Science.gov

Sample records for formation rates revealed

  1. Southern Ocean frontal structure and sea-ice formation rates revealed by elephant seals

    PubMed Central

    Charrassin, J.-B.; Hindell, M.; Rintoul, S. R.; Roquet, F.; Sokolov, S.; Biuw, M.; Costa, D.; Boehme, L.; Lovell, P.; Coleman, R.; Timmermann, R.; Meijers, A.; Meredith, M.; Park, Y.-H.; Bailleul, F.; Goebel, M.; Tremblay, Y.; Bost, C.-A.; McMahon, C. R.; Field, I. C.; Fedak, M. A.; Guinet, C.

    2008-01-01

    Polar regions are particularly sensitive to climate change, with the potential for significant feedbacks between ocean circulation, sea ice, and the ocean carbon cycle. However, the difficulty in obtaining in situ data means that our ability to detect and interpret change is very limited, especially in the Southern Ocean, where the ocean beneath the sea ice remains almost entirely unobserved and the rate of sea-ice formation is poorly known. Here, we show that southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) equipped with oceanographic sensors can measure ocean structure and water mass changes in regions and seasons rarely observed with traditional oceanographic platforms. In particular, seals provided a 30-fold increase in hydrographic profiles from the sea-ice zone, allowing the major fronts to be mapped south of 60°S and sea-ice formation rates to be inferred from changes in upper ocean salinity. Sea-ice production rates peaked in early winter (April–May) during the rapid northward expansion of the pack ice and declined by a factor of 2 to 3 between May and August, in agreement with a three-dimensional coupled ocean–sea-ice model. By measuring the high-latitude ocean during winter, elephant seals fill a “blind spot” in our sampling coverage, enabling the establishment of a truly global ocean-observing system. PMID:18695241

  2. Southern Ocean frontal structure and sea-ice formation rates revealed by elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Charrassin, J-B; Hindell, M; Rintoul, S R; Roquet, F; Sokolov, S; Biuw, M; Costa, D; Boehme, L; Lovell, P; Coleman, R; Timmermann, R; Meijers, A; Meredith, M; Park, Y-H; Bailleul, F; Goebel, M; Tremblay, Y; Bost, C-A; McMahon, C R; Field, I C; Fedak, M A; Guinet, C

    2008-08-19

    Polar regions are particularly sensitive to climate change, with the potential for significant feedbacks between ocean circulation, sea ice, and the ocean carbon cycle. However, the difficulty in obtaining in situ data means that our ability to detect and interpret change is very limited, especially in the Southern Ocean, where the ocean beneath the sea ice remains almost entirely unobserved and the rate of sea-ice formation is poorly known. Here, we show that southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) equipped with oceanographic sensors can measure ocean structure and water mass changes in regions and seasons rarely observed with traditional oceanographic platforms. In particular, seals provided a 30-fold increase in hydrographic profiles from the sea-ice zone, allowing the major fronts to be mapped south of 60 degrees S and sea-ice formation rates to be inferred from changes in upper ocean salinity. Sea-ice production rates peaked in early winter (April-May) during the rapid northward expansion of the pack ice and declined by a factor of 2 to 3 between May and August, in agreement with a three-dimensional coupled ocean-sea-ice model. By measuring the high-latitude ocean during winter, elephant seals fill a "blind spot" in our sampling coverage, enabling the establishment of a truly global ocean-observing system. PMID:18695241

  3. Rates of formation and dissipation of clumping reveal lagged responses in tropical tree populations.

    PubMed

    Detto, Matteo; Muller-Landau, Helene C

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of spatial patterns of plant populations can provide important information about underlying processes, yet they have received relatively little attention to date. Here we investigate the rates of formation and dissipation of clusters and the relationship of these rates to the degree of aggregation (clumping) in models and in empirical data for tropical trees. In univariate models, exact solutions and simulations show that the rate of change of spatial patterns has a specific, linear relationship to the degree of aggregation at all scales. Shorter dispersal and/or weaker negative density dependence (NDD) result in both denser and longer-lasting clusters. In multivariate host-parasite models in contrast, the rate of change of spatial pattern is faster relative to the level of aggrega- tion. We then analyzed the dynamics of spatial patterns of stems ≥ 1 cm diameter in 221 tropical tree species from seven censuses spanning 28 yr. We found that for most species, the rates of change in spatial patterns were faster than predicted from univariate models given their aggregation. This indicates that more complex dynamics involving multivariate interactions induce time lags in responses to aggregation in these species. Such lags could arise, for example, if it takes time for natural enemies to locate aggregations of their hosts. This combination of theoretical and empirical results thus shows that complex multilevel models are needed to capture spatiotemporal dynamics of tropical forests and provides new insights into the processes structuring tropical plant communities. PMID:27349094

  4. Ultraviolet Mars Reveals Cloud Formation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Images from MAVEN's Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph were used to make this movie of rapid cloud formation on Mars on July 9-10, 2016. The ultraviolet colors of the planet have been rendered in fal...

  5. New emerging results on molecular gas, stars, and dust at z~2, as revealed by low star formation rate and low stellar mass star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava; Schaerer, Daniel; Combes, Francoise; Egami, Eiichi; Swinbank, Mark; Richard, Johan; Sklias, Panos; Rawle, Tim D.

    2015-08-01

    The large surveys of main sequence star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at z~2, made at near-IR and mm wavelengths, have revolutionized our picture of galaxies at this critical epoch, where the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) density is at its peak and the stellar mass (Ms) assembly is rapid. They reveal that ~70% of SFGs are young, rotation dominated disk-like systems, yet dynamically hotter and geometrically thicker than local spirals, with larger molecular gas fractions (fgas).It is time to refine this modern picture of z~2 galaxies by extending the current studies toward the more numerous and typical SFGs, characterized by SFR1 from the literature, and allow us to revisit and propose new correlations between IR and CO luminosities, molecular gas, stellar and dust masses, specific SFR, molecular gas depletion timescales (tdepl), fgas, dust-to-gas ratios, and redshift, to be directly compared with galaxy evolution models.We find an increase of tdepl with Ms, as now revealed by low-Ms SFGs at z>1 and also observed at z=0, which contrasts with the acknowledged constant tdepl in "bathtub" models and refutes the linearity of the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. A steady increase of fgas with redshift is predicted by cosmological models and is observed from z~0 to z~1.5, but is followed by a mild increase toward higher redshifts, which we further confirm with our highest redshift CO measurement in an SFR* galaxy at z=3.6. We provide the first fgas measure in z>1 SFGs at the low-Ms end 109.4

  6. New emerging results on molecular gas, stars, and dust at z ~ 2, as revealed by low star formation rate and low stellar mass star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava; Zamojski, Michel; Schaerer, Daniel; Combes, Françoise; Egami, Eiichi; Sklias, Panos; Swinbank, Mark A.; Richard, Johan; Rawle, Tim

    Recent CO surveys of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at z ~ 2 have revolutionized our picture of massive galaxies. It is time to expand these studies toward the more common z ~ 2 SFGs with SFR < 40 M ⊙ yr-1 and M * < 2.5 × 1010 M⊙. We have derived molecular gas, stars, and dust in 8 such lensed SFGs. They extend the L IR-L'CO(1-0) distribution of massive z>1 SFGs and increase the spread of the SFG star formation efficiency (SFE). A single star formation relation is found when combining all existing CO-detected galaxies. Our low-M * SFGs also reveal a SFE decrease with M * as found locally. A rise of the molecular gas fraction (f gas) with redshift is observed up to z ~ 1.6, but it severely flattens toward higher redshifts. We provide the first insight into the f gas upturn at the low-M * end 109.4 < M */M⊙ < 1010 reaching f gas ~ 0.7, it is followed by a f gas decrease toward higher M *. Finally, we find a non-universal dust-to-gas ratio among local and high-redshift SFGs and starbursts with near-solar metallicities.

  7. Mammalian phylogeny reveals recent diversification rate shifts.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Tanja

    2011-04-12

    Phylogenetic trees of present-day species allow investigation of the rate of evolution that led to the present-day diversity. A recent analysis of the mammalian phylogeny challenged the view of explosive mammalian evolution after the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary (65 Mya). However, due to lack of appropriate methods, the diversification (speciation minus extinction) rates in the more recent past of mammalian evolution could not be determined. In this paper, I provide a method that reveals that the tempo of mammalian evolution did not change until ∼ 33 Mya. This constant period was followed by a peak of diversification rates between 33 and 30 Mya. Thereafter, diversification rates remained high and constant until 8.55 Mya. Diversification rates declined significantly at 8.55 and 3.35 Mya. Investigation of mammalian subgroups (marsupials, placentals, and the six largest placental subgroups) reveals that the diversification rate peak at 33-30 Mya is mainly driven by rodents, cetartiodactyla, and marsupials. The recent diversification rate decrease is significant for all analyzed subgroups but eulipotyphla, cetartiodactyla, and primates. My likelihood approach is not limited to mammalian evolution. It provides a robust framework to infer diversification rate changes and mass extinction events in phylogenies, reconstructed from, e.g., present-day species or virus data. In particular, the method is very robust toward noise and uncertainty in the phylogeny and can account for incomplete taxon sampling. PMID:21444816

  8. Measuring star formation rates in blue galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Hunter, Deidre A.

    1987-01-01

    The problems associated with measurements of star formation rates in galaxies are briefly reviewed, and specific models are presented for determinations of current star formation rates from H alpha and Far Infrared (FIR) luminosities. The models are applied to a sample of optically blue irregular galaxies, and the results are discussed in terms of star forming histories. It appears likely that typical irregular galaxies are forming stars at nearly constant rates, although a few examples of systems with enhanced star forming activity are found among HII regions and luminous irregular galaxies.

  9. Magnetic fields and galactic star formation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, Sven Van; Tan, Jonathan C.; Falle, Sam A. E. G.

    2015-02-10

    The regulation of galactic-scale star formation rates (SFRs) is a basic problem for theories of galaxy formation and evolution: which processes are responsible for making observed star formation rates so inefficient compared to maximal rates of gas content divided by dynamical timescale? Here we study the effect of magnetic fields of different strengths on the evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) within a kiloparsec patch of a disk galaxy and resolving scales down to ≃0.5 pc. Including an empirically motivated prescription for star formation from dense gas (n{sub H}>10{sup 5} cm{sup −3}) at an efficiency of 2% per local free-fall time, we derive the amount of suppression of star formation by magnetic fields compared to the nonmagnetized case. We find GMC fragmentation, dense clump formation, and SFR can be significantly affected by the inclusion of magnetic fields, especially in our strongest investigated B-field case of 80 μG. However, our chosen kiloparsec-scale region, extracted from a global galaxy simulation, happens to contain a starbursting cloud complex that is only modestly affected by these magnetic fields and likely requires internal star formation feedback to regulate its SFR.

  10. TIME-VARYING DYNAMICAL STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eve J.; Chang, Philip; Murray, Norman

    2015-02-10

    We present numerical evidence of dynamic star formation in which the accreted stellar mass grows superlinearly with time, roughly as t {sup 2}. We perform simulations of star formation in self-gravitating hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that is continuously driven. By turning the self-gravity of the gas in the simulations on or off, we demonstrate that self-gravity is the dominant physical effect setting the mass accretion rate at early times before feedback effects take over, contrary to theories of turbulence-regulated star formation. We find that gravitational collapse steepens the density profile around stars, generating the power-law tail on what is otherwise a lognormal density probability distribution function. Furthermore, we find turbulent velocity profiles to flatten inside collapsing regions, altering the size-line width relation. This local flattening reflects enhancements of turbulent velocity on small scales, as verified by changes to the velocity power spectra. Our results indicate that gas self-gravity dynamically alters both density and velocity structures in clouds, giving rise to a time-varying star formation rate. We find that a substantial fraction of the gas that forms stars arrives via low-density flows, as opposed to accreting through high-density filaments.

  11. New View of Distant Galaxy Reveals Furious Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-12-01

    A furious rate of star formation discovered in a distant galaxy shows that galaxies in the early Universe developed either much faster or in a different way from what astronomers have thought. "This galaxy is forming stars at an incredible rate," said Wei-Hao Wang, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico. The galaxy, Wang said, is forming the equivalent of 4,000 Suns a year. This is a thousand times more violent than our own Milky Way Galaxy. Location of Distant Galaxy Visible-light, left (from HST) and Infrared, right, (from Spitzer) Images: Circles indicate location of GOODS 850-5. CREDIT: Wang et al., STScI, Spitzer, NASA, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for high-resolution file (1 MB) The galaxy, called GOODS 850-5, is 12 billion light-years from Earth, and thus is seen as it was only about 1.5 billion years after the Big Bang. Wang and his colleagues observed it using the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Submillimeter Array (SMA) on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. Young stars in the galaxy were enshrouded in dust that was heated by the stars and radiated infrared light strongly. Because of the galaxy's great distance from Earth, the infrared light waves have been stretched out to submillimeter-length radio waves, which are seen by the SMA. The waves were stretched or "redshifted," as astronomers say, by the ongoing expansion of the Universe. "This evidence for prolific star formation is hidden by the dust from visible-light telescopes," Wang explained. The dust, in turn, was formed from heavy elements that had to be built up in the cores of earlier stars. This indicates, Wang said, that significant numbers of stars already had formed, then spewed those heavy elements into interstellar space through supernova explosions and stellar winds. "Seeing the radiation from this heated dust revealed star formation we could have found in no other way," Wang said. Similar dusty galaxies in the early Universe may contain most of the

  12. The Absolute Rate of LGRB Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, J. F.; Schady, P.

    2016-06-01

    We estimate the long-duration gamma-ray burst (LGRB) progenitor rate using our recent work on the effects of environmental metallically on LGRB formation in concert with supernovae (SNe) statistics via an approach patterned loosely off the Drake equation. Beginning with the cosmic star formation history, we consider the expected number of broad-line Type Ic events (the SNe type associated with LGRBs) that are in low-metallicity host environments adjusted by the contribution of high-metallicity host environments at a much reduced rate. We then compare this estimate to the observed LGRB rate corrected for instrumental selection effects to provide a combined estimate of the efficiency fraction of these progenitors to produce LGRBs and the fraction of which are beamed in our direction. From this we estimate that an aligned LGRB occurs for approximately every 4000 ± 2000 low-metallically broad-lined SNe Ic. Therefore, if one assumes a semi-nominal beaming factor of 100, then only about one such supernova out of 40 produce an LGRB. Finally, we propose an off-axis LGRB search strategy of targeting only broad-line Type Ic events that occur in low-metallicity hosts for radio observation.

  13. ANALYTICAL STAR FORMATION RATE FROM GRAVOTURBULENT FRAGMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hennebelle, Patrick; Chabrier, Gilles

    2011-12-20

    We present an analytical determination of the star formation rate (SFR) in molecular clouds, based on a time-dependent extension of our analytical theory of the stellar initial mass function. The theory yields SFRs in good agreement with observations, suggesting that turbulence is the dominant, initial process responsible for star formation. In contrast to previous SFR theories, the present one does not invoke an ad hoc density threshold for star formation; instead, the SFR continuously increases with gas density, naturally yielding two different characteristic regimes, thus two different slopes in the SFR versus gas density relationship, in agreement with observational determinations. Besides the complete SFR derivation, we also provide a simplified expression, which reproduces the complete calculations reasonably well and can easily be used for quick determinations of SFRs in cloud environments. A key property at the heart of both our complete and simplified theory is that the SFR involves a density-dependent dynamical time, characteristic of each collapsing (prestellar) overdense region in the cloud, instead of one single mean or critical freefall timescale. Unfortunately, the SFR also depends on some ill-determined parameters, such as the core-to-star mass conversion efficiency and the crossing timescale. Although we provide estimates for these parameters, their uncertainty hampers a precise quantitative determination of the SFR, within less than a factor of a few.

  14. Basin Formation and Cratering on Mercury Revealed by MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. R.; Fassett, C.; Marchi, S.; Merline, W. J.; Ostrach, L. R.; Prockter, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Mercury has been bombarded by asteroids and comets throughout its history. The resulting craters and basins are the dominant topographic features on the planet. Although visible basins contain some of the most interesting tectonic features, plains, and evidence of vertical stratigraphy, they fall far short of saturating the surface. Nevertheless, Mercury has a greater spatial density of peak-ring basins and protobasins than any other Solar System body, partly because these morphologies begin at smaller sizes than on most bodies. Cratering at approximately three times the cratering rate on the Moon, combined with likely plains-forming volcanism, prevents recognition of surface features older than 4.0 to 4.1 Ga. Severe losses of craters <50 km in diameter (<20 km in some places) are ascribed to extensive formation of intercrater plains. Estimates of the cratering chronology of Mercury suggest that most plains formation ended about 3.6 to 3.7 Ga, though activity has continued in a few small regions until much more recently (e.g., inside the Rachmaninoff basin). Mercury, compared with other terrestrial bodies, is struck by projectiles impacting at much higher velocities, which is probably responsible for the formation of abundant secondary craters that dominate the numbers of craters <10 km diameter on older plains surfaces. The history of high-velocity bombardment has resulted in the production of abundant impact melts and has churned and processed the regolith, and eroded older topography, more thoroughly than on other Solar System bodies. Although the possible role of Mercury-specific impactors ("vulcanoids") cannot be excluded, imaging searches by MESSENGER have revealed no remaining vulcanoids and no other evidence suggests that Mercury has been bombarded by anything other than the same populations of asteroids and comets that have impacted the Moon and other terrestrial planets from the end of the period of heavy bombardment 3.8 to 3.9 Ga to the present.

  15. Towards universal hybrid star formation rate estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boquien, M.; Kennicutt, R.; Calzetti, D.; Dale, D.; Galametz, M.; Sauvage, M.; Croxall, K.; Draine, B.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Kumari, N.; Hunt, L.; De Looze, I.; Pellegrini, E.; Relaño, M.; Smith, J.-D.; Tabatabaei, F.

    2016-06-01

    Context. To compute the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies from the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV), it is essential to take the obscuration by dust into account. To do so, one of the most popular methods consists in combining the UV with the emission from the dust itself in the infrared (IR). Yet, different studies have derived different estimators, showing that no such hybrid estimator is truly universal. Aims: In this paper we aim at understanding and quantifying what physical processes fundamentally drive the variations between different hybrid estimators. In so doing, we aim at deriving new universal UV+IR hybrid estimators to correct the UV for dust attenuation at local and global scales, taking the intrinsic physical properties of galaxies into account. Methods: We use the CIGALE code to model the spatially resolved far-UV to far-IR spectral energy distributions of eight nearby star-forming galaxies drawn from the KINGFISH sample. This allows us to determine their local physical properties, and in particular their UV attenuation, average SFR, average specific SFR (sSFR), and their stellar mass. We then examine how hybrid estimators depend on said properties. Results: We find that hybrid UV+IR estimators strongly depend on the stellar mass surface density (in particular at 70 μm and 100 μm) and on the sSFR (in particular at 24 μm and the total infrared). Consequently, the IR scaling coefficients for UV obscuration can vary by almost an order of magnitude: from 1.55 to 13.45 at 24 μm for instance. This result contrasts with other groups who found relatively constant coefficients with small deviations. We exploit these variations to construct a new class of adaptative hybrid estimators based on observed UV to near-IR colours and near-IR luminosity densities per unit area. We find that they can reliably be extended to entire galaxies. Conclusions: The new estimators provide better estimates of attenuation-corrected UV emission than classical hybrid estimators

  16. Circulating protein synthesis rates reveal skeletal muscle proteome dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; King, Chelsea L.; Angel, Thomas E.; Holmes, William E.; Li, Kelvin W.; Colangelo, Marc; Price, John C.; Turner, Scott M.; Bell, Christopher; Hamilton, Karyn L.; Miller, Benjamin F.; Hellerstein, Marc K.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we have described and validated a strategy for monitoring skeletal muscle protein synthesis rates in rodents and humans over days or weeks from blood samples. We based this approach on label incorporation into proteins that are synthesized specifically in skeletal muscle and escape into the circulation. Heavy water labeling combined with sensitive tandem mass spectrometric analysis allowed integrated synthesis rates of proteins in muscle tissue across the proteome to be measured over several weeks. Fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of plasma creatine kinase M-type (CK-M) and carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA-3) in the blood, more than 90% of which is derived from skeletal muscle, correlated closely with FSR of CK-M, CA-3, and other proteins of various ontologies in skeletal muscle tissue in both rodents and humans. Protein synthesis rates across the muscle proteome generally changed in a coordinate manner in response to a sprint interval exercise training regimen in humans and to denervation or clenbuterol treatment in rodents. FSR of plasma CK-M and CA-3 revealed changes and interindividual differences in muscle tissue proteome dynamics. In human subjects, sprint interval training primarily stimulated synthesis of structural and glycolytic proteins. Together, our results indicate that this approach provides a virtual biopsy, sensitively revealing individualized changes in proteome-wide synthesis rates in skeletal muscle without a muscle biopsy. Accordingly, this approach has potential applications for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of muscle disorders. PMID:26657858

  17. Stochastic heart-rate model can reveal pathologic cardiac dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuusela, Tom

    2004-03-01

    A simple one-dimensional Langevin-type stochastic difference equation can simulate the heart-rate fluctuations in a time scale from minutes to hours. The model consists of a deterministic nonlinear part and a stochastic part typical of Gaussian noise, and both parts can be directly determined from measured heart-rate data. Data from healthy subjects typically exhibit the deterministic part with two or more stable fixed points. Studies of 15 congestive heart-failure subjects reveal that the deterministic part of pathologic heart dynamics has no clear stable fixed points. Direct simulations of the stochastic model for normal and pathologic cases can produce statistical parameters similar to those of real subjects. Results directly indicate that pathologic situations simplify the heart-rate control system.

  18. Rating Format Effects on Rater Agreement and Reliability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, John H.; Troendle, G. Roger

    This study compares intra- and inter-rater agreement and reliability when using three different rating form formats to assess the same stimuli. One format requests assessment by marking detailed criteria without an overall judgement; the second format requests only an overall judgement without the use of detailed criteria; and the third format…

  19. Inclination Dependence of Estimated Galaxy Masses and Star Formation Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Betsy; Maller, Ariyeh; McKernan, Barry; Ford, Saavik

    2016-01-01

    We examine the inclination dependence of inferred star formation rates and galaxy mass estimates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey by combining the disk/bulge de-convolved catalog of Simard et al 2011 with stellar mass estimates catalog of Mendel et al 2014 and star formation rates measured from spectra by Brinchmann et al 2004. We know that optical star formation indicators are reddened by dust, but calculated star formation rates and stellar mass estimates should account for this. However, we find that face-on galaxies have a higher calculated average star formation rates than edge-on galaxies. We also find edge-on galaxies have ,on average, slightly smaller but similar estimated masses to face-on galaxies, suggesting that there are issues with the applied dust corrections for both models.

  20. Identifying inhibitors of hydrate formation rate with viscometric experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kalbus, J.S.; Christiansen, R.L.; Sloan, D. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Inhibiting the rate of hydrate formation with low concentration additives is an economically and environmentally attractive alternative to prevention of hydrates with large doses of methanol. Here, a method for screening possible rate inhibitors is described. In the method, a viscometer is used to follow the development of hydrate formation for water-THF solutions and for water-gas solutions at conditions favoring hydrate formation. The method was applied to about 30 different chemicals, plus binary combinations of many of these chemicals. The best chemical additives included BASF F-127, Mirawet ASC, Surfynol-465, sodium dodecyl sulfate(SDS), Mirataine CBS with polyvinylpyrrolidone(PVP), and SDS with PVP.

  1. Sulphur-radical control on petroleum formation rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewan, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    Most petroleum is formed through the partial decomposition of kerogen (an insoluble sedimentary organic material) in response to thermal stress during subsurface burial in a sedimentary basin. Knowing the mechanisms and kinetics of this process allows the determination of the extent and timing of petroleum formation, which, in turn, are critical for evaluating the potential for petroleum occurrences within a sedimentary basin. Kinetic models of petroleum generation are derived mainly from pyrolysis experiments, in which it is usually assumed that formation rates are controlled by the strength of the bonds within the precursor compounds: this agrees with the observation that petroleum formation rates increase with increasing sulphur content of thermally immature kerogen, C-S bonds being weaker than C-C bonds. However, this explanation fails to account for the overall composition of petroleum. Here I argue, on the basis of pyrolysis experiments, that it is the presence of sulphur radicals, rather than the relative weakness of C-S bonds, that controls petroleum formation rates. My findings suggest that the rate of petroleum formation depends critically on the concentration of sulphur radicals generated during the initial stages of thermal maturation. The proposed mechanism appears to provide a realistic explanation for both the overall composition of petroleum and the observed variation in formation rates.

  2. Format Effects in Two Teacher Rating Scales of Hyperactivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandoval, Jonathan

    1981-01-01

    The object of the study was to investigate the effect of differences in format on the precision of teacher ratings and thus on the reliability and validity of two teacher rating scales of children's hyperactive behavior. Attributes assessed were motor restlssness, inattentiveness, impulsivity, and aggressiveness/emotional stability. (Author/DB)

  3. Formation and destruction rates of interstellar H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1974-01-01

    In the model of Hollenbach et al. (1971), hydrogen molecules are formed on grains. Molecular hydrogen is destroyed by absorption of radiation in the Lyman bands. A study has been conducted regarding the formation and destruction rates of molecular hydrogen. The ultraviolet radiation field has been calculated to determine the rate of molecular hydrogen destruction resulting from absorption in the Lyman bands. An estimate of an upper limit for the molecular hydrogen formation rate is obtained from observations involving stars in which very little molecular hydrogen is observed.

  4. Star formation rates and abundance gradients in disk galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Silk, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    Analytic models for the evolution of disk galaxies are presented, placing special emphasis on the radial properties. These models are straightforward extensions of the original Schmidt (1959, 1963) models, with a dependence of star formation rate on gas density. The models provide successful descriptions of several measures of galactic disk evolution, including solar neighborhood chemical evolution, the presence and amplitude of metallicity and color gradients in disk galaxies, and the global rates of star formation in disk galaxies, and aid in the understanding of the apparent connection between young and old stellar populations in spiral galaxies.

  5. The star formation rate density from z = 1 to 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Oliver, Seb; Wang, Lingyu; Farrah, Duncan; Clements, David L.; Gruppioni, Carlotta; Marchetti, Lucia; Rigopoulou, Dimitra; Vaccari, Mattia

    2016-09-01

    We use 3035 Herschel-SPIRE 500 μm sources from 20.3 deg2 of sky in the HerMES Lockman, ES1 and XMM-LSS areas to estimate the star formation rate density at z = 0-6. 500 μm sources are associated first with 350 and 250 μm sources, and then with Spitzer 24 μm sources from the SWIRE photometric redshift catalogue. The infrared and submillimetre data are fitted with a set of radiative-transfer templates corresponding to cirrus (quiescent) and starburst galaxies. Lensing candidates are removed via a set of colour-colour and colour-redshift constraints. Star formation rates are found to extend from <1 to 20 000 M⊙ yr-1. Such high values were also seen in the all-sky IRAS Faint Source Survey. Star formation rate functions are derived in a series of redshift bins from 0 to 6, combined with earlier far-infrared estimates, where available, and fitted with a Saunders et al (1990) functional form. The star formation rate density as a function of redshift is derived and compared with other estimates. There is reasonable agreement with both infrared and ultraviolet estimates for z < 3, but we find higher star formation rate densities than ultraviolet estimates at z = 3-6. Given the considerable uncertainties in the submillimetre estimates, we cannot rule out the possibility that the ultraviolet estimates are correct. But the possibility that the ultraviolet estimates have seriously underestimated the contribution of dust-shrouded star formation can also not be excluded.

  6. Star formation rates in luminous quasars at 2 < z < 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Kathryn; Farrah, Duncan; Schulz, Bernhard; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Viero, Marco; Anderson, Nick; Béthermin, Matthieu; Chapman, Scott; Clements, David L.; Cooray, Asantha; Efstathiou, Andreas; Feltre, Anne; Hurley, Peter; Ibar, Eduardo; Lacy, Mark; Oliver, Sebastian; Page, Mathew J.; Pérez-Fournon, Ismael; Petty, Sara M.; Pitchford, Lura K.; Rigopoulou, Dimitra; Scott, Douglas; Symeonidis, Myrto; Vieira, Joaquin; Wang, Lingyu

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the relation between star formation rates (dot{{M}}_s) and AGN properties in optically selected type 1 quasars at 2 < z < 3 using data from Herschel and the SDSS. We find that dot{{M}}_s remains approximately constant with redshift, at 300 ± 100 M⊙ yr-1. Conversely, dot{{M}}_s increases with AGN luminosity, up to a maximum of ˜ 600 M⊙ yr-1, and with C IV FWHM. In context with previous results, this is consistent with a relation between dot{{M}}_s and black hole accretion rate (dot{{M}}_{bh}) existing in only parts of the z-dot{{M}}s-dot{{M}}_{bh} plane, dependent on the free gas fraction, the trigger for activity, and the processes that may quench star formation. The relations between dot{{M}}_s and both AGN luminosity and C IV FWHM are consistent with star formation rates in quasars scaling with black hole mass, though we cannot rule out a separate relation with black hole accretion rate. Star formation rates are observed to decline with increasing C IV equivalent width. This decline can be partially explained via the Baldwin effect, but may have an additional contribution from one or more of three factors; Mi is not a linear tracer of L2500, the Baldwin effect changes form at high AGN luminosities, and high C IV EW values signpost a change in the relation between dot{{M}}_s and dot{{M}}_{bh}. Finally, there is no strong relation between dot{{M}}_s and Eddington ratio, or the asymmetry of the C IV line. The former suggests that star formation rates do not scale with how efficiently the black hole is accreting, while the latter is consistent with C IV asymmetries arising from orientation effects.

  7. Rate of H2 formation on amorphous grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoluchowski, R.

    1981-01-01

    The rate of formation of molecular hydrogen from hydrogen atoms adsorbed on amorphous grains taken to represent interstellar dust grains is analyzed. Following a brief review of the structure and thermodynamics of amorphous grains and the evidence that interstellar grains are indeed amorphous, consideration is given to the mechanism of formation of H2 molecules by the impact of H atoms on grains with adsorbed H atoms, and it is concluded that on amorphous grains, molecule formation will only occur if H atoms are adsorbed within a distance on the order of 10 A of each other. Rates of H2 formation on single crystal and polycrystalline grains are then calculated and compared with those for amorphous grains, and it is shown that, except for certain temperatures and high H atom densities, the rates of H2 formation on polycrystalline and amorphous grains are up to a few orders of magnitude lower than on single crystals. The results suggest that amorphous grains will lead to H2 clouds with irregular and sharply delineated features in contrast to the more uniform clouds formed on crystalline grains.

  8. Impact of State hospital rate setting on capital formation

    PubMed Central

    Cromwell, Jerry

    1987-01-01

    For this article, a new national data base of Medicare cost reports on more than 2,000 hospitals is used to measure the impact of State prospective rate setting on capital formation. Several investment measures are analyzed, both in nominal and real terms, using a combination of descriptive and multivariate techniques. Results indicate that, over the last decade, State hospital rate-setting programs have had little demonstrable effect on capital formation and they have not caused any significant aging of plant assets. Programs in both New York and Massachusetts were found to be associated with a slowing in the rate of bed growth, however, resulting in significant long-term cost savings. PMID:10312117

  9. Effect of alteration phase formation on the glass dissolution rate

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, W.L.

    1997-10-01

    The dissolution rates of many glasses have been observed to increase upon the formation of certain alteration phases. It is important to understand the mechanism by which alteration phases affect glass corrosion behavior and the glass dissolution rate to reliably predict whether or not similar effects will occur in a disposal environment and the impact of phase formation on the long-term performance of waste glass. While solid state transformation of a glass to thermodynamically more stable phases in kinetically prohibitive, contact by water provides an energetically favorable pathway for this transformation to occur by a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism. The kinetics of the transformation depends on the dissolution kinetics of the glass and the precipitation kinetics of the alteration phases. The rates of these two processes are linked primarily through the solution activity of orthosilicic acid (and perhaps also that of an aluminum-bearing species).

  10. THE COSMIC CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA RATE DOES NOT MATCH THE MASSIVE-STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Beacom, John F.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Thompson, Todd A.; Prieto, Jose L.

    2011-09-10

    We identify a 'supernova rate problem': the measured cosmic core-collapse supernova rate is a factor of {approx}2 smaller (with significance {approx}2{sigma}) than that predicted from the measured cosmic massive-star formation rate. The comparison is critical for topics from galaxy evolution and enrichment to the abundance of neutron stars and black holes. We systematically explore possible resolutions. The accuracy and precision of the star formation rate data and conversion to the supernova rate are well supported, and proposed changes would have far-reaching consequences. The dominant effect is likely that many supernovae are missed because they are either optically dim (low-luminosity) or dark, whether intrinsically or due to obscuration. We investigate supernovae too dim to have been discovered in cosmic surveys by a detailed study of all supernova discoveries in the local volume. If possible supernova impostors are included, then dim supernovae are common enough by fraction to solve the supernova rate problem. If they are not included, then the rate of dark core collapses is likely substantial. Other alternatives are that there are surprising changes in our understanding of star formation or supernova rates, including that supernovae form differently in small galaxies than in normal galaxies. These possibilities can be distinguished by upcoming supernova surveys, star formation measurements, searches for disappearing massive stars, and measurements of supernova neutrinos.

  11. Mechanistic studies of carbonate macrocyclization: Rates of carbonate bond formation

    SciTech Connect

    Aquino, E.; Brittain, W.J.; Brunelle, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    High yields of cyclic oligomeric carbonates can be prepared using an amine-catalyzed reaction of bisphenol A-bischloroformate. The authors have studied the kinetics of this carbonate macrocyclization by the isolated study of key chemical events. Using stopped-flow FT-IR spectroscopy, it was found that the rate of carbonate formation between the intermediate acyl ammonium salt (1) and 4-isopropylphenol (4-IPP) is the same for tributylamine, triethylamine and diethylmethylamine. Previously, it was found that conversion of 1 to urethane was also insensitive to amine structure while the formation of 1 is profoundly dependent on amine structure.

  12. Mechanisms of amyloid formation revealed by solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Karamanos, Theodoros K.; Kalverda, Arnout P.; Thompson, Gary S.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are proteinaceous elongated aggregates involved in more than fifty human diseases. Recent advances in electron microscopy and solid state NMR have allowed the characterization of fibril structures to different extents of refinement. However, structural details about the mechanism of fibril formation remain relatively poorly defined. This is mainly due to the complex, heterogeneous and transient nature of the species responsible for assembly; properties that make them difficult to detect and characterize in structural detail using biophysical techniques. The ability of solution NMR spectroscopy to investigate exchange between multiple protein states, to characterize transient and low-population species, and to study high molecular weight assemblies, render NMR an invaluable technique for studies of amyloid assembly. In this article we review state-of-the-art solution NMR methods for investigations of: (a) protein dynamics that lead to the formation of aggregation-prone species; (b) amyloidogenic intrinsically disordered proteins; and (c) protein–protein interactions on pathway to fibril formation. Together, these topics highlight the power and potential of NMR to provide atomic level information about the molecular mechanisms of one of the most fascinating problems in structural biology. PMID:26282197

  13. Soil formation in response to perturbed erosion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudd, Simon; Milodowski, David; Yoo, Kyungsoo; Gabet, Emmanuel; Weinman, Beth; Attal, Mikael; Clubb, Fiona

    2014-05-01

    Time is recognized as one of the soil forming factors. In upland, sloping landscapes time is controlled by erosion rates. These erosion rates may be forced by climate, tectonics, and increasingly anthropogenic disturbance. Perturbations to erosion rates alter the exposure of near surface material to both physical and chemical weathering, which can influence water retention, plant growth and sediment transport. All of these can feed back into further perturbation of erosion rates. Here we present field data, topographic analysis and numerical modelling from a field site in the Sierra Nevada of California where we have attempted to examine soil formation across a range of erosion rates, and determine their influence on soil particle size, geochemistry and plant life, as well as the geomorphic signature of overland flow. Erosion rates have strong impact on soils, leading to coarser soils that support less biomass when erosion rates are high and clay rich soils with higher biomass when erosion rates are low. Erosion rates also appear to influence the dissection of the landscape by channels, which we quantify using high resolution topographic analysis.

  14. Archaeological data reveal slow rates of evolution during plant domestication.

    PubMed

    Purugganan, Michael D; Fuller, Dorian Q

    2011-01-01

    Domestication is an evolutionary process of species divergence in which morphological and physiological changes result from the cultivation/tending of plant or animal species by a mutualistic partner, most prominently humans. Darwin used domestication as an analogy to evolution by natural selection although there is strong debate on whether this process of species evolution by human association is an appropriate model for evolutionary study. There is a presumption that selection under domestication is strong and most models assume rapid evolution of cultivated species. Using archaeological data for 11 species from 60 archaeological sites, we measure rates of evolution in two plant domestication traits--nonshattering and grain/seed size increase. Contrary to previous assumptions, we find the rates of phenotypic evolution during domestication are slow, and significantly lower or comparable to those observed among wild species subjected to natural selection. Our study indicates that the magnitudes of the rates of evolution during the domestication process, including the strength of selection, may be similar to those measured for wild species. This suggests that domestication may be driven by unconscious selection pressures similar to that observed for natural selection, and the study of the domestication process may indeed prove to be a valid model for the study of evolutionary change.

  15. Connecting Galaxies, Halos, and Star Formation Rates Across Cosmic Time

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2008-06-02

    A simple, observationally-motivated model is presented for understanding how halo masses, galaxy stellar masses, and star formation rates are related, and how these relations evolve with time. The relation between halo mass and galaxy stellar mass is determined by matching the observed spatial abundance of galaxies to the expected spatial abundance of halos at multiple epochs--i.e. more massive galaxies are assigned to more massive halos at each epoch. This 'abundance matching' technique has been shown previously to reproduce the observed luminosity- and scale-dependence of galaxy clustering over a range of epochs. Halos at different epochs are connected by halo mass accretion histories estimated from N-body simulations. The halo-galaxy connection at fixed epochs in conjunction with the connection between halos across time provides a connection between observed galaxies across time. With approximations for the impact of merging and accretion on the growth of galaxies, one can then directly infer the star formation histories of galaxies as a function of stellar and halo mass. This model is tuned to match both the observed evolution of the stellar mass function and the normalization of the observed star formation rate--stellar mass relation to z {approx} 1. The data demands, for example, that the star formation rate density is dominated by galaxies with M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10.0-10.5} M{sub {circle_dot}} from 0 < z < 1, and that such galaxies over these epochs reside in halos with M{sub vir} {approx} 10{sup 11.5-12.5} M{sub {circle_dot}}. The star formation rate--halo mass relation is approximately Gaussian over the range 0 < z < 1 with a mildly evolving mean and normalization. This model is then used to shed light on a number of issues, including (1) a clarification of 'downsizing', (2) the lack of a sharp characteristic halo mass at which star formation is truncated, and (3) the dominance of star formation over merging to the stellar build-up of galaxies

  16. Bone Formation Rate in Experimental Disuse Osteoporosis in Monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cann, Christopher; Young, Donald R.

    1976-01-01

    Specific mechanisms underlying weightless and hypodynamic bone loss are obscure. A principal relationship which must be affected is the balance between bone formation and bone resorption rates. In order to better define the influence of those parameters on bone loss, and also to develop measurements in other species as a useful adjunct to human research, studies were undertaken with experimental monkeys. Tests were conducted with a total of 6 adult male monkeys, weighing 10-13 kg, and approximately 10-12 yrs. of age to evaluate specifically bone formation rate during the development of disuse osteoporosis and osteopenia. Three animals were restrained in a semi-recumbent position for six months; three animals served as normal caged controls. Food intake (Purina) was held relatively constant at 200g/day for each animal. Using a Norland Bone Mineral Analyzer, bone mineral losses of 3.5 to 6% were seen in the mid-shaft of the tibia and in the distal radius. Bone loss was confirmed radiographically, with observation of thinning of the proximal tibial cortex and trabeculae in the calcaneus. Bone formation rate was determined using standard Ca-47 kinetics under metabolic balance conditions. After six months of restraint, accretion was 7.2-13.2 mg Ca/kg/day, compared to 3.2-4.1 mg Ca/kg/day in caged controls and 3-8 mg Ca/kg/day in normal adult humans. Fecal and urine calcium was 25-40% higher in restrained animals than in controls. Dietary calcium absorption decreases during restraint, and calcium turnover increases, implying a rise in bone resorption rate concommitant with the observed rise in bone accretion rate. Further studies dealing specifically with bone resorption are underway to define this more fully.

  17. Predicting secondary organic aerosol formation rates in southeast Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Matthew; Allen, David T.

    2005-04-01

    Rates of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, due to the reactions of aromatics and monoterpenes, were estimated for southeast Texas by incorporating a modified version of the Statewide Air Pollution Research Center's chemical mechanism (SAPRC99) into the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (CAMx version 3.10). The model included explicit representation of the reactions of five SOA precursors (α-pinene, β-pinene, sabinene, d-limonene, and Δ3-carene). Reactions of each SOA precursor with O3, OH radical, and NO3 radical were included. The model also included separate reactions for low- and high-SOA-yield aromatic groups with the OH radical. SOA yields in the mechanisms were estimated using compound-specific yield information (ΔSOA/ΔHC) derived from smog chamber experiments conducted by J. R. Odum and colleagues and R. J. Griffin and colleagues. The form of the SOA yield model was based on the work of J. R. Odum and colleagues and is a function of existing organic aerosol concentrations. Existing organic aerosol concentrations were estimated on the basis of ambient measurements of total organic carbon in southeast Texas. The reactions of monoterpenes (predominantly α-pinene and β-pinene) with ozone led to the most regional SOA formation, followed by monoterpenes with the nitrate radical. Aromatic-OH reactions led to less regional SOA formation compared to monoterpenes; however, this formation occurs close to the urban and industrial areas of Houston. In contrast, SOA formation due to the reactions of monoterpenes occurred in the forested areas north of the urban area. The results of this study are in qualitative agreement with estimates of SOA formation based on ambient data from the same time period.

  18. Star Formation in the Gould Belt: Star Formation Rates, Evolutionary Timescales, and Implications for Star Formation Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Neal J.

    2014-06-01

    Results from the c2d and Gould Belt Spitzer Legacy and Herschel Key Programs provide the most complete and accurate information on star formation in nearby molecular clouds. Complementary and follow-up studies add crucial information on the nature of star forming gas and the evolution of matter as it moves from core to disk to planets. The star formation rates and gas properties provide tests of star formation laws used by extragalactic researchers and of theories of large scale star formation. The durations in the stages of star formation (envelope infall, exposed star and disk, etc.) have been refined. The data are consistent with models in which accretion onto the forming star is episodic, with possible consequences for the initial conditions in planet-forming disks. The evolution of these disks, including dustsettling, volatile evolution, and gap-clearing, has been clarified.

  19. VLBA Reveals Formation Region of Giant Cosmic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-10-01

    Astronomers have gained their first glimpse of the mysterious region near a black hole at the heart of a distant galaxy, where a powerful stream of subatomic particles spewing outward at nearly the speed of light is formed into a beam, or jet, that then goes nearly straight for thousands of light-years. The astronomers used radio telescopes in Europe and the U.S., including the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to make the most detailed images ever of the center of the galaxy M87, some 50 million light-years away. "This is the first time anyone has seen the region in which a cosmic jet is formed into a narrow beam," said Bill Junor of the University of New Mexico, in Albuquerque. "We had always speculated that the jet had to be made by some mechanism relatively near the black hole, but as we looked closer and closer to the center, we kept seeing an already-formed beam. That was becoming embarrassing, because we were running out of places to put the formation mechanism that we knew had to be there." Junor, along with John Biretta and Mario Livio of the Space Telescope Science Institute, in Baltimore, MD, now have shown that M87's jet is formed within a few tenths of a light-year of the galaxy's core, presumed to be a black hole three billion times more massive than the sun. In the formation region, the jet is seen opening widely, at an angle of about 60 degrees, nearest the black hole, but is squeezed down to only 6 degrees a few light-years away. "The 60-degree angle of the inner part of M87's jet is the widest such angle yet seen in any jet in the universe," said Junor. "We found this by being able to see the jet to within a few hundredths of a light-year of the galaxy's core -- an unprecedented level of detail." The scientists reported their findings in the October 28 issue of the journal Nature. At the center of M87, material being drawn inward by the strong gravitation of the black hole is formed into a rapidly-spinning flat

  20. Oman metamorphic sole formation reveals early subduction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soret, Mathieu; Agard, Philippe; Dubacq, Benoît; Plunder, Alexis; Ildefonse, Benoît; Yamato, Philippe; Prigent, Cécile

    2016-04-01

    Metamorphic soles correspond to m to ~500m thick tectonic slices welded beneath most of the large-scale ophiolites. They typically show a steep inverted metamorphic structure where the pressure and temperature conditions of crystallization increase upward (from 500±100°C at 0.5±0.2 GPa to 800±100°C at 1.0±0.2 GPa), with isograds subparallel to the contact with the overlying ophiolitic peridotite. The proportion of mafic rocks in metamorphic soles also increases from the bottom (meta-sediments rich) to the top (approaching the ophiolite peridotites). These soles are interpreted as the result of heat transfer from the incipient mantle wedge toward the nascent slab (associated with large-scale fluid transfer and possible shear heating) during the first My of intra-oceanic subduction (as indicated by radiometric ages). Metamorphic soles provide therefore major constraints on early subduction dynamics (i.e., thermal structure, fluid migration and rheology along the nascent slab interface). We present a detailed structural and petrological study of the metamorphic sole from 4 major cross-sections along the Oman ophiolite. We show precise pressure-temperature estimates obtained by pseudosection modelling and EBSD measurements performed on both the garnet-bearing and garnet-free high-grade sole. Results allow quantification of the micro-scale deformation and highlight differences in pressure-temperature-deformation conditions between the 4 different locations, showing that the inverted metamorphic gradient through the sole is not continuous in all locations. Based on these new constraints, we suggest a new tectonic-petrological model for the formation of metamorphic soles below ophiolites. This model involves the stacking of several homogeneous slivers of oceanic crust leading to the present-day structure of the sole. In this view, these thrusts are the result of rheological contrasts between the sole and the peridotite as the plate interface progressively cools down

  1. Star Formation Rate in Holmberg IX Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andjelic, M. M.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we use previously determined Hα fluxes for dwarf galaxy Holmberg IX (Arbutina et al. 2009) to calculate star formation rate (SFR) in this galaxy. We discuss possible contaminations of Hα flux and, for the first time, we take into account optical emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) as a possible source of contamination of Hα flux. Derived SFR for Holmberg IX is 3.4×10-4M_{⊙} yr-1. Our value is lower then in previous studies, due to luminous shock-heated source M&H 9-10, possible hypernova remnant, which we excluded from the total Hα flux in our calculation of SFR.

  2. The Fundamental Plane of star formation in galaxies revealed by the EAGLE hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, Claudia del P.; Theuns, Tom; Schaye, Joop; Furlong, Michelle; Bower, Richard G.; Schaller, Matthieu; Crain, Robert A.; Trayford, James W.; Matthee, Jorryt

    2016-07-01

    We investigate correlations between different physical properties of star-forming galaxies in the `Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments' (EAGLE) cosmological hydrodynamical simulation suite over the redshift range 0 ≤ z ≤ 4.5. A principal component analysis reveals that neutral gas fraction (fgas,neutral), stellar mass (Mstellar) and star formation rate (SFR) account for most of the variance seen in the population, with galaxies tracing a two-dimensional, nearly flat, surface in the three-dimensional space of fgas, neutral-Mstellar-SFR with little scatter. The location of this plane varies little with redshift, whereas galaxies themselves move along the plane as their fgas, neutral and SFR drop with redshift. The positions of galaxies along the plane are highly correlated with gas metallicity. The metallicity can therefore be robustly predicted from fgas, neutral, or from the Mstellar and SFR. We argue that the appearance of this `Fundamental Plane of star formation' is a consequence of self-regulation, with the plane's curvature set by the dependence of the SFR on gas density and metallicity. We analyse a large compilation of observations spanning the redshift range 0 ≲ z ≲ 3, and find that such a plane is also present in the data. The properties of the observed Fundamental Plane of star formation are in good agreement with EAGLE's predictions.

  3. On the cosmic evolution of the specific star formation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, M. D.; van Driel, W.; Le Tiran, L.; Di Matteo, P.; Haywood, M.

    2015-05-01

    The apparent correlation between the specific star formation rate (sSFR) and total stellar mass (M⋆) of galaxies is a fundamental relationship indicating how they formed their stellar populations. To attempt to understand this relation, we hypothesize that the relation and its evolution is regulated by the increase in the stellar and gas mass surface density in galaxies with redshift, which is itself governed by the angular momentum of the accreted gas, the amount of available gas, and by self-regulation of star formation. With our model, we can reproduce the specific SFR - M⋆ relations at z ~ 1-2 by assuming gas fractions and gas mass surface densities similar to those observed for z = 1-2 galaxies. We further argue that it is the increasing angular momentum with cosmic time that causes a decrease in the surface density of accreted gas. The gas mass surface densities in galaxies are controlled by the centrifugal support (i.e., angular momentum), and the sSFR is predicted to increase as, sSFR(z) = (1 + z)3/tH0, as observed (where tH0 is the Hubble time and no free parameters are necessary). In addition, the simple evolution for the star-formation intensity we propose is in agreement with observations of Milky Way-like galaxies selected through abundance matching. At z ≳ 2, we argue that star formation is self-regulated by high pressures generated by the intense star formation itself. The star formation intensity must be high enough to either balance the hydrostatic pressure (a rather extreme assumption) or to generate high turbulent pressure in the molecular medium which maintains galaxies near the line of instability (i.e. Toomre Q ~ 1). We provide simple prescriptions for understanding these self-regulation mechanisms based on solid relationships verified through extensive study. In all cases, the most important factor is the increase in stellar and gas mass surface density with redshift, which allows distant galaxies to maintain high levels of s

  4. THE CURRENT STAR FORMATION RATE OF K+A GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Danielle M.; Ridgway, Susan E.; De Propris, Roberto; Goto, Tomotsugu

    2012-12-20

    We derive the stacked 1.4 GHz flux from the FIRST survey for 811 K+A galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. For these objects we find a mean flux density of 56 {+-} 9 {mu}Jy. A similar stack of radio-quiet white dwarfs yields an upper limit of 43 {mu}Jy at a 5{sigma} significance to the flux in blank regions of the sky. This implies an average star formation rate of 1.6 {+-} 0.3 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} for K+A galaxies. However, the majority of the signal comes from {approx}4% of K+A fields that have aperture fluxes above the 5{sigma} noise level of the FIRST survey. A stack of the remaining galaxies shows little residual flux consistent with an upper limit on star formation of 1.3 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Even for a subset of 456 'young' (spectral ages <250 Myr) K+A galaxies, we find that the stacked 1.4 GHz flux is consistent with no current star formation. Our data suggest that the original starburst has been terminated in the majority of K+A galaxies, but that this may represent part of a duty cycle where a fraction of these galaxies may be active at a given moment with dusty starbursts and active galactic nuclei being present.

  5. Calibration of Star Formation Rates Across the Electromagnetic Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardiff, Ann H.

    2011-01-01

    Measuring and mapping star-forming activity in galaxies is a key element for our understanding of their broad- band spectra, and their structure and evolution in our local, as well as the high-redshift Universe. The main tool we use for these measurements is the observed luminosity in various spectral lines and/or continuum bands. However, the available star-formation rate (SFR) indicators are often discrepant and subject to physical biases and calibration uncertainties. We are organizing a special session at the 2012 IAU General Assembly in Beijing, China (August 20-31, 2012) in order to bring together theoreticians and observers working in different contexts of star-formation to discuss the status of current SFR indicators, to identify open issues and to define a strategic framework for their resolution. The is an ideal time to synthesize information from the current golden era of space astrophysics and still have influence on the upcoming missions that will broaden our view of star-formation. We will be including high-energy constraints on SFR in the program and encourage participation from the high energy astrophysics community.

  6. Photoionising feedback and the star formation rates in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLachlan, J. M.; Bonnell, I. A.; Wood, K.; Dale, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the effects of ionising photons on accretion and stellar mass growth in a young star forming region, using a Monte Carlo radiation transfer code coupled to a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation. Methods: We introduce the framework with which we correct stellar cluster masses for the effects of photoionising (PI) feedback and compare to the results of a full ionisation hydrodynamics code. Results: We present results of our simulations of star formation in the spiral arm of a disk galaxy, including the effects of photoionising radiation from high mass stars. We find that PI feedback reduces the total mass accreted onto stellar clusters by ≈23% over the course of the simulation and reduces the number of high mass clusters, as well as the maximum mass attained by a stellar cluster. Mean star formation rates (SFRs) drop from SFRcontrol = 4.2 × 10-2 M⊙ yr-1 to SFRMCPI = 3.2 × 10-2 M⊙ yr-1 after the inclusion of PI feedback with a final instantaneous SFR reduction of 62%. The overall cluster mass distribution appears to be affected little by PI feedback. Conclusions: We compare our results to the observed extra-galactic Schmidt-Kennicutt relation and the observed properties of local star forming regions in the Milky Way and find that internal photoionising (PI) feedback is unlikely to reduce SFRs by more than a factor of ≈2 and thus may play only a minor role in regulating star formation.

  7. SHAPING THE DUST MASS-STAR-FORMATION RATE RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hjorth, Jens; Gall, Christa; Michałowski, Michał J. E-mail: cgall@phys.au.dk

    2014-02-20

    There is a remarkably tight relation between the observationally inferred dust masses and star-formation rates (SFRs) of Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies, M {sub dust} ∝ SFR{sup 1.11}. Here we extend the M {sub dust}-SFR relation to the high end and show that it bends over at very large SFRs (i.e., dust masses are lower than predicted for a given SFR). We identify several distinct evolutionary processes in the diagram: (1) a star-bursting phase in which dust builds up rapidly at early times. The maximum attainable dust mass in this process is the cause of the bend-over of the relation. A high dust-formation efficiency, a bottom-light initial mass function, and negligible supernova shock dust destruction are required to produce sufficiently high dust masses. (2) A quiescent star-forming phase in which the subsequent parallel decline in dust mass and SFR gives rise to the M {sub dust}-SFR relation, through astration and dust destruction. The dust-to-gas ratio is approximately constant along the relation. We show that the power-law slope of the M {sub dust}-SFR relation is inversely proportional to the global Schmidt-Kennicutt law exponent (i.e., ∼0.9) in simple chemical evolution models. (3) A quenching phase which causes star formation to drop while the dust mass stays roughly constant or drops proportionally. Combined with merging, these processes, as well as the range in total baryonic mass, give rise to a complex population of the diagram which adds significant scatter to the original M {sub dust}-SFR relation. (4) At very high redshifts, a population of galaxies located significantly below the local relation is predicted.

  8. Mapping Extinction and Star Formation Rates of Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridenour, Anthony; Takamiya, M.

    2010-01-01

    Star Formation Rate (SFR) is a physical characteristic of galaxies vital to our understanding of such problems as the evolution of the Universe. In computing SFRs obscuring dust systematically lowers them at shorter wavelengths compared to longer wavelengths. This issue of dust extinction has been handled well by multi-wavelength studies of nearby galaxies. Star Formation Rate measurements of distant galaxies are currently reliant on the emission of visible spectroscopic lines like Hα and [OII] after correction for extinction. However, if the visible light is completely obscured an incorrect assumption may be drawn; namely that there is neither SFR nor extinction. The work purposed here is to calibrate the SFR ascertained from Hα emission in nearby galaxies and compare it to radio and infrared emission. The Balmer decrement, or the ratio of Hβ to Hα emission, used to determine extinction, will also be studied and compared to infrared images. 30 nearby galaxies will be sampled and 2-D maps and Balmer decrements will be formed to do two things: measure SFRs and determine differences between Hα and infrared emission, and explore in what ways this difference corresponds with such things as the radio SFR, galaxy luminosity and morphological type. The accuracy of Hα as a SFR indicator and its determination as a sound tool in measuring SFRs of distant galaxies can both be quantified by interpreting these maps. Dr. Marianne Takamiya, the principal investigator and my mentor, secured funds through a grant to the University of Hawai'i at Hilo from The Research Corporation for Science Advancement Cottrell College Science Awards for this research.

  9. The UV + IR Hybrid Star Formation Rate Across NGC6946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eufrasio, Rafael T.; Lehmer, Bret; Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies is essential to understand galaxy evolution and thus determining reliable, simple tracers of star-forming activity is of paramount importance to astrophysics. For instance, intrinsic ultraviolet (UV) emission from young stars is an excellent tracer of the SFR. Observed UV luminosities, however, have been strongly attenuated by intervening interstellar dust. Since emission from hot dust is readily available from IRAS, Spitzer, and WISE, it is common practice to combine mid-IR emission (around 25 μm) with observed UV in order to obtain an SFR diagnostic of the form Lobs(FUV) + acorr × Lobs(25 μm). Conventionally, a single correction acorr, previously determined for a sample of galaxies, is used. Here we test the reliability of this hybrid SFR diagnostic, allowing for a variable correction factor acorr. For this, we have performed broadband UV-to-IR SED fittings in order to model the star formation histories across the spiral galaxy NGC6946. We have obtained SFRs and stellar masses across the galaxy, from physical scales of 5 kpc down to 500 pc. We find that acorr varies significantly across the galaxy and increases with increasing specific star formation rate (sSFR), the ratio of SFR and stellar mass (or the ratio of young and old stars). The correction acorr does not seem to be correlated to the amount of attenuation AV. Variation of acorr is most likely caused by different mixes of young and old stellar populations across the galaxy. This finding agrees well with our previous results for the interacting spiral galaxy NGC 6872, for which we have demonstrated the variation of acorr and a its correlation with sSFR. Our results show the need of caution when using only two broadband filters in order to determine SFR of individual galaxies or sub-galactic regions. The dust emission most likely overestimates SFR for highly star-forming, high sSFR regions, and underestimates it for more quiescent, low sSFR regions.

  10. The star formation rates of active galactic nuclei host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Sara L.; Teimoorinia, Hossen; Rosario, David J.; Mendel, J. Trevor

    2016-05-01

    Using artificial neural network predictions of total infrared luminosities (LIR), we compare the host galaxy star formation rates (SFRs) of ˜21 000 optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGN), 466 low-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) and 721 mid-IR-selected AGN. SFR offsets (ΔSFR) relative to a sample of star-forming `main-sequence' galaxies (matched in M⋆, z and local environment) are computed for the AGN hosts. Optically selected AGN exhibit a wide range of ΔSFR, with a distribution skewed to low SFRs and a median ΔSFR = -0.06 dex. The LERGs have SFRs that are shifted to even lower values with a median ΔSFR = -0.5 dex. In contrast, mid-IR-selected AGN have, on average, SFRs enhanced by a factor of ˜1.5. We interpret the different distributions of ΔSFR amongst the different AGN classes in the context of the relative contribution of triggering by galaxy mergers. Whereas the LERGs are predominantly fuelled through low accretion rate secular processes which are not accompanied by enhancements in SFR, mergers, which can simultaneously boost SFRs, most frequently lead to powerful, obscured AGN.

  11. Regolith Formation Rates and Evolution from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayne, P. O.; Ghent, R. R.; Bandfield, J. L.; Vasavada, A. R.; Williams, J. P.; Siegler, M. A.; Lucey, P. G.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Elder, C. M.; Paige, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Fragmentation and overturn of lunar surface materials produces a layer of regolith, which increases in thickness through time. Experiments on the lunar surface during the Apollo era, combined with remote sensing, found that the upper 10's of cm of regolith exhibit a rapid increase in density and thermal conductivity with depth. This is interpreted to be the signature of impact gardening, which operates most rapidly in the uppermost layers. Gravity data from the GRAIL mission showed that impacts have also extensively fractured the deeper crust. The breakdown and mixing of crustal materials is therefore a central process to lunar evolution and must be understood in order to interpret compositional information from remote sensing and sample analysis. Recently, thermal infrared data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Diviner radiometer were used to provide the first remote observational constraints on the rate of ejecta breakdown around craters < 1 Ga (Ghent et al., 2014). Here, we use nighttime regolith temperatures derived from Diviner data to constrain regolith thermal inertia, thickness, and spatial variability. Applied to models, these new data help improve understanding of regolith formation on a variety of geologic units. We will also discuss several anomalous features that merit further investigation. Reference: Ghent, R. R., Hayne, P. O., Bandfield, J. L., Campbell, B. A., Allen, C. C., Carter, L. M., & Paige, D. A. (2014). Constraints on the recent rate of lunar ejecta breakdown and implications for crater ages. Geology, 42(12), 1059-1062.

  12. The formation of cluster elliptical galaxies as revealed by extensive star formation.

    PubMed

    Stevens, J A; Ivison, R J; Dunlop, J S; Smail, Ian R; Percival, W J; Hughes, D H; Röttgering, H J A; Van Breugel, W J M; Reuland, M

    2003-09-18

    The most massive galaxies in the present-day Universe are found to lie in the centres of rich clusters. They have old, coeval stellar populations suggesting that the bulk of their stars must have formed at early epochs in spectacular starbursts, which should be luminous phenomena when observed at submillimetre wavelengths. The most popular model of galaxy formation predicts that these galaxies form in proto-clusters at high-density peaks in the early Universe. Such peaks are indicated by massive high-redshift radio galaxies. Here we report deep submillimetre mapping of seven high-redshift radio galaxies and their environments. These data confirm not only the presence of spatially extended regions of massive star-formation activity in the radio galaxies themselves, but also in companion objects previously undetected at any wavelength. The prevalence, orientation, and inferred masses of these submillimetre companion galaxies suggest that we are witnessing the synchronous formation of the most luminous elliptical galaxies found today at the centres of rich clusters of galaxies.

  13. Comparing infrared star formation rate indicators with optically derived quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, J. E.; Gronwall, C.; Salzer, J. J.; Rosenberg, J. L.

    2014-09-01

    We examine the UV reprocessing efficiencies of warm dust and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) through an analysis of the mid- and far-infrared surface luminosity densities of 85 nearby Hα-selected star-forming galaxies detected by the volume-limited KPNO (Kitt Peak National Observatory) International Spectroscopic Survey (KISS). Because Hα selection is not biased towards continuum-bright objects, the KISS sample spans a wide range in stellar masses (108-1012 M⊙), as well as Hα luminosity (1039-1043 erg s-1), mid-infrared 8.0 μm luminosity (1041-1044 erg s-1), and [Bw - R] colour (-0.1-2.2). We find that mid-infrared PAH emission in the Spitzer InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) 8.0 μm band correlates with star formation, and that the efficiency with which galaxies reprocess UV energy into PAH emission depends on metallicity. We also find that the relationship between far-infrared luminosity in the Spitzer Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer 24 μm band pass and Hα-measured star formation rate varies from galaxy to galaxy within our sample; we do not observe a metallicity dependence in this relationship. We use optical colours and established mass-to-light relationships to determine stellar masses for the KISS galaxies; we compare these masses to those of nearby galaxies as a confirmation that the volume-limited nature of KISS avoids strong biases. We also examine the relationship between IRAC 3.6 μm luminosity and galaxy stellar mass, and find a colour-dependent correlation between the two.

  14. CALIBRATING UV STAR FORMATION RATES FOR DWARF GALAXIES FROM STARBIRDS

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Mitchell, Noah P.; Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2015-08-01

    Integrating our knowledge of star formation (SF) traced by observations at different wavelengths is essential for correctly interpreting and comparing SF activity in a variety of systems and environments. This study compares extinction corrected integrated ultraviolet (UV) emission from resolved galaxies with color–magnitude diagram (CMD) based star formation rates (SFRs) derived from resolved stellar populations and CMD fitting techniques in 19 nearby starburst and post-starburst dwarf galaxies. The data sets are from the panchromatic Starburst Irregular Dwarf Survey and include deep legacy GALEX UV imaging, Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging, and Spitzer MIPS imaging. For the majority of the sample, the integrated near-UV fluxes predicted from the CMD-based SFRs—using four different models—agree with the measured, extinction corrected, integrated near-UV fluxes from GALEX images, but the far-UV (FUV) predicted fluxes do not. Furthermore, we find a systematic deviation between the SFRs based on integrated FUV luminosities and existing scaling relations, and the SFRs based on the resolved stellar populations. This offset is not driven by different SF timescales, variations in SFRs, UV attenuation, nor stochastic effects. This first comparison between CMD-based SFRs and an integrated FUV emission SFR indicator suggests that the most likely cause of the discrepancy is the theoretical FUV–SFR calibration from stellar evolutionary libraries and/or stellar atmospheric models. We present an empirical calibration of the FUV-based SFR relation for dwarf galaxies, with uncertainties, which is ∼53% larger than previous relations.

  15. Kinetics of silicide formation over a wide range of heating rates spanning six orders of magnitude

    SciTech Connect

    Molina-Ruiz, Manel; Lopeandía, Aitor F.; Gonzalez-Silveira, Marta; Garcia, Gemma; Clavaguera-Mora, Maria T.; Peral, Inma; Rodríguez-Viejo, Javier

    2014-07-07

    Kinetic processes involving intermediate phase formation are often assumed to follow an Arrhenius temperature dependence. This behavior is usually inferred from limited data over narrow temperature intervals, where the exponential dependence is generally fully satisfied. However, direct evidence over wide temperature intervals is experimentally challenging and data are scarce. Here, we report a study of silicide formation between a 12 nm film of palladium and 15 nm of amorphous silicon in a wide range of heating rates, spanning six orders of magnitude, from 0.1 to 10{sup 5 }K/s, or equivalently more than 300 K of variation in reaction temperature. The calorimetric traces exhibit several distinct exothermic events related to interdiffusion, nucleation of Pd{sub 2}Si, crystallization of amorphous silicon, and vertical growth of Pd{sub 2}Si. Interestingly, the thickness of the initial nucleation layer depends on the heating rate revealing enhanced mass diffusion at the fastest heating rates during the initial stages of the reaction. In spite of this, the formation of the silicide strictly follows an Arrhenius temperature dependence over the whole temperature interval explored. A kinetic model is used to fit the calorimetric data over the complete heating rate range. Calorimetry is complemented by structural analysis through transmission electron microscopy and both standard and in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

  16. Star Formation Rates of dS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo-Gámez, A. M.; Vega-Acevedo, I.; Magaña-Serrano, M. A.

    2014-10-01

    The Star Formation Rate of a sample of nine dwarf spiral galaxies and ten late-type Sm is determined from the Hα luminosity. The main interest was to check if these two kind of late-type galaxies have similar SFR or not. The images were acquired at the 1.5m telescope of the SPM-OAN and they were reduced with the software MIDAS. The values of the SFR are very similar for both type of galaxies and also similar to other Sm galaxies. The main result is that the dwarf spiral galaxies are more efficient when forming stars than the Sm galaxies because the SFR per are are lower for the latter with the same gas density than for dwarf spirals. However, the SFRs are larger in the Sm galaxies. In addition, the SFR per area were compared with global properties of the galaxies. There is only a relationship between the SFR and the surface brightness as well as with the absolute blue magnitude, but no relationship with the optical radius. A larger sample is needed in order to obtain a more conclusive answer.

  17. Shallow Methane Hydrates: Rates, Mechanisms of Formation and Environmental Significance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, M. E.; Trehu, A. M.

    2005-05-01

    Shallow gas hydrates have been identified at more than 20 locations worldwide, and are commonly associated with observations of bubble discharge at the seafloor. These deposits are host to active chemosynthetic communities and are likely to play a predominant role in energy, climate and carbon cycle issues associated with hydrate processes. Because seafloor gas hydrates are not in equilibrium with seawater, these deposits require a constant supply of methane to replace loss by continuous diffusion to bottom water. We will summarize evidence documenting that at the shallow deposits on Hydrate Ridge (OR) methane must be delivered in the free gas phase and present simple models used to infer formation rates, which are orders of magnitude higher than those for hydrates formed deeper in the sediment column (Torres et al., 2004). At Hydrate Ridge, methane gas is channeled from deep accretionary margin sequences to the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) through a permeable layer that has been mapped seismically (Horizon A). High gas pressure in this horizon can drive gas through the GHSZ to the seafloor (Trehu et al., 2004). We will review current ideas that address mechanisms whereby gas migrates from Horizon A to the seafloor, including inhibition by capillary effects and the development of a high salinity front that can shift the hydrate stability field enough to allow for methane transport as a gas phase.

  18. Decreased specific star formation rates in AGN host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, T. Taro; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Meléndez, Marcio; Koss, Michael; Rosario, David J.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the location of an ultra-hard X-ray selected sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalogue with respect to the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies using Herschel-based measurements of the star formation rate (SFR) and M*'s from Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry where the AGN contribution has been carefully removed. We construct the MS with galaxies from the Herschel Reference Survey and Herschel Stripe 82 Survey using the exact same methods to measure the SFR and M* as the Swift/BAT AGN. We find that a large fraction of the Swift/BAT AGN lie below the MS indicating decreased specific SFR (sSFR) compared to non-AGN galaxies. The Swift/BAT AGN are then compared to a high-mass galaxy sample (CO Legacy Database for GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey, COLD GASS), where we find a similarity between the AGN in COLD GASS and the Swift/BAT AGN. Both samples of AGN lie firmly between star-forming galaxies on the MS and quiescent galaxies far below the MS. However, we find no relationship between the X-ray luminosity and distance from the MS. While the morphological distribution of the BAT AGN is more similar to star-forming galaxies, the sSFR of each morphology is more similar to the COLD GASS AGN. The merger fraction in the BAT AGN is much higher than the COLD GASS AGN and star-forming galaxies and is related to distance from the MS. These results support a model in which bright AGN tend to be in high-mass star-forming galaxies in the process of quenching which eventually starves the supermassive black hole itself.

  19. ON STAR FORMATION RATES AND STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF GALAXIES OUT TO z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Wuyts, Stijn; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Lutz, Dieter; Nordon, Raanan; Berta, Stefano; Genzel, Reinhard; Magnelli, Benjamin; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Altieri, Bruno; Andreani, Paola; Aussel, Herve; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Cimatti, Andrea; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Maiolino, Roberto; McGrath, Elizabeth J.

    2011-09-01

    We compare multi-wavelength star formation rate (SFR) indicators out to z {approx} 3 in the GOODS-South field. Our analysis uniquely combines U to 8 {mu}m photometry from FIREWORKS, MIPS 24 {mu}m and PACS 70, 100, and 160 {mu}m photometry from the PEP, and H{alpha} spectroscopy from the SINS survey. We describe a set of conversions that lead to a continuity across SFR indicators. A luminosity-independent conversion from 24 {mu}m to total infrared luminosity yields estimates of L{sub IR} that are in the median consistent with the L{sub IR} derived from PACS photometry, albeit with significant scatter. Dust correction methods perform well at low-to-intermediate levels of star formation. They fail to recover the total amount of star formation in systems with large SFR{sub IR}/SFR{sub UV} ratios, typically occuring at the highest SFRs (SFR{sub UV+IR} {approx}> 100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) and redshifts (z {approx}> 2.5) probed. Finally, we confirm that H{alpha}-based SFRs at 1.5 < z < 2.6 are consistent with SFR{sub SED} and SFR{sub UV+IR} provided extra attenuation toward H II regions is taken into account (A{sub V,neb} = A{sub V,continuum}/0.44). With the cross-calibrated SFR indicators in hand, we perform a consistency check on the star formation histories inferred from spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling. We compare the observed SFR-M relations and mass functions at a range of redshifts to equivalents that are computed by evolving lower redshift galaxies backward in time. We find evidence for underestimated stellar ages when no stringent constraints on formation epoch are applied in SED modeling. We demonstrate how resolved SED modeling, or alternatively deep UV data, may help to overcome this bias. The age bias is most severe for galaxies with young stellar populations and reduces toward older systems. Finally, our analysis suggests that SFHs typically vary on timescales that are long (at least several 100 Myr) compared to the galaxies' dynamical time.

  20. Reliability and Validity of Teacher Rating Procedures in the Assessment of Hyperactivity as a Function of Rating Scale Format.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandoval, Jonathan; Lambert, Nadine M.

    The effects of varying the formats of behavior rating scale items on teacher ratings of student hyperactivity were investigated. Two hundred forty-two teachers were asked to rate a variety of children; some had been identified as hyperactive by physicians, parents, or teachers; some were not considered hyperactive; and others were randomly…

  1. Effects of stellar rotation on star formation rates and comparison to core-collapse supernova rates

    SciTech Connect

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Beacom, John F.; Bothwell, Matt S.; Thompson, Todd A.

    2013-06-01

    We investigate star formation rate (SFR) calibrations in light of recent developments in the modeling of stellar rotation. Using new published non-rotating and rotating stellar tracks, we study the integrated properties of synthetic stellar populations and find that the UV to SFR calibration for the rotating stellar population is 30% smaller than for the non-rotating stellar population, and 40% smaller for the Hα to SFR calibration. These reductions translate to smaller SFR estimates made from observed UV and Hα luminosities. Using the UV and Hα fluxes of a sample of ∼300 local galaxies, we derive a total (i.e., sky-coverage corrected) SFR within 11 Mpc of 120-170 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} and 80-130 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for the non-rotating and rotating estimators, respectively. Independently, the number of core-collapse supernovae discovered in the same volume requires a total SFR of 270{sub −80}{sup +110} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}, suggesting a tension with the SFR estimates made with rotating calibrations. More generally, when compared with the directly estimated SFR, the local supernova discoveries strongly constrain any physical effects that might increase the energy output of massive stars, including, but not limited to, stellar rotation. The cosmic SFR and cosmic supernova rate data, on the other hand, show the opposite trend, with the cosmic SFR higher than that inferred from cosmic supernovae, constraining a significant decrease in the energy output of massive stars. Together, these lines of evidence suggest that the true SFR calibration factors cannot be too far from their canonical values.

  2. Comparison of Traditional and Alternative Fitness Teaching Formats on Heart Rate Intensity and Perceived Enjoyment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ha, Amy Sau-ching; Heung-Sang Wong, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Compared a traditional and an alternative (skill-fitness- music) fitness teaching format to determine whether there would be differences on Hong Kong middle school students' heart rate intensity and perceived enjoyment. Data from heart rate monitors and student surveys indicated that the two formats did not produce differences in heart rates.…

  3. 41 CFR 109-40.306-1 - Recommended rate tender format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-1 Recommended rate tender format. Only those rate tenders which have been submitted by the carriers... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Recommended rate tender format. 109-40.306-1 Section 109-40.306-1 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...

  4. 41 CFR 109-40.306-1 - Recommended rate tender format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-1 Recommended rate tender format. Only those rate tenders which have been submitted by the carriers... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recommended rate tender format. 109-40.306-1 Section 109-40.306-1 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...

