Science.gov

Sample records for fortran computer program

  1. FORTRAN computer program for seismic risk analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, Robin K.

    1976-01-01

    A program for seismic risk analysis is described which combines generality of application, efficiency and accuracy of operation, and the advantage of small storage requirements. The theoretical basis for the program is first reviewed, and the computational algorithms used to apply this theory are described. The information required for running the program is listed. Published attenuation functions describing the variation with earthquake magnitude and distance of expected values for various ground motion parameters are summarized for reference by the program user. Finally, suggestions for use of the program are made, an example problem is described (along with example problem input and output) and the program is listed.

  2. Programming in Fortran M

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, I.; Olson, R.; Tuecke, S.

    1993-08-01

    Fortran M is a small set of extensions to Fortran that supports a modular approach to the construction of sequential and parallel programs. Fortran M programs use channels to plug together processes which may be written in Fortran M or Fortran 77. Processes communicate by sending and receiving messages on channels. Channels and processes can be created dynamically, but programs remain deterministic unless specialized nondeterministic constructs are used. Fortran M programs can execute on a range of sequential, parallel, and networked computers. This report incorporates both a tutorial introduction to Fortran M and a users guide for the Fortran M compiler developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The Fortran M compiler, supporting software, and documentation are made available free of charge by Argonne National Laboratory, but are protected by a copyright which places certain restrictions on how they may be redistributed. See the software for details. The latest version of both the compiler and this manual can be obtained by anonymous ftp from Argonne National Laboratory in the directory pub/fortran-m at info.mcs.anl.gov.

  3. Programming in Vienna Fortran

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Barbara; Mehrotra, Piyush; Zima, Hans

    1992-01-01

    Exploiting the full performance potential of distributed memory machines requires a careful distribution of data across the processors. Vienna Fortran is a language extension of Fortran which provides the user with a wide range of facilities for such mapping of data structures. In contrast to current programming practice, programs in Vienna Fortran are written using global data references. Thus, the user has the advantages of a shared memory programming paradigm while explicitly controlling the data distribution. In this paper, we present the language features of Vienna Fortran for FORTRAN 77, together with examples illustrating the use of these features.

  4. DB90: A Fortran Callable Relational Database Routine for Scientific and Engineering Computer Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrenn, Gregory A.

    2005-01-01

    This report describes a database routine called DB90 which is intended for use with scientific and engineering computer programs. The software is written in the Fortran 90/95 programming language standard with file input and output routines written in the C programming language. These routines should be completely portable to any computing platform and operating system that has Fortran 90/95 and C compilers. DB90 allows a program to supply relation names and up to 5 integer key values to uniquely identify each record of each relation. This permits the user to select records or retrieve data in any desired order.

  5. Computer program utilizes FORTRAN 4 subroutines for contour plotting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, N.; Garret, R.; Lawson, C.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program constructs lists of xy-coordinate pairs that define contour curves for an arbitrary given function of two variables and transmits these lists to plotting equipment to produce contour plots. The principal subroutine, CONTUR, is independent of any specific system of plotting subroutines and equipment.

  6. Fortran computer programs to plot and process aquifer pressure and temperature data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czarnecki, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    Two FORTRAN computer programs have been written to process water-well temperature and pressure data recorded automatically by a datalogger on magnetic tape. These programs process the data into tabular and graphical form. Both programs are presented with documentation. Sample plots of temperature versus time, water levels versus time, aquifer pressure versus log time , log drawdown versus log 1/time, and log drawdown versus log time/radius squared are presented and are obtained using standard CALCOM directives. Drawdown plots may be used directly to obtain aquifer transmissivities and storage coefficients as well as leakance coefficients.

  7. Concurrent extensions to the FORTRAN language for parallel programming of computational fluid dynamics algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, Cindy Lou

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were conducted at NASA Ames Research Center to define multi-tasking software requirements for multiple-instruction, multiple-data stream (MIMD) computer architectures. The focus was on specifying solutions for algorithms in the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The program objectives were to allow researchers to produce usable parallel application software as soon as possible after acquiring MIMD computer equipment, to provide researchers with an easy-to-learn and easy-to-use parallel software language which could be implemented on several different MIMD machines, and to enable researchers to list preferred design specifications for future MIMD computer architectures. Analysis of CFD algorithms indicated that extensions of an existing programming language, adaptable to new computer architectures, provided the best solution to meeting program objectives. The CoFORTRAN Language was written in response to these objectives and to provide researchers a means to experiment with parallel software solutions to CFD algorithms on machines with parallel architectures.

  8. THERMTRAJ: A FORTRAN program to compute the trajectory and gas film temperatures of zero pressure balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, W. J.; Carlson, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program called THERMTRAJ is presented which can be used to compute the trajectory of high altitude scientific zero pressure balloons from launch through all subsequent phases of the balloon flight. In addition, balloon gas and film temperatures can be computed at every point of the flight. The program has the ability to account for ballasting, changes in cloud cover, variable atmospheric temperature profiles, and both unconditional valving and scheduled valving of the balloon gas. The program was verified for an extensive range of balloon sizes (from 0.5 to 41.47 million cubic feet). Instructions on program usage, listing of the program source deck, input data and printed and plotted output for a verification case are included.

  9. FORTRAN 4 computer program for calculation of thermodynamic and transport properties of complex chemical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svehla, R. A.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV computer program for the calculation of the thermodynamic and transport properties of complex mixtures is described. The program has the capability of performing calculations such as:(1) chemical equilibrium for assigned thermodynamic states, (2) theoretical rocket performance for both equilibrium and frozen compositions during expansion, (3) incident and reflected shock properties, and (4) Chapman-Jouguet detonation properties. Condensed species, as well as gaseous species, are considered in the thermodynamic calculation; but only the gaseous species are considered in the transport calculations.

  10. OPPDIF: A Fortran program for computing opposed-flow diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, A.E.; Kee, R.J.; Grcar, J.F.; Rupley, F.M.

    1997-05-01

    OPPDIF is a Fortran program that computes the diffusion flame between two opposing nozzles. A similarity transformation reduces the two-dimensional axisymmetric flow field to a one-dimensional problem. Assuming that the radial component of velocity is linear in radius, the dependent variables become functions of the axial direction only. OPPDIF solves for the temperature, species mass fractions, axial and radial velocity components, and radial pressure gradient, which is an eigenvalue in the problem. The TWOPNT software solves the two-point boundary value problem for the steady-state form of the discretized equations. The CHEMKIN package evaluates chemical reaction rates and thermodynamic and transport properties.

  11. User's manual for THPLOT, A FORTRAN 77 Computer program for time history plotting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    A general purpose FORTRAN 77 computer program (THPLOT) for plotting time histories using Calcomp pen plotters is described. The program is designed to read a time history data file and to generate time history plots for selected time intervals and/or selected data channels. The capabilities of the program are described. The card input required to define the plotting operation is described and examples of card input and the resulting plotted output are given. The examples are followed by a description of the printed output, including both normal output and error messages. Lastly, implementation of the program is described. A complete listing of the program with reference maps produced by the CDC FTN 5.0 compiler is included.

  12. A new Fortran 90 program to compute regular and irregular associated Legendre functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Barry I.; Segura, Javier; Gil, Amparo; Guan, Xiaoxu; Bartschat, Klaus

    2010-12-01

    We present a modern Fortran 90 code to compute the regular Plm(x) and irregular Qlm(x) associated Legendre functions for all x∈(-1,+1) (on the cut) and |x|>1 and integer degree ( l) and order ( m). The code applies either forward or backward recursion in ( l) and ( m) in the stable direction, starting with analytically known values for forward recursion and considering both a Wronskian based and a modified Miller's method for backward recursion. While some Fortran 77 codes existed for computing the functions off the cut, no Fortran 90 code was available for accurately computing the functions for all real values of x different from x=±1 where the irregular functions are not defined. Program summaryProgram title: Associated Legendre Functions Catalogue identifier: AEHE_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHE_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6722 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 310 210 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90 Computer: Linux systems Operating system: Linux RAM: bytes Classification: 4.7 Nature of problem: Compute the regular and irregular associated Legendre functions for integer values of the degree and order and for all real arguments. The computation of the interaction of two electrons, 1/|r-r|, in prolate spheroidal coordinates is used as one example where these functions are required for all values of the argument and we are able to easily compare the series expansion in associated Legendre functions and the exact value. Solution method: The code evaluates the regular and irregular associated Legendre functions using forward recursion when |x|<1 starting the recursion with the analytically known values of the first two members of the sequence. For values of

  13. FORTRAN 4 computer program for calculating critical speeds of rotating shafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trivisonno, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    A FORTRAN 4 computer program, written for the IBM DCS 7094/7044 computer, that calculates the critical speeds of rotating shafts is described. The shaft may include bearings, couplings, extra masses (nonshaft mass), and disks for the gyroscopic effect. Shear deflection is also taken into account, and provision is made in the program for sections of the shaft that are tapered. The boundary conditions at the ends of the shaft can be fixed (deflection and slope equal to zero) or free (shear and moment equal to zero). The fixed end condition enables the program to calculate the natural frequencies of cantilever beams. Instead of using the lumped-parameter method, the program uses continuous integration of the differential equations of beam flexure across different shaft sections. The advantages of this method over the usual lumped-parameter method are less data preparation and better approximation of the distribution of the mass of the shaft. A main feature of the program is the nature of the output. The Calcomp plotter is used to produce a drawing of the shaft with superimposed deflection curves at the critical speeds, together with all pertinent information related to the shaft.

  14. An introduction to using the FORTRAN programs provided with Computational Nuclear Physics 1 Nuclear Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boytos, Matthew A.; Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    The authors of this paper have provided a set of ready-to-run FORTRAN programs that should be useful in the field of theoretical nuclear physics. The purpose of this document is to provide a simple synopsis of the programs and their use. A separate section is devoted to each program set and includes: abstract; files; compiling, linking, and running; obtaining results; and a tutorial.

  15. USSAERO version D computer program development using ANSI standard FORTRAN 77 and DI-3000 graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    The D version of the Unified Subsonic Supersonic Aerodynamic Analysis (USSAERO) program is the result of numerous modifications and enhancements to the B01 version. These changes include conversion to ANSI standard FORTRAN 77; use of the DI-3000 graphics package; removal of the overlay structure; a revised input format; the addition of an input data analysis routine; and increasing the number of aeronautical components allowed.

  16. High Performance Object-Oriented Scientific Programming in Fortran 90

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, Charles D.; Decyk, Viktor K.; Szymanski, Boleslaw K.

    1997-01-01

    We illustrate how Fortran 90 supports object-oriented concepts by example of plasma particle computations on the IBM SP. Our experience shows that Fortran 90 and object-oriented methodology give high performance while providing a bridge from Fortran 77 legacy codes to modern programming principles. All of our object-oriented Fortran 90 codes execute more quickly thatn the equeivalent C++ versions, yet the abstraction modelling capabilities used for scentific programming are comparably powereful.

  17. Evaluation of verification and testing tools for FORTRAN programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, K. A.

    1980-01-01

    Two automated software verification and testing systems were developed for use in the analysis of computer programs. An evaluation of the static analyzer DAVE and the dynamic analyzer PET, which are used in the analysis of FORTRAN programs on Control Data (CDC) computers, are described. Both systems were found to be effective and complementary, and are recommended for use in testing FORTRAN programs.

  18. Computer simulation program for parallel SITAN. [Sandia Inertia Terrain-Aided Navigation, in FORTRAN

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas, R.D.; Sheives, T.C.

    1980-11-01

    This computer program simulates the operation of parallel SITAN using digitized terrain data. An actual trajectory is modeled including the effects of inertial navigation errors and radar altimeter measurements.

  19. Fortran IV computer program for rapid hierarchical classification of large data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jambu, Michel

    1981-01-01

    A rapid hierarchical classification program enables the clustering of 5000 elements in only a few minutes of central processor time using an IBM 370/168 computer. The program algorithm, based on the reductibility axiom in graph theory, is related to the criterion of correspondence analysis. Its application to a set of hydrogeological data is described briefly.

  20. A FORTRAN program to implement the method of finite elements to compute regional and residual anomalies from gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, B. N. P.; Srivastava, Shalivahan

    2010-07-01

    In view of the several publications on the application of the Finite Element Method (FEM) to compute regional gravity anomaly involving only 8 nodes on the periphery of a rectangular map, we present an interactive FORTRAN program, FEAODD.FOR, for wider applicability of the technique. A brief description of the theory of FEM is presented for the sake of completeness. The efficacy of the program has been demonstrated by analyzing the gravity anomaly over Salt dome, South Houston, USA using two differently oriented rectangular blocks and over chromite deposits, Camaguey, Cuba. The analyses over two sets of data reveal that the outline of the ore body/structure matches well with the maxima of the residuals. Further, the data analyses over South Houston, USA, have revealed that though the broad regional trend remains the same for both the blocks, the magnitudes of the residual anomalies differ approximately by 25% of the magnitude as obtained from previous studies.

  1. Comparison of and conversion between different implementations of the FORTRAN programming language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treinish, L.

    1980-01-01

    A guideline for computer programmers who may need to exchange FORTRAN programs between several computers is presented. The characteristics of the FORTRAN language available on three different types of computers are outlined, and procedures and other considerations for the transfer of programs from one type of FORTRAN to another are discussed. In addition, the variance of these different FORTRAN's from the FORTRAN 77 standard are discussed.

  2. Interactive FORTRAN IV computer programs for the thermodynamic and transport properties of selected cryogens (fluids pack)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The thermodynamic and transport properties of selected cryogens had programmed into a series of computer routines. Input variables are any two of P, rho or T in the single phase regions and either P or T for the saturated liquid or vapor state. The output is pressure, density, temperature, entropy, enthalpy for all of the fluids and in most cases specific heat capacity and speed of sound. Viscosity and thermal conductivity are also given for most of the fluids. The programs are designed for access by remote terminal; however, they have been written in a modular form to allow the user to select either specific fluids or specific properties for particular needs. The program includes properties for hydrogen, helium, neon, nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and methane. The programs include properties for gaseous and liquid states usually from the triple point to some upper limit of pressure and temperature which varies from fluid to fluid.

  3. The X-ray system of crystallographic programs for any computer having a PIDGIN FORTRAN compiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, J. M.; Kruger, G. J.; Ammon, H. L.; Dickinson, C.; Hall, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    A manual is presented for the use of a library of crystallographic programs. This library, called the X-ray system, is designed to carry out the calculations required to solve the structure of crystals by diffraction techniques. It has been implemented at the University of Maryland on the Univac 1108. It has, however, been developed and run on a variety of machines under various operating systems. It is considered to be an essentially machine independent library of applications programs. The report includes definition of crystallographic computing terms, program descriptions, with some text to show their application to specific crystal problems, detailed card input descriptions, mass storage file structure and some example run streams.

  4. SAP- FORTRAN STATIC SOURCE CODE ANALYZER PROGRAM (IBM VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manteufel, R.

    1994-01-01

    The FORTRAN Static Source Code Analyzer program, SAP, was developed to automatically gather statistics on the occurrences of statements and structures within a FORTRAN program and to provide for the reporting of those statistics. Provisions have been made for weighting each statistic and to provide an overall figure of complexity. Statistics, as well as figures of complexity, are gathered on a module by module basis. Overall summed statistics are also accumulated for the complete input source file. SAP accepts as input syntactically correct FORTRAN source code written in the FORTRAN 77 standard language. In addition, code written using features in the following languages is also accepted: VAX-11 FORTRAN, IBM S/360 FORTRAN IV Level H Extended; and Structured FORTRAN. The SAP program utilizes two external files in its analysis procedure. A keyword file allows flexibility in classifying statements and in marking a statement as either executable or non-executable. A statistical weight file allows the user to assign weights to all output statistics, thus allowing the user flexibility in defining the figure of complexity. The SAP program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on a DEC VAX series computer under VMS and on an IBM 370 series computer under MVS. The SAP program was developed in 1978 and last updated in 1985.

  5. SAP- FORTRAN STATIC SOURCE CODE ANALYZER PROGRAM (DEC VAX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merwarth, P. D.

    1994-01-01

    The FORTRAN Static Source Code Analyzer program, SAP, was developed to automatically gather statistics on the occurrences of statements and structures within a FORTRAN program and to provide for the reporting of those statistics. Provisions have been made for weighting each statistic and to provide an overall figure of complexity. Statistics, as well as figures of complexity, are gathered on a module by module basis. Overall summed statistics are also accumulated for the complete input source file. SAP accepts as input syntactically correct FORTRAN source code written in the FORTRAN 77 standard language. In addition, code written using features in the following languages is also accepted: VAX-11 FORTRAN, IBM S/360 FORTRAN IV Level H Extended; and Structured FORTRAN. The SAP program utilizes two external files in its analysis procedure. A keyword file allows flexibility in classifying statements and in marking a statement as either executable or non-executable. A statistical weight file allows the user to assign weights to all output statistics, thus allowing the user flexibility in defining the figure of complexity. The SAP program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on a DEC VAX series computer under VMS and on an IBM 370 series computer under MVS. The SAP program was developed in 1978 and last updated in 1985.

  6. FORTRAN programming - A self-taught course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blecher, S.; Butler, R. V.; Horton, M.; Norrod, V.

    1971-01-01

    Comprehensive programming course begins with numerical systems and basic concepts, proceeds systematically through FORTRAN language elements, and concludes with discussion of programming techniques. Course is suitable either for individual study or for group study on informal basis.

  7. FORTRAN program for induction motor analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollenbacher, G.

    1976-01-01

    A FORTRAN program for induction motor analysis is described. The analysis includes calculations of torque-speed characteristics, efficiency, losses, magnetic flux densities, weights, and various electrical parameters. The program is limited to three-phase Y-connected, squirrel-cage motors. Detailed instructions for using the program are given. The analysis equations are documented, and the sources of the equations are referenced. The appendixes include a FORTRAN symbol list, a complete explanation of input requirements, and a list of error messages.

  8. Guidelines for Coding FORTRAN Programs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    39529 PE63759N I I CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Naval Ocean Research and Development Activity July 1982 Code 320 13. NUMBER OF...Element 63759N. ,-! ri ii Contents 1. INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 Scope 1 2. CODING FORTRAN STATEMENTS 2 2.1 General Remarks and Sug- 2 gestions 2.2 FORTRAN...Assignment 11 5.3 Masking Assignment 11 5.4 Multiple Assignment 11 6. CONTROL STATEMENTS 11 6.1 GO TO Statement 11 6.1.1 Unconditional GO TO 11 Statement

  9. New FORTRAN computer programs to acquire and process isotopic mass spectrometric data: Operator`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.; McKown, H.S.

    1993-09-01

    This TM is one of a pair that describes ORNL-developed software for acquisition and processing of isotope ratio mass spectral data. This TM is directed at the laboratory analyst. No technical knowledge of the programs and programming is required. It describes how to create and edit files, how to acquire and process data, and how to set up files to obtain the desired results. The aim of this TM is to serve as a utilitarian instruction manual, a {open_quotes}how to{close_quotes} approach rather than a {open_quotes}why?{close_quotes}

  10. Program Aids In Printing FORTRAN-Coded Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akian, Richard A.

    1993-01-01

    FORPRINT computer program prints FORTRAN-coded output files on most non-Postscript printers with such extra features as control of fonts for Epson and Hewlett Packard printers. Rewrites data to printer and inserts correct printer-control codes. Alternative uses include ability to separate data or ASCII file during printing by use of editing software to insert "1" in first column of data line that starts new page. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  11. Final Report, Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing: Co-Array Fortran, Grant Number DE-FC02-01ER25505

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Numrich

    2008-04-22

    The major accomplishment of this project is the production of CafLib, an 'object-oriented' parallel numerical library written in Co-Array Fortran. CafLib contains distributed objects such as block vectors and block matrices along with procedures, attached to each object, that perform basic linear algebra operations such as matrix multiplication, matrix transpose and LU decomposition. It also contains constructors and destructors for each object that hide the details of data decomposition from the programmer, and it contains collective operations that allow the programmer to calculate global reductions, such as global sums, global minima and global maxima, as well as vector and matrix norms of several kinds. CafLib is designed to be extensible in such a way that programmers can define distributed grid and field objects, based on vector and matrix objects from the library, for finite difference algorithms to solve partial differential equations. A very important extra benefit that resulted from the project is the inclusion of the co-array programming model in the next Fortran standard called Fortran 2008. It is the first parallel programming model ever included as a standard part of the language. Co-arrays will be a supported feature in all Fortran compilers, and the portability provided by standardization will encourage a large number of programmers to adopt it for new parallel application development. The combination of object-oriented programming in Fortran 2003 with co-arrays in Fortran 2008 provides a very powerful programming model for high-performance scientific computing. Additional benefits from the project, beyond the original goal, include a programto provide access to the co-array model through access to the Cray compiler as a resource for teaching and research. Several academics, for the first time, included the co-array model as a topic in their courses on parallel computing. A separate collaborative project with LANL and PNNL showed how to extend the

  12. CLAYFORM: a FORTRAN 77 computer program apportioning the constituents in the chemical analysis of a clay or other silicate mineral into a structural formula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodine, M.W.

    1987-01-01

    The FORTRAN 77 computer program CLAYFORM apportions the constituents of a conventional chemical analysis of a silicate mineral into a user-selected structure formula. If requested, such as for a clay mineral or other phyllosilicate, the program distributes the structural formula components into appropriate default or user-specified structural sites (tetrahedral, octahedral, interlayer, hydroxyl, and molecular water sites), and for phyllosilicates calculates the layer (tetrahedral, octahedral, and interlayer) charge distribution. The program also creates data files of entered analyses for subsequent reuse. ?? 1987.

  13. A Microsoft FORTRAN 77 Program for Pooling Subgroup Correlation Coefficients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, N. Clayton; Hittner, James B.

    1997-01-01

    An interactive FORTRAN 77 program is presented that computes the pooled correlation from independent subgroups via the formula provided by R. Charter and R. Alexander (1993). In addition, the means and standard deviations for each variable are also provided for the composite group. (Author/SLD)

  14. CAMIRD III: Computer Assisted Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry. FORTRAN IV version

    SciTech Connect

    Bellina, C. R.; Guzzardi, R.

    1980-01-01

    This paper desribes the FORTRAN IV version of the P.A. Feller's CAMIRD/II Package (1) revised. In addition another FORTRAN IV program named TILDY (2), which determines the cumulated activity, has been revised and modified to be used as a subroutine of CAMIRD's main program. With such an organization all the calculation involved in dose computation becomes easier and quicker.

  15. FPT- FORTRAN PROGRAMMING TOOLS FOR THE DEC VAX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragosta, A. E.

    1994-01-01

    a screen-oriented editor); a cubic spline fit routine; a screen-oriented array editor; routines to support parsing; and various terminal support routines. These FORTRAN programming tools are written in FORTRAN 77 and ASSEMBLER for interactive and batch execution. FPT is intended for implementation on DEC VAX series computers operating under VMS. This collection of tools was developed in 1985.

  16. Production version of the extended NASA-Langley Vortex Lattice FORTRAN computer program. Volume 1: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.; Herbert, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    The latest production version, MARK IV, of the NASA-Langley vortex lattice computer program is summarized. All viable subcritical aerodynamic features of previous versions were retained. This version extends the previously documented program capabilities to four planforms, 400 panels, and enables the user to obtain vortex-flow aerodynamics on cambered planforms, flowfield properties off the configuration in attached flow, and planform longitudinal load distributions.

  17. FORTRAN Automated Code Evaluation System (faces) system documentation, version 2, mod 0. [error detection codes/user manuals (computer programs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A system is presented which processes FORTRAN based software systems to surface potential problems before they become execution malfunctions. The system complements the diagnostic capabilities of compilers, loaders, and execution monitors rather than duplicating these functions. Also, it emphasizes frequent sources of FORTRAN problems which require inordinate manual effort to identify. The principle value of the system is extracting small sections of unusual code from the bulk of normal sequences. Code structures likely to cause immediate or future problems are brought to the user's attention. These messages stimulate timely corrective action of solid errors and promote identification of 'tricky' code. Corrective action may require recoding or simply extending software documentation to explain the unusual technique.

  18. OPUS: A Fortran Program for Unsteady Opposed-Flowed Flames

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Im; L. L. Raja; R. J. Kee; A. E. Lutz; L. R. Petzold

    2000-07-01

    OPUS is a Fortran program for computing unsteady combustion problems in an opposed-flow configuration using one-dimensional similarity coordinate. The code is an extension of the steady counterpart, OPPDIF, to transient problems by modifying the formulation to accommodate gasdynamic compressibility effects, allowing high-accuracy time integration with adaptive time stepping. Time integration of the differential-algebraic system of equations is performed by the DASPK software package, while the Chemkin packages are used to compute chemical reaction rates and thermodynamic/transport properties. This document describes the details of the mathematical formulation and instruction for using the code.

  19. FORTRAN IV Digital Filter Design Programs. Digital Systems Education Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuss, E.; And Others

    The goals of the Digital Systems Education Project (DISE) include the development and distribution of educational/instructional materials in the digital systems area. Toward that end, this document contains three reports: (1) A FORTRAN IV Design Program for Low-Pass Butterworth and Chebychev Digital Filters; (2) A FORTRAN IV Design Program for…

  20. CNF and F77 -- Mixed Language Programming: Fortran and C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, P. M.; Chipperfield, A. J.; Warren-Smith, R. F.; Draper, P. W.; Berry, D. S.

    The CNF package comprises two sets of software which ease the task of writing portable programs in a mixture of FORTRAN and C. F77 is a set of C macros for handling the FORTRAN/C subroutine linkage in a portable way, and CNF is a set of functions to handle the difference between FORTRAN and C character strings, logical values and pointers to dynamically allocated memory.

  1. Object-Oriented Scientific Programming with Fortran 90

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, C.

    1998-01-01

    Fortran 90 is a modern language that introduces many important new features beneficial for scientific programming. We discuss our experiences in plasma particle simulation and unstructured adaptive mesh refinement on supercomputers, illustrating the features of Fortran 90 that support the object-oriented methodology.

  2. Identifying unknown minerals and compounds from X-ray diffraction patterns using the Johnson and Vand FORTRAN 4 computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, F. T.

    1976-01-01

    Automated computer identification of minerals and compounds from unknown samples is provided along with detailed instructions and worked examples for use in graduate level courses in mineralogy and X-ray analysis applications.

  3. Exploiting first-class arrays in Fortran for accelerator programming

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Craig E; Weseloh, Wayne N; Robey, Robert W; Matthew, Sottile J; Quinlan, Daniel; Overbye, Jeffrey

    2010-12-15

    Emerging architectures for high performance computing often are well suited to a data parallel programming model. This paper presents a simple programming methodology based on existing languages and compiler tools that allows programmers to take advantage of these systems. We will work with the array features of Fortran 90 to show how this infrequently exploited, standardized language feature is easily transformed to lower level accelerator code. Our transformations are based on a mapping from Fortran 90 to C++ code with OpenCL extensions. The sheer complexity of programming for clusters of many or multi-core processors with tens of millions threads of execution make the simplicity of the data parallel model attractive. Furthermore, the increasing complexity of todays applications (especially when convolved with the increasing complexity of the hardware) and the need for portability across hardware architectures make a higher-level and simpler programming model like data parallel attractive. The goal of this work has been to exploit source-to-source transformations that allow programmers to develop and maintain programs at a high-level of abstraction, without coding to a specific hardware architecture. Furthermore these transformations allow multiple hardware architectures to be targeted without changing the high-level source. It also removes the necessity for application programmers to understand details of the accelerator architecture or to know OpenCL.

  4. The FORTRAN static source code analyzer program (SAP) system description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, W.; Taylor, W.; Merwarth, P.; Oneill, M.; Goorevich, C.; Waligora, S.

    1982-01-01

    A source code analyzer program (SAP) designed to assist personnel in conducting studies of FORTRAN programs is described. The SAP scans FORTRAN source code and produces reports that present statistics and measures of statements and structures that make up a module. The processing performed by SAP and of the routines, COMMON blocks, and files used by SAP are described. The system generation procedure for SAP is also presented.

  5. The FORTRAN static source code analyzer program (SAP) user's guide, revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, W.; Taylor, W.; Eslinger, S.

    1982-01-01

    The FORTRAN Static Source Code Analyzer Program (SAP) User's Guide (Revision 1) is presented. SAP is a software tool designed to assist Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) personnel in conducting studies of FORTRAN programs. SAP scans FORTRAN source code and produces reports that present statistics and measures of statements and structures that make up a module. This document is a revision of the previous SAP user's guide, Computer Sciences Corporation document CSC/TM-78/6045. SAP Revision 1 is the result of program modifications to provide several new reports, additional complexity analysis, and recognition of all statements described in the FORTRAN 77 standard. This document provides instructions for operating SAP and contains information useful in interpreting SAP output.

  6. Autogenic Feedback Training (Body Fortran) with Biofeedback and the Computer for Self-Improvement and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.; Sumintardja, Elmira Nasrudin

    1983-01-01

    Describes autogenic feedback training, which provides the basis whereby an individual is able to improve on well being through use of a technique described as "body fortran," implying that you program self as one programs a computer. Necessary requisites are described including relaxation training and the management of stress. (JAC)

  7. Fortran Transformational Tools in Support of Scientific Application Development for Petascale Computer Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Sottille, Matthew

    2013-09-12

    This document is the final report for a multi-year effort building infrastructure to support tool development for Fortran programs. We also investigated static analysis and code transformation methods relevant to scientific programmers who are writing Fortran programs for petascale-class high performance computing systems. This report details our accomplishments, technical approaches, and provides information on where the research results and code may be obtained from an open source software repository. The report for the first year of the project that was performed at the University of Oregon prior to the PI moving to Galois, Inc. is included as an appendix.

  8. Base Numeration Systems and Introduction to Computer Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, K. Ed.; And Others

    This teaching guide is for the instructor of an introductory course in computer programming using FORTRAN language. Five FORTRAN programs are incorporated in this guide, which has been used as a FORTRAN IV SELF TEACHER. The base eight, base four, and base two concepts are integrated with FORTRAN computer programs, geoblock activities, and related…

  9. The Fortran-P Translator: Towards Automatic Translation of Fortran 77 Programs for Massively Parallel Processors

    DOE PAGES

    O'keefe, Matthew; Parr, Terence; Edgar, B. Kevin; ...

    1995-01-01

    Massively parallel processors (MPPs) hold the promise of extremely high performance that, if realized, could be used to study problems of unprecedented size and complexity. One of the primary stumbling blocks to this promise has been the lack of tools to translate application codes to MPP form. In this article we show how applications codes written in a subset of Fortran 77, called Fortran-P, can be translated to achieve good performance on several massively parallel machines. This subset can express codes that are self-similar, where the algorithm applied to the global data domain is also applied to each subdomain. Wemore » have found many codes that match the Fortran-P programming style and have converted them using our tools. We believe a self-similar coding style will accomplish what a vectorizable style has accomplished for vector machines by allowing the construction of robust, user-friendly, automatic translation systems that increase programmer productivity and generate fast, efficient code for MPPs.« less

  10. Programming input-output operations in FORTRAN on magnetic tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorokov, V. N.

    1980-01-01

    The subprogram MTCFF was designed for carrying out input-output operations in FORTRAN on magnetic tape within the framework of the DOS ES EVM operation system. It is possible, by means of this subprogram, to perform any input-output operations of interest to the programmer such as recording and reading various control operations in the direct and reverse directions, even though for these purposes the facilities of the language FORTRAN itself are limited. The subprogram can also be used in programs written in other programming languages.

  11. NEMAR plotting computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myler, T. R.

    1981-01-01

    A FORTRAN coded computer program which generates CalComp plots of trajectory parameters is examined. The trajectory parameters are calculated and placed on a data file by the Near Earth Mission Analysis Routine computer program. The plot program accesses the data file and generates the plots as defined by inputs to the plot program. Program theory, user instructions, output definitions, subroutine descriptions and detailed FORTRAN coding information are included. Although this plot program utilizes a random access data file, a data file of the same type and formatted in 102 numbers per record could be generated by any computer program and used by this plot program.

  12. NEWSUMT: A FORTRAN program for inequality constrained function minimization, users guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miura, H.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A computer program written in FORTRAN subroutine form for the solution of linear and nonlinear constrained and unconstrained function minimization problems is presented. The algorithm is the sequence of unconstrained minimizations using the Newton's method for unconstrained function minimizations. The use of NEWSUMT and the definition of all parameters are described.

  13. Developing CORBA-Based Distributed Scientific Applications from Legacy Fortran Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sang, Janche; Kim, Chan; Lopez, Isaac

    2000-01-01

    generate C/C++ header file and IDL file for wrapping the Fortran code. Programmers need to determine by themselves how to decompose the legacy application into several reusable components based on the cohesion and coupling factors among the functions and subroutines. However, programming effort still can be greatly reduced because function headings and types have been converted to C++ and IDL styles. Most Fortran applications use the COMMON block to facilitate the transfer of large amount of variables among several functions. The COMMON block plays the similar role of global variables used in C. In the CORBA-compliant programming environment, global variables can not be used to pass values between objects. One approach to dealing with this problem is to put the COMMON variables into the parameter list. We do not adopt this approach because it requires modification of the Fortran source code which violates our design consideration. Our approach is to extract the COMMON blocks and convert them into a structure-typed attribute in C++. Through attributes, each component can initialize the variables and return the computation result back to the client. We have tested successfully the proposed conversion methodology based on the f2c converter. Since f2c only translates Fortran to C, we still needed to edit the converted code to meet the C++ and IDL syntax. For example, C++/IDL requires a tag in the structure type, while C does not. In this paper, we identify the necessary changes to the f2c converter in order to directly generate the C++ header and the IDL file. Our future work is to add GUI interface to ease the decomposition task by simply dragging and dropping icons.

  14. An Off-Line Simulation System for Development of Real-Time FORTRAN Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, James W.

    Implementation of an ISA FORTRAN standard for executive functions and process input-output within a simulation system called MINIFOR provides a useful real-time program development tool for small single function, dedicated minicomputers having a FORTRAN compiler but limited program development aids. A FORTRAN-based pre-compiler is used off-line to…

  15. A FORTRAN program for determining aircraft stability and control derivatives from flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maine, R. E.; Iliff, K. W.

    1975-01-01

    A digital computer program written in FORTRAN IV for the estimation of aircraft stability and control derivatives is presented. The program uses a maximum likelihood estimation method, and two associated programs for routine, related data handling are also included. The three programs form a package that can be used by relatively inexperienced personnel to process large amounts of data with a minimum of manpower. This package was used to successfully analyze 1500 maneuvers on 20 aircraft, and is designed to be used without modification on as many types of computers as feasible. Program listings and sample check cases are included.

  16. User's manual for MMLE3, a general FORTRAN program for maximum likelihood parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maine, R. E.; Iliff, K. W.

    1980-01-01

    A user's manual for the FORTRAN IV computer program MMLE3 is described. It is a maximum likelihood parameter estimation program capable of handling general bilinear dynamic equations of arbitrary order with measurement noise and/or state noise (process noise). The theory and use of the program is described. The basic MMLE3 program is quite general and, therefore, applicable to a wide variety of problems. The basic program can interact with a set of user written problem specific routines to simplify the use of the program on specific systems. A set of user routines for the aircraft stability and control derivative estimation problem is provided with the program.

  17. AIRSLUG: A fortran program for the computation of type curves to estimate transmissivity and storativity from prematurely terminated air-pressurized slug tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greene, E.A.; Shapiro, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Fortran code AIRSLUG can be used to generate the type curves needed to analyze the recovery data from prematurely terminated air-pressurized slug tests. These type curves, when used with a graphical software package, enable the engineer or scientist to analyze field tests to estimate transmissivity and storativity. Prematurely terminating the slug test can significantly reduce the overall time needed to conduct the test, especially at low-permeability sites, thus saving time and money.The Fortran code AIRSLUG can be used to generate the type curves needed to analyze the recovery data from prematurely terminated air-pressurized slug tests. These type curves, when used with a graphical software package, enable the engineer or scientist to analyze field tests to estimate transmissivity and storativity. Prematurely terminating the slug test can significantly reduce the overall time needed to conduct the test, especially at low-permeability sites, thus saving time and money.

  18. Flexible Animation Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Scott S.

    1990-01-01

    FLEXAN (Flexible Animation), computer program animating structural dynamics on Evans and Sutherland PS300-series graphics workstation with VAX/VMS host computer. Typical application is animation of spacecraft undergoing structural stresses caused by thermal and vibrational effects. Displays distortions in shape of spacecraft. Program displays single natural mode of vibration, mode history, or any general deformation of flexible structure. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  19. COMMAND: A FORTRAN program for simplified composite analysis and design. [computerized design of multilayered composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, G. N.

    1976-01-01

    A FORTRAN program is presented for preliminary analysis and design of multilayered composite panels subjected to inplane loads. All plys are of the same material. The composite is assumed symmetric about the midplane, but need not be balanced. Failure criterion includes limit ply strains and lower bounds on composite inplane stiffnesses. Multiple load conditions are considered. The required input data is defined and examples are provided to aid the use in making the program operational. Average panel design times are two seconds on an IBM 360/67 computer. Results are compared with published literature. A complete FORTRAN listing of program COMAND is provided. In addition, the optimization program CONMIN is required for design.

  20. CONMIN: A FORTRAN program for constrained function minimization: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, G. N.

    1973-01-01

    CONMIN is a FORTRAN program, in subroutine form, for the solution of linear or nonlinear constrained optimization problems. The basic optimization algorithm is the Method of Feasible Directions. The user must provide a main calling program and an external routine to evaluate the objective and constraint functions and to provide gradient information. If analytic gradients of the objective or constraint functions are not available, this information is calculated by finite difference. While the program is intended primarily for efficient solution of constrained problems, unconstrained function minimization problems may also be solved, and the conjugate direction method of Fletcher and Reeves is used for this purpose. This manual describes the use of CONMIN and defines all necessary parameters. Sufficient information is provided so that the program can be used without special knowledge of optimization techniques. Sample problems are included to help the user become familiar with CONMIN and to make the program operational.

  1. Optimization techniques for FORTRAN 4 (G and H) programs written for the IBM 360 under OS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, J. L.

    1971-01-01

    A fairly complete list is reported of programming techniques which are available to the programmer for optimizing the execution time of production programs written in FORTRAN IV (G and H) for the IBM 360 under OS. After the program has been complied under FORTRAN H, OPT=2, then the process of actually changing code begins. The bulk of execution time of FORTRAN programs can almost always be attributed to a few loops, and primary consideration is given to these.

  2. WATEQ4F - a personal computer Fortran translation of the geochemical model WATEQ2 with revised data base

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, J.W.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Zachmann, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    A FORTRAN 77 version of the PL/1 computer program for the geochemical model WATEQ2, which computes major and trace element speciation and mineral saturation for natural waters has been developed. The code (WATEQ4F) has been adapted to execute on an IBM PC or compatible microcomputer. Two versions of the code are available, one operating with IBM Professional FORTRAN and an 8087 or 89287 numeric coprocessor, and one which operates without a numeric coprocessor using Microsoft FORTRAN 77. The calculation procedure is identical to WATEQ2, which has been installed on many mainframes and minicomputers. Limited data base revisions include the addition of the following ions: AlHS04(++), BaS04, CaHS04(++), FeHS04(++), NaF, SrC03, and SrHCO3(+). This report provides the reactions and references for the data base revisions, instructions for program operation, and an explanation of the input and output files. Attachments contain sample output from three water analyses used as test cases and the complete FORTRAN source listing. U.S. Geological Survey geochemical simulation program PHREEQE and mass balance program BALANCE also have been adapted to execute on an IBM PC or compatible microcomputer with a numeric coprocessor and the IBM Professional FORTRAN compiler. (Author 's abstract)

  3. A Revised FORTRAN IV Program for Three-mode Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, James A.; Walsh, Roberta

    1976-01-01

    This Fortran IV revision of an earlier three-mode factor analysis program uses a main program-subprogram structure and core storage and is written in a sufficiently general form as to be easily convertable to most machines having a Fortran IV compiler. (RC)

  4. TIDY, a complete code for renumbering and editing FORTRAN source programs. User's manual for IBM 360/67

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, A. V.; Vanderplaats, G. N.

    1973-01-01

    TIDY, a computer code which edits and renumerates FORTRAN decks which have become difficult to read because of many patches and revisions, is described. The old program is reorganized so that statement numbers are added sequentially, and extraneous FORTRAN statements are deleted. General instructions for using TIDY on the IBM 360/67 Tymeshare System, and specific instructions for use on the NASA/AMES IBM 360/67 TSS system are included as well as specific instructions on how to run TIDY in conversational and in batch modes. TIDY may be adopted for use on other computers.

  5. Developing CORBA-Based Distributed Scientific Applications From Legacy Fortran Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sang, Janche; Kim, Chan; Lopez, Isaac

    2000-01-01

    An efficient methodology is presented for integrating legacy applications written in Fortran into a distributed object framework. Issues and strategies regarding the conversion and decomposition of Fortran codes into Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) objects are discussed. Fortran codes are modified as little as possible as they are decomposed into modules and wrapped as objects. A new conversion tool takes the Fortran application as input and generates the C/C++ header file and Interface Definition Language (IDL) file. In addition, the performance of the client server computing is evaluated.

  6. NLEdit: A generic graphical user interface for Fortran programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlett, Brian P.

    1994-01-01

    NLEdit is a generic graphical user interface for the preprocessing of Fortran namelist input files. The interface consists of a menu system, a message window, a help system, and data entry forms. A form is generated for each namelist. The form has an input field for each namelist variable along with a one-line description of that variable. Detailed help information, default values, and minimum and maximum allowable values can all be displayed via menu picks. Inputs are processed through a scientific calculator program that allows complex equations to be used instead of simple numeric inputs. A custom user interface is generated simply by entering information about the namelist input variables into an ASCII file. There is no need to learn a new graphics system or programming language. NLEdit can be used as a stand-alone program or as part of a larger graphical user interface. Although NLEdit is intended for files using namelist format, it can be easily modified to handle other file formats.

  7. GKS-EZ programming manual for FORTRAN-77

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    A standard has now been adopted for subroutine packages that drive graphic devices. It is known as the Graphical Kernel system (GKS), and many commercial implementations of it are available. Unfortunately, it is a difficult system to learn, and certain functions that are important for scientific use are not provided. Although GKS can be used to achieve portability of graphic applications between graphic devices, computers, and operating systems, it can also be misused in this respect. In addition, it introduces the very real problem of portability between the various implementations of GKS. This document describes a set of FORTRAN-77 subroutines that may be used to control a wide variety of graphic devices and overcome most of these problems. Some of these subroutines are from GKS itself, while others are higher-level subroutines that call GKS subroutines. These subroutines are collectively known as GKS-EZ. The purpose is to supply someone who is not a specialist in computer graphics with a flexible, robust, and easy to learn graphics system. Users of GKS-EZ should not have much need for a full GKS manual; this document will supply all of the information to use GKS-EZ except for a few items. These missing items include the numeric identification of the supported graphic devices and the procedure for linking the GKS subroutines into a executable module.

  8. A FORTRAN program for the analysis of linear continuous and sample-data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    A FORTRAN digital computer program which performs the general analysis of linearized control systems is described. State variable techniques are used to analyze continuous, discrete, and sampled data systems. Analysis options include the calculation of system eigenvalues, transfer functions, root loci, root contours, frequency responses, power spectra, and transient responses for open- and closed-loop systems. A flexible data input format allows the user to define systems in a variety of representations. Data may be entered by inputing explicit data matrices or matrices constructed in user written subroutines, by specifying transfer function block diagrams, or by using a combination of these methods.

  9. Numerical method and FORTRAN program for the solution of an axisymmetric electrostatic collector design problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reese, O. W.

