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Sample records for four-dimensional semiparallel submanifolds

  1. Parallel, semiparallel, and serial processing of visual hyperacuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahle, Manfred W.

    1990-10-01

    Humans can discriminate between certain elementary stimulus features in parallel, i.e., simultaneously over the visual field. I present evidence that, in man, vernier rnisalignments in the hyperacuity-range, i.e., below the photoreceptor diameter, can also be detected in parallel. This indicates that the visUal system performs some form of spatial interpolation beyond the photoreceptor spacing simultaneously over the visual field. Vernier offsets are detected in parallel even when orientation cues are masked: deviation from straightness is an elementary feature of visual perception. However, the identification process, that classifies each vernier in a stimulus as being offset to the right (versus to the left) is serial and has to scan the visual field sequentially if orientation cues are masked. Therefore, reaction times and thresholds in vernier acuity tasks increase with the number of verniers presented simultaneously if classification of different features is required. Furthermore, when approaching vernier threshold, simple vernier detection is no longer parallel but becomes partially serial, or semi-parallel.

  2. Compressed Submanifold Multifactor Analysis.

    PubMed

    Luu, Khoa; Savvides, Marios; Bui, Tien; Suen, Ching

    2016-04-14

    Although widely used, Multilinear PCA (MPCA), one of the leading multilinear analysis methods, still suffers from four major drawbacks. First, it is very sensitive to outliers and noise. Second, it is unable to cope with missing values. Third, it is computationally expensive since MPCA deals with large multi-dimensional datasets. Finally, it is unable to maintain the local geometrical structures due to the averaging process. This paper proposes a novel approach named Compressed Submanifold Multifactor Analysis (CSMA) to solve the four problems mentioned above. Our approach can deal with the problem of missing values and outliers via SVD-L1. The Random Projection method is used to obtain the fast low-rank approximation of a given multifactor dataset. In addition, it is able to preserve the geometry of the original data. Our CSMA method can be used efficiently for multiple purposes, e.g. noise and outlier removal, estimation of missing values, biometric applications. We show that CSMA method can achieve good results and is very efficient in the inpainting problem as compared to [1], [2]. Our method also achieves higher face recognition rates compared to LRTC, SPMA, MPCA and some other methods, i.e. PCA, LDA and LPP, on three challenging face databases, i.e. CMU-MPIE, CMU-PIE and Extended YALE-B.

  3. Four-Dimensional Graded Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Jonkisz, Jakub; Wierzchoń, Michał; Binder, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Both the multidimensional phenomenon and the polysemous notion of consciousness continue to prove resistant to consistent measurement and unambiguous definition. This is hardly surprising, given that there is no agreement even as regards the most fundamental issues they involve. One of the basic disagreements present in the continuing debate about consciousness pertains to its gradational nature. The general aim of this article is to show how consciousness might be graded and multidimensional at the same time. We therefore focus on the question of what it is, exactly, that is or could be graded in cases of consciousness, and how we can measure it. Ultimately, four different gradable aspects of consciousness will be described: quality, abstractness, complexity and usefulness, which belong to four different dimensions, these being understood, respectively, as phenomenal, semantic, physiological, and functional. Consequently, consciousness may be said to vary with respect to phenomenal quality, semantic abstraction, physiological complexity, and functional usefulness. It is hoped that such a four-dimensional approach will help to clarify and justify claims about the hierarchical nature of consciousness. The approach also proves explanatorily advantageous, as it enables us not only to draw attention to certain new and important differences in respect of subjective measures of awareness and to justify how a given creature may be ranked higher in one dimension of consciousness and lower in terms of another, but also allows for innovative explanations of a variety of well-known phenomena (amongst these, the interpretations of blindsight and locked-in syndrome will be briefly outlined here). Moreover, a 4D framework makes possible many predictions and hypotheses that may be experimentally tested (We point out a few such possibilities pertaining to interdimensional dependencies). PMID:28377738

  4. Geodesics and submanifold structures in conformal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belgun, Florin

    2015-05-01

    A conformal structure on a manifold Mn induces natural second order conformally invariant operators, called Möbius and Laplace structures, acting on specific weight bundles of M, provided that n ≥ 3. By extending the notions of Möbius and Laplace structures to the case of surfaces and curves, we develop here the theory of extrinsic conformal geometry for submanifolds, find tensorial invariants of a conformal embedding, and use these invariants to characterize various notions of geodesic submanifolds.

  5. Three special classes of Wintgen ideal submanifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhenxiao

    2017-04-01

    Wintgen ideal submanifolds in space forms are those ones attaining equality pointwise in the so-called DDVV inequality which relates the scalar curvature, the mean curvature and the normal scalar curvature. In this paper, we investigate three special classes of Wintgen ideal submanifolds: the ones with constant mean curvature, the ones with constant scalar curvature and the ones with constant normal scalar curvature. Some characterization results are given.

  6. A four dimensional variational analysis experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, R.

    1981-01-01

    A demonstration that the four dimensional variational analysis method using the governing equations as exact constraints can be successfully employed for a perfect model and for a simple, but nonlinear, system is presented. The method is stable in an assimilation cycle. The method reconstructs the unobservable variables; in the case demonstrated, no velocity data was observed. The analysis errors are much smaller than the observing system errors.

  7. Inequalities for scalar curvature of pseudo-Riemannian submanifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Mukut Mani; Gülbahar, Mehmet; Kılıç, Erol; Keleş, Sadık

    2017-02-01

    Some basic inequalities, involving the scalar curvature and the mean curvature, for a pseudo-Riemannian submanifold of a pseudo-Riemannian manifold are obtained. We also find inequalities for spacelike submanifolds. Equality cases are also discussed.

  8. String breaking in four dimensional lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.; Eichten, E.; Thacker, H.

    2001-06-01

    Virtual quark pair screening leads to breaking of the string between fundamental representation quarks in QCD. For unquenched four dimensional lattice QCD, this (so far elusive) phenomenon is studied using the recently developed truncated determinant algorithm (TDA). The dynamical configurations were generated on a 650 MHz PC. Quark eigenmodes up to 420 MeV are included exactly in these TDA studies performed at low quark mass on large coarse [but O(a{sup 2}) improved] lattices. A study of Wilson line correlators in Coulomb gauge extracted from an ensemble of 1000 two-flavor dynamical configurations reveals evidence for flattening of the string tension at distances R{approx}>1 fm.

  9. Four-dimensional unsubtraction with massive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sborlini, Germán F. R.; Driencourt-Mangin, Félix; Rodrigo, Germán

    2016-10-01

    We extend the four-dimensional unsubtraction method, which is based on the loop-tree duality (LTD), to deal with processes involving heavy particles. The method allows to perform the summation over degenerate IR configurations directly at integrand level in such a way that NLO corrections can be implemented directly in four space-time dimensions. We define a general momentum mapping between the real and virtual kinematics that accounts properly for the quasi-collinear configurations, and leads to an smooth massless limit. We illustrate the method first with a scalar toy example, and then analyse the case of the decay of a scalar or vector boson into a pair of massive quarks. The results presented in this paper are suitable for the application of the method to any multipartonic process.

  10. Quantum teleportation of four-dimensional qudits

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Amri, M.; Evers, Joerg; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2010-08-15

    A protocol for the teleportation of arbitrary quantum states of four-dimensional qudits is presented. The qudit to be teleported is encoded in the combined state of two ensembles of atoms placed in a cavity at the sender's side. The receiver uses a similar setup, with his atoms prepared in a particular initial state. The teleportation protocol then consists of adiabatic mapping of the ensemble states onto photonic degrees of freedom, which are then directed onto a specific beam splitter and detection setup. For part of the measurement outcome, the qudit state is fully transferred to the receiver. Other detection events lead to partial teleportation or failed teleportation attempts. The interpretation of the different detection outcomes and possible ways of improving the full teleportation probability are discussed.

  11. {N}=3 four dimensional field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Etxebarria, Iñaki; Regalado, Diego

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a class of four dimensional field theories constructed by quotienting ordinary {N}=4 U(N ) SYM by particular combinations of R-symmetry and SL(2, ℤ) automorphisms. These theories appear naturally on the worldvolume of D3 branes probing terminal singularities in F-theory, where they can be thought of as non-perturbative generalizations of the O3 plane. We focus on cases preserving only 12 supercharges, where the quotient gives rise to theories with coupling fixed at a value of order one. These constructions possess an unconventional large N limit described by a non-trivial F-theory fibration with base AdS 5 × (S 5/ ℤ k ). Upon reduction on a circle the {N}=3 theories flow to well-known {N}=6 ABJM theories.

  12. Chiral four-dimensional heterotic covariant lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beye, Florian

    2014-11-01

    In the covariant lattice formalism, chiral four-dimensional heterotic string vacua are obtained from certain even self-dual lattices which completely decompose into a left-mover and a right-mover lattice. The main purpose of this work is to classify all right-mover lattices that can appear in such a chiral model, and to study the corresponding left-mover lattices using the theory of lattice genera. In particular, the Smith-Minkowski-Siegel mass formula is employed to calculate a lower bound on the number of left-mover lattices. Also, the known relationship between asymmetric orbifolds and covariant lattices is considered in the context of our classification.

  13. General flat four-dimensional world pictures and clock systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, J. P.; Underwood, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    We explore the mathematical structure and the physical implications of a general four-dimensional symmetry framework which is consistent with the Poincare-Einstein principle of relativity for physical laws and with experiments. In particular, we discuss a four-dimensional framework in which all observers in different frames use one and the same grid of clocks. The general framework includes special relativity and a recently proposed new four-dimensional symmetry with a nonuniversal light speed as two special simple cases. The connection between the properties of light propagation and the convention concerning clock systems is also discussed, and is seen to be nonunique within the four-dimensional framework.

  14. Splitting a simple homotopy equivalence along a submanifold with filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Bak, A; Muranov, Yu V

    2008-06-30

    A simple homotopy equivalence f:M{sup n}{yields}X{sup n} of manifolds splits along a submanifold Y subset of X if it is homotopic to a map that is a simple homotopy equivalence on the transversal preimage of the submanifold and on the complement of this preimage. The problem of splitting along a submanifold with filtration is a natural generalization of this problem. In this paper we define groups LSF{sub *} of obstructions to splitting along a submanifold with filtration and describe their properties. We apply the results obtained to the problem of the realization of surgery and splitting obstructions by maps of closed manifolds and consider several examples. Bibliography: 36 titles.

  15. Disentangling the Cosmic Web with Lagrangian Submanifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shandarin, Sergei F.; Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2016-10-01

    The Cosmic Web is a complicated highly-entangled geometrical object. Remarkably it has formed from practically Gaussian initial conditions, which may be regarded as the simplest departure from exactly uniform universe in purely deterministic mapping. The full complexity of the web is revealed neither in configuration no velocity spaces considered separately. It can be fully appreciated only in six-dimensional (6D) phase space. However, studies of the phase space is complicated by the fact that every projection of it on a three-dimensional (3D) space is multivalued and contained caustics. In addition phase space is not a metric space that complicates studies of geometry. We suggest to use Lagrangian submanifold i.e., x = x(q), where both x and q are 3D vectors instead of the phase space for studies the complexity of cosmic web in cosmological N-body dark matter simulations. Being fully equivalent in dynamical sense to the phase space it has an advantage of being a single valued and also metric space.

  16. Spinorial representation of submanifolds in metric Lie groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayard, Pierre; Roth, Julien; Zavala Jiménez, Berenice

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we give a spinorial representation of submanifolds of any dimension and codimension into Lie groups equipped with left invariant metrics. As applications, we get a spinorial proof of the Fundamental Theorem for submanifolds into Lie groups, we recover previously known representations of submanifolds in Rn and in the 3-dimensional Lie groups S3 and E(κ , τ) , and we get a new spinorial representation for surfaces in the 3-dimensional semi-direct products: this achieves the spinorial representations of surfaces in the 3-dimensional homogeneous spaces. We finally indicate how to recover a Weierstrass-type representation for CMC-surfaces in 3-dimensional metric Lie groups recently given by Meeks, Mira, Perez and Ros.

  17. Marginally trapped submanifolds in generalized Robertson-Walker spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alías, Luis J.; Cánovas, Verónica L.; Colares, A. Gervasio

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we consider codimension two marginally trapped submanifolds in the family of general Robertson-Walker spacetimes. In particular, we derive some rigidity results for this type of submanifolds which guarantee that, under appropriate hypothesis, the only ones are those contained in slices. We also derive some interesting non-existence results for weakly trapped submanifolds. In particular, we give applications to some cases of physical relevance such as the Einstein-de Sitter spacetime and certain open regions of de Sitter spacetime, including the so called steady state spacetime. Our results will be an application of the (finite) maximum principle for closed manifolds and, more generally, of the weak maximum principle for stochastically complete manifolds.

  18. Manual control displays for a four-dimensional landing approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverthorn, J. T.; Swaim, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Six instrument rated pilots flew a STOL fixed base simulator to study the effectiveness of three displays for a four dimensional approach. The three examined displays were a digital readout of forward position error, a digital speed command, and an analog display showing forward position error and error prediction. A flight director was used in all conditions. All test runs were for a typical four dimensional approach in moderate turbulence that included a change in commanded ground speed, a change in flight path angle, and two standard rate sixty degree turns. Use of the digital forward position error display resulted in large overshoot in the forward position error. Some type of lead (rate or prediction information) was shown to be needed. The best overall performance was obtained using the speed command display. It was demonstrated that curved approaches can be flown with relative ease.

  19. Common time in a four-dimensional symmetry framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, J. P.; Sherry, T. N.

    1980-01-01

    Following the ideas of Poincare, Reichenbach, and Grunbaum concerning the convention of setting up clock systems, clock systems and light propagation are analyzed within the framework of four-dimensional symmetry. It is possible to construct a new four-dimensional symmetry framework incorporating common time: observers in different inertial frames of reference use one and the same clock system, which is located in any one of the frames. Consequently, simultaneity has a meaning independent of position and independent of frame of reference. A further consequence is that the two-way speeds of light alone are isotropic in any frame. By the choice of clock system there will be one frame in which the one-way speed of light is isotropic. This frame can be arbitrarily chosen. The difference between one-way speeds and two-way speeds of light signals is considered in detail.

  20. Going four-dimensional at a national laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, D.C.; Thielman, J.; Gorst, W.

    1990-10-01

    The four-dimensional principle, as explained by Horton, is founded upon the notion that our senses and mind prefer dynamic, life-like images -- we understand and enjoy pictures better than words and raw data. Whenever we convert information to graphical images, we increase the number of readers, improve our chances of being understood, and increase the impact of our document. In this paper, we discuss our efforts to engage today's audience by applying the visual approach to our communication work at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Topics include: the increasing importance of visuals, the opportunity for editors to take a lead role in design and development of the visual elements, a discussion of how we work at PNL and how our efforts to incorporate the four-dimensional concept are going, along with some examples of successes, and efforts to speed up the process and a brief summary. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Finding four dimensional symplectic maps with reduced chaos: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Weishi Wan; Cary, J.R.; Shasharina, S.G.

    1998-06-01

    A method for finding integrable four-dimensional symplectic maps is outlined. The method relies on solving for parameter values at which the linear stability factors of the fixed points of the map have the values corresponding to integrability. This method is applied to accelerator lattices in order to increase dynamic aperture. Results show a increase of the dynamic aperture after correction, which implies the validity of the method.

  2. Semiclassical States Associated with Isotropic Submanifolds of Phase Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemin, V.; Uribe, A.; Wang, Z.

    2016-12-01

    We define classes of quantum states associated with isotropic submanifolds of cotangent bundles. The classes are stable under the action of semiclassical pseudo-differential operators and covariant under the action of semiclassical Fourier integral operators. We develop a symbol calculus for them; the symbols are symplectic spinors. We outline various applications.

  3. Four-dimensional characterization of a sheet-forming web

    DOEpatents

    Sari-Sarraf, Hamed; Goddard, James S.

    2003-04-22

    A method and apparatus are provided by which a sheet-forming web may be characterized in four dimensions. Light images of the web are recorded at a point adjacent the initial stage of the web, for example, near the headbox in a paperforming operation. The images are digitized, and the resulting data is processed by novel algorithms to provide a four-dimensional measurement of the web. The measurements include two-dimensional spatial information, the intensity profile of the web, and the depth profile of the web. These measurements can be used to characterize the web, predict its properties and monitor production events, and to analyze and quantify headbox flow dynamics.

  4. Four-dimensional optical manipulation of colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, Peter John; Daria, Vincent Ricardo; Glückstad, Jesper

    2005-02-01

    We transform a TEM00 laser mode into multiple counterpropagating optical traps to achieve four-dimensional simultaneous manipulation of multiple particles. Efficient synthesis and dynamic control of the counterpropagating-beam traps is carried out via the generalized phase contrast method, and a spatial polarization-encoding scheme. Our experiments genuinely demonstrate real-time, interactive particle-position control for forming arbitrary volumetric constellations and complex three-dimensional trajectories of multiple particles. This opens up doors for cross-disciplinary cutting-edge research in various fields.

  5. Four-dimensional black holes in Einsteinian cubic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, Pablo; Cano, Pablo A.

    2016-12-01

    We construct static and spherically symmetric generalizations of the Schwarzschild- and Reissner-Nordström-(anti-)de Sitter [RN-(A)dS] black-hole solutions in four-dimensional Einsteinian cubic gravity (ECG). The solutions are characterized by a single function which satisfies a nonlinear second-order differential equation. Interestingly, we are able to compute independently the Hawking temperature T , the Wald entropy S and the Abbott-Deser mass M of the solutions analytically as functions of the horizon radius and the ECG coupling constant λ . Using these we show that the first law of black-hole mechanics is exactly satisfied. Some of the solutions have positive specific heat, which makes them thermodynamically stable, even in the uncharged and asymptotically flat case. Further, we claim that, up to cubic order in curvature, ECG is the most general four-dimensional theory of gravity which allows for nontrivial generalizations of Schwarzschild- and RN-(A)dS characterized by a single function which reduce to the usual Einstein gravity solutions when the corresponding higher-order couplings are set to zero.

  6. Restricted Weyl invariance in four-dimensional curved spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edery, Ariel; Nakayama, Yu

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the physics of restricted Weyl invariance, a symmetry of dimensionless actions in four-dimensional curved space time. When we study a scalar field nonminimally coupled to gravity with Weyl(conformal) weight of -1 (i.e. scalar field with the usual two-derivative kinetic term), we find that dimensionless terms are either fully Weyl invariant or are Weyl invariant if the conformal factor Ω(x) obeys the condition gμν∇μ∇νΩ =0. We refer to the latter as restricted Weyl invariance. We show that all the dimensionless geometric terms such as R2, RμνRμν and RμνστRμνστ are restricted Weyl invariant. Restricted Weyl transformations possesses nice mathematical properties such as the existence of a composition and an inverse in four-dimensional space-time. We exemplify the distinction among rigid Weyl invariance, restricted Weyl invariance and the full Weyl invariance in dimensionless actions constructed out of scalar fields and vector fields with Weyl weight zero.

  7. Restricted Weyl invariance in four-dimensional curved spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edery, Ariel; Nakayama, Yu

    2016-03-01

    We discuss the physics of restricted Weyl invariance, a symmetry of dimensionless actions in four dimensional curved space time. When we study a scalar field nonminimally coupled to gravity with Weyl(conformal) weight of - 1 (i.e. scalar field with the usual two-derivative kinetic term), we find that dimensionless terms are either fully Weyl invariant or are Weyl invariant if the conformal factor Ω (x) obeys the condition gμν∇μ∇ν Ω = 0 . We refer to the latter as restricted Weyl invariance. We show that all the dimensionless geometric terms such as R2, RμνRμν and RμνστRμνστ are restricted Weyl invariant. Restricted Weyl transformations possesses nice mathematical properties such as the existence of a composition and an inverse in four dimensional space-time. We exemplify the distinction among rigid Weyl invariance, restricted Weyl invariance and the full Weyl invariance in dimensionless actions constructed out of scalar fields and vector fields with Weyl weight zero.

  8. Four-dimensional maps of the human somatosensory system

    PubMed Central

    Avanzini, Pietro; Abdollahi, Rouhollah O.; Sartori, Ivana; Caruana, Fausto; Pelliccia, Veronica; Casaceli, Giuseppe; Mai, Roberto; Lo Russo, Giorgio; Rizzolatti, Giacomo; Orban, Guy A.

    2016-01-01

    A fine-grained description of the spatiotemporal dynamics of human brain activity is a major goal of neuroscientific research. Limitations in spatial and temporal resolution of available noninvasive recording and imaging techniques have hindered so far the acquisition of precise, comprehensive four-dimensional maps of human neural activity. The present study combines anatomical and functional data from intracerebral recordings of nearly 100 patients, to generate highly resolved four-dimensional maps of human cortical processing of nonpainful somatosensory stimuli. These maps indicate that the human somatosensory system devoted to the hand encompasses a widespread network covering more than 10% of the cortical surface of both hemispheres. This network includes phasic components, centered on primary somatosensory cortex and neighboring motor, premotor, and inferior parietal regions, and tonic components, centered on opercular and insular areas, and involving human parietal rostroventral area and ventral medial-superior-temporal area. The technique described opens new avenues for investigating the neural basis of all levels of cortical processing in humans. PMID:26976579

  9. Low-energy structure of four-dimensional superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Zwirner, F.

    1988-05-01

    The N = 1, d = 4 supergravity theories derived as the low-energy limit of four-dimensional superstrings are discussed, focusing on the properties of their effective potentials. Gauge symmetry breaking is possible along several flat directions. A class of superpotential modifications is introduced, which describes supersymmetry breaking with vanishing cosmological constant and Str M{sup 2} = 0 at any minimum of the tree level potential. Under more restrictive assumptions, there are minima with broken supersymmetry at which also Str f(M{sup 2}) = 0 for any function f, so that the whole one-loop cosmological constant vanishes. This result is interpreted in terms of a new discrete boson-fermion symmetry, relating particles whose helicities differ by 3/2, e.g., the graviton and the dilatino.' 21 refs.

  10. Unravelling cardiovascular disease using four dimensional flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, Vivian P; Westenberg, Jos J M; van der Palen, Roel L F; Blom, Nico A; de Roos, Albert; van der Geest, Rob; Elbaz, Mohammed S M; Roest, Arno A W

    2016-11-25

    Knowledge of normal and abnormal flow patterns in the human cardiovascular system increases our understanding of normal physiology and may help unravel the complex pathophysiological mechanisms leading to cardiovascular disease. Four-dimensional (4D) flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has emerged as a suitable technique that enables visualization of in vivo blood flow patterns and quantification of parameters that could potentially be of prognostic value in the disease process. In this review, current image processing tools that are used for comprehensive visualization and quantification of blood flow and energy distribution in the heart and great vessels will be discussed. Also, imaging biomarkers extracted from 4D flow CMR will be reviewed that have been shown to distinguish between normal and abnormal flow patterns. Furthermore, current applications of 4D flow CMR in the heart and great vessels will be discussed, showing its potential as an additional diagnostic modality which could aid in disease management and timing of surgical intervention.

  11. Visualization of Four Dimensional Data on Virtual Globes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swick, R.; Maurer, J.; Troisi, V.; Wang, I.

    2006-12-01

    The recent proliferation of virtual globes seems to have captured the public imagination to a degree seldom seen in the Earth Sciences. Virtual globes, such as Google Earth and World Winds, do such a fantastic job of rendering geolocated imagery on a 3D Earth it would be almost criminal not to take advantage. For just the cost of creating compatible imagery the scientific community can offer data visualization capabilities with features like zoom, variable transparency, overlays, etc... But for the climate change community 3D is not enough. To show change over time one needs 4D capabilities. Using 20-30 year time series data from the National Snow and Ice Data Center this presentation explores methods for incorporating four dimensional data into virtual globes.

  12. A Four-Dimensional Probabilistic Atlas of the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Mazziotta, John; Toga, Arthur; Evans, Alan; Fox, Peter; Lancaster, Jack; Zilles, Karl; Woods, Roger; Paus, Tomas; Simpson, Gregory; Pike, Bruce; Holmes, Colin; Collins, Louis; Thompson, Paul; MacDonald, David; Iacoboni, Marco; Schormann, Thorsten; Amunts, Katrin; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Geyer, Stefan; Parsons, Larry; Narr, Katherine; Kabani, Noor; Le Goualher, Georges; Feidler, Jordan; Smith, Kenneth; Boomsma, Dorret; Pol, Hilleke Hulshoff; Cannon, Tyrone; Kawashima, Ryuta; Mazoyer, Bernard

    2001-01-01

    The authors describe the development of a four-dimensional atlas and reference system that includes both macroscopic and microscopic information on structure and function of the human brain in persons between the ages of 18 and 90 years. Given the presumed large but previously unquantified degree of structural and functional variance among normal persons in the human population, the basis for this atlas and reference system is probabilistic. Through the efforts of the International Consortium for Brain Mapping (ICBM), 7,000 subjects will be included in the initial phase of database and atlas development. For each subject, detailed demographic, clinical, behavioral, and imaging information is being collected. In addition, 5,800 subjects will contribute DNA for the purpose of determining genotype– phenotype–behavioral correlations. The process of developing the strategies, algorithms, data collection methods, validation approaches, database structures, and distribution of results is described in this report. Examples of applications of the approach are described for the normal brain in both adults and children as well as in patients with schizophrenia. This project should provide new insights into the relationship between microscopic and macroscopic structure and function in the human brain and should have important implications in basic neuroscience, clinical diagnostics, and cerebral disorders. PMID:11522763

  13. Constraints on RG flow for four dimensional quantum field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jack, I.; Osborn, H.

    2014-06-01

    The response of four dimensional quantum field theories to a Weyl rescaling of the metric in the presence of local couplings and which involve a, the coefficient of the Euler density in the energy momentum tensor trace on curved space, is reconsidered. Previous consistency conditions for the anomalous terms, which implicitly define a metric G on the space of couplings and give rise to gradient flow like equations for a, are derived taking into account the role of lower dimension operators. The results for infinitesimal Weyl rescaling are integrated to finite rescalings e2σ to a form which involves running couplings gσ and which interpolates between IR and UV fixed points. The results are also restricted to flat space where they give rise to broken conformal Ward identities. Expressions for the three loop Yukawa β-functions for a general scalar/fermion theory are obtained and the three loop contribution to the metric G for this theory is also calculated. These results are used to check the gradient flow equations to higher order than previously. It is shown that these are only valid when β→B, a modified β-function, and that the equations provide strong constraints on the detailed form of the three loop Yukawa β-function. N=1 supersymmetric Wess-Zumino theories are also considered as a special case. It is shown that the metric for the complex couplings in such theories may be restricted to a hermitian form.

  14. Four dimensional reconstruction and analysis of plume images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhawan, Atam P.; Peck, Charles, III; Disimile, Peter

    1991-05-01

    A number of methods have been investigated and are under current investigation for monitoring the health of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Plume emission analysis has recently emerged as a potential technique for correlating the emission characteristics with the health of an engine. In order to correlate the visual and spectral signatures of the plume emission with the characteristic health monitoring features of the engine, the plume emission data must be acquired, stored, and analyzed in a manner similar to flame emission spectroscopy. The characteristic visual and spectral signatures of the elements vaporized in exhaust plume along with the features related to their temperature, pressure, and velocity can be analyzed once the images of plume emission are effectively acquired, digitized, and stored on a computer. Since the emission image varies with respect to time at a specified planar location, four dimensional visual and spectral analysis need to be performed on the plume emission data. In order to achieve this objective, feasibility research was conducted to digitize, store, analyze, and visualize the images of a subsonic jet in a cross flow. The jet structure was made visible using a direct injection flow visualization technique. The results of time-history based three dimensional reconstruction of the cross sectional images corresponding to a specific planar location of the jet structure are presented. The experimental set-up to acquire such data is described and three dimensional displays of time-history based reconstructions of the jet structure are discussed.

  15. Four-dimensional positron age-momentum correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, Ulrich; Löwe, Benjamin; Dickmann, Marcel; Mitteneder, Johannes; Sperr, Peter; Egger, Werner; Reiner, Markus; Dollinger, Günther

    2016-11-01

    We have performed first four-dimensional age-momentum correlation (4D-AMOC) measurements at a pulsed high intensity positron micro beam and determined the absolute value of the three-dimensional momentum of the electrons annihilating with the positrons in coincidence with the positron age in the sample material. We operated two position sensitive detectors in coincidence to measure the annihilation radiation: a pixelated HPGe-detector and a microchannel plate image intensifier with a CeBr3 scintillator pixel array. The transversal momentum resolution of the 4D-AMOC setup was measured to be about 17 × 10-3 {m}0c (FWHM) and was circa 3.5 times larger than the longitudinal momentum resolution. The total time resolution was 540 ps (FWHM). We measured two samples: a gold foil and a carbon tape at a positron implantation energy of 2 keV. For each sample discrete electron momentum states and their respective positron lifetimes were extracted.

  16. Universality in four-dimensional random-field magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fytas, Nikolaos G.; Theodorakis, Panagiotis E.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the universality aspects of the four-dimensional random-field Ising model (RFIM) using numerical simulations at zero temperature. We consider two different, in terms of the field distribution, versions of the model, namely a Gaussian RFIM and an equal-weight trimodal RFIM. By implementing a computational approach that maps the ground-state of the system to the maximum-flow optimization problem of a network, we employ the most up-to-date version of the push-relabel algorithm and simulate large ensembles of disorder realizations of both models for a broad range of random-field values and system sizes. Using as finite-size measures the sample-to-sample fluctuations of the order parameter of the system, we propose, for both types of distributions, estimates of the critical field hc and the critical exponent ν of the correlation length, the latter suggesting that the two models in four dimensions share the same universality class.

  17. Four-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Since its introduction in the 1970’s, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a standard imaging modality. With its broad and standardized application, it is firmly established in the clinical routine and an essential element in cardiovascular and abdominal imaging. In addition to sonography and computer tomography, MRI is a valuable tool for diagnosing cardiovascular and abdominal diseases, for determining disease severity, and for assessing therapeutic success. MRI techniques have improved over the last few decades, revealing not just morphologic information, but functional information about perfusion, diffusion and hemodynamics as well. Four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, a time-resolved phase contrast-MRI with three-dimensional (3D) anatomic coverage and velocity encoding along all three flow directions has been used to comprehensively assess complex cardiovascular hemodynamics in multiple regions of the body. The technique enables visualization of 3D blood flow patterns and retrospective quantification of blood flow parameters in a region of interest. Over the last few years, 4D flow MRI has been increasingly performed in the abdominal region. By applying different acceleration techniques, taking 4D flow MRI measurements has dropped to a reasonable scanning time of 8 to 12 min. These new developments have encouraged a growing number of patient studies in the literature validating the technique’s potential for enhanced evaluation of blood flow parameters within the liver’s complex vascular system. The purpose of this review article is to broaden our understanding of 4D flow MRI for the assessment of liver hemodynamics by providing insights into acquisition, data analysis, visualization and quantification. Furthermore, in this article we highlight its development, focussing on the clinical application of the technique. PMID:26755862

  18. Model-based image reconstruction for four-dimensional PET

    SciTech Connect

    Li Tianfang; Thorndyke, Brian; Schreibmann, Eduard; Yang Yong; Xing Lei

    2006-05-15

    Positron emission tonography (PET) is useful in diagnosis and radiation treatment planning for a variety of cancers. For patients with cancers in thoracic or upper abdominal region, the respiratory motion produces large distortions in the tumor shape and size, affecting the accuracy in both diagnosis and treatment. Four-dimensional (4D) (gated) PET aims to reduce the motion artifacts and to provide accurate measurement of the tumor volume and the tracer concentration. A major issue in 4D PET is the lack of statistics. Since the collected photons are divided into several frames in the 4D PET scan, the quality of each reconstructed frame degrades as the number of frames increases. The increased noise in each frame heavily degrades the quantitative accuracy of the PET imaging. In this work, we propose a method to enhance the performance of 4D PET by developing a new technique of 4D PET reconstruction with incorporation of an organ motion model derived from 4D-CT images. The method is based on the well-known maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (ML-EM) algorithm. During the processes of forward- and backward-projection in the ML-EM iterations, all projection data acquired at different phases are combined together to update the emission map with the aid of deformable model, the statistics is therefore greatly improved. The proposed algorithm was first evaluated with computer simulations using a mathematical dynamic phantom. Experiment with a moving physical phantom was then carried out to demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method and the increase of signal-to-noise ratio over three-dimensional PET. Finally, the 4D PET reconstruction was applied to a patient case.