  5. High Rate of Microbleed Formation Following Primary Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Jason; Wing, Jeffrey J.; Norato, Gina; Sobotka, Ian; Menon, Ravi S.; Burgess, Richard E.; Gibbons, M. Chris; Shara, Nawar M.; Fernandez, Stephen; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni; Russell, Laura; Edwards, Dorothy F.; Kidwell, Chelsea S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We sought to investigate the frequency of microbleed (MB) development following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a predominantly African-American population and to identify predictors of new MB formation. Methods The DECIPHER study was a prospective, longitudinal, MR-based cohort study designed to evaluate racial/ethnic differences in risk factors for MBs and to evaluate the prognostic impact of MBs in this ICH population. We evaluated new MB formation in 2 time periods: from baseline to 30 days and from 30 days to year 1. Results Of 200 subjects enrolled in DECIPHER, 84 had MRIs at all required timepoints to meet criteria for this analysis. In the baseline to day 30 analysis, 11 (13.1%) had new MBs, compared to 25 (29.8%) in the day 30 to year 1 analysis. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that baseline number of MBs (OR 1.05 [95% CI 1.01, 1.08], p=0.01) was associated with new MB formation at 30 days. A logistic regression model predicting new MB at 1 year included baseline number of MBs (OR 1.05 [1.00, 1.11], p=0.046), baseline age (OR 1.05 [1.00, 1.10], p=0.04) and WMD disease score (OR 1.18 [0.96, 1.45]. p=0.115). Overall 28 of 84 (33.3%) ICH subjects formed new MBs at some point in the first year post-ICH. Conclusions We found that one-third of ICH subjects in this cohort surviving one year developed new MBs, which suggests a dynamic and rapidly progressive vasculopathy. Future studies are needed to examine the impact of new MB formation on patient outcomes. PMID:26311530

  6. Information transfer rate with serial and simultaneous visual display formats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matin, Ethel; Boff, Kenneth R.

    1988-04-01

    Information communication rate for a conventional display with three spatially separated windows was compared with rate for a serial display in which data frames were presented sequentially in one window. For both methods, each frame contained a randomly selected digit with various amounts of additional display 'clutter.' Subjects recalled the digits in a prescribed order. Large rate differences were found, with faster serial communication for all levels of the clutter factors. However, the rate difference was most pronounced for highly cluttered displays. An explanation for the latter effect in terms of visual masking in the retinal periphery was supported by the results of a second experiment. The working hypothesis that serial displays can speed information transfer for automatic but not for controlled processing is discussed.

  7. Attribution of halo merger mass ratio and star formation rate density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungeun; Jo, Jeong-woon; Hwang, Jihe; Youn, Soyoung; Park, Boha

    2016-06-01

    We have used codes for implementing the merger tree algorithm by Cole et al. (2007) and Parkinson et al. (2008) and derived the halo merger mass ratio of protocluster of galaxies across the cosmic time. The authors compare the observed and simulated star formation rates reported by the various groups and derive the star formation rate densities at different red-shifts. This study implies that an investigation of different mass variables should be incorporated into the analysis in order to accurately estimate cumulative star formation rates of galaxies and star formation rate densities as a function of red-shifts.

  8. Ultraviolet Morphology and Unobscured UV Star Formation Rates of CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Megan; Connor, Thomas; Fogarty, Kevin; Li, Yuan; Voit, G. Mark; Postman, Marc; Koekemoer, Anton; Moustakas, John; Bradley, Larry; Ford, Holland

    2015-06-01

    Brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) are usually quiescent, but many exhibit star formation. Here we exploit the opportunity provided by rest-frame UV imaging of galaxy clusters in the Cluster Lensing and Supernovae with Hubble (CLASH) Multi-Cycle Treasury Project to reveal the diversity of UV morphologies in BCGs and to compare them with recent simulations of the cool, star-forming gas structures produced by precipitation-driven feedback. All of the CLASH BCGs are detected in the rest-frame UV (280 nm), regardless of their star formation activity, because evolved stellar populations produce a modest amount of UV light that traces the relatively smooth, symmetric, and centrally peaked stellar distribution seen in the near infrared. Ultraviolet morphologies among the BCGs with strong UV excesses exhibit distinctive knots, multiple elongated clumps, and extended filaments of emission that distinctly differ from the smooth profiles of the UV-quiet BCGs. These structures, which are similar to those seen in the few star-forming BCGs observed in the UV at low redshift, are suggestive of bi-polar streams of clumpy star formation, but not of spiral arms or large, kiloparsec-scale disks. Based on the number of streams and lack of culprit companion galaxies, these streams are unlikely to have arisen from multiple collisions with gas-rich galaxies. These star-forming UV structures are morphologically similar to the cold-gas structures produced in simulations of precipitation-driven active galactic nucleus feedback in which jets uplift low-entropy gas to greater altitudes, causing it to condense. Unobscured star formation rates estimated from CLASH UV images using the Kennicutt relation range up to 80 {{M}⊙ } y{{r}-1} in the most extended and highly structured systems. The circumgalactic gas-entropy threshold for star formation in CLASH BCGs at z ˜ 0.2-0.5 is indistinguishable from that for clusters at z\\lt 0.2.

  9. Combined techniques for characterising pasta structure reveals how the gluten network slows enzymic digestion rate.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Sissons, Mike; Gidley, Michael J; Gilbert, Robert G; Warren, Frederick J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to characterise the influence of gluten structure on the kinetics of starch hydrolysis in pasta. Spaghetti and powdered pasta were prepared from three different cultivars of durum semolina, and starch was also purified from each cultivar. Digestion kinetic parameters were obtained through logarithm-of-slope analysis, allowing identification of sequential digestion steps. Purified starch and semolina were digested following a single first-order rate constant, while pasta and powdered pasta followed two sequential first-order rate constants. Rate coefficients were altered by pepsin hydrolysis. Confocal microscopy revealed that, following cooking, starch granules were completely swollen for starch, semolina and pasta powder samples. In pasta, they were completely swollen in the external regions, partially swollen in the intermediate region and almost intact in the pasta strand centre. Gluten entrapment accounts for sequential kinetic steps in starch digestion of pasta; the compact microstructure of pasta also reduces digestion rates.

  10. TEMPRANILLO Reveals the Mesophyll as Crucial for Epidermal Trichome Formation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Jaramillo, Andrea E.; Osnato, Michela; Shani, Eilon

    2016-01-01

    Plant trichomes are defensive specialized epidermal cells. In all accepted models, the epidermis is the layer involved in trichome formation, a process controlled by gibberellins (GAs) in Arabidopsis rosette leaves. Indeed, GA activates a genetic cascade in the epidermis for trichome initiation. Here we report that TEMPRANILLO (TEM) genes negatively control trichome initiation not only from the epidermis but also from the leaf layer underneath the epidermis, the mesophyll. Plants over-expressing or reducing TEM specifically in the mesophyll, display lower or higher trichome numbers, respectively. We surprisingly found that fluorescently labeled GA3 accumulates exclusively in the mesophyll of leaves, but not in the epidermis, and that TEM reduces its accumulation and the expression of several newly identified GA transporters. This strongly suggests that TEM plays an essential role, not only in GA biosynthesis, but also in regulating GA distribution in the mesophyll, which in turn directs epidermal trichome formation. Moreover, we show that TEM also acts as a link between GA and cytokinin signaling in the epidermis by negatively regulating downstream genes of both trichome formation pathways. Overall, these results call for a re-evaluation of the present theories of trichome formation as they reveal mesophyll essential during epidermal trichome initiation. PMID:26802039

  11. SNLS: Type Ia Supernova Rates from the SNLS Survey: the Connection with Morphology and Star Formation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchet, C. J.; Sullivan, M.; Gwyn, S.; Astier, P.; Aubourg, E.; Balam, D.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R. G.; Conley, A.; Fabbro, S.; Fouchez, D.; Guy, J.; Hook, I.; Howell, D. A.; Lafoux, H.; Neill, J. D.; Pain, R.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perrett, K.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Taillet, R.; Baumont, S.; Bronder, J.; Lusset, V.; Ripoche, P.; Mourao, A.; Perlmutter, S.; Graham, M.; Hsiao, E.

    2005-12-01

    Analysis of 150 SNLS Survey Type Ia supernovae (0.2 < z < 0.9, all with spectroscopic identification) shows a strong connection between SNIa rate, normalized per unit mass, and star formation rate or galaxy morphology. This correlation is in the sense that the rate per unit mass in Irr galaxies is more than a factor of 10 higher than that in E/S0 galaxies. This result independently confirms that found for SNLS SNeIa by Sullivan et al (this meeting), but makes use of different photometric redshifts for the field population (Gwyn et al. 2005), and different M/L and star formation rate estimators. The SFR/morphology dependence of SNIa rate is, to first order, independent of redshift. The observations can be explained in terms of one or two component models for the origin of SNeIa (Howell et al., this meeting).

  12. Observation of low aluminum corrosion rates during biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitz, Markus; Franke, Hilmar

    2002-03-01

    An optical technique based on the surface plasmon resonance of thin was used to study the influence of aqueous organic subtances on thin aluminum films. In a quasi continous flow experiment over several days it was found that the aluminium was dissolved and the thickness decrease could be monitored very accurately. In a series of experiments with different organic components the corrosion could be attributed to the nutrient Alginate promomoting medium and the extracellular polymeric substances produced by the bacteria pseudomonas aeruginosa. In comparison with inorganic substances the same behaviour could not be observed. Regardless of the particular chemical reactions involved this method seems to be suitable to monitor low aluminium corrosion rates in the order of nm/h quite precisely.

  13. Kinetic analysis reveals the diversity of microscopic mechanisms through which molecular chaperones suppress amyloid formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arosio, Paolo; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Linse, Sara; Månsson, Cecilia; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Presto, Jenny; Johansson, Jan; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2016-03-01

    It is increasingly recognized that molecular chaperones play a key role in modulating the formation of amyloid fibrils, a process associated with a wide range of human disorders. Understanding the detailed mechanisms by which they perform this function, however, has been challenging because of the great complexity of the protein aggregation process itself. In this work, we build on a previous kinetic approach and develop a model that considers pairwise interactions between molecular chaperones and different protein species to identify the protein components targeted by the chaperones and the corresponding microscopic reaction steps that are inhibited. We show that these interactions conserve the topology of the unperturbed reaction network but modify the connectivity weights between the different microscopic steps. Moreover, by analysing several protein-molecular chaperone systems, we reveal the striking diversity in the microscopic mechanisms by which molecular chaperones act to suppress amyloid formation.

  14. Kinetic analysis reveals the diversity of microscopic mechanisms through which molecular chaperones suppress amyloid formation

    PubMed Central

    Arosio, Paolo; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Linse, Sara; Månsson, Cecilia; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Presto, Jenny; Johansson, Jan; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2016-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that molecular chaperones play a key role in modulating the formation of amyloid fibrils, a process associated with a wide range of human disorders. Understanding the detailed mechanisms by which they perform this function, however, has been challenging because of the great complexity of the protein aggregation process itself. In this work, we build on a previous kinetic approach and develop a model that considers pairwise interactions between molecular chaperones and different protein species to identify the protein components targeted by the chaperones and the corresponding microscopic reaction steps that are inhibited. We show that these interactions conserve the topology of the unperturbed reaction network but modify the connectivity weights between the different microscopic steps. Moreover, by analysing several protein-molecular chaperone systems, we reveal the striking diversity in the microscopic mechanisms by which molecular chaperones act to suppress amyloid formation. PMID:27009901

  15. GOODS-Herschel: ultra-deep XMM-Newton observations reveal AGN/star-formation connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovilos, E.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Ranalli, P.; Vignali, C.; Lusso, E.; Cappelluti, N.; Zamorani, G.; Elbaz, D.; Dickinson, M.; Hwang, H. S.; Charmandaris, V.; Ivison, R. J.; Merloni, A.; Daddi, E.; Carrera, F. J.; Brandt, W. N.; Mullaney, J. R.; Scott, D.; Alexander, D. M.; Del Moro, A.; Morrison, G.; Murphy, E. J.; Altieri, B.; Aussel, H.; Dannerbauer, H.; Kartaltepe, J.; Leiton, R.; Magdis, G.; Magnelli, B.; Popesso, P.; Valtchanov, I.

    2012-10-01

    Models of galaxy evolution assume some connection between the AGN and star formation activity in galaxies. We use the multi-wavelength information of the CDFS to assess this issue. We select the AGNs from the 3 Ms XMM-Newton survey and measure the star-formation rates of their hosts using data that probe rest-frame wavelengths longward of 20 μm, predominantly from deep 100 μm and 160 μm Herschel observations, but also from Spitzer-MIPS-70 μm. Star-formation rates are obtained from spectral energy distribution fits, identifying and subtracting an AGN component. Our sample consists of sources in the z ≈ 0.5-4 redshift range, with star-formation rates SFR ≈ 101-103 M⊙ yr-1 and stellar masses M⋆ ≈ 1010-1011.5 M⊙. We divide the star-formation rates by the stellar masses of the hosts to derive specific star-formation rates (sSFR) and find evidence for a positive correlation between the AGN activity (proxied by the X-ray luminosity) and the sSFR for themost active systems with X-ray luminosities exceeding Lx ≃ 1043 erg s-1 and redshifts z ≳ 1. We do not find evidence for such a correlation for lower luminosity systems or those at lower redshifts, consistent with previous studies. We do not find any correlation between the SFR (or the sSFR) and the X-ray absorption derived from high-quality XMM-Newton spectra either, showing that the absorption is likely to be linked to the nuclear region rather than the host, while the star-formation is not nuclear. Comparing the sSFR of the hosts to the characteristic sSFR of star-forming galaxies at the same redshift (the so-called "main sequence") we find that the AGNs reside mostly in main-sequence and starburst hosts, reflecting the AGN-sSFR connection; however the infrared selection might bias this result. Limiting our analysis to the highest X-ray luminosity AGNs (X-ray QSOs with Lx > 1044 erg s-1), we find that the highest-redshift QSOs (with z ≳ 2) reside predominantly in starburst hosts, with an average s

  16. Rates of formation of modern phosphorite off western Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuffert, J. D.; Jahnke, R. A.; Kastner, M.; Leather, J.; Sturz, A.; Wing, M. R.

    1994-11-01

    Phosphorite deposition represents a significant but poorly constrained sink in the marine P cycle. This study establishes conclusively that phosphorite forms today throughout a widespread region along the upper continental slope off southern Baja California, Mexico. In this region, O 2-depleted (5-50 μM) bottomwater overlies the seafloor, and a narrow range of suboxic to anoxic redox conditions prevail in the modern (0-18,000 yr old), near-surface (0-50 cm), organic-C-rich (2-10 wt%) sediment. Interstitial gradients of total alkalinity (TA) and inferred effects of organic-matter decay correlate directly with sedimentation rates calculated from 14C dating. Other porewater and solid-phase data indicate that francolite currently precipitates authigenically at each of five study sites. Moderately high concentrations (20-100 μM) of dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) produced in the upper 5 cm of sediment sustain francolite growth at slightly greater depths, while the necessary F - diffuses into the sediment from above. Neither organic-matter decay nor fish-bone dissolution seem capable of producing the steep, near-surface gradients of DIP measured in this study. At some sites, DIP production coincides spatially with the reversible production of dissolved Fe 2+, but thorough evaluation of the possible link between these processes requires further study. The mechanism responsible for the near-surface enrichment of interstitial DIP thus remains unidentified. Box cores from each site contain an unreworked sequence of up to six thin (1-3 cm), discrete, francolite-rich horizons, several of which qualify as true phosphorite (≥ 50 wt% francolite). Estimated diffusional burial fluxes of inorganic P and F range respectively from 2-40 μg cm -2 y -1 and 4-12 μg cm -2 y -1, or the equivalent in francolite of 16-260 μg cm -2 y -1. These present-day accumulation rates lie within the range of those determined for several ancient phosphorite deposits and for the extensively

  17. Modulation of microsaccade rate by task difficulty revealed through between- and within-trial comparisons.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Yan, Hongmei; Sun, Hong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Microsaccades (MSs) are small eye movements that occur during attempted visual fixation. While most studies concerning MSs focus on their roles in visual processing, some also suggest that the MS rate can be modulated by the amount of mental exertion involved in nonvisual processing. The current study focused on the effects of task difficulty on MS rate in a nonvisual mental arithmetic task. Experiment 1 revealed a general inverse relationship between MS rate and subjective task difficulty. During Experiment 2, three task phases with different requirements were identified: during calculation (between stimulus presentation and response), postcalculation (after reporting an answer), and a control condition (undergoing a matching sequence of events without the need to make a calculation). MS rate was observed to approximately double from the during-calculation phase to the postcalculation phase, and was significantly higher in the control condition compared to postcalculation. Only during calculation was the MS rate generally decreased with greater task difficulty. Our results suggest that the nonvisual cognitive processing can suppress MS rate, and that the extent of such suppression is related to the task difficulty. PMID:25740876

  18. Hα star formation rates of z > 1 galaxy clusters in the IRAC shallow cluster survey

    SciTech Connect

    Zeimann, Gregory R.; Stanford, S. A.; Brodwin, Mark; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, Conor; Snyder, Gregory F.; Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, Peter; Dey, Arjun; Moustakas, John

    2013-12-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope near-IR spectroscopy for 18 galaxy clusters at 1.0 formation rates within a projected radius of 500 kpc, and many of our clusters (∼60%) have significant levels of star formation within a projected radius of 200 kpc. A stacking analysis reveals that dust reddening in these star-forming galaxies is positively correlated with stellar mass and may be higher in the field than the cluster at a fixed stellar mass. This may indicate a lower amount of gas in star-forming cluster galaxies than in the field population. Also, Hα equivalent widths of star-forming galaxies in the cluster environment are still suppressed below the level of the field. This suppression is most significant for lower mass galaxies (log M {sub *} < 10.0 M {sub ☉}). We therefore conclude that environmental effects are still important at 1.0

  19. Effect of Common Cryoprotectants on Critical Warming Rates and Ice Formation in Aqueous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Jesse B.; Badeau, Ryan; Warkentin, Matthew; Thorne, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Ice formation on warming is of comparable or greater importance to ice formation on cooling in determining survival of cryopreserved samples. Critical warming rates required for ice-free warming of vitrified aqueous solutions of glycerol, dimethyl sulfoxide, ethylene glycol, polyethylene glycol 200 and sucrose have been measured for warming rates of order 10 to 104 K/s. Critical warming rates are typically one to three orders of magnitude larger than critical cooling rates. Warming rates vary strongly with cooling rates, perhaps due to the presence of small ice fractions in nominally vitrified samples. Critical warming and cooling rate data spanning orders of magnitude in rates provide rigorous tests of ice nucleation and growth models and their assumed input parameters. Current models with current best estimates for input parameters provide a reasonable account of critical warming rates for glycerol solutions at high concentrations/low rates, but overestimate both critical warming and cooling rates by orders of magnitude at lower concentrations and larger rates. In vitrification protocols, minimizing concentrations of potentially damaging cryoprotectants while minimizing ice formation will require ultrafast warming rates, as well as fast cooling rates to minimize the required warming rates. PMID:22728046

  20. Effect of common cryoprotectants on critical warming rates and ice formation in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Jesse B; Badeau, Ryan; Warkentin, Matthew; Thorne, Robert E

    2012-12-01

    Ice formation on warming is of comparable or greater importance to ice formation on cooling in determining survival of cryopreserved samples. Critical warming rates required for ice-free warming of vitrified aqueous solutions of glycerol, dimethyl sulfoxide, ethylene glycol, polyethylene glycol 200 and sucrose have been measured for warming rates of order 10-10⁴ K/s. Critical warming rates are typically one to three orders of magnitude larger than critical cooling rates. Warming rates vary strongly with cooling rates, perhaps due to the presence of small ice fractions in nominally vitrified samples. Critical warming and cooling rate data spanning orders of magnitude in rates provide rigorous tests of ice nucleation and growth models and their assumed input parameters. Current models with current best estimates for input parameters provide a reasonable account of critical warming rates for glycerol solutions at high concentrations/low rates, but overestimate both critical warming and cooling rates by orders of magnitude at lower concentrations and larger rates. In vitrification protocols, minimizing concentrations of potentially damaging cryoprotectants while minimizing ice formation will require ultrafast warming rates, as well as fast cooling rates to minimize the required warming rates.

  1. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Yee, Lindsay D; Schilling, Katherine A; Loza, Christine L; Craven, Jill S; Zuend, Andreas; Ziemann, Paul J; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-07-16

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality, and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multigeneration gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface, and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a midexperiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. Although experiments need to be conducted with other SOA precursor hydrocarbons, current results demonstrate coupling between particle-phase chemistry and size distribution dynamics in the formation of SOAs, thereby opening up an avenue for analysis of the SOA formation process.

  2. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Yee, Lindsay D; Schilling, Katherine A; Loza, Christine L; Craven, Jill S; Zuend, Andreas; Ziemann, Paul J; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-07-16

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality, and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multigeneration gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface, and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a midexperiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. Although experiments need to be conducted with other SOA precursor hydrocarbons, current results demonstrate coupling between particle-phase chemistry and size distribution dynamics in the formation of SOAs, thereby opening up an avenue for analysis of the SOA formation process. PMID:23818634

  3. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation

    PubMed Central

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Yee, Lindsay D.; Schilling, Katherine A.; Loza, Christine L.; Craven, Jill S.; Zuend, Andreas; Ziemann, Paul J.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality, and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multigeneration gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface, and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a midexperiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. Although experiments need to be conducted with other SOA precursor hydrocarbons, current results demonstrate coupling between particle-phase chemistry and size distribution dynamics in the formation of SOAs, thereby opening up an avenue for analysis of the SOA formation process. PMID:23818634

  4. Magnetite: What it reveals about the origin of the banded iron formations. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. E.; Mancinelli, R. L.; White, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetite, Fe3O4 is produced abiotically and biotically. Abiotically, magnetite is a late magmatic mineral and forms as a consequence of the cooling of iron rich magma. Biotically, magnetite is produced by several organisms, including magnetotactic bacteria. Hematite, Fe2O3, is also produced abiotically and biotically. Abiotically, hematite rarely occurs as a primary mineral in igneous rocks, but is common as an alteration product, fumarole deposit, and in some metamorphosed Fe-rich rocks. Biotically, hematite is produced by several types of microorganisms. Biologically-produced magnetite and hematite are formed under the control of the host organism, and consequently, have characteristics not found in abiotically produced magnetite and hematite crystals. To determine if the magnetite and hematite in the Banded Iron Formation was biologically or abiotically produced, the characteristics of biologically-produced magnetite and hematite (concentrated from Aquaspirillum magnetotacticum) and abiotically-produced magnetite and hematite obtained from Wards Scientific Supply Company, were compared with characteristics of magnetite and hematite concentrated from the Gunflint Banded Iron Formation (Ontario, Canada) using thermal and crystallographic analytical techniques. Whole rock analysis of the Gunflint Banded Iron Formation by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) revealed the presence of quartz, hematite, siderite and dolomite as the major minerals, and magnetite, greenalite, pyrite, pyrrhotite and apatite as the minor minerals. Analysis of a crude magnetic fraction of the Gunflint showed the minerals quartz, hematite, siderite, dolomite, and magnetite. Analysis of the crude magnetic fraction from Aquaspirillum magnetotacticum revealed organic compounds plus hematite and magnetite. The mineral identification and particle size distribution data obtained from the DTA along with XRD data indicate that the magnetite and hematite from the Gunflint

  5. Trace incorporation of heavy water reveals slow and heterogeneous pathogen growth rates in cystic fibrosis sputum

    PubMed Central

    Kopf, Sebastian H.; Sessions, Alex L.; Cowley, Elise S.; Reyes, Carmen; Van Sambeek, Lindsey; Hu, Yang; Orphan, Victoria J.; Kato, Roberta; Newman, Dianne K.

    2016-01-01

    Effective treatment for chronic infections is undermined by a significant gap in understanding of the physiological state of pathogens at the site of infection. Chronic pulmonary infections are responsible for the morbidity and mortality of millions of immunocompromised individuals worldwide, yet drugs that are successful in laboratory culture are far less effective against pathogen populations persisting in vivo. Laboratory models, upon which preclinical development of new drugs is based, can only replicate host conditions when we understand the metabolic state of the pathogens and the degree of heterogeneity within the population. In this study, we measured the anabolic activity of the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus directly in the sputum of pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), by combining the high sensitivity of isotope ratio mass spectrometry with a heavy water labeling approach to capture the full range of in situ growth rates. Our results reveal S. aureus generation times with a median of 2.1 d, with extensive growth rate heterogeneity at the single-cell level. These growth rates are far below the detection limit of previous estimates of CF pathogen growth rates, and the rates are slowest in acutely sick patients undergoing pulmonary exacerbations; nevertheless, they are accessible to experimental replication within laboratory models. Treatment regimens that include specific antibiotics (vancomycin, piperacillin/tazobactam, tobramycin) further appear to correlate with slow growth of S. aureus on average, but follow-up longitudinal studies must be performed to determine whether this effect holds for individual patients. PMID:26715741

  6. Trace incorporation of heavy water reveals slow and heterogeneous pathogen growth rates in cystic fibrosis sputum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, Sebastian H.; Sessions, Alex L.; Cowley, Elise S.; Reyes, Carmen; Van Sambeek, Lindsey; Hu, Yang; Orphan, Victoria J.; Kato, Roberta; Newman, Dianne K.

    2016-01-01

    Effective treatment for chronic infections is undermined by a significant gap in understanding of the physiological state of pathogens at the site of infection. Chronic pulmonary infections are responsible for the morbidity and mortality of millions of immunocompromised individuals worldwide, yet drugs that are successful in laboratory culture are far less effective against pathogen populations persisting in vivo. Laboratory models, upon which preclinical development of new drugs is based, can only replicate host conditions when we understand the metabolic state of the pathogens and the degree of heterogeneity within the population. In this study, we measured the anabolic activity of the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus directly in the sputum of pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), by combining the high sensitivity of isotope ratio mass spectrometry with a heavy water labeling approach to capture the full range of in situ growth rates. Our results reveal S. aureus generation times with a median of 2.1 d, with extensive growth rate heterogeneity at the single-cell level. These growth rates are far below the detection limit of previous estimates of CF pathogen growth rates, and the rates are slowest in acutely sick patients undergoing pulmonary exacerbations; nevertheless, they are accessible to experimental replication within laboratory models. Treatment regimens that include specific antibiotics (vancomycin, piperacillin/tazobactam, tobramycin) further appear to correlate with slow growth of S. aureus on average, but follow-up longitudinal studies must be performed to determine whether this effect holds for individual patients.

  7. EFFECTS OF VARYING THE THREE-BODY MOLECULAR HYDROGEN FORMATION RATE IN PRIMORDIAL STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Turk, Matthew J.; Clark, Paul; Glover, S. C. O.; Klessen, Ralf; Greif, T. H.; Abel, Tom; Bromm, Volker

    2011-01-01

    The transformation of atomic hydrogen to molecular hydrogen through three-body reactions is a crucial stage in the collapse of primordial, metal-free halos, where the first generation of stars (Population III stars) in the universe is formed. However, in the published literature, the rate coefficient for this reaction is uncertain by nearly an order of magnitude. We report on the results of both adaptive mesh refinement and smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the collapse of metal-free halos as a function of the value of this rate coefficient. For each simulation method, we have simulated a single halo three times, using three different values of the rate coefficient. We find that while variation between halo realizations may be greater than that caused by the three-body rate coefficient being used, both the accretion physics onto Population III protostars as well as the long-term stability of the disk and any potential fragmentation may depend strongly on this rate coefficient.

  8. Robust hierarchical state-space models reveal diel variation in travel rates of migrating leatherback turtles.

    PubMed

    Jonsen, Ian D; Myers, Ransom A; James, Michael C

    2006-09-01

    1. Biological and statistical complexity are features common to most ecological data that hinder our ability to extract meaningful patterns using conventional tools. Recent work on implementing modern statistical methods for analysis of such ecological data has focused primarily on population dynamics but other types of data, such as animal movement pathways obtained from satellite telemetry, can also benefit from the application of modern statistical tools. 2. We develop a robust hierarchical state-space approach for analysis of multiple satellite telemetry pathways obtained via the Argos system. State-space models are time-series methods that allow unobserved states and biological parameters to be estimated from data observed with error. We show that the approach can reveal important patterns in complex, noisy data where conventional methods cannot. 3. Using the largest Atlantic satellite telemetry data set for critically endangered leatherback turtles, we show that the diel pattern in travel rates of these turtles changes over different phases of their migratory cycle. While foraging in northern waters the turtles show similar travel rates during day and night, but on their southward migration to tropical waters travel rates are markedly faster during the day. These patterns are generally consistent with diving data, and may be related to changes in foraging behaviour. Interestingly, individuals that migrate southward to breed generally show higher daytime travel rates than individuals that migrate southward in a non-breeding year. 4. Our approach is extremely flexible and can be applied to many ecological analyses that use complex, sequential data.

  9. Effect of Booklet/Folder Questionnaire Format and Style of Type on Mail Survey Response Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boser, Judith A.

    Results of two studies, involving surveys of alumni of postsecondary institutions, are presented to assess the effect of format and typeface on mail survey response rates. The first study focused on the effect of booklet/folder format versus stapled sheets. The method of reproduction, page content, page size, and appearance of the questionnaires…

  10. Complex fluid flow revealed by monitoring CO2 injection in a fluvial formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jiemin; Cook, Paul J.; Hosseini, Seyyed A.; Yang, Changbing; Romanak, Katherine D.; Zhang, Tongwei; Freifeld, Barry M.; Smyth, Rebecca C.; Zeng, Hongliu; Hovorka, Susan D.

    2012-03-01

    At Cranfield, Mississippi, United States, a large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection through an injection well (˜3,080 m deep) was continuously monitored using U-tube samplers in two observation wells located 68 and 112 m east of the injector. The Lower Tuscaloosa Formation injection zone, which consists of amalgamated fluvial point-bar and channel-fill deposits, presents an interesting environment for studying fluid flow in heterogeneous formations. Continual fluid sampling was carried out during the first month of CO2 injection. Two subsequent tracer tests using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and krypton were conducted at different injection rates to measure flow velocity change. The field observations showed significant heterogeneity of fluid flow and for the first time clearly demonstrated that fluid flow evolved with time and injection rate. It was found the wells were connected through numerous, separate flow pathways. CO2 flowed through an increasing fraction of the reservoir and sweep efficiency improved with time. The field study also first documented in situ component exchange between brine and gas phases during CO2 injection. It was found that CH4 degassed from brine and is enriched along the gas-water contact. Multiple injectate flow fronts with high CH4 concentration arrived at different times and led to gas composition fluctuations in the observation wells. The findings provide valuable insights into heterogeneous multiphase flow in rock formations and show that conventional geological models and static fluid flow simulations are unable to fully describe the heterogeneous and dynamic flow during fluid injection.

  11. STAR FORMATION RATES IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS AND THE NATURE OF THE EXTRAGALACTIC SCALING RELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lada, Charles J.; Forbrich, Jan; Lombardi, Marco; Alves, Joao F. E-mail: jforbrich@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: joao.alves@univie.ac.at

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate scaling relations between star formation rates and molecular gas masses for both local Galactic clouds and a sample of external galaxies. We specifically consider relations between the star formation rates and measurements of dense, as well as total, molecular gas masses. We argue that there is a fundamental empirical scaling relation that directly connects the local star formation process with that operating globally within galaxies. Specifically, the total star formation rate in a molecular cloud or galaxy is linearly proportional to the mass of dense gas within the cloud or galaxy. This simple relation, first documented in previous studies, holds over a span of mass covering nearly nine orders of magnitude and indicates that the rate of star formation is directly controlled by the amount of dense molecular gas that can be assembled within a star formation complex. We further show that the star formation rates and total molecular masses, characterizing both local clouds and galaxies, are correlated over similarly large scales of mass and can be described by a family of linear star formation scaling laws, parameterized by f{sub DG}, the fraction of dense gas contained within the clouds or galaxies. That is, the underlying star formation scaling law is always linear for clouds and galaxies with the same dense gas fraction. These considerations provide a single unified framework for understanding the relation between the standard (nonlinear) extragalactic Schmidt-Kennicutt scaling law, that is typically derived from CO observations of the gas, and the linear star formation scaling law derived from HCN observations of the dense gas.

  12. Patterned biofilm formation reveals a mechanism for structural heterogeneity in bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Gu, Huan; Hou, Shuyu; Yongyat, Chanokpon; De Tore, Suzanne; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial biofilms are ubiquitous and are the major cause of chronic infections in humans and persistent biofouling in industry. Despite the significance of bacterial biofilms, the mechanism of biofilm formation and associated drug tolerance is still not fully understood. A major challenge in biofilm research is the intrinsic heterogeneity in the biofilm structure, which leads to temporal and spatial variation in cell density and gene expression. To understand and control such structural heterogeneity, surfaces with patterned functional alkanthiols were used in this study to obtain Escherichia coli cell clusters with systematically varied cluster size and distance between clusters. The results from quantitative imaging analysis revealed an interesting phenomenon in which multicellular connections can be formed between cell clusters depending on the size of interacting clusters and the distance between them. In addition, significant differences in patterned biofilm formation were observed between wild-type E. coli RP437 and some of its isogenic mutants, indicating that certain cellular and genetic factors are involved in interactions among cell clusters. In particular, autoinducer-2-mediated quorum sensing was found to be important. Collectively, these results provide missing information that links cell-to-cell signaling and interaction among cell clusters to the structural organization of bacterial biofilms.

  13. Metatranscriptomics reveals the molecular mechanism of large granule formation in granular anammox reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Samik; Lamendella, Regina; Strutt, Steven; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.; Saikaly, Pascal E.

    2016-06-01

    Granules enriched with anammox bacteria are essential in enhancing the treatment of ammonia-rich wastewater, but little is known about how anammox bacteria grow and multiply inside granules. Here, we combined metatranscriptomics, quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to study the changes in community composition, metabolic gene content and gene expression in a granular anammox reactor with the objective of understanding the molecular mechanism of anammox growth and multiplication that led to formation of large granules. Size distribution analysis revealed the spatial distribution of granules in which large granules having higher abundance of anammox bacteria (genus Brocadia) dominated the bottom biomass. Metatranscriptomics analysis detected all the essential transcripts for anammox metabolism. During the later stage of reactor operation, higher expression of ammonia and nitrite transport proteins and key metabolic enzymes mainly in the bottom large granules facilitated anammox bacteria activity. The high activity resulted in higher growth and multiplication of anammox bacteria and expanded the size of the granules. This conceptual model for large granule formation proposed here may assist in the future design of anammox processes for mainstream wastewater treatment.

  14. Mass Spectrometric and Spectrophotometric Analyses Reveal an Alternative Structure and a New Formation Mechanism for Melanin.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanjiao; Liu, Jingjing; Wang, Yajie; Chan, Ho Wai; Wang, Lianrong; Chan, Wan

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the formation mechanism and chemical structure of melanin that results from the self-assembly of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA). Using a combination of "top-down" and "bottom-up" approaches, and on the basis of state-of-the-art electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) results, we propose a new formation mechanism and an alternative structure for melanin. Specifically, our study of the self-aggregation of L-DOPA based on L-DOPA clusters revealed that melanin is comprised partially of noncovalent supramolecular aggregate that is formed by self-aggregation of L-DOPA and with the individual monomers linked together by a combination of hydrogen bonds, π-π stacking, and ionic bonds. Furthermore, our study showed that unmodified L-DOPA may be part of the building block for melanin in addition to the previously proposed indole derivative based on L-DOPA cyclization. A similar self-aggregation phenomenon was also observed in other structurally related catecholamines, for example, adrenaline.

  15. Metatranscriptomics reveals the molecular mechanism of large granule formation in granular anammox reactor

    PubMed Central

    Bagchi, Samik; Lamendella, Regina; Strutt, Steven; Van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.; Saikaly, Pascal E.

    2016-01-01

    Granules enriched with anammox bacteria are essential in enhancing the treatment of ammonia-rich wastewater, but little is known about how anammox bacteria grow and multiply inside granules. Here, we combined metatranscriptomics, quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to study the changes in community composition, metabolic gene content and gene expression in a granular anammox reactor with the objective of understanding the molecular mechanism of anammox growth and multiplication that led to formation of large granules. Size distribution analysis revealed the spatial distribution of granules in which large granules having higher abundance of anammox bacteria (genus Brocadia) dominated the bottom biomass. Metatranscriptomics analysis detected all the essential transcripts for anammox metabolism. During the later stage of reactor operation, higher expression of ammonia and nitrite transport proteins and key metabolic enzymes mainly in the bottom large granules facilitated anammox bacteria activity. The high activity resulted in higher growth and multiplication of anammox bacteria and expanded the size of the granules. This conceptual model for large granule formation proposed here may assist in the future design of anammox processes for mainstream wastewater treatment. PMID:27319320

  16. 13C Tracking after 13CO2 Supply Revealed Diurnal Patterns of Wood Formation in Aspen.

    PubMed

    Mahboubi, Amir; Linden, Pernilla; Hedenström, Mattias; Moritz, Thomas; Niittylä, Totte

    2015-06-01

    Wood of trees is formed from carbon assimilated in the photosynthetic tissues. Determining the temporal dynamics of carbon assimilation, subsequent transport into developing wood, and incorporation to cell walls would further our understanding of wood formation in particular and tree growth in general. To investigate these questions, we designed a (13)CO2 labeling system to study carbon transport and incorporation to developing wood of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloides). Tracking of (13)C incorporation to wood over a time course using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed diurnal patterns in wood cell wall biosynthesis. The dark period had a differential effect on (13)C incorporation to lignin and cell wall carbohydrates. No (13)C was incorporated into aromatic amino acids of cell wall proteins in the dark, suggesting that cell wall protein biosynthesis ceased during the night. The results show previously unrecognized temporal patterns in wood cell wall biosynthesis, suggest diurnal cycle as a possible cue in the regulation of carbon incorporation to wood, and establish a unique (13)C labeling method for the analysis of wood formation and secondary growth in trees.

  17. Metatranscriptomics reveals the molecular mechanism of large granule formation in granular anammox reactor.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Samik; Lamendella, Regina; Strutt, Steven; Van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Saikaly, Pascal E

    2016-01-01

    Granules enriched with anammox bacteria are essential in enhancing the treatment of ammonia-rich wastewater, but little is known about how anammox bacteria grow and multiply inside granules. Here, we combined metatranscriptomics, quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to study the changes in community composition, metabolic gene content and gene expression in a granular anammox reactor with the objective of understanding the molecular mechanism of anammox growth and multiplication that led to formation of large granules. Size distribution analysis revealed the spatial distribution of granules in which large granules having higher abundance of anammox bacteria (genus Brocadia) dominated the bottom biomass. Metatranscriptomics analysis detected all the essential transcripts for anammox metabolism. During the later stage of reactor operation, higher expression of ammonia and nitrite transport proteins and key metabolic enzymes mainly in the bottom large granules facilitated anammox bacteria activity. The high activity resulted in higher growth and multiplication of anammox bacteria and expanded the size of the granules. This conceptual model for large granule formation proposed here may assist in the future design of anammox processes for mainstream wastewater treatment.

  18. Metatranscriptomics reveals the molecular mechanism of large granule formation in granular anammox reactor.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Samik; Lamendella, Regina; Strutt, Steven; Van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Saikaly, Pascal E

    2016-01-01

    Granules enriched with anammox bacteria are essential in enhancing the treatment of ammonia-rich wastewater, but little is known about how anammox bacteria grow and multiply inside granules. Here, we combined metatranscriptomics, quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to study the changes in community composition, metabolic gene content and gene expression in a granular anammox reactor with the objective of understanding the molecular mechanism of anammox growth and multiplication that led to formation of large granules. Size distribution analysis revealed the spatial distribution of granules in which large granules having higher abundance of anammox bacteria (genus Brocadia) dominated the bottom biomass. Metatranscriptomics analysis detected all the essential transcripts for anammox metabolism. During the later stage of reactor operation, higher expression of ammonia and nitrite transport proteins and key metabolic enzymes mainly in the bottom large granules facilitated anammox bacteria activity. The high activity resulted in higher growth and multiplication of anammox bacteria and expanded the size of the granules. This conceptual model for large granule formation proposed here may assist in the future design of anammox processes for mainstream wastewater treatment. PMID:27319320

  19. Dynamics of erosion in a compressional mountain range revealed by 10Be paleoerosion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Val, P.; Hoke, G. D.; Fosdick, J. C.; Wittmann, H.

    2015-12-01

    The temporal evolution of erosion over million-year timescales is key to understanding the evolution of mountain ranges and adjacent fold-and-thrust belts. While models of orogenic wedge evolution predict an instantaneous response of erosion to pulses of rock uplift, stream-power based landscape evolution models predict catchment-wide erosion maxima that lag behind a rock uplift pulse. Here, we explore the relationships between rock uplift, erosion, and sediment deposition in the Argentine Precordillera fold-and-thrust belt at 30°S where extensive previous work documents deformation, climate and sediment accumulation histories. Sandstone samples spanning 8.8 to 1.8 Ma were collected from the previously dated wedge-top (Iglesia) and foredeep basins (Bermejo) for quartz purification and 10Be extraction. 10Be concentrations due to burial and exhumation were estimated and subtracted from the measured concentrations and yielded the inherited 10Be concentrations, which were then corrected for sample magnetostratigraphic age. The inherited concentrations were then used to calculate paleoerosion rates. We modeled various pre-burial and post-burial exposure scenarios in order to assess potential sources of uncertainty in the recovered paleoerosion rates. The modeling results reveal that pre-burial and post-burial exposure periods only marginally affect our results. By combining the 10Be-derived paleoerosion rates and geomorphic observations with detrital zircon provenance, we document the isolation of the wedge-top basin, which was later reconnected by an upstream migrating pulse of erosion in a process that was directly controlled by thrust activity and base level. The data further indicate that the attainment of maximum upland erosion rates lags maximum rates of deformation and subsidence over million-year timescales. The magnitudes and causes of the erosional delays shed new light on the catchment erosional response to tectonic deformation and rock uplift in orogenic

  20. Revealing equilibrium and rate constants of weak and fast noncovalent interactions.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Gleb G; Okhonin, Victor; Gorelsky, Serge I; Berezovski, Maxim V

    2011-03-15

    Rate and equilibrium constants of weak noncovalent molecular interactions are extremely difficult to measure. Here, we introduced a homogeneous approach called equilibrium capillary electrophoresis of equilibrium mixtures (ECEEM) to determine k(on), k(off), and K(d) of weak (K(d) > 1 μM) and fast kinetics (relaxation time, τ < 0.1 s) in quasi-equilibrium for multiple unlabeled ligands simultaneously in one microreactor. Conceptually, an equilibrium mixture (EM) of a ligand (L), target (T), and a complex (C) is prepared. The mixture is introduced into the beginning of a capillary reactor with aspect ratio >1000 filled with T. Afterward, differential mobility of L, T, and C along the reactor is induced by an electric field. The combination of differential mobility of reactants and their interactions leads to a change of the EM peak shape. This change is a function of rate constants, so the rate and equilibrium constants can be directly determined from the analysis of the EM peak shape (width and symmetry) and propagation pattern along the reactor. We proved experimentally the use of ECEEM for multiplex determination of kinetic parameters describing weak (3 mM > K(d) > 80 μM) and fast (0.25 s ≥ τ ≥ 0.9 ms) noncovalent interactions between four small molecule drugs (ibuprofen, S-flurbiprofen, salicylic acid and phenylbutazone) and α- and β-cyclodextrins. The affinity of the drugs was significantly higher for β-cyclodextrin than α-cyclodextrin and mostly determined by the rate constant of complex formation.

  1. Migration rates and formation injectivity to determine containment time scales of sequestered carbon dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burke, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    Additionally, this research establishes a methodology to calculate the injectivity of a target formation. Because injectivity describes the pressure increase due to the introduction of fluids into a formation, the relevant application of injectivity is to determine the pressure increase, due to an injection volume and flow rate, that will induce fractures in the reservoir rocks. This quantity is defined mathematically as the maximum pressure differential between the hydrostatic gradient and the fracture gradient of the target formation. Injectivity is mathematically related to the maximum pressure differential of the formation, and can be used to determine the upper limit for the pressure increase that an injection target can withstand before fracturing.

  2. Cloud Evolution during Tropical Cyclone Formation as Revealed by TRMM PR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, C.; Wang, Z.; Nesbitt, S. W.; Dunkerton, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the cloud evolution during tropical cyclone formation, cloud features for more than 100 named tropical cyclones over the Atlantic are examined from the tropical wave to the tropical cyclone stage using the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR). We focus on a time window from 3 days before genesis to 1 day after genesis, where the diagnoses for the pre-genesis evolution are carried out in the framework of the marsupial paradigm and the post-genesis analysis using the NHC best-tracks. The 20 dBZ echo-top height is used in combination with the near surface rain rate to identify the different types of convection: i) shallow convection; ii) mid-level convection and iii) deep convection. The frequency of occurrence for each precipitation type is calculated, and the relative contributions of different types of precipitation to the total rain rate are examined with respect to the center. Precipitation was found to increase in coverage and intensity near the wave-pouch center approaching genesis. Stratiform precipitation is prevalent from day -3 to day +1, but convective precipitation persistently increases near the inner-core. Mid-level convection occurs more frequently than deep convection from day -3 to day +1 and makes a larger contribution to the total precipitation than deep convection. It is also shown that stratiform precipitation, mid-level convection and deep convection all contribute to the substantial increase in rain-rate.

  3. 40 CFR Table I-15 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for MEMS Manufacturing for Use With...) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for MEMS Manufacturing for...

  4. Conditions for Circumstellar Disc Formation II: Effects of Initial Cloud Stability and Mass Accretion Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2016-09-01

    Disc formation in strongly magnetized cloud cores is investigated using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation with a focus on the effects of the initial cloud stability and the mass accretion rate. The initial cloud stability greatly alters the disc formation process even for prestellar clouds with the same mass-to-flux ratio. A high mass accretion rate onto the disc-forming region is realized in initially unstable clouds, and a large angular momentum is introduced into the circumstellar region in a short time. The region around the protostar has both a thin infalling envelope and a weak magnetic field, which both weaken the effect of magnetic braking. The growth of the rotation-supported disc is promoted in such unstable clouds. Conversely, clouds in an initially near-equilibrium state show lower accretion rates of mass and angular momentum. The angular momentum is transported to the outer envelope before protostar formation. After protostar formation, the circumstellar region has a thick infalling envelope and a strong magnetic field that effectively brake the disc. As a result, disc formation is suppressed when the initial cloud is in a nearly stable state. The density distribution of the initial cloud also affects the disc formation process. Disc growth strongly depends on the initial conditions when the prestellar cloud has a uniform density, whereas there is no significant difference in the disc formation process in prestellar clouds with nonuniform densities.

  5. A Model for Variable Levee Formation Rates in an Active Lava Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, L. S.; Baloga, S. M.; Mouginis-Mark, P.; Crisp, J.

    2004-01-01

    Channelized lava flows on Mars and the Earth often feature levees and collateral margins that change in volume along the path of the flow. Consistent with field observations of terrestrial flows, this suggests that the rate of levee formation varies with distance and other factors. Previous models have assumed a constant rate of levee growth, specified by a single parameter, lambda. The rate of levee formation for lava flows is a good indicator of the mass eruption rate and rheology of the flow. Insight into levee formation will help us better understand whether or not the effusion rate was constant during an eruption, and once local topography is considered, allows us to look at cooling and/or rheology changes downslope. Here we present a more realistic extension of the levee formation model that treats the rate of levee growth as a function of distance along the flow path. We show how this model can be used with a terrestrial flow and a long lava flow on Mars. The key statement of the new formulation is the rate of transfer from the active component to the levees (or other passive components) through an element dx along the path of the flow. This volumetric transfer equation is presented.

  6. Compositional variability across Mercury's surface revealed by MESSENGER measurements of variations in thermal neutron count rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peplowski, P. N.; Lawrence, D. J.; Goldsten, J. O.; Nittler, L. R.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements by MESSENGER's Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer (GRNS) have revealed variations in the flux of thermal neutrons across Mercury's northern hemisphere. These variations are interpreted to originate from spatial variations in surface elemental composition. In particular, the measurements are sensitive to the near-surface abundances of elements that absorb thermal neutrons, including major rock-forming elements such as Fe and Ti, minor elements such as Mn and Cl, and rare-earth elements such as Gd and Sm. We have constructed a map of thermal neutron variability across the surface and compared it with known variations in elemental composition and with the distribution of geologic units. Development of the map included the derivation of the macroscopic thermal neutron absorption cross section across the surface, a quantity whose value and variability provides useful constraints on the formation and geochemical evolution of Mercury's crust. Finally, by combining the thermal neutron measurements with previously reported elemental measurements from the GRNS and MESSENGER's X-Ray Spectrometer, we have derived constraints on the abundances of neutron-absorbing elements, including previously unreported limits for some minor and rare-earth elements.

  7. GAPS IN THE HD 169142 PROTOPLANETARY DISK REVEALED BY POLARIMETRIC IMAGING: SIGNS OF ONGOING PLANET FORMATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Quanz, Sascha P.; Avenhaus, Henning; Garufi, Antonio; Schmid, Hans Martin; Buenzli, Esther; Wolf, Sebastian

    2013-03-20

    We present H-band Very Large Telescope/NACO polarized light images of the Herbig Ae/Be star HD 169142 probing its protoplanetary disk as close as {approx}0.''1 to the star. Our images trace the face-on disk out to {approx}1.''7 ({approx}250 AU) and reveal distinct substructures for the first time: (1) the inner disk ({approx}<20 AU) appears to be depleted in scattering dust grains; (2) an unresolved disk rim is imaged at {approx}25 AU; (3) an annular gap extends from {approx}40 to 70 AU; (4) local brightness asymmetries are found on opposite sides of the annular gap. We discuss different explanations for the observed morphology among which ongoing planet formation is a tempting, but yet to be proven, one. Outside of {approx}85 AU the surface brightness drops off roughly {proportional_to}r {sup -3.3}, but describing the disk regions between 85-120 AU and 120-250 AU separately with power laws {proportional_to}r {sup -2.6} and {proportional_to}r {sup -3.9} provides a better fit hinting toward another discontinuity in the disk surface. The flux ratio between the disk-integrated polarized light and the central star is {approx}4.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}. Finally, combining our results with those from the literature, {approx}40% of the scattered light in the H band appears to be polarized. Our results emphasize that HD 169142 is an interesting system for future planet formation or disk evolution studies.

  8. Surface Polysaccharide Mutants Reveal that Absence of O Antigen Reduces Biofilm Formation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Hathroubi, S.; Hancock, M. A.; Langford, P. R.; Tremblay, Y. D. N.; Labrie, J.

    2015-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family and the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, a highly contagious lung disease causing important economic losses. Surface polysaccharides, including lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and capsular polysaccharides (CPS), are implicated in the adhesion and virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae, but their role in biofilm formation is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the requirement for these surface polysaccharides in biofilm formation by A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1. Well-characterized mutants were used: an O-antigen LPS mutant, a truncated core LPS mutant with an intact O antigen, a capsule mutant, and a poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PGA) mutant. We compared the amount of biofilm produced by the parental strain and the isogenic mutants using static and dynamic systems. Compared to the findings for the biofilm of the parental or other strains, the biofilm of the O antigen and the PGA mutants was dramatically reduced, and it had less cell-associated PGA. Real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant reduction in the level of pgaA, cpxR, and cpxA mRNA in the biofilm cells of the O-antigen mutant compared to that in the biofilm cells of the parental strain. Specific binding between PGA and LPS was consistently detected by surface plasmon resonance, but the lack of O antigen did not abolish these interactions. In conclusion, the absence of the O antigen reduces the ability of A. pleuropneumoniae to form a biofilm, and this is associated with the reduced expression and production of PGA. PMID:26483403

  9. Surface Polysaccharide Mutants Reveal that Absence of O Antigen Reduces Biofilm Formation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Hathroubi, S; Hancock, M A; Bossé, J T; Langford, P R; Tremblay, Y D N; Labrie, J; Jacques, M

    2016-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family and the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, a highly contagious lung disease causing important economic losses. Surface polysaccharides, including lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and capsular polysaccharides (CPS), are implicated in the adhesion and virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae, but their role in biofilm formation is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the requirement for these surface polysaccharides in biofilm formation by A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1. Well-characterized mutants were used: an O-antigen LPS mutant, a truncated core LPS mutant with an intact O antigen, a capsule mutant, and a poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PGA) mutant. We compared the amount of biofilm produced by the parental strain and the isogenic mutants using static and dynamic systems. Compared to the findings for the biofilm of the parental or other strains, the biofilm of the O antigen and the PGA mutants was dramatically reduced, and it had less cell-associated PGA. Real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant reduction in the level of pgaA, cpxR, and cpxA mRNA in the biofilm cells of the O-antigen mutant compared to that in the biofilm cells of the parental strain. Specific binding between PGA and LPS was consistently detected by surface plasmon resonance, but the lack of O antigen did not abolish these interactions. In conclusion, the absence of the O antigen reduces the ability of A. pleuropneumoniae to form a biofilm, and this is associated with the reduced expression and production of PGA. PMID:26483403

  10. Varying relative degradation rates of oil in different forms and environments revealed by ramped pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Pendergraft, Matthew A; Rosenheim, Brad E

    2014-09-16

    Degradation of oil contamination yields stabilized products by removing and transforming reactive and volatile compounds. In contaminated coastal environments, the processes of degradation are influenced by shoreline energy, which increases the surface area of the oil as well as exchange between oil, water, sediments, microbes, oxygen, and nutrients. Here, a ramped pyrolysis carbon isotope technique is employed to investigate thermochemical and isotopic changes in organic material from coastal environments contaminated with oil from the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Oiled beach sediment, tar ball, and marsh samples were collected from a barrier island and a brackish marsh in southeast Louisiana over a period of 881 days. Stable carbon ((13)C) and radiocarbon ((14)C) isotopic data demonstrate a predominance of oil-derived carbon in the organic material. Ramped pyrolysis profiles indicate that the organic material was transformed into more stable forms. Our data indicate relative rates of stabilization in the following order, from fastest to slowest: high energy beach sediments > low energy beach sediments > marsh > tar balls. Oil was transformed most rapidly where shoreline energy and the rates of oil dispersion and exchange with water, sediments, microbes, oxygen, and nutrients were greatest. Still, isotope data reveal persistence of oil. PMID:25105342

  11. Varying relative degradation rates of oil in different forms and environments revealed by ramped pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Pendergraft, Matthew A; Rosenheim, Brad E

    2014-09-16

    Degradation of oil contamination yields stabilized products by removing and transforming reactive and volatile compounds. In contaminated coastal environments, the processes of degradation are influenced by shoreline energy, which increases the surface area of the oil as well as exchange between oil, water, sediments, microbes, oxygen, and nutrients. Here, a ramped pyrolysis carbon isotope technique is employed to investigate thermochemical and isotopic changes in organic material from coastal environments contaminated with oil from the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Oiled beach sediment, tar ball, and marsh samples were collected from a barrier island and a brackish marsh in southeast Louisiana over a period of 881 days. Stable carbon ((13)C) and radiocarbon ((14)C) isotopic data demonstrate a predominance of oil-derived carbon in the organic material. Ramped pyrolysis profiles indicate that the organic material was transformed into more stable forms. Our data indicate relative rates of stabilization in the following order, from fastest to slowest: high energy beach sediments > low energy beach sediments > marsh > tar balls. Oil was transformed most rapidly where shoreline energy and the rates of oil dispersion and exchange with water, sediments, microbes, oxygen, and nutrients were greatest. Still, isotope data reveal persistence of oil.

  12. DNA fingerprinting reveals elevated mutation rates in herring gulls inhabiting a genotoxically contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Yauk, C.L.; Quinn, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    The authors used multi-locus DNA fingerprinting to examine families of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) from a genotoxically contaminated site (Hamilton Harbour) and from a pristine location (Kent Island, Bay of Fundy) to show significant differences in mutation rates between the locations. Overall the authors identified 17 mutant bands from 15 individuals of the 35 examined from Hamilton Harbour, and 7 mutant fragments from 7 individuals, of the 43 examined from Kent Island; a mutation frequency of 0.429 per nestling for Hamilton Harbour and 0.163 for Kent Island. The total number of individuals with mutant bands was significantly higher at Hamilton Harbour than at Kent Island (X{sup 2}=6.734; df = 1; P < 0.01). Ongoing analysis of other less contaminated sites also reveals lower mutation rates than those seen in Hamilton Harbour. With multi-locus DNA fingerprinting many regions of the genome can be surveyed simultaneously. The tandemly repeated arrays of nucleotides examined with DNA fingerprinting are known to have elevated rates of mutation. Furthermore, the mutations seen with DNA fingerprinting are predominantly heritable. Other biomarkers currently used in situ are not able to monitor direct and heritable DNA mutation, or measure biological endpoints that frequently result in spontaneous abortion creating difficulty in observing significantly elevated levels in viable offspring. The authors suggest that multilocus DNA fingerprinting can be used as a biomarker to identify potentially heritable risks before the onset of other types of ecological damage. This approach provides a direct measure of mutation in situ and in vivo in a vertebrate species under ambient conditions.

  13. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Yee, L. D.; Schilling, K.; Loza, C. L.; Craven, J. S.; Zuend, A.; Ziemann, P. J.; Seinfeld, J.

    2013-12-01

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multi-generation gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a mid-experiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. The results of the current work have a number of implications for SOA models. While the dynamics of an aerosol size distribution reflects the mechanism of growth, we demonstrate here that it provides a key constraint in interpreting laboratory and ambient SOA formation. This work, although carried out specifically for the long chain alkane, dodecane, is expected to be widely applicable to other major classes of SOA precursors. SOA consists of a myriad of organic compounds containing various functional groups, which can generally undergo heterogeneous/multiphase reactions forming low-volatility products such as oligomers and other high molecular mass compounds. If particle-phase chemistry is indeed

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE STAR FORMATION RATE, SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE, AND THE PRESENCE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI FOR HIGH STELLAR MASS AND LOW STELLAR MASS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa; Song Jun; Chen Yiqing; Jiang Peng; Ding Yingping

    2012-07-10

    Using two volume-limited main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 (SDSS DR8), we explore the environmental dependence of the star formation rate (SFR), specific star formation rate (SSFR), and the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) for high stellar mass (HSM) and low stellar mass (LSM) galaxies. It is found that the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR for luminous HSM galaxies and faint LSM ones remains very strong: galaxies in the lowest density regime preferentially have higher SFR and SSFR than galaxies in the densest regime, while the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR for luminous LSM galaxies is substantially reduced. Our result also shows that the fraction of AGNs in HSM galaxies decreases as a function of density, while the one in LSM galaxies depends very little on local density. In the faint LSM galaxy sample, the SFR and SSFR of galaxies strongly decrease with increasing density, but the fraction of AGNs depends very little on local density. Such a result can rule out that AGNs are fueled by the cold gas in the disk component of galaxies that is also driving the star formation of those galaxies.

  15. Measuring the rates of spontaneous vortex formation in highly oblate Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neely, Tyler; Samson, Edward; Bradley, Ashton; Davis, Matthew; Anderson, Brian

    2009-05-01

    By studying the dynamics of the Bose-Einstein condensation transition in highly oblate (˜11:1 aspect ratio) traps, we have measured the dependence of spontaneous vortex formation on BEC growth rate, extending our previous experimental and numerical observations of spontaneous vortex formation in weakly oblate (˜2:1 aspect ratio) traps [1]. Our condensation procedure in these highly oblate traps allows us to create BECs over a large range of growth times, from approximately 200 ms to over 2 s. By characterizing vortex formation vs. BEC growth rate, and comparing experimental and numerical results, the Kibble-Zurek mechanism for topological defect formation may be quantitatively studied in our system. [1] C.N. Weiler, T.W. Neely, D.R. Scherer, A.S. Bradley, M.J. Davis, and B.P. Anderson., Nature 455, 948 (2008).

  16. The impact of angular momentum on black hole accretion rates in simulations of galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas-Guevara, Y. M.; Bower, R. G.; Schaye, J.; Furlong, M.; Frenk, C. S.; Booth, C. M.; Crain, R. A.; Dalla Vecchia, C.; Schaller, M.; Theuns, T.

    2015-11-01

    Feedback from energy liberated by gas accretion on to black holes (BHs) is an attractive mechanism to explain the exponential cut-off at the massive end of the galaxy stellar mass function. Most previous implementations of BH accretion in hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation have assumed that BHs grow at an accretion rate that is proportion to the Bondi rate. A major concern is that the Bondi accretion rate is inappropriate when the accreting material has significant angular momentum. We present an improved accretion model that takes into account the circularization and subsequent viscous transport of infalling material, and implemented as a `subgrid' model in hydrodynamic simulations. The resulting accretion rates are generally low in low mass (≲ 1011.5 M⊙) haloes, but show outbursts of Eddington-limited accretion during galaxy mergers. During outbursts these objects strongly resemble quasars. In higher mass haloes, gas accretion peaks at ˜10 per cent of the Eddington rate, which is thought to be conducive to the formation of radio jets. The resulting accretion rate depends strongly on the effective pressure of the gas surrounding the BH, which in turn depends strongly on halo mass. This induces a sharp transition in the importance of BH feedback. In small haloes, the growth of galaxies is regulated by star formation and supernova feedback, but above a halo mass of 1011.5 M⊙, rapid BH growth leads to the suppression of star formation and reduced growth of stellar mass with increasing halo mass.

  17. Magma Systems Formation and Crustal Accretion in Intermediate-rate Spreading Ridges of the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, E. P.; Galushkin, Y. I.; Sveshnikov, A. A.; Grokholsky, A.

    2008-12-01

    Fast spreading mid-ocean ridges (MOR) are known to be characterized by well-developed axial rises with axial magma chambers (AMC) in the crust, whereas slow spreading centers with deep rift valleys are devoid of AMC. An AMC disappears when spreading rate is about 4-5 cm/year. Approximately the same spreading rate is marked by axial morphology transition from axial rises to rift valleys. This transition was thoroughly analyzed for South-East Indian intermediate spreading ridge. Typical patterns of bathymetric profiles across the rift axis with transitional morphology were revealed. Dimensions and relative position of profile constituents change regularly with morphology turning from axial rises to rift valleys. A non-steady thermal model of spreading with periodic axial intrusions allows an explanation of location, size and shape of the crust and mantle magma chambers. This model also permits us to analyze changes in parameters including spreading rate, temperature and composition of the mantle and crust rocks. In the axial zones of intermediate spreading ridges with higher mantle temperature (e.g., under the influence of mantle plumes or hot spots), the modeling confirms an occurrence of the zones with higher melt concentration (magma chambers) at two levels: at depth ~2 km and more in the crust and just below the Moho boundary in the mantle. In the axial zones of intermediate spreading ridges with lower mantle temperature, a quasi steady-state magma chamber in the crust does not exist, but here, formation of the short-living magma chambers in the crust is possible. Difference in location depth, shape and sizes of magma chambers in spreading ridges result in considerable differences in rheologic behavior and accretion mechanisms of the crust and therefore in relief and deep structure of the crust. The steady-state crust magma chambers in the fast spreading ridges or in the intermediate spreading ridges with higher mantle temperature secure a differentiation of

  18. An Estimation of the Star Formation Rate in the Perseus Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercimek, Seyma

    2016-07-01

    The detailed study of all sources are carried on, by comparing the number of existing cores and YSOs from observations with the prediction from column density PDFs. With this investigation, we found a relation between starless cores and protostars that cores may be considered progenitors of the next generation of protostars, assuming the rate of star formation in the recent past is similar to the rate in the near future. These are also new results which have not been investigated previously. In addition, we also calculate the mean density of each starless core and its corresponding free-fall time in order to estimate star formation rate in near future. Following that, we obtained star formation efficiency from the existing stellar cores which later was used to estimate average stellar mass from standard IMF. Finally, we estimate how many starless cores will turn into stars in the predicted free fall time and how many stars will form from calculated core mass.

  19. A Primary Linkage Map of the Porcine Genome Reveals a Low Rate of Genetic Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Ellegren, H.; Chowdhary, B. P.; Johansson, M.; Marklund, L.; Fredholm, M.; Gustavsson, I.; Andersson, L.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive genetic linkage map of the porcine genome has been developed by typing 128 genetic markers in a cross between the European Wild Boar and a domestic breed (Large White). The marker set includes 68 polymerase chain reaction-formatted microsatellites, 60 anchored reference markers informative for comparative mapping and 47 markers which have been physically assigned by in situ hybridization. Novel multipoint assignments are provided for 54 of the markers. The map covers about 1800 cM, and the average spacing between markers is 11 cM. We used the map data to estimate the genome size in pigs, thereby addressing the total recombination distance in a third mammalian species. A sex-average genome length of 1873 +/- 139 cM was obtained by comparing the recombinational and physical distances in defined regions of the genome. This is strikingly different from the length of the human genome (3800-4000 cM) and is more similar to the mouse estimate (1600 cM). The recombination rate in females was significantly higher than in males. PMID:7982563

  20. 40 CFR Table I-5 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for MEMS Manufacturing I Table I-5...) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for MEMS Manufacturing ER13NO13.021...

  1. On the possibly low H2 formation rate in dense clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, T. P.

    1983-01-01

    It has been found for the Rho Ophiuchi cloud, and suggested for diffuse cloud cores in general, that H2 has a lower formation rate than normally expected in diffuse clouds. It is proposed that this may be due to a reduction in grain surface area per unit volume, if the grains in these regions are enlarged due to coagulation. For the Rho Oph cloud, there is independent evidence that grain coagulation has occurred, so this hypothesis regarding H2 formation has a more substantial basis than for other clouds, where the evidence for suppressed H2 formation is less certain, and for which there is little information on grain sizes.

  2. The big problems in star formation: The star formation rate, stellar clustering, and the initial mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumholz, Mark R.

    2014-06-01

    Star formation lies at the center of a web of processes that drive cosmic evolution: generation of radiant energy, synthesis of elements, formation of planets, and development of life. Decades of observations have yielded a variety of empirical rules about how it operates, but at present we have no comprehensive, quantitative theory. In this review I discuss the current state of the field of star formation, focusing on three central questions: What controls the rate at which gas in a galaxy converts to stars? What determines how those stars are clustered, and what fraction of the stellar population ends up in gravitationally-bound structures? What determines the stellar initial mass function, and does it vary with star-forming environment? I use these three questions as a lens to introduce the basics of star formation, beginning with a review of the observational phenomenology and the basic physical processes. I then review the status of current theories that attempt to solve each of the three problems, pointing out links between them and opportunities for theoretical and numerical work that crosses the scale between them. I conclude with a discussion of prospects for theoretical progress in the coming years.

  3. Single-Molecule Kinetics Reveal Cation-Promoted DNA Duplex Formation Through Ordering of Single-Stranded Helices

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Nicholas F.; Holmstrom, Erik D.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the kinetics of short, fully complementary oligonucleotides are investigated at the single-molecule level. Constructs 6–9 bp in length exhibit single exponential kinetics over 2 orders of magnitude time for both forward (kon, association) and reverse (koff, dissociation) processes. Bimolecular rate constants for association are weakly sensitive to the number of basepairs in the duplex, with a 2.5-fold increase between 9 bp (k′on = 2.1(1) × 106 M−1 s−1) and 6 bp (k′on = 5.0(1) × 106 M−1 s−1) sequences. In sharp contrast, however, dissociation rate constants prove to be exponentially sensitive to sequence length, varying by nearly 600-fold over the same 9 bp (koff = 0.024 s−1) to 6 bp (koff = 14 s−1) range. The 8 bp sequence is explored in more detail, and the NaCl dependence of kon and koff is measured. Interestingly, konincreases by >40-fold (kon = 0.10(1) s−1 to 4.0(4) s−1 between [NaCl] = 25 mM and 1 M), whereas in contrast, koffdecreases by fourfold (0.72(3) s−1 to 0.17(7) s−1) over the same range of conditions. Thus, the equilibrium constant (Keq) increases by ≈160, largely due to changes in the association rate, kon. Finally, temperature-dependent measurements reveal that increased [NaCl] reduces the overall exothermicity (ΔΔH° > 0) of duplex formation, albeit by an amount smaller than the reduction in entropic penalty (−TΔΔS° < 0). This reduced entropic cost is attributed to a cation-facilitated preordering of the two single-stranded species, which lowers the association free-energy barrier and in turn accelerates the rate of duplex formation. PMID:23931323

  4. A CLUSTER IN THE MAKING: ALMA REVEALS THE INITIAL CONDITIONS FOR HIGH-MASS CLUSTER FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Rathborne, J. M.; Contreras, Y.; Longmore, S. N.; Bastian, N.; Jackson, J. M.; Alves, J. F.; Bally, J.; Foster, J. B.; Garay, G.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Testi, L.; Walsh, A. J.

    2015-04-01

    G0.253+0.016 is a molecular clump that appears to be on the verge of forming a high-mass cluster: its extremely low dust temperature, high mass, and high density, combined with its lack of prevalent star formation, make it an excellent candidate for an Arches-like cluster in a very early stage of formation. Here we present new Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-millimeter Array observations of its small-scale (∼0.07 pc) 3 mm dust continuum and molecular line emission from 17 different species that probe a range of distinct physical and chemical conditions. The data reveal a complex network of emission features with a complicated velocity structure: there is emission on all spatial scales, the morphology of which ranges from small, compact regions to extended, filamentary structures that are seen in both emission and absorption. The dust column density is well traced by molecules with higher excitation energies and critical densities, consistent with a clump that has a denser interior. A statistical analysis supports the idea that turbulence shapes the observed gas structure within G0.253+0.016. We find a clear break in the turbulent power spectrum derived from the optically thin dust continuum emission at a spatial scale of ∼0.1 pc, which may correspond to the spatial scale at which gravity has overcome the thermal pressure. We suggest that G0.253+0.016 is on the verge of forming a cluster from hierarchical, filamentary structures that arise from a highly turbulent medium. Although the stellar distribution within high-mass Arches-like clusters is compact, centrally condensed, and smooth, the observed gas distribution within G0.253+0.016 is extended, with no high-mass central concentration, and has a complex, hierarchical structure. If this clump gives rise to a high-mass cluster and its stars are formed from this initially hierarchical gas structure, then the resulting cluster must evolve into a centrally condensed structure via a dynamical process.

  5. Bayesian coalescent inference reveals high evolutionary rates and diversification of Zika virus populations.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, Alvaro; Soñora, Martín; Moreno, Pilar; Moratorio, Gonzalo; Cristina, Juan

    2016-10-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a member of the family Flaviviridae. In 2015, ZIKV triggered an epidemic in Brazil and spread across Latin America. By May of 2016, the World Health Organization warns over spread of ZIKV beyond this region. Detailed studies on the mode of evolution of ZIKV strains are extremely important for our understanding of the emergence and spread of ZIKV populations. In order to gain insight into these matters, a Bayesian coalescent Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of complete genome sequences of recently isolated ZIKV strains was performed. The results of these studies revealed a mean rate of evolution of 1.20 × 10(-3) nucleotide substitutions per site per year (s/s/y) for ZIKV strains enrolled in this study. Several variants isolated in China are grouped together with all strains isolated in Latin America. Another genetic group composed exclusively by Chinese strains were also observed, suggesting the co-circulation of different genetic lineages in China. These findings indicate a high level of diversification of ZIKV populations. Strains isolated from microcephaly cases do not share amino acid substitutions, suggesting that other factors besides viral genetic differences may play a role for the proposed pathogenesis caused by ZIKV infection. J. Med. Virol. 88:1672-1676, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27278855

  6. Structure of the DSM-IV personality disorders as revealed in clinician ratings.

    PubMed

    Blais, Mark A; Malone, Johanna C

    2013-05-01

    The revisions proposed for the DSM-5 would greatly alter how personality pathology is conceptualized, assessed, and diagnosed. One aspect of the proposed changes, elimination of four current personality disorders, has raised considerable controversy. The present study attempts to inform this debate by exploring clinicians' views of the structure of Personality Disorders using the current diagnostic system, the DSM-IV. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted on the DSM-IV Personality Disorder criteria using clinician ratings for 280 patients. The factor analysis revealed eight clear and meaningful factors. The eight factors contained all six personality disorders proposed for retention in DSM-5 but also contained clear representations of two disorders (Paranoid and Schizoid) identified for removal from the system. These conditions appear to have clinical utility and their removal may have unintended negative consequences in clinical practice. Dependent and Avoidant criteria also merged to form a new construct with interesting clinical implications. These findings provide new insights into the complex typologies clinicians employ when applying the DSM-IV system to personality disordered patients. Lastly we argue that successful refinement of clinically significant constructs, like diagnostic systems, requires a balanced appraisal of evidence for clinical utility as well as external and internal validity.

  7. Bayesian coalescent inference reveals high evolutionary rates and diversification of Zika virus populations.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, Alvaro; Soñora, Martín; Moreno, Pilar; Moratorio, Gonzalo; Cristina, Juan

    2016-10-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a member of the family Flaviviridae. In 2015, ZIKV triggered an epidemic in Brazil and spread across Latin America. By May of 2016, the World Health Organization warns over spread of ZIKV beyond this region. Detailed studies on the mode of evolution of ZIKV strains are extremely important for our understanding of the emergence and spread of ZIKV populations. In order to gain insight into these matters, a Bayesian coalescent Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of complete genome sequences of recently isolated ZIKV strains was performed. The results of these studies revealed a mean rate of evolution of 1.20 × 10(-3) nucleotide substitutions per site per year (s/s/y) for ZIKV strains enrolled in this study. Several variants isolated in China are grouped together with all strains isolated in Latin America. Another genetic group composed exclusively by Chinese strains were also observed, suggesting the co-circulation of different genetic lineages in China. These findings indicate a high level of diversification of ZIKV populations. Strains isolated from microcephaly cases do not share amino acid substitutions, suggesting that other factors besides viral genetic differences may play a role for the proposed pathogenesis caused by ZIKV infection. J. Med. Virol. 88:1672-1676, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Lidar surveys reveal eruptive volumes and rates at Etna, 2007-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behncke, Boris; Fornaciai, Alessandro; Neri, Marco; Favalli, Massimiliano; Ganci, Gaetana; Mazzarini, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    The quantification of eruptive activity represents one major challenge in volcanology. Digital comparison of lidar-based elevation models of Etna (Italy) was made to quantify the volumes of volcanics emitted in 2007-2010. During this period, Etna produced several summit paroxysms followed by a flank eruption. We integrated the total volume difference resulting from the subtraction of the 2007 and 2010 digital elevation models with volumes of eruptive products based on field and aerial surveys to attribute volumes with hitherto unrealized precision to poorly constrained eruptions. The total erupted volume of 2007-2010 is >86 × 106 m3, most (~74 × 106 m3) of which is made up by the lava flows of the 2008-2009 flank eruption. The survey also reveals the high lava volume (5.73 × 106 m3) and average eruption rate (~400 m3 s-1) of the 10 May 2008 paroxysm, whose flow front stopped 6.2 km from the vent, not far from the town of Zafferana Etnea.

