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Sample records for four-dimensional gated cardiac

  1. Quantitative evaluation study of four-dimensional gated cardiac SPECT reconstruction †

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Mingwu; Yang, Yongyi; Niu, Xiaofeng; Marin, Thibault; Brankov, Jovan G.; Feng, Bing; Pretorius, P. Hendrik; King, Michael A.; Wernick, Miles N.

    2013-01-01

    In practice gated cardiac SPECT images suffer from a number of degrading factors, including distance-dependent blur, attenuation, scatter, and increased noise due to gating. Recently we proposed a motion-compensated approach for four-dimensional (4D) reconstruction for gated cardiac SPECT, and demonstrated that use of motion-compensated temporal smoothing could be effective for suppressing the increased noise due to lowered counts in individual gates. In this work we further develop this motion-compensated 4D approach by also taking into account attenuation and scatter in the reconstruction process, which are two major degrading factors in SPECT data. In our experiments we conducted a thorough quantitative evaluation of the proposed 4D method using Monte Carlo simulated SPECT imaging based on the 4D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom. In particular we evaluated the accuracy of the reconstructed left ventricular myocardium using a number of quantitative measures including regional bias-variance analyses and wall intensity uniformity. The quantitative results demonstrate that use of motion-compensated 4D reconstruction can improve the accuracy of the reconstructed myocardium, which in turn can improve the detectability of perfusion defects. Moreover, our results reveal that while traditional spatial smoothing could be beneficial, its merit would become diminished with the use of motion-compensated temporal regularization. As a preliminary demonstration, we also tested our 4D approach on patient data. The reconstructed images from both simulated and patient data demonstrated that our 4D method can improve the definition of the LV wall. PMID:19724094

  2. Photon gating in four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohammed T.; Liu, Haihua; Baskin, John Spencer; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) is a pivotal tool for imaging of nanoscale structural dynamics with subparticle resolution on the time scale of atomic motion. Photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM), a key UEM technique, involves the detection of electrons that have gained energy from a femtosecond optical pulse via photon–electron coupling on nanostructures. PINEM has been applied in various fields of study, from materials science to biological imaging, exploiting the unique spatial, energy, and temporal characteristics of the PINEM electrons gained by interaction with a “single” light pulse. The further potential of photon-gated PINEM electrons in probing ultrafast dynamics of matter and the optical gating of electrons by invoking a “second” optical pulse has previously been proposed and examined theoretically in our group. Here, we experimentally demonstrate this photon-gating technique, and, through diffraction, visualize the phase transition dynamics in vanadium dioxide nanoparticles. With optical gating of PINEM electrons, imaging temporal resolution was improved by a factor of 3 or better, being limited only by the optical pulse widths. This work enables the combination of the high spatial resolution of electron microscopy and the ultrafast temporal response of the optical pulses, which provides a promising approach to attain the resolution of few femtoseconds and attoseconds in UEM. PMID:26438835

  3. Cardiac gated ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, C.W. III; Hoffman, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. The authors evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50 msec scan aperture. Multi slice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. The authors observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a non-failing model of the heart.

  4. Cardiac gated ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, C. William, III; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1995-05-01

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. We evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50msec scan aperture. Multislice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. We observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a nonfailing model of the heart.

  5. Live four-dimensional optical coherence tomography reveals embryonic cardiac phenotype in mouse mutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Andrew L., III; Wang, Shang; Larin, Kirill V.; Overbeek, Paul A.; Larina, Irina V.

    2015-09-01

    Efficient phenotyping of developmental defects in model organisms is critical for understanding the genetic specification of normal development and congenital abnormalities in humans. We previously reported that optical coherence tomography (OCT) combined with live embryo culture is a valuable tool for mouse embryo imaging and four-dimensional (4-D) cardiodynamic analysis; however, its capability for analysis of mouse mutants with cardiac phenotypes has not been previously explored. Here, we report 4-D (three-dimensional+time) OCT imaging and analysis of the embryonic heart in a Wdr19 mouse mutant, revealing a heart looping defect. Quantitative analysis of cardiac looping revealed a statistically significant difference between mutant and control embryos. Our results indicate that live 4-D OCT imaging provides a powerful phenotyping approach to characterize embryonic cardiac function in mouse models.

  6. Four-dimensional B-spline-based motion analysis of tagged cardiac MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Cengizhan; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    1999-05-01

    In recent years, with development of new MRI techniques, noninvasive evaluation of global and regional cardiac function is becoming a reality. One of the methods used for this purpose is MRI tagging. In tagging, spatially encoded magnetic saturation planes, tags, are created within tissues. These act as temporary markers and move with the tissue. In cardiac tagging, tag deformation pattern provides useful qualitative and quantitative information about the functional properties of underlying myocardium. The measured deformation of a single tag plane contains only unidirectional information of the past motion. In order to track the motion of a cardiac material point, this sparse, single dimensional data has to be combined with similar information gathered from other tag sets and all time frames. Previously, several methods have been developed which rely on the specific geometry of the chambers. Here, we employ an image plane based, simple cartesian coordinate system and provide a stepwise method to describe the heart motion using a four-dimensional tensor product of B-splines. The proposed displacement and forward motion fields exhibited sub-pixel accuracy. Since our motion fields are parametric and based on an image plane based coordinate system, trajectories or other derived values (velocity, acceleration, strains...) can be calculated for any desired point on the MRI images. This method is sufficiently general so that the motion of any tagged structure can be tracked.

  7. Four-dimensional cardiac reconstruction from rotational x-ray sequences: first results for 4D coronary angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansis, Eberhard; Schomberg, Hermann; Erhard, Klaus; Dössel, Olaf; Grass, Michael

    2009-02-01

    The tomographic reconstruction of the beating heart requires dedicated methods. One possibility is gated reconstruction, where only data corresponding to a certain motion state are incorporated. Another one is motioncompensated reconstruction with a pre-computed motion vector field, which requires a preceding estimation of the motion. Here, results of a new approach are presented: simultaneous reconstruction of a three-dimensional object and its motion over time, yielding a fully four-dimensional representation. The object motion is modeled by a time-dependent elastic transformation. The reconstruction is carried out with an iterative gradient-descent algorithm which simultaneously optimizes the three-dimensional image and the motion parameters. The method was tested on a simulated rotational X-ray acquisition of a dynamic coronary artery phantom, acquired on a C-arm system with a slowly rotating C-arm. Accurate reconstruction of both absorption coefficient and motion could be achieved. First results from experiments on clinical rotational X-ray coronary angiography data are shown. The resulting reconstructions enable the analysis of both static properties, such as vessel geometry and cross-sectional areas, and dynamic properties, like magnitude, speed, and synchrony of motion during the cardiac cycle.

  8. Four-dimensional superquadric-based cardiac phantom for Monte Carlo simulation of radiological imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, J.; Gilland, D.R.; Jaszczak, R.J.; Coleman, R.E.

    1999-12-01

    A four-dimensional (x, y, z, t) composite superquadric-based object model of the human heart for Monte Carlo simulation of radiological imaging systems has been developed. The phantom models the real temporal geometric conditions of a beating heart for frame rates up to 32 per cardiac cycle. Phantom objects are described by boolean combinations of superquadric ellipsoid sections.Moving spherical coordinate systems are chosen to model wall movement whereby points of the ventricle and atria walls are assumed to move towards a moving center-of-gravity point. Due to the non-static coordinate systems, the atrial/ventricular valve plane of the mathematical heart phantom moves up and down along the left ventricular long axis resulting in reciprocal emptying and filling of atria and ventricles. Compared to the base movement, the epicardial apex as well as the superior atria area are almost fixed in space. Since geometric parameters of the objects are directly applied on intersection calculations of the photon ray with object boundaries during Monte Carlo simulation, no phantom discretization artifacts are involved.

  9. Quality Assurance Challenges for Motion-Adaptive Radiation Therapy: Gating, Breath Holding, and Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Steve B. Wolfgang, John; Mageras, Gig S.

    2008-05-01

    Compared with conventional three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatments, quality assurance (QA) for motion-adaptive radiation therapy involves various challenges because of the added temporal dimension. Here we discuss those challenges for three specific techniques related to motion-adaptive therapy: namely respiratory gating, breath holding, and four-dimensional computed tomography. Similar to the introduction of any other new technologies in clinical practice, typical QA measures should be taken for these techniques also, including initial testing of equipment and clinical procedures, as well as frequent QA examinations during the early stage of implementation. Here, rather than covering every QA aspect in depth, we focus on some major QA challenges. The biggest QA challenge for gating and breath holding is how to ensure treatment accuracy when internal target position is predicted using external surrogates. Recommended QA measures for each component of treatment, including simulation, planning, patient positioning, and treatment delivery and verification, are discussed. For four-dimensional computed tomography, some major QA challenges have also been discussed.

  10. Four-dimensional in vivo X-ray microscopy with projection-guided gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokso, Rajmund; Schwyn, Daniel A.; Walker, Simon M.; Doube, Michael; Wicklein, Martina; Müller, Tonya; Stampanoni, Marco; Taylor, Graham K.; Krapp, Holger G.

    2015-03-01

    Visualizing fast micrometer scale internal movements of small animals is a key challenge for functional anatomy, physiology and biomechanics. We combine phase contrast tomographic microscopy (down to 3.3 μm voxel size) with retrospective, projection-based gating (in the order of hundreds of microseconds) to improve the spatiotemporal resolution by an order of magnitude over previous studies. We demonstrate our method by visualizing 20 three-dimensional snapshots through the 150 Hz oscillations of the blowfly flight motor.

  11. Four-dimensional in vivo X-ray microscopy with projection-guided gating

    PubMed Central

    Mokso, Rajmund; Schwyn, Daniel A.; Walker, Simon M.; Doube, Michael; Wicklein, Martina; Müller, Tonya; Stampanoni, Marco; Taylor, Graham K.; Krapp, Holger G.

    2015-01-01

    Visualizing fast micrometer scale internal movements of small animals is a key challenge for functional anatomy, physiology and biomechanics. We combine phase contrast tomographic microscopy (down to 3.3 μm voxel size) with retrospective, projection-based gating (in the order of hundreds of microseconds) to improve the spatiotemporal resolution by an order of magnitude over previous studies. We demonstrate our method by visualizing 20 three-dimensional snapshots through the 150 Hz oscillations of the blowfly flight motor. PMID:25762080

  12. Dual gated nuclear cardiac images

    SciTech Connect

    Zubal, I.G.; Bennett, G.W.; Bizais, Y.; Brill, A.B.

    1984-02-01

    A data acquisition system has been developed to collect camera events simultaneously with continually digitized electrocardiograph signals and respiratory flow measurements. Software processing of the list mode data creates more precisely gated cardiac frames. Additionally, motion blur due to heart movement during breathing is reduced by selecting events within a specific respiratory phase. Thallium myocardium images of a healthy volunteer show increased definition. This technique of combined cardiac and respiratory gating has the potential of improving the detectability of small lesions, and the characterization of cardiac wall motion.

  13. Patient-specific modelling of whole heart anatomy, dynamics and haemodynamics from four-dimensional cardiac CT images.

    PubMed

    Mihalef, Viorel; Ionasec, Razvan Ioan; Sharma, Puneet; Georgescu, Bogdan; Voigt, Ingmar; Suehling, Michael; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2011-06-01

    There is a growing need for patient-specific and holistic modelling of the heart to support comprehensive disease assessment and intervention planning as well as prediction of therapeutic outcomes. We propose a patient-specific model of the whole human heart, which integrates morphology, dynamics and haemodynamic parameters at the organ level. The modelled cardiac structures are robustly estimated from four-dimensional cardiac computed tomography (CT), including all four chambers and valves as well as the ascending aorta and pulmonary artery. The patient-specific geometry serves as an input to a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver that derives realistic haemodynamics, constrained by the local anatomy, along the entire heart cycle. We evaluated our framework with various heart pathologies and the results correlate with relevant literature reports.

  14. Four-dimensional modeling of the heart for image guidance of minimally invasive cardiac surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzbicki, Marcin; Drangova, Maria; Guiraudon, Gerard; Peters, Terry

    2004-05-01

    Minimally invasive surgery of the beating heart can be associated with two major limitations: selecting port locations for optimal target coverage from x-rays and angiograms, and navigating instruments in a dynamic and confined 3D environment using only an endoscope. To supplement the current surgery planning and guidance strategies, we continue developing VCSP - a virtual reality, patient-specific, thoracic cavity model derived from 3D pre-procedural images. In this work, we apply elastic image registration to 4D cardiac images to model the dynamic heart. Our method is validated on two image modalities, and for different parts of the cardiac anatomy. In a helical CT dataset of an excised heart phantom, we found that the artificial motion of the epicardial surface can be extracted to within 0.93 +/- 0.33 mm. For an MR dataset of a human volunteer, the error for different heart structures such as the myocardium, right and left atria, right ventricle, aorta, vena cava, and pulmonary artery, ranged from 1.08 +/- 0.18 mm to 1.14 +/- 0.22 mm. These results indicate that our method of modeling the motion of the heart is not only easily adaptable but also sufficiently accurate to meet the requirements for reliable cardiac surgery training, planning, and guidance.

  15. Rotationally acquired four-dimensional optical coherence tomography of embryonic chick hearts using retrospective gating on the common central A-scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Happel, Christoph M.; Thommes, Jan; Thrane, Lars; Männer, Jörg; Ortmaier, Tobias; Heimann, Bodo; Yelbuz, Talat Mesud

    2011-09-01

    We introduce a new method of rotational image acquisition for four-dimensional (4D) optical coherence tomography (OCT) of beating embryonic chick hearts. The rotational axis and the central A-scan of the OCT are identical. An out-of-phase image sequence covering multiple heartbeats is acquired at every angle of an incremental rotation of the deflection mirrors of the OCT system. Image acquisition is accomplished after a rotation of 180°. Comparison of a displayed live M-mode of the central A-scan with a reference M-mode allows instant detection of translational movements of the embryo. For calculation of 4D data sets, we apply an image-based retrospective gating algorithm using the phase information of the common central A-scan present in all acquired images. This leads to cylindrical three-dimensional data sets for every time step of the cardiac cycle that can be used for 4D visualization. We demonstrate this approach and provide a video of a beating Hamburger and Hamilton stage 16 embryonic chick heart generated from a 4D OCT data set using rotational image acquisition.

  16. Clinically applicable gated cardiac computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Cipriano, P.R.; Nassi, M.; Brody, W.R.

    1983-03-01

    Several attempts have been made to improve cardiac images obtained with x-ray transmission computed tomography (CT) by stopping cardiac motion through electrocardiographic gating. These methods reconstruct images that correspond to time intervals of the cardiac cycle identified by electrocardiography using either a pulsed x-ray beam at a selected time in the cardiac cycle or selected measurements in retrospect from regularly pulsed measurements made over several cardiac cycles. Missing CT angles of view (line integrals) have been a major problem contributing to degradation of such gated cardiac CT images. A new method for CT reconstruction from an incomplete set of projection data is presented that can be used clinically with a standard fan-beam reconstruction algorithm to improve gated cardiac CT images.

  17. Comparison of Respiratory-Gated and Respiratory-Ungated Planning in Scattered Carbon Ion Beam Treatment of the Pancreas Using Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Shinichiro; Yanagi, Takeshi; Hara, Ryusuke; Sharp, Gregory C.; Asakura, Hiroshi; Kumagai, Motoki; Kishimoto, Riwa; Yamada, Shigeru; Kato, Hirotoshi; Kandatsu, Susumu; Kamada, Tadashi

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: We compared respiratory-gated and respiratory-ungated treatment strategies using four-dimensional (4D) scattered carbon ion beam distribution in pancreatic 4D computed tomography (CT) datasets. Methods and Materials: Seven inpatients with pancreatic tumors underwent 4DCT scanning under free-breathing conditions using a rapidly rotating cone-beam CT, which was integrated with a 256-slice detector, in cine mode. Two types of bolus for gated and ungated treatment were designed to cover the planning target volume (PTV) using 4DCT datasets in a 30% duty cycle around exhalation and a single respiratory cycle, respectively. Carbon ion beam distribution for each strategy was calculated as a function of respiratory phase by applying the compensating bolus to 4DCT at the respective phases. Smearing was not applied to the bolus, but consideration was given to drill diameter. The accumulated dose distributions were calculated by applying deformable registration and calculating the dose-volume histogram. Results: Doses to normal tissues in gated treatment were minimized mainly on the inferior aspect, which thereby minimized excessive doses to normal tissues. Over 95% of the dose, however, was delivered to the clinical target volume at all phases for both treatment strategies. Maximum doses to the duodenum and pancreas averaged across all patients were 43.1/43.1 GyE (ungated/gated) and 43.2/43.2 GyE (ungated/gated), respectively. Conclusions: Although gated treatment minimized excessive dosing to normal tissue, the difference between treatment strategies was small. Respiratory gating may not always be required in pancreatic treatment as long as dose distribution is assessed. Any application of our results to clinical use should be undertaken only after discussion with oncologists, particularly with regard to radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy.

  18. Four-Dimensional Lung Treatment Planning in Layer-Stacking Carbon Ion Beam Treatment: Comparison of Layer-Stacking and Conventional Ungated/Gated Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Shinichiro; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Asakura, Hiroshi; Sharp, Gregory C.; Kumagai, Motoki; Dobashi, Suguru; Nakajima, Mio; Yamamoto, Naoyoshi; Kandatsu, Susumu; Baba, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: We compared four-dimensional (4D) layer-stacking and conventional carbon ion beam distribution in the treatment of lung cancer between ungated and gated respiratory strategies using 4DCT data sets. Methods and Materials: Twenty lung patients underwent 4DCT imaging under free-breathing conditions. Using planning target volumes (PTVs) at respective respiratory phases, two types of compensating bolus were designed, a full single respiratory cycle for the ungated strategy and an approximately 30% duty cycle for the exhalation-gated strategy. Beams were delivered to the PTVs for the ungated and gated strategies, PTV(ungated) and PTV(gated), respectively, which were calculated by combining the respective PTV(Tn)s by layer-stacking and conventional irradiation. Carbon ion beam dose distribution was calculated as a function of respiratory phase by applying a compensating bolus to 4DCT. Accumulated dose distributions were calculated by applying deformable registration. Results: With the ungated strategy, accumulated dose distributions were satisfactorily provided to the PTV, with D95 values for layer-stacking and conventional irradiation of 94.0% and 96.2%, respectively. V20 for the lung and Dmax for the spinal cord were lower with layer-stacking than with conventional irradiation, whereas Dmax for the skin (14.1 GyE) was significantly lower (21.9 GyE). In addition, dose conformation to the GTV/PTV with layer-stacking irradiation was better with the gated than with the ungated strategy. Conclusions: Gated layer-stacking irradiation allows the delivery of a carbon ion beam to a moving target without significant degradation of dose conformity or the development of hot spots.

  19. Reconstruction of dynamic gated cardiac SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Mingwu; Yang Yongyi; King, Michael A.

    2006-11-15

    In this paper we propose an image reconstruction procedure which aims to unify gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and dynamic SPECT into a single method. We divide the cardiac cycle into a number of gate intervals as in gated SPECT, but treat the tracer distribution for each gate as a time-varying signal. By using both dynamic and motion-compensated temporal regularization, our reconstruction procedure will produce an image sequence that shows both cardiac motion and time-varying tracer distribution simultaneously. To demonstrate the proposed reconstruction method, we simulated gated cardiac perfusion imaging using the gated mathematical cardiac-torso (gMCAT) phantom with Tc99m-Teboroxime as the imaging agent. Our results show that the proposed method can produce more accurate reconstruction of gated dynamic images than independent reconstruction of individual gate frames with spatial smoothness alone. In particular, our results show that the former could improve the contrast to noise ratio of a simulated perfusion defect by as much as 100% when compared to the latter.

  20. Cardiac imaging using gated magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzer, P.; Botvinick, E.H.; Schiller, N.B.

    1984-01-01

    To overcome the limitations of magnetic resonance (MR) cardiac imaging using nongated data acquisition, three methods for acquiring a gating signal, which could be applied in the presence of a magnetic field, were tested; an air-filled plethysmograph, a laser-Doppler capillary perfusion flowmeter, and an electrocardiographic gating device. The gating signal was used for timing of MR imaging sequences (IS). Application of each gating method yielded significant improvements in structural MR image resolution of the beating heart, although with both plethysmography and laser-Doppler velocimetry it was difficult to obtain cardiac images from the early portion of the cardiac cycle due to an intrinsic delay between the ECG R wave and peripheral detection of the gating signal. Variations in the temporal relationship between the R wave and plethysmographic and laser-Doppler signals produced inconsistencies in the timing of IS. Since the ECG signal is virtually free of these problems, the preferable gating technique is IS synchronization with an electrocardiogram. The gated images acquired with this method provide sharp definition of internal cardiac morphology and can be temporarily referenced to end diastole and end systole or intermediate points.

  1. Feasibility Study on Prenatal Cardiac Screening Using Four-Dimensional Ultrasound with Spatiotemporal Image Correlation: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sun; Ren, Yunyun; Chen, Ping; Niu, Jianmei; Li, Cao; Sun, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed at investigating the feasibility of using the spatiotemporal image correlation (STIC) technology for prenatal cardiac screening, finding factors that influence the offline evaluation of reconstructed fetal heart, and establishing an optimal acquisition scheme. Methods The study included 452 gravidae presenting for routine screening at 3 maternity centers at 20–38 gestational weeks. The factors influencing the quality of STIC volume data were evaluated using t test, chi-square test, and logistic regression analysis. The predictive power was evaluated using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results Among the 452 fetuses enrolled, 353 (78.1%) were identified as successful and 99 (21.9%) as failure of evaluation of the reconstructed fetal heart. The total success rate of qualified STIC images was 78.1%. The display rates of reconstructed cardiac views were 86.5% (four-chamber view), 92.5% (left ventricular outflow tract view), 92.7% (right ventricular outflow tract view), 89.9% (three-vessel trachea view), 63.9% (aortic arch view), 81.4% (ductal arch view), 81% (short-axis view of great vessels), 80.1% (long-cava view), and 86.9% (abdominal view). A logistic regression analysis showed that more than 28 gestational weeks [OR = 0.39 (CI 95% 0.16, 0.19), P = 0.035], frequent fetal movements [OR = 0.37 (CI 95% 0.16, 0.87), P = 0.022], shadowing [OR = 0.36 (CI 95% 0.19, 0.72), P = 0.004], spine location at 10–2 o’clock [OR = 0.08 (CI 95% 0.02, 0.27), P = 0.0], and original cardiac view [OR = 0.51 (0.25, 0.89), P = 0.019] had a significant impact on the quality of STIC. The area under the ROC curve was 0.775. Conclusions Fetal cardiac-STIC seems a feasible tool for prenatal screening of congenital heart diseases. The influence factors on the quality of STIC images included the intensity of training, gestational age, fetal conditions and parameter settings. The optimal acquisition scheme may improve the application and

  2. Metric optimized gating for fetal cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Jansz, Michael S; Seed, Mike; van Amerom, Joshua F P; Wong, Derek; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Macgowan, Christopher K

    2010-11-01

    Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging can be used to complement echocardiography for the evaluation of the fetal heart. Cardiac imaging typically requires gating with peripheral hardware; however, a gating signal is not readily available in utero. No successful application of existing technologies to human fetal phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging has been reported to date in the literature. The purpose of this work is to develop a technique for phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal heart that does not require measurement of a gating signal. Metric optimized gating involves acquiring data without gating and retrospectively determining the proper reconstruction by optimizing an image metric. The effects of incorrect gating on phase contrast images were investigated, and the time-entropy of the series of images was found to provide a good measure of the level of corruption. The technique was validated with a pulsatile flow phantom, experiments with adult volunteers, and in vivo application in the fetal population. Images and flow curves from these measurements are presented. Additionally, numerical simulations were used to investigate the degree to which heart rate variability affects the reconstruction process. Metric optimized gating enables imaging with conventional phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging sequences in the absence of a gating signal, permitting flow measurements in the great vessels in utero.

  3. Dosimetric study of a respiratory gating technique based on four-dimensional computed tomography in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hui; Lu, Heming; Shu, Liuyang; Huang, Huixian; Chen, Huasheng; Chen, Jiaxin; Cheng, Jinjian; Pang, Qiang; Peng, Luxing; Gu, Junzhao; Lu, Zhiping

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to compare the differences in target volumes and dose distributions to the targets and organs at risk (OARs) between a four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT)-based respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan (PlanEOE) and a three-dimensional CT (3DCT)-based IMRT plan (Plan3D) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). For 17 patients with Stages I–III NSCLC, both 4DCT data and conventional 3DCT data were obtained. The Plan3D and PlanEOE were designed based on 3DCT data and 4DCT data, respectively. The displacements of the gross tumor volume (GTV) centroid were 0.13 ± 0.09 cm, 0.15 ± 0.1 cm, and 0.27 ± 0.27 cm in the right–left, anterior–posterior, and superior–inferior directions, respectively. The volume of the GTVEOE was 3.05 ± 5.17 cm3 larger than that of the GTV3D. The volume of the PTV3D was 72.82 ± 48.65 cm3 larger than that of the PTVEOE. There was no significant difference between the PTV3D and PTVEOE for V55.8, V60, V66 and the homogeneity index. The PTV3D had a lower target conformity index than the PTVEOE (P = 0.036). PlanEOE had a significantly lower lung V10, V20, V30, V40 and mean lung dose (MLD) than Plan3D. For the heart, PlanEOE had a significantly lower V30 and mean dose. In conclusion, 4DCT is an appropriate method for assessing the displacement of the GTV centroid in three dimensions. PlanEOE has smaller PTVs and a decreased dose and volume for the normal lung and heart, as compared with Plan3D. PMID:24453355

  4. Evaluation of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography-Based Intensity-Modulated and Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy Techniques for Pancreatic Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Geld, Ylanga G. van der; Triest, Baukelien van; Verbakel, Wilko; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van; Senan, Suresh; Slotman, Ben J.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To compare conformal radiotherapy (CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and respiration-gated radiotherapy (RGRT) planning techniques for pancreatic cancer. All target volumes were determined using four-dimensional computed tomography scans (4D CT). Methods and Materials: The pancreatic tumor and enlarged regional lymph nodes were contoured on all 10 phases of a planning 4D CT scan for 10 patients, and the planning target volumes (PTV{sub allphases}) were generated. Three consecutive respiratory phases for RGRT delivery in both inspiration and expiration were identified, and the corresponding PTVs (PTV{sub inspiration} and PTV{sub expiration}) and organ at risk volumes created. Treatment plans using CRT and IMRT, with and without RGRT, were created for each PTV. Results: Compared with the CRT plans, IMRT significantly reduced the mean volume of right kidney exposed to 20 Gy from 27.7% {+-} 17.7% to 16.0% {+-} 18.2% (standard deviation) (p < 0.01), but this was not achieved for the left kidney (11.1% {+-} 14.2% to 5.7% {+-} 6.5%; p = 0.1). The IMRT plans also reduced the mean gastric, hepatic, and small bowel doses (p < 0.01). No additional reductions in the dose to the kidneys or other organs at risk were seen when RGRT plans were combined with either CRT or IMRT, and the findings for RGRT in end-expiration and end-inspiration were similar. Conclusion: 4D CT-based IMRT plans for pancreatic tumors significantly reduced the radiation doses to the right kidney, liver, stomach, and small bowel compared with CRT plans. The additional dosimetric benefits from RGRT appear limited in this setting.

  5. A registration based approach for 4D cardiac micro-CT using combined prospective and retrospective gating

    PubMed Central

    Badea, Cristian T.; Schreibmann, Eduard; Fox, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in murine cardiac studies with three-dimensional cone beam micro-computed tomography (CT) have used either prospective or retrospective gating technique. While prospective gating ensures the best image quality and the highest resolution, it involves longer sampling times and higher radiation dose. Sampling is faster and the radiation dose can be reduced with retrospective gating but the image quality is affected by the limited number of projections with an irregular angular distribution which complicate the reconstruction process, causing significant streaking artifacts. This work involves both prospective and retrospective gating in sampling. Deformable registration is used between a high quality image set acquired with prospective gating with the multiple data sets during the cardiac cycle obtained using retrospective gating. Tests were conducted on a four-dimensional (4D) cardiac mouse phantom and after optimization, the method was applied to in vivo cardiac micro-CT data. Results indicate that, by using our method, the sampling time can be reduced by a factor of 2.5 and the radiation dose can be reduced 35% compared to the prospective sampling while the image quality can be maintained. In conclusion, we proposed a novel solution to 4D cine cardiac micro-CT based on a combined prospective with retrospective gating in sampling and deformable registration post reconstruction that mixed the advantages of both strategies. PMID:18491508

  6. Respiratory compensation in cardiac PET using doubly-gated acquisitions

    SciTech Connect

    Huesman, R.H.; Klein, G.J.; Reutter, B.W.

    1997-05-01

    We present results of respiratory compensation in cardiac PET data via doubly-gated acquisitions on a human subject. The extent of cardiac motion due to respiration has now been documented by numerous researchers. To correct for the blurring effects of this motion, we have modified the CTI/Siemens ECAT EXACT HR scanner to support acquisitions gated for different stages of both the cardiac and respiratory cycles. A human subject was injected with 11.0 mCi 18-FDG. After allowing time for the isotope to clear the blood pool, emission data were acquired for 30 minutes. The respiratory cycle was divided into five gates, the cardiac cycle into three gates for a total of fifteen 47-plane emission datasets. An ungated transmission dataset was acquired to correct for the effects of attenuation. Each gate was separately reconstructed using standard filtered backprojection techniques. Data resulting from the five respiratory gates obtained during diastole will be discussed in this paper.

  7. An integrated bioimpedance—ECG gating technique for respiratory and cardiac motion compensation in cardiac PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivumäki, Tuomas; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Fürst, Sebastian; Loher, Simone; Vauhkonen, Marko; Schwaiger, Markus; Hakulinen, Mikko A.

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory motion may degrade image quality in cardiac PET imaging. Since cardiac PET studies often involve cardiac gating by ECG, a separate respiratory monitoring system is required increasing the logistic complexity of the examination, in case respiratory gating is also needed. Thus, we investigated the simultaneous acquisition of both respiratory and cardiac gating signals using II limb lead mimicking electrode configuration during cardiac PET scans of 11 patients. In addition to conventional static and ECG-gated images, bioimpedance technique was utilized to generate respiratory- and dual-gated images. The ability of the bioimpedance technique to monitor intrathoracic respiratory motion was assessed estimating cardiac displacement between end-inspiration and -expiration. The relevance of dual gating was evaluated in left ventricular volume and myocardial wall thickness measurements. An average 7.6  ±  3.3 mm respiratory motion was observed in the study population. Dual gating showed a small but significant increase (4 ml, p = 0.042) in left ventricular myocardial volume compared to plain cardiac gating. In addition, a thinner myocardial wall was observed in dual-gated images (9.3  ±  1.3 mm) compared to cardiac-gated images (11.3  ±  1.3 mm, p = 0.003). This study shows the feasibility of bioimpedance measurements for dual gating in a clinical setting. The method enables simultaneous acquisition of respiratory and cardiac gating signals using a single device with standard ECG electrodes.

  8. [Echocardiographic gating in non-cardiac digital angiography].

    PubMed

    Gattoni, F; Baldini, U; Cairo, F; Nessi, R; Pozzato, C; Uslenghi, C

    1987-03-01

    This paper reports the results of the ECG-gating in non-cardiac digital subtraction angiography (DSA). One hundred and fifteen patients underwent DSA (126 examinations); ECG-gating was applied in 66/126 examinations: images recorded at 70% of R wave were subtracted. Artifacts produced by vascular movements were evaluated in all patients: only 40 examinations, carried out without ECG-gating, showed vascular artifacts. The major advantage of the ECG-gated DSA is the more efficient subtraction because of the better images superimposition: therefore, ECG-gating can be clinically helpful. On the contrary, it could be a problem in arrhythmic or bradycardic patients. ECG-gating is helpful in DSA imaging of the thoracic and abdominal aorta and of the cervical and renal arteries. In the examinations of peripheral vessels of the limbs it is not so efficient as in the trunk or in the neck.

  9. Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Based Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy with Respiratory Guidance System: Analysis of Respiratory Signals and Dosimetric Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chul Yong; Yang, Dae Sik; Yoon, Won Sup; Park, Young Je; Lee, Suk; Kim, Young Bum

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the effectiveness of respiratory guidance system in 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) based respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT) by comparing respiratory signals and dosimetric analysis of treatment plans. Methods. The respiratory amplitude and period of the free, the audio device-guided, and the complex system-guided breathing were evaluated in eleven patients with lung or liver cancers. The dosimetric parameters were assessed by comparing free breathing CT plan and 4DCT-based 30–70% maximal intensity projection (MIP) plan. Results. The use of complex system-guided breathing showed significantly less variation in respiratory amplitude and period compared to the free or audio-guided breathing regarding the root mean square errors (RMSE) of full inspiration (P = 0.031), full expiration (P = 0.007), and period (P = 0.007). The dosimetric parameters including V5 Gy, V10 Gy, V20 Gy, V30 Gy, V40 Gy, and V50 Gy of normal liver or lung in 4DCT MIP plan were superior over free breathing CT plan. Conclusions. The reproducibility and regularity of respiratory amplitude and period were significantly improved with the complex system-guided breathing compared to the free or the audio-guided breathing. In addition, the treatment plan based on the 4D CT-based MIP images acquired with the complex system guided breathing showed better normal tissue sparing than that on the free breathing CT. PMID:25276775

  10. Improved image quality and computation reduction in 4-D reconstruction of cardiac-gated SPECT images.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, M V; King, M A; Wernick, M N; Byrne, C L; Soares, E J; Pretorius, P H

    2000-05-01

    Spatiotemporal reconstruction of cardiac-gated SPECT images permits us to obtain valuable information related to cardiac function. However, the task of reconstructing this four-dimensional (4-D) data set is computation intensive. Typically, these studies are reconstructed frame-by-frame: a nonoptimal approach because temporal correlations in the signal are not accounted for. In this work, we show that the compression and signal decorrelation properties of the Karhunen-Loève (KL) transform may be used to greatly simplify the spatiotemporal reconstruction problem. The gated projections are first KL transformed in the temporal direction. This results in a sequence of KL-transformed projection images for which the signal components are uncorrelated along the time axis. As a result, the 4-D reconstruction task is simplified to a series of three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions in the KL domain. The reconstructed KL components are subsequently inverse KL transformed to obtain the entire spatiotemporal reconstruction set. Our simulation and clinical results indicate that KL processing provides image sequences that are less noisy than are conventional frame-by-frame reconstructions. Additionally, by discarding high-order KL components that are dominated by noise, we can achieve savings in computation time because fewer reconstructions are needed in comparison to conventional frame-by-frame reconstructions.

  11. Automatic phase determination for retrospectively gated cardiac CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, R.; Koehler, Th.; Nielsen, T.; Hawkes, D.; Grass, M.

    2004-12-01

    The recent improvements in CT detector and gantry technology in combination with new heart rate adaptive cone beam reconstruction algorithms enable the visualization of the heart in three dimensions at high spatial resolution. However, the finite temporal resolution still impedes the artifact-free reconstruction of the heart at any arbitrary phase of the cardiac cycle. Cardiac phases must be found during which the heart is quasistationary to obtain outmost image quality. It is challenging to find these phases due to intercycle and patient-to-patient variability. Electrocardiogram (ECG) information does not always represent the heart motion with an adequate accuracy. In this publication, a simple and efficient image-based technique is introduced which is able to deliver stable cardiac phases in an automatic and patient-specific way. From low-resolution four-dimensional data sets, the most stable phases are derived by calculating the object similarity between subsequent phases in the cardiac cycle. Patient-specific information about the object motion can be determined and resolved spatially. This information is used to perform optimized high-resolution reconstructions at phases of little motion. Results based on a simulation study and three real patient data sets are presented. The projection data were generated using a 16-slice cone beam CT system in low-pitch helical mode with parallel ECG recording.

  12. Combined gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy and /sup 67/Ga-citrate scintigraphy for detection of cardiac lymphoproliferative disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Winzelberg, G.G.; Rapoport, F.; Boucher, C.A.

    1981-10-01

    Two cases are reported in which combined radionuclide imaging using gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy and /sup 67/Ga-citrate scintigraphy aided in evaluating lymphomatous involvement of the heart and distinguishing tumor involvement from other cardiac disorders.

  13. Gated magnetic resonance imaging of congenital cardiac malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jocobstein, M.D.; Nelson, A.D.; Riemenschneider, T.A.; Alfidi, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of a variety of cardiac malformations in 19 patients aged 1 week to 33 years were obtained using pulse plethysmographic- or ECG-gated spin echo pulse sequences. Coronal, axial, and sagittal images displaying intracardiac structures with excellent spatial and contrast resolution were acquired during systole or diastole. It is concluded that MR will be a valuable noninvasive method of diagnosing congenital heart disease.

  14. Cardiac voltage-gated calcium channel macromolecular complexes.

    PubMed

    Rougier, Jean-Sébastien; Abriel, Hugues

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 20 years, a new field of research, called channelopathies, investigating diseases caused by ion channel dysfunction has emerged. Cardiac ion channels play an essential role in the generation of the cardiac action potential. Investigators have largely determined the physiological roles of different cardiac ion channels, but little is known about the molecular determinants of their regulation. The voltage-gated calcium channel Ca(v)1.2 shapes the plateau phase of the cardiac action potential and allows the influx of calcium leading to cardiomyocyte contraction. Studies suggest that the regulation of Ca(v)1.2 channels is not uniform in working cardiomyocytes. The notion of micro-domains containing Ca(v)1.2 channels and different calcium channel interacting proteins, called macro-molecular complex, has been proposed to explain these observations. The objective of this review is to summarize the currently known information on the Ca(v)1.2 macromolecular complexes in the cardiac cell and discuss their implication in cardiac function and disorder. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  15. Acquisition and automated 3-D segmentation of respiratory/cardiac-gated PET transmission images

    SciTech Connect

    Reutter, B.W.; Klein, G.J.; Brennan, K.M.; Huesman, R.H. |

    1996-12-31

    To evaluate the impact of respiratory motion on attenuation correction of cardiac PET data, we acquired and automatically segmented gated transmission data for a dog breathing on its own under gas anesthesia. Data were acquired for 20 min on a CTI/Siemens ECAT EXACT HR (47-slice) scanner configured for 12 gates in a static study, Two respiratory gates were obtained using data from a pneumatic bellows placed around the dog`s chest, in conjunction with 6 cardiac gates from standard EKG gating. Both signals were directed to a LabVIEW-controlled Macintosh, which translated them into one of 12 gate addresses. The respiratory gating threshold was placed near end-expiration to acquire 6 cardiac-gated datasets at end-expiration and 6 cardiac-gated datasets during breaths. Breaths occurred about once every 10 sec and lasted about 1-1.5 sec. For each respiratory gate, data were summed over cardiac gates and torso and lung surfaces were segmented automatically using a differential 3-D edge detection algorithm. Three-dimensional visualizations showed that lung surfaces adjacent to the heart translated 9 mm inferiorly during breaths. Our results suggest that respiration-compensated attenuation correction is feasible with a modest amount of gated transmission data and is necessary for accurate quantitation of high-resolution gated cardiac PET data.

  16. Ca channel gating during cardiac action potentials.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, M; DeFelice, L J

    1990-10-01

    How do Ca channels conduct Ca ions during the cardiac action potential? We attempt to answer this question by applying a two-microelectrode technique, previously used for Na and K currents, in which we record the patch current and the action potential at the same time (Mazzanti, M., and L. J. DeFelice. 1987. Biophys. J. 12:95-100, and 1988. Biophys. J. 54:1139-1148; Wellis, D., L. J. DeFelice, and M. Mazzanti. 1990. Biophys. J. 57:41-48). In this paper, we also compare the action currents obtained by the technique with the step-protocol currents obtained during standard voltage-clamp experiments. Individual Ca channels were measured in 10 mM Ca/1 Ba and 10 mM Ba. To describe part of our results, we use the nomenclature introduced by Hess, P., J. B. Lansman, and R. W. Tsien (1984. Nature (Lond.). 311:538-544). With Ba as the charge carrier, Ca channel kinetics convert rapidly from long to short open times as the patch voltage changes from 20 to -20 mV. This voltage-dependent conversion occurs during action potentials and in step-protocol experiments. With Ca as the charge carrier, the currents are brief at all voltages, and it is difficult to define either the number of channels in the patch or the conductance of the individual channels. Occasionally, however, Ca-conducting channels spontaneously convert to long-open-time kinetics (in Hess et al., 1984, notation, mode 2). When this happens, which is about once in every 100beats, there usually appears to be only one channel in the patch. In this rare configuration, the channel is open long enough to measure its conductance in 10 Ca/ 1 Ba. The value is 8-10 pS, which is about half the conductance in Ba. Because the long openings occur so infrequently with Ca as the charge carrier, they contribute negligibly to the average Ca current at any particular time during an action potential. However, the total number of Ca ions entering during these long openings may be significant when compared to the number entering by the

  17. Ca channel gating during cardiac action potentials.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, M; DeFelice, L J

    1990-10-01

    How do Ca channels conduct Ca ions during the cardiac action potential? We attempt to answer this question by applying a two-microelectrode technique, previously used for Na and K currents, in which we record the patch current and the action potential at the same time (Mazzanti, M., and L. J. DeFelice. 1987. Biophys. J. 12:95-100, and 1988. Biophys. J. 54:1139-1148; Wellis, D., L. J. DeFelice, and M. Mazzanti. 1990. Biophys. J. 57:41-48). In this paper, we also compare the action currents obtained by the technique with the step-protocol currents obtained during standard voltage-clamp experiments. Individual Ca channels were measured in 10 mM Ca/1 Ba and 10 mM Ba. To describe part of our results, we use the nomenclature introduced by Hess, P., J. B. Lansman, and R. W. Tsien (1984. Nature (Lond.). 311:538-544). With Ba as the charge carrier, Ca channel kinetics convert rapidly from long to short open times as the patch voltage changes from 20 to -20 mV. This voltage-dependent conversion occurs during action potentials and in step-protocol experiments. With Ca as the charge carrier, the currents are brief at all voltages, and it is difficult to define either the number of channels in the patch or the conductance of the individual channels. Occasionally, however, Ca-conducting channels spontaneously convert to long-open-time kinetics (in Hess et al., 1984, notation, mode 2). When this happens, which is about once in every 100beats, there usually appears to be only one channel in the patch. In this rare configuration, the channel is open long enough to measure its conductance in 10 Ca/ 1 Ba. The value is 8-10 pS, which is about half the conductance in Ba. Because the long openings occur so infrequently with Ca as the charge carrier, they contribute negligibly to the average Ca current at any particular time during an action potential. However, the total number of Ca ions entering during these long openings may be significant when compared to the number entering by the

  18. Continuous real-time photoacoustic demodulation via field programmable gate array for dynamic imaging of zebrafish cardiac cycle.

    PubMed

    Mattison, Scott P; Shelton, Ryan L; Maxson, Ryan T; Applegate, Brian E

    2013-01-01

    A four dimensional data set of the cardiac cycle of a zebrafish embryo was acquired using postacquisition synchronization of real time photoacoustic b-scans. Utilizing an off-axis photoacoustic microscopy (OA-PAM) setup, we have expanded upon our previous work with OA-PAM to develop a system that can sustain 100 kHz line rates while demodulating the bipolar photoacoustic signal in real-time. Real-time processing was accomplished by quadrature demodulation on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) in line with the signal digitizer. Simulated data acquisition verified the system is capable of real-time processing up to a line rate of 1 MHz. Galvanometer-scanning of the excitation laser inside the focus of the ultrasonic transducer enables real data acquisition of a 200 by 200 by 200 pixel, volumetric data set across a 2 millimeter field of view at a rate of 2.5 Hz.

  19. Continuous real-time photoacoustic demodulation via field programmable gate array for dynamic imaging of zebrafish cardiac cycle.

    PubMed

    Mattison, Scott P; Shelton, Ryan L; Maxson, Ryan T; Applegate, Brian E

    2013-01-01

    A four dimensional data set of the cardiac cycle of a zebrafish embryo was acquired using postacquisition synchronization of real time photoacoustic b-scans. Utilizing an off-axis photoacoustic microscopy (OA-PAM) setup, we have expanded upon our previous work with OA-PAM to develop a system that can sustain 100 kHz line rates while demodulating the bipolar photoacoustic signal in real-time. Real-time processing was accomplished by quadrature demodulation on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) in line with the signal digitizer. Simulated data acquisition verified the system is capable of real-time processing up to a line rate of 1 MHz. Galvanometer-scanning of the excitation laser inside the focus of the ultrasonic transducer enables real data acquisition of a 200 by 200 by 200 pixel, volumetric data set across a 2 millimeter field of view at a rate of 2.5 Hz. PMID:24010007

  20. Evaluation of respiratory and cardiac motion correction schemes in dual gated PET/CT cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lamare, F. Fernandez, P.; Le Maitre, A.; Visvikis, D.; Dawood, M.; Schäfers, K. P.; Rimoldi, O. E.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Cardiac imaging suffers from both respiratory and cardiac motion. One of the proposed solutions involves double gated acquisitions. Although such an approach may lead to both respiratory and cardiac motion compensation there are issues associated with (a) the combination of data from cardiac and respiratory motion bins, and (b) poor statistical quality images as a result of using only part of the acquired data. The main objective of this work was to evaluate different schemes of combining binned data in order to identify the best strategy to reconstruct motion free cardiac images from dual gated positron emission tomography (PET) acquisitions. Methods: A digital phantom study as well as seven human studies were used in this evaluation. PET data were acquired in list mode (LM). A real-time position management system and an electrocardiogram device were used to provide the respiratory and cardiac motion triggers registered within the LM file. Acquired data were subsequently binned considering four and six cardiac gates, or the diastole only in combination with eight respiratory amplitude gates. PET images were corrected for attenuation, but no randoms nor scatter corrections were included. Reconstructed images from each of the bins considered above were subsequently used in combination with an affine or an elastic registration algorithm to derive transformation parameters allowing the combination of all acquired data in a particular position in the cardiac and respiratory cycles. Images were assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, image profile, coefficient-of-variation (COV), and relative difference of the recovered activity concentration. Results: Regardless of the considered motion compensation strategy, the nonrigid motion model performed better than the affine model, leading to higher SNR and contrast combined with a lower COV. Nevertheless, when compensating for respiration only, no statistically significant differences were

  1. Prospective-gated cardiac micro-CT imaging of free-breathing mice using carbon nanotube field emission x-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Guohua; Burk, Laurel M.; Lee, Yueh Z.; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission x-ray source technology has recently been investigated for diagnostic imaging applications because of its attractive characteristics including electronic programmability, fast switching, distributed source, and multiplexing. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the potential of this technology for high-resolution prospective-gated cardiac micro-CT imaging. Methods: A dynamic cone-beam micro-CT scanner was constructed using a rotating gantry, a stationary mouse bed, a flat-panel detector, and a sealed CNT based microfocus x-ray source. The compact single-beam CNT x-ray source was operated at 50 KVp and 2 mA anode current with 100 {mu}mx100 {mu}m effective focal spot size. Using an intravenously administered iodinated blood-pool contrast agent, prospective cardiac and respiratory-gated micro-CT images of beating mouse hearts were obtained from ten anesthetized free-breathing mice in their natural position. Four-dimensional cardiac images were also obtained by gating the image acquisition to different phases in the cardiac cycle. Results: High-resolution CT images of beating mouse hearts were obtained at 15 ms temporal resolution and 6.2 lp/mm spatial resolution at 10% of system MTF. The images were reconstructed at 76 {mu}m isotropic voxel size. The data acquisition time for two cardiac phases was 44{+-}9 min. The CT values observed within the ventricles and the ventricle wall were 455{+-}49 and 120{+-}48 HU, respectively. The entrance dose for the acquisition of a single phase of the cardiac cycle was 0.10 Gy. Conclusions: A high-resolution dynamic micro-CT scanner was developed from a compact CNT microfocus x-ray source and its feasibility for prospective-gated cardiac micro-CT imaging of free-breathing mice under their natural position was demonstrated.

  2. Cardiac Mechano-Gated Ion Channels and Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Peyronnet, Rémi; Nerbonne, Jeanne M; Kohl, Peter

    2016-01-22

    Mechanical forces will have been omnipresent since the origin of life, and living organisms have evolved mechanisms to sense, interpret, and respond to mechanical stimuli. The cardiovascular system in general, and the heart in particular, is exposed to constantly changing mechanical signals, including stretch, compression, bending, and shear. The heart adjusts its performance to the mechanical environment, modifying electrical, mechanical, metabolic, and structural properties over a range of time scales. Many of the underlying regulatory processes are encoded intracardially and are, thus, maintained even in heart transplant recipients. Although mechanosensitivity of heart rhythm has been described in the medical literature for over a century, its molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. Thanks to modern biophysical and molecular technologies, the roles of mechanical forces in cardiac biology are being explored in more detail, and detailed mechanisms of mechanotransduction have started to emerge. Mechano-gated ion channels are cardiac mechanoreceptors. They give rise to mechano-electric feedback, thought to contribute to normal function, disease development, and, potentially, therapeutic interventions. In this review, we focus on acute mechanical effects on cardiac electrophysiology, explore molecular candidates underlying observed responses, and discuss their pharmaceutical regulation. From this, we identify open research questions and highlight emerging technologies that may help in addressing them.

  3. Improving gated cardiac scanning using limited-angle reconstruction technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, K.C.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1983-02-01

    Selected phases of the cardiac cycle can be imaged by the method of gated cardiac scanning using whole body scanners. However, since there is no synchronization between the random heart beats and the CT machine, the output will have gaps in the angular coverage of each scan. The missing projections in these gaps result in artifacts in the reconstructed images. In this paper, the technique of limited-angle reconstruction is employed to fill in the missing projections to remove the artifacts. The object is transformed back and forth between the object space and the projection space, being corrected in each step by the constraints of the finite spatial extent and of the upper and lower bounds of the object in the object space, and the known projections in the projection space. It is found that by using the proposed algorithm the rms errors of the limited-angle images are reduced to a level comparable to those of the complete-angle images. The same iteration algorithm can also be used to reduce the fan beam scanning angle from 360 degree to 180 degree without sacrificing much image quality.

  4. Spatiotemporal processing of gated cardiac SPECT images using deformable mesh modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Brankov, Jovan G.; Yang Yongyi; Wernick, Miles N.

    2005-09-15

    In this paper we present a spatiotemporal processing approach, based on deformable mesh modeling, for noise reduction in gated cardiac single-photon emission computed tomography images. Because of the partial volume effect (PVE), clinical cardiac-gated perfusion images exhibit a phenomenon known as brightening--the myocardium appears to become brighter as the heart wall thickens. Although brightening is an artifact, it serves as an important diagnostic feature for assessment of wall thickening in clinical practice. Our proposed processing algorithm aims to preserve this important diagnostic feature while reducing the noise level in the images. The proposed algorithm is based on the use of a deformable mesh for modeling the cardiac motion in a gated cardiac sequence, based on which the images are processed by smoothing along space-time trajectories of object points while taking into account the PVE. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can yield significantly more-accurate results than several existing methods.

  5. Four-dimensional superconformal index reloaded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, M.

    2013-01-01

    We consider the four-dimensional N≥ 1 superconformal index and its generalization to the lens space. We discuss reductions of the latter to the three-dimensional N≥ 2 sphere partition function, the threedimensional N≥ 2 superconformal index, and the two-dimensional N≥ (2, 2) sphere partition function. We apply these reductions to a class of four-dimensional N =1 superconformal field theories dual to toric Calabi-Yau manifolds, and we find surprising connections with integrable spin chains and hyperbolic geometry. We comment on the problem of classifying infrared fixed points of four-dimensional and threedimensional supersymmetric gauge theories.

  6. The use of gated radionuclide angiography in the diagnosis of cardiac contusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fenner, J.E.; Knopp, R.; Lee, B.; dos Santos, P.A.; Wessel, R.J.; Dang, C.V.; Parks, S.N.

    1984-09-01

    No currently used diagnostic test is an accurate predictor of patients who will develop morbidity or mortality from cardiac contusion. In a prospective study we used gated cardiac radionuclide angiography to assess cardiac function in 30 patients with blunt chest trauma, and we compared the results of this test with those of other diagnostic studies for cardiac contusion to determine whether gated angiography is a more accurate predictor of serious cardiac injury. Diagnostic tests included the following: serial electrocardiograms (ECG), serial creatine phosphokinase muscle-brain isoenzyme (CPK-MB) and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzymes, gated cardiac radionuclide angiography, and technetium-99m (Tc-99m) pyrophosphate scintigraphy. Abnormal studies were present in 26 patients; 22 showed abnormalities in CPK-MB, 19 on ECG, and five on gated scan. No patient demonstrated an abnormal Tc-99m pyrophosphate scan or abnormal elevation of LDH isoenzyme. Although no diagnostic test was predictive of morbidity and mortality, CPK-MB isoenzyme was the only test to correlate with morbidity and mortality. Morbidity and mortality correlated most closely with the number of associated major injuries and the presence of hypotension or hypoxia.

  7. Cardiac and respiratory double self-gated cine MRI in the mouse at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Hiba, Bassem; Richard, Nathalie; Janier, Marc; Croisille, Pierre

    2006-03-01

    ECG-gated cardiac MRI in the mouse is hindered by many technical difficulties in ECG signal recording inside static and variable high magnetic scanner fields. The present study proposes an alternative robust method of acquiring auto-gated cardiac and respiratory cine images in mouse heart. In our approach, a motion synchronization signal is extracted from the echo peak MR signal of a non-triggered radial acquisition. This signal is then used for both cardiac and respiratory retrospective gating before cine image reconstruction. Highly asymmetric echoes were acquired to achieve the radial k-space sampling in order to avoid radial acquisition related artifacts and to increase auto-gating robustness. In vivo experiments demonstrated the feasibility and robustness of self-gated cine-MRI in the mouse heart at 7T. The signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios of the self-gated and ECG-gated images were comparable, all parameters being equal. Magn Reson Med, 2006. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:16463350

  8. Motion-compensated fully 4D reconstruction of gated cardiac sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravier, Erwan; Yang, Yongyi

    2005-03-01

    In this paper we investigate the benefits of a spatio-temporal approach for reconstruction of cardiac image sequences. We introduce a temporal prior based on motion-compensation to enforce temporal correlations along the curved trajectories that follow the cardiac motion. The image frames in a sequence are reconstructed simultaneously through maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation. We evaluated the performance of our algorithm using the 4D gated mathematical cardiac-torso (gMCAT) D1.01 phantom to simulate gated SPECT perfusion imaging with Tc-99m-sestamibi. Our experimental results show that the proposed approach could significantly improve the accuracy of reconstructed images without causing cross-frame blurring that may arise form the cardiac motion.

  9. Super integrable four-dimensional autonomous mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capel, H. W.; Sahadevan, R.; Rajakumar, S.

    2007-05-01

    A systematic investigation of the complete integrability of a fourth-order autonomous difference equation of the type w(n + 4) = w(n)F(w(n + 1), w(n + 2), w(n + 3)) is presented. We identify seven distinct families of four-dimensional mappings which are super integrable and have three (independent) integrals via a duality relation as introduced in a recent paper by Quispel, Capel and Roberts (2005 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 38 3965-80). It is observed that these seven families can be related to the four-dimensional symplectic mappings with two integrals including all the four-dimensional periodic reductions of the integrable double-discrete modified Korteweg-deVries and sine-Gordon equations treated in an earlier paper by two of us (Capel and Sahadevan 2001 Physica A 289 86-106).

  10. Dysfunctional Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-gated Ion Channels in Cardiac Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoqi; Gu, Tianxiang

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are reverse voltage-dependent, and their activation depends on the hyperpolarization of the membrane and may be directly or indirectly regulated by the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) or other signal-transduction cascades. The distribution, quantity and activation states of HCN channels differ in tissues throughout the body. Evidence exhibits that HCN channels play critical roles in the generation and conduction of the electrical impulse and the physiopathological process of some cardiac diseases. They may constitute promising drug targets in the treatment of these cardiac diseases. Pharmacological treatment targeting HCN channels is of benefit to these cardiac conditions. PMID:27556324

  11. End-expiration Respiratory Gating for a High Resolution Stationary Cardiac SPECT system

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chung; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual-respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory-cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or 8 cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (p<0.005) by 24% on average as compared to the ungated images, and led to improved perfusion uniformity across segments on polar maps for normal patients. For a patient with defect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory-cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (p<0.05) compared to EXG SPECT, and further improved defect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased noise on the

  12. End-expiration respiratory gating for a high-resolution stationary cardiac SPECT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chung; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high-resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory-cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or eight cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (p < 0.005) by 24% on average as compared to the ungated images, and led to improved perfusion uniformity across segments on polar maps for normal patients. For a patient with defect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory-cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (p < 0.05) compared to EXG-SPECT, and further improved defect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased noise on

  13. End-expiration respiratory gating for a high-resolution stationary cardiac SPECT system.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chung; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sinusas, Albert J; Liu, Chi

    2014-10-21

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high-resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory-cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or eight cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (p < 0.005) by 24% on average as compared to the ungated images, and led to improved perfusion uniformity across segments on polar maps for normal patients. For a patient with defect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory-cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (p < 0.05) compared to EXG-SPECT, and further improved defect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased noise

  14. Coupled gating between cardiac calcium release channels (ryanodine receptors).

    PubMed

    Marx, S O; Gaburjakova, J; Gaburjakova, M; Henrikson, C; Ondrias, K; Marks, A R

    2001-06-01

    Excitation-contraction coupling in heart muscle requires the activation of Ca(2+)-release channels/type 2 ryanodine receptors (RyR2s) by Ca(2+) influx. RyR2s are arranged on the sarcoplasmic reticular membrane in closely packed arrays such that their large cytoplasmic domains contact one another. We now show that multiple RyR2s can be isolated under conditions such that they remain physically coupled to one another. When these coupled channels are examined in planar lipid bilayers, multiple channels exhibit simultaneous gating, termed "coupled gating." Removal of the regulatory subunit, the FK506 binding protein (FKBP12.6), functionally but not physically uncouples multiple RyR2 channels. Coupled gating between RyR2 channels may be an important regulatory mechanism in excitation-contraction coupling as well as in other signaling pathways involving intracellular Ca(2+) release. PMID:11397781

  15. Automatic image-based cardiac and respiratory cycle synchronization and gating of image sequences.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Hari; Khamene, Ali; Yatziv, Liron; Xu, Chenyang

    2009-01-01

    We propose a novel method to detect the current state of the quasi-periodic system from image sequences which in turn will enable us to synchronize/gate the image sequences to obtain images of the organ system at similar configurations. The method uses the cumulated phase shift in the spectral domain of successive image frames as a measure of the net motion of objects in the scene. The proposed method is applicable to 2D and 3D time varying sequences and is not specific to the imaging modality. We demonstrate its effectiveness on X-Ray Angiographic and Cardiac and Liver Ultrasound sequences. Knowledge of the current (cardiac or respiratory) phase of the system, opens up the possibility for a purely image based cardiac and respiratory gating scheme for interventional and radiotherapy procedures.

  16. Comparison of gated cardiac MRI and 2D echocardiography of intracardiac neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Go, R T; O'Donnell, J K; Underwood, D A; Feiglin, D H; Salcedo, E E; Pantoja, M; MacIntyre, W J; Meaney, T F

    1985-07-01

    The gross diagnostic factors of intracardiac tumor in four patients imaged by two-dimensional echocardiography (2D echo) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were compared. Three cases had left and one had a right atrial tumor, all histologically identified as myxoma. Gated cardiac MRI depicted the size, shape, and surface characteristics of the tumors more clearly than 2D echo, because MRI provides better spatial and contrast resolution. Depiction of tumor attachment was poor to good with both techniques. Both techniques were highly accurate in localizing the tumor and displaying whether it was fixed or mobile. The global field of view provided by MRI allows better definition of tumor prolapse, secondary valvular obstruction, and cardiac chamber size. This study shows that despite its early stage of development, gated cardiac MRI provides superior image quality and is complementary to 2D echo for characterization and diagnosis of intracardiac tumor. PMID:3873848

  17. Automatic intrinsic cardiac and respiratory gating from cone-beam CT scans of the thorax region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Andreas; Sauppe, Sebastian; Lell, Michael; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We present a new algorithm that allows for raw data-based automated cardiac and respiratory intrinsic gating in cone-beam CT scans. It can be summarized in three steps: First, a median filter is applied to an initially reconstructed volume. The forward projection of this volume contains less motion information and is subtracted from the original projections. This results in new raw data that contain only moving and not static anatomy like bones, that would otherwise impede the cardiac or respiratory signal acquisition. All further steps are applied to these modified raw data. Second, the raw data are cropped to a region of interest (ROI). The ROI in the raw data is determined by the forward projection of a binary volume of interest (VOI) that includes the diaphragm for respiratory gating and most of the edge of the heart for cardiac gating. Third, the mean gray value in this ROI is calculated for every projection and the respiratory/cardiac signal is acquired using a bandpass filter. Steps two and three are carried out simultaneously for 64 or 1440 overlapping VOI inside the body for the respiratory or cardiac signal respectively. The signals acquired from each ROI are compared and the most consistent one is chosen as the desired cardiac or respiratory motion signal. Consistency is assessed by the standard deviation of the time between two maxima. The robustness and efficiency of the method is evaluated using simulated and measured patient data by computing the standard deviation of the mean signal difference between the ground truth and the intrinsic signal.

  18. Ryanodine receptor gating controls generation of diastolic calcium waves in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Petrovič, Pavol; Valent, Ivan; Cocherová, Elena; Pavelková, Jana; Zahradníková, Alexandra

    2015-06-01

    The role of cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR) gating in the initiation and propagation of calcium waves was investigated using a mathematical model comprising a stochastic description of RyR gating and a deterministic description of calcium diffusion and sequestration. We used a one-dimensional array of equidistantly spaced RyR clusters, representing the confocal scanning line, to simulate the formation of calcium sparks. Our model provided an excellent description of the calcium dependence of the frequency of diastolic calcium sparks and of the increased tendency for the production of calcium waves after a decrease in cytosolic calcium buffering. We developed a hypothesis relating changes in the propensity to form calcium waves to changes of RyR gating and tested it by simulation. With a realistic RyR gating model, increased ability of RyR to be activated by Ca2+ strongly increased the propensity for generation of calcium waves at low (0.05-0.1-µM) calcium concentrations but only slightly at high (0.2-0.4-µM) calcium concentrations. Changes in RyR gating altered calcium wave formation by changing the calcium sensitivity of spontaneous calcium spark activation and/or the average number of open RyRs in spontaneous calcium sparks. Gating changes that did not affect RyR activation by Ca2+ had only a weak effect on the propensity to form calcium waves, even if they strongly increased calcium spark frequency. Calcium waves induced by modulating the properties of the RyR activation site could be suppressed by inhibiting the spontaneous opening of the RyR. These data can explain the increased tendency for production of calcium waves under conditions when RyR gating is altered in cardiac diseases.

  19. A multi-resolution approach to retrospectively-gated cardiac micro-CT reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. P.; Johnson, G. A.; Badea, C. T.

    2014-03-01

    In preclinical research, micro-CT is commonly used to provide anatomical information; however, there is significant interest in using this technology to obtain functional information in cardiac studies. The fastest acquisition in 4D cardiac micro-CT imaging is achieved via retrospective gating, resulting in irregular angular projections after binning the projections into phases of the cardiac cycle. Under these conditions, analytical reconstruction algorithms, such as filtered back projection, suffer from streaking artifacts. Here, we propose a novel, multi-resolution, iterative reconstruction algorithm inspired by robust principal component analysis which prevents the introduction of streaking artifacts, while attempting to recover the highest temporal resolution supported by the projection data. The algorithm achieves these results through a unique combination of the split Bregman method and joint bilateral filtration. We illustrate the algorithm's performance using a contrast-enhanced, 2D slice through the MOBY mouse phantom and realistic projection acquisition and reconstruction parameters. Our results indicate that the algorithm is robust to under sampling levels of only 34 projections per cardiac phase and, therefore, has high potential in reducing both acquisition times and radiation dose. Another potential advantage of the multi-resolution scheme is the natural division of the reconstruction problem into a large number of independent sub-problems which can be solved in parallel. In future work, we will investigate the performance of this algorithm with retrospectively-gated, cardiac micro-CT data.

  20. Carbon tube electrodes for electrocardiography-gated cardiac multimodality imaging in mice.

    PubMed

    Choquet, Philippe; Goetz, Christian; Aubertin, Gaelle; Hubele, Fabrice; Sannié, Sébastien; Constantinesco, André

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a simple design of noninvasive carbon tube electrodes that facilitates electrocardiography (ECG) in mice during cardiac multimodality preclinical imaging. Both forepaws and the left hindpaw, covered by conductive gel, of mice were placed into the openings of small carbon tubes. Cardiac ECG-gated single-photon emission CT, X-ray CT, and MRI were tested (n = 60) in 20 mice. For all applications, electrodes were used in a warmed multimodality imaging cell. A heart rate of 563 ± 48 bpm was recorded from anesthetized mice regardless of the imaging technique used, with acquisition times ranging from 1 to 2 h.

  1. Cardiac findings on non-gated chest computed tomography: A clinical and pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Kanza, Rene Epunza; Allard, Christian; Berube, Michel

    2016-02-01

    The use of chest computed tomography (CT) as an imaging test for the evaluation of thoracic pathology has significantly increased during the last four decades. Although cardiopulmonary diseases often overlap in their clinical manifestation, radiologists tend to overlook the heart while interpreting routine chest CT. Recent advances in CT technology have led to significant reduction of heart motion artefacts and now allow for the identification of several cardiac findings on chest CT even without electrocardiogram (ECG) gating. These observations range from simple curiosity to both benign and malignant discoveries, to life-threatening discoveries. We here present a clinical and radiologic review of common and less common cardiac findings discovered on non-gated chest CT in order to draw the attention of radiologists and referring physicians to these possibilities.

  2. Cardiac findings on non-gated chest computed tomography: A clinical and pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Kanza, Rene Epunza; Allard, Christian; Berube, Michel

    2016-02-01

    The use of chest computed tomography (CT) as an imaging test for the evaluation of thoracic pathology has significantly increased during the last four decades. Although cardiopulmonary diseases often overlap in their clinical manifestation, radiologists tend to overlook the heart while interpreting routine chest CT. Recent advances in CT technology have led to significant reduction of heart motion artefacts and now allow for the identification of several cardiac findings on chest CT even without electrocardiogram (ECG) gating. These observations range from simple curiosity to both benign and malignant discoveries, to life-threatening discoveries. We here present a clinical and radiologic review of common and less common cardiac findings discovered on non-gated chest CT in order to draw the attention of radiologists and referring physicians to these possibilities. PMID:26781150

  3. Cardiac gating with a pulse oximeter for dual-energy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkumat, N. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Dhanantwari, A. C.; Williams, D. B.; Paul, N. S.; Yorkston, J.; Van Metter, R.

    2008-11-01

    The development and evaluation of a prototype cardiac gating system for double-shot dual-energy (DE) imaging is described. By acquiring both low- and high-kVp images during the resting phase of the cardiac cycle (diastole), heart misalignment between images can be reduced, thereby decreasing the magnitude of cardiac motion artifacts. For this initial implementation, a fingertip pulse oximeter was employed to measure the peripheral pulse waveform ('plethysmogram'), offering potential logistic, cost and workflow advantages compared to an electrocardiogram. A gating method was developed that accommodates temporal delays due to physiological pulse propagation, oximeter waveform processing and the imaging system (software, filter-wheel, anti-scatter Bucky-grid and flat-panel detector). Modeling the diastolic period allowed the calculation of an implemented delay, timp, required to trigger correctly during diastole at any patient heart rate (HR). The model suggests a triggering scheme characterized by two HR regimes, separated by a threshold, HRthresh. For rates at or below HRthresh, sufficient time exists to expose on the same heartbeat as the plethysmogram pulse [timp(HR) = 0]. Above HRthresh, a characteristic timp(HR) delays exposure to the subsequent heartbeat, accounting for all fixed and variable system delays. Performance was evaluated in terms of accuracy and precision of diastole-trigger coincidence and quantitative evaluation of artifact severity in gated and ungated DE images. Initial implementation indicated 85% accuracy in diastole-trigger coincidence. Through the identification of an improved HR estimation method (modified temporal smoothing of the oximeter waveform), trigger accuracy of 100% could be achieved with improved precision. To quantify the effect of the gating system on DE image quality, human observer tests were conducted to measure the magnitude of cardiac artifact under conditions of successful and unsuccessful diastolic gating. Six observers

  4. String breaking in four dimensional lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.; Eichten, E.; Thacker, H.

    2001-06-01

    Virtual quark pair screening leads to breaking of the string between fundamental representation quarks in QCD. For unquenched four dimensional lattice QCD, this (so far elusive) phenomenon is studied using the recently developed truncated determinant algorithm (TDA). The dynamical configurations were generated on a 650 MHz PC. Quark eigenmodes up to 420 MeV are included exactly in these TDA studies performed at low quark mass on large coarse [but O(a{sup 2}) improved] lattices. A study of Wilson line correlators in Coulomb gauge extracted from an ensemble of 1000 two-flavor dynamical configurations reveals evidence for flattening of the string tension at distances R{approx}>1 fm.