  19. Semiautomated four-dimensional computed tomography segmentation using deformable models

    SciTech Connect

    Ragan, Dustin; Starkschall, George; McNutt, Todd; Kaus, Michael; Guerrero, Thomas; Stevens, Craig W.

    2005-07-15

    The purpose of this work is to demonstrate a proof of feasibility of the application of a commercial prototype deformable model algorithm to the problem of delineation of anatomic structures on four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) image data sets. We acquired a 4D CT image data set of a patient's thorax that consisted of three-dimensional (3D) image data sets from eight phases in the respiratory cycle. The contours of the right and left lungs, cord, heart, and esophagus were manually delineated on the end inspiration data set. An interactive deformable model algorithm, originally intended for deforming an atlas-based model surface to a 3D CT image data set, was applied in an automated fashion. Triangulations based on the contours generated on each phase were deformed to the CT data set on the succeeding phase to generate the contours on that phase. Deformation was propagated through the eight phases, and the contours obtained on the end inspiration data set were compared with the original manually delineated contours. Structures defined by high-density gradients, such as lungs, cord, and heart, were accurately reproduced, except in regions where other gradient boundaries may have confused the algorithm, such as near bronchi. The algorithm failed to accurately contour the esophagus, a soft-tissue structure completely surrounded by tissue of similar density, without manual interaction. This technique has the potential to facilitate contour delineation in 4D CT image data sets; and future evolution of the software is expected to improve the process.

  20. Variability of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Patient Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To quantify the interfractional variability in lung tumor trajectory and mean position during the course of radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Repeat four-dimensional (4D) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans (median, nine scans/patient) routinely acquired during the course of treatment were analyzed for 56 patients with lung cancer. Tumor motion was assessed by using local rigid registration of a region of interest in the 3D planning CT to each phase in the 4D CBCT. Displacements of the mean tumor position relative to the planned position (baseline variations) were obtained by using time-weighted averaging of the motion curve. Results: The tumor trajectory shape was found to be stable interfractionally, with mean variability not exceeding 1 mm (1 SD) in each direction for the inhale and exhale phases. Interfractional baseline variations, however, were large, with 1.6- (left-right), 3.9- (cranial-caudal), and 2.8-mm (anterior-posterior) systematic variations (1 SD) and 1.2- (left-right), 2.4- (cranial-caudal) and 2.2-mm (anterior-posterior) random variations. Eliminating baseline variations by using soft-tissue guidance decreases planning target volume margins by approximately 50% compared with bony anatomy-driven protocols for conventional fractionation schemes. Conclusions: Systematic and random baseline variations constitute a substantial portion of the geometric variability present in the treatment of patients with lung cancer and require generous safety margins when relying on accurate setup/immobilization or bony anatomy-driven correction strategies. The 4D-CBCT has the ability to accurately monitor tumor trajectory shape and baseline variations and drive image-guided correction strategies that allows safe margin reduction.

  1. Coupled decomposition of four-dimensional NOESY spectra

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Sebastian; Ibraghimov, Ilghis; Wagner, Gerhard; Orekhov, Vladislav Y.

    2009-01-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) NOESY spectra provide unambiguous distance information at a resolution that can not be achieved in fewer dimensions and thus increase the quality of biomolecular structure determination substantially. Since the degree of chemical shift degeneracy increases with protein size, the use of 4D NOESY spectra is particularly important for large proteins. The potential high resolution in 4D spectra can not be achieved in a reasonable time with conventional acquisition routines that sample the Nyquist grid uniformly. It can however be obtained with non-uniform sampling of the data grid, but optimal processing of such data has not yet been established. Here we describe a processing method for a pair of sparsely sampled 4D NOESY spectra, a methyl–methyl and an amide–methyl NOESY, recorded on a perdeuterated protein with protonated isoleucine, leucine and valine methyl groups. The coupled multi-dimensional decomposition (Co-MDD) of these two spectra together with a 2D template spectrum results in a substantial increase in sensitivity, evidenced by 50–100% additional cross peaks, when compared to alternative processing schemes. At the same time, Co-MDD allows the use of low sparse levels of 10–15% of the full data grid for NOESY spectra. For the 283-residue integral human membrane protein VDAC-1, which has a rotational correlation time of about 70 ns in detergent micelles, the two 4D Co-MDD NOESYs yielded a total of 366 NOEs, resulting in 139 unambiguous upper limit distance constraints for the structure calculation. PMID:19737017

  2. Four-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Stankovic, Zoran

    2016-01-07

    Since its introduction in the 1970's, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a standard imaging modality. With its broad and standardized application, it is firmly established in the clinical routine and an essential element in cardiovascular and abdominal imaging. In addition to sonography and computer tomography, MRI is a valuable tool for diagnosing cardiovascular and abdominal diseases, for determining disease severity, and for assessing therapeutic success. MRI techniques have improved over the last few decades, revealing not just morphologic information, but functional information about perfusion, diffusion and hemodynamics as well. Four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, a time-resolved phase contrast-MRI with three-dimensional (3D) anatomic coverage and velocity encoding along all three flow directions has been used to comprehensively assess complex cardiovascular hemodynamics in multiple regions of the body. The technique enables visualization of 3D blood flow patterns and retrospective quantification of blood flow parameters in a region of interest. Over the last few years, 4D flow MRI has been increasingly performed in the abdominal region. By applying different acceleration techniques, taking 4D flow MRI measurements has dropped to a reasonable scanning time of 8 to 12 min. These new developments have encouraged a growing number of patient studies in the literature validating the technique's potential for enhanced evaluation of blood flow parameters within the liver's complex vascular system. The purpose of this review article is to broaden our understanding of 4D flow MRI for the assessment of liver hemodynamics by providing insights into acquisition, data analysis, visualization and quantification. Furthermore, in this article we highlight its development, focussing on the clinical application of the technique.

  3. On holomorphic Riemannian geometry and submanifolds of Wick-related spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessers, Victor; Van der Veken, Joeri

    2016-06-01

    In this article we show how holomorphic Riemannian geometry can be used to relate certain submanifolds in one pseudo-Riemannian space to submanifolds with corresponding geometric properties in other spaces. In order to do so, we shall first rephrase and extend some background theory on holomorphic Riemannian manifolds, which is essential for the later application of the presented method.

  4. Performance studies of four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhihua; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-10-01

    Four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) has been proposed to characterize the breathing motion of tumors before radiotherapy treatment. However, when the acquired cone beam projection data are retrospectively gated into several respiratory phases, the available data to reconstruct each phase is under-sampled and thus causes streaking artifacts in the reconstructed images. To solve the under-sampling problem and improve image quality in 4DCBCT, various methods have been developed. This paper presents performance studies of three different 4DCBCT methods based on different reconstruction algorithms. The aims of this paper are to study (1) the relationship between the accuracy of the extracted motion trajectories and the data acquisition time of a 4DCBCT scan and (2) the relationship between the accuracy of the extracted motion trajectories and the number of phase bins used to sort projection data. These aims will be applied to three different 4DCBCT methods: conventional filtered backprojection reconstruction (FBP), FBP with McKinnon-Bates correction (MB) and prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) reconstruction. A hybrid phantom consisting of realistic chest anatomy and a moving elliptical object with known 3D motion trajectories was constructed by superimposing the analytical projection data of the moving object to the simulated projection data from a chest CT volume dataset. CBCT scans with gantry rotation times from 1 to 4 min were simulated, and the generated projection data were sorted into 5, 10 and 20 phase bins before different methods were used to reconstruct 4D images. The motion trajectories of the moving object were extracted using a fast free-form deformable registration algorithm. The root mean square errors (RMSE) of the extracted motion trajectories were evaluated for all simulated cases to quantitatively study the performance. The results demonstrate (1) longer acquisition times result in more accurate motion delineation

  5. Reduced dynamics and Lagrangian submanifolds of symplectic manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Toraño Andrés, E.; Guzmán, E.; Marrero, J. C.; Mestdag, T.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we will see that the symplectic creed by Weinstein ‘everything is a Lagrangian submanifold’ also holds for Hamilton-Poincaré and Lagrange-Poincaré reduction. In fact, we show that solutions of the Hamilton-Poincaré equations and of the Lagrange-Poincaré equations are in one-to-one correspondence with distinguished curves in a Lagrangian submanifold of a symplectic manifold. For this purpose, we will combine the concept of a Tulczyjew triple with Marsden-Weinstein symplectic reduction.

  6. Möbius geometry of three-dimensional Wintgen ideal submanifolds in mathbb{S}(5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, ZhenXiao; Li, TongZhu; Ma, Xiang; Wang, ChangPing

    2014-06-01

    Wintgen ideal submanifolds in space forms are those ones attaining equality at every point in the so-called DDVV inequality which relates the scalar curvature, the mean curvature and the normal scalar curvature. This property is conformal invariant; hence we study them in the framework of Moebius geometry, and restrict to three dimensional Wintgen ideal submanifolds in S^5. In particular we give Moebius characterizations for minimal ones among them, which are also known as (3-dimensional) austere submanifolds (in 5-dimensional space forms).

  7. Classification of a class of minimal semi-Einstein submanifolds with an integrable conullity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzoyan, V A

    2008-04-30

    A full local classification and a geometric description of normally flat minimal semi-Einstein submanifolds of Euclidean spaces having multiple principal curvature vectors and an integrable conullity distribution are presented. Bibliography: 30 titles.

  8. On the cylindricity of submanifolds containing a line in Minkowski space

    SciTech Connect

    Borisenko, A. A.

    2014-07-31

    We consider Finsler submanifolds in Minkowski spaces, and in particular, in Randers spaces. We give generalizations of the Toponogov and Cheeger-Gromoll theorems to the case of Randers spaces. Sufficient conditions are obtained for complete Finsler submanifolds in Minkowski spaces to be cylindrical. We also find conditions under which the convexity of a hypersurface in a Randers space implies that the flag curvature is positive. Bibliography: 17 titles. (paper)

  9. Improving the Horizontal Transport in the Lower Troposphere with Four Dimensional Data Assimilation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The physical processes involved in air quality modeling are governed by dynamically-generated meteorological model fields. This research focuses on reducing the uncertainty in the horizontal transport in the lower troposphere by improving the four dimensional data assimilation (F...

  10. Quantum secret sharing protocol based on four-dimensional three-particle entangled states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yi; Mo, Zhi Wen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we proposed a three-party quantum secret sharing (QSS) scheme using four-dimensional three-particle entangled states. In this QSS scheme, each agent can obtain a shadow of the secret key by performing single-particle measurements. Compared with the existing QSS protocol, this scheme has high efficiency and can resist the eavesdropping attack and entangle-measuring attack, which using three-particle entangled states are based on four-dimensional Hilbert space.

  11. Motor Imagery Classification based on Bilinear Sub-Manifold Learning of Symmetric Positive-Definite Matrices.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaofeng; Yu, Zhu Liang; Lu, Haiping; Gu, Zhenghui; Li, Yuanqing

    2016-07-07

    In motor imagery brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), the symmetric positive-definite (SPD) covariance matrices of electroencephalogram (EEG) signals carry important discriminative information. In this paper, we intend to classify motor imagery EEG signals by exploiting the fact that the space of SPD matrices endowed with Riemannian distance is a highdimensional Riemannian manifold. To alleviate the overfitting and heavy computation problems associated with conventional classification methods on high-dimensional manifold, we propose a framework for intrinsic sub-manifold learning from a high-dimensional Riemannian manifold. Considering a special case of SPD space, a simple yet efficient bilinear sub-manifold learning (BSML) algorithm is derived to learn the intrinsic submanifold by identifying a bilinear mapping that maximizes the preservation of the local geometry and global structure of the original manifold. Two BSML-based classification algorithms are further proposed to classify the data on a learned intrinsic sub-manifold. Experimental evaluation of the classification of EEG revealed that the BSML method extracts the intrinsic submanifold approximately 5 faster and with higher classification accuracy compared with competing algorithms. The BSML also exhibited strong robustness against a small training dataset, which often occurs in BCI studies.

  12. Questions on universal constants and four-dimensional symmetry from a broad viewpoint. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    It is demonstrated that there is a flexibility in clock synchronizations and that four-dimensional symmetry framework can be viewed broadly. The true universality of basic constants is discussed, considering a class of measurement processes based on the velocity = distance/time interval, which always yields some number when used by an observer. The four-dimensional symmetry framework based on common time for all observers is formulated, and related processes of measuring light speed are discussed. Invariant 'action functions' for physical laws in the new four-dimensional symmetry framework with the common time are established to discuss universal constants. Truly universal constants are demonstrated, and it is shown that physics in this new framework and in special relativity are equivalent as far as one-particle systems and the S-matrix in field theories are concerned.

  13. Study on eigenvalue space of hyperchaotic canonical four-dimensional Chua's circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guan-Lin; Chen, Xi-You

    2010-03-01

    The eigenvalue space of the canonical four-dimensional Chua's circuit which can realize every eigenvalue for four-dimensional system is studied in this paper. First, the analytical relations between the circuit parameters and the eigenvalues of the system are established, and therefore all the circuit parameters can be determined explicitly by any given set of eigenvalues. Then, the eigenvalue space of the circuit is investigated in two cases by the nonlinear elements used. According to the types of the eigenvalues, some novel hyperchaotic attractors are presented. Further, the dynamic behaviours of the circuit are studied by the bifurcation diagrams and the Lyapunov spectra of the eigenvalues.

  14. Conceptualising Quality of School Life from Pupils' Perspectives: A Four-Dimensional Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tangen, Reidun

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a four-dimensional, dynamic model of pupils' subjective quality of school life. The model is based on the author's and colleagues' studies of experiences and perspectives of pupils in regular schools who have been assessed as having "special educational needs". The conceptualisation of quality of school life proposed…

  15. Integrable and superintegrable Hamiltonian systems with four dimensional real Lie algebras as symmetry of the systems

    SciTech Connect

    Abedi-Fardad, J.; Rezaei-Aghdam, A.; Haghighatdoost, Gh.

    2014-05-15

    We construct integrable and superintegrable Hamiltonian systems using the realizations of four dimensional real Lie algebras as a symmetry of the system with the phase space R{sup 4} and R{sup 6}. Furthermore, we construct some integrable and superintegrable Hamiltonian systems for which the symmetry Lie group is also the phase space of the system.

  16. On metric geometry of conformal moduli spaces of four-dimensional superconformal theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asnin, Vadim

    2010-09-01

    Conformal moduli spaces of four-dimensional superconformal theories obtained by deformations of a superpotential are considered. These spaces possess a natural metric (a Zamolodchikov metric). This metric is shown to be Kahler. The proof is based on superconformal Ward identities.

  17. Adding Four- Dimensional Data Assimilation (a.k.a. grid nudging) to MPAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adding four-dimensional data assimilation (a.k.a. grid nudging) to MPAS.The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is investigating the use of MPAS as the meteorological driver for its next-generation air quality model. To function as such, MPAS needs to operate in a diagnostic mod...

  18. Chiral symmetry breaking in quenched massive strong-coupling four-dimensional QED

    SciTech Connect

    Hawes, F.T. ); Williams, A.G. )

    1995-03-15

    We present results from a study of subtractive renormalization of the fermion propagator Dyson-Schwinger equation (DSE) in massive strong-coupling quenched four-dimensional QED. The results are compared for three different fermion-photon proper vertex [ital Ansa]$[ital uml---tze]: bare [gamma][sup [mu

  19. Tensor Spherical and Pseudo-Spherical Harmonics in Four-Dimensional Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, K.

    1982-07-01

    Explicit expressions for tensor spherical harmonics on the 3 sphere in the four-dimensional Euclidean space are derived, and extended to derive those for pseudo-spherical harmonics. They are useful for the analyses of large-scale perturbations in the Friedmann universe models.

  20. Four-dimensional optical coherence tomography imaging of total liquid ventilated rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsten, Lars; Schnabel, Christian; Gaertner, Maria; Koch, Edmund

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be utilized for the spatially and temporally resolved visualization of alveolar tissue and its dynamics in rodent models, which allows the investigation of lung dynamics on the microscopic scale of single alveoli. The findings could provide experimental input data for numerical simulations of lung tissue mechanics and could support the development of protective ventilation strategies. Real four-dimensional OCT imaging permits the acquisition of several OCT stacks within one single ventilation cycle. Thus, the entire four-dimensional information is directly obtained. Compared to conventional virtual four-dimensional OCT imaging, where the image acquisition is extended over many ventilation cycles and is triggered on pressure levels, real four-dimensional OCT is less vulnerable against motion artifacts and non-reproducible movement of the lung tissue over subsequent ventilation cycles, which widely reduces image artifacts. However, OCT imaging of alveolar tissue is affected by refraction and total internal reflection at air-tissue interfaces. Thus, only the first alveolar layer beneath the pleura is visible. To circumvent this effect, total liquid ventilation can be carried out to match the refractive indices of lung tissue and the breathing medium, which improves the visibility of the alveolar structure, the image quality and the penetration depth and provides the real structure of the alveolar tissue. In this study, a combination of four-dimensional OCT imaging with total liquid ventilation allowed the visualization of the alveolar structure in rat lung tissue benefiting from the improved depth range beneath the pleura and from the high spatial and temporal resolution.

  1. Lightlike hypersurfaces along spacelike submanifolds in anti-de Sitter space

    SciTech Connect

    Izumiya, Shyuichi

    2015-11-15

    Anti-de Sitter space is the Lorentzian space form with negative curvature. In this paper, we consider lightlike hypersurfaces along spacelike submanifolds in anti-de Sitter space with general codimension. In particular, we investigate the singularities of lightlike hypersurfaces as an application of the theory of Legendrian singularities.

  2. Legendre submanifolds in contact manifolds as attractors and geometric nonequilibrium thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Shin-itiro

    2015-07-15

    It has been proposed that equilibrium thermodynamics is described on Legendre submanifolds in contact geometry. It is shown in this paper that Legendre submanifolds embedded in a contact manifold can be expressed as attractors in phase space for a certain class of contact Hamiltonian vector fields. By giving a physical interpretation that points outside the Legendre submanifold can represent nonequilibrium states of thermodynamic variables, in addition to that points of a given Legendre submanifold can represent equilibrium states of the variables, this class of contact Hamiltonian vector fields is physically interpreted as a class of relaxation processes, in which thermodynamic variables achieve an equilibrium state from a nonequilibrium state through a time evolution, a typical nonequilibrium phenomenon. Geometric properties of such vector fields on contact manifolds are characterized after introducing a metric tensor field on a contact manifold. It is also shown that a contact manifold and a strictly convex function induce a lower dimensional dually flat space used in information geometry where a geometrization of equilibrium statistical mechanics is constructed. Legendre duality on contact manifolds is explicitly stated throughout.

  3. Geometry of warped product pointwise semi-slant submanifolds of cosymplectic manifolds and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Akram; Ozel, Cenap

    It is known from [K. Yano and M. Kon, Structures on Manifolds (World Scientific, 1984)] that the integration of the Laplacian of a smooth function defined on a compact orientable Riemannian manifold without boundary vanishes with respect to the volume element. In this paper, we find out the some potential applications of this notion, and study the concept of warped product pointwise semi-slant submanifolds in cosymplectic manifolds as a generalization of contact CR-warped product submanifolds. Then, we prove the existence of warped product pointwise semi-slant submanifolds by their characterizations, and give an example supporting to this idea. Further, we obtain an interesting inequality in terms of the second fundamental form and the scalar curvature using Gauss equation and then, derive some applications of it with considering the equality case. We provide many trivial results for the warped product pointwise semi-slant submanifolds in cosymplectic space forms in various mathematical and physical terms such as Hessian, Hamiltonian and kinetic energy, and generalize the triviality results for contact CR-warped products as well.

  4. Three- and four-dimensional ultrasound in fetal echocardiography: an up-to-date overview.

    PubMed

    Adriaanse, B M E; van Vugt, J M G; Haak, M C

    2016-09-01

    Congenital heart diseases (CHD) are the most commonly overlooked lesions in prenatal screening programs. Real-time two-dimensional ultrasound (2DUS) is the conventionally used tool for fetal echocardiography. Although continuous improvements in the hardware and post-processing software have resulted in a good image quality even in late first trimester, 2DUS still has its limitations. Four-dimensional ultrasound with spatiotemporal image correlation (STIC) is an automated volume acquisition, recording a single three-dimensional (3D) volume throughout a complete cardiac cycle, which results in a four-dimensional (4D) volume. STIC has the potential to increase the detection rate of CHD. The aim of this study is to provide a practical overview of the possibilities and (dis)advantages of STIC. A review of literature and evaluation of the current status and clinical value of 3D/4D ultrasound in prenatal screening and diagnosis of congenital heart disease are presented.

  5. Four-Dimensional Screening Anti-Counterfeiting Pattern by Inkjet Printed Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jue; Zhang, Huacheng; Su, Bin; Li, Mingzhu; Yang, Qiang; Jiang, Lei; Song, Yanlin

    2016-10-06

    A four-dimensional screening anti-counterfeiting QR code composed of differently shaped photonic crystal (PC) dots has been fabricated that could display four images depending on different lighting conditions. By controlling the rheology of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), three kinds of PC dots could be sequentially integrated into one pattern using the layer-by-layer printing strategy. The information can be encoded and stored in shapes and read out by the difference in optical properties.

  6. Haunted Kaluza universe with four-dimensional Lorentzian flat, Kerr, and Taub NUT slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Rossen I.; Prodanov, Emil M.

    2005-03-01

    The duality between the original Kaluza's theory and Klein's subsequent modification is duality between slicing and threading decomposition of the five-dimensional spacetime. The field equations of the original Kaluza's theory lead to the interpretation of the four-dimensional Lorentzian Kerr and Taub-NUT solutions as resulting from static electric and magnetic charges and dipoles in the presence of ghost matter and constant dilaton, which models Newton's constant.

  7. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-03: Four-Dimensional Dose Distribution Measurement Using Plastic Scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, M; Kozuka, T; Oguchi, M; Nishio, T; Haga, A; Hanada, T; Kabuki, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop the detector for the four-dimensional dose distribution measurement. Methods: We made the prototype detector for four-dimensional dose distribution measurement using a cylindrical plastic scintillator (5 cm diameter) and a conical reflection grass. The plastic scintillator is used as a phantom. When the plastic scintillator is irradiated, the scintillation light was emitted according to absorbed dose distribution. The conical reflection grass was arranged to surround the plastic scintillator, which project to downstream the projection images of the scintillation light. Then, the projection image was reflected to 45 degree direction by flat reflection grass, and was recorded by camcorder. By reconstructing the three-dimensional dose distribution from the projection image recorded in each frame, we could obtain the four-dimensional dose distribution. First, we tested the characteristic according to the amount of emitted light. Then we compared of the light profile and the dose profile calculated with the radiotherapy treatment planning system. Results: The dose dependency of the amount of light showed linearity. The pixel detecting smaller amount of light had high sensitivity than the pixel detecting larger amount of light. However the difference of the sensitivity could be corrected from the amount of light detected in each pixel. Both of the depth light profile through the conical reflection grass and the depth dose profile showed the same attenuation in the region deeper than peak depth. In lateral direction, the difference of the both profiles was shown at outside field and penumbra region. We consider that the difference is occurred due to the scatter of the scintillation light in the plastic scintillator block. Conclusion: It was possible to obtain the amount of light corresponding to the absorbed dose distribution from the prototype detector. Four-dimensional dose distributions can be reconstructed with high accuracy by the correction of

  8. Exact four-dimensional dyonic black holes and Bertotti-Robinson spacetimes in string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, David A.; Strominger, Andrew

    1994-09-01

    Conformal field theories corresponding to two-dimensional electrically charged black holes and to two-dimensional anti-de Sitter space with a covariantly constant electric field are simply constructed as SL(2,openR)/openZ Wess-Zumino-Witten coset models. Four-dimensional spacetime solutions are obtained by tensoring these two-dimensional theories with SU(2)/Z(m) coset models. These describe a family of dyonic black holes and the Bertotti-Robinson universe.

  9. Supergravity backgrounds for four-dimensional maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxfield, Travis

    2017-02-01

    In this note, we describe supersymmetric backgrounds for the four-dimensional maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. As an extension of the method of Festuccia and Seiberg to sixteen supercharges in four dimensions, we utilize the coupling of the gauge theory to maximally extended conformal supergravity. Included among the fields of the conformal supergravity multiplet is the complexified coupling parameter of the gauge theory; therefore, backgrounds with spacetime varying coupling — such as appear in F-theory and Janus configurations — are naturally included in this formalism. We demonstrate this with a few examples from past literature.

  10. An accessible four-dimensional treatment of Maxwell's equations in terms of differential forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sá, Lucas

    2017-03-01

    Maxwell’s equations are derived in terms of differential forms in the four-dimensional Minkowski representation, starting from the three-dimensional vector calculus differential version of these equations. Introducing all the mathematical and physical concepts needed (including the tool of differential forms), using only knowledge of elementary vector calculus and the local vector version of Maxwell’s equations, the equations are reduced to a simple and elegant set of two equations for a unified quantity, the electromagnetic field. The treatment should be accessible for students taking a first course on electromagnetism.

  11. The compatible balancing approach to initialization, and four-dimensional data assimilation. [in meteorology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghil, M.

    1980-01-01

    A unified theoretical approach to both the four-dimensional assimilation of asynoptic data and the initialization problem is attempted. This approach relies on the derivation of certain relationships between geopotential tendencies and tendencies of the horizontal velocity field in primitive-equation models of atmospheric flow. The approach is worked out and analyzed in detail for some simple barotropic models. Certain independent results of numerical experiments for the time-continuous assimilation of real asynoptic meteorological data into a complex, baroclinic weather prediction model are discussed in the context of the present approach. Tentative inferences are drawn for practical assimilation procedures.

  12. Heat balance statistics derived from four-dimensional assimilations with a global circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, S. D.; Herman, G. F.

    1981-01-01

    The reported investigation was conducted to develop a reliable procedure for obtaining the diabatic and vertical terms required for atmospheric heat balance studies. The method developed employs a four-dimensional assimilation mode in connection with the general circulation model of NASA's Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences. The initial analysis was conducted with data obtained in connection with the 1976 Data Systems Test. On the basis of the results of the investigation, it appears possible to use the model's observationally constrained diagnostics to provide estimates of the global distribution of virtually all of the quantities which are needed to compute the atmosphere's heat and energy balance.

  13. A four-dimensional model with the fermionic determinant exactly evaluated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignaco, J. A.; Rego Monteiro, M. A.

    1986-07-01

    A method is presented to compute the fermion determinant of some class of field theories. By this method the following results of the fermion determinant in two dimensions are easily recovered: (i) Schwinger model without reference to a particular gauge. (ii) QCD in the light-cone gauge. (iii) Gauge invariant result of QCD. The method is finally applied to give an analytical solution of the fermion determinant of a four-dimensional, non-abelian, Dirac-like theory with massless fermions interacting with an external vector field through a pseudo-vectorial coupling. Fellow of the Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Cientifico e Tecnologico (CNPq), Brazil.

  14. Four-dimensional dose evaluation using deformable image registration in radiotherapy for liver cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hoon Jung, Sang; Min Yoon, Sang; Ho Park, Sung; Cho, Byungchul; Won Park, Jae; Jung, Jinhong; Park, Jin-hong; Hoon Kim, Jong; Do Ahn, Seung

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: In order to evaluate the dosimetric impact of respiratory motion on the dose delivered to the target volume and critical organs during free-breathing radiotherapy, a four-dimensional dose was evaluated using deformable image registration (DIR). Methods: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images were acquired for 11 patients who were treated for liver cancer. Internal target volume-based treatment planning and dose calculation (3D dose) were performed using the end-exhalation phase images. The four-dimensional dose (4D dose) was calculated based on DIR of all phase images from 4DCT to the planned image. Dosimetric parameters from the 4D dose, were calculated and compared with those from the 3D dose. Results: There was no significant change of the dosimetric parameters for gross tumor volume (p > 0.05). The increase D{sub mean} and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) for liver were by 3.1%{+-} 3.3% (p= 0.003) and 2.8%{+-} 3.3% (p= 0.008), respectively, and for duodenum, they were decreased by 15.7%{+-} 11.2% (p= 0.003) and 15.1%{+-} 11.0% (p= 0.003), respectively. The D{sub max} and gEUD for stomach was decreased by 5.3%{+-} 5.8% (p= 0.003) and 9.7%{+-} 8.7% (p= 0.003), respectively. The D{sub max} and gEUD for right kidney was decreased by 11.2%{+-} 16.2% (p= 0.003) and 14.9%{+-} 16.8% (p= 0.005), respectively. For left kidney, D{sub max} and gEUD were decreased by 11.4%{+-} 11.0% (p= 0.003) and 12.8%{+-} 12.1% (p= 0.005), respectively. The NTCP values for duodenum and stomach were decreased by 8.4%{+-} 5.8% (p= 0.003) and 17.2%{+-} 13.7% (p= 0.003), respectively. Conclusions: The four-dimensional dose with a more realistic dose calculation accounting for respiratory motion revealed no significant difference in target coverage and potentially significant change in the physical and biological dosimetric parameters in normal organs during free-breathing treatment.

  15. Four-dimensional (4D) tracking of high-temperature microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhehui; Liu, Q.; Waganaar, W.; Fontanese, J.; James, D.; Munsat, T.

    2016-11-01

    High-speed tracking of hot and molten microparticles in motion provides rich information about burning plasmas in magnetic fusion. An exploding-wire apparatus is used to produce moving high-temperature metallic microparticles and to develop four-dimensional (4D) or time-resolved 3D particle tracking techniques. The pinhole camera model and algorithms developed for computer vision are used for scene calibration and 4D reconstructions. 3D positions and velocities are then derived for different microparticles. Velocity resolution approaches 0.1 m/s by using the local constant velocity approximation.

  16. Four-dimensional (4D) tracking of high-temperature microparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Liu, Qiuguang; Waganaar, Bill; Fontanese, John; James, David; Munsat, Tobin

    2016-07-08

    High-speed tracking of hot and molten microparticles in motion provides rich information about burning plasmas in magnetic fusion. An exploding-wire apparatus is used to produce moving high-temperature metallic microparticles and to develop four-dimensional (4D) or time-resolved 3D particle tracking techniques. The pinhole camera model and algorithms developed for computer vision are used for scene calibration and 4D reconstructions. 3D positions and velocities are then derived for different microparticles. As a result, velocity resolution approaches 0.1 m/s by using the local constant velocity approximation.

  17. Gravitational matter-antimatter asymmetry and four-dimensional Yang-Mills gauge symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    A formulation of gravity based on the maximum four-dimensional Yang-Mills gauge symmetry is studied. The theory predicts that the gravitational force inside matter (fermions) is different from that inside antimatter. This difference could lead to the cosmic separation of matter and antimatter in the evolution of the universe. Moreover, a new gravitational long-range spin-force between two fermions is predicted, in addition to the usual Newtonian force. The geometrical foundation of such a gravitational theory is the Riemann-Cartan geometry, in which there is a torsion. The results of the theory for weak fields are consistent with previous experiments.

  18. The violation of the no-hair conjecture in four-dimensional ungauged supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, Pablo; Shahbazi, C. S.

