Science.gov

Sample records for formations recent results

  1. The formation, destruction and chemical influence of water ice: a review of recent laboratory results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberg, Karin I.

    2015-08-01

    Water ice is ubiquitous in dense molecular clouds, the stellar nurseries of the Galaxy. Recent theoretical investigations (Cleeves et al. 2014) suggest that much of this pre-stellar ice survives disk formation and thus takes part in forming of planets and planetesimals. Interstellar and circumstellar ice abundances thus affect the compositions of planets. The presence of water ice is also important for the formation of other molecules on grains. Water is the most abundant ice constituent and therefore sets the ice diffusion environment, which regulates for example the organic photochemistry proposed to drive the complex chemical evolution during star formation.The processes that regulate the formation, destruction and chemical influence of water have all been explored in laboratory experiments. One of the most significant advances in recent years is the arrival of laboratory experiments on hydrogen additions to condensed O, O2 and O3 — the proposed main formation pathways of water ice. These experiments have revealed how the interplay between diffusion and reaction barriers together regulate the water formation chemistry as well as the chemistry of closely related carbon-bearing species such as CO2. A very different set of laboratory experiments have in the same time period constrained the efficiency of non-thermal water desorption, especially UV-induced ice photodesorption. Laboratory work on other non-thermal desorption pathways, e.g. chemical desorption, has also advanced, though more experiments are needed to quantify the importance of these desorption pathways relative to photodesorption. There are also an increasing number of experiments aimed at constraining the diffusion environment of water-dominated ices and its effects on the formation of organics when ice mixtures are exposed to UV photons or other kinds of energetic radiation.I will review the many significant laboratory water ice experiments that has been relaized in the past few years and how they

  2. Numerical Modeling of CO2 Sequestration in Geologic Formations -Recent Results and Open Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten

    2006-03-08

    Rising atmospheric concentrations of CO2, and their role inglobal warming, have prompted efforts to reduce emissions of CO2 fromburning of fossil fuels. An attractive mitigation option underconsideration in many countries is the injection of CO2 from stationarysources, such as fossil-fueled power plants, into deep, stable geologicformations, where it would be stored and kept out of the atmosphere fortime periods of hundreds to thousands of years or more. Potentialgeologic storage reservoirs include depleted or depleting oil and gasreservoirs, unmineable coal seams, and saline formations. While oil andgas reservoirs may provide some attractive early targets for CO2 storage,estimates for geographic regions worldwide have suggested that onlysaline formations would provide sufficient storage capacity tosubstantially impact atmospheric releases. This paper will focus on CO2storage in saline formations.Injection of CO2 into a saline aquifer willgive rise to immiscible displacement of brine by the advancing CO2. Thelower viscosity of CO2 relative to aqueous fluids provides a potentialfor hydrodynamic instabilities during the displacement process. Attypical subsurface conditions of temperature and pressure, CO2 is lessdense than aqueous fluids and is subject to upward buoyancy force inenvironments where pressures are controlled by an ambient aqueous phase.Thus CO2 would tend to rise towards the top of a permeable formation andaccumulate beneath the caprock. Some CO2 will also dissolve in theaqueous phase, while the CO2-rich phase may dissolve some formationwaters, which would tend to dry out the vicinity of the injection wells.CO2 will make formation waters more acidic, and will induce chemicalrections that may precipitate and dissolve mineral phases (Xu et al.,2004). As a consequence of CO2 injection, significant pressurization offormation fluids would occur over large areas. These pressurizationeffects will change effective stresses, and may cause movement alongfaults

  3. Recent CDF results

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Gervasio; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2007-11-01

    As of November of 2007, the CDF detector has recorded approximately 2.7 fb{sup -1} of data. This contribution describes some of the most recent and most relevant results from the CDF collaboration in all areas of its wide physics program, as well as some insights into the Tevatron reach for Higgs searches within the next few years.

  4. Recent results from MAMI

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, Hans-Juergen

    2011-10-24

    The Mainz Microtron MAMI is an ideal facility to study the hadron structure with the electromagnetic probe. With the new accelerator stage (HDSM), which went into operation in 2007, high-intensity polarized electron and photon beams with energies up to 1.6 GeV are delivered to the experiments. Polarized targets and recoil polarimeters in combination with dedicated detectors are available for precision experiments in hadron physics. In this article, an overview over selected recent results is given.

  5. Recent BABAR Results

    SciTech Connect

    Eigen, Gerald

    2015-04-29

    We present herein the most recent BABAR results on direct CP asymmetry measurements in B → Xsγ, on partial branching fraction and CP asymmetry measurements in B → Xs+-, on a search for B → π/ηℓ+- decays, on a search for lepton number violation in B+ → X-+ℓ'+ modes and a study of B0 →ωω and B0 → ωφ decays.

  6. Recent Results from WMAP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward

    2003-01-01

    The early Universe was incredibly hot, dense, and homogeneous. A powerful probe of this time is provided by the relic radiation which we refer to today as the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Images produced from this light contain the earliest glimpse of the Universe after the Big Bang and the signature of the evolution of its contents. By exploiting these clues, precise constraints on the age, mass density, and geometry of the early Universe can be derived. Recent results from NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) will be presented.

  7. Recent results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Takikawa, K.; CDF

    1998-02-15

    We first present recent CDF results on the top quark, covering the measurement of the t{anti t} production cross section and the top quark mass, the observation of hadronic W decays in top events, the measurement of V{sub tb}, the search for flavor changing neutral current decays, and kinematical properties of t{anti t} production. Then we present one topic from CDF exotic physics results, i.e., the search for first-generation leptoquarks, and one topic from CDF B physics results, i.e., the measurement of time-dependent B{sup 0}-{anti B}{sup 0} mixing. Finally we conclude by briefly mentioning the prospects for Run II.

  8. Recent Results from Phobos

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Edmundo; Betts, R. R.; Garcia, E.; Halliwell, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Iordanova, A.; Sagerer, J.; Smith, C. E.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; George, N.; Hauer, M.; Holzman, B.; Pak, R.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.

    2007-02-12

    The PHOBOS detector is one of four heavy ion experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this paper we will review some of the results of PHOBOS from the data collected in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energies up to 200 GeV. Evidence is found of the formation of a very high energy density and highly interactive system, which can not be described in terms of hadrons, and has a relatively low baryon density. There is evidence that the system formed is thermalized to a certain degree. Scaling with the number of participants and extended longitudinal scaling behavior are also observed in distributions of produced charged particles.

  9. Recent Results from Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeschke, D.; Agostini, M.; Altenmüller, K.; Appel, S.; Atroshchenko, V.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Carlini, M.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Choi, K.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Di Noto, L.; Drachnev, I.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jany, A.; Jedrzejczak, K.; Jeschke, D.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Manuzio, G.; Marcocci, S.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Roncin, R.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Semenov, D.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Thurn, J.; Toropova, M.; Unzhakov, E.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Weinz, S.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Yokley, Z.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-01-01

    The Borexino experiment is taking data since 2007 at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy accomplishing outstanding achievements in the field of neutrino physics. Its success is strongly based on the unprecedented ultra-high radio-purity of the inner scintillator core. The main features of the detector and the impressive results for solar and geo-neutrinos obtained by Borexino so far are summarized. The main focus is laid on the most recent results, i.e. the first real-time measurement of the solar pp neutrino flux and the detection of the signal induced by geo-neutrinos with a significance as high as 5.9σ. The measurement of the pp neutrino flux represents a direct probe of the major mechanism of energy production in the Sun and its observation at a significance of 10σ proves the stability of the Sun over a time of at least 105 years. It further puts Borexino in the unique position of being capable to test the MSW-LMA paradigm across the whole solar energy range. The geo-neutrino data allow to infer information concerning important geophysical properties of the Earth that are also discussed. The perspectives of the final stage of the Borexino solar neutrino program that are centered on the goal of measuring the CNO neutrinos that so far escaped any observation are outlined.

  10. Observational astrochemistry - Recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, W. M.

    More than 80 molecular species have now been observed in the dense interstellar clouds where stars and planets form or in the envelopes expelled by evolved stars. Elemental constituents of these compounds include all of the biogenic elements, H, C, N, O, S and P. In addition, Si is found in several molecules, and a series of metal halides have recently been detected in the outflowing envelope of a nearby carbon star. Knowledge of the chemical reservoirs for the major volatile elements and a comparison between observed molecular abundances and theoretical models are both discussed.

  11. Recent results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Sally Carol Seidel

    2001-07-16

    During the past year, the CDF Experiment has reported on a variety of results concerning QCD and electroweak studies, studies of the top quark, and searches for new phenomena. A sample of these results is presented here.

  12. Recent results from TRISTAN

    SciTech Connect

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    1997-01-01

    TRISTAN results on {gamma}{gamma} physics from 1994 to 1995 are reviewed in this report. We have systematically investigated jet production, the {gamma}-structure function, and charm pair production in {gamma}{gamma} processes. The results are discussed, and future prospects are presented.

  13. Recent results from PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Hollebeek, R.

    1981-10-01

    Preliminary results are presented for the data taken by the MARK II and MAC collaborations at the PEP storage ring. Results include measurements of QED processes, limits on the weak couplings g/sub V/ and g/sub A/, limits on anomalous lepton production, the measurement of the tau lifetime, scale violation in inclusive hadron production, Monte Carlo independent tests of QCD using energy-energy correlations and single jet energy moments, measurements of the properties of three jet events, and measurements of proton, neutral kaon, lambda and proton pair yields.

  14. Recent TFTR results

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, D.M.; Arunasalam, V.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Boivin, R.; Bretz, N.L.; Budny, R.; Cavallo, A.; Cheng, C.Z.; Chu, T.K.; Cohen, S.A.; Cowley, S.; Davis, S.L.; Dimock, D.L.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ehrhardt, A.B.; Fredrickson, E.; Furth, H.P.; Goldston, R.J.; Greene, G.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hill, K.W.; Hosea, J.C.; Hulse, R.A.; Hsuan, H.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W

    1991-07-01

    TFTR experiments have emphasized the optimization of high performance plasmas as well as studies of transport in high temperature plasmas. The recent installation of carbon composite tiles on the main bumper limiter has allowed operation with up to 32 MW of neutral beam injection without degradation of plasma performance by large bursts of carbon impurities ( carbon blooms''). Plasma parameters have been extended to T{sub i}(0) {approximately} 35 keV, T{sub e}(0) {approximately} 12 keV, n{sub e}(0) {approximately}1.2 {times} 10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3} producing D-D reaction rates of 8.8 {times} 10{sup 16} reactions per second. The fusion parameter n{sub e}(0){tau}{sub E}T{sub i}(0) in supershot plasmas is an increasing function of heating power up to an MHD stability limit, reaching values of {approximately}4.4 {times} 10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3} sec keV. Peaked-density-profile hot-ion plasmas with the edge characteristics of the H-mode have been produced in a circular cross-section limiter configuration with n{sub e}(0){tau}{sub E}T{sub i}(0) values characteristic of supershots, namely up to four times those projected for standard H-modes with broad density profiles. Reduced transport is also observed in the core of high-density ICRF-heated plasmas when the density profile is peaked. At the highest performance, the central plasma pressure in TFTR reaches reactor level values of 6.5 atmospheres. In these regimes, MHD instabilities with m/n = 1/1, 2/1, 3/2 and 4/3 are often observed concurrent with a degradation in performance. High {beta}{sub p} plasmas with {var epsilon}{beta}{sub p} {approx} 1.6 and {beta}/(I/aB) {approx} 4.7 (%mT/MA) have demonstrated confinement enhancement over the low-mode confinement time with {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub L} {approximately} 3.5 and a bootstrap current of about 65% of the total plasma current.

  15. Recent results from MAC

    SciTech Connect

    MAC Collaboration

    1982-05-01

    Some preliminary results from the MAC detector at PEP are presented. These include measurements of the angular distribution of ..gamma gamma.., ..mu mu.. and tau tau final states, a determination of the tau lifetime, a measurement of R, and a presentation of the inclusive muon p/sub perpendicular/ distribution for hadronic events.

  16. Recent Results from HAPPEX

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Michaels

    2006-09-18

    New measurements of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic scattering of 3GeV electrons off hydrogen and helium-4 targets at theta{sub lab} = 6 degrees are reported. The helium-4 result is A = (+6.40 {+-} 0.23 (stat) {+-} 0.12 (syst)) * 10{sup -6}. The hydrogen result is A = (-1.58 {+-} 0.12 (stat) {+-} 0.04 (syst)) * 10{sup -6}. The asymmetry for hydrogen is a function of a linear combination of G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s}, the strange quark contributions to the electric and magnetic form factors of the nucleon respectively, and that for helium-4 is a function solely of G{sub E}{sup s}. The combination of the two measurements separates G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s} and provide new limits on the role of strange quarks in the nucleon charge and magnetization distributions. We extract G{sub E}{sup s} = 0.002 {+-} 0.014 {+-} 0.007 at Q{sup 2} = 0.077 GeV{sup 2} and G{sub E}{sup s} + 0.09 G{sub M}{sup s} = 0.007 {+-} 0.011 {+-} 0.006 at Q{sup 2} = 0.109 GeV{sup 2}.

  17. Recent Results from ARGUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Henning

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e+e- storage ring DORIS II at DESY new results on beauty and τ physics have been obtained. In particular, new measurements on fundamental constants in the Yukawa sector of the Standard Model are presented. These comprise measurements of CKM matrix elements from the study of B decays as well as determinations of properties of the τ lepton and its neutrino vτ. From semileptonic B decays ARGUS finds |Vcb|=0.050±0.008±0.007 and from B0 bar B0 mixing |Vtd|= 0.007±0.002. An analysis of the decay type τ-→π-π-π+ντ yields a τ mass of mτ=(1776.3±2.4±1.4) MeV/c2. This result also leads to an improvement of the upper limit on the m{ν r } < 31 {{{MeV}} {/ {{{MeV}} {{c}{2} }}} ; } {{c}{2} }} at the 95% confidence level.

  18. Recent MAGSAT results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Meyer, et al. have improved their original global crustal model and made a spherical harmonic analysis of the resulting magnetic field to n=50. The Z contours at 400 Km altitude from a field model composed of the first 15 degrees and order of their model and the terms n=16 to 29 from the MAGSAT model M051782 are presented. The main point to consider from such representations is that the lower order terms appear to contribute components comparable in magnitude to those of higher order. Thus, one should allow in making tectonic interpretations of global maps of anomalies such as those published by Langel, that there are likely continental scale (or smaller) features that have been removed along with the core field by the subtraction of the terms n=1 to 13 of the observed field. Planning for the analysis of data to be accrued by GRM should thus address this problem.

  19. Recent Dama Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabei, R.; Belli, P.; Montecchia, F.; Nozzoli, F.; Cappella, F.; D'Angelo, A.; Incicchitti, A.; Prosperi, D.; Cerulli, R.; Dai, C. J.; He, H. L.; Kuang, H. H.; Ma, J. M.; Ye, Z. P.

    2006-04-01

    DAMA is an observatory for rare processes and it is operative deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of the I.N.F.N. The experiment developes and uses low background scintillator for rare processes investigation. In this paper, after a short presentation of the main DAMA set-ups, the DAMA/NaI apparatus (≃ 100 kg highly radiopure NaI(Tl)) and its main results in the Dark Matter field will be addressed. This experiment, in particular, has effectively investigated the presence of a Dark Matter particle component in the galactic halo by exploiting the model-independent annual modulation signature over seven annual cycles (total exposure of 107731 kg × day), obtaining a 6.3 σ C.L. model-independent evidence for such a presence. In addition, some corollary model-dependent quests to investigate the nature of a candidate particle will be recalled. The new additional analysis for a pseudoscalar and for a scalar bosonic candidate (whose detection only involves electrons and photons/X-rays) will be addressed as well. Some perspectives of the second generation DAMA/LIBRA set-up (≃ 250 kg highly radiopure NaI(Tl)), presently in measurement deep underground, will be mentioned.

  20. Formation of gas-phase peroxides in a rural atmosphere: An interpretation of the recent SOS/SERON field results

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; Tang, I.N.; Weinstein-Lloyd, J.B.

    1993-09-01

    Hydrogen perioxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and certain organic peroxides such as hydroxymethyl-hydroperoxide (HMHP), are gas-phase oxidants present in the atmosphere at ppbv concentration levels. These oxidants play an important role in atmospheric chemistry. In addition, precipitation containing H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is toxic to trees, and it has also been suggested that organic peroxides formed presumably by ozone reactions with biogenic alkenes are responsible for leaf disorders. Recently, we have developed a nonenzymatic method or aqueous-phase H{sub 2}O{sub 2} measurement, using Fenton reagent and fluorescent hydroxy- benzoic acid. The new method, in conjunction with the well-known method of p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and horseradish peroxidase for total peroxides, and together with an improved gas scrubber to mitigate sampling line problems, has been successfully deployed in recent SOS/SERON field measurements in rural Georgia. For the first time, continuously measured and speciated gas-phase peroxide data have become available, making it possible to examine some aspects of the ozone chemistry leading to the formation of these oxidants. It is observed that daily H{sub 2}O{sub 2} maximum frequently occurs at a different time than does HMHP, and that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, but not HMHP, tends to correlate with solar fluxes measured at the same location. These findings seem to indicate that the formation mechanisms for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and organic peroxides are basically different. It is likely that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is formed from radical-radical recombination, while HMHP is formed by ozone-alkene reactions. Since the gas-phase ozone-alkene reactions are usually too slow to account for the diurnal concentration variations observed for HMHP, heterogeneous processes involving ozone and alkenes are also a possibility.

  1. ISO: highlights of recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, L.; Salama, A.

    ESA's Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) mission, operating in the wavelength range from 2.5 to 240 microns, made over 26000 scientific observations during its 2.5 year operational lifetime. ISO's results broke new ground on all scales. New asteroid counts and improved asteroid thermophysical models augmented important advances in Solar System chemistry to comprise a striking body of results addressing our planetary system. In turn, parallels between the chemical composition of Solar System dust and dust around other stars revealed by the comparison of stellar spectra with cometary spectra, together with results on the incidence and stability of stellar disks, recall the birth of our Solar System and point to fundamental similarities with other star systems. Numerous important facts concerning the chemistry of the ISM have unfolded, such as the ubiquity of water and of the probably-organic carriers of the Unidentified Infrared Bands (UIBs). The large systematic body of data on galactic stars has permitted fascinating advances in the characterisation of important aspects of stellar evolution. Investigations of nearby normal galaxies complement template specimens of interacting galaxies. These in turn exemplify galaxy evolutionary processes in the early Universe associated with a huge burst of dust-obscured star formation at redshifts of just below one. This global surge of star formation has vital implications for the interpretation and explanation of major components of the Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) and for charting the global history of star formation and the relative importance of sources which derive their energy from accretion processes. Representative examples of key aspects of ISO's recent scientific output will be presented, once again affirming ISO's place at the forefront of successful space-borne astronomy missions.

  2. Laboratory formation of a scaled protostellar jet by coaligned poloidal magnetic field: recent results and new exeprimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinci, Tommaso; Revet, Guilhem; Higginson, Drew; Béard, Jérome; Burdonov, K.; Chen, Sophia; Khagani, D.; Khiar, B.; Naughton, K.; Pikuz, S.; Riconda, Caterina; Riquier, R.; Soloviev, A.; Willi, O.; Portugall, O.; Pépin, Henry; Ciardi, Andrea; Fuchs, Julien; Albertazzi, Bruno

    2015-08-01

    Accretion shocks in Young Stellar Objects (YSO) are a subject of great interest in astrophysics; they exhibit intense magnetic activity and are surrounded by an accretion disk from which matter falls down onto the stellar surface in the form of columns following the magnetic lines (B ~ kG) at the free-fall velocity (100-500 km/s). As a column impacts the stellar surface, a radiative shock is created which heats up the infalling flow. As a consequence, a new reverse shock forms and some oscillations are expected in the emitted radiation as a proof of this periodic dynamic, but no periodicity has yet been detected in observations.To understand the reasons for this apparent inconsistency, we have recently developped an experimental setup [B. Albertazzi et al. Science 346, 325 (2014)] in which a plasma flow (generated by a high energy laser: 1013 W/cm2 - 0.6 ns pulse) is confined inside a poloidal magnetic field (20 T). This jet has an aspect ratio >10, a temperature of tens of eV, an electron density of 1018 cm-3 and propagates at 700 km/s as show by our previous numerical work [A. Ciardi et al. Physical Review Letters, 110 (2013)]. To investigate the accretion dynamics, the jet acts as the accretion column and hits a secondary target acting as the stellar surface. We will present the recent results on generation and dynamics of the jet and the new experimental results of this configuration, namely of a supersonic reverse shock traveling within the accretion column with a speed of 100 km/s, representing a Mach number of ~ 30, and the observation of increased density structures along the edges of the interaction. This will be discussed in the light of 3D-magneto-hydrodynamic simulations which parametric variations allow to understand how the various plasma parameters affect the accretion.

  3. Recent results from DORIS II

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report contains a brief review of recent results from the ARGUS and Crystal Ball experiments at DORIS II, concentrating on UPSILON(1S) and UPSILON(2S) spectroscopy with a short foray into ..gamma gamma.. physics. 18 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Recent Results from Hera Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levonian, Sergey

    2013-11-01

    HERA collaborations H1 and ZEUS are publishing final analyses based on complete e±p statistics of ~ 0.5 fb-1 per experiment and using combinations of their data sets. Here selected recent results are presented from three areas: structure of the proton, searches for new physics and investigations of QCD phenomena at low Bjorken x.

  5. Recent Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Demorden, L.

    1998-06-01

    We review recent results from fixed-target and collider experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron. Among the topics discussed are jet production rates, {alpha}{sub S} measurements, the {anti d}/{anti u} ratio in the proton sea, diffraction, heavy quark physics and leptoquark searches.

  6. Overview of recent ALICE results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakomov, Igor

    2016-10-01

    ALICE is one of the four largest LHC experiments. It is dedicated to the study of the properties of the deconfined state of matter formed at large energy densities in heavy-ion collisions — the Quark-Gluon Plasma. The ALICE Collaboration also participated in the pp and p-Pb data-taking periods at the LHC. An overview of recent ALICE results is presented for three collision systems: pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb.

  7. Recent DIII-D results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, P. I.

    1994-07-01

    This paper summarizes the recent D3-D experimental results and the development of the relevant hardware systems. The D3-D program focuses on divertor solutions for next generation tokamaks such as International Thermo-nuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX), and on developing configurations with enhanced confinement and stability properties that will lead to a more compact and economical fusion reactor. The D3-D program carries out this research in an integrated fashion.

  8. Recent DIII-D results

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, P.I.

    1994-07-01

    This paper summarizes the recent DIII-D experimental results and the development of the relevant hardware systems. The DIII-D program focuses on divertor solutions for next generation tokamaks such as International Thermo-nuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX), and on developing configurations with enhanced confinement and stability properties that will lead to a more compact and economical fusion reactor. The DIII-D program carries out this research in an integrated fashion.

  9. Recent results from hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, H.J. )

    1990-12-10

    This is a summary of some of the many recent results from the CERN and Fermilab colliders, presented for an audience of nuclear, medium-energy, and elementary particle physicists. The topics are jets and QCD at very high energies, precision measurements of electroweak parameters, the remarkably heavy top quark, and new results on the detection of the large flux of B mesons produced at these machines. A summary and some comments on the bright prospects for the future of hadron colliders conclude the talk. 39 refs., 44 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Recent QCD results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    I. Gorelov

    2001-12-28

    Experimental results on QCD measurements obtained in recent analyses and based on data collected with CDF Detector from the Run 1b Tevatron running cycle are presented. The scope of the talk includes major QCD topics: a measurement of the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}, extracted from inclusive jet spectra and the underlying event energy contribution to a jet cone. Another experimental object of QCD interest, prompt photon production, is also discussed and the updated measurements by CDF of the inclusive photon cross section at 630 GeV and 1800 GeV, and the comparison with NLO QCD predictions is presented.

  11. Some Recent Results with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Maurik Holtrop

    2010-10-01

    The CLAS is a multipurpose, large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, instrumented with detector systems sensitive to charged and neutral particles. The experimental program at CLAS is aimed at furthering our understanding of hadronic and nuclear physics, through electron and photon scattering experiments, which cover a large range of topics, including meson and baryon spectroscopy, nucleon structure through elastic and deep inelastic scattering, nuclear transparency, nuclear correlations and nuclear structure. This talk will briefly describe the detector and the collaboration that uses it and will highlight some recent results.

  12. Recent results for Mark III

    SciTech Connect

    Brient, J.C.

    1987-12-01

    This paper presents recent results from the Mark III detector at SPEAR, in the open charm sector. The first topic discussed is the reanalysis of the direct measurement of the D hadronic branching fractions, where a detailed study has been made of the Cabibbo suppressed and multi-..pi../sup 0/'s D decays backgrounds in the double tag sample. Next, the Dalitz plot analysis of the D decays to K..pi pi.. is presented, leading to the relative fractions of three-body versus pseudoscalarvector decays. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Recent results from SND detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achasov, M. N.; Barnyakov, A. Yu.; Beloborodov, K. I.; Berdyugin, A. V.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Botov, A. A.; Dimova, T. V.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kardapoltsev, L. V.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Koop, I. A.; Korol, A. A.; Koshuba, S. V.; Kovrizhin, D. P.; Kupich, A. S.; Martin, K. A.; Obrazovsky, A. E.; Pakhtusova, E. V.; Rogozina, E. V.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Shatunov, Yu. M.; Shtol, D. A.; Silagadze, Z. K.; Surin, I. K.; Usov, Yu. V.; Vasiljev, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    Recent results from the SND detector obtained in experiments at the VEPP-2000 e+e- collider are presented. The reactions e+e- → ηπ+π-, e+e- → K+K-, e+e- → π+π-π0, e+e- → ωπ0, e+e- → ωη have been studied in the energy region 1.05-2.00 GeV. The neutron and proton electromagnetic form factors have been measured in the energy range from the threshold up to 2 GeV. The result of the search of the rare process e+e- → η' is also presented.

  14. Recent Opportunity Microscopic Imager Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Arvidson, R. E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Yingst, R.; Team, A.

    2013-12-01

    Opportunity. The extremely soft bedrock exposed at a Whitewater Lake outcrop target dubbed 'Azilda' is mostly fine-grained, with dispersed 2-5 mm-diameter spherules and resistant veins. This target was easily abraded by the RAT, exposing a sandstone-like texture, but the sorting of grains is difficult to determine at MI resolution. Darker, erosion-resistant veneers, similar to desert varnishes on Earth, appear to record aqueous alteration that post-dates the formation of the Ca sulfate veins; they likely contain the nontronite that is observed by CRISM in this area. The inferred neutral pH and relatively low temperature of the fluids involved in these phases of alteration would have provided a habitable environment for life if it existed on Mars at that time. Because Opportunity can no longer directly sense phyllosilicate mineralogy with the MiniTES or Mössbauer spectrometers, it is focusing on characterizing the chemistry with the APXS and texture with the MI of potential phyllosilicate host rocks. The Athena MI continues to return useful images of Mars that are being used to study the textures of rocks and soils at Endeavour crater. Exploration by Opportunity continues, with the rover approaching 'Solander Point' and more exposures of phyllosilicates detected from orbit; the latest MI results will be presented at the conference.

  15. Recent results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Vellidis, Costas; Bravina, L.; Foka, Y.; Kabana, S.

    2015-01-01

    The Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ collider was shut down in 2011, after 10 years of high performance operation at a center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV in Run II. The two experiments, CDF and DZero, continue to analyze the collected data, aiming to extract all possible information regarding studies of the standard model and searches for new physics. A short review of some of the recent measurements at the Tevatron, and of the impact of the Tevatron program to high energy physics, is presented.

  16. Recent QCD results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, J.C.

    1990-10-10

    In this paper we report recent QCD analysis with the new data taken from CDF detector. CDF recorded an integrated luminosity of 4.4 nb{sup {minus}1} during the 1988--1989 run at center of mass system (CMS) energy of 1.8 TeV. The major topics of this report are inclusive jet, dijet, trijet and direct photon analysis. These measurements are compared of QCD predictions. For the inclusive jet an dijet analysis, tests of quark compositeness are emphasized. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Some recent results from ICARUS

    SciTech Connect

    Farnese, Christian

    2015-07-15

    ICARUS T600 is the largest Liquid Argon (LAr) Time Projection Chamber (TPC) ever built. Thanks to the excellent spatial and calorimetric resolutions and the three-dimensional visualization capabilities ICARUS T600 represents a major milestone towards the realization of future LAr detectors for neutrino physics and for the search of rare events. Three new important results from the analysis of the events collected by this detector will be here shortly presented: in particular the new improved results on the electron neutrino search, the results on the determination of the muon momentum using the Multiple Scattering and the new LAr purification methods and improvements of the electron lifetime.

  18. Recent KTeV Results

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Kessler

    2001-11-09

    Preliminary KTEV results are presented based on the 1997 data set, and include an improved measurement of R({epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon}), CPT tests, and precise measurements of {tau}{sub S} and {Delta}{sub m}.

  19. Catastrophic disruption experiments: Recent results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martelli, G.; Ryan, E. V.; Nakamura, A. M.; Giblin, I.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the progress in the field of catastrophic disruption experiments over the past 4 years, since the publication of the review paper by Fujiwara et al. (1989). We describe the development of new techniques to produce shattering impacts relevant to the study of the collisional evolution of the asteroids, and summarize the results from numerous experiments which have been performed to date, using a variety of materials for both the impactor and the targets. Some of these, such as ice-on-ice, loose aggregates and pressurized targets, are quite new and have provided novel and exciting results. Some of the gaps existing previously in the data on fragment ejection-angle distributions, as well as translational and rotational velocity fields (including fine fragments) have been filled, and these new results will be surveyed.

  20. Recent results from Daya Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Ming-chung

    2016-11-01

    Utilizing powerful nuclear reactors as antineutrino sources, high mountains to provide ample shielding from cosmic rays in the vicinity, and functionally identical detectors with large target volume for near-far relative measurement, the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment has achieved unprecedented precision in measuring the neutrino mixing angle θ13 and the neutrino mass squared difference |Δm2ee|. I will report the latest Daya Bay results on neutrino oscillations and light sterile neutrino search.

  1. Overview of recent ALICE results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunji, Taku

    2016-12-01

    The ALICE experiment explores the properties of strongly interacting QCD matter at extremely high temperatures created in Pb-Pb collisions at LHC and provides further insight into small-system physics in (high-multiplicity) pp and p-Pb collisions. The ALICE collaboration presented 27 parallel talks, 50 posters, and 1 flash talk at Quark Matter 2015 and covered various topics including collective dynamics, correlations and fluctuations, heavy flavors, quarkonia, jets and high pT hadrons, electromagnetic probes, small system physics, and the upgrade program. This paper highlights some of the selected results.

  2. The Recent Results from CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Jeong

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN sitting astride the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva has accumulated the proton and proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of around 5 fb-1 at the center of mass energy 7 TeV in 2011 and around 20 fb-1 at 8 TeV in 2012 with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector. The CMS detector is designed to investigate the wide range of particle physics including testing perturbative QCD and searching for Brout-Englert-Higgs (BEH) boson as well as new physics phenomena beyond the Standard Model. Observation of a new boson has moved the phase from hunting for the SM BEH boson to evaluating the consistency of this new particle with the SM expectation. The latest results from the CMS collaboration will be presented.

  3. About recent star formation rates inferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerviño, M.; Bongiovanni, A.; Hidalgo, S.

    2017-03-01

    Star Formation Rate (SFR) inferences are based in the so-called constant SFR approximation, where synthesis models are require to provide a calibration; we aims to study the key points of such approximation to produce accurate SFR inferences. We use the intrinsic algebra used in synthesis models, and we explore how SFR can be inferred from the integrated light without any assumption about the underling Star Formation history (SFH). We show that the constant SFR approximation is actually a simplified expression of more deeper characteristics of synthesis models: It is a characterization of the evolution of single stellar populations (SSPs), acting the SSPs as sensitivity curve over different measures of the SFH can be obtained. As results, we find that (1) the best age to calibrate SFR indices is the age of the observed system (i.e. about 13 Gyr for z = 0 systems); (2) constant SFR and steady-state luminosities are not requirements to calibrate the SFR ; (3) it is not possible to define a SFR single time scale over which the recent SFH is averaged, and we suggest to use typical SFR indices (ionizing flux, UV fluxes) together with no typical ones (optical/IR fluxes) to correct the SFR from the contribution of the old component of the SFH, we show how to use galaxy colors to quote age ranges where the recent component of the SFH is stronger/softer than the older component. Particular values of SFR calibrations are (almost) not affect by this work, but the meaning of what is obtained by SFR inferences does. In our framework, results as the correlation of SFR time scales with galaxy colors, or the sensitivity of different SFR indices to sort and long scale variations in the SFH, fit naturally. In addition, the present framework provides a theoretical guideline to optimize the available information from data/numerical experiments to improve the accuracy of SFR inferences. More info en Cerviño, Bongiovanni & Hidalgo A&A 588, 108C (2016)

  4. Gap analysis: Concepts, methods, and recent results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, M.D.

    2000-01-01

    Rapid progress is being made in the conceptual, technical, and organizational requirements for generating synoptic multi-scale views of the earth's surface and its biological content. Using the spatially comprehensive data that are now available, researchers, land managers, and land-use planners can, for the first time, quantitatively place landscape units - from general categories such as 'Forests' or 'Cold-Deciduous Shrubland Formation' to more categories such as 'Picea glauca-Abies balsamea-Populus spp. Forest Alliance' - in their large-area contexts. The National Gap Analysis Program (GAP) has developed the technical and organizational capabilities necessary for the regular production and analysis of such information. This paper provides a brief overview of concepts and methods as well as some recent results from the GAP projects. Clearly, new frameworks for biogeographic information and organizational cooperation are needed if we are to have any hope of documenting the full range of species occurrences and ecological processes in ways meaningful to their management. The GAP experience provides one model for achieving these new frameworks.

  5. Recent Studies Investigating Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, R. J.

    2009-05-01

    The metropolitan areas of Mexico City and Atlanta have very different emissions and meteorology, yet in both cities secondary organic aerosol (SOA) comprises a significant fraction of fine particle mass. SOA in Mexico City is predominately from anthropogenic emissions and a number of studies have investigated the role of dicarbonyl partitioning to aerosol liquid water as a SOA formation route [Volkamer et al., 2006; 2007]. Hennigan et al. [2008] noted a high correlation between SOA (measured as water-soluble organic carbon) and fine particle nitrate in Mexico City and used this to estimate the volatility of both species during periods of rapidly decreasing RH in late morning. Secondary aerosol may also form when particles are much drier. In Mexico City, both nitrate and SOA were also frequently observed and highly correlated in late afternoon when RH was below 30 percent. A thermodynamic model could reproduce the observed morning nitrate under high RH when equilibrium was between nitric acid and dissolved nitrate, whereas equilibrium between vapor and crystalline ammonium nitrate was predicted in the afternoon [Fountoukis et al., 2007]. By analogy, these results may suggest two different SOA partitioning mechanisms in Mexico City, occurring at different times of the day. In contrast, measurements suggest that SOA in the southeastern United States is largely from biogenic precursors, and there is evidence that liquid water also plays a role. The stability of dissolved organic aerosol in response to loss of liquid water is currently being investigated and preliminary data suggest that like Mexico City, there is some degree of volatility. Recent experiments comparing data from rural-urban sites shows that there are periods when anthropogenic emissions also substantially contribute to SOA in the Atlanta metropolitan region. However, the mechanisms, or organic precursors involved, are yet to be determined. Results from these various ongoing studies will be presented

  6. Symposium on Recent Results in Infrared Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Abstracts of papers presented at a symposium titled Recent Results in Infrared Astrophysics are set forth. The abstracts emphasize photometric, spectroscopic, polarization, and theoretical results on a broad range of current topics in infrared astrophysics.

  7. Highlights of Recent Results with Clas

    SciTech Connect

    Volker Burkert

    2005-04-01

    Recent results on the study of the electromagnetic structure of nucleon resonances, the spin structure of proton and neutrons at small and intermediate photon virtualities, and the search for exotic pentaquark baryons are presented.

  8. Recent QCD results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Pickarz, Henryk; CDF and DO collaboration

    1997-02-01

    Recent QCD results from the CDF and D0 detectors at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider are presented. An outlook for future QCD tests at the Tevatron collider is also breifly discussed. 27 refs., 11 figs.

  9. Recent Results from the Belle Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Z.; Schwartz, A. J.; Belle Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    We review recent results from the Belle experiment, which took data at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider in Japan. The experiment recorded about 1000 fb-1 of data running mainly at the ϒ(4S) and ϒ(5S) resonances. The results presented here are obtained from the full data set.

  10. Quark Hadron Duality - Recent Jefferson Lab Results

    SciTech Connect

    Niculescu, Maria Ioana

    2016-08-01

    The duality between the partonic and hadronic descriptions of electron--nucleon scattering is a remarkable feature of nuclear interactions. When averaged over appropriate energy intervals the cross section at low energy which is dominated by nucleon resonances resembles the smooth behavior expected from perturbative QCD. Recent Jefferson Lab results indicate that quark-hadron duality is present in a variety of observables, not just the proton F2 structure function. An overview of recent results, especially local quark-hadron duality on the neutron, are presented here.

  11. Recent results on charm physics from Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjos, J. C.; Cuautle, E.

    2000-08-01

    New high statistics, high resolution fixed target experiments producing 105-106 fully reconstructed charm particles are allowing a detailed study of the charm sector. Recent results on charm quark production from Fermilab fixed target experiments E-791, SELEX and FOCUS are presented. .

  12. Recent work and results on sparrow project

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Neal R

    2010-12-23

    This briefing describes recent work undertaken on the Sparrow Project and results of this work. It describes experiments comparing the use of Genie with 2 classes with 3 classes for the problem of ship delineation. It also describes some preliminary work in the area of the optimization of segmentation techniques.

  13. Summary of recent color coherence results

    SciTech Connect

    Varelas, N., University of Chicago

    1998-08-01

    Recent experimental results on color coherence phenomena from e{sup +}e{sup -}, ep, and p{anti p} collisions are presented. The data are compared to analytic perturbative QCD calculations based on the modified leading logarithm approximation and the local parton hadron duality hypothesis.

  14. Recent Stirling engine loss-understanding results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy C.; Thieme, Lanny G.; Dudenhoefer, James E.

    1990-01-01

    For several years, NASA and other U.S. government agencies have been funding experimental and analytical efforts to improve the understanding of Stirling thermodynamic losses. NASA's objective is to improve Stirling engine design capability to support the development of new engines for space power. An overview of these efforts was last given at the 1988 IECEC. Recent results of this research are reviewed.

  15. Recent results from COMPASS muon scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozza, Luigi; Compass Collaboration

    2012-10-01

    A sample of recent results in muon scattering measurements from the COMPASS experiment at CERN will be reviewed. These include high energy processes with longitudinally polarised proton and deuteron targets. High energy polarised measurements provide important constraints for studying the nucleon spin structure and thus permit to test the applicability of the theoretical framework of factorisation theorems and perturbative QCD. Specifically, latest results on longitudinal quark polarisation, quark helicity densities and gluon polarisation will be reviewed.

  16. Recent results from COMPASS muon scattering measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Capozza, Luigi [Irfu Collaboration: COMPASS Collaboration

    2012-10-23

    A sample of recent results in muon scattering measurements from the COMPASS experiment at CERN will be reviewed. These include high energy processes with longitudinally polarised proton and deuteron targets. High energy polarised measurements provide important constraints for studying the nucleon spin structure and thus permit to test the applicability of the theoretical framework of factorisation theorems and perturbative QCD. Specifically, latest results on longitudinal quark polarisation, quark helicity densities and gluon polarisation will be reviewed.

  17. Random walk through recent CDF QCD results

    SciTech Connect

    C. Mesropian

    2003-04-09

    We present recent results on jet fragmentation, jet evolution in jet and minimum bias events, and underlying event studies. The results presented in this talk address significant questions relevant to QCD and, in particular, to jet studies. One topic discussed is jet fragmentation and the possibility of describing it down to very small momentum scales in terms of pQCD. Another topic is the studies of underlying event energy originating from fragmentation of partons not associated with the hard scattering.

  18. Recent Stirling engine loss - understanding results

    SciTech Connect

    Tew, R.C.; Thieme, L.G.; Dudenhoefer, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    For several years, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and other US Government agencies have been funding experimental and analytical efforts to improve the understanding of Stirling thermodynamic losses. NASA`s objective is to improve Stirling engine design capability to support the development of new engines for space power. An overview of these efforts was last given at the 1988 IECEC. Recent results of this research are reviewed.

  19. Recent results from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Gascón, Alberto; Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2014-07-23

    The Pierre Auger Observatory has been designed to investigate the origin and nature of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) using a hybrid detection technique. In this contribution we present some of the most recent results of the observatory, namely the upper-end of the spectrum of cosmic rays, state-of-the-art analyses on mass composition, the measurements of the proton-air cross-section, and the number of muons at ground.

  20. Results of the recent TDA member survey.

    PubMed

    1999-10-01

    This article fully outlines active TDA members' responses to the various questions posed by the recent membership survey. Every effort was made to ensure the accuracy of the results. To this end, a professional research firm was employed to cross tabulate answers and analyze the data. A thorough reading will provide you with the TDA members' perspective on a wide range of important dental issues.

  1. Recent Results from MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Jonathan

    2014-09-01

    MINERvA (Main INjector ExpeRiment for v-A) is a few-GeV neutrino nucleus scattering experiment at Fermilab using various nuclei as targets. The experiment provides measurements of neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections off of nuclear targets which are important for neutrino oscillation experiments and the probing of the nuclear medium.Presented are recent results from MINERvA on quasi-elastic, inclusive charged-current neutrino scattering, and pion production processes.

  2. Recent results from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascón, Alberto; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory has been designed to investigate the origin and nature of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) using a hybrid detection technique. In this contribution we present some of the most recent results of the observatory, namely the upper-end of the spectrum of cosmic rays, state-of-the-art analyses on mass composition, the measurements of the proton-air cross-section, and the number of muons at ground.

  3. Recent Higgs results from the ATLAS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Brendlinger, Kurt; Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration

    2014-06-24

    This paper presents recent results on the Higgs boson from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The Collaboration reports on measurements of the signal strength, couplings, and spin of the Higgs in several decay channels. We find all measurements to be consistent with Standard Model predictions. The Higgs branching fraction to invisible particles is constrained and no evidence of physics beyond the Standard Model is found.

  4. Recent Star Formation History of the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebel, E. K.; Brandner, W.

    Cepheids and other supergiants are well suited as tracers of the recent star formation history of the LMC. We used 2138 supergiants with UBV photometry from various databases and performed an age calibration of UBV colors based on Geneva models. We also used 1170 LMC Cepheids. We calibrated their periods versus age using Cepheids in 16 open clusters and Geneva isochrones. The resulting data set covers a time period from approximately 250 million years ago to the present, which corresponds to one rotation period of the LMC. Our data show the spatial variations in star formation along the LMC bar spreading from the southeast to the northwest and the formation of the currently observed supergiant shells surrounding the bar. Global star formation occurred stochastically across the face of the LMC. The highly heterogeneous gas distribution prevents self-propagating star formation on a large scale. The age structure of the LMC does not support the recently suggested scenario for bow-shock-induced star formation (de Boer et al. 1998). Also, the data show that 30 Dor did not form through collision of the supergiant shells LMC 2 and LMC 3. Massive star formation in 30 Dor and LMC 3 started almost simultaneously and spread later toward LMC 2. We see pronounced activity centers in the LMC where star formation took place continuously during the past 250 Myr, while other regions remained almost inactive for the same period of time. The only recently formed extended star-forming regions are LMC 4 and 30 Doradus. The observed large-scale star formation is best reproduced by the N-body simulations of Gardiner & Turfus (1998), who studied the effects of an off-centered bar on a rotating gaseous disk.

  5. Recent results from strangeness in transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinheimer, J.; Botvina, A. S.; Bleicher, M.

    2016-01-01

    In these proceedings we discuss recent developments in the microscopic description of strange particle production in nuclear collisions. We put a special emphasis on the production of hypernuclei at the upcoming FAIR and NICA facilities as well as the deep sub threshold, ϕ and Ξ- production yields measured with the HADES experiment. Employing new resonance decay channels we obtain a satisfactory description of ϕ and Ξ- production in deep sub threshold Ar+KCl reactions. Our results implicate that no new medium effects are required to describe the rare strange particle production data from low energy nuclear collisions.

  6. Recent results in convolution feedback systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desoer, C. A.; Callier, F. M.

    1972-01-01

    Survey of recent results obtained by the authors concerning certain types of multiinput, multioutput feedback systems. The discrete-time case as well as the continuous-time case are considered. In each case three theorems are shown. These give insight into the nature of the relationship between the open-loop operator and the closed-loop operator of the system, as well as necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of the closed-loop system when 'unstable' poles are present in their open-loop transfer function.

  7. Heavy baryons - Recent and very new results

    SciTech Connect

    Peter S Cooper

    2003-01-15

    Recent results on observations, properties and decay modes of the charmed and beauty baryons will be reviewed. Candidates for several new high mass states which include a cleanly-identified daughter {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryon are seen in data from the SELEX experiment at Fermilab. These states are candidates for doubly-charmed baryons: a {Xi}{sub cc}{sup ++} state and a {Xi}{sub cc}{sup +} state. These candidates are more than 5{sigma} signals in each case at masses of 3520 and 3460 MeV respectively.

  8. Recent results in convolution feedback systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desoer, C. A.; Callier, F. M.

    1972-01-01

    Survey of recent results obtained by the authors concerning certain types of multiinput, multioutput feedback systems. The discrete-time case as well as the continuous-time case are considered. In each case three theorems are shown. These give insight into the nature of the relationship between the open-loop operator and the closed-loop operator of the system, as well as necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of the closed-loop system when 'unstable' poles are present in their open-loop transfer function.

  9. Results of recent experiments with slotted wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachmann, G

    1925-01-01

    This report gives the results of a recent series of experiments performed on a wing designed for a cantilever monoplane. Both wings were trapezial in their ground plan, with their tips rounded elliptically. These wing sections combine all known devices for increasing the lift, namely, the slot, the increased camber and angle of attack by means of an aileron running the whole length of the span. The last advance included in the wing section was an increase in wing area by means of an auxiliary wing adjusted by a sort of rectangular joint.

  10. Recent Results from NASA's Morphing Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Washburn, Anthony E.; Horta, Lucas G.; Bryant, Robert G.; Cox, David E.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Padula, Sharon L.; Holloway, Nancy M.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Morphing Project seeks to develop and assess advanced technologies and integrated component concepts to enable efficient, multi-point adaptability in air and space vehicles. In the context of the project, the word "morphing" is defined as "efficient, multi-point adaptability" and may include macro, micro, structural and/or fluidic approaches. The project includes research on smart materials, adaptive structures, micro flow control, biomimetic concepts, optimization and controls. This paper presents an updated overview of the content of the Morphing Project including highlights of recent research results.

  11. Recent results of the LOPES experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haungs, A.; Apel, W. D.; Arteaga, J. C.; Asch, T.; Badea, F.; Bähren, L.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Brüggemann, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buitink, S.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Ender, M.; Engel, R.; Falcke, H.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Kickelbick, D.; Kolotaev, Y.; Krömer, O.; Kuijpers, J.; Lafebre, S.; Link, K.; Łuczak, P.; Ludwig, M.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Melissas, M.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Nehls, S.; Nigl, A.; Oehlschläger, J.; Over, S.; Palmieri, N.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rautenberg, J.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Saftoiu, A.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, A.; Schröder, F.; Sima, O.; Singh, K.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G.; Ulrich, H.; Walkowiak, W.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; Zabierowski, J.; Zensus, J. A.; Lopes Collaboration

    2009-12-01

    LOPES measures radio pulses from extensive air showers and aims to calibrate the emitted signal in the primary energy range of 10 16-10 18 eV. LOPES, a digital radio interferometer using high bandwidths and fast data processing, is set up at the location of the KASCADE-Grande extensive air shower experiment in Karlsruhe, Germany and profits from the reconstructed air shower observables of KASCADE-Grande. We report about recent analysis results of the radio signals measured by LOPES.

  12. Gamma Ray Bursts and recent Swift Results .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chincarini, G.

    Due to the large activity we had during these last months with the Swift satellite I started the writing of the presentation I gave at the SAIt Catania meeting only in the middle of September. The Swift satellite, however, never rested. Since then and in addition to the results I showed at the meeting in relation to the early and steep light curves observed with the XRT telescope in the 0.2 - 10 keV band, we had fundamental discoveries among which the detection and localization of short bursts and the detection of the largest redshift ever. It obviously would be improper to discuss here the most recent results but it would also be silly in such a fast evolving topics where the day by day observations show excellent results and the observer is far ahead of the theoretician, to write an article that, from the observational point of view, would be completely obsolete. The best approach here seems to be a brief description of what was presented during the meeting briefly mentioning also some of the most recent results. We remind the reader, however, that a copious literature written, and in preparation, exists so that we urge the reader to refer to the specialized articles. This brief article will touch on the basic characteristics of the Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) in the Introduction (section 1) and illustrate the basic characteristics of the Swift mission in section 2. Preliminary science results will be discussed in section 3 and finally we will mention one, among many, of the main goal we plan to achieve in Cosmology via the observations of very distant GRBs.

  13. Recent results from TRISTAN at KEK

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Shiro

    1994-12-01

    Recent results of the TRISTAN experiment with high luminosity runs are reviewed. Updated results on lepton and quark pair production in the annihilation processes are presented, and limits on the compositeness scale and lower mass limit for extra Z bosons are given. The total hadronic cross section is presented in the effective Born approximation. A search for a resonance suggested by the L3 group is done in several different final states. The strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s} is derived from several observables with an improved theoretical framework. The running nature of {alpha}{sub s} is studied in comparison with PEP4 and ALEPH data. Various properties of quark and gluon jets are examined. Hard scattering of two photons is established and these data provide information on quark and gluon distributions in the photon.

  14. Recent B Physics Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Behari, Satyajit

    2011-07-01

    We review recent B physics results from the CDF and D0 experiments in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}(s) = 1.96 TeV. Using a data sample of 1.4-6.0 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector we present searches for New Physics in B{sub s} sector and some competitive results with B-factories in the B/charm sector. In the first category we report the BR in B{sub s} J/{Psi} f{sub 0}(980) decays and the time-integrated mixing probability ({bar {chi}}) of B mesons. In the second category BR and A{sub CP} in doubly Cabibbo-suppressed B{sup {+-}} D{sup 0} h{sup {+-}} decays and time-integrated CP violation in D{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -} are presented.

  15. Recent Results of the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bonis, Giulia; ANTARES Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of cosmic neutrinos of astrophysical origin by IceCube has started a new chapter in the field of Neutrino Astronomy. Noticeably, a small accumulation of events in the region near the Galactic Centre has been observed: a telescope in the Mediterranean Sea constitutes a great opportunity for the physics quest, since it offers a perfect complementarity to IceCube and, in particular, a better visibility of the Galactic Centre. ANTARES (Astronomy with a Neutrino Telescope and Abyss Environmental RESearch) is the first operational Cherenkov neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea and the largest neutrino detector in the Northern hemisphere, covering an area of about 0.1 km2; located 40 km offshore Toulon, France, at a depth of 2475 m, it has been completed in June 2008 and it is currently taking data. It consists of a tri-dimensional array of 885 photo-multipliers tubes (PMTs), distributed in 12 lines. ANTARES has recently performed a search for an excess of high energy neutrinos in the direction of the Galactic Centre, close to the accumulation of the IceCube events, assuming both the hypotheses of a point-like and an extended neutrino source. The results of this search will be discussed in this contribution, together with other recent achievements of the experiment, as the search for point-like sources, the results on the diffuse flux of cosmic neutrino signal and the search for neutrino emission from the Fermi bubbles. ANTARES offers a first view of the Neutrino Sky from the Northern hemisphere; its successful operation and its promising results make more compelling the expectations for KM3NeT, the next generation neutrino experiment in the Mediterranean Sea.

  16. Recent Results from Experiments at COSY

    SciTech Connect

    Goldenbaum, Frank

    2010-08-05

    In hadron physics, experiments using hadronic probes may shed light on open questions on the structure of hadrons, their interactions that are subject to the strong force and on the symmetries of nature. Therefore a major focus of the physics program studied at the COoler SYnchrotron COSY of the Forschungszentrum Juelich is the production of mesons and hyperons in hadron- hadron scattering with the aim to investigate relevant production processes, interactions of the participating particles as well as symmetries and symmetry breaking. The COoler SYnchrotron COSY at Juelich accelerates protons and deuterons with momenta up to 3.7 GeV/c covering hadron physics in the light quark sector. The availability of the beam cooling systems allow precision measurements, using polarized proton and deuteron beams in combination with polarized Hydrogen or Deuterium targets. Due to the excellent experimental conditions at COSY single- and double-polarization measurements can be performed with high reaction rates. With the operation of the recently installed WASA-at-COSY apparatus, high-statistics studies aiming at rare decays of {eta} and {eta}{sup '} are effectively turning COSY into a meson factory. This contribution summarizes the ongoing physics program at the COSY facility, using the detector systems ANKE, WASA and COSY-TOF highlighting a few selective recent results and outlining future developments. The research at COSY also provides a step towards the realization of FAIR with studies on spin manipulation and polarization build-up of protons in polarized targets.

  17. Recent results from the Crystal Ball

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, F.C.

    1981-09-01

    During the past year, the Crystal Ball experiment has continued the investigation of e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions at SPEAR. In the course of the year, we have slightly more than doubled the available datasets at the J/psi (to 2.2 x 10/sup 6/ produced J/psi) and the psi' (to 1.8 x 10/sup 6/ produced psi') resonances, and have increased the data in the 5.2 to 7.4 GeV center-of-mass (E/sub c.m./) region. The present discussion is limited to recent results obtained with the J/psi and psi' datasets, primarily dealing with transitions among the charmonium bound states.

  18. Recent results from the Crystal Barrel experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-09

    The Crystal Barrel experiment has been constructed and installed at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. It has been fully operational since late 1989. In this talk, recent results of meson spectroscopy in p[bar p]-annihilations are presented. The main emphasis is on all-neutral annihilations, the study of the strange quark content of the proton, and the investigation of the decay mode of il particles. A 2[sup ++] resonance decaying into [pi][degrees][pi][degrees]at a mass of 1515 [plus minus] 10 MeV with a width of 120 [plus minus] 10 MeV has been seen in a 3[pi][degrees] final state.

  19. Recent results from the Crystal Barrel experiment

    SciTech Connect

    The Crystal Barrel Collaboration

    1991-10-09

    The Crystal Barrel experiment has been constructed and installed at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. It has been fully operational since late 1989. In this talk, recent results of meson spectroscopy in p{bar p}-annihilations are presented. The main emphasis is on all-neutral annihilations, the study of the strange quark content of the proton, and the investigation of the decay mode of il particles. A 2{sup ++} resonance decaying into {pi}{degrees}{pi}{degrees}at a mass of 1515 {plus_minus} 10 MeV with a width of 120 {plus_minus} 10 MeV has been seen in a 3{pi}{degrees} final state.

  20. Recent results at the Canarian Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Varela, A. M.; Fuensalida, J. J.

    2007-10-01

    During the last years a mayor effort has been carried out both, in defining key parameters to quantify the quality of a site for astronomical observations, and to design reliable techniques and tools to compare different sites. Here, we will revise some of the parameters relevant for astronomical site evaluation, and we will also brief on the instruments currently available for their measurements. The Observatories at the Canaries, Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM) and Observatorio del Teide (OT) have been used as test bench for the development of new techniques and tools for more than three decades. Results on statistical measurements and techniques, emphasizing the most recent ones in the framework of the FP6 site selection program at the Canarian Observatories are given.

  1. Recent Results from RHIC: The Perfect Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, Gary

    2006-07-19

    In the past two years we have witnessed a leap forward in the understanding high temperature, high density, and strongly interacting matter produced in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Combining measurements of Au+Au, d+Au, and p+p collisions at energies up to 200 GeV per nucleon pair in the center of mass frame, the four RHIC experimental groups, STAR, PHENIX, PHOBOS, and BRAHMS, have produced impressive experimental evidence for the existence of a new form of matter. In this Colloquium, I will present an overview of recent experimental results from RHIC including evidence for thermalization, hydrodynamic behavior of a perfect fluid, the partonic origin of flow, and jet suppression. These measurements point to the observation of a hot, dense, strongly interacting matter produced in central Au+Au collisions at the highest available energies.

  2. Some Recent Results from the CHARA Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Brummelaar, T. A.; Huber, D.; von Braun, K.; Boyajian, T.; Richardson, N. D.; Schaefer, G.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; Mourard, D.; McAlister, H. A.; Turner, N. H.; Sturmann, L.; Sturmann, J.; Monnier, J. D.; Ireland, M.

    2014-09-01

    The CHARA Array is a six 1-m telescope optical and near infrared interferometer located at the Mount Wilson Observatory in southern California and operated by the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy of Georgia State University. The CHARA Array has been in regular scientific operation since 2005 and now has over 55 publications in the refereed literature, including two in Science and one in Nature. The Array now supports seven beam combiners ranging from 0.5 microns up to 2.3 microns and combing from 2 to 4 beams at a time. An upgrade to a full 6-beam combiner is now underway, and fringes with all six telescopes were achieved soon after the meeting. We present some of the more recent results from the CHARA Array.

  3. Some recent results from CLEO II

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, R.

    1997-06-01

    The CLEO experiment has been operating for several years now collecting e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation data at and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance (E{sub cm} {approx} 10.6 GeV). The accumulated event sample contains several million B{anti B} and {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} pairs. These data are used to explore rare b, c, and {tau} decays. In this report, several recent CLEO results in the area of B-meson and {tau} decay are presented. The topics covered include: penguin decays of B-mesons, measurement of exclusive b {r_arrow} u semileptonic transitions, {tau} decays with an {eta} in the final state, precision measurement of the Michel parameters in leptonic {tau} decay, and a search for lepton number violation using {tau}`s. 39 refs., 26 figs.