  5. On four dimensional N = 3 superconformal theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharony, Ofer; Evtikhiev, Mikhail

    2016-04-01

    In this note we study four dimensional theories with N = 3 superconformal symmetry, that do not also have N = 4 supersymmetry. No examples of such theories are known, but their existence is also not ruled out. We analyze several properties that such theories must have. We show that their conformal anomalies obey a = c. Using the N = 3 superconformal algebra, we show that they do not have any exactly marginal deformations preserving N = 3 supersymmetry, or global symmetries (except for their R-symmetries). Finally, we analyze the possible dimensions of chiral operators labeling their moduli space.

  6. Propranolol Blocks Cardiac and Neuronal Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dao W.; Mistry, Akshitkumar M.; Kahlig, Kristopher M.; Kearney, Jennifer A.; Xiang, Jizhou; George, Alfred L.

    2010-01-01

    Propranolol is a widely used, non-selective β-adrenergic receptor antagonist with proven efficacy in treating cardiovascular disorders and in the prevention of migraine headaches. At plasma concentrations exceeding those required for β-adrenergic receptor inhibition, propranolol also exhibits anti-arrhythmic (“membrane stabilizing”) effects that are not fully explained by β-blockade. Previous in vitro studies suggested that propranolol may have local anesthetic effects. We directly tested the effects of propranolol on heterologously expressed recombinant human cardiac (NaV1.5) and brain (NaV1.1, NaV1.2, NaV1.3) sodium channels using whole-cell patch-clamp recording. We found that block was not stereospecific as we observed approximately equal IC50 values for tonic and use-dependent block by R-(+) and S-(−) propranolol (tonic block: R: 21.4 μM vs S: 23.6 μM; use-dependent block: R: 2.7 μM vs S: 2.6 μM). Metoprolol and nadolol did not block NaV1.5 indicating that sodium channel block is not a class effect of β-blockers. The biophysical effects of R-(+)-propranolol on NaV1.5 and NaV1.1 resembled that of the prototypical local anesthetic lidocaine including the requirement for a critical phenylalanine residue (F1760 in NaV1.5) in the domain 4 S6 segment. Finally, we observed that brain sodium channels exhibited less sensitivity to R-(+)-propranolol than NaV1.5 channels. Our findings establish sodium channels as targets for propranolol and may help explain some beneficial effects of the drug in treating cardiac arrhythmias, and may explain certain adverse central nervous system effects. PMID:21833183

  7. Pseudo‐projection–driven, self‐gated cardiac cine imaging using cartesian golden step phase encoding

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liheng; Derbyshire, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate a novel two‐dimensional self‐gated imaging technique for free‐breathing cardiac cine MRI that is free of motion‐detection overhead and requires minimal planning for motion tracking. Methods Motion along the readout direction was extracted solely from normal Cartesian imaging readouts near ky = 0. During imaging, the readouts below a certain |ky| threshold were scaled in magnitude and filtered in time to form “pseudo‐projections,” enabling projection‐based motion tracking along readout without frequently acquiring the central phase encode. A discrete golden step phase encode scheme allowed the |ky| threshold to be freely set after the scan while maintaining uniform motion sampling. Results The pseudo‐projections stream displayed sufficient spatiotemporal resolution for both cardiac and respiratory tracking, allowing retrospective reconstruction of free‐breathing non‐electrocardiogram (ECG) cines. The technique was tested on healthy subjects, and the resultant image quality, measured by blood‐myocardium boundary sharpness, myocardial mass, and single‐slice ejection fraction was found to be comparable to standard breath‐hold ECG‐gated cines. Conclusion The use of pseudo‐projections for motion tracking was found feasible for cardiorespiratory self‐gated imaging. Despite some sensitivity to flow and eddy currents, the simplicity of acquisition makes the proposed technique a valuable tool for self‐gated cardiac imaging. Magn Reson Med 76:417–429, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID

  8. Four-dimensional visualization of rising microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Je, Jung Ho; Jung, Ji Won; Pyo, Jaeyeon; Lim, Jae-Hong

    2014-11-01

    Four-dimensional imaging, which indicates imaging in three spatial dimensions as a function of time, provides useful evidence to investigate the interactions of rising bubbles. However, this has been largely unexplored for microbubbles, mostly due to problems associated with strong light scattering and shallow depth of field in optical imaging. Here, we developed tracking x-ray microtomography that is capable of visualizing rising microbubbles in four dimensions. Bubbles are tracked by moving the in-situ cell to account for their rise velocity. The sizes, shapes, time-dependent positions, and velocities of individual rising microbubbles are clearly identified, despite substantial overlaps between bubbles in the field of view. Our tracking x-ray microtomography affords opportunities for understanding bubble-bubble (or particle) interactions at microscales - important in various fields such as microfluidics, biomechanics, and floatation.

  9. Quantum teleportation of four-dimensional qudits

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Amri, M.; Evers, Joerg; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2010-08-15

    A protocol for the teleportation of arbitrary quantum states of four-dimensional qudits is presented. The qudit to be teleported is encoded in the combined state of two ensembles of atoms placed in a cavity at the sender's side. The receiver uses a similar setup, with his atoms prepared in a particular initial state. The teleportation protocol then consists of adiabatic mapping of the ensemble states onto photonic degrees of freedom, which are then directed onto a specific beam splitter and detection setup. For part of the measurement outcome, the qudit state is fully transferred to the receiver. Other detection events lead to partial teleportation or failed teleportation attempts. The interpretation of the different detection outcomes and possible ways of improving the full teleportation probability are discussed.

  10. {N}=3 four dimensional field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Etxebarria, Iñaki; Regalado, Diego

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a class of four dimensional field theories constructed by quotienting ordinary {N}=4 U(N ) SYM by particular combinations of R-symmetry and SL(2, ℤ) automorphisms. These theories appear naturally on the worldvolume of D3 branes probing terminal singularities in F-theory, where they can be thought of as non-perturbative generalizations of the O3 plane. We focus on cases preserving only 12 supercharges, where the quotient gives rise to theories with coupling fixed at a value of order one. These constructions possess an unconventional large N limit described by a non-trivial F-theory fibration with base AdS 5 × (S 5/ ℤ k ). Upon reduction on a circle the {N}=3 theories flow to well-known {N}=6 ABJM theories.

  11. A statistical method for retrospective cardiac and respiratory motion gating of interventional cardiac x-ray images

    SciTech Connect

    Panayiotou, Maria King, Andrew P.; Housden, R. James; Ma, YingLiang; Rhode, Kawal S.; Cooklin, Michael; O'Neill, Mark; Gill, Jaswinder; Rinaldi, C. Aldo

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Image-guided cardiac interventions involve the use of fluoroscopic images to guide the insertion and movement of interventional devices. Cardiorespiratory gating can be useful for 3D reconstruction from multiple x-ray views and for reducing misalignments between 3D anatomical models overlaid onto fluoroscopy. Methods: The authors propose a novel and potentially clinically useful retrospective cardiorespiratory gating technique. The principal component analysis (PCA) statistical method is used in combination with other image processing operations to make our proposed masked-PCA technique suitable for cardiorespiratory gating. Unlike many previously proposed techniques, our technique is robust to varying image-content, thus it does not require specific catheters or any other optically opaque structures to be visible. Therefore, it works without any knowledge of catheter geometry. The authors demonstrate the application of our technique for the purposes of retrospective cardiorespiratory gating of normal and very low dose x-ray fluoroscopy images. Results: For normal dose x-ray images, the algorithm was validated using 28 clinical electrophysiology x-ray fluoroscopy sequences (2168 frames), from patients who underwent radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and cardiac resynchronization therapy procedures for heart failure. The authors established end-systole, end-expiration, and end-inspiration success rates of 97.0%, 97.9%, and 97.0%, respectively. For very low dose applications, the technique was tested on ten x-ray sequences from the RFA procedures with added noise at signal to noise ratio (SNR) values of√(5)0, √(1)0, √(8), √(6), √(5), √(2), and √(1) to simulate the image quality of increasingly lower dose x-ray images. Even at the low SNR value of √(2), representing a dose reduction of more than 25 times, gating success rates of 89.1%, 88.8%, and 86.8% were established. Conclusions: The proposed

  12. Electron-conformational transformations govern the temperature dependence of the cardiac ryanodine receptor gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskvin, A. S.; Iaparov, B. I.; Ryvkin, A. M.; Solovyova, O. E.; Markhasin, V. S.

    2015-07-01

    Temperature influences many aspects of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, in particular, hypothermia increases the open probability ( P open) of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-release channels (ryanodine-sensitive RyR channels) rising the SR Ca2+ load in mammalian myocytes. However, to the best of our knowledge, no theoretical models are available for that effect. Traditional Markov chain models do not provide a reasonable molecular mechanistic insight on the origin of the temperature effects. Here in the paper we address a simple physically clear electron-conformational model to describe the RyR gating and argue that a synergetic effect of external thermal fluctuation forces (Gaussian-Markovian noise) and internal friction via the temperature stimulation/suppression of the open-close RyR tunneling probability can be considered as a main contributor to temperature effects on the RyR gating. Results of the computer modeling allowed us to successfully reproduce all the temperature effects observed for an isolated RyR gating in vitro under reducing the temperature: increase in P open and mean open time without any significant effect on mean closed

  13. Detectability of perfusion defect in five-dimensional gated-dynamic cardiac SPECT images

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Yang, Yongyi; King, Michael A.; Wernick, Miles N.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In previous work, the authors developed and demonstrated the concept of an image reconstruction procedure aimed to unify gated and dynamic nuclear cardiac imaging, which the authors have termed five-dimensional (5D) SPECT. Gated imaging permits the clinician to evaluate wall motion and, through the use of stress and rest scans, allows perfusion defects to be observed. Dynamic imaging depicts kinetics in the myocardium, which can be used to evaluate perfusion, but traditional dynamic images are motionless and do not depict wall motion. In this article, the authors investigate the degree to which perfusion defects can be detected from the dynamic information conveyed by 5D images, a problem that is particularly challenging in the absence of multiple fast camera rotations. Methods: The authors first demonstrate the usefulness of dynamic reconstructed images for perfusion detection by using linear discriminant analyses (Fisher linear discriminant analysis and principal component analysis) and a numerical channelized Hotelling observer. The authors then derive three types of discriminant metrics for characterizing the temporal kinetic information in reconstructed dynamic images for differentiating perfusion defects from normal cardiac perfusion, which are the Fisher linear discriminant map, temporal derivative map, and kinetic parametric images. Results: Results are based on the NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom with simulation of Tc99m-teboroxime as the imaging agent. The derived metric maps and quantitative contrast-to-noise ratio results demonstrate that the reconstructed dynamic images could yield higher detectability of the perfusion defect than conventional gated reconstruction while providing wall motion information simultaneously. Conclusions: The proposed metrics can be used to produce new types of visualizations, showing wall motion and perfusion information, that may potentially be useful for clinical evaluation. Since 5D imaging permits wall motion

  14. Impact of Cardiac Arrhythmia on Velocity Quantification by ECG gated Phase Contrast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Markl, Michael; Fluckiger, Jacob; Lee, Daniel C.; Ng, Jason; Goldberger, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To systematically investigate the impact of beat-to-beat variations on ECG gated multi-beat flow imaging with phase contrast (PC) MRI based on real time in-vivo TEE data in patients with known arrhythmia. Methods Real-time 2D Doppler transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) was performed in five patients with atrial fibrillation (4 male, age=64±8.7 years). TEE data provided real-time left atrial (LA) and left ventricular (LV) flow velocities in consecutive cardiac cycles with different RR-interval durations. PC-MRI acquisitions were simulated from the TEE velocity measures by constructing time-resolved k-space data for segmented sampling schemes typically used for ECG gated 2D PC MRI. Each simulation was repeated 100 times to minimize effects from data that may be weighted to a particular beat in the center of k-space. The resulting LA and LV velocities were compared to the average TEE velocities and data from individual cardiac cycles. Results Despite beat-to-beat variations velocities in TEE data, ECG gated flow imaging with MRI could reproduce persistent average LA and LV mean velocities within 7.0–7.4% compared to TEE. Conclusions PC-MRI velocity measurements in patients with varying R-R interval durations are not significantly different from time-averaged real-time velocity data for a typical segmented k-space data acquisition schemes. Though beat-to-beat variations in atrial velocities that were observed with TEE cannot be detected with ECG gated multi-beat PC MRI, it can reliably assess average flow patterns across multiple beats PMID:25978593

  15. ECG-gated emission computed tomography of the cardiac blood pool

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.L.; Murphy, P.H.; Burdine, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    ECG-gated cross-sectional images of the cardiac blood pool were produced using a specially constructed emission computed tomographic scanner. A pair of large-field-of-view cameras were mounted in opposition in a gantry that rotates 360/sup 0/ about the patient. The coordinates of each detected event, the output of a physiological synchronizer, and the position of the camera heads were input to a dedicated minicomputer which was used to produce the images. Display as a movie permitted evaluation of regional and global wall motion in cross section without the disadvantages of superimposed blood pools as obtained in nontomographic views.

  16. Gated cardiac scanning using limited-angle image reconstruction technique and information in the neighboring phases

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, K.C.; MacDonald, B.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1984-02-01

    It is known that there are gaps in scan angle in gated cardiac scanning due to lack of synchronization between heart beat and CT machine rotation. The missing projections in these gaps result in artifacts in the reconstructed images. In a previous paper an iterative limited-angle reconstruction technique was employed to fill in the missing projections to remove the artifacts. It was found there that the root-mean-square errors of the limited-angle images were reduced to a level comparable to those of reconstructions using complete-angle information. In the present paper the results are further improved by using the scans of a neighboring portion of the cardiac cycle as a first estimate of the missing scans in the phase of interest when initializing the iterations. Such a modification provides a better starting point for the iterations.

  17. FASTSPECT: A four-dimensional brain imager

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, D.D.; Barrett, H.H.; Chen, J.C. |

    1994-05-01

    The exact location of a lesion in the brain is most critical. High-resolution quantitative 4-dimensional brain imaging would offer improvement in detecting and characterizing brain lesions over state-of-the-art SPECT systems. We report the first clinical brain images on FASTSPECT (Four-dimensional Arizona Stationary SPECT), a fixed imaging system based on 24 modular 10 cm x 10 cm gamma cameras in 2 rings (13+11) about the bead. Each module views the entire brain continuously from a different perspective through one or more pinhole apertures. The system gathers true 3-dimensional whole-brain data it 1-2 frame/sec, fully adequate for vascular dynamics, and is therefore a 4-dimensional imaging system (dynamic SPECT). To calibrate the system a (3.3 mm){sup 3} point source of Tc-99m is stepped through each voxel in the object space. We measure the response of each detector element on each modular camera to the source at each position. The resulting system matrix (dimensions approximately 100,000 x 160,000) is compressed, stored and used in the iterative reconstruction algorithm. Three volunteers, blindfolded for 20 min to suppress visual cortical uptake, were imaged after bolus IV injection of 30 mCi (1.11 GBq) Tc-99m HMPAO. Dynamic images at 2 sec/frame clearly showed common and internal carotid arteries, and anterior and middle cerebral artery groups. Static images (11 million counts in 20 min imaging time) clearly showed the cerebral cortex and white matter, cerebellar cortex and white matter, thalami, caudate, lentiform nuclei, cingulate gyrus, brain stem, and brachium pontis. Distinguishable only with difficulty were putamen from globus pallidus, ventral from dorsal thalamus, and cerebrospinal fluid from white matter. Comparison with concurrent conventional single-headed SPECT images in the same subjects showed significantly better anatomic definition in the FASTSPECT images. Conventional SPECT is incapable of full-brain dynamic imaging.

  18. Investigations on the efficiency of cardiac-gated methods for the acquisition of diffusion-weighted images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Rita G.; Jezzard, Peter; Clare, Stuart

    2005-11-01

    Diffusion-weighted images are inherently very sensitive to motion. Pulsatile motion of the brain can give rise to artifactual signal attenuation leading to over-estimation of the apparent diffusion coefficients, even with snapshot echo planar imaging. Such miscalculations can result in erroneous estimates of the principal diffusion directions. Cardiac gating can be performed to confine acquisition to the quiet portion of the cycle. Although effective, this approach leads to significantly longer acquisition times. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that pulsatile motion is not significant in regions above the corpus callosum. To reduce acquisition times and improve the efficiency of whole brain cardiac-gated acquisitions, the upper slices of the brain can be imaged during systole, reserving diastole for those slices most affected by pulsatile motion. The merits and disadvantages of this optimized approach are investigated here, in comparison to a more standard gating method and to the non-gated approach.

  19. Comparison study of temporal regularization methods for fully 5D reconstruction of cardiac gated dynamic SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Yang, Yongyi; King, Michael A.

    2012-09-01

    Temporal regularization plays a critical role in cardiac gated dynamic SPECT reconstruction, of which the goal is to obtain an image sequence from a single acquisition which simultaneously shows both cardiac motion and tracer distribution change over the course of imaging (termed 5D). In our recent work, we explored two different approaches for temporal regularization of the dynamic activities in gated dynamic reconstruction without the use of fast camera rotation: one is the dynamic EM (dEM) approach which is imposed on the temporal trend of the time activity of each voxel, and the other is a B-spline modeling approach in which the time activity is regulated by a set of B-spline basis functions. In this work, we extend the B-spline approach to fully 5D reconstruction and conduct a thorough quantitative comparison with the dEM approach. In the evaluation of the reconstruction results, we apply a number of quantitative measures on two major aspects of the reconstructed dynamic images: (1) the accuracy of the reconstructed activity distribution in the myocardium and (2) the ability of the reconstructed dynamic activities to differentiate perfusion defects from normal myocardial wall uptake. These measures include the mean square error (MSE), bias-variance analysis, accuracy of time-activity curves (TAC), contrast-to-noise ratio of a defect, composite kinetic map of the left ventricle wall and perfusion defect detectability with channelized Hotelling observer. In experiments, we simulated cardiac gated imaging with the NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom and Tc99m-Teboroxime as the imaging agent, where acquisition with the equivalent of only three full camera rotations was used during the imaging period. The results show that both dEM and B-spline 5D could achieve similar overall accuracy in the myocardium in terms of MSE. However, compared to dEM 5D, the B-spline approach could achieve a more accurate reconstruction of the voxel TACs; in particular, B-spline 5D could

  20. Residual motion compensation in ECG-gated interventional cardiac vasculature reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwemmer, C.; Rohkohl, C.; Lauritsch, G.; Müller, K.; Hornegger, J.

    2013-06-01

    Three-dimensional reconstruction of cardiac vasculature from angiographic C-arm CT (rotational angiography) data is a major challenge. Motion artefacts corrupt image quality, reducing usability for diagnosis and guidance. Many state-of-the-art approaches depend on retrospective ECG-gating of projection data for image reconstruction. A trade-off has to be made regarding the size of the ECG-gating window. A large temporal window is desirable to avoid undersampling. However, residual motion will occur in a large window, causing motion artefacts. We present an algorithm to correct for residual motion. Our approach is based on a deformable 2D-2D registration between the forward projection of an initial, ECG-gated reconstruction, and the original projection data. The approach is fully automatic and does not require any complex segmentation of vasculature, or landmarks. The estimated motion is compensated for during the backprojection step of a subsequent reconstruction. We evaluated the method using the publicly available CAVAREV platform and on six human clinical datasets. We found a better visibility of structure, reduced motion artefacts, and increased sharpness of the vessels in the compensated reconstructions compared to the initial reconstructions. At the time of writing, our algorithm outperforms the leading result of the CAVAREV ranking list. For the clinical datasets, we found an average reduction of motion artefacts by 13 ± 6%. Vessel sharpness was improved by 25 ± 12% on average.

  1. General flat four-dimensional world pictures and clock systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, J. P.; Underwood, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    We explore the mathematical structure and the physical implications of a general four-dimensional symmetry framework which is consistent with the Poincare-Einstein principle of relativity for physical laws and with experiments. In particular, we discuss a four-dimensional framework in which all observers in different frames use one and the same grid of clocks. The general framework includes special relativity and a recently proposed new four-dimensional symmetry with a nonuniversal light speed as two special simple cases. The connection between the properties of light propagation and the convention concerning clock systems is also discussed, and is seen to be nonunique within the four-dimensional framework.

  2. Design of an automated algorithm for labeling cardiac blood pool in gated SPECT images of radiolabeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hebert, T.J. |; Moore, W.H.; Dhekne, R.D.; Ford, P.V.; Wendt, J.A.; Murphy, P.H.; Ting, Y.

    1996-08-01

    The design of an automated computer algorithm for labeling the cardiac blood pool within gated 3-D reconstructions of the radiolabeled red blood cells is investigated. Due to patient functional abnormalities, limited resolution, and noise, certain spatial and temporal features of the cardiac blood pool that one would anticipate finding in every study are not present in certain frames or with certain patients. The labeling of the cardiac blood pool requires an algorithm that only relies upon features present in all patients. The authors investigate the design of a fully-automated region growing algorithm for this purpose.

  3. Automated detection of the left ventricular region in gated nuclear cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Boudraa, A E; Arzi, M; Sau, J; Champier, J; Hadj-Moussa, S; Besson, J E; Sappey-Marinier, D; Itti, R; Mallet, J J

    1996-04-01

    An approach to automated outlining the left ventricular contour and its bounded area in gated isotopic ventriculography is proposed. Its purpose is to determine the ejection fraction (EF), an important parameter for measuring cardiac function. The method uses a modified version of the fuzzy C-means (MFCM) algorithm and a labeling technique. The MFCM algorithm is applied to the end diastolic (ED) frame and then the (FCM) is applied to the remaining images in a "box" of interest. The MFCM generates a number of fuzzy clusters. Each cluster is a substructure of the heart (left ventricle,...). A cluster validity index to estimate the optimum clusters number present in image data point is used. This index takes account of the homogeneity in each cluster and is connected to the geometrical property of data set. The labeling is only performed to achieve the detection process in the ED frame. Since the left ventricle (LV) cluster has the greatest area of the cardiac images sequence in ED phase, a framing operation is performed to obtain, automatically, the "box" enclosing the LV cluster. THe EF assessed in 50 patients by the proposed method and a semi-automatic one, routinely used, are presented. A good correlation between the two methods EF values is obtained (R = 0.93). The LV contour found has been judged very satisfactory by a team of trained clinicians. PMID:8626193

  4. Color intensity projections: A rapid approach for evaluating four-dimensional CT scans in treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Cover, Keith S.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Senan, Suresh . E-mail: s.senan@vumc.nl

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computerized tomography scans (4DCT) enable intrafractional motion to be determined. Because more than 1500 images can be generated with each 4DCT study, tools for efficient data visualization and evaluation are needed. We describe the use of color intensity projections (CIP) for visualizing mobility. Methods: Four-dimensional computerized tomography images of each patient slice were combined into a CIP composite image. Pixels largely unchanged over the component images appear unchanged in the CIP image. However, pixels whose intensity changes over the phases of the 4DCT appear in the CIP image as colored pixels, and the hue encodes the percentage of time the tissue was in each location. CIPs of 18 patients were used to study tumor and surrogate markers, namely the diaphragm and an abdominal marker block. Results: Color intensity projections permitted mobility of high-contrast features to be quickly visualized and measured. In three selected expiratory phases ('gating phases') that were reviewed in the sagittal plane, gating would have reduced mean tumor mobility from 6.3 {+-} 2.0 mm to 1.4 {+-} 0.5 mm. Residual tumor mobility in gating phases better correlated with residual mobility of the marker block than that of the diaphragm. Conclusion: CIPs permit immediate visualization of mobility in 4DCT images and simplify the selection of appropriate surrogates for gated radiotherapy.

  5. Three- and four-dimensional ultrasound in fetal echocardiography: an up-to-date overview.

    PubMed

    Adriaanse, B M E; van Vugt, J M G; Haak, M C

    2016-09-01

    Congenital heart diseases (CHD) are the most commonly overlooked lesions in prenatal screening programs. Real-time two-dimensional ultrasound (2DUS) is the conventionally used tool for fetal echocardiography. Although continuous improvements in the hardware and post-processing software have resulted in a good image quality even in late first trimester, 2DUS still has its limitations. Four-dimensional ultrasound with spatiotemporal image correlation (STIC) is an automated volume acquisition, recording a single three-dimensional (3D) volume throughout a complete cardiac cycle, which results in a four-dimensional (4D) volume. STIC has the potential to increase the detection rate of CHD. The aim of this study is to provide a practical overview of the possibilities and (dis)advantages of STIC. A review of literature and evaluation of the current status and clinical value of 3D/4D ultrasound in prenatal screening and diagnosis of congenital heart disease are presented.

  6. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, Robert . E-mail: robert.manzke@philips.com

    2005-10-15

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net.

  7. Vector particles tunneling from four-dimensional Schwarzschild black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ge-Rui; Zhou, Shiwei; Huang, Yong-Chang

    2015-05-01

    Vector particles' Hawking radiation from a four-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole is investigated. By applying the WKB approximation and the Hamilton-Jacobi ansatz to the Proca equation, we obtain the tunneling spectrum of vector particles and the expected Hawking temperature.

  8. Cardiac arterial spin labeling using segmented ECG-gated Look-Locker FAIR: variability and repeatability in preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Washburn, Adrienne E; Price, Anthony N; Wells, Jack A; Thomas, David L; Ordidge, Roger J; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2013-01-01

    MRI is important for the assessment of cardiac structure and function in preclinical studies of cardiac disease. Arterial spin labeling techniques can be used to measure perfusion noninvasively. In this study, an electrocardiogram-gated Look-Locker sequence with segmented k-space acquisition has been implemented to acquire single slice arterial spin labeling data sets in 15 min in the mouse heart. A data logger was introduced to improve data quality by: (1) allowing automated rejection of respiration-corrupted images, (2) providing additional prospective gating to improve consistency of acquisition timing, and (3) allowing the recombination of uncorrupted k-space lines from consecutive data sets to reduce respiration corruption. Finally, variability and repeatability of perfusion estimation within-session, between-session, between-animal, and between image rejection criteria were assessed in mice. The criterion used to reject images from the T(1) fit was shown to affect the perfusion estimation. These data showed that the between-animal coefficient of variability (24%) was greater than the between-session variability (17%) and within-session variability (11%). Furthermore, the magnitude of change in perfusion required to detect differences was 30% (within-session) and 55% (between-session) according to Bland-Altman repeatability analysis. These technique developments and repeatability statistics will provide a platform for future preclinical studies applying cardiac arterial spin labeling.

  9. Unambiguous observation of blocked states reveals altered, blocker-induced, cardiac ryanodine receptor gating

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Thomas, N. Lowri; Williams, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    The flow of ions through membrane channels is precisely regulated by gates. The architecture and function of these elements have been studied extensively, shedding light on the mechanisms underlying gating. Recent investigations have focused on ion occupancy of the channel’s selectivity filter and its ability to alter gating, with most studies involving prokaryotic K+ channels. Some studies used large quaternary ammonium blocker molecules to examine the effects of altered ionic flux on gating. However, the absence of blocking events that are visibly distinct from closing events in K+ channels makes unambiguous interpretation of data from single channel recordings difficult. In this study, the large K+ conductance of the RyR2 channel permits direct observation of blocking events as distinct subconductance states and for the first time demonstrates the differential effects of blocker molecules on channel gating. This experimental platform provides valuable insights into mechanisms of blocker-induced modulation of ion channel gating. PMID:27703263

  10. The Development and Initial Evaluation of a Realistic Simulated SPECT Dataset with Simultaneous Respiratory and Cardiac Motion for Gated Myocardial Perfusion SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a realistic simulation dataset for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac (R&C) gated SPECT/CT using the 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) Phantom and Monte Carlo simulation methods, and evaluated it for a sample application study. The 4D NCAT phantom included realistic respiratory motion and beating heart motion based on respiratory gated CT and cardiac tagged MRI data of normal human subjects. To model the respiratory motion, a set of 24 separate 3D NCAT phantoms excluding the heart was generated over a respiratory cycle. The beating heart motion was modelled separately with 48 frames per cardiac cycle for each of the 24 respiratory phases. The resultant set of 24×48 3D NCAT phantoms provides a realistic model of a normal human subject at different phases of combined R&C motions. An almost noise-free SPECT projection dataset for each of the 1,152 3D NCAT phantoms was generated using Monte Carlo simulation techniques and the radioactivity uptake distribution of 99mTc sestamibi in different organs. By grouping and summing the separate projection datasets, separate or simultaneous R&C gated acquired data with different gating schemes could be simulated. In the initial evaluation, we combined the projection datasets into no gating, 6 respiratory-gates only, 8 cardiac-gates only, and combined 6 respiratory-gates & 8 cardiac-gates projection datasets. Each dataset was reconstructed using 3D OS-EM without and with attenuation correction using the averaged and respiratory-gated attenuation maps, and the resulting reconstructed images were compared. These results were used to demonstrate the effects of R&C motions and the reduction of image artifact due to R&C motions by gating and attenuation corrections. We concluded that the realistic 4D NCAT phantom and Monte Carlo simulated SPECT projection datasets with R&C motions are powerful tools in the study of the effects of R&C motions, as well as in the development of R&C gating schemes and motion correction

  11. Computational modeling of inhibition of voltage-gated Ca channels: identification of different effects on uterine and cardiac action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Wing-Chiu; Ghouri, Iffath; Taggart, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The uterus and heart share the important physiological feature whereby contractile activation of the muscle tissue is regulated by the generation of periodic, spontaneous electrical action potentials (APs). Preterm birth arising from premature uterine contractions is a major complication of pregnancy and there remains a need to pursue avenues of research that facilitate the use of drugs, tocolytics, to limit these inappropriate contractions without deleterious actions on cardiac electrical excitation. A novel approach is to make use of mathematical models of uterine and cardiac APs, which incorporate many ionic currents contributing to the AP forms, and test the cell-specific responses to interventions. We have used three such models—of uterine smooth muscle cells (USMC), cardiac sinoatrial node cells (SAN), and ventricular cells—to investigate the relative effects of reducing two important voltage-gated Ca currents—the L-type (ICaL) and T-type (ICaT) Ca currents. Reduction of ICaL (10%) alone, or ICaT (40%) alone, blunted USMC APs with little effect on ventricular APs and only mild effects on SAN activity. Larger reductions in either current further attenuated the USMC APs but with also greater effects on SAN APs. Encouragingly, a combination of ICaL and ICaT reduction did blunt USMC APs as intended with little detriment to APs of either cardiac cell type. Subsequent overlapping maps of ICaL and ICaT inhibition profiles from each model revealed a range of combined reductions of ICaL and ICaT over which an appreciable diminution of USMC APs could be achieved with no deleterious action on cardiac SAN or ventricular APs. This novel approach illustrates the potential for computational biology to inform us of possible uterine and cardiac cell-specific mechanisms. Incorporating such computational approaches in future studies directed at designing new, or repurposing existing, tocolytics will be beneficial for establishing a desired uterine specificity of action

  12. Manual control displays for a four-dimensional landing approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverthorn, J. T.; Swaim, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Six instrument rated pilots flew a STOL fixed base simulator to study the effectiveness of three displays for a four dimensional approach. The three examined displays were a digital readout of forward position error, a digital speed command, and an analog display showing forward position error and error prediction. A flight director was used in all conditions. All test runs were for a typical four dimensional approach in moderate turbulence that included a change in commanded ground speed, a change in flight path angle, and two standard rate sixty degree turns. Use of the digital forward position error display resulted in large overshoot in the forward position error. Some type of lead (rate or prediction information) was shown to be needed. The best overall performance was obtained using the speed command display. It was demonstrated that curved approaches can be flown with relative ease.

  13. Going four-dimensional at a national laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, D.C.; Thielman, J.; Gorst, W.

    1990-10-01

    The four-dimensional principle, as explained by Horton, is founded upon the notion that our senses and mind prefer dynamic, life-like images -- we understand and enjoy pictures better than words and raw data. Whenever we convert information to graphical images, we increase the number of readers, improve our chances of being understood, and increase the impact of our document. In this paper, we discuss our efforts to engage today's audience by applying the visual approach to our communication work at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Topics include: the increasing importance of visuals, the opportunity for editors to take a lead role in design and development of the visual elements, a discussion of how we work at PNL and how our efforts to incorporate the four-dimensional concept are going, along with some examples of successes, and efforts to speed up the process and a brief summary. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Platonic solids generate their four-dimensional analogues.

    PubMed

    Dechant, Pierre Philippe

    2013-11-01

    This paper shows how regular convex 4-polytopes - the analogues of the Platonic solids in four dimensions - can be constructed from three-dimensional considerations concerning the Platonic solids alone. Via the Cartan-Dieudonné theorem, the reflective symmetries of the Platonic solids generate rotations. In a Clifford algebra framework, the space of spinors generating such three-dimensional rotations has a natural four-dimensional Euclidean structure. The spinors arising from the Platonic solids can thus in turn be interpreted as vertices in four-dimensional space, giving a simple construction of the four-dimensional polytopes 16-cell, 24-cell, the F4 root system and the 600-cell. In particular, these polytopes have `mysterious' symmetries, that are almost trivial when seen from the three-dimensional spinorial point of view. In fact, all these induced polytopes are also known to be root systems and thus generate rank-4 Coxeter groups, which can be shown to be a general property of the spinor construction. These considerations thus also apply to other root systems such as A(1)\\oplus I(2)(n) which induces I(2)(n)\\oplus I(2)(n), explaining the existence of the grand antiprism and the snub 24-cell, as well as their symmetries. These results are discussed in the wider mathematical context of Arnold's trinities and the McKay correspondence. These results are thus a novel link between the geometries of three and four dimensions, with interesting potential applications on both sides of the correspondence, to real three-dimensional systems with polyhedral symmetries such as (quasi)crystals and viruses, as well as four-dimensional geometries arising for instance in Grand Unified Theories and string and M-theory. PMID:24132220

  15. Platonic solids generate their four-dimensional analogues.

    PubMed

    Dechant, Pierre Philippe

    2013-11-01

    This paper shows how regular convex 4-polytopes - the analogues of the Platonic solids in four dimensions - can be constructed from three-dimensional considerations concerning the Platonic solids alone. Via the Cartan-Dieudonné theorem, the reflective symmetries of the Platonic solids generate rotations. In a Clifford algebra framework, the space of spinors generating such three-dimensional rotations has a natural four-dimensional Euclidean structure. The spinors arising from the Platonic solids can thus in turn be interpreted as vertices in four-dimensional space, giving a simple construction of the four-dimensional polytopes 16-cell, 24-cell, the F4 root system and the 600-cell. In particular, these polytopes have `mysterious' symmetries, that are almost trivial when seen from the three-dimensional spinorial point of view. In fact, all these induced polytopes are also known to be root systems and thus generate rank-4 Coxeter groups, which can be shown to be a general property of the spinor construction. These considerations thus also apply to other root systems such as A(1)\\oplus I(2)(n) which induces I(2)(n)\\oplus I(2)(n), explaining the existence of the grand antiprism and the snub 24-cell, as well as their symmetries. These results are discussed in the wider mathematical context of Arnold's trinities and the McKay correspondence. These results are thus a novel link between the geometries of three and four dimensions, with interesting potential applications on both sides of the correspondence, to real three-dimensional systems with polyhedral symmetries such as (quasi)crystals and viruses, as well as four-dimensional geometries arising for instance in Grand Unified Theories and string and M-theory.

  16. Finding four dimensional symplectic maps with reduced chaos: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Weishi Wan; Cary, J.R.; Shasharina, S.G.

    1998-06-01

    A method for finding integrable four-dimensional symplectic maps is outlined. The method relies on solving for parameter values at which the linear stability factors of the fixed points of the map have the values corresponding to integrability. This method is applied to accelerator lattices in order to increase dynamic aperture. Results show a increase of the dynamic aperture after correction, which implies the validity of the method.

  17. The development and initial evaluation of a realistic simulated SPECT dataset with simultaneous respiratory and cardiac motion for gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-02-01

    We developed a realistic simulation dataset for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac (R&C) gated SPECT/CT using the 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) Phantom and Monte Carlo simulation methods, and evaluated it for a sample application study. The 4D NCAT phantom included realistic respiratory motion and beating heart motion based on respiratory gated CT and cardiac tagged MRI data of normal human subjects. To model the respiratory motion, a set of 24 separate 3D NCAT phantoms excluding the heart was generated over a respiratory cycle. The beating heart motion was modeled separately with 48 frames per cardiac cycle for each of the 24 respiratory phases. The resultant set of 24  ×  48 3D NCAT phantoms provides a realistic model of a normal human subject at different phases of combined R&C motions. An almost noise-free SPECT projection dataset for each of the 1152 3D NCAT phantoms was generated using Monte Carlo simulation techniques and the radioactivity uptake distribution of 99mTc sestamibi in different organs. By grouping and summing the separate projection datasets, separate or simultaneous R&C gated acquired data with different gating schemes could be simulated. In the initial evaluation, we combined the projection datasets into ungated, 6 respiratory-gates only, 8 cardiac-gates only, and combined 6 respiratory-gates & 8 cardiac-gates projection datasets. Each dataset was reconstructed using 3D OS-EM without and with attenuation correction using the averaged and respiratory-gated attenuation maps, and the resulting reconstructed images were compared. These results were used to demonstrate the effects of R&C motions and the reduction of image artifact due to R&C motions by gating and attenuation corrections. We concluded that the realistic 4D NCAT phantom and Monte Carlo simulated SPECT projection datasets with R&C motions are powerful tools in the study of the effects of R&C motions, as well as in the development of R&C gating schemes and motion

  18. The development and initial evaluation of a realistic simulated SPECT dataset with simultaneous respiratory and cardiac motion for gated myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2015-02-21

    We developed a realistic simulation dataset for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac (R&C) gated SPECT/CT using the 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) Phantom and Monte Carlo simulation methods, and evaluated it for a sample application study. The 4D NCAT phantom included realistic respiratory motion and beating heart motion based on respiratory gated CT and cardiac tagged MRI data of normal human subjects. To model the respiratory motion, a set of 24 separate 3D NCAT phantoms excluding the heart was generated over a respiratory cycle. The beating heart motion was modeled separately with 48 frames per cardiac cycle for each of the 24 respiratory phases. The resultant set of 24  ×  48 3D NCAT phantoms provides a realistic model of a normal human subject at different phases of combined R&C motions. An almost noise-free SPECT projection dataset for each of the 1152 3D NCAT phantoms was generated using Monte Carlo simulation techniques and the radioactivity uptake distribution of (99m)Tc sestamibi in different organs. By grouping and summing the separate projection datasets, separate or simultaneous R&C gated acquired data with different gating schemes could be simulated. In the initial evaluation, we combined the projection datasets into ungated, 6 respiratory-gates only, 8 cardiac-gates only, and combined 6 respiratory-gates & 8 cardiac-gates projection datasets. Each dataset was reconstructed using 3D OS-EM without and with attenuation correction using the averaged and respiratory-gated attenuation maps, and the resulting reconstructed images were compared. These results were used to demonstrate the effects of R&C motions and the reduction of image artifact due to R&C motions by gating and attenuation corrections. We concluded that the realistic 4D NCAT phantom and Monte Carlo simulated SPECT projection datasets with R&C motions are powerful tools in the study of the effects of R&C motions, as well as in the development of R&C gating schemes and motion

  19. Objective evaluation of methods to track motion from clinical cardiac-gated tagged MRI without the use of a gold standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parages, Felipe M.; Denney, Thomas S.; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac-gated MRI is widely used for the task of measuring parameters related to heart motion. More specifically, gated tagged MRI is the preferred modality to estimate local deformation (strain) and rotational motion (twist) of myocardial tissue. Many methods have been proposed to estimate cardiac motion from gated MRI sequences. However, when dealing with clinical data, evaluation of these methods is problematic due to the absence of gold-standards for cardiac motion. To overcome that, a linear regression scheme known as regression-without-truth (RWT) was proposed in the past. RWT uses priors to model the distribution of true values, thus enabling us to assess image-analysis algorithms without knowledge of the ground-truth. Furthermore, it allows one to rank methods by means of an objective figure-of-merit γ (i.e. precision). In this work we apply RWT to compare the performance of several gated MRI motion-tracking methods (e.g. non-rigid registration, feature based, harmonic phase) at the task of estimating myocardial strain and left-ventricle (LV) twist, from a population of 18 clinical human cardiac-gated tagged MRI studies.

  20. Gated cardiac imaging using a continuously rotating CT scanner: clinical evaluation of 91 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, Y.; Uji, T.; Hirayama, T.; Inada, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Fujii, M.

    1984-05-01

    To produce electrocardiographically (ECG)-gated computed tomographic (CT) image of the heart, a post-data-acquisition ECG correlation technique was used in which data for missing angular projections are derived from the original scan data to complete 360 angular projections. Improved image quality and clinical usefulness were demonstrated compared with routine nongated CT and two-dimensional echocardiography. The equipment required for CT gating is of low cost, but the examination time is lengthy and less conveniently performed than echocardiography. However, when echocardiography is indecisive or suspected to be falsely negative, gated CT imaging of the heart is recommended.

  1. Four-dimensional characterization of a sheet-forming web

    DOEpatents

    Sari-Sarraf, Hamed; Goddard, James S.

    2003-04-22

    A method and apparatus are provided by which a sheet-forming web may be characterized in four dimensions. Light images of the web are recorded at a point adjacent the initial stage of the web, for example, near the headbox in a paperforming operation. The images are digitized, and the resulting data is processed by novel algorithms to provide a four-dimensional measurement of the web. The measurements include two-dimensional spatial information, the intensity profile of the web, and the depth profile of the web. These measurements can be used to characterize the web, predict its properties and monitor production events, and to analyze and quantify headbox flow dynamics.

  2. Five Dimensional Minimal Supergravities and Four Dimensional Complex Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, Jai; Gutowski, Jan B.; Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.; Sabra, Wafic

    2009-05-01

    We discuss the relation between solutions admitting Killing spinors of minimal supergravities in five dimensions and four dimensional complex geometries. In the ungauged case (vanishing cosmological constant {lambda} 0) the solutions are determined in terms of a hyper-Kaehler base space; in the gauged case ({lambda}<0) the complex geometry is Kaehler; in the de Sitter case ({lambda}>0) the complex geometry is hyper-Kaehler with torsion (HKT). In the latter case some details of the derivation are given. The method for constructing explicit solutions is discussed in each case.

  3. Cardiac-Gated En Face Doppler Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow Using Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography at 100,000 Axial Scans per Second

    PubMed Central

    Lee, ByungKun; Choi, WooJhon; Liu, Jonathan J.; Lu, Chen D.; Schuman, Joel S.; Wollstein, Gadi; Duker, Jay S.; Waheed, Nadia K.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To develop and demonstrate a cardiac gating method for repeatable in vivo measurement of total retinal blood flow (TRBF) in humans using en face Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) at commercially available imaging speeds. Methods. A prototype swept-source OCT system operating at 100-kHz axial scan rate was developed and interfaced with a pulse oximeter. Using the plethysmogram measured from the earlobe, Doppler OCT imaging of a 1.5- × 2-mm area at the optic disc at 1.8 volumes/s was synchronized to cardiac cycle to improve sampling of pulsatile blood flow. Postprocessing algorithms were developed to achieve fully automatic calculation of TRBF. We evaluated the repeatability of en face Doppler OCT measurement of TRBF in 10 healthy young subjects using three methods: measurement at 100 kHz with asynchronous acquisition, measurement at 100 kHz with cardiac-gated acquisition, and a control measurement using a 400-kHz instrument with asynchronous acquisition. Results. The median intrasubject coefficients of variation (COV) of the three methods were 8.0%, 4.9%, and 6.1%, respectively. All three methods correlated well, without a significant bias. Mean TRBF measured at 100 kHz with cardiac-gated acquisition was 40.5 ± 8.2 μL/min, and the range was from 26.6 to 55.8 μL/min. Conclusions. Cardiac-gated en face Doppler OCT can achieve smaller measurement variability than previously reported methods. Although further validation in older subjects and diseased subjects is required, precise measurement of TRBF using cardiac-gated en face Doppler OCT at commercially available imaging speeds should be feasible. PMID:25744974

  4. Following one's heart: cardiac rhythms gate central initiation of sympathetic reflexes.

    PubMed

    Gray, Marcus A; Rylander, Karin; Harrison, Neil A; Wallin, B Gunnar; Critchley, Hugo D

    2009-02-11

    Central nervous processing of environmental stimuli requires integration of sensory information with ongoing autonomic control of cardiovascular function. Rhythmic feedback of cardiac and baroreceptor activity contributes dynamically to homeostatic autonomic control. We examined how the processing of brief somatosensory stimuli is altered across the cardiac cycle to evoke differential changes in bodily state. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging of brain and noninvasive beat-to-beat cardiovascular monitoring, we show that stimuli presented before and during early cardiac systole elicited differential changes in neural activity within amygdala, anterior insula and pons, and engendered different effects on blood pressure. Stimulation delivered during early systole inhibited blood pressure increases. Individual differences in heart rate variability predicted magnitude of differential cardiac timing responses within periaqueductal gray, amygdala and insula. Our findings highlight integration of somatosensory and phasic baroreceptor information at cortical, limbic and brainstem levels, with relevance to mechanisms underlying pain control, hypertension and anxiety. PMID:19211888

  5. Four-dimensional maps of the human somatosensory system

    PubMed Central

    Avanzini, Pietro; Abdollahi, Rouhollah O.; Sartori, Ivana; Caruana, Fausto; Pelliccia, Veronica; Casaceli, Giuseppe; Mai, Roberto; Lo Russo, Giorgio; Rizzolatti, Giacomo; Orban, Guy A.

    2016-01-01

    A fine-grained description of the spatiotemporal dynamics of human brain activity is a major goal of neuroscientific research. Limitations in spatial and temporal resolution of available noninvasive recording and imaging techniques have hindered so far the acquisition of precise, comprehensive four-dimensional maps of human neural activity. The present study combines anatomical and functional data from intracerebral recordings of nearly 100 patients, to generate highly resolved four-dimensional maps of human cortical processing of nonpainful somatosensory stimuli. These maps indicate that the human somatosensory system devoted to the hand encompasses a widespread network covering more than 10% of the cortical surface of both hemispheres. This network includes phasic components, centered on primary somatosensory cortex and neighboring motor, premotor, and inferior parietal regions, and tonic components, centered on opercular and insular areas, and involving human parietal rostroventral area and ventral medial-superior-temporal area. The technique described opens new avenues for investigating the neural basis of all levels of cortical processing in humans. PMID:26976579

  6. Four-dimensional maps of the human somatosensory system.

    PubMed

    Avanzini, Pietro; Abdollahi, Rouhollah O; Sartori, Ivana; Caruana, Fausto; Pelliccia, Veronica; Casaceli, Giuseppe; Mai, Roberto; Lo Russo, Giorgio; Rizzolatti, Giacomo; Orban, Guy A

    2016-03-29

    A fine-grained description of the spatiotemporal dynamics of human brain activity is a major goal of neuroscientific research. Limitations in spatial and temporal resolution of available noninvasive recording and imaging techniques have hindered so far the acquisition of precise, comprehensive four-dimensional maps of human neural activity. The present study combines anatomical and functional data from intracerebral recordings of nearly 100 patients, to generate highly resolved four-dimensional maps of human cortical processing of nonpainful somatosensory stimuli. These maps indicate that the human somatosensory system devoted to the hand encompasses a widespread network covering more than 10% of the cortical surface of both hemispheres. This network includes phasic components, centered on primary somatosensory cortex and neighboring motor, premotor, and inferior parietal regions, and tonic components, centered on opercular and insular areas, and involving human parietal rostroventral area and ventral medial-superior-temporal area. The technique described opens new avenues for investigating the neural basis of all levels of cortical processing in humans. PMID:26976579

  7. Visualization of Four Dimensional Data on Virtual Globes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swick, R.; Maurer, J.; Troisi, V.; Wang, I.

    2006-12-01

    The recent proliferation of virtual globes seems to have captured the public imagination to a degree seldom seen in the Earth Sciences. Virtual globes, such as Google Earth and World Winds, do such a fantastic job of rendering geolocated imagery on a 3D Earth it would be almost criminal not to take advantage. For just the cost of creating compatible imagery the scientific community can offer data visualization capabilities with features like zoom, variable transparency, overlays, etc... But for the climate change community 3D is not enough. To show change over time one needs 4D capabilities. Using 20-30 year time series data from the National Snow and Ice Data Center this presentation explores methods for incorporating four dimensional data into virtual globes.

  8. A new method for Fourier analysis in ECG-gated cardiac blood pool emission computed tomography (ECT)

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, T.; Maeda, H.; Takeda, K.; Nakagawa, T.; Yamaguchi, N.; Konishi, T.; Ichikawa, T.

    1984-01-01

    An integrated technique for Fourier analysis in multigated blood pool ECT study has been developed. Following the administration of 15-20 mCi of Tc-99m RBC, ECG-gated cardiac blood pool data were acquired using an ECT system with dual opposed gamma cameras. Fundamental studies for data acquisition showed that acquisition time of 10 sec. for each projection, 14 divisions of one cardiac cycle and angular interval of 6/sup 0/ (60 projections over 360/sup 0/) were reasonable for clinical purpose. Total acquisition time was about 5 minutes under these conditions. Data were processed as follows: 1) Transaxial (TA) tomographic images in every phase of cardiac cycle were reconstructed by convolution algorithm; 2) TA images were rotated to construct sagittal (SAG) and short axial (S-A) oblique-angle tomography which are respectively parallel and perpendicular to the long axis of either of the ventricles; 3) Images covering the portion other than the purposed ventricle were eliminated from the series of SAG images in every phase of the cycle; 4) Images in the same phase were summed to construct a series of SAG and S-A planar images; and 5) Fourier analysis was made to construct phase and amplitude images. The advantages of this method are that the phase and amplitude images from arbitrary directions can be obtained, that the region of interest can be selected on a three dimensional basis, eliminating the overlapping activity of the other ventricle or neighbouring tissues, that the diseased areas can be easily and accurately localized even in small inferior wall myocardial infarction and that patient study can be finished within 5 minutes.

  9. Streaking artifacts reduction in four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Leng, Shuai; Zambelli, Joseph; Tolakanahalli, Ranjini; Nett, Brian; Munro, Peter; Star-Lack, Joshua; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2008-10-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) using an "on-board" x-ray imaging device integrated into a radiation therapy system has recently been made available for patient positioning, target localization, and adaptive treatment planning. One of the challenges for gantry mounted image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) systems is the slow acquisition of projections for cone-beam CT (CBCT), which makes them sensitive to any patient motion during the scans. Aiming at motion artifact reduction, four-dimensional CBCT (4D CBCT) techniques have been introduced, where a surrogate for the target's motion profile is utilized to sort the cone-beam data by respiratory phase. However, due to the limited gantry rotation speed and limited readout speed of the on-board imager, fewer than 100 projections are available for the image reconstruction at each respiratory phase. Thus, severe undersampling streaking artifacts plague 4D CBCT images. In this paper, the authors propose a simple scheme to significantly reduce the streaking artifacts. In this method, a prior image is first reconstructed using all available projections without gating, in which static structures are well reconstructed while moving objects are blurred. The undersampling streaking artifacts from static structures are estimated from this prior image volume and then can be removed from the phase images using gated reconstruction. The proposed method was validated using numerical simulations, experimental phantom data, and patient data. The fidelity of stationary and moving objects is maintained, while large gains in streak artifact reduction are observed. Using this technique one can reconstruct 4D CBCT datasets using no more projections than are acquired in a 60 s scan. At the same time, a temporal gating window as narrow as 100 ms was utilized. Compared to the conventional 4D CBCT reconstruction, streaking artifacts were reduced by 60% to 70%.

  10. Gated in vivo examination of cardiac metabolites with /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kantor, H.L.; Briggs, R.W.; Metz, K.R.; Balaban, R.S.

    1986-07-01

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (/sup 31/P NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the temporal aspects of metabolism of canine heart in vivo. An NMR catheter coil was passed through the jugular vein of a dog into the apex of the right ventricle and spectra were recorded at four points in the cardiac cycle by triggering from the blood pressure trace of the animal. The /sup 31/P spin-lattice relaxation times of phosphocreatine (PC) and the ..gamma../sup -/,..cap alpha../sup -/, and ..beta..-phosphates of ATP at 1.89 Tesla are 4.4, 1.8, 1.7, and 1.6 s, respectively. The ratio of PC to ATP is 2.0. No changes in PC/ATP were noted in any of the four portions of the cardiac cycle examined, and difference spectra exhibited no observable signals, in contrast to previously reported results for glucose-perfused rat hearts. On the assumption that intracellular pH and the total creatine pool were constant, the expression for the creatine kinase reaction was used to deduce that free ADP concentrations were invariant throughout the cardiac cycle. This is in apparent disagreement with the proposed regulatory role for ADP in heart oxidative phosphorylation.

  11. Radiation-induced cardiomyopathy as a function of radiation beam gating to the cardiac cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, David J.; Flanagan, Michael F.; Southworth, Jean B.; Hadley, Vaughn; Thibualt, Melissa Wei; Hug, Eugen B.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2004-04-01

    Portions of the heart are often unavoidably included in the primary treatment volume during thoracic radiotherapy, and radiation-induced heart disease has been observed as a treatment-related complication. Such complications have been observed in humans following radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease and treatment of the left breast for carcinoma. Recent attempts have been made to prevent re-stenosis following angioplasty procedures using external beam irradiation. These attempts were not successful, however, due to the large volume of heart included in the treatment field and subsequent cardiac morbidity. We suggest a mechanism for sparing the heart from radiation damage by synchronizing the radiation beam with the cardiac cycle and delivering radiation only when the heart is in a relatively hypoxic state. We present data from a rat model testing this hypothesis and show that radiation damage to the heart can be altered by synchronizing the radiation beam with the cardiac cycle. This technique may be useful in reducing radiation damage to the heart secondary to treatment for diseases such as Hodgkin's disease and breast cancer.

  12. Motion artifact detection in four-dimensional computed tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouilhol, G.; Ayadi, M.; Pinho, R.; Rit, S.; Sarrut, D.

    2014-03-01

    Motion artifacts appear in four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images because of suboptimal acquisition parameters or patient breathing irregularities. Frequency of motion artifacts is high and they may introduce errors in radiation therapy treatment planning. Motion artifact detection can be useful for image quality assessment and 4D reconstruction improvement but manual detection in many images is a tedious process. We propose a novel method to evaluate the quality of 4DCT images by automatic detection of motion artifacts. The method was used to evaluate the impact of the optimization of acquisition parameters on image quality at our institute. 4DCT images of 114 lung cancer patients were analyzed. Acquisitions were performed with a rotation period of 0.5 seconds and a pitch of 0.1 (74 patients) or 0.081 (40 patients). A sensitivity of 0.70 and a specificity of 0.97 were observed. End-exhale phases were less prone to motion artifacts. In phases where motion speed is high, the number of detected artifacts was systematically reduced with a pitch of 0.081 instead of 0.1 and the mean reduction was 0.79. The increase of the number of patients with no artifact detected was statistically significant for the 10%, 70% and 80% respiratory phases, indicating a substantial image quality improvement.

  13. Four-dimensional proton treatment planning for lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Engelsman, Martijn . E-mail: martijn.engelsman@maastro.nl; Rietzel, Eike; Kooy, Hanne M.

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: In proton radiotherapy, respiration-induced variations in density lead to changes in radiologic path lengths and will possibly result in geometric misses. We compared different treatment planning strategies for lung tumors that compensate for respiratory motion. Methods and Materials: Particle-specific treatment planning margins were applied to standard helical computed tomography (CT) scans as well as to 'representative' CT scans. Margins were incorporated beam specific laterally by aperture widening and longitudinally by compensator smearing. Furthermore, treatment plans using full time-resolved 4D-computed tomography data were generated. Results: Four-dimensional treatment planning guaranteed target coverage throughout a respiratory cycle. Use of a standard helical CT data set resulted in underdosing the target volume to 36% of the prescribed dose. For CT data representing average target positions, coverage can be expected but not guaranteed. In comparison to this strategy, 4D planning decreased the mean lung dose by up to 16% and the lung volume receiving 20 Gy (prescribed target dose 72 Gy) by up to 15%. Conclusion: When the three planning strategies are compared, only 4D proton treatment planning guarantees delivery of the prescribed dose throughout a respiratory cycle. Furthermore, the 4D planning approach results in equal or reduced dose to critical structures; even the ipsilateral lung is spared.

  14. Four-dimensional unsubtraction from the loop-tree duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sborlini, Germán F. R.; Driencourt-Mangin, Félix; Hernández-Pinto, Roger J.; Rodrigo, Germán

    2016-08-01

    We present a new algorithm to construct a purely four dimensional representation of higher-order perturbative corrections to physical cross-sections at next-to-leading order (NLO). The algorithm is based on the loop-tree duality (LTD), and it is implemented by introducing a suitable mapping between the external and loop momenta of the virtual scattering amplitudes, and the external momenta of the real emission corrections. In this way, the sum over degenerate infrared states is performed at integrand level and the cancellation of infrared divergences occurs locally without introducing subtraction counter-terms to deal with soft and final-state collinear singularities. The dual representation of ultraviolet counter-terms is also discussed in detail, in particular for self-energy contributions. The method is first illustrated with the scalar three-point function, before proceeding with the calculation of the physical cross-section for {γ}^{ast}to qoverline{q}(g) , and its generalisation to multi-leg processes. The extension to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) is briefly commented.

  15. Phosphatidic acid stimulates cardiac KATP channels like phosphatidylinositols, but with novel gating kinetics.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zheng; Gao, Lizhi; Wang, Wenxia

    2003-01-01

    Membrane-bound anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylinositols have the capacity to modulate ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels through a mechanism involving long-range electrostatic interaction between the lipid headgroup and channel. However, it has not yet been determined whether the multiple effects of phosphatidylinositols reported in the literature all result from this general electrostatic interaction or require a specific headgroup structure. The present study investigated whether phosphatidic acid (PA), an anionic phospholipid substantially different in structure from phosphatidylinositols, evokes effects similar to phosphatidylinositols on native K(ATP) channels of rat heart and heterogeneous Kir6.2/SUR2A channels. Channels treated with PA (0.2-1 mg/ml applied to the cytoplasmic side of the membrane) exhibited higher activity, lower sensitivity to ATP inhibition, less Mg(2+)-dependent nucleotide stimulation, and poor sulfonylurea inhibition. These effects match the spectrum of phosphatidylinositols' effects, but, in addition, PA also induced a novel pattern in gating kinetics, represented by a decreased mean open time (from 12.2 +/- 2.0 to 3.3 +/- 0.7 ms). This impact on gating kinetics clearly distinguishes PA's effects from those of phosphatidylinositols. Results indicate that multiple effects of anionic phospholipids on K(ATP) channels are related phenomena and can likely be attributed to a common mechanism, but additional specific effects due to other mechanisms may also coincide.

  16. Measurement of changes in high-energy phosphates in the cardiac cycle by using gated /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Fossel, E.T.; Morgan, H.E.; Ingwall, J.S.

    1980-06-01

    Levels of the high-energy phosphate-containing compounds, ATP and creatine phosphate, and of inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/ were measured as a function of position in the cardiac cycle. Measurements were made on isolated, perfused, working rat hearts through the use of gated /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Levels of ATP and creatine phosphate were found to vary during the cardiac cycle and were maximal at minimal aortic pressure and minimal at maximal aortic pressure. P/sub i/ varied inversely with the high-energy phosphates.

  17. Erroneous cardiac ECG-gated PET list-mode trigger events can be retrospectively identified and replaced by an offline reprocessing approach: first results in rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böning, Guido; Todica, Andrei; Vai, Alessandro; Lehner, Sebastian; Xiong, Guoming; Mille, Erik; Ilhan, Harun; la Fougère, Christian; Bartenstein, Peter; Hacker, Marcus

    2013-11-01

    The assessment of left ventricular function, wall motion and myocardial viability using electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated [18F]-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) is widely accepted in human and in preclinical small animal studies. The nonterminal and noninvasive approach permits repeated in vivo evaluations of the same animal, facilitating the assessment of temporal changes in disease or therapy response. Although well established, gated small animal PET studies can contain erroneous gating information, which may yield to blurred images and false estimation of functional parameters. In this work, we present quantitative and visual quality control (QC) methods to evaluate the accuracy of trigger events in PET list-mode and physiological data. Left ventricular functional analysis is performed to quantify the effect of gating errors on the end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes, and on the ejection fraction (EF). We aim to recover the cardiac functional parameters by the application of the commonly established heart rate filter approach using fixed ranges based on a standardized population. In addition, we propose a fully reprocessing approach which retrospectively replaces the gating information of the PET list-mode file with appropriate list-mode decoding and encoding software. The signal of a simultaneously acquired ECG is processed using standard MATLAB vector functions, which can be individually adapted to reliably detect the R-peaks. Finally, the new trigger events are inserted into the PET list-mode file. A population of 30 mice with various health statuses was analyzed and standard cardiac parameters such as mean heart rate (119 ms ± 11.8 ms) and mean heart rate variability (1.7 ms ± 3.4 ms) derived. These standard parameter ranges were taken into account in the QC methods to select a group of nine optimal gated and a group of eight sub-optimal gated [18F]-FDG PET scans of mice from our archive. From the list-mode files of the optimal gated group, we

  18. The influence of novel CT reconstruction technique and ECG-gated technique on image quality and patient dose of cardiac computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Dyakov, I; Stoinova, V; Groudeva, V; Vassileva, J

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare image quality and patient dose in cardiac computed tomography angiography (CTA) in terms of volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI vol), dose length product (DLP) and effective dose, when changing from filtered back projection (FBP) to adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR) reconstruction techniques. Further aim was to implement prospective electrocardiogram (ECG) gating for patient dose reduction. The study was performed with Aquilion ONE 320-row CT of Toshiba Medical Systems. Analysis of cardiac CT protocols was performed before and after integration of the new software. The AIDR technique showed more than 50 % reduction in CTDIvol values and 57 % in effective dose. The subjective evaluation of clinical images confirmed the adequate image quality acquired by the AIDR technique. The preliminary results indicated significant dose reduction when using prospective ECG gating by keeping the adequate diagnostic quality of clinical images. PMID:25836680

  19. Four-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Since its introduction in the 1970’s, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a standard imaging modality. With its broad and standardized application, it is firmly established in the clinical routine and an essential element in cardiovascular and abdominal imaging. In addition to sonography and computer tomography, MRI is a valuable tool for diagnosing cardiovascular and abdominal diseases, for determining disease severity, and for assessing therapeutic success. MRI techniques have improved over the last few decades, revealing not just morphologic information, but functional information about perfusion, diffusion and hemodynamics as well. Four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, a time-resolved phase contrast-MRI with three-dimensional (3D) anatomic coverage and velocity encoding along all three flow directions has been used to comprehensively assess complex cardiovascular hemodynamics in multiple regions of the body. The technique enables visualization of 3D blood flow patterns and retrospective quantification of blood flow parameters in a region of interest. Over the last few years, 4D flow MRI has been increasingly performed in the abdominal region. By applying different acceleration techniques, taking 4D flow MRI measurements has dropped to a reasonable scanning time of 8 to 12 min. These new developments have encouraged a growing number of patient studies in the literature validating the technique’s potential for enhanced evaluation of blood flow parameters within the liver’s complex vascular system. The purpose of this review article is to broaden our understanding of 4D flow MRI for the assessment of liver hemodynamics by providing insights into acquisition, data analysis, visualization and quantification. Furthermore, in this article we highlight its development, focussing on the clinical application of the technique. PMID:26755862

  20. Fast Gated EPR Imaging of the Beating Heart: Spatiotemporally-Resolved 3D Imaging of Free Radical Distribution during the Cardiac Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhiyu; Reyes, Levy A.; Johnson, David H.; Velayutham, Murugesan; Yang, Changjun; Samouilov, Alexandre; Zweier, Jay L.

    2012-01-01

    In vivo or ex vivo electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) is a powerful technique for determining the spatial distribution of free radicals and other paramagnetic species in living organs and tissues. However, applications of EPRI have been limited by long projection acquisition times and the consequent fact that rapid gated EPRI was not possible. Hence in vivo EPRI typically provided only time-averaged information. In order to achieve direct gated EPRI, a fast EPR acquisition scheme was developed to decrease EPR projection acquisition time down to 10 – 20 ms, along with corresponding software and instrumentation to achieve fast gated EPRI of the isolated beating heart with submillimeter spatial resolution in as little as 2 to 3 minutes. Reconstructed images display temporal and spatial variations of the free radical distribution, anatomical structure, and contractile function within the rat heart during the cardiac cycle. PMID:22473660

  1. Biophysical adaptation of the theory of photo-induced phase transition: model of cooperative gating of cardiac ryanodine receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskvin, A. S.; Philipiev, M. P.; Solovyova, O. E.; Markhasin, V. S.

    2005-01-01

    Theory of photo-induced phase transitions has been adapted to describe the cooperative dynamics of the lattice of ryanodine receptors/channels (RyR) in cardiac muscle which regulate the release of the intracellular activator calcium from calcium stores in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) by a process of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR). We introduce two main degrees of freedom for RyR channel, fast electronic and slow conformational ones. The RyR lattice response to the L-type channel triggering evolves due to a nucleation process with a step-by-step domino-like opening of RyR channels. Typical mode of RyR lattice functioning in a CICR process implies the fractional release with a robust termination due to the depletion of SR with a respective change in effective conformational strain. The SR overload leads to an unconventional auto-oscillation regime with a spontaneous calcium release. The model is believed to consistently describe the main features of CICR, that is its gradedness, coupled gating, irreversibility, inactivation/adaptation, and spark termination.

  2. Characterization of the driving force as a modulator of gating in cardiac ATP-sensitive K+ channels - evidence for specific elementary properties.

    PubMed

    Benz, I; Haverkampf, K; Kohlhardt, M

    1998-09-01

    Single cardiac ATP-sensitive K+ channels and, comparatively, two other members of the inwardly rectifying K+ channel family, cardiac K+(ir) and K+(ACh) channels, were studied in the inside-out recording mode in order to analyze influence and significance of the electrochemical K+ gradient for open-state kinetics of these K+ channels. The conductive state of K+(ATP) channels was defined as a function of the electrochemical K+ gradient in that increased driving force correlates with shortened open-channel lifetime. Flux coupling of gating can be largely excluded as the underlying mechanism for two reasons: (i) tauopen proved identical in 23 pS, 56 pS and 80 pS channels; (ii) K+(ATP) channel protonation by an external pH shift from 9.5 to 5.5 reduced conductance without a concomitant detectable change of tauopen. Since gating continued to operate at EK, i.e., in the absence of K+ permeation through the pore, K+ driving force cannot be causally involved in gating. Rather the driving force acts to modulate the gating process similar to Rb+ whose interference with an externally located binding site stabilizes the open state. In K+(ir) and K+(ACh) channels, the open state is essentially independent on driving force meaning that their gating apparatus does not sense the electrochemical K+ gradient. Thus, K+(ATP) channels differ in an important functional aspect which may be tentatively explained by a structural peculiarity of their gating apparatus.

