Science.gov

Sample records for formation rates revealed

  1. Southern Ocean frontal structure and sea-ice formation rates revealed by elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Charrassin, J-B; Hindell, M; Rintoul, S R; Roquet, F; Sokolov, S; Biuw, M; Costa, D; Boehme, L; Lovell, P; Coleman, R; Timmermann, R; Meijers, A; Meredith, M; Park, Y-H; Bailleul, F; Goebel, M; Tremblay, Y; Bost, C-A; McMahon, C R; Field, I C; Fedak, M A; Guinet, C

    2008-08-19

    Polar regions are particularly sensitive to climate change, with the potential for significant feedbacks between ocean circulation, sea ice, and the ocean carbon cycle. However, the difficulty in obtaining in situ data means that our ability to detect and interpret change is very limited, especially in the Southern Ocean, where the ocean beneath the sea ice remains almost entirely unobserved and the rate of sea-ice formation is poorly known. Here, we show that southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) equipped with oceanographic sensors can measure ocean structure and water mass changes in regions and seasons rarely observed with traditional oceanographic platforms. In particular, seals provided a 30-fold increase in hydrographic profiles from the sea-ice zone, allowing the major fronts to be mapped south of 60 degrees S and sea-ice formation rates to be inferred from changes in upper ocean salinity. Sea-ice production rates peaked in early winter (April-May) during the rapid northward expansion of the pack ice and declined by a factor of 2 to 3 between May and August, in agreement with a three-dimensional coupled ocean-sea-ice model. By measuring the high-latitude ocean during winter, elephant seals fill a "blind spot" in our sampling coverage, enabling the establishment of a truly global ocean-observing system.

  2. ALMACAL II: Extreme Star Formation Rate Densities in Dusty Starbursts Revealed by ALMA 20 mas Resolution Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oteo, I.; Zwaan, M. A.; Ivison, R. J.; Smail, I.; Biggs, A. D.

    2017-03-01

    We present ultrahigh spatial resolution (∼20 mas or 150 pc) ALMA observations of the dust continuum at 920 μm and 1.2 mm in two submillimeter sources at z = 3.442, ALMACAL–1 (A–1: {S}870μ {{m}}=6.5+/- 0.2 {mJy}) and ALMACAL–2 (A–2: {S}870μ {{m}}=4.4+/- 0.2 {mJy}). About half of the star formation in each of these sources is dominated by a single compact clump (FWHM size of ∼350 pc). In A–1, two additional fainter clumps are found. The star formation rate (SFR) surface densities of all these clumps are extremely high, {{{Σ }}}{SFR}∼ 1200 to ∼ 3000 {M}ȯ {{yr}}-1 {{kpc}}-2, the highest rates found in high-redshift galaxies. Given their geometry and identical redshifts, there is a possibility that A–1 and A–2 are the lensed images of a single background source that are gravitationally amplified by the blazar host. If this were the case, the effective radius of the dusty galaxy in the source plane would be {R}{eff}∼ 40 {pc} and the demagnified SFR surface density would be {{{Σ }}}{SFR} ∼ 10,000 {M}ȯ {{yr}}-1 {{kpc}}-2, comparable with the eastern nucleus of Arp 220. Although we cannot rule out an AGN contribution, our results suggest that a significant percentage of the enormous far-IR luminosity in some dusty starbursts is extremely compact. The high {{{Σ }}}{SFR} in these sources could only be measured thanks to the ultrahigh-resolution ALMA observations used in this work, demonstrating that long-baseline observations are essential to study and interpret the properties of dusty starbursts in the early Universe.

  3. The Bursty Star Formation Histories of Low-mass Galaxies at 0.4 < z < 1 Revealed by Star Formation Rates Measured From Hβ and FUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yicheng; Rafelski, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Willner, S. P.; Amorín, Ricardo; Barro, Guillermo; Bell, Eric F.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Gawiser, Eric; Hathi, Nimish P.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Pacifici, Camilla; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Ravindranath, Swara; Reddy, Naveen; Teplitz, Harry I.; Yesuf, Hassen

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the burstiness of star formation histories (SFHs) of galaxies at 0.4 < z < 1 by using the ratio of star formation rates (SFRs) measured from Hβ and FUV (1500 Å) (Hβ-to-FUV ratio). Our sample contains 164 galaxies down to stellar mass (M *) of 108.5 M ⊙ in the CANDELS GOODS-N region, where Team Keck Redshift Survey Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy and Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 F275W images from CANDELS and Hubble Deep UV Legacy Survey are available. When the ratio of Hβ- and FUV-derived SFRs is measured, dust extinction correction is negligible (except for very dusty galaxies) with the Calzetti attenuation curve. The Hβ-to-FUV ratio of our sample increases with M * and SFR. The median ratio is ˜0.7 at M * ˜ 108.5 M ⊙ (or SFR ˜ 0.5 M ⊙ yr-1) and increases to ˜1 at M * ˜ 1010 M ⊙ (or SFR ˜ 10 M ⊙ yr-1). At M * < 109.5 M ⊙, our median Hβ-to-FUV ratio is lower than that of local galaxies at the same M *, implying a redshift evolution. Bursty SFH on a timescale of a few tens of megayears on galactic scales provides a plausible explanation for our results, and the importance of the burstiness increases as M * decreases. Due to sample selection effects, our Hβ-to-FUV ratio may be an upper limit of the true value of a complete sample, which strengthens our conclusions. Other models, e.g., non-universal initial mass function or stochastic star formation on star cluster scales, are unable to plausibly explain our results.

  4. Ultraviolet Mars Reveals Cloud Formation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Images from MAVEN's Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph were used to make this movie of rapid cloud formation on Mars on July 9-10, 2016. The ultraviolet colors of the planet have been rendered in fal...

  5. Measuring star formation rates in blue galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Hunter, Deidre A.

    1987-01-01

    The problems associated with measurements of star formation rates in galaxies are briefly reviewed, and specific models are presented for determinations of current star formation rates from H alpha and Far Infrared (FIR) luminosities. The models are applied to a sample of optically blue irregular galaxies, and the results are discussed in terms of star forming histories. It appears likely that typical irregular galaxies are forming stars at nearly constant rates, although a few examples of systems with enhanced star forming activity are found among HII regions and luminous irregular galaxies.

  6. Magnetic fields and galactic star formation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, Sven Van; Tan, Jonathan C.; Falle, Sam A. E. G.

    2015-02-10

    The regulation of galactic-scale star formation rates (SFRs) is a basic problem for theories of galaxy formation and evolution: which processes are responsible for making observed star formation rates so inefficient compared to maximal rates of gas content divided by dynamical timescale? Here we study the effect of magnetic fields of different strengths on the evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) within a kiloparsec patch of a disk galaxy and resolving scales down to ≃0.5 pc. Including an empirically motivated prescription for star formation from dense gas (n{sub H}>10{sup 5} cm{sup −3}) at an efficiency of 2% per local free-fall time, we derive the amount of suppression of star formation by magnetic fields compared to the nonmagnetized case. We find GMC fragmentation, dense clump formation, and SFR can be significantly affected by the inclusion of magnetic fields, especially in our strongest investigated B-field case of 80 μG. However, our chosen kiloparsec-scale region, extracted from a global galaxy simulation, happens to contain a starbursting cloud complex that is only modestly affected by these magnetic fields and likely requires internal star formation feedback to regulate its SFR.

  7. Revealing Educationally Critical Aspects of Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Sandra; Pierce, Robyn

    2012-01-01

    Rate (of change) is an important but complicated mathematical concept describing a ratio comparing two different numeric, measurable quantities. Research referring to students' difficulties with this concept spans more than 20 years. It suggests that problems experienced by some calculus students are likely a result of pre-existing limited or…

  8. TIME-VARYING DYNAMICAL STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eve J.; Chang, Philip; Murray, Norman

    2015-02-10

    We present numerical evidence of dynamic star formation in which the accreted stellar mass grows superlinearly with time, roughly as t {sup 2}. We perform simulations of star formation in self-gravitating hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that is continuously driven. By turning the self-gravity of the gas in the simulations on or off, we demonstrate that self-gravity is the dominant physical effect setting the mass accretion rate at early times before feedback effects take over, contrary to theories of turbulence-regulated star formation. We find that gravitational collapse steepens the density profile around stars, generating the power-law tail on what is otherwise a lognormal density probability distribution function. Furthermore, we find turbulent velocity profiles to flatten inside collapsing regions, altering the size-line width relation. This local flattening reflects enhancements of turbulent velocity on small scales, as verified by changes to the velocity power spectra. Our results indicate that gas self-gravity dynamically alters both density and velocity structures in clouds, giving rise to a time-varying star formation rate. We find that a substantial fraction of the gas that forms stars arrives via low-density flows, as opposed to accreting through high-density filaments.

  9. New View of Distant Galaxy Reveals Furious Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-12-01

    A furious rate of star formation discovered in a distant galaxy shows that galaxies in the early Universe developed either much faster or in a different way from what astronomers have thought. "This galaxy is forming stars at an incredible rate," said Wei-Hao Wang, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico. The galaxy, Wang said, is forming the equivalent of 4,000 Suns a year. This is a thousand times more violent than our own Milky Way Galaxy. Location of Distant Galaxy Visible-light, left (from HST) and Infrared, right, (from Spitzer) Images: Circles indicate location of GOODS 850-5. CREDIT: Wang et al., STScI, Spitzer, NASA, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for high-resolution file (1 MB) The galaxy, called GOODS 850-5, is 12 billion light-years from Earth, and thus is seen as it was only about 1.5 billion years after the Big Bang. Wang and his colleagues observed it using the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Submillimeter Array (SMA) on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. Young stars in the galaxy were enshrouded in dust that was heated by the stars and radiated infrared light strongly. Because of the galaxy's great distance from Earth, the infrared light waves have been stretched out to submillimeter-length radio waves, which are seen by the SMA. The waves were stretched or "redshifted," as astronomers say, by the ongoing expansion of the Universe. "This evidence for prolific star formation is hidden by the dust from visible-light telescopes," Wang explained. The dust, in turn, was formed from heavy elements that had to be built up in the cores of earlier stars. This indicates, Wang said, that significant numbers of stars already had formed, then spewed those heavy elements into interstellar space through supernova explosions and stellar winds. "Seeing the radiation from this heated dust revealed star formation we could have found in no other way," Wang said. Similar dusty galaxies in the early Universe may contain most of the

  10. ANALYTICAL STAR FORMATION RATE FROM GRAVOTURBULENT FRAGMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hennebelle, Patrick; Chabrier, Gilles

    2011-12-20

    We present an analytical determination of the star formation rate (SFR) in molecular clouds, based on a time-dependent extension of our analytical theory of the stellar initial mass function. The theory yields SFRs in good agreement with observations, suggesting that turbulence is the dominant, initial process responsible for star formation. In contrast to previous SFR theories, the present one does not invoke an ad hoc density threshold for star formation; instead, the SFR continuously increases with gas density, naturally yielding two different characteristic regimes, thus two different slopes in the SFR versus gas density relationship, in agreement with observational determinations. Besides the complete SFR derivation, we also provide a simplified expression, which reproduces the complete calculations reasonably well and can easily be used for quick determinations of SFRs in cloud environments. A key property at the heart of both our complete and simplified theory is that the SFR involves a density-dependent dynamical time, characteristic of each collapsing (prestellar) overdense region in the cloud, instead of one single mean or critical freefall timescale. Unfortunately, the SFR also depends on some ill-determined parameters, such as the core-to-star mass conversion efficiency and the crossing timescale. Although we provide estimates for these parameters, their uncertainty hampers a precise quantitative determination of the SFR, within less than a factor of a few.

  11. Basin Formation and Cratering on Mercury Revealed by MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. R.; Fassett, C.; Marchi, S.; Merline, W. J.; Ostrach, L. R.; Prockter, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Mercury has been bombarded by asteroids and comets throughout its history. The resulting craters and basins are the dominant topographic features on the planet. Although visible basins contain some of the most interesting tectonic features, plains, and evidence of vertical stratigraphy, they fall far short of saturating the surface. Nevertheless, Mercury has a greater spatial density of peak-ring basins and protobasins than any other Solar System body, partly because these morphologies begin at smaller sizes than on most bodies. Cratering at approximately three times the cratering rate on the Moon, combined with likely plains-forming volcanism, prevents recognition of surface features older than 4.0 to 4.1 Ga. Severe losses of craters <50 km in diameter (<20 km in some places) are ascribed to extensive formation of intercrater plains. Estimates of the cratering chronology of Mercury suggest that most plains formation ended about 3.6 to 3.7 Ga, though activity has continued in a few small regions until much more recently (e.g., inside the Rachmaninoff basin). Mercury, compared with other terrestrial bodies, is struck by projectiles impacting at much higher velocities, which is probably responsible for the formation of abundant secondary craters that dominate the numbers of craters <10 km diameter on older plains surfaces. The history of high-velocity bombardment has resulted in the production of abundant impact melts and has churned and processed the regolith, and eroded older topography, more thoroughly than on other Solar System bodies. Although the possible role of Mercury-specific impactors ("vulcanoids") cannot be excluded, imaging searches by MESSENGER have revealed no remaining vulcanoids and no other evidence suggests that Mercury has been bombarded by anything other than the same populations of asteroids and comets that have impacted the Moon and other terrestrial planets from the end of the period of heavy bombardment 3.8 to 3.9 Ga to the present.

  12. Revealing bismuth oxide hollow nanoparticle formation by the Kirkendall effect.

    PubMed

    Niu, Kai-Yang; Park, Jungwon; Zheng, Haimei; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2013-01-01

    We study the formation of bismuth oxide hollow nanoparticles by the Kirkendall effect using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Rich dynamics of bismuth diffusion through the bismuth oxide shell have been captured in situ. The diffusion coefficient of bismuth through bismuth oxide shell is 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than that of bulk. Observation reveals that defects, temperature, sizes of the particles, and so forth can affect the diffusion of reactive species and modify the kinetics of the hollowing process.

  13. Towards universal hybrid star formation rate estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boquien, M.; Kennicutt, R.; Calzetti, D.; Dale, D.; Galametz, M.; Sauvage, M.; Croxall, K.; Draine, B.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Kumari, N.; Hunt, L.; De Looze, I.; Pellegrini, E.; Relaño, M.; Smith, J.-D.; Tabatabaei, F.

    2016-06-01

    Context. To compute the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies from the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV), it is essential to take the obscuration by dust into account. To do so, one of the most popular methods consists in combining the UV with the emission from the dust itself in the infrared (IR). Yet, different studies have derived different estimators, showing that no such hybrid estimator is truly universal. Aims: In this paper we aim at understanding and quantifying what physical processes fundamentally drive the variations between different hybrid estimators. In so doing, we aim at deriving new universal UV+IR hybrid estimators to correct the UV for dust attenuation at local and global scales, taking the intrinsic physical properties of galaxies into account. Methods: We use the CIGALE code to model the spatially resolved far-UV to far-IR spectral energy distributions of eight nearby star-forming galaxies drawn from the KINGFISH sample. This allows us to determine their local physical properties, and in particular their UV attenuation, average SFR, average specific SFR (sSFR), and their stellar mass. We then examine how hybrid estimators depend on said properties. Results: We find that hybrid UV+IR estimators strongly depend on the stellar mass surface density (in particular at 70 μm and 100 μm) and on the sSFR (in particular at 24 μm and the total infrared). Consequently, the IR scaling coefficients for UV obscuration can vary by almost an order of magnitude: from 1.55 to 13.45 at 24 μm for instance. This result contrasts with other groups who found relatively constant coefficients with small deviations. We exploit these variations to construct a new class of adaptative hybrid estimators based on observed UV to near-IR colours and near-IR luminosity densities per unit area. We find that they can reliably be extended to entire galaxies. Conclusions: The new estimators provide better estimates of attenuation-corrected UV emission than classical hybrid estimators

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE STAR FORMATION RATE AND THE SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE AT FIXED MORPHOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa

    2010-09-20

    From the Main galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, I construct two volume-limited samples with luminosities -20.5 {<=} M{sub r} {<=} -18.5 and -22.5{<=}M{sub r} {<=}-20.5, respectively, to explore the environmental dependence of the star formation rate (SFR) and the specific star formation rate (SSFR) at fixed morphology. It is found that in these two volume-limited samples, galaxies in the lowest density regime preferentially have higher SFR and SSFR than galaxies in the densest regime. I divide each volume-limited Main galaxy sample into two distinct populations, the early type and the late type, and observe that the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR of galaxies remains true at fixed morphology: the SFR and SSFR of galaxies in the densest regime is still preferentially lower than that of the ones in the lowest density regime with the same morphological type. I also note that the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR of late-type galaxies is stronger than that of early-type galaxies.

  15. Stochastic heart-rate model can reveal pathologic cardiac dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuusela, Tom

    2004-03-01

    A simple one-dimensional Langevin-type stochastic difference equation can simulate the heart-rate fluctuations in a time scale from minutes to hours. The model consists of a deterministic nonlinear part and a stochastic part typical of Gaussian noise, and both parts can be directly determined from measured heart-rate data. Data from healthy subjects typically exhibit the deterministic part with two or more stable fixed points. Studies of 15 congestive heart-failure subjects reveal that the deterministic part of pathologic heart dynamics has no clear stable fixed points. Direct simulations of the stochastic model for normal and pathologic cases can produce statistical parameters similar to those of real subjects. Results directly indicate that pathologic situations simplify the heart-rate control system.

  16. Rating Format Effects on Rater Agreement and Reliability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, John H.; Troendle, G. Roger

    This study compares intra- and inter-rater agreement and reliability when using three different rating form formats to assess the same stimuli. One format requests assessment by marking detailed criteria without an overall judgement; the second format requests only an overall judgement without the use of detailed criteria; and the third format…

  17. The Proline Enamine Formation Pathway Revisited in Dimethyl Sulfoxide: Rate Constants Determined via NMR.

    PubMed

    Haindl, Michael H; Hioe, Johnny; Gschwind, Ruth M

    2015-10-14

    Enamine catalysis is a fundamental activation mode in organocatalysis and can be successfully combined with other catalytic methods, e.g., photocatalysis. Recently, the elusive enamine intermediates were detected, and their stabilization modes were revealed. However, the formation pathway of this central organocatalytic intermediate is still a matter of dispute, and several mechanisms involving iminium and/or oxazolidinone are proposed. Here, the first experimentally determined rate constants and rates of enamine formation are presented using 1D selective exchange spectroscopy (EXSY) buildup curves and initial rate approximation. The trends of the enamine formation rates from exo-oxazolidinones and endo-oxazolidinones upon variation of the proline and water concentrations as well as the nucelophilic/basic properties of additives are investigated together with isomerization rates of the oxazolidinones. These first kinetic data of enamine formations in combination with theoretical calculations reveal the deprotonation of iminium intermediates as the dominant pathway in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The dominant enamine formation pathway varies according to the experimental conditions, e.g., the presence and strength of basic additives. The enamine formation is zero-order in proline and oxazolidinones, which excludes the direct deprotonation of oxazolidinones via E2 mechanism. The nucleophilicity of the additives influences only the isomerization rates of the oxazolidinones and not the enamine formation rates, which excludes a nucleophile-assisted anti elimination of oxazolidinones as a major enamine formation pathway.

  18. Drill-in fluid reduces formation damage, increases production rates

    SciTech Connect

    Hands, N.; Kowbel, K.; Nouris, R.

    1998-07-13

    A sodium formate drill-in fluid system reduced formation damage, resulting in better-than-expected production rates for an off-shore Dutch development well. Programmed to optimize production capacity and reservoir drainage from a Rotliegend sandstone gas discovery, the 5-7/8-in. subhorizontal production interval was drilled and completed barefoot with a unique, rheologically engineered sodium formate drill-in fluid system. The new system, consisting of a sodium formate (NaCOOH) brine as the base fluid and properly sized calcium carbonate as the formation-bridging agent, was selected on the basis of its well-documented record in reducing solids impairment and formation damage in similar sandstone structures in Germany. The system was engineered around the low-shear-rate viscosity (LSRV) concept, designed to provide exceptional rheological properties. After describing the drilling program, the paper gives results on the drilling and completion.

  19. CO2 hydrate formation and dissociation rates: Application to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambuehl, Dan; Elwood Madden, Megan

    2014-05-01

    CO2 clathrate hydrate is a crystalline material composed of water cages around a CO2 molecule. CO2 gas hydrates are naturally occurring on Earth and are a likely phase on Mars as well as other cold planetary bodies. CO2 hydrates have minor effects on terrestrial atmospheric composition, but may be a major reservoir for greenhouse gases on Mars. In this study, CO2 hydrate formation and dissociation rates were measured experimentally on ultrapure and CO2 infused water ice (ice containing previously trapped CO2 gas bubbles). Overall, increasing pressure and temperature increased CO2 consumption rates, indicating enhanced hydrate formation rates. CO2 consumption and release rates both increased significantly in infused ice experiments as did the overall amount of CO2 consumed. CO2 bubbles formed during freezing of the infused ice likely provided more surface area for hydrate nucleation, increasing the rate of formation. Higher dissociation rates in infused ice experiments compared to ultrapure ice may be due to the higher concentration of hydrate originally formed in the bubble-filled samples. These results suggest that CO2 hydrate formation in natural, gas-rich ice occurs significantly faster than previously assumed. In addition, formation rates would be maximized and dissociation rates minimized at Mars equatorial conditions, perhaps leading to long-term storage of atmospheric CO2 in localized clathrate reservoirs.

  20. Sulphur-radical control on petroleum formation rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewan, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    Most petroleum is formed through the partial decomposition of kerogen (an insoluble sedimentary organic material) in response to thermal stress during subsurface burial in a sedimentary basin. Knowing the mechanisms and kinetics of this process allows the determination of the extent and timing of petroleum formation, which, in turn, are critical for evaluating the potential for petroleum occurrences within a sedimentary basin. Kinetic models of petroleum generation are derived mainly from pyrolysis experiments, in which it is usually assumed that formation rates are controlled by the strength of the bonds within the precursor compounds: this agrees with the observation that petroleum formation rates increase with increasing sulphur content of thermally immature kerogen, C-S bonds being weaker than C-C bonds. However, this explanation fails to account for the overall composition of petroleum. Here I argue, on the basis of pyrolysis experiments, that it is the presence of sulphur radicals, rather than the relative weakness of C-S bonds, that controls petroleum formation rates. My findings suggest that the rate of petroleum formation depends critically on the concentration of sulphur radicals generated during the initial stages of thermal maturation. The proposed mechanism appears to provide a realistic explanation for both the overall composition of petroleum and the observed variation in formation rates.

  1. Star formation rates and abundance gradients in disk galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Silk, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    Analytic models for the evolution of disk galaxies are presented, placing special emphasis on the radial properties. These models are straightforward extensions of the original Schmidt (1959, 1963) models, with a dependence of star formation rate on gas density. The models provide successful descriptions of several measures of galactic disk evolution, including solar neighborhood chemical evolution, the presence and amplitude of metallicity and color gradients in disk galaxies, and the global rates of star formation in disk galaxies, and aid in the understanding of the apparent connection between young and old stellar populations in spiral galaxies.

  2. Herschel/HIFI reveals the first stages of stellar formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herpin, F.; Bontemps, S.; Chavarria, L.; van der Tak, F.; Wyrowski, F.; van Dishoeck, E.

    2010-12-01

    The understanding of the star formation is still on progress. Especially, the formation of high-mass stars is much less understood than the low-mass case: even the time order of observational phenomena is uncertain. Water, one of the most important molecules in the Universe, might elucidate key episodes in the process of stellar birth, and especially could be a major role in the formation of high-mass stars. For both types of stars, the source chemical composition is not well known and even less known is the chemical evolution of the interstellar matter throughout the various phases of star formation. This talk presents the first results of the various Herschel Space Observatory star formation key-programs. One of the instruments on-board HSO, HIFI, is the most powerful spectrometer never built, covering a huge frequency range, most of them unaccessible from ground. In particular, one of the KP, WISH, aims at following the process of star formation during the various stages and at using the water as a physical diagnostic throughout the evolution.

  3. THE COSMIC CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA RATE DOES NOT MATCH THE MASSIVE-STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Beacom, John F.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Thompson, Todd A.; Prieto, Jose L.

    2011-09-10

    We identify a 'supernova rate problem': the measured cosmic core-collapse supernova rate is a factor of {approx}2 smaller (with significance {approx}2{sigma}) than that predicted from the measured cosmic massive-star formation rate. The comparison is critical for topics from galaxy evolution and enrichment to the abundance of neutron stars and black holes. We systematically explore possible resolutions. The accuracy and precision of the star formation rate data and conversion to the supernova rate are well supported, and proposed changes would have far-reaching consequences. The dominant effect is likely that many supernovae are missed because they are either optically dim (low-luminosity) or dark, whether intrinsically or due to obscuration. We investigate supernovae too dim to have been discovered in cosmic surveys by a detailed study of all supernova discoveries in the local volume. If possible supernova impostors are included, then dim supernovae are common enough by fraction to solve the supernova rate problem. If they are not included, then the rate of dark core collapses is likely substantial. Other alternatives are that there are surprising changes in our understanding of star formation or supernova rates, including that supernovae form differently in small galaxies than in normal galaxies. These possibilities can be distinguished by upcoming supernova surveys, star formation measurements, searches for disappearing massive stars, and measurements of supernova neutrinos.

  4. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as Star Formation Rate Indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetti, D.

    2011-03-01

    As images and spectra from ISO and Spitzer have provided increasingly higher-fidelity representations of the mid-infrared (MIR) and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) emission from galaxies and galactic and extra-galactic regions, more systematic efforts have been devoted to establishing whether the emission in this wavelength region can be used as a reliable star formation rate indicator. This has also been in response to the extensive surveys of distant galaxies that have accumulated during the cold phase of the Spitzer Space Telescope. Results so far have been somewhat contradictory, reflecting the complex nature of the PAHs and of the mid-infrared-emitting dust in general. The two main problems faced when attempting to define a star formation rate indicator based on the mid-infrared emission from galaxies and star-forming regions are: (1) the strong dependence of the PAH emission on metallicity; (2) the heating of the PAH dust by evolved stellar populations unrelated to the current star formation. I review the status of the field, with a specific focus on these two problems, and will try to quantify the impact of each on calibrations of the mid-infrared emission as a star formation rate indicator.

  5. Mechanisms of amyloid formation revealed by solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Karamanos, Theodoros K.; Kalverda, Arnout P.; Thompson, Gary S.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are proteinaceous elongated aggregates involved in more than fifty human diseases. Recent advances in electron microscopy and solid state NMR have allowed the characterization of fibril structures to different extents of refinement. However, structural details about the mechanism of fibril formation remain relatively poorly defined. This is mainly due to the complex, heterogeneous and transient nature of the species responsible for assembly; properties that make them difficult to detect and characterize in structural detail using biophysical techniques. The ability of solution NMR spectroscopy to investigate exchange between multiple protein states, to characterize transient and low-population species, and to study high molecular weight assemblies, render NMR an invaluable technique for studies of amyloid assembly. In this article we review state-of-the-art solution NMR methods for investigations of: (a) protein dynamics that lead to the formation of aggregation-prone species; (b) amyloidogenic intrinsically disordered proteins; and (c) protein–protein interactions on pathway to fibril formation. Together, these topics highlight the power and potential of NMR to provide atomic level information about the molecular mechanisms of one of the most fascinating problems in structural biology. PMID:26282197

  6. Archaeological data reveal slow rates of evolution during plant domestication.

    PubMed

    Purugganan, Michael D; Fuller, Dorian Q

    2011-01-01

    Domestication is an evolutionary process of species divergence in which morphological and physiological changes result from the cultivation/tending of plant or animal species by a mutualistic partner, most prominently humans. Darwin used domestication as an analogy to evolution by natural selection although there is strong debate on whether this process of species evolution by human association is an appropriate model for evolutionary study. There is a presumption that selection under domestication is strong and most models assume rapid evolution of cultivated species. Using archaeological data for 11 species from 60 archaeological sites, we measure rates of evolution in two plant domestication traits--nonshattering and grain/seed size increase. Contrary to previous assumptions, we find the rates of phenotypic evolution during domestication are slow, and significantly lower or comparable to those observed among wild species subjected to natural selection. Our study indicates that the magnitudes of the rates of evolution during the domestication process, including the strength of selection, may be similar to those measured for wild species. This suggests that domestication may be driven by unconscious selection pressures similar to that observed for natural selection, and the study of the domestication process may indeed prove to be a valid model for the study of evolutionary change.

  7. Connecting Galaxies, Halos, and Star Formation Rates Across Cosmic Time

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2008-06-02

    A simple, observationally-motivated model is presented for understanding how halo masses, galaxy stellar masses, and star formation rates are related, and how these relations evolve with time. The relation between halo mass and galaxy stellar mass is determined by matching the observed spatial abundance of galaxies to the expected spatial abundance of halos at multiple epochs--i.e. more massive galaxies are assigned to more massive halos at each epoch. This 'abundance matching' technique has been shown previously to reproduce the observed luminosity- and scale-dependence of galaxy clustering over a range of epochs. Halos at different epochs are connected by halo mass accretion histories estimated from N-body simulations. The halo-galaxy connection at fixed epochs in conjunction with the connection between halos across time provides a connection between observed galaxies across time. With approximations for the impact of merging and accretion on the growth of galaxies, one can then directly infer the star formation histories of galaxies as a function of stellar and halo mass. This model is tuned to match both the observed evolution of the stellar mass function and the normalization of the observed star formation rate--stellar mass relation to z {approx} 1. The data demands, for example, that the star formation rate density is dominated by galaxies with M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10.0-10.5} M{sub {circle_dot}} from 0 < z < 1, and that such galaxies over these epochs reside in halos with M{sub vir} {approx} 10{sup 11.5-12.5} M{sub {circle_dot}}. The star formation rate--halo mass relation is approximately Gaussian over the range 0 < z < 1 with a mildly evolving mean and normalization. This model is then used to shed light on a number of issues, including (1) a clarification of 'downsizing', (2) the lack of a sharp characteristic halo mass at which star formation is truncated, and (3) the dominance of star formation over merging to the stellar build-up of galaxies

  8. Bone Formation Rate in Experimental Disuse Osteoporosis in Monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cann, Christopher; Young, Donald R.

    1976-01-01

    Specific mechanisms underlying weightless and hypodynamic bone loss are obscure. A principal relationship which must be affected is the balance between bone formation and bone resorption rates. In order to better define the influence of those parameters on bone loss, and also to develop measurements in other species as a useful adjunct to human research, studies were undertaken with experimental monkeys. Tests were conducted with a total of 6 adult male monkeys, weighing 10-13 kg, and approximately 10-12 yrs. of age to evaluate specifically bone formation rate during the development of disuse osteoporosis and osteopenia. Three animals were restrained in a semi-recumbent position for six months; three animals served as normal caged controls. Food intake (Purina) was held relatively constant at 200g/day for each animal. Using a Norland Bone Mineral Analyzer, bone mineral losses of 3.5 to 6% were seen in the mid-shaft of the tibia and in the distal radius. Bone loss was confirmed radiographically, with observation of thinning of the proximal tibial cortex and trabeculae in the calcaneus. Bone formation rate was determined using standard Ca-47 kinetics under metabolic balance conditions. After six months of restraint, accretion was 7.2-13.2 mg Ca/kg/day, compared to 3.2-4.1 mg Ca/kg/day in caged controls and 3-8 mg Ca/kg/day in normal adult humans. Fecal and urine calcium was 25-40% higher in restrained animals than in controls. Dietary calcium absorption decreases during restraint, and calcium turnover increases, implying a rise in bone resorption rate concommitant with the observed rise in bone accretion rate. Further studies dealing specifically with bone resorption are underway to define this more fully.

  9. VLBA Reveals Formation Region of Giant Cosmic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-10-01

    Astronomers have gained their first glimpse of the mysterious region near a black hole at the heart of a distant galaxy, where a powerful stream of subatomic particles spewing outward at nearly the speed of light is formed into a beam, or jet, that then goes nearly straight for thousands of light-years. The astronomers used radio telescopes in Europe and the U.S., including the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to make the most detailed images ever of the center of the galaxy M87, some 50 million light-years away. "This is the first time anyone has seen the region in which a cosmic jet is formed into a narrow beam," said Bill Junor of the University of New Mexico, in Albuquerque. "We had always speculated that the jet had to be made by some mechanism relatively near the black hole, but as we looked closer and closer to the center, we kept seeing an already-formed beam. That was becoming embarrassing, because we were running out of places to put the formation mechanism that we knew had to be there." Junor, along with John Biretta and Mario Livio of the Space Telescope Science Institute, in Baltimore, MD, now have shown that M87's jet is formed within a few tenths of a light-year of the galaxy's core, presumed to be a black hole three billion times more massive than the sun. In the formation region, the jet is seen opening widely, at an angle of about 60 degrees, nearest the black hole, but is squeezed down to only 6 degrees a few light-years away. "The 60-degree angle of the inner part of M87's jet is the widest such angle yet seen in any jet in the universe," said Junor. "We found this by being able to see the jet to within a few hundredths of a light-year of the galaxy's core -- an unprecedented level of detail." The scientists reported their findings in the October 28 issue of the journal Nature. At the center of M87, material being drawn inward by the strong gravitation of the black hole is formed into a rapidly-spinning flat

  10. Metamorphic sole formation reveals plate interface rheology during early subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, S.; Agard, P.; Dubacq, B.; Plunder, A.; Prigent, C.

    2015-12-01

    Metamorphic soles are m to ~500m thick tectonic slices welded beneath most large ophiolites. They correspond to highly to mildly deformed portions of oceanic lithosphere metamorphosed at amphibolite to granulite facies peak conditions. Metamorphic soles are interpreted as formed ≤1-2Ma after intraoceanic subduction initiation by heat transfer from the hot, incipient mantle wegde to the underthrusting lower plate. Their early accretion and exhumation together with the future ophiolite implies at least one jump of the subduction plate interface from above to below the metamorphic sole. Metamorphic soles thus represent one of the few remnants of the very early evolution of the subduction plate interface and provide major constraints on the thermal structure and the effective rheology of the crust and mantle along the nascent slab interface.We herein present a structural and petrological detailed description of the Oman and Turkey metamorphic soles. Both soles present a steep inverted metamorphic structure, with isograds subparallel to the peridotite contact, in which the proportion of mafic rocks, pressure and temperature conditions increase upward. They comprise, as most metamorphic soles worldwide, two main units: (1) a high-grade unit adjacent to the overlying peridotite composed of granulitized to amphibolized metabasalts, with rare metasedimentary interlayers (~800±100ºC at 10±2kbar) and (2) a low-grade greenschist facies unit composed of metasedimentary rocks with rare metatuffs (~500±100ºC at 5±2kbar). We provide for the first time refined P-T peak condition estimations by means of pseudosection modelling and maximum temperature constraints for the Oman low-grade sole by RAMAN thermometry. In order to quantify micro-scale deformations trough the sole, we also present EBSD data on the Oman garnet-bearing and garnet-free high-grade sole.With these new constraints, we finally propose a new conceptual mechanical model for metamorphic sole formation. This

  11. Oman metamorphic sole formation reveals early subduction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soret, Mathieu; Agard, Philippe; Dubacq, Benoît; Plunder, Alexis; Ildefonse, Benoît; Yamato, Philippe; Prigent, Cécile

    2016-04-01

    Metamorphic soles correspond to m to ~500m thick tectonic slices welded beneath most of the large-scale ophiolites. They typically show a steep inverted metamorphic structure where the pressure and temperature conditions of crystallization increase upward (from 500±100°C at 0.5±0.2 GPa to 800±100°C at 1.0±0.2 GPa), with isograds subparallel to the contact with the overlying ophiolitic peridotite. The proportion of mafic rocks in metamorphic soles also increases from the bottom (meta-sediments rich) to the top (approaching the ophiolite peridotites). These soles are interpreted as the result of heat transfer from the incipient mantle wedge toward the nascent slab (associated with large-scale fluid transfer and possible shear heating) during the first My of intra-oceanic subduction (as indicated by radiometric ages). Metamorphic soles provide therefore major constraints on early subduction dynamics (i.e., thermal structure, fluid migration and rheology along the nascent slab interface). We present a detailed structural and petrological study of the metamorphic sole from 4 major cross-sections along the Oman ophiolite. We show precise pressure-temperature estimates obtained by pseudosection modelling and EBSD measurements performed on both the garnet-bearing and garnet-free high-grade sole. Results allow quantification of the micro-scale deformation and highlight differences in pressure-temperature-deformation conditions between the 4 different locations, showing that the inverted metamorphic gradient through the sole is not continuous in all locations. Based on these new constraints, we suggest a new tectonic-petrological model for the formation of metamorphic soles below ophiolites. This model involves the stacking of several homogeneous slivers of oceanic crust leading to the present-day structure of the sole. In this view, these thrusts are the result of rheological contrasts between the sole and the peridotite as the plate interface progressively cools down

  12. The star formation rate distribution function of the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothwell, M. S.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Johnson, B. D.; Wu, Y.; Lee, J. C.; Dale, D.; Engelbracht, C.; Calzetti, D.; Skillman, E.

    2011-08-01

    We present total infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions derived from large representative samples of galaxies at z˜ 0, selected at IR and UV wavelengths from the Imperial IRAS Faint Source Catalogue redshift data base (IIFSCz) catalogue, and the GALEX All-Sky Imaging Survey (AIS), respectively. We augment these with deep Spitzer and GALEX imaging of galaxies in the 11 Mpc Local Volume Legacy (LVL) Survey, allowing us to extend these luminosity functions to lower luminosities (˜106 L⊙), and providing good constraints on the slope of the luminosity function at the extreme faint end for the first time. Using conventional star formation prescriptions, we generate from our data the star formation rate (SFR) distribution function for the local Universe. We find that it has a Schechter form, the faint-end slope has a constant value (to the limits of our data) of α=-1.51 ± 0.08 and the ‘characteristic’ SFR ψ* is 9.2 M⊙ yr-1. We also show the distribution function of the SFR volume density; we then use this to calculate a value for the total SFR volume density at z˜ 0 of 0.025 ± 0.0016 M⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3, of which ˜20 per cent is occurring in starbursts. Decomposing the total star formation by infrared luminosity, it can be seen that 9 ± 1 per cent is due to LIRGs, and 0.7 ± 0.2 per cent is occurring in ULIRGs. By comparing UV and IR emission for galaxies in our sample, we also calculate the fraction of star formation occurring in dust-obscured environments, and examine the distribution of dusty star formation: we find a very shallow slope at the highly extincted end, which may be attributable to line-of-sight orientation effects as well as conventional internal extinction.

  13. The Determination of Rate-Limiting Steps during Soot Formation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-14

    the soot formation process. Alternatively, acetylene could add to a soot particle via a Diels - Alder reaction, such as 12 I I C4 H6 + C2H2 - c - C6H...identified. Kiefer (1991) suggested that the acetylene addition processes may be related to the Diels - Alder reaction of acetylene addition to CPD to form...related to the reverse diels - alder reaction of acetylene addition to CPD to form norbornadiene. Benson and O’Neal (1970) report rates for unimolecular

  14. Rates of weathering rind formation on Costa Rican basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sak, Peter B.; Fisher, Donald M.; Gardner, Thomas W.; Murphy, Katherine; Brantley, Susan L.

    2004-04-01

    ( r r = 2.9 ± 0.1 cm) is coincident with stage 5e (ca. 125 ka) and that Qt 3 (r r = 0.9 ± 0.1 cm) is consistent with OIS 3 (ca. 37 ka). These assignments yield a value of k app of 8.6 × 10 -13 cm s -1 (R 2 = 0.99). Only this value satisfies both the existing age controls and yields ages coincident with sea level maxima. Using this value, elemental weathering release fluxes across a weathering rind from Qt 2 range from 6.0 × 10 -9 mol Si m -2 s -1 to 2.5 × 10 -11 mol K m -2 s -1. The rate of rind advance for the Costa Rican terraces is 2.8 × 10 -7 m yr -1. Basalt rind formation rates in lower temperature settings described in the literature are also consistent with interface-controlled weathering with an apparent activation energy of about 50 kJ mol -1. Rates of rind formation in Costa Rica are an order of magnitude slower than reported for global averages of soil formation rates.

  15. On the cosmic evolution of the specific star formation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, M. D.; van Driel, W.; Le Tiran, L.; Di Matteo, P.; Haywood, M.

    2015-05-01

    The apparent correlation between the specific star formation rate (sSFR) and total stellar mass (M⋆) of galaxies is a fundamental relationship indicating how they formed their stellar populations. To attempt to understand this relation, we hypothesize that the relation and its evolution is regulated by the increase in the stellar and gas mass surface density in galaxies with redshift, which is itself governed by the angular momentum of the accreted gas, the amount of available gas, and by self-regulation of star formation. With our model, we can reproduce the specific SFR - M⋆ relations at z ~ 1-2 by assuming gas fractions and gas mass surface densities similar to those observed for z = 1-2 galaxies. We further argue that it is the increasing angular momentum with cosmic time that causes a decrease in the surface density of accreted gas. The gas mass surface densities in galaxies are controlled by the centrifugal support (i.e., angular momentum), and the sSFR is predicted to increase as, sSFR(z) = (1 + z)3/tH0, as observed (where tH0 is the Hubble time and no free parameters are necessary). In addition, the simple evolution for the star-formation intensity we propose is in agreement with observations of Milky Way-like galaxies selected through abundance matching. At z ≳ 2, we argue that star formation is self-regulated by high pressures generated by the intense star formation itself. The star formation intensity must be high enough to either balance the hydrostatic pressure (a rather extreme assumption) or to generate high turbulent pressure in the molecular medium which maintains galaxies near the line of instability (i.e. Toomre Q ~ 1). We provide simple prescriptions for understanding these self-regulation mechanisms based on solid relationships verified through extensive study. In all cases, the most important factor is the increase in stellar and gas mass surface density with redshift, which allows distant galaxies to maintain high levels of s

  16. The Fundamental Plane of star formation in galaxies revealed by the EAGLE hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, Claudia del P.; Theuns, Tom; Schaye, Joop; Furlong, Michelle; Bower, Richard G.; Schaller, Matthieu; Crain, Robert A.; Trayford, James W.; Matthee, Jorryt

    2016-07-01

    We investigate correlations between different physical properties of star-forming galaxies in the `Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments' (EAGLE) cosmological hydrodynamical simulation suite over the redshift range 0 ≤ z ≤ 4.5. A principal component analysis reveals that neutral gas fraction (fgas,neutral), stellar mass (Mstellar) and star formation rate (SFR) account for most of the variance seen in the population, with galaxies tracing a two-dimensional, nearly flat, surface in the three-dimensional space of fgas, neutral-Mstellar-SFR with little scatter. The location of this plane varies little with redshift, whereas galaxies themselves move along the plane as their fgas, neutral and SFR drop with redshift. The positions of galaxies along the plane are highly correlated with gas metallicity. The metallicity can therefore be robustly predicted from fgas, neutral, or from the Mstellar and SFR. We argue that the appearance of this `Fundamental Plane of star formation' is a consequence of self-regulation, with the plane's curvature set by the dependence of the SFR on gas density and metallicity. We analyse a large compilation of observations spanning the redshift range 0 ≲ z ≲ 3, and find that such a plane is also present in the data. The properties of the observed Fundamental Plane of star formation are in good agreement with EAGLE's predictions.

  17. Calibration of Star Formation Rates Across the Electromagnetic Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardiff, Ann H.

    2011-01-01

    Measuring and mapping star-forming activity in galaxies is a key element for our understanding of their broad- band spectra, and their structure and evolution in our local, as well as the high-redshift Universe. The main tool we use for these measurements is the observed luminosity in various spectral lines and/or continuum bands. However, the available star-formation rate (SFR) indicators are often discrepant and subject to physical biases and calibration uncertainties. We are organizing a special session at the 2012 IAU General Assembly in Beijing, China (August 20-31, 2012) in order to bring together theoreticians and observers working in different contexts of star-formation to discuss the status of current SFR indicators, to identify open issues and to define a strategic framework for their resolution. The is an ideal time to synthesize information from the current golden era of space astrophysics and still have influence on the upcoming missions that will broaden our view of star-formation. We will be including high-energy constraints on SFR in the program and encourage participation from the high energy astrophysics community.

  18. Photoionising feedback and the star formation rates in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLachlan, J. M.; Bonnell, I. A.; Wood, K.; Dale, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the effects of ionising photons on accretion and stellar mass growth in a young star forming region, using a Monte Carlo radiation transfer code coupled to a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation. Methods: We introduce the framework with which we correct stellar cluster masses for the effects of photoionising (PI) feedback and compare to the results of a full ionisation hydrodynamics code. Results: We present results of our simulations of star formation in the spiral arm of a disk galaxy, including the effects of photoionising radiation from high mass stars. We find that PI feedback reduces the total mass accreted onto stellar clusters by ≈23% over the course of the simulation and reduces the number of high mass clusters, as well as the maximum mass attained by a stellar cluster. Mean star formation rates (SFRs) drop from SFRcontrol = 4.2 × 10-2 M⊙ yr-1 to SFRMCPI = 3.2 × 10-2 M⊙ yr-1 after the inclusion of PI feedback with a final instantaneous SFR reduction of 62%. The overall cluster mass distribution appears to be affected little by PI feedback. Conclusions: We compare our results to the observed extra-galactic Schmidt-Kennicutt relation and the observed properties of local star forming regions in the Milky Way and find that internal photoionising (PI) feedback is unlikely to reduce SFRs by more than a factor of ≈2 and thus may play only a minor role in regulating star formation.

  19. REVEALING TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PHYSICS WITH COSMIC RATES AND NUCLEAR GAMMA RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Beacom, John F. E-mail: beacom@mps.ohio-state.ed

    2010-11-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) remain mysterious despite their central importance in cosmology and their rapidly increasing discovery rate. The progenitors of SNe Ia can be probed by the delay time between progenitor birth and explosion as SNe Ia. The explosions and progenitors of SNe Ia can be probed by MeV nuclear gamma rays emitted in the decays of radioactive nickel and cobalt into iron. We compare the cosmic star formation and SN Ia rates, finding that their different redshift evolution requires a large fraction of SNe Ia to have large delay times. A delay-time distribution of the form t {sup -}{alpha} with {alpha} = 1.0 {+-} 0.3 provides a good fit, implying that 50% of SNe Ia explode more than {approx}1 Gyr after progenitor birth. The extrapolation of the cosmic SN Ia rate to z = 0 agrees with the rate we deduce from catalogs of local SNe Ia. We investigate prospects for gamma-ray telescopes to exploit the facts that escaping gamma rays directly reveal the power source of SNe Ia and uniquely provide tomography of the expanding ejecta. We find large improvements relative to earlier studies by Gehrels et al. in 1987 and Timmes and Woosley in 1997 due to larger and more certain SN Ia rates and advances in gamma-ray detectors. The proposed Advanced Compton Telescope, with a narrow-line sensitivity {approx}60 times better than that of current satellites, would, on an annual basis, detect up to {approx}100 SNe Ia (3{sigma}) and provide revolutionary model discrimination for SNe Ia within 20 Mpc, with gamma-ray light curves measured with {approx}10{sigma} significance daily for {approx}100 days. Even more modest improvements in detector sensitivity would open a new and invaluable astronomy with frequent SN Ia gamma-ray detections.

  20. SHAPING THE DUST MASS-STAR-FORMATION RATE RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hjorth, Jens; Gall, Christa; Michałowski, Michał J. E-mail: cgall@phys.au.dk

    2014-02-20

    There is a remarkably tight relation between the observationally inferred dust masses and star-formation rates (SFRs) of Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies, M {sub dust} ∝ SFR{sup 1.11}. Here we extend the M {sub dust}-SFR relation to the high end and show that it bends over at very large SFRs (i.e., dust masses are lower than predicted for a given SFR). We identify several distinct evolutionary processes in the diagram: (1) a star-bursting phase in which dust builds up rapidly at early times. The maximum attainable dust mass in this process is the cause of the bend-over of the relation. A high dust-formation efficiency, a bottom-light initial mass function, and negligible supernova shock dust destruction are required to produce sufficiently high dust masses. (2) A quiescent star-forming phase in which the subsequent parallel decline in dust mass and SFR gives rise to the M {sub dust}-SFR relation, through astration and dust destruction. The dust-to-gas ratio is approximately constant along the relation. We show that the power-law slope of the M {sub dust}-SFR relation is inversely proportional to the global Schmidt-Kennicutt law exponent (i.e., ∼0.9) in simple chemical evolution models. (3) A quenching phase which causes star formation to drop while the dust mass stays roughly constant or drops proportionally. Combined with merging, these processes, as well as the range in total baryonic mass, give rise to a complex population of the diagram which adds significant scatter to the original M {sub dust}-SFR relation. (4) At very high redshifts, a population of galaxies located significantly below the local relation is predicted.

  1. A Star-Formation Rate Atlas of the Nearby Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, Tristan; Pooley, David; Rappaport, Saul A.

    2017-01-01

    We present our work in constructing a star-formation rate (SFR) atlas of nearby galaxies. We utilize GALEX far-ultraviolet (FUV) data and Spitzer 24 micron data to compute the SFR map of each galaxy using the relation described in Leroy et al. (2008). For each galaxy, the 24 micron data were downloaded from the Spitzer Heritage Archive and subjected to outlier and overlap corrections through the automated Spitzer pipeline MOPEX. The FUV images were constructing using gphoton, and we then performed background subtraction using source-free regions away from the galaxy. These SFR maps represent an attempt to systematically characterize the local SFR in nearby galaxies, which we will then use to explore the relationship of SFR to the incidence of other phenomena such as supernovae and ultraluminous X-ray sources. We will make all SFR maps available to the community.

  2. The UV + IR Hybrid Star Formation Rate Across NGC6946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eufrasio, Rafael T.; Lehmer, Bret; Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies is essential to understand galaxy evolution and thus determining reliable, simple tracers of star-forming activity is of paramount importance to astrophysics. For instance, intrinsic ultraviolet (UV) emission from young stars is an excellent tracer of the SFR. Observed UV luminosities, however, have been strongly attenuated by intervening interstellar dust. Since emission from hot dust is readily available from IRAS, Spitzer, and WISE, it is common practice to combine mid-IR emission (around 25 μm) with observed UV in order to obtain an SFR diagnostic of the form Lobs(FUV) + acorr × Lobs(25 μm). Conventionally, a single correction acorr, previously determined for a sample of galaxies, is used. Here we test the reliability of this hybrid SFR diagnostic, allowing for a variable correction factor acorr. For this, we have performed broadband UV-to-IR SED fittings in order to model the star formation histories across the spiral galaxy NGC6946. We have obtained SFRs and stellar masses across the galaxy, from physical scales of 5 kpc down to 500 pc. We find that acorr varies significantly across the galaxy and increases with increasing specific star formation rate (sSFR), the ratio of SFR and stellar mass (or the ratio of young and old stars). The correction acorr does not seem to be correlated to the amount of attenuation AV. Variation of acorr is most likely caused by different mixes of young and old stellar populations across the galaxy. This finding agrees well with our previous results for the interacting spiral galaxy NGC 6872, for which we have demonstrated the variation of acorr and a its correlation with sSFR. Our results show the need of caution when using only two broadband filters in order to determine SFR of individual galaxies or sub-galactic regions. The dust emission most likely overestimates SFR for highly star-forming, high sSFR regions, and underestimates it for more quiescent, low sSFR regions.

  3. Experimental particle formation rates spanning tropospheric sulfuric acid and ammonia abundances, ion production rates, and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürten, Andreas; Bianchi, Federico; Almeida, Joao; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Dunne, Eimear M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Williamson, Christina; Barmet, Peter; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Gordon, Hamish; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Ickes, Luisa; Jokinen, Tuija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Onnela, Antti; Ortega, Ismael K.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Smith, James N.; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Wagner, Paul E.; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Ken; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-10-01

    Binary nucleation of sulfuric acid and water as well as ternary nucleation involving ammonia are thought to be the dominant processes responsible for new particle formation (NPF) in the cold temperatures of the middle and upper troposphere. Ions are also thought to be important for particle nucleation in these regions. However, global models presently lack experimentally measured NPF rates under controlled laboratory conditions and so at present must rely on theoretical or empirical parameterizations. Here with data obtained in the European Organization for Nuclear Research CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber, we present the first experimental survey of NPF rates spanning free tropospheric conditions. The conditions during nucleation cover a temperature range from 208 to 298 K, sulfuric acid concentrations between 5 × 105 and 1 × 109 cm-3, and ammonia mixing ratios from zero added ammonia, i.e., nominally pure binary, to a maximum of 1400 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). We performed nucleation studies under pure neutral conditions with zero ions being present in the chamber and at ionization rates of up to 75 ion pairs cm-3 s-1 to study neutral and ion-induced nucleation. We found that the contribution from ion-induced nucleation is small at temperatures between 208 and 248 K when ammonia is present at several pptv or higher. However, the presence of charges significantly enhances the nucleation rates, especially at 248 K with zero added ammonia, and for higher temperatures independent of NH3 levels. We compare these experimental data with calculated cluster formation rates from the Atmospheric Cluster Dynamics Code with cluster evaporation rates obtained from quantum chemistry.

  4. Black hole accretion versus star formation rate: theory confronts observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volonteri, Marta; Capelo, Pedro R.; Netzer, Hagai; Bellovary, Jillian; Dotti, Massimo; Governato, Fabio

    2015-09-01

    We use a suite of hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy mergers to compare star formation rate (SFR) and black hole accretion rate (BHAR) for galaxies before the interaction (`stochastic' phase), during the `merger' proper, lasting ˜0.2-0.3 Gyr, and in the `remnant' phase. We calculate the bivariate distribution of SFR and BHAR and define the regions in the SFR-BHAR plane that the three phases occupy. No strong correlation between BHAR and galaxy-wide SFR is found. A possible exception are galaxies with the highest SFR and the highest BHAR. We also bin the data in the same way used in several observational studies, by either measuring the mean SFR for AGN in different luminosity bins, or the mean BHAR for galaxies in bins of SFR. We find that the apparent contradiction or SFR versus BHAR for observed samples of AGN and star-forming galaxies is actually caused by binning effects. The two types of samples use different projections of the full bivariate distribution, and the full information would lead to unambiguous interpretation. We also find that a galaxy can be classified as AGN-dominated up to 1.5 Gyr after the merger-driven starburst took place. Our study is consistent with the suggestion that most low-luminosity AGN hosts do not show morphological disturbances.

  5. Regolith Formation Rates and Evolution from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayne, P. O.; Ghent, R. R.; Bandfield, J. L.; Vasavada, A. R.; Williams, J. P.; Siegler, M. A.; Lucey, P. G.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Elder, C. M.; Paige, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Fragmentation and overturn of lunar surface materials produces a layer of regolith, which increases in thickness through time. Experiments on the lunar surface during the Apollo era, combined with remote sensing, found that the upper 10's of cm of regolith exhibit a rapid increase in density and thermal conductivity with depth. This is interpreted to be the signature of impact gardening, which operates most rapidly in the uppermost layers. Gravity data from the GRAIL mission showed that impacts have also extensively fractured the deeper crust. The breakdown and mixing of crustal materials is therefore a central process to lunar evolution and must be understood in order to interpret compositional information from remote sensing and sample analysis. Recently, thermal infrared data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Diviner radiometer were used to provide the first remote observational constraints on the rate of ejecta breakdown around craters < 1 Ga (Ghent et al., 2014). Here, we use nighttime regolith temperatures derived from Diviner data to constrain regolith thermal inertia, thickness, and spatial variability. Applied to models, these new data help improve understanding of regolith formation on a variety of geologic units. We will also discuss several anomalous features that merit further investigation. Reference: Ghent, R. R., Hayne, P. O., Bandfield, J. L., Campbell, B. A., Allen, C. C., Carter, L. M., & Paige, D. A. (2014). Constraints on the recent rate of lunar ejecta breakdown and implications for crater ages. Geology, 42(12), 1059-1062.

  6. The formation of cluster elliptical galaxies as revealed by extensive star formation.

    PubMed

    Stevens, J A; Ivison, R J; Dunlop, J S; Smail, Ian R; Percival, W J; Hughes, D H; Röttgering, H J A; Van Breugel, W J M; Reuland, M

    2003-09-18

    The most massive galaxies in the present-day Universe are found to lie in the centres of rich clusters. They have old, coeval stellar populations suggesting that the bulk of their stars must have formed at early epochs in spectacular starbursts, which should be luminous phenomena when observed at submillimetre wavelengths. The most popular model of galaxy formation predicts that these galaxies form in proto-clusters at high-density peaks in the early Universe. Such peaks are indicated by massive high-redshift radio galaxies. Here we report deep submillimetre mapping of seven high-redshift radio galaxies and their environments. These data confirm not only the presence of spatially extended regions of massive star-formation activity in the radio galaxies themselves, but also in companion objects previously undetected at any wavelength. The prevalence, orientation, and inferred masses of these submillimetre companion galaxies suggest that we are witnessing the synchronous formation of the most luminous elliptical galaxies found today at the centres of rich clusters of galaxies.

  7. Exploring the Role of Galaxy Morphology in the Mass-Metallicity-Star Formation Rate Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahl, Anthony; Rafelski, Marc; Scarlata, Claudia; Pacifici, Camilla; Henry, Alaina L.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Elmegreen, Debra M.

    2017-01-01

    The Mass-Metallicity-Star Formation Rate (M-Z-SFR) fundamental relation reveals the underlying physics behind galaxy evolution: the mechanics of gas inflow, outflow, and the formation of stars are intimately connected. At higher redshift, we observe galaxies which are believed to be more actively accreting from the cosmic web, and as a result bright star-forming clumps are expected to form due to the increased gravitational instability of the galactic medium. We investigate these “clumpy” galaxies in context of their location on the M-Z-SFR plane to search for evidence of metal-poor gas inflows as predicted by theoretical models, and to help us understand how galaxies form and change at a higher redshift (1.3 < z < 2.2). We use the CANDELS survey to examine the morphological structure of star forming regions utilizing the high resolution of space-based HST imaging. We create stamps in their rest-frame UV light to investigate recent star formation and visually classify the morphology of the galaxies. We also utilize stellar population fits of the photometric data to determine properties such as mass and star formation rate. From the grism data of the 3D-HST survey, we select 1861 galaxies based on the strong detection of the [OIII_5007] line, and determine metallicity through the line-diagnostic R_23 using [OIII_5007], [OII_3727] and H_beta. We improve these results through the stacking of spectra to remove a sample bias of requiring strong detections on weak emission lines. Using mass, star formation rate, and metallicity we compare the location of clumpy galaxies on the fundamental plane to investigate possible diminished metallicity and heightened star formation rate compared to the remainder of the sample. This will enable us to better understand the theoretical underpinnings of gas accretion and galaxy evolution at high redshift.

  8. Are We Correctly Measuring Star-Formation Rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Kristen B.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Mitchell, Noah P.

    2017-01-01

    Integrating our knowledge of star formation (SF) traced by observations at different wavelengths is essential for correctly interpreting and comparing SF activity in a variety of systems and environments. This study compares extinction-corrected, integrated ultraviolet (UV) emission from resolved galaxies with color-magnitude diagram (CMD) based star-formation rates (SFRs) derived from resolved stellar populations and CMD fitting techniques in 19 nearby starburst and post-starburst dwarf galaxies. The data sets are from the panchromatic Starburst Irregular Dwarf Survey (STARBIRDS) and include deep legacy GALEX UV imaging, Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging, and Spitzer MIPS imaging. For the majority of the sample, the integrated near-UV fluxes predicted from the CMD-based SFRs—using four different models—agree with the measured, extinction corrected, integrated near-UV fluxes from GALEX images, but the far-UV (FUV) predicted fluxes do not. Furthermore, we find a systematic deviation between the SFRs based on integrated FUV luminosities and existing scaling relations, and the SFRs based on the resolved stellar populations. This offset is not driven by different SF timescales, variations in SFRs, UV attenuation, nor stochastic effects. This first comparison between CMD-based SFRs and an integrated FUV emission SFR indicator suggests that the most likely cause of the discrepancy is the theoretical FUV-SFR calibration from stellar evolutionary libraries and/or stellar atmospheric models. We present an empirical calibration of the FUV-based SFR relation for dwarf galaxies, with uncertainties, which is ˜53% larger than previous relations. These results have signficant implications for measuring FUV-based SFRs of high-redshift galaxies.

  9. CALIBRATING UV STAR FORMATION RATES FOR DWARF GALAXIES FROM STARBIRDS

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Mitchell, Noah P.; Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2015-08-01

    Integrating our knowledge of star formation (SF) traced by observations at different wavelengths is essential for correctly interpreting and comparing SF activity in a variety of systems and environments. This study compares extinction corrected integrated ultraviolet (UV) emission from resolved galaxies with color–magnitude diagram (CMD) based star formation rates (SFRs) derived from resolved stellar populations and CMD fitting techniques in 19 nearby starburst and post-starburst dwarf galaxies. The data sets are from the panchromatic Starburst Irregular Dwarf Survey and include deep legacy GALEX UV imaging, Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging, and Spitzer MIPS imaging. For the majority of the sample, the integrated near-UV fluxes predicted from the CMD-based SFRs—using four different models—agree with the measured, extinction corrected, integrated near-UV fluxes from GALEX images, but the far-UV (FUV) predicted fluxes do not. Furthermore, we find a systematic deviation between the SFRs based on integrated FUV luminosities and existing scaling relations, and the SFRs based on the resolved stellar populations. This offset is not driven by different SF timescales, variations in SFRs, UV attenuation, nor stochastic effects. This first comparison between CMD-based SFRs and an integrated FUV emission SFR indicator suggests that the most likely cause of the discrepancy is the theoretical FUV–SFR calibration from stellar evolutionary libraries and/or stellar atmospheric models. We present an empirical calibration of the FUV-based SFR relation for dwarf galaxies, with uncertainties, which is ∼53% larger than previous relations.

  10. Comparing infrared star formation rate indicators with optically derived quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, J. E.; Gronwall, C.; Salzer, J. J.; Rosenberg, J. L.

    2014-09-01

    We examine the UV reprocessing efficiencies of warm dust and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) through an analysis of the mid- and far-infrared surface luminosity densities of 85 nearby Hα-selected star-forming galaxies detected by the volume-limited KPNO (Kitt Peak National Observatory) International Spectroscopic Survey (KISS). Because Hα selection is not biased towards continuum-bright objects, the KISS sample spans a wide range in stellar masses (108-1012 M⊙), as well as Hα luminosity (1039-1043 erg s-1), mid-infrared 8.0 μm luminosity (1041-1044 erg s-1), and [Bw - R] colour (-0.1-2.2). We find that mid-infrared PAH emission in the Spitzer InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) 8.0 μm band correlates with star formation, and that the efficiency with which galaxies reprocess UV energy into PAH emission depends on metallicity. We also find that the relationship between far-infrared luminosity in the Spitzer Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer 24 μm band pass and Hα-measured star formation rate varies from galaxy to galaxy within our sample; we do not observe a metallicity dependence in this relationship. We use optical colours and established mass-to-light relationships to determine stellar masses for the KISS galaxies; we compare these masses to those of nearby galaxies as a confirmation that the volume-limited nature of KISS avoids strong biases. We also examine the relationship between IRAC 3.6 μm luminosity and galaxy stellar mass, and find a colour-dependent correlation between the two.

  11. Water quality and daily temperature cycle affect biofilm formation in drip irrigation devices revealed by optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jueying; Horn, Harald; Tarchitzky, Jorge; Chen, Yona; Katz, Sagi; Wagner, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Drip irrigation is a water-saving technology. To date, little is known about how biofilm forms in drippers of irrigation systems. In this study, the internal dripper geometry was recreated in 3-D printed microfluidic devices (MFDs). To mimic the temperature conditions in (semi-) arid areas, experiments were conducted in a temperature controlled box between 20 and 50°C. MFDs were either fed with two different treated wastewater (TWW) or synthetic wastewater. Biofilm formation was monitored non-invasively and in situ by optical coherence tomography (OCT). 3-D OCT datasets reveal the major fouling position and illustrate that biofilm development was influenced by fluid dynamics. Biofilm volumetric coverage of the labyrinth up to 60% did not reduce the discharge rate, whereas a further increase to 80% reduced the discharge rate by 50%. Moreover, the biofilm formation rate was significantly inhibited in daily temperature cycle independent of the cultivation medium used.

  12. Kinetics of silicide formation over a wide range of heating rates spanning six orders of magnitude

    SciTech Connect

    Molina-Ruiz, Manel; Lopeandía, Aitor F.; Gonzalez-Silveira, Marta; Garcia, Gemma; Clavaguera-Mora, Maria T.; Peral, Inma; Rodríguez-Viejo, Javier

    2014-07-07

    Kinetic processes involving intermediate phase formation are often assumed to follow an Arrhenius temperature dependence. This behavior is usually inferred from limited data over narrow temperature intervals, where the exponential dependence is generally fully satisfied. However, direct evidence over wide temperature intervals is experimentally challenging and data are scarce. Here, we report a study of silicide formation between a 12 nm film of palladium and 15 nm of amorphous silicon in a wide range of heating rates, spanning six orders of magnitude, from 0.1 to 10{sup 5 }K/s, or equivalently more than 300 K of variation in reaction temperature. The calorimetric traces exhibit several distinct exothermic events related to interdiffusion, nucleation of Pd{sub 2}Si, crystallization of amorphous silicon, and vertical growth of Pd{sub 2}Si. Interestingly, the thickness of the initial nucleation layer depends on the heating rate revealing enhanced mass diffusion at the fastest heating rates during the initial stages of the reaction. In spite of this, the formation of the silicide strictly follows an Arrhenius temperature dependence over the whole temperature interval explored. A kinetic model is used to fit the calorimetric data over the complete heating rate range. Calorimetry is complemented by structural analysis through transmission electron microscopy and both standard and in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

  13. Scaling Relations of Galactic Winds with Star Formation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Ryan; Cecil, Gerald; Heitsch, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    The galactic scale outflows generated by nuclear starbursts consist of a multiphase medium where each phase has a distinct velocity depending on the characteristics of the starburst. Using synthetic absorption lines generated from 3D hydrodynamical simulations we probe the outflow velocity of the hot, warm, and neutral gas entrained in a galactic wind. By varying the star formation rate (SFR) in our simulations, we find no correlation between the outflow velocity of the hot gas with the SFR, but we do find a correlation between the outflow velocity of both warm and neutral gas with the SFR. The scaling relation between outflow velocity and SFR only holds for low SFR until the scaling relation abruptly flattens at a SFR determined by the mass loading of the starburst. The outflow velocity of the hot gas only depends on the mass loading of the starburst and not the SFR. For low SFRs the difference between the velocity of cold gas, as measured by absorption lines of neutral or low ionized gas, may be 5-7 times lower than the velocity of the hot, highly ionized gas. The difference in velocity between the cold and hot gas for higher SFRs depends on the mass loading factor of the starburst. Thus the measured velocities of neutral or low ionized gas cannot be used to estimate the outflow velocity of the hot gas without determining the mass loading of the starburst.

  14. The Range of the Star Formation Rate in Local BCDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, U.

    We will compare the star formation rate (SFR) obtained for the emission line galaxy sample (ELGS) of Popescu et al (1999, 2000) and of very nearby Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies (BCD) which were resolved into individual stars with HST. For the ELGS, the SFR was derived from the Balmer line flux applying standard calibration. The new metal-depend calibrations of Weilbacher & Fritze-von Alvensleben (2001) will be considered. The galaxies of the ELGS are distributed in intermediate to very low environment galaxy densities. About half a dozen nearby (D <= 7 Mpc) BCDs in similar density regimes have been resolved into individual stars using either WFPC2 or NIC2 aboard HST. Analysing their color-magnitude diagrams yield clues on the recent and past SFR (e. g. Schulte-Ladbeck et al., 2001, Hopp, 2001). From both samples, we found that the SFR of BCDs is, on average, surprisingly low. For the ELGS, the values range from 2.2 Msolar yr-1 down to 0.01 Msolar yr-1, with two third of them below 0.3 Msolar yr-1. BCDs with high, star-burst like SFR (>= 0.8 Msolar yr-1) are rare (<= 10%). References: Hopp, U., 2001, in: K. de Boer, Proc. of ``Dwarf Galaxies and their Environment'', January 2001, Shacker Verlag, in press Popescu, C.C., Hopp, U., 2000, A&AS, 142, 247 Popescu, C.C., Hopp, U., Rosa, M., 1999, A&A, 350, 414 Schulte-Ladbeck, R.E., Hopp, U., Greggio, L., Crone, M., Drozdovsky, I.O., 2001, AJ (June), in press Weilbacher, P.M., Fritze-von Alvensleben, U., 2001, A&A, in press (astro-ph/0105282)

  15. ON STAR FORMATION RATES AND STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF GALAXIES OUT TO z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Wuyts, Stijn; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Lutz, Dieter; Nordon, Raanan; Berta, Stefano; Genzel, Reinhard; Magnelli, Benjamin; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Altieri, Bruno; Andreani, Paola; Aussel, Herve; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Cimatti, Andrea; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Maiolino, Roberto; McGrath, Elizabeth J.

    2011-09-01

    We compare multi-wavelength star formation rate (SFR) indicators out to z {approx} 3 in the GOODS-South field. Our analysis uniquely combines U to 8 {mu}m photometry from FIREWORKS, MIPS 24 {mu}m and PACS 70, 100, and 160 {mu}m photometry from the PEP, and H{alpha} spectroscopy from the SINS survey. We describe a set of conversions that lead to a continuity across SFR indicators. A luminosity-independent conversion from 24 {mu}m to total infrared luminosity yields estimates of L{sub IR} that are in the median consistent with the L{sub IR} derived from PACS photometry, albeit with significant scatter. Dust correction methods perform well at low-to-intermediate levels of star formation. They fail to recover the total amount of star formation in systems with large SFR{sub IR}/SFR{sub UV} ratios, typically occuring at the highest SFRs (SFR{sub UV+IR} {approx}> 100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) and redshifts (z {approx}> 2.5) probed. Finally, we confirm that H{alpha}-based SFRs at 1.5 < z < 2.6 are consistent with SFR{sub SED} and SFR{sub UV+IR} provided extra attenuation toward H II regions is taken into account (A{sub V,neb} = A{sub V,continuum}/0.44). With the cross-calibrated SFR indicators in hand, we perform a consistency check on the star formation histories inferred from spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling. We compare the observed SFR-M relations and mass functions at a range of redshifts to equivalents that are computed by evolving lower redshift galaxies backward in time. We find evidence for underestimated stellar ages when no stringent constraints on formation epoch are applied in SED modeling. We demonstrate how resolved SED modeling, or alternatively deep UV data, may help to overcome this bias. The age bias is most severe for galaxies with young stellar populations and reduces toward older systems. Finally, our analysis suggests that SFHs typically vary on timescales that are long (at least several 100 Myr) compared to the galaxies' dynamical time.

  16. STAR FORMATION IN THE BULLET CLUSTER. I. THE INFRARED LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND STAR FORMATION RATE ,

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Mi Chung; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Clowe, Douglas; Markevitch, Maxim; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2010-12-20

    The Bullet Cluster is a massive galaxy cluster at z = 0.297 undergoing a major supersonic (Mach 3) merger event. Using data from Spitzer MIPS and the Infrared Array Camera, optical imaging, and optical spectroscopy, we present the global star formation rate (SFR) of this unique cluster. Using a 90% spectroscopically complete sample of 37 star-forming MIPS confirmed cluster members out to R < 1.7 Mpc, and the Rieke et al. relation to convert from 24 {mu}m flux to SFR, we calculate an integrated obscured SFR of 267 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and a specific SFR of 28 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} per 10{sup 14} M{sub sun}. The cluster mass normalized integrated SFR of the Bullet Cluster is among the highest in a sample of eight other clusters and cluster mergers from the literature. Five LIRGs and one ULIRG contribute 30% and 40% of the total SFR of the cluster, respectively. To investigate the origin of the elevated specific SFR, we compare the infrared luminosity function (IR LF) of the Bullet Cluster to those of Coma (evolved to z = 0.297) and CL1358+62. The Bullet Cluster IR LF exhibits an excess of sources compared to the IR LFs of the other massive clusters. A Schechter function fit of the Bullet Cluster IR LF yields L* = 44.68 {+-} 0.11 erg s{sup -1}, which is {approx}0.25 and 0.35 dex brighter than L* of evolved Coma and CL1358+62, respectively. The elevated IR LF of the Bullet Cluster relative to other clusters can be explained if we attribute the 'excess' star-forming IR galaxies to a population associated with the infalling group that has not yet been transformed into quiescent galaxies. In this case, the timescale required for quenching star formation in the cluster environment must be longer than the timescale since the group's accretion-a few hundred million years. We suggest that 'strangulation' is likely to be an important process in the evolution of star formation in clusters.

  17. Comparison of Traditional and Alternative Fitness Teaching Formats on Heart Rate Intensity and Perceived Enjoyment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ha, Amy Sau-ching; Heung-Sang Wong, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Compared a traditional and an alternative (skill-fitness- music) fitness teaching format to determine whether there would be differences on Hong Kong middle school students' heart rate intensity and perceived enjoyment. Data from heart rate monitors and student surveys indicated that the two formats did not produce differences in heart rates.…

  18. High Rate of Microbleed Formation Following Primary Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Jason; Wing, Jeffrey J.; Norato, Gina; Sobotka, Ian; Menon, Ravi S.; Burgess, Richard E.; Gibbons, M. Chris; Shara, Nawar M.; Fernandez, Stephen; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni; Russell, Laura; Edwards, Dorothy F.; Kidwell, Chelsea S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We sought to investigate the frequency of microbleed (MB) development following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a predominantly African-American population and to identify predictors of new MB formation. Methods The DECIPHER study was a prospective, longitudinal, MR-based cohort study designed to evaluate racial/ethnic differences in risk factors for MBs and to evaluate the prognostic impact of MBs in this ICH population. We evaluated new MB formation in 2 time periods: from baseline to 30 days and from 30 days to year 1. Results Of 200 subjects enrolled in DECIPHER, 84 had MRIs at all required timepoints to meet criteria for this analysis. In the baseline to day 30 analysis, 11 (13.1%) had new MBs, compared to 25 (29.8%) in the day 30 to year 1 analysis. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that baseline number of MBs (OR 1.05 [95% CI 1.01, 1.08], p=0.01) was associated with new MB formation at 30 days. A logistic regression model predicting new MB at 1 year included baseline number of MBs (OR 1.05 [1.00, 1.11], p=0.046), baseline age (OR 1.05 [1.00, 1.10], p=0.04) and WMD disease score (OR 1.18 [0.96, 1.45]. p=0.115). Overall 28 of 84 (33.3%) ICH subjects formed new MBs at some point in the first year post-ICH. Conclusions We found that one-third of ICH subjects in this cohort surviving one year developed new MBs, which suggests a dynamic and rapidly progressive vasculopathy. Future studies are needed to examine the impact of new MB formation on patient outcomes. PMID:26311530

  19. Endolithic algae and micrite envelope formation in Bahamian oolites as revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, S.; Rex, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    Examination of Holocene Bahamian ooelites by scanning electron and light microscopy has revealed the morphology and orientation of aragonite crystals in the lamellar ooelitic envelope, and their modification by the boring activities of endolithic algae. The voids produced by these algae are found in progressive stages of being lined and filled with precipitated microcrystalline aragonite, which is similar to the process of micrite envelope formation in molluscan and other skeletal carbonate grains.

