of the basin. The large majority of Fall River stratigraphic trap-type fields produce oil and gas from sandy meander-belt deposits. The largest accumulations of hydrocarbons in traps of this type, as exemplified by the Powell-Mexican Springs trend (lower member) and the Coyote Creek-Miller Creek trend (upper member), occur in the more seaward parts of the deltaic members, near the seaward termini of meander-belt systems. Mapping of meander belts and of the surrounding deltaic deposits constitutes a necessary first step in exploration for stratigraphic traps within the Fall River Formation.

  17. The Role of Groundwater Flow and Faulting on Hydrothermal Ore Formation in Sedimentary Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garven, G.

    2006-05-01

    Sediment-hosted ore formation is thought to occur as a normal outcome of basin evolution, due to deep groundwater flow, heat transport, and reactive mass transport ---all of which are intimately coupled. This paper reviews recent attempts to understand the hydrologic and geochemical processes forming some of the world's largest sediment-hosted ores. Several questions still dominate the literature (driving forces for flows, source and controls on metal acquisition, concentrations of ore-forming components, timing and duration, role of faults, effects of transient flows). This paper touches upon all of these questions. Coupled reactive transport models have been applied for understanding the genesis of sandstone-hosted uranium ores of North America and Australia, red-bed copper ores of North America and northern Europe, carbonate-hosted MVT lead-zinc ores of the U.S. Midcontinent and northwestern Canada, and the carbonate- hosted lead-zinc ores of Ireland and southeast France. Good progress has been made in using these computational methods for comparing and contrasting both carbonate hosted (MVT and Irish types) and shale- hosted (SEDEX type) Pb-Zn deposits. The former are mostly associated with undeformed carbonate platforms associated with distal orogenic belts and the later are mostly associated with extensional basins and failed rifts that are heavily faulted. Two giant ore provinces in extensional basins provide good examples of structural control on reactive mass transport: shale-hosted Pb-Zn ores of the Proterozoic McArthur basin, Australia, and shale-hosted Pb-Zn-Ba ores of the Paleozoic Kuna basin, Alaska. For the McArthur basin, hydrogeologic simulations of thermally-driven free convection suggest a strong structural control on fluid flow created by the north-trending fault systems that dominate this Proterozoic extensional basin. Brines appear to have descended to depths of a few kilometers along the western side of the basin, migrated laterally to the

  18. Regional-scale flow of formation waters in the Williston basin

    SciTech Connect

    Bachu, S.; Hitchon, B.

    1996-02-01

    The Williston basin is a structurally simple intracratonic sedimentary basin that straddles the United States-Canada border east of the Rocky Mountains and that contains an almost continuous stratigraphic record since the Middle Cambrian. Based on the wealth of data generated by the oil industry, the regional-scale characteristics of the flow of formation waters were analyzed for the Canadian side of the basin, and integrated with previous studies performed on the American side. Several aquifers and aquifer systems identified in the basin were separated by intervening aquitards and aquicludes. The Basal, Devonian, and Mannville (Dakota) aquifers are open systems, being exposed at the land surface in both recharge and discharge areas. Recharge takes place in the west-southwest at relatively high altitude in the Bighorn and Big Snowy mountains and at the Black Hills and Central Montana uplifts, whereas discharge takes place in the east and northeast at outcrop along the Canadian Precambrian shield in Manitoba and the Dakotas. The Mississippian and Pennsylvanian aquifer systems are semi-open, cropping out only in the west-southwest where they recharge, but discharging in the northeast into adjacent aquifers through confining aquitards. On regional and geological scales, the entire system seems to be at steady-state, although locally transient flow is present in places due to water use and hydrocarbon exploitation, and to some erosional rebound in the uppermost confining shales. On the western flank of the basin, the interplay between the northeastward structural downdip direction and the northeastward flow of formation waters creates conditions favorable for hydrodynamic oil entrapment.

  19. Laramide tectonic evolution of San Juan sag, Colorado: Implications of Animas and Blanco basin formations

    SciTech Connect

    Brister, B.S. )

    1989-09-01

    The lower member of the Animas Formation (McDermott Member) is a volcaniclastic sequence derived from a north-northwest source (San Juan-La Plata area). It consists of purple andesitic debris flows, green fan-delta sandstones and mud rocks, and dark gray conglomerates with clast compositions indicating that the Precambrian core of the source uplift was exposed. The upper member is a sand-dominated alluvial plain sequence deposited by southwest-flowing braided streams. It includes green-gray-brown carbonaceous mudstones and pebbly sandstones containing clasts of mudstone, andesite, and detritus from Precambrian and Mesozoic sources in the Brazos-San Luis uplift to the east and northeast. by the end of Animas deposition, the San Juan sag (then a northeastern extension of the San Juan basin) was a broad, southwest-plunging synclinal downwarp bounded by hogback monoclines to the north and east. An erosional period followed Animas deposition; the greatest thickness of Animas was preserved along the axis of this synclinal feature. Bright-red sandy mudstones and yellow-gray pebbly sandstones and cobble conglomerates comprise the proximal alluvial-fan deposits of the Blanco Basin Formation. They unconformably overlie Precambrian through Paleocene rocks and clast compositions reflect these sources. Renewed uplift and segmentation of the Brazos-San Luis uplift resulted in the shedding of detritus southwestward into the San Juan sag and eastward into a narrow, asymmetrical, north-trending wrench basin within the uplift. Following Blanco Basin deposition, the last Laramide event is represented by the separation of the San Juan sag from the San Juan basin by uplift of the Archuleta anticlinorium.

  20. Stratigraphic framework of the upper Fort Union Formation, TA Hills, Western Powder River basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, Jean N.; Flores, Romeo M.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to interpret a relationship between the stratigraphy and the environment of deposition of the upper part of the Fort Union Formation in the TA Hills in the western part of the Powder River Basin, Johnson County, Wyoming.  This framework was used to map and correlate coal beds with those mapped by Hose (1955) and Mapel (1959) in the southern and northern parts of the study area, respectively.  More specifically, the established stratigraphic and environmental relationships of the coal beds and associated rocks contribute to a depositional model for the upper part of the Fort Union Formation in the TA Hills.

  1. Acritarchs from Ponta Grossa Formation and their stratigraphic significance: Devonian of Parana basin

    SciTech Connect

    Dino, R.

    1983-03-01

    The Devonian fossil record in the Parana basin of Brazil is restricted to the Ponta Grossa Formation, a potential source rock unit. Paleontological studies of the macrofauna from this formation indicated an Early Devonian age. For this paper a wide range of surface samples and core samples from eight wells drilled by Pauliperto (a CESP-IPT joint venture) have been studied. Microplankton from the Devonian of the Parana basin never before described are presented here, together with their biostratigraphical and paleoecological implications. Intrabasinal and interbasinal correlations are also made. From a total of 60 species identified until now, twenty forms having well-defined stratigraphic ranges and broad (intercontinental) geographic representation are described herein. This assemblage is marked by the presence and diversity of the Subgroups Polygonomorphitae and Pteromorphitae. The Subgroup Acanthomorphitae is also well represented. The Emsian-Frasnian age previously established for the Ponta Grossa Formation through other palynological studies is further confirmed by the paleomicroplankton evidence. Moreover, the chronostratigraphic limits of these sediments may now be refined even further. Thus, depsite the presence of long-ranging forms, other species, such as Triangulina alargada, which is restricted to the Emsian in the La Vid Formation in northern Spain, allow a better chronostratigraphic subdivision of the Ponta Grossa Formation. The abundance of forms of Tasmanites together with a large quantity and diversity of microplankton provides the basis for the paleoecologic interpretations.

  2. Geology of the Molina Member of the Wasatch Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.; Nadon, G.; LaFreniere, L.

    1996-06-01

    The Molina Member of the Wasatch Formation has been cored in order to assess the presence/absence and character of microbial communities in the deep subsurface. Geological study of the Molina Member was undertaken in support of the microbiological tasks of this project, for the purposes of characterizing the host strata and of assessing the potential for post-depositional introduction of microbes into the strata. The Molina Member comprises a sandy fluvial unit within a formation dominated by mudstones. Sandy to conglomeratic deposits of braided and meandering fluvial systems are present on the western and eastern margins of the basin respectively, although the physical and temporal equivalence of these systems cannot be proven. Distal braided facies of planar-horizontal bedded sandstones are recognized on the western margin of the basin. Natural fractures are present in all Molina sandstones, commonly as apparent shear pairs. Core from the 1-M-18 well contains natural fractures similar to those found in outcrops, and has sedimentological affinities to the meandering systems of the eastern margin of the basin. The hydrologic framework of the Molina, and thus any potential post-depositional introduction of microbes into the formation, should have been controlled by approximately east-west flow through the natural fracture system, the geometries and extent of the sandstones in which the fractures occur, and hydraulic gradient. Migration to the well site, from outcropping recharge areas at the edge of the basin, could have started as early as 40 million years ago if the cored strata are connected to the eastern sedimentary system.

  3. Lagoa Feia Formation (Lower Cretaceous), Campos basin, offshore Brazil - Rift-Valley-Stage Lacustrine carbonate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Petrobras, T.; Carozzi, A.V.

    1985-02-01

    The Lagoa Feia Formation, buried in excess of 3000 m, is the exploration frontier of the prolific Campos basin. It contains the source beds of all the basin's oil in addition to having its own potential carbonate reservoirs. The faulted margins of the basin fed a system of alluvial fans, sand flats, and mud flats. Alternating dry and rainy period regulated the size and nature of contemporaneous basinal alkaline lakes. Dry periods corresponded to contracted playa lakes with ostracod carbonates and euxinic shales; rainy periods corresponded to expanded pluvial lakes with pelecypod banks. Subaqueous intrusions of basaltic magma generated hyaloclastites with kerolitic ooids and hyalotuffs. Petrographic analysis reveals 5 diagenetic stages: (1) syndepositional alteration of lithoclasts to trioctahedral smectites; (2) early dolomitization, early silicification, and cementation by bladed-rim calcite and zeolites; (3) freshwater-vadose dissolution of bioclasts and lithoclasts, freshwater-phreatic sparite cementation, and neomorphism; (4) mixed saline-freshwater silicification; and (5) burial with compaction, late dolomitization, and partial conversion of smectites to illite. Pelecypod limestones with primary interparticle, secondary intraparticle, moldic, and moldic-enlarged porosities are the potential reservoirs. Ideal conditions for porosity generation and preservation were subaerial exposure followed by rapid lake expansion and burial.

  4. BASINS

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Better Assessment Science Integrating Point and Nonpoint Sources (BASINS) is a multipurpose environmental analysis system designed to help regional, state, and local agencies perform watershed- and water quality-based studies.

  5. Lithofacies and cyclicity of the Yates Formation, Permian basin: Implications for reservoir heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Borer, J.M.; Harris, P.M. )

    1991-04-01

    Siliciclastics of the Yates Formation (Permian, upper Guadalupian) are significant hydrocarbon reservoirs in the US Permian basin. Subsurface and outcrop data show that the most porous lithofacies occur in a clastic-dominated middle shelf and that evaporitic inner shelf and carbonate outer shelf equivalents are mostly nonporous. Lithofacies relations and much of the heterogeneity in Yates reservoirs are related to the stacking of depositional sequences (i.e., siliciclastic-carbonate alternations and sandstone-argillaceous siltstone alternations) in response to three orders of orbitally forced, low-amplitude, eustatic variation. In general, siliciclastics dominated the Yates shelf during lowstand parts of asymmetric, 400-k.y. sea level fluctuations, whereas carbonates were deposited during sea level highstands. The character and position of sand depocenters on the Yates shelf during these lowstands were controlled by a longer duration third-order sea level variation. Shorter duration cycles controlled the heterogeneity within the 400-k.y. depositional sequences. The variation in cycle packaging, lithology, and reservoir quality between the Central Basin platform and Northwest shelf may be a response of eustatic variation on parts of the shelf with different slopes or subsidence profiles. The lithofacies described from the Yates Formation and the deposition model proposed to explain the stratigraphy may be valuable as analogs in other basins containing mixed siliciclastic-carbonate settings.

  6. Soft sediment deformation structures in the Maastrichtian Ajali Formation Western Flank of Anambra Basin, Southern Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olabode, Solomon Ojo

    2014-01-01

    Soft sediment deformation structures were recognized in the Maastrichtian shallow marine wave to tide influenced regressive sediments of Ajali Formation in the western flank of Anambra basin, southern Nigerian. The soft sediment deformation structures were in association with cross bedded sands, clay and silt and show different morphological types. Two main types recognised are plastic deformations represented by different types of recumbent folds and injection structure represented by clastic dykes. Other structures in association with the plastic deformation structures include distorted convolute lamination, subsidence lobes, pillars, cusps and sand balls. These structures are interpreted to have been formed by liquefaction and fluidization mechanisms. The driving forces inferred include gravitational instabilities and hydraulic processes. Facies analysis, detailed morphologic study of the soft sediment deformation structures and previous tectonic history of the basin indicate that the main trigger agent for deformation is earthquake shock. The soft sediment deformation structures recognised in the western part of Anambra basin provide a continuous record of the tectonic processes that acted on the regressive Ajali Formation during the Maastrichtian.

  7. Stratigraphy, sedimentology and paleontology of lower Eocene San Jose formation, central San Juan basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, S.G.; Smith, L.N. )

    1989-09-01

    The lower Eocene San Jose Formation in the central portion of the San Juan basin (Gobernador-Vigas Canyon area) consists of the Cuba Mesa, Regina, Llaves, and Tapicitos Members. Well log data indicate that, from its 100-m thickness, the Cuba Mesa Member thins toward the basin center and pinches out to the northeast by lat. 36{degree}40'N, long. 107{degree}19'W. The Regina Member has the most extensive outcrops in the central basin, and it decreases in sandstone/mud rock ratio to the north. The Llaves and Tapicitos Members occur only at the highest elevations, are thin due to erosion, and are not mappable as separate units. Well log data and 1,275 m of measured stratigraphic section in the Regina, Llaves, and Tapicitos Members indicate these strata are composed of approximately 35% medium to coarse-grained sandstone and 65% fine-grained sandstone and mud rock. Sedimentology and sediment-dispersal patterns indicate deposition by generally south-flowing streams that had sources to the northwest, northeast, and east. Low-sinuosity, sand-bedded, braided( ) streams shifted laterally across about 1 km-wide channel belts to produce sheet sandstones that are prominent throughout the San Jose Formation. Subtle levees separated channel environments from floodplain and local lacustrine areas. Avulsion relocated channels periodically to areas on the floodplain, resulting in the typically disconnected sheet sandstones within muddy overbank deposits of the Regina Member.

  8. Abo Formation alluvial facies and Associated Basin Fill, Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Speer, S.W.

    1986-03-01

    Outcrops of the Abo Formation (Wolfcampian to early Leonardian age) in the Sacramento Mountains of south-central New Mexico record the evolution of a dry alluvial fan system as it was deposited off the pedernal uplift into the Orogrande basin. The location and orientation of present-day outcrops allow us to observe an inferred east-to-west transverse facies tract consisting of: (1) proximal alluvial fans (lower Abo), which are contiguous in places with underlying Laborcita Formation fan-deltaic sediments; (2) medial anastomosed streams (middle Abo); and (3) distal low-gradient mud-dominated flood basins characterized by either distributary streams (upper Abo) or clastic tidal flats (Lee Ranch Tongue of the Abo) with associated marine carbonates (Pendejo Tongue of the Hueco Formation). Tectonism in the Pedernal highlands, which climaxed during the Late Pennsylvanian, apparently continued well into the Wolfcampian in this region, as evidenced by a major basal Abo unconformity and distinct stacked megasequences of lower Abo alluvial fan lithofacies. However, by the middle Abo, tectonic activity had quiesced and the uplift began eroding and retreating to the north and east. By the late Abo, a pediment surface had formed that was subsequently onlapped by upper Abo and eventually Yeso Formation sediments.

  9. Depositional history of the Lower Triassic Dinwoody Formation in the Wind River basin area, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, R.K.; Paull, R.A. )

    1993-04-01

    Thirty-three measured sections of the Dinwoody Formation, including five from the literature, provide information on thickness, lithology, paleontology, and stratigraphic relations within the Wind River basin and immediately adjacent areas of Wyoming. Most of these sections are in Fremont County, and some lie within the Wind River Indian Reservation. The Dinwoody becomes progressively thinner eastward, from a maximum thickness of 54.6 m in the northwestern Wind River Mountains to zero near the Natrona County line. The formation is characterized by yellowish-weathering, gray siltstone and silty shale. Variable amounts of limestone, sandstone, gypsum, and claystone are also present. Marine bivalves, gastropods, brachiopods (Lingula), and conodonts are common in the western part of the study area, but are absent to the northeast in gypsiferous strata, and near the eastern limit of Dinwoody deposition. The Dinwoody in the Wind River Basin area was deposited unconformably on the Upper Permian Ervary Member of the Park City Formation during the initial Mesozoic flood onto the Wyoming shelf during the Griesbachian, and represents the first of three Lower Triassic transgressive sequences in the western miogeocline. Conodonts of the Isarcica Chronozone document the rapid nature of this eastward transgression. The Permian surface underlying the Dinwoody rarely shows evidence of the long hiatus separating rocks of this age and earliest Triassic deposits. The Dinwoody transgression was followed by westward progradation of the Red Peak Formation of the Chugwater Group across the study area.

  10. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest Mancini

    2000-12-31

    Part 3 (Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation) objectives are to provide an analysis of the Smackover petroleum system in Years 4 and 5 of the project and to transfer effectively the research results to producers through workshops and topical reports. Work Accomplished (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - Basin flow modeling has been completed and the modeling results are being interpreted for report writing (Table 1). Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum source rocks has been integrated into the basin flow model. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum reservoirs continues. The cores to be described have been identified and many of the cores for the eastern part of the basin have been described. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Work on reservoir diagenesis has been initiated. Samples from the cores selected for the reservoir characterization are being used for this task. Work Planned (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - The report on basin flow will be completed. Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Petroleum source rock data will be reviewed in light of the basin flow model results. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Characterization of petroleum reservoirs will continue through core studies. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Characterization of reservoir diagenesis will continue through petrographic analysis.

  11. Permian Bone Spring formation: Sandstone play in the Delaware basin. Part I - slope

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, S.L.

    1997-08-01

    New exploration in the Permian (Leonardian) Bone Spring formation has indicated regional potential in several sandstone sections across portions of the northern Delaware basin. Significant production has been established in the first, second, and third Bone Spring sandstones, as well as in a new reservoir interval, the Avalon sandstone, above the first Bone Spring sandstone. These sandstones were deposited as submarine-fan systems within the northern Delaware basin during periods of lowered sea level. The Bone Spring as a whole consists of alternating carbonate and siliciclastic intervals representing the downdip equivalents to thick Abo-Yeso/Wichita-Clear Fork carbonate buildups along the Leonardian shelf margin. Hydrocarbon exploration in the Bone Spring has traditionally focused on debris-flow carbonate deposits restricted to the paleoslope. Submarine-fan systems, in contrast, extend a considerable distance basinward of these deposits and have been recently proven productive as much as 40-48 km south of the carbonate trend.

  12. Morphology of large impact craters and basins on Venus: Implications for ring formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexopoulos, Jim S.; McKinnon, William B.

    1993-03-01

    A nearly complete examination of the Magellan radar data for the Venusian surface reveals 72 unequivocal peak-ring craters and 4 larger structures that we interpret to be multiringed. This report updates our earlier studies and that of the Magellan team. The general morphology of peak-ring craters, decreasing ring diameter ratio trends with increasing crater diameter, and the general size-morphology progression from complex central-peak crater to peak-ring crater on Venus and the terrestrial planets suggest similar processes of peak-ring formation. Observations are consistent with a model of dynamic collapse, downward and outward, of an unstable central peak to form a ring. We interpret the four larger ringed structures (Klenova, Lise Meitner, Mead, and Isabella) to be morphologically similar to the Orientale Basin on the Moon, and thus, true multiringed basins.

  13. Morphology of large impact craters and basins on Venus: Implications for ring formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexopoulos, Jim S.; Mckinnon, William B.

    1993-01-01

    A nearly complete examination of the Magellan radar data for the Venusian surface reveals 72 unequivocal peak-ring craters and 4 larger structures that we interpret to be multiringed. This report updates our earlier studies and that of the Magellan team. The general morphology of peak-ring craters, decreasing ring diameter ratio trends with increasing crater diameter, and the general size-morphology progression from complex central-peak crater to peak-ring crater on Venus and the terrestrial planets suggest similar processes of peak-ring formation. Observations are consistent with a model of dynamic collapse, downward and outward, of an unstable central peak to form a ring. We interpret the four larger ringed structures (Klenova, Lise Meitner, Mead, and Isabella) to be morphologically similar to the Orientale Basin on the Moon, and thus, true multiringed basins.

  14. Basin formation and Neogene sedimentation in a backarc setting, Halmahera, eastern Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R. ); Nichols, G.J. )

    1991-03-01

    It has been proposed that basins in backarc setting form in association with subduction by thinning of continental crust, backarc spreading in oceanic crust, compression, or trapping of pieces of oceanic plate behind an arc. The Halmahera basin in eastern Indonesia developed in a backarc setting but does not fall into these categories; it formed by subsidence of thickened crust made up of imbricated Mesozoic-Paleogene arc and ophiolite rocks. Halmahera lies at the western edge of the Philippine Sea Plate in a complex zone of convergence between the Eurasian margin, the oceanic plates of the West Pacific, and the Australian/Indian Plate to the south. The basement is an imbricated complex of Mesozoic to Paleogene ophiolite, arc, and arc-related rocks. During the Miocene this basement complex formed an area of thickened crust upon which carbonate reef and reef-associated sediments were deposited. The authors interpret this shallow marine region to be similar to many of the oceanic plateaus and ridges found within the Philippine Sea Plate today. In the Late Miocene, convergence between the Philippine Sea Plate and the Eurasian margin resulted in the formation of the Halmahera Trench to the west of this region of thickened crust. Subduction of the Molucca Sea Plate caused the development of a volcanic island arc. Subsidence in the backarc area produced a broad sedimentary basin filled by clastics eroded from the arc and from uplifted basement and cover rocks. The basin was asymmetric with the thickest sedimentary fill on the western side, against the volcanic arc. The Halmahera basin was modified in the Plio-Pleistocene by east-west compression as the Molucca Sea Plate was eliminated by subduction.

  15. Hydrogeologic investigations of the Miocene Nogales Formation in the Nogales Area, Upper Santa Cruz Basin, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, William R.; Gray, Floyd; Bultman, Mark W.; Menges, Christopher M.

    2016-07-28

    Hydrogeologic investigations were conducted to evaluate the groundwater resource potential for the Miocene Nogales Formation in the Nogales area, southern Arizona. Results indicate that parts of the formation may provide new, deeper sources of groundwater for the area. Geologic mapping determined the hydrogeologic framework of the formation by defining lithologic, mineralogic, and stratigraphic characteristics; identifying potential aquifers and confining units; and mapping faults and fractures which likely influence groundwater flow. Geophysical modeling was used to determine the basin geometry and thickness of the Nogales Formation and younger alluvial aquifers and to identify target areas (deep subbasins) which may prove to be productive aquifers.Volcaniclastic sandstone samples from the formation were analyzed for porosity, bulk density, saturated hydraulic conductivity, and fabric. Effective porosity ranges from 16 to 42 percent, bulk density from 1.6 to 2.47 grams per cubic centimeter, and saturated hydraulic conductivity (SHC) from 4 to 57 centimeters per day (4.9×10-5 to 6.7×10-4 centimeters per second). Thin sections show that sandstone framework grains consist of quartz, feldspar, biotite, hornblende, pumice, volcanic glass, and opaque minerals. The matrix in most samples consists of pumice fragments, and some contain predominantly silt and clay. Samples with a mostly silt and clay matrix have lower porosity and SHC compared to samples with mostly pumice, which have higher and wider ranges of porosity and SHC. Pore space in the Nogales Formation sediments includes moldic, intercrystalline, and fracture porosity. Some intercrystalline pore space is partially filled with calcite cement. About one third of the samples contain fractures, which correspond to fractures noted in outcrops in all members of the formation.Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses indicate that most of the samples contained the zeolite clinoptilolite

  16. Facies analysis and petroleum potential of Smackover Formation, western and northern areas, East Texas basin

    SciTech Connect

    Hancharik, J.M.

    1983-03-01

    The Smackover Formation (Upper Jurassic) in northeast Texas is a transgressive-regressive carbonate sequence which has been extensively dolomitized. The Smackover Formation is subdivided informally into a lower and upper member based on distinctive lithologic characteristics. The lower member, which rests conformably on the fluvial-deltaic sandstones of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation, contains a laminated, organic carbonate mudstone facies that grades into an overlying locally fossiliferous, pelletalmicritic facies. The upper member of the Smackover Formation consists mainly of broken skeletal debris and pelletal allochems in a micritic matrix. The sediments are better winnowed and better sorted upward in the sequence. Interbedded with and overlying the skeletal-pelletal facies is a clean well-sorted dolomitized oolitic-grainstone facies. This upper-most informal member marks the beginning of a progradational sequence which lasts throughout the remainder of Smackover deposition and continues through deposition of the evaporities and red beds of the overlying Buckner Formation. Most of the Smackover production in northeast Texas occurs along the Mexia-Talco fault zone in the deeper gentle salt-related anticlines and salt-graben systems. Reservoir rocks are primarily leached and dolomitized oolitic grainstones and dolomite. Laminated organic carbonate mudstones which characterize the lower, transgressive phase of the Smackover Formation provide an excellent source rock for petroleum. Exploration targets for the Smackover Formation are the areas were dolomitized oolitic and skeletal grainstones occur on top of structurally high areas such as over salt ridges or swells in the deeper portions of the basin.

  17. Facies correlation and basin analysis of Ivishak Formation, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    McMillen, K.J.; Colvin, M.D.

    1985-04-01

    The Ivishak Formation forms a regressive-transgressive deposit. The stratigraphic divisions are (1) a lower prograding deltaic unit of massive sandstone; (2) a middle fluvial unit of sandstone, shale, and minor conglomerate; and (3) an upper destructive deltaic unit of thin-bedded to massive sandstone, these Ivishak units defined in ANWR are recognized in the subsurface and traced over much of the North Slope. Basin analysis consisted of isopach and percent-sandstone mapping and paleocurrent measurement of 15 outcrops. Formation thickness averages 400 ft (120 m) with a northeast-trending depocenter axis through the Romanzof Mountains. Paleocurrent data define two main provenances of quartz-chert sands: northeast and east. Paleocurrents are oriented normal to, and dip toward, the basin axis. Outcrops located within the axis record bidirectional transport. A Lower Cretaceous unconformity (LCU) truncates the Ivishak in the Sadlerochit Mountains. Here, Neocomian pebble shale rests atop the Ivishak, with Shublik through Kingak formations missing. The LCU truncation is part of a regional unconformity that occurs along the north side of the North Slope. Ivishak units thin near the unconformity, suggesting an older high, which the authors term the Nularvik high. This high is part of a regional trend extending through ANWR from the Point Thomson area to bathtub syncline.

  18. Eustatic control on epicontinental basins: The example of the Stuttgart Formation in the Central European Basin (Middle Keuper, Late Triassic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, M.; Nowak, K.; Berner, U.; Heunisch, C.; Bandel, K.; Röhling, H.-G.; Wolfgramm, M.

    2014-11-01

    The deposition of the Stuttgart Formation ('Schilfsandstein'), commonly considered as a type-example of the Carnian Pluvial Event, was controlled by high frequent 4th order sequences that resulted in pre-, intra- and post-Schilfsandstein transgressions from Tethyan waters into the epicontinental Central European Basin (CEB). The pre-Schilfsandstein transgression flooded the CEB trough gates to the Southeast and resulted in a wide-spread inland sea that was characterised by increased biological productivity, predominantly oxic conditions and enabled the immigration of euryhaline marine fauna with plankton, ostracodes, fishes, bivalves and the gastropods Omphaloptychia suebica n. sp. and Settsassia stuttgartica n. sp. The rather short-term intra- and post-Schilfsandstein transgressions flooded the CEB from the Southwest and Southeast and established a shallow brackish inland sea that stretched up to North Germany. Both, the 4th and 3rd order sequences derived from the succession in the CEB correlate well with those derived from successions of Tethyan shelfs. Therefore pronounced circum-Tethyan eustatic cycles are evidenced and may have had considerable impact on prominent middle Carnian events: Reingraben turnover, Carnian Pluvial Event, Carnian Crisis and Mid Carnian Wet Intermezzo. The broad circum-Tethyan evidence of 106-year scale cycles suggests glacioeustatic sea-level changes even in the Triassic Greenhouse period.

  19. A study of models and controls for basin formation during continental collision: (1) Australian lithosphere along Banda orogen (Indonesia) and (2) Alboran Sea basin (western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandon, Kush

    Mechanisms for the formation of a foreland basin at the beginning of continental collision (Pliocene-Recent Australian continental foreland along the Banda orogen) and a post-orogenic, continental, Miocene extensional basin (Alboran Sea) are studied. Such a study investigates the controls on the basin formation during the start of the Wilson cycle and later during the break up of a thickened continent in a collisional environment. Effective Elastic Thickness (EET) of the Australian continental lithosphere from Roti to the Kai Plateau ({˜}121sp°{-}137sp°E longitude) are estimated using an elastic-half beam model to match the sea floor bathymetry and the Bouguer gravity anomalies. Range of constant EET values from 27-75 km across the shelf of Australian lithosphere shows a variation of 64% with the highest value in the vicinity of central Timor where the collision is most advanced. Downdip on the Australian continental lithosphere from shelf to beneath the Banda orogen, the reduction in EET is from ˜90 km-˜30 km (66%). Variations in EET can be explained by inelastic yielding (brittle and plastic failure, crust-mantle decoupling in the lower crust and brittle-ductile decoupling in the upper-middle crust) in the Australian lithosphere. Change in EET occurred at the start of continental subduction due to change in curvature, both in map and cross-sectional view. Oroclinal bending of the continental Australian lithosphere increased the inelastic failure in the eastern end. Different mechanisms of basin formation at a site of post-orogenic collapse are studied by constraining the timing of rifting in the western, eastern, and northern parts of the Alboran Sea basin on seismic reflectors via synthetic seismograms using ODP Leg 161 and Andalucia A-1 data. Regions of adjacent coeval compression and extension are found in the Alboran Sea basin. Normal faulting continues in parts of the eastern Alboran Sea basin later than in the western Alboran Sea basin. The development

  20. Simplified stratigraphic cross sections of the Eocene Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dietrich, John D.; Johnson, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Thirteen stratigraphic cross sections of the Eocene Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin of northwestern Colorado are presented in this report. Originally published in a much larger and more detailed form by Self and others (2010), they are shown here in simplified, page-size versions that are easily accessed and used for presentation purposes. Modifications to the original versions include the elimination of the detailed lithologic columns and oil-yield histograms from Fischer assay data and the addition of ground-surface lines to give the depth of the various oil shale units shown on the cross section.

  1. 3D structure and formation of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Møre Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjoberg, Sigurd; Schmiedel, Tobias; Planke, Sverre; Svensen, Henrik H.; Galland, Oliver; Jerram, Dougal A.

    2016-04-01

    The mid-Norwegian Møre margin is regarded as a type example of a volcanic rifted margin, with its formation usually related to the influence of the Icelandic plume activity. The area is characterized by the presence of voluminous basaltic complexes such as extrusive lava sequences, intrusive sills and dikes, and hydrothermal vent complexes within the Møre Basin. Emplacement of hydrothermal vent complexes is accommodated by deformation of the host rock. The edges of igneous intrusions mobilize fluids by heat transfer into the sedimentary host rock (aureoles). Fluid expansion may lead to formation of piercing structures due to upward fluid migration. Hydrothermal vent complexes induce bending of overlying strata, leading to the formation of dome structures at the paleo-surface. These dome structures are important as they indicate the accommodation created for the intrusions by deformation of the upper layers of the stratigraphy, and may form important structures in many volcanic margins. Both the morphological characteristics of the upper part and the underlying feeder-structure (conduit-zone) can be imaged and studied on 3D seismic data. Seismic data from the Tulipan prospect located in the western part of the Møre Basin have been used in this study. The investigation focusses on (1) the vent complex geometries, (2) the induced surface deformation patterns, (3) the relation to the intrusions (heat source), as well as (4) the emplacement depth of the hydrothermal vent complexes. We approach this by doing a detailed 3D seismic interpretation of the Tulipan seismic data cube. The complexes formed during the initial Eocene, and are believed to be a key factor behind the rapid warming event called the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). The newly derived understanding of age, eruptive deposits, and formation of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Møre Basin enables us to contribute to the general understanding of the igneous plumbing system in volcanic basins and

  2. Basin and range-age reactivation of the ancestral Rocky Mountains in Texas Panhandle: evidence from Ogallala Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Budnik, R.T.

    1984-04-01

    The Ogallala Formation (Neogene) is a widespread syntectonic alluvial apron that was shed eastward from the Rio Grande rift and related uplifts in Colorado and New Mexico during Basin and Range extension. In the Texas Panhandle, the Ogallala completely buried Ancestral Rocky Mountain (Pennsylvanian) structures. Renewed movement on these older structures during the Neogene influenced the thickness and facies distribution of the Ogallala. The Ogallala thickens into the Palo Duro, Dalhart, and Anadarko basins. Major distributary channels on Ogallala alluvial fans coincide with the axes of these basins, whereas major interchannel areas overlie intervening uplifts. Second-order structures subtly influenced the unit as well. For example, the Carson basin, a Pennsylvanian rhomb graben along the Amarillo uplift, the Ogallala is over 250 m (820 ft) thick compared with 90 m (275 ft) in adjacent areas. Within the Palo Duro basin, local highs controlled the distribution of thin, interchannel flood-basin and lacustrine deposits. Thicker, braided-stream channel deposits follow local lows. Later movement on the Amarillo uplift broadly folded the Ogallala. The southern high plains surface subtly reflects basement structure, with topographic highs overlying basement highs, suggesting post-Ogallala deformation within the Palo Duro basin. The Amarillo uplift is approximately perpendicular to the Rio Grande rift and parallel to the direction of Basin and Range extension. Thus, the stress field that produced the rift may have caused strike-slip movement and reactivation of the Carson basin along the Amarillo uplift.

  3. First occurrence of the Salvador Formation in the Jatobá Basin (Pernambuco, Northeast Brazil): Facies characterization and depositional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Bruno Ludovico Dihl; Melo Ferrer de Morais, Débora

    2016-12-01

    Fan deltas, constituting proximal depositional systems adjacent to boundary faults, are common features associated with rift basins. The Cretaceous fan delta systems of the Salvador Formation, deposited during the rift phase of the Recôncavo-Tucano-Jatobá Basin, were first reported in the Recôncavo Basin and later discovered in the Tucano Basin. Because of the absence of any outcrops in the Jatobá Basin until now, these alluvial fans were interpreted solely through seismic analysis. We report the first revealed outcrops of the Salvador Formation in that basin and characterize their depositional systems as interlayered with the lacustrine Candeias Formation. Based on facies and architecture, the alluvial system can be subdivided into three associations: (1) proximal fan delta, characterized by meter-scale conglomerate bodies with a predominance of boulders and cobbles with thin sandstone layers; (2) distal fan delta, characterized by sheet-like pebble conglomerate and sandstone layers with flame and load structures; and (3) lacustrine, further subdivided into shallow lake facies reddish shales and mudstones with oolitic limestones and deep lake facies grey to green shales with pyrite. Paleocurrent measurements for the proximal fan association show paleoflow direction varying from SW to SE, which is expected for the rift phase alluvial system. The Recôncavo-Tucano-Jatobá rift system has two conglomeratic units, namely the Salvador and Marizal Formations, the former a syn-rift and the latter a post-rift unit. The absence of sedimentary clasts in the conglomerates, very low maturity, the presence of giant clasts, and a visible relationship between boundary faults in the outcrop, define the syn-rift Salvador Formation characteristics. Based on the facies and paleocurrent analyses, the Salvador Formation deposits in Jatobá Basin were interpreted as a deposition of a debris flow-dominated fan delta, indicating the lacustrine setting represented by the Candeias

  4. Synextensional basin evolution, lower Miocene Clews Formation, central Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect

    Fillmore, R.P.; Walker, J.D. )

    1991-02-01

    The lower Miocene Clews Formation at Alvord Mountain, Mojave Desert, California, consists of up to 400 m of coarsening-upward continental deposits. During the initial stage of basin development, the depocenter was delineated by a lacustrine system that was bound to the west by alluvial fans and graded northward into a south-flowing fluvial braidplain. Lacustrine strata, composed of claystone, siltstone and carbonate, suggest an initially closed basin. Conglomerate and sandstone to the west represent small, sheetflood-dominated fans and contain igneous clasts and southeasterly paleoflow indicative of a proximal, relatively low relief source in the western Alvord Mountains. The second stage of deposition was dominated by coarse conglomerate and megabreccia with west-southwesterly paleotransport indicators and a distinctive metaigneous petrofacies that indicate a provenance in the Cronese Hills, 8 km to the east. These strata reflect rapid westward progradation of debris flow-dominated alluvial fans that advanced across the facia braidplain, eventually onlapping the smaller Alvord Mountain sourced fans across the basin. Influx of sediment from the paradise Range ceased. Based development resulted from regional northeast-southwest extensional deformation. The Alvord Mountain-Cronese Hills region was transported northeast as a single block on an east-dipping, low-angle normal fault associated with the Waterman Hills core complex 30 km to the west. Development of westward prograding fans is believed to record subsequence propagation of a northwest-trending, west-dipping normal fault associated with, but antithetic to the low-angle master fault.

  5. Generation and expulsion of petroleum and gas from Almond Formation Coal, Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Gonzalez, M.; Surdam, R.C.; Lee, M.L.

    1997-01-01

    Petrographic and geochemical studies of coal from the Almond Formation in the Greater Green River basin demonstrate that the coal contains important volumes of stored liquid petroleum, as well as methane. Modeling indicates that at the basin center, most of the oil generated in the coal has been thermally cracked to gas, whereas at the basin flank the oil-to-gas reaction has barely proceeded. Several new concepts are presented about the mechanism of petroleum generation in coal based on (1) natural maturation trends gleaned form examination of Almond coal samples from different burial depths and (2) similar maturation trends observed in hydrous pyrolysis experiments using immature Almond coal samples. These new concepts show that the oil in the coal was generated during the alteration of desmocollinite and liptinite macerals to exsudatinite (waxy oil) and inertinite solid residue; that the waxy oil was initially stored in porous structures and subsequently in vesicles as the coal matured under increasing temperature; that primary migration of the oil occurred as the generation of a sufficient volume of exsudatinite microfractured the vitrinite-semifusinite vesicles, interconnecting vesicles and pores; and that the thermal cracking of exsudatinite generated a sufficient volume of gas to fracture the vesiculated coal as pore pressure increased and allowed migration of hydrocarbons out of the coal.

  6. Diagenesis and porosity evolution of tight sand reservoirs in Carboniferous Benxi Formation, Southeast Ordos Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Peng; Yu, Xinghe; Shan, Xin; Su, Dongxu; Wang, Jiao; Li, Yalong; Shi, Xin; Xu, Liqiang

    2016-04-01

    The Ordos Basin, situated in west-central China, is one of the oldest and most important fossil-fuel energy base, which contains large reserves of coal, oil and natural gas. The Upper Palaeozoic strata are widely distributed with rich gas-bearing and large natural gas resources, whose potential is tremendous. Recent years have witnessed a great tight gas exploration improvement of the Upper Paleozoic in Southeastern Ordos basin. The Carboniferous Benxi Formation, mainly buried more than 2,500m, is the key target strata for hydrocarbon exploration, which was deposited in a barrier island and tidal flat environment. The sandy bars and flats are the favorable sedimentary microfacies. With an integrated approach of thin-section petrophysics, constant velocity mercury injection test, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry, diagenesis and porosity evolution of tight sand reservoirs of Benxi Formation were analyzed in detail. The result shows that the main lithology of sandstone in this area is dominated by moderately to well sorted quartz sandstone. The average porosity and permeability is 4.72% and 1.22mD. The reservoirs of Benxi Formation holds a variety of pore types and the pore throats, with obvious heterogeneity and poor connection. Based on the capillary pressure curve morphological characteristics and parameters, combined with thin section and phycical property data, the reservoir pore structure of Benxi Formation can be divided into 4 types, including mid pore mid throat type(I), mid pore fine throat type(II), small pore fine throat type(III) and micro pro micro throat type(Ⅳ). The reservoirs primarily fall in B-subsate of middle diagenesis and late diagenesis, which mainly undergo compaction, cmentation, dissolution and fracturing process. Employing the empirical formula of different sorting for unconsolideated sandstone porosity, the initial sandstone porosity is 38.32% on average. Quantitative evaluation of the increase and decrease of

  7. Chemical composition and geologic history of saline waters in Aux Vases and Cypress Formations, Illinois Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demir, I.; Seyler, B.

    1999-01-01

    Seventy-six samples of formation waters were collected from oil wells producing from the Aux Vases or Cypress Formations in the Illinois Basin. Forty core samples of the reservoir rocks were also collected from the two formations. Analyses of the samples indicated that the total dissolved solids content (TDS) of the waters ranged from 43,300 to 151,400 mg/L, far exceeding the 35,400 mg/mL of TDS found in typical seawater. Cl-Br relations suggested that high salinities in the Aux Vases and Cypress formation waters resulted from the evaporation of original seawater and subsequent mixing of the evaporated seawater with concentrated halite solutions. Mixing with the halite solutions increased Na and Cl concentrations and diluted the concentration of other ions in the formation waters. The elemental concentrations were influenced further by diagenetic reactions with silicate and carbonate minerals. Diagenetic signatures revealed by fluid chemistry and rock mineralogy delineated the water-rock interactions that took place in the Aux Vases and Cypress sandstones. Dissolution of K-feldspar released K into the solution, leading to the formation of authigenic illite and mixed-layered illite/smectite. Some Mg was removed from the solution by the formation of authigenic chlorite and dolomite. Dolomitization, calcite recrystallization, and contribution from clay minerals raised Sr levels significantly in the formation waters. The trend of increasing TDS of the saline formation waters with depth can be explained with density stratification. But, it is difficult to explain the combination of the increasing TDS and increasing Ca/Na ratio with depth without invoking the controversial 'ion filtration' mechanism.

  8. The Stratigraphy of the Aquitanian-Burdigalian Asmari Formation of Lorestan Sub-Basin, Iran: an Inclusive Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lankarani, M.; Amini, A.; Swennen, R.

    2012-04-01

    The Asmari Formation is the most important hydrocarbon reservoir in the oilfields of the Zagros pro-foreland basin. The shallow carbonates of this formation have been producing oil for nearly one century. However, detailed stratigraphic aspects of this significant rock unit in some parts of the basin, especially Lorestan sub-basin, are poorly studied. So, because of the necessity, several outcrops of the Asmari Formation in this region were inclusively studied in the framework of this project. The Lorestan sub-basin is a narrow, northwest-southeast trending intrashelf depression in the Zagros basin which is created during the Mesozoic. By the end of Mesozoic, continental collision between Iran and Arabian plates resulted in the formation of the Zagros fold-thrust belt and its associated pro-foreland basin, in which the Asmari Formation was deposited. Detailed paleontological investigations done by this study (based on the distribution of the index fossils) showed that age range of the Asmari Formation in this region is Aquitanian-Burdigalian. The main grain associations forming the facies of the formation were found rhodoliths, large benthic foraminifera (rotaliids), green algae, bivalves (mostly oysters), bryozoans, and echinoderms. The biotic associations suggest that carbonate sedimentation took place in tropical waters under oligotrophic conditions. This Aquitanian-Burdigalian carbonate deposits, which were deposited on an oligotrophic tropical carbonate ramp developed in a foredeep tectonic setting, have unconformable boundaries with the overlying and underlying formations. Comprehensive sequence stratigraphic investigations proved that deposition of the Asmari Formation in the studied region has been generally coincident with a transgressive event during the time of global second order sea-level highstand. So, the whole Asmari rock unit in the Lorestan sub-basin comprises a supersequence formed as a result of the second-order eustatic sea-level changes

  9. Map showing structure contours on the top of the upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crysdale, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies (MF) maps showing computer-generated structure contours, isopachs, and cross sections of selected formations in the Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana. The map and cross sections were constructed from information stored in a U.S. Geological Survey Evolution of Sedimentary Basins data base. This data base contains picks of geologic formation and (or) unit tops and bases determined from electric resistivity and gamma-ray logs of 8,592 wells penetrating Tertiary and older rocks in the Powder River basin. Well completion cards (scout tickets) were reviewed and compared with copies of all logs, and formation or unit contacts determined by N. M. Denson, D.L. Macke, R. R. Schumann and others. This isopach map is based on information from 2,429 of these wells that penetrate the Minnelusa Formation and equivalents.

  10. Tectonics and sedimentation of Oligo-Miocene Vasquez Formation, Soledad basin, southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrix, E.D.

    1987-05-01

    The nonmarine Oligo-Miocene Vasquez Formation represents the earliest sedimentation within the Soledad basin. Basin analysis of this unit provides important clues to the tectonic regimen during the convergent/transform-margin transition in southern California during the mid-Tertiary. The Vasquez crops out in three separate subbasins or depocenters; from south to north, these are the Vasquez Rocks, Texas Canyon, and Charlie Canyon subbasins. Basaltic-andesitic volcanism and rapid subsidence punctuated the initial rifting event which generated the Vasquez Rocks half-graben and Texas Canyon graben. Small, thick alluvial fans were shed into these two subbasins, with sediment derived via erosion of local plutonic, metamorphic, and volcanic source terranes. A minimum of four discrete uplift events generated development of 250 to 600-m thick, upward-fining alluvial megacycles in both the Vasquez Rocks and Texas Canyon depocenters. In the absence of biostratigraphic control, these allocyclic megasequences provide a tangible means of lithostratigraphic correlation between these separate subbasins. A major uplift and drainage basin reorganization event subsequently modified the Vasquez depositional system, facilitating physical interconnection of the two southern subbasins. The northernmost subbasin, Charlie Canyon, is characterized by a single, thick, upward-coarsening alluvial fan sequence. There are no megacycles or clast suites to suggest interconnection with or evolutionary similarities to the other two depocenters. This sedimentologic uniqueness may support a mid-Tertiary palinspastic reconstruction which places the Charlie Canyon region 80-100 km northwest of its current location. Soledad basin rifting and Vasquez sedimentation are consistent with a tectonic model involving lithospheric extension north of the unstable Mendocino triple junction.

  11. Formation and variability of the Lofoten basin vortex in a high-resolution ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Denis L.; Kubryakov, Arseny A.; Lumpkin, Rick

    2015-11-01

    The Lofoten Basin of the Norwegian Sea is characterized by a local maximum of eddy kinetic energy and it is an important transit region for the warm and saline Atlantic waters on their way towards the Arctic Ocean. Eddies are generated by the Norwegian Atlantic Current and propagate anticlockwise around the center of the basin. In situ and satellite observations have discovered a rather small (with a radius of a few tens of km), but strong quasi-permanent anticyclonic vortex that resides in the center of the Lofoten Basin near 3°E, 69.8°N. The objective of this paper is to understand how and why the vortex is formed and to investigate what processes support its stability and drive its variability. To achieve this objective, we have conducted three high-resolution numerical experiments with the mean horizontal grid spacing of 18 km, 9 km, and 4 km. The Lofoten Vortex did not form in the 18-km experiment. The most realistic (compared to available observations) simulation of the vortex is provided by the 4-km experiment, which better reproduces eddy variability in the region. The experiments thus provide experimental evidence of the importance of eddies in the formation and stability of the vortex. We demonstrate how anticyclonic eddies, that are usually stronger and more numerous in the basin than cyclonic eddies, contribute to the intensification of the Lofoten Vortex. The Lofoten Vortex itself is not stationary and drifts cyclonically within the area bounded by approximately the 3250 m isobath. The analysis of the barotropic vorticity budget in the 4-km experiment shows that the advection of the relative vorticity gradient by eddies is the main mechanism that drives the variability of the Lofoten Vortex. The direct impact of wind/buoyancy forcing is found to be small to negligible.

  12. Nahcolite Resources in the Green River Formation, Piceance Basin, Northwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brownfield, Michael E.; Johnson, Ronald C.; Self, Jesse G.; Mercier, Tracey J.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed an assessment of in-place nahcolite (NaHCO3) resources in the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado. Nahcolite is present in the oil shale deposits of the Parachute Creek Member of the Eocene Green River Formation. It occurs as disseminated aggregates, nodules, bedded units of disseminated brown crystals, and white crystalline beds associated with dawsonite (NaAl(OH)2CO3) and halite (NaCl). The nahcolite-bearing facies are divided into an unleached part containing the nahcolite and halite, which is estimated to be as much as 1,130 ft thick, and an upper leached part several hundred feet thick containing minor nahcolite aggregates and nodules. Locally, thick beds of halite and brown fine-grained nahcolite lie in the depocenter of the basin, but thin laterally away from the basin center and grade into beds of white, coarse-grained nahcolite. In the central part of the study area, the top of the nahcolite-bearing rocks range in depth from about 1,300 to 2,000 ft. Dissolution of water-soluble minerals, mostly nahcolite and halite, in the upper part of the nahcolite-bearing facies has created a collapsed leached zone as much as 580 ft thick that consists of laterally continuous units of solution breccia and fractured oil shale containing solution cavities. The top of the leached zone is not yet defined in the basin, but it probably extends into the A groove in the upper part of the Parachute Creek Member.

  13. Sedimentary facies and sequence stratigraphy of the Asmari Formation at Chaman-Bolbol, Zagros Basin, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirshahkarami, Mahnaz; Vaziri-Moghaddam, Hossein; Taheri, Azizolah

    2007-03-01

    The Oligocene-Miocene Asmari Formation of the Zagros Basin is a thick sequence of shallow water carbonate. In the study area, it is subdivided into 14 microfacies that are distinguished on the basis of their depositional textures, petrographic analysis and fauna. Based on the paleoecology and lithology, four distinct depositional settings can be recognized: tidal flat, lagoon, barrier, and open marine. The Asmari Formation represents sedimentation on a carbonate ramp. In the inner ramp, the most abundant lithofacies are medium grained wackestone-packstone with imperforated foraminifera. The middle ramp is represented by packstone-grainstone to floatstone with a diverse assemblage of larger foraminifera with perforate wall, red algae, bryozoa, and echinoids. The outer ramp is dominated by argillaceous wackestone characterized by planktonic foraminifera and large and flat nummulitidae and lepidocyclinidae. Three third-order depositional sequences are recognized from deepening and shallowing trends in the depositional facies, changes in cycle stacking patterns, and sequence boundary features.

  14. Studies of the Permian Phosphoria Formation and related rocks, Great Basin-Rocky Mountain region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wardlaw, Bruce R.

    1979-01-01

    PART A: The transgression of the Permian Retort Phosphatic Shale Member of the Phosphoria Formation is dated by the occurrence of diagnostic brachiopods. The complex pattern of this transgression reflects the paleogeography and indicates two initial basins of deposition: one in southwestern Montana and one in southeastern Idaho. PART B: A new formation is proposed for middle Permian rocks of a transitional facies positioned laterally between the Rex Chert Member of the Phosphoria Formation in northeastern Utah and southeastern Idaho and the Plympton Formation in northeastern Nevada and northwestern Utah. PART C: The relationships of the Permian Park City Group to the Phosphoria and Park City Formations are clarified by the stratigraphy of four sections in northwestern Utah, northeastern Nevada, and southern Idaho. PART D: Five biostratigraphic zones based on the distribution of brachiopods and conodonts are proposed for the Park City Group. They are: the Peniculauris ivesi-Neostreptognathodus prayi Zone, the Peniculauris bassi-Neostreptognathodus sulcoplicatus Zone, the Peniculauris bassi-Neostreptognathodus sp. C Zone, the Thamnosia depressa Zone, and the Yakovlevia. multistriata-Neogondolella bitteri Zone. They range in age from Leonardian to Wordian.

  15. Geology and geochemistry of the La Luna Formation type sections in the Maracaibo basin, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Baptista, N.; Scherer, W.

    1996-08-01

    The Upper Cretaceous La Luna Formation is the most important source rock of hydrocarbons in Western Venezuela. Curiously enough it has two type sections, the formation was first defined in 1926 in Perija on the western flank of the Maracaibo basin; 30 years later the La Aguada, Chejende and Timbetes members were defined 260 km toward the east, on the shelf of the basin. The purpose of this study is to compare these sections and to define the vertical and horizontal variability of geological and geochemical characteristics that might have influenced the generation of hydrocarbons. The study consisted of detailed, bed level sampling, macroscopic sedimentary descriptions, petrography of 168 thin sections with 40 variables recorded in a statistical data matrix for determination of lithomicrofacies, as well as geochemical analysis of total organic carbon (TOC), visual kerogen, Rock-Eval pyrolysis and gas chromatography. The western type section is characterized by alternating thinly laminated and massive bedded limestones. Thermally immature, amorphous organic matter of marine origin is abundant in this section; TOC values range from 0.23% to 8.56%, generally increasing toward the top. Hydrogen index values range from 327 to 1078, indicating good to excellent oil generating potential. The eastern type sections have a higher level of thermal maturity; they show increasing amounts of clastic material, less authigenic minerals and abundant Favreina sp crab fecal pellets. The mainly terrestrially derived organic matter concentrations are considerably less, ranging from 0.07 to 3.39, again increasing toward the top of the section.

  16. Mineral deposit formation in Phanerozoic sedimentary basins of north-east Africa: the contribution of weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germann, Klaus; Schwarz, Torsten; Wipki, Mario

    1994-12-01

    The intra- and epicontinental basins in north-east Africa (Egypt, Sudan) bear ample evidence of weathering processes repeatedly having contributed to the formation of mineral deposits throughout the Phanerozoic. The relict primary weathering mantle of Pan-African basement rocks consists of kaolinitic saprolite, laterite (in places bauxitic) and iron oxide crust. On the continent, the reaccumulation of eroded weathering-derived clay minerals (mainly kaolinite) occurred predominantly in fluvio-lacustrine environments, and floodplain and coastal plain deposits. Iron oxides, delivered from ferricretes, accumulated as oolitic ironstones in continental and marine sediments. Elements leached from weathering profiles accumulated in continental basins forming silcrete and alunite or in the marine environment contributing to the formation of attapulgite/saprolite and phosphorites. The Early Paleozoic Tawiga bauxitic laterite of northern Sudan gives a unique testimony of high latitude lateritic weathering under global greenhouse conditions. It formed in close spatial and temporal vicinity to the Late Ordovician glaciation in north Africa. The record of weathering products is essentially complete for the Late Cretaceous/Early Tertiary. From the continental sources in the south to the marine sinks in the north, an almost complete line of lateritic and laterite-derived deposits of bauxitic kaolin, kaolin, iron oxides and phosphates is well documented.

  17. Gold-bearing reefs of the Witwatersrand Basin: A model of synsedimentation hydrothermal formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, Yu. G.; Prokof'ev, V. Yu.

    2006-12-01

    The current concepts concerning the genesis of the unique ore-bearing reefs of the Witwatersrand Basin and its gold resource potential are considered. The results of microscopic examination of ore from the Black, Ventersdorp Contact, Carbon Leader, and Vaal reefs, as well as of thermobarometric study of quartz, are presented. A model of synsedimentation hydrothermal origin of the reefs in the process of evolution of primary colloidal-disperse systems is substantiated on the basis of these results and the data published by other authors. The formation of these systems is related to the periodic gain of deep ore-bearing gas-saturated fluids. The gold mineralization was formed under conditions of partially closed systems, where various mineral-forming processes developed (metasomatism, crystallization of true solutions and gels, gel metasomatism, dispersion of crystalline phases, segregation of mineral particles, formation of early minerals, etc.). New data on REE specialization of ore-bearing fluids are discussed. The specific features of the gold, carbonic, and uranium mineralization of the intracratonic basin are emphasized.

  18. Katrol Formation, Kutch, India: Varying interactions between eustasy and basin subsidence

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, P.K.; Seth, A.; Sarkar, S. )

    1990-05-01

    Local tectonics, which control sedimentation pattern eustasy, and sedimentation rate, are additional determinants for ultimate stratigraphy. The marine terrigenous Katrol Formation (Kimmeridgian-Tithonian), Kutch, India, illustrates their interplay at the passive margin of the Indian plate at its northwestern end. Recurrence of thick black shale is the signal of three major events of basin subsidence. Deepening was accompanied by ocean-bottom current activity, volcanic outpourings, and igneous intrusions, followed by deposition of tempestites (tsunami products ) and turbidites. Abundant synsedimentary extensional faults of various scales, their episodic reactivations, footwall collapse, detachment of laterally contiguous blocks, intrabasinal mass flows of unconsolidated sediments that disturbed and extruded undersurface sediments due to seismic seiches, truncated submarine fans-all attest to the instability of the depositional platform. Gradual relaxation in the rate of basin subsidence enabled the ongoing global eustatic fall, coupled with accelerated sedimentation to leave its record in the development of three regressive subsequences. Despite mass wasting of nearshore sediments into the offshore through storm and turbidity current transport the global trend of regression eventually controlled the stratigraphic scenario. Regressive phases when sufficiently prolonged led to the establishment of tidal and beach regimes. Stenohaline nektonic ammonites dwindled and suffered mass extinction at the end of the Tithonian when global regression attained its acme. The record of enfaunal activity, however, presents reverse trends, decreasing with intensification of local tectonism. The whole gamut of sedimentologic, paleontologic, and stratigraphic history of the Katrol Formation is apparently calibrated against the changing balance between global and local tectonics.

  19. Analysis of subsidence and modeling of Oil Formation in the Ragusa basin (Iblean Plateau, southeast Sicily)

    SciTech Connect

    Moretti, I.; Brosse, E.; Delahaye, S.; Roure, F. ); Mattavelli, L. )

    1990-05-01

    The Iblean plateau (southeastern Sicily) was part of the Apulian (African) margin of the Ligurian Tethys during the Mesozoic and played the role of a foreland during the Tertiary Alpine compression. From the Tortonian until the Holocene, the Apulian platform has been subducting northward underneath the European plate. Both the thickness and nature of the Apulian crust are poorly known. Subsurface data, from wildcat wells in the Ragusa petroleum basin, and backstripping have been used to quantify the vertical movements and thinning of the Apulian margin in southeastern Sicily. After quiet tectonics during the Middle Triassic, a rifting phase was initiated in the Hettangien, and lasted until the end of the Lias. Tectonic synrift subsidence can be great (up to 800 m in the wells analyzed). By contrast, the postrift subsidence, which gives an image of the lithospheric thermal anomaly, is very low. Comparison with some other current passive margin evolution, such as the Gulf of Lions, suggests that the Iblean plateau remained quite far away from the main axis of the rift. In this general tectonic context, the burial history of the source rocks, i,e., the Noto (Rhaetian) and Streppenosa (mainly Hettangien) formations are quite different from one area of the Ragusa basin to another. Early Jurassic subsidence rates were relatively higher in the center and in the south, and this could have resulted in early oil kitchens in local grabens. On the contrary, in the north, oil formation is a very recent phenomenon, induced by the overthrust of the Maghrebidic (Apenninic) nappes.

  20. Frontier formation stratigraphy on the Moxa Arch, Green River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlin, H.S.

    1996-04-01

    Frontier Formation terrigenous clastics record early Late Cretaceous shoreline progradation and cyclic marine and nonmarine sedimentation in a foreland basin. In this study well-log correlations and studies of core were used to establish the stratigraphic framework of the Frontier along the Moxa Arch, a north-trending intrabasin structure in the western Green River Basin. Regional marine flooding surfaces and surfaces of erosion were traced along the Moxa Arch, which is subparallel to Frontier depositional strike, and from the north end of the Moxa Arch eastward to the Rock Springs Uplift. Nonmarine facies composed of fluvial channel-fill sandstone and interchannel mudstone form lowstand depositional systems tracts overlying subaerial erosion surfaces, whereas marine shoreface sandstones in progradational parasequence sets form highstand depositional systems tracts. Lowstand system tracts are separated from overlying highstand systems tracts by maximum flooding surfaces. Transgressive systems tracts composted of retrogradational parasequence sets are generally thin or missing. By tracing systems tracts from the Moxa Arch westward to outcrops in the Thrust Belt, correlations were made between subsurface and outcrop members of the Frontier Formation. Outcrop chronostratigraphy was then used to compare local sequence development to a global sea-level record. On the Moxa Arch, variations in both depositional thickness and erosional truncation along strike indicate that tectonically controlled subsidence and sediment input were important controls on sequence development and masked the influence of most reported third-order eustatic sea-level fluctuations. More accurate reservoir characterization and attribute prediction are possible within this stratigraphic framework.

  1. Sedimentology and genetic stratigraphy of Dean and Spraberry Formations (Permian), Midland basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Handford, C.R.

    1981-09-01

    The Spraberry trend of west Texas, once known as the world's largest uneconomic oil field, will undoubtedly become an increasingly important objective for the development of enhanced oil recovery techniques in fine-grained, low-permeability, low-pressure reservoirs. As the trend expands, facies and stratigraphic data should be integrated into exploration strategies. The Spraberry and Dean Formations may be divided into three genetic sequences, each consisting of several hundred feet of interbedded shale and carbonate overlain by a roughly equal amount of sandstone and siltstone. These sequences record episodes of shelf-margin progradation, deep-water resedimentation of shelf-derived carbonate debris, followed by influxes of terrigenous clastics into the basin by way of feeder channels or submarine canyons, and suspension settling of fine-grained sediment from the water column. Four lithofacies comprise the terrigenous clastics of the Spraberry and Dean Fomations: (1) cross-laminated, massive, and parallel-laminated sandstone, (2) laminated siltstone, (3) bioturbated siltstone, and (4) black, organic-rich shale. Carbonate lithofacies occur mostly in the form of thin-bedded turbidites, slump, and debris-flow deposits. Terrigenous clastic rocks display facies sequences, isopach patterns, and sedimentary structures suggestive of deposition from turbidity currents, and long-lived saline density underflow and interflow currents. Clastic isopach patterns reflect an overall southward thinning of clastics in the Midland basin. Channelized flow and suspension settling were responsible for the formation of elongate fan-shaped accumulations of clastic sediments.

  2. Fluvial sedimentology and basin analyses of the Permian Fairchild and Buckley formations, Beardmore Glacier region, and the Weller Coal Measures, southern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Isbell, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    The Beardmore Glacier region contains a 1-km-thick Permian fluvial sequence that was deposited in an elongate basin along the margin of the East Antarctica craton. Fluvial architecture, sandstone composition and paleocurrents within the basin record a change from an early Permian cratonic to a late Permian foreland basin. The Lower Permian Fairchild Formation consists entirely of overlapping channel-form sandstone bodies deposited by braided streams. Arkosic sandstone was deposited by SE flowing streams. Fairchild strata record slow subsidence within a broad cratonic basin. The Lower to Upper Permian Buckley Formation consists of an arkosic lower member and a volcaniclastic upper member. Paleocurrents which consist of transverse and longitudinal paleocurrents, suggest a cratonward migration of the basin axis through time. The Buckley Formation was deposited within a braided stream setting and is an important unit because it contains interstratified channel-sandstone sheets, shale and coal, along with evidence of channel-belt avulsions. Sandstone sheets predominate at the base of the formation, while flood-plain deposits thicken and increase in abundance upward. The interaction between fluvial processes and subsidence rates produced this alluvial stratigraphy. The Lower Permian Weller Coal Measures in southern Victoria Land were deposited within a narrow basin located cratonward of the foreland basin. Basin geometry and depositional patterns are similar to those of fault-bounded basins. Although basin formation is not constrained, deposition of the Weller was contemporaneous with the development of the foreland basin. This suggests a relationship between subsidence within the two basins.

  3. Implications for the formation of the Hollywood Basin from gravity interpretations of the northern Los Angeles Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildenbrand, Thomas G.; Davidson, Jeffrey G.; Ponti, Daniel J.; Langenheim, V.E.

    2001-01-01

    Gravity data provide insights on the complex tectonic history and structural development of the northern Los Angeles Basin region. The Hollywood basin appears to be a long (> 12 km), narrow (up to 2 km wide) trough lying between the Santa Monica Mountains and the Wilshire arch. In the deepest parts of the Hollywood basin, the modeled average thickness ranges from roughly 250 m if filled with only Quaternary sediments to approximately 600 m if Pliocene sediments are also present. Interpretations of conflicting drill hole data force us to consider both these scenarios. Because of the marked density contrast between the dense Santa Monica Mountains and the low-density sediments in the Los Angeles Basin, the gravity method is particularly useful in mapping the maximum displacement along the Santa Monica-Hollywood-Raymond fault zone. The gravity-defined Santa Monica–Hollywood fault zone deviates, in places, from the mapped active fault and fold scarps located with boreholes and trenching and by geomorphological mapping by Dolan and others (1997). Our models suggest that the Santa Monica–Hollywood fault zone dips northward approximately 63°. Three structural models are considered for the origin of the Hollywood basin: pull-apart basin, flexural basin, and a basin related to a back limb of a major fold. Although our preferred structural model involves flexure, the available geologic and geophysical data do not preclude contributions to the deepening of the basin from one or both of the other two models. Of particular interest is that the distribution of red-tagged buildings and structures damaged by the Northridge earthquake has a strong spatial correlation with the axis of the Hollywood basin defined by the gravity data. Several explanations for this correlation are explored, but two preferred geologic factors for the amplification of ground motion besides local site effects are (1) focussing of energy by a fault along the axis of the Hollywood basin and (2

  4. Catagenesis of organic matter of oil source rocks in Upper Paleozoic coal formation of the Bohai Gulf basin (eastern China)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, R.X.; Li, Y.Z.; Gao, Y.W.

