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Sample records for formation drives cluster

  1. Formation and Assembly of Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Stephen

    open access to state-of- the-art simulation techniques within a modern, modular software environment. We will follow the gravitational collapse of 0.1-10 million-solar mass gas clouds through star formation and coalescence into a star cluster, modeling in detail the coupling of the gas and the newborn stars. We will study the effects of star formation by detecting accreting regions of gas in self-gravitating, turbulent, MHD, FLASH models that we will translate into collisional dynamical systems of stars modeled with an N-body code, coupled together in the AMUSE framework. Our FLASH models will include treatments of radiative transfer from the newly formed stars, including heating and radiative acceleration of the surrounding gas. Specific questions to be addressed are: (1) How efficiently does the gas in a star forming region form stars, how does this depend on mass, metallicity, and other parameters, and what terminates star formation? What observational predictions can be made to constrain our models? (2) How important are different mechanisms for driving turbulence and removing gas from a cluster: accretion, radiative feedback, and mechanical feedback? (3) How does the infant mortality rate of young clusters depend on the initial properties of the parent cloud? (4) What are the characteristic formation timescales of massive star clusters, and what observable imprints does the assembly process leave on their structure at an age of 10-20 Myr, when formation is essentially complete and many clusters can be observed? These studies are directly relevant to NASA missions at many electromagnetic wavelengths, including Chandra, GALEX, Hubble, and Spitzer. Each traces different aspects of cluster formation and evolution: X-rays trace supernovae, ultraviolet traces young stars, visible colors can distinguish between young blue stars and older red stars, and the infrared directly shows young embedded star clusters.

  2. Polyaspartic acid facilitates oxolation within iron(iii) oxide pre-nucleation clusters and drives the formation of organic-inorganic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheck, J.; Drechsler, M.; Ma, X.; Stöckl, M. T.; Konsek, J.; Schwaderer, J. B.; Stadler, S. M.; De Yoreo, J. J.; Gebauer, D.

    2016-12-01

    The interplay between polymers and inorganic minerals during the formation of solids is crucial for biomineralization and bio-inspired materials, and advanced material properties can be achieved with organic-inorganic composites. By studying the reaction mechanisms, basic questions on organic-inorganic interactions and their role during material formation can be answered, enabling more target-oriented strategies in future synthetic approaches. Here, we present a comprehensive study on the hydrolysis of iron(iii) in the presence of polyaspartic acid. For the basic investigation of the formation mechanism, a titration assay was used, complemented by microscopic techniques. The polymer is shown to promote precipitation in partly hydrolyzed reaction solutions at the very early stages of the reaction by facilitating iron(iii) hydrolysis. In unhydrolyzed solutions, no significant interactions between the polymer and the inorganic solutes can be observed. We demonstrate that the hydrolysis promotion by the polymer can be understood by facilitating oxolation in olation iron(iii) pre-nucleation clusters. We propose that the adsorption of olation pre-nucleation clusters on the polymer chains and the resulting loss in dynamics and increased proximity of the reactants is the key to this effect. The resulting composite material obtained from the hydrolysis in the presence of the polymer was investigated with additional analytical techniques, namely, scanning and transmission electron microscopies, light microscopy, atomic force microscopy, zeta potential measurements, dynamic light scattering, and thermogravimetric analyses. It consists of elastic, polydisperse nanospheres, ca. 50-200 nm in diameter, and aggregates thereof, exhibiting a high polymer and water content.

  3. Formation of Cluster Complexes by Cluster-Cluster-Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihashi, Masahiko; Odaka, Hideho

    2015-03-01

    Multi-element clusters are interested in their chemical and physical properties, and it is expected that they are utilized as catalysts, for example. Their properties critically depend on the size, composition and atomic ordering, and it should be important to adjust the above parameters for their functionality. One of the ways to form a multi-element cluster is to employ a low-energy collision between clusters. Here, we show characteristic results obtained in the collision between a neutral Ar cluster and a size-selected Co cluster ion. Low-energy collision experiment was accomplished by using a newly developed merging-beam apparatus. Cobalt cluster ions were produced by laser ablation, and mass-selected. On the other hand, argon clusters were prepared by the supersonic expansion of Ar gas. Both cluster beams were merged together in an ion guide, and ionic cluster complexes were mass-analyzed. In the collision of Co2+ and ArN, Co2Arn+ (n = 1 - 30) were observed, and the total intensity of Co2Arn+ (n >= 1) is inversely proportional to the relative velocity between Co2+ and ArN. This suggests that the charge-induced dipole interaction between Co2+ and a neutral Ar cluster is dominant in the formation of the cluster complex, Co2+Arn.

  4. Galaxy formation through hierarchical clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Simon D. M.; Frenk, Carlos S.

    1991-01-01

    Analytic methods for studying the formation of galaxies by gas condensation within massive dark halos are presented. The present scheme applies to cosmogonies where structure grows through hierarchical clustering of a mixture of gas and dissipationless dark matter. The simplest models consistent with the current understanding of N-body work on dissipationless clustering, and that of numerical and analytic work on gas evolution and cooling are adopted. Standard models for the evolution of the stellar population are also employed, and new models for the way star formation heats and enriches the surrounding gas are constructed. Detailed results are presented for a cold dark matter universe with Omega = 1 and H(0) = 50 km/s/Mpc, but the present methods are applicable to other models. The present luminosity functions contain significantly more faint galaxies than are observed.

  5. Star formation and substructure in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Seth A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Wegner, Gary A.; Einasto, Maret; Vennik, Jaan

    2014-03-10

    We investigate the relationship between star formation (SF) and substructure in a sample of 107 nearby galaxy clusters using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Several past studies of individual galaxy clusters have suggested that cluster mergers enhance cluster SF, while others find no such relationship. The SF fraction in multi-component clusters (0.228 ± 0.007) is higher than that in single-component clusters (0.175 ± 0.016) for galaxies with M{sub r}{sup 0.1}<−20.5. In both single- and multi-component clusters, the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with clustercentric distance and decreases with local galaxy number density, and multi-component clusters show a higher SF fraction than single-component clusters at almost all clustercentric distances and local densities. Comparing the SF fraction in individual clusters to several statistical measures of substructure, we find weak, but in most cases significant at greater than 2σ, correlations between substructure and SF fraction. These results could indicate that cluster mergers may cause weak but significant SF enhancement in clusters, or unrelaxed clusters exhibit slightly stronger SF due to their less evolved states relative to relaxed clusters.

  6. On the formation process of charged clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Youmei; Chen, Qi; Yu, M. Y.

    2016-11-01

    The clustering process of charged grains often resembles a formation stage of colloidal and spongy matter, as well as some astrophysical objects. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulation is used to simulate the formation process of clusters of massive charged grains in plasmas. It is found that, from an initially uniform distribution of grains with Maxwellian velocity distribution, a statistically stationary system of clusters, each with different dynamic as well as thermodynamic characteristics, can form. The dependence of the asymptotic, of the final, state of the cluster system on the initial temperature and density of the grains is discussed.

  7. Individualization as Driving Force of Clustering Phenomena in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Mäs, Michael; Flache, Andreas; Helbing, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    One of the most intriguing dynamics in biological systems is the emergence of clustering, in the sense that individuals self-organize into separate agglomerations in physical or behavioral space. Several theories have been developed to explain clustering in, for instance, multi-cellular organisms, ant colonies, bee hives, flocks of birds, schools of fish, and animal herds. A persistent puzzle, however, is the clustering of opinions in human populations, particularly when opinions vary continuously, such as the degree to which citizens are in favor of or against a vaccination program. Existing continuous opinion formation models predict “monoculture” in the long run, unless subsets of the population are perfectly separated from each other. Yet, social diversity is a robust empirical phenomenon, although perfect separation is hardly possible in an increasingly connected world. Considering randomness has not overcome the theoretical shortcomings so far. Small perturbations of individual opinions trigger social influence cascades that inevitably lead to monoculture, while larger noise disrupts opinion clusters and results in rampant individualism without any social structure. Our solution to the puzzle builds on recent empirical research, combining the integrative tendencies of social influence with the disintegrative effects of individualization. A key element of the new computational model is an adaptive kind of noise. We conduct computer simulation experiments demonstrating that with this kind of noise a third phase besides individualism and monoculture becomes possible, characterized by the formation of metastable clusters with diversity between and consensus within clusters. When clusters are small, individualization tendencies are too weak to prohibit a fusion of clusters. When clusters grow too large, however, individualization increases in strength, which promotes their splitting. In summary, the new model can explain cultural clustering in human societies

  8. Tracking star formation in dwarf cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rude, Cody Millard

    The evolution of galaxies in dense environments can be affected by close encounters with neighboring galaxies and interactions with the intracluster medium (ICM). Dwarf galaxies may be especially susceptible to these effects due to their low mass. The goal of my dissertation research is to look for signs of star formation in cluster dwarf galaxies by measuring and comparing the r- and u-band luminosity functions of 15 low redshift Abell galaxy clusters using archival data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). Luminosity functions, dwarf-to-giant ratios, and blue fractions are measured in four cluster-centric annuli from stacked cluster data. To account for differences in cluster optical richness, each cluster is scaled according to r200, where r200 is the radius of a sphere, centered on the cluster, whose average density is 200 times the critical density of the universe. The outer region of the cluster sample shows an increase in the faint-end slope of the u-band luminosity function relative to the r-band, indicating star formation in dwarf galaxies. The blue fraction for dwarf galaxies steadily rises with increasing cluster-centric radii. The change in the blue fraction of giant galaxies also increases, but at a lower rate. Additionally, the inner regions of clusters ranging from 0.185 < z < 0.7 from the "Cluster Lensing and Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH)" are used to generate blue- and red-band luminosity functions, dwarf-to-giant ratios, and blue fractions. Comparisons of the inner region of the CLASH and CFHT clusters show an increase in the blue fraction of dwarf galaxies with redshift that is not present in giant galaxies.

  9. Star and cluster formation in NGC 1275

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richer, Harvey B.; Crabtree, Dennis R.; Fabian, A. C.; Lin, D. N. C.

    1993-01-01

    Luminous, blue, and unresolved objects have been found by imaging the nuclear region of the central galaxy in the Perseus Cluster, NGC 1275. Stellar formation in a cooling flow in which gas clouds confined by weak magnetic fields are allowed to remain at low densities is favored. Cloud-cloud collisions and coagulation in the high cloud density environment at the center of the galaxy then causes some clouds to become gravitationally unstable and to form globular clusters.

  10. Globular cluster formation - The fossil record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Stephen D.; Lin, Douglas N. C.

    1992-01-01

    Properties of globular clusters which have remained unchanged since their formation are used to infer the internal pressures, cooling times, and dynamical times of the protocluster clouds immediately prior to the onset of star formation. For all globular clusters examined, it is found that the cooling times are much less than the dynamical times, implying that the protoclusters must have been maintained in thermal equilibrium by external heat sources, with fluxes consistent with those found in previous work, and giving the observed rho-T relation. Self-gravitating clouds cannot be stably heated, so that the Jeans mass forms an upper limit to the cluster masses. The observed dependence of protocluster pressure upon galactocentric position implies that the protocluster clouds were in hydrostatic equilibrium after their formation. The pressure dependence is well fitted by that expected for a quasi-statically evolving background hot gas, shock heated to its virial temperature. The observations and inferences are combined with previous theoretical work to construct a picture of globular cluster formation.

  11. The Formation of Galaxies and Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Stephen; Morrison, Nancy D.

    1985-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on the formation of galaxies and clusters, focusing on research examining how the materials in galaxies seen today separated from the universal expansion and collapsed into stable bodies. A list of six nontechnical books and articles for readers with less background is included. (JN)

  12. Formation of globular clusters with multiple populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decressin, T.

    2017-03-01

    Spectroscopic and photometric evidences have led to a complete revision of our understanding of globular clusters with the discovery of multiple stellar populations which differ chemically. Whereas some stars have a chemical composition similar to fields stars, others show large star-to-star variations in light elements (Li to Al) while their composition in iron and heavy elements stay constant. This peculiar chemical pattern can be explained by self-pollution of the intracluster gas occurring in the early evolution of clusters. Here the possible impact from a first generation of fast rotating stars to the early evolution of globular clusters is presented. The high rotation velocity will allow the stars to rotate at the break-up velocity and release matter enrich in H-burning which in turn will produce new stars with a chemical composition in agreement with observations. The massive stars have also an important role to clear the cluster from the remaining gas left after the star formation episodes. If the gas expulsion is fast enough, the strong change in the potential well will lead to the loss of stars occupying the outer part of the cluster. As second generation stars are preferentially born in the cluster centre, the ratio of second to first generation stars will increase over time to match the present ratio determined by observations. Considerations on the properties of low-mass stars still present in globular clusters will also be presented.

  13. The Environmental Factor: Driving the Onset and Early Evolution of High-Mass Stars and Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Ingraham, Alana; Marston, Anthony; Martin, Peter; Ristorcelli, Isabelle; Juvela, Mika

    2015-08-01

    While the process leading to the formation of low-mass stars is reasonably well established, the origin of their high-mass counterparts, and in particular, the link with the properties and evolution of the parental structures, remains poorly understood. The key role that high-mass stars and massive clusters play in driving the evolution of the ISM, from planetary to galactic scales, makes this study, however, particularly critical.Here we present the latest results from an ongoing Herschel-based project of high-mass star formation in the Outer Galaxy, and which aims to quantify the complex dependence between the final characteristics of young high-mass stars and the early evolution of their local environment.Datasets from the Herschel imaging survey of OB Young Stellar objects (HOBYS; PI. F. Motte) and the Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-Gal; PI. S. Molinari) Key Programmes are used as a base to carry out an in-depth examination of the cloud physical characteristics, compact source population, and star formation history of those regions with the potential for (and on-going) high-mass star and cluster formation. Results from this study are compelling evidence for the requirement of local external processes, such as stellar feedback (e.g., Convergent Constructive Feedback model; Rivera-Ingraham et al. 2013), in order to counteract the limitations of gravity in the formation and evolution of dense and exotic environments. We will describe how such processes could drive the formation and evolution of the parental host, and therefore influence the final characteristics of the young high-mass stars and clusters (Rivera-Ingraham, et al. 2015a; 2015b, in prep). Our conclusions are further supported by an extensive independent analysis of filamentary properties as a function of Galactic environment (Rivera-Ingraham et al. 2015c; subm), and which we will present as part of the Galactic Cold Cores Key Programme (PI. M. Juvela).

  14. Simulating Stellar Cluster Formation and Early Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Joshua; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Ibañez-Mejia, Juan; Portegies Zwart, Simon; Pellegrino, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    We present our current development of a model of stellar cluster formation and evolution in the presence of stellar feedback. We have integrated the MHD code Flash into the Astrophysical Multi-Use Software Environment (AMUSE) and coupled the gas dynamics to an N-body code using a Fujii gravity bridge. Further we have integrated feedback from radiation using the FERVENT module for Flash, supernovae by thermal and kinetic energy injection, and winds by kinetic energy injection. Finally we have developed a method of implementing star formation using the Jeans criterion of the gas. We present initial results from our cluster formation model in a cloud using self-consistent boundary conditions drawn from a model of supernova-driven interstellar turbulence.

  15. Oak Ridge Institutional Cluster Autotune Test Drive Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jibonananda, Sanyal; New, Joshua Ryan

    2014-02-01

    The Oak Ridge Institutional Cluster (OIC) provides general purpose computational resources for the ORNL staff to run computation heavy jobs that are larger than desktop applications but do not quite require the scale and power of the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). This report details the efforts made and conclusions derived in performing a short test drive of the cluster resources on Phase 5 of the OIC. EnergyPlus was used in the analysis as a candidate user program and the overall software environment was evaluated against anticipated challenges experienced with resources such as the shared memory-Nautilus (JICS) and Titan (OLCF). The OIC performed within reason and was found to be acceptable in the context of running EnergyPlus simulations. The number of cores per node and the availability of scratch space per node allow non-traditional desktop focused applications to leverage parallel ensemble execution. Although only individual runs of EnergyPlus were executed, the software environment on the OIC appeared suitable to run ensemble simulations with some modifications to the Autotune workflow. From a standpoint of general usability, the system supports common Linux libraries, compilers, standard job scheduling software (Torque/Moab), and the OpenMPI library (the only MPI library) for MPI communications. The file system is a Panasas file system which literature indicates to be an efficient file system.

  16. In vivo iron–sulfur cluster formation

    PubMed Central

    Raulfs, Estella C.; O'Carroll, Ina P.; Dos Santos, Patricia C.; Unciuleac, Mihaela-Carmen; Dean, Dennis R.

    2008-01-01

    It has been proposed that iron–sulfur [Fe-S] clusters destined for the maturation of [Fe-S] proteins can be preassembled on a molecular scaffold designated IscU. In the present article, it is shown that production of the intact Azotobacter vinelandii [Fe-S] cluster biosynthetic machinery at levels exceeding the amount required for cellular maturation of [Fe-S] proteins results in the accumulation of: (i) apo-IscU, (ii) an oxygen-labile [2Fe-2S] cluster-loaded form of IscU, and (iii) IscU complexed with the S-delivery protein, IscS. It is suggested that these species represent different stages of the [Fe-S] cluster assembly process. Substitution of the IscU Asp39 residue by Ala results in the in vivo trapping of a stoichiometric, noncovalent, nondissociating IscU–IscS complex that contains an oxygen-resistant [Fe-S] species. In aggregate, these results validate the scaffold hypothesis for [Fe-S] cluster assembly and indicate that in vivo [Fe-S] cluster formation is a dynamic process that involves the reversible interaction of IscU and IscS. PMID:18562278

  17. Burst of Star Formation Drives Galactic Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) captures a lumpy bubble of hot gas rising from a cauldron of glowing matter in Galaxy NGC 3079, located 50 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Ursa Major. Astronomers suspect the bubble is being blown by 'winds' or high speed streams of particles, released during a burst of star formation. The bubble's lumpy surface has four columns of gaseous filaments towering above the galaxy's disc that whirl around in a vortex and are expelled into space. Eventually, this gas will rain down on the disc and may collide with gas clouds, compress them, and form a new generation of stars.

  18. Clustering and asymptotic behavior in opinion formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabin, Pierre-Emmanuel; Motsch, Sebastien

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the long time behavior of models of opinion formation. We consider the case of compactly supported interactions between agents which are also non-symmetric, including for instance the so-called Krause model. Because of the finite range of interaction, convergence to a unique consensus is not expected in general. We are nevertheless able to prove the convergence to a final equilibrium state composed of possibly several local consensus. This result had so far only been conjectured through numerical evidence. Because of the non-symmetry in the model, the analysis is delicate and is performed in two steps: First using entropy estimates to prove the formation of stable clusters and then studying the evolution in each cluster. We study both discrete and continuous in time models and give rates of convergence when those are available.

  19. Formation and recombination of protonated acetonitrile clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plasil, R.; Glosík, J.; Zakouril, P.

    1999-07-01

    Formation of the protonated acetonitrile cluster ions CH3CNH+.CH3CN and their subsequent dissociative recombination with electrons was studied in a high-pressure flowing afterglow using the axially movable Langmuir probe. The first step is the binary proton transfer reaction of H3O+ with CH3CN with the rate coefficient k1 = (5.9±1.9) × 10-9 cm3 s-1. Resulting CH3CNH+ ions further associate with the neutral acetonitrile molecules at pressures 3-5 Torr with the effective binary rate coefficient k2eff = (2.1±0.7) × 10-9 cm3 s-1 forming the clusters H+.(CH3CN)2. Further reaction of these clusters with CH3CN is very slow with the effective binary rate coefficient k3eff = (1.1±0.3) × 10-12 cm3 s-1. The large difference between k2eff and k3eff facilitated the study of dissociative recombination of H+.(CH3CN)2 cluster ions with electrons at thermal energy and pressure p = 4.5-7.0 Torr. The recombination rate coefficient thus obtained is (2.8±1) × 10-6 cm3 s-1.

  20. Accelerating Star Formation in Clusters and Associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, Francesco; Stahler, Steven W.

    2000-09-01

    We use our own, recently developed pre-main-sequence evolutionary tracks to investigate the star formation histories of relatively nearby associations and clusters. We first employ published luminosities and effective temperatures to place the known members of each region in the H-R diagram. We then construct age histograms detailing that region's history. The groups studied include Taurus-Auriga, Lupus, Chamaeleon, ρ Ophiuchi, Upper Scorpius, IC 348, and NGC 2264. This study is the first to analyze a large number of star-forming regions with the same set of theoretical tracks. Our investigation corroborates and extends our previous results on the Orion Nebula Cluster. In all cases, we find that star formation began at a relatively low level some 107 yr in the past and has more recently undergone a steep acceleration. This acceleration, which lasts several million years, is usually continuing through the present epoch. The one clear exception is the OB association Upper Scorpius, where the formation rate climbed upward, peaked, and has now died off. Significantly, this is also the only region of our list that has been largely stripped of molecular gas. The acceleration represents a true physical phenomenon that cannot be explained away by incompleteness of the samples; nor is the pattern of stellar births significantly affected by observational errors or the presence of unresolved binaries. We speculate that increasing star formation activity arises from contraction of the parent cloud. Despite the short timescale for acceleration, the cloud is likely to evolve quasi-statically. Star formation itself appears to be a critical phenomenon, occurring only in locations exceeding some threshold density. The cloud's contraction must reverse itself, and the remnant gas dissipate, in less than 107 yr, even for aggregates containing no massive stars. In this case, molecular outflows from the stars themselves presumably accomplish the task, but the actual dispersal mechanism

  1. Nanodroplet cluster formation in ionic liquid microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanan; Voigt, Andreas; Hilfert, Liane; Sundmacher, Kai

    2008-08-04

    A common ionic liquid (IL), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (bmimBF(4)), is used as polar solvent to induce the formation of a reverse bmimBF(4)-in-toluene IL microemulsion with the aid of the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100. The swelling process of the microemulsion droplets by increasing bmimBF(4) content is detected by dynamic light scattering (DLS), conductivity, UV/Vis spectroscopy, and freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy (FF-TEM). The results show that the microemulsion droplets initially formed are enlarged by the addition of bmimBF(4). However, successive addition of bmimBF(4) lead to the appearance of large-sized microemulsion droplet clusters (200-400 nm). NMR spectroscopic analysis reveal that the special structures and properties of bmimBF(4) and Triton X-100 together with the polar nature of toluene contribute to the formation of such self-assemblies. These unique self-assembled structures of IL-based microemulsion droplet clusters may have some unusual and unique properties with a number of interesting possibilities for potential applications.

  2. Spectroscopic Elucidation of First Steps of Supported Bimetallic Cluster Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, A.; Gates, B.C.

    2009-12-23

    Initial steps of bimetallic Ru-Os cluster formation on MgO in the presence of H{sub 2} are analyzed by EXAFS and IR spectroscopy. Ru-Os bond formation takes place after decarbonylation of Ru{sub 3} clusters and subsequently, at higher temperatures, of Os{sub 3} clusters to generate coordinative unsaturation.

  3. Formation of Education Clusters as a Way to Improve Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aitbayeva, Gul'zamira D.; Zhubanova, Mariyash K.; Kulgildinova, Tulebike A.; Tusupbekova, Gulsum M.; Uaisova, Gulnar I.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyze basic prerequisites formation and development factors of educational clusters of the world's leading nations for studying the possibility of cluster policy introduction and creating educational clusters in the Republic of Kazakhstan. The authors of this study concluded that educational cluster could be…

  4. Dehydration-mediated cluster formation of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sungsook; Joon Lee, Sang

    2015-06-01

    Drying procedure is a powerful method to modulate the bottom-up assembly of basic building component. The initially weak attraction between the components screened in a solution strengthens as the solvent evaporates, organizing the components into structures. Drying is process-dependent, irreversible, and nonequilibrated, thus the mechanism and the dynamics are influenced by many factors. Therefore, the interaction of the solvent and the elements during the drying procedure as well as the resulting pattern formations are strongly related. Nonetheless still many things are open in questions in terms of their dynamics. In this study, nanoscale dehydration procedure is experimentally investigated using a nanoparticle (NP) model system. The role of water is verified in a single NP scale and the patterns of collective NP clusters are determined. Stepwise drying procedures are proposed based on the location from which water is removed. Effective water exodus from a unit NP surface enhances the attractive interaction in nanoscale and induces heterogeneous distribution in microscale. This study provides fundamental proof of systematic relation between the dehydration process and the resultant cluster patterns in hierarchical multiscales.

  5. The physics and modes of star cluster formation: observations.

    PubMed

    Lada, Charles J

    2010-02-28

    Stellar clusters are born in cold and dusty molecular clouds and the youngest clusters are embedded to various degrees in a dusty dark molecular material. Such embedded clusters can be considered protocluster systems. The most deeply buried examples are so heavily obscured by dust that they are only visible at infrared wavelengths. These embedded protoclusters constitute the nearest laboratories for a direct astronomical investigation of the physical processes of cluster formation and early evolution. I review the present state of empirical knowledge concerning embedded-cluster systems and discuss the implications for understanding their formation and subsequent evolution to produce bound stellar clusters.

  6. Counterion-mediated cluster formation by polyphosphoinositides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Slochower, David R.; Janmey, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Polyphosphoinositides (PPI) and in particular PI(4,5)P2, are among the most highly charged molecules in cell membranes, are important in many cellular signaling pathways, and are frequently targeted by peripheral polybasic proteins for anchoring through electrostatic interactions. Such interactions between PIP2 and proteins containing polybasic stretches depend on the physical state and the lateral distribution of PIP2 within the inner leaflet of the cell's lipid bilayer. The physical chemical properties of PIP2 such as pH-dependent changes in headgroup ionization and area per molecule as determined by experiments together with molecular simulations that predict headgroup conformations at various ionization states have revealed the electrostatic properties and phase behavior of PIP2-containing membranes. This review focuses on recent experimental and computational developments in defining the physical chemistry of PIP2 and its interactions with counterions. Ca2+-induced changes in PIP2 charge, conformation, and lateral structure within the membrane are documented by numerous experimental and computational studies. A simplified electrostatic model successfully predicts the Ca2+-driven formation of PIP2 clusters but cannot account for the different effects of Ca2+ and Mg2+ on PIP2-containing membranes. A more recent computational study is able to see the difference between Ca2+ and Mg2+ binding to PIP2 in the absence of a membrane and without cluster formation. Spectroscopic studies suggest that divalent cation- and multivalent polyamine-induced changes in the PIP2 lateral distribution in model membrane are also different, and not simply related to the net charge of the counterion. Among these differences is the capacity of Ca2+ but not other polycations to induce nm scale clusters of PIP2 in fluid membranes. Recent super resolution optical studies show that PIP2 forms nanoclusters in the inner leaflet of a plasma membrane with a similar size distribution as those

  7. The High-mass Truncation of the Star Cluster Mass Function: Limits on Massive Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. C.; PHAT Team

    2017-01-01

    Long-lived star clusters serve as useful tracers of star formation, and massive clusters in particular are often associated with vigorous star formation activity. We examine how massive cluster formation varies as a function of star formation surface density (ΣSFR) by comparing cluster populations from galaxies that span a wide range of characteristic ΣSFR values. The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey yielded an unparalleled census of young star clusters in M31 and allows us to examine massive cluster formation in a low intensity star formation environment. We measure the cluster mass function for a sample of 840 young star clusters with ages between 10-300 Myr. The data show clear evidence of a high-mass truncation: only 15 clusters more massive than 104 M⊙ are observed, compared to ~100 expected for a canonical M-2 power-law mass function with the same total number of clusters above the catalog completeness limit. Adopting a Schechter function parameterization, we fit a characteristic truncation mass (Mc) of 8.5×103 M⊙ — the lowest truncation mass ever reported. When combined with previous mass function results, we find that the cluster mass function truncation correlates strongly with the star formation rate surface density, where Mc ∝ ΣSFR1.3. We also find evidence that suggests the observed Mc-ΣSFR relation also holds for globular clusters, linking the two populations via a common formation pathway.

  8. How stellar feedback simultaneously regulates star formation and drives outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, Christopher C.; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-02-01

    We present an analytic model for how momentum deposition from stellar feedback simultaneously regulates star formation and drives outflows in a turbulent interstellar medium (ISM). Because the ISM is turbulent, a given patch of ISM exhibits sub-patches with a range of surface densities. The high-density patches are 'pushed' by feedback, thereby driving turbulence and self-regulating local star formation. Sufficiently low-density patches, however, are accelerated to above the escape velocity before the region can self-adjust and are thus vented as outflows. When the gas fraction is ≳ 0.3, the ratio of the turbulent velocity dispersion to the circular velocity is sufficiently high that at any given time, of the order of half of the ISM has surface density less than the critical value and thus can be blown out on a dynamical time. The resulting outflows have a mass-loading factor (η ≡ dot{M}_{out}/M_{star }) that is inversely proportional to the gas fraction times the circular velocity. At low gas fractions, the star formation rate needed for local self-regulation, and corresponding turbulent Mach number, declines rapidly; the ISM is 'smoother', and it is actually more difficult to drive winds with large mass-loading factors. Crucially, our model predicts that stellar-feedback-driven outflows should be suppressed at z ≲ 1 in M⋆ ≳ 1010 M⊙ galaxies. This mechanism allows massive galaxies to exhibit violent outflows at high redshifts and then 'shut down' those outflows at late times, thereby enabling the formation of a smooth, extended thin stellar disc. We provide simple fitting functions for η that should be useful for sub-resolution and semi-analytic models.

  9. Reversible cluster formation in concentrated monoclonal antibody solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrin, P. Douglas; Porcar, Lionel; Falus, Peter; Zarraga, Isidro; Wagner, Norm; Liu, Yun

    2015-03-01

    Protein cluster formation in solution is of fundamental interest for both academic research and industrial applications. Recently, industrial scientists are also exploring the effect of reversible cluster formation on biopharmaceutical processing and delivery. However, despite of its importance, the understanding of protein clusters at concentrated solutions remains scientifically very challenging. Using the neutron spin echo technique to study the short time dynamics of proteins in solutions, we have recently systematically studied cluster formation in a few monoclonal antibody (mAb) solutions and their relation with solution viscosity. We show that the existence of anisotropic attraction can cause the formation of finite sized clusters, which increases the solution viscosity. Interestingly, once clusters form at relatively low concentrations, the average size of clusters in solutions remains almost constant over a wide range of concentrations similar to that of micelle formation. For a different mAb we have also investigated, the attraction is mostly induced by hydrophobic patches. As a result, these mAbs form large clusters with loosely linked proteins. In both cases, the formation of clusters all increases the solution viscosity substantially. However, due to different physics origins of cluster formation, solutions viscosities for these two different types of mAbs need to be controlled by different ways.

  10. MD simulation of cluster formation during sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramoto, T.; Okai, M.; Yamashita, Y.; Yorizane, K.; Yamamura, Y.

    2001-06-01

    The cluster ejection due to cluster impact on a solid surface is studied through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Simulations are performed for Cu cluster impacts on the Cu(1 1 1) surface for cluster energy 100 eV/atom, and for clusters of 6, 13, 28 and 55 atoms. Interatomic interactions are described by the AMLJ-EAM potential. The vibration energy spectrum is independent of the incident cluster size and energy. This comes from the fact that sputtered clusters become stable through the successive fragmentation of nascent large sputtered clusters. The vibration energy spectra for large sputtered clusters have a peak, whose energy corresponds to the melting temperature of Cu. The exponent of the power-law fit of the abundance distribution and the total sputtering yield for the cluster impacts are higher than that for the monatomic ion impacts with the same total energy, where the exponent δ is given by Yn∝ nδ and Yn is the yield of sputtered n-atom cluster. The exponent δ follows a unified function of the total sputtering yield, which is a monotonic increase function, and it is nearly equal to δ ˜ -3 for larger yield.

  11. System identification, adaptive control and formation driving of farm tractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekow, Andrew Karl Wilhelm

    Great increases in agricultural productivity and profitability can be gained by increasing the navigational control accuracy of a farm tractor. To maximize accuracy in the presence of environmental uncertainties, a novel technique for on-line parameter identification has been developed. This method combines the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and the Least Mean Square (LMS) algorithms and is used to identify key parameters which describe the dynamics of a farm tractor. This algorithm provides a 15:1 improvement in computational efficiency over the traditional EKF, while offering comparable convergence rates and noise rejection properties. Experimental data on a full-sized John Deere tractor shows a 25 percent improvement in lateral accuracy when using then adaptive controller versus a fixed controller over identical trajectories. In addition to parameter identification, farmers require formation driving capability for routine operations. Multiple farm vehicles work cooperatively together to accomplish a common goal. Several formation driving algorithms were developed for these varying requirements. An experimental implementation of a fully autonomous farm vehicle following a human operated lead vehicle demonstrated an accuracy of 10 centimeters in the in-track direction and 10 centimeters in the cross track direction.

  12. Probing Massive Star Cluster Formation with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey

    2015-08-01

    Observationally constraining the physical conditions that give rise to massive star clusters has been a long-standing challenge. Now with the ALMA Observatory coming on-line, we can finally begin to probe the birth environments of massive clusters in a variety of galaxies with sufficient angular resolution. In this talk I will give an overview of ALMA observations of galaxies in which candidate proto-super star cluster molecular clouds have been identified. These new data probe the physical conditions that give rise to super star clusters, providing information on their densities, pressures, and temperatures. In particular, the observations indicate that these clouds may be subject to external pressures of P/k > 108 K cm-3, which is consistent with the prevalence of optically observed adolescent super star clusters in interacting galaxy systems and other high pressure environments. ALMA observations also enable an assessement of the molecular cloud chemical abundances in the regions surrounding super star clusters. Molecular clouds associated with existing super star clusters are strongly correlated with HCO+ emission, but appear to have relatively low ratio of CO/HCO+ emission compared to other clouds, indicating that the super star clusters are impacting the molecular abundances in their vicinity.

  13. The era of star formation in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Brodwin, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, C. L.; Gettings, D. P.; Zeimann, G. R.; Snyder, G. F.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Pope, A.; Alberts, S.; Eisenhardt, P. R.; Stern, D.; Moustakas, L. A.; Brown, M. J. I.; Chary, R.-R.; Dey, Arjun; Galametz, A.; Jannuzi, B. T.; Miller, E. D.; Moustakas, J.

    2013-12-20

    We analyze the star formation properties of 16 infrared-selected, spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters at 1 < z < 1.5 from the Spitzer/IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). We present new spectroscopic confirmation for six of these high-redshift clusters, five of which are at z > 1.35. Using infrared luminosities measured with deep Spitzer/Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer observations at 24 μm, along with robust optical + IRAC photometric redshifts and spectral-energy-distribution-fitted stellar masses, we present the dust-obscured star-forming fractions, star formation rates, and specific star formation rates in these clusters as functions of redshift and projected clustercentric radius. We find that z ∼ 1.4 represents a transition redshift for the ISCS sample, with clear evidence of an unquenched era of cluster star formation at earlier times. Beyond this redshift, the fraction of star-forming cluster members increases monotonically toward the cluster centers. Indeed, the specific star formation rate in the cores of these distant clusters is consistent with field values at similar redshifts, indicating that at z > 1.4 environment-dependent quenching had not yet been established in ISCS clusters. By combining these observations with complementary studies showing a rapid increase in the active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction, a stochastic star formation history, and a major merging episode at the same epoch in this cluster sample, we suggest that the starburst activity is likely merger-driven and that the subsequent quenching is due to feedback from merger-fueled AGNs. The totality of the evidence suggests we are witnessing the final quenching period that brings an end to the era of star formation in galaxy clusters and initiates the era of passive evolution.

  14. Globular cluster formation with multiple stellar populations from hierarchical star cluster complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekki, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Most old globular clusters (GCs) in the Galaxy are observed to have internal chemical abundance spreads in light elements. We discuss a new GC formation scenario based on hierarchical star formation within fractal molecular clouds. In the new scenario, a cluster of bound and unbound star clusters (`star cluster complex', SCC) that have a power-law cluster mass function with a slope (β) of 2 is first formed from a massive gas clump developed in a dwarf galaxy. Such cluster complexes and β = 2 are observed and expected from hierarchical star formation. The most massive star cluster (`main cluster'), which is the progenitor of a GC, can accrete gas ejected from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars initially in the cluster and other low-mass clusters before the clusters are tidally stripped or destroyed to become field stars in the dwarf. The SCC is initially embedded in a giant gas hole created by numerous supernovae of the SCC so that cold gas outside the hole can be accreted onto the main cluster later. New stars formed from the accreted gas have chemical abundances that are different from those of the original SCC. Using hydrodynamical simulations of GC formation based on this scenario, we show that the main cluster with the initial mass as large as [2 - 5] × 105M⊙ can accrete more than 105M⊙ gas from AGB stars of the SCC. We suggest that merging of hierarchical star cluster complexes can play key roles in stellar halo formation around GCs and self-enrichment processes in the early phase of GC formation.

  15. Reputation drives cooperative behaviour and network formation in human groups.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Jose A; Gracia-Lázaro, Carlos; Ferrer, Alfredo; Moreno, Yamir; Sánchez, Angel

    2015-01-19

    Cooperativeness is a defining feature of human nature. Theoreticians have suggested several mechanisms to explain this ubiquitous phenomenon, including reciprocity, reputation, and punishment, but the problem is still unsolved. Here we show, through experiments conducted with groups of people playing an iterated Prisoner's Dilemma on a dynamic network, that it is reputation what really fosters cooperation. While this mechanism has already been observed in unstructured populations, we find that it acts equally when interactions are given by a network that players can reconfigure dynamically. Furthermore, our observations reveal that memory also drives the network formation process, and cooperators assort more, with longer link lifetimes, the longer the past actions record. Our analysis demonstrates, for the first time, that reputation can be very well quantified as a weighted mean of the fractions of past cooperative acts and the last action performed. This finding has potential applications in collaborative systems and e-commerce.

  16. Reputation drives cooperative behaviour and network formation in human groups

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta, Jose A.; Gracia-Lázaro, Carlos; Ferrer, Alfredo; Moreno, Yamir; Sánchez, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Cooperativeness is a defining feature of human nature. Theoreticians have suggested several mechanisms to explain this ubiquitous phenomenon, including reciprocity, reputation, and punishment, but the problem is still unsolved. Here we show, through experiments conducted with groups of people playing an iterated Prisoner's Dilemma on a dynamic network, that it is reputation what really fosters cooperation. While this mechanism has already been observed in unstructured populations, we find that it acts equally when interactions are given by a network that players can reconfigure dynamically. Furthermore, our observations reveal that memory also drives the network formation process, and cooperators assort more, with longer link lifetimes, the longer the past actions record. Our analysis demonstrates, for the first time, that reputation can be very well quantified as a weighted mean of the fractions of past cooperative acts and the last action performed. This finding has potential applications in collaborative systems and e-commerce. PMID:25598347

  17. Cluster formation in a heterogeneous metapopulation model.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jacques A L

    2016-05-01

    A spatially explicit heterogeneous metapopulation model with two different patch types is analyzed. Some network topologies support a partially synchronized dynamics, a state where two different clusters of patches are formed. Within each cluster the dynamics of all patches are synchronized. The linearized asymptotic stability of the partially synchronized attractor is studied. The transversal stability is analyzed and a simple expression for the transversal Lyapunov number of partially synchronized attractors is obtained.

  18. Star Cluster Formation in Cosmological Simulations. I. Properties of Young Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Meng, Xi; Semenov, Vadim A.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2017-01-01

    We present a new implementation of star formation in cosmological simulations by considering star clusters as a unit of star formation. Cluster particles grow in mass over several million years at the rate determined by local gas properties, with high time resolution. The particle growth is terminated by its own energy and momentum feedback on the interstellar medium. We test this implementation for Milky Way-sized galaxies at high redshift by comparing the properties of model clusters with observations of young star clusters. We find that the cluster initial mass function is best described by a Schechter function rather than a single power law. In agreement with observations, at low masses the logarithmic slope is α ≈ 1.8{--}2, while the cutoff at high mass scales with the star formation rate (SFR). A related trend is a positive correlation between the surface density of the SFR and fraction of stars contained in massive clusters. Both trends indicate that the formation of massive star clusters is preferred during bursts of star formation. These bursts are often associated with major-merger events. We also find that the median timescale for cluster formation ranges from 0.5 to 4 Myr and decreases systematically with increasing star formation efficiency. Local variations in the gas density and cluster accretion rate naturally lead to the scatter of the overall formation efficiency by an order of magnitude, even when the instantaneous efficiency is kept constant. Comparison of the formation timescale with the observed age spread of young star clusters provides an additional important constraint on the modeling of star formation and feedback schemes.

  19. The star cluster formation history of the LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgardt, H.; Parmentier, G.; Anders, P.; Grebel, E. K.

    2013-03-01

    The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is one of the nearest galaxies to us and is one of only few galaxies where the star formation history can be determined from studying resolved stellar populations. We have compiled a new catalogue of ages, luminosities and masses of LMC star clusters and used it to determine the age distribution and dissolution rate of LMC star clusters. We find that the frequency of massive clusters with masses M > 5000 M⊙ is almost constant between 10 and 200 Myr, showing that the influence of residual gas expulsion is limited to the first 10 Myr of cluster evolution or clusters less massive than 5000 M⊙. Comparing the cluster frequency in that interval with the absolute star formation rate, we find that about 15 per cent of all stars in the LMC were formed in long-lived star clusters that survive for more than 10 Myr. We also find that the mass function of LMC clusters younger than 109 Gyr can be fitted by a power-law mass function N(m) ˜ m-α with slope α = 2.3, while older clusters follow a significantly shallower slope and interpret that this is a sign of either incompleteness or the ongoing dissolution of low-mass clusters. Our data show that for ages older than 200 Myr, about 90 per cent of all clusters are lost per dex of lifetime. The implied cluster dissolution rate is significantly faster than that based on analytic estimates and N-body simulations. Our cluster age data finally show evidence for a burst in cluster formation about 109 yr ago, but little evidence for bursts at other ages.

  20. Bimodal regime in young massive clusters leading to formation of subsequent stellar generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunsch, Richard; Palous, Jan; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana; Ehlerova, Sona

    2015-08-01

    Massive stars in young massive clusters insert tremendous amounts of mass and energy into their surroundings in the form of stellar winds and supernova ejecta. Mutual shock-shock collisions lead to formation of hot gas, filling the volume of the cluster. The pressure of this gas then drives a powerful cluster wind. However, it has been shown that if the cluster is massive and dense enough, it can evolve in the so called bimodal regime, in which the hot gas inside the cluster becomes thermally unstable and forms dense clumps which are trapped inside the cluster by its gravity.We will review works on the bimodal regime and discuss the implications for the formation of subsequent stellar generations. The mass accumulates inside the cluster and as soon as a high enough column density is reached, the interior of the clumps becomes self-shielded against the ionising radiation of, stars and the clumps collapse and form new stars. The second stellar generation will be enriched by products of the stellar evolution of the first generation, and will be concentrated near the cluster center.

  1. What interactions drive the salivary mucosal pellicle formation?

    PubMed Central

    Gibbins, Hannah L.; Yakubov, Gleb E.; Proctor, Gordon B.; Wilson, Stephen; Carpenter, Guy H.

    2014-01-01

    The bound salivary pellicle is essential for protection of both the enamel and mucosa in the oral cavity. The enamel pellicle formation is well characterised, however the mucosal pellicle proteins have only recently been clarified and what drives their formation is still unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the salivary pellicle on particles with different surface properties (hydrophobic or hydrophilic with a positive or negative charge), to determine a suitable model to mimic the mucosal pellicle. A secondary aim was to use the model to test how transglutaminase may alter pellicle formation. Particles were incubated with resting whole mouth saliva, parotid saliva and submandibular/sublingual saliva. Following incubation and two PBS and water washes bound salivary proteins were eluted with two concentrations of SDS, which were later analysed using SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Experiments were repeated with purified transglutaminase to determine how this epithelial-derived enzyme may alter the bound pellicle. Protein pellicles varied according to the starting salivary composition and the particle chemistry. Amylase, the single most abundant protein in saliva, did not bind to any particle indicating specific protein binding. Most proteins bound through hydrophobic interactions and a few according to their charges. The hydrophobic surface most closely matched the known salivary mucosal pellicle by containing mucins, cystatin and statherin but an absence of amylase and proline-rich proteins. This surface was further used to examine the effect of added transglutaminase. At the concentrations used only statherin showed any evidence of crosslinking with itself or another saliva protein. In conclusion, the formation of the salivary mucosal pellicle is probably mediated, at least in part, by hydrophobic interactions to the epithelial cell surface. PMID:24921197

  2. Clustering algorithms for Stokes space modulation format recognition.

    PubMed

    Boada, Ricard; Borkowski, Robert; Monroy, Idelfonso Tafur

    2015-06-15

    Stokes space modulation format recognition (Stokes MFR) is a blind method enabling digital coherent receivers to infer modulation format information directly from a received polarization-division-multiplexed signal. A crucial part of the Stokes MFR is a clustering algorithm, which largely influences the performance of the detection process, particularly at low signal-to-noise ratios. This paper reports on an extensive study of six different clustering algorithms: k-means, expectation maximization, density-based DBSCAN and OPTICS, spectral clustering and maximum likelihood clustering, used for discriminating between dual polarization: BPSK, QPSK, 8-PSK, 8-QAM, and 16-QAM. We determine essential performance metrics for each clustering algorithm and modulation format under test: minimum required signal-to-noise ratio, detection accuracy and algorithm complexity.

  3. OT2_baltieri_5: Star formation in proto-clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altieri, B.

    2011-09-01

    Massive clusters of galaxies have been found to date from as early as 3-4 billion years after the Big Bang. Cosmological simulations using the current cold dark matter model predict that these systems should descend from 'proto-clusters' - early overdensities of massive galaxies that merge hierarchically to form a cluster. These protocluster regions themselves are built up hierarchically and so are expected to contain extremely massive galaxies, progenitors of the quiescent behemoths observed in cores of the present day massive galaxy clusters. Observational evidence for this picture, however, is sparse because high-redshift proto-clusters are rare and difficult to observe. Here we propose to probe with Herschel SPIRE the very beginning of the cluster and massive galaxies formation process by observing 5 proto-clusters at 3formation at such high redshift, to compare the properties of the proto-cluster galaxies with those of field galaxies at similar redshift. Determining whether cluster galaxies differ from field galaxies when the proto-cluster was still forming, tells us whether any of the difference observed today is driven by nature as apposed to nurture.

  4. The INfrared Survey of Young Nebulous Clusters (IN-SYNC): Surveying the Dynamics and Star Formation Histories of Young Clusters with APOGEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covey, Kevin R.; Cottaar, Michiel; Foster, Jonathan B.; Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan; Meyer, Michael; Nidever, David L.; Flaherty, Kevin M.; Arce, Hector G.; Rebull, Luisa M.; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Hearty, Fred R.; Majewski, Steven R.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Stassun, Keivan; Wilson, John C.; Zasowski, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Young clusters are the most prolific sites of star formation in the Milky Way, but demographic studies indicate that relatively few of the Milky Way's stellar clusters persist as bound structures for 100 Myrs or longer. Uniform & precise measurements of the stellar populations and internal dynamics of these regions are difficult to obtain, however, particularly for extremely young clusters whose optical visibility is greatly hampered by their parental molecular cloud. The INfrared Survey of Young Nebulous Clusters (IN-SYNC), an SDSS-III ancillary science program, leverages the stability and multiplex capability of the APOGEE spectrograph to obtain high resolution spectra at near-infrared wavelengths, where photospheric emission is better able to penetrate the dusty shrouds that surround sites of active star formation. We summarize our recent measurements of the kinematics and stellar populations of IC 348 and NGC 1333, two young clusters in the Perseus Molecular Cloud, and of the members of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) and L1641 filament in the Orion molecular complex. These measurements highlight the dynamically 'warm' environment within these young clusters, and suggest a range of stellar radii within these quasi-single-age populations. We close with a preview of plans for continuing this work as part of the APOGEE-2 science portfolio: self-consistent measurements of the kinematics and star formation histories for clusters spanning a range of initial conditions and ages will provide a opportunity to disentangle the mechanisms that drive the formation and dissolution of sites of active star formation.

  5. STAR FORMATION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT CLUSTER ELLIPTICALS

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Cory R.; Brodwin, Mark; Snyder, Gregory F.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, Conor L.; Stanford, S. A.; Alberts, Stacey; Pope, Alexandra; Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Zeimann, Gregory R.; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Dey, Arjun; Moustakas, John

    2015-02-20

    We measure the star formation rates (SFRs) of massive (M {sub *} > 10{sup 10.1} M {sub ☉}) early-type galaxies (ETGs) in a sample of 11 high-redshift (1.0 < z < 1.5) galaxy clusters drawn from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). We identify ETGs visually from Hubble Space Telescope imaging and select likely cluster members as having either an appropriate spectroscopic redshift or red-sequence color. Mid-infrared SFRs are measured using Spitzer 24 μm data for isolated cluster galaxies for which contamination by neighbors, and active galactic nuclei, can be ruled out. Cluster ETGs show enhanced specific star formation rates (sSFRs) compared to cluster galaxies in the local universe, but have sSFRs more than four times lower than that of field ETGs at 1 < z < 1.5. Relative to the late-type cluster population, isolated ETGs show substantially quenched mean SFRs, yet still contribute 12% of the overall star formation activity measured in 1 < z < 1.5 clusters. We find that new ETGs are likely being formed in ISCS clusters; the fraction of cluster galaxies identified as ETGs increases from 34% to 56% from z ∼ 1.5 → 1.25. While the fraction of cluster ETGs that are highly star-forming (SFR ≥ 26 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) drops from 27% to 10% over the same period, their sSFRs are roughly constant. All these factors taken together suggest that, particularly at z ≳ 1.25, the events that created these distant cluster ETGs—likely mergers, at least among the most massive—were both recent and gas-rich.

  6. Clustering and Pattern Formation in Chemorepulsive Active Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebchen, Benno; Marenduzzo, Davide; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Cates, Michael E.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate that migration away from self-produced chemicals (chemorepulsion) generates a generic route to clustering and pattern formation among self-propelled colloids. The clustering instability can be caused either by anisotropic chemical production, or by a delayed orientational response to changes of the chemical environment. In each case, chemorepulsion creates clusters of a self-limiting area which grows linearly with self-propulsion speed. This agrees with recent observations of dynamic clusters in Janus colloids (albeit not yet known to be chemorepulsive). More generally, our results could inform design principles for the self-assembly of chemorepulsive synthetic swimmers and/or bacteria into nonequilibrium patterns.

  7. Improving performance through concept formation and conceptual clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Douglas H.

    1992-01-01

    Research from June 1989 through October 1992 focussed on concept formation, clustering, and supervised learning for purposes of improving the efficiency of problem-solving, planning, and diagnosis. These projects resulted in two dissertations on clustering, explanation-based learning, and means-ends planning, and publications in conferences and workshops, several book chapters, and journals; a complete Bibliography of NASA Ames supported publications is included. The following topics are studied: clustering of explanations and problem-solving experiences; clustering and means-end planning; and diagnosis of space shuttle and space station operating modes.

  8. Stresses and Cracking During Chromia-Spinel-NiO Cluster Formation in TBC Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, Robert; Gupta, Mohit; Broitman, Esteban; Jonnalagadda, Krishna Praveen; Nylén, Per; Lin Peng, Ru

    2015-08-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are used in gas turbines to reduce the temperatures in the underlying substrate. There are several mechanisms that may cause the TBC to fail; one of them is cracking in the coating interface due to extensive oxidation. In the present study, the role of so called chromia-spinel-NiO (CSN) clusters in TBC failure was studied. Such clusters have previously been found to be prone to cracking. Finite element modeling was performed on a CSN cluster to find out at which stage of its formation it cracks and what the driving mechanisms of cracking are. The geometry of a cluster was obtained from micrographs and modeled as close as possible. Nanoindentation was performed on the cluster to get the correct Young's moduli. The volumetric expansion associated with the formation of NiO was also included. It was found that the cracking of the CSN clusters is likely to occur during its last stage of formation as the last Ni-rich core oxidizes. Furthermore, it was shown that the volumetric expansion associated with the oxidation only plays a minor role and that the main reason for cracking is the high coefficient of thermal expansion of NiO.

  9. Lithium formate ion clusters formation during electrospray ionization: Evidence of magic number clusters by mass spectrometry and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil; Bogdanov, Bogdan

    2015-02-14

    Small cationic and anionic clusters of lithium formate were generated by electrospray ionization and their fragmentations were studied by tandem mass spectrometry. Singly as well as multiply charged clusters were formed with the general formulae, (HCOOLi)nLi+, (HCOOLi)nLimm+, (HCOOLi)nHCOO- and (HCOOLi)n(HCOO)mm-. Several magic number cluster ions were observed in both the positive and negative ion modes although more predominant in the positive ion mode with (HCOOLi)3Li+ being the most abundant and stable cluster ions. Fragmentations of singly charged clusters proceed first by the loss of a dimer unit ((HCOOLi)2) followed by sequential loss of monomer units (HCOOLi). In the case of positive cluster ions, all fragmentations lead to the magic cluster (HCOOLi)3Li+ at higher collision energies which later fragments to dimer and monomer ions in lower abundance. Quantum mechanical calculations performed for smaller cluster ions showed that the trimer ion has a closed ring structure similar to the phenalenylium structure with three closed rings connected to the lithium ion. Further additions of monomer units result in similar symmetric structures for hexamer and nonamer cluster ions. Thermochemical calculations show that trimer cluster ion is relatively more stable than neighboring cluster ions, supporting the experimental observation of a magic number cluster with enhanced stability.

  10. Formation and Levitation of Unconfined Droplet Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, S.; Ruff, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    Combustion experiments using arrays of droplets seek to provide a link between single droplet combustion phenomena and the behavior of complex spray combustion systems. Both single droplet and droplet array studies have been conducted in microgravity to better isolate the droplet interaction phenomena and eliminate or reduce the confounding effects of buoyancy-induced convection. In most experiments involving droplet arrays, the droplets are supported on fibers to keep them stationary and close together before the combustion event. The presence of the fiber, however, disturbs the combustion process by introducing a source of heat transfer and asymmetry into the configuration. As the number of drops in a droplet array increases, supporting the drops on fibers becomes less practical because of the cumulative effect of the fibers on the combustion process. The overall objective of this research is to study the combustion of well-characterized drop clusters in a microgravity environment. Direct experimental observations and measurements of the combustion of droplet clusters would fill a large gap in our current understanding of droplet and spray combustion and provide unique experimental data for the verification and improvement of spray combustion models. This paper describes current work on the design and performance of an apparatus to generate and stabilize droplet clusters using acoustic and electrostatic forces.

  11. Clustered star formation and the origin of stellar masses.

    PubMed

    Pudritz, Ralph E

    2002-01-04

    Star clusters are ubiquitous in galaxies of all types and at all stages of their evolution. We also observe them to be forming in a wide variety of environments, ranging from nearby giant molecular clouds to the supergiant molecular clouds found in starburst and merging galaxies. The typical star in our galaxy and probably in others formed as a member of a star cluster, so star formation is an intrinsically clustered and not an isolated phenomenon. The greatest challenge regarding clustered star formation is to understand why stars have a mass spectrum that appears to be universal. This review examines the observations and models that have been proposed to explain these fundamental issues in stellar formation.

  12. Bottlebrush additives drive formation of vesicle chains in polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mah, Hui Zhen; Afzali, Pantea; Verduzco, Rafeal; Stein, Gila

    2015-03-01

    The effects of bottlebrush polymer additive with poly (styrene-r-methyl methacrylate) side-chains on the thin film morphology of polystyrene (PS) and poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) blends were studied. Results were compared to PS/PMMA blends with diblock copolymer PS-b-PMMA compatibilizer and without any additive. Thin films were spin casted from toluene onto a ``neutral'' silicon surface and then annealed at a fixed temperature of 150ºC for a range of times (up to 85 mins). The morphology of the films was characterized using optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy. In the absence of any additive, the PS/PMMA blend rapidly de-mixes to form macroscale domains, while high loadings of the PS-b-PMMA additive can compatibilize the blend and suppress phase separation. However, the bottlebrush polymer additive drives the formation of well-organized vesicle chains in the PS/PMMA blend films. This morphology is favored by entropic considerations as the bottlebrush polymers are more stable than linear chains at the PS/PMMA interface and the brush like surface attracts.

  13. Galactic flows and the formation of stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilgys, Romas; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the formation of stellar clusters from a Galactic scale SPH simulation. The simulation traces star formation over a 5.6 Myr timescale, with local gravitational instabilities resulting in ~ 105 solar masses of star formation in the form of sink particles. We investigate the time evolution of the physical properties of the forming clusters including their half-mass radii, their energies and the depletion time of the gas. Star formation is driven by the large scale flows which compress the gas to higher densities where self gravity takes over and collapse occurs. We show that the more massive clusters (up to ~ 2 × 104 solar masses) gather their material from of order 10 pc due to these large scale motions associated with the spiral arm passage and shock. The bulk of the gas becomes gravitationally bound near 1-2 Myr before sink formation, and in the absence of feedback, significant accretion ongoing on longer timescales. We trace the hierarchical merging process of cluster formation which naturally results in age spreads of order the crossing time of the original region which provides the gas reservoir for the cluster.

  14. The efficiency of star formation in clustered and distributed regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnell, Ian A.; Smith, Rowan J.; Clark, Paul C.; Bate, Matthew R.

    2011-02-01

    We investigate the formation of both clustered and distributed populations of young stars in a single molecular cloud. We present a numerical simulation of a 104 M⊙ elongated, turbulent, molecular cloud and the formation of over 2500 stars. The stars form both in stellar clusters and in a distributed mode, which is determined by the local gravitational binding of the cloud. A density gradient along the major axis of the cloud produces bound regions that form stellar clusters and unbound regions that form a more distributed population. The initial mass function (IMF) also depends on the local gravitational binding of the cloud with bound regions forming full IMFs whereas in the unbound, distributed regions the stellar masses cluster around the local Jeans mass and lack both the high-mass and the low-mass stars. The overall efficiency of star formation is ≈ 15 per cent in the cloud when the calculation is terminated, but varies from less than 1 per cent in the regions of distributed star formation to ≈ 40 per cent in regions containing large stellar clusters. Considering that large-scale surveys are likely to catch clouds at all evolutionary stages, estimates of the (time-averaged) star formation efficiency (SFE) for the giant molecular cloud reported here is only ≈ 4 per cent. This would lead to the erroneous conclusion of slow star formation when in fact it is occurring on a dynamical time-scale.

  15. Hα star formation rates of z > 1 galaxy clusters in the IRAC shallow cluster survey

    SciTech Connect

    Zeimann, Gregory R.; Stanford, S. A.; Brodwin, Mark; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, Conor; Snyder, Gregory F.; Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, Peter; Dey, Arjun; Moustakas, John

    2013-12-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope near-IR spectroscopy for 18 galaxy clusters at 1.0 Cluster Survey. We use Wide Field Camera 3 grism data to spectroscopically identify Hα emitters in both the cores of galaxy clusters as well as in field galaxies. We find a large cluster-to-cluster scatter in the star formation rates within a projected radius of 500 kpc, and many of our clusters (∼60%) have significant levels of star formation within a projected radius of 200 kpc. A stacking analysis reveals that dust reddening in these star-forming galaxies is positively correlated with stellar mass and may be higher in the field than the cluster at a fixed stellar mass. This may indicate a lower amount of gas in star-forming cluster galaxies than in the field population. Also, Hα equivalent widths of star-forming galaxies in the cluster environment are still suppressed below the level of the field. This suppression is most significant for lower mass galaxies (log M {sub *} < 10.0 M {sub ☉}). We therefore conclude that environmental effects are still important at 1.0 clusters with log M {sub *} ≲ 10.0 M {sub ☉}.

  16. Formation of Globular Clusters in Hierarchical Cosmology: ART and Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Prieto, José L.

    We test the hypothesis that globular clusters form in supergiant molecular clouds within high-redshift galaxies. Numerical simulations demonstrate that such large, dense, and cold gas clouds assemble naturally in current hierarchical models of galaxy formation. These clouds are enriched with heavy elements from earlier stars and could produce star clusters in a similar way to nearby molecular clouds. The masses and sizes of the model clusters are in excellent agreement with the observations of young massive clusters. Do these model clusters evolve into globular clusters that we see in our and external galaxies? In order to study their dynamical evolution, we calculate the orbits of model clusters using the outputs of the cosmological simulation of a Milky Way-sized galaxy. We find that at present the orbits are isotropic in the inner 50 kpc of the Galaxy and preferentially radial at larger distances. All clusters located outside 10 kpc from the center formed in the now-disrupted satellite galaxies. The spatial distribution of model clusters is spheroidal, with a power-law density profile consistent with observations. The combination of two-body scattering, tidal shocks, and stellar evolution results in the evolution of the cluster mass function from an initial power law to the observed log-normal distribution. However, not all initial conditions and not all evolution scenarios are consistent with the observed mass function.

  17. The Star Cluster Mass-Galactocentric Radius Relation: Implications for Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weijia; de Grijs, Richard; Fan, Zhou; Cameron, Ewan

    2016-01-01

    Whether or not the initial star cluster mass function is established through a universal, galactocentric-distance-independent stochastic process, on the scales of individual galaxies, remains an unsolved problem. This debate has recently gained new impetus through the publication of a study that concluded that the maximum cluster mass in a given population is not solely determined by size-of-sample effects. Here, we revisit the evidence in favor and against stochastic cluster formation by examining the young (≲ a few × {10}8 year old) star cluster mass-galactocentric radius relation in M33, M51, M83, and the Large Magellanic Cloud. To eliminate size-of-sample effects, we first adopt radial bin sizes containing constant numbers of clusters, which we use to quantify the radial distribution of the first- to fifth-ranked most massive clusters using ordinary least-squares fitting. We supplement this analysis with an application of quantile regression, a binless approach to rank-based regression taking an absolute-value-distance penalty. Both methods yield, within the 1σ to 3σ uncertainties, near-zero slopes in the diagnostic plane, largely irrespective of the maximum age or minimum mass imposed on our sample selection, or of the radial bin size adopted. We conclude that, at least in our four well-studied sample galaxies, star cluster formation does not necessarily require an environment-dependent cluster formation scenario, which thus supports the notion of stochastic star cluster formation as the dominant star cluster-formation process within a given galaxy.

  18. Chemical abundances in Virgo cluster spirals - what drives the environmental dependence of galaxy metallicity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Sara; Skillman, Evan; Chung, Aeree

    2009-08-01

    The Virgo cluster is not only our nearest massive cluster, but its dynamical infancy also renders it an ideal laboratory for studies of cluster formation and galaxy evolution. Given the intense interest in Virgo, it is astounding that only 9 out of over 100 spirals in its firmament have chemical abundance measurements. We propose to simultaneously address this gap in our fundamental knowledge of Virgo cluster spirals and investigate how the metallicity and abundance gradients of star forming galaxies are sensitive to environment. Our sample consists of 13 Virgo cluster spiral galaxies, preferentially gas-poor early types, which complement the existing metallicity measurements. We also sample a range of clustercentric distances (0.3 -- 3 Mpc from M87), local densities and include several galaxies which exhibit evidence for interactions with the intra-cluster medium.

  19. Signatures of Star Cluster Formation by Cold Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Aleksandra; Hartmann, Lee; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier

    2015-12-01

    Subvirial gravitational collapse is one mechanism by which star clusters may form. Here we investigate whether this mechanism can be inferred from observations of young clusters. To address this question, we have computed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the initial formation and evolution of a dynamically young star cluster through cold (subvirial) collapse, starting with an ellipsoidal, turbulently seeded distribution of gas, and forming sink particles representing (proto)stars. While the initial density distributions of the clouds do not have large initial mass concentrations, gravitational focusing due to the global morphology leads to cluster formation. We use the resulting structures to extract observable morphological and kinematic signatures for the case of subvirial collapse. We find that the signatures of the initial conditions can be erased rapidly as the gas and stars collapse, suggesting that kinematic observations need to be made early in cluster formation and/or at larger scales, away from the growing cluster core. Our results emphasize that a dynamically young system is inherently evolving on short timescales, so that it can be highly misleading to use current-epoch conditions to study aspects such as star formation rates as a function of local density. Our simulations serve as a starting point for further studies of collapse including other factors such as magnetic fields and stellar feedback.

  20. SIGNATURES OF STAR CLUSTER FORMATION BY COLD COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, Aleksandra; Hartmann, Lee; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier

    2015-12-10

    Subvirial gravitational collapse is one mechanism by which star clusters may form. Here we investigate whether this mechanism can be inferred from observations of young clusters. To address this question, we have computed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the initial formation and evolution of a dynamically young star cluster through cold (subvirial) collapse, starting with an ellipsoidal, turbulently seeded distribution of gas, and forming sink particles representing (proto)stars. While the initial density distributions of the clouds do not have large initial mass concentrations, gravitational focusing due to the global morphology leads to cluster formation. We use the resulting structures to extract observable morphological and kinematic signatures for the case of subvirial collapse. We find that the signatures of the initial conditions can be erased rapidly as the gas and stars collapse, suggesting that kinematic observations need to be made early in cluster formation and/or at larger scales, away from the growing cluster core. Our results emphasize that a dynamically young system is inherently evolving on short timescales, so that it can be highly misleading to use current-epoch conditions to study aspects such as star formation rates as a function of local density. Our simulations serve as a starting point for further studies of collapse including other factors such as magnetic fields and stellar feedback.

  1. The gaseous proto-cluster: better characterizing the initial conditions of stellar cluster formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.-N.; Hennebelle, P.

    2016-12-01

    Cluster formation simulations have always been numerically challenging due to the large range of spatial and temporal scales that vary by orders of magnitudes and multiple physical mechanisms involved. The simulation box is typically of parsec (pc) scale while resolution down to a few astronomical units (AUs) is needed to well resolve individual stars. However, studies of this kind are important for the understanding of the interaction between gravity and turbulence that guides the star formation and the mechanisms through which the possibly self-regulated initial mass function (IMF) is shaped by stellar feedback. Most simulation works have initial conditions that correspond to molecular clouds (MCs), while the actual star formation occurs in a very small volume fraction of the whole simulation box. We present a series of simulations to characterise the early stage of cluster formation, of which a primary stage of gas concentration is noticed. We denote this stage as the gaseous proto-cluster, which forms from gravo-turbulent collapse of the MC. This high-density region is indeed the principle site of star formation. The existence of this primary stage implies that the cluster formation environment is somewhat universal and cluster formation studies could therefore set out from more local conditions, therefore reducing the computational demand.

  2. Lithium formate ion clusters formation during electrospray ionization: Evidence of magic number clusters by mass spectrometry and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Anil; Bogdanov, Bogdan

    2015-02-14

    Small cationic and anionic clusters of lithium formate were generated by electrospray ionization and their fragmentations were studied by tandem mass spectrometry (collision-induced dissociation with N2). Singly as well as multiply charged clusters were formed in both positive and negative ion modes with the general formulae, (HCOOLi)nLi(+), (HCOOLi)nLim (m+), (HCOOLi)nHCOO(-), and (HCOOLi)n(HCOO)m (m-). Several magic number cluster (MNC) ions were observed in both the positive and negative ion modes although more predominant in the positive ion mode with (HCOOLi)3Li(+) being the most abundant and stable cluster ion. Fragmentations of singly charged positive clusters proceed first by the loss of a dimer unit ((HCOOLi)2) followed by the loss of monomer units (HCOOLi) although the former remains the dominant dissociation process. In the case of positive cluster ions, all fragmentations lead to the magic cluster (HCOOLi)3Li(+) as the most abundant fragment ion at higher collision energies which then fragments further to dimer and monomer ions at lower abundances. In the negative ion mode, however, singly charged clusters dissociated via sequential loss of monomer units. Multiply charged clusters in both positive and negative ion modes dissociated mainly via Coulomb repulsion. Quantum chemical calculations performed for smaller cluster ions showed that the trimer ion has a closed ring structure similar to the phenalenylium structure with three closed rings connected to the central lithium ion. Further additions of monomer units result in similar symmetric structures for hexamer and nonamer cluster ions. Thermochemical calculations show that trimer cluster ion is relatively more stable than neighboring cluster ions, supporting the experimental observation of a magic number cluster with enhanced stability.

  3. Lithium formate ion clusters formation during electrospray ionization: Evidence of magic number clusters by mass spectrometry and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil; Bogdanov, Bogdan

    2015-02-14

    Small cationic and anionic clusters of lithium formate were generated by electrospray ionization and their fragmentations were studied by tandem mass spectrometry (collision-induced dissociation with N{sub 2}). Singly as well as multiply charged clusters were formed in both positive and negative ion modes with the general formulae, (HCOOLi){sub n}Li{sup +}, (HCOOLi){sub n}Li{sub m}{sup m+}, (HCOOLi){sub n}HCOO{sup −}, and (HCOOLi){sub n}(HCOO){sub m}{sup m−}. Several magic number cluster (MNC) ions were observed in both the positive and negative ion modes although more predominant in the positive ion mode with (HCOOLi){sub 3}Li{sup +} being the most abundant and stable cluster ion. Fragmentations of singly charged positive clusters proceed first by the loss of a dimer unit ((HCOOLi){sub 2}) followed by the loss of monomer units (HCOOLi) although the former remains the dominant dissociation process. In the case of positive cluster ions, all fragmentations lead to the magic cluster (HCOOLi){sub 3}Li{sup +} as the most abundant fragment ion at higher collision energies which then fragments further to dimer and monomer ions at lower abundances. In the negative ion mode, however, singly charged clusters dissociated via sequential loss of monomer units. Multiply charged clusters in both positive and negative ion modes dissociated mainly via Coulomb repulsion. Quantum chemical calculations performed for smaller cluster ions showed that the trimer ion has a closed ring structure similar to the phenalenylium structure with three closed rings connected to the central lithium ion. Further additions of monomer units result in similar symmetric structures for hexamer and nonamer cluster ions. Thermochemical calculations show that trimer cluster ion is relatively more stable than neighboring cluster ions, supporting the experimental observation of a magic number cluster with enhanced stability.

  4. New insights on the formation of nuclear star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillard, Nicolas; Emsellem, Eric; Renaud, Florent

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear clusters (NCs) are common stellar systems in the centres of galaxies. Yet, the physical mechanisms involved in their formation are still debated. Using a parsec-resolution hydrodynamical simulation of a dwarf galaxy, we propose an updated formation scenario for NCs. In this `wet migration scenario', a massive star cluster forms in the gas-rich disc, keeping a gas reservoir, and growing further while it migrates to the centre via a combination of interactions with other substructures and dynamical friction. A wet merger with another dense cluster and its own gas reservoir can occur, although this is not a prerequisite for the actual formation of the NC. The merging process does significantly alter the properties of the NC (mass, morphology, star formation history), also quenching the ongoing local star formation activity, thus leading to interesting observational diagnostics for the physical origin of NCs. A population of lower mass clusters co-exist during the simulation, but these are either destroyed via tidal forces, or have high angular momentum preventing them to interact with the NC and contribute to its growth. The proposed updated scenario emphasizes the role of gas reservoirs associated with the densest star clusters formed in a gas-rich low-mass galaxy.