  20. Attribution of halo merger mass ratio and star formation rate density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungeun; Jo, Jeong-woon; Hwang, Jihe; Youn, Soyoung; Park, Boha

    2016-06-01

    We have used codes for implementing the merger tree algorithm by Cole et al. (2007) and Parkinson et al. (2008) and derived the halo merger mass ratio of protocluster of galaxies across the cosmic time. The authors compare the observed and simulated star formation rates reported by the various groups and derive the star formation rate densities at different red-shifts. This study implies that an investigation of different mass variables should be incorporated into the analysis in order to accurately estimate cumulative star formation rates of galaxies and star formation rate densities as a function of red-shifts.

  1. From attitude formation to behavioral response in organ donation: using marketing to increase consent rates.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, Alicia; Guy, Bonnie; Roggenkamp, Susan

    2003-01-01

    This article presents a theoretical analysis of attitude formation and the relationship to stated behavioral intentions as it relates to the decision to donate organs. This analysis reveals the presence of three distinct paths to behavior of potential donors, groups differing in their involvement with organ donation. Promotional objectives and campaign strategies designed to influence attitudes and behaviors should differ according to the behavioral path in operation and the involvement of the audience. Mass media campaigns are likely to reach high involvement groups only. Therefore, personal selling, underutilized in previous donation campaigns, should be brought into the donation strategy to appeal to low involvement groups. By recognizing differences in audience involvement and implementing different strategies, overall donation rates could substantially increase.

  2. Combined techniques for characterising pasta structure reveals how the gluten network slows enzymic digestion rate.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Sissons, Mike; Gidley, Michael J; Gilbert, Robert G; Warren, Frederick J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to characterise the influence of gluten structure on the kinetics of starch hydrolysis in pasta. Spaghetti and powdered pasta were prepared from three different cultivars of durum semolina, and starch was also purified from each cultivar. Digestion kinetic parameters were obtained through logarithm-of-slope analysis, allowing identification of sequential digestion steps. Purified starch and semolina were digested following a single first-order rate constant, while pasta and powdered pasta followed two sequential first-order rate constants. Rate coefficients were altered by pepsin hydrolysis. Confocal microscopy revealed that, following cooking, starch granules were completely swollen for starch, semolina and pasta powder samples. In pasta, they were completely swollen in the external regions, partially swollen in the intermediate region and almost intact in the pasta strand centre. Gluten entrapment accounts for sequential kinetic steps in starch digestion of pasta; the compact microstructure of pasta also reduces digestion rates.

  3. Ultra-flat galaxies selected from RFGC catalog. III. Star formation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnyk, O. V.; Karachentseva, V. E.; Karachentsev, I. D.

    2017-01-01

    We examine the star formation properties of galaxies with very thin disks selected from the Revised FlatGalaxy Catalog (RFGC). The sample contains 333 ultra-flat galaxies (UFG) at high Galactic latitudes, |b| > 10°, with a blue major angular diameter of a ≥ 1.'2, blue and red apparent axial ratios of ( a/b)b > 10, ( a/b)r > 8.5 and radial velocities within 10 000 kms-1. As a control sample for them we use a population of 722 more thick RFGC galaxies with ( a/b)b > 7, situated in the same volume. The UFG distribution over the sky indicates them as a population of quite isolated galaxies.We found that the specific star formation rate, sSFR FUV, determined via the FUV GALEX flux, increases steadily from the early type to late type disks for both the UFG and RFGC-UFG samples, showing no significant mutual difference within each morphological type T. The population of UFG disks has the average HI-mass-to-stellarmass ratio by (0.25 ± 0.03) dex higher than that of RFGC-UFG galaxies. Being compared with arbitrary orientated disks of the same type, the ultra-flat edge-on galaxies reveal that their total HI mass is hidden by self-absorption on the average by approximately 0.20 dex.We demonstrate that using the robust stellar mass estimate via < B-K>-color and galaxy type T for the thin disks, together with a nowaday accounting for internal extinction, yields their sSFR quantities definitely lying below the limit of -9.4 dex (yr-1). The collected observational data on UFG disks imply that their average star formation rate in the past has been approximately three times the current SFR. The UFG galaxies have also sufficient amount of gas to support their observed SFR over the following nearly 9 Gyrs.

  4. TEMPRANILLO Reveals the Mesophyll as Crucial for Epidermal Trichome Formation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Jaramillo, Andrea E.; Osnato, Michela; Shani, Eilon

    2016-01-01

    Plant trichomes are defensive specialized epidermal cells. In all accepted models, the epidermis is the layer involved in trichome formation, a process controlled by gibberellins (GAs) in Arabidopsis rosette leaves. Indeed, GA activates a genetic cascade in the epidermis for trichome initiation. Here we report that TEMPRANILLO (TEM) genes negatively control trichome initiation not only from the epidermis but also from the leaf layer underneath the epidermis, the mesophyll. Plants over-expressing or reducing TEM specifically in the mesophyll, display lower or higher trichome numbers, respectively. We surprisingly found that fluorescently labeled GA3 accumulates exclusively in the mesophyll of leaves, but not in the epidermis, and that TEM reduces its accumulation and the expression of several newly identified GA transporters. This strongly suggests that TEM plays an essential role, not only in GA biosynthesis, but also in regulating GA distribution in the mesophyll, which in turn directs epidermal trichome formation. Moreover, we show that TEM also acts as a link between GA and cytokinin signaling in the epidermis by negatively regulating downstream genes of both trichome formation pathways. Overall, these results call for a re-evaluation of the present theories of trichome formation as they reveal mesophyll essential during epidermal trichome initiation. PMID:26802039

  5. Comparative analysis of animal growth: a primate continuum revealed by a new dimensionless growth rate coefficient.

    PubMed

    Vinicius, Lucio; Mumby, Hannah S

    2013-05-01

    The comparative analysis of animal growth still awaits full integration into life-history studies, partially due to the difficulty of defining a comparable measure of growth rate across species. Using growth data from 50 primate species, we introduce a modified "general growth model" and a dimensionless growth rate coefficient β that controls for size scaling and phylogenetic effects in the distribution of growth rates. Our results contradict the prevailing idea that slow growth characterizes primates as a group: the observed range of β values shows that not all primates grow slowly, with galago species exhibiting growth rates similar or above the mammalian average, while other strepsirrhines and most New World monkeys show limited reduction in growth rates. Low growth rate characterizes apes and some papionines. Phylogenetic regressions reveal associations between β and life-history variables, providing tests for theories of primate growth evolution. We also show that primate slow growth is an exclusively postnatal phenomenon. Our study exemplifies how the dimensionless approach promotes the integration of growth rate data into comparative life-history analysis, and demonstrates its potential applicability to other cases of adaptive diversification of animal growth patterns.

  6. Effects of CO2 doped ice on CO2 and CH4 hydrate formation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambuehl, D.; Elwood-Madden, M.

    2012-12-01

    Reports of methane plumes on Mars have prompted the proposal of many source and reservoir models for methane, one of which is methane hydrate. A hydrate reservoir could sequester methane for prolonged periods. This reservoir could form as subsurface methane advects, coming into contact with a layer of permafrost. Within 1.5 m of the Martian surface, the permafrost is likely in communication with the Martian atmosphere. Therefore, diffused atmospheric gases in the ice, especially CO2, could affect hydrate formations rates. We tested the effects of diffused CO2 on gas hydrate formation rates using CO2 doped and ultrapure water ice. The resulting data was fit with a third order polynomial trend line and the instantaneous rates were determined using the first derivative of the headspace gas pressure vs. time curve and normalized for surface area. The results have shown that CO2 hydrate formation rates increased by half an order of magnitude and CH4 hydrate formation rates increased by an order of magnitude. The accelerated rate of CO2 hydrate formation is likely due to clathration of the diffused CO2, making further hydrate formation kinetically more favorable. The CH4 hydrate formation rates show a greater acceleration due to the thermodynamic stability imparted by a mixed hydrate phase. This indicates that CO2 trapped in the permafrost layer would facilitate the formation of near-surface methane hydrate on Mars.

  7. GOODS-Herschel: ultra-deep XMM-Newton observations reveal AGN/star-formation connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovilos, E.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Ranalli, P.; Vignali, C.; Lusso, E.; Cappelluti, N.; Zamorani, G.; Elbaz, D.; Dickinson, M.; Hwang, H. S.; Charmandaris, V.; Ivison, R. J.; Merloni, A.; Daddi, E.; Carrera, F. J.; Brandt, W. N.; Mullaney, J. R.; Scott, D.; Alexander, D. M.; Del Moro, A.; Morrison, G.; Murphy, E. J.; Altieri, B.; Aussel, H.; Dannerbauer, H.; Kartaltepe, J.; Leiton, R.; Magdis, G.; Magnelli, B.; Popesso, P.; Valtchanov, I.

    2012-10-01

    Models of galaxy evolution assume some connection between the AGN and star formation activity in galaxies. We use the multi-wavelength information of the CDFS to assess this issue. We select the AGNs from the 3 Ms XMM-Newton survey and measure the star-formation rates of their hosts using data that probe rest-frame wavelengths longward of 20 μm, predominantly from deep 100 μm and 160 μm Herschel observations, but also from Spitzer-MIPS-70 μm. Star-formation rates are obtained from spectral energy distribution fits, identifying and subtracting an AGN component. Our sample consists of sources in the z ≈ 0.5-4 redshift range, with star-formation rates SFR ≈ 101-103 M⊙ yr-1 and stellar masses M⋆ ≈ 1010-1011.5 M⊙. We divide the star-formation rates by the stellar masses of the hosts to derive specific star-formation rates (sSFR) and find evidence for a positive correlation between the AGN activity (proxied by the X-ray luminosity) and the sSFR for themost active systems with X-ray luminosities exceeding Lx ≃ 1043 erg s-1 and redshifts z ≳ 1. We do not find evidence for such a correlation for lower luminosity systems or those at lower redshifts, consistent with previous studies. We do not find any correlation between the SFR (or the sSFR) and the X-ray absorption derived from high-quality XMM-Newton spectra either, showing that the absorption is likely to be linked to the nuclear region rather than the host, while the star-formation is not nuclear. Comparing the sSFR of the hosts to the characteristic sSFR of star-forming galaxies at the same redshift (the so-called "main sequence") we find that the AGNs reside mostly in main-sequence and starburst hosts, reflecting the AGN-sSFR connection; however the infrared selection might bias this result. Limiting our analysis to the highest X-ray luminosity AGNs (X-ray QSOs with Lx > 1044 erg s-1), we find that the highest-redshift QSOs (with z ≳ 2) reside predominantly in starburst hosts, with an average s

  8. Tau Isoform Composition Influences Rate and Extent of Filament Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Qi; Congdon, Erin E.; Nagaraja, Haikady N.; Kuret, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    The risk of developing tauopathic neurodegenerative disease depends in part on the levels and composition of six naturally occurring Tau isoforms in human brain. These proteins, which form filamentous aggregates in disease, vary only by the presence or absence of three inserts encoded by alternatively spliced exons 2, 3, and 10 of the Tau gene (MAPT). To determine the contribution of alternatively spliced segments to Tau aggregation propensity, the aggregation kinetics of six unmodified, recombinant human Tau isoforms were examined in vitro using electron microscopy assay methods. Aggregation propensity was then compared at the level of elementary rate constants for nucleation and extension phases. We found that all three alternatively spliced segments modulated Tau aggregation but through differing kinetic mechanisms that could synergize or compete depending on sequence context. Overall, segments encoded by exons 2 and 10 promoted aggregation, whereas the segment encoded by exon 3 depressed it with its efficacy dependent on the presence or absence of a fourth microtubule binding repeat. In general, aggregation propensity correlated with genetic risk reported for multiple tauopathies, implicating aggregation as one candidate mechanism rationalizing the correlation between Tau expression patterns and disease. PMID:22539343

  9. Modulation of microsaccade rate by task difficulty revealed through between- and within-trial comparisons.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Yan, Hongmei; Sun, Hong-Jin

    2015-03-04

    Microsaccades (MSs) are small eye movements that occur during attempted visual fixation. While most studies concerning MSs focus on their roles in visual processing, some also suggest that the MS rate can be modulated by the amount of mental exertion involved in nonvisual processing. The current study focused on the effects of task difficulty on MS rate in a nonvisual mental arithmetic task. Experiment 1 revealed a general inverse relationship between MS rate and subjective task difficulty. During Experiment 2, three task phases with different requirements were identified: during calculation (between stimulus presentation and response), postcalculation (after reporting an answer), and a control condition (undergoing a matching sequence of events without the need to make a calculation). MS rate was observed to approximately double from the during-calculation phase to the postcalculation phase, and was significantly higher in the control condition compared to postcalculation. Only during calculation was the MS rate generally decreased with greater task difficulty. Our results suggest that the nonvisual cognitive processing can suppress MS rate, and that the extent of such suppression is related to the task difficulty.

  10. Hα star formation rates of z > 1 galaxy clusters in the IRAC shallow cluster survey

    SciTech Connect

    Zeimann, Gregory R.; Stanford, S. A.; Brodwin, Mark; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, Conor; Snyder, Gregory F.; Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, Peter; Dey, Arjun; Moustakas, John

    2013-12-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope near-IR spectroscopy for 18 galaxy clusters at 1.0 formation rates within a projected radius of 500 kpc, and many of our clusters (∼60%) have significant levels of star formation within a projected radius of 200 kpc. A stacking analysis reveals that dust reddening in these star-forming galaxies is positively correlated with stellar mass and may be higher in the field than the cluster at a fixed stellar mass. This may indicate a lower amount of gas in star-forming cluster galaxies than in the field population. Also, Hα equivalent widths of star-forming galaxies in the cluster environment are still suppressed below the level of the field. This suppression is most significant for lower mass galaxies (log M {sub *} < 10.0 M {sub ☉}). We therefore conclude that environmental effects are still important at 1.0

  11. Effect of Common Cryoprotectants on Critical Warming Rates and Ice Formation in Aqueous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Jesse B.; Badeau, Ryan; Warkentin, Matthew; Thorne, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Ice formation on warming is of comparable or greater importance to ice formation on cooling in determining survival of cryopreserved samples. Critical warming rates required for ice-free warming of vitrified aqueous solutions of glycerol, dimethyl sulfoxide, ethylene glycol, polyethylene glycol 200 and sucrose have been measured for warming rates of order 10 to 104 K/s. Critical warming rates are typically one to three orders of magnitude larger than critical cooling rates. Warming rates vary strongly with cooling rates, perhaps due to the presence of small ice fractions in nominally vitrified samples. Critical warming and cooling rate data spanning orders of magnitude in rates provide rigorous tests of ice nucleation and growth models and their assumed input parameters. Current models with current best estimates for input parameters provide a reasonable account of critical warming rates for glycerol solutions at high concentrations/low rates, but overestimate both critical warming and cooling rates by orders of magnitude at lower concentrations and larger rates. In vitrification protocols, minimizing concentrations of potentially damaging cryoprotectants while minimizing ice formation will require ultrafast warming rates, as well as fast cooling rates to minimize the required warming rates. PMID:22728046

  12. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Yee, Lindsay D; Schilling, Katherine A; Loza, Christine L; Craven, Jill S; Zuend, Andreas; Ziemann, Paul J; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-07-16

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality, and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multigeneration gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface, and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a midexperiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. Although experiments need to be conducted with other SOA precursor hydrocarbons, current results demonstrate coupling between particle-phase chemistry and size distribution dynamics in the formation of SOAs, thereby opening up an avenue for analysis of the SOA formation process.

  13. Magnetite: What it reveals about the origin of the banded iron formations. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. E.; Mancinelli, R. L.; White, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetite, Fe3O4 is produced abiotically and biotically. Abiotically, magnetite is a late magmatic mineral and forms as a consequence of the cooling of iron rich magma. Biotically, magnetite is produced by several organisms, including magnetotactic bacteria. Hematite, Fe2O3, is also produced abiotically and biotically. Abiotically, hematite rarely occurs as a primary mineral in igneous rocks, but is common as an alteration product, fumarole deposit, and in some metamorphosed Fe-rich rocks. Biotically, hematite is produced by several types of microorganisms. Biologically-produced magnetite and hematite are formed under the control of the host organism, and consequently, have characteristics not found in abiotically produced magnetite and hematite crystals. To determine if the magnetite and hematite in the Banded Iron Formation was biologically or abiotically produced, the characteristics of biologically-produced magnetite and hematite (concentrated from Aquaspirillum magnetotacticum) and abiotically-produced magnetite and hematite obtained from Wards Scientific Supply Company, were compared with characteristics of magnetite and hematite concentrated from the Gunflint Banded Iron Formation (Ontario, Canada) using thermal and crystallographic analytical techniques. Whole rock analysis of the Gunflint Banded Iron Formation by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) revealed the presence of quartz, hematite, siderite and dolomite as the major minerals, and magnetite, greenalite, pyrite, pyrrhotite and apatite as the minor minerals. Analysis of a crude magnetic fraction of the Gunflint showed the minerals quartz, hematite, siderite, dolomite, and magnetite. Analysis of the crude magnetic fraction from Aquaspirillum magnetotacticum revealed organic compounds plus hematite and magnetite. The mineral identification and particle size distribution data obtained from the DTA along with XRD data indicate that the magnetite and hematite from the Gunflint

  14. Concurrent Growth Rate and Transcript Analyses Reveal Essential Gene Stringency in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Shan; Boberek, Jaroslaw M.; Nakashima, Nobutaka; Stach, Jem; Good, Liam

    2009-01-01

    Background Genes essential for bacterial growth are of particular scientific interest. Many putative essential genes have been identified or predicted in several species, however, little is known about gene expression requirement stringency, which may be an important aspect of bacterial physiology and likely a determining factor in drug target development. Methodology/Principal Findings Working from the premise that essential genes differ in absolute requirement for growth, we describe silencing of putative essential genes in E. coli to obtain a titration of declining growth rates and transcript levels by using antisense peptide nucleic acids (PNA) and expressed antisense RNA. The relationship between mRNA decline and growth rate decline reflects the degree of essentiality, or stringency, of an essential gene, which is here defined by the minimum transcript level for a 50% reduction in growth rate (MTL50). When applied to four growth essential genes, both RNA silencing methods resulted in MTL50 values that reveal acpP as the most stringently required of the four genes examined, with ftsZ the next most stringently required. The established antibacterial targets murA and fabI were less stringently required. Conclusions RNA silencing can reveal stringent requirements for gene expression with respect to growth. This method may be used to validate existing essential genes and to quantify drug target requirement. PMID:19557168

  15. Trace incorporation of heavy water reveals slow and heterogeneous pathogen growth rates in cystic fibrosis sputum

    PubMed Central

    Kopf, Sebastian H.; Sessions, Alex L.; Cowley, Elise S.; Reyes, Carmen; Van Sambeek, Lindsey; Hu, Yang; Orphan, Victoria J.; Kato, Roberta; Newman, Dianne K.

    2016-01-01

    Effective treatment for chronic infections is undermined by a significant gap in understanding of the physiological state of pathogens at the site of infection. Chronic pulmonary infections are responsible for the morbidity and mortality of millions of immunocompromised individuals worldwide, yet drugs that are successful in laboratory culture are far less effective against pathogen populations persisting in vivo. Laboratory models, upon which preclinical development of new drugs is based, can only replicate host conditions when we understand the metabolic state of the pathogens and the degree of heterogeneity within the population. In this study, we measured the anabolic activity of the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus directly in the sputum of pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), by combining the high sensitivity of isotope ratio mass spectrometry with a heavy water labeling approach to capture the full range of in situ growth rates. Our results reveal S. aureus generation times with a median of 2.1 d, with extensive growth rate heterogeneity at the single-cell level. These growth rates are far below the detection limit of previous estimates of CF pathogen growth rates, and the rates are slowest in acutely sick patients undergoing pulmonary exacerbations; nevertheless, they are accessible to experimental replication within laboratory models. Treatment regimens that include specific antibiotics (vancomycin, piperacillin/tazobactam, tobramycin) further appear to correlate with slow growth of S. aureus on average, but follow-up longitudinal studies must be performed to determine whether this effect holds for individual patients. PMID:26715741

  16. Seasonal determinations of algal virus decay rates reveal overwintering in a temperate freshwater pond.

    PubMed

    Long, Andrew M; Short, Steven M

    2016-07-01

    To address questions about algal virus persistence (i.e., continued existence) in the environment, rates of decay of infectivity for two viruses that infect Chlorella-like algae, ATCV-1 and CVM-1, and a virus that infects the prymnesiophyte Chrysochromulina parva, CpV-BQ1, were estimated from in situ incubations in a temperate, seasonally frozen pond. A series of experiments were conducted to estimate rates of decay of infectivity in all four seasons with incubations lasting 21 days in spring, summer and autumn, and 126 days in winter. Decay rates observed across this study were relatively low compared with previous estimates obtained for other algal viruses, and ranged from 0.012 to 11% h(-1). Overall, the virus CpV-BQ1 decayed most rapidly whereas ATCV-1 decayed most slowly, but for all viruses the highest decay rates were observed during the summer and the lowest were observed during the winter. Furthermore, the winter incubations revealed the ability of each virus to overwinter under ice as ATCV-1, CVM-1 and CpV-BQ1 retained up to 48%, 19% and 9% of their infectivity after 126 days, respectively. The observed resilience of algal viruses in a seasonally frozen freshwater pond provides a mechanism that can support the maintenance of viral seed banks in nature. However, the high rates of decay observed in the summer demonstrate that virus survival and therefore environmental persistence can be subject to seasonal bottlenecks.

  17. Trace incorporation of heavy water reveals slow and heterogeneous pathogen growth rates in cystic fibrosis sputum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, Sebastian H.; Sessions, Alex L.; Cowley, Elise S.; Reyes, Carmen; Van Sambeek, Lindsey; Hu, Yang; Orphan, Victoria J.; Kato, Roberta; Newman, Dianne K.

    2016-01-01

    Effective treatment for chronic infections is undermined by a significant gap in understanding of the physiological state of pathogens at the site of infection. Chronic pulmonary infections are responsible for the morbidity and mortality of millions of immunocompromised individuals worldwide, yet drugs that are successful in laboratory culture are far less effective against pathogen populations persisting in vivo. Laboratory models, upon which preclinical development of new drugs is based, can only replicate host conditions when we understand the metabolic state of the pathogens and the degree of heterogeneity within the population. In this study, we measured the anabolic activity of the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus directly in the sputum of pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), by combining the high sensitivity of isotope ratio mass spectrometry with a heavy water labeling approach to capture the full range of in situ growth rates. Our results reveal S. aureus generation times with a median of 2.1 d, with extensive growth rate heterogeneity at the single-cell level. These growth rates are far below the detection limit of previous estimates of CF pathogen growth rates, and the rates are slowest in acutely sick patients undergoing pulmonary exacerbations; nevertheless, they are accessible to experimental replication within laboratory models. Treatment regimens that include specific antibiotics (vancomycin, piperacillin/tazobactam, tobramycin) further appear to correlate with slow growth of S. aureus on average, but follow-up longitudinal studies must be performed to determine whether this effect holds for individual patients.

  18. Isolation of Hox Cluster Genes from Insects Reveals an Accelerated Sequence Evolution Rate

    PubMed Central

    Hadrys, Heike; Simon, Sabrina; Kaune, Barbara; Schmitt, Oliver; Schöner, Anja; Jakob, Wolfgang; Schierwater, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Among gene families it is the Hox genes and among metazoan animals it is the insects (Hexapoda) that have attracted particular attention for studying the evolution of development. Surprisingly though, no Hox genes have been isolated from 26 out of 35 insect orders yet, and the existing sequences derive mainly from only two orders (61% from Hymenoptera and 22% from Diptera). We have designed insect specific primers and isolated 37 new partial homeobox sequences of Hox cluster genes (lab, pb, Hox3, ftz, Antp, Scr, abd-a, Abd-B, Dfd, and Ubx) from six insect orders, which are crucial to insect phylogenetics. These new gene sequences provide a first step towards comparative Hox gene studies in insects. Furthermore, comparative distance analyses of homeobox sequences reveal a correlation between gene divergence rate and species radiation success with insects showing the highest rate of homeobox sequence evolution. PMID:22685537

  19. Utilisation of model pectins reveals the effect of demethylated block size frequency on calcium gel formation.

    PubMed

    Yapo, Beda M; Koffi, Kouassi L

    2013-01-30

    Calcium-mediated gelation of LMP is thought to arise from formation of a dense network of Ca(2+)-cross-linked DMB meeting a required minimum average length along pectin chains. The use of MP containing specific average DMB size (BS) types, in the range of 3-100 and in varying proportion (0-100%), has afforded further insights into the gelling behaviour of pectins with a certain DM in the presence of Ca(2+) ions. It clearly appeared that a required minimum BS and a required minimum average frequency (BSF) of the required minimum BS are conditions that must be satisfied by a pectin for formation of a highly dense Ca(2+)-cross-linked DMB network equaling an elastically stable, strong, and cohesive gel. Furthermore, there is a clear contribution of the pectin branched domains to gelation and formation of a firmer and more cohesive gel. The results suggest that this pectin portion may function, not only as a "maintainer" of the pectin molecular weight to a sufficiently high level which fosters good gelation regarding the gelling rate and the strength and nature of the gel formed, but also as junction-zone-terminating structural elements that limit the appearance of undesirable phenomena, notably turbidity, syneresis, and precipitation.

  20. The evolution of the star formation rate function and cosmic star formation rate density of galaxies at z ˜ 1-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsianis, A.; Tescari, E.; Blanc, G.; Sargent, M.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the evolution of the galaxy star formation rate function (SFRF) and cosmic star formation rate density (CSFRD) of z ˜ 1-4 galaxies, using cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations and a compilation of ultraviolet (UV), infrared (IR) and Hα observations. These tracers represent different populations of galaxies with the IR light being a probe of objects with high star formation rates and dust contents, while UV and Hα observations provide a census of low star formation galaxies where mild obscuration occurs. We compare the above SFRFs with the results of SPH simulations run with the code P-GADGET3(XXL). We focus on the role of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) and supernovae in form of galactic winds. The AGN feedback prescription that we use decreases the simulated CSFRD at z < 3 but is not sufficient to reproduce the observed evolution at higher redshifts. We explore different wind models and find that the key factor for reproducing the evolution of the observed SFRF and CSFRD at z ˜ 1-4 is the presence of a feedback prescription that is prominent at high redshifts (z ≥ 4) and becomes less efficient with time. We show that variable galactic winds which are efficient at decreasing the SFRs of low-mass objects are quite successful in reproducing the observables.

  1. Robust hierarchical state-space models reveal diel variation in travel rates of migrating leatherback turtles.

    PubMed

    Jonsen, Ian D; Myers, Ransom A; James, Michael C

    2006-09-01

    1. Biological and statistical complexity are features common to most ecological data that hinder our ability to extract meaningful patterns using conventional tools. Recent work on implementing modern statistical methods for analysis of such ecological data has focused primarily on population dynamics but other types of data, such as animal movement pathways obtained from satellite telemetry, can also benefit from the application of modern statistical tools. 2. We develop a robust hierarchical state-space approach for analysis of multiple satellite telemetry pathways obtained via the Argos system. State-space models are time-series methods that allow unobserved states and biological parameters to be estimated from data observed with error. We show that the approach can reveal important patterns in complex, noisy data where conventional methods cannot. 3. Using the largest Atlantic satellite telemetry data set for critically endangered leatherback turtles, we show that the diel pattern in travel rates of these turtles changes over different phases of their migratory cycle. While foraging in northern waters the turtles show similar travel rates during day and night, but on their southward migration to tropical waters travel rates are markedly faster during the day. These patterns are generally consistent with diving data, and may be related to changes in foraging behaviour. Interestingly, individuals that migrate southward to breed generally show higher daytime travel rates than individuals that migrate southward in a non-breeding year. 4. Our approach is extremely flexible and can be applied to many ecological analyses that use complex, sequential data.

  2. Effect of Booklet/Folder Questionnaire Format and Style of Type on Mail Survey Response Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boser, Judith A.

    Results of two studies, involving surveys of alumni of postsecondary institutions, are presented to assess the effect of format and typeface on mail survey response rates. The first study focused on the effect of booklet/folder format versus stapled sheets. The method of reproduction, page content, page size, and appearance of the questionnaires…

  3. Molecular mechanisms of NET formation and degradation revealed by intravital imaging in the liver vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta; Jenne, Craig N.; Surewaard, Bas G. J.; Thanabalasuriar, Ajitha; Lee, Woo-Yong; Sanz, Maria-Jesus; Mowen, Kerri; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Kubes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) composed of DNA decorated with histones and proteases trap and kill bacteria but also injure host tissue. Here we show that during a bloodstream infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, the majority of bacteria are sequestered immediately by hepatic Kupffer cells, resulting in transient increases in liver enzymes, focal ischaemic areas and a robust neutrophil infiltration into the liver. The neutrophils release NETs into the liver vasculature, which remain anchored to the vascular wall via von Willebrand factor and reveal significant neutrophil elastase (NE) proteolytic activity. Importantly, DNase although very effective at DNA removal, and somewhat effective at inhibiting NE proteolytic activity, fails to remove the majority of histones from the vessel wall and only partly reduces injury. By contrast, inhibition of NET production as modelled by PAD4-deficiency, or prevention of NET formation and proteolytic activity as modelled in NE−/− mice prevent collateral host tissue damage. PMID:25809117

  4. Growth-Phase Sterigmatocystin Formation on Lactose Is Mediated via Low Specific Growth Rates in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Németh, Zoltán; Molnár, Ákos P.; Fejes, Balázs; Novák, Levente; Karaffa, Levente; Keller, Nancy P.; Fekete, Erzsébet

    2016-01-01

    Seed contamination with polyketide mycotoxins such as sterigmatocystin (ST) produced by Aspergilli is a worldwide issue. The ST biosynthetic pathway is well-characterized in A. nidulans, but regulatory aspects related to the carbon source are still enigmatic. This is particularly true for lactose, inasmuch as some ST production mutant strains still synthesize ST on lactose but not on other carbon substrates. Here, kinetic data revealed that on d-glucose, ST forms only after the sugar is depleted from the medium, while on lactose, ST appears when most of the carbon source is still available. Biomass-specified ST production on lactose was significantly higher than on d-glucose, suggesting that ST formation may either be mediated by a carbon catabolite regulatory mechanism, or induced by low specific growth rates attainable on lactose. These hypotheses were tested by d-glucose limited chemostat-type continuous fermentations. No ST formed at a high growth rate, while a low growth rate led to the formation of 0.4 mg·L−1 ST. Similar results were obtained with a CreA mutant strain. We concluded that low specific growth rates may be the primary cause of mid-growth ST formation on lactose in A. nidulans, and that carbon utilization rates likely play a general regulatory role during biosynthesis. PMID:27916804

  5. Metatranscriptomics reveals the molecular mechanism of large granule formation in granular anammox reactor

    PubMed Central

    Bagchi, Samik; Lamendella, Regina; Strutt, Steven; Van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.; Saikaly, Pascal E.

    2016-01-01

    Granules enriched with anammox bacteria are essential in enhancing the treatment of ammonia-rich wastewater, but little is known about how anammox bacteria grow and multiply inside granules. Here, we combined metatranscriptomics, quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to study the changes in community composition, metabolic gene content and gene expression in a granular anammox reactor with the objective of understanding the molecular mechanism of anammox growth and multiplication that led to formation of large granules. Size distribution analysis revealed the spatial distribution of granules in which large granules having higher abundance of anammox bacteria (genus Brocadia) dominated the bottom biomass. Metatranscriptomics analysis detected all the essential transcripts for anammox metabolism. During the later stage of reactor operation, higher expression of ammonia and nitrite transport proteins and key metabolic enzymes mainly in the bottom large granules facilitated anammox bacteria activity. The high activity resulted in higher growth and multiplication of anammox bacteria and expanded the size of the granules. This conceptual model for large granule formation proposed here may assist in the future design of anammox processes for mainstream wastewater treatment. PMID:27319320

  6. Patterned biofilm formation reveals a mechanism for structural heterogeneity in bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Gu, Huan; Hou, Shuyu; Yongyat, Chanokpon; De Tore, Suzanne; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-09-03

    Bacterial biofilms are ubiquitous and are the major cause of chronic infections in humans and persistent biofouling in industry. Despite the significance of bacterial biofilms, the mechanism of biofilm formation and associated drug tolerance is still not fully understood. A major challenge in biofilm research is the intrinsic heterogeneity in the biofilm structure, which leads to temporal and spatial variation in cell density and gene expression. To understand and control such structural heterogeneity, surfaces with patterned functional alkanthiols were used in this study to obtain Escherichia coli cell clusters with systematically varied cluster size and distance between clusters. The results from quantitative imaging analysis revealed an interesting phenomenon in which multicellular connections can be formed between cell clusters depending on the size of interacting clusters and the distance between them. In addition, significant differences in patterned biofilm formation were observed between wild-type E. coli RP437 and some of its isogenic mutants, indicating that certain cellular and genetic factors are involved in interactions among cell clusters. In particular, autoinducer-2-mediated quorum sensing was found to be important. Collectively, these results provide missing information that links cell-to-cell signaling and interaction among cell clusters to the structural organization of bacterial biofilms.

  7. Metatranscriptomics reveals the molecular mechanism of large granule formation in granular anammox reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Samik; Lamendella, Regina; Strutt, Steven; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.; Saikaly, Pascal E.

    2016-06-01

    Granules enriched with anammox bacteria are essential in enhancing the treatment of ammonia-rich wastewater, but little is known about how anammox bacteria grow and multiply inside granules. Here, we combined metatranscriptomics, quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to study the changes in community composition, metabolic gene content and gene expression in a granular anammox reactor with the objective of understanding the molecular mechanism of anammox growth and multiplication that led to formation of large granules. Size distribution analysis revealed the spatial distribution of granules in which large granules having higher abundance of anammox bacteria (genus Brocadia) dominated the bottom biomass. Metatranscriptomics analysis detected all the essential transcripts for anammox metabolism. During the later stage of reactor operation, higher expression of ammonia and nitrite transport proteins and key metabolic enzymes mainly in the bottom large granules facilitated anammox bacteria activity. The high activity resulted in higher growth and multiplication of anammox bacteria and expanded the size of the granules. This conceptual model for large granule formation proposed here may assist in the future design of anammox processes for mainstream wastewater treatment.

  8. CLK-dependent exon recognition and conjoined gene formation revealed with a novel small molecule inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Funnell, Tyler; Tasaki, Shinya; Oloumi, Arusha; Araki, Shinsuke; Kong, Esther; Yap, Damian; Nakayama, Yusuke; Hughes, Christopher S; Cheng, S-W Grace; Tozaki, Hirokazu; Iwatani, Misa; Sasaki, Satoshi; Ohashi, Tomohiro; Miyazaki, Tohru; Morishita, Nao; Morishita, Daisuke; Ogasawara-Shimizu, Mari; Ohori, Momoko; Nakao, Shoichi; Karashima, Masatoshi; Sano, Masaya; Murai, Aiko; Nomura, Toshiyuki; Uchiyama, Noriko; Kawamoto, Tomohiro; Hara, Ryujiro; Nakanishi, Osamu; Shumansky, Karey; Rosner, Jamie; Wan, Adrian; McKinney, Steven; Morin, Gregg B; Nakanishi, Atsushi; Shah, Sohrab; Toyoshiba, Hiroyoshi; Aparicio, Samuel

    2017-12-01

    CDC-like kinase phosphorylation of serine/arginine-rich proteins is central to RNA splicing reactions. Yet, the genomic network of CDC-like kinase-dependent RNA processing events remains poorly defined. Here, we explore the connectivity of genomic CDC-like kinase splicing functions by applying graduated, short-exposure, pharmacological CDC-like kinase inhibition using a novel small molecule (T3) with very high potency, selectivity, and cell-based stability. Using RNA-Seq, we define CDC-like kinase-responsive alternative splicing events, the large majority of which monotonically increase or decrease with increasing CDC-like kinase inhibition. We show that distinct RNA-binding motifs are associated with T3 response in skipped exons. Unexpectedly, we observe dose-dependent conjoined gene transcription, which is associated with motif enrichment in the last and second exons of upstream and downstream partners, respectively. siRNA knockdown of CLK2-associated genes significantly increases conjoined gene formation. Collectively, our results reveal an unexpected role for CDC-like kinase in conjoined gene formation, via regulation of 3'-end processing and associated splicing factors.The phosphorylation of serine/arginine-rich proteins by CDC-like kinase is a central regulatory mechanism for RNA splicing reactions. Here, the authors synthesize a novel small molecule CLK inhibitor and map CLK-responsive alternative splicing events and discover an effect on conjoined gene transcription.

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Fetal Ovaries Reveals That Primordial Follicle Formation and Transition Are Differentially Regulated

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Mengmeng; Che, Long; Yang, Zhenguo; Zhang, Pan; Shi, Jiankai; Li, Jian; Lin, Yan; Fang, Zhengfeng; Che, Lianqiang; Feng, Bin; Wu, De

    2017-01-01

    Primordial follicle formation represents a critical phase of the initiation of embryonic reproductive organ development, while the primordial follicle transition into primary follicle determines whether oestrus or ovulation will occur in female animals. To identify molecular mechanism of new proteins which are involved in ovarian development, we employed 2D-DIGE to compare the protein expression profiles of primordial follicles and primary follicles of fetal ovaries in pigs. Fetal ovaries were collected at distinct time-points of the gestation cycle (g55 and g90). The identified proteins at the g55 time-point are mainly involved in the development of anatomical structures [reticulocalbin-1 (RCN1), reticulocalbin-3 (RCN3)], cell differentiation (actin), and stress response [heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (HNRNPK)]. Meanwhile, at the g90 stage, the isolated proteins with altered expression levels were mainly associated with cell proliferation [major vault protein (MVP)] and stress response [heat shock-related 70 kDa protein 2 (HSPA2)]. In conclusion, our work revealed that primordial follicle formation is regulated by RCN1, RCN3, actin, and HNRNPK, while the primordial follicle transformation to primary follicle is regulated by MVP and HSPA2. Therefore, our results provide further information for the prospective understanding of the molecular mechanism(s) involved in the regulation of the ovarian follicle development. PMID:28265575

  10. 13C Tracking after 13CO2 Supply Revealed Diurnal Patterns of Wood Formation in Aspen.

    PubMed

    Mahboubi, Amir; Linden, Pernilla; Hedenström, Mattias; Moritz, Thomas; Niittylä, Totte

    2015-06-01

    Wood of trees is formed from carbon assimilated in the photosynthetic tissues. Determining the temporal dynamics of carbon assimilation, subsequent transport into developing wood, and incorporation to cell walls would further our understanding of wood formation in particular and tree growth in general. To investigate these questions, we designed a (13)CO2 labeling system to study carbon transport and incorporation to developing wood of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloides). Tracking of (13)C incorporation to wood over a time course using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed diurnal patterns in wood cell wall biosynthesis. The dark period had a differential effect on (13)C incorporation to lignin and cell wall carbohydrates. No (13)C was incorporated into aromatic amino acids of cell wall proteins in the dark, suggesting that cell wall protein biosynthesis ceased during the night. The results show previously unrecognized temporal patterns in wood cell wall biosynthesis, suggest diurnal cycle as a possible cue in the regulation of carbon incorporation to wood, and establish a unique (13)C labeling method for the analysis of wood formation and secondary growth in trees.

  11. Dynamic auxin transport patterns preceding vein formation revealed by live-imaging of Arabidopsis leaf primordia

    PubMed Central

    Marcos, Danielle; Berleth, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Self-regulatory patterning mechanisms capable of generating biologically meaningful, yet unpredictable cellular patterns offer unique opportunities for obtaining mathematical descriptions of underlying patterning systems properties. The networks of higher-order veins in leaf primordia constitute such a self-regulatory system. During the formation of higher-order veins, vascular precursors are selected from a homogenous field of subepidermal cells in unpredictable positions to eventually connect in complex cellular networks. Auxin transport routes have been implicated in this selection process, but understanding of their role in vascular patterning has been limited by our inability to monitor early auxin transport dynamics in vivo. Here we describe a live-imaging system in emerging Arabidopsis thaliana leaves that uses a PIN1:GFP reporter to visualize auxin transport routes and an Athb8:YFP reporter as a marker for vascular commitment. Live-imaging revealed common features initiating the formation of all higher-order veins. The formation of broad PIN1 expression domains is followed by their restriction, leading to sustained, elevated PIN1 expression in incipient procambial cells files, which then express Athb8. Higher-order PIN1 expression domains (hPEDs) are initiated as freely ending domains that extend toward each other and sometimes fuse with them, creating connected domains. During the restriction and specification phase, cells in wider hPEDs are partitioned into vascular and non-vascular fates: Central cells acquire a coordinated cell axis and express elevated PIN1 levels as well as the pre-procambial marker Athb8, while edge cells downregulate PIN1 and remain isodiametric. The dynamic nature of the early selection process is underscored by the instability of early hPEDs, which can result in dramatic changes in vascular network architecture prior to Athb8 expression, which is correlated with the promotion onto vascular cell fate. PMID:24966861

  12. The Mass-Transfer Formation of Blue Stragglers as Revealed by their White Dwarf Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosnell, Natalie M.

    2014-01-01

    The formation mechanism of blue straggler stars, defined to be brighter and bluer than the main sequence turnoff in a star cluster, has been a question for almost six decades. The blue straggler population of the old (7 Gyr) open cluster NGC 188 provides a unique opportunity to probe the formation histories of blue straggler stars in open clusters. In comparison to the blue straggler populations in younger open clusters and in globular clusters, the cooler temperatures (6,000 to 6,750 K) and close proximity (2.5 kpc) of the blue stragglers in NGC 188 allow for in-depth high-resolution spectroscopic investigation. Long-term radial velocity studies revealed that over 75% of the NGC 188 blue stragglers exist in binaries with a prevalence of 1000-day periods and a statistical secondary mass distribution that peaks at 0.5 Msolar. Using HST/SBC far-UV photometry I will present direct observational detections of young (<300 Myr), hot white dwarf companions in three blue straggler binaries. Given the age distribution predicted in full N-body models, which translates into a white dwarf temperature distribution, three detections is consistent with the entire NGC 188 blue straggler population being formed via mass transfer. These detections affirm the prediction made by previous studies that the blue straggler population of NGC 188 is dominated by mass transfer formation. I also identify and present specific initial binaries and pathways through which these three binary systems could have formed. Support for Program number 12492 was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Incorporated, under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  13. Dynamics of erosion in a compressional mountain range revealed by 10Be paleoerosion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Val, P.; Hoke, G. D.; Fosdick, J. C.; Wittmann, H.

    2015-12-01

    The temporal evolution of erosion over million-year timescales is key to understanding the evolution of mountain ranges and adjacent fold-and-thrust belts. While models of orogenic wedge evolution predict an instantaneous response of erosion to pulses of rock uplift, stream-power based landscape evolution models predict catchment-wide erosion maxima that lag behind a rock uplift pulse. Here, we explore the relationships between rock uplift, erosion, and sediment deposition in the Argentine Precordillera fold-and-thrust belt at 30°S where extensive previous work documents deformation, climate and sediment accumulation histories. Sandstone samples spanning 8.8 to 1.8 Ma were collected from the previously dated wedge-top (Iglesia) and foredeep basins (Bermejo) for quartz purification and 10Be extraction. 10Be concentrations due to burial and exhumation were estimated and subtracted from the measured concentrations and yielded the inherited 10Be concentrations, which were then corrected for sample magnetostratigraphic age. The inherited concentrations were then used to calculate paleoerosion rates. We modeled various pre-burial and post-burial exposure scenarios in order to assess potential sources of uncertainty in the recovered paleoerosion rates. The modeling results reveal that pre-burial and post-burial exposure periods only marginally affect our results. By combining the 10Be-derived paleoerosion rates and geomorphic observations with detrital zircon provenance, we document the isolation of the wedge-top basin, which was later reconnected by an upstream migrating pulse of erosion in a process that was directly controlled by thrust activity and base level. The data further indicate that the attainment of maximum upland erosion rates lags maximum rates of deformation and subsidence over million-year timescales. The magnitudes and causes of the erosional delays shed new light on the catchment erosional response to tectonic deformation and rock uplift in orogenic

  14. Revealing equilibrium and rate constants of weak and fast noncovalent interactions.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Gleb G; Okhonin, Victor; Gorelsky, Serge I; Berezovski, Maxim V

    2011-03-15

    Rate and equilibrium constants of weak noncovalent molecular interactions are extremely difficult to measure. Here, we introduced a homogeneous approach called equilibrium capillary electrophoresis of equilibrium mixtures (ECEEM) to determine k(on), k(off), and K(d) of weak (K(d) > 1 μM) and fast kinetics (relaxation time, τ < 0.1 s) in quasi-equilibrium for multiple unlabeled ligands simultaneously in one microreactor. Conceptually, an equilibrium mixture (EM) of a ligand (L), target (T), and a complex (C) is prepared. The mixture is introduced into the beginning of a capillary reactor with aspect ratio >1000 filled with T. Afterward, differential mobility of L, T, and C along the reactor is induced by an electric field. The combination of differential mobility of reactants and their interactions leads to a change of the EM peak shape. This change is a function of rate constants, so the rate and equilibrium constants can be directly determined from the analysis of the EM peak shape (width and symmetry) and propagation pattern along the reactor. We proved experimentally the use of ECEEM for multiplex determination of kinetic parameters describing weak (3 mM > K(d) > 80 μM) and fast (0.25 s ≥ τ ≥ 0.9 ms) noncovalent interactions between four small molecule drugs (ibuprofen, S-flurbiprofen, salicylic acid and phenylbutazone) and α- and β-cyclodextrins. The affinity of the drugs was significantly higher for β-cyclodextrin than α-cyclodextrin and mostly determined by the rate constant of complex formation.

  15. Migration rates and formation injectivity to determine containment time scales of sequestered carbon dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burke, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    Additionally, this research establishes a methodology to calculate the injectivity of a target formation. Because injectivity describes the pressure increase due to the introduction of fluids into a formation, the relevant application of injectivity is to determine the pressure increase, due to an injection volume and flow rate, that will induce fractures in the reservoir rocks. This quantity is defined mathematically as the maximum pressure differential between the hydrostatic gradient and the fracture gradient of the target formation. Injectivity is mathematically related to the maximum pressure differential of the formation, and can be used to determine the upper limit for the pressure increase that an injection target can withstand before fracturing.

  16. Cloud Evolution during Tropical Cyclone Formation as Revealed by TRMM PR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, C.; Wang, Z.; Nesbitt, S. W.; Dunkerton, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the cloud evolution during tropical cyclone formation, cloud features for more than 100 named tropical cyclones over the Atlantic are examined from the tropical wave to the tropical cyclone stage using the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR). We focus on a time window from 3 days before genesis to 1 day after genesis, where the diagnoses for the pre-genesis evolution are carried out in the framework of the marsupial paradigm and the post-genesis analysis using the NHC best-tracks. The 20 dBZ echo-top height is used in combination with the near surface rain rate to identify the different types of convection: i) shallow convection; ii) mid-level convection and iii) deep convection. The frequency of occurrence for each precipitation type is calculated, and the relative contributions of different types of precipitation to the total rain rate are examined with respect to the center. Precipitation was found to increase in coverage and intensity near the wave-pouch center approaching genesis. Stratiform precipitation is prevalent from day -3 to day +1, but convective precipitation persistently increases near the inner-core. Mid-level convection occurs more frequently than deep convection from day -3 to day +1 and makes a larger contribution to the total precipitation than deep convection. It is also shown that stratiform precipitation, mid-level convection and deep convection all contribute to the substantial increase in rain-rate.

  17. 40 CFR Table I-3 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for Semiconductor Manufacturing for... Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for Semiconductor Manufacturing...

  18. 40 CFR Table I-3 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for Semiconductor Manufacturing for... Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for...

  19. 40 CFR Table I-4 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for Semiconductor Manufacturing for... Factors(1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for...

  20. Fast-Timescale Star Formation at z ~ 1 Revealed by H alpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurczynski, Peter; Gawiser, Eric J.; Acquaviva, Viviana; Rafelski, Marc; Teplitz, Harry I.; UVUDF Team; CANDELS Team

    2017-01-01

    Measuring scatter in the Star Formation Rate (SFR) - stellar mass (M*) correlation as a function of SFR timescale informs us whether galaxies evolve gradually or in bursts. We report the SFRs of individual, intermediate mass (9 < log M* < 10.5) galaxies at z ~ 1 using dust-corrected, fast-timescale H(alpha) grism spectroscopy in 3D-HST. We present measurements of intrinsic scatter in the SFR-M* correlation, and compare with scatter estimated using intermediate timescale, broadband SED-based SFR estimates. We also illustrate SFR calibrations that combine these Ha results with ancillary IR and UV photometry in CANDELS with the goal of achieving greater precision in SFR estimation.

  1. Generalized additive models reveal the intrinsic complexity of wood formation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Henri E; Rathgeber, Cyrille B K; Kiessé, Tristan Senga; Hartmann, Felix P; Barbeito, Ignacio; Fournier, Meriem

    2013-04-01

    The intra-annual dynamics of wood formation, which involves the passage of newly produced cells through three successive differentiation phases (division, enlargement, and wall thickening) to reach the final functional mature state, has traditionally been described in conifers as three delayed bell-shaped curves followed by an S-shaped curve. Here the classical view represented by the 'Gompertz function (GF) approach' was challenged using two novel approaches based on parametric generalized linear models (GLMs) and 'data-driven' generalized additive models (GAMs). These three approaches (GFs, GLMs, and GAMs) were used to describe seasonal changes in cell numbers in each of the xylem differentiation phases and to calculate the timing of cell development in three conifer species [Picea abies (L.), Pinus sylvestris L., and Abies alba Mill.]. GAMs outperformed GFs and GLMs in describing intra-annual wood formation dynamics, showing two left-skewed bell-shaped curves for division and enlargement, and a right-skewed bimodal curve for thickening. Cell residence times progressively decreased through the season for enlargement, whilst increasing late but rapidly for thickening. These patterns match changes in cell anatomical features within a tree ring, which allows the separation of earlywood and latewood into two distinct cell populations. A novel statistical approach is presented which renews our understanding of xylogenesis, a dynamic biological process in which the rate of cell production interplays with cell residence times in each developmental phase to create complex seasonal patterns.

  2. Statistical tests of a periodicity hypothesis for crater formation rate - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabushita, S.

    1996-04-01

    A statistical test is made of the periodicity hypothesis for crater formation rate, using a new data set compiled by Grieve. The criterion adopted is that of Broadbent, modified so as to take into account the loss of craters with time. Small craters (diameters <=2 km) are highly concentrated near the recent epoch, and are not adequate as a data set for testing. Various subsets of the original data are subjected to the test and a period close to 30 Myr is detected. On the assumption of random distribution of crater ages, the probability of detecting such a period is calculated at 50, 73 and 64 per cent respectively for craters with D<~2 km (N=49), for those with 10>=D<~2 km (N=31) and for large craters [D<~10 km, (N=18)] (where N is the number of craters). It is thus difficult to regard the detected period as being significant based on statistical argument alone. It is pointed out that a similar period is associated with geometric reversals and the climatic variation as revealed by the deep ocean delta^18O spectrum.

  3. Conditions for circumstellar disc formation - II. Effects of initial cloud stability and mass accretion rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2016-12-01

    Disc formation in strongly magnetized cloud cores is investigated using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation with a focus on the effects of the initial cloud stability and the mass accretion rate. The initial cloud stability greatly alters the disc formation process even for prestellar clouds with the same mass-to-flux ratio. A high mass accretion rate on to the disc-forming region is realized in initially unstable clouds, and a large angular momentum is introduced into the circumstellar region in a short time. The region around the protostar has both a thin infalling envelope and a weak magnetic field, which both weaken the effect of magnetic braking. The growth of the rotation-supported disc is promoted in such unstable clouds. Conversely, clouds in an initially near-equilibrium state show lower accretion rates of mass and angular momentum. The angular momentum is transported to the outer envelope before protostar formation. After protostar formation, the circumstellar region has a thick infalling envelope and a strong magnetic field that effectively brakes the disc. As a result, disc formation is suppressed when the initial cloud is in a nearly stable state. The density distribution of the initial cloud also affects the disc formation process. Disc growth strongly depends on the initial conditions when the prestellar cloud has a uniform density, whereas there is no significant difference in the disc formation process in prestellar clouds with non-uniform densities.

  4. The Relative Rate of LGRB Formation as a Function of Metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, J. F.; Fruchter, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    There is now strong evidence that long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) are preferentially formed in low-metallicity environments. However, the magnitude of this effect and its functional dependence on metallicity have not been well characterized. In our previous paper, we compared the metallicity distribution of LGRB host galaxies to that of star-forming galaxies in the local universe. Here we build upon this work by in effect dividing one distribution by the other, and thus directly determine the relative rate of LGRB formation as a function of metallicity in the low-redshift universe. We find a dramatic cutoff in LGRB formation above a metallicity of {log}({{O}}/{{H}})+12≈ 8.3 in the KK04 scale, with LGRBs forming between 10 and 50 times more frequently per unit star formation below this cutoff than above. Furthermore, our data suggest that the rate of LGRB formation per unit star formation continues to fall above this break. We estimate that the LGRB formation rate per unit star formation may drop by as much as a factor of 100 between one-third solar and solar metallicity.

  5. A Model for Variable Levee Formation Rates in an Active Lava Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, L. S.; Baloga, S. M.; Mouginis-Mark, P.; Crisp, J.

    2004-01-01

    Channelized lava flows on Mars and the Earth often feature levees and collateral margins that change in volume along the path of the flow. Consistent with field observations of terrestrial flows, this suggests that the rate of levee formation varies with distance and other factors. Previous models have assumed a constant rate of levee growth, specified by a single parameter, lambda. The rate of levee formation for lava flows is a good indicator of the mass eruption rate and rheology of the flow. Insight into levee formation will help us better understand whether or not the effusion rate was constant during an eruption, and once local topography is considered, allows us to look at cooling and/or rheology changes downslope. Here we present a more realistic extension of the levee formation model that treats the rate of levee growth as a function of distance along the flow path. We show how this model can be used with a terrestrial flow and a long lava flow on Mars. The key statement of the new formulation is the rate of transfer from the active component to the levees (or other passive components) through an element dx along the path of the flow. This volumetric transfer equation is presented.

  6. Compositional variability across Mercury's surface revealed by MESSENGER measurements of variations in thermal neutron count rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peplowski, P. N.; Lawrence, D. J.; Goldsten, J. O.; Nittler, L. R.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements by MESSENGER's Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer (GRNS) have revealed variations in the flux of thermal neutrons across Mercury's northern hemisphere. These variations are interpreted to originate from spatial variations in surface elemental composition. In particular, the measurements are sensitive to the near-surface abundances of elements that absorb thermal neutrons, including major rock-forming elements such as Fe and Ti, minor elements such as Mn and Cl, and rare-earth elements such as Gd and Sm. We have constructed a map of thermal neutron variability across the surface and compared it with known variations in elemental composition and with the distribution of geologic units. Development of the map included the derivation of the macroscopic thermal neutron absorption cross section across the surface, a quantity whose value and variability provides useful constraints on the formation and geochemical evolution of Mercury's crust. Finally, by combining the thermal neutron measurements with previously reported elemental measurements from the GRNS and MESSENGER's X-Ray Spectrometer, we have derived constraints on the abundances of neutron-absorbing elements, including previously unreported limits for some minor and rare-earth elements.

  7. 'In-Format' screening of a novel bispecific antibody format reveals significant potency improvements relative to unformatted molecules.

    PubMed

    Scott, Martin J; Lee, Jennifer A; Wake, Matthew S; Batt, Kelly V; Wattam, Trevor A; Hiles, Ian D; Batuwangala, Thil D; Ashman, Claire I; Steward, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies (BsAbs) are emerging as an important class of biopharmaceutical. The majority of BsAbs are created from conventional antibodies or fragments engineered into more complex configurations. A recurring challenge in their development, however, is the identification of components that are optimised for inclusion in the final format in order to deliver both efficacy and robust biophysical properties. Using a modular BsAb format, the mAb-dAb, we assessed whether an 'in-format' screening approach, designed to select format-compatible domain antibodies, could expedite lead discovery. Human nerve growth factor (NGF) was selected as an antigen to validate the approach; domain antibody (dAb) libraries were screened, panels of binders identified, and binding affinities and potencies compared for selected dAbs and corresponding mAb-dAbs. A number of dAbs that exhibited high potency (IC50) when assessed in-format were identified. In contrast, the corresponding dAb monomers had ∼1000-fold lower potency than the formatted dAbs; such dAb monomers would therefore have been omitted from further characterization. Subsequent stoichiometric analyses of mAb-dAbs bound to NGF, or an additional target antigen (vascular endothelial growth factor), suggested different target binding modes; this indicates that the observed potency improvements cannot be attributed simply to an avidity effect offered by the mAb-dAb format. We conclude that, for certain antigens, screening naïve selection outputs directly in-format enables the identification of a subset of format-compatible dAbs, and that this offers substantial benefits in terms of molecular properties and development time.

  8. Varying relative degradation rates of oil in different forms and environments revealed by ramped pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Pendergraft, Matthew A; Rosenheim, Brad E

    2014-09-16

    Degradation of oil contamination yields stabilized products by removing and transforming reactive and volatile compounds. In contaminated coastal environments, the processes of degradation are influenced by shoreline energy, which increases the surface area of the oil as well as exchange between oil, water, sediments, microbes, oxygen, and nutrients. Here, a ramped pyrolysis carbon isotope technique is employed to investigate thermochemical and isotopic changes in organic material from coastal environments contaminated with oil from the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Oiled beach sediment, tar ball, and marsh samples were collected from a barrier island and a brackish marsh in southeast Louisiana over a period of 881 days. Stable carbon ((13)C) and radiocarbon ((14)C) isotopic data demonstrate a predominance of oil-derived carbon in the organic material. Ramped pyrolysis profiles indicate that the organic material was transformed into more stable forms. Our data indicate relative rates of stabilization in the following order, from fastest to slowest: high energy beach sediments > low energy beach sediments > marsh > tar balls. Oil was transformed most rapidly where shoreline energy and the rates of oil dispersion and exchange with water, sediments, microbes, oxygen, and nutrients were greatest. Still, isotope data reveal persistence of oil.

  9. GAPS IN THE HD 169142 PROTOPLANETARY DISK REVEALED BY POLARIMETRIC IMAGING: SIGNS OF ONGOING PLANET FORMATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Quanz, Sascha P.; Avenhaus, Henning; Garufi, Antonio; Schmid, Hans Martin; Buenzli, Esther; Wolf, Sebastian

    2013-03-20

    We present H-band Very Large Telescope/NACO polarized light images of the Herbig Ae/Be star HD 169142 probing its protoplanetary disk as close as {approx}0.''1 to the star. Our images trace the face-on disk out to {approx}1.''7 ({approx}250 AU) and reveal distinct substructures for the first time: (1) the inner disk ({approx}<20 AU) appears to be depleted in scattering dust grains; (2) an unresolved disk rim is imaged at {approx}25 AU; (3) an annular gap extends from {approx}40 to 70 AU; (4) local brightness asymmetries are found on opposite sides of the annular gap. We discuss different explanations for the observed morphology among which ongoing planet formation is a tempting, but yet to be proven, one. Outside of {approx}85 AU the surface brightness drops off roughly {proportional_to}r {sup -3.3}, but describing the disk regions between 85-120 AU and 120-250 AU separately with power laws {proportional_to}r {sup -2.6} and {proportional_to}r {sup -3.9} provides a better fit hinting toward another discontinuity in the disk surface. The flux ratio between the disk-integrated polarized light and the central star is {approx}4.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}. Finally, combining our results with those from the literature, {approx}40% of the scattered light in the H band appears to be polarized. Our results emphasize that HD 169142 is an interesting system for future planet formation or disk evolution studies.

  10. Surface Polysaccharide Mutants Reveal that Absence of O Antigen Reduces Biofilm Formation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Hathroubi, S.; Hancock, M. A.; Langford, P. R.; Tremblay, Y. D. N.; Labrie, J.

    2015-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family and the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, a highly contagious lung disease causing important economic losses. Surface polysaccharides, including lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and capsular polysaccharides (CPS), are implicated in the adhesion and virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae, but their role in biofilm formation is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the requirement for these surface polysaccharides in biofilm formation by A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1. Well-characterized mutants were used: an O-antigen LPS mutant, a truncated core LPS mutant with an intact O antigen, a capsule mutant, and a poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PGA) mutant. We compared the amount of biofilm produced by the parental strain and the isogenic mutants using static and dynamic systems. Compared to the findings for the biofilm of the parental or other strains, the biofilm of the O antigen and the PGA mutants was dramatically reduced, and it had less cell-associated PGA. Real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant reduction in the level of pgaA, cpxR, and cpxA mRNA in the biofilm cells of the O-antigen mutant compared to that in the biofilm cells of the parental strain. Specific binding between PGA and LPS was consistently detected by surface plasmon resonance, but the lack of O antigen did not abolish these interactions. In conclusion, the absence of the O antigen reduces the ability of A. pleuropneumoniae to form a biofilm, and this is associated with the reduced expression and production of PGA. PMID:26483403

  11. The effect of fission products on the rate of U3O8 formation in SIMFUEL oxidized in air at 250°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jong-Won; McEachern, Rod J.; Taylor, Peter; Wood, Donald D.

    1996-06-01

    The effect of fission products on the rate of U3O8 formation was investigated by oxidizing UO2-based SIMFUEL (simulated high burnup nuclear fuel) and unirradiated UO2 fuel specimens in air at 250°C for different times (1-317 days). The progress of oxidation was monitored by X-ray diffraction, revealing that the rate of U3O8 formation declines with increasing burnup. An expression was derived to describe quantitatively the time for U3O8 powder formation as a function of simulated burnup. These findings were supported by additional isochronal oxidation experiments conducted between 200 and 300°C.

  12. The COSMOS-[O II] survey: evolution of electron density with star formation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasinen, Melanie; Bian, Fuyan; Groves, Brent; Kewley, Lisa J.; Gupta, Anshu

    2017-03-01

    Star-forming galaxies at z > 1 exhibit significantly different properties to local galaxies of equivalent stellar mass. Not only are high-redshift star-forming galaxies characterized by higher star formation rates and gas fractions than their local counterparts, they also appear to host star-forming regions with significantly different physical conditions, including greater electron densities. To understand what physical mechanisms are responsible for the observed evolution of the star-forming conditions, we have assembled the largest sample of star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 1.5 with emission-line measurements of the {[O II]}λ λ 3726,3729 doublet. By comparing our z ∼ 1.5 sample to local galaxy samples with equivalent distributions of stellar mass, star formation rate and specific star formation rate we investigate the proposed evolution in electron density and its dependence on global properties. We measure an average electron density of 114_{-27}^{+28} cm^{-3} for our z ∼ 1.5 sample, a factor of 5 greater than the typical electron density of local star-forming galaxies. However, we find no offset between the typical electron densities of local and high-redshift galaxies with equivalent star formation rates. Our work indicates that the average electron density of a sample is highly sensitive to the star formation rates, implying that the previously observed evolution is mainly the result of selection effects.

  13. Estimating hydroxyl radical photochemical formation rates in natural waters during long-term laboratory irradiation experiments.

    PubMed

    Sun, Luni; Chen, Hongmei; Abdulla, Hussain A; Mopper, Kenneth

    2014-04-01

    In this study it was observed that, during long-term irradiations (>1 day) of natural waters, the methods for measuring hydroxyl radical (˙OH) formation rates based upon sequentially determined cumulative concentrations of photoproducts from probes significantly underestimate actual ˙OH formation rates. Performing a correction using the photodegradation rates of the probe products improves the ˙OH estimation for short term irradiations (<1 day), but not long term irradiations. Only the 'instantaneous' formation rates, which were obtained by adding probes to aliquots at each time point and irradiating these sub-samples for a short time (≤2 h), were found appropriate for accurately estimating ˙OH photochemical formation rates during long-term laboratory irradiation experiments. Our results also showed that in iron- and dissolved organic matter (DOM)-rich water samples, ˙OH appears to be mainly produced from the Fenton reaction initially, but subsequently from other sources possibly from DOM photoreactions. Pathways of ˙OH formation in long-term irradiations in relation to H2O2 and iron concentrations are discussed.

  14. DNA fingerprinting reveals elevated mutation rates in herring gulls inhabiting a genotoxically contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Yauk, C.L.; Quinn, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    The authors used multi-locus DNA fingerprinting to examine families of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) from a genotoxically contaminated site (Hamilton Harbour) and from a pristine location (Kent Island, Bay of Fundy) to show significant differences in mutation rates between the locations. Overall the authors identified 17 mutant bands from 15 individuals of the 35 examined from Hamilton Harbour, and 7 mutant fragments from 7 individuals, of the 43 examined from Kent Island; a mutation frequency of 0.429 per nestling for Hamilton Harbour and 0.163 for Kent Island. The total number of individuals with mutant bands was significantly higher at Hamilton Harbour than at Kent Island (X{sup 2}=6.734; df = 1; P < 0.01). Ongoing analysis of other less contaminated sites also reveals lower mutation rates than those seen in Hamilton Harbour. With multi-locus DNA fingerprinting many regions of the genome can be surveyed simultaneously. The tandemly repeated arrays of nucleotides examined with DNA fingerprinting are known to have elevated rates of mutation. Furthermore, the mutations seen with DNA fingerprinting are predominantly heritable. Other biomarkers currently used in situ are not able to monitor direct and heritable DNA mutation, or measure biological endpoints that frequently result in spontaneous abortion creating difficulty in observing significantly elevated levels in viable offspring. The authors suggest that multilocus DNA fingerprinting can be used as a biomarker to identify potentially heritable risks before the onset of other types of ecological damage. This approach provides a direct measure of mutation in situ and in vivo in a vertebrate species under ambient conditions.

  15. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Yee, L. D.; Schilling, K.; Loza, C. L.; Craven, J. S.; Zuend, A.; Ziemann, P. J.; Seinfeld, J.

    2013-12-01

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multi-generation gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a mid-experiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. The results of the current work have a number of implications for SOA models. While the dynamics of an aerosol size distribution reflects the mechanism of growth, we demonstrate here that it provides a key constraint in interpreting laboratory and ambient SOA formation. This work, although carried out specifically for the long chain alkane, dodecane, is expected to be widely applicable to other major classes of SOA precursors. SOA consists of a myriad of organic compounds containing various functional groups, which can generally undergo heterogeneous/multiphase reactions forming low-volatility products such as oligomers and other high molecular mass compounds. If particle-phase chemistry is indeed

  16. Measuring the rates of spontaneous vortex formation in highly oblate Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neely, Tyler; Samson, Edward; Bradley, Ashton; Davis, Matthew; Anderson, Brian

    2009-05-01

    By studying the dynamics of the Bose-Einstein condensation transition in highly oblate (˜11:1 aspect ratio) traps, we have measured the dependence of spontaneous vortex formation on BEC growth rate, extending our previous experimental and numerical observations of spontaneous vortex formation in weakly oblate (˜2:1 aspect ratio) traps [1]. Our condensation procedure in these highly oblate traps allows us to create BECs over a large range of growth times, from approximately 200 ms to over 2 s. By characterizing vortex formation vs. BEC growth rate, and comparing experimental and numerical results, the Kibble-Zurek mechanism for topological defect formation may be quantitatively studied in our system. [1] C.N. Weiler, T.W. Neely, D.R. Scherer, A.S. Bradley, M.J. Davis, and B.P. Anderson., Nature 455, 948 (2008).

  17. An Estimation of the Star Formation Rate in the Perseus Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercimek, Seyma

    2016-07-01

    The detailed study of all sources are carried on, by comparing the number of existing cores and YSOs from observations with the prediction from column density PDFs. With this investigation, we found a relation between starless cores and protostars that cores may be considered progenitors of the next generation of protostars, assuming the rate of star formation in the recent past is similar to the rate in the near future. These are also new results which have not been investigated previously. In addition, we also calculate the mean density of each starless core and its corresponding free-fall time in order to estimate star formation rate in near future. Following that, we obtained star formation efficiency from the existing stellar cores which later was used to estimate average stellar mass from standard IMF. Finally, we estimate how many starless cores will turn into stars in the predicted free fall time and how many stars will form from calculated core mass.

  18. A Primary Linkage Map of the Porcine Genome Reveals a Low Rate of Genetic Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Ellegren, H.; Chowdhary, B. P.; Johansson, M.; Marklund, L.; Fredholm, M.; Gustavsson, I.; Andersson, L.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive genetic linkage map of the porcine genome has been developed by typing 128 genetic markers in a cross between the European Wild Boar and a domestic breed (Large White). The marker set includes 68 polymerase chain reaction-formatted microsatellites, 60 anchored reference markers informative for comparative mapping and 47 markers which have been physically assigned by in situ hybridization. Novel multipoint assignments are provided for 54 of the markers. The map covers about 1800 cM, and the average spacing between markers is 11 cM. We used the map data to estimate the genome size in pigs, thereby addressing the total recombination distance in a third mammalian species. A sex-average genome length of 1873 +/- 139 cM was obtained by comparing the recombinational and physical distances in defined regions of the genome. This is strikingly different from the length of the human genome (3800-4000 cM) and is more similar to the mouse estimate (1600 cM). The recombination rate in females was significantly higher than in males. PMID:7982563

  19. Observational Evidence of Dynamic Star Formation Rate in Milky Way Giant Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eve J.; Miville-Deschênes, Marc-Antoine; Murray, Norman W.

    2016-12-01

    Star formation on galactic scales is known to be a slow process, but whether it is slow on smaller scales is uncertain. We cross-correlate 5469 giant molecular clouds (GMCs) from a new all-sky catalog with 256 star-forming complexes (SFCs) to build a sample of 191 SFC-GMC complexes—collections of multiple clouds each matched to 191 SFCs. The total mass in stars harbored by these clouds is inferred from WMAP free-free fluxes. We measure the GMC mass, the virial parameter, the star formation efficiency ɛ and the star formation rate per freefall time ɛ ff. Both ɛ and ɛ ff range over 3-4 orders of magnitude. We find that 68.3% of the clouds fall within {σ }{logɛ }=0.79+/- 0.22 {dex} and {σ }{log{ɛ }{ff}}=0.91+/- 0.22 {dex} about the median. Compared to these observed scatters, a simple model with a time-independent ɛ ff that depends on the host GMC properties predicts {σ }{log{ɛ }{ff}}=0.12{--}0.24. Allowing for a time-variable ɛ ff, we can recover the large dispersion in the rate of star formation. This strongly suggests that star formation in the Milky Way is a dynamic process on GMC scales. We also show that the surface star formation rate profile of the Milky Way correlates well with the molecular gas surface density profile.

  20. Let's go formative: continuous student ratings with Web 2.0 application Twitter.

    PubMed

    Stieger, Stefan; Burger, Christoph

    2010-04-01

    Student ratings have been a controversial but important method for the improvement of teaching quality during the past several decades. Most universities rely on summative evaluations conducted at the end of a term or course. A formative approach in which each course unit is evaluated may be beneficial for students and teachers but has rarely been applied. This is most probably due to the time constraints associated with various procedures inherent in formative evaluation (numerous evaluations, high amounts of aggregated data, high administrative investment). In order to circumvent these disadvantages, we chose the Web 2.0 Internet application Twitter as evaluation tool and tested whether it is useful for the implementation of a formative evaluation. After a first pilot and subsequent experimental study, the following conclusions were drawn: First, the formative evaluation did not come to the same results as the summative evaluation at the end of term, suggesting that formative evaluations tap into different aspects of course evaluation than summative evaluations do. Second, the results from an offline (i.e., paper-pencil) summative evaluation were identical with those from an online summative evaluation of the same course conducted a week later. Third, the formative evaluation did not influence the ratings of the summative evaluation at the end of the term. All in all, we can conclude that Twitter is a useful tool for evaluating a course formatively (i.e., on a weekly basis). Because of Twitter's simple use and the electronic handling of data, the administrative effort remains small.

  1. Galaxy formation in the Planck cosmology - I. Matching the observed evolution of star formation rates, colours and stellar masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriques, Bruno M. B.; White, Simon D. M.; Thomas, Peter A.; Angulo, Raul; Guo, Qi; Lemson, Gerard; Springel, Volker; Overzier, Roderik

    2015-08-01

    We have updated the Munich galaxy formation model to the Planck first-year cosmology, while modifying the treatment of baryonic processes to reproduce recent data on the abundance and passive fractions of galaxies from z = 3 down to z = 0. Matching these more extensive and more precise observational results requires us to delay the reincorporation of wind ejecta, to lower the surface density threshold for turning cold gas into stars, to eliminate ram-pressure stripping in haloes less massive than {˜ }10^{14}{ M_{⊙}}, and to modify our model for radio mode feedback. These changes cure the most obvious failings of our previous models, namely the overly early formation of low-mass galaxies and the overly large fraction of them that are passive at late times. The new model is calibrated to reproduce the observed evolution both of the stellar mass function and of the distribution of star formation rate at each stellar mass. Massive galaxies (log M⋆/M⊙ ≥ 11.0) assemble most of their mass before z = 1 and are predominantly old and passive at z = 0, while lower mass galaxies assemble later and, for log M⋆/M⊙ ≤ 9.5, are still predominantly blue and star forming at z = 0. This phenomenological but physically based model allows the observations to be interpreted in terms of the efficiency of the various processes that control the formation and evolution of galaxies as a function of their stellar mass, gas content, environment and time.

  2. Lidar surveys reveal eruptive volumes and rates at Etna, 2007-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behncke, Boris; Fornaciai, Alessandro; Neri, Marco; Favalli, Massimiliano; Ganci, Gaetana; Mazzarini, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    The quantification of eruptive activity represents one major challenge in volcanology. Digital comparison of lidar-based elevation models of Etna (Italy) was made to quantify the volumes of volcanics emitted in 2007-2010. During this period, Etna produced several summit paroxysms followed by a flank eruption. We integrated the total volume difference resulting from the subtraction of the 2007 and 2010 digital elevation models with volumes of eruptive products based on field and aerial surveys to attribute volumes with hitherto unrealized precision to poorly constrained eruptions. The total erupted volume of 2007-2010 is >86 × 106 m3, most (~74 × 106 m3) of which is made up by the lava flows of the 2008-2009 flank eruption. The survey also reveals the high lava volume (5.73 × 106 m3) and average eruption rate (~400 m3 s-1) of the 10 May 2008 paroxysm, whose flow front stopped 6.2 km from the vent, not far from the town of Zafferana Etnea.