  9. Fossilized iron bacteria reveal a pathway to the biological origin of banded iron formation.

    PubMed

    Chi Fru, Ernest; Ivarsson, Magnus; Kilias, Stephanos P; Bengtson, Stefan; Belivanova, Veneta; Marone, Federica; Fortin, Danielle; Broman, Curt; Stampanoni, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Debates on the formation of banded iron formations in ancient ferruginous oceans are dominated by a dichotomy between abiotic and biotic iron cycling. This is fuelled by difficulties in unravelling the exact processes involved in their formation. Here we provide fossil environmental evidence for anoxygenic photoferrotrophic deposition of analogue banded iron rocks in shallow marine waters associated with an Early Quaternary hydrothermal vent field on Milos Island, Greece. Trace metal, major and rare earth elemental compositions suggest that the deposited rocks closely resemble banded iron formations of Precambrian origin. Well-preserved microbial fossils in combination with chemical data imply that band formation was linked to periodic massive encrustation of anoxygenic phototrophic biofilms by iron oxyhydroxide alternating with abiotic silica precipitation. The data implicate cyclic anoxygenic photoferrotrophy and their fossilization mechanisms in the construction of microskeletal fabrics that result in the formation of characteristic banded iron formation bands of varying silica and iron oxide ratios. PMID:23784372

  10. Formation rates, stability and reactivity of sulfuric acid - amine clusters predicted by computational chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtén, Theo; Ortega, Ismael; Kupiainen, Oona; Olenius, Tinja; Loukonen, Ville; Reiman, Heidi; McGrath, Matthew; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-04-01

    Despite the importance of atmospheric particle formation for both climate and air quality, both experiments and non-empirical models using e.g. sulfuric acid, ammonia and water as condensing vapors have so far been unable to reproduce atmospheric observations using realistic trace gas concentrations. Recent experimental and theoretical evidence has shown that this mystery is likely resolved by amines. Combining first-principles evaporation rates for sulfuric acid - dimethylamine clusters with cluster kinetic modeling, we show that even sub-ppt concentrations of amines, together with atmospherically realistic concentrations of sulfuric acid, result in formation rates close to those observed in the atmosphere. Our simulated cluster formation rates are also close to, though somewhat larger than, those measured at the CLOUD experiment in CERN for both sulfuric acid - ammonia and sulfuric acid - dimethylamine systems. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the remaining discrepancy for the sulfuric acid - amine particle formation rates is likely caused by steric hindrances to cluster formation (due to alkyl groups of the amine molecules) rather than by significant errors in the evaporation rates. First-principles molecular dynamic and reaction kinetic modeling shed further light on the microscopic physics and chemistry of sulfuric acid - amine clusters. For example, while the number and type of hydrogen bonds in the clusters typically reach their equilibrium values on a picosecond timescale, and the overall bonding patterns predicted by traditional "static" quantum chemical calculations seem to be stable, the individual atoms participating in the hydrogen bonds continuously change at atmospherically realistic temperatures. From a chemical reactivity perspective, we have also discovered a surprising phenomenon: clustering with sulfuric acid molecules slightly increases the activation energy required for the abstraction of alkyl hydrogens from amine molecules. This implies

  11. Reflectometry-Ellipsometry Reveals Thickness, Growth Rate, and Phase Composition in Oxidation of Copper.

    PubMed

    Diaz Leon, Juan J; Fryauf, David M; Cormia, Robert D; Zhang, Min-Xian Max; Samuels, Kathryn; Williams, R Stanley; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P

    2016-08-31

    The oxidation of copper is a complicated process. Copper oxide develops two stable phases at room temperature and standard pressure (RTSP): cuprous oxide (Cu2O) and cupric oxide (CuO). Both phases have different optical and electrical characteristics that make them interesting for applications such as solar cells or resistive switching devices. For a given application, it is necessary to selectively control oxide thickness and cupric/cuprous oxide phase volume fraction. The thickness and composition of a copper oxide film growing on the surface of copper widely depend on the characteristics of as-deposited copper. In this Research Article, two samples, copper films prepared by two different deposition techniques, electron-beam evaporation and sputtering, were studied. As the core part of the study, the formation of the oxidized copper was analyzed routinely over a period of 253 days using spectroscopic polarized reflectometry-spectroscopic ellipsometry (RE). An effective medium approximation (EMA) model was used to fit the RE data. The RE measurements were complemented and validated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Our results show that the two samples oxidized under identical laboratory ambient conditions (RTSP, 87% average relative humidity) developed unique oxide films following an inverse-logarithmic growth rate with thickness and composition different from each other over time. Discussion is focused on the ability of RE to simultaneously extract thickness (i.e., growth rate) and composition of copper oxide films and on plausible physical mechanisms responsible for unique oxidation habits observed in the two copper samples. It appears that extended surface characteristics (i.e., surface roughness and grain boundaries) and preferential crystalline orientation of as-deposited polycrystalline copper films control the growth kinetics of the copper oxide film. Analysis based on a noncontact

  12. Impact of star formation history on the measurement of star formation rates: do we have to reassess the cosmic star formation rate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boquien, Médéric; Buat, Véronique; Perret, Valentin

    2015-08-01

    One of the key assumptions to measure the SFR of a galaxy is its SFH (star formation history). Most classical estimators are based on the assumption of a constant SFR over a period of 100 Myr. If this assumption seems reasonable at first sight for low redshift spiral galaxies evolving secularly, it is unlikely to hold true for interacting systems or at higher redshifts where the SFR necessarily varies on timescales that can be similar or shorter than 100 Myr.Even if in general we cannot uncover the SFH of galaxies in detail due to numerous degeneracies, it should nevertheless still be possible to investigate in isolation the impact of short- and long-term variations of the SFH on the measure of the SFR. To do so we have relied on the latest generation of high resolution hydrodynamical simulations of star-forming galaxies. Such simulations have now become so detailed that they provide us with realistic and reliable SFH. Combining these SFH with the CIGALE SED modelling code we have been able to simulate the observations of 23 main-sequence galaxies between redshift 1 and 2 and follow them every Myr over the course of several hundred Myr. Such an outstanding simulated dataset has allowed us to investigate the impact of realistic SFH on the measure of the SFR with classical methods.In this talk I will report that except for tracers related to the Lyman continuum (such as Hα for instance), classical SFR estimators calibrated over 100 Myr overestimate the true SFR from ~25% in the far-ultraviolet to ~65% in the U band. Such biases are due 1) to the contribution of stars living longer than 100 Myr, and 2) to variations of the SFR on timescales longer than a few tens of Myr. Rapid variations of the SFR increase the uncertainty on the determination of the instantaneous SFR, but have no long term effect. These discrepancies between the true and estimated SFR may explain in part the tension between the integral of the cosmic SFR density and the cosmic stellar mass density

  13. The relation between atomic gas and star formation rate densities in faint dwarf irregular galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, Sambit; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Kaisin, Serafim S.; Karachentsev, Igor D.

    2014-12-01

    We use data for faint (MB > -14.5) dwarf irregular galaxies drawn from the Faint Irregular Galaxy GMRT Survey to study the correlation between the surface densities of atomic gas (Σgas,atomic) and star formation rate (ΣSFR) in the galaxies. The estimated gas-phase metallicity of our sample galaxies is Z ˜ 0.1 Z⊙. Understanding star formation in such molecule-poor gas is of particular importance since it is likely to be of direct relevance to simulations of early galaxy formation. For about 20 per cent (9/43) of our sample galaxies, we find that the H I distribution is significantly disturbed, with little correspondence between the optical and H I distributions. We exclude these galaxies from the comparison. We also exclude galaxies with very low star formation rates, for which stochastic effects make it difficult to estimate the true star formation rates. For the remaining galaxies, we compute the Σgas,atomic and ΣSFR averaged over the entire star-forming disc of the galaxy. For these galaxies, we find a nearly linear relation between the star formation rate and the atomic gas density, namely {log Σ _{SFR} = 0.91^{+0.23}_{-0.25} log Σ _{gas,atomic} - 3.84^{+0.15}_{-0.19}}. The corresponding gas consumption time-scale is ˜10 Gyr, i.e. significantly smaller than the ˜100 Gyr estimated for the outer regions of spiral galaxies. We also estimate the gas consumption time-scale computed using the global gas content and the global star formation rate for all galaxies with a reliable measurement of the star formation rate, regardless of whether the H I distribution is disturbed or not. The mean gas consumption time-scale computed using this entire gas reservoir is ˜18 Gyr, i.e. still significantly smaller than that estimated for the outer parts of spirals. The gas consumption time-scale for dwarfs is intermediate between the values of ˜100 and ˜2 Gyr estimated for the outer molecule-poor and inner molecule-rich regions of spiral discs.

  14. 41 CFR 109-40.306-1 - Recommended rate tender format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recommended rate tender format. 109-40.306-1 Section 109-40.306-1 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS...

  15. 41 CFR 109-40.306-1 - Recommended rate tender format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Recommended rate tender format. 109-40.306-1 Section 109-40.306-1 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS...

  16. Effects of Varying Response Formats on Self-Ratings of Life-Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazaheri, Mehrdad; Theuns, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A sample of 1,737 volunteering students, randomly assigned to 12 conditions, rated their current overall (dis)satisfaction with life. Each condition used 1 of 12 response formats, differing in (1) "polarity" ("bipolar" versus "unipolar"), (2) "orientation" ("horizontal" versus "vertical"), and (3) "anchoring" (-5 to +5, "Not Numbered," and 0 "to"…

  17. Revisiting the formation rate and redshift distribution of long gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaan, C.; de Freitas Pacheco, J. A.

    2013-11-01

    Using a novel approach, the distribution of fluences of long gamma-ray bursts derived from the Swift-BAT catalog was reproduced by a jet-model characterized by the distribution of the total radiated energy in γ-rays and the distribution of the aperture angle of the emission cone. The best fit between simulated and observed fluence distributions permits one to estimate the parameters of the model. An evolution of the median energy of the bursts is required to adequately reproduce the observed redshift distribution of the events when the formation rate of γ-ray bursts follows the cosmic star formation rate. For our preferred model, the median jet energy evolves as EJ ∝ e0.5(1 + z) and the mean expected jet energy is 3.0 × 1049 erg, which agrees with the mean value derived from afterglow data. The estimated local formation rate is Rgrb = 290 Gpc-3 yr-1, representing less than 9% of the local formation rate of type Ibc supernovae. This result also suggests that the progenitors of long gamma-ray bursts have masses ≥ 90 M⊙ when a Miller-Scalo initial mass function is assumed.

  18. Stellar populations and Star Formation Rates in NGC 6872, the Condor galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eufrasio, Rafael T.; De Mello, D. F.; Dwek, E.; Arendt, R. G.; Gadotti, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of 10 kpc regions across the giant spiral galaxy NGC 6872, the Condor galaxy. We made use of archival data from the FUV (GALEX) to 22 μm (WISE). In order to find any signature of the recent interaction 130 Myr) with its companion, the S0 galaxy IC 4970, we inspected the SED of Condor's bar. One possibility is that is would have been formed by passage of the companion. We find that it is a particularly long bar (9 kpc semi-major axis), with a size almost twice as large as the average found in other barred galaxies (4.5 kpc median in the local universe, Gadotti 2011). A bulge/bar/disk 2D decomposition using the Spitzer 3.6 μm image and the budda package (de Souza et al. 2004; Gadotti 2008) reveals that the ratio of the bar semi-major axis to the disk scale-length is 1.4, which is a value typically found in other barred galaxies (see Fig. 1 in Gadotti 2011). The disk scale-length is ~ 7 kpc, which is extremely large (2.8 kpc median in local galaxies, Gadotti 2009). Our analysis also shows that there are no signs of recent star formation along the bar. We find no signs of a box-peanut structure near the central regions, which is also another signature of an evolved bar. Taken altogether, the evidence points to a bar formed at least a few billion years ago and the stars in the bar seem to be a fossil record of the stellar population in the galaxy before the interaction with its companion. Then, we modeled the SFH of each 10 kpc region as constant Star Formation Rate (SFR) for the past 100 Myr superposed on an exponentially decaying, longstanding SFR. We find a single exponential SFH to account for all the recent SFR of the galaxy, with no need for an additional SFR due to the interaction. Av is low all across the galaxy 0.25), but increases near 0.7) the point of collision. The SFH of the arms are asymmetric. The northeastern arm having older ages 5 Gyr) and SFH closer to constant, while the

  19. Singlet Molecular Oxygen on Ice: Rates of Formation and Steady State Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, J. P.; Anastasio, C.

    2007-12-01

    Singlet molecular oxygen (1O2*), the first electronically excited state of molecular oxygen, reacts rapidly with certain types of environmental pollutants such as furans, phenols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Its formation requires the absorption of light by a chromophore (a.k.a. sensitizer), which subsequently transfers energy to ground state molecular oxygen. In the environment, 1O2* chemistry has been studied primarily in the aqueous phase, such as in surface waters or cloud and fog drops. In this work, we expand our current understanding by investigating the rate of formation (Rf) and steady state concentration ([1O2*]) of 1O2* on ice. To investigate 1O2* kinetics, we use a chemical probe technique in which photoformed 1O2* reacts with furfuryl alcohol (FFA). To generate 1O2*, we illuminated frozen samples containing a sensitizer (Rose Bengal, RB) at 549 nm. The concentration of total solutes in each sample was controlled using sodium sulfate (Na2SO4). Following illumination, the decay of FFA was measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Ice tests were conducted at 253, 263, and 268 K. Liquid tests for comparison were conducted at 278 K. Results showed dramatically faster (~104) FFA decay on ice than in liquid samples prepared from the same solutions, in agreement with the calculated solute concentration factor in the quasi-liquid layer (QLL) on ice compared to bulk solution. Varying the concentration of RB resulted in similar changes in both Rf and [1O2*], with magnitudes of change close to those expected. Changing temperature and total solutes, both of which control the volume of the QLL on ice, revealed two model regimes: FFA as a major (1) or minor (2) sink of 1O2*. Experimental results from the former regime show good agreement with expected values for both Rf and [1O2*]. Experiments in the later regime are currently in progress. We will also discuss the potential implications of 1O2* to the chemistry of naturally

  20. Distinctive Genome Reduction Rates Revealed by Genomic Analyses of Two Coxiella-Like Endosymbionts in Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Yuval; Lalzar, Itai; Klasson, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Genome reduction is a hallmark of symbiotic genomes, and the rate and patterns of gene loss associated with this process have been investigated in several different symbiotic systems. However, in long-term host-associated coevolving symbiont clades, the genome size differences between strains are normally quite small and hence patterns of large-scale genome reduction can only be inferred from distant relatives. Here we present the complete genome of a Coxiella-like symbiont from Rhipicephalus turanicus ticks (CRt), and compare it with other genomes from the genus Coxiella in order to investigate the process of genome reduction in a genus consisting of intracellular host-associated bacteria with variable genome sizes. The 1.7-Mb CRt genome is larger than the genomes of most obligate mutualists but has a very low protein-coding content (48.5%) and an extremely high number of identifiable pseudogenes, indicating that it is currently undergoing genome reduction. Analysis of encoded functions suggests that CRt is an obligate tick mutualist, as indicated by the possible provisioning of the tick with biotin (B7), riboflavin (B2) and other cofactors, and by the loss of most genes involved in host cell interactions, such as secretion systems. Comparative analyses between CRt and the 2.5 times smaller genome of Coxiella from the lone star tick Amblyomma americanum (CLEAA) show that many of the same gene functions are lost and suggest that the large size difference might be due to a higher rate of genome evolution in CLEAA generated by the loss of the mismatch repair genes mutSL. Finally, sequence polymorphisms in the CRt population sampled from field collected ticks reveal up to one distinct strain variant per tick, and analyses of mutational patterns within the population suggest that selection might be acting on synonymous sites. The CRt genome is an extreme example of a symbiont genome caught in the act of genome reduction, and the comparison between CLEAA and CRt

  1. Distinctive Genome Reduction Rates Revealed by Genomic Analyses of Two Coxiella-Like Endosymbionts in Ticks.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Yuval; Lalzar, Itai; Klasson, Lisa

    2015-06-01

    Genome reduction is a hallmark of symbiotic genomes, and the rate and patterns of gene loss associated with this process have been investigated in several different symbiotic systems. However, in long-term host-associated coevolving symbiont clades, the genome size differences between strains are normally quite small and hence patterns of large-scale genome reduction can only be inferred from distant relatives. Here we present the complete genome of a Coxiella-like symbiont from Rhipicephalus turanicus ticks (CRt), and compare it with other genomes from the genus Coxiella in order to investigate the process of genome reduction in a genus consisting of intracellular host-associated bacteria with variable genome sizes. The 1.7-Mb CRt genome is larger than the genomes of most obligate mutualists but has a very low protein-coding content (48.5%) and an extremely high number of identifiable pseudogenes, indicating that it is currently undergoing genome reduction. Analysis of encoded functions suggests that CRt is an obligate tick mutualist, as indicated by the possible provisioning of the tick with biotin (B7), riboflavin (B2) and other cofactors, and by the loss of most genes involved in host cell interactions, such as secretion systems. Comparative analyses between CRt and the 2.5 times smaller genome of Coxiella from the lone star tick Amblyomma americanum (CLEAA) show that many of the same gene functions are lost and suggest that the large size difference might be due to a higher rate of genome evolution in CLEAA generated by the loss of the mismatch repair genes mutSL. Finally, sequence polymorphisms in the CRt population sampled from field collected ticks reveal up to one distinct strain variant per tick, and analyses of mutational patterns within the population suggest that selection might be acting on synonymous sites. The CRt genome is an extreme example of a symbiont genome caught in the act of genome reduction, and the comparison between CLEAA and CRt

  2. UNLEASHING POSITIVE FEEDBACK: LINKING THE RATES OF STAR FORMATION, SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE ACCRETION, AND OUTFLOWS IN DISTANT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, Joseph

    2013-08-01

    Pressure-regulated star formation is a simple variant on the usual supernova-regulated star formation efficiency that controls the global star formation rate as a function of cold gas content in star-forming galaxies, and accounts for the Schmidt-Kennicutt law in both nearby and distant galaxies. Inclusion of active galactic nucleus (AGN) induced pressure, by jets and/or winds that flow back onto a gas-rich disk, can lead, under some circumstances, to significantly enhanced star formation rates, especially at high redshift and most likely followed by the more widely accepted phase of star formation quenching. Simple expressions are derived that relate supermassive black hole growth, star formation, and outflow rates. The ratios of black hole to spheroid mass and of both black hole accretion and outflow rates to star formation rate are predicted as a function of time. I suggest various tests of the AGN-triggered star formation hypothesis.

  3. Effect of storage temperature on crystal formation rate and growth rate of calcium lactate crystals on smoked Cheddar cheeses.

    PubMed

    Rajbhandari, P; Patel, J; Valentine, E; Kindstedt, P S

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that storage temperature influences the formation of calcium lactate crystals on vacuum-packaged Cheddar cheese surfaces. However, the mechanisms by which crystallization is modulated by storage temperature are not completely understood. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of storage temperature on smoked Cheddar cheese surfaces for (1) the number of discrete visible crystals formed per unit of cheese surface area; (2) growth rate and shape of discrete crystals (as measured by area and circularity); (3) percentage of total cheese surface area occupied by crystals. Three vacuum-packaged, random weight (∼300 g) retail samples of naturally smoked Cheddar cheese, produced from the same vat of cheese, were obtained from a retail source. The samples were cut parallel to the longitudinal axis at a depth of 10mm from the 2 surfaces to give six 10-mm-thick slabs, 4 of which were randomly assigned to 4 different storage temperature treatments: 1, 5, 10°C, and weekly cycling between 1 and 10°C. Samples were stored for 30 wk. Following the onset of visible surface crystals, digital photographs of surfaces were taken every other week and evaluated by image analysis for number of discrete crystal regions and total surface area occupied by crystals. Specific discrete crystals were chosen and evaluated biweekly for radius, area, and circularity. The entire experiment was conducted in triplicate. The effects of cheese surface, storage temperature, and storage time on crystal number and total crystal area were evaluated by ANOVA, according to a repeated-measures design. The number of discrete crystal regions increased significantly during storage but at different rates for different temperature treatments. Total crystal area also increased significantly during storage, at rates that varied with temperature treatment. Storage temperature did not appear to have a major effect on the growth rates and shapes of the individual crystals

  4. Analysis of Metmyoglobin Formation Rates in Frozen Tuna Meat during Frozen Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viriyarattanasak, Chotika; Watanabe, Manabu; Suzuki, Toru

    Formation of metmyoglobin (metMb) in frozen tuna meat stored at -90, -60, -40, -30, -20, and -10°C for approximately 6 months was investigated. The reaction rate of metMB formation was estimated from a linear plot of ln ([M∞ . Mt] /[M∞ . Mo]) and storage time (t) for each storage temperature (Ts) (M∞, Mt, and Mo are metMb contents at times t = t∞, t, and 0, respectively). When M∞ was assumed to be 100%, the rate of metMb formation followed the first-order reaction only during the early stage of storage period. MetMb formation, however obeyed the first-order reaction for all test temperatures even during long-term storage when M∞ was assumed to be dependent on storage temperature (M∞(Ts)). A discontinuity was observed in the temperature dependence of M∞(Ts) at storage temperature range between -60 and -40°C, which was attributed to the glass transition of protein system. On the other hand, the temperature dependence of metMb formation did not show a significant change over all storage temperatures.

  5. Gas hydrate formation rates from dissolved-phase methane in porous laboratory specimens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, William F.; Spangenberg, E.K.

    2013-01-01

    Marine sands highly saturated with gas hydrates are potential energy resources, likely forming from methane dissolved in pore water. Laboratory fabrication of gas hydrate-bearing sands formed from dissolved-phase methane usually requires 1–2 months to attain the high hydrate saturations characteristic of naturally occurring energy resource targets. A series of gas hydrate formation tests, in which methane-supersaturated water circulates through 100, 240, and 200,000 cm3 vessels containing glass beads or unconsolidated sand, show that the rate-limiting step is dissolving gaseous-phase methane into the circulating water to form methane-supersaturated fluid. This implies that laboratory and natural hydrate formation rates are primarily limited by methane availability. Developing effective techniques for dissolving gaseous methane into water will increase formation rates above our observed (1 ± 0.5) × 10−7 mol of methane consumed for hydrate formation per minute per cubic centimeter of pore space, which corresponds to a hydrate saturation increase of 2 ± 1% per day, regardless of specimen size.

  6. Star Formation Rate and Gas Relations in the Arp 299 Merger from the VIXENS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiderman, Amanda L.; Evans, N. J.; Gebhardt, K.; Blanc, G. A.; Davis, T.; Papovich, C. J.; van den Bosch, R.; Iono, D.; Yun, M.; VIXENS Team

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between star formation and gas content in late interaction phase merger Arp 299 from the VIRUS-P Investigation of the eXtreme ENvironments of Starbursts (VIXENS) integral field unit survey. By comparing H-alpha, Pa-alpha and 24um data to CO(1-0), CO(2-1), HCN(1-0), HCO+(1-0), and HI maps, we explore the relation between the star formation rate and gas surface densities on spatially resolved ~kpc scales. We find discrepancies from known extragalactic spatially resolved relations in nearby spiral galaxies and disk-averaged relations in high-z mergers.

  7. COSMOLOGICAL EVOLUTION OF LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND THE STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosian, Vahé; Kitanidis, Ellie; Kocevski, Daniel

    2015-06-10

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), by virtue of their high luminosities, can be detected up to very high redshifts and therefore can be excellent probes of the early universe. This task is hampered by the fact that most of their characteristics have a broad range, so we first need to obtain an accurate description of the distribution of these characteristics and, especially, their cosmological evolution. We use a sample of about 200 Swift long GRBs with known redshifts to determine the evolution of the luminosity, formation rate, and the general shape of the luminosity function (LF). In contrast to most other forward-fitting methods of treating this problem, we use the Efron–Petrosian methods, which allow a non-parametric determination of the above quantities. We find a relatively strong luminosity evolution, an LF that can be fitted to a broken power law, and an unusually high formation rate at low redshifts, a rate more than one order of magnitude higher than the star formation rate (SFR). On the other hand, our results seem to agree with the almost constant SFR in redshifts 1–3 and the decline above this redshift.

  8. Displacement damage rate dependence of defect cluster formation in α-Fe during irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Y.; Morishita, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Hamaguchi, D.; Tanigawa, H.

    2013-05-01

    Formation kinetics of defect clusters in pure iron during irradiation has been numerically investigated by reaction rate theory, with focusing on nucleation process of vacancy clusters (voids) and self-interstitial-atoms (SIA) clusters under a wide range of atomic displacement damage rate (dpa rate) and temperature conditions. In the rate theory model, the size dependence of thermal stability of a defect cluster is treated for a wide range of cluster size. The numerical analysis shows that the nucleation processes of voids and SIA-clusters are quite different from each other. As to the voids, the nucleation rate of voids depends much on temperature and dpa rate, and has the individual peak temperature for each dpa rate, during which the peak temperature increases with increasing dpa rate. This tendency for void nucleation is similar to that for void swelling observed in experiments. As to the SIA-clusters, the nucleation rate of SIA-clusters does not depend much on temperature and has no peak temperatures because of the relatively high thermal stability of an SIA-cluster, indicating that the conventional model (di-interstitial model) is applicable to describe the nucleation of SIA-clusters in a wide range of temperature.

  9. Formation of volcanic edifices in response to changes in magma budget at intermediate spreading rate ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J.; White, S. M.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Bizimis, M.

    2010-12-01

    The spatial and abundance distributions of volcanic edifices along mid-ocean ridges have a well known correlation with spreading rate. Along slow spreading centers, volcanic edifices are normally distributed about the segment center. Volcanic edifices along fast spreading centers have the opposing trend, i.e. edifices form primarily at the ends of segments. However, in ridges affected by plumes and at back arc basins, the spatial and abundance distributions of volcanic edifices differ from that observed at normal ridges of the same spreading rate. This suggests that magma supply rate may control the spatial and abundance distribution of volcanic edifices. Recent geophysical and geochemical studies along the Galapagos Spreading Centers (GSC), Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR), Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR) and the Valu Fa (VF) and Eastern Lau Spreading Centers (ELSC) put tight constraints on crustal thickness, making it possible investigate the effect of magma budget and axial morphology on the formation of volcanic edifices. Volcanic edifices are described according to their volume, shape (their height to basal radius ratio) and their location relative to the end or center of a segment (abundance distribution). For the GSC, the shape and distribution of volcanic edifices correlate with changes in crustal thickness and axial morphology, consistent with a magma supply control on their formation in this region. This relationship is not apparent along the SEIR or JdFR, where edifices show little variation with changes in axial morphology at relatively constant spreading rates. Results for VF and ELSC are what we expect for changes in spreading rate, not axial morphology. Our study suggests that the formation of volcanic edifices at intermediate spreading rate ridges are influenced by magma budget but only when it is above a certain threshold.

  10. Relative rates of coke formation from hydrocarbons in steam cracking of naphtha: 3. Aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kopinke, F. . Section of Remediation Research); Zimmermann, G. ); Reyniers, G.C.; Froment, G.F. )

    1993-11-01

    Relative rate constants of coke formation (k) from 18 aromatic hydrocarbons during steam cracking of naphtha at 810 C were determined by application of [sup 14]C-labeled compounds. Benzene is a poor coke precursor (k = 0.3), whereas polycyclic structures like acenaphthylene, anthracene, and chrysene have a high coking potential in the pyrolysis reactor (k = 4.5--6) as well as in the TLE section (k = 12--30). The relation between structure and coke formation rate of aromatic hydrocarbons can be interpreted on the basis of their reactivity in radical reactions. Constituents of the fuel fraction ([ge] C[sub 9]) derived from nonaromatic feed components are more efficient in the TLE fouling than those stemming from benzene derivatives.

  11. The effect of clouds on photolysis rates and ozone formation in the unpolluted troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    The photochemistry of the lower atmosphere is sensitive to short- and long-term meteorological effects; accurate modeling therefore requires photolysis rates for trace gases which reflect this variability. As an example, the influence of clouds on the production of tropospheric ozone has been investigated, using a modification of Luther's two-stream radiation scheme to calculate cloud-perturbed photolysis rates in a one-dimensional photochemical transport model. In the unpolluted troposphere, where stratospheric inputs of odd nitrogen appear to represent the photochemical source of O3, strong cloud reflectance increases the concentration of NO in the upper troposphere, leading to greatly enhanced rates of ozone formation. Although the rate of these processes is too slow to verify by observation, the calculation is useful in distinguishing some features of the chemistry of regions of differing mean cloudiness.

  12. GAS REGULATION OF GALAXIES: THE EVOLUTION OF THE COSMIC SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE, THE METALLICITY-MASS-STAR-FORMATION RATE RELATION, AND THE STELLAR CONTENT OF HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Pipino, Antonio; Peng Yingjie; Renzini, Alvio

    2013-08-01

    A very simple physical model of galaxies is one in which the formation of stars is instantaneously regulated by the mass of gas in a reservoir with mass loss scaling with the star-formation rate (SFR). This model links together three different aspects of the evolving galaxy population: (1) the cosmic time evolution of the specific star-formation rate (sSFR) relative to the growth of halos, (2) the gas-phase metallicities across the galaxy population and over cosmic time, and (3) the ratio of the stellar to dark matter mass of halos. The gas regulator is defined by the gas consumption timescale ({epsilon}{sup -1}) and the mass loading {lambda} of the wind outflow {lambda}{center_dot}SFR. The simplest regulator, in which {epsilon} and {lambda} are constant, sets the sSFR equal to exactly the specific accretion rate of the galaxy; more realistic situations lead to an sSFR that is perturbed from this precise relation. Because the gas consumption timescale is shorter than the timescale on which the system evolves, the metallicity Z is set primarily by the instantaneous operation of the regulator system rather than by the past history of the system. The metallicity of the gas reservoir depends on {epsilon}, {lambda}, and sSFR, and the regulator system therefore naturally produces a Z(m{sub star}, SFR) relation if {epsilon} and {lambda} depend on the stellar mass m{sub star}. Furthermore, this relation will be the same at all epochs unless the parameters {epsilon} and {lambda} themselves change with time. A so-called fundamental metallicity relation is naturally produced by these conditions. The overall mass-metallicity relation Z(m{sub star}) directly provides the fraction f{sub star}(m{sub star}) of incoming baryons that are being transformed into stars. The observed Z(m{sub star}) relation of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies implies a strong dependence of stellar mass on halo mass that reconciles the different faint-end slopes of the stellar and halo mass

  13. High star formation rates as the origin of turbulence in early and modern disk galaxies.

    PubMed

    Green, Andrew W; Glazebrook, Karl; McGregor, Peter J; Abraham, Roberto G; Poole, Gregory B; Damjanov, Ivana; McCarthy, Patrick J; Colless, Matthew; Sharp, Robert G

    2010-10-01

    Observations of star formation and kinematics in early galaxies at high spatial and spectral resolution have shown that two-thirds are massive rotating disk galaxies, with the remainder being less massive non-rotating objects. The line-of-sight-averaged velocity dispersions are typically five times higher than in today's disk galaxies. This suggests that gravitationally unstable, gas-rich disks in the early Universe are fuelled by cold, dense accreting gas flowing along cosmic filaments and penetrating hot galactic gas halos. These accreting flows, however, have not been observed, and cosmic accretion cannot power the observed level of turbulence. Here we report observations of a sample of rare, high-velocity-dispersion disk galaxies in the nearby Universe where cold accretion is unlikely to drive their high star formation rates. We find that their velocity dispersions are correlated with their star formation rates, but not their masses or gas fractions, which suggests that star formation is the energetic driver of galaxy disk turbulence at all cosmic epochs.

  14. Fibronectin alters the rate of formation and structure of the fibrin matrix.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Anand; Karuri, Nancy

    2014-01-10

    Plasma fibronectin is a vital component of the fibrin clot; however its role on clot structure is not clearly understood. The goal of this study was to examine the influence of fibronectin on the kinetics of formation, structural characteristics and composition of reconstituted fibrin clots or fibrin matrices. Fibrin matrices were formed by adding thrombin to 1, 2 or 4 mg/ml fibrinogen supplemented with 0-0.4 mg/ml fibronectin. The rate of fibrin matrix formation was then monitored by measuring light absorbance properties at different time points. Confocal microscopy of fluorescein conjugated fibrinogen was used to visualize the structural characteristics of fibrin matrices. The amount of fibronectin in fibrin matrices was determined through electrophoresis and immunoblotting of solubilized matrices. Fibronectin concentration positively correlated with the initial rate of fibrin matrix formation and with steady state light absorbance values of fibrin matrices. An increase in fibronectin concentration resulted in thinner and denser fibers in the fibrin matrices. Electrophoresis and immunoblotting showed that fibronectin was covalently and non-covalently bound to fibrin matrices and in the form of high molecular weight multimers. The formation of fibronectin multimers was attributed to cross-linking of fibronectin by trace amounts Factor XIIIa. These findings are novel because they link results from light absorbance studies to microcopy analyses and demonstrate an influence of fibronectin on fibrin matrix structural characteristics. This data is important in developing therapies that destabilize fibrin clots.

  15. Conifers in cold environments synchronize maximum growth rate of tree-ring formation with day length.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Sergio; Deslauriers, Annie; Anfodillo, Tommaso; Morin, Hubert; Saracino, Antonio; Motta, Renzo; Borghetti, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Intra-annual radial growth rates and durations in trees are reported to differ greatly in relation to species, site and environmental conditions. However, very similar dynamics of cambial activity and wood formation are observed in temperate and boreal zones. Here, we compared weekly xylem cell production and variation in stem circumference in the main northern hemisphere conifer species (genera Picea, Pinus, Abies and Larix) from 1996 to 2003. Dynamics of radial growth were modeled with a Gompertz function, defining the upper asymptote (A), x-axis placement (beta) and rate of change (kappa). A strong linear relationship was found between the constants beta and kappa for both types of analysis. The slope of the linear regression, which corresponds to the time at which maximum growth rate occurred, appeared to converge towards the summer solstice. The maximum growth rate occurred around the time of maximum day length, and not during the warmest period of the year as previously suggested. The achievements of photoperiod could act as a growth constraint or a limit after which the rate of tree-ring formation tends to decrease, thus allowing plants to safely complete secondary cell wall lignification before winter.

  16. Do Teacher Rating Forms Reveal as Much About Students as About Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Les; And Others

    1976-01-01

    College students using teacher's reputation or ability to select sections congregated in certain sections and rated instructors more favorably than classmates using other criteria, endangering previous teacher rating form validation studies which failed to randomize students to classes. (Author/BW)

  17. Time series analyses reveal environmental and fisheries controls on Atlantic horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus) catch rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Time-series models (Dynamic factorial analyses and; Min/max autocorrelation factor analysis) were used to explore the relative influences of environmental variables and fishing pressure of trawl, seine and artisanal fleets on catch rates on Trachurus trachurus in ICES IXa sub-divisions (IXaCN-North coast; IXa- CS-South coast; IXaS-Algarve, South coast, Algarve). Fishing effort influenced catch rates in all areas with a 2 year lag and fishing pressure for each area was related to specific fleet sectors effort. In IXaCN, winter upwelling (spawning peak) and both summer northerly wind and wind magnitude (outside of the spawning peak) were strongly correlated with catch rates. In IXaCS summer/autumn westerly winds were related with catch rates. Northerly winds in spring, upwelling and SST (winter and autumn) were related with catch rates in IXaS-Algarve. For species with a long spawning season such as horse mackerel, seasonal analyses at broad regional scales can detract from a better understanding of variability in short term sub-stock catch rates. Favorable environmental conditions, even during seasons with low spawning activity can positively affect catch rates. Ignoring the role of regional oceanographic features on the spatial distribution of the sub-stocks when analysing variability in catch rates can lead to poor inferences about the productivity of the populations.

  18. Surface Brightness Profiles and Star Formation Rates of Galaxies in NRGb054

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Ellen; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Miller, Brendan; Durbala, Adriana; Fitzgerald, Garrett

    2016-01-01

    We present new optical R and H-alpha images of the galaxy group NRGb054, obtained with the WIYN 0.9m telescope at KPNO using the MOSAIC camera. This group was studied as part of the larger Undergraduate ALFALFA Team project investigating the effects of a group environment on star formation. The stacked H-alpha image was continuum subtracted by the removal of a scaled and stacked R image. Surface photometry was performed on R and continuum-subtracted H-alpha cutouts of 20 covered galaxies to determine the surface brightness as a function of radius. Integrating the continuum-subtracted H-alpha surface brightness profile provides the total star formation within that galaxy, while the shape of the profile illustrates how star formation is spread throughout the galaxy. We provide a catalog of surface brightness profiles and integrated star formation rates for NRGb054. We consider star formation as a function of galaxy-galaxy separation and galaxy location within the group, and discuss our findings in the context of the wider study. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005.

  19. Crystal structure of listeriolysin O reveals molecular details of oligomerization and pore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, Stefan; van Pee, Katharina; Hudel, Martina; Leustik, Martin; Rhinow, Daniel; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Chakraborty, Trinad; Yildiz, Özkan

    2014-04-01

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is an essential virulence factor of Listeria monocytogenes that causes listeriosis. Listeria monocytogenes owes its ability to live within cells to the pH- and temperature-dependent pore-forming activity of LLO, which is unique among cholesterol-dependent cytolysins. LLO enables the bacteria to cross the phagosomal membrane and is also involved in activation of cellular processes, including the modulation of gene expression or intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. Neither the pore-forming mechanism nor the mechanisms triggering the signalling processes in the host cell are known in detail. Here, we report the crystal structure of LLO, in which we identified regions important for oligomerization and pore formation. Mutants were characterized by determining their haemolytic and Ca2+ uptake activity. We analysed the pore formation of LLO and its variants on erythrocyte ghosts by electron microscopy and show that pore formation requires precise interface interactions during toxin oligomerization on the membrane.

  20. OH{sup +} in astrophysical media: state-to-state formation rates, Einstein coefficients and inelastic collision rates with He

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez-Carrasco, Susana; Godard, Benjamin; Lique, François; Bulut, Niyazi; Kłos, Jacek; Roncero, Octavio; Aguado, Alfredo; Aoiz, F. Javier; Castillo, Jesús F.; Goicoechea, Javier R.; Etxaluze, Mireya; Cernicharo, José

    2014-10-10

    The rate constants required to model the OH{sup +} observations in different regions of the interstellar medium have been determined using state of the art quantum methods. First, state-to-state rate constants for the H{sub 2}(v = 0, J = 0, 1) + O{sup +}({sup 4} S) → H + OH{sup +}(X {sup 3}Σ{sup –}, v', N) reaction have been obtained using a quantum wave packet method. The calculations have been compared with time-independent results to assess the accuracy of reaction probabilities at collision energies of about 1 meV. The good agreement between the simulations and the existing experimental cross sections in the 0.01-1 eV energy range shows the quality of the results. The calculated state-to-state rate constants have been fitted to an analytical form. Second, the Einstein coefficients of OH{sup +} have been obtained for all astronomically significant rovibrational bands involving the X {sup 3}Σ{sup –} and/or A {sup 3}Π electronic states. For this purpose, the potential energy curves and electric dipole transition moments for seven electronic states of OH{sup +} are calculated with ab initio methods at the highest level, including spin-orbit terms, and the rovibrational levels have been calculated including the empirical spin-rotation and spin-spin terms. Third, the state-to-state rate constants for inelastic collisions between He and OH{sup +}(X {sup 3}Σ{sup –}) have been calculated using a time-independent close coupling method on a new potential energy surface. All these rates have been implemented in detailed chemical and radiative transfer models. Applications of these models to various astronomical sources show that inelastic collisions dominate the excitation of the rotational levels of OH{sup +}. In the models considered, the excitation resulting from the chemical formation of OH{sup +} increases the line fluxes by about 10% or less depending on the density of the gas.

  1. Comparative genomics reveals convergent rates of evolution in ant-plant mutualisms.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Benjamin E R; Moreau, Corrie S

    2016-01-01

    Symbiosis-the close and often long-term interaction of species-is predicted to drive genome evolution in a variety of ways. For example, parasitic interactions have been shown to increase rates of molecular evolution, a trend generally attributed to the Red Queen Hypothesis. However, it is much less clear how mutualisms impact the genome, as both increased and reduced rates of change have been predicted. Here we sequence the genomes of seven species of ants, three that have convergently evolved obligate plant-ant mutualism and four closely related species of non-mutualists. Comparing these sequences, we investigate how genome evolution is shaped by mutualistic behaviour. We find that rates of molecular evolution are higher in the mutualists genome wide, a characteristic apparently not the result of demography. Our results suggest that the intimate relationships of obligate mutualists may lead to selective pressures similar to those seen in parasites, thereby increasing rates of evolution. PMID:27557866

  2. Comparative genomics reveals convergent rates of evolution in ant–plant mutualisms

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Benjamin E. R.; Moreau, Corrie S.

    2016-01-01

    Symbiosis—the close and often long-term interaction of species—is predicted to drive genome evolution in a variety of ways. For example, parasitic interactions have been shown to increase rates of molecular evolution, a trend generally attributed to the Red Queen Hypothesis. However, it is much less clear how mutualisms impact the genome, as both increased and reduced rates of change have been predicted. Here we sequence the genomes of seven species of ants, three that have convergently evolved obligate plant–ant mutualism and four closely related species of non-mutualists. Comparing these sequences, we investigate how genome evolution is shaped by mutualistic behaviour. We find that rates of molecular evolution are higher in the mutualists genome wide, a characteristic apparently not the result of demography. Our results suggest that the intimate relationships of obligate mutualists may lead to selective pressures similar to those seen in parasites, thereby increasing rates of evolution. PMID:27557866

  3. Long-Term Data Reveal Rate and Risk Factors for Subsequent Surgeries Following Initial ACL Reconstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... we have not known the rate and risk factors for subsequent knee surgery until now,” said senior author Kurt Spindler, M.D., of Vanderbilt University. In the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) study, ...

  4. Genome-wide investigation reveals high evolutionary rates in annual model plants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Rates of molecular evolution vary widely among species. While significant deviations from molecular clock have been found in many taxa, effects of life histories on molecular evolution are not fully understood. In plants, annual/perennial life history traits have long been suspected to influence the evolutionary rates at the molecular level. To date, however, the number of genes investigated on this subject is limited and the conclusions are mixed. To evaluate the possible heterogeneity in evolutionary rates between annual and perennial plants at the genomic level, we investigated 85 nuclear housekeeping genes, 10 non-housekeeping families, and 34 chloroplast genes using the genomic data from model plants including Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula for annuals and grape (Vitis vinifera) and popular (Populus trichocarpa) for perennials. Results According to the cross-comparisons among the four species, 74-82% of the nuclear genes and 71-97% of the chloroplast genes suggested higher rates of molecular evolution in the two annuals than those in the two perennials. The significant heterogeneity in evolutionary rate between annuals and perennials was consistently found both in nonsynonymous sites and synonymous sites. While a linear correlation of evolutionary rates in orthologous genes between species was observed in nonsynonymous sites, the correlation was weak or invisible in synonymous sites. This tendency was clearer in nuclear genes than in chloroplast genes, in which the overall evolutionary rate was small. The slope of the regression line was consistently lower than unity, further confirming the higher evolutionary rate in annuals at the genomic level. Conclusions The higher evolutionary rate in annuals than in perennials appears to be a universal phenomenon both in nuclear and chloroplast genomes in the four dicot model plants we investigated. Therefore, such heterogeneity in evolutionary rate should result from factors that have genome

  5. Late Cenozoic Himalayan Erosion Rates Revealed by Cosmogenic Isotopes in Foreland Sediments, Northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherler, D.; Barnes, J. B.; Insel, N.; Densmore, A.

    2015-12-01

    Most surface processes that transport sediment are influenced by climate. For example, more rainfall enhances runoff and stream capacity, and colder temperatures expand glaciers at the expense of rivers. Late Cenozoic cooling and glacial cycles during the Quaternary should thus have affected erosion of the Earth's surface. But whether these changes were also associated with an overall increase of erosion rates is not clear. Here, we assess the erosional response of the fluvial-dominated Yamuna catchment in the Garhwal Himalaya, northern India, to late Cenozoic cooling and Quaternary climatic oscillations. Our approach is to measure cosmogenic radionuclide (10Be) concentrations in fluvial sediments (n = 14) eroded from uplifting foreland deposits and compare them with modelled concentrations for different paleo-erosion rate scenarios. This approach differs from previous ones that determine paleo-erosion rates from 10Be concentrations in distinct samples from stratigraphic sections, and avoids misinterpreting short-term fluctuations in 10Be concentrations that are unrelated to erosion rates. We tested this approach in the Mohand Range in northwest India, where Miocene to Quaternary deposits of the paleo-Yamuna River are actively uplifting, and where a robust kinematic model and published stratigraphic age constraints exist. Our model free parameters are the shortening rate across the Main Frontal Thrust (MFT) and the onset of shortening, within a known amount of total MFT slip (4-5 km). Preliminary results show that we can reproduce the measured 10Be concentrations best when Himalayan erosion rates were lower in the past than they are now, or have been increasing towards the present. Within uncertainties, the best-fit parameter combinations give shortening rates between 10 and 20 mm/yr, which is consistent with independent estimates from a nearby dated strath terrace and expected uplift rates based on channel steepness indices. Scenarios in which erosion rates are

  6. Ductile strain rates measurements reveal continental crust long-term deformation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutonnet, E.; Leloup, P. H.; Sassier, C.; Gardien, V.; Ricard, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Any discussion on the long-term crustal rheology is hindered by our poor knowledge of deformation rates in the deep crust. These rates have only been estimated to be ≤10-15 and ≥10-13 s-1 in the "stable" and highly deforming zones respectively, and measured in a few peculiar cases. Because quartz ribbons are ubiquitous in continental shear zones, the quartz-strain-rate-metry (QRS) method, based on experimentally calibrated quartz piezometers and ductile flow laws, could provide deformation rates measurements in many geological contexts. However, the results are highly sensitive on the deformation temperature that is difficult to measure. Furthermore, results vary by three orders of magnitude depending on the chosen piezometer and rheological law. If recent technical progress allow measuring more precisely the deformation temperature, it is still not clear what is the most accurate piezometer - rheological law association. We solved that dilemma by comparing strain rates measured by the QRS method with a reference one measured with another method on the same outcrop of the Ailao Shan - Red River (ASRR) shear zone. At site C1, by combining dating of syntectonic dykes and measurements of their deformation, the strain rate is calculated between 3 and 4 x10-14 s-1 between 29 to 22 Ma, (Sassier et al., JGR, 2009). Quartz ribbons sampled in site C1 show large grains recrystallized by grain boundary migration (GBM), themselves recrystallized at lower temperature by sub-grain rotation (SGR). The mean recrystallized quartz grain size for the SGR event range between 74.0 and 79.3 μm. The associated stresses, measured with Shimizu (JSG, 2008) piezometer, range between 35.2 and 38.1 MPa. Conditions of deformation of P≈ 1.5 kbar and T≈ 430°C were inferred by combining several thermobarometers on quartz, such as TitaniQ, fluid inclusions microthermometry and crystallographic fabrics. The calculated strain rate with five flow laws and three piezometers range between 3

  7. Formation Rates of Population III Stars and Chemical Enrichment of Halos during the Reionization Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenti, Michele; Stiavelli, Massimo

    2009-04-01

    The first stars in the universe formed out of pristine primordial gas clouds that were radiatively cooled to a few hundreds of degrees kelvin either via molecular or atomic (Lyman-α) hydrogen lines. This primordial mode of star formation was eventually quenched once radiative and/or chemical (metal enrichment) feedbacks marked the transition to Population II stars. In this paper, we present a model for the formation rate of Population III stars based on Press-Schechter modeling coupled with analytical recipes for gas cooling and radiative feedback. Our model also includes a novel treatment for metal pollution based on self-enrichment due to a previous episode of Population III star formation in progenitor halos. With this model, we derive the star formation history of Population III stars, their contribution to the reionization of the universe and the time of the transition from Population III star formation in minihalos (M ≈ 106 M sun, cooled via molecular hydrogen) to that in more massive halos (M gsim 2 × 107 M sun, where atomic hydrogen cooling is also possible). We consider a grid of models highlighting the impact of varying the values for the free parameters used, such as star formation and feedback efficiency. The most critical factor is the assumption that only one Population III star is formed in a halo. In this scenario, metal-free stars contribute only to a minor fraction of the total number of photons required to reionize the universe. In addition, metal-free star formation is primarily located in minihalos, and chemically enriched halos become the dominant locus of star formation very early in the life of the universe—at redshift z ≈ 25—even assuming a modest fraction (0.5%) of enriched gas converted in stars. If instead multiple metal-free stars are allowed to form out of a single halo, then there is an overall boost of Population III star formation, with a consequent significant contribution to the reionizing radiation budget. In addition

  8. Reducing bit-error rate with optical phase regeneration in multilevel modulation formats.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, Graham; Horak, Peter

    2013-12-15

    We investigate theoretically the benefits of using all-optical phase regeneration in a long-haul fiber optic link. We also introduce a design for a device capable of phase regeneration without phase-to-amplitude noise conversion. We simulate numerically the bit-error rate of a wavelength division multiplexed optical communication system over many fiber spans with periodic reamplification and compare the results obtained with and without phase regeneration at half the transmission distance when using the new design or an existing design. Depending on the modulation format, our results suggest that all-optical phase regeneration can reduce the bit-error rate by up to two orders of magnitude and that the amplitude preserving design offers a 50% reduction in bit-error rate relative to existing technology.

  9. Particle number size distribution in the eastern Mediterranean: Formation and growth rates of ultrafine airborne atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopanakis, I.; Chatoutsidou, S. E.; Torseth, K.; Glytsos, T.; Lazaridis, M.

    2013-10-01

    Particle number concentration was measured between June 2009 and June 2010 at Akrotiri research station in a rural/suburban region of western Crete (Greece). Overall, the available data covered 157 days during the aforementioned period of measurements. The objectives were to study the number size distribution characteristics of ambient aerosols and furthermore to identify new particle formation events and to evaluate particle formation rates and growth rates of the newborn particles. Aerosol particles with mobility diameters between 10 and 1100 nm were measured using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) system. Measurements were performed at ambient relative humidities. The median total particle number concentration was 525 #/cm3 whereas the number concentration ranged between 130 #/cm3 and 9597 #/cm3. The average percentage of particles with diameters between 10 nm and 100 nm (N10-100) to total particles was 53% during summer and spring, but reached 80% during winter. Maximum average contribution of nano-particles (10 nm < Dp < 50 nm) to total particles was recorded also in winter and was attributed partly to the effect of local heating. Furthermore, back trajectories (HYSPLIT model) showed that different air mass origins are linked to different levels of particle number concentrations, with higher values associated with air masses passing from polluted areas before reaching the Akrotiri station. Modal analysis of the measured size distribution data revealed a strong nucleation mode during winter (15-25 nm), which can be correlated with emissions from local sources (domestic heating). The nucleation mode was observed also during the spring campaigns and was partly linked to new particle formation events. On the contrary, an accumulation mode (80-120 nm) prevailed in the measurements during summer campaigns, when the station area was influenced by polluted air masses arriving mainly from Eastern Europe. In total, 13 new particle formation events were recorded

  10. Analysis of feedbacks between nucleation rate, survival probability and cloud condensation nuclei formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westervelt, D. M.; Pierce, J. R.; Adams, P. J.

    2014-06-01

    Aerosol nucleation is an important source of particle number in the atmosphere. However, in order to become cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), freshly nucleated particles must undergo significant condensational growth while avoiding coagulational scavenging. In an effort to quantify the contribution of nucleation to CCN, this work uses the GEOS-Chem-TOMAS global aerosol model to calculate changes in CCN concentrations against a broad range of nucleation rates and mechanisms. We then quantify the factors that control CCN formation from nucleation, including daily nucleation rates, growth rates, coagulation sinks, condensation sinks, survival probabilities, and CCN formation rates, in order to examine feedbacks that may limit growth of nucleated particles to CCN. Nucleation rate parameterizations tested in GEOS-Chem-TOMAS include ternary nucleation (with multiple tuning factors), activation nucleation (with two pre-factors), binary nucleation, and ion-mediated nucleation. We find that nucleation makes a significant contribution to boundary layer CCN(0.2%), but this contribution is only modestly sensitive to the choice of nucleation scheme, ranging from 49 to 78% increase in concentrations over a control simulation with no nucleation. Moreover, a two order-of-magnitude increase in the globally averaged nucleation rate (via changes to tuning factors) results in small changes (less than 10%) to global CCN(0.2%) concentrations. To explain this, we present a simple theory showing that survival probability has an exponentially decreasing dependence on the square of the condensation sink. This functional form stems from a negative correlation between condensation sink and growth rate and a positive correlation between condensation sink and coagulational scavenging. Conceptually, with a fixed condensable vapor budget (sulfuric acid and organics), any increase in CCN concentrations due to higher nucleation rates necessarily entails an increased aerosol surface area in the

  11. Elevated rates of gold mining in the Amazon revealed through high-resolution monitoring.

    PubMed

    Asner, Gregory P; Llactayo, William; Tupayachi, Raul; Luna, Ernesto Ráez

    2013-11-12

    Gold mining has rapidly increased in western Amazonia, but the rates and ecological impacts of mining remain poorly known and potentially underestimated. We combined field surveys, airborne mapping, and high-resolution satellite imaging to assess road- and river-based gold mining in the Madre de Dios region of the Peruvian Amazon from 1999 to 2012. In this period, the geographic extent of gold mining increased 400%. The average annual rate of forest loss as a result of gold mining tripled in 2008 following the global economic recession, closely associated with increased gold prices. Small clandestine operations now comprise more than half of all gold mining activities throughout the region. These rates of gold mining are far higher than previous estimates that were based on traditional satellite mapping techniques. Our results prove that gold mining is growing more rapidly than previously thought, and that high-resolution monitoring approaches are required to accurately quantify human impacts on tropical forests. PMID:24167281

  12. Elevated rates of gold mining in the Amazon revealed through high-resolution monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Asner, Gregory P.; Llactayo, William; Tupayachi, Raul; Luna, Ernesto Ráez

    2013-01-01

    Gold mining has rapidly increased in western Amazonia, but the rates and ecological impacts of mining remain poorly known and potentially underestimated. We combined field surveys, airborne mapping, and high-resolution satellite imaging to assess road- and river-based gold mining in the Madre de Dios region of the Peruvian Amazon from 1999 to 2012. In this period, the geographic extent of gold mining increased 400%. The average annual rate of forest loss as a result of gold mining tripled in 2008 following the global economic recession, closely associated with increased gold prices. Small clandestine operations now comprise more than half of all gold mining activities throughout the region. These rates of gold mining are far higher than previous estimates that were based on traditional satellite mapping techniques. Our results prove that gold mining is growing more rapidly than previously thought, and that high-resolution monitoring approaches are required to accurately quantify human impacts on tropical forests. PMID:24167281

  13. Elevated rates of gold mining in the Amazon revealed through high-resolution monitoring.

    PubMed

    Asner, Gregory P; Llactayo, William; Tupayachi, Raul; Luna, Ernesto Ráez

    2013-11-12

    Gold mining has rapidly increased in western Amazonia, but the rates and ecological impacts of mining remain poorly known and potentially underestimated. We combined field surveys, airborne mapping, and high-resolution satellite imaging to assess road- and river-based gold mining in the Madre de Dios region of the Peruvian Amazon from 1999 to 2012. In this period, the geographic extent of gold mining increased 400%. The average annual rate of forest loss as a result of gold mining tripled in 2008 following the global economic recession, closely associated with increased gold prices. Small clandestine operations now comprise more than half of all gold mining activities throughout the region. These rates of gold mining are far higher than previous estimates that were based on traditional satellite mapping techniques. Our results prove that gold mining is growing more rapidly than previously thought, and that high-resolution monitoring approaches are required to accurately quantify human impacts on tropical forests.

  14. Vacuum-ultraviolet circular dichroism reveals DNA duplex formation between short strands of adenine and thymine.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Lisbeth Munksgaard; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen

    2012-11-21

    Absorbance spectroscopy is used extensively to tell when two DNA single strands come together and form a double strand. Here we show that circular dichroism in the vacuum ultraviolet region provides an even stronger indication for duplex formation in the case of short strands of adenine and thymine (4 to 16 bases in each strand). Indeed, our results show that a strong positive CD band appears at 179 nm when double strands are formed. Melting experiments were done in aqueous solution with and without added Na(+) counter ions. With additional salt present a huge increase in the 179 nm CD band was observed when lowering the temperature. A 179 nm CD marker band for duplex formation can be used to measure the kinetics for the association of two single strands. Such experiments rely on large changes at one particular wavelength since it is too time-consuming to record a full-wavelength spectrum.

  15. Direct observation of mineral-organic composite formation reveals occlusion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rae Cho, Kang; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Yang, Pengcheng; Cai, Wei; Pan, Haihua; Kulak, Alexander N; Lau, Jolene L; Kulshreshtha, Prashant; Armes, Steven P; Meldrum, Fiona C; De Yoreo, James J

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of inorganic materials with organic macromolecules enables organisms to create biominerals such as bones and seashells, where occlusion of biomacromolecules within individual crystals generates superior mechanical properties. Current understanding of this process largely comes from studying the entrapment of micron-size particles in cooling melts. Here, by investigating micelle incorporation in calcite with atomic force microscopy and micromechanical simulations, we show that different mechanisms govern nanoscale occlusion. By simultaneously visualizing the micelles and propagating step edges, we demonstrate that the micelles experience significant compression during occlusion, which is accompanied by cavity formation. This generates local lattice strain, leading to enhanced mechanical properties. These results give new insight into the formation of occlusions in natural and synthetic crystals, and will facilitate the synthesis of multifunctional nanocomposite crystals. PMID:26732046

  16. Direct observation of mineral–organic composite formation reveals occlusion mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Rae Cho, Kang; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Yang, Pengcheng; Cai, Wei; Pan, Haihua; Kulak, Alexander N.; Lau, Jolene L.; Kulshreshtha, Prashant; Armes, Steven P.; Meldrum, Fiona C.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of inorganic materials with organic macromolecules enables organisms to create biominerals such as bones and seashells, where occlusion of biomacromolecules within individual crystals generates superior mechanical properties. Current understanding of this process largely comes from studying the entrapment of micron-size particles in cooling melts. Here, by investigating micelle incorporation in calcite with atomic force microscopy and micromechanical simulations, we show that different mechanisms govern nanoscale occlusion. By simultaneously visualizing the micelles and propagating step edges, we demonstrate that the micelles experience significant compression during occlusion, which is accompanied by cavity formation. This generates local lattice strain, leading to enhanced mechanical properties. These results give new insight into the formation of occlusions in natural and synthetic crystals, and will facilitate the synthesis of multifunctional nanocomposite crystals. PMID:26732046

  17. Direct observation of mineral–organic composite formation reveals occlusion mechanism

    DOE PAGES

    Cho, Kang Rae; Kim, Yi -Yeoun; Yang, Pengcheng; Cai, Wei; Pan, Haihua; Kulak, Alexander N.; Lau, Jolene L.; Kulshreshtha, Prashant; Armes, Steven P.; Meldrum, Fiona C.; et al

    2016-01-06

    Manipulation of inorganic materials with organic macromolecules enables organisms to create biominerals such as bones and seashells, where occlusion of biomacromolecules within individual crystals generates superior mechanical properties. Current understanding of this process largely comes from studying the entrapment of micron-size particles in cooling melts. Here, by investigating micelle incorporation in calcite with atomic force microscopy and micromechanical simulations, we show that different mechanisms govern nanoscale occlusion. By simultaneously visualizing the micelles and propagating step edges, we demonstrate that the micelles experience significant compression during occlusion, which is accompanied by cavity formation. This generates local lattice strain, leading to enhancedmore » mechanical properties. Furthermore, these results give new insight into the formation of occlusions in natural and synthetic crystals, and will facilitate the synthesis of multifunctional nanocomposite crystals.« less

  18. Schottky barrier formation and band bending revealed by first- principles calculations

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yang; Hellman, Anders; Fang, Yurui; Gao, Shiwu; Käll, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    The formation of a Schottky barrier at the metal-semiconductor interface is widely utilised in semiconductor devices. With the emerging of novel Schottky barrier based nanoelectronics, a further microscopic understanding of this interface is in high demand. Here we provide an atomistic insight into potential barrier formation and band bending by ab initio simulations and model analysis of a prototype Schottky diode, i.e., niobium doped rutile titania in contact with gold (Au/Nb:TiO2). The local Schottky barrier height is found to vary between 0 and 1.26 eV depending on the position of the dopant. The band bending is caused by a dopant induced dipole field between the interface and the dopant site, whereas the pristine Au/TiO2 interface does not show any band bending. These findings open the possibility for atomic scale optimisation of the Schottky barrier and light harvesting in metal-semiconductor nanostructures. PMID:26065401

  19. Effects of Antimicrobial Peptide Revealed by Simulations: Translocation, Pore Formation, Membrane Corrugation and Euler Buckling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Licui; Jia, Nana; Gao, Lianghui; Fang, Weihai; Golubovic, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    We explore the effects of the peripheral and transmembrane antimicrobial peptides on the lipid bilayer membrane by using the coarse grained Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations. We study peptide/lipid membrane complexes by considering peptides with various structure, hydrophobicity and peptide/lipid interaction strength. The role of lipid/water interaction is also discussed. We discuss a rich variety of membrane morphological changes induced by peptides, such as pore formation, membrane corrugation and Euler buckling. PMID:23579956

  20. Effects of antimicrobial peptide revealed by simulations: translocation, pore formation, membrane corrugation and euler buckling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Licui; Jia, Nana; Gao, Lianghui; Fang, Weihai; Golubovic, Leonardo

    2013-04-11

    We explore the effects of the peripheral and transmembrane antimicrobial peptides on the lipid bilayer membrane by using the coarse grained Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations. We study peptide/lipid membrane complexes by considering peptides with various structure, hydrophobicity and peptide/lipid interaction strength. The role of lipid/water interaction is also discussed. We discuss a rich variety of membrane morphological changes induced by peptides, such as pore formation, membrane corrugation and Euler buckling.

  1. A novel cell-free system reveals a mechanism of circular DNA formation from tandem repeats.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S; Mechali, M

    2001-06-15

    One characteristic of genomic plasticity is the presence of extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA). High levels of eccDNA are associated with genomic instability, exposure to carcinogens and aging. We have recently reported developmentally regulated formation of eccDNA that occurs preferentially in pre-blastula Xenopus laevis embryos. Multimers of tandemly repeated sequences were over-represented in the circle population while dispersed sequences were not detected, indicating that circles were not formed at random from any chromosomal sequence. Here we present detailed mechanistic studies of eccDNA formation in a cell-free system derived from Xenopus egg extracts. We show that naked chromosomal DNA from sperm or somatic tissues serves as a substrate for direct tandem repeat circle formation. Moreover, a recombinant bacterial tandem repeat can generate eccDNA in the extract through a de novo mechanism which is independent of DNA replication. These data suggest that the presence of a high level of any direct tandem repeat can confer on DNA the ability to be converted into circular multimers in the early embryo irrespective of its sequence and that homologous recombination is involved in this process. PMID:11410662

  2. Distinct mechanisms for spiro-carbon formation reveal biosynthetic pathway crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Tsunematsu, Yuta; Ishikawa, Noriyasu; Wakana, Daigo; Goda, Yukihiro; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Moriya, Hisao; Hotta, Kinya; Watanabe, Kenji

    2013-12-01

    Spirotryprostatins, an indole alkaloid class of nonribosomal peptides isolated from Aspergillus fumigatus, are known for their antimitotic activity in tumor cells. Because spirotryprostatins and many other chemically complex spiro-carbon-bearing natural products exhibit useful biological activities, identifying and understanding the mechanism of spiro-carbon biosynthesis is of great interest. Here we report a detailed study of spiro-ring formation in spirotryprostatins from tryprostatins derived from the fumitremorgin biosynthetic pathway, using reactants and products prepared with engineered yeast and fungal strains. Unexpectedly, FqzB, an FAD-dependent monooxygenase from the unrelated fumiquinazoline biosynthetic pathway, catalyzed spiro-carbon formation in spirotryprostatin A via an epoxidation route. Furthermore, FtmG, a cytochrome P450 from the fumitremorgin biosynthetic pathway, was determined to catalyze the spiro-ring formation in spirotryprostatin B. Our results highlight the versatile role of oxygenating enzymes in the biosynthesis of structurally complex natural products and indicate that cross-talk of different biosynthetic pathways allows product diversification in natural product biosynthesis.

  3. Distinct mechanisms for spiro-carbon formation reveal biosynthetic pathway crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Tsunematsu, Yuta; Ishikawa, Noriyasu; Wakana, Daigo; Goda, Yukihiro; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Moriya, Hisao; Hotta, Kinya; Watanabe, Kenji

    2013-12-01

    Spirotryprostatins, an indole alkaloid class of nonribosomal peptides isolated from Aspergillus fumigatus, are known for their antimitotic activity in tumor cells. Because spirotryprostatins and many other chemically complex spiro-carbon-bearing natural products exhibit useful biological activities, identifying and understanding the mechanism of spiro-carbon biosynthesis is of great interest. Here we report a detailed study of spiro-ring formation in spirotryprostatins from tryprostatins derived from the fumitremorgin biosynthetic pathway, using reactants and products prepared with engineered yeast and fungal strains. Unexpectedly, FqzB, an FAD-dependent monooxygenase from the unrelated fumiquinazoline biosynthetic pathway, catalyzed spiro-carbon formation in spirotryprostatin A via an epoxidation route. Furthermore, FtmG, a cytochrome P450 from the fumitremorgin biosynthetic pathway, was determined to catalyze the spiro-ring formation in spirotryprostatin B. Our results highlight the versatile role of oxygenating enzymes in the biosynthesis of structurally complex natural products and indicate that cross-talk of different biosynthetic pathways allows product diversification in natural product biosynthesis. PMID:24121553

  4. Kinetic analysis of electron flux in cytochrome P450 reductases reveals differences in rate-determining steps in plant and mammalian enzymes.

    PubMed

    Whitelaw, Douglas A; Tonkin, Rochelle; Meints, Carla E; Wolthers, Kirsten R

    2015-10-15

    Herein, we compare the kinetic properties of CPR from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATR2), with CPR from Artemisia annua (aaCPR) and human CPR (hCPR). While all three CPR forms elicit comparable rates for cytochrome c(3+) turnover, NADPH reduction of the FAD cofactor is ∼50-fold faster in aaCPR and ATR2 compared to hCPR, with a kobs of ∼500 s(-1) (6 °C). Stopped-flow analysis of the isolated FAD-domains reveals that NADP(+)-FADH2 charge-transfer complex formation is also significantly faster in the plant enzymes, but the rate of its decay is comparable for all three proteins. In hCPR, transfer of a hydride ion from NADPH to FAD is tightly coupled to subsequent FAD to FMN electron transfer, indicating that the former catalytic event is slow relative to the latter. In contrast, interflavin electron transfer is slower than NADPH hydride transfer in aaCPR and ATR2, occurring with an observed rate constant of ∼50 s(-1). Finally, the transfer of electrons from FMN to cytochrome c(3+) is rapid (>10(3) s(-1)) in all three enzymes and does not limit catalytic turnover. In combination, the data reveal differences in rate-determining steps between plant CPR and their mammalian equivalent in mediating the flux of reducing equivalents from NADPH to external electron acceptors. PMID:26361974

  5. Star Formation Rate and Gas Relations in the Arp 299 Merger from the VIXENS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiderman, Amanda; Evans, Neal J.; Gebhardt, Karl; Blanc, Guillermo; Davis, Timothy; Papovich, Casey; van den Bosch, Remco; Iono, Daisuke; Yun, Min S.

    2015-08-01

    We highlight first results from the VIRUS-P Investigation of the eXtreme ENvironments of Starbursts (VIXENS) integral field unit survey. We investigate the relationship between star formation and gas content in late interaction phase merger Arp 299 from VIXENS. By comparing Hα, Paα, and 24μm images to CO(2→1), CO(3→2), HCN(1→0), HCO+(1→0), and HI maps, we explore the relation between the star formation rate and gas surface densities on spatially resolved ~kpc scales. We find that the SFR-gas relations for Arp 299 are discrepant from known extragalactic spatially resolved relations in nearby spiral galaxies and disk-averaged relations in high-z mergers.

  6. Negative ion formation by Rydberg electron transfer: Isotope-dependent rate constants

    SciTech Connect

    Carman, H.S. Jr.; Klots, C.E.; Compton, R.N.

    1991-01-01

    The formation of negative ions during collisions of rubidium atoms in selected ns and nd Rydberg states with carbon disulfide molecules has been studied for a range of effective principal quantum numbers (10 {le} n* {le} 25). For a narrow range of n* near n* = 17, rate constants for CS{sub 2}{sup {minus}} formation are found to depend upon the isotopic composition of the molecule, producing a negative ion isotope ratio (mass 78 to mass 76, amu) up to 10.5 times larger than the natural abundance ratio of CS{sub 2} isotopes in the reagent. The isotope ratio is found to depend strongly upon the initial quantum state of the Rydberg atom and perhaps upon the collision energy and CS{sub 2} temperature. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Bifurcation and neck formation as a precursor to ductile fracture during high rate extension

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, L.B.; Soerensen, N.J.

    1997-12-31

    A block of ductile material, typically a segment of a plate or shell, being deformed homogeneously in simple plane strain extension commonly undergoes a bifurcation in deformation mode to nonuniform straining in the advanced stages of plastic flow. The focus here is on the influence of material inertia on the bifurcation process, particularly on the formation of diffuse necks as precursors to dynamic ductile fracture. The issue is considered from two points of view, first within the context of the theory of bifurcation of rate-independent, incrementally linear materials and then in terms of the complete numerical solution of a boundary value problem for an elastic-viscoplastic material. It is found that inertia favors the formation of relatively short wavelength necks as observed in shaped charge break-up and dynamic fragmentation.

  8. Distribution of star formation rates during the rapid assembly of NGC 1399 as deduced from its globular cluster system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, C.; Hilker, M.; Kroupa, P.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.

    2016-10-01

    Ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) share many properties with globular clusters (GCs) and are found in similar environments. Here, a large sample of UCDs and GCs around NGC 1399, the central giant elliptical of the Fornax galaxy cluster, is used to infer their formation history and also to shed light on the formation of NGC 1399 itself. We assumed that all GCs and UCDs in our sample are the result of star cluster (SC) formation processes and used them as tracers of past star formation activities. After correcting our GC/UCD sample for mass loss, we interpreted their overall mass function to be a superposition of SC populations that formed coevally during different formation epochs. The SC masses of each population were distributed according to the embedded cluster mass function (ECMF), a pure power law with the slope - β. Each ECMF was characterized by a stellar upper mass limit, Mmax, which depended on the star formation rate (SFR). We decomposed the observed GC/UCD mass function into individual SC populations and converted Mmax of each SC population to an SFR. The overall distribution of SFRs reveals under which conditions the GC/UCD sample around NGC 1399 formed. Considering the constraints set by the age of the GCs/UCDs and the present stellar mass of NGC 1399, we found that the formation of the GCs/UCDs can be well explained within our framework with values for β below 2.3. This finding agrees very well with the observation of young SCs where β ≈ 2.0 is usually found. Even though we took into account that some of the most massive objects might not be genuine SCs and applied different corrections for the mass loss, we found that these considerations do not influence much the outcome. We derived the peak SFRs to be between approximately 300 and 3000 M⊙ yr-1, which matches the SFRs observed in massive high-redshift sub-millimeter galaxies and an SFR estimate inferred from NGC 1399 based on the so-called downsizing picture, meaning that more massive

  9. Constraining star formation rates in cool-core brightest cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Rupal; Whelan, John T.; Combes, Françoise

    2015-07-01

    We used broad-band imaging data for 10 cool-core brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and conducted a Bayesian analysis using stellar population synthesis to determine the likely properties of the constituent stellar populations. Determination of ongoing star formation rates (SFRs), in particular, has a direct impact on our understanding of the cooling of the intracluster medium (ICM), star formation and AGN-regulated feedback. Our model consists of an old stellar population and a series of young stellar components. We calculated marginalized posterior probability distributions for various model parameters and obtained 68 per cent plausible intervals from them. The 68 per cent plausible interval on the SFRs is broad, owing to a wide range of models that are capable of fitting the data, which also explains the wide dispersion in the SFRs available in the literature. The ranges of possible SFRs are robust and highlight the strength in such a Bayesian analysis. The SFRs are correlated with the X-ray mass deposition rates (the former are factors of 4-50 lower than the latter), implying a picture where the cooling of the ICM is a contributing factor to star formation in cool-core BCGs. We find that 9 out of 10 BCGs have been experiencing starbursts since 6 Gyr ago. While four out of nine BCGs seem to require continuous SFRs, five out of nine seem to require periodic star formation on intervals ranging from 20 to 200 Myr. This time-scale is similar to the cooling time of the ICM in the central (<5 kpc) regions.

  10. Changes in the halo formation rates due to features in the primordial spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Hazra, Dhiraj Kumar

    2013-03-01

    Features in the primordial scalar power spectrum provide a possible roadway to describe the outliers at the low multipoles in the WMAP data. Apart from the CMB angular power spectrum, these features can also alter the matter power spectrum and, thereby, the formation of the large scale structure. Carrying out a complete numerical analysis, we investigate the effects of primordial features on the formation rates of the halos. We consider a few different inflationary models that lead to features in the scalar power spectrum and an improved fit to the CMB data, and analyze the corresponding imprints on the formation of halos. Performing a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis with the WMAP seven year data and the SDSS halo power spectrum from LRG DR7 for the models of our interest, we arrive at the parameter space of the models allowed by the data. We illustrate that, inflationary potentials, such as the quadratic potential with sinusoidal modulations and the axion monodromy model, which generate certain repeated, oscillatory features in the inflationary perturbation spectrum, do not induce a substantial difference in the number density of halos at their best fit values, when compared with, say, a nearly scale invariant spectrum as is generated by the standard quadratic potential. However, we find that the number density and the formation rates of halos change by about 13–22% for halo masses ranging over 10{sup 4}–10{sup 14} M{sub s}un, for potential parameters that lie within 2-σ around the best fit values arrived at from the aforesaid joint constraints. We briefly discuss the implications of our results.

