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Sample records for formation upper cretaceous

  1. Biostratigraphic data from Upper Cretaceous formations-eastern Wyoming, central Colorado, and northeastern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merewether, E.A.; Cobban, W.A.; Obradovich, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    Lithological and paleontological studies of outcrops of Upper Cretaceous formations were conducted at 12 localities in eastern Wyoming, central Colorado, and northeastern New Mexico. The sequence extends upward from the top of the Mowry Shale, or age-equivalent rocks, through the Graneros Shale, Greenhorn Limestone, Carlile Shale, Niobrara Formation, Pierre Shale, and Fox Hills Sandstone, or age-equivalent formations, to the top of the Laramie Formation, or laterally equivalent formations. The strata are mainly siliciclastic and calcareous, with thicknesses ranging from about 3,300 ft in northeastern New Mexico to as much as 13,500 ft in eastern Wyoming. Deposition was mainly in marine environments and molluscan fossils of Cenomanian through Maastrichtian ages are common. Radiometric ages were determined from beds of bentonite that are associated with fossil zones. The Upper Cretaceous formations at the 12 study localities are herein divided into three informal time-stratigraphic units based on fossil content and contact relations with adjacent strata. The basal unit in most places extends from the base of the Graneros to the top of the Niobrara, generally to the horizon of the fossil Scaphites hippocrepis, and spans a period of about 14 million years. The middle unit generally extends from the top of the Niobrara to the approximate middle of the Pierre, the horizon of the fossil Baculites gregoryensis, and represents a period of about 5 million years. The upper unit includes strata between the middle of the Pierre and the top of the Upper Cretaceous Series, which is the top of the Laramie Formation or of laterally equivalent formations; it represents a period of deposition of as much as 11 million years. Comparisons of the collections of fossils from each outcrop with the complete sequence of Upper Cretaceous index fossils can indicate disconformable contacts and lacunae. Widespread disconformities have been found within the Carlile Shale and between the Carlile

  2. The Sunny Point Formation: a new Upper Cretaceous subsurface unit in the Carolina Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balson, Audra E.; Self-Trail, Jean; Terry, Dennis O.

    2013-01-01

    This paper formally defines the Sunny Point Formation, a new Upper Cretaceous subsurface unit confined to the outer Atlantic Coastal Plain of North and South Carolina. Its type section is established in corehole NH-C-1-2001 (Kure Beach) from New Hanover County, North Carolina. The Sunny Point Formation consists of light-olive-gray to greenish-gray, fine to coarse micaceous sands and light-olive-brown and grayish-red silty, sandy clays. The clay-rich sections typically include ironstone, lignitized wood, root traces, hematite concretions, goethite, limonite, and sphaerosiderites. The Sunny Point Formation is also documented in cores from Bladen County, North Carolina, and from Dorchester and Horry Counties, South Carolina. Previously, strata of the Sunny Point Formation had been incorrectly assigned to the Cape Fear and Middendorf Formations. The Sunny Point occupies a stratigraphic position above the Cenomanian marine Clubhouse Formation and below an upper Turonian unnamed marine unit. Contacts between these units are sharp and unconformable. Calcareous nannofossil and palynomorph analyses indicate that the Sunny Point Formation is Turonian.

  3. Stratigraphy, sedimentology, and petrology of Upper Cretaceous Horsethief and St. Mary River formations, western Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Fairhurst, W.

    1983-03-01

    The Horsethief and St. Mary River formations were deposited along the Late Cretaceous epicontinental seaway, which then covered much of the western interior. The Horsethief, lower of the two formations, is divided into two facies sequences. Facies sequence A consist of coarsening-upward sequences of sandstones and interbedded shales. These facies comprise a barrier island system consisting of shoreface, dune, tidal channel, and lagoonal environments. Facies sequence B, deposited along the depositional strike, consists of a coarsening-upward sequence of vertically stacked distributary channels that thicken and become more abundant upsection. The St. Mary River Formation is divided into a lower and upper member. The lower member consists of shales, sandstones, limestones, and coals deposited in a lagoon landward of the barrier island system. The upper member contains trough cross-bedded, channel sandstones, overbank sandstones, shales, and carbonate-nodule horizons indicative of fluvial plain sedimentation. Petrographic analysis indicates the detritus of these formations was derived from a magmatic are provenance. Statistically significant correlations document a decrease in grain size as the distance of sediment transport increases within the entire section and within distinct environments, including middle shoreface, upper shoreface, and dune facies. The high percentage of volcanic constituents decreases as the distance of sediment transport increases and the grain size decreases. The recognition of these facies is significant because of the potentially important application associated with hydrocarbon source and reservoir conditions, as well as heavy mineral assemblages.

  4. Phytolaccaceae infructescence from Cerro del Pueblo Formation, Upper Cretaceous (late Campanian), Coahuila, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cevallos-Ferriz, Sergio R S; Estrada-Ruiz, Emilio; Pérez-Hernández, Balam Rodrigo

    2008-01-01

    The Upper Cretaceous (late Campanian) Cerro del Pueblo Formation, Coahuila, Mexico, contains a diverse group of angiosperms represented mainly by their reproductive structures. Among these, a new permineralized infructescence is recognized based on its morphological and anatomical characters. It is a multiple infructescence composed of berry fruits with six locules, each containing a single seed with a curved embryo developed from a campylotropous ovule with pendulous placentation; integumentary anatomy is similar to that of Phytolacca spp. (Phytolaccaceae). Though this new plant from Coahuila shares reproductive characters with Phytolacca, the constant number (six) of carpels per fruit and pendulous placentation strongly support the recognition of a new taxon, Coahuilacarpon phytolaccoides Cevallos-Ferriz, Estrada-Ruiz, et Pérez-Hernández (Phytolaccaceae, Caryophyllales). This new record adds to the known plant diversity of low latitude North America (northern Mexico) and demonstrates the long geologic history of the group.

  5. Reworking of Cretaceous dinosaurs into Paleocene channel deposits, upper Hell Creek Formation, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Lofgren, D.L. ); Hotton, C.L. ); Runkel, A.C. )

    1990-09-01

    Dinosaur teeth from Paleocene channel fills have been interpreted as indicating dinosaur survival into the Paleocene. However, enormous potential for reworking exists because these records are restricted to large channel fills that are deeply incised into Cretaceous strata. Identification of reworked fossils is usually equivocal. This problem is illustrated by the Black Spring Coulee channel fill, a dinosaur-bearing Paleocene deposit in the upper Hell Creek Formation of eastern Montana. In this example, the reworked nature of well-preserved dinosaur bones is apparent only after detailed sedimentological and palynological analysis. Because of the potential for reworking, dinosaur remains derived from Paleocene fluvial deposits should not be assigned a Paleocene age unless the (1) are found in floodplain deposits, (2) are articulated, (3) are in channels that do not incise Cretaceous strata, or (4) are demonstrably reworked from Paleocene deposits. To date, reports of Paleocene dinosaurs do not fulfill any of these criteria. Thus, the proposal that dinosaurs persisted into the Paleocene remains unsubstantiated.

  6. Crocodyliform Feeding Traces on Juvenile Ornithischian Dinosaurs from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Kaiparowits Formation, Utah

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Clint A.; Drumheller, Stephanie K.; Gates, Terry A.

    2013-01-01

    Crocodyliforms serve as important taphonomic agents, accumulating and modifying vertebrate remains. Previous discussions of Mesozoic crocodyliform feeding in terrestrial and riverine ecosystems have often focused on larger taxa and their interactions with equally large dinosaurian prey. However, recent evidence suggests that the impact of smaller crocodyliforms on their environments should not be discounted. Here we present direct evidence of feeding by a small crocodyliform on juvenile specimens of a ‘hypsilophodontid’ dinosaur from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Kaiparowits Formation of southern Utah. Diagnostic crocodyliform bite marks present on a left scapula and a right femur, as well as a partial probable crocodyliform tooth crown (ovoid in cross-section) preserved within a puncture on the right femur, comprise the bulk of the feeding evidence. Computed tomography scans of the femoral puncture reveal impact damage to the surrounding bone and that the distal tip of the embedded tooth was missing prior to the biting event. This is only the second reported incidence of a fossil crocodyliform tooth being found embedded directly into prey bone. These bite marks provide insight into the trophic interactions of the ecosystem preserved in the Kaiparowits Formation. The high diversity of crocodyliforms within this formation may have led to accentuated niche partitioning, which seems to have included juvenile dinosaurian prey. PMID:23460882

  7. Upper Cretaceous Brachycythere (Ostr., Crust.) from Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emami, V.

    Five new species of Brachycythere (Crustacea, Ostracoda) are described and figured from the Gurpi Formation (Campanian, Upper Cretaceous). The new species are B. reymenti. B. ilamensis, B. iranensis, B. labioforma, B. posterotruncata and « Brachycythereå sp.nov.?

  8. Facies architecture and depositional environments of the Upper Cretaceous Kaiparowits Formation, southern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Eric M.

    2007-04-01

    The Kaiparowits Formation is an unusually thick package of Upper Cretaceous (late Campanian) strata exposed in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument of southern Utah, USA. The formation was deposited within the rapidly subsiding Cordilleran foreland basin as part of a thick clastic wedge derived from sources in the Sevier orogenic belt, thrust sheets in southeastern Nevada and southern California, and the Mogollon slope in southwestern Arizona. Channel systems in the Kaiparowits Formation shifted from northeastward to southeastward flow over time, and for a short period of time, sea level rise in the Western Interior Seaway resulted in tidally influenced rivers and/or estuarine systems. Thick floodbasin pond deposits, large suspended-load channels, and poorly developed, hydromorphic paleosols dominate the sedimentary record, and all are suggestive of a relatively wet, subhumid alluvial system. This is supported by extremely rapid sediment accumulation rates (41 cm/ka), and high diversity and abundance of aquatic vertebrate and invertebrate fossils. Facies and architectural analysis was performed on the Kaiparowits Formation, resulting in the identification of nine distinct facies associations: 1) intraformational conglomerate, 2) mollusc-shell conglomerate, 3) major tabular sandstone, 4) major lenticular sandstone, 5) minor tabular and lenticular sandstone, 6) finely laminated, calcareous siltstone, 7) inclined heterolithic sandstone and mudstone, 8) sandy mudstone, and 9) carbonaceous mudstone. These facies associations are interpreted as: 1) channel lags, 2) rare channel-hosted storm beds, 3) meandering channels, 4) anastomosing channels, 5) crevasse splays and crevasse channels, 6) lakes, 7) tidally influenced fluvial and/or estuarine channels, 8) mud-dominated floodplains, and 9) swamps and oxbow lakes. Based on this analysis, the formation is subdivided into three informal units, representative of gross changes in alluvial architecture, including facies

  9. Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) phosphorites in Jordan: implications for the formation of a south Tethyan phosphorite giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pufahl, Peir K.; Grimm, Kurt A.; Abed, Abdulkader M.; Sadaqah, Rushdi M. Y.

    2003-10-01

    A record of sedimentary, authigenic, and biological processes are preserved within the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Alhisa Phosphorite Formation (AP) in central and northern Jordan. The AP formed near the eastern extremity of the south Tethyan Phosphorite Province (STPP), a carbonate-dominated Upper Cretaceous to Eocene "phosphorite giant" that extends from Colombia, North Africa to the Middle East. Multidisciplinary research of the AP and associated cherts, chalks, and oyster buildups indicate that phosphatic strata formed on a highly productive, storm-dominated, east-west trending epeiric platform along the south Tethyan margin. The onset of phosphogenesis and the accumulation of economic phosphorite coincided with a rise in relative sea level that onlapped peritidal carbonates of the Ajlun Group. Pristine phosphates are associated with well-developed micrite concretionary horizons and contain abundant non-keeled spiral planktic foraminifera and a low diversity benthic assemblage of Buliminacean foraminifera, suggesting that pristine phosphates are a condensed facies and phosphogenesis was stimulated by the effects of a highly productive surface ocean and the suboxic diagenesis of sedimentary organic matter. The bulk sediment composition and absence of Fe-bearing authigenic phases such as glauconite, pyrite (including pyrite molds), siderite, and goethite within pristine phosphates suggests that deposition and authigenesis occurred under conditions of detrital starvation and that "iron-pumping" played a minimal role in phosphogenesis. Authigenic precipitation of phosphate occurred in a broad array of sedimentary environments—herein termed a "phosphorite nursery"—that spanned the entire platform. This is a non-uniformitarian phenomenon reflecting precipitation of sedimentary apatite across a wide depositional spectrum in a variety of depositional settings, wherever the conditions were suitable for phosphogenesis. Sedimentologic data indicate that pristine

  10. Geochemical evaluation of upper cretaceous fruitland formation coals, San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michael, G.E.; Anders, D.E.; Law, B.E.

    1993-01-01

    Geochemical analyses of coal samples from the Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico and Colorado were used to determine thermal maturity, type of kerogen, and hydrocarbon generation potential. Mean random vitrinite reflectance (%Rm) of the Fruitland coal ranges from 0.42 to 1.54%. Rock-Eval pyrolysis data and saturated to aromatic hydrocarbon ratio indicate that the onset of thermal hydrocarbon generation begins at about 0.60% Rm and peak generation occurs at about 0.85% Rm. Several samples have hydrogen index values between 200 and 400, indicating some potential for liquid hydrocarbon generation and a mixed Type III and II kerogen. Pentacyclic and tricyclic terpanes, steranes, aromatic steroids and methylphenanthrene maturity parameters were observed through the complete range of thermal maturity in the Fruitland coals. Aromatic pentacyclic terpanes, similar to those found in brown coals of Australia, were observed in low maturity samples, but not found above 0.80% Rm. N-alkane depleted coal samples, which occur at a thermal maturity of approx. 0.90% Rm, paralleling peak hydrocarbon generation, are fairly widespread throughout the basin. Depletion of n-alkanes in these samples may be due to gas solution stripping and migration fromthe coal seams coincident with the development of pressure induced fracturing due to hydrocarbon generation; however, biodegradation may also effect these samples. ?? 1993.

  11. Upper campanian (upper cretaceous) ammonites from the Marshalltown Formation-Mount laurel boundary beds in Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, W.J.; Cobban, W.A.

    1997-01-01

    New collections from the Marshalltown Formation and basal Mount Laurel Sand along the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal in Delaware clarify the ammonite dating of the interval. The Marshalltown Formation yields Pachydiscus (Pachydiscus) sp., Menuites portlocki (Sharpe, 1855) complexus (Hall and Meek, 1856), a subspecies restricted to the Baculites gregoryensis and Baculites scotti zones in the Western Interior of the United States, and Didymoceras binodosum (Kennedy and Cobban, 1993a) known only from the B. scotti zone of the Western Interior and correlatives in Arkansas and Texas. The basal part of the Mount Laurel Sand contains a complex assemblage preserved as phosphatic molds: Nostoceras (Nostoceras) monotuberculatum Kennedy and Cobban, 1993a, Nostoceras (N.) sp., Didymoceras platycostatum (Kennedy and Cobban, 1993b), D. stevensoni (Whitfield, 1877) (previously thought to be from the Marshalltown) and Exiteloceras jenneyi (Whitfield, 1877). The last two are index species of their eponymous zones in the Western Interior. This sequence is compatible with ammonites from the Wenonah Formation, which lies between the Marshalltown and Mount Laurel to the north and contains ammonites indicative of the Baculites scotti zone, and the fauna from higher in the Mount Laurel Sand, which includes elements of the Didymoceras cheyennense and Baculites compressus zones of the Western Interior sequence.

  12. Preliminary stratigraphy and facies analysis of the Upper Cretaceous Kaguyak Formation, including a brief summary of newly discovered oil stain, upper Alaska Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wartes, Marwan A.; Decker, Paul L.; Stanley, Richard G.; Herriott, Trystan M.; Helmold, Kenneth P.; Gillis, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys has an ongoing program aimed at evaluating the Mesozoic forearc stratigraphy, structure, and petroleum systems of lower Cook Inlet. Most of our field studies have focused on the Jurassic component of the petroleum system (this report). However, in late July and early August of 2012, we initiated a study of the stratigraphy and reservoir potential of the Upper Cretaceous Kaguyak Formation. The Kaguyak Formation is locally well exposed on the upper Alaska Peninsula (fig. 25) and was named by Keller and Reiser (1959) for a sequence of interbedded siltstone and sandstone of upper Campanian to Maastrichtian age that they estimated to be 1,450 m thick.Subsequent work by Detterman and Miller (1985) examined 900 m of section and interpreted the unit as the record of a prograding submarine fan.This interpretation of deep-water deposition contrasts with other Upper Cretaceous rocks exposed along the Alaska Peninsula and lower Cook Inlet that are generally described as nonmarine to shallow marine (Detterman and others, 1996; LePain and others, 2012).Based on foraminifera and palynomorphs from the COST No. 1 well, Magoon (1986) concluded that the Upper Cretaceous rocks were deposited in a variety of water depths and environments ranging from upper bathyal to nonmarine. During our recent fieldwork west and south of Fourpeaked Mountain, we similarly encountered markedly varying lithofacies in the Kaguyak Formation (fig. 25), and we also found oil-stained rocks that are consistent with the existence of an active petroleum system in Upper Cretaceous rocks on the upper Alaska Peninsula and in lower Cook Inlet. These field observations are summarized below.

  13. Coal resources of Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation in the Southern Ute Indian Reservation, southwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sandberg, Dorothy T.

    1990-01-01

    Coal resources of the Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation in the Southern Ute Indian Reservation are estimated to total 16 billion short tons of bituminous coal in beds 2 feet thick or more. The coal-bearing Fruitland Formation underlies about 700 square miles of the Southern Ute Indian Reservation and crops out in a roughly semicircular band around the northern edge of the structural San Juan Basin. The coal beds locally dip more than 10? to the southeast along the northwestern rim of the basin. This estimate of coal resources is based on a study of about 500 geophysical logs, mostly of oil and gas wells. Total coal resources include 15 billion short tons of identified resources, based on data points 3 miles or less apart, and about 1 billion short tons of undiscovered or hypothetical resources, based on data points more than 3 miles apart. In this report, the coal-bearing interval is divided into three overlapping zones: lower, middle, and upper. Coal resources were estimated by aggregate thickness for each zone. The lower zone, which is southwest of a large stratigraphic rise of the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone, contains the thickest coal beds, generally in two thick beds that locally have an aggregate thickness as much as 50 feet. The lower zone contains about 28 percent of the estimated resources; in the lower zone, 6 percent of the resources are less than 500 feet beneath the surface, 10 percent of the resources are 500-2,000 feet beneath the surface, and 84 percent are more than 2,000 feet beneath the surface. The middle zone contains 22 percent of the estimated resources; in the middle zone, only 2 percent of the resources are less than 500 feet beneath the surface, 4 percent of the resources are 500-2,000 feet beneath the surface, and 94 percent are more than 2,000 feet beneath the surface. The upper zone contains about half the estimated resources, in part because it occupies about three-fourths of the area underlain by the Fruitland Formation; in the upper

  14. Depositional facies and eustatic effects in Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Ripley Formation, central and eastern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Skotnicki, M.C.; King, D.T. Jr. )

    1989-09-01

    In eastern and central Alabama, the Upper Cretaceous Ripley Formation (40-175 m thick) is comprised of five depositional facies. Facies 1 (barrier-island shoreface and tidal-inlet fill) is a medium to coarse, intraclastic quartzose sand that is planar and trough cross-stratified and has abundant Ophiomorpha traces. Facies 2 (back-barrier lagoon or marsh) is a bioturbated, micaceous, carbonaceous silt that contains macerated plant debris and bivalve molds and impressions. Interbedded with facies 2 is facies 3 (storm-washover deposits), a hummocky cross-stratified, micaceous fine sand. Facies 4 (back-barrier tidal flat) is a micaceous silty clay lacking body fossils and plant debris. Facies 5 (lower shoreface) is a glauconitic, clayey and micaceous, fine to medium sand that is highly bioturbated and commonly has abundant marine macrofauna. The Ripley is divided into two genetic packages of facies; the genetic packages are bounded by stratigraphic breaks or discontinuities. The package-bounding breaks are correlated biostratigraphically with discrete third-order eustatic drops on the world sea level curve. The basal Ripley break is correlated with the end of Campanian (about 74 Ma) eustatic drop, and the middle Ripley break (separating the two genetic packages) marks the mid-Maastrichtian (71 Ma) sea level drop. The basal and middle Ripley breaks are low-relief surfaces marked by sharp facies discontinuities (correlatable across 130 km) and terminal coarsening-upward cycles (5 m thick); the estimated eustatic sea level fall in both instances was about 50 m. The break at the top of the Ripley has 70 m of erosional relief and a bone bed up to 80 cm thick. This break represents a late Maastrichtian (about 68 Ma) sea level fall estimated to have been nearly 95 m. Facies of the superjacent Prairie Bluff Chalk and Providence Sand overlie the erosional surface.

  15. Upper Cretaceous Paleocene biostratigraphy and magnetostratigraphy, Hell Creek and Tullock Formations, northeastern Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, J. David; Butler, Robert F.; Lindsay, Everett H.; Clemens, William A.; Dingus, Lowell

    1982-03-01

    Fossils from the Hell Creek and Tullock Formations in northeastern Montana provide detailed documentation of terrestrial faunal and floral evolution during latest Cretaceous (Lancian) and early Paleocene (Puercan) time. Here the replacement of Lancian faunas by those of Puercan age, most obviously signaled by the extinction of dinosaurs, and the changes in pollen floras sometimes used to mark the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary occurred during a period of reversed magnetic polarity. Paleontological correlations suggest that dinosaur extinction and the change in pollen floras took place in the Red Deer Valley area, Alberta, during the same period of reversed polarity. Furthermore, also on the basis of paleontological correlations, the extinction of dinosaurs in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico, appears to have occurred either during the same period of reversed polarity or, possibly, during the preceding period of normal polarity.

  16. Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Charophyte Gyrogonites from the Lameta Formation of Jabalpur, Central India: Palaeobiogeographic and Palaeoecological Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosla, Ashu

    2014-12-01

    A charophyte gyrogonite assemblage consisting of Platychara cf. sahnii, Nemegtichara grambastii and Microchara sp. is reported herein from two localities (Bara Simla Hill and Chui Hill sections) of the Lameta Formation at Jabalpur. he Lameta Formation locally underlying the Deccan traps has been shown to be pedogenically modified alluvial plain deposits containing one of the most extensive dinosaur nesting sites in the world. They are associated with dinosaur bones and freshwater ostracod assemblages that suggest a Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) age. This is the first detailed systematic account of charophyte gyrogonites from the Lameta Formation. This charophyte assemblage is compatible with the biostratigraphic attribution provided by the ostracods. From a biogeographic viewpoint, it exhibits considerable similarity to other infratrappean assemblages of the Nand, Dongargaon, and Dhamni-Pavna sections (Maharashtra), and some intertrappean assemblages of Kora in Gujarat, Rangapur in Andhra Pradesh and Gurmatkal in South India. Globally, the genus Microchara is well distributed throughout Eurasia, whereas the genus Platychara occurs richly in the Upper Cretaceous deposits of Europe, Asia, America and Africa. However, at the specific level, Platychara cf. sahnii shows close affinities with charophytes from the Maastrichtian of Iran whilst Nemegtichara grambastii shows distinct affinities with two species of Early Palaeogene deposits of China and Mongolia. The presence of charophyte gyrogonites in the Lameta sediments is attributed to local lacustrine and palustrine conditions within a flood plain environment.

  17. A new squamate lizard from the Upper Cretaceous Adamantina Formation (Bauru Group), São Paulo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nava, William R; Martinelli, Agustín G

    2011-03-01

    The record of non-mosasaur squamates (Reptilia, Squamata) is sparse in the Cretaceus fossil record of Brazil and include six putative reports, three from the Aptian-Albian of the Araripe Basin (Tijubina pontei Bonfim-Júnior and Marques, Olindalacerta brasiliensis Evans and Yabumoto, and a lizard indet.) and three from the Upper Cretaceous of the Bauru Group (Pristiguana brasiliensis Estes and Price, Anilioidae gen. et sp. indet., and Squamata gen. et sp. indet.). In this contribution, a new genus and species of lizard, Brasiliguana prudentis gen. et sp. nov., is described based on an isolated left maxilla with teeth. The material was discovered in an outcrop of the Upper Cretaceous Adamantina Formation (Bauru Group) located in the proximity of Presidente Prudente Municipality, São Paulo State, Brazil. The new taxon is considered a basal non-Priscagamidae+Acrodonta iguanian based on the presence of a weakly inclined anterior margin of the maxillary nasal process and maxillary tooth shape and tooth implantation similar to that of iguanians rather than of other lizard groups (e.g. teiids). This finding significantly increases the squamate lizard diversity of South America, which is still poorly understood and sparsely represented in the fossil record.

  18. The Collins Creek and Pleasant Creek Formations: Two new upper cretaceous subsurface units in the Carolina/Georgia Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Prowell, D.C.; Christopher, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper formally defines two new Upper Cretaceous subsurface units in the southern Atlantic Coastal Plain of North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia: the Collins Creek Formation and the Pleasant Creek Formation. These units are confined to the subsurface of the outer Coastal Plain, and their type sections are established in corehole CHN-820 from Charleston County, S.C. The Collins Creek Formation consists of greenish-gray lignitic sand and dark-greenish-gray sandy clay and is documented in cores from Allendale, Beaufort, Berkeley, Dorchester, Jasper and Marion Counties, South Carolina, and from Screven County, Georgia. Previously, Collins Creek strata had been incorrectly assigned to the Middendorf Formation. These sediments occupy a stratigraphic position between the Turonian/Coniacian Cape Fear Formation (?) below and the proposed upper Coniacian to middle Santonian Pleasant Creek Formation above. The Collins Creek Formation is middle and late Coniacian in age on the basis of calcareous nannofossil and palynomorph analyses. The Pleasant Creek Formation consists of olive-gray sand and dark-greenish-gray silty to sandy clay and is documented in cores from New Hanover County, North Carolina, and Berkeley, Charleston, Dorchester, Horry and Marion Counties, South Carolina. The strata of this unit previously were assigned incorrectly to the Middendorf Formation and (or) the Cape Fear Formation. These sediments occupy a stratigraphic position between the proposed Collins Creek Formation below and the Shepherd Grove Formation above. The Pleasant Creek Formation is late Coniacian and middle Santonian in age, on the basis of its calcareous nannofossil and palynomorph assemblages.

  19. Cretaceous age of the upper part of the McCoy Mountains Formation, southeastern California and southwestern Arizona, and its tectonic significance: reconciliation of paleobotanical and paleomagnetic evidence.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, P.; Page, V.M.; Hamilton, W.; Howard, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    The upper part of the 7-km-thick McCoy Mountains Formation in southeastern California contains fossil angiosperm wood that closely resembles the genus Paraphyllanthoxylon, which is known only from strata of late Early Cretaceous and younger age. This wood, in conjunction with geologic field relations, supports previous interpretations that the upper part of the McCoy Mountains Formation is of late Early Cretaceous and/or Late Cretaceous age, in contrast to a more recent interpretation that the entire formation is of Jurassic age. Alternatives are therefore needed to the recent hypothesis that deposition, deformation, and metamorphism of the McCoy Mountains Formation were related to movement on the Jurassic Mojave-Sonora megashear. -Authors

  20. Completely preserved cockroaches of the family Mesoblattinidae from the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Yixian Formation (Liaoning Province, NE China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Dandan; Ren, Dong

    2013-08-01

    Although cockroaches were the dominant insects in various Paleozoic and Mesozoic insect assemblages, their general morphology was extremely conservative. One of the most common of them, the Jurassic-Cretaceous family Mesoblattinidae, is described here for the first time on the basis of completely preserved specimens. Ninety-two specimens of Perlucipecta aurea gen. et sp. n. reveal details of head, mandible, male tergal glands and terminal hook; cercal, leg and antennal sensilla. Its congener, P. vrsanskyi is described from the same sediments of the Yixian Formation (Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous). The forewing venation variability of P. aurea, analysed for the first time in this family is nearly identical (CV = 6.23 %) with variability of two species of family Blattulidae that occur at the same locality (CV = 6.22 %; 5.72 %). The transitional nature of morphological characters represented by asymmetry between left and right wings (simple/branched forewing SC and hind wing M) in P. aurea documents the phylogenetic relation between the families Mesoblattinidae and Ectobiidae

  1. Ammonite zonation in condensed zone, middle Ozan formation (Taylor group, upper Cretaceous) in Northeast Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Echols, J.

    1984-04-01

    Recognition of condensed zones is important because they may be marker horizons that are useful in exploration. Such a zone is demonstrated by the occurrence of ammonites belonging to 12 species and 9 genera from the middle Ozan Formation (lower Taylor Marl) in northeast Texas. The 1-foot (0.3-m) thick bed of bioturbated glauconitic biomicrite contains many specimens of disarticulated vertebrates, molluscs, remanie' fossils (blackened phosphatic internal molds), and hiatus concretions. Four of 6 midcontinent ammonite range zones proposed by Cobban and others appear to be represented in the fauna, in ascending order, by Baculites aquilaensis Reeside, Delawarella delawarensis (Morton) (= zones of two unnamed species of Baculites), Baculites obtusus Meek, and Trachyscaphites spiniger porchi Adkins (=zones of Baculites mclearni and B. asperiformis). Young may be correct in assuming that the occurrence of Delawarella delawarensis and Baculites aquilaensis in the Ozan Formation may mean that rocks of the upper Austin Group and parts of the lower Taylor Group are the same age. If correlation with the midcontinent zonation is correct, then the sediments that formed the condensed zone slowly accumulated from 81 to 79 m.y. (mid early Campanian to early late Campanian). Several species of the fauna are preserved as both normal and remanie' fossils, indicating that members of these species lived in the area for an extended period of time, perhaps as a relict fauna. The fauna includes a mixture of cosmopolitan and endemic species (indicating open shelf environment) with several types of heteromorphs (indicating moderate water depths).

  2. Dinosaur Census Reveals Abundant Tyrannosaurus and Rare Ontogenetic Stages in the Upper Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation (Maastrichtian), Montana, USA

    PubMed Central

    Horner, John R.; Goodwin, Mark B.; Myhrvold, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    Background A dinosaur census recorded during the Hell Creek Project (1999–2009) incorporates multiple lines of evidence from geography, taphohistory, stratigraphy, phylogeny and ontogeny to investigate the relative abundance of large dinosaurs preserved in the Upper Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation of northeastern Montana, USA. Overall, the dinosaur skeletal assemblages in the Hell Creek Formation (excluding lag-influenced records) consist primarily of subadult or small adult size individuals. Small juveniles and large adults are both extremely rare, whereas subadult individuals are relatively common. We propose that mature individuals of at least some dinosaur taxa either lived in a separate geographic locale analogous to younger individuals inhabiting an upland environment where sedimentation rates were relatively less, or these taxa experienced high mortality before reaching terminal size where late stage and often extreme cranial morphology is expressed. Methodology/Principal Findings Tyrannosaurus skeletons are as abundant as Edmontosaurus, an herbivore, in the upper Hell Creek Formation and nearly twice as common in the lower third of the formation. Smaller, predatory dinosaurs (e.g., Troodon and dromaeosaurids) are primarily represented by teeth found in microvertebrate localities and their skeletons or identifiable lag specimens were conspicuously absent. This relative abundance suggests Tyrannosaurus was not a typical predator and likely benefited from much wider food choice opportunities than exclusively live prey and/or specific taxa. Tyrannosaurus adults may not have competed with Tyrannosaurus juveniles if the potential for selecting carrion increased with size during ontogeny. Conclusions/Significance Triceratops is the most common dinosaur and isolated skulls contribute to a significant portion of this census. Associated specimens of Triceratops consisting of both cranial and postcranial elements remain relatively rare. This rarity may be explained

  3. Sedimentology of paleochannels on foreland coastal plain, Judith River Formation (upper Cretaceous), southeast Alberta

    SciTech Connect

    Koster, E.H.

    1984-04-01

    The upper 90 m (295 ft) of the sub-Bearpaw Judith River Formation, continuously exposed in the badlands along the Red Deer River 185 km (115 mi) east of Calgary, is famous for the unrivaled assemblage of dinosaur fossils. Dinosaur Provincial Park presents are a rare opportunity to view the architecture of a foreland coastal-plain sequence as well as to clarify the origin and distribution of subbituminous coal zones and gas reservoirs associated with this formation across southeast Alberta. The distal reaches of paleodrainage from the developing Cordillera to the Western Interior seaway are being examined by north-south traversed across the badlands. Sharp-based paleochannel units, enclosed by rooted, olive-gray mudstone sequences that are commonly 4-6 m (13-20 ft) thick, vary between 2 end members. The first contains laterally accreted sand-mud couplets with abundant macrofloral debris, and represents cyclical, low-energy growth of point bars, possible with an estuarine influence. The second, mainly comprising cosets of large trough cross-beds with mudstone intraclasts, was formed by episodic aggradation of high-energy systems. An intermediate composite type displays evidence for an energy increase as channel sinuosity decreased. This variation in paleochannel type is attributed to alternating alluviation/rejuvenation associated with an unstable base level. Coal zones and potential reservoirs appear to be associated with the transgressive and regressive phases, respectively, of the Bearpaw coast. Amalgamation of paleochannels - marked by laterally extensive horizons of bone fragments, lithic and intraclastic gravel - is more common seaward over the axial region of the Sweetgrass arch.

  4. Lagoonal deposits in the Upper Cretaceous Rock Springs Formation (Mesaverde Group), southwest Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirschbaum, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Most paleogeographic reconstructions of the Rock Springs Formation show shorelines having lobate to arcuate deltas. These shorelines are oriented NE-SW, with the sea to the southeast. Brackish-water bodies are usually shown in interdistributary areas or associated with abandoned delta lobes, and are open to the sea. In this study, a sedimentary sequence 30-50 m thick is interpreted as interdeltaic deposits. Brackish-water deposits within the sequence are interpreted as interdeltaic lagoons rather than interdistributary bays. Three facies associations (units) are recognized in nine measured sections of the study interval. Unit A consists of interbedded sandstone, mudrock and coal which occur in both fining- and coarsening-upward sequences less than 10 m thick. Fining-upward sequences decrease in thickness and frequency upwards in unit A and are interpreted as distributary channels. Coarsening-upward sequences associated with the channels are interpreted as crevasse splays that filled lakes or interdistributary bays. In the upper part of the unit where only minor channels are present, the coarsening-upward sequences are interpreted as bay deltas. Unit B consists of fossiliferous silty shale and bioturbated sandy siltstone. A low-diversity fauna of bivalves, gastropods, ostracods and foraminifers indicates that brackish-water conditions existed. Unit B intertongues with unit A to the northwest and with unit C to the southeast, and is interpreted as lagoonal deposits. Unit C consists of crossbedded and burrowed sandstone in beds 0.5-9 m thick. Sandstones are laterally continuous in the southeast but become tabular bodies enclosed within unit B to the northwest. Laterally continuous sandstones are interpreted as shoreface deposits on the basis of multidirectional crossbeds, marine trace fossils and continuity. Tabular sandstones are interpreted as flood-tidal deltas on the basis of NW-oriented crossbeds, pinchouts to the northwest and enclosure within unit B. Scoured

  5. Sedimentologic evolution of a submarine canyon in a forearc basin, Upper Cretaceous Rosario Formation, San Carlos, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, W.R.; Busby-Spera, C.J.

    1988-06-01

    The walls, floor, and fill of a submarine canyon are well-exposed near San Carlos, Mexico, in forecarc strata of the Upper Cretaceous Rosario Formation. The submarine canyon is about 7 km wide and at least 230 m deep and has eroded a minimum of 150 m into underlying fluvial red beds. It is unclear whether subaerial or submarine processes initiated the canyon cutting; however, marine processes, especially debris flows, modified the morphology of the submarine canyon. The submarine canyon fill and overlying slope deposits form two major fining-upward sequences. The first includes a 120 m thick lower conglomerate-sandstone unit (LCSU) at the base of the canyon fill overlain by a 50-110 m thick middle mudstone-sandstone unit (MMSU). The MMSU consists predominantly of mudstone and thin-bedded sandstone, but includes a channel filled with sandstone beds that form a fining- and thinning-upward sequence. This sequence is overlain by the second major sequence, a 0-60 m thick upper conglomerate-sandstone unit (UCSU), which is confined to three channels within the submarine canyon and passes gradationally upward into slope mudstone. Each of the two major fining-upward sequences records a gradual decrease in supply of coarse-grained sediment to the submarine canyon head. The first fining-upward sequence may correspond to a lowstand and subsequent rise in global sea level or, alternatively, may have resulted from local downdropping of the basin. The second fining-upward sequence does not correspond to global sea level fluctuations but is age-correlative with a drop then rise in relative sea level recognized by other workers 300-400 km to the north in the San Diego-Ensenada area. This sea level drop is inferred to have been a regional-scale tectonic event that affect the forearc basin along its length. 18 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Tectonic and climate control of oil shale deposition in the Upper Cretaceous Qingshankou Formation (Songliao Basin, NE China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jianliang; Liu, Zhaojun; Bechtel, Achim; Strobl, Susanne A. I.; Sun, Pingchang

    2013-09-01

    Oil shales were deposited in the Songliao Basin (NE China) during the Upper Cretaceous period, representing excellent hydrocarbon source rocks. High organic matter (OM) contents, a predominance of type-I kerogen, and a low maturity of OM in the oil shales are indicated by bulk geochemical parameters and biomarker data. A major contribution of aquatic organisms and minor inputs from terrigenous land plants to OM input are indicated by n-alkane distribution patterns, composition of steroids, and organic macerals. Strongly reducing bottom water conditions during the deposition of the oil shale sequences are indicated by low pristane/phytane ratios, high C14-aryl-isoprenoid contents, homohopane distribution patterns, and high V/Ni ratios. Enhanced salinity stratification with mesosaline and alkaline bottom waters during deposition of the oil shales are indicated by high gammacerane index values, low MTTC ratios, high β-carotene contents, low TOC/S ratios, and high Sr/Ba ratios. The stratified water column with anoxic conditions in the bottom water enhanced preservation of OM. Moderate input of detrital minerals during the deposition of the oil shale sequences is reflected by titanium concentrations. In this study, environmental conditions in the paleo-lake leading to OM accumulation in the sediments are related to sequence stratigraphy governed by climate and tectonics. The first Member of the Qingshankou Formation (K2qn1) in the Songliao Basin, containing the oil shale sequence, encompasses a third-order sequence that can be divided into three system tracts (transgressive system tract—TST, highstand system tract—HST, and regressive system tract—RST). Enrichment of OM changed from low values during TST-I to high-moderate values during TST-II/III and HST-I/II. Low OM enrichment occurs during RST-I and RST-II. Therefore, the highest enrichment of OM in the sediments is related to stages of mid-late TST and early HST.

  7. Quartz types, authigenic and detrital, in the Upper Cretaceous Eagle Ford Formation, South Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milliken, Kitty L.; Ergene, Suzan M.; Ozkan, Aysen

    2016-06-01

    Lithologic heterogeneity of the Eagle Ford Formation in South Texas arises from mixing of extrabasinal grains of siliciclastic composition with intrabasinal grain assemblages composed dominantly of marine carbonate with a lesser component of biosiliceous debris. Detrital quartz in particular is derived from both extrabasinal and intrabasinal sources, posing a challenge for the use of bulk compositional data for mudrock classification. Extrabasinal detrital quartz supplied along a major axis of siliciclastic influx, the Woodbine depositional system of East Texas, is reduced to a minor part of the grain assemblage in South Texas. Petrographic evidence and point-count results indicate that around 85 percent of total quartz in these rocks, equal to about 12.6 volume percent, is authigenic. Thus, significant quantities of authigenic silica are not restricted to siliceous mudrocks, but can be found in carbonate-rich mudrocks as well. Formerly opaline skeletons of radiolaria, the dominant source of silica for authigenic quartz precipitation, are only poorly preserved by replacements including calcite, dolomite, pyrite, and quartz. Dissolved silica released by dissolution of radiolarians, and perhaps also by volcanic glass dissolution is re-precipitated in a variety of forms, including matrix-dispersed microquartz cement, fillings within primary intragranular pores, and grain replacement of both calcareous and siliceous allochems. The mass balance of dissolved silica mobilized from radiolarians and other reactive silicates and the precipitation of authigenic quartz is uncertain because the initial volumes of now-dissolved detrital material versus the final volume of authigenic material (quartz and other authigenic silicates) cannot be determined with accuracy.

  8. An integrated 3-D seismic facies analysis of productive Upper Cretaceous and Lower Tertiary Formations of the Willows-Beehive Bend Gas Field, Sacramento Basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Gabay, S.H.; Link, M.H.; Damuth, J.E.; Kalkomey, C.T. )

    1990-05-01

    An integrated seismic facies analysis of the Willows-Beehive Bend gas field, using three-dimensional seismic data has led to improved identification of reservoir facies, depositional environments, and reservoir parameters. These three-dimensional data were interpreted together with cores, time-based wireline logs, synthetic seismograms, and six regional two-dimensional seismic lines. The three productive formations studied include (1) the Eocene Princeton Gorge fill, which represents a submarine canyon fill; (2) the Upper Cretaceous Kione Formation, which is composed of shelf and deltaic facies; and (3) the mud-rich Upper Cretaceous Forbes Formation, which represents deep water slope and submarine-fan facies. The Princeton Gorge fill consists of an upper shale-dominated facies and a lower sand-rich channel-dominated facies. These channel fills are sinuous, 0.4-0.8 km wide, trend north to south, and have the best reservoir quality of the field. Two facies are recognized in the Kione Formation: a sand-rich deltafront facies and a mud-rich prodelta facies. The delta-front facies shows west to east progradation across the survey area and has good reservoir quality. The prodelta deposits are transitional into the prograding shale-dominated slope deposits of the upper Forbes Formation. This slope facies contains shale-rich submarine-canyon and gully fills that trend northwest to southeast are 0.8-1.6 km wide, and locally contain sinuous sandy channel fills. The middle Forbes Formation consists of two turbidite facies: middle submarine-fan channel/levee complexes and lower fan depositional lobes. The channel/level complexes are sinuous, trend north to south, and are approximately 0.8-2.4 km wide, whereas the depositional lobes are 3-4 km in diameter.

  9. Hydrocarbon migration and accumulation in the Upper Cretaceous Qingshankou Formation, Changling Sag, southern Songliao Basin: Insights from integrated analyses of fluid inclusion, oil source correlation and basin modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Tian; He, Sheng; Wang, Dexi; Hou, Yuguang

    2014-08-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Qingshankou Formation acts as both the source and reservoir sequence in the Changling Sag, situated in the southern end of the Songliao Basin, northeast China. An integrated approach involving determination of hydrocarbon charging history, oil source correlation and hydrocarbon generation dynamic modeling was used to investigate hydrocarbon migration processes and further predict the favorable targets of hydrocarbon accumulations in the Qingshankou Formation. The hydrocarbon generation and charge history was investigated using fluid inclusion analysis, in combination with stratigraphic burial and thermal modeling. The source rocks began to generate hydrocarbons at around 82 Ma and the hydrocarbon charge event occurred from approximately 78 Ma to the end of Cretaceous (65.5 Ma) when a large tectonic uplift took place. Correlation of stable carbon isotopes of oils and extracts of source rocks indicates that oil was generated mainly from the first member of Qingshankou Formation (K2qn1), suggesting that hydrocarbon may have migrated vertically. Three dimensional (3D) petroleum system modeling was used to evaluate the processes of secondary hydrocarbon migration in the Qingshankou Formation since the latest Cretaceous. During the Late Cretaceous, hydrocarbon, mainly originated from the Qianan depression, migrated laterally to adjacent structural highs. Subsequent tectonic inversion, defined as the late Yanshan Orogeny, significantly changed hydrocarbon migration patterns, probably causing redistribution of primary hydrocarbon reservoirs. In the Tertiary, the Heidimiao depression was buried much deeper than the Qianan depression and became the main source kitchen. Hydrocarbon migration was primarily controlled by fluid potential and generally migrated from relatively high potential areas to low potential areas. Structural highs and lithologic transitions are potential traps for current oil and gas exploration. Finally, several preferred hydrocarbon

  10. Seismic model study of Patrick Draw field, Wyoming: a stratigraphic trap in the Upper Cretaceous Almond Formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Robert C.; Ryder, Robert T.

    1978-01-01

    The Patrick Draw field, located on the eastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift in the Washakie basin of southwestern Wyoming, was discovered in 1959 without the use of geophysical methods. The field is a classic example of a stratigraphic trap, where Upper Cretaceous porous sandstone units pinch out on a structural nose. Two-dimensional seismic modeling was used to construct the seismic waveform expressions of the Patrick Draw field, and to better understand how to explore for other 'Patrick Draw' fields. Interpretation of the model shows that the detection of the reservoir sand is very difficult, owing to a combination of acoustic contrasts and bed thickness. Because the model included other major stratigraphic units in the subsurface, several stratigraphic traps are suggested as potential exploration targets.

  11. Hydrothermal dolomitization of the Bekhme formation (Upper Cretaceous), Zagros Basin, Kurdistan Region of Iraq: Record of oil migration and degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansurbeg, Howri; Morad, Daniel; Othman, Rushdy; Morad, Sadoon; Ceriani, Andrea; Al-Aasm, Ihsan; Kolo, Kamal; Spirov, Pavel; Proust, Jean Noel; Preat, Alain; Koyi, Hemin

    2016-07-01

    The common presence of oil seepages in dolostones is widespread in Cretaceous carbonate successions of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. This integrated field, petrographic, chemical, stable C, O and Sr isotopes, and fluid inclusion study aims to link dolomitization to the origin and geochemical evolution of fluids and oil migration in the Upper Cretaceous Bekhme carbonates. Flux of hot basinal (hydrothermal) brines, which is suggested to have occurred during the Zagros Orogeny, resulted in dolomitization and cementation of vugs and fractures by coarse-crystalline saddle dolomite, equant calcite and anhydrite. The saddle dolomite and host dolostones have similar stable isotopic composition and formed prior to oil migration from hot (81-115 °C) basinal NaCl-MgCl2-H2O brines with salinities of 18-22 wt.% NaCl eq. The equant calcite cement, which surrounds and hence postdates saddle dolomite, has precipitated during oil migration from cooler (60-110 °C) NaCl-CaCl2-H2O brines (14-18 wt.% NaCl eq). The yellowish fluorescence color of oil inclusions in the equant calcite indicates that the oil had API gravity of 15-25° composition, which is lighter than present-day oil in the reservoirs (API of 10-17°). This difference in oil composition is attributed to oil degradation by the flux of meteoric water, which is evidenced by the low δ13C values (- 8.5‰ to - 3.9‰ VPDB) as well as by nil salinity and low temperature in fluid inclusions of late columnar calcite cement. This study demonstrates that linking fluid flux history and related diagenesis to the tectonic evolution of the basin provides important clues to the timing of oil migration, degradation and reservoir evolution.

  12. Paleo­geographic implications of molluscan assemblages in the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Pigeon Point Formation, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elder, William P.; Saul, LouElla

    1993-01-01

    The Pigeon Point Formation crops out along the San Mateo County coastline in a northern and southern sequence of folded and faulted strata. Correlation of the two sequences remains somewhat equivocal, although on the basis of biostratigraphy and a reversed magnetic interval both appear to have been deposited during the early to middle Campanian. Sedimentary structures suggest that the northern sequence was deposited by turbidity currents in a continental rise setting, whereas the southern sequence primarily reflects deposition in shelf and slope environments . Right-lateral offset on the San Andreas and subsidiary faults to the east of the Pigeon Point Formation can account for 100's of km of northward transport since its deposition. However, Champion and others (1984) suggested 2500 km of northward transport from a tropical setting of about 21°N. Molluscan assemblages in the formation argue strongly for a less tropical site of deposition. Relative abundances of warm and temperate taxa and the presence or absence of key species are similar to those of the Santa Ana Mountains Cretaceous section, and are indicative of a war

  13. Regional distribution of wave- and fluvial-dominated deltaic deposits of Olmos formation (upper Cretaceous) in Maverick basin, southwest Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, W.; Tyler, N.

    1984-04-01

    Regional subsurface analysis in southwest Texas indicates that the Olmos Formation (Gulfian) was deposited by a complex of wave- and fluvial-dominated delta systems in two depocenters. Sediment influx was from the north and northwest. Five deltaic submits, A through E, were deposited in the western depocenter. Three other deltaic wedges (F, G, H) formed the second depocenter farther east in present-day Frio and LaSalle Counties. Subsidence was greater in the western half of the Maverick basin where thickest (1,300 ft; 395 m) deltaic sediments were deposited. Lower Olmos strata represent a succession from wave-reworked, strike-elongate deltas of subunit A, similar to those of the underlying San Miguel Formation, to fluvial-dominated, dip-elongate deltas of subunits B and C. Extensive (1200 mi/sup 2/ or 3100 km/sup 2/ in Texas) aggradational floodplain deposits of B and C are characterized by diverse electric-log patterns; variation in log character is a response to complex depositional facies on the delta platform. Downdip, toward the Cretaceous shelf edge, delta-plain facies merge with upward-coarsening delta-front sandstones. Uppermost subunits D and E were deposited by a prograding barrier-island system in an interdeltaic embayment marginal to high constructive deltas of the easter depocenter. Lagoonal and fluvial-channel deposits are recognized from cores. Eastward migration of deposition was accompanied by an abrupt change of depositional style in the western depocenter from deltaic to coastal-interdeltaic.

  14. A New Specimen of the Controversial Chasmosaurine Torosaurus latus (Dinosauria: Ceratopsidae) from the Upper Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation of Montana

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Andrew T.; Campbell, Carl E.; Thomas, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Torosaurus latus is an uncommon and contentious taxon of chasmosaurine ceratopsid known from several upper Maastrichtian units in western North America. We describe a partial parietal of To. latus from the Hell Creek Formation of Montana. Although the specimen’s ontogenetic maturity means that it cannot inform the ongoing debate over whether To. latus is the old adult form of the contemporary Triceratops, the specimen is one of the best-preserved To. latus parietals and supplements previous descriptions. PMID:26974149

  15. Characterization of the structure, clean-sand percentage, dissolved-solids concentrations, and estimated quantity of groundwater in the Upper Cretaceous Nacatoch Sand and Tokio Formation, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillip, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    The West Gulf Coastal Plain, Mississippi embayment, and underlying Cretaceous aquifers are rich in water resources; however, large parts of the aquifers are largely unusable because of large concentrations of dissolved solids. Cretaceous aquifers are known to have large concentrations of salinity in some parts of Arkansas. The Nacatoch Sand and the Tokio Formation of Upper Cretaceous age were chosen for investigation because these aquifers produce groundwater to wells near their outcrops and have large salinity concentrations away from their outcrop areas. Previous investigations have indicated that dissolved-solids concentrations of groundwater within the Nacatoch Sand, 2–20 miles downdip from the outcrop, render the groundwater as unusable for purposes requiring freshwater. Groundwater within the Tokio Formation also exhibits large concentrations of dissolved solids downdip. Water-quality data showing elevated dissolved-solids concentrations are limited for these Cretaceous aquifers because other shallower aquifers are used for water supply. Although not suitable for many uses, large, unused amounts of saline groundwater are present in these aquifers. Historical borehole geophysical logs were used to determine the geologic and hydrogeologic properties of these Cretaceous aquifers, as well as the quality of the groundwater within the aquifers. Based on the interpretation of borehole geophysical logs, in Arkansas, the altitude of the top of the Nacatoch Sand ranges from more than 200 to less than -4,000 feet; the structural high occurs in the outcrop area and the structural low occurs in southeastern Arkansas near the Desha Basin structural feature. The thickness of the Nacatoch Sand ranges from 0 to over 550 feet. The minimum thickness occurs where the formation pinches out in the outcrop area, and the maximum thickness occurs in the southwestern corner of Arkansas. Other areas of large thickness include the area of the Desha Basin structural feature in

  16. Compositional variability of glauconites within the Upper Cretaceous Karai Shale Formation, Cauvery Basin, India: Implications for evaluation of stratigraphic condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Santanu; Bansal, Udita; Pande, Kanchan; Meena, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed mineral chemical investigation of glauconite within the condensed section deposits of the Cretaceous Karai Shale Formation, Cauvery Basin, India reflects a wide spectrum in chemical composition related to origin and evolution in different substrates, stratigraphic condensation, and post-depositional alteration. Fe- and Mg-rich glauconite, comprising up to 60% of the sedimentary rocks, occurs as replaced forms of fecal pellets, as infillings within pores and chambers of bioclasts including those of foraminifera, ostracoda, bryozoa, and algae, and as altered forms of mica exhibiting vermiforms. Authigenic precipitation of K- and Fe-poor glauconite, followed by addition of Fe and K into the lattice and concomitant release of Al and Si explains the origin of glauconite pellets and infillings; the origin of glauconite vermiforms in partly degraded mica involves only the second stage of Fe and K addition. Glauconite pellets and vermiforms exhibit sharply defined alteration zones along peripheries to form rims, and in proximity to cracks or cleavages with reduced K2O and Fe2O3 (total) and enhanced Al2O3 and SiO2, related to late-stage meteoric water actions. Cores of glauconite pellets and unaltered zones of vermiforms reflect 'evolved' characteristics with > 6% K2O, typical of a condensed section, while other glauconite varieties occurring at the same stratigraphic level exhibit 'slightly evolved' nature, not consonant with stratigraphic condensation. Increasing abundance of glauconite pellets from the bottom to the top of the transgressive systems tract, accompanied by slight increase in K2O within their cores, reflects the effect of stratigraphic condensation on the evolution of glauconite. High Fe2O3 (total) content of glauconite in the Karai Shale Formation may be related to upwelling, although the Fe may be contributed partly by the biotite substrate. Mössbauer spectroscopy of glauconites reveals significant total Fe substitution in both tetrahedral and

  17. Palynology, palynofacies and petroleum potential of the Upper Cretaceous-Eocene Matulla, Brown Limestone and Thebes formations, Belayim oilfields, central Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Diasty, W. Sh.; El Beialy, S. Y.; Abo Ghonaim, A. A.; Mostafa, A. R.; El Atfy, H.

    2014-07-01

    Palynological, palynofacies and organic geochemical results of 46 samples retrieved from the Upper Cretaceous - Eocene Matulla, Brown Limestone and Thebes formations, Belayim oilfields, central Gulf of Suez, Egypt are presented. The two latter formations are not dated palynologically as their lithology is not promising for palynological yield. However the Matulla Formation is dated as Turonian-Santonian age, based on the combined evidence of pollen and dinocysts. Palynofacies analysis carried out under both transmitted and fluorescent microscopy indicated that both the Thebes and Brown Limestone formations are deposited under a distal suboxic-anoxic environment. On the other hand, the Turonian-Santonian Matulla Formation supported the existence of a marginal marine deposition under dysoxic-anoxic basin to proximal suboxic-anoxic shelf environments. Rock-Eval pyrolysis and TOC results indicated that most of the studied formations are thermally immature to marginally mature and have a good petroleum potential. They are organically-rich in both oil- and gas-prone kerogen Type-II and II/III, deposited under marine reducing conditions favorable for hydrocarbon generation and expulsion.

  18. A new turtle from the Upper Cretaceous Bauru Group of Brazil, updated phylogeny and implications for age of the Santo Anastácio Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegazzo, Mirian Costa; Bertini, Reinaldo José; Manzini, Flávio Fernando

    2015-03-01

    A new Podocnemidinura specimen from the Upper Cretaceous Bauru Group (Paraná Basin) of southeastern Brazil was described. The Bauru Group provided an important portrait of the Brazilian Mesozoic terrestrial biota, which boasts a vertebrate fauna formed from fishes, frogs, lacertilians, crocodyliforms, dinosaurs and mammals; records of palynomorphs; and invertebrate fauna consisted of gastropods, bivalves, ostracods and conchostracans. Nevertheless, the age of these continental deposits is not precisely estimated, which prevents global correlations, and its fauna is argued to be endemic. The new specimen described is the first turtle from the Santo Anastácio Formation, and its morphological comparison with other South American forms provided a significant advancement in the understanding of the age of this unit (Late Cretaceous). This study permitted a revision of the turtle taxa of the Bauru Group. As a result, some taxa were considered synonym, including the new Santo Anastácio form. The specimen is still unnamed due to the absence of skull characters that preclude its accurate positioning within the Bauru Group skull-based taxa. In addition, the phylogenetic affinities of this taxon were analyzed into Podocnemidinura clade.

  19. Geologic map of the Peach Orchard Flat quadrangle, Carbon County, Wyoming, and descriptions of new stratigraphic units in the Upper Cretaceous Lance Formation and Paleocene Fort Union Formation, eastern Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming-Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honey, J.D.; Hettinger, R.D.

    2004-01-01

    This report provides a geologic map of the Peach Orchard Flat 7.5-minute quadrangle, located along the eastern flank of the Washakie Basin, Wyo. Geologic formations and individual coal beds were mapped at a scale of 1:24,000; surface stratigraphic sections were measured and described; and well logs were examined to determine coal correlations and thicknesses in the subsurface. In addition, four lithostratigraphic units were named: the Red Rim Member of the Upper Cretaceous Lance Formation, and the China Butte, Blue Gap, and Overland Members of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation.

  20. The Lindi Formation (upper Albian-Coniacian) and Tanzania Drilling Project Sites 36-40 (Lower Cretaceous to Paleogene): Lithostratigraphy, biostratigraphy and chemostratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Berrocoso, Álvaro; Huber, Brian T.; MacLeod, Kenneth G.; Petrizzo, Maria Rose; Lees, Jacqueline A.; Wendler, Ines; Coxall, Helen; Mweneinda, Amina K.; Falzoni, Francesca; Birch, Heather; Haynes, Shannon J.; Bown, Paul R.; Robinson, Stuart A.; Singano, Joyce M.

    2015-01-01

    The 2009 Tanzania Drilling Project (TDP) expedition to southeastern Tanzania cored a total of 572.3 m of sediments at six new mid-Cretaceous to mid-Paleocene boreholes (TDP Sites 36, 37, 38, 39, 40A, 40B). Added to the sites drilled in 2007 and 2008, the new boreholes confirm the common excellent preservation of planktonic and benthic foraminifera and calcareous nannofossils from core samples that will be used for biostratigraphy, evolutionary studies, paleoceanography and climatic reconstructions from the Tanzanian margin, with implications elsewhere. The new sites verify the presence of a relatively expanded Upper Cretaceous succession in the region that has allowed a new stratigraphic unit, named here as the Lindi Formation (Fm), to be formally defined. The Lindi Fm (upper Albian to Coniacian), extending ∼120 km between Kilwa and Lindi, comprises a 335-m-thick, outer-shelf to upper-slope unit, consisting of dark gray claystone and siltstone interbeds, common finely-laminated intervals, minor cm-thick sandstones and up to 2.6% organic carbon in the Turonian. A subsurface, composite stratotype section is proposed for the Lindi Fm, with a gradational top boundary with the overlying Nangurukuru Fm (Santonian to Maastrichtian) and a sharp bottom contact with underlying upper Albian sandstones. The section cored at TDP Sites 36 and 38 belongs to the Lindi Fm and are of lower to middle Turonian age (planktonic foraminifera Whiteinella archaeocretacea to Helvetoglobotruncana helvetica Zones and nannofossils subzones UC6b ± UC7). The lower portion of TDP Site 39 (uppermost part of the Lindi Fm) is assigned to the lower to upper Coniacian (planktonic foraminifera Dicarinella concavata Zone and nannofossils zone UC 10), while the remaining part of this site is attributed to the Coniacian-Santonian transition and younger Santonian (planktonic foraminifera D. asymetrica Zone and upper part of nannofossils zone UC10). TDP Site 37 recovered relatively expanded (150 m thick

  1. Spatial variation in quartz cement type and concentration: An example from the Heidelberg formation (Teufelsmauer outcrops), Upper Cretaceous Subhercynian Basin, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Cornelius; Waldmann, Svenja; von Eynatten, Hilmar

    2013-06-01

    Spatial heterogeneity of cement abundance in sandstones is an important factor for reservoir compartmentalization. Here we present results on the variety of diagenetic products and spatial distribution of intense and focused silica cementation within otherwise friable sandstone without silica cements. The Cretaceous quartz arenite of the Teufelsmauer outcrops near Quedlinburg (Upper Cretaceous Heidelberg formation, Subhercynian Basin, Germany) is cemented by various types of diagenetic silica. The highly cemented sandstone sections contain both syntaxial quartz cement (concentrations: 11-31 vol.%) and microcrystalline pore-filling quartz cement (10-34 vol.%). Microcrystalline cement generations form the latest SiO2 precipitations and overgrow moderate to intense syntaxial rims. At outcrop and sedimentary basin scales, the occurrence of highly cemented sandstone is limited to an area of several hundreds of meters in lateral extension, but does not exceed a layer thickness of about 5 m. The highly cemented sandstone shows internal heterogeneity in cementation with preferred orientation of their length axis, suggesting mainly stationary fluid flow pathways during cementation of several silica generations. Most likely, the source of all diagenetic silica is owing to enhanced dissolution at cataclastic deformation bands, which are found within the same sandstone strata. As a mechanism for locally focused precipitation, we suggest a combination of (1) local enhancement of silica dissolution due to deformation and cataclasis and (2) enhanced fluid flow and expulsion during deformation related to the synchronous thrusting of the Harz block onto the Cretaceous Subhercynian Basin. We interpret that the expelled silica-enriched formation water experienced fluid mixing with ascending water from an overpressured, deeper regime, implying that the observed silica generations trace this unique zone of fluid expulsion, ascension, and mixing. Our investigations show that silica

  2. A Re-Evaluation of the Chasmosaurine Ceratopsid Genus Chasmosaurus (Dinosauria: Ornithischia) from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Dinosaur Park Formation of Western Canada

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, James A.; Ryan, Michael J.; Holmes, Robert B.; Schröder-Adams, Claudia J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The chasmosaurine ceratopsid Chasmosaurus is known from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Dinosaur Park Formation of southern Alberta and Saskatchewan. Two valid species, Chasmosaurus belli and C. russelli, have been diagnosed by differences in cranial ornamentation. Their validity has been supported, in part, by the reported stratigraphic segregation of chasmosaurines in the Dinosaur Park Formation, with C. belli and C. russelli occurring in discrete, successive zones within the formation. Results/Conclusions An analysis of every potentially taxonomically informative chasmosaurine specimen from the Dinosaur Park Formation indicates that C. belli and C. russelli have indistinguishable ontogenetic histories and overlapping stratigraphic intervals. Neither taxon exhibits autapomorphies, nor a unique set of apomorphies, but they can be separated and diagnosed by a single phylogenetically informative character—the embayment angle formed by the posterior parietal bars relative to the parietal midline. Although relatively deeply embayed specimens (C. russelli) generally have relatively longer postorbital horncores than specimens with more shallow embayments (C. belli), neither this horncore character nor epiparietal morphology can be used to consistently distinguish every specimen of C. belli from C. russelli. Status of Kosmoceratops in the Dinosaur Park Formation Kosmoceratops is purportedly represented in the Dinosaur Park Formation by a specimen previously referred to Chasmosaurus. The reassignment of this specimen to Kosmoceratops is unsupported here, as it is based on features that are either influenced by taphonomy or within the realm of individual variation for Chasmosaurus. Therefore, we conclude that Kosmoceratops is not present in the Dinosaur Park Formation, but is instead restricted to southern Laramidia, as originally posited. PMID:26726769

  3. Taphonomy of a Baurusuchus (Crocodyliformes, Baurusuchidae) from the Adamantina Formation (Upper Cretaceous, Bauru Basin), Brazil: Implications for preservational modes, time resolution and paleoecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo Júnior, Hermínio Ismael de; Silva Marinho, Thiago da

    2013-11-01

    Upper Cretaceous vertebrate accumulations from the Adamantina Formation are known due to their high taxonomic diversity. On the other hand, taphonomic analyses still are rare, limiting the understanding of processes related to the biostratinomic and fossildiagenetic histories of this lithostratigraphic unit. In 2005, fossils were collected from an outcrop located at Jales municipality, state of São Paulo, southeastern Brazil. From this outcrop, a well-preserved Baurusuchus was recovered, which displays a peculiar set of taphonomic signatures. This paper identifies and interprets taphonomic features of a specimen of Baurusuchus (Crocodyliformes, Baurusuchidae; UFRJ DG 418-R) from the Adamantina Formation (Upper Cretaceous of the Bauru Basin), in Jales municipality, state of São Paulo. Brief taphonomic comparisons with other specimens previously studied (crocodiles and dinosaurs) and a lithofaciological analysis of the outcrop were undertaken in order to enhance the knowledge of the stratigraphy and paleoenvironment and improve the time resolution for the Adamantina Formation in the region of Jales. Furthermore, paleoecological data were interpreted based on the taphonomic analysis. The fossil is composed of an articulated segment of vertebral column, ribs, part of the pelvic girdle and gastralia. There is no hydraulic equivalence between both the specimen of Baurusuchus and the size of quartz grain predominant in the fossiliferous layer, suggesting death in situ or short transport as a “water carcass”. Teeth marks identified on the pubes were assigned to a small/juvenile baurusuchid crocodyliform or a theropod dinosaur. The repositioning of some elements (ribs and dorsal osteoderms) is suggestive of mummification. Desiccation marks were observed and attributed to the stage 1 of weathering. These features suggest subaerial exposure of the carcass prior to burial, however, probably after the mummification. On the other hand, the subaerial exposure was short

  4. The coal-forming plants of the upper part of the Lower Cretaceous Starosuchan Formation (Partizansk Basin, South Primorye region)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugdaeva, E. V.; Markevich, V. S.; Volynets, E. B.

    2014-05-01

    The plant remains and palynological assemblages are studied in detail in the section of the coal-bearing upper part of the Aptian Starosuchan Formation near the village of Molchanovka (Partizansk Basin, South Primorye region). On the basis of the light and electron microscopic study of the disperse cuticles, it was established that the coals are mostly composed of remains of taxodialean Elatides asiatica (Yok.) Krassil., subordinate Miroviaceae, rare ginkgoalean Pseudotorellia sp., and bennettite Nilssoniopteris rithidorachis (Krysht.) Krassil. The spores Gleicheniidites and pollen Taxodiaceaepollenites are dominant in the palynospectrum of the coal interlayer. It was found that dominant taxodialeans and gleicheniaceous ferns with less abundant Miroviaceae, ginkgoaleans, and rare bennettites occurred in the Aptian swamp communities of the Partizansk basin. Shoots and leaves of Elatides asiatica, fronds of Birisia onychioides (Vassil. et K.-M.) Samyl., are dominant in the burials of plants from the clastic rocks. The fragments of leaves of Nilssoniopteris, scale-leaved conifers, and Ginkgo ex gr. adiantoides are rare. The disperse cuticle of these layers mostly includes Pseudotorellia sp.; however, its remains in burials were not found. The spores Laevigatosporites are dominant in the palynospectra from the clastic interlayers. Ginkgocycadophytus and taxa close to Pinaceae are plentiful among the pollen of gymnosperms.

  5. Distribution and origin of regional coal fracture (cleat) domains in Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation coal: Possible effects on coalbed stimulation and methane production

    SciTech Connect

    Laubach, S.E. ); Tremain, C.M. )

    1991-03-01

    Fracture permeability is of primary importance to producibility of coalbed methane. To evaluate controls on fracture (cleat) patterns in coal beds in the Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation in the San Juan basin, the authors studied fractures in the coal and adjacent sandstones in 11 cores and 90 outcrop stations along the basin margin and mapped fractures in selected areas. Cleats are perpendicular to bedding, planar, usually uniform in strike within an outcrop or core, and arranged in closely spaced subparallel sets. Face cleats are the first formed (and generally most prominent) fractures; butt cleats formed later, and most cases strike perpendicular to the face cleat. Timing of cleat development is constrained by the age of cleats relative to dated folds and the burial history of the Fruitland Formation. Where beds ar reoriented by folds, cleats remain orthogonal to bedding, indicating that they formed prior to fold development during the early Tertiary. Cleat crosscuts bedding-parallel coal compaction fabrics, indicating that cleat formed later. Cleat development was contemporaneous with orogenesis in the Cordilleran belt, in progress during late Campanian time. Patterns reflect lateral stresses associated with northeast- and southeast-directed Cordilleran orogenic movements. Domains may represent separate deformation events or contemporaneous paleostress provinces. Contrasts in cleat development in individual domains can affect hydraulic fracture treatment or cavity completion. The prevalence of strongly developed face and butt cleat in the domain-boundary region and resulting increased coal friability may increase the success of cavity completions in this areas.

  6. Outcrops, Fossils, Geophysical Logs, and Tectonic Interpretations of the Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation and Contiguous Strata in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merewether, E.A.; Cobban, W.A.; Tillman, R.W.

    2010-01-01

    In the Bighorn Basin of north-central Wyoming and south-central Montana, the Frontier Formation of early Late Cretaceous age consists of siliciclastic, bentonitic, and carbonaceous beds that were deposited in marine, brackish-water, and continental environments. Most lithologic units are laterally discontinuous. The Frontier Formation conformably overlies the Mowry Shale and is conformably overlain by the Cody Shale. Molluscan fossils collected from outcrops of these formations and listed in this report are mainly of marine origin and of Cenomanian, Turonian, and Coniacian ages. The lower and thicker part of the Frontier in the Bighorn Basin is of Cenomanian age and laterally equivalent to the Belle Fourche Member of the Frontier in central Wyoming. Near the west edge of the basin, these basal strata are disconformably overlain by middle Turonian beds that are the age equivalent of the Emigrant Gap Member of the Frontier in central Wyoming. The middle Turonian beds are disconformably overlain by lower Coniacian strata. Cenomanian strata along the south and east margins of the basin are disconformably overlain by upper Turonian beds in the upper part of the Frontier, as well as in the lower part of the Cody; these are, in turn, conformably overlain by lower Coniacian strata. Thicknesses and ages of Cenomanian strata in the Bighorn Basin and adjoining regions are evidence of regional differential erosion and the presence of an uplift during the early Turonian centered in northwestern Wyoming, west of the basin, probably associated with a eustatic event. The truncated Cenomanian strata were buried by lower middle Turonian beds during a marine transgression and possibly during regional subsidence and a eustatic rise. An uplift in the late middle Turonian, centered in north-central Wyoming and possibly associated with a eustatic fall, caused the erosion of lower middle Turonian beds in southern and eastern areas of the basin as well as in an adjoining region of north

  7. Peat accumulation in coastal-plain mires: a model for coals of the Fruitland Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of southern Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Roberts L.N.; McCabe, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    In the northwestern part of the San Juan basin, Colorado, thick high-volatile B bituminous coal deposits in the Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation are associated with nearshore marine sandstones of the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone. Detailed work along the outcrop and examination of drill cores, revealed two coal-bearing zones in the lower 60 m of the Fruitland Formation. Each zone is up to 13 m thick and consists of interbedded bright and dull coal (average ash values of 17 and 34% on a moisture-free basis, respectively), thin fine-grained clastic partings and abundant altered volcanic ash partings. Isopachs of the interval between the top of the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone and a marker bed (Huerfanito Bentonite Bed) in the underlying Lewis Shale show linear zones where the interval abruptly thickens. These zones, which trend northwest to southeast, represent areas where the shoreline paused during an overall migration to the northeast. Isopach maps of coal in the lower part of the Fruitland Formation and subsurface correlation of shoreface sandstones with coal zones show that the thickest accumulation of coal is 20-25 km landward of these coeval shorelines. The Fruitland coals may be compared to the high-ash peats of the Dismal Swamp in the southeastern U.S.A., which form in pocosin mires about 20 km inland from the Atlantic coast. Clastic deposirion, resulting from coastal processes, precludes the formation of peat in low-lying mires adjacent to the shoreline. The high ash yield, numerous partings and the relationship with the coeval shoreline suggest that the coals in the lower part of the Fruitland Formation accumulated in mires that were transitional from low-lying to raised. ?? 1992.

  8. Giant Upper Cretaceous oysters from the Gulf coast and Caribbean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sohl, Norman F.; Kauffman, Erle G.

    1964-01-01

    Two unusually massive ostreid species, representing the largest and youngest Mesozoic members of their respective lineages, occur in Upper Cretaceous sediment of the gulf coast and Caribbean areas. Their characteristics and significance, as well as the morphologic terminology of ostreids in general, are discussed. Crassostrea cusseta Sohl and Kauffman n. sp. is the largest known ostreid from Mesozoic rocks of North America; it occurs sporadically in the Cusseta Sand and rarely in the Blufftown Formation of the Chattahoochee River region in Georgia and Alabama. It is especially notable in that it lacks a detectable posterior adductor muscle scar on large adult shells. C. cusseta is the terminal Cretaceous member of the C. soleniscus lineage in gulf coast sediments; the lineage continues, however, with little basic modification, throughout the Cenozoic, being represented in the Eocene by C. gigantissima (Finch) and probably, in modern times, by C. virginica (Gmelin). The C. soleniscus lineage is the first typically modern crassostreid group recognized in the Mesozoic. Arctostrea aguilerae (Böse) occurs in Late Campanian and Early Maestrichtian sediments of Alabama, Mississippi, Texas(?), Mexico, and Cuba. The mature shell of this species is larger and more massive than that of any other known arctostreid. Arctostrea is well represented throughout the Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous of Europe, but in North America, despite the great numbers and diversity of Cretaceous oysters, only A. aguilerae and the Albian form A. carinata are known. The presence of A. aquilerae in both the Caribbean and gulf coast faunas is exceptional, as the Late Cretaceous faunas of these provinces are generally distinct and originated in different faunal realms.

  9. Mechanisms of aggradation in fluvial systems influenced by explosive volcanism: An example from the Upper Cretaceous Bajo Barreal Formation, San Jorge Basin, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umazano, Aldo M.; Bellosi, Eduardo S.; Visconti, Graciela; Melchor, Ricardo N.

    2008-01-01

    The Late Cretaceous succession of the San Jorge Basin (Patagonia, Argentina) records different continental settings that interacted with explosive volcanism derived from a volcanic arc located in the western part of Patagonia. This paper discusses the contrasting aggradational mechanisms in fluvial systems strongly influenced by explosive volcanism which took place during sedimentation of the Bajo Barreal Formation. During deposition of the lower member of the unit, common ash-fall events and scarce sandy debris-flows occurred, indicating syn-eruptive conditions. However, the record of primary pyroclastic deposits is scarce because they were reworked by river flows. The sandy fluvial channels were braided and show evidence of important variations in water discharge. The overbank flows (sheet-floods) represent the main aggradational mechanism of the floodplain. In places, subordinate crevasse-splays and shallow lakes also contributed to the floodplain aggradation. In contrast, deposition of the upper member occurred in a fluvial-aeolian setting without input of primary volcaniclastic detritus, indicating inter-eruptive conditions. The fluvial channels were also braided and flowed across low-relief floodplains that mainly aggraded by deposition of silt-sized sediments of aeolian origin (loess) and, secondarily by sheet-floods. The Bajo Barreal Formation differs from the classic model of syn-eruptive and inter-eruptive depositional conditions in the presence of a braided fluvial pattern during inter-eruptive periods, at least at one locality. This braided fluvial pattern is attributed to the high input of fine-grained pyroclastic material that composes the loessic sediments.

  10. Upper Cretaceous to Lower Miocene of the Subsilesian Unit (Western Carpathians, Czech Republic): stratotypes of formations revised

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubík, Miroslav; Franců, Juraj; Gilíková, Helena; Otava, Jiří; Švábenická, Lilian

    2016-06-01

    Type sections/areas for all four formations distinguished in the sedimentary succession of the Subsilesian Unit on Czech territory were revisited and described. New data on lithology, sedimentology, fossil record, biostratigraphy, heavy-minerals and geochemical proxies are based on observations and analysis of these sections. The historical type section of the Frýdek Formation was destroyed during railway construction in 19th century. Outcrops of Campanian to Maastrichtian marls and sandstones on the southwestern slope of "Castle hill" at Frýdek, are proposed as a new type section. The Ostravice riverbed in Frýdlant nad Ostravicí was originally designated as the type area, not mentioning the particular section. This area, even when supplemented with Sibudov Creek, does not show all typical facies of the formation. The outcrops range from lowermost Eocene to Eocene-Oligocene transition. In the original description of the Menilite Formation Glocker mentioned several localities in the area covering the Ždanice, Subsilesian and Silesian units, not mentioning the principal one. The single sections, each not exceeding a thickness of 2 m, are not sufficient to be a type section. Instead of that, we propose the area between Paršovice and Bystřice pod Hostýnem, covering the historical localities, as the type area. The type locality of the Ženklava Formation is an outcrop in an unnamed creek in Ženklava according to the original definition. It seems to be reasonable to extend the type section to the whole 500 m long section of the creek with the outcrops that better illustrate the lithological variability of the formation. New biostratigraphic data allow assignment to late Egerian (Eggenburgian?).

  11. New petrofacies in upper Cretaceous section of southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Colburn, I.P.; Oliver, D.

    1986-04-01

    A distinctive sandstone-conglomerate petrofacies is recognized throughout the Late Cretaceous (Maestrichtian-late Campanian) Chatsworth Formation in the Simi Hills. It is named the Woolsey Canyon petrofacies after the district where it was first recognized. The petrofacies is also recognized in the Late Cretaceous (late Campanian and possibly early Maestrichtian) Tuna Canyon Formation of the central Santa Monica Mountains. The conglomerates in the petrofacies are composed predominantly of angular pebble-size clasts of argillite, quartz-rich rocks (orthoquartzarenite, metaorthoquartzarenite, mice quartz schist) and leucocratic plutoniate (granite-granodiorite). The conglomerate texture and composition are mirrored in the sandstone. The uniformly angular character of the conglomerate clasts and the survival of argillite clasts indicate that the detritus underwent no more than 5 mi of subaerial transport before it entered the deep marine realm. Foraminifers collected from mudstones interbedded with the conglomerates indicate upper bathyal water depth at the site of deposition. A source terrane of low to moderate relief is indicated by the absence of cobbles and boulders. Bed forms, sedimentary structures, and textural features indicate the detritus moved north from its source terrane to be deposited by turbidity currents, debris flows, and grain flows on the Chatsworth Submarine Fan. The detritus of the Woolsey Canyon petrofacies was derived from basement rocks, now largely buried beneath the Los Angeles basin, that were being eroded during the formation of the Cretaceous Los Angeles erosion surface. The detritus came from the Los Angeles arch of that surface.