    2007-05-15

    The Bohai Gulf basin is the largest petroliferous basin in China. Its Carboniferous-Permian deposits are thick (on the average, ca. 600 m) and occur as deeply as 5000 m. Coal and carbonaceous shale of the Carboniferous Taiyuan Formation formed in inshore plain swamps. Their main hydrocarbon-generating macerals are fluorescent vitrinite, exinite, alginite, etc. Coal and carbonaceous shale of the Permian Shanxi Formation were deposited in delta-alluvial plain. Their main hydrocarbon-generating macerals are vitrinite, exinite, etc. The carbonaceous rocks of these formations are characterized by a high thermal maturity, with the vitrinite reflectance R{sub 0} > 2.0%. The Bohai Gulf basin has been poorly explored so far, but it is highly promising for natural gas.

  5. Interfacial film formation: influence on oil spreading rates in lab basin tests and dispersant effectiveness testing in a wave tank.

    PubMed

    King, Thomas L; Clyburne, Jason A C; Lee, Kenneth; Robinson, Brian J

    2013-06-15

    Test facilities such as lab basins and wave tanks are essential when evaluating the use of chemical dispersants to treat oil spills at sea. However, these test facilities have boundaries (walls) that provide an ideal environment for surface (interfacial) film formation on seawater. Surface films may form from surfactants naturally present in crude oil as well as dispersant drift/overspray when applied to an oil spill. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of surface film formation on oil spreading rates in a small scale lab basin and on dispersant effectiveness conducted in a large scale wave tank. The process of crude oil spreading on the surface of the basin seawater was influenced in the presence of a surface film as shown using a 1st order kinetic model. In addition, interfacial film formation can greatly influence chemically dispersed crude oil in a large scale dynamic wave tank.

  6. Ammonia sources in the California South Coast Air Basin and their impact on ammonium nitrate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, J. B.; Neuman, J. A.; Bahreini, R.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Holloway, J. S.; McKeen, S. A.; Parrish, D. D.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.

    2012-04-01

    Observations from the NOAA WP-3D aircraft during CalNex in May and June 2010 are used to quantify ammonia (NH3) emissions from automobiles and dairy facilities in the California South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) and assess their impact on particulate ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) formation. These airborne measurements in the SoCAB are used to estimate automobile NH3 emissions, 62 ± 24 metric tons day-1, and dairy facility NH3 emissions, 33 ± 16 to 176 ± 88 metric tons day-1. Emission inventories agree with the observed automobile NH3:CO emission ratio, but substantially underpredict dairy facility NH3 emissions. Conditions observed downwind of the dairy facilities were always thermodynamically favorable for NH4NO3 formation due to high NH3 mixing ratios from the concentrated sources. Although automobile emissions generated lower NH3 mixing ratios, they also can thermodynamically favor NH4NO3 formation. As an aerosol control strategy, addressing the dairy NH3 source would have the larger impact on reducing SoCAB NH4NO3 formation.

  7. Formation Conditions and Sedimentary Characteristics of a Triassic Shallow Water Braided Delta in the Yanchang Formation, Southwest Ordos Basin, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ziliang; Shen, Fang; Zhu, Xiaomin; Li, Fengjie; Tan, Mengqi

    2015-01-01

    A large, shallow braided river delta sedimentary system developed in the Yanchang Formation during the Triassic in the southwest of the Ordos basin. In this braided delta system, abundant oil and gas resources have been observed, and the area is a hotspot for oil and gas resource exploration. Through extensive field work on outcrops and cores and analyses of geophysical data, it was determined that developments in the Late Triassic produced favorable geological conditions for the development of shallow water braided river deltas. Such conditions included a large basin, flat terrain, and wide and shallow water areas; wet and dry cyclical climate changes; ancient water turbulence; dramatic depth cycle changes; ancient uplift development; strong weathering of parent rock; and abundant supply. The shallow water braided river delta showed grain sediment granularity, plastic debris, and sediment with mature composition and structure that reflected the strong hydrodynamic environment of large tabular cross-bedding, wedge cross-bedding, and multiple positive rhythms superimposed to form a thick sand body layer. The branch river bifurcation developed underwater, and the thickness of the sand body increased further, indicating that the slope was slow and located in shallow water. The seismic responses of the braided river delta reflected strong shallow water performance, indicated by a progradation seismic reflection phase axis that was relatively flat; in addition, the seismic reflection amplitude was strong and continuous with a low angle and extended over considerable distances (up to 50 km). The sedimentary center was close to the provenance, the width of the river was large, and a shallow sedimentary structure and a sedimentary rhythm were developed. The development of the delta was primarily controlled by tectonic activity and changes in the lake level; as a result, the river delta sedimentary system eventually presented a “small plain, big front” character. PMID

  8. Formation Conditions and Sedimentary Characteristics of a Triassic Shallow Water Braided Delta in the Yanchang Formation, Southwest Ordos Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziliang; Shen, Fang; Zhu, Xiaomin; Li, Fengjie; Tan, Mengqi

    2015-01-01

    A large, shallow braided river delta sedimentary system developed in the Yanchang Formation during the Triassic in the southwest of the Ordos basin. In this braided delta system, abundant oil and gas resources have been observed, and the area is a hotspot for oil and gas resource exploration. Through extensive field work on outcrops and cores and analyses of geophysical data, it was determined that developments in the Late Triassic produced favorable geological conditions for the development of shallow water braided river deltas. Such conditions included a large basin, flat terrain, and wide and shallow water areas; wet and dry cyclical climate changes; ancient water turbulence; dramatic depth cycle changes; ancient uplift development; strong weathering of parent rock; and abundant supply. The shallow water braided river delta showed grain sediment granularity, plastic debris, and sediment with mature composition and structure that reflected the strong hydrodynamic environment of large tabular cross-bedding, wedge cross-bedding, and multiple positive rhythms superimposed to form a thick sand body layer. The branch river bifurcation developed underwater, and the thickness of the sand body increased further, indicating that the slope was slow and located in shallow water. The seismic responses of the braided river delta reflected strong shallow water performance, indicated by a progradation seismic reflection phase axis that was relatively flat; in addition, the seismic reflection amplitude was strong and continuous with a low angle and extended over considerable distances (up to 50 km). The sedimentary center was close to the provenance, the width of the river was large, and a shallow sedimentary structure and a sedimentary rhythm were developed. The development of the delta was primarily controlled by tectonic activity and changes in the lake level; as a result, the river delta sedimentary system eventually presented a "small plain, big front" character.

  9. Synchronous basin-wide Mediterranean Sapropel S1 formation; Preservation versus Productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lange, Gert J.; Slomp, Caroline; Corselli, Cesare; Erba, Elisabetta; Thomson, John; Reitz, Anja

    2013-04-01

    The timing of deposition of all distinct organic-rich units (sapropels) in eastern Mediterraneran sediments is precession-related and is associated with humid climate conditions. The last of such 'humid periods' occurred from 11 - 5 kyr 14C ago, simultaneous with a sustained circum-Mediterranean wet period including a vegetated Sahara. The end of this period coincides with a high manganese-oxide peak in all 30 studied cores and concurs with an abrupt re-ventilation event at 5.7 kyr for the deep-water. We demonstrate that the most recent sapropel (S1) formed synchronously between 9.8 and 5.7 14C ky BP at all water depths greater than a few hundred metres. As a consequence of increased fresh water (monsoon) input, surface waters had a reduced salinity and concomitantly the deep (> 1.8 km) eastern Mediterranean Sea was devoid of oxygen during 4,000 years of S1 formation (De Lange ea., 2008). This has resulted in a differential basin-wide preservation of S1 determined by water depth, as a result of different ventilation/climate-related redox conditions above and below 1.8 km. Climate-induced stratification of the ocean may thus contribute to enhanced preservation of organic matter, i.e. formation of sapropels (and potentially black shales). Reference De Lange G.J., Thomson J., Reitz A., Slomp C.P., Principato M.S., Erba E., and Corselli C. (2008) Synchronous basin-wide formation and redox-controlled preservation of a Mediterranean sapropel. Nature Geo 1, 606-610.

  10. Ordovician carbonate formation waters in the Illinois Basin: Chemical and isotopic evolution beneath a regional aquitard

    SciTech Connect

    Stueber, A.M. ); Walter, L.M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Formation waters from carbonate reservoirs in the upper Ordovician Galena Group of the Illinois Basin have been analyzed geochemically to study origin of salinity, chemical and isotopic evolution, and relation to paleohydrologic flow systems. These carbonate reservoirs underlie the Maquoketa Shale Group of Cincinnatian age, which forms a regional aquitard. Cl-Br relations and Na/Br-Cl/Br systematics indicate that initial brine salinity resulted from subaerial evaporation of seawater to a point not significantly beyond halite saturation. Subsequent dilution in the subsurface by meteoric waters is supported by delta D-delta O-18 covariance. Systematic relations between Sr-87/Sr-86 and 1/Sr suggest two distinct mixing events: introduction of a Sr-87 enriched fluid from a siliciclastic source, and a later event which only affected reservoir waters from the western shelf of the basin. The second mixing event is supported by covariance between Sr-87/Sr-86 and concentrations of cations and anions; covariance between Sr and O-D isotopes suggests that the event is related to meteoric water influx. Systematic geochemical relations in ordovician Galena Group formation waters have been preserved by the overlying Maquoketa shale aquitard. Comparison with results from previous studies indicates that waters from Silurian-Devonian carbonate strata evolved in a manner similar to yet distinct from that of the Ordovician carbonate waters, whereas waters from Mississippian-Pennsylvanian strata that overlie the New Albany Shale Group regional aquitard are marked by fundamentally different Cl-Br-Na and Sr isotope systematics. Evolution of these geochemical formation-water regimes apparently has been influenced significantly by paleohydrologic flow systems.

  11. In-place oil shale resources of the Mahogany zone sorted by grade, overburden thickness and stripping ratio, Green River Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado and Uinta Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birdwell, Justin E.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Johnson, Ronald C.; Brownfield, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    A range of geological parameters relevant to mining oil shale have been examined for the Mahogany zone of the Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin, Colorado, and Uinta Basin, Utah, using information available in the U.S. Geological Survey Oil Shale Assessment database. Basinwide discrete and cumulative distributions of resource in-place as a function of (1) oil shale grade, (2) Mahogany zone thickness, (3) overburden thickness, and (4) stripping ratio (overburden divided by zone thickness) were determined for both basins on a per-acre basis, and a resource map showing the areal distribution of these properties was generated. Estimates of how much of the Mahogany zone resource meets various combinations of these parameters were also determined. Of the 191.7 billion barrels of Mahogany zone oil in-place in the Piceance Basin, 32.3 percent (61.8 billion barrels) is associated with oil shale yielding at least 25 gallons of oil per ton (GPT) of rock processed, is covered by overburden 1,000 feet thick or less, and has a stripping ratio of less than 10. In the Uinta Basin, 14.0 percent (29.9 billion barrels) of the 214.5 billion barrels of Mahogany zone oil in-place meets the same overburden and stripping ratio criteria but only for the lower grade cutoff of 15 GPT.

  12. Reconstruction of groundwater formation in the Baltic Artesian basin through water stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babre, A.; Delina, A.; Retike, I.

    2012-04-01

    Subsurface hydrology of the Baltic Artesian basin has changed rapidly during the Quaternary period. Glacial and several interglacial phases as well as the change in the sea level led to complicated subsurface hydrology and a large difference in groundwater chemical as much as isotopic content. Baltic artesian basin fully covers territory of Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia; also parts of Poland, Russia, and Belarus are included. This work aims to give better overview of the complexity of the groundwater recharge and discharge dynamics beyond country borders, taking into account only shared geological framework, common climate conditions and development during the Quaternary period. To maintain better understanding of the processes that took part in the formation of groundwater that can be observed nowadays several methods were applied placing major emphasis on the new oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope ratio results. Additionally large scale modeling as well as hydrochemistry and trace element concentrations was used. Paleowaters usually are isotopically lighter, that facilitate to detect their presence. Earlier investigations in the northern part of the basin indicated glacial melt water intrusion in the Cambrian-Vendian aquifer corrected radiocarbon age suggests that this meltwater intrusion took place during the late Weichelian. Several radiocarbon and stable isotope studies in groundwater have been done at the southern part of the basin as well reporting extensive groundwater recharge during the Late Pleistocene in the Devonian aquifers; authors suggest that recharge took place under different recharge mechanisms compared with the northern part. So far no similar studies were accomplished in the central part of the basin, thus to make clearer picture and possibility to find the mixing line between groundwater bodies of different origin, the new groundwater samples were collected from more than 200 wells mainly in the territory of Latvia. New stable isotope samples

  13. Tectonic controls on deposition and preservation of Pennsylvanian Tensleep Formation, Bighorn basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly Anne, O.; Horne, J.C.; Wheeler, D.M.; Musgrave, C.E.

    1986-08-01

    During deposition of the Tensleep Formation, a shallow, semirestricted portion of a major seaway that occupied the geosynclinal area to the west extended into the area of the present-day Bighorn basin. Limiting the transgression of this sea was the Beartooth high on the north and the Bighorn high on the east and southeast. On the western side of the area, a southerly extension of the Yellowstone high restricted circulation. The lower Tensleep Formation (Desmoinesian), characterized by extensive marine influence, was deposited as coastal sand dunes and interdunes over subaerially exposed structural highs. These deposits grade basinward into shoreface sandstones, which in turn grade into sandstones and carbonates of the shelf environment. During deposition of upper Tensleep strata (Missourian through Virgilian), marine waters were less widespread. The Greybull arch, a northeast-trending feature in the northern part of the area, was uplifted, dividing the shallow sea into two parts. The upper Tensleep Formation was deposited as a terrestrial sand sea over the Bighorn high. Coastal dunes and interdunes were deposited seaward of the sand seas and over the Beartooth high, the Greybull arch, and the southerly extension of the Yellowstone high. These deposits grade basinward into clastic shoreface deposits. Following Tensleep deposition, the region underwent southward tilting, which caused exposure and erosion of the Tensleep Formation. The resulting unconformity surface was deeply incised by a dendritic drainage system that controlled the thickness of the formation. The Greybull arch and the Bighorn high acted as significant drainage divides, over which very little of the formation was preserved.

  14. Using a novel Mg isotope tracer to investigate the dolomitization of the Red River Formation in the Williston Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmig, S. R.; Holmden, C. E.; Qing, H.

    2015-12-01

    The Williston Basin is a sub-circular intracratonic basin spanning central North America with its center in NW North Dakota. The Late Ordovician Red River Formation is an economically viable unit in the Williston Basin containing large hydrocarbon reserves in Saskatchewan, North Dakota, Manitoba, and Montana. Red River dolomitization contributed to the reservoir-quality porosity and permeability observed today with three types of dolomite (burrow, matrix, and saddle) possibly representing three events. Dolomitization is widely believed to have resulted from downward percolating brines, due to the stratigraphically close association between dolomite deposits and overlying basin-scale evaporites. However, in contrast, Sr isotope evidence suggests an upward fluid migration in the basin. Spatial variation of Mg isotopes (δ26Mg) may serve as a direct tracer of dolomitizing fluid flow. Dolomite sequesters light isotopes of Mg from dolomitizing fluids, therefore, the fluid will evolve with time and distance to heavier δ26Mg values. Accordingly, the δ26Mg values of the Red River dolomite should increase in the direction of fluid flow. We test this hypothesis on Red River burrow dolomite from the Williston Basin; the first event most often attributed to downward infiltration of brines. Burrow δ26Mg values range between -1.89‰ and -1.31‰. Using contouring software, the data are shown to form a pattern of increasing δ26Mg values out from the center of the Williston Basin, indicating an up-dip migration of dolomitizing fluids through the burrow network, rather than down-dip as suggested by the brine reflux model. We conclude that dolomitization of the Red River carbonate is not tied to the spatial and temporal history of evaporite deposition in the Williston Basin, but rather to the thermal history of the basin, suggesting dolomitization likely occurred during a late Paleozoic heating event that drove Mg-rich connate waters ponded in the center of the basin upwards

  15. Sequence stratigraphy of the Pennsylvanian Morrow Formation, northern Delaware basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Bay, A.R.; Baltensperger, P.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Stratigraphic sequence analysis of the Pennsylvanian Morrow Formation is a new technique useful in predicting and understanding shifts in sand trends that can help locate Morrow gas reservoirs in the mature northern Delaware basin. Morrow sandstone reservoirs are fluvial deltaic channel fill and transgressive beach deposits that typically are 10-30 ft thick and consistently less than 1 mi wide. Detailed mapping and correlation within the systems tracts of each sequence can high-grade specific areas in the basin for exploration. Based on subsurface log correlations, the Morrow clastics and Atoka carbonates in the northern Delaware basin are interpreted as three stratigraphic sequences bounded by subregional type I unconformities. The post-Mississippian unconformity represents the oldest sequence boundary in the Morrow-to-Atoka succession and formed as the base level dropped and the shoreline shifted at least 50 mi basinward. The uplifted Pedernal Highlands supplied sediment to dip-trending lower Morrow channels that downcut into the exposed Mississippian carbonate ramp surface. The transgressive systems tract in this sequence consists of landward-stepping, wave-dominated deltaic deposit. The Morrow shale, a regionally correlatable organic-rich shale that separates the lower Morrow from the middle Morrow, represents the highstand deposits as base level that rose to a maximum. Another base level drop occurred at the end of Morrow shale deposition and resulted in dip-trending channel-fill sandstones and, stacked landward stepping transgressive beach and offshore ridge deposits oriented parallel to strike. The highstand progradational deposits of this sequence formed a terrace that supplied a shelf margin system of deltaic and slope-apron sediments during the succeeding third sequence. The shelf margin deposits are capped by highstand shelf carbonates of the upper Morrow and lower Atoka.

  16. REGIONAL PARADOX FORMATION STRUCTURE AND ISOCHORE MAPS, BLANDING SUB-BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan; Thomas C. Chidsey Jr.; David E. Eby

    2003-12-01

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field (figure 1). However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

  17. Depositional systems and petroleum potential, Mesaverde Formation southeastern Wind River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Hippe, D.J.; Needham, D.W.; Ethridge, F.G.

    1986-08-01

    Depositional environments and systems of the Wind River basin Mesaverde Formation were interpreted from an analysis of outcrops along the Casper arch and Rattlesnake Hills anticline and cores and wireline logs from the adjacent subsurface. The Fales Sandstone and Parkman Sandstone/unnamed middle member are deposits of eastward progradational, wave-dominated strand-plain and deltaic complexes. Basal portions of the Fales Sandstone and the Parkman Sandstone are composed of a thickening- and coarsening-upward sandstone sequence whose facies represent storm-dominated inner-shelf and wave-dominated shore-zone environments. Facies sequences in the upper Fales Sandstone interval and the unnamed middle member are interpreted as deposits of lower coastal plain (marshes, bay fills, distributary channels, and crevasse splays) and upper coastal plain (alluvial channels, crevasse splays and fine-grained flood basin) sequences. The Teapot Sandstone is interpreted as an alluvial deposit. Analysis of facies sequences in the Teapot suggests a change in fluvial style, from braided-belt deposits along the southwest flank to meander-belt deposits along the northeast flank of the basin. These fluvial systems fed the Teapot deltas to the east. Stratigraphic plays for oil and gas include alluvial valley fills and point-bar deposits in the Teapot Sandstone, storm-dominated shelf sands in the upper Cody Shale and the Fales and Parkman Sandstones, and a transgressive barrier-bar sequence in the upper Fales Sandstone. Laterally continuous shore-zone sandstones may form combination traps where pinch-outs occur on structure.

  18. Finding the Plateau: Paleogene Topography and Basin Formation in the Cordilleran Hinterland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassel, E. J.; Smith, M. E.; Canada, A.; Henry, C.; Breecker, D.

    2014-12-01

    /or broad dynamic and thermal uplift associated with Farallon slab rollback likely drove basin formation. Late Oligocene δD values from fluvially interbedded tephras suggest < 500-900 m of uplift following rollback, while stratigraphy indicates a coincident westward shift in the locus of deposition.

  19. Preliminary Simulations of CO2 Transport in the Dolostone Formations in the Ordos Basin, China

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Y; Wolery, T; Carroll, S

    2009-04-30

    This report summarizes preliminary 2-D reactive-transport simulations on the injection, storage and transport of supercritical CO{sub 2} in dolostone formations in the Ordos Basin in China. The purpose of the simulations was to evaluate the role that basin heterogeneity, permeability, CO{sub 2} flux, and geochemical reactions between the carbonate geology and the CO{sub 2} equilibrated brines have on the evolution of porosity and permeability in the storage reservoir. The 2-D simulation of CO{sub 2} injection at 10{sup 3} ton/year corresponds to CO{sub 2} injection at a rate of 3 x 10{sup 5} ton/year in a 3-D, low permeable rock. An average permeability of 10 md was used in the simulation and reflects the upper range of permeability reported for the Ordos Basin Majiagou Group. Transport and distribution of CO{sub 2} between in the gas, aqueous, and solid phases were followed during a 10-year injection phase and a 10-year post injection phase. Our results show that CO{sub 2} flux and the spatial distribution of reservoir permeability will dictate the transport of CO{sub 2} in the injection and post injection phases. The injection rate of supercritical CO{sub 2} into low permeable reservoirs may need to be adjusted to avoid over pressure and mechanical damage to the reservoir. Although it should be noted that 3-D simulations are needed to more accurately model pressure build-up in the injection phase. There is negligible change in porosity and permeability due to carbonate mineral dissolution or anhydrite precipitation because a very small amount of carbonate dissolution is required to reach equilibrium with respect these phases. Injected CO{sub 2} is stored largely in supercritical and dissolved phases. During the injection phase, CO{sub 2} is transport driven by pressure build up and CO{sub 2} buoyancy.

  20. The Lower Cretaceous Chinkeh Formation: A frontier-type play in the Liard basin of western Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Leckie, D.A. ); Potocki, D.J. ); Visser, K. )

    1991-08-01

    The Lower Cretaceous Liard basin in western Canada covers an area of 9,500 km{sup 2} (3,668 mi{sup 2}) but is relatively unexplored despite its size. The present-day expression of the basin, which formed during the latest Cretaceous to early Tertiary, trends north-south and is delineated by the outcrop of the coarse-clastic Upper Cretaceous Dunvegan Formation. The lowermost Cretaceous unit, herein named the Chinkeh Formation, is up to 32 m (105 ft) thick and unconformably overlies older Paleozoic strata. The Chinkeh Formation contains four major lithotypes: (1) conglomeratic breccia interpreted as debris-flow or talus deposits, (2) interbedded coal, carbonaceous as nonmarine valley fill or channel deposits, (3) conglomeratic lag related to marine deposits, (3) conglomeratic lag related to marine transgression, and (4) upward-coarsening sandstone interpreted as abandoned shoreline deposits. Cretaceous strata in the Liard basin have gave petroleum source-rock and reservoir potential, and hydrocarbons may be present in sandstone of the Chinkeh Formation. Potential play types include stratigraphic traps formed by incised-valley deposits and shallow-marine sandstone pinching out laterally into marine shales of the Garbutt Formation. A potential structural play may occur along the Bovie fault zone where reservoirs may abut against a shale seal on the eastern side of the fault. Potential source rocks include the lowermost Garbutt Formation and underlying Triassic Toad Garbutt formations. The Chinkeh Formation sandstone has porosity values of 8-18%.

  1. Geochemical Characteristics and its Geological Significance of Oil Shale from the Youganwo Formation, Maoming Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuanyuan; Qiu, Nansheng

    2016-04-01

    Geochemical elements of oil shale in the Maoming Basin were analyzed to discuss provenance attribute and depositional environment of the Youganwo formation. Experimental date of the major elements, trace elements and rare earth elements of 24 samples from the Maoye 1 well were examined.The analyzed oil shale samples were characterized by enrichment of Th, U, Pb and LREE, depleted of Zr, Cr and Hf,negative Eu and Ce anomalies, indicating that these samples were originated from continental crust. The chemical index of alteration (CIA) values and the Zr/Sc-Th/Sc diagrams indicate that source rocks had undergone intense chemical weathering and deposition recirculation. Based on the La/Th-Hf and La/Yb-∑REE diagrams and the negative anomaly of Eu element, the oil shale in the Maoming Basin has diverse sources, which mainly came from felsic source region of the upper crust or the mixture of felsic volcanic rocks, granite and sedimentary rocks. Ratios of the Sr/Cu, MgO/CaO suggest that oil shale was formed in fresh water under warm and humid climate, shallow water column became deeper during the middle and late sedimentary period. The depositional environment is interpreted to be limnetic with weak reduction at the early stage and gradually turned into semi-deep to deep lacustrine.

  2. Characterization of petroleum reservoirs in the Eocene Green River Formation, Central Uinta Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, C.D.; Bereskin, S.R.

    2003-01-01

    The oil-productive Eocene Green River Formation in the central Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah is divided into five distinct intervals. In stratigraphically ascending order these are: 1) Uteland Butte, 2) Castle Peak, 3) Travis, 4) Monument Butte, and 5) Beluga. The reservoir in the Uteland Butte interval is mainly lacustrine limestone with rare bar sandstone beds, whereas the reservoirs in the other four intervals are mainly channel and lacustrine sandstone beds. The changing depositional environments of Paleocene-Eocene Lake Uinta controlled the characteristics of each interval and the reservoir rock contained within. The Uteland Butte consists of carbonate and rare, thin, shallow-lacustrine sandstone bars deposited during the initial rise of the lake. The Castle Peak interval was deposited during a time of numerous and rapid lake-level fluctuations, which developed a simple drainage pattern across the exposed shallow and gentle shelf with each fall and rise cycle. The Travis interval records a time of active tectonism that created a steeper slope and a pronounced shelf break where thick cut-and-fill valleys developed during lake-level falls and rises. The Monument Butte interval represents a return to a gentle, shallow shelf where channel deposits are stacked in a lowstand delta plain and amalgamated into the most extensive reservoir in the central Uinta Basin. The Beluga interval represents a time of major lake expansion with fewer, less pronounced lake-level falls, resulting in isolated single-storied channel and shallow-bar sandstone deposits.

  3. Geochemical evaluation of upper cretaceous fruitland formation coals, San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michael, G.E.; Anders, D.E.; Law, B.E.

    1993-01-01

    Geochemical analyses of coal samples from the Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico and Colorado were used to determine thermal maturity, type of kerogen, and hydrocarbon generation potential. Mean random vitrinite reflectance (%Rm) of the Fruitland coal ranges from 0.42 to 1.54%. Rock-Eval pyrolysis data and saturated to aromatic hydrocarbon ratio indicate that the onset of thermal hydrocarbon generation begins at about 0.60% Rm and peak generation occurs at about 0.85% Rm. Several samples have hydrogen index values between 200 and 400, indicating some potential for liquid hydrocarbon generation and a mixed Type III and II kerogen. Pentacyclic and tricyclic terpanes, steranes, aromatic steroids and methylphenanthrene maturity parameters were observed through the complete range of thermal maturity in the Fruitland coals. Aromatic pentacyclic terpanes, similar to those found in brown coals of Australia, were observed in low maturity samples, but not found above 0.80% Rm. N-alkane depleted coal samples, which occur at a thermal maturity of approx. 0.90% Rm, paralleling peak hydrocarbon generation, are fairly widespread throughout the basin. Depletion of n-alkanes in these samples may be due to gas solution stripping and migration fromthe coal seams coincident with the development of pressure induced fracturing due to hydrocarbon generation; however, biodegradation may also effect these samples. ?? 1993.

  4. Undrilled Muddy formation (Lower Cretaceous) paleodrainage basin, southwestern Wyoming and northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Dolson, J.; Leighton, V.

    1989-03-01

    The Muddy formation (Lower Cretaceous) of the central and northern Rocky Mountains has produced over 1.5 billion bbl of oil equivalent hydrocarbons. Traps are developed in buried hills, valley fills, and onlapping marine sands associated with subaerial unconformities formed during a sea level drop. At least 10 paleodrainage basins developed at maximum lowstand. Of these, production has been established in seven. One such paleodrainage, herein designated the Washakie/Sand Wash basin (WSW) drainage, is only drilled peripherally and remains essentially untested over nearly 20,000 km/sup 2/. The WSW paleodrainage is productive in Wyoming from local tributary sandstones at Sugar Creek field (Sierra Madre uplift) and Lost Soldier field (Sweetwater uplift). A major through-going trunk drainage network is productive at Brady field (Rock Springs uplift) and in numerous pools on the Axial and Douglas Creek arches of northwestern Colorado. A recent deep wildcat in northwestern Colorado has confirmed subsurface existence of additional valley networks. Ten to fourteen percent porosity at 5800 m and recent deep Muddy equivalent valley fill discoveries on the southern Moxa arch (Wyoming) demonstrate reservoir potential throughout this trend. Future drilling successes will require 3400 to 6000-m deep tests but should result in significant deep gas and condensate production.

  5. Progradational sequences in lower Ordovician portion of Deadwood Formation, Williston basin

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.

    1988-07-01

    In the Williston basin, the Cambrian and Ordovician Deadwood Formation can be divided into six informal members based on gamma-ray log characteristics. Members C through F are Early Ordovician (Tremadocian to Arenigian) and consist of three progradational sequences. In ascending order, the sequences consist of (1) a mixed sandstone-limestone lithotype, (2) limestone lithotypes ranging from mudstone to grainstone, (3) bioturbated, peloidal, calcareous, siliciclastic mudstone and siltstone, (4) bioturbated to planar-laminated, peloidal, calcareous siltstone and sandstone, (5) Skolithos-bored, cross-bedded to planar-laminated quartzarenite, (6) bioturbated dolomite and anhydrite-cemented fossiliferous quartz wacke, and (7) silty laminated dolomudstone. The asymmetrical sequences represent progradation of a siliciclastic shoreline, back-barrier lagoon, and intertidal algal flat over a siliciclastic shelf and a distal carbonate shoal. The present distribution of the sequences and individual lithotypes in the Williston basin is a function of the limited eastward advance of the carbonate shoal during transgression, the limited westward advance of the shoreline during progradation, deep shoreface erosion of the previous sequence during rapid transgression, and Middle Ordovician erosion.

  6. Geochemistry and origin of formation waters in the western Canada sedimentary basin-I. Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hitchon, B.; Friedman, I.

    1969-01-01

    Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen, together with chemical analyses, were determined for 20 surface waters, 8 shallow potable formation waters, and 79 formation waters from oil fields and gas fields. The observed isotope ratios can be explained by mixing of surface water and diagenetically modified sea water, accompanied by a process which enriches the heavy oxygen isotope. Mass balances for deuterium and total dissolved solids in the western Canada sedimentary basin demonstrate that the present distribution of deuterium in formation waters of the basin can be derived through mixing of the diagenetically modified sea water with not more than 2.9 times as much fresh water at the same latitude, and that the movement of fresh water through the basin has redistributed the dissolved solids of the modified sea water into the observed salinity variations. Statistical analysis of the isotope data indicates that although exchange of deuterium between water and hydrogen sulphide takes place within the basin, the effect is minimized because of an insignificant mass of hydrogen sulphide compared to the mass of formation water. Conversely, exchange of oxygen isotopes between water and carbonate minerals causes a major oxygen-18 enrichment of formation waters, depending on the relative masses of water and carbonate. Qualitative evidence confirms the isotopic fractionation of deuterium on passage of water through micropores in shales. ?? 1969.

  7. Hydrocarbon source potential of the Santiago Formation, Oriente Basin, SE of Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaibor, J.; Hochuli, J. P. A.; Winkler, W.; Toro, J.

    2008-03-01

    The Santiago Formation (Late Hettangian-Sinemurian), described in the area of Santiago in the Oriente Basin of eastern Ecuador, consists of three distinct sedimentary members. The Santiago River Member is composed of limestones and calcareous sandstones. The Yuquianza Member is a monotonous sequence of black shales. The Patuca Member consists of a sequence of sandstones, greywackes, and shales, intercalated with lava flows and dikes. The fine-grained sediments of the three members are characterized by a high content of particulate organic matter (POM). Palynofacies and rock-eval analyses indicate the predominance of kerogen types II and III, with HI values that indicate a moderate to low source potential. At the type locality, the organic matter is thermally mature and locally overmatures.

  8. Microfacies, depositional models and diagenesis of Lagoa Feia Formation (lower cretaceous), Campos Basin, offshore Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertani, R. T.

    The Lagoa Feia Formation consists of the sediments deposited during the rift valley stage of the Campos Basin, varying from 200m to more than 1500m in thickness. In this unit seventeen microfacies were recognized, grouped into four main sequences, respectively dominated by terrigenous supplies, ostracods, pelecypods, and basic volcaniclastics. The vertical sequence of microfacies and the associations of syndepositional diagenetic minerals were used to reconstruct the general environment of deposition. Five diagenetic stages were recognized. Pelecypod rich microfacies present the highest potential for development of intraparticle and moldic secondary porosity. Two types of fabric selective porosity were experimentally developed in low porosity samples under simulated burial conditions. Intercrystal microporosity was formed by preferential dissolution of micrite size calcite compared to coarse calcite crystals of sparite and neomorphosed bioclasts, and intraparticle porosity was developed in pelecypod shells by selective dissolution of neomorphic calcite compared to sparite cement.

  9. Effect of Smoke on Cloud Formation during the Biomass Burning Season over the Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koren, I.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Remer, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    Aerosol absorption of sunlight reduces surface irradiation and heats the aerosol layer. The consequent changes in the temperature and humidity profiles can affect cloud formation extent and life time, which is called the semi-direct effect. We evaluate this aerosol semi-direct effect using data collected during the 2002 biomass burning season over the Amazon basin from the MODIS instrument on the Aqua satellite. MODIS measures the cloud coverage and the aerosol optical thickness among the clouds. We found that the radiative heating of the atmosphere and cooling of the surface due to the presence of the smoke decreases the cloud coverage. A very clear negative correlation emerges between the cloud fraction and the smoke optical depth. The results are compared to calculations using 1-D radiation model (M.D. Chou), and used to calculate this regional semi direct effect on climate forcing.

  10. Gas geochemistry characteristic of shale gas in Longmaxi Formation, SE Sichuan Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chunhui; Du, Li; Li, Liwu; He, Jian; Li, Zhongping

    2017-01-01

    Shale gas samples collected from Lower Silurian Longmaxi Formation of Southern Sichuan Basin in Weiyuan were analysed for stable isotope composition of noble gases and molecular composition, stable carbon isotope composition of hydrocarbons. Results show these shale gases are of organic origin gas, and produced at high-over maturity stage. All the analysed hydrocarbon gases reveal complete inversed isotopic trends from methane to propane, and δ13C1, δ13C2 have obviously different between Weiyuan and Changning areas. CO2 was mainly generated during thermogenic processes of transformation of organic matter, although some gases can contain components from endogenic processes and from thermal destruction of carbonates. He and Ar are mainly product of α-decay of U and Th enriched in crustal materials. A small contribution of mantle origin He was found in the gas reservoirs. Continuous monitoring data indicate 3He/4He ratio didn’t change with the mining time.

  11. Stimulation techniques in the Red Fork Formation in the Anadarko Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Burnette, P.T.

    1983-02-01

    This paper presents the results of fracture stimulation treatments on the Red Fork formation in the Anadarko Basin. All wells studied are located in Roger Mills and Custer counties of Oklahoma. Only data for which valid production information was available are included. Fracturing techniques and their results using five different stimulation fluids are examined; cross-linked water base, gelled water (non cross-linked), gelled diesel, gelled carbon dioxide, and foamed carbon dioxide with water as the liquid phase. Three types of propping agents have been used in various grades in conjunction with the above stimulation fluids; sand, intermediate strength proppant and high strength sintered bauxite. A discussion of various treatment parameters and their possible overall effect on the production results is presented.

  12. Reservoir geology and paleoenvironmental reconstruction of Yates Formation, Central Basin Platform, West Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Casavant, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    Computer slice maps and proprietary three-dimensional interactive graphics were used to reconstruct the paleodeposition and to map reservoir variations within the Yates Formation of west Texas. The prolific Yates Formation is a major reservoir in the North Ward Estes field, Ward County, Texas. The Upper Permian (Guadalupian) Yates Formation is an overall regressive shallowing-upward package containing variable sequences of subtidal, intertidal, and supratidal strata. Sediment types include various siliciclastics mixed with sabkha-type carbonates and evaporites. The types of rocks and their structures indicate that these sediments were deposited in a prograding tidal flat-lagoonal setting located behind a shelf margin edge on the western flank of the positive Central Basin platform during the Guadalupian. The cyclic nature of the Yates is largely the result of lagoonal expansion and construction that caused environmental belts on both sides of the lagoon to converge and diverge. These rapid migrations of facies coupled with diagenetic processes created the heterogeneities that characterize this large reservoir.

  13. Macrofossils of Bakken Formation (Devonian and Mississippian), Williston Basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Thrasher, L.; Holland, F.D. Jr.

    1983-08-01

    Results of this study of the macrofossils of the Bakken Formation in North Dakota have reinforced the suggestion, based on previous paleontological work in Saskatchewan, that the Bakken is of both Devonian and Mississippian age, rather than being entirely of Lower Mississippian age as originally considered. Increased drilling and coring activity in the North Dakota part of the Williston Basin has provided the opportunity for acquiring a larger fauna that was previously available. Based on lithologic character, the Bakken has been divided into three informal members. These consist of a calcareous siltstone unit between two lithologically similar units of carbonaceous shale. These black shales contain similar faunas distinct from that of the middle member. The black shales contain inarticulate brachiopods, conchostracans, and rare cephalopods and fish remains as well as more abundant conodonts, ostracods, and palynomorphs. The middle siltstone unit contains a more abundant and diverse fauna consisting of inarticulate and articulate brachiopods together with corals, gastropods, cephalopods, ostracods, echinoderm remains, and trace fossils. This is the first report of cephalopods, conchostracans, ostracods, corals, trace fossils, and some of the brachiopods in the Bakken, although all, except the gastropods, have been reported from stratigraphic equivalents (Exshaw Formation of south-central Montana, the Leatham Formation of northeastern Utah, and the middle member of the Pilot Shale in western Utah and eastern Nevada).

  14. Sedimentation of the Triassic Jurassic Adigrat Sandstone Formation, Blue Nile (Abay) Basin, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolela, A.

    2008-09-01

    Exploration of oil and gas deposits in the Blue Nile Basin targeted the Adigrat Sandstone Formation as a reservoir objective. Conglomerates, gravely sandstones, coarse to medium-grained sandstones, very fine-grained cross-bedded sandstones, siltstones and mudstones of the Adigrat Sandstone Formation were deposited in semi-arid to arid climates. The North-western highlands are the main source for the sedimentation. The poorly-sorted, crudely-bedded conglomerates and gravely sandstones are interpreted as alluvial fan deposits. The basal polymictic orthoconglomerate passes up vertically into gravely sandstone, possibly indicating proximal to mid-fan sedimentation. The alluvial fan sedimentation passes up vertically into channel, point bars and flood-plain fines. The meandering river sedimentation is characterized by single and amalgamated multi-storey sandstone bodies. In places, the uppermost part of the Adigrat Sandstone Formation is represented by coal-bearing sediments possibly reflect lacustrine depositional environment. The medium-coarse-grained sandstone is a possible oil and gas reservoir, whilst the fine-grained sediments are a possible gas reservoir.

  15. Vegetation canopy cover effects on sediment erosion processes in the upper Colorado River Basin mancos shale formation, Price, Utah

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study provides new parameterizations for applying the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM) on the highly erosive, rangeland saline soils of the Mancos Shale formation in the Price-San Rafael River Basin in east central Utah. Calibrated hydrologic parameters (Kss and K') values are gener...

  16. Fluvial facies architecture in small-scale river systems in the Upper Dupi Tila Formation, northeast Bengal Basin, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royhan Gani, M.; Mustafa Alam, M.

    2004-11-01

    The late stage basin-fill history of the fluvial Dupi Tila Group (Plio-Pleistocene) is described. These rocks have been deposited in the Sylhet trough, a sub-basin of the Bengal Basin, in a foreland basin setting. This outcrop study, carried out in Sylhet, Bangladesh, presents the first detailed facies analysis of the Upper Dupi Tila Formation. Four facies have been identified: trough cross-bedded sandstone (St), ripple cross-laminated sandstone (Sr), finely laminated mud with ripples (Fl), and massive mud with rootlets (Fm). Facies analysis supplemented with embedded Markov chain analysis, reveals small-scale fining-upward cycles (average 4.5 m thick). Facies architectural elements include channel (CH), lateral accretion (LA), sandy bedforms (SB), and overbank fines (OF) with limited vertical and lateral connectivity of the sand bodies. The average channel depth and width is 5 and 30 m, respectively. Sand body geometry ranges from tabular, to sheet, to shoestring with a 0.45 net to gross ratio. This study shows that the Upper Dupi Tila Formation is composed of small-scale, mudstone-reach meandering river deposits. In Bangladesh, the Dupi Tila Formation is the main aquifer presently being utilized. Understanding of facies architecture and sand body geometry of this Formation is crucial in examining the issue of arsenic and other contaminations of ground water in Bangladesh.

  17. Assessment of In-Place Oil Shale Resources of the Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Self, Jesse G.

    2010-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a total of 1.32 trillion barrels of oil in place in 18 oil shale zones in the Eocene Green River Formation in the Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado.

  18. Assessment of Undiscovered Oil Resources in the Devonian-Mississippian Bakken Formation, Williston Basin Province, Montana and North Dakota, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollastro, Richard M.; Cook, Troy A.; Roberts, Laura N.R.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Lewan, Michael D.; Anna, Lawrence O.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Lillis, Paul G.; Klett, Timothy R.; Charpentier, Ronal R.

    2008-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean undiscovered volumes of 3.65 billion barrels of oil, 1.85 trillion cubic feet of associated/dissolved natural gas, and 148 million barrels of natural gas liquids in the Bakken Formation of the Williston Basin Province, Montana and North Dakota.

  19. Assessment of undiscovered continuous oil and gas resources in the Monterey Formation, Los Angeles Basin Province, California, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Pitman, Janet K.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Le, Phuong A.; Lillis, Paul G.; Marra, Kristen R.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2016-07-08

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey assessed technically recoverable mean resources of 13 million barrels of oil, 22 billion cubic feet of gas, and 1 million barrels of natural gas liquids in the Monterey Formation of the Los Angeles Basin Province, California.

  20. Geodynamical Nature of the Formation of Large Plates of Platforms, Jointed in North Caspian Oil and Gas Basin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seitov, Nassipkali; Tulegenova, Gulmira P.

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the problems of tectonic zoning and determination of geodynamical nature of the formation of jointed tectonic structures within the North Caspian oil and gas basin, represented by Caspian Depression of Russian platform of East European Pre-Cambrian Craton and plate ancient Precambrian Platform stabilization and Turan…

  1. Microbial consortia controlling biogenic gas formation in the Qaidam Basin of western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuai, Yanhua; Zhang, Shuichang; Grasby, Stephen E.; Hou, Weiguo; Chen, Zhuoheng; Huang, Ling; Kui, Mingqing; Xu, Yirui; Wang, Yang

    2016-08-01

    Knowledge of what controls the activity of subsurface microbial communities is critical for assessing and managing biogenic methane resources. In this study, 19 formation waters and five gas samples were collected at depths of 800 to 1900 m from Quaternary biogenic gas fields of the Qaidam Basin, China. The formation waters were brines with chloride (Cl) concentrations from 1200 to 2700 mM. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies ranged from 3.75 × 104 to 2.23 × 106 copies mL-1 of water, and those of archaea ranged from 2.44 × 103 to 4.66 × 107 copies mL-1 of water. Both bacterial and archaea 16 s rRNA gene copies were negatively correlated with Cl concentration. The microbial community structure differed significantly depending on Cl concentrations. At high Cl waters (>1800 mM), the microbial community showed a halophilic signature made up of several abundant taxonomic groups within Firmicules, γ-Proteobacteria, and methylotrophic Methanosarcinales. At low Cl, Firmicules and hydrogenotrophic methanogens were dominant members. The proportion of inferred hydrogenotrophic methanogens decreased from 89% to 14% of total archaeal reads with increasing Cl concentration; in contrast, methylotrophic species increased from 11% to 85%. Given that the proportion of hydrogenotrophic species was positively correlated with the archaeal gene abundances, we suggest that Cl concentrations primarily constrain the activity of archaea catalyzing H2 reduction of CO2. Our results show that dilution of formation waters is critical in the process of biogenic gas formation, suggesting that an engineered decrease in Cl concentrations may induce methanogenesis as a potential method to increase gas reserves in such areas in the future.

  2. The origin and formation model of Permian dolostones on the northwestern margin of Junggar Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xinchuan; Shi, Ji'an; Zhang, Shuncun; Zou, Niuniu; Sun, Guoqiang; Zhang, Shengyin

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the mechanism of dolostone formation and establishes a dolomitization model in the Permian strata on the northwestern margin of Junggar Basin, China. Dolomitic rock samples are collected from the Permian Fengcheng Formation in Urho area and then characterized by petrological, mineralogical, carbon and oxygen isotope, and trace element geochemical analyses. Results show that the major types of dolomitic rocks include dolomitic mudstone, dolomitic siltstone, dolomitized tuffaceous siltstone, and dolomitized tuffaceous mudstone. The dolomitized rocks are dominated by euhedral or subhedral powder- and fine-crystal dolomites formed by replacement lacustrine argilla-calcareous and siliceous (tuffaceous) components and commonly filled with residual and late calcite cements. The parameters of dolomitic rocks show great variations, including the V/Ni ratio (1.02-4.88), Sr content (95.9-783.6 μg/g), Mg/Ca ratio (0.68-5.13), degree of ordering (0.39-1.00), δ18OPDB (-14.8‰ to 3.2‰), and δ13CPDB (-1‰ to 5.2‰). The dolomitic rocks have multi-stage origins and were formed in a semi-closed continental brackish-saltwater bay with weak hydrodynamic processes, deep water bodies, and relatively quiet conditions. In the Permian depositional stage, a combination of complex tectonic activities, fault development, hot subtropical climate, and frequent volcanic activities provided not only Mg2+ source for dolomitization but also channels for rapid flow and seepage of Mg-rich fluids. The origins of dolostones in the study area include penecontemporaneous dolomitization, burial dolomitization, and hydrothermal dolomitization. This study lays a foundation for further studies on dolomite formation and dolomite reservoir, and provides effective methods for researching complex dolostone (tuffaceous, shale and silty dolomite) formation.

  3. Geothermal investigation of Paleozoic formations in the Central Alberta Basin/Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weides, S.; Moeck, I.; Majorowicz, J.

    2012-04-01

    This study explores Paleozoic formations in the Central Alberta Basin with regard to their usability as geothermal reservoirs. The research area of this regional scale study is approx. 150 km * 200 km in size and located around the city of Edmonton. A 3D geological model is developed based on stratigraphic picks of more than 7000 wells from the Alberta general well data file. The model consists of 20 different geological units, of which 14 belong to the Paleozoic succession. Spatial distribution and thickness of formations is analysed with help of the 3D modelling study. Due to its depth and its distribution throughout the whole study area, the Cambrian Basal Sandstone formation is the most promising horizon for a geothermal development. Porosity and horizontal permeability of four Devonian carbonate formations - Cooking Lake, Leduc, Nisku and Wabamun - is mapped by reinvestigation of more than 50,000 core analyses from the Alberta general well data file. Average porosity of the Devonian ranges from 5.2 % (Nisku) to 10.4 % (Wabamun), average horizontal permeability is between 5 mD (Cooking Lake) and 142 mD (Leduc). In parts of the Devonian formations a vuggy porosity exists, as analysis of cores has shown. This locally high porosity and permeability zones are not fully covered by the core measurements. Since logging and core analysis data of the Cambrian Basal Sandstone are rare, properties of this formation are measured on core samples with probe permeametry, gas permeametry and helium pycnometry. First results show an average porosity of 11.1 % and an average horizontal permeability of 1.4 mD. Further investigation of the Cambrian Basal Sandstone in Central Alberta is planned, including analysis of thin sections and geomechanical testing. Surface temperatures of Cambrian and Devonian strata are calculated, based on a newly calculated geothermal gradient and the reservoir depth range derived from the 3D model. Temperature in the Cambrian Basal Sandstone

  4. The Palaeoproterozoic Woodlands Formation of eastern Botswana-northwestern South Africa: lithostratigraphy and relationship with Transvaal Basin inversion structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, P. G.; Van Der Merwe, R.; Bumby, A. J.

    1998-11-01

    The Woodlands Formation (uppermost Pretoria Group) of eastern Botswana overlies thick quartzites of the Sengoma Formation (Magaliesberg Formation) and comprises a lower unit of interbedded mudrocks and fine-grained recrystallised quartzitic sandstones, succeeded by chaotic and very coarse-grained inferred slump deposits. Within the adjacent western region of South Africa, interbedded mudrocks and quartzitic sandstones stratigraphically overlying the Magaliesberg Formation are now assigned to the lower Woodlands Formation. Within the entire region, interference folding produced by northeast-southwest (F 1 and F 3) and northwest-southeast (F 2) compression, and concomitant faulting characterised inversion of the Pretoria Group basin. This deformation is of pre-Bushveld age and affected all units in the Pretoria Group, including the uppermost Silverton, Magaliesberg and Woodlands Formations, and intrusive Marico Hypabyssal Suite (pre-Bushveld) mafic sills. The Nietverdiend lobe of the Bushveld Complex, intrusive into this succession, was not similarly deformed. Movement along the major Mannyelanong Fault in the northwest of the study area post-dated Transvaal Basin inversion, after which the "upper Woodlands" chaotic slump deposits were formed. The latter must thus belong to a younger stratigraphical unit and is possibly analogous to apparently syntectonic sedimentary rocks (Otse Group) in the Otse Basin of eastern Botswana.

  5. Linked sequence stratigraphy and tectonics in the Sichuan continental foreland basin, Upper Triassic Xujiahe Formation, southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingjiao; Shao, Longyi; Eriksson, Kenneth A.; Tong, Xin; Gao, Caixia; Chen, Zhongshu

    2014-07-01

    Intracontinental subduction of the South China Block below the North China Block in the Late Triassic resulted in formation of the transpressional Sichuan foreland basin on the South China Block. The Upper Triassic Xujiahe Formation was deposited in this basin and consists of an eastward-tapering wedge of predominantly continental siliciclastic sedimentary rocks that are up to 3.5 km thick in the western foredeep depocenter and thin onto the forebulge and into backbulge depocenters. Five facies associations (A-E) make up the Xujiahe Formation and these are interpreted, respectively, as alluvial fan, transverse and longitudinal braided river, meandering river, overbank or shallow lacustrine, and deltaic deposits. This study establishes a sequence stratigraphic framework for the Xujiahe Formation which is subdivided into four sequences (SQ1, 2, 3 and 4). Sequence boundaries are recognized on the basis of facies-tract dislocations and associated fluvial rejuvenation and incision, and systems tracts are identified based on their constituent facies associations and changes in architectural style and sediment body geometries. Typical sequences consist of early to late transgressive systems tract deposits related to a progressive increase in accommodation and represented by Facies Associations A, B and C that grade upwards into Facies Association D. Regionally extensive and vertically stacked coal seams define maximum accommodation and are overlain by early highstand systems tract deposits represented by Facies Associations D, E and C. Late highstand systems tract deposits are rare because of erosion below sequence boundaries. Sequence development in the Xujiahe Formation is attributed to active and quiescent phases of thrust-loading events and is closely related to the tectonic evolution of the basin. The Sichuan Basin experienced three periods of thrust loading and lithospheric flexure (SQ1, lower SQ2 and SQ3), two periods of stress relaxation and basin widening (upper

  6. Climate Proxy Signals in the Plio-Pleistocene Chemeron and Miocene Lukeino Formations, Baringo Basin, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deino, A. L.; Kingston, J.; Hill, A.; Wilson, K. E.; Edgar, R.; Goble, E.

    2009-12-01

    The Chemeron Formation is a hominin-bearing, highly fossiliferous sequence of dominantly alluvial fan and fluvial sedimentary rocks, with climatically significant lacustrine intercalations, exposed within the Tugen Hills of the central Kenya Rift. As we have previously documented (Deino et al., 2006; Kingston et al., 2007), the formation contains a sequence of five 3-7 m thick diatomites in the interval 2.7-2.5 Ma that record, at precessional intervals, the repeated occurrence of deep-lake conditions in the Baringo Basin. These lakes appear abruptly, persist for only about 8,000 years of the ~23,000 year precessional cycle, and recede quickly. The oscillations have been tied to marine core and Mediterranean sapropel sections based on high-precision 40Ar/39Ar dating of K-feldspar in tuffs interspersed through the sequence, and paleomagnetic reversal stratigraphy. Ongoing paleontological investigations in the Tugen Hills are addressing the dynamics of high-resolution faunal and ecological change directly related to the fluctuating climatic background, including its effect on hominin evolution. This specific interval in the Baringo Basin/Tugen Hills has been identified by the Hominid Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project Steering Committee as one of five target areas in East Africa for high-resolution coring studies. The drilling project is currently moving forward to the funding agency proposal development phase. Further exploration in the Tugen Hills has revealed a similar, older sequence of rhythmic alternating diatomites and non-lacustrine sediments in nearby drainages. These beds may represent a precessionally driven climate response possibly associated with the next older orbital eccentricity maximum from ~3.2-2.9 Ma. Characterization of the lithostratigraphy of this area is in progress, and samples of intercalated tuff beds suitable for high-precision single-crystal 40Ar/39Ar dating have been acquired. We have also extended our search for climate proxy records

  7. Synchronous Basin-Wide Formation and Redox-Controled Preservation of Mediterranean s1 Sapropel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lange, G. J.; Slomp, C. P.; Corselli, C.; Erba, E.; Thomson, J.; Reitz, A.

    2012-12-01

    Deposition of distinct organic-rich units (sapropels) in eastern Mediterraneran sediments is precession-related and associated with humid climate conditions. The last of such 'humid periods' occurred from 11 - 5 kyr 14C ago, simultaneous with a sustained circum-Mediterranean wet period. The end of this period coincides with a high manganeseoxide peak in all 30 studied cores and concurs with an abrupt re-ventilation event at 5.7 kyr. We demonstrate that the most recent sapropel (S1) formed synchronously between 9.8 and 5.7 14C ky BP at all water depths greater than a few hundred metres. As a consequence of increased fresh water (monsoon) input, surface waters had a reduced salinity and concomitantly the deep (> 1.8 km) eastern Mediterranean Sea was devoid of oxygen during 4,000 years of S1 formation (De Lange ea., 2008). This has resulted in a differential basin-wide preservation of S1 determined by water depth, as a result of different ventilation/climate-related redox conditions above and below 1.8 km. Climate-induced stratification of the ocean may thus contribute to enhanced preservation of organic matter, ie formation of sapropels (and potentially black shales)

  8. Seismic facies analysis of lacustrine system: Paleocene upper Fort Union Formation, Wind River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Liro, L.M.; Pardus, Y.C.

    1989-03-01

    The authors interpreted seismic reflection data, supported by well control, to reconstruct the stratigraphic development of Paleocene Lake Waltman in the Wind River basin of Wyoming. After dividing the upper Fort Union into eight seismic sequences, the authors mapped seismic attributes (amplitude, continuity, and frequency) within each sequence. Interpretation of the variation in seismic attributes allowed them to detail delta development and encroachment into Lake Waltman during deposition of the upper Fort Union Formation. These deltas are interpreted as high-energy, well-differentiated lobate forms with distinct clinoform morphology on seismic data. Prograding delta-front facies are easily identified on seismic data as higher amplitude, continuous events within the clinoforms. Seismic data clearly demonstrate the time-Transgressive nature of this facies. Downdip of these clinoforms, homogeneous shales, as evidenced by low-amplitude, generally continuous seismic events, accumulated in an interpreted quiet, areally extensive lacustrine setting. Seismic definition of the lateral extent of this lacustrine facies is excellent, allowing them to effectively delineate changes in the lake morphology during deposition of the upper Fort Union Formation. Encasing the upper Fort Union lacustrine deposits are fluvial-alluvial deposits, interpreted from discontinuous, variable-amplitude seismic facies. The authors highlight the correlation of seismic facies data and interpretation to well log data in the Frenchie Draw field to emphasize the accuracy of depositional environment prediction from seismic data.

  9. Lithologic variations and diagenesis of Lower Cretaceous Muddy Formation in northern Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, A.L.; Patterson, P.E.

    1986-08-01

    Regional facies studies show that sandstones in the Muddy Formation, northern Powder River basin, were deposited in fluvial and nearshore marine paleoenvironments. Most sandstones of the fluvial facies contain only minor amounts of clay matrix and are classified as quartzarenite or sublitharenite, whereas those of the shoreface facies contain appreciable clay and are classified as litharenite or arkose. The arkoses are concentrated along a narrow belt that trends northeastward, parallel to the inferred paleoshoreline. Both the fluvial and shoreface sandstones have been variably affected by postdepositional alteration. During early stages of diagenesis, matrix clay was formed predominantly within the shoreface sandstones, owing mainly to alteration of volcanic material. Later, quartz overgrowths and calcite cement were precipitated within the remaining pore spaces in both fluvial and shoreface sandstones. Calcite also replaced detrital framework grains and some of the previously formed matrix clay. During intermediate diagenetic stages, detrital feldspar grains, particularly those in the arkosic shoreface sandstones, were replaced by albite, which characteristically lacks twinning or displays distinctive chessboard texture. Microprobe analyses indicate that both forms are essentially pure albite. During later stages of diagenesis, following maximum burial, much of the calcite was dissolved, producing secondary porosity. Inasmuch as the calcite was precipitated early, i.e., prior to significant compaction, and inasmuch as it replaced both framework grains and authigenic matrix clay, the secondary pores exhibit a relatively high level of interconnection. It is this secondary porosity that has contributed to the migration and storage of hydrocarbons in the Muddy Formation.

  10. Role of halite in the evolution of sandstone porosity, upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation, Mississippi salt basin

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, C.J.; Schmoker, J.W. )

    1993-09-01

    Analysis of petrographic point-count data, cement paragenesis, and scanning electron microscopy examination of pores has shown that poikilitic halite cement in sandstones of the Norphlet Formation in a core from Wayne County, Mississippi, formed following cementation by quartz, feldspar, dolomite, and anhydrite. Intergranular volume ranges from 26 to 42%, averaging 35%, indicating that an average of 10% of the rock volume was lost to compaction, and a further 10-15%, was lost to cementation prior to halite cementation, assuming a depositional porosity of about 45%. Most halite occurs as intergranular cement, but some halite is present as intragranular cement within framework feldspars and lithic fragments. Halite is easily removed from a sandstone during coring, slabbing, and thin-section preparation techniques that do not use oil-based fluids and muds, so the amount of porosity in these samples that is a product of artificial removal of halite is unknown. Although the present and former distribution of halite is poorly known, natural halite dissolution could have produced about 20% secondary porosity in the Norphlet Formation at depth in this part of the Mississippi Salt basin.

  11. Identifying and Remediating High Water Production Problems in Basin-Centered Formations

    SciTech Connect

    R.L. Billingsley

    2005-12-01

    Through geochemical analyses of produced waters, petrophysics, and reservoir simulation we developed concepts and approaches for mitigating unwanted water production in tight gas reservoirs and for increasing recovery of gas resources presently considered noncommercial. Only new completion research (outside the scope of this study) will validate our hypothesis. The first task was assembling and interpreting a robust regional database of historical produced-water analyses to address the production of excessive water in basin-centered tight gas fields in the Greater Green (GGRB ) and Wind River basins (WRB), Wyoming. The database is supplemented with a sampling program in currently active areas. Interpretation of the regional water chemistry data indicates most produced waters reflect their original depositional environments and helps identify local anomalies related to basement faulting. After the assembly and evaluation phases of this project, we generated a working model of tight formation reservoir development, based on the regional nature and occurrence of the formation waters. Through an integrative approach to numerous existing reservoir concepts, we synthesized a generalized development scheme organized around reservoir confining stress cycles. This single overarching scheme accommodates a spectrum of outcomes from the GGRB and Wind River basins. Burial and tectonic processes destroy much of the depositional intergranular fabric of the reservoir, generate gas, and create a rock volume marked by extremely low permeabilities to gas and fluids. Stress release associated with uplift regenerates reservoir permeability through the development of a penetrative grain bounding natural fracture fabric. Reservoir mineral composition, magnitude of the stress cycle and local tectonics govern the degree, scale and exact mechanism of permeability development. We applied the reservoir working model to an area of perceived anomalous water production. Detailed water analyses

  12. RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE LOWER GREEN RIVER FORMATION, SOUTHWEST UINTA BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect

    C.D. Morgan

    1999-08-17

    The +2000-foot-thick (600-m), Tertiary-aged lacustrine deposits of the Middle and Lower Members of the Green River Formation contain the primary oil-producing reservoirs in the southwest Uinta Basin. The authors developed a log-based correlation scheme by identifying what they interpret as depositional cycles on the gamma-ray and resistivity logs of several wells. Regional cross sections were constructed and cycle boundaries revised as needed. The cycles typically range from 50 to 100 feet (15-30 m) thick. The regional correlation scheme will be used to improve their knowledge of the depositional patterns and distribution of productive intervals in the southwest Uinta Basin. Currently, each operator uses a different terminology for many of the same intervals. A regional log-based correlation scheme based on depositional cycles should make it easier to relate subsurface data to the outcrop where depositional environments and lateral continuity of the reservoir rocks can be studied in greater detail. The correlation scheme uses an alpha-numeric nomenclature avoiding local field or facies names that are difficult to use regionally. The nomenclature has three primary levels: (1) MGR or LGR for Middle or Lower Green River, respectively, (2) MGR1 through MGR18 and LGR1 through LGR3 for the different cycles in each member, and (3) MGR1a, MGR1b, and so on, for beds within each cycle. Beds are defined for local use and are not intended to be regional. The cycles can be divided into smaller subcycles, if necessary, for detailed work within a field (MGR14A and MGR14B, for example). cycles can be combined where depositional thinning or poor log quality does not allow correlation of all the individual cycles (MGR5 through MGR9, for example).

  13. CONSOLIDATION OF K BASIN SLUDGE DATA AND EXPERIENCES ON AGGLOMERATE FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    HILL SR

    2010-06-10

    The formation of high sludge strength agglomerates is a key concern to the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) to ensure the sludge can be retrieved after planned storage for up to 10 years in Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSC) at T Plant. This report addresses observations of agglomerate formation, conditions that the data shows lead to agglomeration, the frequency of agglomerate formation and postulated physiochemical mechanisms that may lead to agglomeration. Although the exact underlying chemistry of K Basin sludge agglomerate formation is not known, the factors that lead to agglomeration formation, based on observations, are as follows: (1) High Total Uranium Content (i.e., sample homogeneity and influence from other constituents); (2) Distribution of Uranium Phases (i.e., extent of conversion from uraninite to uranium oxide hydroxide compounds); (3) Sample Dry-out (loss of cover water); (4) Elevated temperature; (5) Solubility ofU(IV) phases vs. U(VI) phases; and (6) Long storage times. Agglomerated sludge has occurred infrequently and has only been observed in four laboratory samples, five samples subjected to hydrothermal testing (performed for 7 to 10 hours at {approx}185 C and 225 psig), and indirectly during six sampling events in the KE Basin. In the four laboratory samples where agglomerates were observed, the agglomerates exhibited high shear strength and the sample container typically had to be broken to remove the solids. The total uranium content (dry basis) for the four samples (KE Pit, KC-2/3 SS, KC-2/3 M250 and 96-13) were {approx}8 wt%, {approx}59.0 wt%, 68.3 wt% and 82 wt%. The agglomerates that were present during the six sampling events were undoubtedly disturbed and easily broken apart during sample collection, thus no agglomerates were observed in subsequent laboratory analyses. The highest shear strengths measured for K Basin sludge samples were obtained after hydrothermal treatment (7 to 10 hr at 185 C) of high-uranium-content KE

  14. Peleolakes and impact basins in southern Arabia Terra, including Meridiani Planum: Implications for the formation of hematite deposits on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newsom, Horton E.; Barber, C.A.; Hare, T.M.; Schelble, R.T.; Sutherland, V.A.; Feldman, W.C.

    2003-01-01

    The hematite deposit in Meridiani Planum was selected for a Mars Exploration Rover (MER) landing site because water could be involved in the formation of hematite, and water is a key ingredient in the search for life. Our discovery of a chain of paleolake basins and channels along the southern margin of the hematite deposits in Meridiani Planum with the presence of the strongest hematite signature adjacent to a paleolake basin, supports the possible role of water in the formation of the hematite and the deposition of other layered materials in the region. The hematite may have formed by direct precipitation from lake water, as coatings precipitated from groundwater, or by oxidation of preexisting iron oxide minerals. The paleolake basins were fed by an extensive channel system, originating from an area larger than Texas and located south of the Schiaparelli impact basin. On the basis of stratigraphic relationships, the formation of channels in the region occurred over much of Mars' history, from before the layered materials in Meridiani Planum were deposited until recently. The location of the paleolake basins and channels is connected with the impact cratering history of the region. The earliest structure identified in this study is an ancient circular multiringed basin (800-1600 km diameter) that underlies the entire Meridiani Planum region. The MER landing site is located on the buried northern rim of a later 150 km diameter crater. This crater is partially filled with layered deposits that contained a paleolake in its southern portion. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Characteristics of hydrothermal sedimentation process in the Yanchang Formation, south Ordos Basin, China: Evidence from element geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Cong; Ji, Liming; Wu, Yuandong; Su, Ao; Zhang, Mingzhen

    2016-11-01

    Hydrothermal sedimentation occurred in the Triassic Yanchang Formation, Ordos Basin, China. However, their macroscopic features at the scale of the stratum and hydrothermal sources still lack correlational research. This paper performed element geochemical study on a large number of core samples collected from the Yanchang Formation of a new drilling well located in the south Ordos Basin. The SiO2/(K2O + Na2O) vs. MnO/TiO2 crossplot and Fe vs. Mn vs. (Cu + Co + Ni) × 10 ternary diagram demonstrate that the Yanchang stratum in the study area has, in general, hydrothermal components. The Al/(Al + Fe + Mn) and (Fe + Mn)/Ti ratios of the core samples range from 0.34 to 0.84 and 4.81 to 50.54, averaging 0.66 and 10.67, respectively, indicating that the stratum is a set of atypical hydrothermal sedimentation with much terrigenous input. Data analysis shows that the hydrothermal source in the study area was from the deep North Qinling Orogen around the south margin of the basin, where some active tectonic and volcanic activities took place, rather than from the relatively stable internal basin. Early Indosinian movement and volcanic activities activated basement faults around the southern margin of the basin, providing vents for the deep hydrothermal fluid upwelling. The hydrothermal indicators suggest that the study area experienced 4 episodes of relatively stronger hydrothermal activity, namely during the Chang 10, Chang 9-1, Chang 7-3 and Chang 6-2 periods. We also propose a new hydrothermal sedimentation model of hydrothermal fluids overflowing from basin margin faults, for the Yanchang Formation, which is reported here for the first time.