  5. STAR FORMATION AND RELAXATION IN 379 NEARBY GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Seth A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Wegner, Gary A.

    2015-06-10

    We investigate the relationship between star formation (SF) and level of relaxation in a sample of 379 galaxy clusters at z < 0.2. We use data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to measure cluster membership and level of relaxation, and to select star-forming galaxies based on mid-infrared emission detected with the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer. For galaxies with absolute magnitudes M{sub r} < −19.5, we find an inverse correlation between SF fraction and cluster relaxation: as a cluster becomes less relaxed, its SF fraction increases. Furthermore, in general, the subtracted SF fraction in all unrelaxed clusters (0.117 ± 0.003) is higher than that in all relaxed clusters (0.097 ± 0.005). We verify the validity of our SF calculation methods and membership criteria through analysis of previous work. Our results agree with previous findings that a weak correlation exists between cluster SF and dynamical state, possibly because unrelaxed clusters are less evolved relative to relaxed clusters.

  6. Geometric and potential driving formation and evolution of biomolecular surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bates, P W; Chen, Zhan; Sun, Yuhui; Wei, Guo-Wei; Zhao, Shan

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents new geometrical flow equations for the theoretical modeling of biomolecular surfaces in the context of multiscale implicit solvent models. To account for the local variations near the biomolecular surfaces due to interactions between solvent molecules, and between solvent and solute molecules, we propose potential driven geometric flows, which balance the intrinsic geometric forces that would occur for a surface separating two homogeneous materials with the potential forces induced by the atomic interactions. Stochastic geometric flows are introduced to account for the random fluctuation and dissipation in density and pressure near the solvent-solute interface. Physical properties, such as free energy minimization (area decreasing) and incompressibility (volume preserving), are realized by some of our geometric flow equations. The proposed approach for geometric and potential forces driving the formation and evolution of biological surfaces is illustrated by extensive numerical experiments and compared with established minimal molecular surfaces and molecular surfaces. Local modification of biomolecular surfaces is demonstrated with potential driven geometric flows. High order geometric flows are also considered and tested in the present work for surface generation. Biomolecular surfaces generated by these approaches are typically free of geometric singularities. As the speed of surface generation is crucial to implicit solvent model based molecular dynamics, four numerical algorithms, a semi-implicit scheme, a Crank-Nicolson scheme, and two alternating direction implicit (ADI) schemes, are constructed and tested. Being either stable or conditionally stable but admitting a large critical time step size, these schemes overcome the stability constraint of the earlier forward Euler scheme. Aided with the Thomas algorithm, one of the ADI schemes is found to be very efficient as it balances the speed and accuracy.

  7. The physics and modes of star cluster formation: simulations.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Cathie

    2010-02-28

    We review progress in numerical simulations of star cluster formation. These simulations involve the bottom-up assembly of clusters through hierarchical mergers, which produces a fractal stellar distribution at young (approx. 0.5 Myr) ages. The resulting clusters are predicted to be mildly aspherical and highly mass-segregated, except in the immediate aftermath of mergers. The upper initial mass function within individual clusters is generally somewhat flatter than for the aggregate population. Recent work has begun to clarify the factors that control the mean stellar mass in a star-forming cloud and also the efficiency of star formation. The former is sensitive to the thermal properties of the gas while the latter depends both on the magnetic field and the initial degree of gravitational boundedness of the natal cloud. Unmagnetized clouds that are initially bound undergo rapid collapse, which is difficult to reverse by ionization feedback or stellar winds.

  8. Actin retrograde flow and actomyosin II arc contraction drive receptor cluster dynamics at the immunological synapse in Jurkat T cells.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jason; Wu, Xufeng S; Crites, Travis; Hammer, John A

    2012-03-01

    Actin retrograde flow and actomyosin II contraction have both been implicated in the inward movement of T cell receptor (TCR) microclusters and immunological synapse formation, but no study has integrated and quantified their relative contributions. Using Jurkat T cells expressing fluorescent myosin IIA heavy chain and F-tractin-a novel reporter for F-actin-we now provide direct evidence that the distal supramolecular activation cluster (dSMAC) and peripheral supramolecular activation cluster (pSMAC) correspond to lamellipodial (LP) and lamellar (LM) actin networks, respectively, as hypothesized previously. Our images reveal concentric and contracting actomyosin II arcs/rings at the LM/pSMAC. Moreover, the speeds of centripetally moving TCR microclusters correspond very closely to the rates of actin retrograde flow in the LP/dSMAC and actomyosin II arc contraction in the LM/pSMAC. Using cytochalasin D and jasplakinolide to selectively inhibit actin retrograde flow in the LP/dSMAC and blebbistatin to selectively inhibit actomyosin II arc contraction in the LM/pSMAC, we demonstrate that both forces are required for centripetal TCR microcluster transport. Finally, we show that leukocyte function-associated antigen 1 clusters accumulate over time at the inner aspect of the LM/pSMAC and that this accumulation depends on actomyosin II contraction. Thus actin retrograde flow and actomyosin II arc contraction coordinately drive receptor cluster dynamics at the immunological synapse.

  9. Probing Globular Cluster Formation in Low Metallicity Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey E.; Hunt, Leslie K.; Reines, Amy E.

    2008-12-01

    The ubiquitous presence of globular clusters around massive galaxies today suggests that these extreme star clusters must have been formed prolifically in the earlier universe in low-metallicity galaxies. Numerous adolescent and massive star clusters are already known to be present in a variety of galaxies in the local universe; however most of these systems have metallicities of 12 + log(O/H) > 8, and are thus not representative of the galaxies in which today's ancient globular clusters were formed. In order to better understand the formation and evolution of these massive clusters in environments with few heavy elements, we have targeted several low-metallicity dwarf galaxies with radio observations, searching for newly-formed massive star clusters still embedded in their birth material. The galaxies in this initial study are HS 0822+3542, UGC 4483, Pox 186, and SBS 0335-052, all of which have metallicities of 12 + log(O/H) < 7.75. While no thermal radio sources, indicative of natal massive star clusters, are found in three of the four galaxies, SBS 0335-052 hosts two such objects, which are incredibly luminous. The radio spectral energy distributions of these intense star-forming regions in SBS 0335-052 suggest the presence of ~12,000 equivalent O-type stars, and the implied star formation rate is nearing the maximum starburst intensity limit.

  10. Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. XVI. Star Cluster Formation Efficiency and the Clustered Fraction of Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. Clifton; Seth, Anil C.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Beerman, Lori C.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Lewis, Alexia R.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Bell, Eric F.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Larsen, Søren S.; Sandstrom, Karin; Skillman, Evan D.

    2016-08-01

    We use the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey data set to perform spatially resolved measurements of star cluster formation efficiency (Γ), the fraction of stellar mass formed in long-lived star clusters. We use robust star formation history and cluster parameter constraints, obtained through color-magnitude diagram analysis of resolved stellar populations, to study Andromeda’s cluster and field populations over the last ˜300 Myr. We measure Γ of 4%-8% for young, 10-100 Myr-old populations in M31. We find that cluster formation efficiency varies systematically across the M31 disk, consistent with variations in mid-plane pressure. These Γ measurements expand the range of well-studied galactic environments, providing precise constraints in an H i-dominated, low-intensity star formation environment. Spatially resolved results from M31 are broadly consistent with previous trends observed on galaxy-integrated scales, where Γ increases with increasing star formation rate surface density (ΣSFR). However, we can explain observed scatter in the relation and attain better agreement between observations and theoretical models if we account for environmental variations in gas depletion time (τ dep) when modeling Γ, accounting for the qualitative shift in star formation behavior when transitioning from a H2-dominated to a H i-dominated interstellar medium. We also demonstrate that Γ measurements in high ΣSFR starburst systems are well-explained by τ dep-dependent fiducial Γ models.

  11. Formation and evolution of star clusters in merging galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing

    2002-04-01

    Recent observations have revealed numerous young massive star clusters, often known as “young globular clusters”. Their formation and evolution are important astrophysical processes and may potentially have cosmological implications. In this work, we focus on the star clusters in the nearest ongoing merger NGC 4038/9 (the “Antennae”). With the Hubble Space Telescope, we identify clusters with all ages, most of which are younger than 20 Myr. Our goal is to study their formation mechanisms, and the relation with the interstellar medium environment, and their evolutionary connection with old globular clusters. We find that their luminosity function and mass function are best described as power laws with indices around -2. The masses of young star clusters cover the range 104 ≤ M ≤ 10 6 M⊙ . This result is distinctly different from that of old globular clusters that has a “preferred” scale at M ≈ 2 × 105 M⊙ . To understand the difference in MF between the young and old star clusters, we conduct a theoretical study on the effects of dynamical disruption of individual clusters on the mass function. We find that, for a wide variety of initial conditions, the mass function develops a characteristic scale, that is remarkably close to the observed one for globular clusters after 12 Gyr. In addition, we find that some radial anisotropy in the initial velocity distribution, especially when decreasing outward, is needed to account for the observed near-uniformity of the mass functions of globular clusters. This is consistent with the observed near-isotropy of the present velocity distributions because clusters on elongated orbits are preferentially destroyed. In order to understand the formation and feedback effects of young star clusters, we have also conducted a multi- wavelength study on the association between young star clusters and their interstellar environment in the Antennae galaxies. This is possible for the first time because various new

  12. Concomitant formation of different nature clusters and hardening in reactor pressure vessel steels irradiated by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, K.; Fukuya, K.; Hojo, T.

    2013-11-01

    Specimens of A533B steels containing 0.04, 0.09 and 0.21 wt%Cu were irradiated at 290 °C to 3 dpa with 3 MeV Fe ions and subjected to atom probe analyses, transmission electron microscopy observations and hardness measurements. The atom probe analysis results showed that two types of solute clusters were formed: Cu-enriched clusters containing Mn, Ni and Si atoms as irradiation-enhanced solute atom clusters and Mn/Ni/Si-enriched clusters as irradiation-induced solute atom clusters. Both cluster types occurred in the highest Cu-content steel and the ratio of Mn/Ni/Si-enriched clusters to Cu-enriched clusters increased with irradiation doses. It was confirmed that the cluster formation was a key factor in the microstructure evolution until the high dose irradiation was reached even in the low Cu content steels though the dislocation loops with much lower density than that of the clusters were observed as matrix damage. The difference in the hardening efficiency due to the difference in the nature of the clusters was small. The irradiation-induced clustering of undersized Si atoms suggested that a clustering driving force other than vacancy-driven diffusion, probably an interstitial mechanism, may become important at higher dose rates.

  13. THE DYNAMICAL STATE OF BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES AND THE FORMATION OF CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Coziol, R.; Andernach, H.; Caretta, C. A.; Alamo-MartInez, K. A.; Tago, E. E-mail: heinz@astro.ugto.mx E-mail: k.alamo@astrosmo.unam.mx

    2009-06-15

    A large sample of Abell clusters of galaxies, selected for the likely presence of a dominant galaxy, is used to study the dynamical properties of the brightest cluster members (BCMs). From visual inspection of Digitized Sky Survey images combined with redshift information we identify 1426 candidate BCMs located in 1221 different redshift components associated with 1169 different Abell clusters. This is the largest sample published so far of such galaxies. From our own morphological classification we find that {approx}92% of the BCMs in our sample are early-type galaxies and 48% are of cD type. We confirm what was previously observed based on much smaller samples, namely, that a large fraction of BCMs have significant peculiar velocities. From a subsample of 452 clusters having at least 10 measured radial velocities, we estimate a median BCM peculiar velocity of 32% of their host clusters' radial velocity dispersion. This suggests that most BCMs are not at rest in the potential well of their clusters. This phenomenon is common to galaxy clusters in our sample, and not a special trait of clusters hosting cD galaxies. We show that the peculiar velocity of the BCM is independent of cluster richness and only slightly dependent on the Bautz-Morgan type. We also find a weak trend for the peculiar velocity to rise with the cluster velocity dispersion. The strongest dependence is with the morphological type of the BCM: cD galaxies tend to have lower relative peculiar velocities than elliptical galaxies. This result points to a connection between the formation of the BCMs and that of their clusters. Our data are qualitatively consistent with the merging-groups scenario, where BCMs in clusters formed first in smaller subsystems comparable to compact groups of galaxies. In this scenario, clusters would have formed recently from the mergers of many such groups and would still be in a dynamically unrelaxed state.

  14. Stellar Dynamical Processes in Massive Star and Star Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan; Eyer, L.

    2009-01-01

    We study how high precision astrometric measurements by SIM and GAIA of stars involved in dynamical ejection events from star clusters can constrain theories of massive star and star cluster formation. We focus on the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). First, we investigate the scientific potential associated with an accurate measurement of the distance and proper motion of Theta 1 Ori C, which is the most massive star in the cluster and was recently involved (about 4000 years ago) in the ejection of a B star: the Becklin-Neugebauer (BN) star. The motion of the BN star has taken it close to a massive protostar, known as source I, where it appears to have influenced the accretion and outflow activity, most likely by a tidal interaction with the accretion disk. An accurate proper motion measurement of Theta 1 Ori C will constrain BN's initial motion, allowing us to search for deflections caused by the gravitational potential of the massive protostar. Second, we search the Hipparcos catalog for candidate runaway stars, i.e. that have been dynamically ejected from the cluster over the course of the last several Myr. SIM and GAIA observations of these stars will be needed to confirm their origin from the ONC. The results of this study will constrain the star cluster formation timescale and the statistics of the population of ejected stars. JCT acknowledges support from from NSF CAREER grant AST-0645412 and a grant from NASA for SIM Science Studies.

  15. W3 Main, a test case for cluster formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bik, Arjan

    2013-07-01

    Embedded clusters play an important role in the star formation process: it is in these embedded clusters where most, or even all, young stars are born. In such star-forming regions, stars interact via stellar feedback and dynamical interactions with each other and with the surrounding interstellar medium. Therefore, the understanding of the physical processes operating on scales of a few tens of parsecs becomes fundamental to perceive the impact of star formation on global galactic scales. We use the embedded cluster W3 Main as a test case to derive constraints on the formation of embedded clusters. Deep near-infrared JHK imaging of W3 Main as well as K-band spectroscopy of the massive stars using LUCI1 at the LBT provide us with a detailed picture of this complex region. We combine these data with a large multi-wavelength dataset, ranging from X-rays to radio in order to derive its formation history. Based on the spectroscopy of the massive stars and the presence of hyper-compact HII regions in W3 Main we derive an age spread of 2 -3 Myrs for W3 Main. This age spread is comfirmed by a spatially varying disk fraction of the low-mass stars. The age of the most massive O star IRS2, and the nature of the HII regions suggest that star formation in W3 Main started at least 2-3 Myrs ago, and due to dynamical interactions with dense molecular cores in the surroundings and possible internal triggering, star formation is continuing until the present day. Currently the youngest population is located in the center and may be the latest dense concentration of molecular gas in the contracting cloud, forming the youngest sub cluster around IRS5.

  16. He cluster dynamics in W in the presence of cluster induced formation of He traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Smirnov, R. D.

    2016-02-01

    The theoretical model describing spatiotemporal dynamics of He clusters in tungsten, which takes into account He trap generation associated with the growth of He clusters, is presented. Application of this model to the formation of the layer of nano-bubbles underneath of the surface of thick He irradiated sample, before surface morphology starts to change, gives very good agreement with currently available experimental data. The role of thermophoresis in a long-term evolution of nano-bubble containing structures is discussed.

  17. DUST-OBSCURED STAR FORMATION IN INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFT GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, Rose A.; Desai, Vandana; Rudnick, Gregory; Poggianti, Bianca; Bell, Eric F.; Hinz, Joannah; Zaritsky, Dennis; Jablonka, Pascale; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Moustakas, John; Rines, Kenneth E-mail: jmoustakas@ucsd.ed

    2010-09-01

    We present Spitzer MIPS 24 {mu}m observations of sixteen 0.4 < z < 0.8 galaxy clusters drawn from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey. This is the first large 24 {mu}m survey of clusters at intermediate redshift. The depth of our imaging corresponds to a total IR luminosity of 8 x 10{sup 10} L{sub sun}, just below the luminosity of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs), and 6{sup +1}{sub -1}% of M{sub V} < -19 cluster members show 24 {mu}m emission at or above this level. We compare with a large sample of coeval field galaxies and find that while the fraction of cluster LIRGs lies significantly below that of the field, the IR luminosities of the field and cluster galaxies are consistent. However, the stellar masses of the EDisCS LIRGs are systematically higher than those of the field LIRGs. A comparison with optical data reveals that {approx}80% of cluster LIRGs are blue and the remaining 20% lie on the red sequence. Of LIRGs with optical spectra, 88{sup +4} {sub -5}% show [O II] emission with EW([O II]) > 5 A, and {approx}75% exhibit optical signatures of dusty starbursts. On average, the fraction of cluster LIRGs increases with projected clustercentric radius but remains systematically lower than the field fraction over the area probed (<1.5x R {sub 200}). The amount of obscured star formation declines significantly over the 2.4 Gyr interval spanned by the EDisCS sample, and the rate of decline is the same for the cluster and field populations. Our results are consistent with an exponentially declining LIRG fraction, with the decline in the field delayed by {approx}1 Gyr relative to the clusters.

  18. Fragmentation Energetics of Clusters Relevant to Atmospheric New Particle Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bzdek, Bryan R.; Depalma, Joseph W.; Ridge, Douglas P.; Laskin, Julia; Johnston, Murray V.

    2013-02-27

    The exact mechanisms by which small clusters form and grow in the atmosphere are poorly understood, but this process may significantly impact cloud condensation nuclei number concentrations and global climate. Sulfuric acid is the key chemical component to new particle formation, but basic species such as ammonia are also important. However, few laboratory experiments address the kinetics or thermodynamics of acid and base incorporation into small clusters. This work utilizes a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer equipped with surface-induced dissociation (FTICR-SID) to investigate time- and collision energy-resolved fragmentation of positively charged ammonium bisulfate clusters. Critical energies for dissociation are obtained from Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus/Quasi-Equilibrium Theory (RRKM/QET) modeling of the experimental data and are compared to quantum chemical calculations of the thermodynamics of cluster dissociation. Fragmentation of ammonium bisulfate clusters occurs by two pathways: 1) a two-step pathway whereby the cluster sequentially loses ammonia followed by sulfuric acid and 2) a one-step pathway whereby the cluster loses an ammonium bisulfate molecule. Experimental critical energies for loss of an ammonia molecule and loss of an ammonium bisulfate molecule are higher than the thermodynamic values. If cluster growth is considered the reverse of cluster fragmentation, these results require the presence of an activation barrier to describe the incorporation of ammonia into small acidic clusters and suggest that kinetically (i.e. diffusion) limited growth should not be assumed. An important corollary is that models of atmospheric NPF should be revised to consider activation barriers to individual chemical steps along the growth pathway.

  19. Fragmentation energetics of clusters relevant to atmospheric new particle formation.

    PubMed

    Bzdek, Bryan R; DePalma, Joseph W; Ridge, Douglas P; Laskin, Julia; Johnston, Murray V

    2013-02-27

    The exact mechanisms by which small clusters form and grow in the atmosphere are poorly understood, but this process may significantly impact cloud condensation nuclei number concentrations and global climate. Sulfuric acid is the key chemical component to new particle formation (NPF), but basic species such as ammonia are also important. Few laboratory experiments address the kinetics or thermodynamics of acid and base incorporation into small clusters. This work utilizes a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer equipped with surface-induced dissociation to investigate time- and collision-energy-resolved fragmentation of positively charged ammonium bisulfate clusters. Critical energies for dissociation are obtained from Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus/quasi-equilibrium theory modeling of the experimental data and are compared to quantum chemical calculations of the thermodynamics of cluster dissociation. Fragmentation of ammonium bisulfate clusters occurs by two pathways: (1) a two-step pathway whereby the cluster sequentially loses ammonia followed by sulfuric acid and (2) a one-step pathway whereby the cluster loses an ammonium bisulfate molecule. Experimental critical energies for loss of an ammonia molecule and loss of an ammonium bisulfate molecule are higher than the thermodynamic values. If cluster growth is considered the reverse of cluster fragmentation, these results require the presence of an activation barrier to describe the incorporation of ammonia into small acidic clusters and suggest that kinetically (i.e., diffusion) limited growth should not be assumed. An important corollary is that models of atmospheric NPF should be revised to consider activation barriers to individual chemical steps along the growth pathway.

  20. Star Formation and Supercluster Environment of 107 nearby Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Seth A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Wegner, Gary A.; Einasto, Maret; Vennik, Jaan

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the relationship between star formation (SF), substructure, and supercluster environment in a sample of 107 nearby galaxy clusters using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Previous works have investigated the relationships between SF and cluster substructure, and cluster substructure and supercluster environment, but definitive conclusions relating all three of these variables has remained elusive. We find an inverse relationship between cluster SF fraction (fSF) and supercluster environment density, calculated using the Galaxy luminosity density field at a smoothing length of 8 h‑1 Mpc (D8). The slope of fSF versus D8 is ‑0.008 ± 0.002. The fSF of clusters located in low-density large-scale environments, 0.244 ± 0.011, is higher than for clusters located in high-density supercluster cores, 0.202 ± 0.014. We also divide superclusters, according to their morphology, into filament- and spider-type systems. The inverse relationship between cluster fSF and large-scale density is dominated by filament- rather than spider-type superclusters. In high-density cores of superclusters, we find a higher fSF in spider-type superclusters, 0.229 ± 0.016, than in filament-type superclusters, 0.166 ± 0.019. Using principal component analysis, we confirm these results and the direct correlation between cluster substructure and SF. These results indicate that cluster SF is affected by both the dynamical age of the cluster (younger systems exhibit higher amounts of SF); the large-scale density of the supercluster environment (high-density core regions exhibit lower amounts of SF); and supercluster morphology (spider-type superclusters exhibit higher amounts of SF at high densities).

  1. The Formation and Early Evolution of Embedded Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter

    We propose to combine Spitzer, WISE, Herschel, and other archival spacecraft data with an existing ground- and space-based mm-wave to near-IR survey of molecular clouds over a large portion of the Milky Way, in order to systematically study the formation and early evolution of massive stars and star clusters, and provide new observational calibrations for a theoretical paradigm of this key astrophysical problem. Central Objectives: The Galactic Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP) is a large, unbiased, uniform, and panchromatic survey of massive star and cluster formation and early evolution, covering 20°x6° of the Galactic Plane. Its uniqueness lies in the comprehensive molecular spectroscopy of 303 massive dense clumps, which have also been included in several archival spacecraft surveys. Our objective is a systematic demographic analysis of massive star and cluster formation, one which has not been possible without knowledge of our CHaMP cloud sample, including all clouds with embedded clusters as well as those that have not yet formed massive stars. For proto-clusters deeply embedded within dense molecular clouds, analysis of these space-based data will: 1. Yield a complete census of Young Stellar Objects in each cluster. 2. Allow systematic measurements of embedded cluster properties: spectral energy distributions, luminosity functions, protostellar and disk fractions, and how these vary with cluster mass, age, and density. Combined with other, similarly complete and unbiased infrared and mm data, CHaMP's goals include: 3. A detailed comparison of the embedded stellar populations with their natal dense gas to derive extinction maps, star formation efficiencies and feedback effects, and the kinematics, physics, and chemistry of the gas in and around the clusters. 4. Tying the demographics, age spreads, and timescales of the clusters, based on pre-Main Sequence evolution, to that of the dense gas clumps and Giant Molecular Clouds. 5. A

  2. Linked supramolecular building blocks for enhanced cluster formation

    DOE PAGES

    McLellan, Ross; Palacios, Maria A.; Beavers, Christine M.; ...

    2015-01-09

    Methylene-bridged calix[4]arenes have emerged as extremely versatile ligand supports in the formation of new polymetallic clusters possessing fascinating magnetic properties. Metal ion binding rules established for this building block allow one to partially rationalise the complex assembly process. The ability to covalently link calix[4]arenes at the methylene bridge provides significantly improved control over the introduction of different metal centres to resulting cluster motifs. Clusters assembled from bis-calix[4]arenes and transition metal ions or 3d-4f combinations display characteristic features of the analogous calix[4]arene supported clusters, thereby demonstrating an enhanced and rational approach towards the targeted synthesis of complex and challenging structures.

  3. Linked supramolecular building blocks for enhanced cluster formation

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Ross; Palacios, Maria A.; Beavers, Christine M.; Teat, Simon J.; Piligkos, Stergios; Brechin, Euan K.; Dalgarno, Scott J.

    2015-01-09

    Methylene-bridged calix[4]arenes have emerged as extremely versatile ligand supports in the formation of new polymetallic clusters possessing fascinating magnetic properties. Metal ion binding rules established for this building block allow one to partially rationalise the complex assembly process. The ability to covalently link calix[4]arenes at the methylene bridge provides significantly improved control over the introduction of different metal centres to resulting cluster motifs. Clusters assembled from bis-calix[4]arenes and transition metal ions or 3d-4f combinations display characteristic features of the analogous calix[4]arene supported clusters, thereby demonstrating an enhanced and rational approach towards the targeted synthesis of complex and challenging structures.

  4. Formation and stability of high-spin alkali clusters.

    PubMed

    Schulz, C P; Claas, P; Schumacher, D; Stienkemeier, F

    2004-01-09

    Helium nanodroplet isolation has been applied to agglomerate alkali clusters at temperatures of 380 mK. The very weak binding to the surface of the droplets allows a selection of only weakly bound, high-spin states. Here we show that larger clusters of alkali atoms in high-spin states can be formed. The lack of strong bonds from pairing electrons makes these systems nonmetallic, van der Waals-like complexes of metal atoms. We find that sodium and potassium readily form such clusters containing up to 25 atoms. In contrast, this process is suppressed for rubidium and cesium. Apparently, for these heavy alkalis, larger high-spin aggregates are not stable and depolarize spontaneously upon cluster formation.

  5. Formation and Stability of High-Spin Alkali Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, C. P.; Claas, P.; Schumacher, D.; Stienkemeier, F.

    2004-01-01

    Helium nanodroplet isolation has been applied to agglomerate alkali clusters at temperatures of 380mK. The very weak binding to the surface of the droplets allows a selection of only weakly bound, high-spin states. Here we show that larger clusters of alkali atoms in high-spin states can be formed. The lack of strong bonds from pairing electrons makes these systems nonmetallic, vanderWaals like complexes of metal atoms. We find that sodium and potassium readily form such clusters containing up to 25atoms. In contrast, this process is suppressed for rubidium and cesium. Apparently, for these heavy alkalis, larger high-spin aggregates are not stable and depolarize spontaneously upon cluster formation.

  6. WITNESSING THE FORMATION OF A BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXY IN A NEARBY X-RAY CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Jesper; Mulchaey, John S.; Bai, Lei; Ponman, Trevor J.; Raychaudhury, Somak; Dariush, Ali

    2010-07-10

    The central dominant galaxies in galaxy clusters constitute the most massive and luminous galaxies in the universe. Despite this, the formation of these brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and the impact of this on the surrounding cluster environment remain poorly understood. Here we present multiwavelength observations of the nearby poor X-ray cluster MZ 10451, in which both processes can be studied in unprecedented detail. Chandra observations of the intracluster medium (ICM) in the cluster core, which harbors two optically bright early-type galaxies in the process of merging, show that the system has retained a cool core and a central metal excess. This suggests that any merger-induced ICM heating and mixing remain modest at this stage. Tidally stripped stars seen around either galaxy likely represent an emerging intracluster light component, and the central ICM abundance enhancement may have a prominent contribution from in situ enrichment provided by these stars. The smaller of the merging galaxies shows evidence for having retained a hot gas halo, along with tentative evidence for some obscured star formation, suggesting that not all BCG major mergers at low redshift are completely dissipationless. Both galaxies are slightly offset from the peak of the ICM emission, with all three lying on an axis that roughly coincides with the large-scale elongation of the ICM. Our data are consistent with a picture in which central BCGs are built up by mergers close to the cluster core, by galaxies infalling on radial orbits aligned with the cosmological filaments feeding the cluster.

  7. Shallow junction formation by polyatomic cluster ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Daisuke; Shimada, Norihiro; Matsuo, Jiro; Yamada, Isao

    1996-12-31

    Recent integrated circuits require shallow junctions which are less than 0.1 {mu}m depth. This creates a strong demand for low energy ion beam techniques. Equivalent low-energy and high-current ion beams can be realized quite easily with clusters, because the kinetic energy of the cluster is shared between the constituent atoms. Additionally, cluster-ion beams avoid damage due to excessive charge. We have used polyatomic clusters, decaborane (B{sub 10}H{sub 14}), as a kind of B cluster, in order to form a very shallow p{sup +} junction. A B SIMS profile of B{sub 10}H{sub 14} implanted into Si (100) at 20keV was quite similar to that of B implanted at 2keV. These SIMS measurements revealed that the cluster ion beam can realize equivalent low-energy implantation quite easily. The implantation efficiency achieved was about 90%. The damage induced by B{sub 10}H{sub 14} implantation was completely removed by a 600{degrees}C furnace anneal for 30 min, and implanted B atoms were electrically activated. After rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 900{degrees}C of a sample prepared with a close of 5{times}10{sup 13} ion/cm{sup 2}, the sheet resistance decreased to about 600W/sq. and the activation efficiency was about 50%. These results show that a polyatomic cluster ion beam is useful for shallow junction formation.

  8. Theory of cluster radioactive decay and of cluster formation in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, S. S.; Gupta, Raj K.

    1989-05-01

    A new model is proposed for the mechanism of cluster formation and then penetration of the confining nuclear interaction barrier in radioactive nuclei. The cluster formation is treated as a quantum-mechanical fragmentation process and the WKB penetrability is found analytically. Applications of the model are made to 14C decay of 222-224Ra and 24Ne decay of 232U. The branching ratio for 14C decay of 232U is also calculated and is found to be incredibly small as compared to that for its 24Ne decay.

  9. Star Formation in Undergraduate ALFALFA Team Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Durbala, Adriana; Finn, Rose; Haynes, Martha P.; Coble, Kimberly A.; Craig, David W.; Hoffman, G. Lyle; Miller, Brendan P.; Crone-Odekon, Mary; O'Donoghue, Aileen A.; Troischt, Parker; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team; ALFALFA Team

    2017-01-01

    The Undergraduate ALFALFA Team (UAT) Groups project is a coordinated study of gas and star formation properties of galaxies in and around 36 nearby (z<0.03) groups and clusters of varied richness, morphological type mix, and X-ray luminosity. By studying a large range of environments and considering the spatial distributions of star formation, we probe mechanisms of gas depletion and morphological transformation. The project uses ALFALFA HI observations, optical observations, and digital databases like SDSS, and incorporates work undertaken by faculty and students at different institutions within the UAT. Here we present results from our wide area Hα and broadband R imaging project carried out with the WIYN 0.9m+MOSAIC/HDI at KPNO, including an analysis of radial star formation rates and extents of galaxies in the NGC 5846, Abell 779, NRGb331, and HCG 69 groups/clusters. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005 and AST-1637339.

  10. STAR FORMATION IN THE BULLET CLUSTER. I. THE INFRARED LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND STAR FORMATION RATE ,

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Mi Chung; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Clowe, Douglas; Markevitch, Maxim; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2010-12-20

    The Bullet Cluster is a massive galaxy cluster at z = 0.297 undergoing a major supersonic (Mach 3) merger event. Using data from Spitzer MIPS and the Infrared Array Camera, optical imaging, and optical spectroscopy, we present the global star formation rate (SFR) of this unique cluster. Using a 90% spectroscopically complete sample of 37 star-forming MIPS confirmed cluster members out to R < 1.7 Mpc, and the Rieke et al. relation to convert from 24 {mu}m flux to SFR, we calculate an integrated obscured SFR of 267 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and a specific SFR of 28 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} per 10{sup 14} M{sub sun}. The cluster mass normalized integrated SFR of the Bullet Cluster is among the highest in a sample of eight other clusters and cluster mergers from the literature. Five LIRGs and one ULIRG contribute 30% and 40% of the total SFR of the cluster, respectively. To investigate the origin of the elevated specific SFR, we compare the infrared luminosity function (IR LF) of the Bullet Cluster to those of Coma (evolved to z = 0.297) and CL1358+62. The Bullet Cluster IR LF exhibits an excess of sources compared to the IR LFs of the other massive clusters. A Schechter function fit of the Bullet Cluster IR LF yields L* = 44.68 {+-} 0.11 erg s{sup -1}, which is {approx}0.25 and 0.35 dex brighter than L* of evolved Coma and CL1358+62, respectively. The elevated IR LF of the Bullet Cluster relative to other clusters can be explained if we attribute the 'excess' star-forming IR galaxies to a population associated with the infalling group that has not yet been transformed into quiescent galaxies. In this case, the timescale required for quenching star formation in the cluster environment must be longer than the timescale since the group's accretion-a few hundred million years. We suggest that 'strangulation' is likely to be an important process in the evolution of star formation in clusters.

  11. Star formation in the massive cluster merger Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawle, T. D.; Altieri, B.; Egami, E.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Richard, J.; Santos, J. S.; Valtchanov, I.; Walth, G.; Bouy, H.; Haines, C. P.; Okabe, N.

    2014-07-01

    We present a comprehensive study of star-forming (SF) galaxies in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Frontier Field recent cluster merger A2744 (z = 0.308). Wide-field, ultraviolet-infrared (UV-IR) imaging enables a direct constraint of the total star formation rate (SFR) for 53 cluster galaxies, with SFRUV+IR = 343 ± 10 M⊙ yr-1. Within the central 4 arcmin (1.1 Mpc) radius, the integrated SFR is complete, yielding a total SFRUV+IR = 201 ± 9 M⊙ yr-1. Focusing on obscured star formation, this core region exhibits a total SFRIR = 138 ± 8 M⊙ yr-1, a mass-normalized SFRIR of ΣSFR = 11.2 ± 0.7 M⊙ yr-1 per 1014 M⊙ and a fraction of IR-detected SF galaxies f_SF = 0.080^{+0.010}_{-0.037}. Overall, the cluster population at z ˜ 0.3 exhibits significant intrinsic scatter in IR properties (total SFRIR, Tdust distribution) apparently unrelated to the dynamical state: A2744 is noticeably different to the merging Bullet cluster, but similar to several relaxed clusters. However, in A2744 we identify a trail of SF sources including jellyfish galaxies with substantial unobscured SF due to extreme stripping (SFRUV/SFRIR up to 3.3). The orientation of the trail, and of material stripped from constituent galaxies, indicates that the passing shock front of the cluster merger was the trigger. Constraints on star formation from both IR and UV are crucial for understanding galaxy evolution within the densest environments.

  12. Quenching of the star formation activity in cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, A.; Roehlly, Y.; Fossati, M.; Buat, V.; Boissier, S.; Boquien, M.; Burgarella, D.; Ciesla, L.; Gavazzi, G.; Serra, P.

    2016-11-01

    We study the star formation quenching mechanism in cluster galaxies by fitting the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the Herschel Reference Survey, a complete volume-limited K-band-selected sample of nearby galaxies including objects in different density regions, from the core of the Virgo cluster to the general field. The SEDs of the target galaxies were fitted using the CIGALE SED modelling code. The truncated activity of cluster galaxies was parametrised using a specific star formation history with two free parameters, the quenching age QA and the quenching factor QF. These two parameters are crucial for the identification of the quenching mechanism, which acts on long timescales when starvation processes are at work, but is rapid and efficient when ram pressure occurs. To be sensitive to an abrupt and recent variation of the star formation activity, we combined twenty photometric bands in the UV to far-infrared in a new way with three age-sensitive Balmer line absorption indices extracted from available medium-resolution (R 1000) integrated spectroscopy and with Hα narrow-band imaging data. The use of a truncated star formation history significantly increases the quality of the fit in HI-deficient galaxies of the sample, that is to say, in those objects whose atomic gas content has been removed during the interaction with the hostile cluster environment. The typical quenching age of the perturbed late-type galaxies is QA ≲ 300 Myr whenever the activity of star formation is reduced by 50% < QF ≤ 80% and QA ≲ 500 Myr for QF > 80%, while that of the quiescent early-type objects is QA ≃ 1-3 Gyr. The fraction of late-type galaxies with a star formation activity reduced by QF > 80% and with an HI-deficiency parameter HI-def > 0.4 drops by a factor of 5 from the inner half virial radius of the Virgo cluster (R/Rvir < 0.5), where the hot diffuse X-ray emitting gas of the cluster is located, to the outer regions (R/Rvir > 4). The efficient quenching of the

  13. STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN CLASH BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-10

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ∼350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ∼0.5–1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions.

  14. The gaseous proto-cluster as a product of gravo-turbulent interaction: modified local environment for stellar cluster formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.-N.; Hennebelle, P.

    2016-12-01

    Stars are often observed to form in clusters, while the formation of the gaseous proto-cluster precedes that of the stellar cluster. We discuss the assembly of gas via gravo-turbulent reprocessing inside collapsing molecular clouds, and demonstrate that virial equilibrium is established for the gaseous proto-cluster, of which the higher density is favorable for clustered star formation, and that some physical characteristics of the stellar cluster are inherited from the gaseous proto-cluster. We introduce an analytical two-dimensional virial model to account for the quasi-stationary accreting gaseous proto-cluster which has non-negligible rotation. Results are compared to observations and simulations and the fact that gaseous proto-clusters lie on an equilibrium sequence may imply that star formation could be to some extent disentangled from larger scale physics, offering an encouraging explanation for the universality of IMF.

  15. Star Cluster Formation from Turbulent Clumps. I. The Fast Formation Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farias, Juan P.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Chatterjee, Sourav

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the formation and early evolution of star clusters, assuming that they form from a turbulent starless clump of a given mass bounded inside a parent self-gravitating molecular cloud characterized by a particular mass surface density. As a first step, we assume instantaneous star cluster formation and gas expulsion. We draw our initial conditions from observed properties of starless clumps. We follow the early evolution of the clusters up to 20 Myr, investigating the effects of different star formation efficiencies, primordial binary fractions and eccentricities, and primordial mass segregation levels. We investigate clumps with initial masses of {M}{cl}=3000 {M}ȯ embedded in ambient cloud environments with mass surface densities {{{Σ }}}{cloud}=0.1 and 1 {{g}} {{cm}}-2. We show that these models of fast star cluster formation result, in the fiducial case, in clusters that expand rapidly, even considering only the bound members. Clusters formed from higher {{{Σ }}}{cloud} environments tend to expand more quickly and thus are soon larger than clusters born from lower {{{Σ }}}{cloud} conditions. To form a young cluster of a given age, stellar mass, and mass surface density, these models need to assume a parent molecular clump that is many times denser, which is unrealistic compared to observed systems. We also show that, in these models, the initial binary properties are only slightly modified by interactions, meaning that the binary properties, e.g., at 20 Myr, are very similar to those at birth. With this study, we set up the foundation for future work, where we will investigate more realistic models of star formation compared to this instantaneous, baseline case.

  16. In situ heat treatment of a tar sands formation after drive process treatment

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Stanecki, John

    2010-09-21

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing a drive fluid to a hydrocarbon containing layer of the tar sands formation to mobilize at least some hydrocarbons in the layer. At least some first hydrocarbons from the layer are produced. Heat is provided to the layer from one or more heaters located in the formation. At least some second hydrocarbons are produced from the layer of the formation. The second hydrocarbons include at least some hydrocarbons that are upgraded compared to the first hydrocarbons produced by using the drive fluid.

  17. Formation of young massive clusters from turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Michiko S.; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2017-03-01

    We simulate the formation and evolution of young star clusters from turbulent molecular clouds using smoothed-particle hydrodynamics and direct N-body methods. We find that the shape of the cluster mass function that originates from an individual molecular cloud is consistent with a Schechter function with power-law slopes of β = -1.73. The superposition of mass functions turn out to have a power-law slope of < -2. The mass of the most massive cluster formed from a single molecular cloud with mass M g scales with 6.1 M 0.51 g. The molecular clouds that tend to form massive clusters are much denser than those typical found in the Milky Way. The velocity dispersion of such molecular clouds reaches 20km s-1 and it is consistent with the relative velocity of the molecular clouds observed near NGC 3603 and Westerlund 2, for which a triggered star formation by cloud-cloud collisions is suggested.

  18. Inflammation-induced formation of fat-associated lymphoid clusters

    PubMed Central

    Bénézech, Cécile; Kruglov, Andrei A.; Loo, Yunhua; Nakamura, Kyoko; Zhang, Yang; Nayar, Saba; Jones, Lucy H.; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; McIntosh, Alistair; Marshall, Jennifer; Barone, Francesca; Besra, Gurdyal; Miles, Katherine; Allen, Judith E.; Gray, Mohini; Kollias, George; Cunningham, Adam F.; Withers, David R.; Toellner, Kai Michael; Jones, Nick D.; Veldhoen, Marc; Nedospasov, Sergei A.; McKenzie, Andrew N.J.; Caamaño, Jorge H.

    2015-01-01

    Fat-associated lymphoid clusters (FALCs) are a recently discovered type of lymphoid tissue associated with visceral fat. Here we show that distribution of FALCs was heterogeneous with the pericardium containing large numbers of these clusters. FALCs contributed to the retention of B-1 B cells in the peritoneal cavity through high expression of the chemokine CXCL13 and supported B cell proliferation and germinal center differentiation during peritoneal immune challenges. FALC formation was induced by inflammation, which triggered recruitment of myeloid cells that express tumor necrosis factor (TNF) necessary for TNF receptor-signaling in stromal cells. CD1d-restricted Natural killer T (NKT) cells were likewise required for inducible formation of FALCs. Thus, FALCs support and coordinate innate B and T cell activation during serosal immune responses. PMID:26147686

  19. Formation of structure in small lead clusters under thermal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidyshev, V. S.; Gafner, Yu. Ya.

    2016-12-01

    The thermal effect on lead clusters with radii up to 5.5 nm has been investigated by the molecular dynamics method using a modified tight-binding potential TB-SMA. The melting of Pb nanoparticles of these sizes is strictly homogeneous, without the formation of a surface liquidlike layer. The primary fcc phase in the particles is retained upon heating in the overwhelming majority of model experiments. An analysis of the structure formation during crystallization has shown that structures with pentagonal symmetry are preferred for lead clusters in this case. It is noted that an increase in the nanoparticle size leads to the dominance of the dodecahedral structure over the icosahedral one.

  20. Method of producing drive fluid in situ in tar sands formations

    SciTech Connect

    Mudunuri, Ramesh Raju; Jaiswal, Namit; Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-03-23

    Methods of treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the formation. The heat may be allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation such that a drive fluid is produced in situ in the formation. The drive fluid may move at least some mobilized, visbroken, and/or pyrolyzed hydrocarbons from a first portion of the formation to a second portion of the formation. At least some of the mobilized, visbroken, and/or pyrolyzed hydrocarbons may be produced from the formation.

  1. Formation and evolution of clumpy tidal tails in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Matteo, P.; Miocchi, P.; Capuzzo Dolcetta, R.

    2004-05-01

    Numerical simulations of a globular cluster orbiting in the central region of a triaxial galaxy have been performed, in order to study the formation and subsequent evolution of tidal tails and their main features. Tails begin to form after about a quarter of the cluster orbital period and tend to lie along its orbit, with a leading tail that precedes the cluster and an outer tail that trails behind it. Tails show clumpy substructures; the most prominent ones (for a globular cluster moving on a quasi-circular orbit around the galaxy) are located at a distance from the cluster center between 50 pc and 80 pc and, after 3 orbital periods, contain about 10% of the cluster mass at that epoch. The morphology of tails and clumps will be compared with available observational data, in particular with that concerning Palomar 5, for which evident clumps in the tails have been detected. Kinematical properties of stars in the tails (line-of-sight velocities and velocity dispersion profiles) will be presented and compared to kinematical data of M15 and ω Centauri, two galactic globular clusters for which there is evidence that the velocity dispersion remains constant at large radii. All the simulations have been performed with our own implementation of a tree-code, that uses a multipolar expansion of the potential truncated at the quadrupole moment and that ran on high performance computers employing an original parallelization approach implemented via MPI routines. The time-integration of the `particles' trajectories is performed by a 2nd order leap-frog algorithm, using individual and variable time-steps. Part of this work has been done using the IBM SP4 platform located at CINECA (Bologna, Italy) thanks to the grant inarm007 obtained in the framework of INAF-CINECA agreements.

  2. Star formation in X-ray cluster cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Raymond E., III; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1987-01-01

    The basic equations for X-ray cluster cooling flows, including the effects of star formation, are derived. It is confirmed that cooling flows are thermally unstable, and it is found that the fastest-growing linear perturbations in the flow are radial, comoving, and isobaric. A local approximation for the star formation rate is developed which allows analytic solutions to be found for both isobaric and gravity-dominated cooling flows. These solutions are used to show how star formation reduces the gas density, thereby lowering the cooling rate, which raises the gas temperature relative to the non-star-forming case. The analytic solutions are also used to estimate the spatial distribution of newly formed stars. It is found that star formation must proceed at a nearly maximal rate if isothermal mass profiles are to result.

  3. Identifying driving gene clusters in complex diseases through critical transition theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolanyk, Nathaniel; Wang, Xujing; Hessner, Martin; Gao, Shouguo; Chen, Ye; Jia, Shuang

    A novel approach of looking at the human body using critical transition theory has yielded positive results: clusters of genes that act in tandem to drive complex disease progression. This cluster of genes can be thought of as the first part of a large genetic force that pushes the body from a curable, but sick, point to an incurable diseased point through a catastrophic bifurcation. The data analyzed is time course microarray blood assay data of 7 high risk individuals for Type 1 Diabetes who progressed into a clinical onset, with an additional larger study requested to be presented at the conference. The normalized data is 25,000 genes strong, which were narrowed down based on statistical metrics, and finally a machine learning algorithm using critical transition metrics found the driving network. This approach was created to be repeatable across multiple complex diseases with only progression time course data needed so that it would be applicable to identifying when an individual is at risk of developing a complex disease. Thusly, preventative measures can be enacted, and in the longer term, offers a possible solution to prevent all Type 1 Diabetes.

  4. Modeling the formation of globular cluster systems in the Virgo cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui; Gnedin, Oleg Y. E-mail: ognedin@umich.edu

    2014-11-20

    The mass distribution and chemical composition of globular cluster (GC) systems preserve fossil record of the early stages of galaxy formation. The observed distribution of GC colors within massive early-type galaxies in the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey (ACSVCS) reveals a multi-modal shape, which likely corresponds to a multi-modal metallicity distribution. We present a simple model for the formation and disruption of GCs that aims to match the ACSVCS data. This model tests the hypothesis that GCs are formed during major mergers of gas-rich galaxies and inherit the metallicity of their hosts. To trace merger events, we use halo merger trees extracted from a large cosmological N-body simulation. We select 20 halos in the mass range of 2 × 10{sup 12} to 7 × 10{sup 13} M {sub ☉} and match them to 19 Virgo galaxies with K-band luminosity between 3 × 10{sup 10} and 3 × 10{sup 11} L {sub ☉}. To set the [Fe/H] abundances, we use an empirical galaxy mass-metallicity relation. We find that a minimal merger ratio of 1:3 best matches the observed cluster metallicity distribution. A characteristic bimodal shape appears because metal-rich GCs are produced by late mergers between massive halos, while metal-poor GCs are produced by collective merger activities of less massive hosts at early times. The model outcome is robust to alternative prescriptions for cluster formation rate throughout cosmic time, but a gradual evolution of the mass-metallicity relation with redshift appears to be necessary to match the observed cluster metallicities. We also affirm the age-metallicity relation, predicted by an earlier model, in which metal-rich clusters are systematically several billion younger than their metal-poor counterparts.

  5. Dynamical formation of cataclysmic variables in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jongsuk; Vesperini, Enrico; Belloni, Diogo; Giersz, Mirek

    2017-01-01

    The formation and evolution of X-ray sources in globular clusters is likely to be affected by the cluster internal dynamics and the stellar interactions in the cluster dense environment. Several observational studies have revealed a correlation between the number of X-ray sources and the stellar encounter rate, and provided evidence of the role of dynamics in the formation of X-ray binaries. We have performed a survey of Monte Carlo simulations aimed at exploring the connection between the dynamics and formation of cataclysmic variables (CVs) and the origin of the observed correlation between the number of these objects, Ncv, and the stellar encounter rate, Γ. The results of our simulations show a correlation between Ncv and Γ, as found in observational data, illustrate the essential role played by the dynamics, and shed light on the dynamical history behind this correlation. CVs in our simulations are more centrally concentrated than single stars with masses close to those of turn-off stars, although this trend is stronger for CVs formed from primordial binaries undergoing exchange encounters, which include a population of more massive CVs absent in the group of CVs formed from binaries not suffering any component exchange.

  6. Dynamic tubulation of mitochondria drives mitochondrial network formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Du, Wanqing; Su, Qian Peter; Zhu, Mingli; Feng, Peiyuan; Li, Ying; Zhou, Yichen; Mi, Na; Zhu, Yueyao; Jiang, Dong; Zhang, Senyan; Zhang, Zerui; Sun, Yujie; Yu, Li

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondria form networks. Formation of mitochondrial networks is important for maintaining mitochondrial DNA integrity and interchanging mitochondrial material, whereas disruption of the mitochondrial network affects mitochondrial functions. According to the current view, mitochondrial networks are formed by fusion of individual mitochondria. Here, we report a new mechanism for formation of mitochondrial networks through KIF5B-mediated dynamic tubulation of mitochondria. We found that KIF5B pulls thin, highly dynamic tubules out of mitochondria. Fusion of these dynamic tubules, which is mediated by mitofusins, gives rise to the mitochondrial network. We further demonstrated that dynamic tubulation and fusion is sufficient for mitochondrial network formation, by reconstituting mitochondrial networks in vitro using purified fusion-competent mitochondria, recombinant KIF5B, and polymerized microtubules. Interestingly, KIF5B only controls network formation in the peripheral zone of the cell, indicating that the mitochondrial network is divided into subzones, which may be constructed by different mechanisms. Our data not only uncover an essential mechanism for mitochondrial network formation, but also reveal that different parts of the mitochondrial network are formed by different mechanisms.

  7. Roles of dynamical symmetry breaking in driving oblate-prolate transitions of atomic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Yurie Yanao, Tomohiro; Koon, Wang Sang

    2015-04-07

    This paper explores the driving mechanisms for structural transitions of atomic clusters between oblate and prolate isomers. We employ the hyperspherical coordinates to investigate structural dynamics of a seven-atom cluster at a coarse-grained level in terms of the dynamics of three gyration radii and three principal axes, which characterize overall mass distributions of the cluster. Dynamics of gyration radii is governed by two kinds of forces. One is the potential force originating from the interactions between atoms. The other is the dynamical forces called the internal centrifugal forces, which originate from twisting and shearing motions of the system. The internal centrifugal force arising from twisting motions has an effect of breaking the symmetry between two gyration radii. As a result, in an oblate isomer, activation of the internal centrifugal force that has the effect of breaking the symmetry between the two largest gyration radii is crucial in triggering structural transitions into prolate isomers. In a prolate isomer, on the other hand, activation of the internal centrifugal force that has the effect of breaking the symmetry between the two smallest gyration radii is crucial in triggering structural transitions into oblate isomers. Activation of a twisting motion that switches the movement patterns of three principal axes is also important for the onset of structural transitions between oblate and prolate isomers. Based on these trigger mechanisms, we finally show that selective activations of specific gyration radii and twisting motions, depending on the isomer of the cluster, can effectively induce structural transitions of the cluster. The results presented here could provide further insights into the control of molecular reactions.

  8. Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a line drive staged process

    DOEpatents

    Miller, David Scott

    2009-07-21

    Method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation are described herein. Methods may include providing heat to a first section of the formation with one or more first heaters in the first section. First hydrocarbons may be heated in the first section such that at least some of the first hydrocarbons are mobilized. At least some of the mobilized first hydrocarbons may be produced through a production well located in a second section of the formation. The second section may be located substantially adjacent to the first section. A portion of the second section may be provided some heat from the mobilized first hydrocarbons, but is not conductively heated by heat from the first heaters. Heat may be provided to the second section with one or more second heaters in the second section to further heat the second section.

  9. Evidence for aqueous clusters as intermediates during zinc sulfide formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, George W.; Theberge, Stephen M.; Rickard, David T.

    1999-10-01

    Using zinc sulfide as an example, we demonstrate a plausible stepwise process for the formation of minerals from low temperature aqueous solutions. The process occurs with the formation of soluble complexes that aggregate into soluble rings and clusters. The final moiety in solution has a structure similar to the moiety in the first formed solid, which is a restatement of the Ostwald step rule. Titrations of aqueous Zn(II) with bisulfide indicate that sulfide clusters form at concentrations of 20 μM (or less) of metal and bisulfide. Precipitation does not occur according to voltammetric measurements using a mercury electrode and UV-VIS (ultra-violet to visible) spectroscopic data. UV-VIS data and filtration experiments indicate that the material passes through 0.1 μm Nuclepore and 1000 dalton filters. The complexes form rapidly (kf > 108 Ms-1), are kinetically inert to dissociation and thermodynamically strong. Although a neutral complex of 1:1 (ZnS) empirical stoichiometry initially forms, an anionic complex with an empirical 2 Zn:3 S stoichiometry results with continued addition of sulfide. Gel electrophoresis confirms the existence of a cluster that is negatively charged with a molecular mass between 350 and 750 daltons. On the basis of known mineral and thiol complex structures for these systems, a tetrameric cluster unit of Zn4S6(H2O)44- is likely. Molecular mechanic calculations show that this cluster is structurally analogous to ZnS minerals (particularly sphalerite) and is a viable precursor to mineral formation and a product of mineral dissolution. The formation of Zn4S6(H2O)44- can occur from condensation of Zn3S3(H2O)6 rings, which are neutral molecular clusters. The Zn atoms on one Zn3S3(H2O)6 ring combine with the S atoms on another Zn3S3(H2O)6, to lead to higher order clusters with loss of water. The Zn4S64- species form by the cross-linking of two neutral Zn3S3 rings by added sulfide; thus a Zn-S-Zn bridge forms across the rings with subsequent

  10. Turbulence and vorticity in Galaxy clusters generated by structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazza, F.; Jones, T. W.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; Gheller, C.; Porter, D.; Ryu, D.

    2017-01-01

    Turbulence is a key ingredient for the evolution of the intracluster medium, whose properties can be predicted with high-resolution numerical simulations. We present initial results on the generation of solenoidal and compressive turbulence in the intracluster medium during the formation of a small-size cluster using highly resolved, non-radiative cosmological simulations, with a refined monitoring in time. In this first of a series of papers, we closely look at one simulated cluster whose formation was distinguished by a merger around z ˜ 0.3. We separate laminar gas motions, turbulence and shocks with dedicated filtering strategies and distinguish the solenoidal and compressive components of the gas flows using Hodge-Helmholtz decomposition. Solenoidal turbulence dominates the dissipation of turbulent motions (˜95 per cent) in the central cluster volume at all epochs. The dissipation via compressive modes is found to be more important (˜30 per cent of the total) only at large radii (≥0.5rvir) and close to merger events. We show that enstrophy (vorticity squared) is good proxy of solenoidal turbulence. All terms ruling the evolution of enstrophy (i.e. baroclinic, compressive, stretching and advective terms) are found to be significant, but in amounts that vary with time and location. Two important trends for the growth of enstrophy in our simulation are identified: first, enstrophy is continuously accreted into the cluster from the outside, and most of that accreted enstrophy is generated near the outer accretion shocks by baroclinic and compressive processes. Secondly, in the cluster interior vortex, stretching is dominant, although the other terms also contribute substantially.

  11. Formation and evolution of star clusters in interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, P.

    2006-02-01

    My present PhD thesis "Formation and evolution of star clusters in interacting galaxies" and the associated work was performed in the Galaxy Evolution Group at the Institut für Astrophysik (Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Germany) under supervision of apl. Prof. Dr. U. Fritze - v. Alvensleben. My co-supervisor - especially for the observational part of the thesis - was Dr. R. de Grijs (Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Sheffield, UK). In the course of my PhD project I got involved in a number of projects, spanning a wide range of astrophysical topics. The results of these projects are reported in my PhD thesis: * evolutionary synthesis modeling: I played a leading role in the most recent updates of the GALEV code (originally built by U. Fritze - v. Alvensleben). I have implemented gaseous emission effects to the code (see Anders & Fritze - v. Alvensleben 2003). Only due to this update, models for younger ages than before became possible, allowing for more direct and detailed studies of star and star cluster formation processes. In addition, I have implemented a variety of new filter systems (models in a comprehensive set of regularly used filter sets, including all relevant filters on-board the HST, are now available) eliminating the need to transform between different filter systems and avoiding the associated uncertainties. * cluster parameter determination: I have developed and thoroughly tested the AnalySED tool (Anders et al. 2004b). This tool allows for statistically robust parameter determination from multi-wavelength broad-band observations of (initially) star clusters. The AnalySED tool has been successfully applied to a large number of star cluster systems (e.g. Anders et al. 2004a; de Grijs et al. (incl. Anders) 2003a,b,c, 2004; de Grijs & Anders 2006, MNRAS, in press) * uncertainties inherent to evolutionary synthesis modeling and parameter determination: I reported very detailed on a large number of tests on the accuracy of the

  12. Sequential clustering of star formations in IC 1396

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya-Fang; Li, Jin-Zeng

    2013-05-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the H II region IC 1396 and its star forming activity, in which multi-wavelength data ranging from the optical to the near- and far-infrared were employed. The surface density distribution of all the 2MASS sources with a certain detection toward IC 1396 indicates the existence of a compact cluster spatially consistent with the position of the exciting source of the H II region, HD 206267. The spatial distribution of the sources with excessive infrared emission, selected based on archived 2MASS data, reveals the existence of four sub-clusters in this region. One is associated with the open cluster Trumpler 37. The other three are found to be spatially coincident with the bright rims of the H II region. All the sources with excessive emission in the near infrared are cross-identified with AKARI IRC data. An analysis of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the resultant sample leads to the identification of eight CLASS I, 15 CLASS II and 15 CLASS III sources in IC 1396. Optical identification of the sample sources with R magnitudes brighter than 17 mag corroborates the results from the SED analysis. Based on the spatial distribution of the infrared young stellar objects at different evolutionary stages, the surrounding sub-clusters located in the bright rims are believed to be younger than the central one. This is consistent with a scenario of sequential star formation in this region. Imaging data of a dark patch in IC 1396 by Herschel SPIRE, on the other hand, indicate the presence of two far-infrared cores in LDN 1111, which are likely to be a new generation of protostellar objects in formation. So we infer that the star formation process in this H II region was not continuous but rather episodic.

  13. Slow Quenching of Star Formation in OMEGAWINGS Clusters: Galaxies in Transition in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paccagnella, A.; Vulcani, B.; Poggianti, B. M.; Moretti, A.; Fritz, J.; Gullieuszik, M.; Couch, W.; Bettoni, D.; Cava, A.; D'Onofrio, M.; Fasano, G.

    2016-01-01

    The star formation quenching depends on environment, but a full understanding of what mechanisms drive it is still missing. Exploiting a sample of galaxies with masses {M}*\\gt {10}9.8{M}⊙ , drawn from the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) and its recent extension OMEGAWINGS, we investigate the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of stellar mass (M{}*) in galaxy clusters at 0.04\\lt z\\lt 0.07. We use non-member galaxies at 0.02 < z < 0.09 as a field control sample. Overall, we find agreement between the SFR-M{}* relation in the two environments, but detect a population of cluster galaxies with reduced SFRs, which is rare in the field. These transition galaxies are mainly found within the cluster virial radius (R200), but they impact on the SFR-M{}* relation only within 0.6R200. The ratio of transition to pure star-forming galaxies strongly depends on environment, being larger than 0.6 within 0.3R200 and rapidly decreasing with distance, while it is almost flat with M*. As galaxies move downward from the SFR-M{}* main sequence, they become redder and present older luminosity- and mass-weighted ages. These trends, together with the analysis of the star formation histories, suggest that transition galaxies have had a reduced SFR for the past 2-5 Gyr. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the interaction of galaxies with the intracluster medium via strangulation causes a gradual shut down of star formation, giving birth to an evolved population of galaxies in transition from being star forming to becoming passive.

  14. Foam and cluster structure formation by latex particles at the air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Garcia, Jaime; Gámez-Corrales, Rogelio; Ivlev, Boris I.

    1997-02-01

    We report the formation of two-dimensional foam and cluster structures by spherical polystyrene particles trapped at the air/water interface. The colloidal foam is a transient structure that evolves to the formation of clusters, but clusters can also be formed after deposition of the sample. We also observed the formation of small aggregates, whose formation along with the cluster stabilization can be explained in terms of a balance between electrostatic repulsive and van der Waals attractive interactions.

  15. Pattern formation of underwater sand ripples with a skewed drive.

    PubMed

    Bundgaard, F; Ellegaard, C; Scheibye-Knudsen, K; Bohr, T; Sams, T

    2004-12-01

    In this paper we present an experimental study of the dynamics of underwater sand ripples when a regular pattern of ripples is subjected to a skewed oscillatory flow, i.e., one not perpendicular to the direction of the ripple crests. Striking patterns with new, superposed ripples on top of the original ones occur very quickly with a characteristic angle, which is, in general, not perpendicular to the flow. A slower, more complex transition then follows, leading to the final state where the ripples are again perpendicular to the flow. We investigate the variation of the superposed pattern as a function of the direction, amplitude, and frequency of the drive, and as a function of the viscosity (by changing the temperature). We quantify the dynamics of the entire transition process and finally study the grain motion around idealized (solid) skewed ripples. This leads to a characteristic mean path of a single particle. The path has a shape close to a parallelogram, with no apparent connection to the pattern of real, superposed ripples. On the other hand, a thin layer of sand sprinkled on the solid ripples leads to qualitatively similar patterns.

  16. Star Formation Activity in CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-01

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M⊙ yr-1. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ˜350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ˜0.5-1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel

  17. Star formation in shocked cluster spirals and their tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roediger, E.; Brüggen, M.; Owers, M. S.; Ebeling, H.; Sun, M.

    2014-09-01

    Recent observations of ram pressure stripped spiral galaxies in clusters revealed details of the stripping process, i.e. the truncation of all interstellar medium phases and of star formation (SF) in the disc, and multiphase star-forming tails. Some stripped galaxies, in particular in merging clusters, develop spectacular star-forming tails, giving them a jellyfish-like appearance. In merging clusters, merger shocks in the intracluster medium (ICM) are thought to have overrun these galaxies, enhancing the ambient ICM pressure and thus triggering SF, gas stripping, and tail formation. We present idealized hydrodynamical simulations of this scenario, including standard descriptions for SF and stellar feedback. To aid the interpretation of recent and upcoming observations, we focus on particular structures and dynamics in SF patterns in the remaining gas disc and in the near tails, which are easiest to observe. The observed jellyfish morphology is qualitatively reproduced for, both, face-on and edge-on stripping. In edge-on stripping, the interplay between the ICM wind and the disc rotation leads to asymmetries along the ICM wind direction and perpendicular to it. The apparent tail is still part of a highly deformed gaseous and young stellar disc. In both geometries, SF takes place in knots throughout the tail, such that the stars in the tails show no ordered age gradients. Significant SF enhancement in the disc occurs only at radii where the gas will be stripped in due course.

  18. Simulating radiative feedback and star cluster formation in GMCs - I. Dependence on gravitational boundedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Corey S.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Harris, William E.

    2016-09-01

    Radiative feedback is an important consequence of cluster formation in giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in which newly formed clusters heat and ionize their surrounding gas. The process of cluster formation, and the role of radiative feedback, has not been fully explored in different GMC environments. We present a suite of simulations which explore how the initial gravitational boundedness, and radiative feedback, affect cluster formation. We model the early evolution (<5 Myr) of turbulent, 106 M⊙ clouds with virial parameters ranging from 0.5 to 5. To model cluster formation, we use cluster sink particles, coupled to a raytracing scheme, and a custom subgrid model which populates a cluster via sampling an initial mass function (IMF) with an efficiency of 20 per cent per free-fall time. We find that radiative feedback only decreases the cluster particle formation efficiency by a few per cent. The initial virial parameter plays a much stronger role in limiting cluster formation, with a spread of cluster formation efficiencies of 37-71 per cent for the most unbound to the most bound model. The total number of clusters increases while the maximum mass cluster decreases with an increasing initial virial parameter, resulting in steeper mass distributions. The star formation rates in our cluster particles are initially consistent with observations but rise to higher values at late times. This suggests that radiative feedback alone is not responsible for dispersing a GMC over the first 5 Myr of cluster formation.

  19. Synaptic clustering within dendrites: an emerging theory of memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Kastellakis, George; Cai, Denise J.; Mednick, Sara C.; Silva, Alcino J.; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2015-01-01

    It is generally accepted that complex memories are stored in distributed representations throughout the brain, however the mechanisms underlying these representations are not understood. Here, we review recent findings regarding the subcellular mechanisms implicated in memory formation, which provide evidence for a dendrite-centered theory of memory. Plasticity-related phenomena which affect synaptic properties, such as synaptic tagging and capture, synaptic clustering, branch strength potentiation and spinogenesis provide the foundation for a model of memory storage that relies heavily on processes operating at the dendrite level. The emerging picture suggests that clusters of functionally related synapses may serve as key computational and memory storage units in the brain. We discuss both experimental evidence and theoretical models that support this hypothesis and explore its advantages for neuronal function. PMID:25576663

  20. The filamentous fungal pellet and forces driving its formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianguo; Zhang, Jining

    2016-12-01

    Filamentous fungi play an important role not only in the bio-manufacturing of value-added products, but also in bioenergy and environmental research. The bioprocess manipulation of filamentous fungi is more difficult than that of other microbial species because of their different pellet morphologies and the presence of tangled mycelia under different cultivation conditions. Fungal pellets, which have the advantages of harvest ease, low fermentation broth viscosity and high yield of some proteins, have been used for a long time. Many attempts have been made to establish the relationship between pellet and product yield using quantitative approaches. Fungal pellet formation is attributed to the combination of electrostatic interactions, hydrophobicity and specific interactions from spore wall components. Electrostatic interactions result from van der Waals forces and negative charge repulsion from carboxyl groups in the spore wall structure. Electrostatic interactions are also affected by counter-ions (cations) and the physiologic conditions of spores that modify the carboxyl groups. Fungal aggregates are promoted by the hydrophobicity generated by hydrophobins, which form a hydrophobic coat that covers the spore. The specific interactions of spore wall components contribute to spore aggregation through salt bridging. A model of spore aggregation was proposed based on these forces. Additionally, some challenges were addressed, including the limitations of research techniques, the quantitative determination of forces and the complex information of biological systems, to clarify the mechanism of fungal pellet formation.

  1. Formation and Reactivity of Organo-Functionalized Tin Selenide Clusters.

    PubMed

    Rinn, Niklas; Eußner, Jens P; Kaschuba, Willy; Xie, Xiulan; Dehnen, Stefanie

    2016-02-24

    Reactions of R(1) SnCl3 (R(1) =CMe2 CH2 C(O)Me) with (SiMe3 )2 Se yield a series of organo-functionalized tin selenide clusters, [(SnR(1) )2 SeCl4 ] (1), [(SnR(1) )2 Se2 Cl2 ] (2), [(SnR(1) )3 Se4 Cl] (3), and [(SnR(1) )4 Se6 ] (4), depending on the solvent and ratio of the reactants used. NMR experiments clearly suggest a stepwise formation of 1 through 4 by subsequent condensation steps with the concomitant release of Me3 SiCl. Furthermore, addition of hydrazines to the keto-functionalized clusters leads to the formation of hydrazone derivatives, [(Sn2 (μ-R(3) )(μ-Se)Cl4 ] (5, R(3) =[CMe2 CH2 CMe(NH)]2 ), [(SnR(2) )3 Se4 Cl] (6, R(2) =CMe2 CH2 C(NNH2 )Me), [(SnR(4) )3 Se4 ][SnCl3 ] (7, R(4) =CMe2 CH2 C(NNHPh)Me), [(SnR(2) )4 Se6 ] (8), and [(SnR(4) )4 Se6 ] (9). Upon treatment of 4 with [Cu(PPh3 )3 Cl] and excess (SiMe3 )2 Se, the cluster fragments to form [(R(1) Sn)2 Se2 (CuPPh3 )2 Se2 ] (10), the first discrete Sn/Se/Cu cluster compound reported in the literature. The derivatization reactions indicate fundamental differences between organotin sulfide and organotin selenide chemistry.

  2. The Orion Nebula Cluster as a Paradigm of Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robberto, Massimo

    2014-10-01

    We propose a 52-orbit Treasury Program to investigate two fundamental questions of star formation: a) the low-mass tail of the IMF, down to a few Jupiter masses; b) the dynamical evolution of clusters, as revealed by stellar proper motions. We target the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) using WFC3 and ACS in coordinated parallel mode to perform a synoptic survey in the 1.345micron H2O feature and Ic broad-band. Our main objectives are: 1) to discover and classify ~500 brown dwarfs and planetary-mass objects in the field, extending the IMF down to lowest masses formed by gravitational collapse. Using the latest generation of high contrast image processing we will also search for faint companions, reaching down to sub-arcsecond separations and 1E-4 flux ratios. 2) to derive high precision (~0.2km/s) relative proper motions of low-mass stars and substellar objects (about 1000 sources total), leveraging on first epoch data obtained by our previous HST Treasury Program about 10 years ago. These data will unveil the cluster dynamics: velocity dispersion vs. mass, substructures, and the fraction of escaping sources. Only HST can access the IR H2O absorption feature sensitive to the effective temperature of substellar objects, while providing the exceptionally stable PSF needed for the detection of faint companions, and the identical ACS platform for our second epoch proper-motion survey. This program will provide the definitive HST legacy dataset on the ONC. Our High-Level Science Products will be mined by the community, both statistically to constrain competing theories of star formation, and to study in depth the multitude of exotic sources harboured by the cluster.

  3. Diffusion layer formation drives zone migration in travelling wave electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Booth, William Albert; Edwards, Boyd; Jo, Kyoo; Timperman, Aaron; Schiffbauer, Jarrod

    2017-04-04

    COMSOL finite element modeling software is used to simulate 2D traveling-wave electrophoresis for microfluidic separations and sample concentration. A four-phase AC potential is applied to a periodic interdigitated four-electrode array to produce a longitudinal electric wave that travels through the channel. Charged particles are carried along with the electric wave or left behind, depending on their mobilities. A simplified model of asymmetric electrode reactions resolves the issue of electric double layer shielding at the electrodes. Selective reactions allow for the formation of diffusion layers of charged particles which follow the traveling electric wave. These diffusion layers determine the transport of charged species through the system. Our model reproduces experimental separations of charged species based on mobility. With easy control over the frequency and direction, one may employ this method for concentrating and/or separating charged particles.