  12. The Kimmeridge Clay Formation (Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous) of the Norwegian continental shelf and Dorset, UK: a chemostratigraphical correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Holly; Gale, Andy; Gradstein, Felix

    2016-04-01

    The type section of the Kimmeridge Clay Formation (KCF) at Dorset, (UK) stands at the forefront in multidisciplinary research on climatic cyclicity, orbital forcing, sea level change and the productivity vs. preservation controversy. In economic terms, it is a prime source rock of the North Sea hydrocarbon province containing up to 35% total organic carbon. Lateral equivalents of the KCF occur widely in the North, Norwegian and Barents Sea regions of north-western Europe under other names: the Draupne, Mandal, Spekk, Hekkingen and Agardhfjellet (Svalbard) formations. Carbon isotopes and clay mineralogy have been extensively studied from the KCF type section at Dorset. However, between the North Sea and Western Barents Sea, little is known of these records. Correlation using both clay mineral and δ13Corg profiles across these areas would provide insights for our understanding of Late Jurassic climatic developments in north-western Europe. New chemostratigraphical records through the KCF of five Norwegian exploration wells of Lundin Petroleum and one of Statoil, are compared with the Kimmeridgian of Sub-Boreal Dorset, along with a correlation between Svalbard records with the Tithonian cores sampled in this project. Dinoflagellate biostratigraphy accompanies isotope stratigraphy in the placement of each core in time. Initial results show a strong overall correlation. On a smaller timescale, several events are described from Dorset, including a distinct mid-Eudoxus positive isotope peak reflecting a sea level rise, and the Hudlestoni aridity peak as recorded by low kaolinite/illite ratios. Off the Norwegian Continental Shelf, how are these events recorded, if recorded at all, in a δ13Corg and clay mineralogical profile? Such events are useful tools in correlation, and their identification regionally reduces the likelihood of local influence on oceanographical conditions, such as palaeoproductivity response to nutrient influxes, and instead reflects changes in the

  13. The impact of evolving current rheology on multi-scale heterogeneity in submarine lobe strata: an example from the Upper Cretaceous Point Loma Formation, San Diego, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlown, A.; Mohrig, D. C.; Perillo, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing recognition of transitional flow deposits in submarine fans has shown that the evolution of flow rheology in sediment-gravity currents can have a significant impact on the heterogeneity of deepwater sediment accumulations. Sea-cliff exposure of the Cretaceous Point Loma Formation in San Diego, California, provides a unique opportunity to document the internal variability and spatial distribution of thin, fine-grained event beds. Upper portions of beds which commonly appear as featureless mud in exposures of typical quality are revealed as thin, clast-rich debrites in areas where sea cliffs are polished by waves. The ubiquity of these deposits in distal lobe strata suggests complex rheological evolution for nearly all currents that were able to run out to lobe margins. Here we supplement qualitative outcrop characterization with statistical analysis to quantify relationships between deposit thickness, grain size, and the spatial distribution of sedimentary facies. Intervals dominated by transitional flow deposits are shown to occur vertically near the base of coarsening-upward successions and laterally toward lobe margins, reflecting a combination of dynamic processes during individual events and the spatial distribution of consecutive deposits. We show that the ability to distinguish patterns of bed-scale variability reflecting flow evolution from patterns associated with larger-scale processes, such as distributary channel avulsion and compensational stacking, is critical if one is to accurately model heterogeneity within submarine fan systems. Furthermore, the observation that thin, fine-grained debrites can be nearly impossible to distinguish from featureless mud intervals unless exceptionally well-exposed may cast doubt on existing interpretations where outcrop quality is less than remarkable.

  14. The lower Tuscaloosa Formation (upper cretaceous) in the Greensburg and Joseph Branch Field Areas, St. Helena Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Corcoran, M.K. ); Cameron, C.P.; Meylan, M.A. )

    1993-09-01

    Detailed examination of five conventional cores and geophysical well logs in the Greensburg and Joseph Branch field areas of St. Helena Parish, Louisiana, were used to determine the geology of the First Tuscaloosa sand (an informal term for the objective sandstone in this part of the Lower Tuscaloosa production trend). Greensburg and Joseph Branch fields occur in the intermediate-depth part of the productive trend at an average depth of about 13,000 ft in an area of limited low-relief structural nosing. Neither anticlinal closures greater than 20 ft nor faults were recognized by structure contour mapping. Based on the updip and lateral shaling-out of the First Tuscaloosa Sand in the field areas, and the absence of structure, these fields are deemed stratigraphic traps. The First Tuscaloosa Sand probably was deposited as a distributary channel that flowed in the subaerial lowland part of a delta. Intense bioturbation of sand tops, unidirectional trough cross-bedding, and flaser structures were recognized in the core, indicating that this part of the overall deltaic environment was influenced or reworked by primarily sublitharenite, with scattered quartzarenite intervals. The reservoir facies was extensively modified by diagenesis. Initial (primary) porosity was reduced by compaction and later by formation of quartz overgrowths. Secondary porosity, developed as a result of the dissolution of unstable grains and late-stage carbonate cements, can range up to 25%.

  15. Facies Variations Along an Ancient Deep-Water Axial Channel Belt: Insights from the Upper Cretaceous Cerro Toro Formation, Magallanes-Austral Basin, Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkowski, M. A.; Jobe, Z. R.; Sharman, G.; Graham, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Cerro Toro Formation preserves a >150 kilometer long deep-water axial channel belt in the Magallanes-Austral Basin in southern Patagonia. Considerable work over the past decade in the Chilean basin sector reveals a 3.5-8 km wide channel-levee system that transported coarse-grained sediment from north to south via a range of low- to high-density turbidity currents, debris flows, and transitional/hybrid flows. In contrast, the more proximal deposits preserved in the Argentine basin sector to the north received little focus. This study documents new sedimentology, stratigraphy, and U-Pb geochronology from the Cerro Toro Formation in Argentina, allowing for a basin-scale comparison of the timing of deposition, sediment sources, and facies and grain size variability. Two ash beds from the base of the section yield U-Pb zircon ages of 90.4 ± 2 Ma and 88.0 ± 3 Ma, suggesting similar, if not slightly older, ages for the lower Cerro Toro Formation when compared to equivalent units to the south. U-Pb detrital zircon age spectra reveal similar provenance trends along the entire outcrop belt, with peak age populations at 310-260, 160-135, and 110-82 Ma. Preliminary statistical analyses of more than 5700 meters of new and previously published detailed stratigraphic sections suggest that, in general, characteristics such as mean bed thickness and net to gross remain fairly consistent along the outcrop belt. However, the bed thickness distributions are log-normal, and the northern sector has higher maximum bed thickness than the southern sector. There are also gradual variations in the down-system (north to south) proportion of lithofacies. For instance, in the northern (Argentine) sector, lithofacies representing mass wasting processes (e.g., debris flow conglomerates and mass-transport deposits) account for as much as ~80 percent of the stratigraphic thickness, whereas near the southern end of the channel belt, coarse-grained facies are almost entirely

  16. Petrographic Evidence of Microbial Mats in the Upper Cretaceous Fish-Bearing, Organic-Rich Limestone, Agua Nueva Formation, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, A.; Maurrasse, F. J.; Hernández-Ávila, J.; Ángeles-Trigueros, S. A.; García-Cabrera, M. E.

    2013-05-01

    We document petrographic evidence of microbial mats in the Upper Cretaceous Agua Nueva Formation in the area of Xilitla (San Luis Potosí, Central Mexico), located in the southern part of the Tampico-Misantla basin. The sequence consists predominantly of alternating decimeter-thick beds of fossiliferous dark laminated limestone (C-org > 1.0wt%), and light gray, bioturbated limestone (C-org < 1.0wt%), with occasional brown shale and green bentonite layers. Well-preserved fossil-fish assemblages occur in the laminated dark limestone beds, which include shark teeth (cf. Ptychodus), scales of teleosteans (Ichthyodectiformes), as well as skeletal remains of holosteans (Nursallia. sp), and teleosteans (cf. Rhynchodercetis, Tselfatia, and unidentified Enchodontids). Thin section and SEM analyses of the laminated, dark limestones, reveal a micritic matrix consisting of dark and light sub-parallel wavy laminae, continuous and discontinuous folded laminae with shreds of organic matter, filaments, oncoids, and interlocking structures. The structures are identical to those previously described for the Cenomanian-Turonian Indidura Fm at Parras de la Fuente (Coahuila state) demonstrated to be of microbial origin (Duque-Botero and Maurrasse, 2005; 2008). These structures are also analogous to microbial mats in present environments, and Devonian deposits (Kremer, 2006). In addition, the laminae at Xilitla include filamentous bacterial structures, as thin and segmented red elements. In some thin sections, filaments appear to be embedded within the crinkly laminae and shreds showing the same pattern of folding, suggestive of biomorphic elements that represent the main producers of the organic matter associated with the laminae. Thus, exceptional bacterial activity characterizes sedimentation during the accumulation of the Agua Nueva Formation. Oxygen-deficient conditions related to the microbial mats were an important element in the mass mortality and preservation of the fish

  17. Seismic expression of subtle strat trap in Upper Cretaceous Almond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, Robert T.; Lee, Myung W.; Agena, Warren F.; Anderson, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The east flank of the Rock Springs uplift and the adjacent Wamsutter arch contain several large hydrocarbon accumulations. Among these accumulations are Patrick Draw field, which produces oil and gas from a stratigraphic trap in the Upper Cretaceous Almond formation, and Table Rock field, a faulted anticlinal trap that produces gas from multiple Tertiary, Mesozoic, and Paleozoic reservoirs. The principal petroleum reservoir in Patrick Draw field is a sandstone at the top of the Almond formation. This sandstone attains a maximum thickness of 35ft and piches out westward into relatively impervious silt-stone and shale that constitute the trapping facies. The objective of this investigation is to determine whether or not the stratigraphic trap at Patrick Draw can be detected on a 12 fold, common depth point seismic profile acquired by Forest Oil Corp. and its partners. The seismic line is 18.5 miles long and crosses Patrick Draw and Table Rock fields.

  18. Seismic expression of subtle strat trap in upper Cretaceous Almond

    SciTech Connect

    Ryder, R.T. ); Lee, M.W.; Agena, W.F. ); Anderson, R.C. )

    1990-12-17

    The east flank of the Rock Springs uplift and the adjacent Wamsutter arch contain several large hydrocarbon accumulations. Among these accumulations are Patrick Draw field, which produces oil and gas from a stratigraphic trap in the upper Cretaceous Almond formation, and Table Rock field, a faulted anticlinal trap that produces gas from multiple Tertiary, Mesozoic, and Paleozoic reservoirs. The principal petroleum reservoir in Patrick Draw field is a sandstone at the top of the Almond formation. This sandstone attains a maximum thickness of 35 ft (11 m) and pinches out westward into relatively impervious siltstone and shale that constitute the trapping facies. The objective of this investigation is to determine whether or not the stratigraphic trap at Patrick Draw can be detected on a 12 fold, common depth point seismic profile.

  19. Paleogeography and sedimentology of Upper Cretaceous turbidites, San Diego, California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nilsen, T.H.; Abbott, P.L.

    1981-01-01

    Upper Cretaceous (Campanian and Maestrichtian) marine strata of the Rosario Group in the San Diego area include the Point Loma Formation and overlying Cabrillo Formation. Thes units contain 6 facies associations which define a deep-sea fan deposited by westward-flowing sediment gravity flows that transported sediments derived chiefly from batholithic and pre-batholithic metamorphic rocks of the Peninsular Ranges. The sedimentary basin initially deepened abruptly. The fan then prograded westward into the basin, with a retrogradational phase recorded in the uppermost part of the sequence. The fan was deposited along the eastern edge of a forearc basin similar to that of the Great Valley sequence in northern California. The western part of the fan appears to have been truncated by late Cenozoic strike-slip faulting.-from Authors

  20. Composition and provenance of placer deposits in McCourt Tongue of Rock Springs Formation (Upper Cretaceous), Rock Springs uplift area, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, G.B.

    1986-08-01

    Heavy minerals from placer sandstones were studied from samples collected at five widely spaced outcrops of the McCourt Tongue on the southeastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift and on the northern flank of the Uinta Mountains. The placers were deposited along a northeast-trending, strand-plain shoreline of the Cretaceous Interior seaway. Heavy minerals from the five localities occur in very fine-grained sandstone and are composed of about 85% opaque iron and titanium minerals, including magnetite, hematite, and ilmenite. About 15% consist of nonopaque minerals, which are mostly zircon, garnet, tourmaline, and rutile with minor amounts of sphene, hornblende, and apatite. The cementing material is mostly hematite. The nonopaque suite is as much as 96% zircon grains, with 3/sup 0/ of roundness and five color varieties. The heavy minerals are from both plutonic and volcanic source areas. The plutonic minerals suggest a westerly source in Precambrian rocks of Utah and Idaho. The volcanic minerals were probably derived from areas of volcanic activity in Alberta and Montana. The composition, distribution, and provenance of the deposits help establish a framework for regressive Upper Cretaceous shorelines in the central Rocky Mountain area.

  1. A giant sauropod dinosaur from an Upper Cretaceous mangrove deposit in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Smith, J B; Lamanna, M C; Lacovara, K J; Dodson, P; Smith, J R; Poole, J C; Giegengack, R; Attia, Y

    2001-06-01

    We describe a giant titanosaurid sauropod dinosaur discovered in coastal deposits in the Upper Cretaceous Bahariya Formation of Egypt, a unit that has produced three Tyrannosaurus-sized theropods and numerous other vertebrate taxa. Paralititan stromeri is the first tetrapod reported from Bahariya since 1935. Its 1.69-meter-long humerus is longer than that of any known Cretaceous sauropod. The autochthonous scavenged skeleton was preserved in mangrove deposits, raising the possibility that titanosaurids and their predators habitually entered such environments.

  2. Origin of crude oil in eastern Gulf Coast: Upper Jurassic, Upper Cretaceous, and lower Tertiary source rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, R.

    1988-02-01

    Analysis of rock and crude oil samples suggests that three source rocks have given rise to most crude oil in reservoirs of the eastern Gulf Coast. Carbonate source rocks of the Jurassic Smackover Formation are characterized by algal-derived kerogen preserved in an anoxic and hypersaline environment, resulting in crude oils with distinct compositions. Migration commenced during the Cretaceous, explaining the emplacement of Smackover-derived crude oil in Jurassic and in some Cretaceous reservoirs. Upper Cretaceous clastic and carbonate source rocks are also present. Much crude oil in Upper Cretaceous reservoirs has been derived from organic-rich marine shales of the Tuscaloosa Formation. These shales are characterized by algal and higher plant kerogen, resulting in distinct crude oil compositions. Migration commenced during the Tertiary, but was mostly focused to Upper Cretaceous reservoirs. Lower Tertiary shales, including those of the Wilcox Formation, are quite organic-rich and include downdip marine facies characterized by both algal and higher plant kerogen. Crude oils in lower Tertiary reservoirs are dissimilar to crude oils from deeper and older source rocks. Migration from lower Tertiary shales commenced during the late Tertiary and charged Tertiary reservoirs. Although most crude oil in the eastern Gulf Coast has been emplaced by short-range migration, often with a strong vertical component, some long-range lateral migration (> 100 km) has occurred along lower Tertiary sands. The framework of crude oil generation and migration onshore has important implications with respect to origin of crude oil in the Gulf of Mexico.

  3. Anatomy and Taxonomic Status of the Chasmosaurine Ceratopsid Nedoceratops hatcheri from the Upper Cretaceous Lance Formation of Wyoming, U.S.A

    PubMed Central

    Farke, Andrew A.

    2011-01-01

    Background The validity of Nedoceratops hatcheri, a chasmosaurine ceratopsid dinosaur known from a single skull recovered in the Lance Formation of eastern Wyoming, U.S.A., has been debated for over a century. Some have argued that the taxon is an aberrant Triceratops, and most recently it was proposed that N. hatcheri represents an intermediate ontogenetic stage between “young adult” and “old adult” forms of a single taxon previously split into Triceratops and Torosaurus. Methodology/Principal Findings The holotype skull of Nedoceratops hatcheri was reexamined in order to map reconstructed areas and compare the specimen with other ceratopsids. Although squamosal fenestrae are almost certainly not of taxonomic significance, some other features are unique to N. hatcheri. These include a nasal lacking a recognizable horn, nearly vertical postorbital horncores, and relatively small parietal fenestrae. Thus, N. hatcheri is tentatively considered valid, and closely related to Triceratops spp. The holotype of N. hatcheri probably represents an “old adult,” based upon bone surface texture and the shape of the horns and epiossifications on the frill. In this study, Torosaurus is maintained as a genus distinct from Triceratops and Nedoceratops. Synonymy of the three genera as ontogenetic stages of a single taxon would require cranial changes otherwise unknown in ceratopsids, including additions of ossifications to the frill and repeated alternation of bone surface texture between juvenile and adult morphotypes. Conclusions/Significance Triceratops, Torosaurus, and likely Nedoceratops, are all distinct taxa, indicating that species richness for chasmosaurine ceratopsids in the Lance Formation just prior to the Cretaceous-Paleocene extinction was roughly equivalent to that earlier in the Cretaceous. PMID:21283763

  4. Carbon isotope stratigraphy of the upper Kharaib and Shuaiba formations: Implications for the Early Cretaceous evolution of the Arabian Gulf Region

    SciTech Connect

    Vahrenkamp, V.C.

    1996-05-01

    The carbon isotope profiles of shallow-marine carbonates from the Barremian-Aptian Kharaib and Shuaiba formations of the Arabian Gulf region range between 0.5 and 7{per_thousand} {delta}{sup 13}C PDB (Peedee belemnite). Systematic variations can be correlated with isotope profiles reported from Tethyan pelagic limestone sequences. The detailed correspondence between the isotopic signature of the relatively well-dated pelagic limestones and the poorly dated shallow-water limestones from the Arabian Gulf region suggests that global marine carbon isotope changes apparently affected deep-sea and shallow-water carbonate sediments similarly and at a similar time resolution. Although oxygen isotopes have been reset during diagenesis, carbon isotopes appear to have maintained their primary marine signature through time. No evidence has been found to connect carbon isotope trends to subaerial exposure or later meteoric diagenesis. In combination with other data, the investigated carbon isotope profiles can be used for basin-to-platform and regional correlations beyond the current resolution of biostratigraphy in shallow-water limestones. Carbon isotope stratigraphy confirms significant hiatuses in the investigated shallow-water carbonate sequences. Using carbon isotope trends as a proxy for sea level fluctuations, the carbon isotope cycles of the late Early Cretaceous of the Arabian Gulf region may represent four cycles of rising and falling sea level with a duration corresponding to that of third-order sea level fluctuations. Regional correlations derived from isotope trends provide a scenario for the larger scale stratigraphic evolution of the Arabian peninsula during the end of the Early Cretaceous.

  5. Extensional tectonic influence on lower and upper cretaceous stratigraphy and reservoirs, southern Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.C.; Rogers, M.H.

    1993-04-01

    The southern Powder River basin has been influenced significantly by an extensional system affecting Lower Cretaceous, Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary units. The system is composed of small throw, nearly vertical normal faults which are identified in the Cretaceous marine shales and that we believe are basement derived. Resultant fractures were present at erosional/depositional surfaces, both marine and nonmarine, that, in part, controlled erosion and subsequent deposition of Lower and Upper Cretaceous rocks. The normal faults also affected coal deposition in the Tertiary, now exposed at the surface. The erosion and resultant deposition formed extensive stratigraphic traps in Cretaceous units in both conventional and unconventional reservoirs. These reservoirs are interbedded with mature source rocks that have generated and expelled large amounts of hydrocarbons. Resulting overpressuring in the Fall River through the Niobrara formations has kept fractures open and has preserved primary porosity in the reservoirs. The normal faults offset thin sandstone reservoirs forming permeability barriers. Associated fractures may have provided vertical pathways for organic acids that assisted development of secondary porosity in Upper Cretaceous sandstones. These normal...faults and fractures provide significant potential for the use of horizontal drilling techniques to evaluate fractured, overpressured conventional and unconventional reservoirs.

  6. First planktonic foraminifera from the Early Cretaceous (Albian) of the Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blau, J.; Vergara, L.; Stock, H. W.

    1992-10-01

    Albian planktonic foraminifera have been found in the Caballos and "Villeta" formations at two localities in the Upper Magdalena Valley. This is the first documented record of Early Cretaceous planktonic foraminifera in Colombia. Hedbergellids and heterohelicids predominate; keeled forms are absent. The sedimentologic features and the associated microfauna indicate the onset of restricted environments from the middle Albian on.

  7. Upper Cretaceous and lower Eocene conglomerates of Western Transverse Ranges: evidence for tectonic rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, W.E.; Krause, R.G.F.

    1989-04-01

    Stratigraphic and paleomagnetic studies have suggested that the western Transverse Ranges (WTR) microplate is allochthonous, and may have experienced translational and rotational motions. Present paleocurrent directions from the Upper Cretaceous Jalama Formation of the Santa Ynez Mountains are north-directed; these forearc sediments (Great Valley sequence) contain magmatic arc-derived conglomerate clasts from the Peninsular Ranges in southern California. Paleocurrents in the lower Eocene Juncal and Cozy Dell Formations are south-directed. This juxtaposition is best explained by 90/degrees/ or more of clockwise rotation of the WTR microplate, so that Upper Cretaceous forearc sediments sourced from the Peninsular Ranges magmatic arc were deposited by west-directed currents. Eocene sediments were derived from an uplifted portion of the western basin margin and deposited by east-directed currents. Franciscan olistoliths in the Upper Cretaceous sediments indicate deposition adjacent to an accretionary wedge; conglomeratic clasts recycled from the Upper Cretaceous sequence, and radiolarian cherts and ophiolitic boulders in the Eocene strata indicate derivation from an outer accretionary ridge.

  8. Sedimentologic and tectonic evolution of the Upper Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary succession at Wadi Qena, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Mohamed A.; Habib, Mohamed E.; Ahmed, Ezzat A.

    1986-01-01

    The Upper Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary rocks around Wadi Qena, Egypt, represent a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate-phosphorite succession including (from base to top) the Nubia Sandstone, Quseir Shale, Duwi Formation, Dakhla Shale, Tarawan Chalk, Esna Shale and Thebes Formation. Facies and microfacies investigations were carried out. The Nubia Sandstone was deposited by a fluviatile system, whereas the Quseir Shale was laid down by deltaic sedimentation. The Dakhla Shale, Esna Shale and Tarawan Chalk were formed in open marine (pelagic) realms. The Thebes Formation is a shallowing carbonate facies. Phosphorites were accumulated as lag deposits by reworking and winnowing of pre-existing phosphatic materials. The sedimentation of the Upper Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary rocks were affected by regional and local tectonics (i.e., faulting). The latter played a substantial role in the distribution of the different facies particularly the siliciclastic-carbonate facies.

  9. Spiclypeus shipporum gen. et sp. nov., a Boldly Audacious New Chasmosaurine Ceratopsid (Dinosauria: Ornithischia) from the Judith River Formation (Upper Cretaceous: Campanian) of Montana, USA

    PubMed Central

    Mallon, Jordan C.; Ott, Christopher J.; Larson, Peter L.; Iuliano, Edward M.; Evans, David C.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on a new ceratopsid, Spiclypeus shipporum gen et sp. nov., from the lower Coal Ridge Member of the Judith River Formation in Montana, USA, which dates to ~76 Ma (upper Campanian). The species is distinguished by rugose dorsal contacts on the premaxillae for the nasals, laterally projecting postorbital horncores, fully fused and anteriorly curled P1 and P2 epiparietals, and a posterodorsally projecting P3 epiparietal. The holotype specimen is also notable for its pathological left squamosal and humerus, which show varied signs of osteomyelitis and osteoarthritis. Although the postorbital horncores of Spiclypeus closely resemble those of the contemporaneous ‘Ceratops’, the horncores of both genera are nevertheless indistinguishable from those of some other horned dinosaurs, including Albertaceratops and Kosmoceratops; ‘Ceratops’ is therefore maintained as a nomen dubium. Cladistic analysis recovers Spiclypeus as the sister taxon to the clade Vagaceratops + Kosmoceratops, and appears transitional in the morphology of its epiparietals. The discovery of Spiclypeus adds to the poorly known dinosaur fauna of the Judith River Formation, and suggests faunal turnover within the formation. PMID:27191389

  10. Sequence stratigraphic controls on synsedimentary cementation and preservation of dinosaur tracks: Example from the lower Cretaceous, (Upper Albian) Dakota Formation, Southeastern Nebraska, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, P.L.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Matthew, Joeckel R.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Brenner, Richard L.; Witzke, B.J.

    2007-01-01

    A thin cemented sandstone bed in the Upper Albian Dakota Formation of southeastern Nebraska contains the first dinosaur tracks to be described from the state. Of equal importance to the tracks are stable-isotope (C, O) analyses of cements in the track bed, especially in the context of data derived from generally correlative strata (sandstones and sphaerosiderite-bearing paleosols) in the region. These data provide the framework for interpretations of paleoenvironmental conditions, as well as a novel approach to understanding mechanisms of terrestrial vertebrate track preservation. High minus-cement-porosity (> 47%) and low grain-to-grain contacts (???2.5) in the track bed indicate early (pre-compaction) lithification. Although phreatic cements dominate, the history of cementation within this stratigraphic interval is complex. Cathodoluminescence petrography reveals two distinct calcite zones in the track-bearing horizon and four cement zones in stratigraphically equivalent strata from a nearby section. The earliest calcite cements from both localities are likely coeval because they exhibit identical positive covariant trends (??18O values of - 9.89 to - 6.32??? and ??13C values of - 28.01 to - 19.33??? VPDB) and record mixing of brackish and meteoric groundwaters. All other calcite cements define meteoric calcite lines with ??18O values clustering around - 9.42??? and - 8.21??? VPDB from the track-bearing horizon, and - 7.74???, - 5.81???, and - 3.95??? VPDB from the neighboring section. Distinct meteoric sphaerosiderite lines from roughly correlative paleosols serve as a proxy for locally recharged groundwaters. Back-calculated paleogroundwater ??18O estimates from paleosol sphaerosiderites range from - 7.4 to - 4.2??? SMOW; whereas, meteoric calcite lines from the track horizon are generally more depleted. Differences in cement ??18O values record changes in paleogroundwater recharge areas over time. Early calcite cements indicate mixing of fresh and brackish

  11. Stratigraphic framework of Lower and Upper Cretaceous rocks in central and eastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Condon, Steven M.

    2000-01-01

    This study shows the lithology, thickness, distribution, and correlation of Lower and Upper Cretaceous rocks in central and eastern Montana. The described stratigraphic units range from the Aptian Kootenai Formation (oldest) to the Maastrichtian Hell Creek Formation (youngest). An included text report describes the units, and most formations or members are also represented by isopach maps. Structure contour maps of three horizons are also included. Correlations across the study area are shown on a series of cross sections. All text and illustrations are included as Adobe PDF files.

  12. Using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to explore geochemical taphonomy of vertebrate fossils in the upper cretaceous two medicine and Judith River formations of Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, R.R.; Fricke, H.C.; Addona, V.; Canavan, R.R.; Dwyer, C.N.; Harwood, C.L.; Koenig, A.E.; Murray, R.; Thole, J.T.; Williams, J.

    2010-01-01

    Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to determine rare earth element (REE) content of 76 fossil bones collected from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Two Medicine (TMF) and Judith River (JRF) Formations of Montana. REE content is distinctive at the formation scale, with TMF samples exhibiting generally higher overall REE content and greater variability in REE enrichment than JRF samples. Moreover, JRF bones exhibit relative enrichment in heavy REE, whereas TMF bones span heavy and light enrichment fields in roughly equal proportions. TMF bones are also characterized by more negative Ce anomalies and greater U enrichment than JRF bones, which is consistent with more oxidizing diagenetic conditions in the TMF. Bonebeds in both formations show general consistency in REE content, with no indication of spatial or temporal mixing within sites. Previous studies, however, suggest that the bonebeds in question are attritional assemblages that accumulated over considerable time spans. The absence of geochemical evidence for mixing is consistent with diagenesis transpiring in settings that remained chemically and hydrologically stable during recrystallization. Lithology-related patterns in REE content were also compared, and TMF bones recovered from fluvial sandstones show relative enrichment in heavy REE when compared with bones recovered from fine-grained floodplain deposits. In contrast, JRF bones, regardless of lithologic context (sandstone versus mudstone), exhibit similar patterns of REE uptake. This result is consistent with previous reconstructions that suggest that channel-hosted microfossil bonebeds of the JRF developed via the reworking of preexisting concentrations embedded in the interfluve. Geochemical data further indicate that reworked elements were potentially delivered to channels in a recrystallized condition, which is consistent with rapid adsorption of REE postmortem. Copyright ?? 2010, SEPM (Society for

  13. Late Cretaceous biostratigraphy of the La Luna Formation, Maracaibo basin

    SciTech Connect

    Truskowski, I.; Galeaalvarez, F.; Sliter, W.V.

    1996-08-01

    Micropaleontological analysis, sedimentological studies, and geochemical data are presented for the Upper Cretaceous {open_quote}black shales{close_quote} of the La Luna Formation of Western Venezuela. The detailed planktonic foraminiferal studies allowed the establishment of the first biozonation, determination of sedimentation rates, and documentation of occurrences of benthic foraminifers for these unusually thick black shales that extend stratigraphically nearly 100 m. Hedbergellids, whiteinellids and Heterohelix characterize the lower part of the La Luna Formation, dated from the late Cenomanian Rotalipora cushmani Zone to middle Turonian Helvetoglobotruncana belvetica Zone. The high productivity of these groups associated with phosphatized fish remains suggest upwelling and a poorly stratified water column. The presence of buliminids and Favreina sp. at some levels, imply disoxic conditions in this anoxic interval. Planktonic foraminifers in the middle and upper parts of the formation range in age from the late Turonian Marginotruncana sigali- Dicarinella primitiva Zone to the early Campanian Globotruncanita elevata Zone. The increase in keeled planktonic foraminifers toward the top of the formation suggest more stratified, oligotrophic surface waters. Benthic foraminifers found at the top are indicative of dysaerobic conditions. This study provides new opportunities for utilizing the petroleum system in the La Luna Formation, arguably the most prolific source rock in northern South America.

  14. A New Ankylosaurid Dinosaur from the Upper Cretaceous (Kirtlandian) of New Mexico with Implications for Ankylosaurid Diversity in the Upper Cretaceous of Western North America

    PubMed Central

    Arbour, Victoria M.; Burns, Michael E.; Sullivan, Robert M.; Lucas, Spencer G.; Cantrell, Amanda K.; Fry, Joshua; Suazo, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    A new ankylosaurid (Ankylosauria: Dinosauria), Ziapelta sanjuanensis, gen. et sp. nov., is based on a complete skull, an incomplete first cervical half ring, a possible fragment of the second cervical half ring, and additional fragmentary osteoderms. The holotype specimen is from the Upper Cretaceous (Upper Campanian, Kirtlandian Land-Vertebrate Age) Kirtland Formation (De-na-zin Member) at Hunter Wash, San Juan Basin, in northwestern New Mexico, USA. Diagnostic characters of Ziapelta include: a large, prominent triangular median nasal caputegulum; a mixture of flat and bulbous frontonasal caputegulae; ventrolaterally oriented squamosal horns with a sharp, prominent dorsal keel; and the ventral surface of basicranium with three prominent anteroposteriorly oriented fossae. A phylogenetic analysis suggests that Ziapelta is not closely related to the other ankylosaurid from the De-na-zin Member, Nodocephalosaurus, but allies it to the northern North American ankylosaurids Ankylosaurus, Anodontosaurus, Euoplocephalus, Dyoplosaurus, and Scolosaurus. PMID:25250819

  15. Geologic Map of Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary Strata and Coal Stratigraphy of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation, Rawlins-Little Snake River Area, South-Central Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hettinger, R.D.; Honey, J.G.; Ellis, M.S.; Barclay, C.S.V.; East, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    This report provides a map and detailed descriptions of geologic formations for a 1,250 square mile region in the Rawlins-Little Snake River coal field in the eastern part of the Washakie and Great Divide Basins of south-central Wyoming. Mapping of geologic formations and coal beds was conducted at a scale of 1:24,000 and compiled at a scale of 1:100,000. Emphasis was placed on coal-bearing strata of the China Butte and Overland Members of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation. Surface stratigraphic sections were measured and described and well logs were examined to determine the lateral continuity of individual coal beds; the coal-bed stratigraphy is shown on correlation diagrams. A structure contour and overburden map constructed on the uppermost coal bed in the China Butte Member is also provided.

  16. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk and Tokio and Eutaw Formations, Gulf Coast, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Krystal; Dubiel, R.F.; Pearson, O.N.; Pitman, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated means of 957 million barrels of undiscovered oil, 3.6 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered natural gas, and 363 million barrels of undiscovered natural gas liquids in the Austin Chalk and Tokio and Eutaw Formations in onshore lands and State waters of the Gulf Coast.

  17. Physical stratigraphy and hydrostratigraphy of Upper Cretaceous and Paleocene sediments, Burke and Screven Counties, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falls, W.F.; Baum, J.S.; Prowell, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    Six geologic units are recognized in the Cretaceous and the Paleocene sediments of eastern Burke and Screven Counties in Georgia on the basis of lithologic, geophysical, and paleontologic data collected from three continuously cored testholes in Georgia and one testhole in South Carolina. The six geologic units are separated by regional unconformities and are designated from oldest to youngest as the Cape Fear Formation, the Middendorf Formation, the Black Creek Group (undivided), and the Steel Creek Formation in the Upper Cretaceous section, and the Ellenton and the Snapp Formations in the Paleocene section. The geologic units provide a spatial and temporal framework for the identification and correlation of a basal confining unit beneath the Midville aquifer system and five aquifers and five confining units in the Dublin and the Midville aquifer systems. The Dublin aquifer system is divided hydrostratigraphically into the Millers Pond, the upper Dublin, and the lower Dublin aquifers. The Midville aquifer system is divided hydrostratigraphically into the upper and the lower Midville aquifers. The fine-grained sediments of the Millers Pond, the lower Dublin, and the lower Midville confining units are nonmarine deposits and are present in the upper part of the Snapp Formation, the Black Creek Group (undivided), and the Middendorf Formation, respectively. Hydrologic data for specific sets of monitoring wells at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina and the Millers Pond site in Georgia confirm that these three units are leaky confining units and locally impede vertical ground-water flow between adjacent aquifers. The fine-grained sediments of the upper Dublin and the upper Midville confining units are marine-deltaic deposits of the Ellenton Formation and the Black Creek Group (undivided), respectively. Hydrologic data confirm that the upper Dublin confining unit regionally impedes vertical ground-water flow on both sides of the Savannah River. The upper Midville

  18. Hydrology of the Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation and the producibility of coal-bed methane, San Juan basin, Colorado and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, W.R. ); Swartz, T.E. )

    1990-05-01

    Fruitland coal seams contain 49 tcf of methane, which is produced from abnormally pressured coals in a variety of hydrologic settings. In a study funded by the Gas Research Institute, the authors calculated bottom-hole pressures from wellhead shut-in pressures to map hydraulic head and pressure regime, and estimated vertical pressure gradients to evaluate Fruitland hydrology and its relation to methane producibility. They inferred relative permeability from hydraulic head, pressure regime, and hydrochemistry, and related these hydrologic elements to established production. In the Fruitland Formation, coal seams are the primary aquifers, receiving recharge mainly from the elevated, wet, north and northwest margins of the basin. Formation waters in the north-central part of the basin have low chlorinities and high alkalinities, whereas those in the southern part of the basin are saline Na-Cl type similar to seawater. Regional discharge is to the San Juan River valley in the western part of the basin. Overpressuring in the north-central part of the basin is explained hydrodynamically and is attributed to artesian conditions. They infer enhanced coal-bed permeability where the potentiometric surface is flat and reduced permeability where it is steep. Overpressuring indicates enhanced permeability because permeability in coal seams is stress dependent. In the overpressured region, groundwater is fresh, indicative of an active, dynamic flow system and of permeable pathways. In contrast, connate seawater in the underpressured southern part of the basin implies negligible permeability; strata are too tight to accept and transmit measurable recharge. The basin's most productive coal bed-methane wells are overpressured and occur at hydrologic transitions from a flat to a steep potentiometric surface, overpressuring to underpressuring, and low- to high-chloride formation waters.

  19. Tylerianthus crossmanensis gen. et sp. nov. (aff. Hydrangeaceae) from the Upper Cretaceous of New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Gandolfo, M; Nixon, K; Crepet, W

    1998-03-01

    A fossil flower with affinities to the modern families of the saxifragalean complex is described. Fossils were collected at Old Crossman Pit, Raritan Formation, New Jersey, USA. These sediments are dated on the basis of palynology as Turonian (Upper Cretaceous, ~90 million years before present). Fossils are charcoalified and preserved with exceptional three- dimensional detail. The characters observed in these flowers, when compared with those of extant flowers of several families of the saxifragalean complex, suggest a close relationship with extant members of the Saxifragaceae and Hydrangeaceae. Hypotheses on the origin of petals and staminodes and a possible mechanism of pollination are discussed. This new taxon provides additional characters in the floral morphology of the fossil saxifragoids and extends their geographical distribution in the Cretaceous to North America.

  20. Traces of evaporites in Upper Cretaceous lacustrine deposits of Korea: Origin and paleoenvironmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, In Sung; Huh, Min; So, Yoon Hwan; Lee, Jeong Eun; Kim, Hyun Joo

    2007-04-01

    Diverse types of halite and sulfate evaporite traces occur in the Upper Cretaceous lacustrine deposits of the Jindong Formation and the Jangdong Tuff in Korea, in which dinosaur tracks are common. The halite traces usually occur as casts or moulds, and they include traces of primary halite hoppers, primary and intrasedimentary skeletal halite, and intrasedimentary tiny halite. The sulfate traces occur as intrasedimentary and displacive casts filled with sediments and sparry calcite, and the casts occur as diverse modes from single crystal casts through nodular aggregates to massive aggregates. Some aggregates of the sulfate casts are aligned in crack pattern, and selective occurrence of the laths in ripple troughs are observed. Soluble sulfate evaporite minerals such as gypsum, glauberite, or mirabilite are probable for the precursors of these traces. These halite and sulfate traces are interpreted to have been formed in a saline lake and mudflats. It is interpreted that meteoric water was responsible for the evaporite precipitation in the Jindong Lake and Jangdong Lake. Recycled brine produced by the repeated dissolution of evaporites might contribute to the evaporite precipitation in the paleo-Jindong Lake and the paleo-Jangdong Lake. The development of saline lake deposits in the Jindong Formation and the Jangdong Tuff suggests that the southern part of the Korean Peninsula remained an inland continental area during the Cretaceous resulting in semi-arid paleoclimatic condition due to an orographic effect by the location of the Korean Peninsula on continental margin in mid-latitude with topographic barriers during the Cretaceous. The occurrence of dinosaur tracks in the lake margin deposits of saline lake with frequent inflow of dilute meteoric water suggests that Upper Cretaceous dinosaurs inhabiting lakes on the Korean Peninsula might have drunken brackish water.

  1. Cyanobacteria/Foraminifera Association from Anoxic/Dysoxic Beds of the Agua Nueva Formation (Upper Cretaceous - Cenomanian/Turonian) at Xilitla, San Luis Potosi, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Piñón, A.; Maurrasse, F. J.; Rojas-León, A.; Duque-Botero, F.

    2008-05-01

    The Agua Nueva Formation in the vicinity of Xilitla, State of San Luis Potosí, Central Mexico, consists of interbedded brown shale (Grayish orange 10YR 7/4 to Moderate yellowish brown 10YR 5/4) and dark-gray fossiliferous limestone (Bluish gray 5B 6/1 to Dark bluish gray 5B 4/1), varying between 10 and 20 cm in thickness. The sequence also includes 2 to 4 cm- thick intermittent bentonite layers (Moderate greenish yellow 10Y 7/4, to dark greenish yellow 10Y 6/6 and Light olive 10Y 5/4). At the field scale, shaly intervals show no apparent internal structures, whereas most limestone beds show primary lamination at the millimeter scale (1-2 mm), and intermittent layers of black chert of about 5 cm thick. Pyrite is present as disseminated crystals and as 2 cm-thick layers. Bioturbation or macrobenthic organisms other than inoceramids do not occur in the Agua Nueva Formation at Xilitla. Unusual macrofossils are present only in limestone strata, and consist of well- preserved diverse genera of fishes such as sharks, Ptychodus sp. and teleosteans, Rhynchodercetis sp., Tselfatia sp., Goulmimichthys sp., and scales of Ichtyodectiformes, as well as ammonites and inoceramids (Blanco et al., 2006). The presence of Inoceramus (Mytyloides) labiatus (Maldonado-Koederll, 1956) indicates an Early Turonian age for the sequence. Total carbonate content (CaCO3 = TIC) varies between 62 and 94% in the Limestone beds, which yield Total Organic Carbon (TOC) from 0.4% to 2.5%; the shale intervals contain TIC values consistently lower than 33% and TOC lower than 0.8% Microscopically the limestone beds vary from mudstone to packstone composed essentially of coccoid cyanobacteria similar to coeval deposits in northeastern Mexico, Coahuila State, at Parras de La Fuente (Duque- Botero 2006). Similarly, the microspheroids are spherical to sub-spherical, and occur as isolated elements or aggregates forming series of chains of parallel-packed light lamina 1-2 mm thick. Filamentous cyanobacteria

  2. Stratigraphy, foraminiferal assemblages and paleoenvironments in the Late Cretaceous of the Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia (part I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Luis S.

    1997-03-01

    The present work focuses on the Cretaceous record (Middle Albian-Maastrichtian) of the Upper Magdalena Valley (UMV), with a scope that covers facies and biofacies. The nomenclatural scheme previously stated for the Girardot-Guataqui area is here extended and proposed for all the basin, the following fomational units being characterized in detail. The Hondita Formation (Middle Albian-late Turonian), placed on top of the Caballos Formation, is separated from the Lomagorda Formation (late Turonian-early Santonian) by a chert interval within a succession of predominantly dark shales deposited in outer shelf environments. The Olini Group (early Santonian-late Campanian) presents two conspicuous chert units (Lidita Inferior and Superior) overlain by the Nivel de Lutitas y Arenas (early Maastrichtian). The sandstones of La Tabla and finally the mudstones of the Seca Formation (Maastrichtian) represent diverse littoral environments of the end of the Cretaceous. In the UMV, the Cretaceous system attains approximately 1350 m of thickness. Within the paleogeographic scenario, the drowning of the basin and of the adjacent Central Cordillera during most of the Late Cretaceous enabled upwelling currents and the development of widespread pelagic sediments. These sediments graded to shallower water deposits towards the south of the basin. In the Upper Cretaceous, four sequences of second order can be identified. The longer cycle begins at the base of the Hondita Formation and exhibits the maximum flooding in the Cenomanian condensed section of this unit. Following this cycle, three successive sudden sea level drops mark the boundaries of complete sequences, each comprising well developed lowstand, transgressive and highstand system tracts. After the last cycle was completed, the basin was uplifted and rocks of the Seca Formation were cannibalized by fluvial processes during the Tertiary. An angular unconformity that truncates this unit represents the uppermost sequence boundary of

  3. Reevaluation of upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, Western Interior

    SciTech Connect

    Mantzios, C.

    1989-03-01

    Comparison of the Brushy Basin member of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation in the Colorado Plateau with the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Morrison-Cloverly sequence in the Bighorn basin, Wyoming, shows great similarities in their depositional environments and stratigraphy. The lower Brushy Basin member is a fluvial deposit composed of channel sandstones and overbank mudstones which display a great number of pedogenic features. Similar depositional setting has been observed in the Morrison Formation in the Bighorn basin, Wyoming, where pedogenic features suggest a distal floodplain setting with low-sinuosity channels cutting through. In both localities the dominant clay mineral is illite. The upper Brushy Basin member in the Colorado Plateau is composed mostly of gray and purpose mudstones rich in montmorillonite. Devitrified tuff beds and bentonite occur in certain levels throughout the unit. Pedogenic features are not conspicuously developed. The Lower Cretaceous Clovery Formation in the Bighorn basin, Wyoming, is strikingly similar in terms of lithological aspects. The depositional environment is interpreted in both localities as a playa deposit. A great variety of nodules is present such as silcretes, septaria, and silica-carbonate nodules. Radiometric dating of bentonites in central Utah revealed that the upper Brushy Basin member is Early Cretaceous in age. Field and geochemical data support these conclusions and aid the understanding of the exact nature of the depositional basin, environments, stratigraphy, and paleotectonics of the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous interval in the Western Interior.

  4. New crocodiles (Eusuchia: Alligatoroidea) from the Upper Cretaceous of southern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscalioni, Angela D.; Ortega, Francisco; Vasse, Denis

    1997-10-01

    The Upper Cretaceous sites of Laño and Quintanilla del Coco in northern Spain have yielded significant crocodilian remains, allowing a more precise interpretation of the fragmentary record of southwestern Europe. Two new genera, Musturzabalsuchus and Acynodon, have been recognized. Both taxa were extinct at the end of the Cretaceous. Their relationships with the alligatoroidean Eusuchia suggest a close relationship with Paleolaurasian groups. Musturzabalsuchus might be regarded as an endemic european taxa, the oldest known member of the basal Alligatoroidea. Acynodon is the only non-North American taxon that is related to the short snouted Upper Cretaceous alligatorids.

  5. The bivalve Anopaea (Inoceramidae) from the Upper Jurassic-lowermost Cretaceous of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zell, Patrick; Crame, J. Alistair; Stinnesbeck, Wolfgang; Beckmann, Seija

    2015-07-01

    In Mexico, the Upper Jurassic to lowermost Cretaceous La Casita and coeval La Caja and La Pimienta formations are well-known for their abundant and well-preserved marine vertebrates and invertebrates. The latter include conspicuous inoceramid bivalves of the genus Anopaea not formally described previously from Mexico. Anopaea bassei (Lecolle de Cantú, 1967), Anopaea cf. stoliczkai (Holdhaus, 1913), Anopaea cf. callistoensis Crame and Kelly, 1995 and Anopaea sp. are rare constituents in distinctive Tithonian-lower Berriasian levels of the La Caja Formation and one Tithonian horizon of the La Pimienta Formation. Anopaea bassei was previously documented from the Tithonian of central Mexico and Cuba, while most other members of Anopaea described here are only known from southern high latitudes. The Mexican assemblage also includes taxa which closely resemble Anopaea stoliczkai from the Tithonian of India, Indonesia and the Antarctic Peninsula, and Anopaea callistoensis from the late Tithonian to ?early Berriasian of the Antarctic Peninsula. Our new data expand the palaeogeographical distribution of the high latitude Anopaea to the Gulf of Mexico region and substantiate faunal exchange, in the Late Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous, between Mexico and the Antarctic Realm.

  6. Upper cretaceous microbial petroleum systems in north-central Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lillis, Paul G.

    2007-01-01

    Methanogenesis began soon after the deposition (early-stage methanogenesis) of the Cenomanian to Campanian source sediments, and was either sustained or rejuvenated by episodic meteoric water influx until sometime in the Paleogene. Methanogenesis probably continued until CO2 and hydrogen were depleted or the pore size was compacted to below tolerance levels of the methanogens. The composition of the Montana and Colorado Group gases and coproduced formation water precludes a scenario of late-stage methanogenesis like the Antrim gas system in the Michigan basin. Some portion of the methane charge was originally dissolved in the pore waters, and subsequent reduction in hydrostatic pressure caused the methane to exsolve and migrate into local stratigraphic and structural traps. The critical moment of the microbial gas systems is this timing of exsolution rather than the time of generation (methanogenesis). Other studies suggest that the reduction in hydrostatic pressure may have been caused by multiple geologic events including the lowering of sea level in the Late Cretaceous, and subsequent uplift and erosion events, the youngest of which began about 5 Ma.

  7. Environmental changes in a fresh-water influenced Upper Cretaceous succession (Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, G.; Wagreich, M.

    2009-04-01

    The interplay of Late Cretaceous basin subsidence and sea-level oscillations produced a cyclic freshwater-marine succession within the Gosau Group in the basement of the Vienna Basin (Austria). Cycles have been investigated in the Markgraf Neusiedl 1 borehole cores (courtesy of OMV AG) of the Glinzendorf syncline. The Markgraf Neusiedl core sediments can be correlated to similar strata of the Grünbach Formation in the outcrop area of Grünbach-Neue Welt (Lower Austria, Northern Calcareous Alps). There, sections from abandoned coal mines were measured and described in detail. Biostratigraphic data indicate a Late Santonian to Early Campanian age of these cyclic sediments. The environment was characterized as terrestrial freshwater swamps interfingering with shallow brackish to marine sediments of a delta plain under warm and humid subtropical climate conditions. The Upper Cretaceous borehole section starts with conglomerates and pebbly sandstones of alluvial environments. Conglomerates at around 4100 m depth yield probably freshwater algal calcite crusts with carbon isotopes of -3.2 per mil VPDB and oxygen isotopes around -4 per mil VPDB. At 4020 m coal seams and shale intercalations are present, grading into a shaly to silty succession with occasional mollusc layers up to ca. 3400 m. Carbon isotope values of 1 to 1.5 per mil and oxygen isotopes around -5 per mil are recorded. The upper part of the Cretaceous succession up to ca. 3200 m becomes more sandy to silty and carbon isotopes become more negative, around -3 to -5 per mil and oxygen isotope values up to -8 per mil, which may indicate a stronger diagenetic influence as carbon and oxyen isotopes covary in that interval. Marine-freshwater cycles are expressed in geochemistry data and fossil assemblages, i.e. the rare occurrence of marine microfossils such as foraminifers and dinoflagellates.

  8. Upper Cretaceous molluscan record along a transect from Virden, New Mexico, to Del Rio, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobban, W.A.; Hook, S.C.; McKinney, K.C.

    2008-01-01

    Updated age assignments and new collections of molluscan fossils from lower Cenomanian through upper Campanian strata in Texas permit a much refined biostratigraphic correlation with the rocks of New Mexico and the Western Interior. Generic names of many Late Cretaceous ammonites and inoceramid bivalves from Texas are updated to permit this correlation. Strata correlated in the west-to-east transect include the lower Cenomanian Beartooth Quartzite and Sarten Sandstone of southwest New Mexico, and the Eagle Mountains Formation, Del Rio Clay, Buda Limestone, and. basal beds of the Chispa Summit, Ojinaga, and Boquillas Formations of the Texas-Mexico border area. Middle Cenomanian strata are lacking in southwestern New Mexico but are present in the lower parts of the Chispa Summit and Boquillas Formations in southwest Texas. Upper Cenomanian and lower Turonian rocks are present at many localities in New Mexico and Texas in the Mancos Shale and Chispa Summit, Ojinaga, and Boquillas Formations. Middle Turonian and younger rocks seem to be entirely nonmarine in southwestern New Mexico, but they are marine in the Rio Grande area in the Chispa. Summit, Ojinaga, and Boquillas Formations. The upper part of the Chispa Summit and Boquillas contain late Turonian fossils. Rocks of Coniacian and Santonian age are present high in the Chispa Summit, Ojinaga, and Boquillas Formations, and in the lower part of the Austin. The San Carlos, Aguja, Pen, and Austin Formations contain fossils of Campanian age. Fossils representing at least 38 Upper Cretaceous ammonite zones are present along the transect. Collections made in recent years in southwestern New Mexico and at Sierra de Cristo Rey just west of downtown El Paso, Texas, have been well treated and do not need revision. Taxonomic names and zonations published in the pre-1970 literature on the Rio Grande area of Texas have been updated. New fossil collections from the Big Bend National Park, Texas, allow for a much refined correlation

  9. Upper Campanian (Upper Cretaceous) cephalopods from the Parras Shale near Saucedas, Coahuila, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifrim, Christina; Stinnesbeck, Wolfgang; Espinosa, Belinda; Ventura, José Flores

    2015-12-01

    72 specimens of ammonites and the nautilid Eutrephoceras, collected from the upper Cretaceous Parras Shale at Saucedas in southern Coahuila, Mexico, are here assigned to twelve genera and fourteen species. The assemblage represents three to four upper Campanian biozones reaching from the Western Interior lower upper Campanian Exiteloceras jenneyi to the uppermost Campanian Tethyan Nostoceras hyatti biozone. Eutrephoceras irritilasi and Trachyscaphites sp. are endemic taxa, while Baculites taylorensis is restricted to the northern Gulf of Mexico Coast and E. jenneyi, Oxybeloceras crassum and Solenoceras elegans are Western Interior Seaway elements. Didymoceras donezianum is a southern Euramerican species, while Bostrychoceras polyplocum and N. hyatti occur throughout lower and middle latitudes. Diplomoceras cylindraceum and Phyllopachyceras forbesianum are cosmopolitan taxa with their main occurrences in the Maastrichtian; their record at Saucedas is the oldest of these species in North America. A clear paleobiogeographic signal is identified in the upper Campanian ammonite assemblages at Saucedas by a change from restricted towards geographically widespread faunas. This suggests gradual disappearence of faunal barriers which separated the Gulf Coast from the rest of the world.

  10. Vertebrate paleontological exploration of the Upper Cretaceous succession in the Dakhla and Kharga Oases, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallam, Hesham M.; O'Connor, Patrick M.; Kora, Mahmoud; Sertich, Joseph J. W.; Seiffert, Erik R.; Faris, Mahmoud; Ouda, Khaled; El-Dawoudi, Iman; Saber, Sara; El-Sayed, Sanaa

    2016-05-01

    The Campanian and Maastrichtian stages are very poorly documented time intervals in Africa's record of terrestrial vertebrate evolution. Upper Cretaceous deposits exposed in southern Egypt, near the Dakhla and Kharga Oases in the Western Desert, preserve abundant vertebrate fossils in nearshore marine environments, but have not yet been the focus of intensive collection and description. Our recent paleontological work in these areas has resulted in the discovery of numerous new vertebrate fossil-bearing localities within the middle Campanian Qusier Formation and the upper Campanian-lower Maastrichtian Duwi Formation. Fossil remains recovered from the Campanian-aged Quseir Formation include sharks, rays, actinopterygian and sarcopterygian fishes, turtles, and rare terrestrial archosaurians, including some of the only dinosaurs known from this interval on continental Africa. The upper Campanian/lower Maastrichtian Duwi Formation preserves sharks, sawfish, actinopterygians, and marine reptiles (mosasaurs and plesiosaurs). Notably absent from these collections are representatives of Mammalia and Avialae, both of which remain effectively undocumented in the Upper Cretaceous rocks of Africa and Arabia. New age constraints on the examined rock units is provided by 23 nannofossil taxa, some of which are reported from the Duwi Formation for the first time. Fossil discoveries from rock units of this age are essential for characterizing the degree of endemism that may have developed as the continent became increasingly tectonically isolated from the rest of Gondwana, not to mention for fully evaluating origin and diversification hypotheses of major modern groups of vertebrates (e.g., crown birds, placental mammals).

  11. Stratigraphy of Upper Cretaceous and Cenozoic deposits of the Bakchar iron ore deposit (southwestern Siberia): New data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedeva, N. K.; Kuzmina, O. B.; Sobolev, E. S.; Khazina, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    The results of complex palynological and microfaunistic studies of Upper Cretaceous and Cenozoic deposits of the Bakchar iron ore deposit are presented. Geochronologically, the age of the deposits varies from Campanian to Quaternary. It was established that the Slavgorod, Gan'kino, and Jurki (?) formations contain four biostratons in the rank of beds with dinocysts and three biostratons in the rank of beds with spores and pollen. The Cenozoic continental deposits contain four biostratons in the rank of beds, containing spores and pollen. As a result of the study, a large stratigraphic gap in the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary deposits, covering a significant part of the Maastrichtian, Paleocene, Ypresian, and Lutetian stages of the Eocene, was established. The remnants of a new morphotype of heteromorphic ammonites of genus Baculites were first described in deposits of the Slavgorod Formation (preliminarily, upper Campanian). The distribution features of the different palynomorph groups in the Upper Cretaceous-Cenozoic deposits in the area of study due to transgressive-regressive cycles and climate fluctuations were revealed.

  12. Preliminary vitrinite and bitumen reflectance, total organic carbon, and pyrolysis data for samples from Upper and Lower Cretaceous strata, Maverick Basin, south Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Paul C.; Dennen, Kristin O.; Gesserman, Rachel M.; Ridgley, Jennie L.

    2009-01-01

    The Lower Cretaceous Pearsall Formation, a regionally occurring limestone and shale interval of 500-600-ft maximum thickness (Rose, 1986), is being evaluated as part of an ongoing U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessment of undiscovered hydrocarbon resources in onshore Lower Cretaceous strata of the northern Gulf of Mexico. The purpose of this report is to release preliminary vitrinite and bitumen reflectance, total organic carbon, and pyrolysis data for Pearsall Formation, Glen Rose Formation, Hosston Formation, Austin Group, and Eagle Ford Group samples from the Maverick Basin in south Texas in order to aid in the characterization of these strata in this area. The preliminary nature of this report and the data contained herein reflect that the assessment and characterization of these samples is a work currently in progress. Pearsall Formation subdivisions are, in ascending stratigraphic order, the Pine Island Shale, James Limestone, and Bexar Shale Members (Loucks, 2002). The Lower Cretaceous Glen Rose Formation is also part of the USGS Lower Cretaceous assessment and produces oil in the Maverick Basin (Loucks and Kerans, 2003). The Hosston Formation was assessed by the USGS for undiscovered oil and gas resources in 2006 (Dyman and Condon, 2006), but not in south Texas. The Upper Cretaceous Austin Group is being assessed as part of the USGS assessment of undiscovered hydrocarbon resources in the Upper Cretaceous strata of the northern Gulf of Mexico and, along with the Upper Cretaceous Eagle Ford Group, is considered to be an important source rock in the Smackover-Austin-Eagleford Total Petroleum System (Condon and Dyman, 2006). Both the Austin Group and the Eagle Ford Group are present in the Maverick Basin in south Texas (Rose, 1986).

  13. The First Freshwater Mosasauroid (Upper Cretaceous, Hungary) and a New Clade of Basal Mosasauroids

    PubMed Central

    Makádi, László; Caldwell, Michael W.; Ősi, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Mosasauroids are conventionally conceived of as gigantic, obligatorily aquatic marine lizards (1000s of specimens from marine deposited rocks) with a cosmopolitan distribution in the Late Cretaceous (90–65 million years ago [mya]) oceans and seas of the world. Here we report on the fossilized remains of numerous individuals (small juveniles to large adults) of a new taxon, Pannoniasaurus inexpectatus gen. et sp. nov. from the Csehbánya Formation, Hungary (Santonian, Upper Cretaceous, 85.3–83.5 mya) that represent the first known mosasauroid that lived in freshwater environments. Previous to this find, only one specimen of a marine mosasauroid, cf. Plioplatecarpus sp., is known from non-marine rocks in Western Canada. Pannoniasaurus inexpectatus gen. et sp. nov. uniquely possesses a plesiomorphic pelvic anatomy, a non-mosasauroid but pontosaur-like tail osteology, possibly limbs like a terrestrial lizard, and a flattened, crocodile-like skull. Cladistic analysis reconstructs P. inexpectatus in a new clade of mosasauroids: (Pannoniasaurus (Tethysaurus (Yaguarasaurus, Russellosaurus))). P. inexpectatus is part of a mixed terrestrial and freshwater faunal assemblage that includes fishes, amphibians turtles, terrestrial lizards, crocodiles, pterosaurs, dinosaurs and birds. PMID:23284766

  14. The first freshwater mosasauroid (Upper Cretaceous, Hungary) and a new clade of basal mosasauroids.

    PubMed

    Makádi, László; Caldwell, Michael W; Ősi, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Mosasauroids are conventionally conceived of as gigantic, obligatorily aquatic marine lizards (1000s of specimens from marine deposited rocks) with a cosmopolitan distribution in the Late Cretaceous (90-65 million years ago [mya]) oceans and seas of the world. Here we report on the fossilized remains of numerous individuals (small juveniles to large adults) of a new taxon, Pannoniasaurus inexpectatus gen. et sp. nov. from the Csehbánya Formation, Hungary (Santonian, Upper Cretaceous, 85.3-83.5 mya) that represent the first known mosasauroid that lived in freshwater environments. Previous to this find, only one specimen of a marine mosasauroid, cf. Plioplatecarpus sp., is known from non-marine rocks in Western Canada. Pannoniasaurus inexpectatus gen. et sp. nov. uniquely possesses a plesiomorphic pelvic anatomy, a non-mosasauroid but pontosaur-like tail osteology, possibly limbs like a terrestrial lizard, and a flattened, crocodile-like skull. Cladistic analysis reconstructs P. inexpectatus in a new clade of mosasauroids: (Pannoniasaurus (Tethysaurus (Yaguarasaurus, Russellosaurus))). P. inexpectatus is part of a mixed terrestrial and freshwater faunal assemblage that includes fishes, amphibians turtles, terrestrial lizards, crocodiles, pterosaurs, dinosaurs and birds.

  15. Relation of the Cretaceous formations to the Rocky Mountains in Colorado and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Willis T.

    1916-01-01

    Some time ago, while working on a problem that involved the question of the presence or absence of islands near the close of the Cretaceous period in the region now occupied by the southern part of the Rocky Mountains, I was forced to the conclusion that no land masses or islands of any considerable size persisted there throughout the Cretaceous period, for I found no sedimentary rocks that were clearly derived from such islands. This result led to a reexamination of available information to see what evidence the sedimentary rocks in other areas near the present mountains could furnish, and I found rather unexpected confirmation of my conclusion. In the course of this study it became evident t that there is apparent conflict of testimony between different classes of fossils and that the physical evidence, including lithology, structure, and sequence of beds, is at variance with some of the commonly accepted correlations. In this state of uncertainty I tried to apply physiographic principles to see if they would throw any light on the interrelations of the interrelations of the Cretaceous formations of the Rocky Mountain region and on the events that opened and closed the period. This led me to a conclusion similar to that reached by the paleontologist C. A. White many years ago, namely, that the Upper Cretaceous formations up to and including the Laramie extended across the site of the mountains.

  16. The Lower Cretaceous Chinkeh Formation: A frontier-type play in the Liard basin of western Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Leckie, D.A. ); Potocki, D.J. ); Visser, K. )

    1991-08-01

    The Lower Cretaceous Liard basin in western Canada covers an area of 9,500 km{sup 2} (3,668 mi{sup 2}) but is relatively unexplored despite its size. The present-day expression of the basin, which formed during the latest Cretaceous to early Tertiary, trends north-south and is delineated by the outcrop of the coarse-clastic Upper Cretaceous Dunvegan Formation. The lowermost Cretaceous unit, herein named the Chinkeh Formation, is up to 32 m (105 ft) thick and unconformably overlies older Paleozoic strata. The Chinkeh Formation contains four major lithotypes: (1) conglomeratic breccia interpreted as debris-flow or talus deposits, (2) interbedded coal, carbonaceous as nonmarine valley fill or channel deposits, (3) conglomeratic lag related to marine deposits, (3) conglomeratic lag related to marine transgression, and (4) upward-coarsening sandstone interpreted as abandoned shoreline deposits. Cretaceous strata in the Liard basin have gave petroleum source-rock and reservoir potential, and hydrocarbons may be present in sandstone of the Chinkeh Formation. Potential play types include stratigraphic traps formed by incised-valley deposits and shallow-marine sandstone pinching out laterally into marine shales of the Garbutt Formation. A potential structural play may occur along the Bovie fault zone where reservoirs may abut against a shale seal on the eastern side of the fault. Potential source rocks include the lowermost Garbutt Formation and underlying Triassic Toad Garbutt formations. The Chinkeh Formation sandstone has porosity values of 8-18%.

  17. Provenance and U-Pb geochronology of the Upper Cretaceous El Chanate Group, northwest Sonora, Mexico, and its tectonic significance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacques-Ayala, C.; Barth, A.P.; Wooden, J.L.; Jacobson, C.E.

    2009-01-01

    The Upper Cretaceous El Chanate Group, northwest Sonora, Mexico, is a 2.8km thick clastic sedimentary sequence deposited in a continental basin closely related to volcanic activity. It consists of three formations: the Pozo Duro (oldest), the Anita, and the Escalante (youngest). Petrographic study, conglomerate pebble counts, and U-Pb geochronology of detrital zircons were performed to determine the source and age of this sequence, and to interpret its tectonic setting. In the sandstones of all three formations, the most abundant grains are those of volcanic composition (Q38F22L 40, Q35F19L46, and Q 31F22L47, respectively). The Pozo Duro Formation includes well-rounded quartz-arenite clast conglomerates, whereas conglomerates of the two upper units have clasts predominantly of andesitic and rhyolitic composition. The most likely source for these sediments was the Jurassic volcanic arc exposed in northern Sonora and southern Arizona. Zircons from five sandstone samples define two main age groups, Proterozoic and Mesozoic. The first ranges mostly from 1000 to 1800Ma, which suggests the influence of a cratonic source. This zircon suite is interpreted to be recycled and derived from the same source area as the quartz-rich sandstone clasts in the basal part of the section. Mesozoic zircons range from Triassic to Late Cretaceous, which confirms the proposed Late Cretaceous age for the sequence, and also corroborates Jurassic felsic source rocks. Another possible source was the Alisitos volcanic arc, exposed along the western margin of the Baja California Peninsula. Of regional significance is the great similarity between the El Chanate Group and the McCoy Mountains Formation of southeastern California and southwestern Arizona. Both are Cretaceous, were deposited in continental environments, and have similar zircon-age patterns. Also, both exhibit intense deformation and locally display penetrative foliation. These features strongly suggest that both units underwent

  18. Definition of Greater Gulf Basin Lower Cretaceous and Upper Cretaceous Lower Cenomanian Shale Gas Assessment Unit, United States Gulf of Mexico Basin Onshore and State Waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dennen, Kristin O.; Hackley, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    An assessment unit (AU) for undiscovered continuous “shale” gas in Lower Cretaceous (Aptian and Albian) and basal Upper Cretaceous (lower Cenomanian) rocks in the USA onshore Gulf of Mexico coastal plain recently was defined by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The AU is part of the Upper Jurassic-Cretaceous-Tertiary Composite Total Petroleum System (TPS) of the Gulf of Mexico Basin. Definition of the AU was conducted as part of the 2010 USGS assessment of undiscovered hydrocarbon resources in Gulf Coast Mesozoic stratigraphic intervals. The purpose of defining the Greater Gulf Basin Lower Cretaceous Shale Gas AU was to propose a hypothetical AU in the Cretaceous part of the Gulf Coast TPS in which there might be continuous “shale” gas, but the AU was not quantitatively assessed by the USGS in 2010.

  19. Dinosaur ichnofauna of the Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous of the Paraná Basin (Brazil and Uruguay)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francischini, H.; Dentzien–Dias, P. C.; Fernandes, M. A.; Schultz, C. L.

    2015-11-01

    Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous sedimentary layers are represented in the Brazilian Paraná Basin by the fluvio-aeolian Guará Formation and the Botucatu Formation palaeoerg, respectively, overlapped by the volcanic Serra Geral Formation. In Uruguay, the corresponding sedimentary units are named Batoví and Rivera Members (both from the Tacuarembó Formation), and the lava flows constitute the Arapey Formation (also in Paraná Basin). Despite the lack of body fossils in the mentioned Brazilian formations, Guará/Batoví dinosaur fauna is composed of theropod, ornithopod and wide-gauge sauropod tracks and isolated footprints, as well as theropod teeth. In turn, the Botucatu/Rivera dinosaur fauna is represented by theropod and ornithopod ichnofossils smaller than those from the underlying units. The analysis of these dinosaur ichnological records and comparisons with other global Mesozoic ichnofauna indicates that there is a size reduction in dinosaur fauna in the more arid Botucatu/Rivera environment, which is dominated by aeolian dunes. The absence of sauropod trackways in the Botucatu Sandstone fits with the increasingly arid conditions because it is difficult for heavy animals to walk on sandy dunes, as well as to obtain the required amount of food resources. This comparison between the Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous dinosaur fauna in south Brazil and Uruguay demonstrates the influence of aridization on the size of animals occupying each habitat.

  20. Paleoshorelines in the Upper Cretaceous Point Lookout Sandstone, southern San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zech, R.S.

    1982-01-01

    LANDSAT images and aerial photography reveal several parallel linear features as much as 17 km long and 0.7 km wide. Detailed cross sections normal to a linear feature show it to be an exhumed paleoshoreline containing several overlapping sandstone units. Each unit tends to pinchout into the shales of the overlying Menefee Formation, showing a range of depositional environments including upper shoreface, foreshore, washover and eolian. Paleogeomorphic elements, predominately beach ridges and interridge swales, shape the upper surface of the sandstone and produce a relief as great as 4.2 m. The various components found in the paleoshoreline create a trellis-like drainage pattern that contrasts with the regional dendritic drainage pattern; the resulting linear feature is easily discernible on aerial photography and LANDSAT images. The rapid lithologic and thickness changes of the sandstone bodies in these linear features provide excellent potential as stratigraphic trap for hydrocarbons. Paleoshoreline facies are likely to be preserved in areas of thickest marginal marine regressive sand accumulation and similar paleoshoreline systems may be preserved at depth in the Point Lookout (Sandstone) or other Cretaceous sandstones.

  1. Evolution and palaeoenvironment of the Bauru Basin (Upper Cretaceous, Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Luiz Alberto; Magalhães Ribeiro, Claudia Maria

    2015-08-01

    The Bauru Basin was one of the great Cretaceous desert basins of the world, evolved in arid zone called Southern Hot Arid Belt. Its paleobiological record consists mainly of dinosaurs, crocodiles and turtles. The Bauru Basin is an extensive region of the South American continent that includes parts of the southeast and south of Brazil, covering an area of 370,000 km2. It is an interior continental basin that developed as a result of subsidence of the central-southern part of the South-American Platform during the Late Cretaceous (Coniacian-Maastrichtian). This sag basin is filled by a sandy siliciclastic sequence with a preserved maximum thickness of 480 m, deposited in semiarid to desert conditions. Its basement consists of volcanic rocks (mainly basalts) of the Lower Cretaceous (Hauterivian) Serra Geral basalt flows, of the Paraná-Etendeka Continental Flood Basalt Province. The sag basin was filled by an essentially siliciclastic psammitic sequence. In lithostratigraphic terms the sequence consists of the Caiuá and Bauru groups. The northern and northeastern edges of the basin provide a record of more proximal original deposits, such as associations of conglomeratic sand facies from alluvial fans, lakes, and intertwined distributary river systems. The progressive basin filling led to the burial of the basaltic substrate by extensive blanket sand sheets, associated with deposits of small dunes and small shallow lakes that retained mud (such as loess). Also in this intermediate context between the edges (more humid) and the interior (dry), wide sand sheet areas crossed by unconfined desert rivers (wadis) occurred. In the central axis of the elliptical basin a regional drainage system formed, flowing from northeast to southwest between the edges of the basin and the hot and dry inner periphery of the Caiuá desert (southwest). Life in the Bauru Basin flourished most in the areas with the greatest water availability, in which dinosaurs, crocodiles, turtles, fish

  2. Current oil and gas production from North American Upper Cretaceous chalks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholle, Peter A.

    1977-01-01

    Production of oil and natural gas from North American chalks has increased significantly during the past five years, spurred by the prolific production from North Sea chalks, as well as by higher prices and improved production technology. Chalk reservoirs have been discovered in the Gulf Coast in the Austin Group, Saratoga and Annona Chalks, Ozan Formation, Selma Group, Monroe gas rock (an informal unit of Navarro age), and other Upper Cretaceous units. In the Western Interior, production has been obtained from the Cretaceous Niobrara and Greenhorn Formations. Significant, though subcommercial, discoveries of natural gas and gas condensate also have been made in the Upper Cretaceous Wyandot Formation on the Scotian Shelf of eastern Canada. All North American chalk units share a similar depositional and diagenetic history. The chalks consist primarily of whole and fragmented coccoliths with subordinate planktonic and benthonic Foraminifera, inoceramid prisms, oysters, and other skeletal grains. Most have between 10 and 35 percent HCl-insoluble residue, predominantly clay. Deposition was principally below wave base in tens to hundreds of meters of water. The diagenetic history of a chalk is critical in determining its reservoir potential. All chalk has a stable composition (low-Mg calcite) and very high primary porosity. With subsequent burial, mechanical and chemical (solution-transfer) compaction can reduce or completely eliminate pore space. The degree of loss of primary porosity in chalk sections is normally a direct function of the maximum depth to which it has been buried. Pore-water chemistry, pore-fluid pressures, and tectonic stresses also influence rates of cementation. Oil or gas reservoirs of North American chalk fall into three main groups: 1. Areas with thin overburden and significant primary porosity retention (for example, Niobrara Formation of Kansas and eastern Colorado). 2. Areas with thicker overburden but considerable fracturing. Here primary

  3. A pterodactyloid pterosaur from the Upper Cretaceous Lapurr sandstone, West Turkana, Kenya.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Patrick M; Sertich, Joseph J W; Manthi, Fredrick K

    2011-03-01

    An isolated pterosaurian caudal cervical (~ postcervical) vertebra was recovered from the Upper Cretaceous Lapurr sandstone of West Turkana, northwestern Kenya. The vertebral centrum is short, wide, and dorsoventrally compressed. Although the specimen is lightly built similar to most pterosaurs, it is here referred to Pterodactyloidea and tentatively to the Azhdarchidae in that it lacks pneumatic features on both the centrum and neural arch. This represents one of the few pterosaurs recovered from the entirety of Afro-Arabia, the first pterosaur recovered from the Cretaceous of East Africa, and, significantly, a specimen that was recovered from fluvial deposits rather than the near-shore marine setting typical of most pterosaur discoveries.

  4. Maps showing thermal maturity of Upper Cretaceous marine shales in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, Thomas M.; Pawlewicz, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    The Wind River Basin is a large Laramide (Late Cretaceous through Eocene) structural and sedimentary basin that encompasses about 7,400 square miles in central Wyoming. The basin is bounded by the Washakie Range, Owl Creek, and southern Bighorn Mountains on the north, the Casper arch on the east and northeast, the Granite Mountains on the south, and the Wind River Range on the west. Important conventional and unconventional oil and gas resources have been discovered and produced from reservoirs ranging in age from Mississippian through Tertiary. It has been suggested that various Upper Cretaceous marine shales are the principal hydrocarbon source rocks for many of these accumulations. Numerous source rock studies of various Upper Cretaceous marine shales throughout the Rocky Mountain region have led to the conclusion that these rocks have generated, or are capable of generating, oil and (or) gas. With recent advances and success in horizontal drilling and multistage fracture stimulation there has been an increase in exploration and completion of wells in these marine shales in other Rocky Mountain Laramide basins that were traditionally thought of only as hydrocarbon source rocks. Important parameters that control hydrocarbon production from shales include: reservoir thickness, amount and type of organic matter, and thermal maturity. The purpose of this report is to present maps and a structural cross section showing levels of thermal maturity, based on vitrinite reflectance (Ro), for Upper Cretaceous marine shales in the Wind River Basin.

  5. Correlation of Upper Cretaceous strata from Lima Peaks area to Madison Range, southwestern Montana and southeastern Idaho, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T.S.; Tysdal, R.G.; Perry, W.J.; Obradovich, J.D.; Haley, J.C.; Nichols, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    An 40Ar/39Ar age of 85.81 Ma ?? 0.22 my was obtained on sanidine from a volcanic procellanite bed near the top of the 2135 + m-thick Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation in the Lima Peaks area of southwestern Montana. This early Santonian age, combined with previously determined age data including a palynological age of Cenomanian for the lower Frontier at Lima Peaks, and a U-Pb isotopic date of about 95 Ma for the base of the Frontier Formation in the eastern Pioneer Mountains north of the Lima Peaks area, provides an age range for this nonmarine formation. In the Madison Range, farther east in southwestern Montana, this age range corresponds to marine strata of not only the Frontier Formation, but also the overlying Cody Shale and Telegraph Creek Formation, a sequence that totals less than 760 m thick. The Upper Cretaceous marine formations of the Madison Range are closely zoned by molluscan faunas that are well constrained with radiometric dates. The 40Ar/39Ar age of 85.81 Ma ?? 0.22 my at Lima Peaks is bracketed by radiometric dates for the Scaphites depressus - Protexanites bourgeoisianus biozone and the overlying Clioscaphites saxitonianus - Inoceramus undulatoplicatus biozone of the Western Interior. Fossils of both of these biozones are present in the Cody Shale and the Telegraph Creek Formation in the Madison Range. The Telegraph Creek contains two units of volcanic ash that are approximate time equivalents of the volcanic procellanite of the Lima Peaks area. Clasts in the conglomerate of the upper part of the Frontier in the Lima Peaks area were shed during the initial stages of uplift of the Blacktail-Snowcrest highlands which rose to the north. The dated porcellanite lies above the conglomerates and indicates that the uplift was initiated by middle or late Coniacian, 87-88 Ma. ?? 1997 Academic Press Limited.

  6. Fossil woods from the Late Cretaceous Aachen Formation.

    PubMed

    Meijer

    2000-11-01

    Silicified fossil woods from the Late Cretaceous (Santonian) Aachen Formation of northeast Belgium, southernmost Netherlands and adjacent Germany were investigated. Gymnosperms dominate this assemblage: Taxodioxylon gypsaceum, T. cf. gypsaceum, T. cf. albertense (all Taxodiaceae), Dammaroxylon aachenense sp. nov. (Araucariaceae), Pinuxylon sp. (Pinaceae), and Scalaroxylon sp. (Cycad or Cycadeoid). Angiosperms are minor constituents: Nyssoxylon sp. (Nyssaceae?, Cornaceae?), Mastixioxylon symplocoides sp. nov. (Mastixiaceae?, Symplocaceae?), Plataninium decipiens (Platanaceae) and Paraphyllanthoxylon cf. marylandense (Anacardiaceae?, Burseraceae?, Lauraceae?).The composition of this assemblage and the anatomy of the woods indicate a seasonal and humid warm-temperate to subtropical climate.