  4. Recent Results From MRO/HiRISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, A. S.; Team, H. S.

    2008-12-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has acquired more than 7.8 Terapixels of Mars imaging since October 2006, covering less than 0.8% of the surface. Images are 5-6 km wide with 3-color coverage over the central 20%, and their scales usually range from 25-60 cm/pixel. More than 800 stereo pairs have been acquired and ~20 digital terrain models (DTMs) completed; these data have led to some of the most significant science results. New methods to measure and correct distortions due to pointing jitter facilitate topographic and change-detection studies at sub-meter scales. There are recent results concerning Noachian bedrock stratigraphy and megabreccia, fluvially- deposited fans in craters and in or near Valles Marineris, groundwater flow in fractures and porous media, quasi-periodic layering in polar and non-polar deposits, tectonic history of west Candor Chasm, geometry of clay-rich deposits near and within Mawrth Vallis, dynamics of flood lavas in the Cerberus Palus region, new evidence for pyroclastic deposits, columnar jointing in rapidly-cooled lava flows, recent collapse pits, evidence for water in well-preserved impact craters, newly-discovered large rayed craters, and glacial and periglacial processes. We are particularly interested in ongoing processes such as those driven by the wind, impact cratering, dust avalanches, icy avalanches on north polar scarps, relatively bright deposits on steep gullied slopes, and the especially dynamic seasonal processes over polar regions in the spring and summer. For landing sites (past, present, and future) HiRISE has acquired hundreds of large images and contributed to scientific and engineering studies.

  5. Recent electroweak results from SLC/SLD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Raymond E.

    1997-06-01

    Key electroweak measurements performed by the SLD collaboration at the SLC are described and recent results given. The left-right cross-section asymmetry, ALR, has been updated to include the 1996 data. It remains the single most precise measurement of sin2 θWeff and it is compared to the LEP results. The polarized differential cross section for b-quarks is measured and is used to perform a unique direct measurement of the parity violation parameter for b quarks, Ab. The excellent capability to perform secondary vertexing at SLC with CCD-based vertex detectors is described, including first physics results with the new detector VXD3. The vertexing is used to full advantage to make a highly pure B tag to measure the fraction of hadronic Z0 decays going to b quarks, Rb. The vertexing, in combination with electron-beam polarization, is used to measure Bd0 mixing. The prospects for making a Bs0 mixing measurement are excellent given good SLC performance in the upcoming SLC run(s).

  6. Crystal Ball Experiment at MAMI Recent Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briscoe, William

    2010-11-01

    The Crystal Ball 4π spectrometer was first installed at the A2 Tagged Photon Facility at the Mainz Microtron in Mainz, Germany in 2003. Since then, a series of highly successful experiments have been performed that study a spectrum of topics from the accurate determination of the η slope parameter to photon asymmetries in 0̂ threshold photoproduction. The high quality of these results is made possible by the large solid-angle coverage of the combined Crystal Ball and TAPS spectrometers in conjunction with the Edinburgh Particle Identification Detector and two Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers from Pavia for charged particle identification and tracking. The successful upgrade of MAMI and the Glasgow Photon Tagger to 1.6 GeV has lead to an expansion of the program. More recently, a frozen-spin polarized proton target has been installed and double-polarization measurements have begun. An overview of the Crystal Ball experimental program will be described and a selection of preliminary results will be shown.

  7. Recent results on jet fragmentation from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    A. Safonov

    2002-06-04

    In this paper, the most recent results on jet fragmentation obtained at the Collider Detector at Fermilab Tevatron are presented. The multiplicity and momentum distribution of charged particles inside jets in dijet events are compared to the predictions of the Modified Leading Log Approximation complemented with the hypothesis of Local Parton-Hadron Duality. Values for the two parameters of the model are extracted, the cut-off scale Q{sub eff} = 230 {+-} 40 MeV and the rate of parton-to-hadron conversions K{sub LPHD}{sup charged} = 0.56 {+-} 0.10. A fit of the data for the ratio of multiplicities in gluon and quark jets r, where r is treated as a free parameter, results in r = 1.9 {+-} 0.5. Also, we compare the charged particle multiplicities in dijet and {gamma}-jet events. The comparison allows for an extraction of a model-independent ratio of multiplicities in gluon and quark jets. We report r = N{sub g}/N{sub q} = 1.61 {+-} 0.11(stat) {+-} 0.28(syst) for E{sub jet} = 40 GeV.

  8. Overview of recent DVCS results from HERMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaschenko, Sergey; Hermes Collaboration

    2012-09-01

    Hard exclusive leptoproduction of real photons on nucleons and nuclei, Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS), is one of the theoretically cleanest ways to access Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). The theoretical framework of GPDs includes parton distribution functions and form factors as limiting cases and as moments of GPDs, respectively, and can provide a multidimensional representation of the structure of hadrons at the partonic level. The HERMES experiment at DESY, Hamburg, collected a wealth of data on DVCS utilizing the HERA polarized electron or positron beams with an energy of 27.6 GeV and longitudinally and transversely polarized or unpolarized gas targets (H, D or heavier nuclei). The azimuthal asymmetries measured in the DVCS process allow access to the imaginary and/or real part of certain combinations of GPDs. For the last two years of HERA running, the HERMES collaboration installed a recoil detector to improve the selection of DVCS events by direct measurement of the recoil protons. An overview of recent HERMES results on DVCS including first results obtained with the recoil detector is presented.

  9. Recent Results from JLab on Nucleon Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2004-02-01

    Highlights of recent data from Jefferson Lab on the nucleon response to an electro-magnetic probe are presented. Recent technological advances in polarized beams and either polarized targets or nucleon recoil polarimeters have yielded a significant improvement on the precision of the data. An outlook is presented of planned experiments.

  10. Recent CCQE results from MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Anushree; Minerva Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The MINER νA detector situated in Fermilab, is designed to make precision cross section measurements for neutrino scattering processes on various nuclei. I will present the two most recent results from the MINER νA charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) studies. The event sample for both analyses are the CCQE-like final state topology and contain contributions from quasi-elastic and inelastic processes where pions are absorbed in the nucleus. One of the analyses is the MINER νA experiment's first double-differential scattering cross sections for antineutrinos on the hydrocarbon target in the few-GeV range relevant to experiments such as DUNE and NOvA. We compare to models produced by different model generators, and are able to draw first conclusions about the predictions of these models. Another analysis, is the CCQE-like analysis for neutrinos on the nuclear targets of carbon, iron and lead. The ratio of differential cross sections on these targets to the differential cross section on the hydrocarbon target are examined to study nuclear effects.

  11. Recent ADI iteration analysis and results

    SciTech Connect

    Wachspress, E.L.

    1994-12-31

    Some recent ADI iteration analysis and results are discussed. Discovery that the Lyapunov and Sylvester matrix equations are model ADI problems stimulated much research on ADI iteration with complex spectra. The ADI rational Chebyshev analysis parallels the classical linear Chebyshev theory. Two distinct approaches have been applied to these problems. First, parameters which were optimal for real spectra were shown to be nearly optimal for certain families of complex spectra. In the linear case these were spectra bounded by ellipses in the complex plane. In the ADI rational case these were spectra bounded by {open_quotes}elliptic-function regions{close_quotes}. The logarithms of the latter appear like ellipses, and the logarithms of the optimal ADI parameters for these regions are similar to the optimal parameters for linear Chebyshev approximation over superimposed ellipses. W.B. Jordan`s bilinear transformation of real variables to reduce the two-variable problem to one variable was generalized into the complex plane. This was needed for ADI iterative solution of the Sylvester equation.

  12. CDF: Recent results and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.P.

    1992-03-03

    We present recent results from the Collider Detector at Fermilab. Searches for the top quark have established a lower bound of M{sub top} > 91 GeV/c{sup 2} (at 95% confidence level). A measurement of B{sup o}{bar B}{sup o} mixing has been obtained from b{bar b} {yields} e{mu}, ee events. Measurements of b-quark production have been obtained from e + X events and J/{psi} + K events. The mass of the W boson has been determined to be M{sub W} = 79.91 {plus minus} 0.39 GeV/c{sup 2}. In searching for new gauge bosons, we have obtained the bounds M{sub Z{prime}} > 412 GeV/c{sup 2} and M{sub W{prime}} > 520 GeV/c{sup 2} (at 95% C.L.). The lower limits on the quark and lepton compositeness scales are 1.4 TeV. In the next two years of data collection, we expect significantly more events for numerous types of physics, due to 25 times more beam luminosity, and improvement to the detector. In the longer term, the Main Injector'' upgrade to the accelerator, further improvements to the detector are being planned to exploit the potentials for physics. We discuss prospects for the discovery of the top quark, precise measurement of properties of b quark, and searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model. 29 refs.

  13. CDF: Recent results and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.P.

    1992-03-03

    We present recent results from the Collider Detector at Fermilab. Searches for the top quark have established a lower bound of M{sub top} > 91 GeV/c{sup 2} (at 95% confidence level). A measurement of B{sup o}{bar B}{sup o} mixing has been obtained from b{bar b} {yields} e{mu}, ee events. Measurements of b-quark production have been obtained from e + X events and J/{psi} + K events. The mass of the W boson has been determined to be M{sub W} = 79.91 {plus_minus} 0.39 GeV/c{sup 2}. In searching for new gauge bosons, we have obtained the bounds M{sub Z{prime}} > 412 GeV/c{sup 2} and M{sub W{prime}} > 520 GeV/c{sup 2} (at 95% C.L.). The lower limits on the quark and lepton compositeness scales are 1.4 TeV. In the next two years of data collection, we expect significantly more events for numerous types of physics, due to 25 times more beam luminosity, and improvement to the detector. In the longer term, the ``Main Injector`` upgrade to the accelerator, further improvements to the detector are being planned to exploit the potentials for physics. We discuss prospects for the discovery of the top quark, precise measurement of properties of b quark, and searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model. 29 refs.

  14. Recent Results from the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Diwan,M.V.

    2009-03-10

    MINOS is an accelerator neutrino oscillation experiment at Fermilab. An intense high energy neutrino beam is produced at Fermilab and sent to a near detector on the Fermilab site and also to a 5 kTon far detector 735 km away in the Soudan mine in northern Minnesota. The experiment has now had several years of running with millions of events in the near detector and hundreds of events recorded in the far detector. I will report on the recent results from this experiment which include precise measurement of |{Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32}|, analysis of neutral current data to limit the component of sterile neutrinos and the search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} conversion. The focus will be on the analysis of data for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} conversion. Using data from an exposure of 3.14 x 10{sup 20} protons on target, we have selected electron type events in both the near and the far detector. The near detector is used to measure the background which is extrapolated to the far detector. We have found 35 events in the signal region with a background expectation of 27 {+-} 5(stat) {+-} 2(syst). Using this observation we set a 90% C.L. limit of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} < 0.29 for {delta}{sub cp} = 0 and normal mass hierarchy. Further analysis is under way to reduce backgrounds and improve sensitivity.

  15. Recent Results from Chinese Meridian Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chi; Yang, Guotao; Xu, Jiyao

    To develop an understanding of near-Earth space’s response to solar activities and the coupling among different layers in geospace, China has initiated a ground base program to monitor China’s geospace environment. Called the Meridian Space Weather Monitoring Project (or Chinese Meridian Project), the effort consists of a chain of 15 ground-based observatories located roughly along 120°E longitude and 30°N latitude. Each observatory is equipped with multiple instruments to measure key parameters such as the baseline and time-varying geomagnetic field, as well as the middle and upper atmosphere and ionosphere from about 20 to 1000 kilometers. This project started collecting data in 2012. We will give a brief overview about the data products from the Chinese Meridian Project, and present recent science results such as the poleward-propagating large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances, sporadic and thermospheric enhanced sodium layers, nigh-time and seasonal variations of the sodium layer, characteristics of atmospheric gravity wave in the mesopause region etc.

  16. Recent massive star formation in 30 Doradus

    SciTech Connect

    Walborn, N.R.; Blades, J.C.

    1987-12-01

    Two early O-type stars apparently involved in dense nebular knots have been found in the northeast quadrant of the 30 Doradus nebula. One of them lies within the positional uncertainty radius of a previously detected water maser source, and it has a well-marked interstellar 4430 A diffuse band feature. These objects may be very young massive stars just emerging from their protostellar cocoons, and it is suggested that this part of 30 Doradus may represent an earlier evolutionary stage than the central region surrounding R136. A brief survey of recent literature on possibly related objects in the Magellanic Clouds suggests the emergence there of a class corresponding to optically observable, very early evolutionary stages of massive stars. 21 references.

  17. Recent results from the VLNDEF network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capra, Alessandro; Zanutta, Antonio; Negusini, Monia; Gandolfi, Stefano; Sarti, Pierguido; Vittuari, Luca; Salvini, Francesco; Cianfarra, Paola; Sterzai, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    measurements, geomagnetic field measurements and other geophysical observations. The deformation patterns obtained with GPS observations over the VLNDEF network are coupled with the data acquired during the geological and geomorphological surveys; the set of observations is used to study the neo-tectonics of NVL. We present the most recent geodetic results derived from the VLNDEF GPS data set and a recent cinematic model of the whole area. We present the preliminary geoid model in the northern part of the network.

  18. Recent lattice QCD results on nucleon structure

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2006-07-01

    I review recent developments in lattice calculations of nucleon structure. In particular, I cover the calculations of nucleon matrix elements related to generalized parton distribution functions, structure functions and form factors.

  19. Results of Aluminosilicate Formation Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    2001-09-11

    The purpose of this work was to examine several experimental parameters of the formation of aluminosilicates under several tank chemistries, examine the conversion of crystalline phases, and determine inherent solubilities of certain crystal phases.

  20. Recent results of the T-10 tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vershkov, V. A.; Andreev, V. F.; Borschegovskiy, A. A.; Chistyakov, V. V.; Dremin, M. M.; Eliseev, L. G.; Gorbunov, E. P.; Grashin, S. A.; Khmara, A. V.; Kislov, A. Ya.; Kislov, D. A.; Komarov, A. D.; Kozachek, A. S.; Krupin, V. A.; Krupnik, L. I.; Krylov, S. V.; Lysenko, S. E.; Maltsev, S. G.; Mavrin, V. A.; Melnikov, A. V.; Notkin, G. E.; Novikov, A. Yu.; Pavlov, Yu. D.; Perfilov, S. V.; Piterskij, V. V.; Ploskirev, G. N.; Poznyak, V. I.; Razumova, K. A.; Roy, I. N.; Ryzhakov, D. V.; Savrukhin, P. V.; Shestakov, E. A.; Shelukhin, D. A.; Skosyrev, Yu. A.; Shurygin, R. V.; Tilinin, G. N.; Trukhina, E. V.; Trukhin, V. M.

    2011-09-01

    Poloidal asymmetry and radial correlation lengths of turbulence were investigated in T-10 at low field side and high field side by correlation reflectometry. Correlation of plasma confinement with the turbulence type was observed. Improvements in heavy ion beam probe diagnostic enabled us to measure the plasma potential during electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in a wide range of radial positions and operational regimes. The turbulence appeared to rotate close to E × B velocity. The concept of electron internal transport barrier (e-ITB) formation at low-order rational surfaces under conditions of low density of the rational surfaces was proved by the observation of e-ITB formation near the q = 1.5 surface in discharges with non-central ECRH and current ramp-up. The kinetic phenomena were investigated by means of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) under the strong on-axis ECRH. Lithium gettering of the limiter and the wall allowed us to significantly reduce the impurity level and obtain a recycling coefficient as low as 0.3. The rates of carbon film deposition were measured in the working and cleaning discharges. Second harmonic EC assisted start-up was investigated. ECRH allowed us to control the generation of runaway electrons and the current decay rate after the energy quench at the density limit disruption.

  1. Recent Results from MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Laura

    2016-12-21

    The MINERvA collaboration is currently engaged in a broad program of neutrino-nucleus interaction measurements. Several recent measurements of interest to the accelerator-based oscillation community are presented. These include measurements of quasi-elastic scattering, diffractive pion production, kaon production and comparisons of interaction cross sections across nuclei. A new measurement of the NuMI neutrino beam flux that incorporates both external hadro-production data and MINERvA detector data is also presented.

  2. Recent results from Super-Kamiokande

    SciTech Connect

    Himmel, Alexander; Collaboration: Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    2014-06-24

    The Super-Kamiokande experiment has collected more than 11 live-years of atmospheric neutrino data. Atmospheric neutrinos cover a wide phase space in both energy and distance travelled, the parameters relevant for studying neutrino oscillations. We present here recent measurements of the three-flavor neutrino oscillation parameters using this atmospheric neutrino data, as well as new limits on mixing with a fourth sterile neutrino state.

  3. Some recent results on meson spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.U.

    1987-06-01

    A comparative survey of established meson states with the predictions of a q anti q (quarkonium) model by Godfrey and Isgur shows that most meson states are well described, from pion to UPSILON(6S). However, a number of states in the light- quark isoscalar sector are not predicted at all in their model, pointing to a need for glueballs, hybrids and multi-quark states to fully account for recently reported meson states. 48 refs.

  4. Recent Electroweak Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Junjie; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2009-07-01

    W and Z bosons are mainly produced via quark-antiquark annihilations at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Precision measurements with these gauge bosons provide us with high precision tests of the Standard Model (SM) as well as indirect search for possible new physics beyond the SM. I present the recent electroweak measurements related to single W, Z boson and diboson productions from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron collider.

  5. Recent results from MoNA-LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyrou, Artemisia

    2012-03-01

    Studies of the nuclear properties of nuclei close and even beyond the limits of stability have revealed exotic modes of decay and new structural characteristics. The MoNA-LISA array is used at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University to study nuclei along the neutron dripline. In a typical experiment, a radioactive beam is employed to produce the neutron-unbound state of interest. This state/resonance immediately decay into a neutron, which is detected by MoNA-LISA and a remaining charged nucleus detected by the sweeper magnet detector suite. In this talk, new exciting findings from recent MoNA-LISA experiments will be presented. These include the first observation of a dineutron decay from ^16Be, the exploration of the ``south shore'' of the Island of Inversion and the first evidence of the decay of the troubling nucleus ^26O.

  6. Recent Results from MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dytman, Steven

    2016-03-01

    Neutrino cross sections are important both as a key component of neutrino oscillation experiments and as a way to study the axial and vector response in nuclear systems. MINERvA is a neutrino cross section experiment that has been taking data at Fermilab since 2009. The beam energy is well-matched to existing oscillation experiments such as MINOS/MINOS + and NOvA and planned experiments such as DUNE. The experiment has the unique capability to measure cross sections simultaneously with hydrocarbon, iron, and lead targets. Numerous publications have provided new data for neutrino and antineutrino interactions in these targets including quasielastic, pion production, and inclusive processes. This talk will present a series of recent measurements, their relationship to oscillation experiments and to nuclear physics.

  7. The Joint Physics Analysis Center: Recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Ramírez, César

    2016-10-01

    We review some of the recent achievements of the Joint Physics Analysis Center, a theoretical collaboration with ties to experimental collaborations, that aims to provide amplitudes suitable for the analysis of the current and forthcoming experimental data on hadron physics. Since its foundation in 2013, the group is focused on hadron spectroscopy in preparation for the forthcoming high statistics and high precision experimental data from BELLEII, BESIII, CLAS12, COMPASS, GlueX, LHCb and (hopefully) PANDA collaborations. So far, we have developed amplitudes for πN scattering, KN scattering, pion and J/ψ photoproduction, two kaon photoproduction and three-body decays of light mesons (η, ω, ϕ). The codes for the amplitudes are available to download from the group web page and can be straightforwardly incorporated to the analysis of the experimental data.

  8. Recent results from the super EBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R.E.

    1995-09-15

    The Super EBIT device at LLNL can produce and trap any highly charged ion at rest in the laboratory, including bare U{sup 92+} ions. Recently, the ionization cross sections for high-Z hydrogenlike ions have been measured for the first time, and measurements of the L-shell ionization cross sections for uranium ions are in progress. The two-electron contributions to the ground state energies of heliumlike ions have been directly measured using a novel technique, and spectra of 2s-2p transitions in highly ionized thorium and uranium have been used to test QED corrections to the energy levels of few electron high-Z ions. A new capability for the study of rare isotopes has been demonstrated. Ion cooling has been used to reduce the thermal broadening of x-ray emission lines to the point where natural line widths can be observed in some cases.

  9. Recent Results from Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, H.; Yamada, M.; Hsu, S.; Morrison, K.

    1997-11-01

    Many fundamental issues of magnetic reconnection are being investigated in the MRX device, which creates an environment satisfying the criteria for MHD plasmas with well controlled boundary conditions in a nearly two-dimensional geometry. The diagnostics include internal magnetic probe arrays, Langmuir probes, Mach probes, a retarding field energy analyzer, an interferometer, and a spectrometer. Major findings of recent MRX experiments are: as the merging angle decreases from ~180^circ to ~ 60^circ, the shape of the diffusion region changes from double-Y to O-shape, the current-sheet thickness increases, and the reconnection speed decreases(M. Yamada, H. Ji, S. Hsu et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 3117(1997).; (2) transition from collisional regime where the measured resistivity is consistent with the two-fluid theory(R. Kulsrud, invited talk in this meeting.) to collisionless regime where resistivity is greatly enhanced; (3) proportionality of current-sheet thickness to ion gyro-radius or equivalently to ion skin-depth (i.e., δ ≈ ρi ∝ c/ω_pi) in the anti-parallel reconnection case; (4) consistency of observed reconnection speed with a modified Sweet-Parker model, in which the compressibility increases the reconnection and finite down-stream pressure decreases the reconnection. Detailed analysis and physics interpretation will be presented.

  10. Recent Radiation Test Results for Power MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Topper, Alyson D.; Casey, Megan C.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Phan, Anthony M.; Kim, Hak S.; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Single-event effect (SEE) and total ionizing dose (TID) test results are presented for various hardened and commercial power metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), including vertical planar, trench, superjunction, and lateral process designs.

  11. Recent QCD Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Vellidis, Costas

    2015-10-10

    Four years after the shutdown of the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, the two Tevatron experiments, CDF and DZero, continue producing important results that test the theory of the strong interaction, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The experiments exploit the advantages of the data sample acquired during the Tevatron Run II, stemming from the unique pp initial state, the clean environment at the relatively low Tevatron instantaneous luminosities, and the good understanding of the data sample after many years of calibrations and optimizations. A summary of results using the full integrated luminosity is presented, focusing on measurements of prompt photon production, weak boson production associated with jets, and non-perturbative QCD processes.

  12. Recent results of the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández-Rey, Juan José

    2015-07-15

    The latest results from the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope are reported. Limits on a high energy neutrino diffuse flux have been set using for the first time both muon–track and showering events. The results for point sources obtained by ANTARES are also shown. These are the most stringent limits for the southern sky for neutrino energies below 100 TeV. Constraints on the nature of the cluster of neutrino events near the Galactic Centre observed by IceCube are also reported. In particular, ANTARES data excludes a single point–like neutrino source as the origin of this cluster. Looking for neutrinos coming from the Sun or the centre of the Galaxy, very competitive limits are set by the ANTARES data to the flux of neutrinos produced by self-annihilation of weakly interacting massive particles.

  13. An Overview of Recent Results from CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Hicks

    2011-12-01

    The unique capabilities of the CLAS detector to measure exclusive meson electroproduction off protons, with almost complete coverage of the final hadron phase space, has extended our knowledge of excited baryon structure. Consistent results from Np and Npp final states provide convincing evidence for reliable extraction of N* electrocouplings. Theoretical analyses of these results, using self-consistent dynamical calculations using an internal quark core and an external meson-baryon cloud suggest that meson-baryon dressing amplitudes need to be included. The meson-baryon dressing was already shown to be necessary to get agreement between calculations and data on the D resonance transition magnetic moment at low Q{sup 2}. Similarly, a new measurement of the transition magnetic moment for strange baryons also disagrees with quark models, suggesting the need for meson-baryon dressings. In the near future, the CLAS detector will be replaced with CLAS12, providing new high-precision data.

  14. Results from Recent NIF Shock Timing Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Boehly, T. R.; Kline, J. L.; Bowers, M. W.; Le Pape, S.; Farley, D. R.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Moody, J. D.; Eggert, J. H.; Munro, D. H.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Clark, D.; Nikroo, A.; Moreno, K. A.; Kroll, J. J.; Hamza, A. V.; Barker, D. A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2011-10-01

    Experiments are underway to tune the shock timing of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to precisely match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to multiple shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of all four shocks is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector). The tuned pulse shape resulting from these experiments has been tested in ignition capsule implosions and demonstrates a considerable improvement in fuel adiabat. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Recent results from CERN-WA98

    SciTech Connect

    Stankus, P.; WA98 Collaboration

    1997-02-01

    The CERN experiment WA98 is a general-survey, open-spectrometer experiment designed to examine 160 A GeV/c Pb+A collisions at the CERN-SPS. The experiment has a broad physics agenda, as suggested by its many different subsystems. A diagram of the experiment as it stood in 1995 is shown in the report. Detectors whose results are presented here are described briefly.

  16. Recent Results from the RICE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seckel, D.; Spiczak, G.; Adams, J.; Seunarine, S.; Frichter, G. M.; Allen, C.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; Box, D. J.; Buniy, R.; Copple, E.; McKay, D.; Ralston, J.; Razzaque, S.; Schimtz, D. W.; Kravchenko, I.

    2001-08-01

    The RICE experiment (Radio Ice Cherenkov Experiment) at the South Pole, co-located with the AMANDA experiment, aims to detect ultra-high energy (UHE) electron neutrinos (? eV) by detection of the longwavelength Cherenkov Radiation (CR) signal resulting from neutrino-induced showers in cold Polar ice: . We present upper limits on the UHE flux based on analysis of August, 2000 data.

  17. Recent results from Daya Bay experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, Dmitry V.

    2015-05-01

    This manuscript is a short summary of my talk given at ICNFP2014 Conference. Here we report on new results of sin2 2θ13 and Δm2ee measurements, search for the sterile neutrino within 10-3 eV2 < Δm241 < 0.1 eV2 domain and precise measurement of the reactor absolute antineutrino flux.

  18. Recent JET results and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Rebut, P.H.

    1990-01-01

    The latest results of JET plasmas in transient and steady states are presented. Substantial improvements in plasma purity and corresponding reductions in plasma dilution have resulted from the use of beryllium as the first wall material facing the hot plasma. As a consequence, plasmas with a fusion triple product (n{sub D}(0){tau}{sub E}T{sub i}(0)) in the range 8--9 {times} 10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3} skeV have been achieved (within a factor of 8 that required in a fusion reactor), albeit under transient conditions. The general JET performance has also improved, allowing the parameters of a reactor plasma to be individually achieved in JET. In view of their importance for reactors, the JET results are presented with particular emphasis on their significance for the formulation of a plasma model for the Next Step. However, impurity influxes limit the attainment of better parameters and prevent the realization of steady state conditions at high heating powers. To address these problems of impurity control, plasma fueling and helium ash exhaust, a New Phase is planned for JET. An axisymmetric pumped divertor configuration will allow operating conditions close to those of a reactor. The divertor configuration should demonstrate a concept of impurity control and determine the size and geometry needed to fulfill this concept in a reactor. It should identify appropriate materials for plasma facing components and define the operational domain for the Next Step.

  19. Recent results on meson spectroscopy from JETSET

    SciTech Connect

    Evangelista, C.; Palano, A.; Drijard, D.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Hamann, N.; Moueellie, B.; Ohlsson, S.; Perreau, J.M.; Price, M.; Eyrich, W.

    1994-09-01

    The JETSET experiment at CERN LEAR studies the process p{bar p} {yields} {phi}{phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}}K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} to search for hadronic resonances. {phi}{phi} are directly formed through the annihilation of an antiproton beam onto an internal-jet target. Preliminary results on the {phi}{phi} cross section in the energy range 2.1-2.4 GeV/c are presented from data taken in 1991. 19 refs., 18 figs.

  20. Recent Results From MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, Cheryl

    2015-05-13

    The MINERvA detector is situated in Fermilab's NuMI beam, which provides neutrinos and antineutrinos in the 1-20 GeV range. It is designed to make precision cross-section measurements for scattering processes on various nuclei. These proceedings summarize the differential cross-section distributions measured for several different processes. Comparison of these with various models hints at additional nuclear effects not included in common simulations. These results will help constrain generators' nuclear models and reduce systematic uncertainties on their predictions. An accurate cross-section model, with minimal uncertainties, is vital to oscillation experiments.

  1. Recent results from experiments at MAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, U.

    2012-04-01

    The Mainz Microtron MAMI is an ideal tool for studying the structure of strongly interacting systems with an electromagnetic probe. With the new HDSM accelerator stage of MAMI C, a continuous-wave electron beam with an energy of up to 1604 MeV and excellent beam quality is available for precision experiments. In addition, polarisation degrees of freedom can be exploited with polarised beams and either polarised targets or recoil polarimetry. This paper presents selected results of the A1, A2, and A4 collaborations.

  2. Recent results from T2K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, M.; T2K Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    The T2K long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment has produced the first observation of νe appearance and the most precise measurement of the mixing angle θ_{23} from 6.57 × 10^{20} protons-on-target (POT) of neutrino beam data. We present here the results of T2K antineutrino oscillation analyses searching for bar{ν}e appearance and measuring the dominant oscillation parameters for bar{ν}_{μ} disappearance, including the results from the T2K near the detector fit. Using 4.01 × 10^{20} POT of antineutrino beam data T2K measured sin2(bar{θ}_{23}) = 0.45^{+0.29}_{-0.12} and \\vertΔ bar{m}2_{32}\\vert = 2.51±0.28 × 10^{-3} ({eV}2) , consistent with previous existing ν_{μ} and bar{ν}_{μ} disappearance measurements. From the same dataset 3 bar{ν}e candidate events were selected at the far detector, which did not provide evidence either for or against the bar{ν}e appearance hypothesis.

  3. Recent Results from the Daya Bay Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Z. Y.; Daya Bay collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment was designed to precisely measure the neutrino oscillation parameter θ 13 via the relative comparison of neutrino rates and spectra at different baselines. Eight identically designed detectors were deployed in two near experimental halls and a far hall. Six 2.9 GWth nuclear power reactors served as intense {\\bar ν _e} sources. Since Dec. 2011, the experiment has been running stably. The latest neutrino oscillation results were based on 1230 days of data. Analysis using a three-flavor oscillation model yielded sin22θ 13 = 0.0841 ± 0.0027(stat.) ± 0.0019(syst.), and effective neutrino mass-squared difference ≤ft| {Δ mee^2} \\right| = ≤ft( {2.50 +/- 0.06≤ft( {stat.} \\right) +/- 0.06≤ft( {syst.} \\right)} \\right) × {10 - 3}e{V^2}. Besides, results from the absolute measurement of reactor {\\bar ν _e} flux and energy spectrum, and a search for a light sterile neutrino are also presented.

  4. Recent heavy flavor results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Dorigo, Mirco; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2012-05-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider have pioneered and established the role of flavor physics in hadron collisions. A broad program is now at its full maturity. We report on three new results sensitive to physics beyond the standard model, obtained using the whole CDF dataset: a measurement of the difference of CP asymmetries in K{sup +}K{sup -} and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays of D{sup 0} mesons, new bounds on the B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing phase and on the decay width difference of B{sub s}{sup 0} mass-eigenstates, and an update of the summer 2011 search for B{sub (s)}{sup 0} mesons decaying into pairs of muons. Finally, the D0 confirmation of the observation of a new hadron, the {chi}{sub b}(3P) state, is briefly mentioned.

  5. Numerical simulations of catastrophic disruption: Recent results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, W.; Asphaug, E.; Ryan, E. V.

    1994-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been used to study high velocity two-body impacts. In this paper, a two-dimensional Largrangian finite difference hydro-code and a three-dimensional smooth particle hydro-code (SPH) are described and initial results reported. These codes can be, and have been, used to make specific predictions about particular objects in our solar system. But more significantly, they allow us to explore a broad range of collisional events. Certain parameters (size, time) can be studied only over a very restricted range within the laboratory; other parameters (initial spin, low gravity, exotic structure or composition) are difficult to study at all experimentally. The outcomes of numerical simulations lead to a more general and accurate understanding of impacts in their many forms.

  6. Recent Results of the Opera Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupilli, F.

    2014-06-01

    The OPERA experiment aims at the direct confirmation of the leading oscillation mechanism in the atmospheric sector looking for the appearance of ντ in an almost pure νμ beam (the CERN CNGS beam). In five years of physics run the experiment collected 17.97 × 1019 p.o.t. The detection of τS produced in ντ CC interactions and of their decays is accomplished exploiting the high spatial resolution of nuclear emulsions. Furthermore OPERA has good capabilities in detecting electron neutrino interactions, setting limits on the νμ → νℯ oscillation channel. In this talk the status of the analysis will be presented together with updated results on both oscillation channels.

  7. Unified evidence accrual for SAR: recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Melvyn; Yu, Ssu-Hsin; Mahler, Ronald P. S.; Ravichandran, B.; Mehra, Raman K.; Musick, Stanton

    2000-08-01

    During the last two decades IR Goodman, HT Nguyen and others have shown that several basic aspects of expert-systems theory-fuzzy logic, Dempster-Shafer evidence theory, and rule-based inference-can be subsumed within a completely probabilistic framework based on random set theory. In addition, it has been shown that this body of research can be rigorously integrated with multisensor, multitarget filtering and estimation using a special case of random set theory called 'finite-set statistics' (FISST). In particular, FISST allows the basis for standard tracking and ID algorithms-nonlinear filtering theory and estimation theory; to be extended to the case when evidence can be highly 'ambiguous' because of extended operating conditions, e.g. when images are corrupted by effects such as dents, mud etc. This paper extends those results by showing that the technique is relatively insensitive to the uncertainty model used to construct the ambiguous likelihood function.

  8. Transparent conducting materials: overview and recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Deelen, Joop; Illiberi, Andrea; Hovestad, Arjan; Barbu, Ionut; Klerk, Lennaert; Buskens, Pascal

    2012-10-01

    An overview of different transparent conductors is given. In addition, atmospheric pressure CVD of ZnO resulted in conductivities below 1 mΩ cm for a temperature of 480°C, whereas at a process temperature of 200°C a value of 2 mΩ cm was obtained. Also atmospheric pressure spatial ALD was used to make conductive ZnO. Furthermore, the properties of transparent conductive oxides (TCO) can be enhanced by application of metallic grids. This way, sheet resistances of below 0.1 Ω/sq and transmittances above 85 % can be achieved. Modeling indicates that the performance of thin film cells can be enhanced by18% using a grid/TCO combination. Light scattering is a vital element of thin film solar cells and both texturization and multimaterial approaches for advanced light management such as plasmonics are discussed.

  9. Recent Results from the OPERA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchesneau, D.

    The OPERA experiment has been designed to perform the first detection of neutrino oscillations in the νμ → ντ channel in direct appearance mode, through the event by event detection of the tau lepton produced in ντ charged current interactions. OPERA is a hybrid detector, made of emulsion/lead target elements and of electronic detectors, placed in the CNGS muon neutrino beam from CERN to Gran Sasso, 730 km away from the source. Neutrino interactions from the CNGS neutrino runs were recorded from 2008 until the end of 2012. We report on the data sample analysed so far and give the latest OPERA results on νμ → ντ and νμ → νe oscillation searches.

  10. Entropy of balance - some recent results

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Entropy when applied to biological signals is expected to reflect the state of the biological system. However the physiological interpretation of the entropy is not always straightforward. When should high entropy be interpreted as a healthy sign, and when as marker of deteriorating health? We address this question for the particular case of human standing balance and the Center of Pressure data. Methods We have measured and analyzed balance data of 136 participants (young, n = 45; elderly, n = 91) comprising in all 1085 trials, and calculated the Sample Entropy (SampEn) for medio-lateral (M/L) and anterior-posterior (A/P) Center of Pressure (COP) together with the Hurst self-similariy (ss) exponent α using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA). The COP was measured with a force plate in eight 30 seconds trials with eyes closed, eyes open, foam, self-perturbation and nudge conditions. Results 1) There is a significant difference in SampEn for the A/P-direction between the elderly and the younger groups Old > young. 2) For the elderly we have in general A/P > M/L. 3) For the younger group there was no significant A/P-M/L difference with the exception for the nudge trials where we had the reverse situation, A/P < M/L. 4) For the elderly we have, Eyes Closed > Eyes Open. 5) In case of the Hurst ss-exponent we have for the elderly, M/L > A/P. Conclusions These results seem to be require some modifications of the more or less established attention-constraint interpretation of entropy. This holds that higher entropy correlates with a more automatic and a less constrained mode of balance control, and that a higher entropy reflects, in this sense, a more efficient balancing. PMID:20670457

  11. Recent results of the Borexino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davini, S.

    2012-04-01

    Borexino is a low background liquid scintillation detector acquiring solar neutrino data at the LNGS underground laboratory in Italy. Borexino is capable to perform spectral-resolved measurements of the low-energy 7Be and pep solar neutrinos. Borexino has performed the first direct measurement of the 7Be solar neutrino rate with accuracy better than 5%. The absence of day-night asymmetry of the 7Be solar neutrino rate was measured with a total uncertainty of 1%. Borexino results alone reject the LOW region of solar neutrino oscillation parameters at more than 8.5 σ CL. Combined with the other solar neutrino data, Borexino measurements isolate the MSW-LMA solution of neutrino oscillations without assuming CPT invariance in the neutrino sector. Borexino has also directly observed, for the first time, solar neutrinos in the 1.0-1.5 MeV energy range, leading to the first direct evidence of the pep solar neutrino signal and the strongest constraint of the CNO solar neutrino flux up to date.

  12. Recent results on output feedback problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrnes, C. I.

    1980-01-01

    Given a real linear system sigma = (A, B, C) with m inputs, p outputs and degree n, the problem of generic pole placement by output feedback is studied, which is to compute the constant C(m,p) such that the inequality C(m,p) not less than n is necessary and sufficient for generically positioning the poles of the generic linear system by constant output feedback. A constant C prime (m,p) is determined, which gives a sufficient condition for generic pole placement and which, to the best of the author's knowledge, is at least as good an estimate of C(m,p) as any in the literature. Some results on the construction of solutions in case mp = n are announced, based on the degree formula of Brockett and Byrnes and the Galois theory. In particular, a question raised by Anderson, Bose, and Jury, on the existence of a rational procedure for computing the feedback law from the desired characteristic polynomial is answered.

  13. Recent results from Compton spectrometer experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Amanda E.; Espy, Michelle A.; Haines, Todd J.; Webb, Timothy J.

    2016-09-01

    During the previous three years, a Compton spectrometer has successfully measured the x-ray spectra of both continuous and flash radiographic sources. In this method, a collimated beam of x-rays incident on a convertor foil ejects Compton electrons. A collimator in the entrance to the spectrometer selects the forward-scattered electrons, which enter the magnetic field region of the spectrometer. The position of the electrons at the magnet's focal plane is proportional to the square root of their momentum, allowing the x-ray spectrum to be reconstructed. The spectrometer is a neodymium-iron magnet which measures spectra in the <1 MeV to 20 MeV energy range. The energy resolution of the spectrometer was experimentally tested with the 44 MeV Short-Pulse Electron LINAC at the Idaho Accelerator Center. The measured values are mostly consistent with the design specification and historical values of the greater of 1% or 0.1 MeV. Experimental results from this study are presented in these proceedings.

  14. Overview of recent physics results from MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, A.; Adamek, J.; Akers, R. J.; Allan, S.; Appel, L.; Arese Lucini, F.; Barnes, M.; Barrett, T.; Ben Ayed, N.; Boeglin, W.; Bradley, J.; Browning, P. K.; Brunner, J.; Cahyna, P.; Cardnell, S.; Carr, M.; Casson, F.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C.; Chapman, I. T.; Chapman, S.; Chorley, J.; Conroy, S.; Conway, N.; Cooper, W. A.; Cox, M.; Crocker, N.; Crowley, B.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darrow, D.; Dendy, R.; Dickinson, D.; Dorland, W.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Easy, L.; Elmore, S.; Evans, M.; Farley, T.; Fedorczak, N.; Field, A.; Fishpool, G.; Fitzgerald, I.; Fox, M.; Freethy, S.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y. C.; Gi, K.; Gibson, K.; Gorelenkova, M.; Gracias, W.; Gurl, C.; Guttenfelder, W.; Ham, C.; Harrison, J.; Harting, D.; Havlickova, E.; Hawkes, N.; Hender, T.; Henderson, S.; Highcock, E.; Hillesheim, J.; Hnat, B.; Horacek, J.; Howard, J.; Howell, D.; Huang, B.; Imada, K.; Inomoto, M.; Imazawa, R.; Jones, O.; Kadowaki, K.; Kaye, S.; Keeling, D.; Klimek, I.; Kocan, M.; Kogan, L.; Komm, M.; Lai, W.; Leddy, J.; Leggate, H.; Hollocombe, J.; Lipschultz, B.; Lisgo, S.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lloyd, B.; Lomanowski, B.; Lukin, V.; Lupelli, I.; Maddison, G.; Madsen, J.; Mailloux, J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G.; McClements, K.; McMillan, B.; Meakins, A.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Milnes, J.; Morris, A. W.; Motojima, G.; Muir, D.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A.; O'Brien, M.; O'Gorman, T.; O'Mullane, M.; Olsen, J.; Omotani, J.; Ono, Y.; Pamela, S.; Pangione, L.; Parra, F.; Patel, A.; Peebles, W.; Perez, R.; Pinches, S.; Piron, L.; Price, M.; Reinke, M.; Ricci, P.; Riva, F.; Roach, C.; Romanelli, M.; Ryan, D.; Saarelma, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Schekochihin, A.; Sharapov, S.; Sharples, R.; Shevchenko, V.; Shinohara, K.; Silburn, S.; Simpson, J.; Stanier, A.; Storrs, J.; Summers, H.; Takase, Y.; Tamain, P.; Tanabe, H.; Tanaka, H.; Tani, K.; Taylor, D.; Thomas, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M.; Valovic, M.; Vann, R.; Van Wyk, F.; Walkden, N.; Watanabe, T.; Wilson, H.; Wischmeier, M.; Yamada, T.; Young, J.; Zoletnik, S.; the MAST Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-10-01

    New results from MAST are presented that focus on validating models in order to extrapolate to future devices. Measurements during start-up experiments have shown how the bulk ion temperature rise scales with the square of the reconnecting field. During the current ramp-up, models are not able to correctly predict the current diffusion. Experiments have been performed looking at edge and core turbulence. At the edge, detailed studies have revealed how filament characteristics are responsible for determining the near and far scrape off layer density profiles. In the core the intrinsic rotation and electron scale turbulence have been measured. The role that the fast ion gradient has on redistributing fast ions through fishbone modes has led to a redesign of the neutral beam injector on MAST Upgrade. In H-mode the turbulence at the pedestal top has been shown to be consistent with being due to electron temperature gradient modes. A reconnection process appears to occur during edge localized modes (ELMs) and the number of filaments released determines the power profile at the divertor. Resonant magnetic perturbations can mitigate ELMs provided the edge peeling response is maximised and the core kink response minimised. The mitigation of intrinsic error fields with toroidal mode number n  >  1 has been shown to be important for plasma performance.

  15. Recent COMPASS results on the gluon polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Quintans, Catarina

    2009-03-23

    The spin structure of the nucleon is studied in the COMPASS experiment at CERN/SPS, from the collisions of 160 GeV polarized muon beam with a {sup 6}LiD target. The data collected from 2002 to 2006 provide an accurate measurement of longitudinal double spin cross-section asymmetries. The latest results on the gluon polarization, accessed from two independent analyses of photon-gluon fusion selected events, are presented. The study of the open-charm production allows to extract the gluon polarization (in LO QCD) from the measurement of the asymmetry, the value obtained being {delta}g/g -0.49{+-}0.27(stat){+-}0.11(syst), at an average x{sub g} 0.11{sub -0.05}{sup +0.11} and a scale <{mu}{sup 2}> = 13(GeV/c){sup 2}. An alternative and independent way to study the gluon polarization, by studying the high transverse momentum hadron pairs produced, leads to a value {delta}g/g 0.08{+-}0.10(stat){+-}0.05(syst), at x{sub g}{sup a{nu}} 0.082{sub -0.027}{sup +0.041} and <{mu}{sup 2}> = 3(GeV/c){sup 2}.

  16. Entropy of balance--some recent results.

    PubMed

    Borg, Frank G; Laxåback, Gerd

    2010-07-30

    Entropy when applied to biological signals is expected to reflect the state of the biological system. However the physiological interpretation of the entropy is not always straightforward. When should high entropy be interpreted as a healthy sign, and when as marker of deteriorating health? We address this question for the particular case of human standing balance and the Center of Pressure data. We have measured and analyzed balance data of 136 participants (young, n = 45; elderly, n = 91) comprising in all 1085 trials, and calculated the Sample Entropy (SampEn) for medio-lateral (M/L) and anterior-posterior (A/P) Center of Pressure (COP) together with the Hurst self-similarity (ss) exponent alpha using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA). The COP was measured with a force plate in eight 30 seconds trials with eyes closed, eyes open, foam, self-perturbation and nudge conditions. 1) There is a significant difference in SampEn for the A/P-direction between the elderly and the younger groups Old > young. 2) For the elderly we have in general A/P > M/L. 3) For the younger group there was no significant A/P-M/L difference with the exception for the nudge trials where we had the reverse situation, A/P < M/L. 4) For the elderly we have, Eyes Closed > Eyes Open. 5) In case of the Hurst ss-exponent we have for the elderly, M/L > A/P. These results seem to be require some modifications of the more or less established attention-constraint interpretation of entropy. This holds that higher entropy correlates with a more automatic and a less constrained mode of balance control, and that a higher entropy reflects, in this sense, a more efficient balancing.

  17. Recent Results for the ECHo Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassel, C.; Blaum, K.; Goodacre, T. Day; Dorrer, H.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Eliseev, S.; Enss, C.; Filianin, P.; Fäßler, A.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Goncharov, M.; Hengstler, D.; Jochum, J.; Johnston, K.; Keller, M.; Kempf, S.; Kieck, T.; Köster, U.; Krantz, M.; Marsh, B.; Mokry, C.; Novikov, Yu. N.; Ranitzsch, P. C. O.; Rothe, S.; Rischka, A.; Runke, J.; Saenz, A.; Schneider, F.; Scholl, S.; Schüssler, R. X.; Simkovic, F.; Stora, T.; Thörle-Pospiech, P.; Türler, A.; Veinhard, M.; Wegner, M.; Wendt, K.; Zuber, K.

    2016-08-01

    The Electron Capture in ^{163}Ho experiment, ECHo, is designed to investigate the electron neutrino mass in the sub-eV range by means of the analysis of the calorimetrically measured spectrum following the electron capture (EC) in ^{163}Ho. Arrays of low-temperature metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs), read-out by microwave SQUID multiplexing, will be used in this experiment. With a first MMC prototype having the ^{163}Ho source ion-implanted into the absorber, we performed the first high energy resolution measurement of the EC spectrum, which demonstrated the feasibility of such an experiment. In addition to the technological challenges for the development of MMC arrays, which preserve the single pixel performance in terms of energy resolution and bandwidth, the success of the experiment relies on the availability of large ultra-pure ^{163}Ho samples, on the precise description of the expected spectrum, and on the identification and reduction of background. We present preliminary results obtained with standard MMCs developed for soft X-ray spectroscopy, maXs-20, where the ^{163}Ho ion-implantation was performed using a high-purity ^{163}Ho source produced by advanced chemical and mass separation. With these measurements, we aim at determining an upper limit for the background level due to source contamination and provide a refined description of the calorimetrically measured spectrum. We discuss the plan for a medium scale experiment, ECHo-1k, in which about 1000 mathrm {Bq} of high-purity ^{163}Ho will be ion-implanted into detector arrays. With one year of measuring time, we will be able to achieve a sensitivity on the electron neutrino mass below 20 eV/c^2 (90 % C.L.), improving the present limit by more than one order of magnitude. This experiment will guide the necessary developments to reach the sub-eV sensitivity.

  18. Negative ions at Titan and Enceladus: recent results.

    PubMed

    Coates, Andrew J; Wellbrock, Anne; Lewis, Gethyn R; Jones, Geraint H; Young, David T; Crary, Frank J; Waite, J Hunter; Johnson, Robert E; Hille, Thomas W; Sittler, Edward C

    2010-01-01

    The detection of heavy negative ions (up to 13 800 amu) in Titan's ionosphere is one of the tantalizing new results from the Cassini mission. These heavy ions indicate for the first time the existence of heavy hydrocarbon and nitrile molecules in this primitive Earth-like atmosphere. These ions were suggested to be precursors of aerosols in Titan's atmosphere and may precipitate to the surface as tholins. We present the evidence for and the analysis of these heavy negative ions at Titan. In addition we examine the variation of the maximum mass of the Titan negative ions with altitude and latitude for the relevant encounters so far, and we discuss the implications for the negative ion formation process. We present data from a recent set of encounters where the latitude was varied between encounters, with other parameters fixed. Models are beginning to explain the low mass negative ions, but the formation process for the higher mass ions is still not understood. It is possible that the structures may be chains, rings or even fullerenes. Negative ions, mainly water clusters in this case, were seen during Cassini's recent close flybys of Enceladus. We present mass spectra from the Enceladus plume, showing water clusters and additional species. As at Titan, the negative ions indicate chemical complexities which were unknown before the Cassini encounters, and are indicative of a complex balance between neutrals and positively and negatively charged ions.

  19. Recent Star Formation in the S0 Galaxy NGC 4150

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, Mark; Kaviraj, S.; Silk, J.; O'Connell, R.; SOC, WFC3

    2010-01-01

    Within the last few years, studies have found that at least 30 per cent of low-redshift (0 < z < 0.11) early-type galaxies show signs of recent star formation (< 1 Gyr), constituting galaxy mass fractions of up to a few per cent. Minor mergers involving companion galaxies of considerably lower mass are the most likely explanation. The S0 galaxy NGC 4150 is an early-type galaxy with indications of recent star formation. Previous observations (SAURON and GALEX) have shown it to possess blue NUV-optical colours, enhanced central H_beta absorption, and a kinematically decoupled core. The first two characteristics are indicative of recent star formation. The latter points towards a past merger with a less massive, gas-rich galaxy as both the source of the disturbed dynamics in the centre of NGC 4150 and as the trigger for recent star formation. Here, we use high resolution UV-optical photometry from HST+WFC3 to accurately quantify the age, mass and spatial distribution of young stars in NGC 4150, with the aim of constraining some of the parameters of the suspected merger event (e.g. age, mass-ratio). This paper is based on Early Release Science observations made by the WFC3 Scientific Oversight Committee. We are grateful to the Director of the Space Telescope Science Institute for awarding Director's Discretionary time for this program.

  20. Fusion-fission study at IUAC: Recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullanhiotan, Sugathan

    2016-10-01

    Several properties observed in heavy ion induced fission led to the conclusion that fission is not always originated from fully equilibrated compound nucleus. Soon after the collision of two nuclei, it forms a di-nuclear system than can fission before a compound nucleus is formed. This process termed quasi-fission is a major hurdle to the formation of heavier elements by fusion. Fission originated before complete equilibration showed anomalously large angular anisotropy and mass distribution wider than what is expected from compound nucleus fission. The standard statistical model fails to predict the outcome of quasi-fission and currently no dynamical model is fully developed to predict all the features of quasi-fission. Though much progress has been made in recent times, a full understanding of the fission dynamics is still missing. Experiments identifying the influence of entrance channel parameters on dynamics of fusion-fission showed contrasting results. At IUAC accelerator facility many experiments have been performed to make a systematic study of fission dynamics using mass distribution, angular distribution and neutron multiplicity measurements in mass region around A ∼ 200. Recent measurement on mass distribution of fission fragment from reaction 19 F +206,208 Pb around fusion barrier energy showed the influence of multi-mode fission in enhancing the mass variance at low excitation energy. In this talk I will present some of these results.

  1. Recent Advances in Molecular Mechanisms of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Annambhotla, Suman; Bourgeois, Sebastian; Wang, Xinwen; Lin, Peter H.; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is an increasingly common clinical condition with fatal implications. It is associated with advanced age, male gender, cigarette smoking, atherosclerosis, hypertension, and genetic predisposition. Although significant evidence has emerged in the last decade, the molecular mechanisms of AAA formation remains poorly understood. Currently, the treatment for AAA remains primarily surgical with the lone innovation of endovascular therapy. With advance in the human genome, understanding precisely which molecules and genes mediate AAA development and blocking their activity at the molecular level could lead to important new discoveries and therapies. This review summarizes recent updates in molecular mechanisms of AAA formation including animal models, autoimmune components, infection, key molecules and cytokines, mechanical forces, genetics and pharmacotherapy. This review will be helpful to those who want to recognize the newest endeavors within the field and identify possible lines of investigation in AAA. PMID:18259804

  2. Most Recent Sampling Results for Annex III Building

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Contains email from Scott Miller, US EPA to Scott Kramer. Subject: Most Recent Sampling Results for Annex III Building. (2:52 PM) and Gore(TM) Surveys Analytical Results U.S. Geological Survey, Montgomery, AL.

  3. Recent Formation of Saturnian Moons: Constraints from Their Cratering Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dones, Henry C. Luke; Charnoz, Sebastien; Robbins, Stuart J.; Bierhaus, Edward B.

    2015-05-01

    Charnoz et al. (2010) proposed that Saturn's small "ring moons" out to Janus and Epimetheus consist of ring material that viscously spread beyond the Roche limit and coagulated into moonlets. The moonlets evolve outward due to the torques they exert at resonances in the rings. More massive moonlets migrate faster; orbits can cross and bodies can merge, resulting in a steep trend of mass vs. distance from the planet. Canup (2010) theorized that Saturn's rings are primordial and originated when a differentiated, Titan-like moon migrated inward when the planet was still surrounded by a gas disk. The satellite's icy shell could have been tidally stripped, and would have given rise to today's rings and the mid-sized moons out to Tethys. Charnoz et al. (2011) investigated the formation of satellites out to Rhea from a spreading massive ring, and Crida and Charnoz (2012) extended this scenario to other planets. Once the mid-sized moons recede far from the rings, tidal interaction with the planet determines the rate at which the satellites migrate. Charnoz et al. (2011) found that Mimas would have formed about 1 billion years more recently than Rhea. The cratering records of these moons (Kirchoff and Schenk 2010; Robbins et al. 2015) provide a test of this scenario. If the mid-sized moons are primordial, most of their craters were created through hypervelocity impacts by ecliptic comets from the Kuiper Belt/Scattered Disk (Zahnle et al. 2003; Dones et al. 2009). In the Charnoz et al. scenario, the oldest craters on the moons would result from low-speed accretionary impacts. We thank the Cassini Data Analysis program for support.ReferencesCanup, R. M. (2010). Nature 468, 943Charnoz, S.; Salmon, J., Crida, A. (2010). Nature 465, 752Charnoz, S., et al. (2011). Icarus 216, 535Crida, A.; Charnoz, S. (2012). Science 338, 1196Dones, L., et al. (2009). In Saturn from Cassini-Huygens, p. 613Kirchoff, M. R.; Schenk, P. (2010). Icarus 206, 485Robbins, S. J.; Bierhaus, E. B.; Dones, L

  4. Recent results from the Swinburne supercomputer software correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingay, Steven; et al.

    I will descrcibe the development of software correlators on the Swinburne Beowulf supercomputer and recent work using the Cray XD-1 machine. I will also describe recent Australian and global VLBI experiments that have been processed on the Swinburne software correlator, along with imaging results from these data. The role of the software correlator in Australia's eVLBI project will be discussed.

  5. Recent results of zebra patterns in solar radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, Gennady P.

    2010-09-01

    This review covers the most recent experimental results and theoretical research on zebra patterns (ZPs) in solar radio bursts. The basic attention is given to events with new peculiar elements of zebra patterns received over the last few years. All new properties are considered in light of both what was known earlier and new theoretical models. Large-scale ZPs consisting of small-scale fiber bursts could be explained by simultaneous inclusion of two mechanisms when whistler waves “highlight" the levels of double plasma resonance (DPR). A unique fine structure was observed in the event on 2006 December 13: spikes in absorption formed dark ZP stripes against the absorptive type III-like bursts. The spikes in absorption can appear in accordance with well known mechanisms of absorptive bursts. The additional injection of fast particles filled the loss-cone (breaking the loss-cone distribution), and the generation of the continuum was quenched at these moments. The maximum absorptive effect occurs at the DPR levels. The parameters of millisecond spikes are determined by small dimensions of the particle beams and local scale heights in the radio source. Thus, the DPR model helps to understand several aspects of unusual elements of ZPs. However, the simultaneous existence of several tens of the DPR levels in the corona is impossible for any realistic profile of the plasma density and magnetic field. Three new theories of ZPs are examined. The formation of eigenmodes of transparency and opacity during the propagation of radio waves through regular coronal inhomogeneities is the most natural and promising mechanism. Two other models (nonlinear periodic space - charge waves and scattering of fast protons on ion-sound harmonics) could happen in large radio bursts.

  6. Radio spectroscopy of comets: Recent results and future prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crovisier, Jacques

    1992-01-01

    We review the recent results of cometary radio spectroscopy (since 1988). Successful observations with several instruments yielded the detection of new molecular species, the simultaneous investigations of several rotational transitions of the same molecule, and mapping of the coma.

  7. A Review of recent results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarelli, Giorgo; /INFN, Pisa

    2007-06-01

    The D0 and CDF experiments have been taking data at the Run 2 of the Tevatron Collider since 2001. We present a selection of recent results, most of them obtained with an integrated luminosity of {approx_equal} 1 fb{sup -1}. I will describe the most important facets of the physics programme and detail some results. Recent direct limits on standard model Higgs obtained at the Tevatron, and their their prospects will be also reviewed.

  8. Recent results and highlights from the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caforio, Davide

    2017-03-01

    After a 2-year stop for the upgrade of the detector, since 2015 the ATLAS collaboration has collected data for over 20 fb-1 at 13 TeV centre-of-mass energy of pp collisions at the LHC. In this talk a summary of recent measurements of Higgs boson properties, BSM Higgs searches and the status with the resonance at 750 GeV will be presented. Also some of most recent SM and electroweak results will be highlighted.

  9. Recent heavy flavor physics results from fixed target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, L.

    1991-11-01

    Recent results from fixed target experiments in the field of heavy quark flavors, as published or otherwise disseminated in the last year, are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on distilling the main conclusions from these results. 35 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Recent BaBar Results on Hadron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Robutti, E.; /INFN, Genoa

    2005-08-29

    Recent results from on hadronic spectroscopy are presented, based on data collected by the BaBar experiment between 1999 and 2004. The properties of the recently discovered D*{sub sJ}(2317){sup +} and D{sub sJ}(2460){sup +} states are studied: resonance parameters and ratios of decay rates are measured from continuum e{sup +}e{sup -} production, and production rates are measured from B decays. A search for the D*{sub sJ}(2632){sup +} state whose observation has been recently reported by the SELEX Collaboration, and a search for a charged partner of the charmonium-like X(3872) state, are performed, yielding negative results. Finally, extensive searches for several pentaquark candidates, both fully inclusive and in B decays, result in no positive evidence.