  3. Energy aware path planning in complex four dimensional environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Anjan

    This dissertation addresses the problem of energy-aware path planning for small autonomous vehicles. While small autonomous vehicles can perform missions that are too risky (or infeasible) for larger vehicles, the missions are limited by the amount of energy that can be carried on board the vehicle. Path planning techniques that either minimize energy consumption or exploit energy available in the environment can thus increase range and endurance. Path planning is complicated by significant spatial (and potentially temporal) variations in the environment. While the main focus is on autonomous aircraft, this research also addresses autonomous ground vehicles. Range and endurance of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) can be greatly improved by utilizing energy from the atmosphere. Wind can be exploited to minimize energy consumption of a small UAV. But wind, like any other atmospheric component , is a space and time varying phenomenon. To effectively use wind for long range missions, both exploration and exploitation of wind is critical. This research presents a kinematics based tree algorithm which efficiently handles the four dimensional (three spatial and time) path planning problem. The Kinematic Tree algorithm provides a sequence of waypoints, airspeeds, heading and bank angle commands for each segment of the path. The planner is shown to be resolution complete and computationally efficient. Global optimality of the cost function cannot be claimed, as energy is gained from the atmosphere, making the cost function inadmissible. However the Kinematic Tree is shown to be optimal up to resolution if the cost function is admissible. Simulation results show the efficacy of this planning method for a glider in complex real wind data. Simulation results verify that the planner is able to extract energy from the atmosphere enabling long range missions. The Kinematic Tree planning framework, developed to minimize energy consumption of UAVs, is applied for path planning

  4. A Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Analysis of Multiorgan Abdominal Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, Joshua L.; Mori, Shinichiro; Sharp, Gregory C.; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Hong, Theodore S.; Chen, George T.Y.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To characterize and quantify multiorgan respiration-induced motion in the abdomen in liver and pancreatic cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography scans were acquired for 18 patients treated for abdominal tumors. Contours of multiple abdominal organs were drawn by the radiation oncologist at one respiratory phase; these contours were propagated to other respiratory phases by deformable registration. Three-dimensional organ models were generated from the resulting contours at each phase. Motions of the bounding box and center of mass were extracted and analyzed for the clinical target volume and organs at risk. Results: On average, the center of mass motion for liver clinical target volumes was 9.7 mm (SD 5 mm) in the superior-inferior direction, with a range of 3 to 18 mm; for pancreatic tumors, the average was 5 mm (SD 1 mm) m with a range of 3 to 7 mm. Abdominal organs move in unison, but with varying amplitudes. Gating near exhale (T40-T60) reduces the range of motion by a factor of {approx}10. Conclusion: We have used deformable registration to calculate the trajectories of abdominal organs in four dimensions, based on center of mass and bounding box motion metrics. Our results are compared with previously reported studies. Possible reasons for differences are discussed.

  5. Assessment of cerebellar pulsation in dogs with and without Chiari-like malformation and syringomyelia using cardiac-gated cine magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Driver, C J; Watts, V; Bunck, A C; Van Ham, L M; Volk, H A

    2013-10-01

    Canine Chiari-like malformation (CM) is characterised by herniation of part of the cerebellum through the foramen magnum. In humans with Chiari type I malformation (CM-I), abnormal pulsation of the cerebellum during the cardiac cycle has been documented and is pivotal to theories for the pathogenesis of syringomyelia (SM). In this retrospective study, cardiac-gated cine balanced fast field echo (bFEE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to assess pulsation of the brain in dogs and to objectively measure the degree of cerebellar pulsation with the neck in a flexed position. Overall, 17 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCS) with CM, including eight with SM and nine without SM, were compared with six small breed control dogs. Linear regions of interest were generated for the length of cerebellar herniation from each phase of the cardiac cycle and the degree of cerebellar pulsation was subsequently calculated. Age, bodyweight and angle of neck flexion were also compared. CKCS with CM and SM had significantly greater pulsation of the cerebellum than control dogs (P=0.003) and CKCS with CM only (P=0.031). There was no significant difference in age, bodyweight and angle of neck flexion between the three groups. Cardiac-gated cine bFEE MRI permitted the dynamic visualisation of cerebellar pulsation in dogs. These findings support the current theories regarding the pathogenesis of SM secondary to CM and further highlight the similarities between canine CM and human CM-I.

  6. An adaptive gating approach for x-ray dose reduction during cardiac interventional procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Malek, A.; Yassa, F.; Bloomer, J. )

    1994-03-01

    The increasing number of cardiac interventional procedures has resulted in a tremendous increase in the absorbed x-ray dose by radiologists as well as patients. A new method is presented for x-ray dose reduction which utilizes adaptive tube pulse-rate scheduling in pulsed fluoroscopic systems. In the proposed system, pulse-rate scheduling depends on the heart muscle activity phase determined through continuous guided segmentation of the patient's electrocardiogram (ECG). Displaying images generated at the proposed adaptive nonuniform rate is visually unacceptable; therefore, a frame-filling approach is devised to ensure a 30 frame/sec display rate. The authors adopted two approaches for the frame-filling portion of the system depending on the imaging mode used in the procedure. During cine-mode imaging (high x-ray dose), collected image frame-to-frame pixel motion is estimated using a pel-recursive algorithm followed by motion-based pixel interpolation to estimate the frames necessary to increase the rate to 30 frames/sec. The other frame-filling approach is adopted during fluoro-mode imaging (low x-ray dose), characterized by low signal-to-noise ratio images. This approach consists of simply holding the last collected frame for as many frames as necessary to maintain the real-time display rate.

  7. Four-dimensional noise reduction using the time series of medical computed tomography datasets with short interval times: a static-phantom study.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Tatsuya; Kono, Atsushi K; Tani, Wakiko; Suehiro, Erina; Negi, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Satoru; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds. This study examines the hypothesis that four-dimensional noise reduction (4DNR) with short interval times reduces noise in cardiac computed tomography (CCT) using "padding" phases. Furthermore, the capability of reducing the reduction dose in CCT using this post-processing technique was assessed. Methods. Using base and quarter radiation doses for CCT (456 and 114 mAs/rot with 120 kVp), a static phantom was scanned ten times with retrospective electrocardiogram gating, and 4DNR with short interval times (50 ms) was performed using a post-processing technique. Differences in the computed tomography (CT) attenuation, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution with modulation transfer function in each dose image obtained with and without 4DNR were assessed by conducting a Tukey-Kramer's test and non-inferiority test. Results. For the base dose, by using 4DNR, the CNR was improved from 1.18 ± 0.15 to 2.08 ± 0.20 (P = 0.001), while the CT attenuation and spatial resolution of the image of 4DNR did not were significantly inferior to those of reference image (P < 0.001). CNRs of the quarter-dose image in 4DNR also improved to 1.28 ± 0.11, and were not inferior to those of the non-4DNR images of the base dose (P < 0.001). Conclusions. 4DNR with short interval times significantly reduced noise. Furthermore, applying this method to CCT would have the potential of reducing the radiation dose by 75%, while maintaining a similar image noise level. PMID:26893966

  8. Robust principal component analysis-based four-dimensional computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hao; Cai, Jian-Feng; Shen, Zuowei; Zhao, Hongkai

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this paper for four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) is threefold. (1) A new spatiotemporal model is presented from the matrix perspective with the row dimension in space and the column dimension in time, namely the robust PCA (principal component analysis)-based 4D CT model. That is, instead of viewing the 4D object as a temporal collection of three-dimensional (3D) images and looking for local coherence in time or space independently, we perceive it as a mixture of low-rank matrix and sparse matrix to explore the maximum temporal coherence of the spatial structure among phases. Here the low-rank matrix corresponds to the 'background' or reference state, which is stationary over time or similar in structure; the sparse matrix stands for the 'motion' or time-varying component, e.g., heart motion in cardiac imaging, which is often either approximately sparse itself or can be sparsified in the proper basis. Besides 4D CT, this robust PCA-based 4D CT model should be applicable in other imaging problems for motion reduction or/and change detection with the least amount of data, such as multi-energy CT, cardiac MRI, and hyperspectral imaging. (2) A dynamic strategy for data acquisition, i.e. a temporally spiral scheme, is proposed that can potentially maintain similar reconstruction accuracy with far fewer projections of the data. The key point of this dynamic scheme is to reduce the total number of measurements, and hence the radiation dose, by acquiring complementary data in different phases while reducing redundant measurements of the common background structure. (3) An accurate, efficient, yet simple-to-implement algorithm based on the split Bregman method is developed for solving the model problem with sparse representation in tight frames.

  9. Robust principal component analysis-based four-dimensional computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hao; Cai, Jian-Feng; Shen, Zuowei; Zhao, Hongkai

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this paper for four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) is threefold. (1) A new spatiotemporal model is presented from the matrix perspective with the row dimension in space and the column dimension in time, namely the robust PCA (principal component analysis)-based 4D CT model. That is, instead of viewing the 4D object as a temporal collection of three-dimensional (3D) images and looking for local coherence in time or space independently, we perceive it as a mixture of low-rank matrix and sparse matrix to explore the maximum temporal coherence of the spatial structure among phases. Here the low-rank matrix corresponds to the 'background' or reference state, which is stationary over time or similar in structure; the sparse matrix stands for the 'motion' or time-varying component, e.g., heart motion in cardiac imaging, which is often either approximately sparse itself or can be sparsified in the proper basis. Besides 4D CT, this robust PCA-based 4D CT model should be applicable in other imaging problems for motion reduction or/and change detection with the least amount of data, such as multi-energy CT, cardiac MRI, and hyperspectral imaging. (2) A dynamic strategy for data acquisition, i.e. a temporally spiral scheme, is proposed that can potentially maintain similar reconstruction accuracy with far fewer projections of the data. The key point of this dynamic scheme is to reduce the total number of measurements, and hence the radiation dose, by acquiring complementary data in different phases while reducing redundant measurements of the common background structure. (3) An accurate, efficient, yet simple-to-implement algorithm based on the split Bregman method is developed for solving the model problem with sparse representation in tight frames. PMID:21540490

  10. Feasibility of four-dimensional conformal planning for robotic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Schlaefer, A.; Fisseler, J.; Dieterich, S.; Shiomi, H.; Cleary, K.; Schweikard, A.

    2005-12-15

    Organ motion can have a severe impact on the dose delivered by radiation therapy, and different procedures have been developed to address its effects. Conventional techniques include breath hold methods and gating. A different approach is the compensation for target motion by moving the treatment beams synchronously. Practical results have been reported for robot based radiosurgery, where a linear accelerator mounted on a robotic arm delivers the dose. However, not all organs move in the same way, which results in a relative motion of the beams with respect to the body and the tissues in the proximity of the tumor. This relative motion can severely effect the dose delivered to critical structures. We propose a method to incorporate motion in the treatment planning for robotic radiosurgery to avoid potential overdosing of organs surrounding the target. The method takes into account the motion of all considered volumes, which is discretized for dose calculations. Similarly, the beam motion is taken into account and the aggregated dose coefficient over all discrete steps is used for planning. We simulated the treatment of a moving target with three different planning methods. First, we computed beam weights based on a 3D planning situation and simulated treatment with organ motion and the beams moving synchronously to the target. Second, beam weights were computed by the 4D planning method incorporating the organ and beam motion and treatment was simulated for beams moving synchronously to the target. Third, the beam weights were determined by the 4D planning method with the beams fixed during planning and simulation. For comparison we also give results for the 3D treatment plan if there was no organ motion and when the plan is delivered by fixed beams in the presence of organ motion. The results indicate that the new 4D method is preferable and can further improve the overall conformality of motion compensated robotic radiosurgery.

  11. Accelerated and Navigator-Gated Look-Locker Imaging for Cardiac T1 Estimation (ANGIE): Development and Application to T1 Mapping of the Right Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Bhairav B.; Chen, Xiao; Bilchick, Kenneth C.; Salerno, Michael; Epstein, Frederick H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method for high-resolution cardiac T1 mapping. Methods: A new method, accelerated and navigator-gated look-locker imaging for cardiac T1 estimation (ANGIE), was developed. An adaptive acquisition algorithm that accounts for the interplay between navigator gating and undersampling patterns well-suited for compressed sensing was used to minimize scan time. Computer simulations, phantom experiments, and imaging of the left ventricle (LV) were used to optimize and evaluate ANGIE. ANGIE’s high spatial resolution was demonstrated by T1 mapping of the right ventricle (RV). Comparisons were made to modified Look-Locker imaging (MOLLI). Results: Retrospective reconstruction of fully sampled datasets demonstrated the advantages of the adaptive algorithm. For the LV, ANGIE measurements of T1 were in good agreement with MOLLI. For the RV, ANGIE achieved a spatial resolution of 1.2 × 1.2 mm2 with a scan time of 157±53 s per slice, and measured RV T1 values of 980±96 ms versus 1076±157 ms for lower-resolution MOLLI. ANGIE provided lower intrascan variation in the RV T1 estimate compared with MOLLI (P<0.05). Conclusion: ANGIE enables high-resolution cardiac T1 mapping in clinically reasonable scan times. ANGIE opens the prospect of quantitative T1 mapping of thin cardiovascular structures such as the RV wall. PMID:24515952

  12. Determination of Respiratory Motion for Distal Esophagus Cancer Using Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Yaremko, Brian P.; Guerrero, Thomas M. McAleer, Mary F.; Bucci, M. Kara; Noyola-Martinez, Josue M.S.; Nguyen, Linda T. C.; Balter, Peter A.; Guerra, Rudy; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the motion characteristics of distal esophagus cancer primary tumors using four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT). Methods and Materials: Thirty-one consecutive patients treated for esophagus cancer who received respiratory-gated 4D CT imaging for treatment planning were selected. Deformable image registration was used to map the full expiratory motion gross tumor volume (GTV) to the full-inspiratory CT image, allowing quantitative assessment of each voxel's displacement. These displacements were correlated with patient tumor and respiratory characteristics. Results: The mean (SE) tidal volume was 608 (73) mL. The mean GTV volume was 64.3 (10.7) mL on expiration and 64.1 (10.7) mL on inspiration (no significant difference). The mean tumor motion in the x-direction was 0.13 (0.006) cm (average of absolute values), in the y-direction 0.23 (0.01) cm (anteriorly), and in the z-direction 0.71 (0.02) cm (inferiorly). Tumor motion correlated with tidal volume. Comparison of tumor motion above vs. below the diaphragm was significant for the average net displacement (p = 0.014), motion below the diaphragm was greater than above. From the cumulative distribution 95% of the tumors moved less than 0.80 cm radially and 1.75 cm inferiorly. Conclusions: Primary esophagus tumor motion was evaluated with 4D CT. According to the results of this study, when 4D CT is not available, a radial margin of 0.8 cm and axial margin of {+-}1.8 cm would provide tumor motion coverage for 95% of the cases in our study population.

  13. A Four-Dimensional CT-Based Evaluation of Techniques for Gastric Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Geld, Ylanga G. van; Senan, Suresh; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.; Slotman, Ben J.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate three-dimensional conformal (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated (IMRT) and respiration-gated radiotherapy (RGRT) techniques for gastric irradiation for target coverage and minimization of renal doses. All techniques were four-dimensional (4D)-CT based, incorporating the intrafractional mobility of the target volume and organs at risk (OAR). Methods and Materials: The stomach, duodenal C-loop, and OAR (kidneys, liver, and heart) were contoured in all 10 phases of planning 4D-CT scans for five patients who underwent abdominal radiotherapy. Planning target volumes (PTVs) encompassing all positions of the stomach (PTV{sub allphases}) were generated. Three respiratory phases for RGRT in inspiration and expiration were identified, and corresponding PTV{sub inspiration} and PTV{sub expiration} and OAR volumes were created. Landmark-based fields recommended for the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 99-04 study protocol were simulated to assess PTV coverage. IMRT and 3D-CRT planning with and without additional RGRT planning were performed for all PTVs, and corresponding dose volume histograms were analyzed. Results: Use of landmark-based fields did not result in full geometric coverage of the PTV{sub allphases} in any patient. IMRT significantly reduced mean renal doses compared with 3D-CRT (15.0 Gy {+-} 0.9 Gy vs. 20.1 Gy {+-} 9.3 Gy and 16.6 Gy {+-} 1.5 Gy vs. 32.6 Gy {+-} 7.1 Gy for the left and right kidneys, respectively; p = 0.04). No significant increase in renal sparing was seen when adding RGRT to either 3D-CRT or IMRT. Tolerance doses to the other OAR were not exceeded. Conclusions: Individualized field margins are essential for gastric irradiation. IMRT plans significantly reduce renal doses, but the benefits of RGRT in gastric irradiation appear to be limited.

  14. Image-based view-angle independent cardiorespiratory motion gating and coronary sinus catheter tracking for x-ray-guided cardiac electrophysiology procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panayiotou, Maria; Rhode, Kawal S.; King, Andrew P.; Ma, Yingliang; Cooklin, Michael; O'Neill, Mark; Gill, Jaswinder; Rinaldi, C. A.; Housden, R. James

    2015-10-01

    Determination of the cardiorespiratory phase of the heart has numerous applications during cardiac imaging. In this article we propose a novel view-angle independent near-real time cardiorespiratory motion gating and coronary sinus (CS) catheter tracking technique for x-ray fluoroscopy images that are used to guide cardiac electrophysiology procedures. The method is based on learning CS catheter motion using principal component analysis and then applying the derived motion model to unseen images taken at arbitrary projections, using the epipolar constraint. This method is also able to track the CS catheter throughout the x-ray images in any arbitrary subsequent view. We also demonstrate the clinical application of our model on rotational angiography sequences. We validated our technique in normal and very low dose phantom and clinical datasets. For the normal dose clinical images we established average systole, end-expiration and end-inspiration gating success rates of 100%, 85.7%, and 92.3%, respectively. For very low dose applications, the technique was able to track the CS catheter with median errors not exceeding 1 mm for all tracked electrodes. Average gating success rates of 80.3%, 71.4%, and 69.2% were established for the application of the technique on clinical datasets, even with a dose reduction of more than 10 times. In rotational sequences at normal dose, CS tracking median errors were within 1.2 mm for all electrodes, and the gating success rate was 100%, for view angles from RAO 90° to LAO 90°. This view-angle independent technique can extract clinically useful cardiorespiratory motion information using x-ray doses significantly lower than those currently used in clinical practice.

  15. Validation of four-dimensional ultrasound for targeting in minimally-invasive beating-heart surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Danielle F.; Wiles, Andrew D.; Moore, John; Wedlake, Chris; Gobbi, David G.; Peters, Terry M.

    2009-02-01

    Ultrasound is garnering significant interest as an imaging modality for surgical guidance, due to its affordability, real-time temporal resolution and ease of integration into the operating room. Minimally-invasive intracardiac surgery performed on the beating-heart prevents direct vision of the surgical target, and procedures such as mitral valve replacement and atrial septal defect closure would benefit from intraoperative ultrasound imaging. We propose that placing 4D ultrasound within an augmented reality environment, along with a patient-specific cardiac model and virtual representations of tracked surgical tools, will create a visually intuitive platform with sufficient image information to safely and accurately repair tissue within the beating heart. However, the quality of the imaging parameters, spatial calibration, temporal calibration and ECG-gating must be well characterized before any 4D ultrasound system can be used clinically to guide the treatment of moving structures. In this paper, we describe a comprehensive accuracy assessment framework that can be used to evaluate the performance of 4D ultrasound systems while imaging moving targets. We image a dynamic phantom that is comprised of a simple robot and a tracked phantom to which point-source, distance and spherical objects of known construction can be attached. We also follow our protocol to evaluate 4D ultrasound images generated in real-time by reconstructing ECG-gated 2D ultrasound images acquired from a tracked multiplanar transesophageal probe. Likewise, our evaluation framework allows any type of 4D ultrasound to be quantitatively assessed.

  16. Free-Breathing 3D Imaging of Right Ventricular Structure and Function Using Respiratory and Cardiac Self-Gated Cine MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanchun; Liu, Jing; Weinsaft, Jonathan; Spincemaille, Pascal; Nguyen, Thanh D.; Prince, Martin R.; Bao, Shanglian; Xie, Yaoqin; Wang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Providing a movie of the beating heart in a single prescribed plane, cine MRI has been widely used in clinical cardiac diagnosis, especially in the left ventricle (LV). Right ventricular (RV) morphology and function are also important for the diagnosis of cardiopulmonary diseases and serve as predictors for the long term outcome. The purpose of this study is to develop a self-gated free-breathing 3D imaging method for RV quantification and to evaluate its performance by comparing it with breath-hold 2D cine imaging in 7 healthy volunteers. Compared with 2D, the 3D RV functional measurements show a reduction of RV end-diastole volume (RVEDV) by 10%, increase of RV end-systole volume (RVESV) by 1.8%, reduction of RV systole volume (RVSV) by 21%, and reduction of RV ejection fraction (RVEF) by 12%. High correlations between the two techniques were found (RVEDV: 0.94; RVESV: 0.85; RVSV: 0.95; and RVEF: 0.89). Compared with 2D, the 3D image quality measurements show a small reduction in blood SNR, myocardium-blood CNR, myocardium contrast, and image sharpness. In conclusion, the proposed self-gated free-breathing 3D cardiac cine imaging technique provides comparable image quality and correlated functional measurements to those acquired with the multiple breath-hold 2D technique in RV. PMID:26185764

  17. Improving the Horizontal Transport in the Lower Troposphere with Four Dimensional Data Assimilation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The physical processes involved in air quality modeling are governed by dynamically-generated meteorological model fields. This research focuses on reducing the uncertainty in the horizontal transport in the lower troposphere by improving the four dimensional data assimilation (F...

  18. Construction of a Class of Four-Dimensional Piecewise Affine Systems with Homoclinic Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tiantian; Yang, Xiao-Song

    2016-06-01

    Based on mathematical analysis, this paper provides a methodology to ensure the existence of homoclinic orbits in a class of four-dimensional piecewise affine systems. In addition, an example is provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the method.

  19. Thallium 201 imaging and gated cardiac blood pool scans in patients with ischemic and idiopathic congestive cardiomyopathy. A clinical and pathologic study.

    PubMed

    Bulkley, B H; Hutchins, G M; Bailey, I; Strauss, H W; Pitt, B

    1977-05-01

    In ischemic cardiomyopathy (CM) fibrosis replaces large segments of myocardium, but in idiopathic congestive CM the myocardium contains only small foci of fibrosis or is morphologically normal. As coronary disease and myocardial infarction may be clinically silent, it is not always possible to distinguish ischemic from idiopathic congestive CM during life without cardiac catheterization. To determine whether noninvasive methods, thallium 201 myocardial (Tl) imaging and technetium 99m gated cardiac blood pool scans (GCBPS), could separate the entities, we evaluated radioisotope images of the heart in 13 patients with ischemic, and eight patients with idiopathic congestive CM, and 14 patients with normal hearts. Diagnosis was setablished by cardiac catherterization and/or autopsy in each of the 35 patients. The 14 normals could be readily distinguished from CM, and ischemic could be distinguished from idiopathic dilated CM in 20 of 21 patients. All patients with myocardiopathy showed hypokinetic and dilated left ventricles, but right ventricular dilatation was evident mainly in those with idiopathic CM. Tl images in the ischemic type had defects of greater than 40% of image circumference which corresponded to segmental wall motion abnormalities on GCBPS, whereas those with the idiopathic congestive form were homogeneous or had defects of less than 20% of image circumference. Autopsy studies in 7 of 35 patients correlated Tl defects of greater than 20% of circumference with transmural myocardial fibrosis. PMID:557377

  20. High-frame rate four dimensional optoacoustic tomography enables visualization of cardiovascular dynamics and mouse heart perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís; Ford, Steven James; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Functional imaging of mouse models of cardiac health and disease provides a major contribution to our fundamental understanding of the mammalian heart. However, imaging murine hearts presents significant challenges due to their small size and rapid heart rate. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of high-frame-rate, noninvasive optoacoustic imaging of the murine heart. The temporal resolution of 50 three-dimensional frames per second provides functional information at important phases of the cardiac cycle without the use of gating or other motion-reduction methods. Differentiation of the blood oxygenation state in the heart chambers was enabled by exploiting the wavelength dependence of optoacoustic signals. Real-time volumetric tracking of blood perfusion in the cardiac chambers was also evaluated using indocyanine green. Taken together, the newly-discovered capacities offer a unique tool set for in-vivo structural and functional imaging of the whole heart with high spatio-temporal resolution in all three dimensions. PMID:26130401

  1. High-quality four-dimensional cone-beam CT by deforming prior images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Xuejun

    2013-01-01

    Due to a limited number of projections at each phase, severe view aliasing artifacts are present in four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) when reconstruction is performed using conventional algorithms. In this work, we aim to obtain high-quality 4D-CBCT of lung cancer patients in radiation therapy by deforming the planning CT. The deformation vector fields (DVF) to deform the planning CT are estimated through matching the forward projection of the deformed prior image and measured on-treatment CBCT projection. The estimation of the DVF is formulated as an unconstrained optimization problem, where the objective function to be minimized is the sum of the squared difference between the forward projection of the deformed planning CT and the measured 4D-CBCT projection. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the DVF. As the number of the variables in the DVF is much greater than the number of measurements, the solution to such a highly ill-posed problem is very sensitive to the initials during the optimization process. To improve the estimation accuracy of DVF, we proposed a new strategy to obtain better initials for the optimization. In this strategy, 4D-CBCT is first reconstructed by total variation minimization. Demons deformable registration is performed to register the planning CT and the 4D-CBCT reconstructed by total variation minimization. The resulted DVF from demons registration is then used as the initial parameters in the optimization process. A 4D nonuniform rotational B-spline-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom and a patient 4D-CBCT are used to evaluate the algorithm. Image quality of 4D-CBCT is substantially improved by using the proposed strategy in both NCAT phantom and patient studies. The proposed method has the potential to improve the temporal resolution of 4D-CBCT. Improved 4D-CBCT can better characterize the motion of lung tumors and will be a valuable tool for image-guided adaptive radiation therapy.

  2. Anti-addiction drug ibogaine inhibits voltage-gated ionic currents: A study to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, Xaver; Kovar, Michael; Rubi, Lena; Mike, Agnes K.; Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S.; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz; Sandtner, Walter

    2013-12-01

    The plant alkaloid ibogaine has promising anti-addictive properties. Albeit not licenced as a therapeutic drug, and despite hints that ibogaine may perturb the heart rhythm, this alkaloid is used to treat drug addicts. We have recently reported that ibogaine inhibits human ERG (hERG) potassium channels at concentrations similar to the drugs affinity for several of its known brain targets. Thereby the drug may disturb the heart's electrophysiology. Here, to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile in more detail, we studied the effects of ibogaine and its congener 18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) on various cardiac voltage-gated ion channels. We confirmed that heterologously expressed hERG currents are reduced by ibogaine in low micromolar concentrations. Moreover, at higher concentrations, the drug also reduced human Na{sub v}1.5 sodium and Ca{sub v}1.2 calcium currents. Ion currents were as well reduced by 18-MC, yet with diminished potency. Unexpectedly, although blocking hERG channels, ibogaine did not prolong the action potential (AP) in guinea pig cardiomyocytes at low micromolar concentrations. Higher concentrations (≥ 10 μM) even shortened the AP. These findings can be explained by the drug's calcium channel inhibition, which counteracts the AP-prolonging effect generated by hERG blockade. Implementation of ibogaine's inhibitory effects on human ion channels in a computer model of a ventricular cardiomyocyte, on the other hand, suggested that ibogaine does prolong the AP in the human heart. We conclude that therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine have the propensity to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram in humans. In some cases this may lead to cardiac arrhythmias. - Highlights: • We study effects of anti-addiction drug ibogaine on ionic currents in cardiomyocytes. • We assess the cardiac ion channel profile of ibogaine. • Ibogaine inhibits hERG potassium, sodium and calcium channels. • Ibogaine’s effects on ion channels are a

  3. An advisory system for predicting and resolving airspace violations based on four-dimensional guidance techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Homer Q.

    1987-01-01

    New heuristics are integrated with four-dimensional guidance techniques developed by NASA in order to automate the prediction and resolution of airspace violations, and three rules are derived to reduce the amount of computation time for conflict detection. Controller experience has been used to establish techniques for resolving potential conflicts including speed control, altitude maneuvers, and horizontal flight maneuvers. Current aircraft states, flight plans, and extrapolation of aircraft trajectories are used to synthesize four-dimensional trajectories, and the state of the air traffic and the interaction between aircraft are projected into the future using the four-dimensional algorithms. The situation is immediately updated to incorporate any new information. Potential conflicts among multiple aircraft are resolved by fast sequential resolution of potential conflicts between aircraft pairs, one at a time.

  4. Questions on universal constants and four-dimensional symmetry from a broad viewpoint. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    It is demonstrated that there is a flexibility in clock synchronizations and that four-dimensional symmetry framework can be viewed broadly. The true universality of basic constants is discussed, considering a class of measurement processes based on the velocity = distance/time interval, which always yields some number when used by an observer. The four-dimensional symmetry framework based on common time for all observers is formulated, and related processes of measuring light speed are discussed. Invariant 'action functions' for physical laws in the new four-dimensional symmetry framework with the common time are established to discuss universal constants. Truly universal constants are demonstrated, and it is shown that physics in this new framework and in special relativity are equivalent as far as one-particle systems and the S-matrix in field theories are concerned.

  5. Back Cover: Four-dimensional live imaging of hemodynamics in mammalian embryonic heart with Doppler optical coherence tomography (J. Biophotonics 8/2016).

    PubMed

    Wang, Shang; Lakomy, David S; Garcia, Monica D; Lopez, Andrew L; Larin, Kirill V; Larina, Irina V

    2016-08-01

    Detailed volumetric measurement of hemodynamics in early developing mammalian heart can provide great insights for improved understanding of normal cardiogenesis and management of congenital cardiac disease. In this study, Doppler optical coherence tomography is performed in live mouse embryo culture to obtain the first four-dimensional high-resolution reconstruction and quantitative analysis of hemodynamic features in the mouse embryonic heart. This provides a powerful approach to investigate biomechanical regulation of early mammalian cardiogenesis. Further details can be found in the article by Shang Wang et al. on pp. 837-847. PMID:27480645

  6. Experimental Measurement of the Four-Dimensional Coherence Function for an Undulator X-Ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, C. Q.; Williams, G. J.; Roberts, A.; Flewett, S.; Peele, A. G.; Paterson, D.; de Jonge, M. D.; Nugent, K. A.

    2007-06-01

    A full measurement of the four-dimensional coherence function from an undulator beam line is reported. The analysis is based on the observation that the data are consistent with a coherence function that is mathematically separable. The effective source size can be altered by changing the width of the exit slit, and the complete coherence function is presented for two settings. We find, to within experimental error, that the four-dimensional complex degree of coherence can be described as a real Gaussian function that depends only on the difference of the spatial coordinates.

  7. Chiral symmetry breaking in quenched massive strong-coupling four-dimensional QED

    SciTech Connect

    Hawes, F.T. ); Williams, A.G. )

    1995-03-15

    We present results from a study of subtractive renormalization of the fermion propagator Dyson-Schwinger equation (DSE) in massive strong-coupling quenched four-dimensional QED. The results are compared for three different fermion-photon proper vertex [ital Ansa]$[ital uml---tze]: bare [gamma][sup [mu

  8. Adding Four- Dimensional Data Assimilation (a.k.a. grid nudging) to MPAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adding four-dimensional data assimilation (a.k.a. grid nudging) to MPAS.The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is investigating the use of MPAS as the meteorological driver for its next-generation air quality model. To function as such, MPAS needs to operate in a diagnostic mod...

  9. Conceptualising Quality of School Life from Pupils' Perspectives: A Four-Dimensional Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tangen, Reidun

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a four-dimensional, dynamic model of pupils' subjective quality of school life. The model is based on the author's and colleagues' studies of experiences and perspectives of pupils in regular schools who have been assessed as having "special educational needs". The conceptualisation of quality of school life proposed here is…

  10. Permanent quark confinement in four-dimensional hierarchical lattice gauge theories of Migdal-Kadanoff type

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, K.R.

    1985-08-05

    Permanent quark confinement is established for four-dimensional hierarchical lattice gauge theories in which the Migdal-Kadanoff approximate renormalization recursion formulas hold exactly. This holds for gauge groups G = SU(N) as well as G = U(N).

  11. Integrable and superintegrable Hamiltonian systems with four dimensional real Lie algebras as symmetry of the systems

    SciTech Connect

    Abedi-Fardad, J.; Rezaei-Aghdam, A.; Haghighatdoost, Gh.

    2014-05-15

    We construct integrable and superintegrable Hamiltonian systems using the realizations of four dimensional real Lie algebras as a symmetry of the system with the phase space R{sup 4} and R{sup 6}. Furthermore, we construct some integrable and superintegrable Hamiltonian systems for which the symmetry Lie group is also the phase space of the system.

  12. The College Newspaper Press: An Analysis of Its Development Since 1968 in Four Dimensional Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, George Paul

    This dissertation analyzes four dimensional areas of the college newspaper--scope and function, legal control, business organization, and news and editorial content--from 1968 to the beginning of the 1974-75 academic year. The methodology took the form of a necessary illumination of the literature and other secondary investigation, an evaluation…

  13. Four-dimensional optical coherence tomography imaging of total liquid ventilated rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsten, Lars; Schnabel, Christian; Gaertner, Maria; Koch, Edmund

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be utilized for the spatially and temporally resolved visualization of alveolar tissue and its dynamics in rodent models, which allows the investigation of lung dynamics on the microscopic scale of single alveoli. The findings could provide experimental input data for numerical simulations of lung tissue mechanics and could support the development of protective ventilation strategies. Real four-dimensional OCT imaging permits the acquisition of several OCT stacks within one single ventilation cycle. Thus, the entire four-dimensional information is directly obtained. Compared to conventional virtual four-dimensional OCT imaging, where the image acquisition is extended over many ventilation cycles and is triggered on pressure levels, real four-dimensional OCT is less vulnerable against motion artifacts and non-reproducible movement of the lung tissue over subsequent ventilation cycles, which widely reduces image artifacts. However, OCT imaging of alveolar tissue is affected by refraction and total internal reflection at air-tissue interfaces. Thus, only the first alveolar layer beneath the pleura is visible. To circumvent this effect, total liquid ventilation can be carried out to match the refractive indices of lung tissue and the breathing medium, which improves the visibility of the alveolar structure, the image quality and the penetration depth and provides the real structure of the alveolar tissue. In this study, a combination of four-dimensional OCT imaging with total liquid ventilation allowed the visualization of the alveolar structure in rat lung tissue benefiting from the improved depth range beneath the pleura and from the high spatial and temporal resolution.

  14. Four-dimensional cone beam CT reconstruction and enhancement using a temporal nonlocal means method

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Xun; Tian Zhen; Lou Yifei; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Jiang, Steve B.

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) has been developed to provide respiratory phase-resolved volumetric imaging in image guided radiation therapy. Conventionally, it is reconstructed by first sorting the x-ray projections into multiple respiratory phase bins according to a breathing signal extracted either from the projection images or some external surrogates, and then reconstructing a 3D CBCT image in each phase bin independently using FDK algorithm. This method requires adequate number of projections for each phase, which can be achieved using a low gantry rotation or multiple gantry rotations. Inadequate number of projections in each phase bin results in low quality 4D-CBCT images with obvious streaking artifacts. 4D-CBCT images at different breathing phases share a lot of redundant information, because they represent the same anatomy captured at slightly different temporal points. Taking this redundancy along the temporal dimension into account can in principle facilitate the reconstruction in the situation of inadequate number of projection images. In this work, the authors propose two novel 4D-CBCT algorithms: an iterative reconstruction algorithm and an enhancement algorithm, utilizing a temporal nonlocal means (TNLM) method. Methods: The authors define a TNLM energy term for a given set of 4D-CBCT images. Minimization of this term favors those 4D-CBCT images such that any anatomical features at one spatial point at one phase can be found in a nearby spatial point at neighboring phases. 4D-CBCT reconstruction is achieved by minimizing a total energy containing a data fidelity term and the TNLM energy term. As for the image enhancement, 4D-CBCT images generated by the FDK algorithm are enhanced by minimizing the TNLM function while keeping the enhanced images close to the FDK results. A forward-backward splitting algorithm and a Gauss-Jacobi iteration method are employed to solve the problems. The algorithms implementation on

  15. Four dimensional magnetic resonance imaging with retrospective k-space reordering: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yilin; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cai, Jing; Chen, Nan-kuei; Chu, Mei-Lan

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Current four dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) techniques lack sufficient temporal/spatial resolution and consistent tumor contrast. To overcome these limitations, this study presents the development and initial evaluation of a new strategy for 4D-MRI which is based on retrospective k-space reordering. Methods: We simulated a k-space reordered 4D-MRI on a 4D digital extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) human phantom. A 2D echo planar imaging MRI sequence [frame rate (F) = 0.448 Hz; image resolution (R) = 256 × 256; number of k-space segments (N{sub KS}) = 4] with sequential image acquisition mode was assumed for the simulation. Image quality of the simulated “4D-MRI” acquired from the XCAT phantom was qualitatively evaluated, and tumor motion trajectories were compared to input signals. In particular, mean absolute amplitude differences (D) and cross correlation coefficients (CC) were calculated. Furthermore, to evaluate the data sufficient condition for the new 4D-MRI technique, a comprehensive simulation study was performed using 30 cancer patients’ respiratory profiles to study the relationships between data completeness (C{sub p}) and a number of impacting factors: the number of repeated scans (N{sub R}), number of slices (N{sub S}), number of respiratory phase bins (N{sub P}), N{sub KS}, F, R, and initial respiratory phase at image acquisition (P{sub 0}). As a proof-of-concept, we implemented the proposed k-space reordering 4D-MRI technique on a T2-weighted fast spin echo MR sequence and tested it on a healthy volunteer. Results: The simulated 4D-MRI acquired from the XCAT phantom matched closely to the original XCAT images. Tumor motion trajectories measured from the simulated 4D-MRI matched well with input signals (D = 0.83 and 0.83 mm, and CC = 0.998 and 0.992 in superior–inferior and anterior–posterior directions, respectively). The relationship between C{sub p} and N{sub R} was found best represented by an exponential function

  16. Rotating system for four-dimensional transverse rms-emittance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, C.; Maier, M.; Du, X. N.; Gerhard, P.; Groening, L.; Mickat, S.; Vormann, H.

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of the transverse four-dimensional beam rms parameters is essential for applications that involve lattice elements that couple the two transverse degrees of freedom (planes). Of special interest is the elimination of interplane correlations to reduce the projected emittances. A dedicated rotating system for emittance measurements (ROSE) has been proposed, developed, and successfully commissioned to fully determine the four-dimensional beam matrix. This device has been used at the high charge injector (HLI) at GSI in a beam line which is composed of a skew quadrupole triplet, a normal quadrupole doublet, and ROSE. Mathematical algorithms, measurements, and the analysis of errors and the decoupling capability for ion beams of 83Kr 13+ at 1.4 MeV /u are reported in this paper.

  17. Six-dimensional methods for four-dimensional conformal field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Steven

    2010-08-15

    The calculation of both spinor and tensor Green's functions in four-dimensional conformally-invariant field theories can be greatly simplified by six-dimensional methods. For this purpose, four-dimensional fields are constructed as projections of fields on the hypercone in six-dimensional projective space, satisfying certain transversality conditions. In this way some Green's functions in conformal field theories are shown to have structures more general than those commonly found by use of the inversion operator. These methods fit in well with the assumption of AdS/CFT duality. In particular, it is transparent that if fields on AdS{sub 5} approach finite limits on the boundary of AdS{sub 5}, then in the conformal field theory on this boundary these limits transform with conformal dimensionality zero if they are tensors (of any rank), but with conformal dimension 1/2 if they are spinors or spinor-tensors.

  18. All-versus-nothing violation of local realism by two-photon, four-dimensional entanglement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Jun; Yin, Juan; Zhao, Zhi; Zukowski, Marek; Chen, Zeng-Bing; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2005-12-01

    We develop and exploit a source of two-photon, four-dimensional entanglement to report the first two-particle all-versus-nothing test of local realism with a linear optics setup, but without resorting to a noncontextuality assumption. Our experimental results are in good agreement with quantum mechanics while in extreme contradiction to local realism. Potential applications of our experiment are briefly discussed.

  19. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-03: Four-Dimensional Dose Distribution Measurement Using Plastic Scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, M; Kozuka, T; Oguchi, M; Nishio, T; Haga, A; Hanada, T; Kabuki, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop the detector for the four-dimensional dose distribution measurement. Methods: We made the prototype detector for four-dimensional dose distribution measurement using a cylindrical plastic scintillator (5 cm diameter) and a conical reflection grass. The plastic scintillator is used as a phantom. When the plastic scintillator is irradiated, the scintillation light was emitted according to absorbed dose distribution. The conical reflection grass was arranged to surround the plastic scintillator, which project to downstream the projection images of the scintillation light. Then, the projection image was reflected to 45 degree direction by flat reflection grass, and was recorded by camcorder. By reconstructing the three-dimensional dose distribution from the projection image recorded in each frame, we could obtain the four-dimensional dose distribution. First, we tested the characteristic according to the amount of emitted light. Then we compared of the light profile and the dose profile calculated with the radiotherapy treatment planning system. Results: The dose dependency of the amount of light showed linearity. The pixel detecting smaller amount of light had high sensitivity than the pixel detecting larger amount of light. However the difference of the sensitivity could be corrected from the amount of light detected in each pixel. Both of the depth light profile through the conical reflection grass and the depth dose profile showed the same attenuation in the region deeper than peak depth. In lateral direction, the difference of the both profiles was shown at outside field and penumbra region. We consider that the difference is occurred due to the scatter of the scintillation light in the plastic scintillator block. Conclusion: It was possible to obtain the amount of light corresponding to the absorbed dose distribution from the prototype detector. Four-dimensional dose distributions can be reconstructed with high accuracy by the correction of

  20. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION Single-charge rotating black holes in four-dimensional gauged supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, David D. K.

    2011-02-01

    We consider four-dimensional U(1)4 gauged supergravity, and obtain asymptotically AdS4, non-extremal, charged, rotating black holes with one non-zero U(1) charge. The thermodynamic quantities are computed. We obtain a generalization that includes a NUT parameter. The general solution has a discrete symmetry involving inversion of the rotation parameter, and has a string frame metric that admits a rank-2 Killing-Stäckel tensor.

  1. Evaluation of regional work from ECG-gated SPECT images through solution of equations of continuity for fluids-mechanical cardiac work calculated using thin wall model.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hisatoshi

    2012-03-01

    Regional contraction work (RCW) of left ventricle (LV) was evaluated from cardiac perfusion images of ECG-gated single photon emission computed tomography (ECG-SPECT). The mechanical work was computed as a product of force and displaced distance. Force was determined from Laplace's law under a rectangle pressure. Deformation of wireframe representing LV was calculated from equations of continuity for two-dimensional fluids. Experiments were performed with homemade life-sized cardiac models. Total contraction work (TCW) and stroke work (SW) were 524.0 ± 166.1 mJ/beat and 709.8 ± 169.5 mJ/beat, respectively, in normal subjects (n = 23). Moderate correlation was seen between TCW and SW (y = -43.4 + 0.779 x, r = 0.815). The regional contraction amplitude (RCA), synchronous contraction index and RCW were 35.4 ± 3.5%, 95.4 ± 3.1% and 5.58 ± 0.97 mJ cm(-2)/beat in normal subjects, whereas those in patients with decreased ejection raction (EF) ≤ 30% (n = 6) were 19.6 ± 7.7%, 64.4 ± 32.2% and 2.58 ± 0.82 mJ cm(-2)/beat (p < 0.0001, Student's t-test). There was a poor correlation between RCW and RCA (y = 1.648 ± 0.116 x, r = 0.501) in normal subjects, suggesting that it might not be suitable to use RCA as an alternative to evaluate RCW.

  2. A three-dimensional model-based partial volume correction strategy for gated cardiac mouse PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumouchel, Tyler; Thorn, Stephanie; Kordos, Myra; DaSilva, Jean; Beanlands, Rob S. B.; deKemp, Robert A.

    2012-07-01

    Quantification in cardiac mouse positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is limited by the imaging spatial resolution. Spillover of left ventricle (LV) myocardial activity into adjacent organs results in partial volume (PV) losses leading to underestimation of myocardial activity. A PV correction method was developed to restore accuracy of the activity distribution for FDG mouse imaging. The PV correction model was based on convolving an LV image estimate with a 3D point spread function. The LV model was described regionally by a five-parameter profile including myocardial, background and blood activities which were separated into three compartments by the endocardial radius and myocardium wall thickness. The PV correction was tested with digital simulations and a physical 3D mouse LV phantom. In vivo cardiac FDG mouse PET imaging was also performed. Following imaging, the mice were sacrificed and the tracer biodistribution in the LV and liver tissue was measured using a gamma-counter. The PV correction algorithm improved recovery from 50% to within 5% of the truth for the simulated and measured phantom data and image uniformity by 5-13%. The PV correction algorithm improved the mean myocardial LV recovery from 0.56 (0.54) to 1.13 (1.10) without (with) scatter and attenuation corrections. The mean image uniformity was improved from 26% (26%) to 17% (16%) without (with) scatter and attenuation corrections applied. Scatter and attenuation corrections were not observed to significantly impact PV-corrected myocardial recovery or image uniformity. Image-based PV correction algorithm can increase the accuracy of PET image activity and improve the uniformity of the activity distribution in normal mice. The algorithm may be applied using different tracers, in transgenic models that affect myocardial uptake, or in different species provided there is sufficient image quality and similar contrast between the myocardium and surrounding structures.

  3. Fully 4D motion-compensated reconstruction of cardiac SPECT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravier, Erwan; Yang, Yongyi; King, Michael A.; Jin, Mingwu

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the benefits of a spatiotemporal approach for reconstruction of image sequences. In the proposed approach, we introduce a temporal prior in the form of motion compensation to account for the statistical correlations among the frames in a sequence, and reconstruct all the frames collectively as a single function of space and time. The reconstruction algorithm is derived based on the maximum a posteriori estimate, for which the one-step late expectation-maximization algorithm is used. We demonstrated the method in our experiments using simulated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) cardiac perfusion images. The four-dimensional (4D) gated mathematical cardiac-torso phantom was used for simulation of gated SPECT perfusion imaging with Tc-99m-sestamibi. In addition to bias-variance analysis and time activity curves, we also used a channelized Hotelling observer to evaluate the detectability of perfusion defects in the reconstructed images. Our experimental results demonstrated that the incorporation of temporal regularization into image reconstruction could significantly improve the accuracy of cardiac images without causing any significant cross-frame blurring that may arise from the cardiac motion. This could lead to not only improved detection of perfusion defects, but also improved reconstruction of the heart wall which is important for functional assessment of the myocardium. This work was supported in part by the National Institutes of Health under grant no HL65425.

  4. A four-dimensional variational chemistry data assimilation scheme for Eulerian chemistry transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibern, Hendrik; Schmidt, Hauke

    1999-08-01

    The inverse problem of data assimilation of tropospheric trace gas observations into an Eulerian chemistry transport model has been solved by the four-dimensional variational technique including chemical reactions, transport, and diffusion. The University of Cologne European Air Pollution Dispersion Chemistry Transport Model 2 with the Regional Acid Deposition Model 2 gas phase mechanism is taken as the basis for developing a full four-dimensional variational data assimilation package, on the basis of the adjoint model version, which includes the adjoint operators of horizontal and vertical advection, implicit vertical diffusion, and the adjoint gas phase mechanism. To assess the potential and limitations of the technique without degrading the impact of nonperfect meteorological analyses and statistically not established error covariance estimates, artificial meteorological data and observations are used. The results are presented on the basis of a suite of experiments, where reduced records of artificial "observations" are provided to the assimilation procedure, while other "data" is retained for performance control of the analysis. The paper demonstrates that the four-dimensional variational technique is applicable for a comprehensive chemistry transport model in terms of computational and storage requirements on advanced parallel platforms. It is further shown that observed species can generally be analyzed, even if the "measurements" have unbiased random errors. More challenging experiments are presented, aiming to tax the skill of the method (1) by restricting available observations mostly to surface ozone observations for a limited assimilation interval of 6 hours and (2) by starting with poorly chosen first guess values. In this first such application to a three-dimensional chemistry transport model, success was also achieved in analyzing not only observed but also chemically closely related unobserved constituents.

  5. Three-dimensional and four-dimensional HDlive-rendered images of thanatophoric dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Inubashiri, Eisuke; Kuroki, Katumaru; Maeda, Nobuhiko; Kawai, Kiichirou; Akutagawa, Noriyuki; Sugawara, Masaki; Imai, Shosuke; Minami, Kunihiro; Nomura, Yasuhiro

    2015-04-01

    We present herein our first experience with a case of thanatophoric dysplasia (type I) that was diagnosed during the second trimester using three- and four-dimensional HDlive ultrasonography. The HDlive rendering mode clearly showed the anatomical features of thanatophoric dysplasia: external malformations and skeletal abnormalities, including extremely short limbs, flattened vertebral bodies, and short horizontal ribs, among others. HDlive can provide valuable, highly realistic images for the differential diagnosis of skeletal dysplasia. It may also play an important complementary role when conventional two- and three-dimensional ultrasonography does not provide sufficient definition. PMID:26576586

  6. Four-dimensional (4D) tracking of high-temperature microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhehui; Liu, Q.; Waganaar, W.; Fontanese, J.; James, D.; Munsat, T.

    2016-11-01

    High-speed tracking of hot and molten microparticles in motion provides rich information about burning plasmas in magnetic fusion. An exploding-wire apparatus is used to produce moving high-temperature metallic microparticles and to develop four-dimensional (4D) or time-resolved 3D particle tracking techniques. The pinhole camera model and algorithms developed for computer vision are used for scene calibration and 4D reconstructions. 3D positions and velocities are then derived for different microparticles. Velocity resolution approaches 0.1 m/s by using the local constant velocity approximation.

  7. Four-dimensional generalized difference matrix and some double sequence spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuǧ, Orhan; Başar, Feyzi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we introduce some new double sequence spaces B(Mu), B(Cp), B(Cbp), B(Cr) and B(Lq) as the domain of four-dimensional generalized difference matrix B(r,s,t,u) in the spaces Mu, Cp, Cbp, Cr and Lq, respectively. We show that the double sequence spaces B(Mu), B(Cbp) and B(Cr) are the Banach spaces under some certain conditions. We give some inclusion relations with some topological properties.

  8. Four-dimensional dose evaluation using deformable image registration in radiotherapy for liver cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hoon Jung, Sang; Min Yoon, Sang; Ho Park, Sung; Cho, Byungchul; Won Park, Jae; Jung, Jinhong; Park, Jin-hong; Hoon Kim, Jong; Do Ahn, Seung

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: In order to evaluate the dosimetric impact of respiratory motion on the dose delivered to the target volume and critical organs during free-breathing radiotherapy, a four-dimensional dose was evaluated using deformable image registration (DIR). Methods: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images were acquired for 11 patients who were treated for liver cancer. Internal target volume-based treatment planning and dose calculation (3D dose) were performed using the end-exhalation phase images. The four-dimensional dose (4D dose) was calculated based on DIR of all phase images from 4DCT to the planned image. Dosimetric parameters from the 4D dose, were calculated and compared with those from the 3D dose. Results: There was no significant change of the dosimetric parameters for gross tumor volume (p > 0.05). The increase D{sub mean} and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) for liver were by 3.1%{+-} 3.3% (p= 0.003) and 2.8%{+-} 3.3% (p= 0.008), respectively, and for duodenum, they were decreased by 15.7%{+-} 11.2% (p= 0.003) and 15.1%{+-} 11.0% (p= 0.003), respectively. The D{sub max} and gEUD for stomach was decreased by 5.3%{+-} 5.8% (p= 0.003) and 9.7%{+-} 8.7% (p= 0.003), respectively. The D{sub max} and gEUD for right kidney was decreased by 11.2%{+-} 16.2% (p= 0.003) and 14.9%{+-} 16.8% (p= 0.005), respectively. For left kidney, D{sub max} and gEUD were decreased by 11.4%{+-} 11.0% (p= 0.003) and 12.8%{+-} 12.1% (p= 0.005), respectively. The NTCP values for duodenum and stomach were decreased by 8.4%{+-} 5.8% (p= 0.003) and 17.2%{+-} 13.7% (p= 0.003), respectively. Conclusions: The four-dimensional dose with a more realistic dose calculation accounting for respiratory motion revealed no significant difference in target coverage and potentially significant change in the physical and biological dosimetric parameters in normal organs during free-breathing treatment.

  9. Intervolume analysis to achieve four-dimensional optical microangiography for observation of dynamic blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Xu, Jingjiang; Baran, Utku; Song, Shaozhen; Qin, Wan; Qi, Xiaoli; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate in vivo volumetric optical microangiography at ˜200 volumes/s by the use of 1.6 MHz Fourier domain mode-locking swept source optical coherence tomography and an effective 36 kHz microelectromechanical system (MEMS) scanner. We propose an intervolume analysis strategy to contrast the dynamic blood flow signal from the static tissue background. The proposed system is demonstrated by imaging cerebral blood flow in mice in vivo. For the first time, imaging speed, sensitivity, and temporal resolution become possible for a direct four-dimensional observation of microcirculations within live body parts.

  10. Model independent determination of the gluon condensate in four dimensional SU(3) gauge theory.

    PubMed

    Bali, Gunnar S; Bauer, Clemens; Pineda, Antonio

    2014-08-29

    We determine the nonperturbative gluon condensate of four-dimensional SU(3) gauge theory in a model-independent way. This is achieved by carefully subtracting high-order perturbation theory results from nonperturbative lattice QCD determinations of the average plaquette. No indications of dimension-two condensates are found. The value of the gluon condensate turns out to be of a similar size as the intrinsic ambiguity inherent to its definition. We also determine the binding energy of a B meson in the heavy quark mass limit. PMID:25215978

  11. A four-dimensional model with the fermionic determinant exactly evaluated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignaco, J. A.; Rego Monteiro, M. A.

    1986-07-01

    A method is presented to compute the fermion determinant of some class of field theories. By this method the following results of the fermion determinant in two dimensions are easily recovered: (i) Schwinger model without reference to a particular gauge. (ii) QCD in the light-cone gauge. (iii) Gauge invariant result of QCD. The method is finally applied to give an analytical solution of the fermion determinant of a four-dimensional, non-abelian, Dirac-like theory with massless fermions interacting with an external vector field through a pseudo-vectorial coupling. Fellow of the Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Cientifico e Tecnologico (CNPq), Brazil.

  12. Evaluation of Bogus Vortex Techniques Using Four-Dimensional Variational Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pu, Zhao-Xia; Braun, Scott A.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The effectiveness of a four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4-DVAR) technique for creating "bogus" vortices in numerical simulations of hurricanes is evaluated in this study. A series of numerical experiments is conducted to generate initial vortices for Hurricane Georges and Bonnie (1998) in the Atlantic Ocean by assimilating bogus sea-level pressure and wind information into a mesoscale numerical model (MM5). Several different strategies are tested for investigating the sensitivity of the initial vortex representation to the type of bogus information.

  13. Quantification of left and right atrial kinetic energy using four-dimensional intracardiac magnetic resonance imaging flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Per M; Töger, Johannes; Heiberg, Einar; Carlsson, Marcus; Arheden, Håkan

    2013-05-15

    Kinetic energy (KE) of atrial blood has been postulated as a possible contributor to ventricular filling. Therefore, we aimed to quantify the left (LA) and right (RA) atrial blood KE using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent CMR at 3 T, including a four-dimensional phase-contrast flow sequence. Mean LA KE was lower than RA KE (1.1 ± 0.1 vs. 1.7 ± 0.1 mJ, P < 0.01). Three KE peaks were seen in both atria: one in ventricular systole, one during early ventricular diastole, and one during atrial contraction. The systolic LA peak was significantly smaller than the RA peak (P < 0.001), and the early diastolic LA peak was larger than the RA peak (P < 0.05). Rotational flow contained 46 ± 7% of total KE and conserved energy better than nonrotational flow did. The KE increase in early diastole was higher in the LA (P < 0.001). Systolic KE correlated with the combination of atrial volume and systolic velocity of the atrioventricular plane displacement (r(2) = 0.57 for LA and r(2) = 0.64 for RA). Early diastolic KE of the LA correlated with left ventricle (LV) mass (r(2) = 0.28), however, no such correlation was found in the right heart. This suggests that LA KE increases during early ventricular diastole due to LV elastic recoil, indicating that LV filling is dependent on diastolic suction. Right ventricle (RV) relaxation does not seem to contribute to atrial KE. Instead, RA KE generated during ventricular systole may be conserved in a hydraulic "flywheel" and transferred to the RV through helical flow, which may contribute to RV filling.

  14. Quantification of left and right atrial kinetic energy using four-dimensional intracardiac magnetic resonance imaging flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Per M; Töger, Johannes; Heiberg, Einar; Carlsson, Marcus; Arheden, Håkan

    2013-05-15

    Kinetic energy (KE) of atrial blood has been postulated as a possible contributor to ventricular filling. Therefore, we aimed to quantify the left (LA) and right (RA) atrial blood KE using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent CMR at 3 T, including a four-dimensional phase-contrast flow sequence. Mean LA KE was lower than RA KE (1.1 ± 0.1 vs. 1.7 ± 0.1 mJ, P < 0.01). Three KE peaks were seen in both atria: one in ventricular systole, one during early ventricular diastole, and one during atrial contraction. The systolic LA peak was significantly smaller than the RA peak (P < 0.001), and the early diastolic LA peak was larger than the RA peak (P < 0.05). Rotational flow contained 46 ± 7% of total KE and conserved energy better than nonrotational flow did. The KE increase in early diastole was higher in the LA (P < 0.001). Systolic KE correlated with the combination of atrial volume and systolic velocity of the atrioventricular plane displacement (r(2) = 0.57 for LA and r(2) = 0.64 for RA). Early diastolic KE of the LA correlated with left ventricle (LV) mass (r(2) = 0.28), however, no such correlation was found in the right heart. This suggests that LA KE increases during early ventricular diastole due to LV elastic recoil, indicating that LV filling is dependent on diastolic suction. Right ventricle (RV) relaxation does not seem to contribute to atrial KE. Instead, RA KE generated during ventricular systole may be conserved in a hydraulic "flywheel" and transferred to the RV through helical flow, which may contribute to RV filling. PMID:23493355

  15. Four-dimensional Langevin dynamics of heavy-ion-induced fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadtochy, P. N.; Ryabov, E. G.; Gegechkori, A. E.; Anischenko, Yu. A.; Adeev, G. D.

    2012-06-01

    A four-dimensional dynamical model based on Langevin equations was developed and applied to calculate a wide set of experimental observables for the reactions 16O+208Pb→224Th and 16O+232Th→248Cf over a wide range of excitation energy. The fusion-fission and evaporation residue cross sections, fission fragment mass-energy distribution parameters, prescission neutron multiplicities, and anisotropy of angular distribution of fission fragments could be reasonably reproduced using a modified one-body mechanism for nuclear friction with a reduction coefficient of the contribution from a wall formula ks≃0.25 and a dissipation coefficient for the orientation degree of freedom (K coordinate) γK≃ 0.077 (MeVzs)-1/2. Inclusion of the K coordinate into calculation of potential energy changes the stiffness of the nucleus with respect to mass asymmetry coordinate for the values of K≠0 and results in a shift of the Businaro-Gallone point towards larger Z2/A values. The experimental data on the fission fragment mass-energy distribution parameters together with mean prescission neutron multiplicity for heavy fissioning nuclei are reproduced through the four-dimensional Langevin calculations more accurately than through three-dimensional calculations.

  16. A novel four-dimensional analytical approach for analysis of complex samples.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Susanne; Jakob, Cornelia; Hippler, Jörg; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2016-05-01

    A two-dimensional LC (2D-LC) method, based on the work of Erni and Frei in 1978, was developed and coupled to an ion mobility-high-resolution mass spectrometer (IM-MS), which enabled the separation of complex samples in four dimensions (2D-LC, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), and mass spectrometry (MS)). This approach works as a continuous multiheart-cutting LC system, using a long modulation time of 4 min, which allows the complete transfer of most of the first - dimension peaks to the second - dimension column without fractionation, in comparison to comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography. Hence, each compound delivers only one peak in the second dimension, which simplifies the data handling even when ion mobility spectrometry as a third and mass spectrometry as a fourth dimension are introduced. The analysis of a plant extract from Ginkgo biloba shows the separation power of this four-dimensional separation method with a calculated total peak capacity of more than 8700. Furthermore, the advantage of ion mobility for characterizing unknown compounds by their collision cross section (CCS) and accurate mass in a non-target approach is shown for different matrices like plant extracts and coffee. Graphical abstract Principle of the four-dimensional separation. PMID:27038056

  17. Four dimensional chaos and intermittency in a mesoscopic model of the electroencephalogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dafilis, Mathew P.; Frascoli, Federico; Cadusch, Peter J.; Liley, David T. J.

    2013-06-01

    The occurrence of so-called four dimensional chaos in dynamical systems represented by coupled, nonlinear, ordinary differential equations is rarely reported in the literature. In this paper, we present evidence that Liley's mesoscopic theory of the electroencephalogram (EEG), which has been used to describe brain activity in a variety of clinically relevant contexts, possesses a chaotic attractor with a Kaplan-Yorke dimension significantly larger than three. This accounts for simple, high order chaos for a physiologically admissible parameter set. Whilst the Lyapunov spectrum of the attractor has only one positive exponent, the contracting dimensions are such that the integer part of the Kaplan-Yorke dimension is three, thus giving rise to four dimensional chaos. A one-parameter bifurcation analysis with respect to the parameter corresponding to extracortical input is conducted, with results indicating that the origin of chaos is due to an inverse period doubling cascade. Hence, in the vicinity of the high order, strange attractor, the model is shown to display intermittent behavior, with random alternations between oscillatory and chaotic regimes. This phenomenon represents a possible dynamical justification of some of the typical features of clinically established EEG traces, which can arise in the case of burst suppression in anesthesia and epileptic encephalopathies in early infancy.

  18. Four-dimensional modulation and coding: An alternate to frequency-reuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S. G.; Sleeper, H. A.

    1983-01-01

    Four dimensional modulation as a means of improving communication efficiency on the band-limited Gaussian channel, with the four dimensions of signal space constituted by phase orthogonal carriers (cos omega sub c t and sin omega sub c t) simultaneously on space orthogonal electromagnetic waves are discussed. "Frequency reuse' techniques use such polarization orthogonality to reuse the same frequency slot, but the modulation is not treated as four dimensional, rather a product of two-d modulations, e.g., QPSK. It is well known that, higher dimensionality signalling affords possible improvements in the power bandwidth sense. Four-D modulations based upon subsets of lattice-packings in four-D, which afford simplification of encoding and decoding are described. Sets of up to 1024 signals are constructed in four-D, providing a (Nyquist) spectral efficiency of up to 10 bps/Hz. Energy gains over the reuse technique are in the one to three dB range t equal bandwidth.

  19. Non-Invasive Evaluation of Heart Function with Four-Dimensional Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ran; Zhu, Meihua; Sahn, David J.; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to assess the accuracy and feasibility of left ventricular systolic function determined by four-dimensional echocardiography (4DE). Methods Latex balloons were sewn into the left ventricle (LV) of 20 freshly harvested pig hearts which were then passively driven by a pulsatile pump apparatus. Global longitudinal strain (GLS), global circumferential strain (GCS), global area strain (GAS) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) derived from 4DEand two-dimensional echocardiography (2DE)-derived LVEF were quantified at different stroke volumes (SV) 30–70 ml and correlated with sonomicrometry data. Results In all comparisons, GLS, GCS, GAS, 2DE-LVEF, and 4DE-LVEF demonstrated strong correlations with sonomicrometry data (r = 0.77, r = 0.89, r = 0.79, r = 0.93, r = 0.96, all P <0.001). Bland-Altman analyses showed slight overestimations of echo-derived GLS, GCS, 2DE-LVEF and 3DE-LVEF over sonomicrometry values (bias = 2.88, bias = 3.99, bias = 3.37, bias = 2.78, respectively). Furthermore, there is better agreement between GCS, 4D LVEF and sonomicrometry values compared with GLS and 2D LVEF. Conclusion Four-dimensional echocardiography accurately assesses LV function. GCS derived by 4DE is a potential alternative parameter to quantify LV systolic function. PMID:27144844

  20. A symplectic rearrangement of the four dimensional non-geometric scalar potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Pramod

    2015-11-01

    We present a symplectic rearrangement of the effective four-dimensional non-geometric scalar potential resulting from type IIB superstring compactification on Calabi Yau orientifolds. The strategy has two main steps. In the first step, we rewrite the four dimensional scalar potential utilizing some interesting flux combinations which we call new generalized flux orbits. After invoking a couple of non-trivial symplectic relations, in the second step, we further rearrange all the pieces of scalar potential into a completely `symplectic-formulation' which involves only the symplectic ingredients (such as period matrix etc.) without the need of knowing Calabi Yau metric. Moreover, the scalar potential under consideration is induced by a generic tree level Kähler potential and (non-geometric) flux superpotential for arbitrary numbers of complex structure moduli, Kähler moduli and odd-axions. Finally, we exemplify our symplectic formulation for the two well known toroidal examples based on type IIB superstring compactification on {T}^6/({Z}_2× {Z}_2) -orientifold and {T}^6/{Z}_4 -orientifold.

  1. On the existence of bifocal heteroclinic cycles in a class of four-dimensional piecewise affine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tiantian; Yang, Xiao-Song

    2016-05-01

    Based on mathematical analysis, this paper provides a methodology to ensure the existence of heteroclinic cycles in a class of four-dimensional piecewise affine systems. In addition, examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the method.

  2. Evaluation of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography to Four-Dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Deformable Image Registration for Lung Cancer Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Balik, Salim; Weiss, Elisabeth; Jan, Nuzhat; Roman, Nicholas; Sleeman, William C.; Fatyga, Mirek; Christensen, Gary E.; Zhang, Cheng; Murphy, Martin J.; Lu, Jun; Keall, Paul; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate two deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms for the purpose of contour mapping to support image guided adaptive radiotherapy with four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4DCBCT). Methods and Materials One planning 4D fan-beam CT (4DFBCT) and 7 weekly 4DCBCT scans were acquired for 10 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was delineated by a physician in all 4D images. End-of-inspiration phase planning 4DFBCT was registered to the corresponding phase in weekly 4DCBCT images for day-to-day registrations. For phase-to-phase registration, the end-of-inspiration phase from each 4D image was registered to the end-of-expiration phase. Two DIR algorithms—small deformation inverse consistent linear elastic (SICLE) and Insight Toolkit diffeomorphic demons (DEMONS)—were evaluated. Physician-delineated contours were compared to the warped contours by using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), average symmetric distance (ASD), false positive and false negative indices. The DIR results are compared to rigid registration of tumor. Results For day-to-day registrations, the mean DSC was 0.75 ± 0.09 with SICLE, 0.70 ± 0.12 with DEMONS, 0.66 ± 0.12 with rigid-tumor registration and 0.60 ± 0.14 with rigid-bone registration. Results were comparable to intra-observer variability calculated from phase-to-phase registrations as well as measured inter-observer variation for one patient. SICLE and DEMONS, when compared to rigid-bone (4.1 mm) and rigid-tumor (3.6 mm) registration, respectively reduced the ASD to 2.6 and 3.3 mm. On average, SICLE and DEMONS increased the DSC to 0.80 and 0.79 respectively, compared to rigid-tumor (0.78) registrations for 4DCBCT phase-to-phase registrations. Conclusions DIR achieved comparable accuracy to reported inter-observer delineation variability and higher accuracy than rigid-tumor registration. DIR performance varied with the algorithm and the patient. PMID

  3. Berry curvature and four-dimensional monopoles in the relativistic chiral kinetic equation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Pu, Shi; Wang, Qun; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2013-06-28

    We derive a relativistic chiral kinetic equation with manifest Lorentz covariance from Wigner functions of spin-1/2 massless fermions in a constant background electromagnetic field. It contains vorticity terms and a four-dimensional Euclidean Berry monopole which gives an axial anomaly. By integrating out the zeroth component of the 4-momentum p, we reproduce the previous three-dimensional results derived from the Hamiltonian approach, together with the newly derived vorticity terms. The phase space continuity equation has an anomalous source term proportional to the product of electric and magnetic fields (FσρF[over ˜]σρ∼EσBσ). This provides a unified interpretation of the chiral magnetic and vortical effects, chiral anomaly, Berry curvature, and the Berry monopole in the framework of Wigner functions.