  16. Petrology, depositional environments and structural development of the Mineta Formation, Teran Basin, Cochise County, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, Jeffrey A.

    1984-03-01

    The Oligocene Mineta Formation of the Teran Basin in southeastern Arizona contains approximately 1000 m of interfingering alluvial-fan, fluvial, and lacustrine strata with minor intercalated volcanics. Sedimentation began prior to the middle Oligocene and ended with the eruption of the Oligocene-Miocene Galiuro Volcanics about 28 m.y. ago. Several related depositional facies are present in a cyclic pattern within the Mineta Formation. A complete cycle contains proximal, coarse-grained alluvial-fan conglomerates that fine upward into sandstone and pebble conglomerate of a distal-fan or braided-stream environment. Medium- to fine-grained sandstones are interpreted as sandflat deposits that lie stratigraphically above the distal-fan deposits and below lacustrine sandstone and algal limestone. The cycle culminates with deeper water lacustrine mudstone with intercalated thin-bedded turbidite sandstone. Discrete cycles of bedded gypsum and mudstone are found locally within the lacustrine deposits. These deposits represent a temporary playa-lake phase of the Mineta depositional system. The Mineta Formation filled a half-graben that developed in response to extensional stresses associated with the development of the Rincon/Catalina metamorphic core complex. Paleocurrents flowed southwestward from a source area of predominantly sedimentary and volcanic rocks. Sedimentation was contemporaneous with extensional deformation that produced low-angle normal faults and tilted the section toward the northeast. Maximum extension was directed about N55°E-S55°W, roughly parallel to the direction of paleocurrent flow, parallel to the mean slip direction for low-angle normal faults and perpendicular to the strike of the Mineta section.

  17. Formation of nanoporous pyrobitumen residues during maturation processes within the Barnett Shale (Fort Worth Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, S.; Wirth, R.; Schreiber, A.; Schulz, H.-M.; Horsfield, B.

    2012-04-01

    Hydrocarbon generation processes occur within organic-rich shales as a response to increases in thermal maturation. Shale gas reservoir quality is thought to be largely dependent on the extent to which solid organic material has been converted to pore space during catagenesis. Although pores may drastically vary in variety and abundance within differing shales, the occurrence of nanopores within organic particles has recently been documented for an important number of gas shale systems (i.e., Barnett, Haynesville, Utica, Eagle Ford, Woodford, Horn River, Marcellus, Posidonia …). However, despite their ubiquitous nature, the formation and the geochemical nature of these nanoporous organic compounds remain unclear. Here, we present the characterization of samples from the organic-rich Mississippian Barnett shale gas system (Fort Worth Basin, Texas, USA) at varying stages of thermal maturation. Using a combination of compositional organic geochemistry and spectromicroscopy techniques, including synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM - data collected using the CLS 10ID-1 STXM beamline) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we document a net increase in sample geochemical heterogeneity with increasing maturity. In addition to the presence of bitumen in samples of oil window maturity, very likely genetically derived from thermally degraded kerogen, the formation of nanoporous pyrobitumen has been inferred for samples of gas window maturity, likely resulting from the formation of gaseous hydrocarbons by secondary cracking of bitumen compounds. By providing in-situ insights into the fate of bitumen and pyrobitumen as a response to the thermal evolution of the macromolecular structure of kerogen, the present contribution constitutes an important step towards better constraining hydrocarbon generation processes occurring within unconventional gas shale systems.

  18. Burning peat and reworking loess contribute to the formation and evolution of a large Carolina-bay basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Antonio B.; Waters, Matthew N.; Piehler, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Carolina bays are nearly ubiquitous along ~ 1300 km of the North American Atlantic Coastal Plain, but relatively few bays have been examined in detail, making their formation and evolution a topic of controversy. The Lake Mattamuskeet basin, eastern North Carolina, USA, is a conglomeration of multiple Carolina bays that form a > 162 km2 lake. The eastern shoreline of the lake is made up of a 2.9-km-wide plain of parabolic ridges that recorded rapid shoreface progradation. The lower shoreface deposit contains abundant charcoal beds and laminae dated 6465-6863 cal yr BP, corresponding with initiation of a lacustrine environment in the eastern part of the lake. A core from the western part of the lake sampled a 1541-1633 cal yr BP charcoal bed at the base of the lacustrine unit, indicating formation of this part of the basin postdates the eastern basin. Lake Mattamuskeet has no relationship to the Younger Dryas or a linked impact event because rim accretion significantly postdates 12,000 cal yr BP. The shoreline progradation, and association of charcoal beds with the oldest lake sediment in both main parts of the basin, suggest that fire and subsequent hydrodynamic processes were associated with initial formation of these Carolina bays.

  19. Revised Subsurface Stratigraphic Framework of the Fort Union and Wasatch Formations, Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, Romeo M.; Spear, Brianne D.; Purchase, Peter A.; Gallagher, Craig M.

    2010-01-01

    Described in this report is an updated subsurface stratigraphic framework of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation and Eocene Wasatch Formation in the Powder River Basin (PRB) in Wyoming and Montana. This framework is graphically presented in 17 intersecting west-east and north-south cross sections across the basin. Also included are: (1) the dataset and all associated digital files and (2) digital files for all figures and table 1 suitable for large-format printing. The purpose of this U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Open-File Report is to provide rapid dissemination and accessibility of the stratigraphic cross sections and related digital data to USGS customers, especially the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), to facilitate their modeling of the hydrostratigraphy of the PRB. This report contains a brief summary of the coal-bed correlations and database, and is part of a larger ongoing study that will be available in the near future.

  20. Factors controlling Li concentration and isotopic composition in formation waters and host rocks of Marcellus Shale, Appalachian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phan, Thai T.; Capo, Rosemary C; Stewart, Brian W.; Macpherson, Gwen; Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Hammack, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    In Greene Co., southwest Pennsylvania, the Upper Devonian sandstone formation waters have δ7Li values of + 14.6 ± 1.2 (2SD, n = 25), and are distinct from Marcellus Shale formation waters which have δ7Li of + 10.0 ± 0.8 (2SD, n = 12). These two formation waters also maintain distinctive 87Sr/86Sr ratios suggesting hydrologic separation between these units. Applying temperature-dependent illitilization model to Marcellus Shale, we found that Li concentration in clay minerals increased with Li concentration in pore fluid during diagenetic illite-smectite transition. Samples from north central PA show a much smaller range in both δ7Li and 87Sr/86Sr than in southwest Pennsylvania. Spatial variations in Li and δ7Li values show that Marcellus formation waters are not homogeneous across the Appalachian Basin. Marcellus formation waters in the northeastern Pennsylvania portion of the basin show a much smaller range in both δ7Li and 87Sr/86Sr, suggesting long term, cross-formational fluid migration in this region. Assessing the impact of potential mixing of fresh water with deep formation water requires establishment of a geochemical and isotopic baseline in the shallow, fresh water aquifers, and site specific characterization of formation water, followed by long-term monitoring, particularly in regions of future shale gas development.

  1. Oxfordian reef architecture of the La Manga Formation, Neuquén Basin, Mendoza Province, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, Ricardo M.; Kietzmann, Diego A.; Adamonis, Susana; Gómez, José López

    2009-11-01

    The Neuquén back-arc basin is located on the west margin of the South American platform between latitudes 36° and 40° S. The basin is famous for its continuous sedimentary record from the Late Triassic to Cenozoic comprising continental and marine clastic, carbonate, and evaporitic deposits up to 2.600 m in thickness. The stratigraphical and paleontological studies of the outcrops of the La Manga Formation, Argentina, located near the Bardas Blancas region, Mendoza province (35° S and 69° O) allow the reconstruction of the sedimentary environments of an Oxfordian carbonate ramp, where outer ramp, middle ramp, inner ramp (oolitic shoal), inner ramp margin (patch reef) lagoon and paleokarst were differentiated. The reefs consist of back reef facies and insitu framework of coral boundstones that was formed at the top of shallowing-upward succession. Coral reefs were analyzed by defining coral colonies shapes, paleontological content, coral diversity and taphonomy studies. In some studied sections abundant fragments of gryphaeids, encrusting bryozoans, and isolated sponges provided a suitable substrate for coral colonization; however, other sections show an increase in the proportions of ooids, peloidal and coral intraclasts. The core reef facies is composed of white-grey unstratified and low diversity scleractinian coral limestone dominated by robust and thinly branching corals with cerioid-phocoid growths and massive coral colonies with meandroid-thamnasteroid growth forms. The assemblage is characterized by Actinastraea sp., Australoseris sp., Thamnasteria sp. and Garateastrea sp. Internal facies organization and different types of coral colonies allow to recognize the development of varying framework as well as intercolony areas. A superstratal growth fabric characterizes the coral assemblage. On the basis of coral growth fabric (branche and domal types), the reef of La Manga Formation is considered a typical mixstones. The intercolony areas consist of

  2. Two-stage formation model of the Junggar basin basement: Constraints to the growth style of Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Dengfa

    2016-04-01

    Junggar Basin is located in the central part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). Its basement nature is a highly controversial scientific topic, involving the basic style and processes of crustal growth. Some researchers considered the basement of the Junggar Basin as a Precambrian continental crust, which is not consistent with the petrological compositions of the adjacent orogenic belts and the crust isotopic compositions revealed by the volcanic rocks in the basin. Others, on the contrary, proposed an oceanic crust basement model that does not match with the crustal thickness and geophysical characteristics of the Junggar area. Additionally, there are several viewponits, such as the duplex basement with the underlying Precambrian crystalline rocks and the overlying pre-Carboniferous folded basement, and the collaged basement by the Precambrian micro-continent block in the central part and the Hercynian accretionary folded belts circling it. Anyway, it is necessary to explain the property of basement rock, its strong inhomogeneous compositions as well as the geophysical features. In this paper, based on the borehole data from more than 300 industry wells drilled into the Carboniferous System, together with the high-resolution gravity and magnetic data (in a scale of 1:50,000), we made a detailed analysis of the basement structure, formation timing and processes and its later evolution on a basis of core geochemical and isotopic analysis. Firstly, we defined the Mahu Pre-Cambrian micro-continental block in the juvenile crust of Junggar Basin according to the Hf isotopic analysis of the Carboniferous volcanic rocks. Secondly, the results of the tectonic setting and basin analysis suggest that the Junggar area incorporates three approximately E-W trending island arc belts (from north to south: Yemaquan- Wulungu-Chingiz, Jiangjunmiao-Luliang-Darbut and Zhongguai-Mosuowan- Baijiahai-Qitai island arcs respectively) and intervened three approximately E-W trending

  3. Dynamic processes in the lithosphere leading to extension, rifting and basin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The similarity of ages of extensional core complexes, co-genetic basin formation, and kinematically compatible movements along large strike-slip faults in western North America to ages of comparable events within the Himalayas-Alps orogenic belt leads to the speculation that strain related to changes in Pacific (PAC)-North America(NA) plate motions may be recorded on a global scale affecting the coupled plates and extending eastward across Eurasia. The contemporaneous global deformation reflects abrupt changes in PAC-NA plate motions in response to coupling following convergence of buoyant oceanic lithosphere, commonly part of a spreading center, which impedes subduction and leads to collision followed by coupling when the buoyant lithosphere binds against the base of the overriding continental plate. Critical coupling of a sufficiently long ridge segment leads to "capture", after which the former movements of the newly coupled plates are integrated abruptly and changed from previous directions. In western North America, episodes of capture of the NA plate by the (PAC) plate are recorded by break-up unconformities (ca. 55, 35, and 17 Ma) and basins commonly within extensional domains distinguished by age and direction of tectonic transport (Eocene [~55-42 Ma], ca. 285o, Oligocene [~35-20 Ma], 240o, Miocene [17-0 Ma], ca. 280o). The transport directions record the integration of the southwesterly motion of NA , related to mantle convection, and the northwesterly motion of PAC, driven by slab pull. Following each coupling event, PAC moves westward dragging: 1) the formerly subducting Farallon slab, 2) the coupled, formerly overriding, NA plate, and 3) Eurasia (EA), with it. In response to the strong extension that is imposed upon rocks within domains encompassed by the PAC-NA coupled region, and along the southern margin of Eurasia, brittle deformation, accommodated by normal and strike-slip faults, and formation of contemporaneous basins, takes place. Core

  4. Distant effects in bivergent orogenic belts - How retro-wedge erosion triggers resource formation in pro-foreland basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoth, Silvan; Kukowski, Nina; Oncken, Onno

    2008-08-01

    Timeseries derived from two-dimensional sandbox simulations involving surface erosion are taken for the first time to be implemented into flexure calculations of foreland basins. Based on our results we highlight that orogenic systems are a four component system, consisting of a pro-foreland basin, a pro-wedge, a retro-wedge, and a retro-foreland basin. These four components are mechanically coupled via the load dependence of tectonic faulting [Mandl, G., 1988. Mechanics of tectonic faulting, 1st Edition. Elsevier, Amsterdam.] and the finite flexural rigidity of lithospheric plates [Beaumont, C., 1981. Foreland basins. Geophys. J. R. Astron. Soc. 5 (2), 291-329.]. We further demonstrate that the impact of pro-wedge erosion is most pronounced within the pro-wedge but also modifies the shape and size of the retro-wedge, which in turn changes the geometry and propagation velocity of the retro-foreland basin and vice versa. This suggests that one out of the four components of an orogenic system cannot be fully understood without recognition of the other three components. Thus, spatial separation between processes or observations does not necessarily imply their physical independence. This conceptual model is applied in a case study to the Pyrenean orogenic wedge and its Ebro and Aquitaine foreland basins. Our analysis suggests that the Pyrenean pro- and retro-wedge are mechanically coupled and that this coupling manifests itself in the migration of depocentres in both foreland basins. We finally explore implications for the formation of Mississippi Valley Type deposits.

  5. Gas, Water, and Oil Production from the Wasatch Formation, Greater Natural Buttes Field, Uinta Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.; Hoffman, Eric L.

    2009-01-01

    Gas, oil, and water production data were compiled from 38 wells with production commencing during the 1980s from the Wasatch Formation in the Greater Natural Buttes field, Uinta Basin, Utah. This study is one of a series of reports examining fluid production from tight gas reservoirs, which are characterized by low permeability, low porosity, and the presence of clay minerals in pore space. The general ranges of production rates after 2 years are 100-1,000 mscf/day for gas, 0.35-3.4 barrel per day for oil, and less than 1 barrel per day for water. The water:gas ratio ranges from 0.1 to10 barrel per million standard cubic feet, indicating that free water is produced along with water dissolved in gas in the reservoir. The oil:gas ratios are typical of a wet gas system. Neither gas nor water rates show dependence upon the number of perforations, although for low gas-flow rates there is some dependence upon the number of sandstone intervals that were perforated. Over a 5-year time span, gas and water may either increase or decrease in a given well, but the changes in production rate do not exhibit any dependence upon well proximity or well location.

  6. Formation and Identification of Unresolved Complex Mixtures in Lacustrine Biodegraded Oil from Nanxiang Basin, China

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Pengfei; He, Sheng; Zhu, Shukui; Chai, Derong; Yin, Shiyan; Dai, Wei; Zhang, Wanfeng

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC/TOFMS) method has been developed for the formation and identification of unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) in lacustrine biodegraded oils that with the same source rock, similar maturity, and increasing degradation rank from Nanxiang Basin, China. Normal alkanes, light hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, steranes, and terpanes are degraded gradually from oil B330 to oil G574. The compounds in biodegraded oil (oil G574) have fewer types, the polarity difference of compounds in different types is minor, and the relative content of individual compounds is similar. All the features make the compounds in biodegraded oil coelute in GC analysis and form the raised “baseline hump” named UCMs. By injecting standard materials and analyzing mass spectrums of target compounds, it is shown that cyclic alkanes with one to five rings are the major components of UCMs. Furthermore, UCMs were divided into six classes. Classes I and II, composed of alkyl-cyclohexanes, alkyl-naphthanes, and their isomers, are originated from the enrichment of hydrocarbons resistant to degradation in normal oils. Classes III ~ VI, composed of sesquiterpenoids, tricyclic terpanes, low molecular steranes, diasteranes, norhopanes, and their isomers, are probably from some newly formed compounds during the microbial transformation of oil. PMID:25177711

  7. The nonopaque, detrital heavy mineralogy of the Morrison Formation near Crownpoint, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansley, Paula L.

    1983-01-01

    Description and quantification of the nonopaque, detrital heavy mineralogy of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation in the southwestern part of the San Juan Basin have helped to identify stratigraphic trends, source-area lithologies, and zones of post-depositional alteration possibly related to uranium mineralization. A synthesis of stratigraphic variations in mineral species and diversity in Morrison sandstones reveals an increasing upward igneous component, characterized by euhedral zircon and subhedral apatite. Complementing this trend, the predominantly well-rounded assemblage of the Recapture Member changes to a mixed assemblage of rounded and angular grains in the Westwater Canyon Member. Overall, the low diversity in mineral species indicates a sedimentary, low- to medium-grade-metamorphic, and acid igneous parentage for Morrison sediments; however, post-depositional processes have played a significant role in determining the present mineralogy. The roles that diagenesis and weathering have played in determining the present aspect of the assemblage, which is a mature garnet-zircon-apatite-tourmaline suite, cannot be overemphasized. For instance, the presence of authigenically etched to skeletal garnet and staurolite implies that entire grains have been destroyed. Comparison of cores with measured sections indicates that near-surface weathering has caused the destruction of some minerals, notably apatite, sensitive to acidic conditions. Therefore, in order to interpret the sedimentology, stratigraphic intervals in which post-depositional processes have affected the mineralogy were identified. These diagenetic zones may prove to be most useful in delineating the past movements and compositions of interstitial, possibly ore-forming, fluids.

  8. Depositional model, dolomitization, and porosity of Henryhouse Formation (Silurian), Anadarko basin, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Beardall, G.B.

    1987-08-01

    The Upper Silurian Henryhouse Formation, which is part of the Hunton Group, is a major hydrocarbon reservoir in the Anadarko basin. Three basic lithofacies are present in the Henryhouse, based on sedimentary structures, lithology, fossil content, and fabric relationships. These facies, represented in general by massive lime mudstone with diverse fauna, burrowed dolowackestone/packstone with mainly crinoids, and massive to laminated dolomudstone with fenestral fabrics and sparse fauna, are inferred to represent subtidal, intertidal, and supratidal environments, respectively. These facies comprise a vertical sequence that represents regressive deposition. The Henryhouse consists of several of these sequences. The Henryhouse commonly is partly or completely dolomitized in western Oklahoma. Three stages of dolomitization were documented: (1) penecontemporaneous hypersaline dolomite occurring as brownish, hypidiotopic rhombs concentrated in the supratidal and intertidal facies, (2) mixed marine and freshwater dolomite occurring as white rims around preexisting hypersaline dolomite, and as subhedral, white rhombs in vugs and molds, and (3) deep-burial vug, mold, and fracture-filling saddle dolomite. Production in the Henryhouse is generally from porous zones in dolomite. However, lithofacies reflecting depositional environments in which they were formed are equally important in porosity development.

  9. Fault control of channel sandstones in Dakota Formation, southwest Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, W.R.

    1983-08-01

    The Dakota Formation is an important oil reservoir in the southwestern Powder River basin and adjoining Casper arch. Two fields, Burke Ranch and South Cole Creek, are used as examples to show the depositional environments of the Dakota and to indicate the influence of tectonic control on the distribution of the environments. Burke Ranch field is a stratigraphic trap which produces oil from the upper bench of the Dakota. The environment of deposition of the reservoir, determined by subsurface analysis, is a channel sandstone. South Cole Creek field is a structural-stratigraphic trap which produces from the lower bench of the Dakota. Two distinct facies, a channel and channel margin sandstone, exist at South Cole Creek. At both Burke Ranch and South Cole Creek it can be shown that the Dakota channels were deposited on the downthrown side of faults, which were present during Dakota time and which now are reflected on the surface by drainage patterns. An understanding of the environments of deposition of the Dakota and control of the environments by paleotectonics is necessary for exploration for these prolific reservoirs.

  10. Reservoir characteristics of Putnam zone (Silurian Interlake Formation) lithofacies, southwestern Williston basin

    SciTech Connect

    Inden, R. ); Oglesby, C. ); Byrnes, A. ); Cluff, B. )

    1991-06-01

    Reservoirs in the Putnam zone (lower Interlake Formation) in the southwestern part of the Williston basin include oolitic-pellet dolomite grainstone, fossil-pellet grainstone, and a wide spectrum of reef-related, fossil-corral dolomite packstones and coral-stromatoporoid rudstone/boundstones. Each of these potential reservoirs has a unique pore system and, thus a different set of petrophysical properties which define their reservoir characteristics. Oolitic grainstones have a homogeneous intercrystalline-micro-crystalline pore system, whereas the fossil-pellet dolomite grainstone facies consists of separate mesovugs dispersed in well-interconnected intercrystalline porosity. Capillary pressure curves indicate that pore-throat heterogeneity is greater, and entry pressures lower, for reefal lithofacies than for pelletal grainstones. These curves also demonstrate why many of the producing fields tend to have high water cuts. In many oolitic-pellet grainstone units, irreducible water saturations of 10% would not be reached until a hydrocarbon column of 700 ft was reached. High water production characteristics are therefore expected because Red River/Interlake structures attain only 50-100 ft of closure. This, however, does not mean that Putnam is not an economic zone, especially as a secondary objective. Wells in Putnam and Crane fields, for instance, have reserves in excess of 300,000 bbl of oil. The reservoirs here may be dominated by the reef-related facies, which have an extremely high relative permeability to oil.

  11. Ichnofabric analysis of the Tithonian shallow marine sediments (Bhadasar Formation) Jaisalmer Basin, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Bhawanisingh G.; Saklani, Rajendra Dutt

    2014-08-01

    The shallow marine sedimentary sequence of the Jaisalmer Basin exhibits one of the important and well-developed Tithonian sedimentary outcrops for western India. The ichnology and ichnofabric of the lower part of Bhadasar Formation (i.e., Kolar Dongar Member) belonging to Tithonian age are presented and discussed. The Kolar Dongar Member represents a shallow marine succession that contains 16 ichnotaxa: Ancorichnus ancorichnus, Conichnus conicus, Gyrochorte comosa, cf. Jamesonichnites heinbergi, Imponoglyphus kevadiensis, Laevicyclus mongraensis, Monocraterion tentaculatum, Ophiomorpha nodosa, Palaeophycus tubularis, P. bolbiterminus, Phycodes palmatus, Planolites beverleyensis, Rhizocorallium isp., Rosselia rotatus, R. socialis, and Teichichnus rectus. The ichnofabric analysis divulges five distinct ichnofabrics, each typifying distinct depositional environment within shallow marine conditions. The ichnofabric Ophiomorpha 1 with syn-sedimentary faulting exemplifies high energy conditions typical of lower shoreface environment, whereas the Ophiomorpha 2 ichnofabric typifies upper shoreface environment. The Ancorichnus ichnofabric reflects lower offshore condition of deposition. The high ichnodiversity Ancorichnus- Rosselia ichnofabric is indicative of inner shelf conditions, while low ichno-diversity Teichichnus ichnofabric indicates prevalence of low energy brackish bay environment. Thus, Tithonian Kolar Dongar Member indicates depositional environment ranging from shoreface to offshore to inner shelf and finally to brackish bay environment.

  12. Formation and identification of unresolved complex mixtures in lacustrine biodegraded oil from Nanxiang Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Pengfei; He, Sheng; Zhu, Shukui; Chai, Derong; Yin, Shiyan; Dai, Wei; Zhang, Wanfeng

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC/TOFMS) method has been developed for the formation and identification of unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) in lacustrine biodegraded oils that with the same source rock, similar maturity, and increasing degradation rank from Nanxiang Basin, China. Normal alkanes, light hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, steranes, and terpanes are degraded gradually from oil B330 to oil G574. The compounds in biodegraded oil (oil G574) have fewer types, the polarity difference of compounds in different types is minor, and the relative content of individual compounds is similar. All the features make the compounds in biodegraded oil coelute in GC analysis and form the raised "baseline hump" named UCMs. By injecting standard materials and analyzing mass spectrums of target compounds, it is shown that cyclic alkanes with one to five rings are the major components of UCMs. Furthermore, UCMs were divided into six classes. Classes I and II, composed of alkyl-cyclohexanes, alkyl-naphthanes, and their isomers, are originated from the enrichment of hydrocarbons resistant to degradation in normal oils. Classes III ~ VI, composed of sesquiterpenoids, tricyclic terpanes, low molecular steranes, diasteranes, norhopanes, and their isomers, are probably from some newly formed compounds during the microbial transformation of oil.

  13. Paleobotany and palynology of the Bristol Hill Coal Member (Bond Formation) and Friendsville Coal Member (Mattoon Formation) of the Illinois Basin (Upper Pennsylvanian)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willard, D.A.; Phillips, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    Late Pennsylvanian coal swamps of the Illinois Basin were dominated by Psarnius tree ferns with a spatially heterogeneous distribution of medullosan pteridosperms (subdominant), calamites, sigillarian lycopsids, and cordaites. Miospore and coal-ball plant assemblages from the Missourian-age Bristol Hill Coal Member (Mattoon Formation) of southeastern Illinois were quantified to analyze vegetational patterns in Late Pennsylvanian peat swamps and to compare vegetational composition of the coals. -from Authors

  14. Origin of tuff deposits in the lower Miocene Lospe Formation, Santa Maria basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, R.B. ); Stanley, R.G. ); Johnson, S.Y. )

    1991-02-01

    The Lospe Formation contains at least five mappable tuff units (17-18 Ma) which were erupted during initial stages of Neogene Santa Maria basin subsidence. Individual tuff units are lenticular, as much as 15-20 m thick, and 1-3 km wide; they were deposited predominantly in a lacustrine setting. Subaqueous deposition is indicated by facies of the interbedded nonvolcanic Lospe Formation. The lowermost Lospe Tuff unit, however, which overlies Jurassic basement, is interpreted as a subaerial deposit. Each subaqueous tuff unit contains two or more eruption units. Each eruption unit consists of three zones which are, from base to top: (1) massive vitric tuff comprising about 50% of the eruption unit, (2) thin- to medium-bedded vitric tuff with pumice concentrations at the tops of beds and mud drapes between beds, and (3) a thin-bedded interval of massive to planar laminated tuffaceous siltstone-mudstone. The predominance of delicate cuspate vitric shards and pumice, and the near absence of nonvolcanic detritus indicates that little or no reworking of the ash occurred prior to deposition. The Lospe tuffs are predominantly distal pyroclastic flow (zones 1 and 2) and pyroclastic turbidite (zones 2 and 3) deposits, derived from subaerial magmatic eruptions. A possible source for the Lospe tuffs is located at Tranquillon Mountain, 30 km to the south in the westernmost Transverse Range, where 17-18 Ma proximal pyroclastic deposits of welded lithic tuff breccia and thick pumiceous fallout tuffs are present. The similar ages, stratigraphic positions, and petrology, as well as the lateral facies relations suggests a correlation between the Tranquillon volcanic center and the Lospe tuff units. The authors are currently testing this hypothesis on the basis of geochemical and isotopic analyses.

  15. New discoveries of early Paleocene (Torrejonian) primates from the Nacimiento Formation, San Juan Basin, New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Silcox, Mary T; Williamson, Thomas E

    2012-12-01

    Primates underwent a period of diversification following the extinction of non-avian dinosaurs. Although the Order first appeared near the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary, it is not until the Torrejonian (the second North American Land Mammal Age of the Paleocene) that a diversity of families began to emerge. One of the lithological units critical to understanding this first primate adaptive radiation is the early Paleocene Nacimiento Formation of the San Juan Basin (SJB; New Mexico). Primates previously described from this formation comprise six species of palaechthonid and paromomyid plesiadapiforms, all known from very limited material. Collecting has increased the sample of primate specimens more than fivefold. Included in the new sample is the first specimen of a picrodontid plesiadapiform from the Torrejonian of the SJB, referable to Picrodus calgariensis, and the first paromomyid specimen complete enough to allow for a species level taxonomic assignment, representing a new species of Paromomys. With respect to the 'Palaechthonidae', the current report describes large collections of Torrejonia wilsoni and Palaechthon woodi, and the first new specimens attributed to Plesiolestes nacimienti and Anasazia williamsoni since 1972 and 1994, respectively. These collections demonstrate previously unknown morphological variants, including the presence of a metaconid on the p4 of some specimens of T. wilsoni, a discovery that supports previous inferences about a close relationship between Torrejonia and Plesiolestes problematicus. This new sample considerably improves our knowledge of the poorly understood 'Palaechthonidae', and about the biostratigraphy, biogeography, and early evolution of North American primates. In particular, the rarity of paromomyids, the continuing absence of plesiadapid and carpolestid plesiadapiforms, and the presence of a number of endemic palaechthonid species in the SJB contrast with plesiadapiform samples from contemporaneous deposits to the

  16. Mineralization of organogenic ammonium in the Monterey Formation, Santa Maria and San Joaquin basins, California, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, J.S. ); Williams, L.B.; Ferrell, R.E. Jr. )

    1992-05-01

    Inorganic fixed-ammonium (Amm) contents as high as 0.28 wt% were measured in organic-rich, quartz-grade siliceous rocks of the Miocene Monterey Formation from the Santa Maria and San Joaquin basins, California. The greatest amount of fixed-Amm was found in rocks associated with hydrocarbons in the Point Arguello and Lost Hills oil fields, where the Amm/(Amm + K) molar ratio of bulk samples ranges from 0.17-0.35. The formation of Amm-illite is suggested by the parallel increase in the percent of illite in the mixed-layered illite/smectite (I/S) and in the Amm/(Amm + K) molar ratio of the clay-sized fraction with increasing burial depth. Mineralization of Amm appears to be promoted by the coincident timing of the smectite-to-illite clay mineral transformation and the release of Amm during catagenesis. Amm-feldspar may form at shallow burial depths in rocks from the Point Arguello field that contain a greater amount of detrital K-feldspar and in which the I/S contains only 10-20% illite. Quartz-grade siliceous Monterey rocks from coastal outcrops in the Lions Head area lack significant amounts of hydrocarbons and have Amm/(Amm + K) molar ratios of 0.14-0.21. Rocks from the Lions Head area show a strong positive correlation between diagenetic illite and fixed-Amm contents, with Amm constituting 18-21 Mol% of the fixed interlayer cations in the I/S. The results of this study support the suggestion of Williams et al. (1989) that high fixed-Amm contents may provide a long-term geologic record of low-temperature (<150C) Amm mineralization associated with hydrocarbon generation and migration.

  17. Estimation of subsurface formation temperature in the Tarim Basin, northwest China: implications for hydrocarbon generation and preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaowen; Lei, Xiao; Feng, Changge; Hao, Chunyan

    2016-07-01

    Subsurface formation temperature in the Tarim Basin, northwest China, is vital for assessment of hydrocarbon generation and preservation, and of geothermal energy potential. However, it has not previously been well understood, due to poor data coverage and a lack of highly accurate temperature data. Here, we combined recently acquired steady-state temperature logging data with drill stem test temperature data and measured rock thermal properties, to investigate the geothermal regime and estimate the subsurface formation temperature at depth in the range of 1000-5000 m, together with temperatures at the lower boundary of each of four major Lower Paleozoic marine source rocks buried in this basin. Results show that heat flow of the Tarim Basin ranges between 26.2 and 66.1 mW/m2, with a mean of 42.5 ± 7.6 mW/m2; the geothermal gradient at depth of 3000 m varies from 14.9 to 30.2 °C/km, with a mean of 20.7 ± 2.9 °C/km. Formation temperature estimated at the depth of 1000 m is between 29 and 41 °C, with a mean of 35 °C, while 63-100 °C is for the temperature at the depth of 3000 m with a mean of 82 °C. Temperature at 5000 m ranges from 97 to 160 °C, with a mean of 129 °C. Generally spatial patterns of the subsurface formation temperature at depth are basically similar, characterized by higher temperatures in the uplift areas and lower temperatures in the sags, which indicates the influence of basement structure and lateral variations in thermal properties on the geotemperature field. Using temperature to identify the oil window in the source rocks, most of the uplifted areas in the basin are under favorable condition for oil generation and/or preservation, whereas the sags with thick sediments are favorable for gas generation and/or preservation. We conclude that relatively low present-day geothermal regime and large burial depth of the source rocks in the Tarim Basin are favorable for hydrocarbon generation and preservation. In addition, it is found that the

  18. Palaeoenvironment and its control on the formation of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin, northern South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenhao; Zhang, Zhihuan; Wang, Weiming; Lu, Shuangfang; Li, Youchuan; Fu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The main factors of the developmental environment of marine source rocks in continental margin basins have their specificality. This realization, in return, has led to the recognition that the developmental environment and pattern of marine source rocks, especially for the source rocks in continental margin basins, are still controversial or poorly understood. Through the analysis of the trace elements and maceral data, the developmental environment of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin is reconstructed, and the developmental patterns of the Miocene marine source rocks are established. This paper attempts to reveal the hydrocarbon potential of the Miocene marine source rocks in different environment and speculate the quality of source rocks in bathyal region of the continental slope without exploratory well. Our results highlight the palaeoenvironment and its control on the formation of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin of the northern South China Sea and speculate the hydrocarbon potential of the source rocks in the bathyal region. This study provides a window for better understanding the main factors influencing the marine source rocks in the continental margin basins, including productivity, preservation conditions, and the input of terrestrial organic matter.

  19. Palaeoenvironment and Its Control on the Formation of Miocene Marine Source Rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin, Northern South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenhao; Zhang, Zhihuan; Wang, Weiming; Lu, Shuangfang; Li, Youchuan; Fu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The main factors of the developmental environment of marine source rocks in continental margin basins have their specificality. This realization, in return, has led to the recognition that the developmental environment and pattern of marine source rocks, especially for the source rocks in continental margin basins, are still controversial or poorly understood. Through the analysis of the trace elements and maceral data, the developmental environment of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin is reconstructed, and the developmental patterns of the Miocene marine source rocks are established. This paper attempts to reveal the hydrocarbon potential of the Miocene marine source rocks in different environment and speculate the quality of source rocks in bathyal region of the continental slope without exploratory well. Our results highlight the palaeoenvironment and its control on the formation of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin of the northern South China Sea and speculate the hydrocarbon potential of the source rocks in the bathyal region. This study provides a window for better understanding the main factors influencing the marine source rocks in the continental margin basins, including productivity, preservation conditions, and the input of terrestrial organic matter. PMID:25401132

  20. Detailed cross sections of the Eocene Green River Formation along the north and east margins of the Piceance Basin, western Colorado, using measured sections and drill hole information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents two detailed cross sections of the Eocene Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado, constructed from eight detailed measured sections, fourteen core holes, and two rotary holes. The Eocene Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin contains the world’s largest known oil shale deposit with more than 1.5 billion barrels of oil in place. It was deposited in Lake Uinta, a long-lived saline lake that once covered much of the Piceance Basin and the Uinta Basin to the west. The cross sections extend across the northern and eastern margins of the Piceance Basin and are intended to aid in correlating between surface sections and the subsurface in the basin.

  1. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain, Final Report and Topical Reports 5-8 on Smackover Petroleum system and Underdevelopment Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, Ernest A.; Puckett, T. Markham; Parcell, William C.; Llinas, Juan Carlos; Kopaska-Merkel, David C.; Townsend, Roger N.

    2002-03-05

    The Smackover Formation, a major hydrocarbon-producing horizon in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin (MISB), conformably overlies the Norphlet Formation and is conformably overlain by the Buckner Anhydrite Member of the Haynesville Formation. The Norphlet-Smackover contact can be either gradational or abrupt. The thickness and lithofacies distribution of the Smackover Formation were controlled by the configuration of incipient paleotopography. The Smackover Formation has been subdivided into three informal members, referred to as the lower, middle and upper members.

  2. Marine chemistry of the permian phosphoria formation and basin, Southeast Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piper, D.Z.

    2001-01-01

    Major components in the Meade Peak Member of the Phosphoria Formation are apatite, dolomite, calcite, organic matter, and biogenic silica-a marine fraction; and aluminosilicate quartz debris-a terrigenous fraction. Samples from Enoch Valley, in southeast Idaho, have major element oxide abundances of Al2O3, Fe2O3, K2O, and TiO2 that closely approach the composition of the world shale average. Factor analysis further identifies the partitioning of several trace elements-Ba, Ga, Li, Sc, and Th and, at other sites in southeast Idaho and western Wyoming, B, Co, Cs, Hf, Rb, and Ta-totally into this fraction. Trace elements that fail to show such correlations or factor loadings include Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Se, the rare earth elements (REE), U, V, and Zn. Their terrigenous contribution is determined from minimum values of trace elements versus the terrigenous fraction. These minima too define trace element concentrations in the terrigenous fraction that approximately equal their concentrations in the world shale average. The marine fraction of trace elements represents the difference between the bulk trace element content of a sample and the terrigenous contribution. Of the trace elements enriched above a terrigenous contribution, Ag, Cr, Cu, Mo, and Se show strong loadings on the factor with an organic matter loading and U and the REE on the factor with a strong apatite loading. Cd, Ni, V, and Zn do not show a strong correlation with any of the marine components but are, nonetheless, strongly enriched above a terrigenous contribution. Interelement relationships between the trace elements identify two seawater sources-planktonic debris and basinal bottom water. Relationships between Cd, Cu, Mo, Zn, and possibly Ni and Se suggest a solely biogenic source. Their accumulation rates, and that of PO3-4, further identify the level of primary productivity as having been moderate and the residence time of water in the basin at 4.5 yr. Enrichments of Cr, U, V, and the REE

  3. Assessment of in-place oil shale resources of the Green River Formation, Greater Green River Basin in Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, R.C.; Mercier, T.J.; Brownfield, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently (2011) completed an assessment of in-place oil shale resources, regardless of grade, in the Eocene Green River Formation of the Greater Green River Basin in southwestern Wyoming, northwestern Colorado, and northeastern Utah. Green River Formation oil shale also is present in the Piceance Basin of western Colorado and in the Uinta Basin of eastern Utah and western Colorado, and the results of these assessments are published separately. No attempt was made to estimate the amount of oil that is economically recoverable because there has not yet been an economic method developed to recover the oil from Green River Formation oil shale.

  4. Paleontology and sedimentology of upper clastic member of Wanakah Formation, Chama basin, New Mexico: Lacustrine paleoenvironmental implications

    SciTech Connect

    Good, S.J.; Ridgley, J.L. )

    1989-09-01

    Lacustrine strata of the upper part of the Jurassic Wanakah Formation were restricted to the Chama basin of north-central New Mexico by mid-Jurassic tectonic activity in the Brazos and Nacimiento uplifts and along the Gallina-Archuleta anticlinorium. Lateral and vertical facies of the upper Wanakah exposed around the southern margin of the Chama basin indicate that the deeper part of the lake was north of the outcrop belt. The upper 3-5 m of the Wanakah consists of thin-bedded rippled sandstone, interbedded mudstone, and limestone containing trace fossils and freshwater mollusks characteristic of marginal lacustrine facies. Taphonomic studies of mollusks in the Wanakah Formation have been combined with application of ecophenotypic variation documented in extant unionid bivalves to produce paleoenvironmental interpretations of these lacustrine rocks.

  5. Constraining back-arc basin formation in the eastern Coral Sea: preliminary results from the ECOSAT voyage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seton, M.; Williams, S.; Mortimer, N. N.; Meffre, S.; Moore, J.; Micklethwaite, S.; Zahirovic, S.

    2013-12-01

    The eastern Coral Sea region is an underexplored area at the northeastern corner of the Australian plate, where long-lived interaction between the Pacific and Australian plate boundaries has resulted in an intricate assemblage of deep oceanic basins and ridges, continental fragments and volcanic products. A paucity of marine geophysical and geological data from this complex region has resulted in the lack of a clear conceptual framework to describe its formation, ultimately affecting our understanding of the connection between the plate boundaries of the SW Pacific and SE Asia. In particular, the tectonic relationship between two back-arc basins, the Santa Cruz and d'Entrecasteaux Basins, and the South Rennell Trough, has yet to be resolved. In October-November, 2012, we collected 6,200 km of marine magnetic, 6,800 km of gravity and over 13,600 km2 of swath bathymetry data from the eastern Coral Sea onboard the RV Southern Surveyor. A complementary dredging program yielded useful samples from 14 seafloor sites. Our preliminary geochemical interpretation of the dredge samples obtained from the South Rennell Trough reveal volcanic rocks resembling MORB or BABB-type basalts, similar in composition to the recently re-analysed and dated ORSTOM dredges from the area that yielded ~28 Ma MORB-like basalts. Swath bathymetry profiles from the Santa Cruz Basin reveal that the South Rennell Trough extends into this basin, with seafloor spreading fabric being parallel to the trough. Preliminary analysis of the three full and four partial new magnetic anomaly profiles across the Santa Cruz Basin, coupled with limited existing profiles, reveals that the basin may have formed between Chrons 13-18 (~32-38 Ma), with an extinct spreading ridge along the inferred continuation of the South Rennell Trough, consistent with ORSTOM age dates. Our results suggest that the South Rennell Trough is an extinct southwestward propagating spreading ridge, which may have initiated along a pre

  6. New occurrences of fossilized feathers: systematics and taphonomy of the Santana Formation of the Araripe Basin (Cretaceous), NE, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Anelli, Luiz Eduardo; Petri, Setembrino; Romero, Guilherme Raffaeli

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe three fossil feathers from the Early Cretaceous Santana Formation of the Araripe Basin, Brazil. Feathers are the most complex multiform vertebrate integuments; they perform different functions, occurring in both avian and non-avian dinosaurs. Despite their rarity, fossil feathers have been found across the world. Most of the Brazilian feather fossil record comes from the Santana Formation. This formation is composed of two members: Crato (lake) and Romualdo (lagoon); both of which are predominantly reduced deposits, precluding bottom dwelling organisms, resulting in exceptional preservation of the fossils. Despite arid and hot conditions during the Cretaceous, life teemed in the adjacency of this paleolake. Feathered non-avian dinosaurs have not yet been described from the Crato Member, even though there are suggestions of their presence in nearby basins. Our description of the three feathers from the Crato laminated limestone reveals that, despite the small sample size, they can be referred to coelurosaurian theropods. Moreover, based on comparisons with extant feather morphotypes they can be identified as one contour feather and two downy feathers. Despite their rareness and low taxonomic potential, fossilized feathers can offer insights about the paleobiology of its owners and the paleoecology of the Araripe Basin. PMID:27441102

  7. Glacial recharge and paleohydrologic flow systems in the Illinois basin: Evidence from chemistry of Ordovician carbonate (Galena) formation waters

    SciTech Connect

    Stueber, A.M. ); Walter, L.M. )

    1994-11-01

    The Illinois basin provides an opportune setting for elucidating the roles of remnant evaporite brines and meteoric waters in the evolution of formation waters in an intracratonic sedimentary basin. Formation waters from carbonate reservoirs in the Upper Ordovician Galena Group have been analyzed geochemically to study the origin of their salinity, their chemical and isotopic evolution, and their relationship to paleohydrologic flow systems. Chloride/bromide ratios and Cl/Br-Na/Br relations indicate that initial brine salinity resulted from subaerial evaporation of seawater rather than from halite dissolution. Subsequent subsurface dilution of the brines by meteoric waters is disclosed by [delta]D-[delta][sup 18]O covariance; however, the remnant evaporite brine has not been completely expelled from these Ordovician strata. Galena formation waters have [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr ratios that range from 0.708 17 (a value nearly equal to that of coeval seawater) to 0.710 43. This is the greatest range of Sr isotopic ratios found in waters from any stratigraphic unit in the basin. Two fluid mixing events are revealed in plots of [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr vs. 1/Sr. 41 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Makah Formation; a deep-marginal-basin sequence of late Eocene and Oligocene age in the northwestern Olympic Peninsula, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snavely, P. D.; Niem, A.R.; MacLeod, N.S.; Pearl, J.E.; Rau, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    The Makah Formation of the Twin River Group crops out in a northwest-trending linear belt in the northwesternmost part of the Olympic Peninsula, Wash. This marine sequence consists of 2800 meters of predominantly thin-bedded siltstone and sandstone that encloses six distinctive newly named members--four thick-bedded amalgamated turbidite sandstone members, an olistostromal shallow-water marine sandstone and conglomerate member, and a thin-bedded water-laid tuff member. A local unconformity of submarine origin occurs within the lower part of the Makah Formation except in the central part of the study area, where it forms the contact between the older Hoko River Formation and the Makah. Foraminiferal faunas indicate that the Makah Formation ranges in age from late Eocene (late Narizian) to late Oligocene (Zemorrian) and was deposited in a predominantly lower to middle bathyal environment. The Makah Formation is part of a deep-marginalbasin facies that crops out in the western part of the Olympic Peninsula, in southwesternmost Washington and coastal embayments in northwestern Oregon, and along the central part of the coast of western Vancouver Island. On the basis of limited subsurface data from exploratory wells, correlative deep-marginal-basin deposits underlie the inner continental shelf of Oregon and the continental shelf (Tofino basin) along the southwestern side of Vancouver Island. Directional structures in the Makah Formation indicate that the predominantly lithic arkosic sandstone that forms the turbidite packets was derived from the northwest. A possible source of the clastic material is the dioritic, granitic, and volcanic terranes in the vicinity of the Hesquiat Peninsula and Barkley Sound on the west coast of Vancouver Island. Vertical and lateral variations of turbidite facies suggest that the four packets of sandstone were formed as depositional lobes on an outer submarine fan. The thin-bedded strata between the turbidite packets have characteristics of

  9. Preliminary correlation of palynological assemblages from Oman with the Granulatisporites confluens Oppel Zone of the grant formation (lower Permian), Canning Basin, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Michael H.

    1998-05-01

    The presence of Granulatisporites confluens Archangelsky and Gamerro indicates an Asselian-Tastubian (lowermost Permian) age for glaciogene sediments in the Amal-6 borehole, Oman. This suggests that the Al Khlata Formation is in part coeval with glaciogene sediments of the Canning Basin, Western Australia, and sediments of the Chacoparana Basin, Argentina.

  10. Tectonic significance of large-scale chaotic deposits in a Cretaceous fore-arc basin: Valle Formation, Cedros Island (Mexico)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.P.; Busby-Spera, C.J. )

    1990-05-01

    A mappable, deep-marine slide deposit (olistostrome) within medial-Cretaceous fore-arc basin strata (Valle Formation), located on Cedros Island, Baja California Norte, records the initiation of intrabasinal faulting. Studies of both modern and ancient olistostromes show that olistostromes can form in all physiographic provinces (including shelf and abyssal plain) and tectonic settings of the marine environment. A variety of triggering mechanisms have been suggested for olistostromes, including tectonism, sea level changes, diapirism, rapid sedimentation that overloads steep slopes, migration of gas hydrates, or combinations of the above. The olistostrome in the Valle Formation ranges in thickness from 0 to at least 180 m, and extends areally for at least 34 km{sup 2}. It can be divided into two parts. The basal 30-40 m contains large (up to 8 m) angular blocks (allolistoliths) derived from the Jurassic substrate. The allolistoliths decrease in abundance upsection, whereas internally coherent intraformational slide blocks (endolistoliths), which reach tens of meters in width, increase. Beds composing the endolistoliths are alternating mudstone and sandstone turbidites that were deposited on a tectonically stable basin plain or rise setting before catastrophic failure of the sedimentary pile produced the olistostrome. Intrabasinal faulting is invoked as a cause of the sediment failure because of the presence of allolistoliths, which must have been shed into the basin from uplifted( ) basin floor scarps. Allolistoliths occur sporadically throughout at least 400 m of coarse-clastic sediment gravity-flow deposits that cap the olistostrome, suggesting that intrabasinal faulting continued to affect the basin long after the olistrostrome formed.

  11. Ammonia sources and ammonium nitrate formation in the California South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, J. B.; Neuman, J.; Bahreini, R.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Holloway, J. S.; Cai, C.; Kaduwela, A.; McKeen, S. A.; Parrish, D. D.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.

    2011-12-01

    The South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) of California is designated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as being in non-attainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for both PM2.5 and PM10. Formation of fine aerosol nitrates (e.g., ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3)) from gas-phase ammonia (NH3) and nitric acid (HNO3) accounts for a significant fraction of the PM2.5 mass. Quantifying the sources of NH3 in the SoCAB is important for developing aerosol control strategies. Fast-time resolution observations of NH3, particulate ammonium (NH4+), and carbon monoxide (CO) made aboard the NOAA WP-3D aircraft during the CalNex 2010 campaign are used to quantify and compare the major NH3 sources to the SoCAB atmosphere: automobiles and dairy farms. From the automobile NH3:CO emission ratio inferred from the WP-3D observations and CO inventory data the NH3 automobile emissions in the SoCAB are estimated at 38 ± 15 metric tons day-1. Atmospheric mass fluxes are calculated for observed NH3 plumes from dairy farms to estimate the NH3 dairy farm emissions at 27 ± 14 to 120 ± 60 metric tons day-1. Comparison with two emission inventories show good agreement for the automobile NH3:CO emission ratio, however, both inventories under predict NH3 emissions from the dairy farms. The observations suggest that automobiles and dairy farms contributed similar amounts of NH3 to the SoCAB in May 2010. However, observed particle mass was greater downwind from dairy farms, where high NH3 mixing ratios from more concentrated sources shift the NH4NO3 equilibrium toward favorable thermodynamic conditions for the condensation of NH4NO3 onto particles.

  12. Depositional environments of the Santa Margarita Formation in the Miocene Santa Maria basin, Huasna syncline

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.L. )

    1991-02-01

    Preliminary investigation of the depositional environments of the middle sandstone member of the late middle Miocene Santa Margarita Formation in the Huasna syncline suggests a current-dominated shallow shelf environment. Progradation of coarse-grained clastic and bioclastic-rich sediment over siltstone documents the initial stage of deposition of this sand body. Overlying the basal intensely bioturbated bioclastic sediments are large-scale tabular cross-beds, up to 16 m thick, interbedded with tabular lag deposits of barnacles, oysters, and echinoids. The tabular fossil-rich beds, which form sequences up to 6 m thick between the large-scale cross-beds, represent either deposition of bottom set beds of the large-scale cross-beds or current swept lag deposits. Increasing energy conditions are recorded vertically by a decrease in the amount of bioturbation and by an increase in large-scale cross-bed sets and cosets. however, in the northern outcrop area subtidal channels are incised into the upper bioclastic sediments suggesting local shoaling conditions. Paleocurrent data record a unidirectional southwest-directed current trend normal to the basin axis and the East Huasna fault. The coarse clastic deposition terminates with deposition of siltstone as energy conditions decreased and water depth again increased. A current-swept shallow shelf containing extensive sandwaves comprises the major depositional environments. The paleocurrent data and large-scale cross-beds suggest that the shallow shelf extended to the east of the Huasna syncline and that the currents were most likely tidal in origin.

  13. Composition and provenance of the Puente Formation (Miocene), Los Angeles Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Critelli, S. ); Rumelhart, P.E.; Ingersoll, R.V. )

    1994-04-01

    The Puente Formation (PFm) is a middle to upper Miocene clastic unit lying unconformably on the middle to lower Miocene El Modeno Volcanics and Topanga Group, within the Los Angeles basin (LAB). The PFm, about 3900m thick, is composed of sandstone, conglomerate, and mudrock deposited on a submarine fan at bathyal depths. Several intrabasinal discordances suggest active tectonics during deposition. The succession consists of two main upward thickening and coarsening megacycles reflecting submarine fan progradation. The PFm is characterized up-section by: (1) thin-bedded fine sandstone and shale (La Vida M.) grading to thick-bedded coarse sandstone an conglomerate (soquel M.); (2) thin-bedded siltstone, mudrock and sandstone (Yorba M.) grading to thick- to very thick-bedded coarse-grained sandstone and conglomerate (Sycamore Canyon M.). Sandstones of the PFm are quartzofeldspathic and suggest a probable local provenance from the plutonic, volcanic, and metamorphic rocks of the San Gabriel Mountains. Petrological parameters, however, suggest variable contribution of these source rock units through time. Coarse-grained plutonic rock fragments are abundant for the entire succession and consist of plagioclase-rich plutonic rocks perhaps sourced from the Lowe granodiorite. Microlitic, lathwork to felsitic volcanic lithic grains are also present in the lower and middle part. In the Yorba M. there is a local increase of volcanic detritus (Lv/L - 0.80), represented by larger volcanic lithics and abundant volcaniclastic matrix. Metamorphic detritus is not very abundant; it is concentrated in the La Vida M. the PFm represents sedimentation during tectonically active time in the evolution of southern California.

  14. Dolomitized cells within chert of the Permian Assistência Formation, Paraná Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calça, Cléber P.; Fairchild, Thomas R.; Cavalazzi, Barbara; Hachiro, Jorge; Petri, Setembrino; Huila, Manuel Fernando Gonzalez; Toma, Henrique E.; Araki, Koiti

    2016-04-01

    Dolomitic microscopic structures in the form of microspheres, "horseshoe- shaped" objects, and thin botryoidal crusts found within microfossiliferous chert within stromatolites of the Evaporite Bed (EB) of the Permian Assistência Formation, Irati Subgroup, Paraná Basin, Brazil, have been investigated by means of optical microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectrometry and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The microspheres were identified as dolomitized coccoidal cyanobacteria based on similarity in size, spheroidal and paired hemispheroidal morphologies and colonial habit to co-occurring silicified organic-walled cyanobacteria embedded within the same microfabric and rock samples. The co-occurrence of dolomite, pyrite framboids, and abundant dispersed carbonaceous material and silicified cells is consistent with a hypersaline depositional environment with abundant cyanobacterial mats and elevated Mg2 +/Ca2 + ratios and reducing conditions with active anoxic microbial processes near the water-(bio)sediment interface. The abundance of extracellular polymeric substances facilitated anoxic microbial processes (sulfate reduction), providing essential conditions for possible primary microbially induced dolomitization. In most of the dolomitized cells dolomite occurs only as an external layer; in fully dolomitized cells magnesium is richest in the outermost layer. Presumably, the dolomitization process was favored by the presence of anoxic microbial degraders and negatively charged functional groups at the surface of the cyanobacterial cells. Botryoidal dolomite rims of silica-filled fenestrae formed by a similar process and inherited the botryoidal morphology of the cell as originally lining the fenestrae. Silicification interrupted the dolomitization of the largely organic biosediment, mostly by permineralization, but locally by substitution, thereby preserving not only dolomitic microspheres, but also huge numbers of structurally

  15. RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE LOWER GREEN RIVER FORMATION, SOUTHWEST UINTA BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect

    S. Robert Bereskin

    2003-02-11

    Anastamosing, low gradient distributary channels produce {approx}30 gravity, paraffinic oils from the Middle Member of the lacustrine Eocene Green River Formation in the south-central portion of the Uinta Basin. This localized depocenter was situated along the fluctuating southern shoreline of Lake Uinta, where complex deposits of marginal-lacustrine to lower delta plain accumulations are especially characteristic. The Middle Member contains several fining-upward parasequences that can be recognized in outcrop, core, and downhole logs. Each parasequence is about 60 to 120 feet thick and consists of strata deposited during multiple lake level fluctuations that approach 30 to 35 feet in individual thickness. Such parasequences represent 300,000-year cycles based on limited absolute age dating. The subaerial to subaqueous channels commonly possess an erosional base and exhibit a fining upward character. Accordingly, bedding features commonly range from large-scale trough and planar cross bedding or lamination at the base, to a nonreservoir, climbing ripple assemblage near the uppermost reservoir boundary. The best reservoir quality occurs within the laminated to cross-stratified portions, and the climbing ripple phase usually possesses more deleterious micas and/or detrital clays. Diagenesis also exerts a major control on reservoir quality. Certain sandstones were cemented by an early, iron-poor calcite cement, which can be subsequently leached. Secondary intergranular porosity (up to 20%) is largely responsible for the 10 -100 millidarcy rock, which represents petrophysical objectives for both primary and secondary production. Otherwise, intense compaction, silicic and iron-rich carbonate cements, and authigenic clays serve to reduce reservoir quality to marginal economic levels.

  16. Diagenesis of the sandflat and mudflat facies of the upper Queen Formation, Midland basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Mckone, C.J.; Malicse, A.; Mazzullo, J.M. )

    1991-03-01

    The upper Queen Formation (Permian, Guadalupian) of the Midland basin, Texas, consists of cyclically interbedded clastics and evaporites that were deposited in a fluvial-dominated continental sabkha environment. Fluvial sandflat deposits, consisting of thin units (0.2-5.0 m) of very fine grained arkosic sandstones constitute reservoir horizons, whereas 0.1-1.3 m thick units of coarse siltstones and evaporites of playa-mudflat deposits are nonproductive. This study addresses the diagenetic histories of the reservoir and nonreservoir clastics. The primary porosity of the clastics was first reduced by pore-filling hematitic smectite clay, anhydrite, and dolomite during an early diagenetic phase. Subsequent dissolution of the anhydrite and dolomite by acidic pore-waters created high porosities (mean = 15%) and permeabilities (mean = 70 md) in the sandflat deposits, porosities which were only slightly occluded by later dissolution and reprecipitation of grain-lining smectite. Pore-water movement and subsequent hydrocarbon migration were both controlled by the coarser grain size and lower clay-matrix and silt content of these sandflat deposits. In contrast, the finer grain size and higher clay-matrix and silt content prevented similar dissolution of cements within the mudflat facies, which have significantly lower porosities (mean{lt}10%) and permeabilities (mean{lt}0.1 md). Fluids and gases used in enhanced recovery techniques will follow pathways created by dissolution of anhydrite and dolomite cements within the sandflat facies. However, caution must be used with fluids that can cause swelling of the grain-lining smectite.

  17. Petrology, geochemistry, and palynology of Joggins Formation (Westphalian A) coals, Cumberland basin, Nova Scotia

    SciTech Connect

    Hower, J.C.; Calder, J.H.; Cortland, F.E.

    1996-09-01

    Five Westphalian A coals were collected from the Joggins Formation section exposed along Chignecto Bay at Joggins, Nova Scotia. Several of the coal beds along the bay were mined beginning in the early 17th century. There has been little detailed investigation of the coal beds of this classic section. The lowermost coal, the Upper Coal 29 (Fundy), is a high-vitrinite coal with a spore assemblage dominated by arboreous lycopod spores with tree ferns subdominant. The upper portions of the coal bed have the highest ratio of well-preserved to poorly-preserved telinite of any of the coals investigated. Coal 19 (Forty Brine) has 88% total vitrinite but, unlike the Fundy coal bed, the telinite has a poor preservation ratio and half of the total vitrinite population comprises gelocollinite and vitrodetrinite. The latter coal bed is directly overlain by a basin-wide limestone bed. The Lower Kimberly (Coal 15) shows good preservation of vitrinite with relatively abundant telinite among the total vitrinite. The Upper Kimberly, which underlies the tetrapod-bearing lycopsid trees found by Lyell and Dawson in 1852, exhibits an upward decrease in arboreous lycopod spores and an increase in the tree fern spore Punctatisporites minutus. The megaspore record is similarly dominated by Lagenicularugosa paralycopodites and tree fern spores. Telinite preservation increases upwards in the Upper Kimberly but overall is well below the preservation ratio of the Fundy coal bed. The coals are all high sulfur, up to 13.7% total sulfur for the lower lithotype of the Fundy coal bed. The Kimberly coals are not only high in total and pyritic sulfur, but also have high concentrations of chalcophile elements.

  18. Tectonic evolution of Gulf of Anadyr and formation of Anadyr and Navarin basins

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, M.S.; Childs, J.R.; Cooper, A.K.

    1983-04-01

    The Gulf of Anadyr is underlain by two major sedimentary basins, Kresta basin and East Anadyr trough, that trend east to southeast and contain, in places, more than 9 km (29,500 ft) of fill. The basins are flanked on the east and north by the Okhotsk-Chukotsk volcanic belt, a broad bedrock high composed of plutonic and volcanic rocks that extends from eastern Siberia along the inner Bering Sea shelf at least to St. Matthew Island. The East Anadyr trough extends onshore and connects with the larger Anadyr basin, which underlies the lowlands between the Koryak Range and Okhotsk-Chukotsk volcanic belt of eastern Siberia. New seismic reflection and refraction data reveal that Anadyr basin is separated from Navarin basin by Anadyr ridge, a southeast-northwest-trending bedrock high that is characterized by high-amplitude, short-wavelength magnetic anomalies. Anadyr ridge may be an offshore extension of the melange belt underlying the Koryak Range Sonobuoy refraction data indicate that the velocity profile of strata in East Anadyr trough is similar to that in Navarin basin.

  19. The Amaranth Formation of the Williston Basin: Paleomagnetic, Petrologic and Geochemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, E.; Cioppa, M. T.; Al-Aasm, I.

    2008-12-01

    Major debate continues to exist concerning the time of deposition of the Amaranth Formation in the Williston Basin of North America, with postulated ages of Pennsylvanian, Permian, Triassic, Lower and Middle Jurassic. A multidisciplinary study of the lower member of the Amaranth Formation was conducted in six wells in Manitoba. The lower Amaranth red beds are composed of red carbonate-rich and carbonate-poor interbedded sandstones/siltstones/shales containing dolomite and anhydrite and lacking diagnostic fossils. Preliminary analysis of the oxygen and carbon isotope values measured for replacive and cement dolomite show variations related to particular lithologies that can be correlated to the types of dolomite present in the rocks. The siliciclastic sections are dominated by detrital, zoned dolomite that has recrystallized rims, whereas in the more carbonate-rich and evaporitic samples with little to no clastic content, replacive matrix dolomite is the dominant phase. Dolomite samples from the siliciclastic sections are characterized by relatively depleted carbon and oxygen isotope values, the dolomite matrix samples have relatively enriched oxygen and carbon isotope values and a few samples containing replacement matrix dolomite with minor clastic input have intermediate isotope values. These variations reflect primary and diagenetic overprints. Hematite is the major magnetization carrier, with occasional softer magnetic minerals such as magnetite. Optical microscopy revealed the existence of two types of hematite: detrital specular hematite and very fine red pigment hematite. The paleomagnetic data reveals at least three episodes of magnetization. The most pervasive magnetization, B, was formed during the Permian-Carboniferous Kiaman Reverse Superchron. An isolated magnetization in a couple of wells, C, suggests a remagnetization event that happened sometime between mid-Jurassic and Neogene, possibly resulting from a localized oxidizing fluid flow event. The

  20. Reconnaissance geochronology of tuffs in the Miocene Barstow Formation: implications for basin evolution and tectonics in the central Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, D.M.; Leslie, S.R.; Hillhouse, J.W.; Wooden, J.L.; Vazquez, J.A.; Reynolds, R.E.

    2010-01-01

    Early to middle Miocene lacustrine strata of the Barstow Formation are well dated in just a few places, limiting our ability to infer basin evolution and regional tectonics. At the type section in the Mud Hills, previous studies have shown that the lacustrine interval of the Barstow Formation is between ~16.3 Ma and ~13.4 Ma. Elsewhere, lake beds of the Barstow Formation have yielded vertebrate fossils showing the Hemingfordian/Bartovian transition at ~16 Ma but are otherwise poorly dated. In an attempt to clarify the age and depositional environments of the lake deposits, we are mapping the Barstow Formation and dating zircons from interbedded tuffs, as well as testing ash-flow tuffs for the distinctive remanent magnetization direction of the widespread Peach Spring Tuff. Thus far, our new U-Pb zircon ages inficate that the Barstow lake beds contain tuff beds as old as 19.1 Ma and as young as 15.3 Ma. At Harvard Hill, Barstow lake beds contain a thick tuff dated at 18.7 Ma. On the basis of zircon ages, mineralogy, zircon chemistry, and paleomagnetic results, we consider the thick tuff to be a lacustrine facies of the Peach Spring Tuff. We have identified the Peach Spring Tuff by similar methods at eight localities over a broad area, providing a timeline for several fluvial and lacustrine sections. The new dates indicate that long-lived lacustrine systems originated before 19 Ma and persisted to at least 15 Ma. The onset of lacustrine conditions predates the Peach Spring Tuff in most Barstow Formation sections and may be older than 19.5 Ma in some places. The new data indicate that the central Mojave Desert contained narrow to broad lake basins during and after extension, and that Barstow lacustrine deposits did not exclusively postdate extensional tectonics. At present, it is unclear whether several separate, small lake basins coexisted during the early to middle Miocene, or if instead several small early Miocene basins gradually coalesced over about 6 millions

  1. Reconnaissance geochronology of tuffs in the Miocene Barstow Formation: implications for basin evolution and tectonics in the central Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David M.; Leslie, Shannon R.; Hillhouse, John W.; Wooden, Joseph L.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Reynolds, R.E.