    1972-01-01

    The numerical calculation is described of the steady-state flow of electrons in an axisymmetric, spherical, electrostatic collector for a range of boundary conditions. The trajectory equations of motion are solved alternately with Poisson's equation for the potential field until convergence is achieved. A direct (noniterative) numerical technique is used to obtain the solution to Poisson's equation. Space charge effects are included for initial current densities as large as 100 A/sq cm. Ways of dealing successfully with the difficulties associated with these high densities are discussed. A description of the mathematical model, a discussion of numerical techniques, results from two typical runs, and the FORTRAN computer program are included.

  10. Real-time computer simulations of excitable media: JAVA as a scientific language and as a wrapper for C and FORTRAN programs.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Flavio H; Cherry, Elizabeth M; Hastings, Harold M; Evans, Steven J

    2002-01-01

    We describe a useful setting for interactive, real-time study of mathematical models of cardiac electrical activity, using implicit and explicit integration schemes implemented in JAVA. These programs are intended as a teaching aid for the study and understanding of general excitable media. Particularly for cardiac cell models and the ionic currents underlying their basic electrical dynamics. Within the programs, excitable media properties such as thresholds and refractoriness and their dependence on parameter values can be analyzed. In addition, the cardiac model applets allow the study of reentrant tachyarrhythmias using premature stimuli and conduction blocks to induce or to terminate reentrant waves of electrical activation in one and two dimensions. The role of some physiological parameters in the transition from tachycardia to fibrillation also can be analyzed by varying the maximum conductances of ion channels associated with a given model in real time during the simulations. These applets are available for download at http://arrhythmia.hofstra.edu or its mirror site http://stardec.ascc.neu.edu/~fenton.

  11. SEEK: A FORTRAN optimization program using a feasible directions gradient search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the use of computer program 'SEEK' which works in conjunction with two user-written subroutines and an input data file to perform an optimization procedure on a user's problem. The optimization method uses a modified feasible directions gradient technique. SEEK is written in ANSI standard Fortran 77, has an object size of about 46K bytes, and can be used on a personal computer running DOS. This report describes the use of the program and discusses the optimizing method. The program use is illustrated with four example problems: a bushing design, a helical coil spring design, a gear mesh design, and a two-parameter Weibull life-reliability curve fit.

  12. Systems identification using a modified Newton-Raphson method: A FORTRAN program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. W., Jr.; Iliff, K. W.

    1972-01-01

    A FORTRAN program is offered which computes a maximum likelihood estimate of the parameters of any linear, constant coefficient, state space model. For the case considered, the maximum likelihood estimate can be identical to that which minimizes simultaneously the weighted mean square difference between the computed and measured response of a system and the weighted square of the difference between the estimated and a priori parameter values. A modified Newton-Raphson or quasilinearization method is used to perform the minimization which typically requires several iterations. A starting technique is used which insures convergence for any initial values of the unknown parameters. The program and its operation are described in sufficient detail to enable the user to apply the program to his particular problem with a minimum of difficulty.

  13. Structured Design Language for Computer Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, Walter H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Box language used at all stages of program development. Developed to provide improved productivity in designing, coding, and maintaining computer programs. BOX system written in FORTRAN 77 for batch execution.

  14. Fortran programs for the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation in a fully anisotropic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muruganandam, P.; Adhikari, S. K.

    2009-10-01

    , etc.: 122 907 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 609 662 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77 and Fortran 90/95 Computer: PC Operating system: Linux, Unix RAM: 1 GByte (i, iv, v), 2 GByte (ii, vi, vii, x, xi), 4 GByte (iii, viii, xii), 8 GByte (ix) Classification: 2.9, 4.3, 4.12 Nature of problem: These programs are designed to solve the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii nonlinear partial differential equation in one-, two- or three-space dimensions with a harmonic, circularly-symmetric, spherically-symmetric, axially-symmetric or anisotropic trap. The Gross-Pitaevskii equation describes the properties of a dilute trapped Bose-Einstein condensate. Solution method: The time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation is solved by the split-step Crank-Nicolson method by discretizing in space and time. The discretized equation is then solved by propagation, in either imaginary or real time, over small time steps. The method yields the solution of stationary and/or non-stationary problems. Additional comments: This package consists of 12 programs, see "Program title", above. FORTRAN77 versions are provided for each of the 12 and, in addition, Fortran 90/95 versions are included for ii, iii, vi, viii, ix, xii. For the particular purpose of each program please see the below. Running time: Minutes on a medium PC (i, iv, v, vii, x, xi), a few hours on a medium PC (ii, vi, viii, xii), days on a medium PC (iii, ix). Program summary (1)Title of program: imagtime1d.F Title of electronic file: imagtime1d.tar.gz Catalogue identifier: Program summary URL: Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Distribution format: tar.gz Computers: PC/Linux, workstation/UNIX Maximum RAM memory: 1 GByte Programming language used: Fortran 77 Typical running time: Minutes on a medium PC Unusual features: None Nature of physical problem: This program is designed to solve the time-dependent Gross

  15. SELEN: A Fortran 90 program for solving the “sea-level equation”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spada, G.; Stocchi, P.

    2007-05-01

    We present SELEN, a Fortran 90 computer program for solving the "sea-level equation", the law that governs the sea-level variations associated with the melting of the Pleistocene ice sheets. As shown here by a number of examples, SELEN also allows to study a suite of geophysical processes accompanying the mass redistributions associated with glacial-isostatic adjustment, such as vertical deformations of the solid surface of the Earth, and variations of the shape of the geoid. SELEN is built in a simple and easily testable manner, and requires modest computer resources. The source code, which is freely available on request, can be easily modified to implement new features of the sea-level equation or to focus on specific geodynamical aspects of glacial-isostatic adjustment.

  16. A Fortran visualization program for spherical data on a Yin-Yang grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Masato; Kageyama, Akira

    2014-04-01

    Fortran 90 program to visualize data on the Yin-Yang grid system is developed. The purpose of this study is to provide simulation researchers with a source code as a starting point of their own custom-made visualization tools. A basic but sufficiently diverse set of visualization methods are implemented using a Fortran 90 binding for OpenGL for scalar and vector fields defined or simulated on the Yin-Yang grid.

  17. A Fortran-90 Based Multiprecision System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The author has developed a new version of his Fortran multiprecision computation system that is based on the Fortran-90 language. With this new approach, a translator program is not required - translation of Fortran code for multiprecision is accomplished by merely utilizing advanced features of Fortran-90, such as derived data types and operator extensions. This approach results in more reliable translation and also permits programmers of multiprecision applications to utilize the full power of the Fortran-90 language. Three multiprecision datatypes are supported in this system: multiprecision integer. real and complex. All the usual Fortran conventions for mixed mode operations are supported, and many of the Fortran intrinsics, such as SIN, EXP and MOD, are supported with multiprecision arguments. This paper also briefly describes an interesting application of this software, wherein new number-theoretic identities have been discovered by means of multiprecision computations.

  18. CDC to CRAY FORTRAN conversion manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgary, C.; Diebert, D.

    1983-01-01

    Documentation describing software differences between two general purpose computers for scientific applications is presented. Descriptions of the use of the FORTRAN and FORTRAN 77 high level programming language on a CDC 7600 under SCOPE and a CRAY XMP under COS are offered. Itemized differences of the FORTRAN language sets of the two machines are also included. The material is accompanied by numerous examples of preferred programming techniques for the two machines.

  19. Computer program determines inventory size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaspar, H.

    1966-01-01

    FORTRAN 4 computer program calculates optimum size of a small inventory of relatively complex or expensive items. This program can be used in situations where the initial cost of purchase is large or when there is a need for a balanced inventory on a short production run.

  20. A FORTRAN program for calculating nonlinear seismic ground response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joyner, William B.

    1977-01-01

    The program described here was designed for calculating the nonlinear seismic response of a system of horizontal soil layers underlain by a semi-infinite elastic medium representing bedrock. Excitation is a vertically incident shear wave in the underlying medium. The nonlinear hysteretic behavior of the soil is represented by a model consisting of simple linear springs and Coulomb friction elements arranged as shown. A boundary condition is used which takes account of finite rigidity in the elastic substratum. The computations are performed by an explicit finite-difference scheme that proceeds step by step in space and time. A brief program description is provided here with instructions for preparing the input and a source listing. A more detailed discussion of the method is presented elsewhere as is the description of a different program employing implicit integration.

  1. AFWL Benchmark Computer Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    of Fortran programs which is free from non-standard coding. A computer program, SCOFF (Semi- automated Conversion of Fortran Four ) was developed to...0- 0 20 -p I.-- -u - tn -- * -a- - -4-0rn ~4 0--00.-49u ep~~ ~me 0 ~-.1c- 93 .9c - 11 ps o sc *-U.-in mo - -u m I- - ~~~- e4 -.- Ca - w fi* -- oa muu...rowl -,- 0 9 a~ I- a 0-4 a in- mum a w4 mom owu J 94c1 &04l 49 0-. * . 4P PCI-4 ZO 0 .~ .- . . . .n . 0 - - 0- ---- - - ~ zWOW0 - 04 -m 01-0z4 4 .ini

  2. Fortran experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paix, David

    2008-02-01

    Reading your feature article marking 50 years of the computer programming language Fortran (December 2007 pp31-33) reminded me of how I used to work with IBM machines 30 to 40 years ago when I had access to an IBM model 360/50 at the University of New South Wales in Australia. A huge, expensive installation, it was a facility for the whole university. The machine's large cabinets were visible in their air-conditioned room to which users had no access. Machine operators fed decks of punched cards into a card reader, then retrieved them and put them into their boxes or, for small decks, secured them with a rubber band. The mere users waited outside to get their cards back, and (hopefully) a print-out with their results. Everything seemed very advanced, compared with the log tables, slide-rules and mechanical calculators that were our alternative calculating aids of the time.

  3. Optimization guide for programs compiled under IBM FORTRAN H (OPT=2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. M.; Dobyns, A. H.; Marsh, H. M.

    1977-01-01

    Guidelines are given to provide the programmer with various techniques for optimizing programs when the FORTRAN IV H compiler is used with OPT=2. Subroutines and programs are described in the appendices along with a timing summary of all the examples given in the manual.

  4. MT2DInvMatlab—A program in MATLAB and FORTRAN for two-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seong Kon; Kim, Hee Joon; Song, Yoonho; Lee, Choon-Ki

    2009-08-01

    MT2DInvMatlab is an open-source MATLAB® software package for two-dimensional (2D) inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) data; it is written in mixed languages of MATLAB and FORTRAN. MT2DInvMatlab uses the finite element method (FEM) to compute 2D MT model responses, and smoothness-constrained least-squares inversion with a spatially variable regularization parameter algorithm to stabilize the inversion process and provide a high-resolution optimal earth model. It is also able to include terrain effects in inversion by incorporating topography into a forward model. This program runs under the MATLAB environment so that users can utilize the existing general interface of MATLAB, while some specific functions are written in FORTRAN 90 to speed up computation and reuse pre-existing FORTRAN code in the MATLAB environment with minimal modification. This program has been tested using synthetic models, including one with variable topography, and on field data. The results were assessed by comparing inverse models obtained with MT2DInvMatlab and with a non-linear conjugate gradient (NLCG) algorithm. In both tests the new inversion software reconstructs the subsurface resistivity structure very closely and provides an improvement in both resolution and stability.

  5. Modernizing Fortran 77 Legacy Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decyk, Viktor; Norton, Charles

    2003-01-01

    An incremental approach to modernization of scientific software written in the Fortran 77 computing language has been developed. This approach makes it possible to preserve the investment in legacy Fortran software while augmenting the software with modern capabilities to satisfy expanded requirements. This approach could be advantageous (1) in situations in which major rewriting of application programs is undesirable or impossible, or (2) as a means of transition to major rewriting.

  6. A new version of the CADNA library for estimating round-off error propagation in Fortran programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jézéquel, Fabienne; Chesneaux, Jean-Marie; Lamotte, Jean-Luc

    2010-11-01

    The CADNA library enables one to estimate, using a probabilistic approach, round-off error propagation in any simulation program. CADNA provides new numerical types, the so-called stochastic types, on which round-off errors can be estimated. Furthermore CADNA contains the definition of arithmetic and relational operators which are overloaded for stochastic variables and the definition of mathematical functions which can be used with stochastic arguments. On 64-bit processors, depending on the rounding mode chosen, the mathematical library associated with the GNU Fortran compiler may provide incorrect results or generate severe bugs. Therefore the CADNA library has been improved to enable the numerical validation of programs on 64-bit processors. New version program summaryProgram title: CADNA Catalogue identifier: AEAT_v1_1 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAT_v1_1.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 28 488 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 463 778 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran NOTE: A C++ version of this program is available in the Library as AEGQ_v1_0 Computer: PC running LINUX with an i686 or an ia64 processor, UNIX workstations including SUN, IBM Operating system: LINUX, UNIX Classification: 6.5 Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEAT_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Commun. 178 (2008) 933 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: A simulation program which uses floating-point arithmetic generates round-off errors, due to the rounding performed at each assignment and at each arithmetic operation. Round-off error propagation may invalidate the result of a program. The CADNA library enables one to estimate round

  7. User's manual for LINEAR, a FORTRAN program to derive linear aircraft models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, Eugene L.; Patterson, Brian P.; Antoniewicz, Robert F.

    1987-01-01

    This report documents a FORTRAN program that provides a powerful and flexible tool for the linearization of aircraft models. The program LINEAR numerically determines a linear system model using nonlinear equations of motion and a user-supplied nonlinear aerodynamic model. The system model determined by LINEAR consists of matrices for both state and observation equations. The program has been designed to allow easy selection and definition of the state, control, and observation variables to be used in a particular model.

  8. Red`s natural editor: A program designed to edit FORTRAN programs

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.

    1993-09-01

    This program allows the user to edit files using a completely natural method. You don`t need a lot of time to learn how to use this program; it`s as simple as using a typewriter. Even while you are reading this report you can start editing files. Although it is as simple as using a typewriter, this is a full screen editor, so that you can overwrite (replace) anything, delete or insert characters or lines, copy or move lines, find or change anything. All of this can be done without using any complicated combinations of key strokes (as you are forced to memorize with other editors). This program is written in standard FORTRAN. Although it was designed and implemented on an IBM-PC, it can be easily adapted for use on virtually any graphics terminal.

  9. MIPROPS - INTERACTIVE FORTRAN PROGRAMS FOR MICROCOMPUTERS TO CALCULATE THE THERMAL PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF TWELVE FLUIDS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleghorn, T. F.

    1994-01-01

    MIPROPS is a set of programs which gives the thermophysical and transport properties of selected fluids. Although these programs are written in FORTRAN 77 for implementation on microcomputers, they are direct translations of interactive FORTRAN IV programs which were originally developed for large mainframes. MIPROPS calculates the properties of fluids in both the liquid and vapor states over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. The fluids included are: helium, parahydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, argon, nitrogen trifluoride, methane, ethylene, ethane, propane, and iso- and normal butane. All of the programs except for the helium program utilize the same mathematical model of the equation of state. A separate program was necessary for helium, as the model for the helium thermodynamic surface is of a different form. The input variables are any two of pressure, density, or temperature for the single phase regions, and either pressure or temperature for the saturated liquid or vapor states. The output is pressure, density, temperature, internal energy, enthalpy, entropy, specific heat capacities, and speed of sound. In addition, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and dielectric constants are calculated for most of the fluids. The user can select either a single point or a table of output values for a specified temperature range, and can display the data either in engineering or metric units. This machine independent FORTRAN 77 program was implemented on an IBM PC XT with an MS-DOS 3.21 operating system. It has a memory requirement of approximately 100K. The program was developed in 1986.

  10. TRANDES: A FORTRAN program for transonic airfoil analysis or design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1977-01-01

    A program called TRANDES is presented that is used for the analysis of steady, irrotational transonic flow over specified two-dimensional airfoils in free air or for the design of airfoils having a prescribed pressure distribution, including the effects of weak viscous interaction. Instructions on program usage, listings of the program, and sample cases are given.

  11. TSPP - A Collection of FORTRAN Programs for Processing and Manipulating Time Series

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, David M.

    2008-01-01

    This report lists a number of FORTRAN programs that I have developed over the years for processing and manipulating strong-motion accelerograms. The collection is titled TSPP, which stands for Time Series Processing Programs. I have excluded 'strong-motion accelerograms' from the title, however, as the boundary between 'strong' and 'weak' motion has become blurred with the advent of broadband sensors and high-dynamic range dataloggers, and many of the programs can be used with any evenly spaced time series, not just acceleration time series. This version of the report is relatively brief, consisting primarily of an annotated list of the programs, with two examples of processing, and a few comments on usage. I do not include a parameter-by-parameter guide to the programs. Future versions might include more examples of processing, illustrating the various parameter choices in the programs. Although these programs have been used by the U.S. Geological Survey, no warranty, expressed or implied, is made by the USGS as to the accuracy or functioning of the programs and related program material, nor shall the fact of distribution constitute any such warranty, and no responsibility is assumed by the USGS in connection therewith. The programs are distributed on an 'as is' basis, with no warranty of support from me. These programs were written for my use and are being publically distributed in the hope that others might find them as useful as I have. I would, however, appreciate being informed about bugs, and I always welcome suggestions for improvements to the codes. Please note that I have made little effort to optimize the coding of the programs or to include a user-friendly interface (many of the programs in this collection have been included in the software usdp (Utility Software for Data Processing), being developed by Akkar et al. (personal communication, 2008); usdp includes a graphical user interface). Speed of execution has been sacrificed in favor of a code that

  12. FORTRAN program for calculating coolant flow and metal temperatures of a full-coverage-film-cooled vane or blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program that calculates the coolant flow and the metal temperatures of a full-coverage-film-cooled vane or blade was developed. The analysis was based on compressible, one-dimensional fluid flow and on one-dimensional heat transfer and treats the vane or blade shell as a porous wall. The calculated temperatures are average values for the shell outer-surface area associated with each film-cooling hole row. A thermal-barrier coating may be specified on the shell outer surface, and centrifugal effects can be included for blade calculations. The program is written in FORTRAN 4 and is operational on a UNIVAC 1100/42 computer. The method of analysis, the program input, the program output, and two sample problems are provided.

  13. ASCITOVG - FORTRAN PROGRAM FOR X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY DATA REFORMATTING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Able, P. B.

    1994-01-01

    It is often desirable to use a central, more powerful computer to analyze data captured on a local machine. ASCITOVG is a program for use on an IBM PC series computer which creates binary format files from columns of ASCII-format numbers. The resultant files are suitable for interactive analysis on a DEC PDP-11/73 under the Micro-RSX operating system running the VGS-5000 Enhanced Data Processing (EDP) software package. EDP performs data analysis interactively with a color graphics display, speeding up the analysis considerably when compared with batch job processing. Its interactive analysis capabilities also allow the researcher to watch for spurious data that might go undetected when some form of automatic spectrum processing is used. The incompatibility in floating-point number representations of an IBM PC and a DEC computer were resolved by a FORTRAN subroutine that correctly converts single-precision, floating-point numbers on the PC so that they can be directly read by DEC computers, such as a VAX. The subroutine also can convert binary DEC files (single-precision, floating-point numbers) to IBM PC format. This may prove a more efficient method of moving data from, for instance, a VAX-cluster down to a local IBM PC for further examination, manipulation, or display. The input data file used by ASCITOVG is simply a text file in the form of a column of ASCII numbers, with each value followed by a carriage return. These can be the output of a data collection routine or can even be keyed in through the use of a program editor. The data file header required by the EDP programs for an x-ray photoelectron spectrum is also written to the file. The spectrum parameters, entered by the user when the program is run, are coded into the header format used internally by all of the VGS-5000 series EDP packages. Any file transfer protocol having provision for binary data can be used to transmit the resulting file from the PC to the DEC machine. Each EDP data file has at least

  14. LINOPT: A FORTRAN Routine for Solving Linear Programming Problems,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-09

    MD 20910 2R44EA501 I I. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME ANO AOORESS 12. REPORT DATE 9 October 1981 ’I. NUMBER OF PAGES 46 11. MONITORING AGENCY NAME...block /XXXLP/, which must accordingly be a common block in the calling program. ROUNDOFF CONTROL In the program there are three input variables which...can be used to control roundoff error accummulations. EPS is a tolerance used in checking constraint violations. H is also used to zero out

  15. Computer program for calculation of ideal gas thermodynamic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, S.; Mc Bride, B. J.

    1968-01-01

    Computer program calculates ideal gas thermodynamic properties for any species for which molecular constant data is available. Partial functions and derivatives from formulas based on statistical mechanics are provided by the program which is written in FORTRAN 4 and MAP.

  16. A FORTRAN-Based Program for Computerized Algebraic Manipulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-21

    storage will be required for intermediate and final results. When the size and length of the program approach the limit of a particular machine, storage...15,161. The latter approach is simpler and easier to implement and thus is the approach that is fol- lowed. PROGRAM OBJECTIVES The construction of a...bracket (1,J)m n with respect to the variables m,n. The result is stored in location K. Subroutine INTEG (IJ,K) INTEG (Ij,K) integrates each term of I with

  17. Subroutine bundls, a fortran IV program to determine schreinemakers bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, J.; Andrew, A. S.

    Given an entire set of relevant balanced equations, BUNDLS and associated subroutines select all invariant points and order univariant lines around these points. Invariant points are formed by taking every set of m absent phases from each reaction. All revelant univariant lines are ordered around each invariant point by a direct application of the rules of Schreinemakers. The program also calculates true angular values for PT, P-μ x1 or μ y-μ x diagrams.

  18. anQCD: Fortran programs for couplings at complex momenta in various analytic QCD models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, César; Cvetič, Gorazd

    2016-02-01

    We provide three Fortran programs which evaluate the QCD analytic (holomorphic) couplings Aν(Q2) for complex or real squared momenta Q2. These couplings are holomorphic analogs of the powers a(Q2)ν of the underlying perturbative QCD (pQCD) coupling a(Q2) ≡αs(Q2) / π, in three analytic QCD models (anQCD): Fractional Analytic Perturbation Theory (FAPT), Two-delta analytic QCD (2 δanQCD), and Massive Perturbation Theory (MPT). The index ν can be noninteger. The provided programs do basically the same job as the Mathematica package anQCD.m published by us previously (Ayala and Cvetič, 2015), but are now written in Fortran.

  19. Elliptical orbit performance computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myler, T. R.

    1981-01-01

    A FORTRAN coded computer program which generates and plots elliptical orbit performance capability of space boosters for presentation purposes is described. Orbital performance capability of space boosters is typically presented as payload weight as a function of perigee and apogee altitudes. The parameters are derived from a parametric computer simulation of the booster flight which yields the payload weight as a function of velocity and altitude at insertion. The process of converting from velocity and altitude to apogee and perigee altitude and plotting the results as a function of payload weight is mechanized with the ELOPE program. The program theory, user instruction, input/output definitions, subroutine descriptions and detailed FORTRAN coding information are included.

  20. An empirical study of FORTRAN programs for parallelizing compilers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Zhiyu; Li, Zhiyuan; Yew, Pen-Chung

    1990-01-01

    Some results are reported from an empirical study of program characteristics that are important in parallelizing compiler writers, especially in the area of data dependence analysis and program transformations. The state of the art in data dependence analysis and some parallel execution techniques are examined. The major findings are included. Many subscripts contain symbolic terms with unknown values. A few methods of determining their values at compile time are evaluated. Array references with coupled subscripts appear quite frequently; these subscripts must be handled simultaneously in a dependence test, rather than being handled separately as in current test algorithms. Nonzero coefficients of loop indexes in most subscripts are found to be simple: they are either 1 or -1. This allows an exact real-valued test to be as accurate as an exact integer-valued test for one-dimensional or two-dimensional arrays. Dependencies with uncertain distance are found to be rather common, and one of the main reasons is the frequent appearance of symbolic terms with unknown values.

  1. ARVO: A Fortran package for computing the solvent accessible surface area and the excluded volume of overlapping spheres via analytic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buša, Ján; Džurina, Jozef; Hayryan, Edik; Hayryan, Shura; Hu, Chin-Kun; Plavka, Ján; Pokorný, Imrich; Skřivánek, Jaroslav; Wu, Ming-Chya

    2005-01-01

    In calculating the solvation energy of proteins, the hydration effects, drug binding, molecular docking, etc., it is important to have an efficient and exact algorithms for computing the solvent accessible surface area and the excluded volume of macromolecules. Here we present a Fortran package based on the new exact analytical methods for computing volume and surface area of overlapping spheres. In the considered procedure the surface area and volume are expressed as surface integrals of the second kind over the closed region. Using the stereographic projection the surface integrals are transformed to a sum of double integrals which are reduced to the curve integrals. MPI Fortran version is described as well. The package is also useful for computing the percolation probability of continuum percolation models. Program summaryTitle of program: ARVO Catalogue identifier: ADUL Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADUL Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Operating system under which the program has been tested: LINUX system and Windows system Programming language used: FORTRAN Computer: PC Pentium; SPP'2000; Number of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 322 633 Number of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5051 Distribution format: tar.gz Card punching code: ASCII Nature of physical problem: Molecular mechanics computations, continuum percolations. Method of solution: Numerical algorithm based on the analytical formulas, after using the stereographic transformation. Restriction on the complexity of the problem: The program does not account explicitly for cavities inside the molecule. Typical running time: Depends on the size of the molecule under consideration. Unusual features of the program: No

  2. Retargeting of existing FORTRAN program and development of parallel compilers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Dharma P.

    1988-01-01

    The software models used in implementing the parallelizing compiler for the B-HIVE multiprocessor system are described. The various models and strategies used in the compiler development are: flexible granularity model, which allows a compromise between two extreme granularity models; communication model, which is capable of precisely describing the interprocessor communication timings and patterns; loop type detection strategy, which identifies different types of loops; critical path with coloring scheme, which is a versatile scheduling strategy for any multicomputer with some associated communication costs; and loop allocation strategy, which realizes optimum overlapped operations between computation and communication of the system. Using these models, several sample routines of the AIR3D package are examined and tested. It may be noted that automatically generated codes are highly parallelized to provide the maximized degree of parallelism, obtaining the speedup up to a 28 to 32-processor system. A comparison of parallel codes for both the existing and proposed communication model, is performed and the corresponding expected speedup factors are obtained. The experimentation shows that the B-HIVE compiler produces more efficient codes than existing techniques. Work is progressing well in completing the final phase of the compiler. Numerous enhancements are needed to improve the capabilities of the parallelizing compiler.

  3. User's manual for interactive LINEAR: A FORTRAN program to derive linear aircraft models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoniewicz, Robert F.; Duke, Eugene L.; Patterson, Brian P.

    1988-01-01

    An interactive FORTRAN program that provides the user with a powerful and flexible tool for the linearization of aircraft aerodynamic models is documented in this report. The program LINEAR numerically determines a linear system model using nonlinear equations of motion and a user-supplied linear or nonlinear aerodynamic model. The nonlinear equations of motion used are six-degree-of-freedom equations with stationary atmosphere and flat, nonrotating earth assumptions. The system model determined by LINEAR consists of matrices for both the state and observation equations. The program has been designed to allow easy selection and definition of the state, control, and observation variables to be used in a particular model.

  4. The RANDOM computer program: A linear congruential random number generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, R. F., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The RANDOM Computer Program is a FORTRAN program for generating random number sequences and testing linear congruential random number generators (LCGs). The linear congruential form of random number generator is discussed, and the selection of parameters of an LCG for a microcomputer described. This document describes the following: (1) The RANDOM Computer Program; (2) RANDOM.MOD, the computer code needed to implement an LCG in a FORTRAN program; and (3) The RANCYCLE and the ARITH Computer Programs that provide computational assistance in the selection of parameters for an LCG. The RANDOM, RANCYCLE, and ARITH Computer Programs are written in Microsoft FORTRAN for the IBM PC microcomputer and its compatibles. With only minor modifications, the RANDOM Computer Program and its LCG can be run on most micromputers or mainframe computers.

  5. FORTRAN 4 programs for summarization and analysis of fracture trace and lineament patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podwysocki, M. H.; Lowman, P. D., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Systematic and detailed analysis of lineament and fracture trace patterns has long been neglected because of the large number of observations involved in such an analysis. Three FORTRAN 4 programs were written to facilitate this manipulation. TRANSFORM converts the initial fracture map data into a format compatible with AZMAP, whose options allow repetitive manipulation of the data for optimization of the analysis. ROSE creates rose diagrams of the fracture patterns suitable for map overlays and tectonic interpretation. Examples are given and further analysis techniques using output from these programs are discussed.

  6. Fundamental Fortran for Social Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veldman, Donald J.

    An introduction to Fortran programming specifically for social science statistical and routine data processing is provided. The first two sections of the manual describe the components of computer hardware and software. Topics include input, output, and mass storage devices; central memory; central processing unit; internal storage of data; and…

  7. FORTRAN Algorithm for Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Hull, David R.

    1987-01-01

    FORTRAN computer algorithm containing various image-processing analysis and enhancement functions developed. Algorithm developed specifically to process images of developmental heat-engine materials obtained with sophisticated nondestructive evaluation instruments. Applications of program include scientific, industrial, and biomedical imaging for studies of flaws in materials, analyses of steel and ores, and pathology.

  8. User's guide to HYPOINVERSE-2000, a Fortran program to solve for earthquake locations and magnitudes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, Fred W.

    2002-01-01

    Hypoinverse is a computer program that processes files of seismic station data for an earthquake (like p wave arrival times and seismogram amplitudes and durations) into earthquake locations and magnitudes. It is one of a long line of similar USGS programs including HYPOLAYR (Eaton, 1969), HYPO71 (Lee and Lahr, 1972), and HYPOELLIPSE (Lahr, 1980). If you are new to Hypoinverse, you may want to start by glancing at the section “SOME SIMPLE COMMAND SEQUENCES” to get a feel of some simpler sessions. This document is essentially an advanced user’s guide, and reading it sequentially will probably plow the reader into more detail than he/she needs. Every user must have a crust model, station list and phase data input files, and glancing at these sections is a good place to begin. The program has many options because it has grown over the years to meet the needs of one the largest seismic networks in the world, but small networks with just a few stations do use the program and can ignore most of the options and commands. History and availability. Hypoinverse was originally written for the Eclipse minicomputer in 1978 (Klein, 1978). A revised version for VAX and Pro-350 computers (Klein, 1985) was later expanded to include multiple crustal models and other capabilities (Klein, 1989). This current report documents the expanded Y2000 version and it supercedes the earlier documents. It serves as a detailed user's guide to the current version running on unix and VAX-alpha computers, and to the version supplied with the Earthworm earthquake digitizing system. Fortran-77 source code (Sun and VAX compatible) and copies of this documentation is available via anonymous ftp from computers in Menlo Park. At present, the computer is swave.wr.usgs.gov and the directory is /ftp/pub/outgoing/klein/hyp2000. If you are running Hypoinverse on one of the Menlo Park EHZ or NCSN unix computers, the executable currently is ~klein/hyp2000/hyp2000. New features. The Y2000 version of

  9. GKS utilities for FORTRAN-77

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes a number of subroutines that can be useful in GKS graphic applications programmed in FORTRAN-77. The algorithms described here include subroutines to do the following: (1) Draw text characters in a more flexible manner than is possible with basic GKS. (2) Project two-dimensional and three-dimensional space onto two-dimensional space. (3) Draw smooth curves. (4) Draw two-dimensional projections of complex three-dimensional objects. FORTRAN-77 is described in American National Standard, Programming Language, FORTRAN. GKS is described in American National Standard for Information Systems: Computer Graphics -- Graphical Kernel System (GKS) Functional Description and the FORTRAN-77 interface is described in American National Standard for Information Systems: Computer Graphics -- Graphical Kernel System (GKS) FORTRAN Binding. All of the subroutine names and additional enumeration types that will be described in this document begin with the letters GZ.'' Since GKS itself does not have any subroutine names or enumeration types that begin with these letters, no confusion between the usual GKS subroutines and the ones described here should occur. Many concepts will have to be defined in the following chapters. When a concept is first encountered, it will be given in italics. The information around the italicized word or phrase may be taken as its definition.

  10. GKS utilities for FORTRAN-77

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes a number of subroutines that can be useful in GKS graphic applications programmed in FORTRAN-77. The algorithms described here include subroutines to do the following: (1) Draw text characters in a more flexible manner than is possible with basic GKS. (2) Project two-dimensional and three-dimensional space onto two-dimensional space. (3) Draw smooth curves. (4) Draw two-dimensional projections of complex three-dimensional objects. FORTRAN-77 is described in American National Standard, Programming Language, FORTRAN. GKS is described in American National Standard for Information Systems: Computer Graphics -- Graphical Kernel System (GKS) Functional Description and the FORTRAN-77 interface is described in American National Standard for Information Systems: Computer Graphics -- Graphical Kernel System (GKS) FORTRAN Binding. All of the subroutine names and additional enumeration types that will be described in this document begin with the letters ``GZ.`` Since GKS itself does not have any subroutine names or enumeration types that begin with these letters, no confusion between the usual GKS subroutines and the ones described here should occur. Many concepts will have to be defined in the following chapters. When a concept is first encountered, it will be given in italics. The information around the italicized word or phrase may be taken as its definition.

  11. ADS: A FORTRAN program for automated design synthesis: Version 1.10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, G. N.

    1985-01-01

    A new general-purpose optimization program for engineering design is described. ADS (Automated Design Synthesis - Version 1.10) is a FORTRAN program for solution of nonlinear constrained optimization problems. The program is segmented into three levels: strategy, optimizer, and one-dimensional search. At each level, several options are available so that a total of over 100 possible combinations can be created. Examples of available strategies are sequential unconstrained minimization, the Augmented Lagrange Multiplier method, and Sequential Linear Programming. Available optimizers include variable metric methods and the Method of Feasible Directions as examples, and one-dimensional search options include polynomial interpolation and the Golden Section method as examples. Emphasis is placed on ease of use of the program. All information is transferred via a single parameter list. Default values are provided for all internal program parameters such as convergence criteria, and the user is given a simple means to over-ride these, if desired.

  12. Computer network programming

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.Y.

    1996-12-31

    The programs running on a computer network can be divided into two parts, the Network Operating System and the user applications. Any high level language translator, such as C, JAVA, BASIC, FORTRAN, or COBOL, runs under NOS as a programming tool to produce network application programs or software. Each application program while running on the network provides the human user with network application services, such as remote data base search, retrieval, etc. The Network Operating System should provide a simple and elegant system interface to all the network application programs. This programming interface may request the Transport layer services on behalf of a network application program. The primary goals are to achieve programming convenience, and to avoid complexity. In a 5-layer network model, the system interface is comprised of a group of system calls which are collectively known as the session layer with its own Session Protocol Data Units. This is a position paper discussing the basic system primitives which reside between a network application program and the Transport layer, and a programming example of using such primitives.

  13. FORTRAN program for calculating leading and trailing-edge geometry of turbomachine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, L. F.

    1977-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV program which calculates leading- and trailing-edge circle radii, tangency angles on the leading- and trailing-edge circles, and stagger angles of turbomachinery blade sections using only spline points defining the blade surfaces is described. The program shifts the origin of the blade coordinates to the leading edge of the blade. Required input includes (m, theta) coordinates of a sufficient number of spline points to adequately define the two surfaces of the blade. Other required input are the radii from the axis of rotation of the leading- and trailing-edges. The output from this program is used directly as the geometrical input for a NASA developed program for calculating transonic velocities on a blade-to-blade stream surface of a turbomachine. The program is used for axial, radial, and mixed flow turbomachine blades.

  14. A brief description and comparison of programming languages FORTRAN, ALGOL, COBOL, PL/1, and LISP 1.5 from a critical standpoint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, F. P.

    1972-01-01

    Several common higher level program languages are described. FORTRAN, ALGOL, COBOL, PL/1, and LISP 1.5 are summarized and compared. FORTRAN is the most widely used scientific programming language. ALGOL is a more powerful language for scientific programming. COBOL is used for most commercial programming applications. LISP 1.5 is primarily a list-processing language. PL/1 attempts to combine the desirable features of FORTRAN, ALGOL, and COBOL into a single language.

  15. A Multiple Sphere T-Matrix Fortran Code for Use on Parallel Computer Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackowski, D. W.; Mishchenko, M. I.

    2011-01-01

    A general-purpose Fortran-90 code for calculation of the electromagnetic scattering and absorption properties of multiple sphere clusters is described. The code can calculate the efficiency factors and scattering matrix elements of the cluster for either fixed or random orientation with respect to the incident beam and for plane wave or localized- approximation Gaussian incident fields. In addition, the code can calculate maps of the electric field both interior and exterior to the spheres.The code is written with message passing interface instructions to enable the use on distributed memory compute clusters, and for such platforms the code can make feasible the calculation of absorption, scattering, and general EM characteristics of systems containing several thousand spheres.

  16. Moments of inclination error distribution computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myler, T. R.

    1981-01-01

    A FORTRAN coded computer program is described which calculates orbital inclination error statistics using a closed-form solution. This solution uses a data base of trajectory errors from actual flights to predict the orbital inclination error statistics. The Scott flight history data base consists of orbit insertion errors in the trajectory parameters - altitude, velocity, flight path angle, flight azimuth, latitude and longitude. The methods used to generate the error statistics are of general interest since they have other applications. Program theory, user instructions, output definitions, subroutine descriptions and detailed FORTRAN coding information are included.

  17. An improved algorithm and a Fortran 90 module for computing the conical function P-1/2+iτm(x)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Amparo; Segura, Javier; Temme, Nico M.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we describe an algorithm and a Fortran 90 module ( Conical) for the computation of the conical function P-1/2 >+iτm(x) for x>-1, m⩾0, τ>0. These functions appear in the solution of Dirichlet problems for domains bounded by cones; because of this, they are involved in a large number of applications in engineering and physics. In the Fortran 90 module, the admissible parameter ranges for computing the conical functions in standard IEEE double precision arithmetic are restricted to (x,m,τ)∈(-1,1)×[0,40]×[0,100] and (x,m,τ)∈(1,100)×[0,100]×[0,100]. Based on tests of the three-term recurrence relation satisfied by these functions and direct comparison with Maple, we claim a relative accuracy close to 10 in the full parameter range, although a mild loss of accuracy can be found at some points of the oscillatory region of the conical functions. The relative accuracy increases to 10-10 in the region of the monotonic regime of the functions where integral representations are computed ( -1Program summaryProgram title: Conical Catalogue identifier: AELD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AELD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5387 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 49 615 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90 Computer: Any supporting a FORTRAN compiler Operating system: Any supporting a FORTRAN compiler RAM: A few MB Classification: 4.7 Nature of problem: Conical functions appear in a large number of applications because these functions are the natural function basis for solving Dirichlet problems bounded by conical domains. Also, they are the Kernel of the Mehler-Fock transform. Solution method: The algorithm uses different methods of computation

  18. User's Guide for Computer Program that Routes Signal Traces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgley, David R., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    This disk contains both a FORTRAN computer program and the corresponding user's guide that facilitates both its incorporation into your system and its utility. The computer program represents an efficient algorithm that routes signal traces on layers of a printed circuit with both through-pins and surface mounts. The computer program included is an implementation of the ideas presented in the theoretical paper titled "A Formal Algorithm for Routing Signal Traces on a Printed Circuit Board", NASA TP-3639 published in 1996. The computer program in the "connects" file can be read with a FORTRAN compiler and readily integrated into software unique to each particular environment where it might be used.

  19. Program listing for the reliability block diagram computation program of JPL Technical Report 32-1543

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelson, P. O.; Eckstein, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    The computer program listing for the reliability block diagram computation program described in Reliability Computation From Reliability Block Diagrams is given. The program is written in FORTRAN 4 and is currently running on a Univac 1108. Each subroutine contains a description of its function.

  20. System optimization of gasdynamic lasers, computer program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otten, L. J., III; Saunders, R. C., III; Morris, S. J.

    1978-01-01

    The user's manual for a computer program that performs system optimization of gasdynamic lasers is provided. Detailed input/output formats are CDC 7600/6600 computers using a dialect of FORTRAN. Sample input/output data are provided to verify correct program operation along with a program listing.

  1. Babel Fortran 2003 Binding for Structured Data Types

    SciTech Connect

    Muszala, S; Epperly, T; Wang, N

    2008-05-02

    Babel is a tool aimed at the high-performance computing community that addresses the need for mixing programming languages (Java, Python, C, C++, Fortran 90, FORTRAN 77) in order to leverage the specific benefits of those languages. Scientific codes often rely on structured data types (structs, derived data types) to encapsulate data, and Babel has been lacking in this type of support until recently. We present a new language binding that focuses on their interoperability of C/C++ with Fortran 2003. The new binding builds on the existing Fortran 90 infrastructure by using the iso-c-binding module defined in the Fortran 2003 standard as the basis for C/C++ interoperability. We present the technical approach for the new binding and discuss our initial experiences in applying the binding in FACETS (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) to integrate C++ with legacy Fortran codes.

  2. A Scheme for Text Analysis Using Fortran.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koether, Mary E.; Coke, Esther U.

    Using string-manipulation algorithms, FORTRAN computer programs were designed for analysis of written material. The programs measure length of a text and its complexity in terms of the average length of words and sentences, map the occurrences of keywords or phrases, calculate word frequency distribution and certain indicators of style. Trials of…

  3. Program For Displaying Computed Electromagnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hom, Kam W.

    1995-01-01

    EM-ANIMATE computer program specialized visualization displays and animates output data on near fields and surface currents computed by electromagnetic-field program - in particular MOM3D (LAR-15074). Program based on windows and contains user-friendly, graphical interface for setting viewing options, selecting cases, manipulating files, and like. Written in FORTRAN 77. EM-ANIMATE also available as part of package, COS-10048, includes MOM3D, IRIS program computing near-field and surface-current solutions of electromagnetic-field equations.

  4. SOLIB: A Social Science Program Library for Small Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halley, Fred S.

    A package of social science programs--Sociology Library (SOLIB)--for small computers provides users with a partial solution to the problems stemming from the heterogeneity of social science applications programs. SOLIB offers a uniform approach to data handling and program documentation; all its programs are written in standard FORTRAN for the IBM…

  5. AURORA: A FORTRAN program for modeling well stirred plasma and thermal reactors with gas and surface reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Meeks, E.; Grcar, J.F.; Kee, R.J.; Moffat, H.K.

    1996-02-01

    The AURORA Software is a FORTRAN computer program that predicts the steady-state or time-averaged properties of a well mixed or perfectly stirred reactor for plasma or thermal chemistry systems. The software was based on the previously released software, SURFACE PSR which was written for application to thermal CVD reactor systems. AURORA allows modeling of non-thermal, plasma reactors with the determination of ion and electron concentrations and the electron temperature, in addition to the neutral radical species concentrations. Well stirred reactors are characterized by a reactor volume, residence time or mass flow rate, heat loss or gas temperature, surface area, surface temperature, the incoming temperature and mixture composition, as well as the power deposited into the plasma for non-thermal systems. The model described here accounts for finite-rate elementary chemical reactions both in the gas phase and on the surface. The governing equations are a system of nonlinear algebraic relations. The program solves these equations using a hybrid Newton/time-integration method embodied by the software package TWOPNT. The program runs in conjunction with the new CHEMKIN-III and SURFACE CHEMKIN-III packages, which handle the chemical reaction mechanisms for thermal and non-thermal systems. CHEMKIN-III allows for specification of electron-impact reactions, excitation losses, and elastic-collision losses for electrons.

  6. RESIN, a FORTRAN IV program for determining the area of influence of samples or drill holes in resource target search

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV program that calculates the area of influence of drill holes or samples with respect to the size and shape of elliptical or circular resource targets is presented. Program options include determination of the degree to which areas within a region have been explored and estimation of probabilities that points are centers of undiscovered deposits. Errors of recognition can be utilized in the program input. ?? 1976.