  7. Maps showing thermal maturity of Upper Cretaceous marine shales in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, Thomas M.; Pawlewicz, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    The Bighorn Basin is one of many structural and sedimentary basins that formed in the Rocky Mountain foreland during the Laramide orogeny, a period of crustal instability and compressional tectonics that began in latest Cretaceous time and ended in the Eocene. The basin is nearly 180 mi long, 100 mi wide, and encompasses about 10,400 mi2 in north-central Wyoming and south-central Montana. The basin is bounded on the northeast by the Pryor Mountains, on the east by the Bighorn Mountains, and on the south by the Owl Creek Mountains). The north boundary includes a zone of faulting and folding referred to as the Nye-Bowler lineament. The northwest and west margins are formed by the Beartooth Mountains and Absaroka Range, respectively. Important conventional oil and gas resources have been discovered and produced from reservoirs ranging in age from Cambrian through Tertiary. In addition, a potential unconventional basin-centered gas accumulation may be present in Cretaceous reservoirs in the deeper parts of the basin. It has been suggested by numerous authors that various Cretaceous marine shales are the principal source rock for these accumulations. Numerous studies of various Upper Cretaceous marine shales in the Rocky Mountain region have led to the general conclusion that these rocks have generated or are capable of generating oil and (or) gas. In recent years, advances in horizontal drilling and multistage fracture stimulation have resulted in increased exploration and completion of wells in Cretaceous marine shales in other Rocky Mountain Laramide basins that were previously thought of only as hydrocarbon source rocks. Important parameters controlling hydrocarbon production from these shale reservoirs include: reservoir thickness, amount and type of organic matter, and thermal maturity. The purpose of this report is to present maps and a cross section showing levels of thermal maturity, based on vitrinite reflectance (Ro), for selected Upper Cretaceous marine

  8. Geochemistry of the Jurassic and Upper Cretaceous shales from the Molango Region, Hidalgo, eastern Mexico: Implications for source-area weathering, provenance, and tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong-Altrin, John S.; Nagarajan, Ramasamy; Madhavaraju, Jayagopal; Rosalez-Hoz, Leticia; Lee, Yong Il; Balaram, Vysetti; Cruz-Martínez, Adriana; Avila-Ramírez, Gladis

    2013-04-01

    This study focuses on the Jurassic (Huayacocotla and Pimienta Formations) and Upper Cretaceous (Méndez Formation) shales from the Molango Region, Hidalgo, Mexico. In this article, we discuss the mineralogy, major, and trace element geochemistry of the Mesozoic shales of Mexico. The goal of this study is to constrain the provenance of the shales, which belong to two different periods of the Mesozoic Era and to understand the weathering conditions and tectonic environments of the source region.

  9. First North American occurrence of Anacoracid selachian Squalicorax yangaensis, Upper Cretaceous Dalton sandstone, near Crownpoint, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Wolberg, D.L.; Bellis, D. )

    1989-09-01

    This report documents the first North American occurrence of Squalicorax yangaensis in the Upper Cretaceous Dalton sandstone, Borrego Pass area, southeast of Crownpoint, New Mexico. The Dalton sandstone has been interpreted to be a regressive coastal barrier sandstone deposited parallel to the southeast-trending shoreline of the Late Cretaceous epeiric seaway.

  10. Petroleum geology of the Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous, Baltimore Canyon trough, western North Atlantic Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, B.E. )

    1991-02-01

    Numerous hydrocarbon shows, including a noncommercial gas and gas-condensate accumulation, occur in the Baltimore Canyon Trough within sandstone units deposited in prograding coastal-plain and transitional-marine environments located updip of an Oxfordian/Kimmeridgian carbonate shelf edge. The coastal-plain and transitional-marine facies are overlain by a fine-grained deltaic complex dominated by delta-plain shales which collectively form a regionally extensive top seal unit. Wells drilled seaward of the continental shelf edge ( > 1,500 m water depth) tested large structural/stratigraphic closures along the downdip termination of the Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous carbonate shelf edge but encountered no significant hydrocarbon shows. Reservoir rocks in these wells consist of (1) oolite grain-stone, which was deposited within a shoal-water complex located at the Aptian shelf edge, and (2) coral-stromatoporoid grainstone and boundstone. Structural closures having reservoir and top seals are present in both updip and downdip trends. hydrocarbon shows in wells along the shelf interior trend indicate the presence of mature source beds, at least locally. The absence of hydrocarbon shows in downdip carbonate reservoirs and around the Schlee Dome, however, suggests charge/migration mechanisms within the fetch areas of these objectives have failed. Continued development of play concepts in the Baltimore Canyon Trough, therefore, requires identification and mapping of potential source-rock intervals and construction of hydrocarbon expulsion models to time hydrocarbon generation relative to trap formation.

  11. A new oviraptorid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Upper Cretaceous of southern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Sun, Chengkai; Sullivan, Corwin; Xu, Xing

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a new oviraptorid dinosaur taxon, Ganzhousaurus nankangensis gen. et sp. nov., based on a specimen collected from the Upper Cretaceous Nanxiong Formation of Nankang County, Ganzhou City, Jiangxi Province, southern China. This new taxon is distinguishable from other oviraptorids based on the following unique combination of primitive and derived features: relatively shallow dentary; absence of fossa or pneumatopore on lateral surface of dentary; weakly downturned anterior mandibular end; shallow depression immediately surrounding anterior margin of external mandibular fenestra; external mandibular fenestra subdivided by anterior process of surangular; dentary posteroventral process slightly twisted and positioned on mandibular ventrolateral surface; shallow longitudinal groove along medial surface of dentary posteroventral process; angular anterior process wider transversely than deep dorsoventrally; sharp groove along ventrolateral surface of angular anterior process; ventral border of external mandibular fenestra formed mainly by angular; ventral flange along distal half of metatarsal II; and arctometatarsal condition absent. Phylogenetic analysis places Ganzhousaurus nankangensis gen. et sp. nov. in the clade Oviraptoridae, together with Oviraptor, Citipati, Rinchenia and the unnamed Zamyn Khondt oviraptorid.

  12. Upper Cretaceous sequences and sea-level history, New Jersey Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, K.G.; Sugarman, P.J.; Browning, J.V.; Kominz, M.A.; Olsson, R.K.; Feigenson, M.D.; Hernandez, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    We developed a Late Cretaceous sealevel estimate from Upper Cretaceous sequences at Bass River and Ancora, New Jersey (ODP [Ocean Drilling Program] Leg 174AX). We dated 11-14 sequences by integrating Sr isotope and biostratigraphy (age resolution ??0.5 m.y.) and then estimated paleoenvironmental changes within the sequences from lithofacies and biofacies analyses. Sequences generally shallow upsection from middle-neritic to inner-neritic paleodepths, as shown by the transition from thin basal glauconite shelf sands (transgressive systems tracts [TST]), to medial-prodelta silty clays (highstand systems tracts [HST]), and finally to upper-delta-front quartz sands (HST). Sea-level estimates obtained by backstripping (accounting for paleodepth variations, sediment loading, compaction, and basin subsidence) indicate that large (>25 m) and rapid (???1 m.y.) sea-level variations occurred during the Late Cretaceous greenhouse world. The fact that the timing of Upper Cretaceous sequence boundaries in New Jersey is similar to the sea-level lowering records of Exxon Production Research Company (EPR), northwest European sections, and Russian platform outcrops points to a global cause. Because backstripping, seismicity, seismic stratigraphic data, and sediment-distribution patterns all indicate minimal tectonic effects on the New Jersey Coastal Plain, we interpret that we have isolated a eustatic signature. The only known mechanism that can explain such global changes-glacio-eustasy-is consistent with foraminiferal ??18O data. Either continental ice sheets paced sea-level changes during the Late Cretaceous, or our understanding of causal mechanisms for global sea-level change is fundamentally flawed. Comparison of our eustatic history with published ice-sheet models and Milankovitch predictions suggests that small (5-10 ?? 106 km3), ephemeral, and areally restricted Antarctic ice sheets paced the Late Cretaceous global sea-level change. New Jersey and Russian eustatic estimates

  13. Alisitos Formation calcareous facies - Early Cretaceous episode of tectonic calm

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez-Vidal, F.

    1986-04-01

    The Alisitos Formation (Aptian-Albian), shaped as a marine volcanic arc, crops out along the western side of Baja California bounding the Peninsula Range batholith. Lithologically, this formation is formed by volcanic breccias, porphyritic flows, biohermal limestones, and tuffaceous and pyroclastic sediments. The distribution of the different facies depends on the nature of volcanism and the distance from a volcanic center, although the presence of massive biohermal limestone indicates that in the Early Cretaceous (during tectonic episodes), the volcanic activity decreased to the level that the environmental conditions were favorable for the development of an organic barrier reef behind an island arc. Such conditions pertained south of the Agua Blanca fault and extended to El Arco, Baja California. Based on field observation and petrologic analysis in the Alisitos limestone, an attempt has been made to re-create the environmental condition in the Punta China and San Fernando, Baja California, sites.

  14. Alisitos Formation, calcareous facies: Early Cretaceous episode of tectonic calm

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez-Vidal, F.

    1986-07-01

    The Alisitos Formation (Aptian-Albian), shaped as a marine volcanic arc, crops out along the western side of the peninsula of Baja California bounding the Peninsular Range batholith. Lithologically, this formation is formed by volcanic-breccias, porphyritic flows, biohermal limestones, and tuffaceous and pyroclastic sediments. The distribution of the different facies depends on the nature of volcanism and the distance from a volcanic center, although the presence of massive biohermal limestone indicates that in the Early Cretaceous (during the tectonic episodes), the volcanic activity decreased to the level that the environmental conditions were favorable for the development of an organic reef barrier, behind an island arc. Such conditions existed south of the Agua Blanca fault and extended to El Arco, Baja California. Based upon field observations and petrological analysis of the Alisitos limestone, an attempt is made to recreate the environmental condition in the Punta China and San Fernando, Baja California, sites.

  15. Porosphaera globularis (Phillips, 1829) (Porifera, Calcarea) in the Campanian (Upper Cretaceous) of extra-Carpathian Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkowska, Agata; Świerczewska-Gładysz, Ewa; Dubicka, Zofia; Olszewska-Nejbert, Danuta

    2015-03-01

    The stratigraphical distribution of Porosphaera globularis, a common calcareous sponge in the Upper Cretaceous (mostly Campanian and Maastrichtian) of Poland was studied. The presented material, both new and from museum collections, comes from the Campanian of the Miechow Synclinorium, in southern Poland, and from the Lower Campanian of Mielnik in the south-eastern part of the Mazury-Podlasie Homocline, in eastern Poland. The significance of the species in extra-regional correlation, its palaeobiogeography and stratigraphical potential is critically reviewed.

  16. Stratigraphic Analysis of Upper Cretaceous Rocks in the Mahajanga Basin, Northwestern Madagascar: Implications for Ancient and Modern Faunas.

    PubMed

    Rogers; Hartman; Krause

    2000-05-01

    Upper Cretaceous strata of the Mahajanga Basin, northwestern Madagascar, yield some of the most significant and exquisitely preserved vertebrate fossils known from Gondwana. The sedimentology of these strata and their stratigraphic relations have been the focus of renewed geological investigations during the course of five expeditions since 1993. We here designate stratotypes and formalize the terrestrial Maevarano Formation, with three new members (Masorobe, Anembalemba, Miadana), and the overlying marine Berivotra Formation. The Maevarano Formation accumulated on a broad, semiarid alluvial plain bounded to the southeast by crystalline highlands and to the northwest by the Mozambique Channel. The Berivotra Formation was deposited in an open marine setting that evolved from a clastic- to a carbonate-dominated shelf, resulting in deposition of the overlying Betsiboka limestone of Danian age. New stratigraphic data clearly indicate that the Maevarano Formation correlates, at least in part, with the Maastrichtian Berivotra Formation, and this in turn indicates that the most fossiliferous portions of the Maevarano Formation are Maastrichtian in age, rather than Campanian as previously reported. This revised age for the Maevarano vertebrate assemblage indicates that it is approximately contemporaneous with the vertebrate fauna recovered from the Deccan basalt volcano-sedimentary sequence of India. The comparable age of these two faunas is significant because the faunas appear to be more similar to one another than either is to those from any other major Gondwanan landmass. The revised age of the Maevarano Formation, when considered in the light of our recent fossil discoveries, further indicates that the ancestral stocks of Madagascar's overwhelmingly endemic modern vertebrate fauna arrived on the island in post-Mesozoic times. The basal stocks of the modern vertebrate fauna are conspicuously absent in the Maevarano Formation. Finally, the revised age of the Maevarano

  17. A new hermit crab (Anomura, Paguroidea) from the upper Albian (Cretaceous) of Annopol, Poland.

    PubMed

    Fraaije, René H B; Van Bakel, Barry W M; Jagt, John W M; Machalski, Marcin

    2015-05-06

    A new diogenid paguroid, Paguristes liwinskii sp. nov., is described from upper Albian phosphorite-bearing deposits near Annopol, along the east bank of the River Vistula (Wisła), east-central Poland. This new species constitutes an additional example of Early-Mid-Cretaceous macrofaunal shift, from marine reefal limestone to siliciclastic facies, triggered by the worldwide radiation of planktonic organisms. The species described here is the earliest known member of the genus Paguristes, previously recorded from the upper Santonian/lower Campanian to the Recent.

  18. Chapter 2: 2003 Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered Conventional Oil and Gas Resources in the Upper Cretaceous Navarro and Taylor Groups, Western Gulf Province, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Condon, S.M.; Dyman, T.S.

    2006-01-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Navarro and Taylor Groups in the western part of the Western Gulf Province were assessed for undiscovered oil and gas resources in 2003. The area is part of the Smackover-Austin-Eagle Ford Composite Total Petroleum System. The rocks consist of, from youngest to oldest, the Escondido and Olmos Formations of the Navarro Group and the San Miguel Formation and the Anacacho Limestone of the Taylor Group (as well as the undivided Navarro Group and Taylor Group). Some units of the underlying Austin Group, including the 'Dale Limestone' (a term of local usage that describes a subsurface unit), were also part of the assessment in some areas. Within the total petroleum system, the primary source rocks comprise laminated carbonate mudstones and marine shales of the Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation, mixed carbonate and bioclastic deposits of the Upper Cretaceous Eagle Ford Group, and shelf carbonates of the Upper Cretaceous Austin Group. Possible secondary source rocks comprise the Upper Jurassic Bossier Shale and overlying shales within the Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley Group, Lower Cretaceous marine rocks, and the Upper Cretaceous Taylor Group. Oil and gas were generated in the total petroleum system at different times because of variations in depth of burial, geothermal gradient, lithology, and organic-matter composition. A burial-history reconstruction, based on data from one well in the eastern part of the study area (Jasper County, Tex.), indicated that (1) the Smackover generated oil from about 117 to 103 million years ago (Ma) and generated gas from about 52 to 41 Ma and (2) the Austin and Eagle Ford Groups generated oil from about 42 to 28 Ma and generated gas from about 14 Ma to the present. From the source rocks, oil and gas migrated upsection and updip along a pervasive system of faults and fractures as well as along bedding planes and within sandstone units. Types of traps include stratigraphic pinchouts, folds, faulted

  19. Predicting the distribution of Upper Cretaceous aquifers using sea-level analysis and regional paleogeography, Alabama coastal plain

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.T. Jr.; Skotnicki, M.C. )

    1991-03-01

    In the inner coastal plain of Alabama, Upper Cretaceous (i.e., Santonian-Maastrichtian) stratigraphic units containing key aquifers dip south at 7m/km; the aquifers consist mainly of porous and permeable barrier-island facies (including upper-shoreface and tidal-pass sands), barrier-related sand facies (including tidal deltas and lagoonal and marine tempestite beds), and shallow-marine sand facies (including offshore bars and conglomerate sandy turbidite tongues). Confining aquitard and aquiclude facies include lagoonal silty clays, shallow-marine glauconitic clays, clayey marls, and marine chalky marls. The gross geometry, thickness, and lateral and vertical distribution of aquifer sands in both the shallow-subsurface and outcrop (i.e., recharge) area is predictable based on regional paleogeographic reconstructions and the regional Late Cretaceous relative sea-level curve. At a local scale, facies maps and shallow-subsurface correlations provide essential data for aquifer exploration and recharge-area protection. For example, in the Eutaw Formation, barrier-island and barrier-related facies developed along a curved east-west striking shoreline; aquifers include shoreline facies, tempestite beds, and turbidite sands. In the younger, northwest-striking Blufftown-Cusseta and Ripley-Providence systems, aquifers are barrier-island and barrier-related (especially tidal-delta) facies.

  20. A New Troodontid Theropod, Talos sampsoni gen. et sp. nov., from the Upper Cretaceous Western Interior Basin of North America

    PubMed Central

    Zanno, Lindsay E.; Varricchio, David J.; O'Connor, Patrick M.; Titus, Alan L.; Knell, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Troodontids are a predominantly small-bodied group of feathered theropod dinosaurs notable for their close evolutionary relationship with Avialae. Despite a diverse Asian representation with remarkable growth in recent years, the North American record of the clade remains poor, with only one controversial species—Troodon formosus—presently known from substantial skeletal remains. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report a gracile new troodontid theropod—Talos sampsoni gen. et sp. nov.—from the Upper Cretaceous Kaiparowits Formation, Utah, USA, representing one of the most complete troodontid skeletons described from North America to date. Histological assessment of the holotype specimen indicates that the adult body size of Talos was notably smaller than that of the contemporary genus Troodon. Phylogenetic analysis recovers Talos as a member of a derived, latest Cretaceous subclade, minimally containing Troodon, Saurornithoides, and Zanabazar. MicroCT scans reveal extreme pathological remodeling on pedal phalanx II-1 of the holotype specimen likely resulting from physical trauma and subsequent infectious processes. Conclusion/Significance Talos sampsoni adds to the singularity of the Kaiparowits Formation dinosaur fauna, which is represented by at least 10 previously unrecognized species including the recently named ceratopsids Utahceratops and Kosmoceratops, the hadrosaurine Gryposaurus monumentensis, the tyrannosaurid Teratophoneus, and the oviraptorosaurian Hagryphus. The presence of a distinct troodontid taxon in the Kaiparowits Formation supports the hypothesis that late Campanian dinosaurs of the Western Interior Basin exhibited restricted geographic ranges and suggests that the taxonomic diversity of Late Cretaceous troodontids from North America is currently underestimated. An apparent traumatic injury to the foot of Talos with evidence of subsequent healing sheds new light on the paleobiology of deinonychosaurians by bolstering

  1. Sequence stratigraphy of the Jurassic-Cretaceous Morrison and Cedar Mountain Formations, NE Utah--NW Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, B.S. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The Jurassic-Cretaceous Morrison and Cedar Mountain of NE Utah and NW Colorado record nonmarine deposition during early development of the Cordilleran foreland basin. Contained within these formations are three distinct depositional sequences that represent changes in sedimentary architecture due to fluctuations in development of basin accommodation. The first of these sequences comprises the Oxfordian transition from marine to nonmarine sedimentation. Morrison Formation marginal marine and nonmarine facies prograded across shallow marine facies of the Stump Formation (Redwater Member), during a period of increased accommodation. The base of the second depositional sequences within the Morrison Formation was produced by a decrease in regional accommodation. The Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation unconformably overlies the Morrison Formation and its base marks the lower boundary of the third depositional sequence. The unconformity surface represents a decrease in regional accommodation and is marked by fluvial incision and evidence of subaerial exposure and intense weathering of the upper Brushy Basin Member. Increased basin accommodation during the early Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian ) resulted in valley fill deposition of the braided fluvial Buckhorn Conglomerate Member of the Cedar Mountain Formation. This conglomerate is overlain by Cedar Mountain anastomosing fluvial and lacustrine facies which were deposited during continued accommodation development. The Sequence is capped unconformity by the Albian-Cenomanian Dakota Formation.

  2. Paired Magnetic Susceptibility Cyclostratigraphy and Revised Magnetostratigraphy with Late Cretaceous Euler Pole from Forbes Formation, Sand Creek, Sacramento Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotznick, S. P.; Raub, T.; Mitchell, R. N.; Ward, P. D.; Kirschvink, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetostratigraphy in Upper Cretaceous rocks of Sacramento Valley has successfully complemented biostratigraphy for correlating between circum-Pacific basins. Most paleomagnetic measurements were done pre-1990 using alternating field demagnetization only, due to oxidation accompanying thermal demagnetization. We present paleomagnetic data collected via thermal demagnetization in a flowing nitrogen atmosphere from 223 cores collected over a 130m of section of Forbes Formation in Sand Creek, CA spanning upper Dobbins Shale, Forbes Unit 2 and lower Unit 3. These results uniformly indicate Reversed Chron 33R, contra previously published magnetostratigraphy of the area (Ward et al. 1983, Verosub et al. 1989). Additionally, these paleomagnetic results yield a tightly-constrained paleolatitude for Forbes Formation of 31±3°, which varies significantly from previous APWP models ca. 83 Ma (Besse and Courtillot, 2002) suggesting an unaccounted-for deficiency in reconstructions of North America at this time. This discrepancy might indicate an inaccurate cratonic reference pole, underestimated intrabatholithic or distributed plate boundary deformation, and/or true polar wander. As opposed to other units yielding anomalous late Cretaceous paleolatitudes from outboard terranes, Forbes Formation in Sacramento Valley laps unambiguously onto the North American continent. A 25m AW34 core was collected using a Winkie drillrig near the top of Dobbins Shale Mbr. Paleomagnetic measurements on subsamples from the Winkie core, unaffected by surface weathering, combine with the surficial dataset, and we propose a new set of Euler pole solutions potentially quantifying Basin and Range extension and late Cretaceous intra-Sierran shear. Through magnetic susceptibility measurements of the Winkie core, we were able to resolve orbital cycles which, paired with rock magnetic measurements, constrain basin subsidence and sedimentation rate off the Sierran arc at its age of termination. Re

  3. Flow of formation waters in the cretaceous-miocene succession of the Llanos basin, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Villegas, M.E.; Ramon, J.C.; Bachu, S.; Underschultz, J.R.

    1994-12-01

    This study presents the hydrogeological characteristics and flow of formation waters in the post-Paleozoic succession of the Llanos basin, a mainly siliciclastic foreland sub-Andean sedimentary basin located in Columbia between the Cordillera Oriental and the Guyanan Precambrian shield. The porosity of the sandy formations is generally high, in the range of 16-20% on average, with a trend of decreasing values with depth. Permeabilities are also relatively high, in the 10{sup 2} and 10{sup 3} md range. THe salinity (total dissolved solids) of formation waters is generally low, in the 10,000-20,000 mg/L range, suggesting that at least some strata in the basin have been flushed by metoeoric water. The shaly units in the sedimentary succession are weak aquitards in the eastern and southern parts of the basin, but are strong in the central-western part. The pressure in the basin is close to or slightly subdepth, particularly in the central-western area. The flow of formation waters in the upper units is driven mainly by topography from highs in the southwest to lows in the northeast. Local systems from the foothills and from local topographic highs in the east feed into this flow system. The flow of formation waters in the lower units is driven by topography only in the southern, eastern, and northern parts of the basin. In the central-western part, the flow is downdip toward the thrust-fold belt, driven probably by pore-space rebound induced by erosional unloading, which also is the cause of underpressuring. Hydrocarbons generated in the Cretaceous organic-rich, shaly Gacheta Formation probably have migrated updip and to the north-northeast, driven by buoyancy and entrained by the topography-driven flow of formation waters in Cretaceous-Oligocene strata in the central-western part of the basin could have created conditions for hydrodynamic entrapment of hydrocarbons.

  4. Revision of middle Proterozoic Yellowjacket Formation, central Idaho, and revision of Cretaceous Slim Sam Formation, Elkhorn mountains area, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tysdal, Russell G.

    2000-01-01

    The Yellowjacket Formation is restricted to the strata originally assigned to it by Ross (1934). The Yellowjacket, the conformably overlying Hoodoo Quartzite, and succeeding unnamed argillaceous quartzite unit form a genetically related sequence that lies in a structural block delimited on the northeast by the Iron Lake fault. Directly northeast of the fault, strata currently assigned by others to the lower subunit of the Yellowjacket are correlated with the Apple Creek Formation in the Lemhi Range. Mapping in the western part of the Lemhi Range shows that the Apple Creek Formation lies depositionally above the Big Creek Formation and that no rocks of the Yellowjacket-Hoodoo unnamed unit stratigraphic sequence are present. In contrast, in the area of the Yellowjacket mapped by Ross (1934) and the area directly northeast of the Iron Lake Fault, the Big Creek Formation is absent, even though it is 2,700 m thick in the Lemhi Range. These data indicate that the Iron Lake Fault juxtaposed the Yellowjacket-Hoodoo-unnamed unit sequence against non-Yellowjacket strata to the northeast. The Upper Cretaceous Slim Sam Formation of the Elkhorn Mountains area is revised. Strata of the lower part are correlated with the regionally recognized marine Telegraph Creek Formation and the overlying marine to marginal marine Eagle Sandstone. Only lower strata of the Eagle are present in the study area and they are preserved discontinously. The nonmarine volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of the upper part of the Slim Sam as originally defined retain the name Slim Sam Formation. These rocks, mainly of sedimentary origin, are genetically related to the Elkhorn Mountains Volcanics. The lower contact of the Slim Sam (restricted) is unconformable above the Eagle Sandstone or more commonly above the Telegraph Creek Formation. The upper contact is conformable with the Elkhorn Mountains Volcanics.

  5. Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic oil reservoirs of the updip basement structure play: Southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mink, R.M.; Mancini, E.A.

    1995-10-01

    Exploration for Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic reservoirs associated with updip basement structures currently is the most active exploratory oil play in Alabama. High initial flow rates, on the order of hundreds to thousands of barrels of oil per day, are commonly encountered at depths between 8,200 and 14,500 feet. Fifty-one fields have been established and 25 million barrels of oil have been produced from these fields developed in Lower Cretaceous Hosston and Upper Jurassic Haynesville, Smackover, and Norphlet reservoirs. Production from Smackover carbonates began at Toxey field in 1967 and from Haynesville sandstones at Frisco City field in 1986. As of September 1994, Smackover wells averaged 88 barrels of oil per day and Haynesville wells averaged 284 barrels of oil per day. In 1994, production was established in the Norphlet at North Excel field and in the Hosston at Pleasant Home field. Reservoirs in the updip basement structure play cluster in three distinct areas; (1) a western area on the Choctaw ridge complex, (2) a central area on the Conecuh ridge complex, and (3) an eastern area in the Conecuh embayment. Reservoir lithologies include Smackover limestones and dolostones and Hosston, Haynesville, Smackover, and Norphlet sandstones. Hydrocarbon traps are structural or combination traps where reservoirs occur on the flanks or over the crests of basement palohighs. An understanding of the complex reservoir properties and trap relationships is the key to successful discovery and development of Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic oil reservoirs of the updip basement structure play of southwest Alabama.

  6. Upper Cretaceous Shannon Sandstone reservoirs, Powder River Basin, Wyoming: evidence for organic acid diagenesis?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansley, P.L.; Nuccio, V.F.

    1992-01-01

    Comparison of the petrology of shallow and deep oil reservoirs in the Upper Cretaceous Shannon Sandstone Beds of the Steele Member of the Cody Shale strongly suggests that organic acids have had a more significant impact on the diagenetic alteration of aluminosilicate grains and carbonate cements in the deep reservoirs than in the shallow reservoirs. Vitrinite reflectance and Rock-Eval measurements, as well as the time-temperature index and kinetic modeling, indicate that deep reservoirs have been subjected to maximum temperatures of approximately 110-120??C, whereas shallow reservoirs have reached only 75??C. -from Authors

  7. Vertebrate fossils and trace fossils in Upper Jurassic-Lower cretaceous red beds in the Atacama region, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, C. M.; Suárez, M.

    Pterosaur, dinosaur, and crocodile bones are recorded here for the first time in Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous red beds in the Atacama region east of Copiapó, Chile. Trace fossils produced by vertebrate animals include the footprints of theropod dinosaurs and the depressions of sandstone laminae interpreted as burrows and foot impressions. The fossils occur in the 1500-meter-thick Quebrada Monardes Formation, which consists predominantly of the aeolian and alluvial deposits of a semi-arid terrestrial environment. Vertebrate fossils are very rare in Chile. Dinosaur bones and footprints have previously been recorded at only seven locations, and pterosaur remains at only one location. The newly discovered dinosaur bones are the oldest to be described in Chile.

  8. Early Cretaceous continental sedimentation in the Coastal Cordillera (Atajaña Formation), Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, G.; Garcia, M.; Sepulveda, F.; Vasquez, P.

    2013-12-01

    Early Cretaceous continental sedimentation development at the Coastal Cordillera of northern Chile has been described in a broad sense. The Atajaña Formation represents this continental sedimentation, south of Arica (18°30S), where it exposes mostly as an elongated swath oriented N70°E, forming a 20 km long and 8 km wide area of outcrop. Northward, these deposits occur as isolated outcrops at the bottom of Chiza, Camarones, Vitor and Azapa valleys. The Atajaña succession was deposited in apparent angular unconformity over Cuya Formation (Middle-Late Jurassic) and Chiza Formation (Bajocian-Oxfordian). The Atajaña Formation is overlain, conformable and transitional, by the Blanco Formation (Aptian-Albian) and overlain in erosion unconformity by the Suca Formation (upper Early Cretaceous). Angular unconformity contact between Atajaña Formation and Cenozoic units (Azapa Formation and alluvial deposits) is exposed at previously named valleys. In the Camarones valley, the Atajaña Formation unconformably overlies Middle to Late Jurassic intrusive rocks. In this work, the Atajaña Formation is divided in three facies associations, exposed close to Atajaña hill and Chiza valley (Kia1, Kia2 y Kia2a). Reddish conglomerates and sedimentary breccias facies (Kia1) consists of an up to 850 m thick. These rocks are massive, polymictic and poorly-sorted, and form laterally extensive beds. Clasts are mostly composed by diorites, monzodiorites, grayish fine sandstones, fine calcareous sandstones, limestones, volcarenites and porphyric andesites. Facies Kia1 includes interbedded red calcareous sandstones and siltstones, some of them displaying low-angle cross bedding. Facies Kia2 consists of an up to 570 m thick of red sandstone and siltstone, interbedded with conglomerates. This well stratified succession, parallel bedded and minor cross bedded, form continuous beds with subrounded and well-sorted clasts. Previous authors described dessication cracks in the red siltstones

  9. Incrusting and boring bryozoans from the Dessau Chalk Formation (Cretaceous), Little Walnut Creek, Austin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, P.A. )

    1990-09-01

    Four sections were measured along a 1/4 mi length of Little Walnut Creek. The first section was 165 ft north of the US. 290 bridge while the fourth was 1/4 mi upstream. Structurally, the stream follows the fault in this section. Small faults can be found perpendicular to the primary fault and apparently account not only for minor variation in local dip (8{degrees}SE, parallel to 5{degrees}NW) but also for the placement of at least one tributary. Megainvertebrate exoskeletons were found to have been inhabited by incrusting bryozoans, boring bryozoans, and sponges. These fossils were found on both interior and exterior surfaces of Exogyra laeviuscula E tigrina, and interior surfaces of Inoceramus. A low-energy environment allowed exposure of megainvertebrate exoskeletons after death but also prevented fracturing. Low siltation rates also extended exoskeleton availability after organismic death. The nonboring bryozoans are cheilostomes and at least one species, Pyripora, has been described from the Kansas Cretaceous as well as European Cretaceous sites. The boring bryozoans are primarily represented by Terebripora sp. In conclusion, this section of Dessau Chalk Formation, Upper Austin Group, was mostly a low-energy environment, shallow, limy mud platform. This substrate was probably not stable enough for bryozoan colonization as unattached colonies have not been found in sediments. Therefore, bryozoan substrates were limited to living and dead Exogyra sp. and dead Inoceramus sp. exoskeletons.

  10. Tertiary age for upper Nubian sandstone formation, central Sudan

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, G.; Lejal-Nicol, A.; Vaudois-Mieja, N.

    1986-02-01

    In central and northern Sudan, oil exploration is now active in the basins containing sediments of the Nubian Sandstone Formation. On the evidence of planned pipeline construction, significant volumes of oil appear to have been discovered in southwestern Sudan. A newly discovered flora from the upper Nubian Sandstone Formation near Khartoum in central Sudan is Tertiary in age. The flora is well preserved, and comprises leaves, flowers, and fruits, many not yet described. At the generic level, they are comparable to forms that are known fro the Eocene to Miocene. Aquatic plants indicate a lacustrine paleoenvironment; humid tropical forests thrived on the lakeshores. The Nubian Sandstone Formation of Sudan had been considered to be entirely of Cretaceous age; this new flora shifts the upper boundary into the Tertiary. The Tertiary Hudi Chert, found in scattered outcrops in the region of Atbara, was considered to overlie the Nubian Sandstone Formation. The authors suggest that the Hudi Chert is partly age equivalent to the Tertiary upper Nubian Sandstone at Jebel Mudaha.

  11. Turbidite fans in Upper Cretaceous Pierre Shale, Eagle Basin, Colorado: a new reservoir facies

    SciTech Connect

    Krystinik, L.F.

    1983-03-01

    Two fans intercalate with the Upper Cretaceous Pierre Shale and form cliffs over more than 10 mi (16 km) of continuous outcrop in the Eagle basin, north of Walcott, Colorado. Both units exhibit progradational sequences typical of turbidite fans. A common vertical succession of sedimentary structures consists of starved ripples, flat-bottomed ripple beds, thin flat beds grading into ripples of climbing ripples, and amalgamated flat beds. Massive to graded beds are rare and occur only in the upper part of each sandstone body. Associated sedimentary features include parting lineation, grooves, prod marks, mud chips, contorted bedding, and flute casts. Broad, low-relief channels occur at the top of the lower, more well-developed sequence. The sedimentary structures described correlate well with accepted models for turbidite-fan sedimentation. Alternative interpretations of these laterally continuous, progradational sandstone bodies might include deposition in a distal shoreface or offshore bar environment. Hummocky cross-stratification and large-scale cross-stratified bed forms are not common in the sequence, as would be expected in a shoreface or marine-bar environment. Turbidite-fan deposits similar to those studied could be economically significant because of their extreme lateral continuity, updip seals, intercalation with hydrocarbon source rock, and possible overpressuring. The presence of submarine fans within the Cretaceous Western Interior seaway may increase significantly the hydrocarbon potential of previously unexplored, shaly portions of the basin.

  12. Chemostratigraphy of Upper Cretaceous chalk sequences in Norwegian-Danish basin and North Sea Central Trough

    SciTech Connect

    Joergensen, N.O.

    1987-05-01

    Geochemical studies of subsurface sections and outcrops in the Upper Cretaceous chalk sequences from the Norwegian-Danish basin and the North Sea Central Trough have resulted in a detailed chemostratigraphy for these strata. The most applicable chemostratigraphic markers are based on the distribution of strontium, magnesium, manganese, the /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratio, and the variations in the carbonate contents. It is demonstrated that the chemostratigraphic approach is valid at two levels: (1) a superior chemostratigraphy in which deep-sea cores from the Atlantic Ocean and sections from western Europe are correlated on the basis of significant geochemical anomalies and long-term variations most likely induced by oceanic geochemical cycles and sea level fluctuations; (2) a subordinate but detailed intrabasinal chemostratigraphic correlation which primarily reflects the physicochemical conditions in the depositional environment. The Upper Cretaceous chemostratigraphy established in the Danish area allows a detailed correlation between relatively continuous chalk sequences in the Norwegian-Danish basin and the rather condensed and hiati-influenced sections in the oil fields of the North Sea. The results emphasize the applicability of chemostratigraphy in the subsurface exploration for hydrocarbon reservoirs in chalk.

  13. Integrated foraminiferal biostratigraphy and chemostratigraphy of the querecual formation (Cretaceous), Eastern Venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crespo De Cabrera, S.; Sliter, W.V.; Jarvis, I.

    1999-01-01

    An integrated foraminiferal biostratigraphy and chemostratigraphy is presented for the Lower to Upper Cretaceous Querecual Formation exposed on Chimana Grande Island, Eastern Venezuela. The formation consists of >450 m alternating foraminiferal and organic-rich carbonates and laminated mudrocks, and is considered the main hydrocarbon source rock for the eastern Venezuela Basin. Biostratigraphic resolution within the Querecual Formation is poor, due to a paucity of keeled planktonic foraminifera and impoverished benthic faunas. Deposition occurred in a bathyal environment, with dysaerobic or anoxic bottom waters resulting from high rates of surface productivity associated with an upwelling environment. Biostratigraphic evidence indicates that the Querecual Formation ranges from the upper Albian Rotalipora ticinensis Zone to the Santonian Dicarinella asymetrica Zone. Iron and Al contents fall through the Albian-Cenomanian indicating a progressive decrease in the detrital supply, driven by rising eustatic sea level. A Ca profile demonstrates variations in carbonate production and dissolution. High total organic carbon (TOC) intervals occur in the upper Albian to mid-Cenomanian and Turonian, and high Ba/Al and Si/Al ratios characterize mid-Cenomanian and younger sediments. Variations in these elements primarily reflect changes in marine productivity, but are also affected by diagenetic processes. A stable carbon isotope curve established from analysis of organic matter (??13Corg) correlates well with published ??13C curves for carbonates from England and Italy. The Cenomanian/Turonian boundary cannot be identified using planktonic foraminifera, because key taxa are absent, but the base of the Turonian is clearly indicated by a sharp fall in ??13C immediately above a major positive excursion. The bottom of the Coniacian is placed below a ??13C minimum, towards the base of the Dicarinella concavata Zone. Combined with the foraminiferal data, the isotopic data enable much

  14. Fossil Megaloptera (Insecta: Neuropterida) from the Lower Cretaceous Crato Formation of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Jepson, James E; Heads, Sam W

    2016-04-05

    Two new genera and species of Megaloptera are described from the Lower Cretaceous Crato Formation of Brazil. Cratocorydalopsis brasiliensis gen. et sp. nov. and Lithocorydalus fuscata gen. et sp. nov. are both placed within the family Corydalidae. The specimens represent the first Cretaceous examples of adult megalopteran body fossils not preserved in amber, and are the first megalopterans to be formally described from the Crato Formation.

  15. Late Cretaceous stratigraphy of the Upper Magdalena Basin in the Payandé-Chaparral segment (western Girardot Sub-Basin), Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrio, C. A.; Coffield, D. Q.

    1992-02-01

    The Cretaceous section on the western margin of the Girardot Sub-Basin, Upper Magdalena Valley, is composed of the Lower Sandstone (Hauterivian-Barremian?), Tetuán Limestone (pre-Aptian?), and Bambuca Shale (pre-Aptian?), and the following formations: Caballos (Aptian-Albian), Villeta (Albian-Campanian), Monserrate (Campanian-Maastrichtian), and Guaduas (Maastrichtian-Paleocene). The Lower Sandstone is composed of quartz arenites with abundant calcareous cement; the Tetuúan Limestone is a succession of fossiliferous limestones and calcareous shales; the the Bambuca Shale is composed of black shales that grade upward to micritic limestones and calcarenites. The Caballos Formation comprises three members: a lower member of quartz arenites, a middle member of black shales and limestones, and an upper member of crossbedded, coarsening-upward quartz arenites. The Villeta Formation is a sequence of shales intercalated with micritic limestones and calcarenites. Two levels of chert (Upper and Lower Chert) are differentiated within the Villeta Formation throughout the study area, with a sandstone unit (El Cobre Sandstone) to the north. The Monserrate Formation is composed of quartz arenites, with abundant crossbedding, and locally of limestone breccias and coarse-grained fossiliferous packstones. The Guaduas Formation is a monotonous succession of red shales and lithic sandstones. Our data suggest three major transgressive-regressive cycles in the Girardot Sub-Basin. The first cycle (Hauterivian?-lower Aptian) is represented by the Lower Sandstone-Tetuán-Bambuca-lower Caballos succession, the second cycle (Aptian-Albian) by the middle-upper Caballos members, and the third cycle (Albian-Paleocene) by the lower Villeta-Monserrate-Guaduas succession. Previous studies proposed a eustatic control during deposition of the Upper Cretaceous in the Upper Magdalena Valley. The lowermost transgressive-regressive cycle was not previously differentiated in the study area, and this

  16. Lower Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous source rocks in Louisiana and Mississippi: Implications to Gulf of Mexico crude oil

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, R. )

    1990-06-01

    The Lower Tertiary Sparta Formation, Wilcox Group, and the Midway Group in southern Louisiana include organic-rich source facies that generate crude oil at relatively high thermal maturities. The Wilcox Group is an important source of Wilcox crude oil, and regional kerogen variations explain two crude oil subfamilies. Wilcox crude oils in downdip areas of southern Louisiana migrated short distances, but long-range lateral migration (about 150 km) best explains Wilcox crude oils far updip from mature source rocks. Crude oils in Oligocene and younger reservoirs in southern Louisiana migrated vertically from deep lower Tertiary source rocks. Some crude oils in Upper Cretaceous Tuscaloosa reservoirs were emplaced by long-range lateral migration from Tuscaloosa source rocks. Given little evidence of upper Tertiary source rocks and the overmaturity problems of Mesozoic source rocks, most crude oils in upper Tertiary and Pleistocene reservoirs of the Gulf continental shelf are best explained by vertical migration from deep lower Tertiary source rocks. Even so, it is simplistic to assume an exclusive lower Tertiary origin. Many Tertiary and Pleistocene crude oils of this study probably include an overprint of high-maturity hydrocarbons from Mesozoic sources. 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. From Source to Sink: Exhumation of the North America Cordillera Revealed by Multi-dating of Detrital Minerals from Upper Jurassic-Upper Cretaceous Sevier Foreland Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, C. S.; Carrapa, B.; DeCelles, P. G.; Gehrels, G. E.; Thomson, S. N.

    2013-12-01

    We sampled twenty-two Late Jurassic to Late Cretaceous syn-orogenic conglomerate clasts in proximal units in the Sevier fold-thrust belt and their distal sandstone equivalents up to 300 km east of the thrust front, in Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, and South Dakota. To better constrain depositional ages, these samples were analyzed using detrital zircon U-Pb (DZ U-Pb) geochronology. To identify a thermochronometer that measures source exhumation in the North America Cordillera, both zircon (U-Th)/He and apatite fission track (AFT) thermochronology was utilized, on both the conglomerate cobbles and sandstone (detrital) samples. Eleven samples were analyzed with zircon (U-Th)/He; however, discordant ages in the conglomerate cobble samples suggest that this system was not fully reset and never experienced T> ~180 °C in the source stratigraphy during the Sevier orogeny. Eleven other samples are analyzed using apatite fission track thermochronology (AFT); AFT ages are generally similar or older than depositional ages indicating that the detrital ages record source exhumation signals, and that exhumation depth corresponds to T>~120 °C. In order to test whether or not the youngest cooling AFT age population represents a source exhumation signal or a co-magmatic signal we here performed double dating of the detrital AFT samples using apatite U-Pb thermochronology. Maximum depositional ages using DZ U-Pb match existing age controls on basin stratigraphy. Our study shows that AFT is an effective thermochronometer to detect source exhumation for Cretaceous foreland stratigraphy in the western U.S.A. Lag-times (i.e. the difference between the source exhumation age and depositional age) are ~0 to 5 Myr with relatively steady-state to slightly increasing exhumation rates suggesting orogenic growth at this time. The very short lag times also indicate limited to no storage time between source and sink. The AFT lag time of the Early Cretaceous Kelvin Formation is ~5 Myr and represents

  18. Mesozoic (Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous) deep gas reservoir play, central and eastern Gulf coastal plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mancini, E.A.; Li, P.; Goddard, D.A.; Ramirez, V.O.; Talukdar, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    The Mesozoic (Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous) deeply buried gas reservoir play in the central and eastern Gulf coastal plain of the United States has high potential for significant gas resources. Sequence-stratigraphic study, petroleum system analysis, and resource assessment were used to characterize this developing play and to identify areas in the North Louisiana and Mississippi Interior salt basins with potential for deeply buried gas reservoirs. These reservoir facies accumulated in Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous Norphlet, Haynesville, Cotton Valley, and Hosston continental, coastal, and marine siliciclastic environments and Smackover and Sligo nearshore marine shelf, ramp, and reef carbonate environments. These Mesozoic strata are associated with transgressive and regressive systems tracts. In the North Louisiana salt basin, the estimate of secondary, nonassociated thermogenic gas generated from thermal cracking of oil to gas in the Upper Jurassic Smackover source rocks from depths below 3658 m (12,000 ft) is 4800 tcf of gas as determined using software applications. Assuming a gas expulsion, migration, and trapping efficiency of 2-3%, 96-144 tcf of gas is potentially available in this basin. With some 29 tcf of gas being produced from the North Louisiana salt basin, 67-115 tcf of in-place gas remains. Assuming a gas recovery factor of 65%, 44-75 tcf of gas is potentially recoverable. The expelled thermogenic gas migrated laterally and vertically from the southern part of this basin to the updip northern part into shallower reservoirs to depths of up to 610 m (2000 ft). Copyright ?? 2008. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  19. Sudden extinction of the dinosaurs: latest Cretaceous, upper Great Plains, USA.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, P M; Fastovsky, D E; Hoffmann, R G; Berghaus, C B; Gabriel, D L

    1991-11-08

    Results of a three-year field study of family-level patterns of ecological diversity of dinosaurs in the Hell Creek Formation of Montana and North Dakota show no evidence (probability P < 0.05) of a gradual decline of dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous. Stratigraphic reliability was maintained through a tripartite division of the Hell Creek, and preservational biases were corrected for by comparison of results only from similar fades as well as through the use of large-scale, statistically rigorous survey and collection procedures. The findings are in agreement with an abrupt extinction event such as one caused by an asteroid impact.

  20. Stratigraphy and sedimentology of the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Anacacho Limestone, Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swezey, C.S.; Sullivan, E.C.

    2004-01-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Anacacho Limestone is exposed in outcrops between the cities of San Antonio and Del Rio, Texas. A detailed study of four outcrops (Blanco Creek section, Sabinal River section, Seco Creek section, Hondo Creek section) shows that the Anacacho Limestone rests on the Upson Clay (which contains fauna of early Campanian age) and is overlain by the Corsicana Marl (which contains fauna of early Maastrichtian age). An unconformity within the Anacacho Limestone is used herein to separate the limestone into a lower member and an upper member. The lower Anacacho member contains fauna of early Campanian age, whereas the upper Anacacho member contains fauna of middle Campanian age. The lower Anacacho member consists predominantly of wackestones to packstones, which are overlain by packstones to grainstones capped by the unconformity. This unconformity is interpreted as a marine flooding surface, delineating a transition from carbonate grainstones deposited in shallow water (<30 m depth) to a chalk deposited in deeper water. Above the unconformity, the upper Anacacho member is characterized by a chalk, overlain by wackestones and packstones. The uppermost section of the Anacacho Limestone consists of packstones and grainstones with abundant and diverse fossils. Most of the Anacacho Limestone developed in relatively shallow water (<50 m depth) leeward of a large carbonate build-up (possibly a rudistid reef) that now comprises the Anacacho Mountains. The environment, however, was open to marine water throughout deposition of the Anacacho Limestone. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Recycled gabbro signature in Upper Cretaceous Magma within Strandja Massif: NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulusoy, Ezgi; Kagan Kadioglu, Yusuf

    2016-04-01

    Basic magma intrusions within plate interiors upwelling mantle plumes have chemical signatures that are distinct from mid-ocean ridge magmas. When a basic magma interact with continental crust or with the felsic magma, the compositions of both magma changes, but there is no consensus as to how this interaction occurs. Here we analyse the mineral behavior and trace element signature of gabbroic rocks of the samples collected from the Strandja Massif. Srednogorie magmatic arc is a part of Apuseni- Banat-Timok-Srednogorie magmatic belt and formed by subduction and closure of the Tethys Ocean during Upper Cretaceous times. Upper Cretaceous magmatic rocks cutting Strandja Massif in NW Turkey belong to eastern edge of Srednogorie Magmatic arc. Upper Cretacous magmatic rocks divided into four subgroup in Turkey part of Strandja massif: (I) granitic rocks, (II) monzonitic rock, (III) syenitic rocks and (IV) gabbroic rocks. Gabbroic rocks outcropped around study area in phaneritic - equigranular texture. According to mineralogic - petrographic studies gabbros have mainly holocrystalline texture and ophitic to subophitic texture composed of plagioclase, amphibole, pyroxene, and rarely olivine and opaque minerals. Also because of special conditions there have been pegmatitic texture on mafic minerals with euhedral form up to 3 cm in size and orbicular texture which reach 15cm in size and rounded - elliptical form. Confocal Raman Spectroscopy studies reveals that plagioclase are ranging in composition from labradorite to bytownite, the pyroxene are ranging in composition from diopside to augite acting with uralitization processes and the olivine are generally in the composition of forsterite. Petrographic and mineralogical determination reveals some metasomatic magmatic epidote presence. Confocal Raman Spectroscopy studies on anhydrous minerals within gabbroic rocks shows affect of hydrous process because of magma mixing. The gabbroic rocks have tholeiitic and changed towards

  2. A new pterosaur (Pterodactyloidea: Azhdarchidae) from the Upper Cretaceous of Morocco.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Nizar; Unwin, David M; Martill, David M; Baidder, Lahssen; Zouhri, Samir

    2010-05-26

    The Kem Kem beds in South Eastern Morocco contain a rich early Upper (or possibly late Lower) Cretaceous vertebrate assemblage. Fragmentary remains, predominantly teeth and jaw tips, represent several kinds of pterosaur although only one species, the ornithocheirid Coloborhynchus moroccensis, has been named. Here, we describe a new azhdarchid pterosaur, Alanqa saharica nov. gen. nov. sp., based on an almost complete well preserved mandibular symphysis from Aferdou N'Chaft. We assign additional fragmentary jaw remains, some of which have been tentatively identified as azhdarchid and pteranodontid, to this new taxon which is distinguished from other azhdarchids by a remarkably straight, elongate, lance-shaped mandibular symphysis that bears a pronounced dorsal eminence near the posterior end of its dorsal (occlusal) surface. Most remains, including the holotype, represent individuals of approximately three to four meters in wingspan, but a fragment of a large cervical vertebra, that probably also belongs to A. saharica, suggests that wingspans of six meters were achieved in this species. The Kem Kem beds have yielded the most diverse pterosaur assemblage yet reported from Africa and provide the first clear evidence for the presence of azhdarchids in Gondwana at the start of the Late Cretaceous. This, the relatively large size achieved by Alanqa, and the additional evidence of variable jaw morphology in azhdarchids provided by this taxon, indicates a longer and more complex history for this clade than previously suspected.

  3. Pre-, syn-, and postcollisional stratigraphic framework and provenance of upper triassic-upper cretaceous strata in the northwestern talkeetna mountains, alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hampton, B.A.; Ridgway, K.D.; O'Neill, J. M.; Gehrels, G.E.; Schmidt, J.; Blodgett, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Mesozoic strata of the northwestern Talkeetna Mountains are located in a regional suture zone between the allochthonous Wrangellia composite terrane and the former Mesozoic continental margin of North America (i.e., the Yukon-Tanana terrane). New geologic mapping, measured stratigraphic sections, and provenance data define a distinct three-part stratigraphy for these strata. The lowermost unit is greater than 290 m thick and consists of Upper Triassic-Lower Jurassic mafic lavas, fossiliferous limestone, and a volcaniclastic unit that collectively we informally refer to as the Honolulu Pass formation. The uppermost 75 m of the Honolulu Pass formation represent a condensed stratigraphic interval that records limited sedimentation over a period of up to ca. 25 m.y. during Early Jurassic time. The contact between the Honolulu Pass formation and the overlying Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous clastic marine strata of the Kahiltna assemblage represents a ca. 20 m.y. depositional hiatus that spans the Middle Jurassic and part of Late Jurassic time. The Kahiltna assemblage may to be up to 3000 m thick and contains detrital zircons that have a robust U-Pb peak probability age of 119.2 Ma (i.e., minimum crystallization age/maximum depositional age). These data suggest that the upper age of the Kahiltna assemblage may be a minimum of 10-15 m.y. younger than the previously reported upper age of Valanginian. Sandstone composition (Q-43% F-30% L-27%-Lv-71% Lm-18% Ls-11%) and U-Pb detrital zircon ages suggest that the Kahiltna assemblage received igneous detritus mainly from the active Chisana arc, remnant Chitina and Talkeetna arcs, and Permian-Triassic plutons (Alexander terrane) of the Wrangellia composite terrane. Other sources of detritus for the Kahiltna assemblage were Upper Triassic-Lower Jurassic plutons of the Taylor Mountains batholith and Devonian-Mississippian plutons; both of these source areas are part of the Yukon-Tanana terrane. The Kahiltna assemblage is overlain

  4. The Mid-Cretaceous Frontier Formation near the Moxa Arch, southwestern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mereweather, E.A.; Blackmon, P.D.; Webb, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Frontier Formation in the Green River Basin of Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado, consists of sandstone, siltstone, and shale, and minor conglomerate, coal, and bentonite. These strata were deposited in several marine and nonmarine environments during early Late Cretaceous time. At north-trending outcrops along the eastern edge of the overthrust belt, the Frontier is of Cenomanian, Turonian, and early Coniacian age, and commonly is about 610 m (2,000 ft) thick. The formation in that area conformably overlies the Lower Cretaceous Aspen Shale and is divided into the following members, in ascending order: Chalk Creek, Coalville, Allen Hollow, Oyster Ridge Sandstone, and Dry Hollow. In west-trending outcrops on the northern flank of the Uinta Mountains in Utah, the Frontier is middle and late Turonian, and is about 60 m (200 ft) thick. These strata disconformably overlie the Lower Cretaceous Mowry Shale. In boreholes on the Moxa arch, the upper part of the Frontier is of middle Turonian to early Coniacian age and unconformably overlies the lower part of the formation, which is early Cenomanian at the south end and probably Cenomanian to early Turonian at the north end. The Frontier on the arch thickens northward from less than 100 m (328 ft) to more than 300 m (984 ft) and conformably overlies the Mowry. The marine and nonmarine Frontier near the Uinta Mountains, marine and mnmarine beds in the upper part of the formation on the Moxa arch and the largely nonmarine Dry Hollow Member at the top of the Frontier in the overthrust belt are similar in age. Older strata in the formation, which are represented by the disconformable basal contact of the Frontier near the Uinta Mountains, thicken northward along the Moxa arch and westward between the arch and the overthrust belt. The large changes in thickness of the Frontier in the Green River Basin were caused mainly by differential uplift and truncation of the lower part of the formation during the early to middle Turonian and

  5. Cretaceous anuran and dinosaur footprints from the Patuxent Formation of Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weems, R.E.; Bachman, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Footprints of an anuran (gen. et sp. indet.), a theropod dinosaur (Megalosauropus sp.), and an ornithopod dinosaur (Amblydactylus sp.) have been recovered from the Lower Cretaceous Patuxent Formation in Stafford County, Virginia. These footprints are the first record of terrestrial vertebrates from Cretaceous strata in Virginia, and their discovery suggests that the scarcity of bones and teeth in the Patuxent probably is an artifact of preservation. The anuran trackway provides the oldest known direct evidence for hopping locomotion among these amphibians.

  6. Biofacies analysis of Upper Cretaceous deposits in the Ust-Yenisei region: Implications of palynomorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedeva, N. K.

    2008-04-01

    The results of palynomorph biofacies analysis in the Upper Cretaceous deposits of the Ust-Yenisei region are presented. The established facies confinement and indicative features of separate palynomorph groups are used, along with identified dinocyst morphotypes and taxa, in paleogeographic reconstructions. Seven palynomorph associations characterizing continental, coastal-marine, shallow-and deep-water facies are distinguished based on quantitative proportions between morphological groupings and individual taxa. As boundaries between distinguishable biostratigraphic and facies subdivisions do not coincide, dinocysts were likely insignificantly dependent in distribution on facies in the West Siberian epicontinental basin at least. On the other hand, distribution trends of particular dinocyst morphotypes and other microphytofossils are correlative with transgressive-regressive cycles and can be used for reconstruction of paleoenvironments.

  7. Middle and upper cretaceous amber from the Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia: Evidence for a new structural sub-class of resinite

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.B.

    1994-08-01

    Analysis of three amber (resinite) samples collected from Middle and Upper Cretaceous sediments in the Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia, indicates that these materials are based on copolymers of biformene (I) and communol (II). No resinites of similar structural character have previously been described and hence, these samples represent a previously unknown structural sub-class of resinite.

  8. Sequence stratigraphy of the lower Upper Cretaceous Elbtal Group (Saxony, Germany): new data from Middle Cenomanian-Upper Turonian outcrops and boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardt, Nadine; Wilmsen, Markus

    2013-04-01

    The formations of the Saxonian Cretaceous have been combined in the so-called Elbtal Group. Their sedimentation took place in a terrestrial to neritic environment palaeogeographically located between the Mid-European Island (MEI) in the SW and the Lusatian Massif in the NE. The through extended from the narrow marine strait of Saxony into the broad Bohemian Cretaceous Basin (Czech Republic) further to the SE. Deposition has been dominated by marine siliciclastics that accumulated on a graded shelf with basically three main facies zones: the coarse-grained nearshore zone ("Küstensandsteinzone"), the transitional zone ("Faziesübergangszone") and the fine-grained marly offshore facies zone ("Plänerfazies"). In general, transgression proceeded in late Early Cenomanian times from the N. Relictic remains of these marine bioclastic conglomerates (Meißen Formation) only occur in the northwesternmost area of the basin around Meißen and are related to the highstand of the depositional sequence Cenomanian 3 (DS Ce 3). After a short stratigraphic gap, onlap continued in the Middle Cenomanian with the following Niederschöna Formation consisting of coarse-grained braided river deposits at the base grading via carbonaceous point-bar cycles of a meandering river system into bioturbated, partly cross-bedded estuarine sediments toward the top. These sediments record DS Ce 4 and are capped by a paleosol. Sedimentation of DS Ce 5 started with a renewed transgressional pulse initiating the Late Cenomanian. The strata consist of bioturbated, cross-bedded predominantly fine- to medium-grained quartz sandstones with some shell-rich horizons corresponding to the Oberhäslich Formation. The unconformably overlying DS Tu 1 comprises the uppermost Cenomanian Dölzschen Formation and the Lower Turonian part of the Schmilka Formation. The onset of this depositional sequence is marked by a major transgression ("plenus Transgression) drowning the remaining pre-transgression topography

  9. Stratigraphy of mid-Cretaceous formations at drilling sites in Weston and Johnson counties, northeastern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mereweather, E.A.

    1980-01-01

    The sedimentary rocks of early Late Cretaceous age in Weston County, Wyo., on the east flank of the Powder River Basin, are assigned, in ascending order, to the Belle Fourche Shale, Greenhorn Formation, and Carlile Shale. In Johnson County, on the west flank of the basin, the lower Upper Cretaceous strata are included in the Frontier Formation and the overlying Cody Shale. The Frontier Formation and some of the laterally equivalent strata in the Rocky Mountain region contain major resources of oil and gas. These rocks also include commercial deposits of bentonite. Outcrop sections, borehole logs, and core studies of the lower Upper Cretaceous rocks near Osage, in Weston County, and Kaycee, in Johnson County, supplement comparative studies of the fossils in the formations. Fossils of Cenomanian, Turonian, and Coniacian Age are abundant at these localities and form sequences of species which can be used for the zonation and correlation of strata throughout the region. The Belle Fourche Shale near Osage is about 115 m (meters) thick and consists mainly of noncalcareous shale, which was deposited in offshore-marine environments during Cenomanian time. These strata are overlain by calcareous shale and limestone of the Greenhorn Formation. In this area, the Greenhorn is about 85 m thick and accumulated in offshore, open-marine environments during the Cenomanian and early Turonian. The Carlile Shale overlies the Greenhorn and is composed of, from oldest to youngest, the Pool Creek Member, Turner Sandy Member, and Sage Breaks Member. In boreholes, the Pool Creek Member is about 23 m thick and consists largely of shale. The member was deposited in offshoremarine environments in Turonian time. These rocks are disconformably overlain by the Turner Sandy Member, a sequence about 50 m thick of interstratified shale, siltstone, and sandstone. The Turner accumulated during the Turonian in several shallow-marine environments. Conformably overlying the Turner is the slightly

  10. Stratigraphy, sedimentology and tectonic evolution of the Upper Cretaceous/Paleogene succession in north Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ayyat, Abdalla M.; Obaidalla, Nageh A.

    2013-05-01

    The stratigraphy, sedimentology and syn-depositional tectonic events (SdTEs) of the Upper Cretaceous/Paleogene (K-P) succession at four localities in north Eastern Desert (NED) of Egypt have been studied. These localities are distributed from south-southwest to north-northeast at Gebel Millaha, at North Wadi Qena, at Wadi El Dakhal, and at Saint Paul Monastery. Lithostratigraphically, four rock units have been recorded: Sudr Formation (Campanian-Maastrichtian); Dakhla Formation (Danian-Selandian); Tarawan Formation (Selandian-Thanetian) and Esna Formation (Thanetian-Ypresian). These rock units are not completely represented all over the study area because some of them are absent at certain sites and others have variable thicknesses. Biostratigrapgically, 18 planktonic foraminiferal zones have been recorded. These are in stratigraphic order: Globotruncana ventricosa Zone (Campanian); Gansserina gansseri, Contusotruncana contusa, Recimguembelina fructicosa, Pseudohastigerina hariaensis, Pseudohastigerina palpebra and Plummerita hantkenenoides zones (Maastrichtian); Praemurica incostans, Praemurica uncinata, Morozovella angulata and Praemurica carinata/Igorina albeari zones (Danian); Igorina albeari, Globanomanlina pseudomenradii/Parasubbotina variospira, Acarinina subsphaerica, Acarinina soldadoensis/Globanomanlina pseudomenardii and Morozovella velascoensis zones (Selandian/Thantian); and Acarinina sibaiyaensis, Pseudohastigerina wilcoxensis/Morozovella velascoensis zones (earliest Ypresian). Sedimentologically, four sedimentary facies belts forming southwest gently-dipping slope to basin transect have been detected. They include tidal flats, outer shelf, slumped continental slope and open marine hemipelagic facies. This transect can be subdivided into a stable basin plain plus outer shelf in the extreme southwestern parts; and an unstable slope shelf platform in the northeastern parts. The unstable slope shelf platform is characterized by open marine hemipelagic

  11. Jonah field, sublette county, Wyoming: Gas production from overpressured Upper Cretaceous Lance sandstones of the Green River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery, S.L.; Robinson, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Jonah field, located in the northwestern Green River basin, Wyoming, produces gas from overpressured fluvial channel sandstones of the Upper Cretaceous Lance Formation. Reservoirs exist in isolated and amalgamated channel facies 10-100 ft (3-30 m) thick and 150-4000 ft (45-1210 m) wide, deposited by meandering and braided streams. Compositional and paleocurrent studies indicate these streams flowed eastward and had their source area in highlands associated with the Wyoming-Idaho thrust belt to the west. Productive sandstones at Jonah have been divided into five pay intervals, only one of which (Jonah interval) displays continuity across most of the field. Porosities in clean, productive sandstones range from 8 to 12%, with core permeabilities of .01-0.9 md (millidarcys) and in-situ permeabilities as low as 3-20 ??d (microdarcys), as determined by pressure buildup analyses. Structurally, the field is bounded by faults that have partly controlled the level of overpressuring. This level is 2500 ft (758 m) higher at Jonah field than in surrounding parts of the basin, extending to the top part of the Lance Formation. The field was discovered in 1975, but only in the 1990s did the area become fully commercial, due to improvements in fracture stimulation techniques. Recent advances in this area have further increased recoverable reserves and serve as a potential example for future development of tight gas sands elsewhere in the Rocky Mountain region.

  12. Sedimentology and sequence stratigraphy of the Cretaceous Nanushuk, Seabee, and Tuluvak formations exposed on Umiat Mountain, north-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houseknecht, David W.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    Upper Cretaceous strata of the upper part of the Nanushuk Formation, the Seabee Formation, and the lower part of the Tuluvak Formation are exposed along the Colville River on the east flank of Umiat Mountain in north-central Alaska. The Ninuluk sandstone, which is the uppermost unit of the Nanushuk Formation, displays a vertical succession of facies indicative of deposition in an upward-deepening estuarine through shoreface setting. A marine-flooding surface lies between the Ninuluk sandstone and organic-rich shale of the basal part of the Seabee Formation. The Ninuluk sandstone and the lower part of the Seabee Formation are interpreted as components of a transgressive-systems tract. The lowest, well-exposed strata in the Seabee Formation are a succession of shoreface sandstone beds in the middle of the formation. Integration of outcrop information and the Umiat No. 11 well log suggests that this sandstone succession rests on a sequence boundary and is capped by a marine-flooding surface. The sandstone succession is interpreted as a lowstand-systems tract. The upper part of the Seabee Formation includes a thick interval of organic-rich shale deposited in a dysaerobic offshore environment, and the gradational Seabee-Tuluvak contact is a coarsening-upward shale-to-sandstone succession deposited in a prodelta/delta-front environment. The observation that the upper part of the Seabee Formation correlates with seismic clinoforms suggests that dysaerobic conditions extended well up onto the prodelta slope during intervals of transgression and highstand. Correlation of the Umiat Mountain outcrop section with well logs and seismic data suggests that sequence boundaries and lowstand shoreface deposits may be common in the Seabee Formation and that wave action may have been important in transporting sand to the paleoshelf margin. These conclusions may contribute to an enhanced understanding of sand distribution in prospective lowstand turbidite deposits in the subsurface of

  13. Stratigraphy, petrology, and depositional environments of upper Cretaceous and Lower Tertiary Sabbath Creek section, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, M.L.

    1985-04-01

    A 9387-ft (2816-m) section of Upper Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary strata is exposed along Sabbath Creek in the northern ANWR of north-eastern Alaska and represents a regressive depositional sequence. The entire section is divided into four lithologic units (A-D), each characterized by distinct depositional assemblages. Unit A, at the base of the section, consists of several coarsening-upward sequences of alternating thick organic-rich siltstones an fine-grained litharenites, representing deposition in subaqueous to lower delta-plain environments. Unit B stratigraphically overlies Unit A and is characterized by multiple, mutually erosive, fining-upward sequences of fine to coarse pebble litharenites typical of point-bar sequences in a meandering stream environment (lower to upper delta plain). Unit C consists of multiple, poorly developed fining-upward sequences of dominantly clast- and matrix-supported pebble conglomerate interpreted as braided stream deposits. At the top of the section, Unit D is characterized by multiple fining- and a few coarsening-upward sequences of organic-rich shale with minor amounts of medium to coarse litharenite and pebble conglomerate representing meandering stream deposition. The Sabbath Creek section is lithologically dissimilar to coeval units to the west. The Sagavanirktok Formation and Colville Group contain pyroclastic material and thick coal beds not seen in the Sabbath Creek section. Instead, this section is lithologically similar to the Moose Channel formation - a regressive, fluvial, deltaic sequence exposed in the MacKenzie delta area of northwestern Canada. Consequently , detailed interpretation of the sabbath Creek section has important implications concerning the petroleum potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and offshore beaufort Sea.

  14. Interpretation of Late Cretaceous Volcanic Mounds and Surrounding Gulfian Series Formations Using 3D Seismic Data in Zavala County, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Laura Claire

    The Late Cretaceous Gulfian series is a prominent and important series across the State of Texas that has been extensively studied since the nineteenth century. It is composed of series of southeast-dipping shelf carbonates and clastics deposited on the northwest margin of the Gulf of Mexico Basin. In south Texas, the Gulfian series was deposited in the Rio Grande Embayment and Maverick Basin and is comprised of the Eagle Ford Group, Austin Group, Anacacho Limestone, San Miguel Formation, Olmos Formation, and Escondido Formation that crop out and continue basinward in the subsurface. Late Cretaceous volcanism formed volcanic mounds composed of altered palagonite tuff that are clustered into two fields, including the Uvalde Field centered in Zavala County. Using the Pedernales 3D seismic survey, located in east-central Zavala County, several volcanic mounds were identified and mapped without the use of well log data by identifying structures and characteristics associated with the volcanic mounds. Isolating these mounds through mapping enabled the mapping of the tops surrounding Gulfian formations, Lower Eagle Ford, Upper Eagle Ford, Austin, Anacacho, and San Miguel, for which time-structure, amplitude, similarity/coherency attribute, and isochron maps were generated. By using 3D seismic data, the volcanic mounds and their relation to surrounding rocks can be better interpreted.

  15. Geologic models and evaluation of undiscovered conventional and continuous oil and gas resources: Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Krystal

    2012-01-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk forms a low-permeability, onshore Gulf of Mexico reservoir that produces oil and gas from major fractures oriented parallel to the underlying Lower Cretaceous shelf edge. Horizontal drilling links these fracture systems to create an interconnected network that drains the reservoir. Field and well locations along the production trend are controlled by fracture networks. Highly fractured chalk is present along both regional and local fault zones. Fractures are also genetically linked to movement of the underlying Jurassic Louann Salt with tensile fractures forming downdip of salt-related structures creating the most effective reservoirs. Undiscovered accumulations should also be associated with structure-controlled fracture systems because much of the Austin that overlies the Lower Cretaceous shelf edge remains unexplored. The Upper Cretaceous Eagle Ford Shale is the primary source rock for Austin Chalk hydrocarbons. This transgressive marine shale varies in thickness and lithology across the study area and contains both oil- and gas-prone kerogen. The Eagle Ford began generating oil and gas in the early Miocene, and vertical migration through fractures was sufficient to charge the Austin reservoirs.

  16. Model of the Arctic evolution since the Cretaceous to present, based on upper mantle convection linked with Pacific lithosphere subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobkovsky, Leopold

    2015-04-01

    The present paper comprises a model of Arctic basin evolution since early-mid Cretaceous to present. The model is based on the mechanism of upper mantle substance circulation beneath the Arctic lithosphere linked with Pacific lithosphere subduction. Seismic tomography data obtained for the Pacific-Eurasia-Arctic joint area indicate that Pacific lithosphere slab sinking to the mantle in subduction zone transforms into the horizontal layer upon reaching the upper mantle foot, this layer extending for two or more thousands km beneath the Eurasian continent. This pattern of seismic tomography indicates the presence of a horizontal convective cell where a flow of substance moving along the upper mantle foot from a subduction zone into the continent is compensated by a return flow moving along the lithosphere foot towards the subduction zone. The return mantle flow makes continental lithosphere extension, giving rise to processes of rifting, magmatism and spreading. The convective cell being continuously supplied with new substance which is transported through the subduction zone it is sure to expand horizontally. The above cell expansion occurs first, due to ocean ward movement of subduction zone (roll back) and secondly, due to the cell front propagation into the continent. The given model allows to understand main features for the Arctic evolution since early-mid Cretaceous to present. Numerous seismic profiling data obtained for shelf and deep water sedimentary basins in the Arctic Ocean as well as on land geological investigation reveal that since Aptian up to present the Arctic region has been characterized by sublatitudinal lithosphere extension. This extension is explained by the effect the return mantle flow related to the subduction of the Northern part of the Pacific plate acts on the Arctic lithosphere foot. The model shows the phenomenon of Arctic plume to be caused by the convective cell uprising flow. In fact lower horizontal flow of convective cell moving

  17. Tectonic significance of lithicwacke-polymictic conglomerate petrofacies association within Upper Cretaceous torchlight sandstone, Big Horn basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Khandaker, N.I.; Vondra, C.F.

    1987-05-01

    The Torchlight Sandstone belonging to the Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation in the Big Horn basin, Wyoming, shows a distinctive lithicwacke-polymictic conglomerate is composed of granule-cobble-sized clasts of quartzite, chert, andesite, and argillite, and phyllite. The survival of phyllite, argillite, and neovolcanic andesite clasts indicate that the detritus underwent very little subaerial transport before it was deposited along the proximal margin of the foreland basin. A petrologically heterogeneous upland source of high to moderate relief is indicated by the clast size and composition. Hydrodynamic structures, in conjunction with textural attributes, and compositional data indicate that detritus moved southeast from its source terrane and was deposited by a high-energy distributary complex. The lithicwacke petrofacies is dominated by higher chert and quartz content with a subordinate amount of labile components including paleovolcanic clasts and fine-grained matrix. The development of phyllosilicate matrix around quartz and chert grains preserved the primary porosity and permeability of the sandstone. Absence of any noticeable quartz overgrowth apparently contributed to the preservation of good reservoir quality in this petrofacies. Considering its (Torchlight Sandstone) close proximity to the thrust belt and to the locus of andesite volcanism in the northwest and west, it is suggested that the extrabasinal detritus within the foreland basin can provide significant clues as to the timing of the thrust events and volcanicity in the adjacent region. New perspectives for hydrocarbon exploration and regional correlation may be gained by employing this petrofacies association.

  18. Palynological age determination for Dorcheat and Hosston Formations - Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary in northern Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, R.

    1987-09-01

    Forty-four core samples from three wells drilled into the Dorcheat and Hosston formations in northern Louisiana were examined for fossil palynomorphs. These samples were obtained from the four beds of the Dorcheat formation, and from the lower two beds of the Hosston Formation. A diverse terrestrial and marine palynoflora containing stratigraphically significant species indicates that the cored section of strata spans the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary.

  19. An Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous carbonate platform from the Vâlcan Mountains (Southern Carpathians, Romania): paleoenvironmental interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michetiuc, Mihai; Catincuţ, Camelia; Bucur, Ioan I.

    2012-02-01

    The results of a biostratigraphic and sedimentological study of the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous limestones cropping out in the southern sector of the Vâlcan Mountains in Romania are presented, including the definition of microfacies types, fossil assemblages and environmental interpretation. Six microfacies types (MFT 1-MFT 6) have been identified, each of them pointing to a specific depositional environment. The deposits are characteristic of a shallow carbonate platform. They contain normal marine or restricted marine facies deposited in low or high energy environments from the inner, middle and outer platform. The age attribution of these deposits (Late Jurassic to Berriasian-Valanginian-?Hauterivian, and Barremian) is based on foraminiferal and calcareous algae associations. The micropaleontological assemblage is exceptionally rich in the Vâlcan Mountains and brings new arguments for dating the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous limestones in this area.

  20. The upper cretaceous snake Dinilysia patagonica Smith-Woodward, 1901, and the crista circumfenestralis of snakes.

    PubMed

    Palci, Alessandro; Caldwell, Michael W

    2014-10-01

    Studies on the phylogenetic relationships of snakes and lizards are plagued by problematic characterizations of anatomy that are then used to define characters and states in taxon-character matrices. State assignments and character descriptions must be clear characterizations of observable anatomy and topological relationships if homologies are to be hypothesized. A supposed homology among snakes, not observed in lizards, is the presence of a crista circumfenestralis (CCF), a system of bony crests surrounding the fenestra ovalis and lateral aperture of the recessus scalae tympani. We note that there are some fossil and extant snakes that lack a CCF, and some extant lizards that possess a morphological equivalent. The phylogenetically important upper Cretaceous fossil snake Dinilysia patagonica has been interpreted by different authors as either having or lacking a CCF. These conflicting results for Dinilysia were tested by re-examining the morphology of the otic region in a large sample of snakes and lizards. An unambiguous criterion arising from the test of topology is used to define the presence of a CCF: the enclosure of the ventral margin of the juxtastapedial recess by flanges of the otoccipital (crista tuberalis and crista interfenestralis) that extend forward to contact the posterior margin of the prootic. According to this criterion D. patagonica does not possess a CCF, therefore, this anatomical feature must have arisen later during the evolution of snakes.

  1. Integrated biostratigraphy of the Santonian through Maastrichtian (Upper Cretaceous) of extra-Carpathian Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walaszczyk, Ireneusz; Dubicka, Zofia; Olszewska-Nejbert, Danuta; Remin, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    The biostratigraphic importance, current zonations, and potential for the recognition of the standard chronostratigraphic boundaries of five palaeontological groups (benthic foraminifers, ammonites, belemnites, inoceramid bivalves and echinoids), critical for the stratigraphy of the Santonian through Maastrichtian (Upper Cretaceous) of extra-Carpathian Poland, are presented and discussed. The summary is based on recent studies in selected sections of southern Poland (Nida Synclinorium; Puławy Trough including the Middle Vistula River composite section; and Mielnik and Kornica sections of south-eastern Mazury-Podlasie Homocline) and of western Ukraine (Dubivtsi). The new zonation based on benthic forams is presented for the entire interval studied. Zonations for ammonites, belemnites and inoceramid bivalves are compiled. All stage boundaries, as currently defined or understood, may easily be constrained or precisely located with the groups discussed: the base of the Santonian with the First Occurrence (FO) of the inoceramid Cladoceramus undulatoplicatus; the base of the Campanian with the Last Occurrence (LO) of the crinoid Marsupites testudinarius and approximated by the range of the foraminifer Stensioeina pommerana; and the base of the Maastrichtian approximated by the FO of the inoceramid bivalve Endocostea typica and the FO of the belemnite Belemnella vistulensis. The positions of substage boundaries, as currently understood, are constrained in terms of the groups discussed.

  2. Paleotemperatures and paleodepths of the Upper Cretaceous rocks in El Qusaima, Northeastern Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orabi, O. H.; Zahran, E.

    2014-03-01

    The planktonic foraminiferal morphogroups and planktonic quantitative analysis as well as the lithological variations across the Coniacian to Maastrichtian sediments of El Qusaima section (Northeastern Sinai, Egypt) are studied in detail in order to detect the prevailing paleoecological conditions along these sediments. At the studied area of El Qusaima section there is a gradual cooling started at the base of Globotruncana elevata Zone (early-middle Campanian) of the lower part of the Markha Member and continued till Globotruncana aegyptiaca Zone (Late Campanian) of the upper part of the Markha Member. This trend corresponds to the onset of a global cooling that began at about 73 Ma (Late Campanian) and ended the Cretaceous greenhouse climate mode. At El Qusaima section, a gradual warming started at the base of Pseudogumbelina palpebra Zone (Late Maastrichtian) and continued till Plummerita hantkeninoides Zone (latest Maastrichtian) due to the high abundance of Plummerita hantkeninoides and Plummeritareicheli, which have been flourishing in warm waters. So this warming near the end of the Maastrichtian is a global event as shown by many authors.