  11. Recent Results on High-Pressure Axial Blowers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, B.

    1947-01-01

    Considerable progress has, in recent times, been attained in the development of the high-pressure axial blower by well-planned research. The efforts are directed toward improving the efficiencies, which are already high for the axial blower, and in particular the delivery pressure heads. For high pressures multistage arrangements are used. Of fundamental importance is the careful design of all structural parts of the blower that are subject to the effects of the flow. In the present report, several recent results and experiences are reported, which are based on results of German engine research.

  12. Recent results on SIDIS from pion production at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Rossi

    2011-10-01

    Novel view on QCD dynamics inside hadrons is offered by the transverse momentum dependent parton distributions and fragmentation functions. They can be accessed in Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS) experiments. Recent results on SIDI S from pion production at CLAS is presented in this talk.

  13. Recent results from the Argonne Fragment Mass Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.; Carpenter, M.P.; Henderson, D.J.; Henry, R.G.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.; Liang, Y. ); Bindra, K. Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN ); Chung, W. Notre Dame Univ., IN ); Soramel, F. (Argonne National Lab., IL (

    1992-01-01

    The Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) at the ATLAS accelerator has been operational for about one year. During that period a number of test runs and experiments have been carried out. The test runs have verified that the ion optics of the FMA are essentially as calculated. A brief facility description is followed by recent experimental results.

  14. The Intra-cluster medium: recent results and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molendi, Silvano

    2010-07-01

    This comunication is divided in two parts: in the first I present some recent observational results obtained by my group; in the second I list what I consider to be the top priorities in terms of X-ray instrumentation for cluster science and compare them with missions currently under development.

  15. Recent results and prospects on kaon physics at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosino, Fabio; Ambrosino, F.; Antonelli, A.; Anzivino, G.; Arcidiacono, R.; Baldini, W.; Balev, S.; Batley, J. R.; Behler, M.; Bifani, S.; Biino, C.; Bizzeti, A.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Bocquet, G.; Bolotov, V.; Bucci, F.; Cabibbo, N.; Calvetti, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Ceccucci, A.; Cenci, P.; Cerri, C.; Cheshkov, C.; Chèze, J. B.; Clemencic, M.; Collazuol, G.; Costantini, F.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Coward, D.; Cundy, D.; Dabrowski, A.; D'Agostini, G.; Dalpiaz, P.; Damiani, C.; Danielsson, H.; De Beer, M.; Dellacasa, G.; Derré, J.; Dibon, H.; Di Filippo, D.; DiLella, L.; Doble, N.; Duk, V.; Engelfried, J.; Eppard, K.; Falaleev, V.; Fantechi, R.; Fidecaro, M.; Fiorini, L.; Fiorini, M.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Frabetti, P. L.; Fucci, A.; Gallorini, S.; Gatignon, L.; Gersabeck, E.; Gianoli, A.; Giudici, S.; Gonidec, A.; Goudzovski, E.; Goy Lopez, S.; Gushchin, E.; Hallgren, B.; Hita-Hochgesand, M.; Holder, M.; Hristov, P.; Iacopini, E.; Imbergamo, E.; Jeitler, M.; Kalmus, G.; Kekelidze, V.; Kleinknecht, K.; Kozhuharov, V.; Kubischta, W.; Kurshetsov, V.; Lamanna, G.; Lazzeroni, C.; Lenti, M.; Leonardi, E.; Litov, L.; Madigozhin, D.; Maier, A.; Mannelli, I.; Marchetto, F.; Marel, G.; Markytan, M.; Marouelli, P.; Martini, M.; Masetti, L.; Massarotti, P.; Mazzucato, E.; Michetti, A.; Mikulec, I.; Misheva, M.; Molokanova, N.; Monnier, E.; Moosbrugger, U.; Morales Morales, C.; Moulson, M.; Movchan, S.; Munday, D. J.; Napolitano, M.; Nappi, A.; Neuhofer, G.; Norton, A.; Numao, T.; Obraztsov, V.; Palladino, V.; Patel, M.; Pepe, M.; Peters, A.; Petrucci, F.; Petrucci, M. C.; Peyaud, B.; Piandani, R.; Piccini, M.; Pierazzini, G.; Polenkevich, I.; Popov, I.; Potrebenikov, Yu.; Raggi, M.; Renk, B.; Retière, F.; Riedler, P.; Romano, A.; Rubin, P.; Ruggiero, G.; Salamon, A.; Saracino, G.; Savrié, M.; Scarpa, M.; Semenov, V.; Sergi, A.; Serra, M.; Shieh, M.; Shkarovskiy, S.; Slater, M. W.; Sozzi, M.; Spadaro, T.; Stoynev, S.; Swallow, E.; Szleper, M.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valente, P.; Vallage, B.; Velasco, M.; Veltri, M.; Venditti, S.; Wache, M.; Wahl, H.; Walker, A.; Wanke, R.; Widhalm, L.; Winhart, A.; Winston, R.; Wood, M. D.; Wotton, S. A.; Yushchenko, O.; Zinchenko, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2013-12-01

    A review of recent experimental results on charged kaon decays from NA48/2 and NA62 collaborations is given, together with a description of the NA62 experiment to study the ultra-rare decay K+→π+νν¯ starting in fall 2014.

  16. Developments on passive cooling in buildings -- Results from recent research

    SciTech Connect

    Santamouris, M.; Argiriou, A.A.; Balaras, C.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper summarizes recent developments in natural and passive cooling in buildings and the main results from the European research project PASCOOL. The project was completed at the end of 1995, after 27 months of theoretical and experimental work resulting in a better understanding of passive cooling techniques and the development of tools and design guidelines. The project was a collaboration of 29 European universities and research organizations from 12 countries.

  17. Recent Geologic Mapping Results for the Polar Regions of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    tanaka, K. L.; Kolb, E. J.

    2008-01-01

    The polar regions of Mars include the densest data coverage for the planet because of the polar orbits of MGS, ODY, and MEX. Because the geology of the polar plateaus has been among the most dynamic on the planet in recent geologic time, the data enable the most detailed and complex geologic investigations of any regions on Mars, superseding previous, even recent, mapping efforts [e.g., 1-3]. Geologic mapping at regional and local scales is revealing that the stratigraphy and modificational histories of polar materials by various processes are highly complex at both poles. Here, we describe some of our recent results in polar geologic mapping and how they address the geologic processes involved and implications for polar climate history.

  18. Review of recent results on the /tau/ lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, K.K.

    1988-04-01

    This is a review of the recent results on the /tau/ lepton. The results include precise measurements of the lifetime, measurements of the decay /tau//sup /minus// ..-->.. ..pi../sup /minus//2..pi../sup 0/..nu../sub /tau// with much improved precision, limits on decay modes containing /eta/ mesons, including the second-class-current decay /tau//sup /minus// ..-->.. ..pi../sup /minus///eta/..nu../sub /tau//, and limits on exotic decay modes. The implications of these results on the discrepancy in the one-charged-particle decay modes are discussed. 43 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Recent HARVIST Results: Classifying Crops from Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri; Mazzoni, Dominic

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report on recent results from the Heterogeneous Agricultural Research Via Interactive, Scalable Technology (HARVIST) project. HARVIST seeks to provide the tools and scalability required to enable practicioners to analyze large, diverse data sets that may come from different data sources. We have focused on agricultural applications, and our current results demonstrate the ability of the system to train a crop type classifier that operates on orbital remote sensing images. We find that this classifier can label crops with an accuracy of 82%, comparable to other published results.

  20. A Review of Recent Results on Quarkonium Production at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe Altarelli, Monica

    2014-04-01

    A selection of LHCb results is presented on the production of heavy quarkonium states in pp collisions, including results on J/ψ and ϓ production at √s = 8 TeV, the measurement of prompt J/ψ polarisation, the production of χc mesons from converted photons, exclusive charmonium production, double J/ψ production, as well as recent results on J/ψ production in proton-lead collisions at √sNN = 5 TeV.

  1. Recent results in the hard-tube MILO experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Haworth, M.; Baca, G.; Hendricks, K.; Shiffler, D.; Englert, T.; Henley, D.; LaCour, M.; Sena, M.; Lemke, R.

    1998-12-31

    The Hard-Tube MILO (Magnetically Insulated transmission Line Oscillator) is a gigawatt-class high-power microwave tube which employs conventional-tube brazing techniques rather than finger stock RF joints in its construction. The authors report on recent improvements made to the cathode and to the extractor in order to improve the shot-to-shot reproducibility of the tube by eliminating breakdown at triple points. Results from optimizing the impedance match of the extractor circuit to the tube, which has been predicted to increase the output power by up to 50%, are also presented. Finally, they report on Hard-Tube MILO results when using the recently upgraded IMP pulser. This upgrade gives the authors the potential to increase the output microwave pulse duration from its previously pulsed-power-limited value of 170 ns (FWHM) to nearly 500 ns.

  2. Recent Fermilab results on hadroproduction of heavy flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Garbincius, P.H.

    1993-08-01

    Recent results from various Fermilab experiments on the hadroproduction of states containing charm, bottom, and top quarks are discussed. These include observation of the spectra, lifetime, and production characteristics of charmonium, open charm states, and bottom particle production with both high energy fixed target and {bar p}-p collider facilities. The status of the search for the top quark by the Fermilab collider experiments is updated.

  3. Recent Results of Top Quark Physics from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, R. Y.

    2015-07-09

    Twenty years after its discovery in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab, the top quark still undergoes intensive studies at the Tevatron and the LHC at CERN. In this article, recent top quark physics results from CDF and D0 are reported. In particular, measurements of single top quark and double top quark production, the $t\\bar{t}$ forward-backward asymmetry and the top quark mass are discussed.

  4. Recent results in silicon photonics at the University of Southampton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, G. T.; Mashanovich, G. Z.; Gardes, F. Y.; Thomson, D. J.; Hu, Y.; Soler-Penades, J.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Thomas, P.; Littlejohns, C.; Ahmad, A.; Reynolds, S.; Topley, R.; Mitchell, C.; Stankovic, S.; Owens, N.; Chen, X.; Wilson, P. R.; Ke, L.; Ben Masaud, T. M.; Tarazona, A.; Chong, H.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we will discuss recent results in our work on Silicon Photonics. This will include active and passive devices for a range of applications. Specifically we will include work on modulators and drivers, deposited waveguides, multiplexers, device integration and Mid IR silicon photonics. These devices and technologies are important both for established applications such as integrated transceivers for short reach interconnect, as well as emerging applications such as disposable sensors and mass market photonics.

  5. Recent charm mixing results from BABAR, Belle, and CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, M.J.; /Iowa U. /SLAC

    2009-02-02

    A summary of the results of several recent studies of charm mixing is presented. A number of different methods were used, including the measurement of lifetime ratios for final states of different CP, time dependence of wrong-sign hadronic decays, fits to time-dependent Dalitz plots, and searches for wrong-sign semi-leptonic decays. Taken together, they suggest mixing is of order 1%. The status of searches for indirect CP violation is also reported.

  6. Recent Results from the Mars Exploration Rover Rock Abrasion Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, J.; Paulsen, G.; Davis, K.; Gorevan, S.; Zacny, K.

    2009-12-01

    The Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) serves as the sample preparation device on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) science payload. The RAT grinds Martian rock in a cylindrical volume, 45 mm in diameter and to a depth of up to 10 mm. This grinding action is intended to remove the altered outer layers of rock as well as overlying surface fines in preparation for imaging and spectral observations. In addition to acting as a facilitator for other instruments in the MER payload, RAT telemetry acquired during grinding may be used to assess the physical properties of the rocks that it grinds. RAT instruments on both Spirit and Opportunity have continued to operate and return useful data since 2004, despite minor problems that have recently occurred. The RAT on Spirit has recently been used for a purpose outside its original design capabilities: brushing away thin layers of loose soil without solid rock underneath. By progressing into the soil a few millimeters at a time, the RAT has been instrumental in helping to reveal the stratigraphy of this soft material. These results have helped in assessing soil properties and in turn will facilitate extrication of Spirit from its current location. Recent results from the Mars Exploration Rovers are presented along with data from laboratory RAT testing.

  7. Overview of recent results from the STAR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Mustafa

    2016-12-01

    The Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) experiment utilizes its excellent mid-rapidity tracking and particle identification capabilities to study the emergent properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The STAR heavy-ion program at vanishingly small baryon density is aimed to address questions about the quantitative properties of the strongly-interacting Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) matter created in high energy collisions (η / s, q ˆ , chirality, transport parameters, heavy quark diffusion coefficients…). At finite baryon density, the questions concern the phases of nuclear matter (the QCD phase diagram) and the nature of the phase transition, namely: what is the onset collision energy for the formation of QGP? What is the nature of phase transition in heavy-ion collisions? Are there two phase transition regions? If yes, where is the critical point situated? At Quark Matter 2015, the STAR collaboration has presented a wealth of new experimental results which address these questions. In these proceedings I highlight a few of those results.

  8. Langmuir polymer films: recent results and new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Monroy, F; Arriaga, L R; Langevin, D

    2012-11-14

    Langmuir polymer films (LPFs) are very interesting systems to probe quasi-two dimensional dynamics. Although adsorbed on water, the substrate is fluid enough to avoid irreversible pinning at adsorption sites, as with solid substrates. LPFs in dense states can exhibit a high degree of metastability, however reproducible measurements can be performed on films which have not been previously compressed. The shear rheology is one of the most active fields of research, especially because it allows investigation of flow behaviour in LPFs, thus of possible reptation motion in semidilute films under good solvent conditions. It also allows probing glassy behaviour in dense films under poor solvent conditions. In this perspective article, we review the recent literature and discuss unpublished results on the dynamics of the glass transition, recently observed in these quasi-2D systems at low temperatures. We conclude by listing new problems and open questions emerging from this research area.

  9. Geological calculations with SANGRE and MANTLE: Recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carruthers, L. M.; Goldman, P.; Anderson, C. A.

    1984-08-01

    Q-13 has two finite-element calculational efforts involving geological studies, both two dimensional and both with extensive graphics output. The SANGRE code was developed at Los Alamos as an extension of TSAAS. Recent code developments include introduction of pore pressure, which has made possible some calculations with geologic folds that show the behavior of fluid during the geological fold process. The code has recently been linked to the STRAP code for graphical output--results will be shown. The MANTLE code work has continued in collaboration with Gerald Schubert of UCLA. Modeling efforts include slabs extending into the fluid region, with and without initial slab motion. Coupled calculations are made of temperature and creep. Graphics are internal to the code and show velocities, pressures, temperatures, stream functions, etc.

  10. Satellite Communications for Aeronautical Applications: Recent research and Development Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    Communications systems have always been a critical element in aviation. Until recently, nearly all communications between the ground and aircraft have been based on analog voice technology. But the future of global aviation requires a more sophisticated "information infrastructure" which not only provides more and better communications, but integrates the key information functions (communications, navigation, and surveillance) into a modern, network-based infrastructure. Satellite communications will play an increasing role in providing information infrastructure solutions for aviation. Developing and adapting satellite communications technologies for aviation use is now receiving increased attention as the urgency to develop information infrastructure solutions grows. The NASA Glenn Research Center is actively involved in research and development activities for aeronautical satellite communications, with a key emphasis on air traffic management communications needs. This paper describes the recent results and status of NASA Glenn's research program.

  11. Convective heat transfer in buildings: recent research results. Rev

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, F.; Gadgil, A.; Kammerud, R.; Altmayer, E.; Nansteel, M.W.

    1982-10-01

    Recent experimental and numerical studies of convective heat transfer in buildings are described, and important results are presented. The experimental work has been performed on small-scale, water-filled enclosures; the numerical analysis results have been produced by a computer program based on a finite-difference scheme. The convective processes investigated in this research are: (1) natural convective heat transfer between room surfaces and the adjacent air, (2) natural convective heat transfer between adjacent rooms through a doorway or other openings, and (3) forced convection between the building and its external environment (such as wind-driven ventilation through windows, doors, or other openings). Results obtained at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for surface convection coefficients are compared with existing ASHRAE correlations, and differences can have a significant impact on the accuracy of building energy analysis computer simulations. Interzone coupling correlations obtained from experimental work are in reasonable agreement with recently published experimental results and with earlier published work. Numerical simulations of wind-driven natural ventilation are presented. They exhibit good qualitative agreement with published wind-tunnel data.

  12. Recent results of the NANOGrav Physics Frontiers Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemens, Xavier; NANOGrav Physics Frontiers Center

    2017-01-01

    The NANOGrav Physics Frontiers Center uses the Arecibo Observatory and the Green Bank Telescope (the two most sensitive radio telescopes in the world) to monitor high-precision millisecond pulsars. Our goal is to directly detect low frequency gravitational waves, which cause small correlated changes in the times of arrival of radio pulses from pulsars, and use them to study the low-frequency gravitational-wave universe. Our access to these observatories has allowed us to reach unprecedented sensitivities and we expect to make a detection soon. In this talk I will discuss the most recent results of our searches for gravitational waves in pulsar timing data.

  13. Recent results of the Cosmic Dust Analyzer onboard Cassini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srama, Ralf; Gruen, Eberhard; Kempf, Sascha; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Beckmann, Uwe; Postberg, Frank; Hsu, Hsiang-Wen; Burton, Marcia; Spahn, Frank; Economou, Thanasis

    The Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) onboard the Cassini mission measures the properties of micron sized dust particles in the planetary system. Since 2004 CDA performs successfully measurements in the Saturnian system and made several exciting discoveries and measurements: Dust streams from the inner and outer ring system, dust grain potentials, dust grain composition of ring particles, dust size and density distributions in the outer ring system, the G ring detection, the Enceladus dust plumes and significant dust fluxes outside the known E ring. This paper provides an overview about the recent achievement of the CDA instrument and presents the results of the dust composition measurements of the Enceladus flyby on March 12, 2008.

  14. Summary of recent experimental results on strangeness production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalweit, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    This article summarises the highlights of the recent experimental findings on strangeness production presented at the 16th edition of the International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter in Berkeley. Results obtained by eight large experimental collaborations (ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, HADES, LHCb, NA-61, PHENIX, STAR) spanning a large range in centre-of-mass energy and a variety of collision systems were presented at the conference. The article does not aim at being a complete review, but rather at connecting the experimental highlights of the different collaborations and at pointing towards questions which should be addressed by these experiments in future.

  15. Recent Results on Ultra-Luminous X-ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard

    2005-01-01

    I will summarize what is known about the properties of the ultra-luminous x-ray sources with particular emphasis on their x-ray spectral and temporal properties, their radio counterparts and the environments in which they are located. These results are based on a large XMM survey of nearby galaxies VLA radio observations, recent XMM timing and spectral observations as well has HST and Gemini observations and a review of the literature. I will discuss how our present knowledge fits in with estimates of their mass and whether these objects are 'intermediate mass' black holes or stellar mass black holes in a very unusual state.

  16. Recent results in electroweak physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Giulia Manca

    2004-02-13

    The Run II physics program of CDF and D0 has just begun with the first 72 pb{sup -1} of analysis quality data collected at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The Electroweak measurements are among the first and most important benchmarks for the best understanding of the detectors and testing the Standard Model. We present measurements of the W and Z inclusive cross sections and decays asymmetries, recent results in di-boson physics and searches for new physics which make use of distinct electroweak signatures.

  17. Kappa-deformations: historical developments and recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukierski, Jerzy

    2017-01-01

    I shall recall in historical perspective some results from nineties and show further how κ-deformed symmetries and κ-Minkowski space inspired DSR (Doubly of Deformed Special Relativity) approach proposed after 2000. As very recent development I shall show how to describe quantum-covariant κ-deformed phase spaces by passing from Hopf algebras to Hopf algebroids (arXiv:1507.02612) and I will briefly describe the κ-deformations of AdS 5 × S 5 superstring target spaces (arXiv:1510.030.83).

  18. News from the proton - recent DIS results from HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, K.

    1997-01-01

    Recent results from the two large general-purpose detectors H1 and ZEUS at HERA (DESY, Hamburg, Germany) are presented. Emphasis is given to the analysis of deep inelastic scattering defined by the observation of the scattered electron or positron in the main calorimeters. Results on purely inclusive cross sections lead to a determination of the charged (quarks) parton distribution F{sub 2}(x, Q{sup 2}). Access to the electrically neutral parton content (gluons) is obtained indirectly by an analysis of the expected scaling violation behavior of F{sub 2} or directly from multijet rates originating from well-defined initial parton configurations. Finally, the recently uncovered subclass of large rapidity gap (LRG) events has been analyzed in terms of F{sub 2}. The result supports the concept of a color neutral object (Pomeron IP) being probed by a hard scattering electron. Evidence for factorization of the Pomeron radiation process as well as for scaling in the inclusive IP structure functions has been found.

  19. Recent Results in Semileptonic B Decays with BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, B.K.; /Maryland U.

    2012-04-02

    In this note, recent results of studies of semileptonic B meson decays from BABAR are discussed and preliminary results given. In particular, a recent measurement of {Beta}(B {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{nu}) and the ratio {Beta}(B {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{nu})/{Beta}(B {yields} D{sup (*)}{ell}{nu}) is presented. For the D* mode, a branching fraction of 1.79 {+-} 0.13(stat) {+-} 0.17(syst) is found, with a ratio of 0.325 {+-} 0.023(stat) {+-} 0.027(syst). For the D mode, the results are 1.04 {+-} 0.12(stat) {+-} 0.14(syst) and 0.456 {+-} 0.053(stat) {+-} 0.056(syst), respectively. In addition, a study of B{sub s} production and semileptonic decays using data collected in a center-of-mass energy region above the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance is discussed. The semileptonic branching fraction {Beta}(B{sub s} {yields} {ell}{nu}X) is measured to be 9.9{sub -2.1}{sup +2.6}(stat){sub -2.0}{sup +1.3}(syst).

  20. Helium nanodroplet isolation rovibrational spectroscopy: Methods and recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callegari, Carlo; Lehmann, Kevin K.; Schmied, Roman; Scoles, Giacinto

    2001-12-01

    In this article, recent developments in helium nanodroplet isolation (HENDI) spectroscopy are reviewed, with an emphasis on the infrared region of the spectrum. We discuss how molecular beam spectroscopy and matrix isolation spectroscopy can be usefully combined into a method that provides a unique tool to tackle physical and chemical problems which had been outside our experimental possibilities. Next, in reviewing the experimental methodology, we present design criteria for droplet beam formation and its seeding with the chromophore(s) of interest, followed by a discussion of the merits and shortcomings of radiation sources currently used in this type of spectroscopy. In a second, more conceptual part of the review, we discuss several HENDI issues which are understood by the community to a varied level of depth and precision. In this context, we show first how a superfluid helium cluster adopts the symmetry of the molecule or complex seeded in it and discuss the nature of the potential well (and its anisotropy) that acts on a solute inside a droplet, and of the energy levels that arise because of this confinement. Second, we treat the question of the homogeneous versus inhomogeneous broadening of the spectral profiles, moving after this to a discussion of the rotational dynamics of the molecules and of the surrounding superfluid medium. The change in rotational constants from their gas phase values, and their dependence on the angular velocity and vibrational quantum number are discussed. Finally, the spectral shifts generated by this very gentle matrix are analyzed and shown to be small because of a cancellation between the opposing action of the attractive and repulsive parts of the potential of interaction between molecules and their solvent. The review concludes with a discussion of three recent applications to (a) the synthesis of far-from-equilibrium molecular aggregates that could hardly be prepared in any other way, (b) the study of the influence of a

  1. Recent Observations on Tin Pest Formation in Solder Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumbridge, W. J.

    2008-02-01

    The most recent observations of the response of bulk samples of several lead-free solder alloys, exposed to temperatures below the allotropic transition for tin for extended periods, are reported. Tin pest has been observed in Sn-0.5Cu, Sn-3.5Ag, Sn-3.8Ag-0.7Cu, and Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu alloys at both -18°C and -40°C. The process is slow and inconsistent, usually requiring several years, but may eventually result in complete disintegration of the sample. No tin pest was detected in Sn-Zn-3Bi or in the traditional Sn-37Pb solder alloy after exposure for up to 4 and 10 years, respectively. It is suggested that nucleation is affected by local composition and that extremely small amounts of either intentional solute or impurity are influential. Growth of tin pest is accompanied by a large volume change, and it is likely that stress relaxation ahead of the expanding grey tin front is a controlling factor. A stronger matrix would be more resistant in this case, and at the temperatures of exposure Sn-37Pb is stronger than either Sn-3.5Ag or Sn-0.5Cu. The absence of tin pest, to date, on actual joints is attributed to their restricted free surface area and the greater strength associated with very small samples.

  2. Steps Toward Identifying PAHs: A Child's Garden of Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.

    2005-01-01

    Based on over two decades of experimental, observational and theoretical studies by scientists around the world. It is now widely accepted that the composite emission of mixtures of vibrationally-excited PAHs and PAH ions can accommodate the general pattern of band positions, intensities, and profiles observed in the discreet IR emission features of carbon-rich interstellar dust, as well as the variations in those characteristics. These variations provide insight into the detailed nature of the emitting PAH population and reflect conditions within the emitting regions giving the population enormous potential as probes of astrophysical environments. Moreover, the ubiquity and abundance of this material has impacts that extend well beyond the IR. In this presentation we will examine recent, combined experimental, theoretical, and observational studies that indicate that nitrogen-substituted PAHs represent an important component of the interstellar dust population, and we will go on to explore some of the ramifications of this result. We will also explore the results of recent experimental studies of the strong, low-lying electronic transitions of ionized PAH ions in the Near-IR (0.7 - 2.5 microns) and explore the role that these transitions might play in pumping the PAH IR emission in regions of low-excitation.

  3. Steps Toward Identifying PAHs: A Child's Garden of Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.

    2005-01-01

    Based on over two decades of experimental, observational and theoretical studies by scientists around the world. It is now widely accepted that the composite emission of mixtures of vibrationally-excited PAHs and PAH ions can accommodate the general pattern of band positions, intensities, and profiles observed in the discreet IR emission features of carbon-rich interstellar dust, as well as the variations in those characteristics. These variations provide insight into the detailed nature of the emitting PAH population and reflect conditions within the emitting regions giving the population enormous potential as probes of astrophysical environments. Moreover, the ubiquity and abundance of this material has impacts that extend well beyond the IR. In this presentation we will examine recent, combined experimental, theoretical, and observational studies that indicate that nitrogen-substituted PAHs represent an important component of the interstellar dust population, and we will go on to explore some of the ramifications of this result. We will also explore the results of recent experimental studies of the strong, low-lying electronic transitions of ionized PAH ions in the Near-IR (0.7 - 2.5 microns) and explore the role that these transitions might play in pumping the PAH IR emission in regions of low-excitation.

  4. Recent ARGUS results on τ/charm physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, Andreas

    1992-06-01

    The recent experimental results on τ and charm decays obtained by the ARGUS collaboration are presented in this talk. The results include new measurements of many exclusive decay modes of the τ lepton and of the inclusive three prong decay mode. They confirm the current world averages and stress the τ decay problem. A study of the hadronic τ decays into π-π0ντ and π-π-π+ντ performed. We searched in 29 different channels for neutrinoless τ d ecays. No evidence was found for these decays. The decay D+ → K∗+overlineK*0, which is observed for the first time, is shown together with th e decay of the D s+ meson into the same final state. These decays represent one of the few known decays of D mesons into two vector mesons. Furthermore a measurement of the semileptonic Λc+ decay is shown.

  5. Laser acceleration of ions: recent results and prospects for applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychenkov, V. Yu; Brantov, A. V.; Govras, E. A.; Kovalev, V. F.

    2015-01-01

    We present a brief review of recent theoretical and numerical simulation results on the acceleration of ions from various targets irradiated by high-power femtosecond laser pulses. The results include: the optimization of the laser-plasma acceleration of ions over the thickness of a solid target; a new dependence of the energy of accelerated protons from a semi-transparent foil on the incident pulse energy; a theoretical model of plasma layer expansion in the vacuum for a fixed temperature of heated electrons, describing arbitrary regimes of particle acceleration, from the quasineutral flow of a plasma to Coulomb explosion; analytic theories of the relativistic Coulomb explosion of a spherical microtarget and the radial ponderomotive acceleration of ions from a laser channel in a transparent plasma; and calculations optimizing the production of isotopes for medicine using next-generation lasers.

  6. Recent results on Quarkonium production from LHC and RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scomparin, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    The study of quarkonium production in nuclear collisions at ultrarelativistic energies is a crucial tool for the determination of the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) created in such collisions. After a pioneering phase at the CERN SPS, a large amount of results were obtained at the RHIC collider, at a center of mass energy per nucleon-nucleon collisions √{sNN} = 0 . 2 TeV and, more recently, at the LHC at √{sNN} = 2 . 76 TeV. In a QGP, the binding of the heavy quark pair (either c c or b b) that forms the quarkonium states is screened by the high density of surrounding color charges, leading to a suppression of the yield of such states. At the same time, re-combination processes involving the heavy quarks may lead to a re-generation of the quarkonia that partly counterbalances their suppression. Ultimately, these studies can provide information on the temperature of the QGP and on its degree of thermalization. In this talk, after an introduction of the main physics concepts, I will review recent experimental results obtained at RHIC and LHC in the study of c c (J/ Ψ and Ψ (2 S)) and b b (Γ (1 S) , Γ (2 S) and Γ (3 S)) states. Most results refer to Au-Au (at RHIC) and Pb-Pb collisions (at LHC), but also heavier (U-U) and lighter (Cu-Cu) systems were investigated as well. Prospects for future studies, and in particular first results, if available, from the LHC Run 2 at √{sNN} = 5 . 02 TeV, will also be discussed.

  7. Multiphase Turbulent Interstellar Medium: Some Recent Results from Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Nirupam

    2015-06-01

    The radio frequency 1.4 GHz transition of the atomic hydrogen is one of the important tracers of the diffuse neutral interstellar medium. Radio astronomical observations of this transition, using either a single dish telescope or an array interferometer, reveal different properties of the interstellar medium. Such observations are particularly useful to study the multiphase nature and turbulence in the interstellar gas. Observations with multiple radio telescopes have recently been used to study these two closely related aspects in greater detail. This review article presents a brief outline of some of the basic ideas of radio astronomical observations and data analysis, summarizes the results from these recent observations, and discusses possible implications of the results. Using various observational techniques, the density and the velocity fluctuations in the Galactic interstellar medium was found to have a Kolmogorov-like power law power spectra. The observed power law scaling of the turbulent velocity dispersion with the length scale can be used to derive the true temperature distribution of the medium. Observations from a large ongoing atomic hydrogen absorption line survey have also been used to study the distribution of gas at different temperature. The thermal steady state model predicts that the multiphase neutral gas will exist in cold and warm phase with temperature below 200 K and above 5000 K respectively. However, these observations clearly show the presence of a large fraction of gas in the intermediate unstable phase. These results raise serious doubt about the validity of the standard model, and highlight the necessity of alternative theoretical models. Interestingly, numerical simulations suggest that some of the observational results can be explained consistently by including the effects of turbulence in the models of the multiphase medium.

  8. An Overview of Recent PISCES Program PMI Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tynan, George; Doerner, Russell; Abe, Shota; Baldwin, Matthew; Barton, Joseph; Chen, Renkun; Gosselin, Jordan; Hollmann, Eric; Nishijima, Daisuke; Simmonds, Michael; Wang, Yong; Yu, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    The PISCES Program is focused on fundamental PMI studies of Be and W-based solid plasma facing components under steady-state and transient conditions. We will show results from studies in W, Be and mixed W-Be material systems. Topics of investigation include formation of near-surface nanobubbles from He plasma ion implantation, growth of W-fuzz from these bubbles in steady-state and transient conditions, D retention in Be and W and development of a D-retention model for both H/D isotope exchange and displacement damage experiments. Initial studies of PMI in displacement damaged W are also presented, showing the effect of damage and exposure temperature on D retention, D diffusion, W thermal conductivity. Be-based results include morphology evolution under high plasma flux exposure, Be erosion mechanisms, and retention in Be-based materials. Future plans and connections to fusion energy system requirements will be discussed. This work supported by grant DE-FG02-07ER54912.

  9. Commissioning results from the recently upgraded RHIC LLRF system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.S.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Narayan, G.; Severino, F.; Yuan, S.; Zaltsman, A.

    2011-03-28

    During RHIC Run 10, the first phase of the LLRF Upgrade was successfully completed. This involved replacing the aging VME based system with a modern digital system based on the recently developed RHIC LLRF Upgrade Platform, and commissioning the system as part of the normal RHIC start up process. At the start of Run 11, the second phase of the upgrade is underway, involving a significant expansion of both hardware and functionality. This paper will review the commissioning effort and provide examples of improvements in system performance, flexibility and scalability afforded by the new platform. The RHIC LLRF upgrade is based on the recently developed RHIC LLRF Upgrade Platform. The major design goals of the platform are: (1) Design a stand alone, generic, digital, modular control architecture which can be configured to satisfy all of the application demands we currently have, and which will be supportable and upgradeable into the foreseeable future; and (2) It should integrate seamlessly into existing controls infrastructure, be easy to deploy, provide access to all relevant control parameters (eliminate knobs), provide vastly improved diagnostic data capabilities, and permit remote reconfiguration. Although the system is still in its infancy, we think the initial commissioning results from RHIC indicate that these goals have been achieved, and that we've only begun to realize the benefits the platform provides.

  10. Phenomenology of buoyancy-driven turbulence: recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Mahendra K.; Kumar, Abhishek; Pandey, Ambrish

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we describe the recent developments in the field of buoyancy-driven turbulence with a focus on energy spectrum and flux. Scaling and numerical arguments show that the stably-stratified turbulence with moderate stratification has kinetic energy spectrum {E}u(k)∼ {k}-11/5 and the kinetic energy flux {{{\\Pi }}}u(k)∼ {k}-4/5, which is called Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling. However, for Prandtl number near unity, the energy flux for the three-dimensional Rayleigh–Bénard convection (RBC) is approximately constant in the inertial range that results in Kolmorogorv’s spectrum ({E}u(k)∼ {k}-5/3) for the kinetic energy. The phenomenology of RBC should apply to other flows where the buoyancy feeds the kinetic energy, e.g. bubbly turbulence and fully-developed Rayleigh Taylor instability. This paper also covers several models that predict the Reynolds and Nusselt numbers of RBC. Recent works show that the viscous dissipation rate of RBC scales as ∼ {{Ra}}1.3, where {Ra} is the Rayleigh number.

  11. Recent results in nonlinear strain and modulus imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Timothy J.; Barbone, Paul; Oberai, Assad A.; Jiang, Jingfeng; Dord, Jean Francois; Goenezen, Sevan; Fisher, Ted G.

    2012-01-01

    We report a summary of recent developments and current status of our team’s efforts to image and quantify in vivo nonlinear strain and tissue mechanical properties. Our work is guided by a focus on applications to cancer diagnosis and treatment using clinical ultrasound imaging and quasi-static tissue deformations. We review our recent developments in displacement estimation from ultrasound image sequences. We discuss cross correlation approaches, regularized optimization approaches, guided search methods, multiscale methods, and hybrid methods. Current implementations can return results of high accuracy in both axial and lateral directions at several frames per second. We compare several strain estimators. Again we see a benefit from a regularized optimization approach. We then discuss both direct and iterative methods to reconstruct tissue mechanical property distributions from measured strain and displacement fields. We review the formulation, discretization, and algorithmic considerations that come into play when attempting to infer linear and nonlinear elastic properties from strain and displacement measurements. Finally we illustrate our progress with example applications in breast disease diagnosis and tumor ablation monitoring. Our current status shows that we have demonstrated quantitative determination of nonlinear parameters in phantoms and in vivo, in the context of 2D models and data. We look forward to incorporating 3D data from 2D transducer arrays to noninvasively create calibrated 3D quantitative maps of nonlinear elastic properties of breast tissues in vivo. PMID:22754425

  12. II Zwicky 33: star formation induced by a recent interaction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinks, E.

    The discovery is reported of an H I cloud at the same redshift as II Zwicky 33 with an H I mass of 1.2x109Msun. Only very weak optical emission is seen at its position in the light of Hα and in broad band B pictures whereas II Zw 33 itself shows signs of violent star formation. It is suggestive that the two clouds are tidally interacting and that this has triggered the present burst of star formation. The companion galaxy is practically a dark galaxy and might be of primordial composition. The total mass of the companion is of the same order as the mass in neutral gas and there is no need to invoke any dark matter.

  13. Recent results in the NASA research balloon program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. Vernon

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Balloon Program has progressed from a total hiatus in the fall of 1985 to an unprecedented flight success rate in the fall of 1988. Using heavy-lift balloons being regularly supplied by two manufacturers, the program has provided a timely response for investigations of Supernova 1987A from Australia, low energy cosmic ray investigations from Canada during periods of near-solar-minimum, and routine domestic turnaround flights for a variety of investigations. Recent re-evaluation of balloon flight-safety have resulted in severe constraints on flights launched from the Palestine, Texas facility. The future program must rely heavily on the use of remote launch sites to meet the growing requirements for more frequent and longer duration flights being planned for the next 3 - 5 years.

  14. Trojan Horse Method: recent results in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitaleri, C.; Lamia, L.; Gimenez Del Santo, M.; Burjan, V.; Carlin, N.; Li, Chengbo; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V.; Irgaziev, B.; La Cognata, M.; Mrazek, J.; Mukhamedzhanov, M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Palmerini, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, L.; Zhou, Shu-Hua; Somorjai, E.; Souza, F. A.; Tabacaru, G.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Tumino, A.; Wen, Qungang; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2015-07-01

    The accurate knowledge of thermonuclear reaction rates is important in understanding the energy generation, the neutrinos luminosity and the synthesis of elements in stars. The physical conditions under which the majority of astrophysical reactions proceed in stellar environments make it difficult or impossible to measure them under the same conditions in the laboratory. That is why different indirect techniques are being used along with direct measurements. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) is introduced as an independent technique to obtain the bare nucleus astrophysical S(E)-factor. As examples the results of recent the application of THM to the 2H(11B, σ08Be)n and 2H(10B, σ07Be)n reactions are presented.

  15. SIM Interferometer Testbed (SCDU) Status and Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemati, Bijan; An, Xin; Goullioud, Renaud; Shao, Michael; Shen, Tsae-Pyng; Wehmeier, Udo J.; Weilert, Mark A.; Wang, Xu; Werne, Thomas A.; Wu, Janet P.; Zhai, Chengxing

    2010-01-01

    SIM Lite is a space-borne stellar interferometer capable of searching for Earth-size planets in the habitable zones of nearby stars. This search will require measurement of astrometric angles with sub micro-arcsecond accuracy and optical pathlength differences to 1 picometer by the end of the five-year mission. One of the most significant technical risks in achieving this level of accuracy is from systematic errors that arise from spectral differences between candidate stars and nearby reference stars. The Spectral Calibration Development Unit (SCDU), in operation since 2007, has been used to explore this effect and demonstrate performance meeting SIM goals. In this paper we present the status of this testbed and recent results.

  16. Recent results on celestial gamma radiation from SMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Share, Gerald H.

    1991-01-01

    Observations made by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer on board the SMM are described. Recent results reported include observations and analyses of gamma-ray lines from Co-56 produced in supernovae, observations of the temporal variation of the 511 keV line observed during Galactic center transits, and measurements of the diffuse Galactic spectrum from 0.3 to 8.5 MeV. The work in progress includes measurements of the distribution of Galactic Al-26, observations to place limits on Galactic Ti-44 and Fe-60 and on Be-7 produced in novae, and searches for a characteristic gamma-ray emission from pair plasmas, a 2.223 MeV line emission, limits on deexcitation lines from interstellar C and O, and gamma-ray bursts.

  17. The Askaryan Radio Array: Overview and Recent Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfendner, Carl; Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) is radio frequency observatory under construction at the South Pole that is searching for ultrahigh energy neutrinos via the Askaryan effect. By instrumenting several gigatons of Antarctic glacial ice, the experiment aims to detect a flux of neutrinos above 10 PeV in energy. The measurement of this expected flux of neutrinos would provide information about the highest energy processes in the universe with no local horizon. The full detector consisting of 37 stations is being constructed in a phased deployment with 3 stations already in place and two more planned for deployment in the 2017-2018 season. Recent results from an analysis of data from two stations and a search for neutrinos correlated with gamma ray bursts are presented here. Funding provided by NSF CAREER Award 1255557, NSF ARA Grant 1404266, BigData Grant 1250720.

  18. Recent results on celestial gamma radiation from SMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Share, Gerald H.

    1991-01-01

    Observations made by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer on board the SMM are described. Recent results reported include observations and analyses of gamma-ray lines from Co-56 produced in supernovae, observations of the temporal variation of the 511 keV line observed during Galactic center transits, and measurements of the diffuse Galactic spectrum from 0.3 to 8.5 MeV. The work in progress includes measurements of the distribution of Galactic Al-26, observations to place limits on Galactic Ti-44 and Fe-60 and on Be-7 produced in novae, and searches for a characteristic gamma-ray emission from pair plasmas, a 2.223 MeV line emission, limits on deexcitation lines from interstellar C and O, and gamma-ray bursts.

  19. Recent Results in Quantum Chemical Kinetics from High Resolution Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Quack, Martin

    2007-12-26

    We outline the approach of our group to derive intramolecular kinetic primary processes from high resolution spectroscopy. We then review recent results on intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) and on tunneling processes. Examples are the quantum dynamics of the C-H-chromophore in organic molecules, hydrogen bond dynamics in (HF){sub 2} and stereomutation dynamics in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and related chiral molecules. We finally discuss the time scales for these and further processes which range from 10 fs to more than seconds in terms of successive symmetry breakings, leading to the question of nuclear spin symmetry and parity violation as well as the question of CPT symmetry.

  20. Recent Run II Electroweak and QCD Results from D0

    SciTech Connect

    Robert L. Kehoe

    2003-12-17

    The D0 Detector is a hermetic, multipurpose detector residing at one interaction region designated for p{bar p} collisions at 2 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. Both the detector and accelerator have undergone major upgrades to increase the luminosity and handle higher interaction rates. This paper presents recent results from Run II data which explore QCD and electroweak physics at the energy frontier. The dijet mass cross section and a search for Z' in dielectron decays are presented, and these are already approaching sensitivities seen in Run I. Additionally, the first measurement of the {sigma}{sub Z} * BR(Z {yields} {mu}{mu}) is given for the new collision energy.

  1. Recent Observational Results on Electron Acceleration in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Hamish

    2013-04-01

    The Sun is the largest and most energetic particle accelerator in our solar system. During solar flares, magnetic explosions commonly accelerate electrons to energies in the deca-keV range and above. In the larger flares it is also possible to observe relativistic electrons. We can detect high energy electrons directly via in-situ observations near the Earth and indirectly via the electromagnetic emission they create in a wide spectrum of wavelengths. After a brief overview I will present some of the recent observational results from solar flare electron acceleration and the new insight they are granting us. I will also mention the energy, space, and time scales that are important for solar flares and how this relates to other electron acceleration processes in the solar system (e.g. in the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere).

  2. An overview of recent DVCS results at HERMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaschenko, S.

    2014-01-01

    The HERMES experiment at DESY, Hamburg, collected unique data on Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) utilizing the HERA polarized electron or positron beams with an energy of 27.6 GeV and longitudinally or transversely polarized or unpolarized gas targets (H, D or heavier nuclei). For the last two years of HERA running, a recoil detector was installed to improve the selection of DVCS events by direct measurement of the recoil protons. Recent HERMES results on DVCS off the hydrogen target and on associated processes ep → epπ0γ and ep → enπ+γ in the Δ-resonance region obtained with the recoil detector are presented.

  3. Relativistic pseudospin and spin symmetries in physical systems - recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberto, P.; Castro, A.; Fiolhais, M.; Lisboa, R.; Malheiro, M.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we revise the main features of pseudospin and spin symmetries of the Dirac equation with scalar and vector potentials and mention several of its applications to physical systems. These symmetries have been extensively researched in the last 15 years, especially pseudospin symmetry, mainly in its application in understanding certain nuclear structure features of heavy nuclei. The realization of both symmetries has also been studied using several mean-field scalar and vector potentials. For many classes of potentials, these symmetries allow to have analytical solutions of the Dirac equation which otherwise would not have been possible. We report here some recent results related to anti-fermions, Coulomb and confining potentials.

  4. Recent result from the A2 collaboration at MAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Andreas

    2016-11-01

    The A2 Collaboration at the Mainz Microtron MAMI is measuring photon absorption cross section using circularly and linearly polarized photons up to energies of 1.6 GeV. The photons are produced in the `Bremsstrahlungs' process, the energy is determined by a dedicated tagging system. The Crystal Ball-TAPS detector system with its high capability to cope with multi photon final states is used to acquire data with a variety of nonpolarized and spin polarized targets. Physical goals are the investigation of the nucleons excitation spectrum via single and double meson photoproduction and in addition a detailed determination of meson decays in precision experiments. We have started a program to measure double polarised Compton scattering to determine the nucleons scalar and spin polarisibilities. In this proceedings recent results from A2 collaboration

  5. A summary of recent results from the GRAPES-3 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S. K.

    2017-06-01

    The GRAPES-3 experiment is a combination of a high density extensive air shower (EAS) array of nearly 400 plastic scintillator detectors, and a large 560 m2 area tracking muon telescope with an energy threshold Eμ >1 GeV. GRAPES-3 has been operating continuously in Ooty, India since 2000. By accurately correcting for the effects of atmospheric pressure and temperature, the muon telescope provides a high precision directional survey of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity. This telescope has been used to observe the acceleration of muons during thunderstorm events. The recent discovery of a transient weakening of the Earth's magnetic shield through the detection of a GCR burst was the highlight of the GRAPES-3 results. We have an ongoing major expansion activity to further enhance the capability of the GRAPES-3 muon telescope by doubling its area.

  6. Recent results from ANKE, WASA-at-COSY, and PAX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoukaz, Alfons; ANKE,the; WASA-at-COSY; PAX Collaborations

    2015-11-01

    The complementary internal beam experiments ANKE, WASA, and PAX at the COoler-SYnchrotron COSY-Jülich offer unique and exciting opportunities for hadron physics with polarized and unpolarized hadronic probes. Due to the excellent properties of COSY, in combination with the high performance detection systems, a broad experimental program can be covered. One main emphasis of the studies at these facilities are measurements on symmetries in reactions and particle decays as well as high precision studies on particles and their properties. Furthermore, the availability of polarized beams and/or targets allows for investigations on hadronic reactions using the spin degree of freedom or studies towards polarized antiprotons. After an introduction to the experimental facilities at COSY, both recently published results as well as new and unpublished data will be presented and discussed.

  7. Recent results on spectra and yields from NA49

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NA49 Collaboration; van Leeuwen, M.; Afanasiev, S. V.; Anticic, T.; Baatar, B.; Barna, D.; Bartke, J.; Barton, R. A.; Behler, M.; Betev, L.; Białkowska, H.; Billmeier, A.; Blume, C.; Blyth, C. O.; Boimska, B.; Botje, M.; Bracinik, J.; Bramm, R.; Brun, R.; Bunčić, P.; Cerny, V.; Chvala, O.; Cramer, J. G.; Csató, P.; Dinkelaker, P.; Eckardt, V.; Filip, P.; Fischer, H. G.; Fodor, Z.; Foka, P.; Freund, P.; Friese, V.; Gál, J.; Gaździcki, M.; Georgopoulos, G.; Gładysz, E.; Hegyi, S.; Höhne, C.; Igo, G.; Jones, P. G.; Kadija, K.; Karev, A.; Kolesnikov, V. I.; Kollegger, T.; Kowalski, M.; Kraus, I.; Kreps, M.; van Leeuwen, M.; Lévai, P.; Malakhov, A. I.; Margetis, S.; Market, C.; Mayes, B. W.; Melkumov, G. L.; Meurer, C.; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M.; Molnár, J.; Nelson, J. M.; Pálla, G.; Panagiotou, A. D.; Perl, K.; Petridis, A.; Pikna, M.; Pinsky, L.; Pühlhofer, F.; Reid, J. G.; Renfordt, R.; Retyk, W.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rybicki, A.; Sammer, T.; Sandoval, A.; Sann, H.; Schmitz, N.; Seyboth, P.; Siklér, F.; Sitar, B.; Skrzypczak, E.; Squier, G. T. A.; Stock, R.; Ströbele, H.; Susa, T.; Szentpétery, I.; Sziklai, J.; Trainor, T. A.; Varga, D.; Vassiliou, M.; Veres, G. I.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vranić, D.; Wenig, S.; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Yoo, I. K.; Zaranek, J.; Zimányi, J.

    2003-03-01

    The energy dependence of hadron production in central Pb+Pb collisions is presented and discussed. In particular, midrapidity $m_T$-spectra for $\\pi^-$, $K^-$, $K^+$, $p$, $\\bar{p}$, $d$, $\\phi$, $\\Lambda$ and $\\bar{\\Lambda}$ at 40, 80 and 158 $A$GeV are shown. In addition $\\Xi$ and $\\Omega$ spectra are available at 158 $A$GeV. The spectra allow to determine the thermal freeze-out temperature $T$ and the transverse flow velocity $\\beta_T$ at the three energies. We do not observe a significant energy dependence of these parameters; furthermore there is no indication of early thermal freeze-out of $\\Xi$ and $\\Omega$ at 158 $A$GeV. Rapidity spectra for $\\pi^-$, $K^-$, $K^+$ and $\\phi$ at 40, 80 and 158 $A$GeV are shown, as well as first results on $\\Omega$ rapidity distributions at 158 $A$GeV. The chemical freeze-out parameters $T$ and $\\mu_B$ at the three energies are determined from the total yields. The parameters are close to the expected phase boundary in the SPS energy range and above. Using the total yields of kaons and lambdas, the energy dependence of the strangeness to pion ratio is discussed. A maximum in this ratio is found at 40 $A$GeV. This maximum could indicate the formation of deconfined matter at energies above 40 $A$GeV. A search for open charm in a large sample of 158 $A$GeV events is presented. No signal is observed. This result is compared to several model predictions.

  8. Recent results, status and prospects for the BESIII experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzia, Isabella; BESIII Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    We report the measurement of the asymmetry ACP of the branching fractions of D0 → K-π+ in the CP-odd and CP-even eigenstates using a data sample of 2.92 fb-1 collected with the BESIII detector at the center-of-mass energy √s = 3.773 GeV. With the measured ACP, the strong phase difference δKπ between the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed process D¯0 → K-π+ and the Cabibbo-favored process D0 → K-π+ is extracted. Using world- average values of external parameters, we obtain the most precise measurement of δKπ to date: cos δKπ = 1.02 ± 0.11 ± 0.06 ± 0.01. The first and second uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively, while the third arises from external input. Based on the same data sample a preliminary results of the parameter yCP in D0D¯0 oscillation is obtained. Finally, a summary of the recent results from charmonium spectroscopy is reported. The high statistics accumulated at the Y(4260) and Y(4360) energies help us to understand the nature and the proprieties of the XYZ states.

  9. Recent Borexino results and prospects for the near future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, D.; Agostini, M.; Altenmüller, K.; Appel, S.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Di Noto, L.; Drachnev, I.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jedrzejczak, K.; Kaiser, M.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Roncin, R.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Semenov, D.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Thurn, J.; Toropova, M.; Unzhakov, E.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Weinz, S.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Yokley, Z.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-11-01

    The Borexino experiment located in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, is an organic liquid scintillator detector conceived for the real time spectroscopy of low energy solar neutrinos. The phase-I of the data taking campaign (2007 - 2010) has allowed the first independent measurements of 7Be and pep solar neutrino fluxes as well as the first measurement of anti-neutrinos from the Earth. After a purification of the scintillator, Borexino is now in phase-II since 2011. Thanks to the unprecedented background levels, we have performed the first flux measurement of neutrinos from the fundamental pp reaction which powers the Sun. We review this breakthrough result and other recent results, including the latest review of our terrestrial neutrino analysis. We also discuss the upcoming measurements on middle energy solar neutrino spectral components (pep, CNO) and the new project SOX devoted to the study of sterile neutrinos via the use of a neutrino source placed in close proximity of the detector's active material.

  10. HIV surveillance in MENA: recent developments and results.

    PubMed

    Bozicevic, Ivana; Riedner, Gabriele; Calleja, Jesus Maria Garcia

    2013-11-01

    To provide an overview of the current level of development and results from the national HIV surveillance systems of the 23 countries of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), and to assess the quality of HIV surveillance systems in the period 2007-2011. A questionnaire was used to collect the information about the structure, activities and the results of HIV surveillance systems from the National AIDS Programmes. Assessment of the quality was based on four indicators: timeliness of data collection, appropriateness of populations under surveillance, consistency of the surveillance sites and groups measured over time, and coverage of the surveillance system. Only in four countries did surveillance systems enable assessment of epidemic trends in the same populations and locations over time, such as in pregnant women (Morocco, Iran), injecting drug users (Iran, Pakistan), female sex workers (Djibouti, Morocco) and male sex workers (Pakistan). There is increasing evidence of HIV infection being firmly established in at least one of the populations most at risk of HIV in nine MENA countries, while lower risk populations show elevated HIV prevalence in South Sudan, Djibouti and some parts of Somalia. The performance of HIV surveillance systems in several of the MENA countries has improved in recent years. The extent of HIV epidemics in the populations most at risk of HIV is still largely unknown in 10 countries. Multiple data sources that most of the countries still lack would enable indirectly estimation not only of the patterns of HIV epidemics but also the effectiveness of HIV responses.

  11. Recent experimental results of KSTAR RF heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S. J. Kim, J.; Jeong, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Joung, M.; Bae, Y. S.; Kwak, J. G.

    2015-12-10

    The overview of KSTAR activities on ICRH, LHCD and ECH/CD including the last experimental results and future plan aiming for long-pulse high-beta plasma will be presented. Recently we achieved reasonable coupling of ICRF power to H-mode plasma through several efforts to increase system reliability. Power balance will be discussed on this experiment. LHCD is still struggling in the low power regime. Review of antenna spectrum for the higher coupling in H-mode plasma will be tried. ECH/CD provides 41 sec, 0.8 MW of heating power to support high-performance long-pulse discharge. Also, 170 GHz ECH system is integrated with the Plasma Control System (PCS) for the feedback controlling of NTM. Status and plan of ECH/CD will be discussed. Finally, helicon current drive is being prepared for the next stage of KSTAR operation. The hardware preparation and the calculation results of helicon current drive in KSTAR plasma will be discussed.

  12. Recent Photoemission Results for the Electron-Doped Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Hiroaki

    2006-03-01

    Recent improvement in the energy and angular resolution of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) enabled us to investigate the detailed electronic structure in electron-doped high-temperature superconductors (HTSC), which have a relatively smaller energy-scale of superconductivity compared to hole-doped systems. In this talk, we report our recent ARPES results1,2 focusing on the many-body interaction and the superconducting-gap symmetry in electron-doped HTSC. We have performed high-resolution ARPES measurements on Nd2-xCexCuO4 and observed that the quasiparticle (QP) effective mass around oπ sg&_slash;p is strongly enhanced due to opening of an antiferromagnetic (AF) pseudogap. Both the QP effective mass and the AF pseudogap are strongly anisotropic with the largest magnitude near the hot spot, which is defined as an intersection point of the Fermi surface and the AF zone boundary. Temperature-dependent measurements have revealed that the AF pseudogap survives at temperatures much higher than TN (N'{e}el temperature), possibly due to the short-range AF correlation remaining even above TN. The AF pseudogap gradually decreases with doping and is abruptly filled up near the boundary between the AF and superconducting phases. To study the anisotropy of superconducting gap in electron-doped HTSC, we have performed high-resolution ARPES on Pr0.89LaCe0.11CuO4. We observed that the momentum dependence of superconducting gap is basically consistent with the dx2-y2-wave symmetry, but it obviously deviates from the simple dx2-y2 gap function. The maximum superconducting gap is not observed at the zone boundary as expected from the simple dx2-y2 gap symmetry, but it is located around the hot spot where electrons are thought to be strongly coupled to the AF spin fluctuation. All these ARPES results suggest that the electronic stricture and the superconducting behavior are strongly dominated by the AF interaction in electron-doped HTSC. 1) H. Matsui, K. Terashima

  13. HIV surveillance in MENA: recent developments and results

    PubMed Central

    Bozicevic, Ivana; Riedner, Gabriele; Calleja, Jesus Maria Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To provide an overview of the current level of development and results from the national HIV surveillance systems of the 23 countries of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), and to assess the quality of HIV surveillance systems in the period 2007–2011. Methods A questionnaire was used to collect the information about the structure, activities and the results of HIV surveillance systems from the National AIDS Programmes. Assessment of the quality was based on four indicators: timeliness of data collection, appropriateness of populations under surveillance, consistency of the surveillance sites and groups measured over time, and coverage of the surveillance system. Results Only in four countries did surveillance systems enable assessment of epidemic trends in the same populations and locations over time, such as in pregnant women (Morocco, Iran), injecting drug users (Iran, Pakistan), female sex workers (Djibouti, Morocco) and male sex workers (Pakistan). There is increasing evidence of HIV infection being firmly established in at least one of the populations most at risk of HIV in nine MENA countries, while lower risk populations show elevated HIV prevalence in South Sudan, Djibouti and some parts of Somalia. Conclusions The performance of HIV surveillance systems in several of the MENA countries has improved in recent years. The extent of HIV epidemics in the populations most at risk of HIV is still largely unknown in 10 countries. Multiple data sources that most of the countries still lack would enable indirectly estimation not only of the patterns of HIV epidemics but also the effectiveness of HIV responses. PMID:23434789

  14. Some recent results of nonlinear acoustics in combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culick, F. E. C.

    1994-01-01

    The chief purpose of this paper is to provide a brief review of some recent work on nonlinear acoustics applicable to combustion instabilities, largely in the framework of an approximate analysis. Some connections will be made with the modern theory of nonlinear dynamical systems, including very recent and incomplete attempts by others to assess the possible chaotic behavior observed in laboratory tests.

  15. A recent burst in the star formation history of LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelli, Gianpaolo; Bressan, Alessandro; Chiosi, Cesare; Mateo, Mario

    We present deep photometric observations of stars in three fields of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), and interpret these data using synthetic color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) generated from the overshoot models of Bertelli et al. (1985, 1986, 1990), Bressan et al. (1986), and Aparicio et al. (1990) and from the classical models of Fagotto (1990). We can successfully model the field CMDs and LFs with a star-formation rate that experienced a large increase at a certain age of its history. Only overshoot models are able to provide a unique age of the sudden increase common to the three fields. Our study shows that this phenomenon happened about 4 x 10 exp 9 yrs ago adopting the following constraints: the slope of the initial mass function equal to 2.35 (the Salpeter value), a mean field-star metallicity of about -0.7, and the distance modulus of LMC equal to 18.4.