  4. Modeling jet and outflow feedback during star cluster formation

    SciTech Connect

    Federrath, Christoph; Schrön, Martin; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2014-08-01

    Powerful jets and outflows are launched from the protostellar disks around newborn stars. These outflows carry enough mass and momentum to transform the structure of their parent molecular cloud and to potentially control star formation itself. Despite their importance, we have not been able to fully quantify the impact of jets and outflows during the formation of a star cluster. The main problem lies in limited computing power. We would have to resolve the magnetic jet-launching mechanism close to the protostar and at the same time follow the evolution of a parsec-size cloud for a million years. Current computer power and codes fall orders of magnitude short of achieving this. In order to overcome this problem, we implement a subgrid-scale (SGS) model for launching jets and outflows, which demonstrably converges and reproduces the mass, linear and angular momentum transfer, and the speed of real jets, with ∼1000 times lower resolution than would be required without the SGS model. We apply the new SGS model to turbulent, magnetized star cluster formation and show that jets and outflows (1) eject about one-fourth of their parent molecular clump in high-speed jets, quickly reaching distances of more than a parsec, (2) reduce the star formation rate by about a factor of two, and (3) lead to the formation of ∼1.5 times as many stars compared to the no-outflow case. Most importantly, we find that jets and outflows reduce the average star mass by a factor of ∼ three and may thus be essential for understanding the characteristic mass of the stellar initial mass function.

  5. Long Duration Directional Drives for Star Formation and Photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J. O.; Martinez, D. A.; Pound, M. W.; Heeter, R. F.; Villette, B.; Casner, A.; Mancini, R. C.

    2015-06-18

    This research will; confirm the possibility of studying the structure and evolution of star-forming regions of molecular clouds in the laboratory; test the cometary model for the formation of the pillar structures in molecular clouds; assess the effect of magnetic fields on the evolution of structures in molecular clouds; and develop and demonstrate a new, long-duration (60-100 ns), directional source of x-ray radiation that can be used for the study of deeply nonlinear hydrodynamics, hydrodynamic instabilities that occur in the presence of directional radiation, shock-driven and radiatively-driven collapse of dense cores, and photoionization. Due to the iconic status of the pillars of the Eagle Nebula, this research will bring popular attention to plasma physics, HED laboratory physics, and fundamental science at NIF and other experimental facilities. The result will be to both to bring new perspectives to the studies of hydrodynamics in inertial confinement fusion and HED scenarios in general, and to promote interest in the STEM disciplines.

  6. Gold Cluster Formation on C60 Surfaces: Au-Cluster Beads and Self-Organized Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinke, Petra; Liu, Hui

    2007-03-01

    Petra Reinke, Hui Liu, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia The investigation of C60-Au interaction is central to the advancement of solar cell and nanotechnology applications of C60. C60 grows in a quasi-layer-by-layer mode on a pristine graphite surface and form a special surface structure (coexistence of round and fractal islands). The deposition of Au leads to the formation of a complex array of different surface structures, while the basic island structure of the C60 is preserved. The Au-clusters nucleate preferentially at the graphite-first fullerene layer islands edge forming beadlike structures. A roughness analysis of the fullerene surface indicates the presence of Au atoms embedded in the fullerene surface, situated in the troughs in between the large molecules. The analysis of the spatial and size distributions of Au clusters provides the basis for the development of a qualitative model which describes the relevant surface processes in the Au-fullerene system. The simultaneous deposition of Au and C60 leads to the formation of organized structures, in which Au clusters are embedded in a ring of fullerene molecules with a constant width.

  7. Formation and structure of stable aggregates in binary diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-López, J. M.; Moncho-Jordá, A.; Schmitt, A.; Hidalgo-Álvarez, R.

    2005-09-01

    Binary diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation processes are studied as a function of the relative concentration of the two species. Both, short and long time behaviors are investigated by means of three-dimensional off-lattice Brownian Dynamics simulations. At short aggregation times, the validity of the Hogg-Healy-Fuerstenau approximation is shown. At long times, a single large cluster containing all initial particles is found to be formed when the relative concentration of the minority particles lies above a critical value. Below that value, stable aggregates remain in the system. These stable aggregates are composed by a few minority particles that are highly covered by majority ones. Our off-lattice simulations reveal a value of approximately 0.15 for the critical relative concentration. A qualitative explanation scheme for the formation and growth of the stable aggregates is developed. The simulations also explain the phenomenon of monomer discrimination that was observed recently in single cluster light scattering experiments.

  8. Cluster formation in liverwort-associated methylobacteria and its implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschera, U.; Thomas, J.; Hornschuh, M.

    2007-08-01

    Pink-pigmented methylotropic bacteria of the genus Methylobacterium inhabit the surfaces of plant organs. In bryophytes, these methylobacteria enhance cell growth, but the nature of this plant-microbe interaction is largely unknown. In this study, methylobacteria were isolated from the upper surface of the free-living thalli of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha L. Identification of one strain by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene-targeted polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and other data show that these microbes represent an undescribed species of the genus Methylobacterium ( Methylobacterium sp.). The growth-promoting activity of these wild-type methylobacteria was tested and compared with that of the type strain Methylobacterium mesophilicum. Both types of methylobacteria stimulated surface expansion of isolated gemmae from Marchantia polymorpha by about 350%. When suspended in water, the liverwort-associated bacteria ( Methylobacterium sp.) formed dense clusters of up to 600 cells. In liquid cultures of Methylobacterium mesophilicum, single cells were observed, but no clustering occurred. We suggest that the liverwort-associated methylobacteria are co-evolved symbionts of the plants: Cluster formation may be a behavior that enhances the survival of the epiphytic microbes during periods of drought of these desiccation-tolerant lower plants.

  9. Drama of HII regions: Clustered and Triggered Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinzeng; YUAN, Jinghua; LIU, Hongli; Wu, Yuefang; Huang, Yafang

    2015-08-01

    Intense ultraviolet radiation from young massive stars ionizes ambient material leading to the formation of HII regions which have keen impact upon the birth of new stars in the vicinities. The strong radiation may be responsible for the dispersal of molecular clouds to hinder star formation, while the expansion of HII regions would collect neutral material to form dense layers which may be gravitationally unstable to collapse to give birth to new stars.In order to understand the star formation process under the influence of HII regions, we have carried out extensive investigations to well selected star-forming regions which all have been profoundly affected by existing massive O type stars. On the basis of multi-wavelength data from mid-infrared to millimeter collected using Spitzer, Herschel, and ground based radio telescope, the physical status of interstellar medium and star formation in these regions have been revealed. Clustered and sequential star formation have been detected toward well known HII regions, such as IC1396 and Sh-155. In a relatively large infrared dust bubble, active star formation is undergoing and the shell is still expanding. Socked features and signs of triggered star formation have been tentatively detected in a relatively small bubble. The dense cores in the Rosette Molecular Complex detected at 1.1 mm using SMA have been speculated to have a likely triggered origin according to their spatial distribution. Although some observational results have been obtained, more efforts are necessary to reach trustworthy conclusions. And more regions will be extensively explored based on multi-wavelength observations, especially the data collected using the Herschel Space Observatory.

  10. BURST OF STAR FORMATION DRIVES BUBBLE IN GALAXY'S CORE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These NASA Hubble Space Telescope snapshots reveal dramatic activities within the core of the galaxy NGC 3079, where a lumpy bubble of hot gas is rising from a cauldron of glowing matter. The picture at left shows the bubble in the center of the galaxy's disk. The structure is more than 3,000 light-years wide and rises 3,500 light-years above the galaxy's disk. The smaller photo at right is a close-up view of the bubble. Astronomers suspect that the bubble is being blown by 'winds' (high-speed streams of particles) released during a burst of star formation. Gaseous filaments at the top of the bubble are whirling around in a vortex and are being expelled into space. Eventually, this gas will rain down upon the galaxy's disk where it may collide with gas clouds, compress them, and form a new generation of stars. The two white dots just above the bubble are probably stars in the galaxy. The close-up reveals that the bubble's surface is lumpy, consisting of four columns of gaseous filaments that tower above the galaxy's disk. The filaments disperse at a height of 2,000 light-years. Each filament is about 75 light-years wide. Velocity measurements taken by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope in Hawaii show that the gaseous filaments are ascending at more than 4 million miles an hour (6 million kilometers an hour). According to theoretical models, the bubble formed when ongoing winds from hot stars mixed with small bubbles of very hot gas from supernova explosions. Observations of the core's structure by radio telescopes indicate that those processes are still active. The models suggest that this outflow began about a million years ago. They occur about every 10 million years. Eventually, the hot stars will die, and the bubble's energy source will fade away. Astronomers have seen evidence of previous outbursts from radio and X-ray observations. Those studies show rings of dust and gas and long plumes of material, all of which are larger than the bubble. NGC 3079 is 50

  11. Formation of Short-Period Binary Pulsars in Globular Clusters.

    PubMed

    Rasio; Pfahl; Rappaport

    2000-03-20

    We present a new dynamical scenario for the formation of short-period binary millisecond pulsars in globular clusters. Our work is motivated by the recent observations of 20 radio pulsars in 47 Tuc. In a dense cluster such as 47 Tuc, most neutron stars acquire binary companions through exchange interactions with primordial binaries. The resulting systems have semimajor axes in the range approximately 0.1-1 AU and neutron star companion masses approximately 1-3 M middle dot in circle. For many of these systems, we find that when the companion evolves off the main sequence and fills its Roche lobe, the subsequent mass transfer is dynamically unstable. This leads to a common envelope phase and the formation of short-period neutron star-white dwarf binaries. For a significant fraction of these binaries, the decay of the orbit due to gravitational radiation will be followed by a period of stable mass transfer driven by a combination of gravitational radiation and tidal heating of the companion. The properties of the resulting short-period binaries match well those of observed binary pulsars in 47 Tuc.

  12. Embedded star clusters and the formation of the Oort Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasser, R.; Duncan, M. J.; Levison, H. F.

    2006-09-01

    < when <ρ>≳10 Mpc. Our models easily produce objects on orbits like that of (90377) Sedna [Brown, M.E., Trujillo, C., Rabinowitz, D., 2004. Astrophys. J. 617, 645-649] within ˜1 Myr in cases where the mean density is 10 Mpc or higher; one needs mean densities of order 10 Mpc to create objects like 2000 CR 105 by this mechanism, which are reasonable (see, e.g., Guthermuth, R.A., Megeath, S.T., Pipher, J.L., Williams, J.P., Allen, L.E., Myers, P.C., Raines, S.N., 2005. Astrophys. J. 632, 397-420). Thus the latter object may also be part of the OC. Close stellar passages can stir the primordial Kuiper Belt to sufficiently high eccentricities ( e≳0.05; Kenyon, S.J., Bromley, B.C., 2002. Astron. J. 123, 1757-1775) that collisions become destructive. From the simulations performed it is determined that there is a 50% or better chance to stir the primordial Kuiper Belt to eccentricities e⩾0.05 at 50 AU when <ρ>≳10 Mpc. The orbit of the new object 2003 UB 313 [Brown, M.E., Trujillo, C.A., Rabinowitz, D.L., 2005. Astrophys. J. 635, L97-L100] is only reproduced for mean cluster densities of the order of 10 Mpc, but in the simulations it could not come to be on its current orbit by this mechanism without disrupting the formation of bodies in the primordial Kuiper Belt down to 20 AU. It is therefore improbable that the latter object is created by this mechanism.

  13. A CLUSTER IN THE MAKING: ALMA REVEALS THE INITIAL CONDITIONS FOR HIGH-MASS CLUSTER FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Rathborne, J. M.; Contreras, Y.; Longmore, S. N.; Bastian, N.; Jackson, J. M.; Alves, J. F.; Bally, J.; Foster, J. B.; Garay, G.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Testi, L.; Walsh, A. J.

    2015-04-01

    G0.253+0.016 is a molecular clump that appears to be on the verge of forming a high-mass cluster: its extremely low dust temperature, high mass, and high density, combined with its lack of prevalent star formation, make it an excellent candidate for an Arches-like cluster in a very early stage of formation. Here we present new Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-millimeter Array observations of its small-scale (∼0.07 pc) 3 mm dust continuum and molecular line emission from 17 different species that probe a range of distinct physical and chemical conditions. The data reveal a complex network of emission features with a complicated velocity structure: there is emission on all spatial scales, the morphology of which ranges from small, compact regions to extended, filamentary structures that are seen in both emission and absorption. The dust column density is well traced by molecules with higher excitation energies and critical densities, consistent with a clump that has a denser interior. A statistical analysis supports the idea that turbulence shapes the observed gas structure within G0.253+0.016. We find a clear break in the turbulent power spectrum derived from the optically thin dust continuum emission at a spatial scale of ∼0.1 pc, which may correspond to the spatial scale at which gravity has overcome the thermal pressure. We suggest that G0.253+0.016 is on the verge of forming a cluster from hierarchical, filamentary structures that arise from a highly turbulent medium. Although the stellar distribution within high-mass Arches-like clusters is compact, centrally condensed, and smooth, the observed gas distribution within G0.253+0.016 is extended, with no high-mass central concentration, and has a complex, hierarchical structure. If this clump gives rise to a high-mass cluster and its stars are formed from this initially hierarchical gas structure, then the resulting cluster must evolve into a centrally condensed structure via a dynamical process.

  14. CLUSTERED STAR FORMATION AND OUTFLOWS IN AFGL 2591

    SciTech Connect

    Sanna, A.; Carrasco-Gonzalez, C.; Menten, K. M.; Brunthaler, A.; Reid, M. J.; Moscadelli, L.; Rygl, K. L. J.

    2012-02-01

    We report on a detailed study of the water maser kinematics and radio continuum emission toward the most massive and young object in the star-forming region AFGL 2591. Our analysis shows at least two spatial scales of multiple star formation, one projected across 0.1 pc on the sky and another one at about 2000 AU from a ZAMS star of about 38 M{sub Sun }. This young stellar object drives a powerful jet- and wind-driven outflow system with the water masers associated to the outflow walls, previously detected as a limb-brightened cavity in the NIR band. At about 1300 AU to the north of this object a younger protostar drives two bow shocks, outlined by arc-like water maser emission, at 200 AU either side of the source. We have traced the velocity profile of the gas that expands along these arc-like maser structures and compared it with the jet-driven outflow model. This analysis suggests that the ambient medium around the northern protostar is swept up by a jet-driven shock (>66 km s{sup -1}) and perhaps a lower-velocity ({approx}10 km s{sup -1}) wind with an opening angle of about 20 Degree-Sign from the jet axis.

  15. The formation of cluster elliptical galaxies as revealed by extensive star formation.

    PubMed

    Stevens, J A; Ivison, R J; Dunlop, J S; Smail, Ian R; Percival, W J; Hughes, D H; Röttgering, H J A; Van Breugel, W J M; Reuland, M

    2003-09-18

    The most massive galaxies in the present-day Universe are found to lie in the centres of rich clusters. They have old, coeval stellar populations suggesting that the bulk of their stars must have formed at early epochs in spectacular starbursts, which should be luminous phenomena when observed at submillimetre wavelengths. The most popular model of galaxy formation predicts that these galaxies form in proto-clusters at high-density peaks in the early Universe. Such peaks are indicated by massive high-redshift radio galaxies. Here we report deep submillimetre mapping of seven high-redshift radio galaxies and their environments. These data confirm not only the presence of spatially extended regions of massive star-formation activity in the radio galaxies themselves, but also in companion objects previously undetected at any wavelength. The prevalence, orientation, and inferred masses of these submillimetre companion galaxies suggest that we are witnessing the synchronous formation of the most luminous elliptical galaxies found today at the centres of rich clusters of galaxies.

  16. Revisiting the formation of cyclic clusters in liquid ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanay, Mannix P.; Kim, Dong Hee; Fan, Haiyan

    2016-04-01

    The liquid phase of ethanol in pure and in non-polar solvents was studied at room temperature using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies together with theoretical approach. The FT-IR spectra for pure ethanol and solution in cyclohexane at different dilution stages are consistent with 1H NMR results. The results from both methods were best explained by the results of the density functional theory based on a multimeric model. It is suggested that cyclic trimers and tetramers are dominated in the solution of cyclohexane/hexane with the concentration greater than 0.5M at room temperature. In liquid ethanol, while the primary components at room temperature are cyclic trimers and tetramers, there is a certain amount (˜14%) of open hydroxide group representing the existence of chain like structures in the equilibria. The cyclic cluster model in the liquid and concentrated solution phase (>0.5M) can be used to explain the anomalously lower freezing point of ethanol (159 K) than that of water (273 K) at ambient conditions. In addition, 1H NMR at various dilution stages reveals the dynamics for the formation of cyclic clusters.

  17. Formation of compact clusters from high resolution hybrid cosmological simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Mark L. A.; Scannapieco, Evan; Gray, William J.

    2013-11-20

    The early universe hosted a large population of small dark matter 'minihalos' that were too small to cool and form stars on their own. These existed as static objects around larger galaxies until acted upon by some outside influence. Outflows, which have been observed around a variety of galaxies, can provide this influence in such a way as to collapse, rather than disperse, the minihalo gas. Gray and Scannapieco performed an investigation in which idealized spherically symmetric minihalos were struck by enriched outflows. Here we perform high-resolution cosmological simulations that form realistic minihalos, which we then extract to perform a large suite of simulations of outflow-minihalo interactions including non-equilibrium chemical reactions. In all models, the shocked minihalo forms molecules through non-equilibrium reaction, and then cools to form dense, chemically homogenous clumps of star-forming gas. The formation of these high-redshift clusters may be observable with the next generation of telescopes and the largest of them should survive to the present-day, having properties similar to halo globular clusters.

  18. Hierarchical Cluster Formation in Concentrated Monoclonal Antibody Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrin, P. Douglas; Zarzar, Jonathan; Zarraga, Isidro Dan; Porcar, Lionel; Falus, Peter; Wagner, Norman; Liu, Yun

    Reversible cluster formation has been identified as an underlying cause of large solution viscosities observed in some concentrated monoclonal antibody (mAb) formulations. As high solution viscosity prevents the use of subcutaneous injection as a delivery method for some mAbs, a fundamental understanding of the interactions responsible for high viscosities in concentrated mAb solutions is of significant relevance to mAb applications in human health care as well as of intellectual interest. Here, we present a detailed investigation of a well-studied IgG1 based mAb to relate the short time dynamics and microstructure to significant viscosity changes over a range of pharmaceutically relevant physiochemical conditions. Using a combination of experimental techniques, it is found that upon adding Na2SO4, these antibodies dimerize in solution. Proteins form strongly bounded reversible dimers at dilute concentrations that, when concentrated, interact with each other to form loosely bounded, large, transient clusters. The combined effect of forming strongly bounded dimers and a large transient network is a significant increase in the solution viscosity. Strongly bounded, reversible dimers may exist in many IgG1 based mAb systems such that these results contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the physical mechanisms producing high viscosities in concentrated protein solutions.

  19. Formation of Nanometallic Clusters in Silica by Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Ila, D., Sarkisov, S., Williams, E.K. , Smith, C.C. , Poker, D.B., Hensley, D.K.

    1997-10-01

    We have changed both linear and nonlinear optical properties of suprasil-1 by implanting 2.0 MeV copper, 350 keV tin, 1.5 MeV silver and 3.0 MeV gold.These changes were induced both by over implantation above the threshold fluence for spontaneous cluster formation and by subsequent thermal annealing,and are due to an increase in resonance optical absorption as well as an enhancement of the nonlinear optical properties. Using optical absorption spectrophotometry and Rutherford Backscattering spectrometry, we have measured the cluster size for each heat treatment temperature. Using Z-scan technique we have determined the third order electric susceptibility for each implanted species to be 1.5 x 10(exp -6) esu for Sn nanoclusters, 2.7 x 10(exp -6) esu for Cu nanoclusters, 5 x 10(exp -7) esu for Ag nanoclusters, to 6.5 x 10(exp-7) esu for Au nanoclusters in suprasil- 1.

  20. Star formation in the starburst cluster in NGC 3603

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correnti, Matteo; Paresce, Francesco; Aversa, Rossella; Beccari, Giacomo; De Marchi, Guido; Di Criscienzo, Marcella; Pang, Xiaoying; Spezzi, Loredana; Valenti, Elena; Ventura, Paolo

    2012-08-01

    We have used new, deep, visible and near infrared observations of the compact starburst cluster in the giant HII region NGC 3603 and its surroundings with the WFC3 on HST and HAWK-I on the VLT to study in detail the physical properties of its intermediate mass (˜1-3 M⊙) stellar population. We show that after correction for differential extinction and actively accreting stars, and the study of field star contamination, strong evidence remains for a continuous spread in the ages of pre-main sequence stars in the range ˜2 to ˜30 Myr within the temporal resolution available. Existing differences among presently available theoretical models account for the largest possible variation in shape of the measured age histograms within these limits. We also find that this isochronal age spread in the near infrared and visible Colour-Magnitude Diagrams cannot be reproduced by any other presently known source of astrophysical or instrumental scatter that could mimic the luminosity spread seen in our observations except, possibly, episodic accretion. The measured age spread and the stellar spatial distribution in the cluster are consistent with the hypothesis that star formation started at least 20-30 Myrs ago progressing slowly but continuously up to at least a few million years ago. All the stars in the considered mass range are distributed in a flattened oblate spheroidal pattern with the major axis oriented in an approximate South-East-North-West direction, and with the length of the equatorial axis decreasing with increasing age. This asymmetry is most likely due to the fact that star formation occurred along a filament of gas and dust in the natal molecular cloud oriented locally in this direction.

  1. The Formation of Cluster Populations Through Direct Galaxy Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Bradley W.; Smith, Beverly J.; Struck, Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Much progress has been made on the question of how globular clusters form. In particular, the study of extragalactic populations of young, high-mass clusters ("super star clusters") has revealed a class of objects can evolve into globular clusters. The process by which these clusters form, and how many survive long enough to become globular clusters, is not wholly understood. Here, we use new data on the colliding galaxy system Arp 261 to investigate the possibility that young, massive clusters form in greater numbers during direct galaxy collisions, compared to less direct tidal collisions.

  2. Distances, Ages, and Epoch of Formation of Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretta, Eugenio; Gratton, Raffaele G.; Clementini, Gisella; Fusi Pecci, Flavio

    2000-04-01

    We review the results on distances and absolute ages of Galactic globular clusters (GCs) obtained after the release of the Hipparcos catalog. Several methods aimed at the definition of the Population II local distance scale are discussed, and their results compared, exploiting new results for RR Lyraes in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We find that the so-called short distance and long distance scales may be reconciled whether or not a consistent reddening scale is adopted for Cepheids and RR Lyrae variables in the LMC. Emphasis is given in the paper to the discussion of distances and ages of GCs derived using Hipparcos parallaxes of local subdwarfs. We find that the selection criteria adopted to choose the local subdwarfs, as well as the size of the corrections applied to existing systematic biases, are the main culprit for the differences found among the various independent studies that first used Hipparcos parallaxes and the subdwarf fitting technique. We also caution that the absolute age of M92 (usually considered one of the oldest clusters) still remains uncertain due to the lack of subdwarfs of comparable metallicity with accurate parallaxes. Distances and ages for the nine clusters discussed in a previous paper by Gratton et al. are rederived using an enlarged sample of local subdwarfs, which includes about 90% of the metal-poor dwarfs with accurate parallaxes (Δπ/π<=0.12) in the whole Hipparcos catalog. On average, our revised distance moduli are decreased by 0.04 mag with respect to Gratton et al. The corresponding age of the GCs is t=11.5+/-2.6 Gyr, where the error bars refer to the 95% confidence range. The relation between the zero-age horizontal branch (ZAHB) absolute magnitude and metallicity for the nine program clusters turns out to be MV(ZAHB)=(0.18+/-0.09)([Fe/H]+1.5)+(0.53+/-0.12) Thanks to Hipparcos the major contribution to the total error budget associated with the subdwarf fitting technique has been moved from parallaxes to photometric

  3. Dimerization of postsynaptic neuroligin drives synaptic assembly via transsynaptic clustering of neurexin.

    PubMed

    Shipman, Seth L; Nicoll, Roger A

    2012-11-20

    The transsynaptic complex of neuroligin (NLGN) and neurexin forms a physical connection between pre- and postsynaptic neurons that occurs early in the course of new synapse assembly. Both neuroligin and neurexin have, indeed, been proposed to exhibit active, instructive roles in the formation of synapses. However, the process by which these instructive roles play out during synaptogenesis is not well understood. Here, we examine one aspect of postsynaptic neuroligin with regard to its synaptogenic properties: its basal state as a constitutive dimer. We show that dimerization is required for the synaptogenic properties of neuroligin and likely serves to induce presynaptic differentiation via a transsynaptic clustering of neurexin. Further, we introduce chemically inducible, exogenous dimerization domains to the neuroligin molecule, effectively bestowing chemical control of neuroligin dimerization. This allows us to identify the acute requirements of neuroligin dimerization by chemically manipulating the monomeric-to-dimeric conversion of neuroligin. Based on the results of the inducible dimerization experiments, we propose a model in which dimerized neuroligin induces the mechanical clustering of presynaptic molecules as part of a requisite step in the coordinated assembly of a chemical synapse.

  4. Mechanisms contributing to cluster formation in the inferior olivary nucleus in brainstem slices from postnatal mice.

    PubMed

    Kølvraa, Mathias; Müller, Felix C; Jahnsen, Henrik; Rekling, Jens C

    2014-01-01

    The inferior olivary nucleus (IO) in in vitro slices from postnatal mice (P5.5-P15.5) spontaneously generates clusters of neurons with synchronous calcium transients, and intracellular recordings from IO neurons suggest that electrical coupling between neighbouring IO neurons may serve as a synchronizing mechanism. Here, we studied the cluster-forming mechanism and find that clusters overlap extensively with an overlap distribution that resembles the distribution for a random overlap model. The average somatodendritic field size of single curly IO neurons was ∼6400 μm(2), which is slightly smaller than the average IO cluster size. Eighty-seven neurons with overlapping dendrites were estimated to be contained in the principal olive mean cluster size, and about six non-overlapping curly IO neurons could be contained within the largest clusters. Clusters could also be induced by iontophoresis with glutamate. Induced clusters were inhibited by tetrodotoxin, carbenoxelone and 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid, suggesting that sodium action potentials and electrical coupling are involved in glutamate-induced cluster formation, which could also be induced by activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors. Spikelets and a small transient depolarizing response were observed during glutamate-induced cluster formation. Calcium transients spread with decreasing velocity during cluster formation, and somatic action potentials and cluster formation are accompanied by large dendritic calcium transients. In conclusion, cluster formation depends on gap junctions, sodium action potentials and spontaneous clusters occur randomly throughout the IO. The relative slow signal spread during cluster formation, combined with a strong dendritic influx of calcium, may signify that active dendritic properties contribute to cluster formation.

  5. In vivo cluster formation of nisin and lipid II is correlated with membrane depolarization.

    PubMed

    Tol, Menno B; Morales Angeles, Danae; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Nisin and related lantibiotics kill bacteria by pore formation or by sequestering lipid II. Some lantibiotics sequester lipid II into clusters, which were suggested to kill cells through delocalized peptidoglycan synthesis. Here, we show that cluster formation is always concomitant with (i) membrane pore formation and (ii) membrane depolarization. Nisin variants that cluster lipid II kill L-form bacteria with similar efficiency, suggesting that delocalization of peptidoglycan synthesis is not the primary killing mechanism of these lantibiotics.

  6. Formation and growth of molecular clusters containing sulfuric acid, water, ammonia, and dimethylamine.

    PubMed

    DePalma, Joseph W; Doren, Douglas J; Johnston, Murray V

    2014-07-24

    The structures and thermochemistry of molecular clusters containing sulfuric acid, water, ammonia, and/or dimethylamine ((CH3)2NH or DMA) are explored using a combination of Monte Carlo configuration sampling, semiempirical calculations, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Clusters are of the general form [(BH(+))n(HSO4(-))n(H2O)y], where B = NH3 or DMA, 2 ≤ n ≤ 8, and 0 ≤ y ≤ 10. Cluster formulas are written based on the computed structures, which uniformly show proton transfer from each sulfuric acid molecule to a base molecule while the water molecules remain un-ionized. Cluster formation is energetically favorable, owing to strong electrostatic attraction among the ions. Water has a minor effect on the energetics of cluster formation, lowering the free energy of formation by ∼ 10% depending on the cluster size and number of water molecules. Cluster growth (addition of one base molecule and one sulfuric acid molecule to a pre-existing cluster) and base substitution (substituting DMA for ammonia) are also energetically favorable processes for both anhydrous and hydrated clusters. However, the effect of water is different for different bases. Hydrated ammonium bisulfate clusters have a more favorable free energy for growth (i.e., incrementing n with fixed y) than anhydrous clusters, while the reverse is observed for dimethylammonium bisulfate clusters, where the free energy for growth is more favorable for anhydrous clusters. The substitution of DMA for ammonia in bisulfate clusters is favorable but exhibits a complex water dependence. Base substitution in smaller bisulfate clusters is enhanced by the presence of water, while base substitution in larger bisulfate clusters is less favorable for hydrated clusters than that for anhydrous clusters. While DMA substitution can stabilize small clusters containing one or a few sulfuric acid molecules, the free energy advantage of forming amine clusters relative to ammonia clusters becomes less

  7. Star Formation in Galaxy Clusters Over the Past 10 Billion Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Kim-Vy

    2012-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound systems in the universe and include the most massive galaxies in the universe; this makes galaxy clusters ideal laboratories for disentangling the nature versus nurture aspect of how galaxies evolve. Understanding how galaxies form and evolve in clusters continues to be a fundamental question in astronomy. The ages and assembly histories of galaxies in rich clusters test both stellar population models and hierarchical formation scenarios. Is star formation in cluster galaxies simply accelerated relative to their counterparts in the lower density field, or do cluster galaxies assemble their stars in a fundamentally different manner? To answer this question, I review multi-wavelength results on star formation in galaxy clusters from Coma to the most distant clusters yet discovered at look-back times of 10 billion years (z 2).

  8. Sulfur driven nucleation mode formation in diesel exhaust under transient driving conditions.

    PubMed

    Karjalainen, Panu; Rönkkö, Topi; Pirjola, Liisa; Heikkilä, Juha; Happonen, Matti; Arnold, Frank; Rothe, Dieter; Bielaczyc, Piotr; Keskinen, Jorma

    2014-02-18

    Sulfur driven diesel exhaust nucleation particle formation processes were studied in an aerosol laboratory, on engine dynamometers, and on the road. All test engines were equipped with a combination of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a partial diesel particulate filter (pDPF). At steady operating conditions, the formation of semivolatile nucleation particles directly depended on SO2 conversion in the catalyst. The nucleation particle emission was most significant after a rapid increase in engine load and exhaust gas temperature. Results indicate that the nucleation particle formation at transient driving conditions does not require compounds such as hydrocarbons or sulfated hydrocarbons, however, it cannot be explained only by the nucleation of sulfuric acid. A real-world exhaust study with a heavy duty diesel truck showed that the nucleation particle formation occurs even with ultralow sulfur diesel fuel, even at downhill driving conditions, and that nucleation particles can contribute 60% of total particle number emissions. In general, due to sulfur storage and release within the exhaust aftertreatment systems and transients in driving, emissions of nucleation particles can even be the dominant part of modern diesel vehicle exhaust particulate number emissions.

  9. Cluster Formation Triggered by Filament Collisions in Serpens South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Sugitani, Koji; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Nishitani, Hiroyuki; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Kawabe, Ryohei; Yonekura, Yoshinori; Mizuno, Izumi; Kimura, Kimihiko; Tokuda, Kazuki; Kozu, Minato; Okada, Nozomi; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Ogawa, Hideo; Kameno, Seiji; Shinnaga, Hiroko; Momose, Munetake; Nakajima, Taku; Onishi, Toshikazu; Maezawa, Hiroyuki; Hirota, Tomoya; Takano, Shuro; Iono, Daisuke; Kuno, Nario; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2014-08-01

    The Serpens South infrared dark cloud consists of several filamentary ridges, some of which fragment into dense clumps. On the basis of CCS (JN = 43-32), HC3N (J = 5-4), N2H+ (J = 1-0), and SiO (J = 2-1, v = 0) observations, we investigated the kinematics and chemical evolution of these filamentary ridges. We find that CCS is extremely abundant along the main filament in the protocluster clump. We emphasize that Serpens South is the first cluster-forming region where extremely strong CCS emission is detected. The CCS-to-N2H+ abundance ratio is estimated to be about 0.5 toward the protocluster clump, whereas it is about 3 in the other parts of the main filament. We identify six dense ridges with different V LSR. These ridges appear to converge toward the protocluster clump, suggesting that the collisions of these ridges may have triggered cluster formation. The collisions presumably happened within a few × 105 yr because CCS is abundant only for a short time. The short lifetime agrees with the fact that the number fraction of Class I objects, whose typical lifetime is 0.4 × 105 yr, is extremely high, about 70% in the protocluster clump. In the northern part, two ridges appear to have partially collided, forming a V-shape clump. In addition, we detected strong bipolar SiO emission that is due to the molecular outflow blowing out of the protostellar clump, as well as extended weak SiO emission that may originate from the filament collisions.

  10. CLUSTER FORMATION TRIGGERED BY FILAMENT COLLISIONS IN SERPENS SOUTH

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Kawabe, Ryohei; Shinnaga, Hiroko; Sugitani, Koji; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Kimura, Kimihiko; Tokuda, Kazuki; Kozu, Minato; Okada, Nozomi; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Ogawa, Hideo; Nishitani, Hiroyuki; Mizuno, Izumi; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Kameno, Seiji; Momose, Munetake; Nakajima, Taku; and others

    2014-08-20

    The Serpens South infrared dark cloud consists of several filamentary ridges, some of which fragment into dense clumps. On the basis of CCS (J{sub N} = 4{sub 3}-3{sub 2}), HC{sub 3}N (J = 5-4), N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1-0), and SiO (J = 2-1, v = 0) observations, we investigated the kinematics and chemical evolution of these filamentary ridges. We find that CCS is extremely abundant along the main filament in the protocluster clump. We emphasize that Serpens South is the first cluster-forming region where extremely strong CCS emission is detected. The CCS-to-N{sub 2}H{sup +} abundance ratio is estimated to be about 0.5 toward the protocluster clump, whereas it is about 3 in the other parts of the main filament. We identify six dense ridges with different V {sub LSR}. These ridges appear to converge toward the protocluster clump, suggesting that the collisions of these ridges may have triggered cluster formation. The collisions presumably happened within a few × 10{sup 5} yr because CCS is abundant only for a short time. The short lifetime agrees with the fact that the number fraction of Class I objects, whose typical lifetime is 0.4 × 10{sup 5} yr, is extremely high, about 70% in the protocluster clump. In the northern part, two ridges appear to have partially collided, forming a V-shape clump. In addition, we detected strong bipolar SiO emission that is due to the molecular outflow blowing out of the protostellar clump, as well as extended weak SiO emission that may originate from the filament collisions.

  11. The Insignificance of Major Mergers in Driving Star Formation at z approximately equal to 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaviraj, S.; Cohen, S.; Windhorst, R. A.; Silk, J.; O'Connell, R. W.; Dopita, M. A.; Dekel, A.; Hathi, N. P.; Straughn, A.; Rutkowski, M.

    2012-01-01

    We study the significance of major mergers in driving star formation in the early Universe, by quantifying the contribution of this process to the total star formation budget in 80 massive (M(*) > 10(exp 10) Solar M) galaxies at z approx = 2. Employing visually-classified morphologies from rest-frame V-band HST imaging, we find that 55(exp +/-14)% of the star formation budget is hosted by non-interacting late-types, with 27(exp +/-18% in major mergers and 18(exp +/- 6)% in spheroids. Given that a system undergoing a major merger continues to experience star formation driven by other processes at this epoch (e.g. cold accretion, minor mergers), approx 27% is a likely upper limit for the major-merger contribution to star formation activity at this epoch. The ratio of the average specific star formation rate in major mergers to that in the non-interacting late-types is approx 2.2:1, suggesting that the typical enhancement of star formation due to major merging is modest and that just under half the star formation in systems experiencing major mergers is unrelated to the merger itself. Taking this into account, we estimate that the actual major-merger contribution to the star formation budget may be as low as approx 15%. While our study does not preclude a major-merger-dominated. era in the very early Universe, if the major-merger contribution to star formation does not evolve significantly into larger look-back times, then this process has a relatively insignificant role in driving stellar mass assembly over cosmic time.

  12. Globular cluster systems in nearby dwarf galaxies - III. Formation efficiencies of old globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Iskren Y.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hilker, Michael

    2010-08-01

    We investigate the origin of the shape of the globular cluster (GC) system scaling parameters as a function of galaxy mass, i.e. specific frequency (SN), specific luminosity (SL), specific mass (SM) and specific number () of GCs. In the low-mass galaxy regime (MV >~ -16 mag), our analysis is based on Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys observations of GC populations of faint, mainly late-type dwarf galaxies in low-density environments. In order to sample the entire range in galaxy mass (MV = -11 to -23mag =106- 1011Lsolar), environment and morphology we augment our sample with data of spiral and elliptical galaxies from the literature, in which old GCs are reliably detected. This large data set confirms (irrespective of the galaxy type) the increase in the specific frequencies of GCs above and below a galaxy magnitude of MV ~= -20mag. Over the full mass range, the SL value of early-type galaxies is, on average, twice that of late types. To investigate the observed trends, we derive theoretical predictions of GC system scaling parameters as a function of host galaxy mass based on the models of Dekel and Birnboim in which star formation processes are regulated by stellar and supernova feedback below a stellar mass of 3 × 1010Msolar and by virial shocks above it. We find that the analytical model describes remarkably well the shape of the GC system scaling parameter distributions with a universal specific GC formation efficiency, η, which relates the total mass in GCs to the total galaxy halo mass. Early-type and late-type galaxies show a similar mean value of η = 5.5 × 10-5, with an increasing scatter towards lower galaxy masses. This can be due to the enhanced stochastic nature of the star and star-cluster formation processes for such systems. Some massive galaxies have excess η values compared to what is expected from the mean model prediction for galaxies more luminous than MV ~= -20mag (LV >~ 1010Lsolar). This may be attributed to a very

  13. Undergraduate ALFALFA Team: Analysis of Spatially-Resolved Star-Formation in Nearby Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Rose; Collova, Natasha; Spicer, Sandy; Whalen, Kelly; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Durbala, Adriana; Haynes, Martha P.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2017-01-01

    As part of the Undergraduate ALFALFA Team, we are conducting a survey of the gas and star-formation properties of galaxies in 36 groups and clusters in the local universe. The galaxies in our sample span a large range of galactic environments, from the centers of galaxy groups and clusters to the surrounding infall regions. One goal of the project is to map the spatial distribution of star-formation; the relative extent of the star-forming and stellar disks provides important information about the internal and external processes that deplete gas and thus drive galaxy evolution. We obtained wide-field H-alpha observations with the WIYN 0.9m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory for galaxies in the vicinity of the MKW11 and NRGb004 galaxy groups and the Abell 1367 cluster. We present a preliminary analysis of the relative size of the star-forming and stellar disks as a function of galaxy morphology and local galaxy density, and we calculate gas depletion times using star-formation rates and HI gas mass. We will combine these results with those from other UAT members to determine if and how environmentally-driven gas depletion varies with the mass and X-ray properties of the host group or cluster. This work has supported by NSF grants AST-0847430, AST-1211005 and AST-1637339.

  14. Cationic cluster formation versus disproportionation of low-valent indium and gallium complexes of 2,2'-bipyridine

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenthaler, Martin R.; Stahl, Florian; Kratzert, Daniel; Heidinger, Lorenz; Schleicher, Erik; Hamann, Julian; Himmel, Daniel; Weber, Stefan; Krossing, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Group 13 MI compounds often disproportionate into M0 and MIII. Here, however, we show that the reaction of the MI salt of the weakly coordinating alkoxyaluminate [GaI(C6H5F)2]+[Al(ORF)4]− (RF=C(CF3)3) with 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) yields the paramagnetic and distorted octahedral [Ga(bipy)3]2+•{[Al(ORF)4]−}2 complex salt. While the latter appears to be a GaII compound, both, EPR and DFT investigations assign a ligand-centred [GaIII{(bipy)3}•]2+ radical dication. Surprisingly, the application of the heavier homologue [InI(C6H5F)2]+[Al(ORF)4]− leads to aggregation and formation of the homonuclear cationic triangular and rhombic [In3(bipy)6]3+, [In3(bipy)5]3+ and [In4(bipy)6]4+ metal atom clusters. Typically, such clusters are formed under strongly reductive conditions. Analysing the unexpected redox-neutral cationic cluster formation, DFT studies suggest a stepwise formation of the clusters, possibly via their triplet state and further investigations attribute the overall driving force of the reactions to the strong In−In bonds and the high lattice enthalpies of the resultant ligand stabilized [M3]3+{[Al(ORF)4]−}3 and [M4]4+{[Al(ORF)4]−}4 salts. PMID:26478464

  15. Lack of nuclear clusters in dwarf spheroidal galaxies: implications for massive black holes formation and the cusp/core problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arca-Sedda, Manuel; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    One of the leading scenarios for the formation of nuclear star clusters in galaxies is related to the orbital decay of globular clusters (GCs) and their subsequent merging, though alternative theories are currently debated. The availability of high-quality data for structural and orbital parameters of GCs allows us to test different nuclear star cluster formation scenarios. The Fornax dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy is the heaviest satellite of the Milky Way and it is the only known dSph hosting five GCs, whereas there are no clear signatures for the presence of a central massive black hole. For this reason, it represents a suited place to study the orbital decay process in dwarf galaxies. In this paper, we model the future evolution of the Fornax GCs simulating them and the host galaxy by means of direct N-body simulations. Our simulations also take into account the gravitational field generated by the Milky Way. We found that if the Fornax galaxy is embedded in a standard cold dark matter halo, the nuclear cluster formation would be significantly hampered by the high central galactic mass density. In this context, we discuss the possibility that infalling GCs drive the flattening of the galactic density profile, giving a possible alternative explanation to the so-called cusp/core problem. Moreover, we briefly discuss the link between GC infall process and the absence of massive black holes in the centre of dSphs.

  16. On the formation of cD galaxies and their parent clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovmassian, Hrant M.; Andernach, Heinz

    2012-12-01

    In order to study the mechanism of the formation of cD galaxies, we search for possible dependencies between the K-band luminosity of cD galaxies and the parameters of their host clusters which we select to have a dominant cD galaxy, corresponding to a cluster morphology of Bautz-Morgan type I (BM I). As a comparison sample we use cD galaxies in clusters where they are not dominant, which we define here as non-BM I (NBMI) type clusters. We find that for 71 BM I clusters the absolute K-band luminosity of cD galaxies depends on the cluster richness, but less strongly on the cluster velocity dispersion. Meanwhile, for 35 NBMI clusters the correlation between cD luminosity and cluster richness is weaker, and is absent between cD luminosity and velocity dispersion. In addition, we find that the luminosity of the cD galaxy hosted in BM I clusters tends to increase with the cD's peculiar velocity with respect to the cluster mean velocity. In contrast, for NBMI clusters the cD luminosity decreases with increasing peculiar velocity. Also, the X-ray luminosity of BM I clusters depends on the cluster velocity dispersion, while in NBMI clusters such a correlation is absent. These findings favour the cannibalism scenario for the formation of cD galaxies. We suggest that cD galaxies in clusters of BM I type were formed and evolved preferentially in one and the same cluster. In contrast, cD galaxies in NBMI-type clusters were either originally formed in clusters that later merged with groups or clusters to form the current cluster, or are now in the process of merging.

  17. Formation of failure matrix and failure-free control algorithm for multi-sectioned Switched-reluctance drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odnokopylov, G.; Rozayev, I.

    2014-10-01

    We review fault-tolerant switched reluctance drive with sectioning of the three-phase stator winding. In the operating process of an electric drive, there will be continuous monitoring of the operating state on the basis of a developed algorithm to analyse drive operability and formation tabulate a failure matrix. The paper introduces a failure-free control algorithm for multi-section switch - reluctance motor with formation the assignment values of amplitude phase currents taking into account the failure matrix. We show that in an emergency such single failure or multiple failure in switched-reluctance drive it is possible to provide reduction of torque fall and pro-gressively stock depletion with providing fault-tolerance of drive system. A method of residual life evaluation is proposed on the basis of calculating the coefficient of operability of the electric drive system that gives possibility to control the endurance of electric drive in real time from operational to completely unusable.

  18. Insights on Clusters Formation Mechanism by Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry. 2. The Case of Acetone-Water Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apicella, B.; Li, X.; Passaro, M.; Russo, C.

    2016-11-01

    This paper is the second of a series dealing with clusters formation mechanism. In part 1, water clusters with the addition of an electrophilic molecule such as ethanol were studied by Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOFMS). Mass distributions of molecular clusters of ethanol, water and ethanol-water mixed clusters, were obtained by means of two different ionization methods: Electron Ionization (EI) and picosecond laser Photo-Ionization (PI) at a wavelength of 355 nm. In part 2, the same experimental approach was employed to obtain mass spectra of clusters generated by acetone-water binary mixtures with a different composition. Strong dependence of the mass spectra of clusters with EI and PI on the acetone-water mixing ratio was observed. It was shown that the spectral pattern changes gradually and water-rich cluster signals become fainter while acetone-rich cluster signals become more intensive with increasing acetone concentrations from 0.3% to 40%. Owing to the hydrogen bond acceptor character of acetone, its self-association is discouraged with respect to ethanol. The autocorrelation function (AF) was used to analyze the variation of the water clusters composition with the increase of the acetone concentration in terms of fundamental periodicities. However, although acetone and ethanol present a very different hydrogen-bonding ability, similarly to ethanol-water system, in acetone-water system the formation of water-rich clusters and subsequent metastable fragmentation are the dominant process that determine the clusters distribution, irrespective of the ionization process, while the ionization process significantly affects the acetone-rich clusters distribution.

  19. Formation and Combustion of Unconfined Drop Clusters in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, S.; Craig, G.; Zhang, Y.; Ruff, G. A.

    1997-01-01

    Single-drop and droplet array studies have become common methods to isolate and investigate the effects of any of the complexities that enter into the drop combustion process. Microgravity environments are required to allow larger drops to be studied while minimizing or eliminating the confounding effects of buoyancy. Based on the results from current isolated drop, drop array, and spray studies funded through the Microgravity Science and Applications Division, it has become clear that even with the effects of buoyancy removed, the extrapolation of results from droplet array studies to spray flames is difficult. The problem occurs because even the simplest spray systems introduce complexities of multi-disperse drop sizes and drop-drop interactions, coupled with more complicated fluid dynamics. Not only do these features make the interpretation of experimental data difficult, they also make the problem very difficult to analyze computationally. Group combustion models, in which the interaction between droplets is treated on a statistical manner, have become a popular method to investigate the behavior of large numbers of interacting droplets, particularly through the work of Ryan et al. and Bellan and co-workers. While these models idealize the actual spray systems to a point where they can be treated computationally, the experimental analogy to these models is difficult to achieve because it requires the formation and Combustion of drop clusters without the effects of buoyancy. Therefore, even though these models have provided useful and insightful information, the verification of the results by direct comparison with experimental data is still lacking.

  20. The influence of feedback from massive stars on the formation and emergence of massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, James E.

    2017-03-01

    Massive star clusters are of fundamental importance both observationally, since they are visible at such great distances, and theoretically, because of their influence on the large-scale ISM. Understanding stellar feedback is a prerequisite for making sense of their formation and early evolution, since feedback influences cluster structure, star formation efficiency, and sets the timescales on which clusters emerge from their parent clouds to become optically visible. I review the progress made in understanding these issues from a numerical perspective.

  1. Risky Driving, Mental Health, and Health-Compromising Behaviors: Risk Clustering in Late Adolescents and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, Marilyn S.; Fargo, Jamison D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Health-compromising behaviors in adolescents and adults co-occur. Because motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death and disability for these age groups, understanding the association between risky driving and other health compromising behaviors is critical. Methods We performed a secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial of an intervention for participants who screened positive for risky driving and problem drinking. Using baseline data, we examined relationships among conduct behavior problems before and after age 15, depressive symptoms, sleep, problem drinking, and risky driving (hostile, reckless and drinking and driving) in late adolescents ages 18–24 (n= 110) and adults ages 25–44 (n= 202). We developed a measurement model for the entire sample using confirmatory factor analysis, which was then specified as a multi-group structural equation model. Results Late adolescents and adults had some similar associations for pathways through problem drinking to drinking and driving; depression to reckless driving; and conduct behavior problems after 15 to hostile driving. Late adolescents, however, had more complex relationships: depressive symptoms and conduct behavior problems before 15 were associated with more risky driving behaviors through multiple pathways and males reported more risky driving. Conclusions Risky driving is associated with other health-compromising behaviors and mental health factors. It is a multidimensional phenomenon more pronounced in late adolescence than adulthood. In order to promote safe driving, the findings support the need to consider behaviors that are a health threat in the late adolescent population during driving training and licensure. PMID:24814717

  2. A density-dependent switch drives stochastic clustering and polarization of signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Jilkine, Alexandra; Angenent, Sigurd B; Wu, Lani F; Altschuler, Steven J

    2011-11-01

    Positive feedback plays a key role in the ability of signaling molecules to form highly localized clusters in the membrane or cytosol of cells. Such clustering can occur in the absence of localizing mechanisms such as pre-existing spatial cues, diffusional barriers, or molecular cross-linking. What prevents positive feedback from amplifying inevitable biological noise when an un-clustered "off" state is desired? And, what limits the spread of clusters when an "on" state is desired? Here, we show that a minimal positive feedback circuit provides the general principle for both suppressing and amplifying noise: below a critical density of signaling molecules, clustering switches off; above this threshold, highly localized clusters are recurrently generated. Clustering occurs only in the stochastic regime, suggesting that finite sizes of molecular populations cannot be ignored in signal transduction networks. The emergence of a dominant cluster for finite numbers of molecules is partly a phenomenon of random sampling, analogous to the fixation or loss of neutral mutations in finite populations. We refer to our model as the "neutral drift polarity model." Regulating the density of signaling molecules provides a simple mechanism for a positive feedback circuit to robustly switch between clustered and un-clustered states. The intrinsic ability of positive feedback both to create and suppress clustering is a general mechanism that could operate within diverse biological networks to create dynamic spatial organization.

  3. Induction of peptide bond dipoles drives cooperative helix formation in the (AAQAA)3 peptide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2014-08-19

    Cooperativity is a central feature in the formation of secondary structures in proteins. However, the driving forces behind this cooperativity are poorly understood. The present work shows that the cooperativity of helix formation in the acetyl-(AAQAA)3-NH2 peptide is significantly enhanced using an empirical force field that explicitly includes the treatment of electronic polarizability. Polarizable simulations yield helical content consistent with experimental measurements and indicate that the dependence of helical content on temperature is improved over additive models, though further sampling is required to fully validate this conclusion. Cooperativity is indicated by the peptide sampling either the coiled state or long helices with relatively low populations of short helices. The cooperativity is shown to be associated with enhanced dipole moments of the peptide backbone upon helix formation. These results indicate the polarizable force field to more accurately model peptide-folding cooperativity based on its physically realistic treatment of electronic polarizability.

  4. Induction of Peptide Bond Dipoles Drives Cooperative Helix Formation in the (AAQAA)3 Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Cooperativity is a central feature in the formation of secondary structures in proteins. However, the driving forces behind this cooperativity are poorly understood. The present work shows that the cooperativity of helix formation in the acetyl-(AAQAA)3-NH2 peptide is significantly enhanced using an empirical force field that explicitly includes the treatment of electronic polarizability. Polarizable simulations yield helical content consistent with experimental measurements and indicate that the dependence of helical content on temperature is improved over additive models, though further sampling is required to fully validate this conclusion. Cooperativity is indicated by the peptide sampling either the coiled state or long helices with relatively low populations of short helices. The cooperativity is shown to be associated with enhanced dipole moments of the peptide backbone upon helix formation. These results indicate the polarizable force field to more accurately model peptide-folding cooperativity based on its physically realistic treatment of electronic polarizability. PMID:25140435

  5. Effects of Formation Epoch Distribution on X-Ray Luminosity and Temperature Functions of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enoki, Motohiro; Takahara, Fumio; Fujita, Yutaka

    2001-07-01

    We investigate statistical properties of galaxy clusters in the context of a hierarchical clustering scenario, taking into account their formation epoch distribution; this study is motivated by the recent finding by Fujita and Takahara that X-ray clusters form a fundamental plane in which the mass and the formation epoch are regarded as two independent parameters. Using the formalism that discriminates between major mergers and accretion, the epoch of a cluster formation is identified with that of the last major merger. Since tiny mass accretion following formation does not much affect the core structure of clusters, the properties of X-ray emission from clusters are determined by the total mass and density at their formation time. Under these assumptions, we calculate X-ray luminosity and temperature functions of galaxy clusters. We find that the behavior of the luminosity function differs from the model that does not take into account formation epoch distribution; the behavior of the temperature function, however, is not much different. In our model, the luminosity function is shifted to a higher luminosity and shows no significant evolution up to z~1, independent of cosmological models. The clusters are populated on the temperature-luminosity plane, with a finite dispersion. Since the simple scaling model in which the gas temperature is equal to the virial temperature fails to reproduce the observed luminosity-temperature relation, we also consider a model that takes into account the effects of preheating. The preheating model reproduces the observations much more accurately.

  6. APP-dependent glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression drives neuromuscular junction formation.

    PubMed

    Stanga, Serena; Zanou, Nadège; Audouard, Emilie; Tasiaux, Bernadette; Contino, Sabrina; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; René, Frédérique; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Clotman, Frédéric; Gailly, Philippe; Dewachter, Ilse; Octave, Jean-Noël; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal

    2016-05-01

    Besides its crucial role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, the knowledge of amyloid precursor protein (APP) physiologic functions remains surprisingly scarce. Here, we show that APP regulates the transcription of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). APP-dependent regulation of GDNF expression affects muscle strength, muscular trophy, and both neuronal and muscular differentiation fundamental for neuromuscular junction (NMJ) maturation in vivo In a nerve-muscle coculture model set up to modelize NMJ formation in vitro, silencing of muscular APP induces a 30% decrease in secreted GDNF levels and a 40% decrease in the total number of NMJs together with a significant reduction in the density of acetylcholine vesicles at the presynaptic site and in neuronal maturation. These defects are rescued by GDNF expression in muscle cells in the conditions where muscular APP has been previously silenced. Expression of GDNF in muscles of amyloid precursor protein null mice corrected the aberrant synaptic morphology of NMJs. Our findings highlight for the first time that APP-dependent GDNF expression drives the process of NMJ formation, providing new insights into the link between APP gene regulatory network and physiologic functions.-Stanga, S., Zanou, N., Audouard, E., Tasiaux, B., Contino, S., Vandermeulen, G., René, F., Loeffler, J.-P., Clotman, F., Gailly, P., Dewachter, I., Octave, J.-N., Kienlen-Campard, P. APP-dependent glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression drives neuromuscular junction formation.

  7. Formation of ordered CoAl alloy clusters by the plasma-gas condensation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Toyohiko J.; Yamamuro, Saeki; Sumiyama, Kenji

    2001-09-01

    CoxAl1-x alloy clusters were synthesized from a mixture of Co and Al metal vapors generated by the sputtering of pure metal targets. We observed that the produced alloy clusters were uniform in size, ranging from approximately 20 nm for Al-rich clusters to 10 nm for Co-rich clusters. For a wide average composition range (x≈0.4-0.7), the alloy clusters have the ordered B2 (CsCl-type) structure. In the Co-rich cluster aggregates (x=0.76), the clusters are composed of face-centered-cubic (fcc) Co and minor CoAl(B2) clusters. In the Al-rich aggregates (x=0.23), the clusters are mainly composed of the fcc-Al phase, although clusters occasionally possess a "core-shell structure" with the CoAl(B2) phase surrounded by an Al-rich amorphous phase. These observations are in general agreement with our prediction based on the equilibrium phase diagram. We also noticed that the average composition depends not only on the relative amount of Co and Al vapors, but also on their absolute amount, and even on the Ar gas flow rate, which promotes mixing and cooling the two vapors. These findings show that the formation of alloy clusters in vapor phase is strongly influenced by the kinetics of cluster formation, and is a competing process between the approach to equilibrium and the quenching of the whole system.

  8. THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM OF NGC 4636 AND FORMATION OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN GIANT ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hong Soo; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Hwang, Ho Seong; Kim, Sang Chul; Arimoto, Nobuo; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Tamura, Naoyuki; Onodera, Masato E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr E-mail: sckim@kasi.re.kr E-mail: yoshihiko.yamada@nao.ac.jp E-mail: monodera@phys.ethz.ch

    2012-11-10

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of the metallicities, ages, and alpha-elements of the globular clusters (GCs) in the giant elliptical galaxy (gE) NGC 4636 in the Virgo Cluster. Line indices of the GCs are measured from the integrated spectra obtained with Faint Object Camera and Spectrograph on the Subaru 8.2 m Telescope. We derive [Fe/H] values of 59 GCs based on the Brodie and Huchra method, and [Z/H], age, and [{alpha}/Fe] values of 33 GCs from the comparison of the Lick line indices with single stellar population models. The metallicity distribution of NGC 4636 GCs shows a hint of a bimodality with two peaks at [Fe/H] = -1.23({sigma} = 0.32) and -0.35({sigma} = 0.19). The age spread is large from 2 Gyr to 15 Gyr and the fraction of young GCs with age <5 Gyr is about 27%. The [{alpha}/Fe] of the GCs shows a broad distribution with a mean value [{alpha}/Fe] Almost-Equal-To 0.14 dex. The dependence of these chemical properties on the galactocentric radius is weak. We also derive the metallicities, ages, and [{alpha}/Fe] values for the GCs in other nearby gEs (M87, M49, M60, NGC 5128, NGC 1399, and NGC 1407) from the line index data in the literature using the same methods as used for NGC 4636 GCs. The metallicity distribution of GCs in the combined sample of seven gEs including NGC 4636 is found to be bimodal, supported by the KMM test with a significance level of >99.9%. All these gEs harbor some young GCs with ages less than 5 Gyr. The mean age of the metal-rich GCs ([Fe/H] >-0.9) is about 3 Gyr younger than that of the metal-poor GCs. The mean value of [{alpha}/Fe] of the gE GCs is smaller than that of the Milky Way GCs. We discuss these results in the context of GC formation in gEs.

  9. Westerlund 1: monolithic formation of a starburst cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negueruela, Ignacio; Clark, J. Simon; Ritchie, Ben W.; Goodwin, Simon P.

    2017-03-01

    Westerlund 1 is in all likelihood the most massive young cluster in the Milky Way, with a mass on the order of 105 M ⊙. To determine its bulk properties we have made multi-epoch radial velocity measurements for a substantial fraction of its OB stars and evolved supergiants and obtained multi-object spectroscopy of candidate cluster members in its locale. The results of these two studies show that Westerlund 1 is apparently subvirial and appears completely isolated, with hardly any massive star in its vicinity that could be associated with it in terms of distance modulus or radial velocity. The cluster halo does not extend much further than five parsec away from the centre. All these properties are very unusual among starburst clusters in the Local Universe, which tend to form in the context of large star-forming regions.

  10. Cluster formation as a measure of interpretability in multiple testing.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Juliet Popper

    2008-10-01

    Multiple test procedures are usually compared on various aspects of error control and power. Power is measured as some function of the number of false hypotheses correctly identified as false. However, given equal numbers of rejected false hypotheses, the pattern of rejections, i.e. the particular set of false hypotheses identified, may be crucial in interpreting the results for potential application.In an important area of application, comparisons among a set of treatments based on random samples from populations, two different approaches, cluster analysis and model selection, deal implicitly with such patterns, while traditional multiple testing procedures generally focus on the outcomes of subset and pairwise equality hypothesis tests, without considering the overall pattern of results in comparing methods. An important feature involving the pattern of rejections is their relevance for dividing the treatments into distinct subsets based on some parameter of interest, for example their means. This paper introduces some new measures relating to the potential of methods for achieving such divisions. Following Hartley (1955), sets of treatments with equal parameter values will be called clusters. Because it is necessary to distinguish between clusters in the populations and clustering in sample outcomes, the population clusters will be referred to as P -clusters; any related concepts defined in terms of the sample outcome will be referred to with the prefix outcome. Outcomes of multiple comparison procedures will be studied in terms of their probabilities of leading to separation of treatments into outcome clusters, with various measures relating to the number of such outcome clusters and the proportion of true vs. false outcome clusters. The definitions of true and false outcome clusters and related concepts, and the approach taken here, is in the tradition of hypothesis testing with attention to overall error control and power, but with added consideration of

  11. Formation of bcc and fcc during the coalescence of free and supported Fe and Ni clusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Guojian; Wang, Qiang; Sui, Xudong; Wang, Kai; Wu, Chun; He, Jicheng

    2015-09-07

    The formation of bcc and fcc during the coalescence of free and supported Fe and Ni clusters has been studied by molecular dynamics simulation using an embedded atom method. Structural evolution of the clusters, coalesced under varying temperature, Ni content and substrate conditions, was explored by interatomic energy, snapshots, pair distribution functions and bond order parameters. The results show that the formation of bcc and fcc is strongly related to Ni content, substrate and coalescence temperature. Free clusters coalesced at 1200 K form bcc at lower Ni contents with fcc forming at higher Ni concentrations and no observable coexistence of bcc and fcc. Differences in coalescence at 1000 K result from the coexistence of bcc and fcc within the Ni range of 50-70%. Free clusters supported on disordered Ni substrates were shown to transform from spherical morphology to islands of supported clusters with preferred epitaxial orientation. The Ni content required to form bcc and fcc coexistence on supported clusters at 1000 K decreased to 30-50% Ni. Free clusters possessing bcc and fcc generally stacked along the bcc (110) and fcc (111) facets, whereas supported clusters stacked along the (111) bcc and (100) fcc planes. Structural transformation was induced by clusters containing greater numbers of atoms. Spread over the substrate enhanced interatomic energy, order substrates affect the epitaxial growth direction and increase the melting points of the supported clusters. This study can be used to predict the nature of fcc and bcc formation in Fe-Ni films.

  12. BUDHIES II: a phase-space view of H I gas stripping and star formation quenching in cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffé, Yara L.; Smith, Rory; Candlish, Graeme N.; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Verheijen, Marc A. W.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the effect of ram-pressure from the intracluster medium on the stripping of H I gas in galaxies in a massive, relaxed, X-ray bright, galaxy cluster at z = 0.2 from the Blind Ultra Deep H I Environmental Survey (BUDHIES). We use cosmological simulations, and velocity versus position phase-space diagrams to infer the orbital histories of the cluster galaxies. In particular, we embed a simple analytical description of ram-pressure stripping in the simulations to identify the regions in phase-space where galaxies are more likely to have been sufficiently stripped of their H I gas to fall below the detection limit of our survey. We find a striking agreement between the model predictions and the observed location of H I-detected and non-detected blue (late-type) galaxies in phase-space, strongly implying that ram-pressure plays a key role in the gas removal from galaxies, and that this can happen during their first infall into the cluster. However, we also find a significant number of gas-poor, red (early-type) galaxies in the infall region of the cluster that cannot easily be explained with our model of ram-pressure stripping alone. We discuss different possible additional mechanisms that could be at play, including the pre-processing of galaxies in their previous environment. Our results are strengthened by the distribution of galaxy colours (optical and UV) in phase-space, that suggests that after a (gas-rich) field galaxy falls into the cluster, it will lose its gas via ram-pressure stripping, and as it settles into the cluster, its star formation will decay until it is completely quenched. Finally, this work demonstrates the utility of phase-space diagrams to analyse the physical processes driving the evolution of cluster galaxies, in particular H I gas stripping.

  13. An H-alpha survey of cluster spirals - Comparison of star formation in clusters and the field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, C.; Whittle, M.

    1993-01-01

    In an objective prism survey of eight nearby Abell clusters, we have detected H-alpha emission from 77 out of a total of 201 CGCG spiral galaxies. We find that detection of H alpha emission is approximately independent of galaxy absolute magnitude, distance to the cluster center, and the presence of a bar. However, tidally distorted spirals are much more likely to be detected than undistorted spirals. Furthermore, there is a strong tendency for tidally distorted spirals to have compact nuclear emission rather than more extended disk-wide emission. When compared to field spirals, we find that late-type (Sc and Sc-Irr) cluster spirals have less H alpha emission, while early-type (Sa and Sab) cluster spirals can have significantly enhanced emission. The enhanced emission is most likely to be due to tidally induced star formation from galaxy-galaxy interactions.

  14. Hierarchical Star Formation in Turbulent Media: Evidence from Young Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasha, Kathryn; Elmegreen, Bruce; Calzetti, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    We present an analysis of the positions and ages of star clusters in eight local galaxies and find a correlation between the age difference and separation of cluster pairs. We infer that cluster formation is correlated in time such that clusters that are close to each have similar ages. In addition, the age between cluster pairs increases with their separation to the 0.3 - 0.6 power, close to the expected slope of 0.5 that would arise in a turbulent-driven interstellar medium. This suggests that not only is star formation hierarchical both in space and in time, but that the duration of star formation depends on the region of interest: smaller regions will form stars over a shorter time frame whereas larger regions form stars over a longer time frame.

  15. Behavior of Ac during Gd{sub 2}Cl{sub 3} condensed cluster formation

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheev, N.B.; Kamenskaya, A.N.; Rumer, I.A.

    1994-11-01

    The behavior of tracer {sup 228}Ac during Gd{sub 2}Cl{sub 3} condensed cluster formation is studied. The cluster is prepared by electrochemical reduction of GdCl{sub 3}. Actinium does not cocrystallize with the Gd{sub 2}Cl{sub 3} cluster. Its behavior is similar to that of La under analogous conditions. A number of hypotheses requiring further refinement is proposed to explain the results.

  16. Aging and memory improvement through semantic clustering: The role of list-presentation format.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Beatrice G; Touron, Dayna R

    2016-11-01

    The present study examined how the presentation format of the study list influences younger and older adults' semantic clustering. Spontaneous clustering did not differ between age groups or between an individual-words (presentation of individual study words in consecution) and a whole-list (presentation of the whole study list at once for the same total duration) presentation format in 132 younger (18-30 years, M = 19.7) and 120 older (60-84 years, M = 69.5) adults. However, after instructions to use semantic clustering (second list) age-related differences in recall magnified, indicating a utilization deficiency, and both age groups achieved higher recall in the whole-list than in the individual-words format. While this whole-list benefit was comparable across age groups, it is notable that older adults were only able to improve their average recall performance after clustering instructions in the whole-list but not in the individual-words format. In both formats, instructed clustering was correlated with processing resources (processing speed and, especially, working memory capacity), particularly in older adults. Spontaneous clustering, however, was not related to processing resources but to metacognitive beliefs about the efficacy and difficulty of semantic clustering, neither of which indicated awareness of the benefits of the whole-list presentation format in either age group. Taken together, the findings demonstrate that presentation format has a nontrivial influence on the utilization of semantic clustering in adults. The analyses further highlight important differences between output-based and list-based clustering measures. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. The richness of the globular cluster system of NGC 3923: Clues to elliptical galaxy formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zepf, Stephen E.; Geisler, Doug; Ashman, Keith M.

    1994-01-01

    We present new data on the globular cluster system of the elliptical galaxy NGC 3923 which show that it has the most globular clusters per unit luminosity of any noncluster elliptical yet observed, with S(sub N) = 6.4 +/- 1.4. NGC 3923 is also among the brightest ellipticals outside of a galaxy cluster for which the number of globular clusters has been determined. Our observation of a large number of clusters per unit luminosity (high S(sub N)-value) for a bright elliptical in a sparse environment is consistent with the suggestion of Djorgovski and Santiago that the number of globular clusters is a power-law function of the luminosity with an exponent greater than 1. We relate this higher specific frequency of globular clusters in more luminous galaxies to other observations which indicate that the physical conditions within elliptical galaxies at the time of their formation were dependent on galaxy mass.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of the Influence of Cluster Geometry on Formation of C60 Fullerene Clusters in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hojin; Bedrov, Dmitry; Smith, Grant D

    2008-02-01

    We have performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of linear (1-dimensional), planar (2-dimensional), and icosahedral (3-dimensional) clusters of C60 fullerenes in aqueous solution in order to investigate the influence of cluster geometry on their free energy of formation. As was found in our previous study of the potential of mean force (PMF) as a function of separation for a single pair of fullerenes in aqueous solution, the interaction between fullerenes for all cluster geometries was dominated by direct fullerene-fullerene interactions and not by water-induced hydrophobic interactions. A coarse-grained implicit solvent (CGIS) potential, given by the PMF for the fullerene pair in water obtained from atomistic simulations, was found to describe well the free energy of formation of the linear cluster, indicating that many-body effects, i.e., the influence of neighboring fullerenes on the water-induced interaction between a fullerene pair, are negligible for the 1-dimensional geometry. For the 2-dimensional and particularly the 3-dimensional geometry, however, many-body effects were found to strongly influence hydration, leading to complete dehydration of the central fullerene at close fullerene-fullerene separations for the icosahedral cluster. This strong influence of geometry on hydration translates into water-induced interactions that, while remaining repulsive, as is found for the fullerene pair, are not well described by the two-body CGIS potential obtained from the isolated fullerene pair, particularly for the 3-dimensional geometry.

  19. The regulation of star formation in cool-core clusters: imprints on the stellar populations of brightest cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loubser, S. I.; Babul, A.; Hoekstra, H.; Mahdavi, A.; Donahue, M.; Bildfell, C.; Voit, G. M.