  7. FORTRAN program for analyzing ground-based radar data: Usage and derivations, version 6.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, Edward A., Jr.; Whitmore, Stephen A.

    1995-01-01

    A postflight FORTRAN program called 'radar' reads and analyzes ground-based radar data. The output includes position, velocity, and acceleration parameters. Air data parameters are also provided if atmospheric characteristics are input. This program can read data from any radar in three formats. Geocentric Cartesian position can also be used as input, which may be from an inertial navigation or Global Positioning System. Options include spike removal, data filtering, and atmospheric refraction corrections. Atmospheric refraction can be corrected using the quick White Sands method or the gradient refraction method, which allows accurate analysis of very low elevation angle and long-range data. Refraction properties are extrapolated from surface conditions, or a measured profile may be input. Velocity is determined by differentiating position. Accelerations are determined by differentiating velocity. This paper describes the algorithms used, gives the operational details, and discusses the limitations and errors of the program. Appendices A through E contain the derivations for these algorithms. These derivations include an improvement in speed to the exact solution for geodetic altitude, an improved algorithm over earlier versions for determining scale height, a truncation algorithm for speeding up the gradient refraction method, and a refinement of the coefficients used in the White Sands method for Edwards AFB, California. Appendix G contains the nomenclature.

  8. Aviation Safety Modeling and Simulation (ASMM) Propulsion Fleet Modeling: A Tool for Semi-Automatic Construction of CORBA-based Applications from Legacy Fortran Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sang, Janche

    2003-01-01

    Within NASA's Aviation Safety Program, NASA GRC participates in the Modeling and Simulation Project called ASMM. NASA GRC s focus is to characterize the propulsion systems performance from a fleet management and maintenance perspective by modeling and through simulation predict the characteristics of two classes of commercial engines (CFM56 and GE90). In prior years, the High Performance Computing and Communication (HPCC) program funded, NASA Glenn in developing a large scale, detailed simulations for the analysis and design of aircraft engines called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). Three major aspects of this modeling included the integration of different engine components, coupling of multiple disciplines, and engine component zooming at appropriate level fidelity, require relatively tight coupling of different analysis codes. Most of these codes in aerodynamics and solid mechanics are written in Fortran. Refitting these legacy Fortran codes with distributed objects can increase these codes reusability. Aviation Safety s modeling and simulation use in characterizing fleet management has similar needs. The modeling and simulation of these propulsion systems use existing Fortran and C codes that are instrumental in determining the performance of the fleet. The research centers on building a CORBA-based development environment for programmers to easily wrap and couple legacy Fortran codes. This environment consists of a C++ wrapper library to hide the details of CORBA and an efficient remote variable scheme to facilitate data exchange between the client and the server model. Additionally, a Web Service model should also be constructed for evaluation of this technology s use over the next two- three years.

  9. Computer programs for absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Jones, R N

    1969-03-01

    Brief descriptions are given of twenty-two modular computer programs for performing the basic numerical computations of absorption spectrophotometry. The programs, written in Fortran IV for card input and output, are available from the National Research Council of Canada. The input and output formats are standardized to permit easy interfacing to yield more complex data processing systems. Though these programs were developed for ir spectrophotometry, they are readily modified for use with digitized visual and uv spectrophotometers. The operations covered include ordinate and abscissal unit and scale interconversions, ordinate addition and subtraction, location of band maxima and minima, smoothing and differentiation, slit function convolution and deconvolution, band profile analysis and asymmetry quantification, Fourier transformation to time correlation curves, multiple overlapping band separation in terms of Cauchy (Lorentz), Gauss, Cauchy-Gauss product, and Cauchy-Gauss sum functions and cell path length determination from fringe spacing analysis.

  10. Computer program for afterheat temperature distribution for mobile nuclear power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, W. G.; Vanbibber, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    ESATA computer program was developed to analyze thermal safety aspects of post-impacted mobile nuclear power plants. Program is written in FORTRAN 4 and designed for IBM 7094/7044 direct coupled system.

  11. CAS22 - FORTRAN program for fast design and analysis of shock-free airfoil cascades using fictitious-gas concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.; Sobieczky, H.

    1982-01-01

    A user-oriented computer program, CAS22, was developed that is applicable to aerodynamic analysis and transonic shock-free redesign of existing two-dimensional cascades of airfoils. This FORTRAN program can be used: (1) as an analysis code for full-potential, transonic, shocked or shock-free cascade flows; (2) as a design code for shock-free cascades that uses Sobieczky's fictitious-gas concept; and (3) as a shock-free design code followed automatically by the analysis in order to confirm that the newly obtained cascade shape provides for an entirely shock-free transonic flow field. A four-level boundary-conforming grid of an O type is generated. The shock-free design is performed by implementing Sobieczky's fictitious-gas concept of elliptic continuation from subsonic into supersonic flow domains. Recomputation inside each supersonic zone is performed by the method of characteristics in the rheograph plane by using isentropic gas relations. Besides converting existing cascade shapes with multiple shocked supersonic regions into shock-free cascades, CAS22 can also unchoke previously choked cascades and make them shock free.

  12. A Treatment of Computational Precision, Number Representation, and Large Integers in an Introductory Fortran Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, William H., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Computational precision is sometimes given short shrift in a first programming course. Treating this topic requires discussing integer and floating-point number representations and inaccuracies that may result from their use. An example of a moderately simple programming problem from elementary statistics was examined. It forced students to…

  13. High Performance Fortran: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Zosel, M.E.

    1992-12-23

    The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the work of the High Performance Fortran Forum (HPFF). This group of industry, academic, and user representatives has been meeting to define a set of extensions for Fortran dedicated to the special problems posed by a very high performance computers, especially the new generation of parallel computers. The paper describes the HPFF effort and its goals and gives a brief description of the functionality of High Performance Fortran (HPF).

  14. FORTRAN programs to process Magsat data for lithospheric, external field, and residual core components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alsdorf, Douglas E.; Vonfrese, Ralph R. B.

    1994-01-01

    The FORTRAN programs supplied in this document provide a complete processing package for statistically extracting residual core, external field and lithospheric components in Magsat observations. To process the individual passes: (1) orbits are separated into dawn and dusk local times and by altitude, (2) passes are selected based on the variance of the magnetic field observations after a least-squares fit of the core field is removed from each pass over the study area, and (3) spatially adjacent passes are processed with a Fourier correlation coefficient filter to separate coherent and non-coherent features between neighboring tracks. In the second state of map processing: (1) data from the passes are normalized to a common altitude and gridded into dawn and dusk maps with least squares collocation, (2) dawn and dusk maps are correlated with a Fourier correlation efficient filter to separate coherent and non-coherent features; the coherent features are averaged to produce a total field grid, (3) total field grids from all altitudes are continued to a common altitude, correlation filtered for coherent anomaly features, and subsequently averaged to produce the final total field grid for the study region, and (4) the total field map is differentially reduced to the pole.

  15. Users manual for an expert system (HSPEXP) for calibration of the hydrological simulation program; Fortran

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lumb, A.M.; McCammon, R.B.; Kittle, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Expert system software was developed to assist less experienced modelers with calibration of a watershed model and to facilitate the interaction between the modeler and the modeling process not provided by mathematical optimization. A prototype was developed with artificial intelligence software tools, a knowledge engineer, and two domain experts. The manual procedures used by the domain experts were identified and the prototype was then coded by the knowledge engineer. The expert system consists of a set of hierarchical rules designed to guide the calibration of the model through a systematic evaluation of model parameters. When the prototype was completed and tested, it was rewritten for portability and operational use and was named HSPEXP. The watershed model Hydrological Simulation Program--Fortran (HSPF) is used in the expert system. This report is the users manual for HSPEXP and contains a discussion of the concepts and detailed steps and examples for using the software. The system has been tested on watersheds in the States of Washington and Maryland, and the system correctly identified the model parameters to be adjusted and the adjustments led to improved calibration.

  16. Load estimator (LOADEST): a FORTRAN program for estimating constituent loads in streams and rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Robert L.; Crawford, Charles G.; Cohn, Timothy A.

    2004-01-01

    LOAD ESTimator (LOADEST) is a FORTRAN program for estimating constituent loads in streams and rivers. Given a time series of streamflow, additional data variables, and constituent concentration, LOADEST assists the user in developing a regression model for the estimation of constituent load (calibration). Explanatory variables within the regression model include various functions of streamflow, decimal time, and additional user-specified data variables. The formulated regression model then is used to estimate loads over a user-specified time interval (estimation). Mean load estimates, standard errors, and 95 percent confidence intervals are developed on a monthly and(or) seasonal basis. The calibration and estimation procedures within LOADEST are based on three statistical estimation methods. The first two methods, Adjusted Maximum Likelihood Estimation (AMLE) and Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE), are appropriate when the calibration model errors (residuals) are normally distributed. Of the two, AMLE is the method of choice when the calibration data set (time series of streamflow, additional data variables, and concentration) contains censored data. The third method, Least Absolute Deviation (LAD), is an alternative to maximum likelihood estimation when the residuals are not normally distributed. LOADEST output includes diagnostic tests and warnings to assist the user in determining the appropriate estimation method and in interpreting the estimated loads. This report describes the development and application of LOADEST. Sections of the report describe estimation theory, input/output specifications, sample applications, and installation instructions.

  17. Computer program for the computation of total sediment discharge by the modified Einstein procedure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    Two versions of a computer program to compute total sediment discharge by the modified Einstein procedure are presented. The FORTRAN 77 language version is for use on the PRIME computer, and the BASIC language version is for use on most microcomputers. The program contains built-in limitations and input-output options that closely follow the original modified Einstein procedure. Program documentation and listings of both versions of the program are included. (USGS)

  18. Vienna FORTRAN: A FORTRAN language extension for distributed memory multiprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Barbara; Mehrotra, Piyush; Zima, Hans

    1991-01-01

    Exploiting the performance potential of distributed memory machines requires a careful distribution of data across the processors. Vienna FORTRAN is a language extension of FORTRAN which provides the user with a wide range of facilities for such mapping of data structures. However, programs in Vienna FORTRAN are written using global data references. Thus, the user has the advantage of a shared memory programming paradigm while explicitly controlling the placement of data. The basic features of Vienna FORTRAN are presented along with a set of examples illustrating the use of these features.

  19. Manual for Program PSTRESS: Peel stress computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkey, Derek A.; Madan, Ram C.

    1987-01-01

    Described is the use of the interactive FORTRAN computer program PSTRESS, which computes a closed form solution for two bonded plates subjected to applied moments, vertical shears, and in-plane forces. The program calculates in-plane stresses in the plates, deflections of the plates, and peel and shear stresses in the adhesive. The document briefly outlines the analytical method used by PSTRESS, describes the input and output of the program, and presents a sample analysis. The results of the latter are shown to be within a few percent of results obtained using a NASTRAN finite element analysis. An appendix containing a listing of PSTRESS is included.

  20. User's guide to resin infusion simulation program in the FORTRAN language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weideman, Mark H.; Hammond, Vince H.; Loos, Alfred C.

    1992-01-01

    RTMCL is a user friendly computer code which simulates the manufacture of fabric composites by the resin infusion process. The computer code is based on the process simulation model described in reference 1. Included in the user's guide is a detailed step by step description of how to run the program and enter and modify the input data set. Sample input and output files are included along with an explanation of the results. Finally, a complete listing of the program is provided.

  1. Computer Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Tiffoni

    This module provides information on development and use of a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) software program that seeks to link literacy skills education, safety training, and human-centered design. Section 1 discusses the development of the software program that helps workers understand the MSDSs that accompany the chemicals with which they…

  2. Guidelines for developing vectorizable computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, E. W.

    1982-01-01

    Some fundamental principles for developing computer programs which are compatible with array-oriented computers are presented. The emphasis is on basic techniques for structuring computer codes which are applicable in FORTRAN and do not require a special programming language or exact a significant penalty on a scalar computer. Researchers who are using numerical techniques to solve problems in engineering can apply these basic principles and thus develop transportable computer programs (in FORTRAN) which contain much vectorizable code. The vector architecture of the ASC is discussed so that the requirements of array processing can be better appreciated. The "vectorization" of a finite-difference viscous shock-layer code is used as an example to illustrate the benefits and some of the difficulties involved. Increases in computing speed with vectorization are illustrated with results from the viscous shock-layer code and from a finite-element shock tube code. The applicability of these principles was substantiated through running programs on other computers with array-associated computing characteristics, such as the Hewlett-Packard (H-P) 1000-F.

  3. FORTRAN program to generate engine inlet flow contour maps and distortion parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicus, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program is presented and described that generates jet engine inlet flow contour maps and inlet flow distortion parameters. The program input consists of an array of measurements describing the flow conditions at the engine inlet. User-defined distortion parameters may be calculated.

  4. A Computer Program for Detection of Statistical Outliers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascale, Pietro J.; Lovas, Charles M.

    1976-01-01

    Presents a Fortran program which computes the rejection criteria of ten procedures for detecting outlying observations. These criteria are defined on comment cards. Journal sources for the statistical equations are listed. After applying rejection rules, the program calculates the mean and standard deviation of the censored sample. (Author/RC)

  5. Computer program for high pressure real gas effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. C.

    1969-01-01

    Computer program obtains the real-gas isentropic flow functions and thermodynamic properties of gases for which the equation of state is known. The program uses FORTRAN 4 subroutines which were designed for calculations of nitrogen and helium. These subroutines are easily modified for calculations of other gases.

  6. STAYLAM: A FORTRAN program for the suction transition analysis of a yawed wing laminar boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program called STAYLAM is presented for the computation of the compressible laminar boundary-layer flow over a yawed infinite wing including distributed suction. This program is restricted to the transonic speed range or less due to the approximate treatment of the compressibility effects. The prescribed suction distribution is permitted to change discontinuously along the chord measured perpendicular to the wing leading edge. Estimates of transition are made by considering leading edge contamination, cross flow instability, and instability of the Tollmien-Schlichting type. A program listing is given in addition to user instructions and a sample case.

  7. Programmer's manual for MMLE3, a general FORTRAN program for maximum likelihood parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maine, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The MMLE3 is a maximum likelihood parameter estimation program capable of handling general bilinear dynamic equations of arbitrary order with measurement noise and/or state noise (process noise). The basic MMLE3 program is quite general and, therefore, applicable to a wide variety of problems. The basic program can interact with a set of user written problem specific routines to simplify the use of the program on specific systems. A set of user routines for the aircraft stability and control derivative estimation problem is provided with the program. The implementation of the program on specific computer systems is discussed. The structure of the program is diagrammed, and the function and operation of individual routines is described. Complete listings and reference maps of the routines are included on microfiche as a supplement. Four test cases are discussed; listings of the input cards and program output for the test cases are included on microfiche as a supplement.

  8. A Computer Program to Create a Population with Any Desired Centroid and Covariance Matrix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, John D.

    1975-01-01

    A Computer program written in FORTRAN IV is presented which will create a population of desired size with marginally normal score vectors manifesting any desired centroid and covariance matrix. Uses and documentation are provided. (Author)

  9. Program Computes Universal Transverse Mercator Projection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, David E.

    1991-01-01

    Computer program produces Gauss-Kruger (constant meridional scale) transverse Mercator projection, used to construct U.S. Army's universal transverse Mercator (UTM) grid system. Capable of mapping entire Northern Hemisphere of Earth (and, by symmetry of projection, entire Earth) accurately with respect to single principal meridian. Mathematically insensitive to proximity to pole or equator and insensitive to departure of meridian from central meridian. Useful to any mapmaking agency. FORTRAN 77 program developed on IBM PC-series computer equipped with Intel Math Coprocessor.

  10. High Performance FORTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, Piyush

    1994-01-01

    High performance FORTRAN is a set of extensions for FORTRAN 90 designed to allow specification of data parallel algorithms. The programmer annotates the program with distribution directives to specify the desired layout of data. The underlying programming model provides a global name space and a single thread of control. Explicitly parallel constructs allow the expression of fairly controlled forms of parallelism in particular data parallelism. Thus the code is specified in a high level portable manner with no explicit tasking or communication statements. The goal is to allow architecture specific compilers to generate efficient code for a wide variety of architectures including SIMD, MIMD shared and distributed memory machines.

  11. Adaptation of a Fortran-Based Monte-Carlo Microscopic Black Hole Simulation Program to C++ Based Root

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, C. M.; Godang, R.; Cavaglia, M.; Cremaldi, L.; Summers, D.

    2008-10-01

    The 14 TeV center of mass proton-proton collisions at the LHC opens the possibility for new Physics, including the possible formation of microscopic black holes. A Fortran-based Monte Carlo event generator program called CATFISH (Collider grAviTational FIeld Simulator for black Holes) has been developed at the University of Mississippi to study signatures of microscopic black hole production (http://www.phy.olemiss.edu/GR/catfish). This black hole event generator includes many of the currently accepted theoretical results for microscopic black hole formation. High energy physics data analysis is shifting from Fortran to C++ as the CERN data analysis packages HBOOK and PAW are no longer supported. The C++ based root is replacing these packages. Work done at the University of South Alabama has resulted in a successful inclusion of CATFISH into root. The methods used to interface the Fortran-based CATFISH into the C++ based root will be presented. Benchmark histograms will be presented demonstrating the conversion. Preliminary results will be presented for selecting black hole candidate events in 14 TeV/ center of mass proton-proton collisions.

  12. TRIGRS - A Fortran Program for Transient Rainfall Infiltration and Grid-Based Regional Slope-Stability Analysis, Version 2.0

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baum, Rex L.; Savage, William Z.; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2008-01-01

    The Transient Rainfall Infiltration and Grid-Based Regional Slope-Stability Model (TRIGRS) is a Fortran program designed for modeling the timing and distribution of shallow, rainfall-induced landslides. The program computes transient pore-pressure changes, and attendant changes in the factor of safety, due to rainfall infiltration. The program models rainfall infiltration, resulting from storms that have durations ranging from hours to a few days, using analytical solutions for partial differential equations that represent one-dimensional, vertical flow in isotropic, homogeneous materials for either saturated or unsaturated conditions. Use of step-function series allows the program to represent variable rainfall input, and a simple runoff routing model allows the user to divert excess water from impervious areas onto more permeable downslope areas. The TRIGRS program uses a simple infinite-slope model to compute factor of safety on a cell-by-cell basis. An approximate formula for effective stress in unsaturated materials aids computation of the factor of safety in unsaturated soils. Horizontal heterogeneity is accounted for by allowing material properties, rainfall, and other input values to vary from cell to cell. This command-line program is used in conjunction with geographic information system (GIS) software to prepare input grids and visualize model results.

  13. WASP: A flexible FORTRAN 4 computer code for calculating water and steam properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Peller, I. C.; Baron, A. K.

    1973-01-01

    A FORTRAN 4 subprogram, WASP, was developed to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of water and steam. The temperature range is from the triple point to 1750 K, and the pressure range is from 0.1 to 100 MN/m2 (1 to 1000 bars) for the thermodynamic properties and to 50 MN/m2 (500 bars) for thermal conductivity and to 80 MN/m2 (800 bars) for viscosity. WASP accepts any two of pressure, temperature, and density as input conditions. In addition, pressure and either entropy or enthalpy are also allowable input variables. This flexibility is especially useful in cycle analysis. The properties available in any combination as output include temperature, density, pressure, entropy, enthalpy, specific heats, sonic velocity, viscosity, thermal conductivity, surface tension, and the Laplace constant. The subroutine structure is modular so that the user can choose only those subroutines necessary to his calculations. Metastable calculations can also be made by using WASP.

  14. A visual Fortran 90 program for the two-particle or two-hole excitations of nuclei: The PPRPA program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taqi, Ali H.

    Random Phase Approximation (RPA) is one of the main approximation tools in studying nuclear structure. Here, we present a graphical user interface (GUI) Fortran code: Particle-Particle Random Phase Approximation (PPRPA) version 1, 2015. The code performs Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) and Random Phase Approximation (RPA) calculations of nuclear structure of nuclei having A ± 2 nucleons in the total angular momenta and isospin (JT) scheme. The Hamiltonian is diagonalized with a given input model space, single-particle energies and interaction. Space function has been expanded to include orbits s, p, d, f, g and h. The current version of the code allows the user to test 20 orbits only. All possible eigenvalues and amplitudes within a model space are calculated. The single-particle density, charge distribution density and transition density are calculated in the basis of the harmonic oscillator potential. The primary utility of the PPRPA code is providing a visual tool to implementation and understanding of the collective excitation techniques TDA and RPA. Impact of the program includes all students, researchers and all those interested in knowing the facts about the structure of the atom nucleus and about the success of approximation methods in different branches of science.

  15. Computer program determines chemical composition of physical system at equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, S. S.

    1966-01-01

    FORTRAN 4 digital computer program calculates equilibrium composition of complex, multiphase chemical systems. This is a free energy minimization method with solution of the problem reduced to mathematical operations, without concern for the chemistry involved. Also certain thermodynamic properties are determined as byproducts of the main calculations.

  16. Fatigue-Crack-Growth Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Shivakumar, V.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Fatigue Crack Growth (NASA/FLAGRO) computer program developed as aid in predicting growth of preexisting flaws and cracks in structural components of space systems. Is enhanced version of FLAGRO4 and incorporates state-of-the-art improvements in both fracture mechanics and computer technology. Provides fracture-mechanics analyst with computerized method of evaluating "safe-crack-growth-life" capabilities of structural components. Also used to evaluate tolerance to damage of structure of given design. Designed modular to facilitate revisions and operation on minicomputers. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  17. Graphics Programs for the DEC VAX Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, D.

    1986-01-01

    Variety of plots available in video or printed form. LONGLIB library of computer programs set of subroutines designed for vector plotting on cathode-ray tubes and dot-matrix printers. LONGLIB subroutines invoked by program calls similar to standard CALCOMP routines. In addition to basic plotting routines, LONGLIB contains extensive set of routines to allow viewport clipping, extended character sets, graphic input, gray-level plots, polar plots, and three-dimensional plotting with or without removal of hidden lines. LONGLIB written in FORTRAN 77 and C for batch execution.

  18. Turbofan noise generation. Volume 2: Computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ventres, C. S.; Theobald, M. A.; Mark, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    The use of a package of computer programs developed to calculate the in duct acoustic mods excited by a fan/stator stage operating at subsonic tip speed is described. The following three noise source mechanisms are included: (1) sound generated by the rotor blades interacting with turbulence ingested into, or generated within, the inlet duct; (2) sound generated by the stator vanes interacting with the turbulent wakes of the rotor blades; and (3) sound generated by the stator vanes interacting with the velocity deficits in the mean wakes of the rotor blades. The computations for three different noise mechanisms are coded as three separate computer program packages. The computer codes are described by means of block diagrams, tables of data and variables, and example program executions; FORTRAN listings are included.

  19. Turbofan noise generation. Volume 2: Computer programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventres, C. S.; Theobald, M. A.; Mark, W. D.

    1982-07-01

    The use of a package of computer programs developed to calculate the in duct acoustic mods excited by a fan/stator stage operating at subsonic tip speed is described. The following three noise source mechanisms are included: (1) sound generated by the rotor blades interacting with turbulence ingested into, or generated within, the inlet duct; (2) sound generated by the stator vanes interacting with the turbulent wakes of the rotor blades; and (3) sound generated by the stator vanes interacting with the velocity deficits in the mean wakes of the rotor blades. The computations for three different noise mechanisms are coded as three separate computer program packages. The computer codes are described by means of block diagrams, tables of data and variables, and example program executions; FORTRAN listings are included.

  20. Six degree of freedom FORTRAN program, ASTP docking dynamics, users guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, G. O., Jr.; Mikhalkin, B.

    1974-01-01

    The digital program ASTP Docking Dynamics as outlined is intended to aid the engineer using the program to determine the docking system loads and attendant vehicular motion resulting from docking two vehicles that have an androgynous, six-hydraulic-attenuator, guide ring, docking interface similar to that designed for the Apollo/Soyuz Test Project (ASTP). This program is set up to analyze two different vehicle combinations: the Apollo CSM docking to Soyuz and the shuttle orbiter docking to another orbiter. The subroutine modifies the vehicle control systems to describe one or the other vehicle combinations; the rest of the vehicle characteristics are changed by input data. To date, the program has been used to predict and correlate ASTP docking loads and performance with docking test program results from dynamic testing. The program modified for use on IBM 360 computers. Parts of the original docking system equations in the areas of hydraulic damping and capture latches are modified to better describe the detail design of the ASTP docking system.

  1. GLUCS: a generalized least-squares program for updating cross section evaluations with correlated data sets. [In FORTRAN IV for PDP-10

    SciTech Connect

    Hetrick, D.M.; Fu, C.Y.

    1980-10-01

    The PDP-10 FORTRAN IV computer programs INPUT.F4, GLUCS.F4, and OUTPUT.F4, which employ Bayes' theorem (or generalized least-squares) for simultaneous evaluation of reaction cross sections, are described. Evaluations of cross sections and covariances are used as input for incorporating correlated data sets, particularly ratios. These data are read from Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF/B-V) formatted files. Measured data sets, including ratios and absolute and relative cross section data, are read and combined with the input evaluations by means of the least-squares technique. The resulting output evaluations have not updated only cross sections and covariances, but also cross-reaction covariances. These output data are written into ENDF/B-V format.

  2. PAPIN: A Fortran-IV program to calculate cross section probability tables, Bondarenko and transmission self-shielding factors for fertile isotopes in the unresolved resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz-Cobos, J.G.

    1981-08-01

    The Fortran IV code PAPIN has been developed to calculate cross section probability tables, Bondarenko self-shielding factors and average self-indication ratios for non-fissile isotopes, below the inelastic threshold, on the basis of the ENDF/B prescriptions for the unresolved resonance region. Monte-Carlo methods are utilized to generate ladders of resonance parameters in the unresolved resonance region, from average resonance parameters and their appropriate distribution functions. The neutron cross-sections are calculated by the single level Breit-Wigner (SLBW) formalism, with s, p and d-wave contributions. The cross section probability tables are constructed by sampling the Doppler-broadened cross sections. The various self-shielded factors are computed numerically as Lebesgue integrals over the cross section probability tables. The program PAPIN has been validated through extensive comparisons with several deterministic codes.

  3. A fortran program for Monte Carlo simulation of oil-field discovery sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohling, G.C.; Davis, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a program for performing Monte Carlo simulation of oil-field discovery histories. A synthetic parent population of fields is generated as a finite sample from a distribution of specified form. The discovery sequence then is simulated by sampling without replacement from this parent population in accordance with a probabilistic discovery process model. The program computes a chi-squared deviation between synthetic and actual discovery sequences as a function of the parameters of the discovery process model, the number of fields in the parent population, and the distributional parameters of the parent population. The program employs the three-parameter log gamma model for the distribution of field sizes and employs a two-parameter discovery process model, allowing the simulation of a wide range of scenarios. ?? 1993.

  4. A FORTRAN program for interpretation of relative permeability from unsteady-state displacements with capillary pressure included

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Udegbunam, E.O.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a FORTRAN program for the determination of two-phase relative permeabilities from unsteady-state displacement data with capillary pressure terms included. The interpretative model employed in this program combines the simultaneous solution of a variant of the fractional flow equation which includes a capillary pressure term and an integro-differential equation derived from Darcy's law without assuming the simplified Buckley-Leverett flow. The incorporation of capillary pressure in the governing equations dispenses with the high flowrate experimental requirements normally employed to overcome capillarity effects. An illustrative example is presented herein which implements this program for the determination of oil/water relative permeabilities from a sandstone core sample. Results obtained compares favorably with results previously given in the literature. ?? 1991.

  5. Manual for Getdata Version 3.1: a FORTRAN Utility Program for Time History Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maine, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    This report documents version 3.1 of the GetData computer program. GetData is a utility program for manipulating files of time history data, i.e., data giving the values of parameters as functions of time. The most fundamental capability of GetData is extracting selected signals and time segments from an input file and writing the selected data to an output file. Other capabilities include converting file formats, merging data from several input files, time skewing, interpolating to common output times, and generating calculated output signals as functions of the input signals. This report also documents the interface standards for the subroutines used by GetData to read and write the time history files. All interface to the data files is through these subroutines, keeping the main body of GetData independent of the precise details of the file formats. Different file formats can be supported by changes restricted to these subroutines. Other computer programs conforming to the interface standards can call the same subroutines to read and write files in compatible formats.

  6. IMPMOT user's manual. [written in FORTRAN 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, D. J.; Bishop, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    This user's manual describes the input and output variables as well as the job control language necessary to utilize the IMP-H apogee motor firing program, IMPMOT. The IMPMOT program can be executed as either a stand-alone program or as a member of the flight dynamics system. This program is used to determine the time and attitude at which to fire the IMP-H apogee boost motor. The IMPMOT program is written in FORTRAN 4 for use on the IBM 360 series computer.

  7. A Fortran Program for Spectral Analysis Using the Fast Fourier Transform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    subsequent calculations and can be linked to the public domain program GNUPLOT for graphical output. This report introduces the user to basic spectral...for a one line system call to run the graphics routine GNUPLOT . If this routine is unavailable or unsultable for the computer in use, then the line...file are quite acceptable as SPEC will only read the first number on each line. I c* GNUPLOT plottn to be used ( 1 yes, 0 no) 1 e* Channel number 3 c

  8. FORTRAN programs for calculating nonlinear seismic ground response in two dimensions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joyner, W.B.

    1978-01-01

    The programs described here were designed for calculating the nonlinear seismic response of a two-dimensional configuration of soil underlain by a semi-infinite elastic medium representing bedrock. There are two programs. One is for plane strain motions, that is, motions in the plane perpendicular to the long axis of the structure, and the other is for antiplane strain motions, that is motions parallel to the axis. The seismic input is provided by specifying what the motion of the rock-soil boundary would be if the soil were absent and the boundary were a free surface. This may be done by supplying a magnetic tape containing the values of particle velocity for every boundary point at every instant of time. Alternatively, a punch card deck may be supplied giving acceleration values at every instant of time. In the plane strain program it is assumed that the acceleration values apply simultaneously to every point on the boundary; in the antiplane strain program it is assumed that the acceleration values characterize a plane shear wave propagating upward in the underlying elastic medium at a specified angle with the vertical. The nonlinear hysteretic behavior of the soil is represented by a three-dimensional rheological model. A boundary condition is used which takes account of finite rigidity in the elastic substratum. The computations are performed by an explicit finite-difference scheme that proceeds step by step in space and time. Computations are done in terms of stress departures from an unspecified initial state. Source listings are provided here along with instructions for preparing the input. A more detailed discussion of the method is presented elsewhere.

  9. FORTRAN Versions of Reformulated HFGMC Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Aboudi, Jacob; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2006-01-01

    Several FORTRAN codes have been written to implement the reformulated version of the high-fidelity generalized method of cells (HFGMC). Various aspects of the HFGMC and its predecessors were described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, the most recent being HFGMC Enhancement of MAC/GMC (LEW-17818-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 3 (March 2006), page 34. The HFGMC is a mathematical model of micromechanics for simulating stress and strain responses of fiber/matrix and other composite materials. The HFGMC overcomes a major limitation of a prior version of the GMC by accounting for coupling of shear and normal stresses and thereby affords greater accuracy, albeit at a large computational cost. In the reformulation of the HFGMC, the issue of computational efficiency was addressed: as a result, codes that implement the reformulated HFGMC complete their calculations about 10 times as fast as do those that implement the HFGMC. The present FORTRAN implementations of the reformulated HFGMC were written to satisfy a need for compatibility with other FORTRAN programs used to analyze structures and composite materials. The FORTRAN implementations also afford capabilities, beyond those of the basic HFGMC, for modeling inelasticity, fiber/matrix debonding, and coupled thermal, mechanical, piezo, and electromagnetic effects.

  10. Simulation of runoff and nutrient export from a typical small watershed in China using the Hydrological Simulation Program-Fortran.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaofu; Liu, Hongyu; Luo, Chuan; Li, Yan; Li, Hengpeng; Pan, Jianjun; Jiang, Xiaosan; Zhou, Quansuo; Xiong, Zhengqin

    2015-05-01

    The Hydrological Simulation Program-Fortran (HSPF), which is a hydrological and water-quality computer model that was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, was employed to simulate runoff and nutrient export from a typical small watershed in a hilly eastern monsoon region of China. First, a parameter sensitivity analysis was performed to assess how changes in the model parameters affect runoff and nutrient export. Next, the model was calibrated and validated using measured runoff and nutrient concentration data. The Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (E NS ) values of the yearly runoff were 0.87 and 0.69 for the calibration and validation periods, respectively. For storms runoff events, the E NS values were 0.93 for the calibration period and 0.47 for the validation period. Antecedent precipitation and soil moisture conditions can affect the simulation accuracy of storm event flow. The E NS values for the total nitrogen (TN) export were 0.58 for the calibration period and 0.51 for the validation period. In addition, the correlation coefficients between the observed and simulated TN concentrations were 0.84 for the calibration period and 0.74 for the validation period. For phosphorus export, the E NS values were 0.89 for the calibration period and 0.88 for the validation period. In addition, the correlation coefficients between the observed and simulated orthophosphate concentrations were 0.96 and 0.94 for the calibration and validation periods, respectively. The nutrient simulation results are generally satisfactory even though the parameter-lumped HSPF model cannot represent the effects of the spatial pattern of land cover on nutrient export. The model parameters obtained in this study could serve as reference values for applying the model to similar regions. In addition, HSPF can properly describe the characteristics of water quantity and quality processes in this area. After adjustment, calibration, and validation of the parameters, the HSPF

  11. Updated Panel-Method Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, Dale L.

    1995-01-01

    Panel code PMARC_12 (Panel Method Ames Research Center, version 12) computes potential-flow fields around complex three-dimensional bodies such as complete aircraft models. Contains several advanced features, including internal mathematical modeling of flow, time-stepping wake model for simulating either steady or unsteady motions, capability for Trefftz computation of drag induced by plane, and capability for computation of off-body and on-body streamlines, and capability of computation of boundary-layer parameters by use of two-dimensional integral boundary-layer method along surface streamlines. Investigators interested in visual representations of phenomena, may want to consider obtaining program GVS (ARC-13361), General visualization System. GVS is Silicon Graphics IRIS program created to support scientific-visualization needs of PMARC_12. GVS available separately from COSMIC. PMARC_12 written in standard FORTRAN 77, with exception of NAMELIST extension used for input.

  12. ICASE Computer Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering computer science program is discussed in outline form. Information is given on such topics as problem decomposition, algorithm development, programming languages, and parallel architectures.

  13. Computer programs for computing particle-size statistics of fluvial sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, H.H.; Hubbell, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    Two versions of computer programs for inputing data and computing particle-size statistics of fluvial sediments are presented. The FORTRAN 77 language versions are for use on the Prime computer, and the BASIC language versions are for use on microcomputers. The size-statistics program compute Inman, Trask , and Folk statistical parameters from phi values and sizes determined for 10 specified percent-finer values from inputed size and percent-finer data. The program also determines the percentage gravel, sand, silt, and clay, and the Meyer-Peter effective diameter. Documentation and listings for both versions of the programs are included. (Author 's abstract)

  14. SSME structural computer program development. Volume 2: BOPACE users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    A computer program for use with a thermal-elastic-plastic-creep structural analyzer is presented. The following functions of the computer program are discussed: (1) analysis of very high temperature and large plastic-creep effects, (2) treatment of cyclic thermal and mechanical loads, (3) development of constitutive theory which closely follows actual behavior under variable temperature conditions, (4) stable numerical solution approach which avoids cumulative errors, and (5) capability of handling up to 1000 degrees of freedom. The computer program is written in FORTRAN IV and has been run on the IBM 360 and UNIVAC 1108 computer systems.

  15. Numerical analysis of stiffened shells of revolution. Volume 4: Engineer's program manual for STARS-2S shell theory automated for rotational structures - 2 (statics) digital computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalbonas, V.; Ogilvie, P.

    1973-01-01

    The engineering programming information for the digital computer program for analyzing shell structures is presented. The program is designed to permit small changes such as altering the geometry or a table size to fit the specific requirements. Each major subroutine is discussed and the following subjects are included: (1) subroutine description, (2) pertinent engineering symbols and the FORTRAN coded counterparts, (3) subroutine flow chart, and (4) subroutine FORTRAN listing.

  16. High Performance Fortran for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, Piyush; Zima, Hans; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of High Performance Fortran (HPF) for important classes of algorithms employed in aerospace applications. HPF is a set of Fortran extensions designed to provide users with a high-level interface for programming data parallel scientific applications, while delegating to the compiler/runtime system the task of generating explicitly parallel message-passing programs. We begin by providing a short overview of the HPF language. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the efficient use of HPF for applications involving multiple structured grids such as multiblock and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) codes as well as unstructured grid codes. We focus on the data structures and computational structures used in these codes and on the high-level strategies that can be expressed in HPF to optimally exploit the parallelism in these algorithms.

  17. Program Facilitates Distributed Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    KNET computer program facilitates distribution of computing between UNIX-compatible local host computer and remote host computer, which may or may not be UNIX-compatible. Capable of automatic remote log-in. User communicates interactively with remote host computer. Data output from remote host computer directed to local screen, to local file, and/or to local process. Conversely, data input from keyboard, local file, or local process directed to remote host computer. Written in ANSI standard C language.

  18. Megaflop comparisons of various computers

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferson, T. H.; Scott, M. R.

    1980-10-01

    A test program and results obtained by running this program on a wide range of computers of interest to Sandia National Laboratories are described. The program, written in FORTRAN, was designed to estimate the speed with which a target computer could perform floating-point operations requested by a FORTRAN programer. Input/output operations are not timed. Thus, the results depend not only upon the basic underlying speed of the computer, but also upon the intelligence of the FORTRAN compiler. 2 tables.

  19. Operations analysis (study 2.1). Program listing for the LOVES computer code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, S. T., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A listing of the LOVES computer program is presented. The program is coded partially in SIMSCRIPT and FORTRAN. This version of LOVES is compatible with both the CDC 7600 and the UNIVAC 1108 computers. The code has been compiled, loaded, and executed successfully on the EXEC 8 system for the UNIVAC 1108.

  20. Survey of new vector computers: The CRAY 1S from CRAY research; the CYBER 205 from CDC and the parallel computer from ICL - architecture and programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentzsch, W.

    1982-01-01

    Problems which can arise with vector and parallel computers are discussed in a user oriented context. Emphasis is placed on the algorithms used and the programming techniques adopted. Three recently developed supercomputers are examined and typical application examples are given in CRAY FORTRAN, CYBER 205 FORTRAN and DAP (distributed array processor) FORTRAN. The systems performance is compared. The addition of parts of two N x N arrays is considered. The influence of the architecture on the algorithms and programming language is demonstrated. Numerical analysis of magnetohydrodynamic differential equations by an explicit difference method is illustrated, showing very good results for all three systems. The prognosis for supercomputer development is assessed.

  1. Portable FORTRAN contour-plotting subprogram

    SciTech Connect

    Haskell, K.H.

    1983-07-01

    In this report we discuss a contour plotting Fortran subprogram. While contour plotting subroutines are available in many commercial plotting packages, this routine has the following advantages: (1) since it uses the Weasel and VDI plot routines developed at Sandia, it occupies little storage and can be used on most of the Sandia time-sharing systems as part of a larger program. In the past, the size of plotting packages often forced a user to perform plotting operations in a completely separate program; (2) the contour computation algorithm is efficient and robust, and computes accurate contours for sets of data with low resolution; and (3) the subprogram is easy to use. A simple contour plot can be produced with a minimum of information provided by a user in one Fortran subroutine call. Through the use of a wide variety of subroutine options, many additional features can be used. These include such items as plot titles, grid lines, placement of text on the page, etc. The subroutine is written in portable Fortran 77, and is designed to run on any system which supports the Weasel and VDI plot packages. It also uses routines from the SLATEC mathematical subroutine library.

  2. Numerical nonlinear inelastic analysis of stiffened shells of revolution. Volume 3: Engineer's program manual for STARS-2P digital computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalbonas, V.; Levine, H.; Ogilvie, P.

    1975-01-01

    Engineering programming information is presented for the STARS-2P (shell theory automated for rotational structures-2P (plasticity)) digital computer program, and FORTRAN 4 was used in writing the various subroutines. The execution of this program requires the use of thirteen temporary storage units. The program was initially written and debugged on the IBM 370-165 computer and converted to the UNIVAC 1108 computer, where it utilizes approximately 60,000 words of core. Only basic FORTRAN library routines are required by the program: sine, cosine, absolute value, and square root.

  3. Digital-computer program for design analysis of salient, wound pole alternators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repas, D. S.

    1973-01-01

    A digital computer program for analyzing the electromagnetic design of salient, wound pole alternators is presented. The program, which is written in FORTRAN 4, calculates the open-circuit saturation curve, the field-current requirements at rated voltage for various loads and losses, efficiency, reactances, time constants, and weights. The methods used to calculate some of these items are presented or appropriate references are cited. Instructions for using the program and typical program input and output for an alternator design are given, and an alphabetical list of most FORTRAN symbols and the complete program listing with flow charts are included.

  4. A FORTRAN program for calculating three dimensional, inviscid and rotational flows with shock waves in axial compressor blade rows: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompkins, W. T., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A FORTRAN-IV computer program was developed for the calculation of the inviscid transonic/supersonic flow field in a fully three dimensional blade passage of an axial compressor rotor or stator. Rotors may have dampers (part span shrouds). MacCormack's explicit time marching method is used to solve the unsteady Euler equations on a finite difference mesh. This technique captures shocks and smears them over several grid points. Input quantities are blade row geometry, operating conditions and thermodynamic quanities. Output quantities are three velocity components, density and internal energy at each mesh point. Other flow quanities are calculated from these variables. A short graphics package is included with the code, and may be used to display the finite difference grid, blade geometry and static pressure contour plots on blade to blade calculation surfaces or blade suction and pressure surfaces. The flow in a low aspect ratio transonic compressor was analyzed and compared with high response total pressure probe measurements and gas fluorescence static density measurements made in the MIT blowdown wind tunnel. These comparisons show that the computed flow fields accurately model the measured shock wave locations and overall aerodynamic performance.

  5. Computer program development and user's manual for program PARACH. [to investigate parachute spent solid rocket booster during terminal descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphree, H. I.

    1979-01-01

    A user's manual is provided for program PARACH, a FORTRAN digital computer program operational on the Univac 1108. A description of the program and operating instructions for it are included. Program PARACH is used to study the interaction dynamics of a parachute and its payload during terminal descent. Operating instructions, required input data, program options and limitations, and output data are described. Subroutines used in this program are also listed and explained.

  6. Revised FORTRAN program for calculating velocities and streamlines on the hub-shroud midchannel stream surface of an axial-, radial-, or mixed-flow turbomachine or annular duct. 2: Programmer's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsanis, T.; Mcnally, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV computer program has been developed that obtains a detailed subsonic or shock free transonic flow solution on the hub-shroud midchannel stream surface of a turbomachine. The blade row may be fixed or rotating, and the blades may be twisted and leaned. Flow may be axial, mixed, or radial. Upstream and downstream flow variables may vary from hub to shroud, and provisions are made to correct for loss of stagnation pressure. The results include velocities, streamlines, and flow angles on the stream surface and approximate blade surface velocities.

  7. A FORTRAN program for the determination of nozzle contours for rotational, non-homentropic gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalben, P.

    1977-01-01

    A program was written which generates a nozzle contour and the complete flow field for two dimensional or axisymetric flows designed to exit parallel to the axis at uniform pressure. The flow is that of a rotational, non-homentropic gas mixture where viscous effects were neglected and the chemistry is assumed frozen. A description of the numerical program developed, is also described.