  16. Electron-cloud simulation results for the SPS and recent results for the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.; Pivi, M.T.F.

    2002-06-19

    We present an update of computer simulation results for some features of the electron cloud at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and recent simulation results for the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). We focus on the sensitivity of the power deposition on the LHC beam screen to the emitted electron spectrum, which we study by means of a refined secondary electron (SE) emission model recently included in our simulation code.

  17. Electron-cloud updated simulation results for the PSR, and recent results for the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.; Furman, M.A.

    2002-05-29

    Recent simulation results for the main features of the electron cloud in the storage ring of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge, and updated results for the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at Los Alamos are presented in this paper. A refined model for the secondary emission process including the so called true secondary, rediffused and backscattered electrons has recently been included in the electron-cloud code.

  18. Recent high energy gamma-ray results from SAS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Ogelman, H. B.; Ozel, M. E.; Tumer, T.; Lamb, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Recent developments in gamma-ray astronomy due to the results from SAS-2 have focused on two areas. First, the emission from the plane of the Galaxy is the dominant feature in the gamma-ray sky. The galactic latitude and longitude distributions are consistent with the concept that the high-energy radiation originates from cosmic rays interacting with interstellar matter, and the measurements support a galactic origin for cosmic rays. Second, searches of the SAS-2 data for emission from localized sources have shown three strong discrete gamma-ray sources: the Crab nebula and PSR 0531 + 21, the Vela supernova remnant and PSR 0833-45, and a source near galactic coordinates 193 deg longitude, +3 deg latitude, which does not appear to be associated with other known celestial objects. Evidence has also been found for pulsed gamma-ray emission from two other radio pulsars, PSR 1818-04 and PSR 1747-46. A localized source near longitudes 76-80 deg may be associated with the X-ray source Cyg X-3.

  19. Recent Results of a New Microwave SQUID Multiplexer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Limketkai, B.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing a proof-of-concept microwave SQUID multiplexer containing four SQUIDs coupled to GHz frequency resonant circuits and fed with a single microwave readout line. The resonators are half-wave coplanar waveguide sections and are similar to the structures used for the microwave kinetic inductance detectors developed in our group. Optimal values for the interdigital gap capacitors were determined to maximize the sensitivity of the transmitted and reflected microwave signal with respect to changes in the dynamic resistance of the SQUID. The dc current-bias line for the SQUID has an in-line inductive high frequency filter to minimize coupling between the bias line and resonator. A high frequency modulation scheme is proposed to eliminate the need for individual flux biasing of the SQUIDs, which extends the dynamic range of the readout. In this scheme a common modulation signal is imposed on each SQUID and the received signal is demodulated at one and two times the modulation frequency to maintain sensitivity at any flux state. We present the recent results of the microwave SQUID multiplexer system operating at a readout frequency range of 10 - 11GHz.

  20. Recent results and persisting problems in modeling flow induced coalescence

    SciTech Connect

    Fortelný, I. E-mail: juza@imc.cas.cz; Jza, J. E-mail: juza@imc.cas.cz

    2014-05-15

    The contribution summarizes recent results of description of the flow induced coalescence in immiscible polymer blends and addresses problems that call for which solving. The theory of coalescence based on the switch between equations for matrix drainage between spherical or deformed droplets provides a good agreement with more complicated modeling and available experimental data for probability, P{sub c}, that the collision of droplets will be followed by their fusion. A new equation for description of the matrix drainage between deformed droplets, applicable to the whole range of viscosity ratios, p, of the droplets and matrixes, is proposed. The theory facilitates to consider the effect of the matrix elasticity on coalescence. P{sub c} decreases with the matrix relaxation time but this decrease is not pronounced for relaxation times typical of most commercial polymers. Modeling of the flow induced coalescence in concentrated systems is needed for prediction of the dependence of coalescence rate on volume fraction of droplets. The effect of the droplet anisometry on P{sub c} should be studied for better understanding the coalescence in flow field with high and moderate deformation rates. A reliable description of coalescence in mixing and processing devices requires proper modeling of complex flow fields.

  1. Management of severe malaria: results from recent trials.

    PubMed

    Olupot-Olupot, Peter; Maitland, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Globally, malaria remains a substantial public health burden with an estimated 349-552 million clinical cases of P. falciparum malaria each year--leading to 780,000 deaths directly attributable to the disease. Whilst the outcome from severe malaria in Africa children remains poor, recent developments in the management of malaria have come from two key sources--the introduction of new, safe and rapidly-effective anti-malarials and high quality evidence from two of the largest clinical trials ever conducted in African children with severe malaria. As a result, the time-honoured anti-malarial treatment for severe malaria, quinine, will now be replaced by artesunate, a water-soluble artemisinin derivative. Supportive care, specifically the management of shock, has been informed by a large late phase clinical trial which concluded that bolus resuscitation is harmful and therefore should be avoided in children with severe malaria, including the high risk group with severe metabolic acidosis and advanced shock.

  2. Recent neutron scattering results from Gd-based pyrochlore oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jason

    2009-03-01

    In my presentation I will present recent results that have determined the spin-spin correlations in the geometrically frustrated magnets Gd2Sn2O7 and Gd2Ti2O7. This will include polarised neutron diffraction, inelastic neutron scattering and neutron spin echo data. One sample of particular interest is Gd2Sn2O7 which is believed to be a good approximation to a Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a pyrochlore lattice with exchange and dipole-dipole interactions. Theoretically such a system is expected to enter long range ordered ground state known as the ``Palmer Chalker'' state [1]. We show conclusively, through neutron scattering data, that the system indeed enters an ordered state with the Palmer-Chalker spin configuration below Tc = 1 K [2-3]. Within this state we have also observed long range collective spin dynamics, spin waves. This work has been performed in collaboration with many research groups including G. Ehlers (SNS), R. Stewart (ISIS). [0pt] [1] S. E. Palmer and J. T. Chalker, Phys. Rev. B 62, 488 (2000). [0pt] [2] J. R. Stewart, G. Ehlers, A. S. Wills, S. T. Bramwell, and J. S. Gardner, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 16, L321 (2004). [0pt] [3] J R Stewart, J S Gardner, Y. Qiu and G Ehlers, Phys. Rev. B. 78, 132410 (2008)

  3. The Status and Recent Results of the Telescope Array Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Katsuya

    The Telescope Array (TA) is a cosmic ray observatory of the largest aperture in the northern hemisphere, located in a desert in the western part of Utah, U.S.A., to explore the origin of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays, photons, and neutrinos. The TA employs two types of detectors to observe air showers generated by cosmic rays in the atmosphere: the first is a "surface detector (SD)" of scintillation counters to measure shower particles on the ground, and the second is a "fluorescence detector (FD)" of telescopes installed in three stations to observe fluorescence light, caused by air shower particles, from the atmosphere above the SD array. The TA detectors have been in routine operation since May 2008. We measured the energy spectrum of cosmic rays with energy greater than 1018 eV from our first 4-year data. We found a clear suppression of comic ray intensity above 5 × 1019 eV. This feature is consistent with a theoretical prediction that cosmic rays lose energies due to interaction with cosmic microwave background photons during propagation in the intergalactic space. In this talk, We will present the status of the TA experiment and the recent results, including the energy spectrum, study of the primary mass composition, and searches for anisotropies in the arrival directions. We also briefly describe plans for further extensions.

  4. Meteor Observations with SPOSH - Results from recent Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberst, J.; Flohrer, J.; Elgner, S.; Maue, T.; Schroedter, R.; Michaelis, H.

    In the past years, we have carried out meteor observations during prominent meteor showers using the camera SPOSH (Smart Panoramic Optical Sensor Head). The camera (which was built jointly with jenaoptronik under ESA/ESTEC contract) features a back-illuminated 1K x 1K CCD sensor, and a custom-made extreme wide-angle optical system (up to 170° over the diagonal) with high light-gathering power and low distortion. The camera typically operates at frame rates up to 2 frames/s and has a built-in powerful FPG-based processing unit for event detection and reporting. The camera can be equipped with a rotating shutter to gather meteor velocity information. Two cameras of this type are currently available at our facility (with two additional cameras available at jenaoptronik and ESA/ESTEC), all of which can be used in parallel for coordinated meteor observations. Efforts have been made in the past year to devise geometric calibration schemes on the basis of star images to determine camera orientation, as well as focal length and radial distortion parameters. In addition, software is currently being developed for meteor trajectory determinations using double station data. At the conference, we will report on results from recent test campaigns (including the one we are currently preparing for the Perseids in August 2006), where SPOSH has demonstrated to be a highly effective meteor observation tool.

  5. Editorial: solar radiophysics — recent results on observations and theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakariakov, Valery M.; Kashapova, Larisa K.; Yan, Yi-Hua

    2014-07-01

    Solar radiophysics is a rapidly developing branch of solar physics and plasma astrophysics. Solar radiophysics has the goal of analyzing observations of radio emissions from the Sun and understanding basic physical processes operating in quiet and active regions of the solar corona. In the near future, the commissioning of a new generation of solar radio observational facilities, which include the Chinese Spectral Radio Heliograph (CSRH) and the upgrade of the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT), and the beginning of solar observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), is expected to bring us new breakthrough results of a transformative nature. The Marie-Curie International Research Staff Exchange (MC IRSES) “RadioSun” international network aims to create a solid foundation for the successful exploitation of upcoming solar radio observational facilities, as well as intensive use of the existing observational tools, advanced theoretical modeling of relevant physical processes and observables, and training a new generation of solar radio physicists. The RadioSun network links research teams from China, Czech Republic, Poland, Russia and the UK. This mini-volume presents research papers based on invited reviews and contributed talks at the 1st RadioSun workshop in China. These papers cover a broad range of research topics and include recent observational and theoretical advances in solar radiophysics, MHD seismology of the solar corona, physics of solar flares, generation of radio emission, numerical modeling of MHD and plasma physics processes, charged-particle acceleration and novel instrumentation.

  6. Recent Results of a New Microwave SQUID Multiplexer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Limketkai, B.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing a proof-of-concept microwave SQUID multiplexer containing four SQUIDs coupled to GHz frequency resonant circuits and fed with a single microwave readout line. The resonators are half-wave coplanar waveguide sections and are similar to the structures used for the microwave kinetic inductance detectors developed in our group. Optimal values for the interdigital gap capacitors were determined to maximize the sensitivity of the transmitted and reflected microwave signal with respect to changes in the dynamic resistance of the SQUID. The dc current-bias line for the SQUID has an in-line inductive high frequency filter to minimize coupling between the bias line and resonator. A high frequency modulation scheme is proposed to eliminate the need for individual flux biasing of the SQUIDs, which extends the dynamic range of the readout. In this scheme a common modulation signal is imposed on each SQUID and the received signal is demodulated at one and two times the modulation frequency to maintain sensitivity at any flux state. We present the recent results of the microwave SQUID multiplexer system operating at a readout frequency range of 10 - 11GHz.

  7. Recent Results from KASCADE-Grande and LOPES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kascade-Grande; Lopes Collaboration; Kampert, K.-H.; Apel, W. D.; Arteaga, J. C.; Asch, T.; Badea, F.; Bähren, L.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Brüggemann, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buitink, S.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Ender, M.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Falcke, H.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kang, D.; Kickelbick, D.; Klages, H. O.; Kolotaev, Y.; Krömer, O.; Kuijpers, J.; Lafebre, S.; Link, K.; Łuczak, P.; Ludwig, M.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Melissas, M.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Nehls, S.; Nigl, A.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Over, S.; Palmieri, N.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rautenberg, J.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Saftoiu, A.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, A.; Schröder, F.; Sima, O.; Singh, K.; Stümpert, M.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G.; Ulrich, H.; Walkowiak, W.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; Zabierowski, J.; Zensus, J. A.; KASCADE-Grande and LOPES Collaboration

    2009-05-01

    KASCADE-Grande is an extensive air-shower experiment located at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany. Main parts of the experiment are the Grande array spread over an area of 700×700 m, the original KASCADE array covering 200×200 m with unshielded and shielded detectors, and additional muon tracking devices. This multi-detector system allows to investigate the energy spectrum, composition, and anisotropies of cosmic rays in the energy range up to 1 EeV. LOPES is co-located at the same site to measure radio pulses from extensive air showers in coincidence with KASCADE-Grande. It consists of 30 digital antennas operated in different geometrical configurations. Read out is performed at high bandwidths and rate data processing with the aim to calibrate the emitted signal in the primary energy range of 10-10 eV by making use of reconstructed air-shower observables of KASCADE-Grande. An overview on the performance of both experiments will be given and recent analysis results be reported.

  8. Recent results on time-dependent Hamiltonian oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robnik, M.

    2016-09-01

    Time-dependent Hamilton systems are important in modeling the nondissipative interaction of the system with its environment. We review some recent results and present some new ones. In time-dependent, parametrically driven, one-dimensional linear oscillator, the complete analysis can be performed (in the sense explained below), also using the linear WKB method. In parametrically driven nonlinear oscillators extensive numerical studies have been performed, and the nonlinear WKB-like method can be applied for homogeneous power law potentials (which e.g. includes the quartic oscillator). The energy in time-dependent Hamilton systems is not conserved, and we are interested in its evolution in time, in particular the evolution of the microcanonical ensemble of initial conditions. In the ideal adiabatic limit (infinitely slow parametric driving) the energy changes according to the conservation of the adiabatic invariant, but has a Dirac delta distribution. However, in the general case the initial Dirac delta distribution of the energy spreads and we follow its evolution, especially in the two limiting cases, the slow variation close to the adiabatic regime, and the fastest possible change - a parametric kick, i.e. discontinuous jump (of a parameter), where some exact analytic results are obtained (the so-called PR property, and ABR property). For the linear oscillator the distribution of the energy is always, rigorously, the arcsine distribution, whose variance can in general be calculated by the linear WKB method, while in nonlinear systems there is no such universality. We calculate the Gibbs entropy for the ensembles of noninteracting nonlinear oscillator, which gives the right equipartition and thermostatic laws even for one degree of freedom.

  9. Recent Results from the PVLAS Experiment on the Magnetized Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantatore, Giovanni

    The vacuum element can be used as a target in a photon-photon collider in order to study its properties. Some of these properties are predicted by Quantum Electrodynamics, while additional and unexpected properties might be linked to the existence of yet undiscovered axion-like particles (ALPs) interacting with two photons. In this low energy case (1 2 texteV), real photons from a polarized laser beam are scattered off virtual photons provided by a magnetic field. Information on the scattering processes can be obtained by measuring changes in the polarization state of the probe photons. In the PVLAS (Polarizzazione del Vuoto con LASer) experiment, running at the Legnaro Laboratory of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), near Padova, Italy, a linearly polarized laser beam is sent through a 5 textT strong magnetic field in vacuum, where it is reflected back and forth, by means of a Fabry-P’erot resonator, ˜ 50,000 times over a distance of 1 textm. A heterodyne ellipsometer allows the simultaneous detection of a birefringence and a rotation of the polarization plane. The sensitivity of the instrument allows the detection of rotation or of ellipticity angles of about 10-9 textrad, in an hour of data taking. The measurement technique employed by PVLAS will be illustrated, and recent results on polarization effects due to the magnetized vacuum will be presented in this chapter. The interpretation of these effects in terms of the production of ALPs will also be discussed. Finally, the realization of a photon-regeneration type experiment will be briefly illustrated.

  10. Recent results from the T2K experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawe, M.

    2016-10-01

    T2K is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment based in Japan. It was the first experiment to observe νe appearance in a νμ beam, and has more recently produced the highest precision measurement of the oscillation parameter θ23 and has begun to probe the charge-parity violation phase δ. Using a νμ beam disappearance sample, T2K measures sin2 θ23 = 0.514+0.055-0.056 and Δm232 = (2.51 ± 0.10)×10-3eV2/c4 assuming the normal mass hierarchy, and sin2 θ23 = 0.511±0.055 and Δm213 = (2.48 ± 0.10)×10-3eV2/c4 assuming the inverted mass hierarchy. A joint fit between νμ beam appearance and disappearance samples produces consistent results for sin2 θ23 and Δm232 whilst also excluding at 90% confidence level the regions δ = [0.15,0.83]π for the normal hierarchy and δ = [- 0.08,1.09]π. Using a {bar ν _μ } beam disappearance sample, {sin ^2}{bar θ 23} = 0.45 - 0.12 + 0.29 and {sin ^2}{bar θ 23} = 0.45 - 0.12 + 0.29 and | {Δ bar m32^2} | = (2.51 ± 0.28) × {10 - 3} {{e}}{{{V}}^2}/{{{c}}^4}, consistent with previous measurements and the T2K νμ sample.

  11. GNSS Remote Sensing at GFZ: Overview and Recent Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickert, Jens; Alshawaf, Fadwa; Arras, Christina; Asgarimehr, Milad; Dick, Galina; Heise, Stefan; Larson, Kristine; Li, Xingxing; Lu, Cuixian; Peraza, Luis; Ramatschi, Markus; Schmidt, Torsten; Schuh, Harald; Semmling, Maximilian; Simeonov, Tzvetan; Vey, Sibylle; Zus, Florian

    2017-04-01

    GNSS atmospheric remote sensing was successfully established during the last two decades and evolved into a major application for high precision GNSS. The most prominent example for this development is the use of GNSS atmospheric data to improve day-by-day regional and global weather forecasts since 2006. Globally distributed vertical profiles of refractivity, temperature and water vapour are derived from satellite based GNSS data (Radio Occultation, RO). Ground based measurements, provided by global and regional GNSS networks, allow for the derivation of vertically (IWV) or along the line-of-sight integrated water vapour (SWV). Another important GNSS remote sensing technique, the exploitation of Earth reflected signals (GNSS Reflectometry, GNSS-R), is not yet operationally applied. But the huge potential for the determination of various physical parameters, as, e.g., sea surface height, wind speed over water and soil moisture on regional and global scales is recognized by the Earth Observation community. Therefore GNSS-R is recently a major challenge of international geophysical research. We review related activities at the German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ and introduce recent results. The status of the GNSS-RO experiments aboard the satellites GRACE-A, TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X, which are coordinated by GFZ, is reviewed. Examples of GNSS RO applications are given, as, e.g., climatological investigations of the global vertical temperature structure or the detection of ionospheric irregularities in the E-region. We also focus on ground based activities for GNSS water vapour monitoring. Observations of a global and regionally densified German network, with about 600 stations in total, are processed in near-real time to operationally provide IWV data. These data are assimilated into atmospheric models by several European weather centers. Current research activities are focused on the generation and meteorological application of GNSS based slant data, on real

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic waves and coronal seismology: an overview of recent results.

    PubMed

    De Moortel, Ineke; Nakariakov, Valery M

    2012-07-13

    Recent observations have revealed that magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves and oscillations are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere, with a wide range of periods. We give a brief review of some aspects of MHD waves and coronal seismology that have recently been the focus of intense debate or are newly emerging. In particular, we focus on four topics: (i) the current controversy surrounding propagating intensity perturbations along coronal loops, (ii) the interpretation of propagating transverse loop oscillations, (iii) the ongoing search for coronal (torsional) Alfvén waves, and (iv) the rapidly developing topic of quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flares.

  13. Recent N* results from photoproduction experiments at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    D. Sokhan

    2011-10-01

    The recent breakthroughs in the technology of polarized targets have enabled a new generation of meson photo-production experiments to be carried out. A measurement of a full set of polarization observables off both polarized proton and neutron tar gets and in a large number of meson-production channels has come within sight. Such a measurement would very significantly reduce model-dependence in the analysis of the data and thus has the potential to resolve long-standing issues, such as the 'missing resonance' problem, and shed new light on the nucleon excitation spectrum. This has formed the motivation for the recent N* experimental programme of CLAS.

  14. Recent N* results from photoproduction experiments at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Sokhan, D.

    2011-10-24

    The recent breakthroughs in the technology of polarised targets have enabled a new generation of meson photo-production experiments to be carried out. A measurement of a full set of polarisation observables off both polarised proton and neutron targets and in a large number of meson-production channels has come within sight. Such a measurement would very significantly reduce model-dependence in the analysis of the data and thus has the potential to resolve long-standing issues, such as the 'missing resonance' problem, and shed new light on the nucleon excitation spectrum. This has formed the motivation for the recent N* experimental programme of CLAS.

  15. Recent development of glacier complex Adygine and resulting risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falatkova, Kristyna; Sobr, Miroslav; Engel, Zbynek; Jansky, Bohumir

    2015-04-01

    Recent development of glacier complex Adygine and resulting risks Falátková, K., Šobr, M., Engel, Z., Janský, B. Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, Prague, Czech republic Glacier complex Adygine (3,400-4,200 m asl) is situated on the northern flank of the Kyrgyz Range, Tien Shan, Kyrgyzstan. The valley downstream is part of National Park Ala Archa, which is popular with tourists, and is heading towards the country's capital - Bishkek. At the study site there is a glacier which is observed since 1960's. The glacier has been monitored by satellite imagery and in last 10 years by on-site geodetic measurement as well. Due to glacier shrinkage several glacial lakes of different genetic types (moraine-dammed, moraine- and rock-dammed, termokarst) have appeared at the site. Nowadays, the lakes are situated on three levels in front of the glacier's terminus and form a cascade, they are also hydrologically connected. The lakes were subjected to detailed bathymetric measurement and some parts of the dams were surveyed by geophysical methods. Especially the newest lakes in proximity of the terminus has been undergoing dynamic changes and may pose a threat in the near future. The risks arising together with changing climatic conditions and retreat of the glacier are associated with mainly three of the lakes. The largest one with area of 3.2 ha is dammed by a rock step overlaid by a moraine. Geophysical research of the dam revealed buried ice and seepage channels in its western part. It is the capacity of these subsurface channels, which are draining the lake throughout the year that represents a weak point in terms of dam stability. The second lake, a termokarst one, is a similar case but drained solely by subsurface channels. Very steep slopes of the lake basin are covered with loose material which could slide down and block the drainage channels. The lake would then fill all the basin (approx. 50,000 m3) very quickly as it is supplied with water from the

  16. Recent transition crossing results from the Fermilab Main Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; Ng, K.Y.

    1997-03-01

    This paper outlines the known mechanisms for emittance dilution and beam loss during transition crossing. These include scraping, Johnsen`s nonlinear effect, bunch length mismatch, microwave and negative-mass instabilities, and beam loading. A recent experiment on transition crossing performed with 13 proton bunches injected into the Main Ring is discussed.

  17. Recent Results from the Physics of Colloids in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, David A.; Bailey, A.; Christianson, R.; Manley, S.; Prasad, V.; Segre, P.; Gasser, U.; Cipelletti, L.; Schoefield, A.; Pusey, P.

    2002-01-01

    The Physics of Colloids in Space is an experiment which flew in the ISS. Data on several different samples of colloidal particles were obtained. They provided unexpected information about the behavior of the samples in microgravity. The data are currently being analyzed. The most recent findings will be discussed in this talk.

  18. Recent Results from the Physics of Colloids in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, David A.; Bailey, A.; Christianson, R.; Manley, S.; Prasad, V.; Segre, P.; Gasser, U.; Cipelletti, L.; Schoefield, A.; Pusey, P.

    2002-01-01

    The Physics of Colloids in Space is an experiment which flew in the ISS. Data on several different samples of colloidal particles were obtained. They provided unexpected information about the behavior of the samples in microgravity. The data are currently being analyzed. The most recent findings will be discussed in this talk.

  19. Recent results of laparoscopic surgery in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Hermann; Mudter, Jonas; Hohenberger, Werner

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are an ideal indication for the laparoscopic surgical approach as they are basically benign diseases not requiring lymphadenectomy and extended mesenteric excision; well-established surgical procedures are available for the conventional approach. Inflammatory alterations and fragility of the bowel and mesentery, however, may demand a high level of laparoscopic experience. A broad spectrum of operations from the rather easy enterostomy formation for anal Crohn’s disease (CD) to restorative proctocolectomies for ulcerative colitis (UC) may be managed laparoscopically. The current evidence base for the use of laparoscopic techniques in the surgical therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases is presented. CD limited to the terminal ileum has become a common indication for laparoscopic surgical therapy. In severe anal CD, laparoscopic stoma formation is a standard procedure with low morbidity and short operative time. Studies comparing conventional and laparoscopic bowel resections, have found shorter times to first postoperative bowel movements and shorter hospital stays as well as lower complication rates in favour of the laparoscopic approach. Even complicated cases with previous surgery, abscess formation and enteric fistulas may be operated on laparoscopically with a low morbidity. In UC, restorative proctocolectomy is the standard procedure in elective surgery. The demanding laparoscopic approach is increasingly used, however, mainly in major centers; its feasibility has been proven in various studies. An increased body mass index and acute inflammation of the bowel may be relative contraindications. Short and long-term outcomes like quality of life seem to be equivalent for open and laparoscopic surgery. Multiple studies have proven that the laparoscopic approach to CD and UC is a safe and successful alternative for selected patients. The appropriate selection criteria are still under investigation. Technical considerations are playing

  20. Recent Results from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity Pancam Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, James F., III; Arvidson, Raymond; Farrand, William; Johnson, Jeffrey; Rice, James; Rice, Melissa; Ruff, Steven; Squyres, Steven; Wang, Alian

    2013-04-01

    -toned veins and fracture fills in this region includes an assessment of the hydration state of these materials using the longest-wavelength Pancam filters, which sample a weak H2O and/or OH absorption in some hydrated minerals (such as hydrated sulfates) [2]. Multispectral imaging observations are also helping to constrain the distribution and origin of discontinuous dark coatings on many light toned outcrop rocks at Matijevic Hill, near the southern end of Cape York. These outcrop rocks have been hypothesized [3] to be the unit containing the Fe/Mg smectite phyllosilicates deposits identified in Cape York from MRO/CRISM orbital observations. In this presentation I will discuss the major observations and scientific results in Meridiani that have been derived from or enabled by Pancam imaging observations, as well as provide an update on the most recent rover imaging and other results from Cape York in particular. Lessons learned in terms of the design, performance, remote operation, and analysis of multispectral CCD imaging observations from the Martian surface will also be discussed. [1] J.F. Bell III et al. (2003) JGR, v108, E12; J.F. Bell III et al. (2006) JGR, v111, E02S03. [2] M.S. Rice et al. (2013) this meeting; M.S. Rice et al. (2010) Icarus, v205, 375. [3] S.W. Squyres et al. (2013) LPSC 44th; R.E. Arvidson et al. (2013) LPSC 44th.

  1. Coronal Mass Ejections: a Summary of Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Davila, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have been recognized as the most energetic phenomenon in the heliosphere, deriving their energy from the stressed magnetic fields on the Sun. This paper highlights some of the recent results on CMEs obtained from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) missions. The summary of the talk follows. SOHO observations revealed that the CME rate is almost a factor of two larger than previously thought and varied with the solar activity cycle in a complex way (e.g., high-latitude CMEs occurred in great abundance during the solar maximum years). CMEs were found to interact with other CMEs as well as with other large-scale structures (coronal holes), resulting in deflections and additional particle acceleration. STEREO observations have confirmed the three-dimensional nature of CMEs and the shocks surrounding them. The EUV signatures (flare arcades, corona) dimming, filament eruption, and EUV waves) associated with CMEs have become vital in the identification of solar sources from which CMEs erupt. CMEs with speeds exceeding the characteristic speeds of the corona and the interplanetary medium drive shocks, which produce type II radio bursts. The wavelength range of type II bursts depends on the CME kinetic energy: type II bursts with emission components at all wavelengths (metric to kilometric) are due to CMEs of the highest kinetic energy. Some CMEs, as fast as 1600 km/s do not produce type II bursts, while slow CMEs (400 km/s) occasionally produce type II bursts. These observations can be explained as the variation in the ambient flow speed (solar wind) and the Alfven speed. Not all CME-driven shocks produce type II bursts because either they are subcritical or do not have the appropriate geometry. The same shocks that produce type II bursts also produce solar energetic particles (SEPs), whose release near the Sun seems to be delayed with respect to the onset of type II bursts

  2. Coronal Mass Ejections: a Summary of Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Davila, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have been recognized as the most energetic phenomenon in the heliosphere, deriving their energy from the stressed magnetic fields on the Sun. This paper highlights some of the recent results on CMEs obtained from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) missions. The summary of the talk follows. SOHO observations revealed that the CME rate is almost a factor of two larger than previously thought and varied with the solar activity cycle in a complex way (e.g., high-latitude CMEs occurred in great abundance during the solar maximum years). CMEs were found to interact with other CMEs as well as with other large-scale structures (coronal holes), resulting in deflections and additional particle acceleration. STEREO observations have confirmed the three-dimensional nature of CMEs and the shocks surrounding them. The EUV signatures (flare arcades, corona) dimming, filament eruption, and EUV waves) associated with CMEs have become vital in the identification of solar sources from which CMEs erupt. CMEs with speeds exceeding the characteristic speeds of the corona and the interplanetary medium drive shocks, which produce type II radio bursts. The wavelength range of type II bursts depends on the CME kinetic energy: type II bursts with emission components at all wavelengths (metric to kilometric) are due to CMEs of the highest kinetic energy. Some CMEs, as fast as 1600 km/s do not produce type II bursts, while slow CMEs (400 km/s) occasionally produce type II bursts. These observations can be explained as the variation in the ambient flow speed (solar wind) and the Alfven speed. Not all CME-driven shocks produce type II bursts because either they are subcritical or do not have the appropriate geometry. The same shocks that produce type II bursts also produce solar energetic particles (SEPs), whose release near the Sun seems to be delayed with respect to the onset of type II bursts

  3. Ion traps in nuclear physics-Recent results and achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eronen, Tommi; Kankainen, Anu; Äystö, Juha

    2016-11-01

    Ion traps offer a way to determine nuclear binding energies through atomic mass measurements with a high accuracy and they are routinely used to provide isotopically or even isomerically pure beams of short-living ions for post-trap decay spectroscopy experiments. In this review, different ion-trapping techniques and progresses in recent nuclear physics experiments employing low-energy ion traps are discussed. The main focus in this review is on the benefit of recent high accuracy mass measurements to solve some key problems in physics related to nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics as well as neutrinos. Also, several cases of decay spectroscopy experiments utilizing trap-purified ion samples are summarized.

  4. Recent theoretical results on electron-polyatomic molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect

    McCurdy, C.W.

    1994-03-01

    Until recently, the principal barrier to the accurate theoretical description of electronic collisions with polyatomic molecules was the computational problem of scattering by a nonlocal, arbitrarily asymmetric potential. Effective numerical techniques capable of solving this variety of potential scattering problem for electronic collisions have now matured, and the first applications of methods for treating many-body aspects of collisions of electrons with polyatomic molecules have begun to appear in the literature. The past two years have seen the appearance of a large collection of calculations on electron-polyatomic collisions which compare favorably with experimental determinations. In addition to the dramatic developments in methods which explicitly exploit the methods of quantum chemistry to treat the effects of electron correlation, polarization, etc., parameter-free model potential methods for electronically elastic collisions have also evolved markedly in recent years. Progress in both electronically elastic and inelastic processes is reviewed briefly.

  5. Recent Results from the WASA-at-COSY Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kupsc, Andrzej

    2011-10-24

    Studies of light meson decays are the key experiments for the WASA detector at COSY-Juelich. One of the world largest data samples of the {eta} meson decays have been recently collected in the pd {yields}{sup 3}He{eta} and in the pp {yields} pp{eta} reactions. The status of the analysis of various decay channels and the further plans for the light meson decay program are presented.

  6. Recent results from E802 and E859

    SciTech Connect

    Zajc, W.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent single-particle inclusive measurements and two-particle correlation data from E802 and its successor, E859, are presented. The K{sup +}/{pi}{sup +} ratio observed for collisions of 14.6 A{center dot} {sup 28}Si ions on various targets is presented as a function of both forward and transverse energy. Source sizes are determined via interferometry using {pi}{sup +}, {pi}{sup {minus}}, K{sup +} and proton pairs.

  7. Recent results from E802 and E859

    SciTech Connect

    Zajc, W.A.; E-802 Collaboration, ANL-BNL-UCBerkeley-UCRiverside-Columbia-Hiroshima-INS-Kyushu-LLNL-MIT-NYU-Tokyo

    1991-12-31

    Recent single-particle inclusive measurements and two-particle correlation data from E802 and its successor, E859, are presented. The K{sup +}/{pi}{sup +} ratio observed for collisions of 14.6 A{center_dot} {sup 28}Si ions on various targets is presented as a function of both forward and transverse energy. Source sizes are determined via interferometry using {pi}{sup +}, {pi}{sup {minus}}, K{sup +} and proton pairs.

  8. Some (not so) Recent Results From Continuum Decay Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sobotka, L. G.

    2010-11-24

    Recent technical advances have allowed for high-order multiparticle correlation experiments to be done. The first round of experiments done by our collaboration has lead to the highest quality data on the decay of {sup 6}Be(into an alpha particle and 2 protons), detailed how the continuum states of {sup 10}C decay (into 2 alphas and 2 protons) and lead to finding several previously unknown states in light nuclei and casting doubt on some states found by others.

  9. Recent Results on Top-Quark Physics at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, Kenneth

    2015-10-23

    We present the most recent measurements on top-quark physics obtained with Tevatron $p\\bar{p}$ collisions recorded by the D0 experiment at $\\sqrt{s}= 1.96$ TeV. The full Run II data set of 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ is analyzed. Both lepton+jets and dilepton channels of top-quark pair production are used to measure the differential and inclusive cross sections, the forward-backward asymmetries, the top-quark mass, the spin correlations, and the top-quark polarization.

  10. AFGL ten micron mosaic array spectrometer: Recent results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levan, Paul D.

    1989-01-01

    Recent measurements were made with a novel mosaic array prism spectrometer on long period variable stars of carbon and oxygen-rich atmospheres. These stars have generally large IR excesses and show strong SiC and silicate emission features, respectively. A comparison is provided by published spectra obtained with the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer. Emission feature equivalent widths are independent of the absolute photometric level of the spectra and provide information on the relative variation of the feature and continuum fluxes between the epochs of the space and groundbased observations.

  11. Recent results on the hierarchical triple system HD 150136

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosset, E.; Berger, J. P.; Absil, O.; Le Bouquin, J. B.; Sana, H.; Mahy, L.; De Becker, M.

    2013-06-01

    HD 150136 is a hierarchical triple system, non-thermal radio emitter, made of three O stars totalling some 130 solar masses. The 2.67-day inner orbit is rather well-known. Recent works derived a good approximation for the outer orbit with a period of 3000 days. We report here on interferometric observations that allow us to angularly resolve the outer orbit. First evidences for an astrometric displacement are given. The determination of the outer system orbit gives access to the inclinations of the systems and to the masses, including the one of the O3-O3.5 primary star.

  12. Recent Results on T and CP Violation at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Perez, Alejandro

    2015-02-06

    CP-violation (CPV) and Time-reversal violation (TRV) are intimately related through the CPT theorem: if one of these discrete symmetries is violated the other one has to be violated in such a way to conserve CPT. Although CPV in the B0B0-bar system has been established by the B-factories, implying indirectly TRV, there is still no direct evidence of TRV. We report on the observation of TRV in the B-meson system performed with a dataset of 468 × 106 BB-bar pairs produced in Υ(4S) decays collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We also report on other CPV measurements recently performed on the B-meson system

  13. Stellar activity and coronal heating: an overview of recent results.

    PubMed

    Testa, Paola; Saar, Steven H; Drake, Jeremy J

    2015-05-28

    Observations of the coronae of the Sun and of solar-like stars provide complementary information to advance our understanding of stellar magnetic activity, and of the processes leading to the heating of their outer atmospheres. While solar observations allow us to study the corona at high spatial and temporal resolution, the study of stellar coronae allows us to probe stellar activity over a wide range of ages and stellar parameters. Stellar studies therefore provide us with additional tools for understanding coronal heating processes, as well as the long-term evolution of solar X-ray activity. We discuss how recent studies of stellar magnetic fields and coronae contribute to our understanding of the phenomenon of activity and coronal heating in late-type stars.

  14. Stellar activity and coronal heating: an overview of recent results

    PubMed Central

    Testa, Paola; Saar, Steven H.; Drake, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the coronae of the Sun and of solar-like stars provide complementary information to advance our understanding of stellar magnetic activity, and of the processes leading to the heating of their outer atmospheres. While solar observations allow us to study the corona at high spatial and temporal resolution, the study of stellar coronae allows us to probe stellar activity over a wide range of ages and stellar parameters. Stellar studies therefore provide us with additional tools for understanding coronal heating processes, as well as the long-term evolution of solar X-ray activity. We discuss how recent studies of stellar magnetic fields and coronae contribute to our understanding of the phenomenon of activity and coronal heating in late-type stars. PMID:25897087

  15. Recent bed rest results and countermeasure development at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Bedrest studies of normal subjects provide opportunities to understand physiologic responses to supine posture and inactivity. Furthermore, head-down tilt has been a valuable procedure to investigate adaptation to microgravity and development of countermeasures to maintain the health and well-being of humans during space-flight. Recent bedrest experiments at NASA have ranged in duration from a few hours to 17 weeks. Acute studies of 6 degrees head-down tilt indicate that elevation of capillary blood pressure from 28 to 34 mm Hg and increased capillary perfusion in tissues of the head cause facial and intracranial edema. Intracranial pressure increases from 2 to 17 mm Hg going from upright posture to 6 degrees head-down tilt. Microvessels of the head have a low capacity to constrict and diminish local perfusion. Elevation of blood and tissue fluid pressures/flow in the head may also explain the higher headward bone density associated with long-term head-down tilt. These mechanistic studies of head-down tilt, along with a better understanding of the relative stresses involved with upright posture and lower body negative pressure, have facilitated development of suitable physiologic countermeasures to maintain astronaut health during microgravity. Presently no exercise hardware is available to provide a blood pressure gradient from head to feet in space. However, recent studies in our laboratory suggest that treadmill exercise using a graded lower-body compression suit and 100 mmHg lower body negative pressure provides equivalent or greater physiologic stress than similar upright exercise on Earth. Therefore, exercise within a lower body negative pressure chamber may provide a cost-effective and simple countermeasure to maintain the cardiovascular and neuro-musculoskeletal systems of astronauts during long-duration flight.

  16. Recent bed rest results and countermeasure development at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Bedrest studies of normal subjects provide opportunities to understand physiologic responses to supine posture and inactivity. Furthermore, head-down tilt has been a valuable procedure to investigate adaptation to microgravity and development of countermeasures to maintain the health and well-being of humans during space-flight. Recent bedrest experiments at NASA have ranged in duration from a few hours to 17 weeks. Acute studies of 6 degrees head-down tilt indicate that elevation of capillary blood pressure from 28 to 34 mm Hg and increased capillary perfusion in tissues of the head cause facial and intracranial edema. Intracranial pressure increases from 2 to 17 mm Hg going from upright posture to 6 degrees head-down tilt. Microvessels of the head have a low capacity to constrict and diminish local perfusion. Elevation of blood and tissue fluid pressures/flow in the head may also explain the higher headward bone density associated with long-term head-down tilt. These mechanistic studies of head-down tilt, along with a better understanding of the relative stresses involved with upright posture and lower body negative pressure, have facilitated development of suitable physiologic countermeasures to maintain astronaut health during microgravity. Presently no exercise hardware is available to provide a blood pressure gradient from head to feet in space. However, recent studies in our laboratory suggest that treadmill exercise using a graded lower-body compression suit and 100 mmHg lower body negative pressure provides equivalent or greater physiologic stress than similar upright exercise on Earth. Therefore, exercise within a lower body negative pressure chamber may provide a cost-effective and simple countermeasure to maintain the cardiovascular and neuro-musculoskeletal systems of astronauts during long-duration flight.

  17. Recent bed rest results and countermeasure development at NASA.

    PubMed

    Hargens, A R

    1994-01-01

    Bedrest studies of normal subjects provide opportunities to understand physiologic responses to supine posture and inactivity. Furthermore, head-down tilt has been a valuable procedure to investigate adaptation to microgravity and development of countermeasures to maintain the health and well-being of humans during space-flight. Recent bedrest experiments at NASA have ranged in duration from a few hours to 17 weeks. Acute studies of 6 degrees head-down tilt indicate that elevation of capillary blood pressure from 28 to 34 mm Hg and increased capillary perfusion in tissues of the head cause facial and intracranial edema. Intracranial pressure increases from 2 to 17 mm Hg going from upright posture to 6 degrees head-down tilt. Microvessels of the head have a low capacity to constrict and diminish local perfusion. Elevation of blood and tissue fluid pressures/flow in the head may also explain the higher headward bone density associated with long-term head-down tilt. These mechanistic studies of head-down tilt, along with a better understanding of the relative stresses involved with upright posture and lower body negative pressure, have facilitated development of suitable physiologic countermeasures to maintain astronaut health during microgravity. Presently no exercise hardware is available to provide a blood pressure gradient from head to feet in space. However, recent studies in our laboratory suggest that treadmill exercise using a graded lower-body compression suit and 100 mmHg lower body negative pressure provides equivalent or greater physiologic stress than similar upright exercise on Earth. Therefore, exercise within a lower body negative pressure chamber may provide a cost-effective and simple countermeasure to maintain the cardiovascular and neuro-musculoskeletal systems of astronauts during long-duration flight.

  18. Overview of recent experimental results from the Aditya tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanna, R. L.; Ghosh, J.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Raj, Harshita; Patel, Sharvil; Dhyani, P.; Gupta, C. N.; Jadeja, K. A.; Patel, K. M.; Bhatt, S. B.; Panchal, V. K.; Patel, N. C.; Chavda, Chhaya; Praveenlal, E. V.; Shah, K. S.; Makawana, M. N.; Jha, S. K.; Gopalkrishana, M. V.; Tahiliani, K.; Sangwan, Deepak; Raju, D.; Nagora, Umesh; Pathak, S. K.; Atrey, P. K.; Purohit, S.; Raval, J.; Joisa, Y. S.; Rao, C. V. S.; Chowdhuri, M. B.; Banerjee, S.; Ramaiya, N.; Manchanda, R.; Thomas, J.; Kumar, Ajai; Ajay, Kumar; Sharma, P. K.; Kulkarni, S. V.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Shukla, B. K.; Das, Amita; Jha, R.; Saxena, Y. C.; Sen, A.; Kaw, P. K.; Bora, D.; the ADITYA Team

    2017-10-01

    Several experiments, related to controlled thermonuclear fusion research and highly relevant for large size tokamaks, including ITER, have been carried out in ADITYA, an ohmically heated circular limiter tokamak. Repeatable plasma discharges of a maximum plasma current of ~160 kA and discharge duration beyond ~250 ms with a plasma current flattop duration of ~140 ms have been obtained for the first time in ADITYA. The reproducibility of the discharge reproducibility has been improved considerably with lithium wall conditioning, and improved plasma discharges are obtained by precisely controlling the position of the plasma. In these discharges, chord-averaged electron density ~3.0-4.0  ×  1019 m-3 using multiple hydrogen gas puffs, with a temperature of the order of ~500-700 eV, have been achieved. Novel experiments related to disruption control are carried out and disruptions, induced by hydrogen gas puffing, are successfully mitigated using the biased electrode and ion cyclotron resonance pulse techniques. Runaway electrons are successfully mitigated by applying a short local vertical field (LVF) pulse. A thorough disruption database has been generated by identifying the different categories of disruption. Detailed analysis of several hundred disrupted discharges showed that the current quench time is inversely proportional to the q edge. Apart from this, for volt-sec recovery during the plasma formation phase, low loop voltage start-up and current ramp-up experiments have been carried out using electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH). Successful recovery of volt-sec leads to the achievement of longer plasma discharge durations. In addition, the neon gas puff assisted radiative improved confinement mode has also been achieved in ADITYA. All of the above mentioned experiments will be discussed in this paper.

  19. Analysis methodology and recent results of the IGS network combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferland, R.; Kouba, J.; Hutchison, D.

    2000-11-01

    A working group of the International GPS Service (IGS) was created to look after Reference Frame (RF) issues and contribute to the densification and improvement of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). One important objective of the Reference Frame Working Group is to generate consistent IGS station coordinates and velocities, Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) and geocenter estimates along with the appropriate covariance information. These parameters have a direct impact on other IGS products such as the estimation of GPS satellite ephemerides, as well as satellite and station clocks. The information required is available weekly from the Analysis Centers (AC) (cod, emr, esa, gfz, jpl, ngs, sio) and from the Global Network Associate Analysis Centers (GNAAC) (JPL, mit, ncl) using a "Software Independent Exchange Format" (SINEX). The AC are also contributing daily ERPs as part of their weekly submission. The procedure in place simultaneously combines the weekly station coordinates, geocenter and daily ERP estimates. A cumulative solution containing station coordinates and velocity is also updated with each weekly combination. This provides a convenient way to closely monitor the quality of the estimated station coordinates and to have an up to date cumulative solution available at all times. To provide some necessary redundancy, the weekly station coordinates solution is compared against the GNAAC solutions. Each of the 3 GNAAC uses its own software, allowing independent verification of the combination process. The RMS of the coordinate differences in the north, east and up components between the AC/GNAAC and the ITRF97 Reference Frame Stations are 4-10 mm, 5-20 mm and 6-25 mm. The station velocities within continental plates are compared to the NNR-NUVEL1A plate motion model (DeMets et al., 1994). The north, east and up velocity RMS are 2 mm/y, 3 mm/y and 8 mm/y. Note that NNR-NUVEL1A assumes a zero vertical velocity.

  20. Recent ROSAT results in stellar X-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, T. A.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, I briefly highlight some of the results which have been obtained so far from the ROSAT all-sky survey in the field of stellar X-ray astronomy. These results are summarized in the form of an 'X-ray' Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram.

  1. Sigmoid CME Source Regions at the Sun: Some Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Identifying Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) precursors in the solar corona would be an important step in space weather forecasting, as well as a vital key to understanding the physics of CMEs. Twisted magnetic field structures are suspected of being the source of at least some CMEs. These features can appear sigmoid (S or inverse-S) shaped in soft X-ray (SXR) images. We review recent observations of these structures and their relation to CMEs, using soft X-ray (SXR) data from the Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, and EUV data from the EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) on the SOHO satellite. These observations indicate that the pre-eruption sigmoid patterns are more prominent in SXRs than in EUV, and that sigmoid precursors are present in over 50% of CMEs. These findings are important for CME research, and may potentially be a major component to space weather forecasting. So far, however, the studies have been subject to restrictions that will have to be relaxed before sigmoid morphology can be used as a reliable predictive tool. Moreover, some CMEs do not display a SXR sigmoid structure prior to eruption, and some others show no prominent SXR signature of any kind before or during eruption.

  2. Sigmoid CME Source Regions at The Sun: Some Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2000-01-01

    Identifying coronal mass ejection (CME) precursors in the solar corona would be an important step in space weather forecasting, as well as a vital key to understanding the physics of CMEs. Twisted magnetic field structures are suspected of being the source of at least some CMEs. These features can appear sigmoid (S or inverse-S) shaped in soft X-ray, (SXR) images. We review recent observations of these structures and their relation to CMEs. using SXR data from the Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, and EUV data from the EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) on the SOHO satellite. These observations indicate that the pre-eruption sigmoid patterns are more prominent in SXRs than in EUV, and that sigmoid precursors are present in over 50% of CMEs. These findings are important for CME research, and may potentially be a major component to space weather forecasting. So far, however, the studies have been subject to restrictions that will have to be relaxed before sigmoid morphology can be used as a reliable predictive too[. Moreover, some CMEs do not display a SXR sigmoid structure prior to eruption, and some others show no prominent SXR signature of any kind before or during eruption.

  3. Spin Structure of the Nucleon - Status and Recent Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, Sebastian; Chen, Jian-Ping; Leader, Elliot

    2009-07-01

    After the initial discovery of the so-called "spin crisis in the parton model" in the 1980s, a large set of polarization data in deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering was collected at labs like SLAC, DESY and CERN. More recently, new high precision data at large $x$ and in the resonance region have come from experiments at Jefferson Lab. These data, in combination with the earlier ones, allow us to study in detail the polarized parton densities, the $Q^2$ dependence of various moments of spin structure functions, the duality between deep inelastic and resonance data, and the nucleon structure in the valence quark region. Together with complementary data from HERMES, RHIC and COMPASS, we can put new limits on the flavor decomposition and the gluon contribution to the nucleon spin. In this report, we provide an overview of our present knowledge of the nucleon spin structure and give an outlook on future experiments. We focus in particular on the spin structure functions $g_

  4. Overview of Recent DIII-D Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenstermacher, Max

    2015-11-01

    Recent DIII-D experiments have added to the ITER physics basis and to physics understanding for extrapolation to future devices. ELMs were suppressed by RMPs in He plasmas consistent with ITER non-nuclear phase conditions, and in steady state hybrid plasmas. Characteristics of the EHO during both standard high torque, and low torque enhanced pedestal QH-mode with edge broadband fluctuations were measured, including edge localized density fluctuations with a microwave imaging reflectometer. The path to Super H-mode was verified at high beta with a QH-mode edge, and in plasmas with ELMs triggered by Li granules. ITER acceptable TQ mitigation was obtained with low Ne fraction Shattered Pellet Injection. Divertor ne and Te data from Thomson Scattering confirm predicted drift-driven asymmetries in electron pressure, and X-divertor heat flux reduction and detachment were characterized. The crucial mechanisms for ExB shear control of turbulence were clarified. In collaboration with EAST, high beta-p scenarios were obtained with 80 % bootstrap fraction, high H-factor and stability limits, and large radius ITBs leading to low AE activity. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Overview of recent DIII-D experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenstermacher, M. E.; LLNL; DIII-D Team

    2016-10-01

    Recent DIII-D experiments have contributed to the ITER physics basis and to physics understanding for extrapolation to future devices. Resonant Magnetic Perturbation ELM suppression was extended to lower shaping as a guide to joint experiments showing first ELM suppression in ASDEX-U. The physics model of suppression was validated in low torque ITER baseline plasmas. Toroidal variation of density gradients and turbulence was documented during RMP. Plasma rotation was predicted from measured scaling of intrinsic torque and momentum transport. Runaway electron plateau dissipation using SPI was demonstrated including new understanding of synchrotron and collisional damping effects. Good coupling of high frequency RF from a helicon antenna during H-mode was observed. Upstream pedestal density at divertor detachment decreased with increasing divertor closure. Bifurcations to detachment in H-mode with increasing density were reproduced with UEDGE including drifts. Sources, SOL transport and core accumulation of tungsten from toroidally continuous divertor target tiles were identified. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Tunka-Rex: Status, Plans, and Recent Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, F. G.; Bezyazeekov, P. A.; Budnev, N. M.; Fedorov, O.; Gress, O. A.; Haungs, A.; Hiller, R.; Huege, T.; Kazarina, Y.; Kleifges, M.; Korosteleva, E. E.; Kostunin, D.; Krömer, O.; Kungel, V.; Kuzmichev, L. A.; Lubsandorzhiev, N.; Mirgazov, R. R.; Monkhoev, R.; Osipova, E. A.; Pakhorukov, A.; Pankov, L.; Prosin, V. V.; Rubtsov, G. I.; Wischnewski, R.; Zagorodnikov, A.

    2017-03-01

    Tunka-Rex, the Tunka Radio extension at the TAIGA facility (Tunka Advanced Instrument for cosmic ray physics and Gamma Astronomy) in Siberia, has recently been expanded to a total number of 63 SALLA antennas, most of them distributed on an area of one square kilometer. In the first years of operation, Tunka-Rex was solely triggered by the co-located air-Cherenkov array Tunka-133. The correlation of the measurements by both detectors has provided direct experimental proof that radio arrays can measure the position of the shower maximum. The precision achieved so far is 40 g/cm2, and several methodical improvements are under study. Moreover, the cross-comparison of Tunka-Rex and Tunka-133 shows that the energy reconstruction of Tunka-Rex is precise to 15 %, with a total accuracy of 20 % including the absolute energy scale. By using exactly the same calibration source for Tunka-Rex and LOPES, the energy scale of their host experiments, Tunka-133 and KASCADE-Grande, respectively, can be compared even more accurately with a remaining uncertainty of about 10 %. The main goal of Tunka-Rex for the next years is a study of the cosmic-ray mass composition in the energy range above 100 PeV: For this purpose, Tunka-Rex now is triggered also during daytime by the particle detector array Tunka-Grande featuring surface and underground scintillators for electron and muon detection.

  7. Recent Results for the Ferritics Isotopic Tailoring (FIST) Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, David S.; Hamilton, Margaret L.; Oliver, Brian M.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Ohnuki, Somei; Shiba, K.; Kohno, Y.; Kohyama, Akira; Robertson, J. P.

    2001-10-01

    The results of shear punch testing, microstructural examination, and hydrogen and helium analyses performed on irradiated isotopically tailored alloys are reported for specimens irradiated in the HFIR JP20 experiment.

  8. Tracing recent star formation of red early-type galaxies out to z ∼ 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Jongwan; Lee, Jong Chul; Hwang, Ho Seong; Im, Myungshin; Le Borgne, Damien; Elbaz, David

    2014-08-20

    We study the mid-infrared (IR) excess emission of early-type galaxies (ETGs) on the red sequence at z < 1 using a spectroscopic sample of galaxies in the fields of Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS). In the mass-limited sample of 1025 galaxies with M {sub star} > 10{sup 10.5} M {sub ☉} and 0.4 < z < 1.05, we identify 696 Spitzer 24 μm detected (above the 5σ) galaxies and find them to have a wide range of NUV-r and r-[12 μm] colors despite their red optical u – r colors. Even in the sample of very massive ETGs on the red sequence with M {sub star} > 10{sup 11.2} M {sub ☉}, more than 18% show excess emission over the photospheric emission in the mid-IR. The combination with the results of red ETGs in the local universe suggests that the recent star formation is not rare among quiescent, red ETGs at least out to z ∼ 1 if the mid-IR excess emission results from intermediate-age stars or/and from low-level ongoing star formation. Our color-color diagram including near-UV and mid-IR emissions are efficient not only for identifying ETGs with recent star formation, but also for distinguishing quiescent galaxies from dusty star-forming galaxies.

  9. Tracing Recent Star Formation of Red Early-type Galaxies out to z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Jongwan; Hwang, Ho Seong; Im, Myungshin; Le Borgne, Damien; Lee, Jong Chul; Elbaz, David

    2014-08-01

    We study the mid-infrared (IR) excess emission of early-type galaxies (ETGs) on the red sequence at z < 1 using a spectroscopic sample of galaxies in the fields of Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS). In the mass-limited sample of 1025 galaxies with M star > 1010.5 M ⊙ and 0.4 < z < 1.05, we identify 696 Spitzer 24 μm detected (above the 5σ) galaxies and find them to have a wide range of NUV-r and r-[12 μm] colors despite their red optical u - r colors. Even in the sample of very massive ETGs on the red sequence with M star > 1011.2 M ⊙, more than 18% show excess emission over the photospheric emission in the mid-IR. The combination with the results of red ETGs in the local universe suggests that the recent star formation is not rare among quiescent, red ETGs at least out to z ~ 1 if the mid-IR excess emission results from intermediate-age stars or/and from low-level ongoing star formation. Our color-color diagram including near-UV and mid-IR emissions are efficient not only for identifying ETGs with recent star formation, but also for distinguishing quiescent galaxies from dusty star-forming galaxies.

  10. Recent Results From the Opportunity Rover's Exploration of Endeavour Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. E.; Squyres, S. W.; Gellert, R.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is beginning its 11th year of exploration and as of sol 3535 (1/3/14 UTC) has traversed 38,729 m (based on wheel turns) across the plains of Meridiani and the rim of the approx. 22 km wide Noachian Endeavour Crater. Opportunity has investigated ancient sulfate-rich sand-stones (Burns formation) that dominate the plains and formed in ancient playa and dune environments, characterized impact breccias (Shoemaker formation) and their aqueous alteration on Endeavour's Cape York rim segment, and investigated extensive aqueous alteration of rocks on Cape York's Matijevic Hill that stratigraphically underlie Shoemaker formation and predate the Endeavour-forming event. In this abstract results from Opportunity's recent exploration of Endeavour's rim are covered, focusing on comparing what was found on Matijevic Hill with observations acquired on Murray Ridge, where Opportunity will spend its sixth winter at Cook Haven.

  11. A Preliminary Report on Some Recent Results in Born Inversion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    of pseudo-differential operators, generalized Radon transforms, and generalized back projections. Moreover, Beylkin frames his work in an N...Beylkin uses powerful results in the theory of generalized Radon transforms. However, noting that the result on the left must involve a Dirac delta...pseudo-differential operators, generalized Radon transforms, and generalized back projections. Moreover, Beylkin frames his work in an N- dimensional

  12. Recent results on the optical performance of solar two heliostats

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.A.; Edgar, R.M.; Houser, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    Recent Sandia support of the Solar Two project has included the analysis of optical performance issues related to heliostat field improvements. Two types of heliostats will be used for the Solar Two project: The 1818 original 38.4 m{sup 2} Martin Marietta Co. heliostats, and 108 new 95 m{sup 2} Lugo heliostats. Carrisa Plains mirror modules will be used to construct the Lugo heliostats and refurbish original heliostats. Baseline, clean reflectivity measurements of 0.90 and 0.94 are recomended for the original heliostat and the Carrisa Plains modules, respectively. Sandia`s Beam Characterization System provided beam quality information for representative configurations of both heliostats. This showed that the replacement of two facets with Carrisa Plains modules on an original heliostat led to a slight increase in spillage, but also increased beam power. As expected, the large beam of the Lugo heliostat showed poorer beam quality and significant spillage, but proved to be an economical addition of reflective area. The Carrisa Plains modules were found to be nominally flat, although the focal length changed slightly with temperature. An analysis of the canting options for both types of heliostats was performed. It was recommended the original heliostats be canted with an on-axis, lookback method, whereas a two-step method using first on-, then off-axis approaches was recommended for the Lugo heliostats. Finally, measurements performed at the Daggett site showed that despite the 1992 Landers earthquake, heliostat pedestal tilt and the associated tracking errors are expected to be within acceptable limits.

  13. Recent Results from the C-Mod Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, P.; Irby, J. H.; Bergerson, W. F.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Marmar, E. S.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Ernst, D.; Hughes, J. W.; Mumgaard, R.; Parker, R.; Scott, S.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G. M.; White, A. E.; Wolfe, S. M.