    2016-02-01

    A fraction of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) show bright emission in the ultraviolet and the blue part of the optical spectrum, which has been interpreted as evidence of recent star formation. Most of these results are based on the analysis of broad-band photometric data. Here, we study the optical spectra of a sample of 19 BCGs hosted by X-ray luminous galaxy clusters at 0.15 Cluster Comparison Project sample. We identify plausible star formation histories of the galaxies by fitting simple stellar populations as well as composite populations, consisting of a young stellar component superimposed on an intermediate/old stellar component, to accurately constrain their star formation histories. We detect prominent young (˜200 Myr) stellar populations in four of the 19 galaxies. Of the four, the BCG in Abell 1835 shows remarkable A-type stellar features indicating a relatively large population of young stars, which is extremely unusual even amongst star-forming BCGs. We constrain the mass contribution of these young components to the total stellar mass to be typically between 1 and 3 per cent, but rising to 7 per cent in Abell 1835. We find that the four of the BCGs with strong evidence for recent star formation (and only these four galaxies) are found within a projected distance of 5 kpc of their host cluster's X-ray peak, and the diffuse, X-ray gas surrounding the BCGs exhibits a ratio of the radiative cooling-to-free-fall time (tc/tff) of ≤10. These are also some of the clusters with the lowest central entropy. Our results are consistent with the predictions of the precipitation-driven star formation and active galactic nucleus feedback model, in which the radiatively cooling diffuse gas is subject to local thermal instabilities once the instability parameter tc/tff falls below ˜10, leading to the condensation and precipitation of cold gas. The number of galaxies in our sample where the host cluster satisfies all the

  20. Star Formation in the Cluster Merger DLSCL J0916.2+2953

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansheim, A. S.; Lemaux, B. C.; Dawson, W. A.; Lubin, L. M.; Wittman, D.; Schmidt, S.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate star formation in DLSCL J0916.2+2953, a dissociative merger of two clusters at z = 0.53 that has progressed {1.1}-0.4+1.3 Gyr since the first pass-through. We attempt to reveal the effects a collision may have had on the evolution of the cluster galaxies by tracing their star formation history. We probe current and recent activity to identify a possible star formation event at the time of the merger, using EW({{H}}δ ), EW([{{O}} {{II}}]), and {D}n(4000) measured from the composite spectra of 64 cluster and 153 coeval field galaxies. We supplement Keck DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph spectra with DLS and Hubble Space Telescope imaging, to determine the color, stellar mass, and morphology of each galaxy. We also conduct a comprehensive study of the populations in this complex structure. Spectral results indicate the average cluster and cluster red sequence galaxies experienced no enhanced star formation relative to the surrounding field during the merger, ruling out a predominantly merger-quenched population. We find that the average blue galaxy in the North cluster is currently active, and that the South cluster is currently post-starburst, having undergone a recent star formation event. Although the North activity could be latent or long-term merger effects, a young blue stellar population and irregular geometry suggest the cluster was still forming prior the collision. Even though the South activity coincides with the time of the merger, the blue early-type population could be a result of secular cluster processes. The evidence suggests that the dearth or surfeit of activity is indiscernible from normal cluster galaxy evolution.

  1. Dynein Clusters into Lipid Microdomains on Phagosomes to Drive Rapid Transport toward Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Ashim; Pathak, Divya; Thakur, Shreyasi; Singh, Shampa; Dubey, Alok Kumar; Mallik, Roop

    2016-01-01

    Summary Diverse cellular processes are driven by motor proteins that are recruited to and generate force on lipid membranes. Surprisingly little is known about how membranes control the force from motors and how this may impact specific cellular functions. Here, we show that dynein motors physically cluster into microdomains on the membrane of a phagosome as it matures inside cells. Such geometrical reorganization allows many dyneins within a cluster to generate cooperative force on a single microtubule. This results in rapid directed transport of the phagosome toward microtubule minus ends, likely promoting phagolysosome fusion and pathogen degradation. We show that lipophosphoglycan, the major molecule implicated in immune evasion of Leishmania donovani, inhibits phagosome motion by disrupting the clustering and therefore the cooperative force generation of dynein. These findings appear relevant to several pathogens that prevent phagosome-lysosome fusion by targeting lipid microdomains on phagosomes. PMID:26853472

  2. STAR FORMATION AND UV COLORS OF THE BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES IN THE REPRESENTATIVE XMM-NEWTON CLUSTER STRUCTURE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, Megan; Bruch, Seth; Wang, Emily; Voit, G. Mark; Hicks, Amalia K.; Haarsma, Deborah B.; Croston, Judith H.; Pratt, Gabriel W.; O'Connell, Robert W.

    2010-06-01

    We present UV broadband photometry and optical emission-line measurements for a sample of 32 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in clusters of the Representative XMM-Newton Cluster Structure Survey (REXCESS) with z = 0.06-0.18. The REXCESS clusters, chosen to study scaling relations in clusters of galaxies, have X-ray measurements of high quality. The trends of star formation and BCG colors with BCG and host properties can be investigated with this sample. The UV photometry comes from the XMM-Newton Optical Monitor, supplemented by existing archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer photometry. We detected H{alpha} and forbidden line emission in seven (22%) of these BCGs, in optical spectra obtained using the Southern Astrophysical Research Goodman spectrograph. All of these emission-line BCGs occupy clusters classified as cool cores (CCs) based on the central cooling time in the cluster core, for an emission-line incidence rate of 70% for BCGs in REXCESS CC clusters. Significant correlations between the H{alpha} equivalent widths, excess UV production in the BCG, and the presence of dense, X-ray bright intracluster gas with a short cooling time are seen, including the fact that all of the H{alpha} emitters inhabit systems with short central cooling times and high central intracluster medium densities. Estimates of the star formation rates based on H{alpha} and UV excesses are consistent with each other in these seven systems, ranging from 0.1to8 solar masses per year. The incidence of emission-line BCGs in the REXCESS sample is intermediate, somewhat lower than in other X-ray-selected samples ({approx}35%), and somewhat higher than but statistically consistent with optically selected, slightly lower redshift BCG samples ({approx}10%-15%). The UV-optical colors (UVW1 - R {approx}4.7 {+-} 0.3) of REXCESS BCGs without strong optical emission lines are consistent with those predicted from templates and observations of ellipticals dominated by old stellar populations. We see no

  3. EXTENDED STAR FORMATION IN THE INTERMEDIATE-AGE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD STAR CLUSTER NGC 2209

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Stefan C.; Mackey, A. Dougal; Da Costa, Gary S.

    2012-12-10

    We present observations of the 1 Gyr old star cluster NGC 2209 in the Large Magellanic Cloud made with the GMOS imager on the Gemini South Telescope. These observations show that the cluster exhibits a main-sequence turnoff that spans a broader range in luminosity than can be explained by a single-aged stellar population. This places NGC 2209 amongst a growing list of intermediate-age (1-3 Gyr) clusters that show evidence for extended or multiple epochs of star formation of between 50 and 460 Myr in extent. The extended main-sequence turnoff observed in NGC 2209 is a confirmation of the prediction in Keller et al. made on the basis of the cluster's large core radius. We propose that secondary star formation is a defining feature of the evolution of massive star clusters. Dissolution of lower mass clusters through evaporation results in only clusters that have experienced secondary star formation surviving for a Hubble time, thus providing a natural connection between the extended main-sequence turnoff phenomenon and the ubiquitous light-element abundance ranges seen in the ancient Galactic globular clusters.

  4. Synaptic efficacy cluster formation across the dendrite via STDP.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Nicolangelo; Tanaka, Shigeru

    2006-07-31

    The role of spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) in shaping the strength of a synapse located on the dendritic tree has gained recent interest. Previous theoretical studies using STDP have mostly used simplified integrate-and-fire models to investigate the evolution of synaptic efficacy with time. Such studies usually show that the final weight distribution is unimodal or bimodal resulting from a multiplicative or additive STDP rule, respectively. However, very little is known about how STDP shapes the spatial organization of synaptic efficacies. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate that spatial clustering of synaptic efficacies can occur on the dendrite via STDP, where changes in synaptic efficacy are driven by timing differences between synaptic inputs and the generation of local dendritic spikes. Specifically, when the model neuron is stimulated by two independent groups of correlated afferent inputs, the synaptic efficacies from each group, are not only spatially clustered on the dendrite but also spatially complementary to each other.

  5. STAR CLUSTER FORMATION WITH STELLAR FEEDBACK AND LARGE-SCALE INFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Matzner, Christopher D.; Jumper, Peter H.

    2015-12-10

    During star cluster formation, ongoing mass accretion is resisted by stellar feedback in the form of protostellar outflows from the low-mass stars and photo-ionization and radiation pressure feedback from the massive stars. We model the evolution of cluster-forming regions during a phase in which both accretion and feedback are present and use these models to investigate how star cluster formation might terminate. Protostellar outflows are the strongest form of feedback in low-mass regions, but these cannot stop cluster formation if matter continues to flow in. In more massive clusters, radiation pressure and photo-ionization rapidly clear the cluster-forming gas when its column density is too small. We assess the rates of dynamical mass ejection and of evaporation, while accounting for the important effect of dust opacity on photo-ionization. Our models are consistent with the census of protostellar outflows in NGC 1333 and Serpens South and with the dust temperatures observed in regions of massive star formation. Comparing observations of massive cluster-forming regions against our model parameter space, and against our expectations for accretion-driven evolution, we infer that massive-star feedback is a likely cause of gas disruption in regions with velocity dispersions less than a few kilometers per second, but that more massive and more turbulent regions are too strongly bound for stellar feedback to be disruptive.

  6. Modelling the formation of galaxy clusters in MOND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusser, Adi; Pointecouteau, Etienne

    2006-03-01

    We use a one-dimensional hydrodynamical code to study the evolution of spherically symmetric perturbations in the framework of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND). The code evolves spherical gaseous shells in an expanding Universe by employing a MOND-type relationship between the fluctuations in the density field and the gravitational force, g. We focus on the evolution of initial density perturbations of the form δi~r-si for 0 < s < 3. A shell is initially cold and remains so until it encounters the shock formed by the earlier collapse of shells nearer to the centre. During the early epochs g is sufficiently large and shells move according to Newtonian gravity. As the physical size of the perturbation increases with time, g gets smaller and the evolution eventually becomes MOND-dominated. However, the density in the inner collapsed regions is large enough that they re-enter the Newtonian regime. The evolved gas temperature and density profiles tend to a universal form that is independent of the slope, s, and of the initial amplitude. An analytic explanation of this intriguing result is offered. Over a wide range of scales, the temperature, density and entropy profiles in the simulations depend on radius roughly like r0.5, r-1.5 and r1.5, respectively. We compare our results with XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of clusters. The temperature profiles of 16 observed clusters are either flat or show a mild decrease at R>~ 200kpc. MOND profiles show a significant increase that cannot be reconciled with the data. Our simulated MOND clusters are substantially denser than the observed clusters. It remains to be seen whether these difficulties persist in three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations with generic initial conditions.

  7. Cluster Formation and Evolution on Semiconductor and Insulator Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    Abrupt, Defect-Free Interfaces," Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 1568-1572 (1989). 40. T.J. Wagener, Yongjun Hu, Y. Gao, M.B. Jost, J.H. Weaver, N. Spencer, and...Monmouth, New Jersey, May 1988. 9. Yongjun Hu, T.J. Wagener, Y. Gao, and J.H. Weaver, "Cluster Growth and the Evolution of Empty Electronic States," 35th

  8. Observational constraints on star cluster formation theory. I. The mass-radius relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfalzner, S.; Kirk, H.; Sills, A.; Urquhart, J. S.; Kauffmann, J.; Kuhn, M. A.; Bhandare, A.; Menten, K. M.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Stars form predominantly in groups usually denoted as clusters or associations. The observed stellar groups display a broad spectrum of masses, sizes, and other properties, so it is often assumed that there is no underlying structure in this diversity. Aims: Here we show that the assumption of an unstructured multitude of cluster or association types might be misleading. Current data compilations of clusters in the solar neighbourhood show correlations among cluster mass, size, age, maximum stellar mass, etc. In this first paper we take a closer look at the correlation of cluster mass and radius. Methods: We use literature data to explore relations in cluster and molecular core properties in the solar neighbourhood. Results: We show that for embedded clusters in the solar neighbourhood a clear correlation exists between cluster mass and half-mass radius of the form Mc = CRcγ with γ = 1.7 ± 0.2. This correlation holds for infrared K-band data, as well as for X-ray sources and clusters containing a hundred stars up to those consisting of a few tens of thousands of stars. The correlation is difficult to verify for clusters containing fewer than 30 stars owing to low-number statistics. Dense clumps of gas are the progenitors of the embedded clusters. We find almost the same slope for the mass-size relation of dense, massive clumps as for the embedded star clusters. This might point to a direct translation from gas to stellar mass: however, it is difficult to relate size measurements for clusters (stars) to those for gas profiles. Taking multiple paths for clump mass into cluster mass into account, we obtain an average star-formation efficiency of 18%+9.3-5.7 for the embedded clusters in the solar neighbourhood. Conclusions: The derived mass-radius relation gives constraints for the theory of clustered star formation. Analytical models and simulations of clustered star formation have to reproduce this relation in order to be realistic.

  9. Comparison of defect cluster accumulation and pattern formation in irradiated copper and nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Snead, L.L.; Edwards, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the contrasting behavior of defect cluster formation in neutron-irradiated copper and nickel specimens. Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine the density and spatial distribution of defect clusters produced in copper and nickel as the result of fission neutron irradiation to damage levels of 0.01 to 0.25 displacements per atom (dpa) at irradiation temperature between 50 and 230{degrees}C. A comparison with published results in the literature indicates that defect cluster wall formation occurs in nickel irradiated at 0.2 to 0.4 T{sub M} in a wide variety of irradiation spectra. Defect cluster wall formation apparently only occurs in copper during low temperature irradiation with electrons and light ions. These results are discussed in terms of the thermal spike model for energetic displacement cascades.

  10. Formation of new stellar populations from gas accreted by massive young star clusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengyuan; de Grijs, Richard; Deng, Licai; Geller, Aaron M; Xin, Yu; Hu, Yi; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2016-01-28

    Stars in clusters are thought to form in a single burst from a common progenitor cloud of molecular gas. However, massive, old 'globular' clusters--those with ages greater than ten billion years and masses several hundred thousand times that of the Sun--often harbour multiple stellar populations, indicating that more than one star-forming event occurred during their lifetimes. Colliding stellar winds from late-stage, asymptotic-giant-branch stars are often suggested to be triggers of second-generation star formation. For this to occur, the initial cluster masses need to be greater than a few million solar masses. Here we report observations of three massive relatively young star clusters (1-2 billion years old) in the Magellanic Clouds that show clear evidence of burst-like star formation that occurred a few hundred million years after their initial formation era. We show that such clusters could have accreted sufficient gas to form new stars if they had orbited in their host galaxies' gaseous disks throughout the period between their initial formation and the more recent bursts of star formation. This process may eventually give rise to the ubiquitous multiple stellar populations in globular clusters.

  11. The rise and fall of star formation in z ˜ 0.2 merging galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroe, Andra; Sobral, David; Dawson, William; Jee, M. James; Hoekstra, Henk; Wittman, David; van Weeren, Reinout J.; Brüggen, Marcus; Röttgering, Huub J. A.

    2015-06-01

    CIZA J2242.8+5301 (`Sausage') and 1RXS J0603.3+4213 (`Toothbrush') are two low-redshift (z ˜ 0.2), massive (˜2 × 1015 M⊙), post-core passage merging clusters, which host-shock waves traced by diffuse radio emission. To study their star formation properties, we uniformly survey the `Sausage' and `Toothbrush' clusters in broad- and narrow-band filters and select a sample of 201 and 463 line emitters, down to a rest-frame equivalent width (13 Å). We robustly separate between Hα and higher redshift emitters using a combination of optical multiband (B, g, V, r, i, z) and spectroscopic data. We build Hα luminosity functions for the entire cluster region, near the shock fronts, and away from the shock fronts and find striking differences between the two clusters. In the dynamically younger, 1 Gyr old `Sausage' cluster we find numerous (59) Hα emitters above a star formation rate (SFR) of 0.17 M⊙ yr-1 surprisingly located in close proximity to the shock fronts, embedded in very hot intracluster medium plasma. The SFR density for the cluster population is at least at the level of typical galaxies at z ˜ 2. Down to the same SFR, the possibly dynamically more evolved `Toothbrush' cluster has only nine Hα galaxies. The cluster Hα galaxies fall on the SFR-stellar mass relation z ˜ 0.2 for the field. However, the `Sausage' cluster has an Hα emitter density >20 times that of blank fields. If the shock passes through gas-rich cluster galaxies, the compressed gas could collapse into dense clouds and excite star formation for a few 100 Myr. This process ultimately leads to a rapid consumption of the molecular gas, accelerating the transformation of gas-rich field spirals into cluster S0s or ellipticals.

  12. Formation of Disulfide Bridges Drives Oligomerization, Membrane Pore Formation, and Translocation of Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 to Cell Surfaces*

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Hans-Michael; Steringer, Julia P.; Wegehingel, Sabine; Bleicken, Stephanie; Münster, Maximilian; Dimou, Eleni; Unger, Sebastian; Weidmann, Georg; Andreas, Helena; García-Sáez, Ana J.; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard; Nickel, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is a key signaling molecule in tumor-induced angiogenesis. FGF2 is secreted by an unconventional secretory mechanism that involves phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-dependent insertion of FGF2 oligomers into the plasma membrane. This process is regulated by Tec kinase-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of FGF2. Molecular interactions driving FGF2 monomers into membrane-inserted FGF2 oligomers are unknown. Here we identify two surface cysteines that are critical for efficient unconventional secretion of FGF2. They represent unique features of FGF2 as they are absent from all signal-peptide-containing members of the FGF protein family. We show that phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-dependent FGF2 oligomerization concomitant with the generation of membrane pores depends on FGF2 surface cysteines as either chemical alkylation or substitution with alanines impairs these processes. We further demonstrate that the FGF2 variant forms lacking the two surface cysteines are not secreted from cells. These findings were corroborated by experiments redirecting a signal-peptide-containing FGF family member from the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi-dependent secretory pathway into the unconventional secretory pathway of FGF2. Cis elements known to be required for unconventional secretion of FGF2, including the two surface cysteines, were transplanted into a variant form of FGF4 without signal peptide. The resulting FGF4/2 hybrid protein was secreted by unconventional means. We propose that the formation of disulfide bridges drives membrane insertion of FGF2 oligomers as intermediates in unconventional secretion of FGF2. PMID:25694424

  13. Formation of disulfide bridges drives oligomerization, membrane pore formation, and translocation of fibroblast growth factor 2 to cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Müller, Hans-Michael; Steringer, Julia P; Wegehingel, Sabine; Bleicken, Stephanie; Münster, Maximilian; Dimou, Eleni; Unger, Sebastian; Weidmann, Georg; Andreas, Helena; García-Sáez, Ana J; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard; Nickel, Walter

    2015-04-03

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is a key signaling molecule in tumor-induced angiogenesis. FGF2 is secreted by an unconventional secretory mechanism that involves phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-dependent insertion of FGF2 oligomers into the plasma membrane. This process is regulated by Tec kinase-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of FGF2. Molecular interactions driving FGF2 monomers into membrane-inserted FGF2 oligomers are unknown. Here we identify two surface cysteines that are critical for efficient unconventional secretion of FGF2. They represent unique features of FGF2 as they are absent from all signal-peptide-containing members of the FGF protein family. We show that phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-dependent FGF2 oligomerization concomitant with the generation of membrane pores depends on FGF2 surface cysteines as either chemical alkylation or substitution with alanines impairs these processes. We further demonstrate that the FGF2 variant forms lacking the two surface cysteines are not secreted from cells. These findings were corroborated by experiments redirecting a signal-peptide-containing FGF family member from the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi-dependent secretory pathway into the unconventional secretory pathway of FGF2. Cis elements known to be required for unconventional secretion of FGF2, including the two surface cysteines, were transplanted into a variant form of FGF4 without signal peptide. The resulting FGF4/2 hybrid protein was secreted by unconventional means. We propose that the formation of disulfide bridges drives membrane insertion of FGF2 oligomers as intermediates in unconventional secretion of FGF2.

  14. Comparative study of formation and stabilization of gold and silver clusters and nanoparticles in mordenites.

    PubMed

    Bogdanchikova, N; Tuzovskaya, I; Pestryakov, A; Susarrey-Arce, A

    2011-06-01

    Supporting silver and gold on mordenites by ion-exchange method with further reduction with H2 leads to formation of neutral and charged metal clusters inside zeolite channels as well as metal nanoparticles on external surface of mordenite. A portion of the cluster states of the metals and stability of the clusters depend strongly on acidity of zeolite (determined by SiO2/Al2O3 molar ratio) and nature of zeolite cation (H+, Na+, NH4+). The investigations of silver and gold samples after prolonged storage for 6 and 12 months revealed that silver clusters are comparatively stable while oxidation of gold clusters and nanoparticles by air is the probable cause of deactivation of gold catalysts. The comparison of the results for Au and Ag samples allow suggesting NaM15 and NaM24 mordenites for effective synthesis of complex Au-Ag clusters as active and stable species of catalytic reactions occurring at room temperature.

  15. Mining the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey: star formation and embedded clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solin, O.; Ukkonen, E.; Haikala, L.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Data mining techniques must be developed and applied to analyse the large public data bases containing hundreds to thousands of millions entries. Aims: We develop methods for locating previously unknown stellar clusters from the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) catalogue data. Methods: The cluster candidates are computationally searched from pre-filtered catalogue data using a method that fits a mixture model of Gaussian densities and background noise using the expectation maximization algorithm. The catalogue data contains a significant number of false sources clustered around bright stars. A large fraction of these artefacts were automatically filtered out before or during the cluster search. The UKIDSS data reduction pipeline tends to classify marginally resolved stellar pairs and objects seen against variable surface brightness as extended objects (or "galaxies" in the archive parlance). 10% or 66 × 106 of the sources in the UKIDSS GPS catalogue brighter than 17m in the K band are classified as "galaxies". Young embedded clusters create variable NIR surface brightness because the gas/dust clouds in which they were formed scatters the light from the cluster members. Such clusters appear therefore as clusters of "galaxies" in the catalogue and can be found using only a subset of the catalogue data. The detected "galaxy clusters" were finally screened visually to eliminate the remaining false detections due to data artefacts. Besides the embedded clusters the search also located locations of non clustered embedded star formation. Results: The search covered an area of 1302 deg2 and 137 previously unknown cluster candidates and 30 previously unknown sites of star formation were found. Appendices A-C are available in electronic form at http://www.anda.org

  16. Evolutionary formation of gene clusters by reorganization: the meleagrin/roquefortine paradigm in different fungi.

    PubMed

    Martín, Juan F; Liras, Paloma

    2016-02-01

    The biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in fungi is catalyzed by enzymes encoded by genes linked in clusters that are frequently co-regulated at the transcriptional level. Formation of gene clusters may take place by de novo assembly of genes recruited from other cellular functions, but also novel gene clusters are formed by reorganization of progenitor clusters and are distributed by horizontal gene transfer. This article reviews (i) the published information on the roquefortine/meleagrin/neoxaline gene clusters of Penicillium chrysogenum (Penicillium rubens) and the short roquefortine cluster of Penicillium roqueforti, and (ii) the correlation of the genes present in those clusters with the enzymes and metabolites derived from these pathways. The P. chrysogenum roq/mel cluster consists of seven genes and includes a gene (roqT) encoding a 12-TMS transporter protein of the MFS family. Interestingly, the orthologous P. roquefortine gene cluster has only four genes and the roqT gene is present as a residual pseudogene that encodes only small peptides. Two of the genes present in the central region of the P. chrysogenum roq/mel cluster have been lost during the evolutionary formation of the short cluster and the order of the structural genes in the cluster has been rearranged. The two lost genes encode a N1 atom hydroxylase (nox) and a roquefortine scaffold-reorganizing oxygenase (sro). As a consequence P. roqueforti has lost the ability to convert the roquefortine-type carbon skeleton to the glandicoline/meleagrin-type scaffold and is unable to produce glandicoline B, meleagrin and neoxaline. The loss of this genetic information is not recent and occurred probably millions of years ago when a progenitor Penicillium strain got adapted to life in a few rich habitats such as cheese, fermented cereal grains or silage. P. roqueforti may be considered as a "domesticated" variant of a progenitor common to contemporary P. chrysogenum and related Penicillia.

  17. Velocity Drives Greater Power Observed During Back Squat Using Cluster Sets.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Jonathan M; Kreutzer, Andreas; Jenke, Shane C; Phillips, Melody D; Mitchell, Joel B; Jones, Margaret T

    2016-01-01

    This investigation compared the kinetics and kinematics of cluster sets (CLU) and traditional sets (TRD) during back squat in trained (RT) and untrained (UT) men. Twenty-four participants (RT = 12, 25 ± 1 year, 179.1 ± 2.2 cm, 84.6 ± 2.1 kg; UT = 12, 25 ± 1 year, 180.1 ± 1.8 cm, 85.4 ± 3.8 kg) performed TRD (4 × 10, 120-second rest) and CLU (4 × (2 × 5) 30 seconds between clusters; 90 seconds between sets) with 70% one repetition maximum, randomly. Kinematics and kinetics were sampled through force plate and linear position transducers. Resistance-trained produced greater overall force, velocity, and power; however, similar patterns were observed in all variables when comparing conditions. Cluster sets produced significantly greater force in isolated repetitions in sets 1-3, while consistently producing greater force due to a required reduction in load during set 4 resulting in greater total volume load (CLU, 3302.4 ± 102.7 kg; TRD, 3274.8 ± 102.8 kg). Velocity loss was lessened in CLU resulting in significantly higher velocities in sets 2 through 4. Furthermore, higher velocities were produced by CLU during later repetitions of each set. Cluster sets produced greater power output for an increasing number of repetitions in each set (set 1, 5 repetitions; sets 2 and 3, 6 repetitions; set 4, 8 repetitions), and the difference between conditions increased over subsequent sets. Time under tension increased over each set and was greater in TRD. This study demonstrates greater power output is driven by greater velocity when back squatting during CLU; therefore, velocity may be a useful measure by which to assess power.

  18. Formation of a protocluster: A virialized structure from gravoturbulent collapse. I. Simulation of cluster formation in a collapsing molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yueh-Ning; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Context. Stars are often observed to form in clusters and it is therefore important to understand how such a region of concentrated mass is assembled out of the diffuse medium. The properties of such a region eventually prescribe the important physical mechanisms and determine the characteristics of the stellar cluster. Aims: We study the formation of a gaseous protocluster inside a molecular cloud and associate its internal properties with those of the parent cloud by varying the level of the initial turbulence of the cloud with a view to better characterize the subsequent stellar cluster formation. Methods: We performed high resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of gaseous protoclusters forming in molecular clouds collapsing under self-gravity. We determined ellipsoidal cluster regions via gas kinematics and sink particle distribution, permitting us to determine the mass, size, and aspect ratio of the cluster. We studied the cluster properties, such as kinetic and gravitational energy, and made links to the parent cloud. Results: The gaseous protocluster is formed out of global collapse of a molecular cloud and has non-negligible rotation owing to angular momentum conservation during the collapse of the object. Most of the star formation occurs in this region, which occupies only a small volume fraction of the whole cloud. This dense entity is a result of the interplay between turbulence and gravity. We identify such regions in simulations and compare the gas and sink particles to observed star-forming clumps and embedded clusters, respectively. The gaseous protocluster inferred from simulation results presents a mass-size relation that is compatible with observations. We stress that the stellar cluster radius, although clearly correlated with the gas cluster radius, depends sensitively on its definition. Energy analysis is performed to confirm that the gaseous protocluster is a product of gravoturbulent reprocessing and that the support of turbulent

  19. Canonical free-energy barrier of particle and polymer cluster formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierenberg, Johannes; Schierz, Philipp; Janke, Wolfhard

    2017-02-01

    A common approach to study nucleation rates is the estimation of free-energy barriers. This usually requires knowledge about the shape of the forming droplet, a task that becomes notoriously difficult in macromolecular setups starting with a proper definition of the cluster boundary. Here we demonstrate a shape-free determination of the free energy for temperature-driven cluster formation in particle as well as polymer systems. Combined with rigorous results on equilibrium droplet formation, this allows for a well-defined finite-size scaling analysis of the effective interfacial free energy at a fixed density. We first verify the theoretical predictions for the formation of a liquid droplet in a supersaturated particle gas by generalized-ensemble Monte Carlo simulations of a Lennard-Jones system. Going one step further, we then generalize this approach to cluster formation in a dilute polymer solution. Our results suggest an analogy with particle condensation, when the macromolecules are interpreted as extended particles.

  20. Observation of small cluster formation in concentrated monoclonal antibody solutions and its implications to solution viscosity.

    PubMed

    Yearley, Eric J; Godfrin, Paul D; Perevozchikova, Tatiana; Zhang, Hailiang; Falus, Peter; Porcar, Lionel; Nagao, Michihiro; Curtis, Joseph E; Gawande, Pradad; Taing, Rosalynn; Zarraga, Isidro E; Wagner, Norman J; Liu, Yun

    2014-04-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a major class of biopharmaceuticals. It is hypothesized that some concentrated mAb solutions exhibit formation of a solution phase consisting of reversibly self-associated aggregates (or reversible clusters), which is speculated to be responsible for their distinct solution properties. Here, we report direct observation of reversible clusters in concentrated solutions of mAbs using neutron spin echo. Specifically, a stable mAb solution is studied across a transition from dispersed monomers in dilute solution to clustered states at more concentrated conditions, where clusters of a preferred size are observed. Once mAb clusters have formed, their size, in contrast to that observed in typical globular protein solutions, is observed to remain nearly constant over a wide range of concentrations. Our results not only conclusively establish a clear relationship between the undesirable high viscosity of some mAb solutions and the formation of reversible clusters with extended open structures, but also directly observe self-assembled mAb protein clusters of preferred small finite size similar to that in micelle formation that dominate the properties of concentrated mAb solutions.

  1. Experimental studies of complex crater formation under cluster implantation of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasalovich, S.; Popok, V.; Persson, P.; Campbell, E. E. B.

    2005-10-01

    The results of a systematic study of surface defect formation after energetic Arn+ (n = 12, 22, 32, 54) and Xen+ (n = 4, 16) cluster ion implantation into silicon and sapphire are presented. Implantation energies vary from 3 to 18 keV/ion. Two cases of comparative studies are carried out: the same cluster species are implanted into two different substrates, i.e. Arn+ cluster ions into silicon and sapphire and two different cluster species Arn+ and Xen+ are implanted into the same kind of substrate (silicon). Atomic force, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopies (AFM, SEM and TEM) are used to study the implanted samples. The analysis reveals the formation of two types of surface erosion defects: simple and complex (with centrally positioned hillock) craters. It is found that the ratio of simple to complex crater formation as well as the hillock dimensions depend strongly on the cluster species, size and impact energy as well as on the type of substrate material. Qualitative models describing the two comparative cases of cluster implantation, the case of different cluster species and the case of different substrate materials, are proposed.

  2. Formation of globular clusters induced by external ultraviolet radiation - II. Three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Makito; Umemura, Masayuki; Hasegawa, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    We explore the possibility of the formation of globular clusters (GCs) under ultraviolet (UV) background radiation. One-dimensional spherical symmetric radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) simulations by Hasegawa et al. have demonstrated that the collapse of low-mass (106-7 M⊙) gas clouds exposed to intense UV radiation can lead to the formation of compact star clusters like GCs if gas clouds contract with supersonic infall velocities. However, three-dimensional effects, such as the anisotropy of background radiation and the inhomogeneity in gas clouds, have not been studied so far. In this paper, we perform three-dimensional RHD simulations in a semicosmological context, and reconsider the formation of compact star clusters in strong UV radiation fields. As a result, we find that although anisotropic radiation fields bring an elongated shadow of neutral gas, almost spherical compact star clusters can be procreated from a `supersonic infall' cloud, since photodissociating radiation suppresses the formation of hydrogen molecules in the shadowed regions and the regions are compressed by UV heated ambient gas. The properties of resultant star clusters match those of GCs. On the other hand, in weak UV radiation fields, dark-matter-dominated star clusters with low stellar density form due to the self-shielding effect as well as the positive feedback by ionizing photons. Thus, we conclude that the `supersonic infall' under a strong UV background is a potential mechanism to form GCs.

  3. A Multi-Wavelength View of the Environments of Extreme Clustered Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Buizer, James M.

    2017-01-01

    It is believed that the vast majority of, if not all, stars form within OB clusters. Most theories of star formation assume a star forms in isolation and ignore the fact that the cluster environment and, especially, the presence of extremely energetic and high mass young stellar objects nearby, may have a profound impact on the formation process of a typical cluster member. Giant HII (GHII) regions are Galactic analogs to starburst regions seen in external galaxies, hosting the most active areas of clustered star formation. As such, GHII regions represent a population of objects that can reveal a wealth of information on the environment of the earliest stages of clustered star formation and how it is affected by feedback from the most massive cluster members. This study employs new mid-infrared imaging data obtained from the airborne observatory, SOFIA, as well as archival imaging data from the near-infrared to cm radio wavelengths to create a rich multi-wavelength dataset of a dozen galactic GHII regions. These data allow quantification of the detailed physical conditions within GHII regions individually and as a population on both global and small scales.

  4. On the composition of ammonia-sulfuric-acid ion clusters during aerosol particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobesberger, S.; Franchin, A.; Bianchi, F.; Rondo, L.; Duplissy, J.; Kürten, A.; Ortega, I. K.; Metzger, A.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Dunne, E. M.; Ehn, M.; Gagné, S.; Ickes, L.; Junninen, H.; Hansel, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kirkby, J.; Kupc, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mathot, S.; Onnela, A.; Petäjä, T.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, F. D.; Sipilä, M.; Tomé, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Viisanen, Y.; Wagner, P. E.; Wimmer, D.; Curtius, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new-particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia (NH3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small NH3-H2SO4 clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from < 2 to 1400 pptv, [H2SO4] from 3.3 × 106 to 1.4 × 109 cm-3 (0.1 to 56 pptv), and a temperature range from -25 to +20 °C. Negatively and positively charged clusters were directly measured by an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer, as they initially formed from gas-phase NH3 and H2SO4, and then grew to larger clusters containing more than 50 molecules of NH3 and H2SO4, corresponding to mobility-equivalent diameters greater than 2 nm. Water molecules evaporate from these clusters during sampling and are not observed. We found that the composition of the NH3-H2SO4 clusters is primarily determined by the ratio of gas-phase concentrations [NH3] / [H2SO4], as well as by temperature. Pure binary H2O-H2SO4 clusters (observed as clusters of only H2SO4) only form at [NH3] / [H2SO4] < 0.1 to 1. For larger values of [NH3] / [H2SO4], the composition of NH3-H2SO4 clusters was characterized by the number of NH3 molecules m added for each added H2SO4 molecule n (Δm/Δ n), where n is in the range 4-18 (negatively charged clusters) or 1-17 (positively charged clusters). For negatively charged clusters, Δ m/Δn saturated between 1 and 1.4 for [NH3] / [H2SO4] > 10. Positively

  5. On the composition of ammonia-sulfuric acid clusters during aerosol particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobesberger, S.; Franchin, A.; Bianchi, F.; Rondo, L.; Duplissy, J.; Kürten, A.; Ortega, I. K.; Metzger, A.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Dunne, E. M.; Ehn, M.; Gagné, S.; Ickes, L.; Junninen, H.; Hansel, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kirkby, J.; Kupc, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mathot, S.; Onnela, A.; Petäjä, T.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, F. D.; Sipilä, M.; Tomé, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Viisanen, Y.; Wagner, P. E.; Wimmer, D.; Curtius, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-05-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia (NH3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small NH3-H2SO4 clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from <2 to 1400 pptv, [H2SO4] from 3.3 × 106 to 1.4 × 109 cm-3, and a temperature range from -25 to +20 °C. Negatively and positively charged clusters were directly measured by an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer, as they initially formed from gas-phase NH3 and H2SO4, and then grew to larger clusters containing more than 50 molecules of NH3 and H2SO4, corresponding to mobility-equivalent diameters greater than 2 nm. Water molecules evaporate from these clusters during sampling and are not observed. We found that the composition of the NH3-H2SO4 clusters is primarily determined by the ratio of gas-phase concentrations [NH3] / [H2SO4], as well as by temperature. Pure binary H2O-H2SO4 clusters (observed as clusters of only H2SO4) only form at [NH3] / [H2SO4]<0.1 to 1. For larger values of [NH3] / [H2SO4], the composition of NH3-H2SO4 clusters was characterized by the number of NH3 molecules m added for each added H2SO4 molecule n (Δm / Δn), where n is in the range 4-18 (negatively charged clusters) or 1-17 (positively charged clusters). For negatively charged clusters, Δm / Δn saturated between 1 and 1.4 for [NH3] / [H2SO4]>10. Positively charged clusters grew on

  6. Extended magnetohydrodynamic simulations of field reversed configuration formation and sustainment with rotating magnetic field current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milroy, R. D.; Kim, C. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2010-06-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of field reversed configuration (FRC) formation and sustainment with rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive have been performed with the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)]. The Hall term is a zeroth order effect with strong coupling between Fourier components, and recent enhancements to the NIMROD preconditioner allow much larger time steps than was previously possible. Boundary conditions to capture the effects of a finite length RMF antenna have been added, and simulations of FRC formation from a uniform background plasma have been performed with parameters relevant to the translation, confinement, and sustainment-upgrade experiment at the University of Washington [H. Y. Guo, A. L. Hoffman, and R. D. Milroy, Phys. Plasmas 14, 112502 (2007)]. The effects of both even-parity and odd-parity antennas have been investigated, and there is no evidence of a disruptive instability for either antenna type. It has been found that RMF effects extend considerably beyond the ends of the antenna, and that a large n =0 Bθ can develop in the open-field line region, producing a back torque opposing the RMF.

  7. Reassessing the formation of the inner Oort cloud in an embedded star cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasser, R.; Duncan, M. J.; Levison, H. F.; Schwamb, M. E.; Brown, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    We re-examine the formation of the inner Oort comet cloud while the Sun was in its birth cluster with the aid of numerical simulations. This work is a continuation of an earlier study (Brasser, R., Duncan, M.J., Levison, H.F. [2006]. Icarus 184, 59-82) with several substantial modifications. First, the system consisting of stars, planets and comets is treated self-consistently in our N-body simulations, rather than approximating the stellar encounters with the outer Solar System as hyperbolic fly-bys. Second, we have included the expulsion of the cluster gas, a feature that was absent previously. Third, we have used several models for the initial conditions and density profile of the cluster - either a Hernquist or Plummer potential - and chose other parameters based on the latest observations of embedded clusters from the literature. These other parameters result in the stars being on radial orbits and the cluster collapses. Similar to previous studies, in our simulations the inner Oort cloud is formed from comets being scattered by Jupiter and Saturn and having their pericentres decoupled from the planets by perturbations from the cluster gas and other stars. We find that all inner Oort clouds formed in these clusters have an inner edge ranging from 100 AU to a few hundred AU, and an outer edge at over 100,000 AU, with little variation in these values for all clusters. All inner Oort clouds formed are consistent with the existence of (90377) Sedna, an inner Oort cloud dwarf planetoid, at the inner edge of the cloud: Sedna tends to be at the innermost 2% for Plummer models, while it is 5% for Hernquist models. We emphasise that the existence of Sedna is a generic outcome. We define a 'concentration radius' for the inner Oort cloud and find that its value increases with increasing number of stars in the cluster, ranging from 600 AU to 1500 AU for Hernquist clusters and from 1500 AU to 4000 AU for Plummer clusters. The increasing trend implies that small star

  8. Confronting models of star formation quenching in galaxy clusters with archival Spitzer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnick, Gregory

    Large scale structures in the universe form hierarchically: small structures merge to form larger ones. Over the same epoch where these structures experience significant growth, the fraction of star forming galaxies within them decreases, and at a faster rate than for field galaxies. It is now widely accepted that there must be physical processes at work in these dense environments to actively quench star formation. However, despite no shortage of candidate mechanisms, sophisticated cosmological simulations still cannot reproduce the star formation rate distributions within dense environments, such as galaxy clusters. Insufficient observational constraints are a primary obstacle to further progress. In particular, the interpretation of observations of nearby clusters relies on untested assumptions about the properties of galaxies before they entered the dense cluster environment at higher redshifts. Clearly, direct constraints on these properties are required. Our group has assembled two data sets designed to address these concerns. The first focuses on an intermediate wide-field cluster sample and the second focuses on a well-matched low-redshift cluster sample. We will use these samples, along with sophisticated models of hierarchical galaxy formation, to meet the following objectives: 1. Directly measure the SFR distribution of the progenitors of present-day cluster galaxies. We will use ground-based spectroscopy to identify cluster members within four virial radii of eight intermediate-redshift clusters. We will couple this with archival Spitzer/MIPS data to measure the SFRs of galaxies out to the cluster outskirts. 2. Measure the SFR distribution of the present-day cluster galaxies using Spitzer and WISE. Robust N-body simulations tell us statistically which galaxies at intermediate redshifts will have entered the cluster virial radius by the current epoch. By combining our wide-field coverage at high redshift with our local cluster sample, we will determine

  9. Cluster Formation of Sulfuric Acid with Dimethylamine or Diamines and Detection with Chemical Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, C. N.; McMurry, P. H.; Hanson, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Chemical ionization (CI) mass spectrometers are used to study atmospheric nucleation by detecting clusters produced by reactions of sulfuric acid and various basic gases. These instruments typically use nitrate to chemically ionize clusters for detection. In this study, we compare measured cluster concentrations formed by reacting sulfuric acid vapor with dimethylamine, ethylene diamine, tetramethylethylene diamine, or butanediamine (also known as putrescine) using nitrate and acetate ions. We show from flow reactor measurements that nitrate is unable to chemically ionize clusters with weak acidities. In addition, we vary the ion-molecule reaction time to probe the chemical ionization processes and lifetimes of ions composed of sulfuric acid and base molecules. We then model the neutral and ion cluster formation pathways, including chemical ionization, ion-induced clustering, and ion decomposition, to better identify which cluster types cannot be chemically ionized by nitrate. Our results show that sulfuric acid dimer with two diamines and sulfuric acid trimer with 2 or more base molecules cannot be chemical ionized by nitrate. We conclude that cluster concentrations measured with acetate CI gives a better representation of both cluster abundancies and their base content than nitrate CI.

  10. THE FORMATION OF COSMIC FULLERENES FROM AROPHATIC CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Micelotta, Elisabetta R.; Cami, Jan; Peeters, Els; Fanchini, Giovanni; Jones, Anthony P.; Bernard-Salas, Jeronimo

    2012-12-10

    Fullerenes have recently been identified in space and they may play a significant role in the gas and dust budget of various astrophysical objects including planetary nebulae (PNe), reflection nebulae, and H II regions. The tenuous nature of the gas in these environments precludes the formation of fullerene materials following known vaporization or combustion synthesis routes even on astronomical timescales. We have studied the processing of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H or HAC) nanoparticles and their specific derivative structures, which we name ''arophatics'', in the circumstellar environments of young, carbon-rich PNe. We find that UV-irradiation of such particles can result in the formation of fullerenes, consistent with the known physical conditions in PNe and with available timescales.

  11. Anthropogenic disruption to the seismic driving of beach ridge formation: The Sendai coast, Japan.

    PubMed

    Goff, James; Knight, Jasper; Sugawara, Daisuke; Terry, James P

    2016-02-15

    The expected geomorphic after-effects of the Mw 9.0 Tōhoku-oki earthquake of 11 March 2011 (eastern Japan) are summarized by a schematic model of seismic driving, which details seismogenic disturbances to sediment systems that affect the rate or timing of sediment delivery to coastlines over timescales of 10(2)-10(4)years. The immediate physical environmental responses to this high-magnitude earthquake included a large tsunami and extensive region-wide slope failures. Normally, slope failures within mountain catchments would have significant impacts on Japan's river and coastal geomorphology in the coming decades with, for example, a new beach ridge expected to form within 20-100 years on the Sendai Plain. However, human activity has significantly modified the rate and timing of geomorphic processes of the region, which will have impacts on likely geomorphic responses to seismic driving. For example, the rivers draining into Sendai Bay have been dammed, providing sediment traps that will efficiently capture bedload and much suspended sediment in transit through the river system. Instead of the expected ~1 km of coastal progradation and formation of a ~3m high beach ridge prior to the next large tsunami, it is likely that progradation of the Sendai Plain will continue to slow or even cease as a result of damming of river systems and capture of river sediments behind dams. The resulting reduction of fluvial sediment delivery to the coast due to modification of rivers inadvertently makes seawalls and other engineered coastal structures even more necessary than they would be otherwise.

  12. The Co-Formation of Spheroids and Quasars Traced in their Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Lidz, Adam; Hernquist, Lars; Coil, Alison L.; Myers, Adam D.; Cox, Thomas J.; Spergel, David N.

    2007-06-01

    We compare observed clustering of quasars and galaxies as a function of redshift, mass, luminosity, and color/morphology, to constrain models of quasar fueling and the co-evolution of spheroids and supermassive black holes (BHs). High-redshift quasars are shown to be drawn from the progenitors of local early-type galaxies, with the characteristic quasar luminosity L* reflecting a characteristic mass of ``active'' BH/host populations at each epoch. Evolving observed high-z quasar clustering to z=0 predicts a trend of clustering in ``quasar remnants'' as a function of stellar mass identical to that observed for early types. However, quasar clustering does not simply reflect observed early (or late) type populations; at each redshift, quasars cluster as an ``intermediate'' population. Comparing with the age of elliptical stellar populations as a function of mass reveals that this ``intermediate'' population represents those ellipticals undergoing or terminating their final significant star formation activity at the given epoch. Assuming that quasar triggering is associated with the formation/termination epoch of ellipticals predicts quasar clustering at all observed redshifts without any model dependence or assumptions about quasar light curves, lifetimes, or accretion rates. This is not true for disks or quasar halos; i.e., quasars do not generically trace star formation or halo assembly. Quasar clustering at all redshifts is consistent with ~4×1012 h-1 Msolar, similar to group scales. This supports scenarios in which major mergers dominate the bright, high-redshift quasar populations. We show how improved clustering measurements can be used to constrain lower luminosity AGN fueling and whether or not accretion/star formation can ``shut down'' at z>3.

  13. The ALMA view of the Antennae galaxy collision: How galaxy interaction triggers the formation of super star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Cinthya N.; Boulanger, François; Falgarone, Edith G.; Pineau Des Forêts, Guillaume; García-Burillo, Santiago; Iono, Daisuke; Guillard, Pierre

    The Antennae galaxies are a spectacular example of a burst of star formation triggered by the encounter of two galaxies, being an ideal source to understand how the dynamics of galaxy mergers drives star formation. We present archive ALMA CO(3-2) and VLT near-IR H2 spectro-imaging observations, and new ALMA 13CO(2-1) and dust continuum observations, at ~50 pc resolution. Combining tracers of density and velocity structure of the gas and its energetics, we demonstrate that star formation involves a complex interplay of merger-driven gas dynamics and turbulence, and the dissipation of the gas kinetic energy. We focus on a compact, bright H2 source, associated with cold molecular gas and dust continuum emission, located where the velocity gradient in the interaction region is observed to be the largest. The characteristics of this source suggest that we are witnessing the formation, initiated by turbulent dissipation, of a cloud massive enough (~4×106M⊙) to form a super star cluster within 1 Myr.

  14. Star formation trends in the unrelaxed, post-merger cluster A2255

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, K. D.; Rieke, G. H.; Bai, L.

    2014-10-10

    The effects of dense environments on normal field galaxies are still up for debate despite much study since Abell published his catalog of nearby clusters in 1958. There are changes in color, morphology, and star formation properties when galaxies fall into groups and clusters, but the specifics of how and where these modifications occur are not fully understood. To look for answers, we focused on star-forming galaxies in A2255, an unrelaxed cluster thought to have recently experienced a merger with another cluster or large group. We used Hα, MIPS 24 μm, and WISE 22 μm to estimate total star formation rates (SFRs) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry to find stellar masses (M {sub *}) for galaxies out to ∼5 r {sub 200}. We compared the star-forming cluster galaxies with the field SFR-mass distribution and found no enhancement or suppression of star formation in currently star-forming galaxies of high mass (log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ≳ 10). This conclusion holds out to very large distances from the cluster center. However, the core (r {sub proj} < 3 Mpc) has a much lower fraction of star-forming galaxies than anywhere else in the cluster. These results indicate that for the mass range studied here, the majority of the star formation suppression occurs in the core on relatively short timescales, without any enhancement prior to entering the central region. If any significant enhancement or quenching of star formation occurs, it will be in galaxies of lower mass (log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) < 10).

  15. The rarity of star formation in brightest cluster galaxies as measured by WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser-McKelvie, Amelia; Brown, Michael J. I.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.

    2014-10-01

    We present the mid-infrared star formation rates of 245 X-ray selected, nearby (z < 0.1) brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). A homogeneous and volume limited sample of BCGs was created by X-ray selecting clusters with Lx > 1 × 1044 erg s- 1. The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) All WISE Data Release provides the first measurement of the 12 μm star formation indicator for all BCGs in the nearby Universe. Perseus A and Cygnus A are the only galaxies in our sample to have star formation rates of > 40 M⊙ yr- 1, indicating that these two galaxies are highly unusual at current times. Stellar populations of 99 ± 0.6 per cent of local BCGs are (approximately) passively evolving, with star formation rates of < 10 M⊙ yr- 1. We find that in general, star formation produces only modest BCG growth at the current epoch.

  16. Analysis of radiation-induced small Cu particle cluster formation in aqueous CuCl2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jayanetti, Sumedha; Mayanovic, Robert A.; Anderson, Alan J.; Bassett, William A.; Chou, I.-Ming

    2001-01-01

    Radition-induced small Cu particle cluster formation in aqueous CuCl2 was analyzed. It was noticed that nearest neighbor distance increased with the increase in the time of irradiation. This showed that the clusters approached the lattice dimension of bulk copper. As the average cluster size approached its bulk dimensions, an increase in the nearest neighbor coordination number was found with the decrease in the surface to volume ratio. Radiolysis of water by incident x-ray beam led to the reduction of copper ions in the solution to themetallic state.

  17. Dynamics of cluster formation in driven magnetic colloids dispersed on a monolayer.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Sebastian; Stark, Holger; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2013-05-15

    We report computer simulation results on the cluster formation of dipolar colloidal particles driven by a rotating external field in a quasi-two-dimensional setup. We focus on the interplay between permanent dipolar and hydrodynamic interactions and its influence on the dynamic behavior of the particles. This includes their individual as well as their collective motion. To investigate these characteristics, we employ Brownian dynamics simulations of a finite system with and without hydrodynamic interactions. Our results indicate that hydrodynamic interactions have a profound impact on the dynamic behavior of the clusters and the dynamics of the clustering process.

  18. The formation mechanism of clusters produced by laser ablation of solid sodium azide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Shen, Ruiqi; Wu, Lizhi; Ye, Yinghua; Hu, Yan; Zhu, Peng

    2013-02-01

    The mass spectra of sodium azide (NaN3) cluster ions, produced by 532 nm laser ablation of a solid NaN3 sample, were measured by a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. The spectra showed that most of the cluster ions could be ascribed to the following series: Nan-, (NaN3)n-, Na(NaN3)n-, N3(NaN3)n-, Nan+, Nan(NaN3)+ and Na2(NaN3)n+. According to the possible distribution of the ions, possible formation mechanisms of NaN3 clusters are proposed.

  19. GLOBULAR CLUSTER FORMATION EFFICIENCIES FROM BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARY FEEDBACK

    SciTech Connect

    Justham, Stephen; Peng, Eric W.; Schawinski, Kevin

    2015-08-10

    We investigate a scenario in which feedback from black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs) sometimes begins inside young star clusters before strong supernova (SN) feedback. Those BHXBs could reduce the gas fraction inside embedded young clusters while maintaining virial equilibrium, which may help globular clusters (GCs) to stay bound when SN-driven gas ejection subsequently occurs. Adopting a simple toy model with parameters guided by BHXB population models, we produce GC formation efficiencies consistent with empirically inferred values. The metallicity dependence of BHXB formation could naturally explain why GC formation efficiency is higher at lower metallicity. For reasonable assumptions about that metallicity dependence, our toy model can produce a GC metallicity bimodality in some galaxies without a bimodality in the field-star metallicity distribution.

  20. Numerical analysis of bubble-cluster formation in an ultrasonic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Donghyun; Son, Gihun

    2016-11-01

    Bubble-cluster formation in an ultrasonic field is investigated numerically solving the conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy. The liquid-gas interface is calculated using the volume-of-fluid method with variable gas density to consider the bubble compressibility. The effect of liquid-gas phase change is also included as the interface source terms of the mass and energy equations. The numerical approach is tested through the simulation of the expansion and contraction motion of a compressed bubble adjacent to a wall. When the bubble is placed in an ultrasonic field, it oscillates radially and then collapses violently. Numerical simulation is also performed for bubble-cluster formation induced by an ultrasonic generator, where the generated bubbles are merged into a macrostructure along the acoustic flow field. The effects of ultrasonic power and frequency, liquid properties and pool temperature on the bubble-cluster formation are investigated. This work was supported by the Korea Institute of Energy Research.

  1. The formation of NGC 3603 young starburst cluster: `prompt' hierarchical assembly or monolithic starburst?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2015-02-01

    The formation of very young massive clusters or `starburst' clusters is currently one of the most widely debated topic in astronomy. The classical notion dictates that a star cluster is formed in situ in a dense molecular gas clump. The stellar radiative and mechanical feedback to the residual gas energizes the latter until it escapes the system. The newly born gas-free young cluster eventually readjusts with the corresponding mass-loss. Based on the observed substructured morphologies of many young stellar associations, it is alternatively suggested that even the smooth-profiled massive clusters are also assembled from migrating less massive subclusters. A very young (age ≈ 1 Myr), massive (>104 M⊙) star cluster like the Galactic NGC 3603 young cluster (HD 97950) is an appropriate testbed for distinguishing between the above `monolithic' and `hierarchical' formation scenarios. A recent study by Banerjee & Kroupa demonstrates that the monolithic scenario remarkably reproduces the HD 97950 cluster. In particular, its shape, internal motion and the mass distribution of stars are found to follow naturally and consistently from a single model calculation undergoing ≈70 per cent by mass gas dispersal. In this work, we explore the possibility of the formation of the above cluster via hierarchical assembly of subclusters. These subclusters are initially distributed over a wide range of spatial volumes and have various modes of subclustering in both absence and presence of a background gas potential. Unlike the above monolithic initial system that reproduces HD 97950 very well, the same is found to be prohibitive with hierarchical assembly alone (with/without a gas potential). Only those systems which assemble promptly into a single cluster (in ≲1 Myr) from a close separation (all within ≲2 pc) could match the observed density profile of HD 97950 after a similar gas removal. These results therefore suggest that the NGC 3603 young cluster has formed essentially

  2. CO J = 2-1 LINE EMISSION IN CLUSTER GALAXIES AT z {approx} 1: FUELING STAR FORMATION IN DENSE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wagg, Jeff; Pope, Alexandra; Alberts, Stacey; Armus, Lee; Desai, Vandana; Brodwin, Mark; Bussmann, Robert S.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Melbourne, Jason; Stern, Daniel

    2012-06-20

    We present observations of CO J = 2-1 line emission in infrared-luminous cluster galaxies at z {approx} 1 using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our two primary targets are optically faint, dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) found to lie within 2 Mpc of the centers of two massive (>10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }) galaxy clusters. CO line emission is not detected in either DOG. We calculate 3{sigma} upper limits to the CO J = 2-1 line luminosities, L'{sub CO} < 6.08 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} and <6.63 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}. Assuming a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor derived for ultraluminous infrared galaxies in the local universe, this translates to limits on the cold molecular gas mass of M{sub H{sub 2}}< 4.86 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} and M{sub H{sub 2}}< 5.30 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }. Both DOGs exhibit mid-infrared continuum emission that follows a power law, suggesting that an active galactic nucleus (AGN) contributes to the dust heating. As such, estimates of the star formation efficiencies in these DOGs are uncertain. A third cluster member with an infrared luminosity, L{sub IR} < 7.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }, is serendipitously detected in CO J = 2-1 line emission in the field of one of the DOGs located roughly two virial radii away from the cluster center. The optical spectrum of this object suggests that it is likely an obscured AGN, and the measured CO line luminosity is L'{sub CO} = (1.94 {+-} 0.35) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}, which leads to an estimated cold molecular gas mass M{sub H{sub 2}}= (1.55{+-}0.28) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. A significant reservoir of molecular gas in a z {approx} 1 galaxy located away from the cluster center demonstrates that the fuel can exist to drive an increase in star formation and AGN activity at the outskirts of high-redshift clusters.

  3. Star cluster dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vesperini, Enrico

    2010-02-28

    Dynamical evolution plays a key role in shaping the current properties of star clusters and star cluster systems. A detailed understanding of the effects of evolutionary processes is essential to be able to disentangle the properties that result from dynamical evolution from those imprinted at the time of cluster formation. In this review, I focus my attention on globular clusters, and review the main physical ingredients driving their early and long-term evolution, describe the possible evolutionary routes and show how cluster structure and stellar content are affected by dynamical evolution.

  4. Gas cluster ion beam assisted NiPt germano-silicide formation on SiGe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcan, Ahmet S.; Lavoie, Christian; Alptekin, Emre; Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Zhu, Frank; Leith, Allen; Pfeifer, Brian D.; LaRose, J. D.; Russell, N. M.

    2016-04-01

    We report the formation of very uniform and smooth Ni(Pt)Si on epitaxially grown SiGe using Si gas cluster ion beam treatment after metal-rich silicide formation. The gas cluster ion implantation process was optimized to infuse Si into the metal-rich silicide layer and lowered the NiSi nucleation temperature significantly according to in situ X-ray diffraction measurements. This novel method which leads to more uniform films can also be used to control silicide depth in ultra-shallow junctions, especially for high Ge containing devices, where silicidation is problematic as it leads to much rougher interfaces.

  5. FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTERS WITH IN SITU STAR FORMATION: NUCLEAR CORES AND AGE SEGREGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Aharon, Danor; Perets, Hagai B.

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear stellar cluster (NSCs) are known to exist around massive black holes (MBHs) in galactic nuclei. Two formation scenarios were suggested for their origin: (1) buildup of NSCs from consecutive infall of stellar clusters and (2) continuous in situ star formation. Though the cluster infall scenario has been extensively studied, the in situ formation scenario has been hardly explored. Here we use Fokker-Planck (FP) calculations to study the effects of star formation on the buildup of NSCs and its implications for their long-term evolution and their resulting structure. We use the FP equation to describe the evolution of stellar populations and add appropriate source terms to account for the effects of newly formed stars. We show that continuous star formation even 1-2 pc away from the MBH can lead to the buildup of an NSC with properties similar to those of the Milky Way NSC. We find that the structure of the old stellar population in the NSC with in situ star formation could be very similar to the steady-state Bahcall-Wolf cuspy structure. However, its younger populations do not yet achieve a steady state. In particular, formed/evolved NSCs with in situ star formation contain differential age-segregated stellar populations that are not yet fully mixed. Younger stellar populations formed in the outer regions of the NSC have a cuspy structure toward the NSC outskirts, while showing a core-like distribution inward, with younger populations having larger core sizes. In principal, such a structure can give rise to an apparent core-like radial distribution of younger stars, as observed in the Galactic center.

  6. The Evolution of Star Formation Activity in Cluster Galaxies Over 0.15 < z < 1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Cory R.

    In this thesis, we explore 7.5 billion years of evolution in cluster galaxy star formation activity using a sample of 11 high-redshift (1 < z < 1.5) clusters from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey, and 25 low-redshift (0.15 < z < 1) clusters from The Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble. We compare cluster galaxy star formation to that of the field over 0.15 < z < 1.5 using 8000 galaxies from the UltraVISTA survey. Mid-infrared star formation rates are measured using Spitzer 24 mum data for isolated high-redshift galaxies. We calculate rest-frame ultraviolet star formation rates for low-redshift cluster members using Hubble Space Telescope observations. Using publically available mid-infrared and ultraviolet data for our field sample, we empirically derive scaling relations to adjust low-redshift cluster galaxy ultraviolet star formation rates to mid-infrared levels. We classify cluster galaxy morphology by visual inspection, and use quantitatively measured morphologies for field galaxies. Cluster late-type galaxies at z > 1 show enhanced star formation activity relative to the field, and account for nearly 90% of the overall star formation activity in high-redshift clusters. While high-redshift early-type galaxies are substantially quenched relative to cluster late-types, they still contribute 13% of the total cluster star formation activity. With early-type fractions increasing from 34 to 56% from z 1.5 → 1.16, we find that new cluster early-type galaxies are likely being formed around z 1.4. The fraction of early-type galaxies that are star-forming drops from 29 to 11% over this period, yet their specific star formation rates are roughly constant. These factors suggest that the events that created these new galaxies, possibly mergers, were both recent and gas-rich. With typical coverages of 50% of z < 1 cluster virial radii, we can only probe the cores of low-redshift clusters. We find that in this regime, the star formation activity of cluster

  7. Initial conditions of formation of starburst clusters: constraints from stellar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2015-08-01

    Recent high resolution observations of dense regions of molecular clouds and massive gaseous clumps with instruments like Herschel and ALMA have revealed intricate and filamentary overdensity structures in them. Such progenitors of massive starburst clusters are in contrast with smooth, centrally-pronounced profiles of the latter. In this work, we intend to constrain massive, substructured stellar distributions that would evolve to cluster-like profiles at very young ages (~Myr), as seen in starburst clusters. Taking the well observed NGC3603 Young Cluster (NYC) as an example, we compute the infall and final merger of filament-like compact (0.1-0.3 pc) subclusters, totalling 10000 M_sun, from a range of spatial scales and modes of sub-clustering, using direct N-body calculations. These calculations infer an allowable span of approx. 2.5 pc from which the subclusters can fall in a gas potential and merge to form a single centrally-dense structure in near dynamical equilibrium, within the young age of NYC (1-2 Myr). However, these merged clusters are too compact and centrally overdense compared to typical young clusters. Our N-body calculations, beginning from such compact initial conditions, show that even stellar wind and supernova mass loss, dynamical heating from retaining black holes, external tidal field and heating due to tight O-star binaries together cannot expand these clusters to their observed sizes, even in 100 Myr. Hence an explosive gas dispersal phase seems essential for forming starburst and other young clusters observed in the Milky Way and in the Local Group which can expand the clusters to their observed sizes and concentrations; including that for NYC with approx. 30% clump star formation efficiency. However, some observed massive but highly extended (>10 pc) , >10 Myr old clusters better fit a slow (several Myr timescale) gas dispersal from parsec-scale initial profiles, which can be the future of embedded systems like W3 Main.

  8. GAS RESERVOIRS AND STAR FORMATION IN A FORMING GALAXY CLUSTER AT zbsime0.2

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, Yara L.; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Deshev, Boris Z.; Van Gorkom, Jacqueline H.

    2012-09-10

    We present first results from the Blind Ultra-Deep H I Environmental Survey of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. Our survey is the first direct imaging study of neutral atomic hydrogen gas in galaxies at a redshift where evolutionary processes begin to show. In this Letter we investigate star formation, H I content, and galaxy morphology, as a function of environment in Abell 2192 (at z = 0.1876). Using a three-dimensional visualization technique, we find that Abell 2192 is a cluster in the process of forming, with significant substructure in it. We distinguish four structures that are separated in redshift and/or space. The richest structure is the baby cluster itself, with a core of elliptical galaxies that coincides with (weak) X-ray emission, almost no H I detections, and suppressed star formation. Surrounding the cluster, we find a compact group where galaxies pre-process before falling into the cluster, and a scattered population of 'field-like' galaxies showing more star formation and H I detections. This cluster proves to be an excellent laboratory to understand the fate of the H I gas in the framework of galaxy evolution. We clearly see that the H I gas and the star formation correlate with morphology and environment at z {approx} 0.2. In particular, the fraction of H I detections is significantly affected by the environment. The effect starts to kick in in low-mass groups that pre-process the galaxies before they enter the cluster. Our results suggest that by the time the group galaxies fall into the cluster, they are already devoid of H I.

  9. The axolotl limb blastema: cellular and molecular mechanisms driving blastema formation and limb regeneration in tetrapods

    PubMed Central

    McCusker, Catherine; Bryant, Susan V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The axolotl is one of the few tetrapods that are capable of regenerating complicated biological structures, such as complete limbs, throughout adulthood. Upon injury the axolotl generates a population of regeneration‐competent limb progenitor cells known as the blastema, which will grow, establish pattern, and differentiate into the missing limb structures. In this review we focus on the crucial early events that occur during wound healing, the neural−epithelial interactions that drive the formation of the early blastema, and how these mechanisms differ from those of other species that have restricted regenerative potential, such as humans. We also discuss how the presence of cells from the different axes of the limb is required for the continued growth and establishment of pattern in the blastema as described in the polar coordinate model, and how this positional information is reprogrammed in blastema cells during regeneration. Multiple cell types from the mature limb stump contribute to the blastema at different stages of regeneration, and we discuss the contribution of these types to the regenerate with reference to whether they are “pattern‐forming” or “pattern‐following” cells. Lastly, we explain how an engineering approach will help resolve unanswered questions in limb regeneration, with the goal of translating these concepts to developing better human regenerative therapies. PMID:27499868

  10. THE RICH GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM OF ABELL 1689 AND THE RADIAL DEPENDENCE OF THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER FORMATION EFFICIENCY

    SciTech Connect

    Alamo-Martínez, K. A.; González-Lópezlira, R. A.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Côté, P.; Ferrarese, L.; Jee, M. J.; Jordán, A.; Meurer, G. R.; Peng, E. W.; West, M. J.

    2013-09-20

    We study the rich globular cluster (GC) system in the center of the massive cluster of galaxies Abell 1689 (z = 0.18), one of the most powerful gravitational lenses known. With 28 Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys orbits in the F814W bandpass, we reach a magnitude I{sub 814} = 29 with ∼>90% completeness and sample the brightest ∼5% of the GC system. Assuming the well-known Gaussian form of the GC luminosity function (GCLF), we estimate a total population of N{sup total}{sub GC}= 162,850{sup +75,450}{sub -51,310} GCs within a projected radius of 400 kpc. As many as half of the GCs may comprise an intracluster component. Even with the sizable uncertainties, which mainly result from the uncertain GCLF parameters, this system is by far the largest GC population studied to date. The specific frequency S{sub N} is high, but not uncommon for central galaxies in massive clusters, rising from S{sub N} ≈ 5 near the center to ∼12 at large radii. Passive galaxy fading would increase S{sub N} by ∼20% at z = 0. We construct the radial mass profiles of the GCs, stars, intracluster gas, and lensing-derived total mass, and we compare the mass fractions as a function of radius. The estimated mass in GCs, M{sub GC}{sup total} = 3.9 × 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, is comparable to ∼80% of the total stellar mass of the Milky Way. The shape of the GC mass profile appears intermediate between those of the stellar light and total cluster mass. Despite the extreme nature of this system, the ratios of the GC mass to the baryonic and total masses, and thus the GC formation efficiency, are typical of those in other rich clusters when comparing at the same physical radii. The GC formation efficiency is not constant, but varies with radius, in a manner that appears similar for different clusters; we speculate on the reasons for this similarity in profile.

  11. Formation of the Fe-S cluster of ferredoxin in lysed spinach chloroplasts. [Spinacia oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Mitsui, Akira; Matsubara, Hiroshi )

    1991-01-01

    In vitro formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster of ferredoxin (Fd) has been achieved by incubating apo-Fd and ({sup 35}S)cysteine with osmotically lysed chloroplasts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea). Correct integration of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster into Fd was verified on the basis of the following: (a) Under nondenaturing conditions, {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd showed the same electrophoretic mobility as authentic holo-Fd; (b) {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd showed an ability to bind Fd-NADP{sup +} reductase; (c) the {sup 35}S-labeled moiety was removed from the Fd polypeptide by TCA treatment but not by 2-mercaptoethanol treatment; (d) externally added pea II apo-Fd was converted to {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd. This reconstitution was dependent on both ATP and light, and formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster was observed upon addition of ATP or when an ATP generation-system was constructed in the light. In contrast, ATP-consuming systems abolished the Fe-S cluster formation. A non-hydrolyzable ATP analog was unable to serve as an ATP substitute, indicating the requirement of ATP hydrolysis for cluster formation. GTP was able to substitute for ATP, but CTP and UTP were less effective. Fe-S cluster formation in lysed chloroplasts was stimulated by light even in the presence of added ATP. Light stimulation was inhibited by DCMU or methyl viologen but not by NH{sub 4}{sup +}. NADPH was able to substitute for light, indicating that light energy is required for the production of reducing compounds such as NADPH in addition to the generation of ATP.

  12. Formation of regular polyicosahedral structure during growth of large Lennard-Jones clusters from their global minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polak, Wiesław Z.

    2016-08-01

    Simulated growth of four global-minimum Lennard-Jones clusters of sizes N = 561, 823, 850 and 923, representing multishell icosahedra and decahedron, always leads to formation of regular polyicosahedral clusters. Observation of cluster structure evolution revealed that new atoms form anti-Mackay islands spreading over the cluster surface by making strong island-island junctions at cluster edges. Analysis of potential energies of atoms composing different local structures shows that energy-driven preference for decahedral arrangement of several atoms initiating the junction of pentagonal symmetry on the cluster surface is responsible for kinetic effect in the cluster growth.

  13. The Red Sequence of High-Redshift Clusters: A Comparison with Cosmological Galaxy Formation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menci, N.

    2008-10-01

    We compare the results from a state-of-the-art semi-analytic model of galaxy formation with spectroscopic observations of the distant galaxy clusters observed in the range 1≲ z≲ 1.5. In our model we find that i) a well-defined, narrow red sequence (RS) is obtained already by z≈ 1.2; this is more populated than the field RS analogously to what observed and predicted at z=0; ii) the predicted RS colors and width have average values of 1 and 0.15, respectively, with a cluster-to-cluster variance. The width of the RS of cluster galaxy is 5-10 times lower than the corresponding field value; iii) The predicted distribution of stellar ages of RS galaxies at z=1.2 are peaked at the value τ=3.7 Gyr for both cluster and field; however, for the latter the distribution is significantly skewed toward lower ages. When compared with observations, the above findings show an overall consistency, although the average value ≈ 0.07 of the observed cluster RS width at z≈1.2 is smaller than the corresponding model central value. We discuss the physical origin and the significance of the above results in the framework of cosmological galaxy formation.