  3. Bayesian coalescent inference reveals high evolutionary rates and diversification of Zika virus populations.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, Alvaro; Soñora, Martín; Moreno, Pilar; Moratorio, Gonzalo; Cristina, Juan

    2016-10-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a member of the family Flaviviridae. In 2015, ZIKV triggered an epidemic in Brazil and spread across Latin America. By May of 2016, the World Health Organization warns over spread of ZIKV beyond this region. Detailed studies on the mode of evolution of ZIKV strains are extremely important for our understanding of the emergence and spread of ZIKV populations. In order to gain insight into these matters, a Bayesian coalescent Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of complete genome sequences of recently isolated ZIKV strains was performed. The results of these studies revealed a mean rate of evolution of 1.20 × 10(-3) nucleotide substitutions per site per year (s/s/y) for ZIKV strains enrolled in this study. Several variants isolated in China are grouped together with all strains isolated in Latin America. Another genetic group composed exclusively by Chinese strains were also observed, suggesting the co-circulation of different genetic lineages in China. These findings indicate a high level of diversification of ZIKV populations. Strains isolated from microcephaly cases do not share amino acid substitutions, suggesting that other factors besides viral genetic differences may play a role for the proposed pathogenesis caused by ZIKV infection. J. Med. Virol. 88:1672-1676, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Geologically Controlled Isotope-Time Patterns Reveal Early Differentiation and Crust Formation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, V. C.; Nutman, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanisms of continental crust production and evolution in the early Earth remain controversial, as are questions of the relative roles of early differentiation versus subsequent tectonic procssing in creating Earth's chemical signatures. Here we present geologic observations integrated with whole rock major, trace element and Sm-Nd isotopic signatures and combined with U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic compositions of zircon populations from the same rocks, from the most extensive early rock record comprising the 3.9 Ga to 3.6 Ga terranes of southwest Greenland. These data reveal repeated patterns of formation of juvenile TTG crust and associated mafic and ultramafic rocks in convergent margin settings followed by formation of more evolved granites [1]. Our new zircon Lu-Hf data from rare 3.6-3.7 Ga tonalites within the Itsaq Gneiss Complex, obtained from single component, non-migmatitic gneisses with simple zircon populations, limited within sample Hf isotopic variability and accurate U-Pb ages, now document extraction of juvenile tonalites from a near chondritic mantle source between 3.9 Ga and 3.6 Ga. The more evolved, granitic rocks in each area show slightly negative initial ɛHf in accord with crustal reworking of the older (3.8-3.9 Ga) gniesses. There is no evidence for Hadean material in the sources of the granitoids. The Hf isotope-time patterns are consistent with juvenile crust production from a mantle source that experienced only modest amounts of prior crustal extraction. They are distinct from those predicted by reprocessing of an enriched Hadean mafic crust, as has been proposed for this region [2] and for the source of the Hadean Jack Hills zircons [3]. The well-documented, time decreasing, positive 142Nd anomalies [e.g., 4] from these rocks are further evidence of crustal derivation from a convecting mantle source, rather than reworking of an enriched mafic lithosphere. The 143Nd isotopic -time patterns are more complex, reflecting the interplay

  5. A CLUSTER IN THE MAKING: ALMA REVEALS THE INITIAL CONDITIONS FOR HIGH-MASS CLUSTER FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Rathborne, J. M.; Contreras, Y.; Longmore, S. N.; Bastian, N.; Jackson, J. M.; Alves, J. F.; Bally, J.; Foster, J. B.; Garay, G.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Testi, L.; Walsh, A. J.

    2015-04-01

    G0.253+0.016 is a molecular clump that appears to be on the verge of forming a high-mass cluster: its extremely low dust temperature, high mass, and high density, combined with its lack of prevalent star formation, make it an excellent candidate for an Arches-like cluster in a very early stage of formation. Here we present new Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-millimeter Array observations of its small-scale (∼0.07 pc) 3 mm dust continuum and molecular line emission from 17 different species that probe a range of distinct physical and chemical conditions. The data reveal a complex network of emission features with a complicated velocity structure: there is emission on all spatial scales, the morphology of which ranges from small, compact regions to extended, filamentary structures that are seen in both emission and absorption. The dust column density is well traced by molecules with higher excitation energies and critical densities, consistent with a clump that has a denser interior. A statistical analysis supports the idea that turbulence shapes the observed gas structure within G0.253+0.016. We find a clear break in the turbulent power spectrum derived from the optically thin dust continuum emission at a spatial scale of ∼0.1 pc, which may correspond to the spatial scale at which gravity has overcome the thermal pressure. We suggest that G0.253+0.016 is on the verge of forming a cluster from hierarchical, filamentary structures that arise from a highly turbulent medium. Although the stellar distribution within high-mass Arches-like clusters is compact, centrally condensed, and smooth, the observed gas distribution within G0.253+0.016 is extended, with no high-mass central concentration, and has a complex, hierarchical structure. If this clump gives rise to a high-mass cluster and its stars are formed from this initially hierarchical gas structure, then the resulting cluster must evolve into a centrally condensed structure via a dynamical process.

  6. A coherent digital demodulator for multiple signal formats and widely varying data rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuffin, Bruce F.

    The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) uses four ground station demodulators for K-band signals with data rates from 1 kb/s to 300 Mb/s. The author discusses the feasibility of replacing these demodulators with a single digital demodulator that may be reconfigured by altering stored parameters to accommodate all signal formats and data rates. This implementation will reduce total ground station cost and facilitate automation of ground station operation. Analysis of system performance concentrates on the carrier tracking loop. Analytic and simulation results relate system performance to parameter values and signal format as data rate and power vary independently on the In-phase and quadrature channels. It is demonstrated that a single digital demodulator can support TDRSS-compatible signals at data rates conservatively extending from 1K symbols/s to 10M symbols/s, using off-the-shelf hardware with 6 or more bits of accuracy.

  7. Fossilized iron bacteria reveal a pathway to the biological origin of banded iron formation.

    PubMed

    Chi Fru, Ernest; Ivarsson, Magnus; Kilias, Stephanos P; Bengtson, Stefan; Belivanova, Veneta; Marone, Federica; Fortin, Danielle; Broman, Curt; Stampanoni, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Debates on the formation of banded iron formations in ancient ferruginous oceans are dominated by a dichotomy between abiotic and biotic iron cycling. This is fuelled by difficulties in unravelling the exact processes involved in their formation. Here we provide fossil environmental evidence for anoxygenic photoferrotrophic deposition of analogue banded iron rocks in shallow marine waters associated with an Early Quaternary hydrothermal vent field on Milos Island, Greece. Trace metal, major and rare earth elemental compositions suggest that the deposited rocks closely resemble banded iron formations of Precambrian origin. Well-preserved microbial fossils in combination with chemical data imply that band formation was linked to periodic massive encrustation of anoxygenic phototrophic biofilms by iron oxyhydroxide alternating with abiotic silica precipitation. The data implicate cyclic anoxygenic photoferrotrophy and their fossilization mechanisms in the construction of microskeletal fabrics that result in the formation of characteristic banded iron formation bands of varying silica and iron oxide ratios.

  8. Reflectometry-Ellipsometry Reveals Thickness, Growth Rate, and Phase Composition in Oxidation of Copper.

    PubMed

    Diaz Leon, Juan J; Fryauf, David M; Cormia, Robert D; Zhang, Min-Xian Max; Samuels, Kathryn; Williams, R Stanley; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P

    2016-08-31

    The oxidation of copper is a complicated process. Copper oxide develops two stable phases at room temperature and standard pressure (RTSP): cuprous oxide (Cu2O) and cupric oxide (CuO). Both phases have different optical and electrical characteristics that make them interesting for applications such as solar cells or resistive switching devices. For a given application, it is necessary to selectively control oxide thickness and cupric/cuprous oxide phase volume fraction. The thickness and composition of a copper oxide film growing on the surface of copper widely depend on the characteristics of as-deposited copper. In this Research Article, two samples, copper films prepared by two different deposition techniques, electron-beam evaporation and sputtering, were studied. As the core part of the study, the formation of the oxidized copper was analyzed routinely over a period of 253 days using spectroscopic polarized reflectometry-spectroscopic ellipsometry (RE). An effective medium approximation (EMA) model was used to fit the RE data. The RE measurements were complemented and validated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Our results show that the two samples oxidized under identical laboratory ambient conditions (RTSP, 87% average relative humidity) developed unique oxide films following an inverse-logarithmic growth rate with thickness and composition different from each other over time. Discussion is focused on the ability of RE to simultaneously extract thickness (i.e., growth rate) and composition of copper oxide films and on plausible physical mechanisms responsible for unique oxidation habits observed in the two copper samples. It appears that extended surface characteristics (i.e., surface roughness and grain boundaries) and preferential crystalline orientation of as-deposited polycrystalline copper films control the growth kinetics of the copper oxide film. Analysis based on a noncontact

  9. A novel type of colony formation in marine planktonic diatoms revealed by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bosak, Sunčica; Pletikapić, Galja; Hozić, Amela; Svetličić, Vesna; Sarno, Diana; Viličić, Damir

    2012-01-01

    Diatoms have evolved a variety of colonial life forms in which cells are connected by organic threads, mucilage pads or silicate structures. In this study, we provide the first description of a novel strategy of colony formation among marine planktonic diatoms. Bacteriastrum jadranum forms loose but regular chains with distinct heterovalvate terminal cells. The colonial cells and their siliceous projections, the setae, are not in direct contact; instead, they are enclosed within the optically transparent organic matrix. This cell jacket structure was detected by staining procedure with Alcian Blue, which showed that the polysaccharides are predominant matrix constituents and revealed that the jacket reaches the span of the setae. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations showed distinguishable fibrillar network firmly associated with cells. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we were able to visualise and characterise the cell jacket structure at molecular resolution. At nanoscale resolution, the cell jacket appears as a cross-linked fibrillar network organised into a recognisable structure. The circular patches of self-repeating pattern (hexagonal pores with openings of 8-100 nm) are connected through thicker surrounding fibrils and reinforced by branching fibrils. The pore-forming fibrils within the patches are only 0.6-1.6 nm high, the surrounding fibrils connecting patches are 2.0-2.8 nm high, and the branching fibrils are considerably wider but not higher than 4.0 nm. The discovered polysaccharide fibrillar network is highly organised and delicately structured with a monomolecular fibril height of 0.6 nm. We conclude that the Bacteriastrum polysaccharide jacket represents an essential part of the cell, as the conjunction of the polymer network with the frustule appears to be extremely tight and such specific and unique patterns have never been found in self-assembled polysaccharide gel networks, which are usually encountered in the marine

  10. RECONCILING THE GAMMA-RAY BURST RATE AND STAR FORMATION HISTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, Raul; Piran, Tsvi E-mail: tsvi.piran@huji.ac.il

    2013-08-20

    While there are numerous indications that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) arise from the deaths of massive stars, the GRB rate does not follow the global cosmic star formation rate and, within their hosts, GRBs are more concentrated in regions of very high star formation. We explain both puzzles here. Using the publicly available VESPA database of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 spectra, we explore a multi-parameter space in galaxy properties such as stellar mass, metallicity, and dust to find the subset of galaxies that reproduces the GRB rate recently obtained by Wanderman and Piran. We find that only galaxies with present stellar masses below <10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} and low metallicity reproduce the observed GRB rate. This is consistent with direct observations of GRB hosts and provides an independent confirmation of the nature of GRB hosts. Because of the significantly larger sample of SDSS galaxies, we compute their correlation function and show that they are anti-biased with respect to dark matter: they are in filaments and voids. Using recent observations of massive stars in local dwarfs we show how the fact that GRB host galaxies are dwarfs can explain the observation that GRBs are more concentrated in regions of high star formation than are supernovae. Finally, we explain these results using new theoretical advances in the field of star formation.

  11. Effects of Varying Response Formats on Self-Ratings of Life-Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazaheri, Mehrdad; Theuns, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A sample of 1,737 volunteering students, randomly assigned to 12 conditions, rated their current overall (dis)satisfaction with life. Each condition used 1 of 12 response formats, differing in (1) "polarity" ("bipolar" versus "unipolar"), (2) "orientation" ("horizontal" versus "vertical"), and (3) "anchoring" (-5 to +5, "Not Numbered," and 0 "to"…

  12. Revisiting the formation rate and redshift distribution of long gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaan, C.; de Freitas Pacheco, J. A.

    2013-11-01

    Using a novel approach, the distribution of fluences of long gamma-ray bursts derived from the Swift-BAT catalog was reproduced by a jet-model characterized by the distribution of the total radiated energy in γ-rays and the distribution of the aperture angle of the emission cone. The best fit between simulated and observed fluence distributions permits one to estimate the parameters of the model. An evolution of the median energy of the bursts is required to adequately reproduce the observed redshift distribution of the events when the formation rate of γ-ray bursts follows the cosmic star formation rate. For our preferred model, the median jet energy evolves as EJ ∝ e0.5(1 + z) and the mean expected jet energy is 3.0 × 1049 erg, which agrees with the mean value derived from afterglow data. The estimated local formation rate is Rgrb = 290 Gpc-3 yr-1, representing less than 9% of the local formation rate of type Ibc supernovae. This result also suggests that the progenitors of long gamma-ray bursts have masses ≥ 90 M⊙ when a Miller-Scalo initial mass function is assumed.

  13. Distinctive Genome Reduction Rates Revealed by Genomic Analyses of Two Coxiella-Like Endosymbionts in Ticks.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Yuval; Lalzar, Itai; Klasson, Lisa

    2015-05-28

    Genome reduction is a hallmark of symbiotic genomes, and the rate and patterns of gene loss associated with this process have been investigated in several different symbiotic systems. However, in long-term host-associated coevolving symbiont clades, the genome size differences between strains are normally quite small and hence patterns of large-scale genome reduction can only be inferred from distant relatives. Here we present the complete genome of a Coxiella-like symbiont from Rhipicephalus turanicus ticks (CRt), and compare it with other genomes from the genus Coxiella in order to investigate the process of genome reduction in a genus consisting of intracellular host-associated bacteria with variable genome sizes. The 1.7-Mb CRt genome is larger than the genomes of most obligate mutualists but has a very low protein-coding content (48.5%) and an extremely high number of identifiable pseudogenes, indicating that it is currently undergoing genome reduction. Analysis of encoded functions suggests that CRt is an obligate tick mutualist, as indicated by the possible provisioning of the tick with biotin (B7), riboflavin (B2) and other cofactors, and by the loss of most genes involved in host cell interactions, such as secretion systems. Comparative analyses between CRt and the 2.5 times smaller genome of Coxiella from the lone star tick Amblyomma americanum (CLEAA) show that many of the same gene functions are lost and suggest that the large size difference might be due to a higher rate of genome evolution in CLEAA generated by the loss of the mismatch repair genes mutSL. Finally, sequence polymorphisms in the CRt population sampled from field collected ticks reveal up to one distinct strain variant per tick, and analyses of mutational patterns within the population suggest that selection might be acting on synonymous sites. The CRt genome is an extreme example of a symbiont genome caught in the act of genome reduction, and the comparison between CLEAA and CRt

  14. Distinctive Genome Reduction Rates Revealed by Genomic Analyses of Two Coxiella-Like Endosymbionts in Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Yuval; Lalzar, Itai; Klasson, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Genome reduction is a hallmark of symbiotic genomes, and the rate and patterns of gene loss associated with this process have been investigated in several different symbiotic systems. However, in long-term host-associated coevolving symbiont clades, the genome size differences between strains are normally quite small and hence patterns of large-scale genome reduction can only be inferred from distant relatives. Here we present the complete genome of a Coxiella-like symbiont from Rhipicephalus turanicus ticks (CRt), and compare it with other genomes from the genus Coxiella in order to investigate the process of genome reduction in a genus consisting of intracellular host-associated bacteria with variable genome sizes. The 1.7-Mb CRt genome is larger than the genomes of most obligate mutualists but has a very low protein-coding content (48.5%) and an extremely high number of identifiable pseudogenes, indicating that it is currently undergoing genome reduction. Analysis of encoded functions suggests that CRt is an obligate tick mutualist, as indicated by the possible provisioning of the tick with biotin (B7), riboflavin (B2) and other cofactors, and by the loss of most genes involved in host cell interactions, such as secretion systems. Comparative analyses between CRt and the 2.5 times smaller genome of Coxiella from the lone star tick Amblyomma americanum (CLEAA) show that many of the same gene functions are lost and suggest that the large size difference might be due to a higher rate of genome evolution in CLEAA generated by the loss of the mismatch repair genes mutSL. Finally, sequence polymorphisms in the CRt population sampled from field collected ticks reveal up to one distinct strain variant per tick, and analyses of mutational patterns within the population suggest that selection might be acting on synonymous sites. The CRt genome is an extreme example of a symbiont genome caught in the act of genome reduction, and the comparison between CLEAA and CRt

  15. Stellar populations and Star Formation Rates in NGC 6872, the Condor galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eufrasio, Rafael T.; De Mello, D. F.; Dwek, E.; Arendt, R. G.; Gadotti, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of 10 kpc regions across the giant spiral galaxy NGC 6872, the Condor galaxy. We made use of archival data from the FUV (GALEX) to 22 μm (WISE). In order to find any signature of the recent interaction 130 Myr) with its companion, the S0 galaxy IC 4970, we inspected the SED of Condor's bar. One possibility is that is would have been formed by passage of the companion. We find that it is a particularly long bar (9 kpc semi-major axis), with a size almost twice as large as the average found in other barred galaxies (4.5 kpc median in the local universe, Gadotti 2011). A bulge/bar/disk 2D decomposition using the Spitzer 3.6 μm image and the budda package (de Souza et al. 2004; Gadotti 2008) reveals that the ratio of the bar semi-major axis to the disk scale-length is 1.4, which is a value typically found in other barred galaxies (see Fig. 1 in Gadotti 2011). The disk scale-length is ~ 7 kpc, which is extremely large (2.8 kpc median in local galaxies, Gadotti 2009). Our analysis also shows that there are no signs of recent star formation along the bar. We find no signs of a box-peanut structure near the central regions, which is also another signature of an evolved bar. Taken altogether, the evidence points to a bar formed at least a few billion years ago and the stars in the bar seem to be a fossil record of the stellar population in the galaxy before the interaction with its companion. Then, we modeled the SFH of each 10 kpc region as constant Star Formation Rate (SFR) for the past 100 Myr superposed on an exponentially decaying, longstanding SFR. We find a single exponential SFH to account for all the recent SFR of the galaxy, with no need for an additional SFR due to the interaction. Av is low all across the galaxy 0.25), but increases near 0.7) the point of collision. The SFH of the arms are asymmetric. The northeastern arm having older ages 5 Gyr) and SFH closer to constant, while the

  16. Singlet Molecular Oxygen on Ice: Rates of Formation and Steady State Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, J. P.; Anastasio, C.

    2007-12-01

    Singlet molecular oxygen (1O2*), the first electronically excited state of molecular oxygen, reacts rapidly with certain types of environmental pollutants such as furans, phenols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Its formation requires the absorption of light by a chromophore (a.k.a. sensitizer), which subsequently transfers energy to ground state molecular oxygen. In the environment, 1O2* chemistry has been studied primarily in the aqueous phase, such as in surface waters or cloud and fog drops. In this work, we expand our current understanding by investigating the rate of formation (Rf) and steady state concentration ([1O2*]) of 1O2* on ice. To investigate 1O2* kinetics, we use a chemical probe technique in which photoformed 1O2* reacts with furfuryl alcohol (FFA). To generate 1O2*, we illuminated frozen samples containing a sensitizer (Rose Bengal, RB) at 549 nm. The concentration of total solutes in each sample was controlled using sodium sulfate (Na2SO4). Following illumination, the decay of FFA was measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Ice tests were conducted at 253, 263, and 268 K. Liquid tests for comparison were conducted at 278 K. Results showed dramatically faster (~104) FFA decay on ice than in liquid samples prepared from the same solutions, in agreement with the calculated solute concentration factor in the quasi-liquid layer (QLL) on ice compared to bulk solution. Varying the concentration of RB resulted in similar changes in both Rf and [1O2*], with magnitudes of change close to those expected. Changing temperature and total solutes, both of which control the volume of the QLL on ice, revealed two model regimes: FFA as a major (1) or minor (2) sink of 1O2*. Experimental results from the former regime show good agreement with expected values for both Rf and [1O2*]. Experiments in the later regime are currently in progress. We will also discuss the potential implications of 1O2* to the chemistry of naturally

  17. UNLEASHING POSITIVE FEEDBACK: LINKING THE RATES OF STAR FORMATION, SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE ACCRETION, AND OUTFLOWS IN DISTANT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, Joseph

    2013-08-01

    Pressure-regulated star formation is a simple variant on the usual supernova-regulated star formation efficiency that controls the global star formation rate as a function of cold gas content in star-forming galaxies, and accounts for the Schmidt-Kennicutt law in both nearby and distant galaxies. Inclusion of active galactic nucleus (AGN) induced pressure, by jets and/or winds that flow back onto a gas-rich disk, can lead, under some circumstances, to significantly enhanced star formation rates, especially at high redshift and most likely followed by the more widely accepted phase of star formation quenching. Simple expressions are derived that relate supermassive black hole growth, star formation, and outflow rates. The ratios of black hole to spheroid mass and of both black hole accretion and outflow rates to star formation rate are predicted as a function of time. I suggest various tests of the AGN-triggered star formation hypothesis.

  18. Effect of storage temperature on crystal formation rate and growth rate of calcium lactate crystals on smoked Cheddar cheeses.

    PubMed

    Rajbhandari, P; Patel, J; Valentine, E; Kindstedt, P S

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that storage temperature influences the formation of calcium lactate crystals on vacuum-packaged Cheddar cheese surfaces. However, the mechanisms by which crystallization is modulated by storage temperature are not completely understood. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of storage temperature on smoked Cheddar cheese surfaces for (1) the number of discrete visible crystals formed per unit of cheese surface area; (2) growth rate and shape of discrete crystals (as measured by area and circularity); (3) percentage of total cheese surface area occupied by crystals. Three vacuum-packaged, random weight (∼300 g) retail samples of naturally smoked Cheddar cheese, produced from the same vat of cheese, were obtained from a retail source. The samples were cut parallel to the longitudinal axis at a depth of 10mm from the 2 surfaces to give six 10-mm-thick slabs, 4 of which were randomly assigned to 4 different storage temperature treatments: 1, 5, 10°C, and weekly cycling between 1 and 10°C. Samples were stored for 30 wk. Following the onset of visible surface crystals, digital photographs of surfaces were taken every other week and evaluated by image analysis for number of discrete crystal regions and total surface area occupied by crystals. Specific discrete crystals were chosen and evaluated biweekly for radius, area, and circularity. The entire experiment was conducted in triplicate. The effects of cheese surface, storage temperature, and storage time on crystal number and total crystal area were evaluated by ANOVA, according to a repeated-measures design. The number of discrete crystal regions increased significantly during storage but at different rates for different temperature treatments. Total crystal area also increased significantly during storage, at rates that varied with temperature treatment. Storage temperature did not appear to have a major effect on the growth rates and shapes of the individual crystals

  19. Pathway of actin filament branch formation by Arp2/3 complex revealed by single-molecule imaging

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Benjamin A.; Daugherty-Clarke, Karen; Goode, Bruce L.; Gelles, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Actin filament nucleation by actin-related protein (Arp) 2/3 complex is a critical process in cell motility and endocytosis, yet key aspects of its mechanism are unknown due to a lack of real-time observations of Arp2/3 complex through the nucleation process. Triggered by the verprolin homology, central, and acidic (VCA) region of proteins in the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) family, Arp2/3 complex produces new (daughter) filaments as branches from the sides of preexisting (mother) filaments. We visualized individual fluorescently labeled Arp2/3 complexes dynamically interacting with and producing branches on growing actin filaments in vitro. Branch formation was strikingly inefficient, even in the presence of VCA: only ∼1% of filament-bound Arp2/3 complexes yielded a daughter filament. VCA acted at multiple steps, increasing both the association rate of Arp2/3 complexes with mother filament and the fraction of filament-bound complexes that nucleated a daughter. The results lead to a quantitative kinetic mechanism for branched actin assembly, revealing the steps that can be stimulated by additional cellular factors. PMID:23292935

  20. Determining star formation rates in X-ray cluster cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Raymond E., III; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1987-01-01

    Many X-ray clusters of galaxies are observed to have cooling flows at their centers. Each of these cooling flows is depositing mass onto a central dominant galaxy at a rate of 10-400 solar masses/yr. With such large accretion rates it seems possible that these accreting galaxies are still being formed through ongoing star formation in their associated cooling flows. In this paper techniques are developed to determine directly the distributions of local star formation rate, mass, gas density, temperature, and velocity from cooling flow X-ray surface brightness data. These techniques take account of the potentially important X-ray emission from star-forming cooling condensations dropping out of the background flow. Surface brightness data with either good or poor energy resolution are considered separately.

  1. Analysis of Metmyoglobin Formation Rates in Frozen Tuna Meat during Frozen Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viriyarattanasak, Chotika; Watanabe, Manabu; Suzuki, Toru

    Formation of metmyoglobin (metMb) in frozen tuna meat stored at -90, -60, -40, -30, -20, and -10°C for approximately 6 months was investigated. The reaction rate of metMB formation was estimated from a linear plot of ln ([M∞ . Mt] /[M∞ . Mo]) and storage time (t) for each storage temperature (Ts) (M∞, Mt, and Mo are metMb contents at times t = t∞, t, and 0, respectively). When M∞ was assumed to be 100%, the rate of metMb formation followed the first-order reaction only during the early stage of storage period. MetMb formation, however obeyed the first-order reaction for all test temperatures even during long-term storage when M∞ was assumed to be dependent on storage temperature (M∞(Ts)). A discontinuity was observed in the temperature dependence of M∞(Ts) at storage temperature range between -60 and -40°C, which was attributed to the glass transition of protein system. On the other hand, the temperature dependence of metMb formation did not show a significant change over all storage temperatures.

  2. Gas hydrate formation rates from dissolved-phase methane in porous laboratory specimens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, William F.; Spangenberg, E.K.

    2013-01-01

    Marine sands highly saturated with gas hydrates are potential energy resources, likely forming from methane dissolved in pore water. Laboratory fabrication of gas hydrate-bearing sands formed from dissolved-phase methane usually requires 1–2 months to attain the high hydrate saturations characteristic of naturally occurring energy resource targets. A series of gas hydrate formation tests, in which methane-supersaturated water circulates through 100, 240, and 200,000 cm3 vessels containing glass beads or unconsolidated sand, show that the rate-limiting step is dissolving gaseous-phase methane into the circulating water to form methane-supersaturated fluid. This implies that laboratory and natural hydrate formation rates are primarily limited by methane availability. Developing effective techniques for dissolving gaseous methane into water will increase formation rates above our observed (1 ± 0.5) × 10−7 mol of methane consumed for hydrate formation per minute per cubic centimeter of pore space, which corresponds to a hydrate saturation increase of 2 ± 1% per day, regardless of specimen size.

  3. All-optical phase modulated format conversion for high transmission rates based on fiber nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Vanessa C.; Drummond, Miguel V.; Nogueira, Rogério N.

    2013-11-01

    Advanced modulation formats are an emerging area since they allow reducing the symbol rate while encoding more bits per symbol. This allows higher spectral efficiencies. In addition, we can achieve higher data rates using lower-speed equipment like in all-optical format conversion systems, an important step for the development of systems with high transmission rates. In this paper we study the impact of some impairments found in all-optical advanced format conversions based on cross phase modulation (XPM) on a highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF), such as amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), nonlinear fiber length and group velocity dispersion (GVD), and analyze its performance based on error vector magnitude (EVM) for different bitrate transmissions. This simulation study is applied on earlier proposed phase modulated format conversion where n nonreturn-to-zero on-off keying (NRZ-OOK) channels at 10 Gb/s are converted into a return-to-zero m phase shift keying (RZ-mPSK) at 20Gb/s. We extend the work with simulations and show the results for n NRZ-OOK channels at 20Gb/s, 40 Gb/s and 50Gb/s to RZ-PSK at 40Gb/s, 80 Gb/s and 100Gb/s, respectively.

  4. Star Formation Rate and Gas Relations in the Arp 299 Merger from the VIXENS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiderman, Amanda L.; Evans, N. J.; Gebhardt, K.; Blanc, G. A.; Davis, T.; Papovich, C. J.; van den Bosch, R.; Iono, D.; Yun, M.; VIXENS Team

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between star formation and gas content in late interaction phase merger Arp 299 from the VIRUS-P Investigation of the eXtreme ENvironments of Starbursts (VIXENS) integral field unit survey. By comparing H-alpha, Pa-alpha and 24um data to CO(1-0), CO(2-1), HCN(1-0), HCO+(1-0), and HI maps, we explore the relation between the star formation rate and gas surface densities on spatially resolved ~kpc scales. We find discrepancies from known extragalactic spatially resolved relations in nearby spiral galaxies and disk-averaged relations in high-z mergers.

  5. COSMOLOGICAL EVOLUTION OF LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND THE STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosian, Vahé; Kitanidis, Ellie; Kocevski, Daniel

    2015-06-10

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), by virtue of their high luminosities, can be detected up to very high redshifts and therefore can be excellent probes of the early universe. This task is hampered by the fact that most of their characteristics have a broad range, so we first need to obtain an accurate description of the distribution of these characteristics and, especially, their cosmological evolution. We use a sample of about 200 Swift long GRBs with known redshifts to determine the evolution of the luminosity, formation rate, and the general shape of the luminosity function (LF). In contrast to most other forward-fitting methods of treating this problem, we use the Efron–Petrosian methods, which allow a non-parametric determination of the above quantities. We find a relatively strong luminosity evolution, an LF that can be fitted to a broken power law, and an unusually high formation rate at low redshifts, a rate more than one order of magnitude higher than the star formation rate (SFR). On the other hand, our results seem to agree with the almost constant SFR in redshifts 1–3 and the decline above this redshift.

  6. Outcrossing rates in two self-compatible, hybridising Rhinanthus species: implications for hybrid formation.

    PubMed

    Ducarme, V; Wesselingh, R A

    2013-05-01

    The congeners Rhinanthus angustifolius and Rhinanthus minor, two annual hemiparasites pollinated by bumblebees, are known to hybridise in the wild. Both species are self-compatible, but the capacity for autonomous selfing is higher in R. minor. This suggests a difference in realized outcrossing rates, which have not been determined before in these species. Using microsatellites, both species turned out to have mixed mating systems, but with a much lower multilocus outcrossing rate (0.13) for R. minor compared to R. angustifolius (0.76). We hypothesised that a higher outcrossing rate should lead to a higher chance of heterospecific pollination, and we therefore determined the rate of hybrid formation on each species in an artificial mixed population. Hybrid seeds were produced at low frequency (4.5%), and no significant difference was found between the species. It is therefore likely that post-pollination processes influence hybrid seed formation to counteract the expected difference in heterospecific pollen deposition. We checked fruit set, seed set and the rate of autonomous selfing in controlled crosses in the greenhouse in 2 years, and found that fruit set (2003) or seed set (2010) were lower in R. angustifolius × R. minor crosses relative to the reciprocal cross. Hybrid seeds produced on R. angustifolius also had a much lower germination rate, so most of the established F1 hybrid plants have the R. minor cytoplasm. The formation of advanced hybrids depends on pollinator preference, which is biased towards R. angustifolius if present in sufficient numbers, because it offers more rewards.

  7. Contribution of cotranslational folding to the rate of formation of native protein structure.

    PubMed Central

    Fedorov, A N; Baldwin, T O

    1995-01-01

    To compare the process of protein folding in the cell with refolding following denaturation in vitro, we have investigated and compared the kinetics of renaturation of a full-length protein upon dilution from concentrated urea with the rate of folding in the course of biosynthesis. Formation of enzymatically active bacterial luciferase, an alpha beta heterodimer, occurred 2 min after completion of beta-subunit synthesis in an Escherichia coli cell-free system. Renaturation of urea-denatured beta subunit, either in the presence of the cell-free protein synthesis system or in buffer solutions, proceeded more slowly. Cellular components present in the cell-free protein synthesis system slightly accelerated the rate of refolding of urea-unfolded beta subunit. The results indicate that the luciferase beta subunit begins the folding process cotranslationally and that cotranslational folding contributes to the rapid formation of the native structure in the cell. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7862665

  8. The effect of clouds on photolysis rates and ozone formation in the unpolluted troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    The photochemistry of the lower atmosphere is sensitive to short- and long-term meteorological effects; accurate modeling therefore requires photolysis rates for trace gases which reflect this variability. As an example, the influence of clouds on the production of tropospheric ozone has been investigated, using a modification of Luther's two-stream radiation scheme to calculate cloud-perturbed photolysis rates in a one-dimensional photochemical transport model. In the unpolluted troposphere, where stratospheric inputs of odd nitrogen appear to represent the photochemical source of O3, strong cloud reflectance increases the concentration of NO in the upper troposphere, leading to greatly enhanced rates of ozone formation. Although the rate of these processes is too slow to verify by observation, the calculation is useful in distinguishing some features of the chemistry of regions of differing mean cloudiness.

  9. GAS REGULATION OF GALAXIES: THE EVOLUTION OF THE COSMIC SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE, THE METALLICITY-MASS-STAR-FORMATION RATE RELATION, AND THE STELLAR CONTENT OF HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Pipino, Antonio; Peng Yingjie; Renzini, Alvio

    2013-08-01

    A very simple physical model of galaxies is one in which the formation of stars is instantaneously regulated by the mass of gas in a reservoir with mass loss scaling with the star-formation rate (SFR). This model links together three different aspects of the evolving galaxy population: (1) the cosmic time evolution of the specific star-formation rate (sSFR) relative to the growth of halos, (2) the gas-phase metallicities across the galaxy population and over cosmic time, and (3) the ratio of the stellar to dark matter mass of halos. The gas regulator is defined by the gas consumption timescale ({epsilon}{sup -1}) and the mass loading {lambda} of the wind outflow {lambda}{center_dot}SFR. The simplest regulator, in which {epsilon} and {lambda} are constant, sets the sSFR equal to exactly the specific accretion rate of the galaxy; more realistic situations lead to an sSFR that is perturbed from this precise relation. Because the gas consumption timescale is shorter than the timescale on which the system evolves, the metallicity Z is set primarily by the instantaneous operation of the regulator system rather than by the past history of the system. The metallicity of the gas reservoir depends on {epsilon}, {lambda}, and sSFR, and the regulator system therefore naturally produces a Z(m{sub star}, SFR) relation if {epsilon} and {lambda} depend on the stellar mass m{sub star}. Furthermore, this relation will be the same at all epochs unless the parameters {epsilon} and {lambda} themselves change with time. A so-called fundamental metallicity relation is naturally produced by these conditions. The overall mass-metallicity relation Z(m{sub star}) directly provides the fraction f{sub star}(m{sub star}) of incoming baryons that are being transformed into stars. The observed Z(m{sub star}) relation of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies implies a strong dependence of stellar mass on halo mass that reconciles the different faint-end slopes of the stellar and halo mass

  10. Fibronectin alters the rate of formation and structure of the fibrin matrix.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Anand; Karuri, Nancy

    2014-01-10

    Plasma fibronectin is a vital component of the fibrin clot; however its role on clot structure is not clearly understood. The goal of this study was to examine the influence of fibronectin on the kinetics of formation, structural characteristics and composition of reconstituted fibrin clots or fibrin matrices. Fibrin matrices were formed by adding thrombin to 1, 2 or 4 mg/ml fibrinogen supplemented with 0-0.4 mg/ml fibronectin. The rate of fibrin matrix formation was then monitored by measuring light absorbance properties at different time points. Confocal microscopy of fluorescein conjugated fibrinogen was used to visualize the structural characteristics of fibrin matrices. The amount of fibronectin in fibrin matrices was determined through electrophoresis and immunoblotting of solubilized matrices. Fibronectin concentration positively correlated with the initial rate of fibrin matrix formation and with steady state light absorbance values of fibrin matrices. An increase in fibronectin concentration resulted in thinner and denser fibers in the fibrin matrices. Electrophoresis and immunoblotting showed that fibronectin was covalently and non-covalently bound to fibrin matrices and in the form of high molecular weight multimers. The formation of fibronectin multimers was attributed to cross-linking of fibronectin by trace amounts Factor XIIIa. These findings are novel because they link results from light absorbance studies to microcopy analyses and demonstrate an influence of fibronectin on fibrin matrix structural characteristics. This data is important in developing therapies that destabilize fibrin clots.

  11. High star formation rates as the origin of turbulence in early and modern disk galaxies.

    PubMed

    Green, Andrew W; Glazebrook, Karl; McGregor, Peter J; Abraham, Roberto G; Poole, Gregory B; Damjanov, Ivana; McCarthy, Patrick J; Colless, Matthew; Sharp, Robert G

    2010-10-07

    Observations of star formation and kinematics in early galaxies at high spatial and spectral resolution have shown that two-thirds are massive rotating disk galaxies, with the remainder being less massive non-rotating objects. The line-of-sight-averaged velocity dispersions are typically five times higher than in today's disk galaxies. This suggests that gravitationally unstable, gas-rich disks in the early Universe are fuelled by cold, dense accreting gas flowing along cosmic filaments and penetrating hot galactic gas halos. These accreting flows, however, have not been observed, and cosmic accretion cannot power the observed level of turbulence. Here we report observations of a sample of rare, high-velocity-dispersion disk galaxies in the nearby Universe where cold accretion is unlikely to drive their high star formation rates. We find that their velocity dispersions are correlated with their star formation rates, but not their masses or gas fractions, which suggests that star formation is the energetic driver of galaxy disk turbulence at all cosmic epochs.

  12. The Calibration of Mono-Chromatic Infrared Star Formation Rate Indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetti, Daniela; LVL Team

    2010-01-01

    I will present recent results on the calibration of mono-chromatic (single band) star formation rate indicators using Spitzer data of nearby galaxies from the SINGS and LVL samples. I will discuss not only the range of applicability of each indicator, but also the limitations and caveats. Many of these indicators can have immediate application in surveys of distant galaxies with the Herschel Space Telescope.

  13. In vivo loading increases mechanical properties of scaffold by affecting bone formation and bone resorption rates.

    PubMed

    Roshan-Ghias, Alireza; Lambers, Floor M; Gholam-Rezaee, Mehdi; Müller, Ralph; Pioletti, Dominique P

    2011-12-01

    A successful bone tissue engineering strategy entails producing bone-scaffold constructs with adequate mechanical properties. Apart from the mechanical properties of the scaffold itself, the forming bone inside the scaffold also adds to the strength of the construct. In this study, we investigated the role of in vivo cyclic loading on mechanical properties of a bone scaffold. We implanted PLA/β-TCP scaffolds in the distal femur of six rats, applied external cyclic loading on the right leg, and kept the left leg as a control. We monitored bone formation at 7 time points over 35 weeks using time-lapsed micro-computed tomography (CT) imaging. The images were then used to construct micro-finite element models of bone-scaffold constructs, with which we estimated the stiffness for each sample at all time points. We found that loading increased the stiffness by 60% at 35 weeks. The increase of stiffness was correlated to an increase in bone volume fraction of 18% in the loaded scaffold compared to control scaffold. These changes in volume fraction and related stiffness in the bone scaffold are regulated by two independent processes, bone formation and bone resorption. Using time-lapsed micro-CT imaging and a newly-developed longitudinal image registration technique, we observed that mechanical stimulation increases the bone formation rate during 4-10 weeks, and decreases the bone resorption rate during 9-18 weeks post-operatively. For the first time, we report that in vivo cyclic loading increases mechanical properties of the scaffold by increasing the bone formation rate and decreasing the bone resorption rate.

  14. Time series analyses reveal environmental and fisheries controls on Atlantic horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus) catch rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Time-series models (Dynamic factorial analyses and; Min/max autocorrelation factor analysis) were used to explore the relative influences of environmental variables and fishing pressure of trawl, seine and artisanal fleets on catch rates on Trachurus trachurus in ICES IXa sub-divisions (IXaCN-North coast; IXa- CS-South coast; IXaS-Algarve, South coast, Algarve). Fishing effort influenced catch rates in all areas with a 2 year lag and fishing pressure for each area was related to specific fleet sectors effort. In IXaCN, winter upwelling (spawning peak) and both summer northerly wind and wind magnitude (outside of the spawning peak) were strongly correlated with catch rates. In IXaCS summer/autumn westerly winds were related with catch rates. Northerly winds in spring, upwelling and SST (winter and autumn) were related with catch rates in IXaS-Algarve. For species with a long spawning season such as horse mackerel, seasonal analyses at broad regional scales can detract from a better understanding of variability in short term sub-stock catch rates. Favorable environmental conditions, even during seasons with low spawning activity can positively affect catch rates. Ignoring the role of regional oceanographic features on the spatial distribution of the sub-stocks when analysing variability in catch rates can lead to poor inferences about the productivity of the populations.

  15. Comparative Genomics Revealed Multiple Helicobacter pylori Genes Associated with Biofilm Formation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Eng Guan; Tay, Alfred Chin Yen; Peters, Fanny; Marshall, Barry J.; Ho, Bow; Goh, Khean Lee; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Loke, Mun Fai

    2016-01-01

    Background Biofilm formation by Helicobacter pylori may be one of the factors influencing eradication outcome. However, genetic differences between good and poor biofilm forming strains have not been studied. Materials and Methods Biofilm yield of 32 Helicobacter pylori strains (standard strain and 31 clinical strains) were determined by crystal-violet assay and grouped into poor, moderate and good biofilm forming groups. Whole genome sequencing of these 32 clinical strains was performed on the Illumina MiSeq platform. Annotation and comparison of the differences between the genomic sequences were carried out using RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology) and SEED viewer. Genes identified were confirmed using PCR. Results Genes identified to be associated with biofilm formation in H. pylori includes alpha (1,3)-fucosyltransferase, flagellar protein, 3 hypothetical proteins, outer membrane protein and a cag pathogenicity island protein. These genes play a role in bacterial motility, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis, Lewis antigen synthesis, adhesion and/or the type-IV secretion system (T4SS). Deletion of cagA and cagPAI confirmed that CagA and T4SS were involved in H. pylori biofilm formation. Conclusions Results from this study suggest that biofilm formation in H. pylori might be genetically determined and might be influenced by multiple genes. Good, moderate and poor biofilm forming strain might differ during the initiation of biofilm formation. PMID:27870886

  16. Surface Brightness Profiles and Star Formation Rates of Galaxies in NRGb054

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Ellen; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Miller, Brendan; Durbala, Adriana; Fitzgerald, Garrett

    2016-01-01

    We present new optical R and H-alpha images of the galaxy group NRGb054, obtained with the WIYN 0.9m telescope at KPNO using the MOSAIC camera. This group was studied as part of the larger Undergraduate ALFALFA Team project investigating the effects of a group environment on star formation. The stacked H-alpha image was continuum subtracted by the removal of a scaled and stacked R image. Surface photometry was performed on R and continuum-subtracted H-alpha cutouts of 20 covered galaxies to determine the surface brightness as a function of radius. Integrating the continuum-subtracted H-alpha surface brightness profile provides the total star formation within that galaxy, while the shape of the profile illustrates how star formation is spread throughout the galaxy. We provide a catalog of surface brightness profiles and integrated star formation rates for NRGb054. We consider star formation as a function of galaxy-galaxy separation and galaxy location within the group, and discuss our findings in the context of the wider study. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005.

  17. OH{sup +} in astrophysical media: state-to-state formation rates, Einstein coefficients and inelastic collision rates with He

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez-Carrasco, Susana; Godard, Benjamin; Lique, François; Bulut, Niyazi; Kłos, Jacek; Roncero, Octavio; Aguado, Alfredo; Aoiz, F. Javier; Castillo, Jesús F.; Goicoechea, Javier R.; Etxaluze, Mireya; Cernicharo, José

    2014-10-10

    The rate constants required to model the OH{sup +} observations in different regions of the interstellar medium have been determined using state of the art quantum methods. First, state-to-state rate constants for the H{sub 2}(v = 0, J = 0, 1) + O{sup +}({sup 4} S) → H + OH{sup +}(X {sup 3}Σ{sup –}, v', N) reaction have been obtained using a quantum wave packet method. The calculations have been compared with time-independent results to assess the accuracy of reaction probabilities at collision energies of about 1 meV. The good agreement between the simulations and the existing experimental cross sections in the 0.01-1 eV energy range shows the quality of the results. The calculated state-to-state rate constants have been fitted to an analytical form. Second, the Einstein coefficients of OH{sup +} have been obtained for all astronomically significant rovibrational bands involving the X {sup 3}Σ{sup –} and/or A {sup 3}Π electronic states. For this purpose, the potential energy curves and electric dipole transition moments for seven electronic states of OH{sup +} are calculated with ab initio methods at the highest level, including spin-orbit terms, and the rovibrational levels have been calculated including the empirical spin-rotation and spin-spin terms. Third, the state-to-state rate constants for inelastic collisions between He and OH{sup +}(X {sup 3}Σ{sup –}) have been calculated using a time-independent close coupling method on a new potential energy surface. All these rates have been implemented in detailed chemical and radiative transfer models. Applications of these models to various astronomical sources show that inelastic collisions dominate the excitation of the rotational levels of OH{sup +}. In the models considered, the excitation resulting from the chemical formation of OH{sup +} increases the line fluxes by about 10% or less depending on the density of the gas.

  18. Crystal structure of listeriolysin O reveals molecular details of oligomerization and pore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, Stefan; van Pee, Katharina; Hudel, Martina; Leustik, Martin; Rhinow, Daniel; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Chakraborty, Trinad; Yildiz, Özkan

    2014-04-01

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is an essential virulence factor of Listeria monocytogenes that causes listeriosis. Listeria monocytogenes owes its ability to live within cells to the pH- and temperature-dependent pore-forming activity of LLO, which is unique among cholesterol-dependent cytolysins. LLO enables the bacteria to cross the phagosomal membrane and is also involved in activation of cellular processes, including the modulation of gene expression or intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. Neither the pore-forming mechanism nor the mechanisms triggering the signalling processes in the host cell are known in detail. Here, we report the crystal structure of LLO, in which we identified regions important for oligomerization and pore formation. Mutants were characterized by determining their haemolytic and Ca2+ uptake activity. We analysed the pore formation of LLO and its variants on erythrocyte ghosts by electron microscopy and show that pore formation requires precise interface interactions during toxin oligomerization on the membrane.

  19. The rate and latency of star formation in dense, massive clumps in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyer, M.; Gutermuth, R.; Urquhart, J. S.; Csengeri, T.; Wienen, M.; Leurini, S.; Menten, K.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Newborn stars form within the localized, high density regions of molecular clouds. The sequence and rate at which stars form in dense clumps and the dependence on local and global environments are key factors in developing descriptions of stellar production in galaxies. Aims: We seek to observationally constrain the rate and latency of star formation in dense massive clumps that are distributed throughout the Galaxy and to compare these results to proposed prescriptions for stellar production. Methods: A sample of 24 μm-based Class I protostars are linked to dust clumps that are embedded within molecular clouds selected from the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy. We determine the fraction of star-forming clumps, f∗, that imposes a constraint on the latency of star formation in units of a clump's lifetime. Protostellar masses are estimated from models of circumstellar environments of young stellar objects from which star formation rates are derived. Physical properties of the clumps are calculated from 870 μm dust continuum emission and NH3 line emission. Results: Linear correlations are identified between the star formation rate surface density, ΣSFR, and the quantities ΣH2/τff and ΣH2/τcross, suggesting that star formation is regulated at the local scales of molecular clouds. The measured fraction of star forming clumps is 23%. Accounting for star formation within clumps that are excluded from our sample due to 24 μm saturation, this fraction can be as high as 31%, which is similar to previous results. Dense, massive clumps form primarily low mass (<1-2 M⊙) stars with emergent 24 μm fluxes below our sensitivity limit or are incapable of forming any stars for the initial 70% of their lifetimes. The low fraction of star forming clumps in the Galactic center relative to those located in the disk of the Milky Way is verified. Full Tables 2-4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130

  20. Submerged conidiation and product formation by Aspergillus niger at low specific growth rates are affected in aerial developmental mutants.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Thomas R; Nielsen, Kristian F; Arentshorst, Mark; Park, Joohae; van den Hondel, Cees A; Frisvad, Jens C; Ram, Arthur F

    2011-08-01

    Exposure to an aerial environment or severe nutrient limitation induces asexual differentiation in filamentous fungi. Submerged cultivation of Aspergillus niger in carbon- and energy-limited retentostat cultures both induces and fuels conidiation. Physiological and transcriptomic analyses have revealed that this differentiation strongly affects product formation. Since conidiation is inherent in the aerial environment, we hypothesized that product formation near zero growth can be influenced by affecting differentiation or development of aerial hyphae in general. To investigate this idea, three developmental mutants (ΔfwnA, scl-1, and scl-2 mutants) that have no apparent vegetative growth defects were cultured in maltose-limited retentostat cultures. The secondary-metabolite profile of the wild-type strain defined flavasperone, aurasperone B, tensidol B, and two so far uncharacterized compounds as associated with conidium formation, while fumonisins B(2), B(4), and B(6) were characteristic of early response to nutrient limitation by the vegetative mycelium. The developmental mutants responded differently to the severe substrate limitation, which resulted in distinct profiles of growth and product formation. fwnA encodes the polyketide synthase responsible for melanin biosynthesis during aerial differentiation, and we show that conidial melanin synthesis in submerged retentostat cultures and aurasperone B production are fwnA dependent. The scl-1 and scl-2 strains are two UV mutants generated in the ΔfwnA background that displayed reduced asexual conidiation and formed sclerotium-like structures on agar plates. The reduced conidiation phenotypes of the scl-1 and scl-2 strains are reflected in the retentostat cultivation and are accompanied by elimination or severely reduced accumulation of secondary metabolites and distinctly enhanced accumulation of extracellular protein. This investigation shows that submerged conidiation and product formation of a mitosporic

  1. Comparative genomics reveals convergent rates of evolution in ant–plant mutualisms

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Benjamin E. R.; Moreau, Corrie S.

    2016-01-01

    Symbiosis—the close and often long-term interaction of species—is predicted to drive genome evolution in a variety of ways. For example, parasitic interactions have been shown to increase rates of molecular evolution, a trend generally attributed to the Red Queen Hypothesis. However, it is much less clear how mutualisms impact the genome, as both increased and reduced rates of change have been predicted. Here we sequence the genomes of seven species of ants, three that have convergently evolved obligate plant–ant mutualism and four closely related species of non-mutualists. Comparing these sequences, we investigate how genome evolution is shaped by mutualistic behaviour. We find that rates of molecular evolution are higher in the mutualists genome wide, a characteristic apparently not the result of demography. Our results suggest that the intimate relationships of obligate mutualists may lead to selective pressures similar to those seen in parasites, thereby increasing rates of evolution. PMID:27557866

  2. Late Cenozoic Himalayan Erosion Rates Revealed by Cosmogenic Isotopes in Foreland Sediments, Northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherler, D.; Barnes, J. B.; Insel, N.; Densmore, A.

    2015-12-01

    Most surface processes that transport sediment are influenced by climate. For example, more rainfall enhances runoff and stream capacity, and colder temperatures expand glaciers at the expense of rivers. Late Cenozoic cooling and glacial cycles during the Quaternary should thus have affected erosion of the Earth's surface. But whether these changes were also associated with an overall increase of erosion rates is not clear. Here, we assess the erosional response of the fluvial-dominated Yamuna catchment in the Garhwal Himalaya, northern India, to late Cenozoic cooling and Quaternary climatic oscillations. Our approach is to measure cosmogenic radionuclide (10Be) concentrations in fluvial sediments (n = 14) eroded from uplifting foreland deposits and compare them with modelled concentrations for different paleo-erosion rate scenarios. This approach differs from previous ones that determine paleo-erosion rates from 10Be concentrations in distinct samples from stratigraphic sections, and avoids misinterpreting short-term fluctuations in 10Be concentrations that are unrelated to erosion rates. We tested this approach in the Mohand Range in northwest India, where Miocene to Quaternary deposits of the paleo-Yamuna River are actively uplifting, and where a robust kinematic model and published stratigraphic age constraints exist. Our model free parameters are the shortening rate across the Main Frontal Thrust (MFT) and the onset of shortening, within a known amount of total MFT slip (4-5 km). Preliminary results show that we can reproduce the measured 10Be concentrations best when Himalayan erosion rates were lower in the past than they are now, or have been increasing towards the present. Within uncertainties, the best-fit parameter combinations give shortening rates between 10 and 20 mm/yr, which is consistent with independent estimates from a nearby dated strath terrace and expected uplift rates based on channel steepness indices. Scenarios in which erosion rates are

  3. Genome-wide investigation reveals high evolutionary rates in annual model plants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Rates of molecular evolution vary widely among species. While significant deviations from molecular clock have been found in many taxa, effects of life histories on molecular evolution are not fully understood. In plants, annual/perennial life history traits have long been suspected to influence the evolutionary rates at the molecular level. To date, however, the number of genes investigated on this subject is limited and the conclusions are mixed. To evaluate the possible heterogeneity in evolutionary rates between annual and perennial plants at the genomic level, we investigated 85 nuclear housekeeping genes, 10 non-housekeeping families, and 34 chloroplast genes using the genomic data from model plants including Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula for annuals and grape (Vitis vinifera) and popular (Populus trichocarpa) for perennials. Results According to the cross-comparisons among the four species, 74-82% of the nuclear genes and 71-97% of the chloroplast genes suggested higher rates of molecular evolution in the two annuals than those in the two perennials. The significant heterogeneity in evolutionary rate between annuals and perennials was consistently found both in nonsynonymous sites and synonymous sites. While a linear correlation of evolutionary rates in orthologous genes between species was observed in nonsynonymous sites, the correlation was weak or invisible in synonymous sites. This tendency was clearer in nuclear genes than in chloroplast genes, in which the overall evolutionary rate was small. The slope of the regression line was consistently lower than unity, further confirming the higher evolutionary rate in annuals at the genomic level. Conclusions The higher evolutionary rate in annuals than in perennials appears to be a universal phenomenon both in nuclear and chloroplast genomes in the four dicot model plants we investigated. Therefore, such heterogeneity in evolutionary rate should result from factors that have genome

  4. 5D imaging via light sheet microscopy reveals cell dynamics during the eye-antenna disc primordium formation in Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu Shan; Ku, Hui Yu; Tsai, Yun Chi; Chang, Chin Hao; Pao, Sih Hua; Sun, Y. Henry; Chiou, Arthur

    2017-03-01

    5D images of engrailed (en) and eye gone (eyg) gene expressions during the course of the eye-antenna disc primordium (EADP) formation of Drosophila embryos from embryonic stages 13 through 16 were recorded via light sheet microscopy and analyzed to reveal the cell dynamics involved in the development of the EADP. Detailed analysis of the time-lapsed images revealed the process of EADP formation and its invagination trajectory, which involved an inversion of the EADP anterior-posterior axis relative to the body. Furthermore, analysis of the en-expression pattern in the EADP provided strong evidence that the EADP is derived from one of the en-expressing head segments.

  5. 5D imaging via light sheet microscopy reveals cell dynamics during the eye-antenna disc primordium formation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu Shan; Ku, Hui Yu; Tsai, Yun Chi; Chang, Chin Hao; Pao, Sih Hua; Sun, Y. Henry; Chiou, Arthur

    2017-01-01

    5D images of engrailed (en) and eye gone (eyg) gene expressions during the course of the eye-antenna disc primordium (EADP) formation of Drosophila embryos from embryonic stages 13 through 16 were recorded via light sheet microscopy and analyzed to reveal the cell dynamics involved in the development of the EADP. Detailed analysis of the time-lapsed images revealed the process of EADP formation and its invagination trajectory, which involved an inversion of the EADP anterior-posterior axis relative to the body. Furthermore, analysis of the en-expression pattern in the EADP provided strong evidence that the EADP is derived from one of the en-expressing head segments. PMID:28322328

  6. Elevated rates of gold mining in the Amazon revealed through high-resolution monitoring.

    PubMed

    Asner, Gregory P; Llactayo, William; Tupayachi, Raul; Luna, Ernesto Ráez

    2013-11-12

    Gold mining has rapidly increased in western Amazonia, but the rates and ecological impacts of mining remain poorly known and potentially underestimated. We combined field surveys, airborne mapping, and high-resolution satellite imaging to assess road- and river-based gold mining in the Madre de Dios region of the Peruvian Amazon from 1999 to 2012. In this period, the geographic extent of gold mining increased 400%. The average annual rate of forest loss as a result of gold mining tripled in 2008 following the global economic recession, closely associated with increased gold prices. Small clandestine operations now comprise more than half of all gold mining activities throughout the region. These rates of gold mining are far higher than previous estimates that were based on traditional satellite mapping techniques. Our results prove that gold mining is growing more rapidly than previously thought, and that high-resolution monitoring approaches are required to accurately quantify human impacts on tropical forests.

  7. Elevated rates of gold mining in the Amazon revealed through high-resolution monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Asner, Gregory P.; Llactayo, William; Tupayachi, Raul; Luna, Ernesto Ráez

    2013-01-01

    Gold mining has rapidly increased in western Amazonia, but the rates and ecological impacts of mining remain poorly known and potentially underestimated. We combined field surveys, airborne mapping, and high-resolution satellite imaging to assess road- and river-based gold mining in the Madre de Dios region of the Peruvian Amazon from 1999 to 2012. In this period, the geographic extent of gold mining increased 400%. The average annual rate of forest loss as a result of gold mining tripled in 2008 following the global economic recession, closely associated with increased gold prices. Small clandestine operations now comprise more than half of all gold mining activities throughout the region. These rates of gold mining are far higher than previous estimates that were based on traditional satellite mapping techniques. Our results prove that gold mining is growing more rapidly than previously thought, and that high-resolution monitoring approaches are required to accurately quantify human impacts on tropical forests. PMID:24167281

  8. Effects of work hardening rate on formation of nanocrystallized subsurface layer in Cu alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hisashi; Kaneko, Yuya; Watanabe, Yoshimi

    2017-01-01

    The effects of the work hardening rate on the formation of a nanocrystallized subsurface layer by sliding wear for pure Cu and Cu-Ge alloys are investigated. The nanocrystallized subsurface layer is called the wear-induced layer (WIL). The work hardening rates of the Cu-Ge alloys increase with Ge concentration. By sliding wear, the WIL is formed around a worn surface in all the specimens. The thickness of the WIL decreases with increasing Ge concentration. This means that a thinner WIL is formed in a specimen with a higher work hardening rate. The equivalent Hencky strain required to form the WIL is about 5 regardless of the work hardening rate of the specimen. In addition, a larger strain gradient is generated just below the WIL in the specimen with a higher work hardening rate. This decrease in the thickness of the WIL depending on the work hardening rate of the specimen can be explained by the localization of shear deformation around the worn surface.

  9. Direct observation of mineral–organic composite formation reveals occlusion mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Rae Cho, Kang; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Yang, Pengcheng; Cai, Wei; Pan, Haihua; Kulak, Alexander N.; Lau, Jolene L.; Kulshreshtha, Prashant; Armes, Steven P.; Meldrum, Fiona C.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of inorganic materials with organic macromolecules enables organisms to create biominerals such as bones and seashells, where occlusion of biomacromolecules within individual crystals generates superior mechanical properties. Current understanding of this process largely comes from studying the entrapment of micron-size particles in cooling melts. Here, by investigating micelle incorporation in calcite with atomic force microscopy and micromechanical simulations, we show that different mechanisms govern nanoscale occlusion. By simultaneously visualizing the micelles and propagating step edges, we demonstrate that the micelles experience significant compression during occlusion, which is accompanied by cavity formation. This generates local lattice strain, leading to enhanced mechanical properties. These results give new insight into the formation of occlusions in natural and synthetic crystals, and will facilitate the synthesis of multifunctional nanocomposite crystals. PMID:26732046

  10. Schottky barrier formation and band bending revealed by first- principles calculations

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yang; Hellman, Anders; Fang, Yurui; Gao, Shiwu; Käll, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    The formation of a Schottky barrier at the metal-semiconductor interface is widely utilised in semiconductor devices. With the emerging of novel Schottky barrier based nanoelectronics, a further microscopic understanding of this interface is in high demand. Here we provide an atomistic insight into potential barrier formation and band bending by ab initio simulations and model analysis of a prototype Schottky diode, i.e., niobium doped rutile titania in contact with gold (Au/Nb:TiO2). The local Schottky barrier height is found to vary between 0 and 1.26 eV depending on the position of the dopant. The band bending is caused by a dopant induced dipole field between the interface and the dopant site, whereas the pristine Au/TiO2 interface does not show any band bending. These findings open the possibility for atomic scale optimisation of the Schottky barrier and light harvesting in metal-semiconductor nanostructures. PMID:26065401

  11. Schottky barrier formation and band bending revealed by first- principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Hellman, Anders; Fang, Yurui; Gao, Shiwu; Käll, Mikael

    2015-06-12

    The formation of a Schottky barrier at the metal-semiconductor interface is widely utilised in semiconductor devices. With the emerging of novel Schottky barrier based nanoelectronics, a further microscopic understanding of this interface is in high demand. Here we provide an atomistic insight into potential barrier formation and band bending by ab initio simulations and model analysis of a prototype Schottky diode, i.e., niobium doped rutile titania in contact with gold (Au/Nb:TiO2). The local Schottky barrier height is found to vary between 0 and 1.26 eV depending on the position of the dopant. The band bending is caused by a dopant induced dipole field between the interface and the dopant site, whereas the pristine Au/TiO2 interface does not show any band bending. These findings open the possibility for atomic scale optimisation of the Schottky barrier and light harvesting in metal-semiconductor nanostructures.

  12. Direct observation of mineral–organic composite formation reveals occlusion mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Kang Rae; Kim, Yi -Yeoun; Yang, Pengcheng; Cai, Wei; Pan, Haihua; Kulak, Alexander N.; Lau, Jolene L.; Kulshreshtha, Prashant; Armes, Steven P.; Meldrum, Fiona C.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2016-01-06

    Manipulation of inorganic materials with organic macromolecules enables organisms to create biominerals such as bones and seashells, where occlusion of biomacromolecules within individual crystals generates superior mechanical properties. Current understanding of this process largely comes from studying the entrapment of micron-size particles in cooling melts. Here, by investigating micelle incorporation in calcite with atomic force microscopy and micromechanical simulations, we show that different mechanisms govern nanoscale occlusion. By simultaneously visualizing the micelles and propagating step edges, we demonstrate that the micelles experience significant compression during occlusion, which is accompanied by cavity formation. This generates local lattice strain, leading to enhanced mechanical properties. Furthermore, these results give new insight into the formation of occlusions in natural and synthetic crystals, and will facilitate the synthesis of multifunctional nanocomposite crystals.

  13. Direct observation of mineral-organic composite formation reveals occlusion mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae Cho, Kang; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Yang, Pengcheng; Cai, Wei; Pan, Haihua; Kulak, Alexander N.; Lau, Jolene L.; Kulshreshtha, Prashant; Armes, Steven P.; Meldrum, Fiona C.; de Yoreo, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of inorganic materials with organic macromolecules enables organisms to create biominerals such as bones and seashells, where occlusion of biomacromolecules within individual crystals generates superior mechanical properties. Current understanding of this process largely comes from studying the entrapment of micron-size particles in cooling melts. Here, by investigating micelle incorporation in calcite with atomic force microscopy and micromechanical simulations, we show that different mechanisms govern nanoscale occlusion. By simultaneously visualizing the micelles and propagating step edges, we demonstrate that the micelles experience significant compression during occlusion, which is accompanied by cavity formation. This generates local lattice strain, leading to enhanced mechanical properties. These results give new insight into the formation of occlusions in natural and synthetic crystals, and will facilitate the synthesis of multifunctional nanocomposite crystals.

  14. Vacuum-ultraviolet circular dichroism reveals DNA duplex formation between short strands of adenine and thymine.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Lisbeth Munksgaard; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen

    2012-11-21

    Absorbance spectroscopy is used extensively to tell when two DNA single strands come together and form a double strand. Here we show that circular dichroism in the vacuum ultraviolet region provides an even stronger indication for duplex formation in the case of short strands of adenine and thymine (4 to 16 bases in each strand). Indeed, our results show that a strong positive CD band appears at 179 nm when double strands are formed. Melting experiments were done in aqueous solution with and without added Na(+) counter ions. With additional salt present a huge increase in the 179 nm CD band was observed when lowering the temperature. A 179 nm CD marker band for duplex formation can be used to measure the kinetics for the association of two single strands. Such experiments rely on large changes at one particular wavelength since it is too time-consuming to record a full-wavelength spectrum.

  15. Direct observation of mineral–organic composite formation reveals occlusion mechanism

    DOE PAGES

    Cho, Kang Rae; Kim, Yi -Yeoun; Yang, Pengcheng; ...

    2016-01-06

    Manipulation of inorganic materials with organic macromolecules enables organisms to create biominerals such as bones and seashells, where occlusion of biomacromolecules within individual crystals generates superior mechanical properties. Current understanding of this process largely comes from studying the entrapment of micron-size particles in cooling melts. Here, by investigating micelle incorporation in calcite with atomic force microscopy and micromechanical simulations, we show that different mechanisms govern nanoscale occlusion. By simultaneously visualizing the micelles and propagating step edges, we demonstrate that the micelles experience significant compression during occlusion, which is accompanied by cavity formation. This generates local lattice strain, leading to enhancedmore » mechanical properties. Furthermore, these results give new insight into the formation of occlusions in natural and synthetic crystals, and will facilitate the synthesis of multifunctional nanocomposite crystals.« less

  16. Effects of Antimicrobial Peptide Revealed by Simulations: Translocation, Pore Formation, Membrane Corrugation and Euler Buckling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Licui; Jia, Nana; Gao, Lianghui; Fang, Weihai; Golubovic, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    We explore the effects of the peripheral and transmembrane antimicrobial peptides on the lipid bilayer membrane by using the coarse grained Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations. We study peptide/lipid membrane complexes by considering peptides with various structure, hydrophobicity and peptide/lipid interaction strength. The role of lipid/water interaction is also discussed. We discuss a rich variety of membrane morphological changes induced by peptides, such as pore formation, membrane corrugation and Euler buckling. PMID:23579956

  17. Bar-induced Central Star Formation as Revealed by Integral Field Spectroscopy from CALIFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lin; Li, Cheng; He, Yanqin; Xiao, Ting; Wang, Enci

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the recent star formation history (SFH) in the inner region of 57 nearly face-on spiral galaxies selected from the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey. For each galaxy, we use the integral field spectroscopy from CALIFA to obtain two-dimensional maps and radial profiles of three parameters that are sensitive indicators of the recent SFH: the 4000 Å break (D n (4000)), and the equivalent width of Hδ absorption ({EW}({{H}}{δ }A)) and Hα emission (EW(Hα)). We have also performed photometric decomposition of bulge/bar/disk components based on SDSS optical image. We identify a class of 17 “turnover” galaxies for which the central region presents a significant drop in D n (4000), and most of them correspondingly show a central upturn in {EW}({{H}}{δ }A) and EW(Hα). This indicates that the central region of the turnover galaxies has experienced star formation in the past 1–2 Gyr, which makes the bulge younger and more star-forming than surrounding regions. We find that almost all (15/17) of the turnover galaxies are barred, while only half of the barred galaxies in our sample (15/32) are classified as a turnover galaxies. This finding provides strong evidence in support of the theoretical expectation that the bar may drive gas from the disk inward to trigger star formation in the galaxy center, an important channel for the growth/rejuvenation of pseudobulges in disk galaxies.

  18. Optimized Jasmonic Acid Production by Lasiodiplodia theobromae Reveals Formation of Valuable Plant Secondary Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Felipe; Haroth, Sven; Feussner, Kirstin; Meldau, Dorothea; Rekhter, Dmitrij; Ischebeck, Till; Brodhun, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonic acid is a plant hormone that can be produced by the fungus Lasiodiplodia theobromae via submerged fermentation. From a biotechnological perspective jasmonic acid is a valuable feedstock as its derivatives serve as important ingredients in different cosmetic products and in the future it may be used for pharmaceutical applications. The objective of this work was to improve the production of jasmonic acid by L. theobromae strain 2334. We observed that jasmonic acid formation is dependent on the culture volume. Moreover, cultures grown in medium containing potassium nitrate as nitrogen source produced higher amounts of jasmonic acid than analogous cultures supplemented with ammonium nitrate. When cultivated under optimal conditions for jasmonic acid production, L. theobromae secreted several secondary metabolites known from plants into the medium. Among those we found 3-oxo-2-(pent-2-enyl)-cyclopentane-1-butanoic acid (OPC-4) and hydroxy-jasmonic acid derivatives, respectively, suggesting that fungal jasmonate metabolism may involve similar reaction steps as that of plants. To characterize fungal growth and jasmonic acid-formation, we established a mathematical model describing both processes. This model may form the basis of industrial upscaling attempts. Importantly, it showed that jasmonic acid-formation is not associated to fungal growth. Therefore, this finding suggests that jasmonic acid, despite its enormous amount being produced upon fungal development, serves merely as secondary metabolite. PMID:27907207

  19. Local shear texture formation in adiabatic shear bands by high rate compression of high manganese TRIP steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Yang, P.; Mao, W. M.; Cui, F. E.

    2015-04-01

    Local shear textures in ASBs of high manganese TRIP steels under high rate straining are determined and the influences of initial microstructure is analyzed using EBSD technique. It is seen that even at the presence of majority of two types of martensite before deformation, ASB is preferred to evolve in austenite, rather than in martenite, due to reverse transformation. Ultrafine grains of thress phases due to dynamic recrystallization are formed and all show shear textures. The less ε-martensite in ASB is distributed as islands and its preferred orientation can be found to originate from the variants in matrix. The grain orientation rotation around ASB in multi-phase alloy reveals significant influence of α'- martensite on texture in ASB. The mechanism of local texture formation in ASB of high manganese TRIP steel is proposed in terms of the interaction of early TRIP and later reverse transformation.

  20. Moving beyond Means: Revealing Features of the Learning Environment by Investigating the Consensus among Student Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweig, Jonathan David

    2016-01-01

    Student ratings, a critical component in policy efforts to assess and improve teaching, are often collected using questionnaires, and inferences about teachers are then based on aggregated student survey responses. While considerable attention has been paid to the reliability and validity of these aggregates, much less attention has been paid to…

  1. Cryogenian cap carbonates - what do laminar scale investigations reveal about formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, N. R.; Maupin, C. R.; Partin, J. W.; Quinn, T.; Giddings, J.

    2009-12-01

    Mid- to Late-Neoproterozoic “Cryogenian” cap carbonates are generally regarded as marine chemical sediments rapidly deposited during climatic recoveries from some of Earth’s most extreme glacial intervals, but there is little consensus regarding formation. Many cap successions initiate abruptly above glacigenic strata as finely laminated carbonate (typically dolostone), even in otherwise siliciclastic dominated marine continua, suggesting water mass control and widespread deposition below storm wave base. Cap carbonate units often culminate intervals of ongoing negative δ13C, transitioning to positive δ13C in the higher succession. Considering that fine lamination is a common characteristic among many cap carbonate units in space and time, laminar scale chemostratigraphic investigations may offer insights to modes of formation. Toward this end, we integrate bedding-normal LA-ICP-MS scans and high-resolution C and O isotope stratigraphy, for an array of cap carbonate units spanning “Kaigas”, “Sturtian”, and “Marinoan” post-glacial intervals; namely: Assem Limestone, N. Ethiopia (Nubia); Beck Spring Dolomite and Noonday Dolomite, Death Valley Area (W. Laurentia); Scout Mountain Member of the Pocatello Formation, S. Idaho (W. Laurentia); Tindelpina Shale Member, S. Australia (Adelaide Geosyncline); Rasthof and Keilberg Formations, N. Namibia (Congo Craton); and Mirrasol O’est, Brazil (Sao Francisco Craton). Whole-rock assessments for basal cap samples have δ13C between -4.8 to -1.4‰ and δ18O between -15.5 to -3.1‰. Corresponding PASS-normalized REE patterns show moderate LREE depletion, minor MREE enrichment, and slight HREE depletion. Cap samples from the higher positive δ13C succession (Noonday/Rasthof) display flatter patterns. Laser ablation scans for the Rasthof Fm (basal rhythmite and middle sublittoral microbialite) and Noonday Dolomite show that lamina couplets consist of alternations of comparatively darker organic/terrigenous (Si

  2. Negative ion formation by Rydberg electron transfer: Isotope-dependent rate constants

    SciTech Connect

    Carman, H.S. Jr.; Klots, C.E.; Compton, R.N.

    1991-01-01

    The formation of negative ions during collisions of rubidium atoms in selected ns and nd Rydberg states with carbon disulfide molecules has been studied for a range of effective principal quantum numbers (10 {le} n* {le} 25). For a narrow range of n* near n* = 17, rate constants for CS{sub 2}{sup {minus}} formation are found to depend upon the isotopic composition of the molecule, producing a negative ion isotope ratio (mass 78 to mass 76, amu) up to 10.5 times larger than the natural abundance ratio of CS{sub 2} isotopes in the reagent. The isotope ratio is found to depend strongly upon the initial quantum state of the Rydberg atom and perhaps upon the collision energy and CS{sub 2} temperature. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Bifurcation and neck formation as a precursor to ductile fracture during high rate extension

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, L.B.; Soerensen, N.J.

    1997-12-31

    A block of ductile material, typically a segment of a plate or shell, being deformed homogeneously in simple plane strain extension commonly undergoes a bifurcation in deformation mode to nonuniform straining in the advanced stages of plastic flow. The focus here is on the influence of material inertia on the bifurcation process, particularly on the formation of diffuse necks as precursors to dynamic ductile fracture. The issue is considered from two points of view, first within the context of the theory of bifurcation of rate-independent, incrementally linear materials and then in terms of the complete numerical solution of a boundary value problem for an elastic-viscoplastic material. It is found that inertia favors the formation of relatively short wavelength necks as observed in shaped charge break-up and dynamic fragmentation.

  4. Star formation at low rates - the impact of lacking massive stars on stellar feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensler, Gerhard; Steyrleithner, Patrick; Recchi, Simone

    2017-03-01

    Due to their low masses dwarf galaxies experience low star-formation rates resulting in stellar cluster masses insufficient to fill the initial mass function (IMF) to the uppermost mass. Numerical simulations usually do not account for the completeness of the IMF, but treat a filed IMF by numbers, masses, and stellar feedback by fractions. To ensure that only entire stars are formed, we consider an IMF filled from the lower-mass regime and truncated where at least one entire massive star is formed. By 3D simulations we investigate the effects of two possible IMFs on the evolution of dwarf galaxies: filled vs. truncated IMF. For the truncated IMF the star-formation self-regulation is suppressed, while the energy release by typeII supernovae is larger, both compared to the filled IMF. Moreover, the abundance ratios of particular elements yielded from massive and intermediate-mass stars differ significantly between the two IMF distributions.

  5. Star Formation Rate and Gas Relations in the Arp 299 Merger from the VIXENS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiderman, Amanda; Evans, Neal J.; Gebhardt, Karl; Blanc, Guillermo; Davis, Timothy; Papovich, Casey; van den Bosch, Remco; Iono, Daisuke; Yun, Min S.

    2015-08-01

    We highlight first results from the VIRUS-P Investigation of the eXtreme ENvironments of Starbursts (VIXENS) integral field unit survey. We investigate the relationship between star formation and gas content in late interaction phase merger Arp 299 from VIXENS. By comparing Hα, Paα, and 24μm images to CO(2→1), CO(3→2), HCN(1→0), HCO+(1→0), and HI maps, we explore the relation between the star formation rate and gas surface densities on spatially resolved ~kpc scales. We find that the SFR-gas relations for Arp 299 are discrepant from known extragalactic spatially resolved relations in nearby spiral galaxies and disk-averaged relations in high-z mergers.