    2013-10-01

    The C-Mod 3 chord FIR polarimeter, with a 2 MHz bandwidth, is capable of responding to both fast changes in the plasma equilibrium and high frequency fluctuations. It operates under ITER-like plasma conditions and magnetic fields, and uses an optical layout and FIR sources very similar to those proposed for the ITER polarimeter. Results from the polarimeter as a function of plasma density and current will be discussed, as well as the effects of lower hybrid power levels, phasing and plasma density on the current drive efficiency. The possible identification of some broadband fluctuations as primarily magnetic in nature, and gyrokinetic simulation results from the modeling of these fluctuations will also be presented. Estimates of the localization of this mode will be described. The polarimeter response to low frequency MHD modes will be compared with results from the Fast Two-Color-Interferometer. USDoE contract DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  14. Recent results on the TCS-Upgrade device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossnickle, J. A.; Brooks, R. D.; Deards, C. L.; Hoffman, A. L.; Lee, K. Y.; Melnik, P. A.; Miller, K. E.; Milroy, R. D.; Velas, K. M.; Vlases, G. C.

    2010-11-01

    The Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment Upgrade (TCSU) device is a facility to form and sustain field-reversed configurations (FRC) in quasi-steady state using rotating magnetic fields (RMF). Results from operation with internal flux rings and an additional Ti gettering campaign are reported. Several new diagnostics have been installed including a 90-channel three-axis (30 radial positions) internal magnetic field probe, a multi-point Thomson scattering system, and a Langmuir probe. A broad range of RMF frequencies, from 85 kHz -- 240 kHz, and field configurations have been investigated with a full diagnostic set and results will be reported. Results from operation with odd-parity RMF antennas, which should close field lines, [S.A. Cohen and R.D. Milroy, Physics of Plasmas 7, 2539, (2000)] will also be reported.

  15. Double-beta decay: Some recent results and developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avignone, F. T.

    A brief review and status of theoretical issues associated with double-beta decay (ββ-decay) is given. The final results of the measurement of 2ν ββ-decay of 100Mo to the first excited 0 + state in 100Ru are presented prior to publication. Corrections to the earlier PNL/USC/ITEP/YPI measurement of 2ν ββ-decay of 76Ge are also given prior to publication. Finally, a status report and first results of the phase-I of the International Germanium Experiment (IGEX) are presented.

  16. Recent results of nonlinear estimators applied to hereditary systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiess, J. R.; Roland, V. R.; Wells, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    An application of the extended Kalman filter to delayed systems to estimate the state and time delay is presented. Two nonlinear estimators are discussed and the results compared with those of the Kalman filter. For all the filters considered, the hereditary system was treated with the delay in the pure form and by using Pade approximations of the delay. A summary of the convergence properties of the filters studied is given. The results indicate that the linear filter applied to the delayed system performs inadequately while the nonlinear filters provide reasonable estimates of both the state and the parameters.

  17. Recent results of nonlinear estimators applied to hereditary systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiess, J. R.; Roland, V. R.; Wells, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    An application of the extended Kalman filter to delayed systems to estimate the state and time delay is presented. Two nonlinear estimators are discussed and the results compared with those of the Kalman filter. For all the filters considered, the hereditary system was treated with the delay in the pure form and by using Pade approximations of the delay. A summary of the convergence properties of the filters studied is given. The results indicate that the linear filter applied to the delayed system performs inadequately while the nonlinear filters provide reasonable estimates of both the state and the parameters.

  18. Recent Printing And Registration Results With X-Ray Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fay, B.; Tai, L.; Alexander, D.

    1985-06-01

    X-ray lithography has matured from a research and development phase to an implementation phase. Accordingly, the concerns have shifted from imaging issues to those of registration, critical dimension control, step height coverage, and system repeatability. In this paper, results will be discussed relating to x-ray printing and registration for full field alignment systems with 100mm field diameter using optical verniers, SEM (scanning electron microscope) and electrical wafer probe techniques. These results will encompass micrometer and submicrometer imaging using single 'level and tri-level processing techniques.

  19. Luminescent Solar Concentrators--a review of recent results.

    PubMed

    van Sark, Wilfried G J H M; Barnham, Keith W J; Slooff, Lenneke H; Chatten, Amanda J; Büchtemann, Andreas; Meyer, Andreas; McCormack, Sarah J; Koole, Rolf; Farrell, Daniel J; Bose, Rahul; Bende, Evert E; Burgers, Antonius R; Budel, Tristram; Quilitz, Jana; Kennedy, Manus; Meyer, Toby; Donegá, C De Mello; Meijerink, Andries; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel

    2008-12-22

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) generally consist of transparent polymer sheets doped with luminescent species. Incident sunlight is absorbed by the luminescent species and emitted with high quantum efficiency, such that emitted light is trapped in the sheet and travels to the edges where it can be collected by solar cells. LSCs offer potentially lower cost per Wp. This paper reviews results mainly obtained within the framework of the Full-spectrum project. Two modeling approaches are presented, i.e., a thermodynamic and a ray-trace one, as well as experimental results, with a focus on LSC stability.

  20. Recent top quark physics results at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Valls, J.A.

    1996-07-01

    The evidence of top quark pair production in pp collisions has been firmly established by both the CDF and the D{O} collaborations at Fermilab. In this paper the latest top quark physics results from both experiments at the Tevatron Collider are presented. The experimental analyses have concentrated in improving the accuracy of top quark production and decay measurements like cross sections, mass and, branching fractions. The results shown correspond to the final data set collected with both detectors during the complete Tevatron Run L. This represents a total recorded integrated luminosity of {approximately}110 pb{sup -1} for CDF and {approximately}100 pb{sup -1} for D{O}.

  1. Recent Results of Hadal Investigations in the Southern Mariana Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryer, P. B.; Hellebrand, E.; Sharma, S. K.; Acosta-Maeda, T.; Jicha, B. R.; Cameron, J.

    2014-12-01

    The deepest parts of the southern Mariana Trench have variously been interpreted to 1) indicate strike-slip motion along the trench, 2) contain a series of 3 sediment ponds at greater than 10,900 m depth separated from one another by fault-controlled ridges on the subducting plate, and 3) have an even deeper feature in the western-most pond (Vitiaz Deep). Recent lander deployments in all three ponds and the Deepsea Challenger submersible dive by J. Cameron in 2012 showed that the deepest ponds within the Challenger Deep area have nearly unbroken, flat surfaces. One point explored showed veined serpentinite at a depth of 10,800+ m. The potential for active serpentinite-hosted seeps and vent communities was demonstrated for the Shinkai Vent Field at 5,800m depth. Rocks collected using the Wood Hole Oceanographic Institution's hybrid remotely operated vehicle, Nereus, in 2009 from deep (10,879 m) on the incoming plate south of the Challenger Deep, were recovered from the base of a fault scarp where large, columnar-jointed blocks are draped with sediment. Optical microscopy, electron-microprobe and Raman analysis show that they are partially altered massive diabase with altered interstitial glass and containing microbial tubules in vug-filling secondary phases. The chain of seamounts striking NNW, colinear with the Lyra Trough, has been interpreted as a boundary between the Pacific Plate and the seafloor north of the Caroline Ridge. Sediments, drilled from above postulated basement north of the Caroline Ridge are no older that Oligocene. Ar/Ar age dates completed for one rock collected by Nereus in 2009 give a weighted mean plateau age, based on two experiments, of 24.6 +/- 3.2 Ma. Thus, the igneous basement of the subducting plate south of the Challenger Deep is, far younger than the Jurassic Pacific Plate subducting further east. This represents a previously unidentified tectonic plate. With new vehicles and technologies the future for hadal exploration is ripe.

  2. Recent results on dilepton and strangeness production with HADES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapidus, Kirill; Hades Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    Selected topics of the HADES research program are discussed with an emphasis on the results obtained by studying proton-proton and proton-niobium collisions at a beam energy of 3.5 GeV. Future directions of the measurements at HADES are outlined.

  3. Recent Results from CHAMP Tracking and Accelerometer Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthcke, S. B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Lemoine, F. G.; Nerem, R. S.; Thompson, B.; Pavlis, E.; Williams, T. A.; Colombo, O. L.; Chao, Benjamin F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CHAMP mission's unique combination of sensors and orbit configuration will enable unprecedented improvements in modeling and understanding the Earth's static gravity field and its temporal variations. CHAMP is the first of two missions (GRACE to be launched in the early part of 02') that combine a new generation of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, a high precision three-axis accelerometer, and star cameras for the precision attitude determination. In order to isolate the gravity signal for science investigations, it is necessary to perform a detailed reduction and analysis of the GPS and Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) tracking data in conjunction with the accelerometer and attitude data. Precision orbit determination based on the GPS and SLR tracking data will isolate the orbit perturbations, while the accelerometer data will be used to distinguish the non-gravitational forces from those due to the geopotential (static, and time varying). In preparation for the CHAMP and GRACE missions, extensive modifications have been made to NASA/GSFC's GEODYN orbit determination software to enable the simultaneous reduction of spacecraft tracking (e.g. GPS and SLR), three-axis accelerometer and precise attitude data. Several weeks of CHAMP tracking and accelerometer data have been analyzed and the results will be presented. Precision orbit determination analysis based on tracking data alone in addition to results based on the simultaneous reduction of tracking and accelerometer data will be discussed. Results from a calibration of the accelerometer will be presented along with the results from various orbit determination strategies.

  4. Recent results on the RIA test in IGR reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Asmolov, V.; Yegorova, L.

    1997-01-01

    At the 23d WRSM meeting the data base characterizing results of VVER high burnup fuel rods tests under reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) conditions was presented. Comparison of PWR and VVER failure thresholds was given also. Additional analysis of the obtained results was being carried out during 1996. The results of analysis show that the two different failure mechanisms were observed for PWR and VVER fuel rods. Some factors which can be as the possible reasons of these differences are presented. First of them is the state of preirradiated cladding. Published test data for PWR high burnup fuel rods demonstrated that the PWR high burnup fuel rods failed at the RIA test are characterized by very high level of oxidation and hydriding for the claddings. Corresponding researches were performed at Institute of Atomic Reactors (RLAR, Dimitrovgrad, Russia) for large set of VVER high burnup fuel rods. Results of these investigations show that preirradiated commercial Zr-1%Nb claddings practically keep their initial levels of oxidation and H{sub 2} concentration. Consequently the VVER preirradiated cladding must keep the high level of mechanical properties. The second reason leading to differences between failure mechanisms for two types of high burnup fuel rods can be the test conditions. Now such kind of analysis have been performed by two methods.

  5. Recent Results From BaBar in Tau Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lewczuk, Mateusz; /Victoria U.

    2009-06-25

    The BaBar collaboration has accumulated over 400 million {tau}-pairs which can be used to study charged leptonic and hadronic weak currents to unprecedented precision. This note presents results on lepton universality, measurements of |V{sub us}|, and searches for {tau} decays which violate lepton flavour conservation, or {tau} decays that proceed through a suppressed second class current.

  6. Recent Results on Polarized Quark and Gluon Distributions at Compass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, I.; Jinr; Dubna

    2005-04-01

    The latest results of deep inelastic scattering (DIS) studies of 160 GeV muons on the deuterated polarized target are reported. They include estimations of virtual photon-deuteron asymmetries, gluon contributions to the nucleon spin and Collins asymmetries in hadron production on the transversely polarized target.

  7. Recent results on pathogen intervention during poultry processing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Slaughter plant – focus has been on Campylobacter and Salmonella - Transport: Campylobacter cross contamination in live haul cages can be lessened by drying cages between uses - Applied after spray wash results in undetectable levels of Campylobacter: Time (24-48h), absorbent powder (2 h), hot air (...

  8. Novel oral taxane therapies: recent Phase I results

    PubMed Central

    Flores, John Paul; Saif, M Wasif

    2015-01-01

    The oral taxanes are analogues of existing taxanes with a possible broad range of antitumor activity. They also have the potential advantages of ease of administration, better efficacy and lesser toxicity than currently available taxanes. These drugs have been used in several Phase I clinical trials, the methodology and results of which will be reviewed here. PMID:26146540

  9. Geodetic Volcano Monitoring Research in Canary Islands: Recent Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, J.; Gonzalez, P. J.; Arjona, A.; Camacho, A. G.; Prieto, J. F.; Seco, A.; Tizzani, P.; Manzo, M. R.; Lanari, R.; Blanco, P.; Mallorqui, J. J.

    2009-05-01

    The Canarian Archipelago is an oceanic island volcanic chain with a long-standing history of volcanic activity (> 40 Ma). It is located off the NW coast of the African continent, lying over a transitional crust of the Atlantic African passive margin. At least 12 eruptions have been occurred on the islands of Lanzarote, Tenerife and La Palma in the last 500 years. Volcanism manifest predominantly as basaltic strombolian monogenetic activity (whole archipelago) and central felsic volcanism (active only in Tenerife Island). We concentrate our studies in the two most active islands, Tenerife and La Palma. In these islands, we tested different methodologies of geodetic monitoring systems. We use a combination of ground- and space-based techniques. At Tenerife Island, a differential interferometric study was performed to detect areas of deformation. DInSAR detected two clear areas of deformation, using this results a survey-based GPS network was designed and optimized to control those deformations and the rest of the island. Finally, using SBAS DInSAR results weak spatial long- wavelength subsidence signals has been detected. At La Palma, the first DInSAR analysis have not shown any clear deformation, so a first time series analysis was performed detecting a clear subsidence signal at Teneguia volcano, as for Tenerife a GPS network was designed and optimized taking into account stable and deforming areas. After several years of activities, geodetic results served to study ground deformations caused by a wide variety of sources, such as changes in groundwater levels, volcanic activity, volcano-tectonics, gravitational loading, etc. These results proof that a combination of ground-based and space-based techniques is suitable tool for geodetic volcano monitoring in Canary Islands. Finally, we would like to strength that those results could have serious implications on the continuous geodetic monitoring system design and implementation for the Canary Islands which is under

  10. The Planck Mission: Recent Results, Cosmological and Fundamental Physics Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandolesi, Nazzareno; Burigana, Carlo; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Natoli, Paolo

    2013-12-01

    We provide a description of the latest status and performance of the Planck satellite, focusing on the final predicted sensitivity of Planck. The optimization of the observational strategy for the additional surveys following the nominal 15 months of integration (about two surveys) originally allocated and the limitation represented by astrophysical foreground emissions are presented. An outline of early and intermediate astrophysical results from the Planck Collaboration is provided. A concise view of some fundamental cosmological results that will be achieved by exploiting Planck's full set of temperature and polarization data are presented. Finally, the perspectives opened by Planck in answering some key questions in fundamental physics, with particular attention to parity symmetry analyses, are described.

  11. Recent Results of TMD Measurements from Jefferson Lab Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xiaodong

    2013-10-01

    This slide-show presents results on transverse momentum distributions. The presentation covers: target single-spin asymmetry (SSA) (in parity conserving interactions); • Results of JLab Hall A polarized {sup 3}He target TMD measurement; • Semi-­inclusive deep-inelastic scattering channels (E06-010); • Target single-spin asymmetry A{sub UT}, Collins and Sivers SSA on neutron; • Double-spin asymmetry A{sub LT}, extract TMD g{sub 1T} on neutron; • Inclusive channels SSA (E06-010, E05-015, E07-013) • Target SSA: inclusive {sup 3}He(e,e’) quasi-elastic scattering; • Target SSA: inclusive {sup 3}He(e,e’) deep inelastic-elastic scattering; • New SIDIS experiments planned in Hall-A for JLab-12 GeV.

  12. NASA Space Radiation Risk Project: Overview and Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blattnig, Steve R.; Chappell, Lori J.; George, Kerry A.; Hada, Megumi; Hu, Shaowen; Kidane, Yared H.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Kovyrshina, Tatiana; Norman, Ryan B.; Nounu, Hatem N.; Peterson, Leif E.; Plante, Ianik; Pluth, Janice M.; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Scott Carnell, Lisa A.; Slaba, Tony C.; Sridharan, Deepa; Xu, Xiaojing

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Space Radiation Risk project is responsible for integrating new experimental and computational results into models to predict risk of cancer and acute radiation syndrome (ARS) for use in mission planning and systems design, as well as current space operations. The project has several parallel efforts focused on proving NASA's radiation risk projection capability in both the near and long term. This presentation will give an overview, with select results from these efforts including the following topics: verification, validation, and streamlining the transition of models to use in decision making; relative biological effectiveness and dose rate effect estimation using a combination of stochastic track structure simulations, DNA damage model calculations and experimental data; ARS model improvements; pathway analysis from gene expression data sets; solar particle event probabilistic exposure calculation including correlated uncertainties for use in design optimization.

  13. Recent Results from the T2K Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Abgrall, N.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Bentham, S. W.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bertram, I.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. D. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Curioni, A.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Dufour, F.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Finch, A. J.; Frank, E.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Gaudin, A.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Golan, T.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Ives, S. J.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K. K.; Jung, C. K.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J.; Kim, S. B.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Kogan, G.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koseki, K.; Koshio, Y.; Kreslo, I.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kumaratunga, S.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Laihem, K.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lee, K. P.; Licciardi, C.; Lim, I. T.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, G. D.; Ludovici, L.; Macaire, M.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Maruyama, T.; Marzec, J.; Masliah, P.; Mathie, E. L.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Metelko, C.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Monfregola, L.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nagasaki, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakai, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Otani, M.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Pac, M. Y.; Palladino, V.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Pearce, G. F.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Retiere, F.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Szeglowski, T.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Taylor, I. J.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Ueno, K.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yuan, T.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.

    2014-01-01

    The Tokai to Kamioka (T2K) experiment studies neutrino oscillations using a beam of muon neutrinos produced by an accelerator. The neutrinos travel from J-PARC on the east coast of Japan and are detected 295 kilometers further away in the Super-Kamiokande detector. A complex of near detectors located 280 meters away from the neutrino production target is used to better characterize the neutrino beam and reduce systematic uncertainties. The experiment aims at measuring electronic neutrino appearance (νμ →νe oscillation) to measure the neutrino mixing angle θ13, and muon neutrino disappearance to measure the neutrino mixing angle θ23 and mass splitting | Δ m322 |. We report here electron neutrino appearance results using three years of data, recorded until the 2012 summer, as well as muon neutrino disappearance results based on the data coming from the first two years of the experiment.

  14. Hadron distributions - recent results from the CERN experiment NA44

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, N.

    1996-09-01

    Proton distributions at midrapidity have been measured for 158A{circ}GeV/c Pb + Pb collisions in the focusing spectrometer experiment NA44 at CERN. A high degree of nuclear stopping is found in the truly heavy ion collisions. Systematic results of single particle transverse momentum distributions of pions, kaons, and protons, of 200A-GeV/c S+S and 158A{circ}GeV/c Pb+Pb central collisions will be addressed within the context of thermalization. By comparing these data with thermal and transport models, freeze-out parameters such as the temperature parameter T{sub fo} and mean collective flow velocity ({Beta}) are extracted. Preliminary results of the particle ratios of K{sup -}/K{sup +} and p/p are discussed in the context of cascade models of RQMD and VENUS.

  15. Recent Flight Results of the TRMM Kalman Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Stephen F.; Bilanow, Stephen; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft is a nadir pointing spacecraft that nominally controls the roll and pitch attitude based on the Earth Sensor Assembly (ESA) output. TRMM's nominal orbit altitude was 350 km, until raised to 402 km to prolong mission life. During the boost, the ESA experienced a decreasing signal to noise ratio, until sun interference at 393 km altitude made the ESA data unreliable for attitude determination. At that point, the backup attitude determination algorithm, an extended Kalman filter, was enabled. After the boost finished, TRMM reacquired its nadir-pointing attitude, and continued its mission. This paper will briefly discuss the boost and the decision to turn on the backup attitude determination algorithm. A description of the extended Kalman filter algorithm will be given. In addition, flight results from analyzing attitude data and the results of software changes made onboard TRMM will be discussed. Some lessons learned are presented.

  16. Recent results from the Bugey neutrino oscillation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaignac, J. F.; Hoummada, A.; Koang, D. H.; Vignon, B.; Declais, Y.; de Kerret, H.; Pessard, H.; Thenard, J. M.

    1984-11-01

    The energy spectrum of electron antineutrinos has been measured at two distances, 13.6 and 18.3 meters, from the core of a PWR power reactor at Bugey (FRANCE). About 63000 antineutrinos events have been recorded using the inverse β-decay reaction νe¯+p→n+e+. A significant difference in the counting rate between the two positions has been observed. The compatibility of the results with solutions in a two-neutrino oscillation analysis is discussed.

  17. Multi-Vehicle Flight Experiments: Recent Results and Future Directions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    Dullerud, G., “A Hovercraft Testbed for Decentralized and Cooperative Control ”, Proceedings of the American Control Conference, Boston, MA, July 2004...results in the Aerospace Controls Laboratory (ACL) at MIT. This includes flight tests using a large team of simple external UAVs and a unique indoor...allowing researchers to conduct tests for a wide variety of long-duration mission scenarios in a controlled environment. A comparison of RAVEN with

  18. The DarkSide physics program and its recent results

    DOE PAGES

    D'Angelo, D.

    2017-01-12

    Here, DarkSide (DS) at Gran Sasso underground laboratory is a direct Dark Matter search program based on Time Projection Chambers (TPC) with liquid Argon from underground sources. The DarkSide-50 (DS-50) TPC, with 150 kg of Argon is installed inside active neutron and muon detectors. DS-50 has been taking data since November 2013 with Atmospheric Argon (AAr) and since April 2015 with Underground Argon (UAr), depleted in radioactive 39Ar by a factor ~1400. The exposure of 1422 kg d of AAr has demonstrated that the operation of DS-50 for three years in a background free condition is a solid reality, thanksmore » to the superb performance of the Pulse Shape Analysis. The first release of results from an exposure of 2616 kg d of UAr has shown no candidate Dark Matter events. We have set the best limit for Spin-Independent elastic nuclear scattering of WIMPs obtained by Argon-based detectors, corresponding to a cross-section of 2 10–44 cm2 at a WIMP mass of 100 GeV. We present the detector design and performance, the results from the AAr run and the first results from the UAr run and we briefly introduce the future of the DarkSide program.« less

  19. The DarkSide physics program and its recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, D.; Agnes, P.; Agostino, L.; F. M. Albuquerque, I.; Alexander, T.; K. Alton, A.; Arisaka, K.; Back, H. O.; Baldin, B.; Biery, K.; Bonfini, G.; Bossa, M.; Bottino, B.; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Budano, F.; Bussino, S.; Cadeddu, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cadoni, M.; Calaprice, F.; Canci, N.; Candela, A.; Cao, H.; Cariello, M.; Carlini, M.; Catalanotti, S.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; Crippa, L.; D'Incecco, M.; Davini, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Deo, M.; De Vincenzi, M.; Derbin, A.; Devoto, A.; Di Eusanio, F.; Di Pietro, G.; Edkins, E.; Empl, A.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Fomenko, K.; Forster, G.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Giganti, C.; M. Goretti, A.; Granato, F.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Guan, M.; Guardincerri, Y.; R. Hackett, B.; Herner, K.; V. Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; James, I.; Jollet, C.; Keeter, K.; L. Kendziora, C.; Kobychev, V.; Koh, G.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kubankin, A.; Lissia, M.; Li, X.; Lombardi, P.; Luitz, S.; N. Machulin, I.; Mandarano, A.; Maricic, J.; Marini, L.; M. Mari, S.; J. Martoff, C.; Ma, Y.; Meregaglia, A.; D. Meyers, P.; Miletic, T.; Milincic, R.; Montanari, D.; Monte, A.; Montuschi, M.; Monzani, M.; Mosteiro, P.; J. Mount, B.; N. Muratova, V.; Musico, P.; Napolitano, J.; Nelson, A.; Odrowski, S.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Parmeggiano, S.; Pelczar, K.; Pelliccia, N.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; A. Pugachev, D.; Qian, H.; Randle, K.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Reinhold, B.; L. Renshaw, A.; Romani, A.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Rountree, D.; Sablone, D.; Saggese, P.; Saldanha, R.; Sands, W.; Sangiorgio, S.; Savarese, C.; Segreto, E.; A. Semenov, D.; Shields, E.; N. Singh, P.; D. Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Stanford, C.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Tatarowicz, J.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Trinchese, P.; V. Unzhakov, E.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, B.; Wada, M.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; W. Watson, A.; Westerdale, S.; Wilhelmi, J.; M. Wojcik, M.; Xiang, X.; Xu, J.; Yang, C.; Yoo, J.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zec, A.; Zhong, W.; Zhu, C.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-07-01

    DarkSide (DS) at Gran Sasso underground laboratory is a direct Dark Matter search program based on Time Projection Chambers (TPC) with liquid Argon from underground sources. The DarkSide-50 (DS-50) TPC, with 150kg of Argon is installed inside active neutron and muon detectors. DS-50 has been taking data since November 2013 with Atmospheric Argon (AAr) and since April 2015 with Underground Argon (UAr), depleted in radioactive ^{39} Ar by a factor {˜}1400 . The exposure of 1422kg d of AAr has demonstrated that the operation of DS-50 for three years in a background free condition is a solid reality, thanks to the superb performance of the Pulse Shape Analysis. The first release of results from an exposure of 2616kg d of UAr has shown no candidate Dark Matter events. We have set the best limit for Spin-Independent elastic nuclear scattering of WIMPs obtained by Argon-based detectors, corresponding to a cross-section of 2 10^{-44}{ cm2} at a WIMP mass of 100GeV. We present the detector design and performance, the results from the AAr run and the first results from the UAr run and we briefly introduce the future of the DarkSide program.

  20. An overview of recent physics results from NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, S. M.; Abrams, T.; Ahn, J.-W.; Allain, J. P.; Andre, R.; Andruczyk, D.; Barchfeld, R.; Battaglia, D.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Bedoya, F.; Bell, R. E.; Belova, E.; Berkery, J.; Berry, L.; Bertelli, N.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bialek, J.; Bilato, R.; Boedo, J.; Bonoli, P.; Boozer, A.; Bortolon, A.; Boyer, M. D.; Boyle, D.; Brennan, D.; Breslau, J.; Brooks, J.; Buttery, R.; Capece, A.; Canik, J.; Chang, C. S.; Crocker, N.; Darrow, D.; Davis, W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Diallo, A.; D'Ippolito, D.; Domier, C.; Ebrahimi, F.; Ethier, S.; Evans, T.; Ferraro, N.; Ferron, J.; Finkenthal, M.; Fonck, R.; Fredrickson, E.; Fu, G. Y.; Gates, D.; Gerhardt, S.; Glasser, A.; Gorelenkov, N.; Gorelenkova, M.; Goumiri, I.; Gray, T.; Green, D.; Guttenfelder, W.; Harvey, R.; Hassanein, A.; Heidbrink, W.; Hirooka, Y.; Hooper, E. B.; Hosea, J.; Humphreys, D.; Jaeger, E. F.; Jarboe, T.; Jardin, S.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kaita, R.; Kessel, C.; Kim, K.; Koel, B.; Kolemen, E.; Kramer, G.; Ku, S.; Kubota, S.; LaHaye, R. J.; Lao, L.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Levinton, F.; Liu, D.; Lore, J.; Lucia, M.; Luhmann, N., Jr.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D.; Maqueda, R.; McKee, G.; Medley, S.; Meier, E.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Munsat, T.; Muscatello, C.; Myra, J.; Nelson, B.; Nichols, J.; Ono, M.; Osborne, T.; Park, J.-K.; Peebles, W.; Perkins, R.; Phillips, C.; Podesta, M.; Poli, F.; Raman, R.; Ren, Y.; Roszell, J.; Rowley, C.; Russell, D.; Ruzic, D.; Ryan, P.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Schuster, E.; Scotti, F.; Sechrest, Y.; Shaing, K.; Sizyuk, T.; Sizyuk, V.; Skinner, C.; Smith, D.; Snyder, P.; Solomon, W.; Sovenic, C.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Startsev, E.; Stotler, D.; Stratton, B.; Stutman, D.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, G.; Tritz, K.; Walker, M.; Wang, W.; Wang, Z.; White, R.; Wilson, J. R.; Wirth, B.; Wright, J.; Yuan, X.; Yuh, H.; Zakharov, L.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-10-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is currently being upgraded to operate at twice the toroidal field and plasma current (up to 1 T and 2 MA), with a second, more tangentially aimed neutral beam (NB) for current and rotation control, allowing for pulse lengths up to 5 s. Recent NSTX physics analyses have addressed topics that will allow NSTX-Upgrade to achieve the research goals critical to a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility. These include producing stable, 100% non-inductive operation in high-performance plasmas, assessing plasma-material interface (PMI) solutions to handle the high heat loads expected in the next-step devices and exploring the unique spherical torus (ST) parameter regimes to advance predictive capability. Non-inductive operation and current profile control in NSTX-U will be facilitated by co-axial helicity injection (CHI) as well as radio frequency (RF) and NB heating. CHI studies using NIMROD indicate that the reconnection process is consistent with the 2D Sweet-Parker theory. Full-wave AORSA simulations show that RF power losses in the scrape-off layer (SOL) increase significantly for both NSTX and NSTX-U when the launched waves propagate in the SOL. Toroidal Alfvén eigenmode avalanches and higher frequency Alfvén eigenmodes can affect NB-driven current through energy loss and redistribution of fast ions. The inclusion of rotation and kinetic resonances, which depend on collisionality, is necessary for predicting experimental stability thresholds of fast growing ideal wall and resistive wall modes. Neutral beams and neoclassical toroidal viscosity generated from applied 3D fields can be used as actuators to produce rotation profiles optimized for global stability. DEGAS-2 has been used to study the dependence of gas penetration on SOL temperatures and densities for the MGI system being implemented on the Upgrade for disruption mitigation. PMI studies have focused on the effect of ELMs and 3D fields on plasma detachment and heat

  1. An overview of recent physics results from NSTX

    DOE PAGES

    Kaye, S. M.; Abrams, T.; Ahn, J. -W.; ...

    2015-03-27

    Currently, the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is being upgraded to operate at twice the toroidal field and plasma current (up to 1 T and 2 MA), with a second, more tangentially aimed neutral beam (NB) for current and rotation control, allowing for pulse lengths up to 5 s. Recent NSTX physics analyses have addressed topics that will allow NSTX-Upgrade to achieve the research goals critical to a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility. These include producing stable, 100% non-inductive operation in high-performance plasmas, assessing plasma-material interface (PMI) solutions to handle the high heat loads expected in the next-step devices and exploringmore » the unique spherical torus (ST) parameter regimes to advance predictive capability. Non-inductive operation and current profile control in NSTX-U will be facilitated by co-axial helicity injection (CHI) as well as radio frequency (RF) and NB heating. CHI studies using NIMROD indicate that the reconnection process is consistent with the 2D Sweet-Parker theory. Full-wave AORSA simulations show that RF power losses in the scrape-off layer (SOL) increase significantly for both NSTX and NSTX-U when the launched waves propagate in the SOL. Moreover, Toroidal Alfven eigenmode avalanches and higher frequency Alfven eigenmodes can affect NB-driven current through energy loss and redistribution of fast ions. The inclusion of rotation and kinetic resonances, which depend on collisionality, is necessary for predicting experimental stability thresholds of fast growing ideal wall and resistive wall modes. Neutral beams and neoclassical toroidal viscosity generated from applied 3D fields can be used as actuators to produce rotation profiles optimized for global stability. DEGAS-2 has been used to study the dependence of gas penetration on SOL temperatures and densities for the MGI system being implemented on the Upgrade for disruption mitigation. PMI studies have focused on the effect of ELMs and 3D fields on plasma

  2. An overview of recent physics results from NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S. M.; Abrams, T.; Ahn, J. -W.; Allain, J. P.; Andre, R.; Andruczyk, D.; Barchfeld, R.; Battaglia, D.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Bedoya, F.; Bell, R. E.; Belova, E.; Berkery, J.; Berry, L.; Bertelli, N.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bialek, J.; Bilato, R.; Boedo, J.; Bonoli, P.; Boozer, A.; Bortolon, A.; Boyer, M. D.; Boyle, D.; Brennan, D.; Breslau, J.; Brooks, J.; Buttery, R.; Capece, A.; Canik, J.; Chang, C. S.; Crocker, N.; Darrow, D.; Davis, W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Diallo, A.; D'Ippolito, D.; Domier, C.; Ebrahimi, F.; Ethier, S.; Evans, T.; Ferraro, N.; Ferron, J.; Finkenthal, M.; Fonck, R.; Fredrickson, E.; Fu, G. Y.; Gates, D.; Gerhardt, S.; Glasser, A.; Gorelenkov, N.; Gorelenkova, M.; Goumiri, I.; Gray, T.; Green, D.; Guttenfelder, W.; Harvey, R.; Hassanein, A.; Heidbrink, W.; Hirooka, Y.; Hooper, E. B.; Hosea, J.; Humphreys, D.; Jaeger, E. F.; Jarboe, T.; Jardin, S.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kaita, R.; Kessel, C.; Kim, K.; Koel, B.; Kolemen, E.; Kramer, G.; Ku, S.; Kubota, S.; LaHaye, R. J.; Lao, L.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Levinton, F.; Liu, D.; Lore, J.; Lucia, M.; Jr, N. Luhmann; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D.; Maqueda, R.; McKee, G.; Medley, S.; Meier, E.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Munsat, T.; Muscatello, C.; Myra, J.; Nelson, B.; Nichols, J.; Ono, M.; Osborne, T.; Park, J. -K.; Peebles, W.; Perkins, R.; Phillips, C.; Podesta, M.; Poli, F.; Raman, R.; Ren, Y.; Roszell, J.; Rowley, C.; Russell, D.; Ruzic, D.; Ryan, P.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Schuster, E.; Scotti, F.; Sechrest, Y.; Shaing, K.; Sizyuk, T.; Sizyuk, V.; Skinner, C.; Smith, D.; Snyder, P.; Solomon, W.; Sovenic, C.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Startsev, E.; Stotler, D.; Stratton, B.; Stutman, D.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, G.; Tritz, K.; Walker, M.; Wang, W.; Wang, Z.; White, R.; Wilson, J. R.; Wirth, B.; Wright, J.; Yuan, X.; Yuh, H.; Zakharov, L.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-03-27

    Currently, the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is being upgraded to operate at twice the toroidal field and plasma current (up to 1 T and 2 MA), with a second, more tangentially aimed neutral beam (NB) for current and rotation control, allowing for pulse lengths up to 5 s. Recent NSTX physics analyses have addressed topics that will allow NSTX-Upgrade to achieve the research goals critical to a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility. These include producing stable, 100% non-inductive operation in high-performance plasmas, assessing plasma-material interface (PMI) solutions to handle the high heat loads expected in the next-step devices and exploring the unique spherical torus (ST) parameter regimes to advance predictive capability. Non-inductive operation and current profile control in NSTX-U will be facilitated by co-axial helicity injection (CHI) as well as radio frequency (RF) and NB heating. CHI studies using NIMROD indicate that the reconnection process is consistent with the 2D Sweet-Parker theory. Full-wave AORSA simulations show that RF power losses in the scrape-off layer (SOL) increase significantly for both NSTX and NSTX-U when the launched waves propagate in the SOL. Moreover, Toroidal Alfven eigenmode avalanches and higher frequency Alfven eigenmodes can affect NB-driven current through energy loss and redistribution of fast ions. The inclusion of rotation and kinetic resonances, which depend on collisionality, is necessary for predicting experimental stability thresholds of fast growing ideal wall and resistive wall modes. Neutral beams and neoclassical toroidal viscosity generated from applied 3D fields can be used as actuators to produce rotation profiles optimized for global stability. DEGAS-2 has been used to study the dependence of gas penetration on SOL temperatures and densities for the MGI system being implemented on the Upgrade for disruption mitigation. PMI studies have focused on the effect of ELMs and 3D fields on plasma detachment and

  3. Recent results from the Bugey neutrino oscillation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cavaignac, J.F.; Hoummada, A.; Koang, D.H.; Vignon, B.; Declais, Y.; de Kerret, H.; Pessard, H.; Thenard, J.M.

    1984-11-15

    The energy spectrum of electron antineutrinos has been measured at two distances, 13.6 and 18.3 meters, from the core of a PWR power reactor at Bugey (FRANCE). About 63000 antineutrinos events have been recorded using the inverse ..beta..-decay reaction ..nu../sub e//sub $-bar//sub +p//sub ..-->..//sub n+e<+/. A significant difference in the counting rate between the two positions has been observed. The compatibility of the results with solutions in a two-neutrino oscillation analysis is discussed.

  4. Recent results from CDF and status of CDF-II

    SciTech Connect

    C. Pagliarone

    2001-12-07

    The CDF detector collected during 1992-95 (Run I) a data sample of 110 pb{sup -1} p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. A large variety of physical studies and measurements has been performed using these data. The current paper wants to review results obtained using this data sample as well as discuss the CDF-II upgrades and physical potential of the upgraded CDF Detector (CDF-II) in the Run II.

  5. Recent results from the Saclay nucleon-nucleon program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lac, C. D.; Ball, J.; Bystricky, J.; Derégel, J.; Lehar, F.; de Lesquen, A.; van Rossum, L.; Fontaine, J. M.; Perrot, F.; Bach, J.; Gaillard, G.; Hess, R.; Sormani, Ph.; Binz, R.; Peschina, R.; Rössle, E.; Schmitt, H.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Whitten, C. A.

    1989-05-01

    For n-p scattering we present the existing data for ΔσL, ΔσT and Aookk(np) quantities. For pp elastic scattering we present a direct reconstruction of the isospin I=1 scattering amplitudes in the energy region from 0.84 to 2.7 GeV. The results of this reconstruction suggest a structure in several amplitudes near 2.1 GeV. The existence of this structure was tested in a dedicated experiment.

  6. Comprehensive simulation of the middle atmospheric climate: some recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Kevin

    1995-05-01

    This study discusses the results of comprehensive time-dependent, three-dimensional numerical modelling of the circulation in the middle atmosphere obtained with the GFDL “SKYHI” troposphere-stratosphere-mesosphere general circulation model (GCM). The climate in a long control simulation with an intermediate resolution version (≈3° in horizontal) is briefly reviewed. While many aspects of the simulation are quite realistic, the focus in this study is on remaining first-order problems with the modelled middle atmospheric general circulation, notably the very cold high latitude temperatures in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) winter/spring, and the virtual absence of a quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in the tropical stratosphere. These problems are shared by other extant GCMs. It was noted that the SH cold pole problem is somewhat ameliorated with increasing horizontal resolution in the model. This suggests that improved resolution increases the vertical momentum fluxes from the explicitly resolved gravity waves in the model, a point confirmed by detailed analysis of the spectrum of vertical eddy momentum flux in the winter SH extratropics. This result inspired a series of experiments with the 3° SKYHI model modified by adding a prescribed zonally-symmetric zonal drag on the SH winter westerlies. The form of the imposed momentum source was based on the simple assumption that the mean flow drag produced by unresolved waves has a spatial distribution similar to that of the Eliassen-Palm flux divergence associated with explicitly resolved gravity waves. It was found that an appropriately-chosen drag confined to the top six model levels (above 0.35 mb) can lead to quite realistic simulations of the SH winter flow (including even the stationary wave fields) through August, but that problems still remain in the late-winter/springtime simulation. While the imposed momentum source was largely confined to the extratropics, it produced considerable improvement in the

  7. Recent results from the ARGO-YBJ experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Camarri, P.

    2010-03-26

    The ARGO-YBJ experiment at YangBaJing in Tibet (4300 m a.s.l.) has been taking data with its full layout since October 2007. Here we present the first significant results obtained in gamma-ray astronomy and cosmic-ray physics. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of gamma-ray emission from point-like sources (Crab Nebula, MRK 421), on the preliminary limit on the antiproton/proton flux ratio, on the large-scale cosmic-ray anisotropy and on the proton-air cross section. The performance of the detector is also discussed, and the perspectives of the experiment are outlined.

  8. Recent results from the ARGO-YBJ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarri, P.

    2010-03-01

    The ARGO-YBJ experiment at YangBaJing in Tibet (4300 m a.s.l.) has been taking data with its full layout since October 2007. Here we present the first significant results obtained in gamma-ray astronomy and cosmic-ray physics. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of gamma-ray emission from point-like sources (Crab Nebula, MRK 421), on the preliminary limit on the antiproton/proton flux ratio, on the large-scale cosmic-ray anisotropy and on the proton-air cross section. The performance of the detector is also discussed, and the perspectives of the experiment are outlined.

  9. Convective heat transfer in buildings: Recent research results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauman, F. S.; Gadgil, A.; Kammerud, R. C.; Altmayer, E.; Nansteel, M.

    1982-04-01

    Small scale water filled enclosures were used to study convective heat transfer in buildings. The convective processes investigated are: (1) natural convective heat transfer between room surfaces and the adjacent air; (2) natural convective heat transfer between adjacent rooms through a doorway or other openings; and (3) forced convection between the building and its external environment (such as, wind driven ventilation through windows, doors, or other openings). Results for surface convection coefficients are compared with existing ASHRAE coorelations and differences of as much as 20% are observed. Numerical simulations of wind driven natural ventilation exhibit good qualitative agreement with published wind tunnel data.

  10. Recent results of Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, R.; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    The Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment has been designed to precisely measure the least known neutrino mixing angle θ13. In March 2012, Daya Bay collaboration announced [Daya Bay Collaboration (F. P. An et al.), Observation of electron-antineutrino disappearance at Daya Bay, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 (2012) 171803] the observation of non-zero value of sin2 ⁡ 2θ13. Because of large statistics of detected antineutrinos and excellent performance of the experiment, Daya Bay continuously improves the precision of world best measurement of sin2 ⁡ 2θ13. In addition it provides results on neutrino mass splitting Δmee2 competitive with measurements of other experiments, results on precise measurement of reactor fluxes and on limits of the existence of hypothetical fourth neutrino. In this paper, we report the results available by the time of the 6th Capri workshop: the measurement of oscillation parameters sin2 ⁡ (2θ13) = 0.084 ± 0.005 and | Δ mee2 | = (2.42 ± 0.11) ×10-3eV2 [Daya Bay Collaboration (F. P. An et al.), New Measurement of Antineutrino Oscillation with the Full Detector Configuration at Daya Bay, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115 (2015) no. 11, 111802], searches for sterile neutrinos [Daya Bay Collaboration (F. P. An et al.) Search for a Light Sterile Neutrino at Daya Bay, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 (2014) 141802] and precise measurement of reactor neutrino flux [Daya Bay Collaboration (F. P. An et al.), Measurement of the Reactor Anti-neutrino Flux and Spectrum at Daya Bay, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 (2016) no. 6, 061801]. These are based on 621 days of measurement, most of the data has been taken in full detector configuration. More precise results [Daya Bay Collaboration (F. P. An et al.), Measurement of electron antineutrino oscillation based on 1230 days of operation of the Daya Bay experiment, arxiv:arXiv:1610.04802] with 1230 days of operation have been presented few weeks later at the Neutrino 2016 conference.

  11. Recent Results in Charmless Hadronic B Decays from BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J

    2004-06-29

    We report results from five analyses based on data taken with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. Included are branching fraction measurements for many B-meson decays involving {eta}, {eta}{prime}, {omega}, {phi} or a{sub 0} mesons and the final state K{sub s}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and a full angular analysis of the decay B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}K*{sup 0}.

  12. Recent results in high E{sub T} jet production

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoureux, J.; CDF Collaboration

    1997-02-01

    We present results on high E{sub T} jet measurements from CDF and D0. First we show the inclusive jet cross section and compare it to NLO QCD predictions. Preliminary CDF measurements of the {Sigma} E{sub T} cross section are also shown. In order to place limits on the amount of quark compositeness the data can tolerate, we show the dijet angular distributions. Finally, we discuss the inclusive jet cross section measurement at {radical}s = 0.63 TeV and tests of scaling. 13 refs., 15 figs.

  13. Recent COMPASS results and future prospects for ALICE

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Suh-Urk

    2015-04-10

    The COMPASS Collaboration has accumulated the world’s highest statistics on the reaction π{sup −} p → π{sup +}π{sup −}π{sup −} p at 190 GeV/c. The results, presented in Section 1, show that a new state J{sup PC} = 1{sup ++} state never reported before, the a{sub 1}(1420), decaying to f{sub 0}(980)π followed by f{sub 0}(980) → ππ. In addition, the Collaboration reports an exotic J{sup PC} = 1{sup −+} state, the π{sub 1}(1600), which cannot be a quarkonium. Both states are likely to be a tetra-quark, i.e. qq{sup ¯}+qq{sup ¯} or a gluonic hybrid, a qq{sup ¯} object with an excited gluon inside it. Section 2 is devoted to a brief discussion of the central production of resonances, which is being investigated by both COMPASS and ALICE collaborations. However, the results are not yet released, so it is limited to a broad discussion of the central production, with emphasis on different analyses dictated by differences in the experimental setup.

  14. [Recent results in research on oscillatory chemical reactions].

    PubMed

    Poros, Eszter; Kurin-Csörgei, Krisztina

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of the complicated periodical phenomenas in the nature (e.g. hearth beat, sleep cycle, circadian rhythms, etc) could be understood with using the laws of nonlinear chemical systems. In this article the newest result in the research of the subfield of nonlinear chemical dynamics aimed at constructing oscillatory chemical reactions, which are novel either in composition or in configuration, are presented. In the introductory part the concept of chemical periodicity is defined, then the forms as it can appear in time and space and the methods of their study are discussed. Detailed description of the experimental work that has resulted in two significant discoveries is provided. A method was developed to design pH-oscillators which are capable of operating under close conditions. The batch pH-oscillators are more convenient to use in some proposed applications than the equivalent CSTR variant. A redox oscillator that is new in composition was found. The permanganate oxidation of some amino acids was shown to take place according to oscillatory kinetics in a narrow range of the experimental parameters. The KMnO4 - glycine - Na2HPO4 system represents the first example in the family of manganese based oscillators where amino acids is involved. In the conclusion formal analogies between the simple chemical and some more complicated biological oscillatory phenomena are mentioned and the possibility of modeling periodic processes with the use of information gained from the studies of chemical oscillations is pointed out.

  15. Recent COMPASS results and future prospects for ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Suh-Urk

    2015-04-01

    The COMPASS Collaboration has accumulated the world's highest statistics on the reaction π- p → π+π-π- p at 190 GeV/c. The results, presented in Section 1, show that a new state JPC = 1++ state never reported before, the a1(1420), decaying to f0(980)π followed by f0(980) → ππ. In addition, the Collaboration reports an exotic JPC = 1-+ state, the π1(1600), which cannot be a quarkonium. Both states are likely to be a tetra-quark, i.e. q q ¯+q q ¯ or a gluonic hybrid, a q q ¯ object with an excited gluon inside it. Section 2 is devoted to a brief discussion of the central production of resonances, which is being investigated by both COMPASS and ALICE collaborations. However, the results are not yet released, so it is limited to a broad discussion of the central production, with emphasis on different analyses dictated by differences in the experimental setup.

  16. Complementarity and path distinguishability: Some recent results concerning photon pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimony, Abner; Jaeger, Gregg

    1994-01-01

    Two results concerning photon pairs, one previously reported and one new, are summarized. It was previously shown that if the two photons are prepared in a quantum state formed from bar-A and bar-A' for photon 1 and bar-B and bar-B' for photon 2, then both one- and two-particle interferometry can be studied. If upsilon(sub i) is the visibility of one-photon interference fringes (i = 1,2) and upsilon(sub 12) is the visibility of two-photon fringes (a concept which we explicitly define), then upsilon(sub i) squared + upsilon(sub 12) squared is less than or equal to 1. The second result concerns the distinguishability of the paths of photon 2, using the known 2-photon state. A proposed measure E for path distinguishability is based upon finding an optimum strategy for betting on the outcome of a path measurement. Mandel has also proposed a measure of distinguishability P(sub D), defined in terms of the density operator rho of photon 2. We show that E is greater than or equal to P(sub D) and that upsilon(sub 2) = (1 - E(exp 2))exp 1/2.

  17. Recent Results of NASA's Space Environments and Effects Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, Jody L.; Brewer, Dana S.

    1998-01-01

    The Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program is a multi-center multi-agency program managed by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The program evolved from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), analysis of LDEF data, and recognition of the importance of the environments and environmental effects on future space missions. It is a very comprehensive and focused approach to understanding the space environments, to define the best techniques for both flight and ground-based experimentation, to update the models which predict both the environments and the environmental effects on spacecraft, and finally to ensure that this information is properly maintained and inserted into spacecraft design programs. Formal funding of the SEE Program began initially in FY95. A NASA Research Announcement (NRA) solicited research proposals in the following categories: 1) Engineering environment definitions; 2) Environments and effects design guidelines; 3) Environments and effects assessment models and databases; and, 4) Flight/ground simulation/technology assessment data. This solicitation resulted in funding for eighteen technology development activities (TDA's). This paper will present and describe technical results rom the first set of TDA's of the SEE Program. It will also describe the second set of technology development activities which are expected to begin in January 1998. These new technology development activities will enable the SEE Program to start numerous new development activities in support of mission customer needs.

  18. KASCADE-Grande Review, Recent Results, Future Endeavors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoo, S.; Apel, W. D.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Beck, K.; Bertaina, M.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; Di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Fuhrmann, D.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Klages, H. O.; Link, K.; Łuczak, P.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Palmieri, N.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schröder, F. G.; Sima, O.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Zabierowski, J.

    A detailed knowledge of the energy spectrum and composition of cosmic rays (CRs) is the most important source of information for solving the riddle of the origin of CRs. The KASCADE experiment and its extension KASCADE-Grande have contributed much to the current knowledge about both the spectrum and composition in the energy range from around 1 PeV to 1 EeV. One of the most important results of the KASCADE experiment is the connection of the knee at a few PeV to a decrease in the flux of light primaries. Later, KASCADE-Grande found a knee-like structure also in the spectrum of heavy elements at around 90 PeV and an ankle-like feature in the spectrum of light elements just above 100 PeV. In this contribution a short review of the experiment will be followed by an overview on the current results on spectrum and composition of CRs and a summary of the further activities within the KASCADE-Grande collaboration related to both, data analysis and data publication.

  19. Recent Results from CLAS on Baryon Structure and Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ilieva, Yordanka Yordanova

    2013-08-01

    The understanding of baryon structure and interactions from Quantum Chromodynamics is one of the main objectives of modern hadron physics. Of particular interest is the regime of confinement where perturbative methods are not applicable to derive testable predictions. Understanding the transition from hadronic to partonic degrees of freedom, the hyperon-nucleon interaction, and nuclei in terms of quarks and gluons are some of the key problems. Here we present results of photoproduction experiments on light nuclear targets from Jefferson Lab Hall B. Our observation of onset of dimensional scaling in the cross section of two-body photodisintegration of (3)He at energy and momentum transfer well below 1 GeV suggests that quarks and gluons may be relevant degrees of freedom for the description of nuclear dynamics at energies lower than previously considered. Our program to study lambda-nucleon scattering via a large set of polarization observables for final-state interactions in exclusive hyperon photoproduction off the deuteron has produced preliminary results for single-polarization observables. The beam-spin asymmetry shows interesting features at large lambda polar angles and large kaon momenta.

  20. Recent Results of NASA's Space Environments and Effects Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, Jody L.; Brewer, Dana S.

    1998-01-01

    The Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program is a multi-center multi-agency program managed by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The program evolved from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), analysis of LDEF data, and recognition of the importance of the environments and environmental effects on future space missions. It is a very comprehensive and focused approach to understanding the space environments, to define the best techniques for both flight and ground-based experimentation, to update the models which predict both the environments and the environmental effects on spacecraft, and finally to ensure that this information is properly maintained and inserted into spacecraft design programs. Formal funding of the SEE Program began initially in FY95. A NASA Research Announcement (NRA) solicited research proposals in the following categories: 1) Engineering environment definitions; 2) Environments and effects design guidelines; 3) Environments and effects assessment models and databases; and, 4) Flight/ground simulation/technology assessment data. This solicitation resulted in funding for eighteen technology development activities (TDA's). This paper will present and describe technical results rom the first set of TDA's of the SEE Program. It will also describe the second set of technology development activities which are expected to begin in January 1998. These new technology development activities will enable the SEE Program to start numerous new development activities in support of mission customer needs.

  1. Recent results on top quark physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Gallinaro, M.; CDF Collaboration

    1997-01-01

    We present the latest results on the top quark obtained by the CDF experiment using a data sample of about 110 pb{sup -1}. The data sample has been collected at the FermiLab Tevatron Collider with p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. We briefly describe the candidate event selection and then discuss the production cross section determination and the mass measurement. Combining the results from the channels with at least one W decaying leptonically into an electron or muon, we measure {sigma}{sub t{anti t}} = 7.5{sup +1.9}{sub -1.6} pb. Our best measured value for the top mass gives M{sub t} = 176.8{+-}6.5 GeV/c{sup 2}. We also report on the observation of t{anti t} production in the all hadronic decay channel using kinematic selection and b identification, and in the channel containing one hadronically decaying {tau} lepton. Finally we discuss the kinematics of top events and measure the matrix element {vert_bar}V{sub tb}{vert_bar}=1.12{+-}0.12.

  2. Recent Results from the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, En-Chuan

    2016-11-01

    The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment is designed to precisely measure the mixing parameter sin2 2θ13 via relative measurements with eight functionally identical antineutrino detectors (ADs). In 2012, Daya Bay has first measured a non-zero sin2 2θ13 value with a significance larger than 5σ with the first six ADs. With the installation of two new ADs to complete the full configuration, Daya Bay has continued to increase statistics and lower systematic uncertainties for better precision of sin2 2θ13 and for the exploration of other physics topics. In this proceeding, the latest analysis results of sin2 2θ13 and |Δm 2 ee|, including a measurement made with neutron capture on Gadolinium and an independent measurement made with neutron capture on hydrogen are presented. The latest results of the search for sterile neutrino in the mass splitting range of 10-3 eV2 < |Δm 2 41| < 0.3 eV2 and the absolute measurement of the rate and energy spectrum of reactor antineutrinos will also be presented.

  3. Recent Results from the Jlab RSS Spin Physics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mahbubul Khandaker

    2009-12-01

    The spin physics program in Jefferson Lab’s Hall C concentrates on high precision and high resolution studies of the nucleon spin structure that can be extracted from inclusive polarized scattering experiments. The Resonances Spin Structure - RSS experiment has measured nucleon spin structure functions in the resonances region at an intermediate four-momentum transfer Q2 ~ 1.3 GeV2. The polarized target in Hall C could be polarized longitudinally and transversely, allowing extraction of both spin-dependent structure functions g1 and g2. Results on proton and deuteron spin asymmetries A1 and A2, and spin structure functions g1 and g2, are presented here.

  4. Recent Results from Jefferson Lab RSS Spin Physics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Khandaker, Mahbub

    2009-12-17

    The spin physics program in Jefferson Lab's Hall C concentrates on high precision and high resolution studies of the nucleon spin structure that can be extracted from inclusive polarized scattering experiments. The Resonances Spin Structure - RSS experiment has measured nucleon spin structure functions in the resonances region at an intermediate four-momentum transfer Q{sup 2}{approx_equal}1.3 GeV{sup 2}. The polarized target in Hall C could be polarized longitudinally and transversely, allowing extraction of both spin-dependent structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2}. Results on proton and deuteron spin asymmetries A{sub 1} and A{sub 2}, and spin structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2}, are presented here.

  5. Recent Results from the IR Upgrade FEL at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    K. Beard; C. Behre; S. Benson; G. Biallas; J. Boyce; D. Douglas; H. F. Dylla; R. Evans; A. Grippo; J. Gubeli; D. Hardy; C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Jordan; L. Merminga; N. Nishimori; G. Neil; J. Preble; Michelle D. Shinn; T. Siggins; R. Walker; G. Williams; S. Zhang

    2005-08-21

    After demonstrating 10 kW operation with 1 second pulses, the Jefferson Lab program switched to demonstrating high power operation at short wavelengths using a new 8 cm period wiggler and a THz suppression chicane. We report here on the lasing results to date using this new configuration. We have demonstrated a large reduction in THz heating on the mirrors. We have also eliminated heating in the mirror steering assemblies, making operation at high power much more stable. Finally, we have greatly reduced astigmatism in the optical cavity, allowing operation with a very short Rayleigh range. The laser has been tuned from 0.9 to 3.1 microns using the new wiggler. User experiments commenced in April of 2005 with the FEL Upgrade operating over the 1-3 micron range. We are in the process of installing a 5.5 cm permanent magnet wiggler that will give us even larger tuning range and higher power.

  6. The LOPES experiment—Recent results, status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huege, T.; Apel, W. D.; Arteaga, J. C.; Asch, T.; Bähren, L.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Buchholz, P.; Buitink, S.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Falcke, H.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Gemmeke, H.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Huber, D.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Krömer, O.; Kuijpers, J.; Lafebre, S.; Link, K.; Łuczak, P.; Ludwig, M.; Mathes, H. J.; Melissas, M.; Morello, C.; Nehls, S.; Oehlschläger, J.; Palmieri, N.; Pierog, T.; Rautenberg, J.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Rühle, C.; Saftoiu, A.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, A.; Schröder, F. G.; Sima, O.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; Zabierowski, J.; Zensus, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The LOPES experiment at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology has been taking radio data in the frequency range from 40 to 80 MHz in coincidence with the KASCADE-Grande air shower detector since 2003. Various experimental configurations have been employed to study aspects such as the energy scaling, geomagnetic dependence, lateral distribution, and polarization of the radio emission from cosmic rays. The high quality per-event air shower information provided by KASCADE-Grande has been the key to many of these studies and has even allowed us to perform detailed per-event comparisons with simulations of the radio emission. In this article, we give an overview of results obtained by LOPES, and present the status and perspectives of the ever-evolving experiment.

  7. Status and Recent Results from the Cream Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, E. S.; Ahn, H. S.; Bhoyar, P.; Eaton, J.; Ganel, O.; Han, J. H.; Haque, A.; Kim, K. C.; Kim, M. H.; Lee, M. H.; Lee, S. E.; Lutz, L.; Malinin, A.; Ofoha, O.; Ryu, S. S.; Smith, B. P.; Vartanyan, A.; Walpole, P.; Wu, J.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, Y. S.; Anderson, T.; Conklin, N. B.; Coutu, S.; Geske, M.; Mognet, S. I.; Barbier, L.; Link, J. T.; Mitchell, J. W.; Barrau, A.; Buénerd, M.; Coste, B.; Derome, L.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; Putze, A.; Sallaz-Damaz, Y.; Bazer-Bachi, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Brandt, T. J.; Bigongiari, G.; Maestro, P.; Zei, R.; Jeon, J. A.; Na, G.; Nam, J.; Nam, S.; Park, I. H.; Park, N. H.; Yang, J.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Nutter, S.