  14. INFRARED AND ULTRAVIOLET STAR FORMATION IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES IN THE ACCEPT SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffer, Aaron S.; Donahue, Megan; Hicks, Amalia; Barthelemy, R. S. E-mail: donahue@pa.msu.edu E-mail: ramon.s.barthelemy@wmich.edu

    2012-03-01

    We present infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) photometry for a sample of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). The BCGs are from a heterogeneous but uniformly characterized sample, the Archive of Chandra Cluster Entropy Profile Tables (ACCEPT), of X-ray galaxy clusters from the Chandra X-ray telescope archive with published gas temperature, density, and entropy profiles. We use archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), Spitzer Space Telescope, and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) observations to assemble spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and colors for BCGs. We find that while the SEDs of some BCGs follow the expectation of red, dust-free old stellar populations, many exhibit signatures of recent star formation in the form of excess UV or mid-IR emission, or both. We establish a mean near-UV (NUV) to 2MASS K color of 6.59 {+-} 0.34 for quiescent BCGs. We use this mean color to quantify the UV excess associated with star formation in the active BCGs. We use both fits to a template of an evolved stellar population and library of starburst models and mid-IR star formation relations to estimate the obscured star formation rates (SFRs). We show that many of the BCGs in X-ray clusters with low central gas entropy exhibit enhanced UV (38%) and mid-IR emission (43%) from 8 to 160 {mu}m, above that expected from an old stellar population. These excesses are consistent with ongoing star formation activity in the BCG, star formation that appears to be enabled by the presence of high-density, X-ray-emitting intergalactic gas in the core of the cluster of galaxies. This hot, X-ray-emitting gas may provide the enhanced ambient pressure and some of the fuel to trigger star formation. This result is consistent with previous works that showed that BCGs in clusters with low central gas entropies host H{alpha} emission-line nebulae and radio sources, while clusters with high central gas entropy exhibit none of these features. GALEX UV and Spitzer mid-IR measurements combined

  15. On Iron Enrichment, Star Formation, and Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenstein, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The nature of star formation and Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) in galaxies in the field and in rich galaxy clusters are contrasted by juxtaposing the buildup of heavy metals in the universe inferred from observed star formation and supernovae rate histories with data on the evolution of Fe abundances in the intracluster medium (ICM). Models for the chemical evolution of Fe in these environments are constructed, subject to observational constraints, for this purpose. While models with a mean delay for SNIa of 3 Gyr and standard initial mass function (IMF) are fully consistent with observations in the field, cluster Fe enrichment immediately tracked a rapid, top-heavy phase of star formation - although transport of Fe into the ICM may have been more prolonged and star formation likely continued beyond redshift 1. The means of this prompt enrichment consisted of SNII yielding greater than or equal to 0.1 solar mass per explosion (if the SNIa rate normalization is scaled down from its value in the field according to the relative number of candidate progenitor stars in the 3 - 8 solar mass range) and/or SNIa with short delay times originating during the rapid star formation epoch. Star formation is greater than 3 times more efficient in rich clusters than in the field, mitigating the overcooling problem in numerical cluster simulations. Both the fraction of baryons cycled through stars, and the fraction of the total present-day stellar mass in the form of stellar remnants, are substantially greater in clusters than in the field.

  16. The location, clustering, and propagation of massive star formation in giant molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochsendorf, Bram; Meixner, Margaret; Chastenet, Jeremy; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Roman-Duval, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Massive stars are key players in the evolution of galaxies, yet their formation pathway remains unclear. In this talk, I will highlight results from a project utilizing data from several galaxy-wide surveys to build an unbiased dataset of ~700 massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), ~200 giant molecular clouds (GMCs), and ~100 young (< 10 Myr) optical stellar clusters (SCs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We have employed this data to quantitatively study the location and clustering of massive star formation and its relation to the internal structure of GMCs. The main results are as follows: (1) Massive stars do not typically form at the highest column densities nor centers of their parent GMCs. (2) Massive star formation clusters over multiple generations and on size scales much smaller than the size of the parent GMC. (3) The rate of massive star formation is significantly boosted in clouds near SCs. Yet, comparison of molecular clouds associated with SCs with those that are not reveals no significant difference in their global properties. These results reveal a connection between different generations of massive stars on timescales up to 10 Myr. I will compare our findings with Galactic studies and discuss this in terms of GMC collapse, triggered star formation, and a potential dichotomy between low- and high-mass star formation.

  17. The Location, Clustering, and Propagation of Massive Star Formation in Giant Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochsendorf, Bram B.; Meixner, Margaret; Chastenet, Jérémy; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Roman-Duval, Julia

    2016-11-01

    Massive stars are key players in the evolution of galaxies, yet their formation pathway remains unclear. In this work, we use data from several galaxy-wide surveys to build an unbiased data set of ∼600 massive young stellar objects, ∼200 giant molecular clouds (GMCs), and ∼100 young (<10 Myr) optical stellar clusters (SCs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We employ this data to quantitatively study the location and clustering of massive star formation and its relation to the internal structure of GMCs. We reveal that massive stars do not typically form at the highest column densities nor centers of their parent GMCs at the ∼6 pc resolution of our observations. Massive star formation clusters over multiple generations and on size scales much smaller than the size of the parent GMC. We find that massive star formation is significantly boosted in clouds near SCs. However, whether a cloud is associated with an SC does not depend on either the cloud’s mass or global surface density. These results reveal a connection between different generations of massive stars on timescales up to 10 Myr. We compare our work with Galactic studies and discuss our findings in terms of GMC collapse, triggered star formation, and a potential dichotomy between low- and high-mass star formation.

  18. Star Formation in Intermediate Redshift 0.2 < z < 0.7 Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Kevin C.; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Baum, Stefi A.; Tremblay, Grant R.; Cox, Isabella G.; Gladders, Michael

    2016-12-01

    We present a multi-wavelength photometric and spectroscopic study of 42 Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) in two samples of galaxy clusters chosen for a gravitational lensing study. The study’s initial sample combines 25 BCGs from the Cluster Lensing and Supernova Survey with Hubble sample and 37 BCGs from the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey with a total redshift range of 0.2< z< 0.7. Using archival GALEX, Hubble Space Telescope, Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, Herschel, and Very Large Array data we determine the BCGs’ stellar mass, radio power, and star formation rates. The radio power is higher than expected if due to star formation, consistent with the BCGs being active galactic nucleus (AGN)-powered radio sources. This suggests that the AGN and star formation are both fueled by cold gas in the host galaxy. The specific star formation rate (sSFR) is low and constant with redshift. The mean sSFR is 9.42 × 10-12 yr-1, which corresponds to a mass doubling time of 105 billion years. These findings are consistent with models for hierarchical formation of BCGs, which suggest that star formation is no longer a significant channel for galaxy growth for z ≤slant 1. Instead, stellar growth (of the order of a factor of at least two) during this period is expected to occur mainly via minor dry mergers.

  19. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid-dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-10-21

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even though the neutral particles are stable against evaporation from the SA dimer onward, the formation rates of particles at 1.7-nm size, which contain about 10 SA molecules, are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller compared with those of the dimer due to coagulation and wall loss of particles before they reach 1.7 nm in diameter. This demonstrates that neither the atmospheric particle formation rate nor its dependence on SA can simply be interpreted in terms of cluster evaporation or the molecular composition of a critical nucleus.

  20. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid–dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H.; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M.; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even though the neutral particles are stable against evaporation from the SA dimer onward, the formation rates of particles at 1.7-nm size, which contain about 10 SA molecules, are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller compared with those of the dimer due to coagulation and wall loss of particles before they reach 1.7 nm in diameter. This demonstrates that neither the atmospheric particle formation rate nor its dependence on SA can simply be interpreted in terms of cluster evaporation or the molecular composition of a critical nucleus. PMID:25288761

  1. PROGRESSIVE STAR FORMATION IN THE YOUNG GALACTIC SUPER STAR CLUSTER NGC 3603

    SciTech Connect

    Beccari, Giacomo; Spezzi, Loredana; De Marchi, Guido; Andersen, Morten; Paresce, Francesco; Young, Erick; Panagia, Nino; Bond, Howard; Balick, Bruce; Calzetti, Daniela; Carollo, C. Marcella; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Saha, Abhijit

    2010-09-10

    Early Release Science observations of the cluster NGC 3603 with the WFC3 on the refurbished Hubble Space Telescope allow us to study its recent star formation history. Our analysis focuses on stars with H{alpha} excess emission, a robust indicator of their pre-main sequence (PMS) accreting status. The comparison with theoretical PMS isochrones shows that 2/3 of the objects with H{alpha} excess emission have ages from 1 to 10 Myr, with a median value of 3 Myr, while a surprising 1/3 of them are older than 10 Myr. The study of the spatial distribution of these PMS stars allows us to confirm their cluster membership and to statistically separate them from field stars. This result establishes unambiguously for the first time that star formation in and around the cluster has been ongoing for at least 10-20 Myr, at an apparently increasing rate.

  2. Accretion-driven star formation in central dominant galaxies in X-ray clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarazin, C. L.; Oconnell, R. W.

    1983-05-01

    Analytical and observational evidence for the formation of low-mass stars in the gas accreting in the central dominant galaxies in clusters is presented. Observations of the (U-V) and (K-V) color gradients in accreting galaxies are suggested to reveal colors altered by the appearance of young stars, e.g., the excess blue and the A star spectrum detected in NGC 1275. Low-temperature X ray line emissions from accreting galaxies have been partially surveyed with the result that 10 pct of the brightest cluster galaxies in a magnitude-limited sample show evidence of significant accretion. Photometric data from the quasar 3C 48, located in a galaxy with a very blue population, also suggests low-mass star formation, especially when compared to measurements of NGC 1275, which has the highest accretion rate among observed central dominant cluster galaxies. The quasar, however, would not be accreting interstellar gas.

  3. The Link between the Formation Rates of Clusters and Stars in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandar, Rupali; Fall, S. Michael; Whitmore, Bradley C.

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this paper is to test whether the formation rate of star clusters is proportional to the star formation rate (SFR) in galaxies. As a first step, we present the mass functions of compact clusters younger than 10 Myr in seven star-forming galaxies of diverse masses, sizes, and morphologies: the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, NGC 4214, NGC 4449, M83, M51, and the Antennae. These cluster mass functions (CMFs) are well represented by power laws, {dN}/{dM}\\propto {M}β , with similar exponents β =-1.92+/- 0.27, but with amplitudes that differ by factors up to ˜ {10}3, corresponding to vast differences in the sizes of the cluster populations in these galaxies. We then normalize these CMFs by the SFRs in the galaxies, derived from dust-corrected Hα luminosities, and find that the spread in the amplitudes collapses, with a remaining rms deviation of only σ ({log}A)=0.2. This is close to the expected dispersion from random uncertainties in the CMFs and SFRs. Thus, the data presented here are consistent with exact proportionality between the formation rates of stars and clusters. However, the data also permit weak deviations from proportionality, at the factor of two level, within the statistical uncertainties. We find the same spread in amplitudes when we normalize the mass functions of much older clusters, with ages in the range 100-400 Myr, by the current SFR. This is another indication of the general similarity among the cluster populations of different galaxies.

  4. Real-Time Characterization of Formation and Breakup of Iridium Clusters in Highly Dealuminated Zeolite Y

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun, Alper; Gates, Bruce C.

    2009-01-15

    The chemistry of formation of iridium clusters from mononuclear iridium diethylene complexes anchored in dealuminated Y zeolite, and their subsequent breakup -- all including changes in the metal-metal, metal-support, and metal-ligand interactions -- is demonstrated by time-resolved EXAFS, XANES, and IR spectroscopy.

  5. X-ray irradiation-induced formation of luminescent silver clusters in nanoporous matrices.

    PubMed

    Coutino-Gonzalez, Eduardo; Grandjean, Didier; Roeffaers, Maarten; Kvashnina, Kristina; Fron, Eduard; Dieu, Bjorn; De Cremer, Gert; Lievens, Peter; Sels, Bert; Hofkens, Johan

    2014-02-09

    We report the formation of luminescent silver clusters in zeolites by a fast, highly accurate, and controlled activation of silver ions entrapped in sodalite cages of LTA and FAU zeolites using high-brilliance soft X-rays. The activated luminescent samples were investigated by employing a combination of stationary and time-resolved spectroscopic techniques.

  6. Cluster formation by allelomimesis in real-world complex adaptive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanico, Dranreb Earl; Monterola, Christopher; Saloma, Caesar

    2005-04-01

    Animal and human clusters are complex adaptive systems and many organize in cluster sizes s that obey the frequency distribution D(s)∝s-τ . The exponent τ describes the relative abundance of the cluster sizes in a given system. Data analyses reveal that real-world clusters exhibit a broad spectrum of τ values, 0.7 (tuna fish schools) ⩽τ⩽4.61 (T4 bacteriophage gene family sizes). Allelomimesis is proposed as an underlying mechanism for adaptation that explains the observed broad τ spectrum. Allelomimesis is the tendency of an individual to imitate the actions of others and two cluster systems have different τ values when their component agents display unequal degrees of allelomimetic tendencies. Cluster formation by allelomimesis is shown to be of three general types: namely, blind copying, information-use copying, and noncopying. Allelomimetic adaptation also reveals that the most stable cluster size is formed by three strongly allelomimetic individuals. Our finding is consistent with available field data taken from killer whales and marmots.

  7. The Red Sequence of High-Redshift Clusters: A Comparison with Cosmological Galaxy Formation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menci, N.; Rosati, P.; Gobat, R.; Strazzullo, V.; Rettura, A.; Mei, S.; Demarco, R.

    2008-10-01

    We compare the results from a state-of-the-art semianalytic model of galaxy formation with spectrophotometric observations of distant galaxy clusters observed in the range 0.8 <= z<= 1.3. We investigate the properties of their red sequence (RS) galaxies and compare them with those of the field at the same redshift. In our model we find that (1) a well-defined, narrow RS is obtained already by z ≈ 1.2; this is found to be more populated than the field RS, analogously to what is observed and predicted at z = 0; (2) the predicted U-V rest-frame colors and scatter of the cluster RS at z = 1.2 have average values of 1 and 0.15, respectively, with a cluster-to-cluster variance of ≈0.2 and ≈0.06, respectively. The scatter of the RS of cluster galaxies is ≈5 times smaller than the corresponding field value; (3) when the RS galaxies are considered, the mass growth histories of field and cluster galaxies at z ≈ 1.2 are similar, with 90% of the stellar mass of RS galaxies at z = 1.2 already formed at cosmic times t = 2.5 Gyr, and 50% at t = 1 Gyr; and (4) the predicted distribution of stellar ages of RS galaxies at z = 1.2 peaks at 3.7 Gyr for both cluster and field populations; however, for the latter the distribution is significantly skewed toward lower ages. When compared with observations, the above findings show an overall consistency, although the average value ΔU - V ≈ 0.07 of the observed cluster RS scatter at z ≈ 1.2 is smaller than the corresponding model central value. We discuss the physical origin and the significance of the above results in the framework of cosmological galaxy formation.

  8. Star formation activity of intermediate redshift cluster galaxies out to the infall regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, B.; Ziegler, B.; Balogh, M.; Gilbank, D.; Fritz, A.; Jäger, K.

    2004-07-01

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of two galaxy clusters at z≈0.2, out to ˜4 Mpc. The two clusters VMF73 and VMF74 as identified by \\citet{VMFJQH98} were observed with multiple object spectroscopy using MOSCA at the Calar Alto 3.5 m telescope. Both clusters lie in the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter field R285 and were selected from the X-ray Dark Cluster Survey \\citep{GBCZ04} that provides optical V- and I-band data. VMF73 and VMF74 are located at respective redshifts of z=0.25 and z=0.18 with velocity dispersions of 671 km s-1 and 442 km s-1, respectively. Both cluster velocity dispersions are consistent with Gaussians. The spectroscopic observations reach out to ˜2.5 virial radii. Line strength measurements of the emission lines Hα and [O II]λ3727 are used to assess the star formation activity of cluster galaxies which show radial and density dependences. The mean and median of both line strength distributions as well as the fraction of star forming galaxies increase with increasing clustercentric distance and decreasing local galaxy density. Except for two galaxies with strong Hα and [O II] emission, all of the cluster galaxies are normal star forming or passive galaxies. Our results are consistent with other studies that show the truncation in star formation occurs far from the cluster centre. Table A.1 is only available in electronic from at http//www.edpsciences.org

  9. Clustered star formation as a natural explanation for the Halpha cut-off in disk galaxies.

    PubMed

    Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel

    2008-10-02

    The rate of star formation in a galaxy is often determined by the observation of emission in the Halpha line, which is related to the presence of short-lived massive stars. Disk galaxies show a strong cut-off in Halpha radiation at a certain galactocentric distance, which has led to the conclusion that star formation is suppressed in the outer regions of disk galaxies. This is seemingly in contradiction to recent observations in the ultraviolet which imply that disk galaxies have star formation beyond the Halpha cut-off, and that the star-formation-rate surface density is linearly related to the underlying gas surface density, which is a shallower relationship than that derived from Halpha luminosities. In a galaxy-wide formulation, the clustered nature of star formation has recently led to the insight that the total galactic Halpha luminosity is nonlinearly related to the galaxy-wide star formation rate. Here we show that a local formulation of the concept of clustered star formation naturally leads to a steeper radial decrease in the Halpha surface luminosity than in the star-formation-rate surface density, in quantitative agreement with the observations, and that the observed Halpha cut-off arises naturally.

  10. Star formation in grand-design, spiral galaxies. Young, massive clusters in the near-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosbøl, P.; Dottori, H.

    2012-06-01

    Aims: Spiral structure is a prominent feature in many disk galaxies and is often outlined by bright, young objects. We study the distribution of young stellar clusters in grand-design spiral galaxies and thereby determine whether strong spiral perturbations can influence star formation. Methods: Deep, near-infrared JHK-maps were observed for ten nearby, grand-design, spiral galaxies using HAWK-I at the Very Large Telescope. Complete, magnitude-limited candidate lists of star-forming complexes were obtained by searching within the K-band maps. The properties of the complexes were derived from (H - K) - (J - H) diagrams including the identification of the youngest complexes (i.e. ≲7 Myr) and the estimation of their extinction. Results: Young stellar clusters with ages ≲7 Myr have significant internal extinction in the range of AV = 3-7m, while older ones typically have AV < 1m. The cluster luminosity function (CLF) is well-fitted by a power law with an exponent of around -2 and displays no evidence of a high luminosity cut-off. The brightest cluster complexes in the disk reach luminosities of MK = -15.5m or estimated masses of 106 M⊙. At radii with a strong, two-armed spiral pattern, the star formation rate in the arms is higher by a factor of 2-5 than in the inter-arm regions. The CLF in the arms is also shifted towards brighter MK by at least 0.4m. We also detect clusters with colors compatible with Large Magellanic Cloud intermediate age clusters and Milky Way globular clusters. The (J - K) - MK diagram of several galaxies shows, for the brightest clusters, a clear separation between young clusters that are highly attenuated by dust and older ones with low extinction. Conclusions: The gap in the (J - K) - MK diagrams implies that there has been a rapid expulsion of dust at an age around 7 Myr, possibly triggered by supernovae. Strong spiral perturbations concentrate the formation of clusters in the arm regions and shifts their CLF towards brighter magnitudes

  11. Repetitive motor learning induces coordinated formation of clustered dendritic spines in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fu, Min; Yu, Xinzhu; Lu, Ju; Zuo, Yi

    2012-02-19

    Many lines of evidence suggest that memory in the mammalian brain is stored with distinct spatiotemporal patterns. Despite recent progresses in identifying neuronal populations involved in memory coding, the synapse-level mechanism is still poorly understood. Computational models and electrophysiological data have shown that functional clustering of synapses along dendritic branches leads to nonlinear summation of synaptic inputs and greatly expands the computing power of a neural network. However, whether neighbouring synapses are involved in encoding similar memory and how task-specific cortical networks develop during learning remain elusive. Using transcranial two-photon microscopy, we followed apical dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the motor cortex while mice practised novel forelimb skills. Here we show that a third of new dendritic spines (postsynaptic structures of most excitatory synapses) formed during the acquisition phase of learning emerge in clusters, and that most such clusters are neighbouring spine pairs. These clustered new spines are more likely to persist throughout prolonged learning sessions, and even long after training stops, than non-clustered counterparts. Moreover, formation of new spine clusters requires repetition of the same motor task, and the emergence of succedent new spine(s) accompanies the strengthening of the first new spine in the cluster. We also show that under control conditions new spines appear to avoid existing stable spines, rather than being uniformly added along dendrites. However, succedent new spines in clusters overcome such a spatial constraint and form in close vicinity to neighbouring stable spines. Our findings suggest that clustering of new synapses along dendrites is induced by repetitive activation of the cortical circuitry during learning, providing a structural basis for spatial coding of motor memory in the mammalian brain.

  12. Free energy of cluster formation and a new scaling relation for the nucleation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Diemand, Jürg; Angélil, Raymond

    2014-05-21

    Recent very large molecular dynamics simulations of homogeneous nucleation with (1 − 8) × 10{sup 9} Lennard-Jones atoms [J. Diemand, R. Angélil, K. K. Tanaka, and H. Tanaka, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 074309 (2013)] allow us to accurately determine the formation free energy of clusters over a wide range of cluster sizes. This is now possible because such large simulations allow for very precise measurements of the cluster size distribution in the steady state nucleation regime. The peaks of the free energy curves give critical cluster sizes, which agree well with independent estimates based on the nucleation theorem. Using these results, we derive an analytical formula and a new scaling relation for nucleation rates: ln J{sup ′}/η is scaled by ln S/η, where the supersaturation ratio is S, η is the dimensionless surface energy, and J{sup ′} is a dimensionless nucleation rate. This relation can be derived using the free energy of cluster formation at equilibrium which corresponds to the surface energy required to form the vapor-liquid interface. At low temperatures (below the triple point), we find that the surface energy divided by that of the classical nucleation theory does not depend on temperature, which leads to the scaling relation and implies a constant, positive Tolman length equal to half of the mean inter-particle separation in the liquid phase.

  13. Acceleration of raindrop formation due to the tangling-clustering instability in a turbulent stratified atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elperin, T.; Kleeorin, N.; Krasovitov, B.; Kulmala, M.; Liberman, M.; Rogachevskii, I.; Zilitinkevich, S.

    2015-07-01

    Condensation of water vapor on active cloud condensation nuclei produces micron-size water droplets. To form rain, they must grow rapidly into at least 50- to 100 -μ m droplets. Observations show that this process takes only 15-20 min. The unexplained physical mechanism of such fast growth is crucial for understanding and modeling of rain and known as "condensation-coalescence bottleneck in rain formation." We show that the recently discovered phenomenon of the tangling clustering instability of small droplets in temperature-stratified turbulence [Phys. Fluids 25, 085104 (2013), 10.1063/1.4816643] results in the formation of droplet clusters with drastically increased droplet number densities. The mechanism of the tangling clustering instability is much more effective than the previously considered by us the inertial clustering instability caused by the centrifugal effect of turbulent vortices. This is the reason of strong enhancement of the collision-coalescence rate inside the clusters. The mean-field theory of the droplet growth developed in this study can be useful for explanation of the observed fast growth of cloud droplets in warm clouds from the initial 1 -μ m -size droplets to 40- to 50 -μ m -size droplets within 15-20 min.

  14. Using Herschel Far-Infrared Photometry to Constrain Star Formation Rates in CLASH Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Rebecca L.; Postman, Marc; Fogarty, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) program obtained broadband images of 25 massive galaxy clusters in 16 passbands from the UV to the near-IR. The data was taken with the Wide-field Camera 3 (WFC3), and the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These 25 clusters have also been observed in the mid-IR by Spitzer IRAC, the far-IR by the Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE, and in the x-ray by the Chandra and XMM observatories. We focused on the two brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the survey (MACS1931.8-2653 and RXJ1532.9+3021) that have reddening-corrected UV-derived star formation rates (SFRs) > 100 M⊙ yr-1 as measured by Fogarty et al (2015). The inclusion of Herschel data provides unique constraints on dust content and independent estimates of the star formation rates in these interesting galaxies. We performed photometry on the five Herschel bands (100-500μm), and removed any contamination from other cluster members. We fit a UV-FIR SED to each galaxy to measure the bolometric dust luminosity (Lbol), which we use to derive the FIR obscured SFR. We calculate the sum of the measured UV unobscured SFR from the HST photometry and the FIR obscured SFR from the Herschel photometry to get a total SFR for these two BCGs. We compared this to the reddening-corrected SFRs and found they were in agreement within error. This confirms that the Kennicutt and Calzetti methods for calculating star formation rates are both applicable for these highly star-forming massive cluster galaxies.

  15. The Role of Dynamics in the Formation of Cataclysmic Variables in Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesperini, Enrico; Hong, Jongsuk; Belloni, Diogo; Giersz, Mirek

    2017-01-01

    Internal dynamics and stellar interactions in the high-density environments of globular clusters are likely to play a key role in the formation and evolution of X-ray sources in these stellar systems.Observational evidence in support of the role dynamical interactions in the formation of X-ray sources comes from a number of observational studies showing that the number of X-ray sources in globular clusters is correlated with the cluster stellar encounter rate.We present here the results of a survey of Monte-Carlo simulations exploring the role of dynamics in the formation of cataclysmic variables (CVs). Our simulations show a correlation between the number of CVs and the stellar encounter rate as found in observational studies and illustrate the dynamical path leading to this correlation.We also study the spatial distribution of CVs in clusters and find that they are more concentrated than single stars with masses close to those of turn-off stars at 12 Gyr. This trend is stronger for the population of CVs formed from primordial binaries undergoing exchange encounters.

  16. Glass formation and cluster evolution in the rapidly solidified monatomic metallic liquid Ta under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dejun; Wen, Dadong; Tian, Zean; Liu, Rangsu

    2016-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to examine the glass formation and cluster evolution during the rapid solidification of monatomic metallic liquid Ta under high pressure. The atomic structures in the systems are characterized by the radical distribution function (RDF), Honeycutt-Anderson (H-A) bond-type index method and cluster-type index method (CTIM). It is observed that the defective icosahedra play the critical role in the formation of Ta monatomic metallic glasses (MGs) rather than (12 0 12 0) perfect icosahedra, which have been identified as the basic local atomic units in many multi-component MGs. With the increase of pressure P, the fraction of icosahedral type clusters decreases remarkably in Ta MGs, while the fraction of bcc type clusters rises evidently. The evolution of vitrification degree (DSRO or DMRO) of the rapidly cooled metal Ta system further reveals that a higher pressure P is disadvantageous to the formation of Ta monatomic MGs. The weaker glass forming ability (GFA) of liquid metal Ta obtained under higher pressure P can be contributed to the decrease of DSRO or DMRO which is induced by increasing high pressure P to some extent.

  17. Simulation of XenArm Cluster Formation in a Molecular Beam: Comparison with Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amar, Francois G.; Preston, Thomas J.

    2006-03-01

    We perform direct MD simulations of the formation of mixed XenArm clusters (500clusters and compare them to the experimental spectra of Tchaplyguine et al[1]. The predicted spectra are calculated as the sum of final state energy shifts of the ionized atoms (within the cluster) relative to the isolated gas phase ion using a self-consistent polarization formalism. We use the results of our earlier calculations on pure argon and xenon clusters [2] to determine the appropriate inelastic mean free path value for the signal electrons leaving the mixed clusters. These results allow us to gain a refined understanding of the size, stoichiometry, and core/shell structure of these mixed clusters. [1] M. Tchaplyguine, et al, Phys. Rev A 69, 031201 (2004); [2] F. Amar, et al, JCP 122, 244717 (2005).

  18. Cluster formation in fluids with competing short-range and long-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweatman, Martin B.; Fartaria, Rui; Lue, Leo

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the low density behaviour of fluids that interact through a short-ranged attraction together with a long-ranged repulsion (SALR potential) by developing a molecular thermodynamic model. The SALR potential is a model of effective solute interactions where the solvent degrees of freedom are integrated-out. For this system, we find that clusters form for a range of interaction parameters where attractive and repulsive interactions nearly balance, similar to micelle formation in aqueous surfactant solutions. We focus on systems for which equilibrium behaviour and liquid-like clusters (i.e., droplets) are expected, and find in addition a novel coexistence between a low density cluster phase and a high density cluster phase within a very narrow range of parameters. Moreover, a simple formula for the average cluster size is developed. Based on this formula, we propose a non-classical crystal nucleation pathway whereby macroscopic crystals are formed via crystal nucleation within microscopic precursor droplets. We also perform large-scale Monte Carlo simulations, which demonstrate that the cluster fluid phase is thermodynamically stable for this system.

  19. Formation of the structures from dusty clusters in neon dc discharge under cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, D. N.; Shumova, V. V.; Vasilyak, L. M.

    2016-11-01

    The formation of structures consisted of dusty clusters in plasma at the discharge tube cooling to a temperature of liquid nitrogen was discovered. The dependence of the reduced electric field in the positive column of a discharge on gas temperature was experimentally measured. Depending on the pressure of neon were observed the different structural transitions in the regions of growing current-voltage characteristics at low discharge currents ≤ 1 mA. It was found that the regions of existence of structured clusters and the regions of structural transitions were characterized by the higher values of the reduced electric field than the regions of destruction of ordered structures.

  20. DISSIPATIONLESS FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF THE MILKY WAY NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Antonini, Fabio; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, Roberto; Mastrobuono-Battisti, Alessandra; Merritt, David

    2012-05-10

    In one widely discussed model for the formation of nuclear star clusters (NSCs), massive globular clusters spiral into the center of a galaxy and merge to form the nucleus. It is now known that at least some NSCs coexist with supermassive black holes (SMBHs); this is the case, for instance, in the Milky Way. In this paper, we investigate how the presence of an SMBH at the center of the Milky Way impacts the merger hypothesis for the formation of its NSC. Starting from a model consisting of a low-density nuclear stellar disk and the SMBH, we use direct N-body simulations to follow the successive inspiral and merger of globular clusters. The clusters are started on circular orbits of radius 20 pc, and their initial masses and radii are set up in such a way as to be consistent with the galactic tidal field at that radius. These clusters, decayed orbitally in the central region due to their large mass, were followed in their inspiral events; as a result, the total accumulated mass by Almost-Equal-To 10 clusters is about 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }. Each cluster is disrupted by the SMBH at a distance of roughly 1 pc. The density profile that results after the final inspiral event is characterized by a core of roughly this radius and an envelope with density that falls off {rho} {approx} r{sup -2}. These properties are similar to those of the Milky Way NSC, with the exception of the core size, which in the Milky Way is somewhat smaller. But by continuing the evolution of the model after the final inspiral event, we find that the core shrinks substantially via gravitational encounters in a time (when scaled to the Milky Way) of 10 Gyr as the stellar distribution evolves toward a Bahcall-Wolf cusp. We also show that the luminosity function of the Milky Way NSC is consistent with the hypothesis that 1/2 of the mass comes from old ({approx}10 Gyr) stars, brought in by globular clusters, with the other half due to continuous star formation. We conclude that

  1. Multicolor Photometry of the Merging Galaxy Cluster A2319: Dynamics and Star Formation Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xu

    2014-05-01

    Asymmetric X-ray emission and a powerful cluster-scale radio halo indicate that A2319 is a merging cluster of galaxies. This paper presents our multicolor photometry for A2319 with 15 optical intermediate filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. There are 142 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts within the viewing field of 58' × 58' centered on this rich cluster, including 128 member galaxies (called sample I). A large velocity dispersion in the rest frame, 1622^{+91}_{-70} km s-1, suggests merger dynamics in A2319. The contour map of projected density and localized velocity structure confirm the so-called A2319B substructure, at ~10' northwest to the main concentration A2319A. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of more than 30,000 sources are obtained in our BATC photometry down to V ~ 20 mag. A u-band (~3551 Å) image with better seeing and spatial resolution, obtained with the Bok 2.3 m telescope at Kitt Peak, is taken to make star-galaxy separation and distinguish the overlapping contamination in the BATC aperture photometry. With color-color diagrams and photometric redshift technique, 233 galaxies brighter than h BATC = 19.0 are newly selected as member candidates after an exclusion of false candidates with contaminated BATC SEDs by eyeball-checking the u-band Bok image. The early-type galaxies are found to follow a tight color-magnitude correlation. Based on sample I and the enlarged sample of member galaxies (called sample II), subcluster A2319B is confirmed. The star formation properties of cluster galaxies are derived with the evolutionary synthesis model, PEGASE, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function and an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR). A strong environmental effect on star formation histories is found in the manner that galaxies in the sparse regions have various star formation histories, while galaxies in the dense regions are found to have shorter SFR time scales, older stellar ages, and

  2. Multicolor photometry of the merging galaxy cluster A2319: Dynamics and star formation properties

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xu E-mail: yuanqirong@njnu.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    Asymmetric X-ray emission and a powerful cluster-scale radio halo indicate that A2319 is a merging cluster of galaxies. This paper presents our multicolor photometry for A2319 with 15 optical intermediate filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. There are 142 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts within the viewing field of 58' × 58' centered on this rich cluster, including 128 member galaxies (called sample I). A large velocity dispersion in the rest frame, 1622{sub −70}{sup +91} km s{sup –1}, suggests merger dynamics in A2319. The contour map of projected density and localized velocity structure confirm the so-called A2319B substructure, at ∼10' northwest to the main concentration A2319A. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of more than 30,000 sources are obtained in our BATC photometry down to V ∼ 20 mag. A u-band (∼3551 Å) image with better seeing and spatial resolution, obtained with the Bok 2.3 m telescope at Kitt Peak, is taken to make star-galaxy separation and distinguish the overlapping contamination in the BATC aperture photometry. With color-color diagrams and photometric redshift technique, 233 galaxies brighter than h {sub BATC} = 19.0 are newly selected as member candidates after an exclusion of false candidates with contaminated BATC SEDs by eyeball-checking the u-band Bok image. The early-type galaxies are found to follow a tight color-magnitude correlation. Based on sample I and the enlarged sample of member galaxies (called sample II), subcluster A2319B is confirmed. The star formation properties of cluster galaxies are derived with the evolutionary synthesis model, PEGASE, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function and an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR). A strong environmental effect on star formation histories is found in the manner that galaxies in the sparse regions have various star formation histories, while galaxies in the dense regions are found to have shorter SFR time

  3. The Formation and Evolution of the Large Magellanic Cloud from Selected Clusters and Star Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Knut Anders Grova

    We have obtained deep Hubble Space Telescope color-magnitude diagrams of fields centered on the six old LMC globular clusters NGC 1754, NGC 1835, WGC 1898, NGC 1916, NGC 2005, and NGC 2019. The data have been carefully calibrated and the effects of crowding on the photometric accuracy have been thoroughly investigated. The observations have been used to produce V-I,V color-magnitude diagrams of the clusters and of the background field stars, which we have separated from each other through a statistical cleaning technique. The cluster color-magnitude diagrams show that the clusters are old, with main sequence turnoffs at V~ 22.5 and well-developed horizontal branches. We used the slopes of the red giant branches to measure the abundances, which we find to be 0.3 dex higher, on average, than previously measured spectroscopic abundances. In two cases there is significant variable reddening across at least part of the image, but only for NGC 1916 does differential reddening preclude accurate measurements of the CMD characteristics. The mean reddenings of the clusters, measured both from the color of the red giant branch and through comparison with Milky Way clusters, are <=0.10 magnitudes in E(B-V) in all cases. By matching tbe color-magnitude diagrams of the clusters to fiducial sequences of the Milky Way globular clusters M3, M5, and M55, we find that the mean difference of the LMC and Milky Way cluster ages is 1.0 ± 1.2 Gyr, calculated such that a positive difference indicates that the LMC clusters are older. Through Monte Carlo simulations, errors in the individual measurements of the ages relative to Milky Way clusters are found to be ~<1.0 Gyr. We find a similar chronology by comparing the horizontal branch morphologies and abundances with HB evolutionary tracks, assuming that age is the 'second parameter'. These results imply that the LMC formed at the same time as the Milky Way Galaxy. The evolution of the LMC following its formation has been studied through

  4. Canonical free-energy barrier of particle and polymer cluster formation

    PubMed Central

    Zierenberg, Johannes; Schierz, Philipp; Janke, Wolfhard

    2017-01-01

    A common approach to study nucleation rates is the estimation of free-energy barriers. This usually requires knowledge about the shape of the forming droplet, a task that becomes notoriously difficult in macromolecular setups starting with a proper definition of the cluster boundary. Here we demonstrate a shape-free determination of the free energy for temperature-driven cluster formation in particle as well as polymer systems. Combined with rigorous results on equilibrium droplet formation, this allows for a well-defined finite-size scaling analysis of the effective interfacial free energy at a fixed density. We first verify the theoretical predictions for the formation of a liquid droplet in a supersaturated particle gas by generalized-ensemble Monte Carlo simulations of a Lennard-Jones system. Going one step further, we then generalize this approach to cluster formation in a dilute polymer solution. Our results suggest an analogy with particle condensation, when the macromolecules are interpreted as extended particles. PMID:28240262

  5. Reversible light-controlled formation and evaporation of rubidium clusters in nanoporous silica.

    PubMed

    Burchianti, A; Bogi, A; Marinelli, C; Maibohm, C; Mariotti, E; Moi, L

    2006-10-13

    We observe reversible light assisted formation and evaporation of rubidium clusters embedded in nanoporous silica. Metallic nanoparticles are cyclically produced and evaporated by weak blue-green and near-infrared light, respectively. The atoms photodetached from the huge surface of the silica matrix build up clusters, whereas cluster evaporation is increased by induced surface plasmon excitation. Frequency tuning of light activates either one process or the other and the related changes of glass transparency become visible to the naked eye. We demonstrate that the porous silica, loaded with rubidium, shows memory of illumination sequences behaving as a rereadable and rewritable optical medium. These processes take place as a consequence of the strong confinement of atoms and particles at the nanoscale.

  6. C2-domain mediated nano-cluster formation increases calcium signaling efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bonny, Mike; Hui, Xin; Schweizer, Julia; Kaestner, Lars; Zeug, André; Kruse, Karsten; Lipp, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Conventional protein kinase Cs (cPKCs) are key signaling proteins for transducing intracellular Ca2+ signals into downstream phosphorylation events. However, the lifetime of individual membrane-bound activated cPKCs is an order of magnitude shorter than the average time needed for target-protein phosphorylation. Here, we employed intermolecular Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in living cells combined with computational analysis to study the spatial organization of cPKCs bound to the plasma membrane. We discovered Ca2+-dependent cPKC nano-clusters that significantly extend cPKC’s plasma-membrane residence time. These protein patterns resulted from self-assembly mediated by Ca2+-binding C2-domains, which are widely used for membrane-targeting of Ca2+-sensing proteins. We also established clustering of other unrelated C2-domain containing proteins, suggesting that nano-cluster formation is a key step for efficient cellular Ca2+-signaling. PMID:27808106

  7. Mapping the formation areas of giant molybdenum blue clusters: a spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Botar, Bogdan; Ellern, Arkady; Kogerler, Paul

    2012-05-18

    The self-assembly of soluble molybdenum blue species from simple molybdate solutions has primarily been associated with giant mixed-valent wheel-shaped cluster anions, derived from the {MoV/VI154/176} archetypes, and a {MoV/VI368} lemon-shaped cluster. The combined use of Raman spectroscopy and kinetic precipitation as self-assembly monitoring techniques and single-crystal X-ray diffraction is key to mapping the realm of molybdenum blue species by establishing spherical {MoV/VI102}-type Keplerates as an important giant molybdenum blue-type species. We additionally rationalize the empirical effect of reducing agent concentration on the formation of all three relevant skeletal types: wheel, lemon and spheres. Whereas both wheels and the lemon-shaped {MoV/VI368} cluster are obtained from weakly reduced molybdenum blue solutions, considerably higher reduced solutions lead to {MoV/VI102}-type Keplerates.

  8. C2-domain mediated nano-cluster formation increases calcium signaling efficiency.

    PubMed

    Bonny, Mike; Hui, Xin; Schweizer, Julia; Kaestner, Lars; Zeug, André; Kruse, Karsten; Lipp, Peter

    2016-11-03

    Conventional protein kinase Cs (cPKCs) are key signaling proteins for transducing intracellular Ca(2+) signals into downstream phosphorylation events. However, the lifetime of individual membrane-bound activated cPKCs is an order of magnitude shorter than the average time needed for target-protein phosphorylation. Here, we employed intermolecular Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in living cells combined with computational analysis to study the spatial organization of cPKCs bound to the plasma membrane. We discovered Ca(2+)-dependent cPKC nano-clusters that significantly extend cPKC's plasma-membrane residence time. These protein patterns resulted from self-assembly mediated by Ca(2+)-binding C2-domains, which are widely used for membrane-targeting of Ca(2+)-sensing proteins. We also established clustering of other unrelated C2-domain containing proteins, suggesting that nano-cluster formation is a key step for efficient cellular Ca(2+)-signaling.

  9. THE EVOLUTION OF DUSTY STAR FORMATION IN GALAXY CLUSTERS TO z = 1: SPITZER INFRARED OBSERVATIONS OF THE FIRST RED-SEQUENCE CLUSTER SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, T. M. A.; O'Donnell, D.; Coppin, Kristen; Faloon, Ashley; Geach, James E.; Noble, Allison; Yee, H. K. C.; Gilbank, David; Ellingson, Erica; Gladders, Mike; Muzzin, Adam; Wilson, Gillian; Yan, Renbin

    2013-10-01

    We present the results of an infrared (IR) study of high-redshift galaxy clusters with the MIPS camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. We have assembled a sample of 42 clusters from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey-1 over the redshift range 0.3 < z < 1.0 and spanning an approximate range in mass of 10{sup 14-15} M {sub ☉}. We statistically measure the number of IR-luminous galaxies in clusters above a fixed inferred IR luminosity of 2 × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}, assuming a star forming galaxy template, per unit cluster mass and find it increases to higher redshift. Fitting a simple power-law we measure evolution of (1 + z){sup 5.1±1.9} over the range 0.3 < z < 1.0. These results are tied to the adoption of a single star forming galaxy template; the presence of active galactic nuclei, and an evolution in their relative contribution to the mid-IR galaxy emission, will alter the overall number counts per cluster and their rate of evolution. Under the star formation assumption we infer the approximate total star formation rate per unit cluster mass (ΣSFR/M {sub cluster}). The evolution is similar, with ΣSFR/M {sub cluster} ∼ (1 + z){sup 5.4±1.9}. We show that this can be accounted for by the evolution of the IR-bright field population over the same redshift range; that is, the evolution can be attributed entirely to the change in the in-falling field galaxy population. We show that the ΣSFR/M {sub cluster} (binned over all redshift) decreases with increasing cluster mass with a slope (ΣSFR/M{sub cluster}∼M{sub cluster}{sup -1.5±0.4}) consistent with the dependence of the stellar-to-total mass per unit cluster mass seen locally. The inferred star formation seen here could produce ∼5%-10% of the total stellar mass in massive clusters at z = 0, but we cannot constrain the descendant population, nor how rapidly the star-formation must shut-down once the galaxies have entered the cluster environment. Finally, we show a clear decrease in the number of IR

  10. Ions colliding with clusters of fullerenes—Decay pathways and covalent bond formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, F.; Zettergren, H.; Rousseau, P.; Wang, Y.; Chen, T.; Gatchell, M.; Alexander, J. D.; Stockett, M. H.; Rangama, J.; Chesnel, J. Y.; Capron, M.; Poully, J. C.; Domaracka, A.; Méry, A.; Maclot, S.; Vizcaino, V.; Schmidt, H. T.; Adoui, L.; Alcamí, M.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Martín, F.; Huber, B. A.; Cederquist, H.

    2013-07-01

    We report experimental results for the ionization and fragmentation of weakly bound van der Waals clusters of n C60 molecules following collisions with Ar2 +, He2 +, and Xe20 + at laboratory kinetic energies of 13 keV, 22.5 keV, and 300 keV, respectively. Intact singly charged C60 monomers are the dominant reaction products in all three cases and this is accounted for by means of Monte Carlo calculations of energy transfer processes and a simple Arrhenius-type [C_{60}]_n^+ → C_{60}+ + (n-1)C_{60} evaporation model. Excitation energies in the range of only ˜0.7 eV per C60 molecule in a [C_{60}]_{13}^+ cluster are sufficient for complete evaporation and such low energies correspond to ion trajectories far outside the clusters. Still we observe singly and even doubly charged intact cluster ions which stem from even more distant collisions. For penetrating collisions the clusters become multiply charged and some of the individual molecules may be promptly fragmented in direct knock-out processes leading to efficient formations of new covalent systems. For Ar2 + and He2 + collisions, we observe very efficient C_{119}+ and C_{118}+ formation and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that they are covalent dumb-bell systems due to bonding between C_{59}+ or C_{58}+ and C60 during cluster fragmentation. In the Ar2 + case, it is possible to form even smaller C_{120-2m}+ molecules (m = 2-7), while no molecular fusion reactions are observed for the present Xe20 + collisions.

  11. A new methodology to test galaxy formation models using the dependence of clustering on stellar mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, David J. R.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Mitchell, Peter D.; Helly, John C.; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Lacey, Cedric G.; Lagos, Claudia del P.; Simha, Vimal; Farrow, Daniel J.

    2015-09-01

    We present predictions for the two-point correlation function of galaxy clustering as a function of stellar mass, computed using two new versions of the GALFORM semi-analytic galaxy formation model. These models make use of a high resolution, large volume N-body simulation, set in the 7-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe cosmology. One model uses a universal stellar initial mass function (IMF), while the other assumes different IMFs for quiescent star formation and bursts. Particular consideration is given to how the assumptions required to estimate the stellar masses of observed galaxies (such as the choice of IMF, stellar population synthesis model, and dust extinction) influence the perceived dependence of galaxy clustering on stellar mass. Broad-band spectral energy distribution fitting is carried out to estimate stellar masses for the model galaxies in the same manner as in observational studies. We show clear differences between the clustering signals computed using the true and estimated model stellar masses. As such, we highlight the importance of applying our methodology to compare theoretical models to observations. We introduce an alternative scheme for the calculation of the merger time-scales for satellite galaxies in GALFORM, which takes into account the dark matter subhalo information from the simulation. This reduces the amplitude of small-scale clustering. The new merger scheme offers improved or similar agreement with observational clustering measurements, over the redshift range 0 < z < 0.7. We find reasonable agreement with clustering measurements from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly Survey, but find larger discrepancies for some stellar mass ranges and separation scales with respect to measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey, depending on the GALFORM model used.

  12. Linking star formation and galaxy kinematics in the massive cluster Abell 2163

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menacho, Veronica; Verdugo, Miguel

    2015-02-01

    The origin of the morphology-density relation is still an open question in galaxy evolution. It is most likely driven by the combination of the efficient star formation in the highest peaks of the mass distribution at high-z and the transformation by environmental processes at later times as galaxies fall into more massive halos. To gain additional insights about these processes we study the kinematics, star formation and structural properties of galaxies in Abell 2163 a very massive (~4×1015 M⊙, Holz & Perlmutter 2012) merging cluster at z = 0.2. We use high resolution spectroscopy with VLT/VIMOS to derive rotation curves and dynamical masses for galaxies that show regular kinematics. Galaxies that show irregular rotation are also analysed to study the origin of their distortion. This information is combined with stellar masses and structural parameters obtained from high quality CFHT imaging. From narrow band photometry (2.2m/WFI), centered on the redshifted Hα line, we obtain star formation rates. Although our sample is still small, field and cluster galaxies lie in a similar Tully-Fisher relation as local galaxies. Controlling by additional parameters like SFRs or bulge-to-disk ratio do not affect this result. We find however that ~50% of the cluster galaxies display irregular kinematics in contrast to what is found in the field at similar redshifts (~30%, Böhm et al. 2004) and in agreement with other studies in clusters (e.g. Bösch et al. 2013, Kutdemir et al. 2010) which points out to additional processes operating in clusters that distort the galaxy kinematics.

  13. Importance of the initial conditions for star formation - III. Statistical properties of embedded protostellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girichidis, Philipp; Federrath, Christoph; Allison, Richard; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the formation of protostellar clusters during the collapse of dense molecular cloud cores with a focus on the evolution of potential and kinetic energy, the degree of substructure and the early phase of mass segregation. Our study is based on a series of hydrodynamic simulations of dense cores, where we vary the initial density profile and the initial turbulent velocity. In the three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations, we follow the dynamical formation of filaments and protostars until a star formation efficiency of 20 per cent. Despite the different initial configurations, the global ensemble of all protostars in a setup shows a similar energy evolution and forms sub-virial clusters with an energy ratio Ekin/|Epot|˜ 0.2. Concentrating on the innermost central region, the clusters show a roughly virialized energy balance. However, the region of virial balance only covers the innermost ˜10-30 per cent of all the protostars. In all simulations with multiple protostars, the total kinetic energy of the protostars is higher than the kinetic energy of the gas cloud, although the protostars only contain 20 per cent of the total mass. The clusters vary significantly in size, mass and number of protostars, and show different degrees of substructure and mass segregation. Flat density profiles and compressive turbulent modes produce more subclusters than centrally concentrated profiles and solenoidal turbulence. We find that dynamical relaxation and hence dynamical mass segregation is very efficient in all cases from the very beginning of the nascent cluster, i.e. during a phase when protostars constantly form and accrete.

  14. Formation history of old open clusters constrained by detailed asteroseismology of red giant stars observed by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsaro, E.; Lee, Y.-N.; García, R. A.; Hennebelle, P.; Mathur, S.; Beck, P. G.; Mathis, S.; Stello, D.; Bouvier, J.

    2016-12-01

    Stars originate by the gravitational collapse of a turbulent molecular cloud, often forming clusters of thousands of stars. Stellar clusters therefore play an important role in our understanding of star formation, a fundamental problem in astrophysics that is difficult to investigate because pre-stellar cores are typically obscured by dust. Thanks to a Bayesian analysis of about 50 red giants of NGC 6791 and NGC 6819, two old open clusters observed by NASA Kepler, we characterize thousands of individual oscillation modes. We show for the first time how the measured asteroseismic properties lead us to a discovery about the rotation history of these clusters. Finally, our findings are compared to 3D hydrodynamical simulations for stellar cluster formation to put strong constraints on the physical processes of turbulence and rotation, which are in action in the early formation stage of the stellar clusters.

  15. Understanding the In-Situ Star Formation in a z=1.7 Cluster Core Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Tracy

    2014-10-01

    We have discovered a rare beast of a central galaxy within a z=1.7 rich galaxy cluster (estimated ~4x10^14 Msun), forming stars at a prodigious rate of 1200 Msun/yr. This system is infrared bright and its SED and the detection of PAHs at the cluster redshift, implies the IR luminosity is dominated by star formation. Such an extreme system has to date, only been confirmed in the z=0.6 Phoenix cluster (McDonald et al. 2012, 2013, 2014), whereas this object is observed at a much earlier and more active epoch of galaxy and cluster evolution. Here we propose deep HST imaging with WFC3 F160W/F105W to investigate the morphology of the BCG galaxy and its nearest neighbours. Our main goal is to understand the physical processes fuelling the intense starburst, be it a major merger or infalling gas from a cooling flow. We will also characterize the morphological properties (with color information) of the central BCG. These data will be the first of their kind at this redshift and will relate overall formation and evolution of the central galaxy massive parent halo at a cosmological epoch where these processes may begin to dominate.

  16. Investigating star formation properties of galaxies in massive clusters with Herschel and ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, John F.; Baker, Andrew J.; Aguirre, Paula; Barkats, D.; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Matt; Hughes, John Patrick; Infante, Leopoldo; Lindner, Robert; Marriage, Tobias; Menanteau, Felipe; Sifon, Cristobal; Weiss, Axel; ACT Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    I will present results from an investigation of star formation properties of galaxies residing in two massive z ~ 1 clusters (including the 'El Gordo' merger) that were initially selected via their Sunyaev-Zeldovich decrements by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) southern survey. This study uses new Herschel Space Observatory and Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Cycle 2 observations, which provide information about the dust and cold gas content of galaxies in our targeted clusters. We have detected CO (4-3) and [CI] in individual star-forming cluster galaxies, and also measured stacked continuum and spectral line fluxes at long (e.g., far-infrared, submillimeter, and radio) wavelengths. We use these results to explore the relations between star formation and local environment and cluster dynamical state.This work has been supported by (i) an award issued by JPL/Caltech in association with Herschel, which is a European Space Agency Cornerstone Mission with significant participation by NASA, and (ii) the National Science Foundation through award GSSP SOSPA2-018 from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, which is operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  17. On star formation in stellar systems. I - Photoionization effects in protoglobular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Bodenheimer, P.; Lin, D. N. C.; Noriega-Crespo, A.

    1986-01-01

    The progressive ionization and subsequent dynamical evolution of nonhomogeneously distributed low-metal-abundance diffuse gas after star formation in globular clusters are investigated analytically, taking the gravitational acceleration due to the stars into account. The basic equations are derived; the underlying assumptions, input parameters, and solution methods are explained; and numerical results for three standard cases (ionization during star formation, ionization during expansion, and evolution resulting in a stable H II region at its equilibrium Stromgren radius) are presented in graphs and characterized in detail. The time scale of residual-gas loss in typical clusters is found to be about the same as the lifetime of a massive star on the main sequence.

  18. Controlled Formation and Vibrational Characterization of Large Solvated Ionic Clusters in Cryogenic Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garand, Etienne; Marsh, Brett; Voss, Jonathan; Duffy, Erin M.

    2016-06-01

    An experimental approach for the formation of solvated ionic clusters and their vibrational spectroscopy will be presented. This recently developed apparatus combines an electrospray ionization source, two temperature controlled cryogenic ion traps and a time-of-flight infrared photofragmentation spectrometer, to allow for a universal and controlled formation and characterization of solvent clusters around ionic core as well as product of ion-molecule reaction. Recent results on the spectroscopy of such solvated ions, will be presented and discussed. In particular, this talk will present the structural evolution of glycylglycine as a function of stepwise solvation, and show how the presence of just a few water can modify the geometry of this model peptide. I will also present results solvation of ion that do not form hydrogen bond or strongly interactions with the solvent.

  19. The structure, dynamics, and star formation rate of the Orion nebula cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan C.; Jaehnig, Karl

    2014-11-01

    The spatial morphology and dynamical status of a young, still-forming stellar cluster provide valuable clues to the conditions during the star formation event and the processes that regulated it. We analyze the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), utilizing the latest censuses of its stellar content and membership estimates over a large wavelength range. We determine the center of mass of the ONC and study the radial dependence of angular substructure. The core appears rounder and smoother than the outskirts, which is consistent with a higher degree of dynamical processing. At larger distances, the departure from circular symmetry is mostly driven by the elongation of the system, with very little additional substructure, indicating a somewhat evolved spatial morphology or an expanding halo. We determine the mass density profile of the cluster, which is well fitted by a power law that is slightly steeper than a singular isothermal sphere. Together with the interstellar medium density, which is estimated from average stellar extinction, the mass content of the ONC is insufficient by a factor ∼1.8 to reproduce the observed velocity dispersion from virialized motions, in agreement with previous assessments that the ONC is moderately supervirial. This may indicate recent gas dispersal. Based on the latest estimates for the age spread in the system and our density profiles, we find that at the half-mass radius, 90% of the stellar population formed within ∼5-8 free-fall times (t {sub ff}). This implies a star formation efficiency per t {sub ff} of ε{sub ff} ∼ 0.04-0.07 (i.e., relatively slow and inefficient star formation rates during star cluster formation).

  20. Divalent cation-induced cluster formation by polyphosphoinositides in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Collins, Agnieszka; Guo, Lin; Smith-Dupont, Kathryn B; Gai, Feng; Svitkina, Tatyana; Janmey, Paul A

    2012-02-22

    Polyphosphoinositides (PPIs) and in particular phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate (PI4,5P2), control many cellular events and bind with variable levels of specificity to hundreds of intracellular proteins in vitro. The much more restricted targeting of proteins to PPIs in cell membranes is thought to result in part from the formation of spatially distinct PIP2 pools, but the mechanisms that cause formation and maintenance of PIP2 clusters are still under debate. The hypothesis that PIP2 forms submicrometer-sized clusters in the membrane by electrostatic interactions with intracellular divalent cations is tested here using lipid monolayer and bilayer model membranes. Competitive binding between Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) to PIP2 is quantified by surface pressure measurements and analyzed by a Langmuir competitive adsorption model. The physical chemical differences among three PIP2 isomers are also investigated. Addition of Ca(2+) but not Mg(2+), Zn(2+), or polyamines to PIP2-containing monolayers induces surface pressure drops coincident with the formation of PIP2 clusters visualized by fluorescence, atomic force, and electron microscopy. Studies of bilayer membranes using steady-state probe-partitioning fluorescence resonance energy transfer (SP-FRET) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) also reveal divalent metal ion (Me(2+))-induced cluster formation or diffusion retardation, which follows the trend: Ca(2+) ≫ Mg(2+) > Zn(2+), and polyamines have minimal effects. These results suggest that divalent metal ions have substantial effects on PIP2 lateral organization at physiological concentrations, and local fluxes in their cytoplasmic levels can contribute to regulating protein-PIP2 interactions.

  1. Line-defect mediated formation of hole and Mo clusters in monolayer molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Gyeong Hee; Lee, Jongyeong; Kim, Na Yeon; Lee, Yeongdong; Kim, Youngchan; Kim, Moon J.; Lee, Changgu; Lee, Zonghoon

    2016-03-01

    The production of hole and Mo cluster by electron beam irradiation in molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), which consists of S-Mo-S layers, is monitored over time using atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy. S vacancies are firstly formed due to knocking off of S atoms and then line defects are induced due to accumulation of S vacancies in MoS2 sheet instead of forming a hole. The line defects tend to be merged at a point and a hole is formed subsequently at the point. Mo atoms tend to be clustered discretely as a nano sheet along the edge of the hole due to difference in displacement threshold energy between Mo and S atoms under electron irradiation. After Mo clusters are nearly separated from MoS2 sheet, the clusters are transformed into body-centered cubic nanocrystal of Mo during prolonged electron beam irradiation. The line defect mediated formation of hole and Mo cluster only occurs within a single grain of monolayer MoS2 sheet.

  2. Star Formation in the Dense Environment of Young Clusters: A FORCAST Imaging Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundy, Lee

    2012-10-01

    We propose a multi-wavelength FORCAST survey of 6-8 dense star-forming regions within 1kpc. This survey will image multiple fields in each target cluster with the 11, 19, 31 and 37 micron bands, including an estimated 100 young stellar objects (YSO) with bright mid-IR emission. The results will fill in YSO information for the cluster centers where previous studies based on Spitzer, WISE, and IRAS were saturated and/or suffered from source confusion. In addition, these observations will help fill the 10-40 micron gap in the spectral energy distributions of YSOs in these fields, and will help characterize the spatial extent of the 31 micron and 37micron emission. FORCAST's high spatial resolution will be an improvement by a factor of two over the Spitzer 24 micron images. The proposed survey will provide better statistics on bright young cluster stars which will help test current theories of clustered star formation: Turbulent Core Collapse and Competitive Accretion. Specifically, the data will improve our knowledge of the protostellar luminosity and temperature distributions in the dense regions of forming clusters, which constrain these models (Offner and Mckee 2011; Myers 2011). In addition, the extent of the 31 and 37 micron emission (unresolved compared to 5-10") will provide direct information on Competitive Accretion.

  3. Regulation of Star Formation amidst Heating and Cooling in Galaxies and Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaddi, Sravani

    Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound systems in the Universe and often host the largest galaxies (known as the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG)) at its centers. These BCG's are embedded in hot 1-10 keV X-ray gas. A subset of galaxy clusters known as cool-core clusters show sharply peaked X-ray emission and high central densities, demonstrating cooling of the surrounding halo gas in timescales much shorter than a Hubble time. These observations led to the development of a simple cooling flow model. In the absence of an external heating process, a cooling flow model predicts that the hot intracluster medium gas in these dense cores would hydrostatically cool, generating cooling flows in the center of the cluster. This cooled gas will eventually collapse to form stars and contribute to the bulk of galaxy mass. The rates of star formation actually observed in the clusters however are far less than predicted by the cooling flow model, suggesting a non-gravitational heating source. Active galactic nuclei (AGN), galaxies hosting a supermassive black hole that ejects outflows via accretion, is currently the leading heating mechanism (referred to as AGN feedback) explaining the observed deficit in the star formation rates. AGN feedback also offers an elegant explanation to the observed black hole and galaxy co-evolution. Much of the evidence for AGN feedback has been obtained from studies focussed on galaxy clusters and luminous massive systems with little evidence that it occurs in more typical systems in the local universe. Our research investigates this less explored area to address the importance of AGN heating in the regulation of star formation in typical early type galaxies in the local universe. We selected a sample of 200+ early type, low redshift galaxies and carried out a multiple wavelength study using archival observed in the UV, IR and radio. Our results suggest that early type galaxies in the current epoch are rarely powerful AGN and AGN

  4. Cosmology and astrophysics from relaxed galaxy clusters – V. Consistency with cold dark matter structure formation

    DOE PAGES

    Mantz, A. B.; Allen, S. W.; Morris, R. G.

    2016-07-15

    This is the fifth in a series of papers studying the astrophysics and cosmology of massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. Our sample comprises 40 clusters identified as being dynamically relaxed and hot in Papers I and II of this series. Here we use constraints on cluster mass profiles from X-ray data to test some of the basic predictions of cosmological structure formation in the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm. In addition, we present constraints on the concentration–mass relation for massive clusters, finding a power-law mass dependence with a slope of κm = –0.16 ± 0.07, in agreement with CDM predictions.more » For this relaxed sample, the relation is consistent with a constant as a function of redshift (power-law slope with 1 + z of κζ = –0.17 ± 0.26), with an intrinsic scatter of σln c = 0.16 ± 0.03. We investigate the shape of cluster mass profiles over the radial range probed by the data (typically ~50 kpc–1 Mpc), and test for departures from the simple Navarro–Frenk–White (NFW) form, for which the logarithmic slope of the density profile tends to –1 at small radii. Specifically, we consider as alternatives the generalized NFW (GNFW) and Einasto parametrizations. For the GNFW model, we find an average value of (minus) the logarithmic inner slope of β = 1.02 ± 0.08, with an intrinsic scatter of σβ = 0.22 ± 0.07, while in the Einasto case we constrain the average shape parameter to be α = 0.29 ± 0.04 with an intrinsic scatter of σα = 0.12 ± 0.04. Our results are thus consistent with the simple NFW model on average, but we clearly detect the presence of intrinsic, cluster-to-cluster scatter about the average.« less

  5. Cosmology and astrophysics from relaxed galaxy clusters – V. Consistency with cold dark matter structure formation

    SciTech Connect

    Mantz, A. B.; Allen, S. W.; Morris, R. G.

    2016-07-15

    This is the fifth in a series of papers studying the astrophysics and cosmology of massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. Our sample comprises 40 clusters identified as being dynamically relaxed and hot in Papers I and II of this series. Here we use constraints on cluster mass profiles from X-ray data to test some of the basic predictions of cosmological structure formation in the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm. We present constraints on the concentration–mass relation for massive clusters, finding a power-law mass dependence with a slope of κm = -0.16 ± 0.07, in agreement with CDM predictions. For this relaxed sample, the relation is consistent with a constant as a function of redshift (power-law slope with 1 + z of κζ = -0.17 ± 0.26), with an intrinsic scatter of σln c = 0.16 ± 0.03. We investigate the shape of cluster mass profiles over the radial range probed by the data (typically ~50 kpc–1 Mpc), and test for departures from the simple Navarro–Frenk–White (NFW) form, for which the logarithmic slope of the density profile tends to -1 at small radii. Specifically, we consider as alternatives the generalized NFW (GNFW) and Einasto parametrizations. For the GNFW model, we find an average value of (minus) the logarithmic inner slope of β = 1.02 ± 0.08, with an intrinsic scatter of σβ = 0.22 ± 0.07, while in the Einasto case we constrain the average shape parameter to be α = 0.29 ± 0.04 with an intrinsic scatter of σα = 0.12 ± 0.04. Our results are thus consistent with the simple NFW model on average, but we clearly detect the presence of intrinsic, cluster-to-cluster scatter about the average.

  6. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF THE MILKY WAY'S NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Pfuhl, O.; Fritz, T. K.; Eisenhauer, F.; Genzel, R.; Gillessen, S.; Ott, T.; Dodds-Eden, K.; Zilka, M.; Sternberg, A.; Maness, H.

    2011-11-10

    We present spatially resolved imaging and integral field spectroscopy data for 450 cool giant stars within 1 pc from Sgr A*. We use the prominent CO bandheads to derive effective temperatures of individual giants. Additionally we present the deepest spectroscopic observation of the Galactic center (GC) so far, probing the number of B9/A0 main-sequence stars (2.2-2.8 M{sub sun}) in two deep fields. From spectrophotometry we construct a Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of the red giant population and fit the observed diagram with model populations to derive the star formation history of the nuclear cluster. We find (1) that the average nuclear star formation rate dropped from an initial maximum {approx}10 Gyr ago to a deep minimum 1-2 Gyr ago and increased again during the last few hundred Myrs, (2) that roughly 80% of the stellar mass formed more than 5 Gyr ago, and (3) that mass estimates within R {approx} 1 pc from Sgr A* favor a dominant star formation mode with a 'normal' Chabrier/Kroupa initial mass function for the majority of the past star formation in the GC. The bulk stellar mass seems to have formed under conditions significantly different from the young stellar disks, perhaps because at the time of the formation of the nuclear cluster the massive black hole and its sphere of influence were much smaller than today.

  7. FORMATION OF BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, N.; Heinke, C. O.; Woods, T. E.; Chaichenets, S.; Fregeau, J.; Lombardi, J. C.

    2010-07-10

    Inspired by the recent identification in extragalactic globular clusters of the first candidate black hole-white dwarf (BH-WD) X-ray binaries, where the compact accretors may be stellar-mass black holes (BHs), we explore how such binaries could be formed in a dynamical environment. We provide analyses of the formation rates via well-known formation channels like binary exchange and physical collisions and propose that the only possibility of forming BH-WD binaries is via coupling these usual formation channels with subsequent hardening and/or triple formation. In particular, we find that the most important mechanism for the creation of a BH-WD X-ray binary from an initially dynamically formed BH-WD binary is mass transfer induced in a triple system via the Kozai mechanism. Furthermore, we find that BH-WD binaries that evolve into X-ray sources can be formed by exchanges of a BH into a WD-WD binary or possibly by collisions of a BH and a giant star. If BHs undergo significant evaporation from the cluster or form a completely detached subcluster of BHs, then we cannot match the observationally inferred production rates even using the most optimistic estimates of formation rates. To explain the observations with stellar-mass BH-WD binaries, at least 1% of all formed BHs, or presumably 10% of the BHs present in the core now, must be involved in interactions with the rest of the core stellar population.

  8. Star formation quenching and stellar mass in the cluster Abell 85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadda, Dario; Habas, Rebecca; Marleau, Francine; Biviano, Andrea; Durret, Florence

    2017-01-01

    We report the discovery of a group of galaxies falling into the cluster Abell 85 showing a decrease in star formation limited to its dwarf galaxy population. We covered the cluster and its surroundings with a multi-wavelength survey from the UV to the far-IR using ground and space telescopes (including GALEX, Spitzer, and Herschel) and followed-up these observations with spectroscopic surveys with the WIYN/Hydra and VLT/VIMOS instruments. We were able to obtain spectra for 522 members down to r'=20, 30% of them showing H-alpha emission. We estimated the variation in star formation rate by using two different estimators based on continuum (UV) and line (H-alpha) emission. While massive infalling galaxies continue to produce stars during the infall, the star formation in dwarf galaxies appear to be quenched by the cluster environment. Considering the different time-scales of the two estimators, we can estimate that the quenching happens in a period of approximately 10 Myr.

  9. Caught in Formation: The Nuclear-Cluster-to-Be in NGC 2139

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, David R.; Walcher, C. Jakob; Böker, Torsten; Ho, Luis C.; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Shields, Joseph C.

    2008-12-01

    Close to its center, the bulgeless galaxy NGC 2139 hosts a star cluster that is younger and less massive than any nuclear star cluster (NC) studied so far. We have measured the Hα velocity field around the photometric center of this galaxy using the VLT ARGUS integral field unit and the GIRAFFE spectrograph in order to constrain different proposed theories of NC formation. We observe that the best-fit kinematic center and the candidate NC appear to be separated by 2.8'' (320 pc). Indeed, the kinematic center is also offset from the galaxy's photometric center and a possible bar or extended region of star formation in which the young cluster resides, implying that this galaxy is not in dynamic equilibrium. The Hα flux map also reveals other regions of strong star formation in the possible bar. These observations suggest that a nascent NC is forming away from the kinematic center of NGC 2139, which may come to rest there on a timescale of a few 100 Myr. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, proposal 74.B-0264.

  10. MAPS OF MASSIVE CLUMPS IN THE EARLY STAGE OF CLUSTER FORMATION: TWO MODES OF CLUSTER FORMATION, COEVAL OR NON-COEVAL?

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Aya E.; Saito, Masao; Mauersberger, Rainer; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kurono, Yasutaka; Naoi, Takahiro

    2013-03-10

    We present maps of seven young massive molecular clumps within five target regions in C{sup 18}O (J = 1-0) line emission, using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. These clumps, which are not associated with clusters, lie at distances between 0.7 and 2.1 kpc. We find C{sup 18}O clumps with radii of 0.5-1.7 pc, masses of 470-4200 M{sub Sun }, and velocity widths of 1.4-3.3 km s{sup -1}. All of the clumps are massive and approximately in virial equilibrium, suggesting they will potentially form clusters. Three of our target regions are associated with H II regions (CWHRs), while the other two are unassociated with H II regions (CWOHRs). The C{sup 18}O clumps can be classified into two morphological types: CWHRs with a filamentary or shell-like structure and spherical CWOHRs. The two CWOHRs have systematic velocity gradients. Using the publicly released WISE database, Class I and Class II protostellar candidates are identified within the C{sup 18}O clumps. The fraction of Class I candidates among all YSO candidates (Class I+Class II) is {>=}50% in CWHRs and {<=}50% in CWOHRs. We conclude that effects from the H II regions can be seen in (1) the spatial distributions of the clumps: filamentary or shell-like structure running along the H II regions; (2) the velocity structures of the clumps: large velocity dispersion along shells; and (3) the small age spreads of YSOs. The small spreads in age of the YSOs show that the presence of H II regions tends to trigger coeval cluster formation.

  11. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. X. QUANTIFYING THE STAR CLUSTER FORMATION EFFICIENCY OF NEARBY DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel A.; Seth, Anil C.; Johnson, L. Clifton; Weisz, Daniel R.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Olsen, Knut A. G.; Engelbracht, Charles W.

    2012-06-01

    We study the relationship between the field star formation and cluster formation properties in a large sample of nearby dwarf galaxies. We use optical data from the Hubble Space Telescope and from ground-based telescopes to derive the ages and masses of the young (t{sub age} {approx}< 100 Myr) cluster sample. Our data provide the first constraints on two proposed relationships between the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies and the properties of their cluster systems in the low SFR regime. The data show broad agreement with these relationships, but significant galaxy-to-galaxy scatter exists. In part, this scatter can be accounted for by simulating the small number of clusters detected from stochastically sampling the cluster mass function. However, this stochasticity does not fully account for the observed scatter in our data, suggesting that there may be true variations in the fraction of stars formed in clusters in dwarf galaxies. Comparison of the cluster formation and the brightest cluster in our sample galaxies also provide constraints on cluster destruction models.

  12. STAR FORMATION HISTORIES IN A CLUSTER ENVIRONMENT AT z {approx} 0.84

    SciTech Connect

    Demarco, R.; Gobat, R.; Lidman, C.; Rettura, A.; Nonino, M.; Van der Wel, A.; Jee, M. J.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Ford, H. C.; Postman, M.

