Science.gov

Sample records for formation sites n44

  1. N44C nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Resembling the hair in Botticelli's famous portrait of the birth of Venus, an image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has captured softly glowing filaments streaming from hot young stars in a nearby nebula.

    The image, presented by the Hubble Heritage Project, was taken in 1996 by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The image is available online at

    http://heritage.stsci.edu , http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/12 orhttp://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc .

    On the top right of the image is a source of its artistic likeness, a network of nebulous filaments surrounding the Wolf-Rayet star. This type of rare star is characterized by an exceptionally vigorous 'wind' of charged particles. The shock of the wind colliding with the surrounding gas causes the gas to glow.

    The Wolf-Rayet star is part of N44C, a nebula of glowing hydrogen gas surrounding young stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Visible from the Southern Hemisphere, the Large Magellanic Cloud is a small companion galaxy to the Milky Way.

    What makes N44C peculiar is the temperature of the star that illuminates it. The most massive stars -- those that are 10 to 50 times more massive than the Sun -- have maximum temperatures of 30,000 to 50,000 degrees Celsius (54,000 to 90,000 degrees Fahrenheit). The temperature of this star is about 75,000 degrees Celsius (135,000 degrees Fahrenheit). This unusually high temperature may be due to a neutron star or black hole that occasionally produces X-rays but is now inactive.

    N44C is part of a larger complex that includes young, hot, massive stars, nebulae, and a 'superbubble' blown out by multiple supernova explosions. Part of the superbubble is seen in red at the very bottom left of the Hubble image.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., for NASA, under contract with the Goddard

  2. A Novel Acidic Matrix Protein, PfN44, Stabilizes Magnesium Calcite to Inhibit the Crystallization of Aragonite*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Cong; Fang, Dong; Xu, Guangrui; Liang, Jian; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium is widely used to control calcium carbonate deposition in the shell of pearl oysters. Matrix proteins in the shell are responsible for nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate crystals. However, there is no direct evidence supporting a connection between matrix proteins and magnesium. Here, we identified a novel acidic matrix protein named PfN44 that affected aragonite formation in the shell of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Using immunogold labeling assays, we found PfN44 in both the nacreous and prismatic layers. In shell repair, PfN44 was repressed, whereas other matrix proteins were up-regulated. Disturbing the function of PfN44 by RNAi led to the deposition of porous nacreous tablets with overgrowth of crystals in the nacreous layer. By in vitro circular dichroism spectra and fluorescence quenching, we found that PfN44 bound to both calcium and magnesium with a stronger affinity for magnesium. During in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization and calcification of amorphous calcium carbonate, PfN44 regulated the magnesium content of crystalline carbonate polymorphs and stabilized magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition. Taken together, our results suggested that by stabilizing magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition, PfN44 participated in P. fucata shell formation. These observations extend our understanding of the connections between matrix proteins and magnesium. PMID:24302723

  3. Site formation processes at Zhoukoudian, China.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, P; Weiner, S; Bar-Yosef, O; Xu, Q; Liu, J

    2001-11-01

    Zhoukoudian is often cited for its human remains and the early evidence of fire. Yet, since its first excavations over 70 years ago, detailed studies of processes responsible for the accumulation of anthropogenic and geogenic sediments in the site have been sparse. This paper provides some details of site formation processes mainly through field observations of the extant section at Locality 1, and the use of soil micromorphology and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) analyses of the sediments. Samples from Layers 10 through 3 show extensive water deposition of fine silt-sized material (reworked loess), including fine-grained organic matter. The dark organic-rich unit in Layer 10--often cited as one of the earliest evidence of fire--is a water-laid accumulation. Much of the fine-grained sediment was derived from outside Locality 1, implying that the site was open to varying extents throughout most of its depositional history. The 4-6 m accumulation of "ashes" in Layer 4 represents subaerial water-laid silt deposits derived from the loess-covered hillslopes surrounding the site. They presumably accumulated in an open depression that formed after the collapse of the brecciated roof deposits represented by Layer 6. Diagenesis is present in many of the Layers, and is exemplified by calcite precipitation and dissolution, and localized apatite (dahllite) replacement of calcite. In Layer 4 diagenesis is more advanced, including calcite/dahllite precipitation, subaerial weathering of the loess and associated precipitation of hematite, alteration of clay and the neoformation of quartz. Many of our conclusions concur with those of Teilhard de Chardin & Young published over 70 years ago.

  4. Structure and Dynamics of Candidate O Star Bubbles in N44

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazé, Yaël; Chu, You-Hua; Guerrero, Martín A.; Oey, M. S.; Gruendl, Robert A.; Smith, R. Chris

    2002-12-01

    Dynamical studies of superbubbles and Wolf-Rayet ring nebulae show discrepancies from the standard adiabatic model for windblown bubbles. We therefore study the physical properties and kinematics of three candidate bubbles blown by single O stars to evaluate whether these discrepancies are also found in these simpler objects. Our sample candidates are N44 F, N44 J, and N44 M, in the outskirts of the H II complex N44 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We have obtained ground-based and Hubble Space Telescope emission-line images and high-dispersion echelle spectra for these objects. From the Hα luminosities and the [O III]/Hα ratios of these nebulae, we estimate the spectral types of the ionizing stars to be O7 V, O9.5 V, and O9.5 V for N44 F, N44 J, and N44 M, respectively. We find that the observed expansion velocity of 12 km s-1 for N44 F is consistent with the stellar wind luminosity expected from the central ionizing star, as predicted by the standard bubble model. The observed upper limits for the expansion velocities of N44 J and N44 M are also compatible with the expected values, within the uncertainties. We also report the discovery in N44 F of strongly defined dust columns, similar to those seen in the Eagle Nebula. The photoevaporation of these dense dust features may be kinematically important and may actually govern the evolution of the shell. The inclusion of photoevaporation processes may thus undermine the apparent agreement between the observed bubble dynamics and the simple adiabatic models.

  5. Formation of RNA oligomers on montmorillonite: site of catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ertem, G.; Ferris, J. P.

    1998-01-01

    Certain montmorillonites catalyze the self condensation of the 5'-phosphorimidazolide of nucleosides in pH 8 aqueous electrolyte solutions at ambient temperatures leading to formation of RNA oligomers. In order to establish the nature of the sites on montmorillonite responsible for this catalytic activity, oligomerization reactions were run with montmorillonites which had been selectively modified (I) at the edges by (a) fluoride treatment, (b) silylation, (c) metaphosphate treatment of the anion exchange sites (II) in the interlayer by (a) saturation with quaternary alkylammonium ions of increasing size, (b) aluminum polyoxo cations. High pressure liquid chromatography, HPLC, analysis of condensation products for their chain lengths and yields indicated that modification at the edges did not affect the catalytic activity to a significant extent, while blocking the interlayer strongly inhibited product formation.

  6. Investigation of Gd3N@C2n (40 n 44) family by Raman and inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Brian; Chan, Jack; Williams, Keith A; Ge, Jiechao; Shu, Chunying; Fu, Wujun; Dorn, Harry C; Kushmerick, James G; Puretzky, Alexander A; Geohegan, David B

    2010-01-01

    The structure and vibrational spectrum of Gd3N@C80 is studied through Raman and inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy as well as density-functional theory and universal force eld calculations. Hindered rotations, shown by both theory and experiment, indicate the formation of a Gd3N-C80 bond which reduces the ideal icosahedral symmetry of the C80 cage. The vibrational modes involving the movement of the encapsulated species are a ngerprint of the interaction between the fullerene cage and the core complex. We present Raman data for the Gd3N@C2n 40 n 44 family as well as Y3N@C80, Lu3N@C80, and Y3N@C88 for comparison. Conductance measurements have been performed on Gd3N@C80 and reveal a Kondo effect similar to that observed in C60.

  7. Ftsz Ring Formation at the Chloroplast Division Site in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Vitha, Stanislav; McAndrew, Rosemary S.; Osteryoung, Katherine W.

    2001-01-01

    Among the events that accompanied the evolution of chloroplasts from their endosymbiotic ancestors was the host cell recruitment of the prokaryotic cell division protein FtsZ to function in chloroplast division. FtsZ, a structural homologue of tubulin, mediates cell division in bacteria by assembling into a ring at the midcell division site. In higher plants, two nuclear-encoded forms of FtsZ, FtsZ1 and FtsZ2, play essential and functionally distinct roles in chloroplast division, but whether this involves ring formation at the division site has not been determined previously. Using immunofluorescence microscopy and expression of green fluorescent protein fusion proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana, we demonstrate here that FtsZ1 and FtsZ2 localize to coaligned rings at the chloroplast midpoint. Antibodies specific for recognition of FtsZ1 or FtsZ2 proteins in Arabidopsis also recognize related polypeptides and detect midplastid rings in pea and tobacco, suggesting that midplastid ring formation by FtsZ1 and FtsZ2 is universal among flowering plants. Perturbation in the level of either protein in transgenic plants is accompanied by plastid division defects and assembly of FtsZ1 and FtsZ2 into filaments and filament networks not observed in wild-type, suggesting that previously described FtsZ-containing cytoskeletal-like networks in chloroplasts may be artifacts of FtsZ overexpression. PMID:11285278

  8. Natural new particle formation at the coastal Antarctic site Neumayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, R.; Schmidt, K.; Teinilä, K.; Hillamo, R.

    2015-10-01

    We measured condensation particle (CP) concentrations and particle size distributions at the coastal Antarctic station Neumayer (70°39´ S, 8°15´ W) during two summer campaigns (from 20 January to 26 March 2012 and 1 February to 30 April 2014) and during the polar night between 12 August and 27 September 2014 in the particle diameter (Dp) range from 2.94 to 60.4 nm (2012) and from 6.26 to 212.9 nm (2014). During both summer campaigns we identified all in all 44 new particle formation (NPF) events. From 10 NPF events, particle growth rates could be determined to be around 0.90 ± 0.46 nm h-1 (mean ± SD; range: 0.4-1.9 nm h-1). With the exception of one case, particle growth was generally restricted to the nucleation mode (Dp < 25 nm) and the duration of NPF events was typically around 6.0 ± 1.5 h (mean ± SD; range: 4-9 h). Thus, in the surrounding area of Neumayer, particles did not grow up to sizes required for acting as cloud condensation nuclei. NPF during summer usually occurred in the afternoon in coherence with local photochemistry. During winter, two NPF events could be detected, though showing no ascertainable particle growth. A simple estimation indicated that apart from sulfuric acid, the derived growth rates required other low volatile precursor vapours.

  9. Natural new particle formation at the coastal Antarctic site Neumayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, R.; Schmidt, K.; Teinilä, K.; Hillamo, R.

    2015-06-01

    We measured condensation particle (CP) concentrations and particle size distributions at the coastal Antarctic station Neumayer (70°39' S, 8°15' W) during two summer campaigns (from 20 January to 26 March 2012 and 1 February to 30 April 2014) and during polar night between 12 August and 27 September 2014 in the particle diameter (Dp) range from 2.94 to 60.4 nm (2012) and from 6.26 to 212.9 nm (2014). During both summer campaigns we identified all in all 44 new particle formation (NPF) events. From 10 NPF events, particle growth rates could be determined to be around 0.90 ± 0.46 nm h-1 (mean ± SD; range: 0.4 to 1.9 nm h-1). With the exception of one case, particle growth was generally restricted to the nucleation mode (Dp < 25 nm) and the duration of NPF events was typically around 6.0 ± 1.5 h (mean ± SD; range: 4 to 9 h). Thus in the main, particles did not grow up to sizes required for acting as cloud condensation nuclei. NPF during summer usually occurred in the afternoon in coherence with local photochemistry. During winter, two NPF events could be detected, though showing no ascertainable particle growth. A simple estimation indicated that apart from sulfuric acid, the derived growth rates required other low volatile precursor vapours.

  10. Intrinsic site-selectivity of ubiquitin dimer formation

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kristen A; Martin, Langdon J; Prince, Joel M; Raines, Ronald T

    2015-01-01

    The post-translational modification of proteins with ubiquitin can take on many forms, including the decoration of substrates with polymeric ubiquitin chains. These chains are linked through one of the seven lysine residues in ubiquitin, with the potential to form a panoply of linkage combinations as the chain length increases. The ensuing structural diversity of modifications serves a variety of signaling functions. Still, some linkages are present at a much higher level than others in cellulo. Although ubiquitination is an enzyme-catalyzed process, the large disparity of abundancies led us to the hypothesis that some linkages might be intrinsically faster to form than others, perhaps directing the course of enzyme evolution. Herein, we assess the kinetics of ubiquitin dimer formation in an enzyme-free system by measuring the rate constants for thiol–disulfide interchange between appropriate ubiquitin variants. Remarkably, we find that the kinetically expedient linkages correlate with those that are most abundant in cellulo. As the abundant linkages also appear to function more broadly in cellulo, this correlation suggests that the more accessible chains were selected for global roles. PMID:25401704

  11. OceanSITES format and Ocean Observatory Output harmonisation: past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagnani, Maureen; Galbraith, Nan; Diggs, Stephen; Lankhorst, Matthias; Hidas, Marton; Lampitt, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) initiative was launched in 1991, and was the first step in creating a global view of ocean observations. In 1999 oceanographers at the OceanObs conference envisioned a 'global system of eulerian observatories' which evolved into the OceanSITES project. OceanSITES has been generously supported by individual oceanographic institutes and agencies across the globe, as well as by the WMO-IOC Joint Technical Commission for Oceanography and Marine Meteorology (under JCOMMOPS). The project is directed by the needs of research scientists, but has a strong data management component, with an international team developing content standards, metadata specifications, and NetCDF templates for many types of in situ oceanographic data. The OceanSITES NetCDF format specification is intended as a robust data exchange and archive format specifically for time-series observatory data from the deep ocean. First released in February 2006, it has evolved to build on and extend internationally recognised standards such as the Climate and Forecast (CF) standard, BODC vocabularies, ISO formats and vocabularies, and in version 1.3, released in 2014, ACDD (Attribute Convention for Dataset Discovery). The success of the OceanSITES format has inspired other observational groups, such as autonomous vehicles and ships of opportunity, to also use the format and today it is fulfilling the original concept of providing a coherent set of data from eurerian observatories. Data in the OceanSITES format is served by 2 Global Data Assembly Centres (GDACs), one at Coriolis, in France, at ftp://ftp.ifremer.fr/ifremer/oceansites/ and one at the US NDBC, at ftp://data.ndbc.noaa.gov/data/oceansites/. These two centres serve over 26,800 OceanSITES format data files from 93 moorings. The use of standardised and controlled features enables the files held at the OceanSITES GDACs to be electronically discoverable and ensures the widest access to the data. The OceanSITES

  12. OceanSITES format and Ocean Observatory Output harmonisation: past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagnani, Maureen; Galbraith, Nan; Diggs, Stephen; Lankhorst, Matthias; Hidas, Marton; Lampitt, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) initiative was launched in 1991, and was the first step in creating a global view of ocean observations. In 1999 oceanographers at the OceanObs conference envisioned a 'global system of eulerian observatories' which evolved into the OceanSITES project. OceanSITES has been generously supported by individual oceanographic institutes and agencies across the globe, as well as by the WMO-IOC Joint Technical Commission for Oceanography and Marine Meteorology (under JCOMMOPS). The project is directed by the needs of research scientists, but has a strong data management component, with an international team developing content standards, metadata specifications, and NetCDF templates for many types of in situ oceanographic data. The OceanSITES NetCDF format specification is intended as a robust data exchange and archive format specifically for time-series observatory data from the deep ocean. First released in February 2006, it has evolved to build on and extend internationally recognised standards such as the Climate and Forecast (CF) standard, BODC vocabularies, ISO formats and vocabularies, and in version 1.3, released in 2014, ACDD (Attribute Convention for Dataset Discovery). The success of the OceanSITES format has inspired other observational groups, such as autonomous vehicles and ships of opportunity, to also use the format and today it is fulfilling the original concept of providing a coherent set of data from eurerian observatories. Data in the OceanSITES format is served by 2 Global Data Assembly Centres (GDACs), one at Coriolis, in France, at ftp://ftp.ifremer.fr/ifremer/oceansites/ and one at the US NDBC, at ftp://data.ndbc.noaa.gov/data/oceansites/. These two centres serve over 26,800 OceanSITES format data files from 93 moorings. The use of standardised and controlled features enables the files held at the OceanSITES GDACs to be electronically discoverable and ensures the widest access to the data. The OceanSITES

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Solvation and Kink Site Formation at the {001} Barite-Water Interface.

    SciTech Connect

    Stack, Andrew G

    2009-09-01

    Solvation and kink site formation on step edges are known to be controlling parameters in crystal growth and dissolution. However, links from classical crystal growth models to specific reactions at the mineral-water interface have remained elusive. Molecular dynamics is used here to examine the water structure on barium surface sites and kink site formation enthalpies for material adsorbed to and removed from the step parallel to the [120] direction on the {001} barite-water interface. The bariums at the interface are shown to be coordinatively unsaturated with respect to water, and it is suggested that this is due to a steric hindrance from the nature of the interface. Kink site detachment energies that include hydration energies are endothermic for barium and exothermic for sulfate. The implications and problems of using these parameters in a crystal growth model are discussed.

  14. New investigations at Kalambo Falls, Zambia: Luminescence chronology, site formation, and archaeological significance.

    PubMed

    Duller, Geoff A T; Tooth, Stephen; Barham, Lawrence; Tsukamoto, Sumiko

    2015-08-01

    Fluvial deposits can provide excellent archives of early hominin activity but may be complex to interpret, especially without extensive geochronology. The Stone Age site of Kalambo Falls, northern Zambia, has yielded a rich artefact record from dominantly fluvial deposits, but its significance has been restricted by uncertainties over site formation processes and a limited chronology. Our new investigations in the centre of the Kalambo Basin have used luminescence to provide a chronology and have provided key insights into the geomorphological and sedimentological processes involved in site formation. Excavations reveal a complex assemblage of channel and floodplain deposits. Single grain quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) measurements provide the most accurate age estimates for the youngest sediments, but in older deposits the OSL signal from some grains is saturated. A different luminescence signal from quartz, thermally transferred OSL (TT-OSL), can date these older deposits. OSL and TT-OSL results are combined to provide a chronology for the site. Ages indicate four phases of punctuated deposition by the dominantly laterally migrating and vertically aggrading Kalambo River (∼500-300 ka, ∼300-50 ka, ∼50-30 ka, ∼1.5-0.49 ka), followed by deep incision and renewed lateral migration at a lower topographic level. A conceptual model for site formation provides the basis for improved interpretation of the generation, preservation, and visibility of the Kalambo archaeological record. This model highlights the important role of intrinsic meander dynamics in site formation and does not necessarily require complex interpretations that invoke periodic blocking of the Kalambo River, as has previously been suggested. The oldest luminescence ages place the Mode 2/3 transition between ∼500 and 300 ka, consistent with other African and Asian sites where a similar transition can be found. The study approach adopted here can potentially be applied to other

  15. New investigations at Kalambo Falls, Zambia: Luminescence chronology, site formation, and archaeological significance.

    PubMed

    Duller, Geoff A T; Tooth, Stephen; Barham, Lawrence; Tsukamoto, Sumiko

    2015-08-01

    Fluvial deposits can provide excellent archives of early hominin activity but may be complex to interpret, especially without extensive geochronology. The Stone Age site of Kalambo Falls, northern Zambia, has yielded a rich artefact record from dominantly fluvial deposits, but its significance has been restricted by uncertainties over site formation processes and a limited chronology. Our new investigations in the centre of the Kalambo Basin have used luminescence to provide a chronology and have provided key insights into the geomorphological and sedimentological processes involved in site formation. Excavations reveal a complex assemblage of channel and floodplain deposits. Single grain quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) measurements provide the most accurate age estimates for the youngest sediments, but in older deposits the OSL signal from some grains is saturated. A different luminescence signal from quartz, thermally transferred OSL (TT-OSL), can date these older deposits. OSL and TT-OSL results are combined to provide a chronology for the site. Ages indicate four phases of punctuated deposition by the dominantly laterally migrating and vertically aggrading Kalambo River (∼500-300 ka, ∼300-50 ka, ∼50-30 ka, ∼1.5-0.49 ka), followed by deep incision and renewed lateral migration at a lower topographic level. A conceptual model for site formation provides the basis for improved interpretation of the generation, preservation, and visibility of the Kalambo archaeological record. This model highlights the important role of intrinsic meander dynamics in site formation and does not necessarily require complex interpretations that invoke periodic blocking of the Kalambo River, as has previously been suggested. The oldest luminescence ages place the Mode 2/3 transition between ∼500 and 300 ka, consistent with other African and Asian sites where a similar transition can be found. The study approach adopted here can potentially be applied to other

  16. DNA abasic site-directed formation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters for selective nucleobase recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kun; Cui, Qinghua; Liu, Guiying; Wu, Fei; Xu, Shujuan; Shao, Yong

    2011-07-01

    DNA single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection has attracted much attention due to mutation related diseases. Various methods for SNP detection have been proposed and many are already in use. Here, we find that the abasic site (AP site) in the DNA duplex can be developed as a capping scaffold for the generation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs). As a proof of concept, the DNA sequences from fragments near codon 177 of cancer supression gene p53 were used as a model for SNP detection by in situ formed Ag NCs. The formation of fluorescent Ag NCs in the AP site-containing DNA duplex is highly selective for cytosine facing the AP site and guanines flanking the site and can be employed in situ as readout for SNP detection. The fluorescent signal-on sensing for SNP based on this inorganic fluorophore is substantially advantageous over the previously reported signal-off responses using low-molecular-weight organic ligands. The strong dependence of fluorescent Ag NC formation on the sequences surrounding the AP site was successfully used to identify mutations in codon 177 of cancer supression gene p53. We anticipate that this approach will be employed to develop a practical SNP detection method by locating an AP site toward the midway cytosine in a target strand containing more than three consecutive cytosines.

  17. Multiethnic Neighbourhoods as Sites of Social Capital Formation: Examining Social to Political "Integration" in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basu, Ranu

    2006-01-01

    In an "ideal" democratic society, publicly funded schools serve many purposes. Aside from its educational mandate, schools are places for neighbourhood integration, social capital formation and the fostering of civil society. For newly arrived immigrants, especially those with young children, schools are important sites of settlement experiences.…

  18. Hydraulic testing of Salado Formation evaporites at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site: Second interpretive report

    SciTech Connect

    Beauheim, R.L.; Roberts, R.M.; Dale, T.F.; Fort, M.D.; Stensrud, W.A.

    1993-12-01

    Pressure-pulse, constant-pressure flow, and pressure-buildup tests have been performed in bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to evaluate the hydraulic properties controlling brine flow through the Salado. Transmissivities have been interpreted from six sequences of tests conducted on five stratigraphic intervals within 15 m of the WIPP underground excavations.

  19. Analysis of yeast endocytic site formation and maturation through a regulatory transition point

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Susheela Y.; Stimpson, Helen E. M.; Weinberg, Jasper; Toret, Christopher P.; Sun, Yidi; Drubin, David G.

    2012-01-01

    The earliest stages of endocytic site formation and the regulation of endocytic site maturation are not well understood. Here we analyzed the order in which the earliest proteins are detectable at endocytic sites in budding yeast and found that an uncharacterized protein, Pal1p/Ydr348cp, is also present at the initial stages of endocytosis. Because Ede1p (homologue of Eps15) and clathrin are the early-arriving proteins most important for cargo uptake, their roles during the early stages of endocytosis were examined more comprehensively. Ede1p is necessary for efficient recruitment of most early-arriving proteins, but not for the recruitment of the adaptor protein Yap1802p, to endocytic sites. The early-arriving proteins, as well as the later-arriving proteins Sla2p and Ent1/2p (homologues of Hip1R and epsins), were found to have longer lifetimes in CLC1-knockout yeast, which indicates that clathrin light chain facilitates the transition from the intermediate to late coat stages. Cargo also arrives during the early stages of endocytosis, and therefore its effect on endocytic machinery dynamics was investigated. Our results are consistent with a role for cargo in regulating the transition of endocytic sites from the early stages of formation to the late stages during which vesicle formation occurs. PMID:22190733

  20. Preferential sites for intramolecular glucosepane cross-link formation in type I collagen: A thermodynamic study

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Thomas A.; Nash, Anthony; Birch, Helen L.; de Leeuw, Nora H.

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) undergoes progressive age-related stiffening and loss of proteolytic digestibility due to an increase in concentration of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). The most abundant AGE, glucosepane, accumulates in collagen with concentrations over 100 times greater than all other AGEs. Detrimental collagen stiffening properties are believed to play a significant role in several age-related diseases such as osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. Currently little is known of the potential location of covalently cross-linked glucosepane formation within collagen molecules; neither are there reports on how the respective cross-link sites affect the physical and biochemical properties of collagen. Using fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations (MD) we have identified six sites where the formation of a covalent intra-molecular glucosepane cross-link within a single collagen molecule in a fibrillar environment is energetically favourable. Identification of these favourable sites enables us to align collagen cross-linking with experimentally observed changes to the ECM. For example, formation of glucosepane was found to be energetically favourable within close proximity of the Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 (MMP1) binding site, which could potentially disrupt collagen degradation. PMID:26049074

  1. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites: Dynamic Formation and In Situ Observations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei; Hu, Pingping; Chen, Jianmin; Liu, Xi; Tang, Xingfu

    2015-11-23

    Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation at low temperature. This work provides a general strategy for designing atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites.

  2. Authigenic Carbonate Formation on the Peru Margin; New Insights from IODP Site 1230

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullajintakam, S.; Naehr, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid seepage of reduced organic compounds such as methane impacts the geology and biology of the seabed by inducing complex, microbially mediated biogeochemical processes. Authigenic carbonates serve as one of the few permanent records of these of dynamic biogeochemical interactions that involve methanogenesis, methanotrophy, sulfate reduction and carbonate precipitation. Meister et al. (2007) investigated deep-sea dolomite formation at Sites 1227-1229 on the Peru margin, where dolomite precipitation occurs in association with organic carbon-rich continental margin sediments. Geochemical and petrographic studies indicated episodic dolomite precipitation at a dynamic sulfate methane transition zone (SMTZ). Variations in δ13C values of these dolomites between +15‰ and -15‰ were attributed to non-steady state conditions as a result of the upward and downward migration of the SMTZ. Our study aims to better understand the biogeochemical processes associated with authigenic carbonate precipitation in this dynamic deep-sea setting. We focused our efforts on IODP Site 1230, which is a gas-hydrate-bearing site that shows sulphate consumption within the uppermost 10 m below the seafloor as well as high methane production. Using a multi proxy approach, we combined X-ray diffraction, stable isotope geochemistry, and trace metal analysis of authigenic carbonates to elucidate conditions for authigenic carbonate formation. Results from Site 1230 are compared to Sites 1227 and 1229, which lacks gas hydrates and is characterized by high pore water sulfate and low methane concentrations. This study contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of authigenic carbonate formation and associated biogeochemical processes in continental margin sediments. Meister, P., Mckenzie, J. A., Vasconcelos, C., Bernasconi, S., Frank, M., Gutjhar, M. and SCHRAG, D. P. (2007), Dolomite formation in the dynamic deep biosphere: results from the Peru Margin. Sedimentology, 54: 1007-1032.

  3. Splicing-coupled 3' end formation requires a terminal splice acceptor site, but not intron excision.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Lee; West, Steven

    2013-08-01

    Splicing of human pre-mRNA is reciprocally coupled to 3' end formation by terminal exon definition, which occurs co-transcriptionally. It is required for the final maturation of most human pre-mRNAs and is therefore important to understand. We have used several strategies to block splicing at specific stages in vivo and studied their effect on 3' end formation. We demonstrate that a terminal splice acceptor site is essential to establish coupling with the poly(A) signal in a chromosomally integrated β-globin gene. This is in part to alleviate the suppression of 3' end formation by U1 small nuclear RNA, which is known to bind pre-mRNA at the earliest stage of spliceosome assembly. Interestingly, blocks to splicing that are subsequent to terminal splice acceptor site function, but before catalysis, have little observable effect on 3' end formation. These data suggest that early stages of spliceosome assembly are sufficient to functionally couple splicing and 3' end formation, but that on-going intron removal is less critical. PMID:23716637

  4. Relationships between pair formation, site fidelity and sex in a coral reef cardinalfish.

    PubMed

    Rueger, Theresa; Gardiner, Naomi M; Jones, Geoffrey P

    2014-09-01

    Coral reef fishes are characterised by extreme site fidelity and are often socially monogamous, forming pair bonds within larger social groups. Despite this, the strong link between reproductive behaviour and site fidelity in such social species is poorly understood. We examine these relationships in the cardinalfish Ostorhinchus cyanosoma on the central Great Barrier Reef. We tagged and followed over 100 individuals for 5 weeks to investigate pair fidelity, and behavioural differences between pairs and singles and between sexes, and we experimentally tested the strength of site and mate fidelity. Tagged pairs were typically highly site attached, and lasted throughout the study period. Sex had very little effect on pairing behaviour or habitat use. Paired individuals showed three times higher site fidelity than single ones, with singles frequently relocating. There was a two-fold increase in the movement of individuals that had their partners experimentally removed. Paired individuals exhibited greater homing success, and homed regardless of whether their mate had been displaced with them or was left on the home site. These results suggest that individuals of this species form at least seasonally stable monogamous pair bonds within larger groups, and that pair formation is closely associated with site fidelity.

  5. Vertical stratification of subsurface microbial community composition across geological formations at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan

    2011-11-29

    Microbial diversity in subsurface sediments at the Hanford Site 300 Area near Richland, Washington State (USA) was investigated by analyzing samples recovered from depths of 9 to 52 m. Approximately 8000 near full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed across geological strata that include a natural redox transition zone. These strata included the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation, fine-grained oxic and anoxic Ringold Formation sediments, and the weathered basalt group. We detected 1233 and 120 unique bacterial and archaeal OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units at the 97% identity level), respectively. Microbial community structure and richness varied substantially across the different geological strata. Bacterial OTU richness (Chao1 estimator) was highest (>700) in the upper Hanford formation, and declined to about 120 at the bottom of the Hanford formation. Just above the Ringold oxic-anoxic interface, richness was about 325 and declined to less than 50 in the deeper reduced zones. The deeper Ringold strata were characterized by a preponderance (ca. 90%) of Proteobacteria. The Bacterial community in the oxic sediments contained not only members of 9 well-recognized phyla but also an unusually high proportion of 3 candidate divisions (GAL15, NC10, and SPAM). Additionally, novel phylogenetic orders were identified within the Delta-proteobacteria, a clade rich in microbes that carry out redox transformations of metals that are important contaminants on the Hanford Site.

  6. Characteristics of formation and growth of atmospheric nanoparticles observed at four regional background sites in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yumi; Kim, Sang-Woo; Yoon, Soon-Chang; Park, Jin-Soo; Lim, Jae-Hyun; Hong, Jihyung; Lim, Han-Cheol; Ryu, Jegyu; Lee, Chul-Kyu; Heo, Bok-Haeng

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of the number concentration and size distribution of atmospheric nanoparticles were conducted at four sites on the west coast of the Korean Peninsula by using identical scanning mobility particle sizers (SMPSs) in October 2012. The new particle formation and subsequent growth (NPF) of atmospheric nanoparticles, which were identified by the cyclostationary empirical orthogonal function (CSEOF) analysis technique, was observed on 11 out of 21 days at the Baengnyeong-do Comprehensive Monitoring Observatory (BCMO); and on 10 out of 21 days at the Korea Global Atmosphere Watch Center (KGAWC) from October 9 to 29, 2012. We also observed NPF events for 9 out of 21 days at both the Gosan Climate Observatory (GCO) and the Jeju Comprehensive Monitoring Observatory (JCMO). During the study period, NPF was simultaneously observed for five days at all four sites, which indicates that the NPF event had a spatial extent of at least 540 km. A cold, dry and cloud-free continental air mass originated from northern China, formed favorable environmental conditions (e.g., increasing solar insolation at the surface) on simultaneous NPF at the four sites. These synoptic weather patterns were closely associated with an extraordinary typhoon passing over the south of Japan. The mean values of particle formation rates at BCMO (1.26 cm- 3 s- 1) and KGAWC (1.49 cm- 3 s- 1) were relatively higher than those at GCO (0.39 cm- 3 s- 1) and JCMO (0.74 cm- 3 s- 1), however, the growth rate showed a similar level among four sites. An increase in the spatial homogeneity and inter-site correlation of atmospheric particles among the four sites was apparent for small particles (diameter < 30 nm) on simultaneous NPF event days.

  7. Mineral abundances at the final four curiosity study sites and implications for their formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, F.; Carter, J.; Bishop, J. L.; Loizeau, D.; Murchie, S. M.

    2014-03-01

    A component of the landing site selection process for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) involved the presence of phyllosilicates as the main astrobiological targets. Gale crater was selected as the MSL landing site from among 4 down selected study sites (Gale, Eberswalde and Holden craters, Mawrth Vallis) that addressed the primary scientific goal of assessing the past habitability of Mars. A key constraint on the formation process of these phyllosilicate-bearing deposits is in the precise mineralogical composition. We present a reassessment of the mineralogy of the sites combined with a determination of the modal mineralogy of the major phyllosilicate-bearing deposits of the four final study sites from the modeling of near-infrared spectra using a radiative transfer model. The largest abundance of phyllosilicates (30-70%) is found in Mawrth Vallis, the lowest one in Eberswalde (<25%). Except for Mawrth Vallis, the anhydrous phases (plagioclase, pyroxenes and martian dust) are the dominant phases, suggesting formation conditions with a lower alteration grade and/or a post-formation mixing with anhydrous phases. The composition of Holden layered deposits (mixture of saponite and micas with a total abundance in the range of 25-45%) suggests transport and deposition of altered basalts of the Noachian crust without major chemical transformation. For Eberswalde, the modal mineralogy is also consistent with detrital clays, but the presence of opaline silica indicates that an authigenic formation occurred during the deposition. The overall composition including approximately 20-30% smectite detected by MSL in the rocks of Yellow-knife Bay area interpreted to be material deposited on the floor of Gale crater by channels (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/news/msl20130312.html) is consistent with the compositions modeled for the Eberswalde and Holden deltaic rocks. At Gale, the paucity, the small diversity and the low abundance of nontronite do not favor a complex and

  8. Authigenic clay minerals in the Rustler Formation, WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) Site area, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Brookins, D.G.; Ward, D.B. . Dept. of Geology); Lambert, S.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Transuranic waste is planned for disposal in the Late Permian evaporites of the Delaware Basin, southeastern New Mexico, at the WIPP Site. The disposal horizon is located in the bedded halite of the Salado Formation, which is overlain by the impure haliteanhydrite(gypsum)-siltstone-mudstone of the Rustler Formation. The Rustler Formation also contains two dolomite members, the Magenta and Culebra, which transmit water. The Culebra Member is suspected to have actively interacted with waters at time(s) from the Late Permian to the present, and it is important to assess the reactivity of these waters in conjunction with WIPP stability. We have investigated the Rb--Sr systematics of clay minerals from the Culebra Member and elsewhere in the Rustler Formation. The authigenic fraction is especially sensitive to chemical and isotopic exchange with waters, and an episodic exposure to a large amount of water will reset the clay minerals to such a time. Our data yield 259 {plus minus} 22 MaRb--Sr isochron, which is consistent with the Late Permian age of the Rustler Formation. This age demonstrates that age-determining cations in these clay minerals have preserved their isotopic and chemical integrity since the Late Permian. 16 refs.

  9. Vertical stratification of subsurface microbial community composition across geological formations at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan

    2012-02-01

    The microbial diversity in subsurface sediments at the Hanford Site's 300 Area in southeastern Washington State was investigated by analyzing 21 samples recovered from depths that ranged from 9 to 52 m. Approximately 8000 non-chimeric Bacterial and Archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed across geological strata that contain a natural redox transition zone. These strata included the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation, fine-grained oxic and anoxic Ringold Formation sediments, and the weathered basalt group. We detected 1233 and 120 unique bacterial and archaeal OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units, defined at the 97% identity level). Microbial community structure and richness varied substantially across the different geological strata. Bacterial OTU richness (based upon Chao1 estimator) was highest (>700) in the upper Hanford formation, and declined to about 120 at the bottom of the Hanford formation. Just above the Ringold oxic-anoxic transition zone, richness was about 325 and declined to less than 50 in the deeper reduced zones. The Bacterial community in the oxic Hanford and Ringold Formations contained members of 9 major well-recognized phyla as well 30 as unusually high proportions of 3 candidate divisions (GAL15, NC10, and SPAM). The deeper Ringold strata were characterized by low OTU richness and a very high preponderance (ca. 90%) of Proteobacteria. The study has greatly expanded the intralineage phylogenetic diversity within some major divisions. These subsurface sediments have been shown to contain a large number of phylogenetically novel microbes, with substantial heterogeneities between sediment samples from the same geological formation.

  10. Hydraulic Testing of Salado Formation Evaporites at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Beauheim, Richard L.; Domski, Paul S.; Roberts, Randall M.

    1999-07-01

    This report presents interpretations of hydraulic tests conducted in bedded evaporates of the Salado Formation from May 1992 through May 1995 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP is a US Department of Energy research and development facility designed to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic wastes from the nation's defense programs. The WIPP disposal horizon is located in the lower portion of the Permian Salado Formation. The hydraulic tests discussed in this report were performed in the WIPP underground facility by INTERA inc. (now Duke Engineering and Services, Inc.), Austin, Texas, following the Field Operations Plan and Addendum prepared by Saulnier (1988, 1991 ) under the technical direction of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  11. The metal site as a template for the metalloprotein structure formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changlin; Xu, Huibi

    2002-01-01

    Achieving a thorough explanation of the behavior of metal sites in the formation of native metalloprotein structures is an exciting challenge in the biochemistry of metallobiomacromolecules. This study presents a personal insight into the subject. It is proposed that a metal center and its exogenous ligand compose a template. A template may impose a clear stereochemical preference on the loose peptide chains, and organize them into natural stereospecificity via the metal-ligand interaction, a long-range and strong interaction. Therefore, the stable peptide conformation induced by the template effect surrounding a template polyhedron could be called a template-mediated structural motif (TMSM).

  12. BOREAS TE-20 Soils Data Over the NSA-MSA and Tower Sites in Raster Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Veldhuis, Hugo; Knapp, David; Veldhuis, Hugo

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-20 team collected several data sets for use in developing and testing models of forest ecosystem dynamics. This data set was gridded from vector layers of soil maps that were received from Dr. Hugo Veldhuis, who did the original mapping in the field during 1994. The vector layers were gridded into raster files that cover the NSA-MSA and tower sites. The data are stored in binary, image format files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Center (DAAC).

  13. Assessment of the potential for karst in the Rustler Formation at the WIPP site.

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, John Clay

    2006-01-01

    This report is an independent assessment of the potential for karst dissolution in evaporitic strata of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site. Review of the available data suggests that the Rustler strata thicken and thin across the area in depositional patterns related to lateral variations in sedimentary accommodation space and normal facies changes. Most of the evidence that has been offered for the presence of karst in the subsurface has been used out of context, and the different pieces are not mutually supporting. Outside of Nash Draw, definitive evidence for the development of karst in the Rustler Formation near the WIPP site is limited to the horizon of the Magenta Member in drillhole WIPP-33. Most of the other evidence cited by the proponents of karst is more easily interpreted as primary sedimentary structures and the localized dissolution of evaporitic strata adjacent to the Magenta and Culebra water-bearing units. Some of the cited evidence is invalid, an inherited baggage from studies made prior to the widespread knowledge of modern evaporite depositional environments and prior to the existence of definitive exposures of the Rustler Formation in the WIPP shafts. Some of the evidence is spurious, has been taken out of context, or is misquoted. Lateral lithologic variations from halite to mudstone within the Rustler Formation under the WIPP site have been taken as evidence for the dissolution of halite such as that seen in Nash Draw, but are more rationally explained as sedimentary facies changes. Extrapolation of the known karst features in Nash Draw eastward to the WIPP site, where conditions are and have been significantly different for half a million years, is unwarranted. The volumes of insoluble material that would remain after dissolution of halite would be significantly less than the observed bed thicknesses, thus dissolution is an unlikely explanation for the lateral variations from halite to mudstone and siltstone

  14. The origin of summertime crust and surface hoar formation at the WAIS Divide site, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fegyveresi, J. M.; Alley, R. B.; Spencer, M. K.

    2013-12-01

    Summertime field observations at the WAIS Divide site, West Antarctica, indicate a very active surface. Over five consecutive seasons (2008-2013), daily surface measurements were made along with photography of the surface and of back-lit snowpits, where densities were measured. The Automatic Weather Station in the University of Wisconsin network was supplemented by various independent sensors deployed on site, including pyranometer sensor arrays and net-radiometers in order to better quantify the short-wave and long-wave radiation conditions surrounding near-surface metamorphism. Prominent 'glazed' crusts occur frequently. Surface and pit observations show that such crusts form in summertime during relative low-wind, low-humidity, high-temperature episodes that immediately follow a succession of strong wind events. During each documented case of formation, these episodes were also brought about during clear-sky days with maximum diurnal variability of incoming solar energy. Shallow firn temperature measurements indicate strong inversions during crust formation that likely lead to increased vapor transport. Furthermore, distinct hoar frost growth was observed on crusts that were exposed to multiple clear-sky days, likely as a result of increased insolation, humidity, and vertical vapor transport in the near-surface. There was no obvious indication of melt associated with glazed features during initial inspection. Examination of the WDC06A ice core and its associated ECM record indicates that numerous crusts are present very regularly throughout the core and in all seasons. Crusts are about 40% more abundant in summertime than in wintertime deposits, likely due to the formation of 'glazed' surfaces; formation mechanisms of the less-common wintertime crusts have not been observed and are not known. Over the ice-core record, there is little change in frequency of occurrence of wintertime crusts, but some changes in summertime, perhaps indicating changes in occurrence

  15. Splicing and spliceosome formation of the yeast MATa1 transcript require a minimum distance from the 5' splice site to the internal branch acceptor site.

    PubMed Central

    Köhrer, K; Domdey, H

    1988-01-01

    Small deletions of 6, 7, and 12 nucleotides introduced between the 5' splice site and the internal branch acceptor site of the first intron of the yeast MATa1 gene completely abolish accurate splicing in vitro in these constructs. Splicing only occurs at an alternative 5' splice site which was found in the first exon of the MATa1 gene and which is used both in vivo and in vitro. The splicing defect cannot be cured by expanding the distance from the branch point to the 3' splice site. If the alternative 5' splice site is deleted as well in these constructs, neither spliced products nor spliceosomes are formed. Our findings especially lead to the conclusion that a minimum distance between the 5' splice site and the internal branch acceptor site of the intron is required for the formation of splicing complexes and for accurate splicing. Images PMID:3054807

  16. Geology of the Hanna Formation, Hanna Underground Coal Gasification Site, Hanna, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, R.L.; Youngberg, A.D.

    1984-01-01

    The Hanna Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) study area consists of the SW1/4 of Section 29 and the E1/2SE1/4 of Section 30 in Township 22 North, Range 81 West, Wyoming. Regionally, this is located in the coal-bearing Hanna Syncline of the Hanna Basin in southeast Wyoming. The structure of the site is characterized by beds dipping gently to the northeast. An east-west fault graben complex interrupts this basic trend in the center of the area. The target coal bed of the UCG experiments was the Hanna No. 1 coal in the Hanna Formation. Sedimentary rocks comprising the Hanna Formation consist of a sequence of nonmarine shales, sandstones, coals and conglomerates. The overburden of the Hanna No. 1 coal bed at the Hanna UCG site was divided into four broad local stratigraphic units. Analytical studies were made on overburden and coal samples taken from cores to determine their mineralogical composition. Textural and mineralogical characteristics of sandstones from local stratigraphic units A, B, and C were analyzed and compared. Petrographic analyses were done on the coal including oxides, forms of sulfur, pyrite types, maceral composition, and coal rank. Semi-quantitative spectrographic and analytic geochemical analyses were done on the overburden and coal and relative element concentrations were compared. Trends within each stratigraphic unit were also presented and related to depositional environments. The spectrographic analysis was also done by lithotype. 34 references, 60 figures, 18 tables.

  17. Site formation and chronology of the new Paleolithic site Sima de Las Palomas de Teba, southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehl, Martin; Burow, Christoph; Cantalejo, Pedro; Domínguez-Bella, Salvador; Durán, Juan José; Henselowsky, Felix; Klasen, Nicole; Linstädter, Jörg; Medianero, Javier; Pastoors, Andreas; Ramos, José; Reicherter, Klaus; Schmidt, Christoph; Weniger, Gerd-Christian

    2016-03-01

    The newly identified Paleolithic site Sima de Las Palomas de Teba hosts an almost seven-m-thick sediment profile investigated here to elucidate the rock shelter's chronostratigraphy and formation processes. At its base, the sediment sequence contains rich archeological deposits recording intensive occupation by Neanderthals. Luminescence provides a terminus ante quem of 39.4 ± 2.6 ka or 44.9 ± 4.1 ka (OSL) and 51.4 ± 8.4 ka (TL). This occupation ended with a rockfall event followed by accumulation of archeologically sterile sediments. These were covered by sediments containing few Middle Paleolithic artifacts, which either indicate ephemeral occupation by Neanderthals or reworking as suggested by micromorphological features. Above this unit, scattered lithic artifacts of undiagnostic character may represent undefined Paleolithic occupations. Sediment burial ages between about 23.0 ± 1.5 ka (OSL) and 40.5 ± 3.4 ka (pIRIR) provide an Upper Paleolithic chronology for sediments deposited above the rockfall. Finally, a dung-bearing Holocene layer in the uppermost part of the sequence contains a fragment of a human mandible dated to 4032 ± 39 14C yr BP. Overall, the sequence represents an important new site for studying the end of Neanderthal occupation in southern Spain. Supplementary Figure S2: Preheat-plateau and dose-recovery test results for OSL on fine-grained quartz of samples CP7. Aliquots for the dose-recovery test were administered a dose of 40 Gy after removing the natural signal by blue stimulation for 150 s at 125°C and 80% optical power. Supplementary Figure S3: Dependence of equivalent dose on prior IR stimulation temperature for samples CP1, CP3 and CP7. For each sample and pIRIR protocol six aliquots were used while increasing the first IR stimulation temperature in steps of 30°C from 50°C to 140°C and to 180°C. Data are normalized to the pIRIR De obtained with a first IR stimulation at 50°C. Supplementary Figure S4: Regenerative TL glow

  18. New particle formation at a remote site in the eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikridas, Michael; Riipinen, Ilona; Hildebrandt, Lea; Kostenidou, Evangelia; Manninen, Hanna; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Kalivitis, Nikos; Burkhart, John F.; Stohl, Andreas; Kulmala, Markku; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2012-06-01

    A year (6-April-2008 to 14-April-2009) of particulate monitoring was conducted at a remote coastal station on the island of Crete, Greece in the eastern Mediterranean. Fifty-eight regional new particle formation events were observed with an Air Ion Spectrometer (AIS), half of which occurred during the coldest months of the year (December-March). Particle formation was favored by air masses arriving from the west that crossed Crete or southern Greece prior to reaching the site and also by lower-than-average condensational sinks (CS). Aerosol composition data, which were acquired during month-long campaigns in the summer and winter, suggest that nucleation events occurred only when particles were neutral. This is consistent with the hypothesis that a lack of NH3, during periods when particles are acidic, may limit nucleation in sulfate-rich environments. Nucleation was not limited by the availability of SO2 alone, as nucleation events often did not take place during periods with high SO2 or H2SO4 concentrations. The above results support the hypothesis that an additional reactant (other than H2SO4) plays an important role in the formation and/or growth of new particles. Our results are consistent with NH3 being this missing reactant.

  19. Measurements of aerosol chemistry during new particle formation events at a remote rural mountain site.

    PubMed

    Creamean, Jessie M; Ault, Andrew P; Ten Hoeve, John E; Jacobson, Mark Z; Roberts, Gregory C; Prather, Kimberly A

    2011-10-01

    Determining the major sources of particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) represents a critical step in the development of a more fundamental understanding of aerosol impacts on cloud formation and climate. Reported herein are direct measurements of the CCN activity of newly formed ambient particles, measured at a remote rural site in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of Northern California. Nucleation events in the winter of 2009 occurred during two pristine periods following precipitation, with higher gas-phase SO(2) concentrations during the second period, when faster particle growth occurred (7-8 nm/h). Amines, as opposed to ammonia, and sulfate were detected in the particle phase throughout new particle formation (NPF) events, increasing in number as the particles grew to larger sizes. Interestingly, long-range transport of SO(2) from Asia appeared to potentially play a role in NPF during faster particle growth. Understanding the propensity of newly formed particles to act as CCN is critical for predicting the effects of NPF on orographic cloud formation during winter storms along the Sierra Nevada Mountain range. The potential impact of newly formed particles in remote regions needs to be compared with that of transported urban aerosols when evaluating the impact of aerosols on clouds and climate.

  20. Stone-Wales defects in silicene: Formation, stability, and reactivity of defect sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, H.; Sivek, J.; Li, S.; Partoens, B.; Peeters, F. M.

    2013-07-01

    During the synthesis of ultrathin materials with hexagonal lattice structure Stone-Wales (SW) type of defects are quite likely to be formed and the existence of such topological defects in the graphenelike structures results in dramatic changes of their electronic and mechanical properties. Here we investigate the formation and reactivity of such SW defects in silicene. We report the energy barrier for the formation of SW defects in freestanding (˜2.4 eV) and Ag(111)-supported (˜2.8 eV) silicene and found it to be significantly lower than in graphene (˜9.2 eV). Moreover, the buckled nature of silicene provides a large energy barrier for the healing of the SW defect and therefore defective silicene is stable even at high temperatures. Silicene with SW defects is semiconducting with a direct band gap of 0.02 eV and this value depends on the concentration of defects. Furthermore, nitrogen substitution in SW-defected silicene shows that the defect lattice sites are the least preferable substitution locations for the N atoms. Our findings show the easy formation of SW defects in silicene and also provide a guideline for band gap engineering in silicene-based materials through such defects.

  1. New Particle Formation Above a Loblolly Pine Forest at a New Tower Site in Central Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joerger, V.; O'Halloran, T. L.; Barr, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    We present initial results investigating the environmental controls on new particle formation events at a new research site in central Virginia. The Sweet Briar College Land-Atmosphere Research Station (SBC-LARS) became operational in July, 2014 and features a 37-meter tower within a ~30 year-old loblolly pine plantation that is surrounded by mixed deciduous forest at the eastern edge of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The tower supports meteorological instruments at three different heights (2, 26, and 37 meters) and two air sampling inlets located above the canopy. The inlets draw air samples into a climate-controlled shed where precursor gas concentrations (ozone, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxides) are determined by gas analyzers. Aerosol size distributions between 10 and 470 nm are measured every 3 minutes by a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). For this study, aerosol size distributions from July through November 2014 were analyzed along with HYSPLIT backwards trajectories, meteorological measurements, gas concentrations, and the condensational sink, to investigate controls on new particle formation. This station and corresponding dataset will contribute to a better understanding of the contribution of biogenic and anthropogenic emissions to aerosol formation in the southeastern United States.

  2. Greater Bone Formation Induction Occurred in Aged than Young Cancellous Bone Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ke, H. Z.; Jee, W. S. S.; Ito, H.; Setterberg, R. B.; Li, M.; Lin, B. Y.; Liang, X. G.; Ma, Y. F.

    1993-01-01

    We have determined the differences in the effects of continual prostaglandin E(sub 2) (PGE(sub 2) treatment in aged (non-growing) and young (growing) cancellous bone sites in 7-month-old Sprague-Dawley rats. The sites involved are the aged distal tibial metaphysis (DTM) with a closed epiphysis and the young proximal tibial metaphysis (PTM) with a slow growing, open epiphysis. The study involved rats treated with 0, 1, 3 or 6 mg PGE(sub 2)/kg/d for 60, 120 and 180 days. Static and dynamic histomorphometry of percent trabecular area, and tissue-referent bone formation rate (BFR/TV) were determined in both DTM and PTM. In pretreatment controls, the secondary spongiosa of the two metaphyses contain the same amount of cancellous bone (11% in DTM vs. 13% in PTM), but markedly less bone formation in DTM (0.6%/y in DTM vs. 41.5%/y in PTM). After 60 days of 6 mg PGE(sub 2)/kg/d treatment, %Tb.Ar was increased 607% in DTM and 199% in PTM, BFR/TV was increased to nearly 14 fold in DTM and only 5 fold in PTM. These results indicated the aged metaphysis of the DTM was much more responsive to PGE(sub 2) treatment than young, growing metaphysis of the PTM. The results of 120 and 180 days treatment did not significantly differ from 60 days treatment in both sites, indicating that the effect of continuous daily PGE2 treatment were in equilibrium after 60 days. We concluded that aged metaphysis was much more responsive to PGE(sub 2) treatment than young growing metaphysis.

  3. Formation of metal nanoclusters on specific surface sites of protein molecules.

    PubMed

    Braun, Nathalie; Meining, Winfried; Hars, Ulrike; Fischer, Markus; Ladenstein, Rudolf; Huber, Robert; Bacher, Adelbert; Weinkauf, Sevil; Bachmann, Luis

    2002-08-01

    During vacuum condensation of metals on frozen proteins, nanoclusters are preferentially formed at specific surface sites (decoration). Understanding the nature of metal/protein interaction is of interest for structure analysis and is also important in the fields of biocompatibility and sensor development. Studies on the interaction between metal and distinct areas on the protein which enhance or impede the probability for cluster formation require information on the structural details of the protein's surface underlying the metal clusters. On three enzyme complexes, lumazine synthase from Bacillus subtilis, proteasome from Thermoplasma acidophilum and GTP cyclohydrolase I from Escherichia coli, the decoration sites as determined by electron microscopy (EM) were correlated with their atomic surface structures as obtained by X-ray crystallography. In all three cases, decoration of the same protein results in different cluster distributions for gold and silver. Gold decorates surface areas consisting of polar but uncharged residues and with rough relief whereas silver clusters are preferentially formed on top of protein pores outlined by charged and hydrophilic residues and filled with frozen buffer under the experimental conditions. A common quality of both metals is that they strictly avoid condensation on hydrophobic sites lacking polar and charged residues. The results open ways to analyse the binding mechanism of nanoclusters to small specific sites on the surface of hydrated biomacromolecules by non-microscopic, physical-chemical methods. Understanding the mechanism may lead to advanced decoration techniques resulting in fewer background clusters. This would improve the analysis of single molecules with regard to their symmetries and their orientation in the adsorbed state and in precrystalline assemblies as well as facilitate the detection of point defects in crystals caused by misorientation or by impurities. PMID:12144790

  4. Formation of target-specific binding sites in enzymes: solid-phase molecular imprinting of HRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czulak, J.; Guerreiro, A.; Metran, K.; Canfarotta, F.; Goddard, A.; Cowan, R. H.; Trochimczuk, A. W.; Piletsky, S.

    2016-05-01

    Here we introduce a new concept for synthesising molecularly imprinted nanoparticles by using proteins as macro-functional monomers. For a proof-of-concept, a model enzyme (HRP) was cross-linked using glutaraldehyde in the presence of glass beads (solid-phase) bearing immobilized templates such as vancomycin and ampicillin. The cross-linking process links together proteins and protein chains, which in the presence of templates leads to the formation of permanent target-specific recognition sites without adverse effects on the enzymatic activity. Unlike complex protein engineering approaches commonly employed to generate affinity proteins, the method proposed can be used to produce protein-based ligands in a short time period using native protein molecules. These affinity materials are potentially useful tools especially for assays since they combine the catalytic properties of enzymes (for signaling) and molecular recognition properties of antibodies. We demonstrate this concept in an ELISA-format assay where HRP imprinted with vancomycin and ampicillin replaced traditional enzyme-antibody conjugates for selective detection of templates at micromolar concentrations. This approach can potentially provide a fast alternative to raising antibodies for targets that do not require high assay sensitivities; it can also find uses as a biochemical research tool, as a possible replacement for immunoperoxidase-conjugates.Here we introduce a new concept for synthesising molecularly imprinted nanoparticles by using proteins as macro-functional monomers. For a proof-of-concept, a model enzyme (HRP) was cross-linked using glutaraldehyde in the presence of glass beads (solid-phase) bearing immobilized templates such as vancomycin and ampicillin. The cross-linking process links together proteins and protein chains, which in the presence of templates leads to the formation of permanent target-specific recognition sites without adverse effects on the enzymatic activity. Unlike

  5. Formation of target-specific binding sites in enzymes: solid-phase molecular imprinting of HRP.

    PubMed

    Czulak, J; Guerreiro, A; Metran, K; Canfarotta, F; Goddard, A; Cowan, R H; Trochimczuk, A W; Piletsky, S

    2016-06-01

    Here we introduce a new concept for synthesising molecularly imprinted nanoparticles by using proteins as macro-functional monomers. For a proof-of-concept, a model enzyme (HRP) was cross-linked using glutaraldehyde in the presence of glass beads (solid-phase) bearing immobilized templates such as vancomycin and ampicillin. The cross-linking process links together proteins and protein chains, which in the presence of templates leads to the formation of permanent target-specific recognition sites without adverse effects on the enzymatic activity. Unlike complex protein engineering approaches commonly employed to generate affinity proteins, the method proposed can be used to produce protein-based ligands in a short time period using native protein molecules. These affinity materials are potentially useful tools especially for assays since they combine the catalytic properties of enzymes (for signaling) and molecular recognition properties of antibodies. We demonstrate this concept in an ELISA-format assay where HRP imprinted with vancomycin and ampicillin replaced traditional enzyme-antibody conjugates for selective detection of templates at micromolar concentrations. This approach can potentially provide a fast alternative to raising antibodies for targets that do not require high assay sensitivities; it can also find uses as a biochemical research tool, as a possible replacement for immunoperoxidase-conjugates. PMID:27174700

  6. Ice Lens Formation and Frost Heave at the Phoenix Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, A. P.; Sizemore, H. G.; Remple, A. W.

    2011-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that the volume of shallow ground ice in the martian high latitudes exceeds the pore volume of the host regolith. Boynton et al. found an optimal fit to the Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) data at the Phoenix landing site by modeling a buried layer of 50-75% ice by mass (up to 90% ice by volume). Thermal and optical observations of recent impact craters in the northern hemisphere have revealed nearly pure ice. Ice deposits containing only 1-2% soil by volume were excavated by Phoenix. The leading hypothesis for the origin of this excess ice is that it developed in situ by a mechanism analogous to the formation of terrestrial ice lenses and needle ice. Problematically, terrestrial soil-ice segregation is driven by freeze/thaw cycling and the movement of bulk water, neither of which are expected to have occurred in the geologically recent past on Mars. If however ice lens formation is possible at temperatures less than 273 K, there are possible implications for the habitability of Mars permafrost, since the same thin films of unfrozen water that lead to ice segregation are used by terrestrial psychrophiles to metabolize and grow down to temperatures of at least 258 K.

  7. Dynamic formation of single-atom catalytic active sites on ceria-supported gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanggang; Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Li, Jun; Rousseau, Roger J.

    2015-03-04

    Ab initio Molecular Dynamics simulations and static Density Functional Theory calculations have been performed to investigate the reaction mechanism of CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst. It is found that under reaction condition CO adsorption significantly labializes the surface atoms of the Au cluster and leads to the formation of isolated Au+-CO species that resides on the support in the vicinity of the Au particle. In this context, we identified a dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism at the interfacial area for CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst, which is a lower energy pathway than that of CO oxidation at the interface with the metal particle. This results from the ability of the single atom site to strongly couple with the redox properties of the support in a synergistic manner thereby lowering the barrier for redox reactions. We find that the single Au+ ion, which only exists under reaction conditions, breaks away from the Au cluster to catalyze CO oxidation and returns to the Au cluster after the catalytic cycle is completed. Generally, our study highlights the importance of the dynamic creation of active sites under reaction conditions and their essential role in a catalytic process.

  8. Dynamic formation of single-atom catalytic active sites on ceria-supported gold nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yanggang; Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Li, Jun; Rousseau, Roger J.

    2015-03-04

    Ab initio Molecular Dynamics simulations and static Density Functional Theory calculations have been performed to investigate the reaction mechanism of CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst. It is found that under reaction condition CO adsorption significantly labializes the surface atoms of the Au cluster and leads to the formation of isolated Au+-CO species that resides on the support in the vicinity of the Au particle. In this context, we identified a dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism at the interfacial area for CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst, which is a lower energy pathway than that of CO oxidation at the interface with themore » metal particle. This results from the ability of the single atom site to strongly couple with the redox properties of the support in a synergistic manner thereby lowering the barrier for redox reactions. We find that the single Au+ ion, which only exists under reaction conditions, breaks away from the Au cluster to catalyze CO oxidation and returns to the Au cluster after the catalytic cycle is completed. Generally, our study highlights the importance of the dynamic creation of active sites under reaction conditions and their essential role in a catalytic process.« less

  9. Evolutionarily conserved sites in yeast tropomyosin function in cell polarity, transport and contractile ring formation

    PubMed Central

    Cranz-Mileva, Susanne; MacTaggart, Brittany; Russell, Jacquelyn; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tropomyosin is a coiled-coil protein that binds and regulates actin filaments. The tropomyosin gene in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cdc8, is required for formation of actin cables, contractile rings, and polar localization of actin patches. The roles of conserved residues were investigated in gene replacement mutants. The work validates an evolution-based approach to identify tropomyosin functions in living cells and sites of potential interactions with other proteins. A cdc8 mutant with near-normal actin affinity affects patch polarization and vacuole fusion, possibly by affecting Myo52p, a class V myosin, function. The presence of labile residual cell attachments suggests a delay in completion of cell division and redistribution of cell patches following cytokinesis. Another mutant with a mild phenotype is synthetic negative with GFP-fimbrin, inferring involvement of the mutated tropomyosin sites in interaction between the two proteins. Proteins that assemble in the contractile ring region before actin do so in a mutant cdc8 strain that cannot assemble condensed actin rings, yet some cells can divide. Of general significance, LifeAct-GFP negatively affects the actin cytoskeleton, indicating caution in its use as a biomarker for actin filaments. PMID:26187949

  10. Environmental significance of Upper Miocene phosphorites at hominid sites in the Lukeino Formation (Tugen Hills, Kenya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dericquebourg, Perrine; Person, Alain; Ségalen, Loïc; Pickford, Martin; Senut, Brigitte; Fagel, Nathalie

    2015-08-01

    The Lukeino Formation contains an important sedimentary and fossiliferous record of the late Miocene (6.09-5.68 Ma), which has in particular yielded the fossil remains of the oldest East African bipedal hominid called Orrorin tugenensis. This fluvio-lacustrine sedimentary succession crops out in the Kenyan part of the East African Rift. It is mainly composed of clay to sandy clay deposits intercalated with volcanic ash horizons, and localized layers of carbonates and diatomites. A detailed sedimentological and mineralogical study of the Lukeino Formation was conducted to throw light on the environmental conditions in which the hominids lived. Several centimetric, relatively continuous and indurated phosphatic horizons, of sedimentary origin, were identified at two sites (Sunbarua and Kapcheberek). Mineralogical (XRD) and geochemical analyses as well as observations by SEM, which was coupled with an energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) microprobe, indicate that the autochthonous phosphate layers are composed of a micritic matrix of francolite (38-93%), with incorporation of silicates in variable proportions from one layer to another. The phosphate matrix contains very well preserved and abundant diatom frustules in the basal phosphate layer. These diatoms are identified as Aulacoseira granulata, implying a pH of 7.8-8.2 for freshwaters of the Palaeolake Lukeino. Calcitic tubular structures, linked to a possible bacterial origin, are also observed locally. Phosphate layers occur abruptly within a thick clay-sandy series, associated with an intense runoff phase during the deposition of this interval of the Lukeino Formation. The massive and cyclic input of phosphorus to the lake promoted productivity to the stage where it caused a diatom bloom. The establishment of several phosphate horizons testifies to successive phases of eutrophication of Palaeolake Lukeino. The diatom cells provided some of the organic matter, which was decomposed by bacterial activity at the

  11. Eastern-Mediterranean ventilation variability during sapropel S1 formation, evaluated at two sites influenced by deep-water formation from Adriatic and Aegean Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippidi, A.; Triantaphyllou, M. V.; De Lange, G. J.

    2016-07-01

    Present-day bottom-water ventilation in the Eastern Mediterranean basin occurs through deep-water convection originating from the two marginal basins, i.e. Adriatic and Aegean Seas. In the paleo record, long periods of enhanced deep-water formation have been alternating with shorter periods of reduced deep-water formation. The latter is related mainly to low-latitude humid climate conditions and the enhanced deposition and preservation of organic-rich sediment units (sapropels). This study focuses on sedimentary archives of the most-recent sapropel S1, retrieved from two sites under the direct influence of the two deep-water formation areas. Restricted oxygen conditions have developed rapidly at the beginning of S1 deposition in the Adriatic site, but bottom-water conditions have not persistently remained anoxic during the full interval of sapropel deposition. In fact, the variability in intensity and persistence of sedimentary redox conditions at the two deep-water formation sites is shown to be related to brief episodes of climate cooling. In the Adriatic site, sapropel deposition appears to have been interrupted twice. The 8.2 ka event, only recovered at the Adria site, is characterized by gradually increasing suboxic to possibly intermittently oxic conditions and decreasing Corg fluxes, followed by an abrupt re-establishment of anoxic conditions. Another important event that disrupted sapropel S1 formation, has taken place at ca. 7.4 cal ka BP. The latter event has been recovered at both sites. In the Adriatic site it is followed by a period of sedimentary conditions that gradually change from suboxic to more permanently oxic, as deduced from the Mn/Al pattern. Using the same proxy for suboxic/oxic sedimentary redox conditions, we observe that conditions in the Aegean Sea site shift to more permanently oxic from the 7.4 ka event onwards. However, at both sites the accumulation and preservation of enhanced amounts of organic matter have continued under these

  12. Dipstick format of an improved ELISA for on-site atrazine monitoring in water in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, Uzma; Anwar-ul-Haq; Mahboob, Sadia

    2010-01-01

    A dipstick format was developed for on-site atrazine monitoring in water samples of different origins. It was derived from an in-house-developed ELISA based on polyclonal antibodies that also cross-react with hydroxyatrazine (30%) and terbuthylazine (17%). Test reagents were evaluated for temperature and pH stabilities and rapidity for field applications. Reagents performed well within a temperature range of 20-30 degrees C and were tolerant to alkaline pH (up to 8.5) of the assay buffering system. Tracer incubation time could be reduced to 40 min. Bovine serum albumin addition (1%) in the assay buffer improved assay performance, giving 50% B/B0 (IC50) of 65 ng/L and the lowest LOD of 2 ng/L at 90% B/B0 (IC10). The dipstick ELISA format was standardized on a membrane support. Nylon membrane, positively charged, was superior to PVDF for qualitative or semiquantitative analysis regarding color intensity and stability. Tracer incubation time was further reduced to 30 min with a lowest LOD of 0.1 microg/L. For real sample screening with dipsticks, acceptable results were obtained for water. Significant correlation was found between dipstick and plate ELISA results. Validation using GC with a nitrogen-phosphorus detector and HPLC indicated that dipstick signals in aged water samples, which were mainly due to hydroxyatrazine, were significantly above European Commission regulations of 0.1 microg/L. However, dipsticks were superior, fast, and cost-effective.