  8. Programming the social computer.

    PubMed

    Robertson, David; Giunchiglia, Fausto

    2013-03-28

    The aim of 'programming the global computer' was identified by Milner and others as one of the grand challenges of computing research. At the time this phrase was coined, it was natural to assume that this objective might be achieved primarily through extending programming and specification languages. The Internet, however, has brought with it a different style of computation that (although harnessing variants of traditional programming languages) operates in a style different to those with which we are familiar. The 'computer' on which we are running these computations is a social computer in the sense that many of the elementary functions of the computations it runs are performed by humans, and successful execution of a program often depends on properties of the human society over which the program operates. These sorts of programs are not programmed in a traditional way and may have to be understood in a way that is different from the traditional view of programming. This shift in perspective raises new challenges for the science of the Web and for computing in general.

  9. Computer programs for multilocus haplotyping of general pedigrees

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, D.E.; O`Connell, J.R.; Sobel, E.

    1995-06-01

    We have recently developed and implemented three different computer algorithms for accurate haplotyping with large numbers of codominant markers. Each of these algorithms employs likelihood criteria that correctly incorporate all intermarker recombination fractions. The three programs, HAPLO, SIMCROSS, and SIMWALK, are now available for haplotying general pedigrees. The HAPLO program will be distributed as part of the Programs for Pedigree Analysis package by Kenneth Lange. The SIMCROSS and SIMWALK programs are available by anonymous ftp from watson.hgen.pitt.edu. Each program is written in FORTRAN 77 and is distributed as source code. 15 refs.

  10. Fortran Automatic Code Evaluation System (FACES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browne, J. C.; Davis, T.; Haller, A.; Henneman, M.; Kleir, R.; Lasseter, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    Software package takes as input FORTRAN program which may contain many modules (subroutines and functions). Main parts: (1) FORTRAN front end gathers information about input program and (2) set of routines organized as diagnostic package evaluates information and prints warning messages concerning actual or potential errors.

  11. FORTRAN 77 programs for conductive cooling of dikes with temperature-dependent thermal properties and heat of crystallization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delaney, P.T.

    1988-01-01

    Temperature histories obtained from transient heat-conduction theory are applicable to most dikes despite potential complicating effects related to magma flow during emplacement, groundwater circulation, and metamorphic reaction during cooling. Here. machine-independent FORTRAN 77 programs are presented to calculate temperatures in and around dikes as they cool conductively. Analytical solutions can treat thermal-property contrasts between the dike and host rocks, but cannot address the release of magmatic heat of crystallization after the early stages of cooling or the appreciable temperature dependence of thermal conductivity and diffusivity displayed by most rock types. Numerical solutions can incorporate these additional factors. The heat of crystallization can raise the initial temperature at the dike contact, ??c1, about 100??C above that which would be estimated if it were neglected, and can decrease the rate at which the front of solidified magma moves to the dike center by a factor of as much as three. Thermal conductivity and diffusivity of rocks increase with decreasing temperature and, at low temperatures, these properties increase more if the rocks are saturated with water. Models that treat these temperature dependencies yield estimates of ??c1 that are as much as 75??C beneath those which would be predicted if they were neglected. ?? 1988.

  12. Computer program for design analysis of radial-inflow turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program written in FORTRAN that may be used for the design analysis of radial-inflow turbines was documented. The following information is included: loss model (estimation of losses), the analysis equations, a description of the input and output data, the FORTRAN program listing and list of variables, and sample cases. The input design requirements include the power, mass flow rate, inlet temperature and pressure, and rotational speed. The program output data includes various diameters, efficiencies, temperatures, pressures, velocities, and flow angles for the appropriate calculation stations. The design variables include the stator-exit angle, rotor radius ratios, and rotor-exit tangential velocity distribution. The losses are determined by an internal loss model.

  13. A Fortran program to calculate the matrix elements of the Coulomb interaction involving hydrogenic wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkadi, L.

    2017-03-01

    The program MTRXCOUL [1] calculates the matrix elements of the Coulomb interaction between a charged particle and an atomic electron, ∫ψf∗ (r) | R - r | - 1ψi(r) d r. Bound-free transitions are considered, and non-relativistic hydrogenic wave functions are used. In this revised version a bug discovered in the F3Y CPC Program Library (PL) subprogram [2] is fixed. Furthermore, the COULCC CPC PL subprogram [3] applied for the calculations of the radial wave functions of the free states and the Bessel functions is replaced by the CPC PL subprogram DCOUL [4].

  14. KGS-HighK: A Fortran 90 program for simulation of hydraulic tests in highly permeable aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhan, X.; Butler, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    Slug and pumping tests (hydraulic tests) are frequently used by hydrogeologists to obtain in-situ estimates of the transmissive and storage properties of a formation (Streltsova, 1988; Kruseman and de Ridder, 1990; Butler, 1998). In aquifers of high hydraulic conductivity, hydraulic tests are affected by mechanisms that are not considered in the analysis of tests in less permeable media (Bredehoeft et al., 1966). Inertia-induced oscillations in hydraulic head are the most common manifestation of such mechanisms. Over the last three decades, a number of analytical solutions that incorporate these mechanisms have been developed for the analysis of hydraulic tests in highly permeable aquifers (see Butler and Zhan (2004) for a review of this previous work). These solutions, however, are restricted to a subset of the conditions commonly encountered in the field. Recently, a more general solution has been developed that builds on this previous work to remove many of the limitations imposed by these earlier approaches (Butler and Zhan, 2004). The purpose of this note is to present a Fortran 90 program, KGS-HighK, for the evaluation of this new solution. This note begins with a brief overview of the conceptual model that motivated the development of the solution of Butler and Zhan (2004) for pumping- and slug-induced flow to/from a central well. The major steps in the derivation of that solution are described, but no details are given. Instead, a Mathematica notebook is provided for those interested in the derivation details. The key algorithms used in KGS-HighK are then described and the program structure is briefly outlined. A field example is provided to demonstrate program performance. The note concludes with a short summary section. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Emulating Multiple Inheritance in Fortran 2003/2008

    DOE PAGES

    Morris, Karla

    2015-01-01

    Although the high-performance computing (HPC) community increasingly embraces object-oriented programming (OOP), most HPC OOP projects employ the C++ programming language. Until recently, Fortran programmers interested in mining the benefits of OOP had to emulate OOP in Fortran 90/95. The advent of widespread compiler support for Fortran 2003 now facilitates explicitly constructing object-oriented class hierarchies via inheritance and leveraging related class behaviors such as dynamic polymorphism. Although C++ allows a class to inherit from multiple parent classes, Fortran and several other OOP languages restrict or prohibit explicit multiple inheritance relationships in order to circumvent several pitfalls associated with them. Nonetheless, whatmore » appears as an intrinsic feature in one language can be modeled as a user-constructed design pattern in another language. The present paper demonstrates how to apply the facade structural design pattern to support a multiple inheritance class relationship in Fortran 2003. The design unleashes the power of the associated class relationships for modeling complicated data structures yet avoids the ambiguities that plague some multiple inheritance scenarios.« less

  16. FORTRAN Programs for Aerodynamic Analyses on the Microvax/2000 CAD CAE Workstation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    wing should be input in a yaw, the apex remains at that point. XCG Wing Center of Gravity . Measured from the apex, this point is used as a pitching...PITCHING ABOUT KeG. CLO N 0.089ඐ PITCINGMOMNT OEFICINT ERIVATIVE ABOUT ORIGIN DUE TO PITCHING ABOUT IOCG . CMO s -0.038412 FOTCH1NSG MOM4ENT COEFF... GRAVITY LOCATION, MEAS *PT FROM THE ING APEX (ORIGIN). THIS HILL BE USED AS TH + INT t, * PITCHING AXIS FOR COMPUTING THE STABILITY DERIVATIVE a , DU

  17. Generic Fortran Containers (GFC)

    SciTech Connect

    Liakh, Dmitry

    2016-09-01

    The Fortran language does not provide a standard library that implements generic containers, like linked lists, trees, dictionaries, etc. The GFC software provides an implementation of generic Fortran containers natively written in Fortran 2003/2008 language. The following containers are either already implemented or planned: Stack (done), Linked list (done), Tree (done), Dictionary (done), Queue (planned), Priority queue (planned).

  18. Logic via Computer Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieschenberg, Agnes A.

    This paper proposed the question "How do we teach logical thinking and sophisticated mathematics to unsophisticated college students?" One answer among many is through the writing of computer programs. The writing of computer algorithms is mathematical problem solving and logic in disguise and it may attract students who would otherwise stop…

  19. FORTRAN plotting subroutines for the space plasma laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R.

    1983-01-01

    The computer program known as PLOTRW was custom made to satisfy some of the graphics requirements for the data collected in the Space Plasma Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). The general requirements for the program were as follows: (1) all subroutines shall be callable through a FORTRAN source program; (2) all graphs shall fill one page and be properly labeled; (3) there shall be options for linear axes and logarithmic axes; (4) each axis shall have tick marks equally spaced with numeric values printed at the beginning tick mark and at the last tick mark; and (5) there shall be three options for plotting. These are: (1) point plot, (2) line plot and (3) point-line plot. The subroutines were written in FORTRAN IV for the LSI-11 Digital equipment Corporation (DEC) Computer. The program is now operational and can be run on any TEKTRONICX graphics terminal that uses a DEC Real-Time-11 (RT-11) operating system.

  20. Computer Programs for Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A NASA computer program aids Hudson Engineering Corporation, Houston, Texas in the design and construction of huge petrochemical processing plants like the one shown, which is located at Ju'aymah, Saud Arabia. The pipes handling the flow of chemicals are subject to a variety of stresses, such as weight and variations in temperature. Hudson Engineering uses a COSMIC piping flexibility analysis computer program to analyze and insure the necessary strength and flexibility of the pipes. This program helps the company realize substantial savings in reduced engineering time.

  1. Fortran and C programs for the time-dependent dipolar Gross-Pitaevskii equation in an anisotropic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R. Kishor; Young-S., Luis E.; Vudragović, Dušan; Balaž, Antun; Muruganandam, Paulsamy; Adhikari, S. K.

    2015-10-01

    Many of the static and dynamic properties of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) are usually studied by solving the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation, which is a nonlinear partial differential equation for short-range atomic interaction. More recently, BEC of atoms with long-range dipolar atomic interaction are used in theoretical and experimental studies. For dipolar atomic interaction, the GP equation is a partial integro-differential equation, requiring complex algorithm for its numerical solution. Here we present numerical algorithms for both stationary and non-stationary solutions of the full three-dimensional (3D) GP equation for a dipolar BEC, including the contact interaction. We also consider the simplified one- (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) GP equations satisfied by cigar- and disk-shaped dipolar BECs. We employ the split-step Crank-Nicolson method with real- and imaginary-time propagations, respectively, for the numerical solution of the GP equation for dynamic and static properties of a dipolar BEC. The atoms are considered to be polarized along the z axis and we consider ten different cases, e.g., stationary and non-stationary solutions of the GP equation for a dipolar BEC in 1D (along x and z axes), 2D (in x- y and x- z planes), and 3D, and we provide working codes in Fortran 90/95 and C for these ten cases (twenty programs in all). We present numerical results for energy, chemical potential, root-mean-square sizes and density of the dipolar BECs and, where available, compare them with results of other authors and of variational and Thomas-Fermi approximations.

  2. An all-FORTRAN version of NASTRAN for the VAX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purves, L.

    1981-01-01

    All FORTRAN version of NASA structural analysis program NASATRAN is implemented on DEC VAX-series computer. Applications of NASATRAN extend to almost every type of linear structure and construction. Two special features are available in VAX version; program is executed from terminal in manner permitting use of VAX interactive debugger, and links are interactively restarted when desired by first making copy of all NASATRAN work files.

  3. Computer program for post-flight analysis of rigid body moments acting on a launch vehicle first stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauber, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    A FORTRAN coded computer program and method for evaluation of the rigid body disturbing moments for a launch vehicle first stage based on post-flight measurements is described. The technique is a straightforward deterministic approach. Residual moments are computed to satisfy the equations of motion. Residuals are expressed in terms of altered vehicle characteristics; the aerodynamic coefficients, thrust misalignment, and control effectiveness. This method was used on the Scout launch vehicle and uncovered several significant differences between flight data and wind tunnel data. The computer program is written in FORTRAN IV for a CDC CYBER 173 computer system.

  4. Program Computes Thermodynamic Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1994-01-01

    PAC91 is latest in PAC (Properties and Coefficients) series. Two principal features are to provide means of (1) generating theoretical thermodynamic functions from molecular constants and (2) least-squares fitting of these functions to empirical equations. PAC91 written in FORTRAN 77 to be machine-independent.

  5. A computer program for analyzing unresolved Mossbauer hyperfine spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiess, J. R.; Singh, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The program for analyzing unresolved Mossbauer hyperfine spectra was written in FORTRAN 4 language for the Control Data CYBER 170 series digital computer system with network operating system 1.1. With the present dimensions, the program requires approximately 36,000 octal locations of core storage. A typical case involving two innermost coordination shells in which the amplitudes and the peak positions of all three components were estimated in 25 iterations requires 30 seconds on CYBER 173. The program was applied to determine the effects of various near neighbor impurity shells on hyperfine fields in dilute FeAl alloys.

  6. Brine: a computer program to compute brine migration adjacent to a nuclear waste canister in a salt repository

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, G.D.; Fuller, M.E.

    1980-06-10

    This report presents a mathematical model used to predict brine migration toward a nuclear waste canister in a bedded salt repository. The mathematical model is implemented in a computer program called BRINE. The program is written in FORTRAN and executes in the batch mode on a CDC 7600. A description of the program input requirements and output available is included. Samples of input and output are given.

  7. User's manual for EZPLOT version 5.5: A FORTRAN program for 2-dimensional graphic display of data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbinski, Charles; Redin, Paul C.; Budd, Gerald D.

    1988-01-01

    EZPLOT is a computer applications program that converts data resident on a file into a plot displayed on the screen of a graphics terminal. This program generates either time history or x-y plots in response to commands entered interactively from a terminal keyboard. Plot parameters consist of a single independent parameter and from one to eight dependent parameters. Various line patterns, symbol shapes, axis scales, text labels, and data modification techniques are available. This user's manual describes EZPLOT as it is implemented on the Ames Research Center, Dryden Research Facility ELXSI computer using DI-3000 graphics software tools.

  8. Computer Programming: BASIC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Patience; And Others

    This guide was prepared to help teachers of the Lincoln Public School's introductory computer programming course in BASIC to make the necessary adjustments for changes made in the course since the purchase of microcomputers and such peripheral devices as television monitors and disk drives, and the addition of graphics. Intended to teach a…

  9. Conversion of the CALAP (Computer Aided Landform Analysis Program) Program from FORTRAN to DUCK.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Manual, CMU Technical Report CMU-CS-81-135, Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, July 1981. 4. Frege , G., Begriffsschrift, a formula...language modelled upon that of arithmetic, for pure thought. In J. van Heijenoort (Ed.), From Frege to Godel: A Source Book In Mathematical Logic

  10. Programmer's Guide for FFORM. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Computer Programs and Graphics Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Lougenia; Gales, Larry

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. FFORM is a portable format-free input subroutine package written in ANSI Fortran IV…

  11. Phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant system performance model and computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkasab, K. A.; Lu, C. Y.

    1984-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program was developed for analyzing the performance of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant systems. Energy mass and electrochemical analysis in the reformer, the shaft converters, the heat exchangers, and the fuel cell stack were combined to develop a mathematical model for the power plant for both atmospheric and pressurized conditions, and for several commercial fuels.

  12. Computer program for calculating the flow field of supersonic ejector nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. H.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical procedure for computing the performance of supersonic ejector nozzles is presented. This procedure includes real sonic line effects and an interaction analysis for the mixing process between the two streams. The procedure is programmed in FORTRAN 4 and has operated successfully on IBM 7094, IBM 360, CDC 6600, and Univac 1108.

  13. A computer program for estimation from incomplete multinomial data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Credeur, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    Coding is given for maximum likelihood and Bayesian estimation of the vector p of multinomial cell probabilities from incomplete data. Also included is coding to calculate and approximate elements of the posterior mean and covariance matrices. The program is written in FORTRAN 4 language for the Control Data CYBER 170 series digital computer system with network operating system (NOS) 1.1. The program requires approximately 44000 octal locations of core storage. A typical case requires from 72 seconds to 92 seconds on CYBER 175 depending on the value of the prior parameter.

  14. Dynamic data distributions in Vienna Fortran

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Barbara; Mehrotra, Piyush; Moritsch, Hans; Zima, Hans

    1993-01-01

    Vienna Fortran is a machine-independent language extension of Fortran, which is based upon the Single-Program-Multiple-Data (SPMD) paradigm and allows the user to write programs for distributed-memory systems using global addresses. The language features focus mainly on the issue of distributing data across virtual processor structures. Those features of Vienna Fortran that allow the data distributions of arrays to change dynamically, depending on runtime conditions are discussed. The relevant language features are discussed, their implementation is outlined, and how they may be used in applications is described.

  15. SIPB: a seismic refraction inverse modeling program for batch computer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, James Henry

    1977-01-01

    SIPB is an interactive Fortran computer program that was developed for use with a timeshare computer system with program control information submitted from a remote terminal, and output data displayed on the terminal or printed on a line printer. The program is an upgraded version of FSIPI (Scott, Tibbetts, and Burdick, 1972) with several major improvements in addition to .its adaptation to timeshare operation. The most significant improvement was made in the procedure for handling data from in-line offset shotpoints beyond the end shotpoints of the geophone spread. The changes and improvements are described, user's instructions are outlined, examples of input and output data for a test problem are presented, and the Fortran program is listed in this report. An upgraded batch-mode program, SIPB, is available for users who do not have a timeshare computer system available (Scott, 1977).

  16. SIPT: a seismic refraction inverse modeling program for timeshare terminal computer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, James Henry

    1977-01-01

    SIPB is an interactive Fortran computer program that was developed for use with a timeshare computer system with program control information submitted from a remote terminal, and output data displayed on the terminal or printed on a line printer. The program is an upgraded version of FSIPI (Scott, Tibbetts, and Burdick, 1972) with several major improvements in addition to .its adaptation to timeshare operation. The most significant improvement was made in the procedure for handling data from in-line offset shotpoints beyond the end shotpoints of the geophone spread. The changes and improvements are described, user's instructions are outlined, examples of input and output data for a test problem are presented, and the Fortran program is listed in this report. An upgraded batch-mode program, SIPB, is available for users who do not have a timeshare computer system available (Scott, 1977).

  17. OpenMP Fortran and C programs for solving the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation in an anisotropic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young-S., Luis E.; Vudragović, Dušan; Muruganandam, Paulsamy; Adhikari, Sadhan K.; Balaž, Antun

    2016-07-01

    We present new version of previously published Fortran and C programs for solving the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for a Bose-Einstein condensate with contact interaction in one, two and three spatial dimensions in imaginary and real time, yielding both stationary and non-stationary solutions. To reduce the execution time on multicore processors, new versions of parallelized programs are developed using Open Multi-Processing (OpenMP) interface. The input in the previous versions of programs was the mathematical quantity nonlinearity for dimensionless form of Gross-Pitaevskii equation, whereas in the present programs the inputs are quantities of experimental interest, such as, number of atoms, scattering length, oscillator length for the trap, etc. New output files for some integrated one- and two-dimensional densities of experimental interest are given. We also present speedup test results for the new programs.

  18. RNGSSELIB: Program library for random number generation. More generators, parallel streams of random numbers and Fortran compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barash, L. Yu.; Shchur, L. N.

    2013-10-01

    In this update, we present the new version of the random number generator (RNG) library RNGSSELIB, which, in particular, contains fast SSE realizations of a number of modern and most reliable generators [1]. The new features are: (i) Fortran compatibility and examples of using the library in Fortran; (ii) new modern and reliable generators; (iii) the abilities to jump ahead inside a RNG sequence and to initialize up to 1019 independent random number streams with block splitting method. Summary of revisions: We added Fortran compatibility and examples of using the library in Fortran for each of the generators. New modern and reliable generators GM29, GM55.4, GQ58.1, GQ58.3, and GQ58.4, which were introduced in [5] were added to the library. The ability to jump ahead inside a RNG sequence and to initialize independent random number streams with block splitting method are added for each of the RNGs. Restrictions: For SSE realizations of the generators, the Intel or AMD CPU supporting SSE2 command set is required. In order to use the SSE realization for the lfsr113 generator, the CPU must support the SSE4.1 command set. Additional comments: The function call interface has been slightly modified compared to the previous version in order to support Fortran compatibility. For each of the generators, RNGSSELIB supports the following functions, where rng should be replaced by the particular name of the RNG: void rng_skipahead_(rng_state* state, unsigned long long offset); void rng_init_(rng_state* state); void rng_init_sequence_(rng_state* state,unsigned long long SequenceNumber); unsigned int rng_generate_(rng_state* state); float rng_generate_uniform_float_(rng_state* state); unsigned int rng_sse_generate_(rng_sse_state* state); void rng_get_sse_state_(rng_state* state,rng_sse_state* sse_state); void rng_print_state_(rng_state* state); void rng_print_sse_state_(rng_sse_state* state); There are a few peculiarities for some of the RNGs. For example, the function void mt

  19. The SIMRAND 1 computer program: Simulation of research and development projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, R. F., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The SIMRAND I Computer Program (Version 5.0 x 0.3) written in Microsoft FORTRAN for the IBM PC microcomputer and its compatibles is described. The SIMRAND I Computer Program comprises eleven modules-a main routine and ten subroutines. Two additional files are used at compile time; one inserts the system or task equations into the source code, while the other inserts the dimension statements and common blocks. The SIMRAND I Computer Program can be run on most microcomputers or mainframe computers with only minor modifications to the computer code.

  20. RCCPAC: A parallel relativistic coupled-cluster program for closed-shell and one-valence atoms and ions in FORTRAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, B. K.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Angom, D.

    2017-04-01

    We report the development of a parallel FORTRAN code, RCCPAC, to solve the relativistic coupled-cluster equations for closed-shell and one-valence atoms and ions. The parallelization is implemented through the use of message passing interface, which is suitable for distributed memory computers. The coupled-cluster equations are defined in terms of the reduced matrix elements, and solved iteratively using Jacobi method. The ground and excited states of coupled-cluster wave functions obtained from the code could be used to compute different properties of closed-shell and one-valence atom or ion. As an example we compute the ground state correlation energy, attachment energies, E1 reduced matrix elements and hyperfine structure constants.

  1. FORTRAN program for calculating velocities and streamlines on the hub-shroud mid-channel flow surface of an axial-or mixed-flow turbomachine. 2: Programmer's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsanis, T.; Mcnally, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    A FORTRAN-IV computer program, MERIDL, has been developed that obtains a subsonic or shock-free transonic flow solution on the hub-shroud mid-channel flow surface of a turbomachine. The blade row may be fixed or rotating and may be twisted and leaned. Flow may be axial or mixed, up to 45 deg from axial. Upstream and downstream flow variables can vary from hub to shroud, and provision is made to correct for loss of stagnation pressure. The results include velocities, streamlines, and flow angles on the flow surface and approximate blade surface velocities. Subsonic solutions are obtained by a finite-difference stream-function solution. Transonic solutions are obtained by a velocity-gradient method, using information from a finite-difference stream-function solution at a reduced mass flow.

  2. Revised FORTRAN program for calculating velocities and streamlines on the hub-shroud midchannel stream surface of an axial-, radial-, or mixed-flow turbomachine or annular duct. 1: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsanis, T.; Mcnally, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    A FORTRAN 4 computer program was developed that obtains a detailed subsonic or shock-free transonic flow solution on the hub-shroud midchannel stream surface of a turbomachine. The blade row may be fixed or rotating, and the blades may be twisted and leaned. Flow may be axial, mixed, or radial. Upstream and downstream flow variables may vary from hub to shroud, and provision is made to correct for loss of stagnation pressure. The results include velocities, streamlines, and flow angles on the stream surface as well as approximate blade surface velocities. Subsonic solutions are obtained by a finite-difference, stream-function solution. Transonic solutions are obtained by a velocity-gradient method that uses information from a finite-difference, stream-function solution at a reduced mass flow.

  3. Optimal control computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, F.

    1992-01-01

    The solution of the optimal control problem, even with low order dynamical systems, can usually strain the analytical ability of most engineers. The understanding of this subject matter, therefore, would be greatly enhanced if a software package existed that could simulate simple generic problems. Surprisingly, despite a great abundance of commercially available control software, few, if any, address the part of optimal control in its most generic form. The purpose of this paper is, therefore, to present a simple computer program that will perform simulations of optimal control problems that arise from the first necessary condition and the Pontryagin's maximum principle.

  4. Constructing Programs from Example Computations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierman, A. W.; Krishnaswamy, R.

    This paper describes the construction and implementation of an autoprogramming system. An autoprogrammer is an interactive computer programming system which automatically constructs computer programs from example computations executed by the user. The example calculations are done in a scratch pad fashion at a computer display, and the system…

  5. APL and FORTRAN programs for a new equation of state for H 2O, CO 2, and their mixtures at supercritical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, G. K.; Kerrick, D. M.

    APL and FORTRAN programs utilizing a new modified hard-sphere Redlich-Kwong equation calculate volumes and fugacity coefficients for pure H 2O and CO 2, and activities in H 2O-CO 2 mixtures, throughout most of the crustal and upper mantle P- T conditions. The new modification allows the term of the equation representing attractive intermolecular forces to vary as a function of both temperature and pressure, in contrast to earlier versions where this term was considered a function of temperature only. Compared with previous modified Redlich-Kwong (MRK) equations, this equation predicts thermodynamic properties for pure H 2O and CO 2 which are in better agreement with those derived from experimental P- V- T data. These programs are versatile and can be incorporated into existing routines which calculate mixed-volatile (H 2O-CO 2) phase equilibria for petrologic systems.

  6. Computer programs for eddy-current defect studies

    SciTech Connect

    Pate, J. R.; Dodd, C. V.

    1990-06-01

    Several computer programs to aid in the design of eddy-current tests and probes have been written. The programs, written in Fortran, deal in various ways with the response to defects exhibited by four types of probes: the pancake probe, the reflection probe, the circumferential boreside probe, and the circumferential encircling probe. Programs are included which calculate the impedance or voltage change in a coil due to a defect, which calculate and plot the defect sensitivity factor of a coil, and which invert calculated or experimental readings to obtain the size of a defect. The theory upon which the programs are based is the Burrows point defect theory, and thus the calculations of the programs will be more accurate for small defects. 6 refs., 21 figs.

  7. EIGEN: A program to compute eigenrays from HARPA (Hamiltonian Acoustic Ray-Tracing Program for the Atmosphere)/HARPO (Hamiltonian Acoustic Ray-Tracing Program for the Ocean) raysets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weickmann, A. M.; Riley, J. P.; Georges, T. M.; Jones, R. M.

    1989-02-01

    EIGEN is a FORTRAN computer program that processes the rayset (machine-readable) output of the HARPA and HARPO acoustic ray-tracing programs. It interpolates in elevation angle to find the eigenrays that connect the source and a specified receiver. It also creates plots of range vs. elevation angle and range vs. travel time.

  8. A computer program for simulating geohydrologic systems in three dimensions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Posson, D.R.; Hearne, G.A.; Tracy, J.V.; Frenzel, P.F.

    1980-01-01

    This document is directed toward individuals who wish to use a computer program to simulate ground-water flow in three dimensions. The strongly implicit procedure (SIP) numerical method is used to solve the set of simultaneous equations. New data processing techniques and program input and output options are emphasized. The quifer system to be modeled may be heterogeneous and anisotropic, and may include both artesian and water-table conditions. Systems which consist of well defined alternating layers of highly permeable and poorly permeable material may be represented by a sequence of equations for two dimensional flow in each of the highly permeable units. Boundaries where head or flux is user-specified may be irregularly shaped. The program also allows the user to represent streams as limited-source boundaries when the streamflow is small in relation to the hydraulic stress on the system. The data-processing techniques relating to ' cube ' input and output, to swapping of layers, to restarting of simulation, to free-format NAMELIST input, to the details of each sub-routine 's logic, and to the overlay program structure are discussed. The program is capable of processing large models that might overflow computer memories with conventional programs. Detailed instructions for selecting program options, for initializing the data arrays, for defining ' cube ' output lists and maps, and for plotting hydrographs of calculated and observed heads and/or drawdowns are provided. Output may be restricted to those nodes of particular interest, thereby reducing the volumes of printout for modelers, which may be critical when working at remote terminals. ' Cube ' input commands allow the modeler to set aquifer parameters and initialize the model with very few input records. Appendixes provide instructions to compile the program, definitions and cross-references for program variables, summary of the FLECS structured FORTRAN programming language, listings of the FLECS and

  9. Computer model for refinery operations with emphasis on jet fuel production. Volume 1: Program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, D. N.; Tunnah, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program is described for predicting the flow streams and material, energy, and economic balances of a typical petroleum refinery, with particular emphasis on production of aviation turbine fuel of varying end point and hydrogen content specifications. The program has provision for shale oil and coal oil in addition to petroleum crudes. A case study feature permits dependent cases to be run for parametric or optimization studies by input of only the variables which are changed from the base case.

  10. Discrim: a computer program using an interactive approach to dissect a mixture of normal or lognormal distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, N.J.; McCammon, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    DISCRIM is an interactive computer graphics program that dissects mixtures of normal or lognormal distributions. The program was written in an effort to obtain a more satisfactory solution to the dissection problem than that offered by a graphical or numerical approach alone. It combines graphic and analytic techniques using a Tektronix1 terminal in a time-share computing environment. The main program and subroutines were written in the FORTRAN language. ?? 1980.

  11. Linear-Algebra Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, C. L.; Krogh, F. T.; Gold, S. S.; Kincaid, D. R.; Sullivan, J.; Williams, E.; Hanson, R. J.; Haskell, K.; Dongarra, J.; Moler, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    The Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms (BLAS) library is a collection of 38 FORTRAN-callable routines for performing basic operations of numerical linear algebra. BLAS library is portable and efficient source of basic operations for designers of programs involving linear algebriac computations. BLAS library is supplied in portable FORTRAN and Assembler code versions for IBM 370, UNIVAC 1100 and CDC 6000 series computers.

  12. A comprehensive package for DNA sequence analysis in FORTRAN IV for the PDP-11.

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, J; Eckenrode, V K; Lemke, K; Phillips, G J; Schaeffer, S W

    1986-01-01

    A computer package written in Fortran-IV for the PDP-11 minicomputer is described. The package's novel features are: software for voice-entry of sequence data; a less memory intensive algorithm for optimal sequence alignment; and programs that fit statistical models to nucleic acid and protein sequences. PMID:3003673

  13. Computer Program Predicts Turbine-Stage Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Robert J.; Haas, Jeffrey E.; Katsanis, Theodore

    1988-01-01

    MTSBL updated version of flow-analysis programs MERIDL and TSONIC coupled to boundary-layer program BLAYER. Method uses quasi-three-dimensional, inviscid, stream-function flow analysis iteratively coupled to calculated losses so changes in losses result in changes in flow distribution. Manner effects both configuration on flow distribution and flow distribution on losses taken into account in prediction of performance of stage. Written in FORTRAN IV.

  14. Programs EMCUPL and SCHCOPL: computation of electromagnetic coupling on a layered halfspace with complex conductivities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, James P.; Anderson, Walter L.

    1979-01-01

    A number of efficient numerical computer algorithms are incorporated into a general program called EMCUPL, which calculates the electromagnetic (EM) coupling between two straight wires on the surface of a multilayered half space. Each layer has an isotropic conductivity which may be either real or complex. A second computer program, called SCHCOPL, is described which calculates the coupling for the special case of a Schlumberger or Wenner array also on a multilayered half space. Comparison with other programs shows that EMCUPL is at least as accurate, more generally applicable, and computationally more efficient FORTRAN listings of all subprograms and example calculations are given in the Appendix.

  15. Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing

    SciTech Connect

    John Mellor-Crummey

    2008-02-29

    Rice University's achievements as part of the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing include: (1) design and implemention of cafc, the first multi-platform CAF compiler for distributed and shared-memory machines, (2) performance studies of the efficiency of programs written using the CAF and UPC programming models, (3) a novel technique to analyze explicitly-parallel SPMD programs that facilitates optimization, (4) design, implementation, and evaluation of new language features for CAF, including communication topologies, multi-version variables, and distributed multithreading to simplify development of high-performance codes in CAF, and (5) a synchronization strength reduction transformation for automatically replacing barrier-based synchronization with more efficient point-to-point synchronization. The prototype Co-array Fortran compiler cafc developed in this project is available as open source software from http://www.hipersoft.rice.edu/caf.

  16. A computer program for calculation of spectral radiative properties of gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealy, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    A computer code is described whereby calculations of radiative properties of gas mixtures may be made. The program is arranged so that distinct radiative processes for each species are computed in individual subroutines. Provision is made for calculating radiative properties in nonequilibrium situations - separate rotational, vibrational, and electronic temperatures may be used. These features should provide a flexibility not currently available in such programs. The basic equations and the program listing in FORTRAN 4 language are presented. Sample calculations are given for high temperature air and carbon dioxide and are compared to calculations made with previously developed programs.

  17. Final Report: Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    2011-09-13

    As part of the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing, Rice University collaborated with project partners in the design, development and deployment of language, compiler, and runtime support for parallel programming models to support application development for the “leadership-class” computer systems at DOE national laboratories. Work over the course of this project has focused on the design, implementation, and evaluation of a second-generation version of Coarray Fortran. Research and development efforts of the project have focused on the CAF 2.0 language, compiler, runtime system, and supporting infrastructure. This has involved working with the teams that provide infrastructure for CAF that we rely on, implementing new language and runtime features, producing an open source compiler that enabled us to evaluate our ideas, and evaluating our design and implementation through the use of benchmarks. The report details the research, development, findings, and conclusions from this work.

  18. Computer program for parameter optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatt, C. R.; Hague, D. S.

    1968-01-01

    Flexible, large scale digital computer program was designed for the solution of a wide range of multivariable parameter optimization problems. The program has the ability to solve constrained optimization problems involving up to one hundred parameters.

  19. Stock Market Index Computer Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowley, Eric

    1986-01-01

    Provides two computer programs, written in BASIC, to calculate average stock market price levels. The programs allow students to work directly from the raw price data that appear daily in the financial news. Teaching suggestions are provided. (JDH)

  20. Force user's manual: A portable, parallel FORTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Harry F.; Benten, Muhammad S.; Arenstorf, Norbert S.; Ramanan, Aruna V.

    1990-01-01

    The use of Force, a parallel, portable FORTRAN on shared memory parallel computers is described. Force simplifies writing code for parallel computers and, once the parallel code is written, it is easily ported to computers on which Force is installed. Although Force is nearly the same for all computers, specific details are included for the Cray-2, Cray-YMP, Convex 220, Flex/32, Encore, Sequent, Alliant computers on which it is installed.

  1. A calculation procedure for viscous flow in turbomachines, volume 3. [computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalil, I.; Sheoran, Y.; Tabakoff, W.

    1980-01-01

    A method for analyzing the nonadiabatic viscous flow through turbomachine blade passages was developed. The field analysis is based upon the numerical integration of the full incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, together with the energy equation on the blade-to-blade surface. A FORTRAN IV computer program was written based on this method. The numerical code used to solve the governing equations employs a nonorthogonal boundary fitted coordinate system. The flow may be axial, radial or mixed and there may be a change in stream channel thickness in the through-flow direction. The inputs required for two FORTRAN IV programs are presented. The first program considers laminar flows and the second can handle turbulent flows. Numerical examples are included to illustrate the use of the program, and to show the results that are obtained.

  2. A programmable Fortran preprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Rosing, M.

    1995-06-01

    A programmable Fortran preprocessor is described. It allows users to define compile time operations that can examine and modify the source tree before it is compiled with a traditional compiler. This intermediate step allows the definition of routines and operations that adapt to the context in which they are used. Context sensitive operations increase the flexibility of abstractions that can be built without degrading efficiency, as compared to using traditional run time based abstractions such as libraries or objects. The preprocessor is described briefly along with an example of how it is used to add CMFortran array operations to Fortran77. Other preprocessors that have been implemented are also briefly described.

  3. FDCHQHP: A Fortran package for heavy quarkonium hadroproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Lu-Ping; Wang, Jian-Xiong

    2014-11-01

    FDCHQHP is a Fortran package to calculate the transverse momentum (pt) distribution of yield and polarization for heavy quarkonium hadroproduction at next-to-leading-order (NLO) based on non-relativistic QCD(NRQCD) framework. It contains the complete color-singlet and color-octet intermediate states in present theoretical level, and is available to calculate different polarization parameters in different frames. As the LHC running now and in the future, it supplies a very useful tool to obtain theoretical prediction on the heavy quarkonium hadroproduction. Catalogue identifier: AETT_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETT_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 12020165 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 103178384 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77. Computer: Any computer with Linux operating system, Intel Fortran Compiler and MPI library. Operating system: Linux. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Parallelized with MPI. Classification: 11.1. External routines: MPI Library Nature of problem: This package is for the calculation of the heavy quarkonium hadroproduction at NRQCD NLO. Solution method: The Fortran codes of this package are generated by the FDC system [1] automatically. Additional comments: It is better to run the package on supercomputers or multi-core computers. !!!!! The distribution file for this program is over 100 MB and therefore is not delivered directly when download or Email is requested. Instead a html file giving details of how the program can be obtained is sent. !!!!! Running time: For an independent sub-process, it may take several seconds to several hours depending on the number of sample points if one CPU core is used. For a complete prompt

  4. Computer Program for Point Location And Calculation of ERror (PLACER)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granato, Gregory E.

    1999-01-01

    A program designed for point location and calculation of error (PLACER) was developed as part of the Quality Assurance Program of the Federal Highway Administration/U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Data and Methodology Synthesis (NDAMS) review process. The program provides a standard method to derive study-site locations from site maps in highwayrunoff, urban-runoff, and other research reports. This report provides a guide for using PLACER, documents methods used to estimate study-site locations, documents the NDAMS Study-Site Locator Form, and documents the FORTRAN code used to implement the method. PLACER is a simple program that calculates the latitude and longitude coordinates of one or more study sites plotted on a published map and estimates the uncertainty of these calculated coordinates. PLACER calculates the latitude and longitude of each study site by interpolating between the coordinates of known features and the locations of study sites using any consistent, linear, user-defined coordinate system. This program will read data entered from the computer keyboard and(or) from a formatted text file, and will write the results to the computer screen and to a text file. PLACER is readily transferable to different computers and operating systems with few (if any) modifications because it is written in standard FORTRAN. PLACER can be used to calculate study site locations in latitude and longitude, using known map coordinates or features that are identifiable in geographic information data bases such as USGS Geographic Names Information System, which is available on the World Wide Web.

  5. Computer Program For Linear Algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, F. T.; Hanson, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Collection of routines provided for basic vector operations. Basic Linear Algebra Subprogram (BLAS) library is collection from FORTRAN-callable routines for employing standard techniques to perform basic operations of numerical linear algebra.

  6. PROJMNG FORTRAN: An Interactive Computer Program for Use with the Defense Management Simulation Exercise.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    1-I 4 ow El*g*** *..*,* 4 f 6 I E4 0 - Do I CA en%0 s-I 1 3O 1 000000000 0 go to 00 0 EUQ .,*..,.*e** -4 04 0I I 𔃺 0 0flrV’ o. I ruaits c~%0%0%cf,4 0...CII.4 M t4 .% w " * W4 wD 0 scD4 * =I w* as mI as CD *D~v at v %0% P 1 V4 9 tD 41400 @4.* *Oa *60 664 000 . CD 0I (c * pain Aw Ne w * .P *-a 9. E- 4 14...P4 0 t E-0 Z 64 C0 14 051 H as %OI4 om1 4-1 01 ~0C40 O1 54 41 64 0401 E4 0 504o ra 0 E1.4 a i s N VeI 0D 9D Moi tD ’ o M54 CDQ - ~ 0l MCA1 =0O p*Q

  7. The Liu, Katsaros, and Businger (1979) Bulk Atmospheric Flux Computational Iteration Program in FORTRAN and BASIC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-11

    1370 LET N1=N1+1 1380 IF N1>50 THEN GOTO 2020 1390 LET Z4=Z5 1400 COTO 1240 1410 REM ............. CONTINUE 1420 LET PI= FNP (1,Z6) 1430 LET Z7=Z6*Z2/Zl...1440 LET Z8=Z6*Z3/Z1 1450 LET P2= FNP (2,Z7) 1460 LET P3= FNP (2,ZB) 1470 UI=DO*.4/(LOG(Zl/Z4)-PI) 1480 LET RI=Z4*UI/V1 1490 LET Z9=Z2*U1/V1 1500 LET ZO=Z3...FUNCTION PSI(ID,Z/L) 2700 DEF FNP (17,X5) 2710 REM .......... TEST Z/L FOR -,0,+ 2720 IF X5=0 THEN GOTO 2800 2730 IF X5>O THEN GOTO

  8. A Three-Dimensional Transonic, Potential Flow Computer Program, Its Conversion to IBM Fortran and Utilization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    xocor-invfrciN^HOoooooooHHrMm^ rinp -oou <a HOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOH az CO 65 •o a» ɟ> om CM r» m r\\ir» * vo ^ o co Nt r*» r-« ^o ^»(\\i rn o> so...4-mcM<H«-.oooooooOi-.<-!CMrn> rinp »coo r-tOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOr-» »-»•OcOrocM UNO»y>oco ^r co cj» co CM OOOCMOOO CM f-t ">, ^o <-• P» ^ ro p

  9. Vocational Accounting and Computing Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avani, Nathan T.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an "Accounting and Computing" program in Michigan that emphasizes computerized accounting procedures. This article describes the program curriculum and duty areas (such as handling accounts receivable), presents a list of sample tasks in each duty area, and specifies components of each task. Computer equipment necessary for this program…

  10. Computer Program Newsletter No. 7

    SciTech Connect

    Magnuson, W.G. Jr.

    1982-09-01

    This issue of the Computer Program Newsletter updates an earlier newsletter (Number 2, September 1979) and focuses on electrical network analysis computer programs. In particular, five network analysis programs (SCEPTRE, SPICE2, NET2, CALAHAN, and EMTP) will be described. The objective of this newsletter will be to provide a very brief description of the input syntax and semantics for each program, highlight their strong and weak points, illustrate how the programs are run at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using the Octopus computer network, and present examples of input for each of the programs to illustrate some of the features of each program. In a sense, this newsletter can be used as a quick reference guide to the programs.

  11. Computer Program to Obtain Ordinates for NACA Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladson, Charles L.; Brooks, Cuyler W., Jr.; Hill, Acquilla S.; Sproles, Darrell W.

    1996-01-01

    Computer programs to produce the ordinates for airfoils of any thickness, thickness distribution, or camber in the NACA airfoil series were developed in the early 1970's and are published as NASA TM X-3069 and TM X-3284. For analytic airfoils, the ordinates are exact. For the 6-series and all but the leading edge of the 6A-series airfoils, agreement between the ordinates obtained from the program and previously published ordinates is generally within 5 x 10(exp -5) chord. Since the publication of these programs, the use of personal computers and individual workstations has proliferated. This report describes a computer program that combines the capabilities of the previously published versions. This program is written in ANSI FORTRAN 77 and can be compiled to run on DOS, UNIX, and VMS based personal computers and workstations as well as mainframes. An effort was made to make all inputs to the program as simple as possible to use and to lead the user through the process by means of a menu.

  12. Metrology data reduction system: PDP-11/34 computer system. [MOUNT, for thermistor mount data acquisition, in FORTRAN IV

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, J.W.