  11. Monte Carlo simulations of protein amyloid formation reveal origin of sigmoidal aggregation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Linse, Björn; Linse, Sara

    2011-07-01

    Severe conditions and lack of cure for many amyloid diseases make it highly desired to understand the underlying principles of formation of fibrillar aggregates (amyloid). Here, amyloid formation from peptides was studied using Monte Carlo simulations. Systems of 20, 50, 100, 200 or 500 hexapeptides were simulated. Association kinetics were modeled equal for fibrillar and other (inter- and intra-peptide) contacts and assumed to be faster the lower the effective contact order, which represents the distance in space. Attempts to form contacts were thus accepted with higher probability the lower the effective contact order, whereby formation of new contacts next to preexisting ones is favored by shorter physical separation. Kinetic discrimination was invoked by using two different life-times for formed contacts. Contacts within amyloid fibrils were assumed to have on average longer life-time than other contacts. We find that the model produces fibrillation kinetics with a distinct lag phase, and that the fibrillar contacts need to dissociate on average 5-20 times slower than all other contacts for the fibrillar structure to dominate at equilibrium. Analysis of the species distribution along the aggregation process shows that no other intermediate is ever more populated than the dimer. Instead of a single nucleation event there is a concomitant increase in average aggregate size over the whole system, and the occurrence of multiple parallel processes makes the process more reproducible the larger the simulated system. The sigmoidal shape of the aggregation curves arises from cooperativity among multiple interactions within each pair of peptides in a fibril. A governing factor is the increasing probability as the aggregation process proceeds of neighboring reinforcing contacts. The results explain the very strong bias towards cross β-sheet fibrils in which the possibilities for cooperativity among interactions involving neighboring residues and the repetitive use of

  12. Mercury's Hollows: Depths, Estimation of Formation Rates, and the Nature of the Bright Haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewett, D. T.; Stadermann, A. C.; Chabot, N. L.; Denevi, B. W.; Ernst, C. M.; Xiao, Z.; Solomon, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Mercury's hollows are shallow depressions, often with high-reflectance interiors and haloes. The fresh appearance of hollows indicates that they are relatively young features. Their morphology is suggestive of formation via sublimation-like loss of a volatile-bearing phase through solar heating, destruction by UV photolysis, contact with molten rock, or bombardment by micrometeoroids and/or ions. Hollows are found within the low-reflectance material (LRM) color unit. Following an examination of all MESSENGER images with pixel sizes <20 m and incidence angles <85°, shadow-length measurements made on 905 images yielded the depths of 2608 hollows. The mean depth is 24 ± 16 m. The narrow range of depths, despite formation within LRM units that are of much greater and more variable thickness, could result from development of a protective lag as the volatile-bearing phase is lost. The rate at which hollows form may be estimated as follows. The size-frequency distribution of Mercury rayed craters >4 km in diameter gives absolute model ages of 110 to 689 Ma, depending on the crater production model. The 41-km-diameter rayed crater Balanchine has a density of superposed craters similar to the average for all rayed craters, so we take Balanchine's age to be the population average. Hollows on Balanchine's floor are ~300 m wide. The average rate of hollows formation by horizontal scarp retreat for a 110 Ma model age would be 1 cm per 3700 Earth years. If Balanchine formed 689 Ma ago, then the average growth rate would be 1 cm per 23,000 yr. We also consider the mechanisms by which hollows form bright haloes. Calculations show that comet-style lofting of dust by sublimating gas is not important given Mercury's high surface gravitational acceleration. Instead, the bright haloes may form by condensation of sublimated material or by physical modification or chemical alteration of the surface by re-deposited sublimation products.

  13. Using Herschel Far-Infrared Photometry to Constrain Star Formation Rates in CLASH Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Rebecca L.; Postman, Marc; Fogarty, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) program obtained broadband images of 25 massive galaxy clusters in 16 passbands from the UV to the near-IR. The data was taken with the Wide-field Camera 3 (WFC3), and the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These 25 clusters have also been observed in the mid-IR by Spitzer IRAC, the far-IR by the Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE, and in the x-ray by the Chandra and XMM observatories. We focused on the two brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the survey (MACS1931.8-2653 and RXJ1532.9+3021) that have reddening-corrected UV-derived star formation rates (SFRs) > 100 M⊙ yr-1 as measured by Fogarty et al (2015). The inclusion of Herschel data provides unique constraints on dust content and independent estimates of the star formation rates in these interesting galaxies. We performed photometry on the five Herschel bands (100-500μm), and removed any contamination from other cluster members. We fit a UV-FIR SED to each galaxy to measure the bolometric dust luminosity (Lbol), which we use to derive the FIR obscured SFR. We calculate the sum of the measured UV unobscured SFR from the HST photometry and the FIR obscured SFR from the Herschel photometry to get a total SFR for these two BCGs. We compared this to the reddening-corrected SFRs and found they were in agreement within error. This confirms that the Kennicutt and Calzetti methods for calculating star formation rates are both applicable for these highly star-forming massive cluster galaxies.

  14. Resolved Gas Kinematics in a Sample of Low-Redshift High Star-Formation Rate Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varidel, Mathew; Pracy, Michael; Croom, Scott; Owers, Matt S.; Sadler, Elaine

    2016-03-01

    We have used integral field spectroscopy of a sample of six nearby (z 0.01-0.04) high star-formation rate (SFR ˜ 10-40 M_⊙ yr^{-1}) galaxies to investigate the relationship between local velocity dispersion and star-formation rate on sub-galactic scales. The low-redshift mitigates, to some extent, the effect of beam smearing which artificially inflates the measured dispersion as it combines regions with different line-of-sight velocities into a single spatial pixel. We compare the parametric maps of the velocity dispersion with the Hα flux (a proxy for local star-formation rate), and the velocity gradient (a proxy for the local effect of beam smearing). We find, even for these very nearby galaxies, the Hα velocity dispersion correlates more strongly with velocity gradient than with Hα flux-implying that beam smearing is still having a significant effect on the velocity dispersion measurements. We obtain a first-order non parametric correction for the unweighted and flux weighted mean velocity dispersion by fitting a 2D linear regression model to the spaxel-by-spaxel data where the velocity gradient and the Hα flux are the independent variables and the velocity dispersion is the dependent variable; and then extrapolating to zero velocity gradient. The corrected velocity dispersions are a factor of 1.3-4.5 and 1.3-2.7 lower than the uncorrected flux-weighted and unweighted mean line-of-sight velocity dispersion values, respectively. These corrections are larger than has been previously cited using disc models of the velocity and velocity dispersion field to correct for beam smearing. The corrected flux-weighted velocity dispersion values are σ m 20-50 km s-1.

  15. Impacts of warming revealed by linking resource growth rates with consumer functional responses.

    PubMed

    West, Derek C; Post, David M

    2016-05-01

    Warming global temperatures are driving changes in species distributions, growth and timing, but much uncertainty remains regarding how climate change will alter species interactions. Consumer-Resource interactions in particular can be strongly impacted by changes to the relative performance of interacting species. While consumers generally gain an advantage over their resources with increasing temperatures, nonlinearities can change this relation near temperature extremes. We use an experimental approach to determine how temperature changes between 5 and 30 °C will alter the growth of the algae Scenedesmus obliquus and the functional responses of the small-bodied Daphnia ambigua and the larger Daphnia pulicaria. The impact of warming generally followed expectations, making both Daphnia species more effective grazers, with the increase in feeding rates outpacing the increases in algal growth rate. At the extremes of our temperature range, however, warming resulted in a decrease in Daphnia grazing effectiveness. Between 25 and 30 °C, both species of Daphnia experienced a precipitous drop in feeding rates, while algal growth rates remained high, increasing the likelihood of algal blooms in warming summer temperatures. Daphnia pulicaria performed significantly better at cold temperatures than D. ambigua, but by 20 °C, there was no significant difference between the two species, and at 25 °C, D. ambigua outperformed D. pulicaria. Warming summer temperatures will favour the smaller D. ambigua, but only over a narrow temperature range, and warming beyond 25 °C could open D. ambigua to invasion from tropical species. By fitting our results to temperature-dependent functions, we develop a temperature- and density-dependent model, which produces a metric of grazing effectiveness, quantifying the grazer density necessary to halt algal growth. This approach should prove useful for tracking the transient dynamics of other density-dependent consumer

  16. National Lupus Hospitalization Trends Reveal Rising Rates of Herpes Zoster and Declines in Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Sara G.; Schmajuk, Gabriela; Trupin, Laura; Gensler, Lianne; Katz, Patricia P.; Yelin, Edward H.; Gansky, Stuart A.; Yazdany, Jinoos

    2016-01-01

    Objective Infection is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Therapeutic practices have evolved over the past 15 years, but effects on infectious complications of SLE are unknown. We evaluated trends in hospitalizations for severe and opportunistic infections in a population-based SLE study. Methods Data derive from the 2000 to 2011 United States National Inpatient Sample, including individuals who met a validated administrative definition of SLE. Primary outcomes were diagnoses of bacteremia, pneumonia, opportunistic fungal infection, herpes zoster, cytomegalovirus, or pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP). We used Poisson regression to determine whether infection rates were changing in SLE hospitalizations and used predictive marginals to generate annual adjusted rates of specific infections. Results We identified 361,337 SLE hospitalizations from 2000 to 2011 meeting study inclusion criteria. Compared to non-SLE hospitalizations, SLE patients were younger (51 vs. 62 years), predominantly female (89% vs. 54%), and more likely to be racial/ethnic minorities. SLE diagnosis was significantly associated with all measured severe and opportunistic infections. From 2000 to 2011, adjusted SLE hospitalization rates for herpes zoster increased more than non-SLE rates: 54 to 79 per 10,000 SLE hospitalizations compared with 24 to 29 per 10,000 non-SLE hospitalizations. Conversely, SLE hospitalizations for PCP disproportionately decreased: 5.1 to 2.5 per 10,000 SLE hospitalizations compared with 0.9 to 1.3 per 10,000 non-SLE hospitalizations. Conclusions Among patients with SLE, herpes zoster hospitalizations are rising while PCP hospitalizations are declining. These trends likely reflect evolving SLE treatment strategies. Further research is needed to identify patients at greatest risk for infectious complications. PMID:26731012

  17. Vacuum ultraviolet photolysis of hydrogenated amorphous carbons . I. Interstellar H2 and CH4 formation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alata, I.; Cruz-Diaz, G. A.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Dartois, E.

    2014-09-01

    Context. The interstellar hydrogenated amorphous carbons (HAC or a-C:H) observed in the diffuse medium are expected to disappear in a few million years, according to the destruction time scale from laboratory measurements. The existence of a-C:H results from the equilibrium between photodesorption, radiolysis, hydrogenation and resilience of the carbonaceous network. During this processing, many species are therefore injected into the gas phase, in particular H2, but also small organic molecules, radicals or fragments. Aims: We perform experiments on interstellar a-C:H analogs to quantify the release of these species in the interstellar medium. Methods: The vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photolysis of interstellar hydrogenated amorphous carbon analogs was performed at low (10 K) to ambient temperature, coupled to mass-spectrometry detection and temperature-programed desorption. Using deuterium isotopic substitution, the species produced were unambiguously separated from background contributions. Results: The VUV photolysis of hydrogenated amorphous carbons leads to the efficient production of H2 molecules, but also to small hydrocarbons. Conclusions: These species are formed predominantly in the bulk of the a-C:H analog carbonaceous network, in addition to the surface formation. Compared with species made by the recombination of H atoms and physisorbed on surfaces, they diffuse out at higher temperatures. In addition to the efficient production rate, it provides a significant formation route in environments where the short residence time scale for H atoms inhibits H2 formation on the surface, such as PDRs. The photolytic bulk production of H2 with carbonaceous hydrogenated amorphous carbon dust grains can provide a very large portion of the contribution to the H2 molecule formation. These dust grains also release small hydrocarbons (such as CH4) into the diffuse interstellar medium, which contribute to the formation of small carbonaceous radicals after being dissociated

  18. Comparative genomics reveals a constant rate of origination and convergent acquisition of functional retrogenes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yongsheng; Casola, Claudio; Feschotte, Cédric; Betrán, Esther

    2007-01-01

    Background Processed copies of genes (retrogenes) are duplicate genes that originated through the reverse-transcription of a host transcript and insertion in the genome. This type of gene duplication, as any other, could be a source of new genes and functions. Using whole genome sequence data for 12 Drosophila species, we dated the origin of 94 retroposition events that gave rise to candidate functional genes in D. melanogaster. Results Based on this analysis, we infer that functional retrogenes have emerged at a fairly constant rate of 0.5 genes per million years per lineage over the last approximately 63 million years of Drosophila evolution. The number of functional retrogenes and the rate at which they are recruited in the D. melanogaster lineage are of the same order of magnitude as those estimated in the human lineage, despite the higher deletion bias in the Drosophila genome. However, unlike primates, the rate of retroposition in Drosophila seems to be fairly constant and no burst of retroposition can be inferred from our analyses. In addition, our data also support an important role for retrogenes as a source of lineage-specific male functions, in agreement with previous hypotheses. Finally, we identified three cases of functional retrogenes in D. melanogaster that have been independently retroposed and recruited in parallel as new genes in other Drosophila lineages. Conclusion Together, these results indicate that retroposition is a persistent mechanism and a recurrent pathway for the emergence of new genes in Drosophila. PMID:17233920

  19. Strain-rate Dependence of Elastic Modulus Reveals Silver Nanoparticle Induced Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Caporizzo, Matthew Alexander; Roco, Charles M.; Ferrer, Maria Carme Coll; Grady, Martha E.; Parrish, Emmabeth; Eckmann, David M.; Composto, Russell John

    2015-01-01

    Force-displacement measurements are taken at different rates with an atomic force microscope to assess the correlation between cell health and cell viscoelasticity in THP-1 cells that have been treated with a novel drug carrier. A variable indentation-rate viscoelastic analysis, VIVA, is employed to identify the relaxation time of the cells that are known to exhibit a frequency dependent stiffness. The VIVA agrees with a fluorescent viability assay. This indicates that dextran-lysozyme drug carriers are biocompatible and deliver concentrated toxic material (rhodamine or silver nanoparticles) to the cytoplasm of THP-1 cells. By modelling the frequency dependence of the elastic modulus, the VIVA provides three metrics of cytoplasmic viscoelasticity: a low frequency modulus, a high frequency modulus and viscosity. The signature of cytotoxicity by rhodamine or silver exposure is a frequency independent twofold increase in the elastic modulus and cytoplasmic viscosity, while the cytoskeletal relaxation time remains unchanged. This is consistent with the known toxic mechanism of silver nanoparticles, where metabolic stress causes an increase in the rigidity of the cytoplasm. A variable indentation-rate viscoelastic analysis is presented as a straightforward method to promote the self-consistent comparison between cells. This is paramount to the development of early diagnosis and treatment of disease. PMID:26834855

  20. Changes in the spectrum and rates of extracellular enzyme activities in seawater following aggregate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziervogel, K.; Steen, A. D.; Arnosti, C.

    2009-12-01

    Marine snow aggregates are heavily colonized by heterotrophic microorganisms that express high levels of hydrolytic activities, making aggregates hotspots for carbon remineralization in the ocean. To assess how aggregate formation influences the ability of seawater microbial communities to access organic carbon, we compared hydrolysis rates of six polysaccharides in coastal seawater after aggregates had been formed (via incubation on a roller table) with hydrolysis rates in seawater from the same site that had not incubated on a roller table (referred to as whole seawater). Hydrolysis rates in the aggregates themselves were up to three orders of magnitude higher on a volume basis than in whole seawater. The enhancement of enzyme activity in aggregates relative to whole seawater differed by substrate, suggesting that the enhancement was under cellular control, rather than due to factors such as lysis or grazing. A comparison of hydrolysis rates in whole seawater with those in aggregate-free seawater, i.e. the fraction of water from the roller bottles that did not contain aggregates, demonstrated a nuanced microbial response to aggregate formation. Activities of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were higher than in whole seawater, while activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinogalactan hydrolyzing enzymes were lower than in whole seawater. These data suggest that aggregate formation enhanced production of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes, and the enhancement also affected the surrounding seawater. Decreased activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinoglactan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawater relative to whole seawater are likely due to shifts in enzyme production by the aggregate-associated community, coupled with the effects of enzyme degradation. Enhanced activities of laminarin- and xylan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were due at least in part to cell-free enzymes. Measurements of enzyme lifetime

  1. Changes in the spectrum and rates of extracellular enzyme activities in seawater following aggregate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziervogel, K.; Steen, A. D.; Arnosti, C.

    2010-03-01

    Marine snow aggregates are heavily colonized by heterotrophic microorganisms that express high levels of hydrolytic activities, making aggregates hotspots for carbon remineralization in the ocean. To assess how aggregate formation influences the ability of seawater microbial communities to access organic carbon, we compared hydrolysis rates of six polysaccharides in coastal seawater after aggregates had been formed (via incubation on a roller table) with hydrolysis rates in seawater from the same site that had not incubated on a roller table (referred to as whole seawater). Hydrolysis rates in the aggregates themselves were up to three orders of magnitude higher on a volume basis than in whole seawater. The enhancement of enzyme activity in aggregates relative to whole seawater differed by substrate, suggesting that the enhancement was under cellular control, rather than due to factors such as lysis or grazing. A comparison of hydrolysis rates in whole seawater with those in aggregate-free seawater, i.e. the fraction of water from the roller bottles that did not contain aggregates, demonstrated a nuanced microbial response to aggregate formation. Activities of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were higher than in whole seawater, while activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinogalactan hydrolyzing enzymes were lower than in whole seawater. These data suggest that aggregate formation enhanced production of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes, and the enhancement also affected the surrounding seawater. Decreased activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinoglactan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawaters relative to whole seawater are likely due to shifts in enzyme production by the aggregate-associated community, coupled with the effects of enzyme degradation. Enhanced activities of laminarin- and xylan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were due at least in part to cell-free enzymes. Measurements of enzyme

  2. Reaction Rates for the Formation of Deuterium Tritide from Deuterium and Tritium

    SciTech Connect

    McConville, G. T.; Menke, D. A.; Ellefson, R. E.

    1985-04-01

    The rates of formation of DT in a mixture of D2 and T2 have been measured as a function of initial T2 concentration, pressure, temperature,and methane concentration in a stainless steel reaction container which had been treated to inhibit protium ingrowth. An attempt has been made to explain the experimental resuts on the basis of ion-molecule chain reactions. Some of the observations are consistent with a gas-phase ion, ground-state molecule reaction, but some of the more interesting observations require more complicated models. The addition of excited state molecules or heterogeneous catalytic effects are possibilities that will need further experiments for confirmation.

  3. Viscous roots of active seismogenic faults revealed by geologic slip rate variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, P. A.; Scholz, C. H.; Roberts, G.; Faure Walker, J.; Steer, P.

    2013-12-01

    Viscous flow at depth contributes to elastic strain accumulation along seismogenic faults during both post-seismic and inter-seismic phases of the earthquake cycle. Evaluating the importance of this contribution is hampered by uncertainties regarding (i) the extent to which viscous deformation occurs in shear zones or by distributed flow within the crust and/or upper mantle, and (ii) the value of the exponent, n, in the flow law that relates strain rate to applied stress. Geodetic data, rock deformation experiments, and field observations of exhumed (inactive) faults provide strong evidence for non-linear viscous flow but may not fully capture the long term, in situ behaviour of active fault zones. Here we demonstrate that strain rates derived from Holocene offsets on seismogenic normal faults in the actively uplifting and extending central and southern Italian Apennines may be used to address this issue. The measured strain rates, averaged over a time scale of 104 years, exhibit a well-defined power-law dependence on topographic elevation with a power-law exponent ≈ 3.0 (2.7 - 3.4 at 95% CI; 2.3 - 4.0 at 99% CI). Contemporary seismicity indicates that the upper crust in this area is at the threshold for frictional failure within an extensional stress field and therefore differential stress is directly proportional to elevation. Our data thus imply a relationship between strain rate and stress that is consistent with non-linear viscous flow, with n ≈ 3, but because the measurements are derived from slip along major crustal faults they do not represent deformation of a continuum. We know that, down-dip of the seismogenic part of active faults, cataclasis, hydrous alteration, and shear heating all contribute to grain size reduction and material weakening. These processes initiate localisation at the frictional-viscous transition and the development of mylonitic shear zones within the viscous regime. Furthermore, in quartzo-feldspathic crust, mylonites form a

  4. Diversity in cell motility reveals the dynamic nature of the formation of zebrafish taste sensory organs.

    PubMed

    Soulika, Marina; Kaushik, Anna-Lila; Mathieu, Benjamin; Lourenço, Raquel; Komisarczuk, Anna Z; Romano, Sebastian Alejo; Jouary, Adrien; Lardennois, Alicia; Tissot, Nicolas; Okada, Shinji; Abe, Keiko; Becker, Thomas S; Kapsimali, Marika

    2016-06-01

    Taste buds are sensory organs in jawed vertebrates, composed of distinct cell types that detect and transduce specific taste qualities. Taste bud cells differentiate from oropharyngeal epithelial progenitors, which are localized mainly in proximity to the forming organs. Despite recent progress in elucidating the molecular interactions required for taste bud cell development and function, the cell behavior underlying the organ assembly is poorly defined. Here, we used time-lapse imaging to observe the formation of taste buds in live zebrafish larvae. We found that tg(fgf8a.dr17)-expressing cells form taste buds and get rearranged within the forming organs. In addition, differentiating cells move from the epithelium to the forming organs and can be displaced between developing organs. During organ formation, tg(fgf8a.dr17) and type II taste bud cells are displaced in random, directed or confined mode relative to the taste bud they join or by which they are maintained. Finally, ascl1a activity in the 5-HT/type III cell is required to direct and maintain tg(fgf8a.dr17)-expressing cells into the taste bud. We propose that diversity in displacement modes of differentiating cells acts as a key mechanism for the highly dynamic process of taste bud assembly.

  5. Mechanisms of endoderm formation in a cartilaginous fish reveal ancestral and homoplastic traits in jawed vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Godard, Benoit G.; Coolen, Marion; Le Panse, Sophie; Gombault, Aurélie; Ferreiro-Galve, Susana; Laguerre, Laurent; Lagadec, Ronan; Wincker, Patrick; Poulain, Julie; Da Silva, Corinne; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Carre, Wilfrid; Boutet, Agnès; Mazan, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to gain insight into the impact of yolk increase on endoderm development, we have analyzed the mechanisms of endoderm formation in the catshark S. canicula, a species exhibiting telolecithal eggs and a distinct yolk sac. We show that in this species, endoderm markers are expressed in two distinct tissues, the deep mesenchyme, a mesenchymal population of deep blastomeres lying beneath the epithelial-like superficial layer, already specified at early blastula stages, and the involuting mesendoderm layer, which appears at the blastoderm posterior margin at the onset of gastrulation. Formation of the deep mesenchyme involves cell internalizations from the superficial layer prior to gastrulation, by a movement suggestive of ingressions. These cell movements were observed not only at the posterior margin, where massive internalizations take place prior to the start of involution, but also in the center of the blastoderm, where internalizations of single cells prevail. Like the adjacent involuting mesendoderm, the posterior deep mesenchyme expresses anterior mesendoderm markers under the control of Nodal/activin signaling. Comparisons across vertebrates support the conclusion that endoderm is specified in two distinct temporal phases in the catshark as in all major osteichthyan lineages, in line with an ancient origin of a biphasic mode of endoderm specification in gnathostomes. They also highlight unexpected similarities with amniotes, such as the occurrence of cell ingressions from the superficial layer prior to gastrulation. These similarities may correspond to homoplastic traits fixed separately in amniotes and chondrichthyans and related to the increase in egg yolk mass. PMID:25361580

  6. Diversity in cell motility reveals the dynamic nature of the formation of zebrafish taste sensory organs.

    PubMed

    Soulika, Marina; Kaushik, Anna-Lila; Mathieu, Benjamin; Lourenço, Raquel; Komisarczuk, Anna Z; Romano, Sebastian Alejo; Jouary, Adrien; Lardennois, Alicia; Tissot, Nicolas; Okada, Shinji; Abe, Keiko; Becker, Thomas S; Kapsimali, Marika

    2016-06-01

    Taste buds are sensory organs in jawed vertebrates, composed of distinct cell types that detect and transduce specific taste qualities. Taste bud cells differentiate from oropharyngeal epithelial progenitors, which are localized mainly in proximity to the forming organs. Despite recent progress in elucidating the molecular interactions required for taste bud cell development and function, the cell behavior underlying the organ assembly is poorly defined. Here, we used time-lapse imaging to observe the formation of taste buds in live zebrafish larvae. We found that tg(fgf8a.dr17)-expressing cells form taste buds and get rearranged within the forming organs. In addition, differentiating cells move from the epithelium to the forming organs and can be displaced between developing organs. During organ formation, tg(fgf8a.dr17) and type II taste bud cells are displaced in random, directed or confined mode relative to the taste bud they join or by which they are maintained. Finally, ascl1a activity in the 5-HT/type III cell is required to direct and maintain tg(fgf8a.dr17)-expressing cells into the taste bud. We propose that diversity in displacement modes of differentiating cells acts as a key mechanism for the highly dynamic process of taste bud assembly. PMID:27122167

  7. Revealing all: misleading self-disclosure rates in laboratory-based online research.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Diana E; Graff, Martin G; Davies, Joanne

    2013-09-01

    Laboratory-based experiments in online self-disclosure research may be inadvertently compromising the accuracy of research findings by influencing some of the factors known to affect self-disclosure behavior. Disclosure-orientated interviews conducted with 42 participants in the laboratory and in nonlaboratory settings revealed significantly greater breadth of self-disclosure in laboratory interviews, with message length and intimacy of content also strongly related. These findings suggest that a contrived online setting with a researcher presence may stimulate motivation for greater self-disclosure than would occur naturally in an online environment of an individual's choice. The implications of these findings are that researchers should consider the importance of experimental context and motivation in self-disclosure research.

  8. Metabolic rate throughout the annual cycle reveals the demands of an Arctic existence in great cormorants.

    PubMed

    White, Craig R; Grémillet, David; Green, Jonathan A; Martin, Graham R; Butler, Patrick J

    2011-02-01

    Aquatic endotherms living in polar regions are faced with a multitude of challenges, including low air and water temperatures and low illumination, especially in winter. Like other endotherms from cold environments, Great Cormorants (Phalacrocorax carbo) living in Arctic waters were hypothesized to respond to these challenges through a combination of high daily rate of energy expenditure (DEE) and high food requirements, which are met by a high rate of catch per unit effort (CPUE). CPUE has previously been shown in Great Cormorants to be the highest of any diving bird. In the present study, we tested this hypothesis by making the first measurements of DEE and foraging activity of Arctic-dwelling Great Cormorants throughout the annual cycle. We demonstrate that, in fact, Great Cormorants have surprisingly low rates of DEE. This low DEE is attributed primarily to very low levels of foraging activity, particularly during winter, when the cormorants spent only 2% of their day submerged. Such a low level of foraging activity can only be sustained through consistently high foraging performance. We demonstrate that Great Cormorants have one of the highest recorded CPUEs for a diving predator; 18.6 g per minute submerged (95% prediction interval 13.0-24.2 g/min) during winter. Temporal variation in CPUE was investigated, and highest CPUE was associated with long days and shallow diving depths. The effect of day length is attributed to seasonal variation in prey abundance. Shallow diving leads to high CPUE because less time is spent swimming between the surface and the benthic zone where foraging occurs. Our study demonstrates the importance of obtaining accurate measurements of physiology and behavior from free-living animals when attempting to understand their ecology. PMID:21618926

  9. A New DTA Method for Measuring Critical Cooling Rate for Glass Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chandra S.; Reis, Signo T.; Brow, Richard K.; Holand, Wolfram; Rheinberger, Volker

    2004-01-01

    A new differential thermal analysis (DTA) experimental method has been developed to determine the critical cooling rate for glass formation, R(sub c). The method, which is found especially suitable for melts that, upon cooling, have a small heat of crystallization or a very slow crystallization rate, has been verified using a 38Na2O-62SiO2 (mol%) melt with a known R(sub c) (-approx. 19 C/min), then used to determine R(sub c) for two complex lithium silicate glass forming melts. The new method is rapid, easy to conduct and yields values for R(sub c) that are in excellent agreement with the R(sub c)-values measured by standard DTA techniques.

  10. Gas-Phase Formation Rates of Nitric Acid and Its Isomers Under Urban Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okumura, M.; Mollner, A. K.; Fry, J. L.; Feng, L.

    2005-01-01

    Ozone formation in urban smog is controlled by a complex set of reactions which includes radical production from photochemical processes, catalytic cycles which convert NO to NO2, and termination steps that tie up reactive intermediates in long-lived reservoirs. The reaction OH + NO2 + M -4 HONO2 + M (la) is a key termination step because it transforms two short-lived reactive intermediates, OH and NO2, into relatively long-lived nitric acid. Under certain conditions (low VOC/NOx), ozone production in polluted urban airsheds can be highly sensitive to this reaction, but the rate parameters are not well constrained. This report summarizes the results of new laboratory studies of the OH + NO2 + M reaction including direct determination of the overall rate constant and branching ratio for the two reaction channels under atmospherically relevant conditions.

  11. Timing of European fluvial terrace formation and incision rates constrained by cosmogenic nuclide dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, Mirjam; Ehlers, Todd A.; Stor, Tomas; Torrent, Jose; Lobato, Leonardo; Christl, Marcus; Vockenhuber, Christof

    2016-10-01

    Age constraints of late Cenozoic fluvial terraces are important for addressing surface process questions related to the incision rates of rivers, or tectonic and climate controls on denudation and sedimentation. Unfortunately, absolute age constraints of fluvial terraces are not always possible, and many previous studies have often dated terraces with relative age constraints that do not allow for robust interpretations of incision rates and timing of terrace formation. However, in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides allow absolute age determination, and hence incision rates, of fluvial deposits back to 5 Ma. Here we present, cosmogenic depth profile dating and isochron burial dating of four different river systems in Europe spanning 12° of latitude. We do this to determine river incision rates and spatial variations in the timing of terrace formation. Isochron burial age constraints of four selected terraces from the Vltava river (Czech Republic) range between 1.00 ± 0.21 to 1.99 ± 0.45Ma. An isochron burial age derived for the Allier river (Central France) is 2.00 ± 0.17Ma. Five terrace levels from the Esla river (NW Spain) were dated between 0.08 + 0.04 / - 0.01Ma and 0.59 + 0.13 / - 0.20Ma with depth profile dating. The latter age agrees with an isochron burial age of 0.52 ± 0.20Ma. Two terrace levels from the Guadalquivir river (SW Spain) were dated by depth profile dating to 0.09 + 0.03 / - 0.02Ma and 0.09 + 0.04 / - 0.03Ma. The one terrace level from the Guadalquivir river dated by isochron burial dating resulted in an age of 1.79 ± 0.18Ma. Results indicate that the cosmogenic nuclide-based ages are generally older than ages derived from previous relative age constraints leading to a factor 2-3 lower incision rates than previous work. Furthermore, the timing of terrace formation over this latitudinal range is somewhat obscured by uncertainties associated with dating older terraces and not clearly synchronous with global climate variations.

  12. Comparative analyses of evolutionary rates reveal different pathways to encephalization in bats, carnivorans, and primates

    PubMed Central

    Smaers, Jeroen B.; Dechmann, Dina K. N.; Goswami, Anjali; Soligo, Christophe; Safi, Kamran

    2012-01-01

    Variation in relative brain size is commonly interpreted as the result of selection on neuronal capacity. However, this approach ignores that relative brain size is also linked to another highly adaptive variable: body size. Considering that one-way tradeoff mechanisms are unlikely to provide satisfactory evolutionary explanations, we introduce an analytical framework that describes and quantifies all possible evolutionary scenarios between two traits. To investigate the effects of body mass changes on the interpretation of relative brain size evolution, we analyze three mammalian orders that are expected to be subject to different selective pressures on body size due to differences in locomotor adaptation: bats (powered flight), primates (primarily arboreal), and carnivorans (primarily terrestrial). We quantify rates of brain and body mass changes along individual branches of phylogenetic trees using an adaptive peak model of evolution. We find that the magnitude and variance of the level of integration of brain and body mass rates, and the subsequent relative influence of either brain or body size evolution on the brain–body relationship, differ significantly between orders and subgroups within orders. Importantly, we find that variation in brain–body relationships was driven primarily by variability in body mass. Our approach allows a more detailed interpretation of correlated trait evolution and variation in the underlying evolutionary pathways. Results demonstrate that a principal focus on interpreting relative brain size evolution as selection on neuronal capacity confounds the effects of body mass changes, thereby hiding important aspects that may contribute to explaining animal diversity. PMID:23071335

  13. Determination of pre-steady-state rate constants on the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex reveals that loop movement controls the rate-limiting step.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Anand; Nemeria, Natalia S; Chakraborty, Sumit; Kakalis, Lazaros; Jordan, Frank

    2012-11-14

    Spectroscopic identification and characterization of covalent and noncovalent intermediates on large enzyme complexes is an exciting and challenging area of modern enzymology. The Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHc), consisting of multiple copies of enzymic components and coenzymes, performs the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA and is central to carbon metabolism linking glycolysis to the Krebs cycle. On the basis of earlier studies, we hypothesized that the dynamic regions of the E1p component, which undergo a disorder-order transition upon substrate binding to thiamin diphosphate (ThDP), play a critical role in modulation of the catalytic cycle of PDHc. To test our hypothesis, we kinetically characterized ThDP-bound covalent intermediates on the E1p component, and the lipoamide-bound covalent intermediate on the E2p component in PDHc and in its variants with disrupted active-site loops. Our results suggest that formation of the first covalent predecarboxylation intermediate, C2α-lactylthiamin diphosphate (LThDP), is rate limiting for the series of steps culminating in acetyl-CoA formation. Substitutions in the active center loops produced variants with up to 900-fold lower rates of formation of the LThDP, demonstrating that these perturbations directly affected covalent catalysis. This rate was rescued by up to 5-fold upon assembly to PDHc of the E401K variant. The E1p loop dynamics control covalent catalysis with ThDP and are modulated by PDHc assembly, presumably by selection of catalytically competent loop conformations. This mechanism could be a general feature of 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes because such interfacial dynamic regions are highly conserved.

  14. A different path: revealing the function of staphylococcal proteins in biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Atkin, Kate E; MacDonald, Sandy J; Brentnall, Andrew S; Potts, Jennifer R; Thomas, Gavin H

    2014-05-21

    Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis cause dangerous and difficult to treat medical device-related infections through their ability to form biofilms. Extracellular poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) facilitates biofilm formation and is a vaccination target, yet details of its biosynthesis by the icaADBC gene products is limited. IcaC is the proposed transporter for PNAG export, however a comparison of the Ica proteins to homologous exo-polysaccharide synthases suggests that the common IcaAD protein components both synthesise and transport the PNAG. The limited distribution of icaC to the Staphylococcaceae and its membership of a family of membrane-bound acyltransferases, leads us to suggest that IcaC is responsible for the known O-succinylation of PNAG that occurs in staphylococci, identifying a potentially new therapeutic target specific for these bacteria. PMID:24735724

  15. Transcriptional profiling reveals regulated genes in the hippocampus during memory formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, Christine P.; Jensen, Roderick V.; Ochiishi, Tomoyo; Eisenstein, Ingrid; Zhao, Mingrui; Shors, Tracey; Kosik, Kenneth S.

    2002-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling (TP) offers a powerful approach to identify genes activated during memory formation and, by inference, the molecular pathways involved. Trace eyeblink conditioning is well suited for the study of regional gene expression because it requires the hippocampus, whereas the highly parallel task, delay conditioning, does not. First, we determined when gene expression was most regulated during trace conditioning. Rats were exposed to 200 trials per day of paired and unpaired stimuli each day for 4 days. Changes in gene expression were most apparent 24 h after exposure to 200 trials. Therefore, we profiled gene expression in the hippocampus 24 h after 200 trials of trace eyeblink conditioning, on multiple arrays using additional animals. Of 1,186 genes on the filter array, seven genes met the statistical criteria and were also validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. These genes were growth hormone (GH), c-kit receptor tyrosine kinase (c-kit), glutamate receptor, metabotropic 5 (mGluR5), nerve growth factor-beta (NGF-beta), Jun oncogene (c-Jun), transmembrane receptor Unc5H1 (UNC5H1), and transmembrane receptor Unc5H2 (UNC5H2). All these genes, except for GH, were downregulated in response to trace conditioning. GH was upregulated; therefore, we also validated the downregulation of the GH inhibitor, somatostatin (SST), even though it just failed to meet criteria on the arrays. By during situ hybridization, GH was expressed throughout the cell layers of the hippocampus in response to trace conditioning. None of the genes regulated in trace eyeblink conditioning were similarly affected by delay conditioning, a task that does not require the hippocampus. These findings demonstrate that transcriptional profiling can exhibit a repertoire of genes sensitive to the formation of hippocampal-dependent associative memories.

  16. Localized Upper Tropospheric Warming During Tropical Depression and Storm Formation Revealed by the NOAA-15 AMSU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Roy W.; Braswell, William D.

    1999-01-01

    The warm core of hurricanes as measured by microwave temperature sounders has been related to various azimuthally averaged measures of hurricane strength by several researchers Unfortunately, the use of these instruments (e.g. the Microwave Sounding Units, MSU) for the routine monitoring of tropical cyclone genesis and intensity has been hampered by poor resolution. The recent launch of the NOAA-15 AMSU represents a significant advance in our ability to monitor subtle atmospheric temperature variations (0.1-0.2 C) at relatively high spatial resolution (50 km) in the presence of clouds. Of particular interest is the possible capability of the AMSU to observe the slight warming associated with depression formation, and the relationship of the spatial characteristics of the warming to the surface pressure and wind field, without azimuthal averaging. In order to present the AMSU data as imagery, we have developed a method for precise limb-correction of all 15 AMSU channels. Through a linear combination of several neighboring channels, we can very closely match the nadir weighting functions of a given AMSU sounding channel with the non-nadir data. It is found that there is discernible, localized upper tropospheric warming associated with depression formation in the Atlantic basin during the 1998 hurricane season. Also, it is found that uncertainty in positioning of tropical cyclone circulation centers can be reduced, as in the example of Hurricane Georges as it approached Cuba. Finally, to explore the potential utility of a future high resolution microwave temperature sounder, we present an analysis of the relationship between the modeled surface wind field and simulated high -resolution AMSU-type measurements, based upon cloud resolving model simulations of hurricane Andrew in 1992.

  17. Controlling the relative rates of adlayer formation and removal during etching in inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Nicholas Colvin Masi

    Laser desorption (LD) of the adlayer coupled with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and plasma induced emission (PIE) of desorbed adsorbates is used to investigate the relative rates of chlorination and sputtering during the etching of Si in inductively coupled Cl2-Ar plasmas. Such an analysis is a two-fold process: surface analysis and plasma characterization. Surface analysis of Si etching using LD-LIF and LD-PIE techniques combined with etch rate measurements have revealed that the coverage of SiCl2 and etch rate increases and coverage of Si decreases abruptly for a chlorine fraction of 75% and ion energy of 80 eV. The precise Cl2 fraction for which these abrupt changes occur increases with an increase in ion energy. These changes may be caused by local chemisorption-induced reconstruction of Si <100>. Furthermore, the chlorination and sputtering rates are increased by ˜ an order of magnitude as the plasma is changed from Ar-dominant to Cl-dominant. Characterization of the plasma included determination of the dominant ion in Cl2 plasmas using LIF and a Langmuir probe and measurement of the absolute densities of Cl2, Cl, Cl+, and At + in Cl2-Ar discharges using optical emission actinometry. These studies reveal that Cl+ is the dominant positive ion in the H-mode and the dissociation of Cl2 to Cl increases with an increase in Ar fraction due to an increase in electron temperature. Furthermore, for powers exceeding 600 W, the neutral to ion flux ratio is strongly dependent on Cl2 fraction and is attributed mostly to the decrease in Cl density. Such dependence of the flux ratio on Cl2 fraction is significant in controlling chlorination and sputtering rates not only for Si etching, but for etching other key technological materials. ICP O2 discharges were also studied for low-kappa polymeric etch applications. These studies reveal that the electron temperature is weakly dependent on rf power and O2 dissociation is low (˜2%) at the maximum rf power density of 5.7 Wcm

  18. Pitfalls when observationally characterizing the relative formation rates of stars and stellar clusters in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Bastian, Nate

    2016-03-01

    Stars generally form in aggregates, some of which are bound (`clusters') while others are unbound and disperse on short ({˜ }10 { Myr}) time-scales (`associations'). The fraction of stars forming in bound clusters (Γ) is a fundamental outcome of the star formation process. Recent observational and theoretical work has suggested that Γ increases with the gas surface density (Σ) or star formation rate (SFR) surface density (ΣSFR), both within galaxies and between different ones. However, a recent paper by Chandar et al. has challenged these results, showing that the total number of stellar aggregates per unit SFR does not vary systematically with the host galaxy's absolute SFR. In this Letter, we show that no variations are expected when no distinction is made between bound and unbound aggregates, because the sum of these two fractions should be close to unity. We also demonstrate that any scaling of Γ with the absolute SFR is much weaker than with ΣSFR, due to the mass-radius-SFR relation of star-forming `main-sequence' galaxies. The environmental variation of Γ should therefore be probed as a function of area-normalized quantities, such as Σ or ΣSFR. We present a set of guidelines for meaningful observational tests of cluster formation theories and show that these resolve the reported discrepancy.

  19. Star formation rates in isolated galaxies selected from the Two-Micron All-Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnyk, O.; Karachentseva, V.; Karachentsev, I.

    2015-08-01

    We have considered the star formation properties of 1616 isolated galaxies from the 2MASS XSC (Extended Source Catalog) selected sample (2MIG) with the far-ultraviolet GALEX magnitudes. This sample was then compared with corresponding properties of isolated galaxies from the Local Orphan Galaxies (LOG) catalogue and paired galaxies. We found that different selection algorithms define different populations of isolated galaxies. The population of the LOG catalogue, selected from non-clustered galaxies in the Local Supercluster volume, mostly consists of low-mass spiral and late-type galaxies. The specific star formation rate (SSFR) upper limit in isolated and paired galaxies does not exceed the value of ˜dex(-9.4). This is probably common for galaxies of differing activity and environment (at least at z < 0.06). The fractions of quenched galaxies are nearly twice as high in the paired galaxy sample as in the 2MIG isolated galaxy sample. From the behaviour of (S)SFR versus M* relations we deduced that the characteristic value influencing evolutionary processes is the galaxy mass. However, the environmental influence is notable: paired massive galaxies with logM* > 11.5 have higher (S)SFR than isolated galaxies. Our results suggest that the environment helps to trigger the star formation in the highest mass galaxies. We found that the fraction of AGN in the paired sample is only a little higher than in our isolated galaxy sample. We assume that AGN phenomenon is probably defined by secular galaxy evolution.

  20. The Specific Star-formation Rates Of z 2 ULIRGs: DOGs And SMGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussmann, R. Shane; Dey, A.; Desai, V.; Melbourne, J.; Soifer, B. T.

    2010-01-01

    The advent of the Spitzer Space Telescope has revolutionized the field of IR astronomy by resolving a significant fraction of the Cosmic IR background at wavelengths up to 160um. A new population of z 2 ULIRGs has been identified via the combination of Spitzer IR imaging with ground-based imaging in the optical. In this contribution, we undertake a systematic comparison of the intrinsic properties of an important subset of this population, dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), and another z 2 ULIRG population that is well-studied, sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs). We utilize far-IR + radio imaging of DOGs to estimate star formation rates and mid-IR + optical imaging to estimate stellar masses and thereby obtain specific star formation rates. We compare our results with predictions from hydrodynamical N-body simulations of quiescent and merging systems to place contraints on the relative evolutionary status of the 24um and sub-mm selected z 2 ULIRG populations.

  1. Stellar Masses, Star Formation Rates and X-ray Constraints on Galaxies in the Coma Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrinda, Greg; Desjardins, T. D.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Gallagher, S.; Hammer, D.; Miller, N. A.; Ptak, A.; Tzanavaris, P.; Johnson, K. E.; Walker, L.

    2014-01-01

    We report on new measurements of star formation rates and stellar masses in the “infall” region of the nearby Coma cluster of galaxies. This region is approximately 1 Mpc from the cluster core, where relatively gas-rich galaxies are interacting with the hot intracluster medium, providing an important view of the impact of cluster processes on galaxy evolution. We have used infrared and ultraviolet data available from both ground and spaced-based observations to make these measurements. The star formation rates and stellar mass values were verified via comparison with published results in the Coma core as well as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectral measurements. The infall region has also been observed by XMM-Newton to faint limits to obtain X-ray luminosities for the galaxies in this field. Specifically, we present X-ray photometry of approximately 20 galaxies with XMM-Newton coverage to constrain the X-ray - SFR correlation in a cluster environment. This project was supported by the Baltimore Excellence in STEM Teaching program via summer internship funding to Hrinda.

  2. Free energy of cluster formation and a new scaling relation for the nucleation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Diemand, Jürg; Angélil, Raymond

    2014-05-21

    Recent very large molecular dynamics simulations of homogeneous nucleation with (1 − 8) × 10{sup 9} Lennard-Jones atoms [J. Diemand, R. Angélil, K. K. Tanaka, and H. Tanaka, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 074309 (2013)] allow us to accurately determine the formation free energy of clusters over a wide range of cluster sizes. This is now possible because such large simulations allow for very precise measurements of the cluster size distribution in the steady state nucleation regime. The peaks of the free energy curves give critical cluster sizes, which agree well with independent estimates based on the nucleation theorem. Using these results, we derive an analytical formula and a new scaling relation for nucleation rates: ln J{sup ′}/η is scaled by ln S/η, where the supersaturation ratio is S, η is the dimensionless surface energy, and J{sup ′} is a dimensionless nucleation rate. This relation can be derived using the free energy of cluster formation at equilibrium which corresponds to the surface energy required to form the vapor-liquid interface. At low temperatures (below the triple point), we find that the surface energy divided by that of the classical nucleation theory does not depend on temperature, which leads to the scaling relation and implies a constant, positive Tolman length equal to half of the mean inter-particle separation in the liquid phase.

  3. Metatranscriptomics reveals temperature-driven functional changes in microbiome impacting cheese maturation rate

    PubMed Central

    De Filippis, Francesca; Genovese, Alessandro; Ferranti, Pasquale; Gilbert, Jack A.; Ercolini, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Traditional cheeses harbour complex microbial consortia that play an important role in shaping typical sensorial properties. However, the microbial metabolism is considered difficult to control. Microbial community succession and the related gene expression were analysed during ripening of a traditional Italian cheese, identifying parameters that could be modified to accelerate ripening. Afterwards, we modulated ripening conditions and observed consistent changes in microbial community structure and function. We provide concrete evidence of the essential contribution of non-starter lactic acid bacteria in ripening-related activities. An increase in the ripening temperature promoted the expression of genes related to proteolysis, lipolysis and amino acid/lipid catabolism and significantly increases the cheese maturation rate. Moreover, temperature-promoted microbial metabolisms were consistent with the metabolomic profiles of proteins and volatile organic compounds in the cheese. The results clearly indicate how processing-driven microbiome responses can be modulated in order to optimize production efficiency and product quality. PMID:26911915

  4. Explaining the Three-decade Correlation between Star Formation Rate and Stellar Mass in Galaxies at z~1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawiser, Eric J.; Kurczynski, Peter; Acquaviva, Viviana; UVUDF Team, CANDELS Team

    2016-01-01

    In star-forming galaxies across cosmic time, a correlation has been found between the mass of stars already assembled and its time derivative, the star formation rate. This surprising correlation was not predicted by theory, but it can be reproduced within cosmological hydrodynamics simulations and semi-analytical models of galaxy formation. Here we use SpeedyMC, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo code for Spectral Energy Distribution fitting, to measure the star formation rates and stellar masses of 800 galaxies from the Ultraviolet Ultradeep Field (UVUDF) and CANDELS/GOODS-S field at redshift 1 < z < 1.5. This galaxy sample leverages the deepest images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope to extend the SFR-M* correlation a factor of 10-100X lower in M* than previous studies, down to values of 10^7 M_sun comparable to present-day dwarf galaxies. Accounting for each galaxy's parameter uncertainties, including their covariances, yields a power-law correlation across three decades with intrinsic scatter of 0.2 dex. Having assumed realistic star formation histories that can rise and fall with time, we are able to measure star formation rates on timescales varying from instantaneous to the "lifetime" average for each galaxy. As the timescale over which star formation rate is averaged increases, the power-law exponent of the correlation with stellar mass increases to unity, and the scatter decreases to 0.05 dex. We conclude that the observed correlation between star formation rate and stellar mass results from a tight correlation between recent and lifetime-average star formation rates and a narrow spread of galaxy ages at a given star formation rate. The resulting correlation provides crucial evidence that galaxy formation proceeds through self-regulated star formation. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF grant AST-1055919 and grants from NASA via the Space Telescope Science Institute in support of programs 12060.57, 12445.56, and GO-12534.

  5. THE MASS-INDEPENDENCE OF SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATES IN GALACTIC DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, Louis E.; Gladders, Michael D.; Kelson, Daniel D.; Dressler, Alan; Oemler, Augustus Jr.; Poggianti, Bianca; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2014-04-20

    The slope of the star formation rate/stellar mass relation (the SFR {sup M}ain Sequence{sup ;} SFR-M {sub *}) is not quite unity: specific star formation rates (SFR/M {sub *}) are weakly but significantly anti-correlated with M {sub *}. Here we demonstrate that this trend may simply reflect the well-known increase in bulge mass-fractions—portions of a galaxy not forming stars—with M {sub *}. Using a large set of bulge/disk decompositions and SFR estimates derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we show that re-normalizing SFR by disk stellar mass (sSFR{sub disk} ≡ SFR/M {sub *,} {sub disk}) reduces the M {sub *} dependence of SF efficiency by ∼0.25 dex per dex, erasing it entirely in some subsamples. Quantitatively, we find log sSFR{sub disk}-log M {sub *} to have a slope β{sub disk} in [ – 0.20, 0.00] ± 0.02 (depending on the SFR estimator and Main Sequence definition) for star-forming galaxies with M {sub *} ≥ 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} and bulge mass-fractions B/T ≲ 0.6, generally consistent with a pure-disk control sample (β{sub control} = –0.05 ± 0.04). That (SFR/M {sub *,} {sub disk}) is (largely) independent of host mass for star-forming disks has strong implications for aspects of galaxy evolution inferred from any SFR-M {sub *} relation, including manifestations of ''mass quenching'' (bulge growth), factors shaping the star-forming stellar mass function (uniform dlog M {sub *}/dt for low-mass, disk-dominated galaxies), and diversity in star formation histories (dispersion in SFR(M {sub *}, t)). Our results emphasize the need to treat galaxies as composite systems—not integrated masses—in observational and theoretical work.

  6. The Mass-independence of Specific Star Formation Rates in Galactic Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Louis E.; Kelson, Daniel D.; Dressler, Alan; Poggianti, Bianca; Gladders, Michael D.; Oemler, Augustus, Jr.; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2014-04-01

    The slope of the star formation rate/stellar mass relation (the SFR "Main Sequence"; SFR-M *) is not quite unity: specific star formation rates (SFR/M *) are weakly but significantly anti-correlated with M *. Here we demonstrate that this trend may simply reflect the well-known increase in bulge mass-fractions—portions of a galaxy not forming stars—with M *. Using a large set of bulge/disk decompositions and SFR estimates derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we show that re-normalizing SFR by disk stellar mass (sSFRdisk ≡ SFR/M *, disk) reduces the M * dependence of SF efficiency by ~0.25 dex per dex, erasing it entirely in some subsamples. Quantitatively, we find log sSFRdisk-log M * to have a slope βdisk in [ - 0.20, 0.00] ± 0.02 (depending on the SFR estimator and Main Sequence definition) for star-forming galaxies with M * >= 1010 M ⊙ and bulge mass-fractions B/T <~ 0.6, generally consistent with a pure-disk control sample (βcontrol = -0.05 ± 0.04). That langSFR/M *, diskrang is (largely) independent of host mass for star-forming disks has strong implications for aspects of galaxy evolution inferred from any SFR-M * relation, including manifestations of "mass quenching" (bulge growth), factors shaping the star-forming stellar mass function (uniform dlog M */dt for low-mass, disk-dominated galaxies), and diversity in star formation histories (dispersion in SFR(M *, t)). Our results emphasize the need to treat galaxies as composite systems—not integrated masses—in observational and theoretical work.

  7. Transcriptomic analysis reveals ethylene as stimulator and auxin as regulator of adventitious root formation in petunia cuttings

    PubMed Central

    Druege, Uwe; Franken, Philipp; Lischewski, Sandra; Ahkami, Amir H.; Zerche, Siegfried; Hause, Bettina; Hajirezaei, Mohammad R.

    2014-01-01

    Adventitious root (AR) formation in the stem base (SB) of cuttings is the basis for propagation of many plant species and petunia is used as model to study this developmental process. Following AR formation from 2 to 192 hours post-excision (hpe) of cuttings, transcriptome analysis by microarray revealed a change of the character of the rooting zone from SB to root identity. The greatest shift in the number of differentially expressed genes was observed between 24 and 72 hpe, when the categories storage, mineral nutrient acquisition, anti-oxidative and secondary metabolism, and biotic stimuli showed a notable high number of induced genes. Analyses of phytohormone-related genes disclosed multifaceted changes of the auxin transport system, auxin conjugation and the auxin signal perception machinery indicating a reduction in auxin sensitivity and phase-specific responses of particular auxin-regulated genes. Genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis and action showed a more uniform pattern as a high number of respective genes were generally induced during the whole process of AR formation. The important role of ethylene for stimulating AR formation was demonstrated by the application of inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis and perception as well as of the precursor aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, all changing the number and length of AR. A model is proposed showing the putative role of polar auxin transport and resulting auxin accumulation in initiation of subsequent changes in auxin homeostasis and signal perception with a particular role of Aux/IAA expression. These changes might in turn guide the entrance into the different phases of AR formation. Ethylene biosynthesis, which is stimulated by wounding and does probably also respond to other stresses and auxin, acts as important stimulator of AR formation probably via the expression of ethylene responsive transcription factor genes, whereas the timing of different phases seems to be controlled by auxin. PMID

  8. Rcf1 mediates cytochrome oxidase assembly and respirasome formation, revealing heterogeneity of the enzyme complex.

    PubMed

    Vukotic, Milena; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Wiese, Sebastian; Vögtle, F Nora; Meisinger, Chris; Meyer, Helmut E; Zieseniss, Anke; Katschinski, Doerthe M; Jans, Daniel C; Jakobs, Stefan; Warscheid, Bettina; Rehling, Peter; Deckers, Markus

    2012-03-01

    The terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, cytochrome oxidase, transfers electrons to molecular oxygen, generating water. Within the inner mitochondrial membrane, cytochrome oxidase assembles into supercomplexes, together with other respiratory chain complexes, forming so-called respirasomes. Little is known about how these higher oligomeric structures are attained. Here we report on Rcf1 and Rcf2 as cytochrome oxidase subunits in S. cerevisiae. While Rcf2 is specific to yeast, Rcf1 is a conserved subunit with two human orthologs, RCF1a and RCF1b. Rcf1 is required for growth in hypoxia and complex assembly of subunits Cox13 and Rcf2, as well as for the oligomerization of a subclass of cytochrome oxidase complexes into respirasomes. Our analyses reveal that the cytochrome oxidase of mitochondria displays intrinsic heterogeneity with regard to its subunit composition and that distinct forms of respirasomes can be formed by complex variants.

  9. Ancient DNA reveals key stages in the formation of Central European mitochondrial genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Guido; Haak, Wolfgang; Adler, Christina J.; Roth, Christina; Szécsényi-Nagy, Anna; Karimnia, Sarah; Möller-Rieker, Sabine; Meller, Harald; Ganslmeier, Robert; Friederich, Susanne; Dresely, Veit; Nicklisch, Nicole; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Sirocko, Frank; Reich, David; Cooper, Alan; Alt, Kurt W.

    2014-01-01

    The processes which shaped modern European mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation remain unclear. The initial peopling by Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers ~42kyrs ago and the immigration of Neolithic farmers into Europe ~8kyrs ago appear to have played important roles, but do not explain present-day mtDNA diversity. We generated mtDNA profiles of 364 individuals from prehistoric cultures in Central Europe to perform a chronological study, spanning the Early Neolithic to the Early Bronze Age (5,500–1,550 cal BC). We use this transect through time to identify four marked shifts in genetic composition during the Neolithic period, revealing a key role for Late Neolithic cultures in shaping modern Central European genetic diversity. PMID:24115443

  10. Power penalties for multi-level PAM modulation formats at arbitrary bit error rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliteevskiy, Nikolay A.; Wood, William A.; Downie, John D.; Hurley, Jason; Sterlingov, Petr

    2016-03-01

    There is considerable interest in combining multi-level pulsed amplitude modulation formats (PAM-L) and forward error correction (FEC) in next-generation, short-range optical communications links for increased capacity. In this paper we derive new formulas for the optical power penalties due to modulation format complexity relative to PAM-2 and due to inter-symbol interference (ISI). We show that these penalties depend on the required system bit-error rate (BER) and that the conventional formulas overestimate link penalties. Our corrections to the standard formulas are very small at conventional BER levels (typically 1×10-12) but become significant at the higher BER levels enabled by FEC technology, especially for signal distortions due to ISI. The standard formula for format complexity, P = 10log(L-1), is shown to overestimate the actual penalty for PAM-4 and PAM-8 by approximately 0.1 and 0.25 dB respectively at 1×10-3 BER. Then we extend the well-known PAM-2 ISI penalty estimation formula from the IEEE 802.3 standard 10G link modeling spreadsheet to the large BER case and generalize it for arbitrary PAM-L formats. To demonstrate and verify the BER dependence of the ISI penalty, a set of PAM-2 experiments and Monte-Carlo modeling simulations are reported. The experimental results and simulations confirm that the conventional formulas can significantly overestimate ISI penalties at relatively high BER levels. In the experiments, overestimates up to 2 dB are observed at 1×10-3 BER.

  11. The structure, dynamics, and star formation rate of the Orion nebula cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan C.; Jaehnig, Karl

    2014-11-01

    The spatial morphology and dynamical status of a young, still-forming stellar cluster provide valuable clues to the conditions during the star formation event and the processes that regulated it. We analyze the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), utilizing the latest censuses of its stellar content and membership estimates over a large wavelength range. We determine the center of mass of the ONC and study the radial dependence of angular substructure. The core appears rounder and smoother than the outskirts, which is consistent with a higher degree of dynamical processing. At larger distances, the departure from circular symmetry is mostly driven by the elongation of the system, with very little additional substructure, indicating a somewhat evolved spatial morphology or an expanding halo. We determine the mass density profile of the cluster, which is well fitted by a power law that is slightly steeper than a singular isothermal sphere. Together with the interstellar medium density, which is estimated from average stellar extinction, the mass content of the ONC is insufficient by a factor ∼1.8 to reproduce the observed velocity dispersion from virialized motions, in agreement with previous assessments that the ONC is moderately supervirial. This may indicate recent gas dispersal. Based on the latest estimates for the age spread in the system and our density profiles, we find that at the half-mass radius, 90% of the stellar population formed within ∼5-8 free-fall times (t {sub ff}). This implies a star formation efficiency per t {sub ff} of ε{sub ff} ∼ 0.04-0.07 (i.e., relatively slow and inefficient star formation rates during star cluster formation).

  12. Hα imaging survey of Wolf-Rayet galaxies: morphologies and star formation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, S.; Omar, A.

    2016-10-01

    The Hα and optical broad-band images of 25 nearby Wolf-Rayet (WR) galaxies are presented. The WR galaxies are known to have a recent (≤10 Myr) and massive star formation episode. The photometric Hα fluxes are estimated and corrected for extinction and line contamination in the filter pass-bands. The star formation rates (SFRs) are estimated using Hα images and from archival data in the far-ultraviolet (FUV), far-infrared (FIR) and 1.4-GHz radio continuum wavebands. A comparison of SFRs estimated from different wavebands is made after including similar data available in the literature for other WR galaxies. The Hα-based SFRs are found to be tightly correlated with SFRs estimated from the FUV data. The correlations also exist with SFR estimates based on the radio and FIR data. The WR galaxies also follow the radio-FIR correlation known for normal star-forming galaxies, although it is seen here that the majority of dwarf WR galaxies have a radio deficiency. An analysis using the ratio of non-thermal to thermal radio continuum and the ratio of the FUV to Hα SFRs indicates that WR galaxies have lower non-thermal radio emission compared to normal galaxies, most likely due to a lack of supernovae in the very young star formation episode in the WR galaxies. The morphologies of 16 galaxies in our sample are highly suggestive of an ongoing tidal interaction or a past merger in these galaxies. This survey strengthens the conclusions obtained from previous similar studies indicating the importance of tidal interactions in triggering star-formation in WR galaxies.

  13. The Structure, Dynamics, and Star Formation Rate of the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan C.; Jaehnig, Karl

    2014-11-01

    The spatial morphology and dynamical status of a young, still-forming stellar cluster provide valuable clues to the conditions during the star formation event and the processes that regulated it. We analyze the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), utilizing the latest censuses of its stellar content and membership estimates over a large wavelength range. We determine the center of mass of the ONC and study the radial dependence of angular substructure. The core appears rounder and smoother than the outskirts, which is consistent with a higher degree of dynamical processing. At larger distances, the departure from circular symmetry is mostly driven by the elongation of the system, with very little additional substructure, indicating a somewhat evolved spatial morphology or an expanding halo. We determine the mass density profile of the cluster, which is well fitted by a power law that is slightly steeper than a singular isothermal sphere. Together with the interstellar medium density, which is estimated from average stellar extinction, the mass content of the ONC is insufficient by a factor ~1.8 to reproduce the observed velocity dispersion from virialized motions, in agreement with previous assessments that the ONC is moderately supervirial. This may indicate recent gas dispersal. Based on the latest estimates for the age spread in the system and our density profiles, we find that at the half-mass radius, 90% of the stellar population formed within ~5-8 free-fall times (t ff). This implies a star formation efficiency per t ff of epsilonff ~ 0.04-0.07 (i.e., relatively slow and inefficient star formation rates during star cluster formation).

  14. Resequencing Reveals Different Domestication Rate for BADH1 and BADH2 in Rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    He, Qiang; Yu, Jie; Kim, Tae-Sung; Cho, Yoo-Hyun; Lee, Young-Sang; Park, Yong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    BADH1 and BADH2 are two homologous genes, encoding betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase in rice. In the present study, we scanned BADHs sequences of 295 rice cultivars, and 10 wild rice accessions to determine the polymorphisms, gene functions and domestication of these two genes. A total of 16 alleles for BADH1 and 10 alleles for BADH2 were detected in transcribed region of cultivars and wild species. Association study showed that BADH1 has significant correlation with salt tolerance in rice during germination stage, the SNP (T/A) in exon 4 is highly correlated with salt tolerance index (STI) (P<10(-4)). While, BADH2 was only responsible for rice fragrance, of which two BADH2 alleles (8 bp deletion in exon 7 and C/T SNP in exon 13) explain 97% of aroma variation in our germplasm. Theses indicate that there are no overlapping functions between the two homologous genes. In addition, a large LD block was detected in BADH2 region, however, there was no large LD blocks in a 4-Mb region of BADH1. We found that BADH2 region only showed significant bias in Tajima's D value from the balance. Extended haplotype homozygosity study revealed fragrant accessions had a large LD block that extended around the mutation site (8 bp deletion in exon 7) of BADH2, while both of the BADH1 alleles (T/A in exon 4) did not show large extended LD block. All these results suggested that BADH2 was domesticated during rice evolution, while BADH1 was not selected by human beings. PMID:26258482

  15. Cryo-EM structure of aerolysin variants reveals a novel protein fold and the pore-formation process

    PubMed Central

    Iacovache, Ioan; De Carlo, Sacha; Cirauqui, Nuria; Dal Peraro, Matteo; van der Goot, F. Gisou; Zuber, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their pathogenical role and unique ability to exist both as soluble proteins and transmembrane complexes, pore-forming toxins (PFTs) have been a focus of microbiologists and structural biologists for decades. PFTs are generally secreted as water-soluble monomers and subsequently bind the membrane of target cells. Then, they assemble into circular oligomers, which undergo conformational changes that allow membrane insertion leading to pore formation and potentially cell death. Aerolysin, produced by the human pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila, is the founding member of a major PFT family found throughout all kingdoms of life. We report cryo-electron microscopy structures of three conformational intermediates and of the final aerolysin pore, jointly providing insight into the conformational changes that allow pore formation. Moreover, the structures reveal a protein fold consisting of two concentric β-barrels, tightly kept together by hydrophobic interactions. This fold suggests a basis for the prion-like ultrastability of aerolysin pore and its stoichiometry. PMID:27405240

  16. Cryo-EM structure of aerolysin variants reveals a novel protein fold and the pore-formation process.

    PubMed

    Iacovache, Ioan; De Carlo, Sacha; Cirauqui, Nuria; Dal Peraro, Matteo; van der Goot, F Gisou; Zuber, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their pathogenical role and unique ability to exist both as soluble proteins and transmembrane complexes, pore-forming toxins (PFTs) have been a focus of microbiologists and structural biologists for decades. PFTs are generally secreted as water-soluble monomers and subsequently bind the membrane of target cells. Then, they assemble into circular oligomers, which undergo conformational changes that allow membrane insertion leading to pore formation and potentially cell death. Aerolysin, produced by the human pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila, is the founding member of a major PFT family found throughout all kingdoms of life. We report cryo-electron microscopy structures of three conformational intermediates and of the final aerolysin pore, jointly providing insight into the conformational changes that allow pore formation. Moreover, the structures reveal a protein fold consisting of two concentric β-barrels, tightly kept together by hydrophobic interactions. This fold suggests a basis for the prion-like ultrastability of aerolysin pore and its stoichiometry. PMID:27405240

  17. Cryo-EM structure of aerolysin variants reveals a novel protein fold and the pore-formation process.

    PubMed

    Iacovache, Ioan; De Carlo, Sacha; Cirauqui, Nuria; Dal Peraro, Matteo; van der Goot, F Gisou; Zuber, Benoît

    2016-07-13

    Owing to their pathogenical role and unique ability to exist both as soluble proteins and transmembrane complexes, pore-forming toxins (PFTs) have been a focus of microbiologists and structural biologists for decades. PFTs are generally secreted as water-soluble monomers and subsequently bind the membrane of target cells. Then, they assemble into circular oligomers, which undergo conformational changes that allow membrane insertion leading to pore formation and potentially cell death. Aerolysin, produced by the human pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila, is the founding member of a major PFT family found throughout all kingdoms of life. We report cryo-electron microscopy structures of three conformational intermediates and of the final aerolysin pore, jointly providing insight into the conformational changes that allow pore formation. Moreover, the structures reveal a protein fold consisting of two concentric β-barrels, tightly kept together by hydrophobic interactions. This fold suggests a basis for the prion-like ultrastability of aerolysin pore and its stoichiometry.

  18. Structural Changes Associated with Transthyretin Misfolding and Amyloid Formation Revealed by Solution and Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kwang Hun; Dasari, Anvesh K R; Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong; Kelly, Jeffery W; Wemmer, David E

    2016-04-01

    Elucidation of structural changes involved in protein misfolding and amyloid formation is crucial for unraveling the molecular basis of amyloid formation. Here we report structural analyses of the amyloidogenic intermediate and amyloid aggregates of transthyretin using solution and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Our solution NMR results show that one of the two main β-sheet structures (CBEF β-sheet) is maintained in the aggregation-competent intermediate, while the other DAGH β-sheet is more flexible on millisecond time scales. Magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR revealed that AB loop regions interacting with strand A in the DAGH β-sheet undergo conformational changes, leading to the destabilized DAGH β-sheet. PMID:26998642

  19. Cryo-EM structure of aerolysin variants reveals a novel protein fold and the pore-formation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovache, Ioan; de Carlo, Sacha; Cirauqui, Nuria; Dal Peraro, Matteo; van der Goot, F. Gisou; Zuber, Benoît

    2016-07-01

    Owing to their pathogenical role and unique ability to exist both as soluble proteins and transmembrane complexes, pore-forming toxins (PFTs) have been a focus of microbiologists and structural biologists for decades. PFTs are generally secreted as water-soluble monomers and subsequently bind the membrane of target cells. Then, they assemble into circular oligomers, which undergo conformational changes that allow membrane insertion leading to pore formation and potentially cell death. Aerolysin, produced by the human pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila, is the founding member of a major PFT family found throughout all kingdoms of life. We report cryo-electron microscopy structures of three conformational intermediates and of the final aerolysin pore, jointly providing insight into the conformational changes that allow pore formation. Moreover, the structures reveal a protein fold consisting of two concentric β-barrels, tightly kept together by hydrophobic interactions. This fold suggests a basis for the prion-like ultrastability of aerolysin pore and its stoichiometry.

  20. Rate of Temperature Decay in Human Muscle Following 3 MHz Ultrasound: The Stretching Window Revealed.

    PubMed

    Draper, D O; Ricard, M D

    1995-10-01

    Researchers have determined that when therapeutic ultrasound vigorously heats connective tissue, it can be effective in increasing extensibility of collagen affected by scar tissue. These findings give credence to the use of continuous thermal ultrasound to heat tissue before stretching, exercise, or friction massage in an effort to decrease joint contractures and increase range of motion. Before our investigation, it was not known how long following an ultrasound treatment the tissue will remain at a vigorous heating level (>3 degrees C). We conducted this study to determine the rate of temperature decay following 3 MHz ultrasound, in order to determine the time period of optimal stretching. Twenty subjects had a 23-gauge hypodermic needle microprobe inserted 1.2 cm deep into the medial aspect of their anesthetized triceps surae muscle. Subjects then received a 3 MHz ultrasound treatment at 1.5 W/cm(2) until the tissue temperature was increased at least 5 degrees C. The mean baseline temperature before each treatment was 33.8 +/- 1.3 degrees C, and it peaked at 39.1 +/- 1.2 degrees C from the ultrasound. Immediately following the treatment, we recorded the rate at which the temperature dropped at 30-second intervals. We ran a stepwise nonlinear regression analysis to predict temperature decay as a function of time following ultrasound treatment. We found a significant nonlinear relationship between time and temperature decay. The average time it took for the temperature to drop each degree as expressed in minutes and seconds was: 1 degrees C = 1:20; 2 degrees C = 3:22; 3 degrees C = 5:50; 4 degrees C = 9:13; 5 degrees C = 14:55; 5.3 degrees C = 18:00 (baseline). We conclude that under similar circumstances where the tissue temperature is raised 5 degrees C, stretching will be effective, on average, for 3.3 minutes following an ultrasound treatment. To increase this stretching window, we suggest that stretching be applied during and immediately after ultrasound

  1. Nascent β-Hairpin Formation of a Natively Unfolded Peptide Reveals the Role of Hydrophobic Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Shi, Chuanyin; Shen, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Despite the important role of the unfolded states in protein stability, folding, and aggregation, they remain poorly understood due to the lack of residue-specific experimental data. Here, we explore features of the unfolded state of the NTL9 protein by applying all-atom replica-exchange simulations to the two fragment peptides NTL9(1–22) and NTL9(6–17). We found that while NTL9(6–17) is unstructured, NTL9(1–22) transiently folds as various β-hairpins, a fraction of which contain a native β-sheet. Interestingly, despite a large number of charged residues, the formation of backbone hydrogen bonds is concomitant with hydrophobic but not electrostatic contacts. Although the fragment peptides lack a proposed specific contact between Asp8 and Lys12, the individually weak, nonspecific interactions with lysines together stabilize the charged Asp8, leading to a pKa shift of nearly 0.5 units, in agreement with the NMR data. Taken together, our data suggest that the unfolded state of NTL9 likely contains a β-hairpin in segment 1–22 with sequence-distant hydrophobic contacts, thus lending support to a long-standing hypothesis that the unfolded states of proteins exhibit native-like topology with hydrophobic clusters. PMID:26244744

  2. Metatranscriptomics reveals temperature-driven functional changes in microbiome impacting cheese maturation rate

    DOE PAGES

    De Filippis, Francesca; Genovese, Alessandro; Ferranti, Pasquale; Gilbert, Jack A.; Ercolini, Danilo

    2016-02-25

    Traditional cheeses harbour complex microbial consortia that play an important role in shaping typical sensorial properties. However, the microbial metabolism is considered difficult to control. Microbial community succession and the related gene expression were analysed during ripening of a traditional Italian cheese, identifying parameters that could be modified to accelerate ripening. Afterwards, we modulated ripening conditions and observed consistent changes in microbial community structure and function. We provide concrete evidence of the essential contribution of non-starter lactic acid bacteria in ripening-related activities. An increase in the ripening temperature promoted the expression of genes related to proteolysis, lipolysis and amino acid/lipidmore » catabolism and significantly increases the cheese maturation rate. Moreover, temperature-promoted microbial metabolisms were consistent with the metabolomic profiles of proteins and volatile organic compounds in the cheese. Finally, the results clearly indicate how processing-driven microbiome responses can be modulated in order to optimize production efficiency and product quality.« less

  3. GLOBAL STAR FORMATION RATES AND DUST EMISSION OVER THE GALAXY INTERACTION SEQUENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Lanz, Lauranne; Zezas, Andreas; Smith, Howard A.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Hernquist, Lars; Brassington, Nicola; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Hayward, Christopher C.; Jonsson, Patrik

    2013-05-01

    We measured and modeled spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in 28 bands from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared (FIR) for 31 interacting galaxies in 14 systems. The sample is drawn from the Spitzer Interacting Galaxy Survey, which probes a range of galaxy interaction parameters at multiple wavelengths with an emphasis on the infrared bands. The subset presented in this paper consists of all galaxies for which FIR Herschel SPIRE observations are publicly available. Our SEDs combine the Herschel photometry with multi-wavelength data from Spitzer, GALEX, Swift UVOT, and 2MASS. While the shapes of the SEDs are broadly similar across our sample, strongly interacting galaxies typically have more mid-infrared emission relative to their near-infrared and FIR emission than weakly or moderately interacting galaxies. We modeled the full SEDs to derive host galaxy star formation rates (SFRs), specific star formation rates (sSFRs), stellar masses, dust temperatures, dust luminosities, and dust masses. We find increases in the dust luminosity and mass, SFR, and cold (15-25 K) dust temperature as the interaction progresses from moderately to strongly interacting and between non-interacting and strongly interacting galaxies. We also find increases in the SFR between weakly and strongly interacting galaxies. In contrast, the sSFR remains unchanged across all the interaction stages. The ultraviolet photometry is crucial for constraining the age of the stellar population and the SFR, while dust mass is primarily determined by SPIRE photometry. The SFR derived from the SED modeling agrees well with rates estimated by proportionality relations that depend on infrared emission.

  4. Ionosphere influence on success rate of GPS ambiguity resolution in a satellite formation flying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroni, Leandro

    2015-10-01

    Satellite formation flying is one of the most promising technologies for future space missions. The distribution of sensors and payloads among different satellites provides more redundancy, flexibility, improved communication coverage, among other advantages. One of the fundamental issues in spacecraft formation flying is precise position and velocity determination between satellites. For missions in low Earth orbits, GPS system can meet the precision requirement in relative positioning, since the satellite dynamics is modeled properly. The key for high accuracy GPS relative positioning is to resolve the ambiguities to their integer values. Ambiguities resolved successfully can improve the positioning accuracy to decimetre or even millimetre-level. So, integer carrier phase ambiguity resolution is often a prerequisite for high precision GPS positioning. The determination of relative position was made using an extended Kalman filter. The filter must take into account imperfections in dynamic modeling of perturbations affecting the orbital flight, and changes in solar activity that affects the GPS signal propagation, for mitigating these effects on relative positioning accuracy. Thus, this work aims to evaluate the impact of ionosphere variation, caused by changes in solar activity, in success rate of ambiguity resolution. Using the Ambiguity Dilution of Precision (ADOP) concept, the ambiguity success rate is analyzed and the expected precision of the ambiguity-fixed solution is calculated. Evaluations were performed using actual data from GRACE mission and analyzed for their performance in real scenarios. Analyses were conducted in different configurations of relative position and during different levels of solar activity. Results bring the impact of various disturbances and modeling of solar activity level on the success rate of ambiguity resolution.