  6. Analysis of carrier gas flow rate effect on hydroxyapatite particle formation in ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiyastuti, W.; Setiawan, Adhi; Nurtono, Tantular; Winardi, Sugeng

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasonic spray pyrolysis has been well-known process for producing fine particles from single and multicomponent materials. Here, the effect of carrier gas flow rate in ultrasonic spray pyrolysis process was studied in the particle formation of hydroxyapatite using solution precursor of Ca(CH3COO)2 and (NH4)2HPO4 with Ca/P ratio of 1.67. The experimental analysis was accompanied with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation for comparison. In the simulation, the evaporation of the solvent in the droplets, a second evaporation due to crust formation, the decomposition reaction of the precursor involving the transfer of heat and mass transfer from droplet to surrounding were considered. By maintaining temperature at 900 °C, the residence time increased with decreasing the carrier gas flow rate led to the increasing the evaporation rate and the reacted fraction of the precursor. The predicted and experimental results of average particles size were agreed well with discrepancy 6.3%.

  7. Distribution of star formation rates during the rapid assembly of NGC 1399 as deduced from its globular cluster system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, C.; Hilker, M.; Kroupa, P.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.

    2016-10-01

    Ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) share many properties with globular clusters (GCs) and are found in similar environments. Here, a large sample of UCDs and GCs around NGC 1399, the central giant elliptical of the Fornax galaxy cluster, is used to infer their formation history and also to shed light on the formation of NGC 1399 itself. We assumed that all GCs and UCDs in our sample are the result of star cluster (SC) formation processes and used them as tracers of past star formation activities. After correcting our GC/UCD sample for mass loss, we interpreted their overall mass function to be a superposition of SC populations that formed coevally during different formation epochs. The SC masses of each population were distributed according to the embedded cluster mass function (ECMF), a pure power law with the slope - β. Each ECMF was characterized by a stellar upper mass limit, Mmax, which depended on the star formation rate (SFR). We decomposed the observed GC/UCD mass function into individual SC populations and converted Mmax of each SC population to an SFR. The overall distribution of SFRs reveals under which conditions the GC/UCD sample around NGC 1399 formed. Considering the constraints set by the age of the GCs/UCDs and the present stellar mass of NGC 1399, we found that the formation of the GCs/UCDs can be well explained within our framework with values for β below 2.3. This finding agrees very well with the observation of young SCs where β ≈ 2.0 is usually found. Even though we took into account that some of the most massive objects might not be genuine SCs and applied different corrections for the mass loss, we found that these considerations do not influence much the outcome. We derived the peak SFRs to be between approximately 300 and 3000 M⊙ yr-1, which matches the SFRs observed in massive high-redshift sub-millimeter galaxies and an SFR estimate inferred from NGC 1399 based on the so-called downsizing picture, meaning that more massive

  8. National Lupus Hospitalization Trends Reveal Rising Rates of Herpes Zoster and Declines in Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Sara G.; Schmajuk, Gabriela; Trupin, Laura; Gensler, Lianne; Katz, Patricia P.; Yelin, Edward H.; Gansky, Stuart A.; Yazdany, Jinoos

    2016-01-01

    Objective Infection is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Therapeutic practices have evolved over the past 15 years, but effects on infectious complications of SLE are unknown. We evaluated trends in hospitalizations for severe and opportunistic infections in a population-based SLE study. Methods Data derive from the 2000 to 2011 United States National Inpatient Sample, including individuals who met a validated administrative definition of SLE. Primary outcomes were diagnoses of bacteremia, pneumonia, opportunistic fungal infection, herpes zoster, cytomegalovirus, or pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP). We used Poisson regression to determine whether infection rates were changing in SLE hospitalizations and used predictive marginals to generate annual adjusted rates of specific infections. Results We identified 361,337 SLE hospitalizations from 2000 to 2011 meeting study inclusion criteria. Compared to non-SLE hospitalizations, SLE patients were younger (51 vs. 62 years), predominantly female (89% vs. 54%), and more likely to be racial/ethnic minorities. SLE diagnosis was significantly associated with all measured severe and opportunistic infections. From 2000 to 2011, adjusted SLE hospitalization rates for herpes zoster increased more than non-SLE rates: 54 to 79 per 10,000 SLE hospitalizations compared with 24 to 29 per 10,000 non-SLE hospitalizations. Conversely, SLE hospitalizations for PCP disproportionately decreased: 5.1 to 2.5 per 10,000 SLE hospitalizations compared with 0.9 to 1.3 per 10,000 non-SLE hospitalizations. Conclusions Among patients with SLE, herpes zoster hospitalizations are rising while PCP hospitalizations are declining. These trends likely reflect evolving SLE treatment strategies. Further research is needed to identify patients at greatest risk for infectious complications. PMID:26731012

  9. Chandra Reveals Heavy Obscuration and Circumnuclear Star Formation in Seyfert 2 Galaxy NGC 4968

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Yaqoob, Tahir; Levenson, N. A.; Boorman, Peter; Heckman, Timothy M.; Gandhi, Poshak; Rigby, Jane R.; Urry, C. Megan; Ptak, Andrew F.

    2017-01-01

    We present the Chandra imaging and spectral analysis of NGC 4968, a nearby (z = 0.00986) Seyfert 2 galaxy. We discover extended (∼1 kpc) X-ray emission in the soft band (0.5–2 keV) that is neither coincident with the narrow line region nor the extended radio emission. Based on spectral modeling, it is linked to on-going star formation (∼2.6–4 M⊙ yr‑1). The soft emission at circumnuclear scales (inner ∼400 pc) originates from hot gas, with kT ∼ 0.7 keV, while the most extended thermal emission is cooler (kT ∼ 0.3 keV). We refine previous measurements of the extreme Fe Kα equivalent width in this source ({EW}={2.5}-1.0+2.6 {keV}), which suggests the central engine is completely embedded within Compton-thick levels of obscuration. Using physically motivated models fit to the Chandra spectrum, we derive a Compton-thick column density (NH > 1.25 × 1024 cm‑2) and an intrinsic hard (2–10 keV) X-ray luminosity of ∼3–8 × 1042 erg s‑1 (depending on the presumed geometry of the obscurer), which is over two orders of magnitude larger than that observed. The large Fe Kα EW suggests a spherical covering geometry, which could be confirmed with X-ray measurements above 10 keV. NGC 4968 is similar to other active galaxies that exhibit extreme Fe Kα EWs (i.e., >2 keV) in that they also contain on-going star formation. This work supports the idea that gas associated with nuclear star formation may increase the covering factor of the enshrouding gas and play a role in obscuring active galactic nuclei.

  10. Strain-rate Dependence of Elastic Modulus Reveals Silver Nanoparticle Induced Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Caporizzo, Matthew Alexander; Roco, Charles M; Ferrer, Maria Carme Coll; Grady, Martha E; Parrish, Emmabeth; Eckmann, David M; Composto, Russell John

    Force-displacement measurements are taken at different rates with an atomic force microscope to assess the correlation between cell health and cell viscoelasticity in THP-1 cells that have been treated with a novel drug carrier. A variable indentation-rate viscoelastic analysis, VIVA, is employed to identify the relaxation time of the cells that are known to exhibit a frequency dependent stiffness. The VIVA agrees with a fluorescent viability assay. This indicates that dextran-lysozyme drug carriers are biocompatible and deliver concentrated toxic material (rhodamine or silver nanoparticles) to the cytoplasm of THP-1 cells. By modelling the frequency dependence of the elastic modulus, the VIVA provides three metrics of cytoplasmic viscoelasticity: a low frequency modulus, a high frequency modulus and viscosity. The signature of cytotoxicity by rhodamine or silver exposure is a frequency independent twofold increase in the elastic modulus and cytoplasmic viscosity, while the cytoskeletal relaxation time remains unchanged. This is consistent with the known toxic mechanism of silver nanoparticles, where metabolic stress causes an increase in the rigidity of the cytoplasm. A variable indentation-rate viscoelastic analysis is presented as a straightforward method to promote the self-consistent comparison between cells. This is paramount to the development of early diagnosis and treatment of disease.

  11. An empirical model for the galaxy luminosity and star formation rate function at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashian, Natalie; Oesch, Pascal A.; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Using the most recent measurements of the ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions (LFs) and dust estimates of early galaxies, we derive updated dust-corrected star formation rate functions (SFRFs) at z ˜ 4-8, which we model to predict the evolution to higher redshifts, z > 8. We employ abundance matching techniques to calibrate a relation between galaxy star formation rate (SFR) and host halo mass Mh by mapping the shape of the observed SFRFs at z ˜ 4-8 to that of the halo mass function. The resulting scaling law remains roughly constant over this redshift range. We apply the average SFR-Mh relation to reproduce the observed SFR functions at 4 ≲ z ≲ 8 and also derive the expected UV LFs at higher redshifts. At z ˜ 9 and z ˜ 10 these model LFs are in excellent agreement with current observed estimates. Our predicted number densities and UV LFs at z > 10 indicate that James Webb Space Telescope will be able to detect galaxies out to z ˜ 15 with an extensive treasury sized program. We also derive the redshift evolution of the star formation rate density (SFRD) and associated reionization history by galaxies. Models which integrate down to the current HUDF12/XDF detection limit (MUV ˜ -17.7 mag) result in a SFRD that declines as (1 + z)-10.4 ± 0.3 at high redshift and fail to reproduce the observed cosmic microwave background electron scattering optical depth, τ ≃ 0.066, to within 1σ. On the other hand, we find that the inclusion of galaxies with SFRs well below the current detection limit (MUV < -5.7 mag) leads to a fully reionized universe by z ˜ 6.5 and an optical depth of τ ≃ 0.054, consistent with the recently derived Planck value at the 1σ level.

  12. Resolved Gas Kinematics in a Sample of Low-Redshift High Star-Formation Rate Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varidel, Mathew; Pracy, Michael; Croom, Scott; Owers, Matt S.; Sadler, Elaine

    2016-03-01

    We have used integral field spectroscopy of a sample of six nearby (z 0.01-0.04) high star-formation rate (SFR ˜ 10-40 M_⊙ yr^{-1}) galaxies to investigate the relationship between local velocity dispersion and star-formation rate on sub-galactic scales. The low-redshift mitigates, to some extent, the effect of beam smearing which artificially inflates the measured dispersion as it combines regions with different line-of-sight velocities into a single spatial pixel. We compare the parametric maps of the velocity dispersion with the Hα flux (a proxy for local star-formation rate), and the velocity gradient (a proxy for the local effect of beam smearing). We find, even for these very nearby galaxies, the Hα velocity dispersion correlates more strongly with velocity gradient than with Hα flux-implying that beam smearing is still having a significant effect on the velocity dispersion measurements. We obtain a first-order non parametric correction for the unweighted and flux weighted mean velocity dispersion by fitting a 2D linear regression model to the spaxel-by-spaxel data where the velocity gradient and the Hα flux are the independent variables and the velocity dispersion is the dependent variable; and then extrapolating to zero velocity gradient. The corrected velocity dispersions are a factor of 1.3-4.5 and 1.3-2.7 lower than the uncorrected flux-weighted and unweighted mean line-of-sight velocity dispersion values, respectively. These corrections are larger than has been previously cited using disc models of the velocity and velocity dispersion field to correct for beam smearing. The corrected flux-weighted velocity dispersion values are σ m 20-50 km s-1.

  13. Mercury's Hollows: Depths, Estimation of Formation Rates, and the Nature of the Bright Haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewett, D. T.; Stadermann, A. C.; Chabot, N. L.; Denevi, B. W.; Ernst, C. M.; Xiao, Z.; Solomon, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Mercury's hollows are shallow depressions, often with high-reflectance interiors and haloes. The fresh appearance of hollows indicates that they are relatively young features. Their morphology is suggestive of formation via sublimation-like loss of a volatile-bearing phase through solar heating, destruction by UV photolysis, contact with molten rock, or bombardment by micrometeoroids and/or ions. Hollows are found within the low-reflectance material (LRM) color unit. Following an examination of all MESSENGER images with pixel sizes <20 m and incidence angles <85°, shadow-length measurements made on 905 images yielded the depths of 2608 hollows. The mean depth is 24 ± 16 m. The narrow range of depths, despite formation within LRM units that are of much greater and more variable thickness, could result from development of a protective lag as the volatile-bearing phase is lost. The rate at which hollows form may be estimated as follows. The size-frequency distribution of Mercury rayed craters >4 km in diameter gives absolute model ages of 110 to 689 Ma, depending on the crater production model. The 41-km-diameter rayed crater Balanchine has a density of superposed craters similar to the average for all rayed craters, so we take Balanchine's age to be the population average. Hollows on Balanchine's floor are ~300 m wide. The average rate of hollows formation by horizontal scarp retreat for a 110 Ma model age would be 1 cm per 3700 Earth years. If Balanchine formed 689 Ma ago, then the average growth rate would be 1 cm per 23,000 yr. We also consider the mechanisms by which hollows form bright haloes. Calculations show that comet-style lofting of dust by sublimating gas is not important given Mercury's high surface gravitational acceleration. Instead, the bright haloes may form by condensation of sublimated material or by physical modification or chemical alteration of the surface by re-deposited sublimation products.

  14. Using Herschel Far-Infrared Photometry to Constrain Star Formation Rates in CLASH Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Rebecca L.; Postman, Marc; Fogarty, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) program obtained broadband images of 25 massive galaxy clusters in 16 passbands from the UV to the near-IR. The data was taken with the Wide-field Camera 3 (WFC3), and the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These 25 clusters have also been observed in the mid-IR by Spitzer IRAC, the far-IR by the Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE, and in the x-ray by the Chandra and XMM observatories. We focused on the two brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the survey (MACS1931.8-2653 and RXJ1532.9+3021) that have reddening-corrected UV-derived star formation rates (SFRs) > 100 M⊙ yr-1 as measured by Fogarty et al (2015). The inclusion of Herschel data provides unique constraints on dust content and independent estimates of the star formation rates in these interesting galaxies. We performed photometry on the five Herschel bands (100-500μm), and removed any contamination from other cluster members. We fit a UV-FIR SED to each galaxy to measure the bolometric dust luminosity (Lbol), which we use to derive the FIR obscured SFR. We calculate the sum of the measured UV unobscured SFR from the HST photometry and the FIR obscured SFR from the Herschel photometry to get a total SFR for these two BCGs. We compared this to the reddening-corrected SFRs and found they were in agreement within error. This confirms that the Kennicutt and Calzetti methods for calculating star formation rates are both applicable for these highly star-forming massive cluster galaxies.

  15. The Link between the Formation Rates of Clusters and Stars in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandar, Rupali; Fall, S. Michael; Whitmore, Bradley C.

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this paper is to test whether the formation rate of star clusters is proportional to the star formation rate (SFR) in galaxies. As a first step, we present the mass functions of compact clusters younger than 10 Myr in seven star-forming galaxies of diverse masses, sizes, and morphologies: the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, NGC 4214, NGC 4449, M83, M51, and the Antennae. These cluster mass functions (CMFs) are well represented by power laws, {dN}/{dM}\\propto {M}β , with similar exponents β =-1.92+/- 0.27, but with amplitudes that differ by factors up to ˜ {10}3, corresponding to vast differences in the sizes of the cluster populations in these galaxies. We then normalize these CMFs by the SFRs in the galaxies, derived from dust-corrected Hα luminosities, and find that the spread in the amplitudes collapses, with a remaining rms deviation of only σ ({log}A)=0.2. This is close to the expected dispersion from random uncertainties in the CMFs and SFRs. Thus, the data presented here are consistent with exact proportionality between the formation rates of stars and clusters. However, the data also permit weak deviations from proportionality, at the factor of two level, within the statistical uncertainties. We find the same spread in amplitudes when we normalize the mass functions of much older clusters, with ages in the range 100-400 Myr, by the current SFR. This is another indication of the general similarity among the cluster populations of different galaxies.

  16. Galaxy Evolution at High Redshift: Obscured Star Formation, GRB Rates, Cosmic Reionization, and Missing Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapi, A.; Mancuso, C.; Celotti, A.; Danese, L.

    2017-01-01

    We provide a holistic view of galaxy evolution at high redshifts z ≳ 4, which incorporates the constraints from various astrophysical/cosmological probes, including the estimate of the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) density from UV/IR surveys and long gamma-ray burst (GRBs) rates, the cosmic reionization history following the latest Planck measurements, and the missing satellites issue. We achieve this goal in a model-independent way by exploiting the SFR functions derived by Mancuso et al. on the basis of an educated extrapolation of the latest UV/far-IR data from HST/Herschel, and already tested against a number of independent observables. Our SFR functions integrated down to a UV magnitude limit MUV ≲ ‑13 (or SFR limit around 10‑2 M⊙ yr‑1) produce a cosmic SFR density in excellent agreement with recent determinations from IR surveys and, taking into account a metallicity ceiling Z ≲ Z⊙/2, with the estimates from long GRB rates. They also yield a cosmic reionization history consistent with that implied by the recent measurements of the Planck mission of the electron scattering optical depth τes ≈ 0.058 remarkably, this result is obtained under a conceivable assumption regarding the average value fesc ≈ 0.1 of the escape fraction for ionizing photons. We demonstrate via the abundance-matching technique that the above constraints concurrently imply galaxy formation becoming inefficient within dark matter halos of mass below a few 108 M⊙ pleasingly, such a limit is also required so as not to run into the missing satellites issue. Finally, we predict a downturn of the Galaxy luminosity function faintward of MUV ≲ ‑12, and stress that its detailed shape, to be plausibly probed in the near future by the JWST, will be extremely informative on the astrophysics of galaxy formation in small halos, or even on the microscopic nature of the dark matter.

  17. Vacuum ultraviolet photolysis of hydrogenated amorphous carbons . I. Interstellar H2 and CH4 formation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alata, I.; Cruz-Diaz, G. A.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Dartois, E.

    2014-09-01

    Context. The interstellar hydrogenated amorphous carbons (HAC or a-C:H) observed in the diffuse medium are expected to disappear in a few million years, according to the destruction time scale from laboratory measurements. The existence of a-C:H results from the equilibrium between photodesorption, radiolysis, hydrogenation and resilience of the carbonaceous network. During this processing, many species are therefore injected into the gas phase, in particular H2, but also small organic molecules, radicals or fragments. Aims: We perform experiments on interstellar a-C:H analogs to quantify the release of these species in the interstellar medium. Methods: The vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photolysis of interstellar hydrogenated amorphous carbon analogs was performed at low (10 K) to ambient temperature, coupled to mass-spectrometry detection and temperature-programed desorption. Using deuterium isotopic substitution, the species produced were unambiguously separated from background contributions. Results: The VUV photolysis of hydrogenated amorphous carbons leads to the efficient production of H2 molecules, but also to small hydrocarbons. Conclusions: These species are formed predominantly in the bulk of the a-C:H analog carbonaceous network, in addition to the surface formation. Compared with species made by the recombination of H atoms and physisorbed on surfaces, they diffuse out at higher temperatures. In addition to the efficient production rate, it provides a significant formation route in environments where the short residence time scale for H atoms inhibits H2 formation on the surface, such as PDRs. The photolytic bulk production of H2 with carbonaceous hydrogenated amorphous carbon dust grains can provide a very large portion of the contribution to the H2 molecule formation. These dust grains also release small hydrocarbons (such as CH4) into the diffuse interstellar medium, which contribute to the formation of small carbonaceous radicals after being dissociated

  18. Formation of the geometrically controlled carbon coils by manipulating the additive gas (SF6) flow rate.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young-Chul; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2012-07-01

    Carbon coils could be synthesized using C2H2/H2 as source gases and SF6 as an incorporated additive gas under the thermal chemical vapor deposition system. The nickel catalyst layer deposition and then hydrogen plasma pretreatment were performed prior to the carbon coils deposition reaction. The flow rate and the injection time of SF6 varied according to the different reaction processes. Geometries of carbon coils developed from embryos to nanosized coils with increasing SF, flow rate from 5 to 35 sccm under the short SF6 flow injection time (5 minutes) condition. The gradual development of carbon coils geometries from nanosized to microsized types could be observed with increasing SF6 flow rate under the full time (90 minutes) SF6 flow injection condition. The flow rate of SF6 for the coil-type geometry formation should be more than or at least equal to the flow rate of carbon source gas (C2H2). A longer injection time of SF6 flow would increase the size of coils diameters from nanometer to micrometer.

  19. Star Formation Rate Indicators in Different Scales: from Star Forming Regions to Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei Law, Ka; Gordon, K.

    2011-01-01

    Do Star Formation Rate (SFR) indicators derived from galaxies work in star forming regions, or vice versa? We explore the behavior and effectiveness of various single- and multi-band SFR indicators across different scales. Our sample spans over 4 orders of magnitudes in total infrared luminosity and covers a wide range of spatial scale - from individual regions in nearby galaxies such as those in SMC, LMC, M33 and M31, to whole galaxies, including galaxies from the Spitzer Local Volume Legacy Survey (LVL; Dale et al. 2009), the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS; Kennicutt et al. 2003), and starburst galaxies from Engelbracht et al. 2008.

  20. Changes in the spectrum and rates of extracellular enzyme activities in seawater following aggregate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziervogel, K.; Steen, A. D.; Arnosti, C.

    2009-12-01

    Marine snow aggregates are heavily colonized by heterotrophic microorganisms that express high levels of hydrolytic activities, making aggregates hotspots for carbon remineralization in the ocean. To assess how aggregate formation influences the ability of seawater microbial communities to access organic carbon, we compared hydrolysis rates of six polysaccharides in coastal seawater after aggregates had been formed (via incubation on a roller table) with hydrolysis rates in seawater from the same site that had not incubated on a roller table (referred to as whole seawater). Hydrolysis rates in the aggregates themselves were up to three orders of magnitude higher on a volume basis than in whole seawater. The enhancement of enzyme activity in aggregates relative to whole seawater differed by substrate, suggesting that the enhancement was under cellular control, rather than due to factors such as lysis or grazing. A comparison of hydrolysis rates in whole seawater with those in aggregate-free seawater, i.e. the fraction of water from the roller bottles that did not contain aggregates, demonstrated a nuanced microbial response to aggregate formation. Activities of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were higher than in whole seawater, while activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinogalactan hydrolyzing enzymes were lower than in whole seawater. These data suggest that aggregate formation enhanced production of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes, and the enhancement also affected the surrounding seawater. Decreased activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinoglactan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawater relative to whole seawater are likely due to shifts in enzyme production by the aggregate-associated community, coupled with the effects of enzyme degradation. Enhanced activities of laminarin- and xylan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were due at least in part to cell-free enzymes. Measurements of enzyme lifetime

  1. Changes in the spectrum and rates of extracellular enzyme activities in seawater following aggregate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziervogel, K.; Steen, A. D.; Arnosti, C.

    2010-03-01

    Marine snow aggregates are heavily colonized by heterotrophic microorganisms that express high levels of hydrolytic activities, making aggregates hotspots for carbon remineralization in the ocean. To assess how aggregate formation influences the ability of seawater microbial communities to access organic carbon, we compared hydrolysis rates of six polysaccharides in coastal seawater after aggregates had been formed (via incubation on a roller table) with hydrolysis rates in seawater from the same site that had not incubated on a roller table (referred to as whole seawater). Hydrolysis rates in the aggregates themselves were up to three orders of magnitude higher on a volume basis than in whole seawater. The enhancement of enzyme activity in aggregates relative to whole seawater differed by substrate, suggesting that the enhancement was under cellular control, rather than due to factors such as lysis or grazing. A comparison of hydrolysis rates in whole seawater with those in aggregate-free seawater, i.e. the fraction of water from the roller bottles that did not contain aggregates, demonstrated a nuanced microbial response to aggregate formation. Activities of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were higher than in whole seawater, while activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinogalactan hydrolyzing enzymes were lower than in whole seawater. These data suggest that aggregate formation enhanced production of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes, and the enhancement also affected the surrounding seawater. Decreased activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinoglactan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawaters relative to whole seawater are likely due to shifts in enzyme production by the aggregate-associated community, coupled with the effects of enzyme degradation. Enhanced activities of laminarin- and xylan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were due at least in part to cell-free enzymes. Measurements of enzyme

  2. Mechanisms of endoderm formation in a cartilaginous fish reveal ancestral and homoplastic traits in jawed vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Godard, Benoit G; Coolen, Marion; Le Panse, Sophie; Gombault, Aurélie; Ferreiro-Galve, Susana; Laguerre, Laurent; Lagadec, Ronan; Wincker, Patrick; Poulain, Julie; Da Silva, Corinne; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Carre, Wilfrid; Boutet, Agnès; Mazan, Sylvie

    2014-10-31

    In order to gain insight into the impact of yolk increase on endoderm development, we have analyzed the mechanisms of endoderm formation in the catshark S. canicula, a species exhibiting telolecithal eggs and a distinct yolk sac. We show that in this species, endoderm markers are expressed in two distinct tissues, the deep mesenchyme, a mesenchymal population of deep blastomeres lying beneath the epithelial-like superficial layer, already specified at early blastula stages, and the involuting mesendoderm layer, which appears at the blastoderm posterior margin at the onset of gastrulation. Formation of the deep mesenchyme involves cell internalizations from the superficial layer prior to gastrulation, by a movement suggestive of ingressions. These cell movements were observed not only at the posterior margin, where massive internalizations take place prior to the start of involution, but also in the center of the blastoderm, where internalizations of single cells prevail. Like the adjacent involuting mesendoderm, the posterior deep mesenchyme expresses anterior mesendoderm markers under the control of Nodal/activin signaling. Comparisons across vertebrates support the conclusion that endoderm is specified in two distinct temporal phases in the catshark as in all major osteichthyan lineages, in line with an ancient origin of a biphasic mode of endoderm specification in gnathostomes. They also highlight unexpected similarities with amniotes, such as the occurrence of cell ingressions from the superficial layer prior to gastrulation. These similarities may correspond to homoplastic traits fixed separately in amniotes and chondrichthyans and related to the increase in egg yolk mass.

  3. Mechanisms of endoderm formation in a cartilaginous fish reveal ancestral and homoplastic traits in jawed vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Godard, Benoit G.; Coolen, Marion; Le Panse, Sophie; Gombault, Aurélie; Ferreiro-Galve, Susana; Laguerre, Laurent; Lagadec, Ronan; Wincker, Patrick; Poulain, Julie; Da Silva, Corinne; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Carre, Wilfrid; Boutet, Agnès; Mazan, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to gain insight into the impact of yolk increase on endoderm development, we have analyzed the mechanisms of endoderm formation in the catshark S. canicula, a species exhibiting telolecithal eggs and a distinct yolk sac. We show that in this species, endoderm markers are expressed in two distinct tissues, the deep mesenchyme, a mesenchymal population of deep blastomeres lying beneath the epithelial-like superficial layer, already specified at early blastula stages, and the involuting mesendoderm layer, which appears at the blastoderm posterior margin at the onset of gastrulation. Formation of the deep mesenchyme involves cell internalizations from the superficial layer prior to gastrulation, by a movement suggestive of ingressions. These cell movements were observed not only at the posterior margin, where massive internalizations take place prior to the start of involution, but also in the center of the blastoderm, where internalizations of single cells prevail. Like the adjacent involuting mesendoderm, the posterior deep mesenchyme expresses anterior mesendoderm markers under the control of Nodal/activin signaling. Comparisons across vertebrates support the conclusion that endoderm is specified in two distinct temporal phases in the catshark as in all major osteichthyan lineages, in line with an ancient origin of a biphasic mode of endoderm specification in gnathostomes. They also highlight unexpected similarities with amniotes, such as the occurrence of cell ingressions from the superficial layer prior to gastrulation. These similarities may correspond to homoplastic traits fixed separately in amniotes and chondrichthyans and related to the increase in egg yolk mass. PMID:25361580

  4. The reliability of [C II] as an indicator of the star formation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Looze, Ilse; Baes, Maarten; Bendo, George J.; Cortese, Luca; Fritz, Jacopo

    2011-10-01

    The [C II] 157.74 μm line is an important coolant for the neutral interstellar gas. Since [C II] is the brightest spectral line for most galaxies, it is a potentially powerful tracer of star formation activity. In this paper, we present a calibration of the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of the [C II] luminosity for a sample of 24 star-forming galaxies in the nearby Universe. This sample includes objects classified as H II regions or low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions, but omits all Seyfert galaxies with a significant contribution from the active galactic nucleus to the mid-infrared photometry. In order to calibrate the SFR against the line luminosity, we rely on both Galaxy Evolution Explorer far-ultraviolet data, which is an ideal tracer of the unobscured star formation, and MIPS 24 μm, to probe the dust-enshrouded fraction of star formation. In the case of normal star-forming galaxies, the [C II] luminosity correlates well with the SFR. However, the extension of this relation to more quiescent (Hα EW ≤ 10 Å) or ultraluminous galaxies should be handled with caution, since these objects show a non-linearity in the ?-to-LFIR ratio as a function of LFIR (and thus, their star formation activity). We provide two possible explanations for the origin of the tight correlation between the [C II] emission and the star formation activity on a global galaxy-scale. A first interpretation could be that the [C II] emission from photodissociation regions (PDRs) arises from the immediate surroundings of star-forming regions. Since PDRs are neutral regions of warm dense gas at the boundaries between H II regions and molecular clouds and they provide the bulk of [C II] emission in most galaxies, we believe that a more or less constant contribution from these outer layers of photon-dominated molecular clumps to the [C II] emission provides a straightforward explanation for this close link between the [C II] luminosity and SFR. Alternatively, we consider the

  5. Gas-Phase Formation Rates of Nitric Acid and Its Isomers Under Urban Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okumura, M.; Mollner, A. K.; Fry, J. L.; Feng, L.

    2005-01-01

    Ozone formation in urban smog is controlled by a complex set of reactions which includes radical production from photochemical processes, catalytic cycles which convert NO to NO2, and termination steps that tie up reactive intermediates in long-lived reservoirs. The reaction OH + NO2 + M -4 HONO2 + M (la) is a key termination step because it transforms two short-lived reactive intermediates, OH and NO2, into relatively long-lived nitric acid. Under certain conditions (low VOC/NOx), ozone production in polluted urban airsheds can be highly sensitive to this reaction, but the rate parameters are not well constrained. This report summarizes the results of new laboratory studies of the OH + NO2 + M reaction including direct determination of the overall rate constant and branching ratio for the two reaction channels under atmospherically relevant conditions.

  6. A New DTA Method for Measuring Critical Cooling Rate for Glass Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chandra S.; Reis, Signo T.; Brow, Richard K.; Holand, Wolfram; Rheinberger, Volker

    2004-01-01

    A new differential thermal analysis (DTA) experimental method has been developed to determine the critical cooling rate for glass formation, R(sub c). The method, which is found especially suitable for melts that, upon cooling, have a small heat of crystallization or a very slow crystallization rate, has been verified using a 38Na2O-62SiO2 (mol%) melt with a known R(sub c) (-approx. 19 C/min), then used to determine R(sub c) for two complex lithium silicate glass forming melts. The new method is rapid, easy to conduct and yields values for R(sub c) that are in excellent agreement with the R(sub c)-values measured by standard DTA techniques.

  7. Direct rate constant measurement of radical disulphide anion formation for cysteine and cysteamine in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezyk, Stephen P.

    1995-03-01

    The techniques of pulse radiolysis, laser photolysis and absorption spectroscopy have been used to directly determine rate constants for radical disulphide anion formation for cysteine and cysteamine in aqueous solution. The measured values for cysteine, over the pH range 7-12, allowed calculation of individual rate constants for the constituent reactions RS . + RSH → RSSR -. + H + and RS . + RS - → RSSR -. as (3.39 ± 0.31) × 10 8 and (1.21 ± 0.04) × 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1, respectively. Analogous values for cysteamine were also determined by this technique as (3.06 ± 0.16) × 10 8 and (3.65 ± 0.07) × 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1.

  8. Timing of European fluvial terrace formation and incision rates constrained by cosmogenic nuclide dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, Mirjam; Ehlers, Todd A.; Stor, Tomas; Torrent, Jose; Lobato, Leonardo; Christl, Marcus; Vockenhuber, Christof

    2016-10-01

    Age constraints of late Cenozoic fluvial terraces are important for addressing surface process questions related to the incision rates of rivers, or tectonic and climate controls on denudation and sedimentation. Unfortunately, absolute age constraints of fluvial terraces are not always possible, and many previous studies have often dated terraces with relative age constraints that do not allow for robust interpretations of incision rates and timing of terrace formation. However, in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides allow absolute age determination, and hence incision rates, of fluvial deposits back to 5 Ma. Here we present, cosmogenic depth profile dating and isochron burial dating of four different river systems in Europe spanning 12° of latitude. We do this to determine river incision rates and spatial variations in the timing of terrace formation. Isochron burial age constraints of four selected terraces from the Vltava river (Czech Republic) range between 1.00 ± 0.21 to 1.99 ± 0.45Ma. An isochron burial age derived for the Allier river (Central France) is 2.00 ± 0.17Ma. Five terrace levels from the Esla river (NW Spain) were dated between 0.08 + 0.04 / - 0.01Ma and 0.59 + 0.13 / - 0.20Ma with depth profile dating. The latter age agrees with an isochron burial age of 0.52 ± 0.20Ma. Two terrace levels from the Guadalquivir river (SW Spain) were dated by depth profile dating to 0.09 + 0.03 / - 0.02Ma and 0.09 + 0.04 / - 0.03Ma. The one terrace level from the Guadalquivir river dated by isochron burial dating resulted in an age of 1.79 ± 0.18Ma. Results indicate that the cosmogenic nuclide-based ages are generally older than ages derived from previous relative age constraints leading to a factor 2-3 lower incision rates than previous work. Furthermore, the timing of terrace formation over this latitudinal range is somewhat obscured by uncertainties associated with dating older terraces and not clearly synchronous with global climate variations.

  9. Formation of a proto-Jovian envelope for various planetary accretion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikoma, M.; Emori, H.; Nakazawa, K.

    1998-12-01

    The formation of a proto-Jovian envelope has been simulated on the basis of a core accretion model and the maximum mass that a proto-Jovian planet can have while keeping its envelope gravitationally stable, called the critical core mass, has also been investigated extensively over a wide range of the core accretion rate. The value of the critical core mass has been found to depend strongly on the core accretion rate; for example, it is less than or equal to 0953-8984/10/49/040/img1 for the typical accretion rates for Uranus and Neptune. Furthermore, through simulations of the quasi-static evolution of the envelope beyond the critical core mass, we have found that the characteristic times of envelope contraction are 0953-8984/10/49/040/img2 and 0953-8984/10/49/040/img3 for the cases where the core accretion rates are 0953-8984/10/49/040/img4 per year, 0953-8984/10/49/040/img5 per year and 0953-8984/10/49/040/img6 per year, respectively. Also, in the last case, the core mass of the Jovian planet can be estimated to be about 0953-8984/10/49/040/img7. We conclude that if a given one of the Jovian planets of our solar system has a core smaller than about 0953-8984/10/49/040/img8, it is very hard to see how the core could have attracted a gaseous envelope from our solar nebula and formed the Jovian envelope. Determination of the sizes of the cores in our Jovian planets should give fruitful information for the theory of the formation of our solar system.

  10. Localized Upper Tropospheric Warming During Tropical Depression and Storm Formation Revealed by the NOAA-15 AMSU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Roy W.; Braswell, William D.

    1999-01-01

    The warm core of hurricanes as measured by microwave temperature sounders has been related to various azimuthally averaged measures of hurricane strength by several researchers Unfortunately, the use of these instruments (e.g. the Microwave Sounding Units, MSU) for the routine monitoring of tropical cyclone genesis and intensity has been hampered by poor resolution. The recent launch of the NOAA-15 AMSU represents a significant advance in our ability to monitor subtle atmospheric temperature variations (0.1-0.2 C) at relatively high spatial resolution (50 km) in the presence of clouds. Of particular interest is the possible capability of the AMSU to observe the slight warming associated with depression formation, and the relationship of the spatial characteristics of the warming to the surface pressure and wind field, without azimuthal averaging. In order to present the AMSU data as imagery, we have developed a method for precise limb-correction of all 15 AMSU channels. Through a linear combination of several neighboring channels, we can very closely match the nadir weighting functions of a given AMSU sounding channel with the non-nadir data. It is found that there is discernible, localized upper tropospheric warming associated with depression formation in the Atlantic basin during the 1998 hurricane season. Also, it is found that uncertainty in positioning of tropical cyclone circulation centers can be reduced, as in the example of Hurricane Georges as it approached Cuba. Finally, to explore the potential utility of a future high resolution microwave temperature sounder, we present an analysis of the relationship between the modeled surface wind field and simulated high -resolution AMSU-type measurements, based upon cloud resolving model simulations of hurricane Andrew in 1992.

  11. Transcriptional profiling reveals regulated genes in the hippocampus during memory formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, Christine P.; Jensen, Roderick V.; Ochiishi, Tomoyo; Eisenstein, Ingrid; Zhao, Mingrui; Shors, Tracey; Kosik, Kenneth S.

    2002-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling (TP) offers a powerful approach to identify genes activated during memory formation and, by inference, the molecular pathways involved. Trace eyeblink conditioning is well suited for the study of regional gene expression because it requires the hippocampus, whereas the highly parallel task, delay conditioning, does not. First, we determined when gene expression was most regulated during trace conditioning. Rats were exposed to 200 trials per day of paired and unpaired stimuli each day for 4 days. Changes in gene expression were most apparent 24 h after exposure to 200 trials. Therefore, we profiled gene expression in the hippocampus 24 h after 200 trials of trace eyeblink conditioning, on multiple arrays using additional animals. Of 1,186 genes on the filter array, seven genes met the statistical criteria and were also validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. These genes were growth hormone (GH), c-kit receptor tyrosine kinase (c-kit), glutamate receptor, metabotropic 5 (mGluR5), nerve growth factor-beta (NGF-beta), Jun oncogene (c-Jun), transmembrane receptor Unc5H1 (UNC5H1), and transmembrane receptor Unc5H2 (UNC5H2). All these genes, except for GH, were downregulated in response to trace conditioning. GH was upregulated; therefore, we also validated the downregulation of the GH inhibitor, somatostatin (SST), even though it just failed to meet criteria on the arrays. By during situ hybridization, GH was expressed throughout the cell layers of the hippocampus in response to trace conditioning. None of the genes regulated in trace eyeblink conditioning were similarly affected by delay conditioning, a task that does not require the hippocampus. These findings demonstrate that transcriptional profiling can exhibit a repertoire of genes sensitive to the formation of hippocampal-dependent associative memories.

  12. Which Phase of the Interstellar Medium Correlates with the Star Formation Rate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Leroy, Adam K.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2011-04-01

    Nearby spiral galaxies show an extremely tight correlation between tracers of molecular hydrogen (H2) in the interstellar medium and tracers of recent star formation, but it is unclear whether this correlation is fundamental or accidental. In the galaxies that have been surveyed to date, H2 resides predominantly in gravitationally bound clouds cooled by carbon monoxide (CO) molecules, but in galaxies of low metal content the correlations between bound clouds, CO, and H2 break down, and it is unclear if the star formation rate (SFR) will then correlate with H2 or with some other quantity. Here, we show that star formation will continue to follow H2 independent of metallicity. This is not because H2 is directly important for cooling, but instead because the transition from predominantly atomic hydrogen (H I) to H2 occurs under the same conditions as a dramatic drop in gas temperature and Bonnor-Ebert mass that destabilizes clouds and initiates collapse. We use this model to compute how SFR will correlate with total gas mass, with mass of gas where the hydrogen is H2, and with mass of gas where the carbon is CO in galaxies of varying metallicity, and show that preliminary observations match the trend we predict.

  13. Controlling the relative rates of adlayer formation and removal during etching in inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Nicholas Colvin Masi

    Laser desorption (LD) of the adlayer coupled with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and plasma induced emission (PIE) of desorbed adsorbates is used to investigate the relative rates of chlorination and sputtering during the etching of Si in inductively coupled Cl2-Ar plasmas. Such an analysis is a two-fold process: surface analysis and plasma characterization. Surface analysis of Si etching using LD-LIF and LD-PIE techniques combined with etch rate measurements have revealed that the coverage of SiCl2 and etch rate increases and coverage of Si decreases abruptly for a chlorine fraction of 75% and ion energy of 80 eV. The precise Cl2 fraction for which these abrupt changes occur increases with an increase in ion energy. These changes may be caused by local chemisorption-induced reconstruction of Si <100>. Furthermore, the chlorination and sputtering rates are increased by ˜ an order of magnitude as the plasma is changed from Ar-dominant to Cl-dominant. Characterization of the plasma included determination of the dominant ion in Cl2 plasmas using LIF and a Langmuir probe and measurement of the absolute densities of Cl2, Cl, Cl+, and At + in Cl2-Ar discharges using optical emission actinometry. These studies reveal that Cl+ is the dominant positive ion in the H-mode and the dissociation of Cl2 to Cl increases with an increase in Ar fraction due to an increase in electron temperature. Furthermore, for powers exceeding 600 W, the neutral to ion flux ratio is strongly dependent on Cl2 fraction and is attributed mostly to the decrease in Cl density. Such dependence of the flux ratio on Cl2 fraction is significant in controlling chlorination and sputtering rates not only for Si etching, but for etching other key technological materials. ICP O2 discharges were also studied for low-kappa polymeric etch applications. These studies reveal that the electron temperature is weakly dependent on rf power and O2 dissociation is low (˜2%) at the maximum rf power density of 5.7 Wcm

  14. Metatranscriptomics reveals temperature-driven functional changes in microbiome impacting cheese maturation rate.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Francesca; Genovese, Alessandro; Ferranti, Pasquale; Gilbert, Jack A; Ercolini, Danilo

    2016-02-25

    Traditional cheeses harbour complex microbial consortia that play an important role in shaping typical sensorial properties. However, the microbial metabolism is considered difficult to control. Microbial community succession and the related gene expression were analysed during ripening of a traditional Italian cheese, identifying parameters that could be modified to accelerate ripening. Afterwards, we modulated ripening conditions and observed consistent changes in microbial community structure and function. We provide concrete evidence of the essential contribution of non-starter lactic acid bacteria in ripening-related activities. An increase in the ripening temperature promoted the expression of genes related to proteolysis, lipolysis and amino acid/lipid catabolism and significantly increases the cheese maturation rate. Moreover, temperature-promoted microbial metabolisms were consistent with the metabolomic profiles of proteins and volatile organic compounds in the cheese. The results clearly indicate how processing-driven microbiome responses can be modulated in order to optimize production efficiency and product quality.

  15. Metatranscriptomics reveals temperature-driven functional changes in microbiome impacting cheese maturation rate

    SciTech Connect

    De Filippis, Francesca; Genovese, Alessandro; Ferranti, Pasquale; Gilbert, Jack A.; Ercolini, Danilo

    2016-02-25

    Traditional cheeses harbour complex microbial consortia that play an important role in shaping typical sensorial properties. However, the microbial metabolism is considered difficult to control. Microbial community succession and the related gene expression were analysed during ripening of a traditional Italian cheese, identifying parameters that could be modified to accelerate ripening. Afterwards, we modulated ripening conditions and observed consistent changes in microbial community structure and function. We provide concrete evidence of the essential contribution of non-starter lactic acid bacteria in ripening-related activities. An increase in the ripening temperature promoted the expression of genes related to proteolysis, lipolysis and amino acid/lipid catabolism and significantly increases the cheese maturation rate. Moreover, temperature-promoted microbial metabolisms were consistent with the metabolomic profiles of proteins and volatile organic compounds in the cheese. Finally, the results clearly indicate how processing-driven microbiome responses can be modulated in order to optimize production efficiency and product quality.

  16. Metatranscriptomics reveals temperature-driven functional changes in microbiome impacting cheese maturation rate

    PubMed Central

    De Filippis, Francesca; Genovese, Alessandro; Ferranti, Pasquale; Gilbert, Jack A.; Ercolini, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Traditional cheeses harbour complex microbial consortia that play an important role in shaping typical sensorial properties. However, the microbial metabolism is considered difficult to control. Microbial community succession and the related gene expression were analysed during ripening of a traditional Italian cheese, identifying parameters that could be modified to accelerate ripening. Afterwards, we modulated ripening conditions and observed consistent changes in microbial community structure and function. We provide concrete evidence of the essential contribution of non-starter lactic acid bacteria in ripening-related activities. An increase in the ripening temperature promoted the expression of genes related to proteolysis, lipolysis and amino acid/lipid catabolism and significantly increases the cheese maturation rate. Moreover, temperature-promoted microbial metabolisms were consistent with the metabolomic profiles of proteins and volatile organic compounds in the cheese. The results clearly indicate how processing-driven microbiome responses can be modulated in order to optimize production efficiency and product quality. PMID:26911915

  17. Free energy of cluster formation and a new scaling relation for the nucleation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Diemand, Jürg; Angélil, Raymond

    2014-05-21

    Recent very large molecular dynamics simulations of homogeneous nucleation with (1 − 8) × 10{sup 9} Lennard-Jones atoms [J. Diemand, R. Angélil, K. K. Tanaka, and H. Tanaka, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 074309 (2013)] allow us to accurately determine the formation free energy of clusters over a wide range of cluster sizes. This is now possible because such large simulations allow for very precise measurements of the cluster size distribution in the steady state nucleation regime. The peaks of the free energy curves give critical cluster sizes, which agree well with independent estimates based on the nucleation theorem. Using these results, we derive an analytical formula and a new scaling relation for nucleation rates: ln J{sup ′}/η is scaled by ln S/η, where the supersaturation ratio is S, η is the dimensionless surface energy, and J{sup ′} is a dimensionless nucleation rate. This relation can be derived using the free energy of cluster formation at equilibrium which corresponds to the surface energy required to form the vapor-liquid interface. At low temperatures (below the triple point), we find that the surface energy divided by that of the classical nucleation theory does not depend on temperature, which leads to the scaling relation and implies a constant, positive Tolman length equal to half of the mean inter-particle separation in the liquid phase.

  18. Replication Rate, Framing, and Format Affect Attitudes and Decisions about Science Claims.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Ralph M; Tobin, Stephanie J; Johnston, Heather M; MacKenzie, Noah; Taglang, Chelsea M

    2016-01-01

    A series of five experiments examined how the evaluation of a scientific finding was influenced by information about the number of studies that had successfully replicated the initial finding. The experiments also tested the impact of frame (negative, positive) and numeric format (percentage, natural frequency) on the evaluation of scientific findings. In Experiments 1 through 4, an attitude difference score served as the dependent measure, while a measure of choice served as the dependent measure in Experiment 5. Results from a diverse sample of 188 non-institutionalized U.S. adults (Experiment 2) and 730 undergraduate college students (Experiments 1, 3, and 4) indicated that attitudes became more positive as the replication rate increased and attitudes were more positive when the replication information was framed positively. The results also indicate that the manner in which replication rate was framed had a greater impact on attitude than the replication rate itself. The large effect for frame was attenuated somewhat when information about replication was presented in the form of natural frequencies rather than percentages. A fifth study employing 662 undergraduate college students in a task in which choice served as the dependent measure confirmed the framing effect and replicated the replication rate effect in the positive frame condition, but provided no evidence that the use of natural frequencies diminished the effect.

  19. Replication Rate, Framing, and Format Affect Attitudes and Decisions about Science Claims

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Ralph M.; Tobin, Stephanie J.; Johnston, Heather M.; MacKenzie, Noah; Taglang, Chelsea M.

    2016-01-01

    A series of five experiments examined how the evaluation of a scientific finding was influenced by information about the number of studies that had successfully replicated the initial finding. The experiments also tested the impact of frame (negative, positive) and numeric format (percentage, natural frequency) on the evaluation of scientific findings. In Experiments 1 through 4, an attitude difference score served as the dependent measure, while a measure of choice served as the dependent measure in Experiment 5. Results from a diverse sample of 188 non-institutionalized U.S. adults (Experiment 2) and 730 undergraduate college students (Experiments 1, 3, and 4) indicated that attitudes became more positive as the replication rate increased and attitudes were more positive when the replication information was framed positively. The results also indicate that the manner in which replication rate was framed had a greater impact on attitude than the replication rate itself. The large effect for frame was attenuated somewhat when information about replication was presented in the form of natural frequencies rather than percentages. A fifth study employing 662 undergraduate college students in a task in which choice served as the dependent measure confirmed the framing effect and replicated the replication rate effect in the positive frame condition, but provided no evidence that the use of natural frequencies diminished the effect. PMID:27920743

  20. 40 CFR Table I-12 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for Semiconductor Manufacturing for... (Bijk) for Semiconductor Manufacturing for Use With the Stack Test Method (300 mm and 450 mm...

  1. 40 CFR Table I-11 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for Semiconductor Manufacturing for... (Bijk) for Semiconductor Manufacturing for Use With the Stack Test Method (150 mm and 200 mm...

  2. 40 CFR Table I-7 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for PV Manufacturing I Table I-7 to Subpart I of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electronics Manufacturing Pt. 98, Subpt. I, Table I-7 Table...

  3. 40 CFR Table I-5 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for MEMS Manufacturing I Table I-5 to Subpart I of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electronics Manufacturing Pt. 98, Subpt. I, Table...

  4. 40 CFR Table I-5 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for MEMS Manufacturing I Table I-5 to Subpart I of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electronics Manufacturing Pt. 98, Subpt. I, Table...

  5. 40 CFR Table I-6 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates(Bijk) for LCD Manufacturing I Table I-6 to Subpart I of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electronics Manufacturing Pt. 98, Subpt. I, Table I-6 Table...

  6. 40 CFR Table I-7 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for PV Manufacturing I Table I-7 to Subpart I of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electronics Manufacturing Pt. 98, Subpt. I, Table I-7 Table...

  7. 40 CFR Table I-6 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for LCD Manufacturing I Table I-6 to Subpart I of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electronics Manufacturing Pt. 98, Subpt. I, Table I-6 Table...

  8. Ancient DNA reveals key stages in the formation of central European mitochondrial genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Guido; Haak, Wolfgang; Adler, Christina J; Roth, Christina; Szécsényi-Nagy, Anna; Karimnia, Sarah; Möller-Rieker, Sabine; Meller, Harald; Ganslmeier, Robert; Friederich, Susanne; Dresely, Veit; Nicklisch, Nicole; Pickrell, Joseph K; Sirocko, Frank; Reich, David; Cooper, Alan; Alt, Kurt W

    2013-10-11

    The processes that shaped modern European mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation remain unclear. The initial peopling by Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers ~42,000 years ago and the immigration of Neolithic farmers into Europe ~8000 years ago appear to have played important roles but do not explain present-day mtDNA diversity. We generated mtDNA profiles of 364 individuals from prehistoric cultures in Central Europe to perform a chronological study, spanning the Early Neolithic to the Early Bronze Age (5500 to 1550 calibrated years before the common era). We used this transect through time to identify four marked shifts in genetic composition during the Neolithic period, revealing a key role for Late Neolithic cultures in shaping modern Central European genetic diversity.

  9. Ancient DNA reveals key stages in the formation of Central European mitochondrial genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Guido; Haak, Wolfgang; Adler, Christina J.; Roth, Christina; Szécsényi-Nagy, Anna; Karimnia, Sarah; Möller-Rieker, Sabine; Meller, Harald; Ganslmeier, Robert; Friederich, Susanne; Dresely, Veit; Nicklisch, Nicole; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Sirocko, Frank; Reich, David; Cooper, Alan; Alt, Kurt W.

    2014-01-01

    The processes which shaped modern European mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation remain unclear. The initial peopling by Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers ~42kyrs ago and the immigration of Neolithic farmers into Europe ~8kyrs ago appear to have played important roles, but do not explain present-day mtDNA diversity. We generated mtDNA profiles of 364 individuals from prehistoric cultures in Central Europe to perform a chronological study, spanning the Early Neolithic to the Early Bronze Age (5,500–1,550 cal BC). We use this transect through time to identify four marked shifts in genetic composition during the Neolithic period, revealing a key role for Late Neolithic cultures in shaping modern Central European genetic diversity. PMID:24115443

  10. Transcriptomic analysis reveals ethylene as stimulator and auxin as regulator of adventitious root formation in petunia cuttings

    PubMed Central

    Druege, Uwe; Franken, Philipp; Lischewski, Sandra; Ahkami, Amir H.; Zerche, Siegfried; Hause, Bettina; Hajirezaei, Mohammad R.

    2014-01-01

    Adventitious root (AR) formation in the stem base (SB) of cuttings is the basis for propagation of many plant species and petunia is used as model to study this developmental process. Following AR formation from 2 to 192 hours post-excision (hpe) of cuttings, transcriptome analysis by microarray revealed a change of the character of the rooting zone from SB to root identity. The greatest shift in the number of differentially expressed genes was observed between 24 and 72 hpe, when the categories storage, mineral nutrient acquisition, anti-oxidative and secondary metabolism, and biotic stimuli showed a notable high number of induced genes. Analyses of phytohormone-related genes disclosed multifaceted changes of the auxin transport system, auxin conjugation and the auxin signal perception machinery indicating a reduction in auxin sensitivity and phase-specific responses of particular auxin-regulated genes. Genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis and action showed a more uniform pattern as a high number of respective genes were generally induced during the whole process of AR formation. The important role of ethylene for stimulating AR formation was demonstrated by the application of inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis and perception as well as of the precursor aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, all changing the number and length of AR. A model is proposed showing the putative role of polar auxin transport and resulting auxin accumulation in initiation of subsequent changes in auxin homeostasis and signal perception with a particular role of Aux/IAA expression. These changes might in turn guide the entrance into the different phases of AR formation. Ethylene biosynthesis, which is stimulated by wounding and does probably also respond to other stresses and auxin, acts as important stimulator of AR formation probably via the expression of ethylene responsive transcription factor genes, whereas the timing of different phases seems to be controlled by auxin. PMID

  11. Transcriptomic analysis reveals ethylene as stimulator and auxin as regulator of adventitious root formation in petunia cuttings.

    PubMed

    Druege, Uwe; Franken, Philipp; Lischewski, Sandra; Ahkami, Amir H; Zerche, Siegfried; Hause, Bettina; Hajirezaei, Mohammad R

    2014-01-01

    Adventitious root (AR) formation in the stem base (SB) of cuttings is the basis for propagation of many plant species and petunia is used as model to study this developmental process. Following AR formation from 2 to 192 hours post-excision (hpe) of cuttings, transcriptome analysis by microarray revealed a change of the character of the rooting zone from SB to root identity. The greatest shift in the number of differentially expressed genes was observed between 24 and 72 hpe, when the categories storage, mineral nutrient acquisition, anti-oxidative and secondary metabolism, and biotic stimuli showed a notable high number of induced genes. Analyses of phytohormone-related genes disclosed multifaceted changes of the auxin transport system, auxin conjugation and the auxin signal perception machinery indicating a reduction in auxin sensitivity and phase-specific responses of particular auxin-regulated genes. Genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis and action showed a more uniform pattern as a high number of respective genes were generally induced during the whole process of AR formation. The important role of ethylene for stimulating AR formation was demonstrated by the application of inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis and perception as well as of the precursor aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, all changing the number and length of AR. A model is proposed showing the putative role of polar auxin transport and resulting auxin accumulation in initiation of subsequent changes in auxin homeostasis and signal perception with a particular role of Aux/IAA expression. These changes might in turn guide the entrance into the different phases of AR formation. Ethylene biosynthesis, which is stimulated by wounding and does probably also respond to other stresses and auxin, acts as important stimulator of AR formation probably via the expression of ethylene responsive transcription factor genes, whereas the timing of different phases seems to be controlled by auxin.

  12. The structure, dynamics, and star formation rate of the Orion nebula cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan C.; Jaehnig, Karl

    2014-11-01

    The spatial morphology and dynamical status of a young, still-forming stellar cluster provide valuable clues to the conditions during the star formation event and the processes that regulated it. We analyze the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), utilizing the latest censuses of its stellar content and membership estimates over a large wavelength range. We determine the center of mass of the ONC and study the radial dependence of angular substructure. The core appears rounder and smoother than the outskirts, which is consistent with a higher degree of dynamical processing. At larger distances, the departure from circular symmetry is mostly driven by the elongation of the system, with very little additional substructure, indicating a somewhat evolved spatial morphology or an expanding halo. We determine the mass density profile of the cluster, which is well fitted by a power law that is slightly steeper than a singular isothermal sphere. Together with the interstellar medium density, which is estimated from average stellar extinction, the mass content of the ONC is insufficient by a factor ∼1.8 to reproduce the observed velocity dispersion from virialized motions, in agreement with previous assessments that the ONC is moderately supervirial. This may indicate recent gas dispersal. Based on the latest estimates for the age spread in the system and our density profiles, we find that at the half-mass radius, 90% of the stellar population formed within ∼5-8 free-fall times (t {sub ff}). This implies a star formation efficiency per t {sub ff} of ε{sub ff} ∼ 0.04-0.07 (i.e., relatively slow and inefficient star formation rates during star cluster formation).

  13. Hα imaging survey of Wolf-Rayet galaxies: morphologies and star formation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, S.; Omar, A.

    2016-10-01

    The Hα and optical broad-band images of 25 nearby Wolf-Rayet (WR) galaxies are presented. The WR galaxies are known to have a recent (≤10 Myr) and massive star formation episode. The photometric Hα fluxes are estimated and corrected for extinction and line contamination in the filter pass-bands. The star formation rates (SFRs) are estimated using Hα images and from archival data in the far-ultraviolet (FUV), far-infrared (FIR) and 1.4-GHz radio continuum wavebands. A comparison of SFRs estimated from different wavebands is made after including similar data available in the literature for other WR galaxies. The Hα-based SFRs are found to be tightly correlated with SFRs estimated from the FUV data. The correlations also exist with SFR estimates based on the radio and FIR data. The WR galaxies also follow the radio-FIR correlation known for normal star-forming galaxies, although it is seen here that the majority of dwarf WR galaxies have a radio deficiency. An analysis using the ratio of non-thermal to thermal radio continuum and the ratio of the FUV to Hα SFRs indicates that WR galaxies have lower non-thermal radio emission compared to normal galaxies, most likely due to a lack of supernovae in the very young star formation episode in the WR galaxies. The morphologies of 16 galaxies in our sample are highly suggestive of an ongoing tidal interaction or a past merger in these galaxies. This survey strengthens the conclusions obtained from previous similar studies indicating the importance of tidal interactions in triggering star-formation in WR galaxies.

  14. The transition state for peptide bond formation reveals the ribosome as a water trap.

    PubMed

    Wallin, Göran; Aqvist, Johan

    2010-02-02

    Recent progress in elucidating the peptide bond formation process on the ribosome has led to notion of a proton shuttle mechanism where the 2'-hydroxyl group of the P-site tRNA plays a key role in mediating proton transfer between the nucleophile and leaving group, whereas ribosomal groups do not actively participate in the reaction. Despite these advances, the detailed nature of the transition state for peptidyl transfer and the role of several trapped water molecules in the peptidyl transferase center remain major open questions. Here, we employ high-level quantum chemical ab initio calculations to locate and characterize global transition states for the reaction, described by a molecular model encompassing all the key elements of the reaction center. The calculated activation enthalpy as well as structures are in excellent agreement with experimental data and point to feasibility of an eight-membered "double proton shuttle" mechanism in which an auxiliary water molecule, observed both in computer simulations and crystal structures, actively participates. A second conserved water molecule is found to be of key importance for stabilizing developing negative charge on the substrate oxyanion and its presence is catalytically favorable both in terms of activation enthalpy and entropy. Transition states calculated both for six- and eight-membered mechanisms are invariably late and do not involve significant charge development on the attacking amino group. Predicted kinetic isotope effects consistent with this picture are similar to those observed for uncatalyzed ester aminolysis reactions in solution.

  15. Lognormal firing rate distribution reveals prominent fluctuation–driven regime in spinal motor networks

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Peter C; Berg, Rune W

    2016-01-01

    When spinal circuits generate rhythmic movements it is important that the neuronal activity remains within stable bounds to avoid saturation and to preserve responsiveness. Here, we simultaneously record from hundreds of neurons in lumbar spinal circuits of turtles and establish the neuronal fraction that operates within either a ‘mean-driven’ or a ‘fluctuation–driven’ regime. Fluctuation-driven neurons have a ‘supralinear’ input-output curve, which enhances sensitivity, whereas the mean-driven regime reduces sensitivity. We find a rich diversity of firing rates across the neuronal population as reflected in a lognormal distribution and demonstrate that half of the neurons spend at least 50 % of the time in the ‘fluctuation–driven’ regime regardless of behavior. Because of the disparity in input–output properties for these two regimes, this fraction may reflect a fine trade–off between stability and sensitivity in order to maintain flexibility across behaviors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18805.001 PMID:27782883

  16. Metatranscriptomics reveals temperature-driven functional changes in microbiome impacting cheese maturation rate

    DOE PAGES

    De Filippis, Francesca; Genovese, Alessandro; Ferranti, Pasquale; ...

    2016-02-25

    Traditional cheeses harbour complex microbial consortia that play an important role in shaping typical sensorial properties. However, the microbial metabolism is considered difficult to control. Microbial community succession and the related gene expression were analysed during ripening of a traditional Italian cheese, identifying parameters that could be modified to accelerate ripening. Afterwards, we modulated ripening conditions and observed consistent changes in microbial community structure and function. We provide concrete evidence of the essential contribution of non-starter lactic acid bacteria in ripening-related activities. An increase in the ripening temperature promoted the expression of genes related to proteolysis, lipolysis and amino acid/lipidmore » catabolism and significantly increases the cheese maturation rate. Moreover, temperature-promoted microbial metabolisms were consistent with the metabolomic profiles of proteins and volatile organic compounds in the cheese. Finally, the results clearly indicate how processing-driven microbiome responses can be modulated in order to optimize production efficiency and product quality.« less

  17. Cryo-EM structure of aerolysin variants reveals a novel protein fold and the pore-formation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovache, Ioan; de Carlo, Sacha; Cirauqui, Nuria; Dal Peraro, Matteo; van der Goot, F. Gisou; Zuber, Benoît

    2016-07-01

    Owing to their pathogenical role and unique ability to exist both as soluble proteins and transmembrane complexes, pore-forming toxins (PFTs) have been a focus of microbiologists and structural biologists for decades. PFTs are generally secreted as water-soluble monomers and subsequently bind the membrane of target cells. Then, they assemble into circular oligomers, which undergo conformational changes that allow membrane insertion leading to pore formation and potentially cell death. Aerolysin, produced by the human pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila, is the founding member of a major PFT family found throughout all kingdoms of life. We report cryo-electron microscopy structures of three conformational intermediates and of the final aerolysin pore, jointly providing insight into the conformational changes that allow pore formation. Moreover, the structures reveal a protein fold consisting of two concentric β-barrels, tightly kept together by hydrophobic interactions. This fold suggests a basis for the prion-like ultrastability of aerolysin pore and its stoichiometry.

  18. GLOBAL STAR FORMATION RATES AND DUST EMISSION OVER THE GALAXY INTERACTION SEQUENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Lanz, Lauranne; Zezas, Andreas; Smith, Howard A.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Hernquist, Lars; Brassington, Nicola; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Hayward, Christopher C.; Jonsson, Patrik

    2013-05-01

    We measured and modeled spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in 28 bands from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared (FIR) for 31 interacting galaxies in 14 systems. The sample is drawn from the Spitzer Interacting Galaxy Survey, which probes a range of galaxy interaction parameters at multiple wavelengths with an emphasis on the infrared bands. The subset presented in this paper consists of all galaxies for which FIR Herschel SPIRE observations are publicly available. Our SEDs combine the Herschel photometry with multi-wavelength data from Spitzer, GALEX, Swift UVOT, and 2MASS. While the shapes of the SEDs are broadly similar across our sample, strongly interacting galaxies typically have more mid-infrared emission relative to their near-infrared and FIR emission than weakly or moderately interacting galaxies. We modeled the full SEDs to derive host galaxy star formation rates (SFRs), specific star formation rates (sSFRs), stellar masses, dust temperatures, dust luminosities, and dust masses. We find increases in the dust luminosity and mass, SFR, and cold (15-25 K) dust temperature as the interaction progresses from moderately to strongly interacting and between non-interacting and strongly interacting galaxies. We also find increases in the SFR between weakly and strongly interacting galaxies. In contrast, the sSFR remains unchanged across all the interaction stages. The ultraviolet photometry is crucial for constraining the age of the stellar population and the SFR, while dust mass is primarily determined by SPIRE photometry. The SFR derived from the SED modeling agrees well with rates estimated by proportionality relations that depend on infrared emission.

  19. THE MOSDEF SURVEY: MASS, METALLICITY, AND STAR-FORMATION RATE AT z ∼ 2.3

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Ryan L.; Shapley, Alice E.; Kriek, Mariska; Price, Sedona H.; Reddy, Naveen A.; Freeman, William R.; Siana, Brian; Mobasher, Bahram; Shivaei, Irene; De Groot, Laura; Coil, Alison L.

    2015-02-01

    We present results on the z ∼ 2.3 mass-metallicity relation (MZR) using early observations from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field survey. We use an initial sample of 87 star-forming galaxies with spectroscopic coverage of Hβ, [O III] λ5007, Hα, and [N II] λ6584 rest-frame optical emission lines, and estimate the gas-phase oxygen abundance based on the N2 and O3N2 strong-line indicators. We find a positive correlation between stellar mass and metallicity among individual z ∼ 2.3 galaxies using both the N2 and O3N2 indicators. We also measure the emission-line ratios and corresponding oxygen abundances for composite spectra in bins of stellar mass. Among composite spectra, we find a monotonic increase in metallicity with increasing stellar mass, offset ∼0.15-0.3 dex below the local MZR. When the sample is divided at the median star-formation rate (SFR), we do not observe significant SFR dependence of the z ∼ 2.3 MZR among either individual galaxies or composite spectra. We furthermore find that z ∼ 2.3 galaxies have metallicities ∼0.1 dex lower at a given stellar mass and SFR than is observed locally. This offset suggests that high-redshift galaxies do not fall on the local ''fundamental metallicity relation'' among stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR, and may provide evidence of a phase of galaxy growth in which the gas reservoir is built up due to inflow rates that are higher than star-formation and outflow rates. However, robust conclusions regarding the gas-phase oxygen abundances of high-redshift galaxies await a systematic reappraisal of the application of locally calibrated metallicity indicators at high redshift.

  20. Low 18O-contents in Arctic Neogloboquadrina pachyderma shells: A proxy of brine formation rate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaire-Marcel, C.; de Vernal, A.

    2006-12-01

    In the Arctic Ocean, the cold water foraminifera Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (Np), left as right coiled, likely forms its shell along the pycnocline between the cold, dilute, surface water and the warmer, saline North Atlantic Water (NAW), due to salinity conditions in the surface water mass below optimum values for the species (~ 35 psu;[1]). However, δ18O-values in Np shell still present negative offsets with isotopic equilibrium conditions for a calcite precipitated at mid-pycnocline depth. This offset ranges from 1 (Arctic seas) to 3 per mil (Canada Basin, East Siberian Sea), although temperature gradients along the pycnocline still result in predictable isotopic shifts from small (juvenile?) to large (mature?) shells [2]. The precise mechanism responsible for the 18O offset is not known, but it seems linked to rate of sea-ice formation or to its seasonal duration (e.g., [3]). The freezing of low 18O-content sea-surface waters rejects isotopically-light brines that sink to the pycnocline. We hypothesize that Np-shell growth occurs in such high- salinity/low-δ18O water droplets or thin layers sinking to the pycnocline. In vitro experiments [4] have indeed shown that formation of new shell-chambers could still occurs in salinities of up to 58 psu, and that some specimens could survive 82 psu for at least a week. Thus, in this hypothesis, isotopic offsets in Np would relate to the rate of brine formation. In the modern Arctic Ocean, mixing of these brines into NAW and export of surface water and sea ice into the North Atlantic would contribute maintaining steady-state conditions, thus resulting in an asymptotic offset value near 2.5/-3 per mil in Np shells. From this viewpoint, the greater offsets in the western Arctic and East Siberian Sea areas (up to 3 per mil), compared with the eastern Arctic Ocean (appr. 1 per mil), would reflect a difference in sea-ice formation rates along the shelves. Such isotopic offsets maintained in the Chukchi Sea during most of

  1. Conditional Deletion of Prolyl Hydroxylase Domain-Containing Protein 2 (Phd2) Gene Reveals Its Essential Role in Chondrocyte Function and Endochondral Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shaohong; Xing, Weirong; Pourteymoor, Sheila; Schulte, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The hypoxic growth plate cartilage requires hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-mediated pathways to maintain chondrocyte survival and differentiation. HIF proteins are tightly regulated by prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein 2 (Phd2)-mediated proteosomal degradation. We conditionally disrupted the Phd2 gene in chondrocytes by crossing Phd2 floxed mice with type 2 collagen-α1-Cre transgenic mice and found massive increases (>50%) in the trabecular bone mass of long bones and lumbar vertebra of the Phd2 conditional knockout (cKO) mice caused by significant increases in trabecular number and thickness and reductions in trabecular separation. Cortical thickness and tissue mineral density at the femoral middiaphysis of the cKO mice were also significantly increased. Dynamic histomorphometric analyses revealed increased longitudinal length and osteoid surface per bone surface in the primary spongiosa of the cKO mice, suggesting elevated conversion rate from hypertrophic chondrocytes to mineralized bone matrix as well as increased bone formation in the primary spongiosa. In the secondary spongiosa, bone formation measured by mineralizing surface per bone surface and mineral apposition rate were not changed, but resorption was slightly reduced. Increases in the mRNA levels of SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9, osterix (Osx), type 2 collagen, aggrecan, alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, vascular endothelial growth factor, erythropoietin, and glycolytic enzymes in the growth plate of cKO mice were detected by quantitative RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry revealed an increased HIF-1α protein level in the hypertrophic chondrocytes of cKO mice. Infection of chondrocytes isolated from Phd2 floxed mice with adenoviral Cre resulted in similar gene expression patterns as observed in the cKO growth plate chondrocytes. Our findings indicate that Phd2 suppresses endochondral bone formation, in part, via HIF-dependent mechanisms in mice. PMID:26562260

  2. Conditional Deletion of Prolyl Hydroxylase Domain-Containing Protein 2 (Phd2) Gene Reveals Its Essential Role in Chondrocyte Function and Endochondral Bone Formation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaohong; Xing, Weirong; Pourteymoor, Sheila; Schulte, Jan; Mohan, Subburaman

    2016-01-01

    The hypoxic growth plate cartilage requires hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-mediated pathways to maintain chondrocyte survival and differentiation. HIF proteins are tightly regulated by prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein 2 (Phd2)-mediated proteosomal degradation. We conditionally disrupted the Phd2 gene in chondrocytes by crossing Phd2 floxed mice with type 2 collagen-α1-Cre transgenic mice and found massive increases (>50%) in the trabecular bone mass of long bones and lumbar vertebra of the Phd2 conditional knockout (cKO) mice caused by significant increases in trabecular number and thickness and reductions in trabecular separation. Cortical thickness and tissue mineral density at the femoral middiaphysis of the cKO mice were also significantly increased. Dynamic histomorphometric analyses revealed increased longitudinal length and osteoid surface per bone surface in the primary spongiosa of the cKO mice, suggesting elevated conversion rate from hypertrophic chondrocytes to mineralized bone matrix as well as increased bone formation in the primary spongiosa. In the secondary spongiosa, bone formation measured by mineralizing surface per bone surface and mineral apposition rate were not changed, but resorption was slightly reduced. Increases in the mRNA levels of SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9, osterix (Osx), type 2 collagen, aggrecan, alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, vascular endothelial growth factor, erythropoietin, and glycolytic enzymes in the growth plate of cKO mice were detected by quantitative RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry revealed an increased HIF-1α protein level in the hypertrophic chondrocytes of cKO mice. Infection of chondrocytes isolated from Phd2 floxed mice with adenoviral Cre resulted in similar gene expression patterns as observed in the cKO growth plate chondrocytes. Our findings indicate that Phd2 suppresses endochondral bone formation, in part, via HIF-dependent mechanisms in mice.

  3. Expression and activity analysis reveal that heme oxygenase (decycling) 1 is associated with blue egg formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z P; Liu, R F; Wang, A R; Li, J Y; Deng, X M

    2011-04-01

    Biliverdin is responsible for the coloration of blue eggs and is secreted onto the eggshell by the shell gland. Previous studies confirmed that a significant difference exists in biliverdin content between blue eggs and brown eggs, although the reasons are still unknown. Because the pigment is derived from oxidative degradation of heme catalyzed by heme oxygenase (HO), this study compared heme oxygenase (decycling) 1 (HMOX1), the gene encoding HO expression and HO activity, in the shell glands of the Dongxiang blue-shelled chicken (n = 12) and the Dongxiang brown-shelled chicken (n = 12). Results showed that HMOX1 was highly expressed at the mRNA (1.58-fold; P < 0.05) and protein levels in blue-shelled chickens compared with brown-shelled chickens. At the functional level, blue-shelled chickens also showed 1.40-fold (P < 0.05) higher HO activity than brown-shelled chickens. To explore the reasons for the differential expression of HMOX1, an association study of 6 SNP capturing the majority of HMOX1 variants with the blue egg coloration was performed. Results showed no significant association between SNP and the blue egg coloration in HMOX1 (P > 0.05). Taken together, these results show that blue egg formation is associated with high expression of HMOX1 in the shell gland of Dongxiang blue-shelled chickens, and suggest that differential expression of HMOX1 in the 2 groups of chickens is most likely to arise from an alteration in the trans-acting factor.

  4. Active Site Formation, Not Bond Kinetics, Limits Adhesion Rate between Human Neutrophils and Immobilized Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1

    PubMed Central

    Waugh, Richard E.; Lomakina, Elena B.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The formation of receptor ligand bonds at the interface between different cells and between cells and substrates is a widespread phenomenon in biological systems. Physical measurements of bond formation rates between cells and substrates have been exploited to increase our understanding of the biophysical mechanisms that regulate bond formation at interfaces. Heretofore, these measurements have been interpreted in terms of simple bimolecular reaction kinetics. Discrepancies between this simple framework and the behavior of neutrophils adhering to surfaces expressing vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) motivated the development of a new kinetic framework in which the explicit formation of active bond formation sites (reaction zones) are a prerequisite for bond formation to occur. Measurements of cells interacting with surfaces having a wide range of VCAM-1 concentrations, and for different durations of contact, enabled the determination of novel kinetic rate constants for the formation of reaction zones and for the intrinsic bond kinetics. Comparison of these rates with rates determined previously for other receptor-ligand pairs points to a predominant role of extrinsic factors such as surface topography and accessibility of active molecules to regions of close contact in determining forward rates of bond formation at cell interfaces. PMID:19134479

  5. Prediction of terrestrial gamma dose rate based on geological formations and soil types in the Johor State, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; bin Hamzah, Khaidzir; Alajerami, Yasser; Moharib, Mohammed; Saeed, Ismael

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to predict and estimate unmeasured terrestrial gamma dose rate (TGDR) using statistical analysis methods to derive a model from the actual measurement based on geological formation and soil type. The measurements of TGDR were conducted in the state of Johor with a total of 3873 measured points which covered all geological formations, soil types and districts. The measurements were taken 1 m above the soil surface using NaI [Ti] detector. The measured gamma dose rates ranged from 9 nGy h(-1) to 1237 nGy h(-1) with a mean value of 151 nGy h(-1). The data have been normalized to fit a normal distribution. Tests of significance were conducted among all geological formations and soil types, using the unbalanced one way ANOVA. The results indicated strong significant differences due to the different geological formations and soil types present in Johor State. Pearson Correlation was used to measure the relations between gamma dose rate based on geological formation and soil type (D(G,S)) with the gamma dose rate based on geological formation (D(G)) or soil type (D(s)). A very good correlation was found between D(G,S) and D(G) or D(G,S) and D(s). A total of 118 pairs of geological formations and soil types were used to derive the statistical contribution of geological formations and soil types to gamma dose rates. The contribution of the gamma dose rate from geological formation and soil type were found to be 0.594 and 0.399, respectively. The null hypotheses were accepted for 83% of examined data, therefore, the model could be used to predict gamma dose rates based on geological formation and soil type information.