  13. Formation of nanostructured Group IIA metal activated sensors: The transformation of Group IIA metal compound sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tune, Travis C.; Baker, Caitlin; Hardy, Neil; Lin, Arthur; Widing, Timothy J.; Gole, James L.

    2015-05-01

    Trends in the Group IIA metal oxides and hydroxides of magnesium, calcium, and barium are unique in the periodic table. In this study we find that they display novel trends as decorating nanostructures for extrinsic semiconductor interfaces. The Group IIA metal ions are strong Lewis acids. We form these M2+ ions in aqueous solution and bring these solutions in contact with a porous silicon interface to form interfaces for conductometric measurements. Observed responses are consistent with the formation of MgO whereas the heavier elements display behaviors which suggest the effect of their more basic nature. Mg(OH)2, when formed, represents a weak base whereas the heavier metal hydroxides of Ca, Sr, and Ba are strong bases. However, the hydroxides tend to give up hydrogen and act as Brönsted acids. For the latter elements, the reversible interaction response of nanostructures deposited to the porous silicon (PS) interface is modified, as the formation of more basic sites appears to compete with M2+ Lewis acidity and hydroxide Brönsted acidity. Mg2+ forms an interface whose response to the analytes NH3 and NO is consistent with MgO and well explained by the recently developing Inverse Hard/Soft Acid/Base model. The behavior of the Ca2+ and Ba2+ decorated interfaces as they interact with the hard base NH3 follows a reversal of the model, indicating a decrease in acidic character as the observed conductometric response suggests the interaction with hydroxyl groups. A change from oxide-like to hydroxide-like constituents is supported by XPS studies. The changes in conductometric response is easily monitored in contrast to changes associated with the Group IIA oxides and hydroxides observed in XPS, EDAX, IR, and NMR measurements.

  14. De novo formation of plant endoplasmic reticulum export sites is membrane cargo induced and signal mediated.

    PubMed

    Hanton, Sally L; Chatre, Laurent; Renna, Luciana; Matheson, Loren A; Brandizzi, Federica

    2007-04-01

    The plant endoplasmic reticulum (ER) contains functionally distinct subdomains at which cargo molecules are packed into transport carriers. To study these ER export sites (ERES), we used tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaf epidermis as a model system and tested whether increased cargo dosage leads to their de novo formation. We have followed the subcellular distribution of the known ERES marker based on a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fusion of the Sec24 COPII coat component (YFP-Sec24), which, differently from the previously described ERES marker, tobacco Sar1-YFP, is visibly recruited at ERES in both the presence and absence of overexpressed membrane cargo. This allowed us to quantify variation in the ERES number and in the recruitment of Sec24 to ERES upon expression of cargo. We show that increased synthesis of membrane cargo leads to an increase in the number of ERES and induces the recruitment of Sec24 to these ER subdomains. Soluble proteins that are passively secreted were found to leave the ER with no apparent up-regulation of either the ERES number or the COPII marker, showing that bulk flow transport has spare capacity in vivo. However, de novo ERES formation, as well as increased recruitment of Sec24 to ERES, was found to be dependent on the presence of the diacidic ER export motif in the cytosolic domain of the membrane cargo. Our data suggest that the plant ER can adapt to a sudden increase in membrane cargo-stimulated secretory activity by signal-mediated recruitment of COPII machinery onto existing ERES, accompanied by de novo generation of new ERES.

  15. Deciphering site formation processes through soil micromorphology at Contrebandiers Cave, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Aldeias, Vera; Goldberg, Paul; Dibble, Harold L; El-Hajraoui, Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    Contrebandiers Cave preserves a Late Pleistocene sequence containing Middle Stone Age (MSA) so-called Maghrebian Mousterian and Aterian occupations, spanning from ∼126 to 95 ka (thousands of years ago), followed by spatially restricted Iberomaurusian industries. Micromorphological analyses, complemented by instrumental mineralogical identification and fabric orientation, allowed for the reconstruction of the main site formation processes at the site. Initial deposition is characterized by local reworking of marine shelly sands dating to Marine Isotopic Stage 5e (MIS5e). The subsequent stratification reveals sedimentary dynamics predominantly associated with gravity-driven inputs and contributions from weathering of the encasing bedrock, at the same time that anthropogenic sediments were being accumulated. The allochthonous components reflect soil degradation and vegetation changes around the cave during the last interglacial. Human occupations seems to be somewhat ephemeral in nature, with some stratigraphic units apparently lacking archaeological components, while in others the human-associated deposits (e.g., burned bones, charcoal, and ashes) can be substantial. Ephemeral breaks in sedimentation and/or erosion followed by stabilization are mainly discernible microscopically by the presence of phosphatic-rich laminae interpreted as short-lived surfaces, peaks of increased humidity and colonization by plants. More substantial erosion affects the uppermost Aterian layers, presumably due to localized reconfigurations of the cave's roof. The subsequent Iberomaurusian deposits are not in their primary position and are associated with well-sorted silts of aeolian origin. While the effects of chemical diagenesis are limited throughout the whole stratigraphic sequence, physical bioturbation (e.g., by wasps, rodents, and earthworms) is more pervasive and leads to localized movement of the original sedimentary particles. PMID:24650737

  16. Site specific comparison of H2, CH4 and compressed air energy storage in porous formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmann Pfeiffer, Wolf; Wang, Bo; Bauer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The supply of energy from renewable sources like wind or solar power is subject to fluctuations determined by the climatic and weather conditions, and shortage periods can be expected on the order of days to weeks. Energy storage is thus required if renewable energy dominates the total energy production and has to compensate the shortages. Porous formations in the subsurface could provide large storage capacities for various energy carriers, such as hydrogen (H2), synthetic methane (CH4) or compressed air (CAES). All three energy storage options have similar requirements regarding the storage site characteristics and consequently compete for suitable subsurface structures. The aim of this work is to compare the individual storage methods for an individual storage site regarding the storage capacity as well as the achievable delivery rates. This objective is pursued using numerical simulation of the individual storage operations. In a first step, a synthetic anticline with a radius of 4 km, a drop of 900 m and a formation thickness of 20 m is used to compare the individual storage methods. The storage operations are carried out using -depending on the energy carrier- 5 to 13 wells placed in the top of the structure. A homogeneous parameter distribution is assumed with permeability, porosity and residual water saturation being 500 mD, 0.35 and 0.2, respectively. N2 is used as a cushion gas in the H2 storage simulations. In case of compressed air energy storage, a high discharge rate of 400 kg/s equating to 28.8 mio. m³/d at surface conditions is required to produce 320 MW of power. Using 13 wells the storage is capable of supplying the specified gas flow rate for a period of 31 hours. Two cases using 5 and 9 wells were simulated for both the H2 and the CH4 storage operation. The target withdrawal rates of 1 mio. sm³/d are maintained for the whole extraction period of one week in all simulations. However, the power output differs with the 5 well scenario producing

  17. U.S. Department of Energy's site screening, site selection, and initial characterization for storage of CO2 in deep geological formations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodosta, T.D.; Litynski, J.T.; Plasynski, S.I.; Hickman, S.; Frailey, S.; Myer, L.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead Federal agency for the development and deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. As part of its mission to facilitate technology transfer and develop guidelines from lessons learned, DOE is developing a series of best practice manuals (BPMs) for carbon capture and storage (CCS). The "Site Screening, Site Selection, and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geological Formations" BPM is a compilation of best practices and includes flowchart diagrams illustrating the general decision making process for Site Screening, Site Selection, and Initial Characterization. The BPM integrates the knowledge gained from various programmatic efforts, with particular emphasis on the Characterization Phase through pilot-scale CO2 injection testing of the Validation Phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) Initiative. Key geologic and surface elements that suitable candidate storage sites should possess are identified, along with example Site Screening, Site Selection, and Initial Characterization protocols for large-scale geologic storage projects located across diverse geologic and regional settings. This manual has been written as a working document, establishing a framework and methodology for proper site selection for CO2 geologic storage. This will be useful for future CO2 emitters, transporters, and storage providers. It will also be of use in informing local, regional, state, and national governmental agencies of best practices in proper sequestration site selection. Furthermore, it will educate the inquisitive general public on options and processes for geologic CO2 storage. In addition to providing best practices, the manual presents a geologic storage resource and capacity classification system. The system provides a "standard" to communicate storage and capacity estimates, uncertainty and project development risk, data guidelines and analyses for adequate site characterization, and

  18. Molecular Study of the Effects of Chemical Processing on Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation: Role of Active Sites and Product Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihvonen, S.; Schill, G. P.; Murphy, K. A.; Mueller, K.; Tolbert, M. A.; Freedman, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Mineral dust aerosol is the largest global source of ice nuclei, but the identity of the active sites for nucleation is unknown. During atmospheric transport, mineral dust aerosol can encounter and react with sulfuric acid, which affects the ice nucleation activity either due to changes to reactive surface sites or product formation. In this study, we reacted two types of clays found in mineral dust, kaolinite and montmorillonite, with sulfuric acid. Variation in the mineral due to acid treatment was separated from product formation through rinsing techniques. The samples were subsequently reacted with a probe molecule, (3,3,3-trifluoropropyl)dimethylchlorosilane, that selectively binds to edge hydroxyl groups that are bonded to a silicon atom with three bridging oxygens. Hydroxyl groups are considered potential active sites, because they can hydrogen bond with water and facilitate ice nucleation. Attachment to these sites was quantified by 19F magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) of the 19F atoms on the probe molecule, which provided a direct correlation of the number of hydroxyl groups. Our results indicate that the number of edge-site hydroxyl groups increases with exposure to acid. Ice nucleation measurements indicate that the sulfuric acid-treated mineral is less ice active than the untreated mineral. Surprisingly, no difference between the nucleation activity of the untreated mineral and acid-treated, rinsed mineral is observed. As a result, we hypothesize that once a critical density of active sites is reached for ice nucleation, there is no further change in nucleation activity despite a continued increase in active sites. We additionally propose that the reduced activity of the acid-treated mineral is due to product formation that blocks active sites on the mineral, rather than changes to active sites.

  19. Quarries of Culture: An Ethnohistorical and Environmental Account of Sacred Sites and Rock Formations in Southern California's Mission Indian Country

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karr, Steven M.

    2005-01-01

    Sacred sites and Rock Formations throughout Southern California's India Country are described by Indians as ancestral markers, origin and place-name locales, areas of deity habitation, and power sources. Early ethnographers were keen to record the traditional stories and meanings related to them by their Native collaborators. Rock formations…

  20. A Study of Geological Formation on Different Sites in Batu Pahat, Malaysia Based On HVSR Method Using Microtremor Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor, M. A. M.; Madun, A.; Kamarudin, A. F.; Daud, M. E.

    2016-07-01

    Geological formation is a one of information need to know during site reconnaissance. Conventional method like borehole has been known is very accurate to identify the formation of geology of a site. However, the problem of this technique is very expensive and not economical for large area. In the last decade, microtremor measurement has been introduced as an alternative technique and widely used in the geological formation study. Therefore, the aim in this study is to determine the geological formation underneath of surface in Batu Pahat district using microtremor measurement. There are two parameters have been carried out from microtremor measurement in term of natural frequency and HVSR curves images. Microtremor measurements are done conducted at 15 sites surrounding of Batu Pahat. Horizontal to vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) method was used for analyzing microtermor measurement data, to determine the natural frequency and also HVSR curves image. In this study, values of natural frequencies are used to classify the soil types with range in the between 0.93 to 5.35 Hz, meanwhile the pattern of HVSR curve images has been shown exists a few groups of soil types surrounding Batu Pahat district. Hence, microtremor measurement indirectly can be used as a one technique to add value in the site reconnaissance in the future.

  1. Cooperativity between Al Sites Promotes Hydrogen Transfer and Carbon–Carbon Bond Formation upon Dimethyl Ether Activation on Alumina

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The methanol-to-olefin (MTO) process allows the conversion of methanol/dimethyl ether into olefins on acidic zeolites via the so-called hydrocarbon pool mechanism. However, the site and mechanism of formation of the first carbon–carbon bond are still a matter of debate. Here, we show that the Lewis acidic Al sites on the 110 facet of γ-Al2O3 can readily activate dimethyl ether to yield CH4, alkenes, and surface formate species according to spectroscopic studies combined with a computational approach. The carbon–carbon forming step as well as the formation of methane and surface formate involves a transient oxonium ion intermediate, generated by a hydrogen transfer between surface methoxy species and coordinated methanol on adjacent Al sites. These results indicate that extra framework Al centers in acidic zeolites, which are associated with alumina, can play a key role in the formation of the first carbon–carbon bond, the initiation step of the industrial MTO process. PMID:27162986

  2. Phage anti-immunocomplex assay for clomazone: two-site recognition increasing assay specificity and facilitating adaptation into an on-site format.

    PubMed

    Rossotti, M A; Carlomagno, M; González-Techera, A; Hammock, B D; Last, J; González-Sapienza, G

    2010-11-01

    The impact of the use of herbicides in agriculture can be minimized by compliance with good management practices that reduce the amount used and their release into the environment. Simple tests that provide real time on-site information about these chemicals are a major aid for these programs. In this work, we show that phage anti-immunocomplex assay (PHAIA), a method that uses phage-borne peptides to detect the formation of antibody-analyte immunocomplexes, is an advantageous technology to produce such field tests. A monoclonal antibody to the herbicide clomazone was raised and used in the development of conventional competitive and noncompetitive PHAIA immunoassays. The sensitivity attained with the PHAIA format was over 10 times higher than that of the competitive format. The cross-reactivity of the two methods was also compared using structurally related compounds, and we observed that the two-site binding of PHAIA "double-checks" the recognition of the analyte, thereby increasing the assay specificity. The positive readout of the noncompetitive PHAIA method allowed adaptation of the assay into a rapid and simple format where as little as 0.4 ng/mL clomazone (more than 10-fold lower than the proposed standard) in water samples from a rice field could be easily detected by simple visual inspection.

  3. Phage Anti-Immunocomplex Assay (PHAIA) for clomazone: Two-site recognition increases assay specificity and facilitates adaptation into a rapid on-site format

    PubMed Central

    Rossotti, M.A.; Carlomagno, M.; González-Techera, A.; Hammock, B.D.; Last, J.; González-Sapienza, G.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of the use of herbicides in agriculture can be minimized by compliance with good management practices that reduce the amount used and their release into the environment. Simple tests that provide real time on-site information about these chemicals are a major aid for these programs. In this work we show that PHAIA, a method that uses phage-borne peptides to detect the formation of antibody-analyte immunocomplexes, is an advantageous technology to produce such field tests. A monoclonal antibody to the herbicide clomazone was raised and used in the development of conventional competitive and noncompetitive PHAIA immunoassays. The sensitivity attained with the PHAIA format was over ten times higher than that of the competitive format. The cross-reactivity of the two methods was also compared by using structurally related compounds, and we observed that the two-site binding of PHAIA “double-checks” the recognition of the analyte, thereby increasing the assay specificity. The positive readout of the noncompetitive PHAIA method allowed adaptation of the assay into a rapid and simple format where as little as 0.4 ng/ml of clomazone (more than 10-fold lower than the proposed standard) in water samples from a rice field could be easily detected by simple visual inspection. PMID:20886819

  4. High Fat Diet Enhances β-Site Cleavage of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) via Promoting β-Site APP Cleaving Enzyme 1/Adaptor Protein 2/Clathrin Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Maesako, Masato; Uemura, Maiko; Tashiro, Yoshitaka; Sasaki, Kazuki; Watanabe, Kiwamu; Noda, Yasuha; Ueda, Karin; Asada-Utsugi, Megumi; Kubota, Masakazu; Okawa, Katsuya; Ihara, Masafumi; Shimohama, Shun; Uemura, Kengo; Kinoshita, Ayae

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are risk factors of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We reported that a high fat diet (HFD) promotes amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleavage by β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) without increasing BACE1 levels in APP transgenic mice. However, the detailed mechanism had remained unclear. Here we demonstrate that HFD promotes BACE1/Adaptor protein-2 (AP-2)/clathrin complex formation by increasing AP-2 levels in APP transgenic mice. In Swedish APP overexpressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells as well as in SH-SY5Y cells, overexpression of AP-2 promoted the formation of BACE1/AP-2/clathrin complex, increasing the level of the soluble form of APP β (sAPPβ). On the other hand, mutant D495R BACE1, which inhibits formation of this trimeric complex, was shown to decrease the level of sAPPβ. Overexpression of AP-2 promoted the internalization of BACE1 from the cell surface, thus reducing the cell surface BACE1 level. As such, we concluded that HFD may induce the formation of the BACE1/AP-2/clathrin complex, which is followed by its transport of BACE1 from the cell surface to the intracellular compartments. These events might be associated with the enhancement of β-site cleavage of APP in APP transgenic mice. Here we present evidence that HFD, by regulation of subcellular trafficking of BACE1, promotes APP cleavage. PMID:26414661

  5. Urinary bladder matrix promotes site appropriate tissue formation following right ventricle outflow tract repair

    PubMed Central

    Remlinger, Nathaniel T; Gilbert, Thomas W; Yoshida, Masahiro; Guest, Brogan N; Hashizume, Ryotaro; Weaver, Michelle L; Wagner, William R; Brown, Bryan N; Tobita, Kimimasa; Wearden, Peter D

    2013-01-01

    The current prevalence and severity of heart defects requiring functional replacement of cardiac tissue pose a serious clinical challenge. Biologic scaffolds are an attractive tissue engineering approach to cardiac repair because they avoid sensitization associated with homograft materials and theoretically possess the potential for growth in similar patterns as surrounding native tissue. Both urinary bladder matrix (UBM) and cardiac ECM (C-ECM) have been previously investigated as scaffolds for cardiac repair with modest success, but have not been compared directly. In other tissue locations, bone marrow derived cells have been shown to play a role in the remodeling process, but this has not been investigated for UBM in the cardiac location, and has never been studied for C-ECM. The objectives of the present study were to compare the effectiveness of an organ-specific C-ECM patch with a commonly used ECM scaffold for myocardial tissue repair of the right ventricle outflow tract (RVOT), and to examine the role of bone marrow derived cells in the remodeling response. A chimeric rat model in which all bone marrow cells express green fluorescent protein (GFP) was generated and used to show the ability of ECM scaffolds derived from the heart and bladder to support cardiac function and cellular growth in the RVOT. The results from this study suggest that urinary bladder matrix may provide a more appropriate substrate for myocardial repair than cardiac derived matrices, as shown by differences in the remodeling responses following implantation, as well as the presence of site appropriate cells and the formation of immature, myocardial tissue. PMID:23974174

  6. Upper Devonian vertebrate taphonomy and sedimentology from the Klunas fossil site, Tervete Formation, Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiļkova, J.; Lukševičs, E.; Stinkulis, Ä.¢.; Zupinš, I.

    2012-04-01

    The deposits of the Tervete Formation, Famennian Stage of Latvia, comprising weakly cemented sandstone and sand intercalated with dolomitic marls, siltstone and clay, have been traditionally interpreted as having formed in a shallow, rather restricted sea with lowered salinity. During seven field seasons the excavations took place in the south-western part of Latvia, at the Klunas site, and resulted in extensive palaeontological and sedimentological data. The taphonomical analysis has been performed, having evaluated the size, sorting, orientation of the fossils, articulation and skeletal preservation as well as the degree of fragmentation and abrasion. The sedimentological analysis involved interpretation of sedimentary structures, palaeocurrent direction reconstruction, grain-size analysis and approximate water depth calculations. The vertebrate assemblage of the Klunas site represents all known taxa of the Sparnene Regional Stage of the Baltic Devonian, comprising placoderms Bothriolepis ornata Eichwald, B. jani Lukševičs, Phyllolepis tolli Vasiliauskas, Dunkleosteus sp. and Chelyophorus sp., sarcopterygians Holoptychius nobilissimus Agassiz, Platycephalichthys skuenicus Vorobyeva, Cryptolepis sp., Conchodus sp., Glyptopomus ? sp., "Strunius" ? sp., and Dipterus sp., as well as an undetermined actinopterygian. Placoderms Bothriolepis ornata and B. jani dominate the assemblage. The fossils are represented in the main by fully disarticulated placoderm plates and plate fragments, sarcopterygian scales and teeth, rarely bones of the head and shoulder girdle, and acanthodian spines and scales. The characteristic feature is the great amount of fragmentary remains several times exceeding the number of intact bones. The horizontal distribution of the bones over the studied area is not homogenous, distinct zones of increased or decreased density of fossils can be traced. Zones of the increased density usually contain many elements of various sizes, whereas zones of the

  7. Role of soil macrofauna in soil formation in post mining sites along climatic and litter quality gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouz, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Soil macrofauna can play important role in soil formation. Here we used thin soil sections to study this process in two environmental gradients, climatic gradient, and liter quality gradient. Climatic gradient consist from four chronosequences of post mining sites in the USA, covering hardwood forest (TN, IN), tallgrass prairie (IL), or shortgrass prairie (WY). Earthworms and other saprophages were absent in such shortgrass sites but were present in the wetter, eastern sites. Absence of saprophagous groups, and especially earthworms, resulted in the absence of bioturbation in shortgrass prairie sites while worm casts and other biogenic structures formed an important part of the soil profile in other chronosequences, in short grass prairie in turn physical processes, such as erosion may play important role in soil mixing. Litter quality gradient consists from set of 28 sites planted with six kind of tree stand (pine, larch, spruce, oak, lime and alder) and unreclaimed sites (covered by willow, birch, aspen dominated forest) on one large heap in Czech Republic. Earthworm density on these sites negatively correlate with CN ratio, the same relationships was shown for proportion of earthworm cast in soil volume. In sites with high earthworm density Oe layer was absent and A layer formed by worm casts was well developed, in the contrary when earthworm were absent Oe layer was thick and A layer absent. Development of A layer correlate with soil carbon storage.

  8. STUDIES CONCERNING THE SITE OF RENIN FORMATION IN THE KIDNEY : III. THE APPARENT SITE OF RENIN FORMATION IN THE TUBULES OF THE MESONEPHROS AND METANEPHROS OF THE HOG FETUS.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, A; Friedman, M

    1942-09-01

    1. Renin was found in both the mesonephric and metanephric kidneys of the smallest hog fetuses examined. These were from 17 to 24 mm. in length in the case of the former, and 25 to 49 mm. in that of the latter. 2. No evidence was found in either type of kidney of juxtaglomerular cells described by Goormaghtigh as the probable site of renin formation. 3. The renin content in both the mesonephros and the metanephros was found to be independent of its arteriologlomerular component but directly dependent upon the number, size, and functional state of the tubular component. It increased in amount with increasing tubular proliferation during the course of embryonic development, and decreased with the progressive tubular atrophy and degeneration incident thereto. 4. The site of renin formation is discussed.

  9. DDT Vertical Migration and Formation of Accumulation Layer in Pesticide-Producing Sites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Bai, Liping; Man, Changgeng; Liang, Wuhong; Li, Fasheng; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2015-08-01

    Soil samples were collected at various depths (0.5-21.5 m) from ten boreholes that were drilled with a SH-30 Model Rig, four of which were at a dicofol production site while six were at a dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) production site. In industrial sites, the shallow soils at depths of 0-2 m were mostly backfill soils, which cannot represent the contamination situation of the sites. The contaminated levels in the deep original soil can represent the situation in contaminated sites. All the soil samples investigated at the DDT and dicofol production sites were found to be seriously polluted. The contents of both DDT (0.6-6071 mg/kg) and dicofol (0.5-1440 mg/kg) were much higher at the dicofol production site than at the DDT production site (DDTs, 0.01-664.6 mg/kg; dicofol, <0.1 mg/kg), even in the deep soil. DDTs had a different distribution in the soil of the pesticide production site from that in the soil outside the sites and that in agricultural soils. The results of the investigation revealed that DDTs were easily enriched in cohesive soil and in the bottom zone of aquifers, where the concentration was higher than in above the layers. DDTs were found to be hard to degrade, and their degradation speed was slower than their vertical migration, despite the fact that hydrophobic DDTs did not migrate easily in soils. In the dicofol production site, the value of DDE/DDD cannot indicate the degradation condition of DDTs, nor can the value of (DDE + DDD)/DDT identify how long DDTs have remained in the soil. It is debatable that the half-life of DDT inputted to soils is about 20-30 years, maybe longer than the generally recognized time. PMID:26131590

  10. DDT Vertical Migration and Formation of Accumulation Layer in Pesticide-Producing Sites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Bai, Liping; Man, Changgeng; Liang, Wuhong; Li, Fasheng; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2015-08-01

    Soil samples were collected at various depths (0.5-21.5 m) from ten boreholes that were drilled with a SH-30 Model Rig, four of which were at a dicofol production site while six were at a dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) production site. In industrial sites, the shallow soils at depths of 0-2 m were mostly backfill soils, which cannot represent the contamination situation of the sites. The contaminated levels in the deep original soil can represent the situation in contaminated sites. All the soil samples investigated at the DDT and dicofol production sites were found to be seriously polluted. The contents of both DDT (0.6-6071 mg/kg) and dicofol (0.5-1440 mg/kg) were much higher at the dicofol production site than at the DDT production site (DDTs, 0.01-664.6 mg/kg; dicofol, <0.1 mg/kg), even in the deep soil. DDTs had a different distribution in the soil of the pesticide production site from that in the soil outside the sites and that in agricultural soils. The results of the investigation revealed that DDTs were easily enriched in cohesive soil and in the bottom zone of aquifers, where the concentration was higher than in above the layers. DDTs were found to be hard to degrade, and their degradation speed was slower than their vertical migration, despite the fact that hydrophobic DDTs did not migrate easily in soils. In the dicofol production site, the value of DDE/DDD cannot indicate the degradation condition of DDTs, nor can the value of (DDE + DDD)/DDT identify how long DDTs have remained in the soil. It is debatable that the half-life of DDT inputted to soils is about 20-30 years, maybe longer than the generally recognized time.

  11. Geological summary of the Busidima Formation (Plio-Pleistocene) at the Hadar paleoanthropological site, Afar Depression, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Campisano, Christopher J

    2012-03-01

    The Hadar paleoanthropological site in Ethiopia preserves a record of hominin evolution spanning from approximately 3.45 Ma to 0.8 Ma. An angular unconformity just above the ca. 2.95 Ma BKT-2 complex divides the sediments into the Hadar Formation (ca. 3.8-2.9Ma) and the Busidima Formation (ca. 2.7-0.15 Ma). The unconformity is likely a response to a major tectonic reorganization in the Afar Depression, and activation of the As Duma fault near the Ethiopian Escarpment (west of Hadar) created a half-graben in which the Busidima Formation was deposited. The pattern and character of sedimentation in the region changed dramatically above the unconformity, as cut-and-fill channel conglomerates and silt-dominated paleosols that comprise the Busidima Formation stand in sharp contrast to the underlying deposits of the Hadar Formation. Conglomerate deposition has been related to both the perennial, axial paleo-Awash and ephemeral, escarpment-draining tributaries. Overbank silts have yielded fossils attributed to early Homo and Oldowan stone tools. Numerous tuffaceous deposits exist within the Busidima Formation, but they are often spatially limited, fine-grained, and reworked. Recent work on the tephrostratigraphic framework of the Busidima Formation at Hadar has identified at least 12 distinct vitric tephras and established the first geochemical-based correlations between Hadar and the neighboring project areas of Gona and Dikika. Compared to Gona and Dikika, where Busidima Formation sediments are exposed over large areas, the highly discontinuous sediments at Hadar comprise less than 40 m in composite section and are exposed over an area of <20 km(2), providing only snapshots into the 2.7-0.15 Ma window. The stratigraphic record at Hadar confirms the complex depositional history of the Busidima Formation, and also provides important details on regional stratigraphic correlations and the pattern of deposition and erosion in the lower Awash Valley reflective of its tectonic

  12. Radial Glial Cell-Neuron Interaction Directs Axon Formation at the Opposite Side of the Neuron from the Contact Site.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chundi; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Takashi; Takano, Tetsuya; Nakamuta, Shinichi; Namba, Takashi; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2015-10-28

    How extracellular cues direct axon-dendrite polarization in mouse developing neurons is not fully understood. Here, we report that the radial glial cell (RGC)-cortical neuron interaction directs axon formation at the opposite side of the neuron from the contact site. N-cadherin accumulates at the contact site between the RGC and cortical neuron. Inhibition of the N-cadherin-mediated adhesion decreases this oriented axon formation in vitro, and disrupts the axon-dendrite polarization in vivo. Furthermore, the RGC-neuron interaction induces the polarized distribution of active RhoA at the contacting neurite and active Rac1 at the opposite neurite. Inhibition of Rho-Rho-kinase signaling in a neuron impairs the oriented axon formation in vitro, and prevents axon-dendrite polarization in vivo. Collectively, these results suggest that the N-cadherin-mediated radial glia-neuron interaction determines the contacting neurite as the leading process for radial glia-guided neuronal migration and directs axon formation to the opposite side acting through the Rho family GTPases.

  13. Insights into site formation at Rose Cottage Cave, South Africa, based on the analysis of sediment peels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloos, Peter; Miller, Christopher E.; Kritikakis, Panagiotis; Wadley, Lyn

    2016-04-01

    Rose Cottage Cave (RCC), in South Africa, has been a key site for explaining the origins of modern human behaviour and movement of early modern humans out of Africa. Nine sediment peels were made previously from the profile sections, preserving original materials that provide a record of cultural and environmental change during the late Pleistocene and Holocene. Here, we present the preliminary results of the study of the RCC sediment peels which aims to investigate site formation processes and the implications for site interpretation. Methods used include micromorphology and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy coupled with detailed observations of the peels. The predominance of geogenic processes is demonstrated by the abundance of silt- and sand-sized quartz grains, which entered the site primarily through a crevice at the back of the cave. RCC lacks rich anthropogenic deposits as noted at other Middle Stone Age sites in southern Africa, but anthropogenic input to the sediment is indicated by the presence of charcoal, burnt bone, lithic fragments, fat-derived char and ashes. Clay coating fragments and chaotic microstructures demonstrate that bioturbation and colluvial reworking homogenised much of the deposit and may explain the absence of preserved bedding and rarity of combustion features. Downward movement of water through the sequence, indicated by clay coatings, is the likely cause for poor bone preservation and near lack of ashes at the site, as well as fluctuations in dose rate that have complicated luminescence dating studies. Evidence for diagenesis at the site is in the form of secondary apatite and gypsum. Sedimentary structures such as channel lag deposits and (silt and sand) laminae observed in peels dating between 60 and 35 ka BP suggest a high-energy sedimentary environment, which experienced flooding events that eroded underlying deposits and deposited large volumes of sediment. This explains why some of the post-Howiesons Poort layers contain

  14. The homing of bone marrow MSCs to non-osseous sites for ectopic bone formation induced by osteoinductive calcium phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Song, Guodong; Habibovic, Pamela; Bao, Chongyun; Hu, Jing; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A.; Yuan, Huipin; Chen, Wenchuan; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoinductive biomaterials are promising for bone repair. There is no direct proof that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) home to non-osseous sites and participate in ectopic bone formation induced by osteoinductive bioceramics. The objective of this study was to use a sex-mismatched beagle dog model to investigate BMSC homing via blood circulation to participate in ectopic bone formation via osteoinductive biomaterial. BMSCs of male dogs were injected into female femoral marrow cavity. The survival and stable chimerism of donor BMSCs in recipients were confirmed with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) granules were implanted in dorsal muscles of female dogs. Y chromosomes were detected in samples harvested from female dogs which had received male BMSCs. At 4 weeks, cells with Y-chromosomes were distributed in the new bone matrix throughout the BCP granule implant. At 6 weeks, cells with Y chromosomes were present in newly mineralized woven bone. TRAP positive osteoclast-like cells were observed in 4-week implants, and the number of such cells decreased from 4 to 6 weeks. These results show that osteoprogenitors were recruited from bone marrow and homed to ectopic site to serve as a cell source for calcium phosphate-induced bone formation. In conclusion, BMSCs were demonstrated to migrate from bone marrow through blood circulation to non-osseous bioceramic implant site to contribute to ectopic bone formation in a canine model. BCP induced new bone in muscles without growth factor delivery, showing excellent osteoinductivity that could be useful for bone tissue engineering. PMID:23298780

  15. Observation of nighttime nitrous acid (HONO) formation at a non-urban site during PRIDE-PRD2004 in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hang; Cheng, Ya Fang; Cheng, Peng; Zhang, Yuan Hang; Dong, Shuofei; Zeng, Li Min; Wang, Xuesong; Slanina, Jacob; Shao, Min; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    Though the importance of HONO as an OH precursor has been recognized for years, its chemical formation pathway is still not well understood. This inhibited the simulations of HONO and observation-based formation rates provided an alternative for the air quality models. However, HONO formation rate derived from certain period may be significantly influenced by uncertainties in transport and emission processes. In this study the use of large sample and scaling methods were recommended in the calculation of HONO formation rate. During the Program of Regional Integrated Experiments of Air Quality over Pear River Delta (PRIDE-PRD2004), good correlations between HONO and NO2 were found supporting the involvement of NO2 in HONO formation. An average NO2-to-HONO nighttime conversion rate CHONO of 1.6%h-1 was derived at a non-urban site Xinken. This conversion rate was comparable to other field measurements and could not be explained by gas phase reactions only. If assumed that HONO was formed only on the ground surface, the observed conversion rate could be explained by the reactions of NO2 on ground surfaces only if three deposited NO2 lead to one HONO released. The emission factor of HONO and its sampling interferences during the measurements were also evaluated in this article.

  16. Genetic alterations and cancer formation in a European flatfish at sites of different contaminant burdens.

    PubMed

    Lerebours, Adélaïde; Stentiford, Grant D; Lyons, Brett P; Bignell, John P; Derocles, Stéphane A P; Rotchell, Jeanette M

    2014-09-01

    Fish diseases are an indicator for marine ecosystem health since they provide a biological end-point of historical exposure to stressors. Liver cancer has been used to monitor the effects of exposure to anthropogenic pollution in flatfish for many years. The prevalence of liver cancer can exceed 20%. Despite the high prevalence and the opportunity of using flatfish to study environmentally induced cancer, the genetic and environmental factors driving tumor prevalence across sites are poorly understood. This study aims to define the link between genetic deterioration, liver disease progression, and anthropogenic contaminant exposures in the flatfish dab (Limanda limanda). We assessed genetic changes in a conserved cancer gene, Retinoblastoma (Rb), in association with histological diagnosis of normal, pretumor, and tumor pathologies in the livers of 165 fish from six sites in the North Sea and English Channel. The highest concentrations of metals (especially cadmium) and organic chemicals correlated with the presence of tumor pathology and with defined genetic profiles of the Rb gene, from these sites. Different Rb genetic profiles were found in liver tissue near each tumor phenotype, giving insight into the mechanistic molecular-level cause of the liver pathologies. Different Rb profiles were also found at sampling sites of differing contaminant burdens. Additionally, profiles indicated that histological "normal" fish from Dogger sampling locations possessed Rb profiles associated with pretumor disease. This study highlights an association between Rb and specific contaminants (especially cadmium) in the molecular etiology of dab liver tumorigenesis.

  17. Genetic alterations and cancer formation in a European flatfish at sites of different contaminant burdens.

    PubMed

    Lerebours, Adélaïde; Stentiford, Grant D; Lyons, Brett P; Bignell, John P; Derocles, Stéphane A P; Rotchell, Jeanette M

    2014-09-01

    Fish diseases are an indicator for marine ecosystem health since they provide a biological end-point of historical exposure to stressors. Liver cancer has been used to monitor the effects of exposure to anthropogenic pollution in flatfish for many years. The prevalence of liver cancer can exceed 20%. Despite the high prevalence and the opportunity of using flatfish to study environmentally induced cancer, the genetic and environmental factors driving tumor prevalence across sites are poorly understood. This study aims to define the link between genetic deterioration, liver disease progression, and anthropogenic contaminant exposures in the flatfish dab (Limanda limanda). We assessed genetic changes in a conserved cancer gene, Retinoblastoma (Rb), in association with histological diagnosis of normal, pretumor, and tumor pathologies in the livers of 165 fish from six sites in the North Sea and English Channel. The highest concentrations of metals (especially cadmium) and organic chemicals correlated with the presence of tumor pathology and with defined genetic profiles of the Rb gene, from these sites. Different Rb genetic profiles were found in liver tissue near each tumor phenotype, giving insight into the mechanistic molecular-level cause of the liver pathologies. Different Rb profiles were also found at sampling sites of differing contaminant burdens. Additionally, profiles indicated that histological "normal" fish from Dogger sampling locations possessed Rb profiles associated with pretumor disease. This study highlights an association between Rb and specific contaminants (especially cadmium) in the molecular etiology of dab liver tumorigenesis. PMID:25102285

  18. Addition of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells to Mesenchymal Stem Cell Sheets Improves Bone Formation at an Ectopic Site

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhifa; Li, Zhijin; Dai, Taiqiang; Zong, Chunlin; Liu, Yanpu; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effect of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) added to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) sheets on bone formation at an ectopic site. We isolated MSCs and ADSCs from the same rabbits. We then prepared MSC sheets for implantation with or without ADSCs subcutaneously in the backs of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. We assessed bone formation at eight weeks after implantation by micro-computed tomography and histological analysis. In osteogenic medium, MSCs grew to form multilayer sheets containing many calcium nodules. MSC sheets without ADSCs formed bone-like tissue; although neo-bone and cartilage-like tissues were sparse and unevenly distributed by eight weeks after implantation. In comparison, MSC sheets with ADSCs promoted better bone regeneration as evidenced by the greater density of bone, increased mineral deposition, obvious formation of blood vessels, large number of interconnected ossified trabeculae and woven bone structures, and greater bone volume/total volume within the composite constructs. Our results indicate that although sheets of only MSCs have the potential to form tissue engineered bone at an ectopic site, the addition of ADSCs can significantly increase the osteogenic potential of MSC sheets. Thus, the combination of MSC sheets with ADSCs may be regarded as a promising therapeutic strategy to stimulate bone regeneration. PMID:26848656

  19. The use of in vitro DNA adduct formation to estimate the genotoxicity of residues at contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Shaw, G; Connell, D; Barron, W

    1995-05-01

    Genotoxic carcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) covalently bind to the bases in DNA to form adducts. The formation of DNA adducts is significant with respect to chemical carcinogenesis. Many contaminated sites contain quantities of carcinogens such as PAHs, and the evaluation of the genotoxicity of these soils has important implications for human risk assessment. DNA adducts can be formed using an in vitro system incorporating extracts from contaminated soils. The 32P-postlabelling assay is a sensitive technique for the detection of DNA adducts from complex mixtures of environmental carcinogens. These techniques have been used to form and detect DNA adducts using soils from a number of coal gasworks sites. The results show that the extent of adduct formation depends partially on the petroleum hydrocarbon content of samples, but also on other undetermined factors related to composition. While environmental weathering has been shown to effect the PAH composition of samples, this is not an important factor in controlling the genotoxicity of samples as estimated by DNA adduct formation. PMID:7780722

  20. Addition of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells to Mesenchymal Stem Cell Sheets Improves Bone Formation at an Ectopic Site.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhifa; Li, Zhijin; Dai, Taiqiang; Zong, Chunlin; Liu, Yanpu; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effect of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) added to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) sheets on bone formation at an ectopic site. We isolated MSCs and ADSCs from the same rabbits. We then prepared MSC sheets for implantation with or without ADSCs subcutaneously in the backs of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. We assessed bone formation at eight weeks after implantation by micro-computed tomography and histological analysis. In osteogenic medium, MSCs grew to form multilayer sheets containing many calcium nodules. MSC sheets without ADSCs formed bone-like tissue; although neo-bone and cartilage-like tissues were sparse and unevenly distributed by eight weeks after implantation. In comparison, MSC sheets with ADSCs promoted better bone regeneration as evidenced by the greater density of bone, increased mineral deposition, obvious formation of blood vessels, large number of interconnected ossified trabeculae and woven bone structures, and greater bone volume/total volume within the composite constructs. Our results indicate that although sheets of only MSCs have the potential to form tissue engineered bone at an ectopic site, the addition of ADSCs can significantly increase the osteogenic potential of MSC sheets. Thus, the combination of MSC sheets with ADSCs may be regarded as a promising therapeutic strategy to stimulate bone regeneration.

  1. Sites of star formation in galaxies: star complexes and spiral arms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, Yu. N.

    This book describes observational data concerning the regions in our Galaxy and other ones where star formation is going on - from young star clusters and associations to the spiral arms. The synthesis of these data is carried out. The author concludes that not only high-luminosity stars, but also star clusters and associations are forming together in vast complexes. These complexes are primary, fundamental entities of star formation. Contents: 1. Introduction: Star groupings and gaseous clouds. 2. The scale of distances. 3. The scale of ages. 4. Young stellar groupings in the Galaxy. 5. Clusters, associations, and complexes in irregular galaxies. 6. Young star groupings in M31 and M33. 7. The problem of spiral structure. 8. The structure of spiral arms in the Andromeda galaxy. 9. The spiral arms of the Galaxy. 10. The origin of clusters and associations. 11. The nature of star complexes. 12. Star complexes and spiral structure.

  2. Active site remodeling accompanies thioester bond formation in the SUMO E1

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Shaun K.; Capili, Allan D.; Lu, Xuequan; Tan, Derek S.; Lima, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    E1 enzymes activate ubiquitin (Ub) and ubiquitin-like (Ubl) proteins in two steps by carboxy-terminal adenylation and thioester bond formation to a conserved catalytic cysteine in the E1 Cys domain. The structural basis for these intermediates remains unknown. Here we report crystal structures for human SUMO E1 in complex with SUMO adenylate and tetrahedral intermediate analogs at 2.45 Å and 2.6 Å, respectively. These structures show that side chain contacts to ATP·Mg are released after adenylation to facilitate a 130 degree rotation of the Cys domain during thioester bond formation that is accompanied by remodeling of key structural elements including the helix that contains the E1 catalytic cysteine, the cross-over and re-entry loops, and refolding of two helices that are required for adenylation. These changes displace side chains required for adenylation with side chains required for thioester bond formation. Mutational and biochemical analyses suggest these mechanisms are conserved in other E1s. PMID:20164921

  3. Active site remodelling accompanies thioester bond formation in the SUMO E1

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Shaun K.; Capili, Allan D.; Lu, Xuequan; Tan, Derek S.; Lima, Christopher D.

    2010-03-30

    E1 enzymes activate ubiquitin (Ub) and ubiquitin-like (Ubl) proteins in two steps by carboxy-terminal adenylation and thioester bond formation to a conserved catalytic cysteine in the E1 Cys domain. The structural basis for these intermediates remains unknown. Here we report crystal structures for human SUMO E1 in complex with SUMO adenylate and tetrahedral intermediate analogues at 2.45 and 2.6 {angstrom}, respectively. These structures show that side chain contacts to ATP-Mg are released after adenylation to facilitate a 130 degree rotation of the Cys domain during thioester bond formation that is accompanied by remodelling of key structural elements including the helix that contains the E1 catalytic cysteine, the crossover and re-entry loops, and refolding of two helices that are required for adenylation. These changes displace side chains required for adenylation with side chains required for thioester bond formation. Mutational and biochemical analyses indicate these mechanisms are conserved in other E1s.

  4. Dynamic formation of single-atom catalytic active sites on ceria-supported gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang-Gang; Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra; Li, Jun; Rousseau, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Catalysis by gold supported on reducible oxides has been extensively studied, yet issues such as the nature of the catalytic site and the role of the reducible support remain fiercely debated topics. Here we present ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of an unprecedented dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism for the oxidation of carbon monoxide by ceria-supported gold clusters. The reported dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism results from the ability of the gold cation to strongly couple with the redox properties of the ceria in a synergistic manner, thereby lowering the energy of redox reactions. The gold cation can break away from the gold nanoparticle to catalyse carbon monoxide oxidation, adjacent to the metal/oxide interface and subsequently reintegrate back into the nanoparticle after the reaction is completed. Our study highlights the importance of the dynamic creation of active sites under reaction conditions and their essential role in catalysis. PMID:25735407

  5. Barometric pressure transient testing applications at the Nevada Test Site: formation permeability analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, J.M.

    1984-12-01

    The report evaluates previous investigations of the gas permeability of the rock surrounding emplacement holes at the Nevada Test Site. The discussion sets the framework from which the present uncertainty in gas permeability can be overcome. The usefulness of the barometric pressure testing method has been established. Flow models were used to evaluate barometric pressure transients taken at NTS holes U2fe, U19ac and U20ai. 31 refs., 103 figs., 18 tabs. (ACR)

  6. In Site Bioimaging of Hydrogen Sulfide Uncovers Its Pivotal Role in Regulating Nitric Oxide-Induced Lateral Root Formation

    PubMed Central

    Xian, Ming; Zhou, Li-Gang; Han, Fengxiang X.; Gan, Li-Jun; Shi, Zhi-Qi

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important gasotransmitter in mammals. Despite physiological changes induced by exogenous H2S donor NaHS to plants, whether and how H2S works as a true cellular signal in plants need to be examined. A self-developed specific fluorescent probe (WSP-1) was applied to track endogenous H2S in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) roots in site. Bioimaging combined with pharmacological and biochemical approaches were used to investigate the cross-talk among H2S, nitric oxide (NO), and Ca2+ in regulating lateral root formation. Endogenous H2S accumulation was clearly associated with primordium initiation and lateral root emergence. NO donor SNP stimulated the generation of endogenous H2S and the expression of the gene coding for the enzyme responsible for endogenous H2S synthesis. Scavenging H2S or inhibiting H2S synthesis partially blocked SNP-induced lateral root formation and the expression of lateral root-related genes. The stimulatory effect of SNP on Ca2+ accumulation and CaM1 (calmodulin 1) expression could be abolished by inhibiting H2S synthesis. Ca2+ chelator or Ca2+ channel blocker attenuated NaHS-induced lateral root formation. Our study confirmed the role of H2S as a cellular signal in plants being a mediator between NO and Ca2+ in regulating lateral root formation. PMID:24587333

  7. Insights into structural and regulatory roles of Sec16 in COPII vesicle formation at ER exit sites

    PubMed Central

    Yorimitsu, Tomohiro; Sato, Ken

    2012-01-01

    COPII-coated buds are formed at endoplasmic reticulum exit sites (ERES) to mediate ER-to-Golgi transport. Sec16 is an essential factor in ERES formation, as well as in COPII-mediated traffic in vivo. Sec16 interacts with multiple COPII proteins, although the functional significance of these interactions remains unknown. Here we present evidence that full-length Sec16 plays an important role in regulating Sar1 GTPase activity at the late steps of COPII vesicle formation. We show that Sec16 interacts with Sec23 and Sar1 through its C-terminal conserved region and hinders the ability of Sec31 to stimulate Sec23 GAP activity toward Sar1. We also find that purified Sec16 alone can self-assemble into homo-oligomeric complexes on a planar lipid membrane. These features ensure prolonged COPII coat association within a preformed Sec16 cluster, which may lead to the formation of ERES. Our results indicate a mechanistic relationship between COPII coat assembly and ERES formation. PMID:22675024

  8. Radial Glial Cell–Neuron Interaction Directs Axon Formation at the Opposite Side of the Neuron from the Contact Site

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chundi; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Takashi; Takano, Tetsuya; Nakamuta, Shinichi; Namba, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    How extracellular cues direct axon–dendrite polarization in mouse developing neurons is not fully understood. Here, we report that the radial glial cell (RGC)–cortical neuron interaction directs axon formation at the opposite side of the neuron from the contact site. N-cadherin accumulates at the contact site between the RGC and cortical neuron. Inhibition of the N-cadherin-mediated adhesion decreases this oriented axon formation in vitro, and disrupts the axon–dendrite polarization in vivo. Furthermore, the RGC–neuron interaction induces the polarized distribution of active RhoA at the contacting neurite and active Rac1 at the opposite neurite. Inhibition of Rho–Rho-kinase signaling in a neuron impairs the oriented axon formation in vitro, and prevents axon–dendrite polarization in vivo. Collectively, these results suggest that the N-cadherin-mediated radial glia–neuron interaction determines the contacting neurite as the leading process for radial glia-guided neuronal migration and directs axon formation to the opposite side acting through the Rho family GTPases. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons are highly polarized cell lines typically with a single axon and multiple dendrites, which underlies the ability of integrating and transmitting the information in the brain. How is the axon–dendrite polarity of neurons established in the developing neocortex? Here we show that the N-cadherin-mediated radial glial cell–neuron interaction directs axon–dendrite polarization, the radial glial cell–neuron interaction induces polarized distribution of active RhoA and active Rac1 in neurons, and Rho–Rho-kinase signaling is required for axon–dendrite polarization. Our work advances the overall understanding of how extracellular cues direct axon–dendrite polarization in mouse developing neurons. PMID:26511243

  9. Mitochondrial translocation contact sites: separation of dynamic and stabilizing elements in formation of a TOM-TIM-preprotein supercomplex.

    PubMed

    Chacinska, Agnieszka; Rehling, Peter; Guiard, Bernard; Frazier, Ann E; Schulze-Specking, Agnes; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Voos, Wolfgang; Meisinger, Chris

    2003-10-15

    Preproteins with N-terminal presequences are imported into mitochondria at translocation contact sites that include the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM complex) and the presequence translocase of the inner membrane (TIM23 complex). Little is known about the functional cooperation of these translocases. We have characterized translocation contact sites by a productive TOM-TIM-preprotein supercomplex to address the role of three translocase subunits that expose domains to the intermembrane space (IMS). The IMS domain of the receptor Tom22 is required for stabilization of the translocation contact site supercomplex. Surprisingly, the N-terminal segment of the channel Tim23, which tethers the TIM23 complex to the outer membrane, is dispensable for both protein import and generation of the TOM-TIM supercomplex. Tim50, with its large IMS domain, is crucial for generation but not for stabilization of the supercomplex. Thus, Tim50 functions as a dynamic factor and the IMS domain of Tom22 represents a stabilizing element in formation of a productive translocation contact site supercomplex.

  10. Malignant tumor formation at the site of previously irradiated acanthomatous epulides in four dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Thrall, D.E.; Goldschmidt, M.H.; Biery, D.N.

    1981-01-15

    The radiation response of acanthomatous epulis in 32 dogs was good, with an estimated median survival time of 21 months. Of the 32 patients, 14 have died. In 4 of those 14, malignant tumors developed at the site of the acanthomatous epulis. The tumors were of epithelial origin in 3 patients and of mesenchymal origin in 1 patient. Possibilities explaining the appearance of the malignancies included spontaneous malignant transformation, radiation induction of neoplasms, and radiation induction of malignant transformation. This uncommon complication was not considered contradictory to radiotherapy of acanthomatous epulides, because of their excellent response to irradiation and the long latent period between irradiation and appearance of the malignant tumor.

  11. BOREAS TE-1 Soils Data Over The SSA Tower Sites in Raster Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Anderson, Darwin; Knapp, David E.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-1 team collected various data to characterize the soil-plant systems in the BOREAS SSA. This data set was gridded from vector layers of soil maps that were received from Dr. Darwin Anderson (TE-1), who did the original soil mapping in the field during 1994. The vector layers were gridded into raster files that cover approximately 1 square kilometer over each of the tower sites in the SSA. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  12. BOREAS TE-20 Soils Data Over the NSA-MSA and Tower Sites in Vector Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Veldhuis, Hugo; Knapp, David

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-20 team collected several data sets for use in developing and testing models of forest ecosystem dynamics. This data set contains vector layers of soil maps that were received from Dr. Hugo Veldhuis, who did the original mapping in the field during 1994. The vector layers were converted to ARCANFO EXPORT files. These data cover 1-kilometer diameters around each of the NSA tower sites, and another layer covers the NSA-MSA. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Center (DAAC).

  13. Stratigraphy of mid-Cretaceous formations at drilling sites in Weston and Johnson counties, northeastern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mereweather, E.A.

    1980-01-01

    The sedimentary rocks of early Late Cretaceous age in Weston County, Wyo., on the east flank of the Powder River Basin, are assigned, in ascending order, to the Belle Fourche Shale, Greenhorn Formation, and Carlile Shale. In Johnson County, on the west flank of the basin, the lower Upper Cretaceous strata are included in the Frontier Formation and the overlying Cody Shale. The Frontier Formation and some of the laterally equivalent strata in the Rocky Mountain region contain major resources of oil and gas. These rocks also include commercial deposits of bentonite. Outcrop sections, borehole logs, and core studies of the lower Upper Cretaceous rocks near Osage, in Weston County, and Kaycee, in Johnson County, supplement comparative studies of the fossils in the formations. Fossils of Cenomanian, Turonian, and Coniacian Age are abundant at these localities and form sequences of species which can be used for the zonation and correlation of strata throughout the region. The Belle Fourche Shale near Osage is about 115 m (meters) thick and consists mainly of noncalcareous shale, which was deposited in offshore-marine environments during Cenomanian time. These strata are overlain by calcareous shale and limestone of the Greenhorn Formation. In this area, the Greenhorn is about 85 m thick and accumulated in offshore, open-marine environments during the Cenomanian and early Turonian. The Carlile Shale overlies the Greenhorn and is composed of, from oldest to youngest, the Pool Creek Member, Turner Sandy Member, and Sage Breaks Member. In boreholes, the Pool Creek Member is about 23 m thick and consists largely of shale. The member was deposited in offshoremarine environments in Turonian time. These rocks are disconformably overlain by the Turner Sandy Member, a sequence about 50 m thick of interstratified shale, siltstone, and sandstone. The Turner accumulated during the Turonian in several shallow-marine environments. Conformably overlying the Turner is the slightly

  14. An evaluation of water quality in private drinking water wells near natural gas extraction sites in the Barnett Shale formation.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Brian E; Hunt, Laura R; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Carlton, Doug D; Oka, Hyppolite; Walton, Jayme L; Hopkins, Dan; Osorio, Alexandra; Bjorndal, Bryan; Hu, Qinhong H; Schug, Kevin A

    2013-09-01

    Natural gas has become a leading source of alternative energy with the advent of techniques to economically extract gas reserves from deep shale formations. Here, we present an assessment of private well water quality in aquifers overlying the Barnett Shale formation of North Texas. We evaluated samples from 100 private drinking water wells using analytical chemistry techniques. Analyses revealed that arsenic, selenium, strontium and total dissolved solids (TDS) exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency's Drinking Water Maximum Contaminant Limit (MCL) in some samples from private water wells located within 3 km of active natural gas wells. Lower levels of arsenic, selenium, strontium, and barium were detected at reference sites outside the Barnett Shale region as well as sites within the Barnett Shale region located more than 3 km from active natural gas wells. Methanol and ethanol were also detected in 29% of samples. Samples exceeding MCL levels were randomly distributed within areas of active natural gas extraction, and the spatial patterns in our data suggest that elevated constituent levels could be due to a variety of factors including mobilization of natural constituents, hydrogeochemical changes from lowering of the water table, or industrial accidents such as faulty gas well casings.

  15. Ground-water flow model of the Boone formation at the Tar Creek superfund site, Oklahoma and Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, T.B.; Czarnecki, John B.

    2006-01-01

    Extensive mining activities conducted at the Tar Creek Superfund site, one of the largest Superfund sites in the United States, pose substantial health and safety risks. Mining activities removed a total of about 6,000,000 tons of lead and zinc by 1949. To evaluate the effect of this mining on the ground-water flow, a MODFLOW 2000 digital model has been developed to simulate ground-water flow in the carbonate formations of Mississippian age underlying the Tar Creek Superfund site. The model consists of three layers of variable thickness and a grid of 580 rows by 680 columns of cells 164 feet (50 meters) on a side. Model flux boundary conditions are specified for rivers and general head boundaries along the northern boundary of the Boone Formation. Selected cells in layer 1 are simulated as drain cells. Model calibration has been performed to minimize the difference between simulated and observed water levels in the Boone Formation. Hydraulic conductivity values specified during calibration range from 1.3 to 35 feet per day for the Boone Formation with the larger values occurring along the axis of the Miami Syncline where horizontal anisotropy is specified as 10 to 1. Hydraulic conductivity associated with the mine void is set at 50,000 feet per day and a specific yield of 1.0 is specified to represent that the mine void is filled completely with water. Residuals (the difference between measured and simulated ground-water altitudes) has a root-mean-squared value of 8.53 feet and an absolute mean value of 7.29 feet for 17 observed values of water levels in the Boone Formation. The utility of the model for simulating and evaluating the possible consequences of remediation activities has been demonstrated. The model was used to simulate the emplacement of chat (mine waste consisting of fines and fragments of chert) back into the mine. Scenarios using 1,800,000 and 6,500,000 tons of chat were run. Hydraulic conductivity was reduced from 50,000 feet per day to 35 feet

  16. Efficient Formation of Site-Specific Protein-DNA Hybrids Using Copper-Free Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mukhortava, Ann; Schlierf, Michael

    2016-07-20

    Protein-DNA hybrids have become increasingly popular molecular building blocks in bionanotechnology and single-molecule studies to synergistically combine the programmability of DNA with the chemical diversity of proteins. The growing demand for protein-DNA hybrids requires powerful strategies for their conjugation. Here, we present an efficient two-step method for protein-DNA assembly based on copper-free click chemistry. The method allows site-specificity and high coupling efficiency, while maintaining the conservation of protein activity. We compare our method to a commonly used protocol of direct linkage of maleimide-modified oligos. We demonstrate the significantly higher yield with a protein-DNA conjugate, which is analyzed using single-molecule force spectroscopy. PMID:27322198

  17. Chromosomal position effects in chicken lysozyme gene transgenic mice are correlated with suppression of DNase I hypersensitive site formation.

    PubMed Central

    Huber, M C; Bosch, F X; Sippel, A E; Bonifer, C

    1994-01-01

    The complete chicken lysozyme gene locus is expressed copy number dependently and at a high level in macrophages of transgenic mice. Gene expression independent of genomic position can only be achieved by the concerted action of all cis regulatory elements located on the lysozyme gene domain. Position independency of expression is lost if one essential cis regulatory region is deleted. Here we compared the DNase I hypersensitive site (DHS) pattern formed on the chromatin of position independently and position dependently expressed transgenes in order to assess the influence of deletions within the gene domain on active chromatin formation. We demonstrate, that in position independently expressed transgene all DHSs are formed with the authentic relative frequency on all genes. This is not the case for position dependently expressed transgenes. Our results show that the formation of a DHS during cellular differentiation does not occur autonomously. In case essential regulatory elements of the chicken lysozyme gene domain are lacking, the efficiency of DHS formation on remaining cis regulatory elements during myeloid differentiation is reduced and influenced by the chromosomal position. Hence, no individual regulatory element on the lysozyme domain is capable of organizing the chromatin structure of the whole locus in a dominant fashion. Images PMID:7937145

  18. Site characterization of the highest-priority geologic formations for CO2 storage in Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Surdam, Ronald C.; Bentley, Ramsey; Campbell-Stone, Erin; Dahl, Shanna; Deiss, Allory; Ganshin, Yuri; Jiao, Zunsheng; Kaszuba, John; Mallick, Subhashis; McLaughlin, Fred; Myers, James; Quillinan, Scott

    2013-12-07

    This study, funded by U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory award DE-FE0002142 along with the state of Wyoming, uses outcrop and core observations, a diverse electric log suite, a VSP survey, in-bore testing (DST, injection tests, and fluid sampling), a variety of rock/fluid analyses, and a wide range of seismic attributes derived from a 3-D seismic survey to thoroughly characterize the highest-potential storage reservoirs and confining layers at the premier CO2 geological storage site in Wyoming. An accurate site characterization was essential to assessing the following critical aspects of the storage site: (1) more accurately estimate the CO2 reservoir storage capacity (Madison Limestone and Weber Sandstone at the Rock Springs Uplift (RSU)), (2) evaluate the distribution, long-term integrity, and permanence of the confining layers, (3) manage CO2 injection pressures by removing formation fluids (brine production/treatment), and (4) evaluate potential utilization of the stored CO2

  19. Use of Modeling for Prevention of Solids Formation During Canyon Processing of Legacy Nuclear Materials at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, W. D.; Crooks III, W. J.; Christian, J. D.

    2002-02-26

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) Environmental Management (EM) nuclear material stabilization program includes the dissolution and processing of legacy materials from various DOE sites. The SRS canyon facilities were designed to dissolve and process spent nuclear fuel and targets. As the processing of typical materials is completed, unusual and exotic nuclear materials are being targeted for stabilization. These unusual materials are often difficult to dissolve using historical flowsheet conditions and require more aggressive dissolver solutions. Solids must be prevented in the dissolver to avoid expensive delays associated with the build-up of insoluble material in downstream process equipment. Moreover, it is vital to prevent precipitation of all solids, especially plutonium-bearing solids, since their presence in dissolver solutions raises criticality safety issues. To prevent precipitation of undesirable solids in aqueous process solutions, the accuracy of computer models to predict precipitate formation requires incorporation of plant specific fundamental data. These data are incorporated into a previously developed thermodynamic computer program that applies the Pitzer correlation to derive activity coefficient parameters. This improved predictive model will reduce unwanted precipitation in process solutions at DOE sites working with EM nuclear materials in aqueous solutions.

  20. New Particle Formation in the Remote Troposphere: A Comparison of Observations at Various Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, R. J.; McMurry, P. H.; Mauldin, R. L., III; Tanner, D. J.; Eisele, F. L.; Clarke, A. D.; Kapustin, V. N.

    Measurements show that new particles are formed by homogenous nucleation over a wide range of conditions in the remote troposphere. In our studies, large nucleation events are found exclusively in regions of enhanced sulfuric acid vapor (H2SO4g) concentrations, with maximum concentrations never exceeding 5×107 molecules cm-3. Although these data suggest that H2SO4g participated, comparisons between ambient conditions in regions of nucleation to conditions necessary for binary H2SO4 water (H2O) nucleation indicate that the mechanism may vary with elevation. In remote marine regions, at altitudes greater than ˜4 km above sea level, observations of nucleation in clear air along cloud perimeters are in fair agreement with current classical binary nucleation models. In these regions, the low temperatures associated with high altitudes may produce sufficiently saturated H2SO4 for the production of new H2SO4/H2O particles. However, uncertainties with current binary nucleation models limit decisive comparisons. In warmer regions, closer to the earth's surface, measured H2SO4 concentrations are clearly insufficient for binary nucleation. Conditions at these sites are similar to those observed in an earlier study where there was circumstantial evidence for a ternary mechanism involving H2SO4, H2O, and ammonia (NH3) [Weber et al., 1998], suggesting that this may be a significant route for particle production at lower altitudes where surface-derived species, like NH3, are more apt to participate.

  1. Site-1 protease is essential for endochondral bone formation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Debabrata; Xing, Xiaoyun; Davies, Sherri; Bryan, Jennifer; Franz, Carl; Hunziker, Ernst B.; Sandell, Linda J.

    2007-01-01

    Site-1 protease (S1P) has an essential function in the conversion of latent, membrane-bound transcription factors to their free, active form. In mammals, abundant expression of S1P in chondrocytes suggests an involvement in chondrocyte function. To determine the requirement of S1P in cartilage and bone development, we have created cartilage-specific S1P knockout mice (S1Pcko). S1Pcko mice exhibit chondrodysplasia and a complete lack of endochondral ossification even though Runx2 expression, Indian hedgehog signaling, and osteoblastogenesis is intact. However, there is a substantial increase in chondrocyte apoptosis in the cartilage of S1Pcko mice. Extraction of type II collagen is substantially lower from S1Pcko cartilage. In S1Pcko mice, the collagen network is disorganized and collagen becomes entrapped in chondrocytes. Ultrastructural analysis reveals that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in S1Pcko chondrocytes is engorged and fragmented in a manner characteristic of severe ER stress. These data suggest that S1P activity is necessary for a specialized ER stress response required by chondrocytes for the genesis of normal cartilage and thus endochondral ossification. PMID:18025304

  2. Climatology and Formation of Tropical Midlevel Clouds at the Darwin ARM Site

    SciTech Connect

    Riihimaki, Laura D.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2012-10-01

    A 4-yr climatology of midlevel clouds is presented from vertically pointing cloud lidar and radar measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) site at Darwin, Australia. Few studies exist of tropical midlevel clouds using a dataset of this length. Seventy percent of clouds with top heights between 4 and 8 km are less than 2 km thick. These thin layer clouds have a peak in cloud-top temperature around the melting level (0°C) and also a second peak around -12.5°C. The diurnal frequency of thin clouds is highest during the night and reaches a minimum around noon, consistent with variation caused by solar heating. Using a 1.5-yr subset of the observations, the authors found that thin clouds have a high probability of containing supercooled liquid water at low temperatures: ~20% of clouds at -30°C, ~50% of clouds at -20°C, and ~65% of clouds at -10°C contain supercooled liquid water. The authors hypothesize that thin midlevel clouds formed at the melting level are formed differently during active and break monsoon periods and test this over three monsoon seasons. A greater frequency of thin midlevel clouds are likely formed by increased condensation following the latent cooling of melting during active monsoon periods when stratiform precipitation is most frequent. This is supported by the high percentage (65%) of midlevel clouds with preceding stratiform precipitation and the high frequency of stable layers slightly warmer than 0°C. In the break monsoon, a distinct peak in the frequency of stable layers at 0°C matches the peak in thin midlevel cloudiness, consistent with detrainment from convection.