  5. THE MOSDEF SURVEY: MASS, METALLICITY, AND STAR-FORMATION RATE AT z ∼ 2.3

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Ryan L.; Shapley, Alice E.; Kriek, Mariska; Price, Sedona H.; Reddy, Naveen A.; Freeman, William R.; Siana, Brian; Mobasher, Bahram; Shivaei, Irene; De Groot, Laura; Coil, Alison L.

    2015-02-01

    We present results on the z ∼ 2.3 mass-metallicity relation (MZR) using early observations from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field survey. We use an initial sample of 87 star-forming galaxies with spectroscopic coverage of Hβ, [O III] λ5007, Hα, and [N II] λ6584 rest-frame optical emission lines, and estimate the gas-phase oxygen abundance based on the N2 and O3N2 strong-line indicators. We find a positive correlation between stellar mass and metallicity among individual z ∼ 2.3 galaxies using both the N2 and O3N2 indicators. We also measure the emission-line ratios and corresponding oxygen abundances for composite spectra in bins of stellar mass. Among composite spectra, we find a monotonic increase in metallicity with increasing stellar mass, offset ∼0.15-0.3 dex below the local MZR. When the sample is divided at the median star-formation rate (SFR), we do not observe significant SFR dependence of the z ∼ 2.3 MZR among either individual galaxies or composite spectra. We furthermore find that z ∼ 2.3 galaxies have metallicities ∼0.1 dex lower at a given stellar mass and SFR than is observed locally. This offset suggests that high-redshift galaxies do not fall on the local ''fundamental metallicity relation'' among stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR, and may provide evidence of a phase of galaxy growth in which the gas reservoir is built up due to inflow rates that are higher than star-formation and outflow rates. However, robust conclusions regarding the gas-phase oxygen abundances of high-redshift galaxies await a systematic reappraisal of the application of locally calibrated metallicity indicators at high redshift.

  6. Real-time observation of polymer network formation by liquid- and solid-state NMR revealing multistage reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kovermann, Michael; Saalwächter, Kay; Chassé, Walter

    2012-06-28

    The reaction rate for the end-cross-linking process of vinyl-terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane) by a cross-linker with four Si-H functionalities in the presence of solvent was studied by (1)H liquid-state NMR in dependence of the reaction temperature. The properties of the resulting polymer networks, i.e., the gel-point and the formation of the elastically effective network, were monitored in situ during the reaction by single-evolution-time (1)H double-quantum (SET-DQ) low-field NMR. It was found that the cross-linking kinetics shows no uniform reaction order for the conversions of the functional groups before the topological gelation threshold of the polymer network. The two NMR methods are combined to investigate the formation of the elastically effective network in dependence of the conversion of the functional groups of the precursor polymers and the cross-linker. The high chemical and time resolution of the experiments enabled an in-depth analysis of the reaction kinetics, allowing us to conclude on a multistage model for PDMS network formation by hydrosilylation-based end-linking in the presence of solvent. We found that the nonuniform network formation kinetics originates from a dependence of the apparent reaction rate on the number of the Si-H groups of the cross-linker that have already reacted during the progress of the reaction. The fastest overall reaction rate is observed in a range until each cross-linker has reacted once on average, and a uniform apparent overall reaction order of unity with respect to cross-linker concentration is only found at a later stage, when multiply reacted cross-linker molecules with similar reactivity dominate. PMID:22650309

  7. Contrasting behavior of oxygen and iron isotopes in banded iron formation revealed by in situ analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, B.; Li, W.; Kita, N.; Valley, J. W.; Johnson, C.

    2012-12-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) record a period of dramatic secular change in Earth's geologic history, when abundant aqueous Fe(II) was removed from Archean and Proterozoic oceans by oxidation. BIFs are characterized by co-existing of quartz and iron minerals, including oxides and carbonates, and alternating iron-rich and iron-poor layers range from m to Formation, Hamersley Group, Western Australia. Oxygen isotope ratios were measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), and Fe isotope ratios were measured by femtosecond Laser ablation Multi-Collector ICP-MS (fs-LA-MC-ICP-MS), with spatial resolutions of 15 mm (O) and 30-50 mm (Fe), and external precisions (2s) of +0.7 ‰ for δ18O and +0.2 ‰ for δ56Fe, respectively. Analysis of δ18O in iron oxides by SIMS employed special tuning with a 3kV primary beam to minimize orientation effects (Huberty et al. 2010 ). For hematite, δ18O values range from -7.1 ‰ to -0.6 ‰, with the majority of data clustering around -4.5 ‰, and δ56Fe values range from -0.50 ‰ to +1.53‰. Magnetite has a δ18O range of -5.6 ‰ to +5.6 ‰ and a δ56Fe range of -0.76 ‰ to +1.33 ‰. Notably, magnetite shows significant O isotope heterogeneity at a mineral grain scale, and the highest δ18O values were commonly measured from Si-rich (1-3 wt% SiO2) magnetite overgrowths or magnetite grains that have a recrystallization texture. In contrast, lowest δ18O values were measured from magnetite that contains less than 1 wt% SiO2. Individual magnetite grains can have up to 6 ‰ variation in δ18O values between low-Si core and Si-rich overgrowth. Iron

  8. Prediction of terrestrial gamma dose rate based on geological formations and soil types in the Johor State, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; bin Hamzah, Khaidzir; Alajerami, Yasser; Moharib, Mohammed; Saeed, Ismael

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to predict and estimate unmeasured terrestrial gamma dose rate (TGDR) using statistical analysis methods to derive a model from the actual measurement based on geological formation and soil type. The measurements of TGDR were conducted in the state of Johor with a total of 3873 measured points which covered all geological formations, soil types and districts. The measurements were taken 1 m above the soil surface using NaI [Ti] detector. The measured gamma dose rates ranged from 9 nGy h(-1) to 1237 nGy h(-1) with a mean value of 151 nGy h(-1). The data have been normalized to fit a normal distribution. Tests of significance were conducted among all geological formations and soil types, using the unbalanced one way ANOVA. The results indicated strong significant differences due to the different geological formations and soil types present in Johor State. Pearson Correlation was used to measure the relations between gamma dose rate based on geological formation and soil type (D(G,S)) with the gamma dose rate based on geological formation (D(G)) or soil type (D(s)). A very good correlation was found between D(G,S) and D(G) or D(G,S) and D(s). A total of 118 pairs of geological formations and soil types were used to derive the statistical contribution of geological formations and soil types to gamma dose rates. The contribution of the gamma dose rate from geological formation and soil type were found to be 0.594 and 0.399, respectively. The null hypotheses were accepted for 83% of examined data, therefore, the model could be used to predict gamma dose rates based on geological formation and soil type information.

  9. Prediction of terrestrial gamma dose rate based on geological formations and soil types in the Johor State, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; bin Hamzah, Khaidzir; Alajerami, Yasser; Moharib, Mohammed; Saeed, Ismael

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to predict and estimate unmeasured terrestrial gamma dose rate (TGDR) using statistical analysis methods to derive a model from the actual measurement based on geological formation and soil type. The measurements of TGDR were conducted in the state of Johor with a total of 3873 measured points which covered all geological formations, soil types and districts. The measurements were taken 1 m above the soil surface using NaI [Ti] detector. The measured gamma dose rates ranged from 9 nGy h(-1) to 1237 nGy h(-1) with a mean value of 151 nGy h(-1). The data have been normalized to fit a normal distribution. Tests of significance were conducted among all geological formations and soil types, using the unbalanced one way ANOVA. The results indicated strong significant differences due to the different geological formations and soil types present in Johor State. Pearson Correlation was used to measure the relations between gamma dose rate based on geological formation and soil type (D(G,S)) with the gamma dose rate based on geological formation (D(G)) or soil type (D(s)). A very good correlation was found between D(G,S) and D(G) or D(G,S) and D(s). A total of 118 pairs of geological formations and soil types were used to derive the statistical contribution of geological formations and soil types to gamma dose rates. The contribution of the gamma dose rate from geological formation and soil type were found to be 0.594 and 0.399, respectively. The null hypotheses were accepted for 83% of examined data, therefore, the model could be used to predict gamma dose rates based on geological formation and soil type information. PMID:26142818

  10. STAR FORMATION RATES IN RESOLVED GALAXIES: CALIBRATIONS WITH NEAR- AND FAR-INFRARED DATA FOR NGC 5055 AND NGC 6946

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yiming; Crocker, Alison F.; Calzetti, Daniela; Wilson, Christine D.; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Galametz, M.; Murphy, Eric J.; Brandl, Bernhard R.; Groves, B.; Draine, B. T.; Johnson, B. D.; Armus, L.; Gordon, K. D.; Croxall, K.; Dale, D. A.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Hinz, J.; Hao, C.-N.; Helou, G.; Hunt, L. K.; and others

    2013-05-10

    We use the near-infrared Br{gamma} hydrogen recombination line as a reference star formation rate (SFR) indicator to test the validity and establish the calibration of the Herschel/PACS 70 {mu}m emission as a SFR tracer for sub-galactic regions in external galaxies. Br{gamma} offers the double advantage of directly tracing ionizing photons and of being relatively insensitive to the effects of dust attenuation. For our first experiment, we use archival Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Br{gamma} and Ks images of two nearby galaxies: NGC 5055 and NGC 6946, which are also part of the Herschel program KINGFISH (Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: a Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel). We use the extinction corrected Br{gamma} emission to derive the SFR(70) calibration for H II regions in these two galaxies. A comparison of the SFR(70) calibrations at different spatial scales, from 200 pc to the size of the whole galaxy, reveals that about 50% of the total 70 {mu}m emission is due to dust heated by stellar populations that are unrelated to the current star formation. We use a simple model to qualitatively relate the increase of the SFR(70) calibration coefficient with decreasing region size to the star formation timescale. We provide a calibration for an unbiased SFR indicator that combines the observed H{alpha} with the 70 {mu}m emission, also for use in H II regions. We briefly analyze the PACS 100 and 160 {mu}m maps and find that longer wavelengths are not as good SFR indicators as 70 {mu}m, in agreement with previous results. We find that the calibrations show about 50% difference between the two galaxies, possibly due to effects of inclination.

  11. An evolutionary model for collapsing molecular clouds and their star formation activity. II. Mass dependence of the star formation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Zamora-Avilés, Manuel; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the evolution and dependence on cloud mass of the star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE) of star-forming molecular clouds (MCs) within the scenario that clouds are undergoing global collapse and that the SFR is controlled by ionization feedback. We find that low-mass clouds (M {sub max} ≲ 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉}) spend most of their evolution at low SFRs, but end their lives with a mini-burst, reaching a peak SFR ∼10{sup 4} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1}, although their time-averaged SFR is only (SFR) ∼ 10{sup 2} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1}. The corresponding efficiencies are SFE{sub final} ≲ 60% and (SFE) ≲ 1%. For more massive clouds (M {sub max} ≳ 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}), the SFR first increases and then reaches a plateau because the clouds are influenced by stellar feedback since earlier in their evolution. As a function of cloud mass, (SFR) and (SFE) are well represented by the fits (SFR) ≈ 100(1 + M {sub max}/1.4 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}){sup 1.68} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1} and (SFE) ≈ 0.03(M {sub max}/2.5 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}){sup 0.33}, respectively. Moreover, the SFR of our model clouds follows closely the SFR-dense gas mass relation recently found by Lada et al. during the epoch when their instantaneous SFEs are comparable to those of the clouds considered by those authors. Collectively, a Monte Carlo integration of the model-predicted SFR(M) over a Galactic giant molecular cloud mass spectrum yields values for the total Galactic SFR that are within half an order of magnitude of the relation obtained by Gao and Solomon. Our results support the scenario that star-forming MCs may be in global gravitational collapse and that the low observed values of the SFR and SFE are a result of the interruption of each SF episode, caused primarily by the ionizing feedback from massive stars.

  12. Transient β-hairpin formation in α-synuclein monomer revealed by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hang; Han, Wei; Ma, Wen; Schulten, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease, originating from the intrinsically disordered peptide α-synuclein, is a common neurodegenerative disorder that affects more than 5% of the population above age 85. It remains unclear how α-synuclein monomers undergo conformational changes leading to aggregation and formation of fibrils characteristic for the disease. In the present study, we perform molecular dynamics simulations (over 180 μs in aggregated time) using a hybrid-resolution model, Proteins with Atomic details in Coarse-grained Environment (PACE), to characterize in atomic detail structural ensembles of wild type and mutant monomeric α-synuclein in aqueous solution. The simulations reproduce structural properties of α-synuclein characterized in experiments, such as secondary structure content, long-range contacts, chemical shifts, and 3J(HNHCα)-coupling constants. Most notably, the simulations reveal that a short fragment encompassing region 38-53, adjacent to the non-amyloid-β component region, exhibits a high probability of forming a β-hairpin; this fragment, when isolated from the remainder of α-synuclein, fluctuates frequently into its β-hairpin conformation. Two disease-prone mutations, namely, A30P and A53T, significantly accelerate the formation of a β-hairpin in the stated fragment. We conclude that the formation of a β-hairpin in region 38-53 is a key event during α-synuclein aggregation. We predict further that the G47V mutation impedes the formation of a turn in the β-hairpin and slows down β-hairpin formation, thereby retarding α-synuclein aggregation.

  13. Transient β-hairpin formation in α-synuclein monomer revealed by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hang; Ma, Wen; Han, Wei; Schulten, Klaus

    2015-12-28

    Parkinson’s disease, originating from the intrinsically disordered peptide α-synuclein, is a common neurodegenerative disorder that affects more than 5% of the population above age 85. It remains unclear how α-synuclein monomers undergo conformational changes leading to aggregation and formation of fibrils characteristic for the disease. In the present study, we perform molecular dynamics simulations (over 180 μs in aggregated time) using a hybrid-resolution model, Proteins with Atomic details in Coarse-grained Environment (PACE), to characterize in atomic detail structural ensembles of wild type and mutant monomeric α-synuclein in aqueous solution. The simulations reproduce structural properties of α-synuclein characterized in experiments, such as secondary structure content, long-range contacts, chemical shifts, and {sup 3}J(H{sub N}H{sub C{sub α}})-coupling constants. Most notably, the simulations reveal that a short fragment encompassing region 38-53, adjacent to the non-amyloid-β component region, exhibits a high probability of forming a β-hairpin; this fragment, when isolated from the remainder of α-synuclein, fluctuates frequently into its β-hairpin conformation. Two disease-prone mutations, namely, A30P and A53T, significantly accelerate the formation of a β-hairpin in the stated fragment. We conclude that the formation of a β-hairpin in region 38-53 is a key event during α-synuclein aggregation. We predict further that the G47V mutation impedes the formation of a turn in the β-hairpin and slows down β-hairpin formation, thereby retarding α-synuclein aggregation.

  14. Transcriptome analysis reveals new insight into appressorium formation and function in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yeonyee; Donofrio, Nicole; Pan, Huaqin; Coughlan, Sean; Brown, Douglas E; Meng, Shaowu; Mitchell, Thomas; Dean, Ralph A

    2008-01-01

    Background Rice blast disease is caused by the filamentous Ascomycetous fungus Magnaporthe oryzae and results in significant annual rice yield losses worldwide. Infection by this and many other fungal plant pathogens requires the development of a specialized infection cell called an appressorium. The molecular processes regulating appressorium formation are incompletely understood. Results We analyzed genome-wide gene expression changes during spore germination and appressorium formation on a hydrophobic surface compared to induction by cAMP. During spore germination, 2,154 (approximately 21%) genes showed differential expression, with the majority being up-regulated. During appressorium formation, 357 genes were differentially expressed in response to both stimuli. These genes, which we refer to as appressorium consensus genes, were functionally grouped into Gene Ontology categories. Overall, we found a significant decrease in expression of genes involved in protein synthesis. Conversely, expression of genes associated with protein and amino acid degradation, lipid metabolism, secondary metabolism and cellular transportation exhibited a dramatic increase. We functionally characterized several differentially regulated genes, including a subtilisin protease (SPM1) and a NAD specific glutamate dehydrogenase (Mgd1), by targeted gene disruption. These studies revealed hitherto unknown findings that protein degradation and amino acid metabolism are essential for appressorium formation and subsequent infection. Conclusion We present the first comprehensive genome-wide transcript profile study and functional analysis of infection structure formation by a fungal plant pathogen. Our data provide novel insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms that will directly benefit efforts to identify fungal pathogenicity factors and aid the development of new disease management strategies. PMID:18492280

  15. Nature or nurture? Clues from the distribution of specific star formation rates in SDSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casado, J.; Ascasibar, Y.; Gavilán, M.; Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E.; Hoyos, C.; Díaz, A. I.

    2015-07-01

    This work investigates the main mechanism(s) that regulate the specific star formation rate (SSFR) in nearby galaxies, cross-correlating two proxies of this quantity - the equivalent width of the Hα line and the (u - r) colour - with other physical properties (mass, metallicity, environment, morphology, and the presence of close companions) in a sample of ˜82 500 galaxies extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The existence of a relatively tight `ageing sequence' in the colour-equivalent width plane favours a scenario where the secular conversion of gas into stars (i.e. nature) is the main physical driver of the instantaneous SSFR and the gradual transition from a `chemically primitive' (metal-poor and intensely star-forming) state to a `chemically evolved' (metal-rich and passively evolving) system. Nevertheless, environmental factors (i.e. nurture) are also important. In the field, galaxies may be temporarily affected by discrete `quenching' and `rejuvenation' episodes, but such events show little statistical significance in a probabilistic sense, and we find no evidence that galaxy interactions are, on average, a dominant driver of star formation. Although visually classified mergers tend to display systematically higher EW(Hα) and bluer (u - r) colours for a given luminosity, most galaxies with high SSFR have uncertain morphologies, which could be due to either internal or external processes. Field galaxies of early and late morphological types are consistent with the gradual `ageing' scenario, with no obvious signatures of a sudden decrease in their SSFR. In contrast, star formation is significantly reduced and sometimes completely quenched on a short time-scale in dense environments, where many objects are found on a `quenched sequence' in the colour-equivalent width plane.

  16. Rate of F center formation in sapphire under low-energy low-fluence Ar+ irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epie, E. N.; Wijesundera, D. N.; Tilakaratne, B. P.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chu, W. K.

    2016-03-01

    Ionoluminescence, optical absorption spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channelling (RBS-C) have been used to study the rate of F center formation with fluence in 170 keV Ar+ irradiated single crystals of α-Al2O3 (sapphire) at room temperature. Implantation fluences range between 1013 cm-2 and 5 ×1014 cm-2. F center density (NF) has been found to display an initial rapid linear increase with Ar+ fluence followed by saturation to a maximum value of 1.74 ×1015 cm-2. Experimental results show a 1-1 correlation between radiation damage in the oxygen sublattice and F center density. This suggest F center kinetics in sapphire under low-energy low-fluence Ar irradiation is a direct consequence of dynamic competition between oxygen defect creation and recombination. An attempt has also been made to extend this discussion to F center kinetics in sapphire under swift heavy ion irradiation.

  17. Rate of Pu(IV) polymer formation in nitric acid solutions. A parametric study

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, L.M.; Osborne, M.M.

    1984-07-01

    The kinetics of Pu(IV) polymer formation has been examined with the intent of developing a simple mathematical equation that would predict the appearance of polymer. The fundamental polymerization rate has been found to be dependent on [Pu(IV)]{sup 1} {sup 2} and [HNO{sub 3}]{sup -6}. The activation energy for polymer formation is real temperature dependent, varying from 66.9 kJ/mol (16 kcal/mol) at 25{sup 0}C to 150.5 kJ/mol (36 kcal/mol) at 105{sup 0}C. These relationships have guided the developement of an empirical model that gives time to form 2% polymer in hours, t = [Pu/sub T/]/sup a/[HNO{sub 3}]/sup b/ Ae/sup c/T/, where a = -1.6, b = 4.6, c = 12.300 K, and A = 7.66 x 10{sup -16} h M{sup -3}; [Pu/sub T/] is the total plutonium concentration, mol/L; and [HNO{sub 3}] is the makeup nitric acid concentration, mol/L. 11 references, 26 figures, 1 table.

  18. Rate of Formation of Trigonal Phase in Blends of Homogeneous Propylene 1-Hexene Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janani, Hamed; Trujillo, Gabriel; Alamo, Rufina

    2013-03-01

    Blends of polyolefins such as polyethylenes, polypropylenes or their copolymers are often used to balance the strengths of each component towards improving processing, physical properties and performance. The final properties depend on the semicrystalline state acquired upon melt-solidification which is highly impacted by the state of melt miscibility. In this work we have assessed the critical composition difference for melt miscibility of propylene 1-hexene copolymers (PH) and selected a miscible pair with 11 and 21 mol% of 1-hexene respectively. PH21 crystallizes in a trigonal packing, while PH11 develops monoclinic crystallites (at low undercooling) or the mesomorphic form (at high undercooling). In situ DSC and WAXD analysis indicate that while the content of trigonal phase decreases with increasing PH11, the rate of formation of trigonal phase in the whole range of undercooling increases with addition of PH11, which as a pure component does not form trigonal phase. The unexpected enhanced kinetics of formation of trigonal phase with blending is attributed to the increasing composition of 1-hexene in the melt during isothermal crystallization of the blend.

  19. Reassessing the Relation Between Stellar Mass, Metallicity, and Star Formation Rate in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telford, Olivia Grace; Dalcanton, Julianne; Skillman, Evan D.; Conroy, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that the well-established mass-metallicity relation in galaxies depends on a third parameter: star formation rate (SFR). The observed strength of this dependence varies substantially depending on the choice of metallicity calibration, but has significant implications for theories of galaxy evolution, as it constrains the interplay between infall of pristine gas, metal production due to star formation, and ejection of enriched gas from galaxies. We present a new analysis of the relation between stellar mass, gas phase metallicity and SFR for ~140,000 star-forming galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using a new set of theoretically calibrated abundance diagnostics from Dopita et al. (2013), we find a weaker dependence of metallicity on SFR at fixed stellar mass than was found by previous studies using different calibration techniques for gas phase metallicity. We analyze possible biases in the derivation of mass, metallicity, and SFR that could cause the observed strength of the metallicity dependence on SFR to differ from reality, as the calculation of each of these quantities is subject to systematic errors. Chemical evolution models must carefully consider these sources of potential bias when accounting for metallicity dependence on SFR.

  20. THE OBSERVED RELATION BETWEEN STELLAR MASS, DUST EXTINCTION, AND STAR FORMATION RATE IN LOCAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zahid, H. J.; Kewley, L. J.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Yates, R. M.

    2013-02-15

    In this study, we investigate the relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and star formation rate (SFR) using {approx}150,000 star-forming galaxies from SDSS DR7. We show that the relation between dust extinction and SFR changes with stellar mass. For galaxies at the same stellar mass, dust extinction is anti-correlated with the SFR at stellar masses <10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }. There is a sharp transition in the relation at a stellar mass of 10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }. At larger stellar masses, dust extinction is positively correlated with the SFR for galaxies at the same stellar mass. The observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and SFR presented in this study helps to confirm similar trends observed in the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR. The relation reported in this study provides important new constraints on the physical processes governing the chemical evolution of galaxies. The correlation between SFR and dust extinction for galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 10} M {sub Sun} is shown to extend to the population of quiescent galaxies suggesting that the physical processes responsible for the observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and SFR may be related to the processes leading to the shutdown of star formation in galaxies.

  1. ANALYTICAL THEORY FOR THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION. III. TIME DEPENDENCE AND STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Hennebelle, Patrick

    2013-06-20

    The present paper extends our previous theory of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) by including time dependence and by including the impact of the magnetic field. The predicted mass spectra are similar to the time-independent ones with slightly shallower slopes at large masses and peak locations shifted toward smaller masses by a factor of a few. Assuming that star-forming clumps follow Larson-type relations, we obtain core mass functions in good agreement with the observationally derived IMF, in particular, when taking into account the thermodynamics of the gas. The time-dependent theory directly yields an analytical expression for the star formation rate (SFR) at cloud scales. The SFR values agree well with the observational determinations of various Galactic molecular clouds. Furthermore, we show that the SFR does not simply depend linearly on density, as is sometimes claimed in the literature, but also depends strongly on the clump mass/size, which yields the observed scatter. We stress, however, that any SFR theory depends, explicitly or implicitly, on very uncertain assumptions like clump boundaries or the mass of the most massive stars that can form in a given clump, making the final determinations uncertain by a factor of a few. Finally, we derive a fully time dependent model for the IMF by considering a clump, or a distribution of clumps accreting at a constant rate and thus whose physical properties evolve with time. In spite of its simplicity, this model reproduces reasonably well various features observed in numerical simulations of converging flows. Based on this general theory, we present a paradigm for star formation and the IMF.

  2. Does the CO-to-H2 conversion factor depend on the star formation rate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Paul C.; Glover, Simon C. O.

    2015-09-01

    We present a series of numerical simulations that explore how the `X-factor', XCO - the conversion factor between the observed integrated CO emission and the column density of molecular hydrogen - varies with the environmental conditions in which a molecular cloud is placed. Our investigation is centred around two environmental conditions in particular: the cosmic ray ionization rate (CRIR) and the strength of the interstellar radiation field (ISRF). Since both these properties of the interstellar medium (ISM) have their origins in massive stars, we make the assumption in this paper that both the strength of the ISRF and the CRIR scale linearly with the local star formation rate (SFR). The cloud modelling in this study first involves running numerical simulations that capture the cloud dynamics, as well as the time-dependent chemistry, and ISM heating and cooling. These simulations are then post-processed with a line radiative transfer code to create synthetic 12CO (1-0) emission maps from which XCO can be calculated. We find that for 104 M⊙ virialized clouds with mean density 100 cm- 3, XCO is only weakly dependent on the local SFR, varying by a factor of a few over 2 orders of magnitude in SFR. In contrast, we find that for similar clouds but with masses of 105 M⊙, the X-factor will vary by an order of magnitude over the same range in SFR, implying that extragalactic star formation laws should be viewed with caution. However, for denser (104 cm- 3), supervirial clouds such as those found at the centre of the Milky Way, the X-factor is once again independent of the local SFR.

  3. Hot spring siliceous stromatolites from Yellowstone National Park: assessing growth rate and laminae formation.

    PubMed

    Berelson, W M; Corsetti, F A; Pepe-Ranney, C; Hammond, D E; Beaumont, W; Spear, J R

    2011-09-01

    Stromatolites are commonly interpreted as evidence of ancient microbial life, yet stromatolite morphogenesis is poorly understood. We apply radiometric tracer and dating techniques, molecular analyses and growth experiments to investigate siliceous stromatolite morphogenesis in Obsidian Pool Prime (OPP), a hot spring in Yellowstone National Park. We examine rates of stromatolite growth and the environmental and/or biologic conditions that affect lamination formation and preservation, both difficult features to constrain in ancient examples. The "main body" of the stromatolite is composed of finely laminated, porous, light-dark couplets of erect (surface normal) and reclining (surface parallel) silicified filamentous bacteria, interrupted by a less-distinct, well-cemented "drape" lamination. Results from dating studies indicate a growth rate of 1-5 cm year(-1) ; however, growth is punctuated. (14)C as a tracer demonstrates that stromatolite cyanobacterial communities fix CO(2) derived from two sources, vent water (radiocarbon dead) and the atmosphere (modern (14)C). The drape facies contained a greater proportion of atmospheric CO(2) and more robust silica cementation (vs. the main body facies), which we interpret as formation when spring level was lower. Systematic changes in lamination style are likely related to environmental forcing and larger scale features (tectonic, climatic). Although the OPP stromatolites are composed of silica and most ancient forms are carbonate, their fine lamination texture requires early lithification. Without early lithification, whether silica or carbonate, it is unlikely that a finely laminated structure representing an ancient microbial mat would be preserved. In OPP, lithification on the nearly diurnal time scale is likely related to temperature control on silica solubility. PMID:21777367

  4. Imbalance of heterologous protein folding and disulfide bond formation rates yields runaway oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The protein secretory pathway must process a wide assortment of native proteins for eukaryotic cells to function. As well, recombinant protein secretion is used extensively to produce many biologics and industrial enzymes. Therefore, secretory pathway dysfunction can be highly detrimental to the cell and can drastically inhibit product titers in biochemical production. Because the secretory pathway is a highly-integrated, multi-organelle system, dysfunction can happen at many levels and dissecting the root cause can be challenging. In this study, we apply a systems biology approach to analyze secretory pathway dysfunctions resulting from heterologous production of a small protein (insulin precursor) or a larger protein (α-amylase). Results HAC1-dependent and independent dysfunctions and cellular responses were apparent across multiple datasets. In particular, processes involving (a) degradation of protein/recycling amino acids, (b) overall transcription/translation repression, and (c) oxidative stress were broadly associated with secretory stress. Conclusions Apparent runaway oxidative stress due to radical production observed here and elsewhere can be explained by a futile cycle of disulfide formation and breaking that consumes reduced glutathione and produces reactive oxygen species. The futile cycle is dominating when protein folding rates are low relative to disulfide bond formation rates. While not strictly conclusive with the present data, this insight does provide a molecular interpretation to an, until now, largely empirical understanding of optimizing heterologous protein secretion. This molecular insight has direct implications on engineering a broad range of recombinant proteins for secretion and provides potential hypotheses for the root causes of several secretory-associated diseases. PMID:22380681

  5. The star-formation rates of 1.5 < z < 2.5 massive galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordon, R.; Lutz, D.; Shao, L.; Magnelli, B.; Berta, S.; Altieri, B.; Andreani, P.; Aussel, H.; Bongiovanni, A.; Cava, A.; Cepa, J.; Cimatti, A.; Daddi, E.; Dominguez, H.; Elbaz, D.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Grazian, A.; Magdis, G.; Maiolino, R.; Pérez García, A. M.; Poglitsch, A.; Popesso, P.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Saintonge, A.; Sanchez-Portal, M.; Santini, P.; Sturm, E.; Tacconi, L.; Valtchanov, I.; Wetzstein, M.; Wieprecht, E.

    2010-07-01

    The star formation rate (SFR) is a key parameter in the study of galaxy evolution. The accuracy of SFR measurements at z ~ 2 has been questioned following a disagreement between observations and theoretical models. The latter predict SFRs at this redshift that are typically a factor 4 or more lower than the measurements. We present star-formation rates based on calorimetric measurements of the far-infrared (FIR) luminosities for massive 1.5 < z < 2.5, normal star-forming galaxies (SFGs), which do not depend on extinction corrections and/or extrapolations of spectral energy distributions. The measurements are based on observations in GOODS-N with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) onboard Herschel, as part of the PACS evolutionary probe (PEP) project, that resolve for the first time individual SFGs at these redshifts at FIR wavelengths. We compare FIR-based SFRs to the more commonly used 24 μm and UV SFRs. We find that SFRs from 24 μm alone are higher by a factor of ~4-7.5 than the true SFRs. This overestimation depends on luminosity: gradually increasing for log L(24 μm) > 12.2 L_⊙. The SFGs and AGNs tend to exhibit the same 24 μm excess. The UV SFRs are in closer agreement with the FIR-based SFRs. Using a Calzetti UV extinction correction results in a mean excess of up to 0.3 dex and a scatter of 0.35 dex from the FIR SFRs. The previous UV SFRs are thus confirmed and the mean excess, while narrowing the gap, is insufficient to explain the discrepancy between the observed SFRs and simulation predictions. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  6. Hot spring siliceous stromatolites from Yellowstone National Park: assessing growth rate and laminae formation.

    PubMed

    Berelson, W M; Corsetti, F A; Pepe-Ranney, C; Hammond, D E; Beaumont, W; Spear, J R

    2011-09-01

    Stromatolites are commonly interpreted as evidence of ancient microbial life, yet stromatolite morphogenesis is poorly understood. We apply radiometric tracer and dating techniques, molecular analyses and growth experiments to investigate siliceous stromatolite morphogenesis in Obsidian Pool Prime (OPP), a hot spring in Yellowstone National Park. We examine rates of stromatolite growth and the environmental and/or biologic conditions that affect lamination formation and preservation, both difficult features to constrain in ancient examples. The "main body" of the stromatolite is composed of finely laminated, porous, light-dark couplets of erect (surface normal) and reclining (surface parallel) silicified filamentous bacteria, interrupted by a less-distinct, well-cemented "drape" lamination. Results from dating studies indicate a growth rate of 1-5 cm year(-1) ; however, growth is punctuated. (14)C as a tracer demonstrates that stromatolite cyanobacterial communities fix CO(2) derived from two sources, vent water (radiocarbon dead) and the atmosphere (modern (14)C). The drape facies contained a greater proportion of atmospheric CO(2) and more robust silica cementation (vs. the main body facies), which we interpret as formation when spring level was lower. Systematic changes in lamination style are likely related to environmental forcing and larger scale features (tectonic, climatic). Although the OPP stromatolites are composed of silica and most ancient forms are carbonate, their fine lamination texture requires early lithification. Without early lithification, whether silica or carbonate, it is unlikely that a finely laminated structure representing an ancient microbial mat would be preserved. In OPP, lithification on the nearly diurnal time scale is likely related to temperature control on silica solubility.

  7. Exploring Systematic Effects in the Relation Between Stellar Mass, Gas Phase Metallicity, and Star Formation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telford, O. Grace; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Skillman, Evan D.; Conroy, Charlie

    2016-08-01

    There is evidence that the well-established mass-metallicity relation in galaxies is correlated with a third parameter: star formation rate (SFR). The strength of this correlation may be used to disentangle the relative importance of different physical processes (e.g., infall of pristine gas, metal-enriched outflows) in governing chemical evolution. However, all three parameters are susceptible to biases that might affect the observed strength of the relation between them. We analyze possible sources of systematic error, including sample bias, application of signal-to-noise ratio cuts on emission lines, choice of metallicity calibration, uncertainty in stellar mass determination, aperture effects, and dust. We present the first analysis of the relation between stellar mass, gas phase metallicity, and SFR using strong line abundance diagnostics from Dopita et al. for ˜130,000 star-forming galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and provide a detailed comparison of these diagnostics in an appendix. Using these new abundance diagnostics yields a 30%-55% weaker anti-correlation between metallicity and SFR at fixed stellar mass than that reported by Mannucci et al. We find that, for all abundance diagnostics, the anti-correlation with SFR is stronger for the relatively few galaxies whose current SFRs are elevated above their past average SFRs. This is also true for the new abundance diagnostic of Dopita et al., which gives anti-correlation between Z and SFR only in the high specific star formation rate (sSFR) regime, in contrast to the recent results of Kashino et al. The poorly constrained strength of the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR must be carefully accounted for in theoretical studies of chemical evolution.

  8. Identification of CROWN ROOTLESS1-regulated genes in rice reveals specific and conserved elements of postembryonic root formation.

    PubMed

    Coudert, Yoan; Le, Van Anh Thi; Adam, Hélène; Bès, Martine; Vignols, Florence; Jouannic, Stefan; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Gantet, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    In monocotyledons, the root system is mostly composed of postembryonic shoot-borne roots called crown roots. In rice (Oryza sativa), auxin promotes crown root initiation via the LOB-domain transcription factor (LBD) transcription factor CROWN ROOTLESS1 (CRL1); however, the gene regulatory network downstream of CRL1 remains largely unknown. We tested CRL1 transcriptional activity in yeast and in planta, identified CRL1-regulated genes using an inducible gene expression system and a transcriptome analysis, and used in situ hybridization to demonstrate coexpression of a sample of CRL1-regulated genes with CRL1 in crown root primordia. We show that CRL1 positively regulates 277 genes, including key genes involved in meristem patterning (such as QUIESCENT-CENTER SPECIFIC HOMEOBOX; QHB), cell proliferation and hormone homeostasis. Many genes are homologous to Arabidopsis genes involved in lateral root formation, but about a quarter are rice-specific. Our study reveals that several genes acting downstream of LBD transcription factors controlling postembryonic root formation are conserved between monocots and dicots. It also provides evidence that specific genes are involved in the formation of shoot-derived roots in rice.

  9. Formation and growth rates of atmospheric nanoparticles: four years of observations at two West Siberian stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.; Belan, Boris D.; Davydov, Denis K.; Kozlov, Artem V.; Arshinova, Victoria

    2015-04-01

    In spite of fact that the first report on the new particle formation (NPF) itself was done by John Aitken more than one century ago (Aitken, 1898), a phenomenon of NPF bursts taken place in the atmosphere was discovered not very long ago. Nevertheless, to date it is known that they may occur quite often in a variety of environments (Kulmala et al., 2004; Hirsikko et al., 2011). Siberia occupies a vast area covered by forests, but the comprehensive data on burst frequency, as well as on formation and growth rates of freshly nucleated particles in this key region are still lacking. Continuous measurements of aerosol size distribution carried out in recent years at two West Siberian stations (TOR-station - 56o28'41"N, 85o03'15"E; Fonovaya Observatory - 56o25'07"N, 84o04'27"E) allowed this gap in data to be filled up. Analysis of the size spectra classified in accordance with criteria proposed by Dal Maso et al. (2005) and Hammed et al. (2007) enabled a conclusion to be drawn that NPF events in Wets Siberia are more often observed during spring (from March to May) and early autumn (secondary frequency peak in September). On average, particle formation bursts took place on 23-28 % of all days. Such a seasonal pattern of the NPF occurrence is very similar to one observed at SMEAR II Station (Hyytiälä, Finland; Dal Maso et al. 2005, 2007). Formation rates (FR) of particles with diameters below 25 nm varied in a wide range from 0.1 to 10 cm-3 s-1. Mean values of FR for the entire period of observations were 1.7 cm-3s-1 (median = 1.13 cm-3 s-1) at TOR-station and 0.88 cm-3 s-1 (median = 0.69 cm-3 s-1) at Fonovaya Observatory. Enhanced values of FR are usually observed from spring to autumn. Mean growth rates of observed at TOR-station and Fonovaya Observatory were 6.5 nm h-1 (median = 5.0 nm h-1) and 8.3 nm h-1 (median = 6.4 nm h-1), respectively. This work was supported by the Branch of Geology, Geophysics and Mining Sciences of RAS (Program No. 5); State contracts of

  10. A CORRELATION BETWEEN STAR FORMATION RATE AND AVERAGE BLACK HOLE ACCRETION IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chien-Ting J.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Alberts, Stacey; Pope, Alexandra; Brodwin, Mark; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Goulding, Andrew D.; Murray, Stephen S.; Alexander, David M.; Mullaney, James R.; Assef, Roberto J.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Brown, Michael J. I.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Le Floc'h, Emeric

    2013-08-10

    We present a measurement of the average supermassive black hole accretion rate (BHAR) as a function of the star formation rate (SFR) for galaxies in the redshift range 0.25 < z < 0.8. We study a sample of 1767 far-IR-selected star-forming galaxies in the 9 deg{sup 2} Booetes multi-wavelength survey field. The SFR is estimated using 250 {mu}m observations from the Herschel Space Observatory, for which the contribution from the active galactic nucleus (AGN) is minimal. In this sample, 121 AGNs are directly identified using X-ray or mid-IR selection criteria. We combined these detected AGNs and an X-ray stacking analysis for undetected sources to study the average BHAR for all of the star-forming galaxies in our sample. We find an almost linear relation between the average BHAR (in M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}) and the SFR (in M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}) for galaxies across a wide SFR range 0.85 < log SFR < 2.56: log BHAR = (- 3.72 {+-} 0.52) + (1.05 {+-} 0.33)log SFR. This global correlation between SFR and average BHAR is consistent with a simple picture in which SFR and AGN activity are tightly linked over galaxy evolution timescales.

  11. Growing black holes and galaxies: black hole accretion versus star formation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volonteri, Marta; Capelo, Pedro R.; Netzer, Hagai; Bellovary, Jillian; Dotti, Massimo; Governato, Fabio

    2015-05-01

    We present a new suite of hydrodynamical simulations and use it to study, in detail, black hole and galaxy properties. The high time, spatial and mass resolution, and realistic orbits and mass ratios, down to 1:6 and 1:10, enable us to meaningfully compare star formation rate (SFR) and BH accretion rate (BHAR) time-scales, temporal behaviour, and relative magnitude. We find that (i) BHAR and galaxy-wide SFR are typically temporally uncorrelated, and have different variability time-scales, except during the merger proper, lasting ˜0.2-0.3 Gyr. BHAR and nuclear (<100 pc) SFR are better correlated, and their variability are similar. Averaging over time, the merger phase leads typically to an increase by a factor of a few in the BHAR/SFR ratio. (ii) BHAR and nuclear SFR are intrinsically proportional, but the correlation lessens if the long-term SFR is measured. (iii) Galaxies in the remnant phase are the ones most likely to be selected as systems dominated by an active galactic nucleus, because of the long time spent in this phase. (iv) The time-scale over which a given diagnostic probes the SFR has a profound impact on the recovered correlations with BHAR, and on the interpretation of observational data.

  12. Rate equation approach to understanding the ion-catalyzed formation of peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.; Sibirev, N. V.; Eliseev, I. E.; Vyazmin, S. Yu; Boitsov, V. M.; Natochin, Yu. V.; Dubina, M. V.

    2013-06-01

    The salt-induced peptide formation is important for assessing and approaching schemes of molecular evolution. Here, we present experimental data and an exactly solvable kinetic model describing the linear polymerization of L-glutamic amino acid in water solutions with different concentrations of KCl and NaCl. The length distributions of peptides are well fitted by the model. Strikingly, we find that KCl considerably enhances the peptide yield, while NaCl does not show any catalytic effect in most cases under our experimental conditions. The greater catalytic effect of potassium ions is entirely interpreted by one and single parameter, the polymerization rate constant that depends on the concentration of a given salt in the reaction mixture. We deduce numeric estimates for the rate constant at different concentrations of the ions and show that it is always larger for KCl. This leads to an exponential increase of the potassium- to sodium-catalyzed peptide concentration ratio with length. Our results show that the ion-catalyzed peptides have a higher probability to emerge in excess potassium rather than in sodium-rich water solutions.

  13. Evaporation Rate Study and NDMA Formation from UDMH/NO2 Reaction Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Vanessa D.; Dee, Louis A.; Baker, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory samples of uns-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) fuel/oxidizer (nitrogen dioxide) non-combustion reaction products (UFORP) were prepared using a unique permeation tube technology. Also, a synthetic UFORP was prepared from UDMH, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), dimethylammonium nitrate, sodium nitrite and purified water. The evaporation rate of UFORP and synthetic UFORP was determined under space vacuum (approx 10(exp -3) Torr) at -40 ?C and 0 ?C. The material remaining was analyzed and showed that the UFORP weight and NDMA concentration decreased over time; however, NDMA had not completely evaporated. Over 85% of the weight was removed by subjecting the UFORP to 10(-3) Torr for 7 hours at -40 ?C and 4 hours at 0 ?C. A mixture of dimethylammonium nitrate and sodium nitrite formed NDMA at a rapid rate in a moist air environment. A sample of UFORP residue was analyzed for formation of NDMA under various conditions. It was found that NDMA was not formed unless nitrite was added.

  14. Effectiveness of intramuscularly administered cyanide antidotes and the rate of methemoglobin formation

    SciTech Connect

    Vick, J.A.; Von Bredow, J.D.

    1993-05-13

    Successful first aid therapy for cyanide intoxication is dependent upon the immediate administration of antidotes which directly or indirectly interact with the cyanide ion to remove it from circulation. Exceptionally rapid methemoglobin formers (hydroxylamine hydrochloride 'HA) and Dimethylaminophenol (DMAP) are usually able to prevent the lethal effect of cyanide following intramuscular injections in doses sufficient to induce 20% methemoglobin (HA = 20 mg/kg and DMAP= 2 mg/kg). Sodium nitrite, the methemoglobin inducer approved by the FDA and is available for military use, must be administered by intravenous infusion since it is not an effective cyanide antidote by the intramuscular route. In the normal un-intoxicated animal an intramuscular injection of 20 mg/kg sodium nitrite will form 20% methemoglobin at a rapid rate; however, in the presence of acute cyanide intoxication the associated severe bradycardia appears to limit the rate of absorption of sodium nitrite from the intramuscular site which prevents the rapid formation of sufficient methemoglobin to counteract cyanide intoxication.

  15. Rating Scale Items: A Brief Review of Nomenclature, Components, and Formatting to Inform the Development of Direct Behavior Rating (DBR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christ, Theodore J.; Boice, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Ratings scales are a common component of many multisource, multimethod frameworks for socioemotional and behavior assessment of children. There is a modest literature base to support the use of attitudinal, behavioral, and personality rating scales. Much of that historic literature focuses on the characteristics and interpretations of specific…

  16. Rate of formation of carboxyhemoglobin in exercising humans exposed to carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Tikuisis, P.; Kane, D.M.; McLellan, T.M.; Buick, F.; Fairburn, S.M. )

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the CFK equation for its prediction of the rate of formation of carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO) in exercising humans by use of measured values of the respiratory variables and to characterize the rate of appearance of HbCO with frequent blood sampling. Ten nonsmoking male subjects were exposed to carbon monoxide (CO) on two separate occasions distinguished by the level of activity. Steady-state exercise was conducted on a cycle ergometer at either a low ([approximately]45 W) or moderate ([approximately]90W) power output. Each experiment began with an exposure of 3,000 ppm CO for 3 min during a rest period followed by three intermittent exposures ranging from 3,000 ppm CO for 1 min at low exercise to 667 ppm CO for 3 min at moderate exercise. Increases in HbCO were normalized against predicted values to account for individual differences in the variables that govern CO uptake. No difference in the normalized uptake of CO was found between the low-and moderate-exercise trials. However, the CFK equation underpredicted the increase in HbCO for the exposures at rest and the first exposure at exercise, whereas it overpredicted for the latter two exposures at exercise. The net increase in HbCO after all exposures ([approximately]10% HbCO) deviated by <1% HbCO between the measured and predicted values. The rate of appearance of HbCO fits a sigmoidal shape with considerable overshoot at the end of exposure. This can be explained by delays in the delivery of CO to the blood sampling point (dorsal hand vein) and by a relatively small blood circulation time compared with other regions of the body. A simple circulation model is used to demonstrate the overshoot phenomenon. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Crystal Structure of the Core Region of Hantavirus Nucleocapsid Protein Reveals the Mechanism for Ribonucleoprotein Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu; Wang, Wenming; Sun, Yuna; Ma, Chao; Wang, Xu; Wang, Xin; Liu, Pi; Shen, Shu; Li, Baobin; Lin, Jianping; Deng, Fei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hantaviruses, which belong to the genus Hantavirus in the family Bunyaviridae, infect mammals, including humans, causing either hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in humans with high mortality. Hantavirus encodes a nucleocapsid protein (NP) to encapsidate the genome and form a ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP) together with viral polymerase. Here, we report the crystal structure of the core domains of NP (NPcore) encoded by Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV), which are two representative members that cause HCPS in the New World. The constructs of SNV and ANDV NPcore exclude the N- and C-terminal portions of full polypeptide to obtain stable proteins for crystallographic study. The structure features an N lobe and a C lobe to clamp RNA-binding crevice and exhibits two protruding extensions in both lobes. The positively charged residues located in the RNA-binding crevice play a key role in RNA binding and virus replication. We further demonstrated that the C-terminal helix and the linker region connecting the N-terminal coiled-coil domain and NPcore are essential for hantavirus NP oligomerization through contacts made with two adjacent protomers. Moreover, electron microscopy (EM) visualization of native RNPs extracted from the virions revealed that a monomer-sized NP-RNA complex is the building block of viral RNP. This work provides insight into the formation of hantavirus RNP and provides an understanding of the evolutionary connections that exist among bunyaviruses. IMPORTANCE Hantaviruses are distributed across a wide and increasing range of host reservoirs throughout the world. In particular, hantaviruses can be transmitted via aerosols of rodent excreta to humans or from human to human and cause HFRS and HCPS, with mortalities of 15% and 50%, respectively. Hantavirus is therefore listed as a category C pathogen. Hantavirus encodes an NP that plays essential roles both in RNP formation and

  18. A chamber study of the influence of boreal BVOC emissions and sulfuric acid on nanoparticle formation rates at ambient concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Maso, M.; Liao, L.; Wildt, J.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Tillmann, R.; Sipilä, M.; Hakala, J.; Lehtipalo, K.; Ehn, M.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D.; Mentel, T.

    2016-02-01

    Aerosol formation from biogenic and anthropogenic precursor trace gases in continental background areas affects climate via altering the amount of available cloud condensation nuclei. Significant uncertainty still exists regarding the agents controlling the formation of aerosol nanoparticles. We have performed experiments in the Jülich plant-atmosphere simulation chamber with instrumentation for the detection of sulfuric acid and nanoparticles, and present the first simultaneous chamber observations of nanoparticles, sulfuric acid, and realistic levels and mixtures of biogenic volatile compounds (BVOCs). We present direct laboratory observations of nanoparticle formation from sulfuric acid and realistic BVOC precursor vapour mixtures performed at atmospherically relevant concentration levels. We directly measured particle formation rates separately from particle growth rates. From this, we established that in our experiments, the formation rate was proportional to the product of sulfuric acid and biogenic VOC emission strength. The formation rates were consistent with a mechanism in which nucleating BVOC oxidation products are rapidly formed and activate with sulfuric acid. The growth rate of nanoparticles immediately after birth was best correlated with estimated products resulting from BVOC ozonolysis.

  19. Mechanism of Formation of Copper(II) Chloro Complexes Revealed by Transient Absorption Spectroscopy and DFT/TDDFT Calculations.

    PubMed

    Mereshchenko, Andrey S; Olshin, Pavel K; Karabaeva, Kanykey E; Panov, Maxim S; Wilson, R Marshall; Kochemirovsky, Vladimir A; Skripkin, Mikhail Yu; Tveryanovich, Yury S; Tarnovsky, Alexander N

    2015-07-16

    Copper(II) complexes are extremely labile with typical ligand exchange rate constants on the order of 10(6)-10(9) M(-1) s(-1). As a result, it is often difficult to identify the actual formation mechanism of these complexes. In this work, using UV-vis transient absorption when probing in a broad time range (20 ps to 8 μs) in conjunction with DFT/TDDFT calculations, we studied the dynamics and underlying reaction mechanisms of the formation of extremely labile copper(II) CuCl4(2-) chloro complexes from copper(II) CuCl3(-) trichloro complexes and chloride ions. These two species, produced via photochemical dissociation of CuCl4(2-) upon 420 nm excitation into the ligand-to-metal-charge-transfer electronic state, are found to recombine into parent complexes with bimolecular rate constants of (9.0 ± 0.1) × 10(7) and (5.3 ± 0.4) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) in acetonitrile and dichloromethane, respectively. In dichloromethane, recombination occurs via a simple one-step addition. In acetonitrile, where [CuCl3](-) reacts with the solvent to form a [CuCl3CH3CN](-) complex in less than 20 ps, recombination takes place via ligand exchange described by the associative interchange mechanism that involves a [CuCl4CH3CN](2-) intermediate. In both solvents, the recombination reaction is potential energy controlled. PMID:26079181

  20. ESTIMATING THE STAR FORMATION RATE AT 1 kpc SCALES IN NEARBY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, Adam K.; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Bigiel, Frank; De Blok, W. J. G.; Boissier, Samuel; Bolatto, Alberto; Brinks, Elias; Madore, Barry; Murphy, Eric; Sandstrom, Karin; Schruba, Andreas; Walter, Fabian

    2012-07-15

    Using combinations of H{alpha}, ultraviolet (UV), and infrared (IR) emission, we estimate the star formation rate (SFR) surface density, {Sigma}{sub SFR}, at 1 kpc resolution for 30 disk galaxies that are targets of the IRAM HERACLES CO survey. We present a new physically motivated IR spectral-energy-distribution-based approach to account for possible contributions to 24 {mu}m emission not associated with recent star formation. Considering a variety of 'reference' SFRs from the literature, we revisit the calibration of the 24 {mu}m term in hybrid (UV+IR or H{alpha}+IR) tracers. We show that the overall calibration of this term remains uncertain at the factor of two level because of the lack of wide-field, robust reference SFR estimates. Within this uncertainty, published calibrations represent a reasonable starting point for 1 kpc-wide areas of star-forming disk galaxies, but we re-derive and refine the calibration of the IR term in these tracers to match our resolution and approach to 24 {mu}m emission. We compare a large suite of {Sigma}{sub SFR} estimates and find that above {Sigma}{sub SFR} {approx} 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2} the systematic differences among tracers are less than a factor of two across two orders of magnitude dynamic range. We caution that methodology and data both become serious issues below this level. We note from simple model considerations that when focusing on a part of a galaxy dominated by a single stellar population, the intrinsic uncertainty in H{alpha}- and FUV-based SFRs is {approx}0.3 and {approx}0.5 dex.

  1. The ultraviolet and infrared star formation rates of compact group galaxies: an expanded sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenkić, Laura; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Desjardins, Tyler D.; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Fedotov, Konstantin; Charlton, Jane; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Durrell, Pat R.; Gronwall, Caryl

    2016-07-01

    Compact groups of galaxies provide insight into the role of low-mass, dense environments in galaxy evolution because the low velocity dispersions and close proximity of galaxy members result in frequent interactions that take place over extended time-scales. We expand the census of star formation in compact group galaxies by Tzanavaris et al. (2010) and collaborators with Swift UVOT, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 μm photometry of a sample of 183 galaxies in 46 compact groups. After correcting luminosities for the contribution from old stellar populations, we estimate the dust-unobscured star formation rate (SFRUV) using the UVOT uvw2 photometry. Similarly, we use the MIPS 24 μm photometry to estimate the component of the SFR that is obscured by dust (SFRIR). We find that galaxies which are MIR-active (MIR-`red'), also have bluer UV colours, higher specific SFRs, and tend to lie in H I-rich groups, while galaxies that are MIR-inactive (MIR-`blue') have redder UV colours, lower specific SFRs, and tend to lie in H I-poor groups. We find the SFRs to be continuously distributed with a peak at about 1 M⊙ yr-1, indicating this might be the most common value in compact groups. In contrast, the specific SFR distribution is bimodal, and there is a clear distinction between star-forming and quiescent galaxies. Overall, our results suggest that the specific SFR is the best tracer of gas depletion and galaxy evolution in compact groups.

  2. Predicting Galaxy Star Formation Rates via the Co-evolution of Galaxies and Halos

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Douglas F.; Hearin, Andrew P.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Becker, Matthew R.; Behroozi, Peter S.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Reyes, Reinabelle; Zentner, Andrew R.

    2014-03-06

    In this paper, we test the age matching hypothesis that the star formation rate (SFR) of a galaxy is determined by its dark matter halo formation history, and as such, that more quiescent galaxies reside in older halos. This simple model has been remarkably successful at predicting color-based galaxy statistics at low redshift as measured in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). To further test this method with observations, we present new SDSS measurements of the galaxy two-point correlation function and galaxy-galaxy lensing as a function of stellar mass and SFR, separated into quenched and star forming galaxy samples. We find that our age matching model is in excellent agreement with these new measurements. We also employ a galaxy group finder and show that our model is able to predict: (1) the relative SFRs of central and satellite galaxies, (2) the SFR-dependence of the radial distribution of satellite galaxy populations within galaxy groups, rich groups, and clusters and their surrounding larger scale environments, and (3) the interesting feature that the satellite quenched fraction as a function of projected radial distance from the central galaxy exhibits an approx r-.15 slope, independent of environment. The accurate prediction for the spatial distribution of satellites is intriguing given the fact that we do not explicitly model satellite-specific processes after infall, and that in our model the virial radius does not mark a special transition region in the evolution of a satellite, contrary to most galaxy evolution models. The success of the model suggests that present-day galaxy SFR is strongly correlated with halo mass assembly history.

  3. Sustaining Star Formation Rates in Spiral Galaxies Supernova-driven Turbulent Accretion Disk Models Applied to THINGS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, Bernd; Leroy, Adam K.

    2011-01-01

    Gas disks of spiral galaxies can be described as clumpy accretion disks without a coupling of viscosity to the actual thermal state of the gas. The model description of a turbulent disk consisting of emerging and spreading clumps contains free parameters, which can be constrained by observations of molecular gas, atomic gas, and the star formation rate for individual galaxies. Radial profiles of 18 nearby spiral galaxies from THINGS, HERACLES, SINGS, and GALEX data are used to compare the observed star formation efficiency, molecular fraction, and velocity dispersion to the model. The observed radially decreasing velocity dispersion can be reproduced by the model. In the framework of this model, the decrease in the inner disk is due to the stellar mass distribution which dominates the gravitational potential. Introducing a radial break in the star formation efficiency into the model improves the fits significantly. This change in the star formation regime is realized by replacing the free-fall time in the prescription of the star formation rate with the molecule formation timescale. Depending on the star formation prescription, the break radius is located near the transition region between the molecular-gas-dominated and atomic-gas-dominated parts of the galactic disk or closer to the optical radius. It is found that only less massive galaxies (log M(M ⊙) <~ 10) can balance gas loss via star formation by radial gas accretion within the disk. These galaxies can thus access their gas reservoirs with large angular momentum. On the other hand, the star formation of massive galaxies is determined by the external gas mass accretion rate from a putative spherical halo of ionized gas or from satellite accretion. In the absence of this external accretion, star formation slowly exhausts the gas within the optical disk within the star formation timescale.

  4. The Conditions Underpinning Extreme Star Formation in ULIRGs and LIRGs as Revealed by Herschel Far-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, Gabriel A.; Ashby, Matthew; Smith, Howard Alan; McTier, Moiya; Melendez, Marcio

    2016-01-01

    We present a systematic survey of molecular and atomic line fluxes in all star-forming galaxies observed by the Herschel PACs instrument with detectable OH lines that also contain Herschel SPIRE FTS spectra, to determine how physical conditions vary as a function of star formation rate. Specifically, we measured selected CO, H2O, [CI], and [NII] integrated line fluxes in a sample of 145 star-forming galaxies covering a range of far-infrared luminosities ranging from 109 to above 1012 LSun . Thus, our sample includes typical, quiescent galaxies as well as Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) and Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs), known to be creating stars extremely rapidly. We find evidence suggesting that ULIRGs with far-infrared luminosities of LFIR> 1012 LSun require an additional heating mechanism other than UV heating from star formation, while LIRGs and less luminous star-forming galaxies may be heated primarily by their star formation. We also find that the [NII] 3P1 - 3P0 fine structure line flux and those of the CO J=5-4, CO J=7-6, and CO J=8-7 transitions are generally weaker for ULIRGs compared to LIRGs and less luminous star-forming galaxies, while we find the CO J=11-10, CO J=12-11, and CO J=13-12 transitions are generally stronger. In all these respects, ULIRGs are shown to differ significantly from other galaxies undergoing less extreme star formation. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  5. Atomic force microscopy imaging reveals the formation of ASIC/ENaC cross-clade ion channels.

    PubMed

    Jeggle, Pia; Smith, Ewan St J; Stewart, Andrew P; Haerteis, Silke; Korbmacher, Christoph; Edwardson, J Michael

    2015-08-14

    ASIC and ENaC are co-expressed in various cell types, and there is evidence for a close association between them. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine whether ASIC1a and ENaC subunits are able to form cross-clade hybrid ion channels. ASIC1a and ENaC could be co-isolated from detergent extracts of tsA 201 cells co-expressing the two subunits. Isolated proteins were incubated with antibodies against ENaC and Fab fragments against ASIC1a. AFM imaging revealed proteins that were decorated by both an antibody and a Fab fragment with an angle of ∼120° between them, indicating the formation of ASIC1a/ENaC heterotrimers. PMID:26032502

  6. Rapid Circumstellar Disk Evolution and an Accelerating Star Formation Rate in the Infrared Dark Cloud M17 SWex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povich, Matthew S.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Broos, Patrick S.; Orbin, Wesley T.; King, Robert R.; Naylor, Tim; Whitney, Barbara A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a catalog of 840 X-ray sources and first results from a 100 ks Chandra X-ray Observatory imaging study of the filamentary infrared (IR) dark cloud G014.225-00.506, which forms the central regions of a larger cloud complex known as the M17 southwest extension (M17 SWex). In addition to the rich population of protostars and young stellar objects with dusty circumstellar disks revealed by archival data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we discover a population of X-ray-emitting, intermediate-mass pre-main-sequence stars that lack IR excess emission from circumstellar disks. We model the IR spectral energy distributions of this source population to measure its mass function and place new constraints on the destruction timescales for the inner dust disk for 2-8 M ⊙ stars. We also place a lower limit on the star formation rate (SFR) and find that it is quite high (\\dot{M}≥slant 0.007 M ⊙ yr-1), equivalent to several Orion Nebula Clusters in G14.225-0.506 alone, and likely accelerating. The cloud complex has not produced a population of massive, O-type stars commensurate with its SFR. This absence of very massive (≳20 M ⊙) stars suggests that either (1) M17 SWex is an example of a distributed mode of star formation that will produce a large OB association dominated by intermediate-mass stars but relatively few massive clusters, or (2) the massive cores are still in the process of accreting sufficient mass to form massive clusters hosting O stars.

  7. Local SDSS galaxies in the Herschel Stripe 82 survey: a critical assessment of optically derived star formation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosario, D. J.; Mendel, J. T.; Ellison, S. L.; Lutz, D.; Trump, J. R.

    2016-04-01

    We study a set of 3319 galaxies in the redshift interval 0.04 < z < 0.15 with far-infrared (FIR) coverage from the Herschel Stripe 82 survey (HerS), and emission-line measurements, redshifts, stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) (DR7) MPA/JHU data base. About 40 per cent of the sample are detected in the Herschel/SPIRE 250 μm band. Total infrared (TIR) luminosities derived from HerS and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) photometry allow us to compare infrared and optical estimates of SFR with unprecedented statistics for diverse classes of galaxies. We find excellent agreement between TIR-derived and emission line-based SFRs for H II galaxies. Other classes, such as active galaxies and evolved galaxies, exhibit systematic discrepancies between optical and TIR SFRs. We demonstrate that these offsets are attributable primarily to survey biases and the large intrinsic uncertainties of the Dn4000- and colour-based optical calibrations used to estimate the SDSS SFRs of these galaxies. Using a classification scheme which expands upon popular emission-line methods, we demonstrate that emission-line galaxies with uncertain classifications include a population of massive, dusty, metal-rich star-forming systems that are frequently neglected in existing studies. We also study the capabilities of infrared selection of star-forming galaxies. FIR selection reveals a substantial population of galaxies dominated by cold dust which are missed by the long-wavelength WISE bands. Our results demonstrate that Herschel large-area surveys offer the means to construct large, relatively complete samples of local star-forming galaxies with accurate estimates of SFR that can be used to study the interplay between nuclear activity and star formation.

  8. The Metabolic Regulation of Sporulation and Parasporal Crystal Formation in Bacillus thuringiensis Revealed by Transcriptomics and Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jieping; Mei, Han; Zheng, Cao; Qian, Hongliang; Cui, Cui; Fu, Yang; Su, Jianmei; Liu, Ziduo; Yu, Ziniu; He, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a well-known entomopathogenic bacterium used worldwide as an environmentally compatible biopesticide. During sporulation, B. thuringiensis accumulates a large number of parasporal crystals consisting of insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) that can account for nearly 20–30% of the cell's dry weight. However, the metabolic regulation mechanisms of ICP synthesis remain to be elucidated. In this study, the combined efforts in transcriptomics and proteomics mainly uncovered the following 6 metabolic regulation mechanisms: (1) proteases and the amino acid metabolism (particularly, the branched-chain amino acids) became more active during sporulation; (2) stored poly-β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoin, together with some low-quality substances provided considerable carbon and energy sources for sporulation and parasporal crystal formation; (3) the pentose phosphate shunt demonstrated an interesting regulation mechanism involving gluconate when CT-43 cells were grown in GYS medium; (4) the tricarboxylic acid cycle was significantly modified during sporulation; (5) an obvious increase in the quantitative levels of enzymes and cytochromes involved in energy production via the electron transport system was observed; (6) most F0F1-ATPase subunits were remarkably up-regulated during sporulation. This study, for the first time, systematically reveals the metabolic regulation mechanisms involved in the supply of amino acids, carbon substances, and energy for B. thuringiensis spore and parasporal crystal formation at both the transcriptional and translational levels. PMID:23408684

  9. Atomic force microscopy imaging reveals the formation of ASIC/ENaC cross-clade ion channels

    SciTech Connect

    Jeggle, Pia; Smith, Ewan St. J.; Stewart, Andrew P.; Haerteis, Silke; Korbmacher, Christoph; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2015-08-14

    ASIC and ENaC are co-expressed in various cell types, and there is evidence for a close association between them. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine whether ASIC1a and ENaC subunits are able to form cross-clade hybrid ion channels. ASIC1a and ENaC could be co-isolated from detergent extracts of tsA 201 cells co-expressing the two subunits. Isolated proteins were incubated with antibodies against ENaC and Fab fragments against ASIC1a. AFM imaging revealed proteins that were decorated by both an antibody and a Fab fragment with an angle of ∼120° between them, indicating the formation of ASIC1a/ENaC heterotrimers. - Highlights: • There is evidence for a close association between ASIC and ENaC. • We used AFM to test whether ASIC1a and ENaC subunits form cross-clade ion channels. • Isolated proteins were incubated with subunit-specific antibodies and Fab fragments. • Some proteins were doubly decorated at ∼120° by an antibody and a Fab fragment. • Our results indicate the formation of ASIC1a/ENaC heterotrimers.

  10. 13C Tracking after 13CO2 Supply Revealed Diurnal Patterns of Wood Formation in Aspen1

    PubMed Central

    Mahboubi, Amir; Linden, Pernilla; Moritz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Wood of trees is formed from carbon assimilated in the photosynthetic tissues. Determining the temporal dynamics of carbon assimilation, subsequent transport into developing wood, and incorporation to cell walls would further our understanding of wood formation in particular and tree growth in general. To investigate these questions, we designed a 13CO2 labeling system to study carbon transport and incorporation to developing wood of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloides). Tracking of 13C incorporation to wood over a time course using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed diurnal patterns in wood cell wall biosynthesis. The dark period had a differential effect on 13C incorporation to lignin and cell wall carbohydrates. No 13C was incorporated into aromatic amino acids of cell wall proteins in the dark, suggesting that cell wall protein biosynthesis ceased during the night. The results show previously unrecognized temporal patterns in wood cell wall biosynthesis, suggest diurnal cycle as a possible cue in the regulation of carbon incorporation to wood, and establish a unique 13C labeling method for the analysis of wood formation and secondary growth in trees. PMID:25931520

  11. IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC DIAGNOSTICS ON THE FORMATION OF TWO MAGNETIC FLUX ROPES REVEALED BY SDO/AIA AND IRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Fang, C.

    2015-05-10

    Helical magnetic flux rope (MFR) is a fundamental structure of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and has been discovered recently to exist as a sigmoidal channel structure prior to its eruption in the EUV high-temperature passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). However, when and where the MFR is built up are still elusive. In this paper, we investigate two MFRs (MFR1 and MFR2) in detail, whose eruptions produced two energetic solar flares and CMEs on 2014 April 18 and 2014 September 10, respectively. The AIA EUV images reveal that for a long time prior to their eruption, both MFR1 and MFR2 are under formation, which is probably through magnetic reconnection between two groups of sheared arcades driven by the shearing and converging flows in the photosphere near the polarity inversion line. At the footpoints of the MFR1, the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph Si iv, C ii, and Mg ii lines exhibit weak to moderate redshifts and a non-thermal broadening in the pre-flare phase. However, a relatively large blueshift and an extremely strong non-thermal broadening are found at the formation site of the MFR2. These spectral features consolidate the proposition that the reconnection plays an important role in the formation of MFRs. For the MFR1, the reconnection outflow may propagate along its legs, penetrating into the transition region and the chromosphere at the footpoints. For the MFR2, the reconnection probably takes place in the lower atmosphere and results in the strong blueshift and non-thermal broadening for the Mg ii, C ii, and Si iv lines.

  12. Constraints on timing and rates of strath terrace formation on actively uplifting anticlines in the foreland of the Chinese Tien Shan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufe, A.; Burbank, D. W.; Chen, J.; Liu, L.; Li, T.; Thompson, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The formation of strath surfaces (fluvially created, sub-horizontal erosion surfaces) requires that the rate of lateral erosion outpaces the rate of incision of a river. The change from incision to strath cutting has commonly been linked to a decrease of incision rates due to shielding of the river bed by a thick sediment cover1. Straths are abandoned when the bed cover is reduced and incision resumes. A more recent study suggests that strath terrace formation might be linked to a change between a braided and a single-thread river2. Finally, several models have explored strath formation due to inherent dynamics of meandering systems3,4. In the foreland of the Tian Shan in northwest China, weakly consolidated Pliocene sand and siltstones are being actively uplifted at rates of 1 - 3 mm/y by a series of detachment anticlines. A number of elevated, several-kilometer-wide planation surfaces bear witness to a history of multiple strath cutting events by braided streams. In contrast, modern rivers incise into the uplifting folds creating 10 - 200 m deep canyons while the up- and downstream alluvial fans remain unincised. We use GIS analysis, field mapping, and OSL dating to describe incision and beveling of the folds. Our chronologic data reveal at least 2 - 3 beveling events over the last 40 ky on the Mutule fold. We find that lateral erosion of the bedrock during beveling events occurs at rates that are more than an order of magnitude higher than average incision rates. During times of incision (which can be tens of thousands of years long), lateral erosion rates need to be considerably lower in order to explain the formation of narrow canyons. Thus, our observations of scale, rate, and intermittency of strath cutting, seem difficult to reconcile with models that explain strath formation by variations of the incision rate1 or intrinsic meandering dynamics under steady forcing3,4. The critical requirement to explain our observations appears to be repeated changes in the

  13. Ultraviolet+Infrared Star Formation Rates: Hickson Compact Groups with Swift and SPitzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Gallagher, S. C.; Johnson, K. E.; Gronwall, C.; Immler, S.; Reines, A. E.; Hoversten, E.; Charlton, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    We present Swift UVOT ultraviolet (UV; 1600-3000 A) data with complete three-band UV photometry for a sample of 41 galaxies in 11 nearby (<4500 km/s) Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) of galaxies. We use UVOT uvw2-band (2000A) photometry to estimate the dust-unobscured component, SFR(sub uv), of the total star formation rate, SFR(sub TOTAL). We use Spitzer MIPS 24 micron photometry to estimate SFR(sub IR), the component of SFR(sub TOTAL) that suffers dust extinction in the UV and is re-emitted in the IR. By combining the two components, we obtain SFR(sub TOTAL) estimates for all HCG galaxies. We obtain total stellar mass, M(sub *) estimates by means of Two Micron All Sky Survey K(sub s)-band luminosities, and use them to calculate specific star formation rates, SSFR is identical with SFR(sub TOTAL)/ M (sub *). SSFR values show a clear and significant bimodality, with a gap between low (approximately <3.2 x 10(exp -11) / yr) and high-SSFR (approximately > 1.2 x lO)exp -10)/yr) systems. We compare this bimodality to the previously discovered bimodality in alpha-IRAC, the MIR activity index from a power-law fit to the Spitzer IRAC 4.5-8 micron data for these galaxies. We find that all galaxies with alpha-IRAC <= 0 (> 0) are in the high- (low-) SSFR locus, as expected if high levels of star-forming activity power MIR emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and a hot dust continuum. Consistent with this finding, all elliptical/SO galaxies are in the low-SSFR locus, while 22 out of 24 spirals / irregulars are in the high-SSFR locus, with two borderline cases. We further divide our sample into three subsamples (I, II, and III) according to decreasing H I richness of the parent galaxy group to which a galaxy belongs. Consistent with the SSFR and alpha-IRAC bimodality, 12 out of 15 type I (11 out of 12 type III) galaxies are in the high- (low-) SSFR locus, while type II galaxies span almost the full range of SSFR values. We use the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxy

  14. J-PLUS and the galaxy star formation rate in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilella, G.; Viironen, K.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Varela, J.; Cenarro, A. J.; J-PAS Team

    2015-05-01

    The Javalambre Physics of the Local Universe Survey (J-PLUS) is a large photometric survey that will cover ˜8000 deg^2 with a set of 5 broad filters (SDSS filter set) and 7 narrow ones. It will be carried out from the Observatorio Astrofísico de Javalambre (OAJ) at the Pico del Buitre, Teruel, Spain. In addition to its main goal, which is the photometric calibration of the J-PAS survey, it has been designed to acquire the Hα flux of the galaxies in the nearby Universe (z≤0.015) up to r˜23 (AB). In this poster we present a first approach to the methodology that will be used to obtain Hα fluxes from photometric data. We first explain different methodologies to recover this flux. To test these methodologies, we simulate observations of real star forming galaxies from SDSS spectra. We show that using the information of one or two broad filters and a narrow one would bias our results. To cope with that, we fit the whole observed spectral energy distribution to a simple stellar population template and isolate the excess of flux inside the Hα filter. This allows us to recover the desired flux with accuracy and without biases. With this information, the J-PLUS survey will allow us to reproduce the Hα luminosity function and derive the star formation rate of thousands of galaxies in the local universe.

  15. PANCHROMATIC ESTIMATION OF STAR FORMATION RATES IN BzK GALAXIES AT 1 < z < 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kurczynski, Peter; Gawiser, Eric; Huynh, Minh; Ivison, Rob J.; Treister, Ezequiel; Smail, Ian; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Greve, Thomas R.; Schinnerer, Eva; Van der Werf, Paul; Urry, Meg

    2012-05-10

    We determine star formation rates (SFRs) in a sample of color-selected, star-forming (sBzK) galaxies (K{sub AB} < 21.8) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South. To identify and avoid active galactic nuclei, we use X-ray, IRAC color, and IR/radio flux ratio selection methods. Photometric redshift-binned, average flux densities are measured with stacking analyses in Spitzer-MIPS IR, BLAST and APEX/LABOCA submillimeter, VLA and GMRT radio, and Chandra X-ray data. We include averages of aperture fluxes in MUSYC UBVRIz'JHK images to determine UV-through-radio spectral energy distributions. We determine the total IR luminosities and compare SFR calibrations from FIR, 24 {mu}m, UV, radio, and X-ray wavebands. We find consistency with our best estimator, SFR{sub IR+UV}, to within errors for the preferred radio SFR calibration. Our results imply that 24 {mu}m only and X-ray SFR estimates should be applied to high-redshift galaxies with caution. Average IR luminosities are consistent with luminous infrared galaxies. We find SFR{sub IR+UV} for our stacked sBzKs at median redshifts 1.4, 1.8, and 2.2 to be 55 {+-} 6 (random error), 74 {+-} 8, and 154 {+-} 17 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, respectively, with additional systematic uncertainty of a factor of {approx}2.

  16. GAMA/H-ATLAS: common star formation rate indicators and their dependence on galaxy physical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Norberg, P.; Gunawardhana, M. L. P.; Heinis, S.; Baldry, I. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bourne, N.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cluver, M. E.; Cooray, A.; da Cunha, E.; Driver, S. P.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Grootes, M. W.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R.; Lacey, C.; Lara-Lopez, M. A.; Loveday, J.; Maddox, S. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Oteo, I.; Owers, M. S.; Popescu, C. C.; Smith, D. J. B.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R. J.; van der Werf, P.