  6. Rate of carotenoid triplet formation in solubilized light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) from spinach.

    PubMed Central

    Schödel, R; Irrgang, K D; Voigt, J; Renger, G

    1998-01-01

    In the present study the rate of triplet transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids in solubilized LHCII was investigated by flash spectroscopy using laser pulses of approximately 2 ns for both pump and probe. Special attention has been paid to calibration of the experimental setup and to avoid saturation effects. Carotenoid triplets were identified by the pronounced positive peak at approximately 507 nm in the triplet-singlet difference spectra. DeltaOD (507 nm) exhibits a monoexponential relaxation kinetics with characteristic lifetimes of 2-9 micros (depending on the oxygen content) that was found to be independent of the pump pulse intensity. The rise of DeltaOD (507 nm) was resolved via a pump probe technique where an optical delay of up to 20 ns was used. A thorough analysis of these experimental data leads to the conclusion that the kinetics of carotenoid triplet formation in solubilized LHCII is almost entirely limited by the lifetime of the excited singlet state of chlorophyll but neither by the pulse width nor by the rate constant of triplet-triplet transfer. Within the experimental error the rate constant of triplet-triplet transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids was estimated to be kTT > (0.5 ns)-1. This value exceeds all data reported so far by at least one order of magnitude. The implications of this finding are briefly discussed. PMID:9826635

  7. An evolutionary model for collapsing molecular clouds and their star formation activity. II. Mass dependence of the star formation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Zamora-Avilés, Manuel; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the evolution and dependence on cloud mass of the star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE) of star-forming molecular clouds (MCs) within the scenario that clouds are undergoing global collapse and that the SFR is controlled by ionization feedback. We find that low-mass clouds (M {sub max} ≲ 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉}) spend most of their evolution at low SFRs, but end their lives with a mini-burst, reaching a peak SFR ∼10{sup 4} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1}, although their time-averaged SFR is only (SFR) ∼ 10{sup 2} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1}. The corresponding efficiencies are SFE{sub final} ≲ 60% and (SFE) ≲ 1%. For more massive clouds (M {sub max} ≳ 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}), the SFR first increases and then reaches a plateau because the clouds are influenced by stellar feedback since earlier in their evolution. As a function of cloud mass, (SFR) and (SFE) are well represented by the fits (SFR) ≈ 100(1 + M {sub max}/1.4 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}){sup 1.68} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1} and (SFE) ≈ 0.03(M {sub max}/2.5 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}){sup 0.33}, respectively. Moreover, the SFR of our model clouds follows closely the SFR-dense gas mass relation recently found by Lada et al. during the epoch when their instantaneous SFEs are comparable to those of the clouds considered by those authors. Collectively, a Monte Carlo integration of the model-predicted SFR(M) over a Galactic giant molecular cloud mass spectrum yields values for the total Galactic SFR that are within half an order of magnitude of the relation obtained by Gao and Solomon. Our results support the scenario that star-forming MCs may be in global gravitational collapse and that the low observed values of the SFR and SFE are a result of the interruption of each SF episode, caused primarily by the ionizing feedback from massive stars.

  8. Trace fossils revealed through x-radiography in facies analysis of Smackover Formation, southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, R.A.; King, D.T. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    The use of x-radiography has been applied to slabbed cores of Jurassic Smackover limestones from southwestern Alabama to enhance the complete petrologic description of the rocks. Through x-radiography, trace fossils have been revealed in what would otherwise appear to be homogeneous rock. In these biogenic structures, organic material, partly fecal in origin, is concentrated as infill packing in actively filled burrows. A microreducing environment within the burrow results in the mineralization by finely disseminated FeS/sub 2/. The density difference between FeS/sub 2/, which has a high absorption coefficient, and the surrounding calcium carbonate highlights the burrows in the x-radiographs. This characteristic burrow mineralization is shown well in the Smackover where a Zoophycus-Thalassinoides trace-fossil assemblage has been identified. Zoophycus, a feeding structure, is characterized by concave-upward traces with whorled peaks, and is best seen in slabs cut perpendicular to bedding. Thalassinoides is a dwelling structure characterized by a boxwork burrow system and is best seen in cores cut parallel to bedding. This assemblage is restricted to facies that is laterally persistent throughout the Smackover in most of Escambia County, Alabama. This trace-fossil assemblage is found in an oolitic pelletal packstone. This unit is overlain by an oolitic grainstone and is stratigraphically above a sparsely fossiliferous, laminated wackestone and packstone. Trace fossils in this horizon are abundant, but the traces are not found in stratigraphically adjacent lithofacies. Detecting these otherwise unseen trace fossils by x-radiography assisted the paleoenvironmental interpretation of this depositional facies as a low-energy subwave-base carbonate-shelf deposit.

  9. Transient β-hairpin formation in α-synuclein monomer revealed by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hang; Ma, Wen; Han, Wei; Schulten, Klaus

    2015-12-28

    Parkinson’s disease, originating from the intrinsically disordered peptide α-synuclein, is a common neurodegenerative disorder that affects more than 5% of the population above age 85. It remains unclear how α-synuclein monomers undergo conformational changes leading to aggregation and formation of fibrils characteristic for the disease. In the present study, we perform molecular dynamics simulations (over 180 μs in aggregated time) using a hybrid-resolution model, Proteins with Atomic details in Coarse-grained Environment (PACE), to characterize in atomic detail structural ensembles of wild type and mutant monomeric α-synuclein in aqueous solution. The simulations reproduce structural properties of α-synuclein characterized in experiments, such as secondary structure content, long-range contacts, chemical shifts, and {sup 3}J(H{sub N}H{sub C{sub α}})-coupling constants. Most notably, the simulations reveal that a short fragment encompassing region 38-53, adjacent to the non-amyloid-β component region, exhibits a high probability of forming a β-hairpin; this fragment, when isolated from the remainder of α-synuclein, fluctuates frequently into its β-hairpin conformation. Two disease-prone mutations, namely, A30P and A53T, significantly accelerate the formation of a β-hairpin in the stated fragment. We conclude that the formation of a β-hairpin in region 38-53 is a key event during α-synuclein aggregation. We predict further that the G47V mutation impedes the formation of a turn in the β-hairpin and slows down β-hairpin formation, thereby retarding α-synuclein aggregation.

  10. Transient β-hairpin formation in α-synuclein monomer revealed by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hang; Han, Wei; Ma, Wen; Schulten, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease, originating from the intrinsically disordered peptide α-synuclein, is a common neurodegenerative disorder that affects more than 5% of the population above age 85. It remains unclear how α-synuclein monomers undergo conformational changes leading to aggregation and formation of fibrils characteristic for the disease. In the present study, we perform molecular dynamics simulations (over 180 μs in aggregated time) using a hybrid-resolution model, Proteins with Atomic details in Coarse-grained Environment (PACE), to characterize in atomic detail structural ensembles of wild type and mutant monomeric α-synuclein in aqueous solution. The simulations reproduce structural properties of α-synuclein characterized in experiments, such as secondary structure content, long-range contacts, chemical shifts, and 3J(HNHCα)-coupling constants. Most notably, the simulations reveal that a short fragment encompassing region 38-53, adjacent to the non-amyloid-β component region, exhibits a high probability of forming a β-hairpin; this fragment, when isolated from the remainder of α-synuclein, fluctuates frequently into its β-hairpin conformation. Two disease-prone mutations, namely, A30P and A53T, significantly accelerate the formation of a β-hairpin in the stated fragment. We conclude that the formation of a β-hairpin in region 38-53 is a key event during α-synuclein aggregation. We predict further that the G47V mutation impedes the formation of a turn in the β-hairpin and slows down β-hairpin formation, thereby retarding α-synuclein aggregation.

  11. Dissolution Rate Enhancement of Clarithromycin Using Ternary Ground Mixtures: Nanocrystal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Shahbaziniaz, Malihe; Foroutan, Seyed Mohsen; Bolourchian, Noushin

    2013-01-01

    Clarithromycin (CLA), a broad-spectrum macrolide, is a poorly soluble drug with dissolution rate limited absorption. The aim of this investigation was to prepare CLA nanoparticles from a ternary ground mixture in the presence of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as co-grinding water-soluble compounds, in order to improve the drug dissolution rate. Different weight ratios of CLA: SLS: PVP were ground in a dry process by planetary ball mill using different grinding ball size. Following the dissolution rate study, physical properties of the best dissolved co-ground formulation was studied. The accelerated stability studies were also conducted on the co-ground formulation. The results revealed that the dissolution rate of ternary ground mixtures was much higher than that of the intact drug (p < 0.001). Decreasing the grinding ball size and weight with the same rotation speed resulted in particles with decreased dissolution. On the other hand, increasing the PVP concentration in the formulations reduced the drug dissolution. Dissolution efficiencies (DE10 and DE30) for the best dissolved formulation, which consisted of the equal ratio of each co-ground component, were 8.7 and 5 folds higher than the untreated CLA, respectively. This formulation formed nanocrystals with enhanced solubility after dispersing in water. X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectrophotometry confirmed no chemical interaction and phase transition during the process. Accelerated stability studies confirmed that the co-ground mixture almost remained unchanged in terms of dissolution rate, drug assay and particle size after exposing in stability conditions for three months. PMID:24523739

  12. The formation of linear aggregates in magnetic hyperthermia: implications on specific absorption rate and magnetic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Saville, Steven L; Qi, Bin; Baker, Jonathon; Stone, Roland; Camley, Robert E; Livesey, Karen L; Ye, Longfei; Crawford, Thomas M; Mefford, O Thompson

    2014-06-15

    The design and application of magnetic nanoparticles for use as magnetic hyperthermia agents has garnered increasing interest over the past several years. When designing these systems, the fundamentals of particle design play a key role in the observed specific absorption rate (SAR). This includes the particle's core size, polymer brush length, and colloidal arrangement. While the role of particle core size on the observed SAR has been significantly reported, the role of the polymer brush length has not attracted as much attention. It has recently been reported that for some suspensions linear aggregates form in the presence of an applied external magnetic field, i.e. chains of magnetic particles. The formation of these chains may have the potential for a dramatic impact on the biomedical application of these materials, specifically the efficiency of the particles to transfer magnetic energy to the surrounding cells. In this study we demonstrate the dependence of SAR on magnetite nanoparticle core size and brush length as well as observe the formation of magnetically induced colloidal arrangements. Colloidally stable magnetic nanoparticles were demonstrated to form linear aggregates in an alternating magnetic field. The length and distribution of the aggregates were dependent upon the stabilizing polymer molecular weight. As the molecular weight of the stabilizing layer increased, the magnetic interparticle interactions decreased therefore limiting chain formation. In addition, theoretical calculations demonstrated that interparticle spacing has a significant impact on the magnetic behavior of these materials. This work has several implications for the design of nanoparticle and magnetic hyperthermia systems, while improving understanding of how colloidal arrangement affects SAR.

  13. Galactic chemical evolution: The star formation rate in the early galaxy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahijpal, Sandeep

    2012-07-01

    The metallicity of the sun has been recently revised from an earlier value of ~0.02 (Anders & Grevesse 1989) to a value ~0.014 (Asplund et al. 2009). We have developed a galactic chemical evolution model to make an assessment of the implications of the revision in the metallicity on the stellar evolutionary history of the galaxy (Sahijpal & Gupta 2012). We performed numerical simulations of the galaxy by evolving numerous generations of stars. The approch is distinct from the conventional approach of solving the non-linear integro-differential equations (e.g., Pagel 1997). In the present work, we have performed numerical simulations of the galactic chemical evolution by taking into account the star formation rate in the earliest epoch of the galaxy. The era corresponds to the formation of the metal-poor stars during the accretion of the halo-thick disk of the galaxy. We have performed several simulations to study the role of the star formation history in this earliest era on the evolution of age-metallicity relation, the elemental abundance evolution of the galaxy in the solar neighborhood. The preliminary results of this work will be presented in the presentation. References: [1] Anders E. & Grevesse N. 1989, Geo. Cosmochimic. Acta 53, 197-214. [2] Asplund M., Grevesse N., Sauval A. J. & Scott P. 2009, A. Rev. A & A 47, 481-522. [3] Sahijpal S. and Gupta G. 2012, Met. Planet. Sci., submitted. [4] Pagel B. E. J. 1997, Nucleosynthesis and the chemical evolution of galaxies. Cambridge University Press.

  14. Nature or nurture? Clues from the distribution of specific star formation rates in SDSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casado, J.; Ascasibar, Y.; Gavilán, M.; Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E.; Hoyos, C.; Díaz, A. I.

    2015-07-01

    This work investigates the main mechanism(s) that regulate the specific star formation rate (SSFR) in nearby galaxies, cross-correlating two proxies of this quantity - the equivalent width of the Hα line and the (u - r) colour - with other physical properties (mass, metallicity, environment, morphology, and the presence of close companions) in a sample of ˜82 500 galaxies extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The existence of a relatively tight `ageing sequence' in the colour-equivalent width plane favours a scenario where the secular conversion of gas into stars (i.e. nature) is the main physical driver of the instantaneous SSFR and the gradual transition from a `chemically primitive' (metal-poor and intensely star-forming) state to a `chemically evolved' (metal-rich and passively evolving) system. Nevertheless, environmental factors (i.e. nurture) are also important. In the field, galaxies may be temporarily affected by discrete `quenching' and `rejuvenation' episodes, but such events show little statistical significance in a probabilistic sense, and we find no evidence that galaxy interactions are, on average, a dominant driver of star formation. Although visually classified mergers tend to display systematically higher EW(Hα) and bluer (u - r) colours for a given luminosity, most galaxies with high SSFR have uncertain morphologies, which could be due to either internal or external processes. Field galaxies of early and late morphological types are consistent with the gradual `ageing' scenario, with no obvious signatures of a sudden decrease in their SSFR. In contrast, star formation is significantly reduced and sometimes completely quenched on a short time-scale in dense environments, where many objects are found on a `quenched sequence' in the colour-equivalent width plane.

  15. The Radio Spectral Energy Distribution and Star-formation Rate Calibration in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaei, F. S.; Schinnerer, E.; Krause, M.; Dumas, G.; Meidt, S.; Damas-Segovia, A.; Beck, R.; Murphy, E. J.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Groves, B.; Bolatto, A.; Dale, D.; Galametz, M.; Sandstrom, K.; Boquien, M.; Calzetti, D.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Hunt, L. K.; De Looze, I.; Pellegrini, E. W.

    2017-02-01

    We study the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the radio continuum (RC) emission from the Key Insight in Nearby Galaxies Emitting in Radio (KINGFISHER) sample of nearby galaxies to understand the energetics and origin of this emission. Effelsberg multi-wavelength observations at 1.4, 4.8, 8.4, and 10.5 GHz combined with archive data allow us, for the first time, to determine the mid-RC (1–10 GHz, MRC) bolometric luminosities and further present calibration relations versus the monochromatic radio luminosities. The 1–10 GHz radio SED is fitted using a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique leading to measurements for the nonthermal spectral index ({S}ν ∼ {ν }-{α {nt}}) and the thermal fraction ({f}{th}) with mean values of {α }{nt}=0.97 +/- 0.16(0.79 +/- 0.15 for the total spectral index) and {f}{th} = (10 ± 9)% at 1.4 GHz. The MRC luminosity changes over ∼3 orders of magnitude in the sample, 4.3× {10}2 {L}ȯ < MRC < 3.9× {10}5 {L}ȯ . The thermal emission is responsible for ∼23% of the MRC on average. We also compare the extinction-corrected diagnostics of the star-formation rate (SFR) with the thermal and nonthermal radio tracers and derive the first star-formation calibration relations using the MRC radio luminosity. The nonthermal spectral index flattens with increasing SFR surface density, indicating the effect of the star-formation feedback on the cosmic-ray electron population in galaxies. Comparing the radio and IR SEDs, we find that the FIR-to-MRC ratio could decrease with SFR, due to the amplification of the magnetic fields in star-forming regions. This particularly implies a decrease in the ratio at high redshifts, where mostly luminous/star-forming galaxies are detected.

  16. A statistical test for periodicity hypothesis in the crater formation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabushita, S.

    1991-06-01

    The hypothesis that the crater formation rate exhibits periodicity is examined by adopting a criterion proposed by Broadbent, which is more stringent than those adopted previously. Data sets of Alvarez and Muller, Rampino and Stothers and of Grieve are tested. The data set of Rampino and Stothers is found to satisfy the adopted criterion for periodicity with period P = 30 Myr. Again, small craters (D less than 10 km) in the data set of Grieve satisfy the criterion even better with P = 30 Myr and 50 Myr, but large craters do not satisfy the criterion. Removal of some of the very young craters (ages less than 8 Myr) yields three significant periods, 16.5, 30, and 50 Myr. Taken at face value, the result would indicate that small impactors hit the earth at intervals of 16.5 Myr and that this period is modulated by the galactic tide.

  17. Evolution of Galaxies and the Star Formation Rate in the Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pahre, Michael, A.; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A central goal of extragalactic observational astronomy is to understand how normal galaxies evolve with redshift, and particularly when galaxies formed their stars. While optical and rest-frame UV (ultraviolet) observations have begun to address these issues, the interpretation of such data is particularly challenging because of the sensitivity to dust obscureness (at optical and UV wavelengths). The absorbed light is re-radiated at IR (infrared) wavelengths, hence the optimal indicators of the star formation rate (SFR) is at a rest-frame of (lambda) (is approximately equal to) 60 microns. The SIRTF (space infrared telescope facility) mission will revolutionize the study of the global evolution of the SFR by providing mass-selected, complete samples of galaxies and fares estimators of the SFR. This research program is to study the SFR using statistical samples of galaxies in the local universe, at intermediate redshifts, and set the stage for continuing studies up to z = 5.

  18. Chemical consequences of low star formation rates: stochastically sampling the initial mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carigi, L.; Hernandez, X.

    2008-10-01

    When estimating the abundances which result from a given star formation event, it is customary to treat the initial mass function (IMF) as a series of weight factors to be applied to the stellar yields, as a function of mass, implicitly assuming one is dealing with an infinite population. However, when the stellar population is small, the standard procedure would imply the inclusion of fractional numbers of stars at certain masses. We study the effects of small number statistics on the resulting abundances by performing a statistical sampling of the IMF to form a stellar population out of discrete numbers of stars. A chemical evolution code then follows the evolution of the population, and traces the resulting abundances. The process is repeated to obtain a statistical distribution of the resulting abundances and their evolution. We explore the manner in which different elements are affected, and how different abundances converge to the infinite population limit as the total mass increases. We include a discussion of our results in the context of dwarf spheroidal galaxies and show the recently reported internal dispersions in abundance ratios for dSph galaxies might be partly explained through the stochastic effects introduced by a low star formation rate, which can account for dispersions of over 2 dex in [C/O], [N/O], [C/Fe], [N/Fe] and [O/Fe].

  19. The effects of interactions on spiral galaxies. II - Disk star-formation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.; Roettiger, Kurt A.; Keel, William C.; Van Der Hulst, J. M.; Hummel, E.

    1987-01-01

    H-alpha emission-line and IRAS far-IR observations of interacting spiral and irregular galaxies are here used to assess the influence of interactions on their global star-formation rates. Two samples of interacting galaxies were observed: a complete sample of close pairs, and an Arp atlas sample of peculiar systems. When compared to a control sample of single galaxies, both samples of interacting systems exhibit systematically higher levels of H-alpha and infrared emission on average, and a larger dispersion in emission properties. Emission levels in the very active system are much more strongly correlated with the properties of the interaction than with the internal properties of the galaxies themselves. Strong disk emission is almost always accompanied by unusually strong nuclear activity. Simple star-formation burst models can reproduce the observed H-alpha equivalent widths and broadband colors of most of the galaxies. The bursts are relatively short (few times 10 million yr) and rarely involve more than 1-2 percent of a galaxy's total mass.

  20. Evolution of Galaxies and the Star Formation Rate in the Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pahre, Michael A.; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    A central goal of extragalactic observational astronomy is to understand how normal galaxies evolve with redshift, and particularly when galaxies formed their stars. While optical and rest-frame UV observations have begun to address these issues, the interpretation of such data is particularly challenging because of the sensitivity to dust obscuration (at optical and UV wavelengths). The absorbed light is re-radiated at IR wavelengths, hence the optimal indicators of the star formation rate (SFR) is at a rest-frame wavelength of approx. 60 microns. The Spitzer Space Telescope mission is revolutionizing the study of the global properties and evolution of galaxies. Spitzer reaches nearly two orders of magnitude more sensitivity than previous IR space missions. This research program is to study the SFR using statistical samples of galaxies in the local universe, at intermediate redshifts, and set the stage for continuing studies up to z=5. The overall research program is divided into three main investigations: A Mid-IR Hubble Atlas and SFR estimators in the local universe, Evolution of the SFR at 0 < z < 1 using pencil beam redshift surveys, and Galaxy formation and evolution at 1 < z < 5. The first papers from Spitzer were published during the last year, including ten refereed journal papers where the PI was first or co-author.

  1. Alpha-satellite DNA and vector composition influence rates of human artificial chromosome formation.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Brenda R; Rhoades, Angela A; Willard, Huntington F

    2002-06-01

    Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) have been proposed as a new class of potential gene transfer and gene therapy vector. HACs can be formed when bacterial cloning vectors containing alpha-satellite DNA are transfected into cultured human cells. We have compared the HAC-forming potential of different sequences to identify features critical to the efficiency of the process. Chromosome 17 or 21 alpha-satellite arrays are highly competent HAC-forming substrates in this assay. In contrast, a Y-chromosome-derived alpha-satellite sequence is inefficient, suggesting that centromere specification is at least partly dependent on DNA sequence. The length of the input array is also an important determinant, as reduction of the chromosome-17-based array from 80 kb to 35 kb reduced the frequency of HAC formation. In addition to the alpha-satellite component, vector composition also influenced HAC formation rates, size, and copy number. The data presented here have a significant impact on the design of future HAC vectors that have potential to be developed for therapeutic applications and as tools for investigating human chromosome structure and function.

  2. THE OBSERVED RELATION BETWEEN STELLAR MASS, DUST EXTINCTION, AND STAR FORMATION RATE IN LOCAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zahid, H. J.; Kewley, L. J.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Yates, R. M.

    2013-02-15

    In this study, we investigate the relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and star formation rate (SFR) using {approx}150,000 star-forming galaxies from SDSS DR7. We show that the relation between dust extinction and SFR changes with stellar mass. For galaxies at the same stellar mass, dust extinction is anti-correlated with the SFR at stellar masses <10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }. There is a sharp transition in the relation at a stellar mass of 10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }. At larger stellar masses, dust extinction is positively correlated with the SFR for galaxies at the same stellar mass. The observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and SFR presented in this study helps to confirm similar trends observed in the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR. The relation reported in this study provides important new constraints on the physical processes governing the chemical evolution of galaxies. The correlation between SFR and dust extinction for galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 10} M {sub Sun} is shown to extend to the population of quiescent galaxies suggesting that the physical processes responsible for the observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and SFR may be related to the processes leading to the shutdown of star formation in galaxies.

  3. Evidence for Reduced Specific Star Formation Rates in the Centers of Massive Galaxies at z = 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Intae; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Song, Mimi; Dickinson, Mark; Dekel, Avishai; Ferguson, Henry C.; Fontana, Adriano; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lu, Yu; Mobasher, Bahram; Papovich, Casey; Ryan, Russell E., Jr.; Salmon, Brett; Straughn, Amber N.

    2017-01-01

    We perform the first spatially resolved stellar population study of galaxies in the early universe (z = 3.5–6.5), utilizing the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey imaging data set over the GOODS-S field. We select a sample of 418 bright and extended galaxies at z = 3.5–6.5 from a parent sample of ∼8000 photometric-redshift-selected galaxies from Finkelstein et al. We first examine galaxies at 3.5 ≲ z ≲ 4.0 using additional deep K-band survey data from the HAWK-I UDS and GOODS Survey which covers the 4000 Å break at these redshifts. We measure the stellar mass, star formation rate, and dust extinction for galaxy inner and outer regions via spatially resolved spectral energy distribution fitting based on a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. By comparing specific star formation rates (sSFRs) between inner and outer parts of the galaxies we find that the majority of galaxies with high central mass densities show evidence for a preferentially lower sSFR in their centers than in their outer regions, indicative of reduced sSFRs in their central regions. We also study galaxies at z ∼ 5 and 6 (here limited to high spatial resolution in the rest-frame ultraviolet only), finding that they show sSFRs which are generally independent of radial distance from the center of the galaxies. This indicates that stars are formed uniformly at all radii in massive galaxies at z ∼ 5–6, contrary to massive galaxies at z ≲ 4.

  4. Exploring Systematic Effects in the Relation Between Stellar Mass, Gas Phase Metallicity, and Star Formation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telford, O. Grace; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Skillman, Evan D.; Conroy, Charlie

    2016-08-01

    There is evidence that the well-established mass-metallicity relation in galaxies is correlated with a third parameter: star formation rate (SFR). The strength of this correlation may be used to disentangle the relative importance of different physical processes (e.g., infall of pristine gas, metal-enriched outflows) in governing chemical evolution. However, all three parameters are susceptible to biases that might affect the observed strength of the relation between them. We analyze possible sources of systematic error, including sample bias, application of signal-to-noise ratio cuts on emission lines, choice of metallicity calibration, uncertainty in stellar mass determination, aperture effects, and dust. We present the first analysis of the relation between stellar mass, gas phase metallicity, and SFR using strong line abundance diagnostics from Dopita et al. for ˜130,000 star-forming galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and provide a detailed comparison of these diagnostics in an appendix. Using these new abundance diagnostics yields a 30%-55% weaker anti-correlation between metallicity and SFR at fixed stellar mass than that reported by Mannucci et al. We find that, for all abundance diagnostics, the anti-correlation with SFR is stronger for the relatively few galaxies whose current SFRs are elevated above their past average SFRs. This is also true for the new abundance diagnostic of Dopita et al., which gives anti-correlation between Z and SFR only in the high specific star formation rate (sSFR) regime, in contrast to the recent results of Kashino et al. The poorly constrained strength of the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR must be carefully accounted for in theoretical studies of chemical evolution.

  5. ANALYTICAL THEORY FOR THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION. III. TIME DEPENDENCE AND STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Hennebelle, Patrick

    2013-06-20

    The present paper extends our previous theory of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) by including time dependence and by including the impact of the magnetic field. The predicted mass spectra are similar to the time-independent ones with slightly shallower slopes at large masses and peak locations shifted toward smaller masses by a factor of a few. Assuming that star-forming clumps follow Larson-type relations, we obtain core mass functions in good agreement with the observationally derived IMF, in particular, when taking into account the thermodynamics of the gas. The time-dependent theory directly yields an analytical expression for the star formation rate (SFR) at cloud scales. The SFR values agree well with the observational determinations of various Galactic molecular clouds. Furthermore, we show that the SFR does not simply depend linearly on density, as is sometimes claimed in the literature, but also depends strongly on the clump mass/size, which yields the observed scatter. We stress, however, that any SFR theory depends, explicitly or implicitly, on very uncertain assumptions like clump boundaries or the mass of the most massive stars that can form in a given clump, making the final determinations uncertain by a factor of a few. Finally, we derive a fully time dependent model for the IMF by considering a clump, or a distribution of clumps accreting at a constant rate and thus whose physical properties evolve with time. In spite of its simplicity, this model reproduces reasonably well various features observed in numerical simulations of converging flows. Based on this general theory, we present a paradigm for star formation and the IMF.

  6. Hot spring siliceous stromatolites from Yellowstone National Park: assessing growth rate and laminae formation.

    PubMed

    Berelson, W M; Corsetti, F A; Pepe-Ranney, C; Hammond, D E; Beaumont, W; Spear, J R

    2011-09-01

    Stromatolites are commonly interpreted as evidence of ancient microbial life, yet stromatolite morphogenesis is poorly understood. We apply radiometric tracer and dating techniques, molecular analyses and growth experiments to investigate siliceous stromatolite morphogenesis in Obsidian Pool Prime (OPP), a hot spring in Yellowstone National Park. We examine rates of stromatolite growth and the environmental and/or biologic conditions that affect lamination formation and preservation, both difficult features to constrain in ancient examples. The "main body" of the stromatolite is composed of finely laminated, porous, light-dark couplets of erect (surface normal) and reclining (surface parallel) silicified filamentous bacteria, interrupted by a less-distinct, well-cemented "drape" lamination. Results from dating studies indicate a growth rate of 1-5 cm year(-1) ; however, growth is punctuated. (14)C as a tracer demonstrates that stromatolite cyanobacterial communities fix CO(2) derived from two sources, vent water (radiocarbon dead) and the atmosphere (modern (14)C). The drape facies contained a greater proportion of atmospheric CO(2) and more robust silica cementation (vs. the main body facies), which we interpret as formation when spring level was lower. Systematic changes in lamination style are likely related to environmental forcing and larger scale features (tectonic, climatic). Although the OPP stromatolites are composed of silica and most ancient forms are carbonate, their fine lamination texture requires early lithification. Without early lithification, whether silica or carbonate, it is unlikely that a finely laminated structure representing an ancient microbial mat would be preserved. In OPP, lithification on the nearly diurnal time scale is likely related to temperature control on silica solubility.

  7. Imbalance of heterologous protein folding and disulfide bond formation rates yields runaway oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The protein secretory pathway must process a wide assortment of native proteins for eukaryotic cells to function. As well, recombinant protein secretion is used extensively to produce many biologics and industrial enzymes. Therefore, secretory pathway dysfunction can be highly detrimental to the cell and can drastically inhibit product titers in biochemical production. Because the secretory pathway is a highly-integrated, multi-organelle system, dysfunction can happen at many levels and dissecting the root cause can be challenging. In this study, we apply a systems biology approach to analyze secretory pathway dysfunctions resulting from heterologous production of a small protein (insulin precursor) or a larger protein (α-amylase). Results HAC1-dependent and independent dysfunctions and cellular responses were apparent across multiple datasets. In particular, processes involving (a) degradation of protein/recycling amino acids, (b) overall transcription/translation repression, and (c) oxidative stress were broadly associated with secretory stress. Conclusions Apparent runaway oxidative stress due to radical production observed here and elsewhere can be explained by a futile cycle of disulfide formation and breaking that consumes reduced glutathione and produces reactive oxygen species. The futile cycle is dominating when protein folding rates are low relative to disulfide bond formation rates. While not strictly conclusive with the present data, this insight does provide a molecular interpretation to an, until now, largely empirical understanding of optimizing heterologous protein secretion. This molecular insight has direct implications on engineering a broad range of recombinant proteins for secretion and provides potential hypotheses for the root causes of several secretory-associated diseases. PMID:22380681

  8. Formation and growth rates of atmospheric nanoparticles: four years of observations at two West Siberian stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.; Belan, Boris D.; Davydov, Denis K.; Kozlov, Artem V.; Arshinova, Victoria

    2015-04-01

    In spite of fact that the first report on the new particle formation (NPF) itself was done by John Aitken more than one century ago (Aitken, 1898), a phenomenon of NPF bursts taken place in the atmosphere was discovered not very long ago. Nevertheless, to date it is known that they may occur quite often in a variety of environments (Kulmala et al., 2004; Hirsikko et al., 2011). Siberia occupies a vast area covered by forests, but the comprehensive data on burst frequency, as well as on formation and growth rates of freshly nucleated particles in this key region are still lacking. Continuous measurements of aerosol size distribution carried out in recent years at two West Siberian stations (TOR-station - 56o28'41"N, 85o03'15"E; Fonovaya Observatory - 56o25'07"N, 84o04'27"E) allowed this gap in data to be filled up. Analysis of the size spectra classified in accordance with criteria proposed by Dal Maso et al. (2005) and Hammed et al. (2007) enabled a conclusion to be drawn that NPF events in Wets Siberia are more often observed during spring (from March to May) and early autumn (secondary frequency peak in September). On average, particle formation bursts took place on 23-28 % of all days. Such a seasonal pattern of the NPF occurrence is very similar to one observed at SMEAR II Station (Hyytiälä, Finland; Dal Maso et al. 2005, 2007). Formation rates (FR) of particles with diameters below 25 nm varied in a wide range from 0.1 to 10 cm-3 s-1. Mean values of FR for the entire period of observations were 1.7 cm-3s-1 (median = 1.13 cm-3 s-1) at TOR-station and 0.88 cm-3 s-1 (median = 0.69 cm-3 s-1) at Fonovaya Observatory. Enhanced values of FR are usually observed from spring to autumn. Mean growth rates of observed at TOR-station and Fonovaya Observatory were 6.5 nm h-1 (median = 5.0 nm h-1) and 8.3 nm h-1 (median = 6.4 nm h-1), respectively. This work was supported by the Branch of Geology, Geophysics and Mining Sciences of RAS (Program No. 5); State contracts of

  9. A CORRELATION BETWEEN STAR FORMATION RATE AND AVERAGE BLACK HOLE ACCRETION IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chien-Ting J.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Alberts, Stacey; Pope, Alexandra; Brodwin, Mark; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Goulding, Andrew D.; Murray, Stephen S.; Alexander, David M.; Mullaney, James R.; Assef, Roberto J.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Brown, Michael J. I.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Le Floc'h, Emeric

    2013-08-10

    We present a measurement of the average supermassive black hole accretion rate (BHAR) as a function of the star formation rate (SFR) for galaxies in the redshift range 0.25 < z < 0.8. We study a sample of 1767 far-IR-selected star-forming galaxies in the 9 deg{sup 2} Booetes multi-wavelength survey field. The SFR is estimated using 250 {mu}m observations from the Herschel Space Observatory, for which the contribution from the active galactic nucleus (AGN) is minimal. In this sample, 121 AGNs are directly identified using X-ray or mid-IR selection criteria. We combined these detected AGNs and an X-ray stacking analysis for undetected sources to study the average BHAR for all of the star-forming galaxies in our sample. We find an almost linear relation between the average BHAR (in M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}) and the SFR (in M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}) for galaxies across a wide SFR range 0.85 < log SFR < 2.56: log BHAR = (- 3.72 {+-} 0.52) + (1.05 {+-} 0.33)log SFR. This global correlation between SFR and average BHAR is consistent with a simple picture in which SFR and AGN activity are tightly linked over galaxy evolution timescales.

  10. Evaporation Rate Study and NDMA Formation from UDMH/NO2 Reaction Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Vanessa D.; Dee, Louis A.; Baker, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory samples of uns-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) fuel/oxidizer (nitrogen dioxide) non-combustion reaction products (UFORP) were prepared using a unique permeation tube technology. Also, a synthetic UFORP was prepared from UDMH, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), dimethylammonium nitrate, sodium nitrite and purified water. The evaporation rate of UFORP and synthetic UFORP was determined under space vacuum (approx 10(exp -3) Torr) at -40 ?C and 0 ?C. The material remaining was analyzed and showed that the UFORP weight and NDMA concentration decreased over time; however, NDMA had not completely evaporated. Over 85% of the weight was removed by subjecting the UFORP to 10(-3) Torr for 7 hours at -40 ?C and 4 hours at 0 ?C. A mixture of dimethylammonium nitrate and sodium nitrite formed NDMA at a rapid rate in a moist air environment. A sample of UFORP residue was analyzed for formation of NDMA under various conditions. It was found that NDMA was not formed unless nitrite was added.

  11. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH ANALYSIS OF SPITZER SELECTED COMA CLUSTER GALAXIES: STAR FORMATION RATES AND MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Louise O. V.; Fadda, Dario E-mail: fadda@ipac.caltech.edu

    2011-11-15

    We present a thorough study of the specific star formation rates (sSFRs) for MIPS 24 {mu}m selected galaxies in the Coma cluster. We build galaxy spectral energy distributions using optical (u', g', r', i', z'), near-infrared (J, H, K{sub s} ), and mid- to far-infrared (Infrared Array Camera and MIPS) photometry. New and archival spectra confirm 210 cluster members. Subsequently, the total infrared luminosity, galaxy stellar mass, and sSFR for the members are determined by measuring best-fit templates. Using an array of complementary diagnostics, we search for any contaminating active galactic nuclei, but find few. We compare obscured SFRs to unobscured rates derived from extinction-corrected H{alpha} emission line measurements. The agreement between these two values leads us to conclude that there is no evidence for an additionally obscured component. In our spectroscopic sample, complete to 80% for r' < 19.5, we find that all starbursts are blue and are dwarfs, having masses <10{sup 9} M{sub sun}. Examining the location of these starbursts within the cluster, we confirm that there is a lower fraction in the cluster core.

  12. Rating Scale Items: A Brief Review of Nomenclature, Components, and Formatting to Inform the Development of Direct Behavior Rating (DBR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christ, Theodore J.; Boice, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Ratings scales are a common component of many multisource, multimethod frameworks for socioemotional and behavior assessment of children. There is a modest literature base to support the use of attitudinal, behavioral, and personality rating scales. Much of that historic literature focuses on the characteristics and interpretations of specific…

  13. Star formation rate and metallicity of damped Lyman α absorbers in cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamine, K.; Springel, V.; Hernquist, L.

    2004-02-01

    We study the distribution of the star formation rate (SFR) and metallicity of damped Lyman α absorbers (DLAs) in the redshift range z= 0-4.5 using cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the Λ cold dark matter model. Our simulations include standard radiative cooling and heating with a uniform ultraviolet background, star formation, supernova (SN) feedback, as well as a phenomenological model for feedback by galactic winds. The latter allows us to examine, in particular, the effect of galactic outflows on the distribution of the SFR and metallicity of DLAs. We employ a `conservative entropy' formulation of SPH which alleviates numerical overcooling effects that affected earlier simulations. In addition, we utilize a series of simulations of varying box-size and particle number to investigate the impact of numerical resolution on our results. We find that there is a positive correlation between the projected stellar mass density and the neutral hydrogen column density (NHI) of DLAs for high NHI systems, and that there is a good correspondence in the spatial distribution of stars and DLAs in the simulations. The evolution of typical star-to-gas mass ratios in DLAs can be characterized by an increase from approximately 2 at z= 4.5 to 3 at z= 3, to 10 at z= 1 and finally to 20 at z= 0. We also find that the projected SFR density in DLAs follows the Kennicutt law well at all redshifts, and the simulated values are consistent with the recent observational estimates of this quantity by Wolfe, Prochaska & Gawiser. The rate of evolution in the mean metallicity of simulated DLAs as a function of redshift is mild, and is consistent with the rate estimated from observations. The predicted metallicity of DLAs is generally subsolar in our simulations, and there is a significant scatter in the distribution of DLA metallicity for a given NHI. However, we find that the median metallicity of simulated DLAs is close to that of Lyman-break galaxies, and is

  14. Rate of formation of carboxyhemoglobin in exercising humans exposed to carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Tikuisis, P.; Kane, D.M.; McLellan, T.M.; Buick, F.; Fairburn, S.M. )

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the CFK equation for its prediction of the rate of formation of carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO) in exercising humans by use of measured values of the respiratory variables and to characterize the rate of appearance of HbCO with frequent blood sampling. Ten nonsmoking male subjects were exposed to carbon monoxide (CO) on two separate occasions distinguished by the level of activity. Steady-state exercise was conducted on a cycle ergometer at either a low ([approximately]45 W) or moderate ([approximately]90W) power output. Each experiment began with an exposure of 3,000 ppm CO for 3 min during a rest period followed by three intermittent exposures ranging from 3,000 ppm CO for 1 min at low exercise to 667 ppm CO for 3 min at moderate exercise. Increases in HbCO were normalized against predicted values to account for individual differences in the variables that govern CO uptake. No difference in the normalized uptake of CO was found between the low-and moderate-exercise trials. However, the CFK equation underpredicted the increase in HbCO for the exposures at rest and the first exposure at exercise, whereas it overpredicted for the latter two exposures at exercise. The net increase in HbCO after all exposures ([approximately]10% HbCO) deviated by <1% HbCO between the measured and predicted values. The rate of appearance of HbCO fits a sigmoidal shape with considerable overshoot at the end of exposure. This can be explained by delays in the delivery of CO to the blood sampling point (dorsal hand vein) and by a relatively small blood circulation time compared with other regions of the body. A simple circulation model is used to demonstrate the overshoot phenomenon. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Rate of formation of carboxyhemoglobin in exercising humans exposed to carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Tikuisis, P; Kane, D M; McLellan, T M; Buick, F; Fairburn, S M

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the CFK equation for its prediction of the rate of formation of carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO) in exercising humans by use of measured values of the respiratory variables and to characterize the rate of appearance of HbCO with frequent blood sampling. Ten nonsmoking male subjects were exposed to carbon monoxide (CO) on two separate occasions distinguished by the level of activity. Steady-state exercise was conducted on a cycle ergometer at either a low (approximately 45 W) or moderate (approximately 90 W) power output. Each experiment began with an exposure of 3,000 ppm CO for 3 min during a rest period followed by three intermittent exposures ranging from 3,000 ppm CO for 1 min at low exercise to 667 ppm CO for 3 min at moderate exercise. Increases in HbCO were normalized against predicted values to account for individual differences in the variables that govern CO uptake. No difference in the normalized uptake of CO was found between the low- and moderate-exercise trials. However, the CFK equation underpredicted the increase in HbCO for the exposures at rest and the first exposure at exercise, whereas it overpredicted for the latter two exposures at exercise. The net increase in HbCO after all exposures (approximately 10% HbCO) deviated by less than 1% HbCO between the measured and predicted values. The rate of appearance of HbCO fits a sigmoidal shape with considerable overshoot at the end of exposure. This can be explained by delays in the delivery of CO to the blood sampling point (dorsal hand vein) and by a relatively small blood circulation time compared with other regions of the body. A simple circulation model is used to demonstrate the overshoot phenomenon.

  16. Crystal Structure of the Core Region of Hantavirus Nucleocapsid Protein Reveals the Mechanism for Ribonucleoprotein Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu; Wang, Wenming; Sun, Yuna; Ma, Chao; Wang, Xu; Wang, Xin; Liu, Pi; Shen, Shu; Li, Baobin; Lin, Jianping; Deng, Fei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hantaviruses, which belong to the genus Hantavirus in the family Bunyaviridae, infect mammals, including humans, causing either hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in humans with high mortality. Hantavirus encodes a nucleocapsid protein (NP) to encapsidate the genome and form a ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP) together with viral polymerase. Here, we report the crystal structure of the core domains of NP (NPcore) encoded by Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV), which are two representative members that cause HCPS in the New World. The constructs of SNV and ANDV NPcore exclude the N- and C-terminal portions of full polypeptide to obtain stable proteins for crystallographic study. The structure features an N lobe and a C lobe to clamp RNA-binding crevice and exhibits two protruding extensions in both lobes. The positively charged residues located in the RNA-binding crevice play a key role in RNA binding and virus replication. We further demonstrated that the C-terminal helix and the linker region connecting the N-terminal coiled-coil domain and NPcore are essential for hantavirus NP oligomerization through contacts made with two adjacent protomers. Moreover, electron microscopy (EM) visualization of native RNPs extracted from the virions revealed that a monomer-sized NP-RNA complex is the building block of viral RNP. This work provides insight into the formation of hantavirus RNP and provides an understanding of the evolutionary connections that exist among bunyaviruses. IMPORTANCE Hantaviruses are distributed across a wide and increasing range of host reservoirs throughout the world. In particular, hantaviruses can be transmitted via aerosols of rodent excreta to humans or from human to human and cause HFRS and HCPS, with mortalities of 15% and 50%, respectively. Hantavirus is therefore listed as a category C pathogen. Hantavirus encodes an NP that plays essential roles both in RNP formation and

  17. Targeted disruption of TGFBI in mice reveals its role in regulating bone mass and bone size through periosteal bone formation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongrun; Wergedal, Jon E; Zhao, Yongliang; Mohan, Subburaman

    2012-07-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta induced (TGFBI) and periostin are two closely related proteins in structure as well as in function. A previous study found that periostin positively regulates bone size. Here, we hypothesize that TGFBI has a similar function in bone development. To test this hypothesis, we employed TGFBI-deficient mice, which were generated by targeted disruption of the TGFBI gene. We bred these mice with C57BL/6J mice to generate homozygous TGFBI-deficient (TGFBI(-/-)) mice and homozygous wild-type littermates. All mice were raised to 12 weeks of age. Bone mass parameters were determined by PIXImus and micro-CT, bone strength parameters by three-point bending, and bone formation and resorption parameters by histomorphometry. We found that targeted disruption of TGFBI led to reduced body size, bone mass, bone size, and bone strength. This indicates that, like periostin, TGFBI also positively regulates bone size and that changes in bone size affect bone strength. Furthermore, there was also a significant decrease in periosteal, but not endosteal, bone formation rate of cortical bone in TGFBI(-/-) mice, suggesting that the observed effect of TGFBI on bone mass and bone size was largely caused by the effect of TGFBI on periosteal bone formation.

  18. A chamber study of the influence of boreal BVOC emissions and sulfuric acid on nanoparticle formation rates at ambient concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Maso, M.; Liao, L.; Wildt, J.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Tillmann, R.; Sipilä, M.; Hakala, J.; Lehtipalo, K.; Ehn, M.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D.; Mentel, T.

    2016-02-01

    Aerosol formation from biogenic and anthropogenic precursor trace gases in continental background areas affects climate via altering the amount of available cloud condensation nuclei. Significant uncertainty still exists regarding the agents controlling the formation of aerosol nanoparticles. We have performed experiments in the Jülich plant-atmosphere simulation chamber with instrumentation for the detection of sulfuric acid and nanoparticles, and present the first simultaneous chamber observations of nanoparticles, sulfuric acid, and realistic levels and mixtures of biogenic volatile compounds (BVOCs). We present direct laboratory observations of nanoparticle formation from sulfuric acid and realistic BVOC precursor vapour mixtures performed at atmospherically relevant concentration levels. We directly measured particle formation rates separately from particle growth rates. From this, we established that in our experiments, the formation rate was proportional to the product of sulfuric acid and biogenic VOC emission strength. The formation rates were consistent with a mechanism in which nucleating BVOC oxidation products are rapidly formed and activate with sulfuric acid. The growth rate of nanoparticles immediately after birth was best correlated with estimated products resulting from BVOC ozonolysis.

  19. Local and Regional Diversity Reveals Dispersal Limitation and Drift as Drivers for Groundwater Bacterial Communities from a Fractured Granite Formation.

    PubMed

    Beaton, E D; Stevenson, Bradley S; King-Sharp, Karen J; Stamps, Blake W; Nunn, Heather S; Stuart, Marilyne

    2016-01-01

    Microorganisms found in terrestrial subsurface environments make up a large proportion of the Earth's biomass. Biogeochemical cycles catalyzed by subsurface microbes have the potential to influence the speciation and transport of radionuclides managed in geological repositories. To gain insight on factors that constrain microbial processes within a formation with restricted groundwater flow we performed a meta-community analysis on groundwater collected from multiple discrete fractures underlying the Chalk River Laboratories site (located in Ontario, Canada). Bacterial taxa were numerically dominant in the groundwater. Although these were mainly uncultured, the closest cultivated representatives were from the phenotypically diverse Betaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Nitrospirae, and Firmicutes. Hundreds of taxa were identified but only a few were found in abundance (>1%) across all assemblages. The remainder of the taxa were low abundance. Within an ecological framework of selection, dispersal and drift, the local and regional diversity revealed fewer taxa within each assemblage relative to the meta-community, but the taxa that were present were more related than predicted by chance. The combination of dispersion at one phylogenetic depth and clustering at another phylogenetic depth suggest both niche (dispersion) and filtering (clustering) as drivers of local assembly. Distance decay of similarity reveals apparent biogeography of 1.5 km. Beta diversity revealed greater influence of selection at shallow sampling locations while the influences of dispersal limitation and randomness were greater at deeper sampling locations. Although selection has shaped each assemblage, the spatial scale of groundwater sampling favored detection of neutral processes over selective processes. Dispersal limitation between assemblages combined with local selection means the meta-community is subject to drift, and therefore, likely reflects the

  20. Local and Regional Diversity Reveals Dispersal Limitation and Drift as Drivers for Groundwater Bacterial Communities from a Fractured Granite Formation

    PubMed Central

    Beaton, E. D.; Stevenson, Bradley S.; King-Sharp, Karen J.; Stamps, Blake W.; Nunn, Heather S.; Stuart, Marilyne

    2016-01-01

    Microorganisms found in terrestrial subsurface environments make up a large proportion of the Earth’s biomass. Biogeochemical cycles catalyzed by subsurface microbes have the potential to influence the speciation and transport of radionuclides managed in geological repositories. To gain insight on factors that constrain microbial processes within a formation with restricted groundwater flow we performed a meta-community analysis on groundwater collected from multiple discrete fractures underlying the Chalk River Laboratories site (located in Ontario, Canada). Bacterial taxa were numerically dominant in the groundwater. Although these were mainly uncultured, the closest cultivated representatives were from the phenotypically diverse Betaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Nitrospirae, and Firmicutes. Hundreds of taxa were identified but only a few were found in abundance (>1%) across all assemblages. The remainder of the taxa were low abundance. Within an ecological framework of selection, dispersal and drift, the local and regional diversity revealed fewer taxa within each assemblage relative to the meta-community, but the taxa that were present were more related than predicted by chance. The combination of dispersion at one phylogenetic depth and clustering at another phylogenetic depth suggest both niche (dispersion) and filtering (clustering) as drivers of local assembly. Distance decay of similarity reveals apparent biogeography of 1.5 km. Beta diversity revealed greater influence of selection at shallow sampling locations while the influences of dispersal limitation and randomness were greater at deeper sampling locations. Although selection has shaped each assemblage, the spatial scale of groundwater sampling favored detection of neutral processes over selective processes. Dispersal limitation between assemblages combined with local selection means the meta-community is subject to drift, and therefore, likely reflects the

  1. Mechanism of Formation of Copper(II) Chloro Complexes Revealed by Transient Absorption Spectroscopy and DFT/TDDFT Calculations.

    PubMed

    Mereshchenko, Andrey S; Olshin, Pavel K; Karabaeva, Kanykey E; Panov, Maxim S; Wilson, R Marshall; Kochemirovsky, Vladimir A; Skripkin, Mikhail Yu; Tveryanovich, Yury S; Tarnovsky, Alexander N

    2015-07-16

    Copper(II) complexes are extremely labile with typical ligand exchange rate constants on the order of 10(6)-10(9) M(-1) s(-1). As a result, it is often difficult to identify the actual formation mechanism of these complexes. In this work, using UV-vis transient absorption when probing in a broad time range (20 ps to 8 μs) in conjunction with DFT/TDDFT calculations, we studied the dynamics and underlying reaction mechanisms of the formation of extremely labile copper(II) CuCl4(2-) chloro complexes from copper(II) CuCl3(-) trichloro complexes and chloride ions. These two species, produced via photochemical dissociation of CuCl4(2-) upon 420 nm excitation into the ligand-to-metal-charge-transfer electronic state, are found to recombine into parent complexes with bimolecular rate constants of (9.0 ± 0.1) × 10(7) and (5.3 ± 0.4) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) in acetonitrile and dichloromethane, respectively. In dichloromethane, recombination occurs via a simple one-step addition. In acetonitrile, where [CuCl3](-) reacts with the solvent to form a [CuCl3CH3CN](-) complex in less than 20 ps, recombination takes place via ligand exchange described by the associative interchange mechanism that involves a [CuCl4CH3CN](2-) intermediate. In both solvents, the recombination reaction is potential energy controlled.

  2. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): galaxy environments and star formation rate variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesinghe, D. B.; Hopkins, A. M.; Brough, S.; Taylor, E. N.; Norberg, P.; Bauer, A.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cameron, E.; Conselice, C. J.; Croom, S.; Driver, S.; Grootes, M. W.; Jones, D. H.; Kelvin, L.; Loveday, J.; Pimbblet, K. A.; Popescu, C. C.; Prescott, M.; Sharp, R.; Baldry, I.; Sadler, E. M.; Liske, J.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Bamford, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Gunawardhana, M.; Meyer, M.; Parkinson, H.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Peacock, J.; Tuffs, R.

    2012-07-01

    We present a detailed investigation into the effects of galaxy environment on their star formation rates (SFRs) using galaxies observed in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. We use three independent volume-limited samples of galaxies within z < 0.2 and Mr < -17.8. We investigate the known SFR-density relationship and explore in detail the dependence of SFR on stellar mass and density. We show that the SFR-density trend is only visible when we include the passive galaxy population along with the star-forming population. This SFR-density relation is absent when we consider only the star-forming population of galaxies, consistent with previous work. While there is a strong dependence of the EWHα on density we find, as in previous studies, that these trends are largely due to the passive galaxy population and this relationship is absent when considering a 'star-forming' sample of galaxies. We find that stellar mass has the strongest influence on SFR and EWHα with the environment having no significant effect on the star formation properties of the star-forming population. We also show that the SFR-density relationship is absent for both early- and late-type star-forming galaxies. We conclude that the stellar mass has the largest impact on the current SFR of a galaxy, and any environmental effect is not detectable. The observation that the trends with density are due to the changing morphology fraction with density implies that the time-scales must be very short for any quenching of the SFR in infalling galaxies. Alternatively, galaxies may in fact undergo predominantly in situ evolution where the infall and quenching of galaxies from the field into dense environments is not the dominant evolutionary mode.

  3. The star formation rate density and dust attenuation evolution over 12 Gyr with the VVDS surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucciati, O.; Tresse, L.; Ilbert, O.; Le Fèvre, O.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the cosmic star formation rate density (SFRD) over ˜12 Gyr (0.05≤ z≤ 4.5), combining the VVDS Deep (17.5 ≤ I_{AB}≤ 24.0) and Ultra-Deep (23.00 ≤ i'_{AB} ≤ 24.75) surveys. We obtain a single homogeneous spectroscopic redshift sample, totalizing about 11000 galaxies. We estimate the rest-frame FUV luminosity function (LF) and luminosity density (LD), extract the dust attenuation of the FUV radiation using SED fitting, and derive the dust-corrected SFRD. We find a constant and flat faint-end slope alpha in the FUV LF at z<1.7. The absolute magnitude M^{*}_{FUV} brightens in the entire range 02 it is on average brighter than in the literature, while φ^{*} is smaller. Our total LD shows a robust peak at z≃2, and the SFRD history peaks as well at z≃2. This peak is produced by the decreasing contribution at z<2 of galaxies with -21.5 ≤ M_{FUV} ≤ -19.5 mag. As times goes by, the total SFRD is dominated by fainter and fainter galaxies. Moreover, at z>2 the SFRD is entirely shaped by the high specific SFR galaxies. The presence of a fast rise at z>2 and of a clear peak at z≃2 of the SFRD is compelling for models of galaxy formation. The mean dust attenuation A_{FUV} of the global galaxy population rises by 1 mag from z=4.5 to z=2, reaches its maximum at z=1 (A_{FUV}≃2.2 mag), and then decreases by 1.1 mag down to z=0. The dust attenuation maximum is reached 2 Gyr after the SFRD peak, implying a contribution from the intermediate-mass stars to the dust production at z<2.

  4. Predicting Galaxy Star Formation Rates via the Co-evolution of Galaxies and Halos

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Douglas F.; Hearin, Andrew P.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Becker, Matthew R.; Behroozi, Peter S.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Reyes, Reinabelle; Zentner, Andrew R.

    2014-03-06

    In this paper, we test the age matching hypothesis that the star formation rate (SFR) of a galaxy is determined by its dark matter halo formation history, and as such, that more quiescent galaxies reside in older halos. This simple model has been remarkably successful at predicting color-based galaxy statistics at low redshift as measured in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). To further test this method with observations, we present new SDSS measurements of the galaxy two-point correlation function and galaxy-galaxy lensing as a function of stellar mass and SFR, separated into quenched and star forming galaxy samples. We find that our age matching model is in excellent agreement with these new measurements. We also employ a galaxy group finder and show that our model is able to predict: (1) the relative SFRs of central and satellite galaxies, (2) the SFR-dependence of the radial distribution of satellite galaxy populations within galaxy groups, rich groups, and clusters and their surrounding larger scale environments, and (3) the interesting feature that the satellite quenched fraction as a function of projected radial distance from the central galaxy exhibits an approx r-.15 slope, independent of environment. The accurate prediction for the spatial distribution of satellites is intriguing given the fact that we do not explicitly model satellite-specific processes after infall, and that in our model the virial radius does not mark a special transition region in the evolution of a satellite, contrary to most galaxy evolution models. The success of the model suggests that present-day galaxy SFR is strongly correlated with halo mass assembly history.

  5. The ultraviolet and infrared star formation rates of compact group galaxies: an expanded sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenkić, Laura; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Desjardins, Tyler D.; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Fedotov, Konstantin; Charlton, Jane; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Durrell, Pat R.; Gronwall, Caryl

    2016-07-01

    Compact groups of galaxies provide insight into the role of low-mass, dense environments in galaxy evolution because the low velocity dispersions and close proximity of galaxy members result in frequent interactions that take place over extended time-scales. We expand the census of star formation in compact group galaxies by Tzanavaris et al. (2010) and collaborators with Swift UVOT, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 μm photometry of a sample of 183 galaxies in 46 compact groups. After correcting luminosities for the contribution from old stellar populations, we estimate the dust-unobscured star formation rate (SFRUV) using the UVOT uvw2 photometry. Similarly, we use the MIPS 24 μm photometry to estimate the component of the SFR that is obscured by dust (SFRIR). We find that galaxies which are MIR-active (MIR-`red'), also have bluer UV colours, higher specific SFRs, and tend to lie in H I-rich groups, while galaxies that are MIR-inactive (MIR-`blue') have redder UV colours, lower specific SFRs, and tend to lie in H I-poor groups. We find the SFRs to be continuously distributed with a peak at about 1 M⊙ yr-1, indicating this might be the most common value in compact groups. In contrast, the specific SFR distribution is bimodal, and there is a clear distinction between star-forming and quiescent galaxies. Overall, our results suggest that the specific SFR is the best tracer of gas depletion and galaxy evolution in compact groups.

  6. THE STAR FORMATION RATE OF TURBULENT MAGNETIZED CLOUDS: COMPARING THEORY, SIMULATIONS, AND OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2012-12-20

    The role of turbulence and magnetic fields is studied for star formation in molecular clouds. We derive and compare six theoretical models for the star formation rate (SFR)-the Krumholz and McKee (KM), Padoan and Nordlund (PN), and Hennebelle and Chabrier (HC) models, and three multi-freefall versions of these, suggested by HC-all based on integrals over the log-normal distribution of turbulent gas. We extend all theories to include magnetic fields and show that the SFR depends on four basic parameters: (1) virial parameter {alpha}{sub vir}; (2) sonic Mach number M; (3) turbulent forcing parameter b, which is a measure for the fraction of energy driven in compressive modes; and (4) plasma {beta}=2M{sub A}{sup 2}/M{sup 2} with the Alfven Mach number M{sub A}. We compare all six theories with MHD simulations, covering cloud masses of 300 to 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} and Mach numbers M=3-50 and M{sub A}=1-{infinity}, with solenoidal (b = 1/3), mixed (b = 0.4), and compressive turbulent (b = 1) forcings. We find that the SFR increases by a factor of four between M=5 and 50 for compressive turbulent forcing and {alpha}{sub vir} {approx} 1. Comparing forcing parameters, we see that the SFR is more than 10 times higher with compressive than solenoidal forcing for M=10 simulations. The SFR and fragmentation are both reduced by a factor of two in strongly magnetized, trans-Alfvenic turbulence compared to hydrodynamic turbulence. All simulations are fit simultaneously by the multi-freefall KM and multi-freefall PN theories within a factor of two over two orders of magnitude in SFR. The simulated SFRs cover the range and correlation of SFR column density with gas column density observed in Galactic clouds, and agree well for star formation efficiencies SFE = 1%-10% and local efficiencies {epsilon} = 0.3-0.7 due to feedback. We conclude that the SFR is primarily controlled by interstellar turbulence, with a secondary effect coming from magnetic fields.

  7. The Star Formation Rate of Turbulent Magnetized Clouds: Comparing Theory, Simulations, and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2012-12-01

    The role of turbulence and magnetic fields is studied for star formation in molecular clouds. We derive and compare six theoretical models for the star formation rate (SFR)—the Krumholz & McKee (KM), Padoan & Nordlund (PN), and Hennebelle & Chabrier (HC) models, and three multi-freefall versions of these, suggested by HC—all based on integrals over the log-normal distribution of turbulent gas. We extend all theories to include magnetic fields and show that the SFR depends on four basic parameters: (1) virial parameter αvir (2) sonic Mach number {M}; (3) turbulent forcing parameter b, which is a measure for the fraction of energy driven in compressive modes; and (4) plasma \\beta =2 {M}_A^2/ {M}^2 with the Alfvén Mach number {M}_A. We compare all six theories with MHD simulations, covering cloud masses of 300 to 4 × 106 M ⊙ and Mach numbers {M}=3-50 and {M}_A=1-∞, with solenoidal (b = 1/3), mixed (b = 0.4), and compressive turbulent (b = 1) forcings. We find that the SFR increases by a factor of four between {M}=5 and 50 for compressive turbulent forcing and αvir ~ 1. Comparing forcing parameters, we see that the SFR is more than 10 times higher with compressive than solenoidal forcing for {M}=10 simulations. The SFR and fragmentation are both reduced by a factor of two in strongly magnetized, trans-Alfvénic turbulence compared to hydrodynamic turbulence. All simulations are fit simultaneously by the multi-freefall KM and multi-freefall PN theories within a factor of two over two orders of magnitude in SFR. The simulated SFRs cover the range and correlation of SFR column density with gas column density observed in Galactic clouds, and agree well for star formation efficiencies SFE = 1%-10% and local efficiencies epsilon = 0.3-0.7 due to feedback. We conclude that the SFR is primarily controlled by interstellar turbulence, with a secondary effect coming from magnetic fields.

  8. Dinosaur Census Reveals Abundant Tyrannosaurus and Rare Ontogenetic Stages in the Upper Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation (Maastrichtian), Montana, USA

    PubMed Central

    Horner, John R.; Goodwin, Mark B.; Myhrvold, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    Background A dinosaur census recorded during the Hell Creek Project (1999–2009) incorporates multiple lines of evidence from geography, taphohistory, stratigraphy, phylogeny and ontogeny to investigate the relative abundance of large dinosaurs preserved in the Upper Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation of northeastern Montana, USA. Overall, the dinosaur skeletal assemblages in the Hell Creek Formation (excluding lag-influenced records) consist primarily of subadult or small adult size individuals. Small juveniles and large adults are both extremely rare, whereas subadult individuals are relatively common. We propose that mature individuals of at least some dinosaur taxa either lived in a separate geographic locale analogous to younger individuals inhabiting an upland environment where sedimentation rates were relatively less, or these taxa experienced high mortality before reaching terminal size where late stage and often extreme cranial morphology is expressed. Methodology/Principal Findings Tyrannosaurus skeletons are as abundant as Edmontosaurus, an herbivore, in the upper Hell Creek Formation and nearly twice as common in the lower third of the formation. Smaller, predatory dinosaurs (e.g., Troodon and dromaeosaurids) are primarily represented by teeth found in microvertebrate localities and their skeletons or identifiable lag specimens were conspicuously absent. This relative abundance suggests Tyrannosaurus was not a typical predator and likely benefited from much wider food choice opportunities than exclusively live prey and/or specific taxa. Tyrannosaurus adults may not have competed with Tyrannosaurus juveniles if the potential for selecting carrion increased with size during ontogeny. Conclusions/Significance Triceratops is the most common dinosaur and isolated skulls contribute to a significant portion of this census. Associated specimens of Triceratops consisting of both cranial and postcranial elements remain relatively rare. This rarity may be explained

  9. The Conditions Underpinning Extreme Star Formation in ULIRGs and LIRGs as Revealed by Herschel Far-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, Gabriel A.; Ashby, Matthew; Smith, Howard Alan; McTier, Moiya; Melendez, Marcio

    2016-01-01

    We present a systematic survey of molecular and atomic line fluxes in all star-forming galaxies observed by the Herschel PACs instrument with detectable OH lines that also contain Herschel SPIRE FTS spectra, to determine how physical conditions vary as a function of star formation rate. Specifically, we measured selected CO, H2O, [CI], and [NII] integrated line fluxes in a sample of 145 star-forming galaxies covering a range of far-infrared luminosities ranging from 109 to above 1012 LSun . Thus, our sample includes typical, quiescent galaxies as well as Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) and Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs), known to be creating stars extremely rapidly. We find evidence suggesting that ULIRGs with far-infrared luminosities of LFIR> 1012 LSun require an additional heating mechanism other than UV heating from star formation, while LIRGs and less luminous star-forming galaxies may be heated primarily by their star formation. We also find that the [NII] 3P1 - 3P0 fine structure line flux and those of the CO J=5-4, CO J=7-6, and CO J=8-7 transitions are generally weaker for ULIRGs compared to LIRGs and less luminous star-forming galaxies, while we find the CO J=11-10, CO J=12-11, and CO J=13-12 transitions are generally stronger. In all these respects, ULIRGs are shown to differ significantly from other galaxies undergoing less extreme star formation. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  10. 13C Tracking after 13CO2 Supply Revealed Diurnal Patterns of Wood Formation in Aspen1

    PubMed Central

    Mahboubi, Amir; Linden, Pernilla; Moritz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Wood of trees is formed from carbon assimilated in the photosynthetic tissues. Determining the temporal dynamics of carbon assimilation, subsequent transport into developing wood, and incorporation to cell walls would further our understanding of wood formation in particular and tree growth in general. To investigate these questions, we designed a 13CO2 labeling system to study carbon transport and incorporation to developing wood of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloides). Tracking of 13C incorporation to wood over a time course using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed diurnal patterns in wood cell wall biosynthesis. The dark period had a differential effect on 13C incorporation to lignin and cell wall carbohydrates. No 13C was incorporated into aromatic amino acids of cell wall proteins in the dark, suggesting that cell wall protein biosynthesis ceased during the night. The results show previously unrecognized temporal patterns in wood cell wall biosynthesis, suggest diurnal cycle as a possible cue in the regulation of carbon incorporation to wood, and establish a unique 13C labeling method for the analysis of wood formation and secondary growth in trees. PMID:25931520

  11. Atomic force microscopy imaging reveals the formation of ASIC/ENaC cross-clade ion channels

    SciTech Connect

    Jeggle, Pia; Smith, Ewan St. J.; Stewart, Andrew P.; Haerteis, Silke; Korbmacher, Christoph; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2015-08-14

    ASIC and ENaC are co-expressed in various cell types, and there is evidence for a close association between them. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine whether ASIC1a and ENaC subunits are able to form cross-clade hybrid ion channels. ASIC1a and ENaC could be co-isolated from detergent extracts of tsA 201 cells co-expressing the two subunits. Isolated proteins were incubated with antibodies against ENaC and Fab fragments against ASIC1a. AFM imaging revealed proteins that were decorated by both an antibody and a Fab fragment with an angle of ∼120° between them, indicating the formation of ASIC1a/ENaC heterotrimers. - Highlights: • There is evidence for a close association between ASIC and ENaC. • We used AFM to test whether ASIC1a and ENaC subunits form cross-clade ion channels. • Isolated proteins were incubated with subunit-specific antibodies and Fab fragments. • Some proteins were doubly decorated at ∼120° by an antibody and a Fab fragment. • Our results indicate the formation of ASIC1a/ENaC heterotrimers.

  12. Calibrating the Star Formation Rate at z ~ 1 from Optical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostek, Nick; Coil, Alison L.; Moustakas, John; Salim, Samir; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2012-02-01

    We present a star formation rate (SFR) calibration based on optical data that is consistent with average observed rates in both the red and blue galaxy populations at z ~ 1. The motivation for this study is to calculate SFRs for DEEP2 Redshift Survey galaxies in the 0.7 < z < 1.4 redshift range, but our results are generally applicable to similar optically selected galaxy samples without requiring UV or IR data. Using SFR fits from UV/optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in the All-Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey, we explore the behavior of rest-frame B-band magnitude, observed [O II] luminosity, and rest-frame color with SED-fit SFR for both red sequence and blue cloud galaxies. The resulting SFR calibration is based on three optical-band observables: MB , (U - B), and (B - V). The best-fit linear relation produces residual errors of 0.3 dex rms scatter for the full color-independent sample with minimal correlated residual error in L[O II] or stellar mass. We then compare the calibrated z ~ 1 SFRs to two diagnostics that use L[O II] as a tracer in local galaxies and correct for dust extinction at intermediate redshifts through either galaxy B-band luminosity or stellar mass. We find that an L[O II]-MB SFR calibration commonly used in the literature agrees well with our calculated SFRs after correcting for the average B-band luminosity evolution in L * galaxies. However, we find better agreement with a local L[O II]-based SFR calibration that includes stellar mass to correct for reddening effects, indicating that stellar mass is a better tracer of dust extinction for all galaxy types and less affected by systematic evolution than galaxy luminosity from z = 1 to the current epoch.

  13. IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC DIAGNOSTICS ON THE FORMATION OF TWO MAGNETIC FLUX ROPES REVEALED BY SDO/AIA AND IRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Fang, C.

    2015-05-10

    Helical magnetic flux rope (MFR) is a fundamental structure of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and has been discovered recently to exist as a sigmoidal channel structure prior to its eruption in the EUV high-temperature passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). However, when and where the MFR is built up are still elusive. In this paper, we investigate two MFRs (MFR1 and MFR2) in detail, whose eruptions produced two energetic solar flares and CMEs on 2014 April 18 and 2014 September 10, respectively. The AIA EUV images reveal that for a long time prior to their eruption, both MFR1 and MFR2 are under formation, which is probably through magnetic reconnection between two groups of sheared arcades driven by the shearing and converging flows in the photosphere near the polarity inversion line. At the footpoints of the MFR1, the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph Si iv, C ii, and Mg ii lines exhibit weak to moderate redshifts and a non-thermal broadening in the pre-flare phase. However, a relatively large blueshift and an extremely strong non-thermal broadening are found at the formation site of the MFR2. These spectral features consolidate the proposition that the reconnection plays an important role in the formation of MFRs. For the MFR1, the reconnection outflow may propagate along its legs, penetrating into the transition region and the chromosphere at the footpoints. For the MFR2, the reconnection probably takes place in the lower atmosphere and results in the strong blueshift and non-thermal broadening for the Mg ii, C ii, and Si iv lines.

  14. Constraints on timing and rates of strath terrace formation on actively uplifting anticlines in the foreland of the Chinese Tien Shan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufe, A.; Burbank, D. W.; Chen, J.; Liu, L.; Li, T.; Thompson, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The formation of strath surfaces (fluvially created, sub-horizontal erosion surfaces) requires that the rate of lateral erosion outpaces the rate of incision of a river. The change from incision to strath cutting has commonly been linked to a decrease of incision rates due to shielding of the river bed by a thick sediment cover1. Straths are abandoned when the bed cover is reduced and incision resumes. A more recent study suggests that strath terrace formation might be linked to a change between a braided and a single-thread river2. Finally, several models have explored strath formation due to inherent dynamics of meandering systems3,4. In the foreland of the Tian Shan in northwest China, weakly consolidated Pliocene sand and siltstones are being actively uplifted at rates of 1 - 3 mm/y by a series of detachment anticlines. A number of elevated, several-kilometer-wide planation surfaces bear witness to a history of multiple strath cutting events by braided streams. In contrast, modern rivers incise into the uplifting folds creating 10 - 200 m deep canyons while the up- and downstream alluvial fans remain unincised. We use GIS analysis, field mapping, and OSL dating to describe incision and beveling of the folds. Our chronologic data reveal at least 2 - 3 beveling events over the last 40 ky on the Mutule fold. We find that lateral erosion of the bedrock during beveling events occurs at rates that are more than an order of magnitude higher than average incision rates. During times of incision (which can be tens of thousands of years long), lateral erosion rates need to be considerably lower in order to explain the formation of narrow canyons. Thus, our observations of scale, rate, and intermittency of strath cutting, seem difficult to reconcile with models that explain strath formation by variations of the incision rate1 or intrinsic meandering dynamics under steady forcing3,4. The critical requirement to explain our observations appears to be repeated changes in the

  15. Ultraviolet+Infrared Star Formation Rates: Hickson Compact Groups with Swift and Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Gallagher, S. C.; Johnson, K. E.; Gronwall, C.; Immler, S.; Reines, A. E.; Hoversten, E.; Charlton, J. C.

    2010-06-01

    We present Swift UVOT ultraviolet (UV; 1600-3000 Å) data with complete three-band UV photometry for a sample of 41 galaxies in 11 nearby (<4500 km s-1) Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) of galaxies. We use UVOT uvw2-band (2000 Å) photometry to estimate the dust-unobscured component, SFRUV, of the total star formation rate, SFRTOTAL. We use Spitzer MIPS 24 μm photometry to estimate SFRIR, the component of SFRTOTAL that suffers dust extinction in the UV and is re-emitted in the IR. By combining the two components, we obtain SFRTOTAL estimates for all HCG galaxies. We obtain total stellar mass, M *, estimates by means of Two Micron All Sky Survey Ks -band luminosities, and use them to calculate specific star formation rates, SSFR ≡ SFRTOTAL/M *. SSFR values show a clear and significant bimodality, with a gap between low (lsim3.2 × 10-11 yr-1) and high-SSFR (gsim1.2 × 10-10 yr-1) systems. We compare this bimodality to the previously discovered bimodality in αIRAC, the MIR activity index from a power-law fit to the Spitzer IRAC 4.5-8 μm data for these galaxies. We find that all galaxies with αIRAC <= 0 ( >0) are in the high- (low-) SSFR locus, as expected if high levels of star-forming activity power MIR emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and a hot dust continuum. Consistent with this finding, all elliptical/S0 galaxies are in the low-SSFR locus, while 22 out of 24 spirals/irregulars are in the high-SSFR locus, with two borderline cases. We further divide our sample into three subsamples (I, II, and III) according to decreasing H I richness of the parent galaxy group to which a galaxy belongs. Consistent with the SSFR and αIRAC bimodality, 12 out of 15 type I (11 out of 12 type III) galaxies are in the high- (low-) SSFR locus, while type II galaxies span almost the full range of SSFR values. We use the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxy Survey (SINGS) to construct a comparison subsample of galaxies that (1) match HCG galaxies in J-band total

  16. ULTRAVIOLET+INFRARED STAR FORMATION RATES: HICKSON COMPACT GROUPS WITH SWIFT AND SPITZER

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Immler, S.; Johnson, K. E.; Reines, A. E.; Gronwall, C.; Hoversten, E.; Charlton, J. C.