    1980-04-01

    A PDP-11/34 computer system was installed to acquire, correct, scale, display, store, and process data obtained by microwave and dc area coupler controllers. The system is used to calibrate power sensors and impedance and dc measurement standards on a real-time basis. The microwave data input is from a digital voltmeter and scanner arrangement, which also may be controlled from a P-ROM control board. The dc data input is from a passive device interface or from a terminal keyboard. 5 figures, 8 tables.

  13. Computer programs for the interpretation of low resolution mass spectra: Program for calculation of molecular isotopic distribution and program for assignment of molecular formulas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Kohl, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    Two FORTRAN computer programs for the interpretation of low resolution mass spectra were prepared and tested. One is for the calculation of the molecular isotopic distribution of any species from stored elemental distributions. The program requires only the input of the molecular formula and was designed for compatability with any computer system. The other program is for the determination of all possible combinations of atoms (and radicals) which may form an ion having a particular integer mass. It also uses a simplified input scheme and was designed for compatability with any system.

  14. TaylUR, an arbitrary-order diagonal automatic differentiation package for Fortran 95

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hippel, G. M.

    2006-04-01

    We present TaylUR, a Fortran 95 module to automatically compute the numerical values of a complex-valued function's derivatives with respect to several variables up to an arbitrary order in each variable, but excluding mixed derivatives. Arithmetic operators and Fortran intrinsics are overloaded to act correctly on objects of a defined type taylor, which encodes a function along with its first few derivatives with respect to the user-defined independent variables. Derivatives of products and composite functions are computed using Leibniz's rule and Faà di Bruno's formula. TaylUR makes heavy use of operator overloading and other Fortran 95 features such as elemental functions. Program summaryProgram title: TaylUR Catalogue identifier:ADXR_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXR_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:none Programming language:Fortran 95 Computer:Any computer with a conforming Fortran 95 compiler Operating system:Any system with a conforming Fortran 95 compiler No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:6286 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc:14 994 Distribution format:tar.gz Nature of problem:Problems that require potentially high orders of derivatives with respect to some variables, such as e.g. expansions of Feynman diagrams in particle masses in perturbative Quantum Field Theory, and which cannot be treated using existing Fortran modules for automatic differentiation [C.W. Straka, ADF95: Tool for automatic differentiation of a FORTRAN code designed for large numbers of independent variables, Comput. Phys. Comm. 168 (2005) 123-139, arXiv:cs.MS/0503014; S. Stamatiadis, R. Prosmiti, S.C. Farantos, AUTO_DERIV: Tool for automatic differentiation of a FORTRAN code, Comput. Phys. Comm. 127 (2000) 343-355]. Solution method:Arithmetic operators and Fortran intrinsics are overloaded to act correctly on objects of

  15. User's guide to the NOZL3D and NOZLIC computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P. D.

    1980-01-01

    Complete FORTRAN listings and running instructions are given for a set of computer programs that perform an implicit numerical solution to the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations to predict the flow characteristics and performance of nonaxisymmetric nozzles. The set includes the NOZL3D program, which performs the flow computations; the NOZLIC program, which sets up the flow field initial conditions for general nozzle configurations, and also generates the computational grid for simple two dimensional and axisymmetric configurations; and the RGRIDD program, which generates the computational grid for complicated three dimensional configurations. The programs are designed specifically for the NASA-Langley CYBER 175 computer, and employ auxiliary disk files for primary data storage. Input instructions and computed results are given for four test cases that include two dimensional, three dimensional, and axisymmetric configurations.

  16. NASA's computer science research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Following a major assessment of NASA's computing technology needs, a new program of computer science research has been initiated by the Agency. The program includes work in concurrent processing, management of large scale scientific databases, software engineering, reliable computing, and artificial intelligence. The program is driven by applications requirements in computational fluid dynamics, image processing, sensor data management, real-time mission control and autonomous systems. It consists of university research, in-house NASA research, and NASA's Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) and Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE). The overall goal is to provide the technical foundation within NASA to exploit advancing computing technology in aerospace applications.

  17. High performance parallel computers for science: New developments at the Fermilab advanced computer program

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, T.; Areti, H.; Atac, R.; Biel, J.; Cook, A.; Deppe, J.; Edel, M.; Fischler, M.; Gaines, I.; Hance, R.

    1988-08-01

    Fermilab's Advanced Computer Program (ACP) has been developing highly cost effective, yet practical, parallel computers for high energy physics since 1984. The ACP's latest developments are proceeding in two directions. A Second Generation ACP Multiprocessor System for experiments will include $3500 RISC processors each with performance over 15 VAX MIPS. To support such high performance, the new system allows parallel I/O, parallel interprocess communication, and parallel host processes. The ACP Multi-Array Processor, has been developed for theoretical physics. Each $4000 node is a FORTRAN or C programmable pipelined 20 MFlops (peak), 10 MByte single board computer. These are plugged into a 16 port crossbar switch crate which handles both inter and intra crate communication. The crates are connected in a hypercube. Site oriented applications like lattice gauge theory are supported by system software called CANOPY, which makes the hardware virtually transparent to users. A 256 node, 5 GFlop, system is under construction. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Manual of phosphoric acid fuel cell stack three-dimensional model and computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, C. Y.; Alkasab, K. A.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed distributed mathematical model of phosphoric acid fuel cell stack have been developed, with the FORTRAN computer program, for analyzing the temperature distribution in the stack and the associated current density distribution on the cell plates. Energy, mass, and electrochemical analyses in the stack were combined to develop the model. Several reasonable assumptions were made to solve this mathematical model by means of the finite differences numerical method.

  19. SMSIM--Fortran programs for simulating ground motions from earthquakes: Version 2.0.--a revision of OFR 96-80-A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, David M.

    2000-01-01

    A simple and powerful method for simulating ground motions is based on the assumption that the amplitude of ground motion at a site can be specified in a deterministic way, with a random phase spectrum modified such that the motion is distributed over a duration related to the earthquake magnitude and to distance from the source. This method of simulating ground motions often goes by the name "the stochastic method." It is particularly useful for simulating the higher-frequency ground motions of most interest to engineers, and it is widely used to predict ground motions for regions of the world in which recordings of motion from damaging earthquakes are not available. This simple method has been successful in matching a variety of ground-motion measures for earthquakes with seismic moments spanning more than 12 orders of magnitude. One of the essential characteristics of the method is that it distills what is known about the various factors affecting ground motions (source, path, and site) into simple functional forms that can be used to predict ground motions. SMSIM is a set of programs for simulating ground motions based on the stochastic method. This Open-File Report is a revision of an earlier report (Boore, 1996) describing a set of programs for simulating ground motions from earthquakes. The programs are based on modifications I have made to the stochastic method first introduced by Hanks and McGuire (1981). The report contains source codes, written in Fortran, and executables that can be used on a PC. Programs are included both for time-domain and for random vibration simulations. In addition, programs are included to produce Fourier amplitude spectra for the models used in the simulations and to convert shear velocity vs. depth into frequency-dependent amplification. The revision to the previous report is needed because the input and output files have changed significantly, and a number of new programs have been included in the set.

  20. Basinsoft, a computer program to quantify drainage basin characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, Craig A.; Eash, David A.

    2001-01-01

    In 1988, the USGS began developing a program called Basinsoft. The initial program quantified 16 selected drainage basin characteristics from three source-data layers that were manually digitized from topographic maps using the versions of ARC/INFO, Fortran programs, and prime system Command Programming Language (CPL) programs available in 1988 (Majure and Soenksen, 1991). By 1991, Basinsoft was enhanced to quantify 27 selected drainage-basin characteristics from three source-data layers automatically generated from digital elevation model (DEM) data using a set of Fortran programs (Majure and Eash, 1991: Jenson and Dominique, 1988). Due to edge-matching problems encountered in 1991 with the preprocessing

  1. CONC/11: A computer program for calculating the performance of dish-type solar thermal collectors and power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    The CONC/11 computer program designed for calculating the performance of dish-type solar thermal collectors and power systems is discussed. This program is intended to aid the system or collector designer in evaluating the performance to be expected with possible design alternatives. From design or test data on the characteristics of the various subsystems, CONC/11 calculates the efficiencies of the collector and the overall power system as functions of the receiver temperature for a specified insolation. If desired, CONC/11 will also determine the receiver aperture and the receiver temperature that will provide the highest efficiencies at a given insolation. The program handles both simple and compound concentrators. The CONC/11 is written in Athena Extended FORTRAN (similar to FORTRAN 77) to operate primarily in an interactive mode on a Sperry 1100/81 computer. It could also be used on many small computers. A user's manual is also provided for this program.

  2. Atmospheric transmission computer program CP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, D. E.; Barnett, T. L.; Korb, C. L.; Hanby, W.; Dillinger, A. E.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program is described which allows for calculation of the effects of carbon dioxide, water vapor, methane, ozone, carbon monoxide, and nitrous oxide on earth resources remote sensing techniques. A flow chart of the program and operating instructions are provided. Comparisons are made between the atmospheric transmission obtained from laboratory and spacecraft spectrometer data and that obtained from a computer prediction using a model atmosphere and radiosonde data. Limitations of the model atmosphere are discussed. The computer program listings, input card formats, and sample runs for both radiosonde data and laboratory data are included.

  3. High-Performance Design Patterns for Modern Fortran

    DOE PAGES

    Haveraaen, Magne; Morris, Karla; Rouson, Damian; ...

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents ideas for using coordinate-free numerics in modern Fortran to achieve code flexibility in the partial differential equation (PDE) domain. We also show how Fortran, over the last few decades, has changed to become a language well-suited for state-of-the-art software development. Fortran’s new coarray distributed data structure, the language’s class mechanism, and its side-effect-free, pure procedure capability provide the scaffolding on which we implement HPC software. These features empower compilers to organize parallel computations with efficient communication. We present some programming patterns that support asynchronous evaluation of expressions comprised of parallel operations on distributed data. We implemented thesemore » patterns using coarrays and the message passing interface (MPI). We compared the codes’ complexity and performance. The MPI code is much more complex and depends on external libraries. The MPI code on Cray hardware using the Cray compiler is 1.5–2 times faster than the coarray code on the same hardware. The Intel compiler implements coarrays atop Intel’s MPI library with the result apparently being 2–2.5 times slower than manually coded MPI despite exhibiting nearly linear scaling efficiency. As compilers mature and further improvements to coarrays comes in Fortran 2015, we expect this performance gap to narrow.« less

  4. Design and performance analysis of solid-propellant rocket motors using a simplified computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sforzini, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis and a computer program are presented which represent a compromise between the more sophisticated programs using precise burning geometric relations and the textbook type of solutions. The program requires approximately 900 computer cards including a set of 20 input data cards required for a typical problem. The computer operating time for a single configuration is approximately 1 minute and 30 seconds on the IBM 360 computer. About l minute and l5 seconds of the time is compilation time so that additional configurations input at the same time require approximately 15 seconds each. The program uses approximately 11,000 words on the IBM 360. The program is written in FORTRAN 4 and is readily adaptable for use on a number of different computers: IBM 7044, IBM 7094, and Univac 1108.

  5. Computational Skills Acceleration Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, William

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes a program in which the rate of accurate response by six special education students (10 to 13 years old) to multiplication fact questions was increased by the application of contingent reinforcement procedures. (Author)

  6. Description of a FORTRAN subroutine for plotting three-dimensional data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, M. R.; Kelley, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    A FORTRAN subroutine is described which provides the capability to plot three-dimensional data on an interactive cathode-ray-tube computer terminal or conventional plotter. The plotted data, which must be described in terms of a series of two-dimensional curves, appeared to form a surface in three-dimensional space. Features are included of the subroutine's capability for hidden-line computations. User instructions and sample programs are described.

  7. IMAGEP - A FORTRAN ALGORITHM FOR DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    IMAGEP is a FORTRAN computer algorithm containing various image processing, analysis, and enhancement functions. It is a keyboard-driven program organized into nine subroutines. Within the subroutines are other routines, also, selected via keyboard. Some of the functions performed by IMAGEP include digitization, storage and retrieval of images; image enhancement by contrast expansion, addition and subtraction, magnification, inversion, and bit shifting; display and movement of cursor; display of grey level histogram of image; and display of the variation of grey level intensity as a function of image position. This algorithm has possible scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications in material flaw studies, steel and ore analysis, and pathology, respectively. IMAGEP is written in VAX FORTRAN for DEC VAX series computers running VMS. The program requires the use of a Grinnell 274 image processor which can be obtained from Mark McCloud Associates, Campbell, CA. An object library of the required GMR series software is included on the distribution media. IMAGEP requires 1Mb of RAM for execution. The standard distribution medium for this program is a 1600 BPI 9track magnetic tape in VAX FILES-11 format. It is also available on a TK50 tape cartridge in VAX FILES-11 format. This program was developed in 1991. DEC, VAX, VMS, and TK50 are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation.

  8. Mathematical computer programs: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Computer programs, routines, and subroutines for aiding engineers, scientists, and mathematicians in direct problem solving are presented. Also included is a group of items that affords the same users greater flexibility in the use of software.

  9. FORTRAN 4 programs for the extraction of potential well parameters from the energy dependence of total elastic scattering cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labudde, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt has been made to keep the programs as subroutine oriented as possible. Usually only the main programs are directly concerned with the problem of total cross sections. In particular the subroutines POLFIT, BILINR, GASS59/MAXLIK, SYMOR, MATIN, STUDNT, DNTERP, DIFTAB, FORDIF, EPSALG, REGFAL and ADSIMP are completely general, and are concerned only with the problems of numerical analysis and statistics. Each subroutine is independently documented.

  10. Calibration parameters used to simulate streamflow from application of the Hydrologic Simulation Program-FORTRAN Model (HSPF) to mountainous basins containing coal mines in West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkins, John T.; Wiley, Jeffrey B.; Paybins, Katherine S.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the Hydrologic Simulation Program-FORTRAN Model (HSPF) parameters for eight basins in the coal-mining region of West Virginia. The magnitude and characteristics of model parameters from this study will assist users of HSPF in simulating streamflow at other basins in the coal-mining region of West Virginia. The parameter for nominal capacity of the upper-zone storage, UZSN, increased from south to north. The increase in UZSN with the increase in basin latitude could be due to decreasing slopes, decreasing rockiness of the soils, and increasing soil depths from south to north. A special action was given to the parameter for fraction of ground-water inflow that flows to inactive ground water, DEEPFR. The basis for this special action was related to the seasonal movement of the water table and transpiration from trees. The models were most sensitive to DEEPFR and the parameter for interception storage capacity, CEPSC. The models were also fairly sensitive to the parameter for an index representing the infiltration capacity of the soil, INFILT; the parameter for indicating the behavior of the ground-water recession flow, KVARY; the parameter for the basic ground-water recession rate, AGWRC; the parameter for nominal capacity of the upper zone storage, UZSN; the parameter for the interflow inflow, INTFW; the parameter for the interflow recession constant, IRC; and the parameter for lower zone evapotranspiration, LZETP.

  11. Documentation of computer program GRIDDEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    The GRIDDEL computer program which generates finite element meshes for NASTRAN in a manner convenient to the study of laminated composite flat plates is discussed. The program is capable of creating 8 node HEXA elements, GRID coordinates, and PSOLID data in the appropriate NASTRAN format. It is more convenient for this purpose than use of NASTRAN's preprocessors.

  12. Computational Nanotechnology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives are: (1) development of methodological and computational tool for the quantum chemistry study of carbon nanostructures and (2) development of the fundamental understanding of the bonding, reactivity, and electronic structure of carbon nanostructures. Our calculations have continued to play a central role in understanding the outcome of the carbon nanotube macroscopic production experiment. The calculations on buckyonions offer the resolution of a long controversy between experiment and theory. Our new tight binding method offers increased speed for realistic simulations of large carbon nanostructures.

  13. Schedule-Tracker Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collazo, Fernando F.

    1990-01-01

    Schedule Tracker provides effective method for tracking tasks "past due" and/or "near term". Generates reports for each responsible staff member having one or more assigned tasks falling within two listed categories. Schedule Organizer (SO) (COSMIC program MSC-21525), Schedule Tracker (ST), and Schedule Report Generator (SRG) (COSMIC program MSC-21527) computer programs manipulating data-base files in ways advantageous in scheduling. Written in PL/1 and DEC Command Language (DCL).

  14. Line-Editor Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Peter J.

    1989-01-01

    ZED editing program for DEC VAX computer simple, powerful line editor for text, program source code, and nonbinary data. Excels in processing of text by use of procedure files. Also features versatile search qualifiers, global changes, conditionals, online help, hexadecimal mode, space compression, looping, logical combinations of search strings, journaling, visible control characters, and automatic detabbing. Users of Cambridge implementation devised such ZED procedures as chess games, calculators, and programs for evaluating pi. Written entirely in C.

  15. Computational Modeling Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Govindan, T. R.; Davis, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    An Integrated Product Team (IPT) has been formed at NASA Ames Research Center which has set objectives to investigate devices and processes suitable for meeting NASA requirements on ultrahigh performance computers, fast and low power devices, and high temperature wide bandgap materials. These devices may ultimately be sub-100nm feature-size. Processes and equipment must meet the stringent demands posed by the fabrication of such small devices. Until now, the reactors for Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) and plasma processes have been designed by trial and error procedures. Further, once the reactor is in place, optimum processing parameters are found through expensive and time-consuming experimentation. If reliable models are available that describe processes and the operation of the reactors, that chore would be reduced to a routine task while being a cost-effective option. The goal is to develop such a design tool, validate that tool using available data from current generation processes and reactors, and then use that tool to explore avenues for meeting NASA needs for ultrasmall device fabrication. Under the present grant, ARL/Penn State along with other IPT members has been developing models and computer code to meet IPT goals. Some of the accomplishments achieved during the first year of the grant are described in this report

  16. An Interactive Fortran Program for Determining Reliability of Pseudo-Range Geodetic Point Positioning Using the Global Positioning System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-13

    satellite’s ephemerides and clock estimates, which are transmitted daily to the satellite from the Control Segment. Control Segment The Operational Control...be communi- *cated to the OCS where they will be processed to provide precise * predictions of the satellites’ ephemerides and clock stimates. These...long-track, cross-track and radial track, and the bias, drift, and aging of the combined user-satellite clock parameters. The .program is written in the

  17. NAMER: A FORTRAN 4 program for use in optimizing designs of two-level factorial experiments given partial prior information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidik, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    Under certain specified conditions, the Bayes procedure for designing two-level fractional factorial experiments is that which maximizes the expected utility over all possible choices of parameter-estimator matchings, physical-design variable matchings, defining parameter groups, and sequences of telescoping groups. NAMER computes the utility of all possible matchings of physical variables to design variables and parameters to estimators for a specified choice of defining parameter group or groups. The matching yielding the maximum expected utility is indicated, and detailed information is provided about the optimal matchings and utilities. Complete documentation is given; and an example illustrates input, output, and usage.

  18. A computer program for the generation of logic networks from task chart data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbert, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    The Network Generation Program (NETGEN), which creates logic networks from task chart data is presented. NETGEN is written in CDC FORTRAN IV (Extended) and runs in a batch mode on the CDC 6000 and CYBER 170 series computers. Data is input via a two-card format and contains information regarding the specific tasks in a project. From this data, NETGEN constructs a logic network of related activities with each activity having unique predecessor and successor nodes, activity duration, descriptions, etc. NETGEN then prepares this data on two files that can be used in the Project Planning Analysis and Reporting System Batch Network Scheduling program and the EZPERT graphics program.

  19. Computer program for determining rotational line intensity factors for diatomic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiting, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV computer program, that provides a new research tool for determining reliable rotational line intensity factors (also known as Honl-London factors), for most electric and magnetic dipole allowed diatomic transitions, is described in detail. This users manual includes instructions for preparing the input data, a program listing, detailed flow charts, and three sample cases. The program is applicable to spin-allowed dipole transitions with either or both states intermediate between Hund's case (a) and Hund's case (b) coupling and to spin-forbidden dipole transitions with either or both states intermediate between Hund's case (c) and Hund's case (b) coupling.

  20. UDATE1: A computer program for the calculation of uranium-series isotopic ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenbauer, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    UDATE1 is a FORTRAN-77 program with an interface for an Apple Macintosh computer that calculates isotope activities from measured count rates to date geologic materials by uranium-series disequilibria. Dates on pure samples can be determined directly by the accumulation of 230Th from 234U and of 231Pa from 235U. Dates for samples contaminated by clays containing abundant natural thorium can be corrected by the program using various mixing models. Input to the program and file management are made simple and user friendly by a series of Macintosh modal dialog boxes. ?? 1991.

  1. A computer program to trace seismic ray distribution in complex two-dimensional geological models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yacoub, Nazieh K.; Scott, James H.

    1970-01-01

    A computer program has been developed to trace seismic rays and their amplitudes and energies through complex two-dimensional geological models, for which boundaries between elastic units are defined by a series of digitized X-, Y-coordinate values. Input data for the program includes problem identification, control parameters, model coordinates and elastic parameter for the elastic units. The program evaluates the partitioning of ray amplitude and energy at elastic boundaries, computes the total travel time, total travel distance and other parameters for rays arising at the earth's surface. Instructions are given for punching program control cards and data cards, and for arranging input card decks. An example of printer output for a simple problem is presented. The program is written in FORTRAN IV language. The listing of the program is shown in the Appendix, with an example output from a CDC-6600 computer.

  2. Computer model for refinery operations with emphasis on jet fuel production. Volume 3: Detailed systems and programming documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, D. N.; Tunnah, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    The FORTRAN computing program predicts flow streams and material, energy, and economic balances of a typical petroleum refinery, with particular emphasis on production of aviation turbine fuels of varying end point and hydrogen content specifications. The program has a provision for shale oil and coal oil in addition to petroleum crudes. A case study feature permits dependent cases to be run for parametric or optimization studies by input of only the variables which are changed from the base case.

  3. Functional Programming in Computer Science

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Loren James; Davis, Marion Kei

    2016-01-19

    We explore functional programming through a 16-week internship at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Functional programming is a branch of computer science that has exploded in popularity over the past decade due to its high-level syntax, ease of parallelization, and abundant applications. First, we summarize functional programming by listing the advantages of functional programming languages over the usual imperative languages, and we introduce the concept of parsing. Second, we discuss the importance of lambda calculus in the theory of functional programming. Lambda calculus was invented by Alonzo Church in the 1930s to formalize the concept of effective computability, and every functional language is essentially some implementation of lambda calculus. Finally, we display the lasting products of the internship: additions to a compiler and runtime system for the pure functional language STG, including both a set of tests that indicate the validity of updates to the compiler and a compiler pass that checks for illegal instances of duplicate names.

  4. Computing Health: Programing Problem 3, Computing Peak Blood Alcohol Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Robert S.

    1985-01-01

    The Alcohol Metabolism Program, a computer program used to compute peak blood alcohol levels, is expanded upon to include a cover page, brief introduction, and techniques for generalizing the program to calculate peak levels for any number of drinks. (DF)

  5. CONC/11: a computer program for calculating the performance of dish-type solar thermal collectors and power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, L. D.

    1984-02-15

    CONC/11 is a computer program designed for calculating the performance of dish-type solar thermal collectors and power systems. It is intended to aid the system or collector designer in evaluating the performance to be expected with possible design alternatives. From design or test data on the characteristics of the various subsystems, CONC/11 calculates the efficiencies of the collector and the overall power system as functions of the receiver temperature for a specified insolation. If desired, CONC/11 will also determine the receiver aperture and the receiver temperature that will provide the highest efficiencies at a given insolation. The program handles both simple and compound concentrators. CONC/11 is written in Athena Extended Fortran (similar to Fortran 77) to operate primarily in an interactive mode on a Sperry 1100/81 computer. It could also be used on many small computers.

  6. A computer program for automated flutter solution and matched point determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, K. G.

    1973-01-01

    The use of a digital computer program (MATCH) for automated determination of the flutter velocity and the matched-point flutter density is described. The program is based on the use of the modified Laguerre iteration formula to converge to a flutter crossing or a matched-point density. A general description of the computer program is included and the purpose of all subroutines used is stated. The input required by the program and various input options are detailed, and the output description is presented. The program can solve flutter equations formulated with up to 12 vibration modes and obtain flutter solutions for up to 10 air densities. The program usage is illustrated by a sample run, and the FORTRAN program listing is included.

  7. Risk-Assessment Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dias, William C.; Mittman, David S.

    1993-01-01

    RISK D/C is prototype computer program assisting in attempts to do program risk modeling for Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) architectures proposed in Synthesis Group Report. Risk assessment performed with respect to risk events, probabilities, and severities of potential results. Enables ranking, with respect to effectiveness, of risk-mitigation strategies proposed for exploration program architecture. Allows for fact that risk assessment in early phases of planning subjective. Although specific to SEI in present form, also used as software framework for development of risk-assessment programs for other specific uses. Developed for Macintosh(TM) series computer. Requires HyperCard(TM) 2.0 or later, as well as 2 Mb of random-access memory and System 6.0.8 or later.

  8. A compilation system that integrates high performance Fortran and Fortran M

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, I.; Xu, Ming; Avalani, B.; Choudhary, A.

    1994-06-01

    Task parallelism and data parallelism are often seen as mutually exclusive approaches to parallel programming. Yet there are important classes of application, for example in multidisciplinary simulation and command and control, that would benefit from an integration of the two approaches. In this paper, we describe a programming system that we are developing to explore this sort of integration. This system builds on previous work on task-parallel and data-parallel Fortran compilers to provide an environment in which the task-parallel language Fortran M can be used to coordinate data-parallel High Performance Fortran tasks. We use an image-processing problem to illustrate the issues that arise when building an integrated compilation system of this sort.

  9. FISHPACK90: Efficient FORTRAN Subprograms for the Solution of Separable Elliptic Partial Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, John C.; Swarztrauber, Paul N.; Sweet, Roland

    2016-09-01

    FISHPACK90 is a modernization of the original FISHPACK (ascl:1609.004), employing Fortran90 to slightly simplify and standardize the interface to some of the routines. This collection of Fortran programs and subroutines solves second- and fourth-order finite difference approximations to separable elliptic Partial Differential Equations (PDEs). These include Helmholtz equations in cartesian, polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, as well as more general separable elliptic equations. The solvers use the cyclic reduction algorithm. When the problem is singular, a least-squares solution is computed. Singularities induced by the coordinate system are handled, including at the origin r=0 in cylindrical coordinates, and at the poles in spherical coordinates. Test programs are provided for the 19 solvers. Each serves two purposes: as a template to guide you in writing your own codes utilizing the FISHPACK90 solvers, and as a demonstration on your computer that you can correctly produce FISHPACK90 executables.

  10. Computer program for calculating supersonic flow on the windward side conical delta wings by the method of lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klunker, E. B.; South, J. C., Jr.; Davis, R. M.

    1972-01-01

    A user's manual is presented for a program that calculates the supersonic flow on the windward side of conical delta wings with shock attached at the sharp leading edge by the method of lines. The program also has a limited capability for computing the flow about circular and elliptic cones at incidence. It provides information including the shock shape, flow field, isentropic surface-flow properties, and force coefficients. A description of the program operation, a sample computation, and a FORTRAN 4 program listing are included.

  11. Computer program for post-flight evaluation of a launch vehicle upper-stage on-off reaction control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauber, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes a FORTRAN IV coded computer program for post-flight evaluation of a launch vehicle upper stage on-off reaction control system. Aerodynamic and thrust misalignment disturbances are computed as well as the total disturbing moments in pitch, yaw, and roll. Effective thrust misalignment angle time histories of the rocket booster motor are calculated. Disturbing moments are integrated and used to estimate the required control system total inpulse. Effective control system specific inpulse is computed for the boost and coast phases using measured control fuel useage. This method has been used for more than fifteen years for analyzing the NASA Scout launch vehicle second and third-stage reaction control system performance. The computer program is set up in FORTRAN IV for a CDC CYBER 175 system. With slight modification it can be used on other machines having a FORTRAN compiler. The program has optional CALCOMP plotting output. With this option the program requires 19K words of memory and has 786 cards. Running time on a CDC CYBER 175 system is less than three (3) seconds for a typical problem.

  12. Object-oriented design patterns in Fortran 90/95: mazev1, mazev2 and mazev3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decyk, Viktor K.; Gardner, Henry J.

    2008-04-01

    This paper discusses the concept, application, and usefulness of software design patterns for scientific programming in Fortran 90/95. An example from the discipline of object-oriented design patterns, that of a game based on navigation through a maze, is used to describe how some important patterns can be implemented in Fortran 90/95 and how the progressive introduction of design patterns can usefully restructure Fortran software as it evolves. This example is complemented by a discussion of how design patterns have been used in a real-life simulation of Particle-in-Cell plasma physics. The following patterns are mentioned in this paper: Factory, Strategy, Template, Abstract Factory and Facade. Program summaryProgram title: mazev1, mazev2, mazev3 Catalogue identifier: AEAI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1958 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 17 100 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 95 Computer: PC/Mac Operating system: Unix/Linux/Mac (FreeBSD)/Windows (Cygwin) RAM: These are interactive programs with small (KB) memory requirements Classification: 6.5, 20 Nature of problem: A sequence of programs which demonstrate the use of object oriented design patterns for the restructuring of Fortran 90/95 software. The programs implement a simple maze game similar to that described in [1]. Solution method: Restructuring uses versions of the Template, Strategy and Factory design patterns. Running time: Interactive. References:E. Gamma, R. Helm, R. Johnson, J. Vlissides, Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object Oriented Software, Addison-Wesley, 1995, ISBN 0201633612.

  13. Cognitive Skills Needed in Computer Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowaczyk, Ronald H.

    Research directed toward a better understanding of the computer user/computer machine relationship has increased in recent years. To identify what factors may predict success in computer programming, 286 college students from three computer classes (160 from introductory programming; 60 from Cobol programming; and 66 from senior level programming)…

  14. A convenient and adaptable package of computer programs for DNA and protein sequence management, analysis and homology determination.

    PubMed Central

    Pustell, J; Kafatos, F C

    1984-01-01

    We describe the further development of a widely used package of DNA/protein sequence analysis programs (1). Important revisions have been made based on user experience, and new features, multi-user capability, and a set of large scale homology programs have been added. The programs are very user friendly, economical of time and memory, and extremely transportable. They are written in a version of FORTRAN which will compile, with a few defined changes, as FORTRAN 66, FORTRAN 77, FORTRAN IV, FORTRAN IV+, and others. They are running on a variety of microcomputers, minicomputers, and mainframes, in both single user and multi-user configurations. PMID:6320100

  15. SSME structural computer program development: BOPACE programmer manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The programming manual for the two-dimensional Boeing Plastic Analysis Capability for Engines (BOPACE) program written in FORTRAN IV is presented. The BOPACE flow logic is summarized along with subroutines and input/output files. Emphasis is placed on linear equation solver routines written as an independent package.

  16. General purpose computer program for interacting supersonic configurations: Programmer's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crill, W.; Dale, B.

    1977-01-01

    The program ISCON (Interacting Supersonic Configuration) is described. The program is in support of the problem to generate a numerical procedure for determining the unsteady dynamic forces on interacting wings and tails in supersonic flow. Subroutines are presented along with the complete FORTRAN source listing.

  17. Manual of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant optimization model and computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, C. Y.; Alkasab, K. A.

    1984-01-01

    An optimized cost and performance model for a phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant system was derived and developed into a modular FORTRAN computer code. Cost, energy, mass, and electrochemical analyses were combined to develop a mathematical model for optimizing the steam to methane ratio in the reformer, hydrogen utilization in the PAFC plates per stack. The nonlinear programming code, COMPUTE, was used to solve this model, in which the method of mixed penalty function combined with Hooke and Jeeves pattern search was chosen to evaluate this specific optimization problem.

  18. GNU Fortran Cray Pointer Extension

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, J. A.

    2005-07-27

    The gfortran compiler is a Fortran front end to the GNU Compiler Collection. The Cray Pointer extension adds to this existing compiler support for Cray-style integer pointers. This non-standard but widely used extension adds the functionality of C-like pointers to the Fortran language.

  19. A Microcomputer-Based Computer Science Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compeau, Larry D.

    1984-01-01

    Examines the use of the microcomputer in computer science programs as an alternative to time-sharing computers at North Country Community College. Discusses factors contributing to the program's success, security problems, outside application possibilities, and program implementation concerns. (DMM)

  20. A Computer-Assisted Laboratory Sequence for Petroleum Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumsden, David N.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a competitive oil-play game for petroleum geology students. It is accompanied by a computer program written in interactive Fortran. The program, however, is not essential, but useful for adding more interest. (SA)

  1. RAWINPROC: Computer program for decommutating, interpreting, and interpolating Rawinsonde meteorological balloon sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staffanson, F. L.

    1981-01-01

    The FORTRAN computer program RAWINPROC accepts output from NASA Wallops computer program METPASS1; and produces input for NASA computer program 3.0.0700 (ECC-PRD). The three parts together form a software system for the completely automatic reduction of standard RAWINSONDE sounding data. RAWINPROC pre-edits the 0.1-second data, including time-of-day, azimuth, elevation, and sonde-modulated tone frequency, condenses the data according to successive dwells of the tone frequency, decommutates the condensed data into the proper channels (temperature, relative humidity, high and low references), determines the running baroswitch contact number and computes the associated pressure altitudes, and interpolates the data appropriate for input to ACC-PRD.

  2. A FORTRAN 77 Program and User's Guide for the Statistical Analyses of Scatterplots to Identify Important Factors in Large-Scale Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Helton, Jon C.; Shortencarier, Maichael J.

    1999-08-01

    A description and user's guide are given for a computer program, PATTRN, developed at Sandia National Laboratories for use in sensitivity analyses of complex models. This program is intended for use in the analysis of input-output relationships in Monte Carlo analyses when the input has been selected using random or Latin hypercube sampling. Procedures incorporated into the program are based upon attempts to detect increasingly complex patterns in scatterplots and involve the detection of linear relationships, monotonic relationships, trends in measures of central tendency, trends in measures of variability, and deviations from randomness. The program was designed to be easy to use and portable.

  3. Computer Language For Optimization Of Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.; Lucas, Stephen H.

    1991-01-01

    SOL is computer language geared to solution of design problems. Includes mathematical modeling and logical capabilities of computer language like FORTRAN; also includes additional power of nonlinear mathematical programming methods at language level. SOL compiler takes SOL-language statements and generates equivalent FORTRAN code and system calls. Provides syntactic and semantic checking for recovery from errors and provides detailed reports containing cross-references to show where each variable used. Implemented on VAX/VMS computer systems. Requires VAX FORTRAN compiler to produce executable program.

  4. Development of efficient computer program for dynamic simulation of telerobotic manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.; Ou, Y. J.

    1989-01-01

    Research in robot control has generated interest in computationally efficient forms of dynamic equations for multi-body systems. For a simply connected open-loop linkage, dynamic equations arranged in recursive form were found to be particularly efficient. A general computer program capable of simulating an open-loop manipulator with arbitrary number of links has been developed based on an efficient recursive form of Kane's dynamic equations. Also included in the program is some of the important dynamics of the joint drive system, i.e., the rotational effect of the motor rotors. Further efficiency is achieved by the use of symbolic manipulation program to generate the FORTRAN simulation program tailored for a specific manipulator based on the parameter values given. The formulations and the validation of the program are described, and some results are shown.

  5. Program Documentation Report: STD Tape Copy Programs,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Berman Model 9040 STD probe and 1014 data logger. The programs are written in FORTRAN IV and IBM 360 ASSEMBLAR COMPUTER LANGUAGES. Data tapes from the... STD in 7 track format are read in ASSEMBLAR Language and a 9 track FORTRAN readable tape produced. Printouts from the programs record the number of data points recovered and also list the bad data points (if any). (Author)

  6. AV Programs for Computer Know-How.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandell, Phyllis Levy

    1985-01-01

    Lists 44 audiovisual programs (most released between 1983 and 1984) grouped in seven categories: computers in society, introduction to computers, computer operations, languages and programing, computer graphics, robotics, computer careers. Excerpts from "School Library Journal" reviews, price, and intended grade level are included. Names…

  7. STARS: An integrated general-purpose finite element structural, aeroelastic, and aeroservoelastic analysis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Kajal K.

    1991-01-01

    The details of an integrated general-purpose finite element structural analysis computer program which is also capable of solving complex multidisciplinary problems is presented. Thus, the SOLIDS module of the program possesses an extensive finite element library suitable for modeling most practical problems and is capable of solving statics, vibration, buckling, and dynamic response problems of complex structures, including spinning ones. The aerodynamic module, AERO, enables computation of unsteady aerodynamic forces for both subsonic and supersonic flow for subsequent flutter and divergence analysis of the structure. The associated aeroservoelastic analysis module, ASE, effects aero-structural-control stability analysis yielding frequency responses as well as damping characteristics of the structure. The program is written in standard FORTRAN to run on a wide variety of computers. Extensive graphics, preprocessing, and postprocessing routines are also available pertaining to a number of terminals.

  8. Input guide for computer programs to generate thermodynamic data for air and Freon CF4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tevepaugh, J. A.; Penny, M. M.; Baker, L. R., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    FORTRAN computer programs were developed to calculate the thermodynamic properties of Freon 14 and air for isentropic expansion from given plenum conditions. Thermodynamic properties for air are calculated with equations derived from the Beattie-Bridgeman nonstandard equation of state and, for Freon 14, with equations derived from the Redlich-Quang nonstandard equation of state. These two gases are used in scale model testing of model rocket nozzle flow fields which requires simulation of the prototype plume shape with a cold flow test approach. Utility of the computer programs for use in analytical prediction of flow fields is enhanced by arranging card or tape output of the data in a format compatible with a method-of-characteristics computer program.

  9. DIALOG: An executive computer program for linking independent programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatt, C. R.; Hague, D. S.; Watson, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    A very large scale computer programming procedure called the DIALOG executive system was developed for the CDC 6000 series computers. The executive computer program, DIALOG, controls the sequence of execution and data management function for a library of independent computer programs. Communication of common information is accomplished by DIALOG through a dynamically constructed and maintained data base of common information. Each computer program maintains its individual identity and is unaware of its contribution to the large scale program. This feature makes any computer program a candidate for use with the DIALOG executive system. The installation and uses of the DIALOG executive system are described.

  10. HADY-I, a FORTRAN program for the compressible stability analysis of three-dimensional boundary layers. [on swept and tapered wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, N. M.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program HADY-I for calculating the linear incompressible or compressible stability characteristics of the laminar boundary layer on swept and tapered wings is described. The eigenvalue problem and its adjoint arising from the linearized disturbance equations with the appropriate boundary conditions are solved numerically using a combination of Newton-Raphson interative scheme and a variable step size integrator based on the Runge-Kutta-Fehlburh fifth-order formulas. The integrator is used in conjunction with a modified Gram-Schmidt orthonormalization procedure. The computer program HADY-I calculates the growth rates of crossflow or streamwise Tollmien-Schlichting instabilities. It also calculates the group velocities of these disturbances. It is restricted to parallel stability calculations, where the boundary layer (meanflow) is assumed to be parallel. The meanflow solution is an input to the program.

  11. A computer program for plotting stress-strain data from compression, tension, and torsion tests of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenbaum, A.; Baker, D. J.; Davis, J. G., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program for plotting stress-strain curves obtained from compression and tension tests on rectangular (flat) specimens and circular-cross-section specimens (rods and tubes) and both stress-strain and torque-twist curves obtained from torsion tests on tubes is presented in detail. The program is written in FORTRAN 4 language for the Control Data 6000 series digital computer with the SCOPE 3.0 operating system and requires approximately 110000 octal locations of core storage. The program has the capability of plotting individual strain-gage outputs and/or the average output of several strain gages and the capability of computing the slope of a straight line which provides a least-squares fit to a specified section of the plotted curve. In addition, the program can compute the slope of the stress-strain curve at any point along the curve. The computer program input and output for three sample problems are presented.

  12. A Guide to Axial-Flow Turbine Off-Design Computer Program AXOD2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shu-Cheng S.

    2014-01-01

    A Users Guide for the axial flow turbine off-design computer program AXOD2 is composed in this paper. This Users Guide is supplementary to the original Users Manual of AXOD. Three notable contributions of AXOD2 to its predecessor AXOD, both in the context of the Guide or in the functionality of the code, are described and discussed in length. These are: 1) a rational representation of the mathematical principles applied, with concise descriptions of the formulas implemented in the actual coding. Their physical implications are addressed; 2) the creation and documentation of an Addendum Listing of input namelist-parameters unique to AXOD2, that differ from or are in addition to the original input-namelists given in the Manual of AXOD. Their usages are discussed; and 3) the institution of proper stoppages of the code execution, encoding termination messaging and error messages of the execution to AXOD2. These measures are to safe-guard the integrity of the code execution, such that a failure mode encountered during a case-study would not plunge the code execution into indefinite loop, or cause a blow-out of the program execution. Details on these are discussed and illustrated in this paper. Moreover, this computer program has since been reconstructed substantially. Standard FORTRAN Langue was instituted, and the code was formatted in Double Precision (REAL*8). As the result, the code is now suited for use in a local Desktop Computer Environment, is perfectly portable to any Operating System, and can be executed by any FORTRAN compiler equivalent to a FORTRAN 9095 compiler. AXOD2 will be available through NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Software Repository.

  13. HYPOELLIPSE; a computer program for determining local earthquake hypocentral parameters, magnitude, and first-motion pattern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lahr, John C.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides Fortran source code and program manuals for HYPOELLIPSE, a computer program for determining hypocenters and magnitudes of near regional earthquakes and the ellipsoids that enclose the 68-percent confidence volumes of the computed hypocenters. HYPOELLIPSE was developed to meet the needs of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists studying crustal and sub-crustal earthquakes recorded by a sparse regional seismograph network. The program was extended to locate hypocenters of volcanic earthquakes recorded by seismographs distributed on and around the volcanic edifice, at elevations above and below the hypocenter. HYPOELLIPSE was used to locate events recorded by the USGS southern Alaska seismograph network from October 1971 to the early 1990s. Both UNIX and PC/DOS versions of the source code of the program are provided along with sample runs.

  14. Checking Automated-Welder Programs By Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damicone, L. O.

    1990-01-01

    Computer system detects and displays actual and potential errors in programs for computer-controlled electron-beam welder. Uses personal computer, separate from welding computer. Programmed specifically to highlight errors in welding program. Eliminates need for preweld full-power test run reducing checkout time to about half hour. Assures much higher quality, damage-free welding. Used to create and edit new programs for welder. Control computer thereby free for production. Useful for checking programs for such other computer-controlled equipment as inertia welders, robots, machine tools, and heat treaters.

  15. New Mexico district work-effort analysis computer program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hiss, W.L.; Trantolo, A.P.; Sparks, J.L.