  3. New predatory cockroaches (Insecta: Blattaria: Manipulatoridae fam.n.) from the Upper Cretaceous Myanmar amber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vršanský, Peter; Bechly, Günter

    2015-04-01

    We describe a new extinct lineage Manipulatoridae (new family) of cockroaches from the Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian) amber of Myanmar. Manipulator modificaputis gen. et sp. n. is a morphologically unique extinct cockroach that represents the first (of a total of 29 known worldwide) cockroach family reported exclusively from the Myanmar amber. This family represents an early side branch of the stem group of Mantodea (most probably a sister group of Eadiidae within Blattaria/Corydioidea) because it has some synapomorphies with the Mantodea (including the stem group and Eadiidae). This family also retains symplesiomorphies that exclude a position in the crown group, and furthermore has unique autapomorphies that exclude a position as a direct ancestor of Mantodea. The unique adaptations such as strongly elongated extremities and freely movable head on a long neck suggest that these animals were pursuit predators. Five additional specimens (including two immatures) reported from the Myanmar amber suggest that this group was relatively rare but belonged to the indigenous and autochthonous inhabitants of the ancient amber forest of the Myanmar region.

  4. Regional disconformities in Turonian and Coniacian (Upper Cretaceous) strata in Colorado, Wyoming, and adjoining states - Biochronological evidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merewether, E.A.; Cobban, W.A.; Obradovich, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    Siliciclastic and calcareous sedimentary rocks of early Late Cretaceous age in the Western Interior of the United States have been assigned to, in ascending order, the Graneros Shale, Greenhorn Formation, Carlile Shale, Niobrara Formation, and their lateral equivalents (including members of the Frontier Formation and overlying formations). This sequence of formations was deposited intermittently within and near an epicontinental seaway during the Cenomanian, Turonian, and Coniacian stages of the Cretaceous. It encloses three conspicuous and widespread disconformities that reflect regional marine regressions and transgressions as well as moderate tectonism. The disconformities and associated lacunae occupy three large areas within Wyoming, Colorado, and adjoining states. In parts of that region, as in northwestern Wyoming, a lacuna can represent more than one period of erosion and more than a single disconformity. Evidence for these disconformities was obtained from about 175 collections of molluscan fossils and from sedimentological studies of outcrops and borehole logs, supplemented by previously published data.

  5. Heavy mineral delineation of the Cretaceous, Paleocene, and Eocene stratigraphic sections at the Savannah River Site, Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Cathcart, E.M. . Dept. of Geology); Sargent, K.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-03-01

    The Upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina consists of a fluvial-deltaic and shallow marine complex of unconsolidated sediments overlying the crystalline basement rocks of the North American continent. Because of the lateral and vertical variability of these sediments, stratigraphic boundaries have been difficult to distinguish. Portions of the Cretaceous, Paleocene, and eocene stratigraphic sections from cores recovered during the construction of two monitoring wells at the Savannah River Site were studied to determine if heavy mineral suites could be utilized to distinguish boundaries. The stratigraphic sections include: the Late Cretaceous Middendorf, Black Creek, and Steel Creek Formations, the Paleocene Snapp Formation, the late Paleocene-Early Eocene Fourmile Branch Formation, and the Early Eocene Congaree formation. In previous studies composite samples were taken over 2.5 ft. intervals along the cores and processed using a heavy liquid for heavy mineral recovery. During this study, heavy mineral distributions were determined by binocular microscope and the mineral identifications confirmed by x-ray diffraction analysis of hand-picked samples. The heavy mineral concentration data and grain size data were then compared to the stratigraphic boundary positions determined by other workers using more classical methods. These comparisons were used to establish the utility of this method for delineating the stratigraphic boundaries in the area of study.

  6. Cobbania corrugata gen. et comb. nov. (Araceae): a floating aquatic monocot from the Upper Cretaceous of western North America.

    PubMed

    Stockey, Ruth A; Rothwell, Gar W; Johnson, Kirk R

    2007-04-01

    The fossil record of aquatic flowering plants broadens our understanding of their former diversity and origins from terrestrial ancestors. This paper describes a floating aquatic monocot from 71 whole plants and several isolated leaf fragments from Upper Cretaceous oxbow lake sediments in the Dinosaur Park Formation, Alberta, Canada. The new material is represented by rosettes of leaves and roots attached to short stems that are interconnected by stolons and corresponds to the fossil aroid originally described as Pistia corrugata Lesquereux. Up to six plants have been found interconnected on a single slab suggesting that these plants grew in extensive floating mats covering lakes and calm stretches of rivers. Stems have up to six leaves and large numbers of branched aquatic roots. The leaf is trumpet-shaped with an elongate clasping petiole, large aerenchymatous base, and a nearly circular blade rim. Leaf bases are often filled with sediment giving the leaf the appearance of having a basal pouch. Petioles have 6-9 veins that divide into an upper and lower set, and veins converge at an apical notch. A submarginal collective vein and at least two marginal veins with branching veins form the leaf rim. A series of dichotomizing and anastomosing veins characterize the adaxial leaf surface. Tertiary and quaternary veins form polygonal areolae. Leaf surfaces are covered in trichomes that, like those in Pistia stratiotes, probably aided in buoyancy. A reconstruction of the plant is presented. Based on unique leaf morphology, these fossil plants are clearly not assignable to the genus Pistia and are described as Cobbania corrugata (Lesquereux) Stockey, Rothwell et Johnson gen. et comb. nov. Recent systematic analyses using molecular characters resolve two separate origins of floating aquatic aroids included in the duckweeds and the genus Pistia. This new fossil genus increases our understanding of colonization of aquatic habitats by revealing a third possible origin of the

  7. Correlation of the Cretaceous formations of Greenland and Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Imlay, Ralph Willard; Reeside, John B.

    1953-01-01

    This is Number 10d of a series of correlation charts prepared for the Committee on Stratigraphy of the National Research Council. It has been sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey and has required about seven months' time of both authors gathering and compiling data and evaluating fossil evidence. As the two regions dealt with in the chart are widely separated, the lists of references are also given separately. The annotations dealing with Greenland are based entirely on published information. The annotations dealing with Alaska are based on a re-examination of nearly all the Cretaceous fossils from Alaska are based on a re-examination of nearly all the Cretaceous fossils from Alaska in the collections of the Geological Survey. This has resulted in many concepts not hitherto published and in some concepts that are completely at variance with those that have been published. Naturally for large areas undergoing active exploration, such as Alaska, a correlation chart is out of date in many particulars as soon as published. Nevertheless it is valuable to the field man whose activities are confined to small areas but who must interpret much of his data in terms of surrounding areas that he has not seen. It is valuable to the student and to the general geologist because it organizes scattered information in a manner that can be applied in their field problems, makes quite unnecessary the memorization of stratigraphic correlations are based on observation and reasoning and not on a vast memory. It is probably of greatest value to the specialist who makes the chart because he discovers what areas and problems are most in need of research and can thereby direct his efforts and those of his associates in a manner that will yield the greatest results.

  8. Sauropod and theropod dinosaur tracks from the Upper Cretaceous of Mendoza (Argentina): Trackmakers and anatomical evidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Riga, Bernardo Javier; Ortiz David, Leonardo Daniel; Tomaselli, María Belén; dos Anjos Candeiro, Carlos Roberto; Coria, Juan Pedro; Prámparo, Mercedes

    2015-08-01

    New findings of dinosaur ichnites from Agua del Choique section (Mendoza Province, Argentina) provides ichnological and anatomical information about the Cretaceous sauropods and theropods. Around 330 tracks distributed in six footprint levels were identified in this area, one of most important of South America. Two ichnocenoses are located in different paleoenvironmental contexts. In the Anacleto Formation (early Campanian) around 20 titanosaurian tracks were found in floodplain and ephemeral channel deposits. Herein, one pes track shows three claw impressions and this is congruent to two new titanosaur specimens recently discovered in Mendoza Province that have articulated and complete pedes. In this context, for the first time to titanosaurs, ichnological evidences are supported by skeletal elements. In the Loncoche Formation (late Campanian-early Maastrichtian) titanosaurian tracks of Titanopodus mendozensis are abundant (around 310 tracks) and were produced by titanosaurs that walked in a very wet substrate of tidally dominated deltas related with the first Atlantic transgression for northern Patagonia. In this facies association, three different trydactl tracks indicate the presence of small theropods (1-2 m long), expanding the knowledge about the faunistic components that lived in these marine marginal environments.

  9. A Gigantic Shark from the Lower Cretaceous Duck Creek Formation of Texas

    PubMed Central

    Frederickson, Joseph A.; Schaefer, Scott N.; Doucette-Frederickson, Janessa A.

    2015-01-01

    Three large lamniform shark vertebrae are described from the Lower Cretaceous of Texas. We interpret these fossils as belonging to a single individual with a calculated total body length of 6.3 m. This large individual compares favorably to another shark specimen from the roughly contemporaneous Kiowa Shale of Kansas. Neither specimen was recovered with associated teeth, making confident identification of the species impossible. However, both formations share a similar shark fauna, with Leptostyrax macrorhiza being the largest of the common lamniform sharks. Regardless of its actual identification, this new specimen provides further evidence that large-bodied lamniform sharks had evolved prior to the Late Cretaceous. PMID:26039066

  10. A new dinosaur ichnotaxon from the Lower Cretaceous Patuxent Formation of Maryland and Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanford, R.; Weems, R.E.; Lockley, M.G.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, numerous dinosaur footprints have been discovered on bedding surfaces within the Lower Cretaceous Patuxent Formation of Maryland and Virginia. Among these, distinctive small tracks that display a combination of small manus with five digit impressions and a relatively much larger pes with four toe impressions evidently were made by animals belonging to the ornithischian family Hypsilophodontidae. These tracks differ from any ornithischian ichnotaxon previously described. We here name them Hypsiloichnus marylandicus and provide a description of their diagnostic characteristics. Although hypsilophodontid skeletal remains have not been found in the Patuxent, their skeletal remains are known from Lower Cretaceous strata of similar age in both western North America and Europe. Therefore, it is not surprising to find that an Early Cretaceous representative of this family also existed in eastern North America. ?? Taylor and Francis Ltd.

  11. Paleontologic and stratigraphic relations of phosphate beds in Upper Cretaceous rocks of the Cordillera Oriental, Colombia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maughan, Edwin K.; Zambrano O., Francisco; Mojica G., Pedro; Abozaglo M., Jacob; Pachon P., Fernando; Duran R., Raul

    1979-01-01

    Phosphorite crops out in the Cordillera Oriental of the Colombian Andes in rocks of Late Cretaceous age as strata composed mostly of pelletal carbonate fluorapatite. One stratum of Santonian age near the base of the Galembo Member of the La Luna Formation crops out at many places in the Departments of Santander and Norte de Santander and may be of commercial grade. This stratum is more than one meter thick at several places near Lebrija and near Sardinata, farther south it is locally one meter thick or more near the base of the Guadalupe Formation in the Department of Boyaca. Other phosphorite beds are found at higher stratigraphic levels in the Galembo Member and the Guadalupe Formation, and at some places these may be commercial also. A stratigraphically lower phosphorite occurs below the Galembo Member in the Capacho Formation (Cenomanian age) in at least one area near the town of San Andres, Santander. A phosphorite or pebbly phosphate conglomerate derived from erosion of the Galembo Member forms the base of the Umir Shale and the equivalent Colon Shale at many places. Deposition of the apatite took place upon the continental shelf in marine water of presumed moderate depth between the Andean geosyncline and near-shore detrital deposits adjacent to the Guayana shield. Preliminary calculations indicate phosphorite reserves of approximately 315 million metric tons in 9 areas, determined from measurements of thickness, length of the outcrop, and by projecting the reserves to a maximum of 1,000 meters down the dip of the strata into the subsurface. Two mines were producing phosphate rock in 1969; one near Turmeque, Boyaca, and the other near Tesalia, Huila.

  12. An Unusual New Theropod with a Didactyl Manus from the Upper Cretaceous of Patagonia, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Apesteguía, Sebastián; Smith, Nathan D.; Juárez Valieri, Rubén; Makovicky, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Late Cretaceous terrestrial strata of the Neuquén Basin, northern Patagonia, Argentina have yielded a rich fauna of dinosaurs and other vertebrates. The diversity of saurischian dinosaurs is particularly high, especially in the late Cenomanian-early Turonian Huincul Formation, which has yielded specimens of rebacchisaurid and titanosaurian sauropods, and abelisaurid and carcharodontosaurid theropods. Continued sampling is adding to the known vertebrate diversity of this unit. Methodology/ Principal Findings A new, partially articulated mid-sized theropod was found in rocks from the Huincul Formation. It exhibits a unique combination of traits that distinguish it from other known theropods justifying erection of a new taxon, Gualicho shinyae gen. et sp. nov. Gualicho possesses a didactyl manus with the third digit reduced to a metacarpal splint reminiscent of tyrannosaurids, but both phylogenetic and multivariate analyses indicate that didactyly is convergent in these groups. Derived characters of the scapula, femur, and fibula supports the new theropod as the sister taxon of the nearly coeval African theropod Deltadromeus and as a neovenatorid carcharodontosaurian. A number of these features are independently present in ceratosaurs, and Gualicho exhibits an unusual mosaic of ceratosaurian and tetanuran synapomorphies distributed throughout the skeleton. Conclusions/ Significance Gualicho shinyae gen. et sp. nov. increases the known theropod diversity of the Huincul Formation and also represents the first likely neovenatorid from this unit. It is the most basal tetatanuran to exhibit common patterns of digit III reduction that evolved independently in a number of other tetanuran lineages. A close relationship with Deltadromaeus from the Kem Kem beds of Niger adds to the already considerable biogeographic similarity between the Huincul Formation and coeval rock units in North Africa. PMID:27410683

  13. Formation of the soft-sediment deformation structures and its constraints on dinosaur fossil burial of the Cretaceous in Zhucheng, Shandong province, East China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bizhu; Qiao, Xiufu; Cai, Zhihui; Tian, Hongshui; Chen, Shuqing

    2013-04-01

    The triangular-shaped Zhucheng depression is located in the southwestern part of the Jiaolai basin, Jiaodong peninsula, East China. Various soft-sediment deformation structures are recognized in the southern Zhucheng depression, which have behaviour are plastic and/or brittle. Soft-sediment deformation structures mainly include undulate fold, mound and sag, diapir, convolute deformation and seismic-unconformity in the Lower Cretaceous, which are composed of fine-grained sediments in lacustrine environment, while load structure, ball and pillow structure, plunged sediment mixtures structure, fault-graded occurred in the Upper Cretaceous, which formed in a conglomeratic or coarse arenaceous alluvial fan and flood-plain setting. These soft-sediment deformation structures are proposed triggered by paleoearthquake. The deformed layers and undeformed layers developed in intervals, suggesting frequent seismic activities. In studied area, numerous giant hadrosaurid skeleton fossils have been found in the Upper Cretaceous Wangshi Group science 1958, and unusual and abundant dinosaur track fossils have been discovered in the Lower Cretaceous Yangzhuang Formation of Laiyang Group. The widespread identified soft-sediment deformation structures are proximately underlying or overlying these dinosaur fossil bearing strata. The depositional setting changed while multiple paleo-seismic events and tectonic activity happened. In the Early Cretaceous, after the occurrence of paleo-earthquakes and environmental changes, dinosaurs migrated and a lot of tracks with similar orientation on lacustrine offshore were preserved. In the Late Cretaceous, a large-scale dinosaur fossil layers and paleo-earthquake records occurred in intervals, indicating that the dinosaur fossils may be associated with large-scale debris flow and frequent earthquake events. Based on regional tectonic setting, distribution of soft-sediment deformation structures and predicted magnitude of paleo-earthquakes, the

  14. Speciation and weathering of selenium in upper cretaceous chalk and shale from South Dakota and Wyoming, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulp, Thomas R.; Pratt, Lisa M.

    2004-09-01

    In geologic materials, petroleum, and the environment, selenium occurs in various oxidation states (VI, IV, 0, -II), mineralized forms, and organo-Se complexes. Each of these forms is characterized by specific chemical and biochemical properties that control the element's solubility, toxicity, and environmental behavior. The organic rich chalks and shales of the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara Formation and the Pierre Shale in South Dakota and Wyoming are bentoniferous stratigraphic intervals characterized by anomalously high concentrations of naturally occurring Se. Numerous environmental problems have been associated with Se derived from these geological units, including the development of seleniferous soils and vegetation that are toxic to livestock and the contamination of drinking water supplies by Se mobilized in groundwater. This study describes a sequential extraction protocol followed by speciation treatments and quantitative analysis by Hydride Generation-Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. This protocol was utilized to investigate the geochemical forms and the oxidation states in which Se occurs in these geologic units. Organic Se and di-selenide minerals are the predominant forms of Se present in the chalks, shales, and bentonites, but distinctive variations in these forms were observed between different sample types. Chalks contain significantly greater proportions of Se in the form of di-selenide minerals (including Se associated with pyrite) than the shales where base-soluble, humic, organo-Se complexes are more prevalent. A comparison between unweathered samples collected from lithologic drill cores and weathered samples collected from outcrop suggest that the humic, organic-Se compounds in shale are formed during oxidative weathering and that Se oxidized by weathering is more likely to be retained by shale than by chalk. Selenium enrichment in bentonites is inferred to result from secondary processes including the adsorption of Se mobilized by groundwater

  15. Deposition and remaining productive capabilities of the Upper Cretaceous Eutaw sands of East-Central Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Greer, B.R.

    1995-10-01

    Nearing the close of the Cretaceous, there were several transgressions and regressions of the epicontinental seas. These rapid changes in sea level played a large part in the depositing and reworking of the Eutaw sands of East-Central Mississippi. The study area includes Jasper, Jones, Clarke and Wayne Counties. The Eutaw sands of this area are described as fine to very fine grained sand which are glauconitic, micaceous and sometimes fossiliferous. This indicates that the environment of deposition was in the neritic zone of the continental shelf. Its high porosities and permeabilities along with its prolific nature makes this formation one of the most sought after reservoirs of the state of Mississippi. All of the 18 Eutaw fields in the study area are closely reaching their economic limits for primary production. Four of these fields have undergone successful waterfloods which have greatly enhanced their ultimate recoveries. The remaining fields in the study area have the potential of yielding millions of barrels of oil from secondary and tertiary recovery methods.

  16. Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous facies relationships in a passive margin basin, western North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, B.E.

    1988-02-01

    Correlation of facies from hydrocarbon-bearing continental and transitional marine sandstones to time-equivalent high-energy shelf-margin carbonates provide insight into hydrocarbon habitats of the Baltimore Canyon basin. These facies occur within a thick (> 10,000 ft) prograded wedge of shelf sediments in this passive margin basin. Wells drilled to test structural closures in shallow-water (< 600 ft) areas of Baltimore Canyon penetrate clastic facies which are time-equivalent to the downdip carbonate facies tested in deep-water wells. Numerous hydrocarbon shows, including a noncommercial gas and gas-condensate accumulation, occur with sandstone units that were deposited in prograding continental/fluvial and transitional marine environments located updip of the Oxfordian/Kimmeridgian carbonate shelf edge. The continental and transitional facies are overlain by a fine-grained deltaic complex which forms a regionally extensive top seal unit. The deltaic complex was deposited during aggradation of the Kimmeridgian through Berriasian shelf-margin carbonates penetrated by the deep-water wells. Deep-water wells (> 5000 ft) drilled off the continental shelf edge to test large structural closures along the downdip termination of the Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous carbonate shelf edge encountered no significant hydrocarbon shows. Reservoir rocks in these wells consist of (1) oolite grainstone which was deposited within a shoal-water complex located at the Aptian shelf edge, and (2) coral-stromatoporoid grainstone and boundstone which formed an aggraded shelf-margin complex located at the Kimmeridgian through Berriasian shelf edge. Structural closures with reservoir and top seals are present in both updip and downdip trends. The absence of hydrocarbon shows in downdip carbonate reservoirs suggests a lack of source rocks available to charge objectives at the shelf margin.

  17. Shocked cobbles in Lower Cretaceous Duwon Formation, South Korea: their classification and possible formation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyoun Soo; Chae, Yong-Un; Kim, Kyung Soo; Kim, Cheng-Bin; Huh, Min

    2016-04-01

    Shocked cobbles are the cobbles having shock-induced deformation structures on the surfaces. The most distinctive macroscopic features are the subparallel fractures and the pervasive surface craters, with or without radial fractures. Until now, these shocked cobbles have been reported mainly in Europe, America, and Africa, but never been found or reported in Korea. Shocked cobbles have recently found in the Lower Cretaceous Duwon Formation in South Korea, which was the second report in Asia. The Duwon Formation consists mainly of conglomerates, gravelly sandstones and intercalated mudstone and shale layers. The shocked cobbles are commonly found in the lowermost clast-supported conglomerate layers, and they show various deformation features, such as pockmarked (circular or elliptical) cobbles, cratered (Hertzian or bowl-shaped) cobbles with or without radial fractures, cobbles showing subparallel fractures, and strongly squashed or heavily dissected cobbles. In general, these deformation structures are considered to have resulted from pressure dissolution by overburden, tectonic compression, and seismic or meteorite impacts. However, the exact formation mechanism is not clearly understood, and still in debate. The shocked cobbles found in the Duwon Formation have similar features to those of previously reported shocked cobbles, especially to Triassic Buntsandstein conglomerates in northeastern Spain. Based on the degree of deformation, the Duwon shocked cobbles can be divided into four types, which are (1) faint contact marks, (2) pitted marks without any fractures, (3) pitted marks with radial or sub-parallel fractures affected by pits, and (4) intensive fractures and heavily dissected fragments. The possible mechanisms for the Duwon shocked cobbles are thought to be crushing process by shear stress and pressure solution.

  18. Perinatal Specimens of Saurolophus angustirostris (Dinosauria: Hadrosauridae), from the Upper Cretaceous of Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    Dewaele, Leonard; Tsogtbaatar, Khishigjav; Barsbold, Rinchen; Garcia, Géraldine; Stein, Koen; Escuillié, François; Godefroit, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Background The Late Cretaceous Nemegt Formation, Gobi Desert, Mongolia has already yielded abundant and complete skeletons of the hadrosaur Saurolophus angustirostris, from half-grown to adult individuals. Methodology/Principal Findings Herein we describe perinatal specimens of Saurolophus angustirostris, associated with fragmentary eggshell fragments. The skull length of these babies is around 5% that of the largest known S. angustirostris specimens, so these specimens document the earliest development stages of this giant hadrosaur and bridge a large hiatus in our knowledge of the ontogeny of S. angustirostris. Conclusions/Significance The studied specimens are likely part of a nest originally located on a riverbank point bar. The perinatal specimens were buried by sediment carried by the river current presumably during the wet summer season. Perinatal bones already displayed diagnostic characters for Saurolophus angustirostris, including premaxillae with a strongly reflected oral margin and upturned premaxillary body in lateral aspect. The absence of a supracranial crest and unfused halves of the cervical neural arches characterize the earliest stages in the ontogeny of S. angustirostris. The eggshell fragments associated with the perinatal individuals can be referred to the Spheroolithus oogenus and closely resemble those found in older formations (e.g. Barun Goyot Fm in Mongolia) or associated with more basal hadrosauroids (Bactrosaurus-Gilmoreosaurus in the Iren Dabasu Fm, Inner Mongolia, China). This observation suggests that the egg microstructure was similar in basal hadrosauroids and more advanced saurolophines. Competing Interests One of the authors (FE) is employed by the commercial organization Eldonia. Eldonia provided support in the form of a salary for FE, but did not have any additional role or influence in the study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript and it does not alter the authors

  19. Franciscan olistoliths in Upper Cretaceous conglomerate deposits, Western Transverse Ranges, California: Implications for basin morphology and tectonic history

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, W.E.; Campbell, M.D. . Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Compositional analyses reveal that Upper Cretaceous sediments exposed in the Western Transverse Ranges of CA were deposited in submarine fan systems in a forearc basin. Point count data suggest a magmatic arc/recycled orogen as the dominant provenance for these sediments. Paleocurrent measurements from conglomerates in these sediments yield a northerly transport direction. Removal of ca. 90[degree] of clockwise rotation and 70 km of right-lateral slip restore this section to a position west of the San Diego area. The forearc basin would have had a N-S orientation, with the bulk of sediments supplied by the Peninsular Ranges to the east. Evidence of the erosion of the accretionary wedge is provided by the presence of large, internally stratified olistoliths of Franciscan material interbedded with and surrounded by upper Cretaceous conglomerate. Petrographic, quantitative SEM, and microprobe analyses indicate the presence of diagnostic Franciscan mineralogy, including glaucophane, riebeckite, lawsonite, and serpentine. Olistoclasts of chert, jadeitic graywacke, serpentine, and blueschist are found intermixed with the conglomerates in close association with the olistoliths. This association provides strong field evidence that recirculation of melange material within the subduction zone was active and well-established by late Cretaceous time. Inferences regarding the forearc system morphology can be drawn from these observations. The occurrence of coarse, easterly-derived conglomerates surrounded by large, stratified, but sheared, westerly-derived Franciscan debris, suggests a narrow, relatively steep-sided basin. Paleocurrent measurements gave no indication of axial transport within the basin. This morphology suggests that, in late Cretaceous time, the forearc basin was youthful, with a narrow arc-trench gap. Thus, relative convergence rates between the North American and Pacific plates were possibly slower than Tertiary convergence rates.

  20. Trace elements geochemistry of kerogen in Upper Cretaceous sediments, Chad (Bornu) Basin, northeastern Nigeria: Origin and paleo-redox conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adegoke, Adebanji Kayode; Abdullah, Wan Hasiah; Hakimi, Mohammed Hail; Sarki Yandoka, Babangida M.; Mustapha, Khairul Azlan; Aturamu, Adeyinka Oluyemi

    2014-12-01

    Trace element contents in isolated kerogen from Upper Cretaceous sediments within Gongila and Fika formations in the Chad (Bornu) Basin, northeastern Nigeria were determined using Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS), in order to infer the origin of the organic matter and the paleo-redox conditions during their sedimentation. The concentrations of the elements in the kerogen samples varied from 1.01 to 24,740 ppm. The distribution of elements shows that Fe is the most abundant element in Chad (Bornu) Basin kerogen, followed by Ce. Among the biophile elements, V is the most abundant, followed by Ni and Co in that order. Statistical evaluation of the elemental composition data shows that As, Ce, Pb, V, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni and U exhibit good positive correlations with each other. Molybdenum, on the other hand displays no obvious correlation with most of the trace elements determined including TOC, but has good positive correlation with TS and negative correlation with Tmax, Ce and Th, which suggests that the concentration of Mo decreases with increasing maturity and vice versa. Some trace element concentrations and their ratios suggest mixed marine and terrigenous source input for the organic matter (kerogen) in Chad (Bornu) Basin. More so, the concentrations of redox-sensitive elements, such as V, Ni, Cu, Cr Mo and Mn, in the kerogen samples suggest dysoxic bottom water conditions within the Gongila and Fika sediments. Cross-plots of V and Ni and V/(V + Ni) ratio also indicate that the organic matter of these samples was deposited in slightly reducing environments.

  1. Cathodoluminescence characterization of quartz grains from the Upper Cretaceous of dinosaur fossil localities in the Gobi desert, Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saneyoshi, M.; Nishido, H.; Masuda, R.; Tsogtbaatar, K.; Chinzorig, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Upper Cretaceous eolian sediments in Mongolia's Gobi desert are one of the most important occurrences of the dinosaurs in the world. Large numbers of confiscated dinosaur fossils illegally worked out by poachers has been stored in the Mongolian Paleontological Center at Ulaanbaatar. In most cases, their localities are unknown. The purpose of this study is to identify their localities by cathodoluminescence (CL) features of quartz grains attached to the dinosaur specimens by comparing to the quartz samples collected from the sediments of circumjacent resources in this area. This study focuses on the confiscated specimen which makes up the nest with the babies' Protoceratops. Most of all Protoceratops in every growth process, have been discovered from the Djadokhta Formation in the Gobi desert. This formation crops out at Tugrikin Shireh and Bayn Dzak in the central part of the Gobi desert, and is derived from medium- to fine-grained sand mainly composed of quartz grains, of which sedimentary environments should be obvious to be eolian. The formation age of the sand beds at Tugrikin Shireh and Bayn Dzak has been estimated to be Middle Campanian. CL spectra of quartz have been demonstrated to show different features between the quartz from hydrothermal, plutonic, volcanic and metamorphic origins, suggesting the spectra reflect the condition of the quartz formation and the local environment. Therefore, we have applied the CL characterization of quartz grains to the evaluation of the provenance of the desert sediments. The quartz grains after sieving (#60-80 mesh size) were embedded in the brass holders with non-luminescent epoxy resin, and their surfaces were polished with 1 μm diamond abrasive. Color CL images obtained by the Luminoscope exhibit blue, violet and red emissions in the grains, suggesting various types of emission centers in the quartz. SEM-CL analysis was conducted using an SEM (JSM-5410) combined with a grating monochromator (Mono CL2) to measure

  2. Spectroscopic studies of wood fossils from the Crato Formation, Cretaceous Period.

    PubMed

    da Silva, J H; Freire, P T C; Abagaro, B T O; Silva, J A F; Saraiva, G D; de Lima, F J; Barros, O A; Bantim, R A; Saraiva, A A F; Viana, B C

    2013-11-01

    In this work we study two types of wood fossils (Gymnosperms, Araucariaceae) from the Crato Formation of Araripe Basin in Brazil, from the Cretaceous Period. The samples were characterized by Raman and infrared spectroscopies, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results obtained by different techniques showed that although the rocks surrounding the fossils have predominantly the same constitution - calcite - however, the formation processes of these types of wood fossils are quite different. One of the fossils, denominated as light wood, is predominantly composed of gypsum, while the other fossil, the dark wood, is rich in amorphous carbon, possibly the kerogen type. Implications relative to the environment where the plants lived millions years ago are also given. Finally, the results highlight the constitution of one of the most important paleontological sites of the Cretaceous Period in the South America.

  3. Radiolaria and Global Oceanic Anoxic Event-2 in the Upper Cretaceous sections of Western Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragina, Liubov; Bragin, Nikita

    2010-05-01

    The Tethyan Upper Cretaceous deposits rich in organic carbon are currently regarded as indications of anoxic condition. Such sediments (predominantly black bituminous shales) are common in the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary and reflect worldwide episode of anomalous environmental conditions that has been called "Global Oceanic Anoxic Event 2" (OAE-2) (Schlanger et al., 1987). Various groups of marine organisms were influenced by this event and displayed different changes related with oxygen-poor environment. The aim of this report is to analyse changes of radiolarian assemblages during late Cenomanian - early Turonian in various Tethyan regions. Micropalaeontological investigation was carried out on a number of samples from the western part of Great Caucasus. Upper Cenomanian to lower Turonian sediments are studied in southern slope of Great Caucasus in the vicinity of Sochi and Novorossiisk. They are represented by deep-water thin-graded flysh composed of clastics and carbonates. The radiolarian assemblages of Caucasian sequences were compared to the findings of O'Dogherty (1994) from the coeval Bonarelli horizon in the Umbra-Marche Apennines, Italy. These two different palaeogeographical regions (O'Dogherty, 1994; Bragina et al., 2007) are characterized by similar radiolarian assemblages. Upper Cenomanian to lower Turonian deposits related with OAE-2 have rich content of organic matter and therefore may be recognized as important regional markers. Such marker named "Bonarelli horizon" is known in the Umbria section of central Italy (Marcucci et al., 1991). It is characterized by black bituminous shales deposited in deep-water pelagic environment together with cherts and pelagic limestones. Lithologically similar regional marker is situated in the flysh deposits of Western Caucasus (Keller, 1940; Afanasyev, 2004) and represents black shales named as "Ananur horizon". This horizon was observed in 4 sections: Volkonka and Mamedova Schel' near Sochi, and Andreevsky

  4. Cretaceous source rocks in Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Kari, I.B. )

    1993-02-01

    Pakistan is located at the converging boundaries of the Indian, Arabian, and Eurasian plates. Evolution of this tectonic setting has provided an array of environmental habitats for deposition of petroleum source rocks and development of structural forms. The potential Cretaceous source rocks in Central and South Indus Basin are spread over an area of about 300,000 km[sup 2]. With 2% cutoff on Total Organic Carbon, the average source rock thickness is 30-50 m, which is estimated to have generated more than 200 billion bbl of oil equivalent. To date, production of more than 30,000 bbl of oil and about 1200 million ft[sup 3] of gas per day can be directly attributed to Cretaceous source. This basin was an area of extensional tectonics during the Lower to Middle Cretaceous associated with slightly restricted circulation of the sea waters at the north-western margin of Indian Plate. Lower Cretaceous source rocks (Sembar Formation) were deposited while the basin was opening up and anoxia was prevailing. Similarly Middle to Upper Cretaceous clastics were deposited in setting favorable for preservation of organic matter. The time and depth of burial of the Cretaceous source material and optimum thermal regime have provided the requisite maturation level for generation of hydrocarbons in the basin. Central Indus basin is characterized by Cretaceous source rocks mature for gas generation. However, in South Indus Basin Cretaceous source rocks lie within the oil window in some parts and have gone past it in others.

  5. New paleomagnetic results from Upper Cretaceous arc-type rocks from the northern and southern branches of the Neotethys ocean in Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cengiz Cinku, Mualla; Heller, Friedrich; Ustaömer, Timur

    2017-03-01

    A paleomagnetic study of Cretaceous arc type rocks in the Central-Eastern Pontides and in the Southeastern Taurides investigates the tectonic and paleolatitudinal evolution of three volcanic belts in Anatolia, namely the Northern and Southern Volcanic Belts in the Pontides and the SE Taurides volcanic belt. The paleomagnetic data indicate that magnetizations were acquired prior to folding at most sampling localities/sites, except for those in the Erzincan area in the Eastern Pontides. The Southern Volcanic Belt was magnetized at a paleolatitude between 23.8_{-3.8}^{+4.2} °N and 20.2_{-1.2}^{+1.3} °N. Hisarlı (J Geodyn 52:114-128, 2011) reported a more northerly paleolatitude (26.6_{-4.6}^{+5.1} °N) for the Northern Volcanic Belt. The comparison of the new paleomagnetic results with previous ones in Anatolia allows to conclude that the Southern Volcanic Belt in the Central-Eastern Pontides was emplaced after the Northern Volcanic Belt as a result of slab-roll back of the Northern Neotethys ocean in the Late Cretaceous. In the Southeast Taurides, Upper Cretaceous arc-related sandstones were at a paleolatitude of 16.8_{-3.8}^{+4.2} . The Late Cretaceous paleomagnetic rotations in the Central Pontides exhibit a counterclockwise rotation of R± Δ R=-37.1° ± 5.8° (Group 1; Çankırı, Yaylaçayı Formation) while Maastrichtian arc type rocks in the Yozgat area (Group 2) show clockwise rotations R + ΔR = 33.7° ± 8.4° and R + ΔR = 29.3° ± 6.0°. In the SE Taurides counterclockwise and clockwise rotations of R± Δ R=-48.6°± 5.2° and R± Δ R=+34.1° ± 15.1° are obtained (Group 4; Elazığ Magmatic Complex). The Late Cretaceous paleomagnetic rotations in the Pontides follow a general trend in concordance with the shape of the suture zone after the collision between the Pontides and the Kırşehir block. The affect of the westwards excursion of the Anatolian plate and the associated fault bounded block rotations in Miocene are observed in the east of the

  6. Genesis, maturity and weathering of some Upper Cretaceous Egyptian glauconites: Mineralogical and geochemical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essa, Mahmoud A.; Ahmed, Ezzat A.; Kurzweil, Hans

    2016-12-01

    Mineralogical and geochemical studies were carried out on Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian - Maastrichtian) glauconites from Egypt by means of polarizing microscope, XRD, SEM, microprobe and XRF techniques. Most of the investigated glauconite grains display zoning-like appearance. X-ray diffraction analyses reveal the presence of glauconite, quartz, dolomite, jarosite, goethite and glauconite (illite)-smectite mixed layer minerals. SEM and microprobe investigations revealed that jarosite is present as a weathering product of pyrite especially in Abu Tartur and Wadi Feiran areas. However, goethite was encountered as oxidation product of both pyrite and glauconite. The microprobe analyses of the glauconite grains reflect clearly their low Alumina (<10%) content at the different localities; suggesting therefore their development at depths from 50 m downwards. The Cenomanian glauconites of Wadi Feiran, Saint Paul and Gabal Dist show slight enrichment in K2O content relative to the Campanian - Maastrichtian glauconite of Abu Tartur, indicating more mineralogical maturity. The microprobe analyses also reflect the loss of K and Fe from the glauconite grains. Fe and K can be contributed to aqueous solution media during weathering, leaving aluminous clay minerals in the soil. As result, argillaceous glauconite (illite)-smectite mixed layer, in some cases, is found associating the green pellets of glauconite in many of the investigated samples; most probably produced by weathering of the glauconite grains. Regarding glauconites, Wadi Feiran bulk samples are enriched in TiO2, Al2O3, MgO, Zr, Ce and La, whereas those of Saint Paul exhibit richness in Y and Rb. Gabal Dist samples display appreciable content of Fe2O3(t), K2O, Pb, Zn, Ni, Co, Sc and V whereas the P2O5 and SO3 show their abundance patterns at Abu Tartur locality. These fluctuations could be attributed to their differences in the mineralogical content (pyrite, goethite, and jarosite). The strong correlation between Ti

  7. Huminite reflectance measurements of Paleocene and Upper Cretaceous coals from borehole cuttings, Zavala and Dimmit counties, South Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Paul C.; Hook, Robert W.; Warwick, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    The reflectance of huminite in 19 cuttings samples was determined in support of ongoing investigations into the coal bed methane potential of subsurface Paleocene and Upper Cretaceous coals of South Texas. Coal cuttings were obtained from the Core Research Center of the Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin. Geophysical logs, mud-gas logs, driller's logs, completion cards, and scout tickets were used to select potentially coal-bearing sample suites and to identify specific sample depths. Reflectance measurements indicate coals of subbituminous rank are present in a wider area in South Texas than previously recognized.

  8. Evaluation of bio-molecular signatures and hydrocarbon potential of upper Cretaceous shale, NE Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boboye, Olugbenga A.; Nzegwu, Uche A.

    2014-11-01

    The Bornu Basin is a sector of the Chad Basin located in the northeastern part of Nigeria, occupying about one-tenth of total area in Chad Basin. Twenty-eight representative shale cutting samples retrieved from Tuma-1, Sa-1 and Albarka-1 exploratory wells were analyzed. Seventeen shale samples systematically selected from Gongila, Fika Shale and Chad Formations were subjected to Total Organic Content (TOC), Rock-Eval pyrolysis, Soluble Organic Matter, Liquid Chromatography, Gas Chromatography and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry analyses. This is to characterize and assess the potential capability of the shale units. The results showed that TOC of the Coniacian-Paleocene shale units exceed the threshold (0.5 wt%) needed for petroleum generation. This classifies it as potential source beds. Evidence from biomarkers indicates a preponderance of marine organic matter with subordinate terrigenous input. The quantity of gammacerane occurrence suggests normal saline environment. The presence of oleanane index indicates angiosperms input into Cretaceous-Tertiary source rock. C35/C34 homohopane ratio showed the anoxia development towards the center of the basin. C29ααα (20R)/C27ααα (20R) sterane ratio indicate the dominance of marine organic matter with subordinate terrigenous input. The 22S/(22S + 22R) ratio of C31 hopane have not reached equilibrium as evident by immaturity to early mature stages from diagnostic ratios of βα moretane/αβ hopane, Ts/(Ts + Tm), 28,30-bisnorhopanes/17α-hopanes, diasteranes/regular steranes, ααα steranes/αββ steranes and 20S/(20S + 20R) C29 regular steranes respectively. This is corroborated with the Rock-Eval indices showing immature to earlier mature kerogen within the Fika Formation. It consists preeminently of Type IV, with subordinate Type III. The prospect for hydrocarbon in this part of the basin is only fair to moderate with potential for gaseous rather than liquid hydrocarbon.

  9. Calpionellid zonation of the Jurassic Cretaceous transition in North-Atlasic Tunisia. Updated Upper Jurassic stratigraphy of the `Tunisian trough' and regional correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boughdiri, Mabrouk; Sallouhi, Houaïda; Maâlaoui, Kamel; Soussi, Mohamed; Cordey, Fabrice

    2006-12-01

    The analysis of calpionellid associations from jebels Amar and Jédidi sections in North-Atlasic Tunisia provides, for the first time, a precise biozonation of the Jurassic-Cretaceous transition succession. In the light of the new data obtained and considering recently published results, the age of Upper Jurassic formations is clarified, allowing correlations with the Tunisian 'Dorsale' and the North-South Axis successions. Within the Maghrebides' range, sections from the external zones correlated to the Tunisian successions are quite distinctive from their equivalent in the internal zones. Both have evolved in different palaeogeographic domains related to the early structuration of the northwestern and southwestern Tethys margins. To cite this article: M. Boughdiri et al., C. R. Geoscience 338 (2006).

  10. Osteology of Huabeisaurus allocotus (Sauropoda: Titanosauriformes) from the Upper Cretaceous of China

    PubMed Central

    D'Emic, Michael D.; Mannion, Philip D.; Upchurch, Paul; Benson, Roger B. J.; Pang, Qiqing; Zhengwu, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Background The Late Cretaceous titanosauriform sauropod Huabeisaurus allocotus Pang and Cheng is known from teeth and much of the postcranial skeleton. Its completeness makes it an important taxon for integrating and interpreting anatomical observations from more fragmentary Cretaceous East Asian sauropods and for understanding titanosauriform evolution in general. Methodology/Principal Findings We present a detailed redescription of Huabeisaurus allocotus and a suite of anatomical comparisons with other titanosauriforms that demonstrate its validity via autapomorphies (e.g., division of some presacral vertebral laminae, reduced development of caudal ribs, the development of fossae relative to one another in caudal vertebral neural arches, high tibia-to-femur ratio). Huabeisaurus shares many features with other Cretaceous East Asian sauropods (e.g., pendant cervical ribs, anterior-middle caudal vertebrae with a nearly flat anterior centrum face and a concave posterior centrum face) that are absent in sauropods from other landmasses and strata, suggesting a close relationship among many of these forms within the clade Somphospondyli. Conclusions/Significance Restudy of Huabeisaurus provides further evidence for the existence of a clade of somphospondylans – Euhelopodidae – mainly found in the Cretaceous of East Asia. Euhelopodidae represents a fourth example of the evolution of narrow crowns within Sauropoda, along with diplodocoids, brachiosaurids, and advanced titanosaurs (lithostrotians). Despite being known from fewer species than Diplodocoidea, Brachiosauridae, or Lithostrotia, euhelopodids possessed a broader range of tooth shapes than any of these clades, suggesting that euhelopodids exemplified a comparably broad range of feeding strategies and perhaps diets. PMID:23936326

  11. Titanosaur Osteoderms from the Upper Cretaceous of Lo Hueco (Spain) and Their Implications on the Armor of Laurasian Titanosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Daniel; Ortega, Francisco; Sanz, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    Titanosaurs are the only sauropod dinosaurs known to bear a dermal armor. Their osteoderms are relatively rare finds, with few more than a hundred specimens recovered worldwide. Also, little is known about their intra-individual, intra-specific or inter-specific variability. The macrovertebrate site of Lo Hueco (Upper Cretaceous; Cuenca, Spain) has yielded several complete specimens of osteoderms, some associated with fairly articulated specimens. They are all variations of the morphotype known as bulb and root. The presence of only this morphotype in Europe, which is considered as the primitive condition among titanosaurs, seems to indicate that the known Upper Cretaceous Laurasian titanosaurs only bore these referred bulb and root osteoderms. An eliptic Fourier analysis on the outline of complete specimens from this morphotype reveals: i) that they truly are part of a morphological cline; and ii) the existence of a consistent correlation between the outline and the morphology of the bulb. Such variation along a cline is more consistent with intra-individual rather than inter-specific variation. The osteoderms associated with a single titanosaur individual from Lo Hueco reinforce this hypothesis. PMID:25118985

  12. "Kasserine Island" boundaries variations during the Upper Cretaceous-Eocene (central Tunisia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadri, Ali; Essid, El Mabrouk; Merzeraud, Gilles

    2015-11-01

    The emergent domain known as "Kasserine Island" in central Tunisia, to the West of the North-South Axis, was emerging during the Turonian. This area has undergone several changes during the Cretaceous-Eocene period. In the present study, the compilation of surface and sub-surface data provided new information about the boundaries variations of the emerged domain. The analysis of paleogeographic maps allowed the identification of three distinct stages of evolution. The first stage extents from the Middle Turonian to the Lower Maastrichtian where the emergent domain covers the area extending from Jebels Selloum-Sidi Aich in the West to Jebel Bouhedma in the East. The boundaries of this area coincide with the E-W Kasserine fault to the North, the N-S Lessouda-Boudinar fault in the East and the N 120 el Mech-Souinia flexure at the South. This emersion contemporaneous with a high eustatic level is most likely related to tectonic activity. The extensional tectonic regime that is characterized by a NE-SW minimal horizontal stress, has reactivated border faults with a normal component. The interference of the tilting of these border faults was at the origin of the emergence of this domain. The ascent of the Triassic salt may also have contributed in this uplift. In the second stage, the emerged domain has reached its maximum expansion to the North, the West and the South during the Middle Maastrichtian-Paleocene period. Its northern limit is irregular, while the southern limit coincides with the N120 Gafsa fault and the E-W fault of Jebels Orbata-Bouhedma. The N-S Lessouda-Boudinar fault forms the eastern limit. This expansion is mostly related to the global eustatic fall that is well characterized during this period, and partly to the compressive tectonic activity. The Lower Eocene is characterized by a marine transgression that has interested the northern edge of the Island, where the Ypresian deposits are discordant on older series. This edge was irregular and marked by

  13. Palaeoclimatic changes during the Upper Cretaceous of eastern Denmark: a study based on the Stevns-2 chalk core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boussaha, M.; Stemmerik, L.; Thibault, N.

    2013-12-01

    The Stevns-2 core located in eastern Denmark penetrated close to 350 m of upper Campanian-Maastrichtian sediments of the upper Chalk Group (Stemmerik et al., 2006). The calcareous nannofossil biozonation spans the time interval from the UC16aBP from the upper Campanian to the NNT1 in the lowermost Danian. Carbon and Oxygen isotopes trends records climatic events occurring in the upper Cretaceous: (1) the Late Campanian warm climatic optimum, (2) the early Maastrichtian cooling event, (3) the mid-Maastrichtian warming event, and (4) the late Maastrichtian cooling event, also observed in the nearby Stevns-1 core (Thibault et al., 2011) . These climatic variations match closely those observed in the nearby Stevns-1 core and in the Atlantic, Pacific and Tethyan realms (Thibault & GARDIN, 2006; Thibault et al., 2011). Changes occurring in the number of observed Inoceramids prisms per meter of core section, in the abundance of calcareous nannofossils and in the visible trace fossils abundances seem to be linked to climatic changes as expressed in the δ18O of the bulk sediment. In addition to the sedimentological data show that the distribution of facies through time from: (1) cyclic marl alternating with mudstone-wackestone chalk and conglomerates, to (2) bioturbated white mudstone and wackestone chalk, then to (3) flint alternating with mudstone and wackestone chalk, ending with (5) bryozoans wackestone and packstone, and the sedimentation rate changes varying from 1.4 cm/kyr to 13.4 cm/kyr. Here we show how changes in the sedimentology of the chalk and abundances of different fossil group are influenced by global and regional mechanisms. Isotopic results mainly reflect global paleoclimatic changes, whereas the sedimentological record is mostly influenced by (1) local variations in paleoproductivity, (2) deep-water paleocurrents influencing the chalk deposition and the shape of the sea-floor, (3) and (4) the geodynamic activity and paleotopography of the Late

  14. Constraining the Geological Time Scale for the Upper Cretaceous in the Edmonton Group: Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heredia, B.; Gaylor, J. R.; Hilgen, F.; Kuiper, K.; Mezger, K.; Wijbrans, J. R.; Quidelleur, X.; Huesing, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Cretaceous period records evidence of sea-level changes, remarkably cyclic sedimentation, major perturbations in carbon cycles during anoxic events, and large scale igneous activity. Astronomically-tuned time scales are only partially consistent with recalculated Ar-Ar constraints for the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary, but differ in number and tuning of 405-kyr eccentricity related cycles. The exposures of Upper Cretaceous strata along the Red Deer River (Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin) offer a unique opportunity to examine aspects of marine, tectonic, and climatic influenced sediments. The uppermost part of the Knudsen Farm section is a well-preserved continuous section, mainly composed by climatically controlled alternations of silt and organic rich horizons, in which altered volcanic ash layers have been deposited. In this section, the K-Pg boundary has been placed at the base of a prominent coal layer (Nevis coal), approx. 24 m from the base of the c29r. We present a compilation of paleomagnetic data, chemical, colour and magnetic susceptibility proxies, and Ar-Ar, K-Ar and U-Pb (CA-TIMS) for the uppermost part of the Maastrichtian, including the base of the c29r to the K-Pg boundary and up to the lowermost Danian. High-resolution radioisotopic ages and the multi-proxy lithological and geochemical datasets are used to develop a cyclostratigraphic reconstruction of this interval, thus permitting the synchronisation of rock clocks close to the K-Pg boundary. This research is funded by the European Community's Seventh Framework Program (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement no [215458].

  15. Authigenic kaolinite and associated pyrite in chalk of the Cretaceous Niobrara Formation, Eastern Colorado.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollastro, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    Cores from the Smoky Hill Chalk Member of the Cretaceous Niobrara Formation have several zones containing authigenic kaolinite as spherical, moldic, polycrystalline aggregates that occur within single or multichambered foraminiferal tests and are commonly associated with framboidal pyrite. Such kaolinite is inferred to result from volcanic ash deposited during chalk sedimentation. Shortly after burial, a colloidal aluminous gel or solution formed from the unstable ash and moved into organic-rich foraminiferal tests, where sulfate-reducing bacteria created a favorable microenvironment for the simultaneous crystallization of kaolinite and pyrite. -Author

  16. Facies analysis of the lower cycles of the Mesaverde Group (Upper Cretaceous) in northwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiteley, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    The uppermost 180 m of the Mancos Shale and overlying 390 m of the Iles Formation of the Mesaverde Group in northwestern Colorado were deposited at the west margin of an epicontinental seaway that spanned North America 66-98 million years ago from the circumboreal seaway on the north to the Gulf of Mexico on the south. Sedimentation in the seaway was controlled by uplift in source areas to the west, subsidence in the basin, and eustatic sea level changes. Sedimentation rates were relatively high, averaging about 220m/million years; marine cycles of deposition occurred in northwestern Colorado that correspond to the Claggett, Judith River, and Bearpaw regressions of Montana. The upper Mancos shale and lower Iles Formation can be subdivided into ten facies based on five criteria: (1) Lithology, texture, and thickness relations (geometry); (2) sedimentary structures and contacts; (3) trace and body fossils; (4) paleocurrent data; and (5) adjoining facies (underlying, overlying, and laterally). Each facies has distinct attributes which characterize a specific depositional environment. Environments represented by facies include (A) offshore shoreface transition (prodelta); (B) shallow marine sand bars; (C) destructional delta front; (D) constructional delta front (sheet sands and mouth bars); (E) beach foreshore-shoreface deposits; (F) interdistributary marsh and swamp deposits and fluvial floodplain; (G) distributary channels; (H) crevasse splays; (J) fluvial streams; and (K) tidally influenced distributary channel. Facies analysis of outcrop data shows that transgressions and regressions occurred, some of which are related to major (eustatic) sea level changes and others that reflect only local causes. These events in northwestern Colorado are summarized in following chapters, and an attempt is made to show their relationship to broad regional patterns of sedimentation.

  17. Trace fossils, storm beds, and depositional sequences in a clastic shelf setting, Upper Cretaceous of Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, R.W. )

    1990-05-01

    In Coal Creek Canyon, Utah the Spring Canyon Member of the Blackhawk Formation is divisible into four regressive hemicycles of deposition each representing the downdip part of a nearshore-to-offshore sequence punctuated locally by hummocky cross-stratification. Bedding units span middle shoreface to lower offshore shelf lithofacies, the latter corresponding to a transgressive intertongue of the Mancos Shale. Trace fossil assemblage include 21 ichnospecies distributed among 17 ichnogenera: Ancorichnus, Aulichnites, Chondrites, Cylindrichnus, Ophiomorpha, Palaeophycus, Phoebichnus, Planolites, Rosselia, Schaubcylindrichnus, Scolicia, Skolithos, Taenidium, Teichichnus, Terebellina, Thalassinoides, and Uchirites. Distal deposits are typified by bioturbate textures; Cylindrichnus concentricus, Palaeophycus heberti, and Rosselia socialis otherwise are prevalent throughout the lithofacies suite. Ophiomorpha irregulaire and Schaubcylindrichnus are most common in middle shoreface beds and Chondrites sp. in upper offshore beds; O. nodosa and O. annulata also are common in this part of the sequence. Planolites-type feeding burrows must have been predominant in many depositional settings but now remain inconspicuous and poorly preserved. Despite gradients in environmental distributions of trace fossils, all resident ichnofaunas are referable to the archetypical Cruziana ichnocoenose. Ichnofaunas in hummocky beds mainly represent either an archetypical Skolithos ichnocoenose or mixed Skolithos-Cruziana ichnocoenose. These post-storm ichnocoenoses correspond primarily to a sere of opportunistic pioneers and secondarily to ensuing seres of resilient resident populations. Differences in ichnofacies also are related to differences in post-storm rates of deposition: the slower the rate of sediment accumulation, the greater the degree of overprinting by burrows from subsequent seres or equilibrium communities.

  18. A New Leptoceratopsid (Ornithischia, Ceratopsia) with a Unique Ischium from the Upper Cretaceous of Shandong Province, China

    PubMed Central

    He, Yiming; Makovicky, Peter J.; Wang, Kebai; Chen, Shuqing; Sullivan, Corwin; Han, Fenglu; Xu, Xing

    2015-01-01

    The partial skeleton of a leptoceratopsid dinosaur, Ischioceratops zhuchengensis gen. et sp. nov., was excavated from the bone-beds of the Upper Cretaceous Wangshi Group of Zhucheng, Shandong Province, China. This fossil represents the second leptoceratopsid dinosaur specimen recovered from the Kugou locality, a highly productive site in Zhucheng. The ischium of the new taxon is morphologically unique among known Dinosauria, flaring gradually to form an obturator process in its middle portion and resembling the shaft of a recurve bow. An elliptical fenestra perforates the obturator process, and the distal end of the shaft forms an axehead-shaped expansion. The discovery of Ischioceratops increases the known taxonomic diversity and morphological disparity of the Leptoceratopsidae. PMID:26701114

  19. Heteromorph ammonites from the Upper Campanian (Upper Cretaceous) Baculites cuneatus and Baculites reesidei zones of the Pierre Shale in Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, W.J.; Cobban, W.A.; Scott, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    Calcareous sandstone concretions in the Upper Cretaceous Pierre Shale in Middle Park and in the Fort Collins area of Colorado in the U.S. Western Interior contain heteromorph ammonites of the families Nostoceratidae HYATT, 1894, and Diplomoceratidae SPATH, 1926. The following species are described: Nostoceras cf. N. approximans (CONRAD, 1855), Nostoceras cf. N. obtusum HOWARTH, 1965, N. larimerense sp. nov., Nostoceras cf. N. splendidum (SHUMARD, 1861). Didymoceras aurarium sp. nov., D. draconis (STEPHENSON, 1941), Cirroceras conradi (MORTON, 1841), Anaklinoceras minutum sp. nov., Solenoceras texanum (SHUMARD, 1861), Solenoceras cf. S. reesidei STEPHENSON, 1941, Lewyites oronensis (LEWY, 1969), and Lewyites? sp. All these species are migrants from the Gulf coastal region. Didymoceras draconis and Cirroceras conradi are also known from the Delaware-New Jersey area, and these two species, together with Solenoceras texanum are known from as far away as Israel.

  20. Petrology and reservoir paragenesis in the Sussex B sandstone of the Upper Cretaceous Cody Shale, House Creek and Porcupine fields, Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This book of reservoir paragenesis includes detailed descriptions of the petrology of depositional facies of the Sussex B sandstone of the Sussex Sandstone Member of the Upper Cretaceous Cody Shale in the House Creek and Porcupine fields, Powder River basin, Wyoming.

  1. Paleoenvironments and origin of the sedimentary phosphorites of the Napo Formation (Late Cretaceous, Oriente Basin, Ecuador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookfield, M. E.; Hemmings, D. P.; Van Straaten, P.

    2009-08-01

    The Napo phosphorites were deposited at the edge of a stable marine shelf during the Upper Cretaceous (Coniacian) oceanic anoxic event (OAE 3) at the transition from bioclastic limestone to organic-rich shale facies. Phosphogenesis was triggered in the shelf margin environment by a number of factors including strong upwelling currents, high biological activity, plankton blooms, and large amounts of organic matter production and subsequent accumulation. Dissolved phosphate levels increased in the sediment from a combination of anoxic conditions and microbial activity. Once dissolved phosphate concentrations were high enough, apatite began to form around nucleic sites including mineral grains, shells, wood fragments, and foraminifera tests forming peloidal fluorine rich carbonate fluoroapatite (francolite). As the peloids formed, sedimentation continued and dissolved phosphate concentrations diminished. A period of minor winnowing ensued, and as dissolved phosphate concentrations remained low, shale layers were deposited separating the various phosphate layers.

  2. Metamorphic pattern of the Cretaceous Celica Formation, SW Ecuador, and its geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Luis

    1992-04-01

    The volcanic rocks of the Cretaceous Celica Formation of southern Ecuador are affected by a weak although widespread alteration. The chemical study of the secondary chemical phases present in andesitic and basaltic lava flows reveals that this alteration corresponds to very low-grade metamorphism comprising the zeolite and the prehnite-pumpellyite facies. Main features of this metamorphism are: weak lithostatic pressure, moderate to steep thermal gradient, high ƒ O2, low value of the seawater/rock ratio and total absence of deformation. These characteristics are typically present in other volcanic suites of similar age and composition along the Andes and correspond to the pattern of metamorphism developed in extensional settings (diastathermal metamorphism) linked to various degrees of thinning of the continental crust. Based on this metamorphic pattern, a geodynamic model is proposed in which the Celica Formation is interpreted as an ensialic, aborted, marginal basin developed on strongly attenuated continental crust at the border of the South American plate. The relationship between the Ecuadorian and Colombian volcanic suites of Cretaceous age present along the Western Cordillera is discussed in the light of the model suggested.

  3. Early Cretaceous vegetation and climate change at high latitude: palynological evidence from Isachsen Formation, Arctic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Jennifer M.; Tullius, Dylan N.; Evenchick, Carol A.; Swindles, Graeme T.; Hadlari, Thomas; Embry, Ashton

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the behaviour of global climate during relatively warm periods in Earth's history, such as the Cretaceous Period, advances our overall understanding of the climate system and provides insight on drivers of climate change over geologic time. While it has been suggested that the Valanginian Age represents the first episode of Cretaceous greenhouse climate conditions with relatively equable warm temperatures, mounting evidence suggests that this time was relatively cool. A paucity of paleoclimate data currently exists for polar regions compared to mid- and low-latitudes and this is particularly true for the Canadian Arctic. There is also a lack of information about the terrestrial realm as most paleoclimate studies have been based on marine material. Here we present quantitative pollen and spore data obtained from the marginal marine and deltaic-fluvial Isachsen Formation of the Sverdrup Basin, Canadian Arctic, to better understand the long-term vegetation and climate history of polar regions during the warm but variable Early Cretaceous (Valanginian to Early Aptian). Detrended correspondence analysis of main pollen and spore taxa is used to derive three ecological groupings influenced by moisture and disturbance based on the botanical affinities of palynomorphs: 1) a mixed coniferous assemblage containing both lowland and upland components; 2) a conifer-filicopsid community that likely grew in dynamic lowland habitats; and, 3) a mature dry lowland community composed of Cheirolepidaceans. Stratigraphic changes in the relative abundance of pollen and spore taxa reflect climate variability in this polar region during the ~20 Mya history of the Isachsen Formation. The late Valanginian was relatively cool and moist and promoted lowland conifer-filicopsid communities. Warming in the Hauterivian resulted in the expansion coniferous communities in well-drained or arid hinterlands. A return to relatively cool and moist conditions in the Barremian resulted in the

  4. Basin analysis of Upper Cretaceous strata of the Washakie and Red Desert basins, southwestern Wyoming, employing computer-generated maps and cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Kohles, K.M.; Potts, J. ); Reid, F.S.

    1991-03-01

    The Washakie and Red Desert basins comprise the eastern portion of the Greater Green River basins of southwestern Wyoming. Stratigraphically the basins are dominated by a thick package of Cretaceous clastic sediments, as much as 16,000 ft thick, which resulted from several major transgressive-regressive cycles. Upper Cretaceous strata deposited during the latest cycle contain extensive deposits of commercial hydrocarbons, particularly gas. Much of the present structural configuration of the area is the result of the Laramide Orogeny in Late Cretaceous time. To facilitate a comprehensive geological analysis of the area a computerized subsurface data base was constructed from available well logs for approximately 3,000 wells in the Washakie and Red Desert basins. This data base contains correlated tops for most of the major Upper Cretaceous stratigraphic units, including selected subdivisions and net sand thickness values. Consistent correlations were achieved through the use of a tight, loop-tied cross section and key well network containing over 400 correlated well-logs. A complete suite of structure contour maps on all correlated horizons was generated from the data base with commercially available software. These maps, along with selected computer-generated structural cross sections, reveal a detailed subsurface picture of the Washakie and Red Desert basins. Isopachous maps of selected intervals were also produced to illustrate the Late Cretaceous depositional history of the area.

  5. Revised nomenclature, definitions, and correlations for the Cretaceous formations in USGS-Clubhouse Crossroads #1, Dorchester County, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gohn, Gregory S.

    1992-01-01

    The stratigraphy of the Cretaceous section in a continuously cored stratigraphic test hole, USGS-Clubhouse Crossroads #1, is reviewed and amended herein. Located in southern Dorchester County, S.C., the Clubhouse Crossroads #1 core is one of the principal stratigraphic reference sections in the southern Atlantic Coastal Plain. Traditional and revised systems of stratigraphic nomenclature for the outcropping Cretaceous formations of the Carolinas are reviewed for their applicability in defining subsurface Cretaceous formations at Clubhouse Crossroads. The revised nomenclature, exemplified by the formations proposed by J. P. Owens in 1989 and by N. F. Sohl and Owens in 1991, is preferred for this purpose over the traditional nomenclature established by D.J.P. Swift and S.D. Heron, Jr., in 1969. The revised nomenclature is selected because of its greater emphasis on the historical succession of entire sedimentary systems (timeparallel formations), in contrast to the emphasis placed on the physical continuity of individual facies through time (time-transgressive formations) in the traditional nomenclature. Physical relationships between the two types of formations are discerned by using K.E. Caster's 1934 facies model, in which the time-transgressive units of the traditional model are his magnafacies and the time-parallel units of the revised model are sets of his laterally contiguous parvafacies. In 1977, G.S. Gohn and others and J.E. Hazel and others provisionally delineated Cretaceous formations in the Clubhouse Crossroads #1 core by using Swift and Heron's traditional units. The publication of additional lithologic and paleontologic data since 1977 for Cretaceous units in the core and for Cretaceous units throughout the Carolinas provides a basis for reviewing and amending the original definitions of the Cretaceous formations at Clubhouse Crossroads. Ages assigned to the Cretaceous units at Clubhouse Crossroads by Hazel and others are also reviewed. The boundaries

  6. Paleocurrent, petrography and provenance analyses of the Ajali Sandstone (Upper Cretaceous), southeastern Benue Trough, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amajor, L. C.

    1987-09-01

    Paleocurrent, petrographic and heavy-mineral analyses of the Ajali Sandstone (Late Cretaceous) in southeastern Nigeria show that the sedimentary rocks on the Santonian Okigwe-Abakaliki anticlinorium provided the major detritus, whereas minor contributions of the eastern Precambrian basement block (Oban massif) are confined along a narrow belt southeast of Alayi in the Afikpo Basin. The sandstones derived from the major sedimentary source are quartz arenites characterized by a zircon-tourmaline heavy-mineral assemblage and a radial paleocurrent pattern which parallels the paleoslope of the provenance. On the other hand, those sands generated from the eastern basement block are arkose and sub-arkose dominated by a garnet-apatite-rutile heavy-mineral assemblage and southwesterly directed paleocurrent modes. The results of this study support the previous hypothesis that most ancient quartz arenites are multicycle in origin.

  7. Chronostratigraphic cross section of Cretaceous formations in western Montana, western Wyoming, eastern Utah, northeastern Arizona, and northwestern New Mexico, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merewether, E. Allen; McKinney, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    In this transect for time-stratigraphic units of the Cretaceous, lateral changes in lithologies, regional differences in thicknesses, and the abundance of associated disconformities possibly reflect local and regional tectonic events. Examples of evidence of those events follow: (1) Disconformities and the absence of strata of lowest Cretaceous age in western Montana, western Wyoming, and northern Utah indicate significant tectonism and erosion probably during the Late Jurassic and earliest Cretaceous; ( 2) stages of Upper Cretaceous deposition in the transect display major lateral changes in thickness, which probably reflect regional and local tectonism.

  8. Architectural studies of Jurassic-Cretaceous fluvial units, Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Miall, A.D.; Bromley, M.H.; Cowan, E.J.; Turner-Peterson, C.E.

    1989-03-01

    A sixfold hierarchy of architectural elements and bounding surfaces evolved from outcrop studies of three fluvial units: Westwater Canyon member (WCM), Morrison Formation, Upper Jurassic; Torrivio sandstone member (TSM), Gallup Sandstone, Upper Cretaceous, northwestern New Mexico; and Kayenta Formation (KF), Lower Jurassic, southwestern Colorado. This hierarchy is discussed.

  9. Stratigraphy and Facies of Cretaceous Schrader Bluff and Prince Creek Formations in Colville River Bluffs, North Slope, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, Romeo M.; Myers, Mark D.; Houseknecht, David W.; Stricker, Gary D.; Brizzolara, Donald W.; Ryherd, Timothy J.; Takahashi, Kenneth I.

    2007-01-01

    Stratigraphic and sedimentologic studies of facies of the Upper Cretaceous rocks along the Colville River Bluffs in the west-central North Slope of Alaska identified barrier shoreface deposits consisting of vertically stacked, coarsening-upward parasequences in the Schrader Bluff Formation. This vertical stack of parasequence deposits represents progradational sequences that were affected by shoaling and deepening cycles caused by fluctuations of sea level. Further, the vertical stack may have served to stabilize accumulation of voluminous coal deposits in the Prince Creek Formation, which formed braided, high-sinuosity meandering, anastomosed, and low-sinuosity meandering fluvial channels and related flood plain deposits. The erosional contact at the top of the uppermost coarsening-upward sequence, however, suggests a significant drop of base level (relative sea level) that permitted a semiregional subaerial unconformity to develop at the contact between the Schrader Bluff and Prince Creek Formations. This drop of relative sea level may have been followed by a relative sea-level rise to accommodate coal deposition directly above the unconformity. This rise was followed by a second drop of relative sea level, with formation of incised valley topography as much as 75 ft deep and an equivalent surface of a major marine erosion or mass wasting, or both, either of which can be traced from the Colville River Bluffs basinward to the subsurface in the west-central North Slope. The Prince Creek fluvial deposits represent late Campanian to late Maastrichtian depositional environments that were affected by these base level changes influenced by tectonism, basin subsidence, and sea-level fluctuations.

  10. A compaction correction for the paleomagnetism of the Cretaceous Pigeon Point Formation of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, K. P.; Davi, J. M.

    1995-10-01

    The paleomagnetism of the Cretaceous Pigeon Point Formation turbidites was reexamined to determine whether the 25° of southerly paleolatitudinal offset originally observed (Champion et al., 1984) for these rocks was all, or in part, due to compaction shallowing of their paleomagnetic inclination. The study consisted of two parts: (1) A standard paleomagnetic study, including detailed thermal and alternating field demagnetization, was conducted on oriented cores collected at Pigeon Point, approximately 50 km south of San Francisco, California. The results of this study were combined with the alternating field demagnetized results for samples provided by D. Champion from the initial Pigeon Point paleomagnetic study. The combined data set has a mean direction for Pigeon Point (I=41.6°, D=346.9°) similar to that originally obtained by Champion et al. (1984). (2) Material from the Pigeon Point Formation was disaggregated, given a laboratory analog of a postdepositional remanence, and compacted to pressures as high as 0.13 MPa which caused volume losses up to 53%. The laboratory-compacted samples were alternating field demagnetized, and their magnetic inclination and anisotropy of anhysteretic remanence were both measured. These data were used to derive correction curves, following Jackson et al. (1991), which describe the specific relationship between remanence anisotropy and inclination shallowing for the Pigeon Point Formation. Two correction curves were determined, one assuming that the magnetic particle orientation distribution experienced a prolate deformation after remanence acquisition and one assuming an oblate deformation. These two different corrections were necessary because the anisotropy of anhysteretic remanence indicates a composite fabric due to both a prelithification technically caused lineation and a burial compaction foliation. The anisotropy of anhysteretic remanence measured for each paleomagnetic sample and the correction curves determined from

  11. Terrestrial input into the upper Cretaceous western tropical Atlantic as traced by biomarker and maceral analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, B.; Birgel, D.; Erbacher, J.; Lückge, A.

    2009-04-01

    The mid Cretaceous represents one of the most prominent episodes of greenhouse climate with high atmospheric CO2 levels and much higher global temperatures than today. During this super-greenhouse, massive and widespread deposition of organic carbon occurred during several Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs). The OAEs are associated with prominent shifts in carbon isotopes and thus represent major disturbances of the ocean system and the global carbon cycle. As such, OAEs played a fundamental role in the evolution of Earth's climatic and biotic history. In the past, research on the dynamics of the mid Cretaceous greenhouse world was almost exclusively based on marine proxy data, while up to now, only few information is available on environmental dynamics and atmosphere/biosphere interactions in terrestrial settings. We investigate two sites (1258 and 1260), drilled approx. 350 km off Suriname at the Demerara Rise during ODP Leg 207, recovering late Albian to Santonian sediments. These black shales were deposited in a proximal position relative to the tropical South American mainland and provide the unique opportunity to link terrestrial environmental information with a wide range of marine paleoclimatic and paleoceanographic proxy data, thus allowing a direct land/sea correlation. Here, we show first results from our multi-parameter study along a stratigraphic splice from the mid Cenomanian to early Turonian, covering two exceptional paleoceanographic events, the OAE2 and the Mid Cenomanian Event (MCE). Our working strategy combines XRF-core scanning with microscopic investigation (maceral analysis), biomarker analysis and subsequently determination of isotopic composition of specific terrestrial organic compounds. Samples from the investigated interval cover a large range of total organic carbon (TOC) concentration, the organic material proves to be thermally immature. For the OAE2, values vary between 1.4 % TOC after the maximum isotope excursion and 23.3 % TOC within

  12. Depositional environments and processes in Upper Cretaceous nonmarine and marine sediments, Ocean Point dinosaur locality, North Slope, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    A 178-m-thick stratigraphic section exposed along the lower Colville River in northern Alaska, near Ocean Point, represents the uppermost part of a 1500 m Upper Cretaceous stratigraphic section. Strata exposed at Ocean Point are assigned to the Prince Creek and Schrader Bluff formations. Three major depositional environments are identified consisting, in ascending order, of floodplain, interdistributary-bay, and shallow-marine shelf. Nonmarine strata, comprising the lower 140 m of this section, consist of fluvial distributaries, overbank sediments, tephra beds, organic-rich beds, and vertebrate remains. Tephras yield isotopic ages between 68 and 72.9 Ma, generally consistent with paleontologic ages of late Campanian-Maastrichtian determined from dinosaur remains, pollen, foraminifers, and ostracodes. Meandering low-energy rivers on a low-gradient, low-relief floodplain carried a suspended-sediment load. The rivers formed multistoried channel deposits (channels to 10 m deep) as well as solitary channel deposits (channels 2-5 m deep). Extensive overbank deposits resulting from episodic flooding formed fining-upward strata on the floodplain. The fining-upward strata are interbedded with tephra and beds of organic-rich sediment. Vertical-accretion deposits containing abundant roots indicate a sheet flood origin for many beds. Vertebrate and nonmarine invertebrate fossils along with plant debris were locally concentrated in the floodplain sediment. Deciduous conifers as well as abundant wetland plants, such as ferns, horsetails, and mosses, covered the coastal plain. Dinosaur skeletal remains have been found concentrated in floodplain sediments in organic-rich bone beds and as isolated bones in fluvial channel deposits in at least nine separate horizons within a 100-m-thick interval. Arenaceous foraminifers in some organic-rich beds and shallow fluvial distributaries indicate a lower coastal plain environment with marginal marine (bay) influence. Marginal marine strata

  13. Late cretaceous foraminifera, paleoenvironments, and paleoceanography of the rosario formation, San Antonio del Mar, Baja California, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maestas, Y.; MacLeod, K.G.; Douglas, R.; Self-Trail, J.; Ward, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    The 315 m of Rosario Formation exposed at the San Antonio del Mar (SADM) section (Baja California, Mexico) contains moderately-to-well preserved benthic and planktic foraminifera, calcareous nannofossils, and molluscs. Nannofossils suggest most of the SADM section was deposited within a narrow interval of the late Campanian (CC21-CC22), whereas foraminifera and molluscs suggest a younger maximum age (younger than the Globotruncana ventricosa Zone) and allow deposition over a longer interval of time. Planktic foraminifera at SADM represent common Tethyan taxa. They are largely restricted to the lower and middle portions of the section and comprise 0-???40% of foraminiferal assemblages. Stable isotopic analyses of Rugoglobigerina rugosa yield ??18OV-PDB values from -2.27%, to -2.82%, corresponding to salinity-corrected paleotemperature estimates of 26-30??C for the Late Cretaceous eastern Pacific. These estimates are as warm as modern tropical temperatures and are similar to tropical paleotemperature estimates from ??18O analyses of exceptionally preserved Maastrichtian samples; however, they are considerably warmer than most tropical Campanian-Maastrichtian estimates. Benthic foraminifera indicate outer shelf paleodepths with a slight increase in depth or decrease in benthic oxygen levels in the upper parts of the interval studied. The change in the benthic assemblage corresponds to an ???1??? positive shift in benthic ??O18, suggesting a relationship between benthic assemblages and an inferred increase in the local intensity of upwelling.

  14. Dinosaur tracks from the Cedar Mountain Formation (Lower Cretaceous), Arches National Park, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockley, M.G.; White, D.; Kirkland, J.; Santucci, V.

    2004-01-01

    The seventh and largest known dinosaur tracksite from the Cedar Mountain Formation is reported from two important stratigraphic levels in the Ruby Ranch Member within the boundaries of Arches National Park. Previous reports of sites with a few isolated tracks are of limited utility in indicating the fauna represented by track makers. The Arches site reveals evidence of several theropod morphotypes, including a possible match for the coelurosaur Nedcolbertia and an apparently didactyl Utahraptor-like dromeosaurid. Sauropod tracks indicate a wide-gauge morphotype (cf. Brontopodus). Ornithischian tracks suggest the presence of an iguandontid-like ornithopod and a large ankylosaur. Dinosaur track diversity is high in comparison with other early Cretaceous vertebrate ichnofaunas, and it correlates well with faunal lists derived from skeletal remains, thus providing a convincing census of the known fauna. ?? Taylor and Francis Inc.

  15. Fossil birds from the Late Cretaceous Los Alamitos Formation, Río Negro Province, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnolin, Federico L.; Martinelli, Agustín G.

    2009-02-01

    In this note we report new avian remains from the Late Cretaceous Los Alamitos Formation (Campanian-Maastrichtian) at the Los Alamitos locality, Río Negro Province, Argentina. Isolated remains referable to indeterminate Aves, ?Patagopterygiformes, indeterminate Ornithurae, cf. Hesperornithes and cf. Neornithes are described and discussed. The new genus and species Alamitornis minutus is erected to include a minute-sized and gracile bird, probably related to the non-volant ratite-like bird Patagopteryx. If correctly identified, the record of Hesperornithes may be the first for this group in the Southern Hemisphere. The Los Alamitos paleoavifauna represents one of the most diverse fossil bird assemblage from the Mesozoic of Gondwana known to date.

  16. A multidisciplinary study of the Lower Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation, Mussentuchit Wash, Utah: a determination of the paleoenvironment and paleoecology of the Eolambia caroljonesa dinosaur quarry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, J.R.; Brinkman, D.; Nichols, D.J.; Layer, P.; Burge, D.; Thayn, D.