    2014-07-01

    By choosing a particular, string-theory-inspired, special Kähler manifold, we are able to find an N=2 four-dimensional ungauged supergravity model that contains supersymmetric black hole solutions that violate the folk uniqueness theorems that are expected to hold in ungauged supergravity. The black hole solutions are regular in the sense that they have a positive mass and a unique physical singularity hidden by an event horizon. In contradistinction to most examples already known in the literature, we find our solutions in a theory without scalar potential, gaugings, or higher-order curvature terms.

  19. A novel four-dimensional analytical approach for analysis of complex samples.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Susanne; Jakob, Cornelia; Hippler, Jörg; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2016-05-01

    A two-dimensional LC (2D-LC) method, based on the work of Erni and Frei in 1978, was developed and coupled to an ion mobility-high-resolution mass spectrometer (IM-MS), which enabled the separation of complex samples in four dimensions (2D-LC, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), and mass spectrometry (MS)). This approach works as a continuous multiheart-cutting LC system, using a long modulation time of 4 min, which allows the complete transfer of most of the first - dimension peaks to the second - dimension column without fractionation, in comparison to comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography. Hence, each compound delivers only one peak in the second dimension, which simplifies the data handling even when ion mobility spectrometry as a third and mass spectrometry as a fourth dimension are introduced. The analysis of a plant extract from Ginkgo biloba shows the separation power of this four-dimensional separation method with a calculated total peak capacity of more than 8700. Furthermore, the advantage of ion mobility for characterizing unknown compounds by their collision cross section (CCS) and accurate mass in a non-target approach is shown for different matrices like plant extracts and coffee. Graphical abstract Principle of the four-dimensional separation.

  20. Four-dimensional modulation and coding: An alternate to frequency-reuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S. G.; Sleeper, H. A.

    1983-01-01

    Four dimensional modulation as a means of improving communication efficiency on the band-limited Gaussian channel, with the four dimensions of signal space constituted by phase orthogonal carriers (cos omega sub c t and sin omega sub c t) simultaneously on space orthogonal electromagnetic waves are discussed. "Frequency reuse' techniques use such polarization orthogonality to reuse the same frequency slot, but the modulation is not treated as four dimensional, rather a product of two-d modulations, e.g., QPSK. It is well known that, higher dimensionality signalling affords possible improvements in the power bandwidth sense. Four-D modulations based upon subsets of lattice-packings in four-D, which afford simplification of encoding and decoding are described. Sets of up to 1024 signals are constructed in four-D, providing a (Nyquist) spectral efficiency of up to 10 bps/Hz. Energy gains over the reuse technique are in the one to three dB range t equal bandwidth.

  1. Four dimensional chaos and intermittency in a mesoscopic model of the electroencephalogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dafilis, Mathew P.; Frascoli, Federico; Cadusch, Peter J.; Liley, David T. J.

    2013-06-01

    The occurrence of so-called four dimensional chaos in dynamical systems represented by coupled, nonlinear, ordinary differential equations is rarely reported in the literature. In this paper, we present evidence that Liley's mesoscopic theory of the electroencephalogram (EEG), which has been used to describe brain activity in a variety of clinically relevant contexts, possesses a chaotic attractor with a Kaplan-Yorke dimension significantly larger than three. This accounts for simple, high order chaos for a physiologically admissible parameter set. Whilst the Lyapunov spectrum of the attractor has only one positive exponent, the contracting dimensions are such that the integer part of the Kaplan-Yorke dimension is three, thus giving rise to four dimensional chaos. A one-parameter bifurcation analysis with respect to the parameter corresponding to extracortical input is conducted, with results indicating that the origin of chaos is due to an inverse period doubling cascade. Hence, in the vicinity of the high order, strange attractor, the model is shown to display intermittent behavior, with random alternations between oscillatory and chaotic regimes. This phenomenon represents a possible dynamical justification of some of the typical features of clinically established EEG traces, which can arise in the case of burst suppression in anesthesia and epileptic encephalopathies in early infancy.

  2. Four dimensional chaos and intermittency in a mesoscopic model of the electroencephalogram.

    PubMed

    Dafilis, Mathew P; Frascoli, Federico; Cadusch, Peter J; Liley, David T J

    2013-06-01

    The occurrence of so-called four dimensional chaos in dynamical systems represented by coupled, nonlinear, ordinary differential equations is rarely reported in the literature. In this paper, we present evidence that Liley's mesoscopic theory of the electroencephalogram (EEG), which has been used to describe brain activity in a variety of clinically relevant contexts, possesses a chaotic attractor with a Kaplan-Yorke dimension significantly larger than three. This accounts for simple, high order chaos for a physiologically admissible parameter set. Whilst the Lyapunov spectrum of the attractor has only one positive exponent, the contracting dimensions are such that the integer part of the Kaplan-Yorke dimension is three, thus giving rise to four dimensional chaos. A one-parameter bifurcation analysis with respect to the parameter corresponding to extracortical input is conducted, with results indicating that the origin of chaos is due to an inverse period doubling cascade. Hence, in the vicinity of the high order, strange attractor, the model is shown to display intermittent behavior, with random alternations between oscillatory and chaotic regimes. This phenomenon represents a possible dynamical justification of some of the typical features of clinically established EEG traces, which can arise in the case of burst suppression in anesthesia and epileptic encephalopathies in early infancy.

  3. Current status of fetal neurodevelopmental assessment: Four-dimensional ultrasound study.

    PubMed

    Hata, Toshiyuki

    2016-10-01

    With the latest advent of four-dimensional (4-D) ultrasound, fetal neurobehavioral or neurodevelopmental assessment can be easily and readily performed. Using this technique, typical fetal movements and behavioral patterns have become apparent in all three trimesters of pregnancy. In twin pregnancy, 4-D ultrasound facilitates the precise evaluation of inter-twin contact and intra-pair stimulation. New fetal neurobehavioral assessment tests, such as Kurjak's Antenatal Neurodevelopmental Test and the Fetal Observable Movement System, may reflect the normal and abnormal neurological development of the fetus, and will facilitate more precise assessments of fetal neurobehavior or neurodevelopment, and fetal brain and central nervous system functions. In this review article, I also discuss interesting topics regarding maternal and fetal stress, fetal pain, and fetal consciousness. Four-dimensional ultrasound has opened the door to new scientific fields, such as 'fetal neurology' and 'fetal psychology,' and fetal neurobehavioral science is at the dawn of a new era. Knowledge on fetal neurobehavior and neurodevelopment will be advanced through fetal behavioral research using this technique.

  4. Classification of four-dimensional real Lie bialgebras of symplectic type and their Poisson-Lie groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi-Fardad, J.; Rezaei-Aghdam, A.; Haghighatdoost, Gh.

    2017-01-01

    We classify all four-dimensional real Lie bialgebras of symplectic type and obtain the classical r-matrices for these Lie bialgebras and Poisson structures on all the associated four-dimensional Poisson-Lie groups. We obtain some new integrable models where a Poisson-Lie group plays the role of the phase space and its dual Lie group plays the role of the symmetry group of the system.

  5. A reduced-order optimization strategy for four dimensional variational data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoteit, I.; Khol, A.; Stammer, D.; Heimbach, P.

    2003-04-01

    Four dimensional variational data assimilation methods remain expensive for operational oceanography. Every optimization step requires actually one forward and one backward integration of the numerical model, and the huge dimension of the system control vector makes the convergence of the optimization procedure very slow. In this study, an order reduction is applied to the control vector in order to speed up the convergence of the optimization. The reduction is based on an Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOF) analysis. Some important features however can not be represented in the reduced space. We therefore propose to start the optimization in the reduced space and than continue in the full control space. The effectiveness of this strategy is demonstrated using a simple configuration of the MIT model over the North Atlantic ocean.

  6. Portraying entanglement between molecular qubits with four-dimensional inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garlatti, E.; Guidi, T.; Ansbro, S.; Santini, P.; Amoretti, G.; Ollivier, J.; Mutka, H.; Timco, G.; Vitorica-Yrezabal, I. J.; Whitehead, G. F. S.; Winpenny, R. E. P.; Carretta, S.

    2017-02-01

    Entanglement is a crucial resource for quantum information processing and its detection and quantification is of paramount importance in many areas of current research. Weakly coupled molecular nanomagnets provide an ideal test bed for investigating entanglement between complex spin systems. However, entanglement in these systems has only been experimentally demonstrated rather indirectly by macroscopic techniques or by fitting trial model Hamiltonians to experimental data. Here we show that four-dimensional inelastic neutron scattering enables us to portray entanglement in weakly coupled molecular qubits and to quantify it. We exploit a prototype (Cr7Ni)2 supramolecular dimer as a benchmark to demonstrate the potential of this approach, which allows one to extract the concurrence in eigenstates of a dimer of molecular qubits without diagonalizing its full Hamiltonian.

  7. Nanomechanics and intermolecular forces of amyloid revealed by four-dimensional electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Anthony W P; Vanacore, Giovanni M; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2015-03-17

    The amyloid state of polypeptides is a stable, highly organized structural form consisting of laterally associated β-sheet protofilaments that may be adopted as an alternative to the functional, native state. Identifying the balance of forces stabilizing amyloid is fundamental to understanding the wide accessibility of this state to peptides and proteins with unrelated primary sequences, various chain lengths, and widely differing native structures. Here, we use four-dimensional electron microscopy to demonstrate that the forces acting to stabilize amyloid at the atomic level are highly anisotropic, that an optimized interbackbone hydrogen-bonding network within β-sheets confers 20 times more rigidity on the structure than sequence-specific sidechain interactions between sheets, and that electrostatic attraction of protofilaments is only slightly stronger than these weak amphiphilic interactions. The potential biological relevance of the deposition of such a highly anisotropic biomaterial in vivo is discussed.

  8. A four-dimensional primitive equation model for coupled coastal-deep ocean studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haidvogel, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    A prototype four dimensional continental shelf/deep ocean model is described. In its present form, the model incorporates the effects of finite amplitude topography, advective nonlinearities, and variable stratification and rotation. The model can be forced either directly by imposed atmospheric windstress and surface pressure distributions, and energetic mean currents imposed by the exterior oceanic circulation; or indirectly by initial distributions of shoreward propagation mesoscale waves and eddies. To avoid concerns over the appropriate specification of 'open' boundary conditions on the cross-shelf and seaward model boundaries, a periodic channel geometry (oriented along-coast) is used. The model employs a traditional finite difference expansion in the cross-shelf direction, and a Fourier (periodic) representation in the long-shelf coordinate.

  9. Weak constraint four-dimensional variational data assimilation in a model of the California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, William J.; Smith, Polly J.; Milliff, Ralph F.; Fiechter, Jerome; Wikle, Christopher K.; Edwards, Christopher A.; Moore, Andrew M.

    2016-12-01

    A new approach is explored for computing estimates of the error covariance associated with the intrinsic errors of a numerical forecast model in regions characterized by upwelling and downwelling. The approach used is based on a combination of strong constraint data assimilation, twin model experiments, linear inverse modeling, and Bayesian hierarchical modeling. The resulting model error covariance estimates Q are applied to a model of the California Current System using weak constraint four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation to compute estimates of the ocean circulation. The results of this study show that the estimates of Q derived following our approach lead to demonstrable improvements in the model circulation estimates and isolate regions where model errors are likely to be important and that have been independently identified in the same model in previously published work.

  10. A new family of four-dimensional symplectic and integrable mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capel, H. W.; Sahadevan, R.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the generalisations of the Quispel, Roberts and Thompson (QRT) family of mappings in the plane leaving a rational quadratic expression invariant to the case of four variables. We assume invariance of the rational expression under a cyclic permutation of variables and we impose a symplectic structure with Poisson brackets of the Weyl type. All mappings satisfying these conditions are shown to be integrable either as four-dimensional mappings with two explicit integrals which are in involution with respect to the symplectic structure and which can also be inferred from the periodic reductions of the double-discrete versions of the modified Korteweg-deVries ( ΔΔMKdV) and sine-Gordon ( ΔΔsG) equations or by reduction to two-dimensional mappings with one integral of the symmetric QRT family.

  11. New classes of bi-axially symmetric solutions to four-dimensional Vasiliev higher spin gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundell, Per; Yin, Yihao

    2017-01-01

    We present new infinite-dimensional spaces of bi-axially symmetric asymptotically anti-de Sitter solutions to four-dimensional Vasiliev higher spin gravity, obtained by modifications of the Ansatz used in arXiv:1107.1217, which gave rise to a Type-D solution space. The current Ansatz is based on internal semigroup algebras (without identity) generated by exponentials formed out of the bi-axial symmetry generators. After having switched on the vacuum gauge function, the resulting generalized Weyl tensor is given by a sum of generalized Petrov type-D tensors that are Kerr-like or 2-brane-like in the asymptotic AdS4 region, and the twistor space connection is smooth in twistor space over finite regions of spacetime. We provide evidence for that the linearized twistor space connection can be brought to Vasiliev gauge.

  12. GeoViS-Relativistic ray tracing in four-dimensional spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The optical appearance of objects moving close to the speed of light or orbiting a black hole is of interest for educational purposes as well as for scientific modeling in special and general relativity. The standard approach to visualize such settings is ray tracing in four-dimensional spacetimes where the direction of the physical propagation of light is reversed. GeoViS implements this ray tracing principle making use of the Motion4D library that handles the spacetime metrics, the integration of geodesics, and the description of objects defined with respect to local reference frames. In combination with the GeodesicViewer, GeoViS might be a valuable tool for graduate students to get a deeper understanding in the visual effects of special and general relativity.

  13. Live four-dimensional optical coherence tomography reveals embryonic cardiac phenotype in mouse mutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Andrew L., III; Wang, Shang; Larin, Kirill V.; Overbeek, Paul A.; Larina, Irina V.

    2015-09-01

    Efficient phenotyping of developmental defects in model organisms is critical for understanding the genetic specification of normal development and congenital abnormalities in humans. We previously reported that optical coherence tomography (OCT) combined with live embryo culture is a valuable tool for mouse embryo imaging and four-dimensional (4-D) cardiodynamic analysis; however, its capability for analysis of mouse mutants with cardiac phenotypes has not been previously explored. Here, we report 4-D (three-dimensional+time) OCT imaging and analysis of the embryonic heart in a Wdr19 mouse mutant, revealing a heart looping defect. Quantitative analysis of cardiac looping revealed a statistically significant difference between mutant and control embryos. Our results indicate that live 4-D OCT imaging provides a powerful phenotyping approach to characterize embryonic cardiac function in mouse models.

  14. Portraying entanglement between molecular qubits with four-dimensional inelastic neutron scattering

    PubMed Central

    Garlatti, E.; Guidi, T.; Ansbro, S.; Santini, P.; Amoretti, G.; Ollivier, J.; Mutka, H.; Timco, G.; Vitorica-Yrezabal, I. J.; Whitehead, G. F. S.; Winpenny, R. E. P.; Carretta, S.

    2017-01-01

    Entanglement is a crucial resource for quantum information processing and its detection and quantification is of paramount importance in many areas of current research. Weakly coupled molecular nanomagnets provide an ideal test bed for investigating entanglement between complex spin systems. However, entanglement in these systems has only been experimentally demonstrated rather indirectly by macroscopic techniques or by fitting trial model Hamiltonians to experimental data. Here we show that four-dimensional inelastic neutron scattering enables us to portray entanglement in weakly coupled molecular qubits and to quantify it. We exploit a prototype (Cr7Ni)2 supramolecular dimer as a benchmark to demonstrate the potential of this approach, which allows one to extract the concurrence in eigenstates of a dimer of molecular qubits without diagonalizing its full Hamiltonian. PMID:28216631

  15. Energy conditions for the four dimensional cosmological model with nonminimal derivative coupling of scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suroso, Agus; Zen, Freddy P.; Hikmawan, Getbogi

    2015-09-01

    The energy conditions is a set of linear equations of energy density ρ and pressure p which ensure the the field(s) that we used in our model is physically "reasonable". We study the energy conditions for four dimensional nonminimal derivative coupling of scalar field and curvature tensor. Considering the scalar field as a perfect fluid, we find some constraint for the coupling constant ξ in order the energy conditions is satisfied or violated. We find that strong energy conditions (SEC) is violated if -1/9H2 ≤ ξ < 1/18H2. For de Sitter solution a ∝ eH0t for some constant H0, we find that while null, weak, and dominant energy conditions violated when ξ <-[12 H02(2 +9 H02) ] -1 . The accelerating universe is exist for the power law solution (a ∝ tp for constant p) if ξ < 0.

  16. Structures of larger proteins in solution: Three- and four-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M.

    1994-12-01

    Complete understanding of a protein`s function and mechanism of action can only be achieved with a knowledge of its three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution. At present, there are two methods available for determining such structures. The first method, which has been established for many years, is x-ray diffraction of protein single crystals. The second method has blossomed only in the last 5 years and is based on the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to proteins in solution. This review paper describes three- and four-dimensional NMR methods applied to protein structure determination and was adapted from Clore and Gronenborn. The review focuses on the underlying principals and practice of multidimensional NMR and the structural information obtained.

  17. Four-dimensional tracking of spatially incoherent illuminated samples using self-interference digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Tianlong; Wan, Yuhong; Wu, Fan; Wang, Dayong

    2015-11-01

    We present a new method for the four-dimensional tracking of a spatially incoherent illuminated object. Self-interference digital holography is utilized for recording the hologram of the spatially incoherent illuminated object. Three-dimensional spatial coordinates encoded in the hologram are extracted by holographic reconstruction procedure and tracking algorithms, while the time information is reserved by the single-shot configuration. Applications of the holographic tracking methods are expanded to the incoherent imaging areas. Speckles and potential damage to the samples of the coherent illuminated tracking methods are overcome. Results on the quantitative tracking of three-dimensional spatial position over time are reported. In practical, living zebra fish larva is used to demonstrate one of the applications of the method.

  18. On-board four-dimensional digital tomosynthesis: first experimental results.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Jacqueline; Godfrey, Devon; Wang, Zhiheng; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to propose four-dimensional digital tomosynthesis (4D-DTS) for on-board analysis of motion information in three dimensions. Images of a dynamic motion phantom were reconstructed using acquisition scan angles ranging from 20 degrees (DTS) to full 360 degrees cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Projection images were acquired using an on-board imager mounted on a clinical linear accelerator. Three-dimensional (3D) images of the moving target were reconstructed for various scan angles. 3D respiratory correlated phase images were also reconstructed. For phase-based image reconstructions, the trajectory of a radiopaque marker was tracked in projection space and used to retrospectively assign respiratory phases to projections. The projections were then sorted according phase and used to reconstruct motion correlated images. By using two sets of projections centered about anterior-posterior and lateral axes, this study demonstrates how phase resolved coronal and sagittal DTS images can be used to obtain 3D motion information. Motion artifacts in 4D-DTS phase images are compared with those present in four-dimensional CT (4DCT) images. Due to the nature of data acquisition for the two modalities, superior-inferior motion artifacts are suppressed to a greater extent in 4D-DTS images compared with 4DCT. Theoretical derivations and experimental results are presented to demonstrate how optimal selection of image acquisition parameters including the frequency of projection acquisition and the phase window depend on the respiratory period. Two methods for acquiring projections are discussed. Preliminary results indicate that 4D-DTS can be used to acquire valuable kinetic information of internal anatomy just prior to radiation treatment.

  19. Breathing-Synchronized Delivery: A Potential Four-Dimensional Tomotherapy Treatment Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Tiezhi . E-mail: tiezhi.zhang@beaumont.edu; Lu Weiguo; Olivera, Gustavo H.; Keller, Harry; Jeraj, Robert; Manon, Rafael; Mehta, Minesh; Mackie, Thomas R.; Paliwal, Bhudatt

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To introduce a four-dimensional (4D) tomotherapy treatment technique with improved motion control and patient tolerance. Methods and Materials: Computed tomographic images at 10 breathing phases were acquired for treatment planning. The full exhalation phase was chosen as the planning phase, and the CT images at this phase were used as treatment-planning images. Region of interest delineation was the same as in traditional treatment planning, except that no breathing motion margin was used in clinical target volume-planning target volume expansion. The correlation between delivery and breathing phases was set assuming a constant gantry speed and a fixed breathing period. Deformable image registration yielded the deformation fields at each phase relative to the planning phase. With the delivery/breathing phase correlation and voxel displacements at each breathing phase, a 4D tomotherapy plan was obtained by incorporating the motion into inverse treatment plan optimization. A combined laser/spirometer breathing tracking system has been developed to monitor patient breathing. This system is able to produce stable and reproducible breathing signals representing tidal volume. Results: We compared the 4D tomotherapy treatment planning method with conventional tomotherapy on a static target. The results showed that 4D tomotherapy can achieve dose distributions on a moving target similar to those obtained with conventional delivery on a stationary target. Regular breathing motion is fully compensated by motion-incorporated breathing-synchronized delivery planning. Four-dimensional tomotherapy also has close to 100% duty cycle and does not prolong treatment time. Conclusion: Breathing-synchronized delivery is a feasible 4D tomotherapy treatment technique with improved motion control and patient tolerance.

  20. Preventing Data Ambiguity in Infectious Diseases with Four-Dimensional and Personalized Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Iandiorio, Michelle J.; Fair, Jeanne M.; Chatzipanagiotou, Stylianos; Ioannidis, Anastasios; Trikka-Graphakos, Eleftheria; Charalampaki, Nikoletta; Sereti, Christina; Tegos, George P.; Hoogesteijn, Almira L.; Rivas, Ariel L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Diagnostic errors can occur, in infectious diseases, when anti-microbial immune responses involve several temporal scales. When responses span from nanosecond to week and larger temporal scales, any pre-selected temporal scale is likely to miss some (faster or slower) responses. Hoping to prevent diagnostic errors, a pilot study was conducted to evaluate a four-dimensional (4D) method that captures the complexity and dynamics of infectious diseases. Methods Leukocyte-microbial-temporal data were explored in canine and human (bacterial and/or viral) infections, with: (i) a non-structured approach, which measures leukocytes or microbes in isolation; and (ii) a structured method that assesses numerous combinations of interacting variables. Four alternatives of the structured method were tested: (i) a noise-reduction oriented version, which generates a single (one data point-wide) line of observations; (ii) a version that measures complex, three-dimensional (3D) data interactions; (iii) a non-numerical version that displays temporal data directionality (arrows that connect pairs of consecutive observations); and (iv) a full 4D (single line-, complexity-, directionality-based) version. Results In all studies, the non-structured approach revealed non-interpretable (ambiguous) data: observations numerically similar expressed different biological conditions, such as recovery and lack of recovery from infections. Ambiguity was also found when the data were structured as single lines. In contrast, two or more data subsets were distinguished and ambiguity was avoided when the data were structured as complex, 3D, single lines and, in addition, temporal data directionality was determined. The 4D method detected, even within one day, changes in immune profiles that occurred after antibiotics were prescribed. Conclusions Infectious disease data may be ambiguous. Four-dimensional methods may prevent ambiguity, providing earlier, in vivo, dynamic, complex, and

  1. Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT): A review of the current status and applications.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Yune; Mel, Alexandra Olimpia; Wheeler, Greg; Troupis, John M

    2015-10-01

    The applications of conventional computed tomography (CT) have been widely researched and implemented in clinical practice. A recent technological innovation in the field of CT is the emergence of four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT), where a three-dimensional computed tomography volume containing a moving structure is imaged over a period of time, creating a dynamic volume data set. 4DCT has previously been mainly utilised in the setting of radiation therapy planning, but with the development of wide field of view CT, 4DCT has opened major avenues in the diagnostic arena. The aim of this study is to provide a comprehensive narrative review of the literature regarding the current clinical applications of 4DCT. The applications reviewed include both routine diagnostic usage as well as an appraisal of the current research literature. A systematic review of the studies related to 4DCT was conducted. The Medline database was searched using the MeSH subject heading 'Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography'. After excluding non-human and non-English papers, 2598 articles were found. Further exclusion criteria were applied, including date range (since wide field of view CT was introduced in 2007), and exclusion of technical/engineering/physics papers. Further filtration of papers included identification of Review papers. This process yielded 67 papers. Of these, exclusion of papers not specifically discussing 4DCT (cone beam, 4D models) yielded 38 papers. As part of the review, the technique for 4DCT is described, with perspectives as to how it has evolved and its benefits in different clinical indications.

  2. Four-Dimensional Positron Emission Tomography: Implications for Dose Painting of High-Uptake Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Killoran, Joseph H.; Chen, Aileen B.; Berbeco, Ross I.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the behavior of tumor subvolumes of high [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake as seen on clinical four-dimensional (4D) FDG-positron emission tomography (PET) scans. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional FDG-PET/computed tomography scans from 13 patients taken before radiotherapy were available. The analysis was focused on regions of high uptake that are potential dose-painting targets. A total of 17 lesions (primary tumors and lymph nodes) were analyzed. On each one of the five phases of the 4D scan a classification algorithm was applied to obtain the region of highest uptake and segment the tumor volume. We looked at the behavior of both the high-uptake subvolume, called 'Boost,' and the segmented tumor volume, called 'Target.' We measured several quantities that characterize the Target and Boost volumes and quantified correlations between them. Results: The behavior of the Target could not always predict the behavior of the Boost. The shape deformation of the Boost regions was on average 133% higher than that of the Target. The gross to internal target volume expansion was on average 27.4% for the Target and 64% for the Boost, a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05). Finally, the inhale-to-exhale phase (20%) had the highest shape deformation for the Boost regions. Conclusions: A complex relationship between the measured quantities for the Boost and Target volumes is revealed. The results suggest that in cases in which advanced therapy techniques such as dose painting are being used, a close examination of the 4D PET scan should be performed.

  3. Aspects of compactifications and black holes in four-dimensional supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looijestijn, H. T.

    2010-09-01

    In the 20th century, theoretical physics has seen the development of General Relativity and the Standard Model of elementary particles. These theories describe, with great precision, gravity and all known matter, respectively. However, it is not possible to unite them into one, single theory. We need such a theory of quantum gravitation to study phenomena where both theories are important, such as black holes and the Big Bang. One of the leading candidates for a theory of quantum gravitation is string theory. The low-energy limit of string theory is called supergravity. This thesis studies some of the open questions in string theory, in the setting of four-dimensional supergravity. We first classify the fully supersymmetric solutions of gauged N=2 supergravity with arbitrary gaugings in the vector- and hypermultiplet sectors. We present several examples of such solutions and connect some of them to vacuum solutions of flux compactifications in string theory. The next chapter searches for black hole solutions, where the scalars in the theory are gauged. Next, we show how one can embed known black hole solutions trough spontaneous symmetry breaking. When searching for new solutions, we find solutions only in cases when the metric contains ripples and the vector multiplet scalars become ghost-like. We then show how one can obtain four-dimensional supergravities by a Scherk-Schwarz reduction of eleven-dimensional supergravity, and study its equivalence with a compactification on a seven-dimensional space. Finally, we study general aspects of NS5-brane instantons in relation to the stabilization of the volume modulus in Calabi-Yau compactifications of type II strings with fluxes, and their orientifold versions.

  4. Four-dimensional multislice computed tomography for determination of respiratory lung tumor motion in conformal radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Leter, Edward M. . E-mail: emleter@hotmail.com; Cademartiri, Filippo; Levendag, Peter C.; Flohr, Thomas; Stam, Henk; Nowak, Peter J.

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: We used four-dimensional multislice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) to determine respiratory lung-tumor motion and compared this strategy to common clinical practice in conformal radiotherapy treatment-planning imaging. Methods and Materials: The entire lung volume of 10 consecutive patients with 14 lung metastases were scanned by a 16-slice MSCT. During the scans, patients were instructed to breathe through a spirometer that was connected to a laptop computer. For each patient, 10 stacks of 1.5-mm slices, equally distributed throughout the respiratory cycle, were reconstructed from the acquired MSCT data. The lung tumors were manually contoured in each data set. For each patient, the tumor-volume contours of all data sets were copied to 1 data set, which allowed determination of the volume that encompassed all 10 lung-tumor positions (i.e., the tumor-traversed volume [TTV]) during the respiratory cycle. The TTV was compared with the 10 tumor volumes contoured for each patient, to which an empiric respiratory-motion margin was added. The latter target volumes were designated internal-motion included tumor volume (IMITV). Results: The TTV measurements were significantly smaller than the reference IMITV measurements (5.2 {+-} 10.2 cm{sup 3} and 10.1 {+-} 13.7 cm{sup 3}, respectively). All 10 IMITVs for 2 of the 4 tumors in 1 subject completely encompassed the TTV. All 10 IMITVs for 3 tumors in 2 patients did not show overlap with up to 35% of the corresponding TTV. The 10 IMITVs for the remaining tumors either completely encompassed the corresponding TTV or did not show overlap with up to 26% of the corresponding TTV. Conclusions: We found that individualized determination of respiratory lung-tumor motion by four-dimensional respiratory-gated MSCT represents a better and simple strategy to incorporate periodic physiologic motion compared with a generalized approach. The former strategy can, therefore, improve common and state-of-the-art clinical practice

  5. Conceptual formulation on four-dimensional inverse planning for intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Louis; Ma, Yunzhi; Ye, Yinyu; Xing, Lei

    2009-07-07

    Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) offers an extra dimension of 'time' on the three-dimensional patient model with which we can incorporate target motion in radiation treatment (RT) planning and delivery in various ways such as in the concept of internal target volume, in gated treatment or in target tracking. However, for all these methodologies, different phases are essentially considered as non-interconnected independent phases for the purpose of optimization, in other words, the 'time' dimension has yet to be incorporated explicitly in the optimization algorithm and fully exploited. In this note, we have formulated a new 4D inverse planning technique that treats all the phases in the 4DCT as one single entity in the optimization. The optimization is formulated as a quadratic problem for disciplined convex programming that enables the problem to be analyzed and solved efficiently. In the proof-of-principle examples illustrated, we show that the temporal information of the spatial relation of the target and organs at risk could be 'exchanged' amongst different phases so that an appropriate weighting of dose deposition could be allocated to each phase, thus enabling a treatment with a tight target margin and a full duty cycle otherwise not achievable by either of the aforementioned methodologies. Yet there are practical issues to be solved in the 4D RT planning and delivery. The 4D concept in the optimization we have formulated here does provide insight on how the 'time' dimension can be exploited in the 4D optimization process.