    2010-01-01

    Early to middle Miocene lacustrine strata of the Barstow Formation are well dated in just a few places, limiting our ability to infer basin evolution and regional tectonics. At the type section in the Mud Hills, previous studies have shown that the lacustrine interval of the Barstow Formation is between ~16.3 Ma and ~13.4 Ma. Elsewhere, lake beds of the Barstow Formation have yielded vertebrate fossils showing the Hemingfordian/Barstovian transition at ~16 Ma but are otherwise poorly dated. In an attempt to clarify the age and depositional environments of the lake deposits, we are mapping the Barstow Formation and dating zircons from interbedded tuffs, as well as testing ash-flow tuffs for the distinctive remanent magnetization direction of the widespread Peach Spring Tuff. Thus far, our new U-Pb zircon ages indicate that the Barstow lake beds contain tuff beds as old as 19.1 Ma and as young as 15.3 Ma. At Harvard Hill, Barstow lake beds contain a thick tuff dated at 18.7 Ma. On the basis of zircon ages, mineralogy, zircon chemistry, and paleomagnetic results, we consider the thick tuff to be a lacustrine facies of the Peach Spring Tuff. We have identified the Peach Spring Tuff by similar methods at eight localities over a broad area, providing a timeline for several fluvial and lacustrine sections. The new dates indicate that long-lived lacustrine systems originated before 19 Ma and persisted to at least 15 Ma. The onset of lacustrine conditions predates the Peach Spring Tuff in most Barstow Formation sections and may be older than 19.5 Ma in some places. The new data indicate that the central Mojave Desert contained narrow to broad lake basins during and after extension, and that Barstow lacustrine deposits did not exclusively postdate extensional tectonics. At present, it is unclear whether several separate, small lake basins coexisted during the early to middle Miocene, or if instead several small early Miocene basins gradually coalesced over about 6 million

  2. Chapter 5. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources-Lower Cretaceous Travis Peak and Hosston formations, Jurassic Smackover interior salt basins total petroleum system, in the East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T.S.; Condon, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    The petroleum assessment of the Travis Peak and Hosston Formations was conducted by using a total petroleum system model. A total petroleum system includes all of the important elements of a hydrocarbon fluid system needed to develop oil and gas accumulations, including source and reservoir rocks, hydrocarbon generation, migration, traps and seals, and undiscovered accumulations. A total petroleum system is mappable and may include one or more assessment units. For each assessment unit, reservoir rocks contain similar geology, exploration characteristics, and risk. The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System is defined for this assessment to include (1) Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates and calcareous shales and organic-rich shales of the Upper Jurassic Bossier Shale of the Cotton Valley Group and (2) Lower Cretaceous Travis Peak and Hosston Formations. The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System includes three conventional Travis Peak-Hosston assessment units: Travis Peak-Hosston Gas and Oil (AU 50490205), Travis Peak-Hosston Updip Oil (AU 50490206), and Travis Peak-Hosston Hypothetical Updip Oil (AU 50490207). A fourth assessment unit, the Hosston Hypothetical Slope-Basin Gas Assessment Unit, was named and numbered (AU 50490208) but not geologically defined or quantitatively assessed owing to a lack of data. Together, assessment units 50490205 to 50490207 are estimated to contain a mean undiscovered conventional resource of 29 million barrels of oil, 1,136 billion cubic feet of gas, and 22 million barrels of natural gas liquids.

  3. Rifting of the Tyrrhenian Basin: A Natural Laboratory to Study Extension of Continental Lithosphere and Conjugate Rifted Margin Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranero, C. R.; Sallares, V.; Grevemeyer, I.; Zitellini, N.; Vendrell, M. G.; Prada, M.; Moeller, S.; Party, M. C.; Medoc Cruise Party

    2011-12-01

    The Tyrrhenian basin has been created by extension of continental lithosphere above a retreating slab during the Neogene. The basin is not currently extending, but its structure preserves information of the time evolution of the rifting process. The basin opened from north to south with different amounts of extension. The northern region stopped opening after relatively low extension. The amount of extension increases southwards to a region where full crustal separation produced mantle exhumation. The final structure displays two conjugate margins with an asymmetric structure. We present results from a two-vessel seismic experiment that took place in spring 2010. The cruise was carried out with the Spanish R/V Sarmiento de Gamboa (SdG) and the Italian R/V Urania in a first leg. The ships collected 5 E-W trending wide-angle seismic (WAS) profiles across the entire basin using 17 Ocean Bottom Seismometers and 25 Ocean Bottom Hydrophones and a 4800 c.i. G-II gun array. During the second leg the R/V SdG collected 16 Multichannel Seismic Reflection (MCS) profiles using a 3.75 km-long streamer and a 3000 c.i. G-II gun array. MCS profiles were acquired coincident with the WAS profiles, and a number of additional lines concentrated in the central region of the basin where mantle exhumation took place. The seismic data covers the region of the basin that experienced different amount of extension from north to south. In this presentation we compare observations from different transects to study the evolution of the processes of continental margin formation by trading space (different areas with different extension factors) for time (evolution of extension). Each transect provides the tectonic structure, the geometry of sedimentary deposits, and seismic velocity distribution. This information allows to interpret the mechanisms of deformation and to study the symmetry-asymmetry structure of the conjugated margins, and thus of the processes involved in their formation. The

  4. Facies analysis, sea level history, and platform evolution of Jurassic Smackover Formation, Conecuh basin, Escambia County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, R.A. Jr.; King, D.T. Jr.

    1987-09-01

    The Smackover Formation (Jurassic, Oxfordian) in the Conecuh basin, Escambia County, Alabama, is divided into six carbonate sedimentary facies. In approximate stratigraphic order, they are (1) intertidal algal mudstone, (2) basinal carbonate mudstone and calcareous shale, (3) graded slope packstone and wackestone, (4) Tubiphytes-bearing, slope debris-flow grainstone and packstone, (5) distal-ramp wackestone, and (6) shoal-produced oolitic grainstone. Facies correlation and synthesis, using 11 key drill cores, show that the Smackover platform was profoundly affected by two rapid sea level rises during the Oxfordian transgression, as well as the late Oxfordian regression. The first rapid rise drowned in the inherited Norphlet clastic ramp, including the Smackover intertidal algal mudstone (facies 1). Subsequently, a Tubiphytes-rimmed shelf developed and its bypass-margin slope deposits (facies 3 and 4) and coeval basinal facies (facies 2) prograded in the basin. The second rapid sea level rise drowned the rimmed shelf, creating a distally steepened ramp. Facies developed on the ramp were distal-ramp deposits (facies 5) and higher energy updip oolitic shoals (facies 6). The late Oxfordian rapid regression caused widespread progradation of the oolitic shoals and coeval sabkha facies of the overlying Buckner anhydrite.

  5. Geothermal energy from the Main Karoo Basin (South Africa): An outcrop analogue study of Permian sandstone reservoir formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Stuart A.; Lenhardt, Nils; Dippenaar, Matthys A.; Götz, Annette E.

    2016-04-01

    The geothermal potential of the South African Main Karoo Basin has not been addressed in the past, although thick siliciclastic successions in geothermal prone depths are promising target reservoir formations. A first assessment of the geothermal potential of the Karoo Basin is based on petro- and thermophysical data gained from an outcrop analogue study of Permian sandstones in the Eastern Cape Province, and evaluation of groundwater temperature and heat flow values from literature. A volumetric approach of the sandstones' reservoir potential leads to a first estimation of 2240 TWh (8.0 EJ) of power generation within the central and southern part of the basin. Comparison with data from other sedimentary basins where deep geothermal reservoirs are identified shows the high potential of the Karoo for future geothermal resource exploration, development and production. The mainly low permeability lithotypes may be operated as stimulated systems, depending on the fracture porosity in the deeper subsurface. In some areas auto-convective thermal water circulation might be expected and direct heat use becomes reasonable. The data presented here serve to identify exploration areas and are valuable attributes for reservoir modeling, contributing to (1) a reliable reservoir prognosis, (2) the decision of potential reservoir stimulation, and (3) the planning of long-term efficient reservoir utilization.

  6. Megabreccia deposits in an extensional basin: The Miocene-Pliocene Horse Camp Formation, east-central Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, J.G.; Brown, C.L. )

    1991-06-01

    Three varieties of megabreccia deposits are present in alluvial-lacustrine extensional basin fill of the Miocene-Pliocene Horse Camp Formation of east-central Nevada. Coherent debris sheets (150-300 m thick; up to 1,500 m long) consist of Oligocene-Miocene volcanic rock masses which are internally fractured yet retain their stratigraphic integrity. Fracture zones show variable amounts of displacement (up to 5 cm) and brecciation. These debris sheets overlie horizontally stratified sandstone and laminated claystone interpreted as playa deposits and are overlain by lithified grus. Emplacement of these coherent debris sheets was by landslide or block slide. Associated deposits of large boulders within playa facies suggest gliding of blocks broken from the edges of the landslides across wet playa surfaces. Large (1.6 - 2.4 km-long) allochthonous blocks consist of intact Paleozoic and Tertiary volcanic stratigraphic sequences which are brecciated and attenuated. Brecciation is accompanied in places by incorporation of muddy sand matrix. These blocks may be fragments of the upper plate of low-angle detachment faults which broke away as gravity-driven blocks from the nearby Horse Range and slid along the uplifted former detachment surface into the adjacent Horse Camp basin. Megabreccia deposits characterize Teritary extensional basins in western North America. Detailed analysis of their stratigraphic, sedimentologic, and structural relations can provide a better understanding of the complex tectonosedimentary history of these basins.

  7. Geomorphic and hydroclimatic controls on the formation of evaporite deposits in the Qaidam Basin, northern Tibetan Plateau, China*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Zhang, L.; Gao, C.; Cheng, A.; He, X.

    2012-12-01

    Qaidam Basin is a hyperarid inland basin with an area of 121×103 km2 located on the northern Tibetan Plateau. One fourth of the basin today is covered by playas and hypersaline lakes. About 80% of brine lithium found in China is contained mostly in four salt lakes: Bieletan (BLT), DongTaijinaier (DT), XiTaijinaier (XT) and Yiliping (YLP). The Li+-rich interstitial brines are associated with the halite-dominated evaporite strata or evaporitic sediments, coexisting with K+-rich brines. Our recent investigation found that the contrasting hydroclimatic conditions between the high mountains containing ice caps and the terminal basins with salt lakes are central to the evaporite deposition. The greater than 4000 m of relief in the watershed enables a massive amount of ions to be weathered and transported together with clastic material from the huge, relatively wet alpine regions to the hyperarid terminal basins, where intense evaporation rapidly enriches the lake water, resulting in the formation of the evaporitic sequences and associated brine deposits. The topographically-induced differential effects of the middle-latitude westerlies are probably raised in a warmer climate, bringing about conditions more favourable for evaporite deposition than today. This is because precipitation increases in the mountainous catchment as a result of enhanced condensation triggered by increased vertical inflows when the alpine surface is warmer, whereas evaporation enhances in the Qaidam Basin under higher summer temperature and rain shadow effect. Qarhan Playa, the largest salt lake in the Qaidam Basin, for example, should have larger inundated areas than today during the early-middle Holocene when the summer was warmer, thus increased evaporite mineral production. Another finding of our work is the geomorphic control associated with the evolution of two large alluvial fans on the depositional system of the four salt lakes. Data from lithostratigraphic correlation of representative

  8. Porous media of the Red River Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota: a possible Sedimentary Enhanced Geothermal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, Caitlin M.

    2016-09-01

    Fracture-stimulated enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) can be developed in both crystalline rocks and sedimentary basins. The Red River Formation (Ordovician) is a viable site for development of a sedimentary EGS (SEGS) because the formation temperatures exceed 140 °C and the permeability is 0.1-38 mD; fracture stimulation can be utilized to improve permeability. The spatial variations of the properties of the Red River Formation were analyzed across the study area in order to understand the distribution of subsurface formation temperatures. Maps of the properties of the Red River Formation-including depth to the top of the formation, depth to the bottom of the formation, porosity, geothermal gradient, heat flow, and temperature-were produced by the Kriging interpolation method in ArcGIS. In the future, these results may be utilized to create a reservoir simulation model of an SEGS in the Red River Formation; the purpose of this model would be to ascertain the thermal response of the reservoir to fracture stimulation.

  9. Formation waters from Mississippian-Pennsylvanian reservoirs, Illinois basin, USA: Chemical and isotopic constraints on evolution and migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stueber, Alan M.; Walter, Lynn M.; Huston, Ted J.; Pushkar, Paul

    1993-02-01

    We have analyzed a suite of seventy-four formation-water samples from Mississippian and Pennsylvanian carbonate and siliciclastic strata in the Illinois basin for major, minor, and trace element concentrations and for strontium isotopic composition. A subset of these samples was also analyzed for boron isotopic composition. Data are used to interpret origin of salinity and chemical and Sr isotopic evolution of the brines and in comparison with a similar data set from an earlier study of basin formation waters from Silurian-Devonian reservoirs. Systematics of Cl-Br-Na show that present Mississippian-Pennsylvanian brine salinity can be explained by a combination of subaerial seawater evaporation short of halite saturation and subsurface dissolution of halite from an evaporite zone in the middle Mississippian St. Louis Limestone, along with extensive dilution by mixing with meteoric waters. Additional diagenetic modifications in the subsurface interpreted from cation/Br ratios include K depletion through interaction with clay minerals, Ca enrichment, and Mg depletion by dolomitization, and Sr enrichment through CaCO 3 recrystallization and dolomitization. Ste. Genevieve Limestone (middle Mississippian) formation waters show 87Sr /86Sr ratios in the range 0.70782-0.70900, whereas waters from the siliciclastic reservoirs are in the range 0.70900-0.71052. Inverse correlations between 87Sr /86Sr and B, Li, and Mg concentrations suggest that the brines acquired radiogenic 87Sr through interaction with siliciclastic minerals. Completely unsystematic relations between 87Sr /86Sr and 1/Sr are observed; Sr concentrations in Ste. Genevieve and Aux Vases (middle Mississippian) waters appear to be buffered by equilibrium with respect to SrSO 4. Although there are many similarities in their origin and evolution, these formation waters are distinguished from Silurian-Devonian brines in the basin by elevated Cl/Br and Na/Br ratios and by unsystematic Sr isotope relationships. Thus

  10. Assessment of Undiscovered Technically Recoverable Oil and Gas Resources of the Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, Montana and North Dakota, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollastro, R.M.; Roberts, L.N.R.; Cook, T.A.; Lewan, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has completed an assessment of the undiscovered oil and associated gas resources of the Upper Devonian to Lower Mississippian Bakken Formation in the U.S. portion of the Williston Basin of Montana and North Dakota and within the Williston Basin Province. The assessment is based on geologic elements of a total petroleum system (TPS), which include (1) source-rock distribution, thickness, organic richness, maturation, petroleum generation, and migration; (2) reservoir-rock type (conventional or continuous), distribution, and quality; and (3) character of traps and time of formation with respect to petroleum generation and migration. Framework studies in stratigraphy and structural geology and modeling of petroleum geochemistry, combined with historical exploration and production analyses, were used to estimate the undiscovered, technically recoverable oil resource of the Bakken Formation. Using this framework, the USGS defined a Bakken-Lodgepole TPS and seven assessment units (AU) within the system. For the Bakken Formation, the undiscovered oil and associated gas resources were quantitatively estimated for six of these AUs.

  11. Organic facies characteristics of the Miocene Soma Formation (Lower Lignite Succession-KM2), Soma Coal Basin, western Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokerek, Selin; Ozcelik, Orhan

    2015-04-01

    The Soma coal basin is one of the largest economic lignite-bearing alluvial basins of western Turkey. The Miocene succession (Soma Formation) of the coalfield contains two lignite seams successions; Lower Lignite, Middle Lignite .The Lower Lignite (KM2) is a seam 15 m thick and found in contact between siliciclastic and carbonate deposits (marlstones). Detailed data from thick Miocene sediments (Soma Formation) made it possible to construct an organic facies framework using different zonations. Organic matter is composed predominantly of woody material. Kerogen in the deposits is type III, as indicated by organic petrographic observations and Rock-Eval data. Total organic carbon (TOC) values are generally between 28.45 and 72.66 %, but reach 73.38 % in the formation. Tmax values vary between 403 and 429 °C, confirming maturation trends indicated by vitrinite reflectance data (between 0.35-0.48 Ro %). Organic facies type C and CD were identified in the investigated units. Organic facies C and CD are related to clayey coal and coal lithofacies. These facies are characterized by average values of HI around 126 mg HC/g TOC (equivalent to type III kerogen), TOC around 56.61 %, and an average of S2 of 72.4 mg HC/g of rock. The organic matter is partly oxidized/oxidized and reworked. Keywords: Western Turkey; Soma Formation; organic facies; organic geochemistry

  12. Isopach and isoresource maps for oil shale deposits in the Eocene Green River Formation for the combined Uinta and Piceance Basins, Utah and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercier, Tracey J.; Johnson, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    The in-place oil shale resources in the Eocene Green River Formation of the Piceance Basin of western Colorado and the Uinta Basin of western Colorado and eastern Utah are estimated at 1.53 trillion barrels and 1.32 trillion barrels, respectively. The oil shale strata were deposited in a single large saline lake, Lake Uinta, that covered both basins and the intervening Douglas Creek arch, an area of comparatively low rates of subsidence throughout the history of Lake Uinta. Although the Green River Formation is largely eroded for about a 20-mile area along the crest of the arch, the oil shale interval is similar in both basins, and 17 out of 18 of the assessed oil shale zones are common to both basins. Assessment maps for these 17 zones are combined so that the overall distribution of oil shale over the entire extent of Lake Uinta can be studied. The combined maps show that throughout most of the history of Lake Uinta, the richest oil shale was deposited in the depocenter in the north-central part of the Piceance Basin and in the northeast corner of the Uinta Basin where it is closest to the Piceance Basin, which is the only area of the Uinta Basin where all of the rich and lean oil shale zones, originally defined in the Piceance Basin, can be identified. Both the oil shale and saline mineral depocenter in the Piceance Basin and the richest oil shale area in the Uinta Basin were in areas with comparatively low rates of subsidence during Lake Uinta time, but both areas had low rates of clastic influx. Limiting clastic influx rather than maximizing subsidence appears to have been the most important factor in producing rich oil shale.

  13. Isopach and structure contour maps of the Burro Canyon(?) Formation in the Chama-El Vado Area, Chama Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ridgley, Jennie L.

    1983-01-01

    In the Chama Basin a wequence of conglomerate, sandstone, and red, gray-green, and pale-purple mudstone occurs stratigraphically between the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation and Upper Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone. This stratigraphic interval has been called the Burro Canyon Formation by several workers (Craig and others, 1959; Smith and others, 1961; Saucier, 1974). Although similarities in lithology and stratigraphic position exist between this unit and the Burro Canyon Formation in Colorado, no direct correlation has been made between the two. For this reason the unit in the Chama Basin is called the Burro Canyon(?) Formation

  14. Isopach and structure contour maps of the Burro Canyon(?) Formation in the Mesa Golondrina and Mesa de los Viejos areas, Chama Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ridgley, Jennie L.

    1983-01-01

    In the Chama Basin a wequence of conglomerate, sandstone, and red, gray-green, and pale-purple mudstone occurs stratigraphically between the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation and Upper Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone. This stratigraphic interval has been called the Burro Canyon Formation by several workers (Craig and others, 1959; Smith and others, 1961; Saucier, 1974). Although similarities in lithology and stratigraphic position exist between this unit and the Burro Canyon Formation in Colorado, no direct correlation has been made between the two. For this reason the unit in the Chama Basin is called the Burro Canyon(?) Formation

  15. Surface to subsurface cross sections showing correlation of the Dakota Sandstone, Burro Canyon (?) Formation, and upper part of the Morrison Formation in the Chama-El Vado area, Chama Basin, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ridgley, Jennie L.

    1987-01-01

    This report shows the correlation of the Dakota Sandstone, Burro Canyon(?) Formation, and the upper part of the Morrison Formation in the Chama basin from E1 Cerro dome, just west of Chama, to El Vado Reservoir. Criteria needed to recognize these formations both at the outcrop and in the subsurface is also included. 

  16. Formation waters from Mississippian-Pennsylvanian reservoirs, Illinois basin, USA: Chemical and isotopic constraints on evolution and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Stueber, A.M. ); Walter, L.M.; Huston, T.J. ); Pushkar, P. )

    1993-02-01

    We have analyzed a suite of seventy-four formation-water samples from Mississippian and Pennsylvanian carbonate and siliciclastic strata in the Illinois basin for major, minor, and trace element concentrations and for strontium isotopic composition. A subset of these samples was also analyzed for boron isotopic composition. Data are used to interpret origin of salinity and chemical and Sr isotopic evolution of the brines and in comparison with a similar data set from an earlier study of basin formation waters from Silurian-Devonian reservoirs. Systematics of Cl-Br-Na show that present Mississippian-Pennsylvanian brine salinity can be explained by a combination of subaerial seawater evaporation short of halite saturation and subsurface dissolution of halite from an evaporite zone in the middle Mississippian St. Louis Limestone, along with extensive dilution by mixing with meteoric waters. Additional diagenetic modifications in the subsurface interpreted from cation/Br ratios include K depletion through interaction with clay minerals, Ca enrichment, and Mg depletion by dolomitization, and Sr enrichment through CaCO[sub 3] recrystallization and dolomitization. Ste. Genevieve Limestone (middle Mississippian) formation waters show [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr ratios in the range 0.70782-0.70900, whereas waters from the siliciclastic reservoirs are in the rante 0.70900-0.71052. Inverse correlations between [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr and B,Li, and Mg concentrations suggest that the brines acquired radiogenic [sup 87]Sr through interaction with siliciclastic minerals. Completely unsystematic relations between [sup 87]Fr/[sup 86]Sr and 1/Sr are observed; Sr concentrations in Ste. Genevieve and Aux Vases (middle Mississippian) waters appear to be buffered by equilibrium with respect to SrSo[sub 4]. These formation waters are distinguished from Silurian-Devonian brines in the basin by elevated Cl/Br and Na/Br ratios and by unsystematic Sr isotope relationships.

  17. Petrology and provenance of the Toro Negro Formation (Neogene) of the Vinchina broken-foreland basin (Central Andes of Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccioli, P. L.; Marenssi, S. A.; Limarino, C. O.

    2014-01-01

    Detrital modes of sandstones and conglomerates of the Toro Negro Formation (Late Miocene-early Pliocene) were used to analyze the evolution of the broken-foreland stage of the Vinchina Basin (28°30‧-29°00‧ S and 68°30‧-68°20‧ W) of NW Argentina. This basin located in the Western Sierras Pampeanas is bounded to the west by the Precordillera and to the east by the Famatina System. Three sandstone petrofacies: plutonic-metamorphic, volcanic and mixed petrofacies and three conglomerate lithic associations: basement, sedimentary and volcanic lithic associations were recognized, allowing to establish three source areas: Western Sierras Pampeanas (Toro Negro and Umango Ranges), Cordillera Frontal and Precordillera.

  18. CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect

    Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

    2011-04-11

    An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

  19. Continuously increasing δ98Mo values in Neoarchean black shales and iron formations from the Hamersley Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzweil, Florian; Wille, Martin; Schoenberg, Ronny; Taubald, Heinrich; Van Kranendonk, Martin J.

    2015-09-01

    We present Mo-, C- and O-isotope data from black shales, carbonate- and oxide facies iron formations from the Hamersley Group, Western Australia, that range in age from 2.6 to 2.5 billion years. The data show a continuous increase from near crustal δ98Mo values of around 0.50‰ for the oldest Marra Mamba and Wittenoom formations towards higher values of up to 1.51‰ for the youngest sample of the Brockman Iron Formation. Thereby, the trend in increasing δ98Mo values is portrayed by both carbonate facies iron formations and black shales. Considering the positive correlation between Mo concentration and total organic carbon, we argue that this uniformity is best explained by molybdate adsorption onto organic matter in carbonate iron formations and scavenging of thiomolybdate onto sulfurized organic matter in black shales. A temporal increase in the seawater δ98Mo over the period 2.6-2.5 Ga is observed assuming an overall low Mo isotope fractionation during both Mo removal processes. Oxide facies iron formations show lowest Mo concentrations, lowest total organic carbon and slightly lower δ98Mo compared to nearly contemporaneous black shales. This may indicate that in iron formation settings with very low organic matter burial rates, the preferential adsorption of light Mo isotopes onto Fe-(oxyhydr)oxides becomes more relevant. A similar Mo-isotope pattern was previously found in contemporaneous black shales and carbonates of the Griqualand West Basin, South Africa. The consistent and concomitant increase in δ98Mo after 2.54 billion years ago suggests a more homogenous distribution of seawater molybdate with uniform isotopic composition in various depositional settings within the Hamersley Basin and the Griqualand West Basin. The modeling of the oceanic Mo inventory in relation to the Mo in- and outflux suggests that the long-term build-up of an isotopically heavy seawater Mo reservoir requires a sedimentary sink for isotopically light Mo. The search for this

  20. Influence of provenance and burial history on diagenesis of Lower Cretaceous Frontier Formation sandstones, Green River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, S.P. . Bureau of Economic Geology)

    1993-07-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation on the Moxa Arch in the western Green River Basin, Wyoming, has had a varied diagenetic history that was controlled in part by differences in composition of detrital framework grains and in burial history. Petrographic examination of 247 thin sections from 13 cores from the south-plunging arch and adjacent deep basin is the basis for diagenetic investigation of sandstones ranging in depth from 2 km to almost 5 km. Major diagenetic events were (1) mechanical compaction by grain rearrangement and deformation of ductile grains, (2) formation of illite and mixed-layer illite-smectite rims, (3) precipitation of quartz overgrowths, (4) precipitation of calcite cement, (5) generation of secondary porosity by dissolution of feldspar, chert, biotite, and mudstone grains and calcite cement, (6) precipitation of kaolinite in primary and secondary pores, and (7) chemical compaction by intergranular pressure solution and stylolitization and additional precipitation of quartz cement. The northern and southern ends of the Moxa Arch differ in the magnitude of each of these diagenetic events. Provenance differences caused more abundant ductile rock fragments and feldspar to be deposited at the northern end of the Moxa Arch. As a result, Frontier sandstones from the northern Moxa Arch underwent more extensive mechanical compaction. In addition, feldspar dissolution and albitization buffered acid-rich basinal fluids at the northern end, resulting in greater development of secondary porosity and precipitation of calcite cement than at the southern end. Deeply buried sandstones at the southern end of the arch and in the basin contain the most abundant quartz cement because intergranular pressure solution and stylolitization liberated silica for overgrowths.

  1. Origin of dolomites in the Lower Cambrian Xiaoerbulak Formation in the Tarim Basin, NW China: Implications for porosity development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing; Jiang, Zaixing; Hu, Wenxuan; You, Xuelian; Hao, Guoli; Zhang, Juntao; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Dolomites occur pervasively in the Cambrian strata in the Tarim Basin, NW China. Although the Cambrian strata have been deeply buried and affected by multiple phases of dolomitization, some intervals in the upper part of the Lower Cambrian Xiaoerbulak Formation developed high porosity. The goal of this study is to understand the origin of different types of dolomites and the formation mechanism of the porosity in the Xiaoerbulak Formation. The geochemistry of matrix dolomites suggests that they formed from middle rare earth element (MREE)-enriched anoxic pore fluids, close to or within the zone of iron reduction. The similar REE + Y patterns and overlapping δ13C values between pore-filling and matrix dolomites indicate that the fluids that were responsible for the precipitation of pore-filling dolomite apparently inherited the signatures of the formation waters that were stored in the host strata. Low δ18O values coupled with high Ba, Zn, and rare earth element (REE) content of pore-filling dolomites indicate that pore-filling dolomites were formed at elevated temperatures. The precipitation of authigenic quartz and saddle dolomites and high Mn content in pore-filling dolomites indicate that hydrothermal fluids that mostly originated from Cambrian basinal clastic units or basement rocks were involved. The mixture of formation water and external hydrothermal fluids is the most likely explanation for the formation of significant porosity and precipitation of pore-filling dolomites at depth. Breccia dolomite, zebra dolomite, and saddle dolomite occur mostly in areas that are close to faults, which suggests that hydrothermal fluids passed through strike-slip faults in this area when these faults were activated. The development of permeable layers in the upper part of the Xiaoerbulak Formation overlain by impermeable layers of the Wusongger Formation suggests a possible potential diagenetic trap. When the faults were activated, high-pressure and high

  2. U-Pb geochronology and geochemistry of the McCoy Mountains Formation, southeastern California: A Cretaceous retroarc foreland basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barth, A.P.; Wooden, J.L.; Jacobson, C.E.; Probst, K.

    2004-01-01

    The timing of deposition of fluvial sediments now forming the >7-km-thick McCoy Mountains Formation is one of the key uncertainties in reconstructing the Mesozoic poleogeography of southern California and western Arizona. Ion-microprobe U-Pb geochronologic data for individual zircons from nine sandstones from the McCoy Mountains type section and six associated igneous rocks provide significant new constraints on the tectonic setting and the timing of deposition within the northwest-trending McCoy basin. U-Pb zircon data from a metavolcanic rock of the underlying Dome Rock sequence in the Palen Mountains confirm that the McCoy Mountains Formation was deposited after regional Middle to Late Jurassic arc magmatism. U-Ph zircon data from a Late Cretaceous granodiorite intruding the formation in the Coxcomb Mountains confirm that the formation was deformed and metamorphosed prior to 73.5 ?? 1.3 Ma. Populations of detrital zircons vary systematically with both rock type and stratigraphic height; lithic arkoses predominantly derived from the west have consistently more abundant younger zircons than do litharenite sandstones predominantly derived from the north, and the youngest zircons yield maximum depositional ages that decrease from 116 Ma near the base to 84 Ma near the top of the section. The detrital-zircon data permit a Late Jurassic age for the basal, comparatively quartz-rich sandstone. However, the data further suggest that >90% of the formation was deposited between middle Early and middle Late Cretaceous time. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that most of the McCoy Mountains Formation represents a retroarc foreland basin, deposited behind the active, evolving Cretaceous Cordilleran continental-margin magmatic arc that lay to the west and in the foreland of the actively deforming Cretaceous Maria fold-and-thrust belt.

  3. Formation mechanism of a basin of attraction for passive dynamic walking induced by intrinsic hyperbolicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obayashi, Ippei; Aoi, Shinya; Tsuchiya, Kazuo; Kokubu, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    Passive dynamic walking is a useful model for investigating the mechanical functions of the body that produce energy-efficient walking. The basin of attraction is very small and thin, and it has a fractal-like shape; this explains the difficulty in producing stable passive dynamic walking. The underlying mechanism that produces these geometric characteristics was not known. In this paper, we consider this from the viewpoint of dynamical systems theory, and we use the simplest walking model to clarify the mechanism that forms the basin of attraction for passive dynamic walking. We show that the intrinsic saddle-type hyperbolicity of the upright equilibrium point in the governing dynamics plays an important role in the geometrical characteristics of the basin of attraction; this contributes to our understanding of the stability mechanism of bipedal walking.

  4. Seismic effects from major basin formation on the Moon and Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.; Gault, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Grooved and hilly terrains are reported which occur at the antipode of major basins on the Moon (Imbrium, Orientale) and Mercury (Caloris). Order-of-magnitude calculations, for an Imbrium-size impact on the Moon, indicate P-wave-induced surface displacements of 10 m at the basin antipode that would arrive prior to secondary ejecta. Comparable surface waves are reported which would arrive subsequent to secondary ejecta impacts and would increase in magnitude as they converge at the antipode. Other seismically induced surface features include: subdued, furrowed crater walls produced by landslides and concomitant secondary impacts; emplacement and leveling of light plains units owing to seismically induced "fluidization" of slide material; knobby, pitted terrain around old basins from enhancement of seismic waves in ancient ejecta blankets; and the production and enhancement of deep-seated fractures that led to the concentration of farside lunar maria in the Apollo-Ingenii region.

  5. Occurrence and significance of magnesite in Upper Permian (Guadalupian) Tansill and Yates Formations, Delaware Basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, R.A.; Harris, P.M.; Borer, J.M. )

    1990-02-01

    Magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}) occurs pervasively in a 270-ft (82-m) cored interval of Upper Permian (Guadalupian) shelf deposits from the northern rim of the Delaware basin portion of the Permian basin, New Mexico. In their core example, magnesite is found in tidal flat/lagoon and pisolite shoal dolomites and siltstones of the Tansill and uppermost Yates formations. The interval is overlain by magnesite-bearing anhydrite and a thick halite section of the (Ochoan) Salado Formation. The basinwide extent of magnesite is unknown. Magnesite may have formed either (1) during Ochoan deposition or thereafter, after burial of the Tansill and Yates formations, from dense brines originating from the overlying Salado evaporites; or less likely, (2) syndepositionally with the Tansill and Yates sediments. Preliminary measurements of stable carbon and oxygen isotopes for magnesite yield normal Permian values for {delta}{sup 13}C averaging + 6.84% (PDB) and slightly evaporitic values for {delta}{sup 18}O averaging + 1.04% (PDB); corrected {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr isotope composition averages 0.70687. Because a high content of associated uranium in the magnesite-rich part of the core causes large gamma-ray deflections similar to those for shale, and because the density of magnesite is close to that of anhydrite, the presence of magnesite could lead to improper evaluation of lithology and porosity from logs and could ultimately result in failure to recognize potential reservoir zones. 14 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Syngenetic and diagenetic features of evaporite-lutite successions of the Ipubi Formation, Araripe Basin, Santana do Cariri, NE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, Daniel Rodrigues, Jr.; da Silva Filho, Wellington Ferreira; Freire, José Gervásio, Jr.; dos Santos, Felipe Holanda

    2016-12-01

    The Ipubi Formation in the Araripe Basin (Northeast Brazil) has evaporite-lutite successions rich in gypsum, a mineral of great regional economic relevance, a highlighted stratigraphic mark, and also a natural boundary for underlying successions potentially analogous to "Pre-Salt" hydrocarbon reservoirs of the Brazilian coastal basins. In this study, syngenetic and diagenetic aspects of the Ipubi Formation at Santana do Cariri (Ceará State) were investigated by means of facies analysis, petrography, and mineralogical/chemical analyses of evaporites and shales. The results show that the contact relationship between evaporites and marly shales, without signs of subaerial exposure and laterally adjacent, was associated with shallow, calm and somewhat anoxic waterbodies, locally salt-supersaturated (brines) but under seasonal variations of water levels. This scenario could have shared place with hydrothermal phenomena in a playa lake depositional system. Regarding diagenesis, although there is evidence supporting pseudomorphic replacement of gypsum by anhydrite, the burial of the Ipubi Formation would have been limited due to the frequent occurrence of gypsum without any trace of chemical replacement.

  7. Surface composition of pull-apart bands in Argadnel Regio, Europa: Evidence of localized cryovolcanic resurfacing during basin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prockter, Louise M.; Shirley, James H.; Dalton, James B.; Kamp, L.

    2017-03-01

    We combine Galileo Solid State Imager (SSI) and Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) data to investigate the composition of pull-apart bands in Europa's Argadnel Regio. Using spectral linear mixture modeling employing cryogenic laboratory reference spectra, we find that bands of intermediate age ("grey" bands) are compositionally distinct from bands that are stratigraphically younger ("dark" bands). The grey bands have higher abundances of larger ice grains and lower abundances of hydrated salts than the dark bands; both of these tendencies are statistically significant at the 1% level. The grey and dark bands have similar abundances of hexahydrite, a material which is relatively stable under irradiation; however, the derived abundances of frozen magnesium sulfate brine and of mirabilite, which are more susceptible to fragmentation by radiation, are significantly higher in the dark bands than in the grey bands. These results are consistent with a physical model in which the differences in composition and in ice grain sizes are linked to space weathering and radiolytic processing levels; the grey bands have presumably undergone higher levels of processing, due to being exposed on Europa's surface for a longer period of time. One prominent wedge-shaped band exhibits an anomalous albedo variation across its northern portion, appearing dark in its top third, and grey in its southernmost two-thirds. We find that the dark part of the band has a modeled composition that is in-family with other dark bands, while the grey portion has a modeled composition that is indistinguishable from other grey bands in the study area. Because these variations cannot easily be attributed to the band's formation mechanism (bands open sequentially along a central axis), we surmise that the northern part has been resurfaced, probably in response to the formation of a large topographic basin that cuts through the band. Faulting accompanying basin formation may provide conduits allowing

  8. Hydrocarbon migration and accumulation in the Upper Cretaceous Qingshankou Formation, Changling Sag, southern Songliao Basin: Insights from integrated analyses of fluid inclusion, oil source correlation and basin modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Tian; He, Sheng; Wang, Dexi; Hou, Yuguang

    2014-08-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Qingshankou Formation acts as both the source and reservoir sequence in the Changling Sag, situated in the southern end of the Songliao Basin, northeast China. An integrated approach involving determination of hydrocarbon charging history, oil source correlation and hydrocarbon generation dynamic modeling was used to investigate hydrocarbon migration processes and further predict the favorable targets of hydrocarbon accumulations in the Qingshankou Formation. The hydrocarbon generation and charge history was investigated using fluid inclusion analysis, in combination with stratigraphic burial and thermal modeling. The source rocks began to generate hydrocarbons at around 82 Ma and the hydrocarbon charge event occurred from approximately 78 Ma to the end of Cretaceous (65.5 Ma) when a large tectonic uplift took place. Correlation of stable carbon isotopes of oils and extracts of source rocks indicates that oil was generated mainly from the first member of Qingshankou Formation (K2qn1), suggesting that hydrocarbon may have migrated vertically. Three dimensional (3D) petroleum system modeling was used to evaluate the processes of secondary hydrocarbon migration in the Qingshankou Formation since the latest Cretaceous. During the Late Cretaceous, hydrocarbon, mainly originated from the Qianan depression, migrated laterally to adjacent structural highs. Subsequent tectonic inversion, defined as the late Yanshan Orogeny, significantly changed hydrocarbon migration patterns, probably causing redistribution of primary hydrocarbon reservoirs. In the Tertiary, the Heidimiao depression was buried much deeper than the Qianan depression and became the main source kitchen. Hydrocarbon migration was primarily controlled by fluid potential and generally migrated from relatively high potential areas to low potential areas. Structural highs and lithologic transitions are potential traps for current oil and gas exploration. Finally, several preferred hydrocarbon

  9. Oil shale resources in the Eocene Green River Formation, Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed a comprehensive assessment of in-place oil in oil shales in the Eocene Green River in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah. This CD-ROM includes reports, data, and an ArcGIS project describing the assessment. A database was compiled that includes about 47,000 Fischer assays from 186 core holes and 240 rotary drill holes. Most of the oil yield data were analyzed by the former U.S. Bureau of Mines oil shale laboratory in Laramie, Wyoming, and some analyses were made by private laboratories. Location data for 971 Wyoming oil-shale drill holes are listed in a spreadsheet and included in the CD-ROM. Total in-place resources for the three assessed units in the Green River Formation are: (1) Tipton Shale Member, 362,816 million barrels of oil (MMBO), (2) Wilkins Peak Member, 704,991 MMBO, and (3) LaClede Bed of the Laney Member, 377,184 MMBO, for a total of 1.44 trillion barrels of oil in place. This compares with estimated in-place resources for the Piceance Basin of Colorado of 1.53 trillion barrels and estimated in-place resources for the Uinta Basin of Utah and Colorado of 1.32 trillion barrels.

  10. Late Paleozoic basin formation and crustal deformation, ancestral Rocky Mountains province, Arizona and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, T.F. )

    1993-04-01

    Late Paleozoic collision of Laurussia and Gondwanaland resulted in regionally consistent sedimentation patterns that record two modes of lithospheric deformation in Arizona and New Mexico. Discrete intraforeland depocenters, the Orogrande and Pedregosa basins, formed in middle to late Pennsylvanian time (late Atokan-Virgilian). A regional unconformity is present at the base of the Permian system. Early Wolfcampian depositional thicknesses largely mimic and accentuate those of the Pennsylvanian, but later Wolfcampian rocks onlap intraforeland uplifts. Depositional systems paralleled the larger collision suture; a marine basin in southern New Mexico and Arizona graded northward to widespread redbeds deposited by south-flowing rivers. Intraforeland highs in northern Arizona and New Mexico were blanketed by sediment in late Wolfcampian time, whereas uplifts in southern New Mexico were covered in the Leonardian. Pennsylvanian basins formed during intraforeland wrench faulting that resulted from initial collision of marginal salients on one or both of the continental masses. The Wolfcampian basin formed through a combination of renewed wrenching and flexural subsidence during final suturing of the two supercontinents.

  11. Selected water-level data for Mesozoic formations in the upper Colorado River basin in Arizona, Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming; excluding the San Juan Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weigel, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    The base of the moderately saline water (water that contains from 3,000 to 10,000 mg/L of dissolved solids) was mapped by using available water quality data and by determining formation-water resistivities from geophysical well logs based on the resistivity-porosity, spontaneous-potential, and resistivity-ratio methods. The contour map developed from these data showed a mound of very saline and briny water, mostly of sodium chloride and sodium bicarbonate type, in most of that part of the Uinta Basin that is underlain by either the Green River or Wasatch Formations. Along its northern edge, the mound rises steeply from below sea level to within 2,000 ft of the land surface and, locally, to land surface. Along its southern edge, the mound rises less steeply and is more complex in outline. This body of very saline to briny water may be a lens; many wells or test holes drilled within the area underlain by the mound re-entered fresh to moderately saline water at depths of 8,000 to 15,000 ft below land surface. (Author 's abstract)

  12. Isopach map of the interval from surface elevation to the top of the Pennsylvanian and Permian Minnelusa Formation and equivalents, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crysdale, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies (MF) maps showing computer-generated structure contours, isopachs, and cross sections of selected formations in the Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana. The map and cross sections were constructed from information stored in a U.S. Geological Survey Evolution of Sedimentary Basins data base. This data base contains picks of geologic formation and (or) unit tops and bases determined from electric resistivity and gamma-ray logs of 8,592 wells penetrating Tertiary and older rocks in the Powder River basin. Well completion cards (scout tickets) were reviewed and compared with copies of all logs, and formation or unit contacts determined by N. M. Denson, D.L. Macke, R. R. Schumann and others. This isopach map is based on information from 1,480 of these wells that penetrate the Minnelusa Formation and equivalents.

  13. Map showing contours on the top of the Pennsylvanian and Permian Minnelusa Formation and equivalents, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crysdale, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies (MF) maps showing computer-generated structure contours, isopachs, and cross sections of selected formations in the Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana. The map and cross sections were constructed from information stored in a U.S. Geological Survey Evolution of Sedimentary Basins data base. This data base contains picks of geologic formation and (or) unit tops and bases determined from electric resistivity and gamma-ray logs of 8,592 wells penetrating Tertiary and older rocks in the Powder River basin. Well completion cards (scout tickets) were reviewed and compared with copies of all logs, and formation or unit contacts determined by N. M. Denson, D.L. Macke, R. R. Schumann and others. This isopach map is based on information from 1,480 of these wells that penetrate the Minnelusa Formation and equivalents.

  14. Uranium enrichment in lacustrine oil source rocks of the Chang 7 member of the Yanchang Formation, Erdos Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hua; Zhang, Wenzheng; Wu, Kai; Li, Shanpeng; Peng, Ping'an; Qin, Yan

    2010-09-01

    The oil source rocks of the Chang 7 member of the Yanchang Formation in the Erdos Basin were deposited during maximum lake extension during the Late Triassic and show a remarkable positive uranium anomaly, with an average uranium content as high as 51.1 μg/g. Uranium is enriched together with organic matter and elements such as Fe, S, Cu, V and Mo in the rocks. The detailed biological markers determined in the Chang 7 member indicate that the lake water column was oxidizing during deposition of the Chang 7 member. However, redox indicators for sediments such as S 2- content, V/Sc and V/(V + Ni) ratios demonstrate that it was a typical anoxic diagenetic setting. The contrasted redox conditions between the water column and the sediment with a very high content of organic matter provided favorable physical and chemical conditions for syngenetic uranium enrichment in the oil source rocks of the Chang 7 member. Possible uranium sources may be the extensive U-rich volcanic ash that resulted from contemporaneous volcanic eruption and uranium material transported by hydrothermal conduits into the basin. The uranium from terrestrial clastics was unlike because uranium concentration was not higher in the margin area of basin where the terrestrial material input was high. As indicated by correlative analysis, the oil source rocks of the Chang 7 member show high gamma-ray values for radioactive well log data that reflect a positive uranium anomaly and are characterized by high resistance, low electric potential and low density. As a result, well log data can be used to identify positive uranium anomalies and spatial distribution of the oil source rocks in the Erdos Basin. The estimation of the total uranium reserves in the Chang 7 member attain 0.8 × 10 8 t.

  15. Magnetostratigraphy of the Willwood Formation, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming: New constraints on the location of Paleocene/Eocene boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauxe, L.; Gee, J.; Gallet, Y.; Pick, T.; Bown, T.

    1994-07-01

    The lower Eocene Willwood Formation in the Bighorn Basin of Wyoming preserves a rich and diverse mammalian and floral record. The paleomagnetic behavior of the sequence of floodplain paleosols of varying degrees of maturation ranges from excellent to poor. We present a magnetostratigraphic section for a composite section near Worland, Wyoming, by using a set of strict criteria for interpreting the step-wise alternating field and thermal demagnetization data of 266 samples from 90 sites throughout the composite section. Correlation to the geomagnetic reversal time scale was achieved by combining magnetostratigraphic and biostratigraphic data from this section, from a section in the Clark's Fork Basin in northern Wyoming, and from Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Site 550, with the isotopic date determined on a tuff near the top of our section. Our correlation suggests that the Bighorn Basin composite section in the Worland area spans from within Chron C24r to near the top of Chron C24n, or from approximately 55 to 52 Ma. This correlation places the Paleocene/Eocene boundary within the vicinity of the base of the section. Cryptochron C24r.6 of Cande and Kent is tentatively identified some 100 m above the base of the section. The temporal framework provided here enables correlation of the mammalian biostratigraphy of the Bighorn Basin to other continental sequences as well as to marine records. It also provides independent chronological information for the calculation of sediment accumulation rates to constrain soil maturation rates. We exclude an age as young as 53 Ma for the Paleocene/Eocene boundary and support older ages, as recommended in recent time scales. The location of a tuff dated at 52.8 +/- 0.3 Ma at the older boundary C24n.1 is consistent with the age of 52.5 Ma estimated by Cande and Kent and inconsistent with that of 53.7 Ma, from Harland et al.

  16. Geochemical characteristics of crude oil from a tight oil reservoir in the Lucaogou Formation, Jimusar Sag, Junggar Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Jimusar Sag, which lies in the Junggar Basin,is one of the most typical tight oil study areas in China. However, the properties and origin of the crude oil and the geochemical characteristics of the tight oil from the Lucaogou Formation have not yet been studied. In the present study, 23 crude oilsfrom the Lucaogou Formation were collected for analysis, such as physical properties, bulk composition, saturated hydrocarbon gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and the calculation of various biomarker parameters. In addition,source rock evaluation and porosity permeability analysis were applied to the mudstones and siltstones. Biomarkers of suitable source rocks (TOC>1, S1+S2>6mg/g, 0.7%basin modeling was performed. The oil-filling history was also defined by means of basin modeling and microthermometry. The results indicated the presence of low maturity to mature crude oils originating from the burial of terrigenous organic matter beneath a saline lake in the source rocks of mainly type II1kerogen. In addition, a higher proportion of bacteria and algae was shown to contribute to the formation of crude oil in the lower section when compared with the upper section of the Lucaogou Formation. Oil-source correlations demonstrated that not all mudstones within the Lucaogou Formation contributed to oil accumulation.Crude oil from the upper and lower sections originated from thin-bedded mudstones interbedded within sweet spot sand bodies. A good coincidence of filling history and hydrocarbon generation history indicated that the Lucaogou reservoir is a typical in situ reservoir. The mudstones over or beneath the sweet spot bodies consisted of natural caprocks and prevented the vertical movement of oil by capillary forces. Despite being thicker, the thick-bedded mudstone between the upper and lower sweet spots had no obvious contribution to

  17. Integrated workflow for characterizing and modeling a mixed sedimentary system: The Ilerdian Alveolina Limestone Formation (Graus-Tremp Basin, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamon, Youri; Deschamps, Remy; Joseph, Philippe; Doligez, Brigitte; Schmitz, Julien; Lerat, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes an advanced stochastic workflow to jointly model sedimentary facies and diagenesis. The formation of interest is the Early Eocene Alveolina Limestone Formation, which outcrops in the Serraduy area (Graus-Tremp Basin, NE Spain). Ten sedimentary lithotypes representing facies or facies associations of a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate ramp system were identified within the succession. A 3D model describing the depositional architecture is also proposed. The results from the diagenetic study evidenced the occurrence of several successive calcite cements, which were grouped into five diagenetic imprints for modeling. These imprints were then quantified to ease their integration into numerical models. The following step consisted in building a 3D gridded model with seven different modeling units. They were populated using a bi-plurigaussian simulation approach that reproduced both the sedimentary organization and the observed diagenetic imprint distributions. Last, the simulation results were validated referring to paleogeographic and diagenetic conceptual maps.

  18. Green River Formation Water Flood Demonstration Project, Uinta Basin, Utah. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lomax, J.D.; Nielson, D.L.; Deo, M.D.

    1993-12-01

    The project is designed to increase recoverable petroleum reserves in the United States. The Green River Formation in Utah`s Uinta Basin contains abundant hydrocarbons that are not easily recovered by primary means. The successful Lomax Montument Butte Unit water flood will be evaluated under this contract, and based on this information, water floods will be initiated in nearby Travis and Boundary units. In 1987, Lomax Exploration Company started a water flood in the Monument Butte Unit of a Douglas Creek member of the Green River Formation. This was a low-enerey, geologically heterogeneous reservoir producing a waxy crude oil. Primary production yielded 5% of the OOIP. Due to the water flood project, total production will yield an estimated recovery of 20% OOIP.

  19. Oxygen-isotope evidence for upward, cross-formational porewater flow in a sedimentary basin near maximum burial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Caritat, Patrice; Baker, Julian C.

    1992-07-01

    Authigenic ankerite in the gas-bearing mid-Permian Aldebaran Sandstone (Denison Trough, Queensland, Australia) has an anomalously light oxygen-isotopic composition ( δ 18O SMOW range: +7.6 to +14.4‰ ) and exhibits a trend of 18O-enrichment from the base to the top of the unit. Textural relationships, together with burial and thermal modelling, indicate that this carbonate precipitated at temperatures of about 100 to 140°C, when the sequence approached maximum burial during the Late Triassic. This implies that ankerite precipitated from porewater very depleted in 18O with respect to marine water ( δ 18O SMOW = -9 to -5‰ ). The formation of this deep, relatively high-temperature ankerite is difficult to reconcile with downward percolation of meteoric water at that time since the basin was then undergoing its first burial/compactional cycle. We interpret the ankerite to have precipitated from porewater expelled upward from the earliest Permian Reids Dome beds. This thick unit, consisting mainly of high-latitude continental sandstones, mudrocks and coals, was initially saturated with very 18O-depleted meteoric water ( δ 18O SMOW ≈ -17‰ ) partly derived from melted snow and ice, and is likely to have undergone overpressuring during rapid burial (at rates up to 1 km/Ma). Tectonically induced expulsion of "connate meteoric" porewater out of the Reids Dome beds took place as the sequence approached maximum burial prior to Late Triassic basin uplift. This water was flushed upward through the overlying units, retaining a (modified) meteoric isotopic signature, which was recorded by the precipitating ankerite. Computer modelling of heat transport, isotopic mass balance and water mixing quantitatively shows that this interpretation is viable, lending support to the suggested mechanism of upward, cross-formational porewater flow deep in a sedimentary basin.

  20. Archosauriform remains from the Late Triassic of San Luis province, Argentina, Quebrada del Barro Formation, Marayes-El Carrizal Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianechini, Federico A.; Codorniú, Laura; Arcucci, Andrea B.; Castillo Elías, Gabriela; Rivarola, David

    2016-03-01

    Here we present archosauriform remains from 'Abra de los Colorados', a fossiliferous locality at Sierra de Guayaguas, NW San Luis Province. Two fossiliferous levels were identified in outcrops of the Quebrada del Barro Formation (Norian), which represent the southernmost outcrops of the Marayes-El Carrizal Basin. These levels are composed by massive muddy lithofacies, interpreted as floodplain deposits. The specimens consist of one incomplete maxilla (MIC-V718), one caudal vertebra (MIC-V719), one metatarsal (MIC-V720) and one indeterminate appendicular bone (MIC-V721). The materials can be assigned to Archosauriformes but the fragmentary nature and lack of unambiguous synapomorphies preclude a more precise taxomic assignment. The maxilla is remarkably large and robust and represents the posterior process. It preserved one partially erupted tooth with ziphodont morphology. This bone shows some anatomical traits and size match with 'rauisuchians' and theropods. MIC-V719 corresponds to a proximal caudal vertebra. It has a high centrum, a ventral longitudinal furrow, expanded articular processes for the chevrons, a posteriorly displaced diapophysis located below the level of the prezygapophyses, and short prezygapophyses. This vertebra would be from an indeterminate archosauriform. MIC-V720 presents a cylindrical diaphysis, with a well-developed distal trochlea, which present resemblances with metatarsals of theropods, pseudosuchians, and silesaurids, although the size matches better with theropods. MIC-V721 has a slender diaphysis and a convex triangular articular surface, and corresponds to an indeterminate archosauriform. Despite being fragmentary, these materials indicate the presence of a diverse archosauriforms association from Late Triassic beds of San Luis. Thus, they add to the faunal assemblage recently reported from this basin at San Juan Province, which is much rich and diverse than the coeval paleofauna well known from Los Colorados Formation in the

  1. Shallow lacustrine system of the Permian Pedra de Fogo Formation, Western Gondwana, Parnaíba Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, Raphael Neto; Nogueira, Afonso César Rodrigues; Bandeira, José; Angélica, Rômulo Simões

    2016-04-01

    The Permian Period of the Parnaíba Basin, northern Brazil, represented here by deposits from the Pedra de Fogo Formation, records important events that occurred in Western Gondwana near its boundary with the Mesozoic Era. The analysis of outcrop based facies from the Permian Pedra de Fogo Formation, which is 100 m thick, carried out along the eastern and western borders of the Parnaiba Basin, allowed the identification of eleven sedimentary facies, which were grouped into three distinct facies associations (FA), representative of a shallow lacustrine system associated with mudflats and ephemeral rivers. Bioturbation, desiccation cracks, silcretes and various siliceous concretions characterize the Pedra de Fogo deposits. The FA1 mudflat deposits occur predominantly at the base of the Pedra de Fogo Formation and consist of laminated claystone/mudstone, mudcrack-bearing sandstones/mudstones and sandstones exhibiting cross-lamination, massive and megaripple bedding. Popcorn-like silicified nodules and casts indicate evaporite deposits. Other common features are silica concretions, silicified tepees and silcretes. FA2 represents nearshore deposits and consists of fine-grained sandstones with evenly parallel lamination, climbing ripple cross-lamination, massive and megaripple bedding and mudstone/siltstone showing evenly parallel lamination. FA3 refers to wadi/inundite deposits, generally organized as fining-upward cycles of metric size, composed of conglomerates and medium-grained pebbly sandstones showing massive bedding and cross-stratification, as well as claystone/siltstone showing evenly parallel to undulate lamination. Scour-and-fill features are isolated in predominantly tabular deposits composed of mudstones interbedded with fine to medium-grained sandstones showing planar to slightly undulate lamination. Silicified plant remains previously classified as belonging to the Psaronius genus found in the uppermost levels of the Pedra de Fogo Formation, near the

  2. Biostratigraphy and paleoecology of an unusual palynological record from the Aquidauana Formation, Late Pennsylvanian of Paraná Basin.

    PubMed

    Souza, Paulo A; Perinotto, José A J; Félix, Cristina M; Araújo, Bruno C

    2015-01-01

    The Aquidauana Formation is a Permo-Carboniferous sedimentary unit, widely stratigraphicaly distributed in the northwestern and northern portions of the Paraná Basin. However, little paleontological data is available from this formation, preventing accurate biostratigraphic and paleoecological interpretations. An abundant, diversified and well preserved assemblage of palynomorphs was recognized from sampling conducted in an outcrop section in Cipolândia District of Aquidauana Municipality, state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. A total of 35 indigenous palynomorph taxa was recognized, comprising 6 species of spores (related to 5 genera), 28 species of pollen grains (14 genera) and 1 species of chlorophycean algae. Monosaccate pollen grains are exceptionally dominant, representing 90.38% of the association, particularly constituted by species of the genera Cannanoropollis (30.41% of the total assemblage), Potonieisporites (28.14%) and Plicatipollenites (19.52%). This quantitative overrepresentation is not usual from Gondwana deposits, revealing a particular plant dominance of Cordaitales in the terrestrial flora. These results are interpreted as an upland ecology characterized by plants with a moisture-independent reproduction strategy, under a glacial climate influence. Certain species of pollen allow assignment of this assemblage to the Crucisaccites monoletus Zone (Late Pennsylvanian), which had been recognized only in the middle portion of the Itararé Group at the northeastern margin of the basin.

  3. A new Xenacanthiformes shark (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii) from the Late Paleozoic Rio do Rasto Formation (Paraná Basin), Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pauliv, Victor E; Dias, Eliseu V; Sedor, Fernando A; Ribeiro, Ana Maria

    2014-03-01

    The Brazilian records on Xenacanthiformes include teeth and cephalic spines from the Parnaíba, Amazonas and Paraná basins. This work describes a new species of Xenacanthidae, collected in an outcrop of Serrinha Member of Rio do Rasto Formation (Wordian to Wuchiapingian), Paraná Basin, municipality of Jacarezinho, State of Paraná. The teeth of the new species are two or three-cuspidated and the aboral surface show a smooth concavity and one rounded basal tubercle. The coronal surface presents one semi-spherical and subcircular coronal button, and also two lateral main cusps and one central (when present) with less than one fifth of the size of the lateral cusps in the labial portion. The lateral cusps are asymmetric or symmetric, rounded in transversal section, lanceolate in longitudinal section, devoid of lateral carinae and lateral serrations, and with few smooth cristae of enameloid. In optical microscope the teeth show a trabecular dentine (osteodentine) base, while the cusps are composed by orthodentine, and the pulp cavities are non-obliterated by trabecular dentine. The fossil assemblage in the same stratigraphical level and in the whole Rio do Rasto Formation indicates another freshwater record for xenacanthid sharks.

  4. Norphlet Formation (Upper Jurassic) sand erg: depositional model for northeastern De Soto salt basin, eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Kemmer, D.A.; Reagan, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    Available well control, seismic reflection geometries, and seismic modeling suggest the interpretation of a Norphlet Formation (Upper Jurassic) sand erg in the northeastern De Soto salt basin. Ranging in thickness from less than 100 ft to nearly 1000 ft, the Norphlet erg encompasses an area of approximately 700 mi/sup 2/. Separated from the major gas accumulation in the Norphlet in the Mobile Bay area by the offshore extension of the Pensacola arch, the Norphlet erg appears to be oriented transverse to the axis of the De Soto salt basin. Seismic signatures for the Smackover carbonate, Norphlet sand, and Louann Salt intervals are investigated using synthetic seismograms generated from six wells in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. General characteristics about the reflection coefficients from the major units in the interval are noted. The reflection coefficient information and synthetic seismograms are used to interpret seismic data on a regional basis. Two-dimensional, vertical-incidence, ray-trace modeling of the seismic data is done to aid the interpretation on a detailed basis. Interpreted Norphlet sandstone thicknesses and Louann Salt structures are combined to support the Norphlet Formation sand erg hypothesis.

  5. Tetrapod footprints from the uppermost level of the Permian Ikakern Formation (Argana Basin, Western High Atlas, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Sebastian; Hminna, Abdelkbir; Saber, Hafid; Schneider, Jörg W.; Klein, Hendrik

    2010-07-01

    Tetrapod footprints from the Permian Ikakern Formation of the Argana Basin have long been known but never studied in detail. Here we present the first comprehensive description of recently discovered tracks and trackways that come from near the uppermost layers of an up to 1800 m thick red-bed sequence. Assigned to HyloidichnusGilmore, 1927 and PachypesLeonardi et al., 1975, these ichnofossils suggest a Middle to Late Permian age of the track-bearing strata. Potential trackmakers are medium to large-sized moradisaurine captorhinids and pareiasaurs. This strongly parallels the bodyfossil record inasmuch as the only known skeletal remains of terrestrial tetrapods from the study area belong to both of these groups. Based on this twofold evidence, captorhinids and Pareiasauria have to be considered as abundant faunal elements of the ancient floodplain environment that is represented by the upper part of the Ikakern Formation. As one of only a few places in the world with closely associated body and ichnofossils of Late Palaeozoic age, the Argana Basin has a high potential for allowing the reconstruction of terrestrial ecosystems during the early stages of the break-up of central Pangaea and just before Mesozoic diapsid reptiles gained ascendancy. Further research on this stimulating topic will significantly contribute to the understanding of still poorly known Middle and Late Permian tetrapod ichnofaunas.

  6. Diagenesis and fracture development in the Bakken Formation, Williston Basin; implications for reservoir quality in the middle member

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitman, Janet K.; Price, Leigh C.; LeFever, Julie A.

    2001-01-01

    The middle member of the Bakken Formation is an attractive petroleum exploration target in the deeper part of the Williston Basin because it is favorably positioned with respect to source and seal units. Progressive rates of burial and minor uplift and erosion of this member led to a stable thermal regime and, consequently, minor variations in diagenesis across much of the basin. The simple diagenetic history recorded in sandstones and siltstones in the middle member can, in part, be attributed to the closed, low-permeability nature of the Bakken petroleum system during most of its burial history. Most diagenesis ceased in the middle member when oil entered the sandstones and siltstones in the Late Cretaceous. Most oil in the Bakken Formation resides in open, horizontal fractures in the middle member. Core analysis reveals that sandstones and siltstones associated with thick mature shales typically have a greater density of fractures than sandstones and siltstones associated with thin mature shales. Fractures were caused by superlithostatic pressures that formed in response to increased fluid volumes in the source rocks during hydrocarbon generation

  7. Ichnological constraints on the depositional environment of the Sawahlunto Formation, Kandi, northwest Ombilin Basin, west Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonneveld, J.-P.; Zaim, Y.; Rizal, Y.; Ciochon, R. L.; Bettis, E. A.; Aswan; Gunnell, G. F.

    2012-02-01

    A low diversity trace fossil assemblage is described from the Oligocene Sawahlunto Formation near Kandi, in the northwestern part of the Ombilin Basin in western Sumatra, Indonesia. This trace fossil assemblage includes six ichnogenera attributed to invertebrate infaunal and epifaunal activities ( Arenicolites, Diplocraterion, Planolites, Monocraterion/ Skolithos and Coenobichnus) and two ichnotaxa attributed to vertebrate activity (avian footprints: two species of Aquatilavipes). Arenicolites, Diplocraterion and Monocraterion/ Skolithos record the suspension feeding activities of either arthropods (most likely amphipods) or vermiform organisms. Planolites reflects the presence of an infaunal deposit feeder. Coenobichnus records the walking activities of hermit crabs. Both the Coenobichnus and the avian footprints record the surficial detritus scavenging of epifaunal organisms within a subaerial setting. These traces occur within a fine-grained sandstone succession characterized by planar laminae and low-relief, asymmetrical, commonly mud-draped (locally bidirectional) ripples. The presence of traces attributable to suspension feeders implies deposition in a subaqueous setting. Their occurrence (particularly the presence of Arenicolites and Diplocraterion) in a sandstone bed characterized by mud-draped and bidirectional ripples implies emplacement in a tidally-influenced marine to marginal marine setting. Co-occurrence of these traces with well-preserved avian footprints ( Aquatilavipes) further implies periodic subaerial exposure. Thus, it is most likely that the Sawahlunto Formation near Kandi records deposition within an intertidal flat setting. Definitive evidence of marine influences in the Oligocene interval of the Ombilin Basin implies a more complex tectono-stratigraphic history than has previously been implied.

  8. On a moderately diverse continental ichnofauna from the Permian Ikakern Formation (Argana Basin, Western High Atlas, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hminna, Abdelkbir; Voigt, Sebastian; Saber, Hafid; Schneider, Jörg W.; Hmich, Driss

    2012-06-01

    The Permian Ikakern Formation of the Argana Basin yielded important tetrapod skeletal remains but is still poorly known for any other kind of fossils. Here we present a moderately diverse assemblage of invertebrate and vertebrate traces from red beds in the upper part of the formation (Tourbihine Member, T2) near Timezgadiouine. Recorded ichnotaxa include Spongeliomorpha carlsbergi (Bromley and Asgaard, 1979), Striatichnium natalisWalter, 1982, AmphisauropusHaubold, 1970, HyloidichnusGilmore, 1927, ErpetopusMoodie, 1929, and DromopusMarsh, 1894. The traces occur in laminated muddy siltstone and fine-grained sandstone that we interpret as slack-water deposits in an episodically high energy fluvial setting. Including arthropod burrows, arthropod grazing traces and tetrapod footprints, the ichnofossil assemblage corresponds to the Scoyenia ichnofacies. The described trace fossils provide evidence for various invertebrates and vertebrates hitherto unknown from the body fossil record of the study area. By extending the stratigraphic and geographic range of some of the recorded ichnotaxa, our finds strongly emphasise the importance of the Argana Basin for the reconstruction and understanding of Late Palaeozoic terrestrial ecosystems.