  3. Dust Seds And Processing Near Sites Of High Mass Star Formation In The LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hony, Sacha; Galliano, F.; Madden, S. M.; SAGE Consortium

    2010-01-01

    We present a study into the properties of the dust and complex molecules in and around selected HII regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The analysis is based on the Spitzer program SAGE (Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution). Because of the lower metallicity environment, dust shielding is reduced and the effects of the ultraviolet radiation carry further than in the Milky way. Because of this these HII regions may better represent star forming regions in the more distant universe. We present the near- to far-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) as a function of radial distance to the center of the several clusters. The regions span a wide range in luminosities. We have developed a self consistent spherical clumpy dust radiative transfer model to interpret the observed trends. The model treats the detailed dust optical properties and transient grain heating as well as IR absorption and reprocession. This allows us to interpret the observed variations in SED in terms of the clumpiness, varying incident radiation-field and changing abundances of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), transiently heated very small grains (VSG) to submicron-sized grains in thermal equilibrium, i.e. in terms of the varying grain-size distribution. We find that the LMC massive star forming sites are typified by a several parsec sized void and clumpiness and PAH abundance which increases with distance from the central illuminating source. The inner void may be the result of massive star winds. The observed flat mid-IR SEDs require a grain-size distribution skewed to a higher fraction of smaller grains compared to the Milky Way dust.

  4. Observation of aerosol size distribution and new particle formation at a mountain site in subtropical Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H.; Wang, D. W.; Cheung, K.; Ling, Z. H.; Chan, C. K.; Yao, X. H.

    2012-10-01

    In order to investigate the formation and growth processes of nucleation mode particles, and to quantify the particle number (PN) concentration and size distributions in Hong Kong, an intensive field measurement was conducted from 25 October to 29 November in 2010 near the mountain summit of Tai Mo Shan, a suburban site approximately the geographical centre of the New Territories in Hong Kong. Based on observations of the particle size distribution, new particle formation (NPF) events were found on 12 out of 35 days with the estimated formation rate J5.5 from 0.97 to 10.2 cm-3 s-1, and the average growth rates from 1.5 to 8.4 nm h-1. The events usually began at 10:00-11:00 LT characterized by the occurrence of a nucleation mode with a peak diameter of 6-10 nm. Solar radiation, wind speed, sulfur dioxide (SO2) and ozone (O3) concentrations were on average higher, whereas temperature, relative humidity and daytime nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentration were lower on NPF days than on non-NPF days. Back trajectory analysis suggested that in majority of the NPF event days, the air masses originated from the northwest to northeast directions. The concentrations of gaseous sulfuric acid (SA) showed good power-law relationship with formation rates, with exponents ranging from 1 to 2. The result suggests that the cluster activation theory and kinetic nucleation could potentially explain the observed NPF events in this mountainous atmosphere of Hong Kong. Meanwhile, in these NPF events, the contribution of sulfuric acid vapor to particle growth rate (GR5.5-25) ranged from 9.2 to 52.5% with an average of 26%. Measurement-based calculated oxidation rates of monoterpenes (i.e. α-pinene, β-pinene, myrcene and limonene) by O3 positively correlated with the GR5.5-25 (R = 0.80, p < 0.05). The observed associations of the estimated formation rate J5.5 and the growth rate GR5.5-25 with gaseous sulfuric acid and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) suggested the critical roles of

  5. Fast Helix Formation in the B Domain of Protein A Revealed by Site-Specific Infrared Probes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Caitlin M.; Cooper, A. Kat; Dyer, R. Brian

    2015-01-01

    Comparison of experimental and computational protein folding studies can be difficult because of differences in structural resolution. Isotope-edited infrared spectroscopy offers a direct measure of structural changes involved in protein folding at the single-residue level. Here we demonstrate the increased resolution of site-specific infrared probes to the peptide backbone in the B domain of staphylococcal protein A (BdpA). 13C=18O-labeled methionine was incorporated into each of the helices using recombinant protein expression. Laser-induced temperature jumps coupled with infrared spectroscopy were used to probe changes in the peptide backbone on the submillisecond time scale. The relaxation kinetics of the buried helices, solvated helices, and labeled positions were measured independently by probing the corresponding bands assigned in the amide I region. Using these wavelength-dependent measurements, we observe a fast nanosecond phase and slower microsecond phase at each position. We find at least partial formation of helices 1–3 in the fast intermediate state that precedes the transition state. These measurements provide direct, time-resolved experimental evidence of the early formation of partial helical structure in helices 1 and 3, supporting folding models proposed by computer simulations. PMID:25706439

  6. Analysis of solutes in groundwaters from the Rustler Formation at and near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K.L.

    1997-09-01

    Between 1976 and 1986, groundwater samples from more than 60 locations in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site were collected and analyzed for a variety of major, minor, and trace solutes. Most of the samples were from the Rustler Formation (the Culebra Dolomite, the Magenta Dolomite, or the zone at the contact between the Rustler and underlying Salado Formations) or the Dewey Lake Red Beds. The analytical data from the laboratories are presented here with accompanying discussions of sample collection methods, supporting field measurements, and laboratory analytical methods. A comparison of four data sets and a preliminary evaluation of the data for the major solutes (Cl{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}, Na, K, Ca, and Mg) shows that the data for samples analyzed by UNC/Bendix for SNL seem to be the most reliable, but that at some locations, samples representative of the native, unperturbed groundwater have not been collected. At other locations, the water chemistry has apparently changed between sampling episodes.

  7. Quasars as the formation sites of high-redshift ellipticals: a signature in the `associated' absorption-line systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschini, A.; Gratton, R.

    1997-03-01

    Published data on the average metallicities and abundance ratios for absorption-line systems in high-redshift quasars suggest that a dichotomy may exist between the chemical composition of damped Lyman alpha (Lyalpha) systems (interpreted as intervening galaxies in the QSO line of sight) and the z_abs~=z_em absorption- line systems associated with the quasar. Intervening systems have smaller than solar metallicities, whereas associated absorbers have solar or greater than solar metallicities and small N/C ratios. While these results have to be confirmed by more precise abundance determinations, we argue that they may be explained by an early phase of efficient metal enrichment occurring only in the close environment of high-z QSOs, and characterized by an excess type-II supernova (SNII) activity. This is reminiscent of the SNII phase required to explain the abundance ratios (favouring alpha- over Fe-group elements) observed in the intracluster (IC) medium of local galaxy clusters. We explore the following scenario, to be tested by forthcoming observations of QSO absorption lines using very large optical telescopes. (a) Well-studied damped- Lyalpha, Lyalpha and metal lines in intervening systems trace only part of the history of metal production in the Universe - the one concerning slowly star-forming discs or dwarf irregulars. (b) The complementary class of early-type and bulge-dominated galaxies formed quickly (at z>~4-5) through a huge episode of star formation favouring high-mass stars. (c) The nucleus of the latter is the site of the subsequent formation of a quasar, which partly hides from view the dimmer host galaxy. (d) The products of a galactic wind, following the violent episode of star formation in the host galaxy and metal pollution of the IC medium in the forming cluster, could be directly observable in the z_abs~=z_em associated absorption systems on the QSO line of sight.

  8. A FEEDBACK-DRIVEN BUBBLE G24.136+00.436: A POSSIBLE SITE OF TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hong-Li; Li, JinZeng; Yuan, Jing-Hua; Wu, Yuefang; Dong, Xiaoyi; Liu, Tie E-mail: yfwu.pku@gmail.com

    2015-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of the IR bubble G24.136+00.436. The J = 1-0 observations of {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O were carried out with the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m telescope. Molecular gas with a velocity of 94.8 km s{sup –1} is found prominently in the southeast of the bubble, shaped as a shell with a total mass of ∼2 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉}. It was likely assembled during the expansion of the bubble. The expanding shell consists of six dense cores, whose dense (a few of 10{sup 3} cm{sup –3}) and massive (a few of 10{sup 3} M {sub ☉}) characteristics coupled with the broad linewidths (>2.5 km s{sup –1}) suggest that they are promising sites for forming high-mass stars or clusters. This could be further consolidated by the detection of compact H II regions in Cores A and E. We tentatively identified and classified 63 candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) based on the Spitzer and UKIDSS data. They are found to be dominantly distributed in regions with strong molecular gas emission, indicative of active star formation, especially in the shell. The H II region inside the bubble is mainly ionized by a ∼O8V star(s), of the dynamical age of ∼1.6 Myr. The enhanced number of candidate YSOs and secondary star formation in the shell as well as the timescales involved, indicate a possible scenario for triggering star formation, signified by the ''collect and collapse'' process.

  9. MECHANISMS OF PHASE FORMATION IN THE VITRIFICATION OF HIGH-FERROUS SAVANNAH RIVER SITE SB2 HLW SLUDGE SURROGATE - 9300

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J

    2008-08-27

    Phase formation mechanisms associated with the vitrification of high-ferrous Savannah River Site (SRS) Sludge Batch 2 (SB2) high level waste surrogate were studied by infrared spectroscopy (IRS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Two mixtures at 50 wt% waste loading with commercially available Frit 320 (Li{sub 2}O - 8 wt %, B{sub 2}O{sub 3} - 8 wt %, Na{sub 2}O - 12 wt %, SiO{sub 2} - 72 wt %) and batch chemicals (LiOH {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}, NaNO{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}) to represent the frit formulation were prepared as slurries with a water content of {approx}50 wt%. The mixtures were air-dried at a temperature of 115 C and heat-treated at 500, 700, 900, 1000, 1100, 1200, and 1300 C for 1 hr at each temperature. Infrared spectra and XRD patterns of the products produced at each temperature were recorded. In both mixtures prepared using frit and batch chemicals to represent the frit, phase formation reactions were completed within the temperature range between 900 and 1000 C. However, residual quartz was still present in glass produced from the mixture with batch chemicals even at 1100 C. Although, the phase composition and structure of the glassy products obtained from both mixtures at temperatures over 1000 C were similar, the products obtained from the mixture using actual frit were more homogeneous than those from the mixture with batch chemicals. Thus, the use of frit rather than batch chemicals reduced the temperature range of phase formation and provided for production of higher quality glass.

  10. Effects of Al(3+) Ions on Formation of Silica Framework and Surface Active Sites for SO4(2-) Ions.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, Shigeo; Ozeki, Sumio

    2016-07-19

    Al(3+) ions were introduced into silica framework at 318 K in order to make active Al sites for SO4(2-) by the addition of aqueous sodium silicate solution to aqueous sulfuric acid solution of Al2(SO4)3. The (27)Al and (29)Si NMR spectra of aluminosilicates were measured at 278 K with reaction time. (29)Si NMR spectra were analyzed by the multivariate curve resolution. The addition of Al(3+) ions to aqueous silicate solution promoted gel formation. Small amounts of Al(3+) ions were incorporated as a four-coordinated complex at early stage of polymerization reaction of silicates and during subsequent reaction six-coordinated Al complex increased, suggesting reversible conversion between 4- and 6-coordinated complexes. SO4(2-) ions interact with positive surfaces of aluminosilicates and are specifically adsorbed on the surface sites of 6-coordinated Al(3+) species, which may be stabilized on silicate surfaces as [Al(H2O)5SO4](+). PMID:27352046

  11. Effects of Al(3+) Ions on Formation of Silica Framework and Surface Active Sites for SO4(2-) Ions.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, Shigeo; Ozeki, Sumio

    2016-07-19

    Al(3+) ions were introduced into silica framework at 318 K in order to make active Al sites for SO4(2-) by the addition of aqueous sodium silicate solution to aqueous sulfuric acid solution of Al2(SO4)3. The (27)Al and (29)Si NMR spectra of aluminosilicates were measured at 278 K with reaction time. (29)Si NMR spectra were analyzed by the multivariate curve resolution. The addition of Al(3+) ions to aqueous silicate solution promoted gel formation. Small amounts of Al(3+) ions were incorporated as a four-coordinated complex at early stage of polymerization reaction of silicates and during subsequent reaction six-coordinated Al complex increased, suggesting reversible conversion between 4- and 6-coordinated complexes. SO4(2-) ions interact with positive surfaces of aluminosilicates and are specifically adsorbed on the surface sites of 6-coordinated Al(3+) species, which may be stabilized on silicate surfaces as [Al(H2O)5SO4](+).

  12. An arginine-aspartate network in the active site of bacterial TruB is critical for catalyzing pseudouridine formation

    PubMed Central

    Friedt, Jenna; Leavens, Fern M. V.; Mercier, Evan; Wieden, Hans-Joachim; Kothe, Ute

    2014-01-01

    Pseudouridine synthases introduce the most common RNA modification and likely use the same catalytic mechanism. Besides a catalytic aspartate residue, the contributions of other residues for catalysis of pseudouridine formation are poorly understood. Here, we have tested the role of a conserved basic residue in the active site for catalysis using the bacterial pseudouridine synthase TruB targeting U55 in tRNAs. Substitution of arginine 181 with lysine results in a 2500-fold reduction of TruB’s catalytic rate without affecting tRNA binding. Furthermore, we analyzed the function of a second-shell aspartate residue (D90) that is conserved in all TruB enzymes and interacts with C56 of tRNA. Site-directed mutagenesis, biochemical and kinetic studies reveal that this residue is not critical for substrate binding but influences catalysis significantly as replacement of D90 with glutamate or asparagine reduces the catalytic rate 30- and 50-fold, respectively. In agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of TruB wild type and TruB D90N, we propose an electrostatic network composed of the catalytic aspartate (D48), R181 and D90 that is important for catalysis by fine-tuning the D48-R181 interaction. Conserved, negatively charged residues similar to D90 are found in a number of pseudouridine synthases, suggesting that this might be a general mechanism. PMID:24371284

  13. An arginine-aspartate network in the active site of bacterial TruB is critical for catalyzing pseudouridine formation.

    PubMed

    Friedt, Jenna; Leavens, Fern M V; Mercier, Evan; Wieden, Hans-Joachim; Kothe, Ute

    2014-04-01

    Pseudouridine synthases introduce the most common RNA modification and likely use the same catalytic mechanism. Besides a catalytic aspartate residue, the contributions of other residues for catalysis of pseudouridine formation are poorly understood. Here, we have tested the role of a conserved basic residue in the active site for catalysis using the bacterial pseudouridine synthase TruB targeting U55 in tRNAs. Substitution of arginine 181 with lysine results in a 2500-fold reduction of TruB's catalytic rate without affecting tRNA binding. Furthermore, we analyzed the function of a second-shell aspartate residue (D90) that is conserved in all TruB enzymes and interacts with C56 of tRNA. Site-directed mutagenesis, biochemical and kinetic studies reveal that this residue is not critical for substrate binding but influences catalysis significantly as replacement of D90 with glutamate or asparagine reduces the catalytic rate 30- and 50-fold, respectively. In agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of TruB wild type and TruB D90N, we propose an electrostatic network composed of the catalytic aspartate (D48), R181 and D90 that is important for catalysis by fine-tuning the D48-R181 interaction. Conserved, negatively charged residues similar to D90 are found in a number of pseudouridine synthases, suggesting that this might be a general mechanism.

  14. A parasitic nematode releases cytokinin that controls cell division and orchestrates feeding site formation in host plants

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Shahid; Radakovic, Zoran S.; De La Torre, Carola M.; Chronis, Demosthenis; Novák, Ondřej; Ramireddy, Eswarayya; Holbein, Julia; Matera, Christiane; Hütten, Marion; Gutbrod, Philipp; Anjam, Muhammad Shahzad; Rozanska, Elzbieta; Habash, Samer; Elashry, Abdelnaser; Sobczak, Miroslaw; Kakimoto, Tatsuo; Strnad, Miroslav; Schmülling, Thomas; Mitchum, Melissa G.; Grundler, Florian M. W.

    2015-01-01

    Sedentary plant-parasitic cyst nematodes are biotrophs that cause significant losses in agriculture. Parasitism is based on modifications of host root cells that lead to the formation of a hypermetabolic feeding site (a syncytium) from which nematodes withdraw nutrients. The host cell cycle is activated in an initial cell selected by the nematode for feeding, followed by activation of neighboring cells and subsequent expansion of feeding site through fusion of hundreds of cells. It is generally assumed that nematodes manipulate production and signaling of the plant hormone cytokinin to activate cell division. In fact, nematodes have been shown to produce cytokinin in vitro; however, whether the hormone is secreted into host plants and plays a role in parasitism remained unknown. Here, we analyzed the spatiotemporal activation of cytokinin signaling during interaction between the cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, and Arabidopsis using cytokinin-responsive promoter:reporter lines. Our results showed that cytokinin signaling is activated not only in the syncytium but also in neighboring cells to be incorporated into syncytium. An analysis of nematode infection on mutants that are deficient in cytokinin or cytokinin signaling revealed a significant decrease in susceptibility of these plants to nematodes. Further, we identified a cytokinin-synthesizing isopentenyltransferase gene in H. schachtii and show that silencing of this gene in nematodes leads to a significant decrease in virulence due to a reduced expansion of feeding sites. Our findings demonstrate the ability of a plant-parasitic nematode to synthesize a functional plant hormone to manipulate the host system and establish a long-term parasitic interaction. PMID:26417108

  15. A parasitic nematode releases cytokinin that controls cell division and orchestrates feeding site formation in host plants.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Shahid; Radakovic, Zoran S; De La Torre, Carola M; Chronis, Demosthenis; Novák, Ondřej; Ramireddy, Eswarayya; Holbein, Julia; Matera, Christiane; Hütten, Marion; Gutbrod, Philipp; Anjam, Muhammad Shahzad; Rozanska, Elzbieta; Habash, Samer; Elashry, Abdelnaser; Sobczak, Miroslaw; Kakimoto, Tatsuo; Strnad, Miroslav; Schmülling, Thomas; Mitchum, Melissa G; Grundler, Florian M W

    2015-10-13

    Sedentary plant-parasitic cyst nematodes are biotrophs that cause significant losses in agriculture. Parasitism is based on modifications of host root cells that lead to the formation of a hypermetabolic feeding site (a syncytium) from which nematodes withdraw nutrients. The host cell cycle is activated in an initial cell selected by the nematode for feeding, followed by activation of neighboring cells and subsequent expansion of feeding site through fusion of hundreds of cells. It is generally assumed that nematodes manipulate production and signaling of the plant hormone cytokinin to activate cell division. In fact, nematodes have been shown to produce cytokinin in vitro; however, whether the hormone is secreted into host plants and plays a role in parasitism remained unknown. Here, we analyzed the spatiotemporal activation of cytokinin signaling during interaction between the cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, and Arabidopsis using cytokinin-responsive promoter:reporter lines. Our results showed that cytokinin signaling is activated not only in the syncytium but also in neighboring cells to be incorporated into syncytium. An analysis of nematode infection on mutants that are deficient in cytokinin or cytokinin signaling revealed a significant decrease in susceptibility of these plants to nematodes. Further, we identified a cytokinin-synthesizing isopentenyltransferase gene in H. schachtii and show that silencing of this gene in nematodes leads to a significant decrease in virulence due to a reduced expansion of feeding sites. Our findings demonstrate the ability of a plant-parasitic nematode to synthesize a functional plant hormone to manipulate the host system and establish a long-term parasitic interaction.

  16. An intramembranous ossification model for the in silico analysis of bone tissue formation in tooth extraction sites.

    PubMed

    Corredor-Gómez, Jennifer Paola; Rueda-Ramírez, Andrés Mauricio; Gamboa-Márquez, Miguel Alejandro; Torres-Rodríguez, Carolina; Cortés-Rodríguez, Carlos Julio

    2016-07-21

    The accurate modeling of biological processes allows us to predict the spatiotemporal behavior of living tissues by computer-aided (in silico) testing, a useful tool for the development of medical strategies, avoiding the expenses and potential ethical implications of in vivo experimentation. A model for bone healing in mouth would be useful for selecting proper surgical techniques in dental procedures. In this paper, the formulation and implementation of a model for Intramembranous Ossification is presented aiming to describe the complex process of bone tissue formation in tooth extraction sites. The model consists in a mathematical description of the mechanisms in which different types of cells interact, synthesize and degrade extracellular matrices under the influence of biochemical factors. Special attention is given to angiogenesis, oxygen-dependent effects and growth factor-induced apoptosis of fibroblasts. Furthermore, considering the depth-dependent vascularization of mandibular bone and its influence on bone healing, a functional description of the cell distribution on the severed periodontal ligament (PDL) is proposed. The developed model was implemented using the finite element method (FEM) and successfully validated by simulating an animal in vivo experiment on dogs reported in the literature. A good fit between model outcome and experimental data was obtained with a mean absolute error of 3.04%. The mathematical framework presented here may represent an important tool for the design of future in vitro and in vivo tests, as well as a precedent for future in silico studies on osseointegration and mechanobiology. PMID:27113783

  17. Evidence that prolonged histamine suffusions produce transient increases in vascular permeability subsequent to the formation of venular macromolecular leakage sites. Proof of the Majno-Palade hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Horan, K. L.; Adamski, S. W.; Ayele, W.; Langone, J. J.; Grega, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether histamine-stimulated increases in macromolecular efflux are dependent on the formation of specific vascular leakage sites, or whether other mechanisms need to be invoked to explain the increase in macromolecular efflux produced by this inflammatory mediator. Intravital light microscopy was used to localize and quantitate vascular macromolecular leakage sites in the noneverted hamster cheek pouch. Fluorimetric measurements of plasma and suffusate tracer (FITC-D 70,000 mol wt) concentrations were utilized to quantitate changes in macromolecular efflux. In some experiments, the FITC-D was injected intravenously either at the start of or after the start of a prolonged histamine suffusion for estimation of the duration of the vascular FITC-D leakage response. In saline control cheek pouches there were few, if any, visible FITC-D vascular leakage sites and only small increases in the [FITC-D]s. The arteriolar vasodilators papaverine (1 X 10(-5) M) and isoproterenol (1 X 10(-5) M) failed to increase the formation of vascular FITC-D leakage sites, and the magnitude of the increase in [FITC-D]s produced by these agents was similar to that observed in saline controls. Histamine (1 X 10(-5) M) suffused for either 15, 60, or 120 minutes produced marked increases in [FITC-D]s and in the number of venular FITC-D leakage sites. The venular FITC-D leakage sites began to fade after 10-20 minutes, eventually disappearing altogether. In contrast, the [FITC-D]s was markedly increased throughout the 120-minute observation period. Treatment with papaverine prior to and during the 60-minute histamine suffusion failed to prevent the mediator-stimulated vascular leakage response. In contrast, similar treatment with isoproterenol inhibited the histamine-stimulated increases in [FITC-D]s and the formation of venular FITC-D leakage sites. When the tracer was injected intravenously at the start of the 60-minute histamine suffusion (1 X 10(-5) M

  18. Numerical studies of gas composition differentiation during gas hydrate formation: An application to the IODP site 1327

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuncheng, C.; Chen, D.

    2014-12-01

    Structure I methane hydrate is the most common type found in nature. Structure I gas hydrate has two types of cages that gas molecules may be hosted. Because the larger cavities filled with ethane would be more stable than those filled by methane (Sloan and Koh, 2008), the larger cavities preferentially enclose ethane during the formation of gas hydrate, which results gas composition differentiation during gas hydrate formation. Based on the principle of gas composition differentiation, we establish a numerical model for the gas composition differentiation between methane and ethane during gas hydrate accumulation and applied the model to IODP site 1327. The simulation shows that the gas composition differentiation only occurs at the interval where gas hydrate presents. The lowest methane/ethane (C1/C2) point indicates the bottom of hydrate zone, and the composition differentiation produces the upward increase of C1/C2 within the gas hydrate zone. The C1/C2 reaches the largest value at the top occurrence of gas hydrate and keeps relative stable above the top occurrence of gas hydrate. The top and bottom occurrence of gas hydrate indicated by the inflection points of the C1/C2 profile are similar to those indicated by the negative anomalies of measured chloride concentrations (Riedel et al., 2006). By comparing with the measured C1/C2, the differentiation coefficient (kh=Xe,h/Xe,w, Xe,h is C1/C2 of the formed gas hydrate, Xe,w [mol/kg] is the concentration of ethane in water ) is calculated to 70 kg/mol. The top occurrence of gas hydrate indicated by the C1/C2 profile also confines the water flux to be 0.4kg/m2-year, similar to that confined by the chloride profile. To best fit the measured C1/C2 profile, the methane flux is calculated to 0.04mol/m2-year. Therefore, the C1/C2 profile could be used to obtain the gas hydrate accumulation information. Acknowledgments:This study was supported by Chinese National Science Foundation (grant 41303044, 91228206 ) References

  19. The Molybdenum Active Site of Formate Dehydrogenase Is Capable of Catalyzing C-H Bond Cleavage and Oxygen Atom Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Tobias; Schrapers, Peer; Utesch, Tillmann; Nimtz, Manfred; Rippers, Yvonne; Dau, Holger; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Haumann, Michael; Leimkühler, Silke

    2016-04-26

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are capable of performing the reversible oxidation of formate and are enzymes of great interest for fuel cell applications and for the production of reduced carbon compounds as energy sources from CO2. Metal-containing FDHs in general contain a highly conserved active site, comprising a molybdenum (or tungsten) center coordinated by two molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide molecules, a sulfido and a (seleno-)cysteine ligand, in addition to a histidine and arginine residue in the second coordination sphere. So far, the role of these amino acids in catalysis has not been studied in detail, because of the lack of suitable expression systems and the lability or oxygen sensitivity of the enzymes. Here, the roles of these active site residues is revealed using the Mo-containing FDH from Rhodobacter capsulatus. Our results show that the cysteine ligand at the Mo ion is displaced by the formate substrate during the reaction, the arginine has a direct role in substrate binding and stabilization, and the histidine elevates the pKa of the active site cysteine. We further found that in addition to reversible formate oxidation, the enzyme is further capable of reducing nitrate to nitrite. We propose a mechanistic scheme that combines both functionalities and provides important insights into the distinct mechanisms of C-H bond cleavage and oxygen atom transfer catalyzed by formate dehydrogenase. PMID:27054466

  20. discordia1 and alternative discordia1 Function Redundantly at the Cortical Division Site to Promote Preprophase Band Formation and Orient Division Planes in Maize[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Amanda J.; Gallagher, Kimberly; Smith, Laurie G.

    2009-01-01

    In plants, cell wall placement during cytokinesis is determined by the position of the preprophase band (PPB) and the subsequent expansion of the phragmoplast, which deposits the new cell wall, to the cortical division site delineated by the PPB. New cell walls are often incorrectly oriented during asymmetric cell divisions in the leaf epidermis of maize (Zea mays) discordia1 (dcd1) mutants, and this defect is associated with aberrant PPB formation in asymmetrically dividing cells. dcd1 was cloned and encodes a putative B'' regulatory subunit of the PP2A phosphatase complex highly similar to Arabidopsis thaliana FASS/TONNEAU2, which is required for PPB formation. We also identified alternative discordia1 (add1), a second gene in maize nearly identical to dcd1. While loss of add1 function does not produce a noticeable phenotype, knock down of both genes in add1(RNAi) dcd1(RNAi) plants prevents PPB formation and causes misorientation of symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions. Immunolocalization studies with an antibody that recognizes both DCD1 and ADD1 showed that these proteins colocalize with PPBs and remain at the cortical division site through metaphase. Our results indicate that DCD1 and ADD1 function in PPB formation, that this function is more critical in asymmetrically dividing cells than in symmetrically dividing cells, and that DCD1/ADD1 may have other roles in addition to promoting PPB formation at the cortical division site. PMID:19168717

  1. Arterial wall degeneration plus hemodynamic insult cause arterial wall remodeling and nascent aneurysm formation at specific sites in dogs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yue-Qi; Li, Ming-Hua; Yan, Lei; Tan, Hua-Qiao; Cheng, Ying-Sheng

    2014-09-01

    To determine whether arterial wall degeneration, in combination with hemodynamic insult, causes cerebral artery aneurysms in a dog model, we simulated the geometry and hemodynamics of a human artery by surgical reconstruction of both common carotid arteries in 12 dogs. The dogs were then randomly assigned to one of the following groups: hemodynamic insult + elastase insult group ( n = 6), hemodynamic insult group (n = 6), or elastase control group (n = 3), in which the straight common carotid arteries were subjected to elastase alone. Angiography and hemodynamic analysis were performed immediately and at 12 weeks after surgery; the animals were then killed for histologic evaluation. The 12 surgically reconstructed distal internal carotid arteries simulated the human artery well with respect to geometric and hemodynamic measurements, with the intended aneurysm sites exposed to higher wall shear stress and velocity, lower pressure, turbulent flow, and changes in wall shear stress gradient. Nascent aneurysms developed in 4 hemodynamic insult + elastase insult group dogs at 12 weeks; blood flow analysis demonstrated decreased wall shear stress, increased pressure, and wall shear stress gradient from the neck to the dome. Arterial wall remodeling or nascent aneurysm formation in the hemodynamic insult + elastase insult group versus the other groups was indicated by internal elastic lamina/elastic fiber disruption, muscular layer thinning, increased smooth muscle cell proliferation, macrophage infiltration, and high expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 in the media. These data suggest that nascent aneurysms were caused by the combination of arterial wall degeneration and hemodynamic perturbations in this distal internal carotid artery dog model.

  2. Observation of nucleation mode particle burst and new particle formation events at an urban site in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dawei; Guo, Hai; Cheung, Kalam; Gan, Fuxing

    2014-12-01

    Particle number (PN) concentrations and particle size distributions (PSD) in the size range of 5.5-350 nm were continuously measured from 22 December 2010 to 20 January 2011 at an urban site in Hong Kong when northeastern monsoon prevailed. Apart from the PN peaks appeared in traffic rush hours (i.e. 08:00-09:00 and 17:00-18:00), a distinct peak of PN concentrations in the afternoon (11:00-16:00) was observed during the sampling period. Concurrent measurement data of PSD, ozone (O3) and proxy sulfuric acid (H2SO4) concentrations revealed that the afternoon peaks observed were likely due to new particle formation (NPF) via photochemical reactions. These NPF events were frequently observed under a clean and dry weather in Hong Kong. The occurrence of NPF was closely associated with high solar radiation (SR), low relative humidity (RH) and low condensation sink (CS) in the atmosphere. Besides the NPF events, we also found four nucleation mode particle burst events, typically with increased number concentrations of nucleation mode particles (Nnuc) without growth to larger size particles. These burst events were generally accompanied by high-level primary air pollutants, i.e. sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxide (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO), low SR and high CS conditions. The very different characteristics of the burst events from those of the NPF events indicated that these nucleation mode particle burst events were not caused by the photochemical reactions, but by the primary emission from the local combustion source(s).

  3. Interpretation of brine-permeability tests of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site: First interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Beauheim, R.L. ); Saulnier, G.J. Jr.; Avis, J.D. )

    1991-08-01

    Pressure-pulse tests have been performed in bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to evaluate the hydraulic properties controlling brine flow through the Salado. Hydraulic conductivities ranging from about 10{sup {minus}14} to 10{sup {minus}11} m/s (permeabilities of about 10{sup {minus}21} to 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2}) have been interpreted from nine tests conducted on five stratigraphic intervals within eleven meters of the WIPP underground excavations. Tests of a pure halite layer showed no measurable permeability. Pore pressures in the stratigraphic intervals range from about 0.5 to 9.3 MPa. An anhydrite interbed (Marker Bed 139) appears to be one or more orders of magnitude more permeable than the surrounding halite. Hydraulic conductivities appear to increase, and pore pressures decrease, with increasing proximity to the excavations. These effects are particularly evident within two to three meters of the excavations. Two tests indicated the presence of apparent zero-flow boundaries about two to three meters from the boreholes. The other tests revealed no apparent boundaries within the radii of influence of the tests, which were calculated to range from about four to thirty-five meters from the test holes. The data are insufficient to determine if brine flow through evaporites results from Darcy-like flow driven by pressure gradients within naturally interconnected porosity or from shear deformation around excavations connecting previously isolated pores, thereby providing pathways for fluids at or near lithostatic pressure to be driven towards the low-pressure excavations. Future testing will be performed at greater distances from the excavations to evaluate hydraulic properties and processes beyond the range of excavation effects.

  4. Computational study on the roles of amino acid residues in the active site formation mechanism of blue-light photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ryuma; Kitoh-Nishioka, Hirotaka; Ando, Koji; Yamato, Takahisa

    2015-07-01

    To examine the functional roles of the active site methionine (M-site) and glutamic acid (E-site) residues of blue-light photoreceptors, we performed in silico mutation at the M-site in a systematic manner and focused on the hydrogen bonding between the E-site and the substrate: the cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimer (CPD). Fragment molecular orbital calculations with electron correlations demonstrated that substitution of the M-site methionine with either alanine or glutamine always destabilizes the interaction energy between the E-site and the CPD by more than 12.0 kcal/mol, indicating that the methionine and glutamic acid residues cooperatively facilitate the enzymatic reaction in the active site.

  5. EphrinA4 mimetic peptide targeted to EphA binding site impairs the formation of long-term fear memory in lateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Dines, M; Lamprecht, R

    2014-09-30

    Fear conditioning leads to long-term fear memory formation and is a model for studying fear-related psychopathologies conditions such as phobias and posttraumatic stress disorder. Long-term fear memory formation is believed to involve alterations of synaptic efficacy mediated by changes in synaptic transmission and morphology in lateral amygdala (LA). EphrinA4 and its cognate Eph receptors are intimately involved in regulating neuronal morphogenesis, synaptic transmission and plasticity. To assess possible roles of ephrinA4 in fear memory formation we designed and used a specific inhibitory ephrinA4 mimetic peptide (pep-ephrinA4) targeted to EphA binding site. We show that this peptide, composed of the ephrinA4 binding domain, interacts with EphA4 and inhibits ephrinA4-induced phosphorylation of EphA4. Microinjection of the pep-ephrinA4 into rat LA 30 min before training impaired long- but not short-term fear conditioning memory. Microinjection of a control peptide derived from a nonbinding E helix site of ephrinA4, that does not interact with EphA, had no effect on fear memory formation. Microinjection of pep-ephrinA4 into areas adjacent to the amygdala had no effect on fear memory. Acute systemic administration of pep-ephrinA4 1 h after training also impaired long-term fear conditioning memory formation. These results demonstrate that ephrinA4 binding sites in LA are essential for long-term fear memory formation. Moreover, our research shows that ephrinA4 binding sites may serve as a target for pharmacological treatment of fear and anxiety disorders.

  6. The strength of an Ig switch region is determined by its ability to drive R loop formation and its number of WGCW sites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng Z; Pannunzio, Nicholas R; Han, Li; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Yu, Kefei; Lieber, Michael R

    2014-07-24

    R loops exist at the murine IgH switch regions and possibly other locations, but their functional importance is unclear. In biochemical systems, R loop initiation requires DNA sequence regions containing clusters of G nucleotides, but cellular studies have not been done. Here, we vary the G-clustering, total switch region length, and the number of target sites (WGCW sites for the activation-induced deaminase) at synthetic switch regions in a murine B cell line to determine the effect on class switch recombination (CSR). G-clusters increase CSR regardless of their immediate proximity to the WGCW sites. This increase is accompanied by an increase in R loop formation. CSR efficiency correlates better with the absolute number of WGCW sites in the switch region rather than the total switch region length or density of WGCW sites. Thus, the overall strength of the switch region depends on G-clusters, which initiate R loop formation, and on the number of WGCW sites. PMID:25017067

  7. The Strength of an Ig Switch Region is Determined by its Ability to Drive R-loop Formation and its Number of WGCW Sites

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng Z.; Pannunzio, Nicholas R.; Han, Li; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Yu, Kefei; Lieber, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY R-loops exist at the murine IgH switch regions and possibly other locations, but their functional importance is unclear. In biochemical systems, R-loop initiation requires DNA sequence regions containing clusters of G nucleotides, but cellular studies have not been done. Here, we vary the G-clustering, total switch region length, and the number of target sites (WGCW sites for the activation-induced deaminase) at synthetic switch regions in a murine B cell line to determine the effect on class switch recombination (CSR). G-clusters increase CSR, regardless of their immediate proximity to the WGCW sites. This increase is accompanied by an increase in R-loop formation. CSR efficiency correlates better with the absolute number of WGCW sites in the switch region rather than the total switch region length or density of WGCW sites. Thus, the overall strength of the switch region depends on G-clusters, which initiate R-loop formation, and on the number of WGCW sites. PMID:25017067

  8. Regeneration of active enzyme by formation of hybrids from inactive derivatives: implications for active sites shared between polypeptide chains of aspartate transcarbamoylase.

    PubMed Central

    Robey, E A; Schachman, H K

    1985-01-01

    Crystallographic studies of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase (aspartate carbamoyltransferase, EC 2.1.3.2) in conjunction with chemical modification experiments have led to the suggestion that the active sites of the enzyme are at the interfaces between adjacent polypeptide chains of the catalytic trimers and involve joint participation of amino acid residues from the adjoining chains. However, the precise locations of the active sites and of the residues involved in catalysis are not known. To test the hypothesis that the active sites are shared between chains, we constructed hybrid trimers in which two chains were modified at one presumed active site residue and the third chain was altered at a different active site residue. One parental trimer was a reduced pyridoxal phosphate derivative in which lysine-84 was modified and the other was a mutant protein in which tyrosine-165 was converted to serine by site-directed mutagenesis. Incubating mixtures of these two virtually inactive derivatives under conditions promoting interchain exchange led to a large increase in enzyme activity corresponding approximately to the formation of one active site per trimer. The purified hybrid trimers, containing either two pyridoxylated and one mutant chain or vice versa, had 23% and 28%, respectively, the activity of native wild-type catalytic trimers, compared to 5% and 3% for the parental trimers. The most likely explanation for this large increase in activity is the formation of one "native" active site in each of the hybrid trimers. The results constitute strong evidence for shared active sites in aspartate transcarbamoylase. Images PMID:3881763

  9. Size-resolved aerosol composition at an urban and a rural site in the Po Valley in summertime: implications for secondary aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrini, Silvia; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Giulianelli, Lara; Herrmann, Hartmut; Poulain, Laurent; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Gilardoni, Stefania; Rinaldi, Matteo; Paglione, Marco; Turpin, Barbara J.; Pollini, Francesca; Bucci, Silvia; Zanca, Nicola; Decesari, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    The aerosol size-segregated chemical composition was analyzed at an urban (Bologna) and a rural (San Pietro Capofiume) site in the Po Valley, Italy, during June and July 2012, by ion-chromatography (major water-soluble ions and organic acids) and evolved gas analysis (total and water-soluble carbon), to investigate sources and mechanisms of secondary aerosol formation during the summer. A significant enhancement of secondary organic and inorganic aerosol mass was observed under anticyclonic conditions with recirculation of planetary boundary layer air but with substantial differences between the urban and the rural site. The data analysis, including a principal component analysis (PCA) on the size-resolved dataset of chemical concentrations, indicated that the photochemical oxidation of inorganic and organic gaseous precursors was an important mechanism of secondary aerosol formation at both sites. In addition, at the rural site a second formation process, explaining the largest fraction (22 %) of the total variance, was active at nighttime, especially under stagnant conditions. Nocturnal chemistry in the rural Po Valley was associated with the formation of ammonium nitrate in large accumulation-mode (0.42-1.2 µm) aerosols favored by local thermodynamic conditions (higher relative humidity and lower temperature compared to the urban site). Nocturnal concentrations of fine nitrate were, in fact, on average 5 times higher at the rural site than in Bologna. The water uptake by this highly hygroscopic compound under high RH conditions provided the medium for increased nocturnal aerosol uptake of water-soluble organic gases and possibly also for aqueous chemistry, as revealed by the shifting of peak concentrations of secondary compounds (water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and sulfate) toward the large accumulation mode (0.42-1.2 µm). Contrarily, the diurnal production of WSOC (proxy for secondary organic aerosol) by photochemistry was similar at the two sites but

  10. Post burial alteration of the Permian Rustler Formation Evaporites, WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) site, New Mexico: Textural, stratigraphic and chemical evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenstein, T.K.

    1987-04-01

    The Rustler Formation is a Late Permian (Ochoan Series) evaporite found in the subsurface and in outcrop in New Mexico and west Texas. The main rock types of the Rustler Formation are anhydrite, gypsum, halite, dolostone and siliciclastic sandstone and mudstone. Across the WIPP site, located in southeastern New Mexico, some of the Rustler rock types and their thicknesses change dramatically over short lateral distances. These lateral variations have mainly been attributed to post-burial dissolution of evaporites. The aim of the present study is to distinguish syndepositional features from post burial alteration features in the Rustler Formation. Four borehole cores of the complete Rustler Formation were examined. Primary sedimentary structures, textures and fabrics were identified, based on comparison with modern evaporite deposits. Vertical and lateral patterns of primary sedimentary features were recorded. From this information, depositional settings have been assembled which best account for the observed types of primary features and their vertical and lateral distribution. With this framework, post-depositional diagenetic overprints were identified in the Rustler Formation. The question of whether subsurface diagenetic alteration is presently active at the WIPP site is addressed.

  11. Directing Group in Decarboxylative Cross-Coupling: Copper-Catalyzed Site-Selective C-N Bond Formation from Nonactivated Aliphatic Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhao-Jing; Lu, Xi; Wang, Guan; Li, Lei; Jiang, Wei-Tao; Wang, Yu-Dong; Xiao, Bin; Fu, Yao

    2016-08-01

    Copper-catalyzed directed decarboxylative amination of nonactivated aliphatic carboxylic acids is described. This intramolecular C-N bond formation reaction provides efficient access to the synthesis of pyrrolidine and piperidine derivatives as well as the modification of complex natural products. Moreover, this reaction presents excellent site-selectivity in the C-N bond formation step through the use of directing group. Our work can be considered as a big step toward controllable radical decarboxylative carbon-heteroatom cross-coupling. PMID:27439145

  12. Target-controlled formation of silver nanoclusters in abasic site-incorporated duplex DNA for label-free fluorescence detection of theophylline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ki Soo; Oh, Seung Soo; Soh, H. Tom; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2014-08-01

    A novel, label-free, fluorescence based sensor for theophylline has been developed. In the new sensor system, an abasic site-incorporated duplex DNA probe serves as both a pocket for recognition of theophylline and a template for the preparation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters. The strategy relies on theophylline-controlled formation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters from abasic site-incorporated duplex DNA. When theophylline is not present, silver ions interact with the cytosine groups opposite to the abasic site in duplex DNA. This interaction leads to efficient formation of intensely red fluorescent silver nanoclusters. In contrast, when theophylline is bound at the abasic site through pseudo base-pairing with appropriately positioned cytosines, silver ion binding to the cytosine nucleobase is prevented. Consequently, fluorescent silver nanoclusters are not formed causing a significant reduction of the fluorescence signal. By employing this new sensor, theophylline can be highly selectively detected at a concentration as low as 1.8 μM. Finally, the diagnostic capability and practical application of this sensor were demonstrated by its use in detecting theophylline in human blood serum.A novel, label-free, fluorescence based sensor for theophylline has been developed. In the new sensor system, an abasic site-incorporated duplex DNA probe serves as both a pocket for recognition of theophylline and a template for the preparation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters. The strategy relies on theophylline-controlled formation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters from abasic site-incorporated duplex DNA. When theophylline is not present, silver ions interact with the cytosine groups opposite to the abasic site in duplex DNA. This interaction leads to efficient formation of intensely red fluorescent silver nanoclusters. In contrast, when theophylline is bound at the abasic site through pseudo base-pairing with appropriately positioned cytosines, silver ion binding to

  13. [[superscript 3]H]-Flunitrazepam-Labeled Benzodiazepine Binding Sites in the Hippocampal Formation in Autism: A Multiple Concentration Autoradiographic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guptill, Jeffrey T.; Booker, Anne B.; Gibbs, Terrell T.; Kemper, Thomas L.; Bauman, Margaret L.; Blatt, Gene J.

    2007-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the GABAergic system in cerebellar and limbic structures is affected in autism. We extended our previous study that found reduced [[superscript 3]H] flunitrazepam-labeled benzodiazepine sites in the autistic hippocampus to determine whether this reduction was due to a decrease in binding site number (B [subscript…

  14. A self-assembling peptide matrix used to control stiffness and binding site density supports the formation of microvascular networks in three dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, M.D.; Piristine, H.; Hogrebe, N.J.; Nocera, T.M.; Boehm, M.W.; Reen, R.K.; Koelling, K.W.; Agarwal, G.; Sarang-Sieminski, A.L.; Gooch, K.J.

    2015-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) cell culture system that allows control of both substrate stiffness and integrin binding density was created and characterized. This system consisted of two self-assembling peptide (SAP) sequences that were mixed in different ratios to achieve the desired gel stiffness and adhesiveness. The specific peptides used were KFE ((acetyl)-FKFEFKFE-CONH2), which has previously been reported not to support cell adhesion or MVN formation, and KFE-RGD ((acetyl)-GRGDSP-GG-FKFEFKFE-CONH2), which is a similar sequence that incorporates the RGD integrin binding site. Storage modulus for these gels ranged from ~60 to 6000 Pa, depending on their composition and concentration. Atomic force microscopy revealed ECM-like fiber microarchitecture of gels consisting of both pure KFE and pure KFE-RGD as well as mixtures of the two peptides. This system was used to study the contributions of both matrix stiffness and adhesiveness on microvascular network (MVN) formation of endothelial cells and the morphology of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). When endothelial cells were encapsulated within 3-D gel matrices without binding sites, little cell elongation and no network formation occurred, regardless of the stiffness. In contrast, matrices containing the RGD binding site facilitated robust MVN formation, and the extent of this MVN formation was inversely proportional to matrix stiffness. Compared with a matrix of the same stiffness with no binding sites, a matrix containing RGD-functionalized peptides resulted in a ~2.5-fold increase in the average length of network structure, which was used as a quantitative measure of MVN formation. Matrices with hMSC facilitated an increased number and length of cellular projections at higher stiffness when RGD was present, but induced a round morphology at every stiffness when RGD was absent. Taken together, these results demonstrate the ability to control both substrate stiffness and binding site density within 3-D cell

  15. Formation and dimerization of the phosphodiesterase active site of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa MorA, a bi-functional c-di-GMP regulator.

    PubMed

    Phippen, Curtis William; Mikolajek, Halina; Schlaefli, Henry George; Keevil, Charles William; Webb, Jeremy Stephen; Tews, Ivo

    2014-12-20

    Diguanylate cyclases (DGC) and phosphodiesterases (PDE), respectively synthesise and hydrolyse the secondary messenger cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), and both activities are often found in a single protein. Intracellular c-di-GMP levels in turn regulate bacterial motility, virulence and biofilm formation. We report the first structure of a tandem DGC-PDE fragment, in which the catalytic domains are shown to be active. Two phosphodiesterase states are distinguished by active site formation. The structures, in the presence or absence of c-di-GMP, suggest that dimerisation and binding pocket formation are linked, with dimerisation being required for catalytic activity. An understanding of PDE activation is important, as biofilm dispersal via c-di-GMP hydrolysis has therapeutic effects on chronic infections.

  16. Exploration of the 1891 Foerstner submarine vent site (Pantelleria, Italy): insights into the formation of basaltic balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Joshua T.; Carey, Steven; Pistolesi, Marco; Rosi, Mauro; Croff-Bell, Katherine Lynn; Roman, Chris; Marani, Michael

    2014-07-01

    On October 17, 1891, a submarine eruption started at Foerstner volcano located within the Pantelleria Rift of the Strait of Sicily (Italy). Activity occurred for a period of 1 week from an eruptive vent located 4 km northwest of the island of Pantelleria at a water depth of 250 m. The eruption produced lava balloons that discharged gas at the surface and eventually sank to the seafloor. Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) video footage and high-resolution multi-beam mapping of the Foerstner vent site were used to create a geologic map of the AD 1891 deposits and conduct the first detailed study of the source area associated with this unusual type of submarine volcanism. The main Foerstner vent consists of two overlapping circular mounds with a total volume of 6.3 × 105 m3 and relief of 60 m. It is dominantly constructed of clastic scoriaceous deposits with some interbedded pillow lavas. Petrographic and geochemical analyses of Foerstner samples by X-ray fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry reveal that the majority of the deposits are vesicular, hypocrystalline basanite scoria that display porphyritic, hyaloophitic, and vitrophyric textures. An intact lava balloon recovered from the seafloor consists of a large interior gas cavity surrounded by a thin lava shell comprising two distinct layers: a thin, oxidized, quenched crust surrounding the exterior of the balloon and a dark gray, tachylite layer lying beneath it. Ostwald ripening is proposed to be the dominant bubble growth mechanism of four representative Foerstner scoria samples as inferred by vesicle size distributions. Characterization of the diversity of deposit facies observed at Foerstner in conjunction with quantitative rock texture analysis indicates that submarine Strombolian-like activity is the most likely mechanism for the formation of lava balloons. The deposit facies observed at the main Foerstner vent are very similar to those produced by other known submarine Strombolian

  17. Geology, coal resources, and chemical analyses of coal from the Fruitland Formation, Kimbeto EMRIA study site, San Juan County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, Gary B.; Hildebrand, Rick T.; Affolter, Ronald H.

    1979-01-01

    The Kimbeto EMRIA study site, an area of about 20 square miles (52 km2), is located on the south margin of the San Juan Basin on the gently northward-dipping strata of the Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation and the Kirtland Shale. The coal beds are mainly in the lower 150 feet (45 m) of the Fruitland Format ion. Coal resources--measured, indicated, and inferred--with less than 400 feet (120 m) of overburden in the site are 69,085,000 short tons (62,660,100 metric tons), 369,078,000 short tons (334,754,000 metric tons), and 177,803,000 short tons (161,267,000 metric tons) respectively. About 68 percent of these resources are overlain by 200 feet (60 m) or less of overburden. The apparent rank of the coal ranges from subbituminous B to subbituminous A. The average Btu/lb value of 14 core samples from the site on the as-received basis is 8,240 (4580 Kcal/kg), average ash content is 23.4 percent, and average sulfur content is 0.5 percent. Analyses of coal from the Kimbeto EMRIA study site show significantly higher ash content and significantly lower contents of volatile matter, fixed carbon, carbon, and a significantly lower heat of combustion when compared with other coal analyses from the Rocky Mountain province.

  18. Target-controlled formation of silver nanoclusters in abasic site-incorporated duplex DNA for label-free fluorescence detection of theophylline.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Soo; Oh, Seung Soo; Soh, H Tom; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2014-09-01

    A novel, label-free, fluorescence based sensor for theophylline has been developed. In the new sensor system, an abasic site-incorporated duplex DNA probe serves as both a pocket for recognition of theophylline and a template for the preparation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters. The strategy relies on theophylline-controlled formation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters from abasic site-incorporated duplex DNA. When theophylline is not present, silver ions interact with the cytosine groups opposite to the abasic site in duplex DNA. This interaction leads to efficient formation of intensely red fluorescent silver nanoclusters. In contrast, when theophylline is bound at the abasic site through pseudo base-pairing with appropriately positioned cytosines, silver ion binding to the cytosine nucleobase is prevented. Consequently, fluorescent silver nanoclusters are not formed causing a significant reduction of the fluorescence signal. By employing this new sensor, theophylline can be highly selectively detected at a concentration as low as 1.8 μM. Finally, the diagnostic capability and practical application of this sensor were demonstrated by its use in detecting theophylline in human blood serum.

  19. NMR structure of the A730 loop of the Neurospora VS ribozyme: insights into the formation of the active site

    PubMed Central

    Bonneau, Eric; Girard, Nicolas; Boisbouvier, Jérôme; Legault, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    The Neurospora VS ribozyme is a small nucleolytic ribozyme with unique primary, secondary and global tertiary structures, which displays mechanistic similarities to the hairpin ribozyme. Here, we determined the high-resolution NMR structure of a stem–loop VI fragment containing the A730 internal loop, which forms part of the active site. In the presence of magnesium ions, the A730 loop adopts a structure that is consistent with existing biochemical data and most likely reflects its conformation in the VS ribozyme prior to docking with the cleavage site internal loop. Interestingly, the A730 loop adopts an S-turn motif that is also present in loop B within the hairpin ribozyme active site. The S-turn appears necessary to expose the Watson–Crick edge of a catalytically important residue (A756) so that it can fulfill its role in catalysis. The A730 loop and the cleavage site loop of the VS ribozyme display structural similarities to internal loops found in the active site of the hairpin ribozyme. These similarities provided a rationale to build a model of the VS ribozyme active site based on the crystal structure of the hairpin ribozyme. PMID:21266483

  20. Binding of two PriA-PriB complexes to the primosome assembly site initiates primosome formation.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, Michal R; Jezewska, Maria J; Bujalowski, Wlodzimierz

    2011-08-01

    A direct quantitative analysis of the initial steps in primosome assembly, involving PriA and PriB proteins and the minimal primosome assembly site (PAS) of phage ϕX174, has been performed using fluorescence intensity, fluorescence anisotropy titration, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques. We show that two PriA molecules bind to the PAS at both strong and weak binding sites on the DNA, respectively, without detectable cooperative interactions. Binding of the PriB dimer to the PriA-PAS complex dramatically increases PriA's affinity for the strong site, but only slightly affects its affinity for the weak site. Associations with the strong and weak sites are driven by apparent entropy changes, with binding to the strong site accompanied by a large unfavorable enthalpy change. The PriA-PriB complex, formed independently of the DNA, is able to directly recognize the PAS without the preceding the binding of PriA to the PAS. Thus, the high-affinity state of PriA for PAS is generated through PriA-PriB interactions. The effect of PriB is specific for PriA-PAS association, but not for PriA-double-stranded DNA or PriA-single-stranded DNA interactions. Only complexes containing two PriA molecules can generate a profound change in the PAS structure in the presence of ATP. The obtained results provide a quantitative framework for the elucidation of further steps in primosome assembly and for quantitative analyses of other molecular machines of cellular metabolism.

  1. Enterococcus faecalis from Food, Clinical Specimens, and Oral Sites: Prevalence of Virulence Factors in Association with Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Annette C.; Jonas, Daniel; Huber, Ingrid; Karygianni, Lamprini; Wölber, Johan; Hellwig, Elmar; Arweiler, Nicole; Vach, Kirstin; Wittmer, Annette; Al-Ahmad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Enterococci have gained significance as the cause of nosocomial infections; they occur as food contaminants and have also been linked to dental diseases. E. faecalis has a great potential to spread virulence as well as antibiotic resistance genes via horizontal gene transfer. The integration of food-borne enterococci into the oral biofilm in-vivo has been observed. Therefore, we investigated the virulence determinants and antibiotic resistance of 97 E. faecalis isolates from the oral cavity, food, and clinical specimens. In addition, phenotypic expression of gelatinase and cytolysin were tested, in-vitro biofilm formation was quantified and isolates were compared for strain relatedness via pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Each isolate was found to possess two or more virulence genes, most frequently gelE, efaA, and asa1. Notably, plaque/saliva isolates possessed the highest abundance of virulence genes, the highest levels of phenotypic gelatinase and hemolysin activity and concurrently a high ability to form biofilm. The presence of asa1 was associated with biofilm formation. The biofilm formation capacity of clinical and plaque/saliva isolates was considerably higher than that of food isolates and they also showed similar antibiotic resistance patterns. These results indicate that the oral cavity can constitute a reservoir for virulent E. faecalis strains possessing antibiotic resistance traits and at the same time distinct biofilm formation capabilities facilitating exchange of genetic material. PMID:26793174

  2. Enterococcus faecalis from Food, Clinical Specimens, and Oral Sites: Prevalence of Virulence Factors in Association with Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Annette C; Jonas, Daniel; Huber, Ingrid; Karygianni, Lamprini; Wölber, Johan; Hellwig, Elmar; Arweiler, Nicole; Vach, Kirstin; Wittmer, Annette; Al-Ahmad, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Enterococci have gained significance as the cause of nosocomial infections; they occur as food contaminants and have also been linked to dental diseases. E. faecalis has a great potential to spread virulence as well as antibiotic resistance genes via horizontal gene transfer. The integration of food-borne enterococci into the oral biofilm in-vivo has been observed. Therefore, we investigated the virulence determinants and antibiotic resistance of 97 E. faecalis isolates from the oral cavity, food, and clinical specimens. In addition, phenotypic expression of gelatinase and cytolysin were tested, in-vitro biofilm formation was quantified and isolates were compared for strain relatedness via pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Each isolate was found to possess two or more virulence genes, most frequently gelE, efaA, and asa1. Notably, plaque/saliva isolates possessed the highest abundance of virulence genes, the highest levels of phenotypic gelatinase and hemolysin activity and concurrently a high ability to form biofilm. The presence of asa1 was associated with biofilm formation. The biofilm formation capacity of clinical and plaque/saliva isolates was considerably higher than that of food isolates and they also showed similar antibiotic resistance patterns. These results indicate that the oral cavity can constitute a reservoir for virulent E. faecalis strains possessing antibiotic resistance traits and at the same time distinct biofilm formation capabilities facilitating exchange of genetic material.

  3. Formation of active sites for oxygen reduction reactions by transformation of nitrogen functionalities in nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Tiva; Hu, Guangzhi; Jia, Xueen; Wågberg, Thomas

    2012-10-23

    Heat treating nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes containing up to six different types of nitrogen functionalities transforms particular nitrogen functionalities into other types which are more catalytically active toward oxygen reduction reactions (ORR). In the first stage, the unstable pyrrolic functionalities transform into pyridinic functionalities followed by an immediate transition into quaternary center and valley nitrogen functionalities. By measuring the electrocatalytic oxidation reduction current for the different samples, we achieve information on the catalytic activity connected to each type of nitrogen functionality. Through this, we conclude that quaternary nitrogen valley sites, N-Q(valley), are the most active sites for ORR in N-CNTs. The number of electrons transferred in the ORR is determined from ring disk electrode and rotating ring disk electrode measurements. Our measurements indicate that the ORR processes proceed by a direct four-electron pathway for the N-Q(valley) and the pyridinic sites while it proceeds by an indirect two-electron pathway via hydrogen peroxide at the N-Q(center) sites. Our study gives both insights on the mechanism of ORR on different nitrogen functionalities in nitrogen-doped carbon nanostructures and it proposes how to treat samples to maximize the catalytic efficiency of such samples.

  4. Site-specific targeting of psoralen photoadducts with a triple helix-forming oligonucleotide: characterization of psoralen monoadduct and crosslink formation.

    PubMed Central

    Gasparro, F P; Havre, P A; Olack, G A; Gunther, E J; Glazer, P M

    1994-01-01

    A polypurine tract in the supF gene of bacteriophage lambda (base pairs 167-176) was selected as the target for triple helix formation and targeted mutagenesis by an oligopurine (5'-AGGAAGGGGG-3') containing a chemically linked psoralen derivative (4'-hydroxymethyl-4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen) at its 5' terminus (psoAG10). The thymines at base pairs 166 and 167, a 5'ApT site, were targeted for photomodification. Exposure of the triple helical complex to long wavelength ultraviolet radiation led to the covalent binding of psoAG10 to the targeted region in the supF gene and to the induction of site-specific mutations. We report here experiments to characterize the photomodification of the targeted region of the supF gene in the context of triple helix formation. An electrophoretic mobility-shift assay showed that, at low radiation doses, monoadducts at base pair 166 were the major photoadducts. At higher doses the monoadducts were converted to crosslinks between base pairs 166 and 167. HPLC analysis of enzymatically hydrolyzed photoreaction mixtures was used to confirm the electrophoresis results. A strong strand preference for specific photoadduct formation was also detected. Images PMID:8052539

  5. Role of interchain alpha-helical hydrophobic interactions in Ca2+ affinity, formation, and stability of a two-site domain in troponin C.

    PubMed Central

    Monera, O. D.; Shaw, G. S.; Zhu, B. Y.; Sykes, B. D.; Kay, C. M.; Hodges, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    We have previously shown that a 34-residue synthetic peptide representing the calcium-binding site III of troponin C formed a symmetric two-site dimer consisting of two helix-loop-helix motifs arranged in a head-to-tail fashion (Shaw, G.S., Hodges, R.S., & Sykes, B.D., 1990, Science 249, 280-283). In this study the hydrophobicities of the alpha-helices were altered by replacing L-98 and F-102 in the N-terminal region and/or I-121 and L-122 in the C-terminal region with alanine residues. Our results showed that substitution of hydrophobic residues either in the N- or C-terminal region have little effect on alpha-helix formation but resulted in a 100- and 300-fold decrease in Ca2+ affinity, respectively. Simultaneous substitution of both hydrophobes in the N- and C-terminal region resulted in a 1,000-fold decrease in Ca2+ affinity. Data from guanidine hydrochloride denaturation studies suggested that intermolecular interactions occur and that the less hydrophobic analogs had a lower overall conformational stability. These data support the contention that the hydrophobic residues are important in the formation of the two-site domain in troponin C, and this hydrophobic association stabilizes Ca2+ affinity. PMID:1304377

  6. On site measurements of the redox and carbonate system parameters in the low-permeability Opalinus Clay formation at the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, A. M. a.; Turrero, M. J.; Sánchez, D. M.; Yllera, A.; Melón, A. M.; Sánchez, M.; Peña, J.; Garralón, A.; Rivas, P.; Bossart, P.; Hernán, P.

    An in situ water sampling experiment was performed in the Opalinus Clay formation (Switzerland), with the aim of obtaining undisturbed pore water samples for its characterization. The study was made from a dedicated borehole, named BDI-B1, drilled in March 2002 in the DI niche of the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory, located at the north-western part of the formation, a few meters away of the underlying Jurensis Marl formation. Five water sampling campaigns have been completed, and on site measurements of the key parameters of the water, such as pH, Eh, Fe(II), S 2- and alkalinity, were performed under controlled conditions inside an anoxic glove box. The chemical composition of the seepage waters obtained from the borehole is Na-Cl type, with an ionic strength of about 0.4 M. The Cl concentrations fit the concentration profile of the Opalinus Clay pore water obtained in previous experiments from boreholes and squeezed water samples. The highest salinity is found in this zone of the Opalinus Clay, with around 12 g/L of chloride. A perturbation of the rock system was produced during the first stages of the experiment due to a packer failure. As a consequence, the borehole was exposed to air during the first phase of the experiment. The main perturbations induced were: (1) pyrite oxidation that caused an increase of sulphate, calcium, magnesium and bicarbonate content in the waters; and (2) the inflow of 3H-bearing water vapour that could penetrate the EDZ. This fresh water infiltration could have mixed with the original formation water, and tritium contents of up to 3.8 TU were measured in the first water sampling campaigns. Nevertheless, after some time the hydrogeochemical conditions of the formation were recovered, and the long-term instrumentation and monitoring of the borehole made possible to obtain different parameters of the formation. Successive water sampling campaigns show a tendency to the stabilization of the main parameters of the water, such as sulphate and

  7. Pre-injection Comparison of Methods for Sampling Formation Water and Associated Gas from a Monitoring Well at a Carbon Dioxide Injection Site, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conaway, C.; Thordsen, J. J.; Manning, M. A.; Cook, P. J.; Abedini, A. A.; Trautz, R. C.; Thomas, B.; Kharaka, Y. K.

    2012-12-01

    The chemical composition of formation water and associated gases from the lower Cretaceous Paluxy Formation was determined using four different sampling methods at a well in the Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama, a site that will be used for a carbon dioxide injection experiment. Prior to each of the two sampling periods, the well was cleaned from the drilling fluids and KCl solutions by producing at least three pore volumes of formation water. Accurate measurements of the chemical composition of groundwater or formation water, including dissolved gasses, and gas samples is essential in understanding subsurface geochemical processes occurring as a result of geologic carbon dioxide injection, which is used for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and has been proposed as a means of carbon sequestration. In this study, formation water and gas samples for geochemical analyses were obtained from well D-9-8 #2 at Citronelle using nitrogen lift, submersible pump, U-Tube, and a downhole (Kuster) sampler. Field chemical analyses included electrical conductivity, hydrogen sulfide, alkalinity, and pH, and laboratory analyses included major, minor and trace elements by mass spectrometry and ion chromatography, dissolved carbon, organic acid anions, free and dissolved gas species. The formation water obtained from this well is a Na-Ca-Cl brine with a salinity of 160,000 and 200,000 mg/L total dissolved solids (TDS). Differences were evident between sampling methodologies, particularly in pH, Fe and alkalinity measurements. The results of the comparison demonstrate the difficulty and importance of preserving volatile analytes in samples, with the downhole sampler and U-Tube system performing most favorably in this aspect.