    2007-01-01

    A quarry within the Cedar Mountain Formation in Mussentuchit Wash, Emery County, Utah, produced a fossil assemblage containing the remains of at least eight juvenile iguanodontid dinosaurs (Eolambia caroljonesa). The Cedar Mountain Formation lies stratigraphically between the Tithonian-Berriasian (Upper Jurassic) Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation and the Cenomanian (Upper Cretaceous) Dakota Formation. Detailed stratigraphic, sedimentological, geochronological, palynological, and paleontological data have been collected along a measured section at the site of the Cifelli #2 Eolambia caroljonesa Quarry. These data provide a chronostratigraphic and a biostratigraphic framework for the Cedar Mountain Formation and allow a detailed reconstruction of the paleoenvironment and the paleoecology of the local paleogeographic area from which E. caroljonesa have been recovered. Three 40Ar/39Ar ages ranging from 96.7 to 98.5 Ma have been obtained three stratigraphically distinct altered volcanic ash layers within the Mussentuchit Member, one of which passes through the E. caroljonesa quarry, that indicate that the quarry is latest Albian in age and that the stratigraphic boundary between the Mussentuchit Member of the Cedar Mountain Formation and the overlying Dakota Formation is at or near the Albian/Cenomanian boundary. Sedimentological and biostratigraphic data suggest that significant long-term and short-term climatic changes are recorded in the Cedar Mountain Formation. During deposition of the lower part of the formation, climatic conditions were warm and arid to semi-arid. During deposition of the upper part of the formation, conditions became more humid. The progressive change in climatic conditions was probably related to the transgression of the Mowry Sea from the north. Cyclic sedimentation in the Mussentuchit Member suggests high-frequency changes from wet to dry periods. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. High-pressure greenschist to blueschist facies transition in the Maimón Formation (Dominican Republic) suggests mid-Cretaceous subduction of the Early Cretaceous Caribbean arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torró, L.; Garcia-Casco, A.; Proenza, J. A.; Blanco-Quintero, I. F.; Gutiérrez-Alonso, G.; Lewis, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    The Maimón Formation (Cordillera Central, Dominican Republic) is formed of metamorphosed bi-modal mafic-felsic volcanic rocks and sedimentary horizons of Early Cretaceous age deposited in the forearc of the nascent Caribbean island arc. Two structural-metamorphic zones depict an inverted metamorphic gradient: the Ozama shear zone, which records intense mylonitic and phyllonitic deformation and ubiquitous metamorphic recrystallization, tectonically overlies the much less deformed and variably recrystallized rocks of the El Altar zone. The presence of ferri-winchite and high-Si phengite, first reported in this paper, in the peak metamorphic assemblage of rocks of the Ozama shear zone (actinolite + phengite + chlorite + epidote + quartz + albite ± ferri-winchite ± stilpnomelane) point to subduction-related metamorphism. Pseudosection calculations and intersection of isopleths indicate peak metamorphic conditions of 8.2 kbar at 380 °C. These figures are consistent with metamorphism in the greenschist/blueschist facies transition, burial depths of 25-29 km and a thermal gradient of 13-16 °C/km. Our new data dispute previous models pointing to metamorphism of Maimón rocks under a steep thermal gradient related to burial under a hot peridotite slice. Instead, we contextualize the metamorphism of the Maimón Formation in a subduction scenario in which a coherent slice of the (warm) Early Cretaceous forearc was engulfed due to intra-arc complexities and regional-scale-driven tectonic processes operating in the late Early Cretaceous. Integration of our findings with previous studies on metamorphic complexes in Hispaniola suggests that a major tectonic event affecting the whole arc system took place at c. 120-110 Ma.

  18. Factors controlling the abundance of organic sulfur in flash pyrolyzates of Upper Cretaceous kerogens from Sergipe Basin, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carmo, A.M.; Stankiewicz, B.A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Pratt, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    The molecular and elemental composition of immature kerogens isolated from Upper Cretaceous marine carbonates from Sergipe Basin, Brazil were investigated using combined pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and organic petrographic techniques. The kerogens are predominantly composed of reddish-fluorescing amorphous organic matter (AOM) and variable amounts of yellow-fluorescing alginite and liptodetrinite. The abundance of organic sulfur in the kerogens inferred from the ratio 2-ethyl-5-methylthiophene/(1,2-dimethylbenzene + dec-1-ene) in the pyrolyzates is variable and may be related to changes in the type of primary organic input and/or to variations in rates of bacterial sulfate reduction. A concomitant increase in S/C and O/C ratios determined in situ using the electron microprobe is observed in AOM and alginites and may be related to a progressive oxidation of the organic matter during sulfurization. The S/C ratio of the AOM is systematically higher than the S C ratio of the alginites. Combined with a thiophene distribution characteristic of pyrolyzates of Type II organic matter, the higher S/C of AOM in Sergipe kerogens suggests that sulfurization and incorporation of low-molecular weight lipids derived from normal marine organic matter into the kerogen structure predominated over direct sulfurization of highly aliphatic algal biomacromolecules.The molecular and elemental composition of immature kerogens isolated from Upper Cretaceous marine carbonates from Sergipe Basin, Brazil were investigated using combined pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and organic petrographic techniques. The kerogens are predominantly composed of reddish-fluorescing amorphous organic matter (AOM) and variable amounts of yellow-fluorescing alginite and liptodetrinite. The abundance of organic sulfur in the kerogens inferred from the ratio 2-ethyl-5-methylthiophene/(1,2-dimethylbenzene+dec-1-ene) in the pyrolyzates is variable and may be related to changes in

  19. Stratigraphic sequence, microfacies, and petroleum prospects of the Yamama Formation, Lower Cretaceous, southern Iraq

    SciTech Connect

    Sadooni, F.N. )

    1993-11-01

    The Lower Cretaceous Yamama Formation basin was deposited over two tectonic regimes, the northeastern flank of the stable Arabian platform and the unstable zone of the Mesopotamian foredeep. This situation and the probable syntectonic deposition of the formation over growing structures created complex carbonate lithologies. From this tectonic configuration and the facies distribution, it seems that the Yamama Formation was deposited in a setting that changes from an inner to an outer ramp. Along the hinge line separating those two tectonic units, oolite shoals developed. The crestal areas of the growing structures were occupied by stromatoporoid-sponge-coral reefs and oolitic facies. The areas between reefs were the sites of carbonate mud accumulation. For the purposes of regional correlation and reserve estimation, the Yamama Formation is divided into five lithologic units: three reservoir units, designated from top as YR-A, YR-B, and YR-C, separated by two permeability barrier units, YB-1 and YB-2. These reservoir units are thought to be at least partially isolated from each other. The best oil prospects are within the oolite shoals and the patch reef buildups in the crestal parts of the structures.

  20. Taxonomic diversity of cockroach assemblages (Blattaria, Insecta) of the Aptian Crato Formation (Cretaceous, NE Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shih-Wei

    2016-10-01

    A comprehensive revision of 981 specimens of fossil cockroaches from the Lower Cretaceous laminated limestones of the Crato Formation of Northeast Brazil shows that they belong to eleven taxa, including Piniblattella limai, P. magna sp. n., Perlucipecta santanensis. sp. n., Raptoblatta waddingtonae; Ocelloblattula santanensis sp. n., Elisama brevis (= E. americana, syn.n.), E. hindwingnii sp. n., Ponopterix axelrodi (= P. maxima syn.n.), Umenopterix burkhardi comb. n., and Cratovitisma oldreadi (Umenocoleidae = Cratovitismidae syn.n. = Ponopterixidae syn.n.). The family Ectobiidae is numerically most abundant in the assemblage of cockroaches of the Crato Formation (83 % of cockroaches), followed by Blattulidae (13 %) and Umenocoleidae (4 %). 79.2 % of specimens are complete and fully articulated. Members of the family Alienopteridae are probably also present. Representatives of a relatively common Mesozoic superfamily Caloblattinoidea are missing. With the exception of the endemic genera Cratovitisma and Raptoblatta and the exclusively Gondwanan genus Ocelloblattula, all other genera were cosmopolitan. Taxonomic richness of cockroaches of the Crato Formation is thus rather low, and consists of geologically long-ranging and geographically-widespread genera, genera restricted to Gondwana, and short-ranging endemic genera found in the Crato Formation only.

  1. Chapter 1: Executive Summary - 2003 Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources in the Upper Cretaceous Navarro and Taylor Groups, Western Gulf Province, Gulf Coast Region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed an assessment of the undiscovered oil and gas potential of the Upper Cretaceous Navarro and Taylor Groups in the Western Gulf Province of the Gulf Coast region (fig. 1) as part of a national oil and gas assessment effort (USGS Navarro and Taylor Groups Assessment Team, 2004). The assessment of the petroleum potential of the Navarro and Taylor Groups was based on the general geologic elements used to define a total petroleum system (TPS), including hydrocarbon source rocks (source rock maturation, hydrocarbon generation and migration), reservoir rocks (sequence stratigraphy and petrophysical properties), and hydrocarbon traps (trap formation and timing). Using this geologic framework, the USGS defined five assessment units (AU) in the Navarro and Taylor Groups as parts of a single TPS, the Smackover-Austin-Eagle Ford Composite TPS: Travis Volcanic Mounds Oil AU, Uvalde Volcanic Mounds Gas and Oil AU, Navarro-Taylor Updip Oil and Gas AU, Navarro-Taylor Downdip Gas and Oil AU, and Navarro-Taylor Slope-Basin Gas AU (table 1).

  2. A condensed middle Cenomanian succession in the Dakota Sandstone (Upper Cretaceous), Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hook, Stephen C.; Cobban, William A.

    2007-01-01

    The upper part of the Dakota Sandstone exposed on the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, northern Socorro County, New Mexico, is a condensed, Upper Cretaceous, marine succession spanning the first five middle Cenomanian ammonite zones of the U.S. Western Interior. Farther north in New Mexico these five ammonite zones occur over a stratigraphic interval more than an order of magnitude thicker. The basal part of this marine sequence was deposited in Seboyeta Bay, an elongate east-west embayment into New Mexico that marked the initial transgression of the western shoreline of the Late Cretaceous seaway into New Mexico. The primary mechanism for condensing this section was nearshore, submarine erosion, although nondeposition played a minor role. The ammonite fossils from each zone are generally fragments of internal molds that are corroded on one side, indicating submarine burial, erosion of the prefossilized steinkern, and corrosion on the sea floor. In addition, the base of the condensed succession is marked by a thin bed that contains abundant, white-weathering, spherical to cylindrical phosphate nodules, many of which contain a cylindrical axial cavity of unknown origin. The nodules lie on the bedding surface of the highly burrowed, ridge-forming sandstone near the top of the Dakota and occur in the overlying breccia. The breccia consists of rip-up clasts of sandstone and eroded internal molds of the ammonite Conlinoceras tarrantense, the zonal index for the basal middle Cenomanian. The nodules below the breccia imply a time of erosion followed by nondeposition or sediment bypass during which the phosphatization occurred. The breccia implies a time of submarine erosion, probably storm-related. Remarkably, this condensed succession and the basal part of the overlying Mancos Shale tongue contain one of the most complete middle Cenomanian ammonite sequences in the U.S. Western Interior. Five of the six ammonite zones that characterize the middle Cenomanian of the

  3. Isotope and elemental geochemistry of Cretaceous fossiliferous concretions (Santana Formation, Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimhofer, Ulrich; Meister, Patrick; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Ariztegui, Daniel; Martill, David M.; Schwark, Lorenz

    2014-05-01

    Exceptional three-dimensional fossil preservation (incl. phosphatization of soft-tissues) within organic carbon-rich mudstones is often associated with the formation of a protective carbonate shell surrounding the fossil specimen. Examples for this type of preservation are the Early Cretaceous fishes, turtles and pterosaurs from the Brazilian Santana Formation. Numerous studies proposed different conceptual models for concretion formation. Having new state-of-the-art geochemical tools at hand we revisited these models for the Santana Formation as an exemplary case. Differential compaction clearly indicates early precipitation of micritic calcite surrounding a central cavity containing the still decomposing fossil. The presence of pyrite forming a circular rim around the fossil and carbonate with negative carbon isotope compositions suggest intense sulphate reduction whereby the production of ammonium from the decay of proteins led to an increased alkalinity, which induced early carbonate precipitation. By means of micro-XRF scanning we found that pyrite is absent from the interior part of the concretions and that total iron content is very low, which indicate absence of sulphate reduction at the center of the concretions and possibly local onset of methanogenesis. We postulate that the central cavity may even have been filled with methane gas that evolved from the decaying animal. Methane diffusing outward was anaerobically oxidized in the surrounding sulphate reduction zone. Carbonate clumped isotopes revealed that micritic calcite formed early, but that these early precipitates are overprinted by two different late diagenetic cements precipitated at elevated temperatures. The occurrence of an outermost "cone-in-cone" calcite rim can be associated with burial showing temperatures of up to 60°C. Strontium-isotope ratios of matrix calcite and cement phases show radiogenic values (0.710416 to 0.712465), which are significantly higher than typical marine Cretaceous

  4. The internal anatomy of titanosaur osteoderms from the Upper Cretaceous of Spain is compatible with a role in oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Daniel; Ortega, Francisco; Gascó, Francisco; Serrano-Martínez, Alejandro; Sanz, José Luis

    2017-01-01

    Dermal armor is one of the most intriguing features of some titanosaurs, the only sauropod dinosaurs that bore osteoderms. Some studies have revealed cavities of varying sizes inside some titanosaur osteoderms, interpreted as the result of bone remodeling for mineral mobilization. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the need for mineral mobilization in titanosaurs. However, rejecting those hypotheses was difficult with hitherto available evidence. The Upper Cretaceous site of Lo Hueco (Cuenca; Spain) has yielded one of the largest titanosaur osteoderm sets available. Observation of pre-existing breakages in the fossils and CT-scanning have revealed a predominant internal channel network for bulb and root osteoderms: most had a very compact spongy bone core, perfused by large longitudinal branching neurovascular canals. Only few osteoderms from the same bed, which was deposited in a single and short event, had areas with low-density spongy bone. This void-like low-density bone is always associated with internal channels. It is also present in osteoderms of different sizes. This scenario is best explained when considering that Lo Hueco titanosaurs might have used their osteoderms as a source of calcium that was mobilized during oogenesis, although other hypotheses cannot be completely ruled out. PMID:28169348

  5. Encrustation of inarticulate brachiopods on scaphitid ammonites and inoceramid bivalves from the Upper Cretaceous U. S. Western Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landman, Neil H.; Slattery, Joshua S.; Harries, Peter J.

    2016-12-01

    The inarticulate brachiopod Discinisca is a rare faunal element in the Upper Cretaceous of the U.S. Western Interior. We report two occurrences of encrustation of Discinisca on a scaphitid ammonite (scaphite) and several inoceramids from the lower Maastrichtian Baculites baculus/Endocostea typica Biozones of the Pierre Shale at two localities. Six specimens of Discinisca are present on a single specimen of Hoploscaphites crassus from east-central Montana. They occur along the furrow at the mature apertural margin. Because the brachiopods are restricted to the margin and do not occur on the rest of the shell, it is likely that they encrusted the ammonite during its lifetime. If so, this implies that the soft body of the scaphite did not cover the outside surface of the aperture, leaving this area vulnerable to epizoan attachment. A total of 13 specimens of Discinisca are also present on four specimens of Cataceramus? barabini from east-central Wyoming. The brachiopods occur in crevices on the outside of the shells and may have encrusted the inoceramids after their death as the shells began to break down and delaminate, resulting from the decomposition of the organic matrix holding them together. Based on the faunal assemblages at both localities, the presence of Discinisca may indicate environments with either low oxygen levels and/or few predators or competitors.

  6. The internal anatomy of titanosaur osteoderms from the Upper Cretaceous of Spain is compatible with a role in oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Daniel; Ortega, Francisco; Gascó, Francisco; Serrano-Martínez, Alejandro; Sanz, José Luis

    2017-02-07

    Dermal armor is one of the most intriguing features of some titanosaurs, the only sauropod dinosaurs that bore osteoderms. Some studies have revealed cavities of varying sizes inside some titanosaur osteoderms, interpreted as the result of bone remodeling for mineral mobilization. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the need for mineral mobilization in titanosaurs. However, rejecting those hypotheses was difficult with hitherto available evidence. The Upper Cretaceous site of Lo Hueco (Cuenca; Spain) has yielded one of the largest titanosaur osteoderm sets available. Observation of pre-existing breakages in the fossils and CT-scanning have revealed a predominant internal channel network for bulb and root osteoderms: most had a very compact spongy bone core, perfused by large longitudinal branching neurovascular canals. Only few osteoderms from the same bed, which was deposited in a single and short event, had areas with low-density spongy bone. This void-like low-density bone is always associated with internal channels. It is also present in osteoderms of different sizes. This scenario is best explained when considering that Lo Hueco titanosaurs might have used their osteoderms as a source of calcium that was mobilized during oogenesis, although other hypotheses cannot be completely ruled out.

  7. The genus Krithe (Ostracoda) from the Campanian and Maastrichtian (Upper Cretaceous) of the northern US Gulf Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puckett, T.M.

    1997-01-01

    The ostracode genus Krithe is one of the most common genera in the Upper Cretaceous (late Santonian to Maastrichtian) deposits of the northern Gulf Coastal Plain of North America. Although it is never abundant, the genus occurs in sediments that were deposited under a wide range of palaeoenvironments, including nearshore sandy marls to offshore, nearly pure, chalk. The taxonomy of this taxon has been problematical, and what is herein considered to be a single species, K. cushmani, has been referred to in the literature under five different names. Two morphotypes were observed: relatively large individuals with 'mushroom'-shaped vestibules collected from chalk, and smaller individuals with pocket-shaped vestibules collected from nearshore deposits. Species of Krithe have been hypothesized to be useful in estimating dissolved oxygen concentration in ancient ocean floors, based on details of their morphology. Whereas the relationship between size and environment corroborates with previous predictions (larger individuals live in deeper water), the morphology of the vestibules contradicts predictions (the larger vestibules occur in the nearshore deposits and the smaller, more constricted vestibules occur in the chalk). A causal relationship between environment and morphology is discussed.

  8. Geohydrology and chemical quality of water in Middle and Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous rocks, western Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kume, Jack

    1984-01-01

    Fresh and saline water occur in Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous rocks in western Kansas. The maximum thickness of the Jurassic aquifer is about 50 feet. During 1981, water levels ranged from 255 to 1,160 feet below land surface; the static heads ranged from about 2,400 to 3,100 feet above sea level and the hydraulic gradient ranged from 16 feet per mile toward the northeast to 40 feet per mile toward the north. The water is moderately saline, very hard, a sodium sulfate or sodium chloride type, and unsuitable for drinking and irrigation. The maximum thickness of the Cheyenne aquifer is about 190 feet. During 1981, water levels ranged from 267 to 375 feet below land surface; the static heads varied from less than 2,300 to more than 3,200 feet above sea level; and the hydraulic gradient was 8 feet per mile toward the east. The water is fresh to moderately saline, soft to very hard, a sodium sulfate or sodium , bicarbonate type, and suitable to unsuitable for drinking and irrigation. The maximum thickness of the Dakota aquifer is about 150 feet. During 1982, water levels ranged from 24 to 604 feet below land surface; the static heads ranged from about 2,100 to 3,200 feet above sea level; and the hydraulic gradient was 11 feet per mile toward the east and northeast. The water is fresh to slightly saline, soft to very hard, and suitable to unsuitable for drinking and irrigation. (USGS)

  9. Sedimentology and Sequence Stratigraphy of the Lower Cretaceous Fortress Mountain and Torok Formations Exposed Along the Siksikpuk River, North-Central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houseknecht, David W.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Wartes, Marwan A.

    2007-01-01

    An exposure of the Lower Cretaceous Fortress Mountain and Torok Formations along the Siksikpuk River in north-central Alaska provides a rare opportunity to observe the stratigraphic contact between these two formations and to interpret the depositional facies and sequence stratigraphy of the exposed strata. The Fortress Mountain Formation at the base of the measured section includes braided-fluvial and coastal-plain facies deposited in a lowstand-systems tract, and an overlying succession of mostly shallow marine facies deposited in the basal part of a transgressive-systems tract. The overlying Torok Formation includes a thick, upward-deepening succession of marine-shelf to marine-slope facies deposited in the upper part of the transgressive-systems tract. The upper part of the section includes marine-slope and incised-slope-channel turbidite deposits of the Torok Formation, interpreted as a highstand-systems tract. Consideration of the balance between accommodation and sediment flux inferred from the sequence-stratigraphic analysis suggests that both tectonics and eustasy may have influenced deposition of the lowstand-systems and transgressive-systems tracts. In contrast, the highstand-systems tract may have been primarily influenced by progradation of a regional sediment-dispersal system and by subsidence induced by sediment loading.

  10. Influence of provenance and burial history on diagenesis of Lower Cretaceous Frontier Formation sandstones, Green River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, S.P. . Bureau of Economic Geology)

    1993-07-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation on the Moxa Arch in the western Green River Basin, Wyoming, has had a varied diagenetic history that was controlled in part by differences in composition of detrital framework grains and in burial history. Petrographic examination of 247 thin sections from 13 cores from the south-plunging arch and adjacent deep basin is the basis for diagenetic investigation of sandstones ranging in depth from 2 km to almost 5 km. Major diagenetic events were (1) mechanical compaction by grain rearrangement and deformation of ductile grains, (2) formation of illite and mixed-layer illite-smectite rims, (3) precipitation of quartz overgrowths, (4) precipitation of calcite cement, (5) generation of secondary porosity by dissolution of feldspar, chert, biotite, and mudstone grains and calcite cement, (6) precipitation of kaolinite in primary and secondary pores, and (7) chemical compaction by intergranular pressure solution and stylolitization and additional precipitation of quartz cement. The northern and southern ends of the Moxa Arch differ in the magnitude of each of these diagenetic events. Provenance differences caused more abundant ductile rock fragments and feldspar to be deposited at the northern end of the Moxa Arch. As a result, Frontier sandstones from the northern Moxa Arch underwent more extensive mechanical compaction. In addition, feldspar dissolution and albitization buffered acid-rich basinal fluids at the northern end, resulting in greater development of secondary porosity and precipitation of calcite cement than at the southern end. Deeply buried sandstones at the southern end of the arch and in the basin contain the most abundant quartz cement because intergranular pressure solution and stylolitization liberated silica for overgrowths.

  11. Sedimentology and ichnology of shallow-water deltaic complex: lower Cretaceous Sparky Formation, Wainwright heavy oil pool, Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Brodylo, L.A.

    1989-03-01

    Much of the 2.5 billion bbl of recoverable reserves in the Lloydminster heavy oil area lie within the Sparky Formation. In the Wainwright pool, the Sparky is 20-30 m thick and comprises three stacked parasequences interpreted to have formed during progradation of a shallow-water deltaic complex into the Cretaceous epicontinental Boreal Sea. Two 4 to 7 m-thick coarsening-upward parasequences comprise the lower Sparky member and are interpreted as progradational, brackish-water, delta lobe deposits. Intensely bioturbated prodelta mudstones grade up into delta-front siltstones/very fine sandstones, which contain low-angle stratification (HCS.), graded-laminated storm beds, and convex ripples, capped by abundant fair-weather wave ripples. Shoaling is reflected in the vertical succession of ichnofacies: Zoophycos(.)-Cruziana-Skolithos-Psilonichnus. Each parasequence is truncated by a flooding surface and overlain by a thin transgressive shale unit deposited within a bay following lobe abandonment. The 10 to 15 m-thick upper Sparky parasequence exhibits a complex three-dimensional arrangement of mudstones, siltstones, sandstones, and coals and is interpreted to have formed in a mosaic of bay, marsh, and swamp environments on the lower delta plain. Following abandonment of the entire deltaic complex, peat-forming environments were established resulting in the formation of a regionally extensive 2 to 3 m-thick coal seam that caps the Sparky succession. Delta-front sublitharenites were cleaned, sorted, and laterally redistributed by storm processes, and form better reservoir facies than feldspathic litharenites of the distributaries.

  12. Paleomagnetic data from Upper Cretaceous Red Beds, Northwest Vietnam (Song Da Terrane), and Their Bearing on the Extrusion History of Indochina and Deformation Along its Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissman, J. W.; Pho, N.; Burchfiel, B.; Muggleton, S. R.

    2008-12-01

    Northwest Vietnam mainly consists of the Song Da terrane, which is bounded to the east by the NW-oriented Ailao Shan/Red River (ASRR) fault system, interpreted to be the southwest margin of the South China Block, and the NW-oriented Song Ma fault. The northern termination of the Song Da terrane is considered to be where the NE-oriented, right lateral Dien Bien Phu fault intersects the ASRR. Whether the Song Da terrane is part of the extruded Indochina Block, paleomagnetic data from which suggest some 10°+ southward latitudinal displacement, can be evaluated with paleomagnetic data from rocks of the appropriate age. Our paleomagnetic sampling concentrated on the Upper Cretaceous Yen Chau Formation, which unconformably overlies Paleozoic and Triassic sedimentary rocks. The Yen Chau Formation is locally up to about 1300 m thick, and is characterized by medium to thick bedded, coarse to fine-grained sandstones and siltstones, all of which are partially cemented by hematite. Samples were collected from 10 localities using a portable drill, with 6 to 19 sites collected per locality, and 7 to 15 samples collected from each site. This approach allows evaluation of the integrity of the remanence at the locality level, where, presumably, considerable time is recorded in each section. Each locality is a homoclinal road cut exposure, with bedding dips varying from sub-horizontal to moderately overturned. NRM intensities range from about 0.7 mA/m to about 25 mA/m; values which are relatively low in comparison to many red beds. A varied response to alternating field (AF) demagnetization indicates that magnetite carries a considerable (over 50 percent) of the remanence; the finest grained samples of relatively high NRM intensity reveal little response to AF treatment, indicating a dominance by hematite, as also supported by three-component IRM thermal demagnetization. Samples with the highest NRM intensities and the least contribution by magnetite respond favorably to thermal

  13. Paleogeography And Diachronous Infill Of An Ancient Deep-Marine Foreland Basin, Upper Cretaceous Cerro Toro Axial Channel, Magallanes Basin, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, A.; Jobe, Z. R.; Grove, M.; Lowe, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    The details of how narrow, orogen-parallel ocean basins are filled with sediment by large axial submarine channels is important to understand because these depositional systems commonly form in through-like basins in various tectonic settings. The Magallanes foreland basin is an excellent location to study an orogen-parallel deep-marine system. Conglomerate lenses of the Upper Cretaceous Cerro Toro Formation have been previously interpreted to represent the fill of a single submarine channel (4-8 km wide, > 100 km long) that funneled coarse detritus southward along the basin axis. This interpretation was based on lithologic correlations. New U/Pb dating of zircons from volcanic ashes and sandstones, coupled with strontium isotope stratigraphy, refine the controls on depositional ages and provenance. Results demonstrate that north-south oriented conglomerate lenses are contemporaneous within error limits (~ 84-82 Ma) supporting that they represent parts of an axial channel belt. Channel deposits 20 km west of the axial location are 87-82 Ma in age. These channels are partly contemporaneous with the ones within the axial channel belt, making it likely that they represent feeders to the axial channel system. The northern Cerro Toro Formation spans an Turonian to Campanian interval (~ 90-82 Ma) whereas the formation top, 70 km to the south, is as young as ~ 76 Ma. Kolmogorov-Smirnoff statistical analysis on detrital zircon age distributions shows that the northern uppermost Cerro Toro Formation yields a statistically different age distribution than other samples from the same formation but shows no difference relative to the overlying, much finer-grained Tres Pasos Formation. These results suggest the partly coeval deposition of both formations representing the gradual transition from an out-of-grade to a graded margin system. Integration of previously acquired geochronologic and stratigraphic data with new data show a pronounced southward younging pattern in all four

  14. Skull ecomorphology of megaherbivorous dinosaurs from the dinosaur park formation (upper campanian) of Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Mallon, Jordan C; Anderson, Jason S

    2013-01-01

    Megaherbivorous dinosaur coexistence on the Late Cretaceous island continent of Laramidia has long puzzled researchers, owing to the mystery of how so many large herbivores (6-8 sympatric species, in many instances) could coexist on such a small (4-7 million km(2)) landmass. Various explanations have been put forth, one of which-dietary niche partitioning-forms the focus of this study. Here, we apply traditional morphometric methods to the skulls of megaherbivorous dinosaurs from the Dinosaur Park Formation (upper Campanian) of Alberta to infer the ecomorphology of these animals and to test the niche partitioning hypothesis. We find evidence for niche partitioning not only among contemporaneous ankylosaurs, ceratopsids, and hadrosaurids, but also within these clades at the family and subfamily levels. Consubfamilial ceratopsids and hadrosaurids differ insignificantly in their inferred ecomorphologies, which may explain why they rarely overlap stratigraphically: interspecific competition prevented their coexistence.

  15. Skull Ecomorphology of Megaherbivorous Dinosaurs from the Dinosaur Park Formation (Upper Campanian) of Alberta, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Mallon, Jordan C.; Anderson, Jason S.

    2013-01-01

    Megaherbivorous dinosaur coexistence on the Late Cretaceous island continent of Laramidia has long puzzled researchers, owing to the mystery of how so many large herbivores (6–8 sympatric species, in many instances) could coexist on such a small (4–7 million km2) landmass. Various explanations have been put forth, one of which–dietary niche partitioning–forms the focus of this study. Here, we apply traditional morphometric methods to the skulls of megaherbivorous dinosaurs from the Dinosaur Park Formation (upper Campanian) of Alberta to infer the ecomorphology of these animals and to test the niche partitioning hypothesis. We find evidence for niche partitioning not only among contemporaneous ankylosaurs, ceratopsids, and hadrosaurids, but also within these clades at the family and subfamily levels. Consubfamilial ceratopsids and hadrosaurids differ insignificantly in their inferred ecomorphologies, which may explain why they rarely overlap stratigraphically: interspecific competition prevented their coexistence. PMID:23874409

  16. Sedimentation and diagenesis along open and island-protected windward carbonate platform margins of the Cretaceous El Abra Formation, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minero, Charles J.

    1991-05-01

    The windward margin of the mid-Cretaceous Valles-San Luis Potosi carbonate platform in northeastern Mexico included open and island-protected segments. Depositional environments and diagenesis vary markedly with margin type. Sand shoals near the windward open margin are composed of oncoid-bioclastic and cross-laminated carbonates. Increasingly restricted and finer lagoonal and tidal-flat environments occurred bankwards, recording gradually decreasing wave and current energy. Lithofacies include peloid-miliolid, cryptalgal laminite, lime mudstone, and molluscan carbonates. Islands along the windward margin are composed of rudistid-skeletal debris from adjacent reefs. Lagoonal to tidal-flat sediments were deposited bankwards. Similar lithofacies occur as in these environments along the open margin but they are muddier and contain less diverse fauna. The different energy regimes along the margin influenced the distribution and packaging of banktop sediments. The bankward transition to low-energy, restricted environments was gradual across the open margin. In contrast, muddy sediments with restricted fauna accumulated in close proximity to the island-protected margin. Non-cyclic vertical lithofacies successions characterized the open platform margin, whereas asymmetric shoaling-upward sequences characterized the island-protected margin. Early diagenesis along the open margin was minor; burial diagenesis was of major importance. Thin rinds of marine cement are widespread but meteoric diagenesis was minor. Burial promoted extensive compaction. Mg-rich connate brines expressed from Guaxcama gypsum resulted in dolomitization and lithification, thereby precluding further compaction. Pore fluids resulting from dehydration of Guaxcama gypsum to anhydrite yielded pore-filling and replacement anhydrite in the El Abra Formation. Burial and Laramide deformation (Maastrichtian-Paleocene) resulted in stylolitization and extensive fracturing. Uplift produced widespread meteoric

  17. Aggradation of gravels in tidally influenced fluvial systems: Upper Albian (Lower Cretaceous) on the cratonic margin of the North American Western Interior foreland basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brenner, Richard L.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Witzke, B.L.; Phillips, P.L.; White, T.S.; Ufnar, David F.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Joeckel, R.M.; Goettemoeller, A.; Shirk, B.R.

    2003-01-01

    Alluvial conglomerates were widely distributed around the margin of the Early Cretaceous North American Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway (KWIS). Conglomerates, sandstones, and lesser amounts of mudstones of the upper Albian Nishnabotna Member of the Dakota Formation were deposited as fill-in valleys that were incised up to 80 m into upper Paleozoic strata. These paleovalleys extended southwestward across present-day northwestern Iowa into eastern Nebraska. Conglomerate samples from four localities in western Iowa and eastern Nebraska consist mostly of polycrystalline quartz with lesser amounts of microcrystalline (mostly chert), and monocrystalline quartz. Previous studies discovered that some chert pebbles contain Ordovician-Pennsylvanian invertebrate fossils. The chert clasts analyzed in this study were consistent with these findings. In addition, we found that non-chert clasts consist of metaquartzite, strained monocrystalline quartz and 'vein' quartz from probable Proterozic sources, indicating that parts of the fluvial system's sediment load must have travelled distances of 400-1200 km. The relative tectonic stability of this subcontinent dictated that stream gradients were relatively low with estimates ranging from 0.3 to 0.6 m/km. Considering the complex sedimentologic relationships that must have been involved, the ability of low-gradient easterly-sourced rivers to entrain gravel clasts was primarily a function of paleodischarge rather than a function of steep gradients. Oxygen isotopic evidence from Albian sphaerosiderite-bearing paleosols in the Dakota Formation and correlative units from Kansas to Alaska suggest that mid-latitude continental rainfall in the Albian was perhaps twice that of the modern climate system. Hydrologic fluxes may have been related to wet-dry climatic cycles on decade or longer scales that could account for the required water supply flux. Regardless of temporal scale, gravels were transported during 'high-energy' pulses, under

  18. Supercritical sheetflood deposits on the volcaniclastic alluvial fan: the Cretaceous upper Daeri Member, Wido Island, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul Hwang, In; Gihm, Yong Sik; Kim, Min Cheol

    2016-04-01

    The upper Daeri Member is composed of subaerial primary and resedimented pyroclastic deposits. The upper Daeri Member accumulated under influence of tectonic subsidence, and the basin was divided into four blocks (Block 1 to 4) by intrabasinal normal faults (Fault A to C). Vertical separation of Fault B is estimated about 250 m and provided sufficient accommodation space on Block 3 with intrabasinal physiographic relief, resulting in conformable stacking of the upper Daeri Member on a volcaniclastic alluvial fan. The welded pumiceous lapilli tuff (primary one) was deposited by a pyroclastic density current during an explosive volcanic eruption. After the eruption, the resedimented pyroclastic deposits were deposited by episodic sediment gravity flows and are intercalated with the reddish, homogeneous mudstones. In Block 3 the resedimented pyroclastic deposits show an abrupt decrease in ten largest lithic clasts from within 3 km away from Fault B, reflecting rapid waning of parental sediment gravity flows. A wavy bedded lapilli tuff is one of the lithofacies of the resedimented pyroclastic deposits. The wavy bedded lapilli tuff is composed of symmetrical or nearly-symmetrical, wavy stratifications, forming undulatory bed geometry. The wavy stratifications are recognized by distinctive alternations of few cm to 10 cm thick, lapilli-rich and ash-rich layers. Beds of the wavy bedded lapilli tuff are 0.1 to 2 m thick (estimated in crests) and range in wavelength 1.3 m to 12 m (ave. 8 m). Both amplitude and wavelength gradually decrease away from Fault B. The wavy bedded lapilli tuff can laterally be traced over 90 m. Based on undulatory bed geometry and wavy stratifications, the wavy bedded lapilli tuff is interpreted as antidune bedforms, formed by supercritical sheetfloods. The symmetrical or nearly symmetrical wavy stratifications are due to maintenance of stationary state of standing waves of the sheetfloods. A down current decrease in both wavelength and thickness

  19. Biostratigraphy, facies analysis of Upper Cretaceous-Lower Paleocene strata in south Zagros basin (southwestern Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afghah, Massih

    2016-07-01

    In this study, two stratigraphic sections of the Tarbur Formation named Kuh-e Gadvan and Kuh-e Tir were selected. The thicknesses of the whole sediments of the sections studied are about 1100 m of which 400 thin sections were studied. Two biozones are determined in Kuh-e Gadvan and three biozones are described in Kuh-e Tir section. According to established biozones, the age of Tarbur Formation of Kuh-e Gadvan section is assigned to Campanian-Maastrichtian and Tarbur Formation age determination shows relation to Maastrichtian-Lower Paleocene in Kuh-e Tir section. Seven major lithofacies are distinguished along two studied stratigraphic columns which are foraminifer-bioclast wackestone, algal-foraminifer- intraclast wackestone, rudist biclast wackestone, bioclast packstone, bioclast-intraclast grainstone, coral and rudist boundstone. According to the recognized lithofacies, paleoenvironment of the Tarbur formation consists of lagoon, open margin of the reef landward, margin of the reef, flat reef, and seaward margin of the reef. Comparison of studied sections allows that geologic setting had been controlled biostratigraphy and facies change.

  20. Sedimentary features of the Blackhawk formation (Cretaceous) at Sunnyside, Carbon County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maberry, John O.

    1968-01-01

    The Blackhawk Formation at Sunnyside, Utah, was deposited along the western margin of the Western Interior Cretaceous sea during southeastward withdrawal of the sea. Sand was the dominant type of land-derived sediment deposited in the Sunnyside district during the regressive phases. Sand bodies prograded seaward in response to changing sediment supply from a source west of Sunnyside. Where conditions were favorable for the accumulation of vegetable material, peat deposits formed and were later changed to bituminous Coal by diagenesis. Studies of the coal bed show that the coals were formed from accumulation of small, low-growing plants and plant debris that was transported into the area of accumulation. Remains of large plants in the coals are rare. Trace fossils, which are tracks, trails and burrows formed by organisms and preserved in the rock, are extremely abundant in the Blackhawk rocks. These biogenic sedimentary structures are common in Cretaceous deposits throughout the western United States. Trace fossil distribution in the rocks is controlled by the depositional environment preferred by their creators. A study of the trace fossils of a. locality allows a more precise determination of the conditions during deposition of the sediments. Water depth, bottom conditions, salinity, current velocity and amount of suspended nutrients in the water are some of the environmental factors that may be reconstructed by studying trace fossils. The Blackhawk Formation at Sunnyside comprises the members, the Kenilworth Member and the Sunnyside Member. Field studies show that the formation may be further subdivided in the Sunnyside district., according to the precepts of units of mappable thickness and similar lithologic characteristics. The Blackhawk pinches out eastward and north. ward into the Mancos Shale, and names for submembers become meaningless. Names are of value in the region of interest, however, because of the prominence of the named units. Coal mining is the

  1. A new angiosperm from the Crato Formation (Araripe Basin, Brazil) and comments on the Early Cretaceous monocotyledons.

    PubMed

    De Lima, Flaviana J; Saraiva, Antônio A F; Da Silva, Maria A P; Bantim, Renan A M; Sayão, Juliana M

    2014-12-01

    The Crato Formation paleoflora is one of the few equatorial floras of the Early Cretaceous. It is diverse, with many angiosperms, especially representatives of the clades magnoliids, monocotyledons and eudicots, which confirms the assumption that angiosperm diversity during the last part of the Early Cretaceous was reasonably high. The morphology of a new fossil monocot is studied and compared to all other Smilacaceae genus, especially in the venation. Cratosmilax jacksoni gen. et sp. nov. can be related to the Smilacaceae family, becoming the oldest record of the family so far. Cratosmilax jacksoni is a single mesophilic leaf with entire margins, ovate shape, with acute apex and base, four venation orders and main acrodromous veins. It is the first terrestrial monocot described for the Crato Formation, monocots were previously described for the same formation, and are considered aquatics. Cratosmilax jacksoni is the first fossil record of Smilacaceae in Brazil, and the oldest record of this family.

  2. Fluvial architecture of dinosaur bonebeds in the Cretaceous Judith River Formation, south-central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, K.M. ); Dodson, P. ); Fiorillo, A.R. )

    1991-03-01

    Fluvial architecture of dinosaur bonebeds in the Cretaceous Judith River Formation, south-central Montana, has been the subject of intensive paleontological study for many years. However, little has been published on the sedimentology of the formation in this area. The authors have completed a preliminary field study of fluvial facies, with a view towards correcting this omission. Initial results include detailed facies descriptions and maps for five quarries along a line of transect stretching some 40 km parallel to depositional dip. Facies identified are predominantly overbank splays and levees, with common point bar/alluvial channel units and occasional small, possibly estuarine sand bodies in parts of the section. Shell beds (mainly oysters) and bedded, 1 m thick coals are also significant in some sections. Preliminary attempts at paleohydrology suggest river channels in some parts of the section were about 100 m wide and 2 m deep; however, other parts of the section exhibit much larger channel widths. Channel stacking is common. Preliminary results suggest a strong correlation between the occurrence of reddish brown carbonaceous silty shales, and dinosaur bone deposits.

  3. Lakota Formation, southern Black Hills, South Dakota: an Early Cretaceous evolving fluvial system

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlstrom D.J.; Fox, J.E.

    1986-08-01

    The fluvial, Early Cretaceous Lakota Formation consists of four spatially and temporally distinct sandstone units in the southern Black Hills and southeastern Powder River basin. Three of these units crop out in proximity to an area of uranium roll-front development (Edgemont mining district) where approximately 2300 wells were drilled and logged. Comparison of the resistivity logs of several of these wells with continuous cores of the Lakota Formation confirms their lithologic sensitivity. These logs (utilized to assist in subsurface facies interpretations where cores were not available), cores, and outcrops are the basis for the following facies interpretations. The discharge, sediment load, and resulting sinuosity of this fluvial system varied substantially throughout the time of Lakota deposition. The oldest unit consists of tabular deposits with complex internal architecture comprised of cross-cutting lateral accretion deposits. Upward-fining grain size, upward-decreasing scale of sedimentary structures, and the angular relationship between lateral accretion surfaces and overlying crevasse-splay deposits support this conclusion. The intermediate unit of ephemeral stream sediments is characterized by abundant pebble- and cobble-strewn erosional surfaces with up to 1.5 m relief, very poor clast sorting, and trough and planar cross-bedding with concave-upward foresets. The youngest unit has a predominance of tabular cross-bedding with back flow climbing ripples and low dispersion of paleocurrent directions, suggesting a relatively straight, bed-load-type channel dominated by trains of sand waves.

  4. Geology and sequence stratigraphy of undiscovered oil and gas resources in conventional and continuous petroleum systems in the Upper Cretaceous Eagle Ford Group and related strata, U.S. Gulf Coast Region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dubiel, Russell F.; Pearson, Ofori N.; Pitman, Janet K.; Pearson, Krystal M.; Kinney, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently assessed the technically recoverable undiscovered oil and gas onshore and in State waters of the Gulf Coast region of the United States. The USGS defined three assessment units (AUs) with potential undiscovered conventional and continuous oil and gas resources in Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian to Turonian) strata of the Eagle Ford Group and correlative rocks. The assessment is based on geologic elements of a total petroleum system, including hydrocarbon source rocks (source rock maturation, hydrocarbon generation and migration), reservoir rocks (sequence stratigraphy and petrophysical properties), and traps (formation, timing, and seals). Conventional oil and gas undiscovered resources are in updip sandstone reservoirs in the Upper Cretaceous Tuscaloosa and Woodbine Formations (or Groups) in Louisiana and Texas, respectively, whereas continuous oil and continuous gas undiscovered resources reside in the middip and downdip Upper Cretaceous Eagle Ford Shale in Texas and the Tuscaloosa marine shale in Louisiana. Conventional resources in the Tuscaloosa and Woodbine are included in the Eagle Ford Updip Sandstone Oil and Gas AU, in an area where the Eagle Ford Shale and Tuscaloosa marine shale display vitrinite reflectance (Ro) values less than 0.6%. The continuous Eagle Ford Shale Oil AU lies generally south of the conventional AU, is primarily updip of the Lower Cretaceous shelf edge, and is defined by thermal maturity values within shales of the Eagle Ford and Tuscaloosa that range from 0.6 to 1.2% Ro. Similarly, the Eagle Ford Shale Gas AU is defined downdip of the shelf edge where source rocks have Ro values greater than 1.2%. For undiscovered oil and gas resources, the USGS assessed means of: 1) 141 million barrels of oil (MMBO), 502 billion cubic feet of natural gas (BCFG), and 4 million barrels of natural gas liquids (MMBNGL) in the Eagle Ford Updip Sandstone Oil and Gas AU; 2) 853 MMBO, 1707 BCFG, and 34 MMBNGL in the

  5. U-Pb geochronology and geochemistry of the McCoy Mountains Formation, southeastern California: A Cretaceous retroarc foreland basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barth, A.P.; Wooden, J.L.; Jacobson, C.E.; Probst, K.

    2004-01-01

    The timing of deposition of fluvial sediments now forming the >7-km-thick McCoy Mountains Formation is one of the key uncertainties in reconstructing the Mesozoic poleogeography of southern California and western Arizona. Ion-microprobe U-Pb geochronologic data for individual zircons from nine sandstones from the McCoy Mountains type section and six associated igneous rocks provide significant new constraints on the tectonic setting and the timing of deposition within the northwest-trending McCoy basin. U-Pb zircon data from a metavolcanic rock of the underlying Dome Rock sequence in the Palen Mountains confirm that the McCoy Mountains Formation was deposited after regional Middle to Late Jurassic arc magmatism. U-Ph zircon data from a Late Cretaceous granodiorite intruding the formation in the Coxcomb Mountains confirm that the formation was deformed and metamorphosed prior to 73.5 ?? 1.3 Ma. Populations of detrital zircons vary systematically with both rock type and stratigraphic height; lithic arkoses predominantly derived from the west have consistently more abundant younger zircons than do litharenite sandstones predominantly derived from the north, and the youngest zircons yield maximum depositional ages that decrease from 116 Ma near the base to 84 Ma near the top of the section. The detrital-zircon data permit a Late Jurassic age for the basal, comparatively quartz-rich sandstone. However, the data further suggest that >90% of the formation was deposited between middle Early and middle Late Cretaceous time. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that most of the McCoy Mountains Formation represents a retroarc foreland basin, deposited behind the active, evolving Cretaceous Cordilleran continental-margin magmatic arc that lay to the west and in the foreland of the actively deforming Cretaceous Maria fold-and-thrust belt.

  6. Geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources—Lower Cretaceous Albian to Upper Cretaceous Cenomanian carbonate rocks of the Fredericksburg and Washita Groups, United States Gulf of Mexico Coastal Plain and State Waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, Sharon M.; Enomoto, Catherine B.; Dennen, Kristin O.; Valentine, Brett J.; Cahan, Steven M.

    2017-02-10

    In 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessed Lower Cretaceous Albian to Upper Cretaceous Cenomanian carbonate rocks of the Fredericksburg and Washita Groups and their equivalent units for technically recoverable, undiscovered hydrocarbon resources underlying onshore lands and State Waters of the Gulf Coast region of the United States. This assessment was based on a geologic model that incorporates the Upper Jurassic-Cretaceous-Tertiary Composite Total Petroleum System (TPS) of the Gulf of Mexico basin; the TPS was defined previously by the USGS assessment team in the assessment of undiscovered hydrocarbon resources in Tertiary strata of the Gulf Coast region in 2007. One conventional assessment unit (AU), which extends from south Texas to the Florida panhandle, was defined: the Fredericksburg-Buda Carbonate Platform-Reef Gas and Oil AU. The assessed stratigraphic interval includes the Edwards Limestone of the Fredericksburg Group and the Georgetown and Buda Limestones of the Washita Group. The following factors were evaluated to define the AU and estimate oil and gas resources: potential source rocks, hydrocarbon migration, reservoir porosity and permeability, traps and seals, structural features, paleoenvironments (back-reef lagoon, reef, and fore-reef environments), and the potential for water washing of hydrocarbons near outcrop areas.In Texas and Louisiana, the downdip boundary of the AU was defined as a line that extends 10 miles downdip of the Lower Cretaceous shelf margin to include potential reef-talus hydrocarbon reservoirs. In Mississippi, Alabama, and the panhandle area of Florida, where the Lower Cretaceous shelf margin extends offshore, the downdip boundary was defined by the offshore boundary of State Waters. Updip boundaries of the AU were drawn based on the updip extent of carbonate rocks within the assessed interval, the presence of basin-margin fault zones, and the presence of producing wells. Other factors evaluated were the middle

  7. Upper Cretaceous and lower Paleogene benthic foraminiferal paleoecology from north-eastern Tunisia: El Melah section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallala, N.; Zaghbib-Turki, D.; Turki, M. M.; Arenillas, I.; Arz, J. A.; Molina, E.

    2009-04-01

    As an impact of the bolide and ejecta falls at the K/Pg boundary the planktonic Foraminifera have suffered sever mass extinction. However, no small Benthic Foraminifera species mass extinction at the K/Pg boundary has documented. Nevertheless many species have showed disturbance. The Maastrichtian assemblages may be different from those of the lower Paleogene by their species content, diversity and frequencies. At the El Melah section, the small benthic foraminifera indicate upper bathyal environment, and manifest significant faunal turnover. Until the uppermost Maastrichtian, their assemblages are highly diversified, with 109 species. They are dominated by endobenthic morphotypes (72 %). At the K/Pg boundary, although 34% of them seem to disappear, but only few species have really extinct such us Arenobulimina obesa. Nevertheless, the majority of species persist elsewhere at the Danian (e.g. Gaudryina aissana, Gaudryina inflata, Tritaxia midwayensis, Coryphostoma incrassata). At the lower Danian, the survivor Maastrichtian species are of 66%. Some of them disappeared temporary. Three survivor species were eclipsed during the Guembelitria cretacea zone (Globobulimina ovata, Praebulimina carseyae and Anomalinoides welleri) and 27 other species were diminished during the Parvularugoglobigerina eugubina subzone. They are composed of both calcareous fauna (e.g. Bulimina rugifera, Bolivina deccurens, Anomalinoides midwayensis, Dentalina colei, Marginulina cf. glabra) and agglutinated fauna (e.g. Spiroplectamina knebeli and Saccamina placenta). Throughout the Parasubbotina pseudobulloides subzone, 15 others species were progressively disappeared. They are oligotrophic and low oxygen tolerant. About the Masstrichtian species Gaudryina inflata, G. pyramidata and Tritaxia midwayensis. These species seem to be more trophic exigent.Besides, at the lower Danian, 27 species seems to be appeared. Few of them appeared really (e.g. Spiroplectamina dentata, Dentalina vertebralis

  8. An exquisitely preserved troodontid theropod with new information on the palatal structure from the Upper Cretaceous of Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuihiji, Takanobu; Barsbold, Rinchen; Watabe, Mahito; Tsogtbaatar, Khishigjav; Chinzorig, Tsogtbaatar; Fujiyama, Yoshito; Suzuki, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    Troodontidae is a clade of small-bodied theropod dinosaurs. A new troodontid, Gobivenator mongoliensis gen. et sp. nov., is described based on the most complete skeleton of a Late Cretaceous member of this clade presently known, from the Campanian Djadokhta Formation in the central Gobi Desert. G. mongoliensis is different from other troodontids in possessing a pointed anterior end of the fused parietal and a fossa on the surangular in front of the posterior surangular foramen. The skull was superbly preserved in the specimen and provides detailed information of the entire configuration of the palate in Troodontidae. Overall morphology of the palate in Gobivenator resembles those of dromaeosaurids and Archaeopteryx, showing an apparent trend of elongation of the pterygoid process of the palatine and reduction of the pterygopalatine suture toward the basal Avialae. The palatal configuration suggests that the skull of Gobivenator would have been akinetic but had already acquired prerequisites for later evolution of cranial kinesis in birds, such as the loss of the epipterygoid and reduction in contact areas among bones.

  9. Biostratigraphic correlation chart of some Upper Cretaceous rocks from the Lost Soldier area, Wyoming to west of Craig, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bader, J.W.; Gill, J.R.; Cobban, W.A.; Law, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    This chart depicts the time-stratigraphic relations of some Upper Cretaceous rocks along the eastern and southeastern margins of the Greater Green River Basin, south-central Wyoming and northwestern Colorado. The purpose of this report is to release a preferred set of correlations based upon marine mollusk biostratigraphy. The senior author, with the help of B. E. Law, has acquired, synthesized, compiled, and interpreted data from various sources. These include selected published documents (see "References Cited") and unpublished reports of fossil identifications by W. A. Cobban who examined collections made by the late J. R. Gill. Numerous measured sections of Gill's were also utilized. It must be emphasized that all interpretations on this chart are based on information obtained from these sources and the senior author has yet to substantiate these correlations in the field. Not all data from the area of this study is included herein because it is either repetitive in nature or its reliability is uncertain. This uncertainty is due to the ambiguity inherent in both fossil identification and stratigraphic interpretation. Questionable unpublished material has been omitted while published data which is inconsistent with the senior author's correlations may be found in the footnotes portion of this report. The rock units are assigned to a range of ammonites that have been related to an absolute time scale. The ammonite zonation and age boundaries are adapted from Obradovich and Cobban (1975). "D" numbers are provided for each geographic locality where fossils were collected and described by personnel of the U.S. Geological Survey. These fossils may be accessed at the offices of the Survey in Lakewood, Colorado.

  10. Facies architecture and high-resolution sequence stratigraphy of an Upper Cretaceous platform margin succession, southern central Pyrenees, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomar, Luis; Gili, Eulalia; Obrador, Antonio; Ward, William C.

    2005-04-01

    Excellent exposures of Upper Cretaceous (Santonian) carbonate platforms on the northern flank of Sant Corneli anticline (southern central Pyrenees) provide detailed information of facies architecture in both depositional strike and dip directions. Basic accretional units are differentiated by facies contrast across mappable surfaces. These surfaces do not show clear evidence of subaerial erosion and are correlated basinward with bedding planes across which there are subtle changes in skeletal composition. Two types of basic accretional units have been identified based on bedding patterns, internal facies architecture and skeletal composition: (1) Rudist buildups consist of a rudist and coral belt at the platform margin, passing landward into a slender-hippuritid lithosome, locally overlain by a bioclastic blanket that passes basinward, into bioclastic "apron-like" clinobeds and into fine-grained packstone/wackestone. (2) Calcarenite wedges consist of yellow-brown, benthic-foraminifer-rich grainstones to grain-dominated packstones, with scattered rudist shells and small coral colonies, passing basinward into mud-dominated packstones to wackestones, with variable siliciclastic content (quartz sand to silt and clay). Rudist buildups and calcarenite wedges alternate, although not rhythmically. These changes in platform skeletal composition reflect changes in the dominant type of carbonate-producing biota independently of the changes in accommodation. Both types of basic accretional units: rudist buildups and calcarenite wedges, form simple sequences and parasequences according to internal lithofacies arrangement and inferred sea-level cyclicity (cycles or paracycles). High-frequency sea-level cyclicity fits in the Milankovitch frequency band. Long-term changes in accommodation governing aggradation, progradation and backstepping of basic sequences and parasequences reflect tectonic influence rather than long-term changes in eustatic sea level.

  11. The late Cenomanian oyster Lopha staufferi (Bergquist, 1944) - the oldest ribbed oyster in the Upper Cretaceous of the Western Interior of the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Stephen C.; Cobban, William A.

    2016-12-01

    Lopha staufferi (Bergquist, 1944) is a medium-sized, ribbed, Late Cretaceous oyster with a slightly curved axis and a zigzag commissure; it appears suddenly and conspicuously in upper Cenomanian rocks in the Western Interior Basin of the United States. At maturity, the ribs on both valves thicken into steep flanks that allow the oyster to increase interior volume without increasing its exterior footprint on the seafloor. Lopha staufferi is the first (earliest) ribbed oyster in the Late Cretaceous of the Western Interior, but has no ancestor in the basin. It disappears from the rock record as suddenly as it appeared, leaving no direct descendent in the basin. In the southern part of the basin where it is well constrained, L. staufferi is restricted stratigraphically to the upper Cenomanian Metoicoceras mosbyense Zone (= Dunveganoceras conditum Zone in the north). Lopha staufferi has an unusual paleogeographic distribution, occurring in only two, widely scattered areas in the basin. It has been found at several localities near the western shoreline of the Late Cretaceous Seaway in west-central New Mexico and adjacent Arizona, and in localities 1,900 km (1,200 mi) to the northeast near the eastern shoreline in northeastern Minnesota, but nowhere in between. In west-central New Mexico and adjacent Arizona, L. staufferi is a guide fossil to the Twowells Tongue of the Dakota Sandstone.

  12. Trace fossils and hummocky cross-stratification, upper Cretaceous of Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, R.W. )

    1990-06-01

    The Spring Canyon Member of the Blackhawk Formation in Coal Creek Canyon, Utah, consists of four regressive nearshore-to-offshore sequences punctuated locally by hummocky cross-stratification. Collectively, nonstorm bedding units span lower offshore to middle shoreface lithofacies. Associated ichnofaunas tend to be diverse, distinctive, and diagnostic of original depositional gradients. Nevertheless, all resident ichnofaunas are referable to the Cruziana ichnocoenose. Ichnofaunas of hummocky beds, in contrast, mainly represent either a Skolithos ichnocoenose or a mixed Skolithos-Cruziana ichnocoenose. These post-storm ichnocoenoses evidently correspond to a sere of opportunistic pioneers or ensuing seres of resilient resident populations, although distal biocoenoses may have remained essentially beyond reach of prevalant nearshore opportunists. The predominance of domichnia over fodinichnia in initial post-storm ichnocoenoses probably reflects original larval settlement patterns tempered by gradients in hydraulic energy. Differences in ichnofaunas also are related to differences in rates of post-storm deposition: the slower the rate of sediment accumulation, the greater the degree of overprinting by burrows of subsequent seres or equilibrium communities.

  13. A Basal Tapejarine (Pterosauria; Pterodactyloidea; Tapejaridae) from the Crato Formation, Early Cretaceous of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Maria Eduarda de Castro; Kellner, Alexander Wilhelm Armin

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional and almost complete pterosaur mandible from the Crato Formation (Early Cretaceous of Northeastern Brazil), Araripe Basin, is described as a new species of a tapejarine tapejarid. Tapejarines are a particular group of toothless pterosaurs, characterized by well-developed cranial crests, downturned rostra, and have been proposed to represent frugivorous flying reptiles. Though comparatively well represented and distributed, the evolutionary history of the group is still poorly known, and the internal relationships of its members are not well understood. The new species here reported, named Aymberedactylus cearensis gen. et sp. nov., adds new data concerning the evolution of the group, concerning their morphology and geographical origin. It differs from known tapejarids due to its unusually elongate retroarticular process and a shallow fossa on the splenial exhibiting distinctive rugose texture. Furthermore, it exhibits a suite of basal and derived conditions within the Tapejaridae, demonstrating how their morphological traits probably evolved and that these forms were even more diverse than already acknowledged. The discovery of Aymberedactylus cearensis sheds new light on the evolutionary history of the Tapejarinae. PMID:27655346

  14. Impressions of dinosaur skin from the Cretaceous Haman Formation in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, In Sung; Kim, Hyun Joo; Huh, Min

    2010-09-01

    The occurrences and features of two specimens of fossil dinosaur skin from Cretaceous Haman Formation in South Korea, including a new type of skin texture (development of micropolygons within scales) are described here for the first time, and several types of sedimentological aberrations of inorganic origin that are similar in appearance to fossil skin and therefore have the potential to be misidentified as fossil skin. The features and origins of fossil dinosaur skin found in South Korea with those of a diverse range of geological aberration structures resembling fossil skin are also compared. It is interpreted that dry climate, the presence of torn skin, and episodic sheetflood on an alluvial plain were related with the preservation of the Haman skin fossils. The preservation condition of the Haman skin fossils suggests that sheetflood deposits on a floodplain to mudflat environment under dry climatic condition are potential candidates for dinosaur skins to be found. The results of this study not only provide additional information that is helpful in understanding dinosaur skin, but also are useful in discriminating between true fossil skin and enigmatic sedimentological aberration structures resembling skin.

  15. The first dromaeosaurid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Lower Cretaceous Bayan Gobi Formation of Nei Mongol, China

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Rui; Tan, Qingwei; Xu, Xing

    2015-01-01

    The first dromaeosaurid theropod from the Lower Cretaceous Bayan Gobi Formation is identified based on an incompletely preserved partially-articulated left leg, increasing the known diversity of its understudied ecosystem. The leg belongs to specimen IVPP V22530 and includes a typical deinonychosaurian pedal phalanx II-2 with a distinct constriction between the enlarged proximal end and the distal condyle as well as a typical deinonychosaurian enlarged pedal phalanx II-3. It possesses a symmetric metatarsus and a slender and long MT V that together suggest it is a dromaeosaurid. Two anatomical traits suggest the leg is microraptorine-like, but a more precise taxonomic referral was not possible: metatarsals II, III and IV are closely appressed distally and the ventral margin of the medial ligament pit of phalanx II-2 is close to the centre of the rounded distal condyle. This taxonomic status invites future efforts to discover additional specimens at the study locality because—whether it is a microraptorine or a close relative—this animal is expected to make important contributions to our understanding of dromaeosaurid evolution and biology. IVPP V22530 also comprises of an isolated dromaeosaurid manual ungual, a proximal portion of a right theropod anterior dorsal rib and an indeterminate bone mass that includes a collection of ribs. Neither the rib fragment nor the bone mass can be confidently referred to Dromaeosauridae, although they may very well belong to the same individual to whom the left leg belongs. PMID:26664809

  16. A Basal Tapejarine (Pterosauria; Pterodactyloidea; Tapejaridae) from the Crato Formation, Early Cretaceous of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pêgas, Rodrigo Vargas; Leal, Maria Eduarda de Castro; Kellner, Alexander Wilhelm Armin

    A three-dimensional and almost complete pterosaur mandible from the Crato Formation (Early Cretaceous of Northeastern Brazil), Araripe Basin, is described as a new species of a tapejarine tapejarid. Tapejarines are a particular group of toothless pterosaurs, characterized by well-developed cranial crests, downturned rostra, and have been proposed to represent frugivorous flying reptiles. Though comparatively well represented and distributed, the evolutionary history of the group is still poorly known, and the internal relationships of its members are not well understood. The new species here reported, named Aymberedactylus cearensis gen. et sp. nov., adds new data concerning the evolution of the group, concerning their morphology and geographical origin. It differs from known tapejarids due to its unusually elongate retroarticular process and a shallow fossa on the splenial exhibiting distinctive rugose texture. Furthermore, it exhibits a suite of basal and derived conditions within the Tapejaridae, demonstrating how their morphological traits probably evolved and that these forms were even more diverse than already acknowledged. The discovery of Aymberedactylus cearensis sheds new light on the evolutionary history of the Tapejarinae.

  17. Undrilled Muddy formation (Lower Cretaceous) paleodrainage basin, southwestern Wyoming and northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Dolson, J.; Leighton, V.

    1989-03-01

    The Muddy formation (Lower Cretaceous) of the central and northern Rocky Mountains has produced over 1.5 billion bbl of oil equivalent hydrocarbons. Traps are developed in buried hills, valley fills, and onlapping marine sands associated with subaerial unconformities formed during a sea level drop. At least 10 paleodrainage basins developed at maximum lowstand. Of these, production has been established in seven. One such paleodrainage, herein designated the Washakie/Sand Wash basin (WSW) drainage, is only drilled peripherally and remains essentially untested over nearly 20,000 km/sup 2/. The WSW paleodrainage is productive in Wyoming from local tributary sandstones at Sugar Creek field (Sierra Madre uplift) and Lost Soldier field (Sweetwater uplift). A major through-going trunk drainage network is productive at Brady field (Rock Springs uplift) and in numerous pools on the Axial and Douglas Creek arches of northwestern Colorado. A recent deep wildcat in northwestern Colorado has confirmed subsurface existence of additional valley networks. Ten to fourteen percent porosity at 5800 m and recent deep Muddy equivalent valley fill discoveries on the southern Moxa arch (Wyoming) demonstrate reservoir potential throughout this trend. Future drilling successes will require 3400 to 6000-m deep tests but should result in significant deep gas and condensate production.

  18. Integrated biostratigraphy, stage boundaries and Paleoclimatology of the Upper Cretaceous-Lower Eocene successions in Kharga and Dakhala Oases, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, H.; Al Sawy, S.

    2014-08-01

    The Upper Cretaceous-Lower Eocene succession in the studied sections is divided into four rock units that arranged from base to top: the Dakhla, Tarawan, Esna and the Thebes formations. Detailed study of the foraminifera and calcareous nannofossils has led to the recognition of 58 and 82 species, respectively. Based on planktonic foraminifera and calcareous nannofossils 8 planktonic foraminiferal biozones (CF4, P2, P3, P4, E1, E2, E3 and E4) have been recognized as well as 8 calcareous nannofossil biozones (CC25b, NP3, NP4, NP5, NP6, NP7/8, NP9, and NP10). At Gabal Teir/Tarawan section, Kharga Oasis, the Paleocene can be divided into three stages; Danian, Selandian and Thanetian. The Danian/Selandian boundary is placed at P3a/P3b zonal boundary (LO of Igorina albeari) which corresponds to the level of LO of Lithoptychius ulii, Fasciculithus pileatus, Fasciculithus involutus and Lithoptychius janii (upper part of Zone NP4). The Selandian/Thanetian boundary, on the other hand, can be traced within the foraminiferal Zone P4 (Globanomalina pseudomenardii Zone) and between the nannofossil zones NP6 and NP7/8 (LO of Discoaster mohleri). At Gabal Ghanima section, the Paleocene/Eocene boundary is located within the lower part of the Esna Formation. It can be traced at the base of planktonic foraminiferal Zone E1 (LOs of Acarinina africana, A sibaiyaensis and Morozovella allinsoensis), and at the NP9a/NP9b subzonal boundary (LO of Rhomboaster spp). However, the lower Eocene succession seems to be condensed and punctuated by minor hiatus (absence of Subzone NP10a). The dominance of cool water nannofossil species in the late Maastrichtian and early Danian interval suggests a gradual decrease in the surface water paleotemperature. However, a slight warming condition prevailed around the Danian/Selandian transition as evidenced by the warm water nannofossil species. At the P/E boundary interval, the high abundance of warm-water taxa (e.g. Discoaster, Sphenolithus, Rhomboaster

  19. Hydrogeologic framework and estimates of ground-water volumes in Tertiary and upper Cretaceous hydrogeologic units in the Powder River basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinaman, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    The Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana is an important source of energy resources for the United States. Coalbed methane gas is contained in Tertiary and upper Cretaceous hydrogeologic units in the Powder River Basin. This gas is released when water pressure in coalbeds is lowered, usually by pumping ground water. Issues related to disposal and uses of by-product water from coalbed methane production have developed, in part, due to uncertainties in hydrologic properties. One hydrologic property of primary interest is the amount of water contained in Tertiary and upper Cretaceous hydrogeologic units in the Powder River Basin. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management, conducted a study to describe the hydrogeologic framework and to estimate ground-water volumes in different facies of Tertiary and upper Cretaceous hydrogeologic units in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. A geographic information system was used to compile and utilize hydrogeologic maps, to describe the hydrogeologic framework, and to estimate the volume of ground water in Tertiary and upper Cretaceous hydrogeologic units in the Powder River structural basin in Wyoming. Maps of the altitudes of potentiometric surfaces, altitudes of the tops and bottoms of hydrogeologic units, thicknesses of hydrogeologic units, percent sand of hydrogeologic units, and outcrop boundaries for the following hydrogeologic units were used: Tongue River-Wasatch aquifer, Lebo confining unit, Tullock aquifer, Upper Hell Creek confining unit, and the Fox Hills-Lower Hell Creek aquifer. Literature porosity values of 30 percent for sand and 35 percent for non-sand facies were used to calculate the volume of total ground water in each hydrogeologic unit. Literature specific yield values of 26 percent for sand and 10 percent for non-sand facies, and literature specific storage values of 0.0001 ft-1 (1/foot) for sand facies and 0.00001 ft-1 for non-sand facies, were used to calculate a

  20. Formation and tectonic evolution of the Cretaceous Jurassic Muslim Bagh ophiolitic complex, Pakistan: Implications for the composite tectonic setting of ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mehrab; Kerr, Andrew C.; Mahmood, Khalid

    2007-10-01

    The Muslim Bagh ophiolitic complex Balochistan, Pakistan is comprised of an upper and lower nappe and represents one of a number of ophiolites in this region which mark the boundary between the Indian and Eurasian plates. These ophiolites were obducted onto the Indian continental margin around the Late Cretaceous, prior to the main collision between the Indian and Eurasian plates. The upper nappe contains mantle sequence rocks with numerous isolated gabbro plutons which we show are fed by dolerite dykes. Each pluton has a transitional dunite-rich zone at its base, and new geochemical data suggest a similar mantle source region for both the plutons and dykes. In contrast, the lower nappe consists of pillow basalts, deep-marine sediments and a mélange of ophiolitic rocks. The rocks of the upper nappe have a geochemical signature consistent with formation in an island arc environment whereas the basalts of the lower nappe contain no subduction component and are most likely to have formed at a mid-ocean ridge. The basalts and sediments of the lower nappe have been intruded by oceanic alkaline igneous rocks during the northward drift of the Indian plate. The two nappes of the Muslim Bagh ophiolitic complex are thus distinctively different in terms of their age, lithology and tectonic setting. The recognition of composite ophiolites such as this has an important bearing on the identification and interpretation of ophiolites where the plate tectonic setting is less well resolved.

  1. Stratigraphy, depositional history, and petroleum geology of Lower Cretaceous Fall River formation, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Ryer, T.A.; Gustason, E.R.

    1985-05-01

    The middle Albian Fall River Formation, better know to petroleum geologists as the Dakota Sandstone, constitutes a northwestward-thinning wedge of predominantly sandy strata under and overlain by marine shale. Two major episodes of deltaic progradation can be recognized in the formation, permitting mapping of lower and upper deltaic members. Study of outcrops, cores, and subsurface relationships indicates that the Fall River consists predominantly of fluvial strata in the southeastern part of the Powder River basin; delta-front and delta-plain facies, which are cut out and replaced locally by northwest-trending meander belts, predominate in an area that tends northeastward across the central part of the basin; the delta-front facies pinches out into offshore marine shale in the northwestern part of the basin. The large majority of Fall River stratigraphic trap-type fields produce oil and gas from sandy meander-belt deposits. The largest accumulations of hydrocarbons in traps of this type, as exemplified by the Powell-Mexican Springs trend (lower member) and the Coyote Creek-Miller Creek trend (upper member), occur in the more seaward parts of the deltaic members, near the seaward termini of meander-belt systems. Mapping of meander belts and of the surrounding deltaic deposits constitutes a necessary first step in exploration for stratigraphic traps within the Fall River Formation.

  2. Submarine fan sedimentation at a convergent margin: the cretaceous mangapokia formation, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Philip M.

    1988-10-01

    The middle Cretaceous Mangapokia Formation (Pahaoa Group) near Te Awaiti, southeast North Island, New Zealand, consists of indurated, poorly fossiliferous, alternating sandstone and argillite, minor conglomerate, grit, pebbly-sandstone, and pebbly-mudstone (terrigenous sedimentary assemblage), and minor basalt, coloured argillite, chert, and micritic limestone (ocean-floor assemblage). Seven lithofacies are distinguished in the sedimentary assemblage on the basis of lithology, bed thickness and geometry, sand/mud ratio, grain size and internal sedimentary features. Facies 1 (10-15% of total exposure), which includes all sediments coarser than sand grade, comprises seven subfacies as follows: lenticular and erosive beds of coarse-grained (Subfacies 1Ai), medium-grained (Subfacies 1Aii) and fine-grained (Subfacies 1Aiii) predominantly clast-supported conglomerate, grit (Subfacies 1Aiv) and pebbly-sandstone (Subfacies 1Av) displaying numerous types of graded bedding and sedimentary structures, were all deposited predominantly from high-concentration turbidity currents or bed-load inertia flows. Minor chaotic sand or mud matrix-supported conglomerate lenses (Subfacies 1Bi), and beds which show clear evidence of post-depositional remobilisation (Subfacies 1Bii), represent debris flow deposits. Thick lenses of sandstone and minor argillite interbeds (Facies 2) were deposited from large-volume inertia flows, possibly grainflows. Facies 3, the most common lithofacies, consists of laterally more extensive, medium thickness, graded beds of alternating sandstone and argillite with rare Bouma sequences. These deposits are proximal turbidites which accumulated in environments more distal than Facies 1 and 2. Thin-bedded (Facies 4) and very thin-bedded (Facies 5) alternating sandstone and argillite, and argillite-dominated sequences with minor interbedded sandstone (Facies 6) were deposited in interchannel depressions, on channel levees, or in areas distant from high

  3. Applications of ichnology to hydrogeology, with examples from the Cape Fear Formation (Cretaceous), South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, A.J. . Geosciences Program); Simones, G.C. )

    1992-01-01

    Ichnology, the study of modern and ancient traces left by organisms, has provided supplemental information to geologic subdisciplines such as sedimentology and stratigraphy. The major objective of the authors paper is to emphasize the valuable information that can be conveyed by trace fossils in the investigation of hydrogeologic units. Bioturbation has a net effect of mixing different types and layers of sediments, such as introducing clays into sands and vice versa. This mixing can decrease porosity and permeability of sandy units, thus changing potential aquifers into confining units. For example, a sandy fluvial deposit will contain distinctive nonmarine trace fossils, thus defining channel sands that may serve as permeable conduits for ground-water flow. In contrast, a sandy shelf deposit will contain marine trace fossils in a sand body geometry that will be markedly different from aquifers produced in nonmarine environments. Bioturbation also causes geochemical and diagenetic changes in sediments, causing irrigation of previously anoxic sediments and precipitation of ion oxides. The Cretaceous Cape Fear Formation of the Atlantic Coastal Plain, in the subsurface of South Carolina, is presented as an example of a hydrogeologic unit that has been reinterpreted using ichnologic data. Extensive bioturbation caused mixing of clays and sands in Cape Fear sediments, which resulted in the Cape Fear becoming a regional confining system. Trace fossil assemblages indicate a brackish water environment, perhaps estuarine, for the Cape Fear, as opposed to previous interpretations of fluvial and deltaic environments. Bioturbated zones also have significantly more oxidized iron than unbioturbated zones, highlighting potential effects on ground-water quality.

  4. New Specimens of Nemegtomaia from the Baruungoyot and Nemegt Formations (Late Cretaceous) of Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    Fanti, Federico; Currie, Philip J.; Badamgarav, Demchig

    2012-01-01

    Two new specimens of the oviraptorid theropod Nemegtomaia barsboldi from the Nemegt Basin of southern Mongolia are described. Specimen MPC-D 107/15 was collected from the upper beds of the Baruungoyot Formation (Campanian-Maastrichtian), and is a nest of eggs with the skeleton of the assumed parent of Nemegtomaia on top in brooding position. Much of the skeleton was damaged by colonies of dermestid coleopterans prior to its complete burial. However, diagnostic characters are recovered from the parts preserved, including the skull, partial forelimbs (including the left hand), legs, and distal portions of both feet. Nemegtomaia represents the fourth known genus of oviraptorid for which individuals have been found on nests of eggs. The second new specimen, MPC-D 107/16, was collected a few kilometers to the east in basal deposits of the Nemegt Formation, and includes both hands and femora of a smaller Nemegtomaia individual. The two formations and their diverse fossil assemblages have been considered to represent sequential time periods and different environments, but data presented here indicate partial overlap across the Baruungoyot-Nemegt transition. All other known oviraptorids from Mongolia and China are known exclusively from xeric or semi-arid environments. However, this study documents that Nemegtomaia is found in both arid/aeolian (Baruungoyot Formation) and more humid/fluvial (Nemegt Formation) facies. PMID:22347465

  5. Sedimentary evolution of the upper Cretaceous and late Oligocene sequences, and its relation to oil production, North Monagas area, Eastern Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Sambrano, J.; Rojas, B.; Rendon, J.; Chigne, R.; Maguregui, J.

    1996-08-01

    The most important oil reservoirs of the Eastern Venezuela Basin are located in the North Monagas Area. These reservoirs are contained within a 3500 ft Cretaceous to Late Oligocene sedimentary section. Daily production is rated at about 350 MBO and 1000 MMCFG. At this moment, these reservoirs are undergoing special studies, in order to establish enhanced recovery projects, for which heterogeneity definition is very important. The database consisted of log analyses of 136 wells, sedimentological and biostratigraphic interpretation of 10,200 ft of cores, and biostratigraphic interpretation of ditch samples from 13 wells. Sedimentary models, based on facies analyses and deltaic conceptual models of 31 separate genetic units were defined. The models allowed for the interpretation of paleoenvironments, sedimentary facies architecture, direction of sedimentation and depocenters. The preferred sediment orientation was determined to be West-East. In the Santa Barbara and Pirital reservoirs the Late Oligocene sediments are composed of fluvial deposits, and the Cretaceous sediments of estuarine deposits. In the Carito-Mulata reservoirs, the Late Oligocene sediments are composed of fluvial to marine deposits, and the Upper Cretaceous sediments of estuarine deposits. Possible preferred transmissibility pathways for fluid injection were described, providing a great support for the enhanced recovery phases of these reservoirs.

  6. Differentiation of delta-front and barrier lithofacies of the Upper Cretaceous Pictured Cliffs Sandstone, southwest San Juan Basin, New Mexico.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, R.M.; Erpenbeck, Michael F.

    1981-01-01

    This Sandstone represents a regressive littoral marine unit deposited during the final retreat of the Cretaceous epeiric sea. Differences in rock type, internal and penecontemporaneous deformation structures, textural sequences, mineral composition and trace fossil content permit recognition of laterally contemporaneous delta-front and barrier lithofacies. The delta-front lithofacies consists of distal bar, distributary mouth bar, and distributary channel deposits. The barrier lithofacies consists of shoreface, beach, washover channel, tidal inlet, tidal channel, and ebb-tidal delta deposits; these lithofacies are coarsening-upward sequences of shale, siltstone and sandstone, locally scoured in the upper part by fining-upward channel deposits.-from Authors

  7. Sedimentology and Stratigraphic architecture of the early Cretaceous Alpian-Aptian succession of the Kiklah Formation, Jabal Nafusah, NW Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlal, Osama

    2016-04-01

    Kiklah Formation is presents on the Jabal Nafusah escarpment for almost 400 km from the Tunisian border to the east of Gharyan. Kiklah Formation overlies the Early Cretaceous, Jurassic and Triassic sediments of Jabal Nafusah with marked unconformity. On the other hand, it is unconformably overlain by the Sidi as Sid Formation. This contact with overlying units is angular unconformity as it is evident only in the central Gharyan area. The Kiklah Formation consists mainly of continental deposits such as conglomeratic sandstone, pebble sandstone, and mudstone with minor lacustrine interbeds of reddish yellow to greenish claystone. In addition, these rocks were formed by a braided river system carrying heavy sediment loads, with frequent shifting of the principal channels. SEM studies show pitting and breakage features on the sand grains which are diagnostic of Fluvial depositional environment. In the Nafusah region the Kiklah Formation varies in thickness westward from absence near Gharyan to over 610 m in Tunisian subsurface.