    2010-06-10

    We present Swift UVOT ultraviolet (UV; 1600-3000 A) data with complete three-band UV photometry for a sample of 41 galaxies in 11 nearby (<4500 km s{sup -1}) Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) of galaxies. We use UVOT uvw2-band (2000 A) photometry to estimate the dust-unobscured component, SFR{sub UV}, of the total star formation rate, SFR{sub TOTAL}. We use Spitzer MIPS 24 {mu}m photometry to estimate SFR{sub IR}, the component of SFR{sub TOTAL} that suffers dust extinction in the UV and is re-emitted in the IR. By combining the two components, we obtain SFR{sub TOTAL} estimates for all HCG galaxies. We obtain total stellar mass, M {sub *}, estimates by means of Two Micron All Sky Survey K{sub s} -band luminosities, and use them to calculate specific star formation rates, SSFR {identical_to} SFR{sub TOTAL}/M {sub *}. SSFR values show a clear and significant bimodality, with a gap between low ({approx}<3.2 x 10{sup -11} yr{sup -1}) and high-SSFR ({approx_gt}1.2 x 10{sup -10} yr{sup -1}) systems. We compare this bimodality to the previously discovered bimodality in {alpha}{sub IRAC}, the MIR activity index from a power-law fit to the Spitzer IRAC 4.5-8 {mu}m data for these galaxies. We find that all galaxies with {alpha}{sub IRAC} {<=} 0 ( >0) are in the high- (low-) SSFR locus, as expected if high levels of star-forming activity power MIR emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and a hot dust continuum. Consistent with this finding, all elliptical/S0 galaxies are in the low-SSFR locus, while 22 out of 24 spirals/irregulars are in the high-SSFR locus, with two borderline cases. We further divide our sample into three subsamples (I, II, and III) according to decreasing H I richness of the parent galaxy group to which a galaxy belongs. Consistent with the SSFR and {alpha}{sub IRAC} bimodality, 12 out of 15 type I (11 out of 12 type III) galaxies are in the high- (low-) SSFR locus, while type II galaxies span almost the full range of SSFR values. We use the

  17. Ultraviolet+Infrared Star Formation Rates: Hickson Compact Groups with Swift and SPitzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Gallagher, S. C.; Johnson, K. E.; Gronwall, C.; Immler, S.; Reines, A. E.; Hoversten, E.; Charlton, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    We present Swift UVOT ultraviolet (UV; 1600-3000 A) data with complete three-band UV photometry for a sample of 41 galaxies in 11 nearby (<4500 km/s) Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) of galaxies. We use UVOT uvw2-band (2000A) photometry to estimate the dust-unobscured component, SFR(sub uv), of the total star formation rate, SFR(sub TOTAL). We use Spitzer MIPS 24 micron photometry to estimate SFR(sub IR), the component of SFR(sub TOTAL) that suffers dust extinction in the UV and is re-emitted in the IR. By combining the two components, we obtain SFR(sub TOTAL) estimates for all HCG galaxies. We obtain total stellar mass, M(sub *) estimates by means of Two Micron All Sky Survey K(sub s)-band luminosities, and use them to calculate specific star formation rates, SSFR is identical with SFR(sub TOTAL)/ M (sub *). SSFR values show a clear and significant bimodality, with a gap between low (approximately <3.2 x 10(exp -11) / yr) and high-SSFR (approximately > 1.2 x lO)exp -10)/yr) systems. We compare this bimodality to the previously discovered bimodality in alpha-IRAC, the MIR activity index from a power-law fit to the Spitzer IRAC 4.5-8 micron data for these galaxies. We find that all galaxies with alpha-IRAC <= 0 (> 0) are in the high- (low-) SSFR locus, as expected if high levels of star-forming activity power MIR emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and a hot dust continuum. Consistent with this finding, all elliptical/SO galaxies are in the low-SSFR locus, while 22 out of 24 spirals / irregulars are in the high-SSFR locus, with two borderline cases. We further divide our sample into three subsamples (I, II, and III) according to decreasing H I richness of the parent galaxy group to which a galaxy belongs. Consistent with the SSFR and alpha-IRAC bimodality, 12 out of 15 type I (11 out of 12 type III) galaxies are in the high- (low-) SSFR locus, while type II galaxies span almost the full range of SSFR values. We use the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxy

  18. PANCHROMATIC ESTIMATION OF STAR FORMATION RATES IN BzK GALAXIES AT 1 < z < 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kurczynski, Peter; Gawiser, Eric; Huynh, Minh; Ivison, Rob J.; Treister, Ezequiel; Smail, Ian; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Greve, Thomas R.; Schinnerer, Eva; Van der Werf, Paul; Urry, Meg

    2012-05-10

    We determine star formation rates (SFRs) in a sample of color-selected, star-forming (sBzK) galaxies (K{sub AB} < 21.8) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South. To identify and avoid active galactic nuclei, we use X-ray, IRAC color, and IR/radio flux ratio selection methods. Photometric redshift-binned, average flux densities are measured with stacking analyses in Spitzer-MIPS IR, BLAST and APEX/LABOCA submillimeter, VLA and GMRT radio, and Chandra X-ray data. We include averages of aperture fluxes in MUSYC UBVRIz'JHK images to determine UV-through-radio spectral energy distributions. We determine the total IR luminosities and compare SFR calibrations from FIR, 24 {mu}m, UV, radio, and X-ray wavebands. We find consistency with our best estimator, SFR{sub IR+UV}, to within errors for the preferred radio SFR calibration. Our results imply that 24 {mu}m only and X-ray SFR estimates should be applied to high-redshift galaxies with caution. Average IR luminosities are consistent with luminous infrared galaxies. We find SFR{sub IR+UV} for our stacked sBzKs at median redshifts 1.4, 1.8, and 2.2 to be 55 {+-} 6 (random error), 74 {+-} 8, and 154 {+-} 17 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, respectively, with additional systematic uncertainty of a factor of {approx}2.

  19. GAMA/H-ATLAS: common star formation rate indicators and their dependence on galaxy physical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Norberg, P.; Gunawardhana, M. L. P.; Heinis, S.; Baldry, I. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bourne, N.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cluver, M. E.; Cooray, A.; da Cunha, E.; Driver, S. P.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Grootes, M. W.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R.; Lacey, C.; Lara-Lopez, M. A.; Loveday, J.; Maddox, S. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Oteo, I.; Owers, M. S.; Popescu, C. C.; Smith, D. J. B.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R. J.; van der Werf, P.

    2016-09-01

    We compare common star formation rate (SFR) indicators in the local Universe in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) equatorial fields (˜160 deg2), using ultraviolet (UV) photometry from GALEX, far-infrared and sub-millimetre (sub-mm) photometry from Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey, and Hα spectroscopy from the GAMA survey. With a high-quality sample of 745 galaxies (median redshift = 0.08), we consider three SFR tracers: UV luminosity corrected for dust attenuation using the UV spectral slope β (SFRUV, corr), Hα line luminosity corrected for dust using the Balmer decrement (BD) (SFRH α, corr), and the combination of UV and infrared (IR) emission (SFRUV + IR). We demonstrate that SFRUV, corr can be reconciled with the other two tracers after applying attenuation corrections by calibrating Infrared excess (IRX; i.e. the IR to UV luminosity ratio) and attenuation in the Hα (derived from BD) against β. However, β, on its own, is very unlikely to be a reliable attenuation indicator. We find that attenuation correction factors depend on parameters such as stellar mass (M*), z and dust temperature (Tdust), but not on Hα equivalent width or Sérsic index. Due to the large scatter in the IRX versus β correlation, when compared to SFRUV + IR, the β-corrected SFRUV, corr exhibits systematic deviations as a function of IRX, BD and Tdust.

  20. Effects of hydraulic parameter cleaning variations on rate of penetration of soft formation insert bits

    SciTech Connect

    Doiron, H.H.; Deane, J.D.

    1982-09-01

    Effects of hydraulic cleaning parameter variations on rate of penetration response of 7 7/8 inch diameter soft formation insert bits have been measured in laboratory drilling tests. Tests were conducted in Mancos Shale rock samples at 700 psi and 4000 psi simulated overbalance pressure conditions using a 9.1 pound per gallon bentonite-barite water base drilling fluid. Bit hydraulic horsepower was varied from 0.72 to 9.5 HHP/in/sup 2/ using two or three nozzles in sizes ranging from 9/32 to 14/32 inches in diameter. Some improvements in ROP at constant bit hydraulic horsepower and impact force levels were obtained with two nozzle configurations vs. three nozzle configurations, but improvements were not consistently out of the range of normal test to test variations. Reduction in drilling costs due to the measured response of ROP to improved hydraulic cleaning is compared to increased operating costs required to provide additional hydraulics. Results indicate that bit hydraulic horsepower levels in excess of popular rules of thumb are cost effective in slow drilling due to high overbalance pressure.

  1. The H alpha Luminosity Function and Star Formation Rate at Z approximately 0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresse, Laurence; Maddox, Steve J.

    1998-03-01

    We have measured the Hα + [N II] fluxes of the I-selected Canada-France Redshift Survey (CFRS) galaxies lying at a redshift z below 0.3 and hence derived the Hα luminosity function. The magnitude limits of the CFRS mean that only the galaxies with MB >~ -21 mag were observed at these redshifts. We obtained a total Hα luminosity density of at least 1039.44+/-0.04 ergs s-1 Mpc-3 at a mean z = 0.2 for galaxies with rest-frame EW(Hα + [N II]) >~ 10 Å. This is twice the value found in the local universe by Gallego et al. Our Hα star formation rate, derived from Madau, is higher than the UV observations at the same z, implying a UV dust extinction of ~1 mag. We found a strong correlation between the Hα luminosity and the absolute magnitude in the B band: M(BAB) = 46.7 - 1.6 log L(Hα). This work will serve as a basis of future studies of Hα luminosity distributions measured from optically selected spectroscopic surveys of the distant universe, and it will provide a better understanding of the physical processes responsible for the observed galaxy evolution.

  2. Scuss u-Band Emission as a Star-Formation-Rate Indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhimin; Zhou, Xu; Wu, Hong; Fan, Xiao-Hui; Fan, Zhou; Jiang, Zhao-Ji; Jing, Yi-Peng; Li, Cheng; Lesser, Michael; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Ma, Jun; Nie, Jun-Dan; Shen, Shi-Yin; Wang, Jia-Li; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Tian-Meng; Zou, Hu

    2017-01-01

    We present and analyze the possibility of using optical u-band luminosities to estimate star-formation rates (SFRs) of galaxies based on the data from the South Galactic Cap u band Sky Survey (SCUSS), which provides a deep u-band photometric survey covering about 5000 deg2 of the South Galactic Cap. Based on two samples of normal star-forming galaxies selected by the BPT diagram, we explore the correlations between u-band, Hα, and IR luminosities by combing SCUSS data with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The attenuation-corrected u-band luminosities are tightly correlated with the Balmer decrement-corrected Hα luminosities with an rms scatter of ∼0.17 dex. The IR-corrected u luminosities are derived based on the correlations between the attenuation of u-band luminosities and WISE 12 (or 22) μm luminosities, and then calibrated with the Balmer-corrected Hα luminosities. The systematic residuals of these calibrations are tested against the physical properties over the ranges covered by our sample objects. We find that the best-fitting nonlinear relations are better than the linear ones and recommended to be applied in the measurement of SFRs. The systematic deviations mainly come from the pollution of old stellar population and the effect of dust extinction; therefore, a more detailed analysis is needed in future work.

  3. Star formation rate at multiple physical scales using CALIFA and TYPHOON data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; Gil de Paz, A.; Castillo-Morales, A.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Sánchez, S. F.; Madore, B. F.; Sturch, L.; CALIFA Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    Both good spatial resolution and sample statistics are key to properly determine (and calibrate) the star formation rate in galaxies. Nevertheless, having an extensive number of objects and high spatial resolution at the same time is a challenge. To address this issue we have combined a well-characterized sample of 380 nearby galaxies from the CALIFA IFS survey and HII Regions from Local Group galaxies using TYPHOON. Firstly, we derive integrated extinction-corrected Hα-based SFRs of 380 nearby galaxies in CALIFA. Then, we provide updated single and hybrid SFRs tracers using our integrated extinction-corrected Hα SFR as a reference. Despite the quality of our attenuation correction via Balmer decrement, this parameter remains one of the main sources of uncertainty in deriving the SFR from Hα. Other major sources of systematic error are the IMF and the escape fraction. To understand the role that the escape fraction plays in the SFR derivations we perform a detail analysis using high spatial resolution around individual HII regions. The aim is to study the Hα ionized gas and dust structure, and resolve the total population of young massive stars in these regions responsible for the ionizing emission. For that purpose, we use TYPHOON observations at the 6.5 m Baade Telescope in Las Campanas (Chile). TYPHOON is a newly methodology for producing highly resolved spectrophotometric datacubes in the optical range. This double approach will allow us to dramatically reduce the uncertainties in the spatially-resolved SFR in galaxies.

  4. The radio continuum-star formation rate relation in WSRT sings galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Heesen, Volker; Brinks, Elias; Leroy, Adam K.; Heald, George; Braun, Robert; Bigiel, Frank; Beck, Rainer E-mail: v.heesen@soton.ac.uk E-mail: heald@astron.nl E-mail: bigiel@uni-heidelberg.de

    2014-05-01

    We present a study of the spatially resolved radio continuum-star formation rate (RC-SFR) relation using state-of-the-art star formation tracers in a sample of 17 THINGS galaxies. We use SFR surface density (Σ{sub SFR}) maps created by a linear combination of GALEX far-UV (FUV) and Spitzer 24 μm maps. We use RC maps at λλ22 and 18 cm from the WSRT SINGS survey and Hα emission maps to correct for thermal RC emission. We compare azimuthally averaged radial profiles of the RC and FUV/mid-IR (MIR) based Σ{sub SFR} maps and study pixel-by-pixel correlations at fixed linear scales of 1.2 and 0.7 kpc. The ratio of the integrated SFRs from the RC emission to that of the FUV/MIR-based SF tracers is R{sub int}=0.78±0.38, consistent with the relation by Condon. We find a tight correlation between the radial profiles of the radio and FUV/MIR-based Σ{sub SFR} for the entire extent of the disk. The ratio R of the azimuthally averaged radio to FUV/MIR-based Σ{sub SFR} agrees with the integrated ratio and has only quasi-random fluctuations with galactocentric radius that are relatively small (25%). Pixel-by-pixel plots show a tight correlation in log-log diagrams of radio to FUV/MIR-based Σ{sub SFR}, with a typical standard deviation of a factor of two. Averaged over our sample we find (Σ{sub SFR}){sub RC}∝(Σ{sub SFR}){sub hyb}{sup 0.63±0.25}, implying that data points with high Σ{sub SFR} are relatively radio dim, whereas the reverse is true for low Σ{sub SFR}. We interpret this as a result of spectral aging of cosmic-ray electrons (CREs), which are diffusing away from the star formation sites where they are injected into the interstellar medium. This is supported by our finding that the radio spectral index is a second parameter in pixel-by-pixel plots: those data points dominated by young CREs are relatively radio dim, while those dominated by old CREs are slightly more RC bright than what would be expected from a linear extrapolation. We studied the ratio R of

  5. Offset of latest pleistocene shoreface reveals slip rate on the Hosgri strike-slip fault, offshore central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Dartnell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Hosgri fault is the southern part of the regional Hosgri–San Gregorio dextral strike‐slip fault system, which extends primarily in the offshore for about 400 km in central California. Between Morro Bay and San Simeon, high‐resolution multibeam bathymetry reveals that the eastern strand of the Hosgri fault is crossed by an ∼265  m wide slope interpreted as the shoreface of a latest Pleistocene sand spit. This sand spit crossed an embayment and connected a western fault‐bounded bedrock peninsula and an eastern bedrock highland, a paleogeography resembling modern coastal geomorphology along the San Andreas fault. Detailed analysis of the relict shoreface with slope profiles and slope maps indicates a lateral slip rate of 2.6±0.9  mm/yr, considered a minimum rate for the Hosgri given the presence of an active western strand. This slip rate indicates that the Hosgri system takes up the largest share of the strike‐slip fault budget and is the most active strike‐slip fault west of the San Andreas fault in central California. This result further demonstrates the value and potential of high‐resolution bathymetry in characterization of active offshore faults.

  6. Genetic map of the human pseudoautosomal region reveals a high rate of recombination in female meiosis at the Xp telomere

    SciTech Connect

    Henke, A.; Fischer, C.; Rappold, G.A. )

    1993-12-01

    This paper describes the genetic map of the pseudoautosomal region bounded by the telomere of the short arms of the X and Y chromosomes. In males, meiotic exchange on Xp/Yp is confined to this region, leading to highly elevated recombination rates. The map was constructed using 11 pseudoautosomal probes (six of which are new) and typing individuals from 38 CEPH families. All markers have been physically mapped, thus providing the opportunity to compare genetic distance to physical distance through all intervals of the map. This comparison reveals an unexpected high rate of recombination in female meiosis between loci DXYS20 and DXYS78, within 20-80 kb from the telomere. Within this telemore-adjacent region no differences in male and female recombination rates are seen. Furthermore, data from this genetic map support the hypothesis of a linear gradient of recombination across most of the region in male meiosis and provide densely spaced anchor points for linkage studies especially in the telomeric portion of the pseudoautosomal region. 34 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. A probabilistic analysis reveals fundamental limitations with the environmental impact quotient and similar systems for rating pesticide risks

    PubMed Central

    Schleier, Jerome J.

    2014-01-01

    Comparing risks among pesticides has substantial utility for decision makers. However, if rating schemes to compare risks are to be used, they must be conceptually and mathematically sound. We address limitations with pesticide risk rating schemes by examining in particular the Environmental Impact Quotient (EIQ) using, for the first time, a probabilistic analytic technique. To demonstrate the consequences of mapping discrete risk ratings to probabilities, adjusted EIQs were calculated for a group of 20 insecticides in four chemical classes. Using Monte Carlo simulation, adjusted EIQs were determined under different hypothetical scenarios by incorporating probability ranges. The analysis revealed that pesticides that have different EIQs, and therefore different putative environmental effects, actually may be no different when incorporating uncertainty. The EIQ equation cannot take into account uncertainty the way that it is structured and provide reliable quotients of pesticide impact. The EIQ also is inconsistent with the accepted notion of risk as a joint probability of toxicity and exposure. Therefore, our results suggest that the EIQ and other similar schemes be discontinued in favor of conceptually sound schemes to estimate risk that rely on proper integration of toxicity and exposure information. PMID:24795854

  8. Current denudation rates in dolostone karst from central Spain: Implications for the formation of unroofed caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krklec, Kristina; Domínguez-Villar, David; Carrasco, Rosa M.; Pedraza, Javier

    2016-07-01

    depth, we consider that this is a more reliable denudation rate for the studied location during the studied period. The calculated weathering rate suggests that denudation has a limited contribution to the thinning of bedrock over caves at this site. Therefore, we consider that the formation of unroofed caves in this region most likely results from the thinning of bedrock cover over caves due to collapse of blocks from their ceilings.

  9. Rate of formation and dissolution of mercury sulfide nanoparticles: The dual role of natural organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slowey, Aaron J.

    2010-01-01

    Mercury is a global contaminant of concern due to its transformation by microorganisms to form methylmercury, a toxic species that accumulates in biological tissues. The effect of dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from natural waters on reactions between mercury(II) (Hg) and sulfide (S(-II)) to form HgS(s) nanoparticles across a range of Hg and S(-II) concentrations was investigated. Hg was equilibrated with DOM, after which S(-II) was added. Dissolved Hg (Hgaq) was periodically quantified using ultracentrifugation and chemical analysis following the addition of S(-II). Particle size and identity were determined using dynamic light scattering and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. S(-II) reacts with Hg to form 20 to 200nm aggregates consisting of 1-2 nm HgS(s) subunits that are more structurally disordered than metacinnabar in the presence of 2 x 10-9 to 8 x 10-6M Hg and 10 (mg C)L-1 DOM. Some of the HgS(s) nanoparticle aggregates are subsequently dissolved by DOM and (re)precipitated by S(-II) over periods of hours to days. At least three fractions of Hg-DOM species were observed with respect to reactivity toward S(-II): 0.3 μmol reactive Hg per mmol C (60 percent), 0.1 μmol per mmol C (20 percent) that are kinetically hindered, and another 0.1 μmol Hg per mmol C (20 percent) that are inert to reaction with S(-II). Following an initial S(-II)-driven precipitation of HgS(s), HgS(s) was dissolved by DOM or organic sulfur compounds. HgS(s) formation during this second phase was counterintuitively favored by lower S(-II) concentrations, suggesting surface association of DOM moieties that are less capable of dissolving HgS(s). DOM partially inhibits HgS(s) formation and mediates reactions between Hg and S(-II) such that HgS(s) is susceptible to dissolution. These findings indicate that Hg accessibility to microorganisms could be controlled by kinetic (intermediate) species in the presence of S(-II) and DOM, undermining the premise that equilibrium Hg species

  10. A Multiwavelength Approach to the Star Formation Rate Estimation in Galaxies at Intermediate Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardiel, N.; Elbaz, D.; Schiavon, R. P.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Koo, D. C.; Phillips, A. C.; Gallego, J.

    2003-02-01

    We use a sample of seven starburst galaxies at intermediate redshifts (z~0.4 and 0.8) with observations ranging from the observed ultraviolet to 1.4 GHz, to compare the star formation rate (SFR) estimators that are used in the different wavelength regimes. We find that extinction-corrected Hα underestimates the SFR, and the degree of this underestimation increases with the infrared luminosity of the galaxies. Galaxies with very different levels of dust extinction as measured with SFRIR/SFR(Hα, uncorrected for extinction) present a similar attenuation A[Hα], as if the Balmer lines probed a different region of the galaxy than the one responsible for the bulk of the IR luminosity for large SFRs. In addition, SFR estimates derived from [O II] λ3727 match very well those inferred from Hα after applying the metallicity correction derived from local galaxies. SFRs estimated from the UV luminosities show a dichotomic behavior, similar to that previously reported by other authors in galaxies at z<~0.4. Here we extend this result up to z~0.8. Finally, one of the studied objects is a luminous compact galaxy (LCG) that may be suffering similar dust-enshrouded star formation episodes. These results highlight the relevance of quantifying the actual LIR of LCGs, as well as that of a much larger and generic sample of luminous infrared galaxies, which will be possible after the launch of SIRTF. Based on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. Based in part on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. Based in part on

  11. Aperture-free star formation rate of SDSS star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte Puertas, S.; Vilchez, J. M.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Kehrig, C.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.

    2017-03-01

    Large area surveys with a high number of galaxies observed have undoubtedly marked a milestone in the understanding of several properties of galaxies, such as star-formation history, morphology, and metallicity. However, in many cases, these surveys provide fluxes from fixed small apertures (e.g. fibre), which cover a scant fraction of the galaxy, compelling us to use aperture corrections to study the global properties of galaxies. In this work, we derive the current total star formation rate (SFR) of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) star-forming galaxies, using an empirically based aperture correction of the measured Hα flux for the first time, thus minimising the uncertainties associated with reduced apertures. All the Hα fluxes have been extinction-corrected using the Hα/ Hβ ratio free from aperture effects. The total SFR for 210 000 SDSS star-forming galaxies has been derived applying pure empirical Hα and Hα/ Hβ aperture corrections based on the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey. We find that, on average, the aperture-corrected SFR is 0.65 dex higher than the SDSS fibre-based SFR. The relation between the SFR and stellar mass for SDSS star-forming galaxies (SFR-M⋆) has been obtained, together with its dependence on extinction and Hα equivalent width. We compare our results with those obtained in previous works and examine the behaviour of the derived SFR in six redshift bins, over the redshift range 0.005 ≤ z ≤ 0.22. The SFR-M⋆ sequence derived here is in agreement with selected observational studies based on integral field spectroscopy of individual galaxies as well as with the predictions of recent theoretical models of disc galaxies. A table of the aperture-corrected fluxes and SFR for 210 000 SDSS star-forming galaxies and related relevant data is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/599/A71 Warning, no authors

  12. Mechanical response and microcrack formation in a fine-grained duplex TiAl at different strain rates and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Z.; Cady, C.; Gray, G.T. III; Kim, Y.-W.

    1996-10-01

    Compressive behavior of this alloy was studied at strain rates of 0. 001 and 2000 sec{sup -1} and temperatures from -196 C to 1200 C. Temperature dependence of yield stress was found to depend on strain rate: At the quasi-static strain rate, 0.001 sec{sup -1}, the yield stress decreases with temperature with a plateau between 200 and 800 C. At the high strain rate, 2000 sec{sup -1}, the yield stress exhibits a positive temperature dependence above 600 C. Strain hardening rate decreases dramatically with temperature in the very low and high temperature regions with a plateau at intermediate temperatures for both strain rates. As the strain rate increases, the strain hardening rate plateaus extended to higher temperatures. The strain rate sensitivity increases slightly with temperature (but less than 0.1) for strain rates above 0.001 sec{sup -1}. However, at a strain rate of 0.001 sec{sup -1}, there is a dramatic increase in the strain rate sensitivity with temperature; above 1100 C, the rate sensitivity becomes much larger. Microcracks occurring in grain interiors and at grain boundaries were observed at all strain rates and temperatures. Formation and distribution of microcracks were found to vary depending on strain rate and deformation temperature.

  13. Reconfigurable digital coherent receiver for metro-access networks supporting mixed modulation formats and bit-rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, Antonio; Gonzalez, Neil Guerrero; Arlunno, Valeria; Borkowski, Robert; Pham, Tien Thang; Rodes, Roberto; Zhang, Xu; Othman, Maisara Binti; Prince, Kamau; Yu, Xianbin; Jensen, Jesper Bevensee; Zibar, Darko; Monroy, Idelfonso Tafur

    2013-12-01

    A single, reconfigurable, digital coherent receiver is proposed and experimentally demonstrated for converged wireless and optical fiber transport. The capacity of reconstructing the full transmitted optical field allows for the demodulation of mixed modulation formats and bit-rates. We performed experimental validation of different modulation formats, including VCSEL based OOK, baseband QPSK, RoF OFDM and wireless IR-UWB over a 78 km deployed fiber link.

  14. Characterization and refinement of carbide coating formation rates and dissolution kinetics in the Ta-C system

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Patrick James

    1996-10-01

    The interaction between carbide coating formation rates and dissolution kinetics in the tantalum-carbon system was investigated. The research was driven by the need to characterize carbide coating formation rates. The characterization of the carbide coating formation rates was required to engineer an optimum processing scheme for the fabrication of the ultracorrosion-resistant composite, carbon-saturated tantalum. A packed-bed carburization process was successfully engineered and employed. The packed-bed carburization process produced consistent, predictable, and repeatable carbide coatings. A digital imaging analysis measurement process for accurate and consistent measurement of carbide coating thicknesses was developed. A process for removing the chemically stable and extremely hard tantalum-carbide coatings was also developed in this work.

  15. The Star Formation Rate Density of the Universe at z = 0.24 and 0.4 from Halpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual, S.

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of both the global star formation history of the universe and the nature of individual star-forming galaxies at different look-back times is essential to our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. Deep redshift surveys suggest star-formation activity increases by an order of magnitude from z = 0 to ~1. As a direct test of whether substantial evolution in star-formation activity has occurred, we need to measure the star formation rate (SFR) density and the properties of the corresponding star-forming galaxy populations at different redshifts, using similar techniques. The main goal of this work is to extend the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM) survey of emission-line galaxies to higher redshifts. (continues)

  16. Rate of Iron Transfer Through the Horse Spleen Ferritin Shell Determined by the Rate of Formation of Prussian Blue and Fe-desferrioxamine Within the Ferritin Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Bo; Watt, Richard K.; Galvez, Natividad; Dominquez-Vera, Jose M.; Watt, Gerald D.

    2005-01-01

    Iron (2+ and 3+) is believed to transfer through the three-fold channels in the ferritin shell during iron deposition and release in animal ferritins. However, the rate of iron transit in and out through these channels has not been reported. The recent synthesis of [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-), Prussian Blue (PB) and desferrioxamine (DES) all trapped within the horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) interior makes these measurements feasible. We report the rate of Fe(2+) penetrating into the ferritin interior by adding external Fe(2+) to [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-) encapsulated in the HoSF interior and measuring the rate of formation of the resulting encapsulated PB. The rate at which Fe(2+) reacts with [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-) in the HoSF interior is much slower than the formation of free PB in solution and is proceeded by a lag period. We assume this lag period and the difference in rate represent the transfer of Fe(2+) through the HoSF protein shell. The calculated diffusion coefficient, D approx. 5.8 x 10(exp -20) square meters per second corresponds to the measured lag time of 10-20 s before PB forms within the HoSF interior. The activation energy for Fe(2+) transfer from the outside solution through the protein shell was determined to be 52.9 kJ/mol by conducting the reactions at 10 to approximately 40 C. The reaction of Fe(3+) with encapsulated [Fe(CN)6](4-) also readily forms PB in the HoSF interior, but the rate is faster than the corresponding Fe(2+) reaction. The rate for Fe(3+) transfer through the ferritin shell was confirmed by measuring the rate of the formation of Fe-DES inside HoSF and an activation energy of 58.4 kJ/mol was determined. An attempt was made to determine the rate of iron (2+ and 3+) transit out from the ferritin interior by adding excess bipyridine or DES to PB trapped within the HoSF interior. However, the reactions are slow and occur at almost identical rates for free and HoSF-encapsulated PB, indicating that the transfer of iron from the interior through the

  17. Star formation rates on global and cloud scales within the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, A. T.; Longmore, S. N.; Battersby, C.; Bally, J.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.

    2017-01-01

    The environment within the inner few hundred parsecs of the Milky Way, known as the ``Central Molecular Zone'' (CMZ), harbours densities and pressures orders of magnitude higher than the Galactic Disc; akin to that at the peak of cosmic star formation (Kruijssen & Longmore 2013). Previous studies have shown that current theoretical star-formation models under-predict the observed level of star-formation (SF) in the CMZ by an order of magnitude given the large reservoir of dense gas it contains. Here we explore potential reasons for this apparent dearth of star formation activity.

  18. Hydroxyl radical in/on illuminated polar snow: formation rates, lifetimes, and steady-state concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zeyuan; Chu, Liang; Galbavy, Edward S.; Ram, Keren; Anastasio, Cort

    2016-08-01

    While the hydroxyl radical (OH) in the snowpack is likely a dominant oxidant for organic species and bromide, little is known about the kinetics or steady-state concentrations of OH on/in snow and ice. Here we measure the formation rate, lifetime, and concentration of OH for illuminated polar snow samples studied in the laboratory and in the field. Laboratory studies show that OH kinetics and steady-state concentrations are essentially the same for a given sample studied as ice and liquid; this is in contrast to other photooxidants, which show a concentration enhancement in ice relative to solution as a result of kinetic differences in the two phases. The average production rate of OH in samples studied at Summit, Greenland, is 5 times lower than the average measured in the laboratory, while the average OH lifetime determined in the field is 5 times higher than in the laboratory. These differences indicate that the polar snows we studied in the laboratory are affected by contamination, despite significant efforts to prevent this; our results suggest similar contamination may be a widespread problem in laboratory studies of ice chemistry. Steady-state concentrations of OH in clean snow studied in the field at Summit, Greenland, range from (0.8 to 3) × 10-15 M, comparable to values reported for midlatitude cloud and fog drops, rain, and deliquesced marine particles, even though impurity concentrations in the snow samples are much lower. Partitioning of firn air OH to the snow grains will approximately double the steady-state concentration of snow-grain hydroxyl radical, leading to an average [OH] in near-surface, summer Summit snow of approximately 4 × 10-15 M. At this concentration, the OH-mediated lifetimes of organics and bromide in Summit snow grains are approximately 3 days and 7 h, respectively, suggesting that hydroxyl radical is a major

  19. On the reversal of star formation rate-density relation at z = 1: Insights from simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tonnesen, Stephanie; Cen, Renyue E-mail: cen@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-06-20

    Recent surveys have found a reversal of the star formation rate (SFR)-density relation at z = 1 from that at z = 0, while the sign of the slope of the color-density relation remains unchanged. We use adaptive mesh refinement cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of a 21 × 24 × 20 h {sup –3} Mpc{sup 3} region to examine the SFR-density and color-density relations of galaxies at z = 0 and z = 1. The local environmental density is defined by the dark matter mass in spheres of radius 1 h {sup –1} Mpc, and we probe two decades of environmental densities. Our simulations produce a large increase of SFR with density at z = 1, as in the Elbaz et al. observations. We also find a significant evolution to z = 0, where the SFR-density relation is much flatter. The simulated color-density relation is consistent from z = 1 to z = 0, in agreement with observations. We find that the increase in SFR with local density at z = 1 is due to a growing population of star-forming galaxies in higher-density environments. At z = 0 and z = 1 both the SFR and cold gas mass are correlated with the galaxy halo mass, and therefore the correlation between median halo mass and local density is an important cause of the SFR-density relation at both redshifts. However, at z = 0 the local density on 1 h {sup –1} Mpc scales affects galaxy SFRs as much as halo mass. Finally, we find indications that while at z = 0 high-density environments depress galaxy SFRs, at z = 1 high-density environments tend to increase SFRs.

  20. Brightest group galaxies: stellar mass and star formation rate (paper I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozaliasl, Ghassem; Finoguenov, Alexis; Khosroshahi, Habib G.; Mirkazemi, Mohammad; Erfanianfar, Ghazaleh; Tanaka, Masayuki

    2016-05-01

    We study the distribution and evolution of the stellar mass and the star formation rate (SFR) of the brightest group galaxies (BGGs) over 0.04 < z < 1.3 using a large sample of 407 X-ray galaxy groups selected from the COSMOS, AEGIS, and XMM-LSS fields. We compare our results with predictions from the semi-analytic models based on the Millennium simulation. In contrast to model predictions, we find that, as the Universe evolves, the stellar mass distribution evolves towards a normal distribution. This distribution tends to skew to low-mass BGGs at all redshifts implying the presence of a star-forming population of the BGGs with MS ˜ 1010.5 M⊙ which results in the shape of the stellar mass distribution deviating from a normal distribution. In agreement with the models and previous studies, we find that the mean stellar mass of BGGs grows with time by a factor of ˜2 between z = 1.3 and z = 0.1, however, the significant growth occurs above z = 0.4. The BGGs are not entirely a dormant population of galaxies, as low-mass BGGs in low-mass haloes are more active in forming stars than the BGGs in more massive haloes, over the same redshift range. We find that the average SFR of the BGGs evolves steeply with redshift and fraction of the passive BGGs increases as a function of increasing stellar mass and halo mass. Finally, we show that the specific SFR of the BGGs within haloes with M200 ≤ 1013.4 M⊙ decreases with increasing halo mass at z < 0.4.

  1. The density structure and star formation rate of non-isothermal polytropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federrath, Christoph; Banerjee, Supratik

    2015-04-01

    The interstellar medium of galaxies is governed by supersonic turbulence, which likely controls the star formation rate (SFR) and the initial mass function (IMF). Interstellar turbulence is non-universal, with a wide range of Mach numbers, magnetic fields strengths and driving mechanisms. Although some of these parameters were explored, most previous works assumed that the gas is isothermal. However, we know that cold molecular clouds form out of the warm atomic medium, with the gas passing through chemical and thermodynamic phases that are not isothermal. Here we determine the role of temperature variations by modelling non-isothermal turbulence with a polytropic equation of state (EOS), where pressure and temperature are functions of gas density, P˜ ρ ^Γ, T ˜ ρΓ - 1. We use grid resolutions of 20483 cells and compare polytropic exponents Γ = 0.7 (soft EOS), Γ = 1 (isothermal EOS) and Γ = 5/3 (stiff EOS). We find a complex network of non-isothermal filaments with more small-scale fragmentation occurring for Γ < 1, while Γ > 1 smoothes out density contrasts. The density probability distribution function (PDF) is significantly affected by temperature variations, with a power-law tail developing at low densities for Γ > 1. In contrast, the PDF becomes closer to a lognormal distribution for Γ ≲ 1. We derive and test a new density variance-Mach number relation that takes Γ into account. This new relation is relevant for theoretical models of the SFR and IMF, because it determines the dense gas mass fraction of a cloud, from which stars form. We derive the SFR as a function of Γ and find that it decreases by a factor of ˜5 from Γ = 0.7 to 5/3.

  2. On the Mass-Metallicity-Star Formation Rate Relation for Galaxies at z˜2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, Samir; Lee, Janice C.; Davé, Romeel; Dickinson, Mark

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that the local mass-metallicity (M*-Z) relation depends on the specific star formation rate (sSFR). Whether such a dependence exists at higher redshifts, and whether the resulting M*-Z-SFR relation is redshift invariant, is debated. We re-examine these issues by applying the non-parametric techniques of Salim et al. to ˜130 z˜ 2.3 galaxies with N2 and O3 measurements from Keck Baryonic Structure Survey (KBSS). We find that the KBSS M*-Z relation depends on sSFR at intermediate masses where such dependence exists locally. KBSS and SDSS galaxies of the same mass and sSFR (“local analogs”) are similarly offset in the BPT diagram relative to the bulk of local star-forming galaxies, and thus we posit that metallicities can be compared self-consistently at different redshifts as long as the masses and sSFRs of the galaxies are similar. We find that the M*-Z-SFR relation of z˜ 2 galaxies is consistent with the local one at {log}{M}*\\lt 10, but is offset up to -0.25 dex at higher masses, so it is altogether not redshift invariant. This high-mass offset could arise from a bias that [O iii]-based, high-redshift spectroscopic surveys have against high-metallicity galaxies, but additional evidence disfavors this possibility. We identify three causes for the reported discrepancy between N2 and O3N2 metallicities at z˜ 2: (1) a smaller offset that is also present for SDSS galaxies, which we remove with new N2 calibration, (2) a genuine offset due to differing ISM condition, which is also present in local analogs, and (3) an additional offset due to unrecognized active galactic nucleus contamination.

  3. The single-giant unilamellar vesicle method reveals lysenin-induced pore formation in lipid membranes containing sphingomyelin.

    PubMed

    Alam, Jahangir Md; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2012-06-26

    Lysenin is a sphingomyelin (SM)-binding pore-forming toxin. To reveal the interaction of lysenin with lipid membranes, we investigated lysenin-induced membrane permeation of a fluorescent probe, calcein, through dioleoylphosphatidylcholine(DOPC)/SM, DOPC/SM/cholesterol(chol), and SM/chol membranes, using the single-giant unilamellar vesicle (GUV) method. The results clearly show that lysenin formed pores in all the membranes, through which membrane permeation of calcein occurred without disruption of GUVs. The membrane permeation began stochastically, and the membrane permeability coefficient increased over time to reach a maximum, steady value, Ps, which persisted for a long time(100--500 s), indicating that the pore concentration increases over time and finally reaches its steady value, NP s . The Ps values increased as the SM/lysenin ratio decreased, and at low concentrations of lysenin, the Ps values of SM/DOPC/chol (42/30/28)GUVs were much larger than those of SM/DOPC (58/42) GUVs. The dependence of Ps on the SM/lysenin ratio for these membranes was almost the same as that of the fraction of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-resistant lysenin oligomers, indicating that NP s increases as the SDS-resistant oligomer fraction increases. On the other hand, lysenin formed pores in GUVs of SM/chol(60/40) membrane, which is in a homogeneous liquid-ordered phase, indicating that the phase boundary is not necessary for pore formation. The Ps values of SM/chol (60/40) GUVs were smaller than those of SM/DOPC/chol (42/30/28) GUVs even though the SDS-resistant oligomer fractions were similar for both membranes, suggesting that not all of the oligomers can convert into a pore. On the basis of these results, we discuss the elementary processes of lysenin-induced pore formation.

  4. Site-directed mutagenesis reveals regions implicated in the stability and fiber formation of human λ3r light chains.

    PubMed

    Villalba, Miryam I; Canul-Tec, Juan C; Luna-Martínez, Oscar D; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Rojas, Sonia; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Fernández-Velasco, Daniel A; Becerril, Baltazar

    2015-01-30

    Light chain amyloidosis (AL) is a disease that affects vital organs by the fibrillar aggregation of monoclonal light chains. λ3r germ line is significantly implicated in this disease. In this work, we contrasted the thermodynamic stability and aggregation propensity of 3mJL2 (nonamyloidogenic) and 3rJL2 (amyloidogenic) λ3 germ lines. Because of an inherent limitation (extremely low expression), Cys at position 34 of the 3r germ line was replaced by Tyr reaching a good expression yield. A second substitution (W91A) was introduced in 3r to obtain a better template to incorporate additional mutations. Although the single mutant (C34Y) was not fibrillogenic, the second mutation located at CDR3 (W91A) induced fibrillogenesis. We propose, for the first time, that CDR3 (position 91) affects the stability and fiber formation of human λ3r light chains. Using the double mutant (3rJL2/YA) as template, other variants were constructed to evaluate the importance of those substitutions into the stability and aggregation propensity of λ3 light chains. A change in position 7 (P7D) boosted 3rJL2/YA fibrillogenic properties. Modification of position 48 (I48M) partially reverted 3rJL2/YA fibril aggregation. Finally, changes at positions 8 (P8S) or 40 (P40S) completely reverted fibril formation. These results confirm the influential roles of N-terminal region (positions 7 and 8) and the loop 40-60 (positions 40 and 48) on AL. X-ray crystallography revealed that the three-dimensional topology of the single and double λ3r mutants was not significantly altered. This mutagenic approach helped to identify key regions implicated in λ3 AL.

  5. Site-directed Mutagenesis Reveals Regions Implicated in the Stability and Fiber Formation of Human λ3r Light Chains

    SciTech Connect

    Villalba, Miryam I.; Canul-Tec, Juan C.; Luna-Martínez, Oscar D.; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Rojas, Sonia; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Fernández-Velasco, Daniel A.; Becerril, Baltazar

    2014-12-11

    Light chain amyloidosis (AL) is a disease that affects vital organs by the fibrillar aggregation of monoclonal light chains. λ3r germ line is significantly implicated in this disease. In this paper, we contrasted the thermodynamic stability and aggregation propensity of 3mJL2 (nonamyloidogenic) and 3rJL2 (amyloidogenic) λ3 germ lines. Because of an inherent limitation (extremely low expression), Cys at position 34 of the 3r germ line was replaced by Tyr reaching a good expression yield. A second substitution (W91A) was introduced in 3r to obtain a better template to incorporate additional mutations. Although the single mutant (C34Y) was not fibrillogenic, the second mutation located at CDR3 (W91A) induced fibrillogenesis. We propose, for the first time, that CDR3 (position 91) affects the stability and fiber formation of human λ3r light chains. Using the double mutant (3rJL2/YA) as template, other variants were constructed to evaluate the importance of those substitutions into the stability and aggregation propensity of λ3 light chains. A change in position 7 (P7D) boosted 3rJL2/YA fibrillogenic properties. Modification of position 48 (I48M) partially reverted 3rJL2/YA fibril aggregation. Finally, changes at positions 8 (P8S) or 40 (P40S) completely reverted fibril formation. These results confirm the influential roles of N-terminal region (positions 7 and 8) and the loop 40–60 (positions 40 and 48) on AL. X-ray crystallography revealed that the three-dimensional topology of the single and double λ3r mutants was not significantly altered. Finally, this mutagenic approach helped to identify key regions implicated in λ3 AL.

  6. Site-directed Mutagenesis Reveals Regions Implicated in the Stability and Fiber Formation of Human λ3r Light Chains

    DOE PAGES

    Villalba, Miryam I.; Canul-Tec, Juan C.; Luna-Martínez, Oscar D.; ...

    2014-12-11

    Light chain amyloidosis (AL) is a disease that affects vital organs by the fibrillar aggregation of monoclonal light chains. λ3r germ line is significantly implicated in this disease. In this paper, we contrasted the thermodynamic stability and aggregation propensity of 3mJL2 (nonamyloidogenic) and 3rJL2 (amyloidogenic) λ3 germ lines. Because of an inherent limitation (extremely low expression), Cys at position 34 of the 3r germ line was replaced by Tyr reaching a good expression yield. A second substitution (W91A) was introduced in 3r to obtain a better template to incorporate additional mutations. Although the single mutant (C34Y) was not fibrillogenic, themore » second mutation located at CDR3 (W91A) induced fibrillogenesis. We propose, for the first time, that CDR3 (position 91) affects the stability and fiber formation of human λ3r light chains. Using the double mutant (3rJL2/YA) as template, other variants were constructed to evaluate the importance of those substitutions into the stability and aggregation propensity of λ3 light chains. A change in position 7 (P7D) boosted 3rJL2/YA fibrillogenic properties. Modification of position 48 (I48M) partially reverted 3rJL2/YA fibril aggregation. Finally, changes at positions 8 (P8S) or 40 (P40S) completely reverted fibril formation. These results confirm the influential roles of N-terminal region (positions 7 and 8) and the loop 40–60 (positions 40 and 48) on AL. X-ray crystallography revealed that the three-dimensional topology of the single and double λ3r mutants was not significantly altered. Finally, this mutagenic approach helped to identify key regions implicated in λ3 AL.« less

  7. Site-directed Mutagenesis Reveals Regions Implicated in the Stability and Fiber Formation of Human λ3r Light Chains*

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Miryam I.; Canul-Tec, Juan C.; Luna-Martínez, Oscar D.; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Rojas, Sonia; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Fernández-Velasco, Daniel A.; Becerril, Baltazar

    2015-01-01

    Light chain amyloidosis (AL) is a disease that affects vital organs by the fibrillar aggregation of monoclonal light chains. λ3r germ line is significantly implicated in this disease. In this work, we contrasted the thermodynamic stability and aggregation propensity of 3mJL2 (nonamyloidogenic) and 3rJL2 (amyloidogenic) λ3 germ lines. Because of an inherent limitation (extremely low expression), Cys at position 34 of the 3r germ line was replaced by Tyr reaching a good expression yield. A second substitution (W91A) was introduced in 3r to obtain a better template to incorporate additional mutations. Although the single mutant (C34Y) was not fibrillogenic, the second mutation located at CDR3 (W91A) induced fibrillogenesis. We propose, for the first time, that CDR3 (position 91) affects the stability and fiber formation of human λ3r light chains. Using the double mutant (3rJL2/YA) as template, other variants were constructed to evaluate the importance of those substitutions into the stability and aggregation propensity of λ3 light chains. A change in position 7 (P7D) boosted 3rJL2/YA fibrillogenic properties. Modification of position 48 (I48M) partially reverted 3rJL2/YA fibril aggregation. Finally, changes at positions 8 (P8S) or 40 (P40S) completely reverted fibril formation. These results confirm the influential roles of N-terminal region (positions 7 and 8) and the loop 40–60 (positions 40 and 48) on AL. X-ray crystallography revealed that the three-dimensional topology of the single and double λ3r mutants was not significantly altered. This mutagenic approach helped to identify key regions implicated in λ3 AL. PMID:25505244

  8. Polymorphism Analysis Reveals Reduced Negative Selection and Elevated Rate of Insertions and Deletions in Intrinsically Disordered Protein Regions.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tahsin; Douglas, Gavin M; Patel, Priyenbhai; Nguyen Ba, Alex N; Moses, Alan M

    2015-06-04

    Intrinsically disordered protein regions are abundant in eukaryotic proteins and lack stable tertiary structures and enzymatic functions. Previous studies of disordered region evolution based on interspecific alignments have revealed an increased propensity for indels and rapid rates of amino acid substitution. How disordered regions are maintained at high abundance in the proteome and across taxa, despite apparently weak evolutionary constraints, remains unclear. Here, we use single nucleotide and indel polymorphism data in yeast and human populations to survey the population variation within disordered regions. First, we show that single nucleotide polymorphisms in disordered regions are under weaker negative selection compared with more structured protein regions and have a higher proportion of neutral non-synonymous sites. We also confirm previous findings that nonframeshifting indels are much more abundant in disordered regions relative to structured regions. We find that the rate of nonframeshifting indel polymorphism in intrinsically disordered regions resembles that of noncoding DNA and pseudogenes, and that large indels segregate in disordered regions in the human population. Our survey of polymorphism confirms patterns of evolution in disordered regions inferred based on longer evolutionary comparisons.

  9. Polymorphism Analysis Reveals Reduced Negative Selection and Elevated Rate of Insertions and Deletions in Intrinsically Disordered Protein Regions

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tahsin; Douglas, Gavin M.; Patel, Priyenbhai; Nguyen Ba, Alex N.; Moses, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered protein regions are abundant in eukaryotic proteins and lack stable tertiary structures and enzymatic functions. Previous studies of disordered region evolution based on interspecific alignments have revealed an increased propensity for indels and rapid rates of amino acid substitution. How disordered regions are maintained at high abundance in the proteome and across taxa, despite apparently weak evolutionary constraints, remains unclear. Here, we use single nucleotide and indel polymorphism data in yeast and human populations to survey the population variation within disordered regions. First, we show that single nucleotide polymorphisms in disordered regions are under weaker negative selection compared with more structured protein regions and have a higher proportion of neutral non-synonymous sites. We also confirm previous findings that nonframeshifting indels are much more abundant in disordered regions relative to structured regions. We find that the rate of nonframeshifting indel polymorphism in intrinsically disordered regions resembles that of noncoding DNA and pseudogenes, and that large indels segregate in disordered regions in the human population. Our survey of polymorphism confirms patterns of evolution in disordered regions inferred based on longer evolutionary comparisons. PMID:26047845

  10. Genome Alignment Spanning Major Poaceae Lineages Reveals Heterogeneous Evolutionary Rates and Alters Inferred Dates for Key Evolutionary Events.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiyin; Wang, Jingpeng; Jin, Dianchuan; Guo, Hui; Lee, Tae-Ho; Liu, Tao; Paterson, Andrew H

    2015-06-01

    Multiple comparisons among genomes can clarify their evolution, speciation, and functional innovations. To date, the genome sequences of eight grasses representing the most economically important Poaceae (grass) clades have been published, and their genomic-level comparison is an essential foundation for evolutionary, functional, and translational research. Using a formal and conservative approach, we aligned these genomes. Direct comparison of paralogous gene pairs all duplicated simultaneously reveal striking variation in evolutionary rates among whole genomes, with nucleotide substitution slowest in rice and up to 48% faster in other grasses, adding a new dimension to the value of rice as a grass model. We reconstructed ancestral genome contents for major evolutionary nodes, potentially contributing to understanding the divergence and speciation of grasses. Recent fossil evidence suggests revisions of the estimated dates of key evolutionary events, implying that the pan-grass polyploidization occurred ∼96 million years ago and could not be related to the Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction as previously inferred. Adjusted dating to reflect both updated fossil evidence and lineage-specific evolutionary rates suggested that maize subgenome divergence and maize-sorghum divergence were virtually simultaneous, a coincidence that would be explained if polyploidization directly contributed to speciation. This work lays a solid foundation for Poaceae translational genomics.

  11. Offset of Latest Pleistocene Shoreface Reveals Slip Rate on the Hosgri Strike-Slip Fault, Offshore Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. Y.; Hartwell, S. R.; Dartnell, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Hosgri fault is the southern part of the regional Hosgri-San Gregorio dextral strike-slip fault system, which extends primarily in the offshore region for about 400 km in central California. Between Morro Bay and San Simeon, high-resolution multibeam bathymetry reveals that the eastern strand of the Hosgri fault is crossed by a ~265-m-wide slope interpreted as the shoreface of a relict sand spit that formed during a period of relatively slower sea-level rise (Younger Dryas stadial) in the latest Pleistocene. This sand spit crossed an embayment and connected a western fault-bounded bedrock peninsula and an eastern bedrock highland, a paleogeography similar to modern geomorphology along coastal segments of the San Andreas fault. Detailed analysis of the relict shoreface with slope profiles and slope maps indicates a lateral slip rate of 2.6 ± 0.9 mm/yr. Because the Hosgri fault locally includes an active western strand, and regionally converges with several other faults, this slip rate should be considered a minimum for the Hosgri fault in central California and should not be applied for the entire Hosgri-San Gregorio fault system. This slip rate indicates that the Hosgri system takes up the largest share of the strike-slip fault budget and is the most active strike-slip fault west of the San Andreas fault in central California. This result further demonstrates the value and potential of high-resolution bathymetry in earthquake-hazard characterization of active offshore faults.

  12. Determination of the Rate of Formation of Hydroceramic Waste Forms made with INEEL Calcined Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Barry Scheetz; Johnson Olanrewaju

    2001-10-15

    The formulation, synthesis, characterization and hydration kinetics of hydroceramic waste forms designed as potential hosts for existing INEEL calcine high-level wastes have been established as functions of temperature and processing time. Initial experimentations were conducted with several aluminosilicate pozzolanic materials, ranging from fly ash obtained from various power generating coal and other combustion industries to reactive alumina, natural clays and ground bottled glass powders. The final selection criteria were based on the ease of processing, excellent physical properties and chemical durability (low-leaching) determined from the PCT test produced in hydroceramic. The formulation contains vermiculite, Sr(NO32), CsC1, NaOH, thermally altered (calcined natural clay) and INEEL simulated calcine high-level nuclear wastes and 30 weight percent of fluorinel blend calcine and zirconia calcine. Syntheses were carried out at 75-200 degree C at autogeneous water pressure (100% relative humidity) at various time intervals. The resulting monolithic compact products were hard and resisted breaking when dropped from a 5 ft height. Hydroceramic host mixed with fluorinel blend calcine and processed at 75 degree C crumbled into rice hull-side grains or developed scaly flakes. However, the samples equally possessed the same chemical durability as their unbroken counterparts. Phase identification by XRD revealed that hydroceramic host crystallized type zeolite at 75-150 degree C and NaP1 at 175-200 degree C in addition to the presence of quartz phase originating from the clay reactant. Hydroceramic host mixed with either fluorinel blend calcine or zirconia calcine crystallized type A zeolite at 75-95 degree C, formed a mixture of type A zeolite and hydroxysodalite at 125-150 degree C and hydroxysodalite at 175-200 degree C. Quartz, calcium fluoride and zirconia phases from the clay reactant and the two calcine wastes were also detected. The PCT test solution

  13. Rates of Melt Migration Following Deglaciation-Induced Mantle Melting Revealed by Studies of Icelandic Table Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eason, D. E.; Sinton, J. M.; Ito, G.; Gronvold, K.; Kurz, M. D.

    2010-12-01

    Deglaciation leads to enhanced melt production under Iceland due to mantle decompression during glacial unloading. Models of isostatic rebound following ice sheet removal predict the greatest melt perturbations at shallow depths, with corresponding changes in the chemical composition of erupted material. Some table mountains (tuyas, or stapi) in Iceland are thought to have erupted through a thinning ice sheet during ice retreat following the last glacial maximum (~15-11 ka). New observations and geochemical analyses of table mountains in the 170 km-long Western Volcanic Zone (WVZ) of Iceland constrain spatial and temporal variations in volcanic production and composition associated with the last deglaciation period. We present new major and trace element compositional data for 19 table mountains in the WVZ, and use a combination of lava surface morphology, passage zone heights, and 3He exposure age dating to construct an eruption chronology for WVZ subglacial units. Late-glacial units, whose surfaces are relatively unmodified and show no evidence of subsequent glaciation, have low incompatible element concentrations (e.g., ~0.05 wt. % K2O at 8.0 wt. % MgO), low FeO* (~10.0 wt. % at 8.0 wt. % MgO), and high SiO2 and CaO concentrations (~49.0 wt. % and 14.0 wt. % at 8.0 wt. % MgO, respectively), while older table mountains whose surfaces that have been modified by glacial processes after formation have chemical compositions more comparable to average WVZ post-glacial units. Decreased levels of highly incompatible to moderately incompatible elements and elevated SiO2 and CaO concentrations are also found in fini-glacial eruption units, which experienced minimal amounts of ice interaction during formation. These geochemical characteristics are consistent with enhanced melting in the upper mantle, as predicted by models of deglaciation-induced mantle decompression. Detailed geologic and geochemical studies of post-glacial units along the WVZ show the eruptive response

  14. Chemometric analysis reveals links in the formation of fragrant bio-molecules during agarwood (Aquilaria malaccensis) and fungal interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Supriyo; Dehingia, Madhusmita; Talukdar, Narayan Chandra; Khan, Mojibur

    2017-01-01

    Fragrant agarwood, arguably the costliest wood in the world, is formed by plant-fungal interactions in Aquilaria spp. However, very little is known about this fragrant outcome of interaction. Therefore, mimicking the ancient traditions of agarwood production in Assam (Northeast India), a chemometric assessment of the agarwood-fungus interaction was made by chemical profiling (GC-MS) coupled with statistical analysis (principal component, correlation network analysis) across three platforms, viz. callus, juvenile plants and resinous wood-chips with an associated Fusarium. In the study of callus-fungus interaction, increased accumulation of key aroma compounds such as pentatriacontane {fold change (log2FC) = 3.47)}, 17-pentatriacontene (log2FC = 2.95), tetradecane, 2-methyl- (log2FC = 1.10) over callus and activation of pathways related to defense and secondary metabolism indicated links to aroma production. Study on fungal interactions in juvenile plants and resinous wood-chips indicated formation of terpenoid precursors (e.g. farnesol, geranylgeraniol acetate) and agarwood sesquiterpenes (e.g. agarospirol, γ-eudesmol). Correlation network analysis revealed the possible regulation of sesquiterpene biosynthesis involving squalene. Also a direct role of fungus in aroma (e.g. dodecane, 4-methyl-, tetracosane) was highlighted. Appearance of fragrant molecules unknown to agarwood during interaction featured as a new possibility for future research. PMID:28290512

  15. Super resolution microscopy is poised to reveal new insights into the formation and maturation of dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Cristina M.; Patel, Mikin R.; Webb, Donna J.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines and synapses are critical for neuronal communication, and they are perturbed in many neurological disorders; however, the study of these structures in living cells has been hindered by their small size. Super resolution microscopy, unlike conventional light microscopy, is diffraction unlimited and thus is well suited for imaging small structures, such as dendritic spines and synapses. Super resolution microscopy has already revealed important new information about spine and synapse morphology, actin remodeling, and nanodomain composition in both healthy cells and diseased states. In this review, we highlight the advancements in probes that make super resolution more amenable to live-cell imaging of spines and synapses. We also discuss recent data obtained by super resolution microscopy that has advanced our knowledge of dendritic spine and synapse structure, organization, and dynamics in both healthy and diseased contexts. Finally, we propose a series of critical questions for understanding spine and synapse formation and maturation that super resolution microscopy is poised to answer. PMID:27408691

  16. Chemometric analysis reveals links in the formation of fragrant bio-molecules during agarwood (Aquilaria malaccensis) and fungal interactions.

    PubMed

    Sen, Supriyo; Dehingia, Madhusmita; Talukdar, Narayan Chandra; Khan, Mojibur

    2017-03-14

    Fragrant agarwood, arguably the costliest wood in the world, is formed by plant-fungal interactions in Aquilaria spp. However, very little is known about this fragrant outcome of interaction. Therefore, mimicking the ancient traditions of agarwood production in Assam (Northeast India), a chemometric assessment of the agarwood-fungus interaction was made by chemical profiling (GC-MS) coupled with statistical analysis (principal component, correlation network analysis) across three platforms, viz. callus, juvenile plants and resinous wood-chips with an associated Fusarium. In the study of callus-fungus interaction, increased accumulation of key aroma compounds such as pentatriacontane {fold change (log2FC) = 3.47)}, 17-pentatriacontene (log2FC = 2.95), tetradecane, 2-methyl- (log2FC = 1.10) over callus and activation of pathways related to defense and secondary metabolism indicated links to aroma production. Study on fungal interactions in juvenile plants and resinous wood-chips indicated formation of terpenoid precursors (e.g. farnesol, geranylgeraniol acetate) and agarwood sesquiterpenes (e.g. agarospirol, γ-eudesmol). Correlation network analysis revealed the possible regulation of sesquiterpene biosynthesis involving squalene. Also a direct role of fungus in aroma (e.g. dodecane, 4-methyl-, tetracosane) was highlighted. Appearance of fragrant molecules unknown to agarwood during interaction featured as a new possibility for future research.

  17. Star Formation at Low Rates: How a Lack of Massive Stars Impacts the Evolution of Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensler, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    In recent years dedicated observations have uncovered star formation at extremely low rates in dwarf galaxies, tidal tails, ram-pressure stripped gas clouds, and the outskirts of galactic disks. At the same time, numerical simulations of galaxy evolution have advanced to higher spatial and mass resolutions, but have yet to account for the underfilling of the uppermost mass bins of stellar initial mass function (IMF) at low star-formation rates. In such situations, simulations may simply scale down the IMF, without realizing that this unrealistically results infractions of massive stars, along with fractions of massive star feedback energy (e.g., radiation and SNII explosions). Not properlyaccounting for such parameters has consequences for the self-regulation of star formation, the energetics of galaxies, as well as for the evolution of chemical abundances.Here we present numerical simulations of dwarf galaxies with low star-formation rates allowing for two extreme cases of the IMF: a "filled" case with fractional massive stars vs. a truncated IMF, at which the IMF is built bottom-up until the gas reservoir allows the formation of a last single star at an uppermost mass. The aim of the study is to demonstrate the different effects on galaxy evolution with respect to self-regulation, feedback, and chemistry. The case of a stochastic sampled IMF is situated somewhere in between these extremes.

  18. Contribution of the photo-Fenton reaction to hydroxyl radical formation rates in river and rain water samples.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Nobutake; Ueda, Marina; Shindo, Hirotaka; Takeda, Kazuhiko; Sakugawa, Hiroshi

    2007-09-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH radical) formation rates from the photo-Fenton reaction in river and rain water samples were determined by using deferoxamine mesylate (DFOM), which makes a stable and strong complex with Fe(III), resulting in a suppression of the photo-Fenton reaction. The difference between the OH radical formation rates with and without added DFOM denotes the rate from the photo-Fenton reaction. The photoformation rates from the photo-Fenton reaction were in the range of 0.7 - 45.8 x 10(-12) and 2.7 - 32.3 x 10(-12) M s(-1) in river and rain water samples, respectively. A strong positive correlation between the OH radical formation rate from the photo-Fenton reaction and the amount of fluorescent matter in river water suggests that fluorescent matter, such as humic substances, plays an important role in the photo-Fenton reaction. In rain water, direct photolysis of hydrogen peroxide was an important source of OH radicals as well as the photo-Fenton reaction. The contributions of the photo-Fenton reaction to the OH radical photoformation rates in river and rain water samples were in the ranges of 2 - 29 and 5 - 38%, respectively. Taking into account the photo-Fenton reaction, 33 - 110 (mean: 80) and 42 - 110 (mean: 84)% of OH radical sources in river and rain water samples, respectively, collected in Hiroshima prefecture were elucidated.

  19. Methane hydrate synthesis from ice: Influence of pressurization and ethanol on optimizing formation rates and hydrate yield

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Po-Chun.; Huang, Wuu-Liang; Stern, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    Polycrystalline methane gas hydrate (MGH) was synthesized using an ice-seeding method to investigate the influence of pressurization and ethanol on the hydrate formation rate and gas yield of the resulting samples. When the reactor is pressurized with CH4 gas without external heating, methane hydrate can be formed from ice grains with yields up to 25% under otherwise static conditions. The rapid temperature rise caused by pressurization partially melts the granular ice, which reacts with methane to form hydrate rinds around the ice grains. The heat generated by the exothermic reaction of methane hydrate formation buffers the sample temperature near the melting point of ice for enough time to allow for continuous hydrate growth at high rates. Surprisingly, faster rates and higher yields of methane hydrate were found in runs with lower initial temperatures, slower rates of pressurization, higher porosity of the granular ice samples, or mixtures with sediments. The addition of ethanol also dramatically enhanced the formation of polycrystalline MGH. This study demonstrates that polycrystalline MGH with varied physical properties suitable for different laboratory tests can be manufactured by controlling synthesis procedures or parameters. Subsequent dissociation experiments using a gas collection apparatus and flowmeter confirmed high methane saturation (CH 4·2O, with n = 5.82 ± 0.03) in the MGH. Dissociation rates of the various samples synthesized at diverse conditions may be fitted to different rate laws, including zero and first order.

  20. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acid and magnesium ion—Possible influence on biogenic calcite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Michael M.

    2012-08-01

    Increases in ocean surface water dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations retard biocalcification by reducing calcite supersaturation (Ωc). Reduced calcification rates may influence growth-rate dependent magnesium ion (Mg) incorporation into biogenic calcite modifying the use of calcifying organisms as paleoclimate proxies. Fulvic acid (FA) at biocalcification sites may further reduce calcification rates. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by FA and Mg, two common constituents of seawater and soil water involved in the formation of biogenic calcite, was measured separately and in combination under identical, highly reproducible experimental conditions. Calcite growth rates (pH=8.5 and Ωc=4.5) are reduced by FA (0.5 mg/L) to 47% and by Mg (10-4 M) to 38%, compared to control experiments containing no added growth-rate inhibitor. Humic acid (HA) is twice as effective a calcite growth-rate inhibitor as FA. Calcite growth rate in the presence of both FA (0.5 mg/L) and Mg (10-4 M) is reduced to 5% of the control rate. Mg inhibits calcite growth rates by substitution for calcium ion at the growth site. In contrast, FA inhibits calcite growth rates by binding multiple carboxylate groups on the calcite surface. FA and Mg together have an increased affinity for the calcite growth sites reducing calcite growth rates.

  1. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acid and magnesium ion—Possible influence on biogenic calcite formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Increases in ocean surface water dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations retard biocalcification by reducing calcite supersaturation (Ωc). Reduced calcification rates may influence growth-rate dependent magnesium ion (Mg) incorporation into biogenic calcite modifying the use of calcifying organisms as paleoclimate proxies. Fulvic acid (FA) at biocalcification sites may further reduce calcification rates. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by FA and Mg, two common constituents of seawater and soil water involved in the formation of biogenic calcite, was measured separately and in combination under identical, highly reproducible experimental conditions. Calcite growth rates (pH=8.5 and Ωc=4.5) are reduced by FA (0.5 mg/L) to 47% and by Mg (10−4 M) to 38%, compared to control experiments containing no added growth-rate inhibitor. Humic acid (HA) is twice as effective a calcite growth-rate inhibitor as FA. Calcite growth rate in the presence of both FA (0.5 mg/L) and Mg (10−4 M) is reduced to 5% of the control rate. Mg inhibits calcite growth rates by substitution for calcium ion at the growth site. In contrast, FA inhibits calcite growth rates by binding multiple carboxylate groups on the calcite surface. FA and Mg together have an increased affinity for the calcite growth sites reducing calcite growth rates.

  2. Is There a Maximum Star Formation Rate in High-redshift Galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.; Chen, C.-C.; Owen, F. N.; Wang, W.-H.; Casey, C. M.; Lee, N.; Sanders, D. B.; Williams, J. P.

    2014-03-01

    We use the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope's SCUBA-2 camera to image a 400 arcmin2 area surrounding the GOODS-N field. The 850 μm rms noise ranges from a value of 0.49 mJy in the central region to 3.5 mJy at the outside edge. From these data, we construct an 850 μm source catalog to 2 mJy containing 49 sources detected above the 4σ level. We use an ultradeep (11.5 μJy at 5σ) 1.4 GHz image obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array together with observations made with the Submillimeter Array to identify counterparts to the submillimeter galaxies. For most cases of multiple radio counterparts, we can identify the correct counterpart from new and existing Submillimeter Array data. We have spectroscopic redshifts for 62% of the radio sources in the 9' radius highest sensitivity region (556/894) and 67% of the radio sources in the GOODS-N region (367/543). We supplement these with a modest number of additional photometric redshifts in the GOODS-N region (30). We measure millimetric redshifts from the radio to submillimeter flux ratios for the unidentified submillimeter sample, assuming an Arp 220 spectral energy distribution. We find a radio-flux-dependent K - z relation for the radio sources, which we use to estimate redshifts for the remaining radio sources. We determine the star formation rates (SFRs) of the submillimeter sources based on their radio powers and their submillimeter fluxes and find that they agree well. The radio data are deep enough to detect star-forming galaxies with SFRs >2000 M ⊙ yr-1 to z ~ 6. We find galaxies with SFRs up to ~6000 M ⊙ yr-1 over the redshift range z = 1.5-6, but we see evidence for a turn-down in the SFR distribution function above 2000 M ⊙ yr-1. The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope is operated by the Joint Astronomy Centre on behalf of the Science and Technology Facilities Council of the United Kingdom, the National Research Council of Canada, and (until 2013 March 31) the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific

  3. Is there a maximum star formation rate in high-redshift galaxies? , , ,

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.; Chen, C.-C.; Casey, C. M.; Lee, N.; Sanders, D. B.; Williams, J. P.; Owen, F. N.; Wang, W.-H.

    2014-03-20

    We use the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope's SCUBA-2 camera to image a 400 arcmin{sup 2} area surrounding the GOODS-N field. The 850 μm rms noise ranges from a value of 0.49 mJy in the central region to 3.5 mJy at the outside edge. From these data, we construct an 850 μm source catalog to 2 mJy containing 49 sources detected above the 4σ level. We use an ultradeep (11.5 μJy at 5σ) 1.4 GHz image obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array together with observations made with the Submillimeter Array to identify counterparts to the submillimeter galaxies. For most cases of multiple radio counterparts, we can identify the correct counterpart from new and existing Submillimeter Array data. We have spectroscopic redshifts for 62% of the radio sources in the 9' radius highest sensitivity region (556/894) and 67% of the radio sources in the GOODS-N region (367/543). We supplement these with a modest number of additional photometric redshifts in the GOODS-N region (30). We measure millimetric redshifts from the radio to submillimeter flux ratios for the unidentified submillimeter sample, assuming an Arp 220 spectral energy distribution. We find a radio-flux-dependent K – z relation for the radio sources, which we use to estimate redshifts for the remaining radio sources. We determine the star formation rates (SFRs) of the submillimeter sources based on their radio powers and their submillimeter fluxes and find that they agree well. The radio data are deep enough to detect star-forming galaxies with SFRs >2000 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} to z ∼ 6. We find galaxies with SFRs up to ∼6000 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} over the redshift range z = 1.5-6, but we see evidence for a turn-down in the SFR distribution function above 2000 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}.

  4. Star formation rate and extinction in faint z ∼ 4 Lyman break galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    To, Chun-Hao; Wang, Wei-Hao; Owen, Frazer N.

    2014-09-10

    We present a statistical detection of 1.5 GHz radio continuum emission from a sample of faint z ∼ 4 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). To constrain their extinction and intrinsic star formation rate (SFR), we combine the latest ultradeep Very Large Array 1.5 GHz radio image and the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) optical images in the GOODS-N. We select a large sample of 1771 z ∼ 4 LBGs from the ACS catalog using B {sub F435W}-dropout color criteria. Our LBG samples have I {sub F775W} ∼ 25-28 (AB), ∼0-3 mag fainter than M{sub UV}{sup ⋆} at z ∼ 4. In our stacked radio images, we find the LBGs to be point-like under our 2'' angular resolution. We measure their mean 1.5 GHz flux by stacking the measurements on the individual objects. We achieve a statistical detection of S {sub 1.5} {sub GHz} = 0.210 ± 0.075 μJy at ∼3σ for the first time on such a faint LBG population at z ∼ 4. The measurement takes into account the effects of source size and blending of multiple objects. The detection is visually confirmed by stacking the radio images of the LBGs, and the uncertainty is quantified with Monte Carlo simulations on the radio image. The stacked radio flux corresponds to an obscured SFR of 16.0 ± 5.7 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, and implies a rest-frame UV extinction correction factor of 3.8. This extinction correction is in excellent agreement with that derived from the observed UV continuum spectral slope, using the local calibration of Meurer et al. This result supports the use of the local calibration on high-redshift LBGs to derive the extinction correction and SFR, and also disfavors a steep reddening curve such as that of the Small Magellanic Cloud.

  5. Adriatic water masses, their rates of formation and transport through the Otranto Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilibić, Ivica; Orlić, Mirko

    2002-08-01

    The paper examines dense water formation in the South Adriatic by analysing temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen data collected during six along-Adriatic cruises carried out from the Jabuka Pit to the Otranto Strait. The least-squares tracer analysis method is applied to distinguish the fractions of the four characteristic deep, dense water masses of the Adriatic Sea. Two types of dense water generation are considered: (1) shelf type occurring during cold and dry winters in the North Adriatic and resulting in the North Adriatic dense water (NAdDW) which partially transforms to the Middle Adriatic dense water (MAdDW) on its way along the Italian shelf to the Bari Canyon, where it interacts with topography, violently mixes and sinks; and (2) deep-convection type occurring in the centre of the South Adriatic Pit, generating dense water which reaches down to 800 m, fills the bottom and enters the Ionian Sea through the Otranto Strait. Both processes are visible in the July 1976 data, as the previous winter was cold (February) and relatively dry over the whole Adriatic basin. Both types of processes can influence the bottom layer of the Otranto Strait, where the fraction of shelf-type dense water generated in the North and Middle Adriatic was occasionally observed along with the fraction of water generated by deep convection in the South Adriatic. During the non-generative period, the cyclonic South Adriatic Gyre moved more to the northwest in general, as the Levantine intermediate water (LIW) occupied southeastern part of the South Adriatic Pit. However, such behaviour was not observed in January 1980, when LIW filled much of the Adriatic, thus diminishing density gradients in the South Adriatic. By applying a simple box model of water masses, it is estimated that the decay time of the Adriatic water masses equals 26 months, whereas transport of the Adriatic deep water (ADW) in the Otranto Strait amounted to 0.34 Sv during summer 1975. In the winter 1974/75 the

  6. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 solar mass per year. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar mass per year for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  7. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2006-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 Solar Mass/yr. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O'Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar Mass/yr for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  8. Narrow-band Imaging of Massive Star-Forming Regions: Tracing Outflows and the Rate of Star-Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Kendall; Willis, Sarah; Hora, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Narrowband images targeting ionized hydrogen (Brackett gamma, 2.17 microns) and molecular hydrogen (2.12 microns) were obtained for six massive star-forming regions within the Milky Way, NGC 6334, G305, G3333, G3264, G3266, and G351. These regions are within 1-4 kpc from our solar system. The narrowband flux in Brackett gamma was used as a star-formation tracer to calculate a star-formation rate for each region. This is compared with other star-formation rates found using other methods such as the count of young stars and YSOs, and rates calculated from using other tracers (e.g. 70 micron monochromatic luminosity). The molecular hydrogen narrowband images were manually searched to locate outflows from young stars. Once these outflows are identified, it may help to get a better survey of the young stellar population. A better understanding of the stellar population distribution can lead to more accurate star-formation rates to compare to those calculated from star-formation tracers. We found the regions NGC 6334 and G3266 to have the highest levels of ongoing star formation activity as indicated by the number of molecular hydrogen objects (MHOs) detected. There are a total of 279 cataloged MHOs in 181 categorized systems for the six regions. There are a total of 150 identified potential driving sources.This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  9. Multi-epoch very long baseline interferometric observations of the nuclear starburst region of NGC 253: Improved modeling of the supernova and star formation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rampadarath, H.; Morgan, J. S.; Tingay, S. J.; Lenc, E.