  4. Nanomechanics and intermolecular forces of amyloid revealed by four-dimensional electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Anthony W P; Vanacore, Giovanni M; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2015-03-17

    The amyloid state of polypeptides is a stable, highly organized structural form consisting of laterally associated β-sheet protofilaments that may be adopted as an alternative to the functional, native state. Identifying the balance of forces stabilizing amyloid is fundamental to understanding the wide accessibility of this state to peptides and proteins with unrelated primary sequences, various chain lengths, and widely differing native structures. Here, we use four-dimensional electron microscopy to demonstrate that the forces acting to stabilize amyloid at the atomic level are highly anisotropic, that an optimized interbackbone hydrogen-bonding network within β-sheets confers 20 times more rigidity on the structure than sequence-specific sidechain interactions between sheets, and that electrostatic attraction of protofilaments is only slightly stronger than these weak amphiphilic interactions. The potential biological relevance of the deposition of such a highly anisotropic biomaterial in vivo is discussed.

  5. Comparison of spirometry and abdominal height as four-dimensional computed tomography metrics in lung

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Wei; Low, Daniel A.; Parikh, Parag J.; Nystrom, Michelle M.; El Naqa, Issam M.; Wahab, Sasha H.; Handoko, Maureen; Fooshee, David; Bradley, Jeffrey D.

    2005-07-15

    An important consideration in four-dimensional CT scanning is the selection of a breathing metric for sorting the CT data and modeling internal motion. This study compared two noninvasive breathing metrics, spirometry and abdominal height, against internal air content, used as a surrogate for internal motion. Both metrics were shown to be accurate, but the spirometry showed a stronger and more reproducible relationship than the abdominal height in the lung. The abdominal height was known to be affected by sensor placement and patient positioning while the spirometer exhibited signal drift. By combining these two, a normalization of the drift-free metric to tidal volume may be generated and the overall metric precision may be improved.

  6. Discrete gauge symmetries by Higgsing in four-dimensional F-theory compactifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayrhofer, Christoph; Palti, Eran; Till, Oskar; Weigand, Timo

    2014-12-01

    We study F-theory compactifications to four dimensions that exhibit discrete gauge symmetries. Geometrically these arise by deforming elliptic fibrations with two sections to a genus-one fibration with a bi-section. From a four-dimensional field theory perspective they are remnant symmetries from a Higgsed U(1) gauge symmetry. We implement such symmetries in the presence of an additional SU(5) symmetry and associated matter fields, giving a geometric prescription for calculating the induced discrete charge for the matter curves and showing the absence of Yukawa couplings that are forbidden by this charge. We present a detailed map between the field theory and the geometry, including an identification of the Higgs field and the massless states before and after the Higgsing. Finally we show that the Higgsing of the U(1) induces a G-flux which precisely accounts for the change in the Calabi-Yau Euler number so as to leave the D3 tadpole invariant.

  7. Metallic phase of the quantum Hall effect in four-dimensional space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edge, Jonathan; Tworzydlo, Jakub; Beenakker, Carlo

    2013-03-01

    We study the phase diagram of the quantum Hall effect in four-dimensional (4D) space. Unlike in 2D, in 4D there exists a metallic as well as an insulating phase, depending on the disorder strength. The critical exponent ν ~ 1 . 2 of the diverging localization length at the quantum Hall insulator-to-metal transition differs from the semiclassical value ν = 1 of 4D Anderson transitions in the presence of time-reversal symmetry. Our numerical analysis is based on a mapping of the 4D Hamiltonian onto a 1D dynamical system, providing a route towards the experimental realization of the 4D quantum Hall effect. NanoCTM, FOM/NWO, ERC

  8. Commissioning and quality assurance of Calypso four-dimensional target localization system in linear accelerator facility.

    PubMed

    Muralidhar, K R; Komanduri, Krishna; Rout, Birendra Kumar; Ramesh, K K D

    2013-07-01

    Four dimensional (4D) target localization system (Calypso System) was installed at our hospital, which is equipped with Beacon Transponders, Console, Electromagnetic Array, Optical System, Tracking Station, Treatment table overlay, and Calypso kVue Couch top. The objective of this presentation is to describe the results of commissioning measurements carried out on the Calypso System to verify the manufacturer specifications and also to evolve a quality assurance (QA) procedure which can be used to test its performance routinely. The QA program consists of a series of tests (QA for checking the calibration or system accuracy, Camera Calibration with L-frame fixture, Camera Calibration with T-frame fixture, System calibration Fixture targets test, Localization, and Tracking). These tests were found to be useful to assess the performance of the Calypso System.

  9. Commissioning and quality assurance of Calypso four-dimensional target localization system in linear accelerator facility

    PubMed Central

    Muralidhar, K. R.; Komanduri, Krishna; Rout, Birendra Kumar; Ramesh, K. K. D.

    2013-01-01

    Four dimensional (4D) target localization system (Calypso System) was installed at our hospital, which is equipped with Beacon Transponders, Console, Electromagnetic Array, Optical System, Tracking Station, Treatment table overlay, and Calypso kVue Couch top. The objective of this presentation is to describe the results of commissioning measurements carried out on the Calypso System to verify the manufacturer specifications and also to evolve a quality assurance (QA) procedure which can be used to test its performance routinely. The QA program consists of a series of tests (QA for checking the calibration or system accuracy, Camera Calibration with L-frame fixture, Camera Calibration with T-frame fixture, System calibration Fixture targets test, Localization, and Tracking). These tests were found to be useful to assess the performance of the Calypso System. PMID:24049322

  10. Four-dimensional multiphoton microscopy with time-correlated single-photon counting.

    PubMed

    Schönle, A; Glatz, M; Hell, S W

    2000-12-01

    We report on the implementation of fluorescence-lifetime imaging in multiphoton excitation microscopy that uses PC-compatible modules for time-correlated single-photon counting. Four-dimensional data stacks are produced with each pixel featuring fluorescence-decay curves that consist of as many as 4096 bins. Fluorescence lifetime(s) and their amplitude(s) are extracted by statistical methods at each pixel or in arbitrarily defined regions of interest. When employing an avalanche photodiode the width of the temporal response function is 420 ps. Although this response confines the temporal resolution to values greater than several hundreds of picoseconds, the lifetime precision is determined by the signal-to-noise ratio and can be in the range of tens of picosconds. Lifetime changes are visualized in pulsed-laser-deposited fluorescent layers as well as in cyan fluorescent proteins that transfer energy to yellow fluorescent proteins in live mammalian cells. PMID:18354639

  11. Commissioning and quality assurance of Calypso four-dimensional target localization system in linear accelerator facility.

    PubMed

    Muralidhar, K R; Komanduri, Krishna; Rout, Birendra Kumar; Ramesh, K K D

    2013-07-01

    Four dimensional (4D) target localization system (Calypso System) was installed at our hospital, which is equipped with Beacon Transponders, Console, Electromagnetic Array, Optical System, Tracking Station, Treatment table overlay, and Calypso kVue Couch top. The objective of this presentation is to describe the results of commissioning measurements carried out on the Calypso System to verify the manufacturer specifications and also to evolve a quality assurance (QA) procedure which can be used to test its performance routinely. The QA program consists of a series of tests (QA for checking the calibration or system accuracy, Camera Calibration with L-frame fixture, Camera Calibration with T-frame fixture, System calibration Fixture targets test, Localization, and Tracking). These tests were found to be useful to assess the performance of the Calypso System. PMID:24049322

  12. Structures of larger proteins in solution: Three- and four-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M.

    1994-12-01

    Complete understanding of a protein`s function and mechanism of action can only be achieved with a knowledge of its three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution. At present, there are two methods available for determining such structures. The first method, which has been established for many years, is x-ray diffraction of protein single crystals. The second method has blossomed only in the last 5 years and is based on the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to proteins in solution. This review paper describes three- and four-dimensional NMR methods applied to protein structure determination and was adapted from Clore and Gronenborn. The review focuses on the underlying principals and practice of multidimensional NMR and the structural information obtained.

  13. A four-dimensional primitive equation model for coupled coastal-deep ocean studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haidvogel, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    A prototype four dimensional continental shelf/deep ocean model is described. In its present form, the model incorporates the effects of finite amplitude topography, advective nonlinearities, and variable stratification and rotation. The model can be forced either directly by imposed atmospheric windstress and surface pressure distributions, and energetic mean currents imposed by the exterior oceanic circulation; or indirectly by initial distributions of shoreward propagation mesoscale waves and eddies. To avoid concerns over the appropriate specification of 'open' boundary conditions on the cross-shelf and seaward model boundaries, a periodic channel geometry (oriented along-coast) is used. The model employs a traditional finite difference expansion in the cross-shelf direction, and a Fourier (periodic) representation in the long-shelf coordinate.

  14. Possible second-order phase transition in strongly coupled unquenched planar four-dimensional QED

    SciTech Connect

    Oliensis, J. ); Johnson, P.W. )

    1990-07-15

    We study chiral-symmetry breaking in four-dimensional QED with {ital N} fermion species using truncated Schwinger-Dyson equations, and taking vacuum-polarization effects into account via a momentum-dependent gauge coupling. These effects transmute the infinite-order phase transition found previously for the case of a fixed gauge coupling into a second-order phase transition. For large {ital N}, the phase transition may not exist, as it is determined primarily by the physics at the cutoff. We also carry out a preliminary renormalization-group analysis of the theory near the critical coupling: the results are compatible with the existence of a nontrivial continuum limit for the planar theory at the critical value, with an effectively dimensionless fermion field.

  15. Flame four-dimensional deflection tomography with compressed-sensing-revision reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Minmin; Liu, Zhigang; Wu, Zhaohang

    2016-08-01

    Deflection tomography with limited angle projections was investigated to visualize a premixed flame. A projection sampling system for deflection tomography was used to obtain chronological deflectogram arrays at six view angles with only a pair of gratings. A new iterative reconstruction algorithm with deflection angle compressed-sensing revision was developed to improve reconstruction-distribution quality from incomplete projection data. Numerical simulation and error analysis provided a good indication of algorithm precision and convergence. In the experiment, 150 fringes were processed, and temperature distributions in 20 cross-sections were reconstructed from projection data in four instants. Four-dimensional flame structures and temperature distributions in the flame interior were visualized using the visualization toolkit. The experimental reconstruction was then compared with the result obtained from computational fluid dynamic analysis.

  16. Dynamic Imaging of Vocal Fold Oscillation With Four-Dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kobler, James B.; Chang, Ernest W.; Zeitels, Steven M.; Yun, Seok-Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Optical coherence tomography (OCT) can provide high-resolution (~10–15 μm/pixel) images of vocal fold microanatomy, as demonstrated previously. We explored physiologically triggered Fourier-domain OCT for imaging vocal folds during phonation. The goal is to visualize dynamic histological cross sections and four-dimensional data sets where multiple planes are displayed in synchronized motion. If feasible, this approach could be a useful research tool and spur development of new clinical instrumentation. Study Design A Fourier-domain, triggered OCT system was created and tested in experiments on excised calf larynges to obtain preliminary observations and characterize important factors affecting image quality. Methods Larynges were imaged during phonation driven by warm, humidified air. A subglottal pressure signal was used to synchronize the OCT system with the phonatory cycle. Image sequences were recorded as functions of anatomical location or sub-glottal pressure. Implant materials were also imaged during vibration, both in isolation and after injection into a vocal fold. Results Oscillations of epithelium and lamina propria were observed, and parameters such as shape, amplitude, and velocity of the vocal fold mucosal waves were found to be measurable. Ripples of mucosal wave as small as 100 μm in vertical height were clearly visible. Internal strain was also observed in normal and implanted vocal folds. Conclusions Four-dimensional OCT of the vocal fold may help to more directly relate biomechanics to anatomy and disease. It may also be useful for assaying the functional rheology of implants in the context of real tissue. With further development, this technology has potential for clinical endoscopic application. PMID:20564724

  17. Preventing Data Ambiguity in Infectious Diseases with Four-Dimensional and Personalized Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Iandiorio, Michelle J.; Fair, Jeanne M.; Chatzipanagiotou, Stylianos; Ioannidis, Anastasios; Trikka-Graphakos, Eleftheria; Charalampaki, Nikoletta; Sereti, Christina; Tegos, George P.; Hoogesteijn, Almira L.; Rivas, Ariel L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Diagnostic errors can occur, in infectious diseases, when anti-microbial immune responses involve several temporal scales. When responses span from nanosecond to week and larger temporal scales, any pre-selected temporal scale is likely to miss some (faster or slower) responses. Hoping to prevent diagnostic errors, a pilot study was conducted to evaluate a four-dimensional (4D) method that captures the complexity and dynamics of infectious diseases. Methods Leukocyte-microbial-temporal data were explored in canine and human (bacterial and/or viral) infections, with: (i) a non-structured approach, which measures leukocytes or microbes in isolation; and (ii) a structured method that assesses numerous combinations of interacting variables. Four alternatives of the structured method were tested: (i) a noise-reduction oriented version, which generates a single (one data point-wide) line of observations; (ii) a version that measures complex, three-dimensional (3D) data interactions; (iii) a non-numerical version that displays temporal data directionality (arrows that connect pairs of consecutive observations); and (iv) a full 4D (single line-, complexity-, directionality-based) version. Results In all studies, the non-structured approach revealed non-interpretable (ambiguous) data: observations numerically similar expressed different biological conditions, such as recovery and lack of recovery from infections. Ambiguity was also found when the data were structured as single lines. In contrast, two or more data subsets were distinguished and ambiguity was avoided when the data were structured as complex, 3D, single lines and, in addition, temporal data directionality was determined. The 4D method detected, even within one day, changes in immune profiles that occurred after antibiotics were prescribed. Conclusions Infectious disease data may be ambiguous. Four-dimensional methods may prevent ambiguity, providing earlier, in vivo, dynamic, complex, and

  18. Four-Dimensional Positron Emission Tomography: Implications for Dose Painting of High-Uptake Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Killoran, Joseph H.; Chen, Aileen B.; Berbeco, Ross I.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the behavior of tumor subvolumes of high [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake as seen on clinical four-dimensional (4D) FDG-positron emission tomography (PET) scans. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional FDG-PET/computed tomography scans from 13 patients taken before radiotherapy were available. The analysis was focused on regions of high uptake that are potential dose-painting targets. A total of 17 lesions (primary tumors and lymph nodes) were analyzed. On each one of the five phases of the 4D scan a classification algorithm was applied to obtain the region of highest uptake and segment the tumor volume. We looked at the behavior of both the high-uptake subvolume, called 'Boost,' and the segmented tumor volume, called 'Target.' We measured several quantities that characterize the Target and Boost volumes and quantified correlations between them. Results: The behavior of the Target could not always predict the behavior of the Boost. The shape deformation of the Boost regions was on average 133% higher than that of the Target. The gross to internal target volume expansion was on average 27.4% for the Target and 64% for the Boost, a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05). Finally, the inhale-to-exhale phase (20%) had the highest shape deformation for the Boost regions. Conclusions: A complex relationship between the measured quantities for the Boost and Target volumes is revealed. The results suggest that in cases in which advanced therapy techniques such as dose painting are being used, a close examination of the 4D PET scan should be performed.

  19. Breathing-Synchronized Delivery: A Potential Four-Dimensional Tomotherapy Treatment Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Tiezhi . E-mail: tiezhi.zhang@beaumont.edu; Lu Weiguo; Olivera, Gustavo H.; Keller, Harry; Jeraj, Robert; Manon, Rafael; Mehta, Minesh; Mackie, Thomas R.; Paliwal, Bhudatt

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To introduce a four-dimensional (4D) tomotherapy treatment technique with improved motion control and patient tolerance. Methods and Materials: Computed tomographic images at 10 breathing phases were acquired for treatment planning. The full exhalation phase was chosen as the planning phase, and the CT images at this phase were used as treatment-planning images. Region of interest delineation was the same as in traditional treatment planning, except that no breathing motion margin was used in clinical target volume-planning target volume expansion. The correlation between delivery and breathing phases was set assuming a constant gantry speed and a fixed breathing period. Deformable image registration yielded the deformation fields at each phase relative to the planning phase. With the delivery/breathing phase correlation and voxel displacements at each breathing phase, a 4D tomotherapy plan was obtained by incorporating the motion into inverse treatment plan optimization. A combined laser/spirometer breathing tracking system has been developed to monitor patient breathing. This system is able to produce stable and reproducible breathing signals representing tidal volume. Results: We compared the 4D tomotherapy treatment planning method with conventional tomotherapy on a static target. The results showed that 4D tomotherapy can achieve dose distributions on a moving target similar to those obtained with conventional delivery on a stationary target. Regular breathing motion is fully compensated by motion-incorporated breathing-synchronized delivery planning. Four-dimensional tomotherapy also has close to 100% duty cycle and does not prolong treatment time. Conclusion: Breathing-synchronized delivery is a feasible 4D tomotherapy treatment technique with improved motion control and patient tolerance.

  20. Four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) using image-based respiratory surrogate: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jing; Chang, Zheng; Wang, Zhiheng; Paul Segars, William; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) has been widely used in radiation therapy to assess patient-specific breathing motion for determining individual safety margins. However, it has two major drawbacks: low soft-tissue contrast and an excessive imaging dose to the patient. This research aimed to develop a clinically feasible four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) technique to overcome these limitations. Methods: The proposed 4D-MRI technique was achieved by continuously acquiring axial images throughout the breathing cycle using fast 2D cine-MR imaging, and then retrospectively sorting the images by respiratory phase. The key component of the technique was the use of body area (BA) of the axial MR images as an internal respiratory surrogate to extract the breathing signal. The validation of the BA surrogate was performed using 4D-CT images of 12 cancer patients by comparing the respiratory phases determined using the BA method to those determined clinically using the Real-time position management (RPM) system. The feasibility of the 4D-MRI technique was tested on a dynamic motion phantom, the 4D extended Cardiac Torso (XCAT) digital phantom, and two healthy human subjects. Results: Respiratory phases determined from the BA matched closely to those determined from the RPM: mean (±SD) difference in phase: −3.9% (±6.4%); mean (±SD) absolute difference in phase: 10.40% (±3.3%); mean (±SD) correlation coefficient: 0.93 (±0.04). In the motion phantom study, 4D-MRI clearly showed the sinusoidal motion of the phantom; image artifacts observed were minimal to none. Motion trajectories measured from 4D-MRI and 2D cine-MRI (used as a reference) matched excellently: the mean (±SD) absolute difference in motion amplitude: −0.3 (±0.5) mm. In the 4D-XCAT phantom study, the simulated “4D-MRI” images showed good consistency with the original 4D-XCAT phantom images. The motion trajectory of the hypothesized “tumor” matched

  1. Dynamic real-time 4D cardiac MDCT image display using GPU-accelerated volume rendering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Eagleson, Roy; Peters, Terry M

    2009-09-01

    Intraoperative cardiac monitoring, accurate preoperative diagnosis, and surgical planning are important components of minimally-invasive cardiac therapy. Retrospective, electrocardiographically (ECG) gated, multidetector computed tomographical (MDCT), four-dimensional (3D + time), real-time, cardiac image visualization is an important tool for the surgeon in such procedure, particularly if the dynamic volumetric image can be registered to, and fused with the actual patient anatomy. The addition of stereoscopic imaging provides a more intuitive environment by adding binocular vision and depth cues to structures within the beating heart. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a comprehensive stereoscopic 4D cardiac image visualization and manipulation platform, based on the opacity density radiation model, which exploits the power of modern graphics processing units (GPUs) in the rendering pipeline. In addition, we present a new algorithm to synchronize the phases of the dynamic heart to clinical ECG signals, and to calculate and compensate for latencies in the visualization pipeline. A dynamic multiresolution display is implemented to enable the interactive selection and emphasis of volume of interest (VOI) within the entire contextual cardiac volume and to enhance performance, and a novel color and opacity adjustment algorithm is designed to increase the uniformity of the rendered multiresolution image of heart. Our system provides a visualization environment superior to noninteractive software-based implementations, but with a rendering speed that is comparable to traditional, but inferior quality, volume rendering approaches based on texture mapping. This retrospective ECG-gated dynamic cardiac display system can provide real-time feedback regarding the suspected pathology, function, and structural defects, as well as anatomical information such as chamber volume and morphology.

  2. Simulations of four-dimensional simplicial quantum gravity as dynamical triangulation

    SciTech Connect

    Agishtein, M.E.; Migdal, A.A. )

    1992-04-20

    In this paper, Four-Dimensional Simplicial Quantum Gravity is simulated using the dynamical triangulation approach. The authors studied simplicial manifolds of spherical topology and found the critical line for the cosmological constant as a function of the gravitational one, separating the phases of opened and closed Universe. When the bare cosmological constant approaches this line from above, the four-volume grows: the authors reached about 5 {times} 10{sup 4} simplexes, which proved to be sufficient for the statistical limit of infinite volume. However, for the genuine continuum theory of gravity, the parameters of the lattice model should be further adjusted to reach the second order phase transition point, where the correlation length grows to infinity. The authors varied the gravitational constant, and they found the first order phase transition, similar to the one found in three-dimensional model, except in 4D the fluctuations are rather large at the transition point, so that this is close to the second order phase transition. The average curvature in cutoff units is large and positive in one phase (gravity), and small negative in another (antigravity). The authors studied the fractal geometry of both phases, using the heavy particle propagator to define the geodesic map, as well as with the old approach using the shortest lattice paths.

  3. Combining four dimensional variational data assimilation and particle filtering for estimating volcanic ash emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, Philipp; Elbern, Hendrik

    2016-04-01

    Estimating volcanic ash emissions is a very challenging task due to limited monitoring capacities of the ash plume and nonlinear processes in the atmosphere, which renders application of source strength and injection height estimations difficult. Most models, which estimate volcanic ash emissions, make strong simplifications of the dispersion of volcanic ash and corresponding atmospheric processes. The objective of this work is to estimate volcanic ash emissions and simulate the ensuing dispersion applying a full chemistry transport model in a hybrid approach by using its adjoint as well as an ensemble of model runs to quantify forecast uncertainties. Therefore, the four dimensional variational data assimilation version of the EURAD-IM chemistry transport model is extended to include a Sequential Importance Resampling Smoother (SIRS), introducing novel weighting and resampling strategies. In the main SIRS step the ensemble members exchange high rated emission patterns while rejecting emission patterns with low value for the forecast. The emission profiles of the ensemble members are perturbed afterwards to guarantee different emissions for all ensemble members. First identical twin experiments show the ability of the system to estimate the temporal and vertical distribution of volcanic ash emissions. The 4D-var data assimilation algorithm of the new system additionally provides quantitative emission estimation.

  4. Subject-specific four-dimensional liver motion modeling based on registration of dynamic MRI.

    PubMed

    Noorda, Yolanda H; Bartels, Lambertus W; Viergever, Max A; Pluim, Josien P W

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatment of the liver is a promising noninvasive technique for ablation of liver lesions. For the technique to be used in clinical practice, however, the issue of liver motion needs to be addressed. A subject-specific four-dimensional liver motion model is presented that is created based on registration of dynamically acquired magnetic resonance data. This model can be used for predicting the tumor motion trajectory for treatment planning and to indicate the tumor position for treatment guidance. The performance of the model was evaluated on a dynamic scan series that was not used to build the model. The method achieved an average Dice coefficient of 0.93 between the predicted and actual liver profiles and an average vessel misalignment of 3.0 mm. The model performed robustly, with a small variation in the results per subject. The results demonstrate the potential of the model to be used for MRI-guided treatment of liver lesions. Furthermore, the model can possibly be applied in other image-guided therapies, for instance radiotherapy of the liver. PMID:27493981

  5. Coupling ensemble Kalman filter with four-dimensional variational data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fuqing; Zhang, Meng; Hansen, James A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the performance of coupling the deterministic four-dimensional variational assimilation system (4DVAR) with an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) to produce a superior hybrid approach for data assimilation. The coupled assimilation scheme (E4DVAR) benefits from using the state-dependent uncertainty provided by EnKF while taking advantage of 4DVAR in preventing filter divergence: the 4DVAR analysis produces posterior maximum likelihood solutions through minimization of a cost function about which the ensemble perturbations are transformed, and the resulting ensemble analysis can be propagated forward both for the next assimilation cycle and as a basis for ensemble forecasting. The feasibility and effectiveness of this coupled approach are demonstrated in an idealized model with simulated observations. It is found that the E4DVAR is capable of outperforming both 4DVAR and the EnKF under both perfect- and imperfect-model scenarios. The performance of the coupled scheme is also less sensitive to either the ensemble size or the assimilation window length than those for standard EnKF or 4DVAR implementations.

  6. An inventory of four-dimensional data sets for the earth sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Terri

    1989-01-01

    The wide variety of data available to the diligent researcher and the myriad paths to obtaining it are emphasized. This inventory is an attempt to make accessible much of the four-dimensional data available in the world. In this quick-look catalog are listed separate data sets (Data Sets sections), sources of data including centers and large data bases (Sources section), and some data expected to be available in the future (Future Data section). In the Data Sets section, individual data sets are arranged alphabetically by institution, with those archived in the U.S.A. listed first, followed by those found elsewhere. The Sources section includes large data bases, centers, and directories. Sources are arranged alphabetically by country. This section is followed by a Future Data section which is a collection of data sets, experiments, and other future developments of which we are cognizant. A collection of further information and order blanks provided by some of the archiving institutions are presented in the appendix.

  7. Towards a coupled ocean-wave-atmosphere four dimensional data assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngodock, Hans; Carrier, Matthew; Amerault, Clark; Campbell, Timothy; Holt, Teddy; Xu, Liang; Rowley, Clark

    2015-04-01

    Individual 4dvar systems have been developed at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) for the ocean model (Navy coastal ocean model, NCOM), the wave model (simulating waves in the nearshore, SWAN) and the atmospheric component of the coupled ocean-atmosphere mesoscale prediction system (COAMPS). Although the three models within COAPMS are coupled in the forward integration, the initialization of each model is done separately. The coupled system forecast is hindered, however, by the lack of a fully coupled and dynamically balanced ocean-atmosphere analysis. A recent work by Ngodock and Carrier (2013) has highlighted this shortcoming with the NCOM-4DVAR, showing that while the NCOM-4DVAR is able to adjust the ocean state properly, the resulting ocean forecast degrades quickly due to the fact that the atmospheric state has not also been adjusted relative to the ocean observations. Likewise, . Currently, the coupled model is initialized using separate analyses for the ocean and atmosphere that do not account for observations in the adjacent fluid. The lack of a coupled analysis produces shocks in the coupled model in the form of gravity waves that degrade the information gained through DA and increase the error in the coupled forecast. The goal of this presentation is to describe ongoing developments at NRL in building a fully coupled ocean-wave-atmosphere four-dimensional variational (4dvar) data assimilation system using the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF).

  8. Spatially isotropic four-dimensional imaging with dual-view plane illumination microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yicong; Wawrzusin, Peter; Senseney, Justin; Fischer, Robert S; Christensen, Ryan; Santella, Anthony; York, Andrew G; Winter, Peter W; Waterman, Clare M; Bao, Zhirong; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A; McAuliffe, Matthew; Shroff, Hari

    2014-01-01

    Optimal four-dimensional imaging requires high spatial resolution in all dimensions, high speed and minimal photobleaching and damage. We developed a dual-view, plane illumination microscope with improved spatiotemporal resolution by switching illumination and detection between two perpendicular objectives in an alternating duty cycle. Computationally fusing the resulting volumetric views provides an isotropic resolution of 330 nm. As the sample is stationary and only two views are required, we achieve an imaging speed of 200 images/s (i.e., 0.5 s for a 50-plane volume). Unlike spinning-disk confocal or Bessel beam methods, which illuminate the sample outside the focal plane, we maintain high spatiotemporal resolution over hundreds of volumes with negligible photobleaching. To illustrate the ability of our method to study biological systems that require high-speed volumetric visualization and/or low photobleaching, we describe microtubule tracking in live cells, nuclear imaging over 14 h during nematode embryogenesis and imaging of neural wiring during Caenorhabditis elegans brain development over 5 h. PMID:24108093

  9. Morphogenesis of an extended phenotype: four-dimensional ant nest architecture.

    PubMed

    Minter, Nicholas J; Franks, Nigel R; Brown, Katharine A Robson

    2012-03-01

    Animals produce a variety of structures to modify their environments adaptively. Such structures represent extended phenotypes whose development is rarely studied. To begin to rectify this, we used micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning and time-series experiments to obtain the first high-resolution dataset on the four-dimensional growth of ant nests. We show that extrinsic features within the environment, such as the presence of planes between layers of sediment, influence the architecture of Lasius flavus nests, with ants excavating horizontal tunnels along such planes. Intrinsically, the dimensions of the tunnels are associated with individual colonies, the dynamics of excavation can be explained by negative feedback and the angular distribution of tunnels is probably a result of local competition among tunnels for miners. The architecture and dynamics of ant nest excavation therefore result from local interactions of ants with one another and templates inherent in the environment. The influence of the environment on the form of structures has been documented across both biotic and abiotic domains. Our study opens up the utility of CT scanning as a technique for observing the morphogenesis of such structures. PMID:21849386

  10. A four-dimensional snapshot hyperspectral video-endoscope for bio-imaging applications

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hoong-Ta; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has proven significance in bio-imaging applications and it has the ability to capture up to several hundred images of different wavelengths offering relevant spectral signatures. To use hyperspectral imaging for in vivo monitoring and diagnosis of the internal body cavities, a snapshot hyperspectral video-endoscope is required. However, such reported systems provide only about 50 wavelengths. We have developed a four-dimensional snapshot hyperspectral video-endoscope with a spectral range of 400–1000 nm, which can detect 756 wavelengths for imaging, significantly more than such systems. Capturing the three-dimensional datacube sequentially gives the fourth dimension. All these are achieved through a flexible two-dimensional to one-dimensional fiber bundle. The potential of this custom designed and fabricated compact biomedical probe is demonstrated by imaging phantom tissue samples in reflectance and fluorescence imaging modalities. It is envisaged that this novel concept and developed probe will contribute significantly towards diagnostic in vivo biomedical imaging in the near future. PMID:27044607

  11. Relativistic positioning: four-dimensional numerical approach in Minkowski space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchades, Neus; Sáez, Diego

    2012-10-01

    We simulate the satellite constellations of two Global Navigation Satellite Systems: Galileo (EU) and GPS (USA). Satellite motions are described in the Schwarzschild space-time produced by an idealized spherically symmetric non rotating Earth. The trajectories are then circumferences centered at the same point as Earth. Photon motions are described in Minkowski space-time, where there is a well known relation, (Coll et al. in Class. Quantum Gravit. 27:065013, 2010a), between the emission and inertial coordinates of any event. Here, this relation is implemented in a numerical code, which is tested and applied. The first application is a detailed numerical four-dimensional analysis of the so-called emission coordinate region and co-region. In a second application, a GPS (Galileo) satellite is considered as the receiver and its emission coordinates are given by four Galileo (GPS) satellites. The bifurcation problem (double localization) in the positioning of the receiver satellite is then pointed out and discussed in detail.

  12. A four-dimensional snapshot hyperspectral video-endoscope for bio-imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hoong-Ta; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has proven significance in bio-imaging applications and it has the ability to capture up to several hundred images of different wavelengths offering relevant spectral signatures. To use hyperspectral imaging for in vivo monitoring and diagnosis of the internal body cavities, a snapshot hyperspectral video-endoscope is required. However, such reported systems provide only about 50 wavelengths. We have developed a four-dimensional snapshot hyperspectral video-endoscope with a spectral range of 400-1000 nm, which can detect 756 wavelengths for imaging, significantly more than such systems. Capturing the three-dimensional datacube sequentially gives the fourth dimension. All these are achieved through a flexible two-dimensional to one-dimensional fiber bundle. The potential of this custom designed and fabricated compact biomedical probe is demonstrated by imaging phantom tissue samples in reflectance and fluorescence imaging modalities. It is envisaged that this novel concept and developed probe will contribute significantly towards diagnostic in vivo biomedical imaging in the near future. PMID:27044607

  13. A four-dimensional virtual hand brain-machine interface using active dimension selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouse, Adam G.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) traditionally rely on a fixed, linear transformation from neural signals to an output state-space. In this study, the assumption that a BMI must control a fixed, orthogonal basis set was challenged and a novel active dimension selection (ADS) decoder was explored. Approach. ADS utilizes a two stage decoder by using neural signals to both (i) select an active dimension being controlled and (ii) control the velocity along the selected dimension. ADS decoding was tested in a monkey using 16 single units from premotor and primary motor cortex to successfully control a virtual hand avatar to move to eight different postures. Main results. Following training with the ADS decoder to control 2, 3, and then 4 dimensions, each emulating a grasp shape of the hand, performance reached 93% correct with a bit rate of 2.4 bits s-1 for eight targets. Selection of eight targets using ADS control was more efficient, as measured by bit rate, than either full four-dimensional control or computer assisted one-dimensional control. Significance. ADS decoding allows a user to quickly and efficiently select different hand postures. This novel decoding scheme represents a potential method to reduce the complexity of high-dimension BMI control of the hand.

  14. Supersymmetric Janus solutions in four-dimensional N =3 gauged supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karndumri, Parinya

    2016-06-01

    We construct supersymmetric Janus solutions using four-dimensional N =3 gauged supergravity with S O (3 )×S U (3 ) gauge group. The N =3 supersymmetric AdS4 vacuum with unbroken S O (3 )×S U (3 ), identified with the compactification of eleven-dimensional supergravity on AdS4×N010 , provides a gravity dual of supersymmetric N =3 Chern-Simons-Matter theory in three dimensions with S U (3 ) flavor symmetry. The Janus solutions accordingly describe supersymmetric conformal interfaces within this Chern-Simons-Matter theory via the AdS /CFT holography. We find two classes of Janus solutions preserving respectively (2,1) and (0,1) supersymmetry on the (1 +1 )-dimensional conformal defects. The solution with (2,1) supersymmetry preserves S O (2 )×S O (2 )×S O (2 )⊂S O (3 )×S U (3 ) symmetry while the (0,1) supersymmetric solution is invariant under a larger S O (2 )×S U (2 )×S O (2 ) symmetry.

  15. Morphogenesis of an extended phenotype: four-dimensional ant nest architecture

    PubMed Central

    Minter, Nicholas J.; Franks, Nigel R.; Robson Brown, Katharine A.

    2012-01-01

    Animals produce a variety of structures to modify their environments adaptively. Such structures represent extended phenotypes whose development is rarely studied. To begin to rectify this, we used micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning and time-series experiments to obtain the first high-resolution dataset on the four-dimensional growth of ant nests. We show that extrinsic features within the environment, such as the presence of planes between layers of sediment, influence the architecture of Lasius flavus nests, with ants excavating horizontal tunnels along such planes. Intrinsically, the dimensions of the tunnels are associated with individual colonies, the dynamics of excavation can be explained by negative feedback and the angular distribution of tunnels is probably a result of local competition among tunnels for miners. The architecture and dynamics of ant nest excavation therefore result from local interactions of ants with one another and templates inherent in the environment. The influence of the environment on the form of structures has been documented across both biotic and abiotic domains. Our study opens up the utility of CT scanning as a technique for observing the morphogenesis of such structures. PMID:21849386

  16. A four-dimensional virtual hand brain–machine interface using active dimension selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouse, Adam G.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Brain–machine interfaces (BMI) traditionally rely on a fixed, linear transformation from neural signals to an output state-space. In this study, the assumption that a BMI must control a fixed, orthogonal basis set was challenged and a novel active dimension selection (ADS) decoder was explored. Approach. ADS utilizes a two stage decoder by using neural signals to both (i) select an active dimension being controlled and (ii) control the velocity along the selected dimension. ADS decoding was tested in a monkey using 16 single units from premotor and primary motor cortex to successfully control a virtual hand avatar to move to eight different postures. Main results. Following training with the ADS decoder to control 2, 3, and then 4 dimensions, each emulating a grasp shape of the hand, performance reached 93% correct with a bit rate of 2.4 bits s‑1 for eight targets. Selection of eight targets using ADS control was more efficient, as measured by bit rate, than either full four-dimensional control or computer assisted one-dimensional control. Significance. ADS decoding allows a user to quickly and efficiently select different hand postures. This novel decoding scheme represents a potential method to reduce the complexity of high-dimension BMI control of the hand.

  17. Live dynamic OCT imaging of cardiac structure and function in mouse embryos with 43 Hz direct volumetric data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shang; Singh, Manmohan; Lopez, Andrew L.; Wu, Chen; Raghunathan, Raksha; Schill, Alexander; Li, Jiasong; Larin, Kirill V.; Larina, Irina V.

    2016-03-01

    Efficient phenotyping of cardiac dynamics in live mouse embryos has significant implications on understanding of early mammalian heart development and congenital cardiac defects. Recent studies established optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a powerful tool for live embryonic heart imaging in various animal models. However, current four-dimensional (4D) OCT imaging of the beating embryonic heart largely relies on gated data acquisition or postacquisition synchronization, which brings errors when cardiac cycles lack perfect periodicity and is time consuming and computationally expensive. Here, we report direct 4D OCT imaging of the structure and function of cardiac dynamics in live mouse embryos achieved by employing a Fourier domain mode-locking swept laser source that enables ~1.5 MHz A-line rate. Through utilizing both forward and backward scans of a resonant mirror, we obtained a ~6.4 kHz frame rate, which allows for a direct volumetric data acquisition speed of ~43 Hz, around 20 times of the early-stage mouse embryonic heart rate. Our experiments were performed on mouse embryos at embryonic day 9.5. Time-resolved 3D cardiodynamics clearly shows the heart structure in motion. We present analysis of cardiac wall movement and its velocity from the primitive atrium and ventricle. Our results suggest that the combination of ultrahigh-speed OCT imaging with live embryo culture could be a useful embryonic heart phenotyping approach for mouse mutants modeling human congenital heart diseases.

  18. Estimate of the Critical Exponent of the Anderson Transition in the Three and Four-Dimensional Unitary Universality Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slevin, Keith; Ohtsuki, Tomi

    2016-10-01

    Disordered non-interacting systems are classified into ten symmetry classes, with the unitary class being the most fundamental. The three and four-dimensional unitary universality classes are attracting renewed interest because of their relation to three-dimensional Weyl semi-metals and four-dimensional topological insulators. Determining the critical exponent of the correlation/localisation length for the Anderson transition in these classes is important both theoretically and experimentally. Using the transfer matrix technique, we report numerical estimations of the critical exponent in a U(1) model in three and four dimensions.

  19. Non-rigid summing of gated PET via optical flow

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.J.; Reutter, B.W.; Huesman, R.H. |

    1996-12-31

    A method for summing together datasets from gated cardiac PET acquisitions is described. Optical flow techniques are used to accurately model non-rigid motion present during the cardiac cycle so that a one-to-one mapping is found between each voxel of two gated volumes. Using this mapping, image summing can take place, producing a composite dataset with improved statistics and reduced motion-induced blur. Results using a data from a gated cardiac study on a dog are presented.

  20. Development of educational programs using Dagik Earth, a four dimensional display of the Earth and planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, A.; Akiya, Y.; Yoshida, D.; Odagi, Y.; Yoshikawa, M.; Tsugawa, T.; Takahashi, M.; Kumano, Y.; Iwasaki, S.

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a four-dimensional display system of the Earth and planets to use in schools, science centers, and research institutes. It can display the Earth and planets in three-dimensional way without glasses, and the time variation of the scientific data can be displayed on the Earth and planets image. The system is named Dagik Earth, and educational programs using Dagik Earth have been developed for schools and science centers. Three dimensional displays can show the Earth and planets in exact form without any distortion, which cannot be achieved with two-dimensional display. Furthermore it can provide a sense of reality. There are several systems for the three-dimensional presentation of the Earth, such as Science on a sphere by NOAA, and Geocosmos by Miraikan, Japan. Comparing these systems, the advantage of Dagik Earth is portability and affordability. The system uses ordinary PC and PC projector. Only a spherical screen is the special equipment of Dagik Earth. Therefore Dagik Earth is easy to use in classrooms. Several educational programs have been developed and carried out in high schools, junior high schools, elementary schools and science centers. Several research institutes have used Dagik Earth in their public outreach programs to demonstrate their novel scientific results to public in an attractive way of presentation. A community of users and developers of Dagik Earth is being formed in Japan. In the presentation, the outline of Dagik Earth and the educational programs using Dagik Earth will be presented. Its future plan will also be discussed.

  1. An automated method for comparing motion artifacts in cine four-dimensional computed tomography images.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guoqiang; Jew, Brian; Hong, Julian C; Johnston, Eric W; Loo, Billy W; Maxim, Peter G

    2012-11-08

    The aim of this study is to develop an automated method to objectively compare motion artifacts in two four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) image sets, and identify the one that would appear to human observers with fewer or smaller artifacts. Our proposed method is based on the difference of the normalized correlation coefficients between edge slices at couch transitions, which we hypothesize may be a suitable metric to identify motion artifacts. We evaluated our method using ten pairs of 4D CT image sets that showed subtle differences in artifacts between images in a pair, which were identifiable by human observers. One set of 4D CT images was sorted using breathing traces in which our clinically implemented 4D CT sorting software miscalculated the respiratory phase, which expectedly led to artifacts in the images. The other set of images consisted of the same images; however, these were sorted using the same breathing traces but with corrected phases. Next we calculated the normalized correlation coefficients between edge slices at all couch transitions for all respiratory phases in both image sets to evaluate for motion artifacts. For nine image set pairs, our method identified the 4D CT sets sorted using the breathing traces with the corrected respiratory phase to result in images with fewer or smaller artifacts, whereas for one image pair, no difference was noted. Two observers independently assessed the accuracy of our method. Both observers identified 9 image sets that were sorted using the breathing traces with corrected respiratory phase as having fewer or smaller artifacts. In summary, using the 4D CT data of ten pairs of 4D CT image sets, we have demonstrated proof of principle that our method is able to replicate the results of two human observers in identifying the image set with fewer or smaller artifacts.

  2. Visualization of endosome dynamics in living nerve terminals with four-dimensional fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Richard S; Kiss, Ilona M; Wilkinson, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) light imaging has been used to study behavior of small structures within motor nerve terminals of the thin transversus abdominis muscle of the garter snake. Raw data comprises time-lapse sequences of 3D z-stacks. Each stack contains 4-20 images acquired with epifluorescence optics at focal planes separated by 400-1,500 nm. Steps in the acquisition of image stacks, such as adjustment of focus, switching of excitation wavelengths, and operation of the digital camera, are automated as much as possible to maximize image rate and minimize tissue damage from light exposure. After acquisition, a set of image stacks is deconvolved to improve spatial resolution, converted to the desired 3D format, and used to create a 4D "movie" that is suitable for variety of computer-based analyses, depending upon the experimental data sought. One application is study of the dynamic behavior of two classes of endosomes found in nerve terminals-macroendosomes (MEs) and acidic endosomes (AEs)-whose sizes (200-800 nm for both types) are at or near the diffraction limit. Access to 3D information at each time point provides several advantages over conventional time-lapse imaging. In particular, size and velocity of movement of structures can be quantified over time without loss of sharp focus. Examples of data from 4D imaging reveal that MEs approach the plasma membrane and disappear, suggesting that they are exocytosed rather than simply moving vertically away from a single plane of focus. Also revealed is putative fusion of MEs and AEs, by visualization of overlap between the two dye-containing structures as viewed in each three orthogonal projections. PMID:24799002

  3. Novel Assessment of Renal Motion in Children as Measured via Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Pai Panandiker, Atmaram S.; Sharma, Shelly; Naik, Mihir H.; Wu, Shengjie; Hua, Chiaho; Beltran, Chris; Krasin, Matthew J.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-04-01

    Objectives: Abdominal intensity-modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy require quantification of target and organ motion to optimize localization and treatment. Although addressed in adults, there is no available literature on this issue in pediatric patients. We assessed physiologic renal motion in pediatric patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty free-breathing pediatric patients at a median age of 8 years (range, 2-18 years) with intra-abdominal tumors underwent computed tomography simulation and four-dimensional computed tomography acquisition (slice thickness, 3 mm). Kidneys and diaphragms were contoured during eight phases of respiration to estimate center-of-mass motion. We quantified center of kidney mass mobility vectors in three dimensions: anteroposterior (AP), mediolateral (ML), and superoinferior (SI). Results: Kidney motion decreases linearly with decreasing age and height. The 95% confidence interval for the averaged minima and maxima of renal motion in children younger than 9 years was 5-9 mm in the ML direction, 4-11 mm in the AP direction, and 12-25 mm in the SI dimension for both kidneys. In children older than 9 years, the same confidence interval reveals a widening range of motion that was 5-16 mm in the ML direction, 6-17 mm in the AP direction, and 21-52 mm in the SI direction. Although not statistically significant, renal motion correlated with diaphragm motion in older patients. The correlation between diaphragm motion and body mass index was borderline (r = 0.52, p = 0.0816) in younger patients. Conclusions: Renal motion is age and height dependent. Measuring diaphragmatic motion alone does not reliably quantify pediatric renal motion. Renal motion in young children ranges from 5 to 25 mm in orientation-specific directions. The vectors of motion range from 5 to 52 mm in older children. These preliminary data represent novel analyses of pediatric intra-abdominal organ motion.

  4. Impact of four-dimensional data assimilation (FDDA) on urban climate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Linlin; Liu, Yubao; Liu, Yuewei; Li, Lei; Jiang, Yin; Cheng, Will; Roux, Gregory

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the impact of four-dimensional data assimilation (FDDA) on urban climate analysis, which employs the NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) WRF (the weather research and forecasting model) based on climate FDDA (CFDDA) technology to develop an urban-scale microclimatology database for the Shenzhen area, a rapidly developing metropolitan located along the southern coast of China, where uniquely high-density observations, including ultrahigh-resolution surface AWS (automatic weather station) network, radio sounding, wind profilers, radiometers, and other weather observation platforms, have been installed. CFDDA is an innovative dynamical downscaling regional climate analysis system that assimilates diverse regional observations; and has been employed to produce a 5 year multiscale high-resolution microclimate analysis by assimilating high-density observations at Shenzhen area. The CFDDA system was configured with four nested-grid domains at grid sizes of 27, 9, 3, and 1 km, respectively. This research evaluates the impact of assimilating high-resolution observation data on reproducing the refining features of urban-scale circulations. Two experiments were conducted with a 5 year run using CFSR (climate forecast system reanalysis) as boundary and initial conditions: one with CFDDA and the other without. The comparisons of these two experiments with observations indicate that CFDDA greatly reduces the model analysis error and is able to realistically analyze the microscale features such as urban-rural-coastal circulation, land/sea breezes, and local-hilly terrain thermal circulations. It is demonstrated that the urbanization can produce 2.5 k differences in 2 m temperatures, delays/speeds up the land/sea breeze development, and interacts with local mountain-valley circulations.

  5. Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography-Based Interfractional Reproducibility Study of Lung Tumor Intrafractional Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, Darek Sontag, Marc; Li Fang; Andrade, Regiane S. de; Uslene, Irmute; Brandner, Edward D.; Heron, Dwight E.; Yue Ning; Huq, M. Saiful

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the interfractional reproducibility of respiration-induced lung tumors motion, defined by their centroids and the intrafractional target motion range. Methods and Materials: Twentythree pairs of four-dimensional/computed tomography scans were acquired for 22 patients. Gross tumor volumes were contoured, Clinical target volumes (CTVs) were generated. Geometric data for CTVs and lung volumes were extracted. The motion tracks of CTV centroids, and CTV edges along the cranio-caudal, anterior-posterior, and lateral directions were evaluated. The Pearson correlation coefficient for motion tracks along the cranio-caudal direction was determined for the entire respiratory cycle and for five phases about the end of expiration. Results: The largest motion extent was along the cranio-caudal direction. The intrafractional motion extent for five CTVs was <0.5 cm, the largest motion range was 3.59 cm. Three CTVs with respiration-induced displacement >0.5 cm did not exhibit the similarity of motion, and for 16 CTVs with motion >0.5 cm the correlation coefficient was >0.8. The lung volumes in corresponding phases for cases that demonstrated CTVs motion similarity were reproducible. No correlation between tumor size and mobility was found. Conclusion: Target motion reproducibility seems to be present in 87% of cases in our dataset. Three cases with dissimilar motion indicate that it is advisable to verify target motion during treatment. The adaptive adjustment to compensate the possible interfractional shifts in a target position should be incorporated as a routine policy for lung cancer radiotherapy.

  6. Evaluating four-dimensional time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography for monitoring DNAPL source zone remediation.

    PubMed

    Power, Christopher; Gerhard, Jason I; Karaoulis, Marios; Tsourlos, Panagiotis; Giannopoulos, Antonios

    2014-07-01

    Practical, non-invasive tools do not currently exist for mapping the remediation of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) exhibits significant potential but has not yet become a practitioner's tool due to challenges in interpreting the survey results at real sites. This study explores the effectiveness of recently developed four-dimensional (4D, i.e., 3D space plus time) time-lapse surface ERT to monitor DNAPL source zone remediation. A laboratory experiment demonstrated the approach for mapping a changing NAPL distribution over time. A recently developed DNAPL-ERT numerical model was then employed to independently simulate the experiment, providing confidence that the DNAPL-ERT model is a reliable tool for simulating real systems. The numerical model was then used to evaluate the potential for this approach at the field scale. Four DNAPL source zones, exhibiting a range of complexity, were initially simulated, followed by modeled time-lapse ERT monitoring of complete DNAPL remediation by enhanced dissolution. 4D ERT inversion provided estimates of the regions of the source zone experiencing mass reduction with time. Results show that 4D time-lapse ERT has significant potential to map both the outline and the center of mass of the evolving treated portion of the source zone to within a few meters in each direction. In addition, the technique can provide a reasonable, albeit conservative, estimate of the DNAPL volume remediated with time: 25% underestimation in the upper 2m and up to 50% underestimation at late time between 2 and 4m depth. The technique is less reliable for identifying cleanup of DNAPL stringers outside the main DNAPL body. Overall, this study demonstrates that 4D time-lapse ERT has potential for mapping where and how quickly DNAPL mass changes in real time during site remediation.

  7. Volumetric limiting spatial resolution analysis of four-dimensional digital subtraction angiography.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brian J; Oberstar, Erick; Royalty, Kevin; Schafer, Sebastian; Mistretta, Charles

    2016-01-01

    C-Arm CT three-dimensional (3-D) digital subtraction angiography (DSA) reconstructions cannot provide temporal information to radiologists. Four-dimensional (4-D) DSA provides a time series of 3-D volumes utilizing temporal dynamics in the two-dimensional (2-D) projections using a constraining image reconstruction approach. Volumetric limiting spatial resolution (VLSR) of 4-D DSA is quantified and compared to a 3-D DSA. The effects of varying 4-D DSA parameters of 2-D projection blurring kernel size and threshold of the 3-D DSA (constraining image) of an in silico phantom (ISPH) and physical phantom (PPH) were investigated. The PPH consisted of a 76-micron tungsten wire. An [Formula: see text] scan protocol acquired the projection data. VLSR was determined from MTF curves generated from each 2-D transverse slice of every (248) 4-D temporal frame. 4-D DSA results for PPH and ISPH were compared to the 3-D DSA. 3-D DSA analysis resulted in a VLSR of 2.28 and [Formula: see text] for ISPH and PPH, respectively. Kernel sizes of either [Formula: see text] or [Formula: see text] with a 3-D DSA constraining image threshold of 10% provided 4-D DSA VLSR nearest to the 3-D DSA. 4-D DSA yielded 2.21 and [Formula: see text] with a percent error of 3.1 and 1.2% for ISPH and PPH, respectively, as compared to 3-D DSA. This research indicates 4-D DSA is capable of retaining the resolution of 3-D DSA. PMID:26835500

  8. Four-dimensional computed tomography and detection of dynamic capitate subluxation.

    PubMed

    Repse, Stephen E; Amis, Benjamin; Troupis, John M

    2015-06-01

    Midcarpal instability syndrome is often misdiagnosed, leading to delayed recognition, treatment and possibly poor clinical outcome. Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) has previously proved useful in assessment of the acromioclavicular joint and wrist motion, allowing clinicians and radiologists to gain an understanding of abnormalities in function as well as morphology, which often contribute to patient symptoms. We present the case of a 25-year-old male with no history of trauma who presents with several months of a right wrist clunk on both passive and active (load bearing) motion. Plain film and 1.5 Tesla MRI with intra-articular contrast demonstrates a normal appearance, without joint space, tendon or ligament disturbance. We further investigated this condition using a wide volume detector CT scanning technique (4D CT). Data from the patient's asymptomatic wrist was utilized as a comparison for this study. Assessment of cine movie files from the symptomatic wrist revealed abnormal subluxation of the capitate from the lunate when compared with the normal wrist, in which the capitate did not deviate from the concavity of the lunate and did not cross the perpendicular line from the superior pole of the lunate in any phase of motion, which we defined as capitate subluxation. 4D CT allows for detection of capitate subluxation in an earlier stage of disease progression, constituting earlier recognition and providing the opportunity for earlier treatment of the disease, potentially mitigating significant patient morbidity. We have been able to confidently identify capitate subluxation both visually (assessment of the sagittal RLC axis) and objectively (documentation of percent subluxation of the capitate beyond the superior pole of the lunate). We propose that 4D CT investigation of all functional carpal instability syndromes may be beneficial as this technique has the potential to significantly increase our knowledge of dynamic carpal bone abnormalities

  9. Evaluation of Bogus Vortex Techniques with Four-Dimensional Variational Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pu, Zhao-Xia; Braun, Scott A.

    2000-01-01

    The effectiveness of techniques for creating "bogus" vortices in numerical simulations of hurricanes is examined by using the Penn State/NCAR nonhydrostatic mesoscale model (MM5) and its adjoint system. A series of four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4-D VAR) experiments is conducted to generate an initial vortex for Hurricane Georges (1998) in the Atlantic Ocean by assimilating bogus sea-level pressure and surface wind information into the mesoscale numerical model. Several different strategies are tested for improving the vortex representation. The initial vortices produced by the 4-D VAR technique are able to reproduce many of the structural features of mature hurricanes. The vortices also result in significant improvements to the hurricane forecasts in terms of both intensity and track. In particular, with assimilation of only bogus sea-level pressure information, the response in the wind field is contained largely within the divergent component, with strong convergence leading to strong upward motion near the center. Although the intensity of the initial vortex seems to be well represented, a dramatic spin down of the storm occurs within the first 6 h of the forecast. With assimilation of bogus surface wind data only, an expected dominance of the rotational component of the wind field is generated, but the minimum pressure is adjusted inadequately compared to the actual hurricane minimum pressure. Only when both the bogus surface pressure and wind information are assimilated together does the model produce a vortex that represents the actual intensity of the hurricane and results in significant improvements to forecasts of both hurricane intensity and track.

  10. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  11. Do Human Fetuses Anticipate Self-Oriented Actions? A Study by Four-Dimensional (4D) Ultrasonography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako; Takeshita, Hideko

    2006-01-01

    Using four-dimensional (4D) ultrasonography, arm and hand movements toward the face were examined in 27 human fetuses at 19 to 35 weeks of gestation, thereby enabling the continuous monitoring of their faces and other surface features such as the extremities. More than half of the observed arm movements resulted in the hand touching the mouth…

  12. To study tumor motion and planning target volume margins using four dimensional computed tomography for cancer of the thorax and abdomen regions.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Sudesh

    2011-01-01

    In this study, four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scanning was performed during free breathing on a 16-slice Positron emission tomography PET /computed tomography (CT) for abdomen and thoracic patients. Images were sorted into 10 phases based on the temporal correlation between surface motion and data acquisition with an Advantage Workstation. Gross tumor volume gross tumor volume (GTV) s were manually contoured on all 10 phases of the 4DCT scan. GTVs in the multiple CT phases were called GTV4D. GTV4D plus an isotropic margin of 1.0 cm was called CTV4D. Two sets of planning target volume (PTV) 4D (PTV4D) were derived from the CTV4D, i.e. PTV4D(2cm) = CTV4D plus 1 cm setup margin (SM) and 1 cm internal margin (IM) and PTV4D(1.5cm) = CTV4D plus 1 cm SM and 0.5cm IM. PTV3D was derived from a CTV3D of the helical CT scan plus conventional margins of 2 cm. PTV(gated) was generated only selecting three CT phases, with a total margin of 1.5 cm. All four volumes were compared. To quantify the extent of the motion, we selected the two phases where the tumor exhibited the greatest range of motion. We also studied the effect of different PTV volumes on dose to the surrounding critical structures. Volume of CTV4D was greater than that of CTV3D. We found, on an average, a reduction of 14% volume of PTV4D(1.5cm) as compared with PTV3D and reduction of 10% volume of PTV(gated) as compared with PTV4D(1.5cm). We found that 2 cm of margin was inadequate if true motion of tumor was not known. We observed greater sparing of critical structures for PTVs drawn taking into account the tumor motion.

  13. A reduced-order approach to four-dimensional variational data assimilation using proper orthogonal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yanhua; Zhu, Jiang; Navon, I. M.; Luo, Zhendong

    2007-04-01

    Four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4DVAR) is a powerful tool for data assimilation in meteorology and oceanography. However, a major hurdle in use of 4DVAR for realistic general circulation models is the dimension of the control space (generally equal to the size of the model state variable and typically of order 107-108) and the high computational cost in computing the cost function and its gradient that require integration model and its adjoint model.In this paper, we propose a 4DVAR approach based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). POD is an efficient way to carry out reduced order modelling by identifying the few most energetic modes in a sequence of snapshots from a time-dependent system, and providing a means of obtaining a low-dimensional description of the system's dynamics. The POD-based 4DVAR not only reduces the dimension of control space, but also reduces the size of dynamical model, both in dramatic ways. The novelty of our approach also consists in the inclusion of adaptability, applied when in the process of iterative control the new control variables depart significantly from the ones on which the POD model was based upon. In addition, these approaches also allow to conveniently constructing the adjoint model.The proposed POD-based 4DVAR methods are tested and demonstrated using a reduced gravity wave ocean model in Pacific domain in the context of identical twin data assimilation experiments. A comparison with data assimilation experiments in the full model space shows that with an appropriate selection of the basis functions the optimization in the POD space is able to provide accurate results at a reduced computational cost. The POD-based 4DVAR methods have the potential to approximate the performance of full order 4DVAR with less than 1/100 computer time of the full order 4DVAR. The HFTN (Hessian-free truncated-Newton)algorithm benefits most from the order reduction (see (Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids, in press)) since

  14. GPU-based four-dimensional general-relativistic ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchelmeister, Daniel; Müller, Thomas; Ament, Marco; Wunner, Günter; Weiskopf, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a new general-relativistic ray tracer that enables image synthesis on an interactive basis by exploiting the performance of graphics processing units (GPUs). The application is capable of visualizing the distortion of the stellar background as well as trajectories of moving astronomical objects orbiting a compact mass. Its source code includes metric definitions for the Schwarzschild and Kerr spacetimes that can be easily extended to other metric definitions, relying on its object-oriented design. The basic functionality features a scene description interface based on the scripting language Lua, real-time image output, and the ability to edit almost every parameter at runtime. The ray tracing code itself is implemented for parallel execution on the GPU using NVidia's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), which leads to performance improvement of an order of magnitude compared to a single CPU and makes the application competitive with small CPU cluster architectures. Program summary Program title: GpuRay4D Catalog identifier: AEMV_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMV_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 73649 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1334251 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++, CUDA. Computer: Linux platforms with a NVidia CUDA enabled GPU (Compute Capability 1.3 or higher), C++ compiler, NVCC (The CUDA Compiler Driver). Operating system: Linux. RAM: 2 GB Classification: 1.5. External routines: OpenGL Utility Toolkit development files, NVidia CUDA Toolkit 3.2, Lua5.2 Nature of problem: Ray tracing in four-dimensional Lorentzian spacetimes. Solution method: Numerical integration of light rays, GPU-based parallel programming using CUDA, 3D

  15. Respiratory motion guided four dimensional cone beam computed tomography: encompassing irregular breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Ricky T.; Cooper, Benjamin J.; Kipritidis, John; Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-02-01

    Four dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) images suffer from angular under sampling and bunching of projections due to a lack of feedback between the respiratory signal and the acquisition system. To address this problem, respiratory motion guided 4DCBCT (RMG-4DCBCT) regulates the gantry velocity and projection time interval, in response to the patient’s respiratory signal, with the aim of acquiring evenly spaced projections in a number of phase or displacement bins during the respiratory cycle. Our previous study of RMG-4DCBCT was limited to sinusoidal breathing traces. Here we expand on that work to provide a practical algorithm for the case of real patient breathing data. We give a complete description of RMG-4DCBCT including full details on how to implement the algorithms to determine when to move the gantry and when to acquire projections in response to the patient’s respiratory signal. We simulate a realistic working RMG-4DCBCT system using 112 breathing traces from 24 lung cancer patients. Acquisition used phase-based binning and parameter settings typically used on commercial 4DCBCT systems (4 min acquisition time, 1200 projections across 10 respiratory bins), with the acceleration and velocity constraints of current generation linear accelerators. We quantified streaking artefacts and image noise for conventional and RMG-4DCBCT methods by reconstructing projection data selected from an oversampled set of Catphan phantom projections. RMG-4DCBCT allows us to optimally trade-off image quality, acquisition time and image dose. For example, for the same image quality and acquisition time as conventional 4DCBCT approximately half the imaging dose is needed. Alternatively, for the same imaging dose, the image quality as measured by the signal to noise ratio, is improved by 63% on average. C-arm cone beam computed tomography systems, with an acceleration up to 200°/s2, a velocity up to 100°/s and the acquisition of 80 projections per second

  16. Dose and Position Measurements using a Novel Four-Dimensional In Vivo Dosimetry System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherpak, Amanda

    This work presents a comprehensive characterization of the dosimetric and position measurement characteristics as well as clinical implementation of a novel four-dimensional in vivo dosimetry system, RADPOS. Preliminary dose and position measurements were first conducted to evaluate any deviation from known characteristics of metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors, MOSFETs, and electromagnetic positioning systems when they are used alone. The system was then combined with a deformable tissue equivalent lung phantom to simulate respiratory-induced tumour motion and lung deformation and to evaluate the potential use of the system as an effective quality assurance tool for 4D conformal radiotherapy. The final phase of testing involved using the RADPOS 4D in vivo dosimetry system in two different clinical trials. The first involved characterizing the breathing patterns of lung cancer patients throughout the course of treatment and measuring inter-fraction variations in skin dose. Within this framework, the feasibility of general use of the RADPOS system on patients during daily treatment fractions was also assessed. The second trial involved a modified RADPOS detector that contained a MOSFET array, allowing for dose measurements at five different points. This detector was used to measure dose and position in the prostatic urethra throughout seed implantation for transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy. It has been found that the dosimetric response is similar to that of a microMOSFET, when used alone, aside from a slightly higher variation in angular response. Position measurements can be obtained with an uncertainty of +/- 2 mm when the detector remains within a specific optimal volume with respect to the magnetic field transmitter and when interfering metal objects are kept at least 200 mm away. Combining the RADPOS system with a deformable lung equivalent phantom allowed for efficient quality assurance of 4D radiation therapy, as

  17. Improved and robust detection of cell nuclei from four dimensional fluorescence images.

    PubMed

    Bashar, Md Khayrul; Yamagata, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation-free direct methods are quite efficient for automated nuclei extraction from high dimensional images. A few such methods do exist but most of them do not ensure algorithmic robustness to parameter and noise variations. In this research, we propose a method based on multiscale adaptive filtering for efficient and robust detection of nuclei centroids from four dimensional (4D) fluorescence images. A temporal feedback mechanism is employed between the enhancement and the initial detection steps of a typical direct method. We estimate the minimum and maximum nuclei diameters from the previous frame and feed back them as filter lengths for multiscale enhancement of the current frame. A radial intensity-gradient function is optimized at positions of initial centroids to estimate all nuclei diameters. This procedure continues for processing subsequent images in the sequence. Above mechanism thus ensures proper enhancement by automated estimation of major parameters. This brings robustness and safeguards the system against additive noises and effects from wrong parameters. Later, the method and its single-scale variant are simplified for further reduction of parameters. The proposed method is then extended for nuclei volume segmentation. The same optimization technique is applied to final centroid positions of the enhanced image and the estimated diameters are projected onto the binary candidate regions to segment nuclei volumes.Our method is finally integrated with a simple sequential tracking approach to establish nuclear trajectories in the 4D space. Experimental evaluations with five image-sequences (each having 271 3D sequential images) corresponding to five different mouse embryos show promising performances of our methods in terms of nuclear detection, segmentation, and tracking. A detail analysis with a sub-sequence of 101 3D images from an embryo reveals that the proposed method can improve the nuclei detection accuracy by 9% over the previous methods

  18. Interfractional Reproducibility in Pancreatic Position Based on Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Shibuya, Keiko; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Akira; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakata, Manabu; Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Itoh, Akio; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the interfractional positional variation of the pancreas using four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) and to determine the suitable phase of respiration for dose delivery methods to account for pancreatic tumor motion. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with pancreatic cancer were enrolled in this study. For each patient, 4D-CT scans were performed at CT simulation and three times during the course of treatment. Regions of interest were set to the intrapancreatic bile ducts as a surrogate for pancreatic position. The centroids of the regions of interest were calculated at end-inhalation and end-exhalation of the respiration phase. The ranges of respiratory motion and interfractional positional variation were evaluated in the left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions. Results: The medians of respiratory motion were 1.1 mm (range, 0.0-9.8 mm), 1.5 mm (range, 0.0-7.0 mm), and 5.0 mm (range, 0.0-12.5 mm) in the LR, AP, and SI directions, respectively. The means {+-} SDs of the interfractional positional variation at end-inhalation were 0.9 {+-} 5.1 mm (range, -9.2 to 15.6 mm), -1.9 {+-} 3.9 mm (range, -12.8 to 6.4 mm), and -1.3 {+-} 6.9 mm (range, -15.0 to 13.7 mm) and those at end-exhalation were 0.0 {+-} 3.1 mm (range, -7.0 to 5.3 mm), -1.2 {+-} 3.9 mm (range, -11.2 to 6.7 mm), and 0.1 {+-} 3.2 mm (range, -9.9 to 5.1 mm) in the LR, AP, and SI directions, respectively. The SDs of the interfractional positional variation in the LR and SI directions were significantly larger at end-inhalation than at end-exhalation (LR, p < 0.001; SI, p < 0.001). Conclusions: The ranges of respiratory motion during the course of treatment and the interfractional positional variation were not negligible. The interfractional positional reproducibility was higher at end-exhalation than at end-inhalation under free breathing.

  19. Improved and Robust Detection of Cell Nuclei from Four Dimensional Fluorescence Images

    PubMed Central

    Bashar, Md. Khayrul; Yamagata, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation-free direct methods are quite efficient for automated nuclei extraction from high dimensional images. A few such methods do exist but most of them do not ensure algorithmic robustness to parameter and noise variations. In this research, we propose a method based on multiscale adaptive filtering for efficient and robust detection of nuclei centroids from four dimensional (4D) fluorescence images. A temporal feedback mechanism is employed between the enhancement and the initial detection steps of a typical direct method. We estimate the minimum and maximum nuclei diameters from the previous frame and feed back them as filter lengths for multiscale enhancement of the current frame. A radial intensity-gradient function is optimized at positions of initial centroids to estimate all nuclei diameters. This procedure continues for processing subsequent images in the sequence. Above mechanism thus ensures proper enhancement by automated estimation of major parameters. This brings robustness and safeguards the system against additive noises and effects from wrong parameters. Later, the method and its single-scale variant are simplified for further reduction of parameters. The proposed method is then extended for nuclei volume segmentation. The same optimization technique is applied to final centroid positions of the enhanced image and the estimated diameters are projected onto the binary candidate regions to segment nuclei volumes.Our method is finally integrated with a simple sequential tracking approach to establish nuclear trajectories in the 4D space. Experimental evaluations with five image-sequences (each having 271 3D sequential images) corresponding to five different mouse embryos show promising performances of our methods in terms of nuclear detection, segmentation, and tracking. A detail analysis with a sub-sequence of 101 3D images from an embryo reveals that the proposed method can improve the nuclei detection accuracy by 9 over the previous methods

  20. Five-dimensional motion compensation for respiratory and cardiac motion with cone-beam CT of the thorax region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauppe, Sebastian; Hahn, Andreas; Brehm, Marcus; Paysan, Pascal; Seghers, Dieter; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We propose an adapted method of our previously published five-dimensional (5D) motion compensation (MoCo) algorithm1, developed for micro-CT imaging of small animals, to provide for the first time motion artifact-free 5D cone-beam CT (CBCT) images from a conventional flat detector-based CBCT scan of clinical patients. Image quality of retrospectively respiratory- and cardiac-gated volumes from flat detector CBCT scans is deteriorated by severe sparse projection artifacts. These artifacts further complicate motion estimation, as it is required for MoCo image reconstruction. For high quality 5D CBCT images at the same x-ray dose and the same number of projections as todays 3D CBCT we developed a double MoCo approach based on motion vector fields (MVFs) for respiratory and cardiac motion. In a first step our already published four-dimensional (4D) artifact-specific cyclic motion-compensation (acMoCo) approach is applied to compensate for the respiratory patient motion. With this information a cyclic phase-gated deformable heart registration algorithm is applied to the respiratory motion-compensated 4D CBCT data, thus resulting in cardiac MVFs. We apply these MVFs on double-gated images and thereby respiratory and cardiac motion-compensated 5D CBCT images are obtained. Our 5D MoCo approach processing patient data acquired with the TrueBeam 4D CBCT system (Varian Medical Systems). Our double MoCo approach turned out to be very efficient and removed nearly all streak artifacts due to making use of 100% of the projection data for each reconstructed frame. The 5D MoCo patient data show fine details and no motion blurring, even in regions close to the heart where motion is fastest.