  8. Spectroscopic studies of the fish fossils (Cladocyclus gardneri and Vinctifer comptoni) from the Ipubi Formation of the Cretaceous Period.

    PubMed

    Sousa Filho, F E; da Silva, J H; Saraiva, G D; Abagaro, B T O; Barros, O A; Saraiva, A A F; Viana, B C; Freire, P T C

    2016-03-15

    Fossils are mineralized remains or traces from animals, plants and other organisms aged to about 10(8)years. The chemical processes of fossilization are dated back from old geological periods on Earth. The understanding of these processes and the structure of the fossils are one of the goals of paleontology and geology in the sedimentary environments. Many researches have tried to unveil details about special kinds of biological samples; however, a lack of data is noticed for various other specimens. This study reports the investigations through infrared spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction measurements for two types of fish fossils from the Cretaceous Period. The sample of Cladocyclus gardneri and Vinctifer comptoni fossils were collected from the Ipubi Formation, being one of the less studied, among the formations that constitute the important Santana group in the Araripe Basin, Brazil. The results obtained through different techniques, showed that the C. gardneri fish fossil contains hydroxyapatite and calcite as constituents whereas its rock matrix was formed by calcite, quartz and pyrite. Regarding the V. comptoni, the measurements confirmed the presence of hydroxyapatite in the fossil and its rock matrix gypsum, pyrite, quartz and calcite. The above scientific data contributed to the understanding the fossil formation in the Ipubi Formation, an important environment of the Cretaceous Period, which is rich in well-preserved fossils from different species.

  9. Spectroscopic studies of the fish fossils (Cladocyclus gardneri and Vinctifer comptoni) from the Ipubi Formation of the Cretaceous Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa Filho, F. E.; da Silva, J. H.; Saraiva, G. D.; Abagaro, B. T. O.; Barros, O. A.; Saraiva, A. A. F.; Viana, B. C.; Freire, P. T. C.

    2016-03-01

    Fossils are mineralized remains or traces from animals, plants and other organisms aged to about 108 years. The chemical processes of fossilization are dated back from old geological periods on Earth. The understanding of these processes and the structure of the fossils are one of the goals of paleontology and geology in the sedimentary environments. Many researches have tried to unveil details about special kinds of biological samples; however, a lack of data is noticed for various other specimens. This study reports the investigations through infrared spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction measurements for two types of fish fossils from the Cretaceous Period. The sample of Cladocyclus gardneri and Vinctifer comptoni fossils were collected from the Ipubi Formation, being one of the less studied, among the formations that constitute the important Santana group in the Araripe Basin, Brazil. The results obtained through different techniques, showed that the C. gardneri fish fossil contains hydroxyapatite and calcite as constituents whereas its rock matrix was formed by calcite, quartz and pyrite. Regarding the V. comptoni, the measurements confirmed the presence of hydroxyapatite in the fossil and its rock matrix gypsum, pyrite, quartz and calcite. The above scientific data contributed to the understanding the fossil formation in the Ipubi Formation, an important environment of the Cretaceous Period, which is rich in well-preserved fossils from different species.

  10. Dynamics of Late Cretaceous rocky shores (Rosario Formation) from Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lescinsky, H.L. ); Ledesma-Vazquez, J. ); Johnson, M.E. )

    1991-04-01

    Two rocky-shore deposits are described at localities of Late Cretaceous age in Baja California, Mexico. The main locality, at Las Minas, is characterized by a carbonate matrix containing clasts derived from an underlying andesite flow. Basal boulders give way up section to smaller cobbles and silt, indicating a transgression. The biotas from the sites include encrusting forms (coralline algae, bryozoans, serpulids, ostreids, spondylids), pholadid bivalve borings, and several nestling and mobile taxa. The well exposed boulder zone contains clusters of nestling pectinids preserved in growth position. This is the first such observation from an ancient rocky shore. Echinoids also lived within the relatively stable boulder interstices. Rocky-shore biotas of Late Cretaceous age from around the world contain many elements in common, including large encrusting oysters, spondylids, serpulids, rhynconellid brachiopods, and echinoids. Other groups common to rocky shores today are found at only some Cretaceous localities (e.g., barnacles, trochid and cerithiid gastropods, limpets, chitons). More archaic taxa, such as crinoids and large inarticulate brachiopods, are rarely represented at the known Cretaceous localities. Reconstructions of the biotas of ancient rocky shores offer a new avenue for the study of evolution on hard substrates. As the number and quality of described rocky-shore localities increases, it will be possible to put into a broader context evolutionary trends derived strictly from hard-grounds or other hard-substrate types.

  11. Palynological analysis of floral changes caused by repeated volcanic ash burial of a coal-forming upper Cretaceous peat swamp, Utah, U. S. A

    SciTech Connect

    Dufek, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Ferron Sandstone C coal horizon and several outcrop samples from the upper Tununk Shale, Ferron Sandstone, and lower Bluegate Shale Members of the Mancos Shale from the Castle Valley area of east-central Utah were studied palynologically. This information was used to reconstruct the floristic assemblages of the coal-forming peat swamps, to determine the extent of destruction of the vegetation by repeated burial by volcanic ash, and the sequence of plant community paleosuccession following such events. Seven floristic assemblages are differentiated in the coal swamps. Both lateral (geographic) and vertical (successional) floristic trends are identified in the Ferron C. coal. Low diversity, fern dominated assemblages represent early successional communities. The mature coal swamp consists primarily of the Gymnosperm Assemblage. Periodic volcanic eruptions had varying effects on the paleocommunity structure of the Ferron C coal swamp vegetation. The thicker ash fall accumulations were more devastating to the flora than the thin ash accumulations. Hydrologic, pedologic, and floristic changes are associated with the thickest ash fall. The Ferron Sandstone palynoflora (middle to late Turonian) is similar to other western US Middle-Cretaceous floras. No depositional or age relationships were established between productive samples from northern and southern Castle Valley. The upper Tununk Shale palynoflora is characteristic of the Cenomanian-Turonian (Middle Cretaceous). The lower Bluegate Shale palynoflora is latest Turonian in age or younger. Both the Tununk Shale and the Bluegate Shale yielded palynofloras characteristic of marine depositional environments.

  12. Geochemical and Petrographic Characterization of Ash in the Cretaceous Eagle Ford Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronay, E.; Lee, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Eagle Ford Formation is composed of highly laminated, organic rich shales and marls interbedded with volcanic ash. Discrete ash beds are easy to identify in outcrop as recessed layers between more resistant rock. In the finely laminated shales, the ash cannot be identified visually, which fosters the questions of whether ash is present in these shales and how that can be determined. The ash is thought to come from volcanic activity in western North America during the Cenomanian and Turonian, depositing in the Western Interior Seaway in what is now South Texas. Samples of known ash-rich beds from the Eagle Ford were analyzed using micro-XRF and thin section petrography in conjunction with ICP-MS laser ablation to determine the geochemical composition of the samples. The high CaCO3 content of the marls diluted the ash in each sample so elemental data were used to separate the two components. The amount of Ca in the ash from the total measured Ca was unknown. Carbonate takes Sr but not Al, therefore the y-intercept of a Ca/Al vs. Sr/Al graph gave the concentration of Ca in the non-carbonate components. This method was used for every cation to gather a generalized overall composition of the present day ash. The ash was found to have been altered to clays, resulting in a substantial loss of Si and thereby making the original composition of the ash indeterminable. However, certain elements like Ti and Zr are not as significantly affected by weathering. Using an empirical relationship between Ti/Zr and SiO2 in magmatic rocks from the Cretaceous Peninsular Ranges batholith, the likely source of ash, our measured Ti/Zr was used to determine the original SiO2 percentage in the ash, giving a range of 60-75 wt%. This was also checked by a Ti/Al regression analysis from the same Peninsular Ranges data, which gave a range of 67-72 wt% SiO2. These results suggest that the ash came from andesitic to rhyolitic eruptions. The discrepancy in Ti/Al and Ti/Zr calculated SiO2

  13. Stratigraphy and paleogeography of the Cretaceous in Arabian Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Alsharhan, A.S.; Nairn, A.E.M.

    1986-05-01

    The Cretaceous of the Arabian Peninsula is divided into three major units by regional unconformities: Lower Cretaceous Thamama Group (Berriasian-middle Aptian), middle Cretaceous Wasia Group (Albian-Turonian), and Upper Cretaceous Aruma Group (Coniacian-Maestrichtian). The profusion of named stratigraphic units in the area reflects not only the lithologic variation resulting from facies changes, but also terminologies adopted by different companies. The authors provide a stratigraphic nomenclature defining standard type sections and indicate synonymies, which follow the recommendation of 10th Geological Liaison Meeting and hence are acceptable to operators in the area. The sedimentologic history of the area was presented in a series of paleogeographic maps, which they relate to the regional tectonic framework. The maps show a predominantly carbonate shelf ramp bordering a land area to the north and west. The principal change in depositional environment occurs during the Upper Cretaceous, as a result of tectonic activity. Less significant changes are attributed to eustatic sea level fluctuations, on which tilting caused by tectonic movement may be superposed during the Lower and middle Cretaceous. The major producing horizons lie below the regional unconformities; secondary porosity in the shelf reefal buildups was developed during subaerial exposure in the Shuaiba Formation (early-middle Aptian), in the Mishrif Formation (late Cenomanian), and in the Simsima Formation (Maestrichtian).

  14. New occurrences of fossilized feathers: systematics and taphonomy of the Santana Formation of the Araripe Basin (Cretaceous), NE, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Anelli, Luiz Eduardo; Petri, Setembrino; Romero, Guilherme Raffaeli

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe three fossil feathers from the Early Cretaceous Santana Formation of the Araripe Basin, Brazil. Feathers are the most complex multiform vertebrate integuments; they perform different functions, occurring in both avian and non-avian dinosaurs. Despite their rarity, fossil feathers have been found across the world. Most of the Brazilian feather fossil record comes from the Santana Formation. This formation is composed of two members: Crato (lake) and Romualdo (lagoon); both of which are predominantly reduced deposits, precluding bottom dwelling organisms, resulting in exceptional preservation of the fossils. Despite arid and hot conditions during the Cretaceous, life teemed in the adjacency of this paleolake. Feathered non-avian dinosaurs have not yet been described from the Crato Member, even though there are suggestions of their presence in nearby basins. Our description of the three feathers from the Crato laminated limestone reveals that, despite the small sample size, they can be referred to coelurosaurian theropods. Moreover, based on comparisons with extant feather morphotypes they can be identified as one contour feather and two downy feathers. Despite their rareness and low taxonomic potential, fossilized feathers can offer insights about the paleobiology of its owners and the paleoecology of the Araripe Basin. PMID:27441102

  15. Revision of the Cretaceous fossil plant-assemblage from Gardeshwar (Gujarat, India): A conifer dominated floral association from an Upper Gondwana sequence on the West Coast of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Brajendra Nath; King, Sarah C.; Hilton, Jason

    2013-09-01

    A small but diverse fossil plant assemblage from Gardeshwar in Gujarat Province of western India is reinvestigated, based on analysis of recently collected specimens that represent previously unrecognised taxa in combination with a critical review of previously reported taxa from the site. The assemblage is dominated by conifers including Brachyphyllum Brongniart, Elatocladus Halle, Pagiophyllum Heer, the cone Conites Sternberg, and ovulate scales of an araucarian conifer. Other plant groups are rare but include notable occurrences of the pteridophytes Lycopodites Lindley and Hutton and Gleichenia Smith, and the seed fern Sphenopteris (Brongniart) Sternberg. This assemblage is important as it represents the only datable fossils available from the Gardeshwar Formation and from the information presented we conclude it belongs to the Lower Cretaceous Allocladus-Brachyphyllum-Pagiophyllum floral biozone. The Gardeshwar assemblage association is unusual as it lacks the distinctive genus Allocladus but includes other taxa more typical of the Lower Cretaceous fern-dominated Weichselia-Onychiopsis-Gleichenia floral biozone, and may represent a transitional assemblage with characters of both biozones. However, this investigation highlights the lack of detailed stratigraphic analyses on the Lower Cretaceous sedimentary sequences of the west coast of India from which it remains uncertain if these two ‘biozones' are of different ages or whether they represent stratigraphically contemporaneous but ecologically distinct environments.

  16. Upper Cretaceous and Lower Jurassic strata in shallow cores on the Chukchi Shelf, Arctic Alaska: Chapter C in Studies by the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska, vol. 15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houseknecht, David W.; Craddock, William H.; Lease, Richard O.

    2016-02-12

    Shallow cores collected in the 1980s on the Chukchi Shelf of western Arctic Alaska sampled pre-Cenozoic strata whose presence, age, and character are poorly known across the region. Five cores from the Herald Arch foreland contain Cenomanian to Coniacian strata, as documented by biostratigraphy, geochronology, and thermochronology. Shallow seismic reflection data collected during the 1970s and 1980s show that these Upper Cretaceous strata are truncated near the seafloor by subtle angular unconformities, including the Paleogene mid-Brookian unconformity in one core and the Pliocene-Pleistocene unconformity in four cores. Sedimentary structures and lithofacies suggest that Upper Cretaceous strata were deposited in a low accommodation setting that ranged from low-lying coastal plain (nonmarine) to muddy, shallow-marine environments near shore. These observations, together with sparse evidence from the adjacent western North Slope, suggest that Upper Cretaceous strata likely were deposited across all of Arctic Alaska.A sixth core from the Herald Arch contains lower Toarcian marine strata, indicated by biostratigraphy, truncated by a Neogene or younger unconformity. These Lower Jurassic strata evidently were deposited south of the arch, buried structurally to high levels of thermal maturity during the Early Cretaceous, and uplifted on the Herald thrust-fault system during the mid to Late Cretaceous. These interpretations are based on regional stratigraphy and apatite fission-track data reported in a complementary report and are corroborated by the presence of recycled palynomorphs of Early Jurassic age and high thermal maturity found in Upper Cretaceous strata in two of the foreland cores. This dataset provides evidence that uplift and exhumation of the Herald thrust belt provided sediment to the foreland during the Late Cretaceous.

  17. Fracture characterization of flysch formation by terrestrial digital photogrammetry: an example in the Antola Formation (upper Staffora Valley, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisina, Claudia; Menegoni, Niccolò; Perotti, Cesare

    2016-04-01

    Geomechanical characterization of flysch formations plays an important role for its implication in slope stability and fluids circulation, especially in Apenninic areas. The Antola Formation of Upper Cretaceous age crops out extensively in the Northern Apennines and provides an important case of study. It consists of turbiditic graded units of calcareous sandstones, sandstones, marlstones, and shales and is interpreted as a deep-sea basin plain deposit, with lateral facies variations which range from proximal, thick-bedded turbidities to distal turbidites that show predominantly thickening upward cycles and have a high percentage of shale. It is in general characterized by folds developed in absence of metamorphism and a usually high degree of fracturation. The presence of well developed fracture networks enhances circulation of fluid and therefore alteration of the less competent layers causing problems of slope stability. Fracture characterization of Antola Formation based on field survey is very time consuming and often limited by the insufficient availability and inaccessibility of outcrops. For this reason, terrestrial remote sensing and in particular terrestrial digital photogrammetry has been applied to investigate the geomechanical features of the formation in the upper Staffora Valley (Northern Italy). Digital photogrammetry allows to generate by Structure from Motion (SfM) technique a 3D point cloud that represents the Digital Outcrop Model (DOM). New technologies allow to associate appropriate texture to the point cloud from the images, in order to preserve important visual information. The analysis of several textured 3D DOMs allows to digitally acquire a large amount of data on discontinuities parameters such as orientation, spacing, aperture, persistence and filling, in order to better characterize the rock mass. Some tests performed by field survey data acquisition to validate the digitally collected data, gave positive results, showing differences

  18. Altered volcanic ash layers of the Late Cretaceous San Felipe Formation, Sierra Madre Oriental (Northeastern Mexico): Usbnd Pb geochronology, provenance and tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco-Tapia, Fernando; Martínez-Paco, Margarita; Iriondo, Alexander; Ocampo-Díaz, Yam Zul Ernesto; Cruz-Gámez, Esther María; Ramos-Ledezma, Andrés; Andaverde, Jorge Alberto; Ostrooumov, Mikhail; Masuch, Dirk

    2016-10-01

    A detailed petrographic, geochemical, and Usbnd Pb geochronological study of altered volcanic ash layers, collected in eight outcrops of the Late Cretaceous San Felipe Formation (Sierra Madre Oriental, Northeastern Mexico), has been carried out. The main objectives have been: (1) to establish a deposit period, and (2) to propose a reliable provenance-transport-deposit-diagenetic model. These volcano-sedimentary strata represent the altered remains of vitreous-crystalline ash (main grains: quartz + K-feldspar (sanidine) + Na-plagioclase + zircon + biotite; groundmass: glass + calcite + clinochlore + illite) deposited and preserved in a shallow, relatively large in area, open platform environment. Major and trace element geochemistry indicate that parent volcanism was mainly rhyodacitic to rhyolitic in composition. Discrimination diagrams suggest a link to continental arc transitional to extension tectonic setting. Usbnd Pb geochronology in zircon has revealed that the volcanic ash was released from their sources approximately during the range 84.6 ± 0.8 to 73.7 ± 0.3 Ma, being transported to the depocenters. Burial diagenesis process was marked by: (a) a limited recycling, (b) the partial loss of original components (mainly K-feldspar, plagioclase, biotite and glass), and (c) the addition of quartz, calcite, illite and clinochlore. The location of the source area remains uncertain, although the lack of enrichment in Zr/Sc ratio suggests that ashes were subjected to relatively fast and short-distance transport process. El Peñuelo intrusive complex, at 130-170 km west of the depocenters, is the nearest known zone of active magmatism during the Upper Cretaceous. This intermediate to felsic pluton, characterized by a geochemical affinity to post-orogenic tectonic setting, could be linked to the volcanic sources.

  19. Depositional environments, diagenesis, and porosity of upper cretaceous volcanic-rich Tokio sandstone reservoirs, Haynesville Field, Clairborne Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, W.J.

    1995-10-01

    Tokio Formation sandstones produce oil from volcanic-rich to quartzose lithic sandstones in the Haynesville Field. The Tokio interval is approximately 210 feet thick and has been divided into four sandstone zones separated by shales or scoured contacts. In ascending order, the four zones are the RA, S3, S2, and S1. The RA is composed of quartzose sublitharenites inferred to have been deposited in delta front bars and distributary channels. The upper three zones are composed of sublitharenite and feldspathic litharenite to quartzose litharenite. The upper sands are interpreted to have been deposited in littoral environments including storm influenced shelf, tidal flats and channels, and barrier island/strand plain. The diagenesis of these sands is strongly related to composition: greater percentages of cements and secondary porosity occur in lithic-rich sandstones. Diagenetic cements in quartzose sandstones are mainly quartz overgrowths with minor early K-spar overgrowths on plagioclase, early chlorite-rims, and late patchy calcite, pyrite, and rare dolomite and siderite. Diagenesis in lithic-rich sands includes greater amounts of chlorite rim and pore-filling kaolinite cements and less quartz-overgrowth and other cements. The effect of the original mineralogy and diagenetic minerals on wireline logs includes: (1) reduction of SP due to cements, (2) increase in GR response due to K-spar and volcanic detritus, (3) higher resistivity due to carbonate minerals, and (4) increase in irreducible water saturation due to pore-lining and pore-filling clay. Thus, potential reservoir zones with lithic-rich sandstones like the Tokio could be overlooked in many areas around the world.

  20. Hints of the early Jehol Biota: important dinosaur footprint assemblages from the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary Tuchengzi Formation in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lida; Zhang, Jianping; Lockley, Martin G; McCrea, Richard T; Klein, Hendrik; Alcalá, Luis; Buckley, Lisa G; Burns, Michael E; Kümmell, Susanna B; He, Qing

    2015-01-01

    New reports of dinosaur tracksites in the Tuchengzi Formation in the newly established Yanqing Global Geopark, Beijing, China, support previous inferences that the track assemblages from this formation are saurischian-dominated. More specifically, the assemblages appear theropod-dominated, with the majority of well-preserved tracks conforming to the Grallator type (sensus lato), thus representing relatively small trackmakers. Such ichnofaunas supplement the skeletal record from this unit that lacks theropods thus far, proving a larger diversity of dinosaur faunas in that region. Sauropods are represented by medium to large sized and narrow and wide-gauge groups, respectively. The latter correspond with earlier discoveries of titanosauriform skeletons in the same unit. Previous records of ornithischian tracks cannot be positively confirmed. Purported occurrences are re-evaluated here, the trackways and imprints, except of a single possible specimen, re-assigned to theropods. Palecologically the Tuchengzi ichnofauna is characteristic of semi-arid fluvio-lacustrine inland basins with Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous deposits in northern China that all show assemblages with abundant theropod and sauropod tracks and minor components of ornithopod, pterosaur and bird tracks.

  1. Hints of the Early Jehol Biota: Important Dinosaur Footprint Assemblages from the Jurassic-Cretaceous Boundary Tuchengzi Formation in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lida; Zhang, Jianping; Lockley, Martin G.; McCrea, Richard T.; Klein, Hendrik; Alcalá, Luis; Buckley, Lisa G.; Burns, Michael E.; Kümmell, Susanna B.; He, Qing

    2015-01-01

    New reports of dinosaur tracksites in the Tuchengzi Formation in the newly established Yanqing Global Geopark, Beijing, China, support previous inferences that the track assemblages from this formation are saurischian-dominated. More specifically, the assemblages appear theropod-dominated, with the majority of well-preserved tracks conforming to the Grallator type (sensus lato), thus representing relatively small trackmakers. Such ichnofaunas supplement the skeletal record from this unit that lacks theropods thus far, proving a larger diversity of dinosaur faunas in that region. Sauropods are represented by medium to large sized and narrow and wide-gauge groups, respectively. The latter correspond with earlier discoveries of titanosauriform skeletons in the same unit. Previous records of ornithischian tracks cannot be positively confirmed. Purported occurrences are re-evaluated here, the trackways and imprints, except of a single possible specimen, re-assigned to theropods. Palecologically the Tuchengzi ichnofauna is characteristic of semi-arid fluvio-lacustrine inland basins with Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous deposits in northern China that all show assemblages with abundant theropod and sauropod tracks and minor components of ornithopod, pterosaur and bird tracks. PMID:25901363

  2. High-resolution sequence-stratigraphic correlation between shallow-marine and terrestrial strata: Examples from the Sunnyside Member of the Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation Book Cliffs eastern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, R.; Howell, J.; Boyd, R.; Flint, S.; Diessel, C.

    2006-07-15

    The Sunnyside Member of the Upper Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation in the Book Cliffs of eastern Utah provides an ideal opportunity to investigate high-resolution sequence-stratigraphic correlation between shallow-marine and terrestrial strata in an area of outstanding outcrop exposure. The thick, laterally extensive coal seam that caps the Sunnyside Member is critical for correlating between its shallow-marine and terrestrial components. Petrographic analysis of 281 samples obtained from 7 vertical sections spanning more than 30 km (18 mi) of depositional dip enabled us to recognize a series of transgressive-regressive coal facies trends in the seam. On this basis, we were able to identify a high-resolution record of accommodation change throughout the deposition of the coal, as well as a series of key sequence-stratigraphic surfaces. The stratigraphic relationships between the coal and the siliciclastic components of the Sunnyside Member enable us to correlate this record with that identified in the time-equivalent shallow-marine strata and to demonstrate that the coal spans the formation of two marine parasequences and two high-frequency, fourth-order sequence boundaries. This study has important implications for improving the understanding of sequence-stratigraphic expression in terrestrial strata and for correlating between marine and terrestrial records of base-level change. It may also have implications for improving the predictability of vertical and lateral variations in coal composition for mining and coalbed methane projects.

  3. The Role of Upper-crustal Thickening in Spatially-focusing Synorogenic Extension: A Case Study from the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene Nevadaplano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, S. P.; Thomson, S. N.; Reiners, P. W.; Di Fiori, R. V.

    2015-12-01

    Synorogenic extension is often interpreted as gravitational spreading of thickened crust or as a response to thrust belt dynamics; however, the processes that spatially-localize extension during orogenesis are not fully understood. Here, we examine additional factors that control the location of synorogenic extension by presenting a case study from the hinterland plateau of the Sevier orogenic belt (or 'Nevadaplano'). The Eureka culmination, a 20 km-wide, N-trending anticline with 4.5 km of structural relief, was constructed in the plateau interior in eastern Nevada in the Early Cretaceous. After its construction, the culmination underwent 40% extension, accommodated by two sets of N-striking normal faults, which exhumed rocks from depths of 6-8 km, and pre-date a late Eocene unconformity. Well-defined fault geometries, stratigraphic thicknesses, and preservation of erosion surfaces allowed estimation of the contributions of tectonic exhumation versus pre- and post-extensional erosional exhumation. Time-temperature paths determined from zircon and apatite (U-Th)/He and fission-track thermochronology collected from Paleozoic quartzite in the footwalls of two normal faults demonstrate rapid (10 °C/Myr) Late Cretaceous to Paleocene (75-60 Ma) cooling, which we interpret as tectonic exhumation during extension, and which was concurrent with late-stage shortening in the frontal Sevier thrust belt. This example illustrates that structural and topographic relief generated within zones of localized upper-crustal thickening can spatially-focus extension during orogenesis. This observation, when combined with Late Cretaceous exhumation in core complexes in northeast Nevada and northern Utah, which also developed within sites of localized crustal thickening, illustrates that gradients in gravitational potential energy, at different scales and crustal levels, played a primary role in controlling the location of late-stage, synorogenic extension within the Nevadaplano.

  4. Norphlet formation (Upper Jurassic) of southwestern and offshore Alabama: environments of deposition and petroleum geology

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Bearden, B.L.; Mink, R.M.; Wilkerson, R.P.

    1985-06-01

    Upper Jurassic Norphlet sediments in southwestern and offshore Alabama accumulated under arid climatic conditions. The Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States extended into southwestern Alabama to provide a barrier for air and water circulation during the deposition of the Norphlet Formation. These mountains produced topographic conditions that contributed to the arid climate, and they affected sedimentation. Norphlet paleogeography in southwestern Alabama was dominated by a broad desert plain, rimmed to the north and east by the Appalachians and to the south by a developing shallow sea. The desert plain extended westward into eastern and central Mississippi. Norphlet hydrocarbon potential in southwestern and offshore Alabama is excellent; six oil and gas fields already have been established. Petroleum traps discovered to date are primarily structural traps involving salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines, and extensional fault traps associated with salt movement. Reservoir rocks consist primarily of quartz-rich sandstones that are eolian, wadi, and marine in origin. Porosity is principally secondary (dissolution) with some intergranular porosity. Smackover algal carbonate mudstones were probably the source for the Norphlet hydrocarbons. Jurassic oil generation and migration probably were initiated in the Early Cretaceous.

  5. Paleoecology and Paleoenvironmental Interpretations of the Late Cretaceous Lower Cantwell Formation, Denali National Park, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomsich, C. S.; Salazar Jaramillo, S.; Jacobus, R. T.; McCarthy, P. J.; Fowell, S. J.; Fiorillo, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    The level of diversity of an ancient high-latitude fauna or flora is of interest not just for the study of species evolution and paleogeographic migration patterns, but also for the imminent response to an amplified climate change rate. Climate modelers thus focus increasingly on proxies of Polar Regions. A rich floral and faunal record indicative of a warm high-latitude paleoclimate is presently emerging from the late Campanian-Maastrichtian lower Cantwell Formation in Denali National Park, south-central Alaska. This thick (up to 4000m) alluvial fan succession was deposited during the latest accretionary phase of the Wrangellia terrane to the former southern margin of Alaska. Facies descriptions from outcrops near Sable Mountain and Polychrome Mountain record heterogeneous and laterally discontinuous lithologies characteristic of alluvial and marginal alluvial fan environments: braided channel, sandy channel, crevasse splay, sheetflood, floodplain, and lacustrine. Trace and plant fossils occur predominantly at lithological boundaries. The vertebrate fossil record encompasses tracks that can be attributed to fishes, pterosaurs, large and small non-avian theropods, birds, hadrosaurs, and ceratopsians. Hadrosaur footprints are abundant and record populations with multiple generations present. The pterosaur tracks constitute the northernmost fossil occurrence for these flying reptiles. Bird traces range from small, shore-wading bird tracks to those of a large crane-like bird. Diverse invertebrate tracks include freshwater bivalve, ostracode and gastropod trails, crayfish burrows, beetle and mole cricket tracks, wood borings and feeding traces on angiosperm leaves. Plant impression fossils represent dicotyledonous angiosperm leaves referable to nymphaealean, menispermoid, platanoid, trochodendroid and higher hamamelid groups; magnoliid seeds; diverse broad-leaved and blade-like monocot leaf fragments; the leafy shoots, leaves, cones, seeds and wood of cupressaceous and

  6. Sedimentary environment and diagenesis of the Lower Cretaceous Chaswood Formation, southeastern Canada: The origin of kaolin-rich mudstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pe-Piper, Georgia; Dolansky, Lila; Piper, David J. W.

    2005-07-01

    The Lower Cretaceous fluvial sandstone-mudstone succession of the Chaswood Formation is the proximal equivalent of offshore deltaic rocks of the Scotian Basin that are reservoirs for producing gas fields. This study interprets the mineralogical consequences of Cretaceous weathering and early diagenesis in a 130-m core from the Chaswood Formation in order to better understand detrital and diagenetic minerals in equivalent rocks offshore. Mineralogy was determined by X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The rocks can be divided into five facies associations: light gray mudstone, dark gray mudstone, silty mudstone and muddy sandstone, sorted sandstone and conglomerate, and paleosols. Facies transitions in coarser facies are related to deposition in and near fluvial channels. In the mudstones, they indicate an evolutionary progression from the dark gray mudstone facies association (swamps and floodplain soils) to mottled paleosols (well-drained oxisols and ultisols following syntectonic uplift). Facies transitions and regional distribution indicate that the light gray mudstone facies association formed from early diagenetic oxidation and alteration of the dark gray mudstone facies association, probably by meteoric water. Principal minerals in mudstones are illite/muscovite, kaolinite, vermiculite and quartz. Illite/muscovite is of detrital origin, but variations in abundance show that it has altered to kaolinite in the light gray mudstone facies association and in oxisols. Vermiculite developed from the weathering of biotite and is present in ultisols. The earliest phase of sandstone cementation in reducing conditions in swamps and ponds produced siderite nodules and framboidal pyrite, which were corroded and oxidized during subsequent development of paleosols. Kaolinite is an early cement, coating quartz grains and as well-crystallized, pore-filling booklets that was probably synchronous with the formation of the light gray

  7. Relationships of Bexar shale, Hensel sandstone, and Hensel dolomite (basal upper Trinity, Comanchean Cretaceous) in south-central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Amsbury, D.L.

    1984-04-01

    The Bexar Shale has been considered the offshore equivalent of the Cow Creek Limestone, the overlying Hensel sandstone, or of the disconformity between them in outcropping sections. Cores and outcrops in Comal, Kendall, and northern Bexar Counties preserve calcitic and dolomitic caliche in the top of the Cow Creek Limestone. Above the caliche is 8-16 m(25-50 ft) of laminated or bioturbated, dolomitic siltstone and silty dolomite (Hensel dolomite). Dolomite is euhedral and silt-sized. The lower part contains collophane grains and oyster shells replaced partly by chalcedony. Carbonate grains within the upper part include angular and well-rounded mollusk and echinoid fragments; many are pyritic and coated by glauconite. Terrigenous grains in Hensel dolomite grade upward from silt to coarse subarkose sand from central Texas. In southern Bexar County, about 35 m (115 ft) of silt-, clay-, and calcite-mudstone referable to the Bexar Shale sharply overlie shallow marine Cow Creek Limestone, and grade abruptly upward into about 7 m (23 ft) of Hensel dolomite. Dolomite is overlain by calcarenite of the Glen Rose Formation containing subarkose sand grains. Similar distinctive sand grains occur in well cuttings of basal Glen Rose beds northeastward through Travis County. The Bexar represents a flood of clay-sized sediment from a distant source, spread across the San Marcos arch during a rapid transgression. Slightly younger sand, silt, and local clay of the Hensel sandstone were eroded from central Texas by a few flash floods during a major period of caliche formation in the area.

  8. High resolution 40AR/39AR chronostratigraphy of the Late Cretaceous El Gallo Formation, Baja California del Norte, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, Paul R.; Fulford, Madeleine M.; Busby-Spera, Cathy

    1991-03-01

    Laser probe 40Ar/39Ar analyses of individual sanidine grains from four tuffs in the alluvial Late Cretaceous (Campanian) El Gallo Formation yield statistically distinct mean dates ranging from 74.87±0.05 Ma to 73.59±0.09 Ma. The exceptional precision of these dates permits calculation of statistically significant sediment accumulation rates that are much higher than passive sediment loading would cause, implying rapid tectonically induced subsidence. The dates bracket tightly the age of important dinosaur and mammalian faunas previously reported from the El Gallo Formation. The dates support an age less than 73 Ma for the Campanian/Maastrichtian stage boundary, younger than indicated by several currently used time scales. Further application of the single grain 40Ar/39Ar technique may be expected to greatly benefit stratigraphic studies of Mesozoic sedimentary basins and contribute to calibration of biostratigraphic and magnetostratigraphic time scales.

  9. Magnetic inclination shallowing problem and the issue of Eurasia's rigidity: insights following a palaeomagnetic study of upper Cretaceous basalts and redbeds from SE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-Xiang; Shu, Liangshu; Wen, Bin; Yang, Zhenyu; Ali, Jason R.

    2013-09-01

    Redbeds are an important source of palaeomagnetic data, but they often record inclinations shallower than that of the ancient local geomagnetic field. Discrepancy of palaeopoles from Cretaceous redbeds in South China Block (SCB) and the coeval Eurasia reference pole is commonly attributed to inclination shallowing. However, redbed-derived palaeomagnetic data from the block have rarely been critically assessed with data from coeval volcanic rocks that should be unaffected by the problem. Here, we address the issue using high-quality palaeomagnetic data from Upper Cretaceous (˜95 Ma) amygdaloidal basalts and coeval redbeds from Jiangshan, Zhejiang Province and Guangfeng, Jiangxi Province. Stepwise thermal and alternating field demagnetizations isolated stable components that in the basalts are carried by a mixture of magnetite and titanomagntite and in the sedimentary units by haematite. The stable components are regarded as primary based on positive intraformational conglomerate tests and a regional tilt test. The redbeds yield a tilt corrected mean direction of D = 20.9°, I = 35.8°, α95 = 8.7°, N = 6, which is statistically indistinguishable from the mean direction of the basalts (D = 17.6°, I = 38.1°, α95 = 8.6°, N = 11), suggesting that the former do not suffer from the problem. In addition, analysis of the other Late Cretaceous SCB palaeopoles reveals two groups with one at relatively high (`H', ˜80°N) latitudes and the other at relatively low (`L', ˜70°N) latitudes. Importantly, each comprises palaeopoles from both redbeds and volcanic rocks, and reasonable consistency exists within each group, further attesting that SCB redbeds do not suffer significant inclination shallowing. Comparison of the SCB palaeopoles with a newly defined coeval reference pole for Europe indicates an ˜11° separation. Since inclination shallowing, over 1000 km tectonic shortening, and apparent polar wander appear unlikely, the ˜11° discrepancy may provide evidence for

  10. A detailed taxonomy of Upper Cretaceous and lower Tertiary Crassatellidae in the Eastern United States; an example of the nature of extinction at the boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wingard, G. Lynn

    1993-01-01

    Current theories on the causes of extinction at the CretaceousTertiary boundary have been based on previously published data; however, few workers have stopped to ask the question, 'How good is the basic data set?' To test the accuracy of the published record, a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the Crassatellidae (Mollusca, Bivalvia) of the Gulf and Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plains of the United States for the Upper Cretaceous and lower Tertiary was conducted. Thirty-eight species names and four generic names are used in publications for the Crassatellidae within the geographic and stratigraphic constraints of this analysis. Fourteen of the 38 species names are represented by statistically valid numbers of specimens and were tested by using canonical discriminant analysis. All 38 names, with the exception of 1 invalid name and 4 names for which no representative specimen could be located, were evaluated qualitatively. The results show that the published fossil record is highly inaccurate. Only 8 valid, recognizable species exist in the Crassatellidae within the limits of this study, 14 names are synonymized, and 11 names are represented by indeterminate molds or poorly preserved specimens. Three of the four genera are well founded; the fourth is based on the juvenile of another genus and therefore synonymized. This detailed taxonomic analysis of the Crassatellidae illustrates that the published fossil record is not reliable. Calculations of evolutionary and paleobiologic significance based on poorly defined, overly split fossil groups, such as the Crassatellidae, are biased in the following ways: Rates of evolution and extinction are higher, Faunal turnover at mass extinctions appears more catastrophic, Species diversity is high, Average species durations are shortened, and Geographic ranges are restricted. The data on the taxonomically standardized Crassatellidae show evolutionary rates one-quarter to one-half that of the published fossil record; faunal change

  11. Allostratigraphy of the U.S. middle Atlantic continental margin; characteristics, distribution, and depositional history of principal unconformity-bounded upper Cretaceous and Cenozoic sedimentary units

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C. Wylie; Ward, Lauck W.

    1993-01-01

    Publication of Volumes 93 and 95 ('The New Jersey Transect') of the Deep Sea Drilling Project's Initial Reports completed a major phase of geological and geophysical research along the middle segment of the U. S. Atlantic continental margin. Relying heavily on data from these and related published records, we have integrated outcrop, borehole, and seismic-reflection data from this large area (500,000 km^2 ) to define the regional allostratigraphic framework for Upper Cretaceous and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks. The framework consists of 12 alloformations, which record the Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic depositional history of the contiguous Baltimore Canyon trough (including its onshore margin) and Hatteras basin (northern part). We propose stratotype sections for each alloformation and present a regional allostratigraphic reference section, which crosses these basins from the inner edge of the coastal plain to the inner edge of the abyssal plain. Selected supplementary reference sections on the coastal plain allow observation of the alloformations and their bounding unconformities in outcrop. Our analyses show that sediment supply and its initial dispersal on the middle segment of the U. S. Atlantic margin have been governed, in large part, by hinterland tectonism and subsequently have been modified by paleoclimate, sea-level changes, and oceanic current systems. Notable events in the Late Cretaceous to Holocene sedimentary evolution of this margin include (1) development of continental-rise depocenters in the northern part of the Hatteras basin during the Late Cretaceous; (2) the appear ance of a dual shelf-edge system, a marked decline in siliciclastic sediment accumulation rates, and widespread acceleration of carbonate production during high sea levels of the Paleogene; (3) rapid deposition and progradation of thick terrigenous delta complexes and development of abyssal depocenters during the middle Miocene to Quaternary interval; and (4) deep incision of the

  12. Evidence from the lamarck granodiorite for rapid late cretaceous crust formation in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, D.S.; Frost, T.P.; Glazner, A.F.

    1992-01-01

    Strontium and neodymium isotopic data for rocks from the voluminous 90-million-year-old Lamarck intrusive suite in the Sierra Nevada batholith, California, show little variation across a compositional range from gabbro to granite. Data for three different gabbro intrusions within the suite are identical within analytical error and are consistent with derivation from an enriched mantle source. Recognition of local involvement of enriched mantle during generation of the Sierran batholith modifies estimates of crustal growth rates in the United States. These data indicate that parts of the Sierra Nevada batholith may consist almost entirely of juvenile crust added during Cretaceous magmatism.

  13. Evidence from the lamarck granodiorite for rapid late cretaceous crust formation in california.

    PubMed

    Coleman, D S; Glazner, A F; Frost, T P

    1992-12-18

    Strontium and neodymium isotopic data for rocks from the voluminous 90-million-year-old Lamarck intrusive suite in the Sierra Nevada batholith, California, show little variation across a compositional range from gabbro to granite. Data for three different gabbro intrusions within the suite are identical within analytical error and are consistent with derivation from an enriched mantle source. Recognition of local involvement of enriched mantle during generation of the Sierran batholith modifies estimates of crustal growth rates in the United States. These data indicate that parts of the Sierra Nevada batholith may consist almost entirely of juvenile crust added during Cretaceous magmatism.

  14. Back barrier facies of a microtidal coastline, Upper Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Kamola, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Protected lagoonal environments situated landward or prograding barriers, are characterized by low energy deposits which include flood tidal deltas, flood-dominated channel-fill sandstones, swamps (coal), and lagoon-fill siltstones. Flood tidal deltas consists of landward-dipping beds of sandstone which interfinger vertically and laterally with rooted and/or bioturbated lagoonal siltstones. Locally, individual beds of the flood tidal delta may be rooted or burrowed, which indicates discontinuous deposition of sediment into a lagoon. Channel-fill sandstones characterized by landward-oriented paleocurrent directions are interpreted to represent tidally influenced channels in a flood-dominated, microtidal setting. The majority of the lagoon-fill sediments are bioturbated, rooted, or burrowed siltstone, with brackish water bivalves Crossostrea, Brachidontes, Corbula and Anomia. Trace fossils Thalassinoides, Planolites, Palaeophycus, and Pelecypodichnus are common. Ophiomorpha-burrowed, medium grain size sandstone with abraded oyster shells is the only evidence of higher energy (storm-related) lagoonal deposition. Swamps are represented by low sulfur, low ash coal seams, with tree stumps, tree roots, and dinosaur tracks. Swamp environments prograded over sediment-filled lagoons, and are interpreted as the final stage of back barrier deposition.

  15. Shocked cobbles in Lower Cretaceous Duwon Formation, South Korea: A first report in Asia and their possible mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Y. U.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, C. B.; Son, M.; Lim, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    Shocked cobbles are the cobbles having shock-induced deformation structures on the surfaces. The most distinctive macroscopic features are the subparallel fractures and the pervasive surface craters, with or without radial fractures. Until now, these shocked cobbles have been reported mainly in Europe (Spain and UK) and N. America (USA and Canada), but never been found or reported in Asia. Shocked cobbles have recently found in the Lower Cretaceous Duwon Formation in South Korea, which was the first report in Asia. The Duwon Formation consists mainly of conglomerates, gravelly sandstones and intercalated mudstone and shale layers. The shocked cobbles are commonly found in the lowermost clast-supported conglomerate layers, and they show various deformation features, such as pockmarked (circular or elliptical) cobbles, cratered (Hertzian or bowl-shaped) cobbles with or without radial fractures, cobbles showing subparallel fractures, and strongly squashed or heavily dissected cobbles. In general, these deformation structures are considered to have resulted from pressure dissolution by overburden, tectonic compression, and seismic or meteorite impacts. However, the exact formation mechanism is not clearly understood, and still in debate. The shocked cobbles found in the Duwon Formation have similar features to those of previously reported shocked cobbles, especially to Triassic Buntsandstein conglomerates in northeastern Spain. Based on the macroscopic and microscopic observations, the impact shock is thought to be the best explanation for the deformation features of the Duwon Formation. However, we think that further studies are still needed to clarify the formation mechanism in detail.

  16. Potential petroleum source rock deposition in the middle Cretaceous Wasia Formation, Rub'Al Khali, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, K.D.; Hennington, R.D.

    1983-03-01

    Stratigraphic correlation and regional geochemical sampling in the Rub'Al Khali (The Empty Quarter) of Saudi Arabia indicate at least two potential petroleum source rock units occur in the middle Cretaceous Wasia Formation. These two sequences, informally named the Safaniya ''source rock'' and the lower Mishrif, are dominated by oil-prone amorphous (Type II) organic matter, in places in excess of 10 weight percent organic carbon. Both units are fine-grained pelagic lime mudstones which were probably deposited in relatively quiet anoxic waters of large intraplatform embayments or basins. The Safaniya ''source rock'' and the lower Mishrif reflect strong marine transgressions on the Arabian craton in Albian to Cenomanian and Cenomanian to Turonian time, respectively. Regressive-phase sedimentary rocks overlying these two transgressive organic-rock phases are generally poor in organic carbon despite being deposited, in part, in similar forereef open-marine depositional settings. The sealevel high-stands associated with the Safaniya ''source rock'' and the lower Mishrif are partly synchronous with two recently described ''oceanic anoxic events'' respectively occurring in late Barremian to late Albian time and late Cenomanian to early Turonian time. Although there is a credible time correlation of these organic-rock units with oceanic anoxic events, their connection to oceanic anoxic events could be strengthened if they could be traced out to the vicinity of the middle Cretaceous continental margin.

  17. Reproductive structures of Rhamnaceae from the Cerro del Pueblo (Late Cretaceous, Coahuila) and Coatzingo (Oligocene, Puebla) Formations, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Calvillo-Canadell, Laura; Cevallos-Ferriz, Sergio R S

    2007-10-01

    Recently discovered fossil flowers from the Cretaceous Cerro del Pueblo and flowers and fruits from the Oligocene Coatzingo Formations are assigned to the Rhamnaceae. The Cretaceous flower, Coahuilanthus belindae Calvillo-Canadell and Cevallos-Ferriz, gen. et sp. nov., is actinomorphic with fused perianth parts forming a slightly campanulate to cupulate floral cup, with sepals slightly keeled and spatulate clawed petals. The Oligocene fossils include Nahinda axamilpensis Calvillo-Canadell and Cevallos-Ferriz, gen. et sp. nov. (characterized by its campanulate bisexual flower with stamens opposite, adnate to and enfolded by petals; and with the ovary ripening into a drupe), and a winged fruit assigned to Ventilago engoto Calvillo-Canadell and Cevallos-Ferriz, sp. nov. The flowers and drupe features indicate closer affinity to Zizipheae and/or Rhamneae, while the single samaroid fruit suggests the presence of Ventilagineae. However, the unique character combination in the fossil flowers precludes placing them in extant genera. Nevertheless, the history of the family is long and can be traced back to the Campanian. A detailed phylogenetic revision of the group that uses morphological characters from both extant and fossil plants is needed to better understand the significance of these records as well as other important fossils of the family.

  18. A new species of Ischyodus (Chondrichthyes: Holocephali: Callorhynchidae) from Upper Maastrichtian Shallow marine facies of the Fox Hills and Hell Creek Formations, Williston basin, North Dakota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoganson, J.W.; Erickson, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    A new species of chimaeroid, Ischyodus rayhaasi sp. nov., is described based primarily upon the number and configuration of tritors on palatine and mandibular tooth plates. This new species is named in honour of Mr Raymond Haas. Fossils of I. rayhaasi have been recovered from the Upper Maastrichtian Fox Hills Formation and the Breien Member and an unnamed member of the Hell Creek Formation at sites in south-central North Dakota and north-central South Dakota, USA. Ischyodus rayhaasi inhabited shallow marine waters in the central part of the Western Interior Seaway during the latest Cretaceous. Apparently it was also present in similar habitats at that time in the Volga region of Russia. Ischyodus rayhaasi is the youngest Cretaceous species Ischyodus known to exist before the Cretaceous/Tertiary extinction, and the species apparently did not survive that event. It was replaced by Ischyodus dolloi, which is found in the Paleocene Cannonball Formation of the Williston Basin region of North Dakota and is widely distributed elsewhere. ?? The Palaeontological Association.

  19. Formation of nitrogenated organic aerosols in the Titan upper atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Imanaka, Hiroshi; Smith, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Many aspects of the nitrogen fixation process by photochemistry in the Titan atmosphere are not fully understood. The recent Cassini mission revealed organic aerosol formation in the upper atmosphere of Titan. It is not clear, however, how much and by what mechanism nitrogen is incorporated in Titan’s organic aerosols. Using tunable synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source, we demonstrate the first evidence of nitrogenated organic aerosol production by extreme ultraviolet–vacuum ultraviolet irradiation of a N2/CH4 gas mixture. The ultrahigh-mass-resolution study with laser desorption ionization-Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry of N2/CH4 photolytic solid products at 60 and 82.5 nm indicates the predominance of highly nitrogenated compounds. The distinct nitrogen incorporations at the elemental abundances of H2C2N and HCN, respectively, are suggestive of important roles of H2C2N/HCCN and HCN/CN in their formation. The efficient formation of unsaturated hydrocarbons is observed in the gas phase without abundant nitrogenated neutrals at 60 nm, and this is confirmed by separately using 13C and 15N isotopically labeled initial gas mixtures. These observations strongly suggest a heterogeneous incorporation mechanism via short lived nitrogenated reactive species, such as HCCN radical, for nitrogenated organic aerosol formation, and imply that substantial amounts of nitrogen is fixed as organic macromolecular aerosols in Titan’s atmosphere. PMID:20616074

  20. Environmental-stratigraphic cross sections of the Cretaceous Fox Hills Sandstone and Hell Creek Formation and Paleocene Fort Union Formation, Richland and Roosevelt Counties, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, R.M.; Lepp, C.L.

    1983-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the stratigraphic, lithofacies, and deopsitional relationships of the Cretaceous Fox Hills Sandstone and Hell Creek Formation and The Paleocene Fort Union Formation. These relationships, shown in sections A-A', B-B', C-C', and D-D', we established form nearly continuous exposures in the Missouri River valley in Richland and Roosevelt Counties, Mont. The river valley topography is characterized by badlands, which permitted detailed description and construction of the stratigraphic framework of the formations within a 30-mi-long belt of exposures paralleling the Missouri River. This area of study is on the western flank of the Williston Basin and east of the Poplar Dome. The latter structure imparted a northeasterly regional dip to the rocks, which averages 25 ft per mi and is as much as 100 ft per mi according to Spencer (1980). The regional dip resulted in exposure of older rocks (Cretaceous) in the west to younger rocks (Tertiary) in the east. 

  1. Non-marine carbonate facies, facies models and palaeogeographies of the Purbeck Formation (Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous) of Dorset (Southern England).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallois, Arnaud; Bosence, Dan; Burgess, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Non-marine carbonates are relatively poorly understood compared with their more abundant marine counterparts. Sedimentary facies and basin architecture are controlled by a range of environmental parameters such as climate, hydrology and tectonic setting but facies models are few and limited in their predictive value. Following the discovery of extensive Early Cretaceous, non-marine carbonate hydrocarbon reservoirs in the South Atlantic, the interest of understanding such complex deposits has increased during recent years. This study is developing a new depositional model for non-marine carbonates in a semi-arid climate setting in an extensional basin; the Purbeck Formation (Upper Jurassic - Lower Cretaceous) in Dorset (Southern England). Outcrop study coupled with subsurface data analysis and petrographic study (sedimentology and early diagenesis) aims to constrain and improve published models of depositional settings. Facies models for brackish water and hypersaline water conditions of these lacustrine to palustrine carbonates deposited in the syn-rift phase of the Wessex Basin will be presented. Particular attention focusses on the factors that control the accumulation of in-situ microbialite mounds that occur within bedded inter-mound packstones-grainstones in the lower Purbeck. The microbialite mounds are located in three units (locally known as the Skull Cap, the Hard Cap and the Soft Cap) separated by three fossil soils (locally known as the Basal, the Lower and the Great Dirt Beds) respectively within three shallowing upward lacustrine sequences. These complex microbialite mounds (up to 4m high), are composed of tabular small-scale mounds (flat and long, up to 50cm high) divided into four subfacies. Many of these small-scale mounds developed around trees and branches which are preserved as moulds (or silicified wood) which are surrounded by a burrowed mudstone-wackestone collar. Subsequently a thrombolite framework developed on the upper part only within

  2. Calibrating Late Cretaceous Terrestrial Cyclostratigraphy with High-precision U-Pb Zircon Geochronology: Qingshankou Formation of the Songliao Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Ramezani, J.; Wang, C.

    2015-12-01

    A continuous succession of Late Cretaceous lacustrine strata has been recovered from the SK-I south (SK-Is) and SKI north (SK-In) boreholes in the long-lived Cretaceous Songliao Basin in Northeast China. Establishing a high-resolution chronostratigraphic framework is a prerequisite for integrating the Songliao record with the global marine Cretaceous. We present high-precision U-Pb zircon geochronology by the chemical abrasion isotope dilution thermal-ionization mass spectrometry method from multiple bentonite core samples from the Late Cretaceous Qingshankou Formation in order to assess the astrochronological model for the Songliao Basin cyclostratigraphy. Our results from the SK-Is core present major improvements in precision and accuracy over the previously published geochronology and allow a cycle-level calibration of the cyclostratigraphy. The resulting choronostratigraphy suggest a good first-order agreement between the radioisotope geochronology and the established astrochronological time scale over the corresponding interval. The dated bentonite beds near the 1780 m depth straddle a prominent oil shale layer of the Qingshankou Formation, which records a basin-wide lake anoxic event (LAE1), providing a direct age constraint for the LAE1. The latter appears to coincide in time with the Late Cretaceous (Turonian) global sea level change event Tu4 presently constrained at 91.8 Ma.

  3. MORB to supra-subduction geochemical transition in the extrusive sequences of major upper Cretaceous ophiolites of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaie, H. A.; Khalatbari Jafari, M.; Moslempour, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    We discuss the geochemical patterns and tectonomagmatic setting of the extrusive sequences in the Khoy, Kermanshah, Fannuj, Nosratabad, Dehshir, south and north Fariman, and Sabzevar ophiolite massifs of Iran. These sequences include pillow lava, sheet flow, hyaloclastite, hyaloclastic breccia, and interbeds of chert and pelagic limestone with Late Cretaceous micro fauna. The Khoy, north Fariman, and Sabzevar massifs also include Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene supra-ophiolitic volcanic and volcano-sedimentary rocks that formed in a trough near the extrusive sequence. The Khoy pillow lava displays T-MORB characteristics but no chemical contribution from the components released from the subducted slab. On the other hand, the diabase dikes that cut the Khoy extrusive sequence show signatures of subduction zone magmatism and contribution from the melt released through the partial melting of the subducted slab. While lava in the Harsin (Kermanshah) extrusive sequence in west Iran displays E-MORB and P-MORB characteristics, the pillows in the Fannuj, north Fariman, Dehshir, and Sabzevar extrusive sequences indicate the contribution of both fluids and melt from the subducted slab. The Nosratabad and south Fariman ophiolites also show evidence for either melt or fluids, respectively. Partial melting of the subducted slab sedimentary cover may have formed the acidic pillow lava and sheet flow in the Fannuj and Nosratabad extrusive sequence, respectively. Some pillows in the Nosratabad, Sabzevar, north Fariman, and to a lesser extent, Dehshir extrusive sequence display the OIB geochemical characteristics. Mantle plumes or asthenospheric flow that probably moved up through weak zones of the subducted slab may have affected the partial melting of the mantle wedge above the slab. The combined OIB and supra-subduction characteristics suggest the role of the roll-back of the subducted slab in the magmatism of the northeast Iranian ophiolites. The clear MORB-like geochemical

  4. Soot and palynologic analysis of Manson impact-related strata (Upper Cretaceous) of Iowa and South Dakota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varricchio, D.J.; Raven, R.F.; Wolbach, W.S.; Elsik, W.C.; Witzke, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    The Campanian Manson impact structure of Iowa represents the best-preserved, large-diameter complex crater within the continental U.S. To assess the timing and potential mode of crater infilling and the possible presence of an impact event horizon, we analyzed samples from both within and distal to the impact structure for their elemental carbon, soot and palynomorphs. Within the impact structure, identifiable soot occurred in fragmented impact breccia and suevite but not in lower impact-melt breccia. Although most of this soot likely represents reworking of material from older Cretaceous marine shales, one high soot concentration occurs with melt material in a Keweenawan Shale-Phanerozoic clast breccia mix. This represents the first association of soot and impact-generated materials within an impact structure and the best sample candidate for Manson impact-generated soot. No palynomorphs occurred in the impact melt breccia. Overlying suevite (Keweenawan Shale clast breccia) of the central peak yielded sparse and thermally altered palynomorphs, indicating deposition prior to full cooling of the crater debris. Presence of easily degraded soot also argues for rapid backfilling of the crater. Distal samples from South Dakota represent the Sharon Springs and Crow Creek members of the Pierre Shale 230 km northwest of the Manson impact structure. Although containing shocked grains, the Crow Creek preserves no soot. In contrast, the Sharon Springs, generally considered as predating the Manson impact, has significant soot quantities. Palynomorphs differ markedly across the unconformity separating the two members with the Crow Creek containing more terrestrial forms, normapolles, and older reworked palynomorphs, consistent with a terrestrial impact to the east. Origin of the Sharon Springs soot remains unclear. Given soot occurrence within four of the five Cretaceous marine units sampled, the relatively shallow, anoxic bottom conditions of the Western Interior Cretaceous

  5. The Tendaguru formation of southeastern Tanzania, East Africa: An alternating Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous palaeoenvironment of exceptional status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sames, B.

    2009-04-01

    Dinosaur remains have inspired considerable scientific interest in the Tendaguru formation of southeastern Tanzania during the 20th century; however, this formation is exceptional in many other respects. The Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous deposits of the Tendaguru formation in the southwestern Tethys are unique because they represent a marginal marine palaeoenvironment with nonmarine faunal and floral content. It is a threefold succession of marginal marine to terrestrial, carbonate-siliciclastic sediments with cyclic character, consisting of three transgressive-regressive cycles. Revisitation of the type locality (the Tendaguru, a hill approximately 60km northwest of the town of Lindi) by a German-Tanzanian expedition in summer 2000 (Heinrich et al., 2001) resulted in a new standard section (hitherto unpublished, the informal terminology is indicated by the use of lower case in Tendaguru formation), a refined environmental model (Aberhan et al., 2002) and many new insights towards its geology (with evidence of event-sedimentation, Bussert and Aberhan, 2004), biostratigraphy and a better understanding of the Tendaguru palaeo-ecosystems and the palaeoclimate. Within the scope of the designation of a new standard section at the type locality, calcareous microfossils (ostracods, charophytes) have been described to supplement the ongoing discussion about the age and palaeoecology of the Tendaguru formation (Sames, 2008). Although only a few unevenly distributed layers across the section produced calcareous microfossils, the results are very promising. A total of 40 ostracode and 2 charophyte taxa could be distinguished. The non-marine part of the ostracod fauna provides an important contribution to the documentation of Purbeck/Wealden-type nonmarine palaeoenvironments and its microfaunas and -floras previously unknown from East Africa. The marine faunal part belongs to a relatively endemic southern (Gondwana) fauna. Together with other fossil groups, the

  6. A New Basal Hadrosauroid Dinosaur from the Lower Cretaceous Khok Kruat Formation in Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Northeastern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Masateru; Jintasakul, Pratueng; Azuma, Yoichi; You, Hai-Lu

    2015-01-01

    A new basal hadrosauroid dinosaur from the Lower Cretaceous Khok Kruat Formation of Thailand, Sirindhorna khoratensis gen. et sp. nov is described. The new taxon is based on composite skull and mandible including premaxilla, maxilla, jugal, quadrate, braincases, predentary, dentaries, surangular, and maxillary and dentary teeth. It is diagnostic by such characters as, sagittal crest extending along entire dorsal surface of the parietal and reaching the frontoparietal suture (autapomorphy), transversely straight frontoparietal suture, caudodorsally faced supraoccipital, no participation of the supraoccipital in the foramen magnum, mesiodistally wide leaf-shaped dentary tooth with primary and secondary ridges on the lingual surface of the crown, perpendicularly-erected and large coronoid process of dentary, and nonvisible antorbital fossa of the maxilla in lateral view. Phylogenetic analysis revealed S. khoratensis as among the most basal hadrosauroids. Sirindhorna khoratensis is the best-preserved iguanodontian ornithopod in Southeast Asia and sheds new light to resolve the evolution of basal hadrosauriforms.

  7. A New Basal Hadrosauroid Dinosaur from the Lower Cretaceous Khok Kruat Formation in Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Northeastern Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Masateru

    2015-01-01

    A new basal hadrosauroid dinosaur from the Lower Cretaceous Khok Kruat Formation of Thailand, Sirindhorna khoratensis gen. et sp. nov is described. The new taxon is based on composite skull and mandible including premaxilla, maxilla, jugal, quadrate, braincases, predentary, dentaries, surangular, and maxillary and dentary teeth. It is diagnostic by such characters as, sagittal crest extending along entire dorsal surface of the parietal and reaching the frontoparietal suture (autapomorphy), transversely straight frontoparietal suture, caudodorsally faced supraoccipital, no participation of the supraoccipital in the foramen magnum, mesiodistally wide leaf-shaped dentary tooth with primary and secondary ridges on the lingual surface of the crown, perpendicularly-erected and large coronoid process of dentary, and nonvisible antorbital fossa of the maxilla in lateral view. Phylogenetic analysis revealed S. khoratensis as among the most basal hadrosauroids. Sirindhorna khoratensis is the best-preserved iguanodontian ornithopod in Southeast Asia and sheds new light to resolve the evolution of basal hadrosauriforms. PMID:26716981

  8. The first Pan-Podocnemididae turtle egg from the Presidente Prudente Formation (Late Cretaceous, Bauru Group), Brazil.

    PubMed

    Marsola, Júlio C De A; Grellet-Tinner, Gerald; Montefeltro, Felipe C; Langer, Max C

    2014-10-08

    Pan-Podocnemididae turtles are ubiquitous in Late Cretaceous rocks of the Bauru Group in southeastern Brazil. This group of side-necked turtles is particularly abundant in a turtle-bearing site of the Presidente Prudente Formation known as Tartaruguito. Here, we describe the first turtle egg (LPRP-USP 0052) from the Tartaruguito site. LPRP-USP 0052 is nearly complete but misses a pole and measures 5,1 and 2,9-2,2 centimeters due to its flattened minor axis. The egg morphology and microstructure were analyzed by observations performed with CT, Optic Microscopy, Scanning Electronic Microscopy and Wave Dispersion Energy analyses. The eggshell ranges from 145 to160 micrometers thick. Considering the matching morphology of the new specimen and its provenance from the stratigraphic horizon that yielded only the podocnemidids Bauruemys and Roxochelys, it is most likely that LPRP-USP 0052 was produced by a podocnemidid turtle. 

  9. Organic geochemical characterisation of shallow marine Cretaceous formations from Yola Sub-basin, Northern Benue Trough, NE Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarki Yandoka, Babangida M.; Abdullah, Wan Hasiah; Abubakar, M. B.; Hakimi, Mohammed Hail; Jauro, Aliyu; Adegoke, Adebanji Kayode

    2016-05-01

    The shallow marine shales of the Cretaceous formations namely Yolde, Dukul, Jessu, Sekuliye and Numanha ranging in age from Cenomanian to Coniacian within the Yola Sub-basin in the Northern Benue Trough, northeastern Nigeria were analysed to provide an overview on their hydrocarbon generation potential. This study is based on pyrolysis analysis, total organic carbon content (TOC), extractable organic matter (EOM), biomarker distributions and measured vitrinite reflectance. The present-day TOC contents range between 0.24 and 0.71 wt. % and Hydrogen Index (HI) values between 8.7 and 113 mg HC/g TOC with Type III/IV kerogens. Based on the present-day kerogen typing, the shale sediments are expected to generate mainly gas. Biomarker compositions indicates deposition in a marine environment under suboxic conditions with prevalent contribution of aquatic organic matter and a significant amount of terrigenous organic matter input. Organic matter that is dominated by marine components contains kerogens of Type II and Type II-III. This study shows that the organic matter has been affected by volcanic intrusion and consequently, have reached post-mature stage of oil generation. These higher thermal maturities levels are consistent with the vitrinite reflectance ranging from 0.85 to 2.35 Ro % and high Tmax (440-508 °C) values as supported by biomarker maturity ratios. Based on this study, a high prospect for major gas and minor oil generation potential is anticipated from the shallow marine Cretaceous formations from Yola Sub-basin.

  10. Tectonically induced climate and its control on the distribution of depositional systems in a continental foreland basin, Cloverly and Lakota Formations (Lower Cretaceous) of Wyoming, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, William S.; Suttner, Lee J.; Pratt, Lisa M.

    2007-12-01

    that existed 300 to 1000 km east of the Sevier fold-and-thrust belt. Proximal to the Sevier fold-and-thrust belt, the A-interval of the Cloverly Formation and upper Ephraim Formation of the Gannett Group are typified by deposits of intermittent to ephemeral rivers and their associated floodplains. In the middle part (B-interval) of the Cloverly Formation, intermittent to ephemeral alluvial systems expand to 600 km into the basin. The upper part (C-interval) of the Cloverly Formation is characterized by playa deposits in the Bighorn and Wind River Basins and intermittent to ephemeral alluvial deposits along the front of the ancestral Sevier Mountains. Deposits of perennial to intermittent alluvial systems in the C-interval of the Cloverly and Lakota Formations are restricted to the Black Hills region, almost 900 km to the east of the Sevier Mountains. The change in the areal distribution of depositional systems through time within this continental foreland basin may be attributed to the development of a rain shadow associated with the uplift of the Sevier Mountains in the Early Cretaceous.

  11. Correlation of the Tonga Formation and the Chiwaukum Schist, North Cascades, Washington: Implications for Late Cretaceous orogenic mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan, K. M.; Brown, E. H.

    1994-12-01

    The Tonga Formation of the North Cascades, Washington, consists of weakly deformed, bedded feldspathic graywacke and shale metamorphosed at chlorite to staurolite grade. Analysis of protolith lithology, Rb-Sr isotopic signature, and plutonic, metamorphic, and deformational evolution in the Tonga Formation suggests that this unit is correlative with the Chiwaukum Schist of the Cascades crystalline core. The Tonga Formation occurs on the flank of the Late Cretaceous orogen, whereas high-grade Chiwaukum Schist is exposed in the core of the orogen. Metamorphic pressure, as reflected by the distribution of metamorphic minerals and thermobarometry, increases continuously northward in the Tonga Formation from the chlorite zone (<4 kbar) to the staurolite zone (≈ 7 kbar) and then to the kyanite zone (≈ 7 kbar) in the Chiwaukum Schist. The findings reported herein do not support the previously advanced concept that the Cascades crystalline core represents the Easton blueschist terrane that was converted into higher-temperature metamorphic rock by thermal relaxation after cessation of subduction. The results of this study suggest a relatively simple two-stage metamorphic history for the Chiwaukum Schist represented by 90-93 Ma shallow contact metamorphism, overprinted by Harrovian metamorphism that increased sharply in pressure from south-west to northeast and reached peak conditions after 90 Ma, all events occurring in a plutonic/magmatic arc setting.

  12. Distribution of palaeosols and deposits in the temporal evolution of a semiarid fluvial distributary system (Bauru Group, Upper Cretaceous, SE Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilici, Giorgio; Bo, Patrick Führ Dal'; de Oliveira, Emerson Ferreira

    2016-07-01

    The stratigraphic and sedimentological knowledge of the Bauru Group (Upper Cretaceous, SE Brazil) is still generally insufficient and controversial. A sedimentological and palaeopedological study allowed to interpret the south-eastern portion of the Bauru Group according to the model of a fluvial distributary system. This work has two objectives: (1) to include palaeosols in the interpretation of a fluvial distributary system and (2) to give detailed information on the sedimentological and stratigraphic features of the SE portion of the Bauru Group in order to support biostratigraphical, taphonomic and palaeoecological studies. In the south-eastern portion of the Bauru Group, three genetic stratigraphic units were described and interpreted, here informally called lower, intermediate and upper units. The lower unit is constituted of muddy sandstone salt flat deposits and sandstone sheet deltas deposits and is interpreted as a basinal part of a fluvial distributary system. The intermediate unit is formed of very fine to fine-grained sandstone-filled ribbon channel and sandy sheet-shaped beds, suggesting a distal or medial portion of a fluvial distributary system. The upper unit does not match with the present models of the fluvial distributary system because mostly constituted of moderately developed, well-drained, medium- to fine-grained sandstone palaeosols, which testify pauses of sedimentation to the order of 104 years. Preserved features of sedimentary structures suggest that the parent material was formed by occasional catastrophic unconfined flows. This unit may represent the most distal portion of a fluvial distributary system generated by retrogradation of the alluvial system due to aridification of the climate. The upper unit may be interpreted also as proximal portion of fluvial distributary system if considering the coarser-grained and the well-drained palaeosols. However, the absence of channel deposits makes this interpretation unconvincing.

  13. Detailed measured sections, cross sections, and paleogeographic reconstructions of the upper cretaceous and lower tertiary nonmarine interval, Wind River Basin, Wyoming: Chapter 10 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas resources in the Wind River Basin Province, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Ronald C.

    2007-01-01

    Detailed measured sections and regional stratigraphic cross sections are used to reconstruct facies maps and interpret paleogeographic settings for the interval from the base of Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Formation to top of lower member of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming. The Mesaverde Formation spans the time during which the Upper Cretaceous seaway retreated eastward out of central Wyoming in Campanian time and the initial stages of the Lewis transgression in earliest Maastrichtian time. This retreat stalled for a considerable period of time during deposition of the lower part of the Mesaverde, creating a thick buildup of marginal marine sandstones and coaly coastal plain deposits across the western part of the basin. The Lewis sea transgressed into the northeast part of Wind River Basin, beginning in early Maastrichtian time during deposition of the Teapot Sandstone Member of the Mesaverde Formation. The Meeteetse Formation, which overlies the Teapot, was deposited in a poorly-drained coastal plain setting southwest of the Lewis seaway. The Lewis seaway, at maximum transgression, covered much of the northeast half of the Wind River Basin area but was clearly deflected around the present site of the Wind River Range, southwest of the basin, providing the first direct evidence of Laramide uplift on that range. Uplift of the Wind River Range continued during deposition of the overlying Maastrichtian Lance Formation. The Granite Mountains south of the basin also became a positive feature during this time. A rapidly subsiding trough during the Maastrichtian time formed near the presentday trough of the Wind River Basin in which more than 6,000 feet of Lance was deposited. The development of this trough appears to have begun before the adjacent Owl Creek Mountains to the north started to rise; however, a muddy facies in the upper part of Lance in the deep subsurface, just to the south, might be interpreted to indicate that the

  14. UPPER BOUND ON THE FIRST STAR FORMATION HISTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Madejski, Grzegorz M.; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Domínguez, Alberto

    2014-02-01

    Our understanding of the nature of the extragalactic background light (EBL) has improved with the recent development of gamma-ray observation techniques. An open subject in the context of the EBL is the reionization epoch, which is an important probe of the formation history of first stars, the so-called Population III (Pop III) stars. Although the mechanisms for the formation of Pop III stars are rather well understood on theoretical grounds, their formation history is still veiled in mystery because of their faintness. To shed light on this matter, we study jointly the gamma-ray opacity of distant objects and the reionization constraints from studies of intergalactic gas. By combining these studies, we obtain a sensitive upper bound on the Pop III star formation rate density of ρ-dot {sub ∗}(z)<0.01[(1+z)/(1+7.0)]{sup 3.4}(f{sub esc}/0.2){sup −1}(C/3.0) M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} Mpc{sup −3} at z ≥ 7, where f {sub esc} and C are the escape fraction of ionizing photons from galaxies and the clumping factor of the intergalactic hydrogen gas. This limit is a ∼10 times tighter constraint compared with previous studies that take into account gamma-ray opacity constraints only. Even if we do not include the current gamma-ray constraints, the results do not change. This is because the detected gamma-ray sources are still at z ≤ 4.35 where the reionization has already finished.

  15. Upper limit on star formation and metal enrichment in minihaloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Renyue

    2017-02-01

    An analysis of negative radiative feedback from resident stars in minihaloes is performed. It is found that the most effective mechanism to suppress star formation is provided by infrared photons from resident stars via photodetachment of H-. It is shown that a stringent upper bound on (total stellar mass, metallicity) of (˜1000 M⊙, -3.3 ± 0.2) in any newly minted atomic cooling halo can be placed, with the actual values possibly significantly lower. This has both important physical ramifications on formation of stars and supermassive black seeds in atomic cooling haloes at high redshift, pertaining to processes of low-temperature metal cooling, dust formation and fragmentation, and direct consequences on the faint end galaxy luminosity function at high redshift and cosmological reionization. The luminosity function of galaxies at the epoch of reionization may be substantially affected due to the combined effect of a diminished role of minihaloes and an enhanced contribution from Population III stars in atomic cooling haloes. Upcoming results on reionization optical depth from Planck High-Frequency Instrument data may provide a significant constraint on and a unique probe of this star formation physical process in minihaloes. As a numerical example, in the absence of significant contributions from minihaloes with virial masses below 1.5 × 108 M⊙, the reionization optical depth is expected to be no greater than 0.065, whereas allowing for minihaloes of masses as low as (107 M⊙, 106.5 M⊙) to form stars unconstrained by this self-regulation physical process, the reionization optical depth is expected to exceed (0.075, 0.085), respectively.

  16. The Basal Nodosaurid Ankylosaur Europelta carbonensis n. gen., n. sp. from the Lower Cretaceous (Lower Albian) Escucha Formation of Northeastern Spain

    PubMed Central

    Kirkland, James I.; Alcalá, Luis; Loewen, Mark A.; Espílez, Eduardo; Mampel, Luis; Wiersma, Jelle P.

    2013-01-01

    Nodosaurids are poorly known from the Lower Cretaceous of Europe. Two associated ankylosaur skeletons excavated from the lower Albian carbonaceous member of the Escucha Formation near Ariño in northeastern Teruel, Spain reveal nearly all the diagnostic recognized character that define nodosaurid ankylosaurs. These new specimens comprise a new genus and species of nodosaurid ankylosaur and represent the single most complete taxon of ankylosaur from the Cretaceous of Europe. These two specimens were examined and compared to all other known ankylosaurs. Comparisons of these specimens document that Europelta carbonensis n. gen., n. sp. is a nodosaur and is the sister taxon to the Late Cretaceous nodosaurids Anoplosaurus, Hungarosaurus, and Struthiosaurus, defining a monophyletic clade of European nodosaurids– the Struthiosaurinae. PMID:24312471

  17. Organic facies variations, source rock potential, and sea level changes in Cretaceous black shales of the Quebrada Ocal, upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, U.; Stein, R.

    1997-04-01

    A 290-m-thick middle Cretaceous black shale sequence in the upper Magdalena Valley, a present-day intramontane basin located between the Central and Eastern cordilleras of Colombia, was investigated with organic-geochemical and microscopic analyses. As a result of the investigation, we were able to (1) differentiate four organic facies types, (2) estimate their source rock potential, and (3) integrated these facies into a sequence stratigraphic framework. The four organic facies types were type C, BC, B, and D. Type C contains a district terrigenous organic matter component in lowstand or highstand deposits. Organic facies type BC is characterized by an increase and a better preservation of marine organic matter. BC belongs to the lower part of the transgressive systems tract. Sediments of organic facies type B have the highest amount of marine organic matter due to excellent preservation under anoxic conditions. The absence of bioturbation and the enrichment of trace metals are further implications for deposition under anoxic conditions. Facies type B is found in the upper part of the transgressive systems tract and contains the best petroleum source rock potential. Facies B occurrence coincides with sea level highstand and correlates especially with a maximum flooding in northern South America during the Turonian. Organic facies type D is also related to highstand deposits, but shows a high rate of reworking and degradation of organic matter.

  18. Source rock potential of upper cretaceous marine shales in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming: Chapter 8 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas resources in the Wind River Basin Province, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, Thomas M.

    2007-01-01

    /S3 ratios indicate that it is capable of generating both oil and gas. Maps showing the distribution of kerogen types and organic richness for the lower shaly member of the Cody Shale are similar to the Mowry and show that lower shaly member of the Cody is more organic rich and more oil-prone in the eastern part of the basin. Analyses of samples of the upper sandy member of the Cody Shale indicate that it has little or no potential as a source rock. Thermal maturity mapping based on vitrinite reflectance measurements in the coal-bearing post-Cody Upper Cretaceous and Paleocene rocks shows that Upper Cretaceous marine shales in the deeper parts of the Wind River Basin are thermally mature to overmature with respect to hydrocarbon generation.

  19. Biostratigraphy of the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary in the Sirwan Valley (Sulaimani Region, Kurdistan, NE Iraq)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharbazheri, Khalid Mahmood; Ghafor, Imad Mahmood; Muhammed, Qahtan Ahmad

    2009-10-01

    The Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary sequence, which crops out in the studied area is located within the High Folded Zone, in the Sirwan Valley, northeastern Iraq. These units mainly consist of flysch and flysch-type successions of thick clastic beds of Tanjero/Kolosh Formations. A detailed lithostratigraphic study is achieved on the outcropping uppermost part of the Upper Cretaceous successions (upper part of Tanjero Formation) and the lowermost part of the Kolosh Formation. On the basis of the identified planktonic foraminiferal assemblages, five biozones are recorded from the uppermost part of Tanjero Formation and four biozones from the lower part of the Kolosh Formation (Lower Paleocene) in the Sirwan section. The biostratigraphic correlations based on planktonic foraminiferal zonations showed a comparison between the biostratigraphic zones established in this study and other equivalents of the commonly used planktonic zonal scheme around the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary in and outside Iraq.

  20. Characteristics of the Earth's Magnetic Field Prior to the Cretaceous Normal Superchron: New Paleomagnetic Results from Alto Paraguay Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes Solano, M.; Goguitchaichrili, A.