    2016-09-01

    We compare common star formation rate (SFR) indicators in the local Universe in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) equatorial fields (˜160 deg2), using ultraviolet (UV) photometry from GALEX, far-infrared and sub-millimetre (sub-mm) photometry from Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey, and Hα spectroscopy from the GAMA survey. With a high-quality sample of 745 galaxies (median redshift = 0.08), we consider three SFR tracers: UV luminosity corrected for dust attenuation using the UV spectral slope β (SFRUV, corr), Hα line luminosity corrected for dust using the Balmer decrement (BD) (SFRH α, corr), and the combination of UV and infrared (IR) emission (SFRUV + IR). We demonstrate that SFRUV, corr can be reconciled with the other two tracers after applying attenuation corrections by calibrating Infrared excess (IRX; i.e. the IR to UV luminosity ratio) and attenuation in the Hα (derived from BD) against β. However, β, on its own, is very unlikely to be a reliable attenuation indicator. We find that attenuation correction factors depend on parameters such as stellar mass (M*), z and dust temperature (Tdust), but not on Hα equivalent width or Sérsic index. Due to the large scatter in the IRX versus β correlation, when compared to SFRUV + IR, the β-corrected SFRUV, corr exhibits systematic deviations as a function of IRX, BD and Tdust.

  17. The radio continuum-star formation rate relation in WSRT sings galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Heesen, Volker; Brinks, Elias; Leroy, Adam K.; Heald, George; Braun, Robert; Bigiel, Frank; Beck, Rainer E-mail: v.heesen@soton.ac.uk E-mail: heald@astron.nl E-mail: bigiel@uni-heidelberg.de

    2014-05-01

    We present a study of the spatially resolved radio continuum-star formation rate (RC-SFR) relation using state-of-the-art star formation tracers in a sample of 17 THINGS galaxies. We use SFR surface density (Σ{sub SFR}) maps created by a linear combination of GALEX far-UV (FUV) and Spitzer 24 μm maps. We use RC maps at λλ22 and 18 cm from the WSRT SINGS survey and Hα emission maps to correct for thermal RC emission. We compare azimuthally averaged radial profiles of the RC and FUV/mid-IR (MIR) based Σ{sub SFR} maps and study pixel-by-pixel correlations at fixed linear scales of 1.2 and 0.7 kpc. The ratio of the integrated SFRs from the RC emission to that of the FUV/MIR-based SF tracers is R{sub int}=0.78±0.38, consistent with the relation by Condon. We find a tight correlation between the radial profiles of the radio and FUV/MIR-based Σ{sub SFR} for the entire extent of the disk. The ratio R of the azimuthally averaged radio to FUV/MIR-based Σ{sub SFR} agrees with the integrated ratio and has only quasi-random fluctuations with galactocentric radius that are relatively small (25%). Pixel-by-pixel plots show a tight correlation in log-log diagrams of radio to FUV/MIR-based Σ{sub SFR}, with a typical standard deviation of a factor of two. Averaged over our sample we find (Σ{sub SFR}){sub RC}∝(Σ{sub SFR}){sub hyb}{sup 0.63±0.25}, implying that data points with high Σ{sub SFR} are relatively radio dim, whereas the reverse is true for low Σ{sub SFR}. We interpret this as a result of spectral aging of cosmic-ray electrons (CREs), which are diffusing away from the star formation sites where they are injected into the interstellar medium. This is supported by our finding that the radio spectral index is a second parameter in pixel-by-pixel plots: those data points dominated by young CREs are relatively radio dim, while those dominated by old CREs are slightly more RC bright than what would be expected from a linear extrapolation. We studied the ratio R of

  18. The Radio Continuum-Star Formation Rate Relation in WSRT SINGS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heesen, Volker; Brinks, Elias; Leroy, Adam K.; Heald, George; Braun, Robert; Bigiel, Frank; Beck, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    We present a study of the spatially resolved radio continuum-star formation rate (RC-SFR) relation using state-of-the-art star formation tracers in a sample of 17 THINGS galaxies. We use SFR surface density (ΣSFR) maps created by a linear combination of GALEX far-UV (FUV) and Spitzer 24 μm maps. We use RC maps at λλ22 and 18 cm from the WSRT SINGS survey and Hα emission maps to correct for thermal RC emission. We compare azimuthally averaged radial profiles of the RC and FUV/mid-IR (MIR) based ΣSFR maps and study pixel-by-pixel correlations at fixed linear scales of 1.2 and 0.7 kpc. The ratio of the integrated SFRs from the RC emission to that of the FUV/MIR-based SF tracers is \\mathscr{R}_int = 0.78+/- 0.38, consistent with the relation by Condon. We find a tight correlation between the radial profiles of the radio and FUV/MIR-based ΣSFR for the entire extent of the disk. The ratio \\mathscr{R} of the azimuthally averaged radio to FUV/MIR-based ΣSFR agrees with the integrated ratio and has only quasi-random fluctuations with galactocentric radius that are relatively small (25%). Pixel-by-pixel plots show a tight correlation in log-log diagrams of radio to FUV/MIR-based ΣSFR, with a typical standard deviation of a factor of two. Averaged over our sample we find (\\Sigma _{SFR})_{RC}\\propto (\\Sigma _{SFR})_{{hyb}}^{0.63+/- 0.25}, implying that data points with high ΣSFR are relatively radio dim, whereas the reverse is true for low ΣSFR. We interpret this as a result of spectral aging of cosmic-ray electrons (CREs), which are diffusing away from the star formation sites where they are injected into the interstellar medium. This is supported by our finding that the radio spectral index is a second parameter in pixel-by-pixel plots: those data points dominated by young CREs are relatively radio dim, while those dominated by old CREs are slightly more RC bright than what would be expected from a linear extrapolation. We studied the ratio \\mathscr{R} of

  19. A probabilistic analysis reveals fundamental limitations with the environmental impact quotient and similar systems for rating pesticide risks

    PubMed Central

    Schleier, Jerome J.

    2014-01-01

    Comparing risks among pesticides has substantial utility for decision makers. However, if rating schemes to compare risks are to be used, they must be conceptually and mathematically sound. We address limitations with pesticide risk rating schemes by examining in particular the Environmental Impact Quotient (EIQ) using, for the first time, a probabilistic analytic technique. To demonstrate the consequences of mapping discrete risk ratings to probabilities, adjusted EIQs were calculated for a group of 20 insecticides in four chemical classes. Using Monte Carlo simulation, adjusted EIQs were determined under different hypothetical scenarios by incorporating probability ranges. The analysis revealed that pesticides that have different EIQs, and therefore different putative environmental effects, actually may be no different when incorporating uncertainty. The EIQ equation cannot take into account uncertainty the way that it is structured and provide reliable quotients of pesticide impact. The EIQ also is inconsistent with the accepted notion of risk as a joint probability of toxicity and exposure. Therefore, our results suggest that the EIQ and other similar schemes be discontinued in favor of conceptually sound schemes to estimate risk that rely on proper integration of toxicity and exposure information. PMID:24795854

  20. Offset of latest pleistocene shoreface reveals slip rate on the Hosgri strike-slip fault, offshore central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Dartnell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Hosgri fault is the southern part of the regional Hosgri–San Gregorio dextral strike‐slip fault system, which extends primarily in the offshore for about 400 km in central California. Between Morro Bay and San Simeon, high‐resolution multibeam bathymetry reveals that the eastern strand of the Hosgri fault is crossed by an ∼265  m wide slope interpreted as the shoreface of a latest Pleistocene sand spit. This sand spit crossed an embayment and connected a western fault‐bounded bedrock peninsula and an eastern bedrock highland, a paleogeography resembling modern coastal geomorphology along the San Andreas fault. Detailed analysis of the relict shoreface with slope profiles and slope maps indicates a lateral slip rate of 2.6±0.9  mm/yr, considered a minimum rate for the Hosgri given the presence of an active western strand. This slip rate indicates that the Hosgri system takes up the largest share of the strike‐slip fault budget and is the most active strike‐slip fault west of the San Andreas fault in central California. This result further demonstrates the value and potential of high‐resolution bathymetry in characterization of active offshore faults.

  1. Genetic map of the human pseudoautosomal region reveals a high rate of recombination in female meiosis at the Xp telomere

    SciTech Connect

    Henke, A.; Fischer, C.; Rappold, G.A. )

    1993-12-01

    This paper describes the genetic map of the pseudoautosomal region bounded by the telomere of the short arms of the X and Y chromosomes. In males, meiotic exchange on Xp/Yp is confined to this region, leading to highly elevated recombination rates. The map was constructed using 11 pseudoautosomal probes (six of which are new) and typing individuals from 38 CEPH families. All markers have been physically mapped, thus providing the opportunity to compare genetic distance to physical distance through all intervals of the map. This comparison reveals an unexpected high rate of recombination in female meiosis between loci DXYS20 and DXYS78, within 20-80 kb from the telomere. Within this telemore-adjacent region no differences in male and female recombination rates are seen. Furthermore, data from this genetic map support the hypothesis of a linear gradient of recombination across most of the region in male meiosis and provide densely spaced anchor points for linkage studies especially in the telomeric portion of the pseudoautosomal region. 34 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Current denudation rates in dolostone karst from central Spain: Implications for the formation of unroofed caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krklec, Kristina; Domínguez-Villar, David; Carrasco, Rosa M.; Pedraza, Javier

    2016-07-01

    depth, we consider that this is a more reliable denudation rate for the studied location during the studied period. The calculated weathering rate suggests that denudation has a limited contribution to the thinning of bedrock over caves at this site. Therefore, we consider that the formation of unroofed caves in this region most likely results from the thinning of bedrock cover over caves due to collapse of blocks from their ceilings.

  3. Variable rate, multi-format receiver design for 10 to 40 Gb/s DPSK and OOK formats.

    PubMed

    Christen, L; Lizé, Y; Nuccio, S; Willner, A E; Paraschis, L

    2008-03-17

    We demonstrate a continuously-variable bit-rate receiver from 10 to 40 Gbit/s for DPSK demodulation. Unlike previous DPSK demodulators, this receiver is also capable of passing intensity modulated waveforms without distortion. Degradations imposed by receiver imperfections are presented and compared with a traditional DPSK delay-line interferometer.

  4. A Multiwavelength Approach to the Star Formation Rate Estimation in Galaxies at Intermediate Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardiel, N.; Elbaz, D.; Schiavon, R. P.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Koo, D. C.; Phillips, A. C.; Gallego, J.

    2003-02-01

    We use a sample of seven starburst galaxies at intermediate redshifts (z~0.4 and 0.8) with observations ranging from the observed ultraviolet to 1.4 GHz, to compare the star formation rate (SFR) estimators that are used in the different wavelength regimes. We find that extinction-corrected Hα underestimates the SFR, and the degree of this underestimation increases with the infrared luminosity of the galaxies. Galaxies with very different levels of dust extinction as measured with SFRIR/SFR(Hα, uncorrected for extinction) present a similar attenuation A[Hα], as if the Balmer lines probed a different region of the galaxy than the one responsible for the bulk of the IR luminosity for large SFRs. In addition, SFR estimates derived from [O II] λ3727 match very well those inferred from Hα after applying the metallicity correction derived from local galaxies. SFRs estimated from the UV luminosities show a dichotomic behavior, similar to that previously reported by other authors in galaxies at z<~0.4. Here we extend this result up to z~0.8. Finally, one of the studied objects is a luminous compact galaxy (LCG) that may be suffering similar dust-enshrouded star formation episodes. These results highlight the relevance of quantifying the actual LIR of LCGs, as well as that of a much larger and generic sample of luminous infrared galaxies, which will be possible after the launch of SIRTF. Based on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. Based in part on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. Based in part on

  5. Rate of formation and dissolution of mercury sulfide nanoparticles: The dual role of natural organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slowey, Aaron J.

    2010-01-01

    Mercury is a global contaminant of concern due to its transformation by microorganisms to form methylmercury, a toxic species that accumulates in biological tissues. The effect of dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from natural waters on reactions between mercury(II) (Hg) and sulfide (S(-II)) to form HgS(s) nanoparticles across a range of Hg and S(-II) concentrations was investigated. Hg was equilibrated with DOM, after which S(-II) was added. Dissolved Hg (Hgaq) was periodically quantified using ultracentrifugation and chemical analysis following the addition of S(-II). Particle size and identity were determined using dynamic light scattering and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. S(-II) reacts with Hg to form 20 to 200nm aggregates consisting of 1-2 nm HgS(s) subunits that are more structurally disordered than metacinnabar in the presence of 2 x 10-9 to 8 x 10-6M Hg and 10 (mg C)L-1 DOM. Some of the HgS(s) nanoparticle aggregates are subsequently dissolved by DOM and (re)precipitated by S(-II) over periods of hours to days. At least three fractions of Hg-DOM species were observed with respect to reactivity toward S(-II): 0.3 μmol reactive Hg per mmol C (60 percent), 0.1 μmol per mmol C (20 percent) that are kinetically hindered, and another 0.1 μmol Hg per mmol C (20 percent) that are inert to reaction with S(-II). Following an initial S(-II)-driven precipitation of HgS(s), HgS(s) was dissolved by DOM or organic sulfur compounds. HgS(s) formation during this second phase was counterintuitively favored by lower S(-II) concentrations, suggesting surface association of DOM moieties that are less capable of dissolving HgS(s). DOM partially inhibits HgS(s) formation and mediates reactions between Hg and S(-II) such that HgS(s) is susceptible to dissolution. These findings indicate that Hg accessibility to microorganisms could be controlled by kinetic (intermediate) species in the presence of S(-II) and DOM, undermining the premise that equilibrium Hg species

  6. Rates and Properties of Type Ia Supernovae as a Function of Mass and Star Formation in Their Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, M.; Le Borgne, D.; Pritchet, C. J.; Hodsman, A.; Neill, J. D.; Howell, D. A.; Carlberg, R. G.; Astier, P.; Aubourg, E.; Balam, D.; Basa, S.; Conley, A.; Fabbro, S.; Fouchez, D.; Guy, J.; Hook, I.; Pain, R.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perrett, K.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Taillet, R.; Baumont, S.; Bronder, J.; Ellis, R. S.; Filiol, M.; Lusset, V.; Perlmutter, S.; Ripoche, P.; Tao, C.

    2006-09-01

    We show that Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are formed within both very young and old stellar populations, with observed rates that depend on the stellar mass and mean star formation rates (SFRs) of their host galaxies. Models in which the SN Ia rate depends solely on host galaxy stellar mass are ruled out with >99% confidence. Our analysis is based on 100 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, plus 24 photometrically classified events, all from the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) and distributed over 0.2rate per unit mass is proportional to the specific SFR of the parent galaxies-more vigorously star-forming galaxies host more SNe Ia per unit stellar mass, broadly equivalent to the trend of increasing SN Ia rate in later type galaxies seen in the local universe. Following earlier suggestions for a simple ``two-component'' model approximating the SN Ia rate, we find bivariate linear dependencies of the SN Ia rate on both the stellar masses and the mean SFRs of the host systems. We find that the SN Ia rate can be well represented as the sum of 5.3+/-1.1×10-14 SNe yr-1 Msolar-1 and 3.9+/-0.7×10-4 SNe yr-1 (Msolar yr-1)-1 of star formation. We also demonstrate a dependence of distant SN Ia light-curve shapes on star formation in the host galaxy, similar to trends observed locally. Passive galaxies, with no star formation, preferentially host faster declining/dimmer SNe Ia, while brighter events are found in systems with ongoing star formation.

  7. Characterization and refinement of carbide coating formation rates and dissolution kinetics in the Ta-C system

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, P.J.

    1996-10-01

    The interaction between carbide coating formation rates and dissolution kinetics in the tantalum-carbon system was investigated. The research was driven by the need to characterize carbide coating formation rates. The characterization of the carbide coating formation rates was required to engineer an optimum processing scheme for the fabrication of the ultracorrosion-resistant composite, carbon-saturated tantalum. A packed-bed carburization process was successfully engineered and employed. The packed-bed carburization process produced consistent, predictable, and repeatable carbide coatings. A digital imaging analysis measurement process for accurate and consistent measurement of carbide coating thicknesses was developed. A process for removing the chemically stable and extremely hard tantalum-carbide coatings was also developed in this work.

  8. The Star Formation Rate Density of the Universe at z = 0.24 and 0.4 from Halpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual, S.

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of both the global star formation history of the universe and the nature of individual star-forming galaxies at different look-back times is essential to our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. Deep redshift surveys suggest star-formation activity increases by an order of magnitude from z = 0 to ~1. As a direct test of whether substantial evolution in star-formation activity has occurred, we need to measure the star formation rate (SFR) density and the properties of the corresponding star-forming galaxy populations at different redshifts, using similar techniques. The main goal of this work is to extend the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM) survey of emission-line galaxies to higher redshifts. (continues)

  9. Rate of Iron Transfer Through the Horse Spleen Ferritin Shell Determined by the Rate of Formation of Prussian Blue and Fe-desferrioxamine Within the Ferritin Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Bo; Watt, Richard K.; Galvez, Natividad; Dominquez-Vera, Jose M.; Watt, Gerald D.

    2005-01-01

    Iron (2+ and 3+) is believed to transfer through the three-fold channels in the ferritin shell during iron deposition and release in animal ferritins. However, the rate of iron transit in and out through these channels has not been reported. The recent synthesis of [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-), Prussian Blue (PB) and desferrioxamine (DES) all trapped within the horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) interior makes these measurements feasible. We report the rate of Fe(2+) penetrating into the ferritin interior by adding external Fe(2+) to [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-) encapsulated in the HoSF interior and measuring the rate of formation of the resulting encapsulated PB. The rate at which Fe(2+) reacts with [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-) in the HoSF interior is much slower than the formation of free PB in solution and is proceeded by a lag period. We assume this lag period and the difference in rate represent the transfer of Fe(2+) through the HoSF protein shell. The calculated diffusion coefficient, D approx. 5.8 x 10(exp -20) square meters per second corresponds to the measured lag time of 10-20 s before PB forms within the HoSF interior. The activation energy for Fe(2+) transfer from the outside solution through the protein shell was determined to be 52.9 kJ/mol by conducting the reactions at 10 to approximately 40 C. The reaction of Fe(3+) with encapsulated [Fe(CN)6](4-) also readily forms PB in the HoSF interior, but the rate is faster than the corresponding Fe(2+) reaction. The rate for Fe(3+) transfer through the ferritin shell was confirmed by measuring the rate of the formation of Fe-DES inside HoSF and an activation energy of 58.4 kJ/mol was determined. An attempt was made to determine the rate of iron (2+ and 3+) transit out from the ferritin interior by adding excess bipyridine or DES to PB trapped within the HoSF interior. However, the reactions are slow and occur at almost identical rates for free and HoSF-encapsulated PB, indicating that the transfer of iron from the interior through the

  10. Hydroxyl radical in/on illuminated polar snow: formation rates, lifetimes, and steady-state concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zeyuan; Chu, Liang; Galbavy, Edward S.; Ram, Keren; Anastasio, Cort

    2016-08-01

    While the hydroxyl radical (OH) in the snowpack is likely a dominant oxidant for organic species and bromide, little is known about the kinetics or steady-state concentrations of OH on/in snow and ice. Here we measure the formation rate, lifetime, and concentration of OH for illuminated polar snow samples studied in the laboratory and in the field. Laboratory studies show that OH kinetics and steady-state concentrations are essentially the same for a given sample studied as ice and liquid; this is in contrast to other photooxidants, which show a concentration enhancement in ice relative to solution as a result of kinetic differences in the two phases. The average production rate of OH in samples studied at Summit, Greenland, is 5 times lower than the average measured in the laboratory, while the average OH lifetime determined in the field is 5 times higher than in the laboratory. These differences indicate that the polar snows we studied in the laboratory are affected by contamination, despite significant efforts to prevent this; our results suggest similar contamination may be a widespread problem in laboratory studies of ice chemistry. Steady-state concentrations of OH in clean snow studied in the field at Summit, Greenland, range from (0.8 to 3) × 10-15 M, comparable to values reported for midlatitude cloud and fog drops, rain, and deliquesced marine particles, even though impurity concentrations in the snow samples are much lower. Partitioning of firn air OH to the snow grains will approximately double the steady-state concentration of snow-grain hydroxyl radical, leading to an average [OH] in near-surface, summer Summit snow of approximately 4 × 10-15 M. At this concentration, the OH-mediated lifetimes of organics and bromide in Summit snow grains are approximately 3 days and 7 h, respectively, suggesting that hydroxyl radical is a major

  11. The density structure and star formation rate of non-isothermal polytropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federrath, Christoph; Banerjee, Supratik

    2015-04-01

    The interstellar medium of galaxies is governed by supersonic turbulence, which likely controls the star formation rate (SFR) and the initial mass function (IMF). Interstellar turbulence is non-universal, with a wide range of Mach numbers, magnetic fields strengths and driving mechanisms. Although some of these parameters were explored, most previous works assumed that the gas is isothermal. However, we know that cold molecular clouds form out of the warm atomic medium, with the gas passing through chemical and thermodynamic phases that are not isothermal. Here we determine the role of temperature variations by modelling non-isothermal turbulence with a polytropic equation of state (EOS), where pressure and temperature are functions of gas density, P˜ ρ ^Γ, T ˜ ρΓ - 1. We use grid resolutions of 20483 cells and compare polytropic exponents Γ = 0.7 (soft EOS), Γ = 1 (isothermal EOS) and Γ = 5/3 (stiff EOS). We find a complex network of non-isothermal filaments with more small-scale fragmentation occurring for Γ < 1, while Γ > 1 smoothes out density contrasts. The density probability distribution function (PDF) is significantly affected by temperature variations, with a power-law tail developing at low densities for Γ > 1. In contrast, the PDF becomes closer to a lognormal distribution for Γ ≲ 1. We derive and test a new density variance-Mach number relation that takes Γ into account. This new relation is relevant for theoretical models of the SFR and IMF, because it determines the dense gas mass fraction of a cloud, from which stars form. We derive the SFR as a function of Γ and find that it decreases by a factor of ˜5 from Γ = 0.7 to 5/3.

  12. Observational evidence for the evolution of nuclear metallicity and star formation rate with the merger stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Rui; Hao, Cai-Na; Xia, Xiao-Yang; Wei, Peng; Guo, Xin

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the evolution of nuclear gas-phase oxygen abundance and star formation rate (SFR) of local far-infrared selected star-forming galaxies along the merger sequence, as traced by their optical morphologies. The sample was drawn from a cross-correlation analysis of the IRAS Point Source Catalog Redshift Survey and 1 Jy ultraluminous infrared galaxy sample with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 database. The investigation is done by comparing our sample to a control sample matched in the normalized redshift distribution in two diagnostics, which are the nuclear gas-phase metallicity vs. stellar mass and the nuclear SFR vs. stellar mass diagrams. Galaxies with different morphological types show different mass-metallicity relations (MZRs). Compared to the MZR defined by the control sample, isolated spirals have comparable metallicities with the control sample at a given stellar mass. Spirals in pairs and interacting galaxies with projected separations of r p > 20 kpc show a mild metallicity dilution of 0.02–0.03 dex. Interacting galaxies with r p < 20 kpc, pre-mergers and advanced mergers are underabundant by ∼ 0.06, ∼ 0.05 and ∼ 0.04 dex, respectively. This shows an evolutionary trend that the metallicity is increasingly depressed as the merging proceeds and it is diluted most dramatically when two galaxies are closely interacting. Afterwards, the interstellar medium (ISM) is enriched when the galaxies coalesce. This is the first time that such ISM enrichment at the final coalescence stage has been observed, which demonstrates the importance of supernova explosions in affecting the nuclear metallicity. Moreover, the central SFR enhancement relative to the control sample evolves simultaneously with the nuclear gas-phase oxygen abundance. Our results support the predictions from numerical simulations.

  13. Observational evidence for the evolution of nuclear metallicity and star formation rate with the merger stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Rui; Hao, Cai-Na; Xia, Xiao-Yang; Wei, Peng; Guo, Xin

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the evolution of nuclear gas-phase oxygen abundance and star formation rate (SFR) of local far-infrared selected star-forming galaxies along the merger sequence, as traced by their optical morphologies. The sample was drawn from a cross-correlation analysis of the IRAS Point Source Catalog Redshift Survey and 1 Jy ultraluminous infrared galaxy sample with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 database. The investigation is done by comparing our sample to a control sample matched in the normalized redshift distribution in two diagnostics, which are the nuclear gas-phase metallicity vs. stellar mass and the nuclear SFR vs. stellar mass diagrams. Galaxies with different morphological types show different mass-metallicity relations (MZRs). Compared to the MZR defined by the control sample, isolated spirals have comparable metallicities with the control sample at a given stellar mass. Spirals in pairs and interacting galaxies with projected separations of r p > 20 kpc show a mild metallicity dilution of 0.02–0.03 dex. Interacting galaxies with r p < 20 kpc, pre-mergers and advanced mergers are underabundant by ˜ 0.06, ˜ 0.05 and ˜ 0.04 dex, respectively. This shows an evolutionary trend that the metallicity is increasingly depressed as the merging proceeds and it is diluted most dramatically when two galaxies are closely interacting. Afterwards, the interstellar medium (ISM) is enriched when the galaxies coalesce. This is the first time that such ISM enrichment at the final coalescence stage has been observed, which demonstrates the importance of supernova explosions in affecting the nuclear metallicity. Moreover, the central SFR enhancement relative to the control sample evolves simultaneously with the nuclear gas-phase oxygen abundance. Our results support the predictions from numerical simulations.

  14. On the reversal of star formation rate-density relation at z = 1: Insights from simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tonnesen, Stephanie; Cen, Renyue E-mail: cen@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-06-20

    Recent surveys have found a reversal of the star formation rate (SFR)-density relation at z = 1 from that at z = 0, while the sign of the slope of the color-density relation remains unchanged. We use adaptive mesh refinement cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of a 21 × 24 × 20 h {sup –3} Mpc{sup 3} region to examine the SFR-density and color-density relations of galaxies at z = 0 and z = 1. The local environmental density is defined by the dark matter mass in spheres of radius 1 h {sup –1} Mpc, and we probe two decades of environmental densities. Our simulations produce a large increase of SFR with density at z = 1, as in the Elbaz et al. observations. We also find a significant evolution to z = 0, where the SFR-density relation is much flatter. The simulated color-density relation is consistent from z = 1 to z = 0, in agreement with observations. We find that the increase in SFR with local density at z = 1 is due to a growing population of star-forming galaxies in higher-density environments. At z = 0 and z = 1 both the SFR and cold gas mass are correlated with the galaxy halo mass, and therefore the correlation between median halo mass and local density is an important cause of the SFR-density relation at both redshifts. However, at z = 0 the local density on 1 h {sup –1} Mpc scales affects galaxy SFRs as much as halo mass. Finally, we find indications that while at z = 0 high-density environments depress galaxy SFRs, at z = 1 high-density environments tend to increase SFRs.

  15. Revealing the secrets of VLA1623: an in-depth look into the earliest star formation stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Shih-Ping; Murillo, Nadia; Bruderer, Simon; van Dishoeck, Ewine

    2015-08-01

    Studying young Keplerian disks may reveal important clues regarding the formation of disks, such as what factors can enhance the formation of the disk, what is the extent of the disk and what are the kinematics of the gas at the transition from infall to rotation. We have discovered an extremely young Keplarian disk around the Class 0 protostar VLA1623A based on our SMA and ALMA Cycle 0 data (Murillo & Lai 2013, Murillo et al. 2013). Here we present our new ALMA Cycle 2 data in Band 6 (C18O (2-1), DCO+ (3-2) and 13CO (2-1)), Band 7 (N2H+ (4-3), DCO+ (5-4) and H2D+ (1$_{1,0}$-1$_{1,1}$)), and Band 8 (C18O (4-3) and continuum), which have been delivered to us partially to date. We will be able to use these data to study the kinematic and temperature structure of the young Keplarian disk. The C18O and 13CO lines will trace the kinematics of the disk. The factor 2 increase in spatial resolution and sensitivity in C18O (2-1) will tell us what the velocity structure is of the disk and its connection with infall. Comparison of the same molecule in (4 3) (Eu=55 K vs 16 K) will allow us to further constrain the temperature structure of the young disk. The two DCO+ transitions, N2H+ and H2D+ will serve as ‘thermometers’, and the different resolutions will trace the large and small scales.

  16. Site-directed Mutagenesis Reveals Regions Implicated in the Stability and Fiber Formation of Human λ3r Light Chains*

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Miryam I.; Canul-Tec, Juan C.; Luna-Martínez, Oscar D.; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Rojas, Sonia; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Fernández-Velasco, Daniel A.; Becerril, Baltazar

    2015-01-01

    Light chain amyloidosis (AL) is a disease that affects vital organs by the fibrillar aggregation of monoclonal light chains. λ3r germ line is significantly implicated in this disease. In this work, we contrasted the thermodynamic stability and aggregation propensity of 3mJL2 (nonamyloidogenic) and 3rJL2 (amyloidogenic) λ3 germ lines. Because of an inherent limitation (extremely low expression), Cys at position 34 of the 3r germ line was replaced by Tyr reaching a good expression yield. A second substitution (W91A) was introduced in 3r to obtain a better template to incorporate additional mutations. Although the single mutant (C34Y) was not fibrillogenic, the second mutation located at CDR3 (W91A) induced fibrillogenesis. We propose, for the first time, that CDR3 (position 91) affects the stability and fiber formation of human λ3r light chains. Using the double mutant (3rJL2/YA) as template, other variants were constructed to evaluate the importance of those substitutions into the stability and aggregation propensity of λ3 light chains. A change in position 7 (P7D) boosted 3rJL2/YA fibrillogenic properties. Modification of position 48 (I48M) partially reverted 3rJL2/YA fibril aggregation. Finally, changes at positions 8 (P8S) or 40 (P40S) completely reverted fibril formation. These results confirm the influential roles of N-terminal region (positions 7 and 8) and the loop 40–60 (positions 40 and 48) on AL. X-ray crystallography revealed that the three-dimensional topology of the single and double λ3r mutants was not significantly altered. This mutagenic approach helped to identify key regions implicated in λ3 AL. PMID:25505244

  17. Genome Alignment Spanning Major Poaceae Lineages Reveals Heterogeneous Evolutionary Rates and Alters Inferred Dates for Key Evolutionary Events.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiyin; Wang, Jingpeng; Jin, Dianchuan; Guo, Hui; Lee, Tae-Ho; Liu, Tao; Paterson, Andrew H

    2015-06-01

    Multiple comparisons among genomes can clarify their evolution, speciation, and functional innovations. To date, the genome sequences of eight grasses representing the most economically important Poaceae (grass) clades have been published, and their genomic-level comparison is an essential foundation for evolutionary, functional, and translational research. Using a formal and conservative approach, we aligned these genomes. Direct comparison of paralogous gene pairs all duplicated simultaneously reveal striking variation in evolutionary rates among whole genomes, with nucleotide substitution slowest in rice and up to 48% faster in other grasses, adding a new dimension to the value of rice as a grass model. We reconstructed ancestral genome contents for major evolutionary nodes, potentially contributing to understanding the divergence and speciation of grasses. Recent fossil evidence suggests revisions of the estimated dates of key evolutionary events, implying that the pan-grass polyploidization occurred ∼96 million years ago and could not be related to the Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction as previously inferred. Adjusted dating to reflect both updated fossil evidence and lineage-specific evolutionary rates suggested that maize subgenome divergence and maize-sorghum divergence were virtually simultaneous, a coincidence that would be explained if polyploidization directly contributed to speciation. This work lays a solid foundation for Poaceae translational genomics.

  18. Selectin receptor-ligand bonds: Formation limited by shear rate and dissociation governed by the Bell model.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Springer, T A

    2001-01-30

    We have studied the principles that govern the formation and dissociation of an adhesive bond between a cell moving in shear flow and a substrate and tested different theories of how force affects bond dissociation. Viscosity relates the kinematics of fluid movement (shear rate, units of time(-1)) to shear stress (units of force/area, the product of shear rate and viscosity). At different medium viscosities, the formation of receptor-ligand bonds between a cell in the flowstream and P-selectin on the vessel wall showed a similar efficiency as a function of shear rate but not of shear stress. Therefore, bond formation was a function of shear rate and hence of the kinematics of receptor and ligand movement. By contrast, the kinetics of bond dissociation was a function of shear stress and hence of force on the bond. The different requirements for bond formation and dissociation allowed dissociation kinetics to be measured at higher forces on the bond by increasing medium viscosity. Data over an extended range of forces on the bond therefore could be collected that enabled five different proposed equations, relating force to bond dissociation, to be compared for fit to experimental data. The relationship proposed by Bell [Bell, G. I. (1978) Science 200, 618-627] fit the data significantly the best and also predicted an off-rate in the absence of force that best matched an independent measurement [Mehta, P., Cummings, R. D. & McEver, R. P. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 32506-32513].

  19. Offset of Latest Pleistocene Shoreface Reveals Slip Rate on the Hosgri Strike-Slip Fault, Offshore Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. Y.; Hartwell, S. R.; Dartnell, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Hosgri fault is the southern part of the regional Hosgri-San Gregorio dextral strike-slip fault system, which extends primarily in the offshore region for about 400 km in central California. Between Morro Bay and San Simeon, high-resolution multibeam bathymetry reveals that the eastern strand of the Hosgri fault is crossed by a ~265-m-wide slope interpreted as the shoreface of a relict sand spit that formed during a period of relatively slower sea-level rise (Younger Dryas stadial) in the latest Pleistocene. This sand spit crossed an embayment and connected a western fault-bounded bedrock peninsula and an eastern bedrock highland, a paleogeography similar to modern geomorphology along coastal segments of the San Andreas fault. Detailed analysis of the relict shoreface with slope profiles and slope maps indicates a lateral slip rate of 2.6 ± 0.9 mm/yr. Because the Hosgri fault locally includes an active western strand, and regionally converges with several other faults, this slip rate should be considered a minimum for the Hosgri fault in central California and should not be applied for the entire Hosgri-San Gregorio fault system. This slip rate indicates that the Hosgri system takes up the largest share of the strike-slip fault budget and is the most active strike-slip fault west of the San Andreas fault in central California. This result further demonstrates the value and potential of high-resolution bathymetry in earthquake-hazard characterization of active offshore faults.

  20. Determination of the Rate of Formation of Hydroceramic Waste Forms made with INEEL Calcined Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Barry Scheetz; Johnson Olanrewaju

    2001-10-15

    The formulation, synthesis, characterization and hydration kinetics of hydroceramic waste forms designed as potential hosts for existing INEEL calcine high-level wastes have been established as functions of temperature and processing time. Initial experimentations were conducted with several aluminosilicate pozzolanic materials, ranging from fly ash obtained from various power generating coal and other combustion industries to reactive alumina, natural clays and ground bottled glass powders. The final selection criteria were based on the ease of processing, excellent physical properties and chemical durability (low-leaching) determined from the PCT test produced in hydroceramic. The formulation contains vermiculite, Sr(NO32), CsC1, NaOH, thermally altered (calcined natural clay) and INEEL simulated calcine high-level nuclear wastes and 30 weight percent of fluorinel blend calcine and zirconia calcine. Syntheses were carried out at 75-200 degree C at autogeneous water pressure (100% relative humidity) at various time intervals. The resulting monolithic compact products were hard and resisted breaking when dropped from a 5 ft height. Hydroceramic host mixed with fluorinel blend calcine and processed at 75 degree C crumbled into rice hull-side grains or developed scaly flakes. However, the samples equally possessed the same chemical durability as their unbroken counterparts. Phase identification by XRD revealed that hydroceramic host crystallized type zeolite at 75-150 degree C and NaP1 at 175-200 degree C in addition to the presence of quartz phase originating from the clay reactant. Hydroceramic host mixed with either fluorinel blend calcine or zirconia calcine crystallized type A zeolite at 75-95 degree C, formed a mixture of type A zeolite and hydroxysodalite at 125-150 degree C and hydroxysodalite at 175-200 degree C. Quartz, calcium fluoride and zirconia phases from the clay reactant and the two calcine wastes were also detected. The PCT test solution

  1. Super resolution microscopy is poised to reveal new insights into the formation and maturation of dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Cristina M.; Patel, Mikin R.; Webb, Donna J.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines and synapses are critical for neuronal communication, and they are perturbed in many neurological disorders; however, the study of these structures in living cells has been hindered by their small size. Super resolution microscopy, unlike conventional light microscopy, is diffraction unlimited and thus is well suited for imaging small structures, such as dendritic spines and synapses. Super resolution microscopy has already revealed important new information about spine and synapse morphology, actin remodeling, and nanodomain composition in both healthy cells and diseased states. In this review, we highlight the advancements in probes that make super resolution more amenable to live-cell imaging of spines and synapses. We also discuss recent data obtained by super resolution microscopy that has advanced our knowledge of dendritic spine and synapse structure, organization, and dynamics in both healthy and diseased contexts. Finally, we propose a series of critical questions for understanding spine and synapse formation and maturation that super resolution microscopy is poised to answer. PMID:27408691

  2. Structural Analysis using SHALiPE to Reveal RNA G-Quadruplex Formation in Human Precursor MicroRNA.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Chun Kit; Sahakyan, Aleksandr B; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2016-07-25

    RNA G-quadruplex (rG4) structures are of fundamental importance to biology. A novel approach is introduced to detect and structurally map rG4s at single-nucleotide resolution in RNAs. The approach, denoted SHALiPE, couples selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation with lithium ion-based primer extension, and identifies characteristic structural fingerprints for rG4 mapping. We apply SHALiPE to interrogate the human precursor microRNA 149, and reveal the formation of an rG4 structure in this non-coding RNA. Additional analyses support the SHALiPE results and uncover that this rG4 has a parallel topology, is thermally stable, and is conserved in mammals. An in vitro Dicer assay shows that this rG4 inhibits Dicer processing, supporting the potential role of rG4 structures in microRNA maturation and post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs. PMID:27355429

  3. A mutable albino allele in rice reveals that formation of thylakoid membranes requires the SNOW-WHITE LEAF1 gene.

    PubMed

    Hayashi-Tsugane, Mika; Takahara, Hiroyuki; Ahmed, Nisar; Himi, Eiko; Takagi, Kyoko; Iida, Shigeru; Tsugane, Kazuo; Maekawa, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    Active DNA transposons are important tools for gene functional analysis. The endogenous non-autonomous transposon, nDart1-0, in rice (Oryza sativa L.) is expected to generate various transposon-insertion mutants because nDart1-0 elements tend to insert into genic regions under natural growth conditions. We have developed a specific method (nDart1-0-iPCR) for efficient detection of nDart1-0 insertions and successfully identified the SNOW-WHITE LEAF1 (SWL1) gene in a variegated albino (swl1-v) mutant obtained from the nDart1-promoted rice tagging line. The variegated albino phenotype was caused by insertion and excision of nDart1-0 in the 5'-untranslated region of the SWL1 gene predicted to encode an unknown protein with the N-terminal chloroplast transit peptide. SWL1 expression was detected in various rice tissues at different developmental stages. However, immunoblot analysis indicated that SWL1 protein accumulation was strictly regulated in a tissue-specific manner. In the swl1 mutant, formations of grana and stroma thylakoids and prolamellar bodies were inhibited. This study revealed that SWL1 is essential for the beginning of thylakoid membrane organization during chloroplast development. Furthermore, we provide a developmental perspective on the nDart1-promoted tagging line to characterize unidentified gene functions in rice.

  4. Methane hydrate synthesis from ice: Influence of pressurization and ethanol on optimizing formation rates and hydrate yield

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Po-Chun.; Huang, Wuu-Liang; Stern, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    Polycrystalline methane gas hydrate (MGH) was synthesized using an ice-seeding method to investigate the influence of pressurization and ethanol on the hydrate formation rate and gas yield of the resulting samples. When the reactor is pressurized with CH4 gas without external heating, methane hydrate can be formed from ice grains with yields up to 25% under otherwise static conditions. The rapid temperature rise caused by pressurization partially melts the granular ice, which reacts with methane to form hydrate rinds around the ice grains. The heat generated by the exothermic reaction of methane hydrate formation buffers the sample temperature near the melting point of ice for enough time to allow for continuous hydrate growth at high rates. Surprisingly, faster rates and higher yields of methane hydrate were found in runs with lower initial temperatures, slower rates of pressurization, higher porosity of the granular ice samples, or mixtures with sediments. The addition of ethanol also dramatically enhanced the formation of polycrystalline MGH. This study demonstrates that polycrystalline MGH with varied physical properties suitable for different laboratory tests can be manufactured by controlling synthesis procedures or parameters. Subsequent dissociation experiments using a gas collection apparatus and flowmeter confirmed high methane saturation (CH 4·2O, with n = 5.82 ± 0.03) in the MGH. Dissociation rates of the various samples synthesized at diverse conditions may be fitted to different rate laws, including zero and first order.

  5. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acid and magnesium ion—Possible influence on biogenic calcite formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Increases in ocean surface water dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations retard biocalcification by reducing calcite supersaturation (Ωc). Reduced calcification rates may influence growth-rate dependent magnesium ion (Mg) incorporation into biogenic calcite modifying the use of calcifying organisms as paleoclimate proxies. Fulvic acid (FA) at biocalcification sites may further reduce calcification rates. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by FA and Mg, two common constituents of seawater and soil water involved in the formation of biogenic calcite, was measured separately and in combination under identical, highly reproducible experimental conditions. Calcite growth rates (pH=8.5 and Ωc=4.5) are reduced by FA (0.5 mg/L) to 47% and by Mg (10−4 M) to 38%, compared to control experiments containing no added growth-rate inhibitor. Humic acid (HA) is twice as effective a calcite growth-rate inhibitor as FA. Calcite growth rate in the presence of both FA (0.5 mg/L) and Mg (10−4 M) is reduced to 5% of the control rate. Mg inhibits calcite growth rates by substitution for calcium ion at the growth site. In contrast, FA inhibits calcite growth rates by binding multiple carboxylate groups on the calcite surface. FA and Mg together have an increased affinity for the calcite growth sites reducing calcite growth rates.

  6. Is there a maximum star formation rate in high-redshift galaxies? , , ,

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.; Chen, C.-C.; Casey, C. M.; Lee, N.; Sanders, D. B.; Williams, J. P.; Owen, F. N.; Wang, W.-H.

    2014-03-20

    We use the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope's SCUBA-2 camera to image a 400 arcmin{sup 2} area surrounding the GOODS-N field. The 850 μm rms noise ranges from a value of 0.49 mJy in the central region to 3.5 mJy at the outside edge. From these data, we construct an 850 μm source catalog to 2 mJy containing 49 sources detected above the 4σ level. We use an ultradeep (11.5 μJy at 5σ) 1.4 GHz image obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array together with observations made with the Submillimeter Array to identify counterparts to the submillimeter galaxies. For most cases of multiple radio counterparts, we can identify the correct counterpart from new and existing Submillimeter Array data. We have spectroscopic redshifts for 62% of the radio sources in the 9' radius highest sensitivity region (556/894) and 67% of the radio sources in the GOODS-N region (367/543). We supplement these with a modest number of additional photometric redshifts in the GOODS-N region (30). We measure millimetric redshifts from the radio to submillimeter flux ratios for the unidentified submillimeter sample, assuming an Arp 220 spectral energy distribution. We find a radio-flux-dependent K – z relation for the radio sources, which we use to estimate redshifts for the remaining radio sources. We determine the star formation rates (SFRs) of the submillimeter sources based on their radio powers and their submillimeter fluxes and find that they agree well. The radio data are deep enough to detect star-forming galaxies with SFRs >2000 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} to z ∼ 6. We find galaxies with SFRs up to ∼6000 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} over the redshift range z = 1.5-6, but we see evidence for a turn-down in the SFR distribution function above 2000 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}.

  7. Is There a Maximum Star Formation Rate in High-redshift Galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.; Chen, C.-C.; Owen, F. N.; Wang, W.-H.; Casey, C. M.; Lee, N.; Sanders, D. B.; Williams, J. P.

    2014-03-01

    We use the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope's SCUBA-2 camera to image a 400 arcmin2 area surrounding the GOODS-N field. The 850 μm rms noise ranges from a value of 0.49 mJy in the central region to 3.5 mJy at the outside edge. From these data, we construct an 850 μm source catalog to 2 mJy containing 49 sources detected above the 4σ level. We use an ultradeep (11.5 μJy at 5σ) 1.4 GHz image obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array together with observations made with the Submillimeter Array to identify counterparts to the submillimeter galaxies. For most cases of multiple radio counterparts, we can identify the correct counterpart from new and existing Submillimeter Array data. We have spectroscopic redshifts for 62% of the radio sources in the 9' radius highest sensitivity region (556/894) and 67% of the radio sources in the GOODS-N region (367/543). We supplement these with a modest number of additional photometric redshifts in the GOODS-N region (30). We measure millimetric redshifts from the radio to submillimeter flux ratios for the unidentified submillimeter sample, assuming an Arp 220 spectral energy distribution. We find a radio-flux-dependent K - z relation for the radio sources, which we use to estimate redshifts for the remaining radio sources. We determine the star formation rates (SFRs) of the submillimeter sources based on their radio powers and their submillimeter fluxes and find that they agree well. The radio data are deep enough to detect star-forming galaxies with SFRs >2000 M ⊙ yr-1 to z ~ 6. We find galaxies with SFRs up to ~6000 M ⊙ yr-1 over the redshift range z = 1.5-6, but we see evidence for a turn-down in the SFR distribution function above 2000 M ⊙ yr-1. The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope is operated by the Joint Astronomy Centre on behalf of the Science and Technology Facilities Council of the United Kingdom, the National Research Council of Canada, and (until 2013 March 31) the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific

  8. Star formation rate in galaxies from UV, IR, and Hα estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirashita, H.; Buat, V.; Inoue, A. K.

    2003-10-01

    Infrared (IR) luminosity of galaxies originating from dust thermal emission can be used as an indicator of the star formation rate (SFR). Inoue et al. (\\cite{inoue00}, IHK) have derived a formula for the conversion from dust IR luminosity to SFR by using the following three quantities: the fraction of Lyman continuum luminosity absorbed by gas (f), the fraction of UV luminosity absorbed by dust (epsilon ), and the fraction of dust heating from old (ga 108 yr) stellar populations (eta ). We develop a method to estimate those three quantities based on the idea that the various way of SFR estimates from ultraviolet (UV) luminosity (2000 Å luminosity), Hα luminosity, and dust IR luminosity should return the same SFR. After applying our method to samples of galaxies, the following results are obtained in our framework. First, our method is applied to a sample of star-forming galaxies, finding that f ~ 0.6, epsilon ~ 0.5, and eta ~ 0.4 as representative values. Next, we apply the method to a starburst sample, which shows larger extinction than the star-forming galaxy sample. With the aid of f, epsilon , and eta , we are able to estimate reliable SFRs from UV and/or IR luminosities. Moreover, the Hα luminosity, if the Hα extinction is corrected by using the Balmer decrement, is suitable for a statistical analysis of SFR, because the same {correction factor for the Lyman continuum extinction (i.e. 1/f)} is applicable to both normal and starburst galaxies over all the range of SFR. The metallicity dependence of f and epsilon is also tested: Only the latter proves to have a correlation with metallicity. As an extension of our result, the local (z=0) comoving density of SFR can be estimated with our dust extinction corrections. We show that all UV, Hα , and IR comoving luminosity densities at z=0 give a consistent SFR per comoving volume ( ~ 3x 10-2h M_sun yr-1 Mpc-3). Useful formulae for SFR estimate are listed. Tables 1 and 2, and Appendix A are only available in

  9. Digestion of high rate activated sludge coupled to biochar formation for soil improvement in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Nansubuga, Irene; Banadda, Noble; Ronsse, Frederik; Verstraete, Willy; Rabaey, Korneel

    2015-09-15

    High rate activated sludge (HRAS) is well-biodegradable sludge enabling energy neutrality of wastewater treatment plants via anaerobic digestion. However, even through successful digestion a notable residue still remains. Here we investigated whether this residue can be converted to biochar, for its use as a fertilizer or as a solid fuel, and assessed its characteristics and overall process efficiency. In a first phase, HRAS was anaerobicaly digested under mesophilic conditions at a sludge retention time of 20 days. HRAS digested well (57.9 ± 6.2% VS degradation) producing on average 0.23 ± 0.04 L CH4 per gram VS fed. The digestate particulates were partially air-dried to mimic conditions used in developing countries, and subsequently converted to biochar by fixed-bed slow pyrolysis at a residence time of 15 min and at highest heating temperatures (HHT) of 300 °C, 400 °C and 600 °C. Subsequently, the produced chars were characterized by proximate analysis, CHN-elemental analysis, pH in solution and bomb calorimetry for higher heating value. The yield and volatile matter decreased with increasing HHT while ash content and fixed carbon increased with increasing HHT. The produced biochar showed properties optimal towards soil amendment when produced at a temperature of 600 °C with values of 5.91 wt%, 23.75 wt%, 70.35% on dry basis (db) and 0.44 for volatile matter, fixed carbon, ash content and H/C ratio, respectively. With regard to its use for energy purposes, the biochar represented a lower calorific value than the dried HRAS digestate likely due to high ash content. Based on these findings, it can be concluded that anaerobic digestion of HRAS and its subsequent biochar formation at HHT of 600 °C represents an attractive route for sludge management in tropic settings like in Uganda, coupling carbon capture to energy generation, carbon sequestration and nutrient recovery. PMID:26072019

  10. Star formation rate and extinction in faint z ∼ 4 Lyman break galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    To, Chun-Hao; Wang, Wei-Hao; Owen, Frazer N.

    2014-09-10

    We present a statistical detection of 1.5 GHz radio continuum emission from a sample of faint z ∼ 4 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). To constrain their extinction and intrinsic star formation rate (SFR), we combine the latest ultradeep Very Large Array 1.5 GHz radio image and the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) optical images in the GOODS-N. We select a large sample of 1771 z ∼ 4 LBGs from the ACS catalog using B {sub F435W}-dropout color criteria. Our LBG samples have I {sub F775W} ∼ 25-28 (AB), ∼0-3 mag fainter than M{sub UV}{sup ⋆} at z ∼ 4. In our stacked radio images, we find the LBGs to be point-like under our 2'' angular resolution. We measure their mean 1.5 GHz flux by stacking the measurements on the individual objects. We achieve a statistical detection of S {sub 1.5} {sub GHz} = 0.210 ± 0.075 μJy at ∼3σ for the first time on such a faint LBG population at z ∼ 4. The measurement takes into account the effects of source size and blending of multiple objects. The detection is visually confirmed by stacking the radio images of the LBGs, and the uncertainty is quantified with Monte Carlo simulations on the radio image. The stacked radio flux corresponds to an obscured SFR of 16.0 ± 5.7 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, and implies a rest-frame UV extinction correction factor of 3.8. This extinction correction is in excellent agreement with that derived from the observed UV continuum spectral slope, using the local calibration of Meurer et al. This result supports the use of the local calibration on high-redshift LBGs to derive the extinction correction and SFR, and also disfavors a steep reddening curve such as that of the Small Magellanic Cloud.

  11. Digestion of high rate activated sludge coupled to biochar formation for soil improvement in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Nansubuga, Irene; Banadda, Noble; Ronsse, Frederik; Verstraete, Willy; Rabaey, Korneel

    2015-09-15

    High rate activated sludge (HRAS) is well-biodegradable sludge enabling energy neutrality of wastewater treatment plants via anaerobic digestion. However, even through successful digestion a notable residue still remains. Here we investigated whether this residue can be converted to biochar, for its use as a fertilizer or as a solid fuel, and assessed its characteristics and overall process efficiency. In a first phase, HRAS was anaerobicaly digested under mesophilic conditions at a sludge retention time of 20 days. HRAS digested well (57.9 ± 6.2% VS degradation) producing on average 0.23 ± 0.04 L CH4 per gram VS fed. The digestate particulates were partially air-dried to mimic conditions used in developing countries, and subsequently converted to biochar by fixed-bed slow pyrolysis at a residence time of 15 min and at highest heating temperatures (HHT) of 300 °C, 400 °C and 600 °C. Subsequently, the produced chars were characterized by proximate analysis, CHN-elemental analysis, pH in solution and bomb calorimetry for higher heating value. The yield and volatile matter decreased with increasing HHT while ash content and fixed carbon increased with increasing HHT. The produced biochar showed properties optimal towards soil amendment when produced at a temperature of 600 °C with values of 5.91 wt%, 23.75 wt%, 70.35% on dry basis (db) and 0.44 for volatile matter, fixed carbon, ash content and H/C ratio, respectively. With regard to its use for energy purposes, the biochar represented a lower calorific value than the dried HRAS digestate likely due to high ash content. Based on these findings, it can be concluded that anaerobic digestion of HRAS and its subsequent biochar formation at HHT of 600 °C represents an attractive route for sludge management in tropic settings like in Uganda, coupling carbon capture to energy generation, carbon sequestration and nutrient recovery.

  12. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2005-12-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. Thirty are cluster member galaxies, and nine are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates between 8 and 525 Msolar yr-1. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J-band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, consistent with several previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O'Connell Cardiel et al.; Crawford et al.). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars and, therefore, recent star formation. Using the Starburst99 model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2-219 Msolar yr-1 for the cooling flow sample. For two-thirds of this sample, it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV-inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well-populated XMM UV cluster archive, and a more extensive follow-up study is currently underway.

  13. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 solar mass per year. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar mass per year for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  14. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2006-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 Solar Mass/yr. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O'Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar Mass/yr for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  15. Narrow-band Imaging of Massive Star-Forming Regions: Tracing Outflows and the Rate of Star-Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Kendall; Willis, Sarah; Hora, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Narrowband images targeting ionized hydrogen (Brackett gamma, 2.17 microns) and molecular hydrogen (2.12 microns) were obtained for six massive star-forming regions within the Milky Way, NGC 6334, G305, G3333, G3264, G3266, and G351. These regions are within 1-4 kpc from our solar system. The narrowband flux in Brackett gamma was used as a star-formation tracer to calculate a star-formation rate for each region. This is compared with other star-formation rates found using other methods such as the count of young stars and YSOs, and rates calculated from using other tracers (e.g. 70 micron monochromatic luminosity). The molecular hydrogen narrowband images were manually searched to locate outflows from young stars. Once these outflows are identified, it may help to get a better survey of the young stellar population. A better understanding of the stellar population distribution can lead to more accurate star-formation rates to compare to those calculated from star-formation tracers. We found the regions NGC 6334 and G3266 to have the highest levels of ongoing star formation activity as indicated by the number of molecular hydrogen objects (MHOs) detected. There are a total of 279 cataloged MHOs in 181 categorized systems for the six regions. There are a total of 150 identified potential driving sources.This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  16. Ozone-Induced Dissociation of Conjugated Lipids Reveals Significant Reaction Rate Enhancements and Characteristic Odd-Electron Product Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Huong T.; Maccarone, Alan T.; Campbell, J. Larry; Mitchell, Todd W.; Blanksby, Stephen J.

    2013-02-01

    Ozone-induced dissociation (OzID) is an alternative ion activation method that relies on the gas phase ion-molecule reaction between a mass-selected target ion and ozone in an ion trap mass spectrometer. Herein, we evaluated the performance of OzID for both the structural elucidation and selective detection of conjugated carbon-carbon double bond motifs within lipids. The relative reactivity trends for [M + X]+ ions (where X = Li, Na, K) formed via electrospray ionization (ESI) of conjugated versus nonconjugated fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) were examined using two different OzID-enabled linear ion-trap mass spectrometers. Compared with nonconjugated analogues, FAMEs derived from conjugated linoleic acids were found to react up to 200 times faster and to yield characteristic radical cations. The significantly enhanced reactivity of conjugated isomers means that OzID product ions can be observed without invoking a reaction delay in the experimental sequence (i.e., trapping of ions in the presence of ozone is not required). This possibility has been exploited to undertake neutral-loss scans on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer targeting characteristic OzID transitions. Such analyses reveal the presence of conjugated double bonds in lipids extracted from selected foodstuffs. Finally, by benchmarking of the absolute ozone concentration inside the ion trap, second order rate constants for the gas phase reactions between unsaturated organic ions and ozone were obtained. These results demonstrate a significant influence of the adducting metal on reaction rate constants in the fashion Li > Na > K.

  17. Ozone-induced dissociation of conjugated lipids reveals significant reaction rate enhancements and characteristic odd-electron product ions.

    PubMed

    Pham, Huong T; Maccarone, Alan T; Campbell, J Larry; Mitchell, Todd W; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2013-02-01

    Ozone-induced dissociation (OzID) is an alternative ion activation method that relies on the gas phase ion-molecule reaction between a mass-selected target ion and ozone in an ion trap mass spectrometer. Herein, we evaluated the performance of OzID for both the structural elucidation and selective detection of conjugated carbon-carbon double bond motifs within lipids. The relative reactivity trends for [M + X](+) ions (where X = Li, Na, K) formed via electrospray ionization (ESI) of conjugated versus nonconjugated fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) were examined using two different OzID-enabled linear ion-trap mass spectrometers. Compared with nonconjugated analogues, FAMEs derived from conjugated linoleic acids were found to react up to 200 times faster and to yield characteristic radical cations. The significantly enhanced reactivity of conjugated isomers means that OzID product ions can be observed without invoking a reaction delay in the experimental sequence (i.e., trapping of ions in the presence of ozone is not required). This possibility has been exploited to undertake neutral-loss scans on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer targeting characteristic OzID transitions. Such analyses reveal the presence of conjugated double bonds in lipids extracted from selected foodstuffs. Finally, by benchmarking of the absolute ozone concentration inside the ion trap, second order rate constants for the gas phase reactions between unsaturated organic ions and ozone were obtained. These results demonstrate a significant influence of the adducting metal on reaction rate constants in the fashion Li > Na > K.

  18. Multi-epoch very long baseline interferometric observations of the nuclear starburst region of NGC 253: Improved modeling of the supernova and star formation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rampadarath, H.; Morgan, J. S.; Tingay, S. J.; Lenc, E.

    2014-01-01

    The results of multi-epoch observations of the southern starburst galaxy, NGC 253, with the Australian Long Baseline Array at 2.3 GHz are presented. As with previous radio interferometric observations of this galaxy, no new sources were discovered. By combining the results of this survey with Very Large Array observations at higher frequencies from the literature, spectra were derived and a free-free absorption model was fitted of 20 known sources in NGC 253. The results were found to be consistent with previous studies. The supernova remnant, 5.48-43.3, was imaged with the highest sensitivity and resolution to date, revealing a two-lobed morphology. Comparisons with previous observations of similar resolution give an upper limit of 10{sup 4} km s{sup –1} for the expansion speed of this remnant. We derive a supernova rate of <0.2 yr{sup –1} for the inner 300 pc using a model that improves on previous methods by incorporating an improved radio supernova peak luminosity distribution and by making use of multi-wavelength radio data spanning 21 yr. A star formation rate of SFR(M ≥ 5 M {sub ☉}) < 4.9 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} was also estimated using the standard relation between supernova and star formation rates. Our improved estimates of supernova and star formation rates are consistent with studies at other wavelengths. The results of our study point to the possible existence of a small population of undetected supernova remnants, suggesting a low rate of radio supernova production in NGC 253.

  19. Selectin receptor-ligand bonds: Formation limited by shear rate and dissociation governed by the Bell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuqi; Springer, Timothy A.

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the principles that govern the formation and dissociation of an adhesive bond between a cell moving in shear flow and a substrate and tested different theories of how force affects bond dissociation. Viscosity relates the kinematics of fluid movement (shear rate, units of time1) to shear stress (units of force/area, the product of shear rate and viscosity). At different medium viscosities, the formation of receptor-ligand bonds between a cell in the flowstream and P-selectin on the vessel wall showed a similar efficiency as a function of shear rate but not of shear stress. Therefore, bondformation was a function of shear rate and hence of the kinematics of receptor and ligand movement. By contrast, the kinetics of bond dissociation was a function of shear stress and hence of force on the bond. The different requirements for bond formation and dissociation allowed dissociation kinetics to be measured at higher forces on the bond by increasing medium viscosity. Data over an extended range of forces on the bond therefore could be collected that enabled five different proposed equations, relating force to bond dissociation, to be compared for fit to experimental data. The relationship proposed by Bell [Bell, G. I. (1978) Science 200, 618-627] fit the data significantly the best and also predicted an off-rate in the absence of force that best matched an independent measurement [Mehta, P., Cummings, R. D. & McEver, R. P. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 32506-32513].

  20. Pattern formation in the monocot embryo as revealed by NAM and CUC3 orthologues from Zea mays L.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Roman; Werr, Wolfgang

    2005-07-01

    All aerial parts of a higher plant originate from the shoot apical meristem (SAM), which is initiated during embryogenesis as a part of the basic body plan. In contrast to dicot species, the SAM in Zea mays is not established at an apico-central, but at a lateral position of the transition stage embryo. Genetic and molecular studies in dicots have revealed that members of the NAC gene family of plant-specific transcription factors such as NO APICAL MERISTEM (NAM) from Petunia or the CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON (CUC) genes from Arabidopsis contribute essential functions to the establishment of the SAM and cotyledon separation. As an approach to the understanding of meristem formation in a monocot species, members of the maize NAC family highly related to the NAM/CUC genes were isolated and characterized. Our phylogenetic analysis indicates that two distinct NAM and CUC3 precursors already existed prior to the separation of mono- and dicot species. The allocation of the two maize paralogues, ZmNAM1 and ZmNAM2 together with PhNAM, AtCUC2 and AmCUP in one sub-branch and the corresponding expression patterns support their contribution to SAM establishment. In contrast, the ZmCUC3 orthologue is associated with boundary specification at the SAM periphery, where it visualizes which fraction of cells in the SAM is committed to a new leaf primordium. Other maize NAC gene family members are clearly positioned outside of this NAM/CUC3 branch and also exhibit highly cell type-specific expression patterns. PMID:16158242

  1. Rate of phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue complex formation in acidic persulfate digested sample matrix for total dissolved phosphorus determination: importance of post-digestion pH adjustment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Lan; Zhang, Jia-Zhong

    2008-10-19

    Acidic persulfate oxidation is one of the most common procedures used to digest dissolved organic phosphorus compounds in water samples for total dissolved phosphorus determination. It has been reported that the rates of phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue complex formation were significantly reduced in the digested sample matrix. This study revealed that the intermediate products of persulfate oxidation, not the slight change in pH, cause the slowdown of color formation. This effect can be remedied by adjusting digested samples pH to a near neural to decompose the intermediate products. No disturbing effects of chlorine on the phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue formation in seawater were observed. It is noted that the modification of mixed reagent recipe cannot provide near neutral pH for the decomposition of the intermediate products of persulfate oxidation. This study provides experimental evidence not only to support the recommendation made in APHA standard methods that the pH of the digested sample must be adjusted to within a narrow range of sample, but also to improve the understanding of role of residue from persulfate decomposition on the subsequent phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue formation.

  2. STAR FORMATION RATES FOR STARBURST GALAXIES FROM ULTRAVIOLET, INFRARED, AND RADIO LUMINOSITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, Lusine A.; Weedman, Daniel W. E-mail: dweedman@isc.astro.cornell.edu

    2009-08-20

    We present a comparison of star formation rates (SFR) determined from mid-infrared 7.7 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) luminosity [SFR(PAH)], from 1.4 GHz radio luminosity [SFR(radio)], and from far-ultraviolet luminosity [SFR(UV)] for a sample of 287 starburst galaxies with z < 0.5 having Spitzer IRS observations. The previously adopted relation log [SFR(PAH)] = log [{nu}L {sub {nu}}(7.7 {mu}m)] - 42.57 {+-} 0.2, for SFR in M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and {nu}L {sub {nu}}(7.7 {mu}m) the luminosity at the peak of the 7.7 {mu}m PAH feature in erg s{sup -1}, is found to agree with SFR(radio). Comparing with SFR(UV) determined independently from ultraviolet observations of the same sources with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer mission (not corrected for dust extinction), the median log [SFR(PAH)/SFR(UV)] = 1.67, indicating that only 2% of the ultraviolet continuum typically escapes extinction by dust within a starburst. This ratio SFR(PAH)/SFR(UV) depends on infrared luminosity, with the form log [SFR(PAH)/SFR(UV)] = (0.53 {+-} 0.05)log [{nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.7 {mu}m)] - 21.5 {+-} 0.18, indicating that more luminous starbursts are also dustier. Using our adopted relation between {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.7 {mu}m) and L {sub ir}, this becomes log [SFR(PAH)/SFR(UV)]= (0.53 {+-} 0.05)log L{sub ir} - 4.11 {+-} 0.18, for L{sub ir} in L{sub sun}. Only blue compact dwarf galaxies show comparable or greater SFR(UV) compared to SFR(PAH). We also find that the ratio SFR(PAH)/SFR(UV) is similar to that in infrared-selected starbursts for a sample of Markarian starburst galaxies originally selected using optical classification, which implies that there is no significant selection effect in SFR(PAH)/SFR(UV) using starburst galaxies discovered by Spitzer. These results indicate that SFRs determined with ultraviolet luminosities require dust corrections by a factor of {approx}10 for typical local starbursts but this factor increases to >700 for the most luminous starbursts at z {approx} 2

  3. Steadily increasing star formation rates in galaxies observed at 3 ≲ z ≲ 5 in the CANDELS/GOODS-S field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seong-Kook; Ferguson, Henry C.; Dahlen, Tomas; Somerville, Rachel S.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Wiklind, Tommy

    2014-03-10

    We investigate the star formation histories (SFHs) of high redshift (3 ≲ z ≲ 5) star-forming galaxies selected based on their rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) colors in the CANDELS/GOODS-S field. By comparing the results from the spectral-energy-distribution-fitting analysis with two different assumptions about the SFHs—i.e., exponentially declining SFHs as well as increasing ones, we conclude that the SFHs of high-redshift star-forming galaxies increase with time rather than exponentially decline. We also examine the correlations between the star formation rates (SFRs) and the stellar masses. When the galaxies are fit with rising SFRs, we find that the trend seen in the data qualitatively matches the expectations from a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. The mean specific SFR is shown to increase with redshift, also in agreement with the theoretical prediction. From the derived tight correlation between stellar masses and SFRs, we derive the mean SFH of star-forming galaxies in the redshift range of 3 ≤ z ≤ 5, which shows a steep power-law (with power α = 5.85) increase with time. We also investigate the formation timescales and mean stellar population ages of these star-forming galaxies. Our analysis reveals that UV-selected star-forming galaxies have a broad range of the formation redshift. The derived stellar masses and the stellar population ages show positive correlation in a sense that more massive galaxies are on average older, but with significant scatter. This large scatter implies that the galaxies' mass is not the only factor which affects the growth or star formation of high-redshift galaxies.

  4. Development of a Brief Rating Scale for the Formative Assessment of Positive Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cressey, James M.

    2010-01-01

    In order to provide effective social, emotional, and behavioral supports to all students, there is a need for formative assessment tools that can help determine the responsiveness of students to intervention. Schoolwide positive behavior support (SWPBS) is one framework that can provide evidence-based intervention within a 3-tiered model to reach…

  5. Herschel reveals the obscured star formation in HiZELS Hα emitters at z = 1.47

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibar, E.; Sobral, D.; Best, P. N.; Ivison, R. J.; Smail, I.; Arumugam, V.; Berta, S.; Béthermin, M.; Bock, J.; Cava, A.; Conley, A.; Farrah, D.; Geach, J.; Ikarashi, S.; Kohno, K.; Le Floc'h, E.; Lutz, D.; Magdis, G.; Magnelli, B.; Marsden, G.; Oliver, S. J.; Page, M. J.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Schulz, B.; Seymour, N.; Smith, A. J.; Symeonidis, M.; Wang, L.; Wardlow, J.; Zemcov, M.

    2013-10-01

    We describe the far-infrared (far-IR; rest-frame 8-1000-μm) properties of a sample of 443 Hα-selected star-forming galaxies in the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) and Ultra Deep Survey (UDS) fields detected by the High-redshift Emission Line Survey (HiZELS) imaging survey. Sources are identified using narrow-band filters in combination with broad-band photometry to uniformly select Hα (and [O II] if available) emitters in a narrow redshift slice at z = 1.47 ± 0.02. We use a stacking approach in Spitzer-MIPS mid-IR, Herschel-PACS/SPIRE far-IR [from the PACS Evolutionary Prove (PEP) and Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES)] and AzTEC mm-wave images to describe their typical far-IR properties. We find that HiZELS galaxies with observed Hα luminosities of L(Hα)obs ≈ 108.1-9.1 L⊙ ( ≈ 1041.7-42.7 erg s-1) have bolometric far-IR luminosities of typical luminous IR galaxies, L(8-1000 μ m)≈ 10^{11.41^{+0.04}_{-0.06}} L⊙. Combining the Hα and far-IR luminosities, we derive median star formation rates (SFRs) of SFRHα, FIR = 32 ± 5 M⊙ yr-1 and Hα extinctions of AHα = 1.0 ± 0.2 mag. Perhaps surprisingly, little difference is seen in typical HiZELS extinction levels compared to local star-forming galaxies. We confirm previous empirical stellar mass (M*) to AHα relations and the little or no evolution up to z = 1.47. For HiZELS galaxies (or similar samples) we provide an empirical parametrization of the SFR as a function of rest-frame (u - z) colours and 3.6-μm photometry - a useful proxy to aid in the absence of far-IR detections in high-z galaxies. We find that the observed Hα luminosity is a dominant SFR tracer when rest-frame (u - z) colours are ≲0.9 mag or when Spitzer-3.6-μm photometry is fainter than 22 mag (Vega) or when stellar masses are lower than 109.7 M⊙. We do not find any correlation between the [O II]/Hα and far-IR luminosity, suggesting that this emission line ratio does not trace the extinction of the most

  6. Genome-wide mutagenesis of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri reveals novel genetic determinants and regulation mechanisms of biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyun; Wang, Nian

    2011-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) causes citrus canker disease, a major threat to citrus production worldwide. Accumulating evidence suggests that the formation of biofilms on citrus leaves plays an important role in the epiphytic survival of this pathogen prior to the development of canker disease. However, the process of Xac biofilm formation is poorly understood. Here, we report a genome-scale study of Xac biofilm formation in which we identified 92 genes, including 33 novel genes involved in biofilm formation and 7 previously characterized genes, colR, fhaB, fliC, galU, gumD, wxacO, and rbfC, known to be important for Xac biofilm formation. In addition, 52 other genes with defined or putative functions in biofilm formation were identified, even though they had not previously reported been to be associated with biofilm formation. The 92 genes were isolated from 292 biofilm-defective mutants following a screen of a transposon insertion library containing 22,000 Xac strain 306 mutants. Further analyses indicated that 16 of the novel genes are involved in the production of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), 7 genes are involved in signaling and regulatory pathways, and 5 genes have unknown roles in biofilm formation. Furthermore, two novel genes, XAC0482, encoding a haloacid dehalogenase-like phosphatase, and XAC0494 (designated as rbfS), encoding a two-component sensor protein, were confirmed to be biofilm-related genes through complementation assays. Our data demonstrate that the formation of mature biofilm requires EPS, LPS, both flagellum-dependent and flagellum-independent cell motility, secreted proteins and extracellular DNA. Additionally, multiple signaling pathways are involved in Xac biofilm formation. This work is the first report on a genome-wide scale of the genetic processes of biofilm formation in plant pathogenic bacteria. The report provides significant new information about the genetic determinants and

  7. Genome-wide mutagenesis of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri reveals novel genetic determinants and regulation mechanisms of biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyun; Wang, Nian

    2011-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) causes citrus canker disease, a major threat to citrus production worldwide. Accumulating evidence suggests that the formation of biofilms on citrus leaves plays an important role in the epiphytic survival of this pathogen prior to the development of canker disease. However, the process of Xac biofilm formation is poorly understood. Here, we report a genome-scale study of Xac biofilm formation in which we identified 92 genes, including 33 novel genes involved in biofilm formation and 7 previously characterized genes, colR, fhaB, fliC, galU, gumD, wxacO, and rbfC, known to be important for Xac biofilm formation. In addition, 52 other genes with defined or putative functions in biofilm formation were identified, even though they had not previously reported been to be associated with biofilm formation. The 92 genes were isolated from 292 biofilm-defective mutants following a screen of a transposon insertion library containing 22,000 Xac strain 306 mutants. Further analyses indicated that 16 of the novel genes are involved in the production of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), 7 genes are involved in signaling and regulatory pathways, and 5 genes have unknown roles in biofilm formation. Furthermore, two novel genes, XAC0482, encoding a haloacid dehalogenase-like phosphatase, and XAC0494 (designated as rbfS), encoding a two-component sensor protein, were confirmed to be biofilm-related genes through complementation assays. Our data demonstrate that the formation of mature biofilm requires EPS, LPS, both flagellum-dependent and flagellum-independent cell motility, secreted proteins and extracellular DNA. Additionally, multiple signaling pathways are involved in Xac biofilm formation. This work is the first report on a genome-wide scale of the genetic processes of biofilm formation in plant pathogenic bacteria. The report provides significant new information about the genetic determinants and

  8. Another short-burst host galaxy with an optically obscured high star formation rate: The case of GRB 071227

    SciTech Connect

    Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Klose, S.; Kann, D. A.; Rossi, A.; Schmidl, S.; Michałowski, M. J.; McKenzie, M. R. G.; Savaglio, S.; Greiner, J.; Hunt, L. K.; Gorosabel, J.

    2014-07-01

    We report on radio continuum observations of the host galaxy of the short gamma-ray burst 071227 (z = 0.381) with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We detect the galaxy in the 5.5 GHz band with an integrated flux density of F {sub ν} = 43 ± 11 μJy, corresponding to an unobscured star-formation rate of about 24 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, 40 times higher than what was found from optical emission lines. Among the ∼30 well-identified and studied host galaxies of short bursts this is the third case where the host is found to undergo an episode of intense star formation. This suggests that a fraction of all short-burst progenitors hosted in star-forming galaxies could be physically related to recent star formation activity, implying a relatively short merger timescale.

  9. Interfacial film formation: influence on oil spreading rates in lab basin tests and dispersant effectiveness testing in a wave tank.