  1. High temporal resolution and streak-free four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Shuai; Tang, Jie; Zambelli, Joseph; Nett, Brian; Tolakanahalli, Ranjini; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2008-10-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been clinically used to verify patient position and to localize the target of treatment in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). However, when the chest and the upper abdomen are scanned, respiratory-induced motion blurring limits the utility of CBCT. In order to mitigate this blurring, respiratory-gated CBCT, i.e. 4D CBCT, was introduced. In 4D CBCT, the cone-beam projection data sets acquired during a gantry rotation are sorted into several respiratory phases. In these gated reconstructions, the number of projections for each respiratory phase is significantly reduced. Consequently, undersampling streaking artifacts are present in the reconstructed images, and the image contrast resolution is also significantly compromised. In this paper, we present a new method to simultaneously achieve both high temporal resolution (~100 ms) and streaking artifact-free image volumes in 4D CBCT. The enabling technique is a newly proposed image reconstruction method, i.e. prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS), which enables accurate image reconstruction using vastly undersampled cone-beam projections and a fully sampled prior image. Using PICCS, a streak-free image can be reconstructed from 10-20 cone-beam projections while the signal-to-noise ratio is determined by a denoising feature of the selected objective function and by the prior image, which is reconstructed using all of the acquired cone-beam projections. This feature of PICCS breaks the connection between the temporal resolution and streaking artifacts' level in 4D CBCT. Numerical simulations and experimental phantom studies have been conducted to validate the method.

  2. Impact of motion velocity on four-dimensional target volumes: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Narita, Yuichiro; Sawada, Akira; Matsugi, Kiyotomo; Nakata, Manabu; Matsuo, Yukinori; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2009-05-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of motion velocity that may cause motion artifacts on target volumes (TVs) using a one-dimensional moving phantom. A 20 mm diameter spherical object embedded in a QUASAR phantom sinusoidally moved with approximately 5.0 or 10.0 mm amplitude (A) along the longitudinal axis of the computed tomography (CT) couch. The motion period was manually set in the range of 2.0-10.0 s at approximately 2.0 s interval. Four-dimensional (4D) CT images were acquired by a four-slice CT scanner (LightSpeed RT; General Electric Medical Systems, Waukesha, WI) with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm in axial cine mode. The minimum gantry rotation of 1.0 s was employed to achieve the maximum in-slice temporal resolution. Projection data over a full gantry rotation (1.0 s) were used for image reconstruction. Reflective marker position was recorded by the real-time positioning management system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). ADVANTAGE 4D software exported ten respiratory phase volumes and the maximum intensity volume generated from all reconstructed data (MIV). The threshold to obtain static object volume (V0, 4.19 ml) was used to automatically segment TVs on CT images, and then the union of TVs on 4D CT images (TV(4D)) was constructed. TVs on MIV (TV(MIV)) were also segmented by the threshold that can determine the area occupied within the central slice of TV(MIV). The maximum motion velocity for each phase bin was calculated using the actual averaged motion period displayed on ADVANTAGE 4D software (T), the range of phases used to construct the target phase bin (phase range), and a mathematical model of sinusoidal function. Each volume size and the motion range of TV in the cranial-caudal (CC) direction were measured. Subsequently, cross-correlation coefficients between TV size and motion velocity as well as phase range were calculated. Both misalignment and motion-blurring artifacts were caused by high motion velocity, Less than 6% phase range was

  3. Four-dimensional (4D) PET/CT imaging of the thorax

    SciTech Connect

    Nehmeh, S.A.; Erdi, Y.E.; Pan, T.

    2004-12-01

    We have reported in our previous studies on the methodology, and feasibility of 4D-PET (Gated PET) acquisition, to reduce respiratory motion artifact in PET imaging of the thorax. In this study, we expand our investigation to address the problem of respiration motion in PET/CT imaging. The respiratory motion of four lung cancer patients were monitored by tracking external markers placed on the thorax. A 4D-CT acquisition was performed using a 'step-and-shoot' technique, in which computed tomography (CT) projection data were acquired over a complete respiratory cycle at each couch position. The period of each CT acquisition segment was time stamped with an 'x-ray ON' signal, which was recorded by the tracking system. 4D-CT data were then sorted into 10 groups, according to their corresponding phase of the breathing cycle. 4D-PET data were acquired in the gated mode, where each breathing cycle was divided into ten 0.5 s bins. For both CT and PET acquisitions, patients received audio prompting to regularize breathing. The 4D-CT and 4D-PET data were then correlated according to respiratory phase. The effect of 4D acquisition on improving the co-registration of PET and CT images, reducing motion smearing, and consequently increase the quantitation of the SUV, were investigated. Also, quantitation of the tumor motions in PET, and CT, were studied and compared. 4D-PET with matching phase 4D-CTAC showed an improved accuracy in PET-CT image co-registration of up to 41%, compared to measurements from 4D-PET with clinical-CTAC. Gating PET data in correlation with respiratory motion reduced motion-induced smearing, thereby decreasing the observed tumor volume, by as much as 43%. 4D-PET lesions volumes showed a maximum deviation of 19% between clinical CT and phase- matched 4D-CT attenuation corrected PET images. In CT, 4D acquisition resulted in increasing the tumor volume in two patients by up to 79%, and decreasing it in the other two by up to 35%. Consequently, these

  4. High-Performance Computing and Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation: The Impact on Future and Current Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makivic, Miloje S.

    1996-01-01

    This is the final technical report for the project entitled: "High-Performance Computing and Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation: The Impact on Future and Current Problems", funded at NPAC by the DAO at NASA/GSFC. First, the motivation for the project is given in the introductory section, followed by the executive summary of major accomplishments and the list of project-related publications. Detailed analysis and description of research results is given in subsequent chapters and in the Appendix.

  5. Four-dimensional visualization of subpleural alveolar dynamics in vivo during uninterrupted mechanical ventilation of living swine

    PubMed Central

    Namati, Eman; Warger, William C.; Unglert, Carolin I.; Eckert, Jocelyn E.; Hostens, Jeroen; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary alveoli have been studied for many years, yet no unifying hypothesis exists for their dynamic mechanics during respiration due to their miniature size (100-300 μm dimater in humans) and constant motion, which prevent standard imaging techniques from visualizing four-dimensional dynamics of individual alveoli in vivo. Here we report a new platform to image the first layer of air-filled subpleural alveoli through the use of a lightweight optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) probe that can be placed upon the pleura to move with the lung over the complete range of respiratory motion. This device enables in-vivo acquisition of four-dimensional microscopic images of alveolar airspaces (alveoli and ducts), within the same field of view, during continuous ventilation without restricting the motion or modifying the structure of the alveoli. Results from an exploratory study including three live swine suggest that subpleural alveolar air spaces are best fit with a uniform expansion (r 2 = 0.98) over a recruitment model (r 2 = 0.72). Simultaneously, however, the percentage change in volume shows heterogeneous alveolar expansion within just a 1 mm x 1 mm field of view. These results signify the importance of four-dimensional imaging tools, such as the device presented here. Quantification of the dynamic response of the lung during ventilation may help create more accurate modeling techniques and move toward a more complete understanding of alveolar mechanics. PMID:24298409

  6. Inverse planning for four-dimensional (4D) volumetric modulated arc therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Yunzhi; Chang, Daniel; Keall, Paul; Xie Yiaoqin; Park, Jae-yoon; Suh, Tae-Suk; Xing Lei

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a 4D volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) inverse planning framework. Methods: 4D VMAT inverse planning aims to derive an aperture and weight modulated arc therapy treatment plan that optimizes the accumulated dose distribution from all gantry angles and breathing phases. Under an assumption that the gantry rotation and patient breathing are synchronized (i.e., there is a functional relationship between the phase of the patient breathing cycle and the beam angle), the authors compute the contribution from different respiration phases through the registration of the phased CT images. The accumulative dose distribution is optimized by iteratively adjusting the aperture shape and weight of each beam through the minimization of the planning objective function. For comparison, traditional 3D VMAT plans are also performed for the two cases and the performance of the proposed technique is demonstrated. Results: A framework for 4D VMAT inverse planning has been proposed. With the consideration of the extra dimension of time in VMAT, a tighter target margin can be achieved with a full duty cycle, which is otherwise not achievable simultaneously by either 3D VMAT optimization or gated VMAT. Conclusions: The 4D VMAT planning formulism proposed here provides useful insight on how the ''time'' dimension can be exploited in rotational arc therapy to maximally compensate for the intrafraction organ motion.

  7. A novel four-dimensional radiotherapy planning strategy from a tumor-tracking beam's eye view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang; Cohen, Patrice; Xie, Huchen; Low, Daniel; Li, Diana; Rimner, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the feasibility of four-dimensional radiotherapy (4DRT) planning from a tumor-tracking beam's eye view (ttBEV) with reliable gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation, realistic normal tissue representation, high planning accuracy and low clinical workload, we propose and validate a novel 4D conformal planning strategy based on a synthesized 3.5D computed tomographic (3.5DCT) image with a motion-compensated tumor. To recreate patient anatomy from a ttBEV in the moving tumor coordinate system for 4DRT planning (or 4D planning), the centers of delineated GTVs in all phase CT images of 4DCT were aligned, and then the aligned CTs were averaged to produce a new 3.5DCT image. This GTV-motion-compensated CT contains a motionless target (with motion artifacts minimized) and motion-blurred normal tissues (with a realistic temporal density average). Semi-automatic threshold-based segmentation of the tumor, lung and body was applied, while manual delineation was used for other organs at risk (OARs). To validate this 3.5DCT-based 4D planning strategy, five patients with peripheral lung lesions of small size (<5 cm3) and large motion range (1.2-3.5 cm) were retrospectively studied for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using 3D conformal radiotherapy planning tools. The 3.5DCT-based 4D plan (3.5DCT plan) with 9-10 conformal beams was compared with the 4DCT-based 4D plan (4DCT plan). The 4DCT plan was derived from multiple 3D plans based on all phase CT images, each of which used the same conformal beam configuration but with an isocenter shift to aim at the moving tumor and a minor beam aperture and weighting adjustment to maintain plan conformality. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the 4DCT plan was created with two methods: one is an integrated DVH (iDVH4D), which is defined as the temporal average of all 3D-phase-plan DVHs, and the other (DVH4D) is based on the dose distribution in a reference phase CT image by dose warping from all phase plans using the

  8. A novel four-dimensional radiotherapy planning strategy from a tumor-tracking beam's eye view.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Cohen, Patrice; Xie, Huchen; Low, Daniel; Li, Diana; Rimner, Andreas

    2012-11-21

    To investigate the feasibility of four-dimensional radiotherapy (4DRT) planning from a tumor-tracking beam's eye view (ttBEV) with reliable gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation, realistic normal tissue representation, high planning accuracy and low clinical workload, we propose and validate a novel 4D conformal planning strategy based on a synthesized 3.5D computed tomographic (3.5DCT) image with a motion-compensated tumor. To recreate patient anatomy from a ttBEV in the moving tumor coordinate system for 4DRT planning (or 4D planning), the centers of delineated GTVs in all phase CT images of 4DCT were aligned, and then the aligned CTs were averaged to produce a new 3.5DCT image. This GTV-motion-compensated CT contains a motionless target (with motion artifacts minimized) and motion-blurred normal tissues (with a realistic temporal density average). Semi-automatic threshold-based segmentation of the tumor, lung and body was applied, while manual delineation was used for other organs at risk (OARs). To validate this 3.5DCT-based 4D planning strategy, five patients with peripheral lung lesions of small size (<5 cm(3)) and large motion range (1.2-3.5 cm) were retrospectively studied for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using 3D conformal radiotherapy planning tools. The 3.5DCT-based 4D plan (3.5DCT plan) with 9-10 conformal beams was compared with the 4DCT-based 4D plan (4DCT plan). The 4DCT plan was derived from multiple 3D plans based on all phase CT images, each of which used the same conformal beam configuration but with an isocenter shift to aim at the moving tumor and a minor beam aperture and weighting adjustment to maintain plan conformality. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the 4DCT plan was created with two methods: one is an integrated DVH (iDVH(4D)), which is defined as the temporal average of all 3D-phase-plan DVHs, and the other (DVH(4D)) is based on the dose distribution in a reference phase CT image by dose warping from all phase plans using

  9. Four-Dimensional Patient Dose Reconstruction for Scanned Ion Beam Therapy of Moving Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Daniel; Saito, Nami; Chaudhri, Naved; Härtig, Martin; Ellerbrock, Malte; Jäkel, Oliver; Combs, Stephanie E.; Habermehl, Daniel; Herfarth, Klaus; Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Estimation of the actual delivered 4-dimensional (4D) dose in treatments of patients with mobile hepatocellular cancer with scanned carbon ion beam therapy. Methods and Materials: Six patients were treated with 4 fractions to a total relative biological effectiveness (RBE)–weighted dose of 40 Gy (RBE) using a single field. Respiratory motion was addressed by dedicated margins and abdominal compression (5 patients) or gating (1 patient). 4D treatment dose reconstructions based on the treatment records and the measured motion monitoring data were performed for the single-fraction dose and a total of 17 fractions. To assess the impact of uncertainties in the temporal correlation between motion trajectory and beam delivery sequence, 3 dose distributions for varying temporal correlation were calculated per fraction. For 3 patients, the total treatment dose was formed from the fractional distributions using all possible combinations. Clinical target volume (CTV) coverage was analyzed using the volumes receiving at least 95% (V{sub 95}) and 107% (V{sub 107}) of the planned doses. Results: 4D dose reconstruction based on daily measured data is possible in a clinical setting. V{sub 95} and V{sub 107} values for the single fractions ranged between 72% and 100%, and 0% and 32%, respectively. The estimated total treatment dose to the CTV exhibited improved and more robust dose coverage (mean V{sub 95} > 87%, SD < 3%) and overdose (mean V{sub 107} < 4%, SD < 3%) with respect to the single-fraction dose for all analyzed patients. Conclusions: A considerable impact of interplay effects on the single-fraction CTV dose was found for most of the analyzed patients. However, due to the fractionated treatment, dose heterogeneities were substantially reduced for the total treatment dose. 4D treatment dose reconstruction for scanned ion beam therapy is technically feasible and may evolve into a valuable tool for dose assessment.

  10. Simulation-based validation for four- dimensional multi-channel ultrasound current source density imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaohui; Witte, Russell S

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI), which has application to the heart and brain, exploits the acoustoelectric (AE) effect and Ohm's law to detect and map an electrical current distribution. In this study, we describe 4-D UCSDI simulations of a dipole field for comparison and validation with bench-top experiments. The simulations consider the properties of the ultrasound pulse as it passes through a conductive medium, the electric field of the injected dipole, and the lead field of the detectors. In the simulation, the lead fields of detectors and electric field of the dipole were calculated by the finite element (FE) method, and the convolution and correlation in the computation of the detected AE voltage signal were accelerated using 3-D fast Fourier transforms. In the bench-top experiment, an electric dipole was produced in a bath of 0.9% NaCl solution containing two electrodes, which injected an ac pulse (200 Hz, 3 cycles) ranging from 0 to 140 mA. Stimulating and recording electrodes were placed in a custom electrode chamber made on a rapid prototype printer. Each electrode could be positioned anywhere on an x-y grid (5 mm spacing) and individually adjusted in the depth direction for precise control of the geometry of the current sources and detecting electrodes. A 1-MHz ultrasound beam was pulsed and focused through a plastic film to modulate the current distribution inside the saline-filled tank. AE signals were simultaneously detected at a sampling frequency of 15 MHz on multiple recording electrodes. A single recording electrode is sufficient to form volume images of the current flow and electric potentials. The AE potential is sensitive to the distance from the dipole, but is less sensitive to the angle between the detector and the dipole. Multi-channel UCSDI potentially improves 4-D mapping of bioelectric sources in the body at high spatial resolution, which is especially important for diagnosing and guiding treatment of cardiac and

  11. Simulation-Based Validation for Four-Dimensional Multi-Channel Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaohui; Witte, Russell S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI), which has application to the heart and brain, exploits the acoustoelectric (AE) effect and Ohm's law to detect and map an electrical current distribution. In this study, we describe 4-D UCSDI simulations of a dipole field for comparison and validation with bench-top experiments. The simulations consider the properties of the ultrasound pulse as it passes through a conductive medium, the electric field of the injected dipole, and the lead field of the detectors. In the simulation, the lead fields of detectors and electric field of the dipole were calculated by the finite element (FE) method, and the convolution and correlation in the computation of the detected AE voltage signal were accelerated using 3-D fast Fourier transforms. In the bench-top experiment, an electric dipole was produced in a bath of 0.9% NaCl solution containing two electrodes, which injected an ac pulse (200 Hz, 3 cycles) ranging from 0 to 140 mA. Stimulating and recording electrodes were placed in a custom electrode chamber made on a rapid prototype printer. Each electrode could be positioned anywhere on an x-y grid (5 mm spacing) and individually adjusted in the depth direction for precise control of the geometry of the current sources and detecting electrodes. A 1-MHz ultrasound beam was pulsed and focused through a plastic film to modulate the current distribution inside the saline-filled tank. AE signals were simultaneously detected at a sampling frequency of 15 MHz on multiple recording electrodes. A single recording electrode is sufficient to form volume images of the current flow and electric potentials. The AE potential is sensitive to the distance from the dipole, but is less sensitive to the angle between the detector and the dipole. Multi-channel UCSDI potentially improves 4-D mapping of bioelectric sources in the body at high spatial resolution, which is especially important for diagnosing and guiding treatment of cardiac and

  12. Gated magnetic resonance imaging of the normal and diseased heart

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, J.M.; Alfidi, R.J.; Nelson, A.D.; Botti, R.E.; Moir, T.W.; Haaga, J.R.; Kopiwoda, S.; Miraldi, F.D.; Cohen, A.M.; Butler, H.E.

    1984-08-01

    Gated cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) images were obtained in two normal volunteers and 21 adults with a variety of cardiovascular abnormalities. The images were correlated with data from clinical examination, electrocardiograms, and cardiac catheterization. Gated cardiac images were superior to nongated images. Combined cardiac and respiratory gated images were superior to images obtained with cardiac gating only, but acquisition time was longer. Portions of the coronary arteries were visualized in seven of 23 examinations (30%), and subacute and old myocardial infarcts were seen in five of nine patients (55%) as areas of thinned myocardium. Normal cardiac anatomy (chambers, valves, and papillary muscles) was well visualized. Examples of aortic stenosis and atherosclerosis of the abdominal aorta are shown.

  13. Systematic evaluation of four-dimensional hybrid depth scanning for carbon-ion lung therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Shinichiro; Furukawa, Takuji; Inaniwa, Taku; Zenklusen, Silvan; Nakao, Minoru; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Irradiation of a moving target with a scanning beam requires a comprehensive understanding of organ motion as well as a robust dose error mitigation technique. The authors studied the effects of intrafractional respiratory motion for carbon-ion pencil beam scanning with phase-controlled rescanning on dose distributions for lung tumors. To address density variations, they used 4DCT data. Methods: Dose distributions for various rescanning methods, such as simple layer rescanning (LR), volumetric rescanning, and phase-controlled rescanning (PCR), were calculated for a lung phantom and a lung patient studies. To ensure realism, they set the scanning parameters such as scanning velocity and energy variation time to be similar to those used at our institution. Evaluation metrics were determined with regard to clinical relevance, and consisted of (i) phase-controlled rescanning, (ii) sweep direction, (iii) target motion (direction and amplitude), (iv) respiratory cycle, and (v) prescribed dose. Spot weight maps were calculated by using a beam field-specific target volume, which takes account of range variations for respective respiratory phases. To emphasize the impact of intrafractional motion on the dose distribution, respiratory gating was not used. The accumulated dose was calculated by applying a B-spline-based deformable image registration, and the results for phase-controlled layered rescanning (PCR{sub L}) and phase-controlled volumetric rescanning (PCR{sub V}) were compared. Results: For the phantom study, simple LR was unable to improve the dose distributions for an increased number of rescannings. The phase-controlled technique without rescanning (1 Multiplication-Sign PCR{sub L} and 1 Multiplication-Sign PCR{sub V}) degraded dose conformity significantly due to a reduced scan velocity. In contrast, 4 Multiplication-Sign PCR{sub L} or more significantly and consistently improved dose distribution. PCR{sub V} showed interference effects, but in general

  14. Hemodynamic Measurement Using Four-Dimensional Phase-Contrast MRI: Quantification of Hemodynamic Parameters and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Hojin; Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Jihoon; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, Young-Hak; Lee, Deok Hee

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements have been made to the use of time-resolved, three-dimensional phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is also named four-dimensional (4D) PC-MRI or 4D flow MRI, in the investigation of spatial and temporal variations in hemodynamic features in cardiovascular blood flow. The present article reviews the principle and analytical procedures of 4D PC-MRI. Various fluid dynamic biomarkers for possible clinical usage are also described, including wall shear stress, turbulent kinetic energy, and relative pressure. Lastly, this article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D PC-MRI in various cardiovascular regions. PMID:27390537

  15. Hemodynamic Measurement Using Four-Dimensional Phase-Contrast MRI: Quantification of Hemodynamic Parameters and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Ha, Hojin; Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Jihoon; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, Young-Hak; Lee, Deok Hee; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kim, Namkug

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements have been made to the use of time-resolved, three-dimensional phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is also named four-dimensional (4D) PC-MRI or 4D flow MRI, in the investigation of spatial and temporal variations in hemodynamic features in cardiovascular blood flow. The present article reviews the principle and analytical procedures of 4D PC-MRI. Various fluid dynamic biomarkers for possible clinical usage are also described, including wall shear stress, turbulent kinetic energy, and relative pressure. Lastly, this article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D PC-MRI in various cardiovascular regions. PMID:27390537

  16. Prognostic Value of Major Cardiac Event Risk Score Estimated With Gated Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Japanese Patients With Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Shunichi; Nakanishi, Kanae; Tano, Ayako; Hori, Yusuke; Hayase, Misa; Mineki, Takashi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Matsumoto, Naoya; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2016-07-27

    We published a cardiac event risk score (CERS) predicting the risk of major cardiac events (MCEs) within 3 years. The purpose of this study was to verify the prognostic value of the CERS before and after treatment in Japanese patients with coronary artery disease.We retrospectively investigated 612 patients who underwent rest (201)Tl and stress (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) between October 2004 and March 2013 and who had a significant stenosis with ≥ 75% narrowing of the arterial diameter detected by coronary angiography performed after confirmation of ≥ 5% ischemia with the SPECT. The patients underwent treatment including revascularization and medication, and thereafter, were re-evaluated with SPECT during a chronic phase and followed-up to confirm prognosis for ≥ 1 year. The endpoint was the onset of MCEs during the follow-up.During the follow-up (36.7 ± 14.5 months), 50 patients (8.7%) experienced MCEs comprising cardiac death (n = 16), non-fatal myocardial infarction (n = 4), and unstable angina pectoris (n = 30). The multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model analysis for the actual occurrence of MCEs showed the summed difference score % and MCE risks estimated with the CERS after treatment to be significant independent variables. Ischemic reduction after treatment contributed significantly to a decrease in the MCE risks. The MCE risks estimated with the CERS after treatment were generally consistent with the incidence of the MCEs actually observed.The CERS after treatment is a valuable formula for predicting prognosis in Japanese patients with coronary artery disease. PMID:27357436

  17. Comparison of Total Variation with a Motion Estimation Based Compressed Sensing Approach for Self-Gated Cardiac Cine MRI in Small Animal Studies

    PubMed Central

    Marinetto, Eugenio; Pascau, Javier; Desco, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Compressed sensing (CS) has been widely applied to prospective cardiac cine MRI. The aim of this work is to study the benefits obtained by including motion estimation in the CS framework for small-animal retrospective cardiac cine. Methods We propose a novel B-spline-based compressed sensing method (SPLICS) that includes motion estimation and generalizes previous spatiotemporal total variation (ST-TV) methods by taking into account motion between frames. In addition, we assess the effect of an optimum weighting between spatial and temporal sparsity to further improve results. Both methods were implemented using the efficient Split Bregman methodology and were evaluated on rat data comparing animals with myocardial infarction with controls for several acceleration factors. Results ST-TV with optimum selection of the weighting sparsity parameter led to results similar to those of SPLICS; ST-TV with large relative temporal sparsity led to temporal blurring effects. However, SPLICS always properly corrected temporal blurring, independently of the weighting parameter. At acceleration factors of 15, SPLICS did not distort temporal intensity information but led to some artefacts and slight over-smoothing. At an acceleration factor of 7, images were reconstructed without significant loss of quality. Conclusion We have validated SPLICS for retrospective cardiac cine in small animal, achieving high acceleration factors. In addition, we have shown that motion modelling may not be essential for retrospective cine and that similar results can be obtained by using ST-TV provided that an optimum selection of the spatiotemporal sparsity weighting parameter is performed. PMID:25350290

  18. Assessment of Mitral Valve Adaptation with Gated Cardiac Computed Tomography: Validation with Three-Dimensional Echocardiography and Mechanistic Insight to Functional Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Beaudoin, Jonathan; Thai, Wai-Ee; Wai, Bryan; Handschumacher, Mark D.; Levine, Robert A.; Truong, Quynh A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitral valve (MV) enlargement is a compensatory mechanism capable of preventing functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) in dilated ventricles. Total leaflet area and its relation with closure area measured by 3D-echocardiography have been related to FMR. Whether these parameters can be assessed with other imaging modalities is not known. Our objectives are to compare cardiac CT-based measurements of MV leaflets with 3D-echocardiography and determine the relationship of these metrics to the presence of FMR. Methods and Results We used two cohorts of patients who had cardiac CT to measure MV total leaflet, closure and annulus areas. In cohort 1 (26 patients), we validated these CT metrics to 3D-echocardiography. In cohort 2 (66 patients), we assessed the relation of MV size with the presence of FMR in three populations: heart failure with FMR, heart failure without FMR, and normal controls. Cardiac CT and 3D-echocardiography produced similar results for total leaflet (R2=0.97), closure (R2=0.89) and annulus areas (R2=0.84). MV size was largest in heart failure without FMR compared with controls and FMR patients (9.1±1.7 vs 7.5±1.0 vs 8.1±0.9 cm2/m2, p<0.01). FMR patients had reduced ratios of total leaflet:closure areas and total leaflet:annulus areas when compared to patients without FMR (p<0.01). Conclusions MV size measured by CT is comparable to 3D-echocardiography. MV enlargement in cardiomyopathy suggests leaflet adaptation. Patients with FMR have inadequate adaptation as reflected by decreased ratios of leaflet area and areas determined by ventricle size (annulus and closure areas). These measurements provide additional insight into the mechanism of FMR. PMID:23873402

  19. 20. DETAIL VIEW OF NONSUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE, GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL VIEW OF NONSUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE, GATE ARM, TRUNNION PIN, PIER AND GATE GAUGE, LOOKING WEST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 10, Guttenberg, Clayton County, IA

  20. 17. DETAIL VIEW OF TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE, GATE ARM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL VIEW OF TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE, GATE ARM, PIER, TRUNNION PIN AND GATE GAUGE, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 6, Trempealeau, Trempealeau County, WI

  1. 17. DETAIL VIEW OF TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATES, GATE ARMS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL VIEW OF TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATES, GATE ARMS, PIERS, GATE CHAINS AND SWITCHES, AND BRIDGE GIRDERS, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 5, Minneiska, Winona County, MN

  2. 18. DETAIL VIEW OF TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATES, GATE ARMS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DETAIL VIEW OF TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATES, GATE ARMS, PIERS, GATE CHAINS AND SWITCHES, AND BRIDGE GIRDERS, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 5, Minneiska, Winona County, MN

  3. 20. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE GATE, SHOWING GATE ARMS, GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE GATE, SHOWING GATE ARMS, GATE PIERS, TRUNNION PIN AND GATE GAUGE, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  4. 21. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE, GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE, GATE ARM, TRUNNION PIN, PIER AND GATE GAUGE, LOOKING EAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 10, Guttenberg, Clayton County, IA

  5. 17. DETAIL VIEW OF NONSUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATES, GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL VIEW OF NON-SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATES, GATE ARMS, PIERS AND DAM BRIDGE, WITH ROLLER GATE HEADHOUSE IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 9, Lynxville, Crawford County, WI

  6. Design and simulation of a descent controller for strategic four-dimensional aircraft navigation. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lax, F. M.

    1975-01-01

    A time-controlled navigation system applicable to the descent phase of flight for airline transport aircraft was developed and simulated. The design incorporates the linear discrete-time sampled-data version of the linearized continuous-time system describing the aircraft's aerodynamics. Using optimal linear quadratic control techniques, an optimal deterministic control regulator which is implementable on an airborne computer is designed. The navigation controller assists the pilot in complying with assigned times of arrival along a four-dimensional flight path in the presence of wind disturbances. The strategic air traffic control concept is also described, followed by the design of a strategic control descent path. A strategy for determining possible times of arrival at specified waypoints along the descent path and for generating the corresponding route-time profiles that are within the performance capabilities of the aircraft is presented. Using a mathematical model of the Boeing 707-320B aircraft along with a Boeing 707 cockpit simulator interfaced with an Adage AGT-30 digital computer, a real-time simulation of the complete aircraft aerodynamics was achieved. The strategic four-dimensional navigation controller for longitudinal dynamics was tested on the nonlinear aircraft model in the presence of 15, 30, and 45 knot head-winds. The results indicate that the controller preserved the desired accuracy and precision of a time-controlled aircraft navigation system.

  7. Improved Quantification and Mapping of Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Flow With Four-Dimensional Phase-Contrast MRI and Interactive Streamline Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Albert; Yousaf, Ufra; Alley, Marcus T.; Lustig, Michael; Chan, Frandics Pak; Newman, Beverley; Vasanawala, Shreyas S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac MRI is routinely performed for quantification of shunt flow in patients with anomalous pulmonary veins, but can be technically-challenging to perform. Four-dimensional phase-contrast (4D-PC) MRI has potential to simplify this exam. We sought to determine whether 4D-PC may be a viable clinical alternative to conventional 2D phase-contrast MR imaging. Methods With institutional review board approval and HIPAA-compliance, we retrospectively identified all patients with anomalous pulmonary veins who underwent cardiac MRI at either 1.5 Tesla (T) or 3T with parallel-imaging compressed-sensing (PI-CS) 4D-PC between April, 2011 and October, 2013. A total of 15 exams were included (10 male, 5 female). Algorithms for interactive streamline visualization were developed and integrated into in-house software. Blood flow was measured at the valves, pulmonary arteries and veins, cavae, and any associated shunts. Pulmonary veins were mapped to their receiving atrial chamber with streamlines. The intraobserver, interobserver, internal consistency of flow measurements, and consistency with conventional MRI were then evaluated with Pearson correlation and Bland-Altman analysis. Results Triplicate measurements of blood flow from 4D-PC were highly consistent, particularly at the aortic and pulmonary valves (cv 2–3%). Flow measurements were reproducible by a second observer (ρ = 0.986–0.999). Direct measurements of shunt volume from anomalous veins and intracardiac shunts matched indirect estimates from the outflow valves (ρ = 0.966). Measurements of shunt fraction using 4D-PC using any approach were more consistent with ventricular volumetric displacements than conventional 2D-PC (ρ = 0.972–0.991 versus 0.929). Conclusion Shunt flow may be reliably quantified with 4D-PC MRI, either indirectly or with detailed delineation of flow from multiple shunts. The 4D-PC may be a more accurate alternative to conventional MRI. PMID:25914149

  8. Investigating the Impact on Modeled Ozone Concentrations Using Meteorological Fields From WRF With and Updated Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation Approach”

    EPA Science Inventory

    The four-dimensional data assimilation (FDDA) technique in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) meteorological model has recently undergone an important update from the original version. Previous evaluation results have demonstrated that the updated FDDA approach in WRF pr...

  9. Measuring working memory is all fun and games: a four-dimensional spatial game predicts cognitive task performance.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Sharona M; Sprenger, Amber M; Colflesh, Gregory J H; Briner, Timothy L; Buchanan, Jacob B; Chavis, Sydnee E; Chen, Sy-Yu; Iannuzzi, Gregory L; Kashtelyan, Vadim; Dowling, Eamon; Harbison, J Isaiah; Bolger, Donald J; Bunting, Michael F; Dougherty, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    We developed a novel four-dimensional spatial task called Shapebuilder and used it to predict performance on a wide variety of cognitive tasks. In six experiments, we illustrate that Shapebuilder: (1) Loads on a common factor with complex working memory (WM) span tasks and that it predicts performance on quantitative reasoning tasks and Ravens Progressive Matrices (Experiment 1), (2) Correlates well with traditional complex WM span tasks (Experiment 2), predicts performance on the conditional go/no go task (Experiment 3) and N-back (Experiment 4), and showed weak or nonsignificant correlations with the Attention Networks Task (Experiment 5), and task switching (Experiment 6). Shapebuilder shows that it exhibits minimal skew and kurtosis, and shows good reliability. We argue that Shapebuilder has many advantages over existing measures of WM, including the fact that it is largely language independent, is not prone to ceiling effects, and take less than 6 min to complete on average.

  10. Adjoint free four-dimensional variational data assimilation for a storm surge model of the German North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiangyang; Mayerle, Roberto; Xing, Qianguo; Fernández Jaramillo, José Manuel

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a data assimilation scheme based on the adjoint free Four-Dimensional Variational(4DVar) method is applied to an existing storm surge model of the German North Sea. To avoid the need of an adjoint model, an ensemble-like method to explicitly represent the linear tangent equation is adopted. Results of twin experiments have shown that the method is able to recover the contaminated low dimension model parameters to their true values. The data assimilation scheme was applied to a severe storm surge event which occurred in the North Sea in December 5, 2013. By adjusting wind drag coefficient, the predictive ability of the model increased significantly. Preliminary experiments have shown that an increase in the predictive ability is attained by narrowing the data assimilation time window.

  11. Measuring working memory is all fun and games: a four-dimensional spatial game predicts cognitive task performance.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Sharona M; Sprenger, Amber M; Colflesh, Gregory J H; Briner, Timothy L; Buchanan, Jacob B; Chavis, Sydnee E; Chen, Sy-Yu; Iannuzzi, Gregory L; Kashtelyan, Vadim; Dowling, Eamon; Harbison, J Isaiah; Bolger, Donald J; Bunting, Michael F; Dougherty, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    We developed a novel four-dimensional spatial task called Shapebuilder and used it to predict performance on a wide variety of cognitive tasks. In six experiments, we illustrate that Shapebuilder: (1) Loads on a common factor with complex working memory (WM) span tasks and that it predicts performance on quantitative reasoning tasks and Ravens Progressive Matrices (Experiment 1), (2) Correlates well with traditional complex WM span tasks (Experiment 2), predicts performance on the conditional go/no go task (Experiment 3) and N-back (Experiment 4), and showed weak or nonsignificant correlations with the Attention Networks Task (Experiment 5), and task switching (Experiment 6). Shapebuilder shows that it exhibits minimal skew and kurtosis, and shows good reliability. We argue that Shapebuilder has many advantages over existing measures of WM, including the fact that it is largely language independent, is not prone to ceiling effects, and take less than 6 min to complete on average. PMID:24962121

  12. Determination of critical linear lattice size for the four dimensional Ising model on the Creutz cellular automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizilirmak, Ganimet Mülazımoğlu

    2015-12-01

    The four-dimensional Ising model is simulated on the Creutz cellular automaton (CCA) near the infinite-lattice critical temperature for the lattice with the linear dimension 4 ⩽ L ⩽ 22. The temperature dependence of Binder parameter ( g L) are analyzed for the lattice with the linear dimension 4 ⩽ L ⩽ 22. In this study conducted highly detailed, two different types of behavior were determined as a result of varying linear lattice dimension. The infinite lattice critical temperatures are obtained to be T c = 6.6845 ± 0.0005 in interval 4 ⩽ L ⩽ 12 and T c = 6.6807 ± 0.0024 in interval 14 ⩽ L ⩽ 22. The finite and infinite lattice critical exponents for the order parameter, the magnetic susceptibility and the specific heat are computed from the results of simulations by using finite-size scaling relations. Critical linear lattice size have been identified as L = 14.

  13. Testing a four-dimensional variational data assimilation method using an improved intermediate coupled model for ENSO analysis and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chuan; Wu, Xinrong; Zhang, Rong-Hua

    2016-07-01

    A four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation method is implemented in an improved intermediate coupled model (ICM) of the tropical Pacific. A twin experiment is designed to evaluate the impact of the 4D-Var data assimilation algorithm on ENSO analysis and prediction based on the ICM. The model error is assumed to arise only from the parameter uncertainty. The "observation" of the SST anomaly, which is sampled from a "truth" model simulation that takes default parameter values and has Gaussian noise added, is directly assimilated into the assimilation model with its parameters set erroneously. Results show that 4D-Var effectively reduces the error of ENSO analysis and therefore improves the prediction skill of ENSO events compared with the non-assimilation case. These results provide a promising way for the ICM to achieve better real-time ENSO prediction.

  14. Development by three-dimensional approaches and four-dimensional imaging: to the knowledge frontier and beyond.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Katia; de Brito, Jose M; Rossi, Maria I D

    2015-03-01

    Many advances have been taken on elucidating embryonic development and tissue homeostasis and repair by the use of experimental strategies that preserve the three-dimensional (3D) organization and allow quantitative analysis of images over time (four-dimensional). Ranging from the understanding about the relationship between blastomeres and the events that take place during gastrulation by the use of time-lapse imaging through 3D cultures that mimic organogenesis, the advances in this area are of critical value. The studies on embryonic development without disrupting the original architecture and the development of 3D organoid cultures pave a new avenue for unprecedented experimental advances that will positively impact the emergence of new treatments applying regenerative principles for both tissue repair and organ transplant. PMID:25789860

  15. Four-dimensional symmetry from a broad viewpoint. II Invariant distribution of quantized field oscillators and questions on infinities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The foundation of the quantum field theory is changed by introducing a new universal probability principle into field operators: one single inherent and invariant probability distribution P(/k/) is postulated for boson and fermion field oscillators. This can be accomplished only when one treats the four-dimensional symmetry from a broad viewpoint. Special relativity is too restrictive to allow such a universal probability principle. A radical length, R, appears in physics through the probability distribution P(/k/). The force between two point particles vanishes when their relative distance tends to zero. This appears to be a general property for all forces and resembles the property of asymptotic freedom. The usual infinities in vacuum fluctuations and in local interactions, however complicated they may be, are all removed from quantum field theories. In appendix A a simple finite and unitary theory of unified electroweak interactions is discussed without assuming Higgs scalar bosons.

  16. A note on the temperature and energy of four-dimensional black holes from an entropic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Xiao; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Wei, Shao-Wen

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the temperature and energy on holographic screens for four-dimensional black holes with the entropic force idea proposed by Verlinde. We find that the 'Unruh-Verlinde temperature' is equal to the Hawking temperature on the horizon, and can be considered as a generalized Hawking temperature on the holographic screen outside the horizons. The energy on the holographic screen is not the black hole mass M but the reduced mass M0, which is related to the black hole parameters. With the replacement of the black hole mass M by the reduced mass M0, the entropic force can be written as F=\\frac{GmM_0}{r^2}, which could be tested by experiments.

  17. Educational and public outreach programs using four-dimensional presentation of the earth and planetary science data with Dagik Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, A.; Tsugawa, T.; Nagayama, S.; Iwasaki, S.; Odagi, Y.; Kumano, Y.; Yoshikawa, M.; Akiya, Y.; Takahashi, M.

    2011-12-01

    We are developing educational and public outreach programs of the earth and planetary science data using a four-dimensional digital globe system, Dagik Earth. Dagik Earth is a simple and affordable four dimensional (three dimension in space and one dimension in time) presentation system of the earth and planetary scientific results. It can display the Earth and planets in three-dimensional way without glasses, and the time variation of the scientific data can be displayed on the Earth and planets image. It is easier to handle and lower cost than similar systems such as Geocosmos by Miraikan museum, Japan and Science On a Sphere by NOAA. At first it was developed as a presentation tool for public outreach programs in universities and research institutes by earth scientists. And now it is used in classrooms of schools and science museums collaboration with school teachers and museum curators. The three dimensional display can show the Earth and planets in exact form without any distortion, which cannot be achieved with two-dimensional display. Furthermore it can provide a sense of reality. Several educational programs have been developed and carried out in high schools, junior high schools, elementary schools and science centers. Several research institutes have used Dagik Earth in their public outreach programs to demonstrate their novel scientific results to public in universities, research institutes and science cafe events. A community of users and developers of Dagik Earth is being formed in Japan. In the presentation, the outline of Dagik Earth and the educational programs using Dagik Earth will be presented.

  18. Use of Respiratory-Correlated Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography to Determine Acceptable Treatment Margins for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Seth D.; Ford, Eric C.; Duhon, Mario; McNutt, Todd; Wong, John; Herman, Joseph M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Respiratory-induced excursions of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma could affect dose delivery. This study quantified tumor motion and evaluated standard treatment margins. Methods and Materials: Respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography images were obtained on 30 patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma; 15 of whom underwent repeat scanning before cone-down treatment. Treatment planning software was used to contour the gross tumor volume (GTV), bilateral kidneys, and biliary stent. Excursions were calculated according to the centroid of the contoured volumes. Results: The mean +- standard deviation GTV excursion in the superoinferior (SI) direction was 0.55 +- 0.23 cm; an expansion of 1.0 cm adequately accounted for the GTV motion in 97% of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients. Motion GTVs were generated and resulted in a 25% average volume increase compared with the static GTV. Of the 30 patients, 17 had biliary stents. The mean SI stent excursion was 0.84 +- 0.32 cm, significantly greater than the GTV motion. The xiphoid process moved an average of 0.35 +- 0.12 cm, significantly less than the GTV. The mean SI motion of the left and right kidneys was 0.65 +- 0.27 cm and 0.77 +- 0.30 cm, respectively. At repeat scanning, no significant changes were seen in the mean GTV size (p = .8) or excursion (p = .3). Conclusion: These data suggest that an asymmetric expansion of 1.0, 0.7, and 0.6 cm along the respective SI, anteroposterior, and medial-lateral directions is recommended if a respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography scan is not available to evaluate the tumor motion during treatment planning. Surrogates of tumor motion, such as biliary stents or external markers, should be used with caution.

  19. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program ... be designed to meet your needs. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Team Cardiac rehab involves a long-term commitment ...

  20. 16. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE, GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE, GATE ARM, TRUNNION PIN AND PIER, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  1. 18. DETAIL VIEW OF NONSUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATES, GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DETAIL VIEW OF NON-SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATES, GATE ARMS, PIERS AND DAM BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 9, Lynxville, Crawford County, WI

  2. Investigation of four-dimensional computed tomography-based pulmonary ventilation imaging in patients with emphysematous lung regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Kabus, Sven; Klinder, Tobias; Lorenz, Cristian; von Berg, Jens; Blaffert, Thomas; Loo, Billy W., Jr.; Keall, Paul J.

    2011-04-01

    A pulmonary ventilation imaging technique based on four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) has advantages over existing techniques. However, physiologically accurate 4D-CT ventilation imaging has not been achieved in patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate 4D-CT ventilation imaging by correlating ventilation with emphysema. Emphysematous lung regions are less ventilated and can be used as surrogates for low ventilation. We tested the hypothesis: 4D-CT ventilation in emphysematous lung regions is significantly lower than in non-emphysematous regions. Four-dimensional CT ventilation images were created for 12 patients with emphysematous lung regions as observed on CT, using a total of four combinations of two deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms: surface-based (DIRsur) and volumetric (DIRvol), and two metrics: Hounsfield unit (HU) change (VHU) and Jacobian determinant of deformation (VJac), yielding four ventilation image sets per patient. Emphysematous lung regions were detected by density masking. We tested our hypothesis using the one-tailed t-test. Visually, different DIR algorithms and metrics yielded spatially variant 4D-CT ventilation images. The mean ventilation values in emphysematous lung regions were consistently lower than in non-emphysematous regions for all the combinations of DIR algorithms and metrics. VHU resulted in statistically significant differences for both DIRsur (0.14 ± 0.14 versus 0.29 ± 0.16, p = 0.01) and DIRvol (0.13 ± 0.13 versus 0.27 ± 0.15, p < 0.01). However, VJac resulted in non-significant differences for both DIRsur (0.15 ± 0.07 versus 0.17 ± 0.08, p = 0.20) and DIRvol (0.17 ± 0.08 versus 0.19 ± 0.09, p = 0.30). This study demonstrated the strong correlation between the HU-based 4D-CT ventilation and emphysema, which indicates the potential for HU-based 4D-CT ventilation imaging to achieve high physiologic accuracy. A further study is needed to confirm these results.

  3. String or branelike solutions in four-dimensional Einstein gravity in the presence of a cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Youngone; Kang, Gungwon; Kim, Hyeong-Chan; Lee, Jungjai

    2011-10-15

    We investigate string or branelike solutions for four-dimensional vacuum Einstein equations in the presence of a cosmological constant. For the case of negative cosmological constant, the Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black string is the only warped stringlike solution. The general solutions for nonwarped branelike configurations are found and they are characterized by the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner mass density and two tensions. Interestingly, the sum of these tensions is equal to the minus of the mass density. Other than the well-known black string and soliton spacetimes, all the static solutions possess naked singularities. The time-dependent solutions can be regarded as the anti-de Sitter extension of the well-known Kasner solutions. The speciality of those static regular solutions and the implication of singular solutions are also discussed in the context of cylindrical matter collapse. For the case of positive cosmological constant, the Kasner-de Sitter spacetime appears as time-dependent solutions and all static solutions are found to be naked singular.

  4. Optical Coherence Tomography for Retinal Surgery: Perioperative Analysis to Real-Time Four-Dimensional Image-Guided Surgery.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar M; Keller, Brenton; Viehland, Christian; Shen, Liangbo; Seider, Michael I; Izatt, Joseph A; Toth, Cynthia A

    2016-07-01

    Magnification of the surgical field using the operating microscope facilitated profound innovations in retinal surgery in the 1970s, such as pars plana vitrectomy. Although surgical instrumentation and illumination techniques are continually developing, the operating microscope for vitreoretinal procedures has remained essentially unchanged and currently limits the surgeon's depth perception and assessment of subtle microanatomy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized clinical management of retinal pathology, and its introduction into the operating suite may have a similar impact on surgical visualization and treatment. In this article, we review the evolution of OCT for retinal surgery, from perioperative analysis to live volumetric (four-dimensional, 4D) image-guided surgery. We begin by briefly addressing the benefits and limitations of the operating microscope, the progression of OCT technology, and OCT applications in clinical/perioperative retinal imaging. Next, we review intraoperative OCT (iOCT) applications using handheld probes during surgical pauses, two-dimensional (2D) microscope-integrated OCT (MIOCT) of live surgery, and volumetric MIOCT of live surgery. The iOCT discussion focuses on technological advancements, applications during human retinal surgery, translational difficulties and limitations, and future directions. PMID:27409495

  5. Educational program using four-dimensional presentation of space data and space-borne data with Dagik Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Akinori; Yoshida, Daiki; Odagi, Yoko; Takahashi, Midori; Tsugawa, Takuya; Kumano, Yoshisuke

    We developed an educational program of space science data and science data observed from the space using a digital globe system, Dagik Earth. Dagik Earth is a simple and affordable four dimensional (three dimension in space and one dimension in time) presentation system. The educational program using Dagik Earth has been carried out in classrooms of schools, science museums, and research institutes to show the scientific data of the earth and planets in an intuitive way. We are developing the hardware system, data contents, and education manuals in cooperation with teachers, museum staffs and scientists. The size of the globe used in this system is from 15cm to 2m in diameter. It is selected according to the environment of the presentation. The contents cover the space science, such as aurora and geomagnetic field, the earth science, such as global clouds and earthquakes, and planetary science. Several model class plans are ready to be used in high school and junior high school. In public outreach programs of universities, research institutes, and scientific meetings, special programs have been carried out. We are establishing a community to use and develop this program for the space science education.

  6. The quest for four-dimensional imaging in plant cell biology: it's just a matter of time

    PubMed Central

    Domozych, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Analysis of plant cell dynamics over time, or four-dimensional imaging (4-DI), represents a major goal of plant science. The ability to resolve structures in the third dimension within the cell or tissue during developmental events or in response to environmental or experimental stresses (i.e. 4-DI) is critical to our understanding of gene expression, post-expression modulations of macromolecules and sub-cellular system interactions. Scope Microscopy-based technologies have been profoundly integral to this type of investigation, and new and refined microscopy technologies now allow for the visualization of cell dynamics with unprecedented resolution, contrast and experimental versatility. However, certain realities of light and electron microscopy, choice of specimen and specimen preparation techniques limit the scope of readily attaining 4-DI. Today, the plant microscopist must use a combinatorial strategy whereby multiple microscopy-based investigations are used. Modern fluorescence, confocal laser scanning, transmission electron and scanning electron microscopy provide effective conduits for synthesizing data detailing live cell dynamics and highly resolved snapshots of specific cell structures that will ultimately lead to 4-DI. This review provides a synopsis of such technologies available. PMID:22628381

  7. Accuracy of four-dimensional CT angiography in detection and characterisation of arteriovenous malformations and dural arteriovenous fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Arun; Radon, Mark; Puthuran, Mani; Bhojak, Maneesh; Nahser, Hans Christean; Das, Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective review was made to assess the accuracy of four dimensional CT angiogram (4D-CTA) in diagnosis of arteriovenous malformations (AVM) and dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVF), with catheter-based digital-subtraction angiogram (DSA) being gold standard. 33 pairs of investigations (DSA and 4D-CTA) were performed primarily for suspicion of AVM/DAVF. Based on blinded reports, sensitivity and specificity for detection of AVM/DAVF were 77% (95% CI: 46 - 95%) and 100% (95% CI: 83 - 100%) respectively. Positive predictive value was 100% (95% CI: 69 - 100%) and negative predictive value 87% (95% CI: 66-97%). 4D-CTA is a practical minimally-invasive technique for evaluating cerebrovascular pathologies. There is good agreement between the findings of 4D-CTA and DSA despite the differences in temporal and spatial resolutions. 4D-CTA may obviate the need for DSA in a subgroup of patients who would otherwise have undergone this invasive investigation, which carries a risk of important complications. PMID:26427892

  8. The finite-size scaling study of four-dimensional Ising model in the presence of external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merdan, Ziya; Kürkçü, Cihan; Öztürk, Mustafa K.

    2014-12-01

    The four-dimensional ferromagnetic Ising model in external magnetic field is simulated on the Creutz cellular automaton algorithm using finite-size lattices with linear dimension 4 ≤ L ≤ 8. The critical temperature value of infinite lattice, Tc χ ( ∞ ) = 6 , 680 (1) obtained for h = 0 agrees well with the values T c ( ∞ ) ≈ 6.68 obtained previously using different methods. Moreover, h = 0.00025 in our work also agrees with all the results obtained from h = 0 in the literature. However, there are no works for h ≠ 0 in the literature. The value of the field critical exponent (δ = 3.0136(3)) is in good agreement with δ = 3 which is obtained from scaling law of Widom. In spite of the finite-size scaling relations of | M L ( t ) | and χ L ( t ) for 0 ≤ h ≤ 0.001 are verified; however, in the cases of 0.0025 ≤ h ≤ 0.1 they are not verified.

  9. Four-dimensional (4D) Motion Detection to Correct Respiratory Effects in Treatment Response Assessment Using Molecular Imaging Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Schreibmann, Eduard; Crocker, Ian; Schuster, David M.; Curran, Walter J.; Fox, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Observing early metabolic changes in positron emission tomography (PET) is an essential tool to assess treatment efficiency in radiotherapy. However, for thoracic regions, the use of three-dimensional (3D) PET imaging is unfeasible because the radiotracer activity is smeared by the respiratory motion and averaged during the imaging acquisition process. This motion-induced degradation is similar in magnitude with the treatment-induced changes, and the two occurrences become indiscernible. We present a customized temporal-spatial deformable registration method for quantifying respiratory motion in a four-dimensional (4D) PET dataset. Once the motion is quantified, a motion-corrected (MC) dataset is created by tracking voxels to eliminate breathing-induced changes in the 4D imaging scan. The 4D voxel-tracking data is then summed to yield a 3D MC-PET scan containing only treatment-induced changes. This proof of concept is exemplified on both phantom and clinical data, where the proposed algorithm tracked the trajectories of individual points through the 4D datasets reducing motion to less than 4 mm in all phases. This correction approach using deformable registration can discern motion blurring from treatment-induced changes in treatment response assessment using PET imaging. PMID:24000982

  10. Restoration of four-dimensional diffeomorphism covariance in canonical general relativity: An intrinsic Hamilton-Jacobi approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salisbury, Donald; Renn, Jürgen; Sundermeyer, Kurt

    2016-02-01

    Classical background independence is reflected in Lagrangian general relativity through covariance under the full diffeomorphism group. We show how this independence can be maintained in a Hamilton-Jacobi approach that does not accord special privilege to any geometric structure. Intrinsic space-time curvature-based coordinates grant equal status to all geometric backgrounds. They play an essential role as a starting point for inequivalent semiclassical quantizations. The scheme calls into question Wheeler’s geometrodynamical approach and the associated Wheeler-DeWitt equation in which 3-metrics are featured geometrical objects. The formalism deals with variables that are manifestly invariant under the full diffeomorphism group. Yet, perhaps paradoxically, the liberty in selecting intrinsic coordinates is precisely as broad as is the original diffeomorphism freedom. We show how various ideas from the past five decades concerning the true degrees of freedom of general relativity can be interpreted in light of this new constrained Hamiltonian description. In particular, we show how the Kuchař multi-fingered time approach can be understood as a means of introducing full four-dimensional diffeomorphism invariants. Every choice of new phase space variables yields new Einstein-Hamilton-Jacobi constraining relations, and corresponding intrinsic Schrödinger equations. We show how to implement this freedom by canonical transformation of the intrinsic Hamiltonian. We also reinterpret and rectify significant work by Dittrich on the construction of “Dirac observables.”

  11. A novel color image encryption algorithm based on genetic recombination and the four-dimensional memristive hyperchaotic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Xiu-Li; Gan, Zhi-Hua; Lu, Yang; Zhang, Miao-Hui; Chen, Yi-Ran

    2016-10-01

    Recently, many image encryption algorithms based on chaos have been proposed. Most of the previous algorithms encrypt components R, G, and B of color images independently and neglect the high correlation between them. In the paper, a novel color image encryption algorithm is introduced. The 24 bit planes of components R, G, and B of the color plain image are obtained and recombined into 4 compound bit planes, and this can make the three components affect each other. A four-dimensional (4D) memristive hyperchaotic system generates the pseudorandom key streams and its initial values come from the SHA 256 hash value of the color plain image. The compound bit planes and key streams are confused according to the principles of genetic recombination, then confusion and diffusion as a union are applied to the bit planes, and the color cipher image is obtained. Experimental results and security analyses demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is secure and effective so that it may be adopted for secure communication. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61203094 and 61305042), the Natural Science Foundation of the United States (Grant Nos. CNS-1253424 and ECCS-1202225), the Science and Technology Foundation of Henan Province, China (Grant No. 152102210048), the Foundation and Frontier Project of Henan Province, China (Grant No. 162300410196), the Natural Science Foundation of Educational Committee of Henan Province, China (Grant No. 14A413015), and the Research Foundation of Henan University, China (Grant No. xxjc20140006).

  12. Locating and tracing of anatomical landmarks based on full-field four-dimensional measurement of human body surface.

    PubMed

    Sitnik, Robert; Witkowski, Marcin

    2008-01-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) (3D+time) measurement systems make it possible today to measure objects while moving and deforming. One of the fields where 4D systems prove themselves useful is medicine--particularly orthopedics and neural sciences--where measurement results may be used to estimate dynamic parameters of a patient's movement. Relatively new in 4D, optical full-field shape measurement systems capture more data than standard marker-based systems and open new ways for clinical diagnosis. However, before this is possible, the appropriate 4D data processing and analysis methods need to be developed. We present a new data analysis path for 4D data input as well as new shape parameters describing local features of a surface. The developed shape parameters are easier and quicker to calculate than standard surface parameters, such as curvatures, but they give results that are very similar to the latter. The presented 4D data analysis path allows characteristic areas on the body, so-called anatomical landmarks, to be located and traces them in time along the measurement sequence. We also present the general concepts and describe selected steps of the developed 4D data analysis path. The algorithms were implemented and tested on real and computer-generated data representing the surface of lower limbs. Finally, we give sample processing and analysis results.

  13. Measurement of the transverse four-dimensional beam rms-emittance of an intense uranium beam at 11.4 MeV/u

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, C.; Groening, L.; Gerhard, P.; Maier, M.; Mickat, S.; Vormann, H.

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge of the transverse four-dimensional beam rms-parameters is essential for applications that involve lattice elements that couple the two transverse degrees of freedom (planes). Usually pepper-pots are used for measuring these beam parameters. However, for ions their application is limited to energies below 150 keV/u. This contribution is on measurements of the full transverse four-dimensional second-moments beam matrix of high intensity uranium ions at an energy of 11.4 MeV/u. The combination of skew quadrupoles with a slit/grid emittance measurement device has been successfully applied.

  14. Retrospective Analysis of Artifacts in Four-Dimensional CT Images of 50 Abdominal and Thoracic Radiotherapy Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro Langner, Ulrich; Loo, Billy W.; Shen, John; Keall, Paul J.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To quantify the type, frequency, and magnitude of artifacts in four-dimensional (4D) CT images acquired using a multislice cine method. Methods and Materials: Fifty consecutive patients who underwent 4D-CT scanning and radiotherapy for thoracic or abdominal cancers were included in this study. All the 4D-CT scans were performed on the GE multislice PET/CT scanner with the Varian Real-time Position Management system in cine mode. The GE Advantage 4D software was used to create 4D-CT data sets. The artifacts were then visually and quantitatively analyzed. We performed statistical analyses to evaluate the relationships between patient- or breathing-pattern-related parameters and the occurrence as well as magnitude of artifacts. Results: It was found that 45 of 50 patients (90%) had at least one artifact (other than blurring) with a mean magnitude of 11.6 mm (range, 4.4-56.0 mm) in the diaphragm or heart. We also observed at least one artifact in 6 of 20 lung or mediastinal tumors (30%). Statistical analysis revealed that there were significant differences between several breathing-pattern-related parameters, including abdominal displacement (p < 0.01), for the subgroups of patients with and without artifacts. The magnitude of an artifact was found to be significantly but weakly correlated with the abdominal displacement difference between two adjacent couch positions (R = 0.34, p < 0.01). Conclusions: This study has identified that the frequency and magnitude of artifacts in 4D-CT is alarmingly high. Significant improvement is needed in 4D-CT imaging.

  15. Preliminary results of a four-dimensional data assimilation technique at a Mediterranean coastal area, Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avolio, E.; Federico, S.; Sempreviva, A. M.; Calidonna, C. R.; de Leo, L.; Bellecci, C.

    2010-09-01

    A four-dimensional data assimilation (FDDA) scheme based on a Newtonian relaxation (or "nudging") was tested using observational asynoptic data available at a coastal site in the Central Mediterranean peninsula of Calabria, in South Italy. Since nudging is performed toward observations, the technique is referred to as "observational data assimilation (ODA)" and it was incorporated into a tailored version of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). This version of RAMS was run at high spatial horizontal resolution (1km), with the purpose of investigating the improvements of the model performance obtained by the assimilation. Wind profiler, sodar and surface meteorological station measurements were considered. In particular, we assimilated vertical wind profiles from the sodar and wind profiler, and wind, temperature and specific humidity from the surface meteorological station. All instruments are installed and operated routinely at the experimental field of the ISAC/CNR-CRATI located at 600 m from the Tyrrhenian coastline. A second station, located few kilometres to the NE of the experimental field, is considered as independent verification. The RAMS meteorological fields, simulated with and without data assimilation, were evaluated and compared for selected case studies in the summer 2008; several experiments were performed for each case (assimilation for the entire simulation time, and for different time windows). The results show that the assimilation of wind and/or temperature data, both throughout the simulation time (continuous FDDA) and for a 12h time window (forecasting configuration), produces improvements of the model performance. Improvements are substantial (50% error reduction) in the case of continuous FDDA, while they are reduced in the case of forecasting configuration (5% to 20% error reduction, depending on cases). The obtained meteorological fields are finalised as input into air quality and agro-meteorological models, and also for

  16. Development of a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled X-ray head

    SciTech Connect

    Kamino, Yuichiro . E-mail: daisaku_horiuchi@mhi.co.jp; Takayama, Kenji; Kokubo, Masaki; Narita, Yuichiro; Hirai, Etsuro; Kawawda, Noriyuki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Nagata, Yasushi; Nishidai, Takehiro; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a new four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system, which enables precise setup, real-time tumor tracking, and pursuit irradiation. Methods and Materials: The system has an innovative gimbaled X-ray head that enables small-angle ({+-}2.4{sup o}) rotations (pan and tilt) along the two orthogonal gimbals. This design provides for both accurate beam positioning at the isocenter by actively compensating for mechanical distortion and quick pursuit of the target. The X-ray head is composed of an ultralight C-band linear accelerator and a multileaf collimator. The gimbaled X-ray head is mounted on a rigid O-ring structure with an on-board imaging subsystem composed of two sets of kilovoltage X-ray tubes and flat panel detectors, which provides a pair of radiographs, cone beam computed tomography images useful for image guided setup, and real-time fluoroscopic monitoring for pursuit irradiation. Results: The root mean square accuracy of the static beam positioning was 0.1 mm for 360{sup o} of O-ring rotation. The dynamic beam response and positioning accuracy was {+-}0.6 mm for a 0.75 Hz, 40-mm stroke and {+-}0.4 mm for a 2.0 Hz, 8-mm stroke. The quality of the images was encouraging for using the tomography-based setup. Fluoroscopic images were sufficient for monitoring and tracking lung tumors. Conclusions: Key functions and capabilities of our new system are very promising for precise image-guided setup and for tracking and pursuit irradiation of a moving target.

  17. Four-dimensional intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning for dynamic tracking using a direct aperture deformation (DAD) method

    SciTech Connect

    Gui Minzhi; Feng Yuanming; Yi Byongyong; Dhople, Anil Arvind; Yu, Cedric

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: Planning for the delivery of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to a moving target, referred to as four-dimensional (4D) IMRT planning, is a crucial step for achieving the treatment objectives for sites that move during treatment delivery. The authors proposed a simplistic method that accounts for both rigid and nonrigid respiration-induced target motion based on 4D computed tomography (4DCT) data sets. Methods: A set of MLC apertures and weights was first optimized on a reference phase of a 4DCT data set. At each beam angle, the apertures were morphed from the reference phase to each of the remaining phases according to the relative shape changes in the beam's eye view of the target. Three different planning schemes were evaluated for two lung cases and one pancreas patient: (1) Individually optimizing each breathing phase; (2) optimizing the reference phase and shifting the optimized apertures to other breathing phases based on a rigid-body image registration; and (3) optimizing the reference phase and deforming the optimized apertures to the other phases based on the deformation and translation of target contours. Planning results using scheme 1 serves as the ''gold standard'' for plan quality assessment; scheme 2 is the method previously proposed in the literature; and scheme 3 is the method the authors proposed in this article. The optimization results were compared between the three schemes for all three cases. Results: The proposed scheme 3 is comparable to scheme 1 in plan quality, and provides improved target coverage and conformity with similar normal tissue dose compared with scheme 2. Conclusions: Direct aperture deformation method for 4D IMRT planning improves upon methods that only consider rigid-body motion and achieves a plan quality close to that optimized for each of the phases.

  18. NCAR Global Climate Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation (CFDDA) Hourly 40 km Reanalysis: a high-resolution dynamically downscaled climatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, G. S.; Hou, C. Y.; Rife, D. L.; Dattore, R.

    2014-12-01

    Wind energy cost models incur inaccuracies from uncertainty in ambient wind measurements and estimates. This inhibits the best possible investment in wind energy infrastructure and management systems. High-resolution temporal and spatial wind data needed for wind availability analysis—usually created with regional-scale models—have traditionally been proprietary and costly to obtain. Freely available global model data suffers from either lower spatial or temporal resolution, or both. Low spatial resolution fails to realistically represent wind speeds in complex terrain. Low temporal resolution fails to capture the full diurnal cycle of wind behavior. The NCAR Global Climate Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation (CFDDA) Hourly 40 km Reanalysis was developed in 2009-2010 by the Research Applications Laboratory (RAL) to provide the most accurate boundary layer wind estimates available at that time. CFDDA used 28 sigma levels, with 19 between the surface and 700 hPa, a four-fold improvement over the contemporary NWP models. The dataset spans 21 years, 1985-2005, providing hourly atmospheric parameters, including winds, on 28 vertical levels on a global 40 km grid. This presentation will introduce the modeling and assimilation strategy, highlight the available data content including the parameter set, and review the data access options available from the RDA. CFDDA project partners, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), NCAR RAL and NCAR Mesoscale & Microscale Meteorology (MMM) divisions are offering this dataset to the public for free with minor restrictions. NCAR Research Data Archive (RDA), hosted by the Computational and Information Systems Laboratory, provides data support. It is available at http://rda.ucar.edu/datasets/ds604.0/

  19. Four-dimensional variational data assimilation for inverse modeling of atmospheric methane emissions: Analysis of SCIAMACHY observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meirink, Jan Fokke; Bergamaschi, Peter; Frankenberg, Christian; D'Amelio, Monica T. S.; Dlugokencky, Edward J.; Gatti, Luciana V.; Houweling, Sander; Miller, John B.; RöCkmann, Thomas; Villani, M. Gabriella; Krol, Maarten C.