  6. Four-dimensional microscope- integrated optical coherence tomography to enhance visualization in glaucoma surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Pasricha, Neel Dave; Bhullar, Paramjit Kaur; Shieh, Christine; Viehland, Christian; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar Mijail; Keller, Brenton; Izatt, Joseph Adam; Toth, Cynthia Ann; Challa, Pratap; Kuo, Anthony Nanlin

    2017-01-01

    We report the first use of swept-source microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography (SS-MIOCT) capable of live four-dimensional (4D) (three-dimensional across time) imaging intraoperatively to directly visualize tube shunt placement and trabeculectomy surgeries in two patients with severe open-angle glaucoma and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) that was not adequately managed by medical intervention or prior surgery. We performed tube shunt placement and trabeculectomy surgery and used SS-MIOCT to visualize and record surgical steps that benefitted from the enhanced visualization. In the case of tube shunt placement, SS-MIOCT successfully visualized the scleral tunneling, tube shunt positioning in the anterior chamber, and tube shunt suturing. For the trabeculectomy, SS-MIOCT successfully visualized the scleral flap creation, sclerotomy, and iridectomy. Postoperatively, both patients did well, with IOPs decreasing to the target goal. We found the benefit of SS-MIOCT was greatest in surgical steps requiring depth-based assessments. This technology has the potential to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:28300743

  7. Subject-specific four-dimensional liver motion modeling based on registration of dynamic MRI

    PubMed Central

    Noorda, Yolanda H.; Bartels, Lambertus W.; Viergever, Max A.; Pluim, Josien P.W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatment of the liver is a promising noninvasive technique for ablation of liver lesions. For the technique to be used in clinical practice, however, the issue of liver motion needs to be addressed. A subject-specific four-dimensional liver motion model is presented that is created based on registration of dynamically acquired magnetic resonance data. This model can be used for predicting the tumor motion trajectory for treatment planning and to indicate the tumor position for treatment guidance. The performance of the model was evaluated on a dynamic scan series that was not used to build the model. The method achieved an average Dice coefficient of 0.93 between the predicted and actual liver profiles and an average vessel misalignment of 3.0 mm. The model performed robustly, with a small variation in the results per subject. The results demonstrate the potential of the model to be used for MRI-guided treatment of liver lesions. Furthermore, the model can possibly be applied in other image-guided therapies, for instance radiotherapy of the liver. PMID:27493981

  8. Four-dimensional reconstruction of cultural heritage sites based on photogrammetry and clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voulodimos, Athanasios; Doulamis, Nikolaos; Fritsch, Dieter; Makantasis, Konstantinos; Doulamis, Anastasios; Klein, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A system designed and developed for the three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of cultural heritage (CH) assets is presented. Two basic approaches are presented. The first one, resulting in an "approximate" 3-D model, uses images retrieved in online multimedia collections; it employs a clustering-based technique to perform content-based filtering and eliminate outliers that significantly reduce the performance of 3-D reconstruction frameworks. The second one is based on input image data acquired through terrestrial laser scanning, as well as close range and airborne photogrammetry; it follows a sophisticated multistep strategy, which leads to a "precise" 3-D model. Furthermore, the concept of change history maps is proposed to address the computational limitations involved in four-dimensional (4-D) modeling, i.e., capturing 3-D models of a CH landmark or site at different time instances. The system also comprises a presentation viewer, which manages the display of the multifaceted CH content collected and created. The described methods have been successfully applied and evaluated in challenging real-world scenarios, including the 4-D reconstruction of the historic Market Square of the German city of Calw in the context of the 4-D-CH-World EU project.

  9. A Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Analysis of Multiorgan Abdominal Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, Joshua L.; Mori, Shinichiro; Sharp, Gregory C.; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Hong, Theodore S.; Chen, George T.Y.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To characterize and quantify multiorgan respiration-induced motion in the abdomen in liver and pancreatic cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography scans were acquired for 18 patients treated for abdominal tumors. Contours of multiple abdominal organs were drawn by the radiation oncologist at one respiratory phase; these contours were propagated to other respiratory phases by deformable registration. Three-dimensional organ models were generated from the resulting contours at each phase. Motions of the bounding box and center of mass were extracted and analyzed for the clinical target volume and organs at risk. Results: On average, the center of mass motion for liver clinical target volumes was 9.7 mm (SD 5 mm) in the superior-inferior direction, with a range of 3 to 18 mm; for pancreatic tumors, the average was 5 mm (SD 1 mm) m with a range of 3 to 7 mm. Abdominal organs move in unison, but with varying amplitudes. Gating near exhale (T40-T60) reduces the range of motion by a factor of {approx}10. Conclusion: We have used deformable registration to calculate the trajectories of abdominal organs in four dimensions, based on center of mass and bounding box motion metrics. Our results are compared with previously reported studies. Possible reasons for differences are discussed.

  10. Quantification of Artifact Reduction With Real-Time Cine Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Acquisition Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Langner, Ulrich W.; Keall, Paul J.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the magnitude and frequency of artifacts in simulated four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) images using three real-time acquisition methods- direction-dependent displacement acquisition, simultaneous displacement and phase acquisition, and simultaneous displacement and velocity acquisition- and to compare these methods with commonly used retrospective phase sorting. Methods and Materials: Image acquisition for the four 4D CT methods was simulated with different displacement and velocity tolerances for spheres with radii of 0.5 cm, 1.5 cm, and 2.5 cm, using 58 patient-measured tumors and respiratory motion traces. The magnitude and frequency of artifacts, CT doses, and acquisition times were computed for each method. Results: The mean artifact magnitude was 50% smaller for the three real-time methods than for retrospective phase sorting. The dose was {approx}50% lower, but the acquisition time was 20% to 100% longer for the real-time methods than for retrospective phase sorting. Conclusions: Real-time acquisition methods can reduce the frequency and magnitude of artifacts in 4D CT images, as well as the imaging dose, but they increase the image acquisition time. The results suggest that direction-dependent displacement acquisition is the preferred real-time 4D CT acquisition method, because on average, the lowest dose is delivered to the patient and the acquisition time is the shortest for the resulting number and magnitude of artifacts.

  11. Combining four dimensional variational data assimilation and particle filtering for estimating volcanic ash emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, Philipp; Elbern, Hendrik

    2016-04-01

    Estimating volcanic ash emissions is a very challenging task due to limited monitoring capacities of the ash plume and nonlinear processes in the atmosphere, which renders application of source strength and injection height estimations difficult. Most models, which estimate volcanic ash emissions, make strong simplifications of the dispersion of volcanic ash and corresponding atmospheric processes. The objective of this work is to estimate volcanic ash emissions and simulate the ensuing dispersion applying a full chemistry transport model in a hybrid approach by using its adjoint as well as an ensemble of model runs to quantify forecast uncertainties. Therefore, the four dimensional variational data assimilation version of the EURAD-IM chemistry transport model is extended to include a Sequential Importance Resampling Smoother (SIRS), introducing novel weighting and resampling strategies. In the main SIRS step the ensemble members exchange high rated emission patterns while rejecting emission patterns with low value for the forecast. The emission profiles of the ensemble members are perturbed afterwards to guarantee different emissions for all ensemble members. First identical twin experiments show the ability of the system to estimate the temporal and vertical distribution of volcanic ash emissions. The 4D-var data assimilation algorithm of the new system additionally provides quantitative emission estimation.

  12. A four-dimensional snapshot hyperspectral video-endoscope for bio-imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hoong-Ta; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has proven significance in bio-imaging applications and it has the ability to capture up to several hundred images of different wavelengths offering relevant spectral signatures. To use hyperspectral imaging for in vivo monitoring and diagnosis of the internal body cavities, a snapshot hyperspectral video-endoscope is required. However, such reported systems provide only about 50 wavelengths. We have developed a four-dimensional snapshot hyperspectral video-endoscope with a spectral range of 400-1000 nm, which can detect 756 wavelengths for imaging, significantly more than such systems. Capturing the three-dimensional datacube sequentially gives the fourth dimension. All these are achieved through a flexible two-dimensional to one-dimensional fiber bundle. The potential of this custom designed and fabricated compact biomedical probe is demonstrated by imaging phantom tissue samples in reflectance and fluorescence imaging modalities. It is envisaged that this novel concept and developed probe will contribute significantly towards diagnostic in vivo biomedical imaging in the near future.

  13. Two-Dimensional Lattice for Four-Dimensional N = 4 Supersymmetric Yang-Mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, M.; Matsuura, S.; Sugino, F.

    2011-10-01

    We construct a lattice formulation of a mass-deformed two-dimensional N = (8,8) super Yang-Mills theory with preserving two supercharges exactly. Gauge fields are represented by compact unitary link variables, and the exact supercharges on the lattice are nilpotent up to gauge transformations and SU(2)_R rotations. Due to the mass deformation, the lattice model is free from the vacuum degeneracy problem, which was encountered in earlier approaches, and flat directions of scalar fields are stabilized giving discrete minima representing fuzzy S^2. Around the trivial minimum, quantum continuum theory is obtained with no tuning, which serves a nonperturbative construction of the IIA matrix string theory. Moreover, around the minimum of k-coincident fuzzy spheres, four-dimensional N = 4 U(k) super Yang-Mills theory with two commutative and two noncommutative directions emerges. In this theory, sixteen supersymmetries are broken by the mass deformation to two. Assuming the breaking is soft, we give a scenario leading to undeformed N = 4 super Yang-Mills on R^4 without any fine tuning. As an evidence for the validity of the assumption, some computation of 1-loop radiative corrections is presented.

  14. Spatially isotropic four-dimensional imaging with dual-view plane illumination microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yicong; Wawrzusin, Peter; Senseney, Justin; Fischer, Robert S; Christensen, Ryan; Santella, Anthony; York, Andrew G; Winter, Peter W; Waterman, Clare M; Bao, Zhirong; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A; McAuliffe, Matthew; Shroff, Hari

    2014-01-01

    Optimal four-dimensional imaging requires high spatial resolution in all dimensions, high speed and minimal photobleaching and damage. We developed a dual-view, plane illumination microscope with improved spatiotemporal resolution by switching illumination and detection between two perpendicular objectives in an alternating duty cycle. Computationally fusing the resulting volumetric views provides an isotropic resolution of 330 nm. As the sample is stationary and only two views are required, we achieve an imaging speed of 200 images/s (i.e., 0.5 s for a 50-plane volume). Unlike spinning-disk confocal or Bessel beam methods, which illuminate the sample outside the focal plane, we maintain high spatiotemporal resolution over hundreds of volumes with negligible photobleaching. To illustrate the ability of our method to study biological systems that require high-speed volumetric visualization and/or low photobleaching, we describe microtubule tracking in live cells, nuclear imaging over 14 h during nematode embryogenesis and imaging of neural wiring during Caenorhabditis elegans brain development over 5 h. PMID:24108093

  15. A four-dimensional snapshot hyperspectral video-endoscope for bio-imaging applications

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hoong-Ta; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has proven significance in bio-imaging applications and it has the ability to capture up to several hundred images of different wavelengths offering relevant spectral signatures. To use hyperspectral imaging for in vivo monitoring and diagnosis of the internal body cavities, a snapshot hyperspectral video-endoscope is required. However, such reported systems provide only about 50 wavelengths. We have developed a four-dimensional snapshot hyperspectral video-endoscope with a spectral range of 400–1000 nm, which can detect 756 wavelengths for imaging, significantly more than such systems. Capturing the three-dimensional datacube sequentially gives the fourth dimension. All these are achieved through a flexible two-dimensional to one-dimensional fiber bundle. The potential of this custom designed and fabricated compact biomedical probe is demonstrated by imaging phantom tissue samples in reflectance and fluorescence imaging modalities. It is envisaged that this novel concept and developed probe will contribute significantly towards diagnostic in vivo biomedical imaging in the near future. PMID:27044607

  16. An inventory of four-dimensional data sets for the earth sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Terri

    1989-01-01

    The wide variety of data available to the diligent researcher and the myriad paths to obtaining it are emphasized. This inventory is an attempt to make accessible much of the four-dimensional data available in the world. In this quick-look catalog are listed separate data sets (Data Sets sections), sources of data including centers and large data bases (Sources section), and some data expected to be available in the future (Future Data section). In the Data Sets section, individual data sets are arranged alphabetically by institution, with those archived in the U.S.A. listed first, followed by those found elsewhere. The Sources section includes large data bases, centers, and directories. Sources are arranged alphabetically by country. This section is followed by a Future Data section which is a collection of data sets, experiments, and other future developments of which we are cognizant. A collection of further information and order blanks provided by some of the archiving institutions are presented in the appendix.

  17. Reconstruction and visualization of irregularly sampled three- and four-dimensional ultrasound data for cerebrovascular applications.

    PubMed

    Meairs, S; Beyer, J; Hennerici, M

    2000-02-01

    Although recent studies have demonstrated the potential value of compounded data for improvement in signal-to-noise ratio and speckle contrast for three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasonography, clinical applications are lacking. We investigated the potential of six degrees-of-freedom (6-DOF) scanhead position and orientation measurement (POM) devices for registration of in vivo multiplanar, irregularly sampled ultrasound (US) images to a regular 3-D volume space. The results demonstrate that accurate spatial and temporal registration of four-dimensional (4-D) US data can be achieved using a 6-DOF scanhead tracking system. For reconstruction of arbitrary, irregularly sampled US data, we introduce a technique based upon a weighted, ellipsoid Gaussian convolution kernel. Volume renderings of 3-D and 4-D compounded in vivo US data are presented. The results, although restricted to the field of cerebrovascular disease, will be of value to other applications of 3-D sonography, particularly those in which compounding of data through irregular sampling may provide superior information on tissue or vessel structure.

  18. Transmigration and phagocytosis of macrophages in an airway infection model using four-dimensional techniques.

    PubMed

    Ding, Peishan; Wu, Huimei; Fang, Lei; Wu, Ming; Liu, Rongyu

    2014-07-01

    During infection, recruited phagocytes transmigrate across the epithelium to remove the pathogens deposited on the airway surface. However, it is difficult to directly observe cellular behaviors (e.g., transmigration) in single-cell layer cultures or in live animals. Combining a three-dimensional (3D) cell coculture model mimicking airway infection with time-lapse confocal imaging as a four-dimensional technique allowed us to image the behaviors of macrophages in 3D over time. The airway infection model was moved to a glass-bottomed dish for live-cell imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Using time-lapse confocal imaging, we recorded macrophages transmigrating across the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) membrane of the inserts through the 5-μm pores in the PET membrane. Macrophages on the apical side of the insert exhibited essentially three types of movements, one of which was transmigrating across the epithelial cell monolayer and arriving at the surface of monolayer. We found that adding Staphylococcus aureus to the model increased the transmigration index but not the transmigration time of the macrophages. Only in the presence of S. aureus were the macrophages able to transmigrate across the epithelial cell monolayer. Apical-to-basal transmigration of macrophages was visualized dynamically. We also imaged the macrophages phagocytizing S. aureus deposited on the surface of the monolayer in the airway infection model. This work provides a useful tool to study the cellular behaviors of immune cells spatially and temporally during infection.

  19. Affine group representation formalism for four-dimensional, Lorentzian, quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Ching-Yi; Ita, Eyo E.; Soo, Chopin

    2013-03-01

    Within the context of the Ashtekar variables, the Hamiltonian constraint of four-dimensional pure general relativity with cosmological constant, Λ, is re-expressed as an affine algebra with the commutator of the imaginary part of the Chern-Simons functional, Q, and the positive-definite volume element. This demonstrates that the affine algebra quantization program of Klauder can indeed be applicable to the full Lorentzian signature theory of quantum gravity with non-vanishing cosmological constant, and it facilitates the construction of solutions to all of the constraints. Unitary, irreducible representations of the affine group exhibit a natural Hilbert space structure, and coherent states and other physical states can be generated from a fiducial state. It is also intriguing that formulation of the Hamiltonian constraint or the Wheeler-DeWitt equation as an affine algebra requires a non-vanishing cosmological constant, and a fundamental uncertainty relation of the form {Δ{V}/{< {V}> }Δ {Q}≥ 2π Λ L^2_{Planck} (wherein V is the total volume) may apply to all physical states of quantum gravity.

  20. Simulations of four-dimensional simplicial quantum gravity as dynamical triangulation

    SciTech Connect

    Agishtein, M.E.; Migdal, A.A. )

    1992-04-20

    In this paper, Four-Dimensional Simplicial Quantum Gravity is simulated using the dynamical triangulation approach. The authors studied simplicial manifolds of spherical topology and found the critical line for the cosmological constant as a function of the gravitational one, separating the phases of opened and closed Universe. When the bare cosmological constant approaches this line from above, the four-volume grows: the authors reached about 5 {times} 10{sup 4} simplexes, which proved to be sufficient for the statistical limit of infinite volume. However, for the genuine continuum theory of gravity, the parameters of the lattice model should be further adjusted to reach the second order phase transition point, where the correlation length grows to infinity. The authors varied the gravitational constant, and they found the first order phase transition, similar to the one found in three-dimensional model, except in 4D the fluctuations are rather large at the transition point, so that this is close to the second order phase transition. The average curvature in cutoff units is large and positive in one phase (gravity), and small negative in another (antigravity). The authors studied the fractal geometry of both phases, using the heavy particle propagator to define the geodesic map, as well as with the old approach using the shortest lattice paths.

  1. A four-dimensional virtual hand brain-machine interface using active dimension selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouse, Adam G.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) traditionally rely on a fixed, linear transformation from neural signals to an output state-space. In this study, the assumption that a BMI must control a fixed, orthogonal basis set was challenged and a novel active dimension selection (ADS) decoder was explored. Approach. ADS utilizes a two stage decoder by using neural signals to both (i) select an active dimension being controlled and (ii) control the velocity along the selected dimension. ADS decoding was tested in a monkey using 16 single units from premotor and primary motor cortex to successfully control a virtual hand avatar to move to eight different postures. Main results. Following training with the ADS decoder to control 2, 3, and then 4 dimensions, each emulating a grasp shape of the hand, performance reached 93% correct with a bit rate of 2.4 bits s-1 for eight targets. Selection of eight targets using ADS control was more efficient, as measured by bit rate, than either full four-dimensional control or computer assisted one-dimensional control. Significance. ADS decoding allows a user to quickly and efficiently select different hand postures. This novel decoding scheme represents a potential method to reduce the complexity of high-dimension BMI control of the hand.

  2. Slow gantry rotation acquisition technique for on-board four-dimensional digital tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, Jacqueline; Pan Tinsu; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) has been investigated for motion imaging in the radiotherapy treatment room. The drawbacks of 4D CBCT are long scan times and high imaging doses. The aims of this study were to develop and investigate a slow gantry rotation acquisition protocol for four-dimensional digital tomosynthesis (4D DTS) as a faster, lower dose alternative to 4D CBCT. Methods: This technique was implemented using an On-Board Imager kV imaging system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) mounted on the gantry of a linear accelerator. The general procedure for 4D DTS imaging using slow gantry rotation acquisition consists of the following steps: (1) acquire projections over a limited gantry rotation angle in a single motion with constant frame rate and gantry rotation speed; (2) generate a respiratory signal and temporally match projection images with appropriate points from the respiratory signal; (3) use the respiratory signal to assign phases to each of the projection images; (4) sort projection images into phase bins; and (5) reconstruct phase images. Phantom studies were conducted to validate theoretically derived relationships between acquisition and respiratory parameters. Optimization of acquisition parameters was then conducted by simulating lung scans using patient data. Lung tumors with approximate volumes ranging from 0.12 to 1.53 cm{sup 3} were studied. Results: A protocol for slow gantry rotation 4D DTS was presented. Equations were derived to express relationships between acquisition parameters (frame rate, phase window, and angular intervals between projections), respiratory cycle durations, and resulting acquisition times and numbers of projections. The phantom studies validated the relationships, and the patient studies resulted in determinations of appropriate acquisition parameters. The phase window must be set according to clinical goals. For 10% phase windows, we found that appropriate frame rates

  3. On correlated sources of uncertainty in four dimensional computed tomography data sets.

    PubMed

    Ehler, Eric D; Tome, Wolfgang A

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to estimate the degree of uncertainty inherent to a given four dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) imaging modality and to test for interaction of the investigated factors (i.e., object displacement, velocity, and the period of motion) when determining the object motion coordinates, motion envelope, and the confomality in which it can be defined within a time based data series. A motion phantom consisting of four glass spheres imbedded in low density foam on a one dimensional moving platform was used to investigate the interaction of uncertainty factors in motion trajectory that could be used in comparison of trajectory definition, motion envelope definition and conformality in an optimal 4D-CT imaging environment. The motion platform allowed for a highly defined motion trajectory that could be as the ground truth in the comparison with observed motion in 4D-CT data sets. 4D-CT data sets were acquired for 9 different motion patterns. Multifactor analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed where the factors considered were the phantom maximum velocity, object volume, and the image intensity used to delineate the high density objects. No statistical significance was found for three factor interaction for definition of the motion trajectory, motion envelope, or Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) conformality. Two factor interactions were found to be statistically significant for the DSC for the interactions of 1) object volume and the HU threshold used for delineation and 2) the object velocity and object volume. Moreover, a statistically significant single factor direct proportionality was observed between the maximum velocity and the mean tracking error. In this work multiple factors impacting on the uncertainty in 4D data sets have been considered and some statistically significant two-factor interactions have been identified. Therefore, the detailed evaluation of errors and uncertainties in 4D imaging modalities is recommended in

  4. Enhancement of four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography by compressed sensing with Bregman iteration.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kihwan; Fahimian, Benjamin P; Li, Tianfang; Suh, Tae-Suk; Lei, Xing

    2013-01-01

    In four-dimensional (4D) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), there is a spatio-temporal tradeoff that currently limits the accuracy. The aim of this study is to develop a Bregman iteration based formalism for high quality 4D CBCT image reconstruction from a limited number of low-dose projections. The 4D CBCT problem is first divided into multiple 3D CBCT subproblems by grouping the projection images corresponding to the phases. To maximally utilize the information from the under-sampled projection data, a compressed sensing (CS) method with Bregman iterations is employed for solving each subproblem. We formulate an unconstrained optimization problem based on least-square criterion regularized by total-variation. The least-square criterion reflects the inconsistency between the measured and the estimated line integrals. Furthermore, the unconstrained problem is updated and solved repeatedly by Bregman iterations. The performance of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated through a series of simulation studies and phantom experiments, and the results are compared to those of previously implemented compressed sensing technique using other gradient-based methods as well as conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) results. The simulation and experimental studies have shown that artifact suppressed images can be obtained with as small as 41 projections per phase, which is adequate for clinical 4D CBCT reconstruction. With such small number of projections, the conventional FDK failed to yield meaningful 4D CBCT images, and CS technique using conjugate gradient was not able to recover sharp edges. The proposed method significantly reduces the radiation dose and scanning time to achieve the high quality images compared to the 4D CBCT imaging based on the conventional FDK technique and the existing CS techniques.

  5. Novel Assessment of Renal Motion in Children as Measured via Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Pai Panandiker, Atmaram S.; Sharma, Shelly; Naik, Mihir H.; Wu, Shengjie; Hua, Chiaho; Beltran, Chris; Krasin, Matthew J.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-04-01

    Objectives: Abdominal intensity-modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy require quantification of target and organ motion to optimize localization and treatment. Although addressed in adults, there is no available literature on this issue in pediatric patients. We assessed physiologic renal motion in pediatric patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty free-breathing pediatric patients at a median age of 8 years (range, 2-18 years) with intra-abdominal tumors underwent computed tomography simulation and four-dimensional computed tomography acquisition (slice thickness, 3 mm). Kidneys and diaphragms were contoured during eight phases of respiration to estimate center-of-mass motion. We quantified center of kidney mass mobility vectors in three dimensions: anteroposterior (AP), mediolateral (ML), and superoinferior (SI). Results: Kidney motion decreases linearly with decreasing age and height. The 95% confidence interval for the averaged minima and maxima of renal motion in children younger than 9 years was 5-9 mm in the ML direction, 4-11 mm in the AP direction, and 12-25 mm in the SI dimension for both kidneys. In children older than 9 years, the same confidence interval reveals a widening range of motion that was 5-16 mm in the ML direction, 6-17 mm in the AP direction, and 21-52 mm in the SI direction. Although not statistically significant, renal motion correlated with diaphragm motion in older patients. The correlation between diaphragm motion and body mass index was borderline (r = 0.52, p = 0.0816) in younger patients. Conclusions: Renal motion is age and height dependent. Measuring diaphragmatic motion alone does not reliably quantify pediatric renal motion. Renal motion in young children ranges from 5 to 25 mm in orientation-specific directions. The vectors of motion range from 5 to 52 mm in older children. These preliminary data represent novel analyses of pediatric intra-abdominal organ motion.

  6. A Four-Dimensional CT-Based Evaluation of Techniques for Gastric Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Geld, Ylanga G. van; Senan, Suresh; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.; Slotman, Ben J.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate three-dimensional conformal (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated (IMRT) and respiration-gated radiotherapy (RGRT) techniques for gastric irradiation for target coverage and minimization of renal doses. All techniques were four-dimensional (4D)-CT based, incorporating the intrafractional mobility of the target volume and organs at risk (OAR). Methods and Materials: The stomach, duodenal C-loop, and OAR (kidneys, liver, and heart) were contoured in all 10 phases of planning 4D-CT scans for five patients who underwent abdominal radiotherapy. Planning target volumes (PTVs) encompassing all positions of the stomach (PTV{sub allphases}) were generated. Three respiratory phases for RGRT in inspiration and expiration were identified, and corresponding PTV{sub inspiration} and PTV{sub expiration} and OAR volumes were created. Landmark-based fields recommended for the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 99-04 study protocol were simulated to assess PTV coverage. IMRT and 3D-CRT planning with and without additional RGRT planning were performed for all PTVs, and corresponding dose volume histograms were analyzed. Results: Use of landmark-based fields did not result in full geometric coverage of the PTV{sub allphases} in any patient. IMRT significantly reduced mean renal doses compared with 3D-CRT (15.0 Gy {+-} 0.9 Gy vs. 20.1 Gy {+-} 9.3 Gy and 16.6 Gy {+-} 1.5 Gy vs. 32.6 Gy {+-} 7.1 Gy for the left and right kidneys, respectively; p = 0.04). No significant increase in renal sparing was seen when adding RGRT to either 3D-CRT or IMRT. Tolerance doses to the other OAR were not exceeded. Conclusions: Individualized field margins are essential for gastric irradiation. IMRT plans significantly reduce renal doses, but the benefits of RGRT in gastric irradiation appear to be limited.

  7. Impact of four-dimensional data assimilation (FDDA) on urban climate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Linlin; Liu, Yubao; Liu, Yuewei; Li, Lei; Jiang, Yin; Cheng, Will; Roux, Gregory

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the impact of four-dimensional data assimilation (FDDA) on urban climate analysis, which employs the NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) WRF (the weather research and forecasting model) based on climate FDDA (CFDDA) technology to develop an urban-scale microclimatology database for the Shenzhen area, a rapidly developing metropolitan located along the southern coast of China, where uniquely high-density observations, including ultrahigh-resolution surface AWS (automatic weather station) network, radio sounding, wind profilers, radiometers, and other weather observation platforms, have been installed. CFDDA is an innovative dynamical downscaling regional climate analysis system that assimilates diverse regional observations; and has been employed to produce a 5 year multiscale high-resolution microclimate analysis by assimilating high-density observations at Shenzhen area. The CFDDA system was configured with four nested-grid domains at grid sizes of 27, 9, 3, and 1 km, respectively. This research evaluates the impact of assimilating high-resolution observation data on reproducing the refining features of urban-scale circulations. Two experiments were conducted with a 5 year run using CFSR (climate forecast system reanalysis) as boundary and initial conditions: one with CFDDA and the other without. The comparisons of these two experiments with observations indicate that CFDDA greatly reduces the model analysis error and is able to realistically analyze the microscale features such as urban-rural-coastal circulation, land/sea breezes, and local-hilly terrain thermal circulations. It is demonstrated that the urbanization can produce 2.5 k differences in 2 m temperatures, delays/speeds up the land/sea breeze development, and interacts with local mountain-valley circulations.

  8. Muon borehole detector development for use in four-dimensional tomographic density monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flygare, Joshua

    The increase of CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere and the correlated temperature rise has initiated research into methods of carbon sequestration. One promising possibility is to store CO2 in subsurface reservoirs of porous rock. After injection, the monitoring of the injected CO2 is of paramount importance because the CO2 plume, if escaped, poses health and environmental risks. Traditionally, seismic reflection methods are the chosen method of determining changes in the reservoir density due to CO2 injection, but this is expensive and not continuous. A potential and promising alternative is to use cosmic muon tomography to determine density changes in the reservoir over a period of time. The work I have completed was the development of a muon detector that will be capable of being deployed in boreholes and perform long-term tomography of the reservoir of interest. The detector has the required dimensions, an angular resolution of approximately 2 degrees, and is robust enough to survive the caustic nature of the fluids in boreholes, as well as temperature and pressure fluctuations. The detector design is based on polystyrene scintillating rods arrayed in alternating layers. The layers, as arranged, can provide four-dimensional (4D) tomographic data to detect small changes in density at depths up to approximately 2 kilometers. Geant4, a Monte Carlo simulation code, was used to develop and optimize the detector design. Additionally, I developed a method of determining the muon flux at depth, including CO2 saturation changes in subsurface reservoirs. Preliminary experiments were performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This thesis will show the simulations I performed to determine the angular resolution and background discrimination required of the detector, the experiments to determine light transport through the polystyrene scintillating rods and fibers, and the method developed to predict muon flux changes at depth expected after injection.

  9. Four-Dimensional Printing Hierarchy Scaffolds with Highly Biocompatible Smart Polymers for Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Miao, Shida; Zhu, Wei; Castro, Nathan J; Leng, Jinsong; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to four-dimensional (4D) print novel biomimetic gradient tissue scaffolds with highly biocompatible naturally derived smart polymers. The term "4D printing" refers to the inherent smart shape transformation of fabricated constructs when implanted minimally invasively for seamless and dynamic integration. For this purpose, a series of novel shape memory polymers with excellent biocompatibility and tunable shape changing effects were synthesized and cured in the presence of three-dimensional printed sacrificial molds, which were subsequently dissolved to create controllable and graded porosity within the scaffold. Surface morphology, thermal, mechanical, and biocompatible properties as well as shape memory effects of the synthesized smart polymers and resultant porous scaffolds were characterized. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and gel content analysis confirmed the formation of chemical crosslinking by reacting polycaprolactone triol and castor oil with multi-isocyanate groups. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed an adjustable glass transition temperature in a range from -8°C to 35°C. Uniaxial compression testing indicated that the obtained polymers, possessing a highly crosslinked interpenetrating polymeric networks, have similar compressive modulus to polycaprolactone. Shape memory tests revealed that the smart polymers display finely tunable recovery speed and exhibit greater than 92% shape fixing at -18°C or 0°C and full shape recovery at physiological temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of fabricated scaffolds revealed a graded microporous structure, which mimics the nonuniform distribution of porosity found within natural tissues. With polycaprolactone serving as a control, human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation greatly increased on our novel smart polymers. The current work will significantly advance the future design and development of

  10. Visualization of Endosome Dynamics in Living Nerve Terminals with Four-dimensional Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Richard S.; Kiss, Ilona M.; Wilkinson, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) light imaging has been used to study behavior of small structures within motor nerve terminals of the thin transversus abdominis muscle of the garter snake. Raw data comprises time-lapse sequences of 3D z-stacks. Each stack contains 4-20 images acquired with epifluorescence optics at focal planes separated by 400-1,500 nm. Steps in the acquisition of image stacks, such as adjustment of focus, switching of excitation wavelengths, and operation of the digital camera, are automated as much as possible to maximize image rate and minimize tissue damage from light exposure. After acquisition, a set of image stacks is deconvolved to improve spatial resolution, converted to the desired 3D format, and used to create a 4D "movie" that is suitable for variety of computer-based analyses, depending upon the experimental data sought. One application is study of the dynamic behavior of two classes of endosomes found in nerve terminals-macroendosomes (MEs) and acidic endosomes (AEs)-whose sizes (200-800 nm for both types) are at or near the diffraction limit. Access to 3D information at each time point provides several advantages over conventional time-lapse imaging. In particular, size and velocity of movement of structures can be quantified over time without loss of sharp focus. Examples of data from 4D imaging reveal that MEs approach the plasma membrane and disappear, suggesting that they are exocytosed rather than simply moving vertically away from a single plane of focus. Also revealed is putative fusion of MEs and AEs, by visualization of overlap between the two dye-containing structures as viewed in each three orthogonal projections. PMID:24799002

  11. Four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography using an on-board imager.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianfang; Xing, Lei; Munro, Peter; McGuinness, Christopher; Chao, Ming; Yang, Yong; Loo, Bill; Koong, Albert

    2006-10-01

    On-board cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has recently become available to provide volumetric information of a patient in the treatment position, and holds promises for improved target localization and irradiation dose verification. The design of currently available on-board CBCT, however, is far from optimal. Its quality is adversely influenced by many factors, such as scatter, beam hardening, and intra-scanning organ motion. In this work we quantitatively study the influence of organ motion on CBCT imaging and investigate a strategy to acquire high quality phase-resolved [four-dimensional (4D)] CBCT images based on phase binning of the CBCT projection data. An efficient and robust method for binning CBCT data according to the patient's respiratory phase derived in the projection space was developed. The phase-binned projections were reconstructed using the conventional Feldkamp algorithm to yield 4D CBCT images. Both phantom and patient studies were carried out to validate the technique and to optimize the 4D CBCT data acquisition protocol. Several factors that are important to the clinical implementation of the technique, such as the image quality, scanning time, number of projections, and radiation dose, were analyzed for various scanning schemes. The general references drawn from this study are: (i) reliable phase binning of CBCT projections is accomplishable with the aid of external or internal marker and simple analysis of its trace in the projection space, and (ii) artifact-free 4D CBCT images can be obtained without increasing the patient radiation dose as compared to the current 3D CBCT scan.