    1972-01-01

    The computer program (CAN 2) described in this report is one of several related programs used in the New Mexico District cost-analysis system. The work-effort information used in these programs is accumulated and entered to the nearest hour on forms completed by each employee. Tabulating cards are punched directly from these forms after visual examinations for errors are made. Reports containing detailed work-effort data itemized by employee within each project and account and by account and project for each employee are prepared for both current-month and year-to-date periods by the CAN 2 computer program. An option allowing preparation of reports for a specified 3-month period is provided. The total number of hours worked on each account and project and a grand total of hours worked in the New Mexico District is computed and presented in a summary report for each period. Work effort not chargeable directly to individual projects or accounts is considered as overhead and can be apportioned to the individual accounts and projects on the basis of the ratio of the total hours of work effort for the individual accounts or projects to the total New Mexico District work effort at the option of the user. The hours of work performed by a particular section, such as General Investigations or Surface Water, are prorated and charged to the projects or accounts within the particular section. A number of surveillance or buffer accounts are employed to account for the hours worked on special events or on those parts of large projects or accounts that require a more detailed analysis. Any part of the New Mexico District operation can be separated and analyzed in detail by establishing an appropriate buffer account. With the exception of statements associated with word size, the computer program is written in FORTRAN IV in a relatively low and standard language level to facilitate its use on different digital computers. The program has been run only on a Control Data Corporation

  16. F77NNS - A FORTRAN-77 NEURAL NETWORK SIMULATOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, P. H.

    1994-01-01

    F77NNS (A FORTRAN-77 Neural Network Simulator) simulates the popular back error propagation neural network. F77NNS is an ANSI-77 FORTRAN program designed to take advantage of vectorization when run on machines having this capability, but it will run on any computer with an ANSI-77 FORTRAN Compiler. Artificial neural networks are formed from hundreds or thousands of simulated neurons, connected to each other in a manner similar to biological nerve cells. Problems which involve pattern matching or system modeling readily fit the class of problems which F77NNS is designed to solve. The program's formulation trains a neural network using Rumelhart's back-propagation algorithm. Typically the nodes of a network are grouped together into clumps called layers. A network will generally have an input layer through which the various environmental stimuli are presented to the network, and an output layer for determining the network's response. The number of nodes in these two layers is usually tied to features of the problem being solved. Other layers, which form intermediate stops between the input and output layers, are called hidden layers. The back-propagation training algorithm can require massive computational resources to implement a large network such as a network capable of learning text-to-phoneme pronunciation rules as in the famous Sehnowski experiment. The Sehnowski neural network learns to pronounce 1000 common English words. The standard input data defines the specific inputs that control the type of run to be made, and input files define the NN in terms of the layers and nodes, as well as the input/output (I/O) pairs. The program has a restart capability so that a neural network can be solved in stages suitable to the user's resources and desires. F77NNS allows the user to customize the patterns of connections between layers of a network. The size of the neural network to be solved is limited only by the amount of random access memory (RAM) available to the

  17. Computer Programs in Marine Science

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    available from the NODC. If the NODC holds a copy of the program, it will be so noted at the end of the abstract, and the form will be described (listing...equation end the Wilson sound velocity formula are used in the computations. Running time is two seconds per sta.ion. -p / ! Miguel Angel Alatorre Copy on...RAXSC Hardware - CDC 6600 Determines th! inteinal and external changes of a multi-strand electrome-hanical cable under end zoustrair,:s and loadings

  18. How One Computer Science Program Grew.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, James C.

    1983-01-01

    Describes growth of computer science program in Chetek Junior High School (Wisconsin), from having a single DecWriter II terminal to 14 microprocessors, electronic training devices, and a sequence of computer science courses. Students learn about basic computer literacy, hardware, software, programing, and computer technology. (EAO)

  19. Operational procedure for computer program for design point characteristics of a gas generator or a turbojet lift engine for V/STOL applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, R. P.

    1972-01-01

    The computer program described calculates the design-point characteristics of a gas generator or a turbojet lift engine for V/STOL applications. The program computes the dimensions and mass, as well as the thermodynamic performance of the model engine and its components. The program was written in FORTRAN 4 language. Provision has been made so that the program accepts input values in either SI Units or U.S. Customary Units. Each engine design-point calculation requires less than 0.5 second of 7094 computer time.

  20. Combustion of hydrogen-air jets in local chemical equilibrium: A guide to the CHARNAL computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalding, D. B.; Launder, B. E.; Morse, A. P.; Maples, G.

    1974-01-01

    A guide to a computer program, written in FORTRAN 4, for predicting the flow properties of turbulent mixing with combustion of a circular jet of hydrogen into a co-flowing stream of air is presented. The program, which is based upon the Imperial College group's PASSA series, solves differential equations for diffusion and dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy and also of the R.M.S. fluctuation of hydrogen concentration. The effective turbulent viscosity for use in the shear stress equation is computed. Chemical equilibrium is assumed throughout the flow.

  1. Computer Integrated Manufacturing. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of South Florida, Tampa. Dept. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This packet contains a program guide and Career Merit Achievement Plan (Career MAP) for the implementation of a computer-integrated manufacturing program in Florida secondary and postsecondary schools. The program guide describes the program content and structure, provides a program description, lists job titles under the program, and includes a…

  2. SO - SCHEDULE ORGANIZER COMPUTER PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collazo, F. F.

    1994-01-01

    the user. The time span of SO is nineteen months. This parameter can be modified by the user. The SO program requires the VMS Operating System on a DEC VAX computer and was written in PL/1 and DEC Command Language (DCL). The memory requirement for the program is 61KB. SO can be purchased separately or in a package (COSMIC Program COS-10021) containing SO, ST, and SRG. SO was developed in 1985.

  3. Fluid dynamics computer programs for NERVA turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunner, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    During the design of the NERVA turbopump, numerous computer programs were developed for the analyses of fluid dynamic problems within the machine. Program descriptions, example cases, users instructions, and listings for the majority of these programs are presented.

  4. On the tradeoffs of programming language choice for numerical modelling in geoscience. A case study comparing modern Fortran, C++/Blitz++ and Python/NumPy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarecka, D.; Arabas, S.; Fijalkowski, M.; Gaynor, A.

    2012-04-01

    The language of choice for numerical modelling in geoscience has long been Fortran. A choice of a particular language and coding paradigm comes with different set of tradeoffs such as that between performance, ease of use (and ease of abuse), code clarity, maintainability and reusability, availability of open source compilers, debugging tools, adequate external libraries and parallelisation mechanisms. The availability of trained personnel and the scale and activeness of the developer community is of importance as well. We present a short comparison study aimed at identification and quantification of these tradeoffs for a particular example of an object oriented implementation of a parallel 2D-advection-equation solver in Python/NumPy, C++/Blitz++ and modern Fortran. The main angles of comparison will be complexity of implementation, performance of various compilers or interpreters and characterisation of the "added value" gained by a particular choice of the language. The choice of the numerical problem is dictated by the aim to make the comparison useful and meaningful to geoscientists. Python is chosen as a language that traditionally is associated with ease of use, elegant syntax but limited performance. C++ is chosen for its traditional association with high performance but even higher complexity and syntax obscurity. Fortran is included in the comparison for its widespread use in geoscience often attributed to its performance. We confront the validity of these traditional views. We point out how the usability of a particular language in geoscience depends on the characteristics of the language itself and the availability of pre-existing software libraries (e.g. NumPy, SciPy, PyNGL, PyNIO, MPI4Py for Python and Blitz++, Boost.Units, Boost.MPI for C++). Having in mind the limited complexity of the considered numerical problem, we present a tentative comparison of performance of the three implementations with different open source compilers including CPython and

  5. FORTRAN implementation of Friedman's test for several related samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, S. A.

    1982-01-01

    The FRIEDMAN program is a FORTRAN-coded implementation of Friedman's nonparametric test for several related samples with one observation per treatment/-block combination, or as it is sometimes called, the two-way analysis of variance by ranks. The FRIEDMAN program is described and a test data set and its results are presented to aid potential users of this program.

  6. AUTO_DERIV: Tool for automatic differentiation of a Fortran code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatiadis, S.; Farantos, S. C.

    2010-10-01

    AUTO_DERIV is a module comprised of a set of FORTRAN 95 procedures which can be used to calculate the first and second partial derivatives (mixed or not) of any continuous function with many independent variables. The mathematical function should be expressed as one or more FORTRAN 77/90/95 procedures. A new type of variables is defined and the overloading mechanism of functions and operators provided by the FORTRAN 95 language is extensively used to define the differentiation rules. Proper (standard complying) handling of floating-point exceptions is provided by using the IEEE_EXCEPTIONS intrinsic module (Technical Report 15580, incorporated in FORTRAN 2003). New version program summaryProgram title: AUTO_DERIV Catalogue identifier: ADLS_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADLS_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2963 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 10 314 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 95 + (optionally) TR-15580 (Floating-point exception handling) Computer: all platforms with a Fortran 95 compiler Operating system: Linux, Windows, MacOS Classification: 4.12, 6.2 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADLS_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 127 (2000) 343 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: The need to calculate accurate derivatives of a multivariate function frequently arises in computational physics and chemistry. The most versatile approach to evaluate them by a computer, automatically and to machine precision, is via user-defined types and operator overloading. AUTO_DERIV is a Fortran 95 implementation of them, designed to evaluate the first and second derivatives of a function of many variables

  7. Python interface generator for Fortran based codes (a code development aid)

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, D. P.

    2012-02-22

    Forthon generates links between Fortran and Python. Python is a high level, object oriented, interactive and scripting language that allows a flexible and versatile interface to computational tools. The Forthon package generates the necessary wrapping code which allows access to the Fortran database and to the Fortran subroutines and functions. This provides a development package where the computationally intensive parts of a code can be written in efficient Fortran, and the high level controlling code can be written in the much more versatile Python language.

  8. Computer Program for Calculation of a Gas Temperature Profile by Infrared Emission: Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program to calculate the temperature profile of a flame or hot gas was presented in detail. Emphasis was on profiles found in jet engine or rocket engine exhaust streams containing H2O or CO2 radiating gases. The temperature profile was assumed axisymmetric with an assumed functional form controlled by two variable parameters. The parameters were calculated using measurements of gas radiation at two wavelengths in the infrared. The program also gave some information on the pressure profile. A method of selection of wavelengths was given that is likely to lead to an accurate determination of the parameters. The program is written in FORTRAN IV language and runs in less than 60 seconds on a Univac 1100 computer.

  9. FASTPLOT: An interface to Microsoft{reg_sign} FORTRAN graphics

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R.C.

    1994-03-01

    Interface routines to the Microsoft{reg_sign} FORTRAN graphics library (GRAPHICS.LIB) are provided to facilitate development of graphics codes. These routines are collected into the FASTPLOT library (FASTPLOT.LIB). The FASTPLOT routines simplified the development of applications utilizing graphics and add capabilities not available in GRAPHICS.LIB such as plotting histograms, splines, symbols, and error bars. Specifically, these routines were utilized in the development of the mortality data viewing code, MORTVIEW, for the US Environmental Protection Agency. Routines for color imaging, developed for use with the X-ray Computer Tomography (XCT) imaging code, and examples are also provided in the FASTPLOT library. Many example uses of FASTPLOT.LIB are contained in this document to facilitate applications development. The FASTPLOT.LIB library, source, and applications programs are supplied on the accompanying FASTPLOT diskette.

  10. Directions in parallel programming: HPF, shared virtual memory and object parallelism in pC++

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodin, Francois; Priol, Thierry; Mehrotra, Piyush; Gannon, Dennis

    1994-01-01

    Fortran and C++ are the dominant programming languages used in scientific computation. Consequently, extensions to these languages are the most popular for programming massively parallel computers. We discuss two such approaches to parallel Fortran and one approach to C++. The High Performance Fortran Forum has designed HPF with the intent of supporting data parallelism on Fortran 90 applications. HPF works by asking the user to help the compiler distribute and align the data structures with the distributed memory modules in the system. Fortran-S takes a different approach in which the data distribution is managed by the operating system and the user provides annotations to indicate parallel control regions. In the case of C++, we look at pC++ which is based on a concurrent aggregate parallel model.

  11. Computer programs: Operational and mathematical, a compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Several computer programs which are available through the NASA Technology Utilization Program are outlined. Presented are: (1) Computer operational programs which can be applied to resolve procedural problems swiftly and accurately. (2) Mathematical applications for the resolution of problems encountered in numerous industries. Although the functions which these programs perform are not new and similar programs are available in many large computer center libraries, this collection may be of use to centers with limited systems libraries and for instructional purposes for new computer operators.

  12. Personal Computer Transport Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiStefano, Frank, III; Wobick, Craig; Chapman, Kirt; McCloud, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Personal Computer Transport Analysis Program (PCTAP) is C++ software used for analysis of thermal fluid systems. The program predicts thermal fluid system and component transients. The output consists of temperatures, flow rates, pressures, delta pressures, tank quantities, and gas quantities in the air, along with air scrubbing component performance. PCTAP s solution process assumes that the tubes in the system are well insulated so that only the heat transfer between fluid and tube wall and between adjacent tubes is modeled. The system described in the model file is broken down into its individual components; i.e., tubes, cold plates, heat exchangers, etc. A solution vector is built from the components and a flow is then simulated with fluid being transferred from one component to the next. The solution vector of components in the model file is built at the initiation of the run. This solution vector is simply a list of components in the order of their inlet dependency on other components. The component parameters are updated in the order in which they appear in the list at every time step. Once the solution vectors have been determined, PCTAP cycles through the components in the solution vector, executing their outlet function for each time-step increment.

  13. A Computer Program for Crystal Drawing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutch, Steven I.

    1981-01-01

    Described is a computer program which accepts face data, performs all necessary symmetry operations, and produces a drawing of the resulting crystal. The program shortens computing time to make it suitable for online teaching use or for use in small computers. (Author/DC)

  14. Data Processing: Business Students and Computer Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aukerman, Richard

    1977-01-01

    Notes that business students should be able to understand computer programming but do not have to perform as computer programmers, and presents a brief topic outline of material that should be included in a computer programming course for business students. (EM)

  15. Executive computer program for linking independent computer programs: ODINEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latt, C. R.; Hague, D. S.; Watson, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    Program controls sequence of execution of network of program elements and maintains data base of common information which forms communication link among them. Approach is applicable to any multiple-program task.

  16. Debugging a high performance computing program

    DOEpatents

    Gooding, Thomas M.

    2013-08-20

    Methods, apparatus, and computer program products are disclosed for debugging a high performance computing program by gathering lists of addresses of calling instructions for a plurality of threads of execution of the program, assigning the threads to groups in dependence upon the addresses, and displaying the groups to identify defective threads.

  17. Debugging a high performance computing program

    DOEpatents

    Gooding, Thomas M.

    2014-08-19

    Methods, apparatus, and computer program products are disclosed for debugging a high performance computing program by gathering lists of addresses of calling instructions for a plurality of threads of execution of the program, assigning the threads to groups in dependence upon the addresses, and displaying the groups to identify defective threads.

  18. RUSAP: A computer program for the calculation of Roll-Up Solar Array Performance characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.; Coyner, J. V., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    RUSAP is a FORTRAN 4 computer program designed to determine the performance characteristics (power-to-weight ratio, blanket tension, structural member section dimensions, and resonant frequencies) of large-area, roll-up solar arrays of the single-boom, tensioned-substrate design. The program includes the determination of the size and weight of the base structure supporting the boom and blanket and the determination of the blanket tension and deployable boom stiffness needed to achieve the minimum-weight design for a specified frequency for the first mode of vibration. A complete listing of the program, a description of the theoretical background, and all information necessary to use the program are provided.

  19. A data reduction technique and associated computer program for obtaining vehicle attitudes with a single onboard camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendura, R. J.; Renfroe, P. G.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed discussion of the application of a previously method to determine vehicle flight attitude using a single camera onboard the vehicle is presented with emphasis on the digital computer program format and data reduction techniques. Application requirements include film and earth-related coordinates of at least two landmarks (or features), location of the flight vehicle with respect to the earth, and camera characteristics. Included in this report are a detailed discussion of the program input and output format, a computer program listing, a discussion of modifications made to the initial method, a step-by-step basic data reduction procedure, and several example applications. The computer program is written in FORTRAN 4 language for the Control Data 6000 series digital computer.

  20. Development of Relations of Stream Stage to Channel Geometry and Discharge for Stream Segments Simulated with Hydrologic Simulation Program-Fortran (HSPF), Chesapeake Bay Watershed and Adjacent Parts of Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyer, Douglas; Bennett, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP), Interstate Commission for the Potomac River Basin (ICPRB), Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE), Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation (VADCR), and University of Maryland (UMD) are collaborating to improve the resolution of the Chesapeake Bay Regional Watershed Model (CBRWM). This watershed model uses the Hydrologic Simulation Program-Fortran (HSPF) to simulate the fate and transport of nutrients and sediment throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed and extended areas of Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware. Information from the CBRWM is used by the CBP and other watershed managers to assess the effectiveness of water-quality improvement efforts as well as guide future management activities. A critical step in the improvement of the CBRWM framework was the development of an HSPF function table (FTABLE) for each represented stream channel. The FTABLE is used to relate stage (water depth) in a particular stream channel to associated channel surface area, channel volume, and discharge (streamflow). The primary tool used to generate an FTABLE for each stream channel is the XSECT program, a computer program that requires nine input variables used to represent channel morphology. These input variables are reach length, upstream and downstream elevation, channel bottom width, channel bankfull width, channel bankfull stage, slope of the floodplain, and Manning's roughness coefficient for the channel and floodplain. For the purpose of this study, the nine input variables were grouped into three categories: channel geometry, Manning's roughness coefficient, and channel and floodplain slope. Values of channel geometry for every stream segment represented in CBRWM were obtained by first developing regional regression models that relate basin drainage area to observed values of bankfull width, bankfull depth, and bottom width at each of the 290 USGS

  1. DIALOG: An executive computer program for linking independent programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatt, C. R.; Hague, D. S.; Watson, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    A very large scale computer programming procedure called the DIALOG Executive System has been developed for the Univac 1100 series computers. The executive computer program, DIALOG, controls the sequence of execution and data management function for a library of independent computer programs. Communication of common information is accomplished by DIALOG through a dynamically constructed and maintained data base of common information. The unique feature of the DIALOG Executive System is the manner in which computer programs are linked. Each program maintains its individual identity and as such is unaware of its contribution to the large scale program. This feature makes any computer program a candidate for use with the DIALOG Executive System. The installation and use of the DIALOG Executive System are described at Johnson Space Center.

  2. MICA, a facility to achieve portability for message-passing and dynamic memory management in FORTRAN

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.C.; Mirin, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    MICA, which stands for Macro Interface for Communication and Allocation, is a macro facility for message passing and dynamic memory management for Fortran programs on Unix platforms. A combination of CPP and M4 preprocessing is used to provide the macro interface. CPP is used for conditional compilation according to machine architecture and selected memory management and message passing options. M4 is used for translating the macro calls into the appropriate Fortran code sequences. Several supporting Fortran subprograms are included.

  3. The NASA computer science research program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A taxonomy of computer science is included, one state of the art of each of the major computer science categories is summarized. A functional breakdown of NASA programs under Aeronautics R and D, space R and T, and institutional support is also included. These areas were assessed against the computer science categories. Concurrent processing, highly reliable computing, and information management are identified.

  4. Modular Programming Techniques for Distributed Computing Tasks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    Modular Programming Techniques for Distributed Computing Tasks Anthony Cowley, Hwa-Chow Hsu, Camillo J. Taylor GRASP Laboratory University of...network, distributed computing , software design 1. INTRODUCTION As efforts to field sensor networks, or teams of mobile robots, become more...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Modular Programming Techniques for Distributed Computing Tasks 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  5. Virtual Frame Buffer Interface Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Thomas L.

    1990-01-01

    Virtual Frame Buffer Interface program makes all frame buffers appear as generic frame buffer with specified set of characteristics, allowing programmers to write codes that run unmodified on all supported hardware. Converts generic commands to actual device commands. Consists of definition of capabilities and FORTRAN subroutines called by application programs. Developed in FORTRAN 77 for DEC VAX 11/780 or DEC VAX 11/750 computer under VMS 4.X.

  6. SALE-3D: a simplified ALE computer program for calculating three-dimensional fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Amsden, A.A.; Ruppel, H.M.

    1981-11-01

    This report presents a simplified numerical fluid-dynamics computing technique for calculating time-dependent flows in three dimensions. An implicit treatment of the pressure equation permits calculation of flows far subsonic without stringent constraints on the time step. In addition, the grid vertices may be moved with the fluid in Lagrangian fashion or held fixed in an Eulerian manner, or moved in some prescribed manner to give a continuous rezoning capability. This report describes the combination of Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) to form the ICEd-ALE technique in the framework of the Simplified-ALE (SALE-3D) computer program, for which a general flow diagram and complete FORTRAN listing are included. Sample problems show how to modify the code for a variety of applications. SALE-3D is patterned as closely as possible on the previously reported two-dimensional SALE program.

  7. BALANCE : a computer program for calculating mass transfer for geochemical reactions in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parkhurst, David L.; Plummer, L. Niel; Thorstenson, Donald C.

    1982-01-01

    BALANCE is a Fortran computer designed to define and quantify chemical reactions between ground water and minerals. Using (1) the chemical compositions of two waters along a flow path and (2) a set of mineral phases hypothesized to be the reactive constituents in the system, the program calculates the mass transfer (amounts of the phases entering or leaving the aqueous phase) necessary to account for the observed changes in composition between the two waters. Additional constraints can be included in the problem formulation to account for mixing of two end-member waters, redox reactions, and, in a simplified form, isotopic composition. The computer code and a description of the input necessary to run the program are presented. Three examples typical of ground-water systems are described. (USGS)

  8. CSM programs SM RCS propellant quantity gaging systems program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, G. R.; Reynolds, R. G.

    1971-01-01

    Computer program calculates actual and useable remaining propellant quantities as required in positive expulsion rocket engine propellant feed system. Program establishes relationship between helium system pressures and temperatures and propellant weight remaining in tanks. Program is written in FORTRAN 4 for IBM-360 computer.

  9. Evaluation of aerothermal modeling computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, K. C.; Yu, S. T.

    1987-01-01

    Various computer programs based upon the SIMPLE or SIMPLER algorithm were studied and compared for numerical accuracy, efficiency, and grid dependency. Four two-dimensional and one three-dimensional code originally developed by a number of research groups were considered. In general, the accuracy and computational efficieny of these TEACH type programs were improved by modifying the differencing schemes and their solvers. A brief description of each program is given. Error reduction, spline flux and second upwind differencing programs are covered.

  10. COSMIC: A catalog of selected computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Information is presented on various computer programs developed in the space program which are now available to the public. Many programs from the Department of Defense and selected software from other government agencies are also offered. Over 1500 programs in almost every technical or managerial discipline are available.

  11. Statistical Energy Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferebee, R. C.; Trudell, R. W.; Yano, L. I.; Nygaard, S. I.

    1985-01-01

    Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) is powerful tool for estimating highfrequency vibration spectra of complex structural systems and incorporated into computer program. Basic SEA analysis procedure divided into three steps: Idealization, parameter generation, and problem solution. SEA computer program written in FORTRAN V for batch execution.

  12. Thermal-Hydraulic-Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    ELM computer program is simple computational tool for modeling steady-state thermal hydraulics of flows of propellants through fuel-element-coolant channels in nuclear thermal rockets. Evaluates various heat-transfer-coefficient and friction-factor correlations available for turbulent pipe flow with addition of heat. Comparisons possible within one program. Machine-independent program written in FORTRAN 77.

  13. Two BASIC computer programs for the determination of in situ stresses using the CSIRO hollow inclusion stress cell and the USBM borehole deformation gage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, W.K.

    1982-01-01

    The mathematical method of determining in-situ stresses by overcoring, using either the U.S. Bureau of Mines Borehole Deformation Gage or the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Hollow Inclusion Stress Cell, is summarized, and data reduction programs for each type of instrument, written in BASIC, are presented. The BASIC programs offer several advantages over previously available FORTRAN programs. They can be executed on a desk-top microcomputer at or near the field site, allowing the investigator to assess the quality of the data and make decisions on the need for additional testing while the crew is still in the field. Also, data input is much simpler than with currently available FORTRAN programs; either English or SI units can be used; and standard deviations of the principal stresses are computed as well as those of the geographic components.

  14. Computer program for design of two-dimensional supersonic turbine rotor blades with boundary-layer correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, L. J.; Scullin, V. J.

    1971-01-01

    A FORTRAN 4 computer program for the design of two-dimensional supersonic rotor blade sections corrected for boundary-layer displacement thickness is presented. The ideal rotor is designed by the method of characteristics to produce vortex flow within the blade passage. The boundary-layer parameters are calculated by Cohen and Reshotoko's method for laminar flow and Sasman and Cresci's method for turbulent flow. The program input consists essentially of the blade surface Mach number distribution and total flow conditions. The primary output is the corrected blade profile and the boundary-layer parameters.

  15. A computer program to generate two-dimensional grids about airfoils and other shapes by the use of Poisson's equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorenson, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    A method for generating two dimensional finite difference grids about airfoils and other shapes by the use of the Poisson differential equation is developed. The inhomogeneous terms are automatically chosen such that two important effects are imposed on the grid at both the inner and outer boundaries. The first effect is control of the spacing between mesh points along mesh lines intersecting the boundaries. The second effect is control of the angles with which mesh lines intersect the boundaries. A FORTRAN computer program has been written to use this method. A description of the program, a discussion of the control parameters, and a set of sample cases are included.

  16. GASPLOT - A computer graphics program that draws a variety of thermophysical property charts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trivisonno, R. J.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    A FORTRAN V computer program, written for the UNIVAC 1100 series, is used to draw a variety of precision thermophysical property charts on the Calcomp plotter. In addition to the program (GASPLOT), which requires (15 160) sub 10 storages, a thermophysical properties routine needed to produce plots. The program is designed so that any two of the state variables, the derived variables, or the transport variables may be plotted as the ordinate - abscissa pair with as many as five parametric variables. The parameters may be temperature, pressure, density, enthalpy, and entropy. Each parameter may have as many a 49 values, and the range of the variables is limited only by the thermophysical properties routine.

  17. Computer program for prediction of capture maneuver probability for an on-off reaction controlled upper stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauber, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    A FORTRAN coded computer program which computes the capture transient of a launch vehicle upper stage at the ignition and/or separation event is presented. It is for a single degree-of-freedom on-off reaction jet attitude control system. The Monte Carlo method is used to determine the statistical value of key parameters at the outcome of the event. Aerodynamic and booster induced disturbances, vehicle and control system characteristics, and initial conditions are treated as random variables. By appropriate selection of input data pitch, yaw and roll axes can be analyzed. Transient response of a single deterministic case can be computed. The program is currently set up on a CDC CYBER 175 computer system but is compatible with ANSI FORTRAN computer language. This routine has been used over the past fifteen (15) years for the SCOUT Launch Vehicle and has been run on RECOMP III, IBM 7090, IBM 360/370, CDC6600 and CDC CYBER 175 computers with little modification.

  18. Specifications and programs for computer software validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browne, J. C.; Kleir, R.; Davis, T.; Henneman, M.; Haller, A.; Lasseter, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    Three software products developed during the study are reported and include: (1) FORTRAN Automatic Code Evaluation System, (2) the Specification Language System, and (3) the Array Index Validation System.

  19. Computer Integrated Manufacturing Programs in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Business Machines Corp., Milford, CT. Academic Information Systems.

    This publication focuses on computer integrated manufacturing (CIM) programs at several higher education institutions which teach the use of computing in manufacturing. The document describes programs at the following institutions: University of Alabama (where researchers are investigating CIM techniques with a key focus on transferring their…

  20. Preschool Cookbook of Computer Programming Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgado, Leonel; Cruz, Maria; Kahn, Ken

    2010-01-01

    A common problem in computer programming use for education in general, not simply as a technical skill, is that children and teachers find themselves constrained by what is possible through limited expertise in computer programming techniques. This is particularly noticeable at the preliterate level, where constructs tend to be limited to…

  1. Computer Programming Goes Back to School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafai, Yasmin B.; Burke, Quinn

    2013-01-01

    We are witnessing a remarkable comeback of programming. Current initiatives to promote computational thinking and to broaden participation in computing signal a renewed interest to bring programming back into K-12 schools and help develop children as producers and not simply consumers of digital media. This essay explores the re-emergence of…

  2. Computer Program To Transliterate Into Arabic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephan, E.

    1986-01-01

    Conceptual program for TRS-80, Model 12 (or equivalent) computer transliterates from English letters of computer keyboard to Arabic characters in output of associated printer. Program automatically changes character sequence from left-to-right of English to right-to-left of Arabic.

  3. Simple Data Format - A Platform Independent Data Format that works in Fortran, C, and IDL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, George H.

    2006-06-01

    Saving the output from large-scale numerical simulations, especially big, multi-dimensional arrays, in a form that can be easily post-processed and analyzed on many different computing platforms has been a challenge for decades.Here, I describe one possible solution for this problem, "Simple Data Format" (SDF), and an implementation of this format that works in Fortran, C, and IDL. At the present time, the file format and software has been demonstrated to work for all 3 languages in Linux on x86 and x86_64 architectures, in Windows XP (x86), in Solaris, and in Mac OSX (G4,G5 architectures). SDF data files can be passed from one architecture to another transparently.SDF was designed specifically to allow a clean replacement of unformatted and direct access I/O in Fortran 77 or Fortran 90/95 programs with simple subroutine calls, and to accomodate "large" (over 2GB) file sizes on all platforms.Specific examples of how to read, write, and edit SDF files in all 3 languages will be shown.This work was partially supported by the DoD MURI award "Understanding Magnetic Eruptions on the Sun and their Interplanetary Consequences", and by the NASA SECT award "Understanding the Dynamic Coupling Between the Solar Interior and the Solar Atmosphere".

  4. Protection of Computer Programs--A Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnahan, William H.

    Computer programs, as legitimate original inventions or creative written expressions, are entitled to patent or copyright protection. Understanding the legal implications of this concept is crucial to both computer programmers and their employers in our increasingly computer-oriented way of life. Basically the copyright or patent procedure…

  5. A computer program for calculating symmetrical aerodynamic characteristics and lateral-directional stability derivatives of wing-body combinations with blowing jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.; Mehrotra, S. C.; Fox, C. H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The necessary information for using a computer program to calculate the aerodynamic characteristics under symmetrical flight conditions and the lateral-directional stability derivatives of wing-body combinations with upper-surface-blowing (USB) or over-wing-blowing (OWB) jets are described. The following new features were added to the program: (1) a fuselage of arbitrary body of revolution has been included. The effect of wing-body interference can now be investigated, and (2) all nine lateral-directional stability derivatives can be calculated. The program is written in FORTRAN language and runs on CDC Cyber 175 and Honeywell 66/60 computers.

  6. Controlling Laboratory Processes From A Personal Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, H.; Mackin, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    Computer program provides natural-language process control from IBM PC or compatible computer. Sets up process-control system that either runs without operator or run by workers who have limited programming skills. Includes three smaller programs. Two of them, written in FORTRAN 77, record data and control research processes. Third program, written in Pascal, generates FORTRAN subroutines used by other two programs to identify user commands with device-driving routines written by user. Also includes set of input data allowing user to define user commands to be executed by computer. Requires personal computer operating under MS-DOS with suitable hardware interfaces to all controlled devices. Also requires FORTRAN 77 compiler and device drivers written by user.

  7. Report on Computer Programs for Robotic Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, R. T.; Kan, E. P.

    1986-01-01

    Collection of programs supports robotic research. Report describes computer-vision software library NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Programs evolved during past 10 years of research into robotics. Collection includes low- and high-level image-processing software proved in applications ranging from factory automation to spacecraft tracking and grappling. Programs fall into several overlapping categories. Image utilities category are low-level routines that provide computer access to image data and some simple graphical capabilities for displaying results of image processing.

  8. Creation of a Course in Computer Methods and Modeling for Undergraduate Earth Science Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menking, K. M.; Dashnaw, J. M.

    2003-12-01

    In recent years computer modeling has gained importance in geological research as a means to generate and test hypotheses and to allow simulation of processes in places inaccessible to humans (e.g., outer core fluid dynamics), too slow to permit observation (e.g., erosionally-induced uplift of topography), or too large to facilitate construction of physical models (e.g., faulting on the San Andreas). Entire fields within the Earth sciences now exist in which computer modeling has become the core work of the discipline. Undergraduate geology/Earth science programs have been slow to adapt to this change, and computer science curricular offerings often do not meet geology students' needs. To address these problems, a course in Computer Methods and Modeling in the Earth Sciences is being developed at Vassar College. The course uses the STELLA iconographical box modeling software developed by High Performance Systems, Inc. to teach students the fundamentals of dynamical systems modeling and then builds on the knowledge students have constructed with STELLA to teach introductory computer programming in Fortran. Fully documented and debugged STELLA and Fortran models along with reading lists, answer keys, and course notes are being developed for distribution to anyone interested in teaching a course such as this. Modeling topics include U-Pb concordia/discordia dating techniques, the global phosphorus cycle, Earth's energy balance and temperature, the impact of climate change on a chain of lakes in eastern California, heat flow in permafrost, and flow of ice in glaciers by plastic deformation. The course has been taught twice at Vassar and has been enthusiastically received by students who reported not only that they enjoyed learning the process of modeling, but also that they had a newfound appreciation for the role of mathematics in geology and intended to enroll in more math courses in the future.

  9. An Empirical Study of Plan-Based Representations of Pascal and Fortran Code.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    COMPUTING LABORATORY lReport No. CCL-0687-0 00 IAN EMPIRICAL STUDY OF PLAN-BASED REPRESENTATIONS OF PASCAL AND FORTRAN CODE Scott P. Robertson Chiung-Chen Yu...82173 ’, " Office of Naval Research Contract No. N00014-86-K-0876 Work Unit No. NR 4424203-01 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED...researchers have argued recenitly that programmers utilize a plan-based representation when composing or comprehending program code. In a series of studies we

  10. Performance of FORTRAN floating-point operations on the Flex/32 multicomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas W.

    1987-01-01

    A series of experiments has been run to examine the floating-point performance of FORTRAN programs on the Flex/32 (Trademark) computer. The experiments are described, and the timing results are presented. The time required to execute a floating-point operation is found to vary considerbaly depending on a number of factors. One factor of particular interest from an algorithm design standpoint is the difference in speed between common memory accesses and local memory accesses. Common memory accesses were found to be slower, and guidelines are given for determinig when it may be cost effective to copy data from common to local memory.

  11. Automatic system for computer program documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, D. B.; Elliott, R. W.; Arseven, S.; Colunga, D.

    1972-01-01

    Work done on a project to design an automatic system for computer program documentation aids was made to determine what existing programs could be used effectively to document computer programs. Results of the study are included in the form of an extensive bibliography and working papers on appropriate operating systems, text editors, program editors, data structures, standards, decision tables, flowchart systems, and proprietary documentation aids. The preliminary design for an automated documentation system is also included. An actual program has been documented in detail to demonstrate the types of output that can be produced by the proposed system.

  12. Valve- And Switch-Monitoring Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Matthew R.; Lowe, Carlyle M., III

    1991-01-01

    Human operators freed from tedious, repetitive monitoring tasks. Computer program applies techniques of artificial intelligence to monitoring positions of many switches and valves. Uses combination of procedural and declarative programming techniques. NASA's C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) provides rule-processing capabilities. Host program, written in C, acquires necessary data and applies valuation algorithm to generate knowledge-based propositions. Written to assist human flight controllers in comparing actual with expected configuration of switches and valves in Space Shuttle; underlying programming concept applicable to other complicated systems as chemical-processing plants, power-plants, and automated assembly lines. Program works with present monitoring equipment and computers.

  13. VOE Computer Programming: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This guide, which was written as an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System, outlines the suggested scope and sequence of a 3-year program in computer programming. The guide consists of a course description; general course…

  14. Computer Assistance for Writing Interactive Programs: TICS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplow, Roy; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Investigators developed an on-line, interactive programing system--the Teacher-Interactive Computer System (TICS)--to provide assistance to those who were not programers, but nevertheless wished to write interactive instructional programs. TICS had two components: an author system and a delivery system. Underlying assumptions were that…

  15. A Creative Arts Approach to Computer Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Gary

    1991-01-01

    Discusses "Object LOGO," a symbolic computer programing language for use in the creative arts. Describes the use of the program in approaching arts projects from textual, graphic, and musical perspectives. Suggests that use of the program can promote development of creative skills and humanities learning in general. (SG)

  16. STARS: An Integrated, Multidisciplinary, Finite-Element, Structural, Fluids, Aeroelastic, and Aeroservoelastic Analysis Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, K. K.

    1997-01-01

    A multidisciplinary, finite element-based, highly graphics-oriented, linear and nonlinear analysis capability that includes such disciplines as structures, heat transfer, linear aerodynamics, computational fluid dynamics, and controls engineering has been achieved by integrating several new modules in the original STARS (STructural Analysis RoutineS) computer program. Each individual analysis module is general-purpose in nature and is effectively integrated to yield aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic solutions of complex engineering problems. Examples of advanced NASA Dryden Flight Research Center projects analyzed by the code in recent years include the X-29A, F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle/Thrust Vectoring Control System, B-52/Pegasus Generic Hypersonics, National AeroSpace Plane (NASP), SR-71/Hypersonic Launch Vehicle, and High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) projects. Extensive graphics capabilities exist for convenient model development and postprocessing of analysis results. The program is written in modular form in standard FORTRAN language to run on a variety of computers, such as the IBM RISC/6000, SGI, DEC, Cray, and personal computer; associated graphics codes use OpenGL and IBM/graPHIGS language for color depiction. This program is available from COSMIC, the NASA agency for distribution of computer programs.

  17. Radiation and scattering from bodies of translation. Volume 2: User's manual, computer program documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medgyesi-Mitschang, L. N.; Putnam, J. M.

    1980-04-01

    A hierarchy of computer programs implementing the method of moments for bodies of translation (MM/BOT) is described. The algorithm treats the far-field radiation and scattering from finite-length open cylinders of arbitrary cross section as well as the near fields and aperture-coupled fields for rectangular apertures on such bodies. The theoretical development underlying the algorithm is described in Volume 1. The structure of the computer algorithm is such that no a priori knowledge of the method of moments technique or detailed FORTRAN experience are presupposed for the user. A set of carefully drawn example problems illustrates all the options of the algorithm. For more detailed understanding of the workings of the codes, special cross referencing to the equations in Volume 1 is provided. For additional clarity, comment statements are liberally interspersed in the code listings, summarized in the present volume.

  18. Geomagnetic Cutoff Rigidity Computer Program: Theory, Software Description and Example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, D. F.; Shea, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    The access of charged particles to the earth from space through the geomagnetic field has been of interest since the discovery of the cosmic radiation. The early cosmic ray measurements found that cosmic ray intensity was ordered by the magnetic latitude and the concept of cutoff rigidity was developed. The pioneering work of Stoermer resulted in the theory of particle motion in the geomagnetic field, but the fundamental mathematical equations developed have 'no solution in closed form'. This difficulty has forced researchers to use the 'brute force' technique of numerical integration of individual trajectories to ascertain the behavior of trajectory families or groups. This requires that many of the trajectories must be traced in order to determine what energy (or rigidity) a charged particle must have to penetrate the magnetic field and arrive at a specified position. It turned out the cutoff rigidity was not a simple quantity but had many unanticipated complexities that required many hundreds if not thousands of individual trajectory calculations to solve. The accurate calculation of particle trajectories in the earth's magnetic field is a fundamental problem that limited the efficient utilization of cosmic ray measurements during the early years of cosmic ray research. As the power of computers has improved over the decades, the numerical integration procedure has grown more tractable, and magnetic field models of increasing accuracy and complexity have been utilized. This report is documentation of a general FORTRAN computer program to trace the trajectory of a charged particle of a specified rigidity from a specified position and direction through a model of the geomagnetic field.

  19. Computer program for thermal and transport properties of parahydrogen from 20 to 10,000 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, James T.

    1993-01-01

    A computer program was recently developed to provide thermal and transport properties for parahydrogen across a wide temperature and pressure range. The program, NBS+/-pH2, matches the most recent parahydrogen property data from the National Bureau of Standards up to 3000 K and property data from the NASA Lewis Research Center's Chemical Equilibrium Computer Program up to 10,000 K. The pressure range of NBS+/-pH2 is from 1 x 10(exp 4) to 1.6 x 10(exp 7) Pa. The program was developed to meet the need for accurate parahydrogen properties from liquid to dissociated conditions as required by propulsion simulation programs being developed under the Space Exploration Initiative. NBS+/-pH2 is a machine-independent, standard Fortran 77 program which provides density, thermal conductivity, viscosity, Prandtl number, entropy, specific heats, and speed of sound given pressure and either temperature or enthalpy. This program is described and a comparison to programs previously available is provided.

  20. A VLBI variance-covariance analysis interactive computer program. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, Y.

    1980-01-01

    An interactive computer program (in FORTRAN) for the variance covariance analysis of VLBI experiments is presented for use in experiment planning, simulation studies and optimal design problems. The interactive mode is especially suited to these types of analyses providing ease of operation as well as savings in time and cost. The geodetic parameters include baseline vector parameters and variations in polar motion and Earth rotation. A discussion of the theroy on which the program is based provides an overview of the VLBI process emphasizing the areas of interest to geodesy. Special emphasis is placed on the problem of determining correlations between simultaneous observations from a network of stations. A model suitable for covariance analyses is presented. Suggestions towards developing optimal observation schedules are included.

  1. TPA - A COMPUTER PROGRAM TO BALANCE MAPPED TURBOPUMP ASSEMBLIES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    Accurate simulation of nuclear thermal propulsion systems using computational methods will permit reductions in testing and, thus, the time and cost of achieving a flight ready status for systems utilizing this advanced technology. An accurate simulation must maintain a "balance-of-plant" where the required pump work equals the supplied turbine work. This turbopump assembly balancing must be integrated into the overall system analysis models. TPA was developed to balance turbine and pump work using performance maps. It requires the inlet properties, performance maps, and shaft speed. TPA then computes the exit conditions and work terms. The work terms can then be balanced by varying the input shaft speed. The objective of the pump analysis is to determine the propellant state properties at the pump exit and the pump work. The pump analysis algorithm for liquid flow assumes that the shaft speed, the propellant state properties at the pump entrance, the propellant flow rate, the pump entrance and exit areas, as well as performance curves, are all known. The analysis of both the pump pressure rise and pump efficiency curves is required. The objective of the turbine analysis is to determine the propellant state properties at the turbine exit and the turbine work. The turbine analysis algorithm assumes that the shaft speed, the propellant state properties at the turbine entrance, the propellant flow rate, the turbine root mean square blade diameter, the turbine entrance and exit areas, as well as performance curves, are all known. The analysis also requires the turbine flow parameter curve and the turbine total efficiency curve. TPA is written in FORTRAN 77 to be machine independent. The TPA package includes the NBS+_PH2 code, which is also available separately (LEW-15505). TPA has been successfully implemented on a DEC VAX series computer running VMS, a Sun4 series computer running SunOS, and an IBM PC compatible computer running MS-DOS. Lahey F77L3 EM/32 v. 5.01 or

  2. Developing a computer security training program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    We all know that training can empower the computer protection program. However, pushing computer security information outside the computer security organization into the rest of the company is often labeled as an easy project or a dungeon full of dragons. Used in part or whole, the strategy offered in this paper may help the developer of a computer security training program ward off dragons and create products and services. The strategy includes GOALS (what the result of training will be), POINTERS (tips to ensure survival), and STEPS (products and services as a means to accomplish the goals).

  3. Using C++ as a scientific programming language

    SciTech Connect

    Peery, J.S.; Budge, K.G.; Robinson, A.C. ); Whitney, D. )

    1991-01-01

    Large computational physics codes are increasing in complexity as customers demand improved physics packages and more flexible algorithms and problem specifications. It is not uncommon for a code to exceed one hundred thousand lines of FORTRAN, and some codes are much larger. This poses a considerable challenge for program management. The Computational Physics Research and Development Division at Sandia National Laboratories is aggressively pursuing C++ as the language of choice for new coding efforts. We feel that we cannot meet the stringent customer requirements and delivery schedules we now face with either FORTRAN77 or Fortran-90. 8 refs., 3 tabs.