    2008-09-01

    Recent observations from the Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) instrument aboard ENVISAT have brought new insights in the global distribution of atmospheric methane. In particular, the observations showed higher methane concentrations in the tropics than previously assumed. Here, we analyze the SCIAMACHY observations and their implications for emission estimates in detail using a four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation system. We focus on the period September to November 2003 and on the South American continent, for which the satellite observations showed the largest deviations from model simulations. In this set-up the advantages of the 4D-Var approach and the zooming capability of the underlying TM5 atmospheric transport model are fully exploited. After application of a latitude-dependent bias correction to the SCIAMACHY observations, the assimilation system is able to accurately fit those observations, while retaining consistency with a network of surface methane measurements. The main emission increments resulting from the inversion are an increase in the tropics, a decrease in South Asia, and a decrease at northern hemispheric high latitudes. The SCIAMACHY observations yield considerable additional emission uncertainty reduction, particularly in the (sub-)tropical regions, which are poorly constrained by the surface network. For tropical South America, the inversion suggests more than a doubling of emissions compared to the a priori during the 3 months considered. Extensive sensitivity experiments, in which key assumptions of the inversion set-up are varied, show that this finding is robust. Independent airborne observations in the Amazon basin support the presence of considerable local methane sources. However, these observations also indicate that emissions from eastern South America may be smaller than estimated from SCIAMACHY observations. In this respect it must be realized that the bias

  20. TH-A-19A-10: Fast Four Dimensional Monte Carlo Dose Computations for Proton Therapy of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mirkovic, D; Titt, U; Mohan, R; Yepes, P

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate a fast and accurate four dimensional (4D) Monte Carlo (MC) dose computation system for proton therapy of lung cancer and other thoracic and abdominal malignancies in which the delivered dose distributions can be affected by respiratory motion of the patient. Methods: A 4D computer tomography (CT) scan for a lung cancer patient treated with protons in our clinic was used to create a time dependent patient model using our in-house, MCNPX-based Monte Carlo system (“MC{sup 2}”). The beam line configurations for two passively scattered proton beams used in the actual treatment were extracted from the clinical treatment plan and a set of input files was created automatically using MC{sup 2}. A full MC simulation of the beam line was computed using MCNPX and a set of phase space files for each beam was collected at the distal surface of the range compensator. The particles from these phase space files were transported through the 10 voxelized patient models corresponding to the 10 phases of the breathing cycle in the 4DCT, using MCNPX and an accelerated (fast) MC code called “FDC”, developed by us and which is based on the track repeating algorithm. The accuracy of the fast algorithm was assessed by comparing the two time dependent dose distributions. Results: The error of less than 1% in 100% of the voxels in all phases of the breathing cycle was achieved using this method with a speedup of more than 1000 times. Conclusion: The proposed method, which uses full MC to simulate the beam line and the accelerated MC code FDC for the time consuming particle transport inside the complex, time dependent, geometry of the patient shows excellent accuracy together with an extraordinary speed.

  1. TH-E-17A-05: Optimizing Four Dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography Projection Allocation to Respiratory Bins

    SciTech Connect

    OBrien, R; Shieh, C; Kipritidis, J; Keall, P

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Four dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) is an emerging image guidance strategy but it can suffer from poor image quality. To avoid repeating scans it is beneficial to make the best use of the imaging data obtained. For conventional 4DCBCT the location and size of respiratory bins is fixed and projections are allocated to the respiratory bin within which it falls. Strictly adhering to this rule is unnecessary and can compromise image quality. In this study we optimize the size and location of respiratory bins and allow projections to be sourced from adjacent phases of the respiratory cycle. Methods: A mathematical optimization framework using mixed integer quadratic programming has been developed that determines when to source projections from adjacent respiratory bins and optimizes the size and location of the bins. The method, which we will call projection sharing, runs in under 2 seconds of CPU time. Five 4DCBCT datasets of stage III-IV lung cancer patients were used to test the algorithm. The standard deviation of the angular separation between projections (SD-A) and the standard deviation in the volume of the reconstructed fiducial gold coil (SD-V) were used as proxies to measure streaking artefacts and motion blur respectively. Results: The SD-A using displacement binning and projection sharing was 30%–50% smaller than conventional phase based binning and 59%–76% smaller than conventional displacement binning indicating more uniformly spaced projections and fewer streaking artefacts. The SD-V was 20–90% smaller when using projection sharing than using conventional phase based binning suggesting more uniform marker segmentation and less motion blur. Conclusion: Image quality was visibly and significantly improved with projection sharing. Projection sharing does not require any modifications to existing hardware and offers a more robust replacement to phase based binning, or, an option if phase based reconstruction is not of a

  2. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coronary artery disease - cardiac rehab; Angina - cardiac rehab; Heart failure - cardiac rehab ... have had: Heart attack Coronary heart disease (CHD) Heart failure Angina (chest pain) Heart or heart valve surgery ...

  3. Inter-individual variance and cardiac cycle dependency of aortic root dimensions and shape as assessed by ECG-gated multi-slice computed tomography in patients with severe aortic stenosis prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation: is it crucial for correct sizing?

    PubMed

    Lehmkuhl, Lukas; Foldyna, Borek; Von Aspern, Konstantin; Lücke, Christian; Grothoff, Matthias; Nitzsche, Stefan; Kempfert, Jörg; Haensig, Martin; Rastan, Ardawan; Walther, Thomas; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Gutberlet, Matthias

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the inter-individual variance and the variability of the aortic root dimensions during the cardiac cycle by computed tomography (CT) in patients with severe aortic stenosis prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Fifty-six patients (m/w = 16/40, 81 ± 6.8 years), scheduled for a transapical aortic valve implantation with available preprocedural ECG-gated CT were retrospectively included. The evaluation included sizing of the aortic annulus and the aortic sinus, measurements of the coronary topography, aortic valve planimetry and scoring of calcification. The new defined aortic annulus sphericity ratio revealed a mostly elliptical shape with increasing diastolic deformation. The calculated effective diameter (ED), determined from the annulus' lumen area, turned out to be the parameter least affected from cardiac cycle changes while systolic and diastolic annulus dimensions and shape (diameter and area) differed significantly (p < 0.001). In about 70 % of the patients with relevant paravalvular leaks the finally implanted prosthesis was too small according to the CT based calculated ED. The ostial height of the coronaries showed a high variability with a critical minimum range <5 mm. The degree of the aortic calcification did not have an influence on the aortic annulus deformation during the cardiac cycle, but on the occurrence of paravalvular leaks. The aortic root anatomy demonstrated a high inter-individual variability and cardiac cycle dependency. These results must be strongly considered during the patient evaluation prior to TAVI to avoid complications. The systolic effective diameter, as measured by ECG-gated CT, represents an appropriate parameter for sizing the aortic annulus.

  4. Comparing the accuracy of four-dimensional photon dose calculations with three-dimensional calculations using moving and deforming phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y.; Balter, Peter; Followill, David S.; Alvarez, Paola E.; White, R. Allen; Starkschall, George

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Four-dimensional (4D) dose calculation algorithms, which explicitly incorporate respiratory motion in the calculation of doses, have the potential to improve the accuracy of dose calculations in thoracic treatment planning; however, they generally require greater computing power and resources than currently used for three-dimensional (3D) dose calculations. The purpose of this work was to quantify the increase in accuracy of 4D dose calculations versus 3D dose calculations. Methods: The accuracy of each dose calculation algorithm was assessed using measurements made with two phantoms. Specifically, the authors used a rigid moving anthropomorphic thoracic phantom and an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom with a deformable lung insert. To incorporate a clinically relevant range of scenarios, they programed the phantoms to move and deform with two motion patterns: A sinusoidal motion pattern and an irregular motion pattern that was extracted from an actual patient's breathing profile. For each combination of phantom and motion pattern, three plans were created: A single-beam plan, a multiple-beam plan, and an intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan. Doses were calculated using 4D dose calculation methods as well as conventional 3D dose calculation methods. The rigid moving and deforming phantoms were irradiated according to the three treatment plans and doses were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and radiochromic film. The accuracy of each dose calculation algorithm was assessed using measured-to-calculated TLD doses and a {gamma} analysis. Results: No significant differences were observed between the measured-to-calculated TLD ratios among 4D and 3D dose calculations. The {gamma} results revealed that 4D dose calculations had significantly greater percentage of pixels passing the 5%/3 mm criteria than 3D dose calculations. Conclusions: These results indicate no significant differences in the accuracy between the 4D and the 3D dose

  5. Quantitation of the reconstruction quality of a four-dimensional computed tomography process for lung cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Wei; Parikh, Parag J.; El Naqa, Issam M.; Nystrom, Michelle M.; Hubenschmidt, James P.; Wahab, Sasha H.; Mutic, Sasa; Singh, Anurag K.; Christensen, Gary E.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Low, Daniel A.

    2005-04-01

    We have developed a four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) technique for mapping breathing motion in radiotherapy treatment planning. A multislice CT scanner (1.5 mm slices) operated in cine mode was used to acquire 12 contiguous slices in each couch position for 15 consecutive scans (0.5 s rotation, 0.25 s between scans) while the patient underwent simultaneous quantitative spirometry measurements to provide a sorting metric. The spirometry-sorted scans were used to reconstruct a 4D data set. A critical factor for 4D CT is quantifying the reconstructed data set quality which we measure by correlating the metric used relative to internal-object motion. For this study, the internal air content within the lung was used as a surrogate for internal motion measurements. Thresholding and image morphological operations were applied to delineate the air-containing tissues (lungs, trachea) from each CT slice. The Hounsfield values were converted to the internal air content (V). The relationship between the air content and spirometer-measured tidal volume ({nu}) was found to be quite linear throughout the lungs and was used to estimate the overall accuracy and precision of tidal volume-sorted 4D CT. Inspection of the CT-scan air content as a function of tidal volume showed excellent correlations (typically r>0.99) throughout the lung volume. Because of the discovered linear relationship, the ratio of internal air content to tidal volume was indicative of the fraction of air change in each couch position. Theoretically, due to air density differences within the lung and in room, the sum of these ratios would equal 1.11. For 12 patients, the mean value was 1.08{+-}0.06, indicating the high quality of spirometry-based image sorting. The residual of a first-order fit between {nu} and V was used to estimate the process precision. For all patients, the precision was better than 8%, with a mean value of 5.1%{+-}1.9%. This quantitative analysis highlights the value of using

  6. Comparison of planning target volumes based on three-dimensional and four-dimensional CT imaging of thoracic esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Li, Jianbin; Zhang, Yingjie; Shao, Qian; Xu, Min; Fan, Tingyong; Wang, Jinzhi

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose To investigate the definition of planning target volumes (PTVs) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) compared with conventional PTV definition and PTV definition using asymmetrical margins for thoracic primary esophageal cancer. Materials and methods Forty-three patients with esophageal cancer underwent 3DCT and 4DCT simulation scans during free breathing. The motions of primary tumors located in the proximal (group A), middle (group B), and distal (group C) thoracic esophagus were obtained from the 4DCT scans. PTV3D was defined on 3DCT using the tumor motion measured based on 4DCT, PTV conventional (PTVconv) was defined on 3DCT by adding a 1.0 cm margin to the clinical target volume, and PTV4D was defined as the union of the target volumes contoured on the ten phases of the 4DCT images. The centroid positions, volumetric differences, and dice similarity coefficients were evaluated for all PTVs. Results The median centroid shifts between PTV3D and PTV4D and between PTVconv and PTV4D in all three dimensions were <0.3 cm for the three groups. The median size ratios of PTV4D to PTV3D were 0.80, 0.88, and 0.71, and PTV4D to PTVconv were 0.67, 0.73, and 0.76 (χ2=−3.18, −2.98, and −3.06; P=0.001, 0.003, and 0.002) for groups A, B, and C, respectively. The dice similarity coefficients were 0.87, 0.90, and 0.81 between PTV4D and PTV3D and 0.80, 0.84, and 0.83 between PTV4D and PTVconv (χ2 =−3.18, −2.98, and −3.06; P=0.001, 0.003, and 0.002) for groups A, B, and C, respectively. The difference between the degree of inclusion of PTV4D in PTV3D and that of PTV4D in PTVconv was <2% for all groups. Compared with PTVconv, the amount of irradiated normal tissue for PTV3D was decreased by 11.81% and 11.86% in groups A and B, respectively, but was increased by 2.93% in group C. Conclusion For proximal and middle esophageal cancer, 3DCT-based PTV using asymmetrical margins provides good coverage of PTV4D; however, for distal

  7. Motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR): Application to four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Justin C.; Kim, Jin Sung; Park, Sung Ho; Liu, Zhaowei; Song, Bongyong; Song, William Y.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Utilization of respiratory correlated four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) has enabled verification of internal target motion and volume immediately prior to treatment. However, with current standard CBCT scan, 4DCBCT poses challenge for reconstruction due to the fact that multiple phase binning leads to insufficient number of projection data to reconstruct and thus cause streaking artifacts. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel 4DCBCT reconstruction algorithm framework called motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR), that allows reconstruction of high quality and high phase resolution 4DCBCT images with no more than the imaging dose as well as projections used in a standard free breathing 3DCBCT (FB-3DCBCT) scan.Methods: The unknown 4DCBCT volume at each phase was mathematically modeled as a combination of FB-3DCBCT and phase-specific update vector which has an associated motion-map matrix. The motion-map matrix, which is the key innovation of the MCIR algorithm, was defined as the matrix that distinguishes voxels that are moving from stationary ones. This 4DCBCT model was then reconstructed with compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction framework such that the voxels with high motion would be aggressively updated by the phase-wise sorted projections and the voxels with less motion would be minimally updated to preserve the FB-3DCBCT. To evaluate the performance of our proposed MCIR algorithm, we evaluated both numerical phantoms and a lung cancer patient. The results were then compared with the (1) clinical FB-3DCBCT reconstructed using the FDK, (2) 4DCBCT reconstructed using the FDK, and (3) 4DCBCT reconstructed using the well-known prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS).Results: Examination of the MCIR algorithm showed that high phase-resolved 4DCBCT with sets of up to 20 phases using a typical FB-3DCBCT scan could be reconstructed without compromising the image quality. Moreover, in comparison with

  8. Improving thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam CT reconstruction with anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR).

    PubMed

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Kipritidis, John; O'Brien, Ricky T; Cooper, Benjamin J; Kuncic, Zdenka; Keall, Paul J

    2015-01-21

    Total-variation (TV) minimization reconstructions can significantly reduce noise and streaks in thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) images compared to the Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm currently used in practice. TV minimization reconstructions are, however, prone to over-smoothing anatomical details and are also computationally inefficient. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a proof of concept that these disadvantages can be overcome by incorporating the general knowledge of the thoracic anatomy via anatomy segmentation into the reconstruction. The proposed method, referred as the anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR) method, utilizes the adaptive-steepest-descent projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) framework, but introduces an additional anatomy segmentation step in every iteration. The anatomy segmentation information is implemented in the reconstruction using a heuristic approach to adaptively suppress over-smoothing at anatomical structures of interest. The performance of AAIR depends on parameters describing the weighting of the anatomy segmentation prior and segmentation threshold values. A sensitivity study revealed that the reconstruction outcome is not sensitive to these parameters as long as they are chosen within a suitable range. AAIR was validated using a digital phantom and a patient scan and was compared to FDK, ASD-POCS and the prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) method. For the phantom case, AAIR reconstruction was quantitatively shown to be the most accurate as indicated by the mean absolute difference and the structural similarity index. For the patient case, AAIR resulted in the highest signal-to-noise ratio (i.e. the lowest level of noise and streaking) and the highest contrast-to-noise ratios for the tumor and the bony anatomy (i.e. the best visibility of anatomical details). Overall, AAIR was much less prone to over-smoothing anatomical details compared to ASD-POCS and did

  9. Improving thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam CT reconstruction with anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Kipritidis, John; O'Brien, Ricky T.; Cooper, Benjamin J.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Keall, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Total-variation (TV) minimization reconstructions can significantly reduce noise and streaks in thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) images compared to the Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm currently used in practice. TV minimization reconstructions are, however, prone to over-smoothing anatomical details and are also computationally inefficient. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a proof of concept that these disadvantages can be overcome by incorporating the general knowledge of the thoracic anatomy via anatomy segmentation into the reconstruction. The proposed method, referred as the anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR) method, utilizes the adaptive-steepest-descent projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) framework, but introduces an additional anatomy segmentation step in every iteration. The anatomy segmentation information is implemented in the reconstruction using a heuristic approach to adaptively suppress over-smoothing at anatomical structures of interest. The performance of AAIR depends on parameters describing the weighting of the anatomy segmentation prior and segmentation threshold values. A sensitivity study revealed that the reconstruction outcome is not sensitive to these parameters as long as they are chosen within a suitable range. AAIR was validated using a digital phantom and a patient scan and was compared to FDK, ASD-POCS and the prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) method. For the phantom case, AAIR reconstruction was quantitatively shown to be the most accurate as indicated by the mean absolute difference and the structural similarity index. For the patient case, AAIR resulted in the highest signal-to-noise ratio (i.e. the lowest level of noise and streaking) and the highest contrast-to-noise ratios for the tumor and the bony anatomy (i.e. the best visibility of anatomical details). Overall, AAIR was much less prone to over-smoothing anatomical details compared to ASD-POCS and did

  10. Simulation of four-dimensional CT images from deformable registration between inhale and exhale breath-hold CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrut, David; Boldea, Vlad; Miguet, Serge; Ginestet, Chantal

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: We propose to simulate an artificial four-dimensional (4-D) CT image of the thorax during breathing. It is performed by deformable registration of two CT scans acquired at inhale and exhale breath-hold. Materials and methods: Breath-hold images were acquired with the ABC (Active Breathing Coordinator) system. Dense deformable registrations were performed. The method was a minimization of the sum of squared differences (SSD) using an approximated second-order gradient. Gaussian and linear-elastic vector field regularizations were compared. A new preprocessing step, called a priori lung density modification (APLDM), was proposed to take into account lung density changes due to inspiration. It consisted of modulating the lung densities in one image according to the densities in the other, in order to make them comparable. Simulated 4-D images were then built by vector field interpolation and image resampling of the two initial CT images. A variation in the lung density was taken into account to generate intermediate artificial CT images. The Jacobian of the deformation was used to compute voxel values in Hounsfield units. The accuracy of the deformable registration was assessed by the spatial correspondence of anatomic landmarks located by experts. Results: APLDM produced statistically significantly better results than the reference method (registration without APLDM preprocessing). The mean (and standard deviation) of distances between automatically found landmark positions and landmarks set by experts were 2.7(1.1) mm with APLDM, and 6.3(3.8) mm without. Interexpert variability was 2.3(1.2) mm. The differences between Gaussian and linear elastic regularizations were not statistically significant. In the second experiment using 4-D images, the mean difference between automatic and manual landmark positions for intermediate CT images was 2.6(2.0) mm. Conclusion: The generation of 4-D CT images by deformable registration of inhale and exhale CT images is

  11. SU-C-207-01: Four-Dimensional Inverse Geometry Computed Tomography: Concept and Its Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K; Kim, D; Kim, T; Kang, S; Cho, M; Shin, D; Suh, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In past few years, the inverse geometry computed tomography (IGCT) system has been developed to overcome shortcomings of a conventional computed tomography (CT) system such as scatter problem induced from large detector size and cone-beam artifact. In this study, we intend to present a concept of a four-dimensional (4D) IGCT system that has positive aspects above all with temporal resolution for dynamic studies and reduction of motion artifact. Methods: Contrary to conventional CT system, projection data at a certain angle in IGCT was a group of fractionated narrow cone-beam projection data, projection group (PG), acquired from multi-source array which have extremely short time gap of sequential operation between each of sources. At this, for 4D IGCT imaging, time-related data acquisition parameters were determined by combining multi-source scanning time for collecting one PG with conventional 4D CBCT data acquisition sequence. Over a gantry rotation, acquired PGs from multi-source array were tagged time and angle for 4D image reconstruction. Acquired PGs were sorted into 10 phase and image reconstructions were independently performed at each phase. Image reconstruction algorithm based upon filtered-backprojection was used in this study. Results: The 4D IGCT had uniform image without cone-beam artifact on the contrary to 4D CBCT image. In addition, the 4D IGCT images of each phase had no significant artifact induced from motion compared with 3D CT. Conclusion: The 4D IGCT image seems to give relatively accurate dynamic information of patient anatomy based on the results were more endurable than 3D CT about motion artifact. From this, it will be useful for dynamic study and respiratory-correlated radiation therapy. This work was supported by the Industrial R&D program of MOTIE/KEIT [10048997, Development of the core technology for integrated therapy devices based on real-time MRI guided tumor tracking] and the Mid-career Researcher Program (2014R1A2A1A

  12. Improving thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam CT reconstruction with anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR)

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Kipritidis, John; O’Brien, Ricky T; Cooper, Benjamin J; Kuncic, Zdenka; Keall, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Total-variation (TV) minimization reconstructions can significantly reduce noise and streaks in thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) images compared to the Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm currently used in practice. TV minimization reconstructions are, however, prone to over-smoothing anatomical details and are also computationally inefficient. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a proof of concept that these disadvantages can be overcome by incorporating the general knowledge of the thoracic anatomy via anatomy segmentation into the reconstruction. The proposed method, referred as the anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR) method, utilizes the adaptive-steepest-descent projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) framework, but introduces an additional anatomy segmentation step in every iteration. The anatomy segmentation information is implemented in the reconstruction using a heuristic approach to adaptively suppress over-smoothing at anatomical structures of interest. The performance of AAIR depends on parameters describing the weighting of the anatomy segmentation prior and segmentation threshold values. A sensitivity study revealed that the reconstruction outcome is not sensitive to these parameters as long as they are chosen within a suitable range. AAIR was validated using a digital phantom and a patient scan, and was compared to FDK, ASD-POCS, and the prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) method. For the phantom case, AAIR reconstruction was quantitatively shown to be the most accurate as indicated by the mean absolute difference and the structural similarity index. For the patient case, AAIR resulted in the highest signal-to-noise ratio (i.e. the lowest level of noise and streaking) and the highest contrast-to-noise ratios for the tumor and the bony anatomy (i.e. the best visibility of anatomical details). Overall, AAIR was much less prone to over-smoothing anatomical details compared to ASD-POCS, and

  13. Four-dimensional MR microscopy of the mouse heart using radial acquisition and liposomal gadolinium contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Bucholz, Elizabeth; Ghaghada, Ketan; Qi, Yi; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Johnson, G. Allan

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy has become an important tool for small animal cardiac imaging. In relation to competing technologies (microCT and ultrasound), MR is limited by spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and acquisition time. All three of these limitations have been addressed by developing a 4D (3D plus time) radial acquisition sequence. The signal-to-noise has been optimized by minimizing the echo time (300 μs). The temporal resolution and throughput have been improved by center-out trajectories resulting in TR < 2.5 ms. The contrast has been enhanced through the use of a liposomal blood pool agent that reduces T1 of the blood to < 400 ms. We have developed protocols for three specific applications: a) high-throughput with spatial resolution of 87×87×352 μm3 (voxel volume=2.7 nL) and acquisition time of 16 minutes; b) high-temporal resolution with spatial resolution of 87×87×352 μm3 (voxel volume=2.7 nL); temporal resolution at 4.8 ms and acquisition time of 32 minutes; and c) high-resolution isotropic imaging at 87×87×87 μm3 (voxel volume=0.68 nL), and acquisition time of 31 minutes. The 4D image arrays allow direct measure of cardiac functional parameters dependent on chamber volumes, e.g. ejection fraction, end diastolic volume, and end systolic volume. PMID:18581419

  14. Measuring interfraction and intrafraction lung function changes during radiation therapy using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kipritidis, John Keall, Paul J.; Hugo, Geoffrey; Weiss, Elisabeth; Williamson, Jeffrey

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Adaptive ventilation guided radiation therapy could minimize the irradiation of healthy lung based on repeat lung ventilation imaging (VI) during treatment. However the efficacy of adaptive ventilation guidance requires that interfraction (e.g., week-to-week), ventilation changes are not washed out by intrafraction (e.g., pre- and postfraction) changes, for example, due to patient breathing variability. The authors hypothesize that patients undergoing lung cancer radiation therapy exhibit larger interfraction ventilation changes compared to intrafraction function changes. To test this, the authors perform the first comparison of interfraction and intrafraction lung VI pairs using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging (4D-CBCT VI), a novel technique for functional lung imaging. Methods: The authors analyzed a total of 215 4D-CBCT scans acquired for 19 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) patients over 4–6 weeks of radiation therapy. This set of 215 scans was sorted into 56 interfraction pairs (including first day scans and each of treatment weeks 2, 4, and 6) and 78 intrafraction pairs (including pre/postfraction scans on the same-day), with some scans appearing in both sets. VIs were obtained from the Jacobian determinant of the transform between the 4D-CBCT end-exhale and end-inhale images after deformable image registration. All VIs were deformably registered to their corresponding planning CT and normalized to account for differences in breathing effort, thus facilitating image comparison in terms of (i) voxelwise Spearman correlations, (ii) mean image differences, and (iii) gamma pass rates for all interfraction and intrafraction VI pairs. For the side of the lung ipsilateral to the tumor, we applied two-sided t-tests to determine whether interfraction VI pairs were more different than intrafraction VI pairs. Results: The (mean ± standard deviation) Spearman correlation for interfraction VI pairs was r{sup -}{sub Inter

  15. Measuring interfraction and intrafraction lung function changes during radiation therapy using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kipritidis, John; Hugo, Geoffrey; Weiss, Elisabeth; Williamson, Jeffrey; Keall, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Adaptive ventilation guided radiation therapy could minimize the irradiation of healthy lung based on repeat lung ventilation imaging (VI) during treatment. However the efficacy of adaptive ventilation guidance requires that interfraction (e.g., week-to-week), ventilation changes are not washed out by intrafraction (e.g., pre- and postfraction) changes, for example, due to patient breathing variability. The authors hypothesize that patients undergoing lung cancer radiation therapy exhibit larger interfraction ventilation changes compared to intrafraction function changes. To test this, the authors perform the first comparison of interfraction and intrafraction lung VI pairs using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging (4D-CBCT VI), a novel technique for functional lung imaging. Methods: The authors analyzed a total of 215 4D-CBCT scans acquired for 19 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) patients over 4–6 weeks of radiation therapy. This set of 215 scans was sorted into 56 interfraction pairs (including first day scans and each of treatment weeks 2, 4, and 6) and 78 intrafraction pairs (including pre/postfraction scans on the same-day), with some scans appearing in both sets. VIs were obtained from the Jacobian determinant of the transform between the 4D-CBCT end-exhale and end-inhale images after deformable image registration. All VIs were deformably registered to their corresponding planning CT and normalized to account for differences in breathing effort, thus facilitating image comparison in terms of (i) voxelwise Spearman correlations, (ii) mean image differences, and (iii) gamma pass rates for all interfraction and intrafraction VI pairs. For the side of the lung ipsilateral to the tumor, we applied two-sided t-tests to determine whether interfraction VI pairs were more different than intrafraction VI pairs. Results: The (mean ± standard deviation) Spearman correlation for interfraction VI pairs was r¯Inter=0.52±0

  16. FLOW GATING

    DOEpatents

    Poppelbaum, W.J.

    1962-12-01

    BS>This invention is a fast gating system for eiectronic flipflop circuits. Diodes connect the output of one circuit to the input of another, and the voltage supply for the receiving flip-flop has two alternate levels. When the supply is at its upper level, no current can flow through the diodes, but when the supply is at its lower level, current can flow to set the receiving flip- flop to the same state as that of the circuit to which it is connected. (AEC)

  17. Gated Treatment Delivery Verification With On-Line Megavoltage Fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tai An; Christensen, James D.; Gore, Elizabeth; Khamene, Ali; Boettger, Thomas; Li, X. Allen

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To develop and clinically demonstrate the use of on-line real-time megavoltage (MV) fluoroscopy for gated treatment delivery verification. Methods and Materials: Megavoltage fluoroscopy (MVF) image sequences were acquired using a flat panel equipped for MV cone-beam CT in synchrony with the respiratory signal obtained from the Anzai gating device. The MVF images can be obtained immediately before or during gated treatment delivery. A prototype software tool (named RTReg4D) was developed to register MVF images with phase-sequenced digitally reconstructed radiograph images generated from the treatment planning system based on four-dimensional CT. The image registration can be used to reposition the patient before or during treatment delivery. To demonstrate the reliability and clinical usefulness, the system was first tested using a thoracic phantom and then prospectively in actual patient treatments under an institutional review board-approved protocol. Results: The quality of the MVF images for lung tumors is adequate for image registration with phase-sequenced digitally reconstructed radiographs. The MVF was found to be useful for monitoring inter- and intrafractional variations of tumor positions. With the planning target volume contour displayed on the MVF images, the system can verify whether the moving target stays within the planning target volume margin during gated delivery. Conclusions: The use of MVF images was found to be clinically effective in detecting discrepancies in tumor location before and during respiration-gated treatment delivery. The tools and process developed can be useful for gated treatment delivery verification.

  18. Cardiac arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Article.jsp. Accessed June 16, 2014. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Approach to cardiac arrest and life-threatening ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 63. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Cardiac arrest and audden aardiac death. In: ...

  19. Cardiac 4D Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'hooge, Jan

    Volumetric cardiac ultrasound imaging has steadily evolved over the last 20 years from an electrocardiography (ECC) gated imaging technique to a true real-time imaging modality. Although the clinical use of echocardiography is still to a large extent based on conventional 2D ultrasound imaging it can be anticipated that the further developments in image quality, data visualization and interaction and image quantification of three-dimensional cardiac ultrasound will gradually make volumetric ultrasound the modality of choice. In this chapter, an overview is given of the technological developments that allow for volumetric imaging of the beating heart by ultrasound.

  20. 49 CFR 234.255 - Gate arm and gate mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gate arm and gate mechanism. 234.255 Section 234....255 Gate arm and gate mechanism. (a) Each gate arm and gate mechanism shall be inspected at least once each month. (b) Gate arm movement shall be observed for proper operation at least once each month....

  1. 49 CFR 234.255 - Gate arm and gate mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gate arm and gate mechanism. 234.255 Section 234... Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Inspections and Tests § 234.255 Gate arm and gate mechanism. (a) Each gate arm and gate mechanism shall be inspected at least once each month. (b) Gate arm movement shall...

  2. 49 CFR 234.255 - Gate arm and gate mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....255 Gate arm and gate mechanism. (a) Each gate arm and gate mechanism shall be inspected at least once each month. (b) Gate arm movement shall be observed for proper operation at least once each month. (c... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gate arm and gate mechanism. 234.255 Section...

  3. 49 CFR 234.255 - Gate arm and gate mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gate arm and gate mechanism. 234.255 Section 234... Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Inspections and Tests § 234.255 Gate arm and gate mechanism. (a) Each gate arm and gate mechanism shall be inspected at least once each month. (b) Gate arm movement shall...

  4. 49 CFR 234.255 - Gate arm and gate mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....255 Gate arm and gate mechanism. (a) Each gate arm and gate mechanism shall be inspected at least once each month. (b) Gate arm movement shall be observed for proper operation at least once each month. (c... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gate arm and gate mechanism. 234.255 Section...

  5. New approach for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac motion correction in cardiac PET (NAMC-CPET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mohamed A. A.; Xiao, Peng; Xie, Qingguo

    2015-10-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions are inevitable during the relatively long acquisition time of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) scan. The correction of the resultant motion blur has become a significant challenge due to recent spatial resolution improvement of the PET scanners. The majority of current motion compensation algorithms are based on gating as a primary step. A new approach based on temporal basis functions is developed to correct respiratory and cardiac motion simultaneously in cardiac PET within the normal scanning time (NAMC-CPET). Simulation and experimental studies are conducted to evaluate and validate the final outputs in comparison to the existing gating methods. A dynamic digital phantom is used to simulate realistic human thorax and abdomen with respiratory and cardiac motions. GATE simulation was run at China National Grid Center to obtain realistic PET data in a reasonable time. Moreover, Tibet minipig experiments were conducted using a preclinical small animal PET scanner developed at HUST to validate the performance of the NAMC-CPET in real data. The results reveal that NAMC-CPET outperformed the existing gating methods (respiratory, cardiac, and dual) in cardiac imaging in term of noise reduction and contrast, especially in short acquisition duration. NAMC-CPET obtained better results in the conducted experiments in terms of contrast and the visibility of the heart. In contrast, the dual gating failed to obtain valuable images in the normal scan time due to the low 18F-FDG uptake. NAMC-CPET is advantageous in the low-statistic situation. The results are promising with great potential implications in cardiac PET imaging in terms of the radioactive dose and scan time reduction.

  6. Characterization of the discrepancies between four-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and in-silico simulations of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Heidari Pahlavian, Soroush; Bunck, Alexander C; Loth, Francis; Shane Tubbs, R; Yiallourou, Theresia; Kroeger, Jan Robert; Heindel, Walter; Martin, Bryn A

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare subject-specific magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with time-resolved three-directional (3D) velocity-encoded phase-contrast MRI (4D PCMRI) measurements of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) velocity field in the cervical spinal subarachnoid space (SSS). Three-dimensional models of the cervical SSS were constructed based on MRI image segmentation and anatomical measurements for a healthy subject and patient with Chiari I malformation. CFD was used to simulate the CSF motion and compared to the 4D PCMRI measurements. Four-dimensional PCMRI measurements had much greater CSF velocities compared to CFD simulations (1.4 to 5.6× greater). Four-dimensional PCMRI and CFD both showed anterior and anterolateral dominance of CSF velocities, although this flow feature was more pronounced in 4D PCMRI measurements compared to CFD. CSF flow jets were present near the nerve rootlets and denticulate ligaments (NRDL) in the CFD simulation. Flow jets were visible in the 4D PCMRI measurements, although they were not clearly attributable to nerve rootlets. Inclusion of spinal cord NRDL in the cervical SSS does not fully explain the differences between velocities obtained from 4D PCMRI measurements and CFD simulations.

  7. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients.

  8. 6. DETAIL VIEW OF ENTRANCE GATES, SHOWING IRON GATE, STONE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL VIEW OF ENTRANCE GATES, SHOWING IRON GATE, STONE WORK, AND GATE STOP FROM SOUTHEAST OF NORTHWEST ELEMENTS. - William Enston Home, Entrance Gate, 900 King Street, Charleston, Charleston County, SC

  9. 21. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE ARM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE ARM, GATE PIER, TRUNNION PIN AND GATE GAUGE, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 9, Lynxville, Crawford County, WI

  10. Feature-based characterization of motion-contaminated calcified plaques in cardiac multidetector CT

    SciTech Connect

    King, Martin; Giger, Maryellen L.; Suzuki, Kenji; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2007-12-15

    In coronary calcium scoring, motion artifacts affecting calcified plaques are commonly characterized using descriptive terms, which incorporate an element of subjectivity in their interpretations. Quantitative indices may improve the objective characterization of these motion artifacts. In this paper, an automated method for generating 12 quantitative indices, i.e., features that characterize the motion artifacts affecting calcified plaques, is presented. This method consists of using the rapid phase-correlated region-of-interest (ROI) tracking algorithm for reconstructing ROI images of calcified plaques automatically from the projection data obtained during a cardiac scan, and applying methods for extracting features from these images. The 12 features include two dynamic, six morphological, and four intensity-based features. The two dynamic features are three-dimensional (3D) velocity and 3D acceleration. The six morphological features include edge-based volume, threshold-based volume, sphericity, irregularity, average margin gradient, and variance of margin gradient. The four intensity-based features are maximum intensity, mean intensity, minimum intensity, and standard deviation of intensity. The 12 features were extracted from 54 reconstructed sets of simulated four-dimensional images from the dynamic NCAT phantom involving six calcified plaques under nine heart rate/multi-sector gating combinations. In order to determine how well the 12 features correlated with a plaque motion index, which was derived from the trajectory of the plaque, partial correlation coefficients adjusted for heart rate, number of gated sectors, and mean feature values of the six plaques were calculated for all 12 features. Features exhibiting stronger correlations (|r| set-membership sign [0.60,1.00]) with the motion index were 3D velocity, maximum intensity, and standard deviation of intensity. Features demonstrating stronger correlations (|r| set-membership sign [0.60,1.00]) with other

  11. Cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shanewise, Jack

    2004-12-01

    Cardiac transplantation is a proven, accepted mode of therapy for selected patients with end-stage heart failure, but the inadequate number of suitable donor hearts available ultimately limits its application. This chapter reviews adult cardiac transplantation, with an emphasis on the anesthetic considerations of the heart transplant operation itself.

  12. Parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakago, Kosuke; Hajdušek, Michal; Nakayama, Shojun; Murao, Mio

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how a temporally ordered gate sequence can be parallelized in adiabatic implementations of quantum computation, we modify adiabatic gate teleportation, a model of quantum computation proposed by Bacon and Flammia [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 120504 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.120504], to a form deterministically simulating parallelized gate teleportation, which is achievable only by postselection. We introduce a twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian, a Heisenberg-type spin interaction where the coordinates of the second qubit are twisted according to a unitary gate. We develop parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation (PAGT) where a sequence of unitary gates is performed in a single step of the adiabatic process. In PAGT, numeric calculations suggest the necessary time for the adiabatic evolution implementing a sequence of L unitary gates increases at most as O (L5) . However, we show that it has the interesting property that it can map the temporal order of gates to the spatial order of interactions specified by the final Hamiltonian. Using this property, we present a controlled-PAGT scheme to manipulate the order of gates by a control qubit. In the controlled-PAGT scheme, two differently ordered sequential unitary gates F G and G F are coherently performed depending on the state of a control qubit by simultaneously applying the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonians implementing unitary gates F and G . We investigate why the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian allows PAGT. We show that the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian has an ability to perform a transposed unitary gate by just modifying the space ordering of the final Hamiltonian implementing a unitary gate in adiabatic gate teleportation. The dynamics generated by the time-reversed Hamiltonian represented by the transposed unitary gate enables deterministic simulation of a postselected event of parallelized gate teleportation in adiabatic

  13. Cardiac metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, R; De‐Giorgio, F; Abbate, A; Silvestri, F

    2007-01-01

    Tumours metastatic to the heart (cardiac metastases) are among the least known and highly debated issues in oncology, and few systematic studies are devoted to this topic. Although primary cardiac tumours are extremely uncommon (various postmortem studies report rates between 0.001% and 0.28%), secondary tumours are not, and at least in theory, the heart can be metastasised by any malignant neoplasm able to spread to distant sites. In general, cardiac metastases are considered to be rare; however, when sought for, the incidence seems to be not as low as expected, ranging from 2.3% and 18.3%. Although no malignant tumours are known that diffuse preferentially to the heart, some do involve the heart more often than others—for example, melanoma and mediastinal primary tumours. This paper attempts to review the pathophysiology of cardiac metastatic disease, epidemiology and clinical presentation of cardiac metastases, and pathological characterisation of the lesions. PMID:17098886

  14. Quantum gate decomposition algorithms.

    SciTech Connect

    Slepoy, Alexander

    2006-07-01

    Quantum computing algorithms can be conveniently expressed in a format of a quantum logical circuits. Such circuits consist of sequential coupled operations, termed ''quantum gates'', or quantum analogs of bits called qubits. We review a recently proposed method [1] for constructing general ''quantum gates'' operating on an qubits, as composed of a sequence of generic elementary ''gates''.

  15. Continuous quantitative measurement of the proximal airway dimensions and lung density on four-dimensional dynamic-ventilation CT in smokers

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Moriya, Hiroshi; Tsubakimoto, Maho; Matsuoka, Shin; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Four-dimensional dynamic-ventilation computed tomography (CT) imaging demonstrates continuous movement of the airways and lungs, which cannot be depicted with conventional CT. We aimed to investigate continuous changes in lung density and airway dimensions and to assess the correlation with spirometric values in smokers. Materials and methods This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board, and informed consent was waived. Twenty-one smokers including six patients with COPD underwent four-dimensional dynamic-ventilation CT during free breathing (160 mm in length). The mean lung density (MLD) of the scanned lung and luminal areas (Ai) of fixed points in the trachea and the right proximal bronchi (main bronchus, upper bronchus, bronchus intermedius, and lower bronchus) were continuously measured. Concordance between the time curve of the MLD and that of the airway Ai values was expressed by cross-correlation coefficients. The associations between these quantitative measurements and the forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) values were assessed by Spearman’s rank correlation analysis. Results On the time curve for the MLD, the Δ-MLD1.05 values between the peak inspiratory frame to the later third frame (1.05 seconds later) were strongly correlated with the FEV1/FVC (ρ=0.76, P<0.0001). The cross-correlation coefficients between the airway Ai and MLD values were significantly correlated with the FEV1/FVC (ρ=−0.56 to −0.66, P<0.01), except for the right upper bronchus. This suggested that the synchrony between the airway and lung movement was lost in patients with severe airflow limitation. Conclusion Respiratory changes in the MLD and synchrony between the airway Ai and the MLD measured with dynamic-ventilation CT were correlated with patient’s spirometric values. PMID:27110108

  16. Integrative modeling of the cardiac ventricular myocyte

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, Raimond L.; Cortassa, Sonia; O'Rourke, Brian; Hashambhoy, Yasmin L.; Rice, John Jeremy; Greenstein, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac electrophysiology is a discipline with a rich 50-year history of experimental research coupled with integrative modeling which has enabled us to achieve a quantitative understanding of the relationships between molecular function and the integrated behavior of the cardiac myocyte in health and disease. In this paper, we review the development of integrative computational models of the cardiac myocyte. We begin with a historical overview of key cardiac cell models that helped shape the field. We then narrow our focus to models of the cardiac ventricular myocyte and describe these models in the context of their subcellular functional systems including dynamic models of voltage-gated ion channels, mitochondrial energy production, ATP-dependent and electrogenic membrane transporters, intracellular Ca dynamics, mechanical contraction, and regulatory signal transduction pathways. We describe key advances and limitations of the models as well as point to new directions for future modeling research. PMID:20865780

  17. Towards four-dimensional photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Hannah M.; Ozawa, Tomoki; Goldman, Nathan; Zilberberg, Oded; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in silicon ring-resonator arrays have stimulated the development of topological lattices for photons, with potential applications in integrated photonic devices. Taking inspiration from ultracold atoms, we propose how such arrays can be extended into an additional synthetic dimension by coupling together the different modes of each ring resonator.1 In this way, a 1D resonator chain can become an effective 2D system, while a 3D resonator array can be exploited as a 4D photonic lattice. As an example of the power of this approach, we discuss how to experimentally realise an optical analogue of the 4D quantum Hall effect for the first time. This opens up the way towards the exploration of higher-dimensional lattices in integrated photonics.

  18. 4D micro-CT using fast prospective gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaolian; Johnston, Samuel M.; Qi, Yi; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T.

    2012-01-01

    Micro-CT is currently used in preclinical studies to provide anatomical information. But, there is also significant interest in using this technology to obtain functional information. We report here a new sampling strategy for 4D micro-CT for functional cardiac and pulmonary imaging. Rapid scanning of free-breathing mice is achieved with fast prospective gating (FPG) implemented on a field programmable gate array. The method entails on-the-fly computation of delays from the R peaks of the ECG signals or the peaks of the respiratory signals for the triggering pulses. Projection images are acquired for all cardiac or respiratory phases at each angle before rotating to the next angle. FPG can deliver the faster scan time of retrospective gating (RG) with the regular angular distribution of conventional prospective gating for cardiac or respiratory gating. Simultaneous cardio-respiratory gating is also possible with FPG in a hybrid retrospective/prospective approach. We have performed phantom experiments to validate the new sampling protocol and compared the results from FPG and RG in cardiac imaging of a mouse. Additionally, we have evaluated the utility of incorporating respiratory information in 4D cardiac micro-CT studies with FPG. A dual-source micro-CT system was used for image acquisition with pulsed x-ray exposures (80 kVp, 100 mA, 10 ms). The cardiac micro-CT protocol involves the use of a liposomal blood pool contrast agent containing 123 mg I ml-1 delivered via a tail vein catheter in a dose of 0.01 ml g-1 body weight. The phantom experiment demonstrates that FPG can distinguish the successive phases of phantom motion with minimal motion blur, and the animal study demonstrates that respiratory FPG can distinguish inspiration and expiration. 4D cardiac micro-CT imaging with FPG provides image quality superior to RG at an isotropic voxel size of 88 µm and 10 ms temporal resolution. The acquisition time for either sampling approach is less than 5 min. The

  19. Gated strip proportional detector

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher L.; Idzorek, George C.; Atencio, Leroy G.

    1987-01-01

    A gated strip proportional detector includes a gas tight chamber which encloses a solid ground plane, a wire anode plane, a wire gating plane, and a multiconductor cathode plane. The anode plane amplifies the amount of charge deposited in the chamber by a factor of up to 10.sup.6. The gating plane allows only charge within a narrow strip to reach the cathode. The cathode plane collects the charge allowed to pass through the gating plane on a set of conductors perpendicular to the open-gated region. By scanning the open-gated region across the chamber and reading out the charge collected on the cathode conductors after a suitable integration time for each location of the gate, a two-dimensional image of the intensity of the ionizing radiation incident on the detector can be made.

  20. Gated strip proportional detector

    DOEpatents

    Morris, C.L.; Idzorek, G.C.; Atencio, L.G.

    1985-02-19

    A gated strip proportional detector includes a gas tight chamber which encloses a solid ground plane, a wire anode plane, a wire gating plane, and a multiconductor cathode plane. The anode plane amplifies the amount of charge deposited in the chamber by a factor of up to 10/sup 6/. The gating plane allows only charge within a narrow strip to reach the cathode. The cathode plane collects the charge allowed to pass through the gating plane on a set of conductors perpendicular to the open-gated region. By scanning the open-gated region across the chamber and reading out the charge collected on the cathode conductors after a suitable integration time for each location of the gate, a two-dimensional image of the intensity of the ionizing radiation incident on the detector can be made.

  1. Biophysics, pathophysiology, and pharmacology of ion channel gating pores

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Adrien; Gosselin-Badaroudine, Pascal; Chahine, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Voltage sensor domains (VSDs) are a feature of voltage gated ion channels (VGICs) and voltage sensitive proteins. They are composed of four transmembrane (TM) segments (S1–S4). Currents leaking through VSDs are called omega or gating pore currents. Gating pores are caused by mutations of the highly conserved positively charged amino acids in the S4 segment that disrupt interactions between the S4 segment and the gating charge transfer center (GCTC). The GCTC separates the intracellular and extracellular water crevices. The disruption of S4–GCTC interactions allows these crevices to communicate and create a fast activating and non-inactivating alternative cation-selective permeation pathway of low conductance, or a gating pore. Gating pore currents have recently been shown to cause periodic paralysis phenotypes. There is also increasing evidence that gating pores are linked to several other familial diseases. For example, gating pores in Nav1.5 and Kv7.2 channels may underlie mixed arrhythmias associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) phenotypes and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability (PNH), respectively. There is little evidence for the existence of gating pore blockers. Moreover, it is known that a number of toxins bind to the VSD of a specific domain of Na+ channels. These toxins may thus modulate gating pore currents. This focus on the VSD motif opens up a new area of research centered on developing molecules to treat a number of cell excitability disorders such as epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmias, and pain. The purpose of the present review is to summarize existing knowledge of the pathophysiology, biophysics, and pharmacology of gating pore currents and to serve as a guide for future studies aimed at improving our understanding of gating pores and their pathophysiological roles. PMID:24772081

  2. Cardiac amyloidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way electrical signals move through the heart (conduction system). This can lead to abnormal heartbeats ( arrhythmias ) ... due to medicine) Sick sinus syndrome Symptomatic cardiac conduction system disease (arrhythmias related to abnormal conduction of ...

  3. Cardiac Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Cardiac Sarcoidosis? Sarcoidosis is a poorly understood disease that commonly affects the lungs. It can also involve the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, eyes, skin, bones, salivary glands and heart. ...

  4. Dosimetric evaluation of four-dimensional dose distributions of CyberKnife and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy in stereotactic body lung radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Mark K H; Kwong, Dora L W; Law, Gilbert M L; Tam, Eric; Tong, Anthony; Lee, Venus; Ng, Sherry C Y

    2013-07-08

    Advanced image-guided stereotatic body lung radiotherapy techniques using volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) with four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) and CyberKnife with real-time target tracking have been clinically implemented by different authors. However, dosimetric comparisons between these techniques are lacking. In this study, 4D CT scans of 14 patients were used to create VMAT and CyberKnife treatment plans using 4D dose calculations. The GTV and the organs at risk (OARs) were defined on the end-exhale images for CyberKnife planning and were then deformed to the midventilation images (MidV) for VMAT optimization. Direct 4D Monte Carlo dose optimizations were performed for CyberKnife (4D(CK)). Four-dimensional dose calculations were also applied to VMAT plans to generate the 4D dose distributions (4D(VMAT)) on the exhale images for direct comparisons with the 4D(CK) plans. 4D(CK) and 4D(VMAT) showed comparable target conformity (1.31 ± 0.13 vs. 1.39 ± 0.24, p = 0.05). GTV mean doses were significantly higher with 4D(CK). Statistical differences of dose volume metrics were not observed in the majority of OARs studied, except for esophagus, with 4D(VMAT) yielding marginally higher D1% than 4D(CK). The normal tissue volumes receiving 80%, 50%, and 30% of the prescription dose (V80%, V50%, and V30%) were higher with 4D(VMAT), whereas 4D(CK) yielded slightly higher V10% in posterior lesions than 4D(VMAT). VMAT resulted in much less monitor units and therefore greater delivery efficiency than CyberKnife. In general, it was possible to produce dosimetrically acceptable plans with both techniques. The selection of treatment modality should consider the dosimetric results as well as the patient's tolerance of the treatment process specific to the SBRT technique.

  5. Application of a Four-dimensional Mathematical Model in the Establishment of an Early Post-burn Cerebral Oedema Model in Severely Burned Dogs.

    PubMed

    Haitao, L; Dajun, Y; Kaifa, W; Xiuwu, B; Jiansen, S; Zongchen, Y

    2005-06-30

    The aim of this study was to explore the spatiotemporal development of cerebral oedema in the early stage of severe burn (50% TBSA, third degree), using a four-dimensional (4D) mathematical model. Twenty-six male mongrel dogs were randomly divided into control and 6, 12, 18, and 24 post-burn hour (PBH) groups. The manifestation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathology, changes of brain water content, and intracranial pressure were observed in each group respectively. A 4D mathematical model was established on the basis of the results of MRI scanning. Two turning points (6 and 18 PBH) and three phases of pathological change were displayed by the 4D mathematical model of cerebral oedema in the early stage of severe burn. The first phase was in the subclinical period, and effective treatment should therefore be performed as quickly as possible in order to prevent deterioration of post-burn cerebral oedema. The second phase (6-18 PBH), with pathological characteristics of cytotoxic cerebral oedema, was in the apoptosis period. The third stage (18-24 PBH) was the danger period of cerebral oedema. Intracranial pressure increased rapidly owing to the limitation of the cranial cavity. As a result, cerebral hernia could easily occur. An S-shape curve in the pathological process of cerebral oedema occurred in the early post-burn stage following severe burn. PMID:21990986

  6. Assimilating surface observations in a four-dimensional variational Doppler radar data assimilation system to improve the analysis and forecast of a squall line case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xingchao; Zhao, Kun; Sun, Juanzhen; Zhou, Bowen; Lee, Wen-Chau

    2016-10-01

    This paper examines how assimilating surface observations can improve the analysis and forecast ability of a fourdimensional Variational Doppler Radar Analysis System (VDRAS). Observed surface temperature and winds are assimilated together with radar radial velocity and reflectivity into a convection-permitting model using the VDRAS four-dimensional variational (4DVAR) data assimilation system. A squall-line case observed during a field campaign is selected to investigate the performance of the technique. A single observation experiment shows that assimilating surface observations can influence the analyzed fields in both the horizontal and vertical directions. The surface-based cold pool, divergence and gust front of the squall line are all strengthened through the assimilation of the single surface observation. Three experiments—assimilating radar data only, assimilating radar data with surface data blended in a mesoscale background, and assimilating both radar and surface observations with a 4DVAR cost function—are conducted to examine the impact of the surface data assimilation. Independent surface and wind profiler observations are used for verification. The result shows that the analysis and forecast are improved when surface observations are assimilated in addition to radar observations. It is also shown that the additional surface data can help improve the analysis and forecast at low levels. Surface and low-level features of the squall line—including the surface warm inflow, cold pool, gust front, and low-level wind—are much closer to the observations after assimilating the surface data in VDRAS.

  7. Investigation of dissipation in the tilting degree of freedom from four-dimensional Langevin dynamics of heavy-ion-induced fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadtochy, P. N.; Ryabov, E. G.; Adeev, G. D.

    2015-04-01

    A four-dimensional dynamical model based on Langevin equations was applied to calculate a wide set of experimental observables for heavy fissioning compound nuclei. Three collective shape coordinates plus the tilting coordinate were considered dynamically from the ground state deformation to the scission into fission fragments. A modified one-body mechanism for nuclear dissipation with a reduction coefficient ks of the contribution from a ‘wall’ formula was used for shapes parameters. Different possibilities of deformation-dependent dissipation coefficient for the tilting coordinate ({{γ }K}) were investigated. Presented results demonstrate that the influence of the ks and γK parameters on the calculated quantities can be selectively probed. The nuclear viscosity with respect to the nuclear shape parameters influences the \\lt {{n}pre}\\gt , the fission fragment mass-energy distribution parameters, and the angular distribution of fission fragments. At the same time the viscosity coefficient γK affects the angular distribution of fission fragments only. The independence of anisotropy on the fission fragment mass is found at both Langevin calculations performed with deformation-dependent and constant γK coefficients.

  8. Chemical and biogeophysical impact of four-dimensional (4D) seismic exploration in sub-Saharan Africa, and restoration of dysfunctionalized mangrove forests in the prospect areas.

    PubMed

    Osuji, Leo C; Ayolagha, G; Obute, G C; Ohabuike, H C

    2007-09-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) seismic exploration, an improved geophysical technique for hydrocarbon-data acquisition, was applied for the first time in the Nembe Creek prospect area of Nigeria. The affected soils were slightly alkaline in situ when wet (pH 7.2), but extremely acidic when dry (pH 3.0). The organic carbon content (4.6-26.8%) and other physicochemical properties of soils and water (N, P, and heavy-metal contents, etc.) were higher than the baseline values obtained in 2001 before seismic profiling. Most values also exceeded the baseline compliance standards of the Department of Petroleum Resources (DPR), the World Health Organization (WHO), and the Federal Environmental Protection Agency (FEPA). Rehabilitation of the affected areas was achieved by stabilizing the mangrove floor by liming and appropriate application of nutrients, followed by replanting the cut seismic lines over a distance of 1,372 km with different mangrove species, including juvenile Rhizophora racemosa, R. mangle, and Avicennia species, which were transferred from nursery points. Quicker post-operational intervention is recommended for future 4D surveys, because the time lag between the end of seismic activity and post-impact investigation is critical in determining the relationship between activity and impact: the longer the intervening period, the more mooted the interaction. PMID:17886833

  9. Eight-state trellis-coded optical modulation with signal constellations of four-dimensional M-ary quadrature-amplitude modulation.

    PubMed

    Ishimura, Shota; Kikuchi, Kazuro

    2015-03-01

    We apply the eight-state trellis-coded modulation (TCM) using signal constellations of four-dimensional M-ary quadrature-amplitude modulation (4D-MQAM) to optical communication systems for the first time to our knowledge. In the TCM scheme, the free distance of the trellis diagram is equal to the minimum distance between constellation points in partitioned subsets, which enlarges the coding gain effectively. In fact, its asymptotic power efficiency is 3-dB larger than that of the set-partitioned 4D-MQAM (SP-4D-MQAM) format, while their spectral efficiencies are the same. Such theoretical predictions are confirmed through computer simulations on eight-state TCM with constellations of 4D-4QAM (i.e., 4D quadrature phase-shift keying: 4D-QPSK) and 4D-16QAM. In particular, eight-state TCM with 4D-QPSK constellations is practically important because of its simple encoder structure, relatively low computational cost, and high coding gain against dual-polarization QPSK (DP-QPSK) and SP-4D-QPSK. Through measurements of its bit-error rate (BER) performance, we confirm that the coding gain against DP-QPSK is about 3 dB at BER=10(-3).

  10. 15. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATES AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATES AND GATE ARMS, PIERS AND DAM BRIDGE, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  11. 4. DETAIL VIEW OF TAINTER GATE PIER AND TAINTER GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL VIEW OF TAINTER GATE PIER AND TAINTER GATE NO. 7 AND NON-SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATES, LOOKING WEST (UPSTREAM) - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26R, Alton, Madison County, IL

  12. 19. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE ARM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE ARM, PIER, TRUNNION PIN AND GATE GAUGE, LOOKING NORTH - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  13. 5. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING TAINTER GATES, GATE PIERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING TAINTER GATES, GATE PIERS AND DAN BRIDGE, WITH ROLLER GATE HEADHOUSES AND LOCKS IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING NORTHEAST, UPSTREAM - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 4, Alma, Buffalo County, WI

  14. Cardiac Na Channels: Structure to Function.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, K R; Clancy, C E

    2016-01-01

    Heart rhythms arise from electrical activity generated by precisely timed opening and closing of ion channels in individual cardiac myocytes. Opening of the primary cardiac voltage-gated sodium (NaV1.5) channel initiates cellular depolarization and the propagation of an electrical action potential that promotes coordinated contraction of the heart. The regularity of these contractile waves is critically important since it drives the primary function of the heart: to act as a pump that delivers blood to the brain and vital organs. When electrical activity goes awry during a cardiac arrhythmia, the pump does not function, the brain does not receive oxygenated blood, and death ensues. Perturbations to NaV1.5 may alter the structure, and hence the function, of the ion channel and are associated downstream with a wide variety of cardiac conduction pathologies, such as arrhythmias. PMID:27586288

  15. Sliding-gate valve

    DOEpatents

    Usnick, George B.; Ward, Gene T.; Blair, Henry O.; Roberts, James W.; Warner, Terry N.

    1979-01-01

    This invention is a novel valve of the slidable-gate type. The valve is designed especially for long-term use with highly abrasive slurries. The sealing surfaces of the gate are shielded by the valve seats when the valve is fully open or closed, and the gate-to-seat clearance is swept with an inflowing purge gas while the gate is in transit. A preferred form of the valve includes an annular valve body containing an annular seat assembly defining a flow channel. The seat assembly comprises a first seat ring which is slidably and sealably mounted in the body, and a second seat ring which is tightly fitted in the body. These rings cooperatively define an annular gap which, together with passages in the valve body, forms a guideway extending normal to the channel. A plate-type gate is mounted for reciprocation in the guideway between positions where a portion of the plate closes the channel and where a circular aperture in the gate is in register with the channel. The valve casing includes opposed chambers which extend outwardly from the body along the axis of the guideway to accommodate the end portions of the gate. The chambers are sealed from atmosphere; when the gate is in transit, purge gas is admitted to the chambers and flows inwardly through the gate-to-seat-ring, clearance, minimizing buildup of process solids therein. A shaft reciprocated by an external actuator extends into one of the sealed chambers through a shaft seal and is coupled to an end of the gate. Means are provided for adjusting the clearance between the first seat ring and the gate while the valve is in service.

  16. Adiabatically implementing quantum gates

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng Liu, Fang

    2014-06-14

    We show that, through the approach of quantum adiabatic evolution, all of the usual quantum gates can be implemented efficiently, yielding running time of order O(1). This may be considered as a useful alternative to the standard quantum computing approach, which involves quantum gates transforming quantum states during the computing process.

  17. Gates Speaks to Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Lifer, Evan

    1997-01-01

    In an interview, Microsoft CEO Bill Gates answers questions about the Gates Library Foundation; Libraries Online; tax-support for libraries; comparisons to Andrew Carnegie; charges of "buying" the library market; Internet filters, policies, and government censorship; the future of the World Wide Web and the role of librarians in its future.(PEN)

  18. Optical NAND gate

    DOEpatents

    Skogen, Erik J.; Raring, James; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna

    2011-08-09

    An optical NAND gate is formed from two pair of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each pair of the optical waveguide devices consisting of an electroabsorption modulator and a photodetector. One pair of the optical waveguide devices is electrically connected in parallel to operate as an optical AND gate; and the other pair of the optical waveguide devices is connected in series to operate as an optical NOT gate (i.e. an optical inverter). The optical NAND gate utilizes two digital optical inputs and a continuous light input to provide a NAND function output. The optical NAND gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

  19. Four-Dimensional Measurement of the Displacement of Internal Fiducial and Skin Markers During 320-Multislice Computed Tomography Scanning of Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Okuma, Kae; Tada, Keiichiro; Shiraishi, Kenshiro; Takahashi, Wataru; Shibata-Mobayashi, Shino; Sakumi, Akira; Saotome, Naoya; Haga, Akihiro; Onoe, Tsuyoshi; Ino, Kenji; Akahane, Masaaki; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To study the three-dimensional movement of internal tumor bed fiducial and breast skin markers, using 320-multislice computed tomography (CT); and to analyze intrafractional errors for breast cancer patients undergoing breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: This study examined 280 markers on the skin of the breast (200 markers) and on the primary tumor bed (80 markers) of 20 patients treated by external-beam photon radiotherapy. Motion assessment was analyzed in 41 respiratory phases during 20 s of cine CT in the radiotherapy position. To assess intrafractional errors resulting from respiratory motion, four-dimensional CT scans were acquired for 20 patients. Results: Motion in the anterior-posterior (A/P) and superior-inferior (S/I) directions showed a strong correlation (|r| > 0.7) with the respiratory curve for most markers (79% and 70%, respectively). The average marker displacements between maximum and minimum value during 20 s for the 200 breast skin metal markers were 1.1 {+-} 0.3 mm, 2.1 {+-} 0.6 mm, and 1.6 {+-} 0.4 mm in the left-right, A/P, and S/I directions, respectively. For the 80 tumor bed clips, displacements were 0.9 {+-} 0.2 mm in left-right, 1.7 {+-} 0.5 mm in A/P, and 1.1 {+-} 0.3 mm in S/I. There was no significant difference in the motion between breast quadrant regions or between the primary site and the other regions. Conclusions: Motion in primary breast tumors was evaluated with 320-multislice CT. Very little change was detected during individual radiation treatment fractions.

  20. Assessing Respiration-Induced Tumor Motion and Internal Target Volume Using Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography for Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H. Helen . E-mail: hliu@mdanderson.org; Balter, Peter; Tutt, Teresa; Choi, Bum; Zhang, Joy; Wang, Catherine; Chi, Melinda; Luo Dershan; Pan Tinsu; Hunjan, Sandeep; Starkschall, George; Rosen, Isaac; Prado, Karl; Liao Zhongxing; Chang, Joe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To assess three-dimensional tumor motion caused by respiration and internal target volume (ITV) for radiotherapy of lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Respiration-induced tumor motion was analyzed for 166 tumors from 152 lung cancer patients, 57.2% of whom had Stage III or IV non-small-cell lung cancer. All patients underwent four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) during normal breathing before treatment. The expiratory phase of 4DCT images was used as the reference set to delineate gross tumor volume (GTV). Gross tumor volumes on other respiratory phases and resulting ITVs were determined using rigid-body registration of 4DCT images. The association of GTV motion with various clinical and anatomic factors was analyzed statistically. Results: The proportions of tumors that moved >0.5 cm along the superior-inferior (SI), lateral, and anterior-posterior (AP) axes during normal breathing were 39.2%, 1.8%, and 5.4%, respectively. For 95% of the tumors, the magnitude of motion was less than 1.34 cm, 0.40 cm, and 0.59 cm along the SI, lateral, and AP directions. The principal component of tumor motion was in the SI direction, with only 10.8% of tumors moving >1.0 cm. The tumor motion was found to be associated with diaphragm motion, the SI tumor location in the lung, size of the GTV, and disease T stage. Conclusions: Lung tumor motion is primarily driven by diaphragm motion. The motion of locally advanced lung tumors is unlikely to exceed 1.0 cm during quiet normal breathing except for small lesions located in the lower half of the lung.

  1. Mid-ventilation CT scan construction from four-dimensional respiration-correlated CT scans for radiotherapy planning of lung cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wolthaus, Jochem; Schneider, Christoph; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Herk, Marcel van; Belderbos, Jose; Rossi, Maddalena; Lebesque, Joos V.; Damen, Eugene M.F. . E-mail: e.damen@nki.nl

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional (4D) respiration-correlated imaging techniques can be used to obtain (respiration) artifact-free computed tomography (CT) images of the thorax. Current radiotherapy planning systems, however, do not accommodate 4D-CT data. The purpose of this study was to develop a simple, new concept to incorporate patient-specific motion information, using 4D-CT scans, in the radiotherapy planning process of lung cancer patients to enable smaller error margins. Methods and Materials: A single CT scan was selected from the 4D-CT data set. This scan represented the tumor in its time-averaged position over the respiratory cycle (the mid-ventilation CT scan). To select the appropriate CT scan, two methods were used. First, the three-dimensional tumor motion was analyzed semiautomatically to calculate the mean tumor position and the corresponding respiration phase. An alternative automated method was developed to select the correct CT scan using the diaphragm motion. Results: Owing to hysteresis, mid-ventilation selection using the three-dimensional tumor motion had a tumor position accuracy (with respect to the mean tumor position) better than 1.1 {+-} 1.1 mm for all three directions (inhalation and exhalation). The accuracy in the diaphragm motion method was better than 1.1 {+-} 1.1 mm. Conventional free-breathing CT scanning had an accuracy better than 0 {+-} 3.9 mm. The mid-ventilation concept can result in an average irradiated volume reduction of 20% for tumors with a diameter of 40 mm. Conclusion: Tumor motion and the diaphragm motion method can be used to select the (artifact-free) mid-ventilation CT scan, enabling a significant reduction of the irradiated volume.

  2. The Prognostic Value of a Four-Dimensional CT Angiography-Based Collateral Grading Scale for Reperfusion Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Weili; Tang, Huan; Han, Quan; Yan, Shenqiang; Zhang, Xiaocheng; Chen, Qingmeng; Parsons, Mark; Wang, Shaoshi; Lou, Min

    2016-01-01

    Objective Leptomeningeal collaterals, which affects tissue fate, are still challenging to assess. Four-dimensional CT angiography (4D CTA) originated from CT perfusion (CTP) provides the possibility of non-invasive and time-resolved assessment of leptomeningeal collateral flow. We sought to develop a comprehensive rating system to integrate the speed and extent of collateral flow on 4D CTA, and investigate its prognostic value for reperfusion therapy in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients. Methods We retrospectively studied 80 patients with M1 ± internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion who had baseline CTP before intravenous thrombolysis. The velocity and extent of collaterals were evaluated by regional leptomeningeal collateral score on peak phase (rLMC-P) and temporally fused intensity projections (tMIP) (rLMC-M) on 4D CTA, respectively. The cutoffs of rLMC-P and rLMC-M score for predicting good outcome (mRS score ≤ 2) were integrated to develop the collateral grading scale (CGS) (rating from 0–2). Results The CGS score was correlated with 3-months mRS score (non-recanalizers: ρ = -0.495, p = 0.01; recanalizers: ρ = -0.671, p < 0.001). Patients with intermediate or good collaterals (CGS score of 1 and 2) who recanalized were more likely to have good outcome than those without recanalization (p = 0.038, p = 0.018), while there was no significant difference in outcome in patients with poor collaterals (CGS score of 0) stratified by recanalization (p = 0.227). Conclusions Identification of collaterals based on CGS may help to select good responders to reperfusion therapy in patients with large artery occlusion. PMID:27505435

  3. Inferring Positions of Tumor and Nodes in Stage III Lung Cancer From Multiple Anatomical Surrogates Using Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowski, Kathleen T.; Pantarotto, Jason R.; Senan, Suresh

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of modeling Stage III lung cancer tumor and node positions from anatomical surrogates. Methods and Materials: To localize their centroids, the primary tumor and lymph nodes from 16 Stage III lung cancer patients were contoured in 10 equal-phase planning four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) image sets. The centroids of anatomical respiratory surrogates (carina, xyphoid, nipples, mid-sternum) in each image set were also localized. The correlations between target and surrogate positions were determined, and ordinary least-squares (OLS) and partial least-squares (PLS) regression models based on a subset of respiratory phases (three to eight randomly selected) were created to predict the target positions in the remaining images. The three-phase image sets that provided the best predictive information were used to create models based on either the carina alone or all surrogates. Results: The surrogate most correlated with target motion varied widely. Depending on the number of phases used to build the models, mean OLS and PLS errors were 1.0 to 1.4 mm and 0.8 to 1.0 mm, respectively. Models trained on the 0%, 40%, and 80% respiration phases had mean ({+-} standard deviation) PLS errors of 0.8 {+-} 0.5 mm and 1.1 {+-} 1.1 mm for models based on all surrogates and carina alone, respectively. For target coordinates with motion >5 mm, the mean three-phase PLS error based on all surrogates was 1.1 mm. Conclusions: Our results establish the feasibility of inferring primary tumor and nodal motion from anatomical surrogates in 4D CT scans of Stage III lung cancer. Using inferential modeling to decrease the processing time of 4D CT scans may facilitate incorporation of patient-specific treatment margins.