  8. An active site rearrangement within the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme releases nonproductive interactions and allows formation of catalytic interactions.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Raghuvir N; Van Schie, Sabine N S; Giambaşu, George; Dai, Qing; Yesselman, Joseph D; York, Darrin; Piccirilli, Joseph A; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Biological catalysis hinges on the precise structural integrity of an active site that binds and transforms its substrates and meeting this requirement presents a unique challenge for RNA enzymes. Functional RNAs, including ribozymes, fold into their active conformations within rugged energy landscapes that often contain misfolded conformers. Here we uncover and characterize one such "off-pathway" species within an active site after overall folding of the ribozyme is complete. The Tetrahymena group I ribozyme (E) catalyzes cleavage of an oligonucleotide substrate (S) by an exogenous guanosine (G) cofactor. We tested whether specific catalytic interactions with G are present in the preceding E•S•G and E•G ground-state complexes. We monitored interactions with G via the effects of 2'- and 3'-deoxy (-H) and -amino (-NH(2)) substitutions on G binding. These and prior results reveal that G is bound in an inactive configuration within E•G, with the nucleophilic 3'-OH making a nonproductive interaction with an active site metal ion termed MA and with the adjacent 2'-OH making no interaction. Upon S binding, a rearrangement occurs that allows both -OH groups to contact a different active site metal ion, termed M(C), to make what are likely to be their catalytic interactions. The reactive phosphoryl group on S promotes this change, presumably by repositioning the metal ions with respect to G. This conformational transition demonstrates local rearrangements within an otherwise folded RNA, underscoring RNA's difficulty in specifying a unique conformation and highlighting Nature's potential to use local transitions of RNA in complex function.

  9. Covalent adduct formation between the antihypertensive drug hydralazine and abasic sites in double- and single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Melton, Douglas; Lewis, Calvin D; Price, Nathan E; Gates, Kent S

    2014-12-15

    Hydralazine (4) is an antihypertensive agent that displays both mutagenic and epigenetic properties. Here, gel electrophoretic, mass spectroscopic, and chemical kinetics methods were used to provide evidence that medicinally relevant concentrations of 4 rapidly form covalent adducts with abasic sites in double- and single-stranded DNA under physiological conditions. These findings raise the intriguing possibility that the genotoxic properties of this clinically used drug arise via reactions with an endogenous DNA lesion rather than with the canonical structure of DNA.

  10. Inhibition of translation initiation complex formation by GE81112 unravels a 16S rRNA structural switch involved in P-site decoding

    PubMed Central

    Fabbretti, Attilio; Schedlbauer, Andreas; Brandi, Letizia; Kaminishi, Tatsuya; Giuliodori, Anna Maria; Garofalo, Raffaella; Ochoa-Lizarralde, Borja; Takemoto, Chie; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Connell, Sean R.; Gualerzi, Claudio O.

    2016-01-01

    In prokaryotic systems, the initiation phase of protein synthesis is governed by the presence of initiation factors that guide the transition of the small ribosomal subunit (30S) from an unlocked preinitiation complex (30S preIC) to a locked initiation complex (30SIC) upon the formation of a correct codon–anticodon interaction in the peptidyl (P) site. Biochemical and structural characterization of GE81112, a translational inhibitor specific for the initiation phase, indicates that the main mechanism of action of this antibiotic is to prevent P-site decoding by stabilizing the anticodon stem loop of the initiator tRNA in a distorted conformation. This distortion stalls initiation in the unlocked 30S preIC state characterized by tighter IF3 binding and a reduced association rate for the 50S subunit. At the structural level we observe that in the presence of GE81112 the h44/h45/h24a interface, which is part of the IF3 binding site and forms ribosomal intersubunit bridges, preferentially adopts a disengaged conformation. Accordingly, the findings reveal that the dynamic equilibrium between the disengaged and engaged conformations of the h44/h45/h24a interface regulates the progression of protein synthesis, acting as a molecular switch that senses and couples the 30S P-site decoding step of translation initiation to the transition from an unlocked preIC to a locked 30SIC state. PMID:27071098

  11. Inhibition of translation initiation complex formation by GE81112 unravels a 16S rRNA structural switch involved in P-site decoding.

    PubMed

    Fabbretti, Attilio; Schedlbauer, Andreas; Brandi, Letizia; Kaminishi, Tatsuya; Giuliodori, Anna Maria; Garofalo, Raffaella; Ochoa-Lizarralde, Borja; Takemoto, Chie; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Connell, Sean R; Gualerzi, Claudio O; Fucini, Paola

    2016-04-19

    In prokaryotic systems, the initiation phase of protein synthesis is governed by the presence of initiation factors that guide the transition of the small ribosomal subunit (30S) from an unlocked preinitiation complex (30S preIC) to a locked initiation complex (30SIC) upon the formation of a correct codon-anticodon interaction in the peptidyl (P) site. Biochemical and structural characterization of GE81112, a translational inhibitor specific for the initiation phase, indicates that the main mechanism of action of this antibiotic is to prevent P-site decoding by stabilizing the anticodon stem loop of the initiator tRNA in a distorted conformation. This distortion stalls initiation in the unlocked 30S preIC state characterized by tighter IF3 binding and a reduced association rate for the 50S subunit. At the structural level we observe that in the presence of GE81112 the h44/h45/h24a interface, which is part of the IF3 binding site and forms ribosomal intersubunit bridges, preferentially adopts a disengaged conformation. Accordingly, the findings reveal that the dynamic equilibrium between the disengaged and engaged conformations of the h44/h45/h24a interface regulates the progression of protein synthesis, acting as a molecular switch that senses and couples the 30S P-site decoding step of translation initiation to the transition from an unlocked preIC to a locked 30SIC state. PMID:27071098

  12. Field-based description of rhyolite lava flows of the Calico Hills Formation, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Bova, Shiera C.

    2015-01-01

    In the area south of the Rainier Mesa caldera, surface and subsurface geologic data are combined to interpret the overall thickness of the Calico Hills Formation and the proportion of lava flow lithology across the study area. The formation is at least 500 meters (m) thick and contains the greatest proportion of rhyolite lava flow to the northeast of Yucca Mountain in the lower part of Fortymile Canyon. The formation thins to the south and southwest where it is between 50 and 200 m thick beneath Yucca Mountain and contains no rhyolite lavas. Geologic mapping and field-based correlation of individual lava flows allow for the interpretation of the thickness and extent of specific flows and the location of their source areas. The most extensive flows have widths from 2 to 3 kilometers (km) and lengths of at least 5–6 km. Lava flow thickness varies from 150 to 250 m above interpreted source vents to between 30 and 80 m in more distal locations. Rhyolite lavas have length-to-height ratios of 10:1 or greater and, in one instance, a length-to-width ratio of 2:1 or greater, implying a tongue-shaped geometry instead of circular domes or tabular bodies. Although geologic mapping did not identify any physical feature that could be positively identified as a vent, lava flow thickness and the size of clasts in subjacent pyroclastic deposits suggest that primary vent areas for at least some of the flows in the study area are on the east side of Fortymile Canyon, to the northeast of Yucca Mountain.

  13. A dynamic flow simulation code benchmark study addressing the highly heterogeneous properties of the Stuttgart formation at the Ketzin pilot site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempka, Thomas; Class, Holger; Görke, Uwe-Jens; Norden, Ben; Kolditz, Olaf; Kühn, Michael; Walter, Lena; Wang, Wenqing; Zehner, Björn

    2013-04-01

    CO2 injection at the Ketzin pilot site located in Eastern Germany (Brandenburg) about 25 km west of Berlin is undertaken since June 2008 with a scheduled total amount of about 70,000 t CO2 to be injected into the saline aquifer represented by the Stuttgart Formation at a depth of 630 m to 650 m until the end of August 2013. The Stuttgart Formation is of fluvial origin determined by high-permeablity sandstone channels embedded in a floodplain facies of low permeability indicating a highly heterogeneous distribution of reservoir properties as facies distribution, porosity and permeability relevant for dynamic flow simulations. Following the dynamic modelling activities discussed by Kempka et al. (2010), a revised geological model allowed us to history match CO2 arrival times in the observation wells and reservoir pressure with a good agreement (Martens et al., 2012). Consequently, the validated reservoir model of the Stuttgart Formation at the Ketzin pilot site enabled us to predict the development of reservoir pressure and the CO2 plume migration in the storage formation by dynamic flow simulations. A benchmark study of industrial (ECLIPSE 100 as well as ECLIPSE 300 CO2STORE and GASWAT) and scientific dynamic flow simulations codes (TOUGH2-MP/ECO2N, OpenGeoSys and DuMuX) was initiated to address and compare the simulator capabilities considering a highly complex reservoir model. Hence, our dynamic flow simulations take into account different properties of the geological model such as significant variation of porosity and permeability in the Stuttgart Formation as well as structural geological features implemented in the geological model such as seven major faults located at the top of the Ketzin anticline. Integration of the geological model into reservoir models suitable for the different dynamic flow simulators applied demonstrated that a direct conversion of reservoir model discretization between Finite Volume and Finite Element flow simulators is not feasible

  14. The Evolution of Tissue Stiffness at Radiofrequency Ablation Sites During Lesion Formation and in the Peri‐Ablation Period

    PubMed Central

    EYERLY, STEPHANIE A.; VEJDANI‐JAHROMI, MARYAM; DUMONT, DOUGLAS M.; TRAHEY, GREGG E.

    2015-01-01

    Peri‐Ablation Monitoring of RFA Lesion Stiffness Introduction Elastography imaging can provide radiofrequency ablation (RFA) lesion assessment due to tissue stiffening at the ablation site. An important aspect of assessment is the spatial and temporal stability of the region of stiffness increase in the peri‐ablation period. The aim of this study was to use 2 ultrasound‐based elastography techniques, shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging, to monitor the evolution of tissue stiffness at ablation sites in the 30 minutes following lesion creation. Methods and Results In 6 canine subjects, SWEI measurements and 2‐D ARFI images were acquired at 6 ventricular endocardial RFA sites before, during, and for 30 minutes postablation. An immediate increase in tissue stiffness was detected during RFA, and the area of the postablation region of stiffness increase (RoSI) as well as the relative stiffness at the RoSI center was stable approximately 2 minutes after ablation. Of note is the observation that relative stiffness in the region adjacent to the RoSI increased slightly during the first 15 minutes, consistent with local fluid displacement or edema. The magnitude of this increase, ∼0.5‐fold from baseline, was significantly less than the magnitude of the stiffness increase directly inside the RoSI, which was greater than 3‐fold from baseline. Conclusions Ultrasound‐based SWEI and ARFI imaging detected an immediate increase in tissue stiffness during RFA, and the stability and magnitude of the stiffness change suggest that consistent elasticity‐based lesion assessment is possible 2 minutes after and for at least 30 minutes following ablation. PMID:25970142

  15. Rad54B targeting to DNA double-strand break repair sites requires complex formation with S100A11.

    PubMed

    Murzik, Ulrike; Hemmerich, Peter; Weidtkamp-Peters, Stefanie; Ulbricht, Tobias; Bussen, Wendy; Hentschel, Julia; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Melle, Christian

    2008-07-01

    S100A11 is involved in a variety of intracellular activities such as growth regulation and differentiation. To gain more insight into the physiological role of endogenously expressed S100A11, we used a proteomic approach to detect and identify interacting proteins in vivo. Hereby, we were able to detect a specific interaction between S100A11 and Rad54B, which could be confirmed under in vivo conditions. Rad54B, a DNA-dependent ATPase, is described to be involved in recombinational repair of DNA damage, including DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Treatment with bleomycin, which induces DSBs, revealed an increase in the degree of colocalization between S100A11 and Rad54B. Furthermore, S100A11/Rad54B foci are spatially associated with sites of DNA DSB repair. Furthermore, while the expression of p21(WAF1/CIP1) was increased in parallel with DNA damage, its protein level was drastically down-regulated in damaged cells after S100A11 knockdown. Down-regulation of S100A11 by RNA interference also abolished Rad54B targeting to DSBs. Additionally, S100A11 down-regulated HaCaT cells showed a restricted proliferation capacity and an increase of the apoptotic cell fraction. These observations suggest that S100A11 targets Rad54B to sites of DNA DSB repair sites and identify a novel function for S100A11 in p21-based regulation of cell cycle. PMID:18463164

  16. Rad54B Targeting to DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Sites Requires Complex Formation with S100A11

    PubMed Central

    Murzik, Ulrike; Hemmerich, Peter; Weidtkamp-Peters, Stefanie; Ulbricht, Tobias; Bussen, Wendy; Hentschel, Julia; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2008-01-01

    S100A11 is involved in a variety of intracellular activities such as growth regulation and differentiation. To gain more insight into the physiological role of endogenously expressed S100A11, we used a proteomic approach to detect and identify interacting proteins in vivo. Hereby, we were able to detect a specific interaction between S100A11 and Rad54B, which could be confirmed under in vivo conditions. Rad54B, a DNA-dependent ATPase, is described to be involved in recombinational repair of DNA damage, including DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Treatment with bleomycin, which induces DSBs, revealed an increase in the degree of colocalization between S100A11 and Rad54B. Furthermore, S100A11/Rad54B foci are spatially associated with sites of DNA DSB repair. Furthermore, while the expression of p21WAF1/CIP1 was increased in parallel with DNA damage, its protein level was drastically down-regulated in damaged cells after S100A11 knockdown. Down-regulation of S100A11 by RNA interference also abolished Rad54B targeting to DSBs. Additionally, S100A11 down-regulated HaCaT cells showed a restricted proliferation capacity and an increase of the apoptotic cell fraction. These observations suggest that S100A11 targets Rad54B to sites of DNA DSB repair sites and identify a novel function for S100A11 in p21-based regulation of cell cycle. PMID:18463164

  17. A Threonine on the Active Site Loop Controls Transition State Formation in Escherichia Coli Respiratory Complex II

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasiak, T.M.; Maklashina, E.; Cecchini, G.; Iverson, T.M.

    2009-05-26

    In Escherichia coli, the complex II superfamily members succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (SQR) and quinol:fumarate reductase (QFR) participate in aerobic and anaerobic respiration, respectively. Complex II enzymes catalyze succinate and fumarate interconversion at the interface of two domains of the soluble flavoprotein subunit, the FAD binding domain and the capping domain. An 11-amino acid loop in the capping domain (Thr-A234 to Thr-A244 in quinol:fumarate reductase) begins at the interdomain hinge and covers the active site. Amino acids of this loop interact with both the substrate and a proton shuttle, potentially coordinating substrate binding and the proton shuttle protonation state. To assess the loop's role in catalysis, two threonine residues were mutated to alanine: QFR Thr-A244 (act-T; Thr-A254 in SQR), which hydrogen-bonds to the substrate at the active site, and QFR Thr-A234 (hinge-T; Thr-A244 in SQR), which is located at the hinge and hydrogen-bonds the proton shuttle. Both mutations impair catalysis and decrease substrate binding. The crystal structure of the hinge-T mutation reveals a reorientation between the FAD-binding and capping domains that accompanies proton shuttle alteration. Taken together, hydrogen bonding from act-T to substrate may coordinate with interdomain motions to twist the double bond of fumarate and introduce the strain important for attaining the transition state.

  18. New particle formation and ultrafine charged aerosol climatology at a high altitude site in the Alps (Jungfraujoch, 3580 m a.s.l., Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulon, J.; Sellegri, K.; Venzac, H.; Picard, D.; Weingartner, E.; Wehrle, G.; Baltensperger, U.; Laj, P.

    2010-04-01

    Aerosol nucleation is an important source of atmospheric particles which have an effect both on the climatic system and on human health. The new particle formation (NPF) process is an ubiquitous phenomenon, yet poorly understood despite the many studies performed on this topic using various approaches (observation, experimentation in smog chambers and modeling). In this work, we investigate the formation of secondary charged aerosols and its climatology at Jungfraujoch, a high altitude site in Swiss Alps (3580 m a.s.l.). Charged particles and clusters (0.5-1.8 nm) were measured within the EUCAARI program from April 2008 to April 2009 and allowed the detection of nucleation events. We found that the aerosol concentration, which is dominated by cluster size class, shows a strong diurnal pattern and that the aerosol size distribution and concentration are strongly influenced by the presence of clouds either during daytime or nighttime conditions. New particle formation events have been investigated and it appears that new particle formation occurs 17.5% of measured days and that the nucleation frequency is strongly linked to air mass origin and path and negatively influenced by cloud presence. In fact, we show that NPF events depend on the occurrence of high concentration VOCs air masses which allowed clusters growing by condensation of organic vapors rather than nucleation of new clusters. Furthermore, the contribution of ions to nucleation process was studied and we found that ion-mediated nucleation (IMN) contribute to 26% of the total nucleation so that ions play an important role in the new particle formation and growth at Jungfraujoch.

  19. The Lindi Formation (upper Albian-Coniacian) and Tanzania Drilling Project Sites 36-40 (Lower Cretaceous to Paleogene): Lithostratigraphy, biostratigraphy and chemostratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Berrocoso, Álvaro; Huber, Brian T.; MacLeod, Kenneth G.; Petrizzo, Maria Rose; Lees, Jacqueline A.; Wendler, Ines; Coxall, Helen; Mweneinda, Amina K.; Falzoni, Francesca; Birch, Heather; Haynes, Shannon J.; Bown, Paul R.; Robinson, Stuart A.; Singano, Joyce M.

    2015-01-01

    The 2009 Tanzania Drilling Project (TDP) expedition to southeastern Tanzania cored a total of 572.3 m of sediments at six new mid-Cretaceous to mid-Paleocene boreholes (TDP Sites 36, 37, 38, 39, 40A, 40B). Added to the sites drilled in 2007 and 2008, the new boreholes confirm the common excellent preservation of planktonic and benthic foraminifera and calcareous nannofossils from core samples that will be used for biostratigraphy, evolutionary studies, paleoceanography and climatic reconstructions from the Tanzanian margin, with implications elsewhere. The new sites verify the presence of a relatively expanded Upper Cretaceous succession in the region that has allowed a new stratigraphic unit, named here as the Lindi Formation (Fm), to be formally defined. The Lindi Fm (upper Albian to Coniacian), extending ∼120 km between Kilwa and Lindi, comprises a 335-m-thick, outer-shelf to upper-slope unit, consisting of dark gray claystone and siltstone interbeds, common finely-laminated intervals, minor cm-thick sandstones and up to 2.6% organic carbon in the Turonian. A subsurface, composite stratotype section is proposed for the Lindi Fm, with a gradational top boundary with the overlying Nangurukuru Fm (Santonian to Maastrichtian) and a sharp bottom contact with underlying upper Albian sandstones. The section cored at TDP Sites 36 and 38 belongs to the Lindi Fm and are of lower to middle Turonian age (planktonic foraminifera Whiteinella archaeocretacea to Helvetoglobotruncana helvetica Zones and nannofossils subzones UC6b ± UC7). The lower portion of TDP Site 39 (uppermost part of the Lindi Fm) is assigned to the lower to upper Coniacian (planktonic foraminifera Dicarinella concavata Zone and nannofossils zone UC 10), while the remaining part of this site is attributed to the Coniacian-Santonian transition and younger Santonian (planktonic foraminifera D. asymetrica Zone and upper part of nannofossils zone UC10). TDP Site 37 recovered relatively expanded (150 m thick

  20. Site specific isolated nanostructure array formation on a large area by broad ion beam without any mask and resist

    SciTech Connect

    Karmakar, Prasanta

    2014-06-09

    We report the formation of isolated nanostructure arrays on a large area via broad ion beam implantation without the aid of any mask or resist. Desired ions have been implanted at specific locations of the prefabricated silicon ripple or triangular structures by exploiting the variation of local ion impact angles. We have shown that the implantation of Fe ions on an O{sup +} ions induced pre fabricated triangular shaped patterned Si surface results in a self-organized periodic array of striped magnetic nanostructures having several micron length and about 50 nm width arranged with a spacial separation of ∼200 nm. The morphology, composition, crystalline structure, and magnetic property of these nanopatterns have been analyzed using high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. A geometrical model has been proposed to explain the fundamental features of such ion-induced nanopattern structures.

  1. Photoreduction and light-induced triplet-state formation in a single-site fluoroalkylated zinc phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Moons, Hans; Loas, Andrei; Gorun, Sergiu M; Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2014-10-28

    Electron-withdrawing perfluoroalkyl peripheral substituents enhance the photosensitizing properties of metal phthalocyanines while increasing their solubility, thus providing opportunities for advanced characterization of their catalytically-relevant excited states. Optical absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy experiments reveal that red light induces the reduction of perfluoroisopropyl-substituted zinc(ii) phthalocyanine (F64PcZn) dissolved in ethanol. A similar photoreduction does not occur in toluene. Furthermore, intense UV irradiation causes the photodegradation of F64PcZn in ethanol, but low power UV illumination favours the formation of the triplet excited state, a prerequisite for new photocatalytic applications. The UV-induced triplet state of F64PcZn is characterized using a combination of transient EPR experiments and DFT computations. PMID:24842295

  2. Surface and subsurface features of the upper Pleistocene Beaumont Formation as studied in a proposed super collider site in Liberty and Hardin counties, southeastern Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Aronow, S.

    1994-12-31

    In 1987 an area in Hardin and Libery Counties in southeastern Texas was a much-studied candidate site for the ill-fated Superconducting Super Collider. The site is on the outcrop of the upper Pleistocene Beaumont Formation, which locally was deposited by a sequence of meandering, avulsing, suspended-load, paleo-Trinity River courses, now preserved as a well-defined to poorly defined depositional topography. Test holes in meanderbelt ridges showed that channel and point-bar silty fine to very fine sands are almost everywhere covered by approximately 10 to 40 ft ({approximately}3 to 12 m) of CH and CL overbank clays. Where completely penetrated, sand bodies are approximately 20 to 50 ft ({approximately}6 to 15 m) thick. Pedogenic calcareous deposits and slickensides at depths well below any influence from present-day surface processes are probably parts of lower horizons of truncated now-buried soils generated during the accumulation of the Beaumont, or on the surface of the underlying Lissie Formation. The relationship of one of the paleo-meanderbelts to the uplifted topographic surface of the Hull salt dome suggests that the rise of the surface postdated deposition of the Beaumont.

  3. Site-directed Mutagenesis Reveals Regions Implicated in the Stability and Fiber Formation of Human λ3r Light Chains*

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Miryam I.; Canul-Tec, Juan C.; Luna-Martínez, Oscar D.; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Rojas, Sonia; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Fernández-Velasco, Daniel A.; Becerril, Baltazar

    2015-01-01

    Light chain amyloidosis (AL) is a disease that affects vital organs by the fibrillar aggregation of monoclonal light chains. λ3r germ line is significantly implicated in this disease. In this work, we contrasted the thermodynamic stability and aggregation propensity of 3mJL2 (nonamyloidogenic) and 3rJL2 (amyloidogenic) λ3 germ lines. Because of an inherent limitation (extremely low expression), Cys at position 34 of the 3r germ line was replaced by Tyr reaching a good expression yield. A second substitution (W91A) was introduced in 3r to obtain a better template to incorporate additional mutations. Although the single mutant (C34Y) was not fibrillogenic, the second mutation located at CDR3 (W91A) induced fibrillogenesis. We propose, for the first time, that CDR3 (position 91) affects the stability and fiber formation of human λ3r light chains. Using the double mutant (3rJL2/YA) as template, other variants were constructed to evaluate the importance of those substitutions into the stability and aggregation propensity of λ3 light chains. A change in position 7 (P7D) boosted 3rJL2/YA fibrillogenic properties. Modification of position 48 (I48M) partially reverted 3rJL2/YA fibril aggregation. Finally, changes at positions 8 (P8S) or 40 (P40S) completely reverted fibril formation. These results confirm the influential roles of N-terminal region (positions 7 and 8) and the loop 40–60 (positions 40 and 48) on AL. X-ray crystallography revealed that the three-dimensional topology of the single and double λ3r mutants was not significantly altered. This mutagenic approach helped to identify key regions implicated in λ3 AL. PMID:25505244

  4. Site Formation Processes and Hunter-Gatherers Use of Space in a Tropical Environment: A Geo-Ethnoarchaeological Approach from South India

    PubMed Central

    Friesem, David E.; Lavi, Noa; Madella, Marco; Ajithprasad, P.; French, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Hunter-gatherer societies have distinct social perceptions and practices which are expressed in unique use of space and material deposition patterns. However, the identification of archaeological evidence associated with hunter-gatherer activity is often challenging, especially in tropical environments such as rainforests. We present an integrated study combining ethnoarchaeology and geoarchaeology in order to study archaeological site formation processes related to hunter-gatherers’ ways of living in tropical forests. Ethnographic data was collected from an habitation site of contemporary hunter-gatherers in the forests of South India, aimed at studying how everyday activities and way of living dictate patterns of material deposition. Ethnoarchaeological excavations of abandoned open-air sites and a rock-shelter of the same group located deep in the forests, involved field observations and sampling of sediments from the abandoned sites and the contemporary site. Laboratory analyses included geochemical analysis (i.e., FTIR, ICP-AES), phytolith concentration analysis and soil micromorphology. The results present a dynamic spatial deposition pattern of macroscopic, microscopic and chemical materials, which stem from the distinctive ways of living and use of space by hunter-gatherers. This study shows that post-depositional processes in tropical forests result in poor preservation of archaeological materials due to acidic conditions and intensive biological activity within the sediments. Yet, the multiple laboratory-based analyses were able to trace evidence for activity surfaces and their maintenance practices as well as localized concentrations of activity remains such as the use of plants, metals, hearths and construction materials. PMID:27783683

  5. Analysis of Dose at the Site of Second Tumor Formation After Radiotherapy to the Central Nervous System

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, Thomas J.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Amdur, Robert J.; Morris, Christopher G.; Swanson, Erika L.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Second tumors are an uncommon complication of multimodality treatment of childhood cancer. The present analysis attempted to correlate the dose received as a component of primary treatment and the site of the eventual development of a second tumor. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 16 patients who had received radiotherapy to sites in the craniospinal axis and subsequently developed a second tumor. We compared the historical fields and port films of the primary treatment with the modern imaging of the second tumor locations. We classified the location of the second tumors as follows: in the boost field; marginal to the boost field, but in a whole-brain field; in a whole-brain field; marginal to the whole brain/primary treatment field; and distant to the field. We divided the dose received into 3 broad categories: high dose (>45 Gy), moderate dose (20-36 Gy), and low dose (<20 Gy). Results: The most common location of the second tumor was in the whole brain field (57%) and in the moderate-dose range (81%). Conclusions: Our data contradict previous publications that suggested that most second tumors develop in tissues that receive a low radiation dose. Almost all the second tumors in our series occurred in tissue within a target volume in the cranium that had received a moderate dose (20-36 Gy). These findings suggest that a major decrease in the brain volume that receives a moderate radiation dose is the only way to substantially decrease the second tumor rate after central nervous system radiotherapy.

  6. Tianeptine: 5-HT uptake sites and 5-HT(1-7) receptors modulate memory formation in an autoshaping Pavlovian/instrumental task.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2002-05-01

    Recent studies using invertebrate and mammal species have revealed that, endogenous serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) modulates cognitive processes, particularly learning and memory, though, at present, it is unclear the manner, where, and how long 5-HT systems are involved. Hence in this work, an attempt was made to study the effects of 5-HT endogenous on memory formation, using a 5-HT uptake facilitator (tianeptine) and, selective 5-HT(1-7) receptor antagonists to determine whether 5-HT uptake sites and which 5-HT receptors are involved, respectively. Results showed that post-training tianeptine injection enhanced memory consolidation in an autoshaping Pavlovian/instrumental learning task, which has been useful to detect changes on memory formation elicited by drugs or aging. On interaction experiments, ketanserin (5-HT(1D/2A/2C) antagonist) slightly enhanced tianeptine effects, while WAY 100635 (5-HT(1A) antagonist), SB-224289 (5-HT(1B) inverse agonist), SB-200646 (5-HT(2B/2C) antagonist), ondansetron (5-HT(3) antagonist), GR 127487 (5-HT(4) antagonist), Ro 04-6790 (5-HT(6) antagonist), DR 4004 (5-HT(7) antagonist), or fluoxetine (an inhibitor of 5-HT reuptake) blocked the facilitatory tianeptine effect. Notably, together tianeptine and Ro 04-6790 impaired learning consolidation. Moreover, 5-HT depletion completely reversed the tianeptine effect. Tianeptine also normalized an impaired memory elicited by scopolamine (an antimuscarinic) or dizocilpine (non-competitive glutamatergic antagonist), while partially reversed that induced by TFMPP (5-HT(1B/1D/2A-2C/7) agonist/antagonist). Finally, tianeptine-fluoxetine coadministration had no effect on learning consolidation; nevertheless, administration of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, phenserine, potentiated subeffective tianeptine or fluoxetine doses. Collectively, these data confirmed that endogenously 5-HT modulates, via uptake sites and 5-HT(1-7) receptors, memory consolidation, and are consistent with the

  7. Sources of ambient volatile organic compounds and their contributions to photochemical ozone formation at a site in the Pearl River Delta, southern China.

    PubMed

    Ling, Z H; Guo, H; Cheng, H R; Yu, Y F

    2011-10-01

    The Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model and the Observation Based Model (OBM) were combined to analyze volatile organic compound (VOC) data collected at a suburban site (WQS) in the PRD region. The purposes are to estimate the VOC source apportionment and investigate the contributions of these sources and species of these sources to the O(3) formation in PRD. Ten VOC sources were identified. We further applied the PMF-extracted concentrations of these 10 sources into the OBM and found "solvent usage 1", "diesel vehicular emissions" and "biomass/biofuel burning" contributed most to the O(3) formation at WQS. Among these three sources, higher Relative Incremental Reactivity (RIR)-weighted values of ethene, toluene and m/p-xylene indicated that they were mainly responsible for local O(3) formation in the region. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the sources of "diesel vehicular emissions", "biomass/biofuel burning" and "solvent usage 1" had low uncertainties whereas "gasoline evaporation" showed the highest uncertainty. PMID:21616570

  8. Atg9 Vesicles Recruit Vesicle-tethering Proteins Trs85 and Ypt1 to the Autophagosome Formation Site*

    PubMed Central

    Kakuta, Soichiro; Yamamoto, Hayashi; Negishi, Lumi; Kondo-Kakuta, Chika; Hayashi, Nobuhiro; Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    Atg9 is a transmembrane protein that is essential for autophagy. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it has recently been revealed that Atg9 exists on cytoplasmic small vesicles termed Atg9 vesicles. To identify the components of Atg9 vesicles, we purified the Atg9 vesicles and subjected them to mass spectrometry. We found that their protein composition was distinct from other organellar membranes and that Atg9 and Atg27 in particular are major components of Atg9 vesicles. In addition to these two components, Trs85, a specific subunit of the transport protein particle III (TRAPPIII) complex, and the Rab GTPase Ypt1 were also identified. Trs85 directly interacts with Atg9, and the Trs85-containing TRAPPIII complex facilitates the association of Ypt1 onto Atg9 vesicles. We also showed that Trs85 and Ypt1 are localized to the preautophagosomal structure in an Atg9-dependent manner. Our data suggest that Atg9 vesicles recruit the TRAPPIII complex and Ypt1 to the preautophagosomal structure. The vesicle-tethering machinery consequently acts in the process of autophagosome formation. PMID:23129774

  9. Site-1 protease-activated formation of lysosomal targeting motifs is independent of the lipogenic transcription control[S

    PubMed Central

    Klünder, Sarah; Heeren, Jörg; Markmann, Sandra; Santer, René; Braulke, Thomas; Pohl, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Site-1 protease (S1P) cleaves membrane-bound lipogenic sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) and the α/β-subunit precursor protein of the N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase forming mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) targeting markers on lysosomal enzymes. The translocation of SREBPs from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi-resident S1P depends on the intracellular sterol content, but it is unknown whether the ER exit of the α/β-subunit precursor is regulated. Here, we investigated the effect of cholesterol depletion (atorvastatin treatment) and elevation (LDL overload) on ER-Golgi transport, S1P-mediated cleavage of the α/β-subunit precursor, and the subsequent targeting of lysosomal enzymes along the biosynthetic and endocytic pathway to lysosomes. The data showed that the proteolytic cleavage of the α/β-subunit precursor into mature and enzymatically active subunits does not depend on the cholesterol content. In either treatment, lysosomal enzymes are normally decorated with M6P residues, allowing the proper sorting to lysosomes. In addition, we found that, in fibroblasts of mucolipidosis type II mice and Niemann-Pick type C patients characterized by aberrant cholesterol accumulation, the proteolytic cleavage of the α/β-subunit precursor was not impaired. We conclude that S1P substrate-dependent regulatory mechanisms for lipid synthesis and biogenesis of lysosomes are different. PMID:26108224

  10. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) Rep proteins mediate complex formation between AAV DNA and its integration site in human DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Weitzman, M D; Kyöstiö, S R; Kotin, R M; Owens, R A

    1994-01-01

    AAV is unique among eukaryotic viruses in the ability of its DNA to integrate preferentially into a specific region of the human genome. Understanding AAV integration may aid in developing gene therapy systems with predictable integration sites. Using a gel mobility-shift assay, we have identified a DNA sequence within the AAV integration locus on human chromosome 19 which is specifically bound by the AAV Rep78 and Rep68 proteins. This Rep recognition sequence is a GCTC repeating motif very similar to sequences within the inverted terminal repeats of the AAV genome which are also bound by Rep78 and Rep68. Cloned oligonucleotides containing the recognition sequence can direct specific binding by Rep proteins. Binding assays with mutant Rep proteins show that the amino-terminal portion of Rep78 and Rep68 can direct binding to either the AAV terminal repeat hairpin DNA or chromosome 19. This human genomic DNA can be complexed with AAV DNA by Rep proteins as demonstrated by a dual-label (32P/biotin) assay. These results suggest a role for Rep in targeting viral integration. Images PMID:8016070

  11. Enhanced formation of fine particulate nitrate at a rural site on the North China Plain in summer: The important roles of ammonia and ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Liang; Chen, Jianmin; Yang, Lingxiao; Wang, Xinfeng; Xu, Caihong; Sui, Xiao; Yao, Lan; Zhu, Yanhong; Zhang, Junmei; Zhu, Tong; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-01-01

    Severe PM2.5 pollution was observed frequently on the North China Plain, and nitrate contributed a large fraction of the elevated PM2.5 concentrations. To obtain a comprehensive understanding of the formation pathways of these fine particulate nitrate and the key factors that affect these pathways, field measurements of fine particulate nitrate and related air pollutants were made at a rural site on the North China Plain in the summer of 2013. Extremely high concentrations of fine particulate nitrate were frequently observed at night and in the early morning. The maximum hourly concentration of fine particulate nitrate reached 87.2 μg m-3. This concentration accounted for 29.9% of the PM2.5. The very high NH3 concentration in the early morning significantly accelerated the formation of fine particulate nitrate, as indicated by the concurrent appearance of NH3 and NO3- concentration peaks and a rising neutralization ratio (the equivalent ratio of NH4+ to the sum of SO42- and NO3-). On a number of other episode days, strong photochemical activity during daytime led to high concentrations of O3 at night. The fast secondary formation of fine particulate nitrate was mainly attributed to the hydrolysis of N2O5, which was produced from O3 and NO2. Considering the important roles of NH3 and O3 in fine particulate nitrate formation, we suggest the control of NH3 emissions and photochemical pollution to address the high levels of fine particulate nitrate and the severe PM2.5 pollution on the North China Plain.

  12. Formation of nanostructured porous Cu-Au surfaces: the influence of cationic sites on (electro)-catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najdovski, Ilija; Selvakannan, Pr.; Bhargava, Suresh K.; O'Mullane, Anthony P.

    2012-09-01

    The fabrication of nanostructured bimetallic materials through electrochemical routes offers the ability to control the composition and shape of the final material that can then be effectively applied as (electro)-catalysts. In this work a clean and transitory hydrogen bubble templating method is employed to generate porous Cu-Au materials with a highly anisotropic nanostructured interior. Significantly, the co-electrodeposition of copper and gold promotes the formation of a mixed bimetallic oxide surface which does not occur at the individually electrodeposited materials. Interestingly, the surface is dominated by Au(i) oxide species incorporated within a Cu2O matrix which is extremely effective for the industrially important (electro)-catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol. It is proposed that an aurophilic type of interaction takes place between both oxidized gold and copper species which stabilizes the surface against further oxidation and facilitates the binding of 4-nitrophenol to the surface and increases the rate of reaction. An added benefit is that very low gold loadings are required typically less than 2 wt% for a significant enhancement in performance to be observed. Therefore the ability to create a partially oxidized Cu-Au surface through a facile electrochemical route that uses a clean template consisting of only hydrogen bubbles should be of benefit for many more important reactions.The fabrication of nanostructured bimetallic materials through electrochemical routes offers the ability to control the composition and shape of the final material that can then be effectively applied as (electro)-catalysts. In this work a clean and transitory hydrogen bubble templating method is employed to generate porous Cu-Au materials with a highly anisotropic nanostructured interior. Significantly, the co-electrodeposition of copper and gold promotes the formation of a mixed bimetallic oxide surface which does not occur at the individually electrodeposited materials

  13. Intense secondary aerosol formation due to strong atmospheric photochemical reactions in summer: observations at a rural site in eastern Yangtze River Delta of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongfang; Zhou, Bin; Fu, Qingyan; Zhao, Qianbiao; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Jianmin; Yang, Xin; Duan, Yusen; Li, Juan

    2016-11-15

    High pollution episodes of PM2.5 and O3 were frequently observed at a rural site (N31.0935º, E120.978°) in eastern Yangtze River Delta (YRD) in summer. To study the impacts of photochemical reactions on secondary aerosol formation in this region, we performed real-time measurements of the mass concentration and composition of PM2.5, particle size distribution (13.6~736.5 nm), concentrations of gas pollutants including O3, SO2, NO2, CO, non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC)), and nitrate radical in 2013. During the sampling period, the average concentration of PM2.5 was 76.1 (± 16.5) μg/m(3), in which secondary aerosol species including sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounted for ~ 62%. Gas-phase oxidation of SO2 was mainly responsible for a fast increase of sulfate (at 1.70 μg/m(3)/h) in the morning. Photochemical production of nitric acid was intense during daytime, but particulate nitrate concentration was low in the afternoon due to high temperature. At night, nitrate was mainly formed through the hydrolysis of NO3 and/or N2O5. The correlations among NMHC, Ox (= O3 + NO2), and SOA suggested that a combination of high emission of hydrocarbons and active photochemical reactions led to the rapid formation of SOA. In addition, several new particle formation and fast growth events were observed despite high ambient aerosol loading. Since the onset of new particle events was accompanied by a rapid increase of H2SO4 and SOA, enhanced formation of sulfate and SOA driven by photochemical oxidation likely promoted the formation and growth of new particles. Together, our results demonstrated that strong atmospheric photochemical reactions enhanced secondary aerosols formation and led to the synchronous occurrence of high concentrations of PM2.5 and O3 in a regional scale. These findings are important for better understanding the air pollution in summer in YRD. PMID:27418517

  14. Crystal Structure of the Nonerythroid [alpha]-Spectrin Tetramerization Site Reveals Differences between Erythroid and Nonerythroid Spectrin Tetramer Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Mehboob, Shahila; Song, Yuanli; Witek, Marta; Long, Fei; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Johnson, Michael E.; Fung, Leslie W.-M.

    2010-06-21

    We have solved the crystal structure of a segment of nonerythroid {alpha}-spectrin ({alpha}II) consisting of the first 147 residues to a resolution of 2.3 {angstrom}. We find that the structure of this segment is generally similar to a corresponding segment from erythroid {alpha}-spectrin ({alpha}I) but exhibits unique differences with functional significance. Specific features include the following: (i) an irregular and frayed first helix (Helix C{prime}); (ii) a helical conformation in the junction region connecting Helix C{prime} with the first structural domain (D1); (iii) a long A1B1 loop in D1; and (iv) specific inter-helix hydrogen bonds/salt bridges that stabilize D1. Our findings suggest that the hydrogen bond networks contribute to structural domain stability, and thus rigidity, in {alpha}II, and the lack of such hydrogen bond networks in {alpha}I leads to flexibility in {alpha}I. We have previously shown the junction region connecting Helix C{prime} to D1 to be unstructured in {alpha}I (Park, S., Caffrey, M. S., Johnson, M. E., and Fung, L. W. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 21837-21844) and now find it to be helical in {alpha}II, an important difference for {alpha}-spectrin association with {beta}-spectrin in forming tetramers. Homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation studies of the structure of the tetramerization site, a triple helical bundle of partial domain helices, show that mutations in {alpha}-spectrin will affect Helix C{prime} structural flexibility and/or the junction region conformation and may alter the equilibrium between spectrin dimers and tetramers in cells. Mutations leading to reduced levels of functional tetramers in cells may potentially lead to abnormal neuronal functions.

  15. Localization of the nic site of IncN conjugative plasmid pCU1 through formation of a hybrid oriT.

    PubMed

    Paterson, E S; Iyer, V N

    1997-09-01

    The N-type oriT of plasmid pMUR274 was cloned on a 474-bp RsaI-SspI fragment, and the nucleotide sequence was determined. A comparison of the pMUR274 oriT sequence and the sequence of the oriTs of IncN plasmid pCU1 and IncW plasmid R388 demonstrated 57 and 28% identity, respectively. Intramolecular, site-specific recombination between the pCU1 oriT and the oriT of pMUR274 resulted in the formation of a hybrid oriT containing one half of each parental sequence. The junction point of the hybrid occurred within a 10-bp sequence, GCTATACACC, present in both parental sequences and represents the nic site of each oriT. Mutation of the first A or second T residue within the 10-bp junction sequence reduced transfer less than 20-fold, while mutation of either the second or third A residue reduced transfer over 1,000-fold. Site-specific recombination between a wild-type pCU1 oriT and these four mutant pCU1 oriTs demonstrated that nic lies between the second T and second A residues of the 10-bp junction sequence. Site-specific recombination between wild-type and mutant pCU1 oriTs also demonstrated that point mutations to the right of nic reduced both initiation and termination of transfer while point mutations to the left of nic reduced termination but had little or no effect on initiation. A 28-bp deletion within the AT-rich region 39 bases to the right of nic reduced both initiation and termination, while deletion of a 6-bp inverted repeat sequence at the right-most boundary of the minimal oriT region reduced initiation but not termination.

  16. Site- and Enantioselective Formation of Allene-Bearing Tertiary or Quaternary Carbon Stereogenic Centers through NHC–Cu-Catalyzed Allylic Substitution

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Byunghyuck; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic enantioselective allylic substitutions that result in exclusive addition of an allenyl group (<2% propargyl addition) and formation of tertiary or quaternary C–C bonds are described. Commercially available allenylboronic acid pinacol ester is used (preparation of a more reactive but less stable boronate derivative not required). Reactions are promoted by 5.0–10 mol % of sulfonate-bearing chiral bidentate N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes of copper, which exhibit the unique ability to furnish chiral products arising from SN2′ mode of addition. The desired allenyl-containing products are generated in up to 95% yield, >98% SN2′ selectivity and 99:1 enantiomeric ratio (er). Site-selective NHC–Cu-catalyzed hydroboration of enantiomerically enriched allenes and conversion to the corresponding β-vinyl ketones demonstrates utility. PMID:22214185

  17. Inactivation of the Lactobacillus leichmannii ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase by 2'-chloro-2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate: stoichiometry of inactivation, site of inactivation, and mechanism of the protein chromophore formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, G.W.; Harris, G.; Stubbe, J.A.

    1988-06-14

    The ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase (RTPR) of Lactobacillus leichmannii is inactivated by the substrate analogue 2'-chloro-2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate (ClUTP). Inactivation is due to alkylation by 2-methylene-3(2H)-furanone, a decomposition product of the enzymic product 3'-keto-2'-deoxyuridine triphosphate. The former has been unambiguously identified as 2-((ethylthio)methyl)-3(2H)-furanone, an ethanethiol trapped adduct, which is identical by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy with material synthesized chemically. Subsequent to rapid inactivation, a slow process occurs that results in formation of a new protein-associated chromophore absorbing maximally near 320 nm. The terminal stages of the inactivation have now been investigated in detail. The alkylation and inactivation stoichiometries were studied as a function of the ratio of ClUTP to enzyme. The amount of labeling of RTPR increased with increasing ClUTP concentration up to the maximum of approximately 4 labels/RTPR, yet the degree of inactivation did not increase proportionally. This suggests that (1) RTPR may be inactivated by alkylation of a single site and (2) decomposition of 3'-keto-dUTP is not necessarily enzyme catalyzed. The formation of the new protein chromophore was also monitored during inactivation and found to reach its full extent upon the first alkylation . Thus, out of four alkylation sites, only one appears capable of undergoing the subsequent reaction to form the new chromophore. Model studies suggest that the new chromophore is due to addition of an amino group to the 5-position of enzyme-bound furanone, followed by ring opening and tautomerization to give a ..beta..-aminoenone structure.

  18. Formation of lipid bilayer membrane in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) microchip integrated with a stacked polycarbonate membrane support and an on-site nanoinjector

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Wei; Ban, Changill; Hahn, Jong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new and facile approach for the formation of pore-spanning bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) within a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic device. Commercially, readily available polycarbonate (PC) membranes are employed for the support of BLMs. PC sheets with 5 μm, 2 μm, and 0.4 μm pore diameters, respectively, are thermally bonded into a multilayer-stack, reducing the pore density of 0.4 μm-pore PC by a factor of 200. The BLMs on this support are considerably stable (a mean lifetime: 17 h). This multilayer-stack PC (MSPC) membrane is integrated into the PDMS chip by an epoxy bonding method developed to secure durable bonding under the use of organic solvents. The microchip has a special channel for guiding a micropipette in the proximity of the MSPC support. With this on-site injection technique, tens to hundreds of nanoliters of solutions can be directly dispensed to the support. Incorporating gramicidin ion channels into BLMs on the MSPC support has confirmed the formation of single BLMs, which is based on the observation from current signals of 20 pS conductance that is typical to single channel opening. Based on the bilayer capacitance (1.4 pF), about 15% of through pores across the MSPC membrane are estimated to be covered with BLMs. PMID:26015832

  19. Effect of Siloxane Ring Strain and Cation Charge Density on the Formation of Coordinately Unsaturated Metal Sites on Silica: Insights from DFT Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Ujjal; Zhang, Guanghui; Hu, Bo; Hock, Adam S.; Redfern, Paul C.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silica (SiO2) is commonly used as a support in heterogeneous catalysis. However, due to the structural disorder and temperature induced change of surface morphology, the structures of silica supported metal catalysts are difficult to determine. Most studies are primarily focused on understanding the interactions of different types of surface hydroxyl groups with metal ions. In comparison, the effect of siloxane ring size on the structure of silica supported metal catalysts and how it affects catalytic activity is poorly understood. Here, we have used density functional theory calculations to understand the effect of siloxane ring strain on structure and activity of different monomeric Lewis acid metal sites on silica. In particular, we have found that large siloxane rings favor strong dative bonding interaction between metal ion and surface hydroxyls, leading to the formation of high-coordinate metal sites. In comparison, metal-silanol interaction is weak in small siloxane rings, resulting in low-coordinate metal sites. The physical origin of this size dependence is associated with siloxane ring strain, and, a correlation between metal-silanol interaction energy and ring strain energy has been observed. In addition to ring strain, the strength of the metal-silanol interaction also depends on the positive charge density of the cations. In fact, a correlation also exists between metal-silanol interaction energy and charge density of several first-row transition and post-transition metals. The theoretical results are compared with the EXAFS data of monomeric Zn(II) and Ga(III) ions grafted on silica. The molecular level insights of how metal ion coordination on silica depends on siloxane ring strain and cation charge density will be useful in the synthesis of new catalysts.

  20. Repeated occurrences of methanogenic zones, diagenetic dolomite formation and linked silicate alteration in southern Bering Sea sediments (Bowers Ridge, IODP Exp. 323 Site U1341)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrmann, L. M.; Ockert, C.; Mix, A. C.; Gussone, N.; Teichert, B. M. A.; Meister, P.

    2016-03-01

    porewater calcium was also influenced by ammonium-calcium exchange on clay minerals and carbonate recrystallization. Our study elucidates the response of porewater element concentrations and isotopic profiles interlinked with the formation of diagenetic carbonates to changes in the deposition of organic carbon in sediments of deeper water sites (>2000 m water depth) over prolonged timescales. It shows that variations in biogeochemical processes in response to changes in oceanographic conditions and a dynamic subseafloor biogeochemical zonation have to also be taken into account at these deep water sites for a global assessment of organic carbon burial fluxes and remineralization.

  1. The mechanism of formation of the seafloor massive sulfide ore body beneath the seafloor at HAKUREI Site in Izena Caldera, Middle Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizumi, R.; Urabe, T.

    2012-12-01

    dominant at lower of the ore, relatively. The existence of "Black ore (sphalerite-galena ore)" at upper part and "Yellow ore (chalcopyrite-pyrite ore)" at lower part of the Lower ore indicate that the SMS ore beneath the seafloor has already the characteristic mineral assemblage of Kuroko ore deposit at the time of formation. Fe content in Sphalerite is over 6wt% in the Upper ore and under 1wt% in the Lower ore, respectively, which shows that the Lower ore is formed under high Sulfur and Oxygen fugacity than Upper ore if the temperature of formation is not very different each other. Barite occurs not only in the Upper ore, but also in the Lower ore and the crystal size becomes coarser downwards. These lines of evidence imply that the existence of the Lower ore indicates that the mineralization has been repeated in the HAKUREI site. This study is a part of "TAIGA" project funded by Grant-in-Aid program by Monbusho.t; t;

  2. Role of phospholipase A2 in cholesterol gallstone formation is associated with biliary phospholipid species selection at the site of hepatic excretion: indirect evidence.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Y; Tazuma, S; Yamashita, G; Ochi, H; Sunami, Y; Nishioka, T; Hyogo, H; Yasumiba, S; Kajihara, T; Nakai, K; Tsuboi, K; Asamoto, Y; Sakomoto, M; Kajiyama, G

    2000-07-01

    Phospholipase A2 plays a role in cholesterol gallstone development by hydrolyzing bile phospholipids into lysolecithin and free fatty acids. Lysolecithin and polyunsaturated free fatty acids are known to stimulate the synthesis and/or secretion of gallbladder mucin via a prostanoid pathway, leading to enhancing cholesterol crystal nucleation and growth, and therefore, the action of phospholipase A2 is associated, in part, with bile phospholipid fatty acid. To clarify this hypothesis, we evaluated the effect on bile lipid metastability in vitro of replacing phospholipids with lysolecithin and various free fatty acids. Supersaturated model biles were created with an identical composition (cholesterol saturation index, 1.8; egg yolk lecithin, 34 mM; taurocholate, 120 mM; cholesterol, 25 mM) except for 5%, 10%, or 20% replacement of egg yolk lecithin with a combination of palmitoyl-lysolecithin and a free fatty acid (palmitate, stearate, oleate, linoleate, or arachidonate), followed by time-sequentially monitoring of vesicles and cholesterol crystals using spectrophotometer and video-enhanced differential contrast microscopy. Replacement with hydrophilic fatty acids (linoleate and arachidonate) reduced vesicle formation and promoted cholesterol crystallization, whereas an enhanced cholesterol-holding capacity was evident after replacement with hydrophobic fatty acids (palmitate and stearate). These results indicate that the effect of phospholipase A2 on bile lithogenecity is modulated by the fatty acid species in bile phospholipids, and therefore, that the role of phospholipase A2 in cholesterol gallstone formation is dependent, in part, on biliary phospholipid species selection at the site of hepatic excretion.

  3. Site-specific bonding of copper adatoms to pyridine end groups mediating the formation of two-dimensional coordination networks on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umbach, T. R.; Bernien, M.; Hermanns, C. F.; Sun, L. L.; Mohrmann, H.; Hermann, K. E.; Krüger, A.; Krane, N.; Yang, Z.; Nickel, F.; Chang, Y.-M.; Franke, K. J.; Pascual, J. I.; Kuch, W.

    2014-06-01

    We study the formation of a coordination network consisting of the organic pyridine-based 2,4,6-tris(4-pyridine)-1,3,5-triazine (T4PT) species and Cu atoms on Cu(111) and Ag(111) metal surfaces. Using scanning tunneling microscopy, we find that the organic molecule T4PT forms stable two-dimensional porous networks on the surface of Cu(111) and, by codeposition of Cu atoms, also on the Ag(111) crystal, in which Cu atoms are twofold coordinated by T4PT molecules. X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of the metal-organic network Cu-T4PT on Ag(111) accompanied by density-functional theory calculations show that the nitrogen atoms of the pyridine end groups of the T4PT molecules are the active sites in coordinating the Cu adatoms. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism experiments reveal that the Cu atom in such a metal-organic motif is in a low-valent d10 state and has no magnetic moment.

  4. Interpretations of single-well hydraulic tests of the Rustler Formation conducted in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site, 1988--1989

    SciTech Connect

    Beauheim, R.L.; Dale, T.F.; Pickens, J.F.

    1991-12-01

    This report presents the results of single-well hydraulic tests performed in seven wells in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico in 1988 and 1989. The tests discussed in this report were performed in four of the five members of the Rustler Formation. The tests include: a slug-withdrawal test of the unnamed lower member of the Rustler ate well H-16; slug-withdrawal and slug-injection tests of the Culebra Dolomite Member at well AEC-7; slug-injection tests of the Culebra at well D-268; a pumping test of the Culebra at well H-18; pulse-injection, slug-injection, and slug-withdrawal tests of Magenta Dolomite Member at well H-2b1; pulse-withdrawal, slug-withdrawal, and slug-injection tests of the Magenta at well H-3b1; and pulse-withdrawal and slug-withdrawal tests of the Forty-niner Member at well H-3d. The tests were intended to provide data on the transmissivities of the Rustler members for use in regional-scale modeling of groundwater flow through the Rustler.

  5. CO2–rock–brine interactions in Lower Tuscaloosa Formation at Cranfield CO2 sequestration site, Mississippi, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Jiemin; Kharaka, Yousif K.; Thordsen, James J.; Horita, Juske; Karamalidis, Athanasios; Griffith, Craig; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Ambats, Gil; Cole, David R.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Manning, Michael A.; Cook, Paul J.; Hovorka, Susan D.

    2012-01-01

    A highly integrated geochemical program was conducted at the Cranfield CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration site, Mississippi, U.S.A.. The program included extensive field geochemical monitoring, a detailed petrographic study, and an autoclave experiment under in situ reservoir conditions. Results show that mineral reactions in the Lower Tuscaloosa reservoir were minor during CO2 injection. Brine chemistry remained largely unchanged, which contrasts with significant changes observed in other field tests. Field fluid sampling and laboratory experiments show consistently slow reactions. Carbon isotopic composition and CO2 content in the gas phase reveal simple two-end-member mixing between injected and original formation gas. We conclude that the reservoir rock, which is composed mainly of minerals with low reactivity (average quartz 79.4%, chlorite 11.8%, kaolinite 3.1%, illite 1.3%, concretionary calcite and dolomite 1.5%, and feldspar 0.2%), is relatively unreactive to CO2. The significance of low reactivity is both positive, in that the reservoir is not impacted, and negative, in that mineral trapping is insignificant.

  6. Scorpionate-type coordination in MFU-4l metal-organic frameworks: small-molecule binding and activation upon the thermally activated formation of open metal sites.

    PubMed

    Denysenko, Dmytro; Grzywa, Maciej; Jelic, Jelena; Reuter, Karsten; Volkmer, Dirk

    2014-06-01

    Postsynthetic metal and ligand exchange is a versatile approach towards functionalized MFU-4l frameworks. Upon thermal treatment of MFU-4l formates, coordinatively strongly unsaturated metal centers, such as zinc(II) hydride or copper(I) species, are generated selectively. Cu(I)-MFU-4l prepared in this way was stable under ambient conditions and showed fully reversible chemisorption of small molecules, such as O2, N2, and H2, with corresponding isosteric heats of adsorption of 53, 42, and 32 kJ mol(-1), respectively, as determined by gas-sorption measurements and confirmed by DFT calculations. Moreover, Cu(I)-MFU-4l formed stable complexes with C2H4 and CO. These complexes were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. The demonstrated hydride transfer to electrophiles and strong binding of small gas molecules suggests these novel, yet robust, metal-organic frameworks with open metal sites as promising catalytic materials comprising earth-abundant metal elements.

  7. Site formation processes at Pinnacle Point Cave 13B (Mossel Bay, Western Cape Province, South Africa): resolving stratigraphic and depositional complexities with micromorphology.

    PubMed

    Karkanas, Panagiotis; Goldberg, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Site PP13B is a cave located on the steep cliffs of Pinnacle Point near Mossel Bay in Western Cape Province, South Africa. The depositional sequence of the cave, predating Marine Isotopic Stage 11 (MIS 11) and continuing to present, is in the form of isolated sediment exposures with different depositional facies and vertical and lateral variations. Micromorphological analysis demonstrated that a suite of natural sedimentation processes operated during the development of the sequence ranging from water action to aeolian activity, and from speleothem formations to plant colonization and root encrustation. At the same time, anthropogenic sediments that are mainly in the form of burnt remains from combustion features (e.g., wood ash, charcoal, and burnt bone) were accumulating. Several erosional episodes have resulted in a complicated stratigraphy, as discerned from different depositional and post-depositional features. The cave is associated with a fluctuating coastal environment, frequent changes in sea level and climate controlled patterns of sedimentation, and the presence or absence of humans.

  8. A Model for the Active-Site Formation Process in DMSO Reductase Family Molybdenum Enzymes Involving Oxido-Alcoholato and Oxido-Thiolato Molybdenum(VI) Core Structures.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hideki; Sato, Masanori; Asano, Kaori; Suzuki, Takeyuki; Mieda, Kaoru; Ogura, Takashi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Giles, Logan J; Pokhrel, Amrit; Kirk, Martin L; Itoh, Shinobu

    2016-02-15

    New bis(ene-1,2-dithiolato)-oxido-alcoholato molybdenum(VI) and -oxido-thiolato molybdenum(VI) anionic complexes, denoted as [Mo(VI)O(ER)L2](-) (E = O, S; L = dimethoxycarboxylate-1,2-ethylenedithiolate), were obtained from the reaction of the corresponding dioxido-molybdenum(VI) precursor complex with either an alcohol or a thiol in the presence of an organic acid (e.g., 10-camphorsulfonic acid) at low temperature. The [Mo(VI)O(ER)L2](-) complexes were isolated and characterized, and the structure of [Mo(VI)O(OEt)L2](-) was determined by X-ray crystallography. The Mo(VI) center in [Mo(VI)O(OEt)L2](-) exhibits a distorted octahedral geometry with the two ene-1,2-dithiolate ligands being symmetry inequivalent. The computed structure of [Mo(VI)O(SR)L2](-) is essentially identical to that of [Mo(VI)O(OR)L2](-). The electronic structures of the resulting molybdenum(VI) complexes were evaluated using electronic absorption spectroscopy and bonding calculations. The nature of the distorted O(h) geometry in these [Mo(VI)O(EEt)L2](-) complexes results in a lowest unoccupied molecular orbital wave function that possesses strong π* interactions between the Mo(d(xy)) orbital and the cis S(p(z)) orbital localized on one sulfur donor from a single ene-1,2-dithiolate ligand. The presence of a covalent Mo-S(dithiolene) bonding interaction in these monooxido Mo(VI) compounds contributes to their low-energy ligand-to-metal charge transfer transitions. A second important d-p π bonding interaction derives from the ∼180° O(oxo)-Mo-E-C dihedral angle involving the alcoholate and thiolate donors, and this contributes to ancillary ligand contributions to the electronic structure of these species. The formation of [Mo(VI)O(OEt)L2](-) and [Mo(VI)O(SEt)L2](-) from the dioxidomolybdenum(VI) precursor may be regarded as a model for the active-site formation process that occurs in the dimethyl sulfoxide reductase family of pyranopterin molybdenum enzymes.

  9. Hydroxylated metabolites of beta- and delta-hexachlorocyclohexane: bacterial formation, stereochemical configuration, and occurrence in groundwater at a former production site.

    PubMed

    Raina, Vishakha; Hauser, Andrea; Buser, Hans Rudolf; Rentsch, Daniel; Sharma, Poonam; Lal, Rup; Holliger, Christof; Poiger, J Thomas; Müller, Markus D; Kohler, Hans-Peter E

    2007-06-15

    Although the use of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), one of the most popular insecticides after the Second World War, has been discontinued in many countries, problems remain from former production and waste sites. Despite the widespread occurrence of HCHs, the environmental fate of these compounds is not fully understood. In particular, environmental metabolites of the more persistent beta-HCH and delta-HCH have not been fully identified. Such knowledge, however, is important to follow degradation and environmental fate of the HCHs. In the present study, several hydroxy metabolites that formed during incubation of beta- and delta-HCH with the common soil microorganism Sphingobium indicum B90A were isolated, characterized, and stereochemically identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). The metabolites were identified as isomeric pentachlorocyclohexanols (B1, D1) and tetrachlorocyclohexane-1,4-diols (B2, D2); delta-HCH additionally formed a tetrachloro-2-cyclohexen-1-ol (D3) and a trichloro-2-cyclohexene-1,4-diol (D4), most likely by hydroxylation of delta-pentachlorocyclohexene (delta-PCCH), initially formed by dehydrochlorination. The dehydrochlorinase LinA was responsible for conversion of delta-HCH into delta-PCCH, and the haloalkane dehalogenase LinB was responsible for the transformation of beta-HCH and delta-HCH into B1 and D1, respectively, and subsequently into B2 and D2, respectively. LinB was also responsible for transforming delta-PCCH into D3 and subsequently into D4. These hydroxylations proceeded in accordance with SN2 type reactions with initial substitution of equatorial Cls and formation of axially hydroxylated stereoisomers. The apparently high reactivity of equatorial Cls in beta- and delta-HCH toward initial hydroxylation by LinB of Sphingobium indicum B90A is remarkable when considering the otherwise usually higher reactivity of axial Cls. Several of these metabolites were detected

  10. Hydrothermal Alteration of Glass from Underground Nuclear Tests: Formation and Transport of Pu-clay Colloids at the Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect

    Zavarin, M.; Zhao, P.; Joseph, C.; Begg, J.; Boggs, M.; Dai, Z.; Kersting, A. B.

    2015-05-27

    The testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), has led to the deposition of substantial quantities of plutonium into the environment. Approximately 2.8 metric tons (3.1×104 TBq) of Pu were deposited in the NNSS subsurface as a result of underground nuclear testing. While 3H is the most abundant anthropogenic radionuclide deposited in the NNSS subsurface (4.7×106 TBq), plutonium is the most abundant from a molar standpoint. The only radioactive elements in greater molar abundance are the naturally occurring K, Th, and U isotopes. 239Pu and 240Pu represent the majority of alpha-emitting Pu isotopes. The extreme temperatures associated with underground nuclear tests and the refractory nature of Pu results in most of the Pu (98%) being sequestered in melted rock, referred to as nuclear melt glass (Iaea, 1998). As a result, Pu release to groundwater is controlled, in large part, by the leaching (or dissolution) of nuclear melt glass over time. The factors affecting glass dissolution rates have been studied extensively. The dissolution of Pu-containing borosilicate nuclear waste glasses at 90ºC has been shown to lead to the formation of dioctahedral smectite colloids. Colloid-facilitated transport of Pu at the NNSS has been observed. Recent groundwater samples collected from a number of contaminated wells have yielded a wide range of Pu concentrations from 0.00022 to 2.0 Bq/L. While Pu concentrations tend to fall below the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for drinking water (0.56 Bq/L), we do not yet understand what factors limit the Pu concentration or its transport behavior. To quantify the upper limit of Pu concentrations produced as a result of melt glass dissolution and determine the nature of colloids and Pu associations, we performed a 3 year nuclear melt glass dissolution experiment

  11. Soil use and hydraulic systems in the Terramara S. Rosa (Poviglio, northern Italy). The role of micromorphology in decrypting site formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremaschi, Mauro; Chiara, Pizzi

    2010-05-01

    The S. Rosa moated site (Terramara), which dates back to the Middle-Recent Bronze age, is under excavation since 1984, by the Soprintendenza ai Beni Archeologici dell Emilia Romagna, in cooperation with the Università degli Studi di Milano, CNR-IDPA of Milano, and the sponsorship of the Comune di Poviglio and Coopsette. The field seasons of the last ten years were concentrated in the south-western part of the fringe of the site and the adjoining ditch, and unearthed a complex hydraulic system composed of several wells, the moat, a canal converging to it, and minor ditches connecting these structure to the countryside surrounding the Terramara. During the early phase of occupation (late Middle Bronze age), a large number of wells, located at the fringe of the village, in coincidence with the fence were dug to reach the water table. They were kept in use for a long time and the water extracted from them was not directed to the interior of the village but it was carried inside the moat throughout a system of ditches. Outside the moat, a large canal has been recently discovered. Its large size and the sophisticated knowledge in hydraulic engineering that its construction required, make it the first archaeological proof of a large scale water management during the Bronze Age. During the last phase of the village (late Recent Bronze age) the wells of the fence and the canal were deactivated and the flow inside the moat interrupted. Consequently, more wells were excavated in a very short time at the bottom of the moat, as indicated by refitting of the potsherds included in the fill. These wells are surrounded by reservoirs connected by small ditches to make the extracted water available to be used at the outer fringe of the moat. An intensive program of micromorphological studies has been undertaken to reconstruct the formation processes of the excavated deposits. Thin section study led to the differentiation of long lasting phases of use, maintenance and abandonment on

  12. Analysis of Site Formation and Assemblage Integrity Does Not Support Attribution of the Uluzzian to Modern Humans at Grotta del Cavallo.

    PubMed

    Zilhão, João; Banks, William E; d'Errico, Francesco; Gioia, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Based on the morphology of two deciduous molars and radiocarbon ages from layers D and E of the Grotta del Cavallo (Lecce, Italy), assigned to the Uluzzian, it has been proposed that modern humans were the makers of this Early Upper Paleolithic culture and that this finding considerably weakens the case for an independent emergence of symbolism among western European Neandertals. Reappraisal of the new dating evidence, of the finds curated in the Taranto Antiquities depot, and of coeval publications detailing the site's 1963-66 excavations shows that (a) Protoaurignacian, Aurignacian and Early Epigravettian lithics exist in the assemblages from layers D and E, (b) even though it contains both inherited and intrusive items, the formation of layer D began during Protoaurignacian times, and (c) the composition of the extant Cavallo assemblages is influenced in a non-negligible manner by the post-hoc assignment of items to stratigraphic units distinct from that of original discovery. In addition, a major disturbance feature affected the 1960s excavation trench down to Mousterian layer F, this feature went unrecognized until 1964, the human remains assigned to the Uluzzian were discovered that year and/or the previous year, and there are contradictions between field reports and the primary anthropological description of the remains as to their morphology and level of provenience. Given these major contextual uncertainties, the Cavallo teeth cannot be used to establish the authorship of the Uluzzian. Since this technocomplex's start date is ca. 45,000 calendar years ago, a number of Neandertal fossils are dated to this period, and the oldest diagnostic European modern human fossil is the <41,400 year-old Oase 1 mandible, Neandertal authorship of the Uluzzian remains the parsimonious reading of the evidence.