  9. A preliminary study of the calcite beef found in the Cretaceous Jinju Formation, Gyeongsang Basin, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, S.; Chae, Y. U.; Son, M.; Jeong, G. Y.; Paik, I. S.; Lim, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    The term "beef" refers to fibrous minerals in bedding-parallel veins, where the fibers are approximately perpendicular to the vein margins (Cobbold et al., 2013). It mostly appears within organic-rich black shale layers in sedimentary basin. Although the veins can consist of white gangue minerals, such as calcite, gypsum, or quartz, the commonest mineral in the fibers is calcite. According to the worldwide localities of calcite beef compiled by Cobbold et al (2012), they concentrated in some areas, especially around the Atlantic Ocean. However, they have been rarely reported in the western Pacific margin, except Australia and New Zealand. Recently, calcite beefs have been found in the Cretaceous Jinju Formation, Gyeongsang Basin, Korea. As far as we know, this is the first report of calcite beef in Korea. The lacustrine Jinju Formation is about 1,200 m thick, and made up mainly of lacustrine dark grey to black mudstones. In the study area, calcite beefs were commonly found in the organic-rich black shale layers. The vein thickness is anywhere between a few millimeters to maximum 3 centimeters, and their length ranges from a few centimeters to several tens of meters. The interval between successive veins is from a few centimeters to about 1 meter. Most of them occur parallel to the bedding planes, although some of them are developed along fault planes or within deformed layers. In case of relatively thick beefs, the center of veins often shows a dark grey to black central median line, defined by fine-grained calcite grains, fluid inclusion lines, or wall rock particles. Based on the orientation of fibrous calcite, they can be divided into two types: straight and sigmoidal types. The fibrous calcites are thought to have been symmetrically grown from the median lines to top and bottom of wall rock. The formation mechanism of horizontal fractures, and the formation temperature of beefs in the study area remain as a matter to be studied further.

  10. Conditions of formation of the gas deposits in the Dneprovsk-Donets basin

    SciTech Connect

    Solov'ev, B.A.

    1986-06-01

    The major part of the gas resources of the Dneprovsk-Donets basin, concentrated in the southeast of the region, is associated with a complex of Late Carboniferous-Early Permian age, predominantly redbeds and extraordinarily poor in organic matter. In the northwest, these sediments are associated with oil deposits and in the central part of the basin with oil and gas deposits. The hydrocarbons in this complex undoubtedly entered from underlying petroleum source beds. An analysis of the observed zonation of hydrocarbons in the Upper Carboniferous-Lower Permian sequence leads to the conclusion that it was controlled to a decisive degree by the kind of original organic matter in the underlying sequences. These deposits offer an interesting history of interacting tectonic and hydrodynamic processes. 9 references.

  11. War and early state formation in the northern Titicaca Basin, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Stanish, Charles; Levine, Abigail

    2011-01-01

    Excavations at the site of Taraco in the northern Titicaca Basin of southern Peru indicate a 2,600-y sequence of human occupation beginning ca. 1100 B.C.E. Previous research has identified several political centers in the region in the latter part of the first millennium B.C.E. The two largest centers were Taraco, located near the northern lake edge, and Pukara, located 50 km to the northwest in the grassland pampas. Our data reveal that a high-status residential section of Taraco was burned in the first century A.D., after which economic activity in the area dramatically declined. Coincident with this massive fire at Taraco, Pukara adopted many of the characteristics of state societies and emerged as an expanding regional polity. We conclude that organized conflict, beginning approximately 500 B.C.E., is a significant factor in the evolution of the archaic state in the northern Titicaca Basin. PMID:21788514

  12. War and early state formation in the northern Titicaca Basin, Peru.

    PubMed

    Stanish, Charles; Levine, Abigail

    2011-08-23

    Excavations at the site of Taraco in the northern Titicaca Basin of southern Peru indicate a 2,600-y sequence of human occupation beginning ca. 1100 B.C.E. Previous research has identified several political centers in the region in the latter part of the first millennium B.C.E. The two largest centers were Taraco, located near the northern lake edge, and Pukara, located 50 km to the northwest in the grassland pampas. Our data reveal that a high-status residential section of Taraco was burned in the first century A.D., after which economic activity in the area dramatically declined. Coincident with this massive fire at Taraco, Pukara adopted many of the characteristics of state societies and emerged as an expanding regional polity. We conclude that organized conflict, beginning approximately 500 B.C.E., is a significant factor in the evolution of the archaic state in the northern Titicaca Basin.

  13. Seismic effects from major basin formations on the moon and Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.; Gault, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    Grooved and hilly terrains occur at the antipode of major basins on the moon (Imbrium, Orientale) and Mercury (Caloris). Such terrains may represent extensive landslides and surface disruption produced by impact-generated P-waves and antipodal convergence of surface waves. Order-of-magnitude calculations for an Imbrium-size impact on the moon indicate P-wave-induced surface displacements of 10 m at the basin antipode that would arrive prior to secondary ejecta. Comparable surface waves would arrive subsequent to secondary ejecta impacts beyond 1000 km and would increase in magnitude as they converge at the antipode. Other seismically induced surface features include: subdued, furrowed crater walls produced by landslides and concomitant secondary impacts; emplacement and leveling of light plains units owing to seismically induced 'fluidization' of slide material; and perhaps the production and enhancement of deep-seated fractures that led to the concentration of farside lunar maria in the Apollo-Ingenii region.

  14. Reservoir Characterization of the Lower Green River Formation, Southwest Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Craig D.; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas C.; McClure, Kevin P.; Bereskin, S. Robert; Deo, Milind D.

    2002-12-02

    The objectives of the study were to increase both primary and secondary hydrocarbon recovery through improved characterization (at the regional, unit, interwell, well, and microscopic scale) of fluvial-deltaic lacustrine reservoirs, thereby preventing premature abandonment of producing wells. The study will encourage exploration and establishment of additional water-flood units throughout the southwest region of the Uinta Basin, and other areas with production from fluvial-deltaic reservoirs.

  15. Depositional history of the Mississippian Ullin and Fort Payne Formations in the Illinois Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Lasemi, Z.; Treworgy, J.D.; Norby, R.D. )

    1994-04-01

    Field and subsurface data suggest that the mid-Mississippian Ullin Limestone in the Illinois Basin is composed of coalesced Waulsortian-type mounds and porous bryozoan-dominated buildups. Waulsortian mounds in the basin contain a lime mudstone to wackestone core that is flanked and capped by in situ porous bryozoan bafflestone or transported crinoidal-bryozoan packstone and grainstone. The mound core facies appear to be most common in the lower part of the Ullin and is thicker in a deeper outer-ramp setting. Shoreward and up-section (upper part of the outer-ramp through mid-ramp setting), the core facies is generally thinner, while the flanking and capping facies are thicker. Isopachous maps of the Ullin and Fort Payne suggest the presence of several large areas of thick carbonate buildups (Ullin) surrounded by a deep-water, sub-oxic environment (Fort Payne) in the Illinois Basin. Progradation of these buildups and associated facies resulted in a shallower ramp setting during deposition of the upper Ullin. Storm-generated carbonate sandwaves became widespread on this ramp. Sandwaves were mobile and for the most part unfavorable sites for further development of thick mud mounds and/or in situ bryozoan buildups. However, isolated mounds and flanking buildups are present in the upper part of the Ullin, and, together with the sandwaves, formed an irregular topography that led to the development of oolitic grainstone shoals during deposition of the overlying Salem Limestone.

  16. Diagenetic effects of compaction on reservoir properties: The case of early callovian ``Dalle Nacrée'' formation (Paris basin, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nader, Fadi H.; Champenois, France; Barbier, Mickaël; Adelinet, Mathilde; Rosenberg, Elisabeth; Houel, Pascal; Delmas, Jocelyne; Swennen, Rudy

    2016-11-01

    The impact of compaction diagenesis on reservoir properties is addressed by means of observations made on five boreholes with different burial histories of the Early Callovian "Dalle Nacrée" Formation in the Paris Basin. Petrographic analyses were carried out in order to investigate the rock-texture, pore space type and volume, micro-fabrics, and cement phases. Based on the acquired data, a chronologically ordered sequence of diagenetic events (paragenesis) for each borehole was reconstructed taking the burial history into account. Point counting and a segmentation algorithm (Matlab) were used to quantify porosity, as well as the amounts of grain constituents and cement phases on scanned images of studied thin sections. In addition, four key samples were analyzed by 3D imaging using microfocus X-ray computer tomography. Basin margin grainstones display a different burial diagenesis when compared to basin centre grainstones and wackestones. The former have been affected by considerable cementation (especially by blocky calcite) prior to effective burial, in contrast to the basin centre lithologies where burial and compaction prevailed with relatively less cementation. Fracturing and bed-parallel stylolitization, observed especially in basinal wackestone facies also invoke higher levels of mechanical and chemical compaction than observed in basin marginal equivalents. Compaction fluids may have migrated at the time of burial from the basin centre towards its margins, affecting hence the reservoir properties of similar rock textures and facies and resulting in cross-basin spatial diagenetic heterogeneities.

  17. The Lower Triassic Sorkh Shale Formation of the Tabas Block, east central Iran: Succesion of a failed-rift basin at the Paleotethys margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasemi, Y.; Ghomashi, M.; Amin-Rasouli, H.; Kheradmand, A.

    2008-01-01

    The Lower Triassic Sorkh Shale Formation is a dominantly red colored marginal marine succession deposited in the north-south trending Tabas Basin of east central Iran. It is correlated with the unconformity-bounded lower limestone member of the Elika Formation of the Alborz Mountains of northern Iran. The Sorkh Shale is bounded by the pre-Triassic and post-Lower Triassic interregional unconformities and consists mainly of carbonates, sandstones, and evaporites with shale being a minor constituent. Detailed facies analysis of the Sorkh Shale Formation resulted in recognition of several genetically linked peritidal facies that are grouped into restricted subtidal, carbonate tidal flat, siliciclastic tidal flat, coastal plain and continental evaporite facies associations. These were deposited in a low energy, storm-dominated inner-ramp setting with a very gentle slope that fringed the Tabas Block of east central Iran and passed northward (present-day coordinates) into deeper water facies of the Paleotethys passive margin of northern Cimmerian Continent. Numerous carbonate storm beds containing well-rounded intraclasts, ooids and bioclasts of mixed fauna are present in the Sorkh Shale Formation of the northern Tabas Basin. The constituents of the storm beds are absent in the fair weather peritidal facies of the Sorkh Shale Formation, but are present throughout the lower limestone member of the Elika Formation. The Tabas Block, a part of the Cimmerian continent in east central Iran, is a rift basin that developed during Early Ordovician-Silurian Paleotethys rifting. Facies and sequence stratigraphic analyses of the Sorkh Shale Formation has revealed additional evidence supporting the Tabas Block as a failed rift basin related to the Paleotethys passive margin. Absence of constituents of the storm beds in the fair weather peritidal facies of the Sorkh Shale Formation, presence of the constituents of the storm beds in the fair weather facies of the Elika Formation (the

  18. Authigenic molybdenum formation in marine sediments: A link to pore water sulfide in the Santa Barbara Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zheng, Yen; Anderson, Robert F.; VanGeen, A.; Kuwabara, J.

    2000-01-01

    Pore water and sediment Mo concentrations were measured in a suite of multicores collected at four sites along the northeastern flank of the Santa Barbara Basin to examine the connection between authigenic Mo formation and pore water sulfide concentration. Only at the deepest site (580 m), where pore water sulfide concentrations rise to >0.1 ??M right below the sediment water interface, was there active authigenic Mo formation. At shallower sites (550,430, and 340 m), where pore water sulfide concentrations were consistently <0.05 ??M, Mo precipitation was not occuring at the time of sampling. A sulfide concentration of ???0.1 ??M appears to be a threshold for the onset of Mo-Fe-S co-precipitation. A second threshold sulfide concentration of ???100 ??M is required for Mo precipitation without Fe, possibly as Mo-S or as particle-bound Mo. Mass budgets for Mo were constructed by combining pore water and sediment results for Mo with analyses of sediment trap material from Santa Barbara Basin as well as sediment accumulation rates derived from 210Pb. The calculations show that most of the authigenic Mo in the sediment at the deepest site is supplied by diffusion from overlying bottom waters. There is, however, a non-lithogenic particulate Mo associated with sinking particles that contributes ???15% to the total authigenic Mo accumulation. Analysis of sediment trap samples and supernant brine solutions indicates the presence of non-lithogenic particulate Mo, a large fraction of which is easily remobilized and, perhaps, associated with Mn-oxides. Our observations show that even with the very high flux of organic carbon reaching the sediment of Santa Barbara Basin, active formation of sedimentary authigenic Mo requires a bottom water oxygen concentration below 3 ??M. However, small but measurable rates of authigenic Mo accumulation were observed at sites where bottom water oxygen ranged between 5 and 23 ??M, indicating that the formation of authigenic Mo occured in the

  19. The stratotype and facies of the glacial Lower Vendian Nichatka Formation, Chara River basin, Central Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumakov, N. M.; Kernitskii, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    Sediments of the Nichatka Formation are facially studied and thoroughly described, the sections are correlated, and the subformations are recognized. The formation represents a key stratigraphic unit to reveal the origin of the Central Siberian glacial horizon and to correlate it with glacial horizons in other regions of the world, namely, with the Laplandian Horizon of the Lower Vendian, Nantou and Marino tillites, etc. The Nichatka Formation is correlated with the glacial Bolshoi Patom (Dzhemkukan) Formation of the Vendian reference section at the Ura Uplift. Unlike the latter, it is mainly composed of continental glacial deposits and is marked by a complex facies composition. The glacial origin of the Nichatka Formation is reliably determined on the basis of a set of diagnostic characters. This permits a more complete reconstruction of the Early Vendian depositional environments. In addition to typical basal tillites and marginal moraine deposits, the formation includes glaciolacustrine and fluvioglacial sediments along with aquatillites, allotillites, and the glacial fan, including subaqueous, deposits.

  20. Applied velocity versus offset (VVO) to validated & characterized fracturing zone in intra Baturaja Formation, South Sumatera Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardiyan, Hilman; Rusli, Saifatur

    2016-01-01

    The velocity versus offset (VVO) as new geophysical method can be applied to detect some geological phenomenon, such as hydrocarbon trap, structural-fracture anomaly, facies changes, etc. The VVO method is data driven, based on the normal move out equation (NMO) and measuring the local event correlation between adjacent traces to get velocity gradient attributes which is derived from cross-plotting the velocity versus offset (VVO). This paper is describing applied VVO model that controlled by well data which indicated fracture from logs data, especially Resistivity Imager Logs or Formation Micro Imager (FMI). Images FMI logs data at Intra-Baturaja Carbonate Formation (BRF) in South Palembang Sub-basin (SPB), South Sumatera, shows vugs with fractures which orientation is roughly NNW-SSE. Meanwhile, the 2D NMO seismic gathers indicated those all as hockey stick at far offset. By applying VVO method, hockey stick can be identified and then used to validated, characterized and localized where the fracturing zone in intra-Baturaja Formation is. Laterally, VVO quantified as velocity gradient attribute which associated with geological model as the fracturing zone in study area. Characterization fracturing zone in Intra Baturaja Formation as geological lateral model by design is a challenging task for most exploration and production. In term of exploration where limited data is available, it can be used step ahead as carbonate fracture reservoir candidate in proven area and adjacent, especially in SPB South Sumatra.

  1. Organic Aerosol Formation and Processing in the Los Angeles Basin: Role of Gasoline vs. Diesel Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahreini, R.; Middlebrook, A. M.; De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Trainer, M.; Brown, S. S.; Dube, B.; Holloway, J. S.; Perring, A. E.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.; Stark, H.; Wagner, N.; Parrish, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    During the CalNex-2010 field project in May-June 2010, the NOAA WP-3D aircraft performed flights up- and down-wind of metropolitan, industrial, agricultural and animal feeding sites in central-southern California. Here airborne data on organic aerosol (OA) properties as measured by a compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer along with measurements of trace gases affecting secondary production of aerosols in the Los Angeles Basin are presented. The analysis presented indicates that the ratio of organic aerosol to carbon monoxide (OA/CO) is significantly higher than the previously observed ratios of primary OA/CO downwind of urban areas, indicating that even on short time scales of transport within the basin, there is significant production of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The increase in the ratio of OA/CO is also accompanied by an increase in the fraction of oxygenated species of OA, providing evidence for production of more oxidized SOA as air masses are photochemically processed. Despite a smaller contribution from Diesel vehicles to traffic on weekends, analysis of the weekend vs. weekday data indicates that similar values of ΔOA/ΔCO are observed on the weekends compared to weekdays, for air masses with similar degrees of photochemical processing. This indicates that emissions of gas phase organic species from Diesel vehicles are not significant for OA production in the LA Basin. Our calculated steady-state concentrations of hydroxyl radical (OH) indicate that OH concentrations at mid-day are substantially higher on weekends compared to weekdays, indicating faster chemical processing of air masses during a fixed length of time on the weekends compared to weekdays.

  2. A brief lithostratigraphic review of the Abrahamskraal and Koonap formations of the Beaufort Group, South Africa: Towards a basin-wide stratigraphic scheme for the Middle Permian Karoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Michael Oliver; Rubidge, Bruce Sidney

    2014-12-01

    The basal strata of the Beaufort Group of the South African Karoo Basin, comprising the western Abrahamskraal and eastern Koonap formations, contain the most time extensive record of Middle Permian fossil tetrapods and hold the key to understanding Middle Permian biodiversity change in the continental realm. To determine faunal stratigraphic ranges a reliable lithostratigraphic framework for Middle Permian Beaufort deposits is essential. Until now this has proved difficult to achieve, largely due to the homogeneity of the fluvial succession coupled with structural complexity as a result of Cape Fold Belt orogenesis. Accordingly, the Abrahamskraal Formation has been only locally subdivided on the basis of sandstone packages but regional stratigraphic subdivision has not yet achieved satisfactorily. Collation of stratigraphic sections from around the Karoo Basin for this study demonstrates the presence of four sandstone packages are present within the Abrahamskraal Formation in the south-western corner of the basin. These sandstone packages are given member status, based upon the nomenclature of Le Roux (1985) with the addition of the newly recognised Grootfontein Member. The Combrinkskraal and Grootfontein Members occur in the lower half of the Abrahamskraal Formation and are laterally persistent along the southern margin of the basin. The Koornplaats Member is more restricted to the south west corner of the basin, where it quite thick, suggesting the narrowing of the highly channelized area. The overlying Moordenaars Member, more extensive towards the north than underlying packages, indicates subsequent northwesterly expansion of the locus of active channelization with time. Although thin sandstone packages in the more easterly positioned and stratigraphically equivalent Koonap Formation, this does not facilitate lithostratigraphic subdivision of this part of the stratigraphic succession and may indicate a different form of fluvial architecture. Our study provides

  3. Regional porosity trends of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation in southwestern Alabama and vicinity, with comparisons to formations of other basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmoker, J.W.; Schenk, C.J.

    1994-01-01

    Sandstone porosity of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation decreases systematically as depth and thermal maturity increase over a wide range. Median porosity is about 25% where equivalent vitrinite reflectance (Ro) is slightly over 0.7% in the northern part of the study area (Clarke County, Mississippi). Median porosity is reduced to 8% where Ro approaches 2.7% in the southern part of the study area. Based on the comparisons at similar Ro levels, median (50th-percentile) Norphlet porosity exceeds porosities of "typical' sandstones in other basins by more than a factor of two throughout the study area. Even the lower (10th-percentile) Norphlet porosities are higher than median porosities of sandstones in general. -from Authors

  4. Minerals and trace elements in silcretes of the Sado basin (Alentejo, southern Portugal) and implications for silcrete formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Daniela; Kullmann, Sarah; Zarei, Mehdi; Stahr, Karl

    2014-05-01

    Soils in the eastern part of the Sado basin (southern Portugal) are often characterized by massive cementations caused by silica. The thickness and massive character of these silcretes led to the hypothesis that accumulation of silica took place not only vertically within a soil profile, but also by enrichment through lateral water and element flow into the Sado basin. The aims of the study reported here were: 1) to characterize the cementing agent with regard to its mineralogy; 2) to test the hypothesis that silification was enhanced through lateral silica transport from the adjacent Alto Alentejo into the Sado basin. Aim 1) was achieved by scratching silica coatings from ped surfaces of the silicified soil horizons and cleaning them manually in the lab under a binocular microscope. After careful smashing with a mortar, density separation by sodium polytungstate solution was applied to remove any remaining mineral grains from the silica samples. The cleaned silica samples were then subjected to XRD and SEM in combination with EDS. Aim 2) was attained by using trace element contents of predominant rock types of the Alto Alentejo and of the silcretes in the Sado basin for identifying lateral pathways of water and silica in the landscape. Ten rock samples from the assumed source area of silica were combusted by fusion melt, and their contents of Ba, Co, Cs, Nb, Pb, Rb, Sr, Y and Zr were analyzed by ICP-MS. The same elements were analyzed in NaOH extracts of the cemented soil horizons in the Sado basin. The X-ray diagrams of the silica coatings show the expected broad hump of amorphous silica. In addition, quartz, kaolinite, and surprisingly high amounts of halloysite are identified, the latter reflecting conditions of intensive weathering and pedogenesis during the formation of the silica coatings. This intensive soil formation and hence silification most likely took place during Pliocene. Greater age is impossible, because the silification took place in Pliocene

  5. Sequence architecture and lithofacies assemblages of submarine fan deposits in Los Molles Formation (Jurassic), Neuquen Basin, Argentina

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, J.S.

    1986-05-01

    The Neuquen basin is a remnant of the Mesozoic back-arc basin trend that developed along the western margin of South America. It contains a thick, diverse sequence of Jurassic sedimentary strata, whose facies distribution was strongly influenced by syndepositional tectonism. The predominantly dark, laminated shales and siltstones of the Los Molles Formation range from Pliensbachian to Callovian in age and record the progradation of the outer shelf, slope, and basin-plain sediments deposited during the shoaling phase of the lowermost, or Cuyan, Jurassic cycle. Based on outcrop, well, and seismic data, several thick packages of sandstone and conglomerate within the Los Molles are interpreted to represent submarine fan deposits that developed during periods of relative sea level lowstand. Sea level falls were probably related to local synchronous tectonic pulses rather than true eustatic fluctuations. The distribution of coarse-grained fan deposits was apparently strongly controlled by the location of major Jurassic fault trends that stabilized the position of the shelf-slope break through time. Based on the geometry and sequence architecture, two distinct styles of fan development are recognized in the Los Molles sandstones. The most common style (type A) is characterized by sequences that have poorly defined, sand-poor lobes with well-developed channel-levee complexes. Some channels exhibit large-scale accretion surfaces, probably resulting from lateral migration. Thick-bedded arenite facies are limited to amalgamated channel fills, whereas thin-bedded classical turbidites are present as overbank deposits. Type A fans were built by turbidity and fluxoturbidity currents from submarine canyon point sources. The less common fan sequences (type B) lack channeling; they are dominated by thick, massive beds of internally featureless sandstone that are bounded by chaotic slump deposits.

  6. Methylotrophic methanogenesis governs the biogenic coal bed methane formation in Eastern Ordos Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongguang; Yu, Zhisheng; Liu, Ruyin; Zhang, Hongxun; Zhong, Qiding; Xiong, Zhenghe

    2012-12-01

    To identify themethanogenic pathways present in a deep coal bed methane (CBM) reservoir associated with Eastern Ordos Basin in China, a series of geochemical and microbiological studies was performed using gas and water samples produced from the Liulin CBM reservoir. The composition and stable isotopic ratios of CBM implied a mixed biogenic and thermogenic origin of the methane. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed the dominance of the methylotrophic methanogen Methanolobus in the water produced. The high potential of methane production by methylotrophic methanogens was found in the enrichments using the water samples amended with methanol and incubated at 25 and 35 °C. Methylotrophic methanogens were the dominant archaea in both enrichments as shown by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)–denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that fermentative, sulfate-reducing, and nitrate-reducing bacteria inhabiting the water produced were a factor in coal biodegradation to fuel methanogens. These results suggested that past and ongoing biodegradation of coal by methylotrophic methanogens and syntrophic bacteria, as well as thermogenic CBM production, contributed to the Liulin CBM reserves associated with the Eastern Ordos Basin.

  7. Saharan dust deposition in the Carpathian Basin and its possible effects on interglacial soil formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, György; Cserháti, Csaba; Kovács, János; Szalai, Zoltán

    2016-09-01

    Several hundred tons of windblown dust material are lifted into the atmosphere and are transported every year from Saharan dust source areas towards Europe having an important climatic and other environmental effect also on distant areas. According to the systematic observations of modern Saharan dust events, it can be stated that dust deflated from North African source areas is a significant constituent of the atmosphere of the Carpathian Basin and Saharan dust deposition events are identifiable several times in a year. Dust episodes are connected to distinct meteorological situations, which are also the determining factors of the different kinds of depositional mechanisms. By using the adjusted values of dust deposition simulations of numerical models, the annual Saharan dust flux can be set into the range of 3.2-5.4 g/m2/y. Based on the results of past mass accumulation rates calculated from stratigraphic and sedimentary data of loess-paleosol sequences, the relative contribution of Saharan dust to interglacial paleosol material was quantified. According to these calculations, North African exotic dust material can represent 20-30% of clay and fine silt-sized soil components of interglacial paleosols in the Carpathian Basin. The syngenetic contribution of external aeolian dust material is capable to modify physicochemical properties of soils and hereby the paleoclimatic interpretation of these pedogene stratigraphic units.

  8. Formation of layered and schlieren migmatites by partial melting at Aspen Basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalf, R.V.

    1985-01-01

    Although several recent studies of layered migmatites have suggested that they originated by subsolidus differentiation, both layered and schlieren-type migmatites at Aspen Basin formed by partial melting. Proterozoic supracrustal rocks at Aspen Basin were intruded by a suite of calc-alkalic diorite, tonalite and granite, intensely deformed, then intruded by younger aplite and granite. The supra-crustal rocks consist of migmatitic, sillimanite-grade metagreywacke, felsic gneiss and amphibolite. Within the metagreywackes, concordant coarse-grained neosomes (leucosomes + melanosomes) are interlayered with fine-grained grey gneiss. These layered migmatites grade toward schlieren-type migamtites at deeper levels, where the proportions of leucocratic material and degree of discordance increase. Two pieces of evidence demonstrate that leucosomes crystallized from melts. Partial melting is favored over injection on the basis of major and trace element chemical analyses. None of the plutonic units have appropriate composition to serve as the migmatite source, and the chemical and mineralogical compositions of leucosomes and leucogranites correlate to their metamorphic host rock, implying local derivation. The transition from layered to schlieren migmatites is marked by an increase in Rb, Rb/Sr, and K/sub 2/O/Na/sub 2/O within the leucosomes and leucogranites, and apparently represents an increase in the degree of partial melting.

  9. Wetland river flow interaction in a sedimentary formation of the white Volta basin, Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyarko, B. K.; Diekkruger, B.; Van De Giesen, N.; Barry, B.

    2011-12-01

    Groundwater resources in the floodplain wetlands of the White Volta River basin of Ghana is a major source of water for irrigation activities of communities living around and baseflow to sustain the flow of the river. Hydrology of the floodplain wetlands in the basin are complex, characterized by temporally variable storage volumes with erratic contribution to streamflow. For the continual usage of groundwater resources in the floodplains there is a need to study the form of interaction between the main river and floodplain wetlands. The study, adopted the PM-WIN (MODFLOW) model for simulating the interaction between the wetland and stream. Additionally, the lower boundary discharge output from the HYDRUS-1D model is the estimated recharge. This input quantifies the temporal and spatial variations in sub-surfaces discharges in the floodplain wetland. The simulation of the sub-surface hydraulic head of the wetland indicates a systematic variation relative to the White Volta River response to changes in the rainfall pattern. The interaction conditions vary from season to season with March, April, and May showing the least leakage (estimated values of 0.03mm/day, 0.06mm/day, and 0.15 mm/day, respectively) from the river into the floodplain wetland. Notably, the interaction between the wetland and the river as simulated is bidirectional. With most of the flow coming out from the river into the floodplain wetland, this condition persists in the months of August and September.

  10. Production of NOx and other precursors of ozone formation in the Uinta Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E.; Lyman, S. N.; Martin, R. S.; Anderson, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Uinta Basin, located in northeastern Utah, sometimes experiences ozone mixing ratios greater than the EPA NAAQS during specific meteorological conditions that include a combination of snow cover and inversion. We monitored ozone and some of its precursors, including NO, NO2, NOx (NO + NO2), and NOy (sum of reactive nitrogen species), at two sites (Roosevelt and Horse Pool). The Roosevelt site is in a city of about 6,000 people, and the Horse Pool site is in an area of intensive oil and gas production. In February and March 2012, NO, NO2, and NOy mixing ratios were 0.5 ± 0.8, 5.2 ± 2.6, and 6.5 ± 3.9 ppb at Roosevelt and 0 ± 1.3, 2.8 ± 2.7, and 4.1 ± 4.4 ppb at Horse Pool, respectively (mean ± standard deviation). NO, NO2, and NOx were measured at 7 other sites around the Basin by other entities. The spatial and temporal patterns in NOx and NOy indicate the dominance of local source influences on observed mixing ratios. NOx at urban sites and in oil and gas production areas appeared strongly influenced by traffic patterns. At some sites, wind direction analysis and air trajectory analysis indicated that areas of oil and gas production are significant sources of NOx, though pinpointing individual NOx sources proved difficult.

  11. Sill intrusion driven fluid flow and vent formation in volcanic basins: Modeling rates of volatile release and paleoclimate effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Karthik; Schmid, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Evidence of mass extinction events in conjunction with climate change occur throughout the geological record and may be accompanied by pronounced negative carbon isotope excursions. The processes that trigger such globally destructive changes are still under considerable debate. These include mechanisms such as poisoning from trace metals released during large volcanic eruptions (Vogt, 1972), CO2 released from lava degassing during the formation of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) (Courtillot and Renne, 2003) and CH4 release during the destabilization of sub-seafloor methane (Dickens et al., 1995), to name a few. Thermogenic methane derived from contact metamorphism associated with magma emplacement and cooling in sedimentary basins has been recently gaining considerable attention as a potential mechanism that may have triggered global climate events in the past (e.g. Svensen and Jamtveit, 2010). The discovery of hydrothermal vent complexes that are spatially associated with such basins also supports the discharge of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere (e.g. Jamtveit et al., 2004; Planke et al., 2005; Svensen et al., 2006). A previous study that investigated this process using a fluid flow model (Iyer et al., 2013) suggested that although hydrothermal plume formation resulting from sill emplacement may indeed release large quantities of methane at the surface, the rate at which this methane is released into the atmosphere is too slow to trigger, by itself, some of the negative δ13C excursions observed in the fossil record over short time scales observed in the fossil record. Here, we reinvestigate the rates of gas release during sill emplacement in a case study from the Harstad Basin off-shore Norway with a special emphasis on vent formation. The presented study is based on a seismic line that crosses multiple sill structures emplaced around 55 Ma within the Lower Cretaceous sediments. A single well-defined vent complex is interpreted above the termination of the

  12. The formation of the South Tharsis Ridge Belt: Basin and Range-style extension on early Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasözen, Ezgi; Andrews-Hanna, Jeffrey C.; Dohm, J. M.; Anderson, R. C.

    2016-06-01

    The South Tharsis Ridge Belt (STRB) is located along the northeastern edge of Terra Sirenum and partially surrounds the southwestern part of Tharsis in an arc. It consists of 29 large ridges separated by distances 130 to 260 km, with average relief of 1.5 km above the surrounding plains. Because the STRB is among the oldest tectonic features associated both spatially and developmentally with Tharsis, it may provide key information on the early evolution of Tharsis and possibly pre-Tharsis processes. Earlier studies concluded that the ridges formed through compressional tectonism. However, the shape, size, and separation of the ridges support the interpretation that the STRB resembles the extensional Basin and Range Province on Earth. Both regions are characterized by series of parallel mountain ranges separated by broad valleys. In this study, we evaluate both extensional and compressional hypotheses for the origin of the ridges using evidence from topography, deformed craters, crustal thickness models, and strain modeling. Though neither interpretation explains all aspects of the ridges, the topography of the ridges and crustal thinning associated with the western part of the ridge belt support an extensional origin. Strain models predict that Basin and Range-style wide rifting would be expected for early Martian conditions. This extension may have been initiated by plume-induced uplift in the early stages of Tharsis formation, but the large amount of extensional strain inferred in the western STRB must have been accommodated by compression elsewhere, possibly in the heavily deformed craters of western Terra Sirenum.

  13. The coal-forming plants of the upper part of the Lower Cretaceous Starosuchan Formation (Partizansk Basin, South Primorye region)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugdaeva, E. V.; Markevich, V. S.; Volynets, E. B.

    2014-05-01

    The plant remains and palynological assemblages are studied in detail in the section of the coal-bearing upper part of the Aptian Starosuchan Formation near the village of Molchanovka (Partizansk Basin, South Primorye region). On the basis of the light and electron microscopic study of the disperse cuticles, it was established that the coals are mostly composed of remains of taxodialean Elatides asiatica (Yok.) Krassil., subordinate Miroviaceae, rare ginkgoalean Pseudotorellia sp., and bennettite Nilssoniopteris rithidorachis (Krysht.) Krassil. The spores Gleicheniidites and pollen Taxodiaceaepollenites are dominant in the palynospectrum of the coal interlayer. It was found that dominant taxodialeans and gleicheniaceous ferns with less abundant Miroviaceae, ginkgoaleans, and rare bennettites occurred in the Aptian swamp communities of the Partizansk basin. Shoots and leaves of Elatides asiatica, fronds of Birisia onychioides (Vassil. et K.-M.) Samyl., are dominant in the burials of plants from the clastic rocks. The fragments of leaves of Nilssoniopteris, scale-leaved conifers, and Ginkgo ex gr. adiantoides are rare. The disperse cuticle of these layers mostly includes Pseudotorellia sp.; however, its remains in burials were not found. The spores Laevigatosporites are dominant in the palynospectra from the clastic interlayers. Ginkgocycadophytus and taxa close to Pinaceae are plentiful among the pollen of gymnosperms.

  14. Tectonic significance of basalts of the Middle Run Formation (Upper Proterozoic) of the East Continent Rift Basin, Indiana and Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D. . Kentucky Geological Survey); Misra, K.C. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Thirty-five samples of mafic rock recovered from three basement wells in Lawrence Co., Ind., Campbell Co., Ky., and Jessamine Co., Ky, were analyzed for major, minor, and trace-element composition by XRF and single-acid extraction ICP in a commercial laboratory. Petrographic examination indicates that these mafic rocks are, in part, amygdaloidal basalts, and therefore represent some portion of a Late Proterozoic mafic volcanic center that existed in the East Continent Rift Basin (ECRB). These samples possess systematic trends in the distribution of many trace elements, indicating the original compositions have been preserved. This suggests that these basalts possess their original concentrations of the majority of the large ion lithophile (LIL) elements. The concentrations of the LIL elements in the Middle Run basalts indicate that the Middle run basalts can best be characterized as being continental flood basalts. Comparison with published data from the Keweenanwan basalts of the North Shore Volcanic Group, exposed along the Lake Superior portion of the Midcontinent Rift, indicates that the Middle Run basalts are similar to the more evolved basalts of that suite. However, primitive MORB-like compositions that are present in the North Shore Group are apparently absent in the basalts of the ECRB. This may suggest that the Lake Superior segment of the Midcontinent Rift underwent a greater degree of crustal extension than the Middle Run basin. Alternatively, the basalts associated with the Middle Run Formation may represent magmatic activity early in the rift evolution.

  15. Regional distribution and chronostratigraphy of the Qusaiba member of the Qalibah formation in the Nafud Basin, Northwestern Saudia Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Aoudeh, S.M.; Al-Hajri, S.A.

    1995-08-01

    The Qusaiba Member of the Qalibah Formation (Silurian age) is a thick sequence consisting of massive dark gray shales. Only the very basal shales are black and highly organic rich. The basal {open_quote}Hot Shale{close_quote} unit is a prolific source correlated to all the Paleozoic discoveries in Central and Eastern Saudi Arabia. In the Nafud Basin, Northwest Saudi Arabia, this same sequence acts as both source and seal to the underlying Ordovician reservoir, making the understanding of this sequence essential to the current exploration program underway in the region. Acquiring high resolution blostratigraphy and detailed source rock analysis substantially contributed to the better understanding of the regional depositional setting of the seal, source, and the reservoirs in the area. Graptolites and chitinozoans zonation were utilized to fine-tune the chronostratigraphy and to further subdivide this huge basin into more manageable subbasins. Regional chronostratigraphic analysis has indicated that the early Qusaiba transgression took place swiftly and covered all of the Arabian plate during early Rhuddanian time. Only high areas not covered by the Rhuddanian transgression and areas that experienced later uplift and erosion lack the Rhuddanian deposits.

  16. Paleoclimate cycles and tectonic controls on fluvial, lacustrine, and eolian strata in upper Triassic Chinle Formation, San Juan basin

    SciTech Connect

    Dubiel, R.F. )

    1989-09-01

    Sedimentologic study of the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation in the San Juan basin (SJB) indicates that Late Triassic paleoclimate and tectonic movements influenced the distribution of continental lithofacies. The Shinarump, Monitor Butte, and Petrified Forest Members in the lower part of the Chinle consist of complexly interfingered fluvial, floodplain, marsh, and lacustrine rocks; the Owl Rock and Rock Point Members in the upper part consists of lacustrine-basin and eolian sandsheet strata. Facies analysis, vertebrate and invertebrate paleontology, and paleoclimate models demonstrate that the Late Triassic was dominated by tropical monsoonal circulation, which provided abundant precipitation interspersed with seasonally dry periods. Owl Rock lacustrine strata comprise laminated limestones that reflect seasonal monsoonal precipitation and larger scale, interbedded carbonates and fine-grained clastics that represent longer term, alternating wet and dry climatic cycles. Overlying Rock Point eolian sand-sheet and dune deposits indicate persistent alternating but drier climatic cyclicity. Within the Chinle, upward succession of lacustrine, alternating lacustrine/eolian sand-sheet, and eolian sand-sheet/dune deposits reflects an overall decrease in precipitation due to the northward migration of Pangaea out of low latitudes dominated by monsoonal circulation.

  17. Evolutionary relationships of a new genus and three new species of Omomyid primates (Willwood Formation, Lower Eocene, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bown, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    Studies of new finds of omomyid primates from the lower Eocene Willwood Formation of northwest Wyoming reveal the presence of a new genus and two new species of anaptomorphines and a new species of omomyine. All were apparently short-lived immigrants into the Bighorn Basin. The new genus and speciesTatmanius szalayi is typified by a diminutive single-rooted p3 and a bilobed-rooted p4 with a crown smaller than ml. These traits were probably derived fromPseudotetonius and parallel similar conditions inTrogolemur andNannopithex. The new speciesArapahovius advena is the first occurrence ofArapahovius outside the Washakie Basin, where it appears to have also been a vagrant species.Steinius annectens, sp. nov., is larger than the olderSteinius vespertinus and strengthens the alliance between this genus and BridgerianOraorays carteri, although which species ofSteinius is closer toOmomys is not yet clear. The available evidence suggests a derivation ofOmomys (Omomyini) fromSteinius and all Washakiini from the anaptomorphineTeilhardina, which would indicate that Omomyinae were at least diphyletic. Preliminary evidence suggests that the geographic distributions of at least some Willwood omomyids correlate with paleosol distributions.

  18. Hydrogeochemistry of the formation waters in the San Francisco field, UMV basin, Colombia - A multivariate statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes, J. E.; Muñoz, L. F.; Gonzalez, C. A.; Niño, J. E.; Polo, A.; Suspes, A.; Siachoque, S. C.; Hernández, A.; Trujillo, H.

    2016-08-01

    A wide variety of hydrogeochemical data were obtained through the analysis of the formation water samples collected from 118 producing wells from the San Francisco Oilfield (SFO) in the Upper Magdalena Valley (UMV) basin, Huila, Colombia. The study area is composed of deposited sandstone in fluvial-lacustrine marine environment, which characterized the formation waters as chloride-sodium water type. The brackish-saline facies identified can be attributed to evaporation, halite and dolomite dissolution along with water recharge of meteoric waters somewhere in the basin, probably from Magdalena River, the contribution of the SFO injection water system and significantly by the rock-water interaction. Some ionic ratios were used to confirm clearly that water-rock interactions play a significant role in the evolution of the hydrogeochemistry process in the SFO. The charge balance error ranges between -5.88% and 2.62% indicating very well balanced and mature water for blocks 1, 2 and 3 (north part of the field), and partially equilibrated and immature waters for blocks 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 as is confirmed by Piper, Giggenbach, and Schöeller diagrams. Calculated scale and stability indices (Langelier, Ryznar, and Puckorius), besides halite and dolomite indexes, indicate that these formation waters are slightly saturated with respect to the calcite and dolomite and have strong tendency to the scale formation as well. Concentration maps were used to identify the geological factors that could have influenced its chemical composition and the hydrogeochemical processes involved in the field, such as halite dissolution, calcite or dolomite precipitation and cationic exchange reactions. The mineralogical distribution leads to the conclusion that the halite dissolution is mostly distributed in the Northeastern area of the SFO between B1, B3, B4, B5, and B6 blocks, the dolomite and calcite have greater concentrations between B5 and B6 blocks. The dissolved minerals followed the

  19. Sediment flow routing during formation of forearc basins: Constraints from integrated analysis of detrital pyroxenes and stratigraphy in the Kumano Basin, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchs, David M.; Cukur, Deniz; Masago, Hideki; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter

    2015-03-01

    The evolution of sediment flow routing during complete evolution of the Kumano forearc basin is determined through integration of stratigraphic and sediment provenance analyses in the upper Nankai forearc. A new approach uses the compositional variability of detrital clinopyroxenes and orthopyroxenes collected at eight major rivers in Japan and three drill sites in the basin and nearby slope environment, including the first drill cuttings retrieved by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). Joint interpretation of these datasets reveals that the sedimentation history of the basin is characterised by three main phases separated by newly-recognised time-transgressive boundaries. We show that the Kumano Basin initiated as a trench-slope basin in the early Quaternary (∼1.93 Ma) and that it progressively evolved towards an upper slope environment with increased turbidite confinement and influence from climatic forcing. Basin initiation was broadly synchronous with development of the Nankai megasplay fault, suggesting a causal relationship with construction of the Nankai accretionary prism. Unlike preceding studies documenting long-distance longitudinal transport of clastic material along the lower Nankai forearc, only limited longitudinal transport is documented by detrital pyroxenes in the upper forearc. These results suggest that transverse canyons are a major control on the sediment flow routing during maturation of forearc basins and that long-distance longitudinal flows along convergent margins are principally restricted to near-trench environments, even in the presence of large forearc basins.

  20. Well-log signatures of alluvial-lacustrine reservoirs and source rocks, Lagoa-Feia Formations, Lower Cretaceous, Campos Basin, offshore Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahao, D.; Warme, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Campos basin is situated in offshore southeastern Brazil. The Lagoa Feia is the basal formation in the stratigraphic sequence of the basin, and was deposited during rifting in an evolving complex of lakes of different sizes and chemical characteristics, overlying and closely associated with rift volcanism. The stratigraphic sequence is dominated by lacustrine limestones and shales (some of them organic-rich), and volcaniclastic conglomerates deposited on alluvial fans. The sequence is capped by marine evaporites. In the Lagoa Feia Formation, complex lithologies make reservoirs and source rocks unsuitable for conventional well-log interpretation. To solve this problem, cores were studied and the observed characteristics related to log responses. The results have been extended through the entire basin for other wells where those facies were not cored. The reservoir facies in the Lagoa Feia Formation are restricted to levels of pure pelecypod shells (''coquinas''). Resistivity, sonic, neutron, density, and gamma-ray logs were used in this work to show how petrophysical properties are derived for the unconventional reservoirs existing in this formation. The same suite of logs was used to develop methods to define geochemical characteristics where source rock data are sparse in the organic-rich lacustrine shales of the Lagoa Feia Formation. These shales are the main source rocks for all the oil discovered to date in the Campos basin.

  1. Hydrocarbon source potential of the Tanezzuft Formation, Murzuq Basin, south-west Libya: An organic geochemical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Diasty, W. Sh.; El Beialy, S. Y.; Anwari, T. A.; Batten, D. J.

    2017-06-01

    A detailed organic geochemical study of 20 core and cuttings samples collected from the Silurian Tanezzuft Formation, Murzuq Basin, in the south-western part of Libya has demonstrated the advantages of pyrolysis geochemical methods for evaluating the source-rock potential of this geological unit. Rock-Eval pyrolysis results indicate a wide variation in source richness and quality. The basal Hot Shale samples proved to contain abundant immature to early mature kerogen type II/III (oil-gas prone) that had been deposited in a marine environment under terrigenous influence, implying good to excellent source rocks. Strata above the Hot Shale yielded a mixture of terrigenous and marine type III/II kerogen (gas-oil prone) at the same maturity level as the Hot Shale, indicating the presence of only poor to fair source rocks.

  2. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction based on palynofacies analyses of the Cansona Formation (Late Cretaceous), Sinú-San Jacinto Basin, northwest Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliao-Lemus, Tatiana; Carvalho, Marcelo de Araujo; Torres, Diego; Plata, Angelo; Parra, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    To reconstruct the paleoenvironments of the Cansona Formation, a Cretaceous succession in Colombia that has controversial paleoenvironmental interpretation, occasionally deep marine and occasionally shallow marine, palynofacies analyses were conducted on 93 samples from four sections of the Sinú San Jacinto Basin in the north, midwest, and southwest sectors. For the palynofacies analyses, the kerogen categories were counted and subjected to cluster analyses. Four palynofacies associations were revealed for the four sections: Palynofacies Association I (PA I), which consisted of microforaminiferal linings, scolecodonts, dinoflagellate cysts, pollen grains, and fungi hyphae; PA II, which consisted of phytoclast translucent non-biostructured and biostructured, opaque phytoclasts (equidimensional and lath shaped); PA III, which consisted of pseudoamorphous particles, cuticles, resin, and fungal spores; and PA IV, which consisted of fluorescent and non-fluorescent amorphous organic matter and the fresh-water algae Botryococcus. In contrast to early studies that suggested a generalization of the depositional environment for the Cansona Formation (deep or shallow conditions), this study suggests that the formation reflects conspicuous stratigraphic and lateral changes and hence different depositional environments. The Cerro Cansona (CC4 section) and Chalán (AP section) areas are a more marine proximal settings (Early Campanian-Maastrichtian), and there is an intermediate setting for the Lorica area (SC section) and deeper conditions for the Montería area (CP2 section).

  3. Origin of dolomitic rocks in the lower Permian Fengcheng formation, Junggar Basin, China: evidence from petrology and geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shifa; Qin, Yi; Liu, Xin; Wei, Chengjie; Zhu, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Although dolomitization of calcite minerals and carbonatization of volcanic rocks have been studied widely, the extensive dolomitic rocks that originated from altered volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks have not been reported. The dolomitic rocks of the Fengcheng Formation in the Junggar Basin of China appear to be formed under unusual geologic conditions. The petrological and geochemical characteristics indicate that the dolomitizing host rock is devitrified volcanic tuff. After low-temperature alteration and calcitization, these tuffaceous rocks are replaced by Mg-rich brine to form massive dolomitic tuffs. We propose that the briny (with -2 ‰ ~ 6 ‰ of δ13CPDB and -5 ‰ ~ 4 ‰ of δ18OPDB) and Mg-rich marine formation water (with 0.7060 ~ 0.7087 of 87Sr/86Sr ratio), the thick and intermediate-mafic volcanic ashes, and the tectonically compressional movement may have favored the formation of the unusual dolomitic rocks. We conclude that the proposed origin of the dolomitic rocks can be extrapolated to other similar terranes with volcaniclastic rocks, seabed tuffaceous sediment, and fracture filling of sill.

  4. Sedimentologic and stratigraphic framework of the upper part of the Fort Union Formation, western Powder River basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, J.N.; Flores, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the stratigraphy and interpret the environments of deposition in the upper part of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation. Of all the lithofacies present within the study area, sandstone is the most dominant and makes up most of the upper part of the Fort Union Formation along the western edge of the Powder River basin, Wyoming. This sandstone lithofacies occurs in three forms: 1) pink conglomeratic sandstone, 2) coarse-grained sandstone, and 3) fine-grained sandstone. The pink conglomeratic sandstone lithofacies forms a series of Stacked channel bodies in which the clasts are as much as 1 3/4 in. in diameter. The coarse-grained sandstone lithofacies is laterally equivalent to the pink conglomeratic sandstone sequence, but contains smaller clasts; it is arranged en echelon (offset) to the north. The fine-grained sandstone lithofacies, limited to the northern part of the study area, is not as laterally continuous as the pink conglomeratic sandstone lithofacies to the south. Basal lag conglomerate underlies both the conglomeratic sandstone and coarse-grained sandstone lithofacies, but not the fine-grained sandstone. The presence of a fine-grained sandstone lithofacies lateral to the conglomeratic sandstone and coarse-grained sandstone lithofacies suggests the presence of a coarse-grained braided and meandering fluvial system coeval with a fine-grained meandering fluvial system.. The meandering fluvial systems drained the alluvial plain flanking the Bighorn Mountains on the west and the Casper arch on the southwest, and flowed north-northeastward within the Powder River basin.

  5. Evaluating Floodplain Controls on Paleo-channel Avulsion and Migration: Wasatch Formation (Paleocene/Eocene, Piceance Basin, CO, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baisden, T.; Hajek, E. A.; Chamberlin, E.; Toms, L.; Foreman, B.

    2014-12-01

    Comparing ancient channel and floodplain deposits provides insight into long-term channel and floodplain dynamics in alluvial basins. Channel lateral migration and avulsion behavior may be affected by floodplain characteristics, including sediment cohesion, vegetation cover, and floodplain-drainage conditions. Channel-deposit architecture reflects paleo-channel dynamics; for example, channel form, migration, and reworking can be inferred from bar deposits, while multi-storied sand bodies can indicate a complex history of channel avulsion, reoccupation and migration. Furthermore, associated floodplain deposits can be used to reconstruct some aspects of floodplain sedimentation patterns, drainage, and soil development. In order to better understand how channel mobility may be linked to floodplain conditions, we compare the three members of the Paleocene-Eocene Wasatch Formation, which were deposited under broadly similar basin subsidence conditions, and straddle the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) climate-change event. These ancient deposits show varying styles of channel and floodplain deposits. The Atwell Gulch (pre-PETM) and Shire (post-PETM) members of the Wasatch Formation are both mud-stone dominated, with abundant, well-developed paleosol deposits. In contrast, the middle Molina Member is sand-rich and contains more weakly developed paleosols. Using terrestrial lidar scans and high-resolution photo panels of outcrops, along with detailed field measurements, we identify key surfaces (including bar-accretion, and story-bounding surfaces) and facies within channel deposits, and describe floodplain deposits within each member. Concurrent changes in paleo-channel architecture and floodplain deposits observed within the succession suggest that floodplain conditions are important controls on channel mobility in Wasatch rivers.

  6. Origin and chemical evolution of formation waters from Silurian-Devonian strata in the Illinois basin, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Stueber, A.M. ); Walter, L.M. )

    1991-01-01

    A suite of formation-water samples from Silurian-Devonian reservoirs in the Illinois basin has been analyzed for major, minor, and trace element concentrations and for H, O, and Sr isotopic compositions in order to interpret origin of salinity and geochemical evolution of brine compositions in this evaporite- and shale-poor cratonic basin. Although chloride concentrations range from 2,000 to 137,000 mg/L, Cl/Br ratios (291 {plus minus} 18) are consistent with those of seawater or seawater evaporated short of halite saturation (Cl/Br = 292). Thus, during Silurian-Devonian time, subaerially evaporated, penesaline brine entered the subsurface where it was chemically modified through brine-rock interactions. Cation/Br ratios and mineralogy of associated strata indicate that Na and K were depleted through interaction with clay minerals, Ca was enriched and Mg depleted by dolomitization, and Sr was enriched as a result of CaCO{sub 3} recrystallization and dolomitization. Brine {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios range from 0.7092 to 0.7108; when these ratios are plotted versus 1/Sr, a two-component mixing trend is suggested, although Sr concentrations have experienced local diagenetic modification. A {sup 87}Sr-enriched fluid may have accompanied petroleum migration from New Albany shales into adjacent Silurian-Devonian carbonates where it mixed with remnant evaporated seawater. This event probably preceded the influx of meteoric water, as {delta}D and {delta}{sup 18}O are not correlated with Sr isotopic compositions of formation waters.

  7. Organic geochemical characterisation of shallow marine Cretaceous formations from Yola Sub-basin, Northern Benue Trough, NE Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarki Yandoka, Babangida M.; Abdullah, Wan Hasiah; Abubakar, M. B.; Hakimi, Mohammed Hail; Jauro, Aliyu; Adegoke, Adebanji Kayode

    2016-05-01

    The shallow marine shales of the Cretaceous formations namely Yolde, Dukul, Jessu, Sekuliye and Numanha ranging in age from Cenomanian to Coniacian within the Yola Sub-basin in the Northern Benue Trough, northeastern Nigeria were analysed to provide an overview on their hydrocarbon generation potential. This study is based on pyrolysis analysis, total organic carbon content (TOC), extractable organic matter (EOM), biomarker distributions and measured vitrinite reflectance. The present-day TOC contents range between 0.24 and 0.71 wt. % and Hydrogen Index (HI) values between 8.7 and 113 mg HC/g TOC with Type III/IV kerogens. Based on the present-day kerogen typing, the shale sediments are expected to generate mainly gas. Biomarker compositions indicates deposition in a marine environment under suboxic conditions with prevalent contribution of aquatic organic matter and a significant amount of terrigenous organic matter input. Organic matter that is dominated by marine components contains kerogens of Type II and Type II-III. This study shows that the organic matter has been affected by volcanic intrusion and consequently, have reached post-mature stage of oil generation. These higher thermal maturities levels are consistent with the vitrinite reflectance ranging from 0.85 to 2.35 Ro % and high Tmax (440-508 °C) values as supported by biomarker maturity ratios. Based on this study, a high prospect for major gas and minor oil generation potential is anticipated from the shallow marine Cretaceous formations from Yola Sub-basin.

  8. Tectonic geomorphology of the southern Sierra Nevada Mountains (California): Evidence for uplift and basin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Andrea M.; Knott, Jeffrey R.

    2010-11-01

    Hypotheses regarding uplift of the Sierra Nevada Mountains (Sierra), California, USA, vary from a single slowly tilting block to rapid Pliocene and/or Quaternary uplift in the south exclusively. To test these hypotheses, we examined geomorphic indices of the western Sierra. We interpret longitudinal profiles of the larger westerly flowing rivers, mountain front sinuosity, valley floor-to-width to height ratio, and relief ratio to show that relative tectonic activity is greater in the southern Sierra near the Kern River Gorge fault. The Sierra range crest profile indicates that the increased tectonism is related to more recent uplift in the southern Sierra. Only westward migration of Basin and range extension is consistent with the locus of uplift in the southern Sierra. We hypothesize that the Sierra topography is the result of Pliocene delamination-related uplift in the central Sierra and post-Pliocene interaction of the San Andreas, Garlock, and Sierra Nevada Frontal fault zones.

  9. Lithogenetic stratigraphy of the Triassic Dockum Formation, Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Using approximately 350 well logs and cores from 4 wells, the author examines the depositional origin of the Dockum, discusses the distribution of lithofacies within the basin, and assesses the influences on trends in sandstone thickness. Outcrops were examined along the Eastern and Western Caprock Escarpments in Texas and eastern New Mexico, and facies interpretations were projected into the subsurface to improve regional analysis of the Dockum. Four new cores of subsurface Dockum were described and interpreted, forming the nucleus of subsurface lithofacies identification. The book focuses on the lower Dockum, within which the author identified four depositional sequences. These sequences, presented on cross sections and net-sandstone and paleogeographic maps, document a progression from continental-dominated depositional systems to lacustrine-dominated systems.

  10. Geomorphology of crater and basin deposits - Emplacement of the Fra Mauro formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, R. H.; Oberbeck, V. R.

    1975-01-01

    Characteristics of continuous deposits near lunar craters larger than about 1 km wide are considered, and it is concluded that (1) concentric dunes, radial ridges, and braided lineations result from deposition of the collision products of ejecta from adjacent pairs of similarly oriented secondary-crater chains and are, therefore, concentrations of secondary-crater ejecta; (2) intracrater ridges are produced within preexisting craters surrounding a fresh primary crater by ricocheting and focusing of secondary-crater ejecta from the preexisting craters' walls; and (3) secondary cratering has produced many of the structures of the continuous deposits of relatively small lunar craters and is the dominant process for emplacement of most of the radial facies of the continuous deposits of large lunar craters and basins. The percentages of Imbrium ejecta in deposits and the nature of Imbrium sculpturing are investigated.

  11. Geological and geochemical characterization of the Lower Cretaceous Pearsall Formation, Maverick Basin, south Texas: A future shale gas resource?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    As part of an assessment of undiscovered hydrocarbon resources in the northern Gulf of Mexico onshore Mesozoic section, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) evaluated the Lower Cretaceous Pearsall Formation of the Maverick Basin, south Texas, as a potential shale gas resource. Wireline logs were used to determine the stratigraphic distribution of the Pearsall Formation and to select available core and cuttings samples for analytical investigation. Samples used for this study spanned updip to downdip environments in the Maverick Basin, including several from the current shale gas-producing area of the Pearsall Formation.The term shale does not adequately describe any of the Pearsall samples evaluated for this study, which included argillaceous lime wackestones from more proximal marine depositional environments in Maverick County and argillaceous lime mudstones from the distal Lower Cretaceous shelf edge in western Bee County. Most facies in the Pearsall Formation were deposited in oxygenated environments as evidenced by the presence of biota preserved as shell fragments and the near absence of sediment laminae, which is probably caused by bioturbation. Organic material is poorly preserved and primarily consists of type III kerogen (terrestrial) and type IV kerogen (inert solid bitumen), with a minor contribution from type II kerogen (marine) based on petrographic analysis and pyrolysis. Carbonate dominates the mineralogy followed by clays and quartz. The low abundance and broad size distribution of pyrite are consistent with the presence of oxic conditions during sediment deposition. The Pearsall Formation is in the dry gas window of hydrocarbon generation (mean random vitrinite reflectance values, Ro = 1.2–2.2%) and contains moderate levels of total organic carbon (average 0.86 wt. %), which primarily resides in the inert solid bitumen. Solid bitumen is interpreted to result from in-situ thermal cracking of liquid hydrocarbon generated from original type II kerogen

  12. Hydrology of the Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation and the producibility of coal-bed methane, San Juan basin, Colorado and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, W.R. ); Swartz, T.E. )

    1990-05-01

    Fruitland coal seams contain 49 tcf of methane, which is produced from abnormally pressured coals in a variety of hydrologic settings. In a study funded by the Gas Research Institute, the authors calculated bottom-hole pressures from wellhead shut-in pressures to map hydraulic head and pressure regime, and estimated vertical pressure gradients to evaluate Fruitland hydrology and its relation to methane producibility. They inferred relative permeability from hydraulic head, pressure regime, and hydrochemistry, and related these hydrologic elements to established production. In the Fruitland Formation, coal seams are the primary aquifers, receiving recharge mainly from the elevated, wet, north and northwest margins of the basin. Formation waters in the north-central part of the basin have low chlorinities and high alkalinities, whereas those in the southern part of the basin are saline Na-Cl type similar to seawater. Regional discharge is to the San Juan River valley in the western part of the basin. Overpressuring in the north-central part of the basin is explained hydrodynamically and is attributed to artesian conditions. They infer enhanced coal-bed permeability where the potentiometric surface is flat and reduced permeability where it is steep. Overpressuring indicates enhanced permeability because permeability in coal seams is stress dependent. In the overpressured region, groundwater is fresh, indicative of an active, dynamic flow system and of permeable pathways. In contrast, connate seawater in the underpressured southern part of the basin implies negligible permeability; strata are too tight to accept and transmit measurable recharge. The basin's most productive coal bed-methane wells are overpressured and occur at hydrologic transitions from a flat to a steep potentiometric surface, overpressuring to underpressuring, and low- to high-chloride formation waters.

  13. The oleaginous Botryococcus from the Triassic Yanchang Formation in Ordos Basin, Northwestern China: Morphology and its paleoenvironmental significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Li-ming; Yan, Kui; Meng, Fan-wei; Zhao, Min

    2010-05-01

    High abundance but rather low diversity algal fossils were found in the hydrocarbon source rocks of the Ch 7-2-Ch 7-3 section, Triassic Yanchang Formation in the Xifeng area of southwest Ordos Basin, which are mainly composed of prolific Leiosphaeridia and Botryococcus. Botryococcus colonies are of various forms; the majority is nubbly, with some of cluster and cotton shape. The nubbly colonies appear globular, cordiform, ternate petal, obtuse triangle, chrysanthemum shape and so on. Most Botryococcus are saffron or brown and are frequently covered with clay under transmission microscope, and shows strong yellow and light brown under fluorescence microscope. Botryococcus could live in freshwater and brackish water. The Botryococcus colonies that lived in fresh water are small with small single cells arranged radially, with undulant or indented edges. The Botryococcus colonies that lived in brackish water are bigger, with larger single cells arranged irregularly, with slippery contours. The most of Botryococcus are discovered from the organic-rich argillaceous sediment with abundant pyrites in the semi- and deep-lake facies, and shows they were preserved in low-energy reducing environments. Taphonomic characteristics of various microfossils and the present of Pediastrum in the phytoplankton flora indicate that they are in situ or near burial. The lake area of the Ordos Basin was gradually expanding and reaching its most extensive flood surface in the Ch 7 of Yanchang Formation interval during the Middle and Late Triassic, with warm climate, plentiful rainfall, and luxuriant vegetation, as determined by the environmental analysis with Botryococcus in Xifeng area. The presence of two ecological types of Botryococcus indicates that the salinity of lake water was fluctuating in the Ch 7 interval. The occurrence of symbiotic acritarchs and geochemical salinity indices show that the Ordos Lake was a typical fresh-water lake, which was gradually desalted, and its salinity

  14. Ramah Member of the Crevasse Canyon Formation - A new stratigraphic unit in the Zuni Basin, west-central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, O.J.; Stricker, G.D.

    1996-01-01

    Nonmarine deposition accompanying and following a regression of the Cretaceous Interior Seaway during late Turonian time left a sedimentary sequence consisting of fluvial channel sandstones, thin overbank sandstones, and paludal shales containing thin coal beds. This unit is herein designated the Ramah Member of the Crevasse Canyon Formation. The Ramah Member is locally well exposed in the Zuni Basin of west-central New Mexico where it rests on the Gallup Sandstone (marine) and is overlain by the distinctive, feldspathic Torrivio Member of the Crevasse Canyon Formation (formerly of the Gallup Sandstone) Near Ramah, New Mexico the sequence overlies the F member of the Gallup but northward it overlies progressively younger members. These younger members are discrete sand-stone units associated with minor oscillations of relative sea level during a major regional-scale regression. North and east of Puerco Gap, near Gallup. New Mexico, the Ramah Member thins appreciably, and where unmappable it may be included with the Torrivio Member Southward from Gallup in the Zuni Basin. the Ramah locally approaches 150 ft in thickness and contains minable coal beds. The interval was previously referred to as the coal-bearing member of the Gallup (Mapel and Yesberger, 1985) or the Ramah unit (Anderson and Stricker, 1904). In the northern part of the Zuni Basin a problem may exist locally in determinig the top of the Ramah Member. This is due to the presence of fluviel sandstone with coarse-grained facies that looks much the s ame as the Torrivio Member, but underlines it Two criteria may be employed to distiguish the lower sandstone from the Torrivio and properly place it in the strartigraphic succession: (1) the lower sandstone is generally not as feldspathic as the Torrivio nor do the coarse-grained facies contain pebble-size material; and (2) the lower sandstone is not nearly as widespread as the overlying Torrivio. which has a blanket geometry. The type section of the Ramah

  15. New insights into Gondwana paleography based on palinological data from Morro do Chaves Formation (Sergipe-Alagoas Basin, Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves Garcia, Gustavo; Vasconcellos Garcia, Antônio Jorge; Henriques, Maria Helena

    2016-04-01

    The Sergipe-Alagoas basin (NE Brazil) has been widely studied in the frame of oil exploration, because it displays the most complete exposition of the stratigraphic sequences from the basins of the Brazilian continental margin. In this context, the aim of this workis to present the results of the bio-stratigraphic and paleo-environmental analysis of Morro do Chaves Formation (Lower Cretaceous), in Alagoas Sub-basin, part of the transitional section situated between the rift phase and restricted marine environment associated with the South Atlantic ocean opening. The material was analyzed from the palynological point of view and was collected in the InterCement quarry, located in São Miguel dos Campos, State of Alagoas. From 17 outcrop rock samples collected, nine had palynological content; among these only six were considered for biostratigraphic analysis purposes. In addition to outcrop samples, 28 samples were processed from four core drill. The paleoenvironmental analysis was based on the palynological content of the collected samples and on the paleontological and geological information available. The studied sedimentary package corresponds to carbonate and fine siliciclastic deposits, with approximately 70.0 m in thickness. The unit in question is formed by carbonatic "coquinóides" rocks interspersed with shale levels of dark green color. Palinofloristic assemblages were recuperated between 5.0 m and 70.0 m of the outcropping section. In the recovered material it was possible to identify 9 kinds of spores and 8 kinds of pollen grains, and two genera of fungi. Due to the degree of preservation of the material, age was established by the occurrence of Dicheiropollis etruscus specimens, which has enabled the recognition of the Dicheiropollis etruscus palinozone (upper Barremian). In microscopic observations under fluorescent light some algalic vesicles components were also recognized and classified as possible algae of the Prasinophyceae class, indicating

  16. The non-transform discontinuity on the Central Indian Ridge at 11°S: The transtensional basin formation and hydrothermal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, S. J.; Kim, H. S.; Son, J.; Kim, J.; Moon, J. W.; Son, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    The bathymetric and magnetic survey, hydrocasting and seabed sampling have been carried out in the middle portion of the Central Indian Ridge (MCIR) between 7°S and 17°S. The MCIR constitutes six first-order segments and seven second-order segments with four non-transform discontinuities (NTDs) and twelve ocean core complexes (OCCs). These segments are characterized by asymmetric accretion that corresponds to about 70% of the surveyed MCIR segment. One of the outstanding NTD in the area is a basin like NTD3-1 at 11°S (50km in length) which strike at 035°, approximately 45° oblique in a clockwise direction to the orientation of two adjoining second-order segments. The hydrothermal activity is recognized at the tips of NTD3-1. No abyssal hills paralleling to basin-shape NTD3-1 are observed. Anomalous depth of the basin, lack of positive magnetic anomaly across the basin and rare seismic activities in the basin floor suggests that extensional tectonism with a sparse volcanism is the dominant process occurring along the NTD3-1. Based on the previous researches that the counterclockwise rotation of ridge is predominant in the area, the region of NTD3-1 largely accommodates shear strain by left-lateral sense motion and consequently forms a transtensional basin, i.e., a pull-apart basin. The strong and frequent hydrothermal plume signals, and highly tectonized rocks in both tips of the NTD3-1 are reflective of the dilation zones or tensional fractures accompanied by the pull-apart basin formation. It is the first identification of a pull-apart basin associated with hydrothermal activity in the Central Indian Ridge.