    PubMed

    King, Thomas L; Clyburne, Jason A C; Lee, Kenneth; Robinson, Brian J

    2013-06-15

    Test facilities such as lab basins and wave tanks are essential when evaluating the use of chemical dispersants to treat oil spills at sea. However, these test facilities have boundaries (walls) that provide an ideal environment for surface (interfacial) film formation on seawater. Surface films may form from surfactants naturally present in crude oil as well as dispersant drift/overspray when applied to an oil spill. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of surface film formation on oil spreading rates in a small scale lab basin and on dispersant effectiveness conducted in a large scale wave tank. The process of crude oil spreading on the surface of the basin seawater was influenced in the presence of a surface film as shown using a 1st order kinetic model. In addition, interfacial film formation can greatly influence chemically dispersed crude oil in a large scale dynamic wave tank. PMID:23623652

  10. A Multi-Pathway Perspective on Protein Aggregation: Implications for Control of the Rate and Extent of Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Damien; Kardos, József; Edskes, Herman; Carver, John A.; Goto, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The nucleation-growth model has been used extensively for characterizing in vitro amyloid fibril formation kinetics and for simulating the relationship between amyloid and disease. In the majority of studies amyloid has been considered as the dominant, or sole, aggregation end product, with the presence of other competing non-amyloid aggregation processes, for example amorphous aggregate formation, being largely ignored. Here, we examine possible regulatory effects that off-pathway processes might exert on the rate and extent of amyloid formation – in particular their potential for providing false positives and negatives in the evaluation of anti-amyloidogenic agents. Furthermore, we investigate how such competing reactions might influence the standard interpretation of amyloid aggregation as a two-state system. We conclude by discussing our findings in terms of the general concepts of supersaturation and system metastability – providing some mechanistic insight as to how these empirical phenomena may manifest themselves in the amyloid arena. PMID:25647034

  11. The Relation between Star-Formation Rate and Stellar Mass of Galaxies at z ~ 1-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsianis, A.; Tescari, E.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2016-07-01

    The relation between the star-formation Rate and stellar mass (M ⋆) of galaxies represents a fundamental constraint on galaxy formation, and has been studied extensively both in observations and cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. However, the observed amplitude of the star-formation rate-stellar mass relation has not been successfully reproduced in simulations, indicating either that the halo accretion history and baryonic physics are poorly understood/modelled or that observations contain biases. In this paper, we examine the evolution of the SFR - M ⋆ relation of z ~ 1-4 galaxies and display the inconsistency between observed relations that are obtained using different techniques. We employ cosmological hydrodynamic simulations from various groups which are tuned to reproduce a range of observables and compare these with a range of observed SFR - M ⋆ relations. We find that numerical results are consistent with observations that use Spectral Energy Distribution techniques to estimate star-formation rates, dust corrections, and stellar masses. On the contrary, simulations are not able to reproduce results that were obtained by combining only UV and IR luminosities (UV+IR). These imply star-formation rates at a fixed stellar mass that are larger almost by a factor of 5 than those of Spectral Energy Distribution measurements for z ~ 1.5-4. For z < 1.5, the results from simulations, Spectral Energy Distribution fitting techniques and IR+UV conversion agree well. We find that surveys that preferably select star-forming galaxies (e.g. by adopting Lyman-break or blue selection) typically predict a larger median/average star-formation rate at a fixed stellar mass especially for high mass objects, with respect to mass selected samples and hydrodynamic simulations. Furthermore, we find remarkable agreement between the numerical results from various authors who have employed different cosmological codes and run simulations with different resolutions. This is

  12. Reduction in haze formation rate on prebiotic Earth in the presence of hydrogen.

    PubMed

    DeWitt, H Langley; Trainer, Melissa G; Pavlov, Alex A; Hasenkopf, Christa A; Aiken, Allison C; Jimenez, Jose L; McKay, Christopher P; Toon, Owen B; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2009-06-01

    Recent attempts to resolve the faint young Sun paradox have focused on an early Earth atmosphere with elevated levels of the greenhouse gases methane (CH(4)) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) that could have provided adequate warming to Earth's surface. On Titan, the photolysis of CH(4) has been shown to create a thick haze layer that cools its surface. Unlike Titan, however, early Earth's atmosphere likely contained high amounts of CO(2) and hydrogen (H(2)). In this work, we examine haze formation in an early Earth atmosphere composed of CO(2), H(2), N(2), and CH(4), with a CO(2)/CH(4) ratio of 10 and a H(2)/CO(2) ratio of up to 15. To initiate aerosol formation, a broad-spectrum ultraviolet (UV) energy source with emission at Lyman-alpha was used to simulate the solar spectrum. Aerosol composition and total aerosol mass produced as a function of reagent gas were measured with an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Results show an order of magnitude decrease in haze production with the addition of H(2), with no significant change in the chemical composition of the haze. We calculate that the presence of H(2) on early Earth could thus have favored warmer surface temperatures and yet allowed photochemical haze formation to deliver complex organic species to early Earth's surface.

  13. Estimating the carbon sequestration capacity of shale formations using methane production rates.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhiyuan; Clarens, Andres

    2013-10-01

    Hydraulically fractured shale formations are being developed widely for oil and gas production. They could also represent an attractive repository for permanent geologic carbon sequestration. Shales have a low permeability, but they can adsorb an appreciable amount of CO2 on fracture surfaces. Here, a computational method is proposed for estimating the CO2 sequestration capacity of a fractured shale formation and it is applied to the Marcellus shale in the eastern United States. The model is based on historical and projected CH4 production along with published data and models for CH4/CO2 sorption equilibria and kinetics. The results suggest that the Marcellus shale alone could store between 10.4 and 18.4 Gt of CO2 between now and 2030, which represents more than 50% of total U.S. CO2 emissions from stationary sources over the same period. Other shale formations with comparable pressure-temperature conditions, such as Haynesville and Barnett, could provide significant additional storage capacity. The mass transfer kinetic results indicate that injection of CO2 would proceed several times faster than production of CH4. Additional considerations not included in this model could either reinforce (e.g., leveraging of existing extraction and monitoring infrastructure) or undermine (e.g., leakage or seismicity potential) this approach, but the sequestration capacity estimated here supports continued exploration into this pathway for producing carbon neutral energy.

  14. Stellar Masses and Start Formation Rates of Lensed Dusty Star-Forming Galaxies from the SPT Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jingzhe; Gonzalez, Anthony; SPT SMG Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    To understand cosmic mass assembly in the Universe at early epochs, we primarily rely on measurements of stellar mass and star formation rate of distant galaxies. In this paper, we present stellar masses and star formation rates of six high-redshift (2.8 ≤ z ≤ 5.7) dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) that are strongly gravitationally lensed by foreground galaxies. These sources were first discovered by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) at millimeter wavelengths and all have spectroscopic redshifts and robust lens models derived from ALMA observations. We have conducted follow-up observations, obtaining multi-wavelength imaging data, using HST, Spitzer, Herschel and the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX). We use the high-resolution HST/WFC3 images to disentangle the background source from the foreground lens in Spitzer/IRAC data. The detections and upper limits provide important constraints on the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for these DSFGs, yielding stellar masses, IR luminosities, and star formation rates (SFRs). The SED fits of six SPT sources show that the intrinsic stellar masses span a range more than one order of magnitude with a median value ˜ 5 ×1010M⊙. The intrinsic IR luminosities range from 4×1012L⊙ to 4×1013L⊙. They all have prodigious intrinsic star formation rates of 510 to 4800 M⊙yr-1. Compared to the star-forming main sequence (MS), these six DSFGs have specific SFRs that all lie above the MS, including two galaxies that are a factor of 10 higher than the MS. Our results suggest that we are witnessing the ongoing strong starburst events which may be driven by major mergers.

  15. Age- and gender-specific estimates of partnership formation and dissolution rates in the Seattle Sex Survey

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Sara J.; Hughes, James P.; Foxman, Betsy; Aral, Sevgi O.; Holmes, King K.; White, Peter J.; Golden, Matthew R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Partnership formation and dissolution rates are primary determinants of sexually transmitted infection (STI) transmission dynamics. Methods: The authors used data on persons' lifetime sexual experiences from a 2003-2004 random digit dialing survey of Seattle residents aged 18-39 years (N=1,194) to estimate age- and gender-specific partnership formation and dissolution rates. Partnership start and end dates were used to estimate participants' ages at the start of each partnership and partnership durations, and partnerships not enumerated in the survey were imputed. Results: Partnership formation peaked at age 19 at 0.9 (95% CI: 0.76, 1.04) partnerships per year and decreased to 0.1-0.2 after age 30 for women and peaked at age 20 at 1.4 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.64) and declined to 0.5 after age 30 for men. Nearly a quarter (23.7%) of partnerships ended within 1 week and over one-half (51.2%) ended within 12 weeks. Most (63.5%) individuals aged 30-39 had not formed a new sexual partnership in the past 3 years. Conclusion: A large proportion of the heterosexual population is no longer at substantial STI risk by their early 30s, but similar analyses among high-risk populations may give insight into reasons for the profound disparities in STI rates across populations. PMID:20071193

  16. Critical rate of electrolyte circulation for preventing zinc dendrite formation in a zinc-bromine redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hyeon Sun; Park, Jong Ho; Ra, Ho Won; Jin, Chang-Soo; Yang, Jung Hoon

    2016-09-01

    In a zinc-bromine redox flow battery, a nonaqueous and dense polybromide phase formed because of bromide oxidation in the positive electrolyte during charging. This formation led to complicated two-phase flow on the electrode surface. The polybromide and aqueous phases led to different kinetics of the Br/Br- redox reaction; poor mixing of the two phases caused uneven redox kinetics on the electrode surface. As the Br/Br- redox reaction was coupled with the zinc deposition reaction, the uneven redox reaction on the positive electrode was accompanied by nonuniform zinc deposition and zinc dendrite formation, which degraded battery stability. A single-flow cell was operated at varying electrolyte circulation rates and current densities. Zinc dendrite formation was observed after cell disassembly following charge-discharge testing. In addition, the flow behavior in the positive compartment was observed by using a transparent version of the cell. At low rate of electrolyte circulation, the polybromide phase clearly separated from the aqueous phase and accumulated at the bottom of the flow frame. In the corresponding area on the negative electrode, a large amount of zinc dendrites was observed after charge-discharge testing. Therefore, a minimum circulation rate should be considered to avoid poor mixing of the positive electrolyte.

  17. Bluff formation and long-term recession rates, southwestern Lake Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Rovey, C.W. II )

    1992-01-01

    Where eroding cohesive sediments are present, Lake Michigan bluffs range up to 140 ft. in height and expose multiple stratigraphic units. According to the model presented here, bluffs form as a wave cut terrace erodes inland from a point near the original shoreline. The erosion plane is nearly horizontal, in contrast with the eastward dip of the glacial units inherited from underlying bedrock. Therefore, terraces eroding inland (west) produce progressively higher bluffs and expose successively older units at the toe and beneath the lake. This process repeated several times as lake levels sequentially dropped to their modern stage. The initial modern shoreline, and hence the width of the wave cut terrace, was determined from 4 offshore seismic profiles. It is picked as an inflection point in the slope of the lake bed, occurring offshore of dipping reflectors intersecting the lake bottom. The calculated average recession rate over the 2,500 year duration of the modern stage is 5 ft/yr in contrast to average rates of 2 ft/yr measured over the last century. Thus rates decrease through time as the terrace widens and wave energy is damped. By correlating bluff height to amount of recession of modern bluffs, a third rate of 12 ft/yr of the first 800 years of a recession is calculated for relict bluffs formed at the Nipissing II level. The 3 rates define a steeply decaying exponential curve in early stages of bluff retreat, flattening into a nearly linear function after 1,000 years.

  18. Small impact craters in the lunar regolith - Their morphologies, relative ages, and rates of formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, H. J.; Boyce, J. M.; Hahn, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The size frequency distributions, relative ages, and absolute age determination of lunar impact craters ranging in diameter from 1 to 100 m are discussed in relation to present-day and past impact rates. The size frequency distributions of craters produced by impacts on the lunar surface and of craters remaining after degradation with time and later impacts are examined, together with the steady state frequency curves for various crater morphologies. Relations between the relative ages of craters, their morphologies and their diameters are discussed, and the calibration of this kind of relationship with absolute crater ages by the location of individual craters with known absolute ages, diameters and frequency distribution statistics is considered. Estimates of present and past cratering rates based on crater size-frequency distributions are presented which suggest that the rate of impacting objects producing small lunar craters could have been constant over the last 100 million years.

  19. Efficient quantum-classical method for computing thermal rate constant of recombination: application to ozone formation.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Mikhail V; Babikov, Dmitri

    2012-05-14

    Efficient method is proposed for computing thermal rate constant of recombination reaction that proceeds according to the energy transfer mechanism, when an energized molecule is formed from reactants first, and is stabilized later by collision with quencher. The mixed quantum-classical theory for the collisional energy transfer and the ro-vibrational energy flow [M. Ivanov and D. Babikov, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144107 (2011)] is employed to treat the dynamics of molecule + quencher collision. Efficiency is achieved by sampling simultaneously (i) the thermal collision energy, (ii) the impact parameter, and (iii) the incident direction of quencher, as well as (iv) the rotational state of energized molecule. This approach is applied to calculate third-order rate constant of the recombination reaction that forms the (16)O(18)O(16)O isotopomer of ozone. Comparison of the predicted rate vs. experimental result is presented.

  20. The VMC survey - XIV. First results on the look-back time star formation rate tomography of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubele, Stefano; Girardi, Léo; Kerber, Leandro; Cioni, Maria-Rosa L.; Piatti, Andrés E.; Zaggia, Simone; Bekki, Kenji; Bressan, Alessandro; Clementini, Gisella; de Grijs, Richard; Emerson, Jim P.; Groenewegen, Martin A. T.; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Marconi, Marcella; Marigo, Paola; Moretti, Maria-Ida; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Subramanian, Smitha; Tatton, Benjamin L.; van Loon, Jacco Th.

    2015-05-01

    We analyse deep images from the VISTA survey of the Magellanic Clouds in the YJ{K_s} filters, covering 14 deg2 (10 tiles), split into 120 subregions, and comprising the main body and Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We apply a colour-magnitude diagram reconstruction method that returns their best-fitting star formation rate SFR(t), age-metallicity relation (AMR), distance and mean reddening, together with 68 per cent confidence intervals. The distance data can be approximated by a plane tilted in the East-West direction with a mean inclination of 39°, although deviations of up to ±3 kpc suggest a distorted and warped disc. After assigning to every observed star a probability of belonging to a given age-metallicity interval, we build high-resolution population maps. These dramatically reveal the flocculent nature of the young star-forming regions and the nearly smooth features traced by older stellar generations. They document the formation of the SMC Wing at ages <0.2 Gyr and the peak of star formation in the SMC Bar at ˜40 Myr. We clearly detect periods of enhanced star formation at 1.5 and 5 Gyr. The former is possibly related to a new feature found in the AMR, which suggests ingestion of metal-poor gas at ages slightly larger than 1 Gyr. The latter constitutes a major period of stellar mass formation. We confirm that the SFR(t) was moderately low at even older ages.

  1. A Comparison of Two Instructional Formats on Heart Rate Intensity and Skill Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Patrick B.; Strand, Brad

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the effect of adding aerobic training to football skills development activities for male seventh graders. Two groups completed one or the other type of training. Heart rate monitor and skill assessment data indicated that the addition of the planned fitness component did not detract from skill development. (SM)

  2. Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Molecular Clouds Regulated by Radiation Feedback Forces. I. Star Formation Rate and Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raskutti, Sudhir; Ostriker, Eve C.; Skinner, M. Aaron

    2016-10-01

    Radiation feedback from stellar clusters is expected to play a key role in setting the rate and efficiency of star formation in giant molecular clouds. To investigate how radiation forces influence realistic turbulent systems, we have conducted a series of numerical simulations employing the Hyperion radiation hydrodynamics solver, considering the regime that is optically thick to ultraviolet and optically thin to infrared radiation. Our model clouds cover initial surface densities between Σ cl,0∼ 10--300 M⊙ pc-2, with varying initial turbulence. We follow them through turbulent, self-gravitating collapse, star cluster formation, and cloud dispersal by stellar radiation. All our models display a log-normal distribution of gas surface density Σ for an initial virial parameter αvir,0=2, the log-normal standard deviation is σln Σ =1-1.5 and the star formation rate coefficient ɛff,ρ=0.3-0.5, both of which are sensitive to turbulence but not radiation feedback. The net star formation efficiency (SFE) ɛfinal increases with Σcl,0 and decreases with α vir,0. We interpret these results via a simple conceptual framework, whereby steady star formation increases the radiation force, such that local gas patches at successively higher Σ become unbound. Based on this formalism (with fixed σln Σ), we provide an analytic upper bound on ɛfinal, which is in good agreement with our numerical results. The final SFE depends on the distribution of Eddington ratios in the cloud and is strongly increased by the turbulent compression of gas.

  3. Vitamin C supplementation enhances compact morulae formation but reduces the hatching blastocyst rate of bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Wang, Li-Jun; Zhang, Hui; Li, Rui-Zhe; Cui, Chen-Chen; Li, Wen-Zhe; Zhang, Yong; Jin, Ya-Ping

    2014-08-01

    Vitamin C, an antioxidant that reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells, is capable of significantly improving the developmental competence of porcine and mouse somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos, both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, the effects of vitamin C on the developmental competence of bovine SCNT embryos were investigated. The results indicated that vitamin C (40 μg/mL) positively affected the scavenging of intracellular ROS, cleavage rate at 24 h (76.67 vs. 68.26%, p<0.05), compact morulae formation (60.83 vs. 51.30%, p<0.05), and the blastomere apoptosis index (3.70 ± 1.41 vs. 4.43% ± 1.65, p<0.05) of bovine SCNT embryos. However, vitamin C supplementation did not significantly affect the blastocyst formation rate and proportion of inner cell mass over total cells per blastocyst on day 7. Moreover, vitamin C supplementation obviously impaired the total cell numbers per blastocyst (97.20 ± 11.35 vs. 88.57 ± 10.43, p<0.05) on day 7 and the hatching blastocysts formation rate on day 9 (26.51 vs. 50.65%, p<0.05) compared with that of the untreated group. Vitamin C supplementation preferentially improved the viability of bovine SCNT embryos prior to the blastocyst stage, but did not enhance the formation and quality of blastocysts in vitro. In conclusion, the effect of vitamin C on the development of bovine SCNT embryos is complex, and vitamin C is not a suitable antioxidant chemical for the in vitro culture of bovine SCNT embryos.

  4. Quantifying rind formation and chemical weathering rates in weathering clasts with uranium-series isotopes: a case study from Basse-Terre Island, Guadeloupe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L.; Chabaux, F. J.; Pelt, E.; Granet, M.; Sak, P. B.; Gaillardet, J.; Lebedeva, M.; Brantley, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    Weathering of tropical volcanic islands is rapid because of the reactive nature of the volcanic rock and the hot humid climate. In the tropics, rock fragments in the regolith zone commonly form alteration rinds. Weathering rinds are excellent samples to understand key chemical weathering processes. To quantify rock weathering rates in a tropical climate and to understand the environmental factors that control these rates, we combined a novel U-series isotopic technique with chemical and electron microprobe analyses to study weathering rinds formed at Basse-Terre Island, Guadeloupe. U-series isotopes and element concentrations were analyzed in a basaltic/andesitic weathering rind collected from the Bras David watershed on Basse-Terre Island. From the clast, core and rind samples were obtained by drilling along two linear profiles. Elemental profiles reveal that elemental loss varies in the order of Ca, Na, Sr > K, Mg, Rb > Mn > Si > Ba > Al > Fe, and Ti =0 across the core-rind interface, consistent with relative reactivity of phases in the clast from plagioclase ≈ pyroxene ≈ glass matrix > apatite > ilmenite. Elemental profiles also reveal conservative behavior of Th and external addition of U into the rind during clast weathering. Measured (234U/238U) activity ratios of the rind samples (1.001 to 1.031) are mostly higher than the core samples (average at ~1.003). Measured (238U/232Th) and (230Th/232Th) activity ratios of the core and rind samples range from 0.973 to 1.817, and 0.971 to 1.375, respectively. Most importantly, both (238U/232Th) and (230Th/232Th) activity ratios increase systematically from the core into the weathering rind for the two profiles. The elemental profiles and electronic microprobe observations suggest that weathering reactions include dissolution of pyroxene, plagioclase, and glass matrix, and formation of Fe oxyhydroxides, gibbsite and minor kaolinite. The dissolution of plagioclase leads to significant porosity growth within the rind

  5. Modeling of the cooling rate effect on the residual stress formation in the cantala fiber/recycled HDPE composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probotinanto, Yosafat C.; Raharjo, Wijang W.; Budiana, Eko P.

    2016-03-01

    Residual stress has great influence on the mechanical properties of polymer composites. Therefore, its formation during the manufacturing process needs to be investigated. The aim of this study is to investigate the influences of cooling rate on the residual stress distribution of the cantala/rHDPE composite by simulation. The simulation was done by using a SOLID227 element type of ANSYS. The cooling rates that used in this study are 0.5°C/minute, 1°C/minute, and 60°C/minute. The values of the residual stress correspond to the increasing of the cooling rate are 1171.31 kPa, 1171.42 kPa, 1172.36 kPa. In the radial direction, the residual stress was tensile inside the fibers, while in the longitudinal direction, the tensile residual stress occurred in the matrix zones and compressive in the fiber zones.

  6. The sensitivity of oxidant formation rates to uncertainties in temperature, water vapor, and cloud cover

    SciTech Connect

    Walcek, C.J.; Yuan, H.H.

    1994-12-31

    Photochemical reaction mechanisms have been used for several decades to understand the formation of acids, oxidants, and other pollutants in the atmosphere. With complex chemical reaction mechanisms, it is useful to perform sensitivity studies to identify the most important or uncertain components within the system of reactions. In this study, we quantify the sensitivity of a chemical reaction mechanism to changes in three meteorological factors: temperature, relative humidity, and sunlight intensity. We perform these sensitivity studies over a wide range of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} = NO + NO{sub 2}) and nonmethane hydrocarbon (NMHC) concentrations, since these two chemicals are the dominant controllable pollutants that influence the chemical reactivity of the atmosphere.

  7. The rate of planet formation and the solar system's small bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safronov, Viktor S.

    1991-01-01

    The evolution of random velocities and the mass distribution of preplanetary body at the early stage of accumulation are currently under review. Arguments were presented for and against the view of an extremely rapid, runaway growth of the largest bodies at this stage with parameter values of Theta approximately greater than 10(exp 3). Difficulties are encountered assuming such a large Theta: (1) bodies of the Jovian zone penetrate the asteroid zone too late and do not have time to hinder the formation of a normal-sized planet in the asteroidal zone and thereby remove a significant portion of the mass of solid matter and (2) Uranus and Neptune cannot eject bodies from the solar system into the cometary cloud. Therefore, the values Theta less than 10(exp 2) appear to be preferable.

  8. Formation Pathways of a Guanine-Quadruplex DNA Revealed by Molecular Dynamics and Thermodynamic Analysis of the Substates

    PubMed Central

    Štefl, Richard; Cheatham, Thomas E.; Špačková, Nad'a; Fadrná, Eva; Berger, Imre; Koča, Jaroslav; Šponer, Jiří

    2003-01-01

    The formation of a cation-stabilized guanine quadruplex (G-DNA) stem is an exceptionally slow process involving complex kinetics that has not yet been characterized at atomic resolution. Here, we investigate the formation of a parallel stranded G-DNA stem consisting of four strands of d(GGGG) using molecular dynamics simulations with explicit inclusion of counterions and solvent. Due to the limitations imposed by the nanosecond timescale of the simulations, rather than watching for the spontaneous formation of G-DNA, our approach probes the stability of possible supramolecular intermediates (including two-, three-, and four-stranded assemblies with out-of-register basepairing between guanines) on the formation pathway. The simulations suggest that “cross-like” two-stranded assemblies may serve as nucleation centers in the initial formation of parallel stranded G-DNA quadruplexes, proceeding through a series of rearrangements involving trapping of cations, association of additional strands, and progressive slippage of strands toward the full stem. To supplement the analysis, approximate free energies of the models are obtained with explicit consideration of the integral cations. The approach applied here serves as a prototype for qualitatively investigating other G-DNA molecules using molecular dynamics simulation and free-energy analysis. PMID:12944293

  9. Ozone interactions with human hair: Ozone uptake rates and product formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandrangi, Lakshmi S.; Morrison, Glenn C.

    In this study, the cumulative ozone uptake, the ozone reaction probability and product yields of volatile aldehydes and ketones were quantified for human scalp hair. Hair was chosen because ozone reacts readily with skin oils and the personal-care products that coat hair. Due to their proximity to the breathing zone, these reactions can influence personal exposure to ozone and its volatile reaction products. Hair samples were collected before and after washing and/or application of personal hair-care products. Samples were exposed to ozone for 24 h in a tubular Teflon reactor; ozone consumption rates and product emission rates were quantified. The mean values of integrated ozone uptake, initial and final follicle reaction probability values for eight washed and unwashed samples were, respectively, 5.1±4.4 μmol O 3 g -1, (13±8)×10 -5, and (1.0±1.3)×10 -5. Unwashed hair taken close to the scalp exhibited the highest integrated ozone uptake and reaction probability, indicating that scalp oils are responsible for much of the ozone reactivity. Otherwise there was no significant difference between washed and unwashed hair. Compounds (geranyl acetone, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, and decanal) associated with ozone reacting with sebum were observed as secondary products more frequently from unwashed hair than for washed hair and the summed yield of aldehydes ranged from 0.00 to 0.86. Based on reaction probabilities, cumulative ozone uptake and typical sebum generation rates, ozone flux to skin and hair is anticipated to be nearly transport limited, reducing personal exposure to ozone and increasing exposure to reaction products.

  10. Potential temperature, upwelling rate and eclogite in the formation of the North Atlantic large igneous province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. L.; Lesher, C. E.

    2010-12-01

    The volumes and compositions of basalts generated by adiabatic decompression melting of the Earth’s mantle depend on mantle potential temperature (T_P), upwelling rate and the fertility of the mantle source. The relative importance of these factors in generating the high productivity magmatism of the Paleogene - Recent North Atlantic large igneous province (NAIP) remains controversial. Each has been proposed as a primary factor in the region. To assess the significance of these mechanisms in NAIP magmatism, we apply our forward melting model, REEBOX PRO, which simulates the melting of a heterogeneous source comprised of peridotite and eclogite lithologies. The model accounts for the thermodynamics of adiabatic decompression melting of a heterogeneous source using constraints from laboratory melting experiments. Input values of T_P and eclogite abundance are used to calculate the buoyancy of the mantle source and maximum upwelling rates. Source buoyancy constrains the maximum amount of eclogite in the mantle source that can ascend beneath the rift axis. All melts generated within the melting regime are pooled to form magmatic crust according to the residual column method. Using the model, variations in magmatic crustal thickness (from geophysics) as a function of eclogite content (from geochemistry) can be related to T_P and upwelling rate. Models with no thermal anomaly, that call on either enhanced upwelling rates due to plate separation (edge - driven convection) or the melting of abundant (> 30%) eclogite at “ambient” T_P (1325 °C), cannot generate the observed igneous crustal thicknesses around the province. Rather, elevated mantle T_P (minimum thermal anomaly ~ 85 - 195 °C) and associated buoyancy - driven upwelling are needed to explain the volume of igneous crust in the province. Involvement of eclogite, while necessary to explain the compositions of many NAIP lavas, does not significantly enhance melt production. These factors, coupled with the long

  11. The long-term alteration rate of Na-smectite in natural bentonite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohe, T.; Itoh, M.; Ishii, T.; Nakashima, H.; Hirata, Y.; Yoshida, H.

    1998-12-01

    Alteration of the natural bentonite in Kuroishi ore deposit located in the north Japan was estimated by the vertical element profiles of Na, Ca and Mg in the drilled core samples. The exchangeable Na depleted from the ground surface to 20 m in depth and the total loss of Na coincided with the accumulation of Ca and Mg. This suggests the Na depletion was caused by the ion exchange reactions. A simple analytical calculation using the steady state approximation indicated the average alteration rate was about 1 cm/1000 years. This value is equivalent to that by geomorphological studies.

  12. Rate of Biochemical oxygen demand during formation of hypoxia in Amur Bay, Sea of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tishchenko, P. P.; Tishchenko, P. Ya.; Zvalinskii, V. I.; Semkin, P. Yu.

    2014-12-01

    In May 2011, a Water Quality Monitor (WQM) hydrological station was maintained in the hypoxia area of Amur Bay one meter above the bottom, at the depth of 19 m. The temperature, electric conductivity, pressure, and content of dissolved oxygen were registered every four hours for more than three months. On the basis of these data, it was found that the period of hypoxia at the observation point lasted 93 days and a model of calculation of the rate of biochemical oxygen demand and the velocity of ventilation of the bottom waters is suggested.

  13. Star-formation rates, molecular clouds, and the origin of the far-infrared luminosity of isolated and interacting galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, P. M.; Sage, L. J.

    1988-01-01

    The CO luminosities of 93 galaxies have been determined and are compared with their IRAS FIR luminosities. Strongly interacting/merging galaxies have L(FIR)/L(CO) substantially higher than that of isolated galaxies or galactic giant molecular clouds (GMCs). Galaxies with tidal tails/bridges are the most extreme type with L(FIR)/L(CO) nine times as high as isolated galaxies. Interactions between close pairs of galaxies do not have much effect on the molecular content and global star-formation rate. If the high ratio L(FIR)/L(CO) in strongly interacting galaxies is due to star formation then the efficiency of this process is higher than that of any galactic GMC. Isolated galaxies, distant pairs, and close pairs have an FIR/CO luminosity ratio which is within a factor of two of galactic GMCs with H II regions. The CO luminosities of FIR-luminous galaxies are among the highest observed for any spiral galaxies.

  14. An uncertainty framework to estimate dense water formation rates : case study in the Northwestern Mediterranean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldman, Robin; Somot, Samuel; Herrmann, Marine; Sevault, Florence; Estournel, Claude; Testor, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    The Northwestern Mediterranean (NWMed) sea is a key region for the Mediterranean thermohaline circulation as it includes the main deep water formation sites of the Western Mediterranean. The Mediterranean Ocean Observing System for the Environment (MOOSE) has been implemented since 2007 over that region to characterize the space and time variability of the main water masses up to interannual (yearly summer cruises) scale. However, despite a large covering of the NWMed region, the limited number of conductivity, temperature and depth (CTD) casts leads to subsampling errors and advocates for an uncertainty assessment of large-scale hydrology estimates. This study aims at estimating the error related to subsampling in time and space. For that purpose, an Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) is performed with an eddy-permitting Mediterranean sea model (NEMOMED12) and an eddy-resolving NWMed sea model (SYMPHONIE). A subsampling of the full model fields in time and space allows for an error estimate in terms of large-scale hydrology. The methodology is applied to dense water volume estimates for the period july 2012 - july 2013. Secondly, an optimization framework is proposed to evaluate and improve MOOSE network's performances under a series of scientific constraints. The results will be discussed for an application in MOOSE observing network, as well as the main assumptions, the stakes and limitations of this framework.

  15. On the temperature dependence of the rate coefficient of formation of C2+ from C + CH+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampino, S.; Pastore, M.; Garcia, E.; Pacifici, L.; Laganà, A.

    2016-08-01

    We carry out quasi-classical trajectory calculations for the C + CH+→ C_2^+ + H reaction on an ad hoc computed high-level ab initio potential energy surface. Thermal rate coefficients at the temperatures of relevance in cold interstellar clouds are derived and compared with the assumed, temperature-independent estimates publicly available in kinetic data bases KIDA and UDfA. For a temperature of 10 K the data base value overestimates by a factor of 2 the one obtained by us (thus improperly enhancing the destruction route of CH+ in astrochemical kinetic models) which is seen to double in the temperature range 5-300 K with a sharp increase in the first 50 K. The computed values are fitted via the popular Arrhenius-Kooij formula and best-fitting parameters α = 1.32 × 10-9 cm3 s-1, β = 0.1 and γ = 2.19 K to be included in the online mentioned data bases are provided. Further investigation shows that the temperature dependence of the thermal rate coefficient better conforms to the recently proposed so-called `deformed Arrhenius' law by Aquilanti and Mundim.

  16. The Concordance Cosmic Star Formation Rate: Implications from and for the supernova neutrino and gamma ray backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Strigari, Louis E.; Beacom, John F.; Walker, Terry P.; Zhang, Pengjie; /Fermilab

    2005-02-01

    We constrain the Cosmic Star Formation Rate (CSFR) by requiring that massive stars produce the observed UV, optical, and IR light while at the same time not overproduce the Diffuse Supernova Neutrino Background as bounded by Super-Kamiokande. With the massive star component so constrained we then show that a reasonable choice of stellar Initial Mass Function and other parameters results in SNIa rates and iron yields in good agreement with data. In this way we define a ''concordance'' CSFR that predicts the optical SNII rate and the SNIa contribution to the MeV Cosmic Gamma-Ray Background. The CSFR constrained to reproduce these and other proxies of intermediate and massive star formation is more clearly delineated than if it were measured by any one technique and has the following testable consequences: (1) SNIa contribute only a small fraction of the MeV Cosmic Gamma-Ray Background, (2) massive star core-collapse is nearly always accompanied by a successful optical SNII, and (3) the Diffuse Supernova Neutrino Background is tantalizingly close to detectability.

  17. Examining the Center: Positions, Dominance, and Star Formation Rates of Most Massive Group Galaxies at Intermediate Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelly, Jennifer L.; Parker, Laura C.; McGee, Sean; Mulchaey, John S.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Balogh, Michael; Wilman, David; Group Environment Evolution Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The group environment is believed to be the stage for many galaxy transformations, helping evolve blue star-forming galaxies to red passive ones. In local studies of galaxy clusters, the central member is usually a single dominant giant galaxy at the center of the potential with little star formation thought to be the result of galaxy mergers. In nearby groups, a range of morphologies and star formation rates are observed and the formation history is less clear. Further, the position and dominance of the central galaxy cannot be assumed in groups, which are less massive and evolved than clusters. To understand the connections between global group properties and properties of the central group galaxy at intermediate redshift, we examine galaxy groups from the Group Environment and Evolution Collaboration (GEEC) catalog, including both optically- and X-ray-selected groups at redshift z~0.4. The sample is diverse, containing a range in overall mass and evolutionary state. The number of groups is significant, membership is notably complete, and measurements span the IR to the UV allowing the properties of the members to be connected to those of the host groups. Having investigated trends in the global group properties previously, including mass and velocity substructure, we turn our attention now to the galaxy populations, focusing on the central regions of these systems. The most massive and second most massive group galaxies are identified by their stellar mass. The positions of the most massive galaxies (MMGs) are determined with respect to both the luminosity-weighted and X-ray center. Star formation rates are used to explore the fraction of passive/quiescent versus star-forming MMGs and the dominance of the MMGs in our group sample is also tested. Determinations of these characteristics and trends constitute the important first steps toward a detailed understanding of the relationships between the properties of host groups and their most massive galaxies and the

  18. Comparison of the aggregation of homologous β2-microglobulin variants reveals protein solubility as a key determinant of amyloid formation.

    PubMed

    Pashley, Clare L; Hewitt, Eric W; Radford, Sheena E

    2016-02-13

    The mouse and human β2-microglobulin protein orthologs are 70% identical in sequence and share 88% sequence similarity. These proteins are predicted by various algorithms to have similar aggregation and amyloid propensities. However, whilst human β2m (hβ2m) forms amyloid-like fibrils in denaturing conditions (e.g. pH2.5) in the absence of NaCl, mouse β2m (mβ2m) requires the addition of 0.3M NaCl to cause fibrillation. Here, the factors which give rise to this difference in amyloid propensity are investigated. We utilise structural and mutational analyses, fibril growth kinetics and solubility measurements under a range of pH and salt conditions, to determine why these two proteins have different amyloid propensities. The results show that, although other factors influence the fibril growth kinetics, a striking difference in the solubility of the proteins is a key determinant of the different amyloidogenicity of hβ2m and mβ2m. The relationship between protein solubility and lag time of amyloid formation is not captured by current aggregation or amyloid prediction algorithms, indicating a need to better understand the role of solubility on the lag time of amyloid formation. The results demonstrate the key contribution of protein solubility in determining amyloid propensity and lag time of amyloid formation, highlighting how small differences in protein sequence can have dramatic effects on amyloid formation. PMID:26780548

  19. Action potential energetics at the organismal level reveal a trade-off in efficiency at high firing rates.

    PubMed

    Lewis, John E; Gilmour, Kathleen M; Moorhead, Mayron J; Perry, Steve F; Markham, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The energetic costs of action potential (AP) production constrain the evolution of neural codes and brain networks. Cellular-level estimates of AP-related costs are typically based on voltage-dependent Na(+) currents that drive active transport by the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase to maintain the Na(+) and K(+) ion concentration gradients necessary for AP production. However, these estimates of AP cost have not been verified at the organismal level. Electric signaling in the weakly electric fish Eigenmannia virescens requires that specialized cells in an electric organ generate APs with large Na(+) currents at high rates (200-600 Hz). We measured these currents using a voltage-clamp protocol and then estimated the energetic cost at the cellular level using standard methods. We then used this energy-intensive signaling behavior to measure changes in whole-animal energetics for small changes in electric discharge rate. At low rates, the whole-animal measure of AP cost was similar to our cellular-level estimates. However, AP cost increased nonlinearly with increasing firing rates. We show, with a biophysical model, that this nonlinearity can arise from the increasing cost of maintaining AP amplitude at high rates. Our results confirm that estimates of energetic costs based on Na(+) influx are appropriate for low baseline firing rates, but that extrapolating to high firing rates may underestimate true costs in cases in which AP amplitude does not decrease. Moreover, the trade-off between energetic cost and firing rate suggests an additional constraint on the evolution of high-frequency signaling in neuronal systems. PMID:24381281

  20. Whole genome sequencing of mutation accumulation lines reveals a low mutation rate in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Saxer, Gerda; Havlak, Paul; Fox, Sara A; Quance, Michael A; Gupta, Sharu; Fofanov, Yuriy; Strassmann, Joan E; Queller, David C

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous mutations play a central role in evolution. Despite their importance, mutation rates are some of the most elusive parameters to measure in evolutionary biology. The combination of mutation accumulation (MA) experiments and whole-genome sequencing now makes it possible to estimate mutation rates by directly observing new mutations at the molecular level across the whole genome. We performed an MA experiment with the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum and sequenced the genomes of three randomly chosen lines using high-throughput sequencing to estimate the spontaneous mutation rate in this model organism. The mitochondrial mutation rate of 6.76×10(-9), with a Poisson confidence interval of 4.1×10(-9) - 9.5×10(-9), per nucleotide per generation is slightly lower than estimates for other taxa. The mutation rate estimate for the nuclear DNA of 2.9×10(-11), with a Poisson confidence interval ranging from 7.4×10(-13) to 1.6×10(-10), is the lowest reported for any eukaryote. These results are consistent with low microsatellite mutation rates previously observed in D. discoideum and low levels of genetic variation observed in wild D. discoideum populations. In addition, D. discoideum has been shown to be quite resistant to DNA damage, which suggests an efficient DNA-repair mechanism that could be an adaptation to life in soil and frequent exposure to intracellular and extracellular mutagenic compounds. The social aspect of the life cycle of D. discoideum and a large portion of the genome under relaxed selection during vegetative growth could also select for a low mutation rate. This hypothesis is supported by a significantly lower mutation rate per cell division in multicellular eukaryotes compared with unicellular eukaryotes. PMID:23056439

  1. Controlling growth rate anisotropy for formation of continuous ZnO thin films from seeded substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R H; Slamovich, E B; Handwerker, C A

    2013-05-17

    Solution-processed zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films are promising candidates for low-temperature-processable active layers in transparent thin film electronics. In this study, control of growth rate anisotropy using ZnO nanoparticle seeds, capping ions, and pH adjustment leads to a low-temperature (90 ° C) hydrothermal process for transparent and high-density ZnO thin films. The common 1D ZnO nanorod array was grown into a 2D continuous polycrystalline film using a short-time pure solution method. Growth rate anisotropy of ZnO crystals and the film morphology were tuned by varying the chloride (Cl(-)) ion concentration and the initial pH of solutions of zinc nitrate and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA), and the competitive adsorption effects of Cl(-) ions and HMTA ligands on the anisotropic growth behavior of ZnO crystals were proposed. The lateral growth of nanorods constituting the film was promoted by lowering the solution pH to accelerate the hydrolysis of HMTA, thereby allowing the adsorption effects from Cl(-) to dominate. By optimizing the growth conditions, a dense ∼100 nm thickness film was fabricated in 15 min from a solution of [Cl(-)]/[Zn(2+)] = 1.5 and pH=  4.8 ± 0.1. This film shows >80% optical transmittance and a field-effect mobility of 2.730 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at zero back-gate bias. PMID:23595114

  2. Controlling growth rate anisotropy for formation of continuous ZnO thin films from seeded substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R H; Slamovich, E B; Handwerker, C A

    2013-05-17

    Solution-processed zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films are promising candidates for low-temperature-processable active layers in transparent thin film electronics. In this study, control of growth rate anisotropy using ZnO nanoparticle seeds, capping ions, and pH adjustment leads to a low-temperature (90 ° C) hydrothermal process for transparent and high-density ZnO thin films. The common 1D ZnO nanorod array was grown into a 2D continuous polycrystalline film using a short-time pure solution method. Growth rate anisotropy of ZnO crystals and the film morphology were tuned by varying the chloride (Cl(-)) ion concentration and the initial pH of solutions of zinc nitrate and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA), and the competitive adsorption effects of Cl(-) ions and HMTA ligands on the anisotropic growth behavior of ZnO crystals were proposed. The lateral growth of nanorods constituting the film was promoted by lowering the solution pH to accelerate the hydrolysis of HMTA, thereby allowing the adsorption effects from Cl(-) to dominate. By optimizing the growth conditions, a dense ∼100 nm thickness film was fabricated in 15 min from a solution of [Cl(-)]/[Zn(2+)] = 1.5 and pH=  4.8 ± 0.1. This film shows >80% optical transmittance and a field-effect mobility of 2.730 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at zero back-gate bias.

  3. Simultaneous high bit-rate format and mode conversion with a single tilted apodized few-mode fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ya; Sun, Junqiang; Sima, Chaotan

    2016-10-01

    We propose an all-optical approach for simultaneous high bit-rate return-to-zero (RZ) to non-return-to-zero (NRZ) format and LP01 to LP11 mode conversion using a weakly tilted apodized few-mode fiber Bragg grating (TA-FM-FBG) with specific linear spectral response. The grating apodization profile is designed by utilizing an efficient inverse scattering algorithm and the maximum refractive index modulation is adjusted based on the grating tilt angle, according to Coupled-Mode Theory. The temporal performance and operation bandwidth of the converter are discussed. The approach provides potential favorable device for the connection of various communication systems.

  4. Slow evolution of the specific star formation rate at z > 2: the impact of dust, emission lines, and a rising star formation history

    SciTech Connect

    González, Valentino; Illingworth, Garth; Oesch, Pascal; Magee, Dan; Bouwens, Rychard; Labbé, Ivo; Franx, Marijn

    2014-01-20

    We measure the evolution of the specific star formation rate (sSFR = SFR/M {sub stellar}) between redshift 4 and 6 to assess the reported 'constant' sSFR at z > 2. We derive stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs) for a large sample of 750 z ∼ 4-6 galaxies in the GOODS-S field by fitting stellar population models to their spectral energy distributions. Dust extinction is derived from the observed UV colors. We evaluate different star formation histories (SFHs, constant and rising with time) and the impact of optical emission lines. The SFR and M {sub stellar} values are insensitive to whether the SFH is constant or rising. The derived sSFR is very similar (within 0.1 dex) in two M {sub stellar} bins centered at 1 and 5 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}. The effect of emission lines was, however, quite pronounced. Assuming no contribution from emission lines, the sSFR for galaxies at 5 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} evolves weakly at z > 2 (sSFR(z)∝(1 + z){sup 0.6} {sup ±} {sup 0.1}), consistent with previous results. When emission lines are included in the rest-frame optical bands, consistent with the observed Infrared Array Camera [3.6] and [4.5] fluxes, the sSFR shows higher values at high redshift following sSFR(z)∝(1 + z){sup 1.0} {sup ±} {sup 0.1}, i.e., the best-fit evolution shows a sSFR ∼2.3 × higher at z ∼ 6 than at z ∼ 2. This is, however, a substantially weaker trend than that found at z < 2 and even than that expected from current models for z > 2 (sSFR(z)∝(1 + z){sup 2.5}). Even accounting for emission lines, the observed sSFR(z) trends at z > 2 are still in tension with theoretical expectations.

  5. Gingival Fibromatosis with Significant De Novo Formation of Fibrotic Tissue and a High Rate of Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Gawron, Katarzyna; Łazarz-Bartyzel, Katarzyna; Fertala, Andrzej; Plakwicz, Paweł; Potempa, Jan; Chomyszyn-Gajewska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hereditary gingival fibromatosis is characterized by slowly progressive enlargement of the gingiva that can present as an isolated condition or present as part of various syndromes. CASE REPORT An 11-year-old female reported with a gingival lesion that caused masticatory problems and poor oral hygiene. Periodontal examination revealed a dense tissue covering 30% of her teeth crowns within both jaws. Panoramic x-ray showed a normal bone height and teeth positioning. The patient did not use any medications, but a similar condition was also present in other family members. The patient was diagnosed with hereditary gingival fibromatosis. Surgery was carried out to remove excess of gingival tissue. Post-surgical healing was uneventful, but four weeks after the first surgery, the condition recurred amounting to 45% of the initial tissue volume presenting in the mandible, and 25% in the maxilla. Two months later, no significant growth was noted in the mandible, while in the maxilla, growth increased to 40% of the preoperative state. Analysis by polarized microscope showed a significant increase of thin fibrotic fibrils that contributed 80% of the total pool of collagen fibrils in the patient's gingiva, but only 25% in healthy gingiva. The patient was receiving outpatient care for follow-up every three months and surgical intervention had not been planned as long as her periodontal health was not be compromised.  CONCLUSIONS It is currently not clear whether the extent of the fibrosis had a mechanistic association with the ratio of gingival tissue re-growth in our case study. Further studies are needed to explain this association and improve the management of this condition. PMID:27609299

  6. Gingival Fibromatosis with Significant De Novo Formation of Fibrotic Tissue and a High Rate of Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Gawron, Katarzyna; Łazarz-Bartyzel, Katarzyna; Fertala, Andrzej; Plakwicz, Paweł; Potempa, Jan; Chomyszyn-Gajewska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 11 Final Diagnosis: Hereditary gingival fibromatosis Symptoms: Gingival overgrowth Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Surgery Specialty: Dentistry Objective: Rare disease Background: Hereditary gingival fibromatosis is characterized by slowly progressive enlargement of the gingiva that can present as an isolated condition or a part of various syndromes. Case Report: An 11-year-old female reported with a gingival lesion that caused masticatory problems and poor oral hygiene. Periodontal examination revealed a dense tissue covering 30% of her teeth crowns within both jaws. Panoramic x-ray showed a normal bone height and teeth positioning. The patient did not use any medications, but a similar condition was also present in other family members. The patient was diagnosed with hereditary gingival fibromatosis. Surgery was carried out to remove excess of gingival tissue. Post-surgical healing was uneventful, but four weeks after the first surgery, the condition recurred amounting to 45% of the initial tissue volume presenting in the mandible, and 25% in the maxilla. Two months later, no significant growth was noted in the mandible, while in the maxilla, growth increased to 40% of the pre-operative state. Analysis by polarized microscope showed a significant increase of thin fibrotic fibrils that contributed 80% of the total pool of collagen fibrils in the patient’s gingiva, but only 25% in healthy gingiva. The patient was receiving outpatient care for follow-up every three months and surgical intervention had not been planned as long as her periodontal health would not be compromised. Conclusions: It is currently not clear whether the extent of the fibrosis had a mechanistic association with the ratio of gingival tissue re-growth in our case study. Further studies are needed to explain this association and improve the management of this condition. PMID:27609299

  7. Pore-scale insights to the rate of organic carbon degradation and biofilm formation under variable hydro-biogeochemical conditions in soils and sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Yan, Z.; Liu, Y.; Li, M.; Bailey, V. L.

    2015-12-01

    Biogeochemical processes that control microbial growth, organic carbon degradation, and CO2 production and migration are fundamentally occur at the pore scale. In this presentation, we will describe our recent results of a pore-scale simulation research to investigate: 1) how moisture content and distribution affects oxygen delivery, organic carbon availability, and microbial activities that regulate the rate of organic carbon degradation and CO2 production in aerobic systems; and 2) how pore-scale reactive transport processes affect local microbial growth, biofilm formation, and overall rate of microbial reactions in anoxic systems. The results revealed that there is an optimal moisture content for aerobic bacterial respiration and CO2 production. When moisture is below the optimal value, organic carbon availability limits its degradation due to diffusion and osmotic stress to bacterial reactivity; and when moisture is above the optimal value, oxygen delivery limits microbial respiration. The optimal moisture condition is, however, a function of soil texture and physical heterogeneity, bioavailable soil organic carbon, and microbial community function. In anoxic and saturated system, simulation results show that biofilm preferentially forms in concave areas around sand particles and macro aggregates where cross-directional fluxes of organic carbon and electron acceptors (e.g., nitrate) favor microbial growth and attachment. The results provide important insights to the establishment of constitutive relationships between the macroscopic rates of soil organic carbon degradation and moisture content, and to the development of biogeochemical reactive transport models that incorporate biofilm structures and physio-chemical heterogeneity in soils and sediments.

  8. iTRAQ-based analysis of developmental dynamics in the soybean leaf proteome reveals pathways associated with leaf photosynthetic rate.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jun; Zhang, Jianan; Liu, Duan; Yin, Changcheng; Wang, Fengmin; Chen, Pengyin; Chen, Hao; Ma, Jinbing; Zhang, Bo; Xu, Jin; Zhang, Mengchen

    2016-08-01

    Photosynthetic rate which acts as a vital limiting factor largely affects the potential of soybean production, especially during the senescence phase. However, the physiological and molecular mechanisms that underlying the change of photosynthetic rate during the developmental process of soybean leaves remain unclear. In this study, we compared the protein dynamics during the developmental process of leaves between the soybean cultivar Hobbit and the high-photosynthetic rate cultivar JD 17 using the iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification) method. A total number of 1269 proteins were detected in the leaves of these two cultivars at three different developmental stages. These proteins were classified into nine expression patterns depending on the expression levels at different developmental stages, and the proteins in each pattern were also further classified into three large groups and 20 small groups depending on the protein functions. Only 3.05-6.53 % of the detected proteins presented a differential expression pattern between these two cultivars. Enrichment factor analysis indicated that proteins involved in photosynthesis composed an important category. The expressions of photosynthesis-related proteins were also further confirmed by western blotting. Together, our results suggested that the reduction in photosynthetic rate as well as chloroplast activity and composition during the developmental process was a highly regulated and complex process which involved a serial of proteins that function as potential candidates to be targeted by biotechnological approaches for the improvement of photosynthetic rate and production.

  9. Fossil skulls reveal that blood flow rate to the brain increased faster than brain volume during human evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Roger S.; Bosiocic, Vanya; Snelling, Edward P.

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of human cognition has been inferred from anthropological discoveries and estimates of brain size from fossil skulls. A more direct measure of cognition would be cerebral metabolic rate, which is proportional to cerebral blood flow rate (perfusion). The hominin cerebrum is supplied almost exclusively by the internal carotid arteries. The sizes of the foramina that transmitted these vessels in life can be measured in hominin fossil skulls and used to calculate cerebral perfusion rate. Perfusion in 11 species of hominin ancestors, from Australopithecus to archaic Homo sapiens, increases disproportionately when scaled against brain volume (the allometric exponent is 1.41). The high exponent indicates an increase in the metabolic intensity of cerebral tissue in later Homo species, rather than remaining constant (1.0) as expected by a linear increase in neuron number, or decreasing according to Kleiber's Law (0.75). During 3 Myr of hominin evolution, cerebral tissue perfusion increased 1.7-fold, which, when multiplied by a 3.5-fold increase in brain size, indicates a 6.0-fold increase in total cerebral blood flow rate. This is probably associated with increased interneuron connectivity, synaptic activity and cognitive function, which all ultimately depend on cerebral metabolic rate.

  10. Plastid genomes reveal support for deep phylogenetic relationships and extensive rate variation among palms and other commelinid monocots.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Craig F; Baker, William J; Comer, Jason R; Conran, John G; Lahmeyer, Sean C; Leebens-Mack, James H; Li, Jeff; Lim, Gwynne S; Mayfield-Jones, Dustin R; Perez, Leticia; Medina, Jesus; Pires, J Chris; Santos, Cristian; Wm Stevenson, Dennis; Zomlefer, Wendy B; Davis, Jerrold I

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress based on multilocus, phylogenetic studies of the palms (order Arecales, family Arecaceae), uncertainty remains in resolution/support among major clades and for the placement of the palms among the commelinid monocots. Palms and related commelinids represent a classic case of substitution rate heterogeneity that has not been investigated in the genomic era. To address questions of relationships, support and rate variation among palms and commelinid relatives, 39 plastomes representing the palms and related family Dasypogonaceae were generated via genome skimming and integrated within a monocot-wide matrix for phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary analyses. Support was strong for 'deep' relationships among the commelinid orders, among the five palm subfamilies, and among tribes of the subfamily Coryphoideae. Additionally, there was extreme heterogeneity in the plastid substitution rates across the commelinid orders indicated by model based analyses, with c. 22 rate shifts, and significant departure from a global clock. To date, this study represents the most comprehensively sampled matrix of plastomes assembled for monocot angiosperms, providing genome-scale support for phylogenetic relationships of monocot angiosperms, and lays the phylogenetic groundwork for comparative analyses of the drivers and correlates of such drastic differences in substitution rates across a diverse and significant clade. PMID:26350789

  11. CARBON-RICH MOLECULAR CHAINS IN PROTOPLANETARY AND PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES: QUANTUM MECHANISMS AND ELECTRON ATTACHMENT RATES FOR ANION FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Carelli, F.; Grassi, T.; Gianturco, F. A.; Satta, M.

    2013-09-10

    The elementary mechanisms through which molecular polyynes could form stable negative ions after interacting with free electrons in planetary atmospheres (e.g., Titan's) are analyzed using quantum scattering calculations and quantum structure methods. The case of radical species and of nonpolar partners are analyzed via specific examples for both the C{sub n}H and HC{sub n}H series, with n values from 4 to 12. We show that attachment processes to polar radicals are dominating the anionic production and that the mediating role of dipolar scattering states is crucial to their formation. The corresponding attachment rates are presented as calculated upper limits to their likely values and are obtained down to the low temperatures of interest. The effects of the computed rates, when used in simple evolutionary models, are also investigated and presented in detail.

  12. The effect on Earth's surface temperature from variations in rotation rate, continent formation, solar luminosity, and carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, W R; Walker, J C; Marshall, H G

    1989-08-20

    Proposed evolutionary histories of solar luminosity, atmospheric carbon dioxide amounts, Earth rotation rate, and continent formation have been used to generate a time evolution of Earth's surface temperature. While speculative because of uncertainties in the input parameters, such a study does help to prioritize the areas of most concern to paleoclimatic research while illustrating the relationships and mutual dependencies. The mean temperature averages about 5 K higher than today over most of geologic time; the overall variation is less than 15 K. The evolution of Earth's rotation rate makes a significant contribution to the surface temperature distribution as late as 0.5 b.y. ago. While there is little change in equatorial temperatures, polar temperatures decrease, being some 15 K lower 3.5 b.y. ago than with present day rotation. The effect of continent growth on albedo is of secondary importance.

  13. Transcriptome analysis of grain-filling caryopses reveals involvement of multiple regulatory pathways in chalky grain formation in rice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Grain endosperm chalkiness of rice is a varietal characteristic that negatively affects not only the appearance and milling properties but also the cooking texture and palatability of cooked rice. However, grain chalkiness is a complex quantitative genetic trait and the molecular mechanisms underlying its formation are poorly understood. Results A near-isogenic line CSSL50-1 with high chalkiness was compared with its normal parental line Asominori for grain endosperm chalkiness. Physico-biochemical analyses of ripened grains showed that, compared with Asominori, CSSL50-1 contains higher levels of amylose and 8 DP (degree of polymerization) short-chain amylopectin, but lower medium length 12 DP amylopectin. Transcriptome analysis of 15 DAF (day after flowering) caryopses of the isogenic lines identified 623 differential expressed genes (P < 0.01), among which 324 genes are up-regulated and 299 down-regulated. These genes were classified into 18 major categories, with 65.3% of them belong to six major functional groups: signal transduction, cell rescue/defense, transcription, protein degradation, carbohydrate metabolism and redox homeostasis. Detailed pathway dissection demonstrated that genes involved in sucrose and starch synthesis are up-regulated, whereas those involved in non-starch polysaccharides are down regulated. Several genes involved in oxidoreductive homeostasis were found to have higher expression levels in CSSL50-1 as well, suggesting potential roles of ROS in grain chalkiness formation. Conclusion Extensive gene expression changes were detected during rice grain chalkiness formation. Over half of these differentially expressed genes are implicated in several important categories of genes, including signal transduction, transcription, carbohydrate metabolism and redox homeostasis, suggesting that chalkiness formation involves multiple metabolic and regulatory pathways. PMID:21192807

  14. Changes in gene expression of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in response to anaerobic stress reveal induction of central metabolism and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Zhu, Jiawen; Yang, Kui; Xu, Zhuofei; Liu, Ziduo; Zhou, Rui

    2014-06-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is an important porcine respiratory pathogen causing great economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. Oxygen deprivation is a stress that A. pleuropneumoniae will encounter during both early infection and the later, persistent stage. To understand modulation of A. pleuropneumoniae gene expression in response to the stress caused by anaerobic conditions, gene expression profiles under anaerobic and aerobic conditions were compared in this study. The microarray results showed that 631 genes (27.7% of the total ORFs) were differentially expressed in anaerobic conditions. Many genes encoding proteins involved in glycolysis, carbon source uptake systems, pyruvate metabolism, fermentation and the electron respiration transport chain were up-regulated. These changes led to an increased amount of pyruvate, lactate, ethanol and acetate in the bacterial cells as confirmed by metabolite detection. Genes encoding proteins involved in cell surface structures, especially biofilm formation, peptidoglycan biosynthesis and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis were up-regulated as well. Biofilm formation was significantly enhanced under anaerobic conditions. These results indicate that induction of central metabolism is important for basic survival of A. pleuropneumoniae after a shift to an anaerobic environment. Enhanced biofilm formation may contribute to the persistence of this pathogen in the damaged anaerobic host tissue and also in the early colonization stage. These discoveries give new insights into adaptation mechanisms of A. pleuropneumoniae in response to environmental stress.

  15. Using Uranium-Series Isotopes to Quantify Volcanic Soil Formation Rates Under a Tropical Climate: Basse-Terre, Guadeloupe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereyra, Y.; Ma, L.; Sak, P. B.; Gaillardet, J.; Buss, H. L.; Brantley, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    U-series isotopes fractionate during chemical weathering and their activity ratios have been used to determine timescales and rates of soil formation. Such soil formation rates are measured at soil profile scale and provide an important link to compare chemical weathering rates measured across different spatial scales. We analyzed U-series isotope compositions in a ~12m deep soil profile in Basse-Terre Island of French Guadeloupe. The tropical Bras David watershed is developed on andesitic pyroclastic flows. Field observations have shown heterogeneity in color and texture in this profile. However, major element chemistry and mineralogy show some general depth trends. First, Al, Fe, and Ti show a depletion profile relative to Th from 12m to 4m depth, an addition from 4m to 2m, and depletion from 2m to the surface. Second, mobile elements such as Ca, Mg, and Sr have undergone intensive weathering, therefore show almost complete depletion even in the deep profile, and an addition profile near the surface. This addition trend is most likely related to atmospheric dust and marine aerosol signatures. Finally, K, Mn, and Si show a partial depletion profile at depth. The main minerals present throughout the soil profile are halloysite and gibbsite. 238U/232Th ratios in this profile ranged from 0.374 to 1.696, while the 230Th/232Th ratios ranged from 0.367 to 1.701. A decrease of (238U/232Th) in the deep soil profile from 12m to 4m depth is observed, and an increase in the shallow profile from 4m to the surface. The (230Th /232Th) ratios showed a similar trend as (238U/232Th). Marine aerosols and atmospheric dust are responsible for the addition of U in shallow soils while intensive chemical weathering is responsible for the loss of U at depth. U-series chemical weathering model suggests that the weathering duration from 12m to 4m depth is about 250kyr, with a weathering advancing rate of ~30 m/Ma. The rate is also about one order of magnitude lower than the weathering rate

  16. Providing Stringent Star Formation Rate Limits of z ˜ 2 QSO Host Galaxies at High Angular Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vayner, Andrey; Wright, Shelley A.; Do, Tuan; Larkin, James E.; Armus, Lee; Gallagher, S. C.

    2016-04-01

    We present integral field spectrograph (IFS) with laser guide star adaptive optics (LGS-AO) observations of z ˜ 2 quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) designed to resolve extended nebular line emission from the host galaxy. Our data was obtained with W. M. Keck and Gemini North Observatories, using OSIRIS and NIFS coupled with the LGS-AO systems, respectively. We have conducted a pilot survey of five QSOs, three observed with NIFS+AO and two observed with OSIRIS+AO at an average redshift of z = 2.2. We demonstrate that the combination of AO and IFSs provides the necessary spatial and spectral resolutions required to separate QSO emission from its host. We present our technique for generating a point-spread function (PSF) from the broad-line region of the QSO and performing PSF subtraction of the QSO emission to detect the host galaxy emission at a separation of ˜0.″2 (˜1.4 kpc). We detect Hα narrow-line emission for two sources, SDSS J1029+6510 (zHα = 2.182) and SDSS J0925+0655 (zHα = 2.197), that have evidence for both star formation and extended narrow-line emission. Assuming that the majority of narrow-line Hα emission is from star formation, we infer a star formation rate (SFR) for SDSS J1029+6510 of 78.4 M⊙ yr-1 originating from a compact region that is kinematically offset by 290-350 km s-1. For SDSS J0925+0655 we infer a SFR of 29 M⊙ yr-1 distributed over three clumps that are spatially offset by ˜7 kpc. The null detections on three of the QSOs are used to infer surface brightness limits and we find that at 1.4 kpc from the QSO the un-reddened star formation limit is ≲0.3 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. If we assume typical extinction values for z = 2 type-1 QSOs, the dereddened SFR for our null detections would be ≲0.6 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. These IFS observations indicate that while the central black hole is accreting mass at 10%-40% of the Eddington rate, if star formation is present in the host (1.4-20 kpc) it would have to occur diffusely with significant

  17. Sill intrusion driven fluid flow and vent formation in volcanic basins: Modeling rates of volatile release and paleoclimate effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Karthik; Schmid, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Evidence of mass extinction events in conjunction with climate change occur throughout the geological record and may be accompanied by pronounced negative carbon isotope excursions. The processes that trigger such globally destructive changes are still under considerable debate. These include mechanisms such as poisoning from trace metals released during large volcanic eruptions (Vogt, 1972), CO2 released from lava degassing during the formation of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) (Courtillot and Renne, 2003) and CH4 release during the destabilization of sub-seafloor methane (Dickens et al., 1995), to name a few. Thermogenic methane derived from contact metamorphism associated with magma emplacement and cooling in sedimentary basins has been recently gaining considerable attention as a potential mechanism that may have triggered global climate events in the past (e.g. Svensen and Jamtveit, 2010). The discovery of hydrothermal vent complexes that are spatially associated with such basins also supports the discharge of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere (e.g. Jamtveit et al., 2004; Planke et al., 2005; Svensen et al., 2006). A previous study that investigated this process using a fluid flow model (Iyer et al., 2013) suggested that although hydrothermal plume formation resulting from sill emplacement may indeed release large quantities of methane at the surface, the rate at which this methane is released into the atmosphere is too slow to trigger, by itself, some of the negative δ13C excursions observed in the fossil record over short time scales observed in the fossil record. Here, we reinvestigate the rates of gas release during sill emplacement in a case study from the Harstad Basin off-shore Norway with a special emphasis on vent formation. The presented study is based on a seismic line that crosses multiple sill structures emplaced around 55 Ma within the Lower Cretaceous sediments. A single well-defined vent complex is interpreted above the termination of the

  18. Effect of the oxygen transfer rate (OSR) on the formation of cellulases by Trichoderma viride in submersion culture

    SciTech Connect

    Skachova, H.; Gottvaldova, M.; Kucera, J.; Podrazky, V.

    1981-12-01

    The formation of cellulases by Trichoderma viride in a medium containing cellulose as a sole source of carbon depends on the oxygen transfer rate (OSR); the OSR, on the other hand, depends on the concentration of cellulose in the medium because the concentration of cellulose strongly affects the viscosity of the medium. In the work presented here, the dependence has been determined for the oxygen transfer rate on geometric relations and viscosity in cellulose-containing media during cultivation in shaken flasks, and the oxygen transfer rates on NRE, NG, and Na during cultivation in a laboratory fermentor of 3000-mL volume. Two cellulosic materials have been compared with a different effect on viscosity; microcrystalline beach cellulose and fibrous cellulose. It has been found that, in an applicable range of concentration, microcrystalline cellulose does not affect the oxygen transfer rate (at concentrations up to 3%). Fibrous cellulose increases the OSR during cultivation in shake flasks but decreases its during cultivation in fermentors. On the basis of these results, the optimizing has been carried out on the cultivation conditions in fermentors. (Refs. 50).

  19. Simulating the formation of massive seed black holes in the early Universe - II. Impact of rate coefficient uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Simon C. O.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate how uncertainties in the chemical and cooling rate coefficients relevant for a metal-free gas influence our ability to determine the critical ultraviolet field strength required to suppress H2 cooling in high-redshift atomic cooling haloes. The suppression of H2 cooling is a necessary prerequisite for the gas to undergo direct collapse and form an intermediate mass black hole. These black holes can then act as seeds for the growth of the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) observed at redshifts z ˜ 6. The viability of this model for SMBH formation depends on the critical ultraviolet field strength, Jcrit: if this is too large, then too few seeds will form to explain the observed number density of SMBHs. We show in this paper that there are five key chemical reactions whose rate coefficients are uncertain enough to significantly affect Jcrit. The most important of these is the collisional ionization of hydrogen by collisions with other hydrogen atoms, as the rate for this process is very poorly constrained at the low energies relevant for direct collapse. The total uncertainty introduced into Jcrit by this and the other four reactions could in the worst case approach a factor of five. We also show that the use of outdated or inappropriate values for the rates of some chemical reactions in previous studies of the direct collapse mechanism may have significantly affected the values of Jcrit determined by these studies.

  20. alpha,beta-Dehydro-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine derivatives: rate and mechanism of formation.

    PubMed

    Rzepecki, L M; Waite, J H

    1991-02-15

    The amino acid L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), when present in the primary sequence of proteins, does not form melanin upon oxidation to the quinone, since its amine moiety participates in a peptide bond and cannot undergo internal cyclization. Instead, peptidyl DOPA quinone is available for other reactions. We have investigated the oxidation chemistry of a low molecular weight peptidyl DOPA analog, N-acetylDOPA ethyl ester (NAcDEE), and have shown that a major product of oxidation is an unsaturated DOPA derivative, N-acetyl-alpha,beta-dehydroDOPA ethyl ester (NAc delta DEE) (see companion paper, Rzepecki et al., Arch. Biochem. Biophys. (1991) 285, 17-26). In the present study, we have explored kinetic and mechanistic features of the conversion of NAcDEE to NAc delta DEE and found that the reaction requires: (i) oxidation of NAcDEE to the quinone, (ii) the presence of a Lewis base as a catalyst (phosphate anion was the best of those tried in the pH range 6.0-8.0), and (iii) prevention of competing reactions such as Michael additions. Conversion efficiencies in the presence of Lewis bases ranged between 12 and 19% at pH 8.0 and 35 and 90% at pH 6.0. At least two separate reaction mechanisms appeared necessary to explain the kinetic data: (i) a pseudo-first-order mechanism at pH 6.0 and above, and (ii) an additional second-order mechanism at higher pH which involved both NAcDEE catechol and quinone. The apparent pseudo-first-order rate constants increased with pH from 2.36 X 10(-4) s-1 at pH 6.0 to about 30 X 10(-4) s-1 at pH 8.0 in 0.1 M sodium phosphate. Tautomerization of DOPA quinone to dehydroDOPA may thus be a factor in the sclerotization of natural structures incorporating DOPA containing proteins. PMID:1899328

  1. Fast formation of aerobic granules by combining strong hydraulic selection pressure with overstressed organic loading rate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Tay, Joo-Hwa

    2015-09-01

    The combined strong hydraulic selection pressure (HSP) with overstressed organic loading rate (OLR) as a fast granulation strategy was used to enhance aerobic granulation. To investigate the wide applicability of this strategy to different scenarios and its relevant mechanism, different settling times, different inoculums, different exchange ratios, different reactor configurations, and different shear force were used in this study. It was found that clear granules were formed within 24 h and steady state reached within three days when the fast granulation strategy was used in a lab-scale reactor seeded with well settled activated sludge (Reactor 2). However, granules appeared after 2-week operation and reached steady state after one month at the traditional step-wise decreased settling time from 20 to 2 min with OLR of 6 g COD/L·d (Reactor 1). With the fast granulation strategy, granules appeared within 24 h even with bulking sludge as seed to start up Reactor 3, but 6-day lag phase was observed compared with Reactor 2. Both Reactor 2 and Reactor 3 experienced sigmoidal growth curve in terms of biomass accumulation and granule size increase after granulation. In addition, the reproducible results in pilot-scale reactors (Reactor 5 and Reactor 6) with diameter of 20 cm and height/diameter ratio (H/D) of 4 further proved that reactor configuration and fluid flow pattern had no effect on the aerobic granulation when the fast granulation strategy was employed, but biomass accumulation experienced a short lag phase too in Reactor 5 and Reactor 6. Although overstressed OLR was favorable for fast granulation, it also led to the fluffy granules after around two-week operation. However, the stable 6-month operation of Reactor 3 demonstrated that the rapidly formed granules were able to maintain long-term stability by reducing OLR from 12 g COD/L·d to 6 g COD/L·d. A mechanism of fast granulation with the strategy of combined strong HSP and OLR was proposed to explain

  2. Limits on the star formation rates of z>2 damped Lyα systems from Hα spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, Andrew J.; Warren, Stephen J.; Clements, D. L.; Williger, Gerard M.; Hewett, Paul C.

    1999-11-01

    We present the results of a long-slit K-band spectroscopic search for Hα emission from eight damped Lyα absorbers (DLAs) at z>2 with the goal of measuring the star formation rates in these systems. For each system we searched for compact sources of Hα emission within a solid angle 11x2.5arcsec2 (44x10h-2kpc2, for q0=0.5, H0=100hkms-1Mpc-1). No Hα emission was detected above 3σ limits in the range (6.5-16)x10-20Wm-2, equivalent to star formation rates of 5.6-18h-2Msolaryr-1, for a standard initial mass function, assuming the lines are spectrally unresolved (<650kms-1 FWHM). We compare these results against the predictions of the models of Pei & Fall of the global history of star formation, under two different simplifying hypotheses: (i) the space density of DLAs at z=2.3 is equal to the space density of spiral galaxies today (implying DLA discs were larger in the past, the `large-disc' hypothesis); (ii) the sizes of DLAs at z=2.3 were the same as the gas sizes of spiral galaxies today (implying DLA discs were more common in the past, the `hierarchical' hypothesis). Compared with the previous most sensitive spectroscopic search, our sample is twice as large, our limits are a factor greater than two deeper, and the solid angle surveyed is over three times as great. Despite this, our results are not in conflict with either the large-disc hypothesis, because of the limited solid angle covered by the slit, or the hierarchical hypothesis, because of the limited sensitivity.

  3. Comparison of Subantarctic Mode Water and Antarctic Intermediate Water formation rates in the South Pacific between NCAR-CCSM4 and observations

    SciTech Connect

    Hartin, Corinne A.; Fine, Rana A.; Kamenkovich, Igor; Sloyan, Bernadette M.

    2014-01-28

    Average formation rates for Subantarctic Mode (SAMW) and Antarctic Intermediate Waters (AAIW) in the South Pacific are calculated from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model version 4 (NCAR-CCSM4), using chlorofluorocarbon inventories. CFC-12 inventories and formation rates are compared to ocean observations. CCSM4 accurately simulates the southeast Pacific as the main formation region for SAMW and AAIW. CCSM4 formation rates for SAMW are 3.4 Sv, about half of the observational rate. Shallow mixed layers and a thinner SAMW in CCSM4 are responsible for lower formation rates. A formation rate of 8.1 Sv for AAIW in CCSM4 is higher than observations. Higher inventories in CCSM4 in the southwest and central Pacific, and higher surface concentrations are the main reasons for higher formation rates of AAIW. This comparison of model and observations is useful for understanding the uptake and transport of other gases, e.g., CO2 by the model.

  4. A PANCHROMATIC STUDY OF BLAST COUNTERPARTS: TOTAL STAR FORMATION RATE, MORPHOLOGY, ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FRACTION, AND STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Ade, Peter A. R.; Cortese, Luca; Dye, Simon; Eales, Stephen; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Pascale, Enzo; Tucker, Carole; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas; Wiebe, Donald V.; Devlin, Mark J.; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Viero, Marco P.

    2011-02-01

    We carry out a multi-wavelength study of individual galaxies detected by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) and identified at other wavelengths, using data spanning the radio to the ultraviolet (UV). We develop a Monte Carlo method to account for flux boosting, source blending, and correlations among bands, which we use to derive deboosted far-infrared (FIR) luminosities for our sample. We estimate total star-formation rates (SFRs) for BLAST counterparts with z {<=} 0.9 by combining their FIR and UV luminosities. Star formation is heavily obscured at L{sub FIR} {approx}> 10{sup 11} L{sub sun}, z {approx}> 0.5, but the contribution from unobscured starlight cannot be neglected at L{sub FIR} {approx}< 10{sup 11} L{sub sun}, z {approx}< 0.25. We assess that about 20% of the galaxies in our sample show indication of a type 1 active galactic nucleus, but their submillimeter emission is mainly due to star formation in the host galaxy. We compute stellar masses for a subset of 92 BLAST counterparts; these are relatively massive objects, with a median mass of {approx}10{sup 11} M{sub sun}, which seem to link the 24 {mu}m and Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) populations, in terms of both stellar mass and star formation activity. The bulk of the BLAST counterparts at z {approx}< 1 appears to be run-of-the-mill star-forming galaxies, typically spiral in shape, with intermediate stellar masses and practically constant specific SFRs. On the other hand, the high-z tail of the BLAST counterparts significantly overlaps with the SCUBA population, in terms of both SFRs and stellar masses, with observed trends of specific SFR that support strong evolution and downsizing.

  5. Ancient and recent clay formation on Mars as revealed from a global survey of hydrous minerals in crater central peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Vivian Z.; Milliken, Ralph E.

    2015-12-01

    Clay minerals on Mars have commonly been interpreted as the remnants of pervasive water-rock interaction during the Noachian period (>3.7 Ga). This history has been partly inferred by observations of clays in central peaks of impact craters, which often are presumed uplifted from depth. However, combined mineralogical and morphological analyses of individual craters have shown that some central peak clays may represent post-impact, possibly authigenic processes. Here we present a global survey of 633 central peaks to assess their hydrous minerals and the prevalence of uplifted, detrital, and authigenic clays. Central peak regions are examined using high-resolution Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment data to identify hydrous minerals and place their detections in a stratigraphic and geologic context. We find that many occurrences of Fe/Mg clays and hydrated silica are associated with potential impact melt deposits. Over 35% of central peak clays are not associated with uplifted rocks; thus, caution must be used when inferring deeper crustal compositions from surface mineralogy of central peaks. Uplifted clay-bearing rocks suggest the Martian crust hosts clays to depths of at least 7 km. We also observe evidence for increasing chloritization with depth, implying the presence of fluids in the upper portions of the crust. Our observations are consistent with widespread Noachian/Early Hesperian clay formation, but a number of central peak clays are also suggestive of clay formation during the Amazonian. These results broadly support current paradigms of Mars' aqueous history while adding insight to global crustal and diagenetic processes associated with clay mineral formation and stability.