    2011-06-01

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) balloon-borne experiment has accumulated ~156 days of exposure during five successful flights over Antarctica. Energy measurements are made with a transition radiation detector and an ionization calorimeter. Charge measurements are made with timing scintillators, pixelated Si, and Cherenkov detectors to minimize the effect of backscattered particles. High energy cosmic-ray data were collected over a wide energy range from ~ 1010 to ~ 1015 eV at an average altitude of ~38.5 km, with ~3.9 g/cm2 atmospheric overburden. All cosmic-ray elements from protons (Z = 1) to iron nuclei (Z = 26) are separated with excellent charge resolution. The instrument performance, results from the ongoing data analysis, and their implications on cosmic-ray origin, acceleration and propagation are discussed.

  8. Recent field test results using OMEGA transmissions for clock synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, A. R.; Wardrip, S. C.

    1974-01-01

    The results are presented of clock synchronization experiments using OMEGA transmissions from North Dakota on 13.10 kHz and 12.85 kHz. The OMEGA transmissions were monitored during April 1974 from NASA tracking sites located at Madrid, Spain; Canary Island; and Winkfield, England. The sites are located at distances between 6600 kilometers (22,100 microseconds) to 7300 kilometers (24,400 microseconds) from North Dakota. The data shows that cycle identification of the received signals was accomplished. There are, however, discrepancies between the measured and calculated propagation delay values which have not been explained, but seem to increase with distance between the receiver and the transmitter. The data also indicates that three strategically located OMEGA transmitting stations may be adequate to provide worldwide coverage for clock synchronization to within plus or minus two (2) microseconds.

  9. Recent Results in Dark Matter Direct Detection Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kelso, Christopher Michael

    2012-08-01

    In this dissertation, we study the original excess of low energy events observed by the Co- GeNT collaboration and the annual modulation reported by the DAMA/LIBRA collaboration, and discuss whether these signals could both be the result of the same elastically scattering dark matter particle. We find that, without channeling but when taking into account uncertainties in the relevant quenching factors, a dark matter candidate with a mass of approximately ~7.0 GeV and a cross section with nucleons of σDM-N ~2 x 10-40 cm2 could account for both of these observations. We also compare the region of parameter space favored by DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT to the constraints from XENON 10, XENON 100, and CDMS (Si).

  10. Recent results from the AMISR Systems (PFISR and RISR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinselman, Craig; Nicolls, Michael

    2010-05-01

    The first face of the Advanced Modular Incoherent Scatter Radar (AMISR) was installed at the Poker Flat Research Range north of Fairbanks, Alaska, and became fully operational in March 2007. This system, a phased-array radar for ionospheric studies, had been under development for the National Science Foundation for several years and that development progressed in a staged manner with several prototype systems fielded and tested at different geographic locations. The first panels of the system were field tested near SRI's facility at the ‘Big Dish' above the Stanford University campus in California. Subsequent system testing occurred at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory in Peru and at the HAARP ionospheric modification facility near Gakona in Alaska. The Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) was the first AMISR implementation with full incoherent scatter capabilities at geophysically interesting integration times. Geomagnetically, it is an auroral zone system. A second AMISR face has now been installed very near the magnetic north pole at Resolute Bay, Nunavut, Canada. This face (called RISR for short) is similar, but not identical to, the Poker Flat installation. In addition to its very different geomagnetic location, Resolute Bay's face is also oriented differently and has a number of system improvements adding to the flexibility and utility of that radar. One of the most interesting attributes of the AMISR systems is their ability to steer on a pulse-by-pulse basis. This rapid redirection of the look direction uniquely supports the separation of temporal and spatial changes in the ionospheric plasma. One of the first experiments performed with the completed RISR utilized this steering capability to estimate latitudinal and temporal variations in the electric fields above and to the North of Resolute Bay. This talk will show some of these early results and discuss the details of the system configuration and post processing needed to produce them. It will

  11. CO2CARE - Site Closure Assessment Research - Recent Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wipki, Mario; Liebscher, Axel; Kühn, Michael; Lüth, Stefan; Durucan, Sevket; Deflandre, Jean-Pierre; Wollenweber, Jens; Chadwick, Andy; Böhm, Gualtiero

    2013-04-01

    The EU project CO2CARE, which started in January 2011, supports the large scale demonstration of CCS technology by addressing requirements of operators and regulators face in terms of CO2 storage site abandonment. The CO2CARE consortium, consisting of 24 project partners from universities, research institutes, and the industry, investigate technologies and procedures for abandonment and post-closure safety, satisfying the regulatory requirements for the transfer of responsibility. Nine key injections sites in Europe, USA, Japan, and Australia, each with a specific (hydro) geological and environmental character, were selected for investigations. These sites can be divided into the CO2 storage types on-shore, off-shore, natural CO2 reservoir, depleted gas reservoirs, and saline aquifers. The project mainly focuses on three key areas: - well abandonment and long-term integrity; - reservoir management and prediction from closure to the long-term; - risk management methodologies for long-term safety. These key areas are in turn closely linked to the three high-level requirements of the EU Directive 2009/31/EC, Article 18 for CO2 storage which are: (i) absence of any detectable leakage, (ii) conformity of actual behaviour of the injected CO2 with the modeled behaviour, and (iii) the storage site is evolving towards a situation of long-term stability. The identification of criteria and the development of site abandonment procedures and technologies, which guarantee the fulfillment of the high-level requirements, are the major objectives in CO2CARE. These criteria have to be fulfilled prior to subsequent transfer of responsibility to the competent authorities, typically 20 or 30 years after site closure. Finally, the essential results of the different working groups in CO2CARE will feed into overall guidelines for regulatory compliance and "Best Practice" for site abandonment. Dissemination of the results will show policy makers and the general public how site abandonment

  12. Recent results about fan noise: Its generation, radiation and suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiler, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    Fan noise including its generation, radiation characteristics, and suppression by acoustic treatment is studied. In fan noise generation, results from engine and fan experiments, using inflow control measures to suppress noise sources related to inflow distortion and turbulence, are described. The suppression of sources related to inflow allows the experiments to focus on the fan or engine internal sources. Some of the experiments incorporated pressure sensors on the fan blades to sample the flow disturbances encountered by the blades. From these data some inferences can be drawn about the origins of the disturbances. Also, hot wire measurements of a fan rotor wake field are presented and related to the fan's noise signature. The radiation and the suppression of fan noise are dependent on the acoustic modes generated by the fan. Fan noise suppression and radiation is described by relating these phenomena to the mode cutoff ratio parameter. In addition to its utility in acoustic treatment design and performance prediction, cutoff ratio was useful in developing a simple description of the radiation pattern for broadband fan noise. Some of the findings using the cutoff ratio parameter are presented.

  13. The Mexican participation at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Román, S.; Alcaráz, F.; Cantoral, E.; Castro, J.; Cordero, A.; Fernández, A.; López, R.; Pacheco, C.; Rubín, M.; Salazar, H.; Valdés, J.; Vargas, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Zepeda, A.

    1998-02-01

    In this work we present the participations of the Mexican group at development of the Pierre Auger Observatory. We have been working in both parts of the hybrid proposed for the Auger detector, the fluorescence and the surface detectors. In the part of fluorescence, we have analyzed the resolution of the Hi-Res optical design of the fluorescence detector observatory. We have found a heterogeneus image resolution. We propose to use a lensless Schmidt camera (with spherical image surface) to duplicate the field of view to 30×30 degrees and simultaneously guarantee a resolution of one degree over of the whole field of view. By the Surface Detector, a water Čerenkov detector (WCD) prototype of reduced dimensions (cylinder 1.54 diameter filled with purified water up to 1.20 m high) is used to obtain preliminary experimental results that validate the concept of remote calibration and monitoring of WCDs. We use muons that stop and decay inside the WCD and, in a complementary way, muons that croos the WCD. We used a moun telescope trigger in order to study the charge distribution of vertical muons, their pulse amplitude decay and the Cerenkov light attenuation length of those secondary cosmic muons we include the bacteria population content for the four months of operation to validate the monitoring method.

  14. Recent results from Mark II at SPEAR and PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, J.

    1982-04-01

    Three results are presented: (1) The semi-leptonic branching ratio of the ..lambda../sub c/ has been measured at SPEAR to be B(..lambda../sub c//sup +/ ..-->.. e/sup +/X) = (4.5 +- 1.7)%. (2) Properties of tau-pair production have been measured at PEP at square root S = 29 GeV: sigma/sup tau tau//sigma/sup QED/ = 0.97 +- 0.05 +- 0.06; the forward-backward asymmetry is A/sub tau tau/ = (-3.5 +- 5.0)%; inclusive branching ratios are B(tau ..-->.. 1 Prong) = (86 +- 4)%, B(tau ..-->.. 3 Prongs) = (14 +- 4)%, B(tau ..-->.. 5 Prongs) < 0.6% (95% C.L.). (3) A search has been performed for the pair production of charged, point-like, spin 0 particles. The existence of such particles can be ruled out at a 90% confidence level for 3 approx. < M approx. < 10 GeV/c/sup 2/ and branching ratio into hadrons approx. < 90%.

  15. Recent MARK III results in radiative J/psi decays

    SciTech Connect

    Toki, W.

    1985-11-01

    New results on the zeta(2.2) are reported. Mark III has analyzed new J/psi data and reconfirmed the zeta(2.2) in radiative J/psi decays to K/sub S//sup 0/K/sub S//sup 0/ and K/sup +/K/sup -/. The significances of the signals are 3.6 and 4.5 standard deviations, the masses, 2.232 +- .007 +- .007 and 2.230 +- .006 +- .014 GeV/c/sup 2/, and the widths, 0.018/sub -.015//sup +.023/ +- .010 and 0.026/sub -.016//sup +.020/ +- .017 GeV/c/sup 2/, for the K/sub S//sup 0/K/sub S//sup 0/ and K/sup +/K/sup -/ modes, respectively. The branching ratios are BR(J/psi ..-->.. ..gamma..zeta, zeta ..-->.. K/sub S//sup 0/K/sub S//sup 0/) = (3.2/sub -1.3//sub +1.6/ +- 0.7) x 10/sup -5/ and BR(J/psi ..-->.. ..gamma..zeta, zeta ..-->.. K/sup +/K/sup -/) = (4.2/sub -1.4//sup +1.7/ +- 0.8) x 10/sup -5/. 14 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Gamma Ray Bursts Spectral-Energy correlations: recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirlanda, Giancarlo

    2011-02-01

    The correlations between the rest frame peak of the νFν spectrum of GRBs (Epeak) and their isotropic energy (Eiso) or luminosity (Liso) could have several implications for the understanding of the GRB prompt emission. These correlations are presently founded on the time-averaged spectral properties of a sample of 95 bursts, with measured redshifts, collected by different instruments in the last 13 years (pre-Fermi). One still open issue is wether these correlations have a physical origin or are due to instrumental selection effects. By studying 10 long and 14 short GRBs detected by Fermi we find that a strong time-resolved correlation between Epeak and the luminosity Liso is present within individual GRBs and that it is consistent with the time-integrated correlation. This result is a direct proof of the existence in both short and long GRBs of a similar physical link between the hardness and the luminosity which is not due to instrumental selection effects. The origin of the Epeak - Liso correlation should be searched in the radiation mechanism of the prompt emission.

  17. Recent results about fan noise: Its generation, radiation and suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiler, C. E.

    Fan noise including its generation, radiation characteristics, and suppression by acoustic treatment is studied. In fan noise generation, results from engine and fan experiments, using inflow control measures to suppress noise sources related to inflow distortion and turbulence, are described. The suppression of sources related to inflow allows the experiments to focus on the fan or engine internal sources. Some of the experiments incorporated pressure sensors on the fan blades to sample the flow disturbances encountered by the blades. From these data some inferences can be drawn about the origins of the disturbances. Also, hot wire measurements of a fan rotor wake field are presented and related to the fan's noise signature. The radiation and the suppression of fan noise are dependent on the acoustic modes generated by the fan. Fan noise suppression and radiation is described by relating these phenomena to the mode cutoff ratio parameter. In addition to its utility in acoustic treatment design and performance prediction, cutoff ratio was useful in developing a simple description of the radiation pattern for broadband fan noise. Some of the findings using the cutoff ratio parameter are presented.

  18. Recent results from DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabei, R.; Belli, P.; Cappella, F.; Caracciolo, V.; Cerulli, R.; Dai, C. J.; d'Angelo, A.; d'Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A.; He, H. L.; Incicchitti, A.; Kuang, H. H.; Ma, X. H.; Montecchia, F.; Sheng, X. D.; Wang, R. G.; Ye, Z. P.

    2016-04-01

    The DAMA/LIBRA experiment, consisting of about 250 kg of highly radio-pure NaI(Tl) target, is running deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the I.N.F.N.; its main aim is the investigation of Dark Matter (DM) particles in the Galactic halo by means of the model independent DM annual modulation signature. In this paper we briefly summarize the results obtained in its first phase of measurements (DAMA/LIBRA-phase1) lasted for 7 annual cycles with a total exposure of 1.04 ton ×yr. The DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 and the former DAMA/NaI data (cumulative exposure 1.33 ton ×yr, corresponding to 14 annual cycles) give evidence at 9.3 σ C.L. for the presence of DM particles in the galactic halo. No systematic or side reaction able to mimic the exploited DM signature has been found or suggested by anyone over more than a decade. At fall 2010 a relevant upgrade of the experiment has been performed: all the PMTs have been replaced by new ones having higher quantum efficiency. After some optimization periods, a new phase of measurement, DAMA/LIBRA-phase2, has began in this new configuration with increased sensitivity. Some of the perspectives of the presently running DAMA/LIBRA-phase2 are mentioned.

  19. Recent CMS results in top and Higgs physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca

    2017-09-01

    After the Higgs boson discovery in 2012, the investigation of its properties and compatibility with the Standard Model predictions is central to the physics program of the LHC experiments. Likewise, the study of the top quark is still relevant at the LHC, more than two decades after its discovery at the Tevatron. Top quarks and Higgs bosons are produced at the LHC on a large scale and share a deep connection based on the large mass of the top quark. Both particles provide an excellent laboratory in which to search for new physics: the measurement of their properties tests the foundations of the Standard Model; and they feature prominently in a variety of exotic signals. The coupling of the Higgs boson to the top quark, a fundamental Standard Model parameter, can only be measured directly in processes where the two particles are produced together. The production of a Higgs boson together with one or two top quarks is also sensitive to several exciting new physics effects. A brief overview of the current experimental status of top quark and Higgs boson physics is presented using results from the CMS Collaboration.

  20. Recent Radiation Test Results for Trench Power MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan C.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Phan, Anthony M.; Kim, Hak S.; Topper, Alyson D.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; Label, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    Single-event effect (SEE) radiation test results are presented for various trench-gate power MOSFETs. The heavy-ion response of the first (and only) radiation-hardened trench-gate power MOSFET is evaluated: the manufacturer SEE response curve is verified and importantly, no localized dosing effects are measured, distinguishing it from other, non-hardened trench-gate power MOSFETs. Evaluations are made of n-type commercial and both n- and p-type automotive grade trench-gate device using ions comparable to of those on the low linear energy transfer (LET) side of the iron knee of the galactic cosmic ray spectrum, to explore suitability of these parts for missions with higher risk tolerance and shorter duration, such as CubeSats. Part-to-part variability of SEE threshold suggests testing with larger sample sizes and applying more aggressive derating to avoid on-orbit failures. The n-type devices yielded expected localized dosing effects including when irradiated in an unbiased (0-V) configuration, adding to the challenge of inserting these parts into space flight missions.

  1. Overview of Recent Alcator C-Mod Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmar, Earl; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2014-10-01

    Alcator C-Mod research currently emphasizes RF heating, current and flow drive, divertor/PMI issues, non-ELMing pedestal regimes with enhanced confinement, and disruption mitigation/runaway dynamics. Stability analysis of I-mode pedestals shows pressures well below the peeling-ballooning limit, as well as expected kinetic ballooning mode thresholds, consistent with the lack of ELMs. Results with the magnetic field aligned ICRF antenna show reductions in high-Z metallic impurities. Implementation of novel ``mirror-probe'' electronics has enabled simultaneous measurements of Te, ne and φ with 1 μs time response using a single probe tip, revealing important properties of the Quasi-Coherent-Mode (QCM) which regulates edge particle transport in EDA H-mode. An Accelerator-based In-situ Material Surveillance diagnostic has been deployed, providing the first between-shot measurements of surface evolution of the all-metal wall. We have observed suppression of boundary turbulence and τE improvement using LHRF into high-density H-modes, with H-factor increases up to 30%. Upgrades which are ready for construction and near term installation on C-Mod include: an off-midplane LH launcher to test theories of improved current drive at high density and an actively heated (900 K) tungsten DEMO-like outer divertor. We are proposing a new facility, ADX, based on Alcator technology, to access advanced magnetic topologies to solve the divertor PMI problem, combined with high-field launch LHCD and ICRF to extend the tokamak to steady-state with reactor relevant tools. Supported by USDOE.

  2. Foreshocks and earthquake prediction: recent results from Greece experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, G. A.; Daskalaki, E.; Minadakis, G.; Orfanogiannaki, K.

    2009-04-01

    Foreshock activity has been proposed since 60's as one of the most potential tools for the short-term prediction of the mainshock. However, the usually low earthquake detectability of the seismic monitoring systems makes it difficult to identify significant foreshock seismicity patterns in near real-time conditions. The gradual improvement of the monitoring systems in the last years makes it possible to detect more reliably the precursory nature of the foreshock activity. This is exactly the case of Greece which is characterized by the highest seismicity in the western Eurasia. We use data from the routine Greek seismicity catalogue of the time interval 1985-2008 and identify a posteriori foreshock activity occurring before strong earthquakes of Ms ≥ 5.5. The criteria to identify significant foreshock activity includes the next: time window up to 1 year before the strong earthquake, space window no more that 50 km from the epicenter of the strong earthquake, increase of the seismicity rate in the particular space-time window at a significance level of at least 95% with respect to the background seismicity rate in the same area. The results indicate that at least of about 50% of the strong earthquakes were preceded by significant foreshock activity. However, further examination of the records in particular seismograph stations of the national Greek seismograph system showed that foreshock activity is not always evident in the routine seismicity catalogue because of reasons related to the detection capabilities of the system. We propose the systematic, automatic monitoring of the daily seismicity with the purpose to identify in near real-time foreshock activity. We demonstrate the algorithm FORMA which is designed to perform such an automatic detection.

  3. Recent theoretical and experimental results on inertial fusion energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, G.; Perlado, J. M.; Alonso, M.; Bravo, E.; Cabellos, O.; Dominguez, E.; Eliezer, S.; Falquina, R.; Rubiano, J. G.; Gil, J. M.; del Rio, J. G.; Gonzalez, A. I.; Leon, P. T.; Lodi, D.; Marian, J.; Martel, P.; Martinez-Val, J. M.; Minguez, E.; Ogando, F.; Piera, M.; Prieto, J.; Relano, A.; Reyes, S.; Rodriguez, A.; Rodriguez, R.; Salvador, M.; Sanz, Jose L.; Senz, D. G.; Sauvan, P.; Velarde, M.; Velarde, P.

    2003-12-01

    We study with ARWEN code a target design for ICF based on jet production. ARWEN is 2D Adaptive Mesh Refinement fluid dynamic and multigroup radiation transport. We are designing, by using also ARWEN, a target for laboratory simulation of astrophysical phenomena. We feature an experimental device to reproduce collisions of two shock waves, scaled to roughly represent cosmic supernova remnants. ANALOP code uses parametric potentials fitting to self-consistent potentials, it includes temperature and density effects by linearized Debye-Huckel and it treats excited configurations and H+He-like lines. Other is an average SHM using the parametric potentials above described. H-like emissivities and opacities have been simulated, using both, for Al and F plasmas with density 1023 cm-3 and temperatures higher than 200 eV. Advanced fusion cycles, as the aneutronic proton-boron 11 reaction, require very high ignition temperatures. Plasma conditions for a fusion-burning wave to propagate at such temperatures are rather extreme and complex, because of the overlapping effects of the main energy transport mechanisms. Calculations on the most appropriate ICF regimes for this purpose are presented. A new Monte Carlo procedure estimates effect of activation cross section uncertainties in the accuracy of inventory calculations, based on simultaneous random sampling of all the cross sections; it is implemented in activation code ACAB. We apply, with LLNL, to NIF gunite chamber shielding with reference pulsing operation. Preliminary results show that the 95 percentile of the distribution of the relative error of the contact dose rate can take values up to 1.2. Model is promising for uncertainty analysis of pulsed activation in IFE PP by using a continuous-pulsed model. Neutron intensities versus time after target emission are presented for IFE protections: LiPb/Flibe, including spectral effects. HT evaluation indicates that 90-98% of the total dose comes from ingestion of agriculture

  4. Copper-catalyzed oxidative carbon-heteroatom bond formation: a recent update.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xu; Chiba, Shunsuke

    2016-08-08

    This review updates recent advances in Cu-catalyzed (anaerobic) oxidative carbon-heteroatom bond formation on sp(3)- and sp(2)-C-H bonds as well as alkenes, classified according to the types of stoichiometric oxidants.

  5. Curiosity explores the base of Aeolis Mons, Gale crater, Mars: Recent Geological and Geochemical Mission Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev; Vasavada, Ashwin; Crisp, Joy; Grotzinger, John

    2016-04-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover has been exploring sedimentary rocks at the foothills of Aolis Mons since August 2014. Here, an array of fluvial, lacustrine and aeolian strata that show a complex pattern of post-depositional alteration are present. This presentation will summarize the most recent geological and geochemical findings of the MSL mission. Basal outcrops that form the lowest stratigraphic unit of Aeolis Mons, the Murray formation, are characterized predominantly by mudstones with minor intercalated sandstones. The mudstone facies, originally identified at the Pahrump Hills field site, show abundant fine-scale planar laminations throughout the Murray formation succession and is interpreted to record deposition in an ancient lacustrine system in Gale crater. Interbedded cross-stratified sandstones are considered to record fluvio-deltaic incursions into the lake. The lacustrine deposits of the Murray formation are unconformably overlain by much younger sandstones of the Stimson formation. Orbital mapping and in situ observations indicate that the basal strata of the Stimson formation show complex onlap relationships with the underlying Murray formation strata signifying that there was metre-scale palaeotopographic relief on the unconformity surface upon which the Stimson accumulated. The Stimson formation itself is characterized by cross-bedded sandstones with cross-bed sets tens of centimetres in thickness. Sedimentological observations suggest that the Stimson dominantly records deposition by aeolian dunes. Curiosity has made detailed measurements of the geochemistry of the Murray and Stimson formations and associated diagenetic features. Perhaps most surprising has been the discovery of extensive silica enrichment both within mudstones of the Murray formation, perhaps of primary sedimentary or later diagenetic origin, also in as fracture-related diagenetic halos within the Stimson formation. We will describe the nature of this silica

  6. Fatty Acid Surfactant Photochemistry Results in New Particle Formation.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Peter A; Ciuraru, Raluca; Rossignol, Stéphanie; Passananti, Monica; Tinel, Liselotte; Perrier, Sebastien; Dupart, Yoan; Steimer, Sarah S; Ammann, Markus; Donaldson, D James; George, Christian

    2017-10-04

    Organic interfaces that exist at the sea surface microlayer or as surfactant coatings on cloud droplets are highly concentrated and chemically distinct from the underlying bulk or overlying gas phase. Therefore, they may be potentially unique locations for chemical or photochemical reactions. Recently, photochemical production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was reported at a nonanoic acid interface however, subsequent secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particle production was incapable of being observed. We investigated SOA particle formation due to photochemical reactions occurring at an air-water interface in presence of model saturated long chain fatty acid and alcohol surfactants, nonanoic acid and nonanol, respectively. Ozonolysis of the gas phase photochemical products in the dark or under continued UV irradiation both resulted in nucleation and growth of SOA particles. Irradiation of nonanol did not yield detectable VOC or SOA production. Organic carbon functionalities of the SOA were probed using X-ray microspectroscopy and compared with other laboratory generated and field collected particles. Carbon-carbon double bonds were identified in the condensed phase which survived ozonolysis during new particle formation and growth. The implications of photochemical processes occurring at organic coated surfaces are discussed in the context of marine SOA particle atmospheric fluxes.

  7. Recent star formation in the Hi dominated outer regions of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldız, Mustafa K.; Serra, Paolo; Peletier, Reynier F.; Oosterloo, Tom A.; Duc, Pierre-Alain

    2017-03-01

    Context According to the ATLAS3D project, about 20 percent of all nearby early-type galaxies (D < 42 Mpc; M K < -21.5 mag; stellar mass M stars >~ 6 × 109 M⊙) outside clusters are surrounded by a disc or ring of low-column-density neutral hydrogen (Hi) gas with typical radii of tens of kpc, much larger than the stellar body. Aims Our aim is to understand the impact of these gas systems on the host galaxies, in particular, whether there is any recent star formation related to the Hi and effect of recent star formation on the host early-type galaxies. Methods and sample We analyse the distribution of star formation out to large radii by using resolved Hi images together with UV and optical images. We calculate the UV-UV and UV-optical colours in two apertures, 1-3 and 3-10 R eff. Using FUV emission as a proxy for star formation, we also estimate the integrated star formation rate in the outer regions. Our sample consists of 18 Hi-rich galaxies as well as 55 control galaxies where no Hi has been detected. We select the control sample galaxies to match the Hi-rich galaxies in stellar mass, environment, distance and stellar kinematics. Results In half of the Hi-rich galaxies the radial UV profile changes slope at the position of the Hi radial profile peak. We find that the FUV-NUV and UV-optical colours in the first and second apertures of the Hi-rich galaxies are on average 0.5 and 0.8 mag bluer than the Hi-poor ones, respectively. We also find that the Hi-rich early-type galaxies have colour gradients that are almost 2 times stronger than the Hi-poor ones. we estimate the integrated star formation rate in the outer regions (R > 1 R eff) to be on average ~ 6.1×10-3 M⊙ yr-1 for the Hi-rich galaxies. We find that the gas depletion time in the outermost region (3-10 R eff) is ~ 80 Gyrs, which is similar to that estimated for the outskirts of spirals. Conclusions Studying the stellar populations in early type galaxies with and without Hi, we find that galaxies with

  8. Microbial diversity and methanogenic activity of Antrim Shale formation waters from recently fractured wells

    PubMed Central

    Wuchter, Cornelia; Banning, Erin; Mincer, Tracy J.; Drenzek, Nicholas J.; Coolen, Marco J. L.

    2013-01-01

    The Antrim Shale in the Michigan Basin is one of the most productive shale gas formations in the U.S., but optimal resource recovery strategies must rely on a thorough understanding of the complex biogeochemical, microbial, and physical interdependencies in this and similar systems. We used Illumina MiSeq 16S rDNA sequencing to analyze the diversity and relative abundance of prokaryotic communities present in Antrim shale formation water of three closely spaced recently fractured gas-producing wells. In addition, the well waters were incubated with a suite of fermentative and methanogenic substrates in an effort to stimulate microbial methane generation. The three wells exhibited substantial differences in their community structure that may arise from their different drilling and fracturing histories. Bacterial sequences greatly outnumbered those of archaea and shared highest similarity to previously described cultures of mesophiles and moderate halophiles within the Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and δ- and ε-Proteobacteria. The majority of archaeal sequences shared highest sequence similarity to uncultured euryarchaeotal environmental clones. Some sequences closely related to cultured methylotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens were also present in the initial well water. Incubation with methanol and trimethylamine stimulated methylotrophic methanogens and resulted in the largest increase in methane production in the formation waters, while fermentation triggered by the addition of yeast extract and formate indirectly stimulated hydrogenotrophic methanogens. The addition of sterile powdered shale as a complex natural substrate stimulated the rate of methane production without affecting total methane yields. Depletion of methane indicative of anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) was observed over the course of incubation with some substrates. This process could constitute a substantial loss of methane in the shale formation. PMID:24367357

  9. Microbial diversity and methanogenic activity of Antrim Shale formation waters from recently fractured wells.

    PubMed

    Wuchter, Cornelia; Banning, Erin; Mincer, Tracy J; Drenzek, Nicholas J; Coolen, Marco J L

    2013-01-01

    The Antrim Shale in the Michigan Basin is one of the most productive shale gas formations in the U.S., but optimal resource recovery strategies must rely on a thorough understanding of the complex biogeochemical, microbial, and physical interdependencies in this and similar systems. We used Illumina MiSeq 16S rDNA sequencing to analyze the diversity and relative abundance of prokaryotic communities present in Antrim shale formation water of three closely spaced recently fractured gas-producing wells. In addition, the well waters were incubated with a suite of fermentative and methanogenic substrates in an effort to stimulate microbial methane generation. The three wells exhibited substantial differences in their community structure that may arise from their different drilling and fracturing histories. Bacterial sequences greatly outnumbered those of archaea and shared highest similarity to previously described cultures of mesophiles and moderate halophiles within the Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and δ- and ε-Proteobacteria. The majority of archaeal sequences shared highest sequence similarity to uncultured euryarchaeotal environmental clones. Some sequences closely related to cultured methylotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens were also present in the initial well water. Incubation with methanol and trimethylamine stimulated methylotrophic methanogens and resulted in the largest increase in methane production in the formation waters, while fermentation triggered by the addition of yeast extract and formate indirectly stimulated hydrogenotrophic methanogens. The addition of sterile powdered shale as a complex natural substrate stimulated the rate of methane production without affecting total methane yields. Depletion of methane indicative of anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) was observed over the course of incubation with some substrates. This process could constitute a substantial loss of methane in the shale formation.

  10. Mixed Material Plasma-Surface Interactions in ITER: Recent Results from the PISCES Group

    SciTech Connect

    Tynan, George R.; Baldwin, Matthew; Doerner, Russell; Hollmann, Eric; Nishijima, Daisuke; Umstadter, Karl; Yu, Jonathan

    2010-05-20

    This paper summarizes recent PISCES studies focused on the effects associated with mixed species plasmas that are similar in composition to what one might expect in ITER. Formation of nanometer scale whiskerlike features occurs in W surfaces exposed to pure He and mixed D/He plasmas and appears to be associated with the formation of He nanometer-scaled bubbles in the W surface. Studies of Be-W alloy formation in Be-seeded D plasmas suggest that this process may be important in ITER all metal wall operational scenarios. Studies also suggest that BeD formation via chemical sputtering of Be walls may be an important first wall erosion mechanism. D retention in ITER mixed materials has also been studied. The D release behavior from beryllium co-deposits does not appear to be a diffusion dominated process, but instead is consistent with thermal release from a number of variable trapping energy sites. As a result, the amount of tritium remaining in codeposits in ITER after baking will be determined by the maximum temperature achieved, rather than by the duration of the baking cycle.

  11. Formation of recent Pb-Ag-Au mineralization by potential sub-surface microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Tornos, Fernando; Velasco, Francisco; Menor-Salván, César; Delgado, Antonio; Slack, John F; Escobar, Juan Manuel

    2014-08-06

    Las Cruces is a base-metal deposit in the Iberian Pyrite Belt, one of the world's best-known ore provinces. Here we report the occurrence of major Pb-Ag-Au mineralization resulting from recent sub-surface replacement of supergene oxyhydroxides by carbonate and sulphide minerals. This is probably the largest documented occurrence of recent microbial activity producing an ore assemblage previously unknown in supergene mineralizing environments. The presence of microbial features in the sulphides suggests that these may be the first-described natural bacteriomorphs of galena. The low δ(13)C values of the carbonate minerals indicate formation by deep anaerobic microbial processes. Sulphur isotope values of sulphides are interpreted here as reflecting microbial reduction in a system impoverished in sulphate. We suggest that biogenic activity has produced around 3.1 × 10(9) moles of reduced sulphur and 10(10) moles of CO2, promoting the formation of ca. 1.19 Mt of carbonates, 114,000 t of galena, 638 t of silver sulphides and 6.5 t of gold.

  12. Formation of recent Pb-Ag-Au mineralization by potential sub-surface microbial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornos, Fernando; Velasco, Francisco; Menor-Salván, César; Delgado, Antonio; Slack, John F.; Escobar, Juan Manuel

    2014-08-01

    Las Cruces is a base-metal deposit in the Iberian Pyrite Belt, one of the world’s best-known ore provinces. Here we report the occurrence of major Pb-Ag-Au mineralization resulting from recent sub-surface replacement of supergene oxyhydroxides by carbonate and sulphide minerals. This is probably the largest documented occurrence of recent microbial activity producing an ore assemblage previously unknown in supergene mineralizing environments. The presence of microbial features in the sulphides suggests that these may be the first-described natural bacteriomorphs of galena. The low δ13C values of the carbonate minerals indicate formation by deep anaerobic microbial processes. Sulphur isotope values of sulphides are interpreted here as reflecting microbial reduction in a system impoverished in sulphate. We suggest that biogenic activity has produced around 3.1 × 109 moles of reduced sulphur and 1010 moles of CO2, promoting the formation of ca. 1.19 Mt of carbonates, 114,000 t of galena, 638 t of silver sulphides and 6.5 t of gold.

  13. Recent Galaxy Mergers and Residual Star Formation of Red Sequence Galaxies in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Ree, Chang H.; Jaffé, Yara; Demarco, Ricardo; Treister, Ezequiel

    2016-08-01

    This study explored the Galaxy Evolution Explorer ultraviolet (UV) properties of optical red sequence galaxies in four rich Abell clusters at z≤slant 0.1. In particular, we tried to find a hint of merger-induced recent star formation (RSF) in red sequence galaxies. Using the NUV - r\\prime colors of the galaxies, RSF fractions were derived based on various criteria for post-merger galaxies and normal galaxies. Following k-correction, about 36% of the post-merger galaxies were classified as RSF galaxies with a conservative criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5), and that number was doubled (˜72%) when using a generous criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5.4). The trend was the same when we restricted the sample to galaxies within 0.5 × R 200. Post-merger galaxies with strong UV emission showed more violent, asymmetric features in the deep optical images. The RSF fractions did not show any trend along the clustocentric distance within R 200. We performed a Dressler-Shectman test to check whether the RSF galaxies had any correlation with the substructures in the galaxy clusters. Within R 200 of each cluster, the RSF galaxies did not appear to be preferentially related to the clusters’ substructures. Our results suggested that only 30% of RSF red sequence galaxies show morphological hints of recent galaxy mergers. This implies that internal processes (e.g., stellar mass loss or hot gas cooling) for the supply of cold gas to early-type galaxies may play a significant role in the residual star formation of early-type galaxies at a recent epoch.

  14. Meteor storm evidence against the recent formation of lunar crater Giordano Bruno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, Paul

    2001-04-01

    It has been suggested that the formation of the 22 km diameter lunar crater Giordano Bruno was witnessed in June 1178 A.D. To date, this hypothesis has not been well tested. Such an impact on the Earth would be "civilization threatening". Previous studies have shown that the formation of Giordano Bruno would lead to the arrival of 10 million tonnes of ejecta in the Earth's atmosphere in the following week. I calculate that this would cause a week-long meteor storm potentially comparable to the peak of the 1966 Leonids storm. The lack of any known historical records of such a storm is evidence against the recent formation of Giordano Bruno. Other tests of the hypothesis are also discussed, with emphasis on the lack of corroborating evidence for a very recent formation of the crater.

  15. Initial Satellite Formation Flight Results from the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Trevor; Ottenstein, Neil; Palmer, Eric; Farahmand, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the underlying dynamics of formation flying in a high-eccentricity orbit such as that of the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission. The GPS-based results used for MMS navigation is summarized, as well as the procedures that are used to design the maneuvers used to place the spacecraft into a tetrahedron formation and then maintain it. The details of how to carry out these maneuvers are then discussed. Finally, the numerical results that have been obtained concerning formation flying for the MMS mission to date (e.g. tetrahedron sizes flown, maneuver execution error, fuel usage, etc.) are presented in detail.

  16. Salt dissolution and sinkhole formation: Results of laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oz, Imri; Eyal, Shalev; Yoseph, Yechieli; Ittai, Gavrieli; Elad, Levanon; Haim, Gvirtzman

    2016-10-01

    The accepted mechanism for the formation of thousands of sinkholes along the coast of the Dead Sea suggests that their primary cause is dissolution of a salt layer by groundwater undersaturated with respect to halite. This is related to the drop in the Dead Sea level, which caused a corresponding drop of the freshwater-saltwater interface, resulting in fresher groundwater replacing the brines that were in contact with the salt layer. In this study we used physical laboratory experiments to examine the validity of this mechanism by reproducing the full dynamic natural process and to examine the impact of different hydrogeological characteristics on this process. The experimental results show surface subsidence and sinkhole formation. The stratigraphic configurations of the aquifer, together with the mechanical properties of the salt layer, determine the dynamic patterns of the sinkhole formation (instantaneous versus gradual formation). Laboratory experiments were also used to study the potential impact of future stratification in the Dead Sea, if and when the "Red Sea-Dead Sea Canal" project is carried out, and the Dead Sea level remains stable. The results show that the dissolution rates are slower by 1 order of magnitude in comparison with a nonstratified saltwater body, and therefore, the processes of salt dissolution and sinkhole formation will be relatively restrained under these conditions.

  17. EUMETSAT and OSI-SAF Sea Surface Temperature: Recent results and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Carroll, Anne; Le Borgne, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    The European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) delivers operational weather and climate-related satellite data, images and products throughout all day and year. EUMETSAT also has commitments to operational oceanography and atmospheric composition monitoring. Activities over the next twenty years include the continuation of the Mandatory Programmes (MSG, EPS) and future (MTG, EPS-SG), which all include ocean observations of Sea Surface Temperature. The EUMETSAT Ocean and Sea-ice (OSI) Satellite Application Facility (SAF) is lead by Meteo-France with a consortium of institutes from EUMETSAT member states, and provides reliable and timely operational services related to meteorology, oceanography and the marine environment. The OSI-SAF delivers level-2 Sea Surface Temperature products in GHRSST format from a range of EUMETSAT data including Metop AVHRR, IASI; and SEVIRI. EUMETSAT is participating in Copernicus Sentinel-3 in partnership with ESA, where EUMETSAT will operate the satellite and will serve the marine user community. The operational Sea Surface Temperature product delivered by EUMETSAT for Sentinel-3 SLSTR will be in GHRSST L2P format. On-going work towards access to relevant data from third-parties with the preparation of agreements with ISRO, SOA and JAXA, will give EUMETSAT access to an enhanced ocean products catalogue. The presentation will give an overview of activities relating to Sea Surface Temperature at EUMETSAT and the OSI-SAF, and their support to GHRSST, focusing on recent results and future developments.

  18. Attitudes toward Individuals with Disabilities: Results of a Recent Survey and Implications of Those Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goreczny, Anthony J.; Bender, Erin E.; Caruso, Guy; Feinstein, Celia S.

    2011-01-01

    Attitudes toward individuals with disabilities are often negative and deleterious, resulting in decreased opportunity and chances at successful integration into the community for these individuals. The purpose of the current study was to investigate attitudes of a group of 129 individuals attending a state-wide conference aimed toward improving…

  19. The ASCD Healthy School Communities Project: Formative Evaluation Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valois, Robert F.; Lewallen, Theresa C.; Slade, Sean; Tasco, Adriane N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report the formative evaluation results from the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Healthy School Communities (HSC) pilot project. Design/methodology/approach: This study utilized 11 HSC pilot sites in the USA (eight sites) and Canada (three sites). The evaluation question was…

  20. The ASCD Healthy School Communities Project: Formative Evaluation Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valois, Robert F.; Lewallen, Theresa C.; Slade, Sean; Tasco, Adriane N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report the formative evaluation results from the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Healthy School Communities (HSC) pilot project. Design/methodology/approach: This study utilized 11 HSC pilot sites in the USA (eight sites) and Canada (three sites). The evaluation question was…

  1. Electrode microwave discharge: Areas of application and recent results of discharge physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Yu A.; Epstein, I. L.; Tatarinov, A. V.; Shakhatov, V. A.

    2010-01-01

    The first paper on the electrode microwave discharge (EMD) appeared in 1996. Presently many problems of EMD physics and applications have already been solved. Several examples of EMD application are discussed: diamond growth, deposition of CNx films and nanotubes, deposition of metal films (Cu, Al), deposition of TiN and TiO2 films, generation of O2(a1Δ), and EMD as a plasma cathode. Results of EMD experiments and modeling give rise to the assumption that an EMD consists of a self-sustained domain (near-electrode plasma region with overcritical plasma density) which is surrounded by a region of a non-self-sustained discharge (ball shaped region with undercritical plasma density). We assumed that the layer of charge separation and of induced electrostatic field originated at the outer EMD boundary was one of the reasons for the abrupt decrease of the plasma density which leads to the formation of a compact plasma structure. Recent modeling results of the strongly nonuniform electrode microwave plasma based on a quasi static, 1D spherically symmetric model showed that such a layer can be generated at the point where a sudden increase of the total ionization rate takes place.

  2. Arctic Autumn Air-Ice-Ocean Interactions Resulting from Recent Sea-ice Decline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Ola; Blomquist, Byron; Fairall, Christopher; Guest, Peter; Stammerjohn, Sharon; Rainville, Luc; Thomson, Jim; Smith, Madison; Tjernström, Michael; Solomon, Amy

    2017-04-01

    The recent decline in Arctic sea-ice extent has produced large areas of open water in September that were previously ice covered. Autumn air-ice-ocean interactions in these regions are now characterized by ice-edge or marginal ice zone (MIZ) processes rather than by primarily air-ice refreezing processes. This study will utilize field program measurements to illustrate this change in processes, provide examples of new processes, and to quantify changes in energy fluxes resulting from some of the key processes. Observations from SHEBA (1998) and near the North Pole during ASCOS (2008) are used to illustrate freeze-up over existing sea ice ("old Arctic" processes) while observations from ACSE (2014), Mirai (2014), and Sea State (2015), supplemented with mesoscale model output, are used to illustrate "new Arctic" processes. In the "old Arctic", energy budgets show that freeze-up over remaining end-of-season sea ice occurred in late August, primarily because of the high albedo of the ice enhanced by snowfall events. In the "new Arctic" with extensive open water, summertime upper-ocean heating, formation of atmospheric ice-edge fronts, atmospheric thermal circulations, formation of thin new ice, ocean waves, and upper-ocean mixing all play a role in the autumn freeze-up process. These new processes also significantly impact the temporal extent and magnitude of the ocean heat loss to the atmosphere during this critical season from September to November, and possibly beyond. The magnitude of this heat loss plays an important role in various hypotheses regarding the impact of Arctic sea-ice loss on mid-latitude atmospheric circulations. While these hypotheses will not be discussed, the observations directly provide estimates of heat loss magnitudes in the "old Arctic" and the "new Arctic", thereby quantifying changes in heat loss, which can then be used to assess the accuracy of the various models and reanalyses.

  3. Recent Developments in Hardware-in-the-Loop Formation Navigation and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Jason W.; Luquette, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    The Formation Flying Test-Bed (FFTB) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) provides a hardware-in-the-loop test environment for formation navigation and control. The facility is evolving as a modular, hybrid, dynamic simulation facility for end-tc-end guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) design and analysis of formation flying spacecraft. The core capabilities of the FFTB, as a platform for testing critical hardware and software algorithms in-the-loop, are reviewed with a focus on many recent improvements. Two significant upgrades to the FFTB are a message-oriented middleware (MOM) architecture, and a software crosslink for inter-spacecraft ranging. The MOM architecture provides a common messaging bus for software agents, easing integration, arid supporting the GSFC Mission Services Evolution Center (GMSEC) architecture via software bridge. Additionally, the FFTB s hardware capabilities are expanding. Recently, two Low-Power Transceivers (LPTs) with ranging capability have been introduced into the FFTB. The LPT crosslinks will be connected to a modified Crosslink Channel Simulator (CCS), which applies realistic space-environment effects to the Radio Frequency (RF) signals produced by the LPTs.

  4. Recent glacier retreat and lake formation in the Querecocha watershed, Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Moreno, J.; Valero-Garces, B.; Revuelto, J.; Azorín-Molina, C.; Bazo, J.; Cochachin, A.; Fontaneda, S.; Mark, B. G.

    2013-12-01

    In the Andes, and specifically in the Peruvian mountains a marked decrease of the glaciated area has occurred since the end of the Little Ice Age, and it has been accelerated since the last decades of the 20th century. As a result of the glacier retreat new pro-glaciar lakes are originated, and often the area and volume of existing ones increases. The study of these newly-formed lakes and their recent evolution may provide a better understanding of the hydrological and geomorphological evolution of deglaciated areas, and a better evaluation of the risk of glacial lakes outburst floods (GLOFS). In this work, we use 26 annual Landsat Thematic Mapper images from 1975 to 2010 to determine changes of the glaciated surface, snow line elevation and lakes formation in the headwaters of the Querecocha watershed in Cordillera Blanca (Perú). We also present the information derived from 10 short sediment cores (up to 50 cm long) retrieved along several transects in Yanamarey Lake. Both data sets inform of the sediment yield and lake development in recently deglaciated environments of the Andes. Results demonstrate that only one third of the surface covered by ice in 1975 remained in 2010. In this period, snowline has shifted up more than 100 meters in elevation in both, Yanamarey North and South areas respectively. At the same time, new lakes have been formed very quickly in these deglaciated areas. Preliminary 137Cs dating of Yanamarey sediment core indicates that at least the top 50 cm of the lake sequence deposited after 1960. This is coherent with the Landsat image of 1975 that showed the current surface of the lake still covered by ice. The high sediment rate (> 1 cm/yr) in the lake demonstrates the very high sediment yield in these geomorphically active settings. The sediment cores are composed of cm-thick sequences defined by grain-size (silt-clay) common in proglacial lakes reflecting the variability of hydrological response associated to the glacier retreat in the

  5. Image formation in diffusion MRI: A review of recent technical developments

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Karla L.

    2017-01-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a standard imaging tool in clinical neurology, and is becoming increasingly important for neuroscience studies due to its ability to depict complex neuroanatomy (eg, white matter connectivity). Single‐shot echo‐planar imaging is currently the predominant formation method for diffusion MRI, but suffers from blurring, distortion, and low spatial resolution. A number of methods have been proposed to address these limitations and improve diffusion MRI acquisition. Here, the recent technical developments for image formation in diffusion MRI are reviewed. We discuss three areas of advance in diffusion MRI: improving image fidelity, accelerating acquisition, and increasing the signal‐to‐noise ratio. Level of Evidence: 5 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;46:646–662 PMID:28194821

  6. Recent developments for SPIE-IA, a new sandwich immunoassay format for very small molecules.

    PubMed

    Volland, Hervé; Pradelles, Philippe; Taran, Frédéric; Buscarlet, Laure; Creminon, Christophe

    2004-03-01

    Recent publications describing new elegant approaches to assay small analytes using noncompetitive format were briefly reviewed. Among these methods, we have developed a new protocol, named SPIE-IA, which involves a cross-linking step achieved using chemical hombifunctional reagents, UV irradiation or free radicals. This new method proved to be useful to detect naturally occurring analyte/antibody complexes or to protect the analytes against degradation by peptidases. On the other hand, SPIE-IA could allow to study the adverse biological effects of UV and some aspects of free radical chemistry or to evaluate the antioxidant activity of molecules.

  7. Evidence of authigenic vivianite formation in a recent lake sediment due to an iron amendment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothe, Matthias; Frederichs, Thomas; Eder, Michaela; Kleeberg, Andreas; Hupfer, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Pore water chemistry and equilibrium calculations indicated supersaturation of the ferrous iron phosphate mineral vivianite throughout the upper 30 cm of the iron-rich lake sediments of dimictic lake Groß-Glienicker See, Berlin (Germany). Phosphorus (P) bound in the crystal lattice of the mineral is supposed to be immobilized since vivianite is stable under anoxic, reducing sedimentary conditions. Thus, vivianite formation can be an important process contributing to P retention during early diagenesis. Application of a heavy-liquid separation enabled to identify vivianite by means of X-ray diffraction. Electron micrographs showed spherical nodules consisting of platy- and needle-shaped crystal aggregates with diameters between 50 and 120 μm. Inclusions of diatom shells and other organic debris confirmed the authigenic origin of the dark blue coloured nodules. Vivianite deposits were restricted to the upper 22 cm of the sediment although supersaturation even increased in subjacent pore waters. The high enrichment of vivianite aggregates after sediment preparation combined with magnetic hysteresis measurements allowed to assess the significance of vivianite formation for P burial in aquatic systems. From our results we conclude that vivianite formation was triggered by an artificial iron amendment more than 20 years ago that aimed at reducing the P content of the lake's water body. Furthermore, our results indicate that vivianite formation is located closely beneath the sediment-water interface and that equilibrium calculations, i.e. supersaturated pore water, alone cannot serve as a reliable predictor for the in situ formation of vivianite.

  8. The LBL Advanced Light Source (ALS) transverse coupled-bunch feedback system: Recent commissioning results

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, W.; Byrd, J.; Corlett, J.

    1994-10-01

    The ALS transverse coupled-bunch feedback system is described along with some recent commissioning results. Results presented include transfer function measurements, demonstrations of multi-bunch damping, and demonstrations of simultaneous transverse and longitudinal systems operation.

  9. Late Pop III Star Formation During the Epoch of Reionization: Results from the Renaissance Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao; Norman, Michael L.; O'Shea, Brian W.; Wise, John H.

    2016-06-01

    We present results on the formation of Population III (Pop III) stars at redshift 7.6 from the Renaissance Simulations, a suite of extremely high-resolution and physics-rich radiation transport hydrodynamics cosmological adaptive-mesh refinement simulations of high-redshift galaxy formation performed on the Blue Waters supercomputer. In a survey volume of about 220 comoving Mpc3, we found 14 Pop III galaxies with recent star formation. The surprisingly late formation of Pop III stars is possible due to two factors: (i) the metal enrichment process is local and slow, leaving plenty of pristine gas to exist in the vast volume; and (ii) strong Lyman-Werner radiation from vigorous metal-enriched star formation in early galaxies suppresses Pop III formation in (“not so”) small primordial halos with mass less than ˜3 × 107 M ⊙. We quantify the properties of these Pop III galaxies and their Pop III star formation environments. We look for analogs to the recently discovered luminous Ly α emitter CR7, which has been interpreted as a Pop III star cluster within or near a metal-enriched star-forming galaxy. We find and discuss a system similar to this in some respects, however, the Pop III star cluster is far less massive and luminous than CR7 is inferred to be.

  10. RECENT STAR FORMATION IN THE LEADING ARM OF THE MAGELLANIC STREAM

    SciTech Connect

    Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I.; Bidin, Christian Moni; Girard, Terrence M.; Van Altena, William F.; Méndez, Réne A.; Vieira, Katherine; Korchagin, Vladimir I. E-mail: dana.casetti@yale.edu E-mail: william.vanaltena@yale.edu E-mail: ramendez.uchile@gmail.com E-mail: vkorchagin@sfedu.ru

    2014-04-01

    Strongly interacting galaxies undergo a short-lived but dramatic phase of evolution characterized by enhanced star formation, tidal tails, bridges, and other morphological peculiarities. The nearest example of a pair of interacting galaxies is the Magellanic Clouds, whose dynamical interaction produced the gaseous features known as the Magellanic Stream trailing the pair's orbit about the Galaxy, the bridge between the Clouds, and the leading arm (LA), a wide and irregular feature leading the orbit. Young, newly formed stars in the bridge are known to exist, giving witness to the recent interaction between the Clouds. However, the interaction of the Clouds with the Milky Way (MW) is less well understood. In particular, the LA must have a tidal origin; however, no purely gravitational model is able to reproduce its morphology and kinematics. A hydrodynamical interaction with the gaseous hot halo and disk of the Galaxy is plausible as suggested by some models and supporting neutral hydrogen (H I) observations. Here we show for the first time that young, recently formed stars exist in the LA, indicating that the interaction between the Clouds and our Galaxy is strong enough to trigger star formation in certain regions of the LA—regions in the outskirts of the MW disk (R ∼ 18 kpc), far away from the Clouds and the bridge.

  11. The recent formation of Saturn's moonlets from viscous spreading of the main rings.

    PubMed

    Charnoz, Sébastien; Salmon, Julien; Crida, Aurélien

    2010-06-10

    The regular satellites of the giant planets are believed to have finished their accretion concurrent with the planets, about 4.5 Gyr ago. A population of Saturn's small moons orbiting just outside the main rings are dynamically young (less than 10(7) yr old), which is inconsistent with the formation timescale for the regular satellites. They are also underdense ( approximately 600 kg m(-3)) and show spectral characteristics similar to those of the main rings. It has been suggested that they accreted at the rings' edge, but hitherto it has been impossible to model the formation process fully owing to a lack of computational power. Here we report a hybrid simulation in which the viscous spreading of Saturn's rings beyond the Roche limit (the distance beyond which the rings are gravitationally unstable) gives rise to the small moons. The moonlets' mass distribution and orbital architecture are reproduced. The current confinement of the main rings and the existence of the dusty F ring are shown to be direct consequences of the coupling of viscous evolution and satellite formation. Saturn's rings, like a mini protoplanetary disk, may be the last place where accretion was recently active in the Solar System, some 10(6)-10(7) yr ago.

  12. Low energy lepton scattering -- recent results for electron and positron interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, J. P.; Vizcaino, V.; Mondal, S.; Lower, J. C.; Jones, A.; Caradonna, P.; Makochekanwa, C.; Buckman, S. J.

    2008-07-01

    The interaction of low energy electrons with atoms, molecules and materials underpin a large number of technological, environmental and biomedical processes that impact on our everyday lives. Many of these areas have been well studied over the years and in some cases a large body of important and relevant cross section data has been gathered to assist in the understanding and development of the technology or phenomena. A perfect example of this is the area of low energy gaseous electronics where microscopic cross section information for a whole host of scattering processes (vibrational and electronic excitation, dissociation, ionization) have been critical to an understanding of the macroscopic behaviour of a range of gas discharge environments -- large area plasma processing discharges being a case in point. More recently there has been a realisation that fundamental information about both low energy electron and positron interactions also have significant bearing on issues of radiation damage in biological materials. Low energy electrons have been shown to cause significant damage to DNA strands, for instance, as a result of processes such as dissociative attachment -- a process which can occur at energies down to 0 eV. These processes result from the production of copious low energy electrons (< 20 eV) when high energy ionizing radiation thermalises in the body. This realisation has provided an enormous boost to the field of low energy electron physics and spawned an enormous number of new studies of interactions with biologically relevant molecules. In a similar fashion, low energy positron interactions are thought to be fundamentally important for an understanding of the atomic and molecular processes that underpin technologies such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET). PET scans image the coincident 511 keV gamma-rays that arise form the annihilation of an electron-positron pair. During a PET scan, high energy positrons thermalise in the body through

  13. Sulfate formation in point source plumes: A review of recent field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, William E.

    Data in twelve power plant and smelter plumes reported by eight different organizations have been reviewed in an attempt to establish the existence of recognizable patterns concerning the extent and rates of sulfate formation. The data reviewed here were collected in Australia, Canada and the U.S., during warm as well as cold seasons, and during day and night. The primary variables examined and compared are Sp/ ST, the paniculate fraction of excess sulfur sampled in the plume, and the corresponding plume age. The variation of the extent of sulfate formation ( Sp/ ST) is also examined in terms of plume exposure to solar radiation dose during transport. In spite of wide geographical, seasonal, background and source variations, a distinct difference is observed in day and night sulfate formation. During the daytime, there exists a substantial variability in sulfate formation rates (typically 0-5% h -1) and extent (typically up to 25%) for any given physical plume age. This variability is significantly less for plumes with similar exposure to sunlight dose, showing that environmental factors linked to solar radiation strongly influence the rate and extent of sulfate formation in point-source plumes. The diurnal and seasonal co-variance of all insolation-related factors makes it difficult to distinguish the roles of specific environmental factors or conversion mechanisms. Night-time data show that Sp/ ST seldom exceeds 3% even after 5-10 h of plume transport. A surprising result is observed related to geographical variability of the conversion rate. Except in the case of the data of the Navajo coal-fired power plant plume collected as part of the VISTTA study, all other data fall within an identifiable envelope ranging over 15-30% sulfate formation ( Sp/ ST) corresponding to solar dose equivalent to one July day in St. Louis. The Navajo data yield about an order of magnitude lower conversion. Evidently, factors other than those related to insolation are also important.

  14. Ediacaran paleomagnetic results from feeder dikes of the Catoctin Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankard, F.; Domeier, M. M.; Bentley, C.; Van Der Voo, R.

    2011-12-01

    A paleomagnetic study undertaken sixteen years ago on the Catoctin basalts, feeder dikes and sills (Meert et al, 1994) did not bring firm and strong conclusions about the paleoposition of Laurentia during the Ediacaran period. The results were rather complex and sketchy. In effect, three paleomagnetic directions derived from this study were interpreted as follows: one placed Laurentia at high southerly latitude during Catoctin time while the other two were considered as later "remagnetization" events. One remagnetization was hypothesized to have been acquired in the Late Cambrian, when Laurentia was in an equatorial position, whereas a second one was attributed to Taconian mountain-building during the Ordovician period. In order to attempt to unravel the confusing late Precambrian paleogeography, we conducted a detailed paleomagnetic sampling in the Blue Ridge Province of Central Virginia. We focused on the dikes that fed the 568-555 Ma volcanism of the Catoctin Formation (Southworth et al, 2009) in the Shenandoah National Park, as well as in several locations outside the park, and along the south shore of the Potomac River (Maryland). These new data should help to define unambiguously which (if any) of the magnetization components is primary for the Catoctin Formation.

  15. Compendium of Test Results of Recent Single Event Effect Tests Conducted by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, Steven S.; Allen, Gregory R.; Irom, Farokh; Scheick, Leif Z.; Adell, Philippe C.; Miyahira, Tetsuo F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports heavy ion and proton-induced single event effect (SEE) results from recent tests for a variety of microelectronic devices. The compendium covers devices tested over the last two years by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  16. Recent Results on Charm and Tau Physics from BaBar And Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Salvatore, Fabrizio F.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London

    2007-10-15

    Recent results on charm and tau physics obtained at the BABAR and Belle experiments are presented in this article. The charm section will be focused on the most recent results on D{sup 0}{bar D}{sup 0} mixing at Belle and on the measurement of the pseudoscalar decay constant f{sub Ds} using charm tagged e+e- events at BABAR. In the tau section the recent results on Lepton Flavor Violation from tau decays will be discussed, as well as the recent result on the rare decay {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3{pi}{sup -}2{pi}{sup +}2{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} at BABAR and the measurement of the {tau} lepton mass at Belle.