  13. Monoclonal antibody Cat-315 detects a glycoform of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/phosphacan early in CNS development that localizes to extrasynaptic sites prior to synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Dino, M R; Harroch, S; Hockfield, S; Matthews, R T

    2006-11-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNs) are lattice-like condensations of the extracellular matrix (ECM) that envelop synapses and decorate the surface of subsets of neurons in the CNS. Previous work has suggested that, despite the fact that PNs themselves are not visualized until later in development, some PN component molecules are expressed in the rodent CNS even before synaptogenesis. In the adult mammalian brain, monoclonal antibody Cat-315 recognizes a glycoform of aggrecan, a major component of PNs. In primary cortical cultures, a Cat-315-reactive chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) is also expressed on neuronal surfaces and is secreted into culture media as early as 24 h after plating. In this study, we show that in primary cortical cultures, the Cat-315 CSPG detected in early neural development is expressed in extrasynaptic sites prior to synapse formation. This suggests that ECM components in the CNS, as in the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), may prepattern neuronal surfaces prior to innervation. We further show that while the Cat-315-reactive carbohydrate decorates aggrecan in the adult, it decorates a different CSPG in the developing CNS. Using receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta (RPTPbeta/protein tyrosine phosphatase zeta) knock-out mice and immunoprecipitation techniques, we demonstrate here that in the developing rodent brain Cat-315 recognizes RPTPbeta isoforms. Our further examination of the Cat-315 epitope suggests that it is an O-mannose linked epitope in the HNK-1 family. The presence of the Cat-315 reactive carbohydrate on different PN components--RPTPbeta and aggrecan--at different stages of synapse development suggests a potential role for this neuron-specific carbohydrate motif in synaptogenesis.

  14. Observation of new particle formation and measurement of sulfuric acid, ammonia, amines and highly oxidized organic molecules at a rural site in central Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürten, Andreas; Bergen, Anton; Heinritzi, Martin; Leiminger, Markus; Lorenz, Verena; Piel, Felix; Simon, Mario; Sitals, Robert; Wagner, Andrea C.; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-10-01

    The exact mechanisms for new particle formation (NPF) under different boundary layer conditions are not known yet. One important question is whether amines and sulfuric acid lead to efficient NPF in the atmosphere. Furthermore, it is not clear to what extent highly oxidized organic molecules (HOMs) are involved in NPF. We conducted field measurements at a rural site in central Germany in the proximity of three larger dairy farms to investigate whether there is a connection between NPF and the presence of amines and/or ammonia due to the local emissions from the farms. Comprehensive measurements using a nitrate chemical ionization-atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (CI-APi-TOF) mass spectrometer, a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), particle counters and differential mobility analyzers (DMAs), as well as measurements of trace gases and meteorological parameters, were performed. We demonstrate here that the nitrate CI-APi-TOF is suitable for sensitive measurements of sulfuric acid, amines, a nitrosamine, ammonia, iodic acid and HOMs. NPF was found to correlate with sulfuric acid, while an anti-correlation with RH, amines and ammonia is observed. The anti-correlation between NPF and amines could be due to the efficient uptake of these compounds by nucleating clusters and small particles. Much higher HOM dimer (C19/C20 compounds) concentrations during the night than during the day indicate that these HOMs do not efficiently self-nucleate as no nighttime NPF is observed. Observed iodic acid probably originates from an iodine-containing reservoir substance, but the iodine signals are very likely too low to have a significant effect on NPF.

  15. Analysis of Site Formation and Assemblage Integrity Does Not Support Attribution of the Uluzzian to Modern Humans at Grotta del Cavallo.

    PubMed

    Zilhão, João; Banks, William E; d'Errico, Francesco; Gioia, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Based on the morphology of two deciduous molars and radiocarbon ages from layers D and E of the Grotta del Cavallo (Lecce, Italy), assigned to the Uluzzian, it has been proposed that modern humans were the makers of this Early Upper Paleolithic culture and that this finding considerably weakens the case for an independent emergence of symbolism among western European Neandertals. Reappraisal of the new dating evidence, of the finds curated in the Taranto Antiquities depot, and of coeval publications detailing the site's 1963-66 excavations shows that (a) Protoaurignacian, Aurignacian and Early Epigravettian lithics exist in the assemblages from layers D and E, (b) even though it contains both inherited and intrusive items, the formation of layer D began during Protoaurignacian times, and (c) the composition of the extant Cavallo assemblages is influenced in a non-negligible manner by the post-hoc assignment of items to stratigraphic units distinct from that of original discovery. In addition, a major disturbance feature affected the 1960s excavation trench down to Mousterian layer F, this feature went unrecognized until 1964, the human remains assigned to the Uluzzian were discovered that year and/or the previous year, and there are contradictions between field reports and the primary anthropological description of the remains as to their morphology and level of provenience. Given these major contextual uncertainties, the Cavallo teeth cannot be used to establish the authorship of the Uluzzian. Since this technocomplex's start date is ca. 45,000 calendar years ago, a number of Neandertal fossils are dated to this period, and the oldest diagnostic European modern human fossil is the <41,400 year-old Oase 1 mandible, Neandertal authorship of the Uluzzian remains the parsimonious reading of the evidence. PMID:26154139

  16. Mapping the homotypic binding sites in CD31 and the role of CD31 adhesion in the formation of interendothelial cell contacts

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    CD31 is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily consisting of six Ig- related domains. It is constitutively expressed by platelets, monocytes, and some lymphocytes, but at tenfold higher levels on vascular endothelial cells. CD31 has both homotypic and heterotypic adhesive properties. We have mapped the homotypic binding sites using a deletion series of CD31-Fc chimeras and a panel of anti-CD31 monoclonal antibodies. An extensive surface of CD31 is involved in homotypic binding with domains 2 and 3 and domains 5 and 6 playing key roles. A model consistent with the experimental data is that CD31 on one cell binds to CD31 on an apposing cell in an antiparallel interdigitating mode requiring full alignment of the six domains of each molecule. In addition to establishing intercellular homotypic contacts. CD31 binding leads to augmented adhesion via beta 1 integrins. The positive cooperation between CD31 and beta 1 integrins can occur in heterologous primate cells (COS cells). The interaction is specific to both CD31 and beta 1 integrins. Neither intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM- 1)/leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LCAM-1) nor neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)/NCAM adhesion leads to recruitment of beta 1 integrin adhesion pathways. Establishment of CD31 contacts have effects on the growth and morphology of endothelial cells. CD31(D1-D6)Fc inhibits the growth of endothelial cells in culture. In addition, papain fragments of anti-CD31 antibodies (Fab fragments) disrupt interendothelial contact formation and monolayer integrity when intercellular contacts are being formed. The same reagents are without effect once these contacts have been established, suggesting that CD31- CD31 interactions are critically important only in the initial phases of intercellular adhesion. PMID:7534767

  17. Seasonal variation of atmospheric particle number concentrations, new particle formation and atmospheric oxidation capacity at the high Arctic site Villum Research Station, Station Nord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Quynh T.; Glasius, Marianne; Sørensen, Lise L.; Jensen, Bjarne; Skov, Henrik; Birmili, Wolfram; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Kristensson, Adam; Nøjgaard, Jacob K.; Massling, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    This work presents an analysis of the physical properties of sub-micrometer aerosol particles measured at the high Arctic site Villum Research Station, Station Nord (VRS), northeast Greenland, between July 2010 and February 2013. The study focuses on particle number concentrations, particle number size distributions and the occurrence of new particle formation (NPF) events and their seasonality in the high Arctic, where observations and characterization of such aerosol particle properties and corresponding events are rare and understanding of related processes is lacking.A clear accumulation mode was observed during the darker months from October until mid-May, which became considerably more pronounced during the prominent Arctic haze months from March to mid-May. In contrast, nucleation- and Aitken-mode particles were predominantly observed during the summer months. Analysis of wind direction and wind speed indicated possible contributions of marine sources from the easterly side of the station to the observed summertime particle number concentrations, while southwesterly to westerly winds dominated during the darker months. NPF events lasting from hours to days were mostly observed from June until August, with fewer events observed during the months with less sunlight, i.e., March, April, September and October. The results tend to indicate that ozone (O3) might be weakly anti-correlated with particle number concentrations of the nucleation-mode range (10-30 nm) in almost half of the NPF events, while no positive correlation was observed. Calculations of air mass back trajectories using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model for the NPF event days suggested that the onset or interruption of events could possibly be explained by changes in air mass origin. A map of event occurrence probability was computed, indicating that southerly air masses from over the Greenland Sea were more likely linked to those events.

  18. Gas-particle concentrations of atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at an urban and a residential site in Osaka, Japan: effect of the formation of atmospherically stable layer on their temporal change.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Masao; Nishikawa, Ayako; Fujimori, Keiichi; Shibutani, Yasuhiko

    2011-09-15

    A comparative study on atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in particulate matter and the gaseous phase was performed at an urban and a residential site in Osaka, Japan, during 2005-2006. PAH concentrations at the urban site were found to be approximately twice higher than those at the residential site. At both sites, particulate PAH concentrations increased mainly in winter while the trends of temporal change in gaseous PAH concentrations were not clearly observed. The main sources of PAHs were estimated to be local traffic, e.g., diesel engines with catalytic converter. PAH concentrations did not significantly negatively correlate with ozone concentrations and meteorological parameters. Gas-particle partitioning coefficients of representative PAHs with low molecular weight (LMW) significantly negatively correlated with ambient temperature, showing that temporal change in the LMW PAH concentrations in PM could be attributable to the shift of their gas-particle distribution caused by the change in ambient temperature. For the first time, we studied the effect of the formation of atmospherically stable layer following an increase in PAH concentrations in Japan. At the urban site, PAHs showed a significant positive correlation with potential temperature gradients, indicating that temporal variability in PAH concentrations would be dominantly controlled by the formation of atmospherically stable layer in Osaka area.

  19. Unravelling the secrets of Cs controlled secondary ion formation: Evidence of the dominance of site specific surface chemistry, alloying and ionic bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmaack, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    implantation can be evaluated as a function of Cs coverage. The summarised results imply that secondary ions are commonly not formed by charge transfer between an escaping atom and the electronic system of the sample but are already emitted as ions. The probability of ion formation appears to be controlled by the local ionic character of the alkali-target atom bonds, i.e., by the difference in electronegativity between the involved elements as well as by the electron affinity and the ionisation potential of the departing atom. This idea is supported by the finding that Si- yields exhibit the same very strong dependence on Cs coverage as Si+ and O- yields on the oxygen fraction in oxygen loaded Si. Most challenging to theoreticians is the finding that the ionisation probability is independent of the emission velocity of sputtered ions. This phenomenon cannot be rationalised along established routes of thinking. Different concepts need to be explored. An old, somewhat exotic idea takes account of the heavy perturbation created for a very short period of time at the site of ion emission (dynamic randomisation). Molecular dynamics simulations are desirable to clarify the issue. Ultimately it may be possible to describe all phenomena of enhanced or suppressed secondary ion formation, produced either by surface loading with alkali atoms or by enforced surface oxidation, on the basis of a single universal model. There is plenty of room for exciting new studies.

  20. Unravelling the secrets of Cs controlled secondary ion formation: Evidence of the dominance of site specific surface chemistry, alloying and ionic bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmaack, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    implantation can be evaluated as a function of Cs coverage.The summarised results imply that secondary ions are commonly not formed by charge transfer between an escaping atom and the electronic system of the sample but are already emitted as ions. The probability of ion formation appears to be controlled by the local ionic character of the alkali-target atom bonds, i.e., by the difference in electronegativity between the involved elements as well as by the electron affinity and the ionisation potential of the departing atom. This idea is supported by the finding that Si- yields exhibit the same very strong dependence on Cs coverage as Si+ and O- yields on the oxygen fraction in oxygen loaded Si. Most challenging to theoreticians is the finding that the ionisation probability is independent of the emission velocity of sputtered ions. This phenomenon cannot be rationalised along established routes of thinking. Different concepts need to be explored. An old, somewhat exotic idea takes account of the heavy perturbation created for a very short period of time at the site of ion emission (dynamic randomisation). Molecular dynamics simulations are desirable to clarify the issue. Ultimately it may be possible to describe all phenomena of enhanced or suppressed secondary ion formation, produced either by surface loading with alkali atoms or by enforced surface oxidation, on the basis of a single universal model. There is plenty of room for exciting new studies.

  1. Natural heterogeneity and evolving geochemistry of Lower Tuscaloosa Formation brine in response to continuing CO2 injection at Cranfield EOR site, Mississippi, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thordsen, J. J.; Kharaka, Y. K.; Thomas, B.; Abedini, A. A.; Conaway, C. H.; Manning, M. A.; Lu, J.

    2012-12-01

    Geochemical monitoring of Lower Tuscaloosa Formation (LTF) brine continues at the Cranfield CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration site to investigate the potential for the geologic storage of large volumes of CO2 in saline aquifers and depleted reservoirs. Cranfield oil field is a domal depleted oil and gas reservoir in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, with production in heterogeneous fluvial sandstones of the LTF (depth ~3000 m). CO2 flood began in July 2008. Brine samples were collected from selected production wells in March and December 2009, April 2010, and November 2011. Intensive sampling also was conducted for the first 18 days of a CO2 injection experiment below the oil-water contact (December 2009) at the Detailed Area of Study (DAS) 3-well array. The sampling objectives are to define the geochemical composition of the pre-injection brine, and to understand the geochemical changes resulting from interactions between the injected CO2, brine, and reservoir minerals. Results show that Tuscaloosa brine is Na-Ca-Cl type with total salinity ranging from ~140 to 160 g/L TDS (50 samples). Relatively large variations are observed in major divalent cations (Ca ~7,500-14,000 mg/L, Mg ~800-1,250 mg/L, Sr ~475-750 mg/L). Significant positive correlations are noted amongst Ca, Mg, Sr, Ba, and Br, whereas these solutes all trend negatively with Na and Cl. These results may be interpreted as possible binary mixing between two end-member waters: (1) high Na-Cl (51 and 97 g/L, respectively), low Ca, Mg, Sr, and Br (~7500, 800, 475, 280 mg/L, respectively); and (2) low Na-Cl (40 and 86 g/L), high Ca, Mg, Sr, and Br (~14,000, 1250, 750, 480 mg/L). This apparent binary mixing has no obvious correlation to CO2 injection, which suggests that observed variations are due to natural heterogeneities in LTF brine within the Cranfield dome. The variations may indicate vertical and/or lateral proximity to a halite source (i.e. salt dome), with the high Na-Cl, low Br

  2. Potential function of added minerals as nucleation sites and effect of humic substances on mineral formation by the nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizer Acidovorax sp. BoFeN1.

    PubMed

    Dippon, Urs; Pantke, Claudia; Porsch, Katharina; Larese-Casanova, Phil; Kappler, Andreas

    2012-06-19

    The mobility of toxic metals and the transformation of organic pollutants in the environment are influenced and in many cases even controlled by iron minerals. Therefore knowing the factors influencing iron mineral formation and transformation by Fe(II)-oxidizing and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria is crucial for understanding the fate of contaminants and for the development of remediation technologies. In this study we followed mineral formation by the nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing strain Acidovorax sp. BoFeN1 in the presence of the crystalline Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides goethite, magnetite and hematite added as potential nucleation sites. Mössbauer spectroscopy analysis of minerals precipitated by BoFeN1 in (57)Fe(II)-spiked microbial growth medium showed that goethite was formed in the absence of mineral additions as well as in the presence of goethite or hematite. The presence of magnetite minerals during Fe(II) oxidation induced the formation of magnetite in addition to goethite, while the addition of humic substances along with magnetite also led to goethite but no magnetite. This study showed that mineral formation not only depends on the aqueous geochemical conditions but can also be affected by the presence of mineral nucleation sites that initiate precipitation of the same underlying mineral phases.

  3. Instrumentation used for hydraulic testing of potential water-bearing formations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site in southeastern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basler, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Requirements for testing hydrologic test wells at the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico, necessitated the use of inflatable formation packers and pressure transducers. Observations during drilling and initial development indicated small formation yields which would require considerable test times by conventional open-casing methods. A pressure-monitoring system was assembled for performance evaluation utilizing commercially available components. Formation pressures were monitored with a down-hole strain-gage transducer. An inflatable packer equipped with a 1/4-inch-diameter steel tube extending through the inflation element permitted sensing formation pressures in isolated test zones. Surface components of the monitoring system provided AC transducer excitation, signal conditioning for recording directly in engineering units, and both analog and digital recording. Continuous surface monitoring of formation pressures provided a means of determining test status and projecting completion times during any phase of testing. Maximum portability was afforded by battery operation with all surface components mounted in a small self-contained trailer. (USGS)

  4. Site-Selective Tertiary Alkyl-Fluorine Bond Formation from α-Bromoamides Using a Copper/CsF Catalyst System.

    PubMed

    Nishikata, Takashi; Ishida, Syo; Fujimoto, Ryo

    2016-08-16

    A copper-catalyzed site-selective fluorination of α-bromoamides possessing multiple reaction sites, such as primary and secondary alkyl-Br bonds, using inexpensive CsF is reported. Tertiary alkyl-F bonds, which are very difficult to synthesize, can be formed by this fluorination reaction with the aid of an amide group. Control experiments revealed that in situ generated CuF2 is a key fluorinating reagent that reacts with the tertiary alkyl radicals generated by the reaction between an α-bromocarbonyl compound and a copper(I) salt. PMID:27282558

  5. (S, C, O, Sr) isotopic constraints on the diagenetic evolution of the COX clay formations at the Bure URL site, Paris Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerouge, C.; Gaucher, E. C.; Tournassat, C.; Agrinier, P.; Widory, D.; Guerrot, C.; Buschaert, S.

    2009-04-01

    The Underground Research Laboratory of Bure, located in the Eastern part of the Paris Basin, was selected by ANDRA (French Agency for Nuclear Management) in order to study the feasibility of a nuclear waste disposal in the Callovian-Oxfordian thick clayey formation at 400 meters depth. Since 1994's, numerous investigations have been initiated to understand and predict the behaviour of the clay formation in time and in space, by constraining its stability, the chemical evolution of the porewaters, and solution transfers between the clayey formation and its adjacent limestone sequences during geological times (ANDRA, 2005). In that way, this study presents combined new mineralogical and isotopic data of the diagenetic mineral sequence to constrain the porewater chemistry of the rock at different stages of the sedimentary then burial history of the clayey formation. The petrological study of Callovian-Oxfordian claystones provided evidence of the following diagenetic mineral sequence: 1) Framboïdal pyrite ± micritic calcite in replacement of carbonate bioclasts and in bioturbations, 2) Iron-rich euhedral carbonates (ankerite, sideroplesite), Glauconite, 3) Sparry dolomite, celestite in residual porosity, 4) Chalcedony 5) quartz/calcite. Pyrite in bioturbations shows a wide range of δ34S (-38 to +74 permil/CDT), providing evidence of bacterial sulphate reduction processes. The lowest negative values (-38 to -22 permil) indicate precipitation of pyrite in a marine environment with a permanent recharge in sulphate, whereas the higher pyrite δ34S values (-14 up to +74 permil) show that pyrite precipitated in a system that closed for sulphate. Consequently the variations of pyrite δ34S in bioturbations along the lithostratigraphic profil indicate a change of sedimentation conditions from a deep marine environment to an environment with alternative recharge of marine sulphates; that is consistent with the transgression/regression cycle observed in the middle sequence

  6. Grain-size and grain-shape analyses using digital imaging technology: Application to the fluvial formation of the Ngandong paleoanthropological site in Central Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipola, Maija

    2013-04-01

    This study implements grain-size and grain-shape analyses to better understand the fluvial processes responsible for forming the Ngandong paleoanthropological site along the Solo River in Central Java. The site was first discovered and excavated by the Dutch Geological Survey in the early 1930's, during which fourteen Homo erectus fossils and thousands of other macrofaunal remains were uncovered. The Homo erectus fossils discovered at Ngandong are particularly interesting to paleoanthropologists because the morphology of the excavated crania suggests they are from a recently-living variety of the species. The primary scientific focus for many years has been to determine the absolute age of the Ngandong fossils, while the question of exactly how the Ngandong site itself formed has been frequently overlooked. In this study I use Retsch CAMSIZER digital imaging technology to conduct grain-size and grain-shape analyses of sediments from the terrace stratigraphy at the Ngandong site to understand if there are significant differences between sedimentary layers in grain-size and/or grain-shape, and what these differences mean in terms of local paleoflow dynamics over time. Preliminary analyses indicate there are four distinct sedimentary layers present at Ngandong with regard to size sorting, with the fossil-bearing layers proving to be the most poorly-sorted and most similar to debris-flow deposits. These results support hypotheses by geoarchaeologists that the fossil-bearing layers present at Ngandong were deposited during special flow events rather than under normal stream flow conditions.

  7. Glycerolipid biosynthesis in rat adipose tissue. Influence of adipose-cell size and site of adipose tissue on triacylglycerol formation in lean and obese rats.

    PubMed

    Jamdar, S C

    1978-01-15

    The rates of lipid formation were compared in different fat-depots from lean and obese rats by using [14C]glycerol 3-phosphate, [14C]glucose or [14C]acetate as substrates. In lean animals, subcutaneous adipose tissue showed significantly lower rates of lipid synthesis than did perirenal and gonadal fat-tissue. In obese animals, the rates of lipid synthesis were significantly higher and did not vary from one fat-depot to another. Differences in the rates of lipid formation between lean and obese rats disappeared during dietary restriction of obese animals. The isolated adipocyte preparation did not reflect the true metabolic activity of the adipose organ, since this preparation was mainly derived from smaller adipocytes that were metabolically less active than larger adipocytes. The present study suggests that it is better to use whole tissue preparations to measure lipogenesis and esterification reactions, because these measurements represent the contribution of both larger and smaller adipocytes towards lipid formation.

  8. ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF A HIGH-DENSITY CORE IN TAURUS: DYNAMICAL GAS INTERACTION AT THE POSSIBLE SITE OF A MULTIPLE STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuda, Kazuki; Onishi, Toshikazu; Saigo, Kazuya; Kawamura, Akiko; Fukui, Yasuo; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Tachihara, Kengo; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Machida, Masahiro N.; Tomida, Kengo

    2014-07-01

    Starless dense cores eventually collapse dynamically, forming protostars inside them, and the physical properties of the cores determine the nature of the forming protostars. We report ALMA observations of dust continuum emission and molecular rotational lines toward MC27 or L1521F, which is considered to be very close to the first protostellar core phase. We found a few starless high-density cores, one of which has a very high density of ∼10{sup 7} cm{sup –3}, within a region of several hundred AU around a very low-luminosity protostar detected by Spitzer. A very compact bipolar outflow with a dynamical timescale of a few hundred years was found toward the protostar. The molecular line observation shows several cores with an arc-like structure, possibly due to the dynamical gas interaction. These complex structures revealed in the present observations suggest that the initial condition of star formation is highly dynamical in nature, which is considered to be a key factor in understanding fundamental issues of star formation such as the formation of multiple stars and the origin of the initial mass function of stars.

  9. Bone taphonomy of the Schöningen "Spear Horizon South" and its implications for site formation and hominin meat provisioning.

    PubMed

    Starkovich, Britt M; Conard, Nicholas J

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the faunal remains from the new excavation area at the Lower Paleolithic site of Schöningen. The focus of the study is on the southern extension of the main find horizon (Spear Horizon South), which includes the layer that yielded the famous Schöningen spears (13 II-4). Taxonomic data corroborate previous studies, that hominins primarily hunted Equus mosbachensis, a large Pleistocene horse. Equid body part representation at the site suggests that the animals were hunted and butchered locally. There is no evidence for density-mediated attrition in the assemblage. Weathering damage is uncommon, though there is ample evidence that carnivores had access to the bone. Carnivore bite sizes were measured and compared to experimental data provided by previous authors. Based on relationships between bite size and carnivore behavior and body size, we conclude that the primary modifying agents were large carnivores (i.e., wolves or saber-toothed cats). Previous studies show that carnivores often had secondary access to the remains, after hominins. Cut marks are commonly arranged haphazardly on the bones. This may indicate that multiple hominins participated in the butchery of horse skeletons, or that they were butchered over the course of hours or days. Cut marks on axial elements are more "orderly," which probably reflects the physical logistics of orienting one's body in relation to a large carcass. These data differ from sites formed by Middle and Upper Paleolithic hominins, which might suggest that in later times, a system of organized meat provisioning was already in place. Taken together, the faunal evidence from the Spear Horizon South indicates that late Lower Paleolithic hominins using the site understood the behaviors of different prey species, hunted socially to take down large game, and successfully competed with large carnivores on the landscape for primary access to ungulate remains. PMID:26626957

  10. Bone taphonomy of the Schöningen "Spear Horizon South" and its implications for site formation and hominin meat provisioning.

    PubMed

    Starkovich, Britt M; Conard, Nicholas J

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the faunal remains from the new excavation area at the Lower Paleolithic site of Schöningen. The focus of the study is on the southern extension of the main find horizon (Spear Horizon South), which includes the layer that yielded the famous Schöningen spears (13 II-4). Taxonomic data corroborate previous studies, that hominins primarily hunted Equus mosbachensis, a large Pleistocene horse. Equid body part representation at the site suggests that the animals were hunted and butchered locally. There is no evidence for density-mediated attrition in the assemblage. Weathering damage is uncommon, though there is ample evidence that carnivores had access to the bone. Carnivore bite sizes were measured and compared to experimental data provided by previous authors. Based on relationships between bite size and carnivore behavior and body size, we conclude that the primary modifying agents were large carnivores (i.e., wolves or saber-toothed cats). Previous studies show that carnivores often had secondary access to the remains, after hominins. Cut marks are commonly arranged haphazardly on the bones. This may indicate that multiple hominins participated in the butchery of horse skeletons, or that they were butchered over the course of hours or days. Cut marks on axial elements are more "orderly," which probably reflects the physical logistics of orienting one's body in relation to a large carcass. These data differ from sites formed by Middle and Upper Paleolithic hominins, which might suggest that in later times, a system of organized meat provisioning was already in place. Taken together, the faunal evidence from the Spear Horizon South indicates that late Lower Paleolithic hominins using the site understood the behaviors of different prey species, hunted socially to take down large game, and successfully competed with large carnivores on the landscape for primary access to ungulate remains.

  11. The formation of DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites in human blood lymphocytes exposed to 365-nm UVA radiation.

    PubMed

    Osipov, Andreyan N; Smetanina, Nadezhda M; Pustovalova, Margarita V; Arkhangelskaya, Ekaterina; Klokov, Dmitry

    2014-08-01

    The potency of UVA radiation, representing 90% of solar UV light reaching the earth's surface, to induce human skin cancer is the subject of continuing controversy. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of reactive oxygen species in DNA damage produced by the exposure of human cells to UVA radiation. This knowledge is important for better understanding of UV-induced carcinogenesis. We measured DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites in human lymphocytes exposed ex vivo to various doses of 365-nm UV photons compared to X-rays and hydrogen peroxide using the comet assay. We demonstrated that the UVA-induced DNA damage increased in a linear dose-dependent manner. The rate of DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites after exposure to 1J/cm(2) was similar to the rate induced by exposure to 1 Gy of X-rays or 25 μM hydrogen peroxide. The presence of either the hydroxyl radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide or the singlet oxygen quencher sodium azide resulted in a significant reduction in the UVA-induced DNA damage, suggesting a role for these reactive oxygen species in mediating UVA-induced DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites. We also showed that chromatin relaxation due to hypertonic conditions resulted in increased damage in both untreated and UVA-treated cells. The effect was the most significant in the presence of 0.5M Na(+), implying a role for histone H1. Our data suggest that the majority of DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites after exposure of human lymphocytes to UVA are produced by reactive oxygen species (the hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen) and that the state of chromatin may substantially contribute to the outcome of such exposures.

  12. Quantum-chemical study of the effect of oxygen on the formation of active sites of silver clusters during the selective adsorption of hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanin, S. N.; Polynskaya, Yu. G.; Pichugina, D. A.; Nguen, V.; Beletskaya, A. V.; Kuz'menko, N. E.; Shestakov, A. F.

    2013-09-01

    Density functional theory (PBE with a modified Dirac-Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian) is used to simulate the adsorption of hydrocarbons (C2H2, C2H4, C2H6) on the surface of a sorbent containing Ag0, Agδ+, and AgO sites. The dynamics of change in the structural characteristics of Ag n ( n ≤ 10) is analyzed and the adsorption of oxygen on Ag8 and Ag10 is studied to select the adsorption site model. Studying the interaction of hydrocarbons with Ag8, Ag10, Ag{10/+}, Ag10O, and Ag10O2 clusters reveals that the presence of oxygen leads to an increase in the activation of unsaturated hydrocarbons, and the adsorption energy of C2H2 increases tenfold. It is found that the role of adsorbed oxygen is not only to form adsorption sites of hydrocarbons (Agδ+) but also to bind C2H2 and C2H4 directly to the sorbent's surface.

  13. Water-Level Reconstruction and its Implications for Late Pleistocene Paleontological Site Formation in Hoyo Negro, a Submerged Subterranean Pit in Quintana Roo, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissolo, D.; Reinhardt, E. G.; Collins, S.; Kovacs, S. E.; Beddows, P. A.; Chatters, J. C.; Nava Blank, A.; Luna Erreguerena, P.

    2014-12-01

    A massive pit deep within the now submerged cave system of Sac Actun, located along the central east coast of the Yucatan Peninsula, contains a diverse fossil assemblage of extinct megafauna as well as a nearly complete human skeleton. The inundated site of Hoyo Negro presents a unique and promising opportunity for interdisciplinary Paleoamerican and paleoenvironmental research in the region. Investigations have thus far revealed a range of associated features and deposits which make possible a multi-proxy approach to identifying and reconstructing the natural and cultural processes that have formed and transformed the site over millennia. Understanding water-level fluctuations (both related to, and independent from, eustatic sea level changes), with respect to cave morphology is central to understanding the movement of humans and animals into and through the cave system. Recent and ongoing studies involve absolute dating of human, faunal, macrobotanical, and geological samples; taphonomic analyses; and a characterization of site hydrogeology and sedimentological facies, including microfossil assemblages and calcite raft deposits.

  14. Structure of cyanase reveals that a novel dimeric and decameric arrangement of subunits is required for formation of the enzyme active site

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Martin A; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Perrakis, Anatassis; Anderson, Paul M; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyanase is an enzyme found in bacteria and plants that catalyzes the reaction of cyanate with bicarbonate to produce ammonia and carbon dioxide. In Escherichia coli, cyanase is induced from the cyn operon in response to extracellular cyanate. The enzyme is functionally active as a homodecamer of 17 kDa subunits, and displays half-site binding of substrates or substrate analogs. The enzyme shows no significant amino acid sequence homology with other proteins. Results We have determined the crystal structure of cyanase at 1.65 Å resolution using the multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) method. Cyanase crystals are triclinic and contain one homodecamer in the asymmetric unit. Selenomethionine-labeled protein offers 40 selenium atoms for use in phasing. Structures of cyanase with bound chloride or oxalate anions, inhibitors of the enzyme, allowed identification of the active site. Conclusions The cyanase monomer is composed of two domains. The N-terminal domain shows structural similarity to the DNA-binding α-helix bundle motif. The C-terminal domain has an ‘open fold’ with no structural homology to other proteins. The subunits of cyanase are arranged in a novel manner both at the dimer and decamer level. The dimer structure reveals the C-terminal domains to be intertwined, and the decamer is formed by a pentamer of these dimers. The active site of the enzyme is located between dimers and is comprised of residues from four adjacent subunits of the homodecamer. The structural data allow a conceivable reaction mechanism to be proposed. PMID:10801492

  15. Programming for SITE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mody, Bella

    1979-01-01

    Describes the Satellite Instructional Television Experiment (SITE) project in India during 1975-76, including programing patterns, formats, and audiences. Demonstrates that countries like India have the technical and managerial capability to design, operate, and maintain advanced communication technology. (JMF)

  16. ALMA Observations of a High-density Core in Taurus: Dynamical Gas Interaction at the Possible Site of a Multiple Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuda, Kazuki; Onishi, Toshikazu; Saigo, Kazuya; Kawamura, Akiko; Fukui, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Machida, Masahiro N.; Tomida, Kengo; Tachihara, Kengo

    2015-08-01

    It is crucially important to observe dense cores in order to investigate the initial condition of star formation since protostars are formed via dynamical collapse of dense cores, inhering the physical properties from their natal dense cores. Here we present the results of ALMA Cycle 0 and Cycle 1 observations of dust continuum emission and molecular rotational lines toward a dense core, MC27 (aka L1521F), which is considered to be very close to the first protostellar core phase.The Cycle 0 observations revealed complex structures at the center. We found a few starless high-density cores, one of which (MMS2) has a very high density of ~107 cm-3, around the very low-luminousity protostar detected by Spitzer. A very compact bipolar outflow with a dynamical timescale of a few hundred years was found toward the protostar. The HCO+ (3-2) observation shows several cores associated with an arc-like structure whose length is ~2000 AU, possibly due to the dynamical gas interaction. These complex structures suggest that the initial condition of star formation is highly dynamical in nature, which is considered to be a key factor in understanding fundamental issues of star formation such as origins of the stellar multiplicity and the initial mass function. These initial Cycle 0 results were published by Tokuda et al. (2014). Matsumoto et al. (2015) investigated the arc-like structures by performing numerical simulations.Detailed column density distribution with the size from ~100 to ~10000 AU scale are revealed by combining the 12m array data with the 7m array data of the ALMA Compact Array as well as with the single dish MAMBO data. Our preliminary analysis shows that the averaged radial column density distribution of the inner part (r < 2000 AU) is N(H2)~r-0.4, clearly flatter than that of the outer part, ~r-1.3. We detected the above-mentioned complex structure inside the inner flatter region, which may reflect the dynamical status of the dense core. The Cycle 1

  17. The COW1 locus of arabidopsis acts after RHD2, and in parallel with RHD3 and TIP1, to determine the shape, rate of elongation, and number of root hairs produced from each site of hair formation.

    PubMed Central

    Grierson, C S; Roberts, K; Feldmann, K A; Dolan, L

    1997-01-01

    Two recessive mutant alleles at CAN OF WORMS1 (COW1), a new locus involved in root hair morphogenesis, have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana L. Heynh. Root hairs on Cow1- mutants are short and wide and occasionally formed as pairs at a single site of hair formation. The COW1 locus maps to chromosome 4. Root hairs on Cow1- plants form in the usual positions, suggesting that the phenotype is not the result of abnormal positional signals. Root hairs on Cow1- roots begin hair formation normally, forming a small bulge, or root hair initiation site, of normal size and shape and in the usual position on the hair-forming cell. However, when Cow1- root hairs start to elongate by tip growth, abnormalities in the shape and elongation rate of the hairs become apparent. Genetic evidence from double-mutant analysis of cow1-1 and other loci involved in root hair development supports our conclusion that COW1 is required during root hair elongation. PMID:9390433

  18. The COW1 locus of arabidopsis acts after RHD2, and in parallel with RHD3 and TIP1, to determine the shape, rate of elongation, and number of root hairs produced from each site of hair formation.

    PubMed

    Grierson, C S; Roberts, K; Feldmann, K A; Dolan, L

    1997-11-01

    Two recessive mutant alleles at CAN OF WORMS1 (COW1), a new locus involved in root hair morphogenesis, have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana L. Heynh. Root hairs on Cow1- mutants are short and wide and occasionally formed as pairs at a single site of hair formation. The COW1 locus maps to chromosome 4. Root hairs on Cow1- plants form in the usual positions, suggesting that the phenotype is not the result of abnormal positional signals. Root hairs on Cow1- roots begin hair formation normally, forming a small bulge, or root hair initiation site, of normal size and shape and in the usual position on the hair-forming cell. However, when Cow1- root hairs start to elongate by tip growth, abnormalities in the shape and elongation rate of the hairs become apparent. Genetic evidence from double-mutant analysis of cow1-1 and other loci involved in root hair development supports our conclusion that COW1 is required during root hair elongation.

  19. Mauna Loa lava accumulation rates at the Hilo drill site: Formation of lava deltas during a period of declining overall volcanic growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Moore, J.G.

    1996-01-01

    Accumulation rates for lava flows erupted from Mauna Loa, as sampled in the uppermost 280 m of the Hilo drill hole, vary widely for short time intervals (several thousand years), but overall are broadly similar to those documented elsewhere on this volcano since 100 ka. Thickness variations and accumulation rates for Mauna Loa lavas at the Hilo drill site have been strongly affected by local paleotopography, including funneling and ponding between Mauna Kea and Kilauea. In addition, gentle submerged slopes of Mauna Kea in Hilo Bay have permitted large shoreline displacements by Mauna Loa flows. Ages of eruptive intervals have been determined from published isotopic data and from eustatic sea level curves modified to include the isostatic subsidence of the island of Hawaii at 2.2-2.6 mm/yr. Prior to 10 ka, rates of Mauna Loa lava accumulation at the drill site varied from 0.6 to 4.3 mm/yr for dateable intervals, with an overall rate of 1.8 mm/yr. Major eruptive pulses at about 1.3 and 10 ka, each probably representing a single long-lived eruption based on lack of weathering between flow units, increase the overall accumulation rate to 2.4 mm/yr. The higher rate since 10 ka reflects construction of thick near-shoreline lava deltas as postglacial sea levels rose rapidly. Large lava deltas form only along coastal segments where initially subaerial slopes have been submerged by the combined effects of eustatic sea level rise, isostatic subsidence, or spreading of volcano flanks. Overall accumulation of 239 m of lava at the drill site since 100-120 ka closely balances submergence of the Hilo area, suggesting that processes of coastal lava deposition have been modulated by rise in sea level. The Hilo accumulation rate is slightly higher than average rates of 1-2 mm/yr determined elsewhere along the Mauna Loa coast, based on rates of shoreline coverage and dated sea cliff and fault scarp exposures. Low rates of coastal lava accumulation since 100 ka, near or below the rate

  20. LPS-Induced Formation of Immunoproteasomes: TNF-α and Nitric Oxide Production are Regulated by Altered Composition of Proteasome-Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Julia; Guan, Xiu Qin; Kisselev, Alexei F.; Papasian, Christopher J.; Qureshi, Asaf A.; Morrison, David C.; Van Way, Charles W.; Vogel, Stefanie N.

    2011-01-01

    Stimulation of mouse macrophages with LPS leads to tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) secretion and nitric oxide (NO) release at different times through independent signaling pathways. While the precise regulatory mechanisms responsible for these distinct phenotypic responses have not been fully delineated, results of our recent studies strongly implicate the cellular cytoplasmic ubiquitin–proteasome pathway as a key regulator of LPS-induced macrophage inflammatory responses. Our objective in this study was to define the relative contribution of specific proteasomal active-sites in induction of TNF-α and NO after LPS treatment of RAW 264.7 macrophages using selective inhibitors of these active sites. Our data provide evidence that LPS stimulation of mouse macrophages triggers a selective increase in the levels of gene and protein expression of the immunoproteasomes, resulting in a modulation of specific functional activities of the proteasome and a corresponding increase in NO production as compared to untreated controls. These findings suggest the LPS-dependent induction of immunoproteasome. In contrast, we also demonstrate that TNF-α expression is primarily dependent on both the chymotrypsin- and the trypsin-like activities of X, Y, Z subunits of the proteasome. Proteasome-associated post-acidic activity alone also contributes to LPS-induced expression of TNF-α. Taken together; our results indicate that LPS-induced TNF-α in macrophages is differentially regulated by each of the three proteasome activities. Since addition of proteasome inhibitors to mouse macrophages profoundly affects the degradation of proteins involved in signal transduction, we conclude that proteasome-specific degradation of several signaling proteins is likely involved in differential regulation of LPS-dependent secretion of proinflammatory mediators. PMID:21455682

  1. Dynamic changes in subcellular localization of cattle XLF during cell cycle, and focus formation of cattle XLF at DNA damage sites immediately after irradiation.

    PubMed

    Koike, Manabu; Yutoku, Yasutomo; Koike, Aki

    2015-09-01

    Clinically, many chemotherapeutics and ionizing radiation (IR) have been applied for the treatment of various types of human and animal malignancies. These treatments kill tumor cells by causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Core factors of classical nonhomologous DNA-end joining (C-NHEJ) play a vital role in DSB repair. Thus, it is indispensable to clarify the mechanisms of C-NHEJ in order to develop next-generation chemotherapeutics for cancer. The XRCC4-like factor (XLF; also called Cernunnos or NHEJ1) is the lastly identified core NHEJ factor. The localization of core NHEJ factors might play a critical role in regulating NHEJ activity. The localization and function of XLF have not been elucidated in animal species other than mice and humans. Domestic cattle (Bos taurus) are the most common and vital domestic animals in many countries. Here, we show that the localization of cattle XLF changes dynamically during the cell cycle. Furthermore, EYFP-cattle XLF accumulates quickly at microirradiated sites and colocalizes with the DSB marker γH2AX. Moreover, nuclear localization and accumulation of cattle XLF at DSB sites are dependent on 12 amino acids (288-299) of the C-terminal region of XLF (XLF CTR). Furthermore, basic amino acids on the XLF CTR are highly conserved among domestic animals including cattle, goat and horses, suggesting that the CTR is essential for the function of XLF in domestic animals. These findings might be useful to develop the molecular-targeting therapeutic drug taking XLF as a target molecule for human and domestic animals.

  2. Habitat change by the formation of alien Crassostrea-reefs in the Wadden Sea and its role as feeding sites for waterbirds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markert, Alexandra; Esser, Wiebke; Frank, Dietrich; Wehrmann, Achim; Exo, Klaus-Michael

    2013-10-01

    Non-indigenous Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) have been invading the central Wadden Sea since 1998, predominantly settling on intertidal blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) beds which are increasingly transformed into Crassostrea-reefs. Pacific oysters are strong ecosystem engineers and the habitat change is considered to be a threat for waterbirds losing important feeding sites in the intertidal of the Wadden Sea. This study has increased our understanding of the use of foraging habitats by birds according to changing food resources. During the spring and autumn migration period in 2007, we recorded bird densities at two reef types varying in Pacific oyster density and at the adjacent sand flat as a reference site. We also recorded feeding behaviour, choice of prey and assessed peck and intake rate of three target species: Eurasian oystercatcher Haematopus ostralegus, Eurasian curlew Numenius arquata and European herring gull Larus argentatus. To evaluate the use of the Crassostrea-reef in the central Wadden Sea, we compared bird densities of the target species at different intertidal feeding habitats in various regions and compared the biomass intake of Eurasian oystercatcher feeding on different prey species. We show that Eurasian oystercatcher and Eurasian curlew have adapted to the new situation and learned to exploit the food supply offered by Crassostrea-reefs. While foraging mainly on Pacific oysters, Eurasian oystercatchers attained sustainable intake rates even though food resource at dense reef during autumn was very poor due to a lack in harvestable oysters. Consolidation of reefs limits the accessibility of prey for Eurasian oystercatchers whereas a successful recruitment of Pacific oysters enhances the suitability of the habitat. Eurasian curlew was promoted by the engineering effects of the Pacific oyster while feeding extensively on shore crabs at the reefs. In contrast, European herring gulls appear hampered in foraging during low tide and hereby

  3. Dynamic changes in subcellular localization of cattle XLF during cell cycle, and focus formation of cattle XLF at DNA damage sites immediately after irradiation

    PubMed Central

    KOIKE, Manabu; YUTOKU, Yasutomo; KOIKE, Aki

    2015-01-01

    Clinically, many chemotherapeutics and ionizing radiation (IR) have been applied for the treatment of various types of human and animal malignancies. These treatments kill tumor cells by causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Core factors of classical nonhomologous DNA-end joining (C-NHEJ) play a vital role in DSB repair. Thus, it is indispensable to clarify the mechanisms of C-NHEJ in order to develop next-generation chemotherapeutics for cancer. The XRCC4-like factor (XLF; also called Cernunnos or NHEJ1) is the lastly identified core NHEJ factor. The localization of core NHEJ factors might play a critical role in regulating NHEJ activity. The localization and function of XLF have not been elucidated in animal species other than mice and humans. Domestic cattle (Bos taurus) are the most common and vital domestic animals in many countries. Here, we show that the localization of cattle XLF changes dynamically during the cell cycle. Furthermore, EYFP-cattle XLF accumulates quickly at microirradiated sites and colocalizes with the DSB marker γH2AX. Moreover, nuclear localization and accumulation of cattle XLF at DSB sites are dependent on 12 amino acids (288–299) of the C-terminal region of XLF (XLF CTR). Furthermore, basic amino acids on the XLF CTR are highly conserved among domestic animals including cattle, goat and horses, suggesting that the CTR is essential for the function of XLF in domestic animals. These findings might be useful to develop the molecular-targeting therapeutic drug taking XLF as a target molecule for human and domestic animals. PMID:25947322

  4. Part I. Cobalt thiolate complexes modeling the active site of cobalt nitrile hydratase. Part II. Formation of inorganic nanoparticles on protein scaffolding in Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Irene Yuk Man

    Part I. A series of novel cobalt dithiolate complexes with mixed imine/amine ligand systems is presented here as electronic and structural models for the active site in the bacterial enzyme class, nitrile hydratase (NHase). Pentadentate cobalt(II) complexes with S2N 3 ligand environments are first studied as precursors to the more relevant cobalt(III) complexes. Adjustment of the backbone length by removal of a methylene group increases the reactivity of the system; whereas reduction of the two backbone imine bonds to allow free rotation about those bonds may decrease reactivity. Reactivity change due to the replacement of the backbone amine proton with a more sterically challenging methyl group is not yet clear. Upon oxidation, the monocationic pentadentate cobalt(III) complex, 1b, shows promising reactivity similar to that of NHase. The metal's open coordination site allows reversible binding of the endogenous, monoanionic ligands, N 3- and NCS-. Oxygenation of the thiolate sulfur atoms by exposure to O2 and H2O 2 produces sulfenate and sulfinate ligands in complex 8, which resembles the crystal structure of "deactivated" Fe NHase. However, its lack of reactivity argues against the oxygenated enzyme structure as the active form. Six-coordinate cobalt(III) complexes with S2N4 amine/amine ligand systems are also presented as analogues of previously reported iron(III) compounds, which mimic the spectroscopic properties of Fe NHase. The cobalt complexes do not seem to similarly model Co NHase. However, the S = 0 cobalt(III) center can be spectroscopically silent and difficult to detect, making comparison with synthetic models using common techniques hard. Part II. Dodecameric Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase mutant, E165C, stacks along its six-fold axis to produce tubular nanostructures in the presence of some divalent metal ions, as does the wild type enzyme. The centrally located, engineered Cys-165 residues appear to bind to various species and may serve as

  5. Nanopore Detection of 8-Oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine in Immobilized Single-stranded DNA via Adduct Formation to the DNA Damage Site

    PubMed Central

    Schibel, Anna E. P.; An, Na; Jin, Qian; Fleming, Aaron M.; Burrows, Cynthia J.; White, Henry S.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to detect DNA damage within the context of the surrounding sequence is an important goal in medical diagnosis and therapies, but there are no satisfactory methods available to detect a damaged base while providing sequence information. One of the most common base lesions is 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine that occurs during oxidation of guanine. In the work presented here, we demonstrate the detection of a single oxidative damage site using ion channel nanopore methods employing α-hemolysin. Hydantoin lesions produced from further oxidation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine, as well as spirocyclic adducts produced from covalently attaching a primary amine to the spiroiminodihydantoin lesion, were detected by tethering the damaged DNA to streptavidin via a biotin linkage, and capturing the DNA inside an α-hemolysin ion channel. Spirocyclic adducts, in both homo- and hetero-polymer background single-stranded DNA sequences, produced current blockage levels differing by almost 10% from those of native base current blockage levels. These preliminary studies show the applicability of ion channel recordings not only for DNA sequencing, which has recently received much attention, but also to detecting DNA damage, which will be an important component to any sequencing efforts. PMID:21138270

  6. Origin of the local structures at the Philae landing site and possible implications on the formation and evolution of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, F.; Lucchetti, A.; Bibring, J.-P.; Carter, J.; Gondet, B.; Jorda, L.; Langevin, Y.; Pilorget, C.; Capanna, C.; Cremonese, G.

    2016-11-01

    In situ images of the 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko nucleus acquired by the CIVA cameras on-board PHILAE revealed a rough landscape dominated by consolidated materials. These data provide a unique view to constrain the past and present conditions prevailing at the surface of the comet. A quantitative analysis of microscopic structures (fractures and pebbles) is derived using a manual extraction from the images. Fractures/cracks are rather ubiquitous at various spatial scales with network and size (from sub-cm to 10 cm) well correlated to the texture of the landscape. The pebble size distributions are derived and compared to the size distribution of other cometary materials. The nature of the landscape is then discussed in relation to endogenic and exogenic processes of surface modification. The block seen in CIVA no. 1 is interpreted to be close-ups of fractured boulder/cliff belonging to the boulder field identified from the orbit near Abydos, this boulder field being itself the result of gravitational regressive erosion due to sublimation. The observed fractures are best explained by thermal insolation leading to thermal fatigue and/or to loss of volatile materials. This surficial fragmentation (up to >10 cm length) could generate macroscopic erosion that is also visible at larger scale from the orbit. There is at least an intriguing possibility that the pebbles are remnants of primordial accretion processes. We thus speculate that the Abydos landscape could be in favour of pebble accretion model instead of runaway coagulation model with a formation location in the outer region of the Solar system.

  7. Origin of the local structures at the Philae landing site and possible implications on the formation and evolution of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, F.; Lucchetti, A.; Bibring, J.-P.; Carter, J.; Gondet, B.; Jorda, L.; Langevin, Y.; Pilorget, C.; Capanna, C.; Cremonese, G.

    2016-08-01

    In situ images of the 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko nucleus acquired by the CIVA cameras on-board PHILAE revealed a rough landscape dominated by consolidated materials (Bibring et al. 2015). These data provide a unique view to constrain the past and present conditions prevailing at the surface of the comet. A quantitative analysis of microscopic structures (fractures and pebbles) is derived using a manual extraction from the images. Fractures/cracks are rather ubiquitous at various spatial scales with network and size (from sub-cm to 10 cm) well correlated to the texture of the landscape. The pebble size distributions are derived and compared to the size distribution of other cometary materials. The nature of the landscape is then discussed in relation to endogenic and exogenic processes of surface modification. The block seen in CIVA#1 is interpreted to be close-ups of fractured boulder/cliff belonging to the boulder field identified from the orbit near Abydos, this boulder field being itself the result of gravitational regressive erosion due to sublimation. The observed fractures are best explained by thermal insolation leading to thermal fatigue and/or to loss of volatile materials. This surficial fragmentation (up to > 10 cm length) could generate macroscopic erosion that is also visible at larger scale from the orbit. There is at least an intriguing possibility that the pebbles are remnants of primordial accretion processes. We thus speculate that the Abydos landscape could be in favour of pebble accretion model instead of runaway coagulation model with a formation location in the outer region of the Solar System.

  8. Analysis of Site Formation and Assemblage Integrity Does Not Support Attribution of the Uluzzian to Modern Humans at Grotta del Cavallo

    PubMed Central

    Zilhão, João; Banks, William E.; d’Errico, Francesco; Gioia, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Based on the morphology of two deciduous molars and radiocarbon ages from layers D and E of the Grotta del Cavallo (Lecce, Italy), assigned to the Uluzzian, it has been proposed that modern humans were the makers of this Early Upper Paleolithic culture and that this finding considerably weakens the case for an independent emergence of symbolism among western European Neandertals. Reappraisal of the new dating evidence, of the finds curated in the Taranto Antiquities depot, and of coeval publications detailing the site’s 1963–66 excavations shows that (a) Protoaurignacian, Aurignacian and Early Epigravettian lithics exist in the assemblages from layers D and E, (b) even though it contains both inherited and intrusive items, the formation of layer D began during Protoaurignacian times, and (c) the composition of the extant Cavallo assemblages is influenced in a non-negligible manner by the post-hoc assignment of items to stratigraphic units distinct from that of original discovery. In addition, a major disturbance feature affected the 1960s excavation trench down to Mousterian layer F, this feature went unrecognized until 1964, the human remains assigned to the Uluzzian were discovered that year and/or the previous year, and there are contradictions between field reports and the primary anthropological description of the remains as to their morphology and level of provenience. Given these major contextual uncertainties, the Cavallo teeth cannot be used to establish the authorship of the Uluzzian. Since this technocomplex’s start date is ca. 45,000 calendar years ago, a number of Neandertal fossils are dated to this period, and the oldest diagnostic European modern human fossil is the <41,400 year-old Oase 1 mandible, Neandertal authorship of the Uluzzian remains the parsimonious reading of the evidence. PMID:26154139

  9. Isotopic variations within upper oceanic crust at IODP Site 1256: Implications for crustal recycling and the formation of ocean island basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggen, S.; Hoernle, K.; Geldmacher, J.; Hauff, F.

    2007-12-01

    The origin of ocean island basalts (OIBs) is a fundamental question facing Earth scientists. It is commonly agreed that lithospheric material recycled in the mantle is involved in the magma source of OIBs. The relative importance of 1) subducted altered oceanic basaltic crust (AOC), 2) subducted marine sediments and/or 3) delaminated metasomatised subcontinental lithosphere and continental lower crust remains to be resolved. We examine the geochemical composition of a complete in situ section of oceanic crust drilled at Site 1256 during IODP Expeditions 309 and 312. It includes the extrusive layer, sheeted dikes and gabbros of ca. 15 Ma old oceanic crust of the Cocos Plate formed during a period of superfast spreading at the East Pacific Rise. Modeling in the Sr-Nd-Pb-isotope space and comparison with present day radiogenic isotope ratios of OIBs provides constraints on the significance of recycled oceanic crust in the OIB mantle source(s). Our study shows that the generation of sulphides during low- and high-temperature alteration of oceanic crust has a strong influence on U/Pb and Th/Pb ratios and whether an AOC domain evolves relatively low or high Pb-isotope ratios over geological timescales. The model suggests that AOC as the sole precursor material, modified during the subduction process, and after relatively low to moderate recycling ages of ca. 300-800 Ma, is sufficient to explain the Sr-Nd-Pb-isotopic composition of OIBs with Pb-isotopic compositions along or below the Northern Hemisphere Reference Line (NHRL) and relatively high Nd-isotope ratios (e.g. Canaries, Galapagos, Iceland, Madeira). This indicates that additional EM-components, potentially associated with recycled lithospheric material such as subducted sediments, lower continental crust or subcontinental lithosphere, are not required for an array of OIBs, but are only necessary to explain OIBs with Pb-isotope ratios above the NHRL and relatively low Nd- isotope ratios (e.g. Pitcairn, Tristan

  10. The variability of urban aerosol size distributions and optical properties in São Paulo - Brazil: new particle formation events occur at the site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, J.; Rizzo, L. V.; Hakala, J.; Nieminen, T.; Manninen, H. E.; Morais, F.; Aalto, P. P.; Siivola, E.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Artaxo, P.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.

    2011-11-01

    The quest to reduce the dependence on fossil fuel has increased the use of bio-ethanol as an additive to gasoline. The metropolitan area of São Paulo (population 20 million) is a unique laboratory to study the ambient aerosol population caused by the use of bio-fuels because 55% of the fuel used is ethanol. The use of ethanol as an additive to fossil fuel is known to increase aldehyde emissions and when photo chemically oxidized, result in smog. In order to characterize this smog problem total particle number concentration, particle number size distribution, light scattering and light absorption measurement equipment were deployed at the University of São Paulo campus area. Here we present the results from three months of measurements from 10 October 2010 to 10 January 2011. The median total particle number concentration for the sub-micron aerosol typically varies between 1×104-3×104 cm-3 frequently exceeding 5×104 cm-3 during the day. Median diurnal values for light absorption and light scattering vary between 12-33 Mm-1 and 21-64 Mm-1, respectively. The hourly median single-scattering albedo varied between 0.63 and 0.85 indicating a net warming effect on a regional scale. A total of ten new particle formation (NPF) events were observed. During these events, growth rates ranged between 9-25 nm h-1. On average, a calculated sulphuric acid vapour abundance of 2.6× 108 cm-3 would have explained the growth with a vapour production rate of 2.8×106 cm-3 s-1 to sustain it. The estimated sulphuric acid concentration, calculated from global irradiance and sulphur dioxide measurements, accounted for only a fraction of the vapour concentration needed to explain the observed growth rates. This indicates that also other condensable vapours participate in the growth process. During the events, the condensation sink was calculated to be 12× 10-3 s-1 on average.

  11. Transport, biomass burning, and in-situ formation contribute to fine particle concentrations at a remote site near Grand Teton National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurman, M. I.; Lee, T.; Desyaterik, Y.; Schichtel, B. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L.

    2015-07-01

    Ecosystem health and visibility degradation due to fine-mode atmospheric particles have been documented in remote areas and motivate particle characterization that can inform mitigation strategies. This study explores submicron (PM1) particle size, composition, and source apportionment at Grand Teton National Park using High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer data with Positive Matrix Factorization and MODIS fire information. Particulate mass averages 2.08 μg/m3 (max = 21.91 μg/m3) of which 75.0% is organic; PMF-derived Low-Volatility Oxygenated Organic Aerosol (LV-OOA) averages 61.1% of PM1 (or 1.05 μg/m3), with sporadic but higher-concentration biomass burning (BBOA) events contributing another 13.9%. Sulfate (12.5%), ammonium (8.7%), and nitrate (3.8%) are generally low in mass. Ammonium and sulfate have correlated time-series and association with transport from northern Utah and the Snake River Valley. A regionally disperse and/or in situ photochemical LV-OOA source is suggested by 1) afternoon concentration enhancement not correlated with upslope winds, anthropogenic NOx, or ammonium sulfate, 2) smaller particle size, higher polydispersity, and lower levels of oxidation during the day and in comparison to a biomass burning plume inferred to have traveled ∼480 km, and 3) lower degree of oxidation than is usually observed in transported urban plumes and alpine sites with transported anthropogenic OA. CHN fragment spectra suggest organic nitrogen in the form of nitriles and/or pyridines during the day, with the addition of amine fragments at night. Fires near Boise, ID may be the source of a high-concentration biomass-burning event on August 15-16, 2011 associated with SW winds (upslope from the Snake River Valley) and increased sulfate, ammonium, nitrate, and CHN and CHON fragments (nominally, amines and organonitrates). Comparison to limited historical data suggests that the amounts and sources of organics and inorganics presented here

  12. Geomechanical characterization of an Upper Triassic reservoir rock (Stuttgart Formation) in the NE German Basin (pilot site for CO2 storage at Ketzin, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapperer, S.; Moeck, I.; Backers, T.

    2012-04-01

    behavior of rock are the angle of internal friction ψ and cohesion c, representing aspects determining failure occurrence that can be expressed and illustrated by the Mohr Coulomb failure criterion. As for the UCS there is also a wide range of values for ψ (4.06° to 36.98°) and c (10.45 MPa to 49.41 MPa) which differ distinctly within similar lithologies. With respect to these differences further geomechanical tests in combination with petrographic investigations will be in focus to evaluate the impact of lithologal as well as lithofacial characteristics on geomechanical properties. Thus the lithological and lithofacial heterogeneous characteristics of the Stuttgart formation could influence significantly the geomechanical behavior and transmission of stresses resulting from CO2 injection. Therefrom knowledge about these rock mechanical properties helps to provide a save and long term injection and prevent leakage scenarios.

  13. Assessing the impact of anthropogenic pollution on isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol formation in PM2.5 collected from the Birmingham, Alabama, ground site during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rattanavaraha, Weruka; Chu, Kevin; Hapsari Budisulistiorini, Sri; Riva, Matthieu; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Edgerton, Eric S.; Baumann, Karsten; Shaw, Stephanie L.; Guo, Hongyu; King, Laura; Weber, Rodney J.; Neff, Miranda E.; Stone, Elizabeth A.; Offenberg, John H.; Zhang, Zhenfa; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2016-04-01

    In the southeastern US, substantial emissions of isoprene from deciduous trees undergo atmospheric oxidation to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) that contributes to fine particulate matter (PM2.5). Laboratory studies have revealed that anthropogenic pollutants, such as sulfur dioxide (SO2), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), and aerosol acidity, can enhance SOA formation from the hydroxyl radical (OH)-initiated oxidation of isoprene; however, the mechanisms by which specific pollutants enhance isoprene SOA in ambient PM2.5 remain unclear. As one aspect of an investigation to examine how anthropogenic pollutants influence isoprene-derived SOA formation, high-volume PM2.5 filter samples were collected at the Birmingham, Alabama (BHM), ground site during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). Sample extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography-electron ionization-mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS) with prior trimethylsilylation and ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-HR-QTOFMS) to identify known isoprene SOA tracers. Tracers quantified using both surrogate and authentic standards were compared with collocated gas- and particle-phase data as well as meteorological data provided by the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) network to assess the impact of anthropogenic pollution on isoprene-derived SOA formation. Results of this study reveal that isoprene-derived SOA tracers contribute a substantial mass fraction of organic matter (OM) ( ˜ 7 to ˜ 20 %). Isoprene-derived SOA tracers correlated with sulfate (SO42-) (r2 = 0.34, n = 117) but not with NOx. Moderate correlations between methacrylic acid epoxide and hydroxymethyl-methyl-α-lactone (together abbreviated MAE/HMML)-derived SOA tracers with nitrate radical production (P[NO3]) (r2 = 0.57, n = 40) were observed during nighttime, suggesting a potential role of the NO3 radical in

  14. On the Formation and Properties of Interstrand DNA-DNA Cross-links Forged by Reaction of an Abasic Site With the Opposing Guanine Residue of 5′-CAp Sequences in Duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kevin M.; Price, Nathan E.; Wang, Jin; Fekry, Mostafa I.; Dutta, Sanjay; Seiner, Derrick R.; Wang, Yinsheng; Gates, Kent S.

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that the aldehyde residue of an abasic (Ap) site in duplex DNA can generate an interstrand cross-link via reaction with a guanine residue on the opposing strand. This finding is intriguing because the highly deleterious nature of interstrand cross-links suggests that even small amounts of Ap-derived cross-links could make a significant contribution to the biological consequences stemming from the generation of Ap sites in cellular DNA. Incubation of 21-bp duplexes containing a central 5′-CAp sequence under conditions of reductive amination (NaCNBH3, pH 5.2) generated much higher yields of cross-linked DNA than reported previously. At pH 7, in the absence of reducing agents, these Ap-containing duplexes also produced cross-linked duplexes that were readily detected on denaturing polyacrylamide gels. Cross-link formation was not highly sensitive to reaction conditions and, once formed, the cross-link was stable to a variety of work-up conditions. Results of multiple experiments including MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, gel mobility, methoxyamine capping of the Ap aldehyde, inosine-for-guanine replacement, hydroxyl radical footprinting, and LCMS/MS were consistent with a cross-linking mechanism involving reversible reaction of the Ap aldehyde residue with the N2-amino group of the opposing guanine residue in 5′-CAp sequences to generate hemiaminal, imine, or cyclic hemiaminal cross-links (7-10) that were irreversibly converted under conditions of reductive amination (NaCNBH3/pH 5.2) to a stable amine linkage. Further support for the importance of the exocyclic N2-amino group in this reaction was provided by an experiment showing that installation of a 2-aminopurine-thymine base pair at the cross-linking site produced high yields (15-30%) of a cross-linked duplex at neutral pH, in the absence of NaCNBH3. PMID:23215239

  15. AnCF, the CCAAT Binding Complex of Aspergillus nidulans, Is Essential for the Formation of a DNase I-Hypersensitive Site in the 5′ Region of the amdS Gene

    PubMed Central

    Narendja, Frank M.; Davis, Meryl A.; Hynes, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    The CCAAT sequence in the amdS promoter of Aspergillus nidulans is recognized by AnCF, a complex consisting of the three evolutionary conserved subunits HapB, HapC, and HapE. In this study we have investigated the effect of AnCF on the chromatin structure of the amdS gene. The AnCF complex and the CCAAT sequence were found to be necessary for the formation of a nucleosome-free, DNase I-hypersensitive region in the 5′ region of the amdS gene. Deletion of the hapE gene results in loss of the DNase I-hypersensitive site, and the positioning of nucleosomes over the transcriptional start point is lost. Likewise, a point mutation in the CCAAT motif, as well as a 530-bp deletion which removes the CCAAT box, results in the loss of the DNase I-hypersensitive region. The DNase I-hypersensitive region and the nucleosome positioning can be restored by insertion of a 35-bp oligonucleotide carrying the CCAAT motif. A DNase I-hypersensitive region has been found in the CCAAT-containing fmdS gene and was also hapE dependent. These data indicate a critical role for the AnCF complex in establishing an open chromatin structure in A. nidulans. PMID:10490592

  16. AnCF, the CCAAT binding complex of Aspergillus nidulans, is essential for the formation of a DNase I-hypersensitive site in the 5' region of the amdS gene.