  12. Robust principal component analysis-based four-dimensional computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hao; Cai, Jian-Feng; Shen, Zuowei; Zhao, Hongkai

    2011-06-07

    The purpose of this paper for four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) is threefold. (1) A new spatiotemporal model is presented from the matrix perspective with the row dimension in space and the column dimension in time, namely the robust PCA (principal component analysis)-based 4D CT model. That is, instead of viewing the 4D object as a temporal collection of three-dimensional (3D) images and looking for local coherence in time or space independently, we perceive it as a mixture of low-rank matrix and sparse matrix to explore the maximum temporal coherence of the spatial structure among phases. Here the low-rank matrix corresponds to the 'background' or reference state, which is stationary over time or similar in structure; the sparse matrix stands for the 'motion' or time-varying component, e.g., heart motion in cardiac imaging, which is often either approximately sparse itself or can be sparsified in the proper basis. Besides 4D CT, this robust PCA-based 4D CT model should be applicable in other imaging problems for motion reduction or/and change detection with the least amount of data, such as multi-energy CT, cardiac MRI, and hyperspectral imaging. (2) A dynamic strategy for data acquisition, i.e. a temporally spiral scheme, is proposed that can potentially maintain similar reconstruction accuracy with far fewer projections of the data. The key point of this dynamic scheme is to reduce the total number of measurements, and hence the radiation dose, by acquiring complementary data in different phases while reducing redundant measurements of the common background structure. (3) An accurate, efficient, yet simple-to-implement algorithm based on the split Bregman method is developed for solving the model problem with sparse representation in tight frames.

  13. Evaluation of Bogus Vortex Techniques with Four-Dimensional Variational Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pu, Zhao-Xia; Braun, Scott A.

    2000-01-01

    The effectiveness of techniques for creating "bogus" vortices in numerical simulations of hurricanes is examined by using the Penn State/NCAR nonhydrostatic mesoscale model (MM5) and its adjoint system. A series of four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4-D VAR) experiments is conducted to generate an initial vortex for Hurricane Georges (1998) in the Atlantic Ocean by assimilating bogus sea-level pressure and surface wind information into the mesoscale numerical model. Several different strategies are tested for improving the vortex representation. The initial vortices produced by the 4-D VAR technique are able to reproduce many of the structural features of mature hurricanes. The vortices also result in significant improvements to the hurricane forecasts in terms of both intensity and track. In particular, with assimilation of only bogus sea-level pressure information, the response in the wind field is contained largely within the divergent component, with strong convergence leading to strong upward motion near the center. Although the intensity of the initial vortex seems to be well represented, a dramatic spin down of the storm occurs within the first 6 h of the forecast. With assimilation of bogus surface wind data only, an expected dominance of the rotational component of the wind field is generated, but the minimum pressure is adjusted inadequately compared to the actual hurricane minimum pressure. Only when both the bogus surface pressure and wind information are assimilated together does the model produce a vortex that represents the actual intensity of the hurricane and results in significant improvements to forecasts of both hurricane intensity and track.

  14. Stable de Sitter vacua in four-dimensional supergravity originating from five dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Oegetbil, O.

    2008-11-15

    The five-dimensional stable de Sitter ground states in N=2 supergravity obtained by gauging SO(1,1) symmetry of the real symmetric scalar manifold (in particular, a generic Jordan family manifold of the vector multiplets) simultaneously with a subgroup R{sub s} of the R-symmetry group descend to four-dimensional de Sitter ground states under certain conditions. First, the holomorphic section in four dimensions has to be chosen carefully by using the symplectic freedom in four dimensions; second, a group contraction is necessary to bring the potential into a desired form. Under these conditions, stable de Sitter vacua can be obtained in dimensionally reduced theories (from 5D to 4D) if the semidirect product of SO(1,1) with R{sup (1,1)} together with a simultaneous R{sub s} is gauged. We review the stable de Sitter vacua in four dimensions found in earlier literature for N=2 Yang-Mills Einstein supergravity with the SO(2,1)xR{sub s} gauge group in a symplectic basis that comes naturally after dimensional reduction. Although this particular gauge group does not descend directly from five dimensions, we show that its contraction does. Hence, two different theories overlap in certain limits. Examples of stable de Sitter vacua are given for the cases: (i) R{sub s}=U(1){sub R}, (ii) R{sub s}=SU(2){sub R}, and (iii) N=2 Yang-Mills/Einstein supergravity theory coupled to a universal hypermultiplet. We conclude with a discussion regarding the extension of our results to supergravity theories with more general homogeneous scalar manifolds.

  15. Do Human Fetuses Anticipate Self-Oriented Actions? A Study by Four-Dimensional (4D) Ultrasonography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako; Takeshita, Hideko

    2006-01-01

    Using four-dimensional (4D) ultrasonography, arm and hand movements toward the face were examined in 27 human fetuses at 19 to 35 weeks of gestation, thereby enabling the continuous monitoring of their faces and other surface features such as the extremities. More than half of the observed arm movements resulted in the hand touching the mouth…

  16. Atomic orbitals of the nonrelativistic hydrogen atom in a four-dimensional Riemann space through the path integral formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Grinberg, H.; Maranon, J.; Vucetich, H.

    1983-01-15

    The Kustaanheimo--Stiefel transformation together with the well-known expansion of the kernel of an isotropic harmonic oscillator is used to generate the atomic orbitals of the nonrelativistic hydrogen atom in a four-dimensional Riemann space through the path integral formalism. Group theoretical implications of the present problem are briefly discussed.

  17. ESTIMATION OF EMISSION ADJUSTMENTS FROM THE APPLICATION OF FOUR-DIMENSIONAL DATA ASSIMILATION TO PHOTOCHEMICAL AIR QUALITY MODELING. (R826372)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four-dimensional data assimilation applied to photochemical air quality modeling is used to suggest adjustments to the emissions inventory of the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area. In this approach, a three-dimensional air quality model, coupled with direct sensitivity analys...

  18. Improved and robust detection of cell nuclei from four dimensional fluorescence images.

    PubMed

    Bashar, Md Khayrul; Yamagata, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation-free direct methods are quite efficient for automated nuclei extraction from high dimensional images. A few such methods do exist but most of them do not ensure algorithmic robustness to parameter and noise variations. In this research, we propose a method based on multiscale adaptive filtering for efficient and robust detection of nuclei centroids from four dimensional (4D) fluorescence images. A temporal feedback mechanism is employed between the enhancement and the initial detection steps of a typical direct method. We estimate the minimum and maximum nuclei diameters from the previous frame and feed back them as filter lengths for multiscale enhancement of the current frame. A radial intensity-gradient function is optimized at positions of initial centroids to estimate all nuclei diameters. This procedure continues for processing subsequent images in the sequence. Above mechanism thus ensures proper enhancement by automated estimation of major parameters. This brings robustness and safeguards the system against additive noises and effects from wrong parameters. Later, the method and its single-scale variant are simplified for further reduction of parameters. The proposed method is then extended for nuclei volume segmentation. The same optimization technique is applied to final centroid positions of the enhanced image and the estimated diameters are projected onto the binary candidate regions to segment nuclei volumes.Our method is finally integrated with a simple sequential tracking approach to establish nuclear trajectories in the 4D space. Experimental evaluations with five image-sequences (each having 271 3D sequential images) corresponding to five different mouse embryos show promising performances of our methods in terms of nuclear detection, segmentation, and tracking. A detail analysis with a sub-sequence of 101 3D images from an embryo reveals that the proposed method can improve the nuclei detection accuracy by 9% over the previous methods

  19. High-quality four-dimensional cone-beam CT by deforming prior images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Xuejun

    2013-01-21

    Due to a limited number of projections at each phase, severe view aliasing artifacts are present in four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) when reconstruction is performed using conventional algorithms. In this work, we aim to obtain high-quality 4D-CBCT of lung cancer patients in radiation therapy by deforming the planning CT. The deformation vector fields (DVF) to deform the planning CT are estimated through matching the forward projection of the deformed prior image and measured on-treatment CBCT projection. The estimation of the DVF is formulated as an unconstrained optimization problem, where the objective function to be minimized is the sum of the squared difference between the forward projection of the deformed planning CT and the measured 4D-CBCT projection. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the DVF. As the number of the variables in the DVF is much greater than the number of measurements, the solution to such a highly ill-posed problem is very sensitive to the initials during the optimization process. To improve the estimation accuracy of DVF, we proposed a new strategy to obtain better initials for the optimization. In this strategy, 4D-CBCT is first reconstructed by total variation minimization. Demons deformable registration is performed to register the planning CT and the 4D-CBCT reconstructed by total variation minimization. The resulted DVF from demons registration is then used as the initial parameters in the optimization process. A 4D nonuniform rotational B-spline-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom and a patient 4D-CBCT are used to evaluate the algorithm. Image quality of 4D-CBCT is substantially improved by using the proposed strategy in both NCAT phantom and patient studies. The proposed method has the potential to improve the temporal resolution of 4D-CBCT. Improved 4D-CBCT can better characterize the motion of lung tumors and will be a valuable tool for image-guided adaptive radiation therapy.

  20. GPU-based four-dimensional general-relativistic ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchelmeister, Daniel; Müller, Thomas; Ament, Marco; Wunner, Günter; Weiskopf, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a new general-relativistic ray tracer that enables image synthesis on an interactive basis by exploiting the performance of graphics processing units (GPUs). The application is capable of visualizing the distortion of the stellar background as well as trajectories of moving astronomical objects orbiting a compact mass. Its source code includes metric definitions for the Schwarzschild and Kerr spacetimes that can be easily extended to other metric definitions, relying on its object-oriented design. The basic functionality features a scene description interface based on the scripting language Lua, real-time image output, and the ability to edit almost every parameter at runtime. The ray tracing code itself is implemented for parallel execution on the GPU using NVidia's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), which leads to performance improvement of an order of magnitude compared to a single CPU and makes the application competitive with small CPU cluster architectures. Program summary Program title: GpuRay4D Catalog identifier: AEMV_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMV_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 73649 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1334251 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++, CUDA. Computer: Linux platforms with a NVidia CUDA enabled GPU (Compute Capability 1.3 or higher), C++ compiler, NVCC (The CUDA Compiler Driver). Operating system: Linux. RAM: 2 GB Classification: 1.5. External routines: OpenGL Utility Toolkit development files, NVidia CUDA Toolkit 3.2, Lua5.2 Nature of problem: Ray tracing in four-dimensional Lorentzian spacetimes. Solution method: Numerical integration of light rays, GPU-based parallel programming using CUDA, 3D

  1. Four dimensional variational assimilation of in-situ and remote-sensing aerosol data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieradzik, L. P.; Elbern, H.

    2012-04-01

    Aerosols play an increasingly important role in atmospheric modelling. They have a strong influence on the radiative transfer balance and a significant impact on human health. Their origin is various and so are its effects. Most of the measurement sites in Europe account for an integrated aerosol load PMx (Particulate Matter of less than x μm in diameter) which does not give any qualitative information on the composition of the aerosol. Since very different constituents contribute to PMx, like e.g. mineral dust derived from desert storms or sea salt, it is necessary to make aerosol forecasts not only of load, but also type resolved. The method of four dimensional variational data assimilation (4Dvar) is a widely known technique to enhance forecast skills of CTMs (Chemistry-Transport-Models) by ingesting in-situ and, especially, remote-sensing measurements. The EURAD-IM (EURopean Air pollution Dispersion - Inverse Model), containing a full adjoint gas-phase model, has been expanded with an adjoint of the MADE (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe) to optimise initial and boundary values for aerosols using 4Dvar. A forward and an adjoint radiative transfer model is driven by the EURAD-IM as mapping between BLAOT (Boundary Layer Aerosol Optical Thickness) and internal aerosol species. Furthermore, its condensation scheme has been bypassed by an HDMR (High-Dimensional-Model-Representation) to ensure differentiability. In this study both in-situ measured PMx as well as satellite retrieved aerosol optical thicknesses have been assimilated and the effect on forecast performance has been investigated. The source of BLAOT is the aerosol retrieval system SYNAER (SYNergetic AErosol Retrieval) from DLR-DFD that retrieves AOT by making use of both AATSR/SCIAMACHY and AVHRR/GOME-2 data respectively. Its strengths are a large spatial coverage, near real-time availability, and the classification of five intrinsic aerosol species, namely water-solubles, water-insolubles, soot

  2. Four dimensional variational data assimilation of species-resolved satellite-retrieved aerosol optical thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieradzik, Lars Peter; Elbern, Hendrik

    2010-05-01

    Aerosols play an increasingly important role in atmospheric modelling. They have a strong influence on the radiative transfer balance and a significant impact on human health. Their origin is various and so are its effects. Most of the measurement sites in Europe only account for an integrated aerosol load PMx (Particulate Matter of less than x μm in diameter) which does not give any qualitative information on the composition of the aerosol. Since very different constituents like mineral dust derived from desert storms and sea salt contribute to PMx it is necessary to make aerosol forcasts not only of load, but also type resolved. The source of information chosen for this study is the aerosol retrieval system SYNAER (SYNergetic AErosol Retrieval) from DLR-DFD that retrieves BLAOT (Boundary Layer Aerosol Optical Thickness) making use of both AATSR/SCIAMACHY and AVHRR/GOME-2 data respectively. Its strengths are a large spatial coverage, near real-time availability, and the classification of five intrinsic aerosol species, namely water-solubles, water-insolubles, soot, sea salt, and mineral dust which are furthermore size resolved in terms of modes. A widely known technique to enhance forecast skills of CTMs (Chemistry-Transport-Models) by ingesting in-situ and, especially, remote-sensing measurements is the method of four dimensional variational data assimilation (4Dvar). The EURAD-IM (EURopean Air pollution Dispersion - Inverse Model), containing a full adjoint gas-phase model, has been expanded with an adjoint of the MADE (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe) to optimise initial and boundary values for aerosols using 4Dvar. A forward and an adjoint radiative transfer model is driven by the EURAD-IM as mapping between BLAOT and internal aerosol species. Furthermore, its condensation scheme has been bypassed by an HDMR (High-Dimensional-Model-Representation) to ensure differentiability, and a time saving online NMC-module for the generation of the background

  3. Four-dimensional seismic analysis of the Hibernia oil field, Grand Banks, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Richard James

    2004-12-01

    The seismic reflection method, traditionally a geologic structural imaging tool, is increasingly being utilized for petroleum reservoir monitoring purposes. Time-lapse, or four dimensional (4D) seismic reservoir monitoring is the process by which repeated 3D seismic surveys are acquired over a common area during the production of a petroleum reservoir in an effort to spatially image production related changes. While if successful, this seismic method can have a significant impact on an oil field's development plan, the sometimes subtle nature of the 4D seismic signals restricts the universal application of 4D seismic methods in all reservoirs and operating environments. To examine the potential use of 4D seismic on Canada's Grand Banks, this thesis conducts a 4D seismic analysis of the Hibernia oil field---the first example of 4D seismic technology on the Grand Banks. Due to a challenging environment (seismic and reservoir) at Hibernia for 4D seismic success, rock physics modeling predicts a subtle 4D seismic response for areas of both water and gas injection. To equalize the 4D seismic datasets, specialized poststack cross equalization including a volume event warping process is applied to two 3D post stack seismic datasets from the Hibernia oil field, a pre-production "legacy" survey acquired in 1991, and a 2001 survey. The cross equalization processing improves the repeatability of non-reservoir events fieldwide and enhances reservoir anomalies in some areas of the field. While the data contains a fair degree of noise, 4D seismic anomalies above the noise level can be imaged in areas of both water and gas injection. Through interpretation, some of these anomalies are shown to be consistent with modeled responses to water and gas injection. In addition, there is evidence that some of the seismic anomalies may be due to pore pressure changes in the reservoir. The results of the Hibernia 4D seismic analysis are then used as background for a feasibility analysis for

  4. High-quality four-dimensional cone-beam CT by deforming prior images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Xuejun

    2013-01-01

    Due to a limited number of projections at each phase, severe view aliasing artifacts are present in four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) when reconstruction is performed using conventional algorithms. In this work, we aim to obtain high-quality 4D-CBCT of lung cancer patients in radiation therapy by deforming the planning CT. The deformation vector fields (DVF) to deform the planning CT are estimated through matching the forward projection of the deformed prior image and measured on-treatment CBCT projection. The estimation of the DVF is formulated as an unconstrained optimization problem, where the objective function to be minimized is the sum of the squared difference between the forward projection of the deformed planning CT and the measured 4D-CBCT projection. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the DVF. As the number of the variables in the DVF is much greater than the number of measurements, the solution to such a highly ill-posed problem is very sensitive to the initials during the optimization process. To improve the estimation accuracy of DVF, we proposed a new strategy to obtain better initials for the optimization. In this strategy, 4D-CBCT is first reconstructed by total variation minimization. Demons deformable registration is performed to register the planning CT and the 4D-CBCT reconstructed by total variation minimization. The resulted DVF from demons registration is then used as the initial parameters in the optimization process. A 4D nonuniform rotational B-spline-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom and a patient 4D-CBCT are used to evaluate the algorithm. Image quality of 4D-CBCT is substantially improved by using the proposed strategy in both NCAT phantom and patient studies. The proposed method has the potential to improve the temporal resolution of 4D-CBCT. Improved 4D-CBCT can better characterize the motion of lung tumors and will be a valuable tool for image-guided adaptive radiation therapy.

  5. Interfractional Reproducibility in Pancreatic Position Based on Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Shibuya, Keiko; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Akira; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakata, Manabu; Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Itoh, Akio; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the interfractional positional variation of the pancreas using four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) and to determine the suitable phase of respiration for dose delivery methods to account for pancreatic tumor motion. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with pancreatic cancer were enrolled in this study. For each patient, 4D-CT scans were performed at CT simulation and three times during the course of treatment. Regions of interest were set to the intrapancreatic bile ducts as a surrogate for pancreatic position. The centroids of the regions of interest were calculated at end-inhalation and end-exhalation of the respiration phase. The ranges of respiratory motion and interfractional positional variation were evaluated in the left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions. Results: The medians of respiratory motion were 1.1 mm (range, 0.0-9.8 mm), 1.5 mm (range, 0.0-7.0 mm), and 5.0 mm (range, 0.0-12.5 mm) in the LR, AP, and SI directions, respectively. The means {+-} SDs of the interfractional positional variation at end-inhalation were 0.9 {+-} 5.1 mm (range, -9.2 to 15.6 mm), -1.9 {+-} 3.9 mm (range, -12.8 to 6.4 mm), and -1.3 {+-} 6.9 mm (range, -15.0 to 13.7 mm) and those at end-exhalation were 0.0 {+-} 3.1 mm (range, -7.0 to 5.3 mm), -1.2 {+-} 3.9 mm (range, -11.2 to 6.7 mm), and 0.1 {+-} 3.2 mm (range, -9.9 to 5.1 mm) in the LR, AP, and SI directions, respectively. The SDs of the interfractional positional variation in the LR and SI directions were significantly larger at end-inhalation than at end-exhalation (LR, p < 0.001; SI, p < 0.001). Conclusions: The ranges of respiratory motion during the course of treatment and the interfractional positional variation were not negligible. The interfractional positional reproducibility was higher at end-exhalation than at end-inhalation under free breathing.

  6. A reduced-order approach to four-dimensional variational data assimilation using proper orthogonal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yanhua; Zhu, Jiang; Navon, I. M.; Luo, Zhendong

    2007-04-01

    Four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4DVAR) is a powerful tool for data assimilation in meteorology and oceanography. However, a major hurdle in use of 4DVAR for realistic general circulation models is the dimension of the control space (generally equal to the size of the model state variable and typically of order 107-108) and the high computational cost in computing the cost function and its gradient that require integration model and its adjoint model.In this paper, we propose a 4DVAR approach based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). POD is an efficient way to carry out reduced order modelling by identifying the few most energetic modes in a sequence of snapshots from a time-dependent system, and providing a means of obtaining a low-dimensional description of the system's dynamics. The POD-based 4DVAR not only reduces the dimension of control space, but also reduces the size of dynamical model, both in dramatic ways. The novelty of our approach also consists in the inclusion of adaptability, applied when in the process of iterative control the new control variables depart significantly from the ones on which the POD model was based upon. In addition, these approaches also allow to conveniently constructing the adjoint model.The proposed POD-based 4DVAR methods are tested and demonstrated using a reduced gravity wave ocean model in Pacific domain in the context of identical twin data assimilation experiments. A comparison with data assimilation experiments in the full model space shows that with an appropriate selection of the basis functions the optimization in the POD space is able to provide accurate results at a reduced computational cost. The POD-based 4DVAR methods have the potential to approximate the performance of full order 4DVAR with less than 1/100 computer time of the full order 4DVAR. The HFTN (Hessian-free truncated-Newton)algorithm benefits most from the order reduction (see (Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids, in press)) since

  7. Dose and Position Measurements using a Novel Four-Dimensional In Vivo Dosimetry System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherpak, Amanda

    This work presents a comprehensive characterization of the dosimetric and position measurement characteristics as well as clinical implementation of a novel four-dimensional in vivo dosimetry system, RADPOS. Preliminary dose and position measurements were first conducted to evaluate any deviation from known characteristics of metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors, MOSFETs, and electromagnetic positioning systems when they are used alone. The system was then combined with a deformable tissue equivalent lung phantom to simulate respiratory-induced tumour motion and lung deformation and to evaluate the potential use of the system as an effective quality assurance tool for 4D conformal radiotherapy. The final phase of testing involved using the RADPOS 4D in vivo dosimetry system in two different clinical trials. The first involved characterizing the breathing patterns of lung cancer patients throughout the course of treatment and measuring inter-fraction variations in skin dose. Within this framework, the feasibility of general use of the RADPOS system on patients during daily treatment fractions was also assessed. The second trial involved a modified RADPOS detector that contained a MOSFET array, allowing for dose measurements at five different points. This detector was used to measure dose and position in the prostatic urethra throughout seed implantation for transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy. It has been found that the dosimetric response is similar to that of a microMOSFET, when used alone, aside from a slightly higher variation in angular response. Position measurements can be obtained with an uncertainty of +/- 2 mm when the detector remains within a specific optimal volume with respect to the magnetic field transmitter and when interfering metal objects are kept at least 200 mm away. Combining the RADPOS system with a deformable lung equivalent phantom allowed for efficient quality assurance of 4D radiation therapy, as

  8. Respiratory motion guided four dimensional cone beam computed tomography: encompassing irregular breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Ricky T.; Cooper, Benjamin J.; Kipritidis, John; Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-02-01

    Four dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) images suffer from angular under sampling and bunching of projections due to a lack of feedback between the respiratory signal and the acquisition system. To address this problem, respiratory motion guided 4DCBCT (RMG-4DCBCT) regulates the gantry velocity and projection time interval, in response to the patient’s respiratory signal, with the aim of acquiring evenly spaced projections in a number of phase or displacement bins during the respiratory cycle. Our previous study of RMG-4DCBCT was limited to sinusoidal breathing traces. Here we expand on that work to provide a practical algorithm for the case of real patient breathing data. We give a complete description of RMG-4DCBCT including full details on how to implement the algorithms to determine when to move the gantry and when to acquire projections in response to the patient’s respiratory signal. We simulate a realistic working RMG-4DCBCT system using 112 breathing traces from 24 lung cancer patients. Acquisition used phase-based binning and parameter settings typically used on commercial 4DCBCT systems (4 min acquisition time, 1200 projections across 10 respiratory bins), with the acceleration and velocity constraints of current generation linear accelerators. We quantified streaking artefacts and image noise for conventional and RMG-4DCBCT methods by reconstructing projection data selected from an oversampled set of Catphan phantom projections. RMG-4DCBCT allows us to optimally trade-off image quality, acquisition time and image dose. For example, for the same image quality and acquisition time as conventional 4DCBCT approximately half the imaging dose is needed. Alternatively, for the same imaging dose, the image quality as measured by the signal to noise ratio, is improved by 63% on average. C-arm cone beam computed tomography systems, with an acceleration up to 200°/s2, a velocity up to 100°/s and the acquisition of 80 projections per second

  9. Finite-size scaling relations for a four-dimensional Ising model on Creutz cellular automatons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merdan, Z.; Güzelsoy, E.

    2011-06-01

    The four-dimensional Ising model is simulated on Creutz cellular automatons using finite lattices with linear dimensions 4 ≤ L ≤ 8. The temperature variations and finite-size scaling plots of the specific heat and the Binder parameter verify the theoretically predicted expression near the infinite lattice critical temperature for 7, 14, and 21 independent simulations. Approximate values for the critical temperature of the infinite lattice of Tc(∞) = 6.6965(35), 6.6961(30), 6.6960(12), 6.6800(3), 6.6801(2), 6.6802(1) and 6.6925(22) (without the logarithmic factor), 6.6921(22) (without the logarithmic factor), 6.6909(2) (without the logarithmic factor), 6.6822(13) (with the logarithmic factor), 6.6819(11) (with the logarithmic factor), and 6.6808(8) (with the logarithmic factor) are obtained from the intersection points of the specific heat curves, the Binder parameter curves, and straight line fits of specific heat maxima for 7, 14, and 21 independent simulations, respectively. As the number of independent simulations increases, the results, 6.6802(1) and 6.6808(8), are in very good agreement with the results of a series expansion of Tc(∞), 6.6817(15) and 6.6802(2), the dynamic Monte Carlo value Tc(∞) = 6.6803(1), the cluster Monte Carlo value Tc(∞) = 6.680(1), and the Monte Carlo value using the Metropolis-Wolff cluster algorithm Tc(∞) = 6.6802632 ± 5 . 10-5. The average values calculated for the critical exponent of the specific heat are α =- 0.0402(15), - 0.0393(12), - 0.0391(11) with 7, 14, and 21 independent simulations, respectively. As the number of independent simulations increases, the result, α =- 0.0391(11), agrees with the series expansions result, α =- 0.12 ± 0.03 and the Monte Carlo result using the Metropolis-Wolff cluster algorithm, α ≥ 0 ± 0.04. However, α =- 0.0391(11) is inconsistent with the renormalization group prediction of α = 0.

  10. Applying Computerized Adaptive Testing to the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ): A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    de Beurs, Derek P; Terluin, Berend; Verhaak, Peter F

    2017-01-01

    Background Efficient screening questionnaires are useful in general practice. Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) is a method to improve the efficiency of questionnaires, as only the items that are particularly informative for a certain responder are dynamically selected. Objective The objective of this study was to test whether CAT could improve the efficiency of the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ), a frequently used self-report questionnaire designed to assess common psychosocial problems in general practice. Methods A simulation study was conducted using a sample of Dutch patients visiting a general practitioner (GP) with psychological problems (n=379). Responders completed a paper-and-pencil version of the 50-item 4DSQ and a psychometric evaluation was performed to check if the data agreed with item response theory (IRT) assumptions. Next, a CAT simulation was performed for each of the four 4DSQ scales (distress, depression, anxiety, and somatization), based on the given responses as if they had been collected through CAT. The following two stopping rules were applied for the administration of items: (1) stop if measurement precision is below a predefined level, or (2) stop if more than half of the items of the subscale are administered. Results In general, the items of each of the four scales agreed with IRT assumptions. Application of the first stopping rule reduced the length of the questionnaire by 38% (from 50 to 31 items on average). When the second stopping rule was also applied, the total number of items could be reduced by 56% (from 50 to 22 items on average). Conclusions CAT seems useful for improving the efficiency of the 4DSQ by 56% without losing a considerable amount of measurement precision. The CAT version of the 4DSQ may be useful as part of an online assessment to investigate the severity of mental health problems of patients visiting a GP. This simulation study is the first step needed for the development a CAT version of the 4

  11. T2-weighted four dimensional magnetic resonance imaging with result-driven phase sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yilin; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cai, Jing; Czito, Brian G.; Bashir, Mustafa R.

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: T2-weighted MRI provides excellent tumor-to-tissue contrast for target volume delineation in radiation therapy treatment planning. This study aims at developing a novel T2-weighted retrospective four dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) phase sorting technique for imaging organ/tumor respiratory motion. Methods: A 2D fast T2-weighted half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo MR sequence was used for image acquisition of 4D-MRI, with a frame rate of 2–3 frames/s. Respiratory motion was measured using an external breathing monitoring device. A phase sorting method was developed to sort the images by their corresponding respiratory phases. Besides, a result-driven strategy was applied to effectively utilize redundant images in the case when multiple images were allocated to a bin. This strategy, selecting the image with minimal amplitude error, will generate the most representative 4D-MRI. Since we are using a different image acquisition mode for 4D imaging (the sequential image acquisition scheme) with the conventionally used cine or helical image acquisition scheme, the 4D dataset sufficient condition was not obviously and directly predictable. An important challenge of the proposed technique was to determine the number of repeated scans (N{sub R}) required to obtain sufficient phase information at each slice position. To tackle this challenge, the authors first conducted computer simulations using real-time position management respiratory signals of the 29 cancer patients under an IRB-approved retrospective study to derive the relationships between N{sub R} and the following factors: number of slices (N{sub S}), number of 4D-MRI respiratory bins (N{sub B}), and starting phase at image acquisition (P{sub 0}). To validate the authors’ technique, 4D-MRI acquisition and reconstruction were simulated on a 4D digital extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) human phantom using simulation derived parameters. Twelve healthy volunteers were involved

  12. Four dimensional magnetic resonance imaging with retrospective k-space reordering: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yilin; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cai, Jing; Chen, Nan-kuei; Chu, Mei-Lan

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Current four dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) techniques lack sufficient temporal/spatial resolution and consistent tumor contrast. To overcome these limitations, this study presents the development and initial evaluation of a new strategy for 4D-MRI which is based on retrospective k-space reordering. Methods: We simulated a k-space reordered 4D-MRI on a 4D digital extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) human phantom. A 2D echo planar imaging MRI sequence [frame rate (F) = 0.448 Hz; image resolution (R) = 256 × 256; number of k-space segments (N{sub KS}) = 4] with sequential image acquisition mode was assumed for the simulation. Image quality of the simulated “4D-MRI” acquired from the XCAT phantom was qualitatively evaluated, and tumor motion trajectories were compared to input signals. In particular, mean absolute amplitude differences (D) and cross correlation coefficients (CC) were calculated. Furthermore, to evaluate the data sufficient condition for the new 4D-MRI technique, a comprehensive simulation study was performed using 30 cancer patients’ respiratory profiles to study the relationships between data completeness (C{sub p}) and a number of impacting factors: the number of repeated scans (N{sub R}), number of slices (N{sub S}), number of respiratory phase bins (N{sub P}), N{sub KS}, F, R, and initial respiratory phase at image acquisition (P{sub 0}). As a proof-of-concept, we implemented the proposed k-space reordering 4D-MRI technique on a T2-weighted fast spin echo MR sequence and tested it on a healthy volunteer. Results: The simulated 4D-MRI acquired from the XCAT phantom matched closely to the original XCAT images. Tumor motion trajectories measured from the simulated 4D-MRI matched well with input signals (D = 0.83 and 0.83 mm, and CC = 0.998 and 0.992 in superior–inferior and anterior–posterior directions, respectively). The relationship between C{sub p} and N{sub R} was found best represented by an exponential function

  13. Four-dimensional cone beam CT reconstruction and enhancement using a temporal nonlocal means method

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Xun; Tian Zhen; Lou Yifei; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Jiang, Steve B.