    2014-01-01

    The results of multi-epoch observations of the southern starburst galaxy, NGC 253, with the Australian Long Baseline Array at 2.3 GHz are presented. As with previous radio interferometric observations of this galaxy, no new sources were discovered. By combining the results of this survey with Very Large Array observations at higher frequencies from the literature, spectra were derived and a free-free absorption model was fitted of 20 known sources in NGC 253. The results were found to be consistent with previous studies. The supernova remnant, 5.48-43.3, was imaged with the highest sensitivity and resolution to date, revealing a two-lobed morphology. Comparisons with previous observations of similar resolution give an upper limit of 10{sup 4} km s{sup –1} for the expansion speed of this remnant. We derive a supernova rate of <0.2 yr{sup –1} for the inner 300 pc using a model that improves on previous methods by incorporating an improved radio supernova peak luminosity distribution and by making use of multi-wavelength radio data spanning 21 yr. A star formation rate of SFR(M ≥ 5 M {sub ☉}) < 4.9 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} was also estimated using the standard relation between supernova and star formation rates. Our improved estimates of supernova and star formation rates are consistent with studies at other wavelengths. The results of our study point to the possible existence of a small population of undetected supernova remnants, suggesting a low rate of radio supernova production in NGC 253.

  10. Pattern formation in the monocot embryo as revealed by NAM and CUC3 orthologues from Zea mays L.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Roman; Werr, Wolfgang

    2005-07-01

    All aerial parts of a higher plant originate from the shoot apical meristem (SAM), which is initiated during embryogenesis as a part of the basic body plan. In contrast to dicot species, the SAM in Zea mays is not established at an apico-central, but at a lateral position of the transition stage embryo. Genetic and molecular studies in dicots have revealed that members of the NAC gene family of plant-specific transcription factors such as NO APICAL MERISTEM (NAM) from Petunia or the CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON (CUC) genes from Arabidopsis contribute essential functions to the establishment of the SAM and cotyledon separation. As an approach to the understanding of meristem formation in a monocot species, members of the maize NAC family highly related to the NAM/CUC genes were isolated and characterized. Our phylogenetic analysis indicates that two distinct NAM and CUC3 precursors already existed prior to the separation of mono- and dicot species. The allocation of the two maize paralogues, ZmNAM1 and ZmNAM2 together with PhNAM, AtCUC2 and AmCUP in one sub-branch and the corresponding expression patterns support their contribution to SAM establishment. In contrast, the ZmCUC3 orthologue is associated with boundary specification at the SAM periphery, where it visualizes which fraction of cells in the SAM is committed to a new leaf primordium. Other maize NAC gene family members are clearly positioned outside of this NAM/CUC3 branch and also exhibit highly cell type-specific expression patterns.

  11. Rate of phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue complex formation in acidic persulfate digested sample matrix for total dissolved phosphorus determination: importance of post-digestion pH adjustment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Lan; Zhang, Jia-Zhong

    2008-10-19

    Acidic persulfate oxidation is one of the most common procedures used to digest dissolved organic phosphorus compounds in water samples for total dissolved phosphorus determination. It has been reported that the rates of phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue complex formation were significantly reduced in the digested sample matrix. This study revealed that the intermediate products of persulfate oxidation, not the slight change in pH, cause the slowdown of color formation. This effect can be remedied by adjusting digested samples pH to a near neural to decompose the intermediate products. No disturbing effects of chlorine on the phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue formation in seawater were observed. It is noted that the modification of mixed reagent recipe cannot provide near neutral pH for the decomposition of the intermediate products of persulfate oxidation. This study provides experimental evidence not only to support the recommendation made in APHA standard methods that the pH of the digested sample must be adjusted to within a narrow range of sample, but also to improve the understanding of role of residue from persulfate decomposition on the subsequent phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue formation.

  12. On the Inconsistency between Cosmic Stellar Mass Density and Star Formation Rate up to z ∼ 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Wang, F. Y.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we test the discrepancy between the stellar mass density (SMD) and instantaneous star formation rate in the redshift range 0 < z < 8 using a large observational data sample. We first compile the measurements of SMDs up to z ∼ 8. Comparing the observed SMDs with the time-integral of instantaneous star formation history (SFH), we find that the observed SMDs are lower than that implied from the SFH at z < 4. We also use the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method to derive the best-fitting SFH from the observed SMD data. At 0.5 < z < 6, the observed star formation rate densities are larger than the best-fitting one, especially at z ∼ 2 where they are larger by a factor of about two. However, at lower (z < 0.5) and higher redshifts (z > 6), the derived SFH is consistent with the observations. This is the first time that the discrepancy between the observed SMD and instantaneous star formation rate has been tested up to very high redshift z ≈ 8 using the MCMC method and a varying recycling factor. Several possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed, such as underestimation of SMD, initial mass function, and evolution of cosmic metallicity.

  13. ON THE INCONSISTENCY BETWEEN COSMIC STELLAR MASS DENSITY AND STAR FORMATION RATE UP TO z ∼ 8

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, H.; Wang, F. Y.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we test the discrepancy between the stellar mass density (SMD) and instantaneous star formation rate in the redshift range 0 < z < 8 using a large observational data sample. We first compile the measurements of SMDs up to z ∼ 8. Comparing the observed SMDs with the time-integral of instantaneous star formation history (SFH), we find that the observed SMDs are lower than that implied from the SFH at z < 4. We also use the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method to derive the best-fitting SFH from the observed SMD data. At 0.5 < z < 6, the observed star formation rate densities are larger than the best-fitting one, especially at z ∼ 2 where they are larger by a factor of about two. However, at lower (z < 0.5) and higher redshifts (z > 6), the derived SFH is consistent with the observations. This is the first time that the discrepancy between the observed SMD and instantaneous star formation rate has been tested up to very high redshift z ≈ 8 using the MCMC method and a varying recycling factor. Several possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed, such as underestimation of SMD, initial mass function, and evolution of cosmic metallicity.

  14. STAR FORMATION RATES FOR STARBURST GALAXIES FROM ULTRAVIOLET, INFRARED, AND RADIO LUMINOSITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, Lusine A.; Weedman, Daniel W. E-mail: dweedman@isc.astro.cornell.edu

    2009-08-20

    We present a comparison of star formation rates (SFR) determined from mid-infrared 7.7 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) luminosity [SFR(PAH)], from 1.4 GHz radio luminosity [SFR(radio)], and from far-ultraviolet luminosity [SFR(UV)] for a sample of 287 starburst galaxies with z < 0.5 having Spitzer IRS observations. The previously adopted relation log [SFR(PAH)] = log [{nu}L {sub {nu}}(7.7 {mu}m)] - 42.57 {+-} 0.2, for SFR in M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and {nu}L {sub {nu}}(7.7 {mu}m) the luminosity at the peak of the 7.7 {mu}m PAH feature in erg s{sup -1}, is found to agree with SFR(radio). Comparing with SFR(UV) determined independently from ultraviolet observations of the same sources with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer mission (not corrected for dust extinction), the median log [SFR(PAH)/SFR(UV)] = 1.67, indicating that only 2% of the ultraviolet continuum typically escapes extinction by dust within a starburst. This ratio SFR(PAH)/SFR(UV) depends on infrared luminosity, with the form log [SFR(PAH)/SFR(UV)] = (0.53 {+-} 0.05)log [{nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.7 {mu}m)] - 21.5 {+-} 0.18, indicating that more luminous starbursts are also dustier. Using our adopted relation between {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.7 {mu}m) and L {sub ir}, this becomes log [SFR(PAH)/SFR(UV)]= (0.53 {+-} 0.05)log L{sub ir} - 4.11 {+-} 0.18, for L{sub ir} in L{sub sun}. Only blue compact dwarf galaxies show comparable or greater SFR(UV) compared to SFR(PAH). We also find that the ratio SFR(PAH)/SFR(UV) is similar to that in infrared-selected starbursts for a sample of Markarian starburst galaxies originally selected using optical classification, which implies that there is no significant selection effect in SFR(PAH)/SFR(UV) using starburst galaxies discovered by Spitzer. These results indicate that SFRs determined with ultraviolet luminosities require dust corrections by a factor of {approx}10 for typical local starbursts but this factor increases to >700 for the most luminous starbursts at z {approx} 2

  15. The star formation rate density and dust attenuation evolution over 12 Gyr with the VVDS surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucciati, O.; Tresse, L.; Ilbert, O.; Le Fèvre, O.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Cassata, P.; Franzetti, P.; Maccagni, D.; Scodeggio, M.; Zucca, E.; Zamorani, G.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bielby, R. M.; McCracken, H. J.; Zanichelli, A.; Vergani, D.

    2012-03-01

    Aims: We investigate the global galaxy evolution over ~12 Gyr (0.05 ≤ z ≤ 4.5), from the far ultraviolet (FUV) luminosity function (LF), luminosity density (LD), and star formation rate density (SFRD), using the VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey (VVDS), a single deep galaxy redshift survey with a well controlled selection function. Methods: We combine the VVDS Deep (17.5 ≤ IAB ≤ 24.0) and Ultra-Deep (23.00 ≤ i'AB ≤ 24.75) redshift surveys, totalizing ~11 000 galaxies, to estimate the rest-frame FUV LF and LD, using a wide wavelength range of deep photometry (337 < λ < 2310 nm). We extract the dust attenuation of the FUV radiation, embedded in the well-constrained spectral energy distributions. We then derive the dust-corrected SFRD. Results: We find a constant and flat faint-end slope α in the FUV LF at z < 1.7. At z > 1.7, we set α steepening with (1 + z). The absolute magnitude M*FUV steadily brightens in the entire range 0 < z < 4.5, and at z > 2 it is on average brighter than in the literature, while φ∗ is on average smaller. The evolution of our total LD shows a peak at z ≃ 2, clearly present also when considering all sources of uncertainty. The SFRD history peaks as well at z ≃ 2. It first steadily rises by a factor of ~6 during 2 Gyr (from z = 4.5 to z = 2), and then decreases by a factor of ~12 during 10 Gyr down to z = 0.05. This peak is mainly produced by a similar peak within the population of galaxies with -21.5 ≤ MFUV ≤ - 19.5. As times goes by, the total SFRD is dominated by fainter and fainter galaxies. The mean dust attenuation of the global galaxy population rises fast by 1 mag during 2 Gyr from z ≃ 4.5 to z ~ 2, reaches slowly its maximum at z ≃ 1 (AFUV ≃ 2.2 mag), and then decreases by 1.1 mag during 7 Gyr down to z ≃ 0. Conclusions: We have derived the cosmic SFRD history and the total dust amount in galaxies over a continuous period of ~12 Gyr, using a single homogeneous spectroscopic redshift sample. The presence of a

  16. Growth rate effects on the formation of dislocation loops around deep helium bubbles in Tungsten

    DOE PAGES

    Sandoval, Luis; Perez, Danny; Uberuaga, Blas P.; ...

    2016-11-15

    Here, the growth process of spherical helium bubbles located 6 nm below a (100) surface is studied using molecular dynamics and parallel replica dynamics simulations, over growth rates from 106 to 1012 helium atoms per second. Slower growth rates lead to a release of pressure and lower helium content as compared with fast growth cases. In addition, at slower growth rates, helium bubbles are not decorated by multiple dislocation loops, as these tend to merge or emit given sufficient time. At faster rates, dislocation loops nucleate faster than they can emit, leading to a more complicated dislocation structure around themore » bubble.« less

  17. Growth rate effects on the formation of dislocation loops around deep helium bubbles in Tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, Luis; Perez, Danny; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Voter, Arthur Ford

    2016-11-15

    Here, the growth process of spherical helium bubbles located 6 nm below a (100) surface is studied using molecular dynamics and parallel replica dynamics simulations, over growth rates from 106 to 1012 helium atoms per second. Slower growth rates lead to a release of pressure and lower helium content as compared with fast growth cases. In addition, at slower growth rates, helium bubbles are not decorated by multiple dislocation loops, as these tend to merge or emit given sufficient time. At faster rates, dislocation loops nucleate faster than they can emit, leading to a more complicated dislocation structure around the bubble.

  18. Steadily increasing star formation rates in galaxies observed at 3 ≲ z ≲ 5 in the CANDELS/GOODS-S field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seong-Kook; Ferguson, Henry C.; Dahlen, Tomas; Somerville, Rachel S.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Wiklind, Tommy

    2014-03-10

    We investigate the star formation histories (SFHs) of high redshift (3 ≲ z ≲ 5) star-forming galaxies selected based on their rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) colors in the CANDELS/GOODS-S field. By comparing the results from the spectral-energy-distribution-fitting analysis with two different assumptions about the SFHs—i.e., exponentially declining SFHs as well as increasing ones, we conclude that the SFHs of high-redshift star-forming galaxies increase with time rather than exponentially decline. We also examine the correlations between the star formation rates (SFRs) and the stellar masses. When the galaxies are fit with rising SFRs, we find that the trend seen in the data qualitatively matches the expectations from a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. The mean specific SFR is shown to increase with redshift, also in agreement with the theoretical prediction. From the derived tight correlation between stellar masses and SFRs, we derive the mean SFH of star-forming galaxies in the redshift range of 3 ≤ z ≤ 5, which shows a steep power-law (with power α = 5.85) increase with time. We also investigate the formation timescales and mean stellar population ages of these star-forming galaxies. Our analysis reveals that UV-selected star-forming galaxies have a broad range of the formation redshift. The derived stellar masses and the stellar population ages show positive correlation in a sense that more massive galaxies are on average older, but with significant scatter. This large scatter implies that the galaxies' mass is not the only factor which affects the growth or star formation of high-redshift galaxies.

  19. Development of a Brief Rating Scale for the Formative Assessment of Positive Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cressey, James M.

    2010-01-01

    In order to provide effective social, emotional, and behavioral supports to all students, there is a need for formative assessment tools that can help determine the responsiveness of students to intervention. Schoolwide positive behavior support (SWPBS) is one framework that can provide evidence-based intervention within a 3-tiered model to reach…

  20. Genome-wide mutagenesis of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri reveals novel genetic determinants and regulation mechanisms of biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyun; Wang, Nian

    2011-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) causes citrus canker disease, a major threat to citrus production worldwide. Accumulating evidence suggests that the formation of biofilms on citrus leaves plays an important role in the epiphytic survival of this pathogen prior to the development of canker disease. However, the process of Xac biofilm formation is poorly understood. Here, we report a genome-scale study of Xac biofilm formation in which we identified 92 genes, including 33 novel genes involved in biofilm formation and 7 previously characterized genes, colR, fhaB, fliC, galU, gumD, wxacO, and rbfC, known to be important for Xac biofilm formation. In addition, 52 other genes with defined or putative functions in biofilm formation were identified, even though they had not previously reported been to be associated with biofilm formation. The 92 genes were isolated from 292 biofilm-defective mutants following a screen of a transposon insertion library containing 22,000 Xac strain 306 mutants. Further analyses indicated that 16 of the novel genes are involved in the production of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), 7 genes are involved in signaling and regulatory pathways, and 5 genes have unknown roles in biofilm formation. Furthermore, two novel genes, XAC0482, encoding a haloacid dehalogenase-like phosphatase, and XAC0494 (designated as rbfS), encoding a two-component sensor protein, were confirmed to be biofilm-related genes through complementation assays. Our data demonstrate that the formation of mature biofilm requires EPS, LPS, both flagellum-dependent and flagellum-independent cell motility, secreted proteins and extracellular DNA. Additionally, multiple signaling pathways are involved in Xac biofilm formation. This work is the first report on a genome-wide scale of the genetic processes of biofilm formation in plant pathogenic bacteria. The report provides significant new information about the genetic determinants and

  1. Genome-Wide Mutagenesis of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri Reveals Novel Genetic Determinants and Regulation Mechanisms of Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinyun; Wang, Nian

    2011-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) causes citrus canker disease, a major threat to citrus production worldwide. Accumulating evidence suggests that the formation of biofilms on citrus leaves plays an important role in the epiphytic survival of this pathogen prior to the development of canker disease. However, the process of Xac biofilm formation is poorly understood. Here, we report a genome-scale study of Xac biofilm formation in which we identified 92 genes, including 33 novel genes involved in biofilm formation and 7 previously characterized genes, colR, fhaB, fliC, galU, gumD, wxacO, and rbfC, known to be important for Xac biofilm formation. In addition, 52 other genes with defined or putative functions in biofilm formation were identified, even though they had not previously reported been to be associated with biofilm formation. The 92 genes were isolated from 292 biofilm-defective mutants following a screen of a transposon insertion library containing 22,000 Xac strain 306 mutants. Further analyses indicated that 16 of the novel genes are involved in the production of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), 7 genes are involved in signaling and regulatory pathways, and 5 genes have unknown roles in biofilm formation. Furthermore, two novel genes, XAC0482, encoding a haloacid dehalogenase-like phosphatase, and XAC0494 (designated as rbfS), encoding a two-component sensor protein, were confirmed to be biofilm-related genes through complementation assays. Our data demonstrate that the formation of mature biofilm requires EPS, LPS, both flagellum-dependent and flagellum-independent cell motility, secreted proteins and extracellular DNA. Additionally, multiple signaling pathways are involved in Xac biofilm formation. This work is the first report on a genome-wide scale of the genetic processes of biofilm formation in plant pathogenic bacteria. The report provides significant new information about the genetic determinants and

  2. Measuring Star-Formation Rates of AGNs and QSOs using a new calibration from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papovich, Casey

    Understanding the coevolution of star-formation and supermassive black hole accretion is one of the key questions in galaxy formation theory. This relation is important for understanding why at present the mass in galaxy bulges (on scales of kpc) correlates so tightly with the mass of galaxy central supermassive blackholes (on scales of AU). Feedback from supermassive black hole accretion may also be responsible for heating or expelling cold gas from galaxies, shutting off the fuel for star-formation and additional black hole growth. Did bulges proceed the formation of black holes, or vice versa, or are they contemporaneous? Therefore, understanding the exact rates of star-formation and supermassive black hole growth, and how they evolve with time and galaxy mass has deep implications for how galaxies form. It has previously been nearly impossible to study simultaneously both star-formation and accretion onto supermassive black holes in galaxies because the emission from black hole accretion contaminates nearly all diagnostics of star-formation. The "standard" diagnostics for the star-formation rate (the emission from hydrogen, UV emission, midIR emission, far-IR emission, etc) are not suitable for measuring star-formation rates in galaxies with actively accreting supermassive blackholes. In this proposal, the researchers request NASA/ADP funding for an archival study using spectroscopy with the Spitzer Space Telescope to measure simultaneously the star-formation rate (SFR) and bolometric emission from accreting supermassive blackholes to understand the complex relation between both processes. The key to this study is that they will develop a new calibrator for SFRs in galaxies with active supermassive black holes based on the molecular emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which emit strongly in the mid-IR (3 - 20 micron) and are very strong in spectra from the Spitzer Space Telescope. The PAH molecules exist near photo-dissociation regions, and

  3. A Multi-Pathway Perspective on Protein Aggregation: Implications for Control of the Rate and Extent of Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Damien; Kardos, József; Edskes, Herman; Carver, John A.; Goto, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The nucleation-growth model has been used extensively for characterizing in vitro amyloid fibril formation kinetics and for simulating the relationship between amyloid and disease. In the majority of studies amyloid has been considered as the dominant, or sole, aggregation end product, with the presence of other competing non-amyloid aggregation processes, for example amorphous aggregate formation, being largely ignored. Here, we examine possible regulatory effects that off-pathway processes might exert on the rate and extent of amyloid formation – in particular their potential for providing false positives and negatives in the evaluation of anti-amyloidogenic agents. Furthermore, we investigate how such competing reactions might influence the standard interpretation of amyloid aggregation as a two-state system. We conclude by discussing our findings in terms of the general concepts of supersaturation and system metastability – providing some mechanistic insight as to how these empirical phenomena may manifest themselves in the amyloid arena. PMID:25647034

  4. A multi-pathway perspective on protein aggregation: implications for control of the rate and extent of amyloid formation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Damien; Kardos, József; Edskes, Herman; Carver, John A; Goto, Yuji

    2015-03-12

    The nucleation-growth model has been used extensively for characterizing in vitro amyloid fibril formation kinetics and for simulating the relationship between amyloid and disease. In the majority of studies amyloid has been considered as the dominant, or sole, aggregation end product, with the presence of other competing non-amyloid aggregation processes, for example amorphous aggregate formation, being largely ignored. Here, we examine possible regulatory effects that off-pathway processes might exert on the rate and extent of amyloid formation - in particular their potential for providing false positives and negatives in the evaluation of anti-amyloidogenic agents. Furthermore, we investigate how such competing reactions might influence the standard interpretation of amyloid aggregation as a two-state system. We conclude by discussing our findings in terms of the general concepts of supersaturation and system metastability - providing some mechanistic insight as to how these empirical phenomena may manifest themselves in the amyloid arena.

  5. Interfacial film formation: influence on oil spreading rates in lab basin tests and dispersant effectiveness testing in a wave tank.

    PubMed

    King, Thomas L; Clyburne, Jason A C; Lee, Kenneth; Robinson, Brian J

    2013-06-15

    Test facilities such as lab basins and wave tanks are essential when evaluating the use of chemical dispersants to treat oil spills at sea. However, these test facilities have boundaries (walls) that provide an ideal environment for surface (interfacial) film formation on seawater. Surface films may form from surfactants naturally present in crude oil as well as dispersant drift/overspray when applied to an oil spill. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of surface film formation on oil spreading rates in a small scale lab basin and on dispersant effectiveness conducted in a large scale wave tank. The process of crude oil spreading on the surface of the basin seawater was influenced in the presence of a surface film as shown using a 1st order kinetic model. In addition, interfacial film formation can greatly influence chemically dispersed crude oil in a large scale dynamic wave tank.

  6. Reduction in haze formation rate on prebiotic Earth in the presence of hydrogen.

    PubMed

    DeWitt, H Langley; Trainer, Melissa G; Pavlov, Alex A; Hasenkopf, Christa A; Aiken, Allison C; Jimenez, Jose L; McKay, Christopher P; Toon, Owen B; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2009-06-01

    Recent attempts to resolve the faint young Sun paradox have focused on an early Earth atmosphere with elevated levels of the greenhouse gases methane (CH(4)) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) that could have provided adequate warming to Earth's surface. On Titan, the photolysis of CH(4) has been shown to create a thick haze layer that cools its surface. Unlike Titan, however, early Earth's atmosphere likely contained high amounts of CO(2) and hydrogen (H(2)). In this work, we examine haze formation in an early Earth atmosphere composed of CO(2), H(2), N(2), and CH(4), with a CO(2)/CH(4) ratio of 10 and a H(2)/CO(2) ratio of up to 15. To initiate aerosol formation, a broad-spectrum ultraviolet (UV) energy source with emission at Lyman-alpha was used to simulate the solar spectrum. Aerosol composition and total aerosol mass produced as a function of reagent gas were measured with an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Results show an order of magnitude decrease in haze production with the addition of H(2), with no significant change in the chemical composition of the haze. We calculate that the presence of H(2) on early Earth could thus have favored warmer surface temperatures and yet allowed photochemical haze formation to deliver complex organic species to early Earth's surface.

  7. Estimating the carbon sequestration capacity of shale formations using methane production rates.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhiyuan; Clarens, Andres

    2013-10-01

    Hydraulically fractured shale formations are being developed widely for oil and gas production. They could also represent an attractive repository for permanent geologic carbon sequestration. Shales have a low permeability, but they can adsorb an appreciable amount of CO2 on fracture surfaces. Here, a computational method is proposed for estimating the CO2 sequestration capacity of a fractured shale formation and it is applied to the Marcellus shale in the eastern United States. The model is based on historical and projected CH4 production along with published data and models for CH4/CO2 sorption equilibria and kinetics. The results suggest that the Marcellus shale alone could store between 10.4 and 18.4 Gt of CO2 between now and 2030, which represents more than 50% of total U.S. CO2 emissions from stationary sources over the same period. Other shale formations with comparable pressure-temperature conditions, such as Haynesville and Barnett, could provide significant additional storage capacity. The mass transfer kinetic results indicate that injection of CO2 would proceed several times faster than production of CH4. Additional considerations not included in this model could either reinforce (e.g., leveraging of existing extraction and monitoring infrastructure) or undermine (e.g., leakage or seismicity potential) this approach, but the sequestration capacity estimated here supports continued exploration into this pathway for producing carbon neutral energy.

  8. Circulation and north atlantic deep water formation rates based on evolution of the cfc signal in the north atlantic ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smethie, W.; Lebel, D.

    2003-04-01

    The first high quality CFC measurements in the North Atlantic were made in 1981 as part of the TTO program. The WOCE survey in 1996-1998 provided the first synoptic CFC survey of the entire North Atlantic, but CFC measurements were made throughout the North Atlantic on a non-synoptic basis prior to WOCE. The pre-WOCE and WOCE CFC data sets will be compared on a regional basis using maps of concentrations on neutral density surfaces, maps of CFC-11 inventories, and plots of CFCs verses potential temperature for the major components of NADW. Circulation patterns and time scales inferred from the CFC distributions will be presented. The CFC inventories reflect the formation rate of a given water mass and formation rates calculated from the CFC inventories will be presented and compared for pre-WOCE and WOCE data.

  9. Performance comparison of RZ pulse formats in PDM-16QAM high rates transmissions with optical pre-filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, E. P.; Carvalho, L. H. H.; Lopes, M. L.; Ribeiro, V. B.; Bordonalli, A. C.; Oliveira, J. C. R. F.

    2013-01-01

    The digitally modulated signals spectral density depends directly on pulse format used for information symbols transmission. The modulated signal spectral occupancy can be modified according to the channel frequency response to facilitate information retrieval at the receiver. New generation of coherent optical transmission systems operating at high rates are subject to various bandwidth restrictions aspects, such as electronic components limitations and optical filtering via ROADMs deployed on networks. As noted in technical literature, the RZ pulse formats have some advantages compared to traditional NRZ pulses in optical fiber transmissions. In particular, RZ pulses have a better performance in situations where nonlinear effects of the fiber severely impact the quality of transmission. Among other situations, this occurs in systems that employ modulation formats for high order QAM (16QAM, 64QAM, etc.). Moreover, since RZ pulses have shorter duty cycle, temporal spread of the transmitted symbols causes less performance degradation due to ISI compared with NRZ pulses. This report presents results of experiments carried out in a 226 km recirculation loop, to evaluate the performance of NRZ, RZ 67%, 50% RZ and RZ 33% pulse shapes in a transmission of DP-16QAM (or PDM-16QAM). As application it is proposed and experimentally demonstrated a transmission system that employ 28 GBaud dual carrier PDM-16QAM channels operating with a total line rate of 448 Gb/s each, utilizing RZ pulse format and carrier narrow pre-filtering to increase spectral efficiency of transmission, aggregating a 400G channel in a 75 GHz WDM grid.

  10. Critical rate of electrolyte circulation for preventing zinc dendrite formation in a zinc-bromine redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hyeon Sun; Park, Jong Ho; Ra, Ho Won; Jin, Chang-Soo; Yang, Jung Hoon

    2016-09-01

    In a zinc-bromine redox flow battery, a nonaqueous and dense polybromide phase formed because of bromide oxidation in the positive electrolyte during charging. This formation led to complicated two-phase flow on the electrode surface. The polybromide and aqueous phases led to different kinetics of the Br/Br- redox reaction; poor mixing of the two phases caused uneven redox kinetics on the electrode surface. As the Br/Br- redox reaction was coupled with the zinc deposition reaction, the uneven redox reaction on the positive electrode was accompanied by nonuniform zinc deposition and zinc dendrite formation, which degraded battery stability. A single-flow cell was operated at varying electrolyte circulation rates and current densities. Zinc dendrite formation was observed after cell disassembly following charge-discharge testing. In addition, the flow behavior in the positive compartment was observed by using a transparent version of the cell. At low rate of electrolyte circulation, the polybromide phase clearly separated from the aqueous phase and accumulated at the bottom of the flow frame. In the corresponding area on the negative electrode, a large amount of zinc dendrites was observed after charge-discharge testing. Therefore, a minimum circulation rate should be considered to avoid poor mixing of the positive electrolyte.

  11. Bluff formation and long-term recession rates, southwestern Lake Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Rovey, C.W. II )

    1992-01-01

    Where eroding cohesive sediments are present, Lake Michigan bluffs range up to 140 ft. in height and expose multiple stratigraphic units. According to the model presented here, bluffs form as a wave cut terrace erodes inland from a point near the original shoreline. The erosion plane is nearly horizontal, in contrast with the eastward dip of the glacial units inherited from underlying bedrock. Therefore, terraces eroding inland (west) produce progressively higher bluffs and expose successively older units at the toe and beneath the lake. This process repeated several times as lake levels sequentially dropped to their modern stage. The initial modern shoreline, and hence the width of the wave cut terrace, was determined from 4 offshore seismic profiles. It is picked as an inflection point in the slope of the lake bed, occurring offshore of dipping reflectors intersecting the lake bottom. The calculated average recession rate over the 2,500 year duration of the modern stage is 5 ft/yr in contrast to average rates of 2 ft/yr measured over the last century. Thus rates decrease through time as the terrace widens and wave energy is damped. By correlating bluff height to amount of recession of modern bluffs, a third rate of 12 ft/yr of the first 800 years of a recession is calculated for relict bluffs formed at the Nipissing II level. The 3 rates define a steeply decaying exponential curve in early stages of bluff retreat, flattening into a nearly linear function after 1,000 years.

  12. Dose rate effects on damage formation in ion-implanted gallium arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, T.E.; Holland, O.W.

    1990-09-01

    The residual damage in GaAs was measured by ion channeling following implantation of either 100 keV {sup 30}Si{sup +} at temperatures of 300K or 77K, or 360 keV {sup 120}Sn{sup +} at 300K. For room-temperature Si implants and fluences between 1 and 10 {times} 10{sup 14} Si/cm{sup 2}, the amount of damage created was strongly dependent upon the ion current density, which was varied between 0.05 and 12 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}. Two different stages of damage growth were identified by an abrupt increase in the damage growth rate as a function of fluence, and the threshold fluence for the onset of the second stage was found to be dependent on the dose rate. The dose rate effect on damage was substantially weaker for {sup 120}Sn{sup +} implants and was negligible for Si implants at 77K. The damage was found to be most sensitive to the average current density, demonstrating that the defects which are the precursors to the residual dose-rate dependent damage have active lifetimes of at least 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} s. The dose rate effect and its variation with ion mass and temperature are discussed in the context of homogeneous nucleation and growth of damage during ion irradiation.

  13. The rate of iron corrosion for different organic carbon sources during biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Park, S K; Choi, S C; Kim, Y K

    2007-01-01

    The effects of total organic carbon and biofilm on microbial corrosion were quantified using serum bottles in a 2 x 2 factorial design. Both organic carbon and biofilm bacteria had a significant effect on the iron corrosion rate, irrespective of the levels of the other variable (p = 0.05). There was no evidence of interaction between organic carbon and biofilm bacteria. Within the tested levels, the addition of exogenous organic carbon increased the corrosion rate by an average of 3.838 mg dm(-2) day(-1) (mdd), but the presence of biofilm bacteria decreased the rate by an average of 2.305 mdd. More iron was released from the coupon in response to organic carbon. Powder x-ray diffractometry indicated that the scales deposited on the corroded iron surface consisted primarily of lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH), magnetite (Fe3O4) and hematite (alpha-Fe203). Corrosion rates by different organic carbon sources, i.e. acetate, glucose and humic substances, were compared using an annular biofilm reactor. One-way ANOVA suggested that the effect of each carbon source on corrosion was not the same, with the iron corrosion rate highest for glucose, followed by acetate, humic substances and the control. Magnetite was a major constituent of the corrosion products scraped from iron slides. Examination of community-level physiological profile patterns on the biofilms indicated that acetate was a carbon source that could promote the metabolic and functional potentials of biofilm communities.

  14. The C. elegans DSB-2 protein reveals a regulatory network that controls competence for meiotic DSB formation and promotes crossover assurance.

    PubMed

    Rosu, Simona; Zawadzki, Karl A; Stamper, Ericca L; Libuda, Diana E; Reese, Angela L; Dernburg, Abby F; Villeneuve, Anne M

    2013-01-01

    For most organisms, chromosome segregation during meiosis relies on deliberate induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and repair of a subset of these DSBs as inter-homolog crossovers (COs). However, timing and levels of DSB formation must be tightly controlled to avoid jeopardizing genome integrity. Here we identify the DSB-2 protein, which is required for efficient DSB formation during C. elegans meiosis but is dispensable for later steps of meiotic recombination. DSB-2 localizes to chromatin during the time of DSB formation, and its disappearance coincides with a decline in RAD-51 foci marking early recombination intermediates and precedes appearance of COSA-1 foci marking CO-designated sites. These and other data suggest that DSB-2 and its paralog DSB-1 promote competence for DSB formation. Further, immunofluorescence analyses of wild-type gonads and various meiotic mutants reveal that association of DSB-2 with chromatin is coordinated with multiple distinct aspects of the meiotic program, including the phosphorylation state of nuclear envelope protein SUN-1 and dependence on RAD-50 to load the RAD-51 recombinase at DSB sites. Moreover, association of DSB-2 with chromatin is prolonged in mutants impaired for either DSB formation or formation of downstream CO intermediates. These and other data suggest that association of DSB-2 with chromatin is an indicator of competence for DSB formation, and that cells respond to a deficit of CO-competent recombination intermediates by prolonging the DSB-competent state. In the context of this model, we propose that formation of sufficient CO-competent intermediates engages a negative feedback response that leads to cessation of DSB formation as part of a major coordinated transition in meiotic prophase progression. The proposed negative feedback regulation of DSB formation simultaneously (1) ensures that sufficient DSBs are made to guarantee CO formation and (2) prevents excessive DSB levels that could have deleterious

  15. Efficient quantum-classical method for computing thermal rate constant of recombination: application to ozone formation.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Mikhail V; Babikov, Dmitri

    2012-05-14

    Efficient method is proposed for computing thermal rate constant of recombination reaction that proceeds according to the energy transfer mechanism, when an energized molecule is formed from reactants first, and is stabilized later by collision with quencher. The mixed quantum-classical theory for the collisional energy transfer and the ro-vibrational energy flow [M. Ivanov and D. Babikov, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144107 (2011)] is employed to treat the dynamics of molecule + quencher collision. Efficiency is achieved by sampling simultaneously (i) the thermal collision energy, (ii) the impact parameter, and (iii) the incident direction of quencher, as well as (iv) the rotational state of energized molecule. This approach is applied to calculate third-order rate constant of the recombination reaction that forms the (16)O(18)O(16)O isotopomer of ozone. Comparison of the predicted rate vs. experimental result is presented.

  16. Fault Mirror Formation and Destruction Correlates With Slip Rates on Carbonate Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siman-Tov, S.; Aharonov, E.; Boneh, Y.; Reches, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Glossy, highly smooth surfaces, recently termed Fault Mirrors (FMs), are commonly observed on exposed fault-zones. At least for carbonate faults, TEM investigation of FMs indicates that they are composed of a thin layer of ultra-fine, nano-size grains (Siman-Tov et al., 2013). Recent carbonate shearing experiments suggest FMs form during seismic slip and may serve as seismic indicators. To explore the formation and destruction of FMs we performed rotary shear experiments on experimental fault surfaces in three types of limestone. The experiments were conducted at slip-velocities ranging between V=0.001-0.7 m/s, and normal stress up to 1.5 MPa. FMs started to develop when the slip velocity exceeded a few cm/s, and fault coverage by FMs increased systematically with velocity, reaching ~ 50% of fault surface at V=0.6 m/s. No FMs developed at V~<3 cm/s, and importantly, pre-existing FMs were destroyed at these low velocities. The measured friction coefficient, μ, was found to be inversely correlated with the FM coverage: μ~0.8 for no-FM, low velocity, and μ~0.4 for 50% FMs coverage at high velocity. The analysis of the experimental thermal conditions and SEM FM images suggests that the FMs form by sintering of gouge nano-grains in a process similar to industrial 'hot pressing'. We propose that formation and destruction of FMs is indicative of a thermally and mechanically controlled brittle-ductile transition: destruction of the highly smoothed fault mirrors is caused by brittle wear at relatively low temperature, while their formation is controlled by ductile deformation at higher temperature. We further suggest that the observed velocity weakening at high velocity is caused by formation of an extremely localized and ductile nano-slip zone that reduces friction. Based on these results we conclude that the presence of fault mirrors along natural carbonate faults indicates that the fault slipped at seismic velocities and had weakened during the slip event, and also in

  17. AGN contamination in total infrared determined star formation rates in dusty galaxies at z~2-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzei, Renato; Sharon, Chelsea E.; Riechers, Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Along with theoretical work that suggests feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) may quench star formation in massive galaxies, the temporal coincidence between the peak of cosmic star formation rates and black hole accretion rates suggests that AGN are common in star forming galaxies at z~2-3. Since star forming galaxies at these epochs are also very dusty, it is important that we correct galaxies’ long-wavelength properties for the presence of dust-obscured AGN in order to accurately capture their star formation rates and gas characteristics. We present a spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis of several un-lensed z~2-3 dusty star-forming galaxies from Pope et al. (2008) and Coppin et al. (2010), which we compare to several other high-z starbursts with well sampled SEDs. We constructed dust SEDs from existing Spitzer, Herschel, and SCUBA-2 photometry catalogues with data between 3.6 and 850 μm. For the SED fits, we used the Code Investigating GALaxy Emission (CIGALE), since it self-consistently determines the dust attenuation of stars and dust emission in the infrared in addition to determining the dust emission from obscured AGN (Noll et al. 2009; Serra et al. 2011). Our best-fit SEDs have typical reduced χ2 values between 0.2 and ~3. We use the output from CIGALE to determine the fraction of the total infrared luminosity (LTIR 8-1000 um) from star formation and from any potential obscured AGN. In order to examine the effects of buried AGN on the integrated Schmidt-Kennicutt relation (log(LTIR) vs. log(L'CO)), we compare our new LTIR to recently obtained CO(1-0) line luminosities from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. Unaccounted for dust emission from AGN can artificially inflate the star formation rate inferred from LTIR, and may therefore offset starburst galaxies from the local Schmidt-Kennicutt relation and increase the slope of the relation, which can affect the inferred drivers of star formation.

  18. Slow Evolution of the Specific Star Formation Rate at z > 2: The Impact of Dust, Emission Lines, and a Rising Star Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Valentino; Bouwens, Rychard; Illingworth, Garth; Labbé, Ivo; Oesch, Pascal; Franx, Marijn; Magee, Dan

    2014-01-01

    We measure the evolution of the specific star formation rate (sSFR = SFR/M stellar) between redshift 4 and 6 to assess the reported "constant" sSFR at z > 2. We derive stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs) for a large sample of 750 z ~ 4-6 galaxies in the GOODS-S field by fitting stellar population models to their spectral energy distributions. Dust extinction is derived from the observed UV colors. We evaluate different star formation histories (SFHs, constant and rising with time) and the impact of optical emission lines. The SFR and M stellar values are insensitive to whether the SFH is constant or rising. The derived sSFR is very similar (within 0.1 dex) in two M stellar bins centered at 1 and 5 × 109 M ⊙. The effect of emission lines was, however, quite pronounced. Assuming no contribution from emission lines, the sSFR for galaxies at 5 × 109 M ⊙ evolves weakly at z > 2 (sSFR(z)vprop(1 + z)0.6 ± 0.1), consistent with previous results. When emission lines are included in the rest-frame optical bands, consistent with the observed Infrared Array Camera [3.6] and [4.5] fluxes, the sSFR shows higher values at high redshift following sSFR(z)vprop(1 + z)1.0 ± 0.1, i.e., the best-fit evolution shows a sSFR ~2.3 × higher at z ~ 6 than at z ~ 2. This is, however, a substantially weaker trend than that found at z < 2 and even than that expected from current models for z > 2 (sSFR(z)vprop(1 + z)2.5). Even accounting for emission lines, the observed sSFR(z) trends at z > 2 are still in tension with theoretical expectations.

  19. A Model for the Formation of the Chesapeake Bay Impact Crater as Revealed by Drilling and Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, G. S.; Kenkmann, T.; Wünnemann, K.; Wittmann, A.; Reimold, W. U.; Melosh, H. J.

    The combination of numerical simulation results and petrographic analysis of drill core from the recent ICDP-USGS drilling project provides new insight into the formation of the Chesapeake Bay impact crater.

  20. Simulation of Cooling Rate Effects on Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb Crack Formation in Direct Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lei; Li, Wei; Chen, Xueyang; Zhang, Yunlu; Newkirk, Joe; Liou, Frank; Dietrich, David

    2017-03-01

    Transient temperature history is vital in direct laser deposition (DLD) as it reveals the cooling rate at specific temperatures. Cooling rate directly relates to phase transformation and types of microstructure formed in deposits. In this paper, finite element analysis simulation was employed to study the transient temperature history and cooling rate at different experimental setups in the Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb DLD process. An innovative prediction strategy was developed to model with a moving Gaussian distribution heat source and element birth and death technology in ANSYS®, and fabricate crack-free deposits. This approach helps to understand and analyze the impact of cooling rate and also explain phase information gathered from x-ray diffraction.

  1. Zebrafish embryo screen for mycobacterial genes involved in the initiation of granuloma formation reveals a newly identified ESX-1 component.

    PubMed

    Stoop, Esther J M; Schipper, Tim; Rosendahl Huber, Sietske K; Nezhinsky, Alexander E; Verbeek, Fons J; Gurcha, Sudagar S; Besra, Gurdyal S; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Bitter, Wilbert; van der Sar, Astrid M

    2011-07-01

    The hallmark of tuberculosis (TB) is the formation of granulomas, which are clusters of infected macrophages surrounded by additional macrophages, neutrophils and lymphocytes. Although it has long been thought that granulomas are beneficial for the host, there is evidence that mycobacteria also promote the formation of these structures. In this study, we aimed to identify new mycobacterial factors involved in the initial stages of granuloma formation. We exploited the zebrafish embryo Mycobacterium marinum infection model to study initiation of granuloma formation and developed an in vivo screen to select for random M. marinum mutants that were unable to induce granuloma formation efficiently. Upon screening 200 mutants, three mutants repeatedly initiated reduced granuloma formation. One of the mutants was found to be defective in the espL gene, which is located in the ESX-1 cluster. The ESX-1 cluster is disrupted in the Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine strain and encodes a specialized secretion system known to be important for granuloma formation and virulence. Although espL has not been implicated in protein secretion before, we observed a strong effect on the secretion of the ESX-1 substrates ESAT-6 and EspE. We conclude that our zebrafish embryo M. marinum screen is a useful tool to identify mycobacterial genes involved in the initial stages of granuloma formation and that we have identified a new component of the ESX-1 secretion system. We are confident that our approach will contribute to the knowledge of mycobacterial virulence and could be helpful for the development of new TB vaccines.

  2. Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Molecular Clouds Regulated by Radiation Feedback Forces. I. Star Formation Rate and Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raskutti, Sudhir; Ostriker, Eve C.; Skinner, M. Aaron

    2016-10-01

    Radiation feedback from stellar clusters is expected to play a key role in setting the rate and efficiency of star formation in giant molecular clouds. To investigate how radiation forces influence realistic turbulent systems, we have conducted a series of numerical simulations employing the Hyperion radiation hydrodynamics solver, considering the regime that is optically thick to ultraviolet and optically thin to infrared radiation. Our model clouds cover initial surface densities between Σ cl,0∼ 10--300 M⊙ pc-2, with varying initial turbulence. We follow them through turbulent, self-gravitating collapse, star cluster formation, and cloud dispersal by stellar radiation. All our models display a log-normal distribution of gas surface density Σ for an initial virial parameter αvir,0=2, the log-normal standard deviation is σln Σ =1-1.5 and the star formation rate coefficient ɛff,ρ=0.3-0.5, both of which are sensitive to turbulence but not radiation feedback. The net star formation efficiency (SFE) ɛfinal increases with Σcl,0 and decreases with α vir,0. We interpret these results via a simple conceptual framework, whereby steady star formation increases the radiation force, such that local gas patches at successively higher Σ become unbound. Based on this formalism (with fixed σln Σ), we provide an analytic upper bound on ɛfinal, which is in good agreement with our numerical results. The final SFE depends on the distribution of Eddington ratios in the cloud and is strongly increased by the turbulent compression of gas.

  3. Comparison of biofilm formation and motility processes in arsenic-resistant Thiomonas spp. strains revealed divergent response to arsenite.

    PubMed

    Farasin, Julien; Koechler, Sandrine; Varet, Hugo; Deschamps, Julien; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Proux, Caroline; Erhardt, Mathieu; Huber, Aline; Jagla, Bernd; Briandet, Romain; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence

    2017-02-07

    Bacteria of the genus Thiomonas are found ubiquitously in arsenic contaminated waters such as acid mine drainage (AMD), where they contribute to the precipitation and the natural bioremediation of arsenic. In these environments, these bacteria have developed a large range of resistance strategies among which the capacity to form particular biofilm structures. The biofilm formation is one of the most ubiquitous adaptive response observed in prokaryotes to various stresses, such as those induced in the presence of toxic compounds. This study focused on the process of biofilm formation in three Thiomonas strains (CB1, CB2 and CB3) isolated from the same AMD. The results obtained here show that these bacteria are all capable of forming biofilms, but the architecture and the kinetics of formation of these biofilms differ depending on whether arsenite is present in the environment and from one strain to another. Indeed, two strains favoured biofilm formation, whereas one favoured motility in the presence of arsenite. To identify the underlying mechanisms, the patterns of expression of some genes possibly involved in the process of biofilm formation were investigated in Thiomonas sp. CB2 in the presence and absence of arsenite, using a transcriptomic approach (RNA-seq). The findings obtained here shed interesting light on how the formation of biofilms, and the motility processes contribute to the adaptation of Thiomonas strains to extreme environments.

  4. Thermal decomposition of HO2NO2 (peroxynitric acid, PNA): rate coefficient and determination of the enthalpy of formation.

    PubMed

    Gierczak, Tomasz; Jiménez, Elena; Riffault, Veronique; Burkholder, James B; Ravishankara, A R

    2005-02-03

    Rate coefficients for the gas-phase thermal decomposition of HO(2)NO(2) (peroxynitric acid, PNA) are reported at temperatures between 331 and 350 K at total pressures of 25 and 50 Torr of N(2). Rate coefficients were determined by measuring the steady-state OH concentration in a mixture of known concentrations of HO(2)NO(2) and NO. The measured thermal decomposition rate coefficients k(-)(1)(T,P) are used in combination with previously published rate coefficient data for the HO(2)NO(2) formation reaction to yield a standard enthalpy for reaction 1 of Delta(r)H degrees (298K) = -24.0 +/- 0.5 kcal mol(-1) (uncertainties are 2sigma values and include estimated systematic errors). A HO(2)NO(2) standard heat of formation, Delta(f)H degrees (298K)(HO(2)NO(2)), of -12.6 +/- 1.0 kcal mol(-1) was calculated from this value. Some of the previously reported data on the thermal decomposition of HO(2)NO(2) have been reanalyzed and shown to be in good agreement with our reported value.

  5. Vitamin C supplementation enhances compact morulae formation but reduces the hatching blastocyst rate of bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Wang, Li-Jun; Zhang, Hui; Li, Rui-Zhe; Cui, Chen-Chen; Li, Wen-Zhe; Zhang, Yong; Jin, Ya-Ping

    2014-08-01

    Vitamin C, an antioxidant that reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells, is capable of significantly improving the developmental competence of porcine and mouse somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos, both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, the effects of vitamin C on the developmental competence of bovine SCNT embryos were investigated. The results indicated that vitamin C (40 μg/mL) positively affected the scavenging of intracellular ROS, cleavage rate at 24 h (76.67 vs. 68.26%, p<0.05), compact morulae formation (60.83 vs. 51.30%, p<0.05), and the blastomere apoptosis index (3.70 ± 1.41 vs. 4.43% ± 1.65, p<0.05) of bovine SCNT embryos. However, vitamin C supplementation did not significantly affect the blastocyst formation rate and proportion of inner cell mass over total cells per blastocyst on day 7. Moreover, vitamin C supplementation obviously impaired the total cell numbers per blastocyst (97.20 ± 11.35 vs. 88.57 ± 10.43, p<0.05) on day 7 and the hatching blastocysts formation rate on day 9 (26.51 vs. 50.65%, p<0.05) compared with that of the untreated group. Vitamin C supplementation preferentially improved the viability of bovine SCNT embryos prior to the blastocyst stage, but did not enhance the formation and quality of blastocysts in vitro. In conclusion, the effect of vitamin C on the development of bovine SCNT embryos is complex, and vitamin C is not a suitable antioxidant chemical for the in vitro culture of bovine SCNT embryos.

  6. Periodicity in the crater formation rate and implications for astronomical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabushita, S.

    1992-03-01

    A criterion proposed by Broadbent (1955, 1956) is used to reinvestigate the claim for periodicity in crater formation; data sets of Rampino and Stothers (1986) and of Grieve (1987) are shown to satisfy the periodicity criterion (about 30 Myr). A Monte Carlo simulation is employed to obtain constraints for the dispersion sigma(Myr) from an exact periodicity and for the periodic components (Flp) in the signals for their periodicity to be detected. It is found that for sigma of 5, 6, and 7 Myr, Flp would have to be 40 percent or greater, 60 percent or greater, and 80 percent or greater, respectively. These constraints are used to discuss whether the GMC perturbations can give rise to the periodicity in the impact events.

  7. The rate of planet formation and the solar system's small bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safronov, Viktor S.

    1991-01-01

    The evolution of random velocities and the mass distribution of preplanetary body at the early stage of accumulation are currently under review. Arguments were presented for and against the view of an extremely rapid, runaway growth of the largest bodies at this stage with parameter values of Theta approximately greater than 10(exp 3). Difficulties are encountered assuming such a large Theta: (1) bodies of the Jovian zone penetrate the asteroid zone too late and do not have time to hinder the formation of a normal-sized planet in the asteroidal zone and thereby remove a significant portion of the mass of solid matter and (2) Uranus and Neptune cannot eject bodies from the solar system into the cometary cloud. Therefore, the values Theta less than 10(exp 2) appear to be preferable.

  8. The sensitivity of oxidant formation rates to uncertainties in temperature, water vapor, and cloud cover

    SciTech Connect

    Walcek, C.J.; Yuan, H.H.

    1994-12-31

    Photochemical reaction mechanisms have been used for several decades to understand the formation of acids, oxidants, and other pollutants in the atmosphere. With complex chemical reaction mechanisms, it is useful to perform sensitivity studies to identify the most important or uncertain components within the system of reactions. In this study, we quantify the sensitivity of a chemical reaction mechanism to changes in three meteorological factors: temperature, relative humidity, and sunlight intensity. We perform these sensitivity studies over a wide range of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} = NO + NO{sub 2}) and nonmethane hydrocarbon (NMHC) concentrations, since these two chemicals are the dominant controllable pollutants that influence the chemical reactivity of the atmosphere.

  9. Rate constant for formation of chlorine nitrate by the reaction ClO + NO2 + M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, M. T.; Lin, C. L.; Demore, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    The pseudo-first-order decay of ClO in a large excess of NO2 was monitored in a discharge flow/mass-spectrometer apparatus in order to measure the rate constant of the reaction ClO + NO2 + M yields ClONO2 + M for M = He, Ar, and N2 over the temperature range from 248 to 417 K. Numerical results are given for He at 248, 299, 360, and 417 K (1 to 9 torr); for Ar at 298 K (1 to 4 torr); and for N2 at 299, 360, and 417 K (1 to 6 torr). Systematic errors are estimated, and identification of the reaction product is discussed. The results obtained are shown to be in excellent agreement with other recent measurements of the same rate constant.

  10. Research perspectives and role of lactose uptake rate revealed by its study using 14C-labelled lactose in whey fermentation.

    PubMed

    Golfinopoulos, Aristidis; Kopsahelis, Nikolaos; Tsaousi, Konstantina; Koutinas, Athanasios A; Soupioni, Magdalini

    2011-03-01

    The present investigation examines the effect of pH, temperature and cell concentration on lactose uptake rate, in relation with kinetics of whey fermentation using kefir and determines the optimum conditions of these parameters. Lactose uptake rate was measured by adding (14)C-labelled lactose in whey. The results reveal the role of lactose uptake rate, being the main factor that affects the rate of fermentation, in contrast to the activity of the enzymes involved in lactose bioconversion process. Lactose uptake rate results discussion showed that mainly Ca(2+) is responsible for the reduced whey fermentation rate in comparison with fermentations using synthetic media containing lactose. Likewise, the results draw up perspectives on whey fermentation research to improve whey fermentation rate. Those perspectives are research to remove Ca(2+) from whey, the use of nano and microtubular biopolymers and promoters such as γ-alumina pellets and volcan foaming rock kissiris in order to accelerate whey fermentation.

  11. Effects of structure formation on the expansion rate of the Universe: An estimate from numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xinghai; Mathews, Grant J.

    2011-01-01

    General relativistic corrections to the expansion rate of the Universe arise when the Einstein equations are averaged over a spatial volume in a locally inhomogeneous cosmology. It has been suggested that they may contribute to the observed cosmic acceleration. In this paper, we propose a new scheme that utilizes numerical simulations to make a realistic estimate of the magnitude of these corrections for general inhomogeneities in (3+1) spacetime. We then quantitatively calculate the volume averaged expansion rate using N-body large-scale structure simulations and compare it with the expansion rate in a standard FRW cosmology. We find that in the weak gravitational field limit, the converged corrections are slightly larger than the previous claimed 10-5 level, but not large enough nor even of the correct sign to drive the current cosmic acceleration. Nevertheless, the question of whether the cumulative effect can significantly change the expansion history of the Universe needs to be further investigated with strong-field relativity.

  12. Regulating the Skin Permeation Rate of Escitalopram by Ion-pair Formation with Organic Acids.

    PubMed

    Song, Tian; Quan, Peng; Xiang, Rongwu; Fang, Liang

    2016-12-01

    In order to regulate the skin permeation rate (flux) of escitalopram (ESP), ion-pair strategy was used in our work. Five organic acids with different physicochemical properties, benzoic acid (BA), ibuprofen (IB), salicylic acid (SA), benzenesulfonic acid (BSA), and p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), were employed as counter-ions to regulate the permeation rate of ESP across the rabbit abdominal skin in vitro. The interaction between ESP and organic acids was characterized by FTIR and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Results showed that all organic acids investigated in this study performed a controlling effect on ESP flux. To further analyze the factors concerned with the permeation capability of ESP-acid complex, a multiple linear regression model was used. It is concluded that the steady-state flux (J) of ESP-acid complexes had a positive correlation with log K o/w (the n-octanol/water partition coefficient of ion-pair complex) and pK a (the acidity of organic acid counter-ion), but a negative correlation with MW (the molecular weight of ion-pair complex). The logK o/w of ion-pair complex is the primary one in all the factors that influence the skin permeation rate of ESP. The results demonstrated that organic acid with appropriate physicochemical properties can be considered as suitable candidate for the transdermal drug delivery of escitalopram.

  13. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent mechanism of defect formation and fracture in carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam; Raha, S.; Mahapatra, D. Roy

    2017-02-01

    Electromagnetic and thermo-mechanical forces play a major role in nanotube-based materials and devices. Under high-energy electron transport or high current densities, carbon nanotubes fail via sequential fracture. The failure sequence is governed by certain length scale and flow of current. We report a unified phenomenological model derived from molecular dynamic simulation data, which successfully captures the important physics of the complex failure process. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent defect nucleation, growth, and fracture in single-walled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range of 0.47 to 2.03 nm and length which is about 6.17 to 26.45 nm are simulated. Nanotubes with long length and small diameter show brittle fracture, while those with short length and large diameter show transition from ductile to brittle fracture. In short nanotubes with small diameters, we observe several structural transitions like Stone-Wales defect initiation, its propagation to larger void nucleation, formation of multiple chains of atoms, conversion to monatomic chain of atoms, and finally complete fracture of the carbon nanotube. Hybridization state of carbon-carbon bonds near the end cap evolves, leading to the formation of monatomic chain in short nanotubes with small diameter. Transition from ductile to brittle fracture is also observed when strain rate exceeds a critical value. A generalized analytical model of failure is established, which correlates the defect energy during the formation of atomic chain with aspect ratio of the nanotube and strain rate. Variation in the mechanical properties such as elastic modulus, tensile strength, and fracture strain with the size and strain rate shows important implications in mitigating force fields and ways to enhance the life of electronic devices and nanomaterial conversion via fracture in manufacturing.

  14. Inferred H⍺ Flux as a Star Formation Rate Indicator at z ~ 4-5: Implications for Dust Properties, Burstiness, and the z = 4-8 Star Formation Rate Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, Renske; Bouwens, Rychard J.; Labbé, Ivo; Franx, Marijn; Wilkins, Stephen M.; Oesch, Pascal A.

    2016-12-01

    We derive Hα fluxes for a large spectroscopic and photometric-redshift-selected sample of sources over GOODS-North and South in the redshift range z = 3.8-5.0 with deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Spitzer/IRAC, and ground-based observations. The Hα flux is inferred based on the offset between the IRAC 3.6 μm flux and that predicted from the best-fit spectral energy distribution (SED). We demonstrate that the Hα flux correlates well with dust-corrected UV star formation rate (SFR) and therefore can serve as an independent SFR indicator. However, we also find a systematic offset in the {{SFR}}{{H}α }/{{SFR}}{UV+β } ratios for z ˜ 4-5 galaxies relative to local relations (assuming the same dust corrections for nebular regions and stellar light). We show that we can resolve the modest tension in the inferred SFRs by assuming bluer intrinsic UV slopes (increasing the dust correction), a rising star formation history, or assuming a low-metallicity stellar population with a hard ionizing spectrum (increasing the {L}{{H}α }/{SFR} ratio). Using Hα as an SFR indicator, we find a normalization of the star formation main sequence in good agreement with recent SED-based determinations and also derive the SFR functions at z˜ 4{--}8. In addition, we assess for the first time the burstiness of star formation in z˜ 4 galaxies on <100 Myr timescales by comparing UV and Hα-based sSFRs; their one-to-one relationship argues against significantly bursty star formation histories.

  15. Potential temperature, upwelling rate and eclogite in the formation of the North Atlantic large igneous province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. L.; Lesher, C. E.

    2010-12-01

    The volumes and compositions of basalts generated by adiabatic decompression melting of the Earth’s mantle depend on mantle potential temperature (T_P), upwelling rate and the fertility of the mantle source. The relative importance of these factors in generating the high productivity magmatism of the Paleogene - Recent North Atlantic large igneous province (NAIP) remains controversial. Each has been proposed as a primary factor in the region. To assess the significance of these mechanisms in NAIP magmatism, we apply our forward melting model, REEBOX PRO, which simulates the melting of a heterogeneous source comprised of peridotite and eclogite lithologies. The model accounts for the thermodynamics of adiabatic decompression melting of a heterogeneous source using constraints from laboratory melting experiments. Input values of T_P and eclogite abundance are used to calculate the buoyancy of the mantle source and maximum upwelling rates. Source buoyancy constrains the maximum amount of eclogite in the mantle source that can ascend beneath the rift axis. All melts generated within the melting regime are pooled to form magmatic crust according to the residual column method. Using the model, variations in magmatic crustal thickness (from geophysics) as a function of eclogite content (from geochemistry) can be related to T_P and upwelling rate. Models with no thermal anomaly, that call on either enhanced upwelling rates due to plate separation (edge - driven convection) or the melting of abundant (> 30%) eclogite at “ambient” T_P (1325 °C), cannot generate the observed igneous crustal thicknesses around the province. Rather, elevated mantle T_P (minimum thermal anomaly ~ 85 - 195 °C) and associated buoyancy - driven upwelling are needed to explain the volume of igneous crust in the province. Involvement of eclogite, while necessary to explain the compositions of many NAIP lavas, does not significantly enhance melt production. These factors, coupled with the long

  16. Star-formation rates, molecular clouds, and the origin of the far-infrared luminosity of isolated and interacting galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, P. M.; Sage, L. J.

    1988-01-01

    The CO luminosities of 93 galaxies have been determined and are compared with their IRAS FIR luminosities. Strongly interacting/merging galaxies have L(FIR)/L(CO) substantially higher than that of isolated galaxies or galactic giant molecular clouds (GMCs). Galaxies with tidal tails/bridges are the most extreme type with L(FIR)/L(CO) nine times as high as isolated galaxies. Interactions between close pairs of galaxies do not have much effect on the molecular content and global star-formation rate. If the high ratio L(FIR)/L(CO) in strongly interacting galaxies is due to star formation then the efficiency of this process is higher than that of any galactic GMC. Isolated galaxies, distant pairs, and close pairs have an FIR/CO luminosity ratio which is within a factor of two of galactic GMCs with H II regions. The CO luminosities of FIR-luminous galaxies are among the highest observed for any spiral galaxies.

  17. An uncertainty framework to estimate dense water formation rates : case study in the Northwestern Mediterranean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldman, Robin; Somot, Samuel; Herrmann, Marine; Sevault, Florence; Estournel, Claude; Testor, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    The Northwestern Mediterranean (NWMed) sea is a key region for the Mediterranean thermohaline circulation as it includes the main deep water formation sites of the Western Mediterranean. The Mediterranean Ocean Observing System for the Environment (MOOSE) has been implemented since 2007 over that region to characterize the space and time variability of the main water masses up to interannual (yearly summer cruises) scale. However, despite a large covering of the NWMed region, the limited number of conductivity, temperature and depth (CTD) casts leads to subsampling errors and advocates for an uncertainty assessment of large-scale hydrology estimates. This study aims at estimating the error related to subsampling in time and space. For that purpose, an Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) is performed with an eddy-permitting Mediterranean sea model (NEMOMED12) and an eddy-resolving NWMed sea model (SYMPHONIE). A subsampling of the full model fields in time and space allows for an error estimate in terms of large-scale hydrology. The methodology is applied to dense water volume estimates for the period july 2012 - july 2013. Secondly, an optimization framework is proposed to evaluate and improve MOOSE network's performances under a series of scientific constraints. The results will be discussed for an application in MOOSE observing network, as well as the main assumptions, the stakes and limitations of this framework.

  18. What controls Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth rate and the formation of bubbles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizengaw, E.; Moldwin, M.; Zesta, E.; Damtie, B.; Rabiu, B.; Valladares, C. E.; Stoneback, R.

    2014-12-01

    According to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) growth rate mathematical expression, the vertical drift is supposed to be the primary component that controls the RTI growth rate. However, in the African sector that does not seem to be the case. In this paper we present independent ground- and space-based observations that consistently show weaker vertical drift (both dayside and evening sector) in the African sector compared with the American sector. On the other hand, observations from both satellite and recently deployed ground-based instruments have shown that the African sector is home to stronger and year-round ionospheric bubbles/irregularities and scintillations compared to the American and Asian sectors. The question is if the drift is weaker in the African sector, what causes these strong bubbles that have been observed in the African sector almost throughout the night and during all seasons? Are there other mechanisms that initiate RTI growth other than vertical drift? Would it be the neutral winds that cause the long lasting bubbles in Africa? If it is the neutral wind, why are the winds unique in terms of orientation and magnitude in the African sector compared to other longitudinal sectors?

  19. On the temperature dependence of the rate coefficient of formation of C2+ from C + CH+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampino, S.; Pastore, M.; Garcia, E.; Pacifici, L.; Laganà, A.

    2016-08-01

    We carry out quasi-classical trajectory calculations for the C + CH+→ C_2^+ + H reaction on an ad hoc computed high-level ab initio potential energy surface. Thermal rate coefficients at the temperatures of relevance in cold interstellar clouds are derived and compared with the assumed, temperature-independent estimates publicly available in kinetic data bases KIDA and UDfA. For a temperature of 10 K the data base value overestimates by a factor of 2 the one obtained by us (thus improperly enhancing the destruction route of CH+ in astrochemical kinetic models) which is seen to double in the temperature range 5-300 K with a sharp increase in the first 50 K. The computed values are fitted via the popular Arrhenius-Kooij formula and best-fitting parameters α = 1.32 × 10-9 cm3 s-1, β = 0.1 and γ = 2.19 K to be included in the online mentioned data bases are provided. Further investigation shows that the temperature dependence of the thermal rate coefficient better conforms to the recently proposed so-called `deformed Arrhenius' law by Aquilanti and Mundim.

  20. Controlling growth rate anisotropy for formation of continuous ZnO thin films from seeded substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. H.; Slamovich, E. B.; Handwerker, C. A.

    2013-05-01

    Solution-processed zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films are promising candidates for low-temperature-processable active layers in transparent thin film electronics. In this study, control of growth rate anisotropy using ZnO nanoparticle seeds, capping ions, and pH adjustment leads to a low-temperature (90 ° C) hydrothermal process for transparent and high-density ZnO thin films. The common 1D ZnO nanorod array was grown into a 2D continuous polycrystalline film using a short-time pure solution method. Growth rate anisotropy of ZnO crystals and the film morphology were tuned by varying the chloride (Cl-) ion concentration and the initial pH of solutions of zinc nitrate and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA), and the competitive adsorption effects of Cl- ions and HMTA ligands on the anisotropic growth behavior of ZnO crystals were proposed. The lateral growth of nanorods constituting the film was promoted by lowering the solution pH to accelerate the hydrolysis of HMTA, thereby allowing the adsorption effects from Cl- to dominate. By optimizing the growth conditions, a dense ˜100 nm thickness film was fabricated in 15 min from a solution of [Cl-]/[Zn2+] = 1.5 and pH= 4.8 ± 0.1. This film shows >80% optical transmittance and a field-effect mobility of 2.730 cm2 V-1 s-1 at zero back-gate bias.

  1. The Concordance Cosmic Star Formation Rate: Implications from and for the supernova neutrino and gamma ray backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Strigari, Louis E.; Beacom, John F.; Walker, Terry P.; Zhang, Pengjie; /Fermilab

    2005-02-01

    We constrain the Cosmic Star Formation Rate (CSFR) by requiring that massive stars produce the observed UV, optical, and IR light while at the same time not overproduce the Diffuse Supernova Neutrino Background as bounded by Super-Kamiokande. With the massive star component so constrained we then show that a reasonable choice of stellar Initial Mass Function and other parameters results in SNIa rates and iron yields in good agreement with data. In this way we define a ''concordance'' CSFR that predicts the optical SNII rate and the SNIa contribution to the MeV Cosmic Gamma-Ray Background. The CSFR constrained to reproduce these and other proxies of intermediate and massive star formation is more clearly delineated than if it were measured by any one technique and has the following testable consequences: (1) SNIa contribute only a small fraction of the MeV Cosmic Gamma-Ray Background, (2) massive star core-collapse is nearly always accompanied by a successful optical SNII, and (3) the Diffuse Supernova Neutrino Background is tantalizingly close to detectability.

  2. Examining the Center: Positions, Dominance, and Star Formation Rates of Most Massive Group Galaxies at Intermediate Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelly, Jennifer L.; Parker, Laura C.; McGee, Sean; Mulchaey, John S.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Balogh, Michael; Wilman, David; Group Environment Evolution Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The group environment is believed to be the stage for many galaxy transformations, helping evolve blue star-forming galaxies to red passive ones. In local studies of galaxy clusters, the central member is usually a single dominant giant galaxy at the center of the potential with little star formation thought to be the result of galaxy mergers. In nearby groups, a range of morphologies and star formation rates are observed and the formation history is less clear. Further, the position and dominance of the central galaxy cannot be assumed in groups, which are less massive and evolved than clusters. To understand the connections between global group properties and properties of the central group galaxy at intermediate redshift, we examine galaxy groups from the Group Environment and Evolution Collaboration (GEEC) catalog, including both optically- and X-ray-selected groups at redshift z~0.4. The sample is diverse, containing a range in overall mass and evolutionary state. The number of groups is significant, membership is notably complete, and measurements span the IR to the UV allowing the properties of the members to be connected to those of the host groups. Having investigated trends in the global group properties previously, including mass and velocity substructure, we turn our attention now to the galaxy populations, focusing on the central regions of these systems. The most massive and second most massive group galaxies are identified by their stellar mass. The positions of the most massive galaxies (MMGs) are determined with respect to both the luminosity-weighted and X-ray center. Star formation rates are used to explore the fraction of passive/quiescent versus star-forming MMGs and the dominance of the MMGs in our group sample is also tested. Determinations of these characteristics and trends constitute the important first steps toward a detailed understanding of the relationships between the properties of host groups and their most massive galaxies and the

  3. Comparison of the aggregation of homologous β2-microglobulin variants reveals protein solubility as a key determinant of amyloid formation.

    PubMed

    Pashley, Clare L; Hewitt, Eric W; Radford, Sheena E

    2016-02-13

    The mouse and human β2-microglobulin protein orthologs are 70% identical in sequence and share 88% sequence similarity. These proteins are predicted by various algorithms to have similar aggregation and amyloid propensities. However, whilst human β2m (hβ2m) forms amyloid-like fibrils in denaturing conditions (e.g. pH2.5) in the absence of NaCl, mouse β2m (mβ2m) requires the addition of 0.3M NaCl to cause fibrillation. Here, the factors which give rise to this difference in amyloid propensity are investigated. We utilise structural and mutational analyses, fibril growth kinetics and solubility measurements under a range of pH and salt conditions, to determine why these two proteins have different amyloid propensities. The results show that, although other factors influence the fibril growth kinetics, a striking difference in the solubility of the proteins is a key determinant of the different amyloidogenicity of hβ2m and mβ2m. The relationship between protein solubility and lag time of amyloid formation is not captured by current aggregation or amyloid prediction algorithms, indicating a need to better understand the role of solubility on the lag time of amyloid formation. The results demonstrate the key contribution of protein solubility in determining amyloid propensity and lag time of amyloid formation, highlighting how small differences in protein sequence can have dramatic effects on amyloid formation.

  4. The Scale-dependent Energy Transfer Rate as a Tracer for Star Formation in Cosmological N-Body Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeft, M.; Mücket, J. P.; Heide, P.

    2002-05-01

    We investigate the energy release due to large-scale structure formation and the subsequent transfer of energy from larger to smaller scales. We calculate the power spectra for the large-scale velocity field and show that the coupling of modes results in a transfer of power predominately from larger to smaller scales. We use the concept of cumulative energy to calculate the amount of energy deposited into small scales during the cosmological structure evolution. To estimate the contribution due to the gravitational interaction only, we perform our investigations by means of dark matter simulations. The global mean of the energy transfer increases with redshift ~(z+1)3 this can be traced back to the similar evolution of the merging rates of dark matter halos. The global mean energy transfer can be decomposed into its local contributions, which allows us to determine the energy injection per unit mass into a local volume. The obtained energy injection rates are at least comparable to other energy sources driving interstellar turbulence, e.g., supernova kinetic feedback. On that basis, we make the crude assumption that processes causing this energy transfer from large to small scales, e.g., the merging of halos, may contribute substantially to the driving of interstellar medium turbulence, which may eventually result in star formation on much smaller scales. We propose that the ratio of the local energy injection rate to the energy already stored within small-scale motions is a rough measure for the probability of local star formation, applicable within cosmological large-scale N-body simulations.

  5. ERα-mediated repression of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression by glucocorticoids reveals a crucial role for TNFα and IL1α in lumen formation and maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Eritja, Nuria; Mirantes, Cristina; Llobet, David; Masip, Gemma; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Dolcet, Xavi

    2012-01-01

    Most glandular tissues comprise polarized epithelial cells organized around a single central lumen. Although there is active research investigating the molecular networks involved in the regulation of lumenogenesis, little is known about the extracellular factors that influence lumen formation and maintenance. Using a three-dimensional culture system of epithelial endometrial cells, we have revealed a new role for pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFα and IL1α in the formation and, more importantly, maintenance of a single central lumen. We also studied the mechanism by which glucocorticoids repress TNFα and IL1α expression. Interestingly, regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and subsequent lumen formation is mediated by estrogen receptor α (ERα) but not by the glucocorticoid receptor. Finally, we investigated the signaling pathways involved in the regulation of lumen formation by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our results demonstrate that activation of the ERK/MAPK signaling pathway, but not the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, is important for the formation and maintenance of a single central lumen. In summary, our results suggest a novel role for ERα-regulated pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in lumen formation and maintenance. PMID:22328525

  6. Gingival Fibromatosis with Significant De Novo Formation of Fibrotic Tissue and a High Rate of Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Gawron, Katarzyna; Łazarz-Bartyzel, Katarzyna; Fertala, Andrzej; Plakwicz, Paweł; Potempa, Jan; Chomyszyn-Gajewska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 11 Final Diagnosis: Hereditary gingival fibromatosis Symptoms: Gingival overgrowth Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Surgery Specialty: Dentistry Objective: Rare disease Background: Hereditary gingival fibromatosis is characterized by slowly progressive enlargement of the gingiva that can present as an isolated condition or a part of various syndromes. Case Report: An 11-year-old female reported with a gingival lesion that caused masticatory problems and poor oral hygiene. Periodontal examination revealed a dense tissue covering 30% of her teeth crowns within both jaws. Panoramic x-ray showed a normal bone height and teeth positioning. The patient did not use any medications, but a similar condition was also present in other family members. The patient was diagnosed with hereditary gingival fibromatosis. Surgery was carried out to remove excess of gingival tissue. Post-surgical healing was uneventful, but four weeks after the first surgery, the condition recurred amounting to 45% of the initial tissue volume presenting in the mandible, and 25% in the maxilla. Two months later, no significant growth was noted in the mandible, while in the maxilla, growth increased to 40% of the pre-operative state. Analysis by polarized microscope showed a significant increase of thin fibrotic fibrils that contributed 80% of the total pool of collagen fibrils in the patient’s gingiva, but only 25% in healthy gingiva. The patient was receiving outpatient care for follow-up every three months and surgical intervention had not been planned as long as her periodontal health would not be compromised. Conclusions: It is currently not clear whether the extent of the fibrosis had a mechanistic association with the ratio of gingival tissue re-growth in our case study. Further studies are needed to explain this association and improve the management of this condition. PMID:27609299

  7. Gingival Fibromatosis with Significant De Novo Formation of Fibrotic Tissue and a High Rate of Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Gawron, Katarzyna; Łazarz-Bartyzel, Katarzyna; Fertala, Andrzej; Plakwicz, Paweł; Potempa, Jan; Chomyszyn-Gajewska, Maria

    2016-09-09

    BACKGROUND Hereditary gingival fibromatosis is characterized by slowly progressive enlargement of the gingiva that can present as an isolated condition or present as part of various syndromes. CASE REPORT An 11-year-old female reported with a gingival lesion that caused masticatory problems and poor oral hygiene. Periodontal examination revealed a dense tissue covering 30% of her teeth crowns within both jaws. Panoramic x-ray showed a normal bone height and teeth positioning. The patient did not use any medications, but a similar condition was also present in other family members. The patient was diagnosed with hereditary gingival fibromatosis. Surgery was carried out to remove excess of gingival tissue. Post-surgical healing was uneventful, but four weeks after the first surgery, the condition recurred amounting to 45% of the initial tissue volume presenting in the mandible, and 25% in the maxilla. Two months later, no significant growth was noted in the mandible, while in the maxilla, growth increased to 40% of the preoperative state. Analysis by polarized microscope showed a significant increase of thin fibrotic fibrils that contributed 80% of the total pool of collagen fibrils in the patient's gingiva, but only 25% in healthy gingiva. The patient was receiving outpatient care for follow-up every three months and surgical intervention had not been planned as long as her periodontal health was not be compromised.  CONCLUSIONS It is currently not clear whether the extent of the fibrosis had a mechanistic association with the ratio of gingival tissue re-growth in our case study. Further studies are needed to explain this association and improve the management of this condition.