    2011-12-01

    We report a detailed paleomagnetic investigation from 28 lava flows (221 standard paleomagnetic cores) collected in the Paraguayan part of the Paraná Flood Basalts (Alto Paraguay Formation) in order to (i) document the variability of the Earth's magnetic field during the early Cretaceous, (ii) estimate the extrusion rate of Paraná magma and (iii) obtain a new Cretaceous paleomagnetic pole for stable South America. The paleofield direction is precisely determined for 26 sites for which, the remanent magnetization is characterized by a small within-site dispersion and a high directional stability. Nine sites give normal polarity magnetization and other 9 are reversely magnetized while 8 remaining sites show intermediate paleodirections. The mean paleomagnetic direction of normal polarity sites is I=-41.8, D=4.9, k=112, a95=4.9 while reversely magnetized sites give I=37.1, D=181.4, k=23, a95=11.1. These results point to almost antipodal mean directions, since the reversal test is positive. The mean paleomagnetic pole position obtained from 18 sites is Plong= 179.2E, Plat= 86.2S, R=17.74, k=64.56, A95=4.3. The positions of Virtual Geomagnetic Poles show a reasonably good fit with a Fisherian distribution when probability plots as well as formal testing procedures are used. The pole obtained in this study agrees reasonably well with coeval pole positions, in particular with those obtained from CPMP (Central Paraná), Los Adobes, Misiones and SAMC. However, some other similar age paleomagnetic poles show significant departure that may be attributed to local tectonic rotations or insufficient sampling to overcome the paleosecular variation. The paleosecular variation parameters are in agreement with the selected data reported for the Cretaceous Normal Superchron. In contrast, VGP angular dispersions found here are lower with respect to the Jurassic and Plio-Pleistocene data. The intermediate VGPs show a cluster in southern hemisphere of 6 VGPs located near the pacific

  1. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction based on palynofacies analyses of the Cansona Formation (Late Cretaceous), Sinú-San Jacinto Basin, northwest Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliao-Lemus, Tatiana; Carvalho, Marcelo de Araujo; Torres, Diego; Plata, Angelo; Parra, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    To reconstruct the paleoenvironments of the Cansona Formation, a Cretaceous succession in Colombia that has controversial paleoenvironmental interpretation, occasionally deep marine and occasionally shallow marine, palynofacies analyses were conducted on 93 samples from four sections of the Sinú San Jacinto Basin in the north, midwest, and southwest sectors. For the palynofacies analyses, the kerogen categories were counted and subjected to cluster analyses. Four palynofacies associations were revealed for the four sections: Palynofacies Association I (PA I), which consisted of microforaminiferal linings, scolecodonts, dinoflagellate cysts, pollen grains, and fungi hyphae; PA II, which consisted of phytoclast translucent non-biostructured and biostructured, opaque phytoclasts (equidimensional and lath shaped); PA III, which consisted of pseudoamorphous particles, cuticles, resin, and fungal spores; and PA IV, which consisted of fluorescent and non-fluorescent amorphous organic matter and the fresh-water algae Botryococcus. In contrast to early studies that suggested a generalization of the depositional environment for the Cansona Formation (deep or shallow conditions), this study suggests that the formation reflects conspicuous stratigraphic and lateral changes and hence different depositional environments. The Cerro Cansona (CC4 section) and Chalán (AP section) areas are a more marine proximal settings (Early Campanian-Maastrichtian), and there is an intermediate setting for the Lorica area (SC section) and deeper conditions for the Montería area (CP2 section).

  2. Preliminary results in larger benthic foraminifera assemblage in a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate platform from the Upper Cretaceous of the External Prebetic Domain (Valencia province, SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Salcedo, Raquel; Vicedo, Vicent

    2016-04-01

    In the External Prebetic Domain (Betic Mountain Range, Valencia province, SE Spain) it is difficult to find good outcrops to study larger benthic foraminifera (LBF), particularly in the Upper Cretaceous deposits, because of three main reasons. During the Upper Cretaceous, the complex paleogeography in the northern Prebetic Domain developed a complex system of shallow-water platforms. This is directly linked to the complexity in the distribution of the facies observed nowadays, which may change drastically in lateral, closely related outcrops having a special negative impact in the lateral extension of stratigraphical levels containing LBF. The second reason is the nature of the shallow water environments in which the larger foraminifera lived. The local continental influence derived in the establishment of very complex mixed platforms. Thus, there is not a complete register through carbonate rocks, but an alternation of microconglomerates, sandstones, calcarenites and carbonates that can be observed in the stratigraphic series of the Upper Cretaceous. This affects negatively in observing changes in the evolutionary trends of taxa. The third reason difficulting the study of LBF in northern localities of the Prebetic Domain is diagenetic. Dolomitization affects a huge part of the Mesozoic rocks deleting all fossil microfauna in the affected rocks. Such three reasons are behind the difficulty in developing correlations and having a comprehensive understanding of the biostratigraphy and phylogeny of the taxa involved. However, after several field trips developed in the northern Prebetic area, an excellent reference section for the study of the LBF in the Prebetic Domain has been identified in the surroundings of the Pinet village (Valencia province). Here, a relatively continuous section with scarce dolomitization and good conditions of accessibility exists. The larger foraminifera assemblages appering in the Pinet section will be compared with other paleobiogeographic

  3. Revision of Hamites wernickei Wollemann, 1902 (Cephalopoda, Ancyloceratina) from the classic Lüneburg section (Upper Cretaceous, northern Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niebuhr, Birgit; Jagt, John W. M.

    2016-12-01

    A re-examination of heteromorph ammonites of late Campanian age from the Zeltberg section at Lüneburg has demonstrated that the type series of Hamites wernickei in fact comprises two different species that are here assigned to the nostoceratid Nostoceras (Hyatt, 1894) and the polyptychoceratid Oxybeloceras (Hyatt, 1900)>. Nostoceras (Didymoceras) wernickei (Wollemann, 1902) comb. nov., to which three of the four specimens that were described and illustrated by Wollemann (1902) belong, has irregularities of ribbing and tuberculation and changes its direction of growth at the transition from the helicoidal whorls to the hook, which is a typical feature of members of the subfamily Nostoceratinae. Torsion of body chambers is not developed in hairpin-shaped ammonite species, which means that the species name wernickei is no longer available for such polyptychoceratine diplomoceratids. Consequently, the fourth specimen figured and assigned to Hamites wernickei by Wollemann (1902) is here transferred to Oxybeloceras and considered conspecific to material from the Hannover area (Lehrte West Syncline) as O. aff. crassum (Whitfield, 1877). In addition to the "Heteroceras-Schicht des Mucronaten-Senons" of Lüneburg (bipunctatum/roemeri Zone, upper upper Campanian), the geographic range of N. (D.) wernickei probably includes Upper Austria, Tunisia and the Donbass region, while O. aff. crassum is known from the Hannover area (northern Germany), southern France, northern Spain and Upper Austria.

  4. Upper Cretaceous to Holocene magmatism and evidence for transient Miocene shallowing of the Andean subduction zone under the northern Neuquén Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kay, Suzanne M.; Burns, W. Matthew; Copeland, Peter; Mancilla, Oscar

    2006-01-01

    Evidence for a Miocene period of transient shallow subduction under the Neuquén Basin in the Andean backarc, and an intermittent Upper Cretaceous to Holocene frontal arc with a relatively stable magma source and arc-to-trench geometry comes from new 40Ar/39Ar, major- and trace-element, and Sr, Pb, and Nd isotopic data on magmatic rocks from a transect at ∼36°–38°S. Older frontal arc magmas include early Paleogene volcanic rocks erupted after a strong Upper Cretaceous contractional deformation and mid-Eocene lavas erupted from arc centers displaced slightly to the east. Following a gap of some 15 m.y., ca. 26–20 Ma mafic to acidic arc-like magmas erupted in the extensional Cura Mallín intra-arc basin, and alkali olivine basalts with intraplate signatures erupted across the backarc. A major change followed as ca. 20–15 Ma basaltic andesite–dacitic magmas with weak arc signatures and 11.7 Ma Cerro Negro andesites with stronger arc signatures erupted in the near to middle backarc. They were followed by ca. 7.2–4.8 Ma high-K basaltic to dacitic hornblende-bearing magmas with arc-like high field strength element depletion that erupted in the Sierra de Chachahuén, some 500 km east of the trench. The chemistry of these Miocene rocks along with the regional deformational pattern support a transient period of shallow subduction that began at ca. 20 Ma and climaxed near 5 Ma. The subsequent widespread eruption of Pliocene to Pleistocene alkaline magmas with an intraplate chemistry in the Payenia large igneous province signaled a thickening mantle wedge above a steepening subduction zone. A pattern of decreasingly arc-like Pliocene to Holocene backarc lavas in the Tromen region culminated with the eruption of a 0.175 ± 0.025 Ma mafic andesite. The northwest-trending Cortaderas lineament, which generally marks the southern limit of Neogene backarc magmatism, is considered to mark the southern boundary of the transient shallow subduction zone.

  5. Strontium isotopes correlation of the Tunisian Late Cretaceous Abiod Formation: Comparison to previous biostratigraphic assignments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabrouk El Asmi, Amina

    2015-11-01

    The Tunisian topmost Le Kef Formation and Abiod Formation were the focus of strontium isotopes numeric age dating. A representative outcrop section in NW Tunisia near Le Kef town (El Djebil section) constituted the main study material. In addition, a small outcrop section (Kodiet ez Zarbia) in NW Tunisia, equivalent of the base of the overlying El Haria Formation, was also examined. Results were compared to previous numeric dating by Mabrouk et al. (2005) of the Aleg (lateral equivalent of Le Kef Formation), Abiod and El Haria formations in four offshore wells from the Miskar Gas Field (Miskar W1, W2, W3, and W4), Gulf of Gabes, SE Tunisia. Strontium isotopes stratigraphy, overall, supports the previous biostratigraphic assignments and indicates that: (i) the age ranges of the Abiod Formation at El Djebil section and in the Miskar Field are very similar; (ii) the age of the Le Kef Formation at El Djebil section is younger than its equivalent Aleg Formation in the Miskar Field; (iii) the El Haria Formation, cored in Miskar W3 and sampled at Kodiet ez Zarbia, is of approximately the same age. The strontium isotopes dating concurs with biostratigraphic assignments and suggest that the Abiod Formation in Miskar W1 (SE) corresponds to most of that occurring at El Djebil section (NW) and is therefore a condensed chalk sequence that was deposited through Campanian-Early Maastrichtian time.

  6. The late cretaceous Donlin Creek gold deposit, Southwestern Alaska: Controls on epizonal ore formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldfarb, R.J.; Ayuso, R.; Miller, M.L.; Ebert, S.W.; Marsh, E.E.; Petsel, S.A.; Miller, L.D.; Bradley, D.; Johnson, Chad; McClelland, W.

    2004-01-01

    The Donlin Creek gold deposit, southwestern Alaska, has an indicated and inferred resource of approximately 25 million ounces (Moz) Au at a cutoff grade of 1.5 g/t. The ca. 70 Ma deposit is hosted in the Late Cretaceous Kuskokwim flysch basin, which developed in the back part of the are region of an active continental margin, on previously accreted oceanic terranes and continental fragments. A hypabyssal, mainly rhyolitic to rhyodacitic, and commonly porphyritic, 8- ?? 3-km dike complex, part of a regional ca. 77 to 58 Ma magmatic arc, formed a structurally competent host for the mineralization. This deposit is subdivided into about one dozen distinct prospects, most of which consist of dense quartz ?? carbonate veinlet networks that fill north-northeast-striking extensional fractures in the northeast-trending igneous rocks. The sulfide mineral assemblage is dominated by arsenopyrite, pyrite, and, typically younger, stibnite; gold is refractory within the arsenopyrite. Sericitization, carbonatization, and suffidation were the main alteration processes. Fluid inclusion studies of the quartz that hosts the resource indicate dominantly aqueous ore fluids with also about 3 to 7 mol percent CO2 ?? CH4 and a few tenths to a few mole percent NaCl + KCl. The gold-bearing fluids were mainly homogeneously trapped at approximately 275?? to 300??C and at depths of 1 to 2 km. Some of the younger stibnite may have been deposited by late-stage aqueous fluids at lower temperature. Measured ??18O values for the gold-bearing quartz range between 11 and 25 per mil; the estimated ??18O fluid values range from 7 to 12 per mil, suggesting a mainly crustally derived fluid. A broad range of measured ??D values for hydrothermal micas, between -150 and -80 per mil, is suggestive of a contribution from devolatilization of organic matter and/or minor amounts of mixing with meteoric fluids. Gold-associated hydrothermal sulfide minerals are characterized by ??34S values mainly between -16 and

  7. Formation of the Oceanic Lithosphere from the Upper Asthenosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presnall, D. C.; Gudfinnsson, G. H.

    2007-12-01

    In a global examination of the chemistry of MORBs, we find that Na8-Fe8-axial depth data do not support large variations in the temperature and pressure of MORB extraction from the mantle. Instead, the complete absence of high-pressure (> ~1.5 GPa) olivine-controlled crystallization of MORBs combined with solidus phase relations in the CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-Na2O-FeO system indicate that the inverse and positive Na8-Fe8 variations are produced from a heterogeneous source by melt extraction over a very narrow range of P and T (~1.2-1.5 GPa and 1250-1280°C) at the plagioclase-spinel lherzolite transition. This is inconsistent with the existence of hot mantle plumes (Easter, Galapagos, Iceland, Azores, St. Helena, Tristan, Afar) on or close to ridges. However, it is consistent with the very flat 410 km discontinuity beneath the East Pacific Rise, which does not permit the existence of even a single hot plume (Easter) beneath the ridge (Melbourne and Helmberger, 2002, JGR, 107, doi:10.1029/2001B000332). The global absence of MORBs with a high-pressure major-element signature implies that the isolation of the East Pacific Rise from the deeper mantle applies to all ridges. A new model is developed (Presnall and Gudfinnsson, in press, Origin of the Oceanic Lithosphere, J. Petrol.) that explains the formation of new seismic lithosphere (~70 km thickness) by lateral and upward migration of the slightly melted upper part (~70-140 km depth) of the low-velocity zone toward the ridge. Although decompression melting occurs over a large pressure range, melt extraction is constrained to the very narrow P-T range given above by the maximum T in the mantle at which CO2 vapor can be extracted. This condition occurs at a pressure just below that of the abrupt 280°C temperature decrease of the carbonated lherzolite solidus at the base of the seismic lithosphere. The constant association of strombolian and effusive eruptions at ridges (Clague, 2007, Geophys. Res. Abstr., 9, EUG, 02096

  8. Upper Cambrian Intrashelf Basin, Nolichucky formation, southwest Virginia Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Markello, J.R.; Read, J.F.

    1982-07-01

    An intrashelf basin located on the Upper Cambrian carbonate-rimmed shelf (miogeocline) of the Appalachian orogene, appears to have controlled facies distribution during deposition of the Nolichucky Formation (0 to 985 ft; 0 to 300 m thick). The intrashelf basin was bordered along strike and toward the regional shelf edge by a rim of peritidal carbonates and by nearshore clastics toward the craton. The peritidal carbonates passed into the intrashelf basin by way of a gently sloping carbonate ramp. Development of the Late Cambrian carbonate-rimmed shelf and its intrashelf ramp and basin may have been influenced by high carbonate production along the regional shelf edge, by tectonic subsidence associated with a major shelf depocenter, and by influx of terrigenous sediments which suppressed carbonate deposition in the basin. Understanding the Nolichucky facies within a ramp to intrashelf basin model provides a framework for understanding similar continental-shelf facies which are widely distributed in the lower Paleozoic and in the subsurface of the Mesozoic. Recognition of basins located on pericratonic shelves is important because such basins influence the distribution of potential petroleum source beds and reservoir facies whose trends may be unrelated to regional shelf-edge trends. (JMT)

  9. A preliminary study of the calcite beef found in the Cretaceous Jinju Formation, Gyeongsang Basin, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, S.; Chae, Y. U.; Son, M.; Jeong, G. Y.; Paik, I. S.; Lim, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    The term "beef" refers to fibrous minerals in bedding-parallel veins, where the fibers are approximately perpendicular to the vein margins (Cobbold et al., 2013). It mostly appears within organic-rich black shale layers in sedimentary basin. Although the veins can consist of white gangue minerals, such as calcite, gypsum, or quartz, the commonest mineral in the fibers is calcite. According to the worldwide localities of calcite beef compiled by Cobbold et al (2012), they concentrated in some areas, especially around the Atlantic Ocean. However, they have been rarely reported in the western Pacific margin, except Australia and New Zealand. Recently, calcite beefs have been found in the Cretaceous Jinju Formation, Gyeongsang Basin, Korea. As far as we know, this is the first report of calcite beef in Korea. The lacustrine Jinju Formation is about 1,200 m thick, and made up mainly of lacustrine dark grey to black mudstones. In the study area, calcite beefs were commonly found in the organic-rich black shale layers. The vein thickness is anywhere between a few millimeters to maximum 3 centimeters, and their length ranges from a few centimeters to several tens of meters. The interval between successive veins is from a few centimeters to about 1 meter. Most of them occur parallel to the bedding planes, although some of them are developed along fault planes or within deformed layers. In case of relatively thick beefs, the center of veins often shows a dark grey to black central median line, defined by fine-grained calcite grains, fluid inclusion lines, or wall rock particles. Based on the orientation of fibrous calcite, they can be divided into two types: straight and sigmoidal types. The fibrous calcites are thought to have been symmetrically grown from the median lines to top and bottom of wall rock. The formation mechanism of horizontal fractures, and the formation temperature of beefs in the study area remain as a matter to be studied further.

  10. Map showing contours on top of the upper Cretaceous Mowry Shale, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crysdale, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies (MF) maps showing computer-generated structure contours, isopachs, and cross sections of selected formations in the Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana. The map and cross sections were constructed from information stored in a U.S. Geological Survey Evolution of Sedimentary Basins data base. This data base contains picks of geologic formation and (or) unit tops and bases determined from electric resistivity and gamma-ray logs of 8,592 wells penetrating Tertiary and older rocks in the Powder River basin. Well completion cards (scout tickets) were reviewed and compared with copies of all logs, and formation or unit contacts determined by N. M. Denson, D.L. Macke, R. R. Schumann and others. This isopach map is based on information from 4,926 of these wells that penetrate the Minnelusa Formation and equivalents.

  11. Chapter 4: The GIS Project for the Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas in the Upper Cretaceous Navarro and Taylor Groups, Western Gulf Province, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biewick, Laura R.H.

    2006-01-01

    A geographic information system (GIS) focusing on the Upper Cretaceous Navarro and Taylor Groups in the Gulf Coast region was developed as a visual-analysis tool for the U.S. Geological Survey's 2003 assessment of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil and natural gas resources in the Western Gulf Province. The Central Energy Resources Team of the U.S. Geological Survey has also developed an Internet Map Service to deliver the GIS data to the general public. This mapping tool utilizes information from a database about the oil and natural gas endowment of the United States - including physical locations of geologic and geographic data - and converts the data into visual layers. Portrayal and analysis of geologic features on an interactive map provide an excellent tool for understanding domestic oil and gas resources for strategic planning, formulating economic and energy policies, evaluating lands under the purview of the Federal Government, and developing sound environmental policies. Assessment results can be viewed and analyzed or downloaded from the internet web site.

  12. High resolution carbon isotope stratigraphy and glendonite occurrences of the Christopher Formation, Sverdrup Basin (Axel Heiberg Island, Canada): implications for mid Cretaceous high latitude climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrle, Jens O.; Schröder-Adams, Claudia J.; Galloway, Jennifer M.; Pugh, Adam T.

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the evolution of Canada's Arctic region, as a crucial component of Earth's climate system, is fundamental to assess short and long-term climate, environmental, and paleogeographic change. However, the stratigraphy and paleoenvironmental evolution of the Cretaceous Arctic is poorly constrained and a detailed bio- and chemostratigraphic correlation of major mid-Cretaceous paleoceanographic turning points such as Oceanic Anoxic Events, cold snaps, and biotic turnovers with key locations of the high- and low latitudes is missing. Here we present for the first time a high resolution bio- and carbon isotope stratigraphy of the Arctic Albian Christopher Formation of the Sverdrup Basin at Glacier Fiord in the southern part of Axel Heiberg Island, Canadian High Arctic. By using these techniques we developed a high temporal framework to record major environmental changes as it is indicated by the occurrence of glendonites and sandstone intervals of our studied Albian succession. The Albian Christopher Formation is a shale dominated marine unit with a thickness of approximately 1200 m. Several transgressive/ regressive cycles can be recognized by prograding shoreface units that break up mudrock deposition. In addition, glendonites are mainly found in the lower part of the Christopher Formation. Glendonites are pseudomorphs of calcite, after the metastable mineral ikaite, and have been often described from high latitude Permian, Jurassic and Cretaceous marine environments from the Canadian Arctic, Spitsbergen and Australia. The formation of glendonites takes place in the uppermost layer of the sediment and requires near-freezing temperatures, high salinity, and orthophosphate-rich bottom water. Although the presence of glendonites implies a range of paleoenvironmental conditions there is a consensus in the scientific literature that they reflect cooler paleoenvironmental conditions. Preliminary bio- and carbon isotope stratigraphic results suggest that the

  13. Mid-Cretaceous Frontier Formation near the Moxa arch, southwestern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Merewether, E.A.; Blackmon, P.D.; Webb, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Stratigraphic data, paleontologic and petrographic information is presented for the Frontier Formation in the Green River Basin of Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. In addition, interpretations concerning the areal extent and depositional origin of some strata within the formation are presented. Data indicate that most of the sampled shale units are thermally mature, in terms of oil generation, and some are probably source rocks for oil and gas. 12 figures, 11 tables.

  14. Dynamic depositional and early diagenetic processes in a deep-water shelf setting, upper cretaceous Austin Chalk, North Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hovorka, S.D.; Nance, H.S.

    1994-12-31

    The Austin Chalk of north Texas was deposited on a deep-water shelf north of the Sea Marcos Platform during a worldwide Coniacian and Santonian sea-level highstand. Transgressive (lowermost lower Austin Chalk), highstand (uppermost lower Austin Chalk), and regressive (middle and upper Austin Chalk) phases of cyclic chalk and marl sedimentation are recognized in excavations and tunnels created in Ellis County for the Superconducting Super Collider provide new evidence of sediment transport during Austin Chalk deposition. During transgression, bottom currents syndepositionally reworked nannoplankton oozes, incising channels as much as 120 ft across and 8 ft deep. Weakly burrowed channel fills having preservation of fine lamination document rapid infilling. Channel fills are composed of pyritized and carbonized wood and Inoceramus lag deposits, pellets, echinoderm fragments, and globigerinid grainstones, and coccolith ooze. During maximum highstand, bottom reworking was suppressed. Detrital content of highstand marls is low (>20 percent); organic content is high (1.4 to 3.5 percent). Coccolith preservation is excellent because of minimal diagenetic alteration. Regression is marked by resumed channel cutting and storm-bed winnowing in the middle and upper Austin Chalk. Suppressed resistivity log response and recessive weathering characteristics of the middle Austin Chalk are not primarily related to depositional environment but rather to increased input of volcanic ash during the accumulation of this interval. Early stabilization of ash produced clay-coated microfabrics in sediments that are otherwise similar to the transgressive deposits.

  15. Geological and geochemical characterization of the Lower Cretaceous Pearsall Formation, Maverick Basin, south Texas: A future shale gas resource?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    As part of an assessment of undiscovered hydrocarbon resources in the northern Gulf of Mexico onshore Mesozoic section, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) evaluated the Lower Cretaceous Pearsall Formation of the Maverick Basin, south Texas, as a potential shale gas resource. Wireline logs were used to determine the stratigraphic distribution of the Pearsall Formation and to select available core and cuttings samples for analytical investigation. Samples used for this study spanned updip to downdip environments in the Maverick Basin, including several from the current shale gas-producing area of the Pearsall Formation.The term shale does not adequately describe any of the Pearsall samples evaluated for this study, which included argillaceous lime wackestones from more proximal marine depositional environments in Maverick County and argillaceous lime mudstones from the distal Lower Cretaceous shelf edge in western Bee County. Most facies in the Pearsall Formation were deposited in oxygenated environments as evidenced by the presence of biota preserved as shell fragments and the near absence of sediment laminae, which is probably caused by bioturbation. Organic material is poorly preserved and primarily consists of type III kerogen (terrestrial) and type IV kerogen (inert solid bitumen), with a minor contribution from type II kerogen (marine) based on petrographic analysis and pyrolysis. Carbonate dominates the mineralogy followed by clays and quartz. The low abundance and broad size distribution of pyrite are consistent with the presence of oxic conditions during sediment deposition. The Pearsall Formation is in the dry gas window of hydrocarbon generation (mean random vitrinite reflectance values, Ro = 1.2–2.2%) and contains moderate levels of total organic carbon (average 0.86 wt. %), which primarily resides in the inert solid bitumen. Solid bitumen is interpreted to result from in-situ thermal cracking of liquid hydrocarbon generated from original type II kerogen

  16. Chapter 2. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources--Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley group, Jurassic Smackover interior salt basins total petroleum system, in the East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T.S.; Condon, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System is defined for this assessment to include (1) Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation carbonates and calcareous shales and (2) Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley Group organic-rich shales. The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System includes four conventional Cotton Valley assessment units: Cotton Valley Blanket Sandstone Gas (AU 50490201), Cotton Valley Massive Sandstone Gas (AU 50490202), Cotton Valley Updip Oil and Gas (AU 50490203), and Cotton Valley Hypothetical Updip Oil (AU 50490204). Together, these four assessment units are estimated to contain a mean undiscovered conventional resource of 29.81 million barrels of oil, 605.03 billion cubic feet of gas, and 19.00 million barrels of natural gas liquids. The Cotton Valley Group represents the first major influx of clastic sediment into the ancestral Gulf of Mexico. Major depocenters were located in south-central Mississippi, along the Louisiana-Mississippi border, and in northeast Texas. Reservoir properties and production characteristics were used to identify two Cotton Valley Group sandstone trends across northern Louisiana and east Texas: a high-permeability blanket-sandstone trend and a downdip, low-permeability massive-sandstone trend. Pressure gradients throughout most of both trends are normal, which is characteristic of conventional rather than continuous basin-center gas accumulations. Indications that accumulations in this trend are conventional rather than continuous include (1) gas-water contacts in at least seven fields across the blanket-sandstone trend, (2) relatively high reservoir permeabilities, and (3) high gas-production rates without fracture stimulation. Permeability is sufficiently low in the massive-sandstone trend that gas-water transition zones are vertically extensive and gas-water contacts are poorly defined. The interpreted presence of gas-water contacts within the Cotton Valley

  17. The Aucellina biostratigraphy of the Upper Albian (Early Cretaceous) of the Kirchrode I cored borehole, Hannover-Kirchrode, northern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Christopher J.

    2016-12-01

    The Aucellina biostratigraphy of the Upper Albian Kirchrode Marls Member succession in the Kirchrode I (1/91) cored borehole is described and the fauna illustrated. The borehole commenced at an unknown depth below the Early Cenomanian marls of the Bemerode Member, but higher beds of the Kirchrode Marls and the basal beds of the Bemerode Member were exposed in the Mittellandkanal and its Stichkanal extension at Misburg. The borehole and surface exposures permit a virtually complete Late Albian succession of Aucellina species to be observed. Published Aucellina range data from the borehole are reassessed and it is suggested that the lower part of the recorded range is based partly on misidentifications of fragments of thin-shelled bivalves such as Syncyclonema and Amussium. Aucellina appears in the borehole succession within the upper part of the Callihoplites auritus ammonite Subzone (Mortoniceras inflatum Zone) and continues to the top of the borehole succession within the Preaeschloenbachia briacensis ammonite Subzone (Stoliczkaia spp. Zone). Aucellina from higher in the briacensis Subzone collected from the Misburg Mittellandkanal section are also discussed and illustrated. There is some evidence that Aucellina occurs typically at levels in the borehole containing predominantly Boreal European Province ammonites, supporting the general inference that Aucellina lived in cooler northern waters. In contrast, Aucellina is poorly represented in intervals with Tethyan ammonites and thin-shelled inoceramids (e.g. the Mortoniceras (Durnovarites) perinflatum Subzone, Stoliczkaia spp. Zone). The briacensis Subzone, with an admixture of Tethyan (Stoliczkaia) and Boreal ammonites contains a distinctive, taxonomically highly diverse Aucellina assemblage. Relevant taxonomic research on European Late Albian and Early Cenomanian Aucellina faunas is reviewed. The Late Albian Aucellina succession in the borehole differs from that established from partially correlative successions

  18. Cipactlichthys scutatus, gen. nov., sp. nov. a New Halecomorph (Neopterygii, Holostei) from the Lower Cretaceous Tlayua Formation of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Paulo M.; Alvarado-Ortega, Jesus

    2013-01-01

    Based on specimens from the Lower Cretaceous Tlayua Formation of Mexico, we describe a new genus and species of Halecomorphi, Cipactlichthysscutatus gen. et sp. nov, which exhibits several diagnostic characters such as the dermal bones and the scales with ganoin and highly ornamented by numerous tubercles and ridges; parietal slightly longer than wide with approximately the same length as the frontal; jaws extending far, below the posterior orbital margin, reaching the posterior third of the postorbital plate; maxilla with a convexly rounded posterior margin; pectoral fin margins slightly convex; first ray of pectoral fin very long, reaching the posterior edge of the pelvic fin; about 37 preural vertebrae and 7 Ural centra; a series of hypertrophied scales just posterior to the cleithrum; arrangement of flank scales with two rows of deep scales; a series of dorsal and ventral scutes forming the dorsal and ventral midline, between the dorsal and anal fins and the caudal fin. A phylogenetic analysis including two outgroups and eleven neopterygians confirmed the monophyly of the Holostei as well as the monophyly of the Halecomorphi, although this last clade is weakly supported. Cipactlichthysscutatus was hypothesised as the sister-group of the (Ionoscopiformes + Amiiformes). PMID:24023885

  19. Extent and impact of Cretaceous magmatism on the formation and evolution of Jurassic oceanic crust in the western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, H.; Lizarralde, D.; Tominaga, M.; Hart, L.; Tivey, M.; Swift, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-channel seismic (MCS) images and wide-angle sonobuoy data acquired during a 2011 cruise on the R/V Thomas G. Thompson (TN272) show widespread emplacement of igneous sills and broadly thickened oceanic Layer 2 through hundreds of kilometers of oceanic crust in one of the oldest ocean basins in the western Pacific, a region known as the Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ). Oceanic crust from the JQZ has grown through at least two main magmatic phases: It was formed by mid-ocean ridge processes in the Jurassic (at ~170 Ma), and then it was added to by a substantial Cretaceous magmatic event (at ~75-125 Ma). The scale of Cretaceous magmatism is exemplified by massive seafloor features such as the Ontong Java Plateau, Mid-Pacific Mountains, Marshall-Gilbert Islands, Marcus-Wake Seamount Chain, and numerous guyots, seamounts, and volcaniclastic flows observed throughout the region. We use seismic data to image heavily intruded and modified oceanic crust along an 800-km-long transect through the JQZ in order to examine how processes of secondary crustal growth - including magmatic emplacement, transport, and distribution - are expressed in the structure of modified oceanic crust. We also model gravity anomalies to constrain crustal thickness and depth to the Moho. Our observations suggest that western Pacific crust was modified via the following modes of emplacement: (a) extrusive seafloor flows that may or may not have grown into seamounts, (b) seamounts formed through intrusive diking that pushed older sediments aside during their formation, and (c) igneous sills that intruded sediments at varying depths. Emplacement modes (a) and (b) tend to imply a focused, pipe-like mechanism for melt transport through the lithosphere. Such a mechanism does not explain the observed broadly distributed intrusive emplacement of mode (c) however, which may entail successive sill emplacement between igneous basement and sediments thickening oceanic Layer 2 along ~400 km of our seismic line

  20. New material of Longipteryx (Aves: Enantiornithes) from the Lower Cretaceous Yixian Formation of China with the first recognized avian tooth crenulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuri; Shen, Caizhi; Liu, Sizhao; Gao, Chunling; Cheng, Xiaodong; Zhang, Fengjiao

    2015-04-02

    We report on a new specimen of Longipteryx chaoyangensis from the Lower Cretaceous Yixian Formation in Chaoyang, Liaoning Province, China. The new material preserves previously unknown tooth crenulations. This is the first recognized tooth crenulations within Aves. It not only provides new information regarding the anatomy of the Longipteryx, but also sheds new light on the trophic specialization of this genus and even this family. It was discovered from the Yixian Formation, which is older than the Longipteryx chaoyangensis bearing-Jiufotang Formation. This new discovery also expands the known stratigraphic range of Longipteryx.

  1. Lower cretaceous silcrete-ferricrete, at the northern end of the African Tethys shoreline, Maktesh Gadol, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmon, E.; Kedar, Y.

    1985-04-01

    The lithostratigraphic relationships between the rock members across the Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous unconformity in the Maktesh Gadol erosional crater in the Negev of Israel, show co-existence of silcretes and ferricretes at the base of the Lower Cretaceous rocks, and a change from biomicrite to biomicrite silt and back to biomicrite, near the top of the exposed Upper Jurassic rocks. The base of the Cretaceous is interpreted as the remains of a "B" zone of illuviation of a partly developed soil formation, which derived its components from the underlying biomicritic rocks or biomicrites and from overlying eolian and fluviatile marls, and which formed by a very long duration of weathering beneath a desert floor environment. This lithostratigraphy, displaying alternating clastic to non-clastic carbonates, followed by formation of a soil profile, may be a consequence of a fluctuating Tethys sea on the African plate in the Late Jurassic and consequent major marine regression in the Early Cretaceous.

  2. Petrologic and isotopic data from the Cretaceous (Campanian) Blackhawk Formation and Star Point Sandstone (Mesaverde Group), Wasatch Plateau, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, Neil S.; Turner, Christine E.; Peterson, Fred

    2013-01-01

    The presence of discrete minerals associated with coal—whether (1) detrital or authigenic constituents of the coals or in thin mudstone or siltstone units interbedded with coals, or (2) authigenic phases that formed along cleats—might influence its utilization as an energy resource. The build-up of sintered ash deposits on the surfaces of heat exchangers in coal-fired power plants, due to the alteration of minerals during combustion of the coal, can seriously affect the functioning of the boiler and enhance corrosion of combustion equipment. In particular, the presence of sodium in coals has been considered a key factor in the fouling of boilers; however, other elements (such as calcium or magnesium) and the amount of discrete minerals burned with coal can also play a significant role in the inefficiency of and damage to boilers. Previous studies of the quality of coals in the Cretaceous (Campanian) Blackhawk Formation of the Wasatch Plateau, Utah, revealed that the sodium content of the coals varied across the region. To better understand the origin and distribution of sodium in these coals, petrologic studies were undertaken within a sedimentological framework to evaluate the timing and geochemical constraints on the emplacement of sodium-bearing minerals, particularly analcime, which previously had been identified in coals in the Blackhawk Formation. Further, the study was broadened to include not just coals in the Blackhawk Formation from various localities across the Wasatch Plateau, but also sandstones interbedded with the coals as well as sandstones in the underlying Star Point Sandstone. The alteration history of the sandstones in both formations was considered a key component of this study because it records the nature and timing of fluids passing through them and the associated precipitation of sodium-bearing minerals; thus, the alteration history could place constraints on the distribution and timing of sodium mineralization in the interbedded or

  3. Tectonic significance of large-scale chaotic deposits in a Cretaceous fore-arc basin: Valle Formation, Cedros Island (Mexico)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.P.; Busby-Spera, C.J. )

    1990-05-01

    A mappable, deep-marine slide deposit (olistostrome) within medial-Cretaceous fore-arc basin strata (Valle Formation), located on Cedros Island, Baja California Norte, records the initiation of intrabasinal faulting. Studies of both modern and ancient olistostromes show that olistostromes can form in all physiographic provinces (including shelf and abyssal plain) and tectonic settings of the marine environment. A variety of triggering mechanisms have been suggested for olistostromes, including tectonism, sea level changes, diapirism, rapid sedimentation that overloads steep slopes, migration of gas hydrates, or combinations of the above. The olistostrome in the Valle Formation ranges in thickness from 0 to at least 180 m, and extends areally for at least 34 km{sup 2}. It can be divided into two parts. The basal 30-40 m contains large (up to 8 m) angular blocks (allolistoliths) derived from the Jurassic substrate. The allolistoliths decrease in abundance upsection, whereas internally coherent intraformational slide blocks (endolistoliths), which reach tens of meters in width, increase. Beds composing the endolistoliths are alternating mudstone and sandstone turbidites that were deposited on a tectonically stable basin plain or rise setting before catastrophic failure of the sedimentary pile produced the olistostrome. Intrabasinal faulting is invoked as a cause of the sediment failure because of the presence of allolistoliths, which must have been shed into the basin from uplifted( ) basin floor scarps. Allolistoliths occur sporadically throughout at least 400 m of coarse-clastic sediment gravity-flow deposits that cap the olistostrome, suggesting that intrabasinal faulting continued to affect the basin long after the olistrostrome formed.

  4. Diagenesis and reservoir quality of the Lower Cretaceous Quantou Formation tight sandstones in the southern Songliao Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Kelai; Cao, Yingchang; Jahren, Jens; Zhu, Rukai; Bjørlykke, Knut; Haile, Beyene Girma; Zheng, Lijing; Hellevang, Helge

    2015-12-01

    The Lower Cretaceous Quantou Formation in the southern Songliao Basin is the typical tight oil sandstone in China. For effective exploration, appraisal and production from such a tight oil sandstone, the diagenesis and reservoir quality must be thoroughly studied first. The tight oil sandstone has been examined by a variety of methods, including core and thin section observation, XRD, SEM, CL, fluorescence, electron probing analysis, fluid inclusion and isotope testing and quantitative determination of reservoir properties. The sandstones are mostly lithic arkoses and feldspathic litharenites with fine to medium grain size and moderate to good sorting. The sandstones are dominated by feldspar, quartz, and volcanic rock fragments showing various stages of disintegration. The reservoir properties are quite poor, with low porosity (average 8.54%) and permeability (average 0.493 mD), small pore-throat radius (average 0.206 μm) and high displacement pressure (mostly higher than 1 MPa). The tight sandstone reservoirs have undergone significant diagenetic alterations such as compaction, feldspar dissolution, quartz cementation, carbonate cementation (mainly ferrocalcite and ankerite) and clay mineral alteration. As to the onset time, the oil emplacement was prior to the carbonate cementation but posterior to the quartz cementation and feldspar dissolution. The smectite to illite reaction and pressure solution at stylolites provide a most important silica sources for quartz cementation. Carbonate cements increase towards interbedded mudstones. Mechanical compaction has played a more important role than cementation in destroying the reservoir quality of the K1q4 sandstone reservoirs. Mixed-layer illite/smectite and illite reduced the porosity and permeability significantly, while chlorite preserved the porosity and permeability since it tends to be oil wet so that later carbonate cementation can be inhibited to some extent. It is likely that the oil emplacement occurred

  5. Lower Cretaceous-Upper Jurassic carbonate complex of southern margin of Florida-Bahama platform in northern Cuba

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, G.O.

    1988-09-01

    Examination of core samples and cuttings from seven wells in northern Cuba has shown that the southern margin of the Florida-Bahama platform is composed largely of dolomitized carbonate mound and talus material. Dolomitization is possibly due to reflux of the highly saline waters from the South Florida evaporite basin to the north. At least four separate episodes of mound construction are present, accompanied by seaward talus material. South of the dolomitized carbonate complex, three wells penetrated a deeper water continental slope facies consisting principally of light-colored limestone with uncommon beds of shale and radiolarian limestone. Zones of shallower facies appear to be intercalated. Farther to the south beyond the scope of this study, volcanics and serpentine are reported in the literature. The northernmost wells on the island are cut by one or more high-angle thrust faults. Intense crumpling and faulting are present in the deeper water facies between the continental margin complex and the oceanic volcanic-serpentine province. The intense crumpling was probably caused as the deep-water sediments were scraped off by the subduction of an oceanic plate from the south beneath the continental crust of the Florida-Bahama platform. Certain beds in the northern Cuba carbonate complex can be correlated with the standard section in Florida, as exhibited in the Cay Sal well to the north. Three anhydrite beds in the Cayo Coco well appear to correlate with thick anhydrites in the Punto Gorda, Pumpkin Bay, and Bone Island formations. In the Collazo well to the south, a limestone-anhydrite section appears to correlate with the Pumpkin Bay. Three limestone intervals in the Blanquizal well seem to correlate with portions of the Rattlesnake Hammock, Pumpkin Bay, and Bone Island formations in the Cay Sal well.

  6. Lithologic variations and diagenesis of Lower Cretaceous Muddy Formation in northern Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, A.L.; Patterson, P.E.

    1986-08-01

    Regional facies studies show that sandstones in the Muddy Formation, northern Powder River basin, were deposited in fluvial and nearshore marine paleoenvironments. Most sandstones of the fluvial facies contain only minor amounts of clay matrix and are classified as quartzarenite or sublitharenite, whereas those of the shoreface facies contain appreciable clay and are classified as litharenite or arkose. The arkoses are concentrated along a narrow belt that trends northeastward, parallel to the inferred paleoshoreline. Both the fluvial and shoreface sandstones have been variably affected by postdepositional alteration. During early stages of diagenesis, matrix clay was formed predominantly within the shoreface sandstones, owing mainly to alteration of volcanic material. Later, quartz overgrowths and calcite cement were precipitated within the remaining pore spaces in both fluvial and shoreface sandstones. Calcite also replaced detrital framework grains and some of the previously formed matrix clay. During intermediate diagenetic stages, detrital feldspar grains, particularly those in the arkosic shoreface sandstones, were replaced by albite, which characteristically lacks twinning or displays distinctive chessboard texture. Microprobe analyses indicate that both forms are essentially pure albite. During later stages of diagenesis, following maximum burial, much of the calcite was dissolved, producing secondary porosity. Inasmuch as the calcite was precipitated early, i.e., prior to significant compaction, and inasmuch as it replaced both framework grains and authigenic matrix clay, the secondary pores exhibit a relatively high level of interconnection. It is this secondary porosity that has contributed to the migration and storage of hydrocarbons in the Muddy Formation.

  7. An integrated workflow to assess the remaining potential of mature hydrocarbon basins: a case study from Northwest Germany (Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous, Lower Saxony Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfang, Björn; Aigner, Thomas; Munsterman, Dirk K.; Irmen, Anton

    2016-06-01

    Mature hydrocarbon provinces require a high level of geological understanding in order to extend the lives of producing fields, to replace reserves through smaller targets and to reduce the risks of exploring for more and more subtle hydrocarbon traps. Despite a large number of existing wells in the area studied in this paper, the depositional environments and the stratigraphic architecture were still poorly known. In order to improve the geological understanding, we propose a workflow to assess the remaining reservoir potential of mature hydrocarbon areas, integrating cores, cuttings, well-logs, biostratigraphy and seismic data. This workflow was developed for and is exemplified with the northwest of the Lower Saxony Basin (LSB), a mature hydrocarbon province in northwest Germany, but can be applied in a similar fashion to other areas. Systematic integration of lithofacies analysis, chrono- and sequence stratigraphy, combined with electrofacies analysis and modern digital methods like neural network-based lithology determination and 3D facies modelling provides a high-resolution understanding of the spatial facies and reservoir architecture in the study area. Despite widely correlatable litho-units in the Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous in the LSB, complex heterogeneous sedimentary systems can be found in the basin's marginal parts. Two new play types were determined in the study area, showing a remaining potential for stratigraphic hydrocarbon traps. The results of this exploration scale study also provide the basis for re-evaluations on a field development scale. On a basin scale, this study may encourage further data acquisition and re-evaluations to discover previously unknown reservoirs.

  8. Microfacies, depositional models and diagenesis of Lagoa Feia Formation (lower cretaceous), Campos Basin, offshore Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertani, R. T.

    The Lagoa Feia Formation consists of the sediments deposited during the rift valley stage of the Campos Basin, varying from 200m to more than 1500m in thickness. In this unit seventeen microfacies were recognized, grouped into four main sequences, respectively dominated by terrigenous supplies, ostracods, pelecypods, and basic volcaniclastics. The vertical sequence of microfacies and the associations of syndepositional diagenetic minerals were used to reconstruct the general environment of deposition. Five diagenetic stages were recognized. Pelecypod rich microfacies present the highest potential for development of intraparticle and moldic secondary porosity. Two types of fabric selective porosity were experimentally developed in low porosity samples under simulated burial conditions. Intercrystal microporosity was formed by preferential dissolution of micrite size calcite compared to coarse calcite crystals of sparite and neomorphosed bioclasts, and intraparticle porosity was developed in pelecypod shells by selective dissolution of neomorphic calcite compared to sparite cement.

  9. Lower Cretaceous palynological assemblages of the Levashi Formation in the Aimaki section of Central Dagestan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroshenko, O. P.; Aleksandrova, G. N.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of the study of higher plant spores and pollen in a section of the Levashi Formation near the village of Aimaki. The Hauterivian and Barremian palynological associations were defined on the basis of changes in the taxonomic content of terrestrial plant spores and pollen. The associations are comparable with Hauterivian and Barremian assemblages of various regions of the Caucasus with respect to the composition of major groups and individual taxa. A transition in the vegetation was noted, from the coniferous palynological association of the Hauterivian to a fern association in the Barremian. The predominance of hygrophilous ferns and the presence of lycophytes and representatives of Taxodiaceae and Sphagnopsida in the Barremian (which were nearly absent in the Hauterivian), accompanied by a significant decrease in thermophilic Cheirolepidiaceae and other conifers, indicate a change in climate characterized by an increase in humidity and a decrease in temperature.

  10. DNA sequence from Cretaceous period bone fragments.

    PubMed

    Woodward, S R; Weyand, N J; Bunnell, M

    1994-11-18

    DNA was extracted from 80-million-year-old bone fragments found in strata of the Upper Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation in the roof of an underground coal mine in eastern Utah. This DNA was used as the template in a polymerase chain reaction that amplified and sequenced a portion of the gene encoding mitochondrial cytochrome b. These sequences differ from all other cytochrome b sequences investigated, including those in the GenBank and European Molecular Biology Laboratory databases. DNA isolated from these bone fragments and the resulting gene sequences demonstrate that small fragments of DNA may survive in bone for millions of years.

  11. Chapter 5. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources-Lower Cretaceous Travis Peak and Hosston formations, Jurassic Smackover interior salt basins total petroleum system, in the East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T.S.; Condon, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    The petroleum assessment of the Travis Peak and Hosston Formations was conducted by using a total petroleum system model. A total petroleum system includes all of the important elements of a hydrocarbon fluid system needed to develop oil and gas accumulations, including source and reservoir rocks, hydrocarbon generation, migration, traps and seals, and undiscovered accumulations. A total petroleum system is mappable and may include one or more assessment units. For each assessment unit, reservoir rocks contain similar geology, exploration characteristics, and risk. The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System is defined for this assessment to include (1) Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates and calcareous shales and organic-rich shales of the Upper Jurassic Bossier Shale of the Cotton Valley Group and (2) Lower Cretaceous Travis Peak and Hosston Formations. The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System includes three conventional Travis Peak-Hosston assessment units: Travis Peak-Hosston Gas and Oil (AU 50490205), Travis Peak-Hosston Updip Oil (AU 50490206), and Travis Peak-Hosston Hypothetical Updip Oil (AU 50490207). A fourth assessment unit, the Hosston Hypothetical Slope-Basin Gas Assessment Unit, was named and numbered (AU 50490208) but not geologically defined or quantitatively assessed owing to a lack of data. Together, assessment units 50490205 to 50490207 are estimated to contain a mean undiscovered conventional resource of 29 million barrels of oil, 1,136 billion cubic feet of gas, and 22 million barrels of natural gas liquids.

  12. Carbon-Isotope Chemostratigraphy of the Yellow Cat Member of the Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, C. A.; Hatzell, G.; Suarez, M. B.; Salazar-Verdin, J.; Al-Suwaidi, A. H.; Kirkland, J. I.

    2014-12-01

    Paleosols and lacustrine sediments of the Yellow Cat Member (YCM), Cedar Mountain Formation (CMF), Eastern Utah were collected at the "Lake Madsen" (a dominantly lacustrine section) and Doelling's Bowl (a mixed lacustrine/ palustrine/ paleosol section) and analyzed for bulk organic carbon isotopes (δ13Corg) . The YCM is thought to span the Barremian to Aptian based on dinosaur faunal assemblages. Correlation with distinct carbon isotope excursions (CIE) specifically those associated with the Selli Event or OAE 1a would allow insight into the response of terrestrial ecosystems to C-cycle perturbations during the Aptian, and may improve chronostratigraphy. Lake Madsen data ranges between a minimum of -28.5‰ and a maximum of -21.4‰ with an average of ~ -25‰ and shows a stepped negative isotope excursion of -3‰., with three distinct negative steps starting ~ 7.5 m above the Jurassic Morrison Formation and an intervening large positive excursion ~ 4.5 m from the base of the Poison Strip Sandstone (~119Ma) Member of the CMF. Doelling's Bowl data spans a longer vertical distance and ranges from a minimum of -29.0‰ to a maximum of -25.7‰, averages -27.7‰ and is somewhat cyclic in nature. δ13Corg chemostratigraphic profile for Doelling's Bowl poorly correlates to the Lake Madsen section, likely due to recycling of organic C and wet/dry cycles of the palustrine environment. Correlation of the Lake Madsen section to marine δ13CCO3 curve from Cismon Valley of the southern Alps indicates the lower Aptian C-isotope excursions C1 to C6, with the distinctive C3 negative CIE occur at the top of the Yellow Cat Member, therefore documenting a terrestrial manifestation of the CIE associated with OAE1a - Selli Event. This suggests the age of the majority of the Yellow Cat Member is Barremian to lower Aptian and the Barremian-Aptian boundary occurs at the top of the Member ~ 25cm below the base of the Poison Strip Sandstone. Further isotopic analysis of vertebrate

  13. Upper-greenschist facies intragrain deformation of albite in mylonitic meta-pegmatite and the influence of crystallographic anisotropy on microstructure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberlei, Tobias; Habler, Gerlinde; Grasemann, Bernhard; Abart, Rainer

    2014-12-01

    We studied the deformation behaviour of albite from Permian meta-pegmatite in Cretaceous upper-greenschist facies shear zones from the Austroalpine Matsch Unit in the Eastern Alps (Italy). Sodium-feldspars from these rocks provide excellent natural examples for studying mechanisms of intragranular deformation under mid-crustal conditions in grains with different angular relations between their (010) planes and the kinematic frame. The studied rocks were deformed at c. 500 °C in localized shear zones with well characterized top-W shear kinematics supposedly during the Cretaceous upper-greenschist facies tectonometamorphic event. Microstructural and chemical data suggest that crystallographic anisotropies in albite exert a strong control on microstructure formation and that albite primarily deformed by a combination of brittle fracturing, dissolution-precipitation and incipient crystal plasticity as a function of the orientation of the crystallographic anisotropy relative to the supposed shortening direction. Dissolution along discontinuities forming stylolites perpendicular to the shortening direction is associated with the precipitation of fine-grained albite with some compositional variability (Ab96-98 and Ab89-91) in cracks. New albite precipitates form aggregates with straight segments of high angle grain boundaries, nearly 120° dihedral angles and only a poor or no orientation relation to the hosting clast. Intragranular kinking is related to continuous lattice rotation of up to 15° by a misorientation axis close to albite [100] and the formation of subgrain boundaries with maximum misorientations of 7°. Synthetic microshear zones supposedly nucleated on pre-existing cracks, and are associated with formation of subgrain boundaries in shortening quadrants and cracks together with precipitates of potassium feldspar in extensional quadrants adjacent to the microshear zone. New microstructural and textural data from mylonitic Permian meta-pegmatites document

  14. A transgressive storm- and fair-weather wave dominated shelf sequence: Cretaceous Nimar Formation, Chakrud, Madhya Pradesh, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Pradip K.; Das, Nani Gopal

    1986-01-01

    The lithologic assemblage of the Cretaceous Nimar Formation in the area around Chakrud, Madhya Pradesh, India, has been classified in five marine facies: (A) polymictic conglomerate resting on granite basement, largely representing a lag deposit; (B) coarse-grained pebbly sandstone with normal and reverse coarse-tail grading and also frequency grading; (C) sandstone, with alternate hummocky cross-stratified and small-scale wave-rippled units; (D) mudstone; and (E) limestone. Facies C bears the definite stamp of alternations between storm- and fair-weather waves. Probable parameters of the fair-weather waves have been determined from the grain size and morphometric parameters of the wave ripples. The depth of the generation of the wave corresponds to a modern mid-shelf region. Facies B shows gradational contact with facies C and was deposited shoreward above fair-weather wave base. Bed shear stresses calculated from variable grain-size parameters within individual cross-laminae indicate that the nature of the current that deposited the pebbly sands was similar to that of storm currents. It has been postulated that storm ebb surges initially moved as fluid gravity flows pushing ahead the bed loads, and eventually turned into density currents farther offshore carrying most of the sediment in suspension. The other two facies, D and E, were deposited largely below storm wave base. The overall fining-upward sequence reflects gradual deepening of the basin. Local aberrations in the facies sequence as represented by short-phase coarsening-upward sequences suggest temporary reversals of this trend.

  15. A new toothed pterosaur (Pterodactyloidea: Anhangueridae) from the Early Cretaceous Romualdo Formation, NE Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bantim, Renan A M; Saraiva, Antônio A F; Oliveira, Gustavo R; Sayão, Juliana M

    2014-10-01

    A new species of pterosaur, Maaradactylus kellneri gen. nov., sp. nov. (Archosauria: Pterosauria) from the Romualdo Formation (Aptian/Albian), is herein described. The specimen (MPSC R 2357) was found at Sítio São Gonçalo, Santana do Cariri city (State of Ceará, northeast Brazil) and consists of the skull, atlas and axis, and represents one of the largest skulls of the Anhangueridae from the Araripe Basin described. The autapomorphies of the new pterosaur include the following characters: a premaxillary sagittal crest that is relatively long and high, beginning at the anterior part of the skull (rostrum) and extending to the 22nd pair of alveoli, not covering the nasoantorbital fenestra or the choanaes, and also the presence of 35 pairs of alveoli; smooth palatal ridge, which starts on the 5th pair of alveoli and ends on the 13th pair; palate is convex shaped in the anterior region; choanae not extending laterally; small and convex palatal elevation; the 5th, 6th and 7th alveoli smaller than the 4th and 8th; the alveoli decreasing in size from the 9th to the 12th and increasing from the 13th to 18th, and from the 18th to the 35th they are arranged in triplets. Furthermore, the lateral surface of the premaxillary crest shows grooves and tridimensional structures that may have housed blood vessels.

  16. Lower Cretaceous barrier reef and outer shelf facies, Sligo Formation, south Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkland, B.L.; Lighty, R.G.; Rezak, R.; Tieh, T.T.

    1987-09-01

    Along the south Texas margin, a vast carbonate-shelf complex with an extensive barrier-reef system and abundant shallow-lagoon and skeletal-shoal deposits existed during the Aptian to Albian. The Sligo Formation represents more than 609.6 m (2000 ft) of deposition along this margin. Facies types along the shelf edge were quantitatively delineated by cluster analysis of detailed point-count data from 90 thin sections of whole cores from five wells. In addition, studies of 42.6 m (140 ft) of core slabs and thin sections of well cuttings from four other wells were used to establish a regional depositional model. Along the Sligo shelf edge, three major facies occur: reef or reef rubble (two subfacies), back reef (three subfacies), and lagoonal (two subfacies). Reef facies are dominated by caprinids and also contain solenoporid algae, stromatoporoids, and an assortment of corals. Behind the reef, a spectrum of extensive back-reef deposits interfinger with shallow (< 5 m), lagoonal sediments. Farther behind the shelf-margin reef complex, along the outer shelf, benthic foraminifera, peloids, and ooids were deposited in high-energy shoals, and are interbedded with low-energy lagoonal sediments. The two types of buildups probably existed along the Sligo shelf margin and the equivalent Cupido shelf margin to the south: (1) wave-resistant coral-caprinid-stromatoporid barrier reefs (adjacent to restricted lagoonal facies), and (2) low-lying rudist banks (adjacent to diverse, washed lagoonal facies).

  17. Lagoa Feia Formation (Lower Cretaceous), Campos basin, offshore Brazil - Rift-Valley-Stage Lacustrine carbonate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Petrobras, T.; Carozzi, A.V.

    1985-02-01

    The Lagoa Feia Formation, buried in excess of 3000 m, is the exploration frontier of the prolific Campos basin. It contains the source beds of all the basin's oil in addition to having its own potential carbonate reservoirs. The faulted margins of the basin fed a system of alluvial fans, sand flats, and mud flats. Alternating dry and rainy period regulated the size and nature of contemporaneous basinal alkaline lakes. Dry periods corresponded to contracted playa lakes with ostracod carbonates and euxinic shales; rainy periods corresponded to expanded pluvial lakes with pelecypod banks. Subaqueous intrusions of basaltic magma generated hyaloclastites with kerolitic ooids and hyalotuffs. Petrographic analysis reveals 5 diagenetic stages: (1) syndepositional alteration of lithoclasts to trioctahedral smectites; (2) early dolomitization, early silicification, and cementation by bladed-rim calcite and zeolites; (3) freshwater-vadose dissolution of bioclasts and lithoclasts, freshwater-phreatic sparite cementation, and neomorphism; (4) mixed saline-freshwater silicification; and (5) burial with compaction, late dolomitization, and partial conversion of smectites to illite. Pelecypod limestones with primary interparticle, secondary intraparticle, moldic, and moldic-enlarged porosities are the potential reservoirs. Ideal conditions for porosity generation and preservation were subaerial exposure followed by rapid lake expansion and burial.

  18. Effects of climate, tectonism, and variations in sea level on formation of Cretaceous coals of North America

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, P.J.; Brownfield, M.E.; Hansen, D.E.; Hettinger, R.D.; Kirschbaum, M.A.; Sanchez, D.

    1988-07-01

    Extensive deposits of Cretaceous coal-bearing strata are present in western North America, extending from the North Slope of Alaska to northern Mexico. Most of the Cretaceous sediments were derived from the active Cordillera region and were deposited in foreland basins on the western margin of the Western Interior seaway. A multidisciplinary study is in progress to document and attempt to explain the temporal and spatial distribution of the Cretaceous coals. The study examines the effects of variations of paleoclimate, tectonics, and relative sea level on a continentwide scale. In addition, coal quality is related to the regional depositional settings. Many aspects of coal quality (for example, maceral composition, ash content, sulfur content) are determined by the flora and hydrology of the mire in which the original peat accumulated. The existence of Cretaceous coals throughout the length of the Western Cordillera provides a unique opportunity to determine variations in mire type with climate over a range of 50/degrees/ of paleolatitude, and to examine the effects of these variations on coal quality. The relationships between coal beds and associated clastic facies should also be expected to change with varying mire types. Recent developments in their understanding of foreland basin evolution, Cretaceous sea level changes, and peat-forming environments make this an optimal time to begin a regional synthesis of North America's Cretaceous coals. Results of this study should aid the development of better predictive models of coal quality and seam thickness. These models will take into account the effects of major controls on sedimentation (climate, tectonics, sea level changes) rather than just the local depositional environment.

  19. A New Upper Jurassic Ophthalmosaurid Ichthyosaur from the Slottsmøya Member, Agardhfjellet Formation of Central Spitsbergen

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Aubrey Jane; Druckenmiller, Patrick Scott; Sætre, Glenn-Peter; Hurum, Jørn Harald

    2014-01-01

    Abundant new ichthyosaur material has recently been documented in the Slottsmøya Member of the Agardhfjellet Formation from the Svalbard archipelago of Norway. Here we describe a partial skeleton of a new taxon, Janusaurus lundi, that includes much of the skull and representative portions of the postcranium. The new taxon is diagnosed by a suite of cranial character states including a very gracile stapedial shaft, the presence of a dorsal process on the prearticular and autapomorphic postcranial features such as the presence of an interclavicular trough and a conspicuous anterodorsal process of the ilium. The peculiar morphology of the ilia indicates a previously unrecognized degree of morphological variation in the pelvic girdle of ophthalmosaurids. We also present a large species level phylogenetic analysis of ophthalmosaurids including new and undescribed ichthyosaur material from the Upper Jurassic of Svalbard. Our results recover all Svalbard taxa in a single unresolved polytomy nested within Ophthalmosaurinae, which considerably increases the taxonomic composition of this clade. The paleobiogeographical implications of this result suggest the presence of a single clade of Boreal ophthalmosaurid ichthyosaurs that existed during the latest Jurassic, a pattern also reflected in the high degree of endemicity among some Boreal invertebrates, particularly ammonoids. Recent and ongoing descriptions of marine reptiles from the Slottsmøya Member Lagerstätte provide important new data to test hypotheses of marine amniote faunal turnover at the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary. PMID:25084533

  20. A Ceratopsian Dinosaur from the Lower Cretaceous of Western North America, and the Biogeography of Neoceratopsia

    PubMed Central

    Farke, Andrew A.; Maxwell, W. Desmond; Cifelli, Richard L.; Wedel, Mathew J.

    2014-01-01

    The fossil record for neoceratopsian (horned) dinosaurs in the Lower Cretaceous of North America primarily comprises isolated teeth and postcrania of limited taxonomic resolution, hampering previous efforts to reconstruct the early evolution of this group in North America. An associated cranium and lower jaw from the Cloverly Formation (?middle–late Albian, between 104 and 109 million years old) of southern Montana is designated as the holotype for Aquilops americanus gen. et sp. nov. Aquilops americanus is distinguished by several autapomorphies, including a strongly hooked rostral bone with a midline boss and an elongate and sharply pointed antorbital fossa. The skull in the only known specimen is comparatively small, measuring 84 mm between the tips of the rostral and jugal. The taxon is interpreted as a basal neoceratopsian closely related to Early Cretaceous Asian taxa, such as Liaoceratops and Auroraceratops. Biogeographically, A. americanus probably originated via a dispersal from Asia into North America; the exact route of this dispersal is ambiguous, although a Beringian rather than European route seems more likely in light of the absence of ceratopsians in the Early Cretaceous of Europe. Other amniote clades show similar biogeographic patterns, supporting an intercontinental migratory event between Asia and North America during the late Early Cretaceous. The temporal and geographic distribution of Upper Cretaceous neoceratopsians (leptoceratopsids and ceratopsoids) suggests at least intermittent connections between North America and Asia through the early Late Cretaceous, likely followed by an interval of isolation and finally reconnection during the latest Cretaceous. PMID:25494182

  1. Cretaceous stratigraphy and biostratigraphy, Sierra Blanca basin, southeastern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, S.G. ); Anderson, O.R. )

    1994-03-01

    The Sierra Blanca basin of Otero and Lincoln counties, New Mexico contains a Lower (upper Albian)-Upper (Santonian) Cretaceous section of marine and nonmarine strata as much as 700 m thick which represent the upper part of a regressive cycle followed by two transgressive-regressive deposition cycles. The lower 55 m of the Cretaceous section are the same tripartite Dakota Group units recognized in Guadalupe and San Miguel counties: basal Mesa Rica Sandstone (late Albian), medial Pajarito formation (late Albian) and upper Romeroville sandstone (earliest Cenomanian). The Mesa Rica and Pajarito represent a regression and are overlain disconformably by the transgressive Romeroville sandstone. Overlying transgressive marine clastics and minor carbonates of the Mancos Shale are as much as 73 m thick and include the early Turonian Greenhorn Limestone. The overlying Tres Hermanos formation (up to 91 m thick) consists of the (ascending order) Atarque sandstone and the Carthage and Fite Ranch sandstone members. These strata represent a mid-Turonian regression in response to regional tectonism (Atarque and Carthage), followed by a transgression (Fite Ranch sandstone) that ended in the deposition of the D-Cross Tongue of the Mancos Shale and Fort Hays Member of the Niobrara Formation during the late Turonian. The subsequent regression began with the Coniacian Gallup Sandstone (55 m) followed by coal-bearing Crevasse Canyon Formation (up to 244 m thick). The Coniacian-Santonian Crevasse Canyon Formation, the youngest Cretaceous unit in the basin, is disconformably overlain by middle Eocene conglomerates and red-bed siliciclastics of the Cub Mountain formation. Dakota Group age determinations in the Sierra Blanca basin are those of well-dated sections to the north, but ammonites and inoceramid bivalves from the Sierra Blanca basin provide precise age control for Cenomanian-Santonian marine and marginal marine strata and palynology and megafossil plants for nonmarine strata.

  2. WATER FORMATION IN THE UPPER ATMOSPHERE OF THE EARLY EARTH

    SciTech Connect

    Fleury, Benjamin; Carrasco, Nathalie; Marcq, Emmanuel; Vettier, Ludovic; Määttänen, Anni

    2015-07-10

    The water concentration and distribution in the early Earth's atmosphere are important parameters that contribute to the chemistry and the radiative budget of the atmosphere. If the atmosphere above the troposphere is generally considered as dry, photochemistry is known to be responsible for the production of numerous minor species. Here we used an experimental setup to study the production of water in conditions simulating the chemistry above the troposphere of the early Earth with an atmospheric composition based on three major molecules: N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}. The formation of gaseous products was monitored using infrared spectroscopy. Water was found as the major product, with approximately 10% of the gas products detected. This important water formation is discussed in the context of the early Earth.

  3. Underplating process from melange formation to duplexing: Example from the Cretaceous Shimanto Belt, Kii Peninsula, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Y.; Kimura, G.

    1999-02-01

    Accretionary complexes are considered to form through off scraping and underplating, which results in the lateral and vertical growth of an accretionary prism. Accretion of the upper part of the oceanic crust and the formation of melange are important components of the accretionary process, although the origin of melange is considered controversial. In order to better understand the origin of melange and its role in accretion, in particular during underplating, we have studied the relationship between the formation of melange and duplexing in the Miyama Assemblage. Here the melange is composed dominantly of shale, basalt, chert, and sandstone. This study stresses the following features: (1) the structure of the Miyama Assemblage appears to be a composite suite of landward and seaward dipping duplexes; (2) the melange fabric displays a systematic asymmetry, which may have resulted through shearing along the decollement; and (3) facing of horses within duplexes changes from north to south, coinciding with a change in the sense of shear inferred from the melange fabric, which suggests that it formed prior to duplexing.

  4. Stratigraphy of Smackover formation (Upper Jurassic), Southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    The modeled eustatic sea level rise during Smackover deposition is recorded in rocks along the Wiggins Arch--Conecuh Ridge areas of the Manila embayment as a ''large-scale'' transgressive-regressive carbonate package. Transgression of Smackover carbonates in the Conecuh Ridge area was associated with the end of pronounced fault-block movement characteristic of earlier Norphlet deposits. Underlying Louann and Norphlet strata created a ramplike surface of transgression in the Wiggins arch area, whereas the Louann pinch-out and confinement or Norphlet coarse clastics between basement blocks in the far eastern Manila embayment resulted in a rapidly changing paleotopographic surface. The subdued paleotopographic (ramp) setting was dominated by lateral progradation of sedimentary environments; in contrast, carbonates to the east over basement features responded to the same eustatic changes by vertical upbuilding (aggradation) of facies-a ''tectonic dictator'' existed that controlled depositional relief and localized environments through time. Direct evidence for meter-scale relative sea level oscillations is from multiple exposure surfaces within upper Smackover grainstones. These diagenetic caps (up to four zones recognized in the Chunchula field area) at the top of coarsening-upward sequences are characterized by chemically coated grains, gravitational vadose cements, multiple dissolution-reprecipitation features, and localized radial-fibrous cements. Stacked sedimentary packages indicate that repeated relative sea level rises again initiated carbonate deposition after exposure. Correlation of exposure caps in four wells in Chunchula field reflect internal time lines generally parallel with the Norphlet-Smackover contact, and indicate lateral equivalence of grainstones with updip anhydrite.

  5. Stratigraphic relationships of Cretaceous and early Tertiary rocks of a part of northwestern San Juan basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baltz, Elmer Harold

    1953-01-01

    The Bridge Timber Mountain area in south-central La Plata County, southwestern Colorado lies mostly in the northwestern part of the Central San Juan Basin but contains a segment of the bounding Hogback 'monocline' and Four-Corners platform. The area contains rocks of late Cretaceous through early Eocene age, as well as Pliocene, Pleistocene, and Recent terrace and pediment gravels. The Pictured Cliffs sandstone of late Montana age is the latest marine formation present. Retreat of the Cretaceous seas from the area marked the beginning of Laramide orogenic activity and the earliest stages of deformation which produced the modern San Juan Basin. The Fruitland formation and Kirtland shale were deposited in brackish water and on coastal plains left by the retreating Cretaceous sea. Beds of the Farmington sandstone member and upper shale member of the Kirtland shale show evidence of a new source of sediments to the north or northeast distinct from the southwestern source area of older Cretaceous rocks. The McDermott 'formation', composed mainly of volcanic debris, is considered to be a local lower member of the Animas formation. Beds of the upper member of the Animas formation of Cretaceous and Paleocene age are considered to extend entirely across the area and into New Mexico. Overstep of higher sandstone and shale beds of the upper member across lower conglomeratic beds shows that folding on the Hogback 'monocline' began during deposition of the upper member. Beds of the upper member of the Animas formation grade laterally southward into Paleocene beds of the Nacimiento formation, but upper Nacimiento beds overstep folded beds of the Animas formation on the Hogback 'monocline' at the north end of Bridge Timber Mountain. The San Jose formation of Paleocene and Eocene age is conformable with the Nacimiento formation except at the north end of Bridge Timber Mountain where upper San Jose beds overstep all older tilted beds down to the Fruitland formation. The heavy

  6. Early cretaceous radiolarian assemblages from the East Sakhalin Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurilov, D. V.; Vishnevskaya, V. S.

    2011-02-01

    Three-dimensional radiolarian skeletons isolated from rock matrix in HF solution and then studied under scanning electron microscope substantiate the Early Cretaceous age of volcanogenic-cherty deposits sampled from fragmentary rock successions of the East Sakhalin Mountains. Accordingly the Berriasian age is established for jasper packets formerly attributed to the Upper Paleozoic-Mesozoic Daldagan Group; the Valanginian radiolarians are identified in cherty rock intercalations in the Upper Paleozoic (?) Ivashkino Formation; the Berriasian-Barremian assemblage is macerated from cherty tuffites of the Jurassic-Cretaceous Ostraya Formation; and the Aptian-early Albian radiolarians are characteristic of tuffaceous cherty rocks sampled from the Cretaceous Khoe Formation of the Nabil Group. Photographic documentation of radiolarian skeletons specifies taxonomic composition and age of the Berriasian, Valanginian, Berriasian-Valanginian, Barremian, and Aptian-Albian radiolarian assemblages from the East Sakhalin Mountains, and their evolution as related to abiotic events is considered. Coexistence of Tethyan and Pacific species in the same rock samples evidence origin of radiolarian assemblages in an ecotone. Consequently, the assemblages are applicable for intra- and interregional correlations and paleogeographic reconstructions.

  7. Evidence for the correlation of the upper part of the Llewellyn Formation (Pennsylvania Anthracite region), with the Monongahela Formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eggleston, J.R.; Wnuk, C.; Edmunds, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    A plant fossil assemblage from the roof shale of the No. 25 anthracite bed in Pennsylvania indicates that the upper part of the Llewellyn Formation is much younger than the lower part of the Allegheny Group or Conemaugh Group correlation that was indicated by Read and Mamay (1960). These results confirm the conclusions of Fontaine and White (1880), White (1900), and Darrah (1969) who suggested that the highest coals of the Llewellyn Formation could be equivalent to the Monongahela Group.

  8. Mollusks of the Upper Jurassic (upper Oxfordian-lower Kimmeridgian) shallow marine Minas Viejas Formation, northeastern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zell, Patrick; Beckmann, Seija; Stinnesbeck, Wolfgang; Götte, Martin

    2015-10-01

    We present the first systematic description of Late Jurassic (late Oxfordian-early Kimmeridgian) invertebrates from the shallow marine Minas Viejas Formation of northeastern Mexico. The unit was generally considered to be extremely poor in fossils, due to an overall evaporitic character. The collection described here includes three taxa of ammonites, 10 taxa of bivalves and five taxa of gastropods. The fossils were discovered near Galeana and other localities in southern Nuevo León and northeastern San Luis Potosí, in thin-bedded marly limestones intercalated between gypsum units. Due to complex internal deformation of the sediments, fossils used for this study cannot be assigned to precise layers of origin. However, the taxa identified suggest a Late Jurassic (late Oxfordian-early Kimmeridgian) age for these fossil-bearing layers and allow us, for the first time, to assign a biostratigraphic age to Upper Jurassic strata in the region underlying the La Caja and La Casita formations.

  9. High resolution sup 40 Ar/ sup 39 Ar chronostratigraphy of the Late Cretaceous El Gallo Formation, Baja California del Norte, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Fulford, M.M.; Busby-Spera, C. ); Renne, P.R.

    1991-03-01

    Laser probe {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar analyses of individual sanidine grains from four tuffs in the alluvial Late Cretaceous (Campanian) El Gallo Formation yield statistically distinct mean dates ranging from 74.87 {plus minus} 0.05 Ma to 73.59 {plus minus} 0.09 Ma. The exceptional precision of these dates permits calculation of statistically significant sediment accumulation rates that are much higher than passive sediment loading would cause, implying rapid tectonically induced subsidence. The dates bracket tightly the age of important dinosaur and mammalian faunas previously reported from the El Gallo Formation. The dates support an age less than 73 Ma for the Campanian/Maastrichtian stage boundary, younger than indicated by several currently used time scales. Further application of the single grain {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar technique may be expected to greatly benefit stratigraphic studies of Mesozoic sedimentary basins and contribute to calibration of biostratigraphic and magnetostratigraphic time scales.

  10. An unusual pterosaur specimen (Pterodactyloidea, ?azhdarchoidea) from the early cretaceous Romualdo formation of Brazil, and the evolution of the pterodactyloid palate.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Felipe L; Schultz, Cesar L

    2012-01-01

    A new and unusual specimen of a probable azhdarchoid pterosaur is described for the Early Cretaceous (Albian) Romualdo Formation of Brazil. The specimen consists of a palate that, although fragmentary, has a unique morphology differing from all other known pterosaurs with preservation of palatal elements. The new specimen probably indicates the presence of a yet undescribed pterodactyloid taxon for Romualdo Formation and brings new information on pterosaur diversity of this sedimentary unity. Mainly due to the rarity of pterodactyloid specimens with palate preservation, this structure has been overlooked in this clade. Here, we reassess the palatal anatomy of Pterodactyloidea, revealing an intriguing variety of morphotypes and evolutionary trends, some of them described here for the first time. The morphological disparity displayed by different pterodactyloid taxa may be further evidence of the presence of diverse feeding strategies within the clade.

  11. An Ornithopod-Dominated Tracksite from the Lower Cretaceous Jiaguan Formation (Barremian–Albian) of Qijiang, South-Central China: New Discoveries, Ichnotaxonomy, Preservation and Palaeoecology

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lida; Lockley, Martin G.; Marty, Daniel; Zhang, Jianping; Wang, Yan; Klein, Hendrik; McCrea, Richard T.; Buckley, Lisa G.; Belvedere, Matteo; Mateus, Octávio; Gierliński, Gerard D.; Piñuela, Laura; Persons, W. Scott; Wang, Fengping; Ran, Hao; Dai, Hui; Xie, Xianming

    2015-01-01

    The historically-famous Lotus Fortress site, a deep 1.5–3.0-meter-high, 200-meter-long horizonal notch high up in near-vertical sandstone cliffs comprising the Cretaceous Jiaguan Formation, has been known since the 13th Century as an impregnable defensive position. The site is also extraordinary for having multiple tetrapod track-bearing levels, of which the lower two form the floor of part of the notch, and yield very well preserved asseamblages of ornithopod, bird (avian theropod) and pterosaur tracks. Trackway counts indicate that ornithopods dominate (69%) accounting for at least 165 trackmakers, followed by bird (18%), sauropod (10%), and pterosaur (3%). Previous studies designated Lotus Fortress as the type locality of Caririchnium lotus and Wupus agilis both of which are recognized here as valid ichnotaxa. On the basis of multiple parallel trackways both are interpreted as representing the trackways of gregarious species. C. lotus is redescribed here in detail and interpreted to indicate two age cohorts representing subadults that were sometimes bipedal and larger quadrupedal adults. Two other previously described dinosaurian ichnospecies, are here reinterpreted as underprints and considered nomina dubia. Like a growing number of significant tetrapod tracksites in China the Lotus Fortress site reveals new information about the composition of tetrapod faunas from formations in which the skeletal record is sparse. In particular, the site shows the relatively high abundance of Caririchium in a region where saurischian ichnofaunas are often dominant. It is also the only site known to have yielded Wupus agilis. In combination with information from other tracksites from the Jiaguan formation and other Cretaceous formations in the region, the track record is proving increasingly impotant as a major source of information on the vertebrate faunas of the region. The Lotus Fortress site has been developed as a spectacular, geologically-, paleontologically- and a

  12. An Ornithopod-Dominated Tracksite from the Lower Cretaceous Jiaguan Formation (Barremian-Albian) of Qijiang, South-Central China: New Discoveries, Ichnotaxonomy, Preservation and Palaeoecology.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lida; Lockley, Martin G; Marty, Daniel; Zhang, Jianping; Wang, Yan; Klein, Hendrik; McCrea, Richard T; Buckley, Lisa G; Belvedere, Matteo; Mateus, Octávio; Gierliński, Gerard D; Piñuela, Laura; Persons, W Scott; Wang, Fengping; Ran, Hao; Dai, Hui; Xie, Xianming

    2015-01-01

    The historically-famous Lotus Fortress site, a deep 1.5-3.0-meter-high, 200-meter-long horizonal notch high up in near-vertical sandstone cliffs comprising the Cretaceous Jiaguan Formation, has been known since the 13th Century as an impregnable defensive position. The site is also extraordinary for having multiple tetrapod track-bearing levels, of which the lower two form the floor of part of the notch, and yield very well preserved asseamblages of ornithopod, bird (avian theropod) and pterosaur tracks. Trackway counts indicate that ornithopods dominate (69%) accounting for at least 165 trackmakers, followed by bird (18%), sauropod (10%), and pterosaur (3%). Previous studies designated Lotus Fortress as the type locality of Caririchnium lotus and Wupus agilis both of which are recognized here as valid ichnotaxa. On the basis of multiple parallel trackways both are interpreted as representing the trackways of gregarious species. C. lotus is redescribed here in detail and interpreted to indicate two age cohorts representing subadults that were sometimes bipedal and larger quadrupedal adults. Two other previously described dinosaurian ichnospecies, are here reinterpreted as underprints and considered nomina dubia. Like a growing number of significant tetrapod tracksites in China the Lotus Fortress site reveals new information about the composition of tetrapod faunas from formations in which the skeletal record is sparse. In particular, the site shows the relatively high abundance of Caririchium in a region where saurischian ichnofaunas are often dominant. It is also the only site known to have yielded Wupus agilis. In combination with information from other tracksites from the Jiaguan formation and other Cretaceous formations in the region, the track record is proving increasingly impotant as a major source of information on the vertebrate faunas of the region. The Lotus Fortress site has been developed as a spectacular, geologically-, paleontologically- and a

  13. Stratigraphic framework of the upper Fort Union Formation, TA Hills, Western Powder River basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, Jean N.; Flores, Romeo M.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to interpret a relationship between the stratigraphy and the environment of deposition of the upper part of the Fort Union Formation in the TA Hills in the western part of the Powder River Basin, Johnson County, Wyoming.  This framework was used to map and correlate coal beds with those mapped by Hose (1955) and Mapel (1959) in the southern and northern parts of the study area, respectively.  More specifically, the established stratigraphic and environmental relationships of the coal beds and associated rocks contribute to a depositional model for the upper part of the Fort Union Formation in the TA Hills.