    2010-12-10

    We present a spectrophotometric analysis of galaxies belonging to the dynamically young, massive cluster RX J0152.7-1357 at z {approx} 0.84, aimed at understanding the effects of the cluster environment on the star formation history (SFH) of cluster galaxies and the assembly of the red sequence (RS). We use VLT/FORS spectroscopy, ACS/WFC optical, and NTT/SofI near-IR data to characterize SFHs as a function of color, luminosity, morphology, stellar mass, and local environment from a sample of 134 spectroscopic members. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, individual galaxy spectra are stacked according to these properties. Moreover, the D4000, Balmer, CN3883, Fe4383, and C4668 indices are also quantified. The SFH analysis shows that galaxies in the blue faint-end of the RS have on average younger stars ({Delta}t {approx} 2 Gyr) than those in the red bright-end. We also found, for a given luminosity range, differences in age ({Delta}t {approx} 0.5-1.3 Gyr) as a function of color, indicating that the intrinsic scatter of the RS may be due to age variations. Passive galaxies in the blue faint-end of the RS are preferentially located in the low density areas of the cluster, likely being objects entering the RS from the 'blue cloud'. It is likely that the quenching of the star formation of these RS galaxies is due to interaction with the intracluster medium. Furthermore, the SFH of galaxies in the RS as a function of stellar mass reveals signatures of 'downsizing' in the overall cluster.

  13. Charge exchange and cluster formation in an rf Paul trap: interaction of alkali atoms with C +60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, Stuart; Cameron, Douglas; Rokni, Mordechai; Hill, Winfield; Parks, J. H.

    1996-06-01

    A Paul ion trap was used to study the formation of clusters under controlled temperature and pressure conditions. Exposure of cold C +60 ions to Li flux leads to the formation of Li nC +60 clusters ( n = 1-18) occurring by the sequential association of Li atoms. Cluster formation dependence on He pressure displayed a competition between vibrational relaxation and unimolecular dissociation. Collisions with Na, K, Rb and Cs atoms resulted in dissociative charge exchange. Decay rates of C +60 ions resulting from these low-energy charge exchange collisions were consistent with Langevin capture rates.

  14. Formation of the Galaxy: Clues from Globular Cluster Ages and Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullton, Laura Kellar

    1996-06-01

    In an effort to bring more data to bear on the problem of the age and formation history of the inner regions of the Milky Way, I undertook a photometric and spectroscopic study of a small sample of globular clusters within 5 kpc of the Galactic center: NGC~6723, NGC~6352 and NGC~5927. The ages and chemical compositions of these clusters provide clues to the formation and chemical enrichment timescale of the Galactic (thick) disk and inner halo. Deep color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) were constructed for the clusters from data obtained both from the ground and from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). A total of 104 UBV frames of two fields in NGC~6723 were obtained during three separate runs at CTIO in 1989 and 1993. Twenty-eight images of NGC~5927 in filters F555W and F814W (similar to Johnson VI) were obtained during Cycle 4 with HST. All photometry of these images was done using DAOPHOT II and ALLSTAR (Stetson 1987, PASP, 99, 191 and updates) following standard reduction procedures. A self-consistent photometric reduction of all 110 NGC 6723 data frames was performed using ALLFRAME (Stetson 1994, PASP, 106, 260). NGC 6352 was observed during Cycle~2 with HST. Four exposures in each of two filters (F555W and F785LP) were obtained. Because these images suffered from the effects of spherical aberration in the telescope's primary mirror, a new flux-conserving deconvolution procedure was developed to allow accurate photometry for this data set. Ages were inferred from the magnitude differences between the clusters' horizontal branches (HBs) and main-sequence turnoffs (MSTOs) in the CMDs. A comparison between the age thus derived for NGC 6723 and that derived using an independent age estimator, the color difference between the MSTO and the base of the subgiant branch, indicated that the two methods produced similar relative ages for NGC~6723 with respect to other clusters. Three red giants in NGC~6723 were observed with the CTIO 4m echelle spectrograph in 1994. Usable

  15. Speciation and DNA barcodes: testing the effects of dispersal on the formation of discrete sequence clusters.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Anna; Bergsten, Johannes; Fujisawa, Tomochika; Monaghan, Michael T; Barraclough, Timothy G; Vogler, Alfried P

    2008-09-27

    Large-scale sequencing of short mtDNA fragments for biodiversity inventories ('DNA barcoding') indicates that sequence variation in animal mtDNA is highly structured and partitioned into discrete genetic clusters that correspond broadly to species-level entities. Here we explore how the migration rate, an important demographic parameter that is directly related to population isolation, might affect variation in the strength of mtDNA clustering among taxa. Patterns of mtDNA variation were investigated in two groups of beetles that both contain lineages occupying habitats predicted to select for different dispersal abilities: predacious diving beetles (Dytiscidae) in the genus Bidessus from lotic and lentic habitats across Europe and darkling beetles (Tenebrionidae) in the genus Eutagenia from sand and other soil types in the Aegean Islands. The degree of genetic clustering was determined using the recently developed 'mixed Yule coalescent' (MYC) model that detects the transition from between-species to within-population branching patterns. Lineages from presumed stable habitats, and therefore displaying lower dispersal ability and migration rates, showed greater levels of mtDNA clustering and geographical subdivision than their close relatives inhabiting ephemeral habitats. Simulations of expected patterns of mtDNA variation under island models showed that MYC clusters are only detected when the migration rates are much lower than the value of Nm=1 typically used to define the threshold for neutral genetic divergence. Therefore, discrete mtDNA clusters provide strong evidence for independently evolving populations or species, but their formation is suppressed even under very low levels of dispersal.

  16. Core-halo age gradients and star formation in the Orion Nebula and NGS 2024 young stellar clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Getman, Konstantin V.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Kuhn, Michael A.

    2014-06-01

    We analyze age distributions of two nearby rich stellar clusters, the NGC 2024 (Flame Nebula) and Orion Nebula cluster (ONC) in the Orion molecular cloud complex. Our analysis is based on samples from the MYStIX survey and a new estimator of pre-main sequence (PMS) stellar ages, Age{sub JX} , derived from X-ray and near-infrared photometric data. To overcome the problem of uncertain individual ages and large spreads of age distributions for entire clusters, we compute median ages and their confidence intervals of stellar samples within annular subregions of the clusters. We find core-halo age gradients in both the NGC 2024 cluster and ONC: PMS stars in cluster cores appear younger and thus were formed later than PMS stars in cluster peripheries. These findings are further supported by the spatial gradients in the disk fraction and K-band excess frequency. Our age analysis is based on Age{sub JX} estimates for PMS stars and is independent of any consideration of OB stars. The result has important implications for the formation of young stellar clusters. One basic implication is that clusters form slowly and the apparent age spreads in young stellar clusters, which are often controversial, are (at least in part) real. The result further implies that simple models where clusters form inside-out are incorrect and more complex models are needed. We provide several star formation scenarios that alone or in combination may lead to the observed core-halo age gradients.

  17. Formation of novel rare-gas-containing molecules by molecular photodissociation in clusters.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A; Niv, M Y; Gerber, R B

    2001-01-01

    Recent work by Räsänen and coworkers showed that photolysis of hydrides in rare-gas matrices results in part in formation of novel, rare-gas-containing molecules. Thus, photolysis of HCl in Xe and of H2O in Xe result respectively in formation of HXeCl and HXeOH in the Xe matrices. Ab initio calculations show that the compounds HRgY so formed are stable in isolation, and that by the strength and nature of the bonding these are molecules, very different from the corresponding weakly bound clusters Rg...HY. This paper presents a study of the formation mechanism of HRgY following the photolysis of HY in clusters Rgn(HY). Calculations are described for HXeCl, as a representative example. Potential energy surfaces that govern the formation of HXeCl in the photolysis of HCl in xenon clusters are obtained, and the dynamics on these surfaces is analyzed, partly with insight from trajectories of molecular dynamics simulations. The potential surfaces are obtained by a new variant of the DIM (diatomics in molecules) and DIIS (diatomics in ionic systems) models. Non-adiabatic couplings are also obtained. The main results are: (1) Properties of HXeCl predicted by the DIM-DIIS model are in reasonable accord with results of ab initio calculations. (2) The potential along the isomerization path HXeCl-->Xe...HCl predicted by DIM is in semiquantitative accord with the ab initio results. (3) Surface-hopping molecular dynamics simulations of the process in clusters, with "on the fly" calculations of the DIM-DIIS potentials and non-adiabatic couplings are computationally feasible. (4) Formation of HXeCl, following photolysis of HCl in Xe54(HCl), requires cage-exit of the H atom as a precondition. The H atom and the Cl can then attack the same Xe atom on opposite sides, leading to charge transfer and production of the ionic HXeCl. (5) Non-adiabatic processes play an important role, both in the reagent configurations, and at the charge-transfer stage. The results open the way to

  18. Proteus mirabilis fimbriae- and urease-dependent clusters assemble in an extracellular niche to initiate bladder stone formation

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Jessica N.; Norsworthy, Allison N.; Sun, Tung-Tien

    2016-01-01

    The catheter-associated uropathogen Proteus mirabilis frequently causes urinary stones, but little has been known about the initial stages of bladder colonization and stone formation. We found that P. mirabilis rapidly invades the bladder urothelium, but generally fails to establish an intracellular niche. Instead, it forms extracellular clusters in the bladder lumen, which form foci of mineral deposition consistent with development of urinary stones. These clusters elicit a robust neutrophil response, and we present evidence of neutrophil extracellular trap generation during experimental urinary tract infection. We identified two virulence factors required for cluster development: urease, which is required for urolithiasis, and mannose-resistant Proteus-like fimbriae. The extracellular cluster formation by P. mirabilis stands in direct contrast to uropathogenic Escherichia coli, which readily formed intracellular bacterial communities but not luminal clusters or urinary stones. We propose that extracellular clusters are a key mechanism of P. mirabilis survival and virulence in the bladder. PMID:27044107

  19. Proteus mirabilis fimbriae- and urease-dependent clusters assemble in an extracellular niche to initiate bladder stone formation.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Jessica N; Norsworthy, Allison N; Sun, Tung-Tien; Pearson, Melanie M

    2016-04-19

    The catheter-associated uropathogenProteus mirabilisfrequently causes urinary stones, but little has been known about the initial stages of bladder colonization and stone formation. We found thatP. mirabilisrapidly invades the bladder urothelium, but generally fails to establish an intracellular niche. Instead, it forms extracellular clusters in the bladder lumen, which form foci of mineral deposition consistent with development of urinary stones. These clusters elicit a robust neutrophil response, and we present evidence of neutrophil extracellular trap generation during experimental urinary tract infection. We identified two virulence factors required for cluster development: urease, which is required for urolithiasis, and mannose-resistantProteus-like fimbriae. The extracellular cluster formation byP. mirabilisstands in direct contrast to uropathogenicEscherichia coli, which readily formed intracellular bacterial communities but not luminal clusters or urinary stones. We propose that extracellular clusters are a key mechanism ofP. mirabilissurvival and virulence in the bladder.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of the nucleation of water: Determining the sticking probability and formation energy of a cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Kawano, Akio; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2014-03-01

    We performed molecular dynamics simulations of the nucleation of water vapor in order to test nucleation theories. Simulations were performed for a wide range of supersaturation ratios (S = 3-25) and water temperatures (Tw = 300-390 K). We obtained the nucleation rates and the formation free energies of a subcritical cluster from the cluster size distribution. The classical nucleation theory and the modified classical nucleation theory (MCNT) overestimate the nucleation rates in all cases. The semi-phenomenological model, which corrects the MCNT prediction using the second virial coefficient of a vapor, reproduces the formation free energy of a cluster with the size ≲20 to within 10% and the nucleation rate and cluster size distributions to within one order of magnitude. The sticking probability of the vapor molecules to the clusters was also determined from the growth rates of the clusters. The sticking probability rapidly increases with the supersaturation ratio S, which is similar to the Lennard-Jones system.

  1. Influence of the block hydrophilicity of AB2 miktoarm star copolymers on cluster formation in solutions.

    PubMed

    Han, Minwoo; Hong, Minhyung; Sim, Eunji

    2011-05-28

    We investigated the formation of various micelle shapes of lipid-like amphiphilic AB(2) miktoarm star copolymers in a solution, by performing dissipative particle dynamics simulations. AB(2) miktoarm star copolymer molecules are modeled with coarse-grained structures that consist of a relatively hydrophilic head (A) group with a single arm and a hydrophobic tail (B) group with double arms. A decrease in the hydrophilicity of the head group leads to a reduction of the polymer-solvent contact area, causing cluster structure changes from spherical micelles to vesicles. Consequently, a spherical exterior with multi-lamellar or cylindrical phase interior structures forms under poor solvent conditions without the introduction of spherical hard-wall containers. Furthermore we observed that, for small head group lengths, vesicles were formed in much wider range of solvent-head interaction strength than for long head groups, indicating that molecules with short head group offer a superior vesicle forming property. A phase diagram, the structure and kinetics of the cluster formation, a density profile, and a detailed shape analysis are presented to discuss the molecular characteristics of potential candidates for drug carriers that require superior and versatile vesicle forming properties. We also show that, under certain solvent-hydrophilic head group interaction conditions, initially formed cylindrical micelles transform to bilayer fragments through redistribution of copolymers within the cluster.

  2. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH ANALYSIS OF SPITZER SELECTED COMA CLUSTER GALAXIES: STAR FORMATION RATES AND MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Louise O. V.; Fadda, Dario E-mail: fadda@ipac.caltech.edu

    2011-11-15

    We present a thorough study of the specific star formation rates (sSFRs) for MIPS 24 {mu}m selected galaxies in the Coma cluster. We build galaxy spectral energy distributions using optical (u', g', r', i', z'), near-infrared (J, H, K{sub s} ), and mid- to far-infrared (Infrared Array Camera and MIPS) photometry. New and archival spectra confirm 210 cluster members. Subsequently, the total infrared luminosity, galaxy stellar mass, and sSFR for the members are determined by measuring best-fit templates. Using an array of complementary diagnostics, we search for any contaminating active galactic nuclei, but find few. We compare obscured SFRs to unobscured rates derived from extinction-corrected H{alpha} emission line measurements. The agreement between these two values leads us to conclude that there is no evidence for an additionally obscured component. In our spectroscopic sample, complete to 80% for r' < 19.5, we find that all starbursts are blue and are dwarfs, having masses <10{sup 9} M{sub sun}. Examining the location of these starbursts within the cluster, we confirm that there is a lower fraction in the cluster core.

  3. The Formation of First Generation Stars and Globular Clusters in Protogalactic Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, S

    2003-07-07

    Within collapsing protogalaxies, thermal instability leads to the formation of a population of cool fragments which are confined by the pressure of a residual hot background medium. The critical mass required for the cold clouds to become gravitationally unstable and to form stars is determined by both their internal temperature and external pressure. Massive first generation stars form in primordial clouds with sufficient column density to shield themselves from external UV photons emitted by nearby massive stars or AGNs. Less massive photoionized clouds gain mass due to ram pressure stripping by the residual halo gas. Collisions may also trigger thermal instability and fragmentation into cloudlets. While most cloudlets have substellar masses, the largest become self-gravitating and collapse to form protostellar cores without further fragmentation. The initial stellar mass function is established as these cores capture additional residual cloudlets. Energy dissipation from the mergers ensures that the cluster remains bound in the limit of low star formation efficiency. Dissipation also promotes the formation and retention of the most massive stars in the cluster center. On the scale of the protogalactic clouds, the formation of massive stars generates intense UV radiation which photoionizes gas and quenches star formation in nearby regions. As gas density accumulates in the center of the galactic potential, the self-regulated star formation rate increases. At the location where most of the residual gas can be converted into stars on its internal dynamical timescale, a galaxy attains its asymptotic kinematic structure such as exponential profiles, Tully-Fisher, and Faber-Jackson laws.

  4. Using Formative Assessment to Drive Mathematics Instruction in Grades 3-5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberdorf, Christine; Taylor-Cox, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This book provides targeted mathematics instruction for every child. This book combines formative assessment with practical activities to differentiate the elementary classroom. The formative assessments include student work samples at varying levels. The authors: (1) Illustrate the distinction between a "traditional" assessment and an "enhanced"…

  5. Using Formative Assessment to Drive Mathematics Instruction in Grades PreK-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberdorf, Christine; Taylor-Cox, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Provide targeted mathematics instruction for every child. These books combine formative assessment with practical activities to differentiate the elementary classroom. The formative assessments include student work samples at varying levels. The authors: (1) Illustrate the distinction between a "traditional" assessment and an "enhanced"…

  6. Outflow Feedback Regulated Massive Star Formation in Parsec-Scale Cluster Forming Clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Li, Zhi-Yun; Abel, Tom; Nakamura, Fumitaka; /Niigata U.

    2010-02-15

    We investigate massive star formation in turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clumps of molecular clouds including protostellar outflow feedback using three dimensional numerical simulations of effective resolution 2048{sup 3}. The calculations are carried out using a block structured adaptive mesh refinement code that solves the ideal MHD equations including self-gravity and implements accreting sink particles. We find that, in the absence of regulation by magnetic fields and outflow feedback, massive stars form readily in a turbulent, moderately condensed clump of {approx} 1,600 M{sub {circle_dot}} (containing {approx} 10{sup 2} initial Jeans masses), along with a cluster of hundreds of lower mass stars. The massive stars are fed at high rates by (1) transient dense filaments produced by large-scale turbulent compression at early times, and (2) by the clump-wide global collapse resulting from turbulence decay at late times. In both cases, the bulk of the massive star's mass is supplied from outside a 0.1 pc-sized 'core' that surrounds the star. In our simulation, the massive star is clump-fed rather than core-fed. The need for large-scale feeding makes the massive star formation prone to regulation by outflow feedback, which directly opposes the feeding processes. The outflows reduce the mass accretion rates onto the massive stars by breaking up the dense filaments that feed the massive star formation at early times, and by collectively slowing down the global collapse that fuel the massive star formation at late times. The latter is aided by a moderate magnetic field of strength in the observed range (corresponding to a dimensionless clump mass-to-flux ratio {lambda} {approx} a few); the field allows the outflow momenta to be deposited more efficiently inside the clump. We conclude that the massive star formation in our simulated turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clump is outflow-regulated and clump-fed (ORCF for short). An important implication is that the

  7. Formation, migration, and clustering energies of interstitial He in α-quartz and β-cristobalite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kan-Ju; Ding, Hepeng; Demkowicz, Michael J.

    2016-10-01

    Precipitation of implanted helium (He) is detrimental to many nuclear materials. A solid in which implanted He does not precipitate, but rather remains in solution and diffuses readily is potentially of interest for applications requiring resistance to He-induced damage. We use density functional theory (DFT) calculations to examine He interstitial formation, migration, and clustering energies in two SiO2 polymorphs: α-quartz and β-cristobalite. Our findings show greater He solubility and mobility in the latter than in the former. This difference appears to be due primarily to the unlike atomic-level structures of α-quartz and β-cristobalite, rather than their differing densities. Our findings also suggest that He is unlikely to cluster in either material. The behavior of He in α-quartz and β-cristobalite, and similar forms of silica make them promising materials for further investigation for potential use in applications requiring resistance to He-induced damage.

  8. Star Formation in the Dense Environment of Young Clusters: A FORCAST Imaging Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundy, Lee

    2013-10-01

    [****This is a re-submission from a successful cycle 1 proposal, for which the observations have not yet taken place. We are following the advice from the SOFIA team and re-submitting this proposal, hoping we can still obtain the time on our sources and achieve our scientific goal.****] We propose a multi-wavelength FORCAST survey of 6-8 dense star-forming regions within 1kpc. This survey will image multiple fields in each target cluster with the 11, 19, 31 and 37 micron bands, including an estimated 100 young stellar objects (YSO) with bright mid-IR emission. The results will fill in YSO information for the cluster centers where previous studies based on Spitzer, WISE, and IRAS were saturated and/or suffered from source confusion. In addition, these observations will help fill the 10-40 micron gap in the spectral energy distributions of YSOs in these fields, and will help characterize the spatial extent of the 31 micron and 37micron emission. FORCAST's high spatial resolution will be an improvement by a factor of two over the Spitzer 24 micron images. The proposed survey will provide better statistics on bright young cluster stars which will help test current theories of clustered star formation: Turbulent Core Collapse and Competitive Accretion. Specifically, the data will improve our knowledge of the protostellar luminosity and temperature distributions in the dense regions of forming clusters, which constrain these models (Offner and Mckee 2011; Myers 2011). In addition, the extent of the 31 and 37 micron emission (unresolved compared to 5-10") will provide direct information on Competitive Accretion.

  9. Harvesting the Decay Energy of 26-Al to Drive Lightning Discharge and Chondrule Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, A.; Okuzumi, S.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate that positrons released in the decay of 26-Al cause large-scale charging of dense pebble regions. The charge separation is neutralized by lightning discharge and this can lead to the formation of chondrules.

  10. Environmental effects on star formation in dwarf galaxies and star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, S.; Cropper, M.; Fujita, Y.; Chiosi, C.; Grebel, E. K.

    2015-01-01

    Context. The role of the environment in the formation of a stellar population is a difficult problem in astrophysics. The reason is that similar properties of a stellar population are found in star systems embedded in different environments or, vice versa, similar environments contain stellar systems with stellar populations having different properties. Aims: In this paper, we develop a simple analytical criterion to investigate the role of the environment on the onset of star formation. We will consider the main external agents that influence star formation (i.e. ram pressure, tidal interaction, Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities) in a spherical galaxy moving through an external environment. The theoretical framework developed here has direct applications to the cases of dwarf galaxies in galaxy clusters and dwarf galaxies orbiting our Milky Way system, as well as any primordial gas-rich cluster of stars orbiting within its host galaxy. Methods: We develop an analytic formalism to solve the fluid dynamics equations in a non-inertial reference frame mapped with spherical coordinates. The two-fluids instability at the interface between a stellar system and its surrounding hotter and less dense environment is related to the star formation processes through a set of differential equations. The solution presented here is quite general, allowing us to investigate most kinds of orbits allowed in a gravitationally bound system of stars in interaction with a major massive companion. Results: We present an analytical criterion to elucidate the dependence of star formation in a spherical stellar system (as a dwarf galaxy or a globular cluster) on its surrounding environment useful in theoretical interpretations of numerical results as well as observational applications. We show how spherical coordinates naturally enlighten the interpretation of two-fluids instability in a geometry that directly applies to an astrophysical case. This criterion predicts the

  11. Cluster-formation in the Rosette molecular cloud at the junctions of filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Hennemann, M.; Motte, F.; Didelon, P.; Federrath, C.; Bontemps, S.; Di Francesco, J.; Arzoumanian, D.; Minier, V.; André, Ph.; Hill, T.; Zavagno, A.; Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Attard, M.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Elia, D.; Fallscheer, C.; Griffin, M.; Kirk, J.; Klessen, R.; Könyves, V.; Martin, P.; Men'shchikov, A.; Palmeirim, P.; Peretto, N.; Pestalozzi, M.; Russeil, D.; Sadavoy, S.; Sousbie, T.; Testi, L.; Tremblin, P.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G.

    2012-04-01

    Aims: For many years feedback processes generated by OB-stars in molecular clouds, including expanding ionization fronts, stellar winds, or UV-radiation, have been proposed to trigger subsequent star formation. However, hydrodynamic models including radiation and gravity show that UV-illumination has little or no impact on the global dynamical evolution of the cloud. Instead, gravitational collapse of filaments and/or merging of filamentary structures can lead to building up dense high-mass star-forming clumps. However, the overall density structure of the cloud has a large influence on this process, and requires a better understanding. Methods: The Rosette molecular cloud, irradiated by the NGC 2244 cluster, is a template region for triggered star-formation, and we investigated its spatial and density structure by applying a curvelet analysis, a filament-tracing algorithm (DisPerSE), and probability density functions (PDFs) on Herschel column density maps, obtained within the HOBYS key program. Results: The analysis reveals not only the filamentary structure of the cloud but also that all known infrared clusters except one lie at junctions of filaments, as predicted by turbulence simulations. The PDFs of sub-regions in the cloud show systematic differences. The two UV-exposed regions have a double-peaked PDF we interprete as caused by shock compression, while the PDFs of the center and other cloud parts are more complex, partly with a power-law tail. A deviation of the log-normal PDF form occurs at AV ≈ 9m for the center, and around 4m for the other regions. Only the part of the cloud farthest from the Rosette nebula shows a log-normal PDF. Conclusions: The deviations of the PDF from the log-normal shape typically associated with low- and high-mass star-forming regions at AV ≈ 3-4m and 8-10m, respectively, are found here within the very same cloud. This shows that there is no fundamental difference in the density structure of low- and high-mass star

  12. Solvent driving force ensures fast formation of a persistent and well-separated radical pair in plant cryptochrome.

    PubMed

    Lüdemann, Gesa; Solov'yov, Ilia A; Kubař, Tomáš; Elstner, Marcus

    2015-01-28

    The photoreceptor protein cryptochrome is thought to host, upon light absorption, a radical pair that is sensitive to very weak magnetic fields, endowing migratory birds with a magnetic compass sense. The molecular mechanism that leads to formation of a stabilized, magnetic field sensitive radical pair has despite various theoretical and experimental efforts not been unambiguously identified yet. We challenge this unambiguity through a unique quantum mechanical molecular dynamics approach where we perform electron transfer dynamics simulations taking into account the motion of the protein upon the electron transfer. This approach allows us to follow the time evolution of the electron transfer in an unbiased fashion and to reveal the molecular driving force that ensures fast electron transfer in cryptochrome guaranteeing formation of a persistent radical pair suitable for magnetoreception. We argue that this unraveled molecular mechanism is a general principle inherent to all proteins of the cryptochrome/photolyase family and that cryptochromes are, therefore, tailored to potentially function as efficient chemical magnetoreceptors.

  13. Formation of Iron-Containing Clusters in Silica of Predetermined Porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimkiene, I.; Baran, M.; Babonas, G.-J.; Bendorius, R.-A.; Rėza, A.; Szymczak, R.; Aleshkevych, P.; Šustavičiūtė, R.; Tamaševičius, R.

    2005-02-01

    Iron-containing nanoparticles and clusters were formed in silica with porosity, which was predetermined by different procedures of sol-gel technology and the chemical composition of precursors. Bulk and layer-type samples of different porosity were synthesized and investigated. The morphology, magnetic, and optical properties were studied to characterize the samples and to analyze the formation of Fe-oxides. Experimental results showed that both Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 were formed in the samples and that their relative amount was dependent on preparation technology.

  14. Cosmology and astrophysics from relaxed galaxy clusters – V. Consistency with cold dark matter structure formation

    SciTech Connect

    Mantz, A. B.; Allen, S. W.; Morris, R. G.

    2016-07-15

    This is the fifth in a series of papers studying the astrophysics and cosmology of massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. Our sample comprises 40 clusters identified as being dynamically relaxed and hot in Papers I and II of this series. Here we use constraints on cluster mass profiles from X-ray data to test some of the basic predictions of cosmological structure formation in the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm. In addition, we present constraints on the concentration–mass relation for massive clusters, finding a power-law mass dependence with a slope of κm = –0.16 ± 0.07, in agreement with CDM predictions. For this relaxed sample, the relation is consistent with a constant as a function of redshift (power-law slope with 1 + z of κζ = –0.17 ± 0.26), with an intrinsic scatter of σln c = 0.16 ± 0.03. We investigate the shape of cluster mass profiles over the radial range probed by the data (typically ~50 kpc–1 Mpc), and test for departures from the simple Navarro–Frenk–White (NFW) form, for which the logarithmic slope of the density profile tends to –1 at small radii. Specifically, we consider as alternatives the generalized NFW (GNFW) and Einasto parametrizations. For the GNFW model, we find an average value of (minus) the logarithmic inner slope of β = 1.02 ± 0.08, with an intrinsic scatter of σβ = 0.22 ± 0.07, while in the Einasto case we constrain the average shape parameter to be α = 0.29 ± 0.04 with an intrinsic scatter of σα = 0.12 ± 0.04. Our results are thus consistent with the simple NFW model on average, but we clearly detect the presence of intrinsic, cluster-to-cluster scatter about the average.

  15. Star formation in the first galaxies - III. Formation, evolution, and characteristics of the first metal-enriched stellar cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Montgomery, Michael H.; Milosavljević, Miloš; Bromm, Volker

    2016-01-01

    We simulate the formation of a low-metallicity (10-2 Z⊙) stellar cluster at redshift z ˜ 14. Beginning with cosmological initial conditions, the simulation utilizes adaptive mesh refinement and sink particles to follow the collapse and evolution of gas past the opacity limit for fragmentation, thus resolving the formation of individual protostellar cores. A time- and location-dependent protostellar radiation field, which heats the gas by absorption on dust, is computed by integration of protostellar evolutionary tracks. The simulation also includes a robust non-equilibrium chemical network that self-consistently treats gas thermodynamics and dust-gas coupling. The system is evolved for 18 kyr after the first protostellar source has formed. In this time span, 30 sink particles representing protostellar cores form with a total mass of 81 M⊙. Their masses range from ˜0.1 to 14.4 M⊙ with a median mass ˜0.5-1 M⊙. Massive protostars grow by competitive accretion while lower mass protostars are stunted in growth by close encounters and many-body ejections. In the regime explored here, the characteristic mass scale is determined by the cosmic microwave background temperature floor and the onset of efficient dust-gas coupling. It seems unlikely that host galaxies of the first bursts of metal-enriched star formation will be detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope or other next-generation infrared observatories. Instead, the most promising access route to the dawn of cosmic star formation may lie in the scrutiny of metal-poor, ancient stellar populations in the Galactic neighbourhood. The observable targets corresponding to the system simulated here are ultra-faint dwarf satellite galaxies such as Boötes II and Willman I.

  16. STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF THE MILKY WAY HALO TRACED BY THE OOSTERHOFF DICHOTOMY AMONG GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Sohee; Lee, Young-Wook

    2015-06-22

    In our recent investigation of the Oosterhoff dichotomy in the multiple population paradigm, we have suggested that the RR Lyrae variables in the globular clusters (GCs) of Oosterhoff groups I, II, and III are produced mostly by first, second, and third generation stars (G1, G2, and G3), respectively. Here we show, for the first time, that the observed dichotomies in the inner and outer halo GCs can be naturally reproduced when these models are extended to all metallicity regimes, while maintaining reasonable agreements in the horizontal-branch type versus [Fe/H] correlations. In order to achieve this, however, specific star formation histories are required for the inner and outer halos. In the inner halo GCs, the star formation commenced and ceased earlier with a relatively short formation timescale between the subpopulations (∼0.5 Gyr), while in the outer halo, the formation of G1 was delayed by ∼0.8 Gyr with a more extended timescale between G1 and G2 (∼1.4 Gyr). This is consistent with the dual origin of the Milky Way halo. Despite the difference in detail, our models show that the Oosterhoff period groups observed in both outer and inner halo GCs are all manifestations of the “population-shift” effect within the instability strip, for which the origin can be traced back to the two or three discrete episodes of star formation in GCs.

  17. Synthesis and dephosphorylation of MARCKS in the late stages of megakaryocyte maturation drive proplatelet formation.

    PubMed

    Machlus, Kellie R; Wu, Stephen K; Stumpo, Deborah J; Soussou, Thomas S; Paul, David S; Campbell, Robert A; Kalwa, Hermann; Michel, Thomas; Bergmeier, Wolfgang; Weyrich, Andrew S; Blackshear, Perry J; Hartwig, John H; Italiano, Joseph E

    2016-03-17

    Platelets are essential for hemostasis, and thrombocytopenia is a major clinical problem. Megakaryocytes (MKs) generate platelets by extending long processes, proplatelets, into sinusoidal blood vessels. However, very little is known about what regulates proplatelet formation. To uncover which proteins were dynamically changing during this process, we compared the proteome and transcriptome of round vs proplatelet-producing MKs by 2D difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and polysome profiling, respectively. Our data revealed a significant increase in a poorly-characterized MK protein, myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS), which was upregulated 3.4- and 5.7-fold in proplatelet-producing MKs in 2D DIGE and polysome profiling analyses, respectively. MARCKS is a protein kinase C (PKC) substrate that binds PIP2. In MKs, it localized to both the plasma and demarcation membranes. MARCKS inhibition by peptide significantly decreased proplatelet formation 53%. To examine the role of MARCKS in the PKC pathway, we treated MKs with polymethacrylate (PMA), which markedly increased MARCKS phosphorylation while significantly inhibiting proplatelet formation 84%, suggesting that MARCKS phosphorylation reduces proplatelet formation. We hypothesized that MARCKS phosphorylation promotes Arp2/3 phosphorylation, which subsequently downregulates proplatelet formation; both MARCKS and Arp2 were dephosphorylated in MKs making proplatelets, and Arp2 inhibition enhanced proplatelet formation. Finally, we used MARCKS knockout (KO) mice to probe the direct role of MARCKS in proplatelet formation; MARCKS KO MKs displayed significantly decreased proplatelet levels. MARCKS expression and signaling in primary MKs is a novel finding. We propose that MARCKS acts as a "molecular switch," binding to and regulating PIP2 signaling to regulate processes like proplatelet extension (microtubule-driven) vs proplatelet branching (Arp2/3 and actin polymerization-driven).

  18. Synthesis and dephosphorylation of MARCKS in the late stages of megakaryocyte maturation drive proplatelet formation

    PubMed Central

    Machlus, Kellie R.; Wu, Stephen K.; Stumpo, Deborah J.; Soussou, Thomas S.; Paul, David S.; Campbell, Robert A.; Kalwa, Hermann; Michel, Thomas; Bergmeier, Wolfgang; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Blackshear, Perry J.; Hartwig, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are essential for hemostasis, and thrombocytopenia is a major clinical problem. Megakaryocytes (MKs) generate platelets by extending long processes, proplatelets, into sinusoidal blood vessels. However, very little is known about what regulates proplatelet formation. To uncover which proteins were dynamically changing during this process, we compared the proteome and transcriptome of round vs proplatelet-producing MKs by 2D difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and polysome profiling, respectively. Our data revealed a significant increase in a poorly-characterized MK protein, myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS), which was upregulated 3.4- and 5.7-fold in proplatelet-producing MKs in 2D DIGE and polysome profiling analyses, respectively. MARCKS is a protein kinase C (PKC) substrate that binds PIP2. In MKs, it localized to both the plasma and demarcation membranes. MARCKS inhibition by peptide significantly decreased proplatelet formation 53%. To examine the role of MARCKS in the PKC pathway, we treated MKs with polymethacrylate (PMA), which markedly increased MARCKS phosphorylation while significantly inhibiting proplatelet formation 84%, suggesting that MARCKS phosphorylation reduces proplatelet formation. We hypothesized that MARCKS phosphorylation promotes Arp2/3 phosphorylation, which subsequently downregulates proplatelet formation; both MARCKS and Arp2 were dephosphorylated in MKs making proplatelets, and Arp2 inhibition enhanced proplatelet formation. Finally, we used MARCKS knockout (KO) mice to probe the direct role of MARCKS in proplatelet formation; MARCKS KO MKs displayed significantly decreased proplatelet levels. MARCKS expression and signaling in primary MKs is a novel finding. We propose that MARCKS acts as a “molecular switch,” binding to and regulating PIP2 signaling to regulate processes like proplatelet extension (microtubule-driven) vs proplatelet branching (Arp2/3 and actin polymerization-driven). PMID:26744461

  19. Determining star formation rates in X-ray cluster cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Raymond E., III; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1987-01-01

    Many X-ray clusters of galaxies are observed to have cooling flows at their centers. Each of these cooling flows is depositing mass onto a central dominant galaxy at a rate of 10-400 solar masses/yr. With such large accretion rates it seems possible that these accreting galaxies are still being formed through ongoing star formation in their associated cooling flows. In this paper techniques are developed to determine directly the distributions of local star formation rate, mass, gas density, temperature, and velocity from cooling flow X-ray surface brightness data. These techniques take account of the potentially important X-ray emission from star-forming cooling condensations dropping out of the background flow. Surface brightness data with either good or poor energy resolution are considered separately.

  20. Arcus: Exploring the Formation and Evolution of Clusters, Galaxies, and Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Randall K.

    2016-04-01

    We present the scientific motivation and performance for Arcus, an X-ray grating spectrometer mission to be proposed to NASA as a MIDEX in 2016. This mission will observe structure formation at and beyond the edges of clusters and galaxies, feedback from supermassive black holes, the structure of the interstellar medium and the formation and evolution of stars. Key mission design parameters are R = 3000 with >500 cm2 of effective area at the crucial O VII and O VIII lines, with the full bandpass going from ~10-50 Angstroms. Arcus will use the silicon pore optics developed for ESA’s Athena mission, paired with off-plane gratings being developed at the University of Iowa and combined with MIT/Lincoln Labs CCDs. With essentially no consumables, Arcus should achieve its mission goals in under 2 years, after which we anticipate a substantial period of operation as a general observatory.

  1. Liquid-vapor phase diagram and cluster formation of two-dimensional ionic fluids.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Maldonado, Gloria Arlette; González-Melchor, Minerva; Alejandre, José

    2012-08-07

    Direct molecular dynamics simulations on interfaces at constant temperature are performed to obtain the liquid-vapor phase diagram of the two-dimensional soft primitive model, an equimolar mixture of equal size spheres carrying opposite charges. Constant temperature and pressure simulations are also carried out to check consistency with interface simulations results. In addition, an analysis of the cluster formation of mixtures of particles with charge asymmetry in the range 1:1 to 1:36 at low and high densities is performed. The number of free ions, when plotted as a function of the positive ion charge, Z(+), has an oscillatory behavior and is independent of the density. The formation of aggregates is analyzed in terms of the attraction and repulsion between ions.

  2. Modeling Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback in Cool-core Clusters: The Formation of Cold Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t TI/t ff < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s-1. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  3. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The formation of cold clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-10

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t{sub TI}/t{sub ff} < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s{sup –1}. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  4. Silver cluster formation, dynamics, and chemistry in metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Houk, Ronald J T; Jacobs, Benjamin W; El Gabaly, Farid; Chang, Noel N; Talin, A Alec; Graham, Dennis D; House, Stephen D; Robertson, Ian M; Allendorf, Mark D

    2009-10-01

    Synthetic methods used to produce metal nanoparticles typically lead to a distribution of particle sizes. In addition, creation of the smallest clusters, with sizes of a few to tens of atoms, remains very challenging. Nanoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a promising solution to these problems, since their long-range crystalline order creates completely uniform pore sizes with the potential for both steric and chemical stabilization. We report a systematic investigation of silver nanocluster formation within MOFs using three representative MOF templates. The as-synthesized clusters are spectroscopically consistent with dimensions < or =1 nm, with a significant fraction existing as Ag(3) clusters, as shown by electron paramagnetic resonance. Importantly, we show conclusively that very rapid TEM-induced MOF degradation leads to agglomeration and stable, easily imaged particles, explaining prior reports of particles larger than MOF pores. These results solve an important riddle concerning MOF-based templates and suggest that heterostructures composed of highly uniform arrays of nanoparticles within MOFs are feasible.

  5. Electronic structure, stability, and formation dynamics of hypervalent molecular clusters: CH 3NH 3(CH 3NH 2) n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okai, Nobuhiro; Takahata, Akihiro; Fuke, Kiyokazu

    2004-03-01

    The formation and decay processes of CH 3NH 3(CH 3NH 2) n produced by the photolysis of (CH 3NH 2) n are studied by a pump-probe technique with femtosecond laser. The dissociation time of CH 3NH 2 in clusters is estimated to be less than 500 fs, while the formation time of CH 3NH 3(CH 3NH 2) n is less than 2 ps in the photolysis at 200 nm. The lifetime of free CH 3NH 3 is determined to be 30 ps and is elongated by 10 5 times in clusters. The ionization potentials and the binding energies of these clusters are determined by photoionization threshold measurements. On the basis of these results, the formation and decay processes for these clusters are discussed.

  6. Roles of ATP and NADPH in formation of the Fe-S cluster of spinach ferredoxin. [Spinacia oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Mitsui, Akira; Fujita, Yuichi; Matsubara, Hiroshi )

    1991-01-01

    The present study investigated whether ATP and NADPH in the chloroplast system of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) are involved in the supply of ({sup 35}S)sulfide or iron, or in Fe-S cluster formation itself. ({sup 35}S)Sulfide was liberated from ({sup 35}S)cysteine in an NADPH-dependent manner, whereas ATP was not necessary for this process. This desulfhydration of ({sup 35}S)cysteine occurred before the formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster, and the amount of radioactivity in ({sup 35}S)sulfide was greater than that in {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd by a factor of more than 20. Addition of nonradioactive sulfide (Na{sub 2}S) inhibited competitively formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster along with the addition of nonradioactive cysteine, indicating that some of the inorganic sulfide released from cysteine is incorporated into the Fe-S cluster of Fd. ATP hydrolysis was not involved in the production of inorganic sulfide or in the supply of iron for assembly into the Fe-S cluster. However, ATP-dependent Fe-S cluster formation was observed even in the presence of sufficient amounts of ({sup 35}S)sulfide and iron. These results suggest a novel type of ATP-dependent in vivo Fe-S cluster formation that is distinct from in vitro chemical reconstitution. The implications of these results for the possible mechanisms of ATP-dependent Fe-S cluster formation are discussed.

  7. Binary interactions as a possible scenario for the formation of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Dengkai; Han, Zhanwen; Li, Lifang E-mail: zhanwenhan@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-07-01

    Observations have revealed the presence of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters (GCs) that exhibit wide abundance variations and multiple sequences in the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram. We present a scenario for the formation of multiple stellar populations in GCs. In this scenario, initial GCs are single-generation clusters, and our model predicts that the stars with anomalous abundances observed in GCs are merged stars and accretor stars produced by binary interactions—rapidly rotating stars at the moment of their formation—and that these stars are more massive than normal single stars in the same evolutionary stage. We find that, due to their own evolution, these rapidly rotating stars have surface abundances, effective temperatures, and luminosities that are different from normal single stars in the same evolutionary stage. This stellar population of binaries reproduces two important points of observational evidence of multiple stellar populations: a Na-O anticorrelation and multiple sequences in the HR diagram. This evidence suggests that binary interactions may be a possible scenario for the formation of multiple stellar populations in GCs.

  8. THE CLUSTERED NATURE OF STAR FORMATION. PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE CLUSTERS IN THE STAR-FORMING REGION NGC 602/N90 IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Gennaro, Mario; Schmeja, Stefan; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Tognelli, Emanuele; Prada Moroni, Pier Giorgio

    2012-03-20

    Located at the tip of the wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), the star-forming region NGC 602/N90 is characterized by the H II nebular ring N90 and the young cluster of pre-main-sequence (PMS) and early-type main-sequence stars NGC 602, located in the central area of the ring. We present a thorough cluster analysis of the stellar sample identified with Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys in the region. We show that apart from the central cluster low-mass PMS stars are congregated in 13 additional small, compact sub-clusters at the periphery of NGC 602, identified in terms of their higher stellar density with respect to the average background density derived from star counts. We find that the spatial distribution of the PMS stars is bimodal, with an unusually large fraction ({approx}60%) of the total population being clustered, while the remaining is diffusely distributed in the intercluster area, covering the whole central part of the region. From the corresponding color-magnitude diagrams we disentangle an age difference of {approx}2.5 Myr between NGC 602 and the compact sub-clusters, which appear younger, on the basis of comparison of the brighter PMS stars with evolutionary models, which we accurately calculated for the metal abundance of the SMC. The diffuse PMS population appears to host stars as old as those in NGC 602. Almost all detected PMS sub-clusters appear to be centrally concentrated. When the complete PMS stellar sample, including both clustered and diffused stars, is considered in our cluster analysis, it appears as a single centrally concentrated stellar agglomeration, covering the whole central area of the region. Considering also the hot massive stars of the system, we find evidence that this agglomeration is hierarchically structured. Based on our findings, we propose a scenario according to which the region NGC 602/N90 experiences an active clustered star formation for the last {approx}5 Myr. The central cluster NGC 602 was

  9. Formation and evolution of oxygen-vacancy clusters in lead and tin doped silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londos, C. A.; Aliprantis, D.; Sgourou, E. N.; Chroneos, A.; Pochet, P.

    2012-06-01

    Infrared spectroscopy (IR) measurements were used to investigate the effect of lead (Pb), tin (Sn), and (Pb, Sn) codoping on electron radiation-induced defects in silicon (Si). The study was mainly focused on oxygen-vacancy (VOn) clusters and in particular their formation and evolution upon annealing. It was determined that Pb causes a larger reduction in the production of the VO defect than Sn. In (Pb, Sn) co-doped Si isochronal anneals revealed that the evolution of VO increases substantially at ˜170 °C. This is attributed to the release of V from the SnV pair. Interestingly, in the corresponding evolution curves of VO in the Sn- and the Pb-doped samples, this inverse annealing stage is also present for the former while it is not present for the latter. This is attributed to the formation of PbV pairs that do not dissociate below 280 °C. The partial capture of V by Sn in co-doped samples is rationalized through the higher compressive local strain around Pb atoms that leads to a retardation of vacancy diffusion. The conversion of VO to the VO2 defect is substantially reduced in the Pb-doped sample. The evolution curves of VO and VO2 clusters in the isovalent doped Si samples hint the production of VO2 from other mechanisms (i.e., besides VO + Oi → VO2). For larger VOn clusters (n = 3,4), the signals are very weak in the Pb-doped sample, whereas for n ≥ 5, they are not present in the spectra. Conversely, bands related with the VO5 and VOnCs defects are present in the spectra of the Sn-doped and (Pb, Sn) codoped Si.

  10. Ultraviolet Escape Fractions from Giant Molecular Clouds during Early Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Corey; Pudritz, Ralph; Klessen, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    The UV photon escape fraction from molecular clouds is a key parameter for understanding the ionization of the interstellar medium and extragalactic processes such as cosmic reionization. We present the ionizing photon flux and the corresponding photon escape fraction (fesc) arising as a consequence of star cluster formation in a turbulent, 106 M⊙ giant molecular cloud, simulated using the code FLASH. We make use of sink particles to represent young, star-forming clusters coupled with a radiative transfer scheme to calculate the emergent UV flux. We find that the ionizing photon flux across the cloud boundary is highly variable in time and space due to the turbulent nature of the intervening gas. The escaping photon fraction remains at ∼5% for the first 2.5 Myr, followed by two pronounced peaks at 3.25 and 3.8 Myr with a maximum fesc of 30% and 37%, respectively. These peaks are due to the formation of large H ii regions that expand into regions of lower density, some of which reaching the cloud surface. However, these phases are short-lived, and fesc drops sharply as the H ii regions are quenched by the central cluster passing through high-density material due to the turbulent nature of the cloud. We find an average fesc of 15% with factor of two variations over 1 Myr timescales. Our results suggest that assuming a single value for fesc from a molecular cloud is in general a poor approximation, and that the dynamical evolution of the system leads to large temporal variation.

  11. Where does the gas fueling star formation in brightest cluster galaxies originate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molendi, S.; Tozzi, P.; Gaspari, M.; De Grandi, S.; Gastaldello, F.; Ghizzardi, S.; Rossetti, M.

    2016-11-01

    Aims: We investigate the relationship between X-ray cooling and star formation in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). Methods: We present an X-ray spectral analysis of the inner regions, 10-40 kpc, of six nearby cool core clusters (z < 0.35) observed with Chandra ACIS. This sample is selected on the basis of the high star formation rate (SFR) observed in the BCGs. We restrict our search for cooling gas to regions that are roughly cospatial with the starburst. We fit single- and multi-temperature mkcflow models to constrain the amount of isobarically cooling intracluster medium. Results: We find that in all clusters, below a threshold temperature ranging between 0.9 and 3 keV, only upper limits can be obtained. In four out of six objects, the upper limits are significantly below the SFR and in two, namely A1835 and A1068, they are less than a tenth of the SFR. Conclusions: Our results suggests that a number of mechanisms conspire to hide the cooling signature in our spectra. In a few systems the lack of a cooling signature may be attributed to a relatively long delay time between the X-ray cooling and the star burst. However, for A1835 and A1068, where the X-ray cooling time is shorter than the timescale of the starburst, a possible explanation is that the region where gas cools out of the X-ray phase extends to very large radii, likely beyond the core of these systems.

  12. Formation of clustered DNA damage after high-LET irradiation: a review.

    PubMed

    Hada, Megumi; Georgakilas, Alexandros G

    2008-05-01

    Radiation can cause as well as cure cancer. The risk of developing radiation-induced cancer has traditionally been estimated from cancer incidence among survivors of the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.(1)) These data provide the best estimate of human cancer risk over the dose range for low linear energy transfer (LET) radiations, such as X- or gamma-rays. The situation of estimating the real biological effects becomes even more difficult in the case of high LET particles encountered in space or as the result of domestic exposure to alpha-particles from radon gas emitters or other radioactive emitters like uranium-238. Complex DNA damage, i.e., the signature of high-LET radiations comprises of closely spaced DNA lesions forming a cluster of DNA damage. The two basic groups of complex DNA damage are double strand breaks (DSBs) and non-DSB oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDL). Theoretical analysis and experimental evidence suggest an increased complexity and severity of complex DNA damage with increasing LET (linear energy transfer) and a high mutagenic or carcinogenic potential. Data available on the formation of clustered DNA damage (DSBs and OCDL) by high-LET radiations are often controversial suggesting a variable response to dose and type of radiation. The chemical nature and cellular repair mechanisms of complex DNA damage have been much less characterized than those of isolated DNA lesions like an oxidized base or a single strand break especially in the case of high-LET radiation. This review will focus on the induction of clustered DNA damage by high-LET radiations presenting the earlier and recent relative data.

  13. Formation of Clustered DNA Damage after High-LET Irradiation: A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation can cause as well as cure cancer. The risk of developing radiation-induced cancer has traditionally been estimated from cancer incidence among survivors of the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These data provide the best estimate of human cancer risk over the dose range for low linear energy transfer (LET) radiations, such as X- or gamma-rays. The situation of estimating the real biological effects becomes even more difficult in the case of high LET particles encountered in space or as the result of domestic exposure to particles from radon gas emitters or other radioactive emitters like uranium-238. Complex DNA damage, i.e., the signature of high-LET radiations comprises by closely spaced DNA lesions forming a cluster of DNA damage. The two basic groups of complex DNA damage are double strand breaks (DSBs) and non-DSB oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDL). Theoretical analysis and experimental evidence suggest there is increased complexity and severity of complex DNA damage with increasing LET (linear energy transfer) and a high mutagenic or carcinogenic potential. Data available on the formation of clustered DNA damage (DSBs and OCDL) by high-LET radiations are often controversial suggesting a variable response to dose and type of radiation. The chemical nature and cellular repair mechanisms of complex DNA damage have been much less characterized than those of isolated DNA lesions like an oxidized base or a single strand break especially in the case of high-LET radiation. This review will focus on the induction of clustered DNA damage by high-LET radiations presenting the earlier and recent relative data.

  14. Embryonic body formation using the tapered soft stencil for cluster culture device.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Hiroshi; Ikeuchi, Masashi; Noguchi, Hirofumi; Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Ikuta, Koji; Hayashi, Shuji

    2011-05-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are expected to provide a source of tissue, a renewable cell source for tissue engineering, and a method for in vitro drug screening for patient-specific or disease-specific treatment. A simple technology by which iPS cells can be differentiated effectively and in large quantities is strongly desired. In this paper, a new device (Tapered Soft Stencil for Cluster Culture: TASCL) is proposed for the easy and efficient formation of EBs which can be used in regenerative medicine. This device was compared with the two major methods currently being evaluated, namely the HD method and the Terasaki® plate (MWC substitution), in terms of the efficiency, morphology and acquired number of EB formation. Using the TASCL device, the shape of the EBs formed was almost a perfect sphere, and the formation was also faster than for the two other methods. There was little variability in the number of cells. Moreover, EBs formed using the TASCL device had the ability to differentiate into all three germ layers, and differentiation of EBs from the TASCL culture into hepatic cells was confirmed. In conclusion, it appears that the TASCL device can be utilized for EB formation to generate cells for regenerative medicine applications.

  15. What Drives Star Formation in Galaxies?: A Multiwavelength Analysis of Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartaltepe, Jeyhan

    Galaxy populations have undergone dramatic evolution between z 2, the peak epoch of star formation activity, and today. They have changed morphologically, transitioning from disk-dominated galaxies to bulge-dominated systems. These bulge-dominated passive galaxies have doubled in stellar mass since z 1, indicating that they previously underwent periods of active star formation while the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) decreased by over an order of magnitude over this same time period (e.g., Madau and Dickinson 2014). What process led to the increased SFR at high redshift and what caused the morphological transformation? It is believed that galaxy mergers and interactions could have played a major role in this evolution. Observations of the galaxy merger rate have shown a similar decrease between z 1 and today (e.g., Kartaltepe et al. 2007). The merger of two disk-dominated galaxies can lead to the formation of a bulge-dominated system and the merger of two gas rich galaxies can enhance star formation in those galaxies relative to isolated systems. However, the precise contribution that galaxy mergers have played in the overall evolution of the cosmic SFR is still an open question. The galaxies with the highest star formation rates are best detected in the far-infrared. The Herschel Space Observatory has detected many such objects out to z 4. These objects are known as luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) and are defined by their total infrared luminosity. These galaxies are considered to be at an important transition stage between gas-rich spiral galaxies and massive elliptical galaxies and quasars (Sanders et al. 1988). Although they are quite rare in the local universe, (U)LIRGs become much more common and start to dominate the cosmic star formation rate at z>0.7 (e.g., Le Floc'h et al. 2005, Magnelli et al. 2013) and likely played a critical role at the peak of galaxy assembly (z 2). Collectively, these objects contribute the bulk of

  16. Multi-wavelength study of X-ray luminous clusters at z ~ 0.3. I. Star-formation activity of cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braglia, F. G.; Pierini, D.; Biviano, A.; Böhringer, H.

    2009-06-01

    Context: The current paradigm of cosmic formation and evolution of galaxy clusters foresees growth mostly through merging. Galaxies in the infall region or in the core of a cluster undergo transformations owing to different environmental stresses. Aims: For two X-ray luminous clusters at redshift z 0.3 with opposite X-ray morphologies (i.e., dynamical states), RXCJ 0014.3-3022 and RXCJ 2308.3-0211, we assess differences in galaxy populations as a function of cluster topography. This is a pilot study for the joint X-ray and optical analysis of the REFLEX-DXL cluster sample. Methods: Cluster large-scale structure and substructure are determined from the combined photometry in the B, V, and R bands, and from multi-object optical spectroscopy at low resolution. Photometric redshifts and broad-band optical colours are determined. A spectral index analysis is performed, based on the [O II](λλ3726, 3728 Å) and Hδ(λ4102 Å) features, and the D4000 break, which are available for more than 100 member galaxies per cluster. Additional far-ultraviolet (FUV) photometry is retrieved from the GALEX archive. Combination of spectral indices and FUV-optical colours provides a picture of the star-formation history in galaxies. Results: In spite of the potential presence of a small fraction of galaxies with obscured star-formation activity, the average star-formation history of cluster members is found to depend on clustercentric distance and, more interestingly, on cluster substructure. The core regions of both clusters mainly host galaxies dominated by old, passively evolving stellar populations, which define the same red sequence in a (B-R) colour-R magnitude diagram. However, a sharp increase in star-formation activity is found along two clearly evident filamentary structures of the merging cluster RXCJ 0014.3-3022, out to its virial radius and beyond. It is produced by luminous (i.e., LR ≥ LRstar) and sub-Lstar galaxies. In contrast, the regular cool-core cluster RXCJ 2308

  17. Blank Computer Floppy Disk Formatting Using the AppleWorks Program, Apple IIe or GS Computers and a Duodisk or Two Disk Drives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This manual is a "how to" training device for formatting blank floppy disks in the AppleWorks program using an Apple IIe or Apple IIGS Computer with Duodisk or two disk drives. The manual provides step-by-step directions, and includes 11 figures depicting the computer screen at the various stages of the formatting sequence. (EW)

  18. Suppression of star formation in the central 200 kpc of a z= 1.4 galaxy cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grützbauch, Ruth; Bauer, Amanda E.; Jørgensen, Inger; Varela, Jesus

    2012-07-01

    We present the results of an extended narrow-band Hα study of the massive galaxy cluster XMMU J2235.3-2557 at z= 1.39. This paper represents a follow-up study to our previous investigation of star formation in the cluster centre, extending our analysis out to a projected cluster radius of 1.5 Mpc. Using the Near InfraRed Imager and Spectrograph on Gemini North Telescope we obtained deep H narrow-band imaging corresponding to the rest-frame wavelength of Hα at the cluster's redshift. We identify a total of 163 potential cluster members in both pointings, excluding stars based on their near-infrared colours derived from VLT/HAWK-I imaging. Of these 163 objects 14 are spectroscopically confirmed cluster members, and 20 per cent are excess line emitters. We find no evidence of star formation activity within a radius of 200 kpc of the brightest cluster galaxy in the cluster core. Dust-corrected star formation rates (SFRs) of excess emitters outside this cluster quenching radius, ? kpc, are on average = 2.7 ± 1.0 M⊙ yr-1, but do not show evidence of increasing SFRs towards the extreme 1.5 Mpc radius of the cluster. No individual cluster galaxy exceeds an SFR of 6 M⊙ yr-1. Massive galaxies (log M*/M⊙ > 10.75) all have low specific SFRs (SSFRs, i.e. SFR per unit stellar mass). At fixed stellar mass, galaxies in the cluster centre have lower SSFRs than the rest of the cluster galaxies, which in turn have lower SSFRs than field galaxies at the same redshift by a factor of a few to 10. For the first time we can demonstrate through measurements of individual SFRs that already at very early epochs (at an age of the Universe of ˜4.5 Gyr) the suppression of star formation is an effect of the cluster environment which persists at fixed galaxy stellar mass.

  19. Langerinneg conventional dendritic cells produce IL-23 to drive psoriatic plaque formation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wohn, Christian; Ober-Blöbaum, Julia L.; Haak, Stefan; Pantelyushin, Stanislav; Cheong, Cheolho; Zahner, Sonja P.; Onderwater, Sabina; Kant, Marius; Weighardt, Heike; Holzmann, Bernhard; Reizis, Boris; Becher, Burkhard; Prens, Errol P.; Clausen, Björn E.

    2013-01-01

    Psoriasis is an autoinflammatory skin disease of unknown etiology. Topical application of Aldara cream containing the Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 agonist Imiquimod (IMQ) onto patients induces flares of psoriasis. Likewise, in mice IMQ triggers pathological changes closely resembling psoriatic plaque formation. Key cytokines like IL-23 and type-I IFN (IFN-I), both being produced mainly by dendritic cells (DCs), have been implicated in psoriasis. Although plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) are the main source of IFNα and thought to initiate disease, conventional DCs (cDCs) appear to maintain the psoriatic lesions. Any role of cDCs during lesion formation remains elusive. Here, we report that selective activation of TLR7 signaling specifically in CD11c+ DCs was sufficient to induce psoriasiform skin disease in mice. Intriguingly, both pDCs and the IFN-I pathway were dispensable for the development of local skin inflammation. Selective TLR7 triggering of Langerin+ DCs resulted in attenuated disease, whereas their depletion did not alter the severity of skin lesions. Moreover, after IMQ-painting, IL-23 was exclusively produced by Langerinneg DCs in vivo. In conclusion, TLR7-activated Langerinneg cDCs trigger psoriatic plaque formation via IL-23–mediated activation of innate IL-17/IL-22–producing lymphocytes, independently of pDCs or IFN-I. These results suggest therapeutic targeting of IL-23 production by cDCs to refine current treatment strategies for psoriasis. PMID:23754427

  20. Tumor-associated macrophages drive spheroid formation during early transcoelomic metastasis of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Mingzhu; Li, Xia; Tan, Shu; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Ji, Weidong; Bellone, Stefania; Xu, Xiaocao; Zhang, Haifeng; Santin, Alessandro D.; Lou, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) can influence ovarian cancer growth, migration, and metastasis, but the detailed mechanisms underlying ovarian cancer metastasis remain unclear. Here, we have shown a strong correlation between TAM-associated spheroids and the clinical pathology of ovarian cancer. Further, we have determined that TAMs promote spheroid formation and tumor growth at early stages of transcoelomic metastasis in an established mouse model for epithelial ovarian cancer. M2 macrophage–like TAMs were localized in the center of spheroids and secreted EGF, which upregulated αMβ2 integrin on TAMs and ICAM-1 on tumor cells to promote association between tumor cells and TAM. Moreover, EGF secreted by TAMs activated EGFR on tumor cells, which in turn upregulated VEGF/VEGFR signaling in surrounding tumor cells to support tumor cell proliferation and migration. Pharmacological blockade of EGFR or antibody neutralization of ICAM-1 in TAMs blunted spheroid formation and ovarian cancer progression in mouse models. These findings suggest that EGF secreted from TAMs plays a critical role in promoting early transcoelomic metastasis of ovarian cancer. As transcoelomic metastasis is also associated with many other cancers, such as pancreatic and colon cancers, our findings uncover a mechanism for TAM-mediated spheroid formation and provide a potential target for the treatment of ovarian cancer and other transcoelomic metastatic cancers. PMID:27721235

  1. Calcium signals drive cell shape changes during zebrafish midbrain-hindbrain boundary formation.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Srishti U; Visetsouk, Mike R; Garde, Ryan J; Hennes, Leah; Kwas, Constance; Gutzman, Jennifer H

    2017-02-01

    One of the first morphogenetic events in the vertebrate brain is the formation of the highly conserved midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB). Specific cell shape changes occur at the point of deepest constriction of the MHB, the midbrain-hindbrain boundary constriction (MHBC), and are critical for proper MHB formation. These cell shape changes are controlled by non-muscle myosin II (NMII) motor proteins which are tightly regulated via the phosphorylation of their associated myosin regulatory light chains (MRLC). However, the upstream signaling pathways that initiate the regulation of NMII to mediate cell shape changes during MHB morphogenesis are not known. We show that intracellular calcium signals are critical for the regulation of cell shortening during initial MHB formation. We demonstrate that the MHB region is poised to respond to calcium transients that occur in the MHB at the onset of MHB morphogenesis and that calcium mediates phosphorylation of MRLC specifically in MHB tissue. Our results indicate that calmodulin 1a (calm1a), expressed specifically in the MHB, and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), together mediate MHBC cell length. Our data suggest that modulation of NMII activity by calcium is critical for proper regulation of cell length to determine embryonic brain shape during development.

  2. Nanodomain Formation on Ferroelectrics and Development of Hard-Disk-Drive-Type Ferroelectric Data Storage Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranaga, Yoshiomi; Uda, Tomoya; Kurihashi, Yuichi; Tochishita, Hikari; Kadota, Michio; Cho, Yasuo

    2009-09-01

    In this study, several read/write (R/W) tests were conducted using a hard-disk-drive-type ferroelectric data storage test system based on scanning nonlinear dielectric microscopy (SNDM). A periodically inverted signal, which corresponded to artificial domain stripes formed on LiTaO3 single crystal, could be read correctly with a bit rate of 2 Mbps using this test system. Bit writing on a 50-nm-thick epitaxial LiTaO3 film at 20 Mbps was also demonstrated. In addition, a noncontact probe-height control technique was adapted to solve the problem of tip abrasion. The gap distance between a probe and a medium surface was successfully controlled on the nanometer order using a noncontact SNDM technique with sharp-pointed tungsten needle probes prepared by electrolytic polishing. Bit writing under a noncontact state was also studied. Artificial domain dots with diameters of less than 100 nm could be formed under the noncontact state.

  3. Einstein observations of the Hydra A cluster and the efficiency of galaxy formation in groups and clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David, L. P.; Arnaud, K. A.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.

    1990-01-01

    The Einstein imaging proportional counter observations of the poor cluster of galaxies centered on the radio galaxy Hydra A are examined. From the surface brightness profile, it is found that the X-ray-emitting gas in the Hydra A cluster must be condensing out of the intracluster medium at a rate of 600 solar masses/yr. This is one of the largest mass deposition rates observed in a cluster of galaxies. The ratio of gas mass to stellar mass is compared for a variety of systems, showing that this ratio correlates with the gas temperature.

  4. Support- dependent evolution of oxidation state and nanoassembly formation of subnanometer copper clusters under carbon dioxide conversion conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, Avik; Yang, Bing; Kolipaka, Karthika L.; Pellin, Michael; Seifert, Soenke; Vajda, Stefan; Materials Science Division Team

    Size- and support- dependence of the properties of copper clusters have been investigated during carbon dioxide conversion with hydrogen at high reactant concentrations and atmospheric pressure. The model catalyst systems were prepared by depositing size-selected Cun clusters (n = 3, 4, 12 and 20) on various amorphous metal oxide (Al2O3, ZnO, and ZrO2) , and carbon-based (UNCD = ultrananocrystaline diamond) supports. During the temperature ramp, the evolution of the chemical state and size of the particles were characterized by in situ grazing incidence X-ray absorption near edge structure (GIXANES), and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) respectively. Under reaction conditions the initially oxidized Cu clusters reduced at various temperatures depending on cluster size and support. Clusters supported on ZnO and UNCD were found to be sinter-resistant under reactive gases at elevated temperatures and atmospheric pressures, whereas on ZrO2 support the clusters formed stable aggregates. Clusters on Al2O3 support demonstrated unique properties, where a formation of a nanostructure was observed during heating, which then disintegrated during the cool down. Under applied conditions, Cu4 clusters on Al2O3 were found to be the most efficient in methanol formation.

  5. Molecular clouds toward the super star cluster NGC 3603; possible evidence for a cloud-cloud collision in triggering the cluster formation

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Y.; Ohama, A.; Hanaoka, N.; Furukawa, N.; Torii, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Fukuda, T.; Soga, S.; Moribe, N.; Kuroda, Y.; Hayakawa, T.; Kuwahara, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Okuda, T.; Dawson, J. R.; Mizuno, N.; Kawamura, A.; Onishi, T.; Maezawa, H.; Mizuno, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present new large field observations of molecular clouds with NANTEN2 toward the super star cluster NGC 3603 in the transitions {sup 12}CO(J = 2-1, J = 1-0) and {sup 13}CO(J = 2-1, J = 1-0). We suggest that two molecular clouds at 13 km s{sup –1} and 28 km s{sup –1} are associated with NGC 3603 as evidenced by higher temperatures toward the H II region, as well as morphological correspondence. The mass of the clouds is too small to gravitationally bind them, given their relative motion of ∼20 km s{sup –1}. We suggest that the two clouds collided with each other 1 Myr ago to trigger the formation of the super star cluster. This scenario is able to explain the origin of the highest mass stellar population in the cluster, which is as young as 1 Myr and is segregated within the central sub-pc of the cluster. This is the second super star cluster along with Westerlund 2 where formation may have been triggered by a cloud-cloud collision.

  6. Antiosteoporotic Activity of Dioscorea alata L. cv. Phyto through Driving Mesenchymal Stem Cells Differentiation for Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Kang-Yung; Horng, Lin-Yea; Sung, Hui-Ching; Huang, Hui-Chuan; Wu, Rong-Tsun

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an ethanol extract of the rhizomes of Dioscorea alata L. cv. Phyto, Dispo85E, on bone formation and to investigate the mechanisms involved. Our results showed that Dispo85E increased the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone nodule formation in primary bone marrow cultures. In addition, Dispo85E stimulated pluripotent C3H10T1/2 stem cells to differentiate into osteoblasts rather than adipocytes. Our in vivo data indicated that Dispo85E promotes osteoblastogenesis by increasing ALP activity and bone nodule formation in both intact and ovariectomized (OVX) mice. Microcomputed tomography (μCT) analysis also showed that Dispo85E ameliorates the deterioration of trabecular bone mineral density (tBMD), trabecular bone volume/total volume (BV/TV), and trabecular bone number (Tb.N) in OVX mice. Our results suggested that Dispo85E is a botanical drug with a novel mechanism that drives the lineage-specific differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells and is a candidate drug for osteoporosis therapy. PMID:21760825

  7. Can Mn–S redox cycling drive sedimentary dolomite formation? A hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Petrash, Daniel A.; Lalonde, Stefan V.; González-Arismendi, Gabriela; Gordon, Robert A.; Méndez, José A.; Gingras, Murray K.; Konhauser, Kurt O.

    2016-06-10

    The formation of dolomite in modern peritidal environments is linked to the degradation of buried microbial mats, with complexation of Ca and Mg by extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) and alkalinity generation through organic carbon respiration facilitating the nucleation of dolomite precursors. In the past two decades, microbial sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, and methanotrophy have all been considered as potential drivers of the nucleation process, but it remains unclear why dolomite formation could not also occur in suboxic sediments where abundant alkalinity is produced by processes linked to Mn(IV) and/or Fe(III) reduction coupled with the diffusion and reoxidation of reduced sulfur species. Here we report the interstitial occurrence of spheroidal aggregates of nanometer-scale Ca-rich dolomite rhombohedra within suboxic sediments associated with remnant microbial mats that developed in the peritidal zone of the Archipelago Los Roques, Venezuela. Multiple analytical tools, including EPMA, ICP-MS, synchrotron-based XRF and XRD, and spatially resolved XANES microanalyses, show that the dolomite-cemented interval exhibits depleted bulk iron concentrations, but is interstitially enriched in Mn and elemental sulfur (S⁰). Manganese occurs in several oxidation states, indicating that the dolomite-cemented interval was the locus of complex biological redox transformations characterized by coupled Mn and S cycling. The tight correspondence between sedimentary Mn and MgCO₃ concentrations further hints at a direct role for Mn during dolomitization. While additional studies are required to confirm its relevance in natural settings, we propose a model by which coupled Mn–S redox cycling may promote alkalinity generation and thus dolomite formation in manner similar to, or even more efficiently, than bacterial sulfate reduction alone.