  4. ST - SCHEDULE TRACKER COMPUTER PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collazo, F. F.

    1994-01-01

    The Schedule Organizer, SO (COSMIC Program MSC-21525), Schedule Tracker, ST, and Schedule Report Generator, SRG (COSMIC Program MSC-21527), are programs that manipulate data base files in ways that are advantageous to scheduling applications. Originally designed for the Space Shuttle flight schedule, the program can be easily modified for other scheduling situations. Schedule Organizer provides a simple method for generating distribution lists. These distribution lists contain readers' names for each task schedule defined by the input files. Schedule Tracker provides an effective method for tracking tasks that are 'past due' and/or 'near term'. ST generates reports for each responsible staff member with one or more assigned tasks that fall within the two listed categories. This enables an engineering manager to monitor tasks assigned to staff by running ST on a weekly basis. ST only lists tasks on reports that have become past due or are scheduled for recent completion (near term). Schedule Report Generator provides a simple method for generating periodic schedule reports. ST and SRG use the same data base file as input. The common data base file has a maximum number of 400 entries. The time span of all three programs is nineteen months. Both of these maximum numbers can be modified by the user. ST requires the VMS Operating System on DEC VAX and was written in PL/1 and DEC Command Language (DCL). The program requires a memory of 233KB. ST can be purchased separately or in a package (COSMIC Program COS-10021) containing SO, ST, and SRG. ST was developed in 1985.

  5. Computer Programming Projects in Technology Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Charles R.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses programming projects in applied technology courses, examining documentation, formal reports, and implementation. Includes recommendations based on experience with a sophomore machine elements course which provided computers for problem solving exercises. (DH)

  6. Is the Brain's Mind a Computer Program?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searle, John R.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses whether machines can think in the same sense that humans think. Provides four conclusions based on axioms of differences between computer programs and human minds. Compares claims of strong and weak artificial intelligence. (YP)

  7. Primer for Purchasing Computer Programs: Part 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delf, Robert M.

    1981-01-01

    The last section of a three-part series deals with computer hardware requirements, program installation, and evaluation techniques. The first two parts appeared in the July and September 1981 issues. (Author/MLF)

  8. Primer for Purchasing Computer Programs: Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delf, Robert M.

    1981-01-01

    The second article in a series of three to help purchasers obtain the best computer programs for their budgets, deals with bid solicitation and software evaluation. The first article appeared in the July 1981 issue. (Author/MLF)

  9. Policy Information System Computer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamlin, Roger E.; And Others

    The concepts and methodologies outlined in "A Policy Information System for Vocational Education" are presented in a simple computer format in this booklet. It also contains a sample output representing 5-year projections of various planning needs for vocational education. Computerized figures in the eight areas corresponding to those in the…

  10. A Graphical CAL Program for Fourier Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, J.

    1982-01-01

    A computer program, making use of interactive computer graphics, has been developed to help students become fluent in the mathematical procedures needed to understand concepts of addition of waves. Background theory, use of the program, and technical and educational features of the program (written in Fortran) are discussed. (Author/JN)

  11. Radiator design system computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiggins, C. L.; Oren, J. A.; Dietz, J. B.

    1971-01-01

    Minimum weight space radiator subsystems which can operate over heat load ranges wider than the capabilities of current subsystems are investigated according to projected trends of future long duration space vehicles. Special consideration is given to maximum heat rejection requirements of the low temperature radiators needed for environmental control systems. The set of radiator design programs that have resulted from this investigation are presented in order to provide the analyst with a capability to generate optimum weight radiator panels or sets of panels from practical design considerations, including transient performance. Modifications are also provided for existing programs to improve capability and user convenience.

  12. STEP and STEPSPL: Computer programs for aerodynamic model structure determination and parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterson, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    The successful parametric modeling of the aerodynamics for an airplane operating at high angles of attack or sideslip is performed in two phases. First the aerodynamic model structure must be determined and second the associated aerodynamic parameters (stability and control derivatives) must be estimated for that model. The purpose of this paper is to document two versions of a stepwise regression computer program which were developed for the determination of airplane aerodynamic model structure and to provide two examples of their use on computer generated data. References are provided for the application of the programs to real flight data. The two computer programs that are the subject of this report, STEP and STEPSPL, are written in FORTRAN IV (ANSI l966) compatible with a CDC FTN4 compiler. Both programs are adaptations of a standard forward stepwise regression algorithm. The purpose of the adaptation is to facilitate the selection of a adequate mathematical model of the aerodynamic force and moment coefficients of an airplane from flight test data. The major difference between STEP and STEPSPL is in the basis for the model. The basis for the model in STEP is the standard polynomial Taylor's series expansion of the aerodynamic function about some steady-state trim condition. Program STEPSPL utilizes a set of spline basis functions.

  13. Navy Embedded Computer Accreditation Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    industry and meets certain qualification criteria relating to life-cycle cost, 3 performance, and logistic supportability. This less rigid, optimal...and Projections from Industry After assessing the trends in technology, using the lessons learned from related programs to establish some tentative... RELATED PRtOGRAMS SPARING LOGISTICS TENTATIVE TACCREDITATION EXAMINE CRITERIA: 8 IDEAS LIFE-CYCLE INDUSTRIAL SUBSTANTIATION RESULTS COSDRTOS4

  14. Implementing Computer Integrated Manufacturing Technician Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Roger

    A computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM) technician program was developed to provide training and technical assistance to meet the needs of business and industry in the face of the demands of high technology. The Computer and Automated Systems Association (CASA) of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers provided the incentive and guidelines…

  15. Literature Computer Program among Primary School Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology - TOJET, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the use of computer in learning Malay literature. The objectives of the study were to identify and discuss the basic knowledge and views towards the Malay literature program by using the computer. The samples of the study consisted of 10 subjects who volunteered from Malay language class. They were nine-year-old male and…

  16. MFTF sensor verification computer program

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, H.K.

    1984-11-09

    The design, requirements document and implementation of the MFE Sensor Verification System were accomplished by the Measurement Engineering Section (MES), a group which provides instrumentation for the MFTF magnet diagnostics. The sensors, installed on and around the magnets and solenoids, housed in a vacuum chamber, will supply information about the temperature, strain, pressure, liquid helium level and magnet voltage to the facility operator for evaluation. As the sensors are installed, records must be maintained as to their initial resistance values. Also, as the work progresses, monthly checks will be made to insure continued sensor health. Finally, after the MFTF-B demonstration, yearly checks will be performed as well as checks of sensors as problem develops. The software to acquire and store the data was written by Harry Chow, Computations Department. The acquired data will be transferred to the MFE data base computer system.

  17. High Performance Computer Programming Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-30

    graphic debugging envi- ronment, Voyeur [Bailey, Socha & Notkin 88, Socha, Bailey &S Notkin 88] and two papers on parallel computer structures [Snyder 88...debugger was called Voyeur [Bailey, Socha & Notkin 88, Socha, Bailey & Notkin 88]. Though Voyeur was interfaced to the Poker environment, the intent was...to develop a facility that would be suitable for the more ambitious goals of Orca. Voyeur demonstrated its effectiveness by finding errors in a

  18. NASA High-End Computing Program Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Jarrett S.

    2008-01-01

    If you are a NASA-sponsored scientist or engineer. computing time is available to you at the High-End Computing (HEC) Program's NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) Facility and NASA Center for Computational Sciences (NCCS). The Science Mission Directorate will select from requests NCCS Portals submitted to the e-Books online system for awards beginning on May 1. Current projects set to explore on April 30 must have a request in e-Books to be considered for renewal

  19. SMMP v. 3.0—Simulating proteins and protein interactions in Python and Fortran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, Jan H.; Mohanty, Sandipan; Eisenmenger, Frank; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2008-03-01

    We describe a revised and updated version of the program package SMMP. SMMP is an open-source FORTRAN package for molecular simulation of proteins within the standard geometry model. It is designed as a simple and inexpensive tool for researchers and students to become familiar with protein simulation techniques. SMMP 3.0 sports a revised API increasing its flexibility, an implementation of the Lund force field, multi-molecule simulations, a parallel implementation of the energy function, Python bindings, and more. Program summaryTitle of program:SMMP Catalogue identifier:ADOJ_v3_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADOJ_v3_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html Programming language used:FORTRAN, Python No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:52 105 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:599 150 Distribution format:tar.gz Computer:Platform independent Operating system:OS independent RAM:2 Mbytes Classification:3 Does the new version supersede the previous version?:Yes Nature of problem:Molecular mechanics computations and Monte Carlo simulation of proteins. Solution method:Utilizes ECEPP2/3, FLEX, and Lund potentials. Includes Monte Carlo simulation algorithms for canonical, as well as for generalized ensembles. Reasons for new version:API changes and increased functionality. Summary of revisions:Added Lund potential; parameters used in subroutines are now passed as arguments; multi-molecule simulations; parallelized energy calculation for ECEPP; Python bindings. Restrictions:The consumed CPU time increases with the size of protein molecule. Running time:Depends on the size of the simulated molecule.

  20. Computer-Aided Corrosion Program Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDowell, Louis

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews Computer-Aided Corrosion Program Management at John F. Kennedy Space Center. The contents include: 1) Corrosion at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC); 2) Requirements and Objectives; 3) Program Description, Background and History; 4) Approach and Implementation; 5) Challenges; 6) Lessons Learned; 7) Successes and Benefits; and 8) Summary and Conclusions.

  1. Modifications Of Hydrostatic-Bearing Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbs, Robert I., Jr.; Beatty, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    Several modifications made to enhance utility of HBEAR, computer program for analysis and design of hydrostatic bearings. Modifications make program applicable to more realistic cases and reduce time and effort necessary to arrive at a suitable design. Uses search technique to iterate on size of orifice to obtain required pressure ratio.

  2. Computer Program Aids Design Of Impeller Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei-Chung; Galazin, John V.

    1992-01-01

    Impeller blades for centrifugal turbopumps designed quickly with help of computer program. Generates blade contours and continually subjects them to evaluation. Checks physical parameters to ensure they are compatible with required performance and recycles design if criteria not met. Program written for centrifugal turbomachinery, also adapted to such axial pump components as inducer blades and stator vanes.

  3. Computer-Assisted Study Skills Improvement Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, William F.; Forristall, Dorothy Z.

    The Computer-Assisted Study Skills Improvement Program (CASSIP) is designed to help students develop effective study skills and academic attitudes, thus increasing their potential for scholastic success. The program contains four integrated items: Study Skills Surveys; Study Skills Modules, Study Skills Notebook; and Study Skills Test. The surveys…

  4. Computer programs for estimating civil aircraft economics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.; Molloy, J. K.; Neubawer, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    Computer programs for calculating airline direct operating cost, indirect operating cost, and return on investment were developed to provide a means for determining commercial aircraft life cycle cost and economic performance. A representative wide body subsonic jet aircraft was evaluated to illustrate use of the programs.

  5. Computer Programming by Kindergarten Children Using LOGO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munro-Mavrias, Sandra

    Conservation ability, spatial motor ability, age, and gender were used as predictive variables in a study of 26 kindergarten children's computer programming ability. A preliminary pilot study with first graders had suggested that programming success was related to the ability to reverse thought processes. In both studies, children were taught to…

  6. Computer program CCC: user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Mangold, D.C.; Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1980-01-01

    The Numerical Model CCC (conduction-convection-consolidation), developed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, solves numerically the heat and mass flow equations for a liquid saturated medium, and computes one-dimensional consolidation of the simulated systems. The model employs the Integrated Finite Difference Method (IFDM) in discretizing the saturated medium and in formulating the governing equations. The sets of equations are solved by an iterative solution technique. The deformation of the medium is calculated using the one-dimensional consolidation theory of Terzaghi.

  7. Computer program for calculation of oxygen uptake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, B. L.; Castle, G.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    A description and operational precedures are presented for a computer program, written in Super Basic, that calculates oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide production, and related ventilation parameters. Program features include: (1) the option of entering slope and intercept values of calibration curves for the O2 and CO2 and analyzers; (2) calculation of expired water vapor pressure; and (3) the option of entering inspured O2 and CO2 concentrations. The program is easily adaptable for programmable laboratory calculators.

  8. Computer programs for pressurization (RAMP) and pressurized expulsion from a cryogenic liquid propellant tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, P. A.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis to predict the pressurant gas requirements for the discharge of cryogenic liquid propellants from storage tanks is presented, along with an algorithm and two computer programs. One program deals with the pressurization (ramp) phase of bringing the propellant tank up to its operating pressure. The method of analysis involves a numerical solution of the temperature and velocity functions for the tank ullage at a discrete set of points in time and space. The input requirements of the program are the initial ullage conditions, the initial temperature and pressure of the pressurant gas, and the time for the expulsion or the ramp. Computations are performed which determine the heat transfer between the ullage gas and the tank wall. Heat transfer to the liquid interface and to the hardware components may be included in the analysis. The program output includes predictions of mass of pressurant required, total energy transfer, and wall and ullage temperatures. The analysis, the algorithm, a complete description of input and output, and the FORTRAN 4 program listings are presented. Sample cases are included to illustrate use of the programs.

  9. Computer Programming: Fail Fast to Learn Sooner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Miguel A.; de Sá-Soares, Filipe

    Computer programming is not only to know about the languages or the processes, it is essentially to know how to do it. This involves a constructivist approach in learning. For a newbie in computer programming it is hard to understand the difference between know-about disciplines and the know-how-to-do-it ones. This leads to failure because when they understand they aren't able to solve a programming problem it is usually too late to catch all the time meanwhile lost. Our solution is to get them to fail soon enough. This way they still have time to recover from an eventually bad start.

  10. Linear programming computational experience with onyx

    SciTech Connect

    Atrek, E.

    1994-12-31

    ONYX is a linear programming software package based on an efficient variation of the gradient projection method. When fully configured, it is intended for application to industrial size problems. While the computational experience is limited at the time of this abstract, the technique is found to be robust and competitive with existing methodology in terms of both accuracy and speed. An overview of the approach is presented together with a description of program capabilities, followed by a discussion of up-to-date computational experience with the program. Conclusions include advantages of the approach and envisioned future developments.

  11. Multi level programming Paradigm for Extreme Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petiton, S.; Sato, M.; Emad, N.; Calvin, C.; Tsuji, M.; Dandouna, M.

    2014-06-01

    Abstract: In order to propose a framework and programming paradigms for post-petascale computing, on the road to exascale computing and beyond, we introduced new languages, associated with a hierarchical multi-level programming paradigm, allowing scientific end-users and developers to program highly hierarchical architectures designed for extreme computing. In this paper, we explain the interest of such hierarchical multi-level programming paradigm for extreme computing and its well adaptation to several large computational science applications, such as for linear algebra solvers used for reactor core physic. We describe the YML language and framework allowing describing graphs of parallel components, which may be developed using PGAS-like language such as XMP, scheduled and computed on supercomputers. Then, we propose experimentations on supercomputers (such as the "K" and "Hooper" ones) of the hybrid method MERAM (Multiple Explicitly Restarted Arnoldi Method) as a case study for iterative methods manipulating sparse matrices, and the block Gauss-Jordan method as a case study for direct method manipulating dense matrices. We conclude proposing evolutions for this programming paradigm.

  12. FLOWNET: A Computer Program for Calculating Secondary Flow Conditions in a Network of Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The program requires the network parameters, the flow component parameters, the reservoir conditions, and the gas properties as input. It will then calculate all unknown pressures and the mass flow rate in each flow component in the network. The program can treat networks containing up to fifty flow components and twenty-five unknown network pressures. The types of flow components that can be treated are face seals, narrow slots, and pipes. The program is written in both structured FORTRAN (SFTRAN) and FORTRAN 4. The program must be run in an interactive (conversational) mode.

  13. Research in mathematical theory of computation. [computer programming applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, J.

    1973-01-01

    Research progress in the following areas is reviewed: (1) new version of computer program LCF (logic for computable functions) including a facility to search for proofs automatically; (2) the description of the language PASCAL in terms of both LCF and in first order logic; (3) discussion of LISP semantics in LCF and attempt to prove the correctness of the London compilers in a formal way; (4) design of both special purpose and domain independent proving procedures specifically program correctness in mind; (5) design of languages for describing such proof procedures; and (6) the embedding of ideas in the first order checker.

  14. A core + modules approach to FORTRAN standardization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, W.

    1978-01-01

    A framework for the revision of FORTRAN 77 is presented. There are two kinds of changes: features added to FORTRAN 77, and features remaining in FORTRAN 77 but not included in the core. The net effect of these changes is the following: (1) subroutine linkage facilities are enhanced to improve the interface with applications modules written in FORTRAN, (2) archaic control structures are replaced with modern ones, (3) the concept of storage association is removed, and (4) fixed-form source is replaced with free-form source.

  15. Computer Program Helps Enhance Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanfill, Daniel F., IV

    1994-01-01

    Pixel Pusher is Macintosh application program for viewing and performing minor enhancements on imagery. Works with color images digitized to 8 bits. Reads image files in JPL's two primary image formats VICAR and PDS as well as in Macintosh PICT format. VICAR (NPO-18076) handles array of image-processing capabilities used for variety of applications, including processing of biomedical images, cartography, imaging of Earth resources, and geological exploration. Pixel Pusher also imports color lookup tables in VICAR format for viewing images in pseudocolor (256 colors). Written in Symantec's Think C.

  16. A computer program for analyzing channel geometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Regan, R.S.; Schaffranek, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Channel Geometry Analysis Program (CGAP) provides the capability to process, analyze, and format cross-sectional data for input to flow/transport simulation models or other computational programs. CGAP allows for a variety of cross-sectional data input formats through use of variable format specification. The program accepts data from various computer media and provides for modification of machine-stored parameter values. CGAP has been devised to provide a rapid and efficient means of computing and analyzing the physical properties of an open-channel reach defined by a sequence of cross sections. CGAP 's 16 options provide a wide range of methods by which to analyze and depict a channel reach and its individual cross-sectional properties. The primary function of the program is to compute the area, width, wetted perimeter, and hydraulic radius of cross sections at successive increments of water surface elevation (stage) from data that consist of coordinate pairs of cross-channel distances and land surface or channel bottom elevations. Longitudinal rates-of-change of cross-sectional properties are also computed, as are the mean properties of a channel reach. Output products include tabular lists of cross-sectional area, channel width, wetted perimeter, hydraulic radius, average depth, and cross-sectional symmetry computed as functions of stage; plots of cross sections; plots of cross-sectional area and (or) channel width as functions of stage; tabular lists of cross-sectional area and channel width computed as functions of stage for subdivisions of a cross section; plots of cross sections in isometric projection; and plots of cross-sectional area at a fixed stage as a function of longitudinal distance along an open-channel reach. A Command Procedure Language program and Job Control Language procedure exist to facilitate program execution on the U.S. Geological Survey Prime and Amdahl computer systems respectively. (Lantz-PTT)

  17. The revised solar array synthesis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The Revised Solar Array Synthesis Computer Program is described. It is a general-purpose program which computes solar array output characteristics while accounting for the effects of temperature, incidence angle, charged-particle irradiation, and other degradation effects on various solar array configurations in either circular or elliptical orbits. Array configurations may consist of up to 75 solar cell panels arranged in any series-parallel combination not exceeding three series-connected panels in a parallel string and no more than 25 parallel strings in an array. Up to 100 separate solar array current-voltage characteristics, corresponding to 100 equal-time increments during the sunlight illuminated portion of an orbit or any 100 user-specified combinations of incidence angle and temperature, can be computed and printed out during one complete computer execution. Individual panel incidence angles may be computed and printed out at the user's option.

  18. Numerical-Optimization Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, Garret N.

    1991-01-01

    Automated Design Synthesis (ADS) computer program is general-purpose numerical-optimization program for design engineering. Provides wide range of options for solution of constrained and unconstrained function minimization problems. Suitable for such applications as minimum-weight design. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  19. Computer Series, 115.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birk, James P., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are six computer programs which may be useful in teaching college level chemistry. Topics include dynamic data storage in FORTRAN, "KC?DISCOVERER," pH of acids and bases, calculating percent boundary surfaces for orbitals, and laboratory interfacing with PT Nomograph for the Macintosh. (CW)

  20. FASTER 3: A generalized-geometry Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of neutrons and gamma rays. Volume 2: Users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. M.

    1970-01-01

    A description of the FASTER-III program for Monte Carlo Carlo calculation of photon and neutron transport in complex geometries is presented. Major revisions include the capability of calculating minimum weight shield configurations for primary and secondary radiation and optimal importance sampling parameters. The program description includes a users manual describing the preparation of input data cards, the printout from a sample problem including the data card images, definitions of Fortran variables, the program logic, and the control cards required to run on the IBM 7094, IBM 360, UNIVAC 1108 and CDC 6600 computers.

  1. Three FORTRAN programs for finite-difference solutions to binary diffusion in one and two phases with composition-and time-dependent diffusion coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, R.F.

    1982-01-01

    Geological examples of binary diffusion are numerous. They are potential indicators of the duration and rates of geological processes. Analytical solutions to the diffusion equations generally do not allow for variable diffusion coefficients, changing boundary conditions, and impingement of diffusion fields. The three programs presented here are based on Crank-Nicholson finite-difference approximations, which can take into account these complicating factors. Program 1 describes the diffusion of a component into an initially homogeneous phase that has a constant surface composition. Specifically it is written for Fe-Mg exchange in olivine at oxygen fugacities appropriate for the lunar crust, but other components, phases, or fugacities may be substituted by changing the values of the diffusion coefficient. Program 2 simulates the growth of exsolution lamellae. Program 3 describes the growth of reaction rims. These two programs are written for pseudobinary Ca-(Mg, Fe) exchange in pyroxenes. In all three programs, the diffusion coefficients and boundary conditions can be varied systematically with time. To enable users to employ widely different numerical values for diffusion coefficients and diffusion distance, the grid spacing in the space dimension and the increment by which the grid spacing in the time dimension is increased at each time step are input constants that can be varied each time the programs are run to yield a solution of the desired accuracy. ?? 1982.

  2. View factor computer program (program view) user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puccinelli, E. F.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of program VIEW is to compute view factors between specified surfaces and to be compatible with level 15.5 of the NASTRAN structural analysis program. Program VIEW is a modification of a (finite element) view factor computation program called RAVFAC. VIEW is designed to run on an IBM System/360 operating under OS (operating system), with a minimum region size of 110 K bytes. The actual computation of view factors is still performed exactly as it was in the original version of RAVFAC. In developing VIEW, RAVFAC was modified to satisfy the following compatibility requirements: (1) accept finite element input which can also be used as input to NASTRAN, (2) produce output (view factors) in a format which can be used as input to NASTRAN, and (3) follow NASTRAN program design so that in the future VIEW can be incorporated into NASTRAN as a subroutine. The VIEW program permits computation of the view factors between surfaces, taking into account the presence of any intermediate surfaces. VIEW also computes these view factors either by contour integration or by finite difference (double summation) methods.

  3. New version announcement for TaylUR, an arbitrary-order diagonal automatic differentiation package for Fortran 95

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hippel, G. M.

    2007-06-01

    We present a new version of TaylUR, a Fortran 95 module to automatically compute the numerical values of a complex-valued function's derivatives with respect to several variables up to an arbitrary order in each variable, but excluding mixed derivatives. The new version fixes a potentially serious bug in the code for exponential-related functions that could corrupt the imaginary parts of derivatives, as well as being compatible with a wider range of compilers. Program summaryTitle of program: TaylUR Catalogue identifier: ADXR_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXR_v2_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: none Programming language used: Fortran 95 Computer: Any computer with a conforming Fortran 95 compiler Operating system: Any system with a conforming Fortran 95 compiler No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6548 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 17 468 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADXR_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 174 (2006) 569-576 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: yes Distribution format:tar.gz Nature of problem: Problems that require potentially high orders of derivatives with respect to some variables or derivatives of complex-valued functions, such as, e.g., expansions of Feynman diagrams in particle masses in perturbative Quantum Field Theory. Solution method: Arithmetic operators and Fortran intrinsics are overloaded to act correctly on objects of a defined type taylor, which encodes a function along with its first few derivatives with respect to the user-defined independent variables. Derivatives of products and composite functions are computed using Leibniz's rule and Fàa di Bruno's formula. Reasons for the new version: The previous version [G.M. von Hippel, TaylUR, an arbitrary-order diagonal automatic differentiation package for

  4. Developing Fortran Code for Kriging on the Stampede Supercomputer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgess, Erin

    2016-04-01

    Kriging is easily accessible in the open source statistical language R (R Core Team, 2015) in the gstat (Pebesma, 2004) package. It works very well, but can be slow on large data sets, particular if the prediction space is large as well. We are working on the Stampede supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center to develop code using a combination of R and the Message Passage Interface (MPI) bindings to Fortran. We have a function similar to the autofitVariogram found in the automap (Hiemstra {et al}, 2008) package and it is very effective. We are comparing R with MPI/Fortran, MPI/Fortran alone, and R with the Rmpi package, which uses bindings to C. We will present results from simulation studies and real-world examples. References: Hiemstra, P.H., Pebesma, E.J., Twenhofel, C.J.W. and G.B.M. Heuvelink, 2008. Real-time automatic interpolation of ambient gamma dose rates from the Dutch Radioactivity Monitoring Network. Computers and Geosciences, accepted for publication. Pebesma, E.J., 2004. Multivariable geostatistics in S: the gstat package. Computers and Geosciences, 30: 683-691. R Core Team, 2015. R: A language and environment for statistical computing. R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria. https://www.R-project.org/.

  5. Computer programs for plotting curves with various dashed-line sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmarais, R. N.; Bennett, R. M.

    1972-01-01

    Two FORTRAN-callable subprograms have been written to draw a smooth curve through a set of input points as a solid line or as a general sequence of long and short dashes. Subroutine LINSEQ draws conventional curves whereas subroutine CONSEQ draws smooth closed curves (contours). The subprograms are based on an approximate calculation of the arc length along the curve and spline interpolation along the arc length. Options are provided for smoothing of the input data and for offsetting the plotted curve from the input data points. The method of calculation of the arc length and the generation of the line sequence are described.Usage descriptions of the main subprograms, sample calling programs illustrating the various features of the subprograms, and sample plots are given. The subroutines should be readily adaptable to almost any computer-driven incremental plotter.

  6. Cloudy's Journey from FORTRAN to C, Why and How

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferland, G. J.

    Cloudy is a large-scale plasma simulation code that is widely used across the astronomical community as an aid in the interpretation of spectroscopic data. The cover of the ADAS VI book featured predictions of the code. The FORTRAN 77 source code has always been freely available on the Internet, contributing to its widespread use. The coming of PCs and Linux has fundamentally changed the computing environment. Modern Fortran compilers (F90 and F95) are not freely available. A common-use code must be written in either FORTRAN 77 or C to be Open Source/GNU/Linux friendly. F77 has serious drawbacks - modern language constructs cannot be used, students do not have skills in this language, and it does not contribute to their future employability. It became clear that the code would have to be ported to C to have a viable future. I describe the approach I used to convert Cloudy from FORTRAN 77 with MILSPEC extensions to ANSI/ISO 89 C. Cloudy is now openly available as a C code, and will evolve to C++ as gcc and standard C++ mature. Cloudy looks to a bright future with a modern language.

  7. Computer program for analysis of coupled-cavity traveling wave tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, D. J.; Omalley, T. A.

    1977-01-01

    A flexible, accurate, large signal computer program was developed for the design of coupled cavity traveling wave tubes. The program is written in FORTRAN IV for an IBM 360/67 time sharing system. The beam is described by a disk model and the slow wave structure by a sequence of cavities, or cells. The computational approach is arranged so that each cavity may have geometrical or electrical parameters different from those of its neighbors. This allows the program user to simulate a tube of almost arbitrary complexity. Input and output couplers, severs, complicated velocity tapers, and other features peculiar to one or a few cavities may be modeled by a correct choice of input data. The beam-wave interaction is handled by an approach in which the radio frequency fields are expanded in solutions to the transverse magnetic wave equation. All significant space harmonics are retained. The program was used to perform a design study of the traveling-wave tube developed for the Communications Technology Satellite. Good agreement was obtained between the predictions of the program and the measured performance of the flight tube.

  8. A computer program for anisotropic shallow-shell finite elements using symbolic integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, C. M.; Bowen, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program for anisotropic shallow-shell finite elements with variable curvature is described. A listing of the program is presented together with printed output for a sample case. Computation times and central memory requirements are given for several different elements. The program is based on a stiffness (displacement) finite-element model in which the fundamental unknowns consist of both the displacement and the rotation components of the reference surface of the shell. Two triangular and four quadrilateral elements are implemented in the program. The triangular elements have 6 or 10 nodes, and the quadrilateral elements have 4 or 8 nodes. Two of the quadrilateral elements have internal degrees of freedom associated with displacement modes which vanish along the edges of the elements (bubble modes). The triangular elements and the remaining two quadrilateral elements do not have bubble modes. The output from the program consists of arrays corresponding to the stiffness, the geometric stiffness, the consistent mass, and the consistent load matrices for individual elements. The integrals required for the generation of these arrays are evaluated by using symbolic (or analytic) integration in conjunction with certain group-theoretic techniques. The analytic expressions for the integrals are exact and were developed using the symbolic and algebraic manipulation language.

  9. AESOP: An interactive computer program for the design of linear quadratic regulators and Kalman filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtinen, B.; Geyser, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    AESOP is a computer program for use in designing feedback controls and state estimators for linear multivariable systems. AESOP is meant to be used in an interactive manner. Each design task that the program performs is assigned a "function" number. The user accesses these functions either (1) by inputting a list of desired function numbers or (2) by inputting a single function number. In the latter case the choice of the function will in general depend on the results obtained by the previously executed function. The most important of the AESOP functions are those that design,linear quadratic regulators and Kalman filters. The user interacts with the program when using these design functions by inputting design weighting parameters and by viewing graphic displays of designed system responses. Supporting functions are provided that obtain system transient and frequency responses, transfer functions, and covariance matrices. The program can also compute open-loop system information such as stability (eigenvalues), eigenvectors, controllability, and observability. The program is written in ANSI-66 FORTRAN for use on an IBM 3033 using TSS 370. Descriptions of all subroutines and results of two test cases are included in the appendixes.

  10. Combining high performance simulation, data acquisition, and graphics display computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    Issues involved in the continuing development of an advanced simulation complex are discussed. This approach provides the capability to perform the majority of tests on advanced systems, non-destructively. The controlled test environments can be replicated to examine the response of the systems under test to alternative treatments of the system control design, or test the function and qualification of specific hardware. Field tests verify that the elements simulated in the laboratories are sufficient. The digital computer is hosted by a Digital Equipment Corp. MicroVAX computer with an Aptec Computer Systems Model 24 I/O computer performing the communication function. An Applied Dynamics International AD100 performs the high speed simulation computing and an Evans and Sutherland PS350 performs on-line graphics display. A Scientific Computer Systems SCS40 acts as a high performance FORTRAN program processor to support the complex, by generating numerous large files from programs coded in FORTRAN that are required for the real time processing. Four programming languages are involved in the process, FORTRAN, ADSIM, ADRIO, and STAPLE. FORTRAN is employed on the MicroVAX host to initialize and terminate the simulation runs on the system. The generation of the data files on the SCS40 also is performed with FORTRAN programs. ADSIM and ADIRO are used to program the processing elements of the AD100 and its IOCP processor. STAPLE is used to program the Aptec DIP and DIA processors.

  11. A computer program for two-particle generalized coefficients of fractional parentage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveikis, A.; Juodagalvis, A.

    2008-10-01

    We present a FORTRAN90 program GCFP for the calculation of the generalized coefficients of fractional parentage (generalized CFPs or GCFP). The approach is based on the observation that the multi-shell CFPs can be expressed in terms of single-shell CFPs, while the latter can be readily calculated employing a simple enumeration scheme of antisymmetric A-particle states and an efficient method of construction of the idempotent matrix eigenvectors. The program provides fast calculation of GCFPs for a given particle number and produces results possessing numerical uncertainties below the desired tolerance. A single j-shell is defined by four quantum numbers, (e,l,j,t). A supplemental C++ program parGCFP allows calculation to be done in batches and/or in parallel. Program summaryProgram title:GCFP, parGCFP Catalogue identifier: AEBI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEBI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 17 199 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 88 658 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77/90 ( GCFP), C++ ( parGCFP) Computer: Any computer with suitable compilers. The program GCFP requires a FORTRAN 77/90 compiler. The auxiliary program parGCFP requires GNU-C++ compatible compiler, while its parallel version additionally requires MPI-1 standard libraries Operating system: Linux (Ubuntu, Scientific) (all programs), also checked on Windows XP ( GCFP, serial version of parGCFP) RAM: The memory demand depends on the computation and output mode. If this mode is not 4, the program GCFP demands the following amounts of memory on a computer with Linux operating system. It requires around 2 MB of RAM for the A=12 system at E⩽2. Computation of the A=50 particle system requires around 60 MB of

  12. FORTRAN programs for generating fluid inclusion isochores and fugacity coefficients for the system H 2O-CO 2-NaCl at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Teresa Suter; Helgeson, Harold C.

    Program DENFIND permits calculation of pressures and temperatures corresponding to isochores for H 2O-CO 2-NaCl fluids which can be used to generate pressure corrections of fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures. Program FUGCO facilitates calculation of fugacity coefficients in the system H 2O-CO 2-NaCl as a function of pressure, temperature and fluid composition. Both programs employ a modified Redlich-Kwong equation of state for the ternary system (Bowers and Helgeson, 1983a), which is applicable to fluids containing up to 35 wt. % NaCl (relative to H 2O + NaCl) at pressures above 500 bars and temperature from 350 to 600°C.

  13. Efficient 2d full waveform inversion using Fortran coarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Donghyun; Kim, ahreum; Ha, Wansoo

    2016-04-01

    We developed a time-domain seismic inversion program using the coarray feature of the Fortran 2008 standard to parallelize the algorithm. We converted a 2d acoustic parallel full waveform inversion program with Message Passing Interface (MPI) to a coarray program and examined performance of the two inversion programs. The results show that the speed of the waveform inversion program using the coarray is slightly faster than that of the MPI version. The standard coarray lacks features for collective communication; however, it can be improved in following standards since it is introduced recently. The parallel algorithm can be applied for 3D seismic data processing.

  14. Computer Program For Generation Of Surface Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ching, Raymond; Pierce, Lawrence

    1993-01-01

    S3D is useful computer program for generation of grids on surfaces of bodies having complicated shapes. Product of integration of robust and widely applicable interpolation technique with latest in computer-workstation technology. Incorporates highly efficient and easy-to-use graphical-interface software, enables real-time and interactive analyses of surface-geometry data and facilitates construction of surface grids.

  15. Permanent-File-Validation Utility Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derry, Stephen D.

    1988-01-01

    Errors in files detected and corrected during operation. Permanent File Validation (PFVAL) utility computer program provides CDC CYBER NOS sites with mechanism to verify integrity of permanent file base. Locates and identifies permanent file errors in Mass Storage Table (MST) and Track Reservation Table (TRT), in permanent file catalog entries (PFC's) in permit sectors, and in disk sector linkage. All detected errors written to listing file and system and job day files. Program operates by reading system tables , catalog track, permit sectors, and disk linkage bytes to vaidate expected and actual file linkages. Used extensively to identify and locate errors in permanent files and enable online correction, reducing computer-system downtime.

  16. NASA/FLAGRO - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH COMPUTER PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    -intensity factor numerical values can be computed for making comparisons or checks of solutions. NASA/FLAGRO can check for failure of a part-through crack in the mode of a through crack when net ligament yielding occurs. NASA/FLAGRO has a number of special subroutines and files which provide enhanced capabilities and easy entry of data. These include crack case solutions, cyclic load spectrums, nondestructive examination initial flaw sizes, table interpolation, and material properties. The materials properties files are divided into two types, a user defined file and a fixed file. Data is entered and stored in the user defined file during program execution, while the fixed file contains already coded-in property value data for many different materials. Prompted input from CRT terminals consists of initial crack definition (which can be defined automatically), rate solution type, flaw type and geometry, material properties (if they are not in the built-in tables of material data), load spectrum data (if not included in the loads spectrum file), and design limit stress levels. NASA/FLAGRO output includes an echo of the input with any error or warning messages, the final crack size, whether or not critical crack size has been reached for the specified stress level, and a life history profile of the crack propagation. NASA/FLAGRO is modularly designed to facilitate revisions and operation on minicomputers. The program was implemented on a DEC VAX 11/780 with the VMS operating system. NASA/FLAGRO is written in FORTRAN77 and has a memory requirement of 1.4 MB. The program was developed in 1986.

  17. DORCA computer program. Volume 1: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, S. T., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    The Dynamic Operational Requirements and Cost Analysis Program (DORCA) was written to provide a top level analysis tool for NASA. DORCA relies on a man-machine interaction to optimize results based on external criteria. DORCA relies heavily on outside sources to provide cost information and vehicle performance parameters as the program does not determine these quantities but rather uses them. Given data describing missions, vehicles, payloads, containers, space facilities, schedules, cost values and costing procedures, the program computes flight schedules, cargo manifests, vehicle fleet requirements, acquisition schedules and cost summaries. The program is designed to consider the Earth Orbit, Lunar, Interplanetary and Automated Satellite Programs. A general outline of the capabilities of the program are provided.

  18. Fortran code for SU(3) lattice gauge theory with and without MPI checkerboard parallelization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Bernd A.; Wu, Hao

    2012-10-01

    We document plain Fortran and Fortran MPI checkerboard code for Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations of pure SU(3) lattice gauge theory with the Wilson action in D dimensions. The Fortran code uses periodic boundary conditions and is suitable for pedagogical purposes and small scale simulations. For the Fortran MPI code two geometries are covered: the usual torus with periodic boundary conditions and the double-layered torus as defined in the paper. Parallel computing is performed on checkerboards of sublattices, which partition the full lattice in one, two, and so on, up to D directions (depending on the parameters set). For updating, the Cabibbo-Marinari heatbath algorithm is used. We present validations and test runs of the code. Performance is reported for a number of currently used Fortran compilers and, when applicable, MPI versions. For the parallelized code, performance is studied as a function of the number of processors. Program summary Program title: STMC2LSU3MPI Catalogue identifier: AEMJ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMJ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 26666 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 233126 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 compatible with the use of Fortran 90/95 compilers, in part with MPI extensions. Computer: Any capable of compiling and executing Fortran 77 or Fortran 90/95, when needed with MPI extensions. Operating system: Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server 6.1 with OpenMPI + pgf77 11.8-0, Centos 5.3 with OpenMPI + gfortran 4.1.2, Cray XT4 with MPICH2 + pgf90 11.2-0. Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes, parallelized using MPI extensions. Number of processors used: 2 to 11664 RAM: 200 Mega bytes per process. Classification: 11

  19. Program computes orifice-meter flow rate

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.R.

    1981-10-12

    Useful for designing new metering stations or figuring flow rates through existing ones, the program developed for the Tl-59 programmable calculator computes the gas flow rate through an orifice-meter run. The user inputs are the orifice diameter, meter run ID, flowing gas temperature, density, flowing gas pressure, and differential pressure. The program's results are more accurate than those of flow charts or slide-rule-type calculators.

  20. Program MASTERCALC: an interactive computer program for radioanalytical computations. Description and operating instructions

    SciTech Connect

    Goode, W.

    1980-10-01

    MASTERCALC is a computer program written to support radioanalytical computations in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) Environmental Surveillance Group. Included in the program are routines for gross alpha and beta, /sup 3/H, gross gamma, /sup 90/Sr and alpha spectroscopic determinations. A description of MASTERCALC is presented and its source listing is included. Operating instructions and example computing sessions are given for each type of analysis.

  1. The SPELLINGCLUES Project at Red Deer College: Dialogue With the Computer as an Approach Toward Improving English Spelling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bubba, Lydia; Thorhallsson, Jon

    A computer-assisted instructional (CAI) program jointly sponsored by the English and Computer Science Departments at Red Deer College is being used to examine the ability of the computer to drill students in spelling. The program, called SPELLINGCLUES, runs in FORTRAN IV on an IBM 360/67 computer and covers a list of 100 frequently misspelled…

  2. PISCES: An environment for parallel scientific computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    The parallel implementation of scientific computing environment (PISCES) is a project to provide high-level programming environments for parallel MIMD computers. Pisces 1, the first of these environments, is a FORTRAN 77 based environment which runs under the UNIX operating system. The Pisces 1 user programs in Pisces FORTRAN, an extension of FORTRAN 77 for parallel processing. The major emphasis in the Pisces 1 design is in providing a carefully specified virtual machine that defines the run-time environment within which Pisces FORTRAN programs are executed. Each implementation then provides the same virtual machine, regardless of differences in the underlying architecture. The design is intended to be portable to a variety of architectures. Currently Pisces 1 is implemented on a network of Apollo workstations and on a DEC VAX uniprocessor via simulation of the task level parallelism. An implementation for the Flexible Computing Corp. FLEX/32 is under construction. An introduction to the Pisces 1 virtual computer and the FORTRAN 77 extensions is presented. An example of an algorithm for the iterative solution of a system of equations is given. The most notable features of the design are the provision for several granularities of parallelism in programs and the provision of a window mechanism for distributed access to large arrays of data.

  3. A CAD (Classroom Assessment Design) of a Computer Programming Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawi, Nazir S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a CAD (classroom assessment design) of an entry-level undergraduate computer programming course "Computer Programming I". CAD has been the product of a long experience in teaching computer programming courses including teaching "Computer Programming I" 22 times. Each semester, CAD is evaluated and modified…

  4. 75 FR 69988 - Privacy Act of 1974; Computer Matching Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... Privacy Act of 1974; Computer Matching Program AGENCY: Department of Education. ] ACTION: Notice--Computer... Department of Education implemented a computer matching program. The 18-month computer matching agreement... announce the continued operation of the computer matching program and to provide certain...

  5. RISKIND: A computer program for calculating radiological consequences and health risks from transportation of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Y.C.; Chen, S.Y.; LePoire, D.J.; Rothman, R.

    1993-02-01

    This report presents the technical details of RISIUND, a computer code designed to estimate potential radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the collective population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel. RISKIND is a user-friendly, semiinteractive program that can be run on an IBM or equivalent personal computer. The program language is FORTRAN-77. Several models are included in RISKIND that have been tailored to calculate the exposure to individuals under various incident-free and accident conditions. The incidentfree models assess exposures from both gamma and neutron radiation and can account for different cask designs. The accident models include accidental release, atmospheric transport, and the environmental pathways of radionuclides from spent fuels; these models also assess health risks to individuals and the collective population. The models are supported by databases that are specific to spent nuclear fuels and include a radionudide inventory and dose conversion factors.

  6. A computer program for geochemical analysis of acid-rain and other low-ionic-strength, acidic waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnsson, P.A.; Lord, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    ARCHEM, a computer program written in FORTRAN 77, is designed primarily for use in the routine geochemical interpretation of low-ionic-strength, acidic waters. On the basis of chemical analyses of the water, and either laboratory or field determinations of pH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen, the program calculates the equilibrium distribution of major inorganic aqueous species and of inorganic aluminum complexes. The concentration of the organic anion is estimated from the dissolved organic concentration. Ionic ferrous iron is calculated from the dissolved oxygen concentration. Ionic balances and comparisons of computed with measured specific conductances are performed as checks on the analytical accuracy of chemical analyses. ARCHEM may be tailored easily to fit different sampling protocols, and may be run on multiple sample analyses. (Author 's abstract)

  7. Numerical optimization techniques for bound circulation distribution for minimum induced drag of Nonplanar wings: Computer program documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, J. M.; Ku, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    A two dimensional advanced panel far-field potential flow model of the undistorted, interacting wakes of multiple lifting surfaces was developed which allows the determination of the spanwise bound circulation distribution required for minimum induced drag. This model was implemented in a FORTRAN computer program, the use of which is documented in this report. The nonplanar wakes are broken up into variable sized, flat panels, as chosen by the user. The wake vortex sheet strength is assumed to vary linearly over each of these panels, resulting in a quadratic variation of bound circulation. Panels are infinite in the streamwise direction. The theory is briefly summarized herein; sample results are given for multiple, nonplanar, lifting surfaces, and the use of the computer program is detailed in the appendixes.