    PubMed

    Narendja, F M; Davis, M A; Hynes, M J

    1999-10-01

    The CCAAT sequence in the amdS promoter of Aspergillus nidulans is recognized by AnCF, a complex consisting of the three evolutionary conserved subunits HapB, HapC, and HapE. In this study we have investigated the effect of AnCF on the chromatin structure of the amdS gene. The AnCF complex and the CCAAT sequence were found to be necessary for the formation of a nucleosome-free, DNase I-hypersensitive region in the 5' region of the amdS gene. Deletion of the hapE gene results in loss of the DNase I-hypersensitive site, and the positioning of nucleosomes over the transcriptional start point is lost. Likewise, a point mutation in the CCAAT motif, as well as a 530-bp deletion which removes the CCAAT box, results in the loss of the DNase I-hypersensitive region. The DNase I-hypersensitive region and the nucleosome positioning can be restored by insertion of a 35-bp oligonucleotide carrying the CCAAT motif. A DNase I-hypersensitive region has been found in the CCAAT-containing fmdS gene and was also hapE dependent. These data indicate a critical role for the AnCF complex in establishing an open chromatin structure in A. nidulans.

  17. Analysis of the fluid-pressure responses of the Rustler Formation at H-16 to the construction of the air-intake shaft at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site

    SciTech Connect

    Alvis, J.D.; Saulnier, G.J. Jr.

    1990-03-01

    The construction of the air-intake shaft (AIS) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in 1987 and 1988 initiated fluid-pressure responses which were used to estimate the hydrologic properties of the Culebra Dolomite, Magenta Dolomite, and Forty-niner Members of the Rustler Formation. Fluid-pressure responses were monitored with downhole transducers. The AIS pilot hole,remained open and draining to the underground facility for about three months. The pilot hole was then upreamed from the underground facility to land surface. The pilot hole was drilled and reamed using a bentonite-mud-based brine as a drilling fluid. The well-test simulator GTFM was used to analyze the fluid-pressure responses of the Culebra and Magenta dolomites and the Forty-niner claystone. A cement-invasion skin was used in simulating the Culebra dolomite's drilling/reaming period. A mud-filter-cake skin was used to create reduced wellbore pressures in simulating the pilot-hole drilling/reaming periods of the Magenta dolomite and Forty-niner claystone. 26 refs., 70 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. Value siting

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrar, T.A.; Howes, J.A.

    1995-02-01

    Finding an appropriate site is becoming an increasing challenge in building new power projects. One of the first orders of business in project development is identifying a site that offers the maximum spread between the cost of fuel and net power price. The collection of sites that exhibit an adequate spread - presenting a first-order, acceptable economic expectation - must now be subjected to an ever increasing number of political, societal, technical, and economic exclusion screens. The barriers can include cooling water constraints, community resistance, visual incompatibility, archaeological concerns and endangered species preservation issues. Most power siting difficulties can be substantially mitigated by gaining access to developed, but under-used sites, whose current owners are bound by circumstances - political or financial - that prevent them from using such locations. There are two such categories of sites: Utilities that have sites on which depreciated power production assets rest; and, The federal government, with numerous sites throughout the country, particularly military bases subject to closure under the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) proceedings. It is in the interests of developers, as well as consumers, investors and taxpayers, ti undertake a thorough examination of these overlooked pearls of opportunities and develop their potential.

  19. Gaussian entanglement of formation

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, M.M.; Giedke, G.; Krueger, O.; Werner, R. F.; Cirac, J.I.

    2004-05-01

    We introduce a Gaussian version of the entanglement of formation adapted to bipartite Gaussian states by considering decompositions into pure Gaussian states only. We show that this quantity is an entanglement monotone under Gaussian operations and provide a simplified computation for states of arbitrary many modes. For the case of one mode per site the remaining variational problem can be solved analytically. If the considered state is in addition symmetric with respect to interchanging the two modes, we prove additivity of the considered entanglement measure. Moreover, in this case and considering only a single copy, our entanglement measure coincides with the true entanglement of formation.

  20. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation at the Norbo Underground Nuclear Test in U8c, Nevada Nuclear Security Site, and the Impact on Stability of the Ground Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Pawloski, G A

    2012-06-18

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Containment Program performed a review of nuclear test-related data for the Norbo underground nuclear test in U8c to assist in evaluating this legacy site as a test bed for application technologies for use in On-Site Inspections (OSI) under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. This request is similar to one made for the Salut site in U8c (Pawloski, 2012b). Review of the Norbo site is complicated because the test first exhibited subsurface collapse, which was not unusual, but it then collapsed to the surface over one year later, which was unusual. Of particular interest is the stability of the ground surface above the Norbo detonation point. Proposed methods for on-site verification include radiological signatures, artifacts from nuclear testing activities, and imaging to identify alteration to the subsurface hydrogeology due to the nuclear detonation. Aviva Sussman from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has also proposed work at this site. Both proposals require physical access at or near the ground surface of specific underground nuclear test locations at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and focus on possible activities such as visual observation, multispectral measurements, and shallow and deep geophysical surveys.

  1. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation at the Salut Underground Nuclear Test in U20ak, Nevada National Security Site, and the Impact of Stability of the Ground Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Pawloski, G A

    2012-04-25

    At the request of Jerry Sweeney, the LLNL Containment Program performed a review of nuclear test-related data for the Salut underground nuclear test in U20ak to assist in evaluating this legacy site as a test bed for application technologies for use in On-Site Inspections (OSI) under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. Review of the Salut site is complicated because the test experienced a subsurface, rather than surface, collapse. Of particular interest is the stability of the ground surface above the Salut detonation point. Proposed methods for on-site verification include radiological signatures, artifacts from nuclear testing activities, and imaging to identify alteration to the subsurface hydrogeologogy due to the nuclear detonation. Sweeney's proposal requires physical access at or near the ground surface of specific underground nuclear test locations at the Nevada Nuclear Test Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site), and focuses on possible activities such as visual observation, multispectral measurements, and shallow, and deep geophysical surveys.

  2. Site Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Eric C.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a guide to planning and building a Web site, with an emphasis on setting up a Web server. Discussion includes hiring a consultant, contracts and payment, assembly of teams, training, development of a business plan, registration of domain name, purchase of hardware and software, local area networks, and types of Internet connection. (JKP)

  3. Comet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, J.

    2014-07-01

    There has been vast progress in our understanding of planetesimal formation over the past decades, owing to a number of laboratory experiments as well as to refined models of dust and ice agglomeration in protoplanetary disks. Coagulation rapidly forms cm-sized ''pebbles'' by direct sticking in collisions at low velocities (Güttler et al. 2010; Zsom et al. 2010). For the further growth, two model approaches are currently being discussed: (1) Local concentration of pebbles in nebular instabilities until gravitational instability occurs (Johansen et al. 2007). (2) A competition between fragmentation and mass transfer in collisions among the dusty bodies, in which a few ''lucky winners'' make it to planetesimal sizes (Windmark et al. 2012a,b; Garaud et al. 2013). Predictions of the physical properties of the resulting bodies in both models allow a distinction of the two formation scenarios of planetesimals. In particular, the tensile strength (i.e, the inner cohesion) of the planetesimals differ widely between the two models (Skorov & Blum 2012; Blum et al. 2014). While model (1) predicts tensile strengths on the order of ˜ 1 Pa, model (2) results in rather compactified dusty bodies with tensile strengths in the kPa regime. If comets are km-sized survivors of the planetesimal-formation era, they should in principle hold the secret of their formation process. Water ice is the prime volatile responsible for the activity of comets. Thermophysical models of the heat and mass transport close to the comet-nucleus surface predict water-ice sublimation temperatures that relate to maximum sublimation pressures well below the kPa regime predicted for formation scenario (2). Model (1), however, is in agreement with the observed dust and gas activity of comets. Thus, a formation scenario for cometesimals involving gravitational instability is favored (Blum et al. 2014).

  4. Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klahr, Hubert; Brandner, Wolfgang

    2011-02-01

    1. Historical notes on planet formation Bodenheimer; 2. The formation and evolution of planetary systems Bouwman et al.; 3. Destruction of protoplanetary disks by photoevaporation Richling, Hollenbach and Yorke; 4. Turbulence in protoplanetary accretion disks Klahr, Rozyczka, Dziourkevitch, Wunsch and Johansen; 5. The origin of solids in the early solar system Trieloff and Palme; 6. Experiments on planetesimal formation Wurm and Blum; 7. Dust coagulation in protoplanetary disks Henning, Dullemond, Wolf and Dominik; 8. The accretion of giant planet cores Thommes and Duncan; 9. Planetary transits: direct vision of extrasolar planets Lecavelier des Etangs and Vidal-Madjar; 10. The core accretion - gas capture model Hubickyj; 11. Properties of exoplanets Marcy, Fischer, Butler and Vogt; 12. Giant planet formation: theories meet observations Boss; 13. From hot Jupiters to hot Neptures … and below Lovis, Mayor and Udry; 14. Disk-planet interaction and migration Masset and Kley; 15. The Brown Dwarf - planet relation Bate; 16. From astronomy to astrobiology Brandner; 17. Overview and prospective Lin.

  5. Characterization of Archaeological Sediments Using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) and Portable X-ray Fluorescence (pXRF): An Application to Formative Period Pyro-Industrial Sites in Pacific Coastal Southern Chiapas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Neff, Hector; Bigney, Scott J; Sakai, Sachiko; Burger, Paul R; Garfin, Timothy; George, Richard G; Culleton, Brendan J; Kennett, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    Archaeological sediments from mounds within the mangrove zone of far-southern Pacific coastal Chiapas, Mexico, are characterized in order to test the hypothesis that specialized pyro-technological activities of the region's prehistoric inhabitants (salt and ceramic production) created the accumulations visible today. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) is used to characterize sediment mineralogy, while portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF) is used to determine elemental concentrations. Elemental characterization of natural sediments by both instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and pXRF also contribute to understanding of processes that created the archaeological deposits. Radiocarbon dates combined with typological analysis of ceramics indicate that pyro-industrial activity in the mangrove zone peaked during the Late Formative and Terminal Formative periods, when population and monumental activity on the coastal plain and piedmont were also at their peaks. PMID:26767637

  6. 1994 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  7. Galaxy formation.

    PubMed

    Peebles, P J

    1998-01-01

    It is argued that within the standard Big Bang cosmological model the bulk of the mass of the luminous parts of the large galaxies likely had been assembled by redshift z approximately 10. Galaxy assembly this early would be difficult to fit in the widely discussed adiabatic cold dark matter model for structure formation, but it could agree with an isocurvature version in which the cold dark matter is the remnant of a massive scalar field frozen (or squeezed) from quantum fluctuations during inflation. The squeezed field fluctuations would be Gaussian with zero mean, and the distribution of the field mass therefore would be the square of a random Gaussian process. This offers a possibly interesting new direction for the numerical exploration of models for cosmic structure formation.

  8. Galaxy formation

    PubMed Central

    Peebles, P. J. E.

    1998-01-01

    It is argued that within the standard Big Bang cosmological model the bulk of the mass of the luminous parts of the large galaxies likely had been assembled by redshift z ∼ 10. Galaxy assembly this early would be difficult to fit in the widely discussed adiabatic cold dark matter model for structure formation, but it could agree with an isocurvature version in which the cold dark matter is the remnant of a massive scalar field frozen (or squeezed) from quantum fluctuations during inflation. The squeezed field fluctuations would be Gaussian with zero mean, and the distribution of the field mass therefore would be the square of a random Gaussian process. This offers a possibly interesting new direction for the numerical exploration of models for cosmic structure formation. PMID:9419326

  9. Detection and imaging of the free radical DNA in cells—Site-specific radical formation induced by Fenton chemistry and its repair in cellular DNA as seen by electron spin resonance, immuno-spin trapping and confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Suchandra; Chatterjee, Saurabh; Jiang, JinJie; Sinha, Birandra Kumar; Mason, Ronald P.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress-related damage to the DNA macromolecule produces lesions that are implicated in various diseases. To understand damage to DNA, it is important to study the free radical reactions causing the damage. Measurement of DNA damage has been a matter of debate as most of the available methods measure the end product of a sequence of events and provide limited information on the initial free radical formation. We report a measurement of free radical damage in DNA induced by a Cu(II)-H2O2 oxidizing system using immuno-spin trapping supplemented with electron paramagnetic resonance. In this investigation, the short-lived radical generated is trapped by the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) immediately upon formation. The DMPO adduct formed is initially electron paramagnetic resonance active, but is subsequently oxidized to the stable nitrone adduct, which can be detected and visualized by immuno-spin trapping and has the potential to be further characterized by other analytical techniques. The radical was found to be located on the 2′-deoxyadenosine (dAdo) moiety of DNA. The nitrone adduct was repaired on a time scale consistent with DNA repair. In vivo experiments for the purpose of detecting DMPO–DNA nitrone adducts should be conducted over a range of time in order to avoid missing adducts due to the repair processes. PMID:22387463

  10. Amphiplex Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Shannon; Laaser, Jennifer; Lodge, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Polymer-micelle complexes are currently under heavy investigation due to their potential applications in targeted drug delivery and gene therapy, yet the dynamics of the complex formation is still relatively unstudied. By varying the ratios of poly(styrene sulfonate) chains and cationic poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(styrene) micelles and the ionic strength of the system, we created a variety of complex configurations of different sizes and charges. The complexes were characterized dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements which provided information regarding the hydrodynamic radius, distribution of sizes, and effective charge.

  11. Habit formation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kyle S.; Graybiel, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Habits, both good ones and bad ones, are pervasive in animal behavior. Important frameworks have been developed to understand habits through psychological and neurobiological studies. This work has given us a rich understanding of brain networks that promote habits, and has also helped us to understand what constitutes a habitual behavior as opposed to a behavior that is more flexible and prospective. Mounting evidence from studies using neural recording methods suggests that habit formation is not a simple process. We review this evidence and take the position that habits could be sculpted from multiple dissociable changes in neural activity. These changes occur across multiple brain regions and even within single brain regions. This strategy of classifying components of a habit based on different brain signals provides a potentially useful new way to conceive of disorders that involve overly fixed behaviors as arising from different potential dysfunctions within the brain's habit network. PMID:27069378

  12. Habit formation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kyle S; Graybiel, Ann M

    2016-03-01

    Habits, both good ones and bad ones, are pervasive in animal behavior. Important frameworks have been developed to understand habits through psychological and neurobiological studies. This work has given us a rich understanding of brain networks that promote habits, and has also helped us to understand what constitutes a habitual behavior as opposed to a behavior that is more flexible and prospective. Mounting evidence from studies using neural recording methods suggests that habit formation is not a simple process. We review this evidence and take the position that habits could be sculpted from multiple dissociable changes in neural activity. These changes occur across multiple brain regions and even within single brain regions. This strategy of classifying components of a habit based on different brain signals provides a potentially useful new way to conceive of disorders that involve overly fixed behaviors as arising from different potential dysfunctions within the brain's habit network.

  13. Examining the effects of anthropogenic emissions on isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol formation during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at the Look Rock, Tennessee, ground site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Li, X.; Bairai, S. T.; Renfro, J.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y. J.; McKinney, K. A.; Martin, S. T.; McNeill, V. F.; Pye, H. O. T.; Nenes, A.; Neff, M. E.; Stone, E. A.; Mueller, S.; Knote, C.; Shaw, S. L.; Zhang, Z.; Gold, A.; Surratt, J. D.

    2015-03-01

    A suite of offline and real-time gas- and particle-phase measurements was deployed at Look Rock, Tennessee (TN), during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) to examine the effects of anthropogenic emissions on isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. High- and low-time resolution PM2.5 samples were collected for analysis of known tracer compounds in isoprene-derived SOA by gas chromatography/electron ionization-mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS) and ultra performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection-electrospray ionization-high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/DAD-ESI-HR-QTOFMS). Source apportionment of the organic aerosol (OA) was determined by positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of mass spectrometric data acquired on an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM). Campaign average mass concentrations of the sum of quantified isoprene-derived SOA tracers contributed to ~9% (up to 26%) of the total OA mass, with isoprene-epoxydiol (IEPOX) chemistry accounting for ~97% of the quantified tracers. PMF analysis resolved a factor with a profile similar to the IEPOX-OA factor resolved in an Atlanta study and was therefore designated IEPOX-OA. This factor was strongly correlated (r2>0.7) with 2-methyltetrols, C5-alkene triols, IEPOX-derived organosulfates, and dimers of organosulfates, confirming the role of IEPOX chemistry as the source. On average, IEPOX-derived SOA tracer mass was ~25% (up to 47%) of the IEPOX-OA factor mass, which accounted for 32% of the total OA. A low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and an oxidized factor with a profile similar to 91Fac observed in areas where emissions are biogenic-dominated were also resolved by PMF analysis, whereas no primary organic aerosol (POA) sources could be resolved. These findings were consistent with low levels of primary pollutants, such as nitric oxide (NO~0.03ppb), carbon monoxide (CO~116 ppb), and black carbon (BC~0

  14. Examining the effects of anthropogenic emissions on isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol formation during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at the Look Rock, Tennessee ground site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Li, X.; Bairai, S. T.; Renfro, J.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y. J.; McKinney, K. A.; Martin, S. T.; McNeill, V. F.; Pye, H. O. T.; Nenes, A.; Neff, M. E.; Stone, E. A.; Mueller, S.; Knote, C.; Shaw, S. L.; Zhang, Z.; Gold, A.; Surratt, J. D.

    2015-08-01

    A suite of offline and real-time gas- and particle-phase measurements was deployed at Look Rock, Tennessee (TN), during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) to examine the effects of anthropogenic emissions on isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. High- and low-time-resolution PM2.5 samples were collected for analysis of known tracer compounds in isoprene-derived SOA by gas chromatography/electron ionization-mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS) and ultra performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection-electrospray ionization-high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/DAD-ESI-HR-QTOFMS). Source apportionment of the organic aerosol (OA) was determined by positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of mass spectrometric data acquired on an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM). Campaign average mass concentrations of the sum of quantified isoprene-derived SOA tracers contributed to ~ 9 % (up to 28 %) of the total OA mass, with isoprene-epoxydiol (IEPOX) chemistry accounting for ~ 97 % of the quantified tracers. PMF analysis resolved a factor with a profile similar to the IEPOX-OA factor resolved in an Atlanta study and was therefore designated IEPOX-OA. This factor was strongly correlated (r2 > 0.7) with 2-methyltetrols, C5-alkene triols, IEPOX-derived organosulfates, and dimers of organosulfates, confirming the role of IEPOX chemistry as the source. On average, IEPOX-derived SOA tracer mass was ~ 26 % (up to 49 %) of the IEPOX-OA factor mass, which accounted for 32 % of the total OA. A low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and an oxidized factor with a profile similar to 91Fac observed in areas where emissions are biogenic-dominated were also resolved by PMF analysis, whereas no primary organic aerosol (POA) sources could be resolved. These findings were consistent with low levels of primary pollutants, such as nitric oxide (NO ~ 0.03 ppb), carbon monoxide (CO ~ 116 ppb), and black

  15. An allolactose trapped at the lacZ β-galactosidase active site with its galactosyl moiety in a (4)H3 conformation provides insights into the formation, conformation, and stabilization of the transition state.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Robert W; Huber, Reuben E

    2015-12-01

    When lactose was incubated with G794A-β-galactosidase (a variant with a "closed" active site loop that binds transition state analogs well) an allolactose was trapped with its Gal moiety in a (4)H3 conformation, similar to the oxocarbenium ion-like conformation expected of the transition state. The numerous interactions formed between the (4)H3 structure and β-galactosidase indicate that this structure is representative of the transition state. This conformation is also very similar to that of d-galactono-1,5-lactone, a good transition state analog. Evidence indicates that substrates take up the (4)H3 conformation during migration from the shallow to the deep mode. Steric forces utilizing His418 and other residues are important for positioning the O1 leaving group into a quasi-axial position. An electrostatic interaction between the O5 of the distorted Gal and Tyr503 as well as C-H-π bonds with Trp568 are also significant. Computational studies of the energy of sugar ring distortion show that the β-galactosidase reaction itinerary is driven by energetic considerations in utilization of a (4)H3 transition state with a novel (4)C1-(4)H3-(4)C1 conformation itinerary. To our knowledge, this is the first X-ray crystallographic structural demonstration that the transition state of a natural substrate of a glycosidase has a (4)H3 conformation.

  16. An allolactose trapped at the lacZ β-galactosidase active site with its galactosyl moiety in a (4)H3 conformation provides insights into the formation, conformation, and stabilization of the transition state.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Robert W; Huber, Reuben E

    2015-12-01

    When lactose was incubated with G794A-β-galactosidase (a variant with a "closed" active site loop that binds transition state analogs well) an allolactose was trapped with its Gal moiety in a (4)H3 conformation, similar to the oxocarbenium ion-like conformation expected of the transition state. The numerous interactions formed between the (4)H3 structure and β-galactosidase indicate that this structure is representative of the transition state. This conformation is also very similar to that of d-galactono-1,5-lactone, a good transition state analog. Evidence indicates that substrates take up the (4)H3 conformation during migration from the shallow to the deep mode. Steric forces utilizing His418 and other residues are important for positioning the O1 leaving group into a quasi-axial position. An electrostatic interaction between the O5 of the distorted Gal and Tyr503 as well as C-H-π bonds with Trp568 are also significant. Computational studies of the energy of sugar ring distortion show that the β-galactosidase reaction itinerary is driven by energetic considerations in utilization of a (4)H3 transition state with a novel (4)C1-(4)H3-(4)C1 conformation itinerary. To our knowledge, this is the first X-ray crystallographic structural demonstration that the transition state of a natural substrate of a glycosidase has a (4)H3 conformation. PMID:26291713

  17. SITE EVALUATION OF FIELD PORTABLE PENTACHLOROPHENOL IMMUNOASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four pentachlorophenol (PCP) enzyme immunoassays for environmental analysis have been evaluated through the U.S. EPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. Three assays were formatted for on-site field use and one assay could be used in a field laboratory sett...

  18. Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Rebecca

    2006-03-01

    From the stripes of a zebra and the spots on a leopard's back to the ripples on a sandy beach or desert dune, regular patterns arise everywhere in nature. The appearance and evolution of these phenomena has been a focus of recent research activity across several disciplines. This book provides an introduction to the range of mathematical theory and methods used to analyse and explain these often intricate and beautiful patterns. Bringing together several different approaches, from group theoretic methods to envelope equations and theory of patterns in large-aspect ratio-systems, the book also provides insight behind the selection of one pattern over another. Suitable as an upper-undergraduate textbook for mathematics students or as a fascinating, engaging, and fully illustrated resource for readers in physics and biology, Rebecca Hoyle's book, using a non-partisan approach, unifies a range of techniques used by active researchers in this growing field. Accessible description of the mathematical theory behind fascinating pattern formation in areas such as biology, physics and materials science Collects recent research for the first time in an upper level textbook Features a number of exercises - with solutions online - and worked examples

  19. Barrier Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lyaruu, D.M.; Medina, J.F.; Sarvide, S.; Bervoets, T.J.M.; Everts, V.; DenBesten, P.; Smith, C.E.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Enamel fluorosis is an irreversible structural enamel defect following exposure to supraoptimal levels of fluoride during amelogenesis. We hypothesized that fluorosis is associated with excess release of protons during formation of hypermineralized lines in the mineralizing enamel matrix. We tested this concept by analyzing fluorotic enamel defects in wild-type mice and mice deficient in anion exchanger-2a,b (Ae2a,b), a transmembrane protein in maturation ameloblasts that exchanges extracellular Cl− for bicarbonate. Defects were more pronounced in fluorotic Ae2a,b−/− mice than in fluorotic heterozygous or wild-type mice. Phenotypes included a hypermineralized surface, extensive subsurface hypomineralization, and multiple hypermineralized lines in deeper enamel. Mineral content decreased in all fluoride-exposed and Ae2a,b−/− mice and was strongly correlated with Cl−. Exposure of enamel surfaces underlying maturation-stage ameloblasts to pH indicator dyes suggested the presence of diffusion barriers in fluorotic enamel. These results support the concept that fluoride stimulates hypermineralization at the mineralization front. This causes increased release of protons, which ameloblasts respond to by secreting more bicarbonates at the expense of Cl− levels in enamel. The fluoride-induced hypermineralized lines may form barriers that impede diffusion of proteins and mineral ions into the subsurface layers, thereby delaying biomineralization and causing retention of enamel matrix proteins. PMID:24170372

  20. Late Pleistocene ice margin fluctuations in the Nahanni National Park-UNESCO World Heritage Site and their impact on glacial lake formation and architecture of drainage systems across the Yukon-NWT continental divide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duk-Rodkin, A.; Barendregt, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    In the late Pleistocene the southern Mackenzie region was glaciated by ice masses from a Cordilleran and continental source (Laurentide). Stratigraphic and geomorphologic evidence indicate that the two glaciers occupied this region at different times during the Late Pleistocene. The continental ice sheet advanced over the foothills and up major valleys reaching its maximum extent, ca. 30 ka. B. P. This took place when Cordilleran glaciers were in their initial stages of development. The Laurentide Ice Sheet blocked the drainage of the South Nahanni River near Virginia Falls, forming a glacial lake which inundated an area of approximately 900 km2 at its maximum stand, and had an outlet to the southwest, across the continental divide into the Yukon Territory and eventually into the Pacific Ocean. Lacustrine sediments at various sites reach thicknesses ranging from 110 to 120 metres, at an elevation of around 700 m. Cordilleran glaciers advanced eastward and approximately 5000 years later blocked this southwestward drainage, rerouting it to the east and north along the Mackenzie Mountain front. The drainage was confined between the mountains and continental ice margin where it incised major canyons into the limestone bedrock, and produced a spectacular karst landscape, which today forms part of the Nahanni National Park. During the retreat of the Laurentide and advance of Cordilleran glaciers, glacial Lake Nahanni cut an outlet to the east at First Canyon. This outlet drained into a continuous northbound network of marginal meltwater channels joining the north-flowing drainage that eventually reached the Arctic Ocean, and during further retreat of the ice sheet established the Mackenzie River in its modern location. The presence of Laurentide ice in this region is evidenced by large granite boulders carried from the Canadian Shield. Erratics are found up to 100 km west of the mountain front. Neotectonic activity in the area is interpreted from exposures such as those

  1. DUST FORMATION IN MACRONOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Takami, Hajime; Ioka, Kunihito; Nozawa, Takaya E-mail: kunihito.ioka@kek.jp

    2014-07-01

    We examine dust formation in macronovae (as known as kilonovae), which are the bright ejecta of neutron star binary mergers and one of the leading sites of r-process nucleosynthesis. In light of information about the first macronova candidate associated with GRB 130603B, we find that dust grains of r-process elements have difficulty forming because of the low number density of the r-process atoms, while carbon or elements lighter than iron can condense into dust if they are abundant. Dust grains absorb emission from ejecta with an opacity even greater than that of the r-process elements, and re-emit photons at infrared wavelengths. Such dust emission can potentially account for macronovae without r-process nucleosynthesis as an alternative model. This dust scenario predicts a spectrum with fewer features than the r-process model and day-scale optical-to-ultraviolet emission.

  2. Implementation: Preparing the Site.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Susan Baerg

    1983-01-01

    Considers site requirements that should be specified by the library and the vendor for a library automated system located at a central site away from the library, including size of site, the environment, cleanliness, electrical power, security/safety (fire, restricted access), site certification, telecommunications, and terminal sites. (EJS)

  3. Promoting Your Web Site.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raeder, Aggi

    1997-01-01

    Discussion of ways to promote sites on the World Wide Web focuses on how search engines work and how they retrieve and identify sites. Appropriate Web links for submitting new sites and for Internet marketing are included. (LRW)

  4. Molybdenum and tungsten-dependent formate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Maia, Luisa B; Moura, José J G; Moura, Isabel

    2015-03-01

    The prokaryotic formate metabolism is considerably diversified. Prokaryotes use formate in the C1 metabolism, but also evolved to exploit the low reduction potential of formate to derive energy, by coupling its oxidation to the reduction of numerous electron acceptors. To fulfil these varied physiological roles, different types of formate dehydrogenase (FDH) enzymes have evolved to catalyse the reversible 2-electron oxidation of formate to carbon dioxide. This review will highlight our present knowledge about the diverse physiological roles of FDH in prokaryotes, their modular structural organisation and active site structures and the mechanistic strategies followed to accomplish the formate oxidation. In addition, the ability of FDH to catalyse the reverse reaction of carbon dioxide reduction, a potentially relevant reaction for carbon dioxide sequestration, will also be addressed.

  5. Hanford Site Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. ); Yancey, E.F. )

    1990-01-01

    The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

  6. Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, Jeffrey P.

    2013-02-13

    The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report (HSWMUR) has been created to meet the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Action Plan, Section 3.5, which states: “The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report shall be generated, in a format agreed upon by the Parties, as a calendar year report and issued annually by the DOE by the end of February of each year, and posted electronically for regulator and public access. This report shall reflect all changes made in waste management unit status during the previous year.” This February 2013 version of the HSWMUR contains a comprehensive inventory of the 3427 sites and 564 subsites in the Waste Information Data System (WIDS). The information for each site contains a description of each unit and the waste it contains, where applicable. The WIDS database provides additional information concerning the sites contained in this report and is maintained with daily changes to these sites.

  7. Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, Jeffrey P.

    2012-02-29

    The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report (HSWMUR) has been created to meet the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Action Plan, Section 3.5, which states: “The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report shall be generated, in a format agreed upon by the Parties, as a calendar year report and issued annually by the DOE by the end of February of each year, and posted electronically for regulator and public access. This report shall reflect all changes made in waste management unit status during the previous year.” This February 2012 version of the HSWMUR contains a comprehensive inventory of the 3389 sites and 540 subsites in the Waste Information Data System (WIDS). The information for each site contains a description of each unit and the waste it contains, where applicable. The WIDS database provides additional information concerning the sites contained in this report and is maintained with daily changes to these sites.

  8. Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, Jeffrey P.

    2014-02-19

    The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report (HSWMUR) has been created to meet the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Action Plan, Section 3.5, which states: “The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report shall be generated, in a format agreed upon by the Parties, as a calendar year report and issued annually by the DOE by the end of February of each year, and posted electronically for regulator and public access. This report shall reflect all changes made in waste management unit status during the previous year.” This February 2013 version of the HSWMUR contains a comprehensive inventory of the 3438 sites and 569 subsites in the Waste Information Data System (WIDS). The information for each site contains a description of each unit and the waste it contains, where applicable. The WIDS database provides additional information concerning the sites contained in this report and is maintained with daily changes to these sites.

  9. The ASCD Healthy School Communities Project: Formative Evaluation Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valois, Robert F.; Lewallen, Theresa C.; Slade, Sean; Tasco, Adriane N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report the formative evaluation results from the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Healthy School Communities (HSC) pilot project. Design/methodology/approach: This study utilized 11 HSC pilot sites in the USA (eight sites) and Canada (three sites). The evaluation question was…

  10. Low Abundant N-linked Glycosylation in Hen Egg White Lysozyme Is Localized at Nonconsensus Sites.

    PubMed

    Asperger, Arndt; Marx, Kristina; Albers, Christian; Molin, Laura; Pinato, Odra

    2015-06-01

    Although wild-type hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) is lacking the consensus sequence motif NX(S/T), in 1995 Trudel et al. (Biochem. Cell Biol. 1995, 73, 307-309) proposed the existence of a low abundant N-glycosylated form of HEL; however, the identity of active glycosylation sites in HEL remained a matter of speculation. For the first time since Trudel's initial work, we report here a comprehensive characterization by means of mass spectrometry of N-glycosylation in wild-type HEL. Our analytical approach comprised ZIC-HILIC enrichment of N-glycopeptides from HEL trypsin digest, deglycosylation by (18)O/PNGase F as well as by various endoglycosidases, and LC-MS/MS analysis of both intact and deglycosylated N-glycopeptides engaging multiple techniques of ionization and fragmentation. A novel data interpretation workflow based on MS/MS spectra classification and glycan database searching enabled the straightforward identification of the asparagine-rich N-glycopeptide [34-45] FESNFNTQATNR and allowed for compositional profiling of its modifying N-glycans. The overall heterogeneity profile of N-glycans in HEL comprised at least 26 different compositions. Results obtained from deglycosylation experiments provided clear evidence of asparagine residues N44 and N39 representing active glycosylation sites in HEL. Both of these sites do not fall into any known N-glycosylation-specific sequence motif but are localized in rarely observed nonconsensus sequons (NXN, NXQ).

  11. Low Abundant N-linked Glycosylation in Hen Egg White Lysozyme Is Localized at Nonconsensus Sites.

    PubMed

    Asperger, Arndt; Marx, Kristina; Albers, Christian; Molin, Laura; Pinato, Odra

    2015-06-01

    Although wild-type hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) is lacking the consensus sequence motif NX(S/T), in 1995 Trudel et al. (Biochem. Cell Biol. 1995, 73, 307-309) proposed the existence of a low abundant N-glycosylated form of HEL; however, the identity of active glycosylation sites in HEL remained a matter of speculation. For the first time since Trudel's initial work, we report here a comprehensive characterization by means of mass spectrometry of N-glycosylation in wild-type HEL. Our analytical approach comprised ZIC-HILIC enrichment of N-glycopeptides from HEL trypsin digest, deglycosylation by (18)O/PNGase F as well as by various endoglycosidases, and LC-MS/MS analysis of both intact and deglycosylated N-glycopeptides engaging multiple techniques of ionization and fragmentation. A novel data interpretation workflow based on MS/MS spectra classification and glycan database searching enabled the straightforward identification of the asparagine-rich N-glycopeptide [34-45] FESNFNTQATNR and allowed for compositional profiling of its modifying N-glycans. The overall heterogeneity profile of N-glycans in HEL comprised at least 26 different compositions. Results obtained from deglycosylation experiments provided clear evidence of asparagine residues N44 and N39 representing active glycosylation sites in HEL. Both of these sites do not fall into any known N-glycosylation-specific sequence motif but are localized in rarely observed nonconsensus sequons (NXN, NXQ). PMID:25964011

  12. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1993 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This annual Site Environmental Report summarizes Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s (LBL`s) environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1993. The purpose of this report is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. Its format and content are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  13. Cyclic Imide Dioxime: Formation and Hydrolytic Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.O.; Vukovic, Sinisa; Custelcean, Radu; Hay, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Poly(acrylamidoximes) play an important role in the uranium extraction from seawater. The present work reports solution studies of simple analogs to address the formation and stability of two binding sites present in these polymers, open-chain amidoximes and cyclic imide dioximes, including: 1) conditions that maximize the formation of the cyclic form, 2) existence of a base-induced conversion from open-chain to cyclic form, and 3) degradation under acid and base conditions.

  14. Statins and bone formation.

    PubMed

    Garrett, I R; Gutierrez, G; Mundy, G R

    2001-05-01

    The main therapy needed most in the bone field is an anabolic agent for the treatment of osteoporosis. Current drugs on the market, which included bisphosphonates, calcitonin, estrogen and related compounds, vitamin D analogues trabecular microarchitecture. Therefore, it would be desirable to have a satisfactory and universally and iprifalvone, are essentially bone resorption inhibitors that mainly act to stabilize bone mass. Patients with established osteoporosis have lost more than 50% of their bone mass at critical sites in the skeleton, and more over have marked disruption of acceptable drug that would stimulate new bone formation and correct this disturbance of trabecular microarchitecture characteristic of established osteoporosis. Recently inhibitors of the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase, which controls the first step in the biosynthesis of cholesterol, have been shown to stimulate bone formation in rodents both in vitro and in vivo. The effect is associated with an increased expression of the bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) gene in bone cells. These statins drugs are widely used agents for lowering cholesterol and reducing heart attacks, however they are also known to elicit numerous pleiotropic effects including inhibition of proliferation and migration of smooth muscle cells, inhibition of tumor growth and anti-inflammatory activity. Some of these effects have been attributed to not only to the reduction of cholesterol synthesis by inhibition of the HMG-CoA reductase enzyme but also by the concurrent reduction in downstream metabolites of the mevalonate pathway such as mevalonate, farnesyl pyrophosphate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. The findings that statins are capable of increasing bone formation and bone mass in rodents suggests a potential new action for the statins, which may be beneficial in patients with established osteoporosis where marked bone loss has occurred. Recent clinical data suggests that they

  15. Common File Formats.

    PubMed

    Mills, Lauren

    2014-03-21

    An overview of the many file formats commonly used in bioinformatics and genome sequence analysis is presented, including various data file formats, alignment file formats, and annotation file formats. Example workflows illustrate how some of the different file types are typically used.

  16. Hanford Site Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Hathaway, H.B.; Daly, K.S.; Rinne, C.A.; Seiler, S.W.

    1993-05-01

    The Hanford Site Development Plan (HSDP) provides an overview of land use, infrastructure, and facility requirements to support US Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site. The HSDP`s primary purpose is to inform senior managers and interested parties of development activities and issues that require a commitment of resources to support the Hanford Site. The HSDP provides an existing and future land use plan for the Hanford Site. The HSDP is updated annually in accordance with DOE Order 4320.1B, Site Development Planning, to reflect the mission and overall site development process. Further details about Hanford Site development are defined in individual area development plans.

  17. SCHOOL SITE STANDARDS AND SITE SELECTION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    THIS REPORT PRESENTS ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOL SITE DEVELOPMENT DATA COMPILED BY THE DIVISION OF EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES PLANNING, NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. ENROLLMENT FIGURES USED REPRESENT THE ULTIMATE SIZE OF THE SCHOOLS. THE STANDARDS ARE MINIMUM FOR THE STATE OF NEW YORK WITH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SITES BASED ON THREE ACRES PLUS…

  18. Remedial Action Plan and Site Design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Appendix C to Attachment 3, Calculations. Final

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This volume contains calculations for: Slick Rock processing sites background ground water quality; Slick Rock processing sites lysimeter water quality; Slick Rock processing sites on-site and downgradient ground water quality; Slick Rock disposal site background water quality; Burro Canyon disposal site, Slick Rock, Colorado, average hydraulic gradients and average liner ground water velocities in the upper, middle, and lower sandstone units of the Burro Canyon formation; Slick Rock--Burro Canyon disposal site, Burro Canyon pumping and slug tests--analyses; water balance and surface contours--Burro Canyon disposal cell; and analytical calculation of drawdown in a hypothetical well completed in the upper sandstone unit of the Burro Canyon formation.

  19. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    PubMed Central

    Crable, Bryan R.; Plugge, Caroline M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is produced by either CoA-dependent cleavage of pyruvate or enzymatic reduction of CO2 in an NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent manner. Formate is consumed through oxidation to CO2 and H2 or can be further reduced via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for carbon fixation or industrially for the production of methanol. Here, we review the enzymes involved in the interconversion of formate and discuss potential applications for biofuels production. PMID:21687599

  20. Catalysis of Dialanine Formation by Glycine in the Salt-Induced Peptide Formation Reaction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwannachot, Yuttana; Rode, Bernd M.

    1998-02-01

    Mutual catalysis of amino acids in the salt-induced peptide formation (SIPF) reaction is demonstrated for the case of glycine/alanine. The presence of glycine enhances dialanine formation by a factor up to 50 and enables dialanine formation at much lower alanine concentrations. The actual amounts of glycine play an important role for this catalytic effect, the optimal glycine concentration is 1/8 of the alanine concentration. The mechanism appears to be based on the formation of the intermediate Gly-Ala-Ala tripeptide, connected to one coordination site of copper(II) ion, and subsequent hydrolysis to dialanine and glycine.

  1. Site amplifications for generic rock sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, D.M.; Joyner, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    Seismic shear-wave velocity as a function of depth for generic rock sites has been estimated from borehole data and studies of crustal velocities, and these velocities have been used to compute frequency-dependent amplifications for zero attenuation for use in simulations of strong ground motion. We define a generic rock site as one whose velocity at shallow depths equals the average of those from the rock sites sampled by the borehole data. Most of the boreholes are in populated areas; for that reason, the rock sites sampled are of particular engineering significance. We consider two generic rock sites: rock, corresponding to the bulk of the borehole data, and very hard rock, such as is found in glaciated regions in large areas of eastern North America or in portions of western North America. The amplifications on rock sites can be in excess of 3.5 at high frequencies, in contrast to the amplifications of less than 1.2 on very hard rock sites. The consideration of unattenuated amplification alone is computationally convenient, but what matters for ground-motion estimation is the combined effect of amplification and attenuation. For reasonable values of the attenuation parameter K0, the combined effect of attenuation and amplification for rock sites peaks between about 2 and 5 Hz with a maximum level of less than 1.8. The combined effect is about a factor of 1.5 at 1 Hz and is less than unity for frequencies in the range of 10 to 20 Hz (depending on K0). Using these amplifications, we find provisional values of about ???? = 70 bars and K0 = 0.035 sec for rock sites in western North America by fitting our empirically determined response spectra for an M 6.5 event to simulated values. The borehole data yield shear velocities (V??30) of 618 and 306 m/sec for "rock" and "soil" sites, respectively, when averaged over the upper 30 m. From this, we recommend that V??30 equals 620 and 310 m/sec for applications requiring the average velocity for rock and soil sites in

  2. Yes! You Can Build a Web Site.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzberg, Carol

    2001-01-01

    With specially formatted templates or simple Web page editors, teachers can lay out text and graphics in a work space resembling the interface of a word processor. Several options are presented to help teachers build Web sites. ree templates include Class Homepage Builder, AppliTools: HomePage, MySchoolOnline.com, and BigChalk.com. Web design…

  3. Development of a Learning Progression for the Formation of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, Julia D.; Palma, Christopher; Flarend, Alice; Rubin, KeriAnn; Shiou Ong, Yann; Botzer, Brandon; McDonald, Scott; Furman, Tanya

    2015-06-01

    This study describes the process of defining a hypothetical learning progression (LP) for astronomy around the big idea of Solar System formation. At the most sophisticated level, students can explain how the formation process led to the current Solar System by considering how the planets formed from the collapse of a rotating cloud of gas and dust. Development of this LP was conducted in 2 phases. First, we interviewed middle school, high school, and college students (N = 44), asking them to describe properties of the current Solar System and to explain how the Solar System was formed. Second, we interviewed 6th-grade students (N = 24) before and after a 15-week astronomy curriculum designed around the big idea. Our analysis provides evidence for potential levels of sophistication within the hypothetical LP, while also revealing common alternative conceptions or areas of limited understanding that could form barriers to progress if not addressed by instruction. For example, many students' understanding of Solar System phenomena was limited by either alternative ideas about gravity or limited application of momentum in their explanations. Few students approached a scientific-level explanation, but their responses revealed possible stepping stones that could be built upon with appropriate instruction.

  4. Dispersal of smallmouth bass from a simulated tournament weigh-in site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaintz, Melissa A.; Bettoli, Phillip William

    2010-01-01

    Simulated smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu fishing tournaments were staged in Dale Hollow Lake, a 12,400-ha reservoir in Tennessee, between March 2004 and February 2005 to investigate posttournament dispersal. Smallmouth bass (n = 54) were captured with conventional hook-and-line tackle and artificial lures, placed in live wells, and subjected to a weigh-in procedure before being externally tagged with an ultrasonic transmitter and released. Water temperatures ranged from 7.4°C to 29.3°C (mean [SE] = 17.6°C [2.5]), fish ranged in total length from 330 to 572 mm (mean = 452 [8.3]), and no fish were dead at the weigh-ins. Smallmouth bass dispersed rapidly away from the release site, which was located at the head of a 68-ha embayment. After 3-5d, survivors (n = 44) traversed an average distance of 1,475 m [213]. Most (72%) fish swam uplake and out of the 385-ha study area after 6 d. The rapid dispersal of smallmouth bass may be relevant in systems that experience heavy tournament activity. The smallmouth bass caught and subjected to simulated tournament conditions on Dale Hollow Lake did not stockpile near the release site.

  5. Field site selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, D. E.; Ellefsen, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Several general guidelines should be kept in mind when considering the selection of field sites for teaching remote sensing fundamentals. Proximity and vantage point are two very practical considerations. Only through viewing a broad enough area to place the site in context can one make efficient use of a site. The effects of inclement weather when selecting sites should be considered. If field work is to be an effective tool to illustrate remote sensing principles, the following criteria are critical: (1) the site must represent the range of class interest; (2) the site must have a theme or add something no other site offers; (3) there should be intrasite variation within the theme; (4) ground resolution and spectral signature distinction should be illustrated; and (5) the sites should not be ordered sequentially.

  6. SMARTE'S SITE CHARACTERIZATION TOOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Site Characterization involves collecting environmental data to evaluate the nature and extent of contamination. Environmental data could consist of chemical analyses of soil, sediment, water or air samples. Typically site characterization data are statistically evaluated for thr...

  7. The Format Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oder, Norman

    2002-01-01

    Reports results of a survey of public libraries that investigated trends in audiovisual materials. Highlights include format issues; audiobooks; media budgets for various formats; video collections; DVDs; circulation; collection sizes; music CDs; and future possibilities. (LRW)

  8. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  9. The role of fanatics in consensus formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gündüç, Semra

    2015-08-01

    A model of opinion dynamics with two types of agents as social actors are presented, using the Ising thermodynamic model as the dynamics template. The agents are considered as opportunists which live at sites and interact with the neighbors, or fanatics/missionaries which move from site to site randomly in persuasion of converting agents of opposite opinion with the help of opportunists. Here, the moving agents act as an external influence on the opportunists to convert them to the opposite opinion. It is shown by numerical simulations that such dynamics of opinion formation may explain some details of consensus formation even when one of the opinions are held by a minority. Regardless the distribution of the opinion, different size societies exhibit different opinion formation behavior and time scales. In order to understand general behavior, the scaling relations obtained by comparing opinion formation processes observed in societies with varying population and number of randomly moving agents are studied. For the proposed model two types of scaling relations are observed. In fixed size societies, increasing the number of randomly moving agents give a scaling relation for the time scale of the opinion formation process. The second type of scaling relation is due to the size dependent information propagation in finite but large systems, namely finite-size scaling.

  10. Simple Ontology Format (SOFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokine, Alexandre

    2011-10-01

    Simple Ontology Format (SOFT) library and file format specification provides a set of simple tools for developing and maintaining ontologies. The library, implemented as a perl module, supports parsing and verification of the files in SOFt format, operations with ontologies (adding, removing, or filtering of entities), and converting of ontologies into other formats. SOFT allows users to quickly create ontologies using only a basic text editor, verify it, and portray it in a graph layout system using customized styles.

  11. Record Formatting: MARC AMC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Lisa B.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses how archivists use the MARC AMC (Archival and Manuscripts Control) format for descriptive information about archival materials. Modifications that MARC AMC introduced to the standard MARC bibliographic formats are explained, and examples of a record in AMC formats on different bibliographic utilities are given. (24 references) (LRW)

  12. Generalized trends in the formation energies of perovskite oxides.

    PubMed

    Zeng, ZhenHua; Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Mogensen, Mogens B; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2013-05-28

    Generalized trends in the formation energies of several families of perovskite oxides (ABO3) and plausible explanations to their existence are provided in this study through a combination of DFT calculations, solid-state physics analyses and simple physical/chemical descriptors. The studied elements at the A site of perovskites comprise rare-earth, alkaline-earth and alkaline metals, whereas 3d and 5d metals were studied at the B site. We also include ReO3-type compounds, which have the same crystal structure of cubic ABO3 perovskites except without A-site elements. From the observations we extract the following four conclusions for the perovskites studied in the present paper: for a given cation at the B site, (I) perovskites with cations of identical oxidation state at the A site possess close formation energies; and (II) perovskites with cations of different oxidation states at the A site usually have quite different but ordered formation energies. On the other hand, for a given A-site cation, (III) the formation energies of perovskites vary linearly with respect to the atomic number of the elements at the B site within the same period of the periodic table, and the slopes depend systematically on the oxidation state of the A-site cation; and (IV) the trends in formation energies of perovskites with elements from different periods at the B site depend on the oxidation state of A-site cations. Since the energetics of perovskites is shown to be the superposition of the individual contributions of their constituent oxides, the trends can be rationalized in terms of A-O and B-O interactions in the ionic crystal. These findings reveal the existence of general systematic trends in the formation energies of perovskites and provide further insight into the role of ion-ion interactions in the properties of ternary compounds.

  13. Generalized trends in the formation energies of perovskite oxides.

    PubMed

    Zeng, ZhenHua; Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Mogensen, Mogens B; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2013-05-28

    Generalized trends in the formation energies of several families of perovskite oxides (ABO3) and plausible explanations to their existence are provided in this study through a combination of DFT calculations, solid-state physics analyses and simple physical/chemical descriptors. The studied elements at the A site of perovskites comprise rare-earth, alkaline-earth and alkaline metals, whereas 3d and 5d metals were studied at the B site. We also include ReO3-type compounds, which have the same crystal structure of cubic ABO3 perovskites except without A-site elements. From the observations we extract the following four conclusions for the perovskites studied in the present paper: for a given cation at the B site, (I) perovskites with cations of identical oxidation state at the A site possess close formation energies; and (II) perovskites with cations of different oxidation states at the A site usually have quite different but ordered formation energies. On the other hand, for a given A-site cation, (III) the formation energies of perovskites vary linearly with respect to the atomic number of the elements at the B site within the same period of the periodic table, and the slopes depend systematically on the oxidation state of the A-site cation; and (IV) the trends in formation energies of perovskites with elements from different periods at the B site depend on the oxidation state of A-site cations. Since the energetics of perovskites is shown to be the superposition of the individual contributions of their constituent oxides, the trends can be rationalized in terms of A-O and B-O interactions in the ionic crystal. These findings reveal the existence of general systematic trends in the formation energies of perovskites and provide further insight into the role of ion-ion interactions in the properties of ternary compounds. PMID:23579382

  14. The effect of conventional surgery and piezoelectric surgery bone harvesting techniques on the donor site morbidity of the mandibular ramus and symphysis.

    PubMed

    Altiparmak, N; Soydan, S S; Uckan, S

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the morbidity following bone harvesting at two different intraoral donor sites, mandibular symphysis and ramus, and to determine the effects of piezoelectric and conventional surgical graft harvesting techniques on donor site morbidity. Intraoral block bone grafts were harvested from the symphysis (n=44) and ramus (n=31). The two donor site groups were divided into two subgroups according to the surgical graft harvesting method used (conventional or piezoelectric surgery). Intraoperative and postoperative pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Donor site morbidity and the harvesting techniques were compared statistically. Of 290 teeth evaluated in the symphysis group, four needed root canal treatment after surgery. The incidence of transient paresthesia in the mucosa was significantly higher in the symphysis group than in the ramus group (P=0.004). In the symphysis group, the incidence of temporary skin and mucosa paresthesia was lower in the piezoelectric surgery subgroup than in the conventional surgery subgroup (P=0.006 and P=0.001, respectively). No permanent anaesthesia of any region of the skin was reported in either donor site group. VAS scores did not differ between the ramus and symphysis harvesting groups, or between the piezoelectric and conventional surgery subgroups. When the symphysis was chosen as the donor site, minor sensory disturbances of the mucosa and teeth were recorded. The use of piezoelectric surgery during intraoral harvesting of bone blocks, especially from the symphysis, can reduce these complications.

  15. Formation of polarity convergences underlying shoot outgrowths.

    PubMed

    Abley, Katie; Sauret-Güeto, Susanna; Marée, Athanasius Fm; Coen, Enrico

    2016-08-01

    The development of outgrowths from plant shoots depends on formation of epidermal sites of cell polarity convergence with high intracellular auxin at their centre. A parsimonious model for generation of convergence sites is that cell polarity for the auxin transporter PIN1 orients up auxin gradients, as this spontaneously generates convergent alignments. Here we test predictions of this and other models for the patterns of auxin biosynthesis and import. Live imaging of outgrowths from kanadi1 kanadi2 Arabidopsis mutant leaves shows that they arise by formation of PIN1 convergence sites within a proximodistal polarity field. PIN1 polarities are oriented away from regions of high auxin biosynthesis enzyme expression, and towards regions of high auxin importer expression. Both expression patterns are required for normal outgrowth emergence, and may form part of a common module underlying shoot outgrowths. These findings are more consistent with models that spontaneously generate tandem rather than convergent alignments.

  16. Formation of polarity convergences underlying shoot outgrowths.

    PubMed

    Abley, Katie; Sauret-Güeto, Susanna; Marée, Athanasius Fm; Coen, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The development of outgrowths from plant shoots depends on formation of epidermal sites of cell polarity convergence with high intracellular auxin at their centre. A parsimonious model for generation of convergence sites is that cell polarity for the auxin transporter PIN1 orients up auxin gradients, as this spontaneously generates convergent alignments. Here we test predictions of this and other models for the patterns of auxin biosynthesis and import. Live imaging of outgrowths from kanadi1 kanadi2 Arabidopsis mutant leaves shows that they arise by formation of PIN1 convergence sites within a proximodistal polarity field. PIN1 polarities are oriented away from regions of high auxin biosynthesis enzyme expression, and towards regions of high auxin importer expression. Both expression patterns are required for normal outgrowth emergence, and may form part of a common module underlying shoot outgrowths. These findings are more consistent with models that spontaneously generate tandem rather than convergent alignments. PMID:27478985

  17. Site Environmental Report, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.`` This 1993 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in the Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here.

  18. Tomography finds waste sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan M.

    Geophysical diffraction tomography (GDT), a remote sensing method, is being developed for hazardous waste site characterization by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tenn., with the support of the U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.More accurate assessment of hazardous sites translates into more efficient and less costly cleanup efforts by defining parameters such as waste site boundaries, geophysical site characteristics, buried container leakage, and hazardous material migration. Remote sensing devices eliminate the potential for environmental damage, safety hazards, or high costs associated with intrusive site characterization techniques.

  19. Beaver assisted river valley formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westbrook, C.J.; Cooper, D.J.; Baker, B.W.

    2011-01-01

    We examined how beaver dams affect key ecosystem processes, including pattern and process of sediment deposition, the composition and spatial pattern of vegetation, and nutrient loading and processing. We provide new evidence for the formation of heterogeneous beaver meadows on riverine system floodplains and terraces where dynamic flows are capable of breaching in-channel beaver dams. Our data show a 1.7-m high beaver dam triggered overbank flooding that drowned vegetation in areas deeply flooded, deposited nutrient-rich sediment in a spatially heterogeneous pattern on the floodplain and terrace, and scoured soils in other areas. The site quickly de-watered following the dam breach by high stream flows, protecting the deposited sediment from future re-mobilization by overbank floods. Bare sediment either exposed by scouring or deposited by the beaver flood was quickly colonized by a spatially heterogeneous plant community, forming a beaver meadow. Many willow and some aspen seedlings established in the more heavily disturbed areas, suggesting the site may succeed to a willow carr plant community suitable for future beaver re-occupation. We expand existing theory beyond the beaver pond to include terraces within valleys. This more fully explains how beavers can help drive the formation of alluvial valleys and their complex vegetation patterns as was first postulated by Ruedemann and Schoonmaker in 1938. ?? 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Possible mechanisms of macrolayer formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sadasivan, P.; Chappidi, P.R.; Unal, C.; Nelson, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    The high heat flux nucleate boiling region, also called the vapor mushroom region, has been shown to have a thin liquid layer on the heater surface under the large mushroom-shaped vapor bubbles that grow from the heater surface. The name given to this liquid layer is the macrolayer to differentiate it from the microlayer that exists under the discrete bubbles found at lower heat fluxes in the nucleate boiling region. Typical thicknesses of this macrolayer range from 50 to 500 {mu}m for water on a flat horizontal boiling surface and depend upon the heat flux. Thus, the macrolayer is thicker than the wedge-shaped microlayers, found under discrete bubbles, which range in thickness from 1 to 10 {mu}m. Although the mechanism of microlayer formation and its evaporation is conceptually simple that of the macrolayer is still not understood. This paper critically compares the potential mechanisms proposed for macrolayer formation. These mechanisms include the Helmholtz instability applied to the vapor stem above active nucleation sites, liquid trapped by lateral coalescence of discrete bubbles that initially form during the mushroom bubble's waiting period, and the limitation of liquid resupply at mushroom departure as a result of vapor flow from the active nucleation sites.

  1. Possible mechanisms of macrolayer formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sadasivan, P.; Chappidi, P.R.; Unal, C.; Nelson, R.A.

    1992-05-01

    The high heat flux nucleate boiling region, also called the vapor mushroom region, has been shown to have a thin liquid layer on the heater surface under the large mushroom-shaped vapor bubbles that grow from the heater surface. The name given to this liquid layer is the macrolayer to differentiate it from the microlayer that exists under the discrete bubbles found at lower heat fluxes in the nucleate boiling region. Typical thicknesses of this macrolayer range from 50 to 500 {mu}m for water on a flat horizontal boiling surface and depend upon the heat flux. Thus, the macrolayer is thicker than the wedge-shaped microlayers, found under discrete bubbles, which range in thickness from 1 to 10 {mu}m. Although the mechanism of microlayer formation and its evaporation is conceptually simple that of the macrolayer is still not understood. This paper critically compares the potential mechanisms proposed for macrolayer formation. These mechanisms include the Helmholtz instability applied to the vapor stem above active nucleation sites, liquid trapped by lateral coalescence of discrete bubbles that initially form during the mushroom bubble`s waiting period, and the limitation of liquid resupply at mushroom departure as a result of vapor flow from the active nucleation sites.

  2. Rulison Site corrective action report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    Project Rulison was a joint US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and Austral Oil Company (Austral) experiment, conducted under the AEC`s Plowshare Program, to evaluate the feasibility of using a nuclear device to stimulate natural gas production in low-permeability gas-producing geologic formations. The experiment was conducted on September 10, 1969, and consisted of detonating a 40-kiloton nuclear device at a depth of 2,568 m below ground surface (BGS). This Corrective Action Report describes the cleanup of petroleum hydrocarbon- and heavy-metal-contaminated sediments from an old drilling effluent pond and characterization of the mud pits used during drilling of the R-EX well at the Rulison Site. The Rulison Site is located approximately 65 kilometers (40 miles) northeast of Grand Junction, Colorado. The effluent pond was used for the storage of drilling mud during drilling of the emplacement hole for the 1969 gas stimulation test conducted by the AEC. This report also describes the activities performed to determine whether contamination is present in mud pits used during the drilling of well R-EX, the gas production well drilled at the site to evaluate the effectiveness of the detonation in stimulating gas production. The investigation activities described in this report were conducted during the autumn of 1995, concurrent with the cleanup of the drilling effluent pond. This report describes the activities performed during the soil investigation and provides the analytical results for the samples collected during that investigation.

  3. Medical image file formats.

    PubMed

    Larobina, Michele; Murino, Loredana

    2014-04-01

    Image file format is often a confusing aspect for someone wishing to process medical images. This article presents a demystifying overview of the major file formats currently used in medical imaging: Analyze, Neuroimaging Informatics Technology Initiative (Nifti), Minc, and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom). Concepts common to all file formats, such as pixel depth, photometric interpretation, metadata, and pixel data, are first presented. Then, the characteristics and strengths of the various formats are discussed. The review concludes with some predictive considerations about the future trends in medical image file formats.

  4. Medical image file formats.

    PubMed

    Larobina, Michele; Murino, Loredana

    2014-04-01

    Image file format is often a confusing aspect for someone wishing to process medical images. This article presents a demystifying overview of the major file formats currently used in medical imaging: Analyze, Neuroimaging Informatics Technology Initiative (Nifti), Minc, and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom). Concepts common to all file formats, such as pixel depth, photometric interpretation, metadata, and pixel data, are first presented. Then, the characteristics and strengths of the various formats are discussed. The review concludes with some predictive considerations about the future trends in medical image file formats. PMID:24338090

  5. Hanford Site Comprehensive site Compliance Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tollefson, K.S.

    1997-08-05

    This document is the second annual submittal by WHC, ICF/KH, PNL and BHI and contains the results of inspections of the stormwater outfalls listed in the Hanford Site Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) (WHC 1993a) as required by General Permit No. WA-R-00-000F (WA-R-00-A17F): This report also describes the methods used to conduct the Storm Water Comprehensive Site Compliance Evaluation, as required in Part IV, Section D, {ampersand} C of the General Permit, summarizes the results of the compliance evaluation, and documents significant leaks and spills.

  6. Memory Formation Shaped by Astroglia

    PubMed Central

    Zorec, Robert; Horvat, Anemari; Vardjan, Nina; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes, the most heterogeneous glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS), execute a multitude of homeostatic functions and contribute to memory formation. Consolidation of synaptic and systemic memory is a prolonged process and hours are required to form long-term memory. In the past, neurons or their parts have been considered to be the exclusive cellular sites of these processes, however, it has now become evident that astrocytes provide an important and essential contribution to memory formation. Astrocytes participate in the morphological remodeling associated with synaptic plasticity, an energy-demanding process that requires mobilization of glycogen, which, in the CNS, is almost exclusively stored in astrocytes. Synaptic remodeling also involves bidirectional astroglial-neuronal communication supported by astroglial receptors and release of gliosignaling molecules. Astroglia exhibit cytoplasmic excitability that engages second messengers, such as Ca2+, for phasic, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), for tonic signal coordination with neuronal processes. The detection of signals by astrocytes and the release of gliosignaling molecules, in particular by vesicle-based mechanisms, occurs with a significant delay after stimulation, orders of magnitude longer than that present in stimulus–secretion coupling in neurons. These particular arrangements position astrocytes as integrators ideally tuned to support time-dependent memory formation. PMID:26635551

  7. Star Formation for Predictive Primordial Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosavljević, Miloš; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence

    The elegance of inflationary cosmology and cosmological perturbation theory ends with the formation of the first stars and galaxies, the initial sources of light that launched the phenomenologically rich process of cosmic reionization. Here we review the current understanding of early star formation, emphasizing unsolved problems and technical challenges. We begin with the first generation of stars to form after the Big Bang and trace how they influenced subsequent star formation. The onset of chemical enrichment coincided with a sharp increase in the overall physical complexity of star forming systems. Ab-initio computational treatments are just now entering the domain of the predictive and are establishing contact with local observations of the relics of this ancient epoch.

  8. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-10-01

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2003 was prepared by Bechtel Nevada to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy and the information needs of the public. This report is meant to be useful to members of the public, public officials, regulators, and Nevada Test Site contractors. The Executive Summary strives to present in a concise format the purpose of the document, the NTS mission and major programs, a summary of radiological releases and doses to the public resulting from site operations, a summary of non-radiological releases, and an overview of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Management System. The Executive Summary, combined with the following Compliance Summary, are written to meet all the objectives of the report and to be stand-alone sections for those who choose not to read the entire document.

  9. CELT site testing program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeck, Matthias; Erasmus, D. Andre; Djorgovski, S. George; Chanan, Gary A.; Nelson, Jerry E.

    2003-01-01

    The California Extremely Large Telescope, CELT, is a proposed 30-m telescope. Choosing the best possible site for CELT is essential in order to extract the best science from the observations and to reduce the complexity of the telescope. Site selection is therefore currently one of the most critical pacing items of the CELT project. In this paper, we first present selected results from a survey of the atmospheric transparency at optical and infrared wavelengths over the southwestern USA and northern Mexico using satellite data. Results of a similar study of South America have been reported elsewhere. These studies will serve as the pre-selection criterion of the sites at which we will perform on-site testing. We then describe the current status of on-site turbulence evaluation efforts and the future plans of the CELT site testing program.

  10. Site environmental report summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    In this summary of the Fernald 1992 Site Environmental Report the authors will describe the impact of the Fernald site on man and the environment and provide results from the ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included is a summary of the data obtained from sampling conducted to determine if the site complies with DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA) requirements. These requirements are set to protect both man and the environment.

  11. Viking landing sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panagakos, N.

    1973-01-01

    A valley near the mouth of the 20,000-foot-deep Martian Grand Canyon has been chosen by NASA as the site of its first automated landing on the planet Mars. The landing site for the second mission of the 1975-76 Viking spacecraft will probably be an area about 1,000 miles northeast of the first site, where the likelihood of water increases the chances of finding evidence of life.

  12. Site environmental programs

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.W.; Hanf, R.W.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the site environmental programs. Effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs monitor for impacts from operations in several areas. The first area consists of the point of possible release into the environment. The second area consists of possible contamination adjacent to DOE facilities, and the third area is the general environment both on and off the site.

  13. 1994 Site environmental report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The Fernald site is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facility that produced high-quality uranium metals for military defense for nearly 40 years. DOE suspended production at the site in 1989 and formally ended production in 1991. Although production activities have ceased, the site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the site. The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. This 1994 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in this Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here. All information presented in this summary is discussed more fully in the main body of this report.

  14. Tropical cyclone formation

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, M.T.; Farrell, B.F. )

    1993-01-15

    The physics of tropical cyclone formation is not well understood, and more is known about the mature hurricane than the formative mechanisms that produce it. It is believed part of the reason for this can be traced to insufficient upper-level atmospheric data. Recent observations suggest that tropical cyclones are initiated by asymmetric interactions associated with migratory upper-level potential vorticity disturbances and low-level disturbances. Favored theories of cyclones formation, however, focus on internal processes associated with cumulus convection and/or air-sea interaction. This work focuses on external mechanisms of cyclone formation and, using both a two- and three-dimensional moist geostrophic momentum model, investigates the role of upper-level potential vorticity disturbances on the formation process. A conceptual model of tropical cyclone formation is proposed, and implications of the theory are discussed. 71 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Clear cell chondrosarcomas arising from rare sites.