  4. Mid-Ventilation Concept for Mobile Pulmonary Tumors: Internal Tumor Trajectory Versus Selective Reconstruction of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Frames Based on External Breathing Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenberger, Matthias Wilbert, Juergen; Krieger, Thomas; Richter, Anne; Baier, Kurt; Flentje, Michael

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of direct reconstruction of mid-ventilation and peak-phase four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) frames based on the external breathing signal. Methods and Materials: For 11 patients with 15 pulmonary targets, a respiration-correlated CT study (4D CT) was acquired for treatment planning. After retrospective time-based sorting of raw projection data and reconstruction of eight CT frames equally distributed over the breathing cycle, mean tumor position (P{sub mean}), mid-ventilation frame, and breathing motion were evaluated based on the internal tumor trajectory. Analysis of the external breathing signal (pressure sensor around abdomen) with amplitude-based sorting of projections was performed for direct reconstruction of the mid-ventilation frame and frames at peak phases of the breathing cycle. Results: On the basis of the eight 4D CT frames equally spaced in time, tumor motion was largest in the craniocaudal direction, with 12 {+-} 7 mm on average. Tumor motion between the two frames reconstructed at peak phases was not different in the craniocaudal and anterior-posterior directions but was systematically smaller in the left-right direction by 1 mm on average. The 3-dimensional distance between P{sub mean} and the tumor position in the mid-ventilation frame based on the internal tumor trajectory was 1.2 {+-} 1 mm. Reconstruction of the mid-ventilation frame at the mean amplitude position of the external breathing signal resulted in tumor positions 2.0 {+-} 1.1 mm distant from P{sub mean}. Breathing-induced motion artifacts in mid-ventilation frames caused negligible changes in tumor volume and shape. Conclusions: Direct reconstruction of the mid-ventilation frame and frames at peak phases based on the external breathing signal was reliable. This makes the reconstruction of only three 4D CT frames sufficient for application of the mid-ventilation technique in clinical practice.

  5. Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography-Based Treatment Planning for Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Proton Therapy for Distal Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaodong; Zhao Kuaile; Guerrero, Thomas M.; Mcguire, Sean E.; Yaremko, Brian; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Hui Zhouguang; Li Yupeng; Newhauser, Wayne D.; Mohan, Radhe; Liao Zhongxing

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To compare three-dimensional (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT)-based treatment plans for proton therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for esophageal cancer in terms of doses to the lung, heart, and spinal cord and variations in target coverage and normal tissue sparing. Methods and Materials: The IMRT and proton plans for 15 patients with distal esophageal cancer were designed from the 3D average CT scans and then recalculated on 10 4D CT data sets. Dosimetric data were compared for tumor coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: Compared with IMRT, median lung volumes exposed to 5, 10, and 20 Gy and mean lung dose were reduced by 35.6%, 20.5%, 5.8%, and 5.1 Gy for a two-beam proton plan and by 17.4%, 8.4%, 5%, and 2.9 Gy for a three-beam proton plan. The greater lung sparing in the two-beam proton plan was achieved at the expense of less conformity to the target (conformity index [CI], 1.99) and greater irradiation of the heart (heart-V40, 41.8%) compared with the IMRT plan(CI, 1.55, heart-V40, 35.7%) or the three-beam proton plan (CI, 1.46, heart-V40, 27.7%). Target coverage differed by more than 2% between the 3D and 4D plans for patients with substantial diaphragm motion in the three-beam proton and IMRT plans. The difference in spinal cord maximum dose between 3D and 4D plans could exceed 5 Gy for the proton plans partly owing to variations in stomach gas filling. Conclusions: Proton therapy provided significantly better sparing of lung than did IMRT. Diaphragm motion and stomach gas-filling must be considered in evaluating target coverage and cord doses.

  6. Usefulness of target delineation based on the two extreme phases of a four-dimensional computed tomography scan in stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Seong Soon; Huh, Gil Ja; Park, Suk Young; Yang, Po Song; Cho, EunYoun

    2015-01-01

    Background An evaluation of the usefulness of target delineation based only on the two extreme phases of a four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) scan in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods Seventeen patients treated with SBRT via 4D CT scans for lung cancer were retrospectively enrolled. Volumetric and geometric analyses were performed for the internal target volumes (ITVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) generated using different respiratory phases (all phases and 2 extreme phases) and setup margins (3 mm and 5 mm). Results As the setup margins were added to the ITVs, the overlap percentage between the PTVs based on all phases and the two extreme phases increased (85.1% for ITVs, 89.8% for PTVs_3 mm, and 91.3% for PTVs_5 mm), and there were no differences according to the tumor parameters, such as the gross tumor volume and 3D mobility. The missing-volume differences for ITVs derived from cone-beam CT images also decreased, with values of 5.3% between ITVs, 0.5% between PTVs_3 mm, and 0.2% between PTVs_5 mm. Compared with the plan based on all phases and a 3 mm margin, the average lung-dose differences found for the PTV based on the two extreme phases and a 5 mm margin were 0.41 Gy for the mean lung dose and 0.93% for V20. Conclusions Regardless of tumor characteristics, PTV construction based only on the two extreme phases and a 5 mm setup margin may be a useful tool for reducing the clinical workload involved in target delineation in SBRT for lung cancer. PMID:26273368

  7. Comparison of IGRT Registration Strategies for Optimal Coverage of Primary Lung Tumors and Involved Nodes Based on Multiple Four-Dimensional CT Scans Obtained Throughout the Radiotherapy Course

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed, Nasiruddin; Kestin, Larry; Grills, Inga; Shah, Chirag; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Yan, Di; Ionascu, Dan

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of primary tumor and involved lymph node (LN) geometry (centroid, shape, volume) on internal target volume (ITV) throughout treatment for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer using weekly four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Methods and Materials: Eleven patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer were treated using image-guided radiotherapy with acquisition of weekly 10-Phase 4DCTs (n = 51). Initial ITV was based on planning 4DCT. Master-ITV incorporated target geometry across the entire treatment (all 4DCTs). Geographic miss was defined as the % Master-ITV positioned outside of the initial planning ITV after registration is complete. Registration strategies considered were bony (B), primary tumor soft tissue alone (T), and registration based on primary tumor and involved LNs (T{sub L}N). Results: The % geographic miss for the primary tumor, mediastinal, and hilar lymph nodes based on each registration strategy were (1) B: 30%, 30%, 30%; (2) T: 21%, 40%, 36%; and (3) T{sub L}N: 26%, 26%, 27%. Mean geographic expansions to encompass 100% of the primary tumor and involved LNs were 1.2 {+-} 0.7 cm and 0.8 {+-} 0.3 cm, respectively, for B and T{sub L}N. Primary and involved LN expansions were 0.7 {+-} 0.5 cm and 1.1 {+-} 0.5 cm for T. Conclusion: T is best for solitary targets. When treatments include primary tumor and LNs, B and T{sub L}N provide more comprehensive geographic coverage. We have identified high % geographic miss when considering multiple registration strategies. The dosimetric implications are the subject of future study.

  8. SU-D-18A-01: Tumor Motion Tracking with a Regional Deformable Registration Model for Four Dimensional Radiation Treatment of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, M; Lo, Y; Yuan, Y; Sheu, R; Rosenzweig, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a tumor motion model from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) of thoracic patients and demonstrate its impact on 4D radiation therapy simulation. Methods: A regional deformable image registration algorithm was introduced to extract tumor motion out of patient's breathing cycle. The gross target volume (GTV) was manually delineated on a selected phase of 4DCT and a subregion with 10mm margin supplemented to the GTV was created on the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Together with 4DCT the structures were exported into an inhouse research platform. A free form B-Spline deformable registration was carried out to map the subregion to other respiratory phases. The displacement vector fields were employed to propagate GTV contours with which the center of mass (CoM) of the GTV was computed for each breathing phase of 4DCT. The resultant GTV motion and its volumetric shape are utilized to facilitate 4D treatment planning. Five lung cancer patients undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy were enrolled and their 4DCT sets were included in the study. Results: Application of the algorithm to five thoracic patients indicates that clinically satisfactory outcomes were achievable with a spatial accuracy better than 2mm for GTV contour propagation between adjacent phases, and 3mm between opposite phases. The GTV CoM was found to be in the range of 2.0mm through 2.5cm, depending upon the tumor location. Compared to the traditional whole image based registration, the computation of the regional model was found to be an order of magnitude more efficient. Conclusion: A regional deformable registration model was implemented to extract tumor motion. It will have widespread application in 4D radiation treatment planning in the future to maximally utilize the available spatial-tempo information.

  9. [Cardiac amyloidosis].

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Caroline; Angermann, Christiane E; Knop, Stefan; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan

    2008-03-15

    Amyloidoses are a heterogeneous group of multisystem disorders, which are characterized by an extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils. Typically affected are the heart, liver, kidneys, and nervous system. More than half of the patients die due to cardiac involvement. Clinical signs of cardiac amyloidosis are edema of the lower limbs, hepatomegaly, ascites and elevated jugular vein pressure, frequently in combination with dyspnea. There can also be chest pain, probably due to microvessel disease. Dysfunction of the autonomous nervous system or arrhythmias may cause low blood pressure, dizziness, or recurrent syncope. The AL amyloidosis caused by the deposition of immunoglobulin light chains is the most common form. It can be performed by monoclonal gammopathy. The desirable treatment therapy consists of high-dose melphalan therapy twice followed by autologous stem cell transplantation. Due to the high peritransplantation mortality, selection of appropriate patients is mandatory. The ATTR amyloidosis is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by the amyloidogenic form of transthyretin, a plasmaprotein that is synthesized in the liver. Therefore, liver transplantation is the only curative therapy. The symptomatic treatment of cardiac amyloidosis is based on the current guidelines for chronic heart failure according to the patient's New York Heart Association (NYHA) state. Further types of amyloidosis with possible cardiac involvement comprise the senile systemic amyloidosis caused by the wild-type transthyretin, secondary amyloidosis after chronic systemic inflammation, and the beta(2)-microglobulin amyloidosis after long-term dialysis treatment. PMID:18344065

  10. Echocardiography as an indication of continuous-time cardiac quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wick, C. A.; Auffermann, W. F.; Shah, A. J.; Inan, O. T.; Bhatti, P. T.; Tridandapani, S.

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) angiography using prospective gating requires that data be acquired during intervals of minimal cardiac motion to obtain diagnostic images of the coronary vessels free of motion artifacts. This work is intended to assess B-mode echocardiography as a continuous-time indication of these quiescent periods to determine if echocardiography can be used as a cost-efficient, non-ionizing modality to develop new prospective gating techniques for cardiac CT. These new prospective gating approaches will not be based on echocardiography itself but on CT-compatible modalities derived from the mechanics of the heart (e.g. seismocardiography and impedance cardiography), unlike the current standard electrocardiogram. To this end, echocardiography and retrospectively-gated CT data were obtained from ten patients with varied cardiac conditions. CT reconstructions were made throughout the cardiac cycle. Motion of the interventricular septum (IVS) was calculated from both echocardiography and CT reconstructions using correlation-based, deviation techniques. The IVS was chosen because it (1) is visible in echocardiography images, whereas the coronary vessels generally are not, and (2) has been shown to be a suitable indicator of cardiac quiescence. Quiescent phases were calculated as the minima of IVS motion and CT volumes were reconstructed for these phases. The diagnostic quality of the CT reconstructions from phases calculated from echocardiography and CT data was graded on a four-point Likert scale by a board-certified radiologist fellowship-trained in cardiothoracic radiology. Using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test, no significant difference in the diagnostic quality of the coronary vessels was found between CT volumes reconstructed from echocardiography- and CT-selected phases. Additionally, there was a correlation of 0.956 between the echocardiography- and CT-selected phases. This initial work suggests that B-mode echocardiography can be used as a

  11. Diagnostic quality of time-averaged ECG-gated CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Almar; Oostveen, Luuk J.; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; Hoogeveen, Yvonne; Schultze Kool, Leo J.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Renema, W. Klaas Jan

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: ECG-gated CTA allows visualization of the aneurysm and stentgraft during the different phases of the cardiac cycle, although with a lower SNR per cardiac phase than without ECG gating using the same dose. In our institution, abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is evaluated using non-ECG-gated CTA. Some common CT scanners cannot reconstruct a non-gated volume from ECG-gated acquired data. In order to obtain the same diagnostic image quality, we propose offline temporal averaging of the ECG-gated data. This process, though straightforward, is fundamentally different from taking a non-gated scan, and its result will certainly differ as well. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively investigate how good off-line averaging approximates a non-gated scan. Method: Non-gated and ECG-gated CT scans have been performed on a phantom (Catphan 500). Afterwards the phases of the ECG-gated CTA data were averaged to create a third dataset. The three sets are compared with respect to noise properties (NPS) and frequency response (MTF). To study motion artifacts identical scans were acquired on a programmable dynamic phantom. Results and Conclusions: The experiments show that the spatial frequency content is not affected by the averaging process. The minor differences observed for the noise properties and motion artifacts are in favor of the averaged data. Therefore the averaged ECG-gated phases can be used for diagnosis. This enables the use of ECG-gating for research on stentgrafts in AAA, without impairing clinical patient care.

  12. Voltage gating by molecular subunits of Na+ and K+ ion channels: higher-dimensional cubic kinetics, rate constants, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Fohlmeister, Jürgen F

    2015-06-01

    The structural similarity between the primary molecules of voltage-gated Na and K channels (alpha subunits) and activation gating in the Hodgkin-Huxley model is brought into full agreement by increasing the model's sodium kinetics to fourth order (m(3) → m(4)). Both structures then virtually imply activation gating by four independent subprocesses acting in parallel. The kinetics coalesce in four-dimensional (4D) cubic diagrams (16 states, 32 reversible transitions) that show the structure to be highly failure resistant against significant partial loss of gating function. Rate constants, as fitted in phase plot data of retinal ganglion cell excitation, reflect the molecular nature of the gating transitions. Additional dimensions (6D cubic diagrams) accommodate kinetically coupled sodium inactivation and gating processes associated with beta subunits. The gating transitions of coupled sodium inactivation appear to be thermodynamically irreversible; response to dielectric surface charges (capacitive displacement) provides a potential energy source for those transitions and yields highly energy-efficient excitation. A comparison of temperature responses of the squid giant axon (apparently Arrhenius) and mammalian channel gating yields kinetic Q10 = 2.2 for alpha unit gating, whose transitions are rate-limiting at mammalian temperatures; beta unit kinetic Q10 = 14 reproduces the observed non-Arrhenius deviation of mammalian gating at low temperatures; the Q10 of sodium inactivation gating matches the rate-limiting component of activation gating at all temperatures. The model kinetics reproduce the physiologically large frequency range for repetitive firing in ganglion cells and the physiologically observed strong temperature dependence of recovery from inactivation. PMID:25867741

  13. Voltage gating by molecular subunits of Na+ and K+ ion channels: higher-dimensional cubic kinetics, rate constants, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Fohlmeister, Jürgen F

    2015-06-01

    The structural similarity between the primary molecules of voltage-gated Na and K channels (alpha subunits) and activation gating in the Hodgkin-Huxley model is brought into full agreement by increasing the model's sodium kinetics to fourth order (m(3) → m(4)). Both structures then virtually imply activation gating by four independent subprocesses acting in parallel. The kinetics coalesce in four-dimensional (4D) cubic diagrams (16 states, 32 reversible transitions) that show the structure to be highly failure resistant against significant partial loss of gating function. Rate constants, as fitted in phase plot data of retinal ganglion cell excitation, reflect the molecular nature of the gating transitions. Additional dimensions (6D cubic diagrams) accommodate kinetically coupled sodium inactivation and gating processes associated with beta subunits. The gating transitions of coupled sodium inactivation appear to be thermodynamically irreversible; response to dielectric surface charges (capacitive displacement) provides a potential energy source for those transitions and yields highly energy-efficient excitation. A comparison of temperature responses of the squid giant axon (apparently Arrhenius) and mammalian channel gating yields kinetic Q10 = 2.2 for alpha unit gating, whose transitions are rate-limiting at mammalian temperatures; beta unit kinetic Q10 = 14 reproduces the observed non-Arrhenius deviation of mammalian gating at low temperatures; the Q10 of sodium inactivation gating matches the rate-limiting component of activation gating at all temperatures. The model kinetics reproduce the physiologically large frequency range for repetitive firing in ganglion cells and the physiologically observed strong temperature dependence of recovery from inactivation.

  14. 18. DETAIL VIEW OF NONSUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DETAIL VIEW OF NON-SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE AND GATE ARMS, GATE PIER AND DAM BRIDGE, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  15. 17. DETAIL VIEW OF NONSUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL VIEW OF NON-SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE AND GATE ARM, GATE PIER AND DAM BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  16. Measurement of ventricular function by ECG gating during atrial fibrillation

    SciTech Connect

    Bacharach, S.L.; Green, M.V.; Bonow, R.O.; Findley, S.L.; Ostrow, H.G.; Johnston, G.S.

    1981-03-01

    The assumptions necessary to perform ECG-gated cardiac studies are seemingly not valid for patients in atrial fibrillation (AF). To evaluate the effect of AF on equilibrium gated scintigraphy, beat-by-beat measurements of left-ventricular function were made on seven subjects in AF (mean heart rate 64 bpm), using a high-efficiency nonimaging detector. The parameters evaluated were ejection fraction (EF), time to end-systole (TES), peak rates of ejection and filling (PER,PFR), and their times of occurrence (TPER, TPFR). By averaging together single-beat values of EF, PER, etc., it was possible to determine the true mean values of these parameters. The single-beam mean values were compared with the corresponding parameters calculated from one ECG-gated time-activity curve (TAC) obtained by superimposing all the single-beat TACs irrespective of their length. For this population with slow heart rates, we find that the values for EF, etc., produced from ECG-gated time-activity curves, are very similar to those obtained from the single-beat data. Thus use of ECG gating at low heart rates may allow reliable estimation of average cardiac function even in subjects with AF.

  17. Optical XOR gate

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G. Allen

    2013-11-12

    An optical XOR gate is formed as a photonic integrated circuit (PIC) from two sets of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each set of the optical waveguide devices including an electroabsorption modulator electrically connected in series with a waveguide photodetector. The optical XOR gate utilizes two digital optical inputs to generate an XOR function digital optical output. The optical XOR gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

  18. Optical NOR gate

    DOEpatents

    Skogen, Erik J.; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna

    2011-09-06

    An optical NOR gate is formed from two pair of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each pair of the optical waveguide devices consisting of an electroabsorption modulator electrically connected in series with a waveguide photodetector. The optical NOR gate utilizes two digital optical inputs and a continuous light input to provide a NOR function digital optical output. The optical NOR gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

  19. Fully 4D list-mode reconstruction applied to respiratory-gated PET scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotus, N; Reader, A J; Stute, S; Rosenwald, J C; Giraud, P; Buvat, I

    2009-03-01

    18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the most sensitive and specific imaging modalities for the diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer. A drawback of PET is that it requires several minutes of acquisition per bed position, which results in images being affected by respiratory blur. Respiratory gating techniques have been developed to deal with respiratory motion in the PET images. However, these techniques considerably increase the level of noise in the reconstructed images unless the acquisition time is increased. The aim of this paper is to evaluate a four-dimensional (4D) image reconstruction algorithm that combines the acquired events in all the gates whilst preserving the motion deblurring. This algorithm was compared to classic ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction of gated and non-gated images, and to temporal filtering of gated images reconstructed with OSEM. Two datasets were used for comparing the different reconstruction approaches: one involving the NEMA IEC/2001 body phantom in motion, the other obtained using Monte-Carlo simulations of the NCAT breathing phantom. Results show that 4D reconstruction reaches a similar performance in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as non-gated reconstruction whilst preserving the motion deblurring. In particular, 4D reconstruction improves the SNR compared to respiratory-gated images reconstructed with the OSEM algorithm. Temporal filtering of the OSEM-reconstructed images helps improve the SNR, but does not achieve the same performance as 4D reconstruction. 4D reconstruction of respiratory-gated images thus appears as a promising tool to reach the same performance in terms of the SNR as non-gated acquisitions while reducing the motion blur, without increasing the acquisition time.

  20. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanck, Dorothy A.; Fozzard, Harry A.

    Voltage-gated sodium channels subserve regenerative excitation throughout the nervous system, as well as in skeletal and cardiac muscle. This excitation results from a voltage-dependent mechanism that increases regeneratively and selectively the sodium conductance of the channel e-fold for a 4-7 mV depolarization of the membrane with time constants in the range of tens of microseconds. Entry of Na+ into the cell without a companion anion depolarizes the cell. This depolarization, called the action potential, is propagated at rates of 1-20 meters/sec. In nerve it subserves rapid transmission of information and, in muscle cells, coordinates the trigger for contraction. Sodium-dependent action potentials depolarize the membrane to inside positive values of about 30-40 mV (approaching the electrochemical potential for the transmembrane sodium gradient). Repolarization to the resting potential (usually between -60 and -90 mV) occurs because of inactivation (closure) of sodium channels, which is assisted in different tissues by variable amounts of activation of voltage-gated potassium channels. This sequence results in all-or-nothing action potentials in nerve and fast skeletal muscle of 1-2 ms duration, and in heart muscle of 100-300 ms duration. Recovery of regenerative excitation, i.e., recovery of the ability of sodium channels to open, occurs after restoration of the resting potential with time constants of a few to several hundreds of milliseconds, depending on the channel isoform, and this rate controls the minimum interval for repetitive action potentials (refractory period).

  1. Magnitude of Residual Internal Anatomy Motion on Heavy Charged Particle Dose Distribution in Respiratory Gated Lung Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Shinichiro Asakura, Hiroshi; Kandatsu, Susumu; Kumagai, Motoki; Baba, Masayuki; Endo, Masahiro

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the variation in carbon beam dose distribution due to residual motion in lung cancer patients undergoing respiratory-gated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 11 lung cancer patients underwent four-dimensional computed tomography with a 256-multislice computed tomography scanner under free-breathing conditions. A compensating bolus was designed to cover the treatment beam for all planning target volumes during a 30% duty cycle centered on exhalation (gating window). This bolus was applied to the four-dimensional computed tomography data for one respiratory cycle, and then the carbon beam dose distribution was calculated. Results: A water equivalent pathlength variation of <5 mm was observed in the gating window, but this increased to {<=}20 mm on inhalation. As a result, beam overshoot/undershoot occurred around inhalation, which increased the excessive dosing to normal tissues and the organs at risk. The dose for >95% volume irradiation is dependent on the respiratory phase but not the gating window. However, the dose for >95% volume irradiation correlated well with the tumor displacement distance. More than 90% of the dose for >95% volume irradiation could be delivered in the gating window with <4-mm tumor displacement resulting from exhalation. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that even when the treatment beam delivery occurs outside the gating window, the prescribed dose to the target is not affected in patients with a tumor displacement of <4 mm. Thus, respiratory gating is not required in radiotherapy for patients with <4-mm tumor displacement in a respiratory cycle.

  2. Cardiac-state-driven CT image reconstruction algorithm for cardiac imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesmeli, Erdogan; Edic, Peter M.; Iatrou, Maria; Hsieh, Jiang; Gupta, Rajiv; Pfoh, Armin H.

    2002-05-01

    Multi-slice CT scanners use EKG gating to predict the cardiac phase during slice reconstruction from projection data. Cardiac phase is generally defined with respect to the RR interval. The implicit assumption made is that the duration of events in a RR interval scales linearly when the heart rate changes. Using a more detailed EKG analysis, we evaluate the impact of relaxing this assumption on image quality. We developed a reconstruction algorithm that analyzes the associated EKG waveform to extract the natural cardiac states. A wavelet transform was used to decompose each RR-interval into P, QRS, and T waves. Subsequently, cardiac phase was defined with respect to these waves instead of a percentage or time delay from the beginning or the end of RR intervals. The projection data was then tagged with the cardiac phase and processed using temporal weights that are function of their cardiac phases. Finally, the tagged projection data were combined from multiple cardiac cycles using a multi-sector algorithm to reconstruct images. The new algorithm was applied to clinical data, collected on a 4-slice (GE LightSpeed Qx/i) and 8-slice CT scanner (GE LightSpeed Plus), with heart rates of 40 to 80 bpm. The quality of reconstruction is assessed by the visualization of the major arteries, e.g. RCA, LAD, LC in the reformat 3D images. Preliminary results indicate that Cardiac State Driven reconstruction algorithm offers better image quality than their RR-based counterparts.

  3. SU-E-T-520: Four-Dimensional Dose Calculation Algorithm Considering Variations in Dose Distribution Induced by Sinusoidal One-Dimensional Motion Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Taguenang, J; Algan, O; Ahmad, S; Ali, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate quantitatively the variations in dose-distributions induced by motion by measurements and modeling. A four-dimensional (4D) motion model of dose distributions that accounts for different motion parameters was developed. Methods: Variations in dose distributions induced by sinusoidal phantom motion were measured using a multiple-diode-array-detector (MapCheck2). MapCheck2 was mounted on a mobile platform that moves with adjustable calibrated motion patterns in the superior-inferior direction. Various plans including open and intensity-modulated fields were used to irradiate MapCheck2. A motion model was developed to predict spatial and temporal variations in the dose-distributions and dependence on the motion parameters using pencil-beam spread-out superposition function. This model used the superposition of pencil-beams weighted with a probability function extracted from the motion trajectory. The model was verified with measured dose-distributions obtained from MapCheck2. Results: Dose-distribution varied considerably with motion where in the regions between isocenter and 50% isodose-line, dose decreased with increase of the motion amplitude. Dose levels increased with increase in the motion amplitude in the region beyond 50% isodose-line. When the range of motion (ROM=twice amplitude) was smaller than the field length both central axis dose and the 50% isodose-line did not change with variation of motion amplitude and remained equal to the dose of stationary phantom. As ROM became larger than the field length, the dose level decreased at central axis dose and 50% isodose-line. Motion frequency and phase did not affect the dose distributions which were delivered over an extended time longer than few motion cycles, however, they played an important role for doses delivered with high-dose-rates within one motion cycle . Conclusion: A 4D-dose motion model was developed to predict and correct variations in dose distributions induced by one

  4. Dosimetric characterization of a multileaf collimator for a new four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head, MHI-TM2000

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Sawada, Akira; Ishihara, Yoshitomo; Takayama, Kenji; Mizowaki, Takashi; Kaneko, Shuji; Yamashita, Mikiko; Tanabe, Hiroaki; Kokubo, Masaki; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: To present the dosimetric characterization of a multileaf collimator (MLC) for a new four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head, MHI-TM2000. Methods: MHI-TM2000 has an x-ray head composed of an ultrasmall linear accelerator guide and a system-specific MLC. The x-ray head can rotate along the two orthogonal gimbals (pan and tilt rotations) up to {+-}2.5 deg., which swings the beam up to {+-}41.9 mm in each direction from the isocenter on the isocenter plane perpendicular to the beam. The MLC design is a single-focus type, has 30 pairs of 5 mm thick leaves at the isocenter, and produces a maximum field size of 150x150 mm{sup 2}. Leaf height and length are 110 and 260 mm, respectively. Each leaf end is circular, with a radius of curvature of 370 mm. The distance that each leaf passes over the isocenter is 77.5 mm. Radiation leakage between adjacent leaves is minimized by an interlocking tongue-and-groove (T and G) arrangement with the height of the groove part 55 mm. The dosimetric characterizations including field characteristics, leaf position accuracy, leakage, and T and G effect were evaluated using a well-commissioned 6 MV photon beam, EDR2 films (Kodak, Rochester, NY), and water-equivalent phantoms. Furthermore, the field characteristics and leaf position accuracy were evaluated under conditions of pan or tilt rotation. Results: The differences between nominal and measured field sizes were within {+-}0.5 mm. Although the penumbra widths were greater with wider field size, the maximum width was <5.5 mm even for the fully opened field. Compared to the results of field characteristics without pan or tilt rotation, the variation in field size, penumbra width, flatness, and symmetry was within {+-}1 mm/1% at the maximum pan or tilt rotational angle. The leaf position accuracy was 0.0{+-}0.1 mm, ranging from -0.3 to 0.2 mm at four gantry angles of 0 deg., 90 deg., 180 deg., and 270 deg. with and without pan or tilt rotation

  5. Delivery of four-dimensional radiotherapy with TrackBeam for moving target using an AccuKnife dual-layer MLC: dynamic phantoms study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaxi; Shi, Chengyu; Lin, Bryan; Ha, Chul Soo; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2009-04-23

    Respiratory motion has been considered a clinical challenge for lung tumor treatments due to target motion. In this study, we aimed to perform an experimental evaluation based on dynamic phantoms using MLC-based beam tracking. TrackBeam, a prototype real-time beam tracking system, has been assembled and evaluated in our clinic. TrackBeam includes an orthogonal dual-layer micro multi-leaf collimator (DmMLC), an on-board mega-voltage (MV) portal imaging device, and an image processing workstation. With a fiducial marker implanted in a moving target, the on-board imaging device can capture the motion. The TrackBeam workstation processes the online MV fluence and detects and predicts tumor motion. The DmMLC system then dynamically repositions each leaf to form new beam apertures based on the movement of the fiducial marker. In this study, a dynamic phantom was used for the measurements. Three delivery patterns were evaluated for dosimetric verification based on radiographic films: no-motion-lung-tumor (NMLT), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), and four-dimensional tracking radiotherapy (4DTRT). The displacement between the DmMLC dynamic beam isocenter and the fiducial marker was in the range of 0.5 mm to 1.5 mm. With radiographic film analysis, the planar dose histogram difference between 3DCRT and NLMT was 48.6% and 38.0% with dose difference tolerances of 10% and 20%. The planar dose histogram difference between 4DTRT and NLMT was 15.2% and 4.0% respectively. Based-on dose volume histogram analysis, 4DTRT reduces the mean dose for the surrounding tissue from 35.4 Gy to 19.5 Gy, reduces the relative volume of the total lung from 28% to 18% at V20, and reduces the amount of dose from 35.2 Gy to 15.0 Gy at D20. The experimental results show that MLC-based real-time beam tracking delivery provides a potential solution to respiratory motion control. Beam tracking delivers a highly conformal dose to a moving target, while sparing surrounding normal tissue.

  6. SU-E-J-110: Dosimetric Analysis of Respiratory Motion Based On Four-Dimensional Dose Accumulation in Liver Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S; Kim, D; Kim, T; Kim, K; Cho, M; Shin, D; Suh, T; Kim, S; Park, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Respiratory motion in thoracic and abdominal region could lead to significant underdosing of target and increased dose to healthy tissues. The aim of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric effect of respiratory motion in conventional 3D dose by comparing 4D deformable dose in liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: Five patients who had previously treated liver SBRT were included in this study. Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images with 10 phases for all patients were acquired on multi-slice CT scanner (Siemens, Somatom definition). Conventional 3D planning was performed using the average intensity projection (AIP) images. 4D dose accumulation was calculated by summation of dose distribution for all phase images of 4DCT using deformable image registration (DIR) . The target volume and normal organs dose were evaluated with the 4D dose and compared with those from 3D dose. And also, Index of achievement (IOA) which assesses the consistency between planned dose and prescription dose was used to compare target dose distribution between 3D and 4D dose. Results: Although the 3D dose calculation considered the moving target coverage, significant differences of various dosimetric parameters between 4D and 3D dose were observed in normal organs and PTV. The conventional 3D dose overestimated dose to PTV, however, there was no significant difference for GTV. The average difference of IOA which become ‘1’ in an ideal case was 3.2% in PTV. The average difference of liver and duodenum was 5% and 16% respectively. Conclusion: 4D dose accumulation which can provide dosimetric effect of respiratory motion has a possibility to predict the more accurate delivered dose to target and normal organs and improve treatment accuracy. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2013M2A2A7043498) and the Mid-career Researcher Program (2014R1A2A1A10050270) through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the

  7. Haemodynamic outcome at four-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging following valve-sparing aortic root replacement with tricuspid and bicuspid valve morphology

    PubMed Central

    Semaan, Edouard; Markl, Michael; Chris Malaisrie, S.; Barker, Alex; Allen, Bradley; McCarthy, Patrick; Carr, James C.; Collins, Jeremy D.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To provide a more complete characterization of aortic blood flow in patients following valve-sparing aortic root replacement (VSARR) compared with presurgical cohorts matched by tricuspid and bicuspid valve morphology, age and presurgical aorta size. METHODS Four-dimensional (4D) flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to analyse three-dimensional (3D) blood flow in the thoracic aorta of n = 13 patients after VSARR with reimplantation of native tricuspid aortic valve (TAV, n = 6) and bicuspid aortic valve (BAV, n = 7). Results were compared with presurgical age and aortic size-matched control cohorts with TAV (n = 10) and BAV (n = 10). Pre- and post-surgical aortic flow was evaluated using time-resolved 3D pathlines using a blinded grading system (0–2, 0 = small, 1 = moderate and 2 = prominent) analysing ascending aortic (AAo) helical flow. Systolic flow profile uniformity in the aortic root, proximal and mid-AAo was evaluated using a four-quadrant model. Further analysis in nine analysis planes distributed along the thoracic aorta quantified peak systolic velocity, retrograde fraction and peak systolic flow acceleration. RESULTS Pronounced AAo helical flow in presurgical control subjects (both BAV and TAV: helix grading = 1.8 ± 0.4) was significantly reduced (0.2 ± 0.4, P < 0.001) in cohorts after VSARR independent of aortic valve morphology. Presurgical AAo flow was highly eccentric for BAV patients but more uniform for TAV. VSARR resulted in less eccentric flow profiles. Systolic peak velocities were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in post-root repair BAV patients throughout the aorta (six of nine analysis planes) and to a lesser extent in TAV patients (three of nine analysis planes). BAV reimplantation resulted in significantly increased peak velocities in the proximal AAo compared with root repair with TAV (2.3 ± 0.6 vs 1.6 ± 0.4 m/s, P = 0.017). Post-surgical patients showed a non-significant trend towards higher systolic flow

  8. TU-F-17A-09: Four-Dimensional Cone Beam CT Ventilation Imaging Can Detect Interfraction Lung Function Variations for Locally Advanced Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kipritidis, J; Keall, P; Hugo, G; Weiss, E; Williamson, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging (4D-CBCT VI) is a novel functional lung imaging modality requiring validation. We hypothesize that 4D-CBCT VI satisfies a necessary condition for validity: that intrafraction variations (e.g. due to poor 4D-CBCT image quality) are substantially different to interfraction variations (e.g. due to changes in underlying function). We perform the first comparison of intrafraction (pre/post fraction) and interfraction (week-to-week) 4D-CBCT VIs for locally advanced non small cell lung cancer (LA NSCLC) patients undergoing radiation therapy. Methods: A total of 215 4D-CBCT scans were acquired for 19 LA NSCLC patients over 4-6 weeks of radiation therapy, including 75 pairs of pre-/post-fraction scans on the same day. 4D-CBCT VIs were obtained by applying state-of-the-art, B-spline deformable image registration to obtain the Jacobian determinant of deformation between the end-exhale and end-inhale phases. All VIs were deformably registered to the corresponding first day scan, normalized between the 10th and 90th percentile values and cropped to the ipsilateral lung only. Intrafraction variations were assessed by computing the mean and standard deviation of voxel-wise differences between all same-day pairs of pre-/post-fraction VIs. Interfraction differences were computed between first-day VIs and treatment weeks 2, 4 and 6 for all 19 patients. We tested the hypothesis by comparing cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of intrafraction and interfraction ventilation differences using two-sided Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit tests. Results: The (mean ± std. dev.) of intrafraction differences was (−0.007 ± 0.079). Interfraction differences for weeks 2, 4 and 6 were (−0.035 ± 0.103), (−0.006 ± 0.094) and (−0.019 ± 0.127) respectively. For week 2, the changes in CDFs for intrafraction and interfraction differences approached statistical significance (p=0.099). Conclusion: We have shown that 4D-CBCT VI

  9. Development of an ultrasmall C-band linear accelerator guide for a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Yuichiro; Miura, Sadao; Kokubo, Masaki; Yamashita, Ichiro; Hirai, Etsuro; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2007-05-01

    We are developing a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head. It is capable of pursuing irradiation and delivering irradiation precisely with the help of an agile moving x-ray head on the gimbals. Requirements for the accelerator guide were established, system design was developed, and detailed design was conducted. An accelerator guide was manufactured and basic beam performance and leakage radiation from the accelerator guide were evaluated at a low pulse repetition rate. The accelerator guide including the electron gun is 38 cm long and weighs about 10 kg. The length of the accelerating structure is 24.4 cm. The accelerating structure is a standing wave type and is composed of the axial-coupled injector section and the side-coupled acceleration cavity section. The injector section is composed of one prebuncher cavity, one buncher cavity, one side-coupled half cavity, and two axial coupling cavities. The acceleration cavity section is composed of eight side-coupled nose reentrant cavities and eight coupling cavities. The electron gun is a diode-type gun with a cerium hexaboride (CeB6) direct heating cathode. The accelerator guide can be operated without any magnetic focusing device. Output beam current was 75 mA with a transmission efficiency of 58%, and the average energy was 5.24 MeV. Beam energy was distributed from 4.95 to 5.6 MeV. The beam profile, measured 88 mm from the beam output hole on the axis of the accelerator guide, was 0.7 mm X 0.9 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) width. The beam loading line was 5.925 (MeV)-Ib (mA) X 0.00808 (MeV/mA), where Ib is output beam current. The maximum radiation leakage of the accelerator guide at 100 cm from the axis of the accelerator guide was calculated as 0.33 cGy/min at the rated x-ray output of 500 cGy/min from the measured value. This leakage requires no radiation shielding for the accelerator guide itself per IEC 60601-2-1.

  10. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  11. Optimal simulation of Deutsch gates and the Fredkin gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Nengkun; Ying, Mingsheng

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we study the optimal simulation of the three-qubit unitary using two-qubit gates. First, we completely characterize the two-qubit gate cost of simulating the Deutsch gate (controlled-controlled gate) by generalizing our result on the two-qubit cost of the Toffoli gate. The function of any Deutsch gate is simply a three-qubit controlled-unitary gate and can be intuitively explained as follows: The gate outputs the states of the two control qubits directly, and applies the given one-qubit unitary u on the target qubit only if both the states of the control qubits are |1 > . Previously, it was only known that five two-qubit gates are sufficient for implementing such a gate [Sleator and Weinfurter, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 4087 (1995), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.74.4087]. We show that if the determinant of u is 1, four two-qubit gates are optimal. Otherwise, five two-qubit gates are required. For the Fredkin gate (the controlled-swap gate), we prove that five two-qubit gates are necessary and sufficient, which settles the open problem introduced in Smolin and DiVincenzo [Phys. Rev. A 53, 2855 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevA.53.2855].

  12. Numerical observer for cardiac motion assessment using machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Thibault; Kalayeh, Mahdi M.; Pretorius, P. H.; Wernick, Miles N.; Yang, Yongyi; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2011-03-01

    In medical imaging, image quality is commonly assessed by measuring the performance of a human observer performing a specific diagnostic task. However, in practice studies involving human observers are time consuming and difficult to implement. Therefore, numerical observers have been developed, aiming to predict human diagnostic performance to facilitate image quality assessment. In this paper, we present a numerical observer for assessment of cardiac motion in cardiac-gated SPECT images. Cardiac-gated SPECT is a nuclear medicine modality used routinely in the evaluation of coronary artery disease. Numerical observers have been developed for image quality assessment via analysis of detectability of myocardial perfusion defects (e.g., the channelized Hotelling observer), but no numerical observer for cardiac motion assessment has been reported. In this work, we present a method to design a numerical observer aiming to predict human performance in detection of cardiac motion defects. Cardiac motion is estimated from reconstructed gated images using a deformable mesh model. Motion features are then extracted from the estimated motion field and used to train a support vector machine regression model predicting human scores (human observers' confidence in the presence of the defect). Results show that the proposed method could accurately predict human detection performance and achieve good generalization properties when tested on data with different levels of post-reconstruction filtering.

  13. Free-breathing 3D cardiac MRI using iterative image-based respiratory motion correction.

    PubMed

    Moghari, Mehdi H; Roujol, Sébastien; Chan, Raymond H; Hong, Susie N; Bello, Natalie; Henningsson, Markus; Ngo, Long H; Goddu, Beth; Goepfert, Lois; Kissinger, Kraig V; Manning, Warren J; Nezafat, Reza

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory motion compensation using diaphragmatic navigator gating with a 5 mm gating window is conventionally used for free-breathing cardiac MRI. Because of the narrow gating window, scan efficiency is low resulting in long scan times, especially for patients with irregular breathing patterns. In this work, a new retrospective motion compensation algorithm is presented to reduce the scan time for free-breathing cardiac MRI that increasing the gating window to 15 mm without compromising image quality. The proposed algorithm iteratively corrects for respiratory-induced cardiac motion by optimizing the sharpness of the heart. To evaluate this technique, two coronary MRI datasets with 1.3 mm(3) resolution were acquired from 11 healthy subjects (seven females, 25 ± 9 years); one using a navigator with a 5 mm gating window acquired in 12.0 ± 2.0 min and one with a 15 mm gating window acquired in 7.1 ± 1.0 min. The images acquired with a 15 mm gating window were corrected using the proposed algorithm and compared to the uncorrected images acquired with the 5 and 15 mm gating windows. The image quality score, sharpness, and length of the three major coronary arteries were equivalent between the corrected images and the images acquired with a 5 mm gating window (P-value > 0.05), while the scan time was reduced by a factor of 1.7. PMID:23132549

  14. Cardiac phase: Amplitude analysis using macro programming

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, K.W.; Hickey, K.A.

    1981-11-01

    The analysis of EKG gated radionuclide cardiac imaging data with Fourier amplitude and phase images is becoming a valuable clinical technique, demonstrating location, size, and severity of regional ventricular abnormalities. Not all commercially available nuclear medicine computer systems offer software for phase and amplitude analysis; however, many systems do have the capability of linear image arithmetic using simple macro commands which can easily be sequenced into stored macro-strings or programs. Using simple but accurate series approximations for the Fourier operations, macro programs have been written for a Digital Equipment Corporation Gamma-11 system to obtain phase and amplitude images from routine gated cardiac studies. In addition, dynamic cine-mode presentation of the onset of mechanical systole is generated from the phase data, using only a second set of macro programs. This approach is easily adapted to different data acquisition protocols, and can be used on any system with macro commands for image arithmetic. Key words: Fourier analysis, cardiac cycle, gated blood pool imaging, amplitude image, phase image

  15. Cardiac ion channels in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ahmad S; Tan, Hanno L; Wilde, Arthur A M

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac electrical activity depends on the coordinated propagation of excitatory stimuli through the heart and, as a consequence, the generation of action potentials in individual cardiomyocytes. Action potential formation results from the opening and closing (gating) of ion channels that are expressed within the sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes. Ion channels possess distinct genetic, molecular, pharmacologic, and gating properties and exhibit dissimilar expression levels within different cardiac regions. By gating, ion channels permit ion currents across the sarcolemma, thereby creating the different phases of the action potential (e.g., resting phase, depolarization, repolarization). The importance of ion channels in maintaining normal heart rhythm is reflected by the increased incidence of arrhythmias in inherited diseases that are linked to mutations in genes encoding ion channels or their accessory proteins and in acquired diseases that are associated with changes in ion channel expression levels or gating properties. This review discusses ion channels that contribute to action potential formation in healthy hearts and their role in inherited and acquired diseases. PMID:19875343

  16. The human respiratory gate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, Dwain L.

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory activity phasically alters membrane potentials of preganglionic vagal and sympathetic motoneurones and continuously modulates their responsiveness to stimulatory inputs. The most obvious manifestation of this 'respiratory gating' is respiratory sinus arrhythmia, the rhythmic fluctuations of electrocardiographic R-R intervals observed in healthy resting humans. Phasic autonomic motoneurone firing, reflecting the throughput of the system, depends importantly on the intensity of stimulatory inputs, such that when levels of stimulation are low (as with high arterial pressure and sympathetic activity, or low arterial pressure and vagal activity), respiratory fluctuations of sympathetic or vagal firing are also low. The respiratory gate has a finite capacity, and high levels of stimulation override the ability of respiration to gate autonomic responsiveness. Autonomic throughput also depends importantly on other factors, including especially, the frequency of breathing, the rate at which the gate opens and closes. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is small at rapid, and large at slow breathing rates. The strong correlation between systolic pressure and R-R intervals at respiratory frequencies reflects the influence of respiration on these two measures, rather than arterial baroreflex physiology. A wide range of evidence suggests that respiratory activity gates the timing of autonomic motoneurone firing, but does not influence its tonic level. I propose that the most enduring significance of respiratory gating is its use as a precisely controlled experimental tool to tease out and better understand otherwise inaccessible human autonomic neurophysiological mechanisms.

  17. Advanced insulated gate bipolar transistor gate drive

    DOEpatents

    Short, James Evans; West, Shawn Michael; Fabean, Robert J.

    2009-08-04

    A gate drive for an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) includes a control and protection module coupled to a collector terminal of the IGBT, an optical communications module coupled to the control and protection module, a power supply module coupled to the control and protection module and an output power stage module with inputs coupled to the power supply module and the control and protection module, and outputs coupled to a gate terminal and an emitter terminal of the IGBT. The optical communications module is configured to send control signals to the control and protection module. The power supply module is configured to distribute inputted power to the control and protection module. The control and protection module outputs on/off, soft turn-off and/or soft turn-on signals to the output power stage module, which, in turn, supplies a current based on the signal(s) from the control and protection module for charging or discharging an input capacitance of the IGBT.

  18. Sequence of Gating Charge Movement and Pore Gating in hERG Activation and Deactivation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, Samuel J.; Macdonald, Logan C.; Fedida, David

    2015-01-01

    KV11.1 voltage-gated K+ channels are noted for unusually slow activation, fast inactivation, and slow deactivation kinetics, which tune channel activity to provide vital repolarizing current during later stages of the cardiac action potential. The bulk of charge movement in human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) is slow, as is return of charge upon repolarization, suggesting that the rates of hERG channel opening and, critically, that of deactivation might be determined by slow voltage sensor movement, and also by a mode-shift after activation. To test these ideas, we compared the kinetics and voltage dependence of ionic activation and deactivation with gating charge movement. At 0 mV, gating charge moved ∼threefold faster than ionic current, which suggests the presence of additional slow transitions downstream of charge movement in the physiological activation pathway. A significant voltage sensor mode-shift was apparent by 24 ms at +60 mV in gating currents, and return of charge closely tracked pore closure after pulses of 100 and 300 ms duration. A deletion of the N-terminus PAS domain, mutation R4AR5A or the LQT2-causing mutation R56Q gave faster-deactivating channels that displayed an attenuated mode-shift of charge. This indicates that charge movement is perturbed by N- and C-terminus interactions, and that these domain interactions stabilize the open state and limit the rate of charge return. We conclude that slow on-gating charge movement can only partly account for slow hERG ionic activation, and that the rate of pore closure has a limiting role in the slow return of gating charges. PMID:25809256

  19. Cardiac disease after radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease: analysis of 48 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Applefeld, M.M.; Wiernik, P.H.

    1983-06-01

    Occult or overt but delayed cardiac disease after thoracic radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease may be common. Detailed cardiac evaluations were performed in 48 patients with Hodgkin's disease at risk a mean of 97 months after radiotherapy. The study protocol included echocardiography, gated radionuclide ventriculography, and cardiac catheterization. Cardiac disease was found in 46 patients (96%) and included constrictive or occult constrictive pericarditis (24 patients), an abnormal hemodynamic response to a fluid challenge (14 patients), coronary artery disease (6 patients), and left ventricular dysfunction (2 patients). Most patients (53%) had normal echocardiograms. Gated blood pool radionuclide angiocardiography was performed in 42 patients. Excluding patients with occlusive coronary artery disease, the left ventricular ejection fraction at rest (mean 59%) and during exercise (mean 69%) was within normal limits. Thus (1) delayed cardiac disease after radiotherapy is common, (2) chronic pericardial disorders are the most frequent manifestations of this disease, and (3) the prognosis for patients who have radiation-induced cardiac disease is generally favorable.

  20. Cardiac conduction system

    MedlinePlus

    The cardiac conduction system is a group of specialized cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals ... to contract. The main components of the cardiac conduction system are the SA node, AV node, bundle ...

  1. Dosimetric impact of geometric errors due to respiratory motion prediction on dynamic multileaf collimator-based four-dimensional radiation delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Vedam, S.; Docef, A.; Fix, M.; Murphy, M.; Keall, P.

    2005-06-15

    The synchronization of dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) response with respiratory motion is critical to ensure the accuracy of DMLC-based four dimensional (4D) radiation delivery. In practice, however, a finite time delay (response time) between the acquisition of tumor position and multileaf collimator response necessitates predictive models of respiratory tumor motion to synchronize radiation delivery. Predicting a complex process such as respiratory motion introduces geometric errors, which have been reported in several publications. However, the dosimetric effect of such errors on 4D radiation delivery has not yet been investigated. Thus, our aim in this work was to quantify the dosimetric effects of geometric error due to prediction under several different conditions. Conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for a lung patient were generated for anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior (AP/PA) beam arrangements at 6 and 18 MV energies to provide planned dose distributions. Respiratory motion data was obtained from 60 diaphragm-motion fluoroscopy recordings from five patients. A linear adaptive filter was employed to predict the tumor position. The geometric error of prediction was defined as the absolute difference between predicted and actual positions at each diaphragm position. Distributions of geometric error of prediction were obtained for all of the respiratory motion data. Planned dose distributions were then convolved with distributions for the geometric error of prediction to obtain convolved dose distributions. The dosimetric effect of such geometric errors was determined as a function of several variables: response time (0-0.6 s), beam energy (6/18 MV), treatment delivery (3D/4D), treatment type (conformal/IMRT), beam direction (AP/PA), and breathing training type (free breathing/audio instruction/visual feedback). Dose difference and distance-to-agreement analysis was employed to quantify results. Based on our data, the

  2. The effect of irregular breathing patterns on internal target volumes in four-dimensional CT and cone-beam CT images in the context of stereotactic lung radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, N.; Kron, T.; Roxby, P.; Franich, R.; Dunn, L.; Aarons, Y.; Chesson, B.; Siva, S.; Duplan, D.; Ball, D.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic lung radiotherapy is complicated by tumor motion from patient respiration. Four-dimensional CT (4DCT) imaging is a motion compensation method used in treatment planning to generate a maximum intensity projection (MIP) internal target volume (ITV). Image guided radiotherapy during treatment may involve acquiring a volumetric cone-beam CT (CBCT) image and visually aligning the tumor to the planning 4DCT MIP ITV contour. Moving targets imaged with CBCT can appear blurred and currently there are no studies reporting on the effect that irregular breathing patterns have on CBCT volumes and their alignment to 4DCT MIP ITV contours. The objective of this work was therefore to image a phantom moving with irregular breathing patterns to determine whether any configurations resulted in errors in volume contouring or alignment. Methods: A Perspex thorax phantom was used to simulate a patient. Three wooden 'lung' inserts with embedded Perspex 'lesions' were moved up to 4 cm with computer-generated motion patterns, and up to 1 cm with patient-specific breathing patterns. The phantom was imaged on 4DCT and CBCT with the same acquisition settings used for stereotactic lung patients in the clinic and the volumes on all phantom images were contoured. This project assessed the volumes for qualitative and quantitative changes including volume, length of the volume, and errors in alignment between CBCT volumes and 4DCT MIP ITV contours. Results: When motion was introduced 4DCT and CBCT volumes were reduced by up to 20% and 30% and shortened by up to 7 and 11 mm, respectively, indicating that volume was being under-represented at the extremes of motion. Banding artifacts were present in 4DCT MIP images, while CBCT volumes were largely reduced in contrast. When variable amplitudes from patient traces were used and CBCT ITVs were compared to 4DCT MIP ITVs there was a distinct trend in reduced ITV with increasing amplitude that was not seen when compared to true ITVs

  3. The effect of respiratory motion variability and tumor size on the accuracy of average intensity projection from four-dimensional computed tomography: an investigation based on dynamic MRI.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Read, Paul W; Sheng, Ke

    2008-11-01

    Composite images such as average intensity projection (AIP) and maximum intensity projection (MIP) derived from four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) images are commonly used in radiation therapy for treating lung and abdominal tumors. It has been reported that the quality of 4D-CT images is influenced by the patient respiratory variability, which can be assessed by the standard deviation of the peak and valley of the respiratory trajectory. Subsequently, the resultant MIP underestimates the actual tumor motion extent. As a more general application, AIP comprises not only the tumor motion extent but also the probability that the tumor is present. AIP generated from 4D-CT can also be affected by the respiratory variability. To quantitate the accuracy of AIP and develop clinically relevant parameters for determining suitability of the 4D-CT study for AIP-based treatment planning, real time sagittal dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) was used as the basis for generating simulated 4D-CT. Five-minute MRI scans were performed on seven healthy volunteers and eight lung tumor patients. In addition, images of circular phantoms with diameter 1, 3, or 5 cm were generated by software to simulate lung tumors. Motion patterns determined by dMRI images were reproduced by the software generated phantoms. Resorted dMRI using a 4D-CT acquisition method (RedCAM) based on phantom or patient images was reconstructed by simulating the imaging rebinning processes. AIP images and the corresponding color intensity projection (CIP) images were reconstructed from RedCAM and the full set of dMRI for comparison. AIP similarity indicated by the Dice index between RedCAM and dMRI was calculated and correlated with respiratory variability (v) and tumor size (s). The similarity of percentile intrafractional motion target area (IMTA), defined by the area that the tumor presented for a given percentage of time, and MIP-to-percentile IMTA similarity as a function of percentile were also

  4. Multipulse gate-delayed range gating imaging lidar.

    PubMed

    Wu, Long; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Yong; Jin, Chenfei; Wu, Jie

    2011-04-15

    We present a technique to reconstruct a higher resolution of depth map of range gating imaging lidar by applying the delays of the gates to a typical range gating lidar system during the detection of each returned laser pulse with the encoding of the returned signal. With the consequent delays of the gate, the depth of the scene is extended accordingly. A multipulse gate-delayed range gating lidar system is designed to prove the resolution improvement from 6 to 1.5 m. The unchanged peak power of the laser, the widths of the laser pulse and the sampling period result in a simple structure of the lidar system. PMID:21499358

  5. Computational modeling of cardiac hemodynamics: Current status and future outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Rajat; Seo, Jung Hee; Vedula, Vijay; Choi, Young J.; Liu, Hang; Huang, H. Howie; Jain, Saurabh; Younes, Laurent; Abraham, Theodore; George, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of four-dimensional imaging technologies, increasing computational speeds, improved simulation algorithms, and the widespread availability of powerful computing platforms is enabling simulations of cardiac hemodynamics with unprecedented speed and fidelity. Since cardiovascular disease is intimately linked to cardiovascular hemodynamics, accurate assessment of the patient's hemodynamic state is critical for the diagnosis and treatment of heart disease. Unfortunately, while a variety of invasive and non-invasive approaches for measuring cardiac hemodynamics are in widespread use, they still only provide an incomplete picture of the hemodynamic state of a patient. In this context, computational modeling of cardiac hemodynamics presents as a powerful non-invasive modality that can fill this information gap, and significantly impact the diagnosis as well as the treatment of cardiac disease. This article reviews the current status of this field as well as the emerging trends and challenges in cardiovascular health, computing, modeling and simulation and that are expected to play a key role in its future development. Some recent advances in modeling and simulations of cardiac flow are described by using examples from our own work as well as the research of other groups.

  6. Effects of cardiac pulsation in diffusion tensor imaging of the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungheon; Pickup, Stephen; Poptani, Harish

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of cardiac pulsation in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the rat brain. DTI data were acquired either with or without different cardiac gating delays. For each case, two sets of identical DTI data were acquired for a bootstrap analysis to measure the uncertainty in estimating mean diffusivity (MD), fractional anisotropy (FA) and the primary eigenvector direction. The 95% confidence interval of the primary eigenvectors was substantially reduced (21 ~ 25 %) when cardiac gating with triggering delay of 70 ms (~ half of R-R peak duration) was used in comparison to studies without gating or when gating with a triggering delay of 0 ms was used. Standard deviations of MD and FA estimates were also reduced by 12 – 26 % and 13 – 24 %, respectively. For voxels with mean FA values larger than 0.15 and smaller than 0.95, the decrease in CI and standard deviations of MD and FA by cardiac gating with triggering delay of 70 ms were significant (p < 0.05). These results demonstrate the importance of cardiac gating in acquisition of in vivo high resolution DTI data. PMID:20951164

  7. Evaluation of Linear Accelerator Gating With Real-Time Electromagnetic Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Ryan L.; Lechleiter, Kristen; Malinowski, Kathleen; Shepard, D.M.; Housley, D.J.; Afghan, M.; Newell, Jeff; Petersen, Jay; Sargent, Brian; Parikh, Parag

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: Intrafraction organ motion can produce dosimetric errors in radiotherapy. Commonly, the linear accelerator is gated using real-time breathing phase obtained by way of external sensors. However, the external anatomy does not always correlate well with the internal position. We examined a beam gating technique using signals from implanted wireless transponders that provided real-time feedback on the tumor location without an imaging dose to the patient. Methods and Materials: An interface was developed between Calypso Medical's four-dimensional electromagnetic tracking system and a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator. A film phantom was mounted on a motion platform programmed with lung motion trajectories. Deliveries were performed when the beam was gated according to the signal from the wireless transponders. The dosimetric advantages of beam gating and the system latencies were quantified. Results: Beam gating using on internal position monitoring provided up to a twofold increase in the dose gradients. The percentage of points failing to be within {+-}10 cGy of the planned dose (maximal dose, {approx}200 cGy) was 3.4% for gating and 32.1% for no intervention in the presence of motion. The mean latencies between the transponder position and linear accelerator modulation were 75.0 {+-}12.7 ms for beam on and 65.1 {+-} 12.9 ms for beam off. Conclusion: We have presented the results from a novel method for gating the linear accelerator using trackable wireless internal fiducial markers without the use of ionizing radiation for imaging. The latencies observed were suitable for gating using electromagnetic fiducial markers, which results in dosimetric improvements for irradiation in the presence of motion.

  8. The impact of respiratory gating on lung dosimetry in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seong Soon; Huh, Gil Ja; Park, Suk Young; Yang, Po Song; Cho, Eun Youn

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impacts of respiratory gating and different gating windows (GWs) on lung dosimetry in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Gated SBRT plans were developed using the four-dimensional computed tomography data from 17 lung cancer patients treated with SBRT. Using amplitude-based end-exhalation gating, we established 2 fixed GWs with approximate duty cycles of 50% (50% GW) and 25% (25% GW), respectively, for this study. For highly mobile tumors (3D mobility > 10 mm), additional benefits in lung-dose reductions were achieved with the 25% GW, as a result of inadequate mobility and planning target volume reductions obtained with the 50% GW. In these tumors, the absolute differences compared to the non-gated and 50% gated plans, were 0.5 Gy and 0.33 Gy for the mean lung dose and 1.11% and 0.71% for the V20, respectively. Dosimetric benefits were achieved with the 50% GW, compared with the non-gated plan, for tumors with both low mobility and small volume (gross tumor volume ≤ 10 cc). Among the identified predictive factors of dosimetric benefits, the lateral distance from midspinal canal and the motion range in anterior-posterior direction might be stronger factors because of their correlations with many of the lung-dose parameters and greater predictive capacity. The results of the present study might facilitate the selection of appropriate patients and the optimal GW according to the tumor characteristics for gated lung SBRT.

  9. Technical approach to individualized respiratory-gated carbon-ion therapy for mobile organs.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Mutsumi; Ishii, Takayoshi; Koya, Jun-ichi; Okada, Ryosuke; Kurosawa, Yuji; Arai, Keisuke; Abe, Satoshi; Ohashi, Yoshiaki; Shimada, Hirofumi; Yusa, Ken; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Yamada, Satoru; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Ebara, Takeshi; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2013-07-01

    We propose a strategy of individualized image acquisitions and treatment planning for respiratory-gated carbon-ion therapy. We implemented it in clinical treatments for diseases of mobile organs such as lung cancers at the Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center in June 2010. Gated computed tomography (CT) scans were used for treatment planning, and four-dimensional (4D) CT scans were used to evaluate motion errors within the gating window to help define the internal margins (IMs) and planning target volume for each patient. The smearing technique or internal gross tumor volume (IGTV = GTV + IM), where the stopping power ratio was replaced with the tumor value, was used for range compensation of moving targets. Dose distributions were obtained using the gated CT images for the treatment plans. The influence of respiratory motion on the dose distribution was verified with the planned beam settings using 4D CT images at some phases within the gating window before the adoption of the plan. A total of 14 lung cancer patients were treated in the first year. The planned margins with the proposed method were verified with clinical X-ray set-up images by deriving setup and internal motion errors. The planned margins were considered to be reasonable compared with the errors, except for large errors observed in some cases.

  10. Evaluation of Tumor Position and PTV Margins Using Image Guidance and Respiratory Gating

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Christopher; Balter, Peter; Morice, Rodolfo C.; Bucci, Kara; Dong Lei; Tucker, Susan; Vedam, Sastry; Chang, Joe Y.; Starkschall, George

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the margins currently used to generate the planning target volume for lung tumors and to determine whether image-guided patient setup or respiratory gating is more effective in reducing uncertainties in tumor position. Methods and Materials: Lung tumors in 7 patients were contoured on serial four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) data sets (4-8 4DCTs/patient; 50 total) obtained throughout the course of treatment. Simulations were performed to determine the tumor position when the patient was aligned using skin marks, image-guided setup based on vertebral bodies, fiducials implanted near the tumor, and the actual tumor volume under various scenarios of respiratory gating. Results: Because of the presence of setup uncertainties, the reduction in overall margin needed to completely encompass the tumor was observed to be larger for imaged-guided patient setup than for a simple respiratory-gated treatment. Without respiratory gating and image-guided patient setup, margins ranged from 0.9 cm to 3.1 cm to completely encompass the tumor. These were reduced to 0.7-1.7 cm when image-guided patient setup was simulated and further reduced with respiratory gating. Conclusions: Our results indicate that if respiratory motion management is used, it should be used in conjunction with image-guided patient setup in order to reduce the overall treatment margin effectively.

  11. The human respiratory gate

    PubMed Central

    Eckberg, Dwain L

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory activity phasically alters membrane potentials of preganglionic vagal and sympathetic motoneurones and continuously modulates their responsiveness to stimulatory inputs. The most obvious manifestation of this ‘respiratory gating’ is respiratory sinus arrhythmia, the rhythmic fluctuations of electrocardiographic R–R intervals observed in healthy resting humans. Phasic autonomic motoneurone firing, reflecting the throughput of the system, depends importantly on the intensity of stimulatory inputs, such that when levels of stimulation are low (as with high arterial pressure and sympathetic activity, or low arterial pressure and vagal activity), respiratory fluctuations of sympathetic or vagal firing are also low. The respiratory gate has a finite capacity, and high levels of stimulation override the ability of respiration to gate autonomic responsiveness. Autonomic throughput also depends importantly on other factors, including especially, the frequency of breathing, the rate at which the gate opens and closes. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is small at rapid, and large at slow breathing rates. The strong correlation between systolic pressure and R–R intervals at respiratory frequencies reflects the influence of respiration on these two measures, rather than arterial baroreflex physiology. A wide range of evidence suggests that respiratory activity gates the timing of autonomic motoneurone firing, but does not influence its tonic level. I propose that the most enduring significance of respiratory gating is its use as a precisely controlled experimental tool to tease out and better understand otherwise inaccessible human autonomic neurophysiological mechanisms. PMID:12626671

  12. A nanomechanical Fredkin gate.

    PubMed

    Wenzler, Josef-Stefan; Dunn, Tyler; Toffoli, Tommaso; Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2014-01-01

    Irreversible logic operations inevitably discard information, setting fundamental limitations on the flexibility and the efficiency of modern computation. To circumvent the limit imposed by the von Neumann-Landauer (VNL) principle, an important objective is the development of reversible logic gates, as proposed by Fredkin, Toffoli, Wilczek, Feynman, and others. Here, we present a novel nanomechanical logic architecture for implementing a Fredkin gate, a universal logic gate from which any reversible computation can be built. In addition to verifying the truth table, we demonstrate operation of the device as an AND, OR, NOT, and FANOUT gate. Excluding losses due to resonator dissipation and transduction, which will require significant improvement in order to minimize the overall energy cost, our device requires an energy of order 10(4) kT per logic operation, similar in magnitude to state-of-the-art transistor-based technologies. Ultimately, reversible nanomechanical logic gates could play a crucial role in developing highly efficient reversible computers, with implications for efficient error correction and quantum computing. PMID:24328764

  13. Deoxyribozyme-based logic gates.

    PubMed

    Stojanovic, Milan N; Mitchell, Tiffany Elizabeth; Stefanovic, Darko

    2002-04-10

    We report herein a set of deoxyribozyme-based logic gates capable of generating any Boolean function. We construct basic NOT and AND gates, followed by the more complex XOR gate. These gates were constructed through a modular design that combines molecular beacon stem-loops with hammerhead-type deoxyribozymes. Importantly, as the gates have oligonucleotides as both inputs and output, they open the possibility of communication between various computation elements in solution. The operation of these gates is conveniently connected to a fluorescent readout.

  14. Detail of gate, gate slots, and connection between the two ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of gate, gate slots, and connection between the two segments of the rectangular rearing tank. Pump house (1962) at entrance is in the background. View to the southwest. - Prairie Creek Fish Hatchery, Hwy. 101, Orick, Humboldt County, CA

  15. 7. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING ROLLER GATES, GATE PIERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING ROLLER GATES, GATE PIERS, HEADHOUSES AND DAM BRIDGE, LOOKING NORTHWEST, UPSTREAM - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 9, Lynxville, Crawford County, WI

  16. Abdominal and pancreatic motion correlation using 4D CT, 4D transponders, and a gating belt.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Ricardo; Zou, Wei; Plastaras, John P; Metz, James M; Teo, Boon-Keng; Kassaee, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    The correlation between the pancreatic and external abdominal motion due to respiration was investigated on two patients. These studies utilized four dimensional computer tomography (4D CT), a four dimensional (4D) electromagnetic transponder system, and a gating belt system. One 4D CT study was performed during simulation to quantify the pancreatic motion using computer tomography images at eight breathing phases. The motion under free breathing and breath-hold were analyzed for the 4D electromagnetic transponder system and the gating belt system during treatment. A linear curve was fitted for all data sets and correlation factors were evaluated between the 4D electromagnetic transponder system and the gating belt system data. The 4D CT study demonstrated a modest correlation between the external marker and the pancreatic motion with R-square values larger than 0.8 for the inferior-superior (inf-sup). Then, the relative pressure from the belt gating system correlated well with the 4D electromagnetic transponder system's motion in the anterior-posterior (ant-post) and the inf-post directions. These directions have a correlation value of -0.93 and 0.76, while the lateral only had a 0.03 correlation coefficient. Based on our limited study, external surrogates can be used as predictors of the pancreatic motion in the inf-sup and the ant-post directions. Although there is a low correlation on the lateral direction, its motion is significantly shorter. In conclusion, an appropriate treatment delivery can be used for pancreatic cancer when an internal tracking system, such as the 4D electromagnetic transponder system, is unavailable. PMID:23652242

  17. Abdominal and pancreatic motion correlation using 4D CT, 4D transponders, and a gating belt.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Ricardo; Zou, Wei; Plastaras, John P; Metz, James M; Teo, Boon-Keng; Kassaee, Alireza

    2013-05-06

    The correlation between the pancreatic and external abdominal motion due to respiration was investigated on two patients. These studies utilized four dimensional computer tomography (4D CT), a four dimensional (4D) electromagnetic transponder system, and a gating belt system. One 4D CT study was performed during simulation to quantify the pancreatic motion using computer tomography images at eight breathing phases. The motion under free breathing and breath-hold were analyzed for the 4D electromagnetic transponder system and the gating belt system during treatment. A linear curve was fitted for all data sets and correlation factors were evaluated between the 4D electromagnetic transponder system and the gating belt system data. The 4D CT study demonstrated a modest correlation between the external marker and the pancreatic motion with R-square values larger than 0.8 for the inferior-superior (inf-sup). Then, the relative pressure from the belt gating system correlated well with the 4D electromagnetic transponder system's motion in the anterior-posterior (ant-post) and the inf-post directions. These directions have a correlation value of -0.93 and 0.76, while the lateral only had a 0.03 correlation coefficient. Based on our limited study, external surrogates can be used as predictors of the pancreatic motion in the inf-sup and the ant-post directions. Although there is a low correlation on the lateral direction, its motion is significantly shorter. In conclusion, an appropriate treatment delivery can be used for pancreatic cancer when an internal tracking system, such as the 4D electromagnetic transponder system, is unavailable.