  8. Estimating The CO2 Sequestration Capacity of Fractured Shale Formations Using Methane Production Rates: The Case of the Utica Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Z.; Clarens, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    Fractured shale formations that have been drained of hydrocarbons could serve as attractive sites for geologic sequestration of CO2. Shales preferentially sorb CO2 enabling greater storage potential than would be expected based only on the pores vacated during CH4 production. Sequestration in shales could have a variety of other benefits because the intrinsically low permeability of the rock could help mitigate leakage risks and infrastructure resources could be leveraged to minimize costs. Here a modeling framework developed by the authors to estimate the sequestration capacity of fractured shale formations based on CH4 production rates was applied to the Utica Shale. The model is based on a unipore transport model, which assumes that diffusion of gases into and out of the kerogen matrix will control gas transport. The results from the Utica formation were compared to estimates for sequestration in the Marcellus shale to understand how the petrophysical characteristics of these two formations impact estimated sequestration capacity. A detailed sensitivity analysis was carried out to link modeling assumptions and key parameters with known physicochemical characteristics of these two shale formations. Modeling parameters were derived from published production data obtained from the state of Ohio. The model was found to be most sensitive to the equilibrium sorption parameters of CH4 and CO2, for which there is good literature data available. Published values for CO2 sorption varied considerably based on the composition of the shale. Improved experimental data is needed to provide the most accurate estimates of storage in different formations. Differences were observed in gas diffusivity estimates for the Marcellus and Utica shale that could be understood in terms of the petrophysical characteristics of the two formations. We also found important effects tied to the effective diffusion length out of an average pore in the kerogen. These results allow us to understand

  9. Fossil skulls reveal that blood flow rate to the brain increased faster than brain volume during human evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bosiocic, Vanya

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of human cognition has been inferred from anthropological discoveries and estimates of brain size from fossil skulls. A more direct measure of cognition would be cerebral metabolic rate, which is proportional to cerebral blood flow rate (perfusion). The hominin cerebrum is supplied almost exclusively by the internal carotid arteries. The sizes of the foramina that transmitted these vessels in life can be measured in hominin fossil skulls and used to calculate cerebral perfusion rate. Perfusion in 11 species of hominin ancestors, from Australopithecus to archaic Homo sapiens, increases disproportionately when scaled against brain volume (the allometric exponent is 1.41). The high exponent indicates an increase in the metabolic intensity of cerebral tissue in later Homo species, rather than remaining constant (1.0) as expected by a linear increase in neuron number, or decreasing according to Kleiber's Law (0.75). During 3 Myr of hominin evolution, cerebral tissue perfusion increased 1.7-fold, which, when multiplied by a 3.5-fold increase in brain size, indicates a 6.0-fold increase in total cerebral blood flow rate. This is probably associated with increased interneuron connectivity, synaptic activity and cognitive function, which all ultimately depend on cerebral metabolic rate. PMID:27853608

  10. Fossil skulls reveal that blood flow rate to the brain increased faster than brain volume during human evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Roger S.; Bosiocic, Vanya; Snelling, Edward P.

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of human cognition has been inferred from anthropological discoveries and estimates of brain size from fossil skulls. A more direct measure of cognition would be cerebral metabolic rate, which is proportional to cerebral blood flow rate (perfusion). The hominin cerebrum is supplied almost exclusively by the internal carotid arteries. The sizes of the foramina that transmitted these vessels in life can be measured in hominin fossil skulls and used to calculate cerebral perfusion rate. Perfusion in 11 species of hominin ancestors, from Australopithecus to archaic Homo sapiens, increases disproportionately when scaled against brain volume (the allometric exponent is 1.41). The high exponent indicates an increase in the metabolic intensity of cerebral tissue in later Homo species, rather than remaining constant (1.0) as expected by a linear increase in neuron number, or decreasing according to Kleiber's Law (0.75). During 3 Myr of hominin evolution, cerebral tissue perfusion increased 1.7-fold, which, when multiplied by a 3.5-fold increase in brain size, indicates a 6.0-fold increase in total cerebral blood flow rate. This is probably associated with increased interneuron connectivity, synaptic activity and cognitive function, which all ultimately depend on cerebral metabolic rate.

  11. Plastid genomes reveal support for deep phylogenetic relationships and extensive rate variation among palms and other commelinid monocots.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Craig F; Baker, William J; Comer, Jason R; Conran, John G; Lahmeyer, Sean C; Leebens-Mack, James H; Li, Jeff; Lim, Gwynne S; Mayfield-Jones, Dustin R; Perez, Leticia; Medina, Jesus; Pires, J Chris; Santos, Cristian; Wm Stevenson, Dennis; Zomlefer, Wendy B; Davis, Jerrold I

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress based on multilocus, phylogenetic studies of the palms (order Arecales, family Arecaceae), uncertainty remains in resolution/support among major clades and for the placement of the palms among the commelinid monocots. Palms and related commelinids represent a classic case of substitution rate heterogeneity that has not been investigated in the genomic era. To address questions of relationships, support and rate variation among palms and commelinid relatives, 39 plastomes representing the palms and related family Dasypogonaceae were generated via genome skimming and integrated within a monocot-wide matrix for phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary analyses. Support was strong for 'deep' relationships among the commelinid orders, among the five palm subfamilies, and among tribes of the subfamily Coryphoideae. Additionally, there was extreme heterogeneity in the plastid substitution rates across the commelinid orders indicated by model based analyses, with c. 22 rate shifts, and significant departure from a global clock. To date, this study represents the most comprehensively sampled matrix of plastomes assembled for monocot angiosperms, providing genome-scale support for phylogenetic relationships of monocot angiosperms, and lays the phylogenetic groundwork for comparative analyses of the drivers and correlates of such drastic differences in substitution rates across a diverse and significant clade.

  12. iTRAQ-based analysis of developmental dynamics in the soybean leaf proteome reveals pathways associated with leaf photosynthetic rate.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jun; Zhang, Jianan; Liu, Duan; Yin, Changcheng; Wang, Fengmin; Chen, Pengyin; Chen, Hao; Ma, Jinbing; Zhang, Bo; Xu, Jin; Zhang, Mengchen

    2016-08-01

    Photosynthetic rate which acts as a vital limiting factor largely affects the potential of soybean production, especially during the senescence phase. However, the physiological and molecular mechanisms that underlying the change of photosynthetic rate during the developmental process of soybean leaves remain unclear. In this study, we compared the protein dynamics during the developmental process of leaves between the soybean cultivar Hobbit and the high-photosynthetic rate cultivar JD 17 using the iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification) method. A total number of 1269 proteins were detected in the leaves of these two cultivars at three different developmental stages. These proteins were classified into nine expression patterns depending on the expression levels at different developmental stages, and the proteins in each pattern were also further classified into three large groups and 20 small groups depending on the protein functions. Only 3.05-6.53 % of the detected proteins presented a differential expression pattern between these two cultivars. Enrichment factor analysis indicated that proteins involved in photosynthesis composed an important category. The expressions of photosynthesis-related proteins were also further confirmed by western blotting. Together, our results suggested that the reduction in photosynthetic rate as well as chloroplast activity and composition during the developmental process was a highly regulated and complex process which involved a serial of proteins that function as potential candidates to be targeted by biotechnological approaches for the improvement of photosynthetic rate and production.

  13. Pore-scale insights to the rate of organic carbon degradation and biofilm formation under variable hydro-biogeochemical conditions in soils and sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Yan, Z.; Liu, Y.; Li, M.; Bailey, V. L.

    2015-12-01

    Biogeochemical processes that control microbial growth, organic carbon degradation, and CO2 production and migration are fundamentally occur at the pore scale. In this presentation, we will describe our recent results of a pore-scale simulation research to investigate: 1) how moisture content and distribution affects oxygen delivery, organic carbon availability, and microbial activities that regulate the rate of organic carbon degradation and CO2 production in aerobic systems; and 2) how pore-scale reactive transport processes affect local microbial growth, biofilm formation, and overall rate of microbial reactions in anoxic systems. The results revealed that there is an optimal moisture content for aerobic bacterial respiration and CO2 production. When moisture is below the optimal value, organic carbon availability limits its degradation due to diffusion and osmotic stress to bacterial reactivity; and when moisture is above the optimal value, oxygen delivery limits microbial respiration. The optimal moisture condition is, however, a function of soil texture and physical heterogeneity, bioavailable soil organic carbon, and microbial community function. In anoxic and saturated system, simulation results show that biofilm preferentially forms in concave areas around sand particles and macro aggregates where cross-directional fluxes of organic carbon and electron acceptors (e.g., nitrate) favor microbial growth and attachment. The results provide important insights to the establishment of constitutive relationships between the macroscopic rates of soil organic carbon degradation and moisture content, and to the development of biogeochemical reactive transport models that incorporate biofilm structures and physio-chemical heterogeneity in soils and sediments.

  14. Formation of In-plane Skyrmions in Epitaxial MnSi Thin Films as Revealed by Planar Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokouchi, Tomoyuki; Kanazawa, Naoya; Tsukazaki, Atsushi; Kozuka, Yusuke; Kikkawa, Akiko; Taguchi, Yasujiro; Kawasaki, Masashi; Ichikawa, Masakazu; Kagawa, Fumitaka; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2015-10-01

    We investigate skyrmion formation in both a single crystalline bulk and epitaxial thin films of MnSi by measurements of planar Hall effect. A prominent stepwise field profile of planar Hall effect is observed in the well-established skyrmion phase region in the bulk sample, which is assigned to anisotropic magnetoresistance effect with respect to the magnetic modulation direction. We also detect the characteristic planar Hall anomalies in the thin films under the in-plane magnetic field at low temperatures, which indicates the formation of skyrmion strings lying in the film plane. Uniaxial magnetic anisotropy plays an important role in stabilizing the in-plane skyrmions in the MnSi thin film.

  15. Multi-step formation of a hemifusion diaphragm for vesicle fusion revealed by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hui-Hsu Gavin; Chang, Che-Ming; Lee, Jian-Bin

    2014-06-01

    Membrane fusion is essential for intracellular trafficking and virus infection, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the fusion process remain poorly understood. In this study, we employed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the membrane fusion mechanism using vesicle models which were pre-bound by inter-vesicle Ca(2+)-lipid clusters to approximate Ca(2+)-catalyzed fusion. Our results show that the formation of the hemifusion diaphragm for vesicle fusion is a multi-step event. This result contrasts with the assumptions made in most continuum models. The neighboring hemifused states are separated by an energy barrier on the energy landscape. The hemifusion diaphragm is much thinner than the planar lipid bilayers. The thinning of the hemifusion diaphragm during its formation results in the opening of a fusion pore for vesicle fusion. This work provides new insights into the formation of the hemifusion diaphragm and thus increases understanding of the molecular mechanism of membrane fusion. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Structure and Function: Relevance in the Cell's Physiology, Pathology and Therapy.

  16. Changes in gene expression of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in response to anaerobic stress reveal induction of central metabolism and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Zhu, Jiawen; Yang, Kui; Xu, Zhuofei; Liu, Ziduo; Zhou, Rui

    2014-06-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is an important porcine respiratory pathogen causing great economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. Oxygen deprivation is a stress that A. pleuropneumoniae will encounter during both early infection and the later, persistent stage. To understand modulation of A. pleuropneumoniae gene expression in response to the stress caused by anaerobic conditions, gene expression profiles under anaerobic and aerobic conditions were compared in this study. The microarray results showed that 631 genes (27.7% of the total ORFs) were differentially expressed in anaerobic conditions. Many genes encoding proteins involved in glycolysis, carbon source uptake systems, pyruvate metabolism, fermentation and the electron respiration transport chain were up-regulated. These changes led to an increased amount of pyruvate, lactate, ethanol and acetate in the bacterial cells as confirmed by metabolite detection. Genes encoding proteins involved in cell surface structures, especially biofilm formation, peptidoglycan biosynthesis and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis were up-regulated as well. Biofilm formation was significantly enhanced under anaerobic conditions. These results indicate that induction of central metabolism is important for basic survival of A. pleuropneumoniae after a shift to an anaerobic environment. Enhanced biofilm formation may contribute to the persistence of this pathogen in the damaged anaerobic host tissue and also in the early colonization stage. These discoveries give new insights into adaptation mechanisms of A. pleuropneumoniae in response to environmental stress.

  17. Biodegradation testing of chemicals with high Henry's constants - Separating mass and effective concentration reveals higher rate constants.

    PubMed

    Birch, Heidi; Andersen, Henrik R; Comber, Mike; Mayer, Philipp

    2017-05-01

    During simulation-type biodegradation tests, volatile chemicals will continuously partition between water phase and headspace. This study addressed how (1) this partitioning affects test results and (2) can be accounted for by combining equilibrium partition and dynamic biodegradation models. An aqueous mixture of 9 (semi)volatile chemicals was first generated using passive dosing and then diluted with environmental surface water producing concentrations in the ng/L to μg/L range. After incubation for 2 h to 4 weeks, automated Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction (HS-SPME) was applied directly on the test systems to measure substrate depletion by biodegradation relatively to abiotic controls. HS-SPME was also applied to determine air to water partitioning ratios. Biodegradation rate constants relating to the chemical in the water phase, kwater, were generally a factor 1 to 11 times higher than biodegradation rate constants relating to the total mass of chemical in the test system, ksystem, with one exceptional factor of 72 times for a long chain alkane. True water phase degradation rate constants were found (i) more appropriate for risk assessment than test system rate constants, (ii) to facilitate extrapolation to other air-water systems and (iii) to be better defined input parameters for aquatic exposure and fate models.

  18. Sill intrusion driven fluid flow and vent formation in volcanic basins: Modeling rates of volatile release and paleoclimate effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Karthik; Schmid, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Evidence of mass extinction events in conjunction with climate change occur throughout the geological record and may be accompanied by pronounced negative carbon isotope excursions. The processes that trigger such globally destructive changes are still under considerable debate. These include mechanisms such as poisoning from trace metals released during large volcanic eruptions (Vogt, 1972), CO2 released from lava degassing during the formation of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) (Courtillot and Renne, 2003) and CH4 release during the destabilization of sub-seafloor methane (Dickens et al., 1995), to name a few. Thermogenic methane derived from contact metamorphism associated with magma emplacement and cooling in sedimentary basins has been recently gaining considerable attention as a potential mechanism that may have triggered global climate events in the past (e.g. Svensen and Jamtveit, 2010). The discovery of hydrothermal vent complexes that are spatially associated with such basins also supports the discharge of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere (e.g. Jamtveit et al., 2004; Planke et al., 2005; Svensen et al., 2006). A previous study that investigated this process using a fluid flow model (Iyer et al., 2013) suggested that although hydrothermal plume formation resulting from sill emplacement may indeed release large quantities of methane at the surface, the rate at which this methane is released into the atmosphere is too slow to trigger, by itself, some of the negative δ13C excursions observed in the fossil record over short time scales observed in the fossil record. Here, we reinvestigate the rates of gas release during sill emplacement in a case study from the Harstad Basin off-shore Norway with a special emphasis on vent formation. The presented study is based on a seismic line that crosses multiple sill structures emplaced around 55 Ma within the Lower Cretaceous sediments. A single well-defined vent complex is interpreted above the termination of the

  19. Dissociation between neuronal activity in sensorimotor cortex and hand movement revealed as a function of movement rate.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Dora; Siero, Jeroen C W; Aarnoutse, Erik J; Leijten, Frans S S; Petridou, Natalia; Ramsey, Nick F

    2012-07-11

    It is often assumed that similar behavior is generated by the same brain activity. However, this does not take into account the brain state or recent behavioral history and movement initiation or continuation may not be similarly generated in the brain. To study whether similar movements are generated by the same brain activity, we measured neuronal population activity during repeated movements. Three human subjects performed a motor repetition task in which they moved their hand at four different rates (0.3, 0.5, 1, and 2 Hz). From high-resolution electrocorticography arrays implanted on motor and sensory cortex, high-frequency power (65-95 Hz) was extracted as a measure of neuronal population activity. During the two faster movement rates, high-frequency power was significantly suppressed, whereas movement parameters remained highly similar. This suppression was nonlinear: after the initial movement, neuronal population activity was reduced most strongly, and the data fit a model in which a fast decline rapidly converged to saturation. The amplitude of the beta-band suppression did not change with different rates. However, at the faster rates, beta power did not return to baseline between movements but remained suppressed. We take these findings to indicate that the extended beta suppression at the faster rates, which may suggest a release of inhibition in motor cortex, facilitates movement initiation. These results show that the relationship between behavior and neuronal activity is not consistent: recent movement influences the state of motor cortex and facilitates next movements by reducing the required level of neuronal activity.

  20. Sedimentation rates in eastern North America reveal strong links between regional climate, depositional environments, and sediment accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goring, S. J.; McLachlan, J. S.; Jackson, S. T.; Blaauw, M.; Christen, J.; Marlon, J.; Blois, J.; Williams, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    PalEON is a multidisciplinary project that combines paleo and modern ecological data with state-of-the-art statistical and modelling tools to examine the interactions between climate, fire and vegetation during the past two millennia in the northeastern United States. A fundamental challenge for PalEON (and paleo research more broadly) is to improve age modelling to yield more accurate sediment-core chronologies. To address this challenge, we assessed sedimentation rates and their controls for 218 lakes and mires in the northeastern U.S. Sedimentation rates (yr/cm) were calculated from age-depth models, which were obtained from the Neotoma database (www.neotomadb.org) and other contributed pollen records. The age models were recalibrated to IntCal09 and augmented in some cases using biostratigraphic markers (Picea decline, 16 kcal BP - 10.5 kcal BP; Quercus rise, 12 - 9.1 kcal BP; and Alnus decline, 11.5 - 10.6 kcal BP) as described in Blois et al. (2011). Relationships between sedimentation rates and sediment age, site longitude, and depositional environment (lacustrine or mire) are significant but weak. There are clear and significant links between variations in the NGRIP record of δ18O and sedimentation in mires across the PalEON region, but no links to lacustrine sedimentation rates. This result indicates that super-regional climatic control of primary productivity, and thus autochthonic sediment deposition, dominates in mires while deposition in lacustrine basins may be driven primarily by local and regional factors including watershed size, surficial materials,and regional vegetation. The shape of the gamma probability functions that best describe sedimentation rate distributions are calculated and presented here for use as priors in Bayesian age modelling applications such as BACON (Blaauw and Christen, in press). Future applications of this research are also discussed.

  1. Comparison of the in vivo and in vitro rates of formation of the three main oxidative metabolites of antipyrine in man.

    PubMed Central

    Boobis, A R; Brodie, M J; Kahn, G C; Toverud, E L; Blair, I A; Murray, S; Davies, D S

    1981-01-01

    1 The metabolism of antipyrine to its three main oxidative metabolites, 4-hydroxyantipyrine, 3-hydroxymethylantipyrine and norphenazone was investigated in vivo and in vitro in separate groups of subjects with normal hepatic function and in the same group of patients with suspected liver disease. 2 The rank order for the rate of formation of the three metabolites of antipyrine was similar in vivo and in vitro. 3 There was no significant correlation between the rates of formation of any pair of antipyrine metabolites either in vivo or in vitro. 4 Despite this there was a significant correlation between the in vivo and in vitro rates for formation of each of the three metabolites in the same group of patients. 5 It is concluded that determination of rates of formation of antipyrine metabolites from their excretion in urine provides an indication of the activity of the enzymes involved in their formation. PMID:7340879

  2. The Formation Rate of R11 Hydrate (CCl3F·17H2O) Utilized as a Cool Storage Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Shigetake; Oowa, Masaru; Akiya, Takaji; Nakaiwa, Masaru

    An equationon the formation rate of R11 hydrate in water and aqueous alcohol solutions is derived on basis of a dispersed liquid interface reaction model. From the equation, the relation between percent conversion(β) of R11 and elapse time (θ) is obtained by; -(1⁄m)ln(1-β)=kAΔTnθ where, m is conversion coefficient (R11 in hydrate⁄hydrate = 0.3095), k is over-all coefficient of mass trnsfer [kg⁄m2h°C], A is surface area of dispersed liquid (R11) [m2⁄kg], and ΔT is supercooling degree [°C]. Using above equation, the experimental date of the previous paper are analyzed, and it is found that these date are well applied to the equation. From these results, it can be considered that the formation rate of R11 hydrate in water and the aqueous solutions of ethanol (3.6% and 10%), n-propanol(0.9%) and n-butanol(1.9%) is principally governed by the dispersed liquid interface reaction, not by the crystal growth of R11 hydrate.

  3. Effect of the oxygen transfer rate (OSR) on the formation of cellulases by Trichoderma viride in submersion culture

    SciTech Connect

    Skachova, H.; Gottvaldova, M.; Kucera, J.; Podrazky, V.

    1981-12-01

    The formation of cellulases by Trichoderma viride in a medium containing cellulose as a sole source of carbon depends on the oxygen transfer rate (OSR); the OSR, on the other hand, depends on the concentration of cellulose in the medium because the concentration of cellulose strongly affects the viscosity of the medium. In the work presented here, the dependence has been determined for the oxygen transfer rate on geometric relations and viscosity in cellulose-containing media during cultivation in shaken flasks, and the oxygen transfer rates on NRE, NG, and Na during cultivation in a laboratory fermentor of 3000-mL volume. Two cellulosic materials have been compared with a different effect on viscosity; microcrystalline beach cellulose and fibrous cellulose. It has been found that, in an applicable range of concentration, microcrystalline cellulose does not affect the oxygen transfer rate (at concentrations up to 3%). Fibrous cellulose increases the OSR during cultivation in shake flasks but decreases its during cultivation in fermentors. On the basis of these results, the optimizing has been carried out on the cultivation conditions in fermentors. (Refs. 50).

  4. A PANCHROMATIC STUDY OF BLAST COUNTERPARTS: TOTAL STAR FORMATION RATE, MORPHOLOGY, ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FRACTION, AND STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Ade, Peter A. R.; Cortese, Luca; Dye, Simon; Eales, Stephen; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Pascale, Enzo; Tucker, Carole; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas; Wiebe, Donald V.; Devlin, Mark J.; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Viero, Marco P.

    2011-02-01

    We carry out a multi-wavelength study of individual galaxies detected by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) and identified at other wavelengths, using data spanning the radio to the ultraviolet (UV). We develop a Monte Carlo method to account for flux boosting, source blending, and correlations among bands, which we use to derive deboosted far-infrared (FIR) luminosities for our sample. We estimate total star-formation rates (SFRs) for BLAST counterparts with z {<=} 0.9 by combining their FIR and UV luminosities. Star formation is heavily obscured at L{sub FIR} {approx}> 10{sup 11} L{sub sun}, z {approx}> 0.5, but the contribution from unobscured starlight cannot be neglected at L{sub FIR} {approx}< 10{sup 11} L{sub sun}, z {approx}< 0.25. We assess that about 20% of the galaxies in our sample show indication of a type 1 active galactic nucleus, but their submillimeter emission is mainly due to star formation in the host galaxy. We compute stellar masses for a subset of 92 BLAST counterparts; these are relatively massive objects, with a median mass of {approx}10{sup 11} M{sub sun}, which seem to link the 24 {mu}m and Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) populations, in terms of both stellar mass and star formation activity. The bulk of the BLAST counterparts at z {approx}< 1 appears to be run-of-the-mill star-forming galaxies, typically spiral in shape, with intermediate stellar masses and practically constant specific SFRs. On the other hand, the high-z tail of the BLAST counterparts significantly overlaps with the SCUBA population, in terms of both SFRs and stellar masses, with observed trends of specific SFR that support strong evolution and downsizing.

  5. Comparison of Subantarctic Mode Water and Antarctic Intermediate Water formation rates in the South Pacific between NCAR-CCSM4 and observations

    SciTech Connect

    Hartin, Corinne A.; Fine, Rana A.; Kamenkovich, Igor; Sloyan, Bernadette M.

    2014-01-28

    Average formation rates for Subantarctic Mode (SAMW) and Antarctic Intermediate Waters (AAIW) in the South Pacific are calculated from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model version 4 (NCAR-CCSM4), using chlorofluorocarbon inventories. CFC-12 inventories and formation rates are compared to ocean observations. CCSM4 accurately simulates the southeast Pacific as the main formation region for SAMW and AAIW. CCSM4 formation rates for SAMW are 3.4 Sv, about half of the observational rate. Shallow mixed layers and a thinner SAMW in CCSM4 are responsible for lower formation rates. A formation rate of 8.1 Sv for AAIW in CCSM4 is higher than observations. Higher inventories in CCSM4 in the southwest and central Pacific, and higher surface concentrations are the main reasons for higher formation rates of AAIW. This comparison of model and observations is useful for understanding the uptake and transport of other gases, e.g., CO2 by the model.

  6. Analysis of Candida albicans Mutants Defective in the Cdk8 Module of Mediator Reveal Links between Metabolism and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Allia K.; Morales, Diana K.; Liu, Zhongle; Grahl, Nora; Zhang, Anda; Willger, Sven D.; Myers, Lawrence C.; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans biofilm formation is a key virulence trait that involves hyphal growth and adhesin expression. Pyocyanin (PYO), a phenazine secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, inhibits both C. albicans biofilm formation and development of wrinkled colonies. Using a genetic screen, we identified two mutants, ssn3Δ/Δ and ssn8Δ/Δ, which continued to wrinkle in the presence of PYO. Ssn8 is a cyclin-like protein and Ssn3 is similar to cyclin-dependent kinases; both proteins are part of the heterotetrameric Cdk8 module that forms a complex with the transcriptional co-regulator, Mediator. Ssn3 kinase activity was also required for PYO sensitivity as a kinase dead mutant maintained a wrinkled colony morphology in the presence of PYO. Furthermore, similar phenotypes were observed in mutants lacking the other two components of the Cdk8 module—Srb8 and Srb9. Through metabolomics analyses and biochemical assays, we showed that a compromised Cdk8 module led to increases in glucose consumption, glycolysis-related transcripts, oxidative metabolism and ATP levels even in the presence of PYO. In the mutant, inhibition of respiration to levels comparable to the PYO-treated wild type inhibited wrinkled colony development. Several lines of evidence suggest that PYO does not act through Cdk8. Lastly, the ssn3 mutant was a hyperbiofilm former, and maintained higher biofilm formation in the presence of PYO than the wild type. Together these data provide novel insights into the role of the Cdk8 module of Mediator in regulation of C. albicans physiology and the links between respiratory activity and both wrinkled colony and biofilm development. PMID:25275466

  7. Proteomic analysis of Campylobacter jejuni 11168 biofilms reveals a role for the motility complex in biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Kalmokoff, Martin; Lanthier, Patricia; Tremblay, Tammy-Lynn; Foss, Mary; Lau, Peter C; Sanders, Greg; Austin, John; Kelly, John; Szymanski, Christine M

    2006-06-01

    Campylobacter jejuni remains the leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in developed countries, and yet little is known concerning the mechanisms by which this fastidious organism survives within its environment. We have demonstrated that C. jejuni 11168 can form biofilms on a variety of surfaces. Proteomic analyses of planktonic and biofilm-grown cells demonstrated differences in protein expression profiles between the two growth modes. Proteins involved in the motility complex, including the flagellins (FlaA, FlaB), the filament cap (FliD), the basal body (FlgG, FlgG2), and the chemotactic protein (CheA), all exhibited higher levels of expression in biofilms than found in stationary-phase planktonic cells. Additional proteins with enhanced expression included those involved in the general (GroEL, GroES) and oxidative (Tpx, Ahp) stress responses, two known adhesins (Peb1, FlaC), and proteins involved in biosynthesis, energy generation, and catabolic functions. An aflagellate flhA mutant not only lost the ability to attach to a solid matrix and form a biofilm but could no longer form a pellicle at the air-liquid interface of a liquid culture. Insertional inactivation of genes that affect the flagellar filament (fliA, flaA, flaB, flaG) or the expression of the cell adhesin (flaC) also resulted in a delay in pellicle formation. These findings demonstrate that the flagellar motility complex plays a crucial role in the initial attachment of C. jejuni 11168 to solid surfaces during biofilm formation as well as in the cell-to-cell interactions required for pellicle formation. Continued expression of the motility complex in mature biofilms is unusual and suggests a role for the flagellar apparatus in the biofilm phenotype.

  8. Vertical structure and contribution of different types of precipitation during Atlantic tropical cyclone formation as revealed by TRMM PR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Cody; Wang, Zhuo; Nesbitt, Stephen W.; Dunkerton, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Cloud evolution during tropical cyclogenesis was examined using the TRMM PR products from 3 days before to 1 day after genesis. Precipitation increases substantially within 36 h before genesis. Stratiform clouds, mid-level convection, and deep convection all contribute to the increasing precipitation. The contribution by stratiform precipitation is due to its increasing areal coverage, while its pixel rain rate changes little from Day -3 to Day +1. The contribution by mid-level and deep convections results from their increasing areal coverage and intensifying rain rates. Among the three types of convection, deep convection has the largest pixel rain rate, but mid-level convection occurs most frequently and makes the largest contribution to the total precipitation. The overall contribution by convective clouds, despite their low areal coverage, is comparable to that by stratiform precipitation. It is suggested that tropical cyclogenesis may be an outcome of the collective contribution by different precipitation types.

  9. Andreev Bound States Formation and Quasiparticle Trapping in Quench Dynamics Revealed by Time-Dependent Counting Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souto, R. Seoane; Martín-Rodero, A.; Yeyati, A. Levy

    2016-12-01

    We analyze the quantum quench dynamics in the formation of a phase-biased superconducting nanojunction. We find that in the absence of an external relaxation mechanism and for very general conditions the system gets trapped in a metastable state, corresponding to a nonequilibrium population of the Andreev bound states. The use of the time-dependent full counting statistics analysis allows us to extract information on the asymptotic population of even and odd many-body states, demonstrating that a universal behavior, dependent only on the Andreev state energy, is reached in the quantum point contact limit. These results shed light on recent experimental observations on quasiparticle trapping in superconducting atomic contacts.

  10. Defect formation and annealing behaviors of fluorine-implanted GaN layers revealed by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M. J.; Yuan, L.; Cheng, C. C.; Beling, C. D.; Chen, K. J.

    2009-02-01

    Defect formation and annealing behaviors of fluorine-implanted, unintentionally doped GaN layers were studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). Single Ga vacancies (VGa) were identified as the main vacancy-type defects detected by PAS after fluorine implantation at 180 keV with a dose of 1×1015 cm-2. Implantation-induced VGa tend to aggregate and form vacancy clusters after postimplantation annealing in N2 ambient at 600 °C. Fluorine ions tend to form F-vacancy complexes quickly after thermal annealing, which is consistent with the proposed diffusion model that predicts the behaviors of fluorine in GaN.

  11. Multigenerational exposure to ocean acidification during food limitation reveals consequences for copepod scope for growth and vital rates.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Sindre A; Håkedal, Ole Jacob; Salaberria, Iurgi; Tagliati, Alice; Gustavson, Liv Marie; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro; Olsen, Anders J; Altin, Dag

    2014-10-21

    The copepod Calanus finmarchicus is a key component of northern Atlantic food webs, linking energy-transfer from phytoplankton to higher trophic levels. We examined the effect of different ocean acidification (OA) scenarios (i.e., ambient, 1080, 2080, and 3080 μatm CO2) over two subsequent generations under limited food availability. Determination of metabolic and feeding rates, and estimations of the scope for growth, suggests that negative effects observed on vital rates (ontogenetic development, somatic growth, fecundity) may be a consequence of energy budget constraints due to higher maintenance costs under high pCO2-environments. A significant delay in development rate among the parental generation animals exposed to 2080 μatm CO2, but not in the following F1 generation under the same conditions, suggests that C. finmarchicus may have adaptive potential to withstand the direct long-term effects of even the more pessimistic future OA scenarios but underlines the importance of transgenerational experiments. The results also indicate that in a more acidic ocean, increased energy expenditure through rising respiration could lower the energy transfer to higher trophic levels and thus hamper the productivity of the northern Atlantic ecosystem.

  12. Fast Helix Formation in the B Domain of Protein A Revealed by Site-Specific Infrared Probes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Caitlin M.; Cooper, A. Kat; Dyer, R. Brian

    2015-01-01

    Comparison of experimental and computational protein folding studies can be difficult because of differences in structural resolution. Isotope-edited infrared spectroscopy offers a direct measure of structural changes involved in protein folding at the single-residue level. Here we demonstrate the increased resolution of site-specific infrared probes to the peptide backbone in the B domain of staphylococcal protein A (BdpA). 13C=18O-labeled methionine was incorporated into each of the helices using recombinant protein expression. Laser-induced temperature jumps coupled with infrared spectroscopy were used to probe changes in the peptide backbone on the submillisecond time scale. The relaxation kinetics of the buried helices, solvated helices, and labeled positions were measured independently by probing the corresponding bands assigned in the amide I region. Using these wavelength-dependent measurements, we observe a fast nanosecond phase and slower microsecond phase at each position. We find at least partial formation of helices 1–3 in the fast intermediate state that precedes the transition state. These measurements provide direct, time-resolved experimental evidence of the early formation of partial helical structure in helices 1 and 3, supporting folding models proposed by computer simulations. PMID:25706439

  13. Virus-induced gene silencing of P23k in barley leaf reveals morphological changes involved in secondary wall formation.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Ai; Rahman, Abidur; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Taira, Hideharu; Kidou, Shin-Ichiro

    2007-01-01

    P23k is a monocot-unique protein that is highly expressed in the scutellum of germinating barley seed. Previous expression analyses suggested that P23k is involved in sugar translocation and/or sugar metabolism. However, the role of P23k in barley physiology remains unclear. Here, to elucidate its physiological function, BSMV-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of P23k in barley leaves was performed. Expression and localization analyses of P23k mRNA in barley leaves showed up-regulation of P23k transcript with increased photosynthetic activity and the localization of these transcripts to the vascular bundles and sclerenchyma, where secondary wall formation is most active. VIGS of the P23k gene led to abnormal leaf development, asymmetric orientation of main veins, and cracked leaf edges caused by mechanical weakness. In addition, histochemical analyses indicated that the distribution of P23k in leaves coincides with the distribution of cell wall polysaccharides. Considering these results together, it is proposed that P23k is involved in the synthesis of cell wall polysaccharides and contributes to secondary wall formation in barley leaves.

  14. Ethanol formation in adh0 mutants reveals the existence of a novel acetaldehyde-reducing activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Drewke, C; Thielen, J; Ciriacy, M

    1990-01-01

    A strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been constructed which is deficient in the four alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isozymes known at present. This strain (adh0), being irreversibly mutated in the genes ADH1, ADH3, and ADH4 and carrying a point mutation in the gene ADH2 coding for the glucose-repressible isozyme ADHII, still produces up to one third of the theoretical maximum yield of ethanol in a homofermentative conversion of glucose to ethanol. Analysis of the glucose metabolism of adh0 cells shows that the lack of all known ADH isozymes results in the formation of glycerol as a major fermentation product, accompanied by a significant production of acetaldehyde and acetate. Treatment of glucose-growing adh0 cells with the respiratory-chain inhibitor antimycin A leads to an immediate cessation of ethanol production, demonstrating that ethanol production in adh0 cells is dependent on mitochondrial electron transport. Reduction of acetaldehyde to ethanol in isolated mitochondria could also be demonstrated. This reduction is apparently linked to the oxidation of acetaldehyde to acetate. Preliminary data suggest that this novel type of ethanol formation in S. cerevisiae is associated with the inner mitochondrial membrane. Images PMID:2193925

  15. Dynamics of PLCγ and Src Family Kinase 1 Interactions during Nuclear Envelope Formation Revealed by FRET-FLIM

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Richard D.; Applebee, Christopher; Poccia, Dominic L.; Larijani, Banafshé

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) breaks down and reforms during each mitotic cycle. A similar process happens to the sperm NE following fertilisation. The formation of the NE in both these circumstances involves endoplasmic reticulum membranes enveloping the chromatin, but PLCγ-dependent membrane fusion events are also essential. Here we demonstrate the activation of PLCγ by a Src family kinase (SFK1) during NE assembly. We show by time-resolved FRET for the first time the direct in vivo interaction and temporal regulation of PLCγ and SFK1 in sea urchins. As a prerequisite for protein activation, there is a rapid phosphorylation of PLCγ on its Y783 residue in response to GTP in vitro. This phosphorylation is dependent upon SFK activity; thus Y783 phosphorylation and NE assembly are susceptible to SFK inhibition. Y783 phosphorylation is also observed on the surface of the male pronucleus (MPN) in vivo during NE formation. Together the corroborative in vivo and in vitro data demonstrate the phosphorylation and activation of PLCγ by SFK1 during NE assembly. We discuss the potential generality of such a mechanism. PMID:22848394

  16. Fast helix formation in the B domain of protein A revealed by site-specific infrared probes.

    PubMed

    Davis, Caitlin M; Cooper, A Kat; Dyer, R Brian

    2015-03-10

    Comparison of experimental and computational protein folding studies can be difficult because of differences in structural resolution. Isotope-edited infrared spectroscopy offers a direct measure of structural changes involved in protein folding at the single-residue level. Here we demonstrate the increased resolution of site-specific infrared probes to the peptide backbone in the B domain of staphylococcal protein A (BdpA). (13)C═(18)O-labeled methionine was incorporated into each of the helices using recombinant protein expression. Laser-induced temperature jumps coupled with infrared spectroscopy were used to probe changes in the peptide backbone on the submillisecond time scale. The relaxation kinetics of the buried helices, solvated helices, and labeled positions were measured independently by probing the corresponding bands assigned in the amide I region. Using these wavelength-dependent measurements, we observe a fast nanosecond phase and slower microsecond phase at each position. We find at least partial formation of helices 1-3 in the fast intermediate state that precedes the transition state. These measurements provide direct, time-resolved experimental evidence of the early formation of partial helical structure in helices 1 and 3, supporting folding models proposed by computer simulations.

  17. A developmental framework for complex plasmodesmata formation revealed by large-scale imaging of the Arabidopsis leaf epidermis.

    PubMed

    Fitzgibbon, Jessica; Beck, Martina; Zhou, Ji; Faulkner, Christine; Robatzek, Silke; Oparka, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) form tubular connections that function as intercellular communication channels. They are essential for transporting nutrients and for coordinating development. During cytokinesis, simple PDs are inserted into the developing cell plate, while during wall extension, more complex (branched) forms of PD are laid down. We show that complex PDs are derived from existing simple PDs in a pattern that is accelerated when leaves undergo the sink-source transition. Complex PDs are inserted initially at the three-way junctions between epidermal cells but develop most rapidly in the anisocytic complexes around stomata. For a quantitative analysis of complex PD formation, we established a high-throughput imaging platform and constructed PDQUANT, a custom algorithm that detected cell boundaries and PD numbers in different wall faces. For anticlinal walls, the number of complex PDs increased with increasing cell size, while for periclinal walls, the number of PDs decreased. Complex PD insertion was accelerated by up to threefold in response to salicylic acid treatment and challenges with mannitol. In a single 30-min run, we could derive data for up to 11k PDs from 3k epidermal cells. This facile approach opens the door to a large-scale analysis of the endogenous and exogenous factors that influence PD formation.

  18. Effect of repulsive interactions on the rate of doublet formation of colloidal nanoparticles in the presence of convective transport.

    PubMed

    Lattuada, Marco; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2011-03-01

    In this work, we have performed a systematic investigation of the effect of electrostatic repulsive interactions on the aggregation rate of colloidal nanoparticles to from doublets in the presence of a convective transport mechanism. The aggregation rate has been computed by solving numerically the Fuchs-Smoluchowski diffusion-convection equation. Two convective transport mechanisms have been considered: extensional flow field and gravity-induced relative sedimentation. A broad range of conditions commonly encountered in the applications of colloidal dispersions has been analyzed. The relative importance of convective to diffusive contributions has been quantified by using the Peclet number Pe. The simulation results indicate that, in the presence of repulsive interactions, the evolution of the aggregation rate as a function of Pe can always be divided into three distinct regimes, no matter which convective mechanism is considered. At low Pe values the rate of aggregation is independent of convection and is dominated by repulsive interactions. At high Pe values, the rate of aggregation is dominated by convection, and independent of repulsive interactions. At intermediate Pe values, a sharp transition between these two regimes occurs. During this transition, which occurs usually over a 10-100-fold increase in Pe values, the aggregation rate can change by several orders of magnitude. The interval of Pe values where this transition occurs depends upon the nature of the convective transport mechanism, as well as on the height and characteristic lengthscale of the repulsive barrier. A simplified model has been proposed that is capable of quantitatively accounting for the simulations results. The obtained results reveal unexpected features of the effect of ionic strength and particle size on the stability of colloidal suspensions under shear or sedimentation, which have relevant consequences in industrial applications.

  19. Extreme Uplift and Erosion Rates in Eastern Himalayas (Siang-Brahmaputra Basin) Revealed by Detrital (U-Th)/He Termochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibari, B.; Pik, R.; France-Lanord, C.; Carignan, J.; Lave, J.

    2005-12-01

    The distribution of erosion intensity in a major mountain range such as the Himalaya is a fundamental clue to investigate the interaction between climatic, tectonic and erosion processes that govern the morphology and evolution of an orogen. At the first order, the sediment flux measured on the two major rivers - Ganga and Brahmaputra - suggest higher mean denudation rates for the Eastern Himalaya than Western Himalaya (Galy and France-Lanord, 2001). However, the distribution of erosion in the Brahmaputra basin is not uniform and the Namche Barwa area, drained by the Siang-Tsangpo, appears to supply up to 50 % of the total sediment flux of the Brahmaputra (Singh and France-Lanord, 2002). In order to further constrain the relationships between such localized erosion and the associated exhumation rate of basement, we measured (U-Th)/He ages in detrital zircons from river sediments in the Brahmaputra basin. This thermochronological system (Z-He) is particularly interesting for detrital material because: (i) zircon is preserved during weathering and erosion processes, (ii) its closure temperature (150-180°C, Reiners et al., 2004) corresponds to a depth which is close to the surface but deep enough to avoid perturbations by topography variations, and (iii) the error associated to single grain measurement (8-10 %) allows a good definition of population ages. Z-He ages from the Brahmaputra river in Bangladesh range from 0.4 to 77 Ma. 40 % of the zircon population exhibit Z-He ages between 0.4 and 1 Ma defining the major distribution peak centred at 0.5 Ma. These very young ages correspond to extreme denudation rates of 5 to 7 mm/yr. Dispersed Z-He ages from 12 to 77 Ma do not define any population groups, whereas the remaining 40 % of the zircons have ages distributed between 2.5 and 7 Ma, which correspond to the pool of ages recorded by preliminary Z-He ages on the other Himalayan rivers of the basin. Therefore, such very high denudation rates (5-7 mm/yr) seems to

  20. Extremely slow rate of evolution in the HOX cluster revealed by comparison between Tanzanian and Indonesian coelacanths.

    PubMed

    Higasa, Koichiro; Nikaido, Masato; Saito, Taro L; Yoshimura, Jun; Suzuki, Yutaka; Suzuki, Hikoyu; Nishihara, Hidenori; Aibara, Mitsuto; Ngatunga, Benjamin P; Kalombo, Hassan W J; Sugano, Sumio; Morishita, Shinichi; Okada, Norihiro

    2012-09-01

    Coelacanths are known as "living fossils" because their morphology has changed very little from that in the fossil record. To elucidate why coelacanths have evolved so slowly is thus of primary importance in evolutionary biology. In the present study, we determined the entire sequence of the HOX cluster of the Tanzanian coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae) and compared it with that of the Indonesian coelacanth (L. menadoensis), which was available in the literature. The most intriguing result was the extremely small genetic divergence between the two coelacanths. The synonymous divergence of the HOX coding region between the two coelacanths was estimated to be 0.07%, which is ~11-fold smaller than that of human-chimp. When we applied the estimated divergence time of the two coelacanths of 6 million years ago (MYA) and 30 MYA, which were proposed in independent mitochondrial DNA analyses, the synonymous substitution rate of the coelacanth HOX cluster was estimated to be ~11-fold and 56-fold smaller than that of human-chimp, respectively. Thus, the present study implies that the reduction of the nucleotide substitution rate in coelacanth HOX genes may account for the conservation of coelacanth morphology during evolution.

  1. Heavy water and 15N labeling with NanoSIMS analysis reveals growth-rate dependent metabolic heterogeneity in chemostats

    PubMed Central

    McGlynn, Shawn E.; Green-Saxena, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    To measure single cell microbial activity and substrate utilization patterns in environmental systems, we employ a new technique using stable isotope labeling of microbial populations with heavy water (a passive tracer) and 15N ammonium in combination with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry. We demonstrate simultaneous NanoSIMS analysis of hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen at high spatial and mass resolution, and report calibration data linking single cell isotopic compositions to the corresponding bulk isotopic equivalents for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Our results show that heavy water is capable of quantifying in situ single cell microbial activities ranging from generational time scales of minutes to years, with only light isotopic incorporation (∼0.1 atom % 2H). Applying this approach to study the rates of fatty acid biosynthesis by single cells of S. aureus growing at different rates in chemostat culture (∼6 hours, 1 day and 2 week generation times), we observe the greatest anabolic activity diversity in the slowest growing populations. By using heavy water to constrain cellular growth activity, we can further infer the relative contributions of ammonium vs. amino acid assimilation to the cellular nitrogen pool. The approach described here can be applied to disentangle individual cell activities even in nutritionally complex environments. PMID:25655651

  2. Expression analysis reveals a role for hydrophobic or epicuticular wax signals in pre-penetration structure formation of Phakopsora pachyrhizi.

    PubMed

    Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Upplapapti, Srinivasa; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2013-11-01

    Asian soybean rust (ASR) caused by the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi is one of the most devastating foliar diseases affecting soybean production worldwide. Even though several resistance sources have been identified in soybean, they do not show resistance to all races of P. pachyrhizi. Identification of genes that confer nonhost resistance (NHR) against P. pachyrhizi in another legume species will provide an avenue to engineer soybean to have durable and broad spectrum resistance against P. pachyrhizi strains. Recently, we identified a Medicago truncatula gene, IRG1 (INHIBITOR OF RUST GERM-TUBE DIFFERENTIATION1), that when mutated inhibits the growth of P. pachyrhizi. IRG1 encodes a Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger transcription factor that controls wax-biosynthesis-related genes. The irg1 mutant shows a complete loss of abaxial epicuticular wax crystals and surface hydrophobicity, resulting in the inhibition of pre-penetration structure formation. In order to confirm the role of surface hydrophobicity in the formation of pre-penetration structures, we examined the expression profiles of P. pachyrhizi putative pre-penetration structure-development-related genes on a solid surface or a M. truncatula abaxial leaf surface. Interestingly, the expression of kinase family genes was upregulated on the hydrophobic surface and M. truncatula wild-type leaf surface, but not on the M. truncatula irg1 mutant leaf surface, suggesting that these genes play a role in P. pachyrhizi pre-penetration structure development. In addition, our results suggest that hydrophobicity on the M. truncatula leaf surface may function as a key signal to induce the P. pachyrhizi genes involved in pre-penetration structure development.

  3. Formation of coffee-stain patterns at the nanoscale: The role of nanoparticle solubility and solvent evaporation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Milzetti, Jasmin; Leroy, Frédéric; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2017-03-01

    When droplets of nanoparticle suspension evaporate from surfaces, they leave behind a deposit of nanoparticles. The mechanism of evaporation-induced pattern formation in the deposit is studied by molecular dynamics simulations for sessile nanodroplets. The influence of the interaction between nanoparticles and liquid molecules and the influence of the evaporation rate on the final deposition pattern are addressed. When the nanoparticle-liquid interaction is weaker than the liquid-liquid interaction, an interaction-driven or evaporation-induced layer of nanoparticles appears at the liquid-vapor interface and eventually collapses onto the solid surface to form a uniform deposit independently of the evaporation rate. When the nanoparticle-liquid and liquid-liquid interactions are comparable, the nanoparticles are dispersed inside the droplet and evaporation takes place with the contact line pinned at a surface defect. In such a case, a pattern with an approximate ring-like shape is found with fast evaporation, while a more uniform distribution is observed with slower evaporation. When the liquid-nanoparticle interaction is stronger than the liquid-liquid interaction, evaporation always occurs with receding contact line. The final deposition pattern changes from volcano-like to pancake-like with decreasing evaporation rate. These findings might help to design nanoscale structures like nanopatterns or nanowires on surface through controlled solvent evaporation.

  4. Effect of freezing rate and dendritic ice formation on concentration profiles of proteins frozen in cylindrical vessels.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Miguel A; Miller, Maria A; Glass, Matt A; Singh, Satish K; Johnston, Keith P

    2011-04-01

    The process of freezing protein solutions can perturb the conformation of the protein and potentially lead to aggregate formation during long-term storage in the frozen state. Radial macroscopic freeze concentration and temperature profiles for bovine serum albumin (BSA) solutions in small cylindrical stainless steel vessels were determined for various freezing rates. The measured concentrations of both BSA and immunoglobulin G2, as well as trehalose in sampled ice sections, increased by up to twofold to threefold toward the bottom and radial center for slow freezing rates produced in stagnant air freezers. The concentration and temperature profiles result in density gradients that transport solutes by convective flow. For faster external cooling by either forced convection of air or a liquid coolant, the increased freezing rate raised the ice front velocity resulting in enhanced dendritic ice growth. The ice trapped the solutes more effectively before they were removed from the ice front by diffusion and convection, resulting in more uniform solute concentration profiles. The dynamic temperature profiles from multiple radial thermocouples were consistent with the independently measured freeze concentration profiles. The ability to control the protein concentration profile in the frozen state offers the potential to improve stability of protein in long-term frozen storage.

  5. Formation of coffee-stain patterns at the nanoscale: The role of nanoparticle solubility and solvent evaporation rate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianguo; Milzetti, Jasmin; Leroy, Frédéric; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2017-03-21

    When droplets of nanoparticle suspension evaporate from surfaces, they leave behind a deposit of nanoparticles. The mechanism of evaporation-induced pattern formation in the deposit is studied by molecular dynamics simulations for sessile nanodroplets. The influence of the interaction between nanoparticles and liquid molecules and the influence of the evaporation rate on the final deposition pattern are addressed. When the nanoparticle-liquid interaction is weaker than the liquid-liquid interaction, an interaction-driven or evaporation-induced layer of nanoparticles appears at the liquid-vapor interface and eventually collapses onto the solid surface to form a uniform deposit independently of the evaporation rate. When the nanoparticle-liquid and liquid-liquid interactions are comparable, the nanoparticles are dispersed inside the droplet and evaporation takes place with the contact line pinned at a surface defect. In such a case, a pattern with an approximate ring-like shape is found with fast evaporation, while a more uniform distribution is observed with slower evaporation. When the liquid-nanoparticle interaction is stronger than the liquid-liquid interaction, evaporation always occurs with receding contact line. The final deposition pattern changes from volcano-like to pancake-like with decreasing evaporation rate. These findings might help to design nanoscale structures like nanopatterns or nanowires on surface through controlled solvent evaporation.

  6. Ultraviolet to infrared emission of z > 1 galaxies: Can we derive reliable star formation rates and stellar masses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buat, V.; Heinis, S.; Boquien, M.; Burgarella, D.; Charmandaris, V.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Le Borgne, D.; Morrison, G.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Our knowledge of the cosmic mass assembly relies on measurements of star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses (Mstar), of galaxies as a function of redshift. These parameters must be estimated in a consistent way with a good knowledge of systematics before studying their correlation and the variation of the specific SFR. Constraining these fundamental properties of galaxies across the Universe is of utmost importance if we want to understand galaxy formation and evolution. Methods: We seek to derive SFRs and stellar masses in distant galaxies and to quantify the main uncertainties affecting their measurement. We explore the impact of the assumptions made in their derivation with standard calibrations or through a fitting process, as well as the impact of the available data, focusing on the role of infrared emission originating from dust. Results: We build a sample of galaxies with z > 1, all observed from the ultraviolet to the infrared in their rest frame. The data are fitted with the code CIGALE, which is also used to build and analyse a catalogue of mock galaxies. Models with different star formation histories are introduced: an exponentially decreasing or increasing SFR and a more complex one coupling a decreasing SFR with a younger burst of constant star formation. We define different sets of data, with or without a good sampling of the ultraviolet range, near-infrared, and thermal infrared data. Variations of the metallicity are also investigated. The impact of these different cases on the determination of stellar mass and SFR are analysed. Conclusions: Exponentially decreasing models with a redshift formation of the stellar population zf ≃ 8 cannot fit the data correctly. All the other models fit the data correctly at the price of unrealistically young ages when the age of the single stellar population is taken to be a free parameter, especially for the exponentially decreasing models. The best fits are obtained with two stellar populations. As

  7. Calorespirometry reveals that goldfish prioritize aerobic metabolism over metabolic rate depression in all but near-anoxic environments.

    PubMed

    Regan, Matthew D; Gill, Ivan S; Richards, Jeffrey G

    2017-02-15

    Metabolic rate depression (MRD) has long been proposed as the key metabolic strategy of hypoxic survival, but surprisingly, the effects of changes in hypoxic O2 tensions (PwO2 ) on MRD are largely unexplored. We simultaneously measured the O2 consumption rate (ṀO2 ) and metabolic heat of goldfish using calorespirometry to test the hypothesis that MRD is employed at hypoxic PwO2  values and initiated just below Pcrit, the PwO2 below which ṀO2  is forced to progressively decline as the fish oxyconforms to decreasing PwO2 Specifically, we used closed-chamber and flow-through calorespirometry together with terminal sampling experiments to examine the effects of PwO2  and time on ṀO2 , metabolic heat and anaerobic metabolism (lactate and ethanol production). The closed-chamber and flow-through experiments yielded slightly different results. Under closed-chamber conditions with a continually decreasing PwO2 , goldfish showed a Pcrit of 3.0±0.3 kPa and metabolic heat production was only depressed at PwO2  between 0 and 0.67 kPa. Under flow-through conditions with PwO2  held at a variety of oxygen tensions for 1 and 4 h, goldfish also initiated MRD between 0 and 0.67 kPa but maintained ṀO2  to 0.67 kPa, indicating that Pcrit is at or below this PwO2 Anaerobic metabolism was strongly activated at PwO2 ≤1.3 kPa, but only used within the first hour at 1.3 and 0.67 kPa, as anaerobic end-products did not accumulate between 1 and 4 h exposure. Taken together, it appears that goldfish reserve MRD for near-anoxia, supporting routine metabolic rate at sub-PcritPwO2  values with the help of anaerobic glycolysis in the closed-chamber experiments, and aerobically after an initial (<1 h) activation of anaerobic metabolism in the flow-through experiments, even at 0.67 kPa PwO2.

  8. High Acidification Rate of Norwegian Sea Revealed by Boron Isotopes in the Deep-Sea Coral Madrepora Oculata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, C.; Douville, E.; Hall-Spencer, J.; Montagna, P.; Louvat, P.; Gaillardet, J.; Frank, N.; Bordier, L.; Juillet-Leclerc, A.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean acidification and global warming due to the increase of anthropogenic CO2 are major threats for marine calcifying organisms, such as deep-sea corals, particularly in high-latitude regions. In order to evaluate the current anthropogenic perturbation and to properly assess the impacts and responses of calcifiers to previous changes in pH it is critical to investigate past changes of the seawater carbonate system. Unfortunately, current instrumental records of oceanic pH are limited, covering only a few decades. Scleractinian coral skeletons record chemical parameters of the seawater in which they grow. However, pH variability over multidecadal timescales remains largely unknown in intermediate and deep seawater masses. Here we present a study that highlights the potential of deep-sea-corals to overcome the lack of long-term pH records and that emphasizes a rapid acidification of high latitude subsurface waters of Norwegian Sea during the past decades. We have reconstructed seawater pH and temperature from a well dated deep-sea coral specimen Madrepora oculata collected alive from Røst reef in Norwegian Sea (67°N, 9°E, 340 m depth). This large branching framework forming coral species grew its skeleton over more than four decades determined using AMS 14C and 210Pb dating (Sabatier et al. 2012). B-isotopes and Li/Mg ratios yield an acidification rate of about -0.0030±0.0008 pH-unit.year-1 and a warming of 0.3°C during the past four decades (1967-2007). Overall our reconstruction technique agrees well with previous pH calculations (Hönisch et al., 2007 vs. Trotter et al., 2011 and McCulloch et al., 2012, i.e. the iterative method), but additional corrections are here applied using stable isotope correlations (O, C, B) to properly address kinetic fractionation of boron isotopes used for pH reconstruction. The resulting pH curve strongly anti-correlates with the annual NAO index, which further strengthens our evidence for the ocean acidification rate

  9. Quantitative TCR:pMHC Dissociation Rate Assessment by NTAmers Reveals Antimelanoma T Cell Repertoires Enriched for High Functional Competence.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Philippe O; Wieckowski, Sébastien; Baumgaertner, Petra; Hebeisen, Michaël; Allard, Mathilde; Speiser, Daniel E; Rufer, Nathalie

    2015-07-01

    Experimental models demonstrated that therapeutic induction of CD8 T cell responses may offer protection against tumors or infectious diseases providing that T cells have sufficiently high TCR/CD8:pMHC avidity for efficient Ag recognition and consequently strong immune functions. However, comprehensive characterization of TCR/CD8:pMHC avidity in clinically relevant situations has remained elusive. In this study, using the novel NTA-His tag-containing multimer technology, we quantified the TCR:pMHC dissociation rates (koff) of tumor-specific vaccine-induced CD8 T cell clones (n = 139) derived from seven melanoma patients vaccinated with IFA, CpG, and the native/EAA or analog/ELA Melan-A(MART-1)(26-35) peptide, binding with low or high affinity to MHC, respectively. We observed substantial correlations between koff and Ca(2+) mobilization (p = 0.016) and target cell recognition (p < 0.0001), with the latter independently of the T cell differentiation state. Our strategy was successful in demonstrating that the type of peptide impacted on TCR/CD8:pMHC avidity, as tumor-reactive T cell clones derived from patients vaccinated with the low-affinity (native) peptide expressed slower koff rates than those derived from patients vaccinated with the high-affinity (analog) peptide (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, we observed that the low-affinity peptide promoted the selective differentiation of tumor-specific T cells bearing TCRs with high TCR/CD8:pMHC avidity (p < 0.0001). Altogether, TCR:pMHC interaction kinetics correlated strongly with T cell functions. Our study demonstrates the feasibility and usefulness of TCR/CD8:pMHC avidity assessment by NTA-His tag-containing multimers of naturally occurring polyclonal T cell responses, which represents a strong asset for the development of immunotherapy.

  10. Systematic dissection of the agrobacterium type VI secretion system reveals machinery and secreted components for subcomplex formation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jer-Sheng; Ma, Lay-Sun; Lai, Erh-Min

    2013-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is widely distributed in pathogenic Proteobacteria. Sequence and structural analysis of T6SS reveals a resemblance to the T4 bacteriophage tail, in which an outer sheath structure contracts an internal tube for injecting nucleic acid into bacterial cells. However, the molecular details of how this phage tail-like T6SS structure is assembled in vivo and executed for exoprotein or effector secretion remain largely unknown. Here, we used a systematic approach to identify T6SS machinery and secreted components and investigate the interaction among the putative sheath and tube components of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We showed that 14 T6SS components play essential roles in the secretion of the T6SS hallmark exoprotein Hcp. In addition, we discovered a novel T6SS exoprotein, Atu4347, that is dispensable for Hcp secretion. Interestingly, Atu4347 and the putative tube components, Hcp and VgrG, are mainly localized in the cytoplasm but also detected on the bacterial surface. Atu4342 (TssB) and Atu4341 (TssC41) interact with and stabilize each other, which suggests that they are functional orthologs of the sheath components TssB (VipA) and TssC (VipB), respectively. Importantly, TssB interacts directly with the three exoproteins (Hcp, VgrG, and Atu4347), in which Hcp also interacts directly with VgrG-1 on co-purification from Escherichia coli. Further co-immunoprecipitation and pulldown assays revealed these subcomplex(es) in A. tumefaciens and thereby support T6SS functioning as a contractile phage tail-like structure.

  11. MEASURING GALAXY STAR FORMATION RATES FROM INTEGRATED PHOTOMETRY: INSIGHTS FROM COLOR-MAGNITUDE DIAGRAMS OF RESOLVED STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Benjamin D.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Johnson, L. C.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dale, Daniel A.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Lee, Janice C.; Skillman, Evan D.; Boquien, Mederic

    2013-07-20

    We use empirical star formation histories (SFHs), measured from Hubble-Space-Telescope-based resolved star color-magnitude diagrams, as input into population synthesis codes to model the broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 50 nearby dwarf galaxies (6.5 < log M{sub *}/M{sub Sun} < 8.5, with metallicities {approx}10% solar). In the presence of realistic SFHs, we compare the modeled and observed SEDs from the ultraviolet (UV) through near-infrared and assess the reliability of widely used UV-based star formation rate (SFR) indicators. In the FUV through i bands, we find that the observed and modeled SEDs are in excellent agreement. In the Spitzer 3.6 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m bands, we find that modeled SEDs systematically overpredict observed luminosities by up to {approx}0.2 dex, depending on treatment of the TP-AGB stars in the synthesis models. We assess the reliability of UV luminosity as a SFR indicator, in light of independently constrained SFHs. We find that fluctuations in the SFHs alone can cause factor of {approx}2 variations in the UV luminosities relative to the assumption of a constant SFH over the past 100 Myr. These variations are not strongly correlated with UV-optical colors, implying that correcting UV-based SFRs for the effects of realistic SFHs is difficult using only the broadband SED. Additionally, for this diverse sample of galaxies, we find that stars older than 100 Myr can contribute from <5%-100% of the present day UV luminosity, highlighting the challenges in defining a characteristic star formation timescale associated with UV emission. We do find a relationship between UV emission timescale and broadband UV-optical color, though it is different than predictions based on exponentially declining SFH models. Our findings have significant implications for the comparison of UV-based SFRs across low-metallicity populations with diverse SFHs.

  12. 3D-HST emission line galaxies at z ∼ 2: discrepancies in the optical/UV star formation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Zeimann, Gregory R.; Ciardullo, Robin; Gebhardt, Henry; Gronwall, Caryl; Schneider, Donald P.; Hagen, Alex; Bridge, Joanna S.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Feldmeier, John

    2014-08-01

    We use Hubble Space Telescope near-IR grism spectroscopy to examine the Hβ line strengths of 260 star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 1.90 < z < 2.35. We show that at these epochs, the Hβ star formation rate (SFR) is a factor of ∼1.8 higher than what would be expected from the systems' rest-frame UV flux density, suggesting a shift in the standard conversion between these quantities and SFR. We demonstrate that at least part of this shift can be attributed to metallicity, as Hβ is more enhanced in systems with lower oxygen abundance. This offset must be considered when measuring the SFR history of the universe. We also show that the relation between stellar and nebular extinction in our z ∼ 2 sample is consistent with that observed in the local universe.

  13. Regioselective Carbohydrate Oxidations: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Study on Selectivity, Rate, and Side-Product Formation

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Palladium/neocuproine catalyzed oxidation of glucosides shows an excellent selectivity for the C3-OH, but in mannosides and galactosides, unselective oxidation was initially observed. For further application in more-complex (oligo)saccharides, a better understanding of the reaction, in terms of selectivity and reactivity, is required. Therefore, a panel of different glycosides was synthesized, subjected to palladium/neocuproine catalyzed oxidation and subsequently analyzed by qNMR. Surprisingly, all studied glucosides, mannosides, galactosides, and xylosides show selective oxidation of the C3-OH. However, subsequent reaction of the resulting ketone moiety is the main culprit for side product formation. Measures are reported to suppress these side reactions. The observed differences in reaction rate, glucosides being the most rapidly oxidized, may be exploited for the selective oxidation of complex oligosaccharides. PMID:28367353

  14. A CENSUS OF OXYGEN IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES: AN EMPIRICAL MODEL LINKING METALLICITIES, STAR FORMATION RATES, AND OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Zahid, H. J.; Dima, G. I.; Kewley, L. J.; Erb, D. K.; Dave, R.

    2012-09-20

    In this contribution, we present the first census of oxygen in star-forming galaxies in the local universe. We examine three samples of galaxies with metallicities and star formation rates (SFRs) at z = 0.07, 0.8, and 2.26, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and DEEP2 survey. We infer the total mass of oxygen produced and mass of oxygen found in the gas-phase from our local SDSS sample. The star formation history is determined by requiring that galaxies evolve along the relation between stellar mass and SFR observed in our three samples. We show that the observed relation between stellar mass and SFR for our three samples is consistent with other samples in the literature. The mass-metallicity relation is well established for our three samples, and from this we empirically determine the chemical evolution of star-forming galaxies. Thus, we are able to simultaneously constrain the SFRs and metallicities of galaxies over cosmic time, allowing us to estimate the mass of oxygen locked up in stars. Combining this work with independent measurements reported in the literature, we conclude that the loss of oxygen from the interstellar medium of local star-forming galaxies is likely to be a ubiquitous process with the oxygen mass loss scaling (almost) linearly with stellar mass. We estimate the total baryonic mass loss and argue that only a small fraction of the baryons inferred from cosmological observations accrete onto galaxies.

  15. Analysis of secondary growth in the Arabidopsis shoot reveals a positive role of jasmonate signalling in cambium formation

    PubMed Central

    Sehr, Eva M; Agusti, Javier; Lehner, Reinhard; Farmer, Edward E; Schwarz, Martina; Greb, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    After primary growth, most dicotyledonous plants undergo secondary growth. Secondary growth involves an increase in the diameter of shoots and roots through formation of secondary vascular tissue. A hallmark of secondary growth initiation in shoots of dicotyledonous plants is the initiation of meristematic activity between primary vascular bundles, i.e. in the interfascicular regions. This results in establishment of a cylindrical meristem, namely the vascular cambium. Surprisingly, despite its major implications for plant growth and the accumulation of biomass, the molecular regulation of secondary growth is only poorly understood. Here, we combine histological, molecular and genetic approaches to characterize interfascicular cambium initiation in the Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence shoot. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling, we show that stress-related and touch-inducible genes are up-regulated in stem regions where secondary growth takes place. Furthermore, we show that the products of COI1, MYC2, JAZ7 and the touch-inducible gene JAZ10, which are components of the JA signalling pathway, are cambium regulators. The positive effect of JA application on cambium activity confirmed a stimulatory role of JA in secondary growth, and suggests that JA signalling triggers cell divisions in this particular context. PMID:20579310

  16. Analysis of secondary growth in the Arabidopsis shoot reveals a positive role of jasmonate signalling in cambium formation.

    PubMed

    Sehr, Eva M; Agusti, Javier; Lehner, Reinhard; Farmer, Edward E; Schwarz, Martina; Greb, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    After primary growth, most dicotyledonous plants undergo secondary growth. Secondary growth involves an increase in the diameter of shoots and roots through formation of secondary vascular tissue. A hallmark of secondary growth initiation in shoots of dicotyledonous plants is the initiation of meristematic activity between primary vascular bundles, i.e. in the interfascicular regions. This results in establishment of a cylindrical meristem, namely the vascular cambium. Surprisingly, despite its major implications for plant growth and the accumulation of biomass, the molecular regulation of secondary growth is only poorly understood. Here, we combine histological, molecular and genetic approaches to characterize interfascicular cambium initiation in the Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence shoot. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling, we show that stress-related and touch-inducible genes are up-regulated in stem regions where secondary growth takes place. Furthermore, we show that the products of COI1, MYC2, JAZ7 and the touch-inducible gene JAZ10, which are components of the JA signalling pathway, are cambium regulators. The positive effect of JA application on cambium activity confirmed a stimulatory role of JA in secondary growth, and suggests that JA signalling triggers cell divisions in this particular context.

  17. Genomewide analysis of the Drosophila tetraspanins reveals a subset with similar function in the formation of the embryonic synapse

    PubMed Central

    Fradkin, Lee G.; Kamphorst, Jessica T.; DiAntonio, Aaron; Goodman, Corey S.; Noordermeer, Jasprina N.

    2002-01-01

    Tetraspanins encode a large conserved family of proteins that span the membrane four times and are expressed in a variety of eukaryotic tissues. They are part of membrane complexes that are involved in such diverse processes as intracellular signaling, cellular motility, metastasis, and tumor suppression. The single fly tetraspanin characterized to date, late bloomer (lbm), is expressed on the axons, terminal arbors, and growth cones of motoneurons. In embryos lacking Lbm protein, motoneurons reach their muscle targets, but initially fail to form synaptic terminals. During larval stages, however, functional contacts are formed. The newly available genomic sequence of Drosophila melanogaster indicates the existence of 34 additional members of the tetraspanin family in the fly. To address the possibility that other tetraspanins with functions that might compensate for a lack of lbm exist, we determined the expression domains of the Drosophila tetraspanin gene family members by RNA in situ analysis. We found two other tetraspanins also expressed in motoneurons and subsequently generated a small chromosomal deletion that removes all three motoneuron-specific tetraspanins. The deletion results in a significant enhancement in the lbm phenotype, indicating that the two additional motoneuron-expressed tetraspanins can, at least in part, compensate for the absence of lbm during the formation of the embryonic synapse. PMID:12370414

  18. Chemical potential shift and gap-state formation in SrTiO3-δ revealed by photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Prabir; Kumar, Pramod; Aswin, V.; Dogra, Anjana; Joshi, Amish G.

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we report on investigations of the electronic structure of SrTiO3 annealed at temperature ranging between 550 and 840 °C in an ultrahigh vacuum. Annealing induced oxygen vacancies (Ovac) impart considerable changes in the electronic structure of SrTiO3. Using core-level photoemission spectroscopy, we have studied the chemical potential shift (Δμ) as a function of annealing temperature. The result shows that the chemical potential monotonously increases with electron doping in SrTiO3-δ. The monotonous increase of the chemical potential rules out the existence of electronic phase separation in the sample. Using valence band photoemission, we have demonstrated the formation of a low density of states at the near Fermi level electronic spectrum of SrTiO3-δ. The gap-states were observed by spectral weight transfer over a large energy scale of the stoichiometric band gap of SrTiO3 system leading finally to an insulator-metal transition. We have interpreted our results from the point of structural distortions induced by oxygen vacancies.

  19. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy of recombinant tuberculosis vaccine antigen with anionic liposomes reveals formation of flattened liposomes.

    PubMed

    Fox, Christopher B; Mulligan, Sean K; Sung, Joyce; Dowling, Quinton M; Fung, H W Millie; Vedvick, Thomas S; Coler, Rhea N

    2014-01-01

    Development of lipid-based adjuvant formulations to enhance the immunogenicity of recombinant vaccine antigens is a focus of modern vaccine research. Characterizing interactions between vaccine antigens and formulation excipients is important for establishing compatibility between the different components and optimizing vaccine stability and potency. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a highly informative analytical technique that may elucidate various aspects of protein- and lipid-based structures, including morphology, size, shape, and phase structure, while avoiding artifacts associated with staining-based TEM. In this work, cryogenic TEM is employed to characterize a recombinant tuberculosis vaccine antigen, an anionic liposome formulation, and antigen-liposome interactions. By performing three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction analysis, the formation of a population of protein-containing flattened liposomes, not present in the control samples, was detected. It is shown that cryogenic TEM provides unique information regarding antigen-liposome interactions not detectable by light-scattering-based methods. Employing a suite of complementary analytical techniques is important to fully characterize interactions between vaccine components.

  20. Time-Resolved In Situ X-ray Diffraction Reveals Metal-Dependent Metal-Organic Framework Formation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Henke, Sebastian; Kieslich, Gregor; Schwedler, Inke; Yang, Miaosen; Fraser, Duncan A X; O'Hare, Dermot

    2016-11-02

    Versatility in metal substitution is one of the key aspects of metal-organic framework (MOF) chemistry, allowing properties to be tuned in a rational way. As a result, it important to understand why MOF syntheses involving different metals arrive at or fail to produce the same topological outcome. Frequently, conditions are tuned by trial-and-error to make MOFs with different metal species. We ask: is it possible to adjust synthetic conditions in a systematic way in order to design routes to desired phases? We have used in situ X-ray powder diffraction to study the solvothermal formation of isostructural M2 (bdc)2 dabco (M=Zn, Co, Ni) pillared-paddlewheel MOFs in real time. The metal ion strongly influences both kinetics and intermediates observed, leading in some cases to multiphase reaction profiles of unprecedented complexity. The standard models used for MOF crystallization break down in these cases; we show that a simple kinetic model describes the data and provides important chemical insights on phase selection.

  1. What does the fine-scale petrography of IDPs reveal about grain formation and evolution in the early solar system?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, John

    1994-01-01

    The 'pyroxene' interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) may be the best samples for investigation of primordial grain-forming reactions because they appear to have experienced negligible post-accretional alteration. They are likely to continue to yield information about gas-to-solid condensation and other grain-forming reactions that may have occurred either in the solar nebular or presolar interstellar environments. An immediate challenge lies in understanding the nanometer-scale petrography of the ultrafine-grained aggregates in 'pyroxene' IDP's. Whether these aggregates contain components from diverse grain-forming environments may ultimately be answered by systematic petrographic studies using electron microscopes capable of high spatial resolution microanalysis. It may be more difficult to decipher evidence of grain formation and evolution in 'olivine' and 'layer silicate' IDP's because they appear to have experienced post-accretional alteration. Most of the studied 'olivine' IDPs have been subjected to heating and equilibration, perhaps during atmospheric entry, while the 'layer silicate' IDP's have experienced aqueous alteration.

  2. Before the flood: Miocene otoliths from eastern Amazon Pirabas Formation reveal a Caribbean-type fish fauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera, Orangel; Schwarzhans, Werner; Moraes-Santos, Heloísa; Nepomuceno, Aguinaldo

    2014-12-01

    The Pirabas Formation of Early Miocene age represents the final stage of the central western Atlantic carbonate platform in northeastern South America, predating the emplacement of the Amazon delta system. The otolith-based fossil fish fauna is represented by 38 species typical of a shallow marine environment. A total of 18 species are described new to science from the families Congridae, Batrachoididae, Bythitidae, Sciaenidae and Paralichthyidae. The fish fauna was associated with high benthic and planktic primary productivity including seagrass meadows, calcareous algae and suspension-feeders. The break of todays shallow marine bioprovince at the Amazonas delta mouth is not evident from the fish fauna of the Pirabas Fm., which shows good correlation with the Gatunian/proto-Caribbean bioprovince known from an only slightly younger time window in Trinidad and Venezuela. Differences observed to those Early Miocene faunal associations are interpreted to be mainly due to stratigraphic and geographic and not environmental differences. We postulate that the emergence of the Amazonas river mouth close to its present day location has terminated the carbonate cycle of the Pirabas Fm. and pushed back northwards a certain proportion of the fish fauna here described.

  3. Effects of Color, Format, and Severity of Issue on Response Rate of Mail Questionnaires When Respondent Population Has Some Familiarity with Sender.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, C. L.; Summerhill, W. R.

    The effects of (1) format and color, and (2) severity of issue (freeze damage to citrus industry) on response rate of mail questionnaires is presented. Questionnaires were formatted in two different ways: a one page, legal size printed on both sides, and one sheet 11- by 17-inch size center-folded with items on three pages. Two colors were used:…

  4. Effect of Oxidation Rate and Fe(II) State on Microbial Nitrate-Dependent Fe(III) Mineral Formation

    PubMed Central

    Senko, John M.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-01-01

    A nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium was isolated and used to evaluate whether Fe(II) chemical form or oxidation rate had an effect on the mineralogy of biogenic Fe(III) (hydr)oxides resulting from nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The isolate (designated FW33AN) had 99% 16S rRNA sequence similarity to Klebsiella ox