  8. THE ROLE OF DRY MERGERS FOR THE FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ruszkowski, M.; Springel, V. E-mail: volker@map-garching.mpg.de

    2009-05-10

    Using a resimulation technique, we perform high-resolution cosmological simulations of dry mergers in a massive (10{sup 15} M {sub sun}) galaxy cluster identified in the Millennium Run. Our initial conditions include well resolved compound galaxy models consisting of dark matter halos and stellar bulges that are used to replace the most massive cluster progenitor halos at redshift z = 3, allowing us to follow the subsequent dry merger processes that build up the cluster galaxies in a self-consistent cosmological setting. By construction, our galaxy models obey the stellar mass-size relation initially. Also, we study both galaxy models with adiabatically contracted and uncompressed halos. We demonstrate that the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) evolves away from the Kormendy relation as defined by the smaller mass galaxies (i.e., the relation bends). This is accompanied by a significantly faster dark matter mass growth within the half-light radius of the BCG compared to the increase in the stellar mass inside the same radius. As a result of the comparatively large number of mergers the BCG experiences, its total mass-to-light ratio becomes significantly higher than in typical elliptical galaxies. We also show that the mixing processes between dark matter and stars lead to a small but numerically robust tilt in the fundamental plane and that the BCG lies on the tilted plane. Our model is consistent with the observed steepening of the logarithmic mass-to-light gradient as a function of the stellar mass. As we have not included effects from gas dynamics or star formation, these trends are exclusively due to N-body and stellar dynamical effects. Surprisingly, we find only tentative weak distortion in the Faber-Jackson relation that depends on the aperture size, unlike expected based on studies of isolated merger simulations. This may be due to differences in the distribution of galaxy orbits, which is given in our approach directly by the cosmological context while it has

  9. The origin of massive clusters: from hyper-massive clouds to mini-bursts of star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motte, Frederique; Louvet, Fabien; Nguyen Luong, Quang

    2015-08-01

    Herschel revealed high-density cloud filaments of several pc^3, which are forming clusters of OB-type stars. Counting Herschel protostars gives a direct measure of the mass of stars forming in a period of ~10^5 yrs, the ``instantaneous'' star formation activity. Given their activity, these so-called mini-starburst cloud ridges could be seen as "miniature and instant models" of starburst galaxies. Their characteristics could shed light on the origin of massive clusters.

  10. Formation of prismatic loops from C15 Laves phase interstitial clusters in body-centered cubic iron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Bai, Xian-Ming; Tonks, Michael R.; Biner, S. Bulent

    2015-03-01

    This Letter reports the transition of C15 phase self-interstitial clusters to loops in body-centered-cubic Iron. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to evaluate the relative stabilities of difference interstitial cluster configurations including C15 phase structure and <100> and <111>/2 loops. Within a certain size range, C15 cluster are found more stable than loops, and the relative stabilities are reversed beyond that range. In accordance to the crossover in relative stabilities, C15 clusters may grow by absorbing individual interstitials at small sizes and transitions into loops eventually. The transition takes place by nucleation and reaction of <111>/2 loop segments. These observations explain the absence of C15 phase interstitial clusters predicted by density-functional-theory calculations in previous experimental observations. More importantly, the current results provide a new formation mechanism of <100> loops which requires no interaction of loops.

  11. The Lost Dwarfs of Centaurus A and the Formation of its Dark Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovill, Mia Sauda; Puzia, Thomas H.; Ricotti, Massimo; Taylor, Matthew A.

    2016-11-01

    We present theoretical constraints for the formation of the newly discovered dark star clusters (DSCs) with high mass-to-light ({ M }/{ L }) ratios, from Taylor et al. These compact stellar systems photometrically resemble globular clusters (GCs) but have dynamical { M }/{ L } ratios of ˜10-100, closer to the expectations for dwarf galaxies. The baryonic properties of the DSCs suggest that their host dark matter halos likely virialized at high redshift with { M }\\gt {10}8{M}⊙ . We use a new set of high-resolution N-body simulations of Centaurus A to determine whether there is a set of z = 0 subhalos whose properties are in line with these observations. While we find such a set of subhalos, when we extrapolate the dark matter density profiles into the inner 20 pc, no dark matter halo associated with Centaurus A in our simulations, at any redshift, can replicate the extremely high central mass densities of the DSCs. Among the most likely options for explaining 105-{10}7{M}⊙ within subhalos of 10 pc diameter is the presence of a central massive black hole (BH). We therefore propose that the DSCs are remnant cusps of stellar systems surrounding the central BHs of dwarf galaxies that have been almost completely destroyed by interactions with Centaurus A.

  12. Cell collectivity regulation within migrating cell cluster during Kupffer's vesicle formation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Bessho, Yasumasa

    2015-01-01

    Although cell adhesion is thought to fasten cells tightly, cells that adhere to each other can migrate directionally. This group behavior, called “collective cell migration,” is observed during normal development, wound healing, and cancer invasion. Loss-of-function of cell adhesion molecules in several model systems of collective cell migration results in delay or inhibition of migration of cell groups but does not lead to dissociation of the cell groups, suggesting that mechanisms of cells staying assembled as a single cell cluster, termed as “cell collectivity,” remain largely unknown. During the formation of Kupffer's vesicle (KV, an organ of laterality in zebrafish), KV progenitors form a cluster and migrate together toward the vegetal pole. Importantly, in this model system of collective cell migration, knockdown of cell adhesion molecules or signal components leads to failure of cell collectivity. In this review, we summarize recent findings in cell collectivity regulation during collective migration of KV progenitor cells and describe our current understanding of how cell collectivity is regulated during collective cell migration. PMID:26000276

  13. Formation of metallic magnetic clusters in a Kondo-lattice metal: evidence from an optical study.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, N N; Kugel, K I; Bazhenov, A V; Fursova, T N; Löser, W; Xu, Y; Behr, G; Kusmartsev, F V

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic materials are usually divided into two classes: those with localised magnetic moments, and those with itinerant charge carriers. We present a comprehensive experimental (spectroscopic ellipsomerty) and theoretical study to demonstrate that these two types of magnetism do not only coexist but complement each other in the Kondo-lattice metal, Tb(2)PdSi(3). In this material the itinerant charge carriers interact with large localised magnetic moments of Tb(4f) states, forming complex magnetic lattices at low temperatures, which we associate with self-organisation of magnetic clusters. The formation of magnetic clusters results in low-energy optical spectral weight shifts, which correspond to opening of the pseudogap in the conduction band of the itinerant charge carriers and development of the low- and high-spin intersite electronic transitions. This phenomenon, driven by self-trapping of electrons by magnetic fluctuations, could be common in correlated metals, including besides Kondo-lattice metals, Fe-based and cuprate superconductors.

  14. Formation of metallic magnetic clusters in a Kondo-lattice metal: Evidence from an optical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, N. N.; Kugel, K. I.; Bazhenov, A. V.; Fursova, T. N.; Löser, W.; Xu, Y.; Behr, G.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2012-11-01

    Magnetic materials are usually divided into two classes: those with localised magnetic moments, and those with itinerant charge carriers. We present a comprehensive experimental (spectroscopic ellipsomerty) and theoretical study to demonstrate that these two types of magnetism do not only coexist but complement each other in the Kondo-lattice metal, Tb2PdSi3. In this material the itinerant charge carriers interact with large localised magnetic moments of Tb(4f) states, forming complex magnetic lattices at low temperatures, which we associate with self-organisation of magnetic clusters. The formation of magnetic clusters results in low-energy optical spectral weight shifts, which correspond to opening of the pseudogap in the conduction band of the itinerant charge carriers and development of the low- and high-spin intersite electronic transitions. This phenomenon, driven by self-trapping of electrons by magnetic fluctuations, could be common in correlated metals, including besides Kondo-lattice metals, Fe-based and cuprate superconductors.

  15. Formation of metallic magnetic clusters in a Kondo-lattice metal: Evidence from an optical study

    PubMed Central

    Kovaleva, N. N.; Kugel, K. I.; Bazhenov, A. V.; Fursova, T. N.; Löser, W.; Xu, Y.; Behr, G.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic materials are usually divided into two classes: those with localised magnetic moments, and those with itinerant charge carriers. We present a comprehensive experimental (spectroscopic ellipsomerty) and theoretical study to demonstrate that these two types of magnetism do not only coexist but complement each other in the Kondo-lattice metal, Tb2PdSi3. In this material the itinerant charge carriers interact with large localised magnetic moments of Tb(4f) states, forming complex magnetic lattices at low temperatures, which we associate with self-organisation of magnetic clusters. The formation of magnetic clusters results in low-energy optical spectral weight shifts, which correspond to opening of the pseudogap in the conduction band of the itinerant charge carriers and development of the low- and high-spin intersite electronic transitions. This phenomenon, driven by self-trapping of electrons by magnetic fluctuations, could be common in correlated metals, including besides Kondo-lattice metals, Fe-based and cuprate superconductors. PMID:23189239

  16. Spin Glass Freezing and Ferromagnetic Cluster Formation in LiNiO_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Duijn, Joost; Gaulin, Bruce; Park, Sungil; Lee, Seung-Hun; Copley, John

    2003-03-01

    LiNiO2 displays a layered structure that consists of alternating triangular nets of magnetic Ni and non-magnetic Li ions. Its magnetic properties have been a longstanding source of debate, having been proposed as a candidate for many exotic magnetic ground states. Recent detailed characterization studies have shown that some Ni ions always occupy sites in the Li layers and vice versa. We have carried out inelastic neutron scattering studies on a well characterized sample of LiNiO2 using the new Disk Chopper Spectrometer at NIST. Diffuse inelastic scattering is observed in the forward direction and around (1,0,0) in reciprocal space, indicative of short range, dynamic ferromagnetic order. Spin freezing is directly observed by a decrease in the inelastic scattering and concomitant increase in the elastic scattering below ˜15 K, consistent with bulk susceptibility measurements. Our neutron measurements are interpreted as arising from ferromagnetic correlations within the triangular net and 3D ferromagnetic clusters surrounding Ni sites within the Li sublattice. Such ferromagnetic clusters interupt the formation of a 3D Neel state in which ferromagnetic sheets stack antiferromagnetically, as is believed to be the case in NaNiO2.

  17. Formation of high mass carbon cluster ions from laser ablation of polymers and thin carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasy, William R.; Brenna, J. T.

    1990-02-01

    Three materials were studied by laser ablation/Fourier transform mass spectrometry, using 266 nm laser radiation: a copolymer of ethylene and tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), and a diamond-like carbon film (DLC). In each case, positive ion mass spectra exhibit primarily even-numbered, high mass carbon clusters (``fullerenes'') of the type previously reported for graphite ablation. In the case of ETFE, a large C+60 peak (``buckminsterfullerene'') was observed. The polymer spectra showed a strong dependence on the number of laser pulses on one spot and the laser power density. For ETFE, the fullerene ion relative intensity first increases and then decreases as a function of the number of laser pulses. For the DLC film, fullerenes are observed with a single laser pulse on a fresh spot of the sample. The results are interpreted in terms of a gas phase growth model for the fullerene ion formation.

  18. Coarse-Grained Model for Colloidal Protein Interactions, B22, and Protein Cluster Formation

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Marco A.; Sahin, Eric; Robinson, Anne S.; Roberts, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein cluster formation is an important initial step in the processes of native and non-native protein aggregation, but involves relatively long time and length scales for detailed atomistic simulations and extensive mapping of free energy landscapes. A coarse-grained (CG) model is presented to semi-quantitatively characterize the thermodynamics and key configurations involved in the landscape for protein oligomerization, as well as experimental measures of interactions such as the osmotic second virial coefficient (B22). Based on earlier work, this CG model treats proteins as rigid bodies composed of one bead per amino acid, with each amino acid having specific parameters for its size, hydrophobicity, and charge. The net interactions are a combination of steric repulsions, short-range attractions, and screened long-range charge-charge interactions. Model parametrization was done by fitting simulation results against experimental values of the B22 as a function of solution ionic strength for α-chymotrypsinogen A and γD-crystallin (gD-Crys). The CG model is applied to characterize the pairwise interactions and dimerization of gD-Crys and the dependance on temperature, protein concentration, and ionic strength. The results illustrate that at experimentally relevant conditions where stable dimers do not form, the entropic contributions are predominant in the free-energy of protein cluster formation and colloidal protein interactions, arguing against interpretations that treat B22 primarily from energetic considerations alone. Additionally, the results suggest that electrostatic interactions help to modulate the population of the different stable configurations for protein nearest-neighbor pairs, while short-range attractions determine the relative orientations of proteins within these configurations. Finally, simulation results are combined with Principal Component Analysis to identify those amino-acids / surface patches that form inter-protein contacts

  19. Wide- and contact-binary formation in substructured young stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorval, J.; Boily, C. M.; Moraux, E.; Roos, O.

    2017-02-01

    We explore with collisional gravitational N-body models the evolution of binary stars in initially fragmented and globally subvirial clusters of stars. Binaries are inserted in the (initially) clumpy configurations so as to match the observed distributions of the field-binary-stars' semimajor axes a and binary fraction versus primary mass. The dissolution rate of wide binaries is very high at the start of the simulations, and is much reduced once the clumps are eroded by the global infall. The transition between the two regimes is sharper as the number of stars N is increased, from N = 1.5 k up to 80 k. The fraction of dissolved binary stars increases only mildly with N, from ≈15 per cent to ≈25 per cent for the same range in N. We repeated the calculation for two initial system mean number densities of 6 per pc3 (low) and 400 per pc3 (high). We found that the longer free-fall time of the low-density runs allows for prolonged binary-binary interactions inside clumps and the formation of very tight (a ≈ 0.01 au) binaries by exchange collisions. This is an indication that the statistics of such compact binaries bear a direct link to their environment at birth. We also explore the formation of wide (a ≳ 5 × 104 au) binaries and find a low (≈0.01 per cent) fraction mildly bound to the central star cluster. The high-precision astrometric mission Gaia could identify them as outflowing shells or streams.

  20. Neutral hydrogen gas, past and future star formation in galaxies in and around the `Sausage' merging galaxy cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroe, Andra; Oosterloo, Tom; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Sobral, David; van Weeren, Reinout; Dawson, William

    2015-09-01

    CIZA J2242.8+5301 (z = 0.188, nicknamed `Sausage') is an extremely massive (M200 ˜ 2.0 × 1015 M⊙), merging cluster with shock waves towards its outskirts, which was found to host numerous emission line galaxies. We performed extremely deep Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope H I observations of the `Sausage' cluster to investigate the effect of the merger and the shocks on the gas reservoirs fuelling present and future star formation (SF) in cluster members. By using spectral stacking, we find that the emission line galaxies in the `Sausage' cluster have, on average, as much H I gas as field galaxies (when accounting for the fact cluster galaxies are more massive than the field galaxies), contrary to previous studies. Since the cluster galaxies are more massive than the field spirals, they may have been able to retain their gas during the cluster merger. The large H I reservoirs are expected to be consumed within ˜0.75-1.0 Gyr by the vigorous SF and active galactic nuclei activity and/or driven out by the outflows we observe. We find that the star formation rate (SFR) in a large fraction of H α emission line cluster galaxies correlates well with the radio broad-band emission, tracing supernova remnant emission. This suggests that the cluster galaxies, all located in post-shock regions, may have been undergoing sustained SFR for at least 100 Myr. This fully supports the interpretation proposed by Stroe et al. and Sobral et al. that gas-rich cluster galaxies have been triggered to form stars by the passage of the shock.

  1. Ex-Situ Kinetic Investigations of the Formation of the Poly-Oxo Cluster U38.

    PubMed

    Falaise, Clément; Volkringer, Christophe; Hennig, Christoph; Loiseau, Thierry

    2015-11-09

    The ex-situ qualitative study of the kinetic formation of the poly-oxo cluster U38 , has been investigated after the solvothermal reaction. The resulting products have been characterized by means of powder XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the solid phase and UV/Vis, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and NMR spectroscopies for the supernatant liquid phase. The analysis of the different synthesis batches, stopped at different reaction times, revealed the formation of spherical crystallites of UO2 from t=3 h, after the formation of unknown solid phases at an early stage. The crystallization of U38 occurred from t=4 h at the expense of UO2 , and is completed after t=8 h. Starting from pure uranium(IV) species in solution (t=0-1 h), oxidation reactions are observed with a U(IV) /U(VI) ratio of 70:30 for t=1-3 h. Then, the ratio is inversed with a U(IV) /U(VI) ratio of 25/75, when the precipitation of UO2 occurs. Thorough SEM observations of the U38 crystallites showed that the UO2 aggregates are embedded within. This may indicate that UO2 acts as reservoir of uranium(IV), for the formation of U38 , stabilized by benzoate and THF ligands. During the early stages of the U38 crystallization, a transient crystallized phase appeared at t=4 h. Its crystal structure revealed a new dodecanuclear moiety (U12 ), based on the inner hexanuclear core of {U6 O8 } type, decorated by three additional pairs of dinuclear U2 units. The U12 motif is stabilized by benzoate, oxalates, and glycolate ligands.

  2. Spatiotemporal pattern formation in a prey-predator model under environmental driving forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirohi, Anuj Kumar; Banerjee, Malay; Chakraborti, Anirban

    2015-09-01

    Many existing studies on pattern formation in the reaction-diffusion systems rely on deterministic models. However, environmental noise is often a major factor which leads to significant changes in the spatiotemporal dynamics. In this paper, we focus on the spatiotemporal patterns produced by the predator-prey model with ratio-dependent functional response and density dependent death rate of predator. We get the reaction-diffusion equations incorporating the self-diffusion terms, corresponding to random movement of the individuals within two dimensional habitats, into the growth equations for the prey and predator population. In order to have the noise added model, small amplitude heterogeneous perturbations to the linear intrinsic growth rates are introduced using uncorrelated Gaussian white noise terms. For the noise added system, we then observe spatial patterns for the parameter values lying outside the Turing instability region. With thorough numerical simulations we characterize the patterns corresponding to Turing and Turing-Hopf domain and study their dependence on different system parameters like noise-intensity, etc.

  3. Reward signal in a recurrent circuit drives appetitive long-term memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Ichinose, Toshiharu; Aso, Yoshinori; Yamagata, Nobuhiro; Abe, Ayako; Rubin, Gerald M; Tanimoto, Hiromu

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine signals reward in animal brains. A single presentation of a sugar reward to Drosophila activates distinct subsets of dopamine neurons that independently induce short- and long-term olfactory memories (STM and LTM, respectively). In this study, we show that a recurrent reward circuit underlies the formation and consolidation of LTM. This feedback circuit is composed of a single class of reward-signaling dopamine neurons (PAM-α1) projecting to a restricted region of the mushroom body (MB), and a specific MB output cell type, MBON-α1, whose dendrites arborize that same MB compartment. Both MBON-α1 and PAM-α1 neurons are required during the acquisition and consolidation of appetitive LTM. MBON-α1 additionally mediates the retrieval of LTM, which is dependent on the dopamine receptor signaling in the MB α/β neurons. Our results suggest that a reward signal transforms a nascent memory trace into a stable LTM using a feedback circuit at the cost of memory specificity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10719.001 PMID:26573957

  4. Coordinated binding of Vps4 to ESCRT-III drives membrane neck constriction during MVB vesicle formation.

    PubMed

    Adell, Manuel Alonso Y; Vogel, Georg F; Pakdel, Mehrshad; Müller, Martin; Lindner, Herbert; Hess, Michael W; Teis, David

    2014-04-14

    Five endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) mediate the degradation of ubiquitinated membrane proteins via multivesicular bodies (MVBs) in lysosomes. ESCRT-0, -I, and -II interact with cargo on endosomes. ESCRT-II also initiates the assembly of a ringlike ESCRT-III filament consisting of Vps20, Snf7, Vps24, and Vps2. The AAA-adenosine triphosphatase Vps4 disassembles and recycles the ESCRT-III complex, thereby terminating the ESCRT pathway. A mechanistic role for Vps4 in intraluminal vesicle (ILV) formation has been unclear. By combining yeast genetics, biochemistry, and electron tomography, we find that ESCRT-III assembly on endosomes is required to induce or stabilize the necks of growing MVB ILVs. Yet, ESCRT-III alone is not sufficient to complete ILV biogenesis. Rather, binding of Vps4 to ESCRT-III, coordinated by interactions with Vps2 and Snf7, is coupled to membrane neck constriction during ILV formation. Thus, Vps4 not only recycles ESCRT-III subunits but also cooperates with ESCRT-III to drive distinct membrane-remodeling steps, which lead to efficient membrane scission at the end of ILV biogenesis in vivo.

  5. Trapped electron plasma formation and equilibrium with a low-power radio-frequency drive

    SciTech Connect

    Romé, M.; Maero, G.; Paroli, B.; Pozzoli, R.; Chen, S.

    2015-06-29

    Penning-Malmberg traps confining electron plasmas usually rely on external sources like thermo- and photocathodes. It has been already demonstrated that electron plasmas of comparable densities can be produced by applying a radio-frequency (RF) power to any inner electrode of the trap. Such excitation may result in significant electron heating and ionization of the residual gas with the formation of a plasma column when the RF frequency is of the order or larger than the typical axial bounce frequencies of few-eV electrons, even at RF amplitude of few volts. While discharges are common in plasma generation at higher pressures and RF power, this mechanism is not yet well explored in our working conditions, namely ultra-high vacuum and very low RF power. This plasma production mechanism is very sensitive to the experimental conditions. Interesting phenomena can be observed: transition from a diffuse to a narrow-section, denser plasma column; presence of low-order diocotron modes in transient and steady-state plasmas; modulation of the m=1 diocotron mode and suppression of its instability despite the presence of positive ions and resistive loads. These observations are reported here, and possible explanations are discussed. In addition, a possible electron heating mechanism is investigated with a single-particle, one-dimensional model described by an area-preserving map where an electron bounces within a square potential well and the RF excitation is modelled by a time-oscillating square barrier. The low-energy part of the Poincaré plot includes both quasi-periodic and chaotic regions, where heating up to ionization energies is achievable. Results of a systematic analysis of the map extracting its chaotic properties and scaling laws as a function of the control parameters are reported.

  6. Trapped electron plasma formation and equilibrium with a low-power radio-frequency drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romé, M.; Chen, S.; Maero, G.; Paroli, B.; Pozzoli, R.

    2015-06-01

    Penning-Malmberg traps confining electron plasmas usually rely on external sources like thermo- and photocathodes. It has been already demonstrated that electron plasmas of comparable densities can be produced by applying a radio-frequency (RF) power to any inner electrode of the trap. Such excitation may result in significant electron heating and ionization of the residual gas with the formation of a plasma column when the RF frequency is of the order or larger than the typical axial bounce frequencies of few-eV electrons, even at RF amplitude of few volts. While discharges are common in plasma generation at higher pressures and RF power, this mechanism is not yet well explored in our working conditions, namely ultra-high vacuum and very low RF power. This plasma production mechanism is very sensitive to the experimental conditions. Interesting phenomena can be observed: transition from a diffuse to a narrow-section, denser plasma column; presence of low-order diocotron modes in transient and steady-state plasmas; modulation of the m=1 diocotron mode and suppression of its instability despite the presence of positive ions and resistive loads. These observations are reported here, and possible explanations are discussed. In addition, a possible electron heating mechanism is investigated with a single-particle, one-dimensional model described by an area-preserving map where an electron bounces within a square potential well and the RF excitation is modelled by a time-oscillating square barrier. The low-energy part of the Poincaré plot includes both quasi-periodic and chaotic regions, where heating up to ionization energies is achievable. Results of a systematic analysis of the map extracting its chaotic properties and scaling laws as a function of the control parameters are reported.

  7. A multiwavelength photometric census of AGN and star formation activity in the brightest cluster galaxies of X-ray selected clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, T. S.; Edge, A. C.; Stott, J. P.; Ebeling, H.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Metcalfe, N.; Kaiser, N.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2016-09-01

    Despite their reputation as being `red and dead', the unique environment inhabited by brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) can often lead to a self-regulated feedback cycle between radiatively cooling intracluster gas and star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in the BCG. However the prevalence of `active' BCGs, and details of the feedback involved, are still uncertain. We have performed an optical, UV and mid-IR photometric analysis of the BCGs in 981 clusters at 0.03 < z < 0.5, selected from the ROSAT All Sky Survey. Using Pan-STARRS PS1 3π, GALEX and WISE survey data we look for BCGs with photometric colours which deviate from that of the bulk population of passive BCGs - indicative of AGN and/or star formation activity within the BCG. We find that whilst the majority of BCGs are consistent with being passive, at least 14 per cent of our BCGs show a significant colour offset from passivity in at least one colour index. And, where available, supplementary spectroscopy reveals the majority of these particular BCGs show strong optical emission lines. On comparing BCG `activity' with the X-ray luminosity of the host cluster, we find that BCGs showing a colour offset are preferentially found in the more X-ray luminous clusters, indicative of the connection between BCG `activity' and the intracluster medium.

  8. Reactivity of niobium-carbon cluster ions with hydrogen molecules in relation to formation mechanism of Met-Car cluster ions.

    PubMed

    Miyajima, Ken; Fukushima, Naoya; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2008-07-03

    It is known that a niobium-carbon Met-Car cluster ion (Nb 8C 12 (+)) and its intermediates (Nb 4C 4 (+), Nb 6C 7 (+), etc.) are selectively formed by the aggregation of the Nb atoms in the presence of hydrocarbons. To elucidate the formation mechanism, we prepared Nb n C m (+) with every combination of n and m in the gas phase by the laser vaporization technique. The reactivity of Nb n C m (+) with H 2 was examined under the multiple collision condition, finding that Nb n C m (+) between Nb 2C 3 (+) and Nb 8C 12 (+) are not reactive with H 2. On the basis of the H 2 affinity of Nb n C m (+) experimentally obtained, we propose a dehydrogenation-controlled formation mechanism of niobium-carbon Met-Car cluster ions.

  9. Major contribution of neutral clusters to new particle formation at the interface between the boundary layer and the free troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, C.; Sellegri, K.; Asmi, E.; Hervo, M.; Freney, E.; Colomb, A.; Junninen, H.; Duplissy, J.; Sipilä, M.; Kontkanen, J.; Lehtipalo, K.; Kulmala, M.

    2015-03-01

    The formation of new aerosol particles in the atmosphere is a key process influencing the aerosol number concentration as well as the climate, in particular at high altitude, where the newly formed particles directly influence cloud formation. However, free tropospheric new particle formation (NPF) is poorly documented due to logistic limitations and complex atmospheric dynamics around high-altitude stations that make the observation of this day-time process challenging. Recent improvements in measurement techniques make now possible the detection of neutral clusters down to ~ 1 nm sizes, which opens new horizons in our understanding of the nucleation process. Indeed, only the charged fraction of clusters has been reported in the upper troposphere up to now. Here we report day-time concentrations of charged and neutral clusters (1 to 2.5 nm mobility diameter) recorded at the interface between the boundary layer (BL) and the FT as well as in the FT at the altitude site of Puy de Dôme (1465 m a.s.l.), central France, between 10 and 29 February 2012. Our findings demonstrate that in the FT, and especially at the interface between the BL and the FT, the formation of 1.5 nm neutral clusters significantly exceeds the one of ionic clusters during NPF events, clearly indicating that they dominate in the nucleation process. We also observe that the total cluster concentration significantly increases during NPF events compared to the other days, which was not clearly observed for the charged cluster population in the past. During the studied period, the nucleation process does not seem to be sulfuric acid-limited and could be promoted by the transport of pollutants to the upper troposphere, coupled with low temperatures.

  10. Gas giants in hot water: inhibiting giant planet formation and planet habitability in dense star clusters through cosmic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Todd A.

    2013-05-01

    I show that the temperature of nuclear star clusters, starburst clusters in M82, compact high-z galaxies and some globular clusters of the Galaxy likely exceeded the ice-line temperature (TIce ≈ 150-170 K) during formation for a time comparable to the planet formation time-scale. The protoplanetary discs within these systems will thus, not have an ice line, decreasing the total material available for building protoplanetary embryos, inhibiting the formation of gas- and ice-giants if they form by core accretion, and prohibiting habitability. Planet formation by gravitational instability is similarly suppressed because Toomre's Q > 1 in all but the most massive discs. I show that cluster irradiation can in many cases dominate the thermodynamics and structure of passive and active protoplanetary discs for semi-major axes larger than ˜1-5 au. I discuss these results in the context of the observed lack of planets in 47 Tuc. I predict that a similar search for planets in the globular cluster NGC 6366 ([Fe/H] = -0.82) should yield detections, whereas (counterintuitively) the relatively metal-rich globular clusters NGC 6440, 6441 and 6388 should be devoid of giant planets. The characteristic stellar surface density above which TIce is exceeded in star clusters is ˜ 6 × 103 M⊙ pc- 2 f- 1/2dg, MW, where fdg, MW is the dust-to-gas ratio of the embedding material, normalized to the Milky Way value. Simple estimates suggest that ˜5-50 per cent of the stars in the universe formed in an environment exceeding this surface density. Future microlensing planet searches that directly distinguish between the bulge and disc planet populations of the Galaxy and M31 can test these predictions. Caveats and uncertainties are detailed.

  11. Highly Dynamic Genomic Loci Drive the Synthesis of Two Types of Capsular or Secreted Polysaccharides within the Mycoplasma mycoides Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, Clothilde; Pau-Roblot, Corinne; Courtois, Josiane; Manso-Silván, Lucía; Tardy, Florence; Poumarat, François; Citti, Christine; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Gaurivaud, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasmas of the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster are all ruminant pathogens. Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides is responsible for contagious bovine pleuropneumonia and is known to produce capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and exopolysaccharide (EPS). Previous studies have strongly suggested a role for Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides polysaccharides in pathogenicity. Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides-secreted EPS was recently characterized as a β(1→6)-galactofuranose homopolymer (galactan) identical to the capsular product. Here, we extended the characterization of secreted polysaccharides to all other members of the M. mycoides cluster: M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, M. capricolum subsp. capricolum, M. leachii, and M. mycoides subsp. capri (including the LC and Capri serovars). Extracted EPS was characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance, resulting in the identification of a homopolymer of β(1→2)-glucopyranose (glucan) in M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae and M. leachii. Monoclonal antibodies specific for this glucan and for the Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides-secreted galactan were used to detect the two polysaccharides. While M. mycoides subsp. capri strains of serovar LC produced only capsular galactan, no polysaccharide could be detected in strains of serovar Capri. All strains of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae and M. leachii produced glucan CPS and EPS, whereas glucan production and localization varied among M. capricolum subsp. capricolum strains. Genes associated with polysaccharide synthesis and forming a biosynthetic pathway were predicted in all cluster members. These genes were organized in clusters within two loci representing genetic variability hot spots. Phylogenetic analysis showed that some of these genes, notably galE and glf, were acquired via horizontal gene transfer. These findings call for a reassessment of the specificity of the serological tests based on mycoplasma polysaccharides. PMID:25398856

  12. Cosmological constraints from galaxy clustering and the mass-to-number ratio of galaxy clusters: marginalizing over the physics of galaxy formation

    SciTech Connect

    Reddick, Rachel M.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Lu, Yu; Tinker, Jeremy L. E-mail: rwechsler@stanford.edu

    2014-03-10

    Many approaches to obtaining cosmological constraints rely on the connection between galaxies and dark matter. However, the distribution of galaxies is dependent on their formation and evolution as well as on the cosmological model, and galaxy formation is still not a well-constrained process. Thus, methods that probe cosmology using galaxies as tracers for dark matter must be able to accurately estimate the cosmological parameters. This can be done without knowing details of galaxy formation a priori as long as the galaxies are well represented by a halo occupation distribution (HOD). We apply this reasoning to the method of obtaining Ω {sub m} and σ{sub 8} from galaxy clustering combined with the mass-to-number ratio of galaxy clusters. To test the sensitivity of this method to variations due to galaxy formation, we consider several different models applied to the same cosmological dark matter simulation. The cosmological parameters are then estimated using the observables in each model, marginalizing over the parameters of the HOD. We find that for models where the galaxies can be well represented by a parameterized HOD, this method can successfully extract the desired cosmological parameters for a wide range of galaxy formation prescriptions.

  13. Possible mechanism of BN fullerene formation from a boron cluster: Density-functional tight-binding molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Y

    2016-04-15

    We simulate the formation of a BN fullerene from an amorphous B cluster at 2000 K by quantum mechanical molecular dynamics based on the density-functional tight-binding method. We run 30 trajectories 200 ps in length, where N atoms are supplied around the target cluster, which is initially an amorphous B36 cluster. Most of the incident N atoms are promptly incorporated into the target cluster to form B-N-B bridges or NB3 pyramidal local substructures. BN fullerene formation is initiated by alternating BN ring condensation. Spontaneous atomic rearrangement and N2 dissociation lead to the construction of an sp(2) single-shelled structure, during which the BN cluster undergoes a transition from a liquid-like to a solid-like state. Continual atomic rearrangement and sporadic N2 dissociation decrease the number of defective rings in the BN cluster and increase the number of six-membered rings, forming a more regular shell structure. The number of four-membered rings tends to remain constant, and contributes to more ordered isolated-tetragon-rule ring placement.

  14. Formation of supported rhodium clusters from mononuclear rhodium complexes controlled by the support and ligands on rhodium.

    PubMed

    Serna, Pedro; Yardimci, Dicle; Kistler, Joseph D; Gates, Bruce C

    2014-01-21

    Extremely small supported rhodium clusters were prepared from rhodium complexes on the surfaces of solids with contrasting electron-donor properties. The samples were characterized by infrared and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies to determine the changes occurring in the rhodium species resulting from treatments in hydrogen. Rhodium cluster formation occurred in the presence of H2, and the first steps are controlled by the electron-donor properties of the support--which acts as a ligand--and the other ligands bonded to the rhodium. The cluster formation begins at a lower temperature when the support is zeolite HY than when it is the better electron-donor MgO, provided that the other ligands on rhodium are ethene. In contrast, when these other ligands are CO, the pattern is reversed. The choice of ligands including the support also allows regulation of the stoichiometry of the surface transformations in H2 and the stability of the structures formed in the presence of other reactants. The combination of MgO as the support and ethene as a ligand allows restriction of the rhodium cluster size to the smallest possible-and these were formed in high yields. The data presented here are among the first characterizing the first steps of metal cluster formation.

  15. The challenging task of determining star formation rates: the case of a massive stellar burst in the brightest cluster galaxy of Phoenix galaxy cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Rupal; McDonald, M.; Whelan, John T.; Bruzual, Gustavo

    2017-03-01

    Star formation in galaxies at the centre of cooling-flow galaxy clusters is an important phenomenon in the context of formation and evolution of massive galaxies in the Universe. Yet, star formation rates (SFRs) in such systems continue to be elusive. We use our Bayesian-motivated spectral energy distribution (SED)-fitting code, BAYESCOOL, to estimate the plausible SFR values in the brightest cluster galaxy of a massive, X-ray luminous galaxy cluster, Phoenix. Previous studies of Phoenix have resulted in the highest measurement of SFR for any galaxy, with the estimates reaching up to 1000 M⊙ yr-1. However, a very small number of models have been considered in those studies. BAYESCOOL allows us to probe a large parameter space. We consider two models for star formation history, instantaneous bursts and continuous star formation, a wide range of ages for the old and the young stellar population, along with other discrete parameters, such as the initial mass function, metallicities, internal extinction and extinction law. We find that in the absence of any prior except that the maximum cooling rate <3000 M⊙ yr-1, the SFR lies in the range (2230 - 2890) M⊙ yr-1. If we impose an observational prior on the internal extinction, E(B-V) < 0.6, the best-fitting SFR lies in (454 - 494) M⊙ yr-1, and we consider this as the most probable range of SFR values for Phoenix. The SFR dependence on the extinction is a reflection of the standard age-extinction degeneracy, which can be overcome by using a prior on one of the two quantities in question.

  16. LoCuSS: THE SLOW QUENCHING OF STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTER GALAXIES AND THE NEED FOR PRE-PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, C. P.; Pereira, M. J.; Egami, E.; Rawle, T. D.; Smith, G. P.; Ziparo, F.; McGee, S. L.; Babul, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Okabe, N.; Moran, S. M.

    2015-06-10

    We present a study of the spatial distribution and kinematics of star-forming galaxies in 30 massive clusters at 0.15 < z < 0.30, combining wide-field Spitzer 24 μm and GALEX near-ultraviolet imaging with highly complete spectroscopy of cluster members. The fraction (f{sub SF}) of star-forming cluster galaxies rises steadily with cluster-centric radius, increasing fivefold by 2r{sub 200}, but remains well below field values even at 3r{sub 200}. This suppression of star formation at large radii cannot be reproduced by models in which star formation is quenched in infalling field galaxies only once they pass within r{sub 200} of the cluster, but is consistent with some of them being first pre-processed within galaxy groups. Despite the increasing f{sub SF}-radius trend, the surface density of star-forming galaxies actually declines steadily with radius, falling ∼15× from the core to 2r{sub 200}. This requires star formation to survive within recently accreted spirals for 2–3 Gyr to build up the apparent over-density of star-forming galaxies within clusters. The velocity dispersion profile of the star-forming galaxy population shows a sharp peak of 1.44 σ{sub ν} at 0.3r{sub 500}, and is 10%–35% higher than that of the inactive cluster members at all cluster-centric radii, while their velocity distribution shows a flat, top-hat profile within r{sub 500}. All of these results are consistent with star-forming cluster galaxies being an infalling population, but one that must also survive ∼0.5–2 Gyr beyond passing within r{sub 200}. By comparing the observed distribution of star-forming galaxies in the stacked caustic diagram with predictions from the Millennium simulation, we obtain a best-fit model in which star formation rates decline exponentially on quenching timescales of 1.73 ± 0.25 Gyr upon accretion into the cluster.

  17. LoCuSS: The Slow Quenching of Star Formation in Cluster Galaxies and the Need for Pre-processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, C. P.; Pereira, M. J.; Smith, G. P.; Egami, E.; Babul, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Ziparo, F.; McGee, S. L.; Rawle, T. D.; Okabe, N.; Moran, S. M.

    2015-06-01

    We present a study of the spatial distribution and kinematics of star-forming galaxies in 30 massive clusters at 0.15 < z < 0.30, combining wide-field Spitzer 24 μm and GALEX near-ultraviolet imaging with highly complete spectroscopy of cluster members. The fraction (fSF) of star-forming cluster galaxies rises steadily with cluster-centric radius, increasing fivefold by 2r200, but remains well below field values even at 3r200. This suppression of star formation at large radii cannot be reproduced by models in which star formation is quenched in infalling field galaxies only once they pass within r200 of the cluster, but is consistent with some of them being first pre-processed within galaxy groups. Despite the increasing fSF-radius trend, the surface density of star-forming galaxies actually declines steadily with radius, falling ˜15× from the core to 2r200. This requires star formation to survive within recently accreted spirals for 2-3 Gyr to build up the apparent over-density of star-forming galaxies within clusters. The velocity dispersion profile of the star-forming galaxy population shows a sharp peak of 1.44 σν at 0.3r500, and is 10%-35% higher than that of the inactive cluster members at all cluster-centric radii, while their velocity distribution shows a flat, top-hat profile within r500. All of these results are consistent with star-forming cluster galaxies being an infalling population, but one that must also survive ˜0.5-2 Gyr beyond passing within r200. By comparing the observed distribution of star-forming galaxies in the stacked caustic diagram with predictions from the Millennium simulation, we obtain a best-fit model in which star formation rates decline exponentially on quenching timescales of 1.73 ± 0.25 Gyr upon accretion into the cluster.

  18. Formation of Parametric Images in Positron Emission Tomography Using a Clustering-Based Kinetic Analysis With Statistical Clustering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    constant describing the conversion rate from FDG to FDG{6{PO4. In the clus- tering method, K1 is considered to be a scaling factor, whereas k2 and k3... ve minutes for clustering, and one minute for estimation. 0 0.015 0.03 0.045 0.06 0.075 0.09 0.105 0.12

  19. The influence of silver ion exchange on the formation and luminescent properties of lead sulfide molecular clusters and quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdrshin, A. N.; Lipatova, Zh. O.; Kolobkova, E. V.; Sgibnev, E. M.; Nikonorov, N. V.

    2016-12-01

    PbS molecular clusters and quantum dots are formed by heat treatment in fluorophosphate glasses of the Na2O3-P2O5-Ga2O3-AlF3-ZnO(S)-PbF2 system with different lead concentrations. PbS molecular clusters are characterized by optical absorption in the range of 300-800 nm and low quantum yields, which decrease from 8.9 to 2.7% with a semiconductor component concentration. It is shown that the parameters of formation of quantum dots luminescing in the wavelength range of 1000-1500 nm are considerably different at different semiconductor component concentrations. The influence of silver ion exchange on the formation of PbS nanoparticles is studied. Introduction of silver stimulates the growth of molecular clusters, which is seen in the absorption spectra. A possible mechanism of interaction of silver nanoparticles with PbS quantum dots is presented.

  20. Isolated crater formation by gas cluster ion impact and their use as templates for carbon nanotube growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Kimura, Asahi; Yamada, Isao

    2016-03-01

    Crater-like defects formations with gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) were used as templates for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth. Upon a gas cluster ion impact, dense energy is deposited on a target surface while energy/atom of gas cluster ion is low, which creates crater-like defects. Si and SiO2 were irradiated with Ar-GCIB, subsequently CNTs were grown with an alcohol catalytic CVD using Co and ethanol as catalyst and precursor, respectively. From SEM, AFM and Raman spectroscopy, it was shown that growth of CNT with small diameter was observed on SiO2 with Ar-GCIB irradiation. On Si targets, formation of craters with bottom oxide prevented Co diffusion during CNT growth, as a result, CNT growth was observed only on Si irradiated with high-energy Ar-GCIB. These results showed that isolated defects created by GCIB can be used as templates for nanotube growth.

  1. Segregation formation, thermal and electronic properties of ternary cubic CdZnTe clusters: MD simulations and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurban, Mustafa; Erkoç, Şakir

    2017-04-01

    Surface and core formation, thermal and electronic properties of ternary cubic CdZnTe clusters are investigated by using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In this work, MD simulations of the CdZnTe clusters are performed by means of LAMMPS by using bond order potential (BOP). MD simulations are carried out at different temperatures to study the segregation phenomena of Cd, Zn and Te atoms, and deviation of clusters and heat capacity. After that, using optimized geometries obtained, excess charge on atoms, dipole moments, highest occupied molecular orbitals, lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals, HOMO-LUMO gaps (Eg) , total energies, spin density and the density of states (DOS) have been calculated with DFT. Simulation results such as heat capacity and segregation formation are compared with experimental bulk and theoretical results.

  2. Formation of bimetallic nanoalloys by Au coating of size-selected Cu clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Feng; Wang, Zhi Wei; Palmer, Richard E.

    2012-10-01

    Bimetallic clusters display new characteristics that could not be obtained by varying either the size of pure metallic systems or the composition of bulk bimetals alone. Coating of pre-deposited clusters by vapour deposition is a typical synthesis process of bimetallic clusters. Here, we have demonstrated that hierarchical, gold cluster-decorated copper clusters as well as both heterogeneous and homogeneous Cu-Au bimetallic clusters (4.6 to 10.7 nm) can be prepared by coating pre-deposited, size-selected Cu5000 (4.6 ± 0.2 nm) with Au evaporation at various temperatures. These bimetallic clusters were analyzed by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and associated electron energy loss spectroscopy. The results indicate that the growth of bimetallic clusters is controlled by a competition between nucleation and diffusion of the coating Au atoms.

  3. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 solar mass per year. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar mass per year for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  4. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2006-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 Solar Mass/yr. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O'Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar Mass/yr for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  5. Formation, migration, and clustering of point defects in CuInSe2 from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikkonen, L. E.; Ganchenkova, M. G.; Seitsonen, A. P.; Nieminen, R. M.

    2014-08-01

    The electronic properties of high-efficiency CuInSe2 (CIS)-based solar cells are affected by the microstructural features of the absorber layer, such as point defect types and their distribution. Recently, there has been controversy over whether some of the typical point defects in CIS—VCu, VSe, InCu, CuIn—can form stable complexes in the material. In this work, we demonstrate that the presence of defect complexes during device operational time can be justified by taking into account the thermodynamic and kinetic driving forces acting behind defect microstructure formation. Our conclusions are backed up by thorough state-of-the-art calculations of defect interaction potentials as well as the activation barriers surrounding the complexes. Defect complexes such as InCu-2VCu, InCu-CuIn, and VSe-VCu are shown to be stable against thermal dissociation at device operating temperatures, but can anneal out within tens of minutes at temperatures higher than 150-200 °C (VCu-related complexes) or 400 °C (antisite pair). Our results suggest that the presence of these complexes can be controlled via growth temperatures, which provides a mechanism for tuning the electronic activity of defects and the device altogether.

  6. On the formation of compact, massive subsystems in stellar clusters and its relation with intermediate-mass black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arca-Sedda, M.

    2016-01-01

    During their evolution, star clusters undergo mass segregation, by which the orbits of the most massive stars shrink, while the lighter stars move outwards from the cluster centre. In this context, recent observations and dynamical modelling of several galactic and extragalactic globular clusters (GCs) suggest that most of them show, close to their centre, an overabundance of mass whose nature is still matter of debate. For instance, many works show that orbitally segregated stars may collide with each other in a runaway fashion, leading to the formation of a very massive star or an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) with a mass comparable to the observed mass excess. On the other hand, segregated stars can form a dense system if the IMBH formation fails. In this paper we study the early formation phase of a dense, massive subsystem (MSS) in several GCs models using a recently developed semi-analytical treatment of the mass segregation process. In order to investigate how the MSS properties depend on the host cluster properties, we varied initial mass function (IMF), total mass, spatial distribution and metallicity of our models. Our results show how the IMF contributes to determine the final mass of the MSS, while the metallicity and the spatial distribution play a minor role. The method presented in this paper allowed us to provide scaling relations that connect the MSS mass and the host cluster mass in agreement with the observed correlation. In order to follow the early formation stage of the MSSs and improve our statistical results, we performed several N-body simulations of stellar clusters with masses between 103 and 2 × 105 M⊙.

  7. A large Hα survey of star formation in relaxed and merging galaxy cluster environments at z ∼ 0.15-0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroe, Andra; Sobral, David; Paulino-Afonso, Ana; Alegre, Lara; Calhau, João; Santos, Sergio; van Weeren, Reinout

    2017-03-01

    We present the first results from the largest Hα survey of star formation and active galactic nucleus activity in galaxy clusters. Using nine different narrow-band filters, we select >3000 Hα emitters within 19 clusters and their larger scale environment over a total volume of 1.3 × 105 Mpc3. The sample includes both relaxed and merging clusters, covering the 0.15-0.31 redshift range and spanning from 5 × 1014 to 30 × 1014 M⊙. We find that the Hα luminosity function for merging clusters has a higher characteristic density ϕ* compared to relaxed clusters. ϕ* drops from cluster core to cluster outskirts for both merging and relaxed clusters, with the merging cluster values ∼0.3 dex higher at each projected radius. The characteristic luminosity L* drops over the 0.5-2.0 Mpc distance from the cluster centre for merging clusters and increases for relaxed objects. Among disturbed objects, clusters hosting large-scale shock waves (traced by radio relics) are overdense in Hα emitters compared to those with turbulence in their intracluster medium (traced by radio haloes). We speculate that the increase in star formation activity in disturbed, young, massive galaxy clusters can be triggered by interactions between gas-rich galaxies, shocks and/or the intracluster medium, as well as accretion of filaments and galaxy groups. Our results indicate that disturbed clusters represent vastly different environments for galaxy evolution compared to relaxed clusters or average field environments.

  8. Expansion and concatenation of nonmuscle myosin IIA filaments drive cellular contractile system formation during interphase and mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Fenix, Aidan M.; Taneja, Nilay; Buttler, Carmen A.; Lewis, John; Van Engelenburg, Schuyler B.; Ohi, Ryoma; Burnette, Dylan T.

    2016-01-01

    Cell movement and cytokinesis are facilitated by contractile forces generated by the molecular motor, nonmuscle myosin II (NMII). NMII molecules form a filament (NMII-F) through interactions of their C-terminal rod domains, positioning groups of N-terminal motor domains on opposite sides. The NMII motors then bind and pull actin filaments toward the NMII-F, thus driving contraction. Inside of crawling cells, NMIIA-Fs form large macromolecular ensembles (i.e., NMIIA-F stacks), but how this occurs is unknown. Here we show NMIIA-F stacks are formed through two non–mutually exclusive mechanisms: expansion and concatenation. During expansion, NMIIA molecules within the NMIIA-F spread out concurrent with addition of new NMIIA molecules. Concatenation occurs when multiple NMIIA-Fs/NMIIA-F stacks move together and align. We found that NMIIA-F stack formation was regulated by both motor activity and the availability of surrounding actin filaments. Furthermore, our data showed expansion and concatenation also formed the contractile ring in dividing cells. Thus interphase and mitotic cells share similar mechanisms for creating large contractile units, and these are likely to underlie how other myosin II–based contractile systems are assembled. PMID:26960797

  9. THE 'NESSIE' NEBULA: CLUSTER FORMATION IN A FILAMENTARY INFRARED DARK CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, James M.; Finn, Susanna C.; Chambers, Edward T.; Rathborne, Jill M.; Simon, Robert E-mail: sfinn@bu.ed E-mail: rathborn@das.uchile.c

    2010-08-20

    The 'Nessie' Nebula is a filamentary infrared dark cloud (IRDC) with a large aspect ratio of over 150:1 (1.{sup 0}5 x 0.{sup 0}01 or 80 pc x 0.5 pc at a kinematic distance of 3.1 kpc). Maps of HNC (1-0) emission, a tracer of dense molecular gas, made with the Australia Telescope National Facility Mopra telescope, show an excellent morphological match to the mid-IR extinction. Moreover, because the molecular line emission from the entire nebula has the same radial velocity to within {+-}3.4 km s{sup -1}, the nebula is a single, coherent cloud and not the chance alignment of multiple unrelated clouds along the line of sight. The Nessie Nebula contains a number of compact, dense molecular cores which have a characteristic projected spacing of {approx}4.5 pc along the filament. The theory of gravitationally bound gaseous cylinders predicts the existence of such cores, which, due to the 'sausage' or 'varicose' fluid instability, fragment from the cylinder at a characteristic length scale. If turbulent pressure dominates over thermal pressure in Nessie, then the observed core spacing matches theoretical predictions. We speculate that the formation of high-mass stars and massive star clusters arises from the fragmentation of filamentary IRDCs caused by the 'sausage' fluid instability that leads to the formation of massive, dense molecular cores. The filamentary molecular gas clouds often found near high-mass star-forming regions (e.g., Orion, NGC 6334, etc.) may represent a later stage of IRDC evolution.

  10. Cage Structure Formation of Singly Doped Aluminum Cluster Cations Al n TM + ( TM = Ti, V, Cr)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Sandra M.; Claes, Pieterjan; Neukermans, Sven; Janssens, Ewald

    2011-09-01

    Structural information on free transition metal doped aluminum clusters, Al n TM + ( TM = Ti, V, Cr), was obtained by studying their ability for argon physisorption. Systematic size ( n = 5 - 35) and temperature ( T = 145 - 300 K) dependent investigations reveal that bare Al n + clusters are inert toward argon, while Al n TM + clusters attach one argon atom up to a critical cluster size. This size is interpreted as the geometrical transition from surface-located dopant atoms to endohedrally doped aluminum clusters with the transition metal atom residing in an aluminum cage. The critical size, n crit , is found to be surprisingly large, namely n crit = 16 and n crit = 19 - 21 for TM = V, Cr, and TM = Ti, respectively. Experimental cluster-argon bond dissociation energies have been derived as function of cluster size from equilibrium mass spectra and are in the 0.1-0.3 eV range.

  11. Pair and Cluster Formation in Hybrid Active-Passive Matter Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafnick, Ryan; Garcia, Angel

    2015-03-01

    Systems composed of self-propelling entities, dubbed active matter, are ubiquitous in nature, from flocks of birds and schools of fish to swarms of bacteria and catalytic nanomotors. These systems (both biological and industrial) have applications ranging from micron-scale cargo manipulation and directed transport to water remediation and material processing. When added to a solution with passive (non-self-propelling) particles, active matter leads to new and altered system properties. For example, the diffusion of passive particles increases by orders of magnitude in typical systems, leading to a raised effective temperature. Additionally, particles that normally repel each other exhibit effective attractions which can lead to pair formation and clustering. The nature of these effects depends on both the mechanical collisions of swimmers and the hydrodynamic flow fields they propagate. We computationally examine the effect and dependence of various system parameters, such as particle shape and density, on these properties. This work was funded by NIH grant GM086801 and NSF grant MCB-1050966.

  12. Galaxy and cluster formation in a universe dominated by cold dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Primack, J.R.

    1984-07-01

    The dark matter (DM) that appears to be gravitationally dominant on all astronomical scales larger than the cores of galaxies can be classified, on the basis of its characteristic free-streaming damping mass M/sub D/, as hot (M/sub D/ approx. 10/sup 15/ M/sub mass/), warm (M/sub D/ approx. 10/sup 11/ M/sub mass/), or cold (M/sub D < 10/sup 8/ M/sub mass/). For the case of cold DM, the shape of the DM fluctuation spectrum is determined by (a) the primordial spectrum (on scales larger than the horizon), and (b) stagspansion, the stagnation of the growth of DM fluctuations that enter the horizon while the universe is still radiation-dominated. An attractive feature of the cold dark matter hypothesis is its considerable predictive power: the post-recombination fluctuation spectrum is calculable, and it in turn governs the formation of galaxies and clusters. Good agreement with the data is obtained for a Zeldovich spectrum of primordial fluctuations.

  13. CANDIDATE TIDAL DWARF GALAXIES IN Arp 305: LESSONS ON DWARF DETACHMENT AND GLOBULAR CLUSTER FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, Mark; Smith, Beverly J.; Giroux, Mark L.; Hurlock, Sabrina; Struck, Curtis E-mail: smithbj@etsu.edu E-mail: zshh7@goldmail.etsu.edu

    2009-06-15

    To search for Tidal Dwarf Galaxies (TDGs) and to study star formation (SF) in tidal features, we are conducting a large UV imaging survey of interacting galaxies selected from the Arp (1996) Atlas using the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) telescope. As part of that study, we present a GALEX UV and Sloan Digital Sky Survey and SARA optical study of the gas-rich interacting galaxy pair Arp 305 (NGC 4016/7). The GALEX UV data reveal much extended diffuse UV emission and SF outside the disks. This includes a luminous star-forming region between the two galaxies, and a number of such regions in tidal tails. We have identified 45 young star-forming clumps in Arp 305, including several TDG candidates. By comparing the UV and optical colors to population synthesis models, we determined that the clumps are very young, with several having ages {approx}6 Myr. We do not find many intermediate age clumps in spite of the fact that the last closest encounter was about 300 Myr ago. We have used a smooth particle hydrodynamics code to model the interaction and determine the fate of the star clusters and candidate TDGs.

  14. Formation of ion clusters in the phase separated structures of neutral-charged polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Ha-Kyung; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2015-03-01

    Polyelectrolyte blends, consisting of at least one charged species, are promising candidate materials for fuel cell membranes, for their mechanical stability and high selectivity for proton conduction. The phase behavior of the blends is important to understand, as this can significantly affect the performance of the device. The phase behavior is controlled by χN, the Flory-Huggins parameter multiplied by the number of mers, as well as the electrostatic interactions between the charged backbone and the counterions. It has recently been shown that local ionic correlations, incorporated via liquid state (LS) theory, enhance phase separation of the blend, even in the absence of polymer interactions. In this study, we show phase diagrams of neutral-charged polymer blends including ionic correlations via LS theory. In addition to enhanced phase separation at low χN, the blends show liquid-liquid phase separation at high electrostatic interaction strengths. Above the critical strength, the charged polymer phase separates into ion-rich and ion-poor regions, resulting in the formation of ion clusters within the charged polymer phase. This can be shown by the appearance of multiple spinodal and critical points, indicating the coexistence of several charge separated phases. This work was performed under the following financial assistance award 70NANB14H012 from U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology as part of the Center for Hierarchical Materials Design (CHiMaD).

  15. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF THE FORMATION OF COLD FRONTS IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES: EFFECTS OF ANISOTROPIC VISCOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kentaro; Ogawa, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Matsumoto, Ryoji E-mail: ogawa@astro.s.chiba-u.ac.jp E-mail: matumoto@astro.s.chiba-u.ac.jp

    2013-05-10

    We carried out three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations to study the effects of plasma viscosity on the formation of sharp discontinuities of density and temperature distributions, cold fronts, in clusters of galaxies. By fixing the gravitational potential that confines the cool, dense plasma in a moving subcluster, we simulated its interaction with the hot, lower density plasma around the subcluster. At the initial state, the intracluster medium (ICM) is assumed to be threaded by uniform magnetic fields. The enhancement of plasma viscosity along the direction of magnetic fields is incorporated as anisotropic viscosity depending on the direction of magnetic fields. We found that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the surface of the subcluster grows even in models with anisotropic viscosity, because its effects on the velocity shear across the magnetic field lines are suppressed. We also found that magnetic fields around the interface between the subcluster and ICM are amplified even in the presence of viscosity, while magnetic fields behind the subcluster are amplified up to {beta}{sup -1} {approx} 0.01 in models with viscosity, whereas they are amplified up to {beta}{sup -1} {approx} 0.1 in models without viscosity, where {beta} is the ratio of gas pressure to magnetic pressure.

  16. Formation of a sodium bicarbonate cluster in the structure of sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, M. V.; Kamzin, A. S.

    2015-02-01

    Ceramic sodium-substituted carbonated hydroxyapatite has been synthesized using the method of the solid-phase reaction in the temperature range of 640-820°C in water vapor. It has been established that substitutions of Ca2+ ions in the cation and anion subsystems with Na+ ions and the PO{4/3-} and OH- groups with CO{3/2-} ions lead to a considerable acceleration of the shrinkage and synthesis of dense ceramics at substantially lower temperatures than in the case of unsubstituted hydroxyapatite. Sintering in water vapor leads to densification of carbonate groups in channel positions, which induces the appearance of orderings of A2 and B2 types (bands with wave numbers 867 and 865 cm-1 in IR spectra, respectively) as well as the protonation of carbonate groups both in A and B sites and the formation of sodium bicarbonate clusters (856 and 859 cm-1) in addition to carbonate ordering of A1 and B1 types (879 and 872 cm-1).

  17. THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: CLUSTERING DEPENDENCE ON GALAXY STELLAR MASS AND STAR FORMATION RATE AT z {approx} 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mostek, Nick; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael; Davis, Marc; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2013-04-10

    We present DEEP2 galaxy clustering measurements at z {approx} 1 as a function of stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and specific SFR (sSFR). We find a strong positive correlation between stellar mass and clustering amplitude on 1-10 h {sup -1} Mpc scales for blue, star-forming galaxies with 9.5 < log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) < 11 and no dependence for red, quiescent galaxies with 10.5 < log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) < 11.5. Using recently re-calibrated DEEP2 SFRs from restframe B-band magnitude and optical colors, we find that within the blue galaxy population at z {approx} 1 the clustering amplitude increases strongly with increasing SFR and decreasing sSFR. For red galaxies there is no significant correlation between clustering amplitude and either SFR or sSFR. Blue galaxies with high SFR or low sSFR are as clustered on large scales as red galaxies. We find that the clustering trend observed with SFR can be explained mostly, but not entirely, by the correlation between stellar mass and clustering amplitude for blue galaxies. We also show that galaxies above the star-forming 'main sequence' are less clustered than galaxies below the main sequence, at a given stellar mass. These results are not consistent with the high-sSFR population being dominated by major mergers. We also measure the clustering amplitude on small scales ({<=}0.3 h {sup -1} Mpc) and find an enhanced clustering signal relative to the best-fit large-scale power law for red galaxies with high stellar mass, blue galaxies with high SFR, and both red and blue galaxies with high sSFR. The increased small-scale clustering for galaxies with high sSFRs is likely linked to triggered star formation in interacting galaxies. These measurements provide strong constraints on galaxy evolution and halo occupation distribution models at z {approx} 1.

  18. The effect of ram-pressure stripping and starvation on the star formation properties of cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, A.; Boissier, S.; Cortese, L.; Gavazzi, G.

    2009-12-01

    We have combined UV to radio centimetric observations of resolved galaxies in the Virgo cluster with multizone, chemo-spectrophotometric models of galaxy evolution especially tailored to take into account the effects of the cluster environment (ram pressure stripping and starvation). This exercise has shown that anemic spirals with truncated radial profiles of the gas component and of the young stellar populations, typical in rich clusters of galaxies, have been perturbed by a recent (˜100 Myr) ram pressure stripping event induced by their interaction with the cluster intergalactic medium. Starvation is not able to reproduce the observed truncated radial profiles. Both ram pressure and starvation induce a decrease of the stellar surface brightness of the perturbed disc, and thus can hardly be invoked to explain the formation of lenticular galaxies inhabiting rich clusters, which are characterised by higher surface brightnesses than early type spirals of similar luminosity. In dwarfs the ram pressure stripping event is so efficient to totally remove their gas thus stopping on short time scales (<2 Gyr) their star formation activity. Low luminosity star forming discs can be transformed in dE galaxies.

  19. The Epipolythiodiketopiperazine Gene Cluster in Claviceps purpurea: Dysfunctional Cytochrome P450 Enzyme Prevents Formation of the Previously Unknown Clapurines

    PubMed Central

    Tudzynski, Paul; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Claviceps purpurea is an important food contaminant and well known for the production of the toxic ergot alkaloids. Apart from that, little is known about its secondary metabolism and not all toxic substances going along with the food contamination with Claviceps are known yet. We explored the metabolite profile of a gene cluster in C. purpurea with a high homology to gene clusters, which are responsible for the formation of epipolythiodiketopiperazine (ETP) toxins in other fungi. By overexpressing the transcription factor, we were able to activate the cluster in the standard C. purpurea strain 20.1. Although all necessary genes for the formation of the characteristic disulfide bridge were expressed in the overexpression mutants, the fungus did not produce any ETPs. Isolation of pathway intermediates showed that the common biosynthetic pathway stops after the first steps. Our results demonstrate that hydroxylation of the diketopiperazine backbone is the critical step during the ETP biosynthesis. Due to a dysfunctional enzyme, the fungus is not able to produce toxic ETPs. Instead, the pathway end-products are new unusual metabolites with a unique nitrogen-sulfur bond. By heterologous expression of the Leptosphaeria maculans cytochrome P450 encoding gene sirC, we were able to identify the end-products of the ETP cluster in C. purpurea. The thioclapurines are so far unknown ETPs, which might contribute to the toxicity of other C. purpurea strains with a potentially intact ETP cluster. PMID:27390873

  20. Studies of the formation, chemical reactivity, and properties of small clusters: Application to an understanding of aerosol formation and heterogeneous chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The small cluster program involves (1) studies of reactions related to formation and growth of heteromolecular clusters and their thermochemical properties, (2) studies of photoinitiated processes in clusters, (3) investigations related to heterogeneous reactions including the influence of reaction centers on the interconversion, and (4) theoretical calculations of properties, dynamics, and structure. A major thrust of the work during the past year has been devoted to a study of the role of ionization and the presence of ions on reactions and energetics. During the past few months, particular attention has been paid to systems having varying proton affinities. From the data, we can determine the influence of these values on the nature of the reactions and ascertain the ultimate chemical nature of the ionization center formed as a result of the reactions. 83 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Formation of rhyolite at the Okataina Volcanic Complex, New Zealand: New insights from analysis of quartz clusters in plutonic lithics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeter, K.; Beane, R. J.; Deering, C. D.; Gravley, D. M.; Bachmann, O.

    2014-12-01

    Granitoid lithic clasts from the 0.7 ka Kaharoa eruption at the Tarawera volcano (Okataina Volcanic Complex, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand) - the world's most productive region where rhyolite volcanism is currently active - give insight into the processes of rhyolite formation. The plutonic lithic clasts of the Kaharoa eruption consist of (1) quartz phenocrysts, which are often grouped into clusters of two to eight quartz grains, (2) plagioclase phenocrysts with anorthitic cores and albitic rims, and (3) interstitial potassium feldspar. Quartz orientations obtained through electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) methods show that 78% of the 82 analyzed clusters have at least one pair of quartz grains with matched dipyramidal faces that are in either parallel or Esterel twin orientation. Variations in cathodoluminescence (CL) zoning patterns of the quartz suggest that quartz clusters in the plutonic lithics formed after initial crystal growth and that many quartz crystals were subject to one or more resorption events. Thus, individual quartz crystals with different magmatic histories came together into preferred orientations to form clusters; this process is indicative of oriented quartz synneusis and suggests a history of crystal accumulation. The quartz clusters are interpreted to have formed as part of a crystal cumulate mush within a shallow magma chamber where quartz crystals rotated into contact along their dipyramidal faces during hindered settling and/or compaction. Therefore, the preservation of oriented quartz clusters from the Kaharoa plutonic lithics provides direct evidence for synchronous, shallow pluton formation from a cumulate mush during active volcanism. This result is consistent with a model whereby melt-rich, high-silica rhyolite formation occurs via interstitial melt extraction from a low-silica rhyolite mush in the shallow crust.

  2. Formation of charged H3O+ and OH- fragments at consistent shifts of protons in water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednyakov, A. S.; Novakovskaya, Yu. V.

    2016-09-01

    Probable paths of consistent shifts of bridge protons within the hexamolecular rings of dodecamer water cluster at different arrangement of neighboring molecules are determined. As with individual rings, consistent shifts of protons in molecular cages are found to be promoted by contraction/extension of the oxygen skeleton. Transition states characterized by the formation of different numbers of such charged fragments as H3Oδ+, H5O 2 δ+ , and OH-, are identified. Conditions of the relatively long-term (about picoseconds) existence of the fragments in cluster systems are determined.

  3. Formation of Globular Clusters in Atomic-cooling Halos Via Rapid Gas Condensation and Fragmentation during the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimm, Taysun; Cen, Renyue; Rosdahl, Joakim; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the formation of metal-poor globular clusters (GCs) at the center of two dark matter halos with {M}{{halo}}˜ 4× {10}7 {M}⊙ at z\\gt 10 using cosmological radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. We find that very compact (≲1 pc) and massive (˜ 6× {10}5 {M}⊙ ) clusters form rapidly when pristine gas collapses isothermally with the aid of efficient Lyα emission during the transition from molecular-cooling halos to atomic-cooling halos. Because the local free-fall time of dense star-forming gas is very short (\\ll 1 {{Myr}}), a large fraction of the collapsed gas is turned into stars before stellar feedback processes blow out the gas and shut down star formation. Although the early stage of star formation is limited to a small region of the central star-forming disk, we find that the disk quickly fragments due to metal enrichment from supernovae. Sub-clusters formed in the fragmented clouds eventually merge with the main cluster at the center. The simulated clusters closely resemble the local GCs in mass and size but show a metallicity spread that is much wider than found in the local GCs. We discuss a role of pre-enrichment by Pop III and II stars as a potential solution to the latter issue. Although not without shortcomings, it is encouraging that a naive blind (not tuned) cosmological simulation presents a possible channel for the formation of at least some massive GCs.

  4. Titanium embedded cage structure formation in Al{sub n}Ti{sup +} clusters and their interaction with Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, M. B.; Vega, A.; Balbás, L. C.; Aguilera-Granja, F.

    2014-05-07

    Recently, Ar physisorption was used as a structural probe for the location of the Ti dopant atom in aluminium cluster cations, Al{sub n}Ti{sup +} [Lang et al., J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 22, 1508 (2011)]. As an experiment result, the lack of Ar complexes for n > n{sub c} determines the cluster size for which the Ti atom is located inside of an Al cage. To elucidate the decisive factors for the formation of endohedrally Al{sub n}Ti{sup +}, experimentalists proposed detailed computational studies as indispensable. In this work, we investigated, using the density functional theory, the structural and electronic properties of singly titanium doped cationic clusters, Al{sub n}Ti{sup +} (n = 16–21) as well as the adsorption of an Ar atom on them. The first endohedral doped cluster, with Ti encapsulated in a fcc-like cage skeleton, appears at n{sub c} = 21, which is the critical number consistent with the exohedral-endohedral transition experimentally observed. At this critical size the non-crystalline icosahedral growth pattern, related to the pure aluminium clusters, with the Ti atom in the surface, changes into a endohedral fcc-like pattern. The map of structural isomers, relative energy differences, second energy differences, and structural parameters were determined and analyzed. Moreover, we show the critical size depends on the net charge of the cluster, being different for the cationic clusters (n{sub c} = 21) and their neutral counterparts (n{sub c} = 20). For the Al {sub n} Ti {sup +} · Ar complexes, and for n < 21, the preferred Ar adsorption site is on top of the exohedral Ti atom, with adsorption energy in very good agreement with the experimental value. Instead, for n = 21, the Ar adsorption occurs on the top an Al atom with very low absorption energy. For all sizes the geometry of the Al{sub n}Ti{sup +} clusters keeps unaltered in the Ar-cluster complexes. This fact indicates that Ar adsorption does not influence the cluster structure, providing support

  5. Clusters of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation: formation of short DNA fragments. II. Experimental detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The basic 30-nm chromatin fiber in the mammalian cell consists of an unknown (possibly helical) arrangement of nucleosomes, with about 1.2 kb of DNA per 10-nm length of fiber. Track-structure considerations suggest that interactions of single delta rays or high-LET particles with the chromatin fiber might result in the formation of multiple lesions spread over a few kilobases of DNA (see the accompanying paper: W.R. Holley and A. Chatterjee, Radiat. Res. 145, 188-199, 1996). In particular, multiple DNA double-strand breaks and single-strand breaks may form. To test this experimentally, primary human fibroblasts were labeled with [3H]thymidine and exposed at 0 degrees C to X rays or accelerated nitrogen or iron ions in the LET range of 97-440 keV/microns. DNA was isolated inside agarose plugs and subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis under conditions that allowed good separation of 0.1-2 kb size DNA. The bulk of DNA remained in the well or migrated only a small distance into the gel. It was found that DNA fragments in the expected size range were formed linearly with dose with an efficiency that increased with LET. A comparison of the yield of such fragments with the yield of total DNA double-strand breaks suggests that for the high-LET ions a substantial proportion (20-90%) of DNA double-strand breaks are accompanied within 0.1-2 kb by at least one additional DNA double-strand break. It is shown that these results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations based on treating the 30-nm chromatin fiber as the target for ionizing particles. Theoretical considerations also predict that the clusters will contain numerous single-strand breaks and base damages. It is proposed that such clusters be designated "regionally multiply damaged sites." Postirradiation incubation at 37 degrees C resulted in a decline in the number of short DNA fragments, suggesting a repair activity. The biological significance of regionally multiply damaged sites is presently unknown.

  6. Clusters of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation: Formation of short DNA fragments. II. Experimental detection

    SciTech Connect

    Rydberg, B.