  18. CEnPiT: Helical cardiac CT reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Bontus, Claas; Koken, Peter; Koehler, Thomas; Grass, Michael

    2006-08-15

    Computer tomography (CT) scanners with an increasing number of detector rows offer the potential of shorter scanning times. Nevertheless, the reconstruction problem becomes more challenging, since cone beam artifacts are likely to enter. Here, we consider helical cardiac CT. We analyze how a relationship can be established between exact reconstruction algorithms and the demand to perform a cardiac gating. Utilizing the redundancies requires the consideration of all kinds of Radon planes. For the reconstruction algorithm proposed here, we separate the data into two parts. The first part contains contributions of Radon planes, which are measured with a large number of redundancies. The second part contains the remaining contributions. As it turns out, the second part contributes rather to the low-frequency contents of trans-axial slices. Therefore, we propose to perform a gated back-projection only for the first part, while the second part is back-projected in an ungated way. Data from the complete source trajectory are employed in the reconstruction process in contrary to conventional helical cardiac reconstruction methods. Moreover, all different types of Radon planes are taken into account in the reconstruction, though an ECG-dependent cardiac gating is applied. The reconstruction results, which we present for clinical and simulated data, demonstrate the high potential of CEnPiT for helical cardiac CT with large cone angle systems.

  19. Adiabatic gate teleportation.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T

    2009-09-18

    The difficulty in producing precisely timed and controlled quantum gates is a significant source of error in many physical implementations of quantum computers. Here we introduce a simple universal primitive, adiabatic gate teleportation, which is robust to timing errors and many control errors and maintains a constant energy gap throughout the computation above a degenerate ground state space. This construction allows for geometric robustness based upon the control of two independent qubit interactions. Further, our piecewise adiabatic evolution easily relates to the quantum circuit model, enabling the use of standard methods from fault-tolerance theory for establishing thresholds.

  20. Functional imaging as an indicator of diagnostic information in cardiac magnetic-resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingler, Joseph W.; Andrews, Lee T.; Begeman, Michael S.; Zeiss, Jacob; Leighton, Richard F.

    1990-08-01

    Magnetic Resonance (MR) images of the human heart provide three dimensional geometric information about the location of cardiac structures throughout the cardiac cycle. Analysis of this four dimensional data set allows detection of abnormal cardiac function related to the presence of coronary artery disease. To assist in this analysis, quantitative measurements of cardiac performance are made from the MR data including ejection fractions, regional wall motion and myocardial wall thickening. Analysis of cardiac performance provided by quantitative analysis of MR data can be aided by computer graphics presentation techniques. Two and three dimensional functional images are computed to indicate regions of abnormality based on the previous methods. The two dimensional images are created using color graphics overlays on the original MR image to represent performance. Polygon surface modeling techniques are used to represent data which is three dimensional, such as blood pool volumes. The surface of these images are color encoded by regional ejection fraction, wall motion or wall thickening. A functional image sequence is constructed at each phase of the cardiac cycle and displayed as a movie loop for review by the physician. Selection of a region on the functional image allows visual interpretation of the original MR images, graphical plots of cardiac function and tabular results. Color encoding is based on absolute measurements and comparison to standard normal templates of cardiac performance.

  1. Outlet side of gate, showing the Radial Gate, hoist mechanism ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Outlet side of gate, showing the Radial Gate, hoist mechanism and concrete walkway across the canal. The concrete baffle separating the afterbay and the cipoletti weir is in the foreground - Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation System, Radial Gate Check with Drop, Wellton Canal 9.9, West of Avenue 34 East & north of County Ninth Street, Wellton, Yuma County, AZ

  2. Exterior, looking southeast from within compound towards Main Gate, Gate ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior, looking southeast from within compound towards Main Gate, Gate House center left - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Gate House, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  3. Exterior, looking northwest towards Main Gate, Gate House on left, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior, looking northwest towards Main Gate, Gate House on left, Technical Equipment Building (Building 5760) in background to right - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Gate House, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  4. The four-gate transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojarradi, M. M.; Cristoveanu, S.; Allibert, F.; France, G.; Blalock, B.; Durfrene, B.

    2002-01-01

    The four-gate transistor or G4-FET combines MOSFET and JFET principles in a single SOI device. Experimental results reveal that each gate can modulate the drain current. Numerical simulations are presented to clarify the mechanisms of operation. The new device shows enhanced functionality, due to the combinatorial action of the four gates, and opens rather revolutionary applications.

  5. Stanford, Duke, Rice,... and Gates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an open letter to Bill Gates. In his letter, the author suggests that Bill Gates should build a brand-new university, a great 21st-century institution of higher learning. This university will be unlike anything the world has ever seen. He asks Bill Gates not to stop helping existing colleges create the higher-education system…

  6. Models of HERG gating.

    PubMed

    Bett, Glenna C L; Zhou, Qinlian; Rasmusson, Randall L

    2011-08-01

    HERG (Kv11.1, KCNH2) is a voltage-gated potassium channel with unique gating characteristics. HERG has fast voltage-dependent inactivation, relatively slow deactivation, and fast recovery from inactivation. This combination of gating kinetics makes study of HERG difficult without using mathematical models. Several HERG models have been developed, with fundamentally different organization. HERG is the molecular basis of I(Kr), which plays a critical role in repolarization. We programmed and compared five distinct HERG models. HERG gating cannot be adequately replicated using Hodgkin-Huxley type formulation. Using Markov models, a five-state model is required with three closed, one open, and one inactivated state, and a voltage-independent step between some of the closed states. A fundamental difference between models is the presence/absence of a transition directly from the proximal closed state to the inactivated state. The only models that effectively reproduce HERG data have no direct closed-inactivated transition, or have a closed-inactivated transition that is effectively zero compared to the closed-open transition, rendering the closed-inactivation transition superfluous. Our single-channel model demonstrates that channels can inactivate without conducting with a flickering or bursting open-state. The various models have qualitative and quantitative differences that are critical to accurate predictions of HERG behavior during repolarization, tachycardia, and premature depolarizations. PMID:21806931

  7. Strategy Retooled at Gates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2008-01-01

    In rolling out plans last week to revamp its high school strategy and launch a major new effort on the postsecondary front, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is undertaking a more sweeping approach to grantmaking that appears aimed at reshaping some core elements of the U.S. education system. The philanthropy's agenda on secondary schools…

  8. Models of HERG Gating

    PubMed Central

    Bett, Glenna C.L.; Zhou, Qinlian; Rasmusson, Randall L.

    2011-01-01

    HERG (Kv11.1, KCNH2) is a voltage-gated potassium channel with unique gating characteristics. HERG has fast voltage-dependent inactivation, relatively slow deactivation, and fast recovery from inactivation. This combination of gating kinetics makes study of HERG difficult without using mathematical models. Several HERG models have been developed, with fundamentally different organization. HERG is the molecular basis of IKr, which plays a critical role in repolarization. We programmed and compared five distinct HERG models. HERG gating cannot be adequately replicated using Hodgkin-Huxley type formulation. Using Markov models, a five-state model is required with three closed, one open, and one inactivated state, and a voltage-independent step between some of the closed states. A fundamental difference between models is the presence/absence of a transition directly from the proximal closed state to the inactivated state. The only models that effectively reproduce HERG data have no direct closed-inactivated transition, or have a closed-inactivated transition that is effectively zero compared to the closed-open transition, rendering the closed-inactivation transition superfluous. Our single-channel model demonstrates that channels can inactivate without conducting with a flickering or bursting open-state. The various models have qualitative and quantitative differences that are critical to accurate predictions of HERG behavior during repolarization, tachycardia, and premature depolarizations. PMID:21806931

  9. Validation of the Spatial Accuracy of the ExacTracRTM Adaptive Gating System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twork, Gregory

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a method of treatment that is used in extracranial locations, including the abdominal and thoracic cavities, as well as spinal and paraspinal locations. At the McGill University Health Centre, liver SBRT treatments include gating, which places the treatment beam on a duty cycle controlled by tracking of fiducial markers moving with the patient's breathing cycle. Respiratory gated treatments aim to spare normal tissue, while delivering a dose properly to a moving target. The ExacTracRTM system (BrainLAB AG Germany) is an image-guided radiotherapy system consisting of a combination of infra-red (IR) cameras and dual kilovoltage (kV) X-ray tubes. The IR system is used to track patient positioning and respiratory motion, while the kV X-rays are used to determine a positional shift based on internal anatomy or fiducial markers. In order to validate the system's ability to treat under gating conditions, each step of the SBRT process was evaluated quantitatively. Initially the system was tested under ideal static conditions, followed by a study including gated parameters. The uncertainties of the isocenters, positioning algorithm, planning computed tomography (CT) and four dimensional CT (4DCT) scans, gating window size and tumor motion were evaluated for their contributions to the total uncertainty in treatment. The mechanical isocenter and 4DCT were found to be the largest sources of uncertainty. However, for tumors with large internal amplitudes (>2.25 cm) that are treated with large gating windows (>30%) the gating parameters can contribute more than 1.1 +/- 1.8 mm.

  10. Imaging of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Erthal, Fernanda; Juneau, Daniel; Lim, Siok P; Dwivedi, Girish; Nery, Pablo B; Birnie, David; Beanlands, Rob S

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease. Cardiac involvement is described in up to 50% of the cases. The disease spectrum is wide and cardiac manifestations ranges from being asymptomatic to heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. The diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis can be challenging due to its non-specific nature and the focal involvement of the heart. In this review, we discuss the utility of a stepwise approach with multimodality cardiac imaging in the diagnosis and management of CS. PMID:27225318

  11. Cardiac phase detection in intravascular ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Monica M. S.; Lemos, Pedro Alves; Yoneyama, Takashi; Furuie, Sergio Shiguemi

    2008-03-01

    Image gating is related to image modalities that involve quasi-periodic moving organs. Therefore, during intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) examination, there is cardiac movement interference. In this paper, we aim to obtain IVUS gated images based on the images themselves. This would allow the reconstruction of 3D coronaries with temporal accuracy for any cardiac phase, which is an advantage over the ECG-gated acquisition that shows a single one. It is also important for retrospective studies, as in existing IVUS databases there are no additional reference signals (ECG). From the images, we calculated signals based on average intensity (AI), and, from consecutive frames, average intensity difference (AID), cross-correlation coefficient (CC) and mutual information (MI). The process includes a wavelet-based filter step and ascendant zero-cross detection in order to obtain the phase information. Firstly, we tested 90 simulated sequences with 1025 frames each. Our method was able to achieve more than 95.0% of true positives and less than 2.3% of false positives ratio, for all signals. Afterwards, we tested in a real examination, with 897 frames and ECG as gold-standard. We achieved 97.4% of true positives (CC and MI), and 2.5% of false positives. For future works, methodology should be tested in wider range of IVUS examinations.

  12. CARDIAC MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Joachim R.; Johnson, Edward A.

    1968-01-01

    With light and electron microscopy a comparison has been made of the morphology of ventricular (V) and Purkinje (P) fibers of the hearts of guinea pig, rabbit, cat, dog, goat, and sheep. The criteria, previously established for the rabbit heart, that V fibers are distinguished from P fibers by the respective presence and absence of transverse tubules is shown to be true for all animals studied. No evidence was found of a permanent connection between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the extracellular space. The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of V fibers formed couplings with the sarcolemma of a transverse tubule (interior coupling) and with the peripheral sarcolemma (peripheral coupling), whereas in P fibers the SR formed only peripheral couplings. The forms of the couplings were identical. The significance, with respect to excitation-contraction coupling, of the difference in the form of the couplings in cardiac versus skeletal muscle is discussed together with the electrophysiological implications of the differing geometries of bundles of P fibers from different animals. PMID:5645545

  13. Universal Superreplication of Unitary Gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiribella, G.; Yang, Y.; Huang, C.

    2015-03-01

    Quantum states obey an asymptotic no-cloning theorem, stating that no deterministic machine can reliably replicate generic sequences of identically prepared pure states. In stark contrast, we show that generic sequences of unitary gates can be replicated deterministically at nearly quadratic rates, with an error vanishing on most inputs except for an exponentially small fraction. The result is not in contradiction with the no-cloning theorem, since the impossibility of deterministically transforming pure states into unitary gates prevents the application of the gate replication protocol to states. In addition to gate replication, we show that N parallel uses of a completely unknown unitary gate can be compressed into a single gate acting on O (log2N ) qubits, leading to an exponential reduction of the amount of quantum communication needed to implement the gate remotely.

  14. Four-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations demonstrating how the extent of intensity-modulation impacts motion effects in proton therapy lung treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Dowdell, Stephen; Paganetti, Harald; Grassberger, Clemens

    2013-12-15

    greatest variations between the IMPT{sub 20%} and IMPT{sub full} deliveries are observed for patients with the largest motion amplitudes. These patients would likely be treated using gating or another motion mitigation technique, which was not the focus of this study.Conclusions: For the treatment parameters considered in this study, the differences between IMPT{sub full} and IMPT{sub 20%} are only likely to be clinically significant for patients with large (>20 mm) motion amplitudes.

  15. A quantum Fredkin gate.

    PubMed

    Patel, Raj B; Ho, Joseph; Ferreyrol, Franck; Ralph, Timothy C; Pryde, Geoff J

    2016-03-01

    Minimizing the resources required to build logic gates into useful processing circuits is key to realizing quantum computers. Although the salient features of a quantum computer have been shown in proof-of-principle experiments, difficulties in scaling quantum systems have made more complex operations intractable. This is exemplified in the classical Fredkin (controlled-SWAP) gate for which, despite theoretical proposals, no quantum analog has been realized. By adding control to the SWAP unitary, we use photonic qubit logic to demonstrate the first quantum Fredkin gate, which promises many applications in quantum information and measurement. We implement example algorithms and generate the highest-fidelity three-photon Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states to date. The technique we use allows one to add a control operation to a black-box unitary, something that is impossible in the standard circuit model. Our experiment represents the first use of this technique to control a two-qubit operation and paves the way for larger controlled circuits to be realized efficiently. PMID:27051868

  16. A quantum Fredkin gate

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Raj B.; Ho, Joseph; Ferreyrol, Franck; Ralph, Timothy C.; Pryde, Geoff J.

    2016-01-01

    Minimizing the resources required to build logic gates into useful processing circuits is key to realizing quantum computers. Although the salient features of a quantum computer have been shown in proof-of-principle experiments, difficulties in scaling quantum systems have made more complex operations intractable. This is exemplified in the classical Fredkin (controlled-SWAP) gate for which, despite theoretical proposals, no quantum analog has been realized. By adding control to the SWAP unitary, we use photonic qubit logic to demonstrate the first quantum Fredkin gate, which promises many applications in quantum information and measurement. We implement example algorithms and generate the highest-fidelity three-photon Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states to date. The technique we use allows one to add a control operation to a black-box unitary, something that is impossible in the standard circuit model. Our experiment represents the first use of this technique to control a two-qubit operation and paves the way for larger controlled circuits to be realized efficiently. PMID:27051868

  17. A quantum Fredkin gate.

    PubMed

    Patel, Raj B; Ho, Joseph; Ferreyrol, Franck; Ralph, Timothy C; Pryde, Geoff J

    2016-03-01

    Minimizing the resources required to build logic gates into useful processing circuits is key to realizing quantum computers. Although the salient features of a quantum computer have been shown in proof-of-principle experiments, difficulties in scaling quantum systems have made more complex operations intractable. This is exemplified in the classical Fredkin (controlled-SWAP) gate for which, despite theoretical proposals, no quantum analog has been realized. By adding control to the SWAP unitary, we use photonic qubit logic to demonstrate the first quantum Fredkin gate, which promises many applications in quantum information and measurement. We implement example algorithms and generate the highest-fidelity three-photon Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states to date. The technique we use allows one to add a control operation to a black-box unitary, something that is impossible in the standard circuit model. Our experiment represents the first use of this technique to control a two-qubit operation and paves the way for larger controlled circuits to be realized efficiently.

  18. Ventricular volume measured from sestamibi gated tomograms

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, K.; DePuey, E.G.; Salensky, H. |

    1994-05-01

    Since left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic volume (EDV) and end-systolic volume (ESV) are valuable prognostic indicators, deriving accurate LV volumes could enhance the prognostic utility of Tc-99m sestamibi myocardial perfusion SPECT. We examined two methods of obtaining volumes adjunctive to sestamibi injections. A previously reported method of computing volumes from gated first pass (FP) images by combining maximum and total counts with IV maximum depth information from an orthogonal view was tested by imaging the LV chamber of a thoracic/cardiac phantom in RAO-30{degrees} and LAO-60{degrees} projections. Computed volume agreed with known volume to within 4.9%. In a separate experiment, tomograms of the simulated myocardium of the phantom were acquired which were reoriented into vertical and horizontal long-axis slices on which an observer drew inner LV outlines, and from which volume was computed using a scatter-corrected Simpson`s rule method. Computed phantom volume agreed with known simulated LV volume to within 3.5%. To evaluate these volume methods for patient data, we analyzed LV ED and ES images of 39 patients acquired in simultaneous biplane RAO-30{degrees} and LAO-60{degrees} projections during FP bolus transit of 840 MBq Tc-99m sestamibi. One hour later, 64 projections were acquired in 64{sup 2} matrices for 20 seconds each, gated at 8 frames per R-R interval.

  19. Respiratory Gating during Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Reduces Tumor Position Variability

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Tetsuo; Matsuyama, Tomohiko; Toya, Ryo; Fukugawa, Yoshiyuki; Toyofuku, Takamasa; Semba, Akiko; Oya, Natsuo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the effects of respiratory gating on treatment accuracy in lung cancer patients undergoing lung stereotactic body radiotherapy by using electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. Materials and Methods Our study population consisted of 30 lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (48 Gy/4 fractions/4 to 9 days). Of these, 14 were treated with- (group A) and 16 without gating (group B); typically the patients whose tumors showed three-dimensional respiratory motion ≧5 mm were selected for gating. Tumor respiratory motion was estimated using four-dimensional computed tomography images acquired during treatment simulation. Tumor position variability during all treatment sessions was assessed by measuring the standard deviation (SD) and range of tumor displacement on EPID images. The two groups were compared for tumor respiratory motion and position variability using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results The median three-dimensional tumor motion during simulation was greater in group A than group B (9 mm, range 3–30 mm vs. 2 mm, range 0–4 mm; p<0.001). In groups A and B the median SD of the tumor position was 1.1 mm and 0.9 mm in the craniocaudal- (p = 0.24) and 0.7 mm and 0.6 mm in the mediolateral direction (p = 0.89), respectively. The median range of the tumor position was 4.0 mm and 3.0 mm in the craniocaudal- (p = 0.21) and 2.0 mm and 1.5 mm in the mediolateral direction (p = 0.20), respectively. Conclusions Although patients treated with respiratory gating exhibited greater respiratory tumor motion during treatment simulation, tumor position variability in the EPID images was low and comparable to patients treated without gating. This demonstrates the benefit of respiratory gating. PMID:25379729

  20. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  1. Role of breathing in cardiac performance: experimental and mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Binh Q.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1999-05-01

    Due to the close proximity of the heart and lungs within a closed chest environment, we expect breathing to affect various cardiac performance parameters and hence cardiac output. We present an integrative approach to study heart-lung interactions, combining a mathematical formulation of the circulation system with imaging techniques using echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) and dynamic x-ray CT (EBCT). We hypothesize that appropriate synchronization of mechanical ventilation to cardiac-cycle specific events can improve cardiac function, i.e. stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO). Computational and experimental results support the notion that heart-lung interaction, leading to altered cardiac output associated with inspiration/expiration, is not directly associated with lung inflation/deflation and thus is felt to be more influenced by pleural pressure changes. The mathematical model of the circulation demonstrates the importance of cardiac-cycle specific timing of ventilation on cardiac function and matches with experimentally observed relationships found in animal models studied via EBCT and human studies using EPI. Results show that positive pressure mechanical ventilation timed to systolic events may increase SV and CO by up to 30%, mainly by increased filling of the ventricles during diastole. Similarly, negative pressure (spontaneous) respiration has its greatest effect on ventricular diastolic filling. Cardiac-gated mechanical ventilation may provide sufficient cardiac augmentation to warrant further investigation as a minimally-invasive technique for temporary cardiac assist. Through computational modeling and advanced imaging protocols, we were able to uniquely study heart-lung interactions within the intact milieu of the never-invaded thorax.

  2. An observer study methodology for evaluating detection of motion abnormalities in gated myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Lalush, David S; Jatko, Megan K; Segars, W Paul

    2005-03-01

    To address the task of detecting nonischemic motion abnormalities from animated displays of gated myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography data, we performed an observer study to evaluate the difference in detection performance between gating to 8 and 16 frames. Images were created from the NCAT mathematical phantom with a realistic heart simulating hypokinetic motion in the left lateral wall. Realistic noise-free projection data were simulated for both normal and defective hearts to obtain 16 frames for the cardiac cycle. Poisson noise was then simulated for each frame to create 50 realizations of each heart, All datasets were processed in two ways: reconstructed as a 16-frame set, and collapsed to 8 frames and reconstructed. Ten observers viewed the cardiac images animated with a realistic real-time frame rate. Observers trained on 100 images and tested on 100 images, rating their confidence on the presence of a motion defect on a continuous scale. None of the observers showed a significant difference in performance between the two gating methods. The 95% confidence interval on the difference in areas under the ROC curve (Az8 - Az16) was -0.029-0.085. Our test did not find a significant difference in detection performance between 8-frame gating and 16-frame gating. We conclude that, for the task of detecting abnormal motion, increasing the number of gated frames from 8 to 16 offers no apparent advantage.

  3. ONE SHAKE GATE FORMER

    DOEpatents

    Kalibjian, R.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1957-08-20

    An improved circuit for forming square pulses having substantially short and precise durations is described. The gate forming circuit incorporates a secondary emission R. F. pentode adapted to receive input trigger pulses amd having a positive feedback loop comnected from the dynode to the control grid to maintain conduction in response to trigger pulses. A short circuited pulse delay line is employed to precisely control the conducting time of the tube and a circuit for squelching spurious oscillations is provided in the feedback loop.

  4. Compact gate valve

    DOEpatents

    Bobo, Gerald E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a double-disc gate valve which is compact, comparatively simple to construct, and capable of maintaining high closing pressures on the valve discs with low frictional forces. The valve casing includes axially aligned ports. Mounted in the casing is a sealed chamber which is pivotable transversely of the axis of the ports. The chamber contains the levers for moving the valve discs axially, and an actuator for the levers. When an external drive means pivots the chamber to a position where the discs are between the ports and axially aligned therewith, the actuator for the levers is energized to move the discs into sealing engagement with the ports.

  5. Tide gate valve

    SciTech Connect

    Raftis, S. G.

    1985-01-08

    A tide gate check valve in which at least three converging sides are provided at a tapered region of a flexible sleeve, so that on reverse back pressure build-up of fluid, reverse fluid flow is prevented, while the valve sleeve does not invert or collapse. The present configuration features embedded reinforcing elements for resisting inversion or collapsing when the back pressure builds up. This feature is especially important for large-sized conduits of 36'' or 72'' diameter, or even larger, such as are common in storm sewer applications.

  6. 12. INTERIOR VIEW OF GATE OPERATOR ROOM, SHOWING SLIDES GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. INTERIOR VIEW OF GATE OPERATOR ROOM, SHOWING SLIDES GATE OPERATORS, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River approximately 175 feet west of eastern levee on river; roughly .5 mile downstream from confluence of Sacramento & American Rivers, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  7. 16. Little Hell Gate Bridge with Big Hell Gate Bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Little Hell Gate Bridge with Big Hell Gate Bridge in background. Wards Island, New York Co., NY. Sec. 4207, MP 8.02. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New Jersey/New York & New York/Connecticut State Lines, New York County, NY

  8. 3. TAINTER GATES (LEFT FOREGROUND) AND ROLLING SECTOR GATE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. TAINTER GATES (LEFT FOREGROUND) AND ROLLING SECTOR GATE AND SPILLWAY (BACKGROUND) OF THE NORTH CHANNEL DAM, LOOKING SOUTH. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, North Channel Dam, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  9. 5. GATE 5, INTAKE CHANNEL LOOKING SOUTH; WATER FROM GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. GATE 5, INTAKE CHANNEL LOOKING SOUTH; WATER FROM GATE 5 ENTERED DITCH AND IRRIGATED HONDIUS' FIELDS. - Hondius Water Line, 1.6 miles Northwest of Park headquarters building & 1 mile Northwest of Beaver Meadows entrance station, Estes Park, Larimer County, CO

  10. Cardiac ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Priest, Birgit T; McDermott, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels are critical for all aspects of cardiac function, including rhythmicity and contractility. Consequently, ion channels are key targets for therapeutics aimed at cardiac pathophysiologies such as atrial fibrillation or angina. At the same time, off-target interactions of drugs with cardiac ion channels can be the cause of unwanted side effects. This manuscript aims to review the physiology and pharmacology of key cardiac ion channels. The intent is to highlight recent developments for therapeutic development, as well as elucidate potential mechanisms for drug-induced cardiac side effects, rather than present an in-depth review of each channel subtype. PMID:26556552

  11. Beat-by-beat validation of ECG gating

    SciTech Connect

    Bacharach, S.L.; Green, M.V.; Borer, J.S.; Ostrow, H.G.; Bonow, R.O.; Farkas, S.P.; Johnston, G.S.

    1980-04-01

    Ejection fraction, normalized peak ejection and filling rates, and the time of occurrence of these events relative to the R-wave were determined in each of 512 consecutive individual cardiac cycles in each of 30 patients using an ultra-high-efficiency nonimaging detector system. For a given patient the 512 measurements of each quantity were averaged and compared with the value of this same quantity as determined from an R-wave-gated left-ventricular (LV) time-activity curve (TAC) derived from the same 512 cycles. We conclude (a) that a small but detectable systematic underestimate occurs in some LV function parameters when they are derived from gated LV TACs; (b) that the magnitude of this underestimate is smaller and less variable for systolic than for diastolic measurements; (c) that the magnitude of the underestimate is not greater than 20% in any single patient for diastolic parameters, nor greater than 8% in any individual patient for systolic parameters, and is substantially less for most patients; and (d) that a small subset of patients may require beat-length windowing if the gated values of diastolic parameters are to fall within these limits. Thus LV function measurements obtained from gated TACs adequately reflect the true average of such values during the measurement interval.

  12. Voltage gated sodium channels as drug discovery targets.

    PubMed

    Bagal, Sharan K; Marron, Brian E; Owen, Robert M; Storer, R Ian; Swain, Nigel A

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are a family of transmembrane ion channel proteins. They function by forming a gated, water-filled pore to help establish and control cell membrane potential via control of the flow of ions between the intracellular and the extracellular environments. Blockade of NaVs has been successfully accomplished in the clinic to enable control of pathological firing patterns that occur in a diverse range of conditions such as chronic pain, epilepsy, and cardiac arrhythmias. First generation sodium channel modulator drugs, despite low inherent subtype selectivity, preferentially act on over-excited cells which reduces undesirable side effects in the clinic. However, the limited therapeutic indices observed with the first generation demanded a new generation of sodium channel inhibitors. The structure, function and the state of the art in sodium channel modulator drug discovery are discussed in this chapter.

  13. Voltage gated sodium channels as drug discovery targets

    PubMed Central

    Bagal, Sharan K; Marron, Brian E; Owen, Robert M; Storer, R Ian; Swain, Nigel A

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are a family of transmembrane ion channel proteins. They function by forming a gated, water-filled pore to help establish and control cell membrane potential via control of the flow of ions between the intracellular and the extracellular environments. Blockade of NaVs has been successfully accomplished in the clinic to enable control of pathological firing patterns that occur in a diverse range of conditions such as chronic pain, epilepsy, and cardiac arrhythmias. First generation sodium channel modulator drugs, despite low inherent subtype selectivity, preferentially act on over-excited cells which reduces undesirable side effects in the clinic. However, the limited therapeutic indices observed with the first generation demanded a new generation of sodium channel inhibitors. The structure, function and the state of the art in sodium channel modulator drug discovery are discussed in this chapter. PMID:26646477

  14. 4D embryonic cardiography using gated optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, M. W.; Rothenberg, F.; Roy, D.; Nikolski, V. P.; Hu, Z.; Watanabe, M.; Wilson, D. L.; Efimov, I. R.; Rollins, A. M.

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous imaging of very early embryonic heart structure and function has technical limitations of spatial and temporal resolution. We have developed a gated technique using optical coherence tomography (OCT) that can rapidly image beating embryonic hearts in four-dimensions (4D), at high spatial resolution (10-15 μm), and with a depth penetration of 1.5 - 2.0 mm that is suitable for the study of early embryonic hearts. We acquired data from paced, excised, embryonic chicken and mouse hearts using gated sampling and employed image processing techniques to visualize the hearts in 4D and measure physiologic parameters such as cardiac volume, ejection fraction, and wall thickness. This technique is being developed to longitudinally investigate the physiology of intact embryonic hearts and events that lead to congenital heart defects.

  15. Gates Learns to Think Big

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses how the philanthropy of Microsoft Corp software magnate co-chairs, Bill Gates and his wife Melinda, are reshaping the American high school nowadays. Gates and his wife have put the issue on the national agenda like never before, with a commitment of more than 1.3 billion US dollars this decade toward the foundation's agenda…

  16. Penn State DOE GATE Program

    SciTech Connect

    Anstrom, Joel

    2012-08-31

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) was established in October 1998 pursuant to an award from the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE). The focus area of the Penn State GATE Program is advanced energy storage systems for electric and hybrid vehicles.

  17. How the Hodgkin–Huxley equations inspired the Cardiac Physiome Project

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Denis; Garny, Alan; Noble, Penelope J

    2012-01-01

    Early modelling of cardiac cells (1960–1980) was based on extensions of the Hodgkin–Huxley nerve axon equations with additional channels incorporated, but after 1980 it became clear that processes other than ion channel gating were also critical in generating electrical activity. This article reviews the development of models representing almost all cell types in the heart, many different species, and the software tools that have been created to facilitate the cardiac Physiome Project. PMID:22473779

  18. 4D VMAT, gated VMAT, and 3D VMAT for stereotactic body radiation therapy in lung.

    PubMed

    Chin, E; Loewen, S K; Nichol, A; Otto, K

    2013-02-21

    Four-dimensional volumetric modulated arc therapy (4D VMAT) is a treatment strategy for lung cancers that aims to exploit relative target and tissue motion to improve organ at risk (OAR) sparing. The algorithm incorporates the entire patient respiratory cycle using 4D CT data into the optimization process. Resulting treatment plans synchronize the delivery of each beam aperture to a specific phase of target motion. Stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans for 4D VMAT, gated VMAT, and 3D VMAT were generated on three patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Tumour motion ranged from 1.4-3.4 cm. The dose and fractionation scheme was 48 Gy in four fractions. A B-spline transformation model registered the 4D CT images. 4D dose volume histograms (4D DVH) were calculated from total dose accumulated at the maximum exhalation. For the majority of OARs, gated VMAT achieved the most radiation sparing but treatment times were 77-148% longer than 3D VMAT. 4D VMAT plan qualities were comparable to gated VMAT, but treatment times were only 11-25% longer than 3D VMAT. 4D VMAT's improvement of healthy tissue sparing can allow for further dose escalation. Future study could potentially adapt 4D VMAT to irregular patient breathing patterns.

  19. 4D VMAT, gated VMAT, and 3D VMAT for stereotactic body radiation therapy in lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, E.; Loewen, S. K.; Nichol, A.; Otto, K.

    2013-02-01

    Four-dimensional volumetric modulated arc therapy (4D VMAT) is a treatment strategy for lung cancers that aims to exploit relative target and tissue motion to improve organ at risk (OAR) sparing. The algorithm incorporates the entire patient respiratory cycle using 4D CT data into the optimization process. Resulting treatment plans synchronize the delivery of each beam aperture to a specific phase of target motion. Stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans for 4D VMAT, gated VMAT, and 3D VMAT were generated on three patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Tumour motion ranged from 1.4-3.4 cm. The dose and fractionation scheme was 48 Gy in four fractions. A B-spline transformation model registered the 4D CT images. 4D dose volume histograms (4D DVH) were calculated from total dose accumulated at the maximum exhalation. For the majority of OARs, gated VMAT achieved the most radiation sparing but treatment times were 77-148% longer than 3D VMAT. 4D VMAT plan qualities were comparable to gated VMAT, but treatment times were only 11-25% longer than 3D VMAT. 4D VMAT's improvement of healthy tissue sparing can allow for further dose escalation. Future study could potentially adapt 4D VMAT to irregular patient breathing patterns.

  20. Cardiac Innervation and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Keiichi; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Ardell, Jeffrey L.; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2015-01-01

    Afferent and efferent cardiac neurotransmission via the cardiac nerves intricately modulates nearly all physiological functions of the heart (chronotropy, dromotropy, lusitropy and inotropy). Afferent information from the heart is transmitted to higher levels of the nervous system for processing (intrinsic cardiac nervous system, extracardiac-intrathoracic ganglia, spinal cord, brain stem and higher centers) which ultimately results in efferent cardiomotor neural impulses (via the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves). This system forms interacting feedback loops that provide physiological stability for maintaining normal rhythm and life-sustaining circulation. This system also ensures that there is fine-tuned regulation of sympathetic-parasympathetic balance in the heart under normal and stressed states in the short (beat to beat), intermediate (minutes-hours) and long term (days-years). This important neurovisceral /autonomic nervous system also plays a major role in the pathophysiology and progression of heart disease, including heart failure and arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death (SCD). Transdifferentiation of neurons in heart failure, functional denervation, cardiac and extra-cardiac neural remodeling have also been identified and characterized during the progression of disease. Recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular processes governing innervation and the functional control of the myocardium in health and disease provides a rational mechanistic basis for development of neuraxial therapies for preventing SCD and other arrhythmias. Advances in cellular, molecular, and bioengineering realms have underscored the emergence of this area as an important avenue of scientific inquiry and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26044253

  1. ECG and Navigator-Free 4D Whole-Heart Coronary MRA for Simultaneous Visualization of Cardiac Anatomy and Function

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jianing; Sharif, Behzad; Fan, Zhaoyang; Bi, Xiaoming; Arsanjani, Reza; Berman, Daniel S.; Li, Debiao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop a cardiac and respiratory self-gated 4D coronary MRA technique for simultaneous cardiac anatomy and function visualization. Methods A contrast-enhanced, ungated spoiled gradient echo sequence with self-gating (SG) and 3DPR trajectory was used for image acquisition. Data was retrospectively binned into different cardiac and respiratory phases based on information extracted from SG projections using principal component analysis. Each cardiac phase was reconstructed using a respiratory motion-corrected self-calibrating SENSE framework, and those belong to the quiescent period were retrospectively combined for coronary visualization. Healthy volunteer studies were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the SG method, the accuracy of the left ventricle (LV) function parameters and the quality of coronary artery visualization. Results SG performed reliably for all subjects including one with poor ECG. The LV function parameters showed excellent agreement with those from a conventional cine protocol. For coronary imaging, the proposed method yielded comparable apparent SNR and coronary sharpness and lower apparent CNR on three subjects compared with an ECG and navigator-gated Cartesian protocol and an ECG-gated, respiratory motion-corrected 3DPR protocol. Conclusion A fully self-gated 4D whole-heart imaging technique was developed, potentially allowing cardiac anatomy and function assessment from a single measurement. PMID:25216287

  2. Four-dimensional spatial reasoning in humans.

    PubMed

    Aflalo, T N; Graziano, M S A

    2008-10-01

    Human subjects practiced navigation in a virtual, computer-generated maze that contained 4 spatial dimensions rather than the usual 3. The subjects were able to learn the spatial geometry of the 4-dimensional maze as measured by their ability to perform path integration, a standard test of spatial ability. They were able to travel down a winding corridor to its end and then point back accurately toward the occluded origin. One interpretation is that the brain substrate for spatial navigation is not a built-in map of the 3-dimensional world. Instead it may be better described as a set of general rules for manipulating spatial information that can be applied with practice to a diversity of spatial frameworks.

  3. Four-Dimensional Spatial Reasoning in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aflalo, T. N.; Graziano, M. S. A.

    2008-01-01

    Human subjects practiced navigation in a virtual, computer-generated maze that contained 4 spatial dimensions rather than the usual 3. The subjects were able to learn the spatial geometry of the 4-dimensional maze as measured by their ability to perform path integration, a standard test of spatial ability. They were able to travel down a winding…

  4. Structural Basis for Pharmacology of Voltage-Gated Sodium and Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Teresa M.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels initiate action potentials in nerve, muscle, and other electrically excitable cells. Voltage-gated calcium channels are activated by depolarization during action potentials, and calcium influx through them is the key second messenger of electrical signaling, initiating secretion, contraction, neurotransmission, gene transcription, and many other intracellular processes. Drugs that block sodium channels are used in local anesthesia and the treatment of epilepsy, bipolar disorder, chronic pain, and cardiac arrhythmia. Drugs that block calcium channels are used in the treatment of epilepsy, chronic pain, and cardiovascular disorders, including hypertension, angina pectoris, and cardiac arrhythmia. The principal pore-forming subunits of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels are structurally related and likely to have evolved from ancestral voltage-gated sodium channels that are widely expressed in prokaryotes. Determination of the structure of a bacterial ancestor of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels at high resolution now provides a three-dimensional view of the binding sites for drugs acting on sodium and calcium channels. In this minireview, we outline the different classes of sodium and calcium channel drugs, review studies that have identified amino acid residues that are required for their binding and therapeutic actions, and illustrate how the analogs of those key amino acid residues may form drug-binding sites in three-dimensional models derived from bacterial channels. PMID:25848093

  5. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing.

  6. 49 CFR 234.223 - Gate arm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gate arm. 234.223 Section 234.223 Transportation... SYSTEMS Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.223 Gate arm. Each gate arm, when... maintained in a condition sufficient to be clearly viewed by approaching highway users. Each gate arm...

  7. Reversible logic gates on Physarum Polycephalum

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, Andrew

    2015-03-10

    In this paper, we consider possibilities how to implement asynchronous sequential logic gates and quantum-style reversible logic gates on Physarum polycephalum motions. We show that in asynchronous sequential logic gates we can erase information because of uncertainty in the direction of plasmodium propagation. Therefore quantum-style reversible logic gates are more preferable for designing logic circuits on Physarum polycephalum.

  8. Fibroblast growth factor homologous factors in the heart: a potential locus for cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Wei, Eric Q; Barnett, Adam S; Pitt, Geoffrey S; Hennessey, Jessica A

    2011-10-01

    The four fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs; FGF11-FGF14) are intracellular proteins that bind and modulate voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). Although FHFs have been well studied in neurons and implicated in neurologic disease, their role in cardiomyocytes was unclear until recently. This review discusses the expression profile and function of FHFs in mouse and rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. Recent data show that FGF13 is the predominant FHF in the murine heart, directly binds the cardiac VGSC α subunit, and is essential for normal cardiac conduction. FHF loss-of-function mutations may be unrecognized causes of cardiac arrhythmias, such as long QT and Brugada syndromes.

  9. The Gates, 1979-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts: The Art Education Magazine for Teachers, 2005

    2005-01-01

    One art critic called it pure Despite the mixed reviews of Christo and Jeanne-Claude's temporary art installation in New York's Central Park, the public reaction to The Gates was largely positive.The Gates consisted of 7,500 orange PVC frames straddling the park's walkways that varied in widths from 5 1/2 feet to 18 feet. Eight-foot-long ripstop…

  10. Input states for quantum gates

    SciTech Connect

    Gilchrist, A.; White, A.G.; Munro, W.J.

    2003-04-01

    We examine three possible implementations of nondeterministic linear optical controlled NOT gates with a view to an in-principle demonstration in the near future. To this end we consider demonstrating the gates using currently available sources, such as spontaneous parametric down conversion and coherent states, and current detectors only able to distinguish between zero and many photons. The demonstration is possible in the coincidence basis and the errors introduced by the nonoptimal input states and detectors are analyzed.

  11. Quantum gates with topological phases

    SciTech Connect

    Ionicioiu, Radu

    2003-09-01

    We investigate two models for performing topological quantum gates with the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) and Aharonov-Casher (AC) effects. Topological one- and two-qubit Abelian phases can be enacted with the AB effect using charge qubits, whereas the AC effect can be used to perform all single-qubit gates (Abelian and non-Abelian) for spin qubits. Possible experimental setups suitable for a solid-state implementation are briefly discussed.

  12. Latest design of gate valves

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzhofer, U.; Stolte, J.; Weyand, M.

    1996-12-01

    Babcock Sempell, one of the most important valve manufacturers in Europe, has delivered valves for the nuclear power industry since the beginning of the peaceful application of nuclear power in the 1960s. The latest innovation by Babcock Sempell is a gate valve that meets all recent technical requirements of the nuclear power technology. At the moment in the United States, Germany, Sweden, and many other countries, motor-operated gate and globe valves are judged very critically. Besides the absolute control of the so-called {open_quotes}trip failure,{close_quotes} the integrity of all valve parts submitted to operational forces must be maintained. In case of failure of the limit and torque switches, all valve designs have been tested with respect to the quality of guidance of the gate. The guidances (i.e., guides) shall avoid a tilting of the gate during the closing procedure. The gate valve newly designed by Babcock Sempell fulfills all these characteristic criteria. In addition, the valve has cobalt-free seat hardfacing, the suitability of which has been proven by friction tests as well as full-scale blowdown tests at the GAP of Siemens in Karlstein, West Germany. Babcock Sempell was to deliver more than 30 gate valves of this type for 5 Swedish nuclear power stations by autumn 1995. In the presentation, the author will report on the testing performed, qualifications, and sizing criteria which led to the new technical design.

  13. Electrical recordings from rat cardiac muscle cells using field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprössler, Christoph; Denyer, Morgan; Britland, Steve; Knoll, Wolfgang; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    1999-08-01

    Extracellular electrophysiological recordings were made from cardiac cells cultured for up to seven days over microfabricated arrays of field-effect transistors. The recorded signals can be separated mainly into two types of cell transistor couplings: one that can be explained entirely by purely passive circuitry elements, and a second where voltage-gated ion channels contribute greatly to the measured extracellular signal.

  14. Measurement of cardiac troponins.

    PubMed

    Collinson, P O; Boa, F G; Gaze, D C

    2001-09-01

    The cardiac troponins form part of the regulatory mechanism for muscle contraction. Specific cardiac isoforms of cardiac troponin T and cardiac troponin I exist and commercially available immunoassay systems have been developed for their measurement. A large number of clinical and analytical studies have been performed and the measurement of cardiac troponins is now considered the 'gold standard' biochemical test for diagnosis of myocardial damage. There have been advances in understanding the development and structure of troponins and their degradation following myocardial cell necrosis. This has contributed to the understanding of the problems with current assays. Greater clinical use has also highlighted areas of analytical and clinical confusion. The assays are reviewed based on manufacturers' information, current published material as well as the authors' in-house experience.

  15. Functional cardiac tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liau, Brian; Zhang, Donghui; Bursac, Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Heart attack remains the leading cause of death in both men and women worldwide. Stem cell-based therapies, including the use of engineered cardiac tissues, have the potential to treat the massive cell loss and pathological remodeling resulting from heart attack. Specifically, embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells are a promising source for generation of therapeutically relevant numbers of functional cardiomyocytes and engineering of cardiac tissues in vitro. This review will describe methodologies for successful differentiation of pluripotent stem cells towards the cardiovascular cell lineages as they pertain to the field of cardiac tissue engineering. The emphasis will be placed on comparing the functional maturation in engineered cardiac tissues and developing heart and on methods to quantify cardiac electrical and mechanical function at different spatial scales. PMID:22397609

  16. Cardiac Hegemony of Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Sailay; Sussman, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac senescence and age-related disease development have gained general attention and recognition in the past decades due to increased accessibility and quality of health care. The advancement in global civilization is complementary to concerns regarding population aging and development of chronic degenerative diseases. Cardiac degeneration has been rigorously studied. The molecular mechanisms of cardiac senescence are on multiple cellular levels and hold a multilayer complexity level, thereby hampering development of unambiguous treatment protocols. In particular, the synergistic exchange of the senescence phenotype through a senescence secretome between myocytes and stem cells appears complicated and is of great future therapeutic value. The current review article will highlight hallmarks of senescence, cardiac myocyte and stem cell senescence, and the mutual exchange of senescent secretome. Future cardiac cell therapy approaches require a comprehensive understanding of myocardial senescence to improve therapeutic efficiency as well as efficacy. PMID:24349878

  17. A system for seismocardiography-based identification of quiescent heart phases: implications for cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Wick, Carson A; Su, Jin-Jyh; McClellan, James H; Brand, Oliver; Bhatti, Pamela T; Buice, Ashley L; Stillman, Arthur E; Tang, Xiangyang; Tridandapani, Srini

    2012-09-01

    Seismocardiography (SCG), a representation of mechanical heart motion, may more accurately determine periods of cardiac quiescence within a cardiac cycle than the electrically derived electrocardiogram (EKG) and, thus, may have implications for gating in cardiac computed tomography. We designed and implemented a system to synchronously acquire echocardiography, EKG, and SCG data. The device was used to study the variability between EKG and SCG and characterize the relationship between the mechanical and electrical activity of the heart. For each cardiac cycle, the feature of the SCG indicating Aortic Valve Closure was identified and its time position with respect to the EKG was observed. This position was found to vary for different heart rates and between two human subjects. A color map showing the magnitude of the SCG acceleration and computed velocity was derived, allowing for direct visualization of quiescent phases of the cardiac cycle with respect to heart rate. PMID:22581141

  18. A System for Seismocardiography-Based Identification of Quiescent Heart Phases: Implications for Cardiac Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wick, Carson A.; Su, Jin-Jyh; McClellan, James H.; Brand, Oliver; Bhatti, Pamela T.; Buice, Ashley L.; Stillman, Arthur E.; Tang, Xiangyang; Tridandapani, Srini

    2013-01-01

    Seismocardiography (SCG), a representation of mechanical heart motion, may more accurately determine periods of cardiac quiescence within a cardiac cycle than the electrically derived electrocardiogram (EKG) and, thus, may have implications for gating in cardiac computed tomography. We designed and implemented a system to synchronously acquire echocardiography, EKG, and SCG data. The device was used to study the variability between EKG and SCG and characterize the relationship between the mechanical and electrical activity of the heart. For each cardiac cycle, the feature of the SCG indicating Aortic Valve Closure was identified and its time position with respect to the EKG was observed. This position was found to vary for different heart rates and between two human subjects. A color map showing the magnitude of the SCG acceleration and computed velocity was derived, allowing for direct visualization of quiescent phases of the cardiac cycle with respect to heart rate. PMID:22581141

  19. Non-rigid dual respiratory and cardiac motion correction methods after, during, and before image reconstruction for 4D cardiac PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Tao; Wang, Jizhe; Fung, George; Tsui, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory motion (RM) and cardiac motion (CM) degrade the quality and resolution in cardiac PET scans. We have developed non-rigid motion estimation methods to estimate both RM and CM based on 4D cardiac gated PET data alone, and compensate the dual respiratory and cardiac (R&C) motions after (MCAR), during (MCDR), and before (MCBR) image reconstruction. In all three R&C motion correction methods, attenuation-activity mismatch effect was modeled by using transformed attenuation maps using the estimated RM. The difference of using activity preserving and non-activity preserving models in R&C correction was also studied. Realistic Monte Carlo simulated 4D cardiac PET data using the 4D XCAT phantom and accurate models of the scanner design parameters and performance characteristics at different noise levels were employed as the known truth and for method development and evaluation. Results from the simulation study suggested that all three dual R&C motion correction methods provide substantial improvement in the quality of 4D cardiac gated PET images as compared with no motion correction. Specifically, the MCDR method yields the best performance for all different noise levels compared with the MCAR and MCBR methods. While MCBR reduces computational time dramatically but the resultant 4D cardiac gated PET images has overall inferior image quality when compared to that from the MCAR and MCDR approaches in the ‘almost’ noise free case. Also, the MCBR method has better noise handling properties when compared with MCAR and provides better quantitative results in high noise cases. When the goal is to reduce scan time or patient radiation dose, MCDR and MCBR provide a good compromise between image quality and computational times.

  20. Non-rigid dual respiratory and cardiac motion correction methods after, during, and before image reconstruction for 4D cardiac PET.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tao; Wang, Jizhe; Fung, George; Tsui, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory motion (RM) and cardiac motion (CM) degrade the quality and resolution in cardiac PET scans. We have developed non-rigid motion estimation methods to estimate both RM and CM based on 4D cardiac gated PET data alone, and compensate the dual respiratory and cardiac (R&C) motions after (MCAR), during (MCDR), and before (MCBR) image reconstruction. In all three R&C motion correction methods, attenuation-activity mismatch effect was modeled by using transformed attenuation maps using the estimated RM. The difference of using activity preserving and non-activity preserving models in R&C correction was also studied. Realistic Monte Carlo simulated 4D cardiac PET data using the 4D XCAT phantom and accurate models of the scanner design parameters and performance characteristics at different noise levels were employed as the known truth and for method development and evaluation. Results from the simulation study suggested that all three dual R&C motion correction methods provide substantial improvement in the quality of 4D cardiac gated PET images as compared with no motion correction. Specifically, the MCDR method yields the best performance for all different noise levels compared with the MCAR and MCBR methods. While MCBR reduces computational time dramatically but the resultant 4D cardiac gated PET images has overall inferior image quality when compared to that from the MCAR and MCDR approaches in the 'almost' noise free case. Also, the MCBR method has better noise handling properties when compared with MCAR and provides better quantitative results in high noise cases. When the goal is to reduce scan time or patient radiation dose, MCDR and MCBR provide a good compromise between image quality and computational times.

  1. Quantum gate-set tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume-Kohout, Robin

    2014-03-01

    Quantum information technology is built on (1) physical qubits and (2) precise, accurate quantum logic gates that transform their states. Developing quantum logic gates requires good characterization - both in the development phase, where we need to identify a device's flaws so as to fix them, and in the production phase, where we need to make sure that the device works within specs and predict residual error rates and types. This task falls to quantum state and process tomography. But until recently, protocols for tomography relied on a pre-existing and perfectly calibrated reference frame comprising the measurements (and, for process tomography, input states) used to characterize the device. In practice, these measurements are neither independent nor perfectly known - they are usually implemented via exactly the same gates that we are trying to characterize! In the past year, several partial solutions to this self-consistency problem have been proposed. I will present a framework (gate set tomography, or GST) that addresses and resolves this problem, by self-consistently characterizing an entire set of quantum logic gates on a black-box quantum device. In particular, it contains an explicit closed-form protocol for linear-inversion gate set tomography (LGST), which is immune to both calibration error and technical pathologies like local maxima of the likelihood (which plagued earlier methods). GST also demonstrates significant (multiple orders of magnitude) improvements in efficiency over standard tomography by using data derived from long sequences of gates (much like randomized benchmarking). GST has now been applied to qubit devices in multiple technologies. I will present and discuss results of GST experiments in technologies including a single trapped-ion qubit and a silicon quantum dot qubit. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U

  2. Query cardiac pain.

    PubMed

    Todd, J W

    1983-08-01

    Query cardiac pain is a common problem, and immense efforts are made to solve it. No test can prove that a patient has not had a cardiac infarct, though in the recent past eminent authorities wrongly stated that a normal ECG supplied this proof. This history is by far the most important means of interpreting recurrent pain. Coronary arteriography is only useful in diagnosis when the pain is certainly due to myocardial ischaemia but it is uncertain whether this is caused by coronary artery disease or some other cardiac lesion. In practice, much pain is not diagnosed. This need be no cause for concern, and patients who in fact have had a small cardiac infarct gain rather than lose if wrongly reassured of its non-existence. The history of cardiology is a depressing catalogue of error. Bogus cardiac diseases have been diagnosed on an enormous scale, mainly because attention has been concentrated on the cardiac manifestations, while the patient was ignored. Much "excluding" is fatuous. Because treatment was derived from theory, treatment for patients who had had cardiac infarcts was disastrous. The great error at present is to overvalue technology.

  3. Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Guyette, Francis X; Reynolds, Joshua C; Frisch, Adam

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac arrest is a dynamic disease that tests the multitasking and leadership abilities of emergency physicians. Providers must simultaneously manage the logistics of resuscitation while searching for the cause of cardiac arrest. The astute clinician will also realize that he or she is orchestrating only one portion of a larger series of events, each of which directly affects patient outcomes. Resuscitation science is rapidly evolving, and emergency providers must be familiar with the latest evidence and controversies surrounding resuscitative techniques. This article reviews evidence, discusses controversies, and offers strategies to provide quality cardiac arrest resuscitation.

  4. [Cardiac Rehabilitation 2015].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Andreas

    2015-11-25

    The goals of cardiac rehabilitation are (re-)conditioning and secondary prevention in patients with heart disease or an elevated cardiovascular risk profile. Rehabilitation is based on motivation through education, on adapted physical activity, instruction of relaxation techniques, psychological support and optimized medication. It is performed preferably in groups either in outpatient or inpatient settings. The Swiss working group on cardiac rehabilitation provides a network of institutions with regular quality auditing. Positive effects of rehabilitation programs on mortality and morbidity have been established by numerous studies. Although a majority of patients after cardiac surgery are being referred to rehabilitation, these services are notoriously underused after catheter procedures. PMID:26602848

  5. Photocontrol of Voltage-Gated Ion Channel Activity by Azobenzene Trimethylammonium Bromide in Neonatal Rat Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Frolova, Sheyda R.; Gaiko, Olga; Tsvelaya, Valeriya A.; Pimenov, Oleg Y.; Agladze, Konstantin I.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of azobenzene trimethylammonium bromide (azoTAB) to sensitize cardiac tissue excitability to light was recently reported. The dark, thermally relaxed trans- isomer of azoTAB suppressed spontaneous activity and excitation propagation speed, whereas the cis- isomer had no detectable effect on the electrical properties of cardiomyocyte monolayers. As the membrane potential of cardiac cells is mainly controlled by activity of voltage-gated ion channels, this study examined whether the sensitization effect of azoTAB was exerted primarily via the modulation of voltage-gated ion channel activity. The effects of trans- and cis- isomers of azoTAB on voltage-dependent sodium (INav), calcium (ICav), and potassium (IKv) currents in isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The experiments showed that azoTAB modulated ion currents, causing suppression of sodium (Na+) and calcium (Ca2+) currents and potentiation of net potassium (K+) currents. This finding confirms that azoTAB-effect on cardiac tissue excitability do indeed result from modulation of voltage-gated ion channels responsible for action potential. PMID:27015602

  6. Neurologic complications of cardiac tumors.

    PubMed

    Roeltgen, David; Kidwell, Chelsea S

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are an uncommon cause for neurologic disease, but if undiagnosed can be associated with devastating neurologic consequences. Primary cardiac tumors, both benign and neoplastic, and metastatic tumors occur. Primary cardiac tumors are more likely to be associated with neurologic embolic complications. Metastatic cardiac tumors are more likely to be associated with valvular distraction, arrhythmia, diminished cardiac output and indirect neurological dysfunction. Primary and metastatic cardiac tumors may result in cerebral metastatic disease. Atrial myxoma, a benign primary cardiac tumor, is the most common cardiac tumor associated with neurologic disease, and most commonly causes cerebral embolization and stroke. The use of thrombolytic therapy for these strokes is controversial. Additionally, delayed manifestations, including aneurysm formation and intracranial hemorrhage, are possible. Aneurysm formation has been described as occurring after removal of the primary tumor. The availability of noninvasive cardiac imaging has significantly helped decrease the neurologic morbidity of cardiac tumors and has led to frequent successful intervention. PMID:24365298

  7. Molecular Basis of Cardiac Myxomas

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Pooja; Luk, Adriana; Rao, Vivek; Butany, Jagdish

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are rare, and of these, primary cardiac tumors are even rarer. Metastatic cardiac tumors are about 100 times more common than the primary tumors. About 90% of primary cardiac tumors are benign, and of these the most common are cardiac myxomas. Approximately 12% of primary cardiac tumors are completely asymptomatic while others present with one or more signs and symptoms of the classical triad of hemodynamic changes due to intracardiac obstruction, embolism and nonspecific constitutional symptoms. Echocardiography is highly sensitive and specific in detecting cardiac tumors. Other helpful investigations are chest X-rays, magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography scan. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for primary cardiac tumors and is usually associated with a good prognosis. This review article will focus on the general features of benign cardiac tumors with an emphasis on cardiac myxomas and their molecular basis. PMID:24447924

  8. Quantum gates by periodic driving

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Z. C.; Wang, W.; Yi, X. X.

    2016-01-01

    Topological quantum computation has been extensively studied in the past decades due to its robustness against decoherence. One way to realize the topological quantum computation is by adiabatic evolutions—it requires relatively long time to complete a gate, so the speed of quantum computation slows down. In this work, we present a method to realize single qubit quantum gates by periodic driving. Compared to adiabatic evolution, the single qubit gates can be realized at a fixed time much shorter than that by adiabatic evolution. The driving fields can be sinusoidal or square-well field. With the sinusoidal driving field, we derive an expression for the total operation time in the high-frequency limit, and an exact analytical expression for the evolution operator without any approximations is given for the square well driving. This study suggests that the period driving could provide us with a new direction in regulations of the operation time in topological quantum computation. PMID:26911900

  9. The ryanodine receptor store-sensing gate controls Ca2+ waves and Ca2+-triggered arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenqian; Wang, Ruiwu; Chen, Biyi; Zhong, Xiaowei; Kong, Huihui; Bai, Yunlong; Zhou, Qiang; Xie, Cuihong; Zhang, Jingqun; Guo, Ang; Tian, Xixi; Jones, Peter P; O'Mara, Megan L; Liu, Yingjie; Mi, Tao; Zhang, Lin; Bolstad, Jeff; Semeniuk, Lisa; Cheng, Hongqiang; Zhang, Jianlin; Chen, Ju; Tieleman, D Peter; Gillis, Anne M; Duff, Henry J; Fill, Michael; Song, Long-Sheng; Chen, S R Wayne

    2014-02-01

    Spontaneous Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores is important for various physiological and pathological processes. In cardiac muscle cells, spontaneous store overload-induced Ca(2+) release (SOICR) can result in Ca(2+) waves, a major cause of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VTs) and sudden death. The molecular mechanism underlying SOICR has been a mystery for decades. Here we show that a point mutation, E4872A, in the helix bundle crossing region (the proposed gate) of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) completely abolishes luminal, but not cytosolic, Ca(2+) activation of RyR2. The introduction of metal-binding histidines at this site converts RyR2 into a luminal Ni(2+)-gated channel. Mouse hearts harboring a heterozygous RyR2 mutation at this site (E4872Q) are resistant to SOICR and are completely protected against Ca(2+)-triggered VTs. These data show that the RyR2 gate directly senses luminal (store) Ca(2+), explaining the regulation of RyR2 by luminal Ca(2+), the initiation of Ca(2+) waves and Ca(2+)-triggered arrhythmias. This newly identified store-sensing gate structure is conserved in all RyR and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor isoforms.

  10. Cardiac glycoside overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in the leaves of the digitalis (foxglove) plant. This plant is the original source of this medicine. People ... Digitoxin (Crystodigin) Digoxin (Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin) Besides the foxglove plant, cardiac glycosides also occur naturally in plants such ...

  11. Time delays in gated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Wendy L; Becker, Nathan

    2009-07-28

    In gated radiotherapy, the accuracy of treatment delivery is determined by the accuracy with which both the imaging and treatment beams are gated. If the time delays (the time between the target entering/leaving the gated region and the first/last image acquired or treatment beam on/off) for the imaging and treatment systems are in the opposite directions, they may increase the required internal target volume (ITV) margin, above that indicated by the tolerance for either system measured individually. We measured a gating system's time delay on 3 fluoroscopy systems, and 3 linear accelerator treatment beams, using a motion phantom of known geometry, varying gating type (amplitude vs. phase), beam energy, dose rate, and period. The average beam on imaging time delays were -0.04 +/- 0.05 s (amplitude, 1 SD), -0.11 +/- 0.04 s (phase); while the average beam off imaging time delays were -0.18 +/- 0.08 s (amplitude) and -0.15 +/- 0.04 s (phase). The average beam on treatment time delays were 0.09 +/- 0.02 s (amplitude, 1 SD), 0.10 +/- 0.03 s (phase); while the average beam off time delays for treatment beams were 0.08 +/- 0.02 s (amplitude) and 0.07 +/- 0.02 s (phase). The negative value indicates the images were acquired early, and the positive values show the treatment beam was triggered late. We present a technique for calculating the margin necessary to account for time delays and found that the difference between the imaging and treatment time delays required a significant increase in the ITV margin in the direction of tumor motion at the gated level.

  12. Localizing a gate in CFTR.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaolong; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2015-02-24

    Experimental and computational studies have painted a picture of the chloride permeation pathway in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) as a short narrow tunnel flanked by wider inner and outer vestibules. Although these studies also identified a number of transmembrane segments (TMs) as pore-lining, the exact location of CFTR's gate(s) remains unknown. Here, using a channel-permeant probe, [Au(CN)2](-), we provide evidence that CFTR bears a gate that coincides with the predicted narrow section of the pore defined as residues 338-341 in TM6. Specifically, cysteines introduced cytoplasmic to the narrow region (i.e., positions 344 in TM6 and 1148 in TM12) can be modified by intracellular [Au(CN)2](-) in both open and closed states, corroborating the conclusion that the internal vestibule does not harbor a gate. However, cysteines engineered to positions external to the presumed narrow region (e.g., 334, 335, and 337 in TM6) are all nonreactive toward cytoplasmic [Au(CN)2](-) in the absence of ATP, whereas they can be better accessed by extracellular [Au(CN)2](-) when the open probability is markedly reduced by introducing a second mutation, G1349D. As [Au(CN)2](-) and chloride ions share the same permeation pathway, these results imply a gate is situated between amino acid residues 337 and 344 along TM6, encompassing the very segment that may also serve as the selectivity filter for CFTR. The unique position of a gate in the middle of the ion translocation pathway diverges from those seen in ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and thus distinguishes CFTR from other members of the ABC transporter family. PMID:25675504

  13. Trapped ion scaling with pulsed fast gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, C. D. B.; Carvalho, A. R. R.; Hope, J. J.

    2015-10-01

    Fast entangling gates for trapped ion pairs offer vastly improved gate operation times relative to implemented gates, as well as approaches to trap scaling. Gates on a neighbouring ion pair only involve local ions when performed sufficiently fast, and we find that even a fast gate between a pair of distant ions with few degrees of freedom restores all the motional modes given more stringent gate speed conditions. We compare pulsed fast gate schemes, defined by a timescale faster than the trap period, and find that our proposed scheme has less stringent requirements on laser repetition rate for achieving arbitrary gate time targets and infidelities well below 10-4. By extending gate schemes to ion crystals, we explore the effect of ion number on gate fidelity for coupling two neighbouring ions in large crystals. Inter-ion distance determines the gate time, and a factor of five increase in repetition rate, or correspondingly the laser power, reduces the infidelity by almost two orders of magnitude. We also apply our fast gate scheme to entangle the first and last ions in a crystal. As the number of ions in the crystal increases, significant increases in the laser power are required to provide the short gate times corresponding to fidelity above 0.99.

  14. Neuroprotection during cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Grocott, Hilary P; Yoshitani, Kenji

    2007-01-01

    Cerebral injury following cardiac surgery continues to be a significant source of morbidity and mortality after cardiac surgery. A spectrum of injuries ranging from subtle neurocognitive dysfunction to fatal strokes are caused by a complex series of multifactorial mechanisms. Protecting the brain from these injuries has focused on intervening on each of the various etiologic factors. Although numerous studies have focused on a pharmacologic solution, more success has been found with nonpharmacologic strategies, including optimal temperature management and reducing emboli generation. PMID:17680190

  15. Ranolazine in Cardiac Arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Saad, Marwan; Mahmoud, Ahmed; Elgendy, Islam Y; Richard Conti, C

    2016-03-01

    Ranolazine utilization in the management of refractory angina has been established by multiple randomized clinical studies. However, there is growing evidence showing an evolving role in the field of cardiac arrhythmias. Multiple experimental and clinical studies have evaluated the role of ranolazine in prevention and management of atrial fibrillation, with ongoing studies on its role in ventricular arrhythmias. In this review, we will discuss the pharmacological, experimental, and clinical evidence behind ranolazine use in the management of various cardiac arrhythmias.

  16. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany.

    PubMed

    Karoff, Marthin; Held, Klaus; Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the rehabilitation measures provided for cardiac patients in Germany and to outline its legal basis and outcomes. In Germany the cardiac rehabilitation system is different from rehabilitation measures in other European countries. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany since 1885 is based on specific laws and the regulations of insurance providers. Cardiac rehabilitation has predominantly been offered as an inpatient service, but has recently been complemented by outpatient services. A general agreement on the different indications for offering these two services has yet to be reached. Cardiac rehabilitation is mainly offered after an acute cardiac event and bypass surgery. It is also indicated in severe heart failure and special cases of percutaneous coronary intervention. Most patients are men (>65%) and the age at which events occur is increasing. The benefits obtained during the 3-4 weeks after an acute event, and confirmed in numerous studies, are often later lost under 'usual care' conditions. Many attempts have been made by rehabilitation institutions to improve this deficit by providing intensive aftercare. One instrument set up to achieve this is the nationwide institution currently comprising more than 6000 heart groups with approximately 120000 outpatients. After coronary artery bypass grafting or acute coronary syndrome cardiac rehabilitation can usually be started within 10 days. The multidisciplinary rehabilitation team consists of cardiologists, psychologists, exercise therapists, social workers, nutritionists and nurses. The positive effects of cardiac rehabilitation are also important economically, for example, for the improvement of secondary prevention and vocational integration. PMID:17301623

  17. Ranolazine in Cardiac Arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Saad, Marwan; Mahmoud, Ahmed; Elgendy, Islam Y; Richard Conti, C

    2016-03-01

    Ranolazine utilization in the management of refractory angina has been established by multiple randomized clinical studies. However, there is growing evidence showing an evolving role in the field of cardiac arrhythmias. Multiple experimental and clinical studies have evaluated the role of ranolazine in prevention and management of atrial fibrillation, with ongoing studies on its role in ventricular arrhythmias. In this review, we will discuss the pharmacological, experimental, and clinical evidence behind ranolazine use in the management of various cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26459200

  18. Cardiac Munchausen's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, E J; Evans, T R

    1987-01-01

    Ten years' experience of cardiac Munchausen's syndrome in the Cardiac Care Unit of an Inner London teaching hospital is reported. Thirty-six admissions in this category were identified and analysed, and 4 typical cases are described. The common presenting complaints, recurring features and the relationship with other forms of Munchausen's syndrome are discussed, as are possible strategies available to deal with this clinical entity. PMID:3694601

  19. Cardiac imaging in adults

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  20. Small Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Lieu, Deborah K.; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan

    2015-01-01

    Small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK, KCa2) channels are unique in that they are gated solely by changes in intracellular Ca2+ and hence, function to integrate intracellular Ca2+ and membrane potentials on a beat-to-beat basis. Recent studies have provided evidence for the existence and functional significance of SK channels in the heart. Indeed, our knowledge of cardiac SK channels has been greatly expanded over the past decade. Interests in cardiac SK channels are further driven by recent studies suggesting the critical roles of SK channels in human atrial fibrillation, SK channel as a possible novel therapeutic target in atrial arrhythmias and up-regulation of SK channels in heart failure (HF) in animal models and human HF. However, there remain critical gaps in our knowledge. Specifically, blockade of SK channels in cardiac arrhythmias has been shown to be both anti-arrhythmic and proarrhythmic. This contemporary review will provide an overview of the literature on the role of cardiac SK channels in cardiac arrhythmias and to serve as a discussion platform for the current clinical perspectives. At the translational level, development of SK channel blockers as a new therapeutic target in the treatment of atrial fibrillation and the possible pro-arrhythmic effects merit further considerations and investigations. PMID:25956967