  17. Anomalous Iridium Enrichment at the Triassic-Jurassic Boundary, Blomidon Formation, Fundy Basin, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.

    2005-01-01

    We present new analyses that confirm Ir enrichment (up to 0.31 ng/g) in close proximity to the palynological Triassic-Jurassic boundary in strata near the top of the Blomidon Formation at Partridge Island, Nova Scotia. High Ir concentrations have been found in at least two samples within the uppermost 70 cm of the formation. Ratios of other PGEs and Au to Ir are generally higher by an order of magnitude than in ordinary chondrites. No impact-related materials have been identified at #is horizon in the Blomidon Formation, therefore we cannot confirm an extraterrestrial source for the anomalous Ir levels. We consider, however, the possibility that regional basaltic volcanism is a potential source for the Ir in these sediments. The elevated Ir concentrations are found in reduced, grey colored mudstones, so redox concentration is a possible explanation for the distribution of Ir in these strata.

  18. Sedimentology, rhythmicity and basin-fill architecture of a carbonate ramp depositional system with intermittent terrigenous influx: The Albian Kharfot Formation of the Jeza-Qamar Basin, Dhofar, Southern Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salad Hersi, O.; Abbasi, I. A.; Al-Harthy, A.

    2016-01-01

    The Albian Kharfot Formation is preserved in the eastern margin of the Jeza-Qamar Basin which straddles across the Oman-Yemen border. This study addresses the sedimentological attributes of the formation and deduces its depositional setting, cyclicity and relative sea level changes in local (within the basin) and regional (Arabian) contexts. The interaction among siliciclastic influxes, in-situ carbonate production and tectono-climatic controls on the stacking nature of the various lithofacies that build-up the formation is discussed. In the study area, the formation lies unconformably over Barremian-Aptian Qishn Formation and conformably under late Albian-?Turonian Dhalqut Formation. The Kharfot Formation thickens from ~ 140 m in the eastern side of the study area to ~ 300 m at the Oman-Yemen border. It consists of eight lithofacies: Orbitolina-rich marls, peloidal bioclastic packstone, bioclastic mudstone to wackestone, argillaceous, bioclastic floatstone to rudstone, bioclastic rudstone, sandy, peloidal, bioclastic mudstone to packstone, peloidal, bioclastic grainstone and dolostone. The vertical arrangement of these lithofacies defines recurring meter- to decameter-scale, shallowing-upward units deposited on a westward-deepening inner- to outer-ramp setting. Tectonic rejuvenation of the siliciclastic source area was accompanied by warm, humid climatic conditions as suggested by high kaolinitic marls of the Kharfot Fm. and coeval quartz-rich sandstone units (Harshiyat Fm.). The shallowing-upward rhythmic sedimentation of the formation has close resemblance with cycles of the Nahr Umr Formation in northern Oman and partially comparable with the global sea level changes. The Kharfot basin was an intrashelf depression that was part of the much larger Arabian epeiric platform. The latter is defined by a rimmed margin in northern Oman where Al-Hassanat Formation represents platform margin deposits and Nahr Umr Formation representing back-rim intrashelf depression

  19. Magnetostratigraphic and rock magnetic study of the Neogene upper Yaha section, Kuche Depression (Tarim Basin): Implications to formation of the Xiyu conglomerate formation, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Baochun; Piper, John D. A.; Qiao, Qingqing; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Chunxia

    2010-01-01

    Magnetostratigraphic study of 251 horizons through the younger Yaha succession in the Kuche Depression of the Tarim Basin, NW China, lying beneath a massive regionally extensive (Xiyu) conglomerate formation identifies nine reversed and eight normal polarity chrons correlating with the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale to show that deposition spanned the interval ˜5.3 to ˜1.7 Ma. Sedimentation rates fell episodically from ˜49 to ˜24 cm/kyr as neotectonic deformation in the southern Tian Shan thrust belt became focused on two major anticlines with the northern (Qiulitage) anticline being initiated at ˜5.5 Ma and developing a northern hinged limb that embraces the basal part of the studied section. Rock magnetic parameters show multiple signatures of lithologic change, deformation, burial diagenesis, and climate with the latter identifying an early Pliocene warm/humid interval followed by cooling and desertification after ˜2.6 Ma. Diachronous commencement of Xiyu conglomerate deposition ranged from mid-Miocene in the north of the southern flank of the Tian Shan to Pleistocene in the south advancing as a clastic wedge derived from the uplifted range front to the north. This southward progradation was not climatically controlled although climatic effects may have modulated deposition during the Pleistocene. Uplift in the Tian Shan at ˜16-15 Ma correlates with rapid increase in sedimentation rate and episodic increases occurred subsequently until the initiation of the Qiulitage anticline. Reduced rates since ˜5.0 Ma contrast with increases more commonly recorded in foreland basins and have been controlled by accelerated growth of this regional structure counterbalancing uplift of the mountain front to the north.

  20. Assessment of undiscovered continuous oil and shale-gas resources in the Bazhenov Formation of the West Siberian Basin Province, Russia, 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klett, Timothy R.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Pitman, Janet K.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

    2016-11-10

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean continuous resources of 12 billion barrels of oil and 75 trillion cubic feet of gas in the Bazhenov Formation of the West Siberian Basin Province, Russia.

  1. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the Uteland Butte Member of the Eocene Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Leathers, Heidi M.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

    2015-09-03

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean undiscovered resources of 214 million barrels of oil, 329 billion cubic feet of associated/dissolved natural gas, and 14 million barrels of natural gas liquids in the informal Uteland Butte member of the Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah.

  2. Magnetostratigraphic evidence of a mid-Pliocene onset of the Nihewan Formation - implications for early fauna and hominid occupation in the Nihewan Basin, North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Hong; Dekkers, Mark J.; An, Zhisheng; Xiao, Guoqiao; Li, Yongxiang; Zhao, Hui; Qiang, Xiaoke; Chang, Hong; Chang, Qiufang; Wu, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    The fluvio-lacustrine sediments in the Nihewan Basin of North China, known as the Nihewan Formation, are well-known for an abundance of Early Pleistocene mammalian fossils (known as the Nihewan Fauna sensu lato) and Paleolithic sites. The age at which the sedimentation started is thus crucial for our understanding of early fauna and hominid occupation and infilling history of the basin, but it is poorly constrained to date. Here we report on a detailed paleomagnetic investigation of the Yangshuizhan section that crops out in the northeastern Nihewan Basin, supplemented by rock magnetic analyses into the carriers of the natural remanent magnetization. Magnetite and hematite are shown to be the main carriers of the characteristic remanent magnetization. Magnetostratigraphic correlation to the geomagnetic polarity timescale indicates that the onset of the Nihewan Formation in this section occurs at ˜3.7 Ma, just below the Gilbert-Gauss boundary and ca 1-Myr earlier than previously established evidence. This pushes the lower limit of the Nihewan Formation back in time from very late Pliocene (<2.8 Ma) to (at least) the mid-Pliocene. Combining the previously established magnetostratigraphic data with the present study, we arrive at a better understanding of the chronological framework and spatio-temporal history of the deposition of the terrestrial Nihewan Formation. Furthermore, it provides new perspectives of early fauna and hominid occupation in the Nihewan Basin.

  3. Seismic structural investigation and reservoir characterization of the Moki Formation in Maari Field, Taranaki Basin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alotaibi, Mohammed Dhaifallah M.

    The Maari Field is a large oil field located in the southern part of the Taranaki Basin, New Zealand. The field is bounded by two major structures, the Eastern Mobile Belt and Western Stable Platform. The Maari Field produces 40,000 BOPD (Barrels of Oil per Day) from five wells from reservoirs in the Moki Formation. The Miocene Moki Formation was deposited as part of the Wai-iti Group and consists of sandstone interbedded with siltstone and claystone. The sandstone of the Moki Formation is characterized by a submarine fan. It is distributed along the southern and central Taranaki shelf. Three-dimensional seismic data and well logs were recorded by the Geco-Prakla Company. Time and depth structural maps on the top of the Moki Formation are subdivided into a main structure with high and low elevations of topography, which are separated by a major fault, the Kiwi Fault. The fault trends from the south toward the northeast. Seismic attributes, such as coherence and edge detection, were mapped to interpret the major and minor faults. In the Maari Field, there are more than seventeen faults. Seismic data and well log data were used to determine the petrophysical properties in the Moki reservoir. Using the well logs, the transition zone (oil-water contact) between the oil and water was found to be 1352 m. The Moki reservoir has good quality oil, with an average porosity at Maari-1, Maui-4, Kea-1, Moki, and Maari-2 ranging from 14 to 19 percent. Gamma ray, resistivity, and spontaneous potential logs were used to determine correlation between well and lithology of the Moki reservoir. The net thickness of the reservoir is 320 m to 360 m. The distribution of shale is less than 10 percent throughout the Moki reservoir.

  4. Geology and hydrocarbon potential of Dawson Bay Formation carbonate unit (Middle Devonian), Williston basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Pound, W.

    1988-07-01

    The Middle Devonian Dawson Bay Formation carbonate unit is present in the subsurface of North Dakota except where truncated by postdepositional erosion. The carbonate unit thickens from the erosional limit to a maximum thickness of 47.5 m (156 ft) in Renville County and reaches a maximum depth of 3798 m (12,460 ft) below the surface in McKenzie County. In North Dakota, a submarine hardground separates the carbonate unit from the underlying second red bed member of the Dawson Bay Formation. The upper contact with the Souris River Formation is conformable except in those areas where the Dawson Bay Formation was exposed to subaerial erosion prior to deposition of the Souris River sediments. The Dawson Bay carbonate unit is predominantly dolomitic and fossiliferous limestone or fossiliferous dolostone. The carbonate unit can be subdivided into five lithofacies on the basis of characteristic fossil fauna, flora, and other lithologic features. Lithofacies analysis of the Dawson Bay carbonates suggests a shallowing-upward succession of depositional environments and associated energy zones as follows: shallow epeiric sea (very low energy), stromatoporoid biostrome/bioherm (low energy), very shallow epeiric sea (very low energy), restricted shallow epeiric sea (extremely low energy), and shallow epeiric sea shoreline (variable energy). Eogenetic diagenesis includes color-mottling, dolomitization of micrite to microcrystalline dolomite with penecontemporaneous anhydrite replacement of cryptalgal mudstones and boundstones, cementation by sparry calcite, and vuggy porosity development. Mesogenetic diagenesis includes formation of mosaic dolomites, cementation by blocky equant calcite, neomorphism, pressure-solution, fracturing, halite cementation, and hydrocarbon emplacement.

  5. Kinetic modeling of petroleum formation in the Maracaibo Basin: Final report, Annex 12

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A.K.; Braun, R.L.; Sweeney, J.J.; Reynolds, J.G.; Vallejos, C.; Talukdar, S.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and test improved kinetic models of petroleum generation and cracking, pore pressure buildup, and fluid expulsion. The work was performed jointly between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Research Organization of the Venezuelan National Petroleum Company under Annex 12 of an agreement between DOE and the Venezuelan Ministry of Energy and Mines. Laboratory experiments were conducted at both LLNL and INTEVEP to obtain the reaction rate and product composition information needed to develop chemical kinetic models. Experiments at INTEVEP included hydrous pyrolysis and characterization of oils by gas and liquid chromatography. Experiments at LLNL included programmed pyrolysis in open and self-purging reactors, sometimes including on-line gas analysis by tandem mass spectrometry, and characterization of oils by gas chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance. The PMOD code was used to develop a detailed pyrolysis mechanism from the extensive laboratory data. This mechanism is able to predict yield of bitumen, oil, and gas as a function of time and temperature for such diverse laboratory conditions as hydrous pyrolysis and rapid, programmed, open pyrolysis. PMOD calculations were compared to geologic observations for 22 wells in the Maracaibo basin. When permeability parameters are chosen to match calculated pore pressures with measured present day values, the PMOD calculations indicate that organic maturation reactions contribute a significant fraction of the overpressure during oil generation and early oil cracking. Calculations agreed with observed geochemical maturity parameters of the source rock. 37 refs., 64 figs., 20 tabs.

  6. Microbial methane formation in deep aquifers of a coal-bearing sedimentary basin, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Gründger, Friederike; Jiménez, Núria; Thielemann, Thomas; Straaten, Nontje; Lüders, Tillmann; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Krüger, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Coal-bearing sediments are major reservoirs of organic matter potentially available for methanogenic subsurface microbial communities. In this study the specific microbial community inside lignite-bearing sedimentary basin in Germany and its contribution to methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation processes was investigated. The stable isotope signature of methane measured in groundwater and coal-rich sediment samples indicated methanogenic activity. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the presence of methanogenic Archaea, predominantly belonging to the orders Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales, capable of acetoclastic or hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Furthermore, we identified fermenting, sulfate-, nitrate-, and metal-reducing, or acetogenic Bacteria clustering within the phyla Proteobacteria, complemented by members of the classes Actinobacteria, and Clostridia. The indigenous microbial communities found in the groundwater as well as in the coal-rich sediments are able to degrade coal-derived organic components and to produce methane as the final product. Lignite-bearing sediments may be an important nutrient and energy source influencing larger compartments via groundwater transport. PMID:25852663

  7. Dilatant shear band formation and diagenesis in calcareous, arkosic sandstones, Vienna Basin (Austria)

    PubMed Central

    Lommatzsch, Marco; Exner, Ulrike; Gier, Susanne; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The present study examines deformation bands in calcareous arkosic sands. The investigated units can be considered as an equivalent to the Matzen field in the Vienna Basin (Austria), which is one of the most productive oil reservoirs in central Europe. The outcrop exposes carbonate-free and carbonatic sediments of Badenian age separated by a normal fault. Carbonatic sediments in the hanging wall of the normal fault develop dilation bands with minor shear displacements (< 2 mm), whereas carbonate-free sediments in the footwall develop cataclastic shear bands with up to 70 cm displacement. The cataclastic shear bands show a permeability reduction up to 3 orders of magnitude and strong baffling effects in the vadose zone. Carbonatic dilation bands show a permeability reduction of 1-2 orders of magnitude and no baffling structures. We distinguished two types of deformation bands in the carbonatic units, which differ in deformation mechanisms, distribution and composition. Full-cemented bands form as dilation bands with an intense syn-kinematic calcite cementation, whereas the younger loose-cemented bands are dilatant shear bands cemented by patchy calcite and clay minerals. All analyzed bands are characterized by a porosity and permeability reduction caused by grain fracturing and cementation. The changed petrophysical properties and especially the porosity evolution are closely related to diagenetic processes driven by varying pore fluids in different diagenetic environments. The deformation band evolution and sealing capacity is controlled by the initial host rock composition. PMID:26300577

  8. Dilatant shear band formation and diagenesis in calcareous, arkosic sandstones, Vienna Basin (Austria).

    PubMed

    Lommatzsch, Marco; Exner, Ulrike; Gier, Susanne; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    The present study examines deformation bands in calcareous arkosic sands. The investigated units can be considered as an equivalent to the Matzen field in the Vienna Basin (Austria), which is one of the most productive oil reservoirs in central Europe. The outcrop exposes carbonate-free and carbonatic sediments of Badenian age separated by a normal fault. Carbonatic sediments in the hanging wall of the normal fault develop dilation bands with minor shear displacements (< 2 mm), whereas carbonate-free sediments in the footwall develop cataclastic shear bands with up to 70 cm displacement. The cataclastic shear bands show a permeability reduction up to 3 orders of magnitude and strong baffling effects in the vadose zone. Carbonatic dilation bands show a permeability reduction of 1-2 orders of magnitude and no baffling structures. We distinguished two types of deformation bands in the carbonatic units, which differ in deformation mechanisms, distribution and composition. Full-cemented bands form as dilation bands with an intense syn-kinematic calcite cementation, whereas the younger loose-cemented bands are dilatant shear bands cemented by patchy calcite and clay minerals. All analyzed bands are characterized by a porosity and permeability reduction caused by grain fracturing and cementation. The changed petrophysical properties and especially the porosity evolution are closely related to diagenetic processes driven by varying pore fluids in different diagenetic environments. The deformation band evolution and sealing capacity is controlled by the initial host rock composition.

  9. Hydrocarbon potential evaluation of the source rocks from the Abu Gabra Formation in the Sufyan Sag, Muglad Basin, Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jinqi; Liu, Luofu; An, Fuli; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Ying; Wu, Kangjun; Zhao, Yuanyuan

    2016-06-01

    The Sufyan Sag is one of the low-exploration areas in the Muglad Basin (Sudan), and hydrocarbon potential evaluation of source rocks is the basis for its further exploration. The Abu Gabra Formation consisting of three members (AG3, AG2 and AG1 from bottom to top) was thought to be the main source rock formation, but detailed studies on its petroleum geology and geochemical characteristics are still insufficient. Through systematic analysis on distribution, organic matter abundance, organic matter type, organic matter maturity and characteristics of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion of the source rocks from the Abu Gabra Formation, the main source rock members were determined and the petroleum resource extent was estimated in the study area. The results show that dark mudstones are the thickest in the AG2 member while the thinnest in the AG1 member, and the thickness of the AG3 dark mudstone is not small either. The AG3 member have developed good-excellent source rock mainly with Type I kerogen. In the Southern Sub-sag, the AG3 source rock began to generate hydrocarbons in the middle period of Bentiu. In the early period of Darfur, it reached the hydrocarbon generation and expulsion peak. It is in late mature stage currently. The AG2 member developed good-excellent source rock mainly with Types II1 and I kerogen, and has lower organic matter abundance than the AG3 member. In the Southern Sub-sag, the AG2 source rock began to generate hydrocarbons in the late period of Bentiu. In the late period of Darfur, it reached the peak of hydrocarbon generation and its expulsion. It is in middle mature stage currently. The AG1 member developed fair-good source rock mainly with Types II and III kerogen. Throughout the geological evolution history, the AG1 source rock has no effective hydrocarbon generation or expulsion processes. Combined with basin modeling results, we have concluded that the AG3 and AG2 members are the main source rock layers and the Southern Sub-sag is

  10. Early Callovian ingression in southwestern Gondwana. Palaeoenvironmental evolution of the carbonate ramp (Calabozo Formation) in southwestern Mendoza, Neuquen basin, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armella, Claudia; Cabaleri, Nora G.; Cagnoni, Mariana C.; Panarello, Héctor O.

    2013-08-01

    The carbonatic sequence of the Calabozo Formation (Lower Callovian) developed in southwestern Gondwana, within the northern area of the Neuquén basin, and is widespread in thin isolated outcrops in southwestern Mendoza province, Argentina. This paper describes the facies, microfacies and geochemical-isotopic analysis carried out in five studied localities, which allowed to define the paleoenvironmental conditions of a homoclinal shallow ramp model, highly influenced by sea level fluctuations, where outer, mid and inner ramp subenvironments were identified. The outer ramp subenvironment was only recognized in the south of the depocenter and is characterized by proximal outer ramp facies with shale levels and interbedded mudstone and packstone layers. The mid ramp subenvironment is formed by low energy facies (wackestone) affected by storms (packstones, grainstones and floatstones). The inner ramp subenvironment is the most predominant and is characterized by tidal flat facies (wackestones, packstones and grainstones) over which a complex of shoals (grainstones and packstones) dissected by tidal channels (packstone, grainstones and floatstones) developed. In the north area, protected environment facies were recorded (bioturbated wackestones and packstones). The vertical distribution of facies indicates that the paleoenvironmental evolution of the Calabozo Formation results from a highstand stage in the depocenter, culminating in a supratidal environment, with stromatolitic levels interbedded with anhydrite originated under restricted water circulation conditions due to a progressive isolation of the basin. δ13C and δ18O values of the carbonates of the Calabozo Formation suggest an isotopic signature influenced by local palaeoenvironmental parameters and diagenetic overprints. The δ13C and δ18O oscillations between the carbonates of the different studied sections are related with lateral facies variations within the carbonate ramp accompanied with dissimilar

  11. Regional distribution of wave- and fluvial-dominated deltaic deposits of Olmos formation (upper Cretaceous) in Maverick basin, southwest Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, W.; Tyler, N.

    1984-04-01

    Regional subsurface analysis in southwest Texas indicates that the Olmos Formation (Gulfian) was deposited by a complex of wave- and fluvial-dominated delta systems in two depocenters. Sediment influx was from the north and northwest. Five deltaic submits, A through E, were deposited in the western depocenter. Three other deltaic wedges (F, G, H) formed the second depocenter farther east in present-day Frio and LaSalle Counties. Subsidence was greater in the western half of the Maverick basin where thickest (1,300 ft; 395 m) deltaic sediments were deposited. Lower Olmos strata represent a succession from wave-reworked, strike-elongate deltas of subunit A, similar to those of the underlying San Miguel Formation, to fluvial-dominated, dip-elongate deltas of subunits B and C. Extensive (1200 mi/sup 2/ or 3100 km/sup 2/ in Texas) aggradational floodplain deposits of B and C are characterized by diverse electric-log patterns; variation in log character is a response to complex depositional facies on the delta platform. Downdip, toward the Cretaceous shelf edge, delta-plain facies merge with upward-coarsening delta-front sandstones. Uppermost subunits D and E were deposited by a prograding barrier-island system in an interdeltaic embayment marginal to high constructive deltas of the easter depocenter. Lagoonal and fluvial-channel deposits are recognized from cores. Eastward migration of deposition was accompanied by an abrupt change of depositional style in the western depocenter from deltaic to coastal-interdeltaic.

  12. The formation of Proval Bay as an episode in the development of the Baikal rift basin: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchetnikov, A. A.; Radziminovich, Ya. B.; Vologina, E. G.; Ufimtsev, G. F.

    2012-12-01

    This paper provides a cumulative review of important specific features in the formation and development of Proval Bay (Lake Baikal) as a large seismic dislocation element. This bay appeared during one of the largest historical earthquakes in Siberia (MLH 7.5) on January 12, 1862. As a result, more than 230 km2 of the shore was submerged. The paper considers the formation of Proval Bay in the context of analysis conducted on general morphological characteristics of the Baikal rift and in terms of the occurrence of the main elements in the mechanism of its neotectonic development. It is precisely these seismotectonic phenomena, associated with the subsidence of large tectonic blocks, which primarily cause the growth of Lake Baikal basin. In spite of the fact that the northwestern side of the rift has a more pronounced morphological structure, whose general elements are high and steep monolithic tectonic escarpments, major lithospheric extension and its associated extension of the rift, thinning and rearrangement of blocks in the upper lithosphere slab occur on the more gently sloping eastern side.

  13. Assessment of In-Place Oil Shale Resources of the Green River Formation, Piceance Basin, Western Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Pantea, Michael P.; Self, Jesse G.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed a reassessment of in-place oil shale resources, regardless of richness, in the Eocene Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin, western Colorado. A considerable amount of oil-yield data has been collected after previous in-place assessments were published, and these data were incorporated into this new assessment. About twice as many oil-yield data points were used, and several additional oil shale intervals were included that were not assessed previously for lack of data. Oil yields are measured using the Fischer assay method. The Fischer assay method is a standardized laboratory test for determining the oil yield from oil shale that has been almost universally used to determine oil yields for Green River Formation oil shales. Fischer assay does not necessarily measure the maximum amount of oil that an oil shale can produce, and there are retorting methods that yield more than the Fischer assay yield. However, the oil yields achieved by other technologies are typically reported as a percentage of the Fischer assay oil yield, and thus Fischer assay is still considered the standard by which other methods are compared.

  14. Stratigraphic hierarchy of organic carbon rich siltstones in deep-water facies, Brushy Canyon Formation (Guadalupian), Delaware Basin, West Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sageman, Bradley B.; Gardner, Michael H.; Armentrout, John M.; Murphy, Adam E.

    1998-05-01

    The first systematic test for a predictive relationship between organic carbon content and stratigraphic hierarchy in a deep-water slope to basin-floor deposit was performed. The studied section includes the Pipeline Shale, the Brushy Canyon Formation, and the lower part of the Cherry Canyon Formation of the Delaware Mountain Group, West Texas. This interval represents one large-scale, 3rd-order genetic sequence within which 4th- and 5th-order stratigraphic cycles are recognized. Samples of fine-grained facies throughout the section were collected from outcrop and analyzed for organic carbon content and hydrogen index. Degree of pyritization was also determined for a subset of the samples. The results indicate that organic enrichment is closely correlated to the stratigraphic hierarchy at the 3rd-, 4th-, and 5th-order levels. The data suggest that quantity and quality of preserved organic matter are controlled by changes in bulk sedimentation rate (dilution vs. condensation), which affect organic matter inputs to the sediment, as well as the balance between (1) burial and preservation of organic matter and (2) its degradation on the sea floor during times of sediment starvation.

  15. Ichnofabrics of the Capdevila Formation (early Eocene) in the Los Palacios Basin (western Cuba): Paleoenvironmental and paleoecological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villegas-Martín, Jorge; Netto, Renata Guimarães; Lavina, Ernesto Luis Correa; Rojas-Consuegra, Reinaldo

    2014-12-01

    The ichnofabrics present in the early Eocene siliciclastic deposits of the Capdevila Formation exposed in the Pinar del Rio area (Los Palacios Basin, western Cuba) are analyzed in this paper and their paleoecological and paleoenvironmental significance are discussed. Nine ichnofabrics were recognized in the dominantly sandy sedimentary succession: Ophiomorpha, Asterosoma, Thalassinoides, Palaeophycus, Scolicia, Bichordites-Thalassinoides, Rhizocorallium, Scolicia-Thalassinoides and rhizobioturbation. Diversity of ichnofauna is low and burrows made by detritus-feeding organisms in well oxygenated and stenohaline waters predominate. Suites of the Cruziana and Skolithos Ichnofacies lacking their archetypical characteristics were recognized, being impoverished in diversity and presenting dominance of echinoderm and decapods crustacean burrows as a response to the environmental stress caused by the high frequency of deposition. The ichnofabric distribution in the studied succession, its recurrence in the sandstone beds and the presence of a Glossifungites Ichnofacies suite with rhizobioturbation associated reflect a shoaling-upward event with subaerial exposure of the substrate. The integrated analysis of the ichnology and the sedimentary facies suggests deposition in a shallow slope frequently impacted by gravitational flows and high-energy events. The evidence of substrate exposure indicates the occurrence of a forced regression and suggests the existence of a sequence boundary at the top of the Capdevila Formation.

  16. Preliminary paleogeographic reconstruction of the Illinois basin during deposition of the Mississippian Aux Vases Formation: Implications for hydrocarbon recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, R.D. )

    1991-03-01

    Extensive outcrop investigation and selective subsurface study allow definition of Illinois basin paleogeography during deposition of the Mississippian (Valmeyeran-Meramecian) Aux Vases Formation. The results incorporate an integrated approach utilizing field observations and petrographic analysis, wireline logs, subsurface maps, and cores. The Aux Vases Formation depositional system has been determined to be composed of subtidal to intertidal facies. Depositional facies in outcrop are based on rock body geometries, sedimentary structure assemblages, paleocurrent analysis, paleontology of body and trace fossils, facies relationships, and petrography. Depositional facies determined from subsurface data are based on correlation of lithologic interpretations from wireline logs, sand body geometries form isopach maps, and petrography. Specific depositional facies observed in outcrop and core and inferred from wireline logs and isopach maps are offshore bars and tidal channel complexes, extensive subtidal to lower intertidal, ripple-laminated, fine-grained quartzose sandstone. Carbonate facies occur as subtidal grainstones at or near the base of a sequence, or as high energy deposits which have been tidally reworked. This depositional system produces reservoir heterogeneities that complicate efficient hydrocarbon recovery. This diverse facies architecture is modified by tectonic and diagenetic overprinting, further segregating potential producing zones. To significantly improve recovery efficiency, predictions regarding compartmentalization can be used prior to designing a drilling program, an infill drilling program, or an application of enhanced recovery techniques.

  17. Radiometric age determinations on Pliocene/Pleistocene formations in the lower Omo basin, Ethiopia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, F.H.; Lajoie, K.R.

    1971-01-01

    THE potassium-argon ages presented here were obtained during 1966 to 1969 in order to provide an absolute time scale for the stratigraphic work by the international Omo Research Expedition in the Pliocene/Pleistocene formations (unpublished work of F. H. B., J. de Heinzelin and F. C. Howell) in south-west Ethiopia. Although some of these dates are not new1-3, most of the analytical procedures and data have not been presented. We also present a list of fossil localities recorded by the University of Chicago contingent of the expedition within the Shungura Formation. Preliminary descriptions of the Hominidae have been published already3,4. ?? 1971 Nature Publishing Group.

  18. Tectonic and climate control of oil shale deposition in the Upper Cretaceous Qingshankou Formation (Songliao Basin, NE China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jianliang; Liu, Zhaojun; Bechtel, Achim; Strobl, Susanne A. I.; Sun, Pingchang

    2013-09-01

    Oil shales were deposited in the Songliao Basin (NE China) during the Upper Cretaceous period, representing excellent hydrocarbon source rocks. High organic matter (OM) contents, a predominance of type-I kerogen, and a low maturity of OM in the oil shales are indicated by bulk geochemical parameters and biomarker data. A major contribution of aquatic organisms and minor inputs from terrigenous land plants to OM input are indicated by n-alkane distribution patterns, composition of steroids, and organic macerals. Strongly reducing bottom water conditions during the deposition of the oil shale sequences are indicated by low pristane/phytane ratios, high C14-aryl-isoprenoid contents, homohopane distribution patterns, and high V/Ni ratios. Enhanced salinity stratification with mesosaline and alkaline bottom waters during deposition of the oil shales are indicated by high gammacerane index values, low MTTC ratios, high β-carotene contents, low TOC/S ratios, and high Sr/Ba ratios. The stratified water column with anoxic conditions in the bottom water enhanced preservation of OM. Moderate input of detrital minerals during the deposition of the oil shale sequences is reflected by titanium concentrations. In this study, environmental conditions in the paleo-lake leading to OM accumulation in the sediments are related to sequence stratigraphy governed by climate and tectonics. The first Member of the Qingshankou Formation (K2qn1) in the Songliao Basin, containing the oil shale sequence, encompasses a third-order sequence that can be divided into three system tracts (transgressive system tract—TST, highstand system tract—HST, and regressive system tract—RST). Enrichment of OM changed from low values during TST-I to high-moderate values during TST-II/III and HST-I/II. Low OM enrichment occurs during RST-I and RST-II. Therefore, the highest enrichment of OM in the sediments is related to stages of mid-late TST and early HST.

  19. Sedimentologic evolution of a submarine canyon in a forearc basin, Upper Cretaceous Rosario Formation, San Carlos, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, W.R.; Busby-Spera, C.J.

    1988-06-01

    The walls, floor, and fill of a submarine canyon are well-exposed near San Carlos, Mexico, in forecarc strata of the Upper Cretaceous Rosario Formation. The submarine canyon is about 7 km wide and at least 230 m deep and has eroded a minimum of 150 m into underlying fluvial red beds. It is unclear whether subaerial or submarine processes initiated the canyon cutting; however, marine processes, especially debris flows, modified the morphology of the submarine canyon. The submarine canyon fill and overlying slope deposits form two major fining-upward sequences. The first includes a 120 m thick lower conglomerate-sandstone unit (LCSU) at the base of the canyon fill overlain by a 50-110 m thick middle mudstone-sandstone unit (MMSU). The MMSU consists predominantly of mudstone and thin-bedded sandstone, but includes a channel filled with sandstone beds that form a fining- and thinning-upward sequence. This sequence is overlain by the second major sequence, a 0-60 m thick upper conglomerate-sandstone unit (UCSU), which is confined to three channels within the submarine canyon and passes gradationally upward into slope mudstone. Each of the two major fining-upward sequences records a gradual decrease in supply of coarse-grained sediment to the submarine canyon head. The first fining-upward sequence may correspond to a lowstand and subsequent rise in global sea level or, alternatively, may have resulted from local downdropping of the basin. The second fining-upward sequence does not correspond to global sea level fluctuations but is age-correlative with a drop then rise in relative sea level recognized by other workers 300-400 km to the north in the San Diego-Ensenada area. This sea level drop is inferred to have been a regional-scale tectonic event that affect the forearc basin along its length. 18 figures, 2 tables.

  20. Origin and formation of neck in a basin landform: Examples from the Camargo volcanic field, Chihuahua (México)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranda-Gómez, José Jorge; Housh, Todd B.; Luhr, James F.; Noyola-Medrano, Cristina; Rojas-Beltrán, Marco Antonio

    2010-11-01

    The term "neck in a basin" (NIB) landform is proposed for volcanic structures characterized by nearly circular to elliptical open basins, located near the headwater of small streams or drainages, which contain small volcanic necks and/or erosion remnants of one (or more) cinder cones. NIB landforms are typically 400-1000 m in diameter and 30-100 m deep and are invariably surrounded by steep walls cut into one or more basaltic lava flows. NIB landforms lack evidence for a primary volcanogenic origin through either collapse or youthful eruptive activity. In the Pliocene portion (4 - 2 Ma) of the Plio-Quaternary Camargo volcanic field of Chihuahua (México), they are relatively numerous and are best developed at the margins of a gently sloping (3-5°) basaltic lava plateau and near major fault scarps. Mature NIB landforms have ring-like circular drainage patterns and central elevations marked by small volcanic necks and associated radial dikes intruded into basaltic scoria-fall and /or agglutinate deposits. We interpret NIB landforms to be erosional in origin. They develop where a cinder cone is surrounded by one or more sheet-like lava flows from one or more separate subsequent vents. Once eruptive activity ceases at the younger volcano(es), fluvial erosion gradually produces a ring-like drainage pattern along the contact between the lava and the older cinder cone. As a response to a marked contrast in resistance to erosion between lava flows and unconsolidated or poorly lithified pyroclastic deposits, the older cinder cone is preferentially eroded. In this manner, a ring-shaped, steep sided erosional basin, preformed by the scoria cone, is produced; eventually fluvial erosion exposes the central neck and dikes. The volume, relief, and age of the volcanic field are key factors in the formation and preservation of a NIB landform. They form in volcanic fields where lava emissions are sufficiently vigorous to engulf earlier cinder cones. Relief and associated high rates

  1. Alteration of magnetite and ilmenite in Upper Jurassic Morrison formation, San Juan basin, New Mexico: relationship to facies and primary uranium mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Fishman, N.S.; Peterson, C.E.T.; Reynolds; Reynolds, R.L.

    1984-07-01

    Petrographic studies of outcrop and drill core samples in the Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation along the southern and western margins of the San Juan basin reveal a close spatial relationship among altered (iron-leached) detrital magnetite and ilmenite (FeTi oxides), depositional facies in the overlying Brushy Basin Member, and distribution of primary uranium deposits. Iron leaching of FeTi oxides resulted from passage of solutions containing soluble organic material; concentrations of this organic material are the sites of the primary uranium ore bodies. Along the southern and western parts of the basin, FeTi oxides typically have been leached in the upper Westwater Member, but are unaltered in the lower Westwater; however, locally, leaching occurred throughout the Westwater. This zone of leaching systematically thins northward to zero, where unleached FeTi oxides occur throughout the Westwater. Regional patterns of alteration of FeTi oxides correspond to regional facies distribution in the overlying Brushy Basin Member. Extensive FeTi oxide leaching characterizes the Westwater beneath the smectite-rich mud-flat facies of the Brushy Basin, whereas negligible leaching characterizes the Westwater beneath the zeolite-rich playa facies of the Brushy Basin. This correspondence between facies and alteration patterns suggests that solutions responsible for solubilization of organic material, which in turn leached FeTi oxides in the Westwater, originated from the mud-flat facies of the Brushy Basin. Organic material that precipitated form these solutions concentrated uranium to form primary uranium ore bodies; therefore, distribution of the Brushy Basin mud-flat facies may define, and restrict, distribution of primary ore bodies in the Westwater.

  2. Taphonomic and paleoenvironmental considerations for the concentrations of macroinvertibrate fossils in the Romualdo Member, Santana Formation, Late Aptian - Early Albian, Araripe Basin, Araripina, NE, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Ludmila Alves Cadeira Do; Pereira, Priscilla Albuquerque; Sales, Alexandre Magno Feitosa; Barreto, Alcina Magnólia Franca

    2015-10-01

    Benthic macroinvertebrate fossils can be seen towards to the top of the Romualdo Member of the Santana Formation, in the Araripe Basin, Northeast Brazil, and can provide paleoenvironmental and paleobiogeographical information regarding the Cretaceous marine transgression which reached the interior basins in Northeast Brazil. We analyse taphonomic characteristics of macroinvertebrate concentrations of two outcrops (Torrinha and Torre Grande) within the municipality Araripina, Pernambuco, in order to enhance our understanding of the Cretaceous paleoenvironment in the western portion of the Araripe Basin. At the outcrop Torrinha, proximal tempestitic taphofacies were identified. These predominantly consist of ceritid, cassiopid, and later, naticid gastropods as well as undetermined bivalves. Given this lack of variability it can be deduced that there were no significant paleoenvironmental changes during the successive stages tempestitic sedimentation. In the Torre Grande outcrop distal to proximal tempestitic taphofacies were identified from the base to the top respectively pointing to a decrease in paleodepth. Asides from the macroinvertebrates present in Torrinha, there are also echinoids - unequivocal evidence for marine conditions. These occurrences appear to be restricted to Romualdo Member outcrops in the Araripina municipality (the Southeast portion of the Araripe Basin) confirming a previously published hypothesis suggesting that the Cretaceous marine transgression originated from the neighbouring Parnaíba Basin to the west. This study identified marine molluscs of a similar age to those in the Romualdo Member's equivalent rock units in the Parnaíba and Sergipe-Alagoas (SE-AL) basins suggesting a marine connection between these basins and the Araripe Basin during the Early Cretaceous.

  3. Diagenesis and late-stage porosity development in the pennsylvanian strawn formation, val verde basin, Texas, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    David, Newell K.; Goldstein, R.H.; Burdick, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    The Middle Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Strawn Formation in the Trans-Pecos area of Texas was deposited during relative tectonic quiescence that prevailed before rapid infilling of the Val Verde Basin. It represents one of a series of backstepping carbonate ramps formed on the craton side of this foreland basin. Strawn Formation carbonate rocks in three cores - Conoco Anna McClung #3-1, Alex Mitchell S2-1R, and Creek Ranch #10-1 - show several shallowing-up ward sequences, each a few meters thick. The Creek Ranch core displays the deepest-water characteristics of the three cores; the lower part of this core is dominated by graded bedding. The Mitchell and McClung cores contain skeletal-rich carbonates. Both of these cores display characteristics of shallow-water bank or lagoonal environments. All three cores have approximately the same diagenetic history. Primary fluid inclusions indicate early porosity-occluding interparticle and mold-filling calcite precipitated from water with a narrow range of salinities. Modal salinities are that of seawater, but slightly lesser salinities (indicating mixing of seawater and meteoric water) and slightly greater salinities (indicating evaporative concentration of seawater) are also indicated. The influence of meteoric groundwater can be detected by stable-isotope analyses of the early cements at stratigraphic levels that correlate to the tops of the major shallowing-upward depositional sequences. However, subaerial exposure surfaces are not demonstrated in these cores but were likely to be present updip. Most porosity is cement-reduced vugs, dissolution-enlarged (and cement-reduced) molds (> 1/16 mm, < 4 mm), and fractures. Minor intraparticle, intercrystalline, and shelter porosity is also present. Reservoir porosity is caused by fracturing and a late-stage dissolution event. Dissolution in the Creek Ranch core is not as pronounced as in the other cores because of a dearth of skeletal material. Porous zones in the McClung and

  4. Ozone formation potentials of organic compounds from different emission sources in the South Coast Air Basin of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianjun; Luo, Dongmin

    2012-08-01

    Different organic compounds exhibit different propensities for ozone formation. Two approaches were used to study the ozone formation potentials or source reactivities of different anthropogenic organic compounds emission categories in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). The first approach was based on the combination of total organic gases (TOG) emission speciation profiles and the maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) scale of organic species. The second approach quantified ozone impacts from different emission sources by performing 3-dimensional air quality model sensitivity analysis involving increased TOG emissions from particular sources. The source reactivities derived from these two approaches agree reasonably well for 58 anthropogenic organic compounds emission categories in the SoCAB. Both approaches identify TOG emissions from mobile sources as having the highest reactivity. Source reactivities from both approaches were also combined with TOG emissions from each source category to produce a 2005 reactivity-based anthropogenic TOG emission inventory for the SoCAB. The top five reactivity-based anthropogenic TOG emission sources in the SoCAB during 2005 were: light-duty passenger cars, off-road equipment, consumer products, light-duty trucks category 2 (i.e., 3751-5750 lb), and recreational boats. This is in contrast to the mass-based TOG emission inventory, which indicates that livestock waste and composting emission categories were two of the five largest mass-based anthropogenic TOG emission sources. The reactivity-based TOG emission inventory is an important addition to the mass-based TOG emission inventory because it represents the ozone formation potentials from emission sources and can be used to assist in determining targeted sources for developing organic compounds reduction policies.

  5. Ozone Formation Potentials from Different Anthropogenic Emission Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds in California's South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Luo, D.; Croes, B.

    2010-12-01

    Different volatile organic compounds (VOC) exhibit different propensities for ozone formation. Two approaches were used to study the relative ozone formation potentials (source reactivities) of different anthropogenic VOC emission source categories in California’s South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). The first approach combined emission speciation profiles for total organic gases (TOG) with maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) scales for VOC species. The second approach quantified ozone impacts from different sources by performing 3-dimensional air quality model sensitivity analyses involving increased TOG emissions from particular sources. The source reactivities for 58 VOC emission categories in SoCAB derived from these two approaches agree reasonably well (R2 = ~0.9). Both approaches revealed the two emissions source types with the highest TOG reactivity were mobile sources and managed forest burning. Also, a reactivity-based TOG emission inventory for SoCAB in 2005 was produced by combining the source reactivities from both approaches with TOG emissions from anthropogenic source categories. The top five reactivity-based source categories are: light-duty passenger cars, off-road equipments, consumer products, light-duty trucks, and recreational boats. This is in contrast to the mass-based TOG emission inventory, which indicates that farming operations (mainly from animal waste) was one of the five largest mass-based anthropogenic TOG emission sources. Compared to the mass-based TOG emission inventory, the reactivity-based TOG emission inventory more appropriately represents the ozone formation potentials from emission sources, and highlights those sources that should be targeted for future regulations.

  6. Sequence boundaries in uppermost Proterozoic mixed siliciclastic-carbonate rocks: Deep Spring Formation, southern Basin and Range

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, S.M.; Rees, M.N. . Geosciences Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    The authors propose that a sequence boundary lies at the top of the Reed Dolomite and another at the top of the lower member of the overlying Deep Spring Formation. These boundaries should be useful in correlating critical pre-trilobite Neoproterozoic rocks across the southern Basin and Range Province. Furthermore, the mixed siliciclastic-carbonate rocks between these boundaries reflect an intimate interplay between subsidences, sea-level change and the different rates at which siliciclastic and carbonate sediments accumulate. The Type 2 sequence boundary at the top of the Reed Dolomite is marked in outcrop near Bishop, California by minor channelization and dissolution surfaces that resulted from subaerial exposure of the carbonate platform. This sea level low stand is recorded in the lower Deep Spring Formation, 150 km northwest, by carbonate sediment-gravity-flow deposits. With initiation of transgression, siliciclastics buried the eroded platform and carbonate sedimentation continued in the northwest. As sea level continued to rise, carbonate deposition occurred across the region. Time of maximum flooding is represented by lagoonal deposits in the southeast and a condensed section to the northwest. The condensed section is characterized by dolomitized limestones containing glauconite and small shelly fossils that are overlain by thinly interbedded shales and siltstones with rare trace fossils. The slower rate of siliciclastic deposition on the rapidly subsiding shelf produced an increase in accommodation space resulting in development of an ooid shoal to the southeast. To the northwest, however, continued submarine deposition produced thinly interbedded limestone turbidities and shales. Ooid accumulation outpaced subsidence and together with sea level fall resulted in extensive subaerial exposure of the oolite. Thus, the top of the lower member of the Deep Spring Formation represents the second Type 2 sequence boundary.

  7. The Antiquity of the Rhine River: Stratigraphic Coverage of the Dinotheriensande (Eppelsheim Formation) of the Mainz Basin (Germany)

    PubMed Central

    Böhme, Madelaine; Aiglstorfer, Manuela; Uhl, Dieter; Kullmer, Ottmar

    2012-01-01

    Background Mammalian fossils from the Eppelsheim Formation (Dinotheriensande) have been a benchmark for Neogene vertebrate palaeontology since 200 years. Worldwide famous sites like Eppelsheim serve as key localities for biochronologic, palaeobiologic, environmental, and mammal community studies. So far the formation is considered to be of early Late Miocene age (∼9.5 Ma, Vallesian), representing the oldest sediments of the Rhine River. The stratigraphic unity of the formation and of its fossil content was disputed at times, but persists unresolved. Principal Findings Here we investigate a new fossil sample from Sprendlingen, composed by over 300 mammalian specimens and silicified wood. The mammals comprise entirely Middle Miocene species, like cervids Dicrocerus elegans, Paradicrocerus elegantulus, and deinotheres Deinotherium bavaricum and D. levius. A stratigraphic evaluation of Miocene Central European deer and deinothere species proof the stratigraphic inhomogenity of the sample, and suggest late Middle Miocene (∼12.5 Ma) reworking of early Middle Miocene (∼15 Ma) sediments. This results agree with taxonomic and palaeoclimatic analysis of plant fossils from above and within the mammalian assemblage. Based on the new fossil sample and published data three biochronologic levels within the Dinotheriensand fauna can be differentiated, corresponding to early Middle Miocene (late Orleanian to early Astaracian), late Middle Miocene (late Astaracian), and early Late Miocene (Vallesian) ages. Conclusions/Significance This study documents complex faunal mixing of classical Dinotheriensand fauna, covering at least six million years, during a time of low subsidence in the Mainz Basin and shifts back the origination of the Rhine River by some five million years. Our results have severe implications for biostratigraphy and palaeobiology of the Middle to Late Miocene. They suggest that turnover events may be obliterated and challenge the proposed

  8. Is there a remnant Variscan subducted slab in the mantle beneath the Paris basin? Implications for the late Variscan lithospheric delamination process and the Paris basin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averbuch, O.; Piromallo, C.

    2012-08-01

    The Paris basin (northern France) is a Late Paleozoic-Mesozoic intracratonic basin that settled upon the collapsed Variscan collisional belt. The lithospheric roots of the Variscan orogenic system, below the Paris basin, have been investigated using a European-scale P-wave velocity tomographic model. Tomography points out the existence of a significant high velocity anomaly in the upper mantle below the western part of the basin. At ~ 150-200 km depth, the anomaly extends with a NW-SE trend along the buried Northern France trace of the Northern Variscan Suture Zone i.e. the Bray segment of the Upper Carboniferous Lizard-Rhenohercynian (LRH) suture. Moreover, the high-velocity anomaly is spatially correlated with the prominent Paris Basin Magnetic Anomaly. Its downdip extent reaches depths greater than 200 km below the southern margin of the Paris basin. As suggested in previous tomographic studies below ancient suture zones, these data argue for such anomaly being the remnant of a Variscan subducted slab that escaped the extensive late orogenic delamination process affecting the lithospheric roots by Late Carboniferous-Early Permian times and that was preserved stable over 300 Ma at the base of the lithosphere. On a general geodynamical perspective, these results provide a new insight into the long-term evolution of subducted lithosphere into the mantle. In the case of the Western European Variscan orogenic belt, they suggest that the subduction of the LRH slab below the previously thickened Variscan crust, and its final detachment from the orogenic root, have played an important role in the collapse of the belt, inducing thermal erosion and extension of the overriding lithosphere. The spatial evolution of late orogenic extension across the belt and of subsequent thermal subsidence in the Paris basin is suggested to result from the heterogeneous delamination of the lithospheric roots along strike and from the resultant pattern of asthenospheric rise.

  9. Tight gas sand production from the Almond Formation, Washakie Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, W.P.; Surdam, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    Gas production from the Almond Formation in the Standard Draw trend can only be accounted for by draining numerous layers of tight gas sands via the permeable upper bar sand. Discovery of this field originally focused upon production from this bar sand. But continued development cannot be explained simply by considering depletion of a 30 foot sand. Gas volumetrics verify the need to include lower sands in reservoir analysis. Core obtained from the Almond bar sand confirm petrophysical constants used in the authors` models. Their results imply that economic levels of gas production should be possible wherever a similar horizontal conduit can be tied into gas saturated layers through massive hydraulic fracturing.

  10. Upper-tropospheric precursors associated with subtropical cyclone formation in the North Atlantic basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Alicia M.

    Oceanic cyclones exhibiting properties of both tropical and extratropical systems have been categorized as subtropical cyclones (STCs) since the early 1950s. The opportunity to investigate the roles of baroclinic and diabatic processes during the evolution of STCs from a potential vorticity (PV) perspective motivates this study. This study investigates the roles of baroclinic and diabatic processes during the evolution of STCs by calculating three PV metrics from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Climate Forecast System Reanalysis 0.5° gridded dataset. The three PV metrics quantify the relative contributions of lower-tropospheric baroclinic processes, midtropospheric diabatic heating, and upper-tropospheric dynamical processes during the evolution of individual cyclones. Quantification of these three contributions reveals the changing PV structure of an individual cyclone, indicates fluctuations in the dominant energy source of the cyclone, and aids in categorizing the cyclone. A cyclone-relative composite analysis performed on subjectively constructed clusters of North Atlantic STCs identified from a 1979--2010 climatology is presented to document the structure, motion, and evolution of upper-tropospheric features linked to STC formation. The STCs included in the climatology are separated into five clusters representing the most common upper-tropospheric features linked to STC formation: PV Streamers, Cutoffs, Midlatitude Troughs, Subtropical Disturbances, and PV Debris. STCs forming in association with PV streamers and cutoffs have a well-defined midlatitude connection, developing near a region of upper-tropospheric PV injected into the subtropics during an upstream anticyclonic wave breaking (AWB) event. STCs forming in association with midlatitude troughs also have a well-defined midlatitude connection, but are not associated with an upstream AWB event. In contrast, STCs forming in association with subtropical disturbances do not have a well

  11. Regional porosity trends of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation in southwestern Alabama and vicinity, with comparisons to formations of other basins

    SciTech Connect

    Schmoker, J.W.; Schenk, C.J. )

    1994-02-01

    Sandstone porosity of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation in southwestern Alabama and vicinity decreases systematically as depth and thermal maturity increase over a wide range. Median porosity is about 25% where equivalent vitrinite reflectance (R[sub o]) is slightly over 0.7% in the northern part of the study area (Clarke County, Mississippi). Median porosity is reduced to 8% where R[sub o] approaches 2.7% in the southern part of the study area (state waters of Mobile Bay). Porosity of the cemented, tight zone at the top of the Norphlet in downdip locations is roughly 10% lower than porosities of facies underlying the tight zone, but nevertheless is slightly above the norm for other sandstones at similar R[sub o] levels. Porosity of dune facies is consistently 2-5% higher than that of interdune facies, other factors being equal. Our data show 3-6% higher porosity in chlorite-dominated intervals relative to intervals where illite is the dominant clay mineral. Norphlet porosity has little or no correlation with position relative to the present-day hydrocarbon-water contact. Based on comparisons at similar R[sub o] levels, median (50th-percentile) Norphlet porosity exceeds porosities of [open quotes]typical[close quotes] sandstones in other basins by more than a factor of two throughout the study area. Even the lower (10th-percentile) Norphlet porosities are higher than median porosities of sandstones in general. 48 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Genetic and temporal relations between formation waters and biogenic methane: Upper Devonian Antrim Shale, Michigan Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, A. M.; Walter, L. M.; Budai, J. M.; Ku, T. C. W.; Kaiser, C. J.; Schoell, M.

    1998-05-01

    Controversy remains regarding how well geochemical criteria can distinguish microbial from thermogenic methane. Natural gas in most conventional deposits has migrated from a source rock to a reservoir, rarely remaining associated with the original or cogenetic formation waters. We investigated an unusual gas reservoir, the Late Devonian Antrim Shale, in which large volumes of variably saline water are coproduced with gas. The Antrim Shale is organic-rich, of relatively low thermal maturity, extensively fractured, and is both source and reservoir for methane that is generated dominantly by microbial activity. This hydrogeologic setting permits integration of chemical and isotopic compositions of coproduced water and gas, providing a unique opportunity to characterize methane generating mechanisms. The well-developed fracture network provides a conduit for gas and water mass transport within the Antrim Shale and allows invasion of meteoric water from overlying aquifers in the glacial drift. Steep regional concentration gradients in chemical and isotopic data are observed for formation waters and gases; dilute waters grade into dense brines (300,000 ppm) over lateral distances of less than 30 km. Radiogenic ( 14C and 3H) and stable isotope ( 18O and D) analyses of shallow Antrim Shale formation waters and glacial drift groundwaters indicate recharge times from modern to 20,000 yr BP. Carbon isotope compositions of methane from Antrim Shale wells are typical of the established range for thermogenic or mixed gas (δ 13C = -47 to -56‰). However, the unusually high δ 13C values of CO 2 coproduced with methane (˜+22‰) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in formation waters (˜+28‰) require bacterial mediation. The δD values of methane and coproduced formation water provide the strongest evidence of bacterial methanogenesis. Methane/[ethane + propane] ratios and δ 13C values for ethane indicate: (1) the presence of a thermogenic gas component that increases

  13. Ichnofossils of the alluvial Willwood Formation (lower Eocene), Bighorn Basin, northwest Wyoming, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bown, T.M.; Kraus, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    The ichnofossil assemblage of the lower Eocene Willwood Formation consists of at least nine distinct endichnia that are preserved in full relief. Four forms (three ichnogenera and four ichnospecies) are new and represent fodinichnia and domichnia of oligochaete worms, an insect or spider, an unknown vertebrate (probably a mammal), and domichnia of an unidentified organism. Other potential trace makers of the ichnofauna include insects, mollusks, and decapods. In contrast to an Egyptian Oligocene fluvial ichnofauna produced largely by animals that burrowed in stream channel deposits, the Willwood assemblage is principally of flood-plain origin. Though the ichnofauna occurs in a variety of paleosol types, most of the fossils are restricted in distribution to specific sediment and soil types and, within paleosols, to specific identifiable horizons. This attribute will make them valuable indiced of paleoenvironment once they are better known in other ancient alluvial sequences. The environment suggested by the Willwood trace fossils (damp, but not wet soils with fluctuating water tables) is consistent with the warm temperate to subtropical (possibly monsoonal) conditions that are interpreted for the Willwood Formation by independent evidence of body fossils and paleopedology. ?? 1983.

  14. Stratigraphic framework and estuarine depositional environments of the Miocene Bear Lake Formation, Bristol Bay Basin, Alaska: Onshore equivalents to potential reservoir strata in a frontier gas-rich basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finzel, E.S.; Ridgway, K.D.; Reifenstuhl, R.R.; Blodgett, R.B.; White, J.M.; Decker, P.L.

    2009-01-01

    The Miocene Bear Lake Formation is exposed along the coast and mountains of the central Alaska Peninsula and extends offshore as part of the Bristol Bay Basin. The Bear Lake Formation is up to 2360 m (7743 ft) thick in an offshore well and is considered to have the highest reservoir potential in this gasrich frontier basin. Our new macrofossil and palynological data, collected in the context of measured stratigraphic sections, allow us to construct the first chronostratigraphic framework for this formation. Biostratigraphic age assignments for the numerous, commonly isolated, onshore exposures of the Bear Lake Formation show that deposition initiated sometime before the middle Miocene (15 Ma) and extended to possibly the earliest Pliocene. The bulk of the Bear Lake Formation, however, was deposited during the middle and late Miocene based on our new findings. We interpret the Bear Lake Formation as the product of a regional transgressive estuarine depositional system based on lithofacies analysis. The lower part of the formation is characterized by trough cross-stratified sandstone interbedded with coal and pedogenic mudstone deposited in fluvial and swamp environments of the uppermost parts of the estuarine system. The lower-middle part of the formation is dominated by nonbioturbated, wavy- and flaser-bedded sandstone and siltstone that were deposited in supratidal flat environments. The uppermiddle part of the Bear Lake Formation is characterized by inclined heterolithic strata and coquinoid mussel beds that represent tidal channel environments in the middle and lower tracts of the estuarine system. The uppermost part of the formation consists of tabular, bioturbated sandstone with diverse marine invertebrate macrofossil faunas. We interpret this part of the section as representing the subtidal tract of the lower estuarine system and possibly the adjacent shallow inner shelf. A comparison of our depositional framework for the Bear Lake Formation with core and

  15. Palynostratigraphy of the Nayband Formation, Tabas, Central Iran Basin: Paleogeographical and paleoecological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajjadi, F.; Hashemi, H.; Borzuee, E.

    2015-11-01

    Reasonably diverse and moderately preserved palynofloras of exclusively terrestrial derivation occur in surface samples of the Nayband Formation, Kamar Macheh Kuh, southeastern Tabas, east-central Iran. No marine palynomorphs encountered in the samples examined. The palynofloras comprise 62 species including radially symmetrical and monolete spores (37 species allocated to 27 genera) and pollen (25 species designated to 19 genera). Of the latter, such bisaccate taxa as Ovalipollis ovalis, Alisporites spp., Falcisporites nuthallensis, the inaperturate Araucariacites australis, and the monosulcate Chasmatosporites major dominate the assemblages. Representatives of such trilete spores as Dictyophyllidites mortonii, Kyrtomisporis laevigatus, and Gleicheiniidites senonicus are essentially abundant in the palynofloras examined. Vertical distribution of miospores allows erection within the Nayband Formation of three informal distinctive stratigraphically successive interval biozones, viz., A. australis-Annulispora folliculosa biozone, Conbaculatisporites sp.-Ricciisporites tuberculatus biozone, and R. tuberculatus-Polypodiisporites polymicroforatus biozone based on the First Observed Occurrence (FOO) and Last Observed Occurrence (LOO) of selected taxa. These are compared with palynozones from ±coeval strata in Iran and elsewhere. Additionally, two non-palyniferous intervals, one at the base (188 m thick) and another (18 m in thickness) at uppermost part of the section studied are identified. Based on the association of such key misopore species as Lunatisporites rhaeticus, O. ovalis (alias pseudoalatus), A. folliculosa, Polycingulatisporites mooniensis, Limbosporites lundbladii, Quadraeculina anellaeformis, R. tuberculatus, Conbaculatisporites sp., P. polymicroforatus, and Striatisaccus novimundi within the Nayband palynofloras, the host strata are assigned to Late Triassic (Norian-Rhaetian). This dating while corroborating previous attempts made with reference to mostly

  16. Outcrops, Fossils, Geophysical Logs, and Tectonic Interpretations of the Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation and Contiguous Strata in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merewether, E.A.; Cobban, W.A.; Tillman, R.W.

    2010-01-01

    In the Bighorn Basin of north-central Wyoming and south-central Montana, the Frontier Formation of early Late Cretaceous age consists of siliciclastic, bentonitic, and carbonaceous beds that were deposited in marine, brackish-water, and continental environments. Most lithologic units are laterally discontinuous. The Frontier Formation conformably overlies the Mowry Shale and is conformably overlain by the Cody Shale. Molluscan fossils collected from outcrops of these formations and listed in this report are mainly of marine origin and of Cenomanian, Turonian, and Coniacian ages. The lower and thicker part of the Frontier in the Bighorn Basin is of Cenomanian age and laterally equivalent to the Belle Fourche Member of the Frontier in central Wyoming. Near the west edge of the basin, these basal strata are disconformably overlain by middle Turonian beds that are the age equivalent of the Emigrant Gap Member of the Frontier in central Wyoming. The middle Turonian beds are disconformably overlain by lower Coniacian strata. Cenomanian strata along the south and east margins of the basin are disconformably overlain by upper Turonian beds in the upper part of the Frontier, as well as in the lower part of the Cody; these are, in turn, conformably overlain by lower Coniacian strata. Thicknesses and ages of Cenomanian strata in the Bighorn Basin and adjoining regions are evidence of regional differential erosion and the presence of an uplift during the early Turonian centered in northwestern Wyoming, west of the basin, probably associated with a eustatic event. The truncated Cenomanian strata were buried by lower middle Turonian beds during a marine transgression and possibly during regional subsidence and a eustatic rise. An uplift in the late middle Turonian, centered in north-central Wyoming and possibly associated with a eustatic fall, caused the erosion of lower middle Turonian beds in southern and eastern areas of the basin as well as in an adjoining region of north

  17. Artificial maturation of oil shale: The Irati Formation from the Parana Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayer, James L.

    Oil shale samples from the Irati Formation in Brazil were evaluated from an outcrop block, denoted Block 003. The goals of this thesis include: 1) Characterizing the Irati Formation, 2) Comparing the effects of two different types of pyrolysis, anhydrous and hydrous, and 3) Utilizing a variety of geophysical experiments to determine the changes associated with each type of pyrolysis. Primary work included determining total organic carbon, source rock analysis, mineralogy, computer tomography x-ray scans, and scanning electron microscope images before and after pyrolysis, as well as acoustic properties of the samples during pyrolysis. Two types of pyrolysis (hydrous and anhydrous) were performed on samples cored at three different orientations (0°, 45°, and 90°) with respect to the axis of symmetry, requiring six total experiments. During pyrolysis, the overall effective pressure was maintained at 800 psi, and the holding temperature was 365°C. The changes and deformation in the hydrous pyrolysis samples were greater compared to the anhydrous pyrolysis. The velocities gave the best indication of changes occurring during pyrolysis, but it was difficult to maintain the same amplitude and quality of waveforms at higher temperatures. The velocity changes were due to a combination of factors, including thermal deformation of the samples, fracture porosity development, and the release of adsorbed water and bitumen from the sample. Anhydrous pyrolysis in this study did not reduce TOC, while TOC was reduced due to hydrous pyrolysis by 5%, and velocities in the hydrous pyrolysis decreased by up to 30% at 365°C compared to room temperature. Data from this study and future data that can be acquired with the improved high-temperature, high-pressure experiment will assist in future economic production from oil shale at lower temperatures under hydrous pyrolysis conditions.

  18. Past, present and future formation of groundwater resources in northern part of Baltic Artesian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marandi, A.; Vallner, L.; Vaikmae, R.; Raidla, V.

    2012-04-01

    Cambrian-Vendian Aquifer System (CVAS) is the deepest confined aquifer system used for water consumption in northern part of Baltic Artesian Basin (BAB). A regional groundwater flow and transport model (Visual Modflow) was used to investigate the paleohydrogeological scientific and contemporary management problems of CVAS. The model covers the territory of Estonia and its close surrounding, all together 88,000 km2 and includes all main aquifers and aquitards from ground surface to as low as the impermeable part of the crystalline basement. Three-dimensional distribution of groundwater heads, flow directions, velocities, and rates as well as transport and budget characteristics were simulated by the model. Water composition was changed significantly during the last glaciations.Strongly depleted O and H stable isotope composition, absence of 3H and low radiocarbon concentration are the main indicators of glacial origin of groundwater in the Cambrian-Vendian aquifer in northern Estonia. The noble gas analyses allowed concluding, that palaeorecharge took place at temperatures around the freezing point. While in North Estonia, most of water was changed by glacial melt water, high salinity water is till preserved in Southern part of Estonia.First results of modeling suggest that during the intrusion period lasting 7.3-9.3 ka the front of glacial thaw water movement had southeast direction and reachedto 180-220 kmfrom CVAS outcrop in Baltic Sea. Confining layer of CVAS is cut through by deep buried valleys in several places in North Estonia making possible for modern precipitation to infiltrate into aquifer system in present day. In case of natural conditions, the water pressure of CVAS is few meters above sea level and most of valleys act as discharge areas for aquifers system. Two regional depression ones have formed in North Estonia as a result of groundwater use from CVAS. Water consumption changes the natural groundwater gradient, flow direction and thereforerecharge

  19. Late-glacial to Early Holocene lake basin and river valley formation within Pomeranian moraine belt near Dobbertin (Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, NE Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawiska, Izabela; Lorenz, Sebastian; Börner, Andreas; Niessner, Dominique; Słowiński, Michał; Theuerkauf, Martin; Pieper, Hagen; Lampe, Reinhard

    2014-05-01

    In central Mecklenburg-Vorpommern vast areas between the terminal moraine belts of the Frankfurt (W1F) and Pomeranian Phase (W2) were covered by glaciolacustrine basins which were embedded in the outwash plains. With deglaciation of the Pomeranian Phase around 17-18 ka BP the basins north to the villages Dobbertin and Dobbin were part of a glaciofluvial river system in combination with ice-dammed lake basins. During the late-glacial after ~14 ka cal BP the melting of buried dead ice reshaped the lake basin morphology by new depressions, in- and outlets. We study late-glacial basin and landscape development using cores collected along a pipeline trench crossing the Dobbin-Dobbertin basin. Core analysis includes sedimentological (carbon content, grainsize distribution) and palaeoecological (pollen, plant macrofossils, Cladocera) proxies. Radiocarbon dates indicate that peat formation started soon after the start of the Weichselian late-glacial. High resolution analysis of a basal peat layer indicates that initial organic and lacustrine sedimentation started in shallow ponding mires, evolving from buried dead ice sinks in the glaciofluvial sequence, in which telmatic plants (Carex aquatilis, Schoenoplectus lacustris) dominated. Chydorus sphaericus, the only cladocera species recorded, is ubiquitous and can survive in almost all reservoir types in very harsh conditions. Findings of Characeae than point at the formation of shallow lakes. The expansion of rich fen communities, including Scorpidium scorpoides, and a decline in Cladocera diversity show that these lakes soon again terrestrialised with peat formation. The appearance of Alona costata points at a lowering of pH values in that process. A tree trunk of birch (14.2 ka cal. BP) shows that first trees established during this first telmatic period. At this position in the basin, the basal peat layer is covered by minerogenic sediments, which points at a period of higher water levels and fluvial dynamics, possibly

  20. Integrated reservoir characterization to define a hydrodynamic model in the Misoa formation, Eocene, Center Lake Field, Maracaibo Basin, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Azuaje, V.; Gil, J.