    1996-02-01

    The basic 30-nm chromatin fiber in the mammalian cell consists of an unknown (possibly helical) arrangement of nucleosomes, with about 1.2 kb of DNA per 10-nm length of fiber. Track-structure considerations suggest that interactions of single {delta} rays or high-LET particles with the chromatin fiber might result in the formation of multiple lesions spread over a few kilobases of DNA. In particular, multiple DNA double-strand breaks and single-strand breaks may form. To test this experimentally, primary human fibroblasts were labeled with [{sup 3}H]thymidine and exposed at 0{degrees}C to X rays or accelerated nitrogen or iron ions in the LET range of 97-440 keV/pm. DNA was isolated inside agarose plugs and subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis under conditions that allowed good separation of 0.1-2 kb size DNA. The bulk of DNA remained in the well or migrated only a small distance into the gel. It was found that DNA fragments in the expected size range were formed linearly with dose with an efficiency that increased with LET. A comparison of the yield of such fragments with the yield of total DNA double-strand breaks suggests that for the high-LET ions a substantial proportion (20-90%) of DNA double-strand breaks are accompanied within 0.1-2 kb by at least one additional DNA double-strand break. It is shown that these results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations based on treating the 30-nm chromatin fiber as the target for ionizing particles. Theoretical considerations also predict that the clusters will contain numerous single-strand breaks and base damages. It is proposed that such clusters be designated {open_quotes}regionally multiply damaged sites.{close_quotes} Postirradiation incubation at 37{degrees}C resulted in a decline in the number of short DNA fragments, suggesting a repair activity. The biological significance of regionally multiply damaged sites is presently unknown. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. A CEP215–HSET complex links centrosomes with spindle poles and drives centrosome clustering in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chavali, Pavithra L.; Chandrasekaran, Gayathri; Barr, Alexis R.; Tátrai, Péter; Taylor, Chris; Papachristou, Evaggelia K.; Woods, C. Geoffrey; Chavali, Sreenivas; Gergely, Fanni

    2016-01-01

    Numerical centrosome aberrations underlie certain developmental abnormalities and may promote cancer. A cell maintains normal centrosome numbers by coupling centrosome duplication with segregation, which is achieved through sustained association of each centrosome with a mitotic spindle pole. Although the microcephaly- and primordial dwarfism-linked centrosomal protein CEP215 has been implicated in this process, the molecular mechanism responsible remains unclear. Here, using proteomic profiling, we identify the minus end-directed microtubule motor protein HSET as a direct binding partner of CEP215. Targeted deletion of the HSET-binding domain of CEP215 in vertebrate cells causes centrosome detachment and results in HSET depletion at centrosomes, a phenotype also observed in CEP215-deficient patient-derived cells. Moreover, in cancer cells with centrosome amplification, the CEP215–HSET complex promotes the clustering of extra centrosomes into pseudo-bipolar spindles, thereby ensuring viable cell division. Therefore, stabilization of the centrosome–spindle pole interface by the CEP215–HSET complex could promote survival of cancer cells containing supernumerary centrosomes. PMID:26987684

  8. Are the Effects of Structure Formation Seen in the Central Metallicity of Galaxy Clusters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkholy, Tamer Y.; Bautz, Mark W.; Canizares, Claude R.

    2015-05-01

    A sample of 46 nearby clusters observed with Chandra is analyzed to produce radial density, temperature, entropy, and metallicity profiles, as well as other morphological measurements. The entropy profiles are computed to larger radii than in previous Chandra cluster sample analyses. We find that the iron mass fraction measured in the inner 0.15{{R}500} shows a larger dispersion across the sample of low-mass clusters than it does for the sample of high-mass clusters. We interpret this finding as the result of the mixing of more halos in large clusters than in small clusters, leading to an averaging of the metallicity in the large clusters, and thus less dispersion of metallicity. This interpretation lends support to the idea that the low-entropy, metal-rich gas of merging halos reaches the clusters’ centers, which explains observations of core-collapse supernova product metallicity peaks, and which is seen in hydrodynamical simulations. The gas in these merging halos would have to reach cluster centers without mixing in the outer regions. On the other hand, the metallicity dispersion does not change with mass in the outer regions of the clusters, suggesting that most of the outer metals originate from a source with a more uniform metallicity level, such as during pre-enrichment. We also measure a correlation between the metal content in low-mass clusters and the morphological disturbance of their intracluster medium, as measured by centroid shift. This suggests an alternative interpretation, whereby transitional metallicity boosts in the center of low-mass clusters account for the larger dispersion of their metallicities.

  9. Clusters of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation: Formation of short DNA fragments. I. Theoretical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Holley, W.R.; Chatterjee, A.

    1996-02-01

    We have developed a general theoretical model for the interaction of ionizing radiation with chromatin. Chromatin is modeled as a 30-nm-diameter solenoidal fiber composed of 20 turns of nucleosomes, 6 nucleosomes per turn. Charged-particle tracks are modeled by partitioning the energy deposition between primary track core, resulting from glancing collisions with 100 eV or less per event, and {delta} rays due to knock-on collisions involving energy transfers > 100 eV. A Monte Carlo simulation incorporates damages due to the following molecular mechanisms: (1) ionization of water molecules leading to the formation of {circ}OH, {circ}H, e{sub aq}, etc.; {circ}OH attack on sugar molecules leading to strand breaks; {circ}OH attack on bases; direct ionization of the sugar molecules leading to strand breaks; direct ionization of the bases. Our calculations predict significant clustering of damage both locally, over regions up to 40 hp and over regions extending to several kilobase pairs. A characteristic feature of the regional damage predicted by our model is the production of short fragments of DNA associated with multiple nearby strand breaks. Such fragments have subsequently been detected experimentally and are reported in an accompanying paper after exposure to both high- and low-LET radiation. The overall measured yields agree well quantitatively with the theoretical predictions. Our theoretical results predict the existence of a strong peak at about 85 bp, which represents the revolution period about the nucleosome. Other peaks at multiples of about 1,000 bp correspond to the periodicity of the particular solenoid model of chromatin used in these calculations. Theoretical results in combination with experimental data on fragmentation spectra may help determine the consensus or average structure of the chromatin fibers in mammalian DNA. 27 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Clusters of DNA induced by ionizing radiation: formation of short DNA fragments. I. Theoretical modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holley, W. R.; Chatterjee, A.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a general theoretical model for the interaction of ionizing radiation with chromatin. Chromatin is modeled as a 30-nm-diameter solenoidal fiber comprised of 20 turns of nucleosomes, 6 nucleosomes per turn. Charged-particle tracks are modeled by partitioning the energy deposition between primary track core, resulting from glancing collisions with 100 eV or less per event, and delta rays due to knock-on collisions involving energy transfers >100 eV. A Monte Carlo simulation incorporates damages due to the following molecular mechanisms: (1) ionization of water molecules leading to the formation of OH, H, eaq, etc.; (2) OH attack on sugar molecules leading to strand breaks: (3) OH attack on bases; (4) direct ionization of the sugar molecules leading to strand breaks; (5) direct ionization of the bases. Our calculations predict significant clustering of damage both locally, over regions up to 40 bp and over regions extending to several kilobase pairs. A characteristic feature of the regional damage predicted by our model is the production of short fragments of DNA associated with multiple nearby strand breaks. The shapes of the spectra of DNA fragment lengths depend on the symmetries or approximate symmetries of the chromatin structure. Such fragments have subsequently been detected experimentally and are reported in an accompanying paper (B. Rydberg, Radiat, Res. 145, 200-209, 1996) after exposure to both high- and low-LET radiation. The overall measured yields agree well quantitatively with the theoretical predictions. Our theoretical results predict the existence of a strong peak at about 85 bp, which represents the revolution period about the nucleosome. Other peaks at multiples of about 1,000 bp correspond to the periodicity of the particular solenoid model of chromatin used in these calculations. Theoretical results in combination with experimental data on fragmentation spectra may help determine the consensus or average structure of the

  11. The effect of dust and gas energetics on the clustered star formation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Andrea

    The effect of dust/gas heating and cooling is shown to have a significant effect on the process of clustered star formation. Compared to an isothermal simulation, a simulation with a more accurate description of the equation of state produces an order of magnitude fewer stars as well as stars of much greater mass. The energetics algorithm used to calculate the dust and gas temperature includes the radiative heating of dust, dust-gas collisional heating/cooling, cosmic-ray heating, and molecular cooling. It uses DUSTY, a spherical continuum radiative transfer code, to model the dust temperature distribution around young stellar objects with various luminosities and surrounding gas and dust density distributions. The gas temperature is then determined by assuming energy balance. Before the complete energetics algorithm is included in a simulation, first only the dust heating component is included. The gas temperature is then set solely by the dust temperature. The resultant mass functions of our simulations which include heating are compared to those which assume an isothermal equation of state. We find that including dust heating severely limits star formation; we form at least an order of magnitude fewer objects when we include dust heating compared to an isothermal simulation. The mass functions from our simulations which include heating are much more similar than the mass functions from our isothermal simulations to the observed mass functions, in that they are able to form high-mass stars ( M [Special characters omitted.] 10[Special characters omitted.] ). The distribution of the high-mass objects is well- approximated by the Salpeter initial mass function. Including the complete energetics algorithm in a simulation produces results similar to a simulation with only dust heating. Both simulations have similar density profile parameters. The mass accretion, mass, and luminosity evolution of the sinks is also similar. The average temperature, however, is cooler

  12. Revisiting argon cluster formation in a planar gas jet for high-intensity laser matter interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Y.; Hagmeijer, R.; van der Weide, E. T. A.; Bastiaens, H. M. J.; Boller, K.-J.

    2016-04-01

    We determine the size of argon clusters generated with a planar nozzle, based on the optical measurements in conjunction with theoretical modelling. Using a quasi-one dimensional model for the moments of the cluster size distribution, we determine the influence of critical physical assumptions. These refer to the surface tension depending on the presence of thermal equilibrium, the mass density of clusters, and different methods to model the growth rate of the cluster radius. We show that, despite strong variation in the predicted cluster size, , the liquid mass ratio, g, can be determined with high trustworthiness, because g is predicted as being almost independent of the specific model assumptions. Exploiting this observation, we use the calculated value for g to retrieve the cluster size from optical measurements, i.e., calibrated Rayleigh scattering and interferometry. Based on the measurements of the cluster size vs. the nozzle stagnation pressure, we provide a new power law for the prediction of the cluster size in experiments with higher values of the Hagena parameter (Γ*>104 ) . This range is of relevance for experiments on high-intensity laser matter interactions.

  13. Duration of the Early Galactic Formation Epoch: HST Photometry for Red-Horizontal Branch Clusters in the Outer Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesser, J. E.; Stetson, P. B.; McClure, R. D.; van den Bergh, S.; Bolte, M.; Harris, W. E.; van den Berg, D. A.; Bell, R. A.; Fahlman, G. G.; Richer, H. B.; Bond, H. E.

    1997-12-01

    Last year we presented evidence from HST photometry of the low-metallicity cluster NGC 2419 (M_V = -9.5, R_⊙ ~ 90 kpc, [Fe/H] = -2.2) that globular cluster formation began at essentially the same time throughout a region of the Galactic halo now almost 200 kpc in diameter (Harris et al. 1997 AJ 114, 1030). We now turn to the time spread of halo formation, with the ultimate aim of addressing the relative roles of mergers over the first 4 or more Gyrs (Searle & Zinn 1978, ApJ, 225, 357; Lee, Demarque & Zinn 1994 ApJ, 423, 248) versus models favoring a rapid collapse (Eggen, Lynden-Bell & Sandage 1962, ApJ, 236, 748; Stetson, VandenBerg & Bolte 1996, PASP, 108, 560), or some combination of those and other processes. We provide the first reliable measurements from the giant branch through the main-sequence turnoffs of red-horizontal-branch clusters in the outer halo, which are frequently postulated to be younger than most other globular clusters. From WFPC2 F555W (`V') and F814W (`I') photometry for Pal 3 (M_V = -5.2, R_⊙ ~ 87 kpc), Pal 4 (M_V = -5.8, R_⊙ ~ 98 kpc), and Eridanus (M_V = -4.8, R_⊙ ~ 78 kpc), all with [Fe/H] ~ -1.5, we estimate their relative ages by making differential comparisons among them and with respect to inner-halo objects of, presumably, comparable chemical compositions. It seems likely at this stage of our analysis that (a) the three clusters are the same age to our measurement precision of ~ 1 Gyr, and, (b) the CMDs of all three outer halo clusters differ from those of M 3 and M 5 (our template clusters of similar metallicity), in the sense that the outer halo clusters are younger by ~ 3 Gyr, or they are ~ 0.5 dex more metal-rich than currently thought. Large uncertainties in chemical compositions (He, [alpha /Fe], [CNO/Fe]) for outer halo and template clusters alike mask the true interpretation.

  14. Simulation of GaAs cluster formation on GaAs(00-1), AlAs(00-1), Si(001), and As1/Si(001) surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, D. K.; Koch, S. M.; Takai, T.; Halicioglu, T.; Tiller, W. A.

    1988-01-01

    Recently developed semiempirical potential energy functions for the Ga-As-Si and Ga-As-Al systems have been applied here to determine the excess formation energy for GaAs clusters on GaAs(00-1), AlAs(00-1), Si(001), and one atomic layer As-covered Si(001) substrates as a function of cluster size and cluster shape by the Monte Carlo technique. Pyramidal type ledges on the GaAs clusters are found to be the favored ledge for the first three layers while an inverted-pyramidal type ledge is also favored in certain cases for the As1/Si(001) substrate. Cluster formation at ledges is compared with cluster formation on a flat terrace for the Si(001) and the As1/Si(001) substrates.

  15. A dual cryogenic ion trap spectrometer for the formation and characterization of solvated ionic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Brett M.; Voss, Jonathan M.; Garand, Etienne

    2015-11-01

    A new experimental approach is presented in which two separate cryogenic ion traps are used to reproducibly form weakly bound solvent clusters around electrosprayed ions and messenger-tag them for single-photon infrared photodissociation spectroscopy. This approach thus enables the vibrational characterization of ionic clusters comprised of a solvent network around large and non-volatile ions. We demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument by clustering water, methanol, and acetone around a protonated glycylglycine peptide. For water, cluster sizes with greater than twenty solvent molecules around a single ion are readily formed. We further demonstrate that similar water clusters can be formed around ions having a shielded charge center or those that do not readily form hydrogen bonds. Finally, infrared photodissociation spectra of D2-tagged GlyGlyH+ ṡ (H2O)1-4 are presented. They display well-resolved spectral features and comparisons with calculations reveal detailed information on the solvation structures of this prototypical peptide.

  16. Radiolytic formation of Ag clusters in aqueous polyvinyl alcohol solution and hydrogel matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manmohan; Varshney, Lalit; Francis, Sanju

    2005-05-01

    Ag+ ions, in aqueous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) solution and in PVA hydrogel matrix have been gamma radiolytically reduced to produce Ag clusters. UV-visible absorption spectral characteristics of Ag clusters obtained under different gamma dose, Ag+ concentration, PVA concentration and crosslinking density of the gel used have been studied. The effect of Ag+ ions on the radiation crosslinking of the PVA chains, have also been investigated by viscosity measurements. The radiation-induced Ag+ ion reduction was followed by crosslinking of the PVA chains. PVA was found to be a very efficient stabilizer to prevent aggregation of Ag clusters. The clusters produced in the hydrogel matrix were expected to be smaller than the pore size (∼2-20 nm) of the gels used in the study. These Ag clusters were unable to reduce methyl viologen (MV2+) chloride and were stable in air.

  17. Atomistic studies of formation and diffusion of helium clusters and bubbles in BCC iron

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, David M; Stoller, Roger E; Osetskiy, Yury N

    2011-01-01

    In fusion applications, helium created by transmutation plays an important role in the response of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels to neutron radiation damage. We have performed extensive atomistic simulations using the ORNL 3-body Fe He interatomic potential combined with three interatomic potentials for the iron matrix. Some of the results obtained are summarized in this review. Interstitial helium is very mobile and coalesces together to form interstitial clusters. We have investigated the mobility of these clusters. When an interstitial He cluster reaches sufficient size, it punches out an Fe interstitial, creating an immobile helium vacancy cluster. If more helium atoms join it, more Fe interstitials can be created; the He V defect is a nascent bubble. These mechanisms are investigated together in simulations that examine the nucleation of He defects. Mobile interstitial He clusters and helium bubbles 1 to 6 nm across are also simulated separately. Results are compared based on temperature and interatomic potentials used.

  18. Self-regulated cooling flows in elliptical galaxies and in cluster cores - Is exclusively low mass star formation really necessary?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.; Djorgovski, S.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Bruzual A., G.

    1986-01-01

    A self-consistent treatment of the heating by supernovae associated with star formation in a spherically symmetric cooling flow in a cluster core or elliptical galaxy is presented. An initial stellar mass function similar to that in the solar neighborhood is adopted. Inferred star-formation rates, within the cooling region - typically the inner 100 kpc around dominant galaxies at the centers of cooling flows in XD clusters - are reduced by about a factor of 2, relative to rates inferred when the heat input from star formation is ignored. Truncated initial mass functions (IMFs) are also considered, in which massive star formation is suppressed in accordance with previous treatments, and colors are predicted for star formation in cooling flows associated with central dominant elliptical galaxies and with isolated elliptical galaxies surrounded by gaseous coronae. The low inferred cooling-flow rates around isolated elliptical galaxies are found to be insensitive to the upper mass cutoff in the IMF, provided that the upper mass cutoff exceeds 2 M solar mass. Comparison with observed colors favors a cutoff in the IMF above 1 M solar mass in at least two well-studied cluster cooling flows, but a normal IMF cannot be excluded definitively. Models for NGC 1275 support a young (less than about 3 Gyr) cooling flow. As for the isolated elliptical galaxies, the spread in colors is consistent with a normal IMF. A definitive test of the IMF arising via star formation in cooling flows requires either UV spectral data or supernova searches in the cooling-flow-centered galaxies.

  19. Cluster-root formation and carboxylate release in three Lupinus species as dependent on phosphorus supply, internal phosphorus concentration and relative growth rate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xing; Pearse, Stuart J.; Lambers, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Some Lupinus species produce cluster roots in response to low plant phosphorus (P) status. The cause of variation in cluster-root formation among cluster-root-forming Lupinus species is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate if cluster-root formation is, in part, dependent on different relative growth rates (RGRs) among Lupinus species when they show similar shoot P status. Methods Three cluster-root-forming Lupinus species, L. albus, L. pilosus and L. atlanticus, were grown in washed river sand at 0, 7·5, 15 or 40 mg P kg−1 dry sand. Plants were harvested at 34, 42 or 62 d after sowing, and fresh and dry weight of leaves, stems, cluster roots and non-cluster roots of different ages were measured. The percentage of cluster roots, tissue P concentrations, root exudates and plant RGR were determined. Key Results Phosphorus treatments had major effects on cluster-root allocation, with a significant but incomplete suppression in L. albus and L. pilosus when P supply exceeded 15 mg P kg−1 sand. Complete suppression was found in L. atlanticus at the highest P supply; this species never invested more than 20 % of its root weight in cluster roots. For L. pilosus and L. atlanticus, cluster-root formation was decreased at high internal P concentration, irrespective of RGR. For L. albus, there was a trend in the same direction, but this was not significant. Conclusions Cluster-root formation in all three Lupinus species was suppressed at high leaf P concentration, irrespective of RGR. Variation in cluster-root formation among the three species cannot be explained by species-specific variation in RGR or leaf P concentration. PMID:24061491

  20. High-frequency detection of the formation and stabilization of a radiation-induced defect cluster in semiconductor structures

    SciTech Connect

    Puzanov, A. S.; Obolenskiy, S. V. Kozlov, V. A.; Volkova, E. V.; Paveliev, D. G.

    2015-12-15

    The processes of the formation and stabilization of a radiation-induced defect cluster upon the arrival of a fast neutron to the space-charge region of a semiconductor diode are analyzed. The current pulse formed by secondary electrons is calculated and the spectrum of the signal generated by the diode (detector) under the action of an instantaneous neutron flux of the fission spectrum is determined. The possibility of experimental detection of the picosecond radiation-induced transition processes is discussed.

  1. Formation of Exotic Networks of Water Clusters in Helium Droplets Facilitated by the Presence of Neon Atoms.

    PubMed

    Douberly, Gary E; Miller, Roger E; Xantheas, Sotiris S

    2017-03-22

    Water clusters are formed in helium droplets via the sequential capture of monomers. One or two neon atoms are added to each droplet prior to the addition of water. The infrared spectrum of the droplet ensemble reveals several signatures of polar, water tetramer clusters having dipole moments between 2D and 3D. Comparison with ab initio computations supports the assignment of the cluster networks to noncyclic "3 + 1" clusters, which are ∼5.3 kcal/mol less stable than the global minimum nonpolar cyclic tetramer. The (H2O)3Ne + H2O ring insertion barrier is sufficiently large, such that evaporative helium cooling is capable of kinetically quenching the nonequilibrium tetramer system prior to its rearrangement to the lower energy cyclic species. To this end, the reported process results in the formation of exotic water cluster networks that are either higher in energy than the most stable gas-phase analogs or not even stable in the gas phase.

  2. The role of Super Stellar Cluster in extreme stellar formation: which programme for the E-ELT ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouan, D.; Gratadour, D.; Perrot, C.

    2013-11-01

    In ULIRGs, the intense star formation (up to 1000 Msol / year ) induced by the direct interaction of two galaxies is concretized as extremely compact and bright star clusters with no equivalent in the Galaxy. These super star cluster ( SSC ) which play a major role in the structural and chemical Evolution of galaxies are rare and distant (d ≈ 150 Mpc ) with a diameter lower than the resolution achieved with adaptive optics on a 8 -10m telescope. The resolution offered by MICADO on the EELT (10 mas , 8 pc at 150 Mpc ) will allow a major leap in three types of programs: 1) characterizing the starburst on five times more distant objects; 2) spatial resolution of the close SSC to address many questions: Schmidt law, filiation with globular clusters, proper spatial structure ( IMF, HII region clustering, dust clustering, etc.); 3) finding direct links between a starburst and the presence of a central super-massive black hole. Instrumental choices are analyzed against these objectives.

  3. From Boron Cluster to Two-Dimensional Boron Sheet on Cu(111) Surface: Growth Mechanism and Hole Formation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongsheng; Gao, Junfeng; Zhao, Jijun

    2013-01-01

    As attractive analogue of graphene, boron monolayers have been theoretically predicted. However, due to electron deficiency of boron atom, synthesizing boron monolayer is very challenging in experiments. Using first-principles calculations, we explore stability and growth mechanism of various boron sheets on Cu(111) substrate. The monotonic decrease of formation energy of boron cluster BN with increasing cluster size and low diffusion barrier for a single B atom on Cu(111) surface ensure continuous growth of two-dimensional (2D) boron cluster. During growth process, hexagonal holes can easily arise at the edge of a 2D triangular boron cluster and then diffuse entad. Hence, large-scale boron monolayer with mixed hexagonal-triangular geometry can be obtained via either depositing boron atoms directly on Cu(111) surface or soft landing of small planar BN clusters. Our theoretical predictions would stimulate further experiments of synthesizing boron sheets on metal substrates and thus enrich the variety of 2D monolayer materials. PMID:24241341

  4. Life Before the Fall: Star Formation of Galaxies in Groups Prior to Cluster Assembly at z~0.37

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Kim-Vy; Gonzalez, Anthony; Moustakas, John; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2005-06-01

    We propose to obtain a deep MIPS 24 micron map (18'x18') of a protocluster made of 4 distinct galaxy groups that are gravitationally bound to each other at z=0.37. The galaxy groups already have a total combined mass comparable to the Coma cluster, but they have at least 4 times as many emission line galaxies as Coma. The SG1120 complex thus provides an unprecedented opportunity for determining when and how star formation is quenched (or briefly enhanced) in the galaxies that will evolve into cluster members. MIPS is ideal for measuring the emission due to warm dust at mid-IR wavelengths. This sensitive tracer of integrated star formation enables us to identify weakly star-forming members (~1 solar mass/year) to very dusty, strongly star-forming ones, e.g. ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and the possible progenitors of post-starburst (E+A) members. Combining mid-IR with the deep, wide-field X-ray/optical/near-IR imaging and spectroscopy we already have in hand, we will trace how star formation varies as a function of environment and how quickly cluster galaxies build up their stellar masses.

  5. Cluster formation and distributions in field ionization of coadsorbed methanol and water on platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothfuss, C. J.; Medvedev, V. K.; Stuve, E. M.

    2016-08-01

    Pure and mixed clusters of methanol and water were examined with pulsed field desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) as a function of adlayer composition varying from pure water to nominally pure methanol. The experiments were performed on a Pt tip at 165 K and total pressure of approximately 5 × 10-6 Torr. Protonated clusters of up 7 water molecules and up to 4 methanol molecules were detected. For mixed adlayers, mixed clusters involving 1 or 2 water and methanol molecules were observed. The hydronium cluster (H2O)H+ exhibited unusual behavior in that its maximum intensity occurred for an approximately equimolar mixture. This was attributed to direct ionization of a methanol monohydrate species, (CH3OH ṡ H2O). Water production was observed in methanol-rich layers and ascribed to scission of the C-O bond to produce CH3 and OH. The TOF-MS data exhibited significant time lags for most higher mass clusters. The time lags for pure H2O were analyzed in terms of a two-step mechanism involving a trade-off of ion cluster emission and growth, from which the rate constant for cluster growth was estimated as 9 × 10-6 s-1.

  6. Formation of massive black holes through runaway collisions in dense young star clusters.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Simon F Portegies; Baumgardt, Holger; Hut, Piet; Makino, Junichiro; McMillan, Stephen L W

    2004-04-15

    A luminous X-ray source is associated with MGG 11--a cluster of young stars approximately 200 pc from the centre of the starburst galaxy M 82 (refs 1, 2). The properties of this source are best explained by invoking a black hole with a mass of at least 350 solar masses (350 M(o)), which is intermediate between stellar-mass and supermassive black holes. A nearby but somewhat more massive cluster (MGG 9) shows no evidence of such an intermediate-mass black hole, raising the issue of just what physical characteristics of the clusters can account for this difference. Here we report numerical simulations of the evolution and motion of stars within the clusters, where stars are allowed to merge with each other. We find that for MGG 11 dynamical friction leads to the massive stars sinking rapidly to the centre of the cluster, where they participate in a runaway collision. This produces a star of 800-3,000 M(o) which ultimately collapses to a black hole of intermediate mass. No such runaway occurs in the cluster MGG 9, because the larger cluster radius leads to a mass segregation timescale a factor of five longer than for MGG 11.

  7. A Comparison of Alternative Distributed Dynamic Cluster Formation Techniques for Industrial Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Gholami, Mohammad; Brennan, Robert W

    2016-01-06

    In this paper, we investigate alternative distributed clustering techniques for wireless sensor node tracking in an industrial environment. The research builds on extant work on wireless sensor node clustering by reporting on: (1) the development of a novel distributed management approach for tracking mobile nodes in an industrial wireless sensor network; and (2) an objective comparison of alternative cluster management approaches for wireless sensor networks. To perform this comparison, we focus on two main clustering approaches proposed in the literature: pre-defined clusters and ad hoc clusters. These approaches are compared in the context of their reconfigurability: more specifically, we investigate the trade-off between the cost and the effectiveness of competing strategies aimed at adapting to changes in the sensing environment. To support this work, we introduce three new metrics: a cost/efficiency measure, a performance measure, and a resource consumption measure. The results of our experiments show that ad hoc clusters adapt more readily to changes in the sensing environment, but this higher level of adaptability is at the cost of overall efficiency.

  8. A Comparison of Alternative Distributed Dynamic Cluster Formation Techniques for Industrial Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Mohammad; Brennan, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate alternative distributed clustering techniques for wireless sensor node tracking in an industrial environment. The research builds on extant work on wireless sensor node clustering by reporting on: (1) the development of a novel distributed management approach for tracking mobile nodes in an industrial wireless sensor network; and (2) an objective comparison of alternative cluster management approaches for wireless sensor networks. To perform this comparison, we focus on two main clustering approaches proposed in the literature: pre-defined clusters and ad hoc clusters. These approaches are compared in the context of their reconfigurability: more specifically, we investigate the trade-off between the cost and the effectiveness of competing strategies aimed at adapting to changes in the sensing environment. To support this work, we introduce three new metrics: a cost/efficiency measure, a performance measure, and a resource consumption measure. The results of our experiments show that ad hoc clusters adapt more readily to changes in the sensing environment, but this higher level of adaptability is at the cost of overall efficiency. PMID:26751447

  9. Spontaneous formation of large clusters in a lattice gas above the critical point.

    PubMed

    Khain, Evgeniy; Khasin, Michael; Sander, Leonard M

    2014-12-01

    We consider clustering of particles in the lattice gas model above the critical point. We find the probability for large density fluctuations over scales much larger than the correlation length. This fundamental problem is of interest in various biological contexts such as quorum sensing and clustering of motile, adhesive, cancer cells. In the latter case, it may give a clue to the problem of growth of recurrent tumors. We develop a formalism for the analysis of this rare event employing a phenomenological master equation and measuring the transition rates in numerical simulations. The spontaneous clustering is treated in the framework of the eikonal approximation to the master equation.

  10. Spontaneous formation of large clusters in a lattice gas above the critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khain, Evgeniy; Khasin, Michael; Sander, Leonard M.

    2014-12-01

    We consider clustering of particles in the lattice gas model above the critical point. We find the probability for large density fluctuations over scales much larger than the correlation length. This fundamental problem is of interest in various biological contexts such as quorum sensing and clustering of motile, adhesive, cancer cells. In the latter case, it may give a clue to the problem of growth of recurrent tumors. We develop a formalism for the analysis of this rare event employing a phenomenological master equation and measuring the transition rates in numerical simulations. The spontaneous clustering is treated in the framework of the eikonal approximation to the master equation.

  11. Distribution of star formation rates during the rapid assembly of NGC 1399 as deduced from its globular cluster system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, C.; Hilker, M.; Kroupa, P.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.

    2016-10-01

    Ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) share many properties with globular clusters (GCs) and are found in similar environments. Here, a large sample of UCDs and GCs around NGC 1399, the central giant elliptical of the Fornax galaxy cluster, is used to infer their formation history and also to shed light on the formation of NGC 1399 itself. We assumed that all GCs and UCDs in our sample are the result of star cluster (SC) formation processes and used them as tracers of past star formation activities. After correcting our GC/UCD sample for mass loss, we interpreted their overall mass function to be a superposition of SC populations that formed coevally during different formation epochs. The SC masses of each population were distributed according to the embedded cluster mass function (ECMF), a pure power law with the slope - β. Each ECMF was characterized by a stellar upper mass limit, Mmax, which depended on the star formation rate (SFR). We decomposed the observed GC/UCD mass function into individual SC populations and converted Mmax of each SC population to an SFR. The overall distribution of SFRs reveals under which conditions the GC/UCD sample around NGC 1399 formed. Considering the constraints set by the age of the GCs/UCDs and the present stellar mass of NGC 1399, we found that the formation of the GCs/UCDs can be well explained within our framework with values for β below 2.3. This finding agrees very well with the observation of young SCs where β ≈ 2.0 is usually found. Even though we took into account that some of the most massive objects might not be genuine SCs and applied different corrections for the mass loss, we found that these considerations do not influence much the outcome. We derived the peak SFRs to be between approximately 300 and 3000 M⊙ yr-1, which matches the SFRs observed in massive high-redshift sub-millimeter galaxies and an SFR estimate inferred from NGC 1399 based on the so-called downsizing picture, meaning that more massive

  12. Observations of Lyα and O vi: Signatures of Cooling and Star Formation in a Massive Central Cluster Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Megan; Connor, Thomas; Voit, G. Mark; Postman, Marc

    2017-02-01

    We report new Hubble Space Telescope COS and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph spectroscopy of a star-forming region (∼ 100 {M}ȯ yr‑1) in the center of the X-ray cluster RX J1532.9+3021 (z = 0.362), to follow-up the CLASH team discovery of luminous UV filaments and knots in the central massive galaxy. We detect broad (∼500 km s‑1) Lyα emission lines with extraordinarily high equivalent widths (EQW ∼ 200 Å) and somewhat less broadened Hα (∼220 km s‑1). Ultraviolet emission lines of N v and O vi are not detected, which constrains the rate at which gas cools through temperatures of 106 K to be ≲10 M⊙ yr‑1. The COS spectra also show a flat rest-frame UV continuum with weak stellar photospheric features, consistent with the presence of recently formed hot stars forming at a rate of ∼10 M⊙ yr‑1, uncorrected for dust extinction. The slope and absorption lines in these UV spectra are similar to those of Lyman Break Galaxies at z≈ 3, albeit those with the highest Lyα equivalent widths and star formation rates. This high-EQW Lyα source is a high-metallicity galaxy rapidly forming stars in structures that look nothing like disks. This mode of star formation could significantly contribute to the spheroidal population of galaxies. The constraint on the luminosity of any O vi line emission is stringent enough to rule out steady and simultaneous gas cooling and star formation, unlike similar systems in the Phoenix Cluster and Abell 1795. The fact that the current star formation rate differs from the local mass cooling rate is consistent with recent simulations of episodic active galactic nucleus feedback and star formation in a cluster atmosphere.

  13. Bar star clusters in the LMC - Formation history from UBV integrated photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bica, E.; Claria, J. J.; Dottori, H.

    1992-06-01

    The sample of star clusters in the LMC Bar region with integrated UBV photometry was enlarged by approximately a factor four, totaling 129 objects. The (B-V) histogram gap between blue and red clusters disappears with this deeper sample. Age groups in terms of equivalent SWB types were derived and their spatial distribution studied. Clusters younger than t about 200 Myr are not homogeneously distributed through the bar. In particular a strong star forming event at t about 100 Myr was detected in the eastern part of the Bar, consisting of a compact grouping of seven coeval clusters around NGC 2058 and NGC 2065. Also, 11 close pairs and two trios are analyzed, and the colors indicate that only four pairs are clearly not coeval.

  14. Infrared Spectroscopy of Naphthalene Aggregation and Cluster Formation in Argon Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roser, J. E.; Allamondola, L. J.

    2011-01-01

    Fourier-transform mid-infrared absorption spectra of mixed argon/naphthalene matrices at 5 K are shown with ratios of argon-to-naphthalene that vary from 1000 to 0. These spectra show the changes as naphthalene clustering and aggregation occurs, with moderate spectral shifts affecting the C-H vibrational modes and relatively small or no shifts to the C-C and C-C-C vibrational modes. The possible contribution of homogeneous naphthalene clusters to the interstellar unidentified infrared bands is discussed. The contribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) clusters to the 7.7 micron emission plateau and the blue shading of the 12.7 micron emission band are identified as promising candidates for future research. In addition, since PAH clusters are model components of Jupiter and Titan's atmospheres, the information presented here may also be applicable to the spectroscopy of these objects.

  15. Study of instability driving inward particle flux during the formation of transport barriers at the edge of the HL-2A tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, D. F.; Lan, T.; Liu, A. D.; Yu, C. X.; Zhao, H. L.; Shen, H. G.; Yan, L. W.; Dong, J. Q.; Xu, M.; Zhao, K. J.; Cheng, J.; Duan, X. R.; Liu, Y.; Chen, R.; Sun, X.; Xie, J. L.; Li, H.; Liu, W. D.; The HL-2A Team

    2017-01-01

    An electrostatic coherent mode with a frequency of 20∼ 100 kHz can be observed during the formation of transport barriers in high-confinement-mode plasma in the HL-2A tokamak, using reciprocating Langmuir probes. The mode drives a strong inward particle flux measured directly with four-tip probes with values comparable to the particle flux at the striking point in the divertor, which has also been validated by the measurement of other diagnostics. Several characteristics simultaneously indicate that the mode is an ion mode excited at the edge, which plays an important role in the formation of transport barriers besides particle diffusion.

  16. Formation and decay of the compound nucleus *220Th within the dynamical cluster-decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemdeep, Chopra, Sahila; Kaur, Arshdeep; Gupta, Raj K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The radioactive *220Th compound nucleus (CN) is of interest since the evaporation residue (ER) cross sections are available for various entrance channels 16O+204Pb , 40Ar+180Hf , 48Ca+172Yb , and 82Se+138Ba at near barrier energies. Within the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM), the radioactive CNs *215Fr, *242Pu, *246Bk, and *254Fm are studied where the main decay mode is fission, with very small predicted ER cross section. *220Th provides a first case with experimentally observed ER cross section instead of fission. Purpose: To look for the optimum "hot-compact" target-projectile (t-p) combinations for the synthesis of "cold"*. For best fitting of the measured ER cross sections, with quasifission (qf) content, if any, the fusion-fission (ff) component is predicted. The magic-shell structure and entrance channel mass-asymmetry effects are analyzed, and the behavior of CN formation and survival probabilities PCN and Psurv is studied. Methods: The quantum-mechanical fragmentation theory (QMFT) is used to predict the possible cold t-p combinations for synthesizing *220Th, and the QMFT-based DCM is used to analyze its decay channels for the experimentally studied entrance channels. The only parameter of the model, the neck length Δ R , varies smoothly with the excitation energy E* of CN and is used to best fit the ER data and predict qf and ff cross sections. Results: The hot-compact and "cold-elongated" fragmentation paths show dissimilar results, whose comparisons with measured fission yields result in t-p combinations, the cold reaction valleys. For the decay process, the fixed Δ R fit the measured ER cross section nicely, but not the individual decay-channel cross sections, which require the presence of qf effects, less so for asymmetric t-p combinations, and large (predicted) ff cross section. Conclusions: The calculated yields for hot-compact fragmentation path compared favorably with the observed asymmetric fission-mass distribution, resulting in

  17. The influence of sodium nanoparticles formation on luminescent properties of fluorophosphate glasses containing molecular clusters and quantum dots of lead selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatova, Zh. O.; Kolobkova, E. V.; Sidorov, A. I.; Nikonorov, N. V.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of sodium nanoparticles and secondary heat treatment conditions on the spectralluminescent characteristics of fluorophosphate glasses with PbSe molecular clusters and quantum dots is studied. Experiments with glasses containing no sodium nanoparticles show that their thermal treatment leads to the formation of molecular clusters with subsequent formation of quantum dots having an intense luminescence. The results of numerical simulation for glasses with sodium nanoparticles shows that heat treatment leads to formation of a sodium fluoride shell on the nanoparticles surface. It is shown that quenching of the luminescence of PbSe molecular clusters and quantum dots takes place in these glasses.

  18. Nucleosomes Suppress the Formation of Double-strand DNA Breaks during Attempted Base Excision Repair of Clustered Oxidative Damages*

    PubMed Central

    Cannan, Wendy J.; Tsang, Betty P.; Wallace, Susan S.; Pederson, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation can produce multiple, clustered oxidative lesions in DNA. The near simultaneous excision of nearby lesions in opposing DNA strands by the base excision repair (BER) enzymes can produce double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). This attempted BER accounts for many of the potentially lethal or mutagenic DSBs that occur in vivo. To assess the impact of nucleosomes on the frequency and pattern of BER-dependent DSB formation, we incubated nucleosomes containing oxidative damages in opposing DNA strands with selected DNA glycosylases and human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1. Overall, nucleosomes substantially suppressed DSB formation. However, the degree of suppression varied as a function of (i) the lesion type and DNA glycosylase tested, (ii) local sequence context and the stagger between opposing strand lesions, (iii) the helical orientation of oxidative lesions relative to the underlying histone octamer, and (iv) the distance between the lesion cluster and the nucleosome edge. In some instances the binding of a BER factor to one nucleosomal lesion appeared to facilitate binding to the opposing strand lesion. DSB formation did not invariably lead to nucleosome dissolution, and in some cases, free DNA ends resulting from DSB formation remained associated with the histone octamer. These observations explain how specific structural and dynamic properties of nucleosomes contribute to the suppression of BER-generated DSBs. These studies also suggest that most BER-generated DSBs will occur in linker DNA and in genomic regions associated with elevated rates of nucleosome turnover or remodeling. PMID:24891506

  19. The Formation of Secondary Stellar Generations in Massive Young Star Clusters from Rapidly Cooling Shocked Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wünsch, R.; Palouš, J.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Ehlerová, S.

    2017-01-01

    We study a model of rapidly cooling shocked stellar winds in young massive clusters and estimate the circumstances under which secondary star formation, out of the reinserted winds from a first stellar generation (1G), is possible. We have used two implementations of the model: a highly idealized, computationally inexpensive, spherically symmetric semi-analytic model, and a complex, three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic, simulation; they are in a good mutual agreement. The results confirm our previous findings that, in a cluster with 1G mass 107 M⊙ and half-mass–radius 2.38 pc, the shocked stellar winds become thermally unstable, collapse into dense gaseous structures that partially accumulate inside the cluster, self-shield against ionizing stellar radiation, and form the second generation (2G) of stars. We have used the semi-analytic model to explore a subset of the parameter space covering a wide range of the observationally poorly constrained parameters: the heating efficiency, ηhe, and the mass loading, ηml. The results show that the fraction of the 1G stellar winds accumulating inside the cluster can be larger than 50% if ηhe ≲ 10%, which is suggested by the observations. Furthermore, for low ηhe, the model provides a self-consistent mechanism predicting 2G stars forming only in the central zones of the cluster. Finally, we have calculated the accumulated warm gas emission in the H30α recombination line, analyzed its velocity profile, and estimated its intensity for super star clusters in interacting galaxies NGC4038/9 (Antennae) showing that the warm gas should be detectable with ALMA.

  20. SpARCS Brightest Cluster Galaxies: Evidence for significant star formation down to z~0.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaventura, Nina

    2015-08-01

    We present the first stacked Spitzer/Herschel IR broadband SED of the largest and highest-redshift sample of optically selected Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs), from 1014-Msun clusters in the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS). While semi-analytic models of structure formation predict that star formation ceases at very early times in BCGs, leaving them to passively evolve subsequently, the updated models of Tonini et al. (2012) suggest that star formation persists in BCGs to much lower redshifts than originally predicted. To address this tension between various models and gain a better understanding of the mechanisms guiding BCG stellar mass growth since z~2, we identify their dominant source of IR energy output through a comparison of their SEDs to a variety of model templates in the literature, in multiple redshift bins between z = 0.1 and 1.9. We derive estimates of LIR,TOT , SFR and sSFR , M* , Tdust , and various measures of 'starburstiness' (Chary & Elbaz 2011) from the stacked SEDs.From the observed redshift evolution of the SED emerges a picture of a star-forming BCG down to z~0.1, vigorously producing hundreds of solar masses per year at z>~0.7, with high efficiency at z>~1 and mostly between 1 and 10 solar mass at lower redshifts, with a small subset representing extreme sources and likely marking a period of intense merging activity between z = 0.4 and 0.6. We find a significant AGN contribution to the small 24μm-bright subset of the BCG sample down to z~0.4, mostly coexisting with vigorous star formation and indicative of a relatively ineffective AGN feedback mechanism in BCGs.We conclude that the star formation and AGN activity we observe in BCGs down to lower redshifts than expected is due to their unique environment at the centers of galaxy clusters, where they are continuously subjected to galaxy merger events at mid-to-high redshift, and likely cooling flows and the associated AGN response towards lower redshifts

  1. The strength of an Ig switch region is determined by its ability to drive R loop formation and its number of WGCW sites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng Z; Pannunzio, Nicholas R; Han, Li; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Yu, Kefei; Lieber, Michael R

    2014-07-24

    R loops exist at the murine IgH switch regions and possibly other locations, but their functional importance is unclear. In biochemical systems, R loop initiation requires DNA sequence regions containing clusters of G nucleotides, but cellular studies have not been done. Here, we vary the G-clustering, total switch region length, and the number of target sites (WGCW sites for the activation-induced deaminase) at synthetic switch regions in a murine B cell line to determine the effect on class switch recombination (CSR). G-clusters increase CSR regardless of their immediate proximity to the WGCW sites. This increase is accompanied by an increase in R loop formation. CSR efficiency correlates better with the absolute number of WGCW sites in the switch region rather than the total switch region length or density of WGCW sites. Thus, the overall strength of the switch region depends on G-clusters, which initiate R loop formation, and on the number of WGCW sites.

  2. Cloning and analysis of a gene cluster from Streptomyces coelicolor that causes accelerated aerial mycelium formation in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, H; Kendall, K

    1994-01-01

    We describe the cloning and analysis of two overlapping DNA fragments from Streptomyces coelicolor that cause aerial mycelium to appear more rapidly than usual when introduced into Streptomyces lividans on a low-copy-number plasmid vector. Colonies of S. lividans TK64 harboring either clone produce visible aerial mycelia after only 48 h of growth, rather than the usual 72 to 96 h. From deletion and sequence analysis, this rapid aerial mycelium (Ram) phenotype appears to be due to a cluster of three genes that we have designated ramA, ramB, and ramR. Both ramA and ramB potentially encode 65-kDa proteins with homology to ATP-dependent membrane-translocating proteins. A chromosomal ramB disruption mutant of S. lividans was found to be severely defective in aerial mycelium formation. ramR could encode a 21-kDa protein with significant homology to the UhpA subset of bacterial two-component response regulator proteins. The overall organization and potential proteins encoded by the cloned DNA suggest that this is the S. coelicolor homolog of the amf gene cluster that has been shown to be important for aerial mycelium formation in Streptomyces griseus. However, despite the fact that the two regions probably have identical functions, there is relatively poor homology between the two gene clusters at the DNA sequence level. Images PMID:8206859

  3. B lymphocytes induce the formation of follicular dendritic cell clusters in a lymphotoxin alpha-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Fu, Y X; Huang, G; Wang, Y; Chaplin, D D

    1998-04-06

    Lymphotoxin (LT)alpha is expressed by activated T cells, especially CD4(+) T helper type 1 cells, and by activated B and natural killer cells, but the functions of this molecule in vivo are incompletely defined. We have previously shown that follicular dendritic cell (FDC) clusters and germinal centers (GCs) are absent from the peripheral lymphoid tissues of LTalpha-deficient (LTalpha-/-) mice. LTalpha-/- mice produce high levels of antigen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)M, but very low levels of IgG after immunization with sheep red blood cells. We show here that LTalpha-expressing B cells are essential for the recovery of primary, secondary, and memory humoral immune responses in LTalpha-/- mice. It is not necessary for T cells to express LTalpha to support these immune functions. Importantly, LTalpha-expressing B cells alone are essential and sufficient for the formation of FDC clusters. Once these clusters are formed by LTalpha-expressing B cells, then LTalpha-deficient T cells can interact with B cells to generate GCs and productive class-switched antibody responses. Thus, B cells themselves provide an essential signal that induces and maintains the lymphoid microenvironment essential for GC formation and class-switched Ig responses.

  4. Interatomic potential to study the formation of NiCr clusters in high Cr ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonny, G.; Bakaev, A.; Olsson, P.; Domain, C.; Zhurkin, E. E.; Posselt, M.

    2017-02-01

    Under irradiation NiSiPCr clusters are formed in high-Cr ferritic martensitic steels as well as in FeCr model alloys. In the literature little is known about the origin and contribution to the hardening of these clusters. In this work we performed density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the stability of small substitutional NiCr-vacancy clusters and interstitial configurations in bcc Fe. Based on DFT data and experimental considerations a ternary potential for the ferritic FeNiCr system was developed. The potential was applied to study the thermodynamic stability of NiCr clusters by means of Metropolis Monte Carlo (MMC) simulations. The results of our simulations show that Cr and Ni precipitate as separate fractions and suggest only a limited synergetic effect between Ni and Cr. Therefore our results suggest that the NiCrSiP clusters observed in experiments must be the result of other mechanisms than the synergy of Cr and Ni at thermal equilibrium.

  5. A dual cryogenic ion trap spectrometer for the formation and characterization of solvated ionic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Brett M.; Voss, Jonathan M.; Garand, Etienne

    2015-11-28

    A new experimental approach is presented in which two separate cryogenic ion traps are used to reproducibly form weakly bound solvent clusters around electrosprayed ions and messenger-tag them for single-photon infrared photodissociation spectroscopy. This approach thus enables the vibrational characterization of ionic clusters comprised of a solvent network around large and non-volatile ions. We demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument by clustering water, methanol, and acetone around a protonated glycylglycine peptide. For water, cluster sizes with greater than twenty solvent molecules around a single ion are readily formed. We further demonstrate that similar water clusters can be formed around ions having a shielded charge center or those that do not readily form hydrogen bonds. Finally, infrared photodissociation spectra of D{sub 2}-tagged GlyGlyH{sup +} ⋅ (H{sub 2}O){sub 1−4} are presented. They display well-resolved spectral features and comparisons with calculations reveal detailed information on the solvation structures of this prototypical peptide.

  6. Final Report - Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster Formation in a Cellular Environment Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster Formation in a Cellular Environment

    SciTech Connect

    L.H. Toburen, Principal Investigator; J.L. Shinpaugh; M. Dingfelder; and G. Lapicki; Co-Investigators

    2007-01-07

    Modern tools of radiobiology are leading to many new discoveries regarding how cells and tissues respond to radiation exposure. We can now irradiate single cells and observe responses in adjacent cells. We can also measure clusters of radiation damage produced in DNA. Our primary objective has been to understand the underling physics associated with these new biological responses. The primary tools available to describe the initial spatial pattern of damage formed by the absorption of ionizing radiation are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the structure of charged particle tracks. Although many Monte Carlo codes exist and considerable progress is being made in the incorporation of detailed macromolecular target structures into these codes, much of the interaction physics is still based on gas phase measurements and/or untested theoretical calculations that focus on water as the transport medium. Our objectives were threefold, (1) to expand the applicability of Monte Carlo track structure simulation to tissue-like material beyond the current focus on water, (2) to incorporate the most recent experimental information on electron interactions in biologically relevant material, and (3) to compare recent measurements of electron emissions induced by charged particles in thin foils with Monte Carlo predictions. We addressed these research objectives in three ways. First we applied theoretical techniques, similar to those used to derive data for water, to obtain cross sections for other condensed phase materials. This served two purposes. One was to provide testability of the theoretical technique by comparison to existing experimental data for electron transport (similar data does not exist for water), and the other was to expand the target database for use in modeling tissue. Second, we carefully reviewed published data, and ongoing experiments, for electron interaction cross-sections in biologically relevant condensed phase material. Results for low-energy electron

  7. Cluster formation in binary charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions confined to a two-dimensional plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanat; Mukherjee, Manjori; Mishra, Pankaj

    2016-09-01

    Hypernetted chain (HNC) integral equation theory has been used to study the structural features of binary charged stabilized colloidal suspensions confined to a two-dimensional plane. The particles interact via purely repulsive Yukawa intermolecular potential, the inverse screening length scaled by the average distance between strongly interacting components of the mixture (dimensionless screening parameter) being 1, 3 and 5. Results of HNC theory for one-component systems are found to be in very good agreement with that of simulation, in the parameter range of our study. Binary Yukawa systems with dimensionless screening parameters 1 and 3 are found to exhibit diffuse clusters of the weakly interacting particles, marked by the emergence of a cluster peak in the corresponding partial structure factor curves. No cluster peak is found in the system with the screening parameter 5. For the entire range of mixture parameters, the strongly interacting particles remain homogeneously distributed.

  8. Dense Cluster Formation during Aggregation and Gelation of Attractive Slippery Nanoemulsion Droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Wilking, J.N.; Graves, S.M.; Chang, C.B.; Meleson, K.; Mason, T.G.; Lin, M.Y.

    2006-01-13

    Using time-resolved small angle neutron scattering, we have measured the wave-number-dependent structure factor S(q) of monodisperse nanoemulsions that aggregate and gel after we suddenly turn on a strong, short-range, slippery attraction between the droplets. At high q, peaks in S(q) appear as dense clusters of droplets form, and S(q) increases strongly toward low q, as these dense clusters become locked into a rigid gel network, despite the fluidity of the films between the droplets. The long-time high-q structure of nanoemulsion gels formed by slippery diffusion-limited cluster aggregation is universal in shape and remarkably independent of the droplet volume fraction, {phi}.

  9. Metal clusters and nanoparticles in dielectric matrices: Formation and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladskikh, I. A.; Vartanyan, T. A.

    2016-12-01

    The optical properties of thin dielectric films with metal inclusions and their dependence on thermal and laser annealing are studied experimentally. Metal clusters (Ag, Au, and Cu) in dielectric materials (Al2O3 and SiO2) are obtained by simultaneous vacuum deposition of metal and dielectric on the surface of a corresponding dielectric substrate (sapphire and quartz). It is shown that, depending on the deposited dielectric material, on the weight ratio of deposited metal and dielectric, and on the subsequent thermal treatment, one can obtain different metal structures, from clusters with a small number of atoms to complex dendritic plasmonic structures.

  10. Using Formative Assessments to Improve Student Learning Outcomes: A Study of the Different Types of Formative Assessments Teachers Use to Drive Instruction and Their Effects on Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alzina, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the difference between summative and formative assessments is still unclear for many teachers and principals as well as the effects formative assessments have on student learning outcomes. This quantitative study was conducted to explicitly explore formative assessments as a means to improve student learning outcomes, while examining…

  11. ON THE FORMATION TIMESCALE OF MASSIVE CLUSTER ELLIPTICALS BASED ON DEEP NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Masayuki; Kodama, Tadayuki; Koyama, Yusei; Toft, Sune; Zirm, Andrew; Marchesini, Danilo; De Breuck, Carlos; Kurk, Jaron; Tanaka, Ichi

    2013-08-01

    We present improved constraints on the formation timescale of massive cluster galaxies based on rest-frame optical spectra of galaxies in a forming cluster located at z = 2.16. The spectra are obtained with MOIRCS on the Subaru Telescope with an integration time of {approx}7 hr. We achieve accurate redshift measurements by fitting spectral energy distributions using the spectra and broadband photometry simultaneously, allowing us to identify probable cluster members. Clusters at low redshifts are dominated by quiescent galaxies, but we find that quiescent galaxies and star-forming galaxies coexist in this z = 2 system. Interestingly, the quiescent galaxies form a weak red sequence in the process of forming. By stacking the spectra of star-forming galaxies, we observe strong emission lines such as [O II] and [O III] and we obtain a tentative hint of active galactic nucleus activities in these galaxies. On the other hand, the stacked spectrum of the quiescent galaxies reveals a clear 4000 A break with a possible Ca II H+K absorption feature and strong emission lines such as [O II] are absent in the spectrum, confirming the quiescent nature of these galaxies. We then perform detailed spectral analyses of the stacked spectrum, which suggest that these massive quiescent galaxies formed at redshifts between 3 and 4 on a timescale of {approx}< 0.5 Gyr. This short formation timescale is not reproduced in recent numerical simulations. We discuss possible mechanisms for how these galaxies form 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} stellar mass on a short timescale and become red and quiescent by z = 2.

  12. FORMATION OF METAL-POOR GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN Ly{alpha} EMITTING GALAXIES IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James

    2012-09-20

    The size, mass, luminosity, and space density of Ly{alpha} emitting (LAE) galaxies observed at intermediate to high redshift agree with expectations for the properties of galaxies that formed metal-poor halo globular clusters (GCs). The low metallicity of these clusters is the result of their formation in low-mass galaxies. Metal-poor GCs could enter spiral galaxies along with their dwarf galaxy hosts, unlike metal-rich GCs, which form in the spirals themselves. Considering an initial GC mass larger than the current mass to account for multiple stellar populations, and considering the additional clusters that are likely to form with massive clusters, we estimate that each GC with a mass today greater than 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} was likely to have formed among a total stellar mass {approx}> 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }, a molecular mass {approx}> 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }, and 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} of older stars, depending on the relative gas fraction. The star formation rate would have been several M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} lasting for {approx}10{sup 7} yr, and the Ly{alpha} luminosity would have been {approx}> 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. Integrating the LAE galaxy luminosity function above this minimum, considering the average escape probability for Ly{alpha} photons (25%), and then dividing by the probability that a dwarf galaxy is observed in the LAE phase (0.4%), we find agreement between the comoving space density of LAEs and the average space density of metal-poor GCs today. The local galaxy WLM, with its early starburst and old GC, could be an LAE remnant that did not get into a galaxy halo because of its remote location.

  13. MC2: boosted AGN and star formation activity in CIZA J2242.8+5301, a massive post-merger cluster at z = 0.19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobral, David; Stroe, Andra; Dawson, William A.; Wittman, David; Jee, M. James; Röttgering, Huub; van Weeren, Reinout J.; Brüggen, Marcus

    2015-06-01

    Cluster mergers may play a fundamental role in the formation and evolution of cluster galaxies. Stroe et al. revealed unexpected overdensities of candidate Hα emitters near the ˜1-Mpc-wide shock fronts of the massive (˜2 × 1015 M⊙) `Sausage' merging cluster, CIZA J2242.8+5301. We used the Keck/Deep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph and the William Herschel Telescope/AutoFib2+WYFFOS to confirm 83 Hα emitters in and around the merging cluster. We find that cluster star-forming galaxies in the hottest X-ray gas and/or in the cluster subcores (away from the shock fronts) show high [S II]6716/[S II]6761 and high [S II] 6716/Hα, implying very low electron densities (<30 × lower than all other star-forming galaxies outside the cluster) and/or significant contribution from supernovae, respectively. All cluster star-forming galaxies near the cluster centre show evidence of significant outflows (blueshifted Na D ˜200-300 km s-1), likely driven by supernovae. Strong outflows are also found for the cluster Hα active galactic nucleus (AGN). Hα star-forming galaxies in the merging cluster follow the z ˜ 0 mass-metallicity relation, showing systematically higher metallicity (˜0.15-0.2 dex) than Hα emitters outside the cluster (projected R > 2.5 Mpc). This suggests that the shock front may have triggered remaining metal-rich gas which galaxies were able to retain into forming stars. Our observations show that the merger of impressively massive (˜1015 M⊙) clusters can provide the conditions for significant star formation and AGN activity, but, as we witness strong feedback by star-forming galaxies and AGN (and given how massive the merging cluster is), such sources will likely quench in a few 100 Myr.

  14. The Nuclear Cluster of the Milky Way: Star Formation and Velocity Dispersion in the Central 0.5 Parsec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbe, A.; Genzel, R.; Eckart, A.; Najarro, F.; Lutz, D.; Cameron, M.; Kroker, H.; Tacconi-Garman, L. E.; Thatte, N.; Weitzel, L.; Drapatz, S.; Geballe, T.; Sternberg, A.; Kudritzki, R.

    1995-07-01

    We report the first results of an extensive new study of the Galactic center stellar cluster. The central parsec is powered by a cluster of about two dozen luminous and helium-rich blue supergiants/Wolf-Rayet stars (Teff ~ 20,000--30,000 K) with ZAMS masses up to ~100 M⊙. The most likely scenario for the formation of the massive stars is a small star formation burst between 3 x 106 and 7 x 106 years ago. In this scenario the Galactic center is presently in a short-lived, post--main-sequence "wind phase." In addition, there is evidence for another star formation event about 108 years ago, as well as for recently formed massive stars that may have been transported into the central core along with orbiting gas streamers. The radial velocity dispersion of 35 early- and late-type stars with distances of 1"--12" from Sgr A* is 154 +/- 19 km s-1. Our new results strongly favor the existence of a central dark mass of ~3 x 106 M⊙ (density >= 108.5 M⊙ pc-3, M/L >= 10 M⊙/L⊙) within 0.14 pc of the dynamic center.

  15. On the formation mechanisms of kinetic Alfven waves in the mid-altitude cusp region: Cluster observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, S. P.; Liu, Z. X.; Cao, J. B.; Reme, H.; Balogh, A.; Fazakerley, A. N.

    According to the observation data by the Cluster spacecraft encountering the mid-altitude cusp region and the theory research work of the formation mechanism of kinetic Alfven waves it can be concluded that kinetic Alfven waves can be come into being in the mid-altitude polar cusp Using the observation data detected by the Cluster CIS FGM and PEACE crossing through the mid-altitude cusp region on 4 July 2001 we find that ion and electron number densities are obviously disturbed and protons are always in the down-going direction We obtain that the values of plasma beta are in the range between 0 002 and 0 01 from 13 24 00 to 13 39 00 They are larger than the mass ratio value of electron and proton That implies the mid-altitude polar cusp is a kinetic region Ion and electron density inhomogeneity and the ion beam with down-going direction are the main factors for the formation of kinetic Alfven waves The observational results are consonant with the results obtained from the theory research that the plasma density inhomogeneity and ions motion play important roles in the formation process of kinetic Alfven waves The observational properties of kinetic Alfven waves will be investigated in our following research work

  16. From solid solution to cluster formation of Fe and Cr in α-Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burr, P. A.; Wenman, M. R.; Gault, B.; Moody, M. P.; Ivermark, M.; Rushton, M. J. D.; Preuss, M.; Edwards, L.; Grimes, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the mechanisms by which the re-solution of Fe and Cr additions increase the corrosion rate of irradiated Zr alloys, the solubility and clustering of Fe and Cr in model binary Zr alloys was investigated using a combination of experimental and modelling techniques - atom probe tomography (APT), x-ray diffraction (XRD), thermoelectric power (TEP) and density functional theory (DFT). Cr occupies both interstitial and substitutional sites in the α-Zr lattice; Fe favours interstitial sites, and a low-symmetry site that was not previously modelled is found to be the most favourable for Fe. Lattice expansion as a function of Fe and Cr content in the α-Zr matrix deviates from Vegard's law and is strongly anisotropic for Fe additions, expanding the c-axis while contracting the a-axis. Matrix content of solutes cannot be reliably estimated from lattice parameter measurements, instead a combination of TEP and APT was employed. Defect clusters form at higher solution concentrations, which induce a smaller lattice strain compared to the dilute defects. In the presence of a Zr vacancy, all two-atom clusters are more soluble than individual point defects and as many as four Fe or three Cr atoms could be accommodated in a single Zr vacancy. The Zr vacancy is critical for the increased apparent solubility of defect clusters; the implications for irradiation induced microstructure changes in Zr alloys are discussed.

  17. FDTD study of the formation of optical vortices associated with core-shell nanoparticle cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md Mahfuzur; Lu, Jin You; Ni, George; Fang, Nicholas Xuanlai; Zhang, Tiejun; Ghaferi, Amal Al

    2015-03-01

    Light absorbing plasmonic metal-dielectric nanoparticles suspended in water, or nanofluids have recently been experimentally demonstrated to produce steam at high efficiencies upon solar illumination. This approach localizes high temperatures to the interior of the liquid through efficient trapping of incoming light via scattering and absorption mechanisms. In suspensions, nanoparticles may form clusters due to surface wetting properties, and little work has focused on understanding the optical properties of clusters. In this work, we use the FDTD method to accurately visualize the optical power flow through various plasmonic metal-silica core-shell nanoparticle pairs at different inter-particle separations (10-100 nm). At these separations phase singularities of the power flow can occur, such as vortices of light inside the dielectric core which can enhance the absorption cross-section of the cluster. We study the conditions required to form these vortices. We also consider titanium nitride as shell, other than the widely studied noble metals to visualize the extinction cross-section of a cluster which depends on the separation, and the permittivity of the dielectric core. The authors would like to acknowledge the valuable support from Masdar Institute and Massachusetts Institute of Technology for the soler thermal project grant.

  18. Monte Carlo computer simulations and electron microscopy of colloidal cluster formation via emulsion droplet evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Ingmar; Fortini, Andrea; Wagner, Claudia Simone; Wittemann, Alexander; Schmidt, Matthias

    2011-12-01

    We consider a theoretical model for a binary mixture of colloidal particles and spherical emulsion droplets. The hard sphere colloids interact via additional short-ranged attraction and long-ranged repulsion. The droplet-colloid interaction is an attractive well at the droplet surface, which induces the Pickering effect. The droplet-droplet interaction is a hard-core interaction. The droplets shrink in time, which models the evaporation of the dispersed (oil) phase, and we use Monte Carlo simulations for the dynamics. In the experiments, polystyrene particles were assembled using toluene droplets as templates. The arrangement of the particles on the surface of the droplets was analyzed with cryogenic field emission scanning electron microscopy. Before evaporation of the oil, the particle distribution on the droplet surface was found to be disordered in experiments, and the simulations reproduce this effect. After complete evaporation, ordered colloidal clusters are formed that are stable against thermal fluctuations. Both in the simulations and with field emission scanning electron microscopy, we find stable packings that range from doublets, triplets, and tetrahedra to complex polyhedra of colloids. The simulated cluster structures and size distribution agree well with the experimental results. We also simulate hierarchical assembly in a mixture of tetrahedral clusters and droplets, and find supercluster structures with morphologies that are more complex than those of clusters of single particles.

  19. Formation and evolution of spiral arms in galaxies orbiting a Virgo-like cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semczuk, Marcin; Łokas, Ewa L.

    2017-03-01

    The origin of spiral structure in disks of galaxies remains an open question. One of the theories predicts that two-armed, grand design spiral arms originate from tidal interactions with another body. Using N-body simulations we find that a Milky Way-like galaxy can develop spiral arms due to tidal force from a cluster-size dark matter halo.

  20. Insights Into the Formation of Rhyolite From the Searchlight Pluton: Evidence from Oriented Quartz Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froemming, N.; Deering, C. D.; Beane, R. J.; Bachmann, O.

    2012-12-01

    The Miocene Searchlight pluton (SLP) in the Colorado River extensional corridor of southern Nevada, is well-exposed and tilted near-vertical for exceptional cross-sectional study of magma reservoir dynamics and crystal fractionation of a mid- to upper-crustal pluton (3 to 13 km depth). The upper quartz monzonite section is dominated by minerals in apparent random orientation with a medium- to fine-grained texture due to direct contact with the cold host rock. The middle granitic section is dominated by coarse-grained quartz and feldspar, and interpreted to be a zone of extracted liquid from an intermediate magma. The lower monzonite section is composed of coarse-grained plagioclase and potassium feldspar. We used the crystallographic orientations of quartz clusters, as determined by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD), to test for crystal accumulation in the SLP. Clusters of quartz crystals with matched dipyramidal faces (parallel or Esterel twin orientation) may indicate a period of crystal accumulation. By analyzing representative samples from each section of the pluton, we found that the lower section (intermediate cumulate) and upper section (crystallization front) do not have quartz clusters with matched dipyramidal faces. Although plagioclase grains are aligned in the lower section, the late crystallization of quartz appears to have prevented aligned or preferred growth orientations. In contrast, the middle section has a high percentage of quartz clusters with matched dipyramidal faces - similar to that found in granite porphyry of the Vinalhaven pluton, Maine. The aligned grains may have formed by fractional crystallization, compaction and synneusis of the early forming quartz in this granitic section. We interpret the middle section of the Searchlight pluton as being similar to shallow, upper crustal plutons (3-8 km depth) such as Vinalhaven pluton. The deep vertical exposure of the SLP, shows that the middle section was formed from periodic episodes of

  1. A CHANDRA X-RAY ANALYSIS OF ABELL 1664: COOLING, FEEDBACK, AND STAR FORMATION IN THE CENTRAL CLUSTER GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, C. C.; McNamara, B. R.; Kazemzadeh, F.; Cavagnolo, K. W.; Rafferty, D. A.; BIrzan, L.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Wise, M. W.; Gitti, M.

    2009-05-20

    The brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the Abell 1664 cluster is unusually blue and is forming stars at a rate of {approx} 23 M {sub sun} yr{sup -1}. The BCG is located within 5 kpc of the X-ray peak, where the cooling time of 3.5 x 10{sup 8} yr and entropy of 10.4 keV cm{sup 2} are consistent with other star-forming BCGs in cooling flow clusters. The center of A1664 has an elongated, 'barlike' X-ray structure whose mass is comparable to the mass of molecular hydrogen, {approx}10{sup 10} M {sub sun} in the BCG. We show that this gas is unlikely to have been stripped from interloping galaxies. The cooling rate in this region is roughly consistent with the star formation rate, suggesting that the hot gas is condensing onto the BCG. We use the scaling relations of BIrzan et al. to show that the active galactic nucleus (AGN) is underpowered compared to the central X-ray cooling luminosity by roughly a factor of three. We suggest that A1664 is experiencing rapid cooling and star formation during a low state of an AGN feedback cycle that regulates the rates of cooling and star formation. Modeling the emission as a single-temperature plasma, we find that the metallicity peaks 100 kpc from the X-ray center, resulting in a central metallicity dip. However, a multi-temperature cooling flow model improves the fit to the X-ray emission and is able to recover the expected, centrally peaked metallicity profile.

  2. Infrared absorption imaging of 2D supersonic jet expansions: Free expansion, cluster formation, and shock wave patterns.

    PubMed

    Zischang, Julia; Suhm, Martin A

    2013-07-14

    N2O/He gas mixtures are expanded through a 10 × 0.5 mm(2) slit nozzle and imaged by direct absorption vibrational spectroscopy, employing a HgCdTe focal plane array detector after interferometric modulation. N2O cluster formation in the free supersonic expansion is visualized. The expansion structure behind the frontal shock is investigated as a function of background pressure. At high pressures, a sequence of stationary density peaks along a narrow directed flow channel is characterized. The potential of the technique for the elucidation of aggregation mechanisms is emphasized.

  3. Risk for self-reported anorexia or bulimia nervosa based on drive for thinness and negative affect clusters/dimensions during adolescence: A three-year prospective study of the TChAD cohort

    PubMed Central

    Peñas-Lledó, Eva; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Lichtenstein, Paul; Larsson, Henrik; Baker, Jessica H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study explored the cross-sectional and predictive effect of drive for thinness and/or negative affect scores on the development of self-reported anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Method K-means were used to cluster the Eating Disorder Inventory-Drive for Thinness (DT) and Child Behavior Checklist Anxious/Depressed (A/D) scores from 615 unrelated female twins at age 16–17. Logistic regressions were used to assess the effect of these clusters on self-reported eating disorder diagnosis at ages 16–17 (n=565) and 19–20 (n=451). Results DT and A/D scores were grouped into four clusters: Mild (scores lower than 90th percentile on both scales), DT (higher scores only on DT), A/D (higher scores only on A/D), and DT-A/D (higher scores on both the DT and A/D scales). DT and DT-A/D clusters at age 16–17 were associated cross-sectionally with AN and both cross-sectionally and longitudinally with BN. The DT-A/D cluster had the highest prevalence of AN at follow-up compared with all other clusters. Similarly, an interaction was observed between DT and A/D that predicted risk for AN. Discussion Having elevated DT and A/D scores may increase risk for eating disorder symptomatology above and beyond a high score on either alone. Findings suggest that cluster modeling based on DT and A/D may be useful to inform novel and useful intervention strategies for AN and BN in adolescents. PMID:26013185

  4. LoCuSS: THE STEADY DECLINE AND SLOW QUENCHING OF STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTER GALAXIES OVER THE LAST FOUR BILLION YEARS

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, C. P.; Pereira, M. J.; Egami, E.; Rawle, T. D.; Smith, G. P.; Sanderson, A. J. R.; Babul, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Merluzzi, P.; Busarello, G.; Okabe, N.

    2013-10-01

    We present an analysis of the levels and evolution of star formation activity in a representative sample of 30 massive galaxy clusters at 0.15 < z < 0.30 from the Local Cluster Substructure Survey, combining wide-field Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm data with extensive spectroscopy of cluster members. The specific SFRs of massive (M > or approx. 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}) star-forming cluster galaxies within r{sub 200} are found to be systematically ∼28% lower than their counterparts in the field at fixed stellar mass and redshift, a difference sig