  17. Preferences on technical report format - Results of a survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, T. E.; Cordle, V. M.; Glassman, M.; Vondran, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of 513 engineers and scientists employed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center and 600 engineers and scientists from three professional/technical societies solicited the opinions of report users concerning the format of NASA technical reports. The results indicate that a summary as well as an abstract should be included, that the definitions of symbols and glossary of terms should be located in the front of the report, and that the illustrative material should be integrated with the text rather than grouped at the end of the report. Citation of references by number, one-column, ragged-right-margin layout, and third-person writing style are also preferred by a majority of the respondents.

  18. Recent advances in digital backward propagation algorithm for coherent transmission systems with higher order modulation formats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmauss, Bernhard; Asif, Rameez; Lin, Chien-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Recent numerical and experimental studies have shown that coherent transmission with advanced modulation formats i.e. DP-QPSK and QAM are the promising candidates for next-generation systems with data rates of 100Gbit/s and above. Coherent detection is considered efficient along with digital signal processing (DSP) to compensate many linear effects in fiber propagation i.e. chromatic dispersion (CD) and polarization-mode dispersion (PMD). Despite of fiber non-linearities (NL), which are the major limiting factors, next-generation optical systems are employing higher order modulation formats in order to fulfil the ever increasing demand of capacity requirements. However, the channel capacity is limited at higher signal input powers because the system is operating in the non-linear regime. Due to this phenomenon the compensation of non-linearities is a topic of great interest and research these days, especially for long-haul fiber transmission. Digital backward propagation (DBP) algorithm has emerged as a promising and potentially capable candidate, which can jointly compensate fiber dispersion and non-linearities along with the coherent receiver. In this paper we give a detailed overview on the advancements in DBP algorithm based on different types of mathematical models i.e. Wiener (Asymmetric Method) and Wiener Hammerstein models (Symmetric Method). We also discuss the importance of optimized step-size selection, i.e. constant step-size and logarithmic step-size based split step Fourier methods, for simplified and computationally efficient implementation of DBP algorithm. Moreover, by means of numerical investigations we refer to recent system investigations to further improve the performance of DBP algorithm.

  19. Gully formation on Mars: Two recent phases of formation suggested by links between morphology, slope orientation and insolation history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Gareth A.; Head, James W.; Forget, François; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Spiga, Aymeric

    2010-08-01

    The unusual 80 km diameter Noachian-aged Asimov crater in Noachis Terra (46°S, 5°E) is characterized by extensive Noachian-Hesperian crater fill and a younger superposed annulus of valleys encircling the margins of the crater floor. These valleys provide an opportunity to study the relationships of gully geomorphology as a function of changing slope orientation relative to solar insolation. We found that the level of development of gullies was highly correlated with slope orientation and solar insolation. The largest and most complex gully systems, with the most well-developed fluvial landforms, are restricted to pole-facing slopes. In contrast, gullies on equator-facing slopes are smaller, more poorly developed and integrated, more highly degraded, and contain more impact craters. We used a 1D version of the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique GCM, and slope geometries (orientation and angle), driven by predicted spin-axis/orbital parameter history, to assess the distribution and history of surface temperatures in these valleys during recent geological history. Surface temperatures on pole-facing slopes preferential for water ice accumulation and subsequent melting are predicted to occur as recently as 0.5-2.1 Ma, which is consistent with age estimates of gully activity elsewhere on Mars. In contrast, the 1D model predicts that water ice cannot accumulate on equator-facing slopes until obliquities exceed 45°, suggesting they are unlikely to have been active over the last 5 Ma. The correlation of the temperature predictions and the geological evidence for age differences suggests that there were two phases of gully formation in the last few million years: an older phase in which top-down melting occurred on equator-facing slopes and a younger more robust phase on pole-facing slopes. The similarities of small-scale fluvial erosion features seen in the gullies on Mars and those observed in gullies cut by seasonal and perennial snowmelt in the Antarctic Dry

  20. Gas potential of the Rome Trough in Kentucky: Results of recent Cambrian exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.C.; Drahovzal, J.A.

    1996-09-01

    A recent gas discovery in the Rome Trough suggests the need to re-evaluate the deep Cambrian potential of eastern Kentucky. A new phase of Cambrian exploration began in mid-1994 with a new pool discovery by the Carson Associates No. 1 Kazee well in Elliott County, Ky. This well blew out and initially flowed 11 MMcfd of gas from the upper Conasauga Group/Rome Formation at 6,258 to 6,270 feet. After this discovery, a second exploratory well (the Blue Ridge No. 1Greene) was drilled on a separate structure in Elliott County in late 1995. The Blue Ridge well was temporarily abandoned, but had shows of gas and condensate. In early 1996, Carson Associates offset their initial discovery well with the No. 33 Lawson Heirs well. This activity follows a frustrating exploration history in the Rome Trough that is marked by numerous gas and oil shows, but rare commercial production. Only three single-well pools have produced commercial gas from the trough, including the recent Kazee well. Stratigraphic units below the Cambrian-Ordovician Knox Group in the Rome Trough are dramatically thicker than their equivalents on the shelf to the north. The interval in the trough is thought to include rocks as old as Early Cambrian, consisting of a basal sandstone, equivalents of the Shady/Tomstown Dolomite, the Rome Formation, and the Conasauga Formation. Sandstones and fractured shales have been responsible for most of the production to date, but dolostone intervals may also have potential. Limited seismic data indicate possible fan-delta and basin-floor fan deposits that may have reservoir potential.

  1. Recent results of high p(T) physics at the CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuno, Soushi; /Okayama U.

    2005-02-01

    The Tevatron Run II program has been in progress since 2001. The CDF experiment has accumulated roughly five times as much data as did Run I, with much improved detectors. Preliminary results from the CDF experiment are presented. The authors focus on recent high p{sub T} physics results in the Tevatron Run II program.

  2. Magnetically Controlled Spasmodic Accretion during Star Formation. II. Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Mouschovias, Telemachos Ch.

    2005-01-01

    The problem of the late accretion phase of the evolution of an axisymmetric, isothermal magnetic disk surrounding a forming star has been formulated in a companion paper. The ``central sink approximation'' is used to circumvent the problem of describing the evolution inside the opaque central region for densities greater than 1011 cm-3 and radii smaller than a few AU. Only the electrons are assumed to be attached to the magnetic field lines, and the effects of both negatively and positively charged grains are accounted for. After a mass of 0.1 Msolar accumulates in the central cell (forming star), a series of magnetically driven outflows and associated outward-propagating shocks form in a quasi-periodic fashion. As a result, mass accretion onto the protostar occurs in magnetically controlled bursts. We refer to this process as spasmodic accretion. The shocks propagate outward with supermagnetosonic speeds. The period of dissipation and revival of the outflow decreases in time, as the mass accumulated in the central sink increases. We evaluate the contribution of ambipolar diffusion to the resolution of the magnetic flux problem of star formation during the accretion phase, and we find it to be very significant albeit not sufficient to resolve the entire problem yet. Ohmic dissipation is completely negligible in the disk during this phase of the evolution. The protostellar disk is found to be stable against interchange-like instabilities, despite the fact that the mass-to-flux ratio has temporary local maxima.

  3. Dynamical Electroweak Symmetry Breaking with a Heavy Fermion in Light of Recent LHC Results

    DOE PAGES

    Hung, Pham Q.

    2013-01-01

    The recent announcement of a discovery of a possible Higgs-like particle—its spin and parity are yet to be determined—at the LHC with a mass of 126 GeV necessitates a fresh look at the nature of the electroweak symmetry breaking, in particular if this newly-discovered particle will turn out to have the quantum numbers of a Standard Model Higgs boson. Even if it were a 0 + scalar with the properties expected for a SM Higgs boson, there is still the quintessential hierarchy problem that one has to deal with and which, by itself, suggests a new physics energy scale aroundmore » 1 TeV. This paper presents a minireview of one possible scenario: the formation of a fermion-antifermion condensate coming from a very heavy fourth generation, carrying the quantum number of the SM Higgs field, and thus breaking the electroweak symmetry.« less

  4. MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM: RECENT RESULTS: LESSONS LEARNED AND FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the EPA sponsored AML workshop, a number of Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) projects will be presented in order to highlight the most successful technology demonstrations. Recent results, lesson learned and future opportunities will be presented. The MWTP projects includ...

  5. Recent results from polarization experiments at the LHEP-JINR Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ladygin, V. P.; Azhgirey, L. S.; Gurchin, Yu. V.; Isupov, A. Yu.; Krasnov, V. A.; Khrenov, A. N.; Kiselev, A. S.; Kizka, V. A.; Kurilkin, A. K.; Kurilkin, P. K.; Livanov, A. N.; Ladygina, N. B.; Malakhov, A. I.; Piyadin, S. M.; Reznikov, S. G.; Shikhalev, M. A.; Vasiliev, T. A.; Uesaka, T.; Kawabata, T.; Sakaguchi, S.

    2008-10-13

    The review of recent results from polarization experiments performed at LHEP-JINR Accelerator Complex in a GeV range is given. The current status of the spin program at Nuclotron as well as its further continuation with new high intensity polarized deuterons ion source is discussed.

  6. Recent Results from Galileo PPR at Io: Orbits I31 and I32

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathbun, J. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Tamppari, L. K.; Martin, T. Z.; Barnard, L.; Travis, L. D.

    2002-01-01

    Recent Galileo PPR (Photo-Polarimeter Radiometer) results will be shown, including global day and nighttime maps, high latitude regional maps, and high-resolution scans across hotspots and from pole to pole. SO2 vapor pressure, global heatflow, and hotspot power outputs are estimated. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Recent Results from Galileo PPR at Io: Orbits I31 and I32

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathbun, J. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Tamppari, L. K.; Martin, T. Z.; Barnard, L.; Travis, L. D.

    2002-01-01

    Recent Galileo PPR (Photo-Polarimeter Radiometer) results will be shown, including global day and nighttime maps, high latitude regional maps, and high-resolution scans across hotspots and from pole to pole. SO2 vapor pressure, global heatflow, and hotspot power outputs are estimated. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM: RECENT RESULTS: LESSONS LEARNED AND FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the EPA sponsored AML workshop, a number of Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) projects will be presented in order to highlight the most successful technology demonstrations. Recent results, lesson learned and future opportunities will be presented. The MWTP projects includ...

  9. Nuclear structure relevant to neutrinoless double beta decay candidate {sup 130}Te and other recent results

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, B. P.

    2013-12-30

    We have undertaken a series of single-nucleon and pair transfer reaction measurements to help constrain calculations of the nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double beta decay. In this talk, a short overview of measurements relevant to the {sup 130}Te→{sup 130}Xe system is given. Brief mention is made of other recent and forthcoming results.

  10. Initial Satellite Formation Flight Results from the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Trevor; Ottenstein, Neil; Palmer, Eric; Farahmand, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    This paper will describe the results that have been obtained to date concerning MMS formation flying. The MMS spacecraft spin at a rate of 3.1 RPM, with spin axis roughly aligned with Ecliptic North. Several booms are used to deploy instruments: two 5 m magnetometer booms in the spin plane, two rigid booms of length 12.5 m along the positive and negative spin axes, and four flexible wire booms of length 60 m in the spin plane. Minimizing flexible motion of the wire booms requires that reorientation of the spacecraft spin axis be kept to a minimum: this is limited to attitude maneuvers to counteract the effects of gravity-gradient and apparent solar motion. Orbital maneuvers must therefore be carried out in essentially the nominal science attitude. These burns make use of a set of monopropellant hydrazine thrusters: two (of thrust 4.5 N) along the spin axis in each direction, and eight (of thrust 18 N) in the spin plane; the latter are pulsed at the spin rate to produce a net delta-v. An on-board accelerometer-based controller is used to accurately generate a commanded delta-v. Navigation makes use of a weak-signal GPS-based system: this allows signals to be received even when MMS is flying above the GPS orbits, producing a highly accurate determination of the four MMS orbits. This data is downlinked to the MMS Mission Operations Center (MOC) and used by the MOC Flight Dynamics Operations Area (FDOA) for maneuver design. These commands are then uplinked to the spacecraft and executed autonomously using the controller, with the ground monitoring the burns in real time.

  11. Characterization Of Superconducting Samples With SIC System For Thin Film Developments: Status And Recent Results

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, H. Lawrence; Reece, Charles E.; Valente-Feliciano, Anne-Marie; Xiao, Binping; Eremeev, Grigory V.

    2014-02-01

    Within any thin film development program directed towards SRF accelerating structures, there is a need for an RF characterization device that can provide information about RF properties of small samples. The current installation of the RF characterization device at Jefferson Lab is Surface Impedance Characterization (SIC) system. The data acquisition environment for the system has recently been improved to allow for automated measurement, and the system has been routinely used for characterization of bulk Nb, films of Nb on Cu, MgB{sub 2}, NbTiN, Nb{sub 3}Sn films, etc. We present some of the recent results that illustrate present capabilities and limitations of the system.

  12. Recent results from the Berkeley 0.3-NA microfield exposure tool

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick; Anderson, Christopher N.; Dean, Kim; Denham, Paul; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Hoef, Brian; La Fontaine, Bruno; Wallow, Tom

    2007-03-01

    Operating as a SEMATECH resist test center, the Berkeley 0.3-NA EUV microfield exposure tool continues to play a crucial role in the advancement of EUV resists and masks. Here we present recent resist-characterization results from the tool as well as tool-characterization data. In particular we present lithographic-based aberration measurements demonstrating the long-term stability of the tool. We also describe a recent upgrade to the tool which involved redesign of the programmable coherence illuminator to provide improved field uniformity as well as a programmable field size.

  13. SDSS IV MaNGA: Gradients in Recent Star Formation Histories as Diagnostics for Galaxy Growth and Death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    The spatially resolved spectroscopy from MaNGA allows the radial gradients of recent star formation histories (SFH), as indicated by the 4000Å break (D4000) and the equivalent width of both Hδ absorption line and Hα emission line, to be obtained with high accuracy for a large sample of galaxies in the nearby universe. Analyses of both a dozen galaxies observed by the MaNGA prototype run (P-MaNGA) and ~700 galaxies in the current MaNGA sample have shown that the SFH gradients are useful for understanding disk growth and star formation cessation in local galaxies. We find the SFH gradient of a galaxy to strongly depend on the evolution stage of its central region. Centrally star-forming galaxies generally show very weak or no radial variations. In contrast, centrally quiescent galaxies present significant radial gradients in the sense that Dn(4000) decreases, while both EW(HδA) and EW(Hα) increase from the galactic center outward. This effect is seen mainly for high-mass galaxies with stellar mass above a few ×1010 M⊙, and depends weakly on galaxy morphology type. These results are consistent with a picture in which the cessation of star formation propagates from the center of a galaxy outward as it moves to the red sequence. In this talk I will present these analyses and discuss their implications on galaxy evolution.

  14. Recent Aspects on the Effect of Inclusion Characteristics on the Intragranular Ferrite Formation in Low Alloy Steels: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Wangzhong; Jönsson, Pär Göran; Nakajima, Keiji

    2017-04-01

    Intragranular ferrite (IGF), which nucleates from specific inclusion surfaces in low alloy steels, is the desired microstructure to improve mechanical properties of steel such as the toughness. This microstructure is especially important in the coarse grain heat affected zone (CGHAZ) of weldments. The latest review paper focusing on the role of non-metallic inclusions in the IGF formation in steels has been reported by Sarma et al. in 2009 (ISIJ int., 49(2009), 1063-1074). In recent years, large amount of papers have been presented to investigate different issues of this topic. This paper mainly highlights the frontiers of experimental and theoretical investigations on the effects of inclusion characteristics, such as the composition, size distribution and number density, on the IGF formation in low carbon low-alloyed steels, undertaken by the group of Applied Process Metallurgy, KTH Royal Institute of Technology. Related results reported in previous studies are also introduced. Also, plausible future work regarding various items of IGF formation is mentioned in each section. This work aims to give a better control of improving the steel quality during casting and in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of weldment, according to the concept of oxide metallurgy.

  15. RECENT LATTICE RESULTS ON FINITE TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY QCD, PART 1.

    SciTech Connect

    KARSCH,F.

    2007-07-09

    We discuss recent progress made studies of bulk thermodynamics of strongly interacting matter through lattice simulations of QCD with an almost physical light and strange quark mass spectrum. We present results on the QCD equation of state at vanishing and non-vanishing quark chemical potential and show first results on baryon number and strangeness fluctuations, which might be measured in event-by-event fluctuations in low energy runs at RHIC as well as at FAIR.

  16. New paleomagnetic results from the Nantuo Formation in south China and their paleogeographic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Evans, D. A.; Wu, H.; Jiang, G.; Dong, J.; Raub, T. D.; Li, H.; Zhao, Q.

    2006-12-01

    The Nantuo Formation is well-known as the "Marinoan" glaciogenic stratum (650-635 Ma) distributed throughout the Yangtze Platform (YP) in South China (Zhang et al., 2006; 2006). Paleomagnetic results obtained directly from this formation are crucial to understanding the paleogeographic position of the YP among the fragmented landmasses begat by Rodinia and also assessing extreme paleoclimatic changes during the late Neoproterozoic. However, because of widespread remagnetization across the YP, the few acceptable paleomagnetic results that have been obtained from the Nantuo Formation thus far (eg., Zhang and Piper, 1997) could benefit from more concrete field tests (eg., reversals) and comparison with sections possessing direct geochronological constraints. Because of the lack of reliable data directly from the Nantuo Fm., recently some researchers have even proposed that the Nantuo glaciations might have formed close to the equator, based on a shallow remanent magnetization in Doushantuo Formation (635-550 Ma) that overlies the Nantuo Fm (eg., Macouin et al., 2004). However, we question whether this Doushantuo component is primary in light of several new paleomagnetic data. Our new sampling section is located between Guzhang and Jishou, western Hunan Province, where ~40m- thick laminated red beds in the middle Nantuo formation are well-exposed along the highway from Zhangjiajie to Jishou. A tuff bed at the boundary between Nantuo Formation and underlying Xiangment interglacial deposits gives a U-Pb SHRIMP age of ~650 Ma (Zhang et al., 2006). Ninety-four samples were collected and subjected to stepwise AF and thermal demagnetization. Rock-magnetic analyses have demonstrated that the main magnetic carriers are hematite and magnetite. The samples also contain pyrite, which converts to pyrrhotite upon heating over 590 degrees C. Remagnetization great circles were obtained for the majority of samples, as well as several stable endpoints. A combined analysis of the great

  17. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter - recent results and plans for an exteneded mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, John; Vondrak, Richard; Garvin, Jim; Petro, Noah; McClanahan, Timothy

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter(LRO) mission is poised to take advantage of recent extraordinary discoveries on the Moon to advance lunar and planetary science with new, targeted investigations that focus on geologically recent and even contemporaneous changes on the Moon. We will present recent results for the mission and describe plans for a second two-year extension of the science mission. LRO has been in orbit for nearly 5 years during a remarkable era of lunar science where a paradigm shift has taken place from the view of the Moon as a static planet to one with many active processes. As we approach the end of the first extended mission, we review here the major results from the LRO. Examples include: enabled the development of comprehensive high resolution maps and digital terrain models of the lunar surface; discoveries on the nature of hydrogen distribution, and by extension water, at the lunar poles; measured of the daytime and nighttime temperature of the lunar surface including temperature down below 30 K in permanently shadowed regions (PSRs); direct measurement of Hg, H2, and CO deposits in the Cabeus PSR; evidence for recent tectonic activity on the Moon; and high resolution maps of the illumination conditions at the poles

  18. The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. XI. The Spatially Resolved Recent Star Formation History of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Alexia R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Bell, Eric F.; Seth, Anil C.; Simones, Jacob E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Choi, Yumi; Fouesneau, Morgan; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Johnson, Lent C.; Kalirai, Jason S.; Leroy, Adam K.; Monachesi, Antonela; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schruba, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    We measure the recent star formation history (SFH) across M31 using optical images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope as part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT). We fit the color-magnitude diagrams in ˜9000 regions that are ˜100 pc × 100 pc in projected size, covering a 0.5 square degree area (˜380 kpc2, deprojected) in the NE quadrant of M31. We show that the SFHs vary significantly on these small spatial scales but that there are also coherent galaxy-wide fluctuations in the SFH back to ˜500 Myr, most notably in M31's 10 kpc star-forming ring. We find that the 10 kpc ring is at least 400 Myr old, showing ongoing star formation (SF) over the past ˜500 Myr. This indicates the presence of molecular gas in the ring over at least 2 dynamical times at this radius. We also find that the ring’s position is constant throughout this time, and is stationary at the level of 1 km s-1, although there is evidence for broadening of the ring due to the diffusion of stars into the disk. Based on existing models of M31's ring features, the lack of evolution in the ring’s position makes a purely collisional ring origin highly unlikely. Besides the well-known 10 kpc ring, we observe two other ring-like features. There is an outer ring structure at 15 kpc with concentrated SF starting ˜80 Myr ago. The inner ring structure at 5 kpc has a much lower star formation rate (SFR) and therefore lower contrast against the underlying stellar disk. It was most clearly defined ˜200 Myr ago, but is much more diffuse today. We find that the global SFR has been fairly constant over the last ˜500 Myr, though it does show a small increase at 50 Myr that is 1.3 times the average SFR over the past 100 Myr. During the last ˜500 Myr, ˜60% of all SF has occurred in the 10 kpc ring. Finally, we find that in the past 100 Myr, the average SFR over the PHAT survey area is 0.28 ± 0.03 {{M}⊙ } y{{r}-1} with an average deprojected intensity of 7.3× {{10}-4} {{M}⊙ } y

  19. Recent results on top, bottom and exotic physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, N.M. |

    1993-08-01

    A summary of results from the recently concluded 1991--1993 Tevatron run is presented. Selected topics from b physics and exotic particle searches from the CDF and D0 collaborations are reviewed. Preliminary results from the CDF top search, using 12pb{sup {minus}1} from the 1992--1993 run, are given. In particular, the lepton + b-tag and dilepton analyses are discussed. Preliminary results from the CDF dilepton analysis places a lower limit on the top quark mass of 108GeV/c{sup 2} at the 95% C.L.

  20. Very high energy observations of the Galactic Centre: recent results and perspectives with CTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrier, Regis

    2016-07-01

    The central 300 pc of our Galaxy are a major laboratory for high energy astrophysics. They harbor the closest supermassive black hole (SMBH) and are the site of a sustained star formation activity. The energy released by the supernovae on the ambient medium must be very strong. Similarly, albeit extremely faint nowadays, the SMBH must have experienced episodes of intense activity in the past which can influence significantly the central regions and beyond, e.g. powering the Fermi bubbles. I review observational results at very high energies from the central region and discuss their implications and the questions they leave open. I discuss the perspectives CTA offers for Galactic Centre astrophysics.

  1. Review of recent stellarator results in the USA, the USSR, and Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, J.F.

    1990-12-01

    Stellarators with significant magnetic shear in the United States, the Soviet Union, and Japan are described, and recent results are discussed in terms of their contributions to the physics understanding relevant for stellarator optimization and to toroidal confinement understanding in general. The areas discussed are the properties of stellarators with significant shear, magnetic surfaces, trapped-particle losses, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability, global confinement scaling, local transport, fluctuations, and particle and impurity control. 58 refs., 23 figs.

  2. Actinic review of EUV masks: Status and recent results of the AIMS EUV system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Markus R.; Hellweg, Dirk; Koch, Markus; Peters, Jan Hendrik; Perlitz, Sascha; Garetto, Anthony; Magnusson, Krister; Capelli, Renzo; Jindal, Vibhu

    2015-03-01

    The EUV mask infrastructure is of key importance for the successful introduction of EUV lithography into volume production. In particular, for the production of defect free masks an actinic review of potential defect sites is required. To realize such an actinic review tool, Carl Zeiss and the SEMATECH EUVL Mask Infrastructure consortium started a development program for an EUV aerial image metrology system, the AIMS™ EUV. In this paper, we discuss the current status of the prototype integration and show recent results.

  3. Recent Results in Electroweak B Decays from the BaBar Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Koeneke, Karsten; /MIT, LNS /SLAC

    2006-09-01

    A review of the most recent BABAR results on electroweak penguin B decays is presented. The focus of this paper is on the measurement of observables in the decays B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma}, B {yields} K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -} B {yields} K{sub s}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} (time-dependent analysis) and B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma}.

  4. Recent Results from the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, S. R.; Horne, K.; Lister, T.; Collier Cameron, A.; Street, R. A.; Pollacco, D. L.; James, D.; Tsapras, Y.

    2004-12-01

    WASP0 is a prototype for what is intended to become a collection of WASPs whose primary aim is to detect transiting extra-solar planets across the face of their parent star. We present some recent results from the WASP0 camera, including observations of the known transiting planet around HD 209458. The current status of the next generation camera (SuperWASP) located on La Palma is briefly outlined.

  5. The SOLSPEC experiment: Recent results and future investigations on board the international space station alpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, G.; Hersé, M.; Simon, P. C.; Labs, D.; Mandel, H.; Gillotay, D.; Peetermans, W.; Foujols, T.

    1999-01-01

    The SOLSPEC investigation has already been flown in orbit for measuring the absolute solar spectral irradiance. The scientific objectives for the ISSA mission are presented and their importance is discussed. The performance of the instrument will be shown using the recent SOLSPEC results. For the ISSA mission, changes have been already undertaken in order to meet the ISSA requirements (interfaces and reliability) and several instrumental improvements for a better science return.

  6. Recent results from the GISS model of the global atmosphere. [circulation simulation for weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somerville, R. C. J.

    1975-01-01

    Large numerical atmospheric circulation models are in increasingly widespread use both for operational weather forecasting and for meteorological research. The results presented here are from a model developed at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) and described in detail by Somerville et al. (1974). This model is representative of a class of models, recently surveyed by the Global Atmospheric Research Program (1974), designed to simulate the time-dependent, three-dimensional, large-scale dynamics of the earth's atmosphere.

  7. Recent results on the meson and baryon spectrum from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohler, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Recent lattice results on the meson and baryon spectrum with a focus on the determination of hadronic resonance masses and widths using a combined basis of single-hadron and hadron-hadron interpolating fields are reviewed. These mostly exploratory calculations differ from traditional lattice QCD spectrum calculations for states stable under QCD, where calculations with a full uncertainty estimate are already routinely performed. Progress and challenges in these calculations are highlighted.

  8. Transitioning Results From Recent ONR WESTPAC Field Programs to Operational Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    zone. OBJECTIVES a) Continue analyzing recent data sets from the Western Pacific operating region (WESTPAC) and facilitate transitioning these...years, ONR has organized several major field efforts in the WESTPAC region . The PI has personally organized, participated in, and published results...over 200 km offshore. In this region topographic beta steers the eddies towards the southwest where they interact with other eddies incoming from

  9. Results of recent NASA studies on automatic spin prevention for fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.; Nguyen, L. T.

    1976-01-01

    A broad based research program was developed to eliminate or minimize inadvertent spins for advanced military aircraft. Recent piloted simulator studies and airplane flight tests have demonstrated that the automatic control systems in use on current fighters can be tailored to provide a high degree of spin resistance for some configurations without restrictions to maneuverability. Such systems result in greatly increased tactical effectiveness, safety, and pilot confidence.

  10. Recent results of X-ray observations from OSO-7 and SAS-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Recent observations bearing on the nature of compact X-ray sources obtained from the MIT instruments aboard OSO-7 and SAS-3 are discussed. Results on the X-ray sky survey, new ultralow-energy X-ray sources, X-ray sources in globular clusters, slow X-ray pulsars, and variability and position of compact X-ray sources in Cen A are discussed. Descriptions of the satellite-borne X-ray instruments are provided.

  11. Recent results from the GISS model of the global atmosphere. [circulation simulation for weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somerville, R. C. J.

    1975-01-01

    Large numerical atmospheric circulation models are in increasingly widespread use both for operational weather forecasting and for meteorological research. The results presented here are from a model developed at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) and described in detail by Somerville et al. (1974). This model is representative of a class of models, recently surveyed by the Global Atmospheric Research Program (1974), designed to simulate the time-dependent, three-dimensional, large-scale dynamics of the earth's atmosphere.

  12. Recent results on giant dipole resonance decays in highly excited nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Snover, K.A.

    1991-12-31

    Some recent results on Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) decays in highly excited, equilibrated nuclei, are discussed based primarily on work done at Seattle. Four sections address the following topics: oblate shapes of rotating, highly excited Zr--Mo nuclei; adiabatic versus `motionally narrowed` GDR decay; large spin-driven deformations observed in hot medium-mass nuclei; and search for entrance channel effects in GDR decay following {sup 58}Ni {plus} {sup 92}Zr fusion. 22 refs.

  13. Recent results on giant dipole resonance decays in highly excited nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Snover, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Some recent results on Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) decays in highly excited, equilibrated nuclei, are discussed based primarily on work done at Seattle. Four sections address the following topics: oblate shapes of rotating, highly excited Zr--Mo nuclei; adiabatic versus motionally narrowed' GDR decay; large spin-driven deformations observed in hot medium-mass nuclei; and search for entrance channel effects in GDR decay following [sup 58]Ni [plus] [sup 92]Zr fusion. 22 refs.

  14. Recent results and perspectives on cosmology and fundamental physics from microwave surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burigana, Carlo; Battistelli, Elia Stefano; Benetti, Micol; Cabass, Giovanni; de Bernardis, Paolo; di Serego Alighieri, Sperello; di Valentino, Eleonora; Gerbino, Martina; Giusarma, Elena; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Liguori, Michele; Masi, Silvia; Norgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Rosati, Piero; Salvati, Laura; Trombetti, Tiziana; Vielva, Patricio

    2016-04-01

    Recent cosmic microwave background (CMB) data in temperature and polarization have reached high precision in estimating all the parameters that describe the current so-called standard cosmological model. Recent results about the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect from CMB anisotropies, galaxy surveys, and their cross-correlations are presented. Looking at fine signatures in the CMB, such as the lack of power at low multipoles, the primordial power spectrum (PPS) and the bounds on non-Gaussianities, complemented by galaxy surveys, we discuss inflationary physics and the generation of primordial perturbations in the early universe. Three important topics in particle physics, the bounds on neutrinos masses and parameters, on thermal axion mass and on the neutron lifetime derived from cosmological data are reviewed, with attention to the comparison with laboratory experiment results. Recent results from cosmic polarization rotation (CPR) analyses aimed at testing the Einstein equivalence principle (EEP) are presented. Finally, we discuss the perspectives of next radio facilities for the improvement of the analysis of future CMB spectral distortion experiments.

  15. The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT): Recent Study Results and Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisawitz, David; SPIRIT Mission Study Team

    2007-12-01

    SPIRIT was recommended in the 2002 "Community Plan for Far-IR/Submillimeter Space Astronomy.” A structurally connected interferometer, SPIRIT provides sensitive sub-arcsecond angular resolution images and integral field spectroscopy in the 25 to 400 micron wavelength range. SPIRIT was designed to revolutionize our understanding of planetary system formation, reveal otherwise-undetectable planets through the disk perturbations they induce, spectroscopically probe the atmospheres of extrasolar giant planets in orbits typical of most of the planets in our solar system, and yield significant new insight into the processes associated with galaxy formation and development. This paper updates previously presented study results and describes future study plans. Our SPIRIT mission concept study proposal was peer reviewed and selected by NASA for support under the Origins Probe Mission Concept Study program. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and four industry partners - Ball Aerospace, Boeing, Lockheed-Martin, and Northrop-Grumman - contributed generously the study. The Origins Probe study results were reviewed by an Advisory Review Panel.

  16. Recent Charm Production and Neutrino Oscillation Results From the CHORUS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kayis-Topaksu, A.

    2006-07-11

    CHORUS Experiment was taking data during the years of 1994-1997. In total about 100 000 charged-current(CC) neutrino interactions were located in the nuclear emulsion target and fully reconstructed. In addition to the oscillation search, measurements of charm production have been also performed. From the sample of 100 000 events based on the data acquired by new automatic scanning system, 2013 charm-decay events were selected by a pattern recognition program. A comprehensive study of charm production by neutrinos being made. We report here some of the recent results on charm production and neutrino oscillation results.

  17. Timing is everything? Reconciling the results of recent trials in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Christina M; Coca, Steven G

    2016-10-01

    Observational studies have failed to establish the optimal timing of renal replacement therapy in critically ill adults with acute kidney injury, with some studies suggesting benefit and others suggesting the potential for harm with earlier initiation. Two recent randomized trials have addressed this controversy, also with conflicting results. Careful consideration of differences between the 2 studies is essential when applying the results to clinical practice in the intensive care unit. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Recent Results of Nuclear Mass Measurements at Storage Ring in IMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H. S.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2014-09-01

    Recent commissioning of the Cooler Storage Ring at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL-CSR) has allowed us for direct mass measurements at the Institute of Modern Physics in Lanzhou (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences. A series of isochronous mass measurements have been carried out in the past few years using 78Kr, 86Kr, 58Ni, and 112Sn beams. The main results and the present status are presented in this talk, and the implications of these results with respect to nuclear structures and nucleosynthesis in the rp-process of x-ray bursts are discussed.

  19. Recent balloon flight results concerning the galactic center 511 keV line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leventhal, M.

    Results of three new balloon flights have recently become available concerning the galactic center electron-positron annihilation line at 511 keV. The groups involved were the University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hamsphire; NASA Goddard Center for Nuclear Studies, USA; CEN Saclay, Gif Sur Yvette, France; and Bell Laboratories/Sandia Laboratories, USA. In these flights a ``low'' or ``off'' state was observed in the fall of 1981. Also, new evidence for a low energy ``positronium'' - like tail on the line has been obtained from a 1977 flight. These results are reviewed.

  20. Recent Results of Bottomonium Spectroscopy in Radiative ϒ(2 S) Decays at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stottler, Zachary; Belle Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We report on the recent results of a search for ϒ(2 S) ->(b b) γ decays. We characterize the properties of χbJ(1 P) (J = 0 , 1 , 2) mesons, which are reconstructed from 74 hadronic final states containing charged and neutral pions, kaons, protons. In total, we observe 41 modes with a significance at or above 5 σ , many of which are first observations. Our results are based on an integrated luminosity of 24 . 7 fb-1 of e+e- collision data recorded by the Belle detector at the ϒ(2 S) resonance, corresponding to (157 . 8 +/- 3 . 6) ×106 ϒ(2 S) events.

  1. The 3D structure of the hadrons: recents results and experimental program at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz Camacho, Carlos

    2014-04-01

    The understanding of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) at large distances still remains one of the main outstanding problems of nuclear physics. Studying the internal structure of hadrons provides a way to probe QCD in the non-perturbative domain and can help us unravel the internal structure of the most elementary blocks of matter. Jefferson Lab (JLab) has already delivered results on how elementary quarks and gluons create nucleon structure and properties. The upgrade of JLab to 12 GeV will allow the full exploration of the valence-quark structure of nucleons and the extraction of real threedimensional pictures. I will present recent results and review the future experimental program at JLab.

  2. Recent experimental results in sub- and near-barrier heavy-ion fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnoli, Giovanna; Stefanini, Alberto M.

    2017-08-01

    Recent advances obtained in the field of near and sub-barrier heavy-ion fusion reactions are reviewed. Emphasis is given to the results obtained in the last decade, and focus is mainly on the experimental work performed concerning the influence of transfer channels on fusion cross sections and the hindrance phenomenon far below the barrier. Indeed, early data of sub-barrier fusion taught us that cross sections may strongly depend on the low-energy collective modes of the colliding nuclei, and, possibly, on couplings to transfer channels. The coupled-channels (CC) model has been quite successful in the interpretation of the experimental evidences. Fusion barrier distributions often yield the fingerprint of the relevant coupled channels. Recent results obtained by using radioactive beams are reported. At deep sub-barrier energies, the slope of the excitation function in a semi-logarithmic plot keeps increasing in many cases and standard CC calculations overpredict the cross sections. This was named a hindrance phenomenon, and its physical origin is still a matter of debate. Recent theoretical developments suggest that this effect, at least partially, may be a consequence of the Pauli exclusion principle. The hindrance may have far-reaching consequences in astrophysics where fusion of light systems determines stellar evolution during the carbon and oxygen burning stages, and yields important information for exotic reactions that take place in the inner crust of accreting neutron stars.

  3. Prevention of solids formation: Results of the FY 1999 studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, R.D.; Beahm, E.C.; Chase, C.W.; Collins, J.L.; Dillow, T.A.; Weber, C.F.

    1999-12-01

    Tank farm operations at Hanford and Savannah River have been adversely affected by unintentional solids formations. At Hanford, a new cross-site transfer line had to be built because nearly all the original transfer lines were no longer operational due to plugs. At Savannah River, operations at its evaporator system were suspended while a plug in the gravity drain line was physically removed at considerable expense. The plugs as Hanford and Savannah River, which have been characterized, were primarily due to sodium phosphate and sodium aluminosilicate, respectively.

  4. Nucleic acids in human glioma treatment: innovative approaches and recent results.

    PubMed

    Catuogno, S; Esposito, C L; Quintavalle, C; Condorelli, G; de Franciscis, V; Cerchia, L

    2012-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary central nervous system tumors with a dismal prognosis. Despite recent advances in surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, current treatment regimens have a modest survival benefit. A crucial challenge is to deliver drugs effectively to invasive glioma cells residing in a sanctuary within the central nervous system. New therapies are essential, and oligonucleotide-based approaches, including antisense, microRNAs, small interfering RNAs, and nucleic acid aptamers, may provide a viable strategy. Thanks to their unique characteristics (low size, good affinity for the target, no immunogenicity, chemical structures that can be easily modified to improve their in vivo applications), these molecules may represent a valid alternative to antibodies particularly to overcome challenges presented by the blood-brain barrier. Here we will discuss recent results on the use of oligonucleotides that will hopefully provide new effective treatment for gliomas.

  5. Recent formation of arroyos in the Little Missouri Badlands of southwestern North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonzalez, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    In the Little Missouri Badlands of southwestern North Dakota, the channels of ephemeral streams are incised 2 to 10 m or more into mid-to-late Holocene alluvium. The objectives of this study were to determine the timing and cause(s) of the most recent episodes of fluvial incision and to develop a process-response model that illustrates the formation and evolution of arroyos in this region. The purpose was to distinguish natural from anthropogenic changes to the landscape and to discriminate allogenic from autogenic causes of incision, thereby gaining a greater sense of how steep, relatively small, ephemeral streams evolve. Dendrochronologic and dendrogeomorphic analyses of riparian cottonwoods provide an inexpensive, high-resolution dating method to constrain the time of incision, thereby permitting determination of the cause(s) of incision by evaluating environmental conditions prior to and at the onset of fluvial incision. An examination of seven small (10 to 100 km2) drainage basins indicated ephemeral streams have undergone a four-stage cycle of change within the past 200 years, comprising(i) an initial period of relative geomorphic stability with pedogenesis on the flood plain and low rates of lateral channel migration, (ii) a period of channel incision with subsequent widening of the flood plain through lateral corrasion along middle and upstream reaches, (iii) a concomitant period of aggradation along downstream reaches and, finally, (iv) a period of downstream incision. Dendrochronologic data and dendrogeomorphic relations indicate there have been three distinct periods of fluvial incision in the past 200 years. The first period of incision began in the 1860s and 1870s prior to the onset of European settlement and intensive grazing by domesticated cattle in the area. This period of incision occurred along the middle reaches of all seven of the streams examined and coincided with a severe, protracted drought, suggesting an allogenic cause. The second period

  6. Recent formation of arroyos in the Little Missouri Badlands of southwestern North Dakota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Mark A.

    2001-05-01

    In the Little Missouri Badlands of southwestern North Dakota, the channels of ephemeral streams are incised 2 to 10 m or more into mid-to-late Holocene alluvium. The objectives of this study were to determine the timing and cause(s) of the most recent episodes of fluvial incision and to develop a process-response model that illustrates the formation and evolution of arroyos in this region. The purpose was to distinguish natural from anthropogenic changes to the landscape and to discriminate allogenic from autogenic causes of incision, thereby gaining a greater sense of how steep, relatively small, ephemeral streams evolve. Dendrochronologic and dendrogeomorphic analyses of riparian cottonwoods provide an inexpensive, high-resolution dating method to constrain the time of incision, thereby permitting determination of the cause(s) of incision by evaluating environmental conditions prior to and at the onset of fluvial incision. An examination of seven small (10 to 100 km 2) drainage basins indicated ephemeral streams have undergone a four-stage cycle of change within the past 200 years, comprising (i) an initial period of relative geomorphic stability with pedogenesis on the flood plain and low rates of lateral channel migration, (ii) a period of channel incision with subsequent widening of the flood plain through lateral corrasion along middle and upstream reaches, (iii) a concomitant period of aggradation along downstream reaches and, finally, (iv) a period of downstream incision. Dendrochronologic data and dendrogeomorphic relations indicate there have been three distinct periods of fluvial incision in the past 200 years. The first period of incision began in the 1860s and 1870s prior to the onset of European settlement and intensive grazing by domesticated cattle in the area. This period of incision occurred along the middle reaches of all seven of the streams examined and coincided with a severe, protracted drought, suggesting an allogenic cause. The second

  7. Investigations of a Combustor Using a 9-Point Swirl-Venturi Fuel Injector: Recent Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Yolanda R.; Heath, Christopher M.; Anderson, Robert C.; Tacina, Kathleen M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores recent results obtained during testing in an optically-accessible, JP8-fueled, flame tube combustor using baseline Lean Direct Injection (LDI) research hardware. The baseline LDI geometry has nine fuel/air mixers arranged in a 3 x 3 array. Results from this nine-element array include images of fuel and OH speciation via Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF), which describe fuel spray pattern and reaction zones. Preliminary combustion temperatures derived from Stokes/Anti-Stokes Spontaneous Raman Spectroscopy are also presented. Other results using chemiluminescence from major combustion radicals such as CH* and C2* serve to identify the primary reaction zone, while OH PLIF shows the extent of reaction further downstream. Air and fuel velocities and fuel drop size results are also reported.

  8. Recent sedimentological studies of the Murray and Stimson formations and their implications for Gale crater evolution, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev; Fedo, Chris; Grotzinger, John; Edgett, Ken; Vasavada, Ashwin

    2017-04-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover has been exploring sedimentary rocks on the lower north slope of Aeolis Mons since August 2014. Previous work has demonstrated a succession of sedimentary rock types deposited dominantly in river-delta settings (Bradbury group), and interfingering/overlying contemporaneous/younger lake settings (Murray formation, Mt. Sharp group). The Murray formation is unconformably overlain by the Stimson formation, an ancient aeolian sand lithology. Here, we describe the MSL team's most recent sedimentological findings regarding the Murray and Stimson formations. The Murray formation is of the order of 200 meters thick and formed dominantly of mudstones. The mudstone facies, originally identified at the Pahrump Hills field site, show abundant fine-scale planar laminations throughout the Murray formation succession and is interpreted to record deposition in an ancient lake system in Gale crater. Since leaving the Naukluft Plateau (Stimson formation rocks) and driving south-southeastwards and progressive stratigraphically upwards through the Murray succession, we have recognised a variety of additional facies have been recognized that indicate variability in the overall palaeoenvironmental setting. These facies include (1) cross-bedded siltstones to very fine-grained sandstones with metre-scale troughs that might represent aeolian sedimentation; (2) a heterolithic mudstone-sandstone facies with laminated fine-grained strata, cm-scale ripple cross-laminations in siltstone or very fine sandstone, and dm-scale cross-stratified siltstone and very fine grained sandstone. The palaeoenvironmental setting for the second facies remains under discussion. Our results show that Gale crater hosted lakes systems for millions to tens of millions of years, perhaps punctuated by drier intervals. Murray strata are unconformably overlain by the Stimson formation. Stimson outcrops are typically characterized by cross-bedded sandstones with cross

  9. VDJML: a file format with tools for capturing the results of inferring immune receptor rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Toby, Inimary T; Levin, Mikhail K; Salinas, Edward A; Christley, Scott; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Breden, Felix; Buntzman, Adam; Corrie, Brian; Fonner, John; Gupta, Namita T; Hershberg, Uri; Marthandan, Nishanth; Rosenfeld, Aaron; Rounds, William; Rubelt, Florian; Scarborough, Walter; Scott, Jamie K; Uduman, Mohamed; Vander Heiden, Jason A; Scheuermann, Richard H; Monson, Nancy; Kleinstein, Steven H; Cowell, Lindsay G

    2016-10-06

    The genes that produce antibodies and the immune receptors expressed on lymphocytes are not germline encoded; rather, they are somatically generated in each developing lymphocyte by a process called V(D)J recombination, which assembles specific, independent gene segments into mature composite genes. The full set of composite genes in an individual at a single point in time is referred to as the immune repertoire. V(D)J recombination is the distinguishing feature of adaptive immunity and enables effective immune responses against an essentially infinite array of antigens. Characterization of immune repertoires is critical in both basic research and clinical contexts. Recent technological advances in repertoire profiling via high-throughput sequencing have resulted in an explosion of research activity in the field. This has been accompanied by a proliferation of software tools for analysis of repertoire sequencing data. Despite the widespread use of immune repertoire profiling and analysis software, there is currently no standardized format for output files from V(D)J analysis. Researchers utilize software such as IgBLAST and IMGT/High V-QUEST to perform V(D)J analysis and infer the structure of germline rearrangements. However, each of these software tools produces results in a different file format, and can annotate the same result using different labels. These differences make it challenging for users to perform additional downstream analyses. To help address this problem, we propose a standardized file format for representing V(D)J analysis results. The proposed format, VDJML, provides a common standardized format for different V(D)J analysis applications to facilitate downstream processing of the results in an application-agnostic manner. The VDJML file format specification is accompanied by a support library, written in C++ and Python, for reading and writing the VDJML file format. The VDJML suite will allow users to streamline their V(D)J analysis and

  10. Community Agency Survey Formative Research Results From the TAAG Study

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Ruth P.; Moody, Jamie

    2008-01-01

    School and community agency collaboration can potentially increase physical activity opportunities for youth. Few studies have examined the role of community agencies in promoting physical activity, much less in collaboration with schools. This article describes formative research data collection from community agencies to inform the development of the Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls (TAAG) intervention to provide out-of-school physical activity programs for girls. The community agency survey is designed to assess agency capacity to provide physical activity programs for girls, including resources, programs, and partnerships. Most agency respondents (n = 138) report operations during after-school hours, adequate facilities, and program options for girls, although most are sport oriented. Agency resources and programming vary considerably across the six TAAG field sites. Many agencies report partnerships, some involving schools, although not necessarily related to physical activity. Implications for the TAAG intervention are presented. PMID:16397156

  11. Overview of Recent Results of the Solar Two Test and Evaluations Program

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, R.; Pacheco, J.E.

    1999-01-14

    The Solar Two project is a collaborative, cost-shared project between eleven US industry and utility partners and the U.S. Department of Energy to validate the molten-salt power tower technology. The Solar Two plant, located east of Barstow, CA, comprises 1926 heliostats, a receiver, a thermal storage system and a steam generator system that use molten nitrate salt as the heat transfer fluid and storage media. The steam generator powers a 10 MWe, conventional Rankine cycle turbine. This paper describes the test plan and evaluations currently in progress at Solar Two and provides some recent results.

  12. Recent Results from ArgoNeuT and Status of MicroBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Szelc, Andrzej

    2015-07-10

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) detectors hold the key to answering the outstanding questions about the role of neutrinos in the Standard Model of Particle physics and beyond. Their fine granularity combined with calorimetric capabilities allows for precision measurements that answering these questions will require. Here, we discuss the recent results from the ArgoNeuT experiment as well as the status and prospects for MicroBooNE, both a part of the US-based LArTPC neutrino program.

  13. Recent results and new hardware developments for protein crystal growth in microactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delucas, L. J.; Long, M. M.; Moore, K. M.; Smith, C.; Carson, M.; Narayana, S. V. L.; Carter, D.; Clark, A. D., Jr.; Nanni, R. G.; Ding, J.

    1993-01-01

    Protein crystal growth experiments have been performed on 16 space shuttle missions since April, 1985. The initial experiments utilized vapor diffusion crystallization techniques similar to those used in laboratories for earth-based experiments. More recent experiments have utilized temperature induced crystallization as an alternative method for growing high quality protein crystals in microgravity. Results from both vapor diffusion and temperature induced crystallization experiments indicate that proteins grown in microgravity may be larger, display more uniform morphologies, and yield diffraction data to significantly higher resolutions than the best crystals of these proteins grown on earth.

  14. [Recent demographic trends in Italy according to the results of the October 1981 census].

    PubMed

    Reyne, G

    1983-01-01

    Recent demographic trends in Italy are examined using the results of the 1981 census. The author notes that fertility continued to fall during the 1970s and that migration, although reduced in quantity, remains significant. The general pattern of internal migration continues to be from south to north, while an increasing trend to medium-size towns and suburban areas seems to have developed in northern and central Italy. In southern Italy urbanization is greater, particularly in coastal regions where tourism and new industrial plants have enhanced employment opportunities.

  15. Recent results in γ-ray astronomy with the ARGO-YBJ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Girolamo, Tristano

    2017-03-01

    The ARGO-YBJ air shower detector has been in stable data taking for five years at the YangBaJing Cosmic Ray Laboratory (Tibet, P.R. China, 4300m a.s.l.) with a duty cycle > 86% and an energy threshold of a few hundreds of GeV. With the scaler mode technique, the minimum threshold of 1 GeV can be reached. In this paper recent results in γ-ray astronomy will be presented, including those from 4.5 years of observations of the blazar Mrk 421 in common with the Fermi satellite.

  16. Atmospheric remote sensing and applications from GNSS: Recent results and progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shuanggen; Gurbuz, Gokhan; Akgul, Volkan

    2016-07-01

    The atmospheric delay is one of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) errors. Nowadays, the total zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD) and ionospheric total electron content (TEC) can be precisely obtained from GNSS, which can be used for weather prediction and atmospheric research as well as space weather. In this paper, recent results and progress on atmospheric remote sensing and applications from GNSS are presented, including ocean tide models and mapping functions effects, high-order ionospheric delay correction, tropoapause variations, ionospheric climatology, seismo-atmospheric anomalies and characteristics. Finally, some possible mechanism on atmospheric anomalies and coupling processes are given and discussed as well as future challenges.

  17. Recent experimental results from a long-pulse J-band relativistic klystron amplifier developmental effort

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, K.G.; Crouch, D.D.; Sar, D.R.; Speciale, R.A.; Carlsten, B.E.; Fazio, M.V.; Haynes, W.B.; Stringfield, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    Recent experimental results, supporting simulations, and design modeling are presented from a developmental effort to a produce a long pulse ({approximately}1{mu}s) J-band (5.85-8.2 GHz) relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA) of the high current NRL genealogy. This RKA is designed to operate at approximately 6.6 GHz, with a desired RF output {approximately}700 MW. Conversion of electron beam energy to microwave energy is obtained by a mock magnetically insulated coaxial converter which, in various incarnations, can be made to be either a cavity gap extractor or an inverse cathode.

  18. Recent results on heavy flavor physics from LEP experiments using 1990-92 data

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparini, U.

    1994-12-01

    After three years of data taking, the four LEP experiments collected a total of about four million Z{sup 0} hadronic decays, in which a heavy quark pair (either b{bar b} or c{bar c}) is produced with 40% probability. Results are presented both in the sector of the electroweak precision measurements, with particular emphasis on the beauty quark, and in the determination of the beauty decay properties, where lifetimes and branching ratio measurements take advantage of the large statistics now available and of the recent improvements in the analysis based on microvertex detectors and particle identification devices.

  19. Recent R&D results on LAr LEM TPC and plans for LBNO demonstrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantini, C.; Epprecht, L.; Gendotti, A.; Horikawa, S.; Murphy, S.; Natterer, G.; Periale, L.; Regenfus, C.; Resnati, F.; Rubbia, A.; Sergiampietri, F.; Viant, T.; Wu, S.; LAGUNA-LBNO Collaboration; WA105 Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The double phase Liquid Argon (LAr) Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the state-of-art technology for neutrino detection thanks to its superb 3 Dimensional (3D) tracking and calorimetry performance. Based on this technology, the Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging ExpeRiment (GLACIER) is proposed to be the far detector for the Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation (LBNO) experiment aiming at studying neutrinos 2300 km away from their production point. We report recent R&D results on the charge readout system for GLACIER and the plans to build the GLACIER demonstrators at CERN.

  20. A review of recent results in gamma-ray astronomy obtained from high-altitude balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews recent results in gamma-ray astronomy obtained from experiments flown on high-altitude balloons. New generation balloon-borne imaging experiments have produced the first gamma-ray maps of the Galactic center (GC) region. Balloon flights of new gamma-ray spectrometers with improved sensitivity have provided important new information on the GC annihilation line. For the first time, the narrow 511 keV line as been resolved (FWHM approx. = 3 keV). A very interesting spectral feature at approximately 170 keV has been attributed to backscattered annihilation, probably from the vicinity of a compact object. New results from the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO)/OSSE and Granat/SIGMA experiments on the annihilation line, when considered together with the recent balloon results, have added greatly to our knowledge and understanding of the origin and distribution of this emission. Balloon-borne instruments have made important measurements of gamma-ray continuum and line emission from SN 1987A. The GRIS spectrometer unambiguously resolved the 847 and 1238 keV line emission from radioactive Co-56 synthesized during the explosion. This data indicated that simple spherically symmetric and homogeneous models did not provide an adequate description of the expanding SN shell.

  1. How can evolutionary theory accommodate recent empirical results on organismal senescence?

    PubMed

    Mitteldorf, Joshua; Pepper, John W

    2007-08-01

    According to a prominent recent report, guppies collected from sites lacking predators are inferior in every aspect of their life history profile to those evolved in other, nearby sites with predators present. This is an exception to two classical predictions of evolutionary theory: that low extrinsic mortality should be associated with longer life span, and that higher fertility should be associated with shorter life span. Some theorists have tried to accommodate this and other anomalous results within the standard framework, but we argue that the exceptions they carve out do not explain the results at hand. In fact, the findings suggest that population regulation has been selected at the group level, though this is a mechanism that most theorists regard with suspicion. We conclude by relating the present result to other experiments that seem to point in the same direction.

  2. Recent results on top quark physics and B physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.

    1998-01-01

    We present the recent results on top quark physics and B physics with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). These results come from analyses using a full data sample at an integrated luminosity of 109 pb{sup -1} cross section in 1.8-TeV p{anti p} collisions. We measure the top quark mass to be 175.8{+-}6.5 GeV/c{sup 2} and the t{anti t} production cross section to be 7.6{sup +1.8}{sub -1.5} pb. We also present measurements of the lifetimes of B-hadrons and the time- dependent B{sup 0}-{anti B}{sup 0} mixing which results in the mass difference between heavy and light B{sup 0}{sub d} mesons ({Delta}m{sub d}) of 0.464{+-}0.030(stat){+-}0.026(syst) ps{sup -1}.

  3. Recent Results From The Nasa Earth Science Terra Mission and Future Possibilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomonson, Vincent V.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Earth Sciences Enterprise has made some remarkable strides in recent times in using developing, implementing, and utilizing spaceborne observations to better understand how the Earth works as a coupled, interactive system of the land, ocean, and atmosphere. Notable examples include the Upper Atmosphere Research (UARS) Satellite, the Topology Ocean Experiment (TOPEX) mission, Landsat-7, SeaWiFS, the Tropical Rainfall Monitoring Mission (TRMM), Quickscatt, the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), and, quite recently, the Terra'/Earth Observing System-1 mission. The Terra mission, for example, represents a major step forward in providing sensors that offer considerable advantages and progress over heritage instruments. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS), the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), the Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT), the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emissions and Reflections (ASTER) radiometer, and the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) radiometer are the instruments involved. Early indications in March indicate that each of these instruments are working well and will be augmenting data bases from heritage instruments as well as producing new, unprecedented observations of land, ocean, and atmosphere features. Several missions will follow the Terra mission as the Earth Observing mission systems complete development and go into operation. These missions include EOS PM-1/'Aqua', Icesat, Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL), Jason/TOPEX Follow-on, the Chemistry mission, etc. As the Earth Observing systems completes its first phase in about 2004 a wealth of data enabling better understanding of the Earth and the management of its resources will have been provided. Considerable thought is beginning to be placed on what advances in technology can be implemented that will enable further advances in the early part of the 21st century; e.g., in the time from of 2020. Concepts such as

  4. P-MaNGA: GRADIENTS IN RECENT STAR FORMATION HISTORIES AS DIAGNOSTICS FOR GALAXY GROWTH AND DEATH

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Cheng; Wang, Enci; Lin, Lin; Xiao, Ting; Bershady, Matthew A.; Tremonti, Christy A.; Bundy, Kevin; Cheung, Edmond; Yan, Renbin; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael; Gelfand, Joseph; Cales, Sabrina; Cherinka, Brian; Law, David R.; Drory, Niv; Emsellem, Eric; Fu, Hai; Lin, Lihwai; MacDonald, Nick; and others

    2015-05-10

    We present an analysis of the data produced by the MaNGA prototype run (P-MaNGA), aiming to test how the radial gradients in recent star formation histories, as indicated by the 4000 Å break (D{sub n}(4000)), Hδ absorption (EW(Hδ{sub A})), and Hα emission (EW(Hα)) indices, can be useful for understanding disk growth and star formation cessation in local galaxies. We classify 12 galaxies observed on two P-MaNGA plates as either centrally quiescent (CQ) or centrally star-forming (CSF), according to whether D{sub n}(4000) measured in the central spaxel of each datacube exceeds 1.6. For each spaxel we generate both 2D maps and radial profiles of D{sub n}(4000), EW(Hδ{sub A}), and EW(Hα). We find that CSF galaxies generally show very weak or no radial variation in these diagnostics. In contrast, CQ galaxies present significant radial gradients, in the sense that D{sub n}(4000) decreases, while both EW(Hδ{sub A}) and EW(Hα) increase from the galactic center outward. The outer regions of the galaxies show greater scatter on diagrams relating the three parameters than their central parts. In particular, the clear separation between centrally measured quiescent and star-forming galaxies in these diagnostic planes is largely filled in by the outer parts of galaxies whose global colors place them in the green valley, supporting the idea that the green valley represents a transition between blue-cloud and red-sequence phases, at least in our small sample. These results are consistent with a picture in which the cessation of star formation propagates from the center of a galaxy outward as it moves to the red sequence.