    1996-08-01

    The Center Lake Field is one of the most important light oil reservoirs in the Maracaibo Basin. Field production of {open_quotes}C{close_quotes} sandstones, Misoa formation, Eocene, started in 1968. Actual cumulative production is 630 MMBls, which represents 23% of the original oil in place. Flank water injection programs have been executed since 1976; however, reservoirs within this field still have shown pressure and production declination. A multidisciplinary study has been conducted to produce an updated hydrodynamic model which matches the static and dynamic behavior of the reservoirs. An integrated interpretation team has merged geological, geophysical and engineering data and criteria to generate an updated and consistent interpretation of today`s performance of reservoirs. The integration of a 3D seismic survey with a sequence- stratigraphy analysis, petrophysical and production data allowed us to determine a new structural and stratigraphic framework. The first important conclusion is that active aquifer is not located at the flanks of the structure, as traditionally worked out. Instead, a water-bottom drive system was interpreted and validated with production data so a different strategy for water injection was recommended. The latter interpretation restricted the injection to those areas where rock volume calculation, permeability, porosity and depositional environment make it suitable and profitable. A pattern injection program is going to be developed in C-4-X.46 reservoir and 21.6 MMBls additional recovery is expected in respect to the old production scheme.

  1. Shale gas characterization of the Dinder and Blue Nile Formations in the Blue Nile Basin, East Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoieb, Monera Adam; Sum, Chow Weng; Bhattachary, Swapan Kumar; Abidin, Nor Syazwani Zainal; Abdelrahim, Omer Babiker

    2016-11-01

    The development of gas and oil in unconventional plays in United State and Northern Europe has affected the finances and the energy security. Geochanical properties of shale rocks can have a major impact on the efficiency of shale gas exploration. The goal of this study is to evaluate shale gas potentiality in the Blue Nile Basin, using samples from existing drilled wells. All the samples were analyzed in detail with the following organic geochemical techniques: total organic carbon (TOC), Rock-eval pyrolysis, to determine the quality and quantity of the organic matter. The total organic carbon (TOC) values for the shale intervals vary from 0.6 to 4.5weight% in FARASHA-1 Well, while in TAWAKUL-1 Well range from 0.4 to 2.4weight%, suggesting that fair to good source generative potential, as revealed by the S2 v's TOC plot. Hydrogen index (HI) values range from 12 to 182 mg HC/g TOC in the two wells, indicating type III and IV derived-input in the samples and their potential to generate gas. However, the Blue Nile and Dinder Formation have Tmax values in the range of 437 to 456°C, indicating early maturity in the oil window. Thus, higher maturity levels have affected the hydrocarbon generation potential and HI of the samples.

  2. Modeling of wind gap formation and development of sedimentary basins during fold growth: application to the Zagros Fold Belt, Iran.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collignon, Marine; Yamato, Philippe; Castelltort, Sébastien; Kaus, Boris

    2016-04-01

    Mountain building and landscape evolution are controlled by the interactions between river dynamics and tectonic forces. Such interactions have been largely studied but a quantitative evaluation of tectonic/geomorphic feedbacks remains required for understanding sediments routing within orogens and fold-and-thrust belts. Here, we employ numerical simulations to assess the conditions of uplift and river incision necessary to deflect an antecedent drainage network during the growth of one or several folds. We propose that a partitioning of the river network into internal (endorheic) and longitudinal drainage arises as a result of lithological differences within the deforming crustal sedimentary cover. We show with examples from the Zagros Fold Belt (ZFB) that drainage patterns can be linked to the incision ratio R between successive lithological layers, corresponding to the ratio between their relative erodibilities or incision coefficients. Transverse drainage networks develop for uplift rates smaller than 0.8 mm.yr-1 and -10 < R < 10. Intermediate drainage network are obtained for uplift rates up to 2 mm.yr-1 and incision ratios of 20. Parallel drainage networks and formation of sedimentary basins occur for large values of incision ratio (R >20) and uplift rates between 1 and 2 mm.yr-1. These results have implications for predicting the distribution of sediment depocenters in fold-and-thrust belts, which can be of direct economic interest for hydrocarbon exploration.

  3. Reservoir heterogeneity and hydrocarbon production in mixed dolomitic-clastic sequence: Escandalosa Formation, Barinas-Apure basin, southwestern Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Escalona, N.; Abud, J.

    1989-03-01

    Widespread dedolomitization and differential leaching occur in the Turonian O Member of the Escandalosa Formation, Barinas-Apure basin. Within this dolostone-dominated succession, calcite was developed through a dedolomitization process occurring in deeply buried dolomitized lime sediments previously deposited on a carbonate platform as well as dedolomitization on the associated glauconitic-quartzose sandstones of small-scale channels that scoured the platform. The dolomitized intervals have a strata-bound nature, and their original fabric is totally obliterated. The dolomitization process generated a sucrose-textured mosaic of saddle dolomite. Initial dolomite was of the scattered type, but progressive replacement of the host produced a mosaic dolostone with both idiotopic and xenotopic textures. A general increase occurred in the iron and manganese content, and goethite was exsolved from the curved rhombs of saddle dolomite. Calcite usually postdates dolomitization, except in the highly fossiliferous packstones; calcite veins develop in both dolostones and limestones. Leaching is restricted essentially to glauconitic sandstones where calcite and some clay have been leached. This has produced very low intercrystalline porosity within the dolostones and partially dissolved, corroded and floating grains with oversized pores in the sandstones. These sandy intervals exhibit maximum potential for hydrocarbon storage, due to contrasting diagenetic influence associated with reservoir heterogeneity.

  4. Assessment of the Mowry Shale and Niobrara Formation as Continuous Hydrocarbon Systems, Powder River Basin, Montana and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anna, Lawrence O.; Cook, Troy A.

    2008-01-01

    A recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) oil and gas assessment of the Powder River Basin , Wyoming and Montana, identified the Upper Cretaceous Mowry Shale and Niobrara Formation as the primary hydrocarbon sources for Cretaceous conventional and unconventional reservoirs. Cumulative Mowry-sourced petroleum production is about 1.2 BBO (billion barrels of oil) and 2.2 TCFG (trillion cubic feet of gas) and cumulative Niobrara-sourced oil production is about 520 MMBO (million barrels of oil) and 0.95 TCFG. Burial history modeling indicated that hydrocarbon generation for both formations started at about 0.60 percent Ro at depths of about 8,000 ft. At maximum depths, Ro for the Mowry is about 1.2 to 1.3 percent and about 0.80 percent for the Niobrara. The Mowry and Niobrara continuous reservoirs were assessed using a cell-based methodology that utilized production data. The size of each cell was based on geologic controls and potential drainage areas in analog fields. Current and historical production data were used to determine the estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) distribution for untested cells. Only production data from unconventional fractured shale reservoirs with vertical wells were used. For the Mowry, the minimum, median, and maximum total recovery volumes per cell for untested cells are (1) 0.002, 0.25, and 0.35 MMBO, respectively; and for the Niobrara (2) 0.002, 0.028, and 0.5 MMBO. Sweet spots were identified by lineaments and faults, which are believed to be areas having the greatest petroleum potential; an upper limit of 8,000 ft depth was defined by overpressuring caused by hydrocarbon generation. Mean estimates of technically recoverable undiscovered continuous resource for the Mowry are 198 MMBO, 198 BCF (billion cubic feet of gas), and 11.9 MMBNGL (million barrels of natural gas liquid), and those for the Niobrara are 227 MMBO, 227 BCFG, and 13.6 MMBNGL.

  5. A New Basal Sauropodomorph (Dinosauria: Saurischia) from Quebrada del Barro Formation (Marayes-El Carrizal Basin), Northwestern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Apaldetti, Cecilia; Martinez, Ricardo N.; Alcober, Oscar A.; Pol, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Background Argentinean basal sauropodomorphs are known by several specimens from different basins; Ischigualasto, El Tranquilo, and Mogna. The Argentinean record is diverse and includes some of the most primitive known sauropodomorphs such as Panphagia and Chromogisaurus, as well as more derived forms, including several massospondylids. Until now, the Massospondylidae were the group of basal sauropodomorphs most widely spread around Pangea with a record in almost all continents, mostly from the southern hemisphere, including the only record from Antarctica. Methodology/Principal Finding We describe here a new basal sauropodomorph, Leyesaurus marayensis gen. et sp. nov., from the Quebrada del Barro Formation, an Upper Triassic-Lower Jurassic unit that crops out in northwestern Argentina. The new taxon is represented by a partial articulated skeleton that includes the skull, vertebral column, scapular and pelvic girdles, and hindlimb. Leyesaurus is diagnosed by a set of unique features, such as a sharply acute angle (50 degrees) formed by the ascending process of the maxilla and the alveolar margin, a straight ascending process of the maxilla with a longitudinal ridge on its lateral surface, noticeably bulging labial side of the maxillary teeth, greatly elongated cervical vertebrae, and proximal articular surface of metatarsal III that is shelf-like and medially deflected. Phylogenetic analysis recovers Leyesaurus as a basal sauropodomorph, sister taxon of Adeopapposaurus within the Massospondylidae. Moreover, the results suggest that massospondylids achieved a higher diversity than previously thought. Conclusions/Significance Our phylogenetic results differ with respect to previous analyses by rejecting the massospondylid affinities of some taxa from the northern hemisphere (e.g., Seitaad, Sarahsaurus). As a result, the new taxon Leyesaurus, coupled with other recent discoveries, suggests that the diversity of massospondylids in the southern hemisphere was higher

  6. Diagenesis and reservoir quality of the Lower Cretaceous Quantou Formation tight sandstones in the southern Songliao Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Kelai; Cao, Yingchang; Jahren, Jens; Zhu, Rukai; Bjørlykke, Knut; Haile, Beyene Girma; Zheng, Lijing; Hellevang, Helge

    2015-12-01

    The Lower Cretaceous Quantou Formation in the southern Songliao Basin is the typical tight oil sandstone in China. For effective exploration, appraisal and production from such a tight oil sandstone, the diagenesis and reservoir quality must be thoroughly studied first. The tight oil sandstone has been examined by a variety of methods, including core and thin section observation, XRD, SEM, CL, fluorescence, electron probing analysis, fluid inclusion and isotope testing and quantitative determination of reservoir properties. The sandstones are mostly lithic arkoses and feldspathic litharenites with fine to medium grain size and moderate to good sorting. The sandstones are dominated by feldspar, quartz, and volcanic rock fragments showing various stages of disintegration. The reservoir properties are quite poor, with low porosity (average 8.54%) and permeability (average 0.493 mD), small pore-throat radius (average 0.206 μm) and high displacement pressure (mostly higher than 1 MPa). The tight sandstone reservoirs have undergone significant diagenetic alterations such as compaction, feldspar dissolution, quartz cementation, carbonate cementation (mainly ferrocalcite and ankerite) and clay mineral alteration. As to the onset time, the oil emplacement was prior to the carbonate cementation but posterior to the quartz cementation and feldspar dissolution. The smectite to illite reaction and pressure solution at stylolites provide a most important silica sources for quartz cementation. Carbonate cements increase towards interbedded mudstones. Mechanical compaction has played a more important role than cementation in destroying the reservoir quality of the K1q4 sandstone reservoirs. Mixed-layer illite/smectite and illite reduced the porosity and permeability significantly, while chlorite preserved the porosity and permeability since it tends to be oil wet so that later carbonate cementation can be inhibited to some extent. It is likely that the oil emplacement occurred

  7. Formation of hydrothermal deposits at Kings Triple Junction, northern Lau back-arc basin, SW Pacific: The geochemical perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paropkari, Anil L.; Ray, Durbar; Balaram, V.; Surya Prakash, L.; Mirza, Imran H.; Satyanarayana, M.; Gnaneshwar Rao, T.; Kaisary, Sujata

    2010-04-01

    An inactive hydrothermal field was discovered near Kings Triple Junction (KTJ) in northern Lau back-arc basin during 19th cruise of R/V Akademik Mstislav Keldysh in 1990. The field consisted of a large elongated basal platform 'the pedestal' with several 'small' chimneys on its periphery and one 'main mound' superposed over it. The surrounding region is carpeted with lava pillows having ferromanganese 'precipitate' as infillings. The adjoining second field consisted of small chimney like growths termed as 'Christmas Tree' Field. The basal pedestal, the peripheral chimneys and small 'Christmas Tree' like growths (samples collected by MIR submersibles), though parts of the same hydrothermal field, differ significantly in their mineralogy and elemental composition indicating different history of formation. The pedestal slab consisting of chalcopyrite and pyrite as major minerals and rich in Cu is likely to have formed at higher temperatures than sphalerite dominated peripheral chimney. Extremely low concentration of high field strength elements (e.g. Zr, Hf, Nb and Ta) and enrichment of light REE in these sulfides indicate prominent influence of aqueous arc-magma, rich in subduction components. The oxide growths in the 'Christmas Tree' Field have two distinct layers, Fe rich orange-red basal part which seems to have formed at very low temperature as precipitates from diffused hydrothermal flows from the seafloor whereas Mn rich black surface coating is formed from hydrothermal fluids emanated from the seafloor during another episode of hydrothermal activity. Perhaps this is for the first time such unique hydrothermal oxide growths are being reported in association with hydrothermal system. Here, we discuss the possible processes responsible for the formation of these different hydrothermal deposits based on their mineralogy and geochemistry.

  8. Trace fossil zonation in regressive sequences in the lower Breathitt Formation (Pennsylvanian, Central Appalachian Basin)

    SciTech Connect

    Greb, S.F.; Chesnut, D.R. Jr. )

    1992-01-01

    Commonly, lithofacies of the lower Breathitt Formation occur in coarsening-upward regressive sequences, interpreted as coastal sedimentation in response to eustacy. Similar trace-fossil assemblages were noted within similar lithofacies of these coarsening-upward sequences at 25 locations. The bases of many regressive sequences are sharp and characterized by in situ productoids or transported productoids and crinoidal debris. Transported marine body fossils at the bases of shales are evidence for transgressive surfaces. Mixed sand and shale facies above the shales are interpreted as tidal flats, shoals, and intershoal areas, and exhibit high-abundance/moderate- to high-diversity trace-fossil assemblages. Vertical zoning of suspension- and deposit-feeding organisms were controlled by changes in sedimentation and salinity related to eustatic shallowing. Channel-fill sequences exhibit the widest range in ichnofossil diversity. Larger channels contain only low-abundance/low-diversity assemblages and arthropod locomotion traces. These channels may have been subjected to fresh-water influx and strong current reworking of sediment substrates. In contrast, small (> 150m width) tidal channels capping many regressive sequences contain high-abundance/low-to high-diversity trace-fossil assemblages similar to the intershoal/interflat facies but including different dwelling traces. These channels reworked the tops of the regressive sequences under intertidal conditions. Channels may be capped by coals or a subsequent regressive sequence.

  9. Geochemical fingerprinting of Wilson Creek formation tephra layers (Mono Basin, California) using titanomagnetite compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcaida, Mae; Mangan, Margaret T.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Bursik, Marcus; Lidzbarski, Marsha I.

    2014-03-01

    Nineteen tephra layers within the Wilson Creek formation near Mono Lake provide a record of late Pleistocene to early Holocene volcanic activity from the nearby Mono Craters and are important chronostratigraphic markers for paleomagnetic, paleoclimatic, and paleoecologic studies. These stratigraphically important tephra deposits can be geochemically identified using compositions of their titanomagnetite phenocrysts. Titanomagnetite compositions display a broad range (XUsp 0.26-0.39), which allow the tephra layers to be distinguished despite the indistinguishable major-element glass compositions (76-77 wt% SiO2) of their hosts. The concentrations of Ti and Fe in titanomagnetite display geochemical and stratigraphic groupings that allow clear discrimination between older (> 57 ka) and younger (< 41 ka) tephras. Some individual tephra layers can be uniquely identified on the basis of titanomagnetite MgO, MnO, and Al2O3 contents. In addition, a few tephra layers can be correlated to their source vents by their titanomagnetite compositions. The unique geochemical fingerprint of the Mono Craters-sourced titanomagnetites also allows the discrimination of two tephra layers apparently sourced from nearby Mammoth Mountain volcano in Long Valley.

  10. The break-up of continents and the formation of new ocean basins.

    PubMed

    Minshull, T A

    2002-12-15

    Rifted continental margins are the product of stretching, thinning and ultimate break-up of a continental plate into smaller fragments, and the rocks lying beneath them store a record of this rifting process. Earth scientists can read this record by careful sampling and with remote geophysical techniques. These experimental studies have been complemented by theoretical analyses of continental extension and associated magmatism. Some rifted margins show evidence for extensive volcanic activity and uplift during rifting; at these margins, the record of the final stages of rifting is removed by erosion and obscured by the thick volcanic cover. Other margins were underwater throughout their formation and showed rather little volcanic activity; here the ongoing deposition of sediment provides a clearer record. During the last decade, vast areas of exhumed mantle rocks have been discovered at such margins between continental and oceanic crust. This observation conflicts with the well-established idea that the mantle melts to produce new crust when it is brought close to the Earth's surface. In contrast to the steeply dipping faults commonly seen in zones of extension within continental interiors, faults with very shallow dips play a key role in the deformation immediately preceding continental break-up. Future progress in the study of continental break-up will depend on studies of pairs of margins which were once joined and on the development of computer models which can handle rigorously the complex transition from distributed continental deformation to sea-floor spreading focused at a mid-ocean ridge.

  11. RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE LOWER GREEN RIVER FORMATION, SOUTHWEST UINTA BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect

    Milind D. Deo

    2003-02-11

    Reservoir simulations of different fields in the Green River Formation are reported. Most extensive simulations were performed on the Monument Butte Northeast unit. Log data were used to construct detailed geostatistical models, which were upscaled to obtain reasonable number of grid blocks for reservoir simulation. Porosities, permeabilities, and water saturations required for reservoir simulation were thus generated. Comparison of the production results with the field data revealed that there was a phenomenological deficiency in the model. This was addressed by incorporating hydraulic fractures into the models. With this change, much better agreement between simulation results and field data was obtained. Two other fields, Brundage Canyon and Uteland Butte, were simulated in primary production. Only preliminary simulations were undertaken since a number of critical data elements were missing and could not be obtained from the operators. These studies revealed that the production performance of the Brundage Canyon field is much better than what can be predicted from simulations of a typical non-fractured, undersaturated reservoir. Uteland Butte field performance was that of a typical undersaturated reservoir.

  12. Geochemical fingerprinting of Wilson Creek formation tephra layers (Mono Basin, California) using titanomagnetite compositions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marcaida, Mae; Mangan, Margaret T.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Bursik, Marcus; Lidzbarski, Marsha I.

    2014-01-01

    Nineteen tephra layers within the Wilson Creek formation near Mono Lake provide a record of late Pleistocene to early Holocene volcanic activity from the nearby Mono Craters and are important chronostratigraphic markers for paleomagnetic, paleoclimatic, and paleoecologic studies. These stratigraphically important tephra deposits can be geochemically identified using compositions of their titanomagnetite phenocrysts. Titanomagnetite compositions display a broad range (XUsp 0.26–0.39), which allow the tephra layers to be distinguished despite the indistinguishable major-element glass compositions (76–77 wt% SiO2) of their hosts. The concentrations of Ti and Fe in titanomagnetite display geochemical and stratigraphic groupings that allow clear discrimination between older (> 57 ka) and younger (2O3 contents. In addition, a few tephra layers can be correlated to their source vents by their titanomagnetite compositions. The unique geochemical fingerprint of the Mono Craters-sourced titanomagnetites also allows the discrimination of two tephra layers apparently sourced from nearby Mammoth Mountain volcano in Long Valley.

  13. Lower Cisco Formation (Pennsylvanian-Virgilian) paleokarst, Wolf Flat field Palo Duro basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Trentham, R.C.; Lindsay, R.F.; Pack, D.D.

    1996-12-31

    Wolf Flat field produces from karstified Lower Cisco Formation at the rimmed northeast shelf margin. Mounds, peripheral skeletal debris, and oolitic facies form the vertical/lateral succession. Mounds are composed of crinoids, bryozoans, corals and algae. Skeletal packstone/grainstones surround mounds, With back-mound wackestone. Ooid grainstone formed in high-energy passages onto the shelf and cap shallowing-upward cycles. Karstification resulted from two 100+ ft. (30+ m) sea level drops, that dropped in a step-by-step manner to form {approximately}20 porous intervals that extend through all facies and lithologies in the field. Aragonitic mound and skeletal grainstone/wackestones experienced intense dissolution. Calcitic ooid grainstones dissolved less and form cave roofs and floors. Dissolution was in two phases: first, small vertically oriented pipes formed, resembling a {open_quotes}swiss cheese{close_quotes} texture; second, was intense lateral dissolution that created a {open_quotes}sponge{close_quotes} texture, with porosities up to 60-70%. Eventually, collapse breccias formed, with some clasts transported in the karst system. Porosity was reduced by vadose silt, breccia clasts, speleothem cements, transgressive shale infilling, and burial saddle dolomite. Portions of the field nearest the rimmed margin were dolomitized. {delta}{sup 18}O is within the range of early meteoric diagenesis and {delta}{sup 13}C is negative and becomes more negative toward the exposure surface.

  14. Lower Cisco Formation (Pennsylvanian-Virgilian) paleokarst, Wolf Flat field Palo Duro basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Trentham, R.C. ); Lindsay, R.F. ); Pack, D.D. )

    1996-01-01

    Wolf Flat field produces from karstified Lower Cisco Formation at the rimmed northeast shelf margin. Mounds, peripheral skeletal debris, and oolitic facies form the vertical/lateral succession. Mounds are composed of crinoids, bryozoans, corals and algae. Skeletal packstone/grainstones surround mounds, With back-mound wackestone. Ooid grainstone formed in high-energy passages onto the shelf and cap shallowing-upward cycles. Karstification resulted from two 100+ ft. (30+ m) sea level drops, that dropped in a step-by-step manner to form [approximately]20 porous intervals that extend through all facies and lithologies in the field. Aragonitic mound and skeletal grainstone/wackestones experienced intense dissolution. Calcitic ooid grainstones dissolved less and form cave roofs and floors. Dissolution was in two phases: first, small vertically oriented pipes formed, resembling a [open quotes]swiss cheese[close quotes] texture; second, was intense lateral dissolution that created a [open quotes]sponge[close quotes] texture, with porosities up to 60-70%. Eventually, collapse breccias formed, with some clasts transported in the karst system. Porosity was reduced by vadose silt, breccia clasts, speleothem cements, transgressive shale infilling, and burial saddle dolomite. Portions of the field nearest the rimmed margin were dolomitized. [delta][sup 18]O is within the range of early meteoric diagenesis and [delta][sup 13]C is negative and becomes more negative toward the exposure surface.

  15. Chester (Mississippian) ostracodes from Bangor Formation of Black Warrior basin, northern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Devery, H.; Dewey, C.

    1986-05-01

    A previously unreported ostracode fauna is described from the Bangor Limestone in Franklin, Lawrence, and Colbert Counties, Alabama. The Bangor formation is a Chesterian (Mississippian) platformal carbonate sequence. The predominant carbonates are bioclastic and oolitic grainstones to wackestones with less abundant micritic claystones. Intercalated fine clastics are common in the upper and lower parts of the sequence. This study focuses on the bioclastic limestones with interbedded shales of the lower Bangor. The megafaunal associations include crinoid and blastoid pelmatozoans, orthotetid, and spiriferid brachiopids, and both fenestrate and nonfenestrate bryozoans. Solitary rugose corals and trilobites may be locally abundant. Gastropods and bivalves form a consistent but accessory part of the fauna, which indicates a shallow, nearshore shelf environment. A diverse ostracode fauna of variable abundance has been collected from the shaly units and friable limestones. The ostracode fauna indicates shallow, open-marine conditions and is dominated by bairdiaceans, including Bairdia spp. Rectobairdia and Bairdiacypris. Several species of Cavellina, healdia, and Seminolites are also abundant. Palaeocopids present include Coryellina, Kirkbya, and Polytylites. Kloedenellaceans include Beyrichiopsis, Glyptopleura, Glypotpleurina, and .Hypotetragona. Paraparchitaceans are notably more scarce, but specimens of Shishaella have been found. Some sample have a high valve to carapace ratio, suggesting postmortem transport. Although diversity is high, numerical abundances can be low. Initial studies suggest the ostracodes have a Mid-Continent affinity, which may indicate that the Appalachians were acting as a barrier to migration of European forms.

  16. Fluvial architecture variations linked to changes in accommodation space: Río Chico Formation (Late Paleocene), Golfo San Jorge basin, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foix, Nicolás; Paredes, José M.; Giacosa, Raúl E.

    2013-08-01

    The Upper Paleocene Río Chico Formation is a 50-180 m thick fluvial succession developed in a passive-margin setting, Golfo San Jorge basin, Central Patagonia, Argentina. A detailed description and interpretation of outcrops was carried out, analyzing exposures from the northern basin margin to the most complete successions at the southern depocenter. The unit is characterized by a regional fluvial system that flowed to the south-east. Five main lithofacies associations were defined: (I) active fluvial channels, with three sub-types: braided, meandering and low-sinuosity, (II) sheet-flood deposits, (III) proximal floodplain (natural levee and crevasse-splay), (IV) distal floodplain, and (V) abandoned channels. Lateral/vertical changes in fluvial architecture of the Río Chico Formation were recognized by variations in preserved thickness, fluvial styles, geometry of fluvial channels, regional paleoflow directions, and channel/floodplain ratios. Close to the northern basin margin, the fluvial succession is 50-60 m thick, composed of braided channels, sheet-flow deposits, and high channel/floodplain ratio. In a basinward direction, the alluvial succession increases to 180 m in thickness, the dominant fluvial styles change to low-sinuosity and meandering channels and channel/floodplain ratio reduces. The fluvial architecture of the Río Chico Formation shows two main depositional trends that resulted from changes in accommodation space across the basin. The interpreted break-point coincides with the underlying Cretaceous basin-boundary, thus the synsedimentary extensional reactivation of the pre-existing tectonic lineament generated differential subsidence, delimiting two different accommodation settings.

  17. Geologic map of the Peach Orchard Flat quadrangle, Carbon County, Wyoming, and descriptions of new stratigraphic units in the Upper Cretaceous Lance Formation and Paleocene Fort Union Formation, eastern Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming-Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honey, J.D.; Hettinger, R.D.

    2004-01-01

    This report provides a geologic map of the Peach Orchard Flat 7.5-minute quadrangle, located along the eastern flank of the Washakie Basin, Wyo. Geologic formations and individual coal beds were mapped at a scale of 1:24,000; surface stratigraphic sections were measured and described; and well logs were examined to determine coal correlations and thicknesses in the subsurface. In addition, four lithostratigraphic units were named: the Red Rim Member of the Upper Cretaceous Lance Formation, and the China Butte, Blue Gap, and Overland Members of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation.

  18. Formation and distribution of coal balls in the Herrin Coal (Pennsylvanian), Franklin County, Illinois Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeMaris, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    Large areas of concentrated coal balls (permineralized peat) up to 4 m thick obstructed longwall mining in the Herrin Coal at the Old Ben No. 24 mine. The largest coal-ball area mapped contained >1500 m3; several areas contained >400 m3 of coal balls. In-mine mapping established that there were two types of roof (freshwater and marine), and that the coal balls were spatially correlated with the marine roof units. Regional studies and local data revealed that the younger, freshwater Energy Shale (mud) originally covered all of the peat deposited at the mine, but the mud was locally removed during a period of erosion. The great majority of coal balls are found within the coal seam, where they were permineralized in situ by carbonates. Some coal balls are found exposed on the eroded coal surface and others are within the channel fill associated with the erosion, which predates any marine sedimentation. Thus, the mineralization of the coal balls was synchronous with the erosion of the Energy Shale mud. Data from C- and O-isotope, geochemical, and mineralogical analyses of coal balls and associated materials were used to refine a depositional model of coal-ball formation. The concentrated coal-ball areas were created by the triggered degassing of CO2 from partially decomposed peat in the presence of cations from fresh waters; 13C/12C ratios in these coal balls average -23.9???. 13C/12C ratios as low as -34??? occurring in the most concentrated coal balls are consistent with CO2 produced by anaerobic oxidation of methane. Top-of-seam coal balls were formed later and show slight to strong marine influence; their 13C/12C ratios average -10.8???.

  19. On the formation and evolution of the Pannonian basin: constraints derived from the orogenic collapse recorded at the junction between Carpathians and Dinarides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matenco, L. C.; Radivojevic, D.

    2012-04-01

    Formation and evolution of back-arc basins is related to the evolution of subduction zones, resulting geometries being dependent on the interplay between the velocity of retreating slabs and boundary conditions that often limit rapid subduction systems. Classical models of evolution in the Alps-Carpathians-Dinaridic domain assume that the formation of the Pannonian back-arc basin is related to the rapid roll-back of an European slab and the invasion of Tisza-Dacia and ALCAPA upper plate blocks into the so-called Carpathians embayment starting at ~20Ma. The general mechanism assumes a gradual evolution, an initial mechanical phase of extensional detachments being recognized near the transition between the Alps and the Pannonian basin was subsequently followed by upper crustal normal faulting and a thermal phase during the Middle-late Miocene times that affected the central part of the Pannonian basin. A key area of the entire system often neglected by kinematic studies is the connection between South Carpathians and Dinarides. Here, regional seismic lines traversing the entire Serbian part of the Pannonian basin were calibrated with well data in order to derive an evolutionary model. The deformation is dominantly expressed by the formation of extensional (half-)grabens that are the brittle expression of large-scale extensional detachments. In contrast with previous interpretation restricting the syn-rift phase to the Middle Miocene, the geometry of normal faults and the associated syn-kinematic sedimentation allows the definition of a continuous Early to Late Miocene extensional evolution that was followed by the formation of isolated uplifted areas during the subsequent Pliocene - Quaternary inversion. The orientation of these (half-)grabens changes gradually from W-E to NW-SE and then to N-S, suggesting that the present-day strike of faults is the effect of a clockwise rotational mechanism of South Carpathians and Apuseni Mountains in respect to Dinarides. The S

  20. Paleoclimate controls on late paleozoic sedimentation and peat formation in the central appalachian basin (U.S.A.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cecil, C.B.; Stanton, R.W.; Neuzil, S.G.; Dulong, F.T.; Ruppert, L.F.; Pierce, B.S.

    1985-01-01

    In the central Appalachian basin, at least two major climate changes affected sedimentation during the late Paleozoic. Stratigraphically, these two changes are indicated by the distribution of coal beds, the variation in coal quality, and the variation in rock lithologies. In latest Mississippian or earliest Pennsylvanian time, the climate changed from dry-seasonal tropical to ever-wet (equable) tropical. The equable climate prevailed into the Middle Pennsylvanian, influencing the morphology and geochemistry in peat-forming environments. Many of the peat deposits, which formed under the equable climate, were probably domed (raised bogs); low concentrations of dissolved solids in peat formation water resulted in low buffering capacity. Organic acids caused acidic (pH < 4), antiseptic conditions that resulted in intense leaching of mineral matter, minimal degradation of organic matter, and low-ash and low-sulfur peat deposits; the resulting coal beds are also low in ash and sulfur. Associated rocks are noncalcareous and consist of sequences of interbedded shale, siltstone, and sandstone including quartz arenite. Another climate change occurred in late Middle Pennsylvanian time when evapopation periodically exceeded rainfall resulting in an increase of both dissolved solids and pH (4 to ??? 7) in surface and near-surface water. Throughout the remainder of the Pennsylvanian, the surfaces of peat deposits were probably planar (not domed); water in peat-forming and other depositional environments became more nearly neutral. The coal beds derived from these peats are highly variable in both ash and sulfur contents. Drier or more seasonal climates are also indicated by sequences of (1) calcareous sandstone and shale, (2) nonmarine limestone that shows shallow-water and subaerial exposure features, and (3) calcareous paleosols that have caliche characteristics. Our data and observations indicate that physical depositional environment models for the origin of coal do not

  1. Compositional variability of glauconites within the Upper Cretaceous Karai Shale Formation, Cauvery Basin, India: Implications for evaluation of stratigraphic condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Santanu; Bansal, Udita; Pande, Kanchan; Meena, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed mineral chemical investigation of glauconite within the condensed section deposits of the Cretaceous Karai Shale Formation, Cauvery Basin, India reflects a wide spectrum in chemical composition related to origin and evolution in different substrates, stratigraphic condensation, and post-depositional alteration. Fe- and Mg-rich glauconite, comprising up to 60% of the sedimentary rocks, occurs as replaced forms of fecal pellets, as infillings within pores and chambers of bioclasts including those of foraminifera, ostracoda, bryozoa, and algae, and as altered forms of mica exhibiting vermiforms. Authigenic precipitation of K- and Fe-poor glauconite, followed by addition of Fe and K into the lattice and concomitant release of Al and Si explains the origin of glauconite pellets and infillings; the origin of glauconite vermiforms in partly degraded mica involves only the second stage of Fe and K addition. Glauconite pellets and vermiforms exhibit sharply defined alteration zones along peripheries to form rims, and in proximity to cracks or cleavages with reduced K2O and Fe2O3 (total) and enhanced Al2O3 and SiO2, related to late-stage meteoric water actions. Cores of glauconite pellets and unaltered zones of vermiforms reflect 'evolved' characteristics with > 6% K2O, typical of a condensed section, while other glauconite varieties occurring at the same stratigraphic level exhibit 'slightly evolved' nature, not consonant with stratigraphic condensation. Increasing abundance of glauconite pellets from the bottom to the top of the transgressive systems tract, accompanied by slight increase in K2O within their cores, reflects the effect of stratigraphic condensation on the evolution of glauconite. High Fe2O3 (total) content of glauconite in the Karai Shale Formation may be related to upwelling, although the Fe may be contributed partly by the biotite substrate. Mössbauer spectroscopy of glauconites reveals significant total Fe substitution in both tetrahedral and

  2. An in situ occurrence of coal balls in the Amburgy coal bed, Pikeville Formation (Duckmantian), central Appalachian Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greb, S.F.; Eble, C.F.; Chesnut, D.R.; Phillips, T.L.; Hower, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Carbonate concretions containing permineralized peat, commonly called coal balls, were encountered in the Amburgy coal, a generally low-ash (9.4%), but commonly high-sulfur (3.6%), Middle Pennsylvanian coal of the Eastern Kentucky Coal Field. These are the first coal balls from the Amburgy coal, and one of only a few reported occurrences from the central Appalachian Basin. The coal balls occur in the upper part of the coal, between two paleochannel cut-outs at the top of the Pikeville Formation, and immediately beneath a scour with a marine fossil lag at the base of the Kendrick Shale Member, Hyden Formation. The coal is thickest (1.3 m) in a narrow (<300 m), elongate depression between the bounding paleochannels, and thins toward the occurrence of coal balls. Total biovolume as measured from acetate peels of coal balls indicates cordaites or lycopsid (36.1% each) dominance. Vertical sampling through one coal-ball aggregate shows zoning from a lower cordaites-dominant (88.7%) assemblage, to a middle, degraded, sphenopsid-rich assemblage, to an upper lycopsid-dominant (88.6%) assemblage. Beneath the coal balls, palynologic and petrographic analyses indicate the basal and middle portions of the bed are dominated by arborescent lycopsid spores and cordaites pollen, and by vitrinite macerals. The top part of the bed, above the coal balls, contains increased intertinite macerals, increased percentages of small fern spores, and variable ash yield (5-21%). Thickening of the Amburgy coal along a structural low, in combination with basal high-ash yields, vitrinite-dominance, and heterogenous palynoflora, indicate paleotopographic control on initial peat accumulation. Abundant lycopsid spores in the basal and middle part of the coal reflect rheotrophic conditions consistent with accumulation in a paleotopographic depression. Apparent zonation preserved in one of the coal-ball masses may document plant successions in response to flooding. Similar percentages of cordaites and

  3. Estimates of primary ejecta and local material for the Orientale basin: Implications for the formation and ballistic sedimentation of multi-ring basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Minggang; Zhu, Meng-Hua

    2016-04-01

    A clear understanding of thickness distributions of primary ejecta and local material is critical to interpreting the process of ballistic sedimentation, provenances of lunar samples, the evolution of the lunar surface, and the origin of multi-ring basins. The youngest lunar multi-ring basin, Orientale, provides the best preserved structure for determining the thicknesses of primary ejecta and local material. In general, the primary ejecta thickness was often estimated using crater morphometry. However, previous methods ignored either crater erosion, the crater interior geometry, or both. In addition, ejecta deposits were taken as mostly primary ejecta. And, as far as we know, the local material thickness had not been determined for the Orientale. In this work, we proposed a model based on matching measurements of partially filled pre-Orientale craters (PFPOCs) with the simulations of crater erosion to determine their thicknesses. We provided estimates of primary ejecta thickness distribution with the thickness of 0.85 km at Cordillera ring and a decay power law exponent of b = 2.8, the transient crater radius of 200 km, excavation volume of 2.3 ×106 km3, primary ejecta volume of 2.8 ×106 km3. These results suggest that previous works (e.g., Fassett et al., 2011; Moore et al., 1974) might overestimate the primary ejecta thicknesses of Orientale, and the primary ejecta thickness model of Pike (1974a) for multi-ring basins may give better estimates than the widely cited model of McGetchin et al. (1973) and the scaling law for impacts into Ottawa Sand (Housen et al., 1983). Structural uplift decays slower than previously thought, and rim relief is mostly rim uplift for Orientale. The main reason for rim uplift may be the fracturing and squeezing upward of the surrounding rocks. The proportion of local material to ejecta deposits increases with increasing radial distance from basin center, and the thickness of local material is larger than that of primary ejecta at

  4. Hydraulic, textural and geochemical characteristics of the Ajali Formation, Anambra Basin, Nigeria: implication for groundwater quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijani, Moshood N.; Nton, Matthew E.

    2009-01-01

    This study highlights the distribution of hydraulic conductivity ( K) in the regional aquiferous Ajali Formation of SE-Nigeria on one hand and assesses the possible influences of textural and geochemical characteristics on the hydraulic conductivity on the other hand. The investigation approach involved field sampling and collection of 12 sandstone samples from different outcrop locations, followed by laboratory studies such as grain-size analysis (GSA), constant head permeameter test and geochemical analysis of major and trace elements using X-ray fluorescence method. GSA and textural studies show that the sandstones range from fine to medium sands, constituting about <75-99% sand fraction, with graphic mean grain size of 0.23-0.53 mm. Other parameters such as coefficient of uniformity ( C u) range from 1.58 to 5.25 (av. 2.75), while standard deviation (sorting) values of 0.56Ø-1.24Ø imply moderately well sorted materials. In addition, the order of the estimated K values is K permeameter > K Beyer > K Hazen > K Kozeny-Carmen > K Fair-Hatch with average values of 1.4 × 10-3, 4.4 × 10-4, 3.8 × 10-4, 2.2 × 10-4 and 8.1 × 10-5 m/s, respectively. These values fall within the range of 10-5 and 10-3 m/s for fine to medium sands. However, multivariate factor analysis of the data revealed significant positive dependence of the empirically determined K values on graphic mean grain size and percentage sand content and much less dependence on sorting and total porosity. Geochemical profiles of the fresh samples are dominated by quartz with corresponding SiO2 content of 76.1-98.2% (av. 89.7%) while other major oxides are generally below 1.0 wt.% in the fresh samples. However, the ferruginized samples exhibited elevated concentrations of Al2O3 (3.50-11.60 wt.%) and Fe2O3 (1.80-3.60 wt.%), which are clear indications of weathering/ferruginization processes with attendant trace metal release/enrichment (2.5 mg/l Cu, 7.5 mg/l Pb, 6.5 mg/l Zn, 3.9 mg/l Ni and 19.6 mg/l Cr

  5. Geochemical fingerprinting of Wilson Creek Formation tephra layers (Mono Basin, CA) using titanomagnetite compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcaida, M.; Mangan, M.; Vazquez, J. A.; Bursik, M. I.

    2012-12-01

    The Wilson Creek Formation (WCF) near Mono Lake in eastern California is a 6-15 m thick sequence of lake sediments interbedded with 18 rhyolitic tephra layers attributed to eruptions from nearby Mono Craters, and 2 basaltic tephra layers erupted from Black Point and June Lake (not included in study). These tephra layers are numbered 1 to 19 (June Lake tephra designated as Ash 13*) from top to bottom (Lajoie, 1968), and range in age from ~14 to 67 ka (Zimmerman et al., 2006). The WCF tephras are important to understanding volcanism in the Long Valley region, and they provide age constraints for paleomagnetic, paleoclimatic, and paleoecologic studies. Major-oxide compositions of glass for the rhyolitic tephras are similar, with no reported compositional variations between layers. In this study, we show that titanomagnetite compositions can be used to fingerprint specific WCF tephra layers, thus enhancing their use as time-stratigraphic markers. We performed electron microprobe analyses of >700 titanomagnetite crystals and minor ilmenite. Compositional ranges of titanomagnetite are ~83-89 wt% FeO, and ~8-14 wt% TiO2, with MgO+MnO+Al2O3 <3 wt%. Major oxide concentrations trend linearly, with ratios of FeO/TiO2 generally increasing with age. There is a slight trend offset between the older (~57-67 ka) tephras (Ashes 16, 17, and 19) and younger (~14-40 ka) tephras (Ashes 1-15), and a compositional gap between Ash 8 and the rest of the WCF tephras. Compositional variability within individual tephra beds is minor (FeO <0.4 wt%; TiO2 <0.3 wt%). Older WCF tephra titanomagnetites (Ashes 16, 17, 19) are distinct and characterized by high FeO/TiO2 (~9-9.5). Ashes 7 and 8 have relatively high-TiO2 compositions (>12 wt%), although Ash 8 has the lowest FeO/TiO2 (~6). Titanomagnetite crystals in the other WCF tephra layers are not as compositionally distinct (FeO/TiO2 = ~7.5-8), although the youngest tephras (Ashes 1- 4) can be distinguished on the basis of MgO content. Ash 15 is

  6. Assessment of undiscovered oil resources in the Bakken and Three Forks Formations, Williston Basin Province, Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Marra, Kristen R.; Cook, Troy A.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Gautier, Donald L.; Higley, Debra K.; Klett, Timothy R.; Lewan, Michael D.; Lillis, Paul G.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Whidden, Katherine J.

    2013-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean undiscovered volumes of 7.4 billion barrels of oil, 6.7 trillion cubic feet of associated/dissolved natural gas, and 0.53 billion barrels of natural gas liquids in the Bakken and Three Forks Formations in the Williston Basin Province of Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota.

  7. Long-term Variations of CO2 Trapped in Different Mechanisms in Deep Saline Formations: A Case Study of the Songliao Basin, China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Li, Yilian; Xu, Tianfu; Cheng, Huilin; Zheng, Yan; Xiong, Peng

    2008-06-10

    The geological storage of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations is increasing seen as a viable strategy to reduce the release of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. There are numerous sedimentary basins in China, in which a number of suitable CO{sub 2} geologic reservoirs are potentially available. To identify the multi-phase processes, geochemical changes and mineral alteration, and CO{sub 2} trapping mechanisms after CO{sub 2} injection, reactive geochemical transport simulations using a simple 2D model were performed. Mineralogical composition and water chemistry from a deep saline formation of Songliao Basin were used. Results indicate that different storage forms of CO{sub 2} vary with time. In the CO{sub 2} injection period, a large amount of CO{sub 2} remains as a free supercritical phase (gas trapping), and the amount dissolved in the formation water (solubility trapping) gradually increases. Later, gas trapping decreases, solubility trapping increases significantly due to migration and diffusion of the CO{sub 2} plume, and the amount trapped by carbonate minerals increases gradually with time. The residual CO{sub 2} gas keeps dissolving into groundwater and precipitating carbonate minerals. For the Songliao Basin sandstone, variations in the reaction rate and abundance of chlorite, and plagioclase composition affect significantly the estimates of mineral alteration and CO{sub 2} storage in different trapping mechanisms. The effect of vertical permeability and residual gas saturation on the overall storage is smaller compared to the geochemical factors. However, they can affect the spatial distribution of the injected CO{sub 2} in the formations. The CO{sub 2} mineral trapping capacity could be in the order of ten kilogram per cubic meter medium for the Songliao Basin sandstone, and may be higher depending on the composition of primary aluminosilicate minerals especially the content of Ca, Mg, and Fe.

  8. Structural studies near Pevek, Russia: implications for formation of the East Siberian Shelf and Makarov Basin of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, E. L.; Verzhbitsky, V. E.

    2009-09-01

    The Pevek region of Arctic Russia provides excellent beach cliff exposure of sedimentary and igneous rocks that yield detailed information on the nature, progression and timing of structural events in this region. Regional folding and thrust faulting, with the development of a south-dipping axial plane cleavage/foliation developed during N-S to NE-SW directed shortening and formation of the Chukotka-Anyui fold belt. This deformation involves strata as young as Valanginian (136-140 Ma, Gradstein et al., 2004). Fold-related structures are cut by intermediate to silicic batholiths, plutons and dikes of Cretaceous age. Reported K-Ar whole rock and mineral ages on the granitoids range from 144 to 85 Ma, but to the south, more reliable U-Pb zircon ages on compositionally similar plutons yield a much narrower age range of ~120-105 Ma (Miller et al., this volume) and a pluton in Pevek yields a U-Pb age on zircon of 108.1±1.1 Ma with evidence for inheritance of slightly older 115 Ma zircons. Magmas were intruded during an episode of E-W to ENE-WSW directed regional extension based on the consistent N-S to NNW-SSE orientation of over 800 mapped dikes and quartz veins. Analysis of small-offset faults and slickensides yield results compatible with those inferred from the dikes. Younger tectonic activity across this region is minor and the locus of magmatic activity moved southward towards the Pacific margin as represented by the <90 Ma Okhotsk-Chukotsk volcanic belt (OCVB). A lengthy period of uplift and erosion occurred after emplacement of Cretaceous plutons and produced the peneplain beneath the younger OCVB. Based on our studies, we speculate that ~120-105 Ma magmatism, which heralds a change in tectonic regime from compression to extension, could represent one of the consequences of the inception of rifting in the Amerasian Basin of the Arctic, forming the Makarov Basin north of the Siberian shelf at this longitude. A synthesis of available seismic reflection, gravity

  9. Availability of free oxygen in deep bottom water of some Archean-Early Paleoproterozoic ocean basins as derived from iron formation facies analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beukes, N. J.; Smith, A.

    2013-12-01

    Archean to Early Paleoproterozoic ocean basins are commonly, although not exclusively, depicted as rather static systems; either permanently stratified with shallow mixed oxygenated water overlying anoxic deep water or with a totally anoxic water column. The anoxic water columns are considered enriched in dissolved ferrous iron derived from hydrothermal plume activity. These sourced deposition of iron formations through precipitation of mainly ferrihydrite via reaction with free oxygen in the stratified model or anaerobic iron oxidizing photoautotrophs in the anoxic model. However, both these models face a simple basic problem if detailed facies reconstructions of deepwater microbanded iron formations (MIFs) are considered. In such MIFs it is common that the deepest water and most distal facies is hematite rich followed shoreward by magnetite, iron silicate and siderite facies iron formation. Examples of such facies relations are known from jaspilitic iron formation of the ~3,2 Ga Fig Tree Group (Barberton Mountainland), ~ 2,95 Ga iron formations of the Witwatersrand-Mozaan basin and the ~2,5 Ga Kuruman Iron Formation, Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa. Facies relations of these MIFs with associated siliciclastics or carbonates also indicate that the upper water columns of the basins, down to below wave base, were depleted in iron favoring anoxic-oxic stratification rather than total anoxia. In the MIFs it can be shown that hematite in the distal facies represents the earliest formed diagenetic mineral; most likely crystallized from primary ferrihydrite. The problem is one of how ferrihydrite could have been preserved on the ocean floor if it was in direct contact with reducing ferrous deep bottom water. Rather dissolved ferrous iron would have reacted with ferrihydrite to form diagenetic magnetite. This dilemma is resolved if in the area of deepwater hematite MIF deposition, the anoxic ferrous iron enriched plume was detached from the basin floor due to buoyancy

  10. Miocene fossil plants from Bukpyeong Formation of Bukpyeong Basin in Donghae City, Gangwon-do Province, Korea and their palaeoenvironmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Hyun Joo; Uemura, Kazuhiko; Kim, Kyungsik

    2016-04-01

    The Tertiary sedimentary basins are distributed along the eastern coast of Korean Peninsula. The northernmost Bukpyeong Basin is located in Donghae City, Gangwon-do Province, Korea. The Bukpyeong Basin consists of Bukpyeong Formation and Dogyeongri Conglomerate in ascending order. The geologic age of Bukpyeong Formation has been suggested as from Early Miocene to Pliocene, In particular, Lee & Jacobs (2010) suggested the age of the Bukpyeong Formation as late Early Miocene to early Middle Miocene based on the fossils of rodent teeth. Sedimentary environment has been thought as mainly fresh water lake and/or swamp partly influenced by marine water. Lately, new outcrops of Bukpyeong Formation were exposed during the road construction and abundant fossil plants were yielded from the newly exposed outcrops. As a result of palaeobotanical studies 47 genera of 23 families have been found. This fossil plant assemblage is composed of gymnosperms and dicotyledons. Gymnosperms were Pinaceae (e.g., Pinus, Tsuga), Sciadopityaceae (e.g., Sciadopitys) and Cupressaceae with well-preserved Metasequoia cones. Dicotyledons were deciduous trees such as Betulaceae (e.g., Alnus, Carpinus) and Sapindaceae (e.g., Acer, Aesculus, Sapindus), and evergreen trees such as evergreen Fagaceae (e.g., Castanopsis, Cyclobalanopsis, Pasania) and Lauraceae (e.g., Cinnamomum, Machilus). In addition, fresh water plants such as Hemitrapa (Lytraceae) and Ceratophyllum (Ceratophyllaceae) were also found. The fossil plant assemblage of the Bukpyeong Formation supported the freshwater environment implied by previous studies. It can be suggested that the palaeoflora of Bukpyeong Formation was oak-laurel forest with broad-leaved evergreen and deciduous trees accompanying commonly by conifers of Pinaceae and Cupressaceae under warm-temperate climate.

  11. Ar-40 to Ar-39 dating of pseudotachylites from the Witwatersrand basin, South Africa, with implications for the formation of the Vredefort Dome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trieloff, M.; Kunz, J.; Jessberger, E. K.; Reimold, W. U.; Boer, R. H.; Jackson, M. C.

    1992-01-01

    The formation of the Vredefort Dome, a structure in excess of 100 km in diameter and located in the approximate center of the Witwatersrand basin, is still the subject of lively geological controversy. It is widely accepted that its formation seems to have taken place in a single sudden event, herein referred to as the Vredefort event, accompanied by the release of gigantic amounts of energy. It is debated, however, whether this central event was an internal one, i.e., a cryptoexplosion triggered by volcanic or tectonic processes, or the impact of an extraterrestrial body. The results of this debate are presented.

  12. Dynamic elastic properties of the Wufeng-Longmaxi formation shale in the southeast margin of the Sichuan Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jixin; Shen, Hui; Xu, Zhonghua; Ma, Zhonggao; Zhao, Qun; Li, Chengcheng

    2014-06-01

    In spite of the growing interest in Late Ordovician to the Early Silurian Wufeng-Longmaxi black shale for gas production in the southeast of the Sichuan Basin, little data is available on the acoustic properties of these shale reservoirs. The dynamic elastic properties of a suite of shales from this formation with different organic matter content were measured using the ultrasonic transmission technique at a range of confining pressures. The mineralogical features and reservoir space types were studied with the goal of analyzing their influence on the acoustic properties of the shale samples. The TOC (total organic content) is found to have a positive correlation with the quartz content and a negative correlation with the clay content. Organic matter pores and inter-crystal micro-pores are the main pore types. Organic-rich shales show a low P-wave impedance (Ip) and Vp/Vs ratio due to relatively higher TOC and quartz content; nonetheless, high P-wave (Ip) is also observed when the quartz content is very high resulting from the variation of load-bearing grains. The velocities and anisotropy of different shale samples show varying pressure dependence. A strong positive correlation is found between the anisotropy and the clay content. Three different types of microfabric can be observed in the shale samples, giving a qualitative explanation for the correlation between the anisotropy and the clay content. The occurrence of preferential alignment of the clay minerals requires that the clay content exceeds a critical volume, and this value is about 25%-30% in this study.

  13. Reservoir characterization of the Upper Jurassic geothermal target formations (Molasse Basin, Germany): role of thermofacies as exploration tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homuth, S.; Götz, A. E.; Sass, I.

    2015-06-01

    The Upper Jurassic carbonates of the southern German Molasse Basin are the target of numerous geothermal combined heat and power production projects since the year 2000. A production-orientated reservoir characterization is therefore of high economic interest. Outcrop analogue studies enable reservoir property prediction by determination and correlation of lithofacies-related thermo- and petrophysical parameters. A thermofacies classification of the carbonate formations serves to identify heterogeneities and production zones. The hydraulic conductivity is mainly controlled by tectonic structures and karstification, whilst the type and grade of karstification is facies related. The rock permeability has only a minor effect on the reservoir's sustainability. Physical parameters determined on oven-dried samples have to be corrected, applying reservoir transfer models to water-saturated reservoir conditions. To validate these calculated parameters, a Thermo-Triaxial-Cell simulating the temperature and pressure conditions of the reservoir is used and calorimetric and thermal conductivity measurements under elevated temperature conditions are performed. Additionally, core and cutting material from a 1600 m deep research drilling and a 4850 m (total vertical depth, measured depth: 6020 m) deep well is used to validate the reservoir property predictions. Under reservoir conditions a decrease in permeability of 2-3 magnitudes is observed due to the thermal expansion of the rock matrix. For tight carbonates the matrix permeability is temperature-controlled; the thermophysical matrix parameters are density-controlled. Density increases typically with depth and especially with higher dolomite content. Therefore, thermal conductivity increases; however the dominant factor temperature also decreases the thermal conductivity. Specific heat capacity typically increases with increasing depth and temperature. The lithofacies-related characterization and prediction of reservoir

  14. Variations in fluvial style in the Westwater Canyon Member, Morrison formation (Jurassic), San Juan basin, Colorado plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miall, A.D.; Turner-Peterson, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques of architectural element analysis and lateral profiling have been applied to the fluvial Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation (Jurassic) in southern San Juan Basin. On a large scale, the sandstone-body architecture consists mainly of a series of tabular sandstone sheets 5-15 m thick and hundreds of meters wide, separated by thin fine-grained units. Internally these sheets contain lateral accretion surfaces and are cut by channels 10-20 m deep and at least 250 m wide. On a more detailed scale, interpretations made from large-scale photomosaics show a complex of architectural elements and bounding surfaces. Typical indicators of moderate- to high-sinuosity channels (lateral accretion deposits) coexist in the same outcrop with downstream-accreted macroform deposits that are typical of sand flats of low-sinuosity, multiple-channel rivers. Broad, deep channels with gently to steeply dipping margins were mapped in several of the outcrops by carefully tracing major bounding surfaces. Locally thick accumulations of plane-laminated and low-angle cross-laminated sandstone lithofacies suggest rapid flow, probably transitional to upper flow regime conditions. Such a depositional style is most typical of ephemeral rivers or those periodically undergoing major seasonal (or more erratic) stage fluctuations, an interpretation consistent with independent mineralogical evidence of aridity. Fining-upward sequences are rare in the project area, contrary to the descriptions of Campbell (1976). The humid alluvial fan model of Galloway (1978) cannot be substantiated and, similarly, the architectural model of Campbell (1976) requires major revision. Comparisons with the depositional architecture of the large Indian rivers, such as the Ganges and Brahmaputra, still seem reasonable, as originally proposed by Campbell (1976), although there is now convincing evidence for aridity and for major stage fluctuations, which differs both from those modern rivers and Campbell

  15. Eocene and Miocene extension, meteoric fluid infiltration, and core complex formation in the Great Basin (Raft River Mountains, Utah)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Methner, Katharina; Mulch, Andreas; Teyssier, Christian; Wells, Michael L.; Cosca, Michael A.; Gottardi, Raphaël.; Gébelin, Aude; Chamberlain, C. Page

    2015-04-01

    Metamorphic core complexes (MCCs) in the North American Cordillera reflect the effects of lithospheric extension and contribute to crustal adjustments both during and after a protracted subduction history along the Pacific plate margin. While the Miocene-to-recent history of most MCCs in the Great Basin, including the Raft River-Albion-Grouse Creek MCC, is well documented, early Cenozoic tectonic fabrics are commonly severely overprinted. We present stable isotope, geochronological (40Ar/39Ar), and microstructural data from the Raft River detachment shear zone. Hydrogen isotope ratios of syntectonic white mica (δ2Hms) from mylonitic quartzite within the shear zone are very low (-90‰ to -154‰, Vienna SMOW) and result from multiphase synkinematic interaction with surface-derived fluids. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology reveals Eocene (re)crystallization of white mica with δ2Hms ≥ -154‰ in quartzite mylonite of the western segment of the detachment system. These δ2Hms values are distinctively lower than in localities farther east (δ2Hms ≥ -125‰), where 40Ar/39Ar geochronological data indicate Miocene (18-15 Ma) extensional shearing and mylonitic fabric formation. These data indicate that very low δ2H surface-derived fluids penetrated the brittle-ductile transition as early as the mid-Eocene during a first phase of exhumation along a detachment rooted to the east. In the eastern part of the core complex, prominent top-to-the-east ductile shearing, mid-Miocene 40Ar/39Ar ages, and higher δ2H values of recrystallized white mica, indicate Miocene structural and isotopic overprinting of Eocene fabrics.

  16. Relationships among in-situ stress, fractures and faults, and fluid flow: Monterey formation, Santa Maria Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finkbeiner, T.; Barton, C.A.; Zoback, M.D.

    1997-01-01

    We used borehole televiewer (BHTV) data from four wells within the onshore and offshore Santa Maria basin, California, to investigate the relationships among fracture distribution, orientation, and variation with depth and in-situ stress. Our analysis of stress-induced well-bore breakouts shows a uniform northeast maximum horizontal stress (SH max) orientation in each well. This direction is consistent with the SH max direction determined from well-bore breakouts in other wells in this region, the northwest trend of active fold axes, and kinematic inversion of nearby earthquake focal plane mechanisms. In contrast to the uniformity of the stress field, fracture orientation, dip, and frequency vary considerably from well to well and within each well. With depth, fractures can be divided into distinct subsets on the basis of fracture frequency and orientation, which correlate with changes of lithology and physical properties. Although factors such as tectonic history, diagenesis, and structural variations obviously have influenced fracture distribution, integration of the in-situ stress and fracture data sets indicates that many of the fractures, faults, and bedding planes are active, small-scale strike-slip and reverse faults in the current northeast-trending transpressive stress field. In fact, we observed local breakout rotations in the wells, providing kinematic evidence for recent shear motion along fracture and bedding-parallel planes. Only in the onshore well do steeply dipping fractures strike parallel to SHmax. Drill-stem tests from two of the offshore wells indicate that formation permeability is greatly enhanced in sections of the wells where fractures are favorably oriented for shear failure in the modern stress field. Thus, relatively small-scale active faults provide important conduits along which fluids migrate.

  17. Reservoir characterization of the Ordovician Red River Formation in southwest Williston Basin Bowman County, ND and Harding County, SD

    SciTech Connect

    Sippel, M.A.; Luff, K.D.; Hendricks, M.L.; Eby, D.E.

    1998-07-01

    This topical report is a compilation of characterizations by different disciplines of the Red River Formation in the southwest portion of the Williston Basin and the oil reservoirs which it contains in an area which straddles the state line between North Dakota and South Dakota. Goals of the report are to increase understanding of the reservoir rocks, oil-in-place, heterogeneity, and methods for improved recovery. The report is divided by discipline into five major sections: (1) geology, (2) petrography-petrophysical, (3) engineering, (4) case studies and (5) geophysical. Interwoven in these sections are results from demonstration wells which were drilled or selected for special testing to evaluate important concepts for field development and enhanced recovery. The Red River study area has been successfully explored with two-dimensional (2D) seismic. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) and has been investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Targeted drilling from predictions using 3D seismic for porosity development were successful in developing significant reserves at close distances to old wells. Short-lateral and horizontal drilling technologies were tested for improved completion efficiency. Lateral completions should improve economics for both primary and secondary recovery where low permeability is a problem and higher density drilling is limited by drilling cost. Low water injectivity and widely spaced wells have restricted the application of waterflooding in the past. Water injection tests were performed in both a vertical and a horizontal well. Data from these tests were used to predict long-term injection and oil recovery.

  18. Holocene ice dynamics and bottom-water formation associated with Cape Darnley polynya activity recorded in Burton Basin, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchers, Andreas; Dietze, Elisabeth; Kuhn, Gerhard; Esper, Oliver; Voigt, Ines; Hartmann, Kai; Diekmann, Bernhard

    2016-03-01

    A multi-proxy study including sedimentological, mineralogical, biogeochemical and micropaleontological methods was conducted on sediment core PS69/849-2 retrieved from Burton Basin, MacRobertson Shelf, East Antarctica. The goal of this study was to depict the deglacial and Holocene environmental history of the MacRobertson Land-Prydz Bay region. A special focus was put on the timing of ice-sheet retreat and the variability of bottom-water formation due to sea ice formation through the Holocene. Results from site PS69/849-2 provide the first paleo-environmental record of Holocene variations in bottom-water production probably associated to the Cape Darnley polynya, which is the second largest polynya in the Antarctic. Methods included end-member modeling of laser-derived high-resolution grain size data to reconstruct the depositional regimes and bottom-water activity. The provenance of current-derived and ice-transported material was reconstructed using clay-mineral and heavy-mineral analysis. Conclusions on biogenic production were drawn by determination of biogenic opal and total organic carbon. It was found that the ice shelf front started to retreat from the site around 12.8 ka BP. This coincides with results from other records in Prydz Bay and suggests warming during the early Holocene optimum next to global sea level rise as the main trigger. Ice-rafted debris was then supplied to the site until 5.5 cal. ka BP, when Holocene global sea level rise stabilized and glacial isostatic rebound on MacRobertson Land commenced. Throughout the Holocene, three episodes of enhanced bottom-water activity probably due to elevated brine rejection in Cape Darnley polynya occured between 11.5 and 9 cal. ka BP, 5.6 and 4.5 cal. ka BP and since 1.5 cal. ka BP. These periods are related to shifts from warmer to cooler conditions at the end of Holocene warm periods, in particular the early Holocene optimum, the mid-Holocene warm period and at the beginning of the neoglacial. In

  19. Metalliferous coals of the Westphalian A Joggins Formation, Cumberland basin, Nova Scotia, Canada: Petrology, geochemistry, and palynology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hower, J.C.; Calder, J.H.; Eble, C.F.; Scott, A.C.; Robertson, J.D.; Blanchard, L.J.