    PubMed

    Ogose, A; Motoyama, T; Hotta, T; Emura, I; Inoue, Y; Morita, T; Watanabe, H

    1995-09-01

    Three cases are reported of clear cell chondrosarcoma arising from unusual sites: talus, rib and vertebra. Radiographically, two tumors showed osteolytic features and the vertebral tumor showed osteoplastic change. Histologically, all tumors consisted of clear cells that had a centrally placed nucleus surrounded by clear cytoplasm, osteoclast-like giant cells, areas of conventional chondrosarcoma, and various amounts of reactive bone. The tumor in the talus was initially diagnosed as benign chondroblastoma, but it recurred. The rib tumor showed marked cystic formation stimulating aneurysmal bone cyst. The osteoplastic radiographic feature in vertebral tumor was considered to be due to the abundant bone formation. PMID:8548042

  16. Simple Ontology Format (SOFT)

    2011-10-01

    Simple Ontology Format (SOFT) library and file format specification provides a set of simple tools for developing and maintaining ontologies. The library, implemented as a perl module, supports parsing and verification of the files in SOFt format, operations with ontologies (adding, removing, or filtering of entities), and converting of ontologies into other formats. SOFT allows users to quickly create ontologies using only a basic text editor, verify it, and portray it in a graph layoutmore » system using customized styles.« less

  17. ICP8 Filament Formation Is Essential for Replication Compartment Formation during Herpes Simplex Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Anthar S.; Grady, Lorry M.; Bai, Ping

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus (HSV) dramatically reorganizes the infected-cell nucleus, leading to the formation of prereplicative sites and replication compartments. This process is driven by the essential viral single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein ICP8, which can form double-helical filaments in the absence of DNA. In this paper, we show that two conserved motifs, FNF (F1142, N1143, and F1144) and FW (F843 and W844), are essential for ICP8 self-interactions, and we propose that the FNF motif docks into the FW region during filament formation. Mammalian expression plasmids bearing mutations in these motifs (FNF and FW) were unable to complement an ICP8-null mutant for growth and replication compartment formation. Furthermore, FNF and FW mutants were able to inhibit wild-type (WT) virus plaque formation and filament formation, whereas a double mutant (FNF-FW) was not. These results suggest that single mutant proteins are incorporated into nonproductive ICP8 filaments, while the double mutant is unable to interact with WT ICP8 and does not interfere with WT growth. Cells transfected with WT ICP8 and the helicase-primase (H/P) complex exhibited punctate nuclear structures that resemble prereplicative sites; however, the FNF and FW mutants failed to do so. Taken together, these results suggest that the FNF and FW motifs are required for ICP8 self-interactions and that these interactions may be important for the formation of prereplicative sites and replication compartments. We propose that filaments or other higher-order structures of ICP8 may provide a scaffold onto which other proteins can be recruited to form prereplicative sites and replication compartments. IMPORTANCE For nuclear viruses such as HSV, efficient DNA replication requires the formation of discrete compartments within the infected-cell nucleus in which replication proteins are concentrated and assembled into the HSV replisome. In this paper, we characterize the role of filament formation by the

  18. Savannah River Site's Site Specific Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

  19. Preliminary Site Characterization Report, Rulsion Site, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    This report is a summary of environmental information gathered during a review of the documents pertaining to Project Rulison and interviews with personnel who worked on the project. Project Rulison was part of Operation Plowshare (a program designed to explore peaceful uses for nuclear devices). The project consisted of detonating a 43-kiloton nuclear device on September 10, 1969, in western Colorado to stimulate natural gas production. Following the detonation, a reentry well was drilled and several gas production tests were conducted. The reentry well was shut-in after the last gas production test and was held in standby condition until the general cleanup was undertaken in 1972. A final cleanup was conducted after the emplacement and testing wells were plugged in 1976. However, some surface radiologic contamination resulted from decontamination of the drilling equipment and fallout from the gas flaring during drilling operations. With the exception of the drilling effluent pond, all surface contamination at the Rulison Site was removed during the cleanup operations. All mudpits and other excavations were backfilled, and both upper and lower drilling pads were leveled and dressed. This report provides information regarding known or suspected areas of contamination, previous cleanup activities, analytical results, a review of the regulatory status, the site`s physical environment, and future recommendations for Project Ruhson. Based on this research, several potential areas of contamination have been identified. These include the drilling effluent pond and mudpits used during drilling operations. In addition, contamination could migrate in the gas horizon.

  20. Plugged-in SITE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Rhys

    2003-01-01

    Examines form, color, and technology at the University of Ottawa's School of Information Technology and Engineering (SITE) building, focusing on systems (e.g., SITE is a data wired building, but with no expensive raised floors or cheap dropped ceilings); assembly rather than construction (replacing standard notions of construction with the process…

  1. Site characterization handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    This Handbook discusses both management and technical elements that should be considered in developing a comprehensive site characterization program. Management elements typical of any project of a comparable magnitude and complexity are combined with a discussion of strategies specific to site characterization. Information specific to the technical elements involved in site characterization is based on guidance published by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with respect to licensing requirements for LLW disposal facilities. The objective of this Handbook is to provide a reference for both NRC Agreement States and non-Agreement States for use in developing a comprehensive site characterization program that meets the specific objectives of the State and/or site developer/licensee. Each site characterization program will vary depending on the objectives, licensing requirements, schedules/budgets, physical characteristics of the site, proposed facility design, and the specific concerns raised by government agencies and the public. Therefore, the Handbook is not a prescriptive guide to site characterization. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Commercial Web Site Links.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelwall, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Discusses business use of the Web and related search engine design issues as well as research on general and academic links before reporting on a survey of the links published by a collection of business Web sites. Results indicate around 66% of Web sites do carry external links, most of which are targeted at a specific purpose, but about 17%…

  3. SAMPLING OF CONTAMINATED SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical aspect of characterization of the amount and species of contamination of a hazardous waste site is the sampling plan developed for that site. f the sampling plan is not thoroughly conceptualized before sampling takes place, then certain critical aspects of the limits o...

  4. WWW: Neuroscience Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    The human brain contains an estimated 100 billion neurons, and browsing the Web, one might be led to believe that there's a Web site for every one of those cells. It's no surprise that there are lots of Web sites concerning the nervous system. After all, the human brain is toward the top of nearly everyone's list of favorite organs and of…

  5. Site Planning and Layout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Gary T.

    1998-01-01

    Examines five issues related to child care facility design: (1) siting the building, outdoor play, and service areas; (2) creating favorable microclimates; (3) developmentally appropriate play yards; (4) pedestrian access and site circulation; and (5) vehicular access and parking away from pedestrians and play. (KB)

  6. Sites of the Holocaust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCleary, George F., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a map of Europe identifying the location of major concentration camps, extermination camps, and massacre sites during World War II. Maintains that only a few of the over 400 sites in the former Soviet Union where entire Jewish villages were exterminated are shown. (CFR)

  7. GLOBAL STAR FORMATION REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, Joseph; Norman, Colin E-mail: norman@stsci.edu

    2009-07-20

    A general treatment of disk star formation is developed from a dissipative multiphase model, with the dominant dissipation due to cloud collisions. The Schmidt-Kennicutt (SK) law emerges naturally for star-forming disks and starbursts. We predict that there should be an inverse correlation between Tully-Fisher law and SK law residuals. The model is extended to include a multiphase treatment of supernova feedback that leads to a turbulent pressure-regulated generalization of the star formation law and is applicable to gas-rich starbursts. Enhanced pressure, as expected in merger-induced star formation, enhances star formation efficiency. An upper limit is derived for the disk star formation rate in starbursts that depends on the ratio of global ISM to cloud pressures. We extend these considerations to the case where the interstellar gas pressure in the inner galaxy is dominated by outflows from a central active galactic nucleus (AGN). During massive spheroid formation, AGN-driven winds trigger star formation, resulting in enhanced supernova feedback and outflows. The outflows are comparable to the AGN-boosted star formation rate and saturate in the super-Eddington limit. Downsizing of both SMBH and spheroids is a consequence of AGN-driven positive feedback. Bondi accretion feeds the central black hole with a specific accretion rate that is proportional to the black hole mass. AGN-enhanced star formation is mediated by turbulent pressure and relates spheroid star formation rate to black hole accretion rate. The relation between black hole mass and spheroid velocity dispersion has a coefficient (Salpeter time to gas consumption time ratio) that provides an arrow of time. Highly efficient, AGN-boosted star formation can occur at high redshift.

  8. State of Nevada comments on the US Department of Energy site characterization plan, Yucca Mountain site, Nevada; Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    1989-09-01

    In December 1988, the US Department of Energy issued a Site Characterization Plan (SCP) for the Yucca Mountain site, as required by Section 113 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA). The purpose of site characterization is to develop sufficient information to support a determination of the suitability, or lack of suitability of the site to safely isolate high-level radioactive waste with reasonable certainty for thousands of years. The purpose of the Site Characterization Plan is to describe plans for obtaining sufficient information about the site, plans for mitigation of any adverse impacts occurring from site characterization activities, and plans for decontamination and decommissioning of the site if it is determined not to be suitable for a repository. Part I presents an overview of the State`s comments. The overview takes the form of general concerns and comments organized by specific areas of concern. The overview does not follow the format of the SCP.

  9. Site decommissioning management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

    1993-10-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

  10. Site directed recombination

    DOEpatents

    Jurka, Jerzy W.

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced homologous recombination is obtained by employing a consensus sequence which has been found to be associated with integration of repeat sequences, such as Alu and ID. The consensus sequence or sequence having a single transition mutation determines one site of a double break which allows for high efficiency of integration at the site. By introducing single or double stranded DNA having the consensus sequence flanking region joined to a sequence of interest, one can reproducibly direct integration of the sequence of interest at one or a limited number of sites. In this way, specific sites can be identified and homologous recombination achieved at the site by employing a second flanking sequence associated with a sequence proximal to the 3'-nick.

  11. [Measuring thrombin formation].

    PubMed

    Hemker, H C

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of thrombin formation makes it possible to estimate the risk of haemorrhage or thrombosis much more accurately than by using clotting time. This new technique allows better monitoring of the effect of prophylactic and therapeutic anticoagulant therapy. Thrombin formation is, however, not yet routinely measured. PMID:27650017

  12. Ice Formation on Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, L

    1939-01-01

    This report makes use of the results obtained in the Gottingen ice tunnel in which the atmospheric conditions are simulated and the process of ice formation photographed. The effect of ice formation is threefold: 1) added weight to the airplane; 2) a change in the lift and drag forces; 3) a change in the stability characteristics.

  13. School Formative Feedback Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Data-driven instructional improvement relies on developing coherent systems that allow school staff to generate, interpret, and act upon quality formative information on students and school programs. This article offers a formative feedback system model that captures how school leaders and teachers structure artifacts and practices to create…

  14. Entering the Formative Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Keith

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses formative assessment--classroom strategies that ensure students are understanding music concepts. Unlike summative assessments (end-of-process evaluations like final exams, SATs, or auditions), formative assessments need to be non-threatening, helpful, and most of all, effective. The process starts with a teacher…

  15. Formative Assessment Probes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberle, Francis; Keeley, Page

    2008-01-01

    Formative assessment probes can be effective tools to help teachers build a bridge between students' initial ideas and scientific ones. In this article, the authors describe how using two formative assessment probes can help teachers determine the extent to which students make similar connections between developing a concept of matter and a…

  16. Lunar Polar Landing Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamps, Oscar; Foing, Bernard H.; Flahaut, Jessica

    2016-07-01

    An important step for a scientific mission is to assess on where the mission should be conducted. This study on landing site selection focuses on a mission to the poles of the Moon where an in-situ mission should be conducted to answer the questions with respect to volatiles and ices. The European interest for a mission to the poles of the Moon is presented in the mission concept called Heracles. This mission would be a tele-operated, sample return mission where astronauts will controlling a rover from an Orion capsule in cislunar orbit. The primary selection of landing sites was based on the scientific interest of areas near the poles. The maximum temperature map from Diviner was used to select sites where CO^2¬ should always be stable. This means that the maximum temperature is lower than 54K which is the sublimation temperature for CO^2¬ in lunar atmospheric pressure. Around these areas 14 potential regions of interest were selected. Further selection was based on the epoch of the surface in these regions of interest. It was thought that it would be of high scientific value if sites are sampled which have another epoch than already sampled by one of the Apollo or Luna missions. Only 6 sites on both North as South Pole could contain stable CO^2 ¬and were older than (Pre-)Necterian. Before a landing site and rover traverse was planned these six sites were compared on their accessibility of the areas which could contain stable CO^2. It was assumed that slope lower than 20^o is doable to rove. Eventually Amundsen and Rozhdestvenskiy West were selected as regions of interest. Assumptions for selecting landing sites was that area should have a slope lower than 5^o, a diameter of 1km, in partial illuminated area, and should not be isolated but inside an area which is in previous steps marked as accessible area to rove. By using multiple tools in ArcGIS it is possible to present the area's which were marked as potential landing sites. The closest potential landing

  17. Master Plans for Park Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Meter, Jerry R.

    This booklet is a general guide to park site planning. The four basic steps involved in developing a park site are a) determination of the uses of the site, b) analysis of the site potential for these uses, c) identification of the functional relationship among the uses, and d) coordination of the uses to the park sites. Uses of park sites are…

  18. Biomineralization: mineral formation by organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve

    2014-09-01

    Organisms form many different types of minerals, with diverse shapes and sizes. These minerals fulfill a variety of functions. Inspired by the late H A Lowenstam, Steve Weiner and Lia Addadi have addressed many questions that relate to the mechanisms by which biological organisms produce these mineral phases and how their structures relate to their functions. Addadi and Weiner have explored the manner in which macromolecules extracted from mineralized tissues can interact with some crystal planes and not others, how these macromolecules can be occluded inside the forming crystals residing preferentially on specific crystal planes, and how they can induce one polymorph of calcium carbonate and not another to nucleate. Addadi and Weiner have also identified a novel strategy used by the sea urchin to form its smooth and convoluted mineralized skeletal elements. The strategy involves the initial production by cells of a highly disordered mineral precursor phase in vesicles, and then the export of this so-called amorphous phase to the site of skeletal formation, where it crystallizes. This strategy is now known to be used by many different invertebrate phyla, as well as by vertebrates to build bones and teeth. One of the major current research aims of the Weiner--Addadi group is to understand the biomineralization pathways whereby ions are extracted from the environment, are transported and deposited inside cells within vesicles, how these disordered phases are then transferred to the site of skeletal formation, and finally how the so-called amorphous phase crystallizes. Biology has clearly evolved unique strategies for forming crystalline minerals. Despite more than 300 years of research in this field, many challenging questions still remain unanswered.

  19. A collaborative siting approach

    SciTech Connect

    Strong, T.M.

    1995-11-01

    Michigan`s earlier siting efforts failed, due to an overly prescriptive siting law and strategy. Recent amendments to state law will refocus Michigan`s siting efforts on the development and implementation of a volunteer host community process. A Board of Governors is assisting the Michigan Low-Level Radioactive Waste Authority by developing a comprehensive volunteer plan. The Board will also evaluate broad waste management options and make recommendations to the Authority on issues such as waste minimization initiatives, interim storage alternatives, the potential for joining or forming another compact, and the prospect for out-of-state disposal.

  20. LCOGT Sites and Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, John; Brown, Timothy M.; Conway, Patrick; Elphick, Mark; Falarski, Michael; Hawkins, Eric; Rosing, Wayne; Shobbrook, John

    2011-03-01

    LCOGT is currently building and deploying a world-wide network of at least twelve 1-meter and twenty-four 0.4-meter telescopes to as many as 4 sites in the Southern hemisphere (Chile, South Africa, Eastern Australia) and 4 in the Northern hemisphere (Hawaii, West Texas, Canary Islands). Our deployment and operations model emphasizes modularity and interchangeability of major components, maintenance and troubleshooting personnel who are local to the site, and autonomy of operation. We plan to ship, install, and spare large units (in many cases entire telescopes), with minimal assembly on site.

  1. Intergalactic Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boquien, Médéric

    2007-11-01

    The work presented here is about star formation in the unusual environment of collisional debris studied for the first time as such. These peculiar regions have an interstellar medium, and in particular a metallicity, similar to that of star forming regions in galactic discs while not undergoing similar environment effects such as density waves in the spiral arms for instance. This study has been conducted with a selection of exceptional systems that have ejected large quantities of gas into the intergalactic medium while also showing some intergalactic star forming regions. Principal Investigator as well as archive spectroscopy and imaging from multi-wavelength observations ranging from far ultraviolet to mid-infrared have been used. Withal a model has been built in order to reproduce the spectral energy distributions of intergalactic star forming regions and constrain the star formation histories, their extinctions and their fraction of stars coming from the parent galaxies' discs. Comparisons have been performed on the estimation of star formation rates between infrared, Halpha and ultraviolet wavelengths. This thesis has brought the following main new results: * some regions seem to be deprived of any old stellar population, and these are ideal laboratories in which to study star formation ; * the mid-infrared star formation rate estimator is as reliable as it is in spiral galaxies ; * the scatter in the estimation of star formation rates in various bands is similar to that of spiral galaxies and is mainly due to age effects ; * the combination of the extinction uncorrected Halpha line with mid-infrared yields a good estimation of the actual star formation rate ; * an important part of star formation, which can be as high as 85%, takes place in the intergalactic medium showing that in a young universe, in which this type of system is much more common than in the nearby universe, star formation from collisional debris can be an important factor of enrichment of

  2. Sparse Image Format

    2007-04-12

    The Sparse Image Format (SIF) is a file format for storing spare raster images. It works by breaking an image down into tiles. Space is savid by only storing non-uniform tiles, i.e. tiles with at least two different pixel values. If a tile is completely uniform, its common pixel value is stored instead of the complete tile raster. The software is a library in the C language used for manipulating files in SIF format. Itmore » supports large files (> 2GB) and is designed to build in Windows and Linux environments.« less

  3. Sparse Image Format

    SciTech Connect

    Eads, Damian Ryan

    2007-04-12

    The Sparse Image Format (SIF) is a file format for storing spare raster images. It works by breaking an image down into tiles. Space is savid by only storing non-uniform tiles, i.e. tiles with at least two different pixel values. If a tile is completely uniform, its common pixel value is stored instead of the complete tile raster. The software is a library in the C language used for manipulating files in SIF format. It supports large files (> 2GB) and is designed to build in Windows and Linux environments.

  4. Retroviral integration: Site matters

    PubMed Central

    Demeulemeester, Jonas; De Rijck, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Here, we review genomic target site selection during retroviral integration as a multistep process in which specific biases are introduced at each level. The first asymmetries are introduced when the virus takes a specific route into the nucleus. Next, by co‐opting distinct host cofactors, the integration machinery is guided to particular chromatin contexts. As the viral integrase captures a local target nucleosome, specific contacts introduce fine‐grained biases in the integration site distribution. In vivo, the established population of proviruses is subject to both positive and negative selection, thereby continuously reshaping the integration site distribution. By affecting stochastic proviral expression as well as the mutagenic potential of the virus, integration site choice may be an inherent part of the evolutionary strategies used by different retroviruses to maximise reproductive success. PMID:26293289

  5. Fusion facility siting considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussell, G. T.

    1985-02-01

    Inherent in the fusion program's transition from hydrogen devices to commercial power machines is a general increase in the size and scope of succeeding projects. This growth will lead to increased emphasis on safety, environmental impact, and the external effects of fusion in general, and of each new device in particular. An important consideration in this regard is site selection. Major siting issues that may affect the economics, safety, and environmental impact of fusion are examined.

  6. USGIN Lab site

    2009-08-01

    This web site provides information related to service profiles and implementation in development for the US Geoscience information network (USGIN). It is meant to be a site where developers can learn about the standard in use, the objectives of the application profiles being developed, software being used or tested for implementation of services, and details about particular implementations. Forums are provided for asking questions about the services, profiles, and implemenation issues.

  7. Slipcovering a superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Gascoyne, S.

    1993-09-01

    The Rocky Mountain Arsenal is both a Superfund cleanup site (one of the most contaminated in the United States) and a recently named provisional wildlife refuge. In this article, the history of the Rocky Mountain arsenal is reviewed. The decontamination program for the arsenal and the probable effects of cleanup on the ecology of the site are described. Some of the diverse responses to the program are included in the discussion.

  8. Development of clinical sites.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Mary

    2015-02-01

    Clinical experiences are vital to all types of healthcare educational programs. Supervised clinical experiences provide the opportunity for the learner to apply didactic knowledge and theory to real world situations and hone skills necessary for entry into practice. Nurse anesthesia programs utilize a wide variety of clinical sites to expose student registered nurse anesthetists to experiences that will prepare them clinically, academically and professionally to enter practice as a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist. This article describes the process of developing a clinical site. A thorough evaluation will determine the types of experiences meant to be offered at the site, the resources available to house and educate the students, and how to evaluate the effectiveness of the clinical site. Open communication between the clinical coordinator and the program director or designee is essential to ensure success of the clinical site. The Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs has resources available to guide those interested in becoming a clinical site, as well as for program administrators who seek to add new experiences to their programs. PMID:25842629

  9. Mapping Recombination Initiation Sites Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Wang, Minghui; Sun, Qi; Pawlowski, Wojciech P

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide maps of recombination sites provide valuable information not only on the recombination pathway itself but also facilitate the understanding of genome dynamics and evolution. Here, we describe a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocol to map the sites of recombination initiation in plants with maize used as an example. ChIP is a method that allows identification of chromosomal sites occupied by specific proteins. Our protocol utilizes RAD51, a protein involved in repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate meiotic recombination, to identify DSB formation hotspots. Chromatin is extracted from meiotic flowers, sheared and enriched in fragments bound to RAD51. Genomic location of the protein is then identified by next-generation sequencing. This protocol can also be used in other species of plants, animals, and fungi. PMID:27511175

  10. Comprehensive, integrated, remote sensing at DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Lackey, J.G.; Burson, Z.G.

    1984-01-01

    The Department of Energy has established a program called Comprehensive, Integrated Remote Sensing (CIRS). The overall objective is to provide a state-of-the-art data base of remotely sensed data for all users of such information at large DOE sites. The primary types of remote sensing provided consist of the following: (1) large format aerial photography; (2) video from aerial platforms; (3) multispectral scanning; and (4) airborne nuclear radiometric surveys. Implementation of the CIRS Program began with field operations at the Savannah River Plant in 1982 and is continuing at that DOE site at a level of effort of about $1.5 m per year. Integrated remote sensing studies were subsequently extended to the West Valley Demonstration Project in the summer and fall of 1984. It is expected that the Program will eventually be extended to cover all large DOE sites on a continuing basis. 2 figures.

  11. Formation of Regulatory Modules by Local Sequence Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Nourmohammad, Armita; Lässig, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Turnover of regulatory sequence and function is an important part of molecular evolution. But what are the modes of sequence evolution leading to rapid formation and loss of regulatory sites? Here we show that a large fraction of neighboring transcription factor binding sites in the fly genome have formed from a common sequence origin by local duplications. This mode of evolution is found to produce regulatory information: duplications can seed new sites in the neighborhood of existing sites. Duplicate seeds evolve subsequently by point mutations, often towards binding a different factor than their ancestral neighbor sites. These results are based on a statistical analysis of 346 cis-regulatory modules in the Drosophila melanogaster genome, and a comparison set of intergenic regulatory sequence in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In fly regulatory modules, pairs of binding sites show significantly enhanced sequence similarity up to distances of about 50 bp. We analyze these data in terms of an evolutionary model with two distinct modes of site formation: (i) evolution from independent sequence origin and (ii) divergent evolution following duplication of a common ancestor sequence. Our results suggest that pervasive formation of binding sites by local sequence duplications distinguishes the complex regulatory architecture of higher eukaryotes from the simpler architecture of unicellular organisms. PMID:21998564

  12. Formation of regulatory modules by local sequence duplication.

    PubMed

    Nourmohammad, Armita; Lässig, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Turnover of regulatory sequence and function is an important part of molecular evolution. But what are the modes of sequence evolution leading to rapid formation and loss of regulatory sites? Here we show that a large fraction of neighboring transcription factor binding sites in the fly genome have formed from a common sequence origin by local duplications. This mode of evolution is found to produce regulatory information: duplications can seed new sites in the neighborhood of existing sites. Duplicate seeds evolve subsequently by point mutations, often towards binding a different factor than their ancestral neighbor sites. These results are based on a statistical analysis of 346 cis-regulatory modules in the Drosophila melanogaster genome, and a comparison set of intergenic regulatory sequence in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In fly regulatory modules, pairs of binding sites show significantly enhanced sequence similarity up to distances of about 50 bp. We analyze these data in terms of an evolutionary model with two distinct modes of site formation: (i) evolution from independent sequence origin and (ii) divergent evolution following duplication of a common ancestor sequence. Our results suggest that pervasive formation of binding sites by local sequence duplications distinguishes the complex regulatory architecture of higher eukaryotes from the simpler architecture of unicellular organisms.

  13. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  14. Display formats manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runnels, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The standards and procedures for the generation of operational display formats to be used in the Mission Control Center (MCC) display control system are presented. The required effort, forms, and fundamentals for the design, specifications, and production of display formats are identified. The principles of display design and system constraints controlling the creation of optimum operational displays for mission control are explained. The basic two types of MCC display systems for presenting information are described.

  15. Autonomous Formation Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schkolnik, Gerard S.; Cobleigh, Brent

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Strategic Plan for the Aerospace Technology Enterprise includes ambitious objectives focused on affordable air travel, reduced emissions, and expanded aviation-system capacity. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, in cooperation with NASA Ames Research Center, the Boeing Company, and the University of California, Los Angeles, has embarked on an autonomous-formation-flight project that promises to make significant strides towards these goals. For millions of years, birds have taken advantage of the aerodynamic benefit of flying in formation. The traditional "V" formation flown by many species of birds (including gulls, pelicans, and geese) enables each of the trailing birds to fly in the upwash flow field that exists just outboard of the bird immediately ahead in the formation. The result for each trailing bird is a decrease in induced drag and thus a reduction in the energy needed to maintain a given speed. Hence, for migratory birds, formation flight extends the range of the system of birds over the range of birds flying solo. The Autonomous Formation Flight (AFF) Project is seeking to extend this symbiotic relationship to aircraft.

  16. Site clearance working group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana continue to be areas with a high level of facility removal, and the pace of removal is projected to increase. Regulations were promulgated for the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana requiring that abandoned sites be cleared of debris that could interfere with fishing and shrimping activities. The site clearance regulations also required verification that the sites were clear. Additionally, government programs were established to compensate fishermen for losses associated with snagging their equipment on oil and gas related objects that remained on the water bottoms in areas other than active producing sites and sites that had been verified as clear of obstructions and snags. The oil and gas industry funds the compensation programs. This paper reviews the regulations and evolving operating practices in the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana where site clearance and fisherman`s gear compensation regulations have been in place for a number of years. Although regulations and guidelines may be in place elsewhere in the world, this paper focuses on the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana. Workshop participants are encouraged to bring up international issues during the course of the workshop. Additionally, this paper raises questions and focuses on issues that are of concern to the various Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana water surface and water bottom stakeholders. This paper does not have answers to the questions or issues. During the workshop participants will debate the questions and issues in an attempt to develop consensus opinions and/or make suggestions that can be provided to the appropriate organizations, both private and government, for possible future research or policy adjustments. Site clearance and facility removal are different activities. Facility removal deals with removal of the structures used to produce oil and gas including platforms, wells, casing, piles, pipelines, well protection structures, etc.

  17. Site study plan for intermediate hydrology clusters tests wells Deaf Smith County Site, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    To characterize the geologic, geochemical, and hydrologic characteristics of intermediate-depth formations at the proposed Deaf Smith County, Texas, repository site, wells called Intermediate Hydrology clusters will test the Dewey Lake, Alibates, Salado, Yates, Upper and Lower Seven Rivers, and Queen Grayburg Formations. Sixteen wells will be installed at six locations. One location will have four wills, two locations will have three wells, and three locations will have two wells for a total of 16 wells. Testing of the formations is to proceed from the bottom up, with 2-day pumping tests at the less permeable formations. Tracer tests and tests for verticall hydraulic properties will be designed and performed after other hydrologic tests are completed. After testing, selected wells are to be completed as single or possibly dual monitoring wells to observe water-level trends. To develop a hydrogeologic testing plan, the response of each formation to potential testing procedures was evaluated using design values and an assumend range for hydraulic parameters. These evaluations indicate that hydraulic properties of a sandy zone of the Dockum, the lower Sever Rivers, and possibly the Alibates and Queen/Grayburg can be determined by pumping tests. Standard of shut-in slug tests must be conducted in the remaining formations. Tests of very long duration would be required to determine the verticla properties of less permeable formations. Tracer tests would also require weeks or months. 61 figs., 34 refs., 4 tabs.

  18. Spectral imaging microscopy web sites and data.

    PubMed

    McNamara, George; Gupta, Amit; Reynaert, James; Coates, Thomas D; Boswell, Carl

    2006-08-01

    The Internet is enabling greater access to spectral imaging publications, spectral graphs, and data than that was available a generation ago. The spectral imaging systems discussed in this issue of Cytometry work because reagent and hardware spectra are reproducible, reusable, and provide input to spectral unmixing and spectral components recognition algorithms. These spectra need to be readily available in order to determine what to purchase, how to use it, and what the output means. We refer to several commercially sponsored and academic spectral web sites and discuss our spectral graphing and data sites. Sites include fluorescent dye graph servers from Invitrogen/Molecular Probes, BD Biosciences, Zeiss/Bio-Rad Cell Sciences, and filter set servers from Chroma Technology and Omega Optical. Several of these sites include data download capabilities. Recently, two microscope manufacturers have published on their web sites transmission curves for select objective lenses-crucial data for anyone doing multiphoton excitation microscopy. Notable among the academic sites, PhotoChemCAD 2.0 has over 200 dyes and a downloadable database/graphing program, and the USC-A Chemistry UV-vis Database displays absorption spectra of many dyes and indicators used in clinical histology and pathology. Our Fluorescent Spectra graphing/calculator site presents dyes, filters, and illumination data from many of these and additional sources. PubSpectra is our free download site which uses Microsoft Excel files as standardized human/machine readable format with over 2,000 biomedical spectra. The principle that data is not subject to copyright provides a framework in which all scientific data should be made freely accessible. PMID:16969821

  19. Spectral imaging microscopy web sites and data.

    PubMed

    McNamara, George; Gupta, Amit; Reynaert, James; Coates, Thomas D; Boswell, Carl

    2006-08-01

    The Internet is enabling greater access to spectral imaging publications, spectral graphs, and data than that was available a generation ago. The spectral imaging systems discussed in this issue of Cytometry work because reagent and hardware spectra are reproducible, reusable, and provide input to spectral unmixing and spectral components recognition algorithms. These spectra need to be readily available in order to determine what to purchase, how to use it, and what the output means. We refer to several commercially sponsored and academic spectral web sites and discuss our spectral graphing and data sites. Sites include fluorescent dye graph servers from Invitrogen/Molecular Probes, BD Biosciences, Zeiss/Bio-Rad Cell Sciences, and filter set servers from Chroma Technology and Omega Optical. Several of these sites include data download capabilities. Recently, two microscope manufacturers have published on their web sites transmission curves for select objective lenses-crucial data for anyone doing multiphoton excitation microscopy. Notable among the academic sites, PhotoChemCAD 2.0 has over 200 dyes and a downloadable database/graphing program, and the USC-A Chemistry UV-vis Database displays absorption spectra of many dyes and indicators used in clinical histology and pathology. Our Fluorescent Spectra graphing/calculator site presents dyes, filters, and illumination data from many of these and additional sources. PubSpectra is our free download site which uses Microsoft Excel files as standardized human/machine readable format with over 2,000 biomedical spectra. The principle that data is not subject to copyright provides a framework in which all scientific data should be made freely accessible.

  20. Site study plan for exploratory shaft monitoring wells, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Preliminary Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    As part of site characterization studies, two exploratory shafts will be constructed at the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. Twelve wells at five locations have been proposed to monitor potential impacts of shaft construction on water-bearing zones in the Ogallala Formation and the Dockum Group. In addition, tests have been proposed to determine the hydraulic properties of the water-bearing zones for use in design and construction of the shafts. Samples of the Blackwater Draw Formation, Ogallala Formation, and Dockum Group will be obtained during construction of these wells. Visual indentification, laboratory testing, and in situ testing will yield data necessary for Exploratory Shaft Facility design and construction. This activity provides the earliest data on the Blackwater Drew Formation, Ogallala Formation, and Dockum Group near the exploratory shaft locations. Drilling and hydrologic testing are scheduled prior to other subsurface activity at the Exploratory Shaft Facility to establish ground-water baseline conditions. The Technical Field Services Contractor is responsible for conducting the field program of drilling and testing. Samples and data will be handled and reported in accordance with established Salt Repository Project procedures. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that the appropriate documentation is maintained. 45 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Sand dollar sites orogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amos, Dee

    2013-04-01

    The determinology of the humble sand dollars habitat changing from inception to the drastic evolution of the zone to that of present day. Into the cauldron along the southern Californian 'ring of fire' lithosphere are evidence of geosynclinals areas, metasedimentary rock formations and hydrothermal activity. The explanation begins with 'Theia' and the Moon's formation, battles with cometary impacts, glacial ages, epochs with evolutionary bottlenecks and plate tectonics. Fully illustrated the lecture includes localised diagrams and figures with actual subject photographic examples of plutonic, granitic, jade and peridodite. Finally, the origins of the materials used in the lecture are revealed for prosecution by future students and the enjoyment of interested parties in general.

  2. Dealer model site demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, H.C.

    1992-08-01

    Model site demonstrations are joint efforts between TVA and cooperating organizations to improve the industry's environmental stewardship. Program objectives are to develop, demonstrate, and transfer technologies and management practices to help retail fertilizer/agricultural chemical dealers minimize adverse environmental impacts. The model site demonstrations serve as 'real life' laboratories for researchers, technologists, educators and participants. The retail dealership is treated as a complete unit. The program recognizes the need to: Develop information and experience to guide others; Test numerous methods of containment, materials of construction, management practices, and monitoring techniques; Strengthen and highlight industry's commitment to envirorunental stewardship; Identify future research needs; and Provide a catalyst for cooperation across a broad spectrum of groups and organizations to identify problems and develop solutions appropriate for fertilizer and agrichemical dealers. Emphasis is on transferring current technology and developing and introducing needed new technologies. Field testing and applied research are encouraged at demonstration sites. One of the key concepts is to bridge the gap between research findings and their practical application and evaluation in field settings. Primary audiences include fertilizer dealers and professional workers in agriculture, the fertilizer industry, the environmental arena, and related institutions across the nation. Experiences at participating dealer sites are shared through organized tours, open houses, news articles and publications. Sixteen sites have been selected for demonstrations, and at least four more are planned. TVA provides assistance in engineering, design and educational forums. Dealers pay for installation of needed containment and related features.

  3. SLAC site design aesthetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, F.F.

    1985-10-01

    Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is a single mission laboratory dedicated to basic research in high energy particle physics. SLAC site also houses Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) which is a multi-mission laboratory for research using beams of ultraviolet light and low energy photons as emitted tangentially from SLAC colliding beam facilities. This paper discusses various aspects of SLAC site design aesthetics under the following headings: (1) imposed footprint of SLAC, (2) description of selected site, (3) use of earth cover for radiation and sight screens, (4) use of landscaping for cosmetic purposes, (5) use of exterior paint colors to soften SLAC impact on neighbors, (6) relocation of SLAC main entrance, (7) relocation of SLAC collider arcs and experimental hall, (8) parking lots and storage yards, and (9) land use zoning at SLAC.

  4. Site investigation for Magnus

    SciTech Connect

    Semple, R.M.; Rigden, W.J.

    1983-05-01

    In April 1982, BP's Magnus structure was installed about 150 km northeast of the Shetland Islands. The most northerly, deepest water platform in the North Sea, the steel tower is supported on groups of 2 m diameter piles that were driven, in good accordance with predictions, to an average penetration of 85 m in strong cohesive soils. The paper describes investigations performed at the platform site, and documents soil characteristics for conventional and state of the art pile analyses. Reference is made to several innovative techniques first used at the Magnus site that have since been incorporated into the larger North Sea investigations. Information is given about the geological history of the site. Test results are presented on soil strength and stiffness, including critical state soil mechanics parameters, on residual pore pressures after sampling, and on the effect of sample size on strength characteristics.

  5. The Ignitor Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraldi, D.; Bombarda, F.; Coppi, B.; Salvetti, M.

    2001-10-01

    The site for the construction of the Ignitor facility is chosen by the criterion that it is directly connected to an important node of the European power grid, and that it has the certified characteristics to host a nuclear plant. One of the two options available is the Trino/Leri site, that has a gas fired power station, operated by the national utility corporation ENEL, and is connected to the Rondissone electrical node which can withstand the Ignitor peak power requirements under the most demanding conditions. The second option is the nuclear power plant of Caorso, presently inactive but still connected to an important node of the grid. Both these sites present very substantial credits that are demonstrated to contain the cost of the experiment significantly. The main Ignitor building is designed based on the working experience acquired from existing centers for fusions research, in particular Frascati, MIT, JET and Princeton. Sponsored by ENEA and ENEL of Italy.

  6. Closure Plan for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2008-09-01

    The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RMWS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is managed and operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This document is the first update of the preliminary closure plan for the Area 5 RWMS at the NTS that was presented in the Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan (DOE, 2005a). The major updates to the plan include a new closure schedule, updated closure inventory, updated site and facility characterization data, the Title II engineering cover design, and the closure process for the 92-Acre Area of the RWMS. The format and content of this site-specific plan follows the Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans (DOE, 1999a). This interim closure plan meets closure and post-closure monitoring requirements of the order DOE O 435.1, manual DOE M 435.1-1, Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 40 CFR 265, Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) 444.743, and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements as incorporated into NAC 444.8632. The Area 5 RWMS accepts primarily packaged low-level waste (LLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and asbestiform low-level waste (ALLW) for disposal in excavated disposal cells.

  7. YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Simmons

    2004-04-16

    The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

  8. statement of significance, location map, site plan, landscape plan, site ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    statement of significance, location map, site plan, landscape plan, site sections, evolution of cemetery landscape. - San Francisco National Cemetery, 1 Lincoln Boulevard, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  9. Positronium Formation in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, D. R.

    1970-01-01

    Positronium formation in muscle at +4°C and -4°C was examined by the measurement of the angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation. Since the positronium formation rate in ice is considerably higher than it is in water, there should be a comparable increase in the positronium formation rate in muscle tissue if recent speculation that cellular water is ordered in a semicrystalline icelike state is correct. Comparison of the angular correlation from muscle at +4°C with that from water at +4°C shows no enhancement of the positronium formation rate. Frozen muscle at -4°C shows an enhancement of the positronium formation rate of approximately half that found in ice at -4°C, indicating that most cellular water undergoes a normal water-ice transition when frozen. It is concluded therefore that cell water in muscle is not ordered in a hexagonal icelike structure. While the results are consistent with the hypothesis that cell water is in the liquid state, the hypothesis that cell water is ordered in an undetermined close packed structure which transforms to the hexagonal ice structure at or near 0°C cannot be ruled out. PMID:5436881

  10. PPPL Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect

    Virginia Finley; Sheneman, Robert S.; Levine, Jerry D.

    2012-12-01

    Contained in the following report are data for radioactivity in the environment collected and analyzed by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory’s Princeton Environmental, Analytical, and Radiological Laboratory (PEARL). The PEARL is located on-site and is certified for analyzing radiological and non-radiological parameters through the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection’s Laboratory Certification Program, Certification Number 12471. Non-radiological surface and ground water samples are analyzed by NJDEP certified subcontractor laboratories – QC, Inc. and Accutest Laboratory. To the best of our knowledge, these data, as contained in the “Annual Site Environmental Report for 2011,” are documented and certified to be correct.

  11. Waste Site Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Old aircraft considered not restorable are melted down in on-site furnaces to reclaim the aluminum in their airframes. The process produces aluminum ingots and leaves a residue known as "dross." Because dross contains contaminants like lead silver cadmium and copper, Pima County, the dross dumping site, wanted to locate areas where dross had been dumped. Dr. Larry Lepley and Sandra L. Perry used the Landsat Thematic Mapper to screen for dross. A special two-step procedure was developed to separate the dross dumps (typically no larger than 50 meters across) from the desert background. The project has opened the door for similar applications.

  12. RAPID DUST FORMATION IN NOVAE: THE SPEED CLASS—FORMATION TIMESCALE CORRELATION EXPLAINED

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S. C.; Bode, M. F.; Darnley, M. J.; Evans, A.; Zubko, V.; Shafter, A. W.

    2013-11-10

    Observations show that the time of onset of dust formation in classical novae depends strongly on their speed class, with dust typically taking longer to form in slower novae. Using empirical relationships between speed class, luminosity and ejection velocity, it can be shown that dust formation timescale is expected to be essentially independent of speed class. However, following a nova outburst the spectrum of the central hot source evolves, with an increasing proportion of the radiation being emitted short-ward of the Lyman limit. The rate at which the spectrum evolves also depends on the speed class. We have therefore refined the simple model by assuming photons at energies higher than the Lyman limit are absorbed by neutral hydrogen gas internal to the dust formation sites, therefore preventing these photons reaching the nucleation sites. With this refinement the dust formation timescale is theoretically dependent on speed class and the results of our theoretical modification agree well with the observational data. We consider two types of carbon-based dust, graphite and amorphous carbon, with both types producing similar relationships. Our results can be used to predict when dust will form in a nova of a given speed class and hence when observations should optimally be taken to detect the onset of dust formation.

  13. Developing a perioperative educational video web site.

    PubMed

    O'Dowd Bell, Lynn

    2012-04-01

    Nurses frequently have to adjust to changes in technology, particularly in the OR, but cataloging the wealth of resources commonly used in the OR (eg, equipment, supplies, how to use them) has not kept pace. To address this, I worked with the information systems administrative coordinator at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, to design and implement a perioperative intranet site that includes videos and fact sheets about equipment and supplies and that can be accessed by all perioperative staff members. This required promoting the idea and getting stakeholder sign-on, soliciting videotapes and DVDs and screening all submissions for appropriateness, choosing and formatting applicable resources for use on the site, working with members of the information systems department to create a web site after the video library was assembled, and helping staff members use and accept the site as a valuable educational resource. This intranet web site has been available to staff members for two years, and data from a recent survey of staff members and from mandatory intranet inservice compliance programs show evidence of its effectiveness. PMID:22464619

  14. Planet Formation and Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    alibert, yann

    2016-04-01

    Extrasolar planetary systems show an extreme diversity in mass and orbital architecture, and, very likely, in habitability. Explaining this diversity is one of the key challenges for theoretical models and requires understanding the formation, composition and evolution of planetary systems from the stage of the protoplanetary disk up to the full mature planetary system. I will review in this contribution the different models of planet formation and how they can be related to planetary habitability. In a first part, I will review the main planetary system formation models, and how, from these models, the composition of planets can be predicted. In a second part, I will link the results of these early phases of planetary systems, to the potential planetary habitability. Finally, I will show how it is possible, from transit observations, to put constraints on the water content of extrasolar planets.

  15. Small Wind Site Assessment Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Tim; Preus, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Site assessment for small wind energy systems is one of the key factors in the successful installation, operation, and performance of a small wind turbine. A proper site assessment is a difficult process that includes wind resource assessment and the evaluation of site characteristics. These guidelines address many of the relevant parts of a site assessment with an emphasis on wind resource assessment, using methods other than on-site data collection and creating a small wind site assessment report.

  16. Soils and geomorphology of the East Chestnut Ridge site

    SciTech Connect

    Lietzke, D.A.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, R.R. , Rutledge, TN; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1989-10-01

    Soil mapping of the East Chestnut Ridge site in conjunction with subsurface soil and rock coring provides an in-depth evaluation of the site and its suitability for disposal of wastes. Landforms and surface and subsurface hydrology, the natural, undisturbed, soil-saprolite-geohydrology system beneath the zone of engineering modifications provides for the ultimate containment of wastes and a means for the filtration and purification of any leachate before it reaches the aquifer. The surface location and extent of each geologic formation on the site were mapped. These locations correlated well with projections of subsurface contacts to the surface even through the criteria used by the pedologist and geologist to identify soil and rock from the same formation may be different. Soil thickness over bedrock of the Copper Ridge, Chepultepec, Longview, and Kingsport Formations is sufficient to provide considerable buffering between trench bottoms and groundwater or rock. Soil thickness over the Mascot Formation is comparatively thin, and pinnacles and ledges exposed on steeper sideslopes are common. Soil underlain by the Mascot Formation is not suited for a trench landfill. According to soil coring and active borrow pit observations, chert beds in the soil and saprolite are preferred zones of water flow. Construction of adequate clay liners beneath disposal units sited on the Longview dolomite may require placement and compaction of other native soils to achieve sufficiently low soil permeabilities. Karst geomorphic processes that initiated the formation of dolines evidently started several million years ago. Doline formation and enlargement is episodic, with short periods of activity followed by long periods of stability. Analysis of doline soil stratigraphy suggests that most of the large dolines on the site have been stable for most of the past 10,000 to 1000,000 years. 8 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2007-09-12

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding the importance of

  18. SITE EMERGING TECHNOLOGY Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is intended as a reference guide for EPA Regional decision makers and others interested in tchnologies in the SITE Demonstration and Technologies programs. The Technologies are described in technology profiles presented in alphabetical order by developer name and se...

  19. Science. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Linda Easley, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on science from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference: (1) "Color & Light: Design and Evaluation of a Multimedia-Case for Elementary Teacher-Education" (Peter Blijleven and Ellen van den Berg); (2) "Standards-Based Design of Technology-Integrated Science…

  20. Savannah River Site Robotics

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

  1. 2014 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, Douglas; Remien, Jason; Foley, Brian; Burke, John; Dorsch, William; Ratel, Karen; Howe, Robert; Welty, Tim; Williams, Jeffrey; Pohlpt, Peter; Lagattolla, Richard; Metz, Robert; Milligan, James; Lettieri, Lawrence

    2015-10-01

    BNL prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory’s environmental performance during the calendar year in review.

  2. Research. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Reagan, Ed.

    This document contains papers on instructional technology research from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference. Topics covered include: professors share their thoughts and feelings with their students; faculty reflections on teaching online; integrating technology into preservice teacher education;…

  3. Science. [SITE 2001 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Linda E., Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on science from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2001 conference: (1) "Using a Computer Simulation before Dissection To Help Students Learn Anatomy" (Joseph Paul Akpan and Thomas Andre); (2) "EARTH2CLASS: A Unique Workshop/On-Line/Distance-Learning Teacher Training…

  4. International. [SITE 2001 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Dee Anna, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on international issues from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2001 conference: (1) "Attitudes of Malaysian Vocational Trainee Teachers towards the Integration of Computer in Teaching" (Ab. Rahim Bakar and Shamsiah Mohamed); (2) "Views from an Asian Bridge: How…

  5. Site and Watershed Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Environmental Education, Cleveland, OH.

    Presented as part of a larger unit on watershed investigations are a slideshow script and a map and compass unit intended to help high school students better visualize the relationship between a water sampling site, the entire stream, community, and watershed. The script discusses features of a topographical map, shows how to read one, and…

  6. Research. [SITE 2001 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlister, Kim, Ed.; Curtis, Reagan, Ed.

    This document contains the papers on research from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2001 conference. Topics covered include: concerns of administrators and teachers in the diffusion of information technology; preservice elementary mathematics teachers' computer self efficacy, attitudes, and perceptions; information…

  7. Simulation. [SITE 2001 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Cathy R., Ed.

    This document contains three papers on simulation from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2001 conference. "Simulations in the Learning Cycle: A Case Study Involving 'Exploring the Nardoo'" (William M. Dwyer and Valesca E. Lopez) presents a study of middle school students using a CD-based simulation program,…

  8. Mathematics. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Michael L., Ed.; Lowery, Norene Vail, Ed.; Harnisch, Delwyn L., Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on mathematics from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference: (1) "Teachers' Learning of Mathematics in the Presence of Technology: Participatory Cognitive Apprenticeship" (Mara Alagic); (2) "A Fractal Is a Pattern in Your Neighborhood" (Craig N. Bach); (3)…

  9. Proposed Drill Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Proposed drill sites for intermediate depth temperature gradient holes and/or deep resource confirmation wells. Temperature gradient contours based on shallow TG program and faults interpreted from seismic reflection survey are shown, as are two faults interpreted by seismic contractor Optim but not by Oski Energy, LLC.

  10. Savannah River Site Robotics

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

  11. International. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Dee Anna, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on international issues from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference: (1) "The Management of Technological Change within Faculties in International American Schools" (Martine Audeoud); (2) "Going Global: Using a Website Development Project To Teach Technology…

  12. Elementary Classroom Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Elizabeth A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how elementary classroom Web sites support children's literacy. From a sociocultural perspective of literacy and a transformative stance toward the integration of literacy and technology, and building on explorations of new literacies, I discuss opportunities provided by the Internet that can support…

  13. Academic Enhancement Site

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJong, Judith A.; Holder, Stanley R.

    2006-01-01

    This off-reservation boarding school serves over 600 students in grades 4-12; approximately 85% of the students reside in campus dormitories. After having documented significant improvement on a number of outcomes during a previous High Risk Youth Prevention demonstration grant, the site submitted a Therapeutic Residential Model proposal,…

  14. Mathematics. [SITE 2001 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Michael L., Ed.; Lowery, Norene Vail, Ed.; Harnisch, Delwyn L., Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on mathematics from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2001 conference: "Secondary Mathematics Methods Course with Technology Units: Encouraging Pre-Service Teachers To Use Technology" (Rajee Amarasinghe); "Competency Exams in College Mathematics" (Kathy R. Autrey and Leigh…

  15. Theory. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Paula, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on theory from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference: (1) "The Emerging Ecological Contribution of Online Resources and Tools to K-12 Classrooms" (Therese Laferriere, Robert Bracewell, Alain Breuleux); (2) "Pedagogical Ethnotechnography: A Bifocal Lens To…

  16. Bright Sites, Big Cities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerram, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Businesses spend hundreds of millions of dollars building Web sites to sell products and services to other businesses. Business-to-business commerce on the Web dwarfs the retail and entertainment consumer industries. Examines Web design studios in New York, Los Angeles, and San Francisco: how they win customers, create products, hire, and plan for…

  17. Cloudwater chemistry from ten sites in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Weathers, K.C.; Likens, G.E.; Bormann, F.H.; Bicknell, S.H.; Bormann, B.T.; Daube, B.C. Jr.; Eaton, J.S.; Galloway, J.N.; Keene, W.C.; Kimball, K.D.

    1988-09-01

    Cloudwater and rainwater samples were collected at 2.5 m above ground during 2 years from 10 nonurban sites in North America. On the average, cloudwater collected from sites in the eastern United States was more acidic and had higher concentrations of NO/sub 3//sup -/ and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ than that at sites in the western United States and Puerto Rico. Of all the sites in the network, cloudwater from Maine had the highest concentrations of these ions. Concentrations of hydrogen ion, nitrate, and sulfate were significantly higher in cloudwater than in rainwater at most sites; however, on a paired-event basis, enrichment factors for cloud vs rain varied greatly. In contrast to distributions of inorganic anions, the concentrations of formate and acetate in cloudwater and rainwater were similar at sites in the western and eastern United States, suggesting that these compounds originated primarily with natural rather than anthropogenic sources.

  18. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2Geological Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-02-23

    Several technological options have been proposed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2}. One proposed remedy is to separate and capture CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel power plants and other stationary industrial sources and to inject the CO{sub 2} into deep subsurface formations for long-term storage and sequestration. Characterization of geologic formations for sequestration of large quantities of CO{sub 2} needs to be carefully considered to ensure that sites are suitable for long-term storage and that there will be no adverse impacts to human health or the environment. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (Final Draft, October 2005) states that ''Site characterization, selection and performance prediction are crucial for successful geological storage. Before selecting a site, the geological setting must be characterized to determine if the overlying cap rock will provide an effective seal, if there is a sufficiently voluminous and permeable storage formation, and whether any abandoned or active wells will compromise the integrity of the seal. Moreover, the availability of good site characterization data is critical for the reliability of models''. This International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO{sub 2} Geological Storage (CO2SC) addresses the particular issue of site characterization and site selection related to the geologic storage of carbon dioxide. Presentations and discussions cover the various aspects associated with characterization and selection of potential CO{sub 2} storage sites, with emphasis on advances in process understanding, development of measurement methods, identification of key site features and parameters, site characterization strategies, and case studies.

  19. Reservoir High's TE Site Wins Web Site of the Month

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article features "Mr. Rhine's Technology Education Web Site," a winner of the Web Site of the Month. This Web site was designed by Luke Rhine, a teacher at the Reservoir High School in Fulton, Maryland. Rhine's Web site offers course descriptions and syllabuses, class calendars, lectures and presentations, design briefs and other course…

  20. Technobabble: File Formats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Bradley

    1999-01-01

    Considers the confusion of over 20 different kinds of graphics programs. Briefly distinguishes between some of the more popular graphics formats (Photoshop, TIFF, JPEG, GIF, PICT, and EPS), and describes the benefits and disadvantages of each in the context of journalism education. (SC)

  1. Formation of planetesimals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, Stuart J.

    1991-01-01

    Formation of planetesimals is discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) nebular structure; (2) aerodynamics of the solid bodies in the nebula; (3) problems with gravitational instability; (4) particle growth by coagulation; properties of fractal aggregates; and (5) coagulation and settling of fractal aggregates.

  2. Carrascolendas: A Formative Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laosa, Luis M.

    A formative research project sought to test viewer reactions to two pilot programs of the Carrascolendas series. A total of 360 Puerto Rican-American, Cuban-American, Mexican-American, and Anglo-American children in grades 1, 2, and 3 were observed as they watched the programs. Results indicated that there was high eye contact during the…

  3. Formation of Freirian Facilitators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Phyllis

    This paper is written for people who are already familiar with the philosophy and methodology of Paulo Freire's liberatory education and are interested in creating a formation program for adult education facilitators using his ideas. The author describes the paper as "a collection of thoughts, of things to consider," when organizing such a…

  4. Formation in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glennon, Fred; Jacobsen, Douglas; Jacobsen, Rhonda Hustedt; Thatamanil, John J.; Porterfield, Amanda; Moore, Mary Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    What is the relationship between the academic knowledge of the guild and the formation of students in the classroom? This Forum gathers four essays originally presented at a Special Topics Session at the 2009 conference of the American Academy of Religion (Atlanta, Georgia), with a brief introductory essay by Fred Glennon explaining the genesis of…

  5. Concept Formation and Abstraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunzer, Eric A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper examines the nature of concepts and conceptual processes and the manner of their formation. It argues that a process of successive abstraction and systematization is central to the evolution of conceptual structures. Classificatory processes are discussed and three levels of abstraction outlined. (Author/SJL)

  6. Common file formats.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Shonda A; Littlejohn, Timothy G; Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2007-01-01

    This appendix discusses a few of the file formats frequently encountered in bioinformatics. Specifically, it reviews the rules for generating FASTA files and provides guidance for interpreting NCBI descriptor lines, commonly found in FASTA files. In addition, it reviews the construction of GenBank, Phylip, MSF and Nexus files. PMID:18428774

  7. Kepler Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2015-01-01

    Kepler has vastly increased our knowledge of planets and planetary systems located close to stars. The new data shows surprising results for planetary abundances, planetary spacings and the distribution of planets on a mass-radius diagram. The implications of these results for theories of planet formation will be discussed.

  8. Generic file format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felgate, Nick

    2002-11-01

    The Generic File Format (GFF) is a file format developed within the UK ASW community for the interchange and storage of underwater sonar data. Originally developed for the interchange of time-series data between analysis systems, it has been extended to provide for storage of processed acoustic data (e.g., power and DEMON spectrum, lofargram grey-scale), nonacoustic data (e.g., own-ship dynamics, sensor configuration) and event data (e.g., tracker output, sonar intercepts). The format employs the chunk concept, as used in the WAV and AIFF file formats, to provide extendability (including local variants) while providing a measure of backward compatability. However, the basic concept has been adapted to allow for the mixing in the one file of multiple channels of different sample-rates and data-types through the inclusion of a data frame concept and multiple data blocks. Chunk cross-referencing has been employed to ensure data consistency. A provision is made in the header of the file to store details of the sensor and processing for the data (e.g., the number of hydrophones, beam direction, FFT size) so that an analysis system does not need to know about the sensor or other system from which the data originated.

  9. The Formation of Trihalomethanes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trussell, R. Rhodes; Umphres, Mark D.

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed are a number of factors important in the formation of trihalomethanes (THM) including the nature of aquatic humus and the influences of preozonation, bromide, pH, and chlorine. A brief investigation is also conducted into the kinetics of the THM reaction. Several major research needs are represented. (CS)

  10. The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report Summary, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-02-28

    The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report is prepared and published each year to inform the public of the environmental activities that take place on the reservation and in the surrounding areas. It is written to comply with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. This document has been prepared to present the highlights of the Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report 2007 in an easy-to-read, summary format.

  11. Pattern formation today

    PubMed Central

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Richardson, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    Patterns are orders embedded in randomness. They may appear as spatial arrangements or temporal series, and the elements may appear identical or with variations. Patterns exist in the physical world as well as in living systems. In the biological world, patterns can range from simple to complex, forming the basic building blocks of life. The process which generates this ordering in the biological world was termed pattern formation. Since Wolpert promoted this concept four decades ago, scientists from molecular biology, developmental biology, stem cell biology, tissue engineering, theoretical modeling and other disciplines have made remarkable progress towards understanding its mechanisms. It is time to review and re-integrate our understanding. Here, we explore the origin of pattern formation, how the genetic code is translated into biological form, and how complex phenotypes are selected over evolutionary time. We present four topics: Principles, Evolution, Development, and Stem Cells and Regeneration. We have interviewed several leaders in the field to gain insight into how their research and the field of pattern formation have shaped each other. We have learned that both molecular process and physico-chemical principles are important for biological pattern formation. New understanding will emerge through integration of the analytical approach of molecular-genetic manipulation and the systemic approach of model simulation. We regret that we could not include every major investigator in the field, but hope that this Special Issue of the Int. J. Dev. Biol. represents a sample of our knowledge of pattern formation today, which will help to stimulate more research on this fundamental process. PMID:19557673

  12. Hypoxic adipocytes pattern early heterotopic bone formation.

    PubMed

    Olmsted-Davis, Elizabeth; Gannon, Francis H; Ozen, Mustafa; Ittmann, Michael M; Gugala, Zbigniew; Hipp, John A; Moran, Kevin M; Fouletier-Dilling, Christine M; Schumara-Martin, Shannon; Lindsey, Ronald W; Heggeness, Michael H; Brenner, Malcolm K; Davis, Alan R

    2007-02-01

    The factors contributing to heterotopic ossification, the formation of bone in abnormal soft-tissue locations, are beginning to emerge, but little is known about microenvironmental conditions promoting this often devastating disease. Using a murine model in which endochondral bone formation is triggered in muscle by bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), we studied changes near the site of injection of BMP2-expressing cells. As early as 24 hours later, brown adipocytes began accumulating in the lesional area. These cells stained positively for pimonidazole and therefore generated hypoxic stress within the target tissue, a prerequisite for the differentiation of stem cells to chondrocytes and subsequent heterotopic bone formation. We propose that aberrant expression of BMPs in soft tissue stimulates production of brown adipocytes, which drive the early steps of heterotopic endochondral ossification by lowering oxygen tension in adjacent tissue, creating the correct environment for chondrogenesis. Results in misty gray lean mutant mice not producing brown fat suggest that white adipocytes convert into fat-oxidizing cells when brown adipocytes are unavailable, providing a compensatory mechanism for generation of a hypoxic microenvironment. Manipulation of the transcriptional control of adipocyte fate in local soft-tissue environments may offer a means to prevent or treat development of bone in extraskeletal sites. PMID:17255330

  13. Site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Bachman, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis is a PCR-based method to mutate specified nucleotides of a sequence within a plasmid vector. This technique allows one to study the relative importance of a particular amino acid for protein structure and function. Typical mutations are designed to disrupt or map protein-protein interactions, mimic or block posttranslational modifications, or to silence enzymatic activity. Alternatively, noncoding changes are often used to generate rescue constructs that are resistant to knockdown via RNAi.

  14. Formation of polarity convergences underlying shoot outgrowths

    PubMed Central

    Abley, Katie; Sauret-Güeto, Susanna; Marée, Athanasius FM; Coen, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The development of outgrowths from plant shoots depends on formation of epidermal sites of cell polarity convergence with high intracellular auxin at their centre. A parsimonious model for generation of convergence sites is that cell polarity for the auxin transporter PIN1 orients up auxin gradients, as this spontaneously generates convergent alignments. Here we test predictions of this and other models for the patterns of auxin biosynthesis and import. Live imaging of outgrowths from kanadi1 kanadi2 Arabidopsis mutant leaves shows that they arise by formation of PIN1 convergence sites within a proximodistal polarity field. PIN1 polarities are oriented away from regions of high auxin biosynthesis enzyme expression, and towards regions of high auxin importer expression. Both expression patterns are required for normal outgrowth emergence, and may form part of a common module underlying shoot outgrowths. These findings are more consistent with models that spontaneously generate tandem rather than convergent alignments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18165.001 PMID:27478985

  15. Astronomy. Internet site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimenko, Anatoly Vasilievich

    The Internet site covers a wide area of actual astronomical topics, including 1) Astronomical News 2) Didactics of Astronomy 3) Space Research (Cosmonautics) 4) That's interesting 5) A Handbook of an astronomer 6) The Solar system 7) A Photogalery 8) Works of Schoolars 9) History of Astronomy The most important of them is the section concerning Space Research (Cosmonautics). This section covers a wide range of topics, beginning with very complete Illustrated History of Soviet Space research , the building of Soviet Rockets, a complete list of Cosmonauts with biographies, a list of all the flies. The author of the site concerns much ineterest to recent and extraordinary astronomiucal phenomena, such as Hazardous asteroids, Comets, Solar and Moon Eclipses, Meteorites, as well as to correct from the scientifical point of view interpretation of the extraordinary astronomical phenomena. The section concerning the Solar system is richly illustrated and give detailed explanations to Solar System evolution and actual state, explains many phenomena in the Solar system. THe Internet site is designed for schoolars as well as to amateur and professional astronomers.

  16. Site environmental report: 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) has in place an extensive radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring program which monitors air emissions, groundwater, soil, and ambient air around the facility. ITRI is operated in a manner that minimizes any adverse impact to the environment. The ITRI facility is in compliance with air quality and hazardous waste regulations. However, due to the previous operations of its six on-site sewage lagoons, groundwater in the ITRI vicinity contains nitrate, total dissolved solids, and sulfate contamination that exceeds state groundwater standards. Also, due to an underground fuel system leak, a localized area of groundwater is contaminated with diesel fuel. In addition, a small quantity of mixed low-level waste generated in the process of laboratory research is presently stored on site while treatment and disposal options are determined. Based on present information, the contaminant plume originating from the sewage lagoons has not migrated off the ITRI site. In addition, a groundwater assessment is underway to determine the extent of groundwater contamination and options for remediation, if required. Diesel fuel leaks and spills have been characterized, and the extent of the contamination is currently being assessed with five new monitoring wells, MW-12 through {minus}15. All underground tanks and fuel lines have been removed, along with associated contaminated soil. A soil venting and volatilization remediation system continues to operate in the area of a fuel leak, where further remediation may be required to remove diesel oil in the groundwater.

  17. 1999 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    ENGEL-COX,J.; ZIMMERMAN,E.; LEE,R.; WILLIAMS,J.; GREEN,T.; PAQUETTE,D.; HOODA,B.; SCARPITTA,S.; GENZER,P.; ET AL

    2000-09-01

    Throughout the scientific community, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is renowned for its leading-edge research in physics, medicine, chemistry, biology, materials, and the environment. BNL is committed to supporting its world-class scientific research with an internationally recognized environmental protection program. The 1999 Site Environmental Report (SER) summarizes the status of the Laboratory's environmental programs and performance, including the steady progress towards cleaning up the site and fully integrating environmental stewardship into all facets of the Laboratory's mission. BNL is located on 5,265 acres of pine barrens in Suffolk County in the center of Long Island, New York. The Laboratory is situated above a sole source aquifer at the headwaters of the Peconic River; therefore, protecting ground and surface water quality is a special concern. Approximately 3,600 acres of the site are undeveloped and serve as habitat for a wide variety of animals and plants, including one New York State endangered species, the tiger salamander, and two New York State threatened species, the banded sunfish and the stiff goldenrod. Monitoring, preserving, and restoring these ecological resources is a high priority for the Laboratory.

  18. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 10 April 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image was acquired near 7o S, 172o W (188o E) and shows a remarkable martian geologic deposit known as the Medusae Fossae Formation. This Formation, seen here as the raised plateau in the upper two-thirds of the image, is a soft, easily eroded deposit that extends for nearly 1,000 km along the equator of Mars. In this region the deposit has been heavily eroded by the wind to produce a series of linear ridges called yardangs. These parallel ridges point in direction of the prevailing winds that carved them, and demonstrate the power of martian winds to sculpt the dry landscape of Mars. The Medusae Fossae Formation has been completely stripped from the surface in the lower third of the image, revealing a harder layer below that is more resistant to wind erosion. The easily eroded nature of the Medusae Fossae Formation suggests that it is composed of weakly cemented particles, and was most likely formed by the deposition of wind-blown dust or volcanic ash. Several ancient craters that were once completely buried by this deposit are being exposed, or exhumed, as the overlying Medusae Formation is removed. Very few impact craters are visible on this Formation, indicating that the surface seen today is relatively young, and that the processes of erosion are likely to be actively occurring. The Story Medusa of Greek mythology fame, the name-giver to this region, had snaky locks of hair that could turn a person to stone. Wild and unruly, this monster of the underworld could certainly wreak havoc on the world of the human imagination. As scary as she was, Medusa would have no advantage over the fierce, masterful winds blowing across Mars, which once carved the streaky, terrain at the top of this image. Wild and whipping, these winds have slowly eroded away the 'topsoil,' revealing ancient craters and other surface features they once covered. The loosely cemented particles of this 'topsoil' are likely made up of dust

  19. Gasbuggy Site Assessment and Risk Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    2011-03-01

    The Gasbuggy site is in northern New Mexico in the San Juan Basin, Rio Arriba County (Figure 1-1). The Gasbuggy experiment was designed to evaluate the use of a nuclear detonation to enhance natural gas production from the Pictured Cliffs Formation, a tight, gas-bearing sandstone formation. The 29-kiloton-yield nuclear device was placed in a 17.5-inch wellbore at 4,240 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs), approximately 40 ft below the Pictured Cliffs/Lewis shale contact, in an attempt to force the cavity/chimney formed by the detonation up into the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone. The test was conducted below the southwest quarter of Section 36, Township 29 North, Range 4 West, New Mexico Principal Meridian. The device was detonated on December 10, 1967, creating a 335-ft-high chimney above the detonation point and a cavity 160 ft in diameter. The gas produced from GB-ER (the emplacement and reentry well) during the post-detonation production tests was radioactive and diluted, primarily by carbon dioxide. After 2 years, the energy content of the gas had recovered to 80 percent of the value of gas in conventionally developed wells in the area. There is currently no technology capable of remediating deep underground nuclear detonation cavities and chimneys. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) must continue to manage the Gasbuggy site to ensure that no inadvertent intrusion into the residual contamination occurs. DOE has complete control over the 1/4 section (160 acres) containing the shot cavity, and no drilling is permitted on that property. However, oil and gas leases are on the surrounding land. Therefore, the most likely route of intrusion and potential exposure would be through contaminated natural gas or contaminated water migrating into a producing natural gas well outside the immediate vicinity of ground zero. The purpose of this report is to describe the current site conditions and evaluate the potential health risks posed by the most plausible

  20. Catastrophic desert formation in Daisyworld.

    PubMed

    Ackland, Graeme J; Clark, Michael A; Lenton, Timothy M

    2003-07-01

    Feedback between life and its environment is ubiquitous but the strength of coupling and its global implications remain hotly debated. Abrupt changes in the abundance of life for small changes in forcing provide one indicator of regulation, for example, when vegetation-climate feedback collapses in the formation of a desert. Here we use a two-dimensional "Daisyworld" model with curvature to show that catastrophic collapse of life under gradual forcing provides a testable indicator of environmental feedback. When solar luminosity increases to a critical value, a desert forms across a wide band of the planet. The scale of collapse depends on the strength of feedback. The efficiency of temperature regulation is limited by mutation rate in an analogous manner to the limitation of adaptive fitness in evolutionary theories. The final state of the system emerging from single-site rules can be described by two global quantities: optimization of temperature regulation and maximization of diversity, which are mathematically analogous to energy and entropy in thermodynamics.