  14. Chengia laxispicata gen. et sp. nov., a new ephedroid plant from the Early Cretaceous Yixian Formation of western Liaoning, Northeast China: evolutionary, taxonomic, and biogeographic implications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The extant Gnetales include three monotypic families, namely, Ephedraceae (Ephedra), Gnetaceae (Gnetum), and Welwitschiaceae (Welwitschia), all of which possess compound female cones that comprise a main axis and 1 to multiple pairs/whorls of bracts subtending a female reproductive unit or having lower pairs/whorls of bracts sterile. However, the evolutionary origin of such a reproductive architecture in Gnetales is controversial in the light of the competing anthophyte versus gnetifer hypotheses of seed plant relationships. Hence, macrofossils demonstrating the structure of compound female cones of the Gnetales should be important to decipher the early evolution of the order. Results A new ephedroid plant Chengia laxispicata gen. et sp. nov. is described from the Early Cretaceous Yixian Formation of western Liaoning, Northeast China. The fossil represents a part of a leafy shooting system with reproductive organs attached. The main shoot bears internodes and swollen nodes, from which lateral branches arise oppositely. Reproductive organs consist of female spikes terminal to twigs or axillary to linear leaves. Spikes are loosely arranged, having prominent nodes and internodes. Bracts of the spikes are decussately opposite and comprise 4—8 pairs of bracts. Each bract subtends an ellipsoid seed. Seeds are sessile, with a thin outer envelope and a distal micropylar tube. Conclusions Chengia laxispicata gen. et sp. nov. provides a missing link between archetypal fertile organs in the crown lineage of the Gnetales and compound female cones of the extant Ephedraceae. Combined with a wealth of Ephedra and ephedroid macrofossils from the Early Cretaceous, we propose a reduction and sterilization hypothesis that the female cone of the extant Ephedraceae may have stemmed from archetypal fertile organs in the crown lineage of the Gnetales. These have undergone sequentially intermediate links similar to female cones of Cretaceous Siphonospermum, Chengia, and

  15. Did tropical rainforest vegetation exist during the Late Cretaceous? New data from the late Campanian to early Maastrichtian Olmos Formation, Coahuila, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upchurch, G. R.; Estrada-Ruiz, E.; Cevallos-Ferriz, S. S.

    2008-12-01

    A major problem in paleobotany and paleoclimatology is the origin of modern tropical and paratropical rainforests. Studies of leaf macrofossils, beginning with those of Wolfe and Upchurch, have suggested that tropical and paratropical (i.e., megathermal) rainforests with dominant angiosperms are of Cenozoic origin, and that comparable vegetation was either absent or greatly restricted during the Late Cretaceous. Earth System modeling studies, in contrast, predict the existence of megathermal rainforest vegetation during the mid- and Late Cretaceous, though with less areal extent than during the Late Cenozoic and Recent. Megathermal climate with year-round precipitation is simulated along the paleoequator and along the northern margin of the Tethys Ocean, and tends to occur in highly focused regions, in contrast to the more latitudinally zoned pattern of the Recent. Low-resolution climatic indicators, such as the distribution of coals and tree fern spores, are consistent with evidence from climate modeling for megathermal wet climates during the Late Cretaceous, and by extension megathermal rainforest vegetation. However, corroborative data from plant macrofossil assemblages is needed, because the physiognomy of leaves and woods directly reflects plant adaptation to the environment and can estimate climate independently of the generic and familial affinities of the paleoflora. Newly collected plant macrofossil assemblages from the late Campian to early Maastrichtian Olmos Formation of Coahuila, Mexico, provide evidence for megathermal rainforest vegetation on the northern margin of the Tethys Ocean at approximately 35 degrees paleolatitude. The newly collected leaf flora is 72 percent entire- margined and has abundant palms, features typical of modern megathermal rainforests. Thirty percent of the species have large leaves, and 50 percent of the species have drip tips, features indicative of wet conditions. Simple and multiple regression functions based on the

  16. Continental fossil vertebrates from the mid-Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian) Alcântara Formation, Brazil, and their relationship with contemporaneous faunas from North Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candeiro, Carlos Roberto A.; Fanti, Federico; Therrien, François; Lamanna, Matthew C.

    2011-05-01

    The Albian-Cenomanian Alcântara Formation of northeastern Brazil preserves the most diverse continental vertebrate fauna of this age yet known from northern South America. The Alcântara vertebrate assemblage, consisting of elasmobranchs, actinopterygians, sarcopterygians, turtles, crocodyliforms, pterosaurs, and non-avian dinosaurs, displays close similarities to contemporaneous faunas from North Africa. The co-occurrence of as many as eight freshwater or estuarine fish taxa ( Onchopristis, Bartschichthys, Lepidotes, Stephanodus, Mawsonia, Arganodus, Ceratodus africanus, and possibly Ceratodus humei) and up to seven terrestrial archosaur taxa ( Sigilmassasaurus, Rebbachisauridae, Baryonychinae, Spinosaurinae, Carcharodontosauridae, possibly Pholidosauridae, and doubtfully Bahariasaurus) suggests that a land route connecting northeastern Brazil and North Africa existed at least until the Albian. Interestingly, most components of this mid-Cretaceous northern South American/North African assemblage are not shared with coeval southern South American faunas, which are themselves characterized by a number of distinct freshwater and terrestrial vertebrate taxa (e.g., chelid turtles, megaraptoran and unenlagiine theropods). These results suggest that, although mid-Cretaceous faunal interchange was probably possible between northern South America and North Africa, paleogeographic, paleoclimatic, and/or paleoenvironmental barriers may have hindered continental vertebrate dispersal between northern and southern South America during this time.

  17. The History of Low-Mass Star Formation in the Upper Scorpius OB Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preibisch, Thomas; Zinnecker, Hans

    1999-05-01

    We use a large sample of about 100 low-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars in the Upper Scorpius OB association to explore the star formation history and the initial mass function of this association. Upper Scorpius is an ideal target for such a study, because the star formation process there is finished. The PMS stars have recently been found in a spatially unbiased wide-field survey of X-ray-selected stars in a 160 deg^2 area, covering the Upper Scorpius association nearly completely. Following the optical characterization of these PMS stars, we present a new HR diagram for this association. We perform a detailed analysis of the HR diagram, taking proper account of the uncertainties and the effects of unresolved binaries, and derive ages and masses for the PMS stars. We find that the low-mass PMS stars have a mean age of about 5 Myr and show no evidence for a large age dispersion. This agrees very well with the age of 5-6 Myr previously found for the massive stars and shows that low-mass and high-mass stars are coeval and cospatial and thus have formed together. We conclude that the star formation process in Upper Scorpius was probably triggered by the shock wave of a supernova explosion in the nearby Upper Centaurus-Lupus association. After a short burst of very high star formation activity, which lasted only for a few Myr, star formation in Upper Scorpius was halted, probably by the strong winds and the ionizing radiation of the numerous massive stars that dispersed the molecular cloud.

  18. Cretaceous rocks from southwestern Montana to southwestern Minnesota, northern Rocky Mountains, and Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T.S.; Cobban, W.A.; Fox, J.E.; Hammond, R.H.; Nichols, D.J.; Perry, W.J.; Porter, K.W.; Rice, D.D.; Setterholm, D.R.; Shurr, G.W.; Tysdal, R.G.; Haley, J.C.; Campen, E.B.

    1994-01-01

    In Montana, Wyoming, North and South Dakota, and Minnesota, Cretaceous strata are preserved in the asymmetric Western Interior foreland basin. More than 5,200 m (17,000 ft) of Cretaceous strata are present in southwestern Montana, less than 300 m (1,000 ft) in eastern South Dakota. The asymmetry resulted from varying rates of subsidence due to tectonic and sediment loading. The strata consist primarily of sandstone, siltstone, mudstone, and shale. Conglomerate is locally abundant along the western margin, whereas carbonate is present in most areas of the eastern shelf. Sediment was deposited in both marine and nonmarine environments as the shoreline fluctuated during major tectonic and eustatic cycles.A discussion of Cretaceous strata from southwestern to east-central Montana, the Black Hills, eastern South Dakota, and southwestern Minnesota shows regional stratigraphy and facies relations, sequence, boundaries, and biostratigraphic and radiometric correlations. The thick Cretaceous strata in southwestern Montana typify nonmarine facies of the rapidly subsiding westernmost part of the basin. These strata include more than 3,000 m (10,000 ft) of synorogenic conglomerate of the Upper Cretaceous part of the Beaverhead Group. West of the Madison Range, sequence boundaries bracket the Kootenai (Aptian and Albian), the Blackleaf (Albian and Cenomanian), and the Frontier Formations (Cenomanian and Turonian); sequence boundaries are difficult to recognize because the rocks are dominantly non-marine. Cretaceous strata in east-central Montana (about 1,371 m; 4,500 ft thick) lie at the approximate depositional axis of the basin and are mostly marine terrigenous rocks. Chert-pebble zones in these rocks reflect stratigraphic breaks that may correlate with sequence boundaries to the east and west. Cretaceous rocks of the Black Hills region consist of a predominantly marine clastic sequence averaging approximately 1,524 m (5,000 ft) thick. The Cretaceous System in eastern South

  19. Pentapetalum trifasciculandricus gen. et sp. nov., a thealean fossil flower from the Raritan Formation, New Jersey, USA (Turonian, Late Cretaceous).

    PubMed

    Martínez-Millán, Marcela; Crepet, William L; Nixon, Kevin C

    2009-05-01

    The study of fossil flowers in the last 25 years has greatly increased our understanding of angiosperm diversification. Following that tradition, we here describe a new fossil taxon from the Late Cretaceous of New Jersey, Pentapetalum trifasciculandricus Martínez-Millán, Crepet et Nixon gen. et sp. nov. It includes actinomorphic pentamerous flowers with quincuncial calyx, imbricate corolla, numerous stamens of markedly different heights, and a superior tricarpellate ovary, which are morphologically consistent with the flowers of the Theaceae s.l. and of members of the order Theales sensu Cronquist. Cladistic analyses including 45 extant taxa plus the fossil, 61 morphological characters, and different combinations of the molecular markers rbcL, matK, trnL-trnF, matR, and ITS support its inclusion in the order Ericales sensu APG. Comparison with extant taxa using traditional methods of identification suggests a relation with the Theaceae s.s. (Stewartia), but the phylogenetic analyses do not support this view. Instead, the phylogenetic analysis suggests some relation to the Ternstroemiaceae/Pentaphylacaceae (Theaceae s.l.), exemplifying the importance of evaluating identifications in a phylogenetic context. The description of Pentapetalum further adds to the ample diversity of Ericales in the Late Cretaceous.

  20. Evaluation of organic matter, subsurface temperature and pressure with regard to gas generation in low-permeability Upper Cretaceous and Lower Tertiary sandstones in Pacific Creek area, Sublette and Sweetwater Counties, Wyoming.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.; Bostick, N.H.

    1980-01-01

    The onset of overpressuring occurs at c.3,500 m, near the base of the U. Cretaceous Lance Formation. The development of overpressuring may involve several processes; however, interpretation of the available information indicates that active generation of large amounts of wet gas is one of the more important processes. The present minimum temperature at the top of overpressuring is at least 88oC. The preservation of abnormally high pressures is due to presently active generation of gas in a thick interval of discontinuous, very low-permeability shales, siltstones, and sandstones. - from Authors

  1. Evidence for high taxonomic and morphologic tyrannosauroid diversity in the Late Cretaceous (Late Campanian) of the American Southwest and a new short-skulled tyrannosaurid from the Kaiparowits formation of Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Thomas D.; Williamson, Thomas E.; Britt, Brooks B.; Stadtman, Ken

    2011-03-01

    The fossil record of late Campanian tyrannosauroids of western North America has a geographic gap between the Northern Rocky Mountain Region (Montana, Alberta) and the Southwest (New Mexico, Utah). Until recently, diagnostic tyrannosauroids from the Southwest were unknown until the discovery of Bistahieversor sealeyi from the late Campanian of New Mexico. Here we describe an incomplete skull and postcranial skeleton of an unusual tyrannosaurid from the Kaiparowits Formation (Late Cretaceous) of Utah that represents a new genus and species, Teratophoneus curriei. Teratophoneus differs from other tyrannosauroids in having a short skull, as indicated by a short and steep maxilla, abrupt angle in the postorbital process of the jugal, laterally oriented paroccipital processes, short basicranium, and reduced number of teeth. Teratophoneus is the sister taxon of the Daspletosaurus + Tyrannosaurus clade and it is the most basal North American tyrannosaurine. The presence of Teratophoneus suggests that dinosaur faunas were regionally endemic in the west during the upper Campanian. The divergence in skull form seen in tyrannosaurines indicates that the skull in this clade had a wide range of adaptive morphotypes.

  2. Evidence for high taxonomic and morphologic tyrannosauroid diversity in the Late Cretaceous (late Campanian) of the American Southwest and a new short-skulled tyrannosaurid from the Kaiparowits Formation of Utah.

    PubMed

    Carr, Thomas D; Williamson, Thomas E; Britt, Brooks B; Stadtman, Ken

    2011-03-01

    The fossil record of late Campanian tyrannosauroids of western North America has a geographic gap between the Northern Rocky Mountain Region (Montana, Alberta) and the Southwest (New Mexico, Utah). Until recently, diagnostic tyrannosauroids from the Southwest were unknown until the discovery of Bistahieversor sealeyi from the late Campanian of New Mexico. Here we describe an incomplete skull and postcranial skeleton of an unusual tyrannosaurid from the Kaiparowits Formation (Late Cretaceous) of Utah that represents a new genus and species, Teratophoneus curriei. Teratophoneus differs from other tyrannosauroids in having a short skull, as indicated by a short and steep maxilla, abrupt angle in the postorbital process of the jugal, laterally oriented paroccipital processes, short basicranium, and reduced number of teeth. Teratophoneus is the sister taxon of the Daspletosaurus + Tyrannosaurus clade and it is the most basal North American tyrannosaurine. The presence of Teratophoneus suggests that dinosaur faunas were regionally endemic in the west during the upper Campanian. The divergence in skull form seen in tyrannosaurines indicates that the skull in this clade had a wide range of adaptive morphotypes.

  3. Formative Assessment and Increased Student Involvement Increase Grades in an Upper Secondary School Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granbom, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This study shows that formative methods and increased student participation has a positive influence on learning measured as grades. The study was conducted during the course Biology A in a Swedish Upper Secondary School. The students constructed grade criteria and defined working methods and type of examination within a given topic, Gene…

  4. Influence of Transcontinental arch on Cretaceous listric-normal faulting, west flank, Denver basin

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, T.L.

    1983-08-01

    Seismic studies along the west flank of the Denver basin near Boulder and Greeley, Colorado illustrate the interrelationship between shallow listric-normal faulting in the Cretaceous and deeper basement-controlled faulting. Deeper fault systems, primarily associated with the Transcontinental arch, control the styles and causative mechanisms of listric-normal faulting that developed in the Cretaceous. Three major stratigraphic levels of listric-normal faulting occur in the Boulder-Greeley area. These tectonic sensitive intervals are present in the following Cretaceous formations: Laramie-Fox Hills-upper Pierre, middle Pierre Hygiene zone, and the Niobrara-Carlile-Greenhorn. Documentation of the listric-normal fault style reveals a Wattenberg high, a horst block or positive feature of the greater Transcontinental arch, was active in the east Boulder-Greeley area during Cretaceous time. Paleotectonic events associated with the Wattenberg high are traced through analysis of the listric-normal fault systems that occur in the area. These styles are important to recognize because of their stratigraphic and structural influence on Cretaceous petroleum reservoir systems in the Denver basin. Similar styles of listric-normal faulting occur in the Cretaceous in many Rocky Mountain foreland basins.

  5. The functional and palaeoecological implications of tooth morphology and wear for the megaherbivorous dinosaurs from the Dinosaur Park Formation (upper Campanian) of Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Mallon, Jordan C; Anderson, Jason S

    2014-01-01

    Megaherbivorous dinosaurs were exceptionally diverse on the Late Cretaceous island continent of Laramidia, and a growing body of evidence suggests that this diversity was facilitated by dietary niche partitioning. We test this hypothesis using the fossil megaherbivore assemblage from the Dinosaur Park Formation (upper Campanian) of Alberta as a model. Comparative tooth morphology and wear, including the first use of quantitative dental microwear analysis in the context of Cretaceous palaeosynecology, are used to infer the mechanical properties of the foods these dinosaurs consumed. The phylliform teeth of ankylosaurs were poorly adapted for habitually processing high-fibre plant matter. Nevertheless, ankylosaur diets were likely more varied than traditionally assumed: the relatively large, bladed teeth of nodosaurids would have been better adapted to processing a tougher, more fibrous diet than the smaller, cusp-like teeth of ankylosaurids. Ankylosaur microwear is characterized by a preponderance of pits and scratches, akin to modern mixed feeders, but offers no support for interspecific dietary differences. The shearing tooth batteries of ceratopsids are much better adapted to high-fibre herbivory, attested by their scratch-dominated microwear signature. There is tentative microwear evidence to suggest differences in the feeding habits of centrosaurines and chasmosaurines, but statistical support is not significant. The tooth batteries of hadrosaurids were capable of both shearing and crushing functions, suggestive of a broad dietary range. Their microwear signal overlaps broadly with that of ankylosaurs, and suggests possible dietary differences between hadrosaurines and lambeosaurines. Tooth wear evidence further indicates that all forms considered here exhibited some degree of masticatory propaliny. Our findings reveal that tooth morphology and wear exhibit different, but complimentary, dietary signals that combine to support the hypothesis of dietary niche

  6. The Functional and Palaeoecological Implications of Tooth Morphology and Wear for the Megaherbivorous Dinosaurs from the Dinosaur Park Formation (Upper Campanian) of Alberta, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Mallon, Jordan C.; Anderson, Jason S.

    2014-01-01

    Megaherbivorous dinosaurs were exceptionally diverse on the Late Cretaceous island continent of Laramidia, and a growing body of evidence suggests that this diversity was facilitated by dietary niche partitioning. We test this hypothesis using the fossil megaherbivore assemblage from the Dinosaur Park Formation (upper Campanian) of Alberta as a model. Comparative tooth morphology and wear, including the first use of quantitative dental microwear analysis in the context of Cretaceous palaeosynecology, are used to infer the mechanical properties of the foods these dinosaurs consumed. The phylliform teeth of ankylosaurs were poorly adapted for habitually processing high-fibre plant matter. Nevertheless, ankylosaur diets were likely more varied than traditionally assumed: the relatively large, bladed teeth of nodosaurids would have been better adapted to processing a tougher, more fibrous diet than the smaller, cusp-like teeth of ankylosaurids. Ankylosaur microwear is characterized by a preponderance of pits and scratches, akin to modern mixed feeders, but offers no support for interspecific dietary differences. The shearing tooth batteries of ceratopsids are much better adapted to high-fibre herbivory, attested by their scratch-dominated microwear signature. There is tentative microwear evidence to suggest differences in the feeding habits of centrosaurines and chasmosaurines, but statistical support is not significant. The tooth batteries of hadrosaurids were capable of both shearing and crushing functions, suggestive of a broad dietary range. Their microwear signal overlaps broadly with that of ankylosaurs, and suggests possible dietary differences between hadrosaurines and lambeosaurines. Tooth wear evidence further indicates that all forms considered here exhibited some degree of masticatory propaliny. Our findings reveal that tooth morphology and wear exhibit different, but complimentary, dietary signals that combine to support the hypothesis of dietary niche

  7. Cretaceous to Eocene passive margin sedimentation in Northeastern Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Erikson, J.P. )

    1993-02-01

    Twenty two palinspastic paleogeographic maps are presented for the Cretaceous to Eocene strata of the Serrania del Interior of northeastern Venezuela. The mapped lithologies, environmental conditions, and evolving depositional systems record [approximately]90 m.y. of dominantly marine sedimentation on the only observable Mesozoic passive margin in the Western Hemisphere. The depositional systems of the passive margin are heterogeneous at lateral (i.e., along-margin) length scales greater than [approximately]40 km. The primary lateral heterogeneity is caused by a major Lower Cretaceous deltaic system that emanated southwest of the Serrania del Interior. All important intervals, such as the laterally variable Aptian-Albian El Cantil platform limestone and the hydrocarbon source rocks of the Upper Cretaceous Querecual and San Antonio formations, are related to probable causal mechanisms and environmental conditions. Stratigraphic events have been interpreted as of either local or regional extent; based on a combination of outcrop sedimentologic analyses and regional depositional systems interpretation. The 3-dimensional distribution of depositional systems and systems tracts reveals 4-6 regional sequence boundaries separated by 4-20 m.y. Subsidence analyses support the facies interpretation of a passive margin by showing continuous, thermally dominated subsidence during the Cretaceous to Eocene interval. Subsidence and accumulation rates increased and facies changed significantly in the Oligocene, indicating the end of passive margin sedimentation and the initiation of foredeep subsidence and accumulation associated with overthrusting the eastward-advancing Caribbean Plate.

  8. Taphonomy and depositional environment of a Lower Cretaceous monospecific dinosaur bone assemblage (Puesto Quiroga Member, Lohan Cura Formation), Neuquén Province, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, Alberto Carlos; Salgado, Leonardo

    2015-08-01

    The Puesto Díaz Quarry (Lohan Cura Formation, Lower Cretaceous of Neuquén Basin, Argentina) consists of a monospecific dinosaur bone assemblage that includes 126 specimens from, at least, three individuals of the rebbachisaurid sauropod Comahuesaurus windhauseni. The bonebed was originated as a debris flow of an ephemeral-river bed, in distal areas of low relief. Bones are disarticulated, three-dimensionally distributed through the host facies, showing a normal grading arrangement, which can be correlated with the size, shape and hydraulic behavior inferred for each specimen. Taphonomic evidence suggests that the bones did not experience a prolonged transport, and that these were quickly buried by the debris flow event. The fact that there are more than one individual of the same species suggests a mass mortality by a catastrophic event. Scattered skeletal elements would indicate that the corpses must have been subaerially exposed, long enough to allow disarticulation by scavenging, decay, and defleshing.

  9. A new dinosaur (Theropoda, Spinosauridae) from the Cretaceous (Cenomanian) Alcântara Formation, Cajual Island, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Alexander W A; Azevedo, Sergio A K; Machado, Elaine B; Carvalho, Luciana B de; Henriques, Deise D R

    2011-03-01

    A new spinosaurid taxon, Oxalaia quilombensis gen. et sp. nov., is described based on the anterior part of a snout and a fragment of a maxilla. These specimens were collected at the Laje do Coringa site, Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) of the São Luis Basin. Unlike Cristatusaurus and Suchomimus, Oxalaia quilombensis lacks serrations on the teeth. The new species differs from Angaturama limai by having the anterior part of the premaxillae more expanded and by lacking a sagittal premaxillary crest. It further differs from Spinosaurus cf. S. aegyptiacus and the Algerian spinosaurid by the rounder shape of the terminal expansion. Furthermore, xalaia quilobensis has one functional tooth followed by two replacement teeth, a feature not previously observed in theropods. Oxalaia quilombensis appears to be more closely related to the spinosaurids found in North Africa than to the Brazilian members of this clade and thus further increases the diversity of these enigmatic predatory dinosaurs in this country.

  10. Detrital zircon U-Pb and (U-Th)/He double-dating of Upper Cretaceous-Cenozoic Zagros foreland basin strata in the Kurdistan Region of northern Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, D. E.; Stockli, D. F.; Koshnaw, R. I.; Horton, B. K.; Tamar-Agha, M. Y.; Kendall, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The NW Zagros orogen is the result of the multistage collisional history associated with Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic convergence of the Arabian and Eurasian continents and final closure of Neotethys. Siliciclastic strata preserved within a ~400 km segment of the NW Zagros fold-thrust belt and foreland basin in the Iraqi Kurdistan Region (IKR) provide a widespread record of exhumation and sedimentation. As a means of assessing NW Zagros foreland basin evolution and chronostratigraphy, we present coupled detrital zircon (DZ) U-Pb and (U-Th)/He geo-thermochronometric data of Upper Cretaceous to Pliocene siliciclastic strata from the Duhok, Erbil, and Suleimaniyah provinces of IKR. LA-ICP-MS U-Pb age analyses reveal that the foreland basin fill in IKR in general was dominantly derived from Pan-African/Arabian-Nubian, Peri-Gondwandan, Eurasian, and Cretaceous volcanic arc terrenes. However, the provenance of these strata varies systematically along strike and through time, with an overall increase in complexity upsection. DZ age distribution of Paleocene-Eocene strata is dominated by a ~95 Ma grain age population, likely sourced from the Late Cretaceous Hassanbag-Bitlis volcanic arc complex along the northern margin of Arabia. In contrast, DZ U-Pb age distributions of Neogene strata show a major contribution derived from various Eurasian (e.g., Iranian, Tauride, Pontide; ~45, 150, 300 Ma) and Pan-African (~550, 950 Ma) sources. The introduction of Eurasian DZ ages at the Paleogene-Neogene transition likely records the onset of Arabian-Eurasian collision. Along strike to the southeast, the DZ U-Pb spectra of Neogene strata show a decreased percentage of Pan-African, Peri-Gondwandan, Tauride, and Ordovician ages, coupled with a dramatic increase in 40-50 Ma DZ ages that correspond to Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic rocks in Iran. Combined with paleocurrent data, this suggests that Neogene sediments were transported longitudinally southeastward through an unbroken foreland basin

  11. Upper-tropospheric precursors associated with subtropical cyclone formation in the North Atlantic basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Alicia M.

    Oceanic cyclones exhibiting properties of both tropical and extratropical systems have been categorized as subtropical cyclones (STCs) since the early 1950s. The opportunity to investigate the roles of baroclinic and diabatic processes during the evolution of STCs from a potential vorticity (PV) perspective motivates this study. This study investigates the roles of baroclinic and diabatic processes during the evolution of STCs by calculating three PV metrics from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Climate Forecast System Reanalysis 0.5° gridded dataset. The three PV metrics quantify the relative contributions of lower-tropospheric baroclinic processes, midtropospheric diabatic heating, and upper-tropospheric dynamical processes during the evolution of individual cyclones. Quantification of these three contributions reveals the changing PV structure of an individual cyclone, indicates fluctuations in the dominant energy source of the cyclone, and aids in categorizing the cyclone. A cyclone-relative composite analysis performed on subjectively constructed clusters of North Atlantic STCs identified from a 1979--2010 climatology is presented to document the structure, motion, and evolution of upper-tropospheric features linked to STC formation. The STCs included in the climatology are separated into five clusters representing the most common upper-tropospheric features linked to STC formation: PV Streamers, Cutoffs, Midlatitude Troughs, Subtropical Disturbances, and PV Debris. STCs forming in association with PV streamers and cutoffs have a well-defined midlatitude connection, developing near a region of upper-tropospheric PV injected into the subtropics during an upstream anticyclonic wave breaking (AWB) event. STCs forming in association with midlatitude troughs also have a well-defined midlatitude connection, but are not associated with an upstream AWB event. In contrast, STCs forming in association with subtropical disturbances do not have a well

  12. Particle formation by ion nucleation in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-H; Reeves, J M; Wilson, J C; Hunton, D E; Viggiano, A A; Miller, T M; Ballenthin, J O; Lait, L R

    2003-09-26

    Unexpectedly high concentrations of ultrafine particles were observed over a wide range of latitudes in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Particle number concentrations and size distributions simulated by a numerical model of ion-induced nucleation, constrained by measured thermodynamic data and observed atmospheric key species, were consistent with the observations. These findings indicate that, at typical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere conditions, particles are formed by this nucleation process and grow to measurable sizes with sufficient sun exposure and low preexisting aerosol surface area. Ion-induced nucleation is thus a globally important source of aerosol particles, potentially affecting cloud formation and radiative transfer.

  13. Stratigraphy and paleontology of Mid-Cretaceous rocks in Minnesota and contiguous areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobban, William Aubrey; Merewether, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    PART A: Molluscan fossils are locally abundant at outcrops of Upper Cretaceous rocks in eastern North and South Dakota, northeastern Nebraska, northwestern Iowa, and western and northern Minnesota. Other Cretaceous mollusks have been found in the glacial deposits in Minnesota, Iowa, and Illinois. The oldest well dated marine mollusks are of earliest late Cenomanian age and occur in northwestern Iowa. Mollusks of marginal marine and nonmarine environments in northwestern Iowa and south-central Minnesota are probably of slightly younger late Cenomanian age. The youngest mollusks treated in this report are bivalves of Santonian age found in the Niobrara Formation in eastern North and South Dakota. The collections indicate the presence or former presence of the following ammonite zones in the northeastern part of the Western Interior seaway: Santonian: Scaphites depressus-Clioscaphites choteauensis Coniacian: Scaphites uentrocosus; Scaphites preuentricosus Turonian: Scaphites coruensis; Scaphites whitfieldi; Prionocyclus hyatti; Subprionocyclus percarinatus; Collignoniceras woollgari; Watinoceras coloradoense Cenomanian: Dunueganoceras albertense; Dunueganoceras pondi PART B: Sedimentary rocks of early Late Cretaceous age occur in the eastern parts of North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska, and in Minnesota and western Iowa. They are generally included in, from oldest to youngest, the Dakota Formation, Graneros Shale, Greenhorn Formation, Carlile Shale, and Niobrara Formation. However, in eastern North Dakota, they are also assigned to, in ascending order, the Belle Fourche Shale, Greenhorn Formation, Carlile Shale, and Niobrara Formation. The Graneros Shale and laterally equivalent strata in the Belle Fourche Shale grade eastward into the Coleraine Formation of northeastern Minnesota and probably into the Windrow Formation of southeastern Minnesota. Cretaceous beds locally overlie rocks of Precambrian, Paleozoic, and Jurassic ages, and they are generally overlain by

  14. Hump-shaped 40Ar/ 39Ar age spectra in K-feldspar and evidence for Cretaceous authigenesis in the Fountain Formation near Eldorado Springs, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnock, Andrew C.; van de Kamp, Peter C.

    1999-12-01

    The Fountain Formation near Eldorado Springs, CO, USA, shows evidence of alteration by hydrothermal fluids that precipitated authigenic potassium feldspar (adularia) as rims on detrital feldspars and as interstitial cement deposits. Detailed 40Ar/ 39Ar step-heating experiments of samples from the Fountain Formation reveal age spectra having a characteristic hump at laboratory temperatures between 900 and 1080°C. The humps appear to be related to the presence of adularia. Laser analyses of small grains of adularia indicate that the hump can be physically dissected, unlike age gradients found in igneous feldspars. Such behavior is consistent with the mixing of gas from two or more generations of K-feldspar, each having unique diffusion properties. The feldspars studied here indicate that two pulses of ˜150°C hydrothermal fluids migrated through the Fountain Formation at 135 and 94 Ma, prior to the main phase of Laramide tectonic activity in the region. The limited occurrence of authigenic cements suggests that reactivation of the underlying Precambrian Idaho Springs-Ralston Creek shear zone was significant enough to heat and mobilize large quantities of meteoric fluids. In addition, these data also suggest that Cretaceous movements along the Transcontinental Arch, correlated with stratigraphic events, began approximately 40 million years earlier than previously thought.

  15. Structural features and formation of lower Cretaceous AV1 layer in the Soviet oil field (Tomsk Oblast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhamsaranova, A. B.; Osipova, E. N.; Gaydukova, T. A.; Aksenova, N. V.

    2016-09-01

    The analysis of the collected geological and geophysical information on AV1 layer known as Ryabchik formation is carried out. The facial conditions of this formation which define structural features of «Ryabchik» sandstones formations are considered. Maps characterizing permeability and porosity of reservoir are plotted. Areal tracking technique of sand streaks is given.

  16. Seismic facies analysis of lacustrine system: Paleocene upper Fort Union Formation, Wind River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Liro, L.M.; Pardus, Y.C.

    1989-03-01

    The authors interpreted seismic reflection data, supported by well control, to reconstruct the stratigraphic development of Paleocene Lake Waltman in the Wind River basin of Wyoming. After dividing the upper Fort Union into eight seismic sequences, the authors mapped seismic attributes (amplitude, continuity, and frequency) within each sequence. Interpretation of the variation in seismic attributes allowed them to detail delta development and encroachment into Lake Waltman during deposition of the upper Fort Union Formation. These deltas are interpreted as high-energy, well-differentiated lobate forms with distinct clinoform morphology on seismic data. Prograding delta-front facies are easily identified on seismic data as higher amplitude, continuous events within the clinoforms. Seismic data clearly demonstrate the time-Transgressive nature of this facies. Downdip of these clinoforms, homogeneous shales, as evidenced by low-amplitude, generally continuous seismic events, accumulated in an interpreted quiet, areally extensive lacustrine setting. Seismic definition of the lateral extent of this lacustrine facies is excellent, allowing them to effectively delineate changes in the lake morphology during deposition of the upper Fort Union Formation. Encasing the upper Fort Union lacustrine deposits are fluvial-alluvial deposits, interpreted from discontinuous, variable-amplitude seismic facies. The authors highlight the correlation of seismic facies data and interpretation to well log data in the Frenchie Draw field to emphasize the accuracy of depositional environment prediction from seismic data.

  17. Lower Cretaceous lacustrine deposits and paleosol development

    SciTech Connect

    Mantzios, C.; Vondra, C.F.

    1987-05-01

    The Little Sheep Mudstone Member of the Lower Cretaceous Cloverly Formation in the Big Horn basin, Wyoming, is predominantly a montmorillonite-rich lacustrine deposit. It is informally subdivided into lower and upper units. The lower unit is a playa-lake deposit rich in bentonite derived from the alteration of volcanic ash which had its origin to the west. Horizons of silcretes and septarian nodules are common. The latter show irregular lenticular cracks and are filled with coarse calcite and barite crystals. They formed by desiccation of a clay-gel during dry periods. Silcretes are diagenetic products that formed due to the lowering of silica solubility along with decreasing of the pH value. Desiccation cracks on the playa surface were filled with chalcedony which later underwent replacement by calcite. The upper unit is a perennial saline lake deposit similar to that accumulating in Lake Magadi of the Eastern Rift Valley, Kenya, Chert nodules covered with calcium carbonate form stratigraphically persistent horizons. This chert is the product of the magadiite-kenyaite-chert transformation of Hay. Lenticular devitrified tuffs occurring at various stratigraphic positions up to 3 m thick were deposited in depressions or swales. Locally the tuffs show evidence of mass movement. Pedogenic features in both units indicate paleosol development. Tree trunks, plant roots, burrows, clay-rich zones, and organic-rich A and more iron-rich B master horizons are recognized. These paleosols resemble modern-day Vertisols. The lower unit is not as extensive areally as the upper unit which is present throughout the Big Horn basin, indicating that extensive lakes occurred during the Early Cretaceous in the Sevier foreland basin.

  18. Brazilian continental cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, Setembrino; Campanha, Vilma A.

    1981-04-01

    Cretaceous deposits in Brazil are very well developed, chiefly in continental facies and in thick sequences. Sedimentation occurred essentially in rift-valleys inland and along the coast. Three different sequences can be distinguished: (1) a lower clastic non-marine section, (2) a middle evaporitic section, (3) an upper marine section with non-marine regressive lithosomes. Continental deposits have been laid down chiefly between the latest Jurassic and Albian. The lower lithostratigraphic unit is represented by red shales with occasional evaporites and fresh-water limestones, dated by ostracods. A series of thick sandstone lithosomes accumulated in the inland rift-valleys. In the coastal basins these sequences are often incompletely preserved. Uplift in the beginning of the Aptian produced a widespread unconformity. In many of the inland rift-valleys sedimentation ceased at that time. A later transgression penetrated far into northeastern Brazil, but shortly after continental sedimentation continued, with the deposition of fluvial sandstones which once covered large areas of the country and which have been preserved in many places. The continental Cretaceous sediments have been laid down in fluvial and lacustrine environments, under warm climatic conditions which were dry from time to time. The fossil record is fairly rich, including besides plants and invertebrates, also reptiles and fishes. As faulting tectonism was rather strong, chiefly during the beginning of the Cretaceous, intercalations of igneous rocks are frequent in some places. Irregular uplift and erosion caused sediments belonging to the remainder of this period to be preserved only in tectonic basins scattered across the country.

  19. Stratigraphy and depositional environment of upper Cambrian Red Lion Formation, southwestern Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, L.L.; Bush, J.H.

    1987-08-01

    The Red Lion Formation was examined along a northwest-southeast transect from Missoula to Bozeman, Montana. Lateral equivalents are the Snowy Range Formation east of Bozeman and the upper Fishtrap Dolomite in northwest Montana. The basal Dry Creek Member (0-5 m) consists of shale interbedded with quartz siltstones and sandstones. The overlying Sage Member, up to 115 meters in thickness, is characterized by ribbon carbonate beds containing lime mudstone and quartzose calcisiltite couplets arranged in fining-upward sequences 1-5 cm thick. Couplets are interlayered in places with thin (1-5 cm) to medium bedded (6-70 cm) units of laminated and non-laminated calcareous siltstones, flat-pebble conglomerates, trilobite packstones, cryptalgal boundstones, bioturbated lime mudstones and shales. In places, the upper Sage contains columnar and domal algal features. The Red Lion Formation is considered to be one Grand Cycle with the Dry Creek representing a lower inner detrital half-cycle and the Sage an upper carbonate half-cycle. The Dry Creek formed as the result of a westward clastic pulse from the inner detrital belt across an intrashelf basin onto outer middle carbonate peritidal complexes of the underlying Pilgrim Formation. Lower Sage ribbon rocks were deposited in storm-crossed, below wave-base areas. During deposition of the upper Sage, shallowing formed discontinuous algal-peritidal complexes over much of western and central Montana. These complexes were less extensive than earlier Cambrian buildups owing to slower rates of basin subsidence and clastic input suppressing carbonate production.

  20. Late Cretaceous Volcaniclastics in NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Katharina; Wolfgring, Erik; Omer Yilmaz, Ismail; Tüysüz, Okan; Wagreich, Michael

    2015-04-01

    On the southwestern coast of the Black Sea, in the western Pontides Upper Cretaceous tuff layers are present. The tuffs are intercalated with limestones, marls and turbidites and were investigated with focus on their geochemistry, to get new insights to the arrangement of terranes and ocean basins at this time. In the region two Upper Cretaceous volcanic units can be distinguished, separated by distinct red pelagic limestone successions, belonging to the Unaz Formation. The lower volcanic unit is named Dereköy Formation and is Turonian to Santonian in age. It is thought to be deposited within extension structures, contemporaneously with rifting in the western Black Sea basin. The upper volcanic unit is called Cambu Formation. According to biostratigraphic data it is deposited throughout Campanian, when spreading in the western Black Sea basin started. Interpreted as submarine deposits, element mobility has to be taken into account when interpreting geochemical ICP-MS data of the volcaniclastics. Multiple discrimination diagrams with suitable proxies elucidate the type of volcanism and contribute to reconstruction of the tectonic setting. The classified rock types range from basaltic to rhyodacitic in both volcanic formations. Basically degree of differentiation and alkalinity are the parameters looked at, when determining rock types of the volcanic eruption. Further volcanic series are specified as calc-alkaline to shoshonitic. Moreover, a volcanic arc setting seems to be the most likely case, following several discrimination diagrams, as well as normalized multi-element plots. This tectonic setting can be discussed in connection with paleo-tectonic reconstructions. Most cited in literature nowadays are models favoring a northward subduction of the northern branch of Neotethys, creating an extensional setting north of the Pontides. This kind of back arc extension is interpreted as the reason of a southward drift of the Istanbul continental fragment from Eurasia

  1. Stratigraphy and ammonite fauna of the upper Shemshak Formation (Toarcian Aalenian) at Tazareh, eastern Alborz, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyed-Emami, K.; Fürsich, F. T.; Wilmsen, M.; Cecca, F.; Majidifard, M. R.; Schairer, G.; Shekarifard, A.

    2006-12-01

    With a thickness of 3900 m, the Tazareh section is one of the thickest developments of the Shemshak Formation in the Alborz range. It overlies with sharp and disconformable contact the limestones and dolomites of the Lower-Middle Triassic Elikah Formation and is topped, again with a disconformable contact, by the marls and limestones of the Middle Jurassic Dalichai Formation. The nearly exclusively siliciclastic succession represents a range of environments, from fluvial channels, flood plains, swamps and lake systems to storm-dominated shelf, and a comparatively deep marine and partly dysoxic basin. The segment of the section between 2300 and 3500 m is exclusively marine and contains a moderately diverse ammonite fauna, ranging from the Middle Toarcian to the Upper Aalenian. The ammonite fauna comprises 21 taxa, among them the new genus Shahrudites with two new species, Shahrudites asseretoi and S. stoecklini from the Middle Aalenian Bradfordensis Zone. The other ammonites from the Shemshak Formation at Tazareh (as elsewhere in North and Central Iran) are exclusively Tethyan in character and closely related to faunas from western and central Europe. An ammonite-based correlation of Toarcian-Aalenian successions of the eastern Alborz with time-equivalent strata of the Lut Block, part of the Central-East Iranian Microcontinent (ca. 500 km to the south), suggests a strong influence of synsedimentary tectonics during the deposition of the upper Shemshak Formation.

  2. Preliminary evaluation of the shale gas prospectivity of the Lower Cretaceous Pearsall Formation in the onshore Gulf Coast region, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Enomoto, Catherine B.; Scott, Kristina; Valentine, Brett J.; Hackley, Paul C.; Dennen, Kristin; Lohr, Celeste D.

    2012-01-01

    Recent work by the U.S. Geological Survey indicated that the Lower Cretaceous Pearsall Formation contains an estimated mean undiscovered, technically recoverable unconventional gas resource of 8.8 trillion cubic ft in the Maverick Basin, South Texas. Cumulative gas production from horizontal wells in the core area of the emerging play has exceeded 5 billion cubic ft since 2008. However, very little information is available to characterize the Pearsall Formation as an unconventional gas resource beyond the Maverick Basin in the greater Gulf Coast region. Therefore, this reconnaissance study examines spatial distribution, thickness, organic richness and thermal maturity of the Pearsall Formation in the onshore U.S. Gulf states using wireline logs and drill cuttings sample analysis. Spontaneous potential and resistivity curves of approximately forty wireline logs from wells in five Gulf Coast states were correlated to ascertain the thickness of the Pearsall Formation and delineate its three members: Pine Island Shale, James Limestone or Cow Creek Limestone, and Bexar Shale, in ascending stratigraphic order. In Florida and Alabama the Pearsall Formation is up to about 300 ft thick; in Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, and East Texas, thickness is up to as much as 800 ft. Drill cuttings sampled from 11 wells at depths ranging from 4600 to 19,600 feet subsurface indicate increasingly oxygenated depositional environments (predominance of red shale) towards the eastern part of the basin. Cuttings vary widely in lithology but indicate interbedded clastics and limestones throughout the Pearsall Formation, consistent with previous regional studies. Organic petrographic and geochemical analyses of 17 cutting samples in the Pearsall Formation indicate a wide range in thermal maturity, from immature (0.43% Ro [vitrinite reflectance]) in paleo-high structural locations to the peak oil window (0.99% Ro) in the eastern portion of the Gulf Coast Basin. This is in contrast to dry gas

  3. Current situation of the ichnological locality of São Domingos from the Corda Formation (Lower Cretaceous), northern Tocantins state, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Valais, S.; Candeiro, C. R.; Tavares, L. F.; Alves, Y. M.; Cruvinel, C.

    2015-08-01

    In the 80's, Leonardi treated the presence of a vertebrate ichnological locality from the Barremian Corda Formation, Parnaíba Basin, on the left bank of the Tocantins river, near of the São Domingos town, Itaguatins, State of Tocantins, Brazil. Originally, the record was composed of at least seven in situ trackways, accounting for fifty six tracks. Since 2011, the Hydroelectric Power Plant do Estreito has begun to work, causing the development of a water reservoir 160 km upstream to the ichnological site, causing periodic and highly energetic floods over the footprints-bearing level and altering it. The imprints are poorly to moderate preserved, but it is possible to distinguish the general morphology and the spatial arrangement of the footprints. The specimens are represented by pes imprints, mostly circular to subcircular, with no digital and claw impressions. No distinguishable manus imprints are present. The trackways are relative narrow with respect to the size of the tracks, so they are considered into the Parabrontopodus-like category. The São Domingos tracks have been originally assigned to iguanodontid dinosaurs, and posteriorly related to a sauropodian origin. This idea is herein accepted, particularly to a basal sauropod, basal macronarians, or diplodocoids. Up to date, the tracks from the São Domingos locality are the only vertebrate fossil record from the Corda Formation, meaning an important contribution to the Cretaceous ichnofauna from South America.

  4. Petrography and geochemistry characteristics of the lower Cretaceous Muling Formation from the Laoheishan Basin, Northeast China: implications for provenance and tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yu; Liu, Zhaojun; Meng, Qingtao; Wang, Yimeng; Zheng, Guodong; Xu, Yinbo

    2016-10-01

    The petrography, mineralogy and geochemistry of sedimentary rocks from the lower Cretaceous Muling Formation (K1ml) in the Laoheishan basin, northeast (NE) China are studied to determine the weathering intensity, provenance and tectonic setting of the source region. Petrographic data indicate the average quartz-feldspar-lithic fragments (QFL) of the sandstone is Q = 63 %, F = 22 %, and L = 15 %. Lithic fragments mainly contain volcanic clasts that derived from surrounding basement. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data reveal abundant clay and detrital minerals (e.g. quartz), as well as minor calcite in the fine-grained sediments. The Hf contents and element concentration ratios such as Al2O3/TiO2, Co/Th, La/Sc, and La/Th are comparable to sediments derived from felsic and intermediate igneous rocks. The strong genetic relationship with the igneous rocks from the northwest and northeast areas provides evidence that the sediments of the Muling Formation (K1ml) in the Laoheishan basin have been derived from this area. The chemical index of alteration (CIA) and index of chemical variability (ICV) reveal an intensive weathering in the source region of the sediments. The multidimensional tectonic discrimination diagrams indicate that the source rocks of K1ml are mainly derived from the collision system. However, they may also comprise sediments derived from the continental rift system. The results are consistent with the geology of the study area.

  5. 40Ar/39Ar age of the Manson impact structure, Iowa, and correlative impact ejecta in the Crow Creek member of the Pierre Shale (Upper Cretaceous), South Dakota and Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izett, G.A.; Cobban, W.A.; Dalrymple, G.B.; Obradovich, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    A set of 34 laser total-fusion 40Ar/39Ar analyses of sanidine from a melt layer in crater-fill deposits of the Manson impact structure in Iowa has a weighted-mean age of 74.1 ?? 0.1 Ma. This age is about 9.0 m.y. older than 40Ar/39Ar ages of shocked microcline from the Manson impact structure reported previously by others. The 74.1 Ma age of the sanidine, which is a melt product of Precambrian microcline clasts, indicates that the Manson impact structure played no part in the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) mass extinction at 64.5 Ma. Moreover, incremental-heating 40Ar/39Ar ages of the sanidine show that it is essentially free of excess 40Ar and has not been influenced by postcrystallization heating or alteration. An age spectrum of the matrix of the melt layer shows effects of 39Ar recoil, including older ages in the low-temperature increments and younger ages in the high-temperature increments. At 17 places in eastern South Dakota and Nebraska, shocked quartz and feldspar grains are concentrated in the lower part of the Crow Creek Member of the Pierre Shale (Upper Cretaceous). The grains are largest (3.2 mm) in southeastern South Dakota and decrease in size (0.45 mm) to the northwest, consistent with the idea that the Manson impact structure was their source. The ubiquitous presence of shocked grains concentrated in a thin calcarenite at the base of the Crow Creek Member suggests it is an event bed recording an instant of geologic time. Ammonites below and above the Crow Creek Member limit its age to the zone of Didymoceras nebrascense of earliest late Campanian age. Plagioclase from a bentonite bed in this zone in Colorado has a 40Ar/39Ar age of 74.1 ?? 0.1 Ma commensurate with our sanidine age of 74.1 Ma for the Manson impact structure. 40Ar/39Ar ages of bentonite beds below and above the Crow Creek are consistent with our 74.1 ?? 0.1 Ma age for the Manson impact structure and limit its age to the interval ?? 74.5 0.1 to 73.8 ?? 0.1 Ma. Recently, two origins for the

  6. Trace fossils and sedimentology of a Late Cretaceous Progradational Barrier Island sequence: Bearpaw and Horseshoe Canyon Formations, Dorothy, Alberta

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, T.D.; Pemberton, A.G.; Ranger, M.J. )

    1990-05-01

    A well-exposed example of a regressive barrier island succession crops out in the Alberta badlands along the Red Deer River Valley. In the most landward (northwestern) corner of the study area, only shallow-water and subaerial deposits are represented and are dominated by tidal inlet related facies. Seaward (southeast), water depth increases and the succession is typified by open-marine beach to offshore-related facies arranged in coarsening-upward progradational sequence. Detailed sedimentologic and ichnologic analyses of this sequence have allowed for its division into three distinct environmental zones (lower, middle, and upper). The lower zone comprises a laterally diverse assemblage of storm-influenced, lower shoreface through offshore deposits. Outcrop in the northeast is dominated by thick beds of hummocky and/or swaley cross-stratified storm sand. In the southeast, storm events have only minor influence. This lower zone contains a wide diversity of well-preserved trace fossils whose distribution appears to have been influenced by gradients in wave energy, bottom stagnation, and the interplay of storm and fair-weather processes. The middle zone records deposition across an upper shoreface environment. Here, horizontal to low-angle bedding predominates, with interspersed sets of small- and large-scale cross-bedding increasing toward the top. A characteristic feature of the upper part of this zone is the lack of biogenic structures suggesting deposition in an exposed high-energy surf zone. The upper zone records intertidal to supratidal progradation of the shoreline complex. Planar-laminated sandstone forms a distinct foreshore interval above which rhizoliths and organic material become increasingly abundant, marking transition to the backshore. A significant feature of this zone is the occurrence of an intensely bioturbated interval toward the top of the foreshore.

  7. Geochemistry of the Cretaceous coals from Lamja Formation, Yola Sub-basin, Northern Benue Trough, NE Nigeria: Implications for paleoenvironment, paleoclimate and tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarki Yandoka, Babangida M.; Abdullah, Wan Hasiah; Abubakar, M. B.; Hakimi, Mohammed Hail; Adegoke, Adebanji Kayode

    2015-04-01

    The Cretaceous coals of Lamja Formation located in Yola Sub-basin of the Northern Benue Trough, northeastern Nigeria, were analyzed based on a combined investigation of organic and inorganic geochemistry to define the paleodepositional environment condition, organic matter source inputs and their relation to paleoclimate and tectonic setting. The total organic carbon and sulfur contents of Lamja Formation coals ranges from 48.2%-67.8% wt.% and 0.42%-0.76% wt.%, respectively, pointing their deposition in freshwater environment with inferred marine influence during burial. Biomarkers and chemical compositions provide evidence for a major contribution of land-derived organic matter, with minor aquatic organic matter input. Minerals such as quartz, pyrite, kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite and calcite were present in the coals, suggesting that these minerals were sourced from terrigenous origin with slightly marine influence, considered as post-depositional. This is consistent with a significant amount of the oxides of major elements such as SiO2, Fe2O3, Al2O3, TiO2, CaO, and MgO. The investigated biomarkers are characterized by dominant odd carbon numbered n-alkanes (n-C23 to n-C33), moderately high Pr/Ph ratios (1.72-3.75), very high Tm/Ts ratios (18-29), and high concentrations of regular sterane C29, indicating oxic to relatively suboxic conditions, delta plain marine environment of deposition with prevalent contribution of land plants and minor aquatic organic matter input. Concentrations of trace elements such as Ba, Sr, Cr, Ni, V, Co and their standard ratios also suggested that the organic matter was deposited under oxic to relatively suboxic conditions, which is in parts deposited under marine influenced. Some standard binary plots of SiO2 versus (Al2O3 + K2O + Na2O) indicate a semi-arid paleoclimatic condition whereas log SiO2 versus (K2O/Na2O) also revealed passive continental margin setting. The inferred tectonic setting is in agreement with the tectonic

  8. Controls on the deposition and preservation of the Cretaceous Mowry Shale and Frontier Formation and equivalents, Rocky Mountain region, Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirschbaum, Mark A.; Mercier, Tracey J.

    2013-01-01

    Regional variations in thickness and facies of clastic sediments are controlled by geographic location within a foreland basin. Preservation of facies is dependent on the original accommodation space available during deposition and ultimately by tectonic modification of the foreland in its postthrusting stages. The preservation of facies within the foreland basin and during the modification stage affects the kinds of hydrocarbon reservoirs that are present. This is the case for the Cretaceous Mowry Shale and Frontier Formation and equivalent strata in the Rocky Mountain region of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. Biostratigraphically constrained isopach maps of three intervals within these formations provide a control on eustatic variations in sea level, which allow depositional patterns across dip and along strike to be interpreted in terms of relationship to thrust progression and depositional topography. The most highly subsiding parts of the Rocky Mountain foreland basin, near the fold and thrust belt to the west, typically contain a low number of coarse-grained sandstone channels but limited sandstone reservoirs. However, where subsidence is greater than sediment supply, the foredeep contains stacked deltaic sandstones, coal, and preserved transgressive marine shales in mainly conformable successions. The main exploration play in this area is currently coalbed gas, but the enhanced coal thickness combined with a Mowry marine shale source rock indicates that a low-permeability, basin-centered play may exist somewhere along strike in a deep part of the basin. In the slower subsiding parts of the foreland basin, marginal marine and fluvial sandstones are amalgamated and compartmentalized by unconformities, providing conditions for the development of stratigraphic and combination traps, especially in areas of repeated reactivation. Areas of medium accommodation in the most distal parts of the foreland contain isolated marginal marine shoreface and deltaic sandstones

  9. Lithostratigraphy of Upper Devonian Scherr-Foreknobs and Lockhaven Formations near Allegheny front of central Pennsylvanian

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, A.G.; McGhee, G.R. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    Five well-exposed sections (at Madley, New Baltimore, Altoona, Milesburg, and Lockhaven) of Upper Devonian marine strata were measured and analyzed to refine lithologic and temporal correlations along the Allegheny Front of Pennsylvania. The members of the Scherr and Foreknobs formations (Minnehaha Springs, Mallow, Briery Gap, Blizzard, Pound, and Red Lock) are recognized as far north as Altoona. Farther north at Milesburg and Lockhaven, the lithology of the upper parts of the Lockhaven Formation are markedly different from the contiguous Foreknobs Formation, but the Minnehaha Springs member of the basal Scherr and lower-middle Lockhaven Formations is recognized in all sections studied. The Minnehaha Springs member (a 50 to 100-ft, resistant, medium-gray to red-gray sandy silt unit) is considered to be the result of a brief sea level lowering and is therefore nearly isochronous. The isochronous nature of the Minnehaha Springs member is substantiated by biostratigraphic data; therefore, it is considered the most reliable datum for correlating the sections of this study. The lithologic information of the six measured sections was augmented by 38 wells logs of oil and gas wells of the region. From the combined lithologic data, three generalized lithofacies cross sections were generated. These cross sections clearly indicate that: (1) the strike of the paleoshoreline was nearly parallel with the Allegheny Front; (2) a major delta lobe existed in central Pennsylvania during the Late Devonian; but (3) the size and influence of the delta on depositional environments was not constant through space and time.

  10. Using Clumped Isotopes to Understand Early Diagenetic Processes in Carbonate Microbialites of Mid-Cretaceous Codó Formation, NE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahniuk, A. M.; Vasconcelos, C.; McKenzie, J. A.; Franca, A. B.; Matsuda, N.; Eiler, J.

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies of the sedimentological, stratigraphic and geochemical aspects of carbonate microbialites have been carried out to characterize the paleoenvironmental and hydrological conditions of deposition for the Aptian Codó Formation (Parnaíba Basin) and the time-equivalent Santana Formation (Araripe Basin). This environmental interpretation is of interest because these sediments record the early stages of the opening of the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean, as well as being potentially important reservoir rock. Specifically, clumped isotope thermometry has been applied to evaluate the growth temperatures of carbonate components in selected samples from both outcrop and drill core. Preliminary results of clumped isotope measurements provide paleotemperatures derived for dense stromatolitic fabrics drilled from outcrop samples of the Codó Formation which vary between 29 and 33°C. In contrast, the micritic matrix of the drill core samples of the Codó Formation indicates a temperature range from 30 to 48°C. The lower values for the outcrop samples may represent a primary or early diagenetic temperature signal preserved in the rock. Moreover, the micritic matrix from the Santana Formation drill core samples indicates paleotemperatures ranging from 40 to 68°C, which are slightly higher than those for all measured samples of the Codó Formation. We propose that the higher paleotemperatures for all drill core samples denote a diagenetic effect that occurred with sediment lithification processes during burial; that is, isotopic reequilibration at depth is reflected in the higher measured paleotemperatures. Increased paleotemperatures are probably present in some carbonate fabrics of the outcrop samples of the Codo Formation, which also underwent lithification, but this signal was missed by our inability to micro-sample primary or early diagenetic stromatolitic fabrics. Assuming that the outcrop samples of the Codó Formation preserve an original stable isotope signal

  11. Preservation of internal pleurites in a new palaeocorystid crab (Crustacea, Brachyura, Raninoidia) from the Cenomanian (Upper Cretaceous) of Poitou-Charentes, France.

    PubMed

    Van Bakel, Barry W M

    2013-01-01

    A new palaeocorystid crab, Joeranina houssineaui n. sp., is described from upper Cenomanian strata in southwest France, Being apparently derived from J. broderipii, the new species inhabited a sandier substrate environment than its predecessor. The incomplete holotype reveals portions of the internal pleurites, which are rarely seen in extinct crabs.

  12. A small azhdarchoid pterosaur from the latest Cretaceous, the age of flying giants.

    PubMed

    Martin-Silverstone, Elizabeth; Witton, Mark P; Arbour, Victoria M; Currie, Philip J

    2016-08-01

    Pterosaur fossils from the Campanian-Maastrichtian of North America have been reported from the continental interior, but few have been described from the west coast. The first pterosaur from the Campanian Northumberland Formation (Nanaimo Group) of Hornby Island, British Columbia, is represented here by a humerus, dorsal vertebrae (including three fused notarial vertebrae), and other fragments. The elements have features typical of Azhdarchoidea, an identification consistent with dominance of this group in the latest Cretaceous. The new material is significant for its size and ontogenetic stage: the humerus and vertebrae indicate a wingspan of ca 1.5 m, but histological sections and bone fusions indicate the individual was approaching maturity at time of death. Pterosaurs of this size are exceedingly rare in Upper Cretaceous strata, a phenomenon commonly attributed to smaller pterosaurs becoming extinct in the Late Cretaceous as part of a reduction in pterosaur diversity and disparity. The absence of small juveniles of large species-which must have existed-in the fossil record is evidence of a preservational bias against small pterosaurs in the Late Cretaceous, and caution should be applied to any interpretation of latest Cretaceous pterosaur diversity and success.

  13. A small azhdarchoid pterosaur from the latest Cretaceous, the age of flying giants

    PubMed Central

    Witton, Mark P.; Arbour, Victoria M.; Currie, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Pterosaur fossils from the Campanian–Maastrichtian of North America have been reported from the continental interior, but few have been described from the west coast. The first pterosaur from the Campanian Northumberland Formation (Nanaimo Group) of Hornby Island, British Columbia, is represented here by a humerus, dorsal vertebrae (including three fused notarial vertebrae), and other fragments. The elements have features typical of Azhdarchoidea, an identification consistent with dominance of this group in the latest Cretaceous. The new material is significant for its size and ontogenetic stage: the humerus and vertebrae indicate a wingspan of ca 1.5 m, but histological sections and bone fusions indicate the individual was approaching maturity at time of death. Pterosaurs of this size are exceedingly rare in Upper Cretaceous strata, a phenomenon commonly attributed to smaller pterosaurs becoming extinct in the Late Cretaceous as part of a reduction in pterosaur diversity and disparity. The absence of small juveniles of large species—which must have existed—in the fossil record is evidence of a preservational bias against small pterosaurs in the Late Cretaceous, and caution should be applied to any interpretation of latest Cretaceous pterosaur diversity and success. PMID:27853614

  14. A small azhdarchoid pterosaur from the latest Cretaceous, the age of flying giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Silverstone, Elizabeth; Witton, Mark P.; Arbour, Victoria M.; Currie, Philip J.

    2016-08-01

    Pterosaur fossils from the Campanian-Maastrichtian of North America have been reported from the continental interior, but few have been described from the west coast. The first pterosaur from the Campanian Northumberland Formation (Nanaimo Group) of Hornby Island, British Columbia, is represented here by a humerus, dorsal vertebrae (including three fused notarial vertebrae), and other fragments. The elements have features typical of Azhdarchoidea, an identification consistent with dominance of this group in the latest Cretaceous. The new material is significant for its size and ontogenetic stage: the humerus and vertebrae indicate a wingspan of ca 1.5 m, but histological sections and bone fusions indicate the individual was approaching maturity at time of death. Pterosaurs of this size are exceedingly rare in Upper Cretaceous strata, a phenomenon commonly attributed to smaller pterosaurs becoming extinct in the Late Cretaceous as part of a reduction in pterosaur diversity and disparity. The absence of small juveniles of large species-which must have existed-in the fossil record is evidence of a preservational bias against small pterosaurs in the Late Cretaceous, and caution should be applied to any interpretation of latest Cretaceous pterosaur diversity and success.

  15. Advances in ammonite biostratigraphy of the marine Atacama basin (Lower Cretaceous), northern Chile, and its relationship with the Neuquén basin, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourgues, Francisco Amaro

    2004-09-01

    Preliminary results about the Lower Cretaceous ammonite biostratigraphy of northern Chile reveal eight fossiliferous levels: Lower-Upper Valanginian neocomitid and olcostephanid faunas in the Punta del Cobre and Abundancia Formations and Upper Hauterivian-Barremian crioceratid in the Nantoco, Totoralillo, and Pabellón Formations. The faunal affinities with the Neuquén are strong during the Valanginian and Hauterivian. In contrast, during the Barremian and Aptian, the ammonites show affinities with Austral, California, and Tethys basinal faunas. The Lower Valanginian-lower Upper Aptian series in northern Chile comprises two sedimentary cycles separated by a regressive pulse of Upper Hauterivian-Lower Barremian age. This pulse may be equivalent to the regression that ended the Early Cretaceous marine cycle in central Chile and central west Argentina, where the second marine sedimentary cycle observed in northern Chile is not represented.

  16. Recent advances in the cretaceous stratigraphy of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ki-Hong; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Park, Sun-Ok; Ishida, Keisuke; Uno, Koji

    2003-06-01

    A subrounded, accidental, zircon grain from a rhyolite sample of the Oknyobong Formation has shown an U-Pb CHIME isochron age, 187 Ma, implying its derivation from a Jurassic felsic igneous rock. Such a lower limit of the geologic age of the Oknyobong Formation, combined with its pre-Kyongsang upper limit, constrains that the Oknyobong Formation belongs to the Jasong Synthem (Late Jurassic-early Early Cretaceous) typified in North Korea. The Jaeryonggang Movement terminated the deposition of the Jasong Synthem and caused a shift of the depocenter from North Korea to the Kyongsang Basin, Southeast Korea. The Cretaceous-Paleocene Kyongsang Supergroup of the Kyongsang Basin is the stratotype of the Kyongsang Synthem, an unconformity-bounded unit in the Korean Peninsula. The unconformity at the base of the Yuchon Volcanic Group is a local expression of the interregionally recognizable mid-Albian tectonism; it subdivides the Kyongsang Synthem into the Lower Kyongsang Subsynthem (Barremian-Early Albian) and the Upper Kyongsang Subsynthem (Late Albian-Paleocene). The latter is unconformably overlain by Eocene and younger strata. The Late Permian to Early Jurassic radiolarian fossils from the chert pebbles of the Kumidong and the Kisadong conglomerates of the Aptian-Early Albian Hayang Group of the Kyongsang Basin are equivalent with those of the cherts that constitute the Jurassic accretionary prisms in Japan, the provenance of the chert pebbles in the Kyongsang Basin. Bimodal volcanisms throughout the history of the Kyongsang Basin is exemplified by the felsic Kusandong Tuff erupted abruptly and briefly in the Late Aptian when semi-coeval volcanisms were of intermediate and mafic compositions. The mean paleomagnetic direction shown by the Kusandong Tuff is in good agreement with the Early Cretaceous directions known from North China, South China and Siberia Blocks.

  17. Preliminary geologic mapping of Cretaceous and Tertiary formations in the eastern part of the Little Snake River coal field, Carbon County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haacke, Jon E.; Barclay, C. S. Venable; Hettinger, Robert D.

    2016-09-30

    In the 1970s and 1980s, C.S. Venable Barclay conducted geologic mapping of areas primarily underlain by Cretaceous coals in the eastern part of the Little Snake River coal field (LSR) in Carbon County, southwest Wyoming. With some exceptions, most of the mapping data were never published. Subsequently, after his retirement from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), his field maps and field notebooks were archived in the USGS Field Records. Due to a pending USGS coal assessment of the Little Snake River coal field area and planned geological mapping to be conducted by the Wyoming State Geological Survey, Barclay’s mapping data needed to be published to support these efforts. Subsequently, geologic maps were scanned and georeferenced into a geographic information system, and project and field notes were scanned into Portable Document Format (PDF) files. Data for seventeen 7½-minute quadrangles are presented in this report. This publication is solely intended to compile the mapping data as it was last worked on by Barclay and provides no interpretation or modification of his work.

  18. Pebbly mudstones in the Cretaceous Pigeon Point Formation, western California: a study in the transitional stages from submarine slumps to cohesive debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Gamundí, Oscar R.

    1993-04-01

    The pebbly mudstones in the Late Cretaceous Pigeon Point Formation originated by slumping and related debris-flow processes in a submarine canyon/slope depositional system. The sedimentary characteristics of the pebbly mudstones (PM) enable the distinction of two main varieties: (a) heterogeneous or "patchy" pebbly mudstones (PPM) exhibiting irregular bed geometries and diffuse to irregular bed contacts, with maximum clast sizes in intraformational boulder-sized population, including abundant rip-up mudstone and sandstone clasts with common soft sediment deformations; (b) homogeneous pebbly mudstones (HPM) with tabular bed geometries, non-erosive and almost flat bed contacts, maximum clast sizes in extraformational pebble-sized fraction and scarce to absent soft-sediment deformations. The two varieties of pebbly mudstone represent the mechanical transition from slumps to cohesive debris flows. The presence of abundant intraformational clasts and disrupted, yet preserved slump-fold features in the PPM suggest that this facies represents a stage closer to the slump end-member. As the shear-strain progressed and a fully remolded cohesive debris flow developed, an almost complete disaggregation of the poorly consolidated sand and mud clasts and the incorporation into the remolded "matrix" phase took place.

  19. Depositional controls and environments of the upper Frio Formation: Southeastern Louisiana subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Marlin, D.J. )

    1991-03-01

    The subsurface upper Frio Formation (late Oligocene) consists of interbedded carbonate and siliciclastic facies. Synthesis of induction-electric logs and fragmented conventional core data show that resistive, low porosity carbonates are key to understanding environment of deposition, sandstone facies geometry, and hydrocarbon distribution. The southeastern Louisiana Oligocene shelf received little clastic influx during Frio Formation time. Periodically, the resistive, carbonate facies formed a semi-continuous lineation of banks at the paleo shelf-edge at or about 30N latitude. The banks acted as barriers to siliciclastic deposition with sediments being deflected westward behind the banks and funnelled basinward through breaks in the banks at the shelf edge. Petrographic study of the carbonates commonly reveals lepidocyclinid-nummulitid biomicrites that show signs of early porosity occlusion and minor burial diagenesis. They range in composition from pure limestone to impure, iron-rich dolomitic sandstones. Several cycles of carbonate-shale-sandstone are noted in the upper Frio Formation driven by relative sea-level change. Carbonate banks grew during transgressive periods and were periodically inhibited during early regressive siltation events or water-deepening below the photic range. Subsequent lowering of sea-level initiating progradational pulses of fine- to medium-grained sands that were funnelled around carbonate banks. Sandstone distribution patterns imply funnelling aspects and paleo-bathymetric bank relief while sand lenses within shales imply progradation. The nex sea-level rise initiated conditions advocating renewed bank growth as depicted by carbonate facies overlying sandstones.

  20. Sequence stratigraphy of the Hith/Upper Arab formations offshore Abu Dhabi, U.A.E.

    SciTech Connect

    Azer, S.R.; Peebles, R.G.

    1995-11-01

    The Kimmeridgian Upper Arab zones A, B, and C, are prolific hydrocarbon bearing reservoirs in central and western Offshore Abu Dhabi (OAD). They were deposited in an arid climate which dominated the Arabian peninsula during Late Jurassic times. The Berriasian to Tithonian Hith Formation which overlies the Arab reservoirs constitute the cap rock, which just to the east of central OAD gradually pinches out and forms a N-S feather edge. The Hith and Upper Arab zones A, B, and C form 450 to over 600 feet of massive to interbedded anhydrites with varying proportions of limestones and dolomites in central and western OAD. The Arab Formation in OAD is a major regressive unit which was deposited on a broad carbonate platform and prograded eastwards into an open marine shelf environment. The objectives of this paper are to develop a sequence stratigraphic framework, emphasizing cyclicity, facies architecture and diagenesis. Core and well log data geared with various inorganic geochemical analyses from four wells are used to constrain the current uncertainties in age dating and integrate the diagenetic signatures in the patterns of relative sea level change which considerably control the formation of those parasequences. This effort will help in better understanding and possible prediction of porosity in such prospective reservoirs.

  1. Geology of a cretaceous subduction complex, Western Chicagoof Island, Southeastern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, J. E., Jr.

    1981-08-01

    The geology of the Chugach terrane on Chichagof and Baranof Islands in southeastern Alaska is described and mapped in detail. The Goon Dip Greenstone and the Whitestripe Marble are pre-Late Jurassic in age and possibly correlate with Triassic rocks in the Wrangell Mountains. The Kelp Bay Group is a chaotic metasedimentary and metavolcanic terrane correlative with Lower Cretaceous complexes in the Chugach Mountains and adjacent islands. The Ford Arm Formation consists mainly of flyschoid rocks continuous with Upper Cretaceous rocks of the Valdez Group in the Chugach Mountains and correlative with the Kodiak and Shumagin Formations in southwest Alaska. The Sitka Graywacke consists mainly of massive sandstone petrographically similar to the Ford Arm Formation. The occurrence, geochemistry, and petrology of metavolcanic rocks from Chichagof Island indicate that basaltic ocean floor volcanism was contemporaneous with deposition of continental sediment.

  2. Mid-Cretaceous alluvial-plain incision related to eustasy, southeastern Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aubrey, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    Eustatic effects on the deposition of ancient coastal and marine rocks are well known, but eustasy also can affect depositional patterns and processes well inland from the sea and play an important role in the development of nonmarine unconformities. In the southeastern part of the Colorado Plateau, fluvial rocks of the lowermost Cenomanian (lowermost Upper Cretaceous) Encinal Canyon Member at the base of the Dakota Sandstone fill paleovalleys incised into underlying formations. In the latter part of the Early Cretaceous, an epicontinental sea lay about 240 km east of the southeastern Colorado Plateau and was base level for streams in the plateau region. Near the end of the Early Cretaceous, sea level fell, base level was lowered, and streams incised valleys into alluvial deposits of the Burro Canyon Formation and into older formations. The resulting incised paleodrainage surface was preserved as the sub-Dakota unconformity when the succeeding sea-level rise, in earliest Late Cretaceous time, caused Dakota streams to aggrade and backfill the paleovalleys with alluvial sediments of the Encinal Canyon Member. -from Author

  3. Allocycle symmetry in the hierarchic structure of the Upper Silurian Tonoloway Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, W.J.; Goodwin, P.W. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The basal Third-Order cycle of the Upper Silurian Tonoloway Formation at Pinto, Maryland reveals asymmetry at different levels within a genetic hierarchy of cycles consistent with the Milankovitch Model of orbital forcing. The Tonoloway Formation itself is the upper portion of a Second-Order Super Sequence (10 my duration) which includes the underlying Wills Creek Formation. Approximately 230 meters of Tonoloway pertidal and shallow shelf facies can be divided into 3 Third-Order cycles (1.6--2.0 my Eccentricity) whose asymmetry is expressed in the relative depths of its 4 Fourth-Order cycles (400 ky Eccentricity). For example, within the basal Third-Order cycle, the deepest, most open facies occur in the 2nd Fourth-Order cycle. Each Fourth-Order cycle is, in turn, highly asymmetric, its deepest facies occurring in the first of its 4 Fifth-Order cycles (100ky Eccentricity). The remaining 3 Fifth-Order cycles contain generally shallower facies terminating in the shallowest facies of the last Fifth-Order cycle. Each Fifth-Order cycle, consisting of 5 Sixth-Order cycles (when complete), is also strongly asymmetric; the deepest facies occur in the second Sixth-Order cycle. Finally, each Sixth-Order cycle of PAC (20ky Precession) is a shallowing-upward, sharply bounded cycle frequently containing a sharp surface separating its upper shallower facies from its lower deeper facies. Comparison of the symmetries of each order in the Tonoloway hierarchy with the symmetries of other hierarchic sequences should help to distinguish the relative roles of tectonism and Milankovitch eustasy in producing this important diagnostic stratigraphic property.

  4. Paleoclimatology indicators of the Salt Wash member of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation near Jensen, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Medlyn, D.A. . Dept. of Geology); Bilbey, S.A. )

    1993-04-01

    The Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation has yielded one of the richest floras of the so-called transitional conifers'' of the Middle Mesozoic. Recently, a silicified axis of one of these conifers was collected from the Salt Wash member in essentially the same horizon as a previously reported partial Stegosaurus skeleton. In addition, two other axes of conifers were collected in the same immediate vicinity. Paleoecological considerations are extrapolated from the coniferous flora, vertebrate fauna and associated lithologies. Techniques of paleodendrology and relationships of extant/extinct environments are compared. The paleoclimatic conditions of the transitional conifers and associated dinosaurian fossils are postulated.

  5. Diagenesis of Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation, Mobile and Baldwin Counties and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, R.L. Jr.; Benson, D.J.

    1988-09-01

    The Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation is an important deep gas reservoir in Mobile and Baldwin Counties and offshore Alabama. The producing reservoir consists of a well-sorted fine-grained subarkose to arkose. Sedimentological studies indicate this unit was deposited on a broad desert plain in environments ranging from eolian dune and interdune to wadi and beach-shoreface. Diagenetic minerals comprise from 5 to 20% of the bulk volume of the sandstone. Porosity ranges from less than 3% to more than 25% and averages around 10%. Most of the porosity consists of hybrid solution-enlarged intergranular and intragranular pores resulting from the dissolution of cements, framework grains, and grain replacements.

  6. 40Ar-39Ar ages of bentonite beds in the upper part of the Yazoo Formation (Upper Eocene), west-central Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obradovich, J.D.; Dockery, D. T.; Swisher, C. C.

    1993-01-01

    Bentonite beds recorded from both outcrops and cores in the upper Eocene Yazoo Formation offer opportunities to date the uppermost Eocene of this region and to provide information on the age of the Eocene/Oligocene boundary. This report gives radiometric age dates for three bentonites sampled from the upper Yazoo Formation. Two bentonites are from outcrops near Satartia in western Mississippi and one is from a core hole at Society Ridge in west-central Mississippi. The upper bentonite at Satartia was studied independently at two laboratories using different techniques but with the same results, an age of 34.3 Ma (million years). Results from the Society Ridge bentonite gave the same age. -from Authors

  7. Interfingering of the Frontier Formation and Aspen Shale, Cumberland Gap, Wyoming.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    M'gonigle, J.

    1982-01-01

    The basal part, or the Chalk Creek Member, of the non-marine lower Frontier Formation (Upper Cretaceous) includes a thin coal bed that grades S into a carbonaceous shale. The latter plus associated sandstones and shales pinch out S of Cumberland Gap and lie stratigraphically below the top of the Aspen Shale. The beds in the upper part of the Aspen, in turn, pinch out within the Frontier Formation. The coal bed and equivalent carbonaceous shale represent in-place accumulation of peat. The interfingering suggests that in SW Wyoming the Lower/Upper Cretaceous boundary is within the Chalk Creek Member. -from Author

  8. Sulfur isotope patterns of iron sulfide and barite nodules in the Upper Cretaceous Chalk of England and their regional significance in the origin of coloured chalks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeans, Christopher V.; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Hu, Xu-Fang

    2016-06-01

    the result of movement during the Late Cretaceous or Cenozoic. These invasive fluids are associated with (1) the reduction of the red hematite pigment or its praecursor, (2) the subsequent development of both iron sulfides and barite, and (3) the loss of overpressure in the Cenomanian Chalk and its late diagenetic hardening by anoxic cementation. Evidence is reviewed for the origin of the red hematite pigment of the coloured chalks and for the iron involved in the development of iron sulfides, a hydrothermal or volcanogenic origin is favoured.

  9. Sedimentary environments for the massive formation of the lacustrine organic rich petroleum so