    2000-01-01

    Five coals of Westphalian A (early Middle Pennsylvanian) age were sampled from the Joggins Formation section exposed along Chignecto Bay at Joggins, Nova Scotia. Coal beds along the bay were mined beginning in the early 17th century, yet there have been few detailed published investigation of the coal beds of this classic section. The lowermost coal, the Upper Coal 28 (Upper Fundy), is a high-vitrinite coal with a spore assemblage dominated by arboreous lycopsid spores with tree ferns subdominant. The upper portions of the coal bed have the highest ratio of well-preserved to poorly-preserved telinite of any of the coals investigated. Coal 19 ('clam coal') has 88% total vitrinite but, unlike the Fundy coal bed, the telinite has a poor preservation ratio and half the total vitrinite population comprises gelocollinite and vitrodetrinite. The latter coal bed is directly overlain by a basin-wide limestone bed. The Lower Kimberly coal shows good preservation of vitrinite with relatively abundant telinite among the total vitrinite. The Middle Kimberly coal, which underlies the tetrapod-bearing lycopsid trees found by Lyell and Dawson in 1852, exhibits an upward decrease in arboreous lycopod spores and an upward increase in the tree fern spore Punctatisporites minutus. Telinite preservation increases upwards in the Middle Kimberly but overall is well below the preservation ratio of the Upper Fundy coal bed. The coals all have high sulfur contents, yielding up to 13.7% total sulfur for the lower lithotype of the Upper Fundy coal bed. The Kimberly coals are not only high in total and pyritic sulfur, but also have high concentrations of chalcophile elements. Zinc, ranging up to 15,000 ppm (ash basis), is present as sphalerite in fusain lumens. Arsenic and lead each exceed 6000 ppm (ash basis) in separate lithotypes of the Kimberly coals. Together these data are consistent with elevated pH in planar mires. The source of the elemental enrichment in this presumed continental

  20. Formation and inversion of extensional ramp-syncline basins with pre-kinematic salt layers. Experimental results and application to Iberian Mesozoic analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roma, Maria; Pla, Oriol; Butillé, Mireia; Roca, Eduard; Ferrer, Oriol

    2015-04-01

    The widespread extensional deformation that took place during Jurassic to Cretaceous times in the Western Europe and north-Atlantic realm resulted in the formation of several rift systems. Some of the basins associated to these rifts show broad syncline-shapes filled by thick sedimentary successions deposited overlying a hyperextended crust (i.e., Parentis, Cameros, Organyà or Columbrets basins in Iberia). The development of these syncline basins has been associated to the slip of low-angle lithospheric-scale extensional faults with ramp/flat geometries. The shape and kinematics of such faults have been usually established using the architecture of syn-kinematic layers and assuming a complete coupling of the hangingwall rocks and a layer parallel flexural slip deformation mechanism. However almost all these basins include pre-kinematic Upper Triassic salt layers which undubtoufully acted as an effective detachment decoupling the structure of sub- and suprasalt units. The presence of this salt is denoted by the growth of salt structures as diapirs or salt walls at the edges of these basins where the overburden was thinner. During latest Cretaceous and Cenozoic these basins were partially inverted and often incorporated into thrust-and-fold belts as the Pyrenees . Contractional deformation resulted in the reactivation of major extensional faults and, above the salt, the squeezing of pre-existent salt structures. The pre-kinematic salt clearly acted again as as a major detachment decoupling the contractional deformation. Using an experimental approach (scaled sand-box models) the aim of our research is threefold: 1) to determine the geometrical features of the hangingwall above a convex upwards ramp of a low angle extensional fault with and without pre-kinematic salt, and consequently; 2) to decipher the role played by a pre-kinematic viscous layer, such as salt, in the development of these syncline basins; and 3) to characterize the contractional deformation that

  1. Generation and migration of Bitumen and oil from the oil shale interval of the Eocene Green River formation, Uinta Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Mercier, Tracey J.

    2016-01-01

    The results from the recent U.S. Geological Survey assessment of in-place oil shale resources of the Eocene Green River Formation, based primarily on the Fischer assay method, are applied herein to define areas where the oil shale interval is depleted of some of its petroleum-generating potential along the deep structural trough of the basin and to make: (1) a general estimates of the amount of this depletion, and (2) estimate the total volume of petroleum generated. Oil yields (gallons of oil per ton of rock, GPT) and in-place oil (barrels of oil per acre, BPA) decrease toward the structural trough of the basin, which represents an offshore lacustrine area that is believed to have originally contained greater petroleum-generating potential than is currently indicated by measured Fischer assay oil yields. Although this interval is considered to be largely immature for oil generation based on vitrinite reflectance measurements, the oil shale interval is a likely source for the gilsonite deposits and much of the tar sands in the basin. Early expulsion of petroleum may have occurred due to the very high organic carbon content and oil-prone nature of the Type I kerogen present in Green River oil shale. In order to examine the possible sources and migration pathways for the tar sands and gilsonite deposits, we have created paleogeographic reconstructions of several oil shale zones in the basin as part of this study.

  2. Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas, Cotton Valley group and Travis Peak-Hosston formations, East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces of the northern Gulf Coast region. Chapters 1-7.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment is to develop geologically based hypotheses regarding the potential for additions to oil and gas reserves in priority areas of the United States. The USGS recently completed an assessment of undiscovered oil and gas potential of the Cotton Valley Group and Travis Peak and Hosston Formations in the East Texas Basin and Louisiana-Mississippi Salt Basins Provinces in the Gulf Coast Region (USGS Provinces 5048 and 5049). The Cotton Valley Group and Travis Peak and Hosston Formations are important because of their potential for natural gas resources. This assessment is based on geologic principles and uses the total petroleum system concept. The geologic elements of a total petroleum system include hydrocarbon source rocks (source rock maturation, hydrocarbon generation and migration), reservoir rocks (sequence stratigraphy and petrophysical properties), and hydrocarbon traps (trap formation and timing). The USGS used this geologic framework to define one total petroleum system and eight assessment units. Seven assessment units were quantitatively assessed for undiscovered oil and gas resources.

  3. Reser­voir anisotropy and facies stratigraphic framework in the Pale­ocene Fort Union Formation, western Wind River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, R.M.; Keighin, C.W.

    1993-01-01

    Investigation of reservoir anisotropy and lithofacies stratigraphic framework in the Fort Union Formation in western Wind River Basin, Wyoming focused on excellent surface exposures in the Shotgun Butte, Eagle Point, and Shotgun Bench synclines, and in the Merriam anticline area of the Wind River Reservation (Fig. 1). A complementary study was made of the formation in the Muddy Ridge and Pavillion gas fields, 8-10 mi to the southeast (Fig. 2). The Fort Union Formation is as much as 4000 ft thick in these areas, but thins to approximately 1800 ft toward the northern flank of the Little Dome anticline 3 mi south of Merriam anticline (Keefer and Troyer, 1964). The Fort Union Formation includes interbedded conglomerates, sandstones, siltstones, mudstones, coals, and carbonaceous shales (Fig. 3). The lower member of the Fort Union Formation is dominated by conglomerates and sandstones. The overlying Shotgun Member of the Fort Union Formation mainly consists of siltstones, mudstones, and carbonaceous shales, and coals, and subordinate sandstones. Contact between the lower member and Shotgun Member is gradational and marked by a topographic change from the resistant conglomerates and sandstones of the lower member to less resistant fine-grained strata of the Shotgun Member. In addition, the Shotgun Member commonly contains coal and carbonaceous shale beds, both in the surface and subsurface (Fig. 4). About 15-20 mi east of the study area the Waltman Shale Member of the Fort Union Formation pinches out at the contact between the lower member and Shotgun Member (Keefer and Johnson, this volume). The Waltman Shale Member, which consists of brown to gray silty and shaly claystones interbedded with sandstones, increases in thickness to as much as 3000 ft eastward into the basin center (Keefer, 1961; 1965). Thus, eastward, the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in ascending order, contains the lower member, Waltman Shale Member, and Shotgun Member. The Shotgun Member generally

  4. Paleomagnetic chronology and paleoenvironmental records from drill cores from the Hetao Basin and their implications for the formation of the Hobq Desert and the Yellow River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baofeng; Sun, Donghuai; Xu, Weihong; Wang, Fei; Liang, Baiqing; Ma, Zhiwei; Wang, Xin; Li, Zaijun; Chen, Fahu

    2017-01-01

    Reconstructing the Cenozoic environmental history of Hetao Basin, in the northern part of the Ordos Plateau in North China, is important not only for revealing the evolution of the Yellow River, but also for understanding the formation of the Hobq Desert. Here we present the stratigraphic framework of drill core DR01 with length of 2503.18 m, and the results of magnetostratigraphic and ESR dating and multi-proxy analyses of drill core WEDP05 with length of 274.60 m, from the Hetao Basin. The magnetostratigraphic and ESR results indicate that core WEDP05 spans the last ∼1.68 Ma. Stratigraphic sequence of core DR01 indicates that the Hetao area was uplifted and eroded during the early Cenozoic, before subsiding to form a sedimentary basin. Subsequently, the basin was a fluvio-lacustrine environment during the Pliocene and then experienced alternating desert and fluvio-lacustrine conditions during the Quaternary. Sedimentary facies and multi environmental-proxy analyses of core WEDP05 indicate that the basin was occupied by a fluvio-lacustrine system during the following intervals: ∼1.47 - ∼1.30 Ma, ∼1.17 - ∼1.07 Ma, ∼0.68 - ∼0.60 Ma and from ∼0.47 Ma to the last interglacial; and that a desert environment developed during the lake regression phases of ∼1.30 - ∼1.17 Ma, ∼1.07 - ∼0.68 Ma and ∼0.60 - ∼0.47 Ma. The presence of aeolian sand at the base of core WEDP05 suggests that the origin of the Hobq Desert can be traced back to the early Pleistocene, and resulted from the erosion and transportation of exposed fluvio-lacustrine sediments by near-surface winds associated with the Asian winter monsoon. A large river channel in the Hetao Basin may have existed as early as the Pliocene, which was occupied by the Yellow River when its upper reaches formed by at least ∼1.6 Ma. Subsequently, at least since ∼1.2 Ma, the Yellow River formed its drainage system around the Hetao Basin and controlled the paleoenvironment evolution of the basin.

  5. Evidence for formation of a flexural backarc basin by compression and crustal thickening in the central Alaska peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, G.C.; Lewis, S.D.; Taber, J.; Steckler, M.S.; Kominz, M.A. )

    1988-12-01

    The North Aleutian Basin is a large, Cenozoic sedimentary basin in the northern part of the central Alaska Peninsula and the southern Bering shelf. The gravity anomaly pattern, the geometry, and the structure of the basin suggest that if formed by downward flexure of the backarc lithosphere. Basin modeling suggests that the flexure was driven by the emplacement of surface and subsurface loads having densities comparable to those of oceanic crust and mantle rocks, at approximately the position of the present-day volcanic arc and forearc. The authors suggest that the inferred loads consist of tectonically thickened mafic crustal materials lying beneath the arc and forearc of the central Alaska Peninsula. The crustal thickening may have occurred within a dominantly transpressional regime resulting from oblique convergence between the North American and Pacific plates during the Cenozoic.

  6. Formation of the Maturín Foreland Basin, eastern Venezuela: Thrust sheet loading or subduction dynamic topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JáCome, Maria I.; Kusznir, Nick; Audemard, Felipe; Flint, Steve

    2003-10-01

    The Maturín Basin in eastern Venezuela is considered a good example of a peripheral foreland basin. Earthquake and tomographic data indicate that eastern Venezuela is affected by the oblique subduction of the South American Plate underneath the Caribbean Plate. New forward flexural isostatic modeling of eastern Venezuela has been carried out in order to determine whether the Maturín Basin was generated purely by thrust sheet loading from the Serranía and Monagas Foreland Thrust Belts. A sequence of forward models from middle Miocene to Present was generated for 3 profiles across the Serranía del Interior Thrust Belt, the Monagas Foreland Thrust Belt, and the Maturín Foreland Basin. The predictions of these models are constrained using seismic reflection and well data. The flexural isostatic modeling shows that thrust sheet loading associated with the Serranía del Interior and Monagas Foreland thrust belts is insufficient to generate the observed subsidence within the Maturín Basin. Dynamic fluid flow modeling of subduction related dynamic topography of eastern Venezuela has been used to investigate the influence of South American Plate subduction on the generation of the accommodation space observed in the Maturín Basin. Fluid flow modeling of subduction related dynamic topography suggests that the subduction of the South American lithospheric mantle caused downward deflection of the South American crust affecting the Maturín Basin and the Serranía Thrust Belt. This modeling suggests that the Maturín Basin subsidence has two components: 55% related to thrust sheet loading and 45% driven by continental subduction.

  7. Calibrating Late Cretaceous Terrestrial Cyclostratigraphy with High-precision U-Pb Zircon Geochronology: Qingshankou Formation of the Songliao Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Ramezani, J.; Wang, C.

    2015-12-01

    A continuous succession of Late Cretaceous lacustrine strata has been recovered from the SK-I south (SK-Is) and SKI north (SK-In) boreholes in the long-lived Cretaceous Songliao Basin in Northeast China. Establishing a high-resolution chronostratigraphic framework is a prerequisite for integrating the Songliao record with the global marine Cretaceous. We present high-precision U-Pb zircon geochronology by the chemical abrasion isotope dilution thermal-ionization mass spectrometry method from multiple bentonite core samples from the Late Cretaceous Qingshankou Formation in order to assess the astrochronological model for the Songliao Basin cyclostratigraphy. Our results from the SK-Is core present major improvements in precision and accuracy over the previously published geochronology and allow a cycle-level calibration of the cyclostratigraphy. The resulting choronostratigraphy suggest a good first-order agreement between the radioisotope geochronology and the established astrochronological time scale over the corresponding interval. The dated bentonite beds near the 1780 m depth straddle a prominent oil shale layer of the Qingshankou Formation, which records a basin-wide lake anoxic event (LAE1), providing a direct age constraint for the LAE1. The latter appears to coincide in time with the Late Cretaceous (Turonian) global sea level change event Tu4 presently constrained at 91.8 Ma.

  8. Formation and Evolution of Scalloped Depressions on Malea Planum and the southern rim of the Hellas Basin, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanetti, M.; Hiesinger, H.; Reiss, D.; Neukum, G.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction: Scalloped depressions are an erosional surface morphology characterized as a type of dissected mantle terrain by Milliken and Mustard [1]. They are identified by their asymmetrical north-south profile which shows a steep pole-facing scarp, a flat floor, and a gentle equator-facing slope which grades into the surrounding terrain [1]. They are found in latitudedependent, ice-rich surface mantles in both the northern and southern hemispheres [1]. The mantle material is presumably composed of atmospherically derived dust and water ice, and is thought to be related to obliquity-driven ice activity as recently as 2.1-0.4 Myr ago [3]. Previous researchers, [e.g. 1,2,4-7] have attributed the formation of scallops to the sublimation of interstitial ice. Morgenstern et al. [6] suggested that the asymmetric profile of scallops can be explained by enhanced solar insolation on the equator-facing slope which leads to enhanced sublimation of interstial ice and thereby increases the area of the depression. By this process they can also grow and coalesce to form large degraded areas [6]. Building on our previous work [7], we investigate this hypothesis using HiRISE and THEMIS-IR images. We also propose a hypothesis for the nucleation and evolution of scallops. Previous Work: Our previous work surveyed the southern hemisphere using HRSC images for the presence of scalloped terrain, and revealed that almost all scalloped terrains are in the Malea Planum region near the southern wall of the Hellas basin [7]. We mapped the distribution of scalloped terrain between 50° and 70° E and 50° and 70° S. The results of the map showed that the scalloped terrains contour the southern wall of the Hellas basin between the elevations of 1000 m and -2000 m, and that the icerich mantle is thickest in this region [7]. Data and Methods: High resolution HiRISE images of the scalloped terrain of Malea Planum were used to investigate small scale features. Daytime infrared images from

  9. Propagation of a fold-and-thrust belt vs. timing of flexural basin formation: a case-study in the Betics (Gibraltar Arc System)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Bonilla, Alejandro; Torvela, Taija; Exposito, Inmaculada; Balanya, Juan Carlos; Diaz-Azpiroz, Manuel; Barcos, Leticia; Crespo-Blanc, Ana

    2015-04-01

    Tectonic load associated to the progressive fold-and-thrust belt (FTB) building in the external zones of orogens commonly leads to the lower plate lithosphere flexure, subsequent foreland basin formation, and syn-sedimentary deposits. In this contribution, we focus on a case-study situated in the northern branch of the Gibraltar Arc System. The interpretation of seismic sections together with updated structural data from the Subbetic FTB, formed by paleomargin deposits detached from the South Iberian basement, and the central to eastern Guadalquivir foreland basin, permit us to characterize the variations of deformational style across the Subbetic and the spatial and temporal relationships between the Subbetic and the foreland basin infill, in particular in terms of migration of the FTB deformation front. From the most internal FTB to foreland basin, various structural styles have been characterized: (1) The inner FTB is formed by buckle folds, WSW-ENE striking, kilometre-scale and non-cylindrical, controlled by a detachment within Triassic evaporites. (2) The central FTB is characterized by a thrust system, detached also in Triassic evaporites and whose direction varies from NE-SW to E-W towards a more external position. Ramp geometries and associated fault-bend folds show that this thrust system has N-ward vergence. Syn-compressional Serravallian to Langhian sediments deposited during the back and fore-thrusting permit to constrain the age of the deformation. (3) The frontal FTB is characterised by a tectonically complex area without dominant vergence. The Subbetic competent rocks are surrounded by a clayey matrix, attributed to Langhian-Serravallian age. Finally, seismic lines in the Guadalquivir foreland basin show that the Langhian-Serravallian units were thrust onto a younger Tortonian to Messinian, post-deformational sequence. Our data suggest that the compressional deformation observed in the inner and central FTB corresponds mostly with a Lower to Middle

  10. Trilobites, scolecodonts and fish remains occurrence and the depositional paleoenvironment of the upper Monte Alegre and lower Itaituba formations, Lower - Middle Pennsylvanian of the Amazonas Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutinho, Luciane Profs; Nascimento, Sara; Scomazzon, Ana Karina; Lemos, Valesca Brasil

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to characterize the scolecodonts, trilobite pygidium fragments and fish remains of an outcropped region in the southern Amazonas Basin, comprising the uppermost section of the Monte Alegre Formation and the basal section of the Itaituba Formation. These, correspond to part of the marine portion of the Tapajós Group, related to an intracratonic carbonate platform. The Monte Alegre Formation includes a deposition of fluvial-deltaic and aeolian sandstones, siltstones and shales of interdunes and lakes, intercalated with transgressive carbonates of a shallow restrict nearshore marine environment. The Itaituba Formation comprises a thickest deposit of marine carbonates, representing the establishment of widespread marine conditions, and is the richest interval containing organisms of shallow marine environment in the Pennsylvanian of the Amazonas Basin. The associated fauna includes brachiopods, bivalves, gastropods, crinoids, echinoids, bryozoans, corals, foraminifers, sponges, ostracods, trilobites, scolecodonts, fish remains and conodonts, mainly in the packstones, and subordinately in the wackestones and mudstones. Conodonts Neognathodus atokaensis, Diplognathodus orphanus, Idiognathodus incurvus, and foraminifers Millerella extensa, Millerella pressa, Millerella marblensis, Eostaffella ampla, Eostaffella pinguis and Eostaffella advena characterizes a predominant Atokan age to the analyzed profile. The fossil association herein presented is taxonomically diversified and biologically interesting, comprising an important and well preserved, for the first time occurrence of two molds and two fragments of Proetida trilobites. Well preserved Eunicida and Phyllodocida scolecodonts and paleonisciform fish remains. These fossils help in the paleoenvironmental establishment of the studied interval in the Amazonas Basin and as a potential biostratigraphic and paleoecological tool to correlate regionally and globally the Pennsylvanian.

  11. Evaporite cycles and cycle boundaries in the upper part of the Paradox Member, Hermosa Formation of Pennsylvanian age in the Paradox basin, Utah and Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Raup, O.B.; Hite, R.J. )

    1991-03-01

    The evaporites of the Paradox Member of the Hermosa Formation of Pennsylvanian age in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are direct precipitates from marine brines and have been changed only slightly by subsequent events. Geophysical logs of deep wells indicate that the Paradox Member is composed of at least 30 evaporite cycles. Lithologies that make up the cycles, in order of increasing salinity, are organic carbon-rich carbonate shale (black shale), dolomite, anhydrite, and halite (with or without potash). Studies of core from two wells in the central part of the basin show that some of the cycles in the upper part of the Paradox Member are remarkably symmetrical, indicating regular changes in salinity. Detailed petrologic studies have revealed newly recognized lithologic textures and cycle boundaries in 11 evaporite cycles, indicating very regular cyclicity of subaqueous sedimentation in a basin in which salinity was probably controlled by Gondwana glaciation.

  12. Depositional systems in the lower Cretaceous Morro Do Chaves and Coqueiro Seco formations, and their relationship to petroleum accumulations, middle rift sequence, Sergipe-Alagoas Basin, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    de Figueiredo, A.M.F.

    1981-01-01

    In the Sergipe-Alagoas Basin, northeast coast of Brazil, the Lower Cretaceous lacustrine, middle rift sequence is composed of the Morro do Chaves and Coqueiro Seco Formations. Subsurface analysis permitted recognition and mapping of four principal types of depositional environments: Morro do Chaves carbonate platform, and Coqueiro Seco fluvial-deltaic, fan delta, and slope systems. Morro do Chaves lacustrine carbonate sediments were deposited in positive areas flanking the principal point sources (rivers), and are composed of high energy limestones. Contemporaneous deep-water euxinic and bituminous lacustrine shales were deposited under starved basin conditions. Sublacustrine canyon excavation attested to the presence of a destructional slope episode. Coqueiro Seco fluvial-deltaic and fan delta facies display high sand/shale ratios and blocky to massive E-log patterns; slope facies display serrate to digitate E-log patterns and is less sandy. Delta plain channel-fill facies and coarse-grained meanderbelt fluvial facies are dominant in fluvial-deltaic systems of the Alagoas Sub-basin; and proximal to medial conglomerates and coarse conglomeratic sandstones are dominant facies in fan delta systems of the Rio Sao Francisco Sub-basin. Slope facies are composed of sublacustrine fans formed by fine- to medium-grained sandstones enveloped by subbituminous shales, and lacustrine limestones. Coqueiro Seco coarse clastic systems prograded across the basin and buried Morro do Chaves carbonate platforms in response to cyclic tectonic pulses related to rift development. Evaluation of petroleum occurrences in relationship to defined depositional systems permitted recognition of several types of plays characterized by unique structural and stratigraphic relationships exhibited by reservoirs, source beds and structure. The Coqueiro Seco slope play, formed by updip pinchout of turbidite fans, is judged the most promising in the sequence.

  13. Superficial and deep-seated gravity-driven deformation horizons within basinal succession: the case study of Maiolica Formation, Gargano Promontory, Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonská, Danica; Di Celma, Claudio; Tondi, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    Gravitational phenomena on the paleoslope of continental margins play a significant role both in redistribution of sediment and formation of new structural features within sedimentary basins worldwide. Mass-transport deposits (MTDs) represent important heterogeneities within the succession and occur on various scales (tens of centimetres to hundreds of metres). Small- to medium-scale MTDs (up to tens of meters) act as layers of different petrophysical properties, whereas large-scale MTDs (tens to hundreds of meters) form both stratigraphic and structural discontinuities (faults, thrusts, erosional surfaces, dykes or injections) within the succession. The Maiolica Formation, Early Cretaceous deep basinal succession cropping out in Gargano Promontory of Southeast Italy is represented by undisturbed intervals of flat-lying thin-bedded, cherty micritic limestone interstratified with intervals of lithologically similar, but structurally distorted beds. For this reason, the studied outcrops provide a good opportunity to characterize the geometry and the internal deformation of small- and medium-scale carbonate MTDs. At the outcrop scale, small- to medium-sized MTDs can be simply identified as sheets of deformed strata alternated with packages of undeformed beds. However, several observed features such as folded stylolites with radially oriented peaks within some of these deformed packages and the presence of large vertical clastic-dyke-like bodies in the succession suggest that some of these deformed packages represent deep-seated basal gliding horizons of large-scale MTDs. In this study, we present MTDs on two different scales that have a crucial influence on the evolution of slope to basinal successions. Moreover, we define the features that distinguish superficial MTDs from the deep-seated gravity-driven deformation horizons within basinal carbonates.

  14. Spatial and stratigraphic distribution of water in oil shale of the Green River Formation using Fischer assay, Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Brownfield, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    The spatial and stratigraphic distribution of water in oil shale of the Eocene Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin of northwestern Colorado was studied in detail using some 321,000 Fischer assay analyses in the U.S. Geological Survey oil-shale database. The oil-shale section was subdivided into 17 roughly time-stratigraphic intervals, and the distribution of water in each interval was assessed separately. This study was conducted in part to determine whether water produced during retorting of oil shale could provide a significant amount of the water needed for an oil-shale industry. Recent estimates of water requirements vary from 1 to 10 barrels of water per barrel of oil produced, depending on the type of retort process used. Sources of water in Green River oil shale include (1) free water within clay minerals; (2) water from the hydrated minerals nahcolite (NaHCO3), dawsonite (NaAl(OH)2CO3), and analcime (NaAlSi2O6.H20); and (3) minor water produced from the breakdown of organic matter in oil shale during retorting. The amounts represented by each of these sources vary both stratigraphically and areally within the basin. Clay is the most important source of water in the lower part of the oil-shale interval and in many basin-margin areas. Nahcolite and dawsonite are the dominant sources of water in the oil-shale and saline-mineral depocenter, and analcime is important in the upper part of the formation. Organic matter does not appear to be a major source of water. The ratio of water to oil generated with retorting is significantly less than 1:1 for most areas of the basin and for most stratigraphic intervals; thus water within oil shale can provide only a fraction of the water needed for an oil-shale industry.

  15. Spatial and stratigraphic distribution of water in oil shale of the Green River Formation using Fischer Assay, Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Brownfield, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    The spatial and stratigraphic distribution of water in oil shale of the Eocene Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin of northwestern Colorado was studied in detail using some 321,000 Fischer assay analyses in the U.S. Geological Survey oil-shale database. The oil-shale section was subdivided into 17 roughly time-stratigraphic intervals, and the distribution of water in each interval was assessed separately. This study was conducted in part to determine whether water produced during retorting of oil shale could provide a significant amount of the water needed for an oil-shale industry. Recent estimates of water requirements vary from 1 to 10 barrels of water per barrel of oil produced, depending on the type of retort process used. Sources of water in Green River oil shale include (1) free water within clay minerals; (2) water from the hydrated minerals nahcolite (NaHCO3), dawsonite (NaAl(OH)2CO3), and analcime (NaAlSi2O6.H20); and (3) minor water produced from the breakdown of organic matter in oil shale during retorting. The amounts represented by each of these sources vary both stratigraphically and areally within the basin. Clay is the most important source of water in the lower part of the oil-shale interval and in many basin-margin areas. Nahcolite and dawsonite are the dominant sources of water in the oil-shale and saline-mineral depocenter, and analcime is important in the upper part of the formation. Organic matter does not appear to be a major source of water. The ratio of water to oil generated with retorting is significantly less than 1:1 for most areas of the basin and for most stratigraphic intervals; thus water within oil shale can provide only a fraction of the water needed for an oil-shale industry.

  16. Sedimentary environments for the massive formation of the lacustrine organic rich petroleum source rocks of late Cretaceous from Songliao Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhiguang, S.

    2009-12-01

    Songliao Basin is the major oil-bearing and production basin in China and containing two major sets of excellent organic matter rich source rocks developed during the two related short periods of later Cretaceous time. For a long time, these source rocks were considered unquestionably being formed under fresh or brackish lacustrine environment. However, increasing evidence and studies suggest that this may be not the case anymore, as possible marine transgression and much high salinity lacustrine environment has been suggested or implied from a number of recent studies for Songliao Basin. Here, we show our recent extensive organic geochemical studies carried out on the core samples of Nenjiang formation from a newly drilled scientific exploration well of No. 1 in Songliao Basin. The overall evidence of organic matter and biomarkers suggest that: 1) the main source rocks were likely formed under a much saline(even mesosaline) lacustrine environment, as the existence of a number high saline related biomarkers and their ratios such Pr/Ph, MTTCI, α-MTTC/δ-MTTC, α-MTTC /γ-MTTC, Gammacerane/C30hop are in favor of a mesosaline to saline environments; 2) during the major source rocks formation periods, a photic zone oxygen depletion and stratified water column was suggested by the strong occurrence of a series of aryl isoprenoids and Isorenieratane; 3) a general mild to strong reduced sedimentary environments were concluded from the consistent of a number of index. Fig 1 Correlation between MTTCI vs Pr/Ph ratios with indication of salinity fields (after SCHWARK et al., 1998)

  17. On the formation of ultra-thick sedimentary basins on rifted margins: a comparison of the Scotian and Labrador margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louden, K.; Funck, T.

    2003-12-01

    Sedimentary basins that form on rifted continental margins exhibit a great variety of shapes and sizes. In particular, the total sediment thickness can vary significantly and in certain sub-basins can approach 15-20 km. The deeper structure of these ultra-thick basins is typically not well resolved by seismic reflection profiles due to poor penetration within the thickest parts of the basin. Wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction profiles can help resolve these deeper features. We compare two such sub-basins that occur on the eastern Canadian margins, where reflection and refraction profiles are able to define the complete sedimentary and crustal structures: the Sable sub-basin on the northeast Nova Scotian margin and the Hopedale sub-basin on the central Labrador margin. We compare the development of these basins by converting the sediment refraction velocities to density and back-stripping assuming local isostasy. Although these basins formed during completely different episodes of rifting on different types of continental crust, we find a surprising similarity in the characteristics of crustal thinning across each margin, especially for the lower crust. Initial thinning of the crust by 50-60% occurs within 50 km followed by more gradual thinning over the subsequent 100 km. This leaves a tongue of lower continental crust extending 150 km seaward of the unstretched continental crust. This outer region becomes the location of the thickest initial sediment deposition, followed by up-building and out-building of the shelf. The local form of this deposition differs between the two margins: with much larger syn- and immediately post-rift sediments on the Scotian margin and thicker recent deposition on the Labrador margin, probably controlled by the local availability of sediment fill. Comparison with previous models of rifting based on borehole observations for the Scotia margin compare well with the overall width of the rifting (150 km), but our results suggest more

  18. REDUCING RISK IN LOW-PERMEABILITY GAS FORMATIONS: UNDERSTANDING THE ROCK/FLUID CHARACTERISTICS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN LARAMIDE BASINS

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald C. Surdam

    2003-12-29

    An anomalous velocity model was constructed for the Wind River Basin (WRB) based on {approx}2000 mi of 2-D seismic data and 175 sonic logs, for a total of 132,000 velocity/depth profiles. Ten cross sections were constructed through the model coincident with known gas fields. In each cross section, an intense, anomalously slow velocity domain coincided with the gas-productive rock/fluid interval. The anomalous velocity model: (1) Easily isolates gas-charged rock/fluid systems characterized by anomalously slow velocities and water-rich rock/fluid systems characterized by normal velocities; and (2) Delineates the regional velocity inversion surface, which is characterized by steepening of the Ro/depth gradient, a significant increase in capillary displacement pressure, a significant change in formation water composition, and acceleration of the reaction rate of smectite-to-illite diagenesis in mixed-layer clays. Gas chimneys are observed as topographic highs on the regional velocity inversion surface. Beneath the surface are significant fluid-flow compartments, which have a gas-charge in the fluid phase and are isolated from meteoric water recharge. Water-rich domains may occur within regional gas-charged compartments, but are not being recharged from the meteoric water system (i.e., trapped water). The WRB is divided into at least two regionally prominent fluid-flow compartments separated by the velocity inversion surface: a water-dominated upper compartment likely under strong meteoric water drive and a gas-charged, anomalously pressured lower compartment. Judging from cross sections, numerous gas-charged subcompartments occur within the regional compartment. Their geometries and boundaries are controlled by faults and low-permeability rocks. Commercial gas production results when a reservoir interval characterized by enhanced porosity/permeability intersects one of these gas-charged subcompartments. The rock/fluid characteristics of the Rocky Mountain Laramide

  19. A resource evaluation of the Bakken Formation (Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian) continuous oil accumulation, Williston Basin, North Dakota and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmoker, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    The Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian Bakken Formation in the United States portion of the Williston Basin is both the source and the reservoir for a continuous oil accumulation - in effect a single very large field - underlying approximately 17,800 mi2 (46,100 km2) of North Dakota and Montana. Within this area, the Bakken Formation continuous oil accumulation is not significantly influenced by the water column and cannot be analyzed in terms of conventional, discrete fields. Rather, the continuous accumulation can be envisioned as a collection of oil-charged cells, virtually all of which are capable of producing some oil, but which vary significantly in their production characteristics. Better wellperformance statistics are linked regionally to higher levels of thermal maturity and to lower levels of reservoir heterogeneity. Although portions of the Bakken Formation continuous oil accumulation have reached a mature stage of development, the accumulation as a whole is far from depleted.

  20. Plagioclase-peridotites recording the incipient stage of oceanic basin formation: new constraints from the Nain ophiolites (central Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirnia Naeini, Tahmineh; Arai, Shoji; Saccani, Emilio

    2016-04-01

    Pargasite-bearing plagioclase peridotites of Nain have recorded a complex tectono-magmatic and -metamorphic history. Based on texture, as well as mineral major and trace element chemistry, two stages of facies exchange have been documented in the peridotites, namely, from plagioclase to spinel and vice versa. The earliest event that influenced the peridotites was a low degree of flux melting (<4%) which occurred at the pargasite stability field. Melting resulted in a small fraction of highly enriched melt as well as a depleted chemistry of the pargasites and coexisting pyroxenes. The produced melt fraction was scanty, and consequently hardly mobile. It crystallized in-situ in the peridotites in form of plagioclase. After the melting stage, cooling caused the peridotites to recrystallize in spinel facies. Recrystallization obliterated all textural features associated with formation of magmatic plagioclase in the peridotites. However, lines of evidence are documented by the chemistry of the spinel-facies mineral assemblage, which strongly suggest the pre-existence of plagioclases. This evidence includes a positive Eu anomaly in pargasites and pyroxenes, as well as a Zr negative anomaly in orthopyroxenes. The spinel-facies assemblage subsequently recrystallized in the plagioclase stability field. Recrystallization occurred in various degrees. Strong recrystallization resulted in the formation of modally typical, but atypically enriched, harzburgite from the lherzolite. Remarkable textural characteristics of peridotites that indicate subsolidus origin for plagioclases include: (1) plagioclase heterogeneous distribution, (2) plagioclase exclusive concurrence with spinel and, (3) plagioclase modal positive correlation with olivine but negative correlation with pyroxenes and pargasite. The transition from spinel to plagioclase-facies was associated with the following compositional variations in the peridotite minerals: (1) Al, Mg, Ni decrease and Cr, Ti, Fe increase in

  1. New Sakmarian ages for the Rio Bonito formation (Paraná Basin, southern Brazil) based on LA-ICP-MS U-Pb radiometric dating of zircons crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagliari, Joice; Lavina, Ernesto Luiz Correa; Philipp, Ruy Paulo; Tognoli, Francisco Manoel Wohnrath; Basei, Miguel Angelo Stipp; Faccini, Ubiratan Ferrucio

    2014-12-01

    Two ash fall beds (tonstein) sampled from the post-glacial Permian deposits of the Paraná Basin have provided new U-Pb radiometric age constraints for this stratigraphic interval. The zircon grains were recovered from tonstein layers interbedded with fine-grained and carbonaceous lithologies in the middle portion of the Rio Bonito Formation. In both samples, the dominant population is interpreted as generated by explosive volcanism, as having formed immediately before the eruption. Based on 238U/206Pb, the selected zircon grains from the dominant population have weighted mean ages of 290.6 ± 2.8 Ma and 281.7 ± 3.2 Ma, corresponding to the Sakmarian and Kungurian ages in the Cisuralian epoch, respectively. These ages constrain the time of the deposition of the tonstein horizons and have important stratigraphic implications for the Late Paleozoic evolution of both the Paraná Basin and the southwestern region of Gondwana. The results presented here and the radiometric data already published suggest that deposition of the post-glacial coal-bearing deposits of the Rio Bonito Formation was probably initiated before the Early Permian. Thus, we infer that the climate had already ameliorated by this period in order to allow for the formation and accumulation of peat in this region of Gondwana.

  2. Petrology and diagenetic history of the upper shale member of the Late Devonian–Early Mississippian Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neil S. Fishman,; Sven O. Egenhoff,; Boehlke, Adam; Lowers, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    The organic-rich upper shale member of the upper Devonian–lower Mississippian Bakken Formation (Williston Basin, North Dakota, USA) has undergone significant diagenetic alteration, irrespective of catagenesis related to hydrocarbon generation. Alteration includes precipitation of numerous cements, replacement of both detrital and authigenic minerals, multiple episodes of fracturing, and compaction. Quartz authigenesis occurred throughout much of the member, and is represented by multiple generations of microcrystalline quartz. Chalcedonic quartz fills radiolarian microfossils and is present in the matrix. Sulfide minerals include pyrite and sphalerite. Carbonate diagenesis is volumetrically minor and includes thin dolomite overgrowths and calcite cement. At least two generations of fractures are observed. Based on the authigenic minerals and their relative timing of formation, the evolution of pore waters can be postulated. Dolomite and calcite resulted from early postdepositional aerobic oxidation of some of the abundant organic material in the formation. Following aerobic oxidation, conditions became anoxic and sulfide minerals precipitated. Transformation of the originally opaline tests of radiolaria resulted in precipitation of quartz, and quartz authigenesis is most common in more distal parts of the depositional basin where radiolaria were abundant. Because quartz authigenesis is related to the distribution of radiolaria, there is a link between diagenesis and depositional environment. Furthermore, much of the diagenesis in the upper shale member preceded hydrocarbon generation, so early postdepositional processes were responsible for occlusion of significant original porosity in the member. Thus, diagenetic mineral precipitation was at least partly responsible for the limited ability of these mudstones to provide porosity for storage of hydrocarbons.

  3. Petrology and diagenetic history of the upper shale member of the Late Devonian-Early Mississippian Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neil S. Fishman,; Sven O. Egenhoff,; Boehlke, Adam; Lowers, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    The organic-rich upper shale member of the upper Devonian–lower Mississippian Bakken Formation (Williston Basin, North Dakota, USA) has undergone significant diagenetic alteration, irrespective of catagenesis related to hydrocarbon generation. Alteration includes precipitation of numerous cements, replacement of both detrital and authigenic minerals, multiple episodes of fracturing, and compaction. Quartz authigenesis occurred throughout much of the member, and is represented by multiple generations of microcrystalline quartz. Chalcedonic quartz fills radiolarian microfossils and is present in the matrix. Sulfide minerals include pyrite and sphalerite. Carbonate diagenesis is volumetrically minor and includes thin dolomite overgrowths and calcite cement. At least two generations of fractures are observed. Based on the authigenic minerals and their relative timing of formation, the evolution of pore waters can be postulated. Dolomite and calcite resulted from early postdepositional aerobic oxidation of some of the abundant organic material in the formation. Following aerobic oxidation, conditions became anoxic and sulfide minerals precipitated. Transformation of the originally opaline tests of radiolaria resulted in precipitation of quartz, and quartz authigenesis is most common in more distal parts of the depositional basin where radiolaria were abundant. Because quartz authigenesis is related to the distribution of radiolaria, there is a link between diagenesis and depositional environment. Furthermore, much of the diagenesis in the upper shale member preceded hydrocarbon generation, so early postdepositional processes were responsible for occlusion of significant original porosity in the member. Thus, diagenetic mineral precipitation was at least partly responsible for the limited ability of these mudstones to provide porosity for storage of hydrocarbons.

  4. Late Quaternary landscape evolution in the Kunlun Mountains and Qaidam Basin, Northern Tibet: A framework for examining the links between glaciation, lake level changes and alluvial fan formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, L.A.; Finkel, R.C.; Haizhou, M.; Barnard, P.L.

    2006-01-01

    The Qaidam Basin in Northern Tibet is one of the largest hyper-arid intermontane basins on Earth. Alluvial fans, pediment surfaces, shorelines and a thick succession of sediments within the basin, coupled with moraines and associated landforms in the adjacent high mountain catchments of the Kunlun Mountains, record a complex history of Late Quaternary paleoenvironmental change and landscape evolution. The region provides an ideal natural laboratory to examine the interaction between tectonics and climate within a continent-continent collision zone, and to quantify rates of landscape evolution as controlled by climate and the associated glacial and hydrological changes in hyper-arid and adjacent high-altitude environments. Geomorphic mapping, analysis of landforms and sediments, and terrestrial cosmogenic radionuclide surface exposure and optically stimulated luminescence dating serve to define the timing of formation of Late Quaternary landforms along the southern and northwestern margins of the Qaidam Basin, and in the Burhan Budai Shan of the Kunlun Mountains adjacent to the basin on the south. These dates provide a framework that suggests links between climatic amelioration, deglaciation, lake desiccation and alluvial fan evolution. At least three glacial advances are defined in the Burham Budai Shan of the Kunlun Mountains. On the northern side of this range these occurred in the penultimate glacial cycle or early in the last glacial cycle, during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM)/Lateglacial and during the Holocene. On the south side of the range, advances occurred during the penultimate glacial cycle, MIS-3, and possibly the LGM, Lateglacial or Holocene. Several distinct phases of alluvial fan sedimentation are likewise defined. Alluvial fans formed on the southern side of the Kunlun Mountains prior to 200 ka. Ice-contact alluvial fans formed during the penultimate glacial and during MIS-3. Extensive incised alluvial fans that form the main valley fills north of

  5. In-place oil shale resources examined by grade in the major basins of the Green River Formation, Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birdwell, Justin E.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Johnson, Ronald C.; Brownfield, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a total of 4.285 trillion barrels of oil in-place in the oil shale of the three principal basins of the Eocene Green River Formation. Using oil shale cutoffs of potentially viable (15 gallons per ton) and high grade (25 gallons per ton), it is estimated that between 353 billion and 1.146 trillion barrels of the in-place resource have a high potential for development.

  6. Formation of forearc basins by collision between seamounts and accretionary wedges: an example from the New Hebrides subduction zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collot, J.-Y.; Fisher, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Seabeam data reveal two deep subcircular reentrants in the lower arc slope of the New Hebrides island arc that may illustrate two stages in the development of a novel type of forearc basin. The Malekula reentrant lies just south of the partly subducted Bougainville seamount. This proximity, as well as the similarity in morphology between the reentrant and an indentation in the lower arc slope off Japan, suggests that the Malekula reentrant formed by the collision of a seamount with the arc. An arcuate fold-thrust belt has formed across the mouth of the reentrant, forming the toe of a new accretionary wedge. The Efate reentrant may show the next stage in basin development. This reentrant lies landward of a lower-slope ridge that may have begun to form as an arcuate fold-thrust belt across the mouth of a reentrant. This belt may have grown by continued accretion at the toe of the wedge, by underplating beneath the reentrant, and by trapping of sediment shed from the island arc. These processes could result in a roughly circular forearc basin. Basins that may have formed by seamount collision lie within the accretionary wedge adjacent to the Aleutian trenches. -Authors

  7. Diagenesis of Paleozoic playa-lake and ephemeral-stream deposits from the Pimenta Bueno Formation, Siluro-Devonian (?) of the Parecis Basin, central Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, K.; Morad, S.; Al-Aasm, I. S.; De Ros, L. F.

    2011-07-01

    The Parecis Basin is a large intracratonic rift located in central Brazil and filled with Paleozoic carbonate, evaporite and siliciclastic sediments. The occurrence of gas seeps has recently attracted significant exploration interest by the Brazilian petroleum agency and by Petrobras. The continuously cored PB-01-RO well provided the first opportunity to study the depositional environments, diagenetic evolution and hydrocarbon potential of the largely unknown sedimentary successions of the Parecis Basin. The cored lithologies, belonging to the Siluro-Devonian (?) Pimenta Bueno Formation, are interpreted as deposited in playa-lake and ephemeral-stream environments. The deposits display a strong facies control on the diagenetic mineral assemblages and evolution. Diagenetic minerals in the ephemeral-stream deposits include eogenetic hematite and smectitic clay coats and quartz cement, and the mesogenetic process includes precipitation of sulfates (anhydrite and barite) and carbonates (calcite, dolomite and kutnahorite-ankerite-huntite), followed by partial dissolution of these carbonates and sulfates, and of feldspar grains. Telogenetic processes include the precipitation of hematite and kaolinite within secondary pores, and the replacement of anhydrite by gypsum. A second burial phase and mesodiagenesis is indicated by the precipitation of discrete K-feldspar crystals within moldic pores after dissolved feldspars, and by the illitization of etched, telogenetic kaolinite. The playa-lake deposits show early diagenetic dolomitization of lime mud, precipitation of anhydrite nodules and extensive silicification. The anhydrite nodules were replaced by gypsum and chalcedony during telodiagenesis. Potential source rocks are locally represented by organic shales. The fluvial sandstones show fair reservoir quality and limited compaction, as indicated by their intergranular volume, suggesting that the succession has undergone moderate burial. Potential seals for hydrocarbon

  8. Facies Variations Along an Ancient Deep-Water Axial Channel Belt: Insights from the Upper Cretaceous Cerro Toro Formation, Magallanes-Austral Basin, Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkowski, M. A.; Jobe, Z. R.; Sharman, G.; Graham, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Cerro Toro Formation preserves a >150 kilometer long deep-water axial channel belt in the Magallanes-Austral Basin in southern Patagonia. Considerable work over the past decade in the Chilean basin sector reveals a 3.5-8 km wide channel-levee system that transported coarse-grained sediment from north to south via a range of low- to high-density turbidity currents, debris flows, and transitional/hybrid flows. In contrast, the more proximal deposits preserved in the Argentine basin sector to the north received little focus. This study documents new sedimentology, stratigraphy, and U-Pb geochronology from the Cerro Toro Formation in Argentina, allowing for a basin-scale comparison of the timing of deposition, sediment sources, and facies and grain size variability. Two ash beds from the base of the section yield U-Pb zircon ages of 90.4 ± 2 Ma and 88.0 ± 3 Ma, suggesting similar, if not slightly older, ages for the lower Cerro Toro Formation when compared to equivalent units to the south. U-Pb detrital zircon age spectra reveal similar provenance trends along the entire outcrop belt, with peak age populations at 310-260, 160-135, and 110-82 Ma. Preliminary statistical analyses of more than 5700 meters of new and previously published detailed stratigraphic sections suggest that, in general, characteristics such as mean bed thickness and net to gross remain fairly consistent along the outcrop belt. However, the bed thickness distributions are log-normal, and the northern sector has higher maximum bed thickness than the southern sector. There are also gradual variations in the down-system (north to south) proportion of lithofacies. For instance, in the northern (Argentine) sector, lithofacies representing mass wasting processes (e.g., debris flow conglomerates and mass-transport deposits) account for as much as ~80 percent of the stratigraphic thickness, whereas near the southern end of the channel belt, coarse-grained facies are almost entirely

  9. Petrography and geochemistry characteristics of the lower Cretaceous Muling Formation from the Laoheishan Basin, Northeast China: implications for provenance and tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yu; Liu, Zhaojun; Meng, Qingtao; Wang, Yimeng; Zheng, Guodong; Xu, Yinbo

    2016-10-01

    The petrography, mineralogy and geochemistry of sedimentary rocks from the lower Cretaceous Muling Formation (K1ml) in the Laoheishan basin, northeast (NE) China are studied to determine the weathering intensity, provenance and tectonic setting of the source region. Petrographic data indicate the average quartz-feldspar-lithic fragments (QFL) of the sandstone is Q = 63 %, F = 22 %, and L = 15 %. Lithic fragments mainly contain volcanic clasts that derived from surrounding basement. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data reveal abundant clay and detrital minerals (e.g. quartz), as well as minor calcite in the fine-grained sediments. The Hf contents and element concentration ratios such as Al2O3/TiO2, Co/Th, La/Sc, and La/Th are comparable to sediments derived from felsic and intermediate igneous rocks. The strong genetic relationship with the igneous rocks from the northwest and northeast areas provides evidence that the sediments of the Muling Formation (K1ml) in the Laoheishan basin have been derived from this area. The chemical index of alteration (CIA) and index of chemical variability (ICV) reveal an intensive weathering in the source region of the sediments. The multidimensional tectonic discrimination diagrams indicate that the source rocks of K1ml are mainly derived from the collision system. However, they may also comprise sediments derived from the continental rift system. The results are consistent with the geology of the study area.

  10. Diagenesis and secondary porosity enhancement from dissolution of analcime cement in reservoir sandstones: The Upper Permian Pingdiquan Formation, Junggar basin, northwest China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhaohui, T.; Longstaffe, F.J. ); Parnell, J. )

    1996-01-01

    The Junggar Basin is one of the largest and most important oil-producing basins in China, in which Upper Permian lacustrine oil shales are among the thickest and richest petroleum source rocks in the world. The Upper Permian Pingdiquan Formation was deposited predominantly in fan-delta sequences within a lacustrine setting. The Pingdiquan Formation sandstones constitute the principal oil reservoirs, whereas the interbedded black shales are the predominant oil source rocks. The early diagenetic mineral assemblage in the sandstones comprises siderite, pyrite, analcime, albite, calcite and authigenic quartz as well as trace amount of halite; By contrast, the late diagenetic minerals are characterized by authigenic K-feldspar, ankerite, and minor amounts of mixed-layer clay minerals. Petrographic, mineralogical and available paleoecological data suggest that early authigenic minerals in the sandstones were controlled by alternating periodic fresh water and saline/alkaline water episodes in a lacustrine environment. The cementation of siderite, analcime, calcite and albite occluded the substantial porosity in the sandstones at an early diagenetic stage. However, extensive dissolution of analcime cement and labile detrital feldspars occurred during burial diagenesis, resulting in a significant secondary porosity enhancement in the sandstones and making them very good quality oil reservoirs. The origin of secondary porosity is related to the generation of various organic acids due to organic maturation of the interbedded exceptionally organic-rich oil shales.

  11. Diagenesis and secondary porosity enhancement from dissolution of analcime cement in reservoir sandstones: The Upper Permian Pingdiquan Formation, Junggar basin, northwest China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhaohui, T.; Longstaffe, F.J.; Parnell, J.

    1996-12-31

    The Junggar Basin is one of the largest and most important oil-producing basins in China, in which Upper Permian lacustrine oil shales are among the thickest and richest petroleum source rocks in the world. The Upper Permian Pingdiquan Formation was deposited predominantly in fan-delta sequences within a lacustrine setting. The Pingdiquan Formation sandstones constitute the principal oil reservoirs, whereas the interbedded black shales are the predominant oil source rocks. The early diagenetic mineral assemblage in the sandstones comprises siderite, pyrite, analcime, albite, calcite and authigenic quartz as well as trace amount of halite; By contrast, the late diagenetic minerals are characterized by authigenic K-feldspar, ankerite, and minor amounts of mixed-layer clay minerals. Petrographic, mineralogical and available paleoecological data suggest that early authigenic minerals in the sandstones were controlled by alternating periodic fresh water and saline/alkaline water episodes in a lacustrine environment. The cementation of siderite, analcime, calcite and albite occluded the substantial porosity in the sandstones at an early diagenetic stage. However, extensive dissolution of analcime cement and labile detrital feldspars occurred during burial diagenesis, resulting in a significant secondary porosity enhancement in the sandstones and making them very good quality oil reservoirs. The origin of secondary porosity is related to the generation of various organic acids due to organic maturation of the interbedded exceptionally organic-rich oil shales.

  12. Finding of two new radiolarian associations calibrated with ammonoids in the Vaca Muerta Formation (Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous), Neuquén Basin, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennari, Verónica V.; Pujana, Ignacio

    2017-04-01

    An association of ammonoids and radiolarians retrieved from a sedimentary section of the Vaca Muerta Formation at Vega de Escalone, Neuquén Basin, Argentina, was analized under a strict stratigraphic control. Nine ammonoid assemblage biozones were identified, indicating an age span from Early Tithonian to Late Berriasian/earlymost Valanginian for the Vaca Muerta Formation at the studied section. In connection to the ammonoid record, two radiolarian faunas were identified and named J3A1 and J3B1. Fauna J3A1, corresponding to the Virgatosphinctes andesensis Biozone, is dominated by nasellarian genera and represents the first Lower Tithonian radiolarian fauna described from the Neuquén Basin. Fauna J3B1, linked to the interval assigned to the Substeueroceras koeneni Biozone (Late Tithonian-Early Berriasian), yields abundant representatives of the Pantanellid Family. The presence of Complexapora kozuri (Kiessling and Zeiss) and Loopus primitivus (Matsuoka and Yao), two important radiolarian primary markers of the Late Jurassic in North America, supports a Late Tithonian age for at least part of the S. koeneni Biozone in the studied area. Nor certain Berriasian radiolarian faunas nor elements of the Vallupinae Family were identified so far at the Vega de Escalone section.

  13. Crinoids columnals (Echinodermata) of the Ererê Formation (late Eifelian-early Givetian, Amazon Basin), State of Pará, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffler, S. M.; Fernandes, A. C. S. F.; da Fonseca, V. M. M.

    2014-01-01

    The faunal composition of stalked echinoderms in the Brazilian Devonian is still largely unknown despite the great abundance of crinoids in the shallow epicontinental seas of the Paleozoic. The first Devonian crinoids of Brazil, recorded in the literature in 1875 and 1903, were from the sedimentary rocks of the Ererê Formation in the Amazon Basin. Since then, the echinoderms of this formation have not been studied. This study, based on isolated pluricolumnals and columnals, described and identified Botryocrinus meloi n. sp., the first record for this genus in Brazil. In addition to this species, two other morphological patterns were identified: Tjeecrinus sp. and Morphotype AM/Er-01. The form of occurrence of the crinoid material and the paleoautoecology of B. meloi allow preliminary characterization of the habitat as a moderately deep water with weak to moderate currents and soft substrate. The similarity between B. meloi and Botryocrinus montguyonensis and of Tjeecrinus? sp. and T. crassijugatus, from the Devonian of the Armorican and Rhenan Massif, represents new evidence for the existence of contact between the faunas of the Amazon Basin with those of northern Gondwana and Armorica during the Middle Devonian.

  14. Generation of isotopically and compositionally distinct water during thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) in carbonate reservoirs: Triassic Feixianguan Formation, Sichuan Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lei; Worden, Richard H.; Cai, Chunfang

    2015-09-01

    Thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR), the reaction of petroleum with anhydrite in reservoirs resulting in the growth of calcite and the accumulation of H2S, has been documented in the Feixianguan Formation dolomite reservoir in the Sichuan Basin, China. Fluid inclusion salinity and homogenization temperature data have shown that TSR results in a decrease in salinity from a pre-TSR value of 25 wt.% down to 5 wt.% as a result of water created as a byproduct of progressive TSR. We have studied the isotopic character of the water that resulted from TSR in the Feixianguan Formation by analyzing the oxygen isotopes of TSR calcite and determining the oxygen isotopes of the water in equilibrium with the TSR calcite at the temperatures determined by aqueous fluid inclusion analysis. We have compared these TSR-waters to water that would have been in equilibrium with the bulk rock, also at the temperatures determined by aqueous fluid inclusion analysis. We have found that the TSR-waters are relatively depleted in oxygen isotopes (by up to 8‰ compared to what would be expected at equilibrium between the bulk rock and water) since this type of water was specifically derived from anhydrite. The generation of relatively large volumes of low salinity, low δ18O water associated with advanced TSR in the Feixianguan Formation has also been reported in the Permian Khuff Formation in Abu Dhabi and from sour Devonian fields in the Western Canada Basin. This suggests that TSR-derived water may be a common phenomenon, the effects of which on mesogenetic secondary porosity and reservoir quality have previously been underappreciated.

  15. Chapter 7. The GIS project for the geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas in the Cotton Valley group and Travis Peak and Hosston formations, East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biewick, Laura R.H.

    2006-01-01

    A geographic information system (GIS) focusing on the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley Group and the Lower Cretaceous Travis Peak and Hosston Formations in the northern Gulf Coast region was developed as a visual-analysis tool for the U.S. Geological Survey's 2002 assessment of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil and natural gas resources in the East Texas Basin and Louisiana-Mississippi Salt Basins Provinces. The Central Energy Resources Team of the U.S. Geological Survey has also developed an Internet Map Service to deliver the GIS data to the public. This mapping tool utilizes information from a database about the oil and natural gas endowment of the United States-including physical locations of geologic and geographic data-and converts the data into visual layers. Portrayal and analysis of geologic features on an interactive map provide an excellent tool for understanding domestic oil and gas resources for strategic planning, formulating economic and energy policies, evaluating lands under the purview of the Federal Government, and developing sound environmental policies. Assessment results can be viewed and analyzed or downloaded from the internet web site, http://energy.cr.usgs.gov/oilgas/noga/ .

  16. Geochemistry and hydrodynamics of deep formation brines in the Palo Duro and Dalhart basins, Texas, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, R. L.; Bentley, M. E.

    1982-11-01

    Geological characterization of evaporite deposits as potential host rocks for radioactive waste burial must include hydrogeological investigations on both local and regional scales. The Palo Duro and Dalhart basins of Texas contain candidate salt deposits which are underlain by shelf carbonates and fan-delta sandstones. These basins are ancient intracratonic elements exhibiting regional eastward flow in the deep brine aquifers. Pressures in these aquifers are "subnormal"; however, the major component of flow appears to be parallel to bedding owing to the low permeability of the overlying evaporite strata in the central part of the basin. Salinities computed from geophysical logs or obtained from chemical analyses indicate only small aberrations in the regional salinity profile for brines in carbonate rocks and sandstones of Late Pennsylvanian—Early permian age. Brines reflect reactivity with the host rock deriving salinity primarily from evaporite facies and at present, apparently follow the anhydrite and calcite phase boundaries. Substantial outgassing of CO 2 and oxidation of ferrous iron appear to have occurred during collection of the samples during wildcat drilling by industry. Mass-transfer computer programs have been used to determine the most probable in situ brine composition. Additional support for the computed equilibrium state is the correlation between computed PCO 2 in the brines and observed PCO 2 in adjacent natural gas reservoirs.

  17. The Middle Jurassic basinal deposits of the Surmeh Formation in the Central Zagros Mountains, southwest Iran: Facies, sequence stratigraphy, and controls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasemi, Y.; Jalilian, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    The lower part of the Lower to Upper Jurassic Surmeh Formation consists of a succession of shallow marine carbonates (Toarcian-Aalenian) overlain by a deep marine basinal succession (Aalenian-Bajocian) that grades upward to Middle to Upper Jurassic platform carbonates. The termination of shallow marine carbonate deposition of the lower part of the Surmeh Formation and the establishment of deep marine sedimentation indicate a change in the style of sedimentation in the Neotethys passive margin of southwest Iran during the Middle Jurassic. To evaluate the reasons for this change and to assess the basin configuration during the Middle Jurassic, this study focuses on facies analysis and sequence stratigraphy of the basinal deposits (pelagic and calciturbidite facies) of the Surmeh Formation, referred here as 'lower shaley unit' in the Central Zagros region. The upper Aalenian-Bajocian 'lower shaley unit' overlies, with an abrupt contact, the Toarcian-lower Aalenian platform carbonates. It consists of pelagic (calcareous shale and limestone) and calciturbidite facies grading to upper Bajocian-Bathonian platform carbonates. Calciturbidite deposits in the 'lower shaley unit' consist of various graded grainstone to lime mudstone facies containing mixed deep marine fauna and platform-derived material. These facies include quartz-bearing lithoclast/intraclast grainstone to lime mudstone, bioclast/ooid/peloid intraclast grainstone, ooid grainstone to packstone, and lime wackestone to mudstone. The calciturbidite layers are erosive-based and commonly exhibit graded bedding, incomplete Bouma turbidite sequence, flute casts, and load casts. They consist chiefly of platform-derived materials including ooids, intraclasts/lithoclasts, peloids, echinoderms, brachiopods, bivalves, and open-ocean biota, such as planktonic bivalves, crinoids, coccoliths, foraminifers, and sponge spicules. The 'lower shaley unit' constitutes the late transgressive and the main part of the highstand

  18. Quaternary basin formation along the Dien Bien Phu fault zone and its neotectonic implication of northwestern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, K.; Chen, Y.; Chung, L.; Li, P.; Lam, D.

    2006-12-01

    The Dien Bien Phu (DBP) fault zone is one of the most conspicuous fault systems in the Indochina, extending over a distance of 150 km from Yunnan, China through the NW Vietnam into Laos. Recent Global Positioning system (GPS) data in China yielded that the present clockwise rotation of the southeastern Tibet block geologically corresponds to a region of left-lateral strike-slip faults, such as the Xianshuihe-Xiaojang fault and Dien Bien Phu fault, which appear to have accommodated clockwise rotation; whereas other GPS data from the network of Southeast Asia proposed that Indochina constitutes a stable tectonic block moving approximately east with respect to Eurasia. Although above GPS data show insignificant differential motion along DBP fault, active sinistral slip can be identified by clear geomorphic features, focal solutions and seismicity distribution in a NNE-striking zone parallel to the fault zone. Mapping of surface fault traces along the DBP fault zone using field outcrops, geophysical data, and geomorphologic features recognized by the aerial photos, SRTM, ASTER imageries and derived digital elevation models shows that virtually all active faults are reactivated structures sub-parallel to chronostratigraphic boundary. Along the DBF fault, three larger basins have been developed by different kinematics from north to south. The northern one at Chan Nua is rhomboidal in shape with a dimension of 2.5 km?.5 km, which can be defined as a pull-apart basin resulted by the strike-slip motion of the DBP fault. The fault configuration associated with the central one changes to two parallel sinistral and sinistral-normal faults forming a narrow subsiding weak zone (10 km?.5 km) filled with Quaternary deposits. The southern one is, however, created by that the main DBP fault bends the strike from NNE to NE where branches out a sinistral- normal fault with N-striking controlling a half-graben basin (17 km? km) filled with Quaternary deposits about 200 m in depth above

  19. Shallow structure and its formation process of an active flexure in the forearc basin of the central Nankai subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashi, J.; Ikehara, K.; Omura, A.; Ojima, T.; Murayama, M.

    2013-12-01

    ENE-WSW trending active faults, named Enshu fault system, are developed in the forearc basins of the eastern and central Nankai subduction zone. Three parallel faults developed in the Enshu forearc basin of the eastern Nankai have right lateral slip on the basis of dextral displacement of the canyon axis. Moreover, bathymetry data and side-scan sonar imageries indicate relative uplift of the northern region and the multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection profiles show northward dipping fault planes. In the central Nankai subuduction zone, an ENE-WSW trending step is distributed at the northern part of the Kumano forearc basin and is regarded as the western extension of the Enshu fault system. Although MCS records show deformations including an anticlinal fold beneath the bathymetric step, they have less resolution to identify deformation of basin sequence just below the seafloor. In contrast, deformation seems to reach to the seafloor on a profile by SBP mounted on a mother ship. Investigation of shallow deformation structures is significant for understanding of recent tectonic activity. We carried out deep towed SBP survey by ROV NSS (Navigable Sampling System) during Hakuho-maru KH-11-9 cruise. High resolution mapping of shallow structures was successfully conducted by a chirp SBP system of EdgeTech DW-106. ROV NSS also has capability to take a long core with a pinpoint accuracy around complex topographic region. The Kumano forearc basin is topographically divided into the northern part at a water depth of 2038 m and the other major region at a depth of 2042 m by the ENE-WSW linear step. Three deep towed SBP lines intersected this topographical step and revealed the following structures. This step is composed of 100 m wide gentle slope with an inclination of about 8 degrees. An anticlinal axis is located beneath the upper edge of this slope. Sedimentary layers continue at this slope region without any abut/termination and rapidly increase their thickness toward the

  20. New 40Ar/ 39Ar dating results from the Shanwang Basin, eastern China: Constraints on the age of the Shanwang Formation and associated biota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Huaiyu; Deng, Chenglong; Pan, Yongxin; Deng, Tao; Luo, Zhaohua; Sun, Jimin; Zhu, Rixiang

    2011-07-01

    The fluvio-lacustrine sequence of the Shanwang Basin, eastern China, preserves a rich and important terrestrial fossil fauna and flora; the exceptional preservation of these fossils reveals the dynamics of ancient mammalian ecosystems and plant biology. However, the timing of this sedimentary sequence has been the subject of debate for decades. Here we contribute to this debate by presenting the detailed results of 40Ar/ 39Ar analysis of the basalts above, below, and within the Shanwang Formation. These dates place stringent constraints on the age of Shanwang Formation and associated biota. 40Ar/ 39Ar ages obtained from basalts of the Niushan and Yaoshan Formations, which underlie and overlie the Shanwang Formation, are 21.0 ± 2.5 Ma (2σ, full external error) and 17.3 ± 1.5 Ma (2σ, full external error), respectively. The 40Ar/ 39Ar age of the basalt in the Shanwang Formation is 17-18 Ma. Given the age constraints of the basalts of the Yaoshan and Shanwang Formations, the age of the Shanwang biota is estimated to be ca. 17 Ma, late Burdigalian of the Early Miocene, indicating that the deposition of this fauna coincided with the onset of the mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum. The results provide new age constraints on the Shanwang mammal fauna, and independently support interpretations that this fauna can be assigned to chronozone MN4, and correlated with middle Orleanian of the European Land Mammal Age, and to late Hemingfordian of the North American Land Mammal Age. Biological diversity of the Shanwang Formation could reflect the global-scale mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum.

  1. The Lacustrine Upper Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Four Corners Region, Usa: a Lithological and Mineralogical Terrestrial Analog for Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter-McIntyre, S. L.; Chan, M. A.; McPherson, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    The upper part of the Jurassic Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation is an iron- and clay-rich volcaniclastic shale deposited in an ephemeral alkaline saline lake system. Sedimentary rocks exposed in Gale Crater consist of similar non-acidic clays, possibly of lacustrine origin. Three primary clastic lithofacies are present in both the Brushy Basin Member and at Gale Crater: silt-/claystone, sandstone, and conglomerate. Both the terrestrial and martian silt-/claystone lithofacies are interpreted as lacustrine depositional environments due to features such as parallel laminated and massive sedimentary structures. Vugs are present in the siltstone/claystone facies on both the Colorado Plateau and at Gale Crater. Fluvial features are also observed in both examples such as cross-bedded sandstones and imbricated conglomerates. Concretions are present in both the Colorado Plateau and Gale Crater units. The vugs in the Brushy Basin Member preserve algal forms with cellular elaboration and are interpreted as charophyte molds. Two distinct suites of elements (1. C, Fe, As, P and, 2. C, S, Se, P) are associated with the microbial fossils and may be potential markers for biosignatures. Vugs at Gale Crater are a potential target to investigate the possibility of preserved microbial (algal) life where early analyses show the presence of the elements capable of supporti