  6. A trade-off between embryonic development rate and immune function of avian offspring is revealed by considering embryonic temperature

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Thomas E.; Arriero, Elena; Majewska, Ania

    2011-01-01

    Long embryonic periods are assumed to reflect slower intrinsic development that are thought to trade off to allow enhanced physiological systems, such as immune function. Yet, the relatively rare studies of this trade-off in avian offspring have not found the expected trade-off. Theory and tests have not taken into account the strong extrinsic effects of temperature on embryonic periods of birds. Here, we show that length of the embryonic period did not explain variation in two measures of immune function when temperature was ignored, based on studies of 34 Passerine species in tropical Venezuela (23 species) and north temperate Arizona (11 species). Variation in immune function was explained when embryonic periods were corrected for average embryonic temperature, in order to better estimate intrinsic rates of development. Immune function of offspring trades off with intrinsic rates of embryonic development once the extrinsic effects of embryonic temperatures are taken into account. PMID:21227978

  7. A trade-off between embryonic development rate and immune function of avian offspring is revealed by considering embryonic temperature.

    PubMed

    Martin, Thomas E; Arriero, Elena; Majewska, Ania

    2011-06-23

    Long embryonic periods are assumed to reflect slower intrinsic development that are thought to trade off to allow enhanced physiological systems, such as immune function. Yet, the relatively rare studies of this trade-off in avian offspring have not found the expected trade-off. Theory and tests have not taken into account the strong extrinsic effects of temperature on embryonic periods of birds. Here, we show that length of the embryonic period did not explain variation in two measures of immune function when temperature was ignored, based on studies of 34 Passerine species in tropical Venezuela (23 species) and north temperate Arizona (11 species). Variation in immune function was explained when embryonic periods were corrected for average embryonic temperature, in order to better estimate intrinsic rates of development. Immune function of offspring trades off with intrinsic rates of embryonic development once the extrinsic effects of embryonic temperatures are taken into account.

  8. A Cell Motility Screen Reveals Role for MARCKS-Related Protein in Adherens Junction Formation and Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Finlayson, Alexander E.; Freeman, Kevin W.

    2009-01-01

    Invasion through the extracellular matrix (ECM) is important for wound healing, immunological responses and metastasis. We established an invasion-based cell motility screen using Boyden chambers overlaid with Matrigel to select for pro-invasive genes. By this method we identified antisense to MARCKS related protein (MRP), whose family member MARCKS is a target of miR-21, a microRNA involved in tumor growth, invasion and metastasis in multiple human cancers. We confirmed that targeted knockdown of MRP, in both EpRas mammary epithelial cells and PC3 prostate cancer cells, promoted in vitro cell migration that was blocked by trifluoperazine. Additionally, we observed increased immunofluoresence of E-cadherin, β-catenin and APC at sites of cell-cell contact in EpRas cells with MRP knockdown suggesting formation of adherens junctions. By wound healing assay we observed that reduced MRP supported collective cell migration, a type of cell movement where adherens junctions are maintained. However, destabilized adherens junctions, like those seen in EpRas cells, are frequently important for oncogenic signaling. Consequently, knockdown of MRP in EpRas caused loss of tumorigenesis in vivo, and reduced Wnt3a induced TCF reporter signaling in vitro. Together our data suggest that reducing MRP expression promotes formation of adherens junctions in EpRas cells, allowing collective cell migration, but interferes with oncogenic β-catenin signaling and tumorigenesis. PMID:19924305

  9. Fast Helix Formation in the B Domain of Protein A Revealed by Site-Specific Infrared Probes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Caitlin M.; Cooper, A. Kat; Dyer, R. Brian

    2015-01-01

    Comparison of experimental and computational protein folding studies can be difficult because of differences in structural resolution. Isotope-edited infrared spectroscopy offers a direct measure of structural changes involved in protein folding at the single-residue level. Here we demonstrate the increased resolution of site-specific infrared probes to the peptide backbone in the B domain of staphylococcal protein A (BdpA). 13C=18O-labeled methionine was incorporated into each of the helices using recombinant protein expression. Laser-induced temperature jumps coupled with infrared spectroscopy were used to probe changes in the peptide backbone on the submillisecond time scale. The relaxation kinetics of the buried helices, solvated helices, and labeled positions were measured independently by probing the corresponding bands assigned in the amide I region. Using these wavelength-dependent measurements, we observe a fast nanosecond phase and slower microsecond phase at each position. We find at least partial formation of helices 1–3 in the fast intermediate state that precedes the transition state. These measurements provide direct, time-resolved experimental evidence of the early formation of partial helical structure in helices 1 and 3, supporting folding models proposed by computer simulations. PMID:25706439

  10. Mechanism of intranuclear crystal formation of herpes simplex virus as revealed by the negative staining of thin sections.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K

    1971-10-01

    Structural alterations induced in HeLa cells by herpes simplex virus and the mechanism whereby the virus is formed in the nucleus in crystal arrays were studied by electron microscopy with both the usual and negatively stained sections. Aggregates of granular and filamentous material were observed in the cytoplasm of infected cells with both sections. On the other hand, no remarkable alterations in appearance of the cytoplasmic ground substance were observed with the usual sections of infected cells. However, the cytoplasmic ground substance of infected cells when negatively stained consisted of granular material which was different in appearance from the spongy material constituting the cytoplasmic matrix of uninfected cells. In the nucleus of infected cells, complexes consisting of round bodies, amorphous material, aggregates of uniform granules in rows, and viral crystals were often observed near the nuclear membrane in both types of sections. Examinations of the granular aggregates with negatively stained sections suggested that each granule represents a subunit and that the several adjoining subunits (approximately eight) constitute the requirement for formation of a single viral capsid with a core. Thus, rapid and simultaneous formation of the core and capsid within the aggregate would replace the rows of the granules with the viral crystal. The advantages of negative staining of thin sections for visualization of fine structural alterations are discussed.

  11. The Human SepSecS-tRNA[superscript Sec] Complex Reveals the Mechanism of Selenocysteine Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Palioura, Sotiria; Sherrer, R. Lynn; Steitz, Thomas A.; Söll, Dieter; Simonovic, Miljan

    2009-08-13

    Selenocysteine is the only genetically encoded amino acid in humans whose biosynthesis occurs on its cognate transfer RNA (tRNA). O-Phosphoseryl-tRNA:selenocysteinyl-tRNA synthase (SepSecS) catalyzes the final step of selenocysteine formation by a poorly understood tRNA-dependent mechanism. The crystal structure of human tRNA{sup Sec} in complex with SepSecS, phosphoserine, and thiophosphate, together with in vivo and in vitro enzyme assays, supports a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent mechanism of Sec-tRNA{sup Sec} formation. Two tRNA{sup Sec} molecules, with a fold distinct from other canonical tRNAs, bind to each SepSecS tetramer through their 13-base pair acceptor-T{Upsilon}C arm (where {Upsilon} indicates pseudouridine). The tRNA binding is likely to induce a conformational change in the enzyme's active site that allows a phosphoserine covalently attached to tRNA{sup Sec}, but not free phosphoserine, to be oriented properly for the reaction to occur.

  12. Ethanol formation in adh0 mutants reveals the existence of a novel acetaldehyde-reducing activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Drewke, C; Thielen, J; Ciriacy, M

    1990-01-01

    A strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been constructed which is deficient in the four alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isozymes known at present. This strain (adh0), being irreversibly mutated in the genes ADH1, ADH3, and ADH4 and carrying a point mutation in the gene ADH2 coding for the glucose-repressible isozyme ADHII, still produces up to one third of the theoretical maximum yield of ethanol in a homofermentative conversion of glucose to ethanol. Analysis of the glucose metabolism of adh0 cells shows that the lack of all known ADH isozymes results in the formation of glycerol as a major fermentation product, accompanied by a significant production of acetaldehyde and acetate. Treatment of glucose-growing adh0 cells with the respiratory-chain inhibitor antimycin A leads to an immediate cessation of ethanol production, demonstrating that ethanol production in adh0 cells is dependent on mitochondrial electron transport. Reduction of acetaldehyde to ethanol in isolated mitochondria could also be demonstrated. This reduction is apparently linked to the oxidation of acetaldehyde to acetate. Preliminary data suggest that this novel type of ethanol formation in S. cerevisiae is associated with the inner mitochondrial membrane. Images PMID:2193925

  13. Mechanism of Intranuclear Crystal Formation of Herpes Simplex Virus as Revealed by the Negative Staining of Thin Sections

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Kaneatsu

    1971-01-01

    Structural alterations induced in HeLa cells by herpes simplex virus and the mechanism whereby the virus is formed in the nucleus in crystal arrays were studied by electron microscopy with both the usual and negatively stained sections. Aggregates of granular and filamentous material were observed in the cytoplasm of infected cells with both sections. On the other hand, no remarkable alterations in appearance of the cytoplasmic ground substance were observed with the usual sections of infected cells. However, the cytoplasmic ground substance of infected cells when negatively stained consisted of granular material which was different in appearance from the spongy material constituting the cytoplasmic matrix of uninfected cells. In the nucleus of infected cells, complexes consisting of round bodies, amorphous material, aggregates of uniform granules in rows, and viral crystals were often observed near the nuclear membrane in both types of sections. Examinations of the granular aggregates with negatively stained sections suggested that each granule represents a subunit and that the several adjoining subunits (approximately eight) constitute the requirement for formation of a single viral capsid with a core. Thus, rapid and simultaneous formation of the core and capsid within the aggregate would replace the rows of the granules with the viral crystal. The advantages of negative staining of thin sections for visualization of fine structural alterations are discussed. Images PMID:4108572

  14. A Wide-Field High-Resolution H I Mosaic of Messier 31. I. Opaque Atomic Gas and Star Formation Rate Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, R.; Thilker, D. A.; Walterbos, R. A. M.; Corbelli, E.

    2009-04-01

    We have undertaken a deep, wide-field H I imaging survey of M31, reaching a maximum resolution of about 50 pc and 2 km s-1 across a 95 × 48 kpc region. The H I mass and brightness sensitivity at 100 pc resolution for a 25 km s-1 wide spectral feature is 1500 M sun and 0.28 K. Our study reveals ubiquitous H I self-opacity features, discernible in the first instance as filamentary local minima in images of the peak H I brightness temperature. Local minima are organized into complexes of more than kpc length and are particularly associated with the leading edge of spiral arm features. Just as in the Galaxy, there is only patchy correspondence of self-opaque features with CO(1-0) emission. We have produced images of the best-fit physical parameters: spin temperature, opacity-corrected column density, and nonthermal velocity dispersion, for the brightest spectral feature along each line of sight in the M31 disk. Spectroscopically opaque atomic gas is organized into filamentary complexes and isolated clouds down to 100 pc. Localized opacity corrections to the column density exceed an order of magnitude in many cases and add globally to a 30% increase in the atomic gas mass over that inferred from the integrated brightness under the usual assumption of negligible self-opacity. Opaque atomic gas first increases from 20 to 60 K in spin temperature with radius to 12 kpc but then declines again to 20 K beyond 25 kpc. We have extended the resolved star formation law down to physical scales more than an order of magnitude smaller in area and mass than has been possible previously. The relation between total gas mass and star formation rate density is significantly tighter than that with molecular mass and is fully consistent in both slope and normalization with the power-law index of 1.56 found in the molecule-dominated disk of M51 at 500 pc resolution. Below a gas mass density of about 5 M sun pc-2, there is a downturn in star formation rate density which may represent a real

  15. The Phase Space of z=1.2 Clusters: Probing Dust Temperature and Star Formation Rate as a Function of Environment and Accretion History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Allison; SpARCS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the influence of environment is a fundamental goal in studies of galaxy formation and evolution, and galaxy clusters offer ideal laboratories with which to examine environmental effects on their constituent members. Clusters continually evolve and build up mass through the accumulation of galaxies and groups, resulting in distinct galaxy populations based on their accretion history. In Noble et al. 2013, we presented a novel definition for environment using the phase space of line-of-sight velocity and clustercentric radius, which probes the time-averaged density to which a galaxy has been exposed and traces out accretion histories. Using this dynamical definition of environment reveals a decline in specific star formation towards the cluster core in the earliest accreted galaxies, and was further shown to isolate post-starburst galaxies within clusters (Muzzin et al. 2014). We have now extended this work to higher-redshift clusters at z=1.2 using deep Herschel-PACS and -SPIRE data. With a sample of 120 spectroscopically-confirmed cluster members, we investigate various galaxy properties as a function of phase-space environment. Specifically, we use 5-band Herschel photometry to estimate the dust temperature and star formation rate for dynamically distinct galaxy populations, namely recent infalls and those that were accreted into the cluster at an earlier epoch (Noble et al. submitted). These properties are then compared to a field sample of star-forming galaxies at 1.1 < z < 1.2 to shed light on cluster-specific processes in galaxy evolution. In this talk I will discuss the various implications of a phase-space definition for environment, and present our most recent results, focusing on how this accretion-based definition aids our understanding of quenching mechanisms within z=1.2 galaxies.

  16. Verification of Radicals Formation in Ethanol-Water Mixture Based Solution Plasma and Their Relation to the Rate of Reaction.

    PubMed

    Sudare, Tomohito; Ueno, Tomonaga; Watthanaphanit, Anyarat; Saito, Nagahiro

    2015-12-01

    Our previous research demonstrated that using ethanol-water mixture as a liquid medium for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles by the solution plasma process (SPP) could lead to an increment of the reaction rate of ∼35.2 times faster than that in pure water. This drastic change was observed when a small amount of ethanol, that is, at an ethanol mole fraction (χethanol) of 0.089, was added in the system. After this composition, the reaction rate decreased continuously. To better understand what happens in the ethanol-water mixture-based SPP, in this study, effect of the ethanol content on the radical formation in the system was verified. We focused on detecting the magnetic resonance of electronic spins using electron spin resonance spectroscopy to determine the type and quantity of the generated radicals at each χethanol. Results indicated that ethanol radicals were generated in the ethanol-water mixtures and exhibited maximum quantity at the xethanol of 0.089. Relationship between the ethanol radical yield and the rate of reaction, along with possible mechanism responsible for the observed phenomenon, is discussed in this paper.

  17. Effect of freezing rate and dendritic ice formation on concentration profiles of proteins frozen in cylindrical vessels.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Miguel A; Miller, Maria A; Glass, Matt A; Singh, Satish K; Johnston, Keith P

    2011-04-01

    The process of freezing protein solutions can perturb the conformation of the protein and potentially lead to aggregate formation during long-term storage in the frozen state. Radial macroscopic freeze concentration and temperature profiles for bovine serum albumin (BSA) solutions in small cylindrical stainless steel vessels were determined for various freezing rates. The measured concentrations of both BSA and immunoglobulin G2, as well as trehalose in sampled ice sections, increased by up to twofold to threefold toward the bottom and radial center for slow freezing rates produced in stagnant air freezers. The concentration and temperature profiles result in density gradients that transport solutes by convective flow. For faster external cooling by either forced convection of air or a liquid coolant, the increased freezing rate raised the ice front velocity resulting in enhanced dendritic ice growth. The ice trapped the solutes more effectively before they were removed from the ice front by diffusion and convection, resulting in more uniform solute concentration profiles. The dynamic temperature profiles from multiple radial thermocouples were consistent with the independently measured freeze concentration profiles. The ability to control the protein concentration profile in the frozen state offers the potential to improve stability of protein in long-term frozen storage.

  18. Extremely slow rate of evolution in the HOX cluster revealed by comparison between Tanzanian and Indonesian coelacanths.

    PubMed

    Higasa, Koichiro; Nikaido, Masato; Saito, Taro L; Yoshimura, Jun; Suzuki, Yutaka; Suzuki, Hikoyu; Nishihara, Hidenori; Aibara, Mitsuto; Ngatunga, Benjamin P; Kalombo, Hassan W J; Sugano, Sumio; Morishita, Shinichi; Okada, Norihiro

    2012-09-01

    Coelacanths are known as "living fossils" because their morphology has changed very little from that in the fossil record. To elucidate why coelacanths have evolved so slowly is thus of primary importance in evolutionary biology. In the present study, we determined the entire sequence of the HOX cluster of the Tanzanian coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae) and compared it with that of the Indonesian coelacanth (L. menadoensis), which was available in the literature. The most intriguing result was the extremely small genetic divergence between the two coelacanths. The synonymous divergence of the HOX coding region between the two coelacanths was estimated to be 0.07%, which is ~11-fold smaller than that of human-chimp. When we applied the estimated divergence time of the two coelacanths of 6 million years ago (MYA) and 30 MYA, which were proposed in independent mitochondrial DNA analyses, the synonymous substitution rate of the coelacanth HOX cluster was estimated to be ~11-fold and 56-fold smaller than that of human-chimp, respectively. Thus, the present study implies that the reduction of the nucleotide substitution rate in coelacanth HOX genes may account for the conservation of coelacanth morphology during evolution.

  19. Heavy water and 15N labeling with NanoSIMS analysis reveals growth-rate dependent metabolic heterogeneity in chemostats

    PubMed Central

    McGlynn, Shawn E.; Green-Saxena, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    To measure single cell microbial activity and substrate utilization patterns in environmental systems, we employ a new technique using stable isotope labeling of microbial populations with heavy water (a passive tracer) and 15N ammonium in combination with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry. We demonstrate simultaneous NanoSIMS analysis of hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen at high spatial and mass resolution, and report calibration data linking single cell isotopic compositions to the corresponding bulk isotopic equivalents for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Our results show that heavy water is capable of quantifying in situ single cell microbial activities ranging from generational time scales of minutes to years, with only light isotopic incorporation (∼0.1 atom % 2H). Applying this approach to study the rates of fatty acid biosynthesis by single cells of S. aureus growing at different rates in chemostat culture (∼6 hours, 1 day and 2 week generation times), we observe the greatest anabolic activity diversity in the slowest growing populations. By using heavy water to constrain cellular growth activity, we can further infer the relative contributions of ammonium vs. amino acid assimilation to the cellular nitrogen pool. The approach described here can be applied to disentangle individual cell activities even in nutritionally complex environments. PMID:25655651

  20. Decadal trends reveal recent acceleration in the rate of recovery from acidification in the northeastern U.S.

    PubMed

    Strock, Kristin E; Nelson, Sarah J; Kahl, Jeffrey S; Saros, Jasmine E; McDowell, William H

    2014-05-01

    Previous reports suggest variable trends in recovery from acidification in northeastern U.S. surface waters in response to the Clean Air Act Amendments. Here we analyze recent trends in emissions, wet deposition, and lake chemistry using long-term data from a variety of lakes in the Adirondack Mountains and New England. Sulfate concentration in wet deposition declined by more than 40% in the 2000s and sulfate concentration in lakes declined at a greater rate from 2002 to 2010 than during the 1980s or 1990s (-3.27 μeq L(-1)year(-1) as compared to -1.26 μeq L(-1)year(-1)). During the 2000s, nitrate concentration in wet deposition declined by more than 50% and nitrate concentration in lakes, which had no linear trend prior to 2000, declined at a rate of -0.05 μeq L(-1)year(-1). Base cation concentrations, which decreased during the 1990s (-1.5 μeq L(-1) year(-1)), have stabilized in New England lakes. Although total aluminum concentrations increased since 1999 (2.57 μg L(-1) year(-1)), there was a shift to nontoxic, organic aluminum. Despite this recent acceleration in recovery in multiple variables, both ANC and pH continue to have variable trends. This may be due in part to variable trajectories in the concentrations of base cations and dissolved organic carbon among our study lakes.

  1. Reconstruction of the ancestral plastid genome in Geraniaceae reveals a correlation between genome rearrangements, repeats, and nucleotide substitution rates.

    PubMed

    Weng, Mao-Lun; Blazier, John C; Govindu, Madhumita; Jansen, Robert K

    2014-03-01

    Geraniaceae plastid genomes are highly rearranged, and each of the four genera already sequenced in the family has a distinct genome organization. This study reports plastid genome sequences of six additional species, Francoa sonchifolia, Melianthus villosus, and Viviania marifolia from Geraniales, and Pelargonium alternans, California macrophylla, and Hypseocharis bilobata from Geraniaceae. These genome sequences, combined with previously published species, provide sufficient taxon sampling to reconstruct the ancestral plastid genome organization of Geraniaceae and the rearrangements unique to each genus. The ancestral plastid genome of Geraniaceae has a 4 kb inversion and a reduced, Pelargonium-like small single copy region. Our ancestral genome reconstruction suggests that a few minor rearrangements occurred in the stem branch of Geraniaceae followed by independent rearrangements in each genus. The genomic comparison demonstrates that a series of inverted repeat boundary shifts and inversions played a major role in shaping genome organization in the family. The distribution of repeats is strongly associated with breakpoints in the rearranged genomes, and the proportion and the number of large repeats (>20 bp and >60 bp) are significantly correlated with the degree of genome rearrangements. Increases in the degree of plastid genome rearrangements are correlated with the acceleration in nonsynonymous substitution rates (dN) but not with synonymous substitution rates (dS). Possible mechanisms that might contribute to this correlation, including DNA repair system and selection, are discussed. PMID:24336877

  2. Decadal trends reveal recent acceleration in the rate of recovery from acidification in the northeastern U.S.

    PubMed

    Strock, Kristin E; Nelson, Sarah J; Kahl, Jeffrey S; Saros, Jasmine E; McDowell, William H

    2014-05-01

    Previous reports suggest variable trends in recovery from acidification in northeastern U.S. surface waters in response to the Clean Air Act Amendments. Here we analyze recent trends in emissions, wet deposition, and lake chemistry using long-term data from a variety of lakes in the Adirondack Mountains and New England. Sulfate concentration in wet deposition declined by more than 40% in the 2000s and sulfate concentration in lakes declined at a greater rate from 2002 to 2010 than during the 1980s or 1990s (-3.27 μeq L(-1)year(-1) as compared to -1.26 μeq L(-1)year(-1)). During the 2000s, nitrate concentration in wet deposition declined by more than 50% and nitrate concentration in lakes, which had no linear trend prior to 2000, declined at a rate of -0.05 μeq L(-1)year(-1). Base cation concentrations, which decreased during the 1990s (-1.5 μeq L(-1) year(-1)), have stabilized in New England lakes. Although total aluminum concentrations increased since 1999 (2.57 μg L(-1) year(-1)), there was a shift to nontoxic, organic aluminum. Despite this recent acceleration in recovery in multiple variables, both ANC and pH continue to have variable trends. This may be due in part to variable trajectories in the concentrations of base cations and dissolved organic carbon among our study lakes. PMID:24669928

  3. Ultraviolet to infrared emission of z > 1 galaxies: Can we derive reliable star formation rates and stellar masses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buat, V.; Heinis, S.; Boquien, M.; Burgarella, D.; Charmandaris, V.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Le Borgne, D.; Morrison, G.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Our knowledge of the cosmic mass assembly relies on measurements of star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses (Mstar), of galaxies as a function of redshift. These parameters must be estimated in a consistent way with a good knowledge of systematics before studying their correlation and the variation of the specific SFR. Constraining these fundamental properties of galaxies across the Universe is of utmost importance if we want to understand galaxy formation and evolution. Methods: We seek to derive SFRs and stellar masses in distant galaxies and to quantify the main uncertainties affecting their measurement. We explore the impact of the assumptions made in their derivation with standard calibrations or through a fitting process, as well as the impact of the available data, focusing on the role of infrared emission originating from dust. Results: We build a sample of galaxies with z > 1, all observed from the ultraviolet to the infrared in their rest frame. The data are fitted with the code CIGALE, which is also used to build and analyse a catalogue of mock galaxies. Models with different star formation histories are introduced: an exponentially decreasing or increasing SFR and a more complex one coupling a decreasing SFR with a younger burst of constant star formation. We define different sets of data, with or without a good sampling of the ultraviolet range, near-infrared, and thermal infrared data. Variations of the metallicity are also investigated. The impact of these different cases on the determination of stellar mass and SFR are analysed. Conclusions: Exponentially decreasing models with a redshift formation of the stellar population zf ≃ 8 cannot fit the data correctly. All the other models fit the data correctly at the price of unrealistically young ages when the age of the single stellar population is taken to be a free parameter, especially for the exponentially decreasing models. The best fits are obtained with two stellar populations. As

  4. High Acidification Rate of Norwegian Sea Revealed by Boron Isotopes in the Deep-Sea Coral Madrepora Oculata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, C.; Douville, E.; Hall-Spencer, J.; Montagna, P.; Louvat, P.; Gaillardet, J.; Frank, N.; Bordier, L.; Juillet-Leclerc, A.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean acidification and global warming due to the increase of anthropogenic CO2 are major threats for marine calcifying organisms, such as deep-sea corals, particularly in high-latitude regions. In order to evaluate the current anthropogenic perturbation and to properly assess the impacts and responses of calcifiers to previous changes in pH it is critical to investigate past changes of the seawater carbonate system. Unfortunately, current instrumental records of oceanic pH are limited, covering only a few decades. Scleractinian coral skeletons record chemical parameters of the seawater in which they grow. However, pH variability over multidecadal timescales remains largely unknown in intermediate and deep seawater masses. Here we present a study that highlights the potential of deep-sea-corals to overcome the lack of long-term pH records and that emphasizes a rapid acidification of high latitude subsurface waters of Norwegian Sea during the past decades. We have reconstructed seawater pH and temperature from a well dated deep-sea coral specimen Madrepora oculata collected alive from Røst reef in Norwegian Sea (67°N, 9°E, 340 m depth). This large branching framework forming coral species grew its skeleton over more than four decades determined using AMS 14C and 210Pb dating (Sabatier et al. 2012). B-isotopes and Li/Mg ratios yield an acidification rate of about -0.0030±0.0008 pH-unit.year-1 and a warming of 0.3°C during the past four decades (1967-2007). Overall our reconstruction technique agrees well with previous pH calculations (Hönisch et al., 2007 vs. Trotter et al., 2011 and McCulloch et al., 2012, i.e. the iterative method), but additional corrections are here applied using stable isotope correlations (O, C, B) to properly address kinetic fractionation of boron isotopes used for pH reconstruction. The resulting pH curve strongly anti-correlates with the annual NAO index, which further strengthens our evidence for the ocean acidification rate

  5. The number of O-type runaways, the number of O and Wolf-Rayet stars with a compact companion and the formation rate of double pulsars predicted by massive close binary evolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Donder, E.; Vanbeveren, D.; van Bever, J.

    1997-02-01

    Using a detailed model of massive close binary evolution and accounting properly for the effects of asymmetric supernova explosions (SN) where we use recent observations of pulsar runaway velocities, we determine the theoretically expected number of post-SN O-type stars with and without a compact companion (CC), the number of O-type runaways, the number of WR+CC systems and the formation rate of binary pulsars in our Galaxy. We conclude that o at least 50% of the O-type runaways are formed through the binary scenario, o less than 3% of all WR stars may hide a CC, o the formation rate of binary pulsars in our Galaxy =~0.003-0.01 times the formation rate of massive stars; this corresponds roughly to a binary pulsar formation rate of the order of 10^-5^/year in agreement with the observations. Our results reveal a significant fraction of single WR stars but with a binary history. We also predict the existence of 'weird' WR stars, i.e a WR star with a CC in its centre (descendants of Thorne-˙(Z)ytkow objects).

  6. Mathematical modeling reveals the functional implications of the different nuclear shuttling rates of Erk1 and Erk2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Heather A.; Komorowski, Michał; Beguerisse-Díaz, Mariano; Ratto, Gian Michele; Stumpf, Michael P. H.

    2012-06-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family of proteins is involved in regulating cellular fates such as proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In particular, the dynamics of the Erk/Mek system, which has become the canonical example for MAPK signaling systems, have attracted considerable attention. Erk is encoded by two genes, Erk1 and Erk2, that until recently had been considered equivalent as they differ only subtly at the sequence level. However, these proteins exhibit radically different trafficking between cytoplasm and nucleus and this fact may have functional implications. Here we use spatially resolved data on Erk1/2 to develop and analyze spatio-temporal models of these cascades, and we discuss how sensitivity analysis can be used to discriminate between mechanisms. Our models elucidate some of the factors governing the interplay between signaling processes and the Erk1/2 localization in different cellular compartments, including competition between Erk1 and Erk2. Our approach is applicable to a wide range of signaling systems, such as activation cascades, where translocation of molecules occurs. Our study provides a first model of Erk1 and Erk2 activation and their nuclear shuttling dynamics, revealing a role in the regulation of the efficiency of nuclear signaling.

  7. Tectonic Windows Reveal Off-axis Volcanic and Hydrothermal Activity and Along-strike Variations in Eruption Effusion Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, K. C.

    2005-12-01

    Alvin transects of faulted escarpments 50-500m high provide tectonic windows to investigate the top 500m of oceanic crustal structure and lava stratigraphy. The Alvin archives were used to review dives from the East Pacific Rise, the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the Juan de Fuca Ridge, the Blanco Trough, Cayman Trough and the Galapagos Spreading Center. A spreading rate dependence in lava morphology based solely on areal coverage(Bonatti and Harrison, 1988) was confirmed in scarp transects: mostly pillow lavas at slow spreading rates and sheet flows/lobate flows at faster spreading rates. More interestingly; there is a systematic variation within first, second and third order segments on intermediate and fast-spreading centers such that sheet/lobate flows dominate at segment centers and pillow flows and lava domes are more common at segment ends. This confirms earlier studies which were based on areal coverage (White et al, 2000, 2002, Soule et al 2005). This suggests higher eruption effusion rates and perhaps higher magma pressure and lower magma viscosity at segment centers relative to segment ends. This has important implications for the relationship between segmentation, magma supply, volcanism and hydrothermal activity (Haymon and White 2005). A conundrum remains; based on areal photographic surveys, why are pillow lavas so much more common off-axis than on-axis for intermediate to fast-spreading ridges? If there is an eruption cycle in which sheeted and lobate flows dominate early on, and pillow lavas dominate the waning stages of eruption (e.g. Ballard et al 1979), then more pillow lavas should be seen on axis than are seen on-axis in either areal or transect data. Another explanation is that pillow lavas off-axis are primarily produced by off-axis eruptions (except near segment ends, they may also occur as the pillowed terminations of channeled sheet and lobate flows; the association with channels will make this obvious.) Off-axis volcanism is also indicated by a

  8. Fully band-resolved scattering rate in MgB2 revealed by the nonlinear hall effect and magnetoresistance measurements.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Liu, Yi; Zhuang, Chenggang; Shi, Junren; Yao, Yugui; Massidda, Sandro; Monni, Marco; Jia, Ying; Xi, Xiaoxing; Li, Qi; Liu, Zi-Kui; Feng, Qingrong; Wen, Hai-Hu

    2008-08-01

    We have measured the normal state temperature dependence of the Hall effect and magnetoresistance in epitaxial MgB2 thin films with variable disorders characterized by the residual resistance ratio RRR ranging from 4.0 to 33.3. A strong nonlinearity of the Hall effect and magnetoresistance have been found in clean samples, and they decrease gradually with the increase of disorders or temperature. By fitting the data to the theoretical model based on the Boltzmann equation and ab initio calculations for a four-band system, for the first time, we derived the scattering rates of these four bands at different temperatures and magnitude of disorders. Our method provides a unique way to derive these important parameters in multiband systems.

  9. Effect of cooling rate and cryoprotectant concentration on intracellular ice formation of small abalone (Haliotis diversicolor) eggs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chiang-Yi; Yeh, Yu-Hui Flora; Lee, Po-Ting; Lin, Ta-Te

    2013-08-01

    The intracellular ice formation (IIF) behavior of Haliotis diversicolor (small abalone) eggs is investigated in this study, in relation to controlling the cooling rate and the concentration of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The IIF phenomena are monitored under a self-developed thermoelectric cooling (TEC) cryomicroscope system which can achieve accurate temperature control without the use of liquid nitrogen. The accuracy of the isothermal and ramp control is within ±0.5 °C. The IIF results indicate that the IIF of small abalone eggs is well suppressed at cooling rates of 1.5, 3, 7 and 12 °C/min with 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 and 4.0M DMSO in sea water. As 2.0M DMSO in sea water is the minimum concentration that has sufficient IIF suppression, it is selected as the suspension solution for the cryopreservation of small abalone eggs in order to consider the solution's toxicity effect. Moreover, IIF characteristics of the cumulative probability of IIF temperature distribution are shown to be well fitted by the Weibull probabilistic distribution. According to our IIF results and the Weibull distribution parameters, we conclude that cooling at 1.5 °C/min from 20 to -50 °C with 2.0M DMSO in sea water is more feasible than other combinations of cooling rates and DMSO concentrations in our experiments. Applying this protocol and observing the subsequent osmotic activity, 48.8% of small abalone eggs are osmotically active after thawing. In addition, the higher the cooling rate, the less chance of osmotically active eggs. A separate fertility test experiment, with a cryopreservation protocol of 1.5 °C/min cooling rate and 2.0M DMSO in sea water, achieves a hatching rate of 23.7%. This study is the first to characterize the IIF behavior of small abalone eggs in regard to the cooling rate and the DMSO concentration. The Weibull probabilistic model fitting in this study is an approach that can be applied by other researchers for effective cryopreservation variability estimation and

  10. MEASURING GALAXY STAR FORMATION RATES FROM INTEGRATED PHOTOMETRY: INSIGHTS FROM COLOR-MAGNITUDE DIAGRAMS OF RESOLVED STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Benjamin D.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Johnson, L. C.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dale, Daniel A.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Lee, Janice C.; Skillman, Evan D.; Boquien, Mederic

    2013-07-20

    We use empirical star formation histories (SFHs), measured from Hubble-Space-Telescope-based resolved star color-magnitude diagrams, as input into population synthesis codes to model the broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 50 nearby dwarf galaxies (6.5 < log M{sub *}/M{sub Sun} < 8.5, with metallicities {approx}10% solar). In the presence of realistic SFHs, we compare the modeled and observed SEDs from the ultraviolet (UV) through near-infrared and assess the reliability of widely used UV-based star formation rate (SFR) indicators. In the FUV through i bands, we find that the observed and modeled SEDs are in excellent agreement. In the Spitzer 3.6 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m bands, we find that modeled SEDs systematically overpredict observed luminosities by up to {approx}0.2 dex, depending on treatment of the TP-AGB stars in the synthesis models. We assess the reliability of UV luminosity as a SFR indicator, in light of independently constrained SFHs. We find that fluctuations in the SFHs alone can cause factor of {approx}2 variations in the UV luminosities relative to the assumption of a constant SFH over the past 100 Myr. These variations are not strongly correlated with UV-optical colors, implying that correcting UV-based SFRs for the effects of realistic SFHs is difficult using only the broadband SED. Additionally, for this diverse sample of galaxies, we find that stars older than 100 Myr can contribute from <5%-100% of the present day UV luminosity, highlighting the challenges in defining a characteristic star formation timescale associated with UV emission. We do find a relationship between UV emission timescale and broadband UV-optical color, though it is different than predictions based on exponentially declining SFH models. Our findings have significant implications for the comparison of UV-based SFRs across low-metallicity populations with diverse SFHs.

  11. THE REDSHIFT EVOLUTION OF THE RELATION BETWEEN STELLAR MASS, STAR FORMATION RATE, AND GAS METALLICITY OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Niino, Yuu

    2012-12-20

    We investigate the relation between stellar mass (M{sub *}), star formation rate (SFR), and metallicity (Z) of galaxies, the so-called fundamental metallicity relation, in the galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. We separate the galaxies into narrow redshift bins and compare the relation at different redshifts and find statistically significant (>99%) evolution. We test various observational effects that might cause seeming Z evolution and find it difficult to explain the evolution of the relation only by the observational effects. In the current sample of low-redshift galaxies, galaxies with different M{sub *} and SFR are sampled from different redshifts, and there is degeneracy between M{sub *}/SFR and redshift. Hence, it is not straightforward to distinguish a relation between Z and SFR from a relation between Z and redshift. The separation of the intrinsic relation from the redshift evolution effect is a crucial issue in the understanding of the evolution of galaxies.

  12. 3D-HST emission line galaxies at z ∼ 2: discrepancies in the optical/UV star formation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Zeimann, Gregory R.; Ciardullo, Robin; Gebhardt, Henry; Gronwall, Caryl; Schneider, Donald P.; Hagen, Alex; Bridge, Joanna S.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Feldmeier, John

    2014-08-01

    We use Hubble Space Telescope near-IR grism spectroscopy to examine the Hβ line strengths of 260 star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 1.90 < z < 2.35. We show that at these epochs, the Hβ star formation rate (SFR) is a factor of ∼1.8 higher than what would be expected from the systems' rest-frame UV flux density, suggesting a shift in the standard conversion between these quantities and SFR. We demonstrate that at least part of this shift can be attributed to metallicity, as Hβ is more enhanced in systems with lower oxygen abundance. This offset must be considered when measuring the SFR history of the universe. We also show that the relation between stellar and nebular extinction in our z ∼ 2 sample is consistent with that observed in the local universe.

  13. Decoupled crystallization and eruption histories of the rhyolite magmatic system at Tarawera volcano revealed by zircon ages and growth rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Sonja; Shane, Phil; Schmitt, Axel K.; Lindsay, Jan M.

    2012-03-01

    We obtained U-Th disequilibrium age data on zircons from each of the four rhyolite eruptions that built Tarawera volcano in the last 22 ka within the Okataina Volcanic Center (OVC), caldera, New Zealand. Secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses on unpolished euhedral crystal faces that lack resorption features show that crystal growth variously terminated from near-eruption age to ~100 ka prior to eruption. Age-depth profiling of crystals reveals long periods of continuous (~34 ka) and discontinuous growth (~90 ka). Growth hiatuses of up to ~40 ka duration occur, but do not all relate to obvious resorption surfaces. Age differences up to similar magnitude are found on opposing faces of some crystals suggesting episodes of partial exposure to melts. These features are best explained by periodic, complete, or partial, sub-solidus storage and/or inclusion in larger crystal phases, followed by rapid liberation prior to eruption. This is supported by high abundances of U and Th (~500 - >2,000 ppm) in some zircons consistent with periods of high crystallinity (>70%) in the magmatic system, based on crystal/melt partitioning. Contemporaneous but contrasting rim-ward trends of these elements within crystals, even in the same lava hand sample, require synchronous growth in separate melt bodies and little connectivity within the system, but also significant crystal transport and mixing prior to eruption. Many crystals record continuity of growth through the preceding ~60 ka OVC caldera-collapse and subsequent eruptions from Tarawera. This demonstrates a decoupling between eruption triggers, such as shallow crustal extension and mafic intrusion, and the crystallization state of the OVC silicic magmatic system. The data highlights the need to distinguish between the time for accumulation of eruptible magma and the long-term magma residence time based on the age of crystals with high closure temperatures, when assessing the potential for catastrophic eruptions.

  14. Before the flood: Miocene otoliths from eastern Amazon Pirabas Formation reveal a Caribbean-type fish fauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera, Orangel; Schwarzhans, Werner; Moraes-Santos, Heloísa; Nepomuceno, Aguinaldo

    2014-12-01

    The Pirabas Formation of Early Miocene age represents the final stage of the central western Atlantic carbonate platform in northeastern South America, predating the emplacement of the Amazon delta system. The otolith-based fossil fish fauna is represented by 38 species typical of a shallow marine environment. A total of 18 species are described new to science from the families Congridae, Batrachoididae, Bythitidae, Sciaenidae and Paralichthyidae. The fish fauna was associated with high benthic and planktic primary productivity including seagrass meadows, calcareous algae and suspension-feeders. The break of todays shallow marine bioprovince at the Amazonas delta mouth is not evident from the fish fauna of the Pirabas Fm., which shows good correlation with the Gatunian/proto-Caribbean bioprovince known from an only slightly younger time window in Trinidad and Venezuela. Differences observed to those Early Miocene faunal associations are interpreted to be mainly due to stratigraphic and geographic and not environmental differences. We postulate that the emergence of the Amazonas river mouth close to its present day location has terminated the carbonate cycle of the Pirabas Fm. and pushed back northwards a certain proportion of the fish fauna here described.

  15. Effect of Oxidation Rate and Fe(II) State on Microbial Nitrate-Dependent Fe(III) Mineral Formation

    PubMed Central

    Senko, John M.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-01-01

    A nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium was isolated and used to evaluate whether Fe(II) chemical form or oxidation rate had an effect on the mineralogy of biogenic Fe(III) (hydr)oxides resulting from nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The isolate (designated FW33AN) had 99% 16S rRNA sequence similarity to Klebsiella oxytoca. FW33AN produced Fe(III) (hydr)oxides by oxidation of soluble Fe(II) [Fe(II)sol] or FeS under nitrate-reducing conditions. Based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fe(III) (hydr)oxide produced by oxidation of FeS was shown to be amorphous, while oxidation of Fe(II)sol yielded goethite. The rate of Fe(II) oxidation was then manipulated by incubating various cell concentrations of FW33AN with Fe(II)sol and nitrate. Characterization of products revealed that as Fe(II) oxidation rates slowed, a stronger goethite signal was observed by XRD and a larger proportion of Fe(III) was in the crystalline fraction. Since the mineralogy of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides may control the extent of subsequent Fe(III) reduction, the variables we identify here may have an effect on the biogeochemical cycling of Fe in anoxic ecosystems. PMID:16269756

  16. Effects of Color, Format, and Severity of Issue on Response Rate of Mail Questionnaires When Respondent Population Has Some Familiarity with Sender.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, C. L.; Summerhill, W. R.

    The effects of (1) format and color, and (2) severity of issue (freeze damage to citrus industry) on response rate of mail questionnaires is presented. Questionnaires were formatted in two different ways: a one page, legal size printed on both sides, and one sheet 11- by 17-inch size center-folded with items on three pages. Two colors were used:…

  17. Predation or scavenging? Thoracic muscle pH and rates of water loss reveal cause of death in arthropods.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Erin E; Young, Christine V; Holway, David A

    2010-08-01

    The difficulty of directly observing predatory events hinders a complete understanding of how predation structures food webs. Indirect approaches such as PCR-based and isotopic analyses clarify patterns of resource consumption but fail to distinguish predation from scavenging. Given that facultative scavenging is a ubiquitous and phylogenetically widespread foraging strategy, an improved ability to discriminate prey from carrion is needed to enhance an understanding of the demographic effects of consumption and the true nature of trophic interactions. Using physiological properties of muscle tissue - specifically pH and rate of water loss - we develop a novel method to discriminate prey from carrion collected by scavenging hymenopteran predators. Our focal system is the western yellowjacket (Vespula pensylvanica), a common scavenging predator in Hawaii and western North America. Prior to consumption, the physical properties of hymenopteran muscle tissue change in a quantifiable and deterministic manner post mortem and can be used to estimate the time and putative cause of death of diet items. Applying this method in laboratory and field situations resulted in the correct identification of prey and carrion in 49 out of 56 cases (88%). Although further investigation is needed to determine how post-mortem physiology of diet items changes in the guts of consumers, the approaches developed in this study can be used to distinguish predation from scavenging by central-place foragers (particularly arthropods). Such information will provide a more definitive characterization of species interactions and food webs.

  18. Tropical tree rings reveal preferential survival of fast-growing juveniles and increased juvenile growth rates over time.

    PubMed

    Rozendaal, Danaë M A; Brienen, Roel J W; Soliz-Gamboa, Claudia C; Zuidema, Pieter A

    2010-02-01

    Long-term juvenile growth patterns of tropical trees were studied to test two hypotheses: fast-growing juvenile trees have a higher chance of reaching the canopy ('juvenile selection effect'); and tree growth has increased over time ('historical growth increase'). Tree-ring analysis was applied to test these hypotheses for five tree species from three moist forest sites in Bolivia, using samples from 459 individuals. Basal area increment was calculated from ring widths, for trees < 30 cm in diameter. For three out of five species, a juvenile selection effect was found in rings formed by small juveniles. Thus, extant adult trees in these species have had higher juvenile growth rates than extant juvenile trees. By contrast, rings formed by somewhat larger juveniles in four species showed the opposite pattern: a historical growth increase. For most size classes of > 10 cm diameter none of the patterns was found. Fast juvenile growth may be essential to enable tropical trees to reach the forest canopy, especially for small juvenile trees in the dark forest understorey. The historical growth increase requires cautious interpretation, but may be partially attributable to CO(2) fertilization.

  19. THE EVOLUTION OF THE STAR FORMATION RATE OF GALAXIES AT 0.0 {<=} z {<=} 1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Rujopakarn, Wiphu; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Rieke, George H.; Rieke, Marcia J.; Papovich, Casey; Cool, Richard J.; Moustakas, John; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Dey, Arjun; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Eisenhardt, Peter; Murray, Steve S.; Le Floc'h, Emeric

    2010-08-01

    We present the 24 {mu}m rest-frame luminosity function (LF) of star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 0.0 {<=} z {<=} 0.6 constructed from 4047 spectroscopic redshifts from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey of 24 {mu}m selected sources in the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. This sample provides the best available combination of large area (9 deg{sup 2}), depth, and statistically complete spectroscopic observations, allowing us to probe the evolution of the 24 {mu}m LF of galaxies at low and intermediate redshifts while minimizing the effects of cosmic variance. In order to use the observed 24 {mu}m luminosity as a tracer for star formation, active galactic nuclei (AGNs) that could contribute significantly at 24 {mu}m are identified and excluded from our star-forming galaxy sample based on their mid-IR spectral energy distributions or the detection of X-ray emission. Optical emission line diagnostics are considered for AGN identification, but we find that 24 {mu}m emission from optically selected AGNs is usually from star-forming activity and therefore should not be excluded. The evolution of the 24 {mu}m LF of star-forming galaxies for redshifts of z {<=} 0.65 is consistent with a pure luminosity evolution where the characteristic 24 {mu}m luminosity evolves as (1 + z){sup 3.8{+-}0.3}. We extend our evolutionary study to encompass 0.0 {<=} z {<=} 1.2 by combining our data with that of the Far-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey. Over this entire redshift range, the evolution of the characteristic 24 {mu}m luminosity is described by a slightly shallower power law of (1 + z){sup 3.4{+-}0.2}. We find a local star formation rate density of (1.09 {+-} 0.21) x 10{sup -2} M {sub sun} yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3}, and that it evolves as (1 + z){sup 3.5{+-}0.2} over 0.0 {<=} z {<=} 1.2. These estimates are in good agreement with the rates using optical and UV fluxes corrected for the effects of intrinsic extinction in the observed sources. This

  20. The genetic regulatory network centered on Pto-Wuschela and its targets involved in wood formation revealed by association studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohui; Wei, Zunzheng; Du, Qingzhang; Chen, Jinhui; Wang, Qingshi; Quan, Mingyang; Song, Yuepeng; Xie, Jianbo; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-11-09

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate gene expression and can strongly affect phenotypes. However, few studies have examined TF variants and TF interactions with their targets in plants. Here, we used genetic association in 435 unrelated individuals of Populus tomentosa to explore the variants in Pto-Wuschela and its targets to decipher the genetic regulatory network of Pto-Wuschela. Our bioinformatics and co-expression analysis identified 53 genes with the motif TCACGTGA as putative targets of Pto-Wuschela. Single-marker association analysis showed that Pto-Wuschela was associated with wood properties, which is in agreement with the observation that it has higher expression in stem vascular tissues in Populus. Also, SNPs in the 53 targets were associated with growth or wood properties under additive or dominance effects, suggesting these genes and Pto-Wuschela may act in the same genetic pathways that affect variation in these quantitative traits. Epistasis analysis indicated that 75.5% of these genes directly or indirectly interacted Pto-Wuschela, revealing the coordinated genetic regulatory network formed by Pto-Wuschela and its targets. Thus, our study provides an alternative method for dissection of the interactions between a TF and its targets, which will strength our understanding of the regulatory roles of TFs in complex traits in plants.

  1. Astrophysics of CAI formation as revealed by silicon isotope LA-MC-ICPMS of an igneous CAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahar, Anat; Young, Edward D.

    2007-05-01

    Silicon isotope ratios of a typical CAI from the Leoville carbonaceous chondrite, obtained in situ by laser ablation MC-ICPMS, together with existing 25Mg/ 24Mg data, reveal a detailed picture of the astrophysical setting of CAI melting and subsequent heating. Models for the chemical and isotopic effects of evaporation of the molten CAI are used to produce a univariant relationship between PH 2 and time during melting. The result shows that this CAI was molten for a cumulative time of no more than 70 days and probably less than 15 days depending on temperature. The object could have been molten for an integrated time of just a few hours if isotope ratio zoning was eliminated after melting by high subsolidus temperatures (e.g., > 1300 K) for ˜ 500 yr. In all cases subsolidus heating sufficient to produce diffusion-limited isotope fractionation at the margin of the solidified CAI is required. These stable isotope data point to a two-stage history for this igneous CAI involving melting for a cumulative timescale of hours to months followed by subsolidus heating for years to hundreds of years. The thermobarometric history deduced from combining Si and Mg isotope ratio data implicates thermal processing in the disk, perhaps by passage through shockwaves, following melting. This study underscores the direct link between the meaning of stable isotope ratio zoning, or lack thereof, and the inferred astrophysical setting of melting and subsequent processing of CAIs.

  2. The genetic regulatory network centered on Pto-Wuschela and its targets involved in wood formation revealed by association studies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaohui; Wei, Zunzheng; Du, Qingzhang; Chen, Jinhui; Wang, Qingshi; Quan, Mingyang; Song, Yuepeng; Xie, Jianbo; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate gene expression and can strongly affect phenotypes. However, few studies have examined TF variants and TF interactions with their targets in plants. Here, we used genetic association in 435 unrelated individuals of Populus tomentosa to explore the variants in Pto-Wuschela and its targets to decipher the genetic regulatory network of Pto-Wuschela. Our bioinformatics and co-expression analysis identified 53 genes with the motif TCACGTGA as putative targets of Pto-Wuschela. Single-marker association analysis showed that Pto-Wuschela was associated with wood properties, which is in agreement with the observation that it has higher expression in stem vascular tissues in Populus. Also, SNPs in the 53 targets were associated with growth or wood properties under additive or dominance effects, suggesting these genes and Pto-Wuschela may act in the same genetic pathways that affect variation in these quantitative traits. Epistasis analysis indicated that 75.5% of these genes directly or indirectly interacted Pto-Wuschela, revealing the coordinated genetic regulatory network formed by Pto-Wuschela and its targets. Thus, our study provides an alternative method for dissection of the interactions between a TF and its targets, which will strength our understanding of the regulatory roles of TFs in complex traits in plants. PMID:26549216

  3. Small-molecule inhibition of c-MYC:MAX leucine zipper formation is revealed by ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Sophie R; Porrini, Massimiliano; Stachl, Christiane; MacMillan, Derek; Zinzalla, Giovanna; Barran, Perdita E

    2012-11-28

    The leucine zipper interaction between MAX and c-MYC has been studied using mass spectrometry and drift time ion mobility mass spectrometry (DT IM-MS) in addition to circular dichroism spectroscopy. Peptides comprising the leucine zipper sequence with (c-MYC-Zip residues 402-434) and without a postulated small-molecule binding region (c-MYC-ZipΔDT residues 406-434) have been synthesized, along with the corresponding MAX leucine zipper (MAX-Zip residues 74-102). c-MYC-Zip:MAX-Zip complexes are observed both in the absence and in the presence of the reported small-molecule inhibitor 10058-F4 for both forms of c-MYC-Zip. DT IM-MS, in combination with molecular dynamics (MD), shows that the c-MYC-Zip:MAX-Zip complex [M+5H](5+) exists in two conformations, one extended with a collision cross section (CCS) of 1164 ± 9.3 Å(2) and one compact with a CCS of 982 ± 6.6 Å(2); similar values are observed for the two forms of c-MYC-ZipΔDT:MAX-Zip. Candidate geometries for the complexes have been evaluated with MD simulations. The helical leucine zipper structure previously determined from NMR measurements (Lavigne, P.; et al. J. Mol. Biol. 1998, 281, 165), altered to include the DT region and subjected to a gas-phase minimization, yields a CCS of 1247 Å(2), which agrees with the extended conformation we observe experimentally. More extensive MD simulations provide compact complexes which are found to be highly disordered, with CCSs that correspond to the compact form from experiment. In the presence of the ligand, the leucine zipper conformation is completely inhibited and only the more disordered species is observed, providing a novel method to study the effect of interactions of disordered systems and subsequent inhibition of the formation of an ordered helical complex.

  4. Chromosomal Copy Number Variation, Selection and Uneven Rates of Recombination Reveal Cryptic Genome Diversity Linked to Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Farrer, Rhys A.; Henk, Daniel A.; Garner, Trenton W. J.; Balloux, Francois; Woodhams, Douglas C.; Fisher, Matthew C.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic fungi constitute a growing threat to both plant and animal species on a global scale. Despite a clonal mode of reproduction dominating the population genetic structure of many fungi, putatively asexual species are known to adapt rapidly when confronted by efforts to control their growth and transmission. However, the mechanisms by which adaptive diversity is generated across a clonal background are often poorly understood. We sequenced a global panel of the emergent amphibian pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), to high depth and characterized rapidly changing features of its genome that we believe hold the key to the worldwide success of this organism. Our analyses show three processes that contribute to the generation of de novo diversity. Firstly, we show that the majority of wild isolates manifest chromosomal copy number variation that changes over short timescales. Secondly, we show that cryptic recombination occurs within all lineages of Bd, leading to large regions of the genome being in linkage equilibrium, and is preferentially associated with classes of genes of known importance for virulence in other pathosystems. Finally, we show that these classes of genes are under directional selection, and that this has predominantly targeted the Global Panzootic Lineage (BdGPL). Our analyses show that Bd manifests an unusually dynamic genome that may have been shaped by its association with the amphibian host. The rates of variation that we document likely explain the high levels of phenotypic variability that have been reported for Bd, and suggests that the dynamic genome of this pathogen has contributed to its success across multiple biomes and host-species. PMID:23966879

  5. Properties of the seawater-air interface. 2. Rates of surface film formation under steady state conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dragcevic, D.; Pravdic, V.

    1981-05-01

    The laboratory techniques of dynamic surface tension and of surface electrical potential measurements were used to determine rates of formation and of reorientation of organic surface films at the seawater-air interface. Relaxation times of surface films were determined for three characteristic samples obtained by screen and bottle sampling in the coastal waters of the northern Adriatic area. These data were compared with those for model samples produced by spreading oleic acid and crude oil on or dissolving polyethyleneglycol and sodium dodecyl sulfate in artificial seawater. Relaxation times were in the range of 0.1-1 s for most of the samples. A good representative value for field samples is 0.2 s. The temperature-dependence (the energies of activation) for the surface film relaxation indicates that several processes control material transport toward the seawater-air interface. The findings are interpreted as showing that an almost ever-present organic surface film influences the mechanism and the rate of material transport across the sea-atmosphere boundary.

  6. The ALFALFA Hα Survey. I. Project Description and The Local Star-formation Rate Density from the Fall Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Sistine, Angela; Salzer, John J.; Sugden, Arthur; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Janowiecki, Steven; Jaskot, Anne E.; Wilcots, Eric M.

    2016-06-01

    The ALFALFA Hα survey utilizes a large sample of H i-selected galaxies from the ALFALFA survey to study star formation (SF) in the local universe. ALFALFA Hα contains 1555 galaxies with distances between ˜20 and ˜100 Mpc. We have obtained continuum-subtracted narrowband Hα images and broadband R images for each galaxy, creating one of the largest homogeneous sets of Hα images ever assembled. Our procedures were designed to minimize the uncertainties related to the calculation of the local SF rate density (SFRD). The galaxy sample we constructed is as close to volume-limited as possible, is a robust statistical sample, and spans a wide range of galaxy environments. In this paper, we discuss the properties of our Fall sample of 565 galaxies, our procedure for deriving individual galaxy SF rates, and our method for calculating the local SFRD. We present a preliminary value of log(SFRD[M ⊙ yr‑1 Mpc‑3]) = ‑1.747 ± 0.018 (random) ±0.05 (systematic) based on the 565 galaxies in our Fall sub-sample. Compared to the weighted average of SFRD values around z ≈ 2, our local value indicates a drop in the global SFRD of a factor of 10.2 over that lookback time.

  7. Volumetric flow imaging reveals the importance of vortex ring formation in squid swimming tail-first and arms-first.

    PubMed

    Bartol, Ian K; Krueger, Paul S; Jastrebsky, Rachel A; Williams, Sheila; Thompson, Joseph T

    2016-02-01

    Squids use a pulsed jet and fin movements to swim both arms-first (forward) and tail-first (backward). Given the complexity of the squid multi-propulsor system, 3D velocimetry techniques are required for the comprehensive study of wake dynamics. Defocusing digital particle tracking velocimetry, a volumetric velocimetry technique, and high-speed videography were used to study arms-first and tail-first swimming of brief squid Lolliguncula brevis over a broad range of speeds [0-10 dorsal mantle lengths (DML) s(-1)] in a swim tunnel. Although there was considerable complexity in the wakes of these multi-propulsor swimmers, 3D vortex rings and their derivatives were prominent reoccurring features during both tail-first and arms-first swimming, with the greatest jet and fin flow complexity occurring at intermediate speeds (1.5-3.0 DML s(-1)). The jet generally produced the majority of thrust during rectilinear swimming, increasing in relative importance with speed, and the fins provided no thrust at speeds >4.5 DML s(-1). For both swimming orientations, the fins sometimes acted as stabilizers, producing negative thrust (drag), and consistently provided lift at low/intermediate speeds (<2.0 DML s(-1)) to counteract negative buoyancy. Propulsive efficiency (η) increased with speed irrespective of swimming orientation, and η for swimming sequences with clear isolated jet vortex rings was significantly greater (η=78.6±7.6%, mean±s.d.) than that for swimming sequences with clear elongated regions of concentrated jet vorticity (η=67.9±19.2%). This study reveals the complexity of 3D vortex wake flows produced by nekton with hydrodynamically distinct propulsors. PMID:26643088

  8. Volumetric flow imaging reveals the importance of vortex ring formation in squid swimming tail-first and arms-first.

    PubMed

    Bartol, Ian K; Krueger, Paul S; Jastrebsky, Rachel A; Williams, Sheila; Thompson, Joseph T

    2016-02-01

    Squids use a pulsed jet and fin movements to swim both arms-first (forward) and tail-first (backward). Given the complexity of the squid multi-propulsor system, 3D velocimetry techniques are required for the comprehensive study of wake dynamics. Defocusing digital particle tracking velocimetry, a volumetric velocimetry technique, and high-speed videography were used to study arms-first and tail-first swimming of brief squid Lolliguncula brevis over a broad range of speeds [0-10 dorsal mantle lengths (DML) s(-1)] in a swim tunnel. Although there was considerable complexity in the wakes of these multi-propulsor swimmers, 3D vortex rings and their derivatives were prominent reoccurring features during both tail-first and arms-first swimming, with the greatest jet and fin flow complexity occurring at intermediate speeds (1.5-3.0 DML s(-1)). The jet generally produced the majority of thrust during rectilinear swimming, increasing in relative importance with speed, and the fins provided no thrust at speeds >4.5 DML s(-1). For both swimming orientations, the fins sometimes acted as stabilizers, producing negative thrust (drag), and consistently provided lift at low/intermediate speeds (<2.0 DML s(-1)) to counteract negative buoyancy. Propulsive efficiency (η) increased with speed irrespective of swimming orientation, and η for swimming sequences with clear isolated jet vortex rings was significantly greater (η=78.6±7.6%, mean±s.d.) than that for swimming sequences with clear elongated regions of concentrated jet vorticity (η=67.9±19.2%). This study reveals the complexity of 3D vortex wake flows produced by nekton with hydrodynamically distinct propulsors.

  9. Analysis of triclosan-selected Salmonella enterica mutants of eight serovars revealed increased aminoglycoside susceptibility and reduced growth rates.

    PubMed

    Rensch, Ulrike; Klein, Guenter; Kehrenberg, Corinna

    2013-01-01

    The biocide triclosan (TRC) is used in a wide range of household, personal care, veterinary, industrial and medical products to control microbial growth. This extended use raises concerns about a possible association between the application of triclosan and the development of antibiotic resistance. In the present study we determined triclosan mutant prevention concentrations (MPC) for Salmonella enterica isolates of eight serovars and investigated selected mutants for their mechanisms mediating decreased susceptibility to triclosan. MPCTRC values were 8-64-fold higher than MIC values and ranged between 1-16 µg/ml. The frequencies at which mutants were selected varied between 1.3 x 10(-10)-9.9 x 10(-11). Even if MIC values of mutants decreased by 3-7 dilution steps in the presence of the efflux pump inhibitor Phe-Arg-β-naphtylamide, only minor changes were observed in the expression of genes encoding efflux components or regulators, indicating that neither the major multidrug efflux pump AcrAB-TolC nor AcrEF are up-regulated in triclosan-selected mutants. Nucleotide sequence comparisons confirmed the absence of alterations in the regulatory regions acrRA, soxRS, marORAB, acrSE and ramRA of selected mutants. Single bp and deduced Gly93→Val amino acid exchanges were present in fabI, the target gene of triclosan, starting from a concentration of 1 µg/ml TRC used for MPC determinations. The fabI genes were up to 12.4-fold up-regulated. Complementation experiments confirmed the contribution of Gly93→Val exchanges and fabI overexpression to decreased triclosan susceptibility. MIC values of mutants compared to parent strains were even equal or resulted in a more susceptible phenotype (1-2 dilution steps) for the aminoglycoside antibiotics kanamycin and gentamicin as well as for the biocide chlorhexidine. Growth rates of selected mutants were significantly lower and hence, might partly explain the rare occurrence of Salmonella field isolates exhibiting decreased

  10. Revised 40Ar/39Ar age of Aleutian Island arc formation implies high rate of magma production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jicha, B. R.; Scholl, D. W.; Singer, B. S.; Yogodzinski, G. M.; Kay, S. M.

    2005-12-01

    40Ar/39Ar incremental heating data from subaerial and submarine volcanic and plutonic rocks in the Aleutian Island arc provide insight into the timing of arc formation in the late Eocene. Groundmass and plagioclase separates from the Finger Bay volcanics, the oldest exposed rocks in the arc, gave a weighted mean isochron age of 37.4 ± 0.6 Ma, that is 12-17 m.y. younger than a widely cited age of 55-50 Ma. Twenty-six 40Ar/39Ar ages agree with existing K-Ar ages and constrain the duration of arc magmatism to the last 40 m.y. The initiation of magmatism at this time is in agreement with the late Eocene to early Oligocene ages for the fossiliferous sequence of sedimentary deposits on northern Adak Island that overlie 37-38 Ma units, yet it is at odds with all of the existing models of Aleutian arc formation because no major tectonic events in the north Pacific occurred at that time. We have also identified three main pulses of arc-wide plutonism and volcanism at 38-29, 16-11, and 6-0 Ma. The geochronology--in concert with new-generation transverse and arc-parallel seismic constraints on the composition and structure of the Aleutian Island arc and volumetric estimates of crust generated and eroded over the last 40 m.y.--leads to astonishingly high time-averaged magma production rates of 110-205 km3/km/m.y. for the entire arc. This exceeds magma production rates based on older geophysical and petrologic paradigms for the Aleutian arc by almost an order of magnitude. Because the majority of crustal growth likely occurred during the first few m.y. of the arc's history, magma productivity may have been as high as that of mid-ocean ridge spreading centers or continental batholiths (e.g., near 1000 km3/km/m.y.). Rapid Eocene arc growth has recently been proposed for both the Izu Bonin-Mariana and Tonga island arcs in the western Pacific Ocean. Determining whether extraordinarily high rates of island arc magma production in the Eocene reflects increased plate velocities and

  11. The formation heritage of Jupiter Family Comet 10P/Tempel 2 as revealed by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganini, L.; Mumma, M. J.; Bonev, B. P.; Villanueva, G. L.; DiSanti, M. A.; Keane, J. V.; Meech, K. J.

    2012-03-01

    We present spectral and spatial information for major volatile species in Comet 10P/Tempel 2, based on high-dispersion infrared spectra acquired on UT 2010 July 26 (heliocentric distance Rh = 1.44 AU) and September 18 (Rh = 1.62 AU), following the comet’s perihelion passage on UT 2010 July 04. The total production rate for water on July 26 was (1.90 ± 0.12) × 1028 molecules s-1, and abundances of six trace gases (relative to water) were: CH3OH (1.58% ± 0.23%), C2H6 (0.39% ± 0.04%), NH3 (0.83% ± 0.20%), and HCN (0.13% ± 0.02%). A detailed analysis of intensities for water emission lines provided a rotational temperature of 35 ± 3 K. The mean OPR is consistent with nuclear spin populations in statistical equilibrium (OPR = 3.01 ± 0.18), and the (1σ) lower bound corresponds to a spin temperature >38 K. Our measurements were contemporaneous with a jet-like feature observed at optical wavelengths. The spatial profiles of four primary volatiles display strong enhancements in the jet direction, which favors release from a localized vent on the nucleus. The measured IR continuum is much more sharply peaked and is consistent with a dominant contribution from the nucleus itself. The peak intensities for H2O, CH3OH, and C2H6 are offset by ∼200 km in the jet direction, suggesting the possible existence of a distributed source, such as the release of icy grains that subsequently sublimed in the coma. On UT September 18, no obvious emission lines were present in our spectra, nevertheless we obtained a 3σ upper limit Q(H2O) < 2.86 × 1027 molecules s-1.

  12. Increased Small Dense LDL and Decreased Paraoxonase Enzyme Activity Reveals Formation of an Atherogenic Risk in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Mutay; Ozcan, Filiz; Kucuksayan, Ertan

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate LDL subfraction distribution as well as serum cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), and paraoxonase (PON1) activity in streptozotocin-induced diabetic guinea pigs. Materials/Methods. Guinea pigs were given a single intraperitoneal (ip) injection of streptozotocin (STZ) and animals having fasting blood glucose levels greater than 200 mg/dl, were considered diabetic. Protein levels of LCAT and CETP were determined via ELISA. Paraoxonase activity was measured kinetically by the formation of phenol while LDL subfraction analysis was done by disc polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results. Plasma glucose and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol were significantly increased while total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol were significantly decreased in diabetic guinea pigs compared to controls. LDL subfraction analysis revealed a significant decrease in nonatherogenic LDL-2 subfraction and a significant increase in atherogenic LDL-4 subfraction in diabetic guinea pigs compared to controls. Plasma CETP and PON1 levels were significantly decreased while LCAT showed no significant difference in diabetic guinea pigs compared to controls. Conclusion. Decreased non-atherogenic LDL-1, LDL-2 subfractions, increased small dense LDL-4 subfraction, and decreased PON1 activity, reveals formation of an atherogenic risk in diabetic guinea pigs. Decrease in CETP levels supports the observed increase in HDL cholesterol levels in diabetic guinea pigs. PMID:23691522

  13. A protocol for adult somatic cell nuclear transfer in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) with a high rate of viable clone formation.

    PubMed

    Bubenshchikova, Ekaterina; Kaftanovskaya, Elena; Adachi, Tomoko; Hashimoto, Hisashi; Kinoshita, Masato; Wakamatsu, Yuko

    2013-12-01

    Previously, we successfully generated fully grown, cloned medaka (the Japanese rice fish, Oryzias latipes) using donor nuclei from primary culture cells of adult caudal fin tissue and nonenucleated recipient eggs that were heat shock-treated to induce diploidization of the nuclei. However, the mechanism of clone formation using this method is unknown, and the rate of adult clone formation is not high enough for studies in basic and applied sciences. To gain insight into the mechanism and increase the success rate of this method of clone formation, we tested two distinct nuclear transfer protocols. In one protocol, the timing of transfer of donor nuclei was changed, and in the other, the size of the donor cells was changed; each protocol was based on our original methodology. Ultimately, we obtained an unexpectedly high rate of adult clone formation using the protocol that differed with respect to the timing of donor nuclei transfer. Specifically, 17% of the transplants that developed to the blastula stage ultimately developed into adult clones. The success rate with this method was 13 times higher than that obtained using the original method. Analyses focusing on the reasons for this high success rate of clone formation will help to elucidate the mechanism of clone formation that occurs with this method.

  14. The Small Molecule Hyperphyllin Enhances Leaf Formation Rate and Mimics Shoot Meristem Integrity Defects Associated with AMP1 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Poretska, Olena; Yang, Saiqi; Pitorre, Delphine; Rozhon, Wilfried; Zwerger, Karin; Uribe, Marcos Castellanos; May, Sean; McCourt, Peter; Poppenberger, Brigitte; Sieberer, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    ALTERED MERISTEM PROGRAM1 (AMP1) is a member of the M28 family of carboxypeptidases with a pivotal role in plant development and stress adaptation. Its most prominent mutant defect is a unique hypertrophic shoot phenotype combining a strongly increased organ formation rate with enhanced meristem size and the formation of ectopic meristem poles. However, so far the role of AMP1 in shoot development could not be assigned to a specific molecular pathway nor is its biochemical function resolved. In this work we evaluated the level of functional conservation between AMP1 and its human homolog HsGCPII, a tumor marker of medical interest. We show that HsGCPII cannot substitute AMP1 in planta and that an HsGCPII-specific inhibitor does not evoke amp1-specific phenotypes. We used a chemical genetic approach to identify the drug hyperphyllin (HP), which specifically mimics the shoot defects of amp1, including plastochron reduction and enlargement and multiplication of the shoot meristem. We assessed the structural requirements of HP activity and excluded that it is a cytokinin analog. HP-treated wild-type plants showed amp1-related tissue-specific changes of various marker genes and a significant transcriptomic overlap with the mutant. HP was ineffective in amp1 and elevated the protein levels of PHAVOLUTA, consistent with the postulated role of AMP1 in miRNA-controlled translation, further supporting an AMP1-related mode of action. Our work suggests that plant and animal members of the M28 family of proteases adopted unrelated functions. With HP we provide a tool to characterize the plant-specific functions of this important class of proteins. PMID:27208298

  15. THE DEPENDENCE OF STAR FORMATION RATES ON STELLAR MASS AND ENVIRONMENT AT z approx 0.8

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Shannon G.; Holden, Bradford P.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Franx, Marijn

    2009-11-01

    We examine the star formation rates (SFRs) of galaxies in a redshift slice encompassing the z = 0.834 cluster RX J0152.7 - 1357. We used a low-dispersion prism in the Inamori Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph to identify galaxies with z {sub AB} < 23.3 mag in diverse environments around the cluster out to projected distances of approx8 Mpc from the cluster center. We utilize a mass-limited sample (M > 2 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) of 330 galaxies that were imaged by Spitzer MIPS at 24 mum to derive SFRs and study the dependence of specific SFR (SSFR) on stellar mass and environment. We find that the SFR and SSFR show a strong decrease with increasing local density, similar to the relation at z approx 0. Our result contrasts with other work at z approx 1 that finds the SFR-density trend to reverse for luminosity-limited samples. These other results appear to be driven by star formation (SF) in lower mass systems (M approx 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}). Our results imply that the processes that shut down SF are present in groups and other dense regions in the field. Our data also suggest that the lower SFRs of galaxies in higher density environments may reflect a change in the ratio of star-forming to non-star-forming galaxies, rather than a change in SFRs. As a consequence, the SFRs of star-forming galaxies, in environments ranging from small groups to clusters, appear to be similar and largely unaffected by the local processes that truncate SF at z approx 0.8.

  16. Effect of game format on heart rate, activity profile, and player involvement in elite and recreational youth players.

    PubMed

    Randers, M B; Andersen, T B; Rasmussen, L S; Larsen, M N; Krustrup, P

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate activity profile, aerobic load, and player involvement in two game formats of recreational and elite youth football for two age groups. A total of 152 youth players participated, with 45 U10 players playing 5v5 and 8v8 games, and 41 U13 players playing 8v8 and 11v11 (20 min) games. Activity profile, heart rate (HR), and technical actions were measured during all games using 10 Hz GPS, video filming, and HR monitors. For U10, no difference was found in total distance covered (1754 ± 237 vs 1771 ± 314 m, P = 0.650, d = 0.06), whereas mean HR (174 ± 10 vs 168 ± 12 bpm, P = 0.001, d = 0.59) and number of technical actions (65.1 ± 24.0 vs 36.9 ± 20.4, P    0.001, d = 1.27) were higher in 5v5 than in 8v8. For U13, lower total distance covered (1821 ± 325 vs 2038 ± 328 m, P < 0.001, d = 0.66) and higher number of technical actions (36.2 ± 14.9 vs 26.9 ± 14.1, P < 0.001, d = 0.64) were observed in 8v8 than in 11v11, with no difference in mean HR (170 ± 10 vs 171 ± 10 bpm, P = 0.679, d = 0.10). In conclusion, HR is high in youth football matches irrespective of the level of play and the game format. Playing with fewer players on smaller pitches results in minor changes to the physical loading but elevates the technical involvement of youth players both at elite level and recreational level.

  17. CONTINUOUS MID-INFRARED STAR FORMATION RATE INDICATORS: DIAGNOSTICS FOR 0 < z < 3 STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Battisti, A. J.; Calzetti, D.; Johnson, B. D.; Elbaz, D.

    2015-02-20

    We present continuous, monochromatic star formation rate (SFR) indicators over the mid-infrared wavelength range of 6–70 μm. We use a sample of 58 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) in the Spitzer–SDSS–GALEX Spectroscopic Survey at z < 0.2, for which there is a rich suite of multi-wavelength photometry and spectroscopy from the ultraviolet through to the infrared. The data from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) of these galaxies, which spans 5–40 μm, is anchored to their photometric counterparts. The spectral region between 40–70 μm is interpolated using dust model fits to the IRS spectrum and Spitzer 70 and 160 μm photometry. Since there are no sharp spectral features in this region, we expect these interpolations to be robust. This spectral range is calibrated as a SFR diagnostic using several reference SFR indicators to mitigate potential bias. Our band-specific continuous SFR indicators are found to be consistent with monochromatic calibrations in the local universe, as derived from Spitzer, WISE, and Herschel photometry. Our local composite template and continuous SFR diagnostics are made available for public use through the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) and have typical dispersions of 30% or less. We discuss the validity and range of applicability for our SFR indicators in the context of unveiling the formation and evolution of galaxies. Additionally, in the era of the James Webb Space Telescope this will become a flexible tool, applicable to any SFG up to z ∼ 3.

  18. Evidence for an anterior-posterior differentiation in the human hippocampal formation revealed by meta-analytic parcellation of fMRI coordinate maps: Focus on the subiculum

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Henry W.; Clos, Mareike; Dibble, Sofia; Fox, Peter; Grace, Anthony A.; Phillips, Mary L.; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies, predominantly in experimental animals, have suggested the presence of a differentiation of function across the hippocampal formation. In rodents, ventral regions are thought to be involved in emotional behavior while dorsal regions mediate cognitive or spatial processes. Using a combination of modeling the co-occurrence of significant activations across thousands of neuroimaging experiments and subsequent data-driven clustering of these data we were able to provide evidence of distinct subregions within a region corresponding to the human subiculum, a critical hub within the hippocampal formation. This connectivity-based model consists of a bilateral anterior region, as well as separate posterior and intermediate regions on each hemisphere. Functional connectivity assessed both by meta-analytic and resting fMRI approach