  5. P-MaNGA: Gradients in Recent Star Formation Histories as Diagnostics for Galaxy Growth and Death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Wang, Enci; Lin, Lin; Bershady, Matthew A.; Bundy, Kevin; Tremonti, Christy A.; Xiao, Ting; Yan, Renbin; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael; Cales, Sabrina; Cherinka, Brian; Cheung, Edmond; Drory, Niv; Emsellem, Eric; Fu, Hai; Gelfand, Joseph; Law, David R.; Lin, Lihwai; MacDonald, Nick; Maraston, Claudia; Masters, Karen L.; Merrifield, Michael R.; Pan, Kaike; Sánchez, S. F.; Schneider, Donald P.; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David; Wang, Lixin; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Wilkinson, David; Yoachim, Peter; Zhang, Kai; Zheng, Tiantian

    2015-05-01

    We present an analysis of the data produced by the MaNGA prototype run (P-MaNGA), aiming to test how the radial gradients in recent star formation histories, as indicated by the 4000 Å break (Dn(4000)), Hδ absorption (EW(HδA)), and Hα emission (EW(Hα)) indices, can be useful for understanding disk growth and star formation cessation in local galaxies. We classify 12 galaxies observed on two P-MaNGA plates as either centrally quiescent (CQ) or centrally star-forming (CSF), according to whether Dn(4000) measured in the central spaxel of each datacube exceeds 1.6. For each spaxel we generate both 2D maps and radial profiles of Dn(4000), EW(HδA), and EW(Hα). We find that CSF galaxies generally show very weak or no radial variation in these diagnostics. In contrast, CQ galaxies present significant radial gradients, in the sense that Dn(4000) decreases, while both EW(HδA) and EW(Hα) increase from the galactic center outward. The outer regions of the galaxies show greater scatter on diagrams relating the three parameters than their central parts. In particular, the clear separation between centrally measured quiescent and star-forming galaxies in these diagnostic planes is largely filled in by the outer parts of galaxies whose global colors place them in the green valley, supporting the idea that the green valley represents a transition between blue-cloud and red-sequence phases, at least in our small sample. These results are consistent with a picture in which the cessation of star formation propagates from the center of a galaxy outward as it moves to the red sequence.

  6. Diagnostic impact of routine Lyme serology in recent-onset arthritis: results from the ESPOIR cohort

    PubMed Central

    Guellec, Dewi; Narbonne, Valérie; Cornec, Divi; Marhadour, Thierry; Varache, Sophie; Dougados, Maxime; Daurès, Jean Pierre; Jousse-Joulin, Sandrine; Devauchelle-Pensec, Valérie; Saraux, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Lyme disease may be considered by rheumatologists in patients with recent-onset arthritis, even in the absence of suggestive symptoms. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic impact of routine Lyme serology in a French cohort of patients with recent-onset arthritis affecting at least 2 joints. Methods We performed an ancillary study of a French prospective multicentre cohort established to monitor clinical, biological and radiographic data in patients with inflammatory arthritis in at least 2 joints, lasting for 6 weeks to 6 months. Borrelia IgM and IgG antibodies were sought routinely at baseline, using ELISA tests, independently from the physician's strategy for detecting a spirochetal infection. We recorded the proportion of patients with a final diagnosis of Lyme arthritis and evaluated the diagnostic performance of Lyme serology in this particular context. The clinical and biological characteristics of patients according to the Lyme serology results were analysed. Results Of 810 patients, 657 (81.1%) were negative for IgM and IgG antibodies, 91 (11.2%) had only IgM antibodies, 49 (6%) had only IgG antibodies, and 13 (1.6%) had IgG and IgM antibodies. Thus, 7.6% had IgG positivity, consistent with exposure to Borrelia infection. IgG positivity was significantly more prevalent in the North and North-East regions of France (χ2=14.6, p<0.001). No patients received a definite diagnosis of Lyme arthritis. Conclusions This study does not support routine Lyme serological testing in patients with recent-onset inflammatory arthritis affecting more than 1 joint. PMID:26819751

  7. Some aspects of polymer translocation dynamics through nanopore: comparison of recent the theories with simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Aniket

    2012-02-01

    Translocation of a flexible poymer chain through a narrow pore has still remained an active field of research. Earlier theoretical studies of Sung and Park,ootnotetextW. Sung and P. J. Park, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 783 (1996). Muthukumar,ootnotetextM. Muthukumar, J. Chem. Phys. 111, 10371 (1999). Chuang, Kantor and Kardar, Kantor and KardarootnotetextJ. Chuang, Y. Kantor and M. Kardar, Phys. Rev. E 65, 011802 (2001); Y. Kantor and M. Kardar, ibid. 69, 021806 (2004). for a flexible chain have been complemented by more recent theories of SakaueootnotetextT. Sakaue, Phys. Rev. E 76, 021803 (2007); ibid. 81, 041808 (2010). where tension propagation(TP) along the chain backbone at the cis side resulting in a nonuniform stretching of the chain has been proposed to be a key input for theoretical studies. Recently these elements of the TP theory has been incorporated in to a Brownian dynamics (BDTP) scheme and numerical studies of the equations of motion are in excellent agreement with prior simulation studies.ootnotetextT. Ikonen, A. Bhattacharya, T. Ala-Nissila and W. Sung (submitted). A driven translocating chain is essentially out-of-equilibriumootnotetextA. Bhattacharya and Kurt Binder, Phys. Rev. E. 81, 041804 (2010); A. Bhattacharya et al., Eur. Phys. J. E 29, 423 (2009). which results in cis-trans asymmetries both in ocnformations and in dynamics. Therefore, results from theoretical studies should capture these features. In this talk first I will first present results from Langevin dynamics simulation citing several cases where how this cis-trans asymmetry affects the chain conformations and the translocation dynamics. Then I will dicuss relevance of these results in the context of exisiting theories.

  8. Fundamentals and recent results of super high-efficiency solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Ikeda, Kazuma; Takamoto, Tatsuya; Kojima, Nobuaki; Ohshita, Yoshio

    2014-06-01

    III-V compound multi-junction (MJ) solar cells have great potential for space and terrestrial applications because they have high efficiency potential of more than 50% and superior radiation-resistance. Recently, more than 40% efficiency cells were reported by Fraunhofer ISE, Spectrolab, Sharp and others. Concentrator 4-junction or 5-junction solar cells have great potential for realizing super high-efficiency of over 50%. In order to realize super high-efficiency of more than 50%, it is substantially important to understand and reduce several losses of solar cells. This paper reviews loss mechanism for III-V compound solar cells and MJ solar cells. In addition, recent results under the EU-Japan Collaborative Research on Concentrator Photovoltaics are also presented. The conversion efficiency of inverted epitaxially grown InGaP/GaAs/InGaAs triple-junction solar cells has been improved to 37.9% (1-sun, AM1.5G) and 44.4% (250- 300 suns) as a result of proposing double-hetero structure wide-band-gap tunnel junctions, and inverted epitaxial growth.

  9. Interpreting the recent results on direct searches for dark matter particles in terms of relic neutralinos

    SciTech Connect

    Bottino, A.; Donato, F.; Fornengo, N.; Scopel, S.

    2008-10-15

    The most recent results from direct searches for dark matter particles in the Galactic halo are examined in terms of an effective minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model at the electroweak scale without unification of gaugino masses. We show that the annual-modulation effect at 8.2{sigma} C.L. recently presented by the DAMA Collaboration, as the result of a combined analysis of the DAMA/NaI and the DAMA/LIBRA experiments for a total exposure of 0.82 ton yr, fits remarkably well with what is expected for relic neutralinos for a wide variety of weakly interacting massive particle distribution functions. Bounds derivable from other measurements of direct searches for dark matter particles are analyzed. We stress the role played by the uncertainties affecting the neutralino-quark couplings arising from the involved hadronic quantities. We also examine how present data on cosmic antiprotons can help in constraining the neutralino configurations selected by the DAMA effect, in connection with the values of the astrophysical parameters. Perspectives for measurements of antideuterons, possibly produced in the Galactic halo by self-annihilation of neutralinos belonging to the DAMA configurations, are examined. Finally, we discuss how findings at the LHC would impact on these issues.

  10. Recent star formation in the Lupus clouds as seen by Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygl, K. L. J.; Benedettini, M.; Schisano, E.; Elia, D.; Molinari, S.; Pezzuto, S.; André, Ph.; Bernard, J. P.; White, G. J.; Polychroni, D.; Bontemps, S.; Cox, N. L. J.; Di Francesco, J.; Facchini, A.; Fallscheer, C.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Hennemann, M.; Hill, T.; Könyves, V.; Minier, V.; Motte, F.; Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Peretto, N.; Pestalozzi, M.; Sadavoy, S.; Schneider, N.; Spinoglio, L.; Testi, L.; Ward-Thompson, D.

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of the star formation histories of the Lupus I, III, and IV clouds using the Herschel 70-500 μm maps obtained by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey Key Project. By combining the new Herschel data with the existing Spitzer catalog we obtained an unprecedented census of prestellar sources and young stellar objects in the Lupus clouds, which allowed us to study the overall star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE). The high SFE of Lupus III, its decreasing SFR, and its large number of pre-main sequence stars with respect to proto- and prestellar sources, suggest that Lupus III is the most evolved cloud, and after having experienced a major star formation event in the past, is now approaching the end of its current star-forming cycle. Lupus I is currently undergoing a large star formation event, apparent by the increasing SFR, the large number of prestellar objects with respect to more evolved objects, and the high percentage of material at high extinction (e.g., above AV ≈ 8 mag). Also Lupus IV has an increasing SFR; however, the relative number of prestellar sources is much lower, suggesting that its star formation has not yet reached its peak. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. Recent Star Formation in the Lupus Clouds as Seen by Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygl, Kazi L. J.; Benedettini, Milena

    We present a study of the star formation histories of the Lupus I, III, and IV clouds using the Herschel 70-500 μm maps obtained by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey Key-Project. By combining the new Herschel data with the existing Spitzer catalog we obtained an unprecedented census of prestellar sources and young stellar objects in the Lupus clouds, which allowed us to study the overall star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE). The high SFE of Lupus III and its decreasing SFR suggest that Lupus III is the most evolved cloud, that after having experienced a major star formation event, is now approaching the end of its current star-forming cycle. Lupus I is currently undergoing a large star formation event, apparent by the increasing SFR. Also Lupus IV has an increasing SFR, however, the relative number of prestellar sources is much lower than in Lupus I, suggesting that its star formation has not yet reached its peak.

  12. The Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model: A brief review and some recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebhan, Anton

    2015-05-01

    A brief review of the Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model is given, which is a top-down holographic model of low-energy QCD with chiral quarks derived from type-IIA superstring theory. The main predictions of the model, in particular concerning meson spectra, the gluon condensate, the QCD string tension, the mass of the η' and of baryons are discussed and compared quantitatively with available experimental and/or lattice results. Then some recent results of potential interest to the physics program at the future FAIR facility are presented: The spectrum of glueballs and their decay rates into pions, and the phase diagram of QCD at finite temperature, density, and magnetic field strength.

  13. Recent results for electron scattering from biomolecules and molecules formed due to plasma treatment of biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunger, Michael

    2016-09-01

    We have been concentrating our recent experimental studies, for determining absolute cross sections, on both biomolecules (e.g. pyrimidine and benzoquinone) and molecules that result when biomass undergoes treatment by plasmas (e.g. phenol and furfural). All this work was supported and informed by computations from the Brazilian SMC groups and the Madrid IAM-SCAR group. A major rationale for these investigations was to provide cross section data for relevant modelling studies, and in this talk I will also present some results from those modelling studies. Possible further investigations will be canvassed in this presentation. Work done in conjunction with: D. B. Jones, L. Campbell, R. D. White, S. J. Buckman, M. A. P. Lima, M. C. A. Lopes, M. H. F. Bettega, M. T. do N. Varella, R. F. da Costa, G. García, P. Limão-Vieira, D. H. Madison, O. Ingólfsson and many other friends and colleagues.

  14. REFLECTIONS ON MY CONTRIBUTIONS TO PARTICLE PHYSICS AND RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    SAMIOS,N.P.

    2002-01-18

    My talk today will be composed of two parts. The first part will consist of a summary of some of my experimental contributions over the years. It will not be exhaustive but will highlight the findings that had relevance to the progress of our understanding of particle physics as it has evolved over the years. This section will be divided into three periods: Early, Intermediate and Late, with an in depth discussion of a few of the more significant results. The second part will consist of a discussion of the recently completed Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) machine at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). This will encompass the parameters of the accelerator and some of the interesting and exciting early experimental results emanating from this machine.

  15. Recent results on exclusive hadronic cross sections measurements at BaBar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Roger

    2017-01-01

    The BaBar Collaboration has an intensive program studying hadronic cross sections in low-energy e+e- annihilations, accessible via initial-state radiation. Our measurements allow significant improvements in the precision of the predicted value of the muon anomalous magnetic moment. These improvements are necessary for shedding light on the current 3 sigma difference between the predicted and the experimental values. We have published results on a number of processes with two to six hadrons in the final state, and other final state are currently under investigation. We report here on the most recent results obtained by analysing the entire BaBar dataset, including the , and other final states.

  16. Recent results with a combined gamma-ray and neutron imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soundara-Pandian, L.; Whitney, C. M.; Johnson, E. B.; Vinci, R.; Glodo, J.; Christian, J. F.; Gervais, J.; Vogel, Sam; Nagarkar, E.; Robertson, F.; Squillante, M. S.; Waer, P.; Squillante, M. R.

    2014-09-01

    Numerous instruments have been developed for performing gamma-ray imaging and neutron imaging for research, nondestructive testing, medicine and national security. However, none are capable of imaging gamma-rays and neutrons simultaneously while also discriminating gamma-rays from the neutron. This paper will describe recent experimental results obtained using a gamma/neutron camera based on Cs2LiYCl6:Ce (CLYC) scintillation crystals, which can discriminate gamma-rays from neutrons. The ability to do this while also having good energy resolution provides a powerful capability for detecting and identifying shielded special nuclear materials for security applications. Also discussed are results obtained using a LaBr3 scintillation crystal.

  17. Recent results with HV-CMOS and planar sensors for the CLIC vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour Tehrani, Niloufar

    2017-02-01

    The physics aims for the future multi-TeV e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) impose high precision requirements on the vertex detector which has to match the experimental conditions, such as the time structure of the collisions and the presence of beam-induced backgrounds. The principal challenges are: a point resolution of 3 μm , 10 ns time stamping capabilities, low mass (∼0.2% X0 per layer), low power dissipation and pulsed power operation. Recent results of test beam measurements and GEANT4 simulations for assemblies with Timepix3 ASICs and thin active-edge sensors are presented. The 65 nm CLICpix readout ASIC with 25 μm pitch was bump bonded to planar silicon sensors and also capacitively coupled through a thin layer of glue to active HV-CMOS sensors. Test beam results for these two hybridisation concepts are presented.

  18. Estimation of motility parameters from trajectory data. A condensate of our recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestergaard, C. L.; Pedersen, J. N.; Mortensen, K. I.; Flyvbjerg, H.

    2015-07-01

    Given a theoretical model for a self-propelled particle or micro-organism, how does one optimally determine the parameters of the model from experimental data in the form of a time-lapse recorded trajectory? For very long trajectories, one has very good statistics, and optimality may matter little. However, for biological micro-organisms, one may not control the duration of recordings, and then optimality can matter. This is especially the case if one is interested in individuality and hence cannot improve statistics by taking population averages over many trajectories. One can learn much about this problem by studying its simplest case, pure diffusion with no self-propagation. This is an interesting problem also in its own right for the very same reasons: interest in individuality and short trajectories. We summarize our recent results on this latter issue here and speculate about the extent to which similar results may be obtained also for self-propelled particles.

  19. Atmospheric escape due to solar wind interaction: Recent results from Mars and Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, S.; Fedorov, A.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract Non-magnetized planets lose their atmospheres due to interaction with the solar wind. The atmospheric gasses are ionized and a fraction of the ions is accelerated to velocities above the escape velocity by, for example, convectional electric fields, polarization fields, or as result of plasma instabilities at the interface boundary. We review the recent results from the plasma packages onboard ESA Mars and Venus Express on the escape rates from Mars and Venus for the solar minimum conditions. We also compare these new data with the previous measurements at Mars and Venus for the solar maximum as well as with the escape due to the solar wind interaction with the magnetized planet Earth.

  20. Laboratory analyses of micron-sized solid grains: Experimental techniques and recent results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colangeli, L.; Bussoletti, E.; Blanco, A.; Borghesi, A.; Fonti, S.; Orofino, V.; Schwehm, G.

    1989-01-01

    Morphological and spectrophotometric investigations have been extensively applied in the past years to various kinds of micron and/or submicron-sized grains formed by materials which are candidate to be present in space. The samples are produced in the laboratory and then characterized in their physio-chemical properties. Some of the most recent results obtained on various kinds of carbonaceous materials are reported. Main attention is devoted to spectroscopic results in the VUV and IR wavelength ranges, where many of the analyzed samples show typical fingerprints which can be identified also in astrophysical and cometary materials. The laboratory methodologies used so far are also critically discussed in order to point out capabilities and present limitations, in the view of possible application to returned comet samples. Suggestions are given to develop new techniques which should overcome some of the problems faced in the manipulation and analysis of micron solid samples.

  1. “Hot Hand” on Strike: Bowling Data Indicates Correlation to Recent Past Results, Not Causality

    PubMed Central

    Yaari, Gur; David, Gil

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the “hot hand” phenomenon regained interest due to the availability and accessibility of large scale data sets from the world of sports. In support of common wisdom and in contrast to the original conclusions of the seminal paper about this phenomenon by Gilovich, Vallone and Tversky in 1985, solid evidences were supplied in favor of the existence of this phenomenon in different kinds of data. This came after almost three decades of ongoing debates whether the “hot hand” phenomenon in sport is real or just a mis-perception of human subjects of completely random patterns present in reality. However, although this phenomenon was shown to exist in different sports data including basketball free throws and bowling strike rates, a somehow deeper question remained unanswered: are these non random patterns results of causal, short term, feedback mechanisms or simply time fluctuations of athletes performance. In this paper, we analyze large amounts of data from the Professional Bowling Association(PBA). We studied the results of the top 100 players in terms of the number of available records (summed into more than 450,000 frames). By using permutation approach and dividing the analysis into different aggregation levels we were able to supply evidence for the existence of the “hot hand” phenomenon in the data, in agreement with previous studies. Moreover, by using this approach, we were able to demonstrate that there are, indeed, significant fluctuations from game to game for the same player but there is no clustering of successes (strikes) and failures (non strikes) within each game. Thus we were lead to the conclusion that bowling results show correlation to recent past results but they are not influenced by them in a causal manner. PMID:22253898

  2. Wind slab formation in snow: experimental setup and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Christian; Lehning, Michael; Fierz, Charles

    2016-04-01

    The formation of wind-hardened surface layers, also known as wind slabs or wind crusts, is studied. Better knowledge about which processes and parameters are important will lead to an improved understanding of the mass balances in polar and alpine areas. It will also improve snow-cover models (i.e. SNOWPACK) as well as the forecast of avalanche danger. A ring-shaped wind tunnel has been built and instrumented. The facility is ring-shaped to simulate an infinitely long snow surface (infinite fetch). A SnowMicroPen (SMP) is used to measure the snow hardness. Other sensors measure environmental conditions such as wind velocity, air temperature, air humidity, the temperature of the snow and of the snow surface. A camera is used to detect drifting particles and to measure the Specific Surface Area (SSA) at the snow surface via near-infrared photography. First experiments indicate that mechanical fragmentation followed by sintering is the most efficient process to harden the surface. The hardness increased rapidly during drifting snow events, but only slowly or not at all when the wind speed was kept below the threshold for drifting snow. With drifting, the penetration resistance increased from the original 0.07 N to around 0.3 N in about an hour. Without drifting, a slow, further increase in resistance was observed. In about six hours, the hardness of the top 1-2 cm increased to 0.5 N. During this eight-hour experiment consisting of about two hours with intermittent drifting and six hours without drifting, the density at the surface increased from 66 kg/m3 to around 170 kg/m3. In the unaffected region close to the ground, the density increased from 100 kg/m3 to 110 kg/m3.

  3. Involvement of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in Formation, Consolidation, and Reconsolidation of Recent and Remote Contextual Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einarsson, Einar O.; Nader, Karim

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that memories become more stable and less susceptible to the disruption of reconsolidation over weeks after learning. Here, we test this by targeting the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and test its involvement in the formation, consolidation, and reconsolidation of recent and remote contextual fear memory. We found that…

  4. Involvement of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in Formation, Consolidation, and Reconsolidation of Recent and Remote Contextual Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einarsson, Einar O.; Nader, Karim

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that memories become more stable and less susceptible to the disruption of reconsolidation over weeks after learning. Here, we test this by targeting the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and test its involvement in the formation, consolidation, and reconsolidation of recent and remote contextual fear memory. We found that…

  5. Element-specific magnetic imaging with an x-ray microscope with 25 nm resolution: recent results and future goals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denbeaux, Gregory; Chao, Weilun; Pearson, Angelic; Schneider, Gerd; Kusinski, Greg; Fischer, Peter

    2002-03-01

    The XM-1 soft x-ray microscope, located at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been used to image magnetization with 25 nm spatial resolution. The microscope illumination can be adjusted between 300 and 1800 eV allowing element-specific magnetic imaging with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism contrast for various elements including for Fe, Co, Ni, and Gd. This has been demonstrated to have a high sensitivity, which allows imaging of magnetic layers as thin as 3 nm. Since the imaging is photon-based, the presence of an applied magnetic field during imaging does not disrupt the image formation. Currently, samples can be imaged in an applied field of up to 3000 Oe. We will show recent results of high-resolution, element specific imaging of various multilayers and patterned structures.

  6. [Results-based management and health development strategies: some reflections on recent experiences in Africa].

    PubMed

    Wone, Issa; Nedhirou Hamed, Mohamed; Tal Dia, Anta

    2012-01-01

    The Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness (PD), launched in 2005, and the International Health Partnership (IHP+) have promoted a results-based management approach (RBM) to health care based on 6 principles: simplicity, action-based learning, accountability, adaptability, partnership, and transparency. These principles have been implemented in the form of health policies as part of the development and implementation of National Health Sector Strategic Plans. The recent experience of several African countries provides an indication of the strengths and weaknesses of results-based management in the health sector. In Senegal, inadequate training has resulted in inadequate planning, particularly in the development of the Medium-Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF). In its last Health Sector Strategic Plan, Burundi, against all results-based logic, allocated 93 % of its budget to the central level, compared to just 1 % and 6 % respectively to the intermediate and peripheral levels. In Mauritania, the state has not complied with the MTEF, despite the significant increase in the resources allocated to the health sector. By contrast, in Rwanda, there has been a significant improvement in health indicators as a result of the harmonious development of the HSSP and the related MTEF and compliance with the budget. These challenges require an extensive use of RBM through improved governance in the health sector and capacity building.

  7. Recent results in explosive and s-process nucleosynthesis from measurements on radioactive and stable targets

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, P.E.; Kaeppeler, F.; Schatz, H.

    1993-07-01

    Measurements of (n,p) and (n,{alpha}) cross sections are crucial for a better understanding of many scenarios of nucleosynthesis. Current problems in which such reactions play a roll include the possible synthesis of heavy element during the big bang. The production of several rare isotopes in explosive nucleosynthesis, and a better understanding of the role of the s process in the synthesis of light and intermediate mass nuclei. We have recently completed measurements of several (n,p) and (n,{alpha}) cross sections of importance to nuclear astrophysics. The cross sections were measured in the range from thermal energy to approximately 1 MeV by using the white neutron source at the Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) in Los Alamos. We have also made complementary measurements at the Karlsruhe Van de Graaff and at thee Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). We discuss the impact of the results on nuclear astrophysics as well as recent improvements and future plans.

  8. Future paths for HIV vaccine research: Exploiting results from recent clinical trials and current scientific advances.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Geetha P; Malaspina, Angela; Flores, Jorge

    2010-02-01

    More than 60 million individuals have been infected with HIV and approximately half of these individuals have died since the epidemic started. The quest for an effective vaccine to prevent HIV transmission, which is likely to be the most effective approach to halt the epidemic, has been and continues to be an insurmountable challenge. Traditional vaccine strategies that have been effective for other vaccines have proven unsuccessful or impractical for HIV because of safety concerns. Nonetheless, substantial efforts have been directed at the development and clinical testing of HIV vaccines during the past two decades. Four major HIV vaccine efficacy trials conducted by VaxGen Inc (AIDSVAX 003 and AIDSVAX 004) and the NIH-supported HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN 502 and HVTN 503) failed to demonstrate efficacy; however, a recent trial conducted in Thailand (RV144 trial) demonstrated a low level of efficacy, resulting in some renewed optimism. Dissecting the causes for vaccine failure and, more importantly, for the partial level of efficacy observed in the RV144 trial should provide important guidance to the field. This review discusses the ongoing HIV vaccine trials and also highlights recent scientific advances that have provided the field with new leads to invigorate the search for effective vaccines.

  9. Global Electromagnetic Imaging of Lithosphere and Upper Mantle from Space and Ground. Recent Results and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvshinov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Electrical conductivity is one of the characteristic physical parameters of materials making up Earth's interior which is sensitive to variations of temperature, chemical composition, water content, and partial melt. As a consequence, estimating lithosphere and upper mantle (LUM) electrical conductivity structure is a potentially strong tool for mapping their chemistry, mineralogy and physical structure thus presenting a complementary method to seismic studies that focus on LUM elastic properties. Global electromagnetic (EM) studies, which provide information on LUM electrical conductivity, have attracted increasing interest during the last decade, mainly for three reasons. A primary reason is the recent growth in the amount of EM data available, especially from low-Earth orbiting magnetic satellite missions (Oersted, CHAMP, SAC-C, and Swarm). A second reason is the great interest in the characterization of the three-dimensional properties of Earth's interior on a global scale. Finally, the interest has also resulted from the significant methodological progress made during the last years in EM data analysis, forward modelling and inversion. In this talk I will summarize advances and challenges in EM data interpretation, and present recent global and regional models of LUM conductivity derived from satellite and ground-based data. I will also discuss possible topics for future research.

  10. Eosinophilia predicts poor clinical outcomes in recent-onset arthritis: results from the ESPOIR cohort

    PubMed Central

    Guellec, Dewi; Milin, Morgane; Cornec, Divi; Tobon, Gabriel J; Marhadour, Thierry; Jousse-Joulin, Sandrine; Chiocchia, Gilles; Vittecocq, Olivier; Devauchelle-Pensec, Valérie; Saraux, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of eosinophilia in patients with recent-onset arthritis suggestive of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to describe their features and outcomes. Methods We performed an ancillary study of data from a French prospective multicentre cohort study monitoring clinical, laboratory and radiographic data in patients with inflammatory arthritis of 6 weeks to 6 months duration. We determined the proportion of patients with eosinophilia, defined as a count >500/mm3, at baseline and after 3 years. Features of patients with and without baseline eosinophilia were compared. Results Baseline eosinophilia was evidenced in 26 of 804 (3.2%) patients; their mean eosinophil count was 637.7±107/mm3. Baseline eosinophilia was ascribed to atopic syndrome in 6 of 26 (23.1%) patients. After 3 years, patients with eosinophilia had higher Health Assessment Questionnaire scores (0.9 vs 0.5, p=0.004), higher patient visual analogue scale activity score and morning stiffness intensity (p=0.05), and were more often taking disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (p=0.02). Baseline eosinophilia was not associated with presence of extra-articular manifestations. Conclusions Eosinophilia is rare in recent-onset arthritis suggestive of RA, and is usually directly related to the rheumatic disease. Our data suggest that patients with mild eosinophilia at diagnosis could respond worse to the treatment than those without. PMID:26509068

  11. Understanding Gully Formation and Seasonal Flows on Recent and Current Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.; Glines, Natalie

    2016-10-01

    The discoveries of gullies and seasonal slope flows (RSL) have re-ignited the debate over various channel, valley, and gully formation mechanisms on Mars. The controversy over whether liquid water was involved with gully formation, harkens back to the mid-1970s to early 2000s, where catastrophic flooding, surface runnoff and ground-water sapping processes were strongly debated along with other mechanisms as the primary processes responsible for channel and valley formation on Mars. However, over the past decade, the value of multiple working hypotheses has again become apparent, this time in understanding the formation of Martian gullies and Recurring Slope Lineae. Various mechanisms put forth to explain these landforms include liquid H2O/ice erosion, CO2 ice/frost sublimation, CO2 ice block sliding, water and brine flows, salt deliquescence, and dry granular flows, among others.We carried out detailed morphologic/morphometric studies of gullies in various environmental settings on Mars to evaluate the potential formation processes. Using HiRISE images and DTMs, we mapped and generated detailed longitudinal and cross-sectional profiles of gully systems and estimated volumes for both the gullies and their debris aprons. Several gullies form highly integrated patterns similar to fluvial systems. Additionally, RSL are often found either in the tributaries of these integrated systems or in adjacent regions, implying that RSL may play a role in initiating gully formation or mark the last vestiges of water activity in these locations. We also find that the more highly integrated gullies have volumes significantly larger than their aprons, suggesting that the missing volumes (~40-60% or more) were likely the volatiles involved in gully formation. Additionally, THEMIS and TES surface temperatures of these integrated gully sites, many of which also contain RSL, are at or above freezing seasonally suggesting that the volatile component may be consistent with H2O although CO2

  12. Recent Results from a Laboratory Study of Charging Mechanisms in a Dusty Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venturini, Catherine C.; Spann, James F., Jr.; Comfort, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    A laboratory investigation has been developed to experimentally study the interaction of micron sized particles with plasmas and electromagnetic radiation. The intent is to investigate under what conditions particles of various compositions and sizes become charged, or discharged, while exposed to an electron beam and UV radiation. This investigation uses a unique laboratory technique known as electrodynamic suspension of particles. Here, a single charged micron size particle is suspended in a quadrupole trap and then subjected to a controlled environment. In this paper, we will discuss recent results from this experiment in which different materials including polystyrene and aluminum oxide, and sizes ranging from 10 microns to 1 micron have been used to determine charge to mass ratios and then subjected to an electron beam and /or UV radiation. In each instance, the particle's charge as well as beam current flux and radiation intensity flux is measured. These results will be compared with initial results using salt crystals. It was found that a negatively charged salt crystal exposed for 30 minutes to a 500 eV electron beam with primary electron beam current of -3.06 x 10(exp -5) picoamps yielded a secondary electron current of 3.23 x 10(exp -5) picoamps. Additionally, the particle was observed to be steadily losing charge over this time interval. By studying the microphysics of one particle, a better understanding of theoretical models and other laboratory results associated with particle charging mechanisms can be achieved.

  13. Summary and recent results from the NASA advanced High Speed Propeller Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, G. A.; Mikkelson, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    Advanced high-speed propellers offer large performance improvements for aircraft that cruise in the Mach 0.7 to 0.8 speed regime. The current status of the NASA research program on high-speed propeller aerodynamics, acoustics, and aeroelastics is described. Recent wind tunnel results for five 8- to 10-blade advanced models are compared with analytical predictions. Test results show that blade sweep was important in achieving net efficiencies near 80 percent at Mach 0.8 and reducing near-field cruise noise by dB. Lifting line and lifting surface aerodynamic analysis codes are under development and some initial lifting line results are compared with propeller force and probe data. Some initial laser velocimeter measurements of the flow field velocities of an 8-bladed 45 deg swept propeller are shown. Experimental aeroelastic results indicate that cascade effects and blade sweep strongly affect propeller aeroelastic characteristics. Comparisons of propeller near-field noise data with linear acoustic theory indicate that the theory adequate predicts near-field noise for subsonic tip speeds but overpredicts the noise for supersonic tip speeds. Potential large gains in propeller efficiency of 7 to 11 percent at Mach 0.8 may be possible with advanced counter-rotation propellers.

  14. Recent resonance results measured with the ALICE detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalcin, Serpil; Uysal, Ayben Karasu

    2017-02-01

    Resonances are extremely short lived particles (τ ˜ 10-23 s). Due to their lifetime, they may decay, re-scatter and regenerate between chemical and kinetic freeze-outs. For this reason, they are very significant probes to understand the evolution of the medium and particle production mechanism in heavy ion collisions. Different than other particles, resonance properties such as mass, width and yield can be modified by the medium created in the relativistic collisions. Moreover, comparison of resonances produced in different collisions provide evidences about possible in medium effects and system size dependency of their production. ALICE (A Large Heavy Ion Experiment) is one of the detectors at the LHC specifically designed to investigate the features of the quark gluon plasma (QGP). In this proceeding, the recent ALICE resonance results in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC energies are presented.

  15. Recent trends in published occupational cancer epidemiology research: results from a comprehensive review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Raj, Priyanka; Hohenadel, Karin; Demers, Paul A; Zahm, Shelia Hoar; Blair, Aaron

    2014-03-01

    To assess trends in occupational cancer epidemiology research through a literature review of occupational health and epidemiology journals. Fifteen journals were reviewed from 1991 to 2009, and characteristics of articles that assessed the risk of cancer associated with an occupation, industry, or occupational exposure, were incorporated into a database. The number of occupational cancer epidemiology articles published annually declined in recent years (2003 onwards) in the journals reviewed. The number of articles presenting dose-response analyses increased over the review period, from 29% in the first 4 years of review to 49% in the last 4 years. There has been a decrease in the number of occupational cancer epidemiology articles published annually during the review period. The results of these articles help determine the carcinogenicity of workplace exposures and permissible exposure limits, both of which may be hindered with a decline in research. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Recent Results from the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, S. R.; Horne, K.; Street, R. A.; Pollaco, D. L.; James, D.; Tsapras, Y.; Collier Cameron, A.

    WASP0 is a prototype for what is intended to become a collection of WASPs whose primary aim is to detect transiting extrasolar planets across the face of their parent star. The WASP0 instrument is a wide-field (9-degree) 6.3 cm aperture F/2.8 Apogee 10 CCD camera (2Kx2K chip, 16-arcsec pixels). The camera is mounted piggy-back on a commercial 10-inch Meade telescope. We present some recent results from the WASP camera, including observations from La Palma of the known transiting planet around HD 209458 and preliminary analysis of other stars located in the same field. We also outline further problems which restrict the ability to achieve photon limited precision with a wide-field commercial CCD.

  17. Nonlinear Schrödinger equation on graphs: recent results and open problems.

    PubMed

    Noja, Diego

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, an introduction to the new subject of nonlinear dispersive Hamiltonian equations on graphs is given. The focus is on recently established properties of solutions in the case of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation. Special consideration is given to the existence and behaviour of solitary solutions. Two subjects are discussed in some detail concerning the NLS equation on a star graph: the standing waves of the NLS equation on a graph with a δ interaction at the vertex, and the scattering of fast solitons through a Y-junction in the cubic case. The emphasis is on a description of concepts and results and on physical context, without reporting detailed proofs; some perspectives and more ambitious open problems are discussed.

  18. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results for direct reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.

    2014-05-01

    The Trojan Horse method is a powerful indirect technique to determine the astrophysical factor for binary rearrangement processes A+x→b+B at astrophysical energies by measuring the cross section for the Trojan Horse (TH) reaction A+a→B+b+s in quasi free kinematics. The Trojan Horse Method has been successfully applied to many reactions of astrophysical interest, both direct and resonant. In this paper, we will focus on direct sub-processes. The theory of the THM for direct binary reactions will be shortly presented based on a few-body approach that takes into account the off-energy-shell effects and initial and final state interactions. Examples of recent results will be presented to demonstrate how THM works experimentally.

  19. Recent Results of Semi-inclusive DIS Experiments at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Allada, Kalyan

    2015-09-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) is a powerful tool to explore the 3-d structure of nucleon in momentum space. Through a combination of polarized or unpolarized lepton beam and nucleon target one can study various transverse-momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) that appear in the SIDIS cross-section. TMDs provide a description of nucleon structure in terms of parton’s transverse momentum and its transverse spin, which enables us to study the quark orbital angular momentum effects in the nucleon. Several SIDIS experiments were performed in three experimental halls at JLab with 6 GeV electron beam using both polarized or upolarized beam and target combinations. The kinematic range was mainly focued on valence quark region. In this proceeding we will discuss some of the recent results from JLab 6 GeV run.

  20. Recent Results of Target Single-Spin Asymmetry Experiments at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xiaodong

    2013-08-01

    We report recent results from Jefferson Lab Hall A “Neutron Transversity” experiment (E06-010). Transversely polarized target single-spin asymmetry AUT and beam-target double-spin asymmetry A{sub LT} have been measured in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) reactions on a polarized neutron ({sup 3}He) target. Collins-type and Sivers-type asymmetries have been extracted from A{sub UT} for charged pion SIDIS productions, which are sensitive to quark transversity and Sivers distributions, correspondingly. Double spin asymmetry A{sub LT} is sensitive to a specific quark transverse momentum dependent parton distribution (TMD), the so-called “ transverse helicity” (g{sub 1T} ) distributions. In addition, target single-spin asymmetries A{sub y} in inclusive electron scattering on a transversely polarized {sup 3}He target in quasi-elastic and deep inelastic kinematics were also measured in Hall A.

  1. Recent results from ArgoNeuT and status of MicroBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Szelc, A. M.

    2015-07-15

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) are a novel detector technology for neutrino detection experiments. Their fine granularity combined with calorimetric capabilities allows for precision measurements that will answer the outstanding questions about the role of neutrinos in the Standard Model of Particle physics and beyond it. Here, we discuss the development effort underway in the framework of the US based LArTPC program, which ties improving the reach of the technology with relevant physics measurements of beam neutrinos at Fermilab. Examples of experiments in this program are ArgoNeuT which ran on the NuMI beam line and acquired 1.35×10{sup 20} POT and MicroBooNE which is set to run on the Booster neutrino beamline at the beginning of 2015. Recent results from the ArgoNeuT experiment will be discussed as well as the status and prospects for MicroBooNE.

  2. Neutron detection with noble gas scintillation: a review of recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavelle, C. M.; Coplan, Michael; Miller, Eric C.; Thompson, Alan K.; Kowler, Alex; Vest, Rob; Yue, Andrew; Koeth, Tim; Al-Sheikhly, Mohammad; Clark, Charles

    2015-08-01

    Thermal neutron detection is of vital importance to many disciplines, including neutron scattering, workplace monitoring, and homeland protection. We survey recent results from our collaboration which couple low-pressure noble gas scintillation with novel approaches to neutron absorbing materials and geometries to achieve potentially advantageous detector concepts. Noble gas scintillators were used for neutron detection as early as the late 1950's. Modern use of noble gas scintillation includes liquid and solid forms of argon and xenon in the dark matter and neutron physics experiments and commercially available high pressure applications have achieved high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy. Little attention has been paid to the overlap between low pressure noble gas scintillation and thermal neutron detection, for which there are many potential benefits.

  3. The biological effects of pollutants: Results and lessons learned from recent research

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, B.L. )

    1988-09-01

    There are currently two major problems in the research and development of biological effect techniques for use in marine systems: (1) the need for proper integration between response measurements at the cellular, organismal, population and community levels, in order to ensure predictability across hierarchical levels of complexity; and (2) the need for practical evaluation and inter-calibration of effects measurements in real field situations. The results of various field studies in Europe, including a practical workshop coordinated by the IOC Group of Experts on the Effects of Pollution, will be reviewed briefly and certain lessons learned will be discussed. Recent research aimed at exploring causal links between various components of the stress response in bivalve molluscs will be discussed to demonstrate the extent to which current studies are addressing the problem of integration within whole organisms and communities of species.

  4. Actinic review of EUV masks: status and recent results of the AIMSTM EUV system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlitz, Sascha; Peters, Jan Hendrik; Weiss, Markus; Hellweg, Dirk; Capelli, Renzo; Magnusson, Krister; Malloy, Matt; Wurm, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Key enabler of the successful introduction of EUV lithography into volume production is the EUV mask infrastructure. For the production of defect free masks, actinic review of potential defect sites to decide on the need for repair or compensation is required. Also, the repair or compensation with the ZEISS MERiT electron beam repair tool needs actinic verification in a closed loop mask repair solution. For the realization of actinic mask review, ZEISS and the SEMATECH EUVL Mask Infrastructure consortium started a development program for an EUV aerial image metrology system, the AIMSTM EUV, with realization of a prototype tool. The development and prototype realization of the AIMSTM EUV has entered the tool calibration and qualification phase utilizing the achieved capabilities of EUV aerial image acquisition and EUV mask handling. In this paper, we discuss the current status of the prototype qualification and show recent measurement results.

  5. Recent results from the EBIT and Super EBIT at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R.E.

    1996-10-07

    The electron beam ion trap (EBIT), and the higher-energy Super EBIT at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory can produce any highly charged ion. These highly charged ions are used in a variety of research programs. Recent results from four different experiments are reviewed here. K-shell ionization cross sections have been measured for the hydrogenlike ions of several elements, and L-shell ionization cross sections have been measured for uranium ions. A measurement of the ground-state hyperfine transition in hydrogenlike {sup 165}H{sup 66+} is notable because of the complete absence of Doppler shifts. A cryogenic Penning trap, injected with EBIT ions, has been used to observe a single highly charged ion as it recombines by sequential electron capture from H{sub 2} gas. A large sputtered ion yield, suggesting a surface Coulomb explosion, has been observed from insulators bombarded with very highly charged EBIT ions. 21 refs., 11 figs.

  6. Recent Results from the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) onboard the Van Allen Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Elkington, S. R.; Hoxie, V. C.; Li, X.; Spence, H. E.

    2013-05-01

    We describe recent results from the REPT instruments on board Van Allen Probes mission launched on 30 August 2012. The twin spacecraft comprising the Van Allen probes mission are identically instrumented and carry a comprehensive suite of sensors characterizing magnetospheric charged particle populations, electric and magnetic fields and plasma waves. The REPT instruments comprise a well-shielded silicon solid state detector stack, with a state of the art electronics and measure electrons of ~1.5 to > 20 MeV and protons of ~17 to > 100 MeV. The instruments were commissioned 3 days after launch and continue to provide high quality measurements. We describe the Van Allen probes and the REPT instrument and report on the new and unexpected features of the outer zone electron populations observed by REPT.

  7. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results for direct reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tumino, A.; Gulino, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Romano, S.; Cognata, M. La; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Lamia, L.

    2014-05-09

    The Trojan Horse method is a powerful indirect technique to determine the astrophysical factor for binary rearrangement processes A+x→b+B at astrophysical energies by measuring the cross section for the Trojan Horse (TH) reaction A+a→B+b+s in quasi free kinematics. The Trojan Horse Method has been successfully applied to many reactions of astrophysical interest, both direct and resonant. In this paper, we will focus on direct sub-processes. The theory of the THM for direct binary reactions will be shortly presented based on a few-body approach that takes into account the off-energy-shell effects and initial and final state interactions. Examples of recent results will be presented to demonstrate how THM works experimentally.

  8. Video scrambling for privacy protection in video surveillance: recent results and validation framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufaux, Frederic

    2011-06-01

    The issue of privacy in video surveillance has drawn a lot of interest lately. However, thorough performance analysis and validation is still lacking, especially regarding the fulfillment of privacy-related requirements. In this paper, we first review recent Privacy Enabling Technologies (PET). Next, we discuss pertinent evaluation criteria for effective privacy protection. We then put forward a framework to assess the capacity of PET solutions to hide distinguishing facial information and to conceal identity. We conduct comprehensive and rigorous experiments to evaluate the performance of face recognition algorithms applied to images altered by PET. Results show the ineffectiveness of naïve PET such as pixelization and blur. Conversely, they demonstrate the effectiveness of more sophisticated scrambling techniques to foil face recognition.

  9. Nonlinear Elastic Plate in a Flow of Gas: Recent Results and Conjectures

    SciTech Connect

    Chueshov, Igor; Dowell, Earl H.; Lasiecka, Irena; Webster, Justin T.

    2016-06-15

    We give a survey of recent results on flow-structure interactions modeled by a modified wave equation coupled at an interface with equations of nonlinear elasticity. Both subsonic and supersonic flow velocities are considered. The focus of the discussion here is on the interesting mathematical aspects of physical phenomena occurring in aeroelasticity, such as flutter and divergence. This leads to a partial differential equation treatment of issues such as well-posedness of finite energy solutions, and long-time (asymptotic) behavior. The latter includes theory of asymptotic stability, convergence to equilibria, and to global attracting sets. We complete the discussion with several well known observations and conjectures based on experimental/numerical studies.

  10. Signatures of Recent Asteroid Disruptions in the Formation and Evolution of Solar System Dust Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espy Kehoe, A. J.; Kehoe, T. J. J.; Colwell, J. E.; Dermott, S. F.

    2015-09-01

    We have performed detailed dynamical modeling of the structure of a faint dust band observed in coadded InfraRed Astronomical Satellite data at an ecliptic latitude of 17° that convincingly demonstrates that it is the result of a relatively recent (significantly less than 1 Ma) disruption of an asteroid and is still in the process of forming. We show here that young dust bands retain information on the size distribution and cross-sectional area of dust released in the original asteroid disruption, before it is lost to orbital and collisional decay. We find that the Emilkowalski cluster is the source of this partial band and that the dust released in the disruption would correspond to a regolith layer ˜3 m deep on the ˜10 km diameter source body's surface. The dust in this band is described by a cumulative size-distribution inverse power-law index with a lower bound of 2.1 (implying domination of cross-sectional area by small particles) for dust particles with diameters ranging from a few μm up to a few cm. The coadded observations show that the thermal emission of the dust band structure is dominated by large (mm-cm size) particles. We find that dust particle ejection velocities need to be a few times the escape velocity of the Emilkowalski cluster source body to provide a good fit to the inclination dispersion of the observations. We discuss the implications that such a significant release of material during a disruption has for the temporal evolution of the structure, composition, and magnitude of the zodiacal cloud.

  11. SIGNATURES OF RECENT ASTEROID DISRUPTIONS IN THE FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF SOLAR SYSTEM DUST BANDS

    SciTech Connect

    Kehoe, A. J. Espy; Colwell, J. E.; Kehoe, T. J. J.; Dermott, S. F.

    2015-09-20

    We have performed detailed dynamical modeling of the structure of a faint dust band observed in coadded InfraRed Astronomical Satellite data at an ecliptic latitude of 17° that convincingly demonstrates that it is the result of a relatively recent (significantly less than 1 Ma) disruption of an asteroid and is still in the process of forming. We show here that young dust bands retain information on the size distribution and cross-sectional area of dust released in the original asteroid disruption, before it is lost to orbital and collisional decay. We find that the Emilkowalski cluster is the source of this partial band and that the dust released in the disruption would correspond to a regolith layer ∼3 m deep on the ∼10 km diameter source body's surface. The dust in this band is described by a cumulative size-distribution inverse power-law index with a lower bound of 2.1 (implying domination of cross-sectional area by small particles) for dust particles with diameters ranging from a few μm up to a few cm. The coadded observations show that the thermal emission of the dust band structure is dominated by large (mm–cm size) particles. We find that dust particle ejection velocities need to be a few times the escape velocity of the Emilkowalski cluster source body to provide a good fit to the inclination dispersion of the observations. We discuss the implications that such a significant release of material during a disruption has for the temporal evolution of the structure, composition, and magnitude of the zodiacal cloud.

  12. Modeling the formation of bright slope deposits associated with gullies in Hale Crater, Mars: Implications for recent liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Kelly Jean; Pelletier, Jon D.; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2010-01-01

    Our study investigates possible formation mechanisms of the very recent bright gully deposits (BGDs) observed on Mars in order to assess if liquid water was required. We use two models in our assessment: a one-dimensional (1D) kinematic model to model dry granular flows and a two-dimensional (2D) fluid-dynamic model, FLO-2D ( O'Brien et al., 1993, FLO Engineering), to model water-rich and wet sediment-rich flows. Our modeling utilizes a high-resolution topographic model generated from a pair of images acquired by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. For the 1D kinematic modeling of dry granular flows, we examine a range of particle sizes, flow thicknesses, initial velocities, flow densities, and upslope initiation points to examine how these parameters affect the flow run-out distances of the center of mass of a flow. Our 1D modeling results show that multiple combinations of realistic parameters could produce dry granular flows that travel to within the observed deposits' boundaries. We run the 2D fluid-dynamic model, FLO-2D, to model both water-rich and wet sediment-rich flows. We vary the inflow volume, inflow location, discharge rate, water-loss rate (water-rich models only), and simulation time and examine the resulting maximum flow depths and velocities. Our 2D modeling results suggest that both wet sediment-rich and water-rich flows could produce the observed bright deposits. Our modeling shows that the BGDs are not definitive evidence of recent liquid water on the surface of Mars.

  13. Oxidants at the Surface of Mars: A Review in Light of Recent Exploration Results.

    PubMed

    Lasne, J; Noblet, A; Szopa, C; Navarro-González, R; Cabane, M; Poch, O; Stalport, F; François, P; Atreya, S K; Coll, P

    2016-12-01

    In 1976, the Viking landers carried out the most comprehensive search for organics and microbial life in the martian regolith. Their results indicate that Mars' surface is lifeless and, surprisingly, depleted in organics at part-per-billion levels. Several biology experiments on the Viking landers gave controversial results that have since been explained by the presence of oxidizing agents on the surface of Mars. These oxidants may degrade abiotic or biological organics, resulting in their nondetection in the regolith. As several exploration missions currently focus on the detection of organics on Mars (or will do so in the near future), knowledge of the oxidative state of the surface is fundamental. It will allow for determination of the capability of organics to survive on a geological timescale, the most favorable places to seek them, and the best methods to process the samples collected at the surface. With this aim, we review the main oxidants assumed to be present on Mars, their possible formation pathways, and those laboratory studies in which their reactivity with organics under Mars-like conditions has been evaluated. Among the oxidants assumed to be present on Mars, only four have been detected so far: perchlorate ions (ClO4(-)) in salts, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the atmosphere, and clays and metal oxides composing surface minerals. Clays have been suggested as catalysts for the oxidation of organics but are treated as oxidants in the following to keep the structure of this article straightforward. This work provides an insight into the oxidizing potential of the surface of Mars and an estimate of the stability of organic matter in an oxidizing environment. Key Words: Mars surface-Astrobiology-Oxidant-Chemical reactions. Astrobiology 16, 977-996.

  14. Oxidants at the Surface of Mars: A Review in Light of Recent Exploration Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasne, J.; Noblet, A.; Szopa, C.; Navarro-González, R.; Cabane, M.; Poch, O.; Stalport, F.; François, P.; Atreya, S. K.; Coll, P.

    2016-12-01

    In 1976, the Viking landers carried out the most comprehensive search for organics and microbial life in the martian regolith. Their results indicate that Mars' surface is lifeless and, surprisingly, depleted in organics at part-per-billion levels. Several biology experiments on the Viking landers gave controversial results that have since been explained by the presence of oxidizing agents on the surface of Mars. These oxidants may degrade abiotic or biological organics, resulting in their nondetection in the regolith. As several exploration missions currently focus on the detection of organics on Mars (or will do so in the near future), knowledge of the oxidative state of the surface is fundamental. It will allow for determination of the capability of organics to survive on a geological timescale, the most favorable places to seek them, and the best methods to process the samples collected at the surface. With this aim, we review the main oxidants assumed to be present on Mars, their possible formation pathways, and those laboratory studies in which their reactivity with organics under Mars-like conditions has been evaluated. Among the oxidants assumed to be present on Mars, only four have been detected so far: perchlorate ions (ClO4-) in salts, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the atmosphere, and clays and metal oxides composing surface minerals. Clays have been suggested as catalysts for the oxidation of organics but are treated as oxidants in the following to keep the structure of this article straightforward. This work provides an insight into the oxidizing potential of the surface of Mars and an estimate of the stability of organic matter in an oxidizing environment.

  15. Calorie Restriction: What Recent Results Suggest for the Future of Aging Research

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Daniel L.; Nagy, Tim R.; Allison, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Calorie Restriction (CR) research has expanded rapidly over the past few decades and CR remains the most highly reproducible, environmental intervention to improve health and extend lifespan in animal studies. Although many model organisms have consistently demonstrated positive responses to CR, it remains to be shown whether CR will extend lifespan in humans. Additionally, the current environment of excess caloric consumption and high incidence of overweight/obesity illustrate the improbable nature of the long-term adoption of a CR lifestyle by a significant proportion of the human population. Thus, the search for substances that can reproduce the beneficial physiologic responses of CR without a requisite calorie intake reduction, termed CR mimetics (CRMs), has gained momentum. Material & Methods Recent articles describing health and lifespan results of CR in nonhuman primates and short-term human studies are discussed. Additional consideration is given to the rapidly expanding search for CRMs. Results The first results from a long-term, randomized, controlled CR study in nonhuman primates showing statistically significant benefits on longevity have now been reported. Additionally, positive results from short-term, randomized, controlled CR studies in humans are suggestive of potential health and longevity gains, while test of proposed CRMs (including rapamycin, resveratrol, 2-deoxyglucose and metformin) have shown both positive and mixed results in rodents. Conclusion Whether current positive results will translate into longevity gains for humans remains an open question. However, the apparent health benefits that have been observed with CR suggest that regardless of longevity gains, the promotion of healthy aging and disease prevention may be attainable. PMID:20534066

  16. Determination of environemtal radioactivity at two different concentration levels. Results of two recent IAEA intercomparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suschny, O.

    1984-06-01

    In two recent intercomparisons, the performance of laboratories in the determination of radionuclides in environmental materials and in food was again investigated. The first dealt with stroniium isotopes and 137Cs in liquid milk at levels of nanocuries per litre, the second with the same radionuclides and others in fresh water, at levels of picocuries per litre. In both intercomparisons the results could be compared with known input values. Thirty-two laboratories from 14 countries participated in the milk intercomparison. Except for 137Cs, the number of outlying results was small (6%). The standard deviation was highest for 89Sr (54%). The differences of the overall means from the input values were not significant. In the second intercomparison, 32 laboratories from 19 countries returned 108 results. The lower concentration level led to a wider scatter of the data, 20% had to be rejected, the average standard deviation was 32% and the average difference of the overall means from the input values 28%. The positive bias found for all the radionuclides was probably due to incomplete separations. In conclusion 90Sr and 137Cs were adequately determined in the first intercomparisons (higher concentration), 89Sr was not. At the lower concentration level used in the second intercomparison, all the radionuclides investigated, except tritium, were found to present analytical problems.

  17. A survey of recent results in passive sampling of water and air by semipermeable membrane devices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prest, Harry F.; Huckins, James N.; Petty, Jimmie D.; Herve, Sirpa; Paasivirta, Jaakko; Heinonen, Pertti

    1995-01-01

    A survey is presented of some recent results for passive sampling of water and air for trace organic contaminants using lipid-filled semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs). Results of water sampling for trace organochlorine compounds using simultaneously exposed SPMDs and the most universally applied biomonitor (bivalves) are discussed. In general, the total amounts of accumulated analytes available for analysis in bivalves and SPMDs were comparable. However, SPMD controls typically had negligible levels of contamination, which was not always the case for transplanted bivalves, even after prolonged depuration prior to exposure. In surveys of the spatial trends of organochlorines at a series of sites, data from bivalves and SPMDs provided the same picture of contaminant distribution and severity. An exception was ionizable contaminants such as the chlorinated phenolic compounds and their transformation products found in pulp mill effluents. In these cases the two monitoring approaches compliment each other, i.e. what is not found in bivalves appears in SPMDs and vice versa. SPMDs have also been applied in environments where biomonitoring is not feasible. SPMDs have shown their utility in studies of trace levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons by locating and characterizing point sources. An example is given of their application to the calculation of contaminant half-lives from aqueous SPMD residues, a direct measurement of the persistence of contaminants in an environmental compartment. Similarly, results of air sampling with SPMDs in a relatively pristine coastal location are cited which reveal a tremendous enhancement in p,p′-DDE relative to open ocean values.

  18. Recent results on the mass, gravitational field and moments of inertia of the moon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, W. H., Jr.; Blackshear, W. T.

    1972-01-01

    Use of Doppler tracking data from the Lunar Orbiter series of spacecraft in an analysis of the spherical harmonic coefficients of the lunar gravitational field through thirteenth degree and order. The value obtained for the mass of the moon, GM = 4902.84 cu km/sec/sec, is in good agreement with previous results and with results obtained by alternate procedures. Acceleration contour plots, derived from the gravitational coefficients, show correlations with surface features on the near side of the moon, but are of questionable validity for the far side because of the lack of direct tracking data on the far side. Based on the most recent gravitational field data, the current estimate for the polar moment of inertia of the moon is C/Ma squared = 0.4019 super + 0.004 sub - 0.002. This value indicates that the interior of the moon can be homogeneous, but some results presented strongly suggest that the moon is differentiated, with an excess of mass in the direction toward the earth.

  19. Results of recent fluid physics and transport phenomena space flight experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Singh, Bhim S.

    2000-01-01

    A number of space flight experiments in fluid physics and transport phenomena have been conducted under the auspices of NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity Science and Applications. Results of these have been reported in various journals and technical society meetings. As preparations for a new generation of low gravity experiments to be conducted on ISS are well underway, it is useful to review the results of experiments conducted on the ``Shuttle.'' This paper summarizes the key findings of several recent experiments and emphasizes that such low earth orbit spacecraft should be considered as resource in which experiments can be conducted in near weightless conditions for extended time periods. It is hoped that the scientific community will realize the value of a ``microgravity laboratory'' and, stimulated by past results, will propose new experiments that take maximum advantage of the facilities and long duration microgravity conditions afforded by the ISS. The experiments described in this paper include: Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment, Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment, Pool Boiling Experiment, Thermocapillary Migration of Bubbles and Drops, Electrohydrodynamics of Liquid Bridges, Colloidal Disorder Order Transition, Critical Dynamics of Fluids, Mechanics of Granular Materials, and the Angular Liquid Bridge and Interface Configuration Experiment. .

  20. Overview of recent results from the Beam Energy Scan program in the STAR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipiec, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    It is believed, that shortly after the Big Bang the Universe existed in the state of the Quark Gluon Plasma, where quarks and gluons act as quasi-free particles. During relativistic heavy ion collisions this state of matter can be reproduced. Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD) calculations show possible existence of the critical point and the 1st order phase transition between hadron gas and QGP. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider's (RHIC) program called Beam Energy Scan (BES) was developed for experimental verification of above QCD predictions. Within this program the Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) experiment gathered data from gold-gold collisions at √sNN = 7.7, 11.5, 14.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV. This data are analysed by STAR Collaboration in search for answers to questions concerning the nuclear matter phases, namely: what is the collision energy for the onset of the QGP formation? What is the nature of a phase transition between QGP and hadron gas? Is there a critical point and if yes, where is it situated? In this proceedings a few of the latest STAR results that address these questions are presented.