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) has been developed to provide respiratory phase-resolved volumetric imaging in image guided radiation therapy. Conventionally, it is reconstructed by first sorting the x-ray projections into multiple respiratory phase bins according to a breathing signal extracted either from the projection images or some external surrogates, and then reconstructing a 3D CBCT image in each phase bin independently using FDK algorithm. This method requires adequate number of projections for each phase, which can be achieved using a low gantry rotation or multiple gantry rotations. Inadequate number of projections in each phase bin results in low quality 4D-CBCT images with obvious streaking artifacts. 4D-CBCT images at different breathing phases share a lot of redundant information, because they represent the same anatomy captured at slightly different temporal points. Taking this redundancy along the temporal dimension into account can in principle facilitate the reconstruction in the situation of inadequate number of projection images. In this work, the authors propose two novel 4D-CBCT algorithms: an iterative reconstruction algorithm and an enhancement algorithm, utilizing a temporal nonlocal means (TNLM) method. Methods: The authors define a TNLM energy term for a given set of 4D-CBCT images. Minimization of this term favors those 4D-CBCT images such that any anatomical features at one spatial point at one phase can be found in a nearby spatial point at neighboring phases. 4D-CBCT reconstruction is achieved by minimizing a total energy containing a data fidelity term and the TNLM energy term. As for the image enhancement, 4D-CBCT images generated by the FDK algorithm are enhanced by minimizing the TNLM function while keeping the enhanced images close to the FDK results. A forward-backward splitting algorithm and a Gauss-Jacobi iteration method are employed to solve the problems. The algorithms implementation on

  14. Four-dimensional cone beam CT reconstruction and enhancement using a temporal nonlocal means method

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xun; Tian, Zhen; Lou, Yifei; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Jiang, Steve B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) has been developed to provide respiratory phase-resolved volumetric imaging in image guided radiation therapy. Conventionally, it is reconstructed by first sorting the x-ray projections into multiple respiratory phase bins according to a breathing signal extracted either from the projection images or some external surrogates, and then reconstructing a 3D CBCT image in each phase bin independently using FDK algorithm. This method requires adequate number of projections for each phase, which can be achieved using a low gantry rotation or multiple gantry rotations. Inadequate number of projections in each phase bin results in low quality 4D-CBCT images with obvious streaking artifacts. 4D-CBCT images at different breathing phases share a lot of redundant information, because they represent the same anatomy captured at slightly different temporal points. Taking this redundancy along the temporal dimension into account can in principle facilitate the reconstruction in the situation of inadequate number of projection images. In this work, the authors propose two novel 4D-CBCT algorithms: an iterative reconstruction algorithm and an enhancement algorithm, utilizing a temporal nonlocal means (TNLM) method. Methods: The authors define a TNLM energy term for a given set of 4D-CBCT images. Minimization of this term favors those 4D-CBCT images such that any anatomical features at one spatial point at one phase can be found in a nearby spatial point at neighboring phases. 4D-CBCT reconstruction is achieved by minimizing a total energy containing a data fidelity term and the TNLM energy term. As for the image enhancement, 4D-CBCT images generated by the FDK algorithm are enhanced by minimizing the TNLM function while keeping the enhanced images close to the FDK results. A forward–backward splitting algorithm and a Gauss–Jacobi iteration method are employed to solve the problems. The algorithms implementation

  15. Physical performance evaluation of a 256-slice CT-scanner for four-dimensional imaging.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shinichiro; Endo, Masahiro; Tsunoo, Takanori; Kandatsu, Susumu; Tanada, Shuji; Aradate, Hiroshi; Saito, Yasuo; Miyazaki, Hiroaki; Satoh, Kazumasa; Matsushita, Satoshi; Kusakabe, Masahiro

    2004-06-01

    We have developed a prototype 256-slice CT-scanner for four-dimensional (4D) imaging that employs continuous rotations of a cone-beam. Since a cone-beam scan along a circular orbit does not collect a complete set of data to make an exact reconstruction of a volume [three-dimensional (3D) image], it might cause disadvantages or artifacts. To examine effects of the cone-beam data collection on image quality, we have evaluated physical performance of the prototype 256-slice CT-scanner with 0.5 mm slices and compared it to that of a 16-slice CT-scanner with 0.75 mm slices. As a result, we found that image noise, uniformity, and high contrast detectability were independent of z coordinate. A Feldkamp artifact was observed in distortion measurements. Full width at half maximum (FWHM) of slice sensitivity profiles (SSP) increased with z coordinate though it seemed to be caused by other reasons than incompleteness of data. With regard to low contrast detectability, smaller objects were detected more clearly at the midplane (z = 0 mm) than at z = 40 mm, though circular-band like artifacts affected detection. The comparison between the 16-slice and the 256-slice scanners showed better performance for the 16-slice scanner regarding the SSP, low contrast detectability, and distortion. The inferiorities of the 256-slice scanner in other than distortion measurement (Feldkamp artifact) seemed to be partly caused by the prototype nature of the scanner and should be improved in the future scanner. The image noise, uniformity, and high contrast detectability were almost identical for both CTs. The 256-slice scanner was superior to the 16-slice scanner regarding the PSF, though it was caused by the smaller transverse beam width of the 256-slice scanner. In order to compare both scanners comprehensively in terms of exposure dose, noise, slice thickness, and transverse spatial resolution, K=Dsigma2ha3 was calculated, where D was exposure dose (CT dose index), sigma was magnitude of

  16. A construction of a large family of commuting pairs of integrable symplectic birational four-dimensional maps.

    PubMed

    Petrera, Matteo; Suris, Yuri B

    2017-02-01

    We give a construction of completely integrable four-dimensional Hamiltonian systems with cubic Hamilton functions. Applying to the corresponding pairs of commuting quadratic Hamiltonian vector fields the so called Kahan-Hirota-Kimura discretization scheme, we arrive at pairs of birational four-dimensional maps. We show that these maps are symplectic with respect to a symplectic structure that is a perturbation of the standard symplectic structure on [Formula: see text], and possess two independent integrals of motion, which are perturbations of the original Hamilton functions and which are in involution with respect to the perturbed symplectic structure. Thus, these maps are completely integrable in the Liouville-Arnold sense. Moreover, under a suitable normalization of the original pairs of vector fields, the pairs of maps commute and share the invariant symplectic structure and the two integrals of motion.

  17. Four-dimensional optical multiband-OFDM for beyond 1.4 Tb/s serial optical transmission.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Ivan; Batshon, Hussam G; Xu, Lei; Wang, Ting

    2011-01-17

    We propose a four-dimensional (4D) coded multiband-OFDM scheme suitable for beyond 1.4 Tb/s serial optical transport. The proposed scheme organizes the N-dimensional (ND) signal constellation points in the form of signal matrix; employs 2D-inverse FFT and 2D-FFT to perform modulation and demodulation, respectively; and exploits both orthogonal polarizations. This scheme can fully exploit advantages of OFDM to deal with chromatic dispersion, PMD and PDL effects; and multidimensional signal constellations to improve OSNR sensitivity of conventional optical OFDM. The improvement of 4D-OFDM over corresponding polarization-multiplexed QAM (with the same number of constellation points) ranges from 1.79 dB for 16 signal constellation point-four-dimensional-OFDM (16-4D-OFDM) up to 4.53 dB for 128-4D-OFDM.

  18. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Motion of four-dimensional rigid body around a fixed point: an elementary approach I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelomov, A. M.

    2005-12-01

    The goal of this letter is to give an elementary approach to the solution of Euler-Frahm equations for the Manakov four-dimensional case. For this, we use the Kötter approach and some results from the original papers by Schottky, Weber and Caspary. We hope that such an approach will be useful for the solution of the problem of an n-dimensional top.

  19. High-Performance Computing and Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation: The Impact on Future and Current Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makivic, Miloje S.

    1996-01-01

    This is the final technical report for the project entitled: "High-Performance Computing and Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation: The Impact on Future and Current Problems", funded at NPAC by the DAO at NASA/GSFC. First, the motivation for the project is given in the introductory section, followed by the executive summary of major accomplishments and the list of project-related publications. Detailed analysis and description of research results is given in subsequent chapters and in the Appendix.

  20. A novel four-dimensional radiotherapy planning strategy from a tumor-tracking beam's eye view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang; Cohen, Patrice; Xie, Huchen; Low, Daniel; Li, Diana; Rimner, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the feasibility of four-dimensional radiotherapy (4DRT) planning from a tumor-tracking beam's eye view (ttBEV) with reliable gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation, realistic normal tissue representation, high planning accuracy and low clinical workload, we propose and validate a novel 4D conformal planning strategy based on a synthesized 3.5D computed tomographic (3.5DCT) image with a motion-compensated tumor. To recreate patient anatomy from a ttBEV in the moving tumor coordinate system for 4DRT planning (or 4D planning), the centers of delineated GTVs in all phase CT images of 4DCT were aligned, and then the aligned CTs were averaged to produce a new 3.5DCT image. This GTV-motion-compensated CT contains a motionless target (with motion artifacts minimized) and motion-blurred normal tissues (with a realistic temporal density average). Semi-automatic threshold-based segmentation of the tumor, lung and body was applied, while manual delineation was used for other organs at risk (OARs). To validate this 3.5DCT-based 4D planning strategy, five patients with peripheral lung lesions of small size (<5 cm3) and large motion range (1.2-3.5 cm) were retrospectively studied for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using 3D conformal radiotherapy planning tools. The 3.5DCT-based 4D plan (3.5DCT plan) with 9-10 conformal beams was compared with the 4DCT-based 4D plan (4DCT plan). The 4DCT plan was derived from multiple 3D plans based on all phase CT images, each of which used the same conformal beam configuration but with an isocenter shift to aim at the moving tumor and a minor beam aperture and weighting adjustment to maintain plan conformality. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the 4DCT plan was created with two methods: one is an integrated DVH (iDVH4D), which is defined as the temporal average of all 3D-phase-plan DVHs, and the other (DVH4D) is based on the dose distribution in a reference phase CT image by dose warping from all phase plans using the

  1. Marginally trapped submanifolds in Lorentzian space forms and in the Lorentzian product of a space form by the real line

    SciTech Connect

    Anciaux, Henri; Godoy, Yamile

    2015-02-15

    We give local, explicit representation formulas for n-dimensional spacelike submanifolds which are marginally trapped in the Minkowski space ℝ{sub 1}{sup n+2}, the de Sitter space dS{sup n+2}, the anti-de Sitter space AdS{sup n+2} and the Lorentzian products S{sup n+1} × ℝ and ℍ{sup n+1} × ℝ of the sphere and the hyperbolic space by the real line.

  2. Hemodynamic Measurement Using Four-Dimensional Phase-Contrast MRI: Quantification of Hemodynamic Parameters and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Hojin; Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Jihoon; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, Young-Hak; Lee, Deok Hee

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements have been made to the use of time-resolved, three-dimensional phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is also named four-dimensional (4D) PC-MRI or 4D flow MRI, in the investigation of spatial and temporal variations in hemodynamic features in cardiovascular blood flow. The present article reviews the principle and analytical procedures of 4D PC-MRI. Various fluid dynamic biomarkers for possible clinical usage are also described, including wall shear stress, turbulent kinetic energy, and relative pressure. Lastly, this article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D PC-MRI in various cardiovascular regions. PMID:27390537

  3. Design and simulation of a descent controller for strategic four-dimensional aircraft navigation. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lax, F. M.

    1975-01-01

    A time-controlled navigation system applicable to the descent phase of flight for airline transport aircraft was developed and simulated. The design incorporates the linear discrete-time sampled-data version of the linearized continuous-time system describing the aircraft's aerodynamics. Using optimal linear quadratic control techniques, an optimal deterministic control regulator which is implementable on an airborne computer is designed. The navigation controller assists the pilot in complying with assigned times of arrival along a four-dimensional flight path in the presence of wind disturbances. The strategic air traffic control concept is also described, followed by the design of a strategic control descent path. A strategy for determining possible times of arrival at specified waypoints along the descent path and for generating the corresponding route-time profiles that are within the performance capabilities of the aircraft is presented. Using a mathematical model of the Boeing 707-320B aircraft along with a Boeing 707 cockpit simulator interfaced with an Adage AGT-30 digital computer, a real-time simulation of the complete aircraft aerodynamics was achieved. The strategic four-dimensional navigation controller for longitudinal dynamics was tested on the nonlinear aircraft model in the presence of 15, 30, and 45 knot head-winds. The results indicate that the controller preserved the desired accuracy and precision of a time-controlled aircraft navigation system.

  4. Investigating the Impact on Modeled Ozone Concentrations Using Meteorological Fields From WRF With and Updated Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation Approach”

    EPA Science Inventory

    The four-dimensional data assimilation (FDDA) technique in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) meteorological model has recently undergone an important update from the original version. Previous evaluation results have demonstrated that the updated FDDA approach in WRF pr...

  5. A Bäcklund transformation between the four-dimensional Martínez Alonso-Shabat and Ferapontov-Khusnutdinova equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglikov, B. S.; Morozov, O. I.

    2016-09-01

    We find a Bäcklund transformation between the four-dimensional Martínez Alonso-Shabat and Ferapontov-Khusnutdinova equations. We also discuss an integrable deformation of the Martínez Alonso-Shabat equation.

  6. Testing a four-dimensional variational data assimilation method using an improved intermediate coupled model for ENSO analysis and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chuan; Wu, Xinrong; Zhang, Rong-Hua

    2016-07-01

    A four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation method is implemented in an improved intermediate coupled model (ICM) of the tropical Pacific. A twin experiment is designed to evaluate the impact of the 4D-Var data assimilation algorithm on ENSO analysis and prediction based on the ICM. The model error is assumed to arise only from the parameter uncertainty. The "observation" of the SST anomaly, which is sampled from a "truth" model simulation that takes default parameter values and has Gaussian noise added, is directly assimilated into the assimilation model with its parameters set erroneously. Results show that 4D-Var effectively reduces the error of ENSO analysis and therefore improves the prediction skill of ENSO events compared with the non-assimilation case. These results provide a promising way for the ICM to achieve better real-time ENSO prediction.

  7. Patient-specific modelling of whole heart anatomy, dynamics and haemodynamics from four-dimensional cardiac CT images

    PubMed Central

    Mihalef, Viorel; Ionasec, Razvan Ioan; Sharma, Puneet; Georgescu, Bogdan; Voigt, Ingmar; Suehling, Michael; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing need for patient-specific and holistic modelling of the heart to support comprehensive disease assessment and intervention planning as well as prediction of therapeutic outcomes. We propose a patient-specific model of the whole human heart, which integrates morphology, dynamics and haemodynamic parameters at the organ level. The modelled cardiac structures are robustly estimated from four-dimensional cardiac computed tomography (CT), including all four chambers and valves as well as the ascending aorta and pulmonary artery. The patient-specific geometry serves as an input to a three-dimensional Navier–Stokes solver that derives realistic haemodynamics, constrained by the local anatomy, along the entire heart cycle. We evaluated our framework with various heart pathologies and the results correlate with relevant literature reports. PMID:22670200

  8. Four-dimensional symmetry from a broad viewpoint. II Invariant distribution of quantized field oscillators and questions on infinities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The foundation of the quantum field theory is changed by introducing a new universal probability principle into field operators: one single inherent and invariant probability distribution P(/k/) is postulated for boson and fermion field oscillators. This can be accomplished only when one treats the four-dimensional symmetry from a broad viewpoint. Special relativity is too restrictive to allow such a universal probability principle. A radical length, R, appears in physics through the probability distribution P(/k/). The force between two point particles vanishes when their relative distance tends to zero. This appears to be a general property for all forces and resembles the property of asymptotic freedom. The usual infinities in vacuum fluctuations and in local interactions, however complicated they may be, are all removed from quantum field theories. In appendix A a simple finite and unitary theory of unified electroweak interactions is discussed without assuming Higgs scalar bosons.

  9. Determination of critical linear lattice size for the four dimensional Ising model on the Creutz cellular automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizilirmak, Ganimet Mülazımoğlu

    2015-12-01

    The four-dimensional Ising model is simulated on the Creutz cellular automaton (CCA) near the infinite-lattice critical temperature for the lattice with the linear dimension 4 ⩽ L ⩽ 22. The temperature dependence of Binder parameter ( g L) are analyzed for the lattice with the linear dimension 4 ⩽ L ⩽ 22. In this study conducted highly detailed, two different types of behavior were determined as a result of varying linear lattice dimension. The infinite lattice critical temperatures are obtained to be T c = 6.6845 ± 0.0005 in interval 4 ⩽ L ⩽ 12 and T c = 6.6807 ± 0.0024 in interval 14 ⩽ L ⩽ 22. The finite and infinite lattice critical exponents for the order parameter, the magnetic susceptibility and the specific heat are computed from the results of simulations by using finite-size scaling relations. Critical linear lattice size have been identified as L = 14.

  10. Energy analysis of four dimensional extended hyperbolic Scarf I plus three dimensional separable trigonometric noncentral potentials using SUSY QM approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suparmi, A.; Cari, C.; Deta, U. A.; Handhika, J.

    2016-11-01

    The non-relativistic energies and wave functions of extended hyperbolic Scarf I plus separable non-central shape invariant potential in four dimensions are investigated using Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics (SUSY QM) Approach. The three dimensional separable non-central shape invariant angular potential consists of trigonometric Scarf II, Manning Rosen and Poschl-Teller potentials. The four dimensional Schrodinger equation with separable shape invariant non-central potential is reduced into four one dimensional Schrodinger equations through variable separation method. By using SUSY QM, the non-relativistic energies and radial wave functions are obtained from radial Schrodinger equation, the orbital quantum numbers and angular wave functions are obtained from angular Schrodinger equations. The extended potential means there is perturbation terms in potential and cause the decrease in energy spectra of Scarf I potential.

  11. Non-critical, near extremal AdS6 background as a holographic laboratory of four dimensional YM theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperstein, S.; Sonnenschein, J.

    2004-11-01

    We study certain properties of the low energy regime of a theory which resembles four dimensional YM theory in the framework of a non-critical holographic gravity dual. We use for the latter the near extremal AdS6 non-critical SUGRA. We extract the glueball spectra that associates with the fluctuations of the dilaton, one form and the graviton and compare the results to those of the critical near extremal D4 model and lattice simulations. We show an area law behavior for the Wilson loop and screening for the 't Hooft loop. The Luscher term is found to be -(3π/24L). We derive the Regge trajectories of glueballs associated with the spinning folded string configurations.

  12. Educational and public outreach programs using four-dimensional presentation of the earth and planetary science data with Dagik Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, A.; Tsugawa, T.; Nagayama, S.; Iwasaki, S.; Odagi, Y.; Kumano, Y.; Yoshikawa, M.; Akiya, Y.; Takahashi, M.

    2011-12-01

    We are developing educational and public outreach programs of the earth and planetary science data using a four-dimensional digital globe system, Dagik Earth. Dagik Earth is a simple and affordable four dimensional (three dimension in space and one dimension in time) presentation system of the earth and planetary scientific results. It can display the Earth and planets in three-dimensional way without glasses, and the time variation of the scientific data can be displayed on the Earth and planets image. It is easier to handle and lower cost than similar systems such as Geocosmos by Miraikan museum, Japan and Science On a Sphere by NOAA. At first it was developed as a presentation tool for public outreach programs in universities and research institutes by earth scientists. And now it is used in classrooms of schools and science museums collaboration with school teachers and museum curators. The three dimensional display can show the Earth and planets in exact form without any distortion, which cannot be achieved with two-dimensional display. Furthermore it can provide a sense of reality. Several educational programs have been developed and carried out in high schools, junior high schools, elementary schools and science centers. Several research institutes have used Dagik Earth in their public outreach programs to demonstrate their novel scientific results to public in universities, research institutes and science cafe events. A community of users and developers of Dagik Earth is being formed in Japan. In the presentation, the outline of Dagik Earth and the educational programs using Dagik Earth will be presented.

  13. Use of Respiratory-Correlated Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography to Determine Acceptable Treatment Margins for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Seth D.; Ford, Eric C.; Duhon, Mario; McNutt, Todd; Wong, John; Herman, Joseph M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Respiratory-induced excursions of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma could affect dose delivery. This study quantified tumor motion and evaluated standard treatment margins. Methods and Materials: Respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography images were obtained on 30 patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma; 15 of whom underwent repeat scanning before cone-down treatment. Treatment planning software was used to contour the gross tumor volume (GTV), bilateral kidneys, and biliary stent. Excursions were calculated according to the centroid of the contoured volumes. Results: The mean +- standard deviation GTV excursion in the superoinferior (SI) direction was 0.55 +- 0.23 cm; an expansion of 1.0 cm adequately accounted for the GTV motion in 97% of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients. Motion GTVs were generated and resulted in a 25% average volume increase compared with the static GTV. Of the 30 patients, 17 had biliary stents. The mean SI stent excursion was 0.84 +- 0.32 cm, significantly greater than the GTV motion. The xiphoid process moved an average of 0.35 +- 0.12 cm, significantly less than the GTV. The mean SI motion of the left and right kidneys was 0.65 +- 0.27 cm and 0.77 +- 0.30 cm, respectively. At repeat scanning, no significant changes were seen in the mean GTV size (p = .8) or excursion (p = .3). Conclusion: These data suggest that an asymmetric expansion of 1.0, 0.7, and 0.6 cm along the respective SI, anteroposterior, and medial-lateral directions is recommended if a respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography scan is not available to evaluate the tumor motion during treatment planning. Surrogates of tumor motion, such as biliary stents or external markers, should be used with caution.

  14. Theoretical study of different features of the fission process of excited nuclei in the framework of the modified statistical model and four-dimensional dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslamizadeh, H.

    2017-02-01

    Evaporation residue cross section, fission probability, anisotropy of fission fragment angular distribution, mass and energy distributions of fission fragments and the pre-scission neutron multiplicity for the excited compound nuclei {}168{{Y}}{{b}}, {}172{{Y}}{{b}}, {}178{{W}} and {}227{{P}}{{a}} produced in fusion reactions have been calculated in the framework of the modified statistical model and multidimensional dynamical model. In the dynamical calculations, the dynamics of fission of excited nuclei has been studied by solving three- and four-dimensional Langevin equations with dissipation generated through the chaos-weighted wall and window friction formula. Three collective shape coordinates plus the projection of total spin of the compound nucleus to the symmetry axis, K, were considered in the four-dimensional dynamical model. A non-constant dissipation coefficient of K, {γ }k, was applied in the four-dimensional dynamical calculations. A comparison of the results of the three- and four-dimensional dynamical models with the experimental data showed that the results of the four-dimensional dynamical model for the evaporation residue cross section, fission probability, anisotropy of fission fragment angular distribution, mass and energy distributions of fission fragments and the pre-scission neutron multiplicity are in better agreement with the experimental data. It was also shown that the modified statistical model can reproduce the above-mentioned experimental data by choosing appropriate values of the temperature coefficient of the effective potential, λ , and the scaling factor of the fission-barrier height, {r}s.

  15. Four-dimensional volume-of-interest reconstruction for cone-beam computed tomography-guided radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Moiz; Balter, Peter; Pan, Tinsu

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Data sufficiency are a major problem in four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) on linear accelerator-integrated scanners for image-guided radiotherapy. Scan times must be in the range of 4-6 min to avoid undersampling artifacts. Various image reconstruction algorithms have been proposed to accommodate undersampled data acquisitions, but these algorithms are computationally expensive, may require long reconstruction times, and may require algorithm parameters to be optimized. The authors present a novel reconstruction method, 4D volume-of-interest (4D-VOI) reconstruction which suppresses undersampling artifacts and resolves lung tumor motion for undersampled 1-min scans. The 4D-VOI reconstruction is much less computationally expensive than other 4D-CBCT algorithms. Methods: The 4D-VOI method uses respiration-correlated projection data to reconstruct a four-dimensional (4D) image inside a VOI containing the moving tumor, and uncorrelated projection data to reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) image outside the VOI. Anatomical motion is resolved inside the VOI and blurred outside the VOI. The authors acquired a 1-min. scan of an anthropomorphic chest phantom containing a moving water-filled sphere. The authors also used previously acquired 1-min scans for two lung cancer patients who had received CBCT-guided radiation therapy. The same raw data were used to test and compare the 4D-VOI reconstruction with the standard 4D reconstruction and the McKinnon-Bates (MB) reconstruction algorithms. Results: Both the 4D-VOI and the MB reconstructions suppress nearly all the streak artifacts compared with the standard 4D reconstruction, but the 4D-VOI has 3-8 times greater contrast-to-noise ratio than the MB reconstruction. In the dynamic chest phantom study, the 4D-VOI and the standard 4D reconstructions both resolved a moving sphere with an 18 mm displacement. The 4D-VOI reconstruction shows a motion blur of only 3 mm, whereas the MB reconstruction

  16. Investigation of four-dimensional computed tomography-based pulmonary ventilation imaging in patients with emphysematous lung regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Kabus, Sven; Klinder, Tobias; Lorenz, Cristian; von Berg, Jens; Blaffert, Thomas; Loo, Billy W., Jr.; Keall, Paul J.

    2011-04-01

    A pulmonary ventilation imaging technique based on four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) has advantages over existing techniques. However, physiologically accurate 4D-CT ventilation imaging has not been achieved in patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate 4D-CT ventilation imaging by correlating ventilation with emphysema. Emphysematous lung regions are less ventilated and can be used as surrogates for low ventilation. We tested the hypothesis: 4D-CT ventilation in emphysematous lung regions is significantly lower than in non-emphysematous regions. Four-dimensional CT ventilation images were created for 12 patients with emphysematous lung regions as observed on CT, using a total of four combinations of two deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms: surface-based (DIRsur) and volumetric (DIRvol), and two metrics: Hounsfield unit (HU) change (VHU) and Jacobian determinant of deformation (VJac), yielding four ventilation image sets per patient. Emphysematous lung regions were detected by density masking. We tested our hypothesis using the one-tailed t-test. Visually, different DIR algorithms and metrics yielded spatially variant 4D-CT ventilation images. The mean ventilation values in emphysematous lung regions were consistently lower than in non-emphysematous regions for all the combinations of DIR algorithms and metrics. VHU resulted in statistically significant differences for both DIRsur (0.14 ± 0.14 versus 0.29 ± 0.16, p = 0.01) and DIRvol (0.13 ± 0.13 versus 0.27 ± 0.15, p < 0.01). However, VJac resulted in non-significant differences for both DIRsur (0.15 ± 0.07 versus 0.17 ± 0.08, p = 0.20) and DIRvol (0.17 ± 0.08 versus 0.19 ± 0.09, p = 0.30). This study demonstrated the strong correlation between the HU-based 4D-CT ventilation and emphysema, which indicates the potential for HU-based 4D-CT ventilation imaging to achieve high physiologic accuracy. A further study is needed to confirm these results.

  17. Optical Coherence Tomography for Retinal Surgery: Perioperative Analysis to Real-Time Four-Dimensional Image-Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar M.; Keller, Brenton; Viehland, Christian; Shen, Liangbo; Seider, Michael I.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Toth, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    Magnification of the surgical field using the operating microscope facilitated profound innovations in retinal surgery in the 1970s, such as pars plana vitrectomy. Although surgical instrumentation and illumination techniques are continually developing, the operating microscope for vitreoretinal procedures has remained essentially unchanged and currently limits the surgeon's depth perception and assessment of subtle microanatomy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized clinical management of retinal pathology, and its introduction into the operating suite may have a similar impact on surgical visualization and treatment. In this article, we review the evolution of OCT for retinal surgery, from perioperative analysis to live volumetric (four-dimensional, 4D) image-guided surgery. We begin by briefly addressing the benefits and limitations of the operating microscope, the progression of OCT technology, and OCT applications in clinical/perioperative retinal imaging. Next, we review intraoperative OCT (iOCT) applications using handheld probes during surgical pauses, two-dimensional (2D) microscope-integrated OCT (MIOCT) of live surgery, and volumetric MIOCT of live surgery. The iOCT discussion focuses on technological advancements, applications during human retinal surgery, translational difficulties and limitations, and future directions. PMID:27409495

  18. Real-time volume rendering of four-dimensional images based on three-dimensional texture mapping.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J; Kim, J S; Kim, J S; Kim, I Y; Kim, S I

    2001-06-01

    A four-dimensional (4-D) image consists of three-dimensional (3-D) volume data that varies with time. It is used to express a deforming or moving object in virtual surgery or 4-D ultrasound. It is difficult to obtain 4-D images by conventional ray-casting or shear-warp factorization methods because of their time-consuming rendering process and the pre-processing stage necessary whenever the volume data are changed. Even when 3-D texture mapping is used, repeated volume loading is time-consuming in 4-D image rendering. In this study, we propose a method to reduce data loading time using coherence between currently loaded volume and previously loaded volume in order to achieve real-time rendering based on 3-D texture mapping. Volume data are divided into small bricks and each brick being loaded is tested for similarity to one that was already loaded in memory. If the brick passes the test, it is defined as 3-D texture by OpenGL functions. Later, the texture slices of the brick are mapped into polygons and blended by OpenGL blending functions. All bricks undergo this test. Using continuous deforming, 50 volumes are rendered in interactive time with SGI ONYX. Realtime volume rendering based on 3-D texture mapping is currently available for personal computers.

  19. Generation and visualization of four-dimensional MR angiography data using an undersampled 3-D projection trajectory.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Redmond, Michael J; Brodsky, Ethan K; Alexander, Andrew L; Lu, Aiming; Thornton, Francis J; Schulte, Michael J; Grist, Thomas M; Pipe, James G; Block, Walter F

    2006-02-01

    Time-resolved contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) angiography (CE-MRA) has gained in popularity relative to X-ray Digital Subtraction Angiography because it provides three-dimensional (3-D) spatial resolution and it is less invasive. We have previously presented methods that improve temporal resolution in CE-MRA while providing high spatial resolution by employing an undersampled 3-D projection (3D PR) trajectory. The increased coverage and isotropic resolution of the 3D PR acquisition simplify visualization of the vasculature from any perspective. We present a new algorithm to develop a set of time-resolved 3-D image volumes by preferentially weighting the 3D PR data according to its acquisition time. An iterative algorithm computes a series of density compensation functions for a regridding reconstruction, one for each time frame, that exploit the variable sampling density in 3D PR. The iterative weighting procedure simplifies the calculation of appropriate density compensation for arbitrary sampling patterns, which improve sampling efficiency and, thus, signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio, since it is does not require a closed-form calculation based on geometry. Current medical workstations can display these large four-dimensional studies, however, interactive cine animation of the data is only possible at significantly degraded resolution. Therefore, we also present a method for interactive visualization using powerful graphics cards and distributed processing. Results from volunteer and patient studies demonstrate the advantages of dynamic imaging with high spatial resolution.

  20. Restoration of four-dimensional diffeomorphism covariance in canonical general relativity: An intrinsic Hamilton-Jacobi approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salisbury, Donald; Renn, Jürgen; Sundermeyer, Kurt

    2016-02-01

    Classical background independence is reflected in Lagrangian general relativity through covariance under the full diffeomorphism group. We show how this independence can be maintained in a Hamilton-Jacobi approach that does not accord special privilege to any geometric structure. Intrinsic space-time curvature-based coordinates grant equal status to all geometric backgrounds. They play an essential role as a starting point for inequivalent semiclassical quantizations. The scheme calls into question Wheeler’s geometrodynamical approach and the associated Wheeler-DeWitt equation in which 3-metrics are featured geometrical objects. The formalism deals with variables that are manifestly invariant under the full diffeomorphism group. Yet, perhaps paradoxically, the liberty in selecting intrinsic coordinates is precisely as broad as is the original diffeomorphism freedom. We show how various ideas from the past five decades concerning the true degrees of freedom of general relativity can be interpreted in light of this new constrained Hamiltonian description. In particular, we show how the Kuchař multi-fingered time approach can be understood as a means of introducing full four-dimensional diffeomorphism invariants. Every choice of new phase space variables yields new Einstein-Hamilton-Jacobi constraining relations, and corresponding intrinsic Schrödinger equations. We show how to implement this freedom by canonical transformation of the intrinsic Hamiltonian. We also reinterpret and rectify significant work by Dittrich on the construction of “Dirac observables.”

  1. Clocking the anisotropic lattice dynamics of multi-walled carbon nanotubes by four-dimensional ultrafast transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Gaolong; Sun, Shuaishuai; Li, Zhongwen; Tian, Huanfang; Yang, Huaixin; Li, Jianqi

    2015-02-12

    Recent advances in the four-dimensional ultrafast transmission electron microscope (4D-UTEM) with combined spatial and temporal resolutions have made it possible to directly visualize structural dynamics of materials at the atomic level. Herein, we report on our development on a 4D-UTEM which can be operated properly on either the photo-emission or the thermionic mode. We demonstrate its ability to obtain sequences of snapshots with high spatial and temporal resolutions in the study of lattice dynamics of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). This investigation provides an atomic level description of remarkable anisotropic lattice dynamics at the picosecond timescales. Moreover, our UTEM measurements clearly reveal that distinguishable lattice relaxations appear in intra-tubular sheets on an ultrafast timescale of a few picoseconds and after then an evident lattice expansion along the radial direction. These anisotropic behaviors in the MWCNTs are considered arising from the variety of chemical bonding, i.e. the weak van der Waals bonding between the tubular planes and the strong covalent sp(2)-hybridized bonds in the tubular sheets.

  2. Clocking the anisotropic lattice dynamics of multi-walled carbon nanotubes by four-dimensional ultrafast transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Gaolong; Sun, Shuaishuai; Li, Zhongwen; Tian, Huanfang; Yang, Huaixin; Li, Jianqi

    2015-02-01

    Recent advances in the four-dimensional ultrafast transmission electron microscope (4D-UTEM) with combined spatial and temporal resolutions have made it possible to directly visualize structural dynamics of materials at the atomic level. Herein, we report on our development on a 4D-UTEM which can be operated properly on either the photo-emission or the thermionic mode. We demonstrate its ability to obtain sequences of snapshots with high spatial and temporal resolutions in the study of lattice dynamics of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). This investigation provides an atomic level description of remarkable anisotropic lattice dynamics at the picosecond timescales. Moreover, our UTEM measurements clearly reveal that distinguishable lattice relaxations appear in intra-tubular sheets on an ultrafast timescale of a few picoseconds and after then an evident lattice expansion along the radial direction. These anisotropic behaviors in the MWCNTs are considered arising from the variety of chemical bonding, i.e. the weak van der Waals bonding between the tubular planes and the strong covalent sp2-hybridized bonds in the tubular sheets.

  3. The quest for four-dimensional imaging in plant cell biology: it's just a matter of time

    PubMed Central

    Domozych, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Analysis of plant cell dynamics over time, or four-dimensional imaging (4-DI), represents a major goal of plant science. The ability to resolve structures in the third dimension within the cell or tissue during developmental events or in response to environmental or experimental stresses (i.e. 4-DI) is critical to our understanding of gene expression, post-expression modulations of macromolecules and sub-cellular system interactions. Scope Microscopy-based technologies have been profoundly integral to this type of investigation, and new and refined microscopy technologies now allow for the visualization of cell dynamics with unprecedented resolution, contrast and experimental versatility. However, certain realities of light and electron microscopy, choice of specimen and specimen preparation techniques limit the scope of readily attaining 4-DI. Today, the plant microscopist must use a combinatorial strategy whereby multiple microscopy-based investigations are used. Modern fluorescence, confocal laser scanning, transmission electron and scanning electron microscopy provide effective conduits for synthesizing data detailing live cell dynamics and highly resolved snapshots of specific cell structures that will ultimately lead to 4-DI. This review provides a synopsis of such technologies available. PMID:22628381

  4. Mitral annulus segmentation from four-dimensional ultrasound using a valve state predictor and constrained optical flow.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Robert J; Perrin, Douglas P; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Marx, Gerald R; del Nido, Pedro J; Howe, Robert D

    2012-02-01

    Measurement of the shape and motion of the mitral valve annulus has proven useful in a number of applications, including pathology diagnosis and mitral valve modeling. Current methods to delineate the annulus from four-dimensional (4D) ultrasound, however, either require extensive overhead or user-interaction, become inaccurate as they accumulate tracking error, or they do not account for annular shape or motion. This paper presents a new 4D annulus segmentation method to account for these deficiencies. The method builds on a previously published three-dimensional (3D) annulus segmentation algorithm that accurately and robustly segments the mitral annulus in a frame with a closed valve. In the 4D method, a valve state predictor determines when the valve is closed. Subsequently, the 3D annulus segmentation algorithm finds the annulus in those frames. For frames with an open valve, a constrained optical flow algorithm is used to the track the annulus. The only inputs to the algorithm are the selection of one frame with a closed valve and one user-specified point near the valve, neither of which needs to be precise. The accuracy of the tracking method is shown by comparing the tracking results to manual segmentations made by a group of experts, where an average RMS difference of 1.67±0.63mm was found across 30 tracked frames.

  5. Four-dimensional functional analysis of left and right ventricles using MR images and active appearance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Honghai; Thomas, Matthew T.; Walker, Nicholas E.; Stolpen, Alan H.; Wahle, Andreas; Scholz, Thomas D.; Sonka, Milan

    2007-03-01

    Conventional analysis of cardiac ventricular function from magnetic resonance images is typically relying on short axis image information only. Usually, two cardiac phases of the cardiac cycle are analyzed- the end-diastole and end-systole. Unfortunately, the short axis ventricular coverage is incomplete and inconsistent due to the lack of image information about the ventricular apex and base. In routine clinical images, this information is only available in long axis image planes. Additionally, the standard ventricular function indices such as ejection fraction are only based on a limited temporal information and therefore do not fully describe the four-dimensional (4D, 3D+time) nature of the heart's motion. We report a novel approach in which the long and short axis image data are fused to correct for respiratory motion and form a spatio-temporal 4D data sequence with cubic voxels. To automatically segment left and right cardiac ventricles, a 4D active appearance model was built. Applying the method to cardiac segmentation of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) and normal hearts, our method achieved mostly subvoxel signed surface positioning errors of 0.2+/-1.1 voxels for normal left ventricle, 0.6+/-1.5 voxels for normal right ventricle, 0.5+/-2.1 voxels for TOF left ventricle, and 1.3+/-2.6 voxels for TOF right ventricle. Using the computer segmentation results, the cardiac shape and motion indices and volume-time curves were derived as novel indices describing the ventricular function in 4D.

  6. Analysis of four-dimensional cardiac ventricular magnetic resonance images using statistical models of ventricular shape and cardiac motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Honghai; Walker, Nicholas; Mitchell, Steven C.; Thomas, Matthew; Wahle, Andreas; Scholz, Thomas; Sonka, Milan

    2006-03-01

    Conventional analysis of cardiac ventricular magnetic resonance images is performed using short axis images and does not guarantee completeness and consistency of the ventricle coverage. In this paper, a four-dimensional (4D, 3D+time) left and right ventricle statistical shape model was generated from the combination of the long axis and short axis images. Iterative mutual intensity registration and interpolation were used to merge the long axis and short axis images into isotropic 4D images and simultaneously correct existing breathing artifact. Distance-based shape interpolation and approximation were used to generate complete ventricle shapes from the long axis and short axis manual segmentations. Landmarks were automatically generated and propagated to 4D data samples using rigid alignment, distance-based merging, and B-spline transform. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used in model creation and analysis. The two strongest modes of the shape model captured the most important shape feature of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) patients, right ventricle enlargement. Classification of cardiac images into classes of normal and TOF subjects performed on 3D and 4D models showed 100% classification correctness rates for both normal and TOF subjects using k-Nearest Neighbor (k=1 or 3) classifier and the two strongest shape modes.

  7. Evaluation of three presets for four-dimensional cone beam CT in lung radiotherapy verification by visual grading analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Vibeke N; Fast, Martin F; Nill, Simeon; McDonald, Fiona; Ahmed, Merina; Thomas, Karen; McNair, Helen A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate three image acquisition presets for four-dimensional cone beam CT (CBCT) to identify an optimal preset for lung tumour image quality while minimizing dose and acquisition time. Methods: Nine patients undergoing radical conventionally fractionated radiotherapy for lung cancer had verification CBCTs acquired using three presets: Preset 1 on Day 1 (11 mGy dose, 240 s acquisition time), Preset 2 on Day 2 (9 mGy dose, 133 s acquisition time) and Preset 3 on Day 3 (9 mGy dose, 67 s acquisition time). The clarity of the tumour and other thoracic structures, and the acceptability of the match, were retrospectively graded by visual grading analysis (VGA). Logistic regression was used to identify the most appropriate preset and any factors that might influence the result. Results: Presets 1 and 2 met a clinical requirement of 75% of structures to be rated “Clear” or above and 75% of matches to be rated “Acceptable” or above. Clarity is significantly affected by preset, patient, observer and structure. Match acceptability is significantly affected by preset. Conclusion: The application of VGA in this initial study enabled a provisional selection of an optimal preset (Preset 2) to be made. Advances in knowledge: This was the first application of VGA to the investigation of presets for CBCT. PMID:27109735

  8. The finite-size scaling study of four-dimensional Ising model in the presence of external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merdan, Ziya; Kürkçü, Cihan; Öztürk, Mustafa K.

    2014-12-01

    The four-dimensional ferromagnetic Ising model in external magnetic field is simulated on the Creutz cellular automaton algorithm using finite-size lattices with linear dimension 4 ≤ L ≤ 8. The critical temperature value of infinite lattice, Tc χ ( ∞ ) = 6 , 680 (1) obtained for h = 0 agrees well with the values T c ( ∞ ) ≈ 6.68 obtained previously using different methods. Moreover, h = 0.00025 in our work also agrees with all the results obtained from h = 0 in the literature. However, there are no works for h ≠ 0 in the literature. The value of the field critical exponent (δ = 3.0136(3)) is in good agreement with δ = 3 which is obtained from scaling law of Widom. In spite of the finite-size scaling relations of | M L ( t ) | and χ L ( t ) for 0 ≤ h ≤ 0.001 are verified; however, in the cases of 0.0025 ≤ h ≤ 0.1 they are not verified.

  9. Fast and exact method for computing a stack of images at various focuses from a four-dimensional light field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mhabary, Ziv; Levi, Ofer; Small, Eran; Stern, Adrian

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an efficient method for computing a stack of images digitally focused at various lengths from a four-dimensional light field (LF). The main contribution of this work is a fast and algebraically exact method that does not require interpolation in the frequency or spatial domains as alternative methods do. The proposed imaging operator combines two-dimensional (2-D) fast Fourier transform with 2-D fractional Fourier transform and has computational complexity of O(N log N), where N is the number of pixels in the LF tesseract of dimension N=nx×ny×nu×nv. The whole method consists of unitary vector-based operations; therefore, parallel implementation is easy and can contribute additional speed up. While current state of the art methods suffer from inherent tradeoff between the reconstruction quality and computational complexity, the proposed method benefits of both low-computational complexity and high-reconstruction quality. We also offer a solution for refocusing at distances that are not included in the reconstructed images stack. For such a case, we provide a modified version of our method, which is also algebraically exact and has lower computational complexity than other exact methods.

  10. String or branelike solutions in four-dimensional Einstein gravity in the presence of a cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Youngone; Kang, Gungwon; Kim, Hyeong-Chan; Lee, Jungjai

    2011-10-15

    We investigate string or branelike solutions for four-dimensional vacuum Einstein equations in the presence of a cosmological constant. For the case of negative cosmological constant, the Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black string is the only warped stringlike solution. The general solutions for nonwarped branelike configurations are found and they are characterized by the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner mass density and two tensions. Interestingly, the sum of these tensions is equal to the minus of the mass density. Other than the well-known black string and soliton spacetimes, all the static solutions possess naked singularities. The time-dependent solutions can be regarded as the anti-de Sitter extension of the well-known Kasner solutions. The speciality of those static regular solutions and the implication of singular solutions are also discussed in the context of cylindrical matter collapse. For the case of positive cosmological constant, the Kasner-de Sitter spacetime appears as time-dependent solutions and all static solutions are found to be naked singular.

  11. A novel color image encryption algorithm based on genetic recombination and the four-dimensional memristive hyperchaotic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Xiu-Li; Gan, Zhi-Hua; Lu, Yang; Zhang, Miao-Hui; Chen, Yi-Ran

    2016-10-01

    Recently, many image encryption algorithms based on chaos have been proposed. Most of the previous algorithms encrypt components R, G, and B of color images independently and neglect the high correlation between them. In the paper, a novel color image encryption algorithm is introduced. The 24 bit planes of components R, G, and B of the color plain image are obtained and recombined into 4 compound bit planes, and this can make the three components affect each other. A four-dimensional (4D) memristive hyperchaotic system generates the pseudorandom key streams and its initial values come from the SHA 256 hash value of the color plain image. The compound bit planes and key streams are confused according to the principles of genetic recombination, then confusion and diffusion as a union are applied to the bit planes, and the color cipher image is obtained. Experimental results and security analyses demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is secure and effective so that it may be adopted for secure communication. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61203094 and 61305042), the Natural Science Foundation of the United States (Grant Nos. CNS-1253424 and ECCS-1202225), the Science and Technology Foundation of Henan Province, China (Grant No. 152102210048), the Foundation and Frontier Project of Henan Province, China (Grant No. 162300410196), the Natural Science Foundation of Educational Committee of Henan Province, China (Grant No. 14A413015), and the Research Foundation of Henan University, China (Grant No. xxjc20140006).

  12. Locating and tracing of anatomical landmarks based on full-field four-dimensional measurement of human body surface.

    PubMed

    Sitnik, Robert; Witkowski, Marcin

    2008-01-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) (3D+time) measurement systems make it possible today to measure objects while moving and deforming. One of the fields where 4D systems prove themselves useful is medicine--particularly orthopedics and neural sciences--where measurement results may be used to estimate dynamic parameters of a patient's movement. Relatively new in 4D, optical full-field shape measurement systems capture more data than standard marker-based systems and open new ways for clinical diagnosis. However, before this is possible, the appropriate 4D data processing and analysis methods need to be developed. We present a new data analysis path for 4D data input as well as new shape parameters describing local features of a surface. The developed shape parameters are easier and quicker to calculate than standard surface parameters, such as curvatures, but they give results that are very similar to the latter. The presented 4D data analysis path allows characteristic areas on the body, so-called anatomical landmarks, to be located and traces them in time along the measurement sequence. We also present the general concepts and describe selected steps of the developed 4D data analysis path. The algorithms were implemented and tested on real and computer-generated data representing the surface of lower limbs. Finally, we give sample processing and analysis results.

  13. The effects of discontinuities in the Betts Miller cumulus convection scheme on four-dimensional variational data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zupanski, Dušanka

    1993-10-01

    A tangent linear and an adjoint of the large-scale precipitation and the cumulus convection processes in the National Meteorological Center's NMC/ETA regional forecast model are developed. The effects of discontinuities in the Betts Miller cumulus convection scheme are examined and applicability of derivative minimization methods in four-dimensional variational (4D VAR) data assimilation is considered. It is demonstrated that discontinuities present in the control Betts Miller cumulus convection scheme increase linearization errors to a large extent and have adverse effects on 4D VAR data assimilation. In the experiments performed, discontinuities in the cumulus convection scheme have the most serious effect in low layers. These problems can be reduced by modifying the scheme to make it more continuous in low layers. Positive effects of inclusion of cumulus convection in 4D VAR data assimilation are found in upper layers, especially in humidity fields. The "observations" used are optimal interpolation analyses of temperature, surface pressure, wind and specific humidity. By inclusion of other data, more closely related to the convective processes, such as precipitation and clouds, more benefits should be expected. Even with the difficulties caused by discontinuities, derivative minimization techniques appear to work for the data assimilation problems. In order to get more general conclusions, more experiments are needed with different synoptic situations. The inclusion of other important physical processes such as radiation, surface friction and turbulence in the forecast and the corresponding adjoint models could alter the results since they may reinforce the effects of discontinuities.

  14. Four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) using image-based respiratory surrogate: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jing; Chang, Zheng; Wang, Zhiheng; Paul Segars, William; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) has been widely used in radiation therapy to assess patient-specific breathing motion for determining individual safety margins. However, it has two major drawbacks: low soft-tissue contrast and an excessive imaging dose to the patient. This research aimed to develop a clinically feasible four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) technique to overcome these limitations. Methods: The proposed 4D-MRI technique was achieved by continuously acquiring axial images throughout the breathing cycle using fast 2D cine-MR imaging, and then retrospectively sorting the images by respiratory phase. The key component of the technique was the use of body area (BA) of the axial MR images as an internal respiratory surrogate to extract the breathing signal. The validation of the BA surrogate was performed using 4D-CT images of 12 cancer patients by comparing the respiratory phases determined using the BA method to those determined clinically using the Real-time position management (RPM) system. The feasibility of the 4D-MRI technique was tested on a dynamic motion phantom, the 4D extended Cardiac Torso (XCAT) digital phantom, and two healthy human subjects. Results: Respiratory phases determined from the BA matched closely to those determined from the RPM: mean (±SD) difference in phase: −3.9% (±6.4%); mean (±SD) absolute difference in phase: 10.40% (±3.3%); mean (±SD) correlation coefficient: 0.93 (±0.04). In the motion phantom study, 4D-MRI clearly showed the sinusoidal motion of the phantom; image artifacts observed were minimal to none. Motion trajectories measured from 4D-MRI and 2D cine-MRI (used as a reference) matched excellently: the mean (±SD) absolute difference in motion amplitude: −0.3 (±0.5) mm. In the 4D-XCAT phantom study, the simulated “4D-MRI” images showed good consistency with the original 4D-XCAT phantom images. The motion trajectory of the hypothesized “tumor” matched

  15. Dissipation of the tilting degree of freedom in heavy-ion-induced fission from four-dimensional Langevin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadtochy, P. N.; Ryabov, E. G.; Cheredov, A. V.; Adeev, G. D.

    2016-10-01

    A stochastic approach based on four-dimensional Langevin fission dynamics is applied to the calculation of a wide set of experimental observables of excited compound nuclei from 199Pb to 248Cf formed in reactions induced by heavy ions. In the model under investigation, the tilting degree of freedom ( K coordinate) representing the projection of the total angular momentum onto the symmetry axis of the nucleus is taken into account in addition to three collective shape coordinates introduced on the basis of {c,h,α} parametrization. The evolution of the K coordinate is described by means of the Langevin equation in the overdamped regime. The friction tensor for the shape collective coordinates is calculated under the assumption of the modified version of the one-body dissipation mechanism, where the reduction coefficient ks of the contribution from the "wall" formula is introduced. The calculations are performed both for the constant values of the coefficient ks and for the coordinate-dependent reduction coefficient ks(q) which is found on the basis of the "chaos-weighted wall formula". Different possibilities of the deformation-dependent dissipation coefficient (γK) for the K coordinate are investigated. The presented results demonstrate that an impact of the ks and γK parameters on the calculated observable fission characteristics can be selectively probed. It was found that it is possible to describe the experimental data consistently with the deformation-dependent γK(q) coefficient for shapes featuring a neck, which predicts quite small values of γK=0.0077 (MeV zs)-1/2 and constant γK=0.1-0.4 (MeV zs)-1/2 for compact shapes featuring no neck.

  16. Preliminary results of a four-dimensional data assimilation technique at a Mediterranean coastal area, Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avolio, E.; Federico, S.; Sempreviva, A. M.; Calidonna, C. R.; de Leo, L.; Bellecci, C.

    2010-09-01

    A four-dimensional data assimilation (FDDA) scheme based on a Newtonian relaxation (or "nudging") was tested using observational asynoptic data available at a coastal site in the Central Mediterranean peninsula of Calabria, in South Italy. Since nudging is performed toward observations, the technique is referred to as "observational data assimilation (ODA)" and it was incorporated into a tailored version of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). This version of RAMS was run at high spatial horizontal resolution (1km), with the purpose of investigating the improvements of the model performance obtained by the assimilation. Wind profiler, sodar and surface meteorological station measurements were considered. In particular, we assimilated vertical wind profiles from the sodar and wind profiler, and wind, temperature and specific humidity from the surface meteorological station. All instruments are installed and operated routinely at the experimental field of the ISAC/CNR-CRATI located at 600 m from the Tyrrhenian coastline. A second station, located few kilometres to the NE of the experimental field, is considered as independent verification. The RAMS meteorological fields, simulated with and without data assimilation, were evaluated and compared for selected case studies in the summer 2008; several experiments were performed for each case (assimilation for the entire simulation time, and for different time windows). The results show that the assimilation of wind and/or temperature data, both throughout the simulation time (continuous FDDA) and for a 12h time window (forecasting configuration), produces improvements of the model performance. Improvements are substantial (50% error reduction) in the case of continuous FDDA, while they are reduced in the case of forecasting configuration (5% to 20% error reduction, depending on cases). The obtained meteorological fields are finalised as input into air quality and agro-meteorological models, and also for

  17. Near-infrared spectra and rovibrational dynamics on a four-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface of (HBr)2.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Chará, J; McIntosh, A L; Wang, Z; Lucchese, R R; Bevan, J W

    2004-06-08

    Supersonic jet investigations of the (HBr)(2) dimer have been carried out using a tunable diode laser spectrometer to provide accurate data for comparison with results from a four-dimensional (4-D) ab initio potential energy surface (PES). The near-infrared nu(1) (+/-), nu(2) (+/-), and (nu(1)+nu(4))(-) bands of (H (79)Br)(2), (H (79)Br-H (81)Br), and (H (81)Br)(2) isotopomers have been recorded in the range 2500-2600 cm(-1) using a CW slit jet expansion with an upgraded near-infrared diode laser spectrometer. The 4-D PES has been calculated for (HBr)(2) using second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory with an augmented and polarized 6-311G basis set. The potential is characterized by a global minimum occurring at the H bond structure with the distance between the center of masses (CM) of the monomer being R(CM)=4.10 A with angles theta(A)=10 degrees, theta(B)=100 degrees and a well depth of 692.2 cm(-1), theta(A) is the angle the HBr bond of monomer A makes with the vector from the CM of A to the CM of B, and theta(B) is the corresponding angle monomer B makes with the same CM-CM vector. The barrier for the H interchange occurs at the closed C(2h) structure for which R(CM)=4.07 A, theta(A)=45 degrees, theta(B)=135 degrees, and the barrier height is 73.9 cm(-1). The PES was fitted using a linear-least squares method and the rovibrational energy levels of the complex were calculated by a split pseudospectral method. The spectroscopic data provide accurate molecular parameters for the dimer that are then compared with the results predicted on the basis of the 4-D ab initio PES.

  18. TH-A-19A-10: Fast Four Dimensional Monte Carlo Dose Computations for Proton Therapy of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mirkovic, D; Titt, U; Mohan, R; Yepes, P

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate a fast and accurate four dimensional (4D) Monte Carlo (MC) dose computation system for proton therapy of lung cancer and other thoracic and abdominal malignancies in which the delivered dose distributions can be affected by respiratory motion of the patient. Methods: A 4D computer tomography (CT) scan for a lung cancer patient treated with protons in our clinic was used to create a time dependent patient model using our in-house, MCNPX-based Monte Carlo system (“MC{sup 2}”). The beam line configurations for two passively scattered proton beams used in the actual treatment were extracted from the clinical treatment plan and a set of input files was created automatically using MC{sup 2}. A full MC simulation of the beam line was computed using MCNPX and a set of phase space files for each beam was collected at the distal surface of the range compensator. The particles from these phase space files were transported through the 10 voxelized patient models corresponding to the 10 phases of the breathing cycle in the 4DCT, using MCNPX and an accelerated (fast) MC code called “FDC”, developed by us and which is based on the track repeating algorithm. The accuracy of the fast algorithm was assessed by comparing the two time dependent dose distributions. Results: The error of less than 1% in 100% of the voxels in all phases of the breathing cycle was achieved using this method with a speedup of more than 1000 times. Conclusion: The proposed method, which uses full MC to simulate the beam line and the accelerated MC code FDC for the time consuming particle transport inside the complex, time dependent, geometry of the patient shows excellent accuracy together with an extraordinary speed.

  19. Quantification of left and right atrial kinetic energy using four-dimensional intracardiac magnetic resonance imaging flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Per M; Töger, Johannes; Heiberg, Einar; Carlsson, Marcus; Arheden, Håkan

    2013-05-15

    Kinetic energy (KE) of atrial blood has been postulated as a possible contributor to ventricular filling. Therefore, we aimed to quantify the left (LA) and right (RA) atrial blood KE using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent CMR at 3 T, including a four-dimensional phase-contrast flow sequence. Mean LA KE was lower than RA KE (1.1 ± 0.1 vs. 1.7 ± 0.1 mJ, P < 0.01). Three KE peaks were seen in both atria: one in ventricular systole, one during early ventricular diastole, and one during atrial contraction. The systolic LA peak was significantly smaller than the RA peak (P < 0.001), and the early diastolic LA peak was larger than the RA peak (P < 0.05). Rotational flow contained 46 ± 7% of total KE and conserved energy better than nonrotational flow did. The KE increase in early diastole was higher in the LA (P < 0.001). Systolic KE correlated with the combination of atrial volume and systolic velocity of the atrioventricular plane displacement (r(2) = 0.57 for LA and r(2) = 0.64 for RA). Early diastolic KE of the LA correlated with left ventricle (LV) mass (r(2) = 0.28), however, no such correlation was found in the right heart. This suggests that LA KE increases during early ventricular diastole due to LV elastic recoil, indicating that LV filling is dependent on diastolic suction. Right ventricle (RV) relaxation does not seem to contribute to atrial KE. Instead, RA KE generated during ventricular systole may be conserved in a hydraulic "flywheel" and transferred to the RV through helical flow, which may contribute to RV filling.

  20. NCAR Global Climate Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation (CFDDA) Hourly 40 km Reanalysis: a high-resolution dynamically downscaled climatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, G. S.; Hou, C. Y.; Rife, D. L.; Dattore, R.

    2014-12-01

    Wind energy cost models incur inaccuracies from uncertainty in ambient wind measurements and estimates. This inhibits the best possible investment in wind energy infrastructure and management systems. High-resolution temporal and spatial wind data needed for wind availability analysis—usually created with regional-scale models—have traditionally been proprietary and costly to obtain. Freely available global model data suffers from either lower spatial or temporal resolution, or both. Low spatial resolution fails to realistically represent wind speeds in complex terrain. Low temporal resolution fails to capture the full diurnal cycle of wind behavior. The NCAR Global Climate Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation (CFDDA) Hourly 40 km Reanalysis was developed in 2009-2010 by the Research Applications Laboratory (RAL) to provide the most accurate boundary layer wind estimates available at that time. CFDDA used 28 sigma levels, with 19 between the surface and 700 hPa, a four-fold improvement over the contemporary NWP models. The dataset spans 21 years, 1985-2005, providing hourly atmospheric parameters, including winds, on 28 vertical levels on a global 40 km grid. This presentation will introduce the modeling and assimilation strategy, highlight the available data content including the parameter set, and review the data access options available from the RDA. CFDDA project partners, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), NCAR RAL and NCAR Mesoscale & Microscale Meteorology (MMM) divisions are offering this dataset to the public for free with minor restrictions. NCAR Research Data Archive (RDA), hosted by the Computational and Information Systems Laboratory, provides data support. It is available at http://rda.ucar.edu/datasets/ds604.0/

  1. Development of a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled X-ray head

    SciTech Connect

    Kamino, Yuichiro . E-mail: daisaku_horiuchi@mhi.co.jp; Takayama, Kenji; Kokubo, Masaki; Narita, Yuichiro; Hirai, Etsuro; Kawawda, Noriyuki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Nagata, Yasushi; Nishidai, Takehiro; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a new four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system, which enables precise setup, real-time tumor tracking, and pursuit irradiation. Methods and Materials: The system has an innovative gimbaled X-ray head that enables small-angle ({+-}2.4{sup o}) rotations (pan and tilt) along the two orthogonal gimbals. This design provides for both accurate beam positioning at the isocenter by actively compensating for mechanical distortion and quick pursuit of the target. The X-ray head is composed of an ultralight C-band linear accelerator and a multileaf collimator. The gimbaled X-ray head is mounted on a rigid O-ring structure with an on-board imaging subsystem composed of two sets of kilovoltage X-ray tubes and flat panel detectors, which provides a pair of radiographs, cone beam computed tomography images useful for image guided setup, and real-time fluoroscopic monitoring for pursuit irradiation. Results: The root mean square accuracy of the static beam positioning was 0.1 mm for 360{sup o} of O-ring rotation. The dynamic beam response and positioning accuracy was {+-}0.6 mm for a 0.75 Hz, 40-mm stroke and {+-}0.4 mm for a 2.0 Hz, 8-mm stroke. The quality of the images was encouraging for using the tomography-based setup. Fluoroscopic images were sufficient for monitoring and tracking lung tumors. Conclusions: Key functions and capabilities of our new system are very promising for precise image-guided setup and for tracking and pursuit irradiation of a moving target.

  2. Four-dimensional intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning for dynamic tracking using a direct aperture deformation (DAD) method

    SciTech Connect

    Gui Minzhi; Feng Yuanming; Yi Byongyong; Dhople, Anil Arvind; Yu, Cedric

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: Planning for the delivery of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to a moving target, referred to as four-dimensional (4D) IMRT planning, is a crucial step for achieving the treatment objectives for sites that move during treatment delivery. The authors proposed a simplistic method that accounts for both rigid and nonrigid respiration-induced target motion based on 4D computed tomography (4DCT) data sets. Methods: A set of MLC apertures and weights was first optimized on a reference phase of a 4DCT data set. At each beam angle, the apertures were morphed from the reference phase to each of the remaining phases according to the relative shape changes in the beam's eye view of the target. Three different planning schemes were evaluated for two lung cases and one pancreas patient: (1) Individually optimizing each breathing phase; (2) optimizing the reference phase and shifting the optimized apertures to other breathing phases based on a rigid-body image registration; and (3) optimizing the reference phase and deforming the optimized apertures to the other phases based on the deformation and translation of target contours. Planning results using scheme 1 serves as the ''gold standard'' for plan quality assessment; scheme 2 is the method previously proposed in the literature; and scheme 3 is the method the authors proposed in this article. The optimization results were compared between the three schemes for all three cases. Results: The proposed scheme 3 is comparable to scheme 1 in plan quality, and provides improved target coverage and conformity with similar normal tissue dose compared with scheme 2. Conclusions: Direct aperture deformation method for 4D IMRT planning improves upon methods that only consider rigid-body motion and achieves a plan quality close to that optimized for each of the phases.

  3. TH-E-17A-05: Optimizing Four Dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography Projection Allocation to Respiratory Bins

    SciTech Connect

    OBrien, R; Shieh, C; Kipritidis, J; Keall, P

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Four dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) is an emerging image guidance strategy but it can suffer from poor image quality. To avoid repeating scans it is beneficial to make the best use of the imaging data obtained. For conventional 4DCBCT the location and size of respiratory bins is fixed and projections are allocated to the respiratory bin within which it falls. Strictly adhering to this rule is unnecessary and can compromise image quality. In this study we optimize the size and location of respiratory bins and allow projections to be sourced from adjacent phases of the respiratory cycle. Methods: A mathematical optimization framework using mixed integer quadratic programming has been developed that determines when to source projections from adjacent respiratory bins and optimizes the size and location of the bins. The method, which we will call projection sharing, runs in under 2 seconds of CPU time. Five 4DCBCT datasets of stage III-IV lung cancer patients were used to test the algorithm. The standard deviation of the angular separation between projections (SD-A) and the standard deviation in the volume of the reconstructed fiducial gold coil (SD-V) were used as proxies to measure streaking artefacts and motion blur respectively. Results: The SD-A using displacement binning and projection sharing was 30%–50% smaller than conventional phase based binning and 59%–76% smaller than conventional displacement binning indicating more uniformly spaced projections and fewer streaking artefacts. The SD-V was 20–90% smaller when using projection sharing than using conventional phase based binning suggesting more uniform marker segmentation and less motion blur. Conclusion: Image quality was visibly and significantly improved with projection sharing. Projection sharing does not require any modifications to existing hardware and offers a more robust replacement to phase based binning, or, an option if phase based reconstruction is not of a

  4. Impact of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Pulmonary Ventilation Imaging-Based Functional Avoidance for Lung Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Kabus, Sven; Berg, Jens von; Lorenz, Cristian; Keall, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) pulmonary ventilation imaging-based functional treatment planning that avoids high-functional lung regions. Methods and Materials: 4D-CT ventilation images were created from 15 non-small-cell lung cancer patients using deformable image registration and quantitative analysis of the resultant displacement vector field. For each patient, anatomic and functional plans were created for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Consistent beam angles and dose-volume constraints were used for all cases. The plans with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0617-defined major deviations were modified until clinically acceptable. Functional planning spared the high-functional lung, and anatomic planning treated the lungs as uniformly functional. We quantified the impact of functional planning compared with anatomic planning using the two- or one-tailed t test. Results: Functional planning led to significant reductions in the high-functional lung dose, without significantly increasing other critical organ doses, but at the expense of significantly degraded the planning target volume (PTV) conformity and homogeneity. The average reduction in the high-functional lung mean dose was 1.8 Gy for IMRT (p < .001) and 2.0 Gy for VMAT (p < .001). Significantly larger changes occurred in the metrics for patients with a larger amount of high-functional lung adjacent to the PTV. Conclusion: The results of the present study have demonstrated the impact of 4D-CT ventilation imaging-based functional planning for IMRT and VMAT for the first time. Our findings indicate the potential of functional planning in lung functional avoidance for both IMRT and VMAT, particularly for patients who have high-functional lung adjacent to the PTV.

  5. Implementation of the WRF Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation Method of Observation Nudging for Use as an ARL Weather Running Estimate-Nowcast

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Implementation of the WRF Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation Method of Observation Nudging for Use as an ARL Weather Running Estimate-Nowcast...Method of Observation Nudging for Use as an ARL Weather Running Estimate-Nowcast Robert Dumais, Steve Kirby, and Robert Flanigan Computational and...Information Sciences Directorate, ARL Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

  6. Motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR): Application to four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Justin C.; Kim, Jin Sung; Park, Sung Ho; Liu, Zhaowei; Song, Bongyong; Song, William Y.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Utilization of respiratory correlated four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) has enabled verification of internal target motion and volume immediately prior to treatment. However, with current standard CBCT scan, 4DCBCT poses challenge for reconstruction due to the fact that multiple phase binning leads to insufficient number of projection data to reconstruct and thus cause streaking artifacts. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel 4DCBCT reconstruction algorithm framework called motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR), that allows reconstruction of high quality and high phase resolution 4DCBCT images with no more than the imaging dose as well as projections used in a standard free breathing 3DCBCT (FB-3DCBCT) scan.Methods: The unknown 4DCBCT volume at each phase was mathematically modeled as a combination of FB-3DCBCT and phase-specific update vector which has an associated motion-map matrix. The motion-map matrix, which is the key innovation of the MCIR algorithm, was defined as the matrix that distinguishes voxels that are moving from stationary ones. This 4DCBCT model was then reconstructed with compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction framework such that the voxels with high motion would be aggressively updated by the phase-wise sorted projections and the voxels with less motion would be minimally updated to preserve the FB-3DCBCT. To evaluate the performance of our proposed MCIR algorithm, we evaluated both numerical phantoms and a lung cancer patient. The results were then compared with the (1) clinical FB-3DCBCT reconstructed using the FDK, (2) 4DCBCT reconstructed using the FDK, and (3) 4DCBCT reconstructed using the well-known prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS).Results: Examination of the MCIR algorithm showed that high phase-resolved 4DCBCT with sets of up to 20 phases using a typical FB-3DCBCT scan could be reconstructed without compromising the image quality. Moreover, in comparison with

  7. Analysis of environmental and general science efficacy among instructors with contrasting class ethnicity distributions: A four-dimensional assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Bryan Keith

    Scope and method of study. The context and nature of self-efficacy beliefs provides a vector upon which to explore science instructors' perceptions of their own competence, self beliefs, and beliefs concerning their students as a function of ethnicity (Pajares, 1996). Currently, available cross-sectional data that concomitantly compares efficacy for environmental and general science curricula among instructors with contrasting class ethnicity distributions (CED) (minority vs. non-minority) is diminutive. Here, a modified research instrument that incorporates the Environmental Education Efficacy Belief Instrument (Sia, 1992), the Science Teaching Efficacy Beliefs Instrument (Riggs & Enochs, 1990), and factors 2 & 3 from the Ohio State Teacher Efficacy Scale (Tschannen-Moran & Hoy, 2001) is employed to create a bi-disciplinary four dimensional assessment that measures personal teacher efficacy (PTE), outcome expectancy (OE), classroom management (CM), and student engagement (SE). Instructors' willingness to, and utilization of, practical instruction to reinforce science learning is also assessed. Findings and conclusions. Overall, efficacy levels for environmental and general science curriculum among instructors with high minority CED (n=22) were consistently lower than that of instructors with high non-minority CED (n = 18); consistently diminished efficacy levels were evidenced upon analysis of CED and all independent variables analyzed. While all four dimensions of efficacy were consistently low for instructors with high minority CED, markedly low mean CM and SE responses were evidenced. A link exists between teacher self-efficacy and the conditions present that impinge on the successful completion of work goals (Metz, 1978). Many studies have examined the lowered-level of minority involvement in environmental careers, issues, and concerns (Taylor, 1989). While all science instructors were willing to utilize outdoor classrooms, markedly lower outdoor classroom

  8. SU-C-207-01: Four-Dimensional Inverse Geometry Computed Tomography: Concept and Its Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K; Kim, D; Kim, T; Kang, S; Cho, M; Shin, D; Suh, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In past few years, the inverse geometry computed tomography (IGCT) system has been developed to overcome shortcomings of a conventional computed tomography (CT) system such as scatter problem induced from large detector size and cone-beam artifact. In this study, we intend to present a concept of a four-dimensional (4D) IGCT system that has positive aspects above all with temporal resolution for dynamic studies and reduction of motion artifact. Methods: Contrary to conventional CT system, projection data at a certain angle in IGCT was a group of fractionated narrow cone-beam projection data, projection group (PG), acquired from multi-source array which have extremely short time gap of sequential operation between each of sources. At this, for 4D IGCT imaging, time-related data acquisition parameters were determined by combining multi-source scanning time for collecting one PG with conventional 4D CBCT data acquisition sequence. Over a gantry rotation, acquired PGs from multi-source array were tagged time and angle for 4D image reconstruction. Acquired PGs were sorted into 10 phase and image reconstructions were independently performed at each phase. Image reconstruction algorithm based upon filtered-backprojection was used in this study. Results: The 4D IGCT had uniform image without cone-beam artifact on the contrary to 4D CBCT image. In addition, the 4D IGCT images of each phase had no significant artifact induced from motion compared with 3D CT. Conclusion: The 4D IGCT image seems to give relatively accurate dynamic information of patient anatomy based on the results were more endurable than 3D CT about motion artifact. From this, it will be useful for dynamic study and respiratory-correlated radiation therapy. This work was supported by the Industrial R&D program of MOTIE/KEIT [10048997, Development of the core technology for integrated therapy devices based on real-time MRI guided tumor tracking] and the Mid-career Researcher Program (2014R1A2A1A

  9. A WRF and MM5-based four-dimensional data assimilation weather analysis and forecasting system for wind energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Warner, T.; Wu, W.; Chen, F.; Boehnert, J.; Frehlich, R.; Swerdlin, S.

    2008-12-01

    Accurate high-resolution weather analyses and forecasts are very important for wind energy production and management. A Real-Time Four Dimensional Data Assimilation (RTFDDA) and forecasting system has been developed at NCAR to address meteorological needs for estimating wind- energy generation through downscaling with nested grids. The RTFDDA system is built around the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model version 5 (MM5) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. It is capable of continuously collecting and ingesting diverse synoptic and asynoptic weather observations from conventional and unconventional platforms, and provides continuous 4-D synthetic weather analyses, nowcasts and short-term forecasts for mesoscale regions. Operational RTFDDA systems have been implemented at seven US Army test ranges and also have supported tens of other applications in military, public and private sectors in the last seven years, providing rapidly updated, multi-scale weather analyses and forecasts with the fine-mesh domain having 0.5 - 3 km grid increments. The observational data ingested by the system includes WMO standard upper-air and surface reports, wind profilers, satellite cloud-drift winds, commercial aircraft reports, all available mesonet data, radar observations, and any special instruments that report temperature, winds and moistures. Recently, the system has been expanded to include several new modeling and data assimilation capabilities that are highly valuable for wind energy applications: a) Ensemble RTFDDA, which is a multi-model, mesoscale data analysis and forecasting system that samples uncertainties in the major components of RTFDDA and predicts the uncertainties in the weather forecasts by performing an ensemble of RTFDDA analyses and forecasts; b) LES (Large Eddy Simulation) modeling, which is nested down from the RTFDDA mesoscale data assimilation and forecasts to LES models with grid sizes of ~100 m for wind farm regions using GIS 30-m resolution

  10. Simulation of four-dimensional CT images from deformable registration between inhale and exhale breath-hold CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrut, David; Boldea, Vlad; Miguet, Serge; Ginestet, Chantal

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: We propose to simulate an artificial four-dimensional (4-D) CT image of the thorax during breathing. It is performed by deformable registration of two CT scans acquired at inhale and exhale breath-hold. Materials and methods: Breath-hold images were acquired with the ABC (Active Breathing Coordinator) system. Dense deformable registrations were performed. The method was a minimization of the sum of squared differences (SSD) using an approximated second-order gradient. Gaussian and linear-elastic vector field regularizations were compared. A new preprocessing step, called a priori lung density modification (APLDM), was proposed to take into account lung density changes due to inspiration. It consisted of modulating the lung densities in one image according to the densities in the other, in order to make them comparable. Simulated 4-D images were then built by vector field interpolation and image resampling of the two initial CT images. A variation in the lung density was taken into account to generate intermediate artificial CT images. The Jacobian of the deformation was used to compute voxel values in Hounsfield units. The accuracy of the deformable registration was assessed by the spatial correspondence of anatomic landmarks located by experts. Results: APLDM produced statistically significantly better results than the reference method (registration without APLDM preprocessing). The mean (and standard deviation) of distances between automatically found landmark positions and landmarks set by experts were 2.7(1.1) mm with APLDM, and 6.3(3.8) mm without. Interexpert variability was 2.3(1.2) mm. The differences between Gaussian and linear elastic regularizations were not statistically significant. In the second experiment using 4-D images, the mean difference between automatic and manual landmark positions for intermediate CT images was 2.6(2.0) mm. Conclusion: The generation of 4-D CT images by deformable registration of inhale and exhale CT images is

  11. Measuring interfraction and intrafraction lung function changes during radiation therapy using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kipritidis, John Keall, Paul J.; Hugo, Geoffrey; Weiss, Elisabeth; Williamson, Jeffrey

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Adaptive ventilation guided radiation therapy could minimize the irradiation of healthy lung based on repeat lung ventilation imaging (VI) during treatment. However the efficacy of adaptive ventilation guidance requires that interfraction (e.g., week-to-week), ventilation changes are not washed out by intrafraction (e.g., pre- and postfraction) changes, for example, due to patient breathing variability. The authors hypothesize that patients undergoing lung cancer radiation therapy exhibit larger interfraction ventilation changes compared to intrafraction function changes. To test this, the authors perform the first comparison of interfraction and intrafraction lung VI pairs using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging (4D-CBCT VI), a novel technique for functional lung imaging. Methods: The authors analyzed a total of 215 4D-CBCT scans acquired for 19 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) patients over 4–6 weeks of radiation therapy. This set of 215 scans was sorted into 56 interfraction pairs (including first day scans and each of treatment weeks 2, 4, and 6) and 78 intrafraction pairs (including pre/postfraction scans on the same-day), with some scans appearing in both sets. VIs were obtained from the Jacobian determinant of the transform between the 4D-CBCT end-exhale and end-inhale images after deformable image registration. All VIs were deformably registered to their corresponding planning CT and normalized to account for differences in breathing effort, thus facilitating image comparison in terms of (i) voxelwise Spearman correlations, (ii) mean image differences, and (iii) gamma pass rates for all interfraction and intrafraction VI pairs. For the side of the lung ipsilateral to the tumor, we applied two-sided t-tests to determine whether interfraction VI pairs were more different than intrafraction VI pairs. Results: The (mean ± standard deviation) Spearman correlation for interfraction VI pairs was r{sup -}{sub Inter

  12. Comparison of Rigid and Adaptive Methods of Propagating Gross Tumor Volume Through Respiratory Phases of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Image Data Set

    SciTech Connect

    Ezhil, Muthuveni Choi, Bum; Starkschall, George; Bucci, M. Kara; Vedam, Sastry; Balter, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To compare three different methods of propagating the gross tumor volume (GTV) through the respiratory phases that constitute a four-dimensional computed tomography image data set. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography data sets of 20 patients who had undergone definitive hypofractionated radiotherapy to the lung were acquired. The GTV regions of interest (ROIs) were manually delineated on each phase of the four-dimensional computed tomography data set. The ROI from the end-expiration phase was propagated to the remaining nine phases of respiration using the following three techniques: (1) rigid-image registration using in-house software, (2) rigid image registration using research software from a commercial radiotherapy planning system vendor, and (3) rigid-image registration followed by deformable adaptation originally intended for organ-at-risk delineation using the same software. The internal GTVs generated from the various propagation methods were compared with the manual internal GTV using the normalized Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) index. Results: The normalized DSC index of 1.01 {+-} 0.06 (SD) for rigid propagation using the in-house software program was identical to the normalized DSC index of 1.01 {+-} 0.06 for rigid propagation achieved with the vendor's research software. Adaptive propagation yielded poorer results, with a normalized DSC index of 0.89 {+-} 0.10 (paired t test, p <0.001). Conclusion: Propagation of the GTV ROIs through the respiratory phases using rigid- body registration is an acceptable method within a 1-mm margin of uncertainty. The adaptive organ-at-risk propagation method was not applicable to propagating GTV ROIs, resulting in an unacceptable reduction of the volume and distortion of the ROIs.

  13. Nonlinear spatio-temporal filtering of dynamic PET data using a four-dimensional Gaussian filter and expectation-maximization deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floberg, J. M.; Holden, J. E.

    2013-02-01

    We introduce a method for denoising dynamic PET data, spatio-temporal expectation-maximization (STEM) filtering, that combines four-dimensional Gaussian filtering with EM deconvolution. The initial Gaussian filter suppresses noise at a broad range of spatial and temporal frequencies and EM deconvolution quickly restores the frequencies most important to the signal. We aim to demonstrate that STEM filtering can improve variance in both individual time frames and in parametric images without introducing significant bias. We evaluate STEM filtering with a dynamic phantom study, and with simulated and human dynamic PET studies of a tracer with reversible binding behaviour, [C-11]raclopride, and a tracer with irreversible binding behaviour, [F-18]FDOPA. STEM filtering is compared to a number of established three and four-dimensional denoising methods. STEM filtering provides substantial improvements in variance in both individual time frames and in parametric images generated with a number of kinetic analysis techniques while introducing little bias. STEM filtering does bias early frames, but this does not affect quantitative parameter estimates. STEM filtering is shown to be superior to the other simple denoising methods studied. STEM filtering is a simple and effective denoising method that could be valuable for a wide range of dynamic PET applications.

  14. Nonlinear spatio-temporal filtering of dynamic PET data using a four-dimensional Gaussian filter and expectation-maximization deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Floberg, J M; Holden, J E

    2013-02-21

    We introduce a method for denoising dynamic PET data, spatio-temporal expectation-maximization (STEM) filtering, that combines four-dimensional Gaussian filtering withEMdeconvolution. The initial Gaussian filter suppresses noise at a broad range of spatial and temporal frequencies and EM deconvolution quickly restores the frequencies most important to the signal. We aim to demonstrate that STEM filtering can improve variance in both individual time frames and in parametric images without introducing significant bias. We evaluate STEM filtering with a dynamic phantom study, and with simulated and human dynamic PET studies of a tracer with reversible binding behaviour, [C-11]raclopride, and a tracer with irreversible binding behaviour, [F-18]FDOPA. STEM filtering is compared to a number of established three and four-dimensional denoising methods. STEM filtering provides substantial improvements in variance in both individual time frames and in parametric images generated with a number of kinetic analysis techniques while introducing little bias. STEM filtering does bias early frames, but this does not affect quantitative parameter estimates. STEM filtering is shown to be superior to the other simple denoising methods studied. STEM filtering is a simple and effective denoising method that could be valuable for a wide range of dynamic PET applications.

  15. Tangent-linear and ensemble-based four-dimensional data assimilation strategies applied for assimilating conventional data and field observations for Hurricane Karl (2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poterjoy, J.; Zhang, F.

    2014-12-01

    Two advanced four-dimensional ensemble data assimilation systems are applied for studying the genesis of Hurricane Karl (2010) using conventional observations and measurements collected during the Pre-Depression Investigation of Cloud Systems in the Tropics (PREDICT) field campaign. Both methods combine strategies from four-dimensional variational (4DVar) and Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation techniques that have been developed for the Weather Research and Forecasting model. The first method, denoted E4DVar, operates in a manner similar to the traditional 4DVar data assimilation system, but with hybrid climate/ensemble background errors. The second method, denoted 4DEnVar, uses an ensemble of nonlinear model trajectories to replace the function of tangent linear and adjoint model operators in 4DVar, thus improving the parallelization of the data assimilation. Simulations initialized from E4DVar and 4DEnVar analyses provide track, genesis and intensity forecasts for Karl that are more accurate than an ensemble hybrid data assimilation method based on 3DVar (E3DVar). The two 4-D data assimilation methods are applied for studying Karl's genesis, while comparing their theoretical advantages and disadvantages for an application where the system dynamics evolve quickly in time, and are constrained by an unusually high number of in situ observations.

  16. Use of four-dimensional data assimilation by Newtonian relaxation and latent-heat forcing to improve a mesoscale-model precipitation forecast - A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Wei; Warner, Thomas T.

    1988-01-01

    The Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model was used to study special static-initialization (SI) and dynamic-initialization (DI) techniques designed to improve short-range quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs), as applied to the heavy convective rainfall that occurred in Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas during the May 9-10, 1979 SESAMY IV study period. In the DI procedure, two types of four-dimensional data assimilation (FDDA) procedures were used to incorporate data during a 12-h preforecast period, one using the Newtonian relaxation, the other using latent-heat forcing. It was found that combined use of either the preforecast or in-forecast latent-heat forcing with the Newtonian relaxation produced an improved forecast (relative to a conventional forecast procedure) of rainfall intensity compared to the use of the Newtonian relaxation alone. The use of the experimental SI with prescribed latent heating during the first forecast hour produced greatly improved rainfall rates.

  17. Vocal cord dysfunction diagnosed by four-dimensional dynamic volume computed tomography in patients with difficult-to-treat asthma: A case series.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei-Tso; Chen, Huan-Wen; Su, I-Hao; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Kuo, Han-Pin; Huang, Chien-Da

    2015-12-01

    Patients with asthma may also have vocal cord dysfunction (VCD), which leads to poor control of the asthma. Once patients are diagnosed with difficult-to-treat asthma with poor control, VCD should be excluded or treated accordingly. The gold standard for diagnosis of VCD is to perform a laryngoscopy. However, this procedure is invasive and may not be suitable for patients with difficult-to-treat asthma. Four-dimensional (4D) dynamic volume computed tomography (CT) is a noninvasive method for quantification of laryngeal movement, and can serve as an alternative for the diagnosis of VCD. Herein, we present a series of five cases with difficult-to-treat asthma patients who were diagnosed with VCD by 4D dynamic volume CT. Clinicians should be alert to the possibility of VCD when poor control is noted in patients with asthma. Early diagnosis by noninvasive 4D dynamic volume CT can decrease excessive doses of inhaled corticosteroids.

  18. Development of Four Dimensional Human Model that Enables Deformation of Skin, Organs and Blood Vessel System During Body Movement - Visualizing Movements of the Musculoskeletal System.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki; Hashizume, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    We constructed a four dimensional human model that is able to visualize the structure of a whole human body, including the inner structures, in real-time to allow us to analyze human dynamic changes in the temporal, spatial and quantitative domains. To verify whether our model was generating changes according to real human body dynamics, we measured a participant's skin expansion and compared it to that of the model conducted under the same body movement. We also made a contribution to the field of orthopedics, as we were able to devise a display method that enables the observer to more easily observe the changes made in the complex skeletal muscle system during body movements, which in the past were difficult to visualize.

  19. Performance Evaluation of Automatic Anatomy Segmentation Algorithm on Repeat or Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Images Using Deformable Image Registration Method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang He; Garden, Adam S.; Zhang Lifei; Wei Xiong; Ahamad, Anesa; Kuban, Deborah A.; Komaki, Ritsuko; O'Daniel, Jennifer; Zhang Yongbin; Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Auto-propagation of anatomic regions of interest from the planning computed tomography (CT) scan to the daily CT is an essential step in image-guided adaptive radiotherapy. The goal of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the performance of the algorithm in typical clinical applications. Methods and Materials: We had previously adopted an image intensity-based deformable registration algorithm to find the correspondence between two images. In the present study, the regions of interest delineated on the planning CT image were mapped onto daily CT or four-dimensional CT images using the same transformation. Postprocessing methods, such as boundary smoothing and modification, were used to enhance the robustness of the algorithm. Auto-propagated contours for 8 head-and-neck cancer patients with a total of 100 repeat CT scans, 1 prostate patient with 24 repeat CT scans, and 9 lung cancer patients with a total of 90 four-dimensional CT images were evaluated against physician-drawn contours and physician-modified deformed contours using the volume overlap index and mean absolute surface-to-surface distance. Results: The deformed contours were reasonably well matched with the daily anatomy on the repeat CT images. The volume overlap index and mean absolute surface-to-surface distance was 83% and 1.3 mm, respectively, compared with the independently drawn contours. Better agreement (>97% and <0.4 mm) was achieved if the physician was only asked to correct the deformed contours. The algorithm was also robust in the presence of random noise in the image. Conclusion: The deformable algorithm might be an effective method to propagate the planning regions of interest to subsequent CT images of changed anatomy, although a final review by physicians is highly recommended.

  20. Four-Dimensional Golden Search

    SciTech Connect

    Fenimore, Edward E.

    2015-02-25

    The Golden search technique is a method to search a multiple-dimension space to find the minimum. It basically subdivides the possible ranges of parameters until it brackets, to within an arbitrarily small distance, the minimum. It has the advantages that (1) the function to be minimized can be non-linear, (2) it does not require derivatives of the function, (3) the convergence criterion does not depend on the magnitude of the function. Thus, if the function is a goodness of fit parameter such as chi-square, the convergence does not depend on the noise being correctly estimated or the function correctly following the chi-square statistic. And, (4) the convergence criterion does not depend on the shape of the function. Thus, long shallow surfaces can be searched without the problem of premature convergence. As with many methods, the Golden search technique can be confused by surfaces with multiple minima.

  1. Dosimetric evaluation of four-dimensional dose distributions of CyberKnife and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy in stereotactic body lung radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Mark K H; Kwong, Dora L W; Law, Gilbert M L; Tam, Eric; Tong, Anthony; Lee, Venus; Ng, Sherry C Y

    2013-07-08

    Advanced image-guided stereotatic body lung radiotherapy techniques using volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) with four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) and CyberKnife with real-time target tracking have been clinically implemented by different authors. However, dosimetric comparisons between these techniques are lacking. In this study, 4D CT scans of 14 patients were used to create VMAT and CyberKnife treatment plans using 4D dose calculations. The GTV and the organs at risk (OARs) were defined on the end-exhale images for CyberKnife planning and were then deformed to the midventilation images (MidV) for VMAT optimization. Direct 4D Monte Carlo dose optimizations were performed for CyberKnife (4D(CK)). Four-dimensional dose calculations were also applied to VMAT plans to generate the 4D dose distributions (4D(VMAT)) on the exhale images for direct comparisons with the 4D(CK) plans. 4D(CK) and 4D(VMAT) showed comparable target conformity (1.31 ± 0.13 vs. 1.39 ± 0.24, p = 0.05). GTV mean doses were significantly higher with 4D(CK). Statistical differences of dose volume metrics were not observed in the majority of OARs studied, except for esophagus, with 4D(VMAT) yielding marginally higher D1% than 4D(CK). The normal tissue volumes receiving 80%, 50%, and 30% of the prescription dose (V80%, V50%, and V30%) were higher with 4D(VMAT), whereas 4D(CK) yielded slightly higher V10% in posterior lesions than 4D(VMAT). VMAT resulted in much less monitor units and therefore greater delivery efficiency than CyberKnife. In general, it was possible to produce dosimetrically acceptable plans with both techniques. The selection of treatment modality should consider the dosimetric results as well as the patient's tolerance of the treatment process specific to the SBRT technique.

  2. Three-dimensional electrode displacement elastography using the Siemens C7F2 fourSight four-dimensional ultrasound transducer.

    PubMed

    Bharat, Shyam; Fisher, Ted G; Varghese, Tomy; Hall, Timothy J; Jiang, Jingfeng; Madsen, Ernest L; Zagzebski, James A; Lee, Fred T

    2008-08-01

    Because ablation therapy alters the elastic modulus of tissues, emerging strain imaging methods may enable clinicians for the first time to have readily available, cost-effective, real-time guidance to identify the location and boundaries of thermal lesions. Electrode displacement elastography is a method of strain imaging tailored specifically to ultrasound-guided electrode-based ablative therapies (e.g., radio-frequency ablation). Here tissue deformation is achieved by applying minute perturbations to the unconstrained end of the treatment electrode, resulting in localized motion around the end of the electrode embedded in tissue. In this article, we present a method for three-dimensional (3D) elastographic reconstruction from volumetric data acquired using the C7F2 fourSight four-dimensional ultrasound transducer, provided by Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc. (Issaquah, WA, USA). Lesion reconstruction is demonstrated for a spherical inclusion centered in a tissue-mimicking phantom, which simulates a thermal lesion embedded in a normal tissue background. Elastographic reconstruction is also performed for a thermal lesion created in vitro in canine liver using radio-frequency ablation. Postprocessing is done on the acquired raw radio-frequency data to form surface-rendered 3D elastograms of the inclusion. Elastographic volume estimates of the inclusion compare reasonably well with the actual known inclusion volume, with 3D electrode displacement elastography slightly underestimating the true inclusion volume.

  3. Assimilating surface observations in a four-dimensional variational Doppler radar data assimilation system to improve the analysis and forecast of a squall line case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xingchao; Zhao, Kun; Sun, Juanzhen; Zhou, Bowen; Lee, Wen-Chau

    2016-10-01

    This paper examines how assimilating surface observations can improve the analysis and forecast ability of a fourdimensional Variational Doppler Radar Analysis System (VDRAS). Observed surface temperature and winds are assimilated together with radar radial velocity and reflectivity into a convection-permitting model using the VDRAS four-dimensional variational (4DVAR) data assimilation system. A squall-line case observed during a field campaign is selected to investigate the performance of the technique. A single observation experiment shows that assimilating surface observations can influence the analyzed fields in both the horizontal and vertical directions. The surface-based cold pool, divergence and gust front of the squall line are all strengthened through the assimilation of the single surface observation. Three experiments—assimilating radar data only, assimilating radar data with surface data blended in a mesoscale background, and assimilating both radar and surface observations with a 4DVAR cost function—are conducted to examine the impact of the surface data assimilation. Independent surface and wind profiler observations are used for verification. The result shows that the analysis and forecast are improved when surface observations are assimilated in addition to radar observations. It is also shown that the additional surface data can help improve the analysis and forecast at low levels. Surface and low-level features of the squall line—including the surface warm inflow, cold pool, gust front, and low-level wind—are much closer to the observations after assimilating the surface data in VDRAS.

  4. Four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging for the determination of tumour movement and its evaluation using a dynamic porcine lung phantom.

    PubMed

    Remmert, G; Biederer, J; Lohberger, F; Fabel, M; Hartmann, G H

    2007-09-21

    A method of four-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been implemented and evaluated. It consists of retrospective sorting and slice stacking of two-dimensional (2D) images using an external signal for motion monitoring of the object to be imaged. The presented method aims to determine the tumour trajectories based on a signal that is appropriate for monitoring the movement of the target volume during radiotherapy such that the radiation delivery can be adapted to the movement. For evaluation of the 4D-MRI method, it has been applied to a dynamic lung phantom, which exhibits periodic respiratory movement of a porcine heart-lung explant with artificial pulmonary nodules. Anatomic changes of the lung phantom caused by respiratory motion have been quantified, revealing hysteresis. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the presented method of 4D-MRI. In particular, it enables the determination of trajectories of periodically moving objects with an uncertainty in the order of 1 mm.

  5. Application of a Four-dimensional Mathematical Model in the Establishment of an Early Post-burn Cerebral Oedema Model in Severely Burned Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Haitao, L.; Dajun, Y.; Kaifa, W.; Xiuwu, B.; Jiansen, S.; Zongchen, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to explore the spatiotemporal development of cerebral oedema in the early stage of severe burn (50% TBSA, third degree), using a four-dimensional (4D) mathematical model. Twenty-six male mongrel dogs were randomly divided into control and 6, 12, 18, and 24 post-burn hour (PBH) groups. The manifestation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathology, changes of brain water content, and intracranial pressure were observed in each group respectively. A 4D mathematical model was established on the basis of the results of MRI scanning. Two turning points (6 and 18 PBH) and three phases of pathological change were displayed by the 4D mathematical model of cerebral oedema in the early stage of severe burn. The first phase was in the subclinical period, and effective treatment should therefore be performed as quickly as possible in order to prevent deterioration of post-burn cerebral oedema. The second phase (6-18 PBH), with pathological characteristics of cytotoxic cerebral oedema, was in the apoptosis period. The third stage (18-24 PBH) was the danger period of cerebral oedema. Intracranial pressure increased rapidly owing to the limitation of the cranial cavity. As a result, cerebral hernia could easily occur. An S-shape curve in the pathological process of cerebral oedema occurred in the early post-burn stage following severe burn. PMID:21990986

  6. Application of a Four-dimensional Mathematical Model in the Establishment of an Early Post-burn Cerebral Oedema Model in Severely Burned Dogs.

    PubMed

    Haitao, L; Dajun, Y; Kaifa, W; Xiuwu, B; Jiansen, S; Zongchen, Y

    2005-06-30

    The aim of this study was to explore the spatiotemporal development of cerebral oedema in the early stage of severe burn (50% TBSA, third degree), using a four-dimensional (4D) mathematical model. Twenty-six male mongrel dogs were randomly divided into control and 6, 12, 18, and 24 post-burn hour (PBH) groups. The manifestation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathology, changes of brain water content, and intracranial pressure were observed in each group respectively. A 4D mathematical model was established on the basis of the results of MRI scanning. Two turning points (6 and 18 PBH) and three phases of pathological change were displayed by the 4D mathematical model of cerebral oedema in the early stage