  1. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1994 site environmental report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  2. Potential Sites for Ice Nucleation on Aluminosilicate Clay Minerals and Related Materials.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Miriam Arak

    2015-10-01

    Few aerosol particles in clouds nucleate the formation of ice. The surface sites available for nucleus formation, which can include surface defects and functional groups, determine in part the activity of an aerosol particle toward ice formation. Although ice nucleation on particles has been widely studied, exploration of the specific sites at which the initial germ forms has been limited, but is important for predicting the microphysical properties of clouds, which impact climate. This Perspective focuses on what is currently known about surface sites for ice nucleation on aluminosilicate clay minerals, which are commonly found in ice residuals, as well as related materials. PMID:26722881

  3. Potential Sites for Ice Nucleation on Aluminosilicate Clay Minerals and Related Materials.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Miriam Arak

    2015-10-01

    Few aerosol particles in clouds nucleate the formation of ice. The surface sites available for nucleus formation, which can include surface defects and functional groups, determine in part the activity of an aerosol particle toward ice formation. Although ice nucleation on particles has been widely studied, exploration of the specific sites at which the initial germ forms has been limited, but is important for predicting the microphysical properties of clouds, which impact climate. This Perspective focuses on what is currently known about surface sites for ice nucleation on aluminosilicate clay minerals, which are commonly found in ice residuals, as well as related materials.

  4. Cosmological structure formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the current forefront problem of physical cosmology, the formation of structures (galaxies, clusters, great walls, etc.) in the universe is presented. Solutions require two key ingredients: (1) matter; and (2) seeds. Regarding the matter, it now seems clear that both baryonic and non-baryonic matter are required. Whether the non-baryonic matter is hot or cold depends on the choice of seeds. Regarding the seeds, both density fluctuations and topological defects are discussed. The combination of isotropy of the microwave background and the recent observations indicating more power on large scales have severly constrained, if not eliminated, Gaussian fluctuations with equal power on all scales, regardless of the eventual resolution of both the matter and seed questions. It is important to note that all current structure formation ideas require new physics beyond SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1).

  5. Emptiness Formation Probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Nicholas; Ng, Stephen; Starr, Shannon

    2016-08-01

    We present rigorous upper and lower bounds on the emptiness formation probability for the ground state of a spin-1/2 Heisenberg XXZ quantum spin system. For a d-dimensional system we find a rate of decay of the order {exp(-c L^{d+1})} where L is the sidelength of the box in which we ask for the emptiness formation event to occur. In the {d=1} case this confirms previous predictions made in the integrable systems community, though our bounds do not achieve the precision predicted by Bethe ansatz calculations. On the other hand, our bounds in the case {d ≥ 2} are new. The main tools we use are reflection positivity and a rigorous path integral expansion, which is a variation on those previously introduced by Toth, Aizenman-Nachtergaele and Ueltschi.

  6. Tetrahedron Formation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petruzzo, Charles; Guzman, Jose

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers the preliminary development of a general optimization procedure for tetrahedron formation control. The maneuvers are assumed to be impulsive and a multi-stage optimization method is employed. The stages include (1) targeting to a fixed tetrahedron location and orientation, and (2) rotating and translating the tetrahedron. The number of impulsive maneuvers can also be varied. As the impulse locations and times change, new arcs are computed using a differential corrections scheme that varies the impulse magnitudes and directions. The result is a continuous trajectory with velocity discontinuities. The velocity discontinuities are then used to formulate the cost function. Direct optimization techniques are employed. The procedure is applied to the NASA Goddard Magnetospheric Multi-Scale (MMS) mission to compute preliminary formation control fuel requirements.

  7. Prominence Formation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, B. T.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2005-01-01

    Martens and Zwaan (ApJ v. 558 872) have proposed a prominence/ filament formation model in which differential rotation drives reconnection between two initially unconnected active regions to form helical field lines that support mass and are held down by overlying field. Using an MHD solver with adaptive refinement we simulated this process by imposing a shear flow meant to mimic differential rotation on two bipolar flux distributions meant to mimic distinct active regions. In some runs the flux systems are initially potential while in others they have been twisted by footpoint rotation to inject helicity prior to imposing the shear flow. The resulting structures are studied to understand the role of helicity in the formation of prominence-like structures.

  8. Formation of bacterial nanocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, Mikhail; Kudryashova, Ekaterina; Suzina, Natalia; Ariskina, Elena; Voronkov, Vadim

    1998-07-01

    Existence of nanobacteria received increasing attention both in environmental microbiology/geomicro-biology and in medical microbiology. In order to study a production of nanoforms by typical bacterial cells. Effects of different physical factors were investigated. Treatment of bacterial cultures with microwave radiation, or culturing in field of electric current resulted in formation a few types of nanocells. The number and type of nanoforms were determined with type and dose of the treatment. The produced nanoforms were: i) globules, ii) clusters of the globules--probably produced by liaison, iii) nanocells coated with membrane. The viability of the globules is an object opened for doubts. The nanocells discovered multiplication and growth on solidified nutrient media. The authors suggest that formation of nanocells is a common response of bacteria to stress-actions produced by different agents.

  9. Detecting transmissive bedrock fracture zones under cover of glacial formations using residential water-well production data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maharjan, Madan; Eckstein, Yoram

    2013-12-01

    Tracing fractures under glacial drift commonly involves costly and often unfeasible (in populated areas) geophysical methods or outcrop surveys, often far from the area of interest. A hypothesis is tested, that the specific capacity data for wells penetrating through glacial drift into a bedrock aquifer display two statistical populations: assuming uniform well construction, the wells with high specific capacity penetrate transmissive fracture zones, while those with low specific capacity encounter non-fractured rock characterized by primary porosity. The hypothesis was tested on 617 wells drilled into the Pennsylvanian Sharon Sandstone, Geauga County, Ohio (USA). Hydraulic conductivity, calculated using the Cooper and Jacob (1946) approximation to Theis' non-equilibrium radial flow equation, followed quasi-log-normal distribution (geometric mean 9.88 × 10-6 m/s). The lower values presumably correspond to primary porosity, and higher values correspond to bedrock fracture zones. The higher hydraulic conductivity followed two distinct orientations (N34°E, N44°W), corresponding with the regional fracture pattern of the Allegheny Plateau. A variogram showed that the wells within a kilometer of each other correlate and that wells penetrating the thicker glacial blanket have lower hydraulic conductivity and larger drawdown. Cooper and Jacob (1946) A generalized graphical method for evaluating formation constants and summarizing well-field history, Am. Geoph. Union Trans. 27/4:526-534.

  10. Galaxy Formation and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamine, Kentaro; Reddy, Naveen; Daddi, Emanuele; Sargent, Mark T.

    2016-07-01

    In this chapter, we discuss the current status of observational and computational studies on galaxy formation and evolution. In particular, a joint analysis of star-formation rates (SFRs), stellar masses, and metallicities of galaxies throughout cosmic time can shed light on the processes by which galaxies build up their stellar mass and enrich the environment with heavy elements. Comparison of such observations and the results of numerical simulations can give us insights on the physical importance of various feedback effects by supernovae and active galactic nuclei. In Sect. 1, we first discuss the primary methods used to deduce the SFRs, stellar masses, and (primarily) gas-phase metallicities in high-redshift galaxies. Then, we show how these quantities are related to each other and evolve with time. In Sect. 2, we further examine the distribution of SFRs in galaxies following the `Main Sequence' paradigm. We show how the so-called `starbursts' display higher specific SFRs and SF efficiencies by an order of magnitude. We use this to devise a simple description of the evolution of the star-forming galaxy population since z ˜3 that can successfully reproduce some of the observed statistics in the infrared (IR) wavelength. We also discuss the properties of molecular gas. In Sect. 3, we highlight some of the recent studies of high-redshift galaxy formation using cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We discuss the physical properties of simulated galaxies such as luminosity function and escape fraction of ionizing photons, which are important statistics for reionization of the Universe. In particular the escape fraction of ionizing photons has large uncertainties, and studying gamma-ray bursts (which is the main topic of this conference) can also set observational constraints on this uncertain physical parameter as well as cosmic star formation rate density.

  11. Simulations of antihydrogen formation

    SciTech Connect

    Robicheaux, F.

    2004-08-01

    The results of simulations of antihydrogen formation in a Penning trap are reported. The antihydrogen atoms are formed by three-body capture. We find that the arrested nature of the three-body capture in the trap greatly reduces the expected binding energy of the antihydrogen. Typically, the formed antihydrogen has larger velocity along the magnetic field than across the field and a binding energy below k{sub B}T.

  12. Formate-assisted pyrolysis

    DOEpatents

    DeSisto, William Joseph; Wheeler, Marshall Clayton; van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

    2015-03-17

    The present invention provides, among other thing, methods for creating significantly deoxygenated bio-oils form biomass including the steps of providing a feedstock, associating the feedstock with an alkali formate to form a treated feedstock, dewatering the treated feedstock, heating the dewatered treated feedstock to form a vapor product, and condensing the vapor product to form a pyrolysis oil, wherein the pyrolysis oil contains less than 30% oxygen by weight.

  13. Mesospheric cloud formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Formation of mesospheric clouds as a result of deposition of large amounts of H2O by the heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) of the solar power satellite system is discussed. The conditions which must be met in order to form and maintain clouds near the mesopause are described. The frequency and magnitude of H2O injections from the HLLV rocket exhaust are considered.

  14. Hail Formation in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Matthew

    Hail poses a substantial threat to life and property in the state of Florida. These losses could be minimized through better understanding of the relationships between atmospheric variables that impact hail formation in Florida. Improving hail forecasting in Florida requires analyzing a number of meteorological parameters and synoptic data related to hail formation. NOAA archive data was retrieved to create a database that was used to categorize text files of hail days. The text files were entered into the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory website to create National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis maps of atmospheric variables for Florida hail days as well as days leading to the hail event. These data were then analyzed to determine the relationship between variables that affect hail formation, in general, across different regions and seasons in Florida using Statistical Product and Service Solutions. The reasoning for the differing factors affecting hail formation between regions, seasons and hail sizes were discussed, as well as forecasting suggestions relating to region and month in Florida. The study found that the majority of all hail that occurs in Florida is during the wet season. A low Lifted Index, high Precipitable Water and lower than average Sea Level Pressure, in most cases, is present during hail days in Florida. Furthermore, results show that Vector Wind magnitude increases as hail size increases. Additionally, several atmospheric variables useful to studying hail events, such as Lifted Index, Precipitable Water, Sea Level Pressure, Vector Wind and Temperature have significant correlations with each other depending on the region and season being observed. Strong correlations between low Lifted Index, high Precipitable Water values and the occurrence of hail events are discussed, as well as the relationship between temperature anomalies at various

  15. Tetrahedron Formation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzman, Jose J.

    2003-01-01

    Spacecraft flying in tetrahedron formations are excellent instrument platforms for electromagnetic and plasma studies. A minimum of four spacecraft - to establish a volume - is required to study some of the key regions of a planetary magnetic field. The usefulness of the measurements recorded is strongly affected by the tetrahedron orbital evolution. This paper considers the preliminary development of a general optimization procedure for tetrahedron formation control. The maneuvers are assumed to be impulsive and a multi-stage optimization method is employed. The stages include targeting to a fixed tetrahedron orientation, rotating and translating the tetrahedron and/or varying the initial and final times. The number of impulsive maneuvers citn also be varied. As the impulse locations and times change, new arcs are computed using a differential corrections scheme that varies the impulse magnitudes and directions. The result is a continuous trajectory with velocity discontinuities. The velocity discontinuities are then used to formulate the cost function. Direct optimization techniques are employed. The procedure is applied to the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) to compute preliminary formation control fuel requirements.

  16. Terrestrial planet formation.

    PubMed

    Righter, K; O'Brien, D P

    2011-11-29

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (~10(6) y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few 10(6) y), and finally embryos to planets (10(7)-10(8) y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids.

  17. Terrestrial planet formation.

    PubMed

    Righter, K; O'Brien, D P

    2011-11-29

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (~10(6) y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few 10(6) y), and finally embryos to planets (10(7)-10(8) y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids. PMID:21709256

  18. Mars brine formation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Bullock, Mark A.; Stoker, Carol R.

    1993-09-01

    Evaporites, particularly carbonates, nitrates, and sulfates, may be major sinks of volatiles scavenged from the martian atmosphere. Mars is thought to have once had a denser, warmer atmosphere that permitted the presence of liquid surface water. The conversion of atmospheric CO2 into carbonate is hypothesized to have degraded the martian climate to its present state of a generally subfreezing, desiccated desert. The rate for such a conversion under martian conditions is poorly known, so the time scale of climate degradation by this process cannot be easily evaluated. If some models are correct, carbonate formation may have been fast at geological time scales. The experiments of Booth and Kieffer also imply fast (106 - 107 yr) removal of the missing CO2 inventory, estimated to be 1 - 5 bar, by means of carbonate formation. The timing of formation of many of the fluvial features observed on Mars is, in large part, dependent on when and how fast the atmosphere changed. A knowledge of the rate at which carbonates and nitrates formed is also essential for assessing the probability that life, or its chemical precursors, could have developed on Mars. No previous experiments have quantitatively evaluated the rate of solution for a suite of mobile anions and cations from unaltered minerals and atmospheric gases into liquid water under Mars-like conditions. Such experiments are the focus of this task.

  19. Terrestrial planet formation

    PubMed Central

    Righter, K.; O’Brien, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (∼106 y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few × 106 y), and finally embryos to planets (107–108 y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids. PMID:21709256

  20. Multiple phosphorus chemical sites in heavily phosphorus-doped diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Rikiya; Muro, Takayuki; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Hirai, Masaaki; Kato, Hiromitsu; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Takano, Yoshihiko; Ishii, Satoshi; Oguchi, Tamio

    2011-02-21

    We have performed high-resolution core level photoemission spectroscopy on a heavily phosphorus (P)-doped diamond film in order to elucidate the chemical sites of doped-phosphorus atoms in diamond. P 2p core level study shows two bulk components, providing spectroscopic evidence for multiple chemical sites of doped-phosphorus atoms. This indicates that only a part of doped-phosphorus atoms contribute to the formation of carriers. From a comparison with band calculations, possible origins for the chemical sites are discussed.

  1. Sulfate Formation on Mars by Volcanic Aerosols: A New Look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaney, D. L.

    1996-03-01

    Sulfur was measured at both Viking Lander sites in abundances of 5-9 wt % SO3. Because the sulfur was more concentrated in clumps which disintegrated and the general oxidized nature of the Martian soil, these measurements led to the assumption that a sulfate duricrust existed. Two types of models for sulfate formation have been proposed. One is a formation by upwardly migrating ground water. The other is the formation of sulfates by the precipitation of volcanic aerosols. Most investigators have tended to favor the ground water origin of sulfates on Mars. However, evidence assemble since Viking may point to a volcanic aerosol origin.

  2. Spectroscopic Definition of the Ferroxidase Site in M Ferritin: Comparison of Binuclear Substrate vs. Cofactor Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jennifer K.; Liu, Xiaofeng S.; Tosha, Takehiko; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2008-01-01

    Maxi ferritins, 24 subunit protein nanocages, are essential in humans, plants, bacteria, and other animals for the concentration and storage of iron as hydrated ferric oxide, while minimizing free radical generation or use by pathogens. Formation of the precursors to these ferric oxides is catalyzed at a non-heme biferrous substrate site, which has some parallels with the cofactor sites in other biferrous enzymes. A combination of circular dichroism (CD), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), and variable-temperature, variable-field MCD (VTVH MCD) has been used to probe Fe(II) binding to the substrate active site in frog M ferritin. These data determined that the active site within each subunit consists of two inequivalent five-coordinate (5C) ferrous centers that are weakly anti-ferromagnetically coupled, consistent with a μ-1,3 carboxylate bridge. The active site ligand set is unusual and likely includes a terminal water bound to each Fe(II) center. The Fe(II) ions bind to the active sites in a concerted manner, and cooperativity among the sites in each subunit is observed, potentially providing a mechanism for the control of ferritin iron loading. Differences in geometric and electronic structure – including a weak ligand field, availability of two water ligands at the biferrous substrate site, and the single carboxylate bridge in ferritin – coincide with the divergent reaction pathways observed between this substrate site and the previously studied cofactor active sites. PMID:18576633

  3. Histopathology Predicts the Mechanism of Stone Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evan, Andrew P.

    2007-04-01

    About 5% of American women and 12% of men will develop a kidney stone at some time in their life and these numbers appear to be on the rise. Despite years of scientific research into the mechanisms of stone formation and growth, limited advances have been made until recently. Randall's original observations and thoughts on the mechanisms for kidney stone formation have been validated for idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers (ICSF) but not for most other stone forming groups. Our current studies on selected groups of human stone formers using intraoperative papillary biopsies has shown overwhelming evidence for the presence of Randall's plaque in ICSF and that stone formation and growth are exclusively linked to its availability to urinary ions and proteins. Intense investigation of the plaque-stone junction is needed if we are to understand the factors leading to the overgrowth process on exposed regions of plaque. Such information should allow the development of treatment strategies to block stone formation in ICSF patients. Patients who form brushite stones, or who form apatite stones because of distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA), or patients with calcium oxalate stones due to obesity bypass procedures, or patients with cystinuria, get plugged inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCD) which leads to total destruction of the lining cells and focal sites of interstitial fibrosis. These stone formers have plaque but at levels equal to or below non-stone formers, which would suggest that they form stones by a different mechanism than do ICSF patients.

  4. Formation of magnetic discontinuities through viscous relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sanjay; Bhattacharyya, R.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.

    2014-05-15

    According to Parker's magnetostatic theorem, tangential discontinuities in magnetic field, or current sheets (CSs), are generally unavoidable in an equilibrium magnetofluid with infinite electrical conductivity and complex magnetic topology. These CSs are due to a failure of a magnetic field in achieving force-balance everywhere and preserving its topology while remaining in a spatially continuous state. A recent work [Kumar, Bhattacharyya, and Smolarkiewicz, Phys. Plasmas 20, 112903 (2013)] demonstrated this CS formation utilizing numerical simulations in terms of the vector magnetic field. The magnetohydrodynamic simulations presented here complement the above work by demonstrating CS formation by employing a novel approach of describing the magnetofluid evolution in terms of magnetic flux surfaces instead of the vector magnetic field. The magnetic flux surfaces being the possible sites on which CSs develop, this approach provides a direct visualization of the CS formation, helpful in understanding the governing dynamics. The simulations confirm development of tangential discontinuities through a favorable contortion of magnetic flux surfaces, as the magnetofluid undergoes a topology-preserving viscous relaxation from an initial non-equilibrium state with twisted magnetic field. A crucial finding of this work is in its demonstration of CS formation at spatial locations away from the magnetic nulls.

  5. Site Characterization Work Plan for the Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico (Rev. 1, January 2002)

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office

    2002-01-14

    Project Gnome was the first nuclear experiment conducted under the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Plowshare Program. The Plowshare Program focused on developing nuclear devices exclusively for peaceful purposes. The intent of the Gnome experiment was to evaluate the effects of a nuclear detonation in a salt medium. Historically, Project Gnome consisted of a single detonation of a nuclear device on December 10, 1961 with the Salado Formation. Since the Gnome detonation, the AEC/DOE has conducted surface restoration, site reconnaissance, and decontamination and decommissioning activities at the site. In addition, annual groundwater sampling is performed under a long-term hydrological monitoring program begun in 1972. Coach, an experiment to be located near the Gnome project, was initially scheduled for 1963. Although construction and rehabilitation were completed for Coach, the experiment was canceled and never executed. Known collectively as Project Gnome-Coach, the site is located approximately 25 miles east of Carlsbad, New Mexico, in Eddy County, and is comprised of nearly 680 acres, of which approximately 60 acres are disturbed from the combined AEC/DOE operations. The scope of this work plan is to document the environmental objectives and the proposed technical site investigation strategies that will be utilized for the site characterization of the project. The subsurface at the Gnome-Coach site has two contaminant sources that are fundamentally different in terms of both their stratigraphic location and release mechanism. The goal of this characterization is to collect data of sufficient quantity and quality to establish current site conditions and to use the data to identify and evaluate if further action is required to protect human health and the environment and achieve permanent closure of the site. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent corrective action decision document.

  6. Site Characterization Work Plan for Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    DOE /NV

    2001-02-13

    Project Gnome was the first nuclear experiment conducted under the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Plowshare Program. Gnome was part of a joint government-industry experiment focused on developing nuclear devices exclusively for peaceful purposes. The intent of the Gnome experiment was to evaluate the effects of a nuclear detonation in a salt medium. Historically, Project Gnome consisted of a single detonation of a nuclear device on December 10, 1961. Since the Gnome detonation, the AEC/DOE has conducted surface restoration, site reconnaissance, and decontamination and decommissioning activities at the site. In addition, annual groundwater sampling is performed under a long-term hydrological monitoring program begun in 1980. Coach, an experiment to be located near the Gnome project, was initially scheduled for 1963. Although construction and rehabilitation were completed for Coach, the experiment was canceled and never executed. Known collectively as Project Gnome-Coach, the site is situated within the Salado Formation approximately 25 miles east of Carlsbad, New Mexico, in Eddy County, and is comprised of nearly 680 acres, of which 60 acres are disturbed from the combined AEC/DOE operations. The scope of this work plan is to document the environmental objectives and the proposed technical site investigation strategies that will be utilized for the site characterization of the project. The subsurface at the Gnome-Coach site has two contaminant sources that are fundamentally different in terms of both their stratigraphic location and release mechanism. The goal of this characterization is to collect data of sufficient quantity and quality to establish current site conditions and to use the data to identify and evaluate if further action is required to protect human health and the environment and achieve permanent closure of the site. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent corrective

  7. Formation of Catalytic Metal-Molecule Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulevski, George S.; Myers, Matt B.; Hybertsen, Mark S.; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Nuckolls, Colin

    2005-07-01

    We describe a new strategy for the in situ growth of molecular wires predicated on the synthesis of a trifunctional ``primed'' contact formed from metal-carbon multiple bonds. The ruthenium-carbon π bond provides structural stability to the molecular linkages under ambient conditions, and density functional calculations indicate the formation of an efficient conduit for charge carriers to pass between the metal and the molecule. Moreover, the metal-carbon π bond provides a chemically reactive site from which a conjugated molecular wire can be grown in situ through an olefin metathesis reaction.

  8. The Role of Fragile Sites in Sporadic Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Laura W.; Lehman, Christine E.; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer is increasing, especially papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), making it currently the fastest-growing cancer among women. Reasons for this increase remain unclear, but several risk factors including radiation exposure and improved detection techniques have been suggested. Recently, the induction of chromosomal fragile site breakage was found to result in the formation of RET/PTC1 rearrangements, a common cause of PTC. Chromosomal fragile sites are regions of the genome with a high susceptibility to forming DNA breaks and are often associated with cancer. Exposure to a variety of external agents can induce fragile site breakage, which may account for some of the observed increase in PTC. This paper discusses the role of fragile site breakage in PTC development, external fragile site-inducing agents that may be potential risk factors for PTC, and how these factors are especially targeting women. PMID:22762011

  9. Rhizobia are attracted to localized sites on legume roots.

    PubMed

    Gulash, M; Ames, P; Larosiliere, R C; Bergman, K

    1984-07-01

    Clouds of Rhizobium meliloti were attracted to localized sites on the surface of the infectible region of alfalfa roots. This behavior, which required active motility and chemotaxis, was not species specific. Correlation between the behavior of various mutants and their competitiveness for nodulation suggests that cloud formation has a role in the infection of host legume roots by rhizobia.

  10. Site Plan & Site Section of Citrus Landscape (Showing Relationship ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Site Plan & Site Section of Citrus Landscape (Showing Relationship of Victoria Avenue to Citrus Groves) - Arlington Heights Citrus Landscape, Southwestern portion of city of Riverside, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  11. Site Plan & Site Section of Citrus Landscape (Showing Relationship ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Site Plan & Site Section of Citrus Landscape (Showing Relationship of Groves & Irrigation System to Grove Canal) - Arlington Heights Citrus Landscape, Southwestern portion of city of Riverside, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  12. 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    ENVIRONMENT AND WASTE MANAGMENT SERVICES DIVISION; ET AL.

    2004-10-01

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a multi-program national laboratory, prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SER is written to inform outside regulators, the public, and Laboratory employees of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review, and to summarize BNL's on-site environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), state, and local regulations; and environmental, restoration, and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. This report is intended to be a technical document. It is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.ser.htm. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview, and is distributed with a CD version of the full-length SER. The summary supports BNL's educational and community outreach program.

  13. Site Recommendation Subsurface Layout

    SciTech Connect

    C.L. Linden

    2000-06-28

    The purpose of this analysis is to develop a Subsurface Facility layout that is capable of accommodating the statutory capacity of 70,000 metric tons of uranium (MTU), as well as an option to expand the inventory capacity, if authorized, to 97,000 MTU. The layout configuration also requires a degree of flexibility to accommodate potential changes in site conditions or program requirements. The objective of this analysis is to provide a conceptual design of the Subsurface Facility sufficient to support the development of the Subsurface Facility System Description Document (CRWMS M&O 2000e) and the ''Emplacement Drift System Description Document'' (CRWMS M&O 2000i). As well, this analysis provides input to the Site Recommendation Consideration Report. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Evaluation of the existing facilities and their integration into the Subsurface Facility design. (2) Identification and incorporation of factors influencing Subsurface Facility design, such as geological constraints, thermal loading, constructibility, subsurface ventilation, drainage control, radiological considerations, and the Test and Evaluation Facilities. (3) Development of a layout showing an available area in the primary area sufficient to support both the waste inventories and individual layouts showing the emplacement area required for 70,000 MTU and, if authorized, 97,000 MTU.

  14. Spirit's Winter Work Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Version

    This portion of an image acquired by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera shows the Spirit rover's winter campaign site. Spirit was parked on a slope tilted 11 degrees to the north to maximize sunlight during the southern winter season. 'Tyrone' is an area where the rover's wheels disturbed light-toned soils. Remote sensing and in-situ analyses found the light-toned soil at Tyrone to be sulfate rich and hydrated. The original picture is catalogued as PSP_001513_1655_red and was taken on Sept. 29, 2006.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project and built the spacecraft. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment is operated by the University of Arizona, Tucson, and the instrument was built by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corp., Boulder, Colo.

  15. 1996 Site environmental report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The FEMP is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facility that produced high-quality uranium metals for military defense for nearly 40 years. DOE suspended production at the FEMP in 1989 and formally ended production in 1991. Although production activities have ceased, the site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the FEMP. The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. This 1996 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the FEMP progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in this Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish are presented here. All information presented in this summary is discussed more fully in the main body of this report.

  16. Preliminary siting characterization Salt Disposition Facility - Site B

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, D.

    2000-01-04

    A siting and reconnaissance geotechnical program has been completed in S-Area at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. This program investigated the subsurface conditions for the area known as ``Salt Disposition Facility (SDF), Site B'' located northeast of H-Area and within the S-Area. Data acquired from the Site B investigation includes both field exploration and laboratory test data.

  17. Model of kimberlite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrovitsky, Sergey; Fiveyskaya, Lyudmila

    2013-04-01

    The critical goals in recognizing the nature of kimberlites are to find out: (1) the primary composition of melt of these rocks and (2) the principal processes of evolution of primary composition of kimberlites while ascending from mantle depth towards earth surface. Suppose, that the primary composition of kimberlite melt-fluid was in fact the composition of asthenosphere melt geochemically being close to alkaline-basalt (Hi-µ) saturated with high CO2. The genetic relation of kimberlites with basaltoids is indicated by a spatial and temporal affinity of their formation (Carlson et al, 2006; Lehmann et al, 2010; Tappe et al, 2012), similarity of the pattern of incompatible elements distribution, presence of megacryst minerals in alkaline basaltoids, Pyr-Alm garnet included, and finally, model calculation of parent melt composition for low-Cr megacryst minerals; it showed this composition to be typical for the alkaline basaltoid (Jones, 1980). At the asthenosphere level there was differentiation of basaltoid melt-fluid which was responsible for formation of its different parts with varying melt to fluid ratio and possibly varying content of alkalis (K2O). The outbreak of asthenosphere substance through lithosphere mantle proceeded by different scenarios: (a) With a noticeable dominance of fluid component kimberlites were formed by the capture and contamination of high-Mg, high-Cr rocks of lithosphere mantle that caused formation of high-Mg kimberlites. That corresponds to model of Russell (2012). (b) With a considerable proportion of melt phase depending on saturation in fluid there formed magnesium-ferriferous and ferriferous-titaniferous petrochemical types of kimberlites. There is no doubt that in formation of these kimberlite types the contamination of lithosphere material was the case, at the much lower level than in formation of high-Mg kimberlites. This model logically explains steady differences of petrochemistry of kimberlites making up clusters of

  18. Formation of giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magni, G.; Coradini, A.

    2003-04-01

    In this presentation we address the problem of the formation of giant planets and their regular satellites. We study in particular the problem of formation of the Jupiter System comparing the results of the model with the present characteristics of the system, in order to identify what are those better represented by our approach. In fact here, using a 3-D hydro-dynamical code, we study the modalities of gas accretion onto a solid core, believed to be the seed from which Jupiter started. To do that we have modelled three main regions: the central planet, a turbulent accretion disk surrounding it and an extended region from which the gas is collected. In the extended region we treat the gas as a frictionless fluid. Our main goal is to identify what are the characteristics of the planet during its growth and the physical parameters affecting its growth at the expenses of the nebular gas present in the feeding zone. Moreover we want to understand what are the thermodynamical parameters characterizing the gas captured by the planet and swirling around it. Finally, we check if a disk can be formed in prograde rotation around the planet and if this disk can survive the final phases of the planet formation. Due to the interaction between the accreting planet and the disk it has been necessary to develop a complete model of the Jupiter’s structure. In fact the radiation emitted by the growing planet heats up the surrounding gas. In turn the planet’s thermodynamic structure depend on the mass accretion rate onto it. When the accretion is rapid, shock waves in the gas are formed close to the planet. This region cannot be safely treated by a numerical code; for this reason we have developed a semi-analytically model of a a turbulent accretion disk to be considered as transition between the planet and the surrounding disk.

  19. SiteGuide: A Tool for Web Site Authoring Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollink, Vera; de Boer, Viktor; van Someren, Maarten

    We present 'SiteGuide', a tool that helps web designers to decide which information will be included in a new web site and how the information will be organized. SiteGuide takes as input URLs of web sites from the same domain as the site the user wants to create. It automatically searches the pages of these example sites for common topics and common structural features. On the basis of these commonalities it creates a model of the example sites. The model can serve as a starting point for the new web site. Also, it can be used to check whether important elements are missing in a concept version of the new site. Evaluation shows that SiteGuide is able to detect a large part of the common topics in example sites and to present these topics in an understandable form to its users. First results of a user study indicate that Siteguide helps users to create web site designs with better structured contents and links.

  20. Star Formation in Henize 206

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] IRA-MIPS Composite

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Visible

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] IRAC

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] MIPS

    The LMC is a small satellite galaxy gravitationally bound to our own Milky Way. Yet the gravitational effects are tearing the companion to shreds in a long-playing drama of 'intergalactic cannibalism.' These disruptions lead to a recurring cycle of star birth and star death.

    Astronomers are particularly interested in the LMC because its fractional content of heavy metals is two to five times lower than is seen in our solar neighborhood. [In this context, 'heavy elements' refer to those elements not present in the primordial universe. Such elements as carbon, oxygen and others are produced by nucleosynthesis and are ejected into the interstellar medium via mass loss by stars, including supernova explosions.] As such, the LMC provides a nearby cosmic laboratory that may resemble the distant universe in its chemical composition.

    The primary Spitzer image, showing the wispy filamentary structure of Henize 206, is a four-color composite mosaic created by combining data from an infrared array camera (IRAC) at near-infrared wavelengths and the mid-infrared data from a multiband imaging photometer (MIPS). Blue represents invisible infrared light at wavelengths of 3.6 and 4.5 microns. Note that most of the stars in the field of view radiate primarily at these short infrared wavelengths. Cyan denotes emission at 5.8 microns, green depicts the 8.0 micron light, and red is used to trace the thermal emission from dust at 24 microns. The separate instrument images are included as insets to the main composite.

    An inclined ring of emission dominates the central and upper regions of the image. This delineates a bubble of hot, x-ray emitting gas that was blown into space when a massive star died in a supernova

  1. What initiated planetesimal formation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Dobrovolskis, A. R.; Hogan, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    The physical structure of primitive (chondritic) meteorites, even after some geological processing and modification, is thought by most to contain clues as to the first stage of accretion of solid matter into objects that might be called planetesimals. However, theoretical understanding of the processes responsible for this important stage is shaky. We note what we believe are fundamental obstacles for the Goldreich-Ward version of rapid and direct planetesimal formation via gravitational instability in a settled particle layer, and describe an alternative scenario which might lead from grainy nebula gas to primitive planetesimals in a way that has intriguing connections to the meteorite evidence.

  2. Modeling river delta formation.

    PubMed

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2007-10-23

    A model to simulate the time evolution of river delta formation process is presented. It is based on the continuity equation for water and sediment flow and a phenomenological sedimentation/erosion law. Different delta types are reproduced by using different parameters and erosion rules. The structures of the calculated patterns are analyzed in space and time and compared with real data patterns. Furthermore, our model is capable of simulating the rich dynamics related to the switching of the mouth of the river delta. The simulation results are then compared with geological records for the Mississippi River. PMID:17940031

  3. Ultrarelativistic black hole formation.

    PubMed

    East, William E; Pretorius, Frans

    2013-03-01

    We study the head-on collision of fluid particles well within the kinetic energy dominated regime (γ = 8 to 12) by numerically solving the Einstein-hydrodynamic equations. We find that the threshold for black hole formation is lower (by a factor of a few) than simple hoop conjecture estimates, and, moreover, near this threshold two distinct apparent horizons first form postcollision and then merge. We argue that this can be understood in terms of a gravitational focusing effect. The gravitational radiation reaches luminosities of 0.014 c(5)/G, carrying 16 ± 2% of the total energy.

  4. Adiabatic Halo Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bazzani, A.; Turchetti, G.; Benedetti, C.; Rambaldi, S.; Servizi, G.

    2005-06-08

    In a high intensity circular accelerator the synchrotron dynamics introduces a slow modulation in the betatronic tune due to the space-charge tune depression. When the transverse motion is non-linear due to the presence of multipolar effects, resonance islands move in the phase space and change their amplitude. This effect introduces the trapping and detrapping phenomenon and a slow diffusion in the phase space. We apply the neo-adiabatic theory to describe this diffusion mechanism that can contribute to halo formation.

  5. Flexible formation configuration for terrain following flight: Formation keeping constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latyshev, Simon

    This work suggests a control method for the terrain-following formation motion of a group of communicating autonomous agents. The presented approach centers on defining a suitable set of constraints for formation keeping task that shall be fulfilled while agents are negotiating an unknown terrain toward the predefined goal location. It allows agents to maintain a general geometric formation shape, while allowing each individual formation member freedom of maneuver, required for terrain collision free motion. Formation structure is defined with the use of virtual leader. Formation keeping constraints are defined with plane surfaces, specified relative to position and navigation vector of the virtual leader. Formation navigation and guidance constraints are defined using navigation vectors of formation members and the virtual leader. Alternative designs for the constraints derived with parabolic, cone, and cylindrical surfaces are considered. Formation control is derived using the Udwadia-Kalaba equation, following corresponding approach to the development of control methods for constraint based dynamical systems, including leader-follower systems defined using geometric constraints. Approach to terrain following motion requiring agents to stay within bounds of cylindrical corridor volumes built around their respective navigation vectors is assumed. Individual formation primitives and multi-level, hierarchical, formation structures are considered. Simulations, based on three degrees of freedom nonlinear model of an agent, performed using Mathematica and specifically developed combined Maya-Mathematica modeling and simulation system, demonstrate that a flexible terrain following formation motion is achieved with the presented sets of constraints.

  6. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 2): Kauffman and Minteer, Inc., Superfund Site, Jobstown, Burlington County, NJ, September 27, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The selected remedy represents the first and only planned operable unit for the Kauffman and Minteer Site. It addresses contaminated lagoon sediments at the Site and the shallow groundwater. The major components of the selected remedy include: Excavation, off-site treatment as necessary, and off-site disposal of approximately 1000 cubic yards of lagoon sediments; Long-term monitoring of the contaminated shallow ground-water underlying the Site; and Institutional controls to limit groundwater use in the Navesink Formation.

  7. Site Environmental Report for 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Pauer, Ron

    2002-07-01

    The mission of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is to continue the long tradition of outstanding research that has made it a premier national and international multiprogram laboratory. In order to provide the highest degree of protection for the public and the environment, Berkeley Lab employs Integrated Safety Management (ISM). ISM is a comprehensive U.S. Department of Energy management system that involves five core functions (work planning, hazard and risk analysis, establishment of controls, work performance, and feedback and improvement). These five core functions are applied to all activities at Berkeley Lab. Laboratory activities are planned and conducted with full regard to protecting the public and the environment and complying with appropriate environmental laws and regulations. Both radiological and nonradiological activities are thoroughly monitored to assess their potential impact on public health and the environment. This annual Site Environmental Report covers activities for calendar year (CY) 2001. Volume I summarizes environmental protection performance and environmental monitoring activities. Volume II contains individual analytical data summarized in the first volume. Volume II is available on request. (For details, see the Preface.) Data are presented in the report using the International System of Units measuring system, more commonly referred to as the metric system. For the convenience of readers, both volumes of this report can be accessed on the Web from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services home page, which is located at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg. Readers are encouraged to comment on this report by completing either the survey card included with the distributed hard copy of the report or the survey form in the Web version of the report. The format and content of this report satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,1 and

  8. Teacher Learning of Technology-Enhanced Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Ian D.; Feldman, Allan; Leonard, William J.; Gerace, William J.; St. Cyr, Karen; Lee, Hyunju; Harris, Robby

    2008-01-01

    "Technology-Enhanced Formative Assessment" (TEFA) is an innovative pedagogy for teaching secondary school science or mathematics with "classroom response system" technology. "Teacher Learning of TEFA" (TLT) is a five year research project studying teacher change in the context of an intensive, sustained, on-site professional development (PD)…

  9. Stress Can Be a Good Thing for Blood Formation.

    PubMed

    Speck, Nancy A

    2016-09-01

    Like politics, most developmental signals are local. However, in this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Kwan et al. (2016) and colleagues describe how a stress-induced signal that originates in the zebrafish brain promotes the formation of blood at a distant site, the dorsal aorta. PMID:27588740

  10. Peptide Formation Mechanism on Montmorillonite Under Thermal Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchida, Shigeshi; Masuda, Harue; Shinoda, Keiji

    2014-02-01

    The oligomerization of amino acids is an essential process in the chemical evolution of proteins, which are precursors to life on Earth. Although some researchers have observed peptide formation on clay mineral surfaces, the mechanism of peptide bond formation on the clay mineral surface has not been clarified. In this study, the thermal behavior of glycine (Gly) adsorbed on montmorillonite was observed during heating experiments conducted at 150 °C for 336 h under dry, wet, and dry-wet conditions to clarify the mechanism. Approximately 13.9 % of the Gly monomers became peptides on montmorillonite under dry conditions, with diketopiperazine (cyclic dimer) being the main product. On the other hand, peptides were not synthesized in the absence of montmorillonite. Results of IR analysis showed that the Gly monomer was mainly adsorbed via hydrogen bonding between the positively charged amino groups and negatively charged surface sites (i.e., Lewis base sites) on the montmorillonite surface, indicating that the Lewis base site acts as a catalyst for peptide formation. In contrast, peptides were not detected on montmorillonite heated under wet conditions, since excess water shifted the equilibrium towards hydrolysis of the peptides. The presence of water is likely to control thermodynamic peptide production, and clay minerals, especially those with electrophilic defect sites, seem to act as a kinetic catalyst for the peptide formation reaction.

  11. Site descriptive modeling as a part of site characterization in Sweden - Concluding the surface based investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Johan; Winberg, Anders; Skagius, Kristina; Stroem, Anders; Lindborg, Tobias

    2007-07-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., SKB, is currently finalizing its surface based site investigations for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel in the municipalities of Oestharmnar (the Forsmark area) and Oskarshamn (the Simpevar/Laxemar area). The investigation data are assessed into a Site Descriptive Model, constituting a synthesis of geology, rock mechanics, thermal properties, hydrogeology, hydro-geochemistry, transport properties and a surface system description. Site data constitute a wide range of different measurement results. These data both need to be checked for consistency and to be interpreted into a format more amenable for three-dimensional modeling. The three-dimensional modeling (i.e. estimating the distribution of parameter values in space) is made in a sequence where the geometrical framework is taken from the geological models and in turn used by the rock mechanics, thermal and hydrogeological modeling. These disciplines in turn are partly interrelated, and also provide feedback to the geological modeling, especially if the geological description appears unreasonable when assessed together with the other data. Procedures for assessing the uncertainties and the confidence in the modeling have been developed during the course of the site modeling. These assessments also provide key input to the completion of the site investigation program. (authors)

  12. Comparative ecostratigraphy of Pleistocene: ODP site 625 and DSDP site 502

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.E.; Johnson, G.W.

    1989-03-01

    Sediments of Ocean Drilling Program's hole 625B (Leg 100, northeastern Gulf of Mexico) represent a continuous record of Pleistocene paleo-oceanographic development associated with the Florida Loop Current. Planktonic foraminiferal abundances from the Quaternary section of hole 625B have been used to construct a high-resolution ecostratigraphic zonation (calibrated against standard industry markers and magnetostratigraphy) that subdivides the Pleistocene into 21 stratigraphic units. The zonation has been tested successfully against Eureka core E67-135. The zonation was erected using only four species and operational taxonomic groups (OTGs) of planktonic foraminifera: the Globorotalia menardii complex, Globorotalia inflata, and left- and right-coiling varieties of Globorotalia truncatulinoides. Vector analysis of census data indicates that planktonic foraminiferal species are reacting independent to ecological conditions associated with the Florida Loop Current. A four-end-member mixing model is proposed that allows differentiation of the dominant climatic controls on the planktonic fauna; temperature, salinity, and productivity. Ecological factors may, however, be estimated just as accurately by the use of a few key species and OTGs. An ecostratigraphic zonation for the Pleistocene of Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 502 (Colombia basin) has also been constructed and is compared to that of Site 625. Site 502 is linked to Site 625 via the Caribbean and Florida Loop Currents and is fed, in turn, by the North Atlantic Equatorial and Guiana currents. Hence, comparison of the two sites provides further tests of ecostratigraphic zonations and the influence of global vs. regional ecosystems on their formation.

  13. Star Formation in Irregular Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Deidre; Wolff, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms of how stars are formed in irregular galaxies. Formation in giant irregular galaxies, formation in dwarf irregular galaxies, and comparisons with larger star-forming regions found in spiral galaxies are considered separately. (JN)

  14. Standard exercise report format (SERF)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This talk summarizes the reasons for the development of draft SERF the Standard Exercise Report Format used for reporting the results of emergency preparedness exercises, and gives a summary of the format and rational behind it.

  15. Formats for Presenting Procedural Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaiwes, Arthur S.

    1974-01-01

    Thirty male college students performed a mock communication controller's task under three different instructional formats, short sentences, logical tree, and coding. It was concluded that format variations mainly influence the more difficult tasks. (Author/DE)

  16. Tooth formation - delayed or absent

    MedlinePlus

    Delayed or absent tooth formation; Teeth - delayed or absent formation ... The age at which a tooth comes in varies. Most infants get their first tooth between 6 and 9 months, but it may be earlier or later. ...

  17. Mesoarchean Banded Iron Formation sequences in Dixon Island-Cleaverville Formation, Pilbara Australia: Oxygenic signal from DXCL project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyokawa, S.; Ito, T.; Ikehara, M.; Yamaguchi, K. E.; Naraoka, H.; Onoue, T.; Horie, K.; Sakamoto, R.; Aihara, Y.; Miki, T.

    2013-12-01

    The 3.2-3.1 Ga Dixon island-Cleaverville formations are well-preserved Banded Iron Formation (BIF) within hydrothermal oceanic sequence at oceanic island arc setting (Kiyokawa et al., 2002, 2006, 2012). The stratigraphy of the Dixon Island (3195+15Ma) -Cleaverville (3108+13Ma) formations shows the well preserved environmental condition at the Mesoarchean ocean floor. The stratigraphy of these formations are formed about volcano-sedimentary sequences with hydrothermal chert, black shale and banded iron formation to the top. Based on the scientific drilling of DXCL project at 2007 and 2011, detail lithology between BIF sequence was clearly understood. Four drilling holes had been done at coastal sites; the Dixon Island Formation is DX site (100m) and the Cleaverville Formation is CL2 (40m), CL1 (60m) and CL3 (200m) sites and from stratigraphic bottom to top. Coarsening and thickening upward black shale-BIF sequences are well preserved of the stratigraphy form the core samples. The Dixon Island Formation consists komatiite-rhyolite sequences with many hydrothermal veins and very fine laminated cherty rocks above them. The Cleaverville Formation contains black shale, fragments-bearing pyroclastic beds, white chert, greenish shale and BIF. The CL3 core, which drilled through BIF, shows siderite-chert beds above black shale identified before magnetite lamination bed. U-Pb SHRIMP data of the tuff in lower Dixon Island Formation is 3195+15 Ma and the pyroclastic sequence below the Cleaverville BIF is 3108+13 Ma. Sedimentation rate of these sequence is 2-8 cm/ 1000year. The hole section of the organic carbon rich black shales below BIF are similar amount of organic content and 13C isotope (around -30per mill). There are very weak sulfur MIF signal (less 0.2%) in these black shale sequence. Our result show that thick organic rich sediments may be triggered to form iron rich siderite and magnetite iron beds. The stratigraphy in this sequence quite resemble to other Iron

  18. Fullerene formation and annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Mintmire, J.W.

    1996-04-05

    Why does the highly symmetric carbon cluster C{sub 60} form in such profusion under the right conditions? This question was first asked in 1985, when Kroto suggested that the predominance of the C{sub 60} carbon clusters observed in the molecular beam experiments could be explained by the truncated icosahedral (or soccer ball) form. The name given to this cluster, buckminsterfullerene, led to the use of the term fullerenes for the family of hollow-cage carbon clusters made up of even numbers of triply coordinated carbons arranged with 12 pentagonal rings and an almost arbitrary number of hexagonal rings. More than a decade later, we still lack a completely satisfying understanding of the fundamental chemistry that takes place during fullerene formation. Most current models for fullerene formation require a facile mechanism for ring rearrangement in the fullerene structure, but the simplest proposed mechanisms are believed to have unrealistically high activation barriers. In recent research calculations have suggested that atomic carbon in the reaction mixture could act as a catalyst and allow substantially lower activation barriers for fullerene annealing. This article discusses the background for this research and other adjunct research. 14 refs.

  19. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1994-01-01

    Two KC-135 flight campaigns have been conducted to date which are specifically dedicated to study bubble formation in microgravity. The first flight was conducted during March 14-18, 1994, and the other during June 20-24, 1994. The results from the June 1994 flight have not been analyzed yet, while the results from the March flight have been partially analyzed. In the first flight three different experiments were performed, one with the specific aim at determining whether or not cavitation can take place during any of the fluid handling procedures adopted in the shuttle bioprocessing experiments. The other experiments were concerned with duplicating some of the procedures that resulted in bubble formation, namely the NCS filling procedure and the needle scratch of a solid surface. The results from this set of experiments suggest that cavitation did not take place during any of the fluid handling procedures. The results clearly indicate that almost all were generated as a result of the breakup of the gas/liquid interface. This was convincingly demonstrated in the scratch tests as well as in the liquid fill tests.

  20. 2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT.

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    2003-10-01

    The 2002 Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting'', and summarizes the status of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) environmental programs and performance and restoration efforts, as well as any impacts, both past and present, that Laboratory operations have had on the environment. The document is intended to be technical in nature. A summary of the report is also prepared as a separate document to provide a general overview and includes a CD version of the full report. Operated by Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA) for the Department of Energy (DOE), BNL manages its world-class scientific research with particular sensitivity to environmental and community issues. BNL's motto, ''Exploring Life's Mysteries...Protecting its Future'', reflects BNL's management philosophy to fully integrate environmental stewardship into all facets of its missions, with a health balance between science and the environment.

  1. 2006 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY; RATEL,K.

    2007-10-01

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

  2. 2005 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    2006-08-29

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

  3. 2009 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ratel, K.M.; Brookhaven National Laboratory

    2010-09-30

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

  4. Intravenous cannula site management.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Nicola

    2016-08-24

    Intravenous cannulation is becoming one of the most common procedures in healthcare as increasing numbers of patients are treated for acute and chronic illnesses. The use of an intravenous cannula is not without risk, so it is essential that the healthcare practitioner can justify why the patient requires cannulation, as well as being able to safely manage and provide ongoing care for patients with the device. This article provides an overview of intravenous cannulation, including the selection of appropriate cannulation sites, identification of the different types and sizes of cannula used, and cannula maintenance. Specific complications related to intravenous cannulation are discussed and guidance is given on how to recognise and avoid potential complications to ensure that practice is safe and effective. PMID:27641593

  5. Web Site Development Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul, Hameed

    2016-01-01

    This summer I assisted the RPT Program Office in developing a design plan to update their existing website to current NASA web standards. The finished website is intended for the general public, specifically potential customers interested in learning about NASA's chemical rocket test facility capabilities and test assignment process. The goal of the website is to give the public insight about the purpose and function of the RPT Program. Working on this project gave me the opportunity to learn skills necessary for effective project management. The RPT Program Office manages numerous facilities so they are required to travel often to other sites for meetings throughout the year. Maneuvering around the travel schedule of the office and the workload priority of the IT Department proved to be quite the challenge. I overcame the travel schedule of the office by frequently communicating and checking in with my mentor via email and telephone.

  6. Web site blues.

    PubMed

    Maruca, R F

    1999-01-01

    So far, Rachel Soltanoff's instincts had been right. As CEO in this fictional case study, she had successfully navigated TradeRite Software's transition from a news service for stockbrokers to a $70 million provider of shrink-wrapped software geared toward both brokers and the growing day-trader market. Now a well-financed start-up, Stock-net.com, was testing a very competitive product that traders could download directly over the Web. And TradeRite's Web site was nothing more than a collection of elaborate marketing brochures. Rachel knew she needed to start selling over the Web. But the e-commerce consultants she had hired to set up her Web store were behind schedule, and their 21-year-old CEO had just resigned. Her product manager, Lisa Bandini, was working overtime to transform TradeRite's entire product line into Web-aware applications to match Stocknet's, and Rachel had $2.5 million to launch them. But the consultants said it would take $5 million just to rent e-commerce capabilities. Ace sales VP Brian Rockart thought the company had already wasted too much time and money--money from his budget--on its Web site. Marketing VP Rob Collins thought TradeRite should focus on its core stockbroker customers. Chief Technical Officer Joe Martinez doesn't want to go ahead without a pilot project. Should Rachel try to convince Brian, Rob, and the rest of the senior management team that e-commerce is the way to go? Four commentators offer advice. PMID:10387770

  7. Critical Path Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Judith L.; Charles, John B.; Rummel, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Approximately three years ago, the Agency's lead center for the human elements of spaceflight (the Johnson Space Center), along with the National Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) (which has the lead role in developing countermeasures) initiated an activity to identify the most critical risks confronting extended human spaceflight. Two salient factors influenced this activity: first, what information is needed to enable a "go/no go" decision to embark on extended human spaceflight missions; and second, what knowledge and capabilities are needed to address known and potential health, safety and performance risks associated with such missions. A unique approach was used to first define and assess those risks, and then to prioritize them. This activity was called the Critical Path Roadmap (CPR) and it represents an opportunity to develop and implement a focused and evolving program of research and technology designed from a "risk reduction" perspective to prevent or minimize the risks to humans exposed to the space environment. The Critical Path Roadmap provides the foundation needed to ensure that human spaceflight, now and in the future, is as safe, productive and healthy as possible (within the constraints imposed on any particular mission) regardless of mission duration or destination. As a tool, the Critical Path Roadmap enables the decision maker to select from among the demonstrated or potential risks those that are to be mitigated, and the completeness of that mitigation. The primary audience for the CPR Web Site is the members of the scientific community who are interested in the research and technology efforts required for ensuring safe and productive human spaceflight. They may already be informed about the various space life sciences research programs or they may be newcomers. Providing the CPR content to potential investigators increases the probability of their delivering effective risk mitigations. Others who will use the CPR Web Site and its

  8. Critical Path Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Judith L.; Charles, John B.; Rummel, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Approximately three years ago, the Agency's lead center for the human elements of spaceflight (the Johnson Space Center), along with the National Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) (which has the lead role in developing countermeasures) initiated an activity to identify the most critical risks confronting extended human spaceflight. Two salient factors influenced this activity: first, what information is needed to enable a "go/no go" decision to embark on extended human spaceflight missions; and second, what knowledge and capabilities are needed to address known and potential health, safety and performance risks associated with such missions. A unique approach was used to first define and assess those risks, and then to prioritize them. This activity was called the Critical Path Roadmap (CPR) and it represents an opportunity to develop and implement a focused and evolving program of research and technology designed from a "risk reduction" perspective to prevent or minimize the risks to humans exposed to the space environment. The Critical Path Roadmap provides the foundation needed to ensure that human spaceflight, now and in the future, is as safe, productive and healthy as possible (within the constraints imposed on any particular mission) regardless of mission duration or destination. As a tool, the Critical Path Roadmap enables the decisionmaker to select from among the demonstrated or potential risks those that are to be mitigated, and the completeness of that mitigation. The primary audience for the CPR Web Site is the members of the scientific community who are interested in the research and technology efforts required for ensuring safe and productive human spaceflight. They may already be informed about the various space life sciences research programs or they may be newcomers. Providing the CPR content to potential investigators increases the probability of their delivering effective risk mitigations. Others who will use the CPR Web Site and its content

  9. Old Desert Varnish-like Coatings and Young Breccias at the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murchie, S.; Barnouin-Jha, O.; Barnouin-Jha, K.; Bishop, J.; Johnson, J.; McSween, H.; Morris, R.

    2004-03-01

    Many rocks at the Mars Pathfinder landing site exhibit evidence for desert varnish-like coatings, partially stripped by eolian erosion. Rocks excavated subsequently to coating formation have shapes consistent with breccias or conglomerates.

  10. Method for measuring pollutant formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annen, Kurt (Inventor); Stickler, David B. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Diagnostic methods for determining an instantaneous rate of pollutant formation in a combustion system are based on measurement of chemiluminescence intensity generated simultaneously with the formation of the pollutant. The chemiluminescent signal is generated by an analog reaction which occurs in parallel with a key step in the formation of a specific pollutant of interest. The connection between the analog reaction and the pollution reaction is such that the chemiluminescent signal indicates the local, instantaneous formation rate of the pollutant of interest.

  11. CEO Sites Mission Management System (SMMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trenchard, Mike

    2014-01-01

    uses the SMMS for three general functions - database queries of content and status, individual site creation and updates, and mission planning. The CEO administrator of the science site database is able to create or modify the content of sites and activate or deactivate them based on the requirements of the sponsors. The administrator supports and implements ISS mission planning by assembling, reporting, and activating mission-specific site selections for management; deactivating sites as requirements are met; and creating new sites, such as International Charter sites for disasters, as circumstances warrant. In addition to the above CEO internal uses, when site planning for a specific ISS mission is complete and approved, the SMMS can produce and export those essential site database elements for the mission into XML format for use by onboard Earth-location systems, such as Worldmap. The design, development, and implementation of the SMMS resulted in a superior database management system for CEO science sites by focusing on the functions and applications of the database alone instead of integrating the database with the multipurpose configuration of the AMPS. Unlike the AMPS, it can function and be modified within the existing Windows 7 environment. The functions and applications of the SMMS were expanded to accommodate more database elements, report products, and a streamlined interface for data entry and review. A particularly elegant enhancement in data entry was the integration of the Google Earth application for the visual display and definition of site coordinates for site areas defined by multiple coordinates. Transfer between the SMMS and Google Earth is accomplished with a Keyhole Markup Language (KML) expression of geographic data (see figures 3 and 4). Site coordinates may be entered into the SMMS panel directly for display in Google Earth, or the coordinates may be defined on the Google Earth display as a mouse-controlled polygonal definition and

  12. Historic Sites and Your Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Academics debate the veracity of historic sites and what they represent, but no one that has visited historic places as a student, or traveled with students to historic places, can deny their power to teach. Every community has historic sites. Historic sites are, by definition, primary sources. They are artifacts of the past that often contain a…

  13. DNAPL SITE EVALUATION - Project Summary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs), especially chlorinated solvents, are among the most prevalent subsurface contaminants identified in ground-water supplies and at waste disposal sites. There are several site-characterization issues specific to DNAPL sites including (a) the...

  14. Astronomy Sites on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Mike

    1998-01-01

    Describes two Internet sites devoted to astronomy that will help students avoid information overload. The Leicester University site is strong on information while the other site, maintained by the Astro-Web Consortium, offers a host of useful links. Also discusses the advantages of offline browsers, a student-use must that shows only Web pages in…

  15. Can site response be predicted?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    Large modifications of seismic waves are produced by variations of material properties near the Earth's surface and by both surface and buried topography. These modifications, usually referred to as "site response", in general lead to larger motions on soil sites than on rock-like sites. Because the soil amplifications can be as large as a factor of ten, they are important in engineering applications that require the quantitative specification of ground motions. This has been recognised for years by both seismologists and engineers, and it is hard to open an earthquake journal these days without finding an article on site response. What is often missing in these studies, however, are discussions of the uncertainty of the predicted response. A number of purely observational studies demonstrate that ground motions have large site-to-site variability for a single earthquake and large earthquake-location- dependent variability for a single site. This variability makes site-specific, earthquake-specific predictions of site response quite uncertain, even if detailed geotechnical and geological information is available near the site. Predictions of site response for average classes of sites exposed to the motions from many earthquakes can be made with much greater certainty if sufficient empirical observations are available.

  16. Site selection for Mars exobiology.

    PubMed

    Farmer, J; Des Marais, D; Greeley, R; Landheim, R; Klein, H

    1995-03-01

    The selection of sites on Mars that have a high priority for exobiological research is fundamental for planning future exploration. The most immediate need is to identify targets for high resolution orbital imaging during the Mars Observer and Mars '94/'96 missions that can be used to refine site priorities for surface exploration. We present an objective approach to site selection whereby individual sites are selected and scored, based on the presence of key geological features which indicate high priority environments. Prime sites are those that show evidence for the prolonged activity of liquid water and which have sedimentary deposits that are likely to have accumulated in environments favorable for life. High priority areas include fluvio-lacustrine (stream-fed lake systems), springs, and periglacial environments. Sites where mineralization may have occurred in the presence of organisms (e.g. springs) are given high priority in the search for a fossil record on Mars. A systematic review of Viking data for 83 sites in the Mars Landing Site Catalog resulted in the selection of 13 as being of exobiological interest. The descriptions of these sites were expanded to address exobiological concerns. An additional five sites were identified for inclusion in the second edition of the MLSC. We plan to broaden our site selection activities to include a systematic global reconnaissance of Mars using Viking data, and will continue to refine site priorities for exobiological research based on data from future missions in order to define strategies for surface exploration.

  17. Site selection for Mars exobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, J.; Des Marais, D.; Greeley, R.; Landheim, R.; Klein, H.

    1995-01-01

    The selection of sites on Mars that have a high priority for exobiological research is fundamental for planning future exploration. The most immediate need is to identify targets for high resolution orbital imaging during the Mars Observer and Mars '94/'96 missions that can be used to refined site priorities for surface exploration. We present an objective approach to site selection whereby individual sites are selected and scored, based on the presence of key geological features which indicate high priority environments. Prime sites are those that show evidence for the prolonged activity of liquid water and which have sedimentary deposits that are likely to have accumulated in environments favorable for life. High priority areas include fluvio-lacustrine (stream-fed lake systems), springs, and periglacial environments. Sites where mineralization may have occurred in the presence of organisms (e.g. springs) are given high priority in the search for a fossil record on Mars. A systematic review of Viking data for 83 sites in the Mars Landing Site Catalog (MLSC) resulted in the selection of 13 as being of exobiological interest. The descriptions of these sites were expanded to address exobiological concerns. An additional five sites were identified for inclusion in the second edition of the MLSC. We plan to broaden our site selection activities to include a systematic global reconnaissance of Mars using Viking data, and will continue to refine site priorities for exobiological research based on data from future missions in order to define strategies for surface exploration.

  18. Formative Assessment: Simply, No Additives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roskos, Kathleen; Neuman, Susan B.

    2012-01-01

    Among the types of assessment the closest to daily reading instruction is formative assessment. In contrast to summative assessment, which occurs after instruction, formative assessment involves forming judgments frequently in the flow of instruction. Key features of formative assessment include identifying gaps between where students are and…

  19. Observational insights into aerosol formation from isoprene.

    PubMed

    Worton, David R; Surratt, Jason D; Lafranchi, Brian W; Chan, Arthur W H; Zhao, Yunliang; Weber, Robin J; Park, Jeong-Hoo; Gilman, Jessica B; de Gouw, Joost; Park, Changhyoun; Schade, Gunnar; Beaver, Melinda; Clair, Jason M St; Crounse, John; Wennberg, Paul; Wolfe, Glenn M; Harrold, Sara; Thornton, Joel A; Farmer, Delphine K; Docherty, Kenneth S; Cubison, Michael J; Jimenez, Jose-Luis; Frossard, Amanda A; Russell, Lynn M; Kristensen, Kasper; Glasius, Marianne; Mao, Jingqiu; Ren, Xinrong; Brune, William; Browne, Eleanor C; Pusede, Sally E; Cohen, Ronald C; Seinfeld, John H; Goldstein, Allen H

    2013-10-15

    Atmospheric photooxidation of isoprene is an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and there is increasing evidence that anthropogenic oxidant emissions can enhance this SOA formation. In this work, we use ambient observations of organosulfates formed from isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) and methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE) and a broad suite of chemical measurements to investigate the relative importance of nitrogen oxide (NO/NO2) and hydroperoxyl (HO2) SOA formation pathways from isoprene at a forested site in California. In contrast to IEPOX, the calculated production rate of MAE was observed to be independent of temperature. This is the result of the very fast thermolysis of MPAN at high temperatures that affects the distribution of the MPAN reservoir (MPAN / MPA radical) reducing the fraction that can react with OH to form MAE and subsequently SOA (F(MAE formation)). The strong temperature dependence of F(MAE formation) helps to explain our observations of similar concentrations of IEPOX-derived organosulfates (IEPOX-OS; ~1 ng m(-3)) and MAE-derived organosulfates (MAE-OS; ~1 ng m(-3)) under cooler conditions (lower isoprene concentrations) and much higher IEPOX-OS (~20 ng m(-3)) relative to MAE-OS (<0.0005 ng m(-3)) at higher temperatures (higher isoprene concentrations). A kinetic model of IEPOX and MAE loss showed that MAE forms 10-100 times more ring-opening products than IEPOX and that both are strongly dependent on aerosol water content when aerosol pH is constant. However, the higher fraction of MAE ring opening products does not compensate for the lower MAE production under warmer conditions (higher isoprene concentrations) resulting in lower formation of MAE-derived products relative to IEPOX at the surface. In regions of high NOx, high isoprene emissions and strong vertical mixing the slower MPAN thermolysis rate aloft could increase the fraction of MPAN that forms MAE resulting in a vertically varying isoprene SOA source. PMID:24004194

  20. Vessel formation is induced prior to the appearance of cartilage in BMP-2-mediated heterotopic ossification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterotopic ossification (HO), or endochondral bone formation at nonskeletal sites, often results from traumatic injury and can lead to devastating consequences. Alternatively, the ability to harness this phenomenon would greatly enhance current orthopedic tools for treating segmental bone defects. ...