  8. A computer program for calculating aerodynamic characteristics of low aspect-ratio wings with partial leading-edge separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, S. C.; Lan, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    The necessary information for using a computer program to predict distributed and total aerodynamic characteristics for low aspect ratio wings with partial leading-edge separation is presented. The flow is assumed to be steady and inviscid. The wing boundary condition is formulated by the Quasi-Vortex-Lattice method. The leading edge separated vortices are represented by discrete free vortex elements which are aligned with the local velocity vector at midpoints to satisfy the force free condition. The wake behind the trailing edge is also force free. The flow tangency boundary condition is satisfied on the wing, including the leading and trailing edges. The program is restricted to delta wings with zero thickness and no camber. It is written in FORTRAN language and runs on CDC 6600 computer.

  9. Computational Materials Program for Alloy Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo

    2005-01-01

    The research program sponsored by this grant, "Computational Materials Program for Alloy Design", covers a period of time of enormous change in the emerging field of computational materials science. The computational materials program started with the development of the BFS method for alloys, a quantum approximate method for atomistic analysis of alloys specifically tailored to effectively deal with the current challenges in the area of atomistic modeling and to support modern experimental programs. During the grant period, the program benefited from steady growth which, as detailed below, far exceeds its original set of goals and objectives. Not surprisingly, by the end of this grant, the methodology and the computational materials program became an established force in the materials communitiy, with substantial impact in several areas. Major achievements during the duration of the grant include the completion of a Level 1 Milestone for the HITEMP program at NASA Glenn, consisting of the planning, development and organization of an international conference held at the Ohio Aerospace Institute in August of 2002, finalizing a period of rapid insertion of the methodology in the research community worlwide. The conference, attended by citizens of 17 countries representing various fields of the research community, resulted in a special issue of the leading journal in the area of applied surface science. Another element of the Level 1 Milestone was the presentation of the first version of the Alloy Design Workbench software package, currently known as "adwTools". This software package constitutes the first PC-based piece of software for atomistic simulations for both solid alloys and surfaces in the market.Dissemination of results and insertion in the materials community worldwide was a primary focus during this period. As a result, the P.I. was responsible for presenting 37 contributed talks, 19 invited talks, and publishing 71 articles in peer-reviewed journals, as

  10. Computer program for Bessel and Hankel functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreider, Kevin L.; Saule, Arthur V.; Rice, Edward J.; Clark, Bruce J.

    1991-01-01

    A set of FORTRAN subroutines for calculating Bessel and Hankel functions is presented. The routines calculate Bessel and Hankel functions of the first and second kinds, as well as their derivatives, for wide ranges of integer order and real or complex argument in single or double precision. Depending on the order and argument, one of three evaluation methods is used: the power series definition, an Airy function expansion, or an asymptotic expansion. Routines to calculate Airy functions and their derivatives are also included.

  11. Computer Program Re-layers Engineering Drawings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosby, Dewey C., III

    1990-01-01

    RULCHK computer program aids in structuring layers of information pertaining to part or assembly designed with software described in article "Software for Drawing Design Details Concurrently" (MFS-28444). Checks and optionally updates structure of layers for part. Enables designer to construct model and annotate its documentation without burden of manually layering part to conform to standards at design time.

  12. Computer-Assisted Programmed Instruction in Textiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kean, Rita C.; Laughlin, Joan

    Students in an introductory textiles course at the University of Nebraska's College of Home Economics actively participate in the learning experience through a self-paced instructional technique. Specific learning packets were developed adapting programmed instructional learning materials to computer assisted instruction (CAI). A study booklet…

  13. Answer Set Programming and Other Computing Paradigms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Yunsong

    2013-01-01

    Answer Set Programming (ASP) is one of the most prominent and successful knowledge representation paradigms. The success of ASP is due to its expressive non-monotonic modeling language and its efficient computational methods originating from building propositional satisfiability solvers. The wide adoption of ASP has motivated several extensions to…

  14. Data systems and computer science programs: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Paul H.; Hunter, Paul

    1991-01-01

    An external review of the Integrated Technology Plan for the Civil Space Program is presented. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: onboard memory and storage technology; advanced flight computers; special purpose flight processors; onboard networking and testbeds; information archive, access, and retrieval; visualization; neural networks; software engineering; and flight control and operations.

  15. Refurbishment program of HANARO control computer system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H. K.; Choe, Y. S.; Lee, M. W.; Doo, S. K.; Jung, H. S.

    2012-07-01

    HANARO, an open-tank-in-pool type research reactor with 30 MW thermal power, achieved its first criticality in 1995. The programmable controller system MLC (Multi Loop Controller) manufactured by MOORE has been used to control and regulate HANARO since 1995. We made a plan to replace the control computer because the system supplier no longer provided technical support and thus no spare parts were available. Aged and obsolete equipment and the shortage of spare parts supply could have caused great problems. The first consideration for a replacement of the control computer dates back to 2007. The supplier did not produce the components of MLC so that this system would no longer be guaranteed. We established the upgrade and refurbishment program in 2009 so as to keep HANARO up to date in terms of safety. We designed the new control computer system that would replace MLC. The new computer system is HCCS (HANARO Control Computer System). The refurbishing activity is in progress and will finish in 2013. The goal of the refurbishment program is a functional replacement of the reactor control system in consideration of suitable interfaces, compliance with no special outage for installation and commissioning, and no change of the well-proved operation philosophy. HCCS is a DCS (Discrete Control System) using PLC manufactured by RTP. To enhance the reliability, we adapt a triple processor system, double I/O system and hot swapping function. This paper describes the refurbishment program of the HANARO control system including the design requirements of HCCS. (authors)

  16. High performance FORTRAN without templates: An alternative model for distribution and alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Barbara; Mehrotra, Piyush; Zima, Hans

    1993-01-01

    Language extensions of FORTRAN are being developed which permit the user to map data structures to the individual processors of distributed memory machines. These languages allow a programming style in which global data references are used. Current efforts are focussed on designing a common basis for such languages, the result of which is known as High Performance Fortran (HPF). One of the central debates in the HPF effort revolves around the concept of templates, introduced as an abstract index space to which data could be aligned. A model for the mapping of data which provides the functionality of High Performance Fortran distributions without the use of templates is presented.

  17. Documentation of a multiple-technique computer program for plotting major-ion composition of natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briel, L.I.

    1993-01-01

    A computer program was written to produce 6 different types of water-quality diagrams--Piper, Stiff, pie, X-Y, boxplot, and Piper 3-D--from the same file of input data. The Piper 3-D diagram is a new method that projects values from the surface of a Piper plot into a triangular prism to show how variations in chemical composition can be related to variations in other water-quality variables. This program is an analytical tool to aid in the interpretation of data. This program is interactive, and the user can select from a menu the type of diagram to be produced and a large number of individual features. Alternatively, these choices can be specified in the data file, which provides a batch mode for running the program. The program does not display water-quality diagrams directly; plots are written to a file. Four different plot- file formats are available: device-independent metafiles, Adobe PostScript graphics files, and two Hewlett-Packard graphics language formats (7475 and 7586). An ASCII data-table file is also produced to document the computed values. This program is written in Fortran '77 and uses graphics subroutines from either the PRIOR AGTK or the DISSPLA graphics library. The program has been implemented on Prime series 50 and Data General Aviion computers within the USGS; portability to other computing systems depends on the availability of the graphics library.

  18. MEKS: A program for computation of inclusive jet cross sections at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun; Liang, Zhihua; Soper, Davison E.; Lai, Hung-Liang; Nadolsky, Pavel M.; Yuan, C.-P.

    2013-06-01

    EKS is a numerical program that predicts differential cross sections for production of single-inclusive hadronic jets and jet pairs at next-to-leading order (NLO) accuracy in a perturbative QCD calculation. We describe MEKS 1.0, an upgraded EKS program with increased numerical precision, suitable for comparisons to the latest experimental data from the Large Hadron Collider and Tevatron. The program integrates the regularized patron-level matrix elements over the kinematical phase space for production of two and three partons using the VEGAS algorithm. It stores the generated weighted events in finely binned two-dimensional histograms for fast offline analysis. A user interface allows one to customize computation of inclusive jet observables. Results of a benchmark comparison of the MEKS program and the commonly used FastNLO program are also documented. Program SummaryProgram title: MEKS 1.0 Catalogue identifier: AEOX_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOX_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland. Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 9234 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 51997 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran (main program), C (CUBA library and analysis program). Computer: All. Operating system: Any UNIX-like system. RAM: ˜300 MB Classification: 11.1. External routines: LHAPDF (https://lhapdf.hepforge.org/) Nature of problem: Computation of differential cross sections for inclusive production of single hadronic jets and jet pairs at next-to-leading order accuracy in perturbative quantum chromodynamics. Solution method: Upon subtraction of infrared singularities, the hard-scattering matrix elements are integrated over available phase space using an optimized VEGAS algorithm. Weighted events are generated and filled

  19. Computer program: Jet 3 to calculate the large elastic plastic dynamically induced deformations of free and restrained, partial and/or complete structural rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, R. W.; Witmer, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    A user-oriented FORTRAN 4 computer program, called JET 3, is presented. The JET 3 program, which employs the spatial finite-element and timewise finite-difference method, can be used to predict the large two-dimensional elastic-plastic transient Kirchhoff-type deformations of a complete or partial structural ring, with various support conditions and restraints, subjected to a variety of initial velocity distributions and externally-applied transient forcing functions. The geometric shapes of the structural ring can be circular or arbitrarily curved and with variable thickness. Strain-hardening and strain-rate effects of the material are taken into account.

  20. General Purpose Fortran Program for Discrete-Ordinate-Method Radiative Transfer in Scattering and Emitting Layered Media: An Update of DISORT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Stamnes, Knut; Wiscombe, Warren; Laszlo, Istvan; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This update reports a state-of-the-art discrete ordinate algorithm for monochromatic unpolarized radiative transfer in non-isothermal, vertically inhomogeneous, but horizontally homogeneous media. The physical processes included are Planckian thermal emission, scattering with arbitrary phase function, absorption, and surface bidirectional reflection. The system may be driven by parallel or isotropic diffuse radiation incident at the top boundary, as well as by internal thermal sources and thermal emission from the boundaries. Radiances, fluxes, and mean intensities are returned at user-specified angles and levels. DISORT has enjoyed considerable popularity in the atmospheric science and other communities since its introduction in 1988. Several new DISORT features are described in this update: intensity correction algorithms designed to compensate for the 8-M forward-peak scaling and obtain accurate intensities even in low orders of approximation; a more general surface bidirectional reflection option; and an exponential-linear approximation of the Planck function allowing more accurate solutions in the presence of large temperature gradients. DISORT has been designed to be an exemplar of good scientific software as well as a program of intrinsic utility. An extraordinary effort has been made to make it numerically well-conditioned, error-resistant, and user-friendly, and to take advantage of robust existing software tools. A thorough test suite is provided to verify the program both against published results, and for consistency where there are no published results. This careful attention to software design has been just as important in DISORT's popularity as its powerful algorithmic content.

  1. Employing subgoals in computer programming education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulieux, Lauren E.; Catrambone, Richard; Guzdial, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The rapid integration of technology into our professional and personal lives has left many education systems ill-equipped to deal with the influx of people seeking computing education. To improve computing education, we are applying techniques that have been developed for other procedural fields. The present study applied such a technique, subgoal labeled worked examples, to explore whether it would improve programming instruction. The first two experiments, conducted in a laboratory, suggest that the intervention improves undergraduate learners' problem-solving performance and affects how learners approach problem-solving. The third experiment demonstrates that the intervention has similar, and perhaps stronger, effects in an online learning environment with in-service K-12 teachers who want to become qualified to teach computing courses. By implementing this subgoal intervention as a tool for educators to teach themselves and their students, education systems could improve computing education and better prepare learners for an increasingly technical world.

  2. DEROCS: A computer program to simulate offshore oil and natural gas development scenarios and onshore service base requirements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marcus, Philip A.; Smith, E.T.; Robinson, S.R.; Wong, A.T.

    1977-01-01

    The FORTRAN IV (H) computer program, DEROCS, constructs Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) resource development scenarios and quantifies the requirements for and impacts of the operation of the onshore service bases necessary to support offshore oil and gas operations. The acronym DEROCS stands for 'Development of Energy Resources of the Outer Continental Shelf.' The user may specify the number, timing, and amounts of offshore oil and natural gas finds, onshore service base locations, and multiplier relationships between offshore development activities and onshore land, supply, labor and facility requirements. The program determines schedules of platform installation, development drilling, production from platforms, and well workover, and calculates on a yearly basis the requirements for and impacts of the operation of the onshore service bases demanded by offshore activities. We present two examples of program application.

  3. Computer Simulation in Undergraduate Instruction: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Street, Warren R.; And Others

    These symposium papers discuss the instructional use of computers in psychology, with emphasis on computer-produced simulations. The first, by Rich Edwards, briefly outlines LABSIM, a general purpose system of FORTRAN programs which simulate data collection in more than a dozen experimental models in psychology and are designed to train students…

  4. Operational procedure for computer program for design point characteristics of a compressed-air generator with through-flow combustor for V/STOL applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, R. P.

    1971-01-01

    The computer program described in this report calculates the design-point characteristics of a compressed-air generator for use in V/STOL applications such as systems with a tip-turbine-driven lift fan. The program computes the dimensions and mass, as well as the thermodynamic performance of a model air generator configuration which involves a straight through-flow combustor. Physical and thermodynamic characteristics of the air generator components are also given. The program was written in FORTRAN IV language. Provision has been made so that the program will accept input values in either SI units or U.S. customary units. Each air generator design-point calculation requires about 1.5 seconds of 7094 computer time for execution.

  5. SPIN (Version 3. 83): A Fortran program for modeling one-dimensional rotating-disk/stagnation-flow chemical vapor deposition reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Coltrin, M.E. ); Kee, R.J.; Evans, G.H.; Meeks, E.; Rupley, F.M.; Grcar, J.F. )

    1991-08-01

    In rotating-disk reactor a heated substrate spins (at typical speeds of 1000 rpm or more) in an enclosure through which the reactants flow. The rotating disk geometry has the important property that in certain operating regimes{sup 1} the species and temperature gradients normal to the disk are equal everywhere on the disk. Thus, such a configuration has great potential for highly uniform chemical vapor deposition (CVD),{sup 2--5} and indeed commercial rotating-disk CVD reactors are now available. In certain operating regimes, the equations describing the complex three-dimensional spiral fluid motion can be solved by a separation-of-variables transformation{sup 5,6} that reduces the equations to a system of ordinary differential equations. Strictly speaking, the transformation is only valid for an unconfined infinite-radius disk and buoyancy-free flow. Furthermore, only some boundary conditions are consistent with the transformation (e.g., temperature, gas-phase composition, and approach velocity all specified to be independent of radius at some distances above the disk). Fortunately, however, the transformed equations will provide a very good practical approximation to the flow in a finite-radius reactor over a large fraction of the disk (up to {approximately}90% of the disk radius) when the reactor operating parameters are properly chosen, i.e, high rotation rates. In the limit of zero rotation rate, the rotating disk flow reduces to a stagnation-point flow, for which a similar separation-of-variables transformation is also available. Such flow configurations ( pedestal reactors'') also find use in CVD reactors. In this report we describe a model formulation and mathematical analysis of rotating-disk and stagnation-point CVD reactors. Then we apply the analysis to a compute code called SPIN and describe its implementation and use. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  6. GAP: A computer program for gene assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Eisnstein, J.R.; Uberbacher, E.C.; Guan, X.; Mural, R.J.; Mann, R.C.

    1991-09-01

    A computer program, GAP (Gene Assembly Program), has been written to assemble and score hypothetical genes, given a DNA sequence containing the gene, and the outputs of several other programs which analyze the sequence. These programs include the codign-recognition and splice-junction-recognition modules developed in this laboratory. GAP is a prototype of a planned system in which it will be integrated with an expert system and rule base. Initial tests of GAP have been carried out with four sequences, the exons of which have been determined by biochemcial methods. The highest-scoring hypothetical genes for each of the four sequences had percent correct splice junctions ranging from 50 to 100% (average 81%) and percent correct bases ranging from 92 to 100% (average 96%). 9 refs., 1 tab.

  7. APOLLO: A computer program for the calculation of chemical equilibrium and reaction kinetics of chemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H.D.

    1991-11-01

    Several of the technologies being evaluated for the treatment of waste material involve chemical reactions. Our example is the in situ vitrification (ISV) process where electrical energy is used to melt soil and waste into a ``glass like`` material that immobilizes and encapsulates any residual waste. During the ISV process, various chemical reactions may occur that produce significant amounts of products which must be contained and treated. The APOLLO program was developed to assist in predicting the composition of the gases that are formed. Although the development of this program was directed toward ISV applications, it should be applicable to other technologies where chemical reactions are of interest. This document presents the mathematical methodology of the APOLLO computer code. APOLLO is a computer code that calculates the products of both equilibrium and kinetic chemical reactions. The current version, written in FORTRAN, is readily adaptable to existing transport programs designed for the analysis of chemically reacting flow systems. Separate subroutines EQREACT and KIREACT for equilibrium ad kinetic chemistry respectively have been developed. A full detailed description of the numerical techniques used, which include both Lagrange multiplies and a third-order integrating scheme is presented. Sample test problems are presented and the results are in excellent agreement with those reported in the literature.

  8. APOLLO: A computer program for the calculation of chemical equilibrium and reaction kinetics of chemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H.D.

    1991-11-01

    Several of the technologies being evaluated for the treatment of waste material involve chemical reactions. Our example is the in situ vitrification (ISV) process where electrical energy is used to melt soil and waste into a glass like'' material that immobilizes and encapsulates any residual waste. During the ISV process, various chemical reactions may occur that produce significant amounts of products which must be contained and treated. The APOLLO program was developed to assist in predicting the composition of the gases that are formed. Although the development of this program was directed toward ISV applications, it should be applicable to other technologies where chemical reactions are of interest. This document presents the mathematical methodology of the APOLLO computer code. APOLLO is a computer code that calculates the products of both equilibrium and kinetic chemical reactions. The current version, written in FORTRAN, is readily adaptable to existing transport programs designed for the analysis of chemically reacting flow systems. Separate subroutines EQREACT and KIREACT for equilibrium ad kinetic chemistry respectively have been developed. A full detailed description of the numerical techniques used, which include both Lagrange multiplies and a third-order integrating scheme is presented. Sample test problems are presented and the results are in excellent agreement with those reported in the literature.

  9. Is the brain's mind a computer program

    SciTech Connect

    Searle, J.R. )

    1990-01-01

    In recent decades, the question of whether a machine can think has been given a different interpretation entirely. The question that has been posed in its place is, Could a machine think just by virtue of implementing a computer program Is the program by itself constitutive of thinking This is a completely different question because it is not about the physical, causal properties of actual or possible physical systems but rather about the abstract, computational properties of formal computer programs that can be implemented in any sort of substance at all, provided only that the substance is able to carry the program. A fair number of researchers in artificial intelligence (AI) believe the answer to the second question is yes. They believe further-more that they have a scientific test for determining success or failure: the Turing test devise by Alan M. Turing, the founding father of artificial intelligence. The Turing test, as currently understood, is simply this: if a computer can perform is such a way that an expert cannot distinguish its performance from that of a human who has a certain cognitive ability-say, the ability to do addition or to understand Chinese - then the computer also has that ability. So the goal is to design programs that will simulate human cognition in such a way as to pass the Turing test. What is more, such a program would not merely be a model of the mind; it would literally be a mind, in the same sense that a human mind is a mind. By no means does every worker in artificial intelligence accept so extreme a view. A more cautious approach is to think of computer models as being useful in studying the mind in the same way that they are useful in studying the weather, economics or molecular biology. To distinguish these two approaches, the authors call the first strong AI and the second weak AI. It is important to see just how bold an approach strong AI is.

  10. Raster Metafile And Raster Metafile Translator Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, Donald P.; Gates, Raymond L.; Skeens, Kristi M.

    1994-01-01

    Raster Metafile (RM) computer program is generic raster-image-format program, and Raster Metafile Translator (RMT) program is assortment of software tools for processing images prepared in this format. Processing includes reading, writing, and displaying RM images. Such other image-manipulation features as minimal compositing operator and resizing option available under RMT command structure. RMT written in FORTRAN 77 and C language.

  11. Crew appliance computer program manual, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Trade studies of numerous appliance concepts for advanced spacecraft galley, personal hygiene, housekeeping, and other areas were made to determine which best satisfy the space shuttle orbiter and modular space station mission requirements. Analytical models of selected appliance concepts not currently included in the G-189A Generalized Environmental/Thermal Control and Life Support Systems (ETCLSS) Computer Program subroutine library were developed. The new appliance subroutines are given along with complete analytical model descriptions, solution methods, user's input instructions, and validation run results. The appliance components modeled were integrated with G-189A ETCLSS models for shuttle orbiter and modular space station, and results from computer runs of these systems are presented.

  12. The case for open computer programs.

    PubMed

    Ince, Darrel C; Hatton, Leslie; Graham-Cumming, John

    2012-02-22

    Scientific communication relies on evidence that cannot be entirely included in publications, but the rise of computational science has added a new layer of inaccessibility. Although it is now accepted that data should be made available on request, the current regulations regarding the availability of software are inconsistent. We argue that, with some exceptions, anything less than the release of source programs is intolerable for results that depend on computation. The vagaries of hardware, software and natural language will always ensure that exact reproducibility remains uncertain, but withholding code increases the chances that efforts to reproduce results will fail.

  13. 77 FR 38610 - Privacy Act of 1974; Computer Matching Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... Privacy Act of 1974; Computer Matching Program AGENCY: Department of Education. ACTION: Notice--Computer... document provides notice of the continuation of the computer matching program between the Departments of... of Defense and the Department of Education created a computer matching program. The purpose of...

  14. Scout trajectory error propagation computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myler, T. R.

    1982-01-01

    Since 1969, flight experience has been used as the basis for predicting Scout orbital accuracy. The data used for calculating the accuracy consists of errors in the trajectory parameters (altitude, velocity, etc.) at stage burnout as observed on Scout flights. Approximately 50 sets of errors are used in Monte Carlo analysis to generate error statistics in the trajectory parameters. A covariance matrix is formed which may be propagated in time. The mechanization of this process resulted in computer program Scout Trajectory Error Propagation (STEP) and is described herein. Computer program STEP may be used in conjunction with the Statistical Orbital Analysis Routine to generate accuracy in the orbit parameters (apogee, perigee, inclination, etc.) based upon flight experience.

  15. Program for computer aided reliability estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, F. P. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    A computer program for estimating the reliability of self-repair and fault-tolerant systems with respect to selected system and mission parameters is presented. The computer program is capable of operation in an interactive conversational mode as well as in a batch mode and is characterized by maintenance of several general equations representative of basic redundancy schemes in an equation repository. Selected reliability functions applicable to any mathematical model formulated with the general equations, used singly or in combination with each other, are separately stored. One or more system and/or mission parameters may be designated as a variable. Data in the form of values for selected reliability functions is generated in a tabular or graphic format for each formulated model.

  16. The FALSTF last-flight computer program

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, R.L.

    1996-04-01

    FALSTF is a computer program used with the DORT transport code to calculate fluxes and doses at detector points located outside the DORT geometry model. An integral form of the transport equation is solved to obtain the flux at the detector points resulting from the uncollided transport of the emergent particle density within the geometry as calculated by DORT. Both R-Z and R-{theta} geometries are supported.

  17. The FALSTF last-flight computer program

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    FALSTF is a computer program used with the DORT transport code to calculate fluxes and doses at detector points located outside the DORT geometry model. An integral form of the transport equation is solved to obtain the flux at the detector points resulting from the uncollided transport of the emergent particle density within the geometry as calculated by DORT. Both R-Z and R-{Theta} geometries are supported.

  18. NMSPEC: A Fortran code for the sparticle and Higgs masses in the NMSSM with GUT scale boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellwanger, Ulrich; Hugonie, Cyril

    2007-08-01

    NMSPEC is a Fortran code that computes the sparticle and Higgs masses, as well as Higgs decay widths and couplings in the NMSSM, with soft SUSY breaking terms specified at M. Exceptions are the soft singlet mass ms2 and the singlet self-coupling κ, that are both determined in terms of the other parameters through the minimization equations of the Higgs potential. We present a first analysis of the NMSSM parameter space with universal SUSY breaking terms at M—except for m and A—that passes present experimental constraints on sparticle and Higgs masses. We discuss in some detail a region in parameter space where a SM-like Higgs boson decays dominantly into two CP odd singlet-like Higgs states. Program summaryManuscript title: NMSPEC: A Fortran code for the sparticle and Higgs masses in the NMSSM with GUT scale boundary conditions Authors: Ulrich Ellwanger, Cyril Hugonie Program title: NMSPEC Catalogue identifier: ADZD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 121 539 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 560 340 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN Computer: Mac, PC, Sun, Dec, Alpha Operating system: Mac OSC, Linux, Unix, Windows RAM: 2M bytes Keywords: Supersymmetry, Higgs masses, sparticle masses, NMSSM PACS: 12.60.Jv, 14.80.Cp, 14.80.Ly Classification: 11.6 Nature of problem: Computation of the Higgs and Sparticle spectrum in the NMSSM with GUT scale boundary conditions, check of theoretical and experimental constraints. Solution method: Integration of the RGEs for all couplings and mass terms from the GUT scale to the Susy scale using a modified Runge-Kutta method; computation and diagonalization of all mass matrices including up to two loop

  19. 76 FR 11435 - Privacy Act of 1974; Computer Matching Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... Privacy Act of 1974; Computer Matching Program AGENCY: Department of Education. ACTION: Notice--Computer... to the Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act of 1988, Public Law 100-503, the Computer... (OMB) guidance on the conduct of computer matching programs, notice is hereby given of the renewal...

  20. Do Teachers Need to Know about Computer Programming?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Sharon; Moursund, David

    1993-01-01

    The article explores some of the history that has led to the current emphasis on teaching educators to use computer applications without teaching the underlying computer programing or computer science, arguing that all teachers should receive some instruction in computer science and computer programing. (SM)

  1. PROGRAM DROP: A computer program for prediction of evaporation from freely falling multicomponent drops

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, P.M.

    1996-12-01

    PROGRAM DROP consists of a series of FORTRAN routine which together are used to model the evaporation of a freely falling, multicomponent drop composed of an arbitrary number of volatile species and a single nonvolatile, inert component. The physics underlying the model are clearly identified, and the model`s relationship to previous work in the literature is described. Test cases are used to illustrate the viability of the model and to highlight its potential usefulness in the accurate prediction of multicomponent droplet vaporization in a variety of applications.

  2. ASDA - Advanced Suit Design Analyzer computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Conger, Bruce C.; Iovine, John V.; Chang, Chi-Min

    1992-01-01

    An ASDA model developed to evaluate the heat and mass transfer characteristics of advanced pressurized suit design concepts for low pressure or vacuum planetary applications is presented. The model is based on a generalized 3-layer suit that uses the Systems Integrated Numerical Differencing Analyzer '85 in conjunction with a 41-node FORTRAN routine. The latter simulates the transient heat transfer and respiratory processes of a human body in a suited environment. The user options for the suit encompass a liquid cooled garment, a removable jacket, a CO2/H2O permeable layer, and a phase change layer.

  3. NASA high performance computing and communications program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holcomb, Lee; Smith, Paul; Hunter, Paul

    1993-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's HPCC program is part of a new Presidential initiative aimed at producing a 1000-fold increase in supercomputing speed and a 100-fold improvement in available communications capability by 1997. As more advanced technologies are developed under the HPCC program, they will be used to solve NASA's 'Grand Challenge' problems, which include improving the design and simulation of advanced aerospace vehicles, allowing people at remote locations to communicate more effectively and share information, increasing scientist's abilities to model the Earth's climate and forecast global environmental trends, and improving the development of advanced spacecraft. NASA's HPCC program is organized into three projects which are unique to the agency's mission: the Computational Aerosciences (CAS) project, the Earth and Space Sciences (ESS) project, and the Remote Exploration and Experimentation (REE) project. An additional project, the Basic Research and Human Resources (BRHR) project exists to promote long term research in computer science and engineering and to increase the pool of trained personnel in a variety of scientific disciplines. This document presents an overview of the objectives and organization of these projects as well as summaries of individual research and development programs within each project.

  4. NASA High Performance Computing and Communications program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holcomb, Lee; Smith, Paul; Hunter, Paul

    1994-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's HPCC program is part of a new Presidential initiative aimed at producing a 1000-fold increase in supercomputing speed and a 1(X)-fold improvement in available communications capability by 1997. As more advanced technologies are developed under the HPCC program, they will be used to solve NASA's 'Grand Challenge' problems, which include improving the design and simulation of advanced aerospace vehicles, allowing people at remote locations to communicate more effectively and share information, increasing scientists' abilities to model the Earth's climate and forecast global environmental trends, and improving the development of advanced spacecraft. NASA's HPCC program is organized into three projects which are unique to the agency's mission: the Computational Aerosciences (CAS) project, the Earth and Space Sciences (ESS) project, and the Remote Exploration and Experimentation (REE) project. An additional project, the Basic Research and Human Resources (BRHR) project, exists to promote long term research in computer science and engineering and to increase the pool of trained personnel in a variety of scientific disciplines. This document presents an overview of the objectives and organization of these projects, as well as summaries of early accomplishments and the significance, status, and plans for individual research and development programs within each project. Areas of emphasis include benchmarking, testbeds, software and simulation methods.

  5. Manual of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant cost model and computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, C. Y.; Alkasab, K. A.

    1984-01-01

    Cost analysis of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant includes two parts: a method for estimation of system capital costs, and an economic analysis which determines the levelized annual cost of operating the system used in the capital cost estimation. A FORTRAN computer has been developed for this cost analysis.

  6. Program Computes Sound Pressures at Rocket Launches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogg, Gary; Heyman, Roy; White, Michael; Edquist, Karl

    2005-01-01

    Launch Vehicle External Sound Pressure is a computer program that predicts the ignition overpressure and the acoustic pressure on the surfaces and in the vicinity of a rocket and launch pad during launch. The program generates a graphical user interface (GUI) that gathers input data from the user. These data include the critical dimensions of the rocket and of any launch-pad structures that may act as acoustic reflectors, the size and shape of the exhaust duct or flame deflector, and geometrical and operational parameters of the rocket engine. For the ignition-overpressure calculations, histories of the chamber pressure and mass flow rate also are required. Once the GUI has gathered the input data, it feeds them to ignition-overpressure and launch-acoustics routines, which are based on several approximate mathematical models of distributed sources, transmission, and reflection of acoustic waves. The output of the program includes ignition overpressures and acoustic pressures at specified locations.

  7. Iowa Handbook of Basic Computer Programs for Industrial Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bro, Ronald D., Ed.

    This teacher's guide contains computer programs, written in BASIC, for use in Iowa secondary school industrial arts programs. The programs were developed in two 2-week workshops by industrial arts teachers who had little or no previous experience with computers; the programs have been classroom tested and refined for publication. The programs are…

  8. User's manual for computer program BASEPLOT

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanders, Curtis L.

    2002-01-01

    The checking and reviewing of daily records of streamflow within the U.S. Geological Survey is traditionally accomplished by hand-plotting and mentally collating tables of data. The process is time consuming, difficult to standardize, and subject to errors in computation, data entry, and logic. In addition, the presentation of flow data on the internet requires more timely and accurate computation of daily flow records. BASEPLOT was developed for checking and review of primary streamflow records within the U.S. Geological Survey. Use of BASEPLOT enables users to (1) provide efficiencies during the record checking and review process, (2) improve quality control, (3) achieve uniformity of checking and review techniques of simple stage-discharge relations, and (4) provide a tool for teaching streamflow computation techniques. The BASEPLOT program produces tables of quality control checks and produces plots of rating curves and discharge measurements; variable shift (V-shift) diagrams; and V-shifts converted to stage-discharge plots, using data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey Automatic Data Processing System database. In addition, the program plots unit-value hydrographs that show unit-value stages, shifts, and datum corrections; input shifts, datum corrections, and effective dates; discharge measurements; effective dates for rating tables; and numeric quality control checks. Checklist/tutorial forms are provided for reviewers to ensure completeness of review and standardize the review process. The program was written for the U.S. Geological Survey SUN computer using the Statistical Analysis System (SAS) software produced by SAS Institute, Incorporated.

  9. A research program in empirical computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    During the grant reporting period our primary activities have been to begin preparation for the establishment of a research program in experimental computer science. The focus of research in this program will be safety-critical systems. Many questions that arise in the effort to improve software dependability can only be addressed empirically. For example, there is no way to predict the performance of the various proposed approaches to building fault-tolerant software. Performance models, though valuable, are parameterized and cannot be used to make quantitative predictions without experimental determination of underlying distributions. In the past, experimentation has been able to shed some light on the practical benefits and limitations of software fault tolerance. It is common, also, for experimentation to reveal new questions or new aspects of problems that were previously unknown. A good example is the Consistent Comparison Problem that was revealed by experimentation and subsequently studied in depth. The result was a clear understanding of a previously unknown problem with software fault tolerance. The purpose of a research program in empirical computer science is to perform controlled experiments in the area of real-time, embedded control systems. The goal of the various experiments will be to determine better approaches to the construction of the software for computing systems that have to be relied upon. As such it will validate research concepts from other sources, provide new research results, and facilitate the transition of research results from concepts to practical procedures that can be applied with low risk to NASA flight projects. The target of experimentation will be the production software development activities undertaken by any organization prepared to contribute to the research program. Experimental goals, procedures, data analysis and result reporting will be performed for the most part by the University of Virginia.

  10. FORTRAN Based Linear Programming for Microcomputers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    NEW MODEL NR!lTE(1.’(//i7X,’’ENTER A PFDBLEM IDENTIFIER’’/7X?’’(MAXIMUN OF 20 *CHARACTERS)’’//3X,’ PROPLEM ID "I,W) READi5,’ iA2O)’’Pt 10(- #RITEUl

  11. Fortran Programs for Weapon Systems Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    lbs/in 2 The following assumptions are imbedded in this equation: zero starting pressures covolume equal to charge volume burning rate proportional... depend on the terrain and weather. More rugged terrain will generally have a smaller average range and flatter terrain will have a larger average range...in a Table for Interpolation Purposes. To interpolate in tables, use the indexx function. Indexx assumes that the dependent variable is stored in a

  12. A FORTRAN Program for Rectangular Microstrip Antennas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    stant of the dielectric subs~rate, and 8 is the loss tangent of the dielectric substrate (later to be replaced by the "effective loss tangent." See V... substrate . From these fields, computa- I tions of the electric stored energy, the radiated power, and the power loss in the dielectric and copper are made...A)*02) PMB = PH 0 B PY = PM • y PBM! = PHB - PY TERM = (2’CCOS(PY)*CCOS(PBMY)/(PM’CSIN(PMB)) + TAU*A/MPI) • • (COS(M’PXOA) • JO(M*PDO2A))"*2 SUBTOT

  13. A computer program for processing impedance cardiographic data: Improving accuracy through user-interactive software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Naifeh, Karen; Thrasher, Chet

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the source code and documentation for a computer program used to process impedance cardiography data. The cardiodynamic measures derived from impedance cardiography are ventricular stroke column, cardiac output, cardiac index and Heather index. The program digitizes data collected from the Minnesota Impedance Cardiograph, Electrocardiography (ECG), and respiratory cycles and then stores these data on hard disk. It computes the cardiodynamic functions using interactive graphics and stores the means and standard deviations of each 15-sec data epoch on floppy disk. This software was designed on a Digital PRO380 microcomputer and used version 2.0 of P/OS, with (minimally) a 4-channel 16-bit analog/digital (A/D) converter. Applications software is written in FORTRAN 77, and uses Digital's Pro-Tool Kit Real Time Interface Library, CORE Graphic Library, and laboratory routines. Source code can be readily modified to accommodate alternative detection, A/D conversion and interactive graphics. The object code utilizing overlays and multitasking has a maximum of 50 Kbytes.

  14. SALE: a simplified ALE computer program for fluid flow at all speeds

    SciTech Connect

    Amsden, A.A.; Ruppel, H.M.; Hirt, C.W.

    1980-06-01

    A simplified numerical fluid-dynamics computing technique is presented for calculating two-dimensional fluid flows at all speeds. It combines an implicit treatment of the pressure equation similar to that in the Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) technique with the grid rezoning philosophy of the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method. As a result, it can handle flow speeds from supersonic to the incompressible limit in a grid that may be moved with the fluid in typical Lagrangian fashion, or held fixed in an Eulerian manner, or moved in some arbitrary way to give a continuous rezoning capability. The report describes the combined (ICEd-ALE) technique in the framework of the SALE (Simplified ALE) computer program, for which a general flow diagram and complete FORTRAN listing are included. A set of sample problems show how to use or modify the basic code for a variety of applications. Numerical listings are provided for a sample problem run with the SALE program.

  15. A computer program for two-particle intrinsic coefficients of fractional parentage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveikis, A.

    2012-06-01

    A Fortran 90 program CESOS for the calculation of the two-particle intrinsic coefficients of fractional parentage for several j-shells with isospin and an arbitrary number of oscillator quanta (CESOs) is presented. The implemented procedure for CESOs calculation consistently follows the principles of antisymmetry and translational invariance. The approach is based on a simple enumeration scheme for antisymmetric many-particle states, efficient algorithms for calculation of the coefficients of fractional parentage for j-shells with isospin, and construction of the subspace of the center-of-mass Hamiltonian eigenvectors corresponding to the minimal eigenvalue equal to 3/2 (in ℏω). The program provides fast calculation of CESOs for a given particle number and produces results possessing small numerical uncertainties. The introduced CESOs may be used for calculation of expectation values of two-particle nuclear shell-model operators within the isospin formalism. Program summaryProgram title: CESOS Catalogue identifier: AELT_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AELT_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 10 932 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 61 023 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90 Computer: Any computer with a Fortran 90 compiler Operating system: Windows XP, Linux RAM: The memory demand depends on the number of particles A and the excitation energy of the system E. Computation of the A=6 particle system with the total angular momentum J=0 and the total isospin T=1 requires around 4 kB of RAM at E=0,˜3 MB at E=3, and ˜172 MB at E=5. Classification: 17.18 Nature of problem: The code CESOS generates a list of two-particle intrinsic coefficients of fractional parentage for several

  16. Development of Land Segmentation, Stream-Reach Network, and Watersheds in Support of Hydrological Simulation Program-Fortran (HSPF) Modeling, Chesapeake Bay Watershed, and Adjacent Parts of Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martucci, Sarah K.; Krstolic, Jennifer L.; Raffensperger, Jeff P.; Hopkins, Katherine J.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Chesapeake Bay Program Office, Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin, Maryland Department of the Environment, Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are collaborating on the Chesapeake Bay Regional Watershed Model, using Hydrological Simulation Program - FORTRAN to simulate streamflow and concentrations and loads of nutrients and sediment to Chesapeake Bay. The model will be used to provide information for resource managers. In order to establish a framework for model simulation, digital spatial datasets were created defining the discretization of the model region (including the Chesapeake Bay watershed, as well as the adjacent parts of Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia outside the watershed) into land segments, a stream-reach network, and associated watersheds. Land segmentation was based on county boundaries represented by a 1:100,000-scale digital dataset. Fifty of the 254 counties and incorporated cities in the model region were divided on the basis of physiography and topography, producing a total of 309 land segments. The stream-reach network for the Chesapeake Bay watershed part of the model region was based on the U.S. Geological Survey Chesapeake Bay SPARROW (SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes) model stream-reach network. Because that network was created only for the Chesapeake Bay watershed, the rest of the model region uses a 1:500,000-scale stream-reach network. Streams with mean annual streamflow of less than 100 cubic feet per second were excluded based on attributes from the dataset. Additional changes were made to enhance the data and to allow for inclusion of stream reaches with monitoring data that were not part of the original network. Thirty-meter-resolution Digital Elevation Model data were used to delineate watersheds for each

  17. Subspace Iteration Algorithms in FORTRAN 77 and FORTRAN 8x

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-30

    COMPUTED, 0 .LT. EM .LT. P .LE. N .LE. LDX. C EM AS AN INTEGER OUTPUT VARIABLE IS THE NUMBER OF EIGENVECTORS C COMPUTED THROUGH KM ITERATION STEPS . C X...LT. EM .LT. P .LE. N .LE. LDX. C EM AS AN INTEGER OUTPUT VARIABLE IS THE NUMBER OF EIGENVECTORS C COMPUTED TH{ROUGH KM ITERATION STEPS . C X AS A REAL N

  18. The implementation of the graphics of program EAGLE: A numerical grid generation code on NASA Langley SNS computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Johnny L.

    1989-01-01

    Program EAGLE (Eglin Arbitrary Geometry Implicit Euler) Numerical Grid Generation System is a composite (multi-block) algebraic or elliptic grid generation system designed to discretize the domain in and/or around any arbitrarily shaped three dimensional regions. This system combines a boundary conforming surface generation scheme and includes plotting routines designed to take full advantage of the DISSPLA Graphics Package (Version 9.0). Program EAGLE is written to compile and execute efficiently on any Cray machine with or without solid state disk (SSD) devices. Also, the code uses namelist inputs which are supported by all Cray machines using the FORTRAN compiler CFT77. The namelist inputs makes it easier for the user to understand the inputs and operation of Program EAGLE. EAGLE's numerical grid generator is constructed in the following form: main program, EGG (executive routine); subroutine SURFAC (surface generation routine); subroutine GRID (grid generation routine); and subroutine GRDPLOT (grid plotting routines). The EAGLE code was modified to use on the NASA-LaRC SNS computer (Cray 2S) system. During the modification a conversion program was developed for the output data of EAGLE's subroutine GRID to permit the data to be graphically displayed by IRIS workstations, using Plot3D. The code of program EAGLE was modified to make operational subroutine GRDPLOT (using DI-3000 Graphics Software Packages) on the NASA-LaRC SNS Computer System. How to implement graphically, the output data of subroutine GRID was determined on any NASA-LaRC graphics terminal that has access to the SNS Computer System DI-300 Graphics Software Packages. A Quick Reference User Guide was developed for the use of program EAGLE on the NASA-LaRC SNS Computer System. One or more application program(s) was illustrated using program EAGLE on the NASA LaRC SNS Computer System, with emphasis on graphics illustrations.

  19. Ada Integrated Environment III Computer Program Development Specification. Volume III. Ada Optimizing Compiler.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    Corporation , Order No. GY28-6800-5 (December 1971). [IBM72] FORTRAN IV (H) Compiler Program Logic Manual, IBM Corporation , Order No. GH28-6642-5...RAVC ptans6 and excutes~ ’Leseatc, devetopment, .te,~t and 4etected acquisition p)LopLamn in -sappo~~t o6 Command, Con-tt Commnications ~ and

  20. Water-use computer programs for Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geiger, L.H.

    1984-01-01

    Using U.S. Geological Survey computer programs L149-L153, this report shows how to process water-use data for the functional water-use categories: public supply, rural supply, industrial self-supplied, irrigation, and thermo-electric power generation. The programs are used to selectively retrieve entries and list them in a format suitable for publication. Instructions are given for coding cards to produce tables of water-use data for each of the functional use categories. These cards contain entries that identify a particular water-use data-collection site in Florida. Entries on the cards include location information such as county code, water management district code, hydrologic unit code, and, where applicable, a site name and number. Annual and monthly pumpage is included. These entries are shown with several different headings; for example, surface water or ground water, freshwater or saline pumpages, or consumptive use. All the programs use a similar approach; however, the actual programs differ with each functional water-use category and are discussed separately. Data prepared for these programs can also be processed by the National Water-Use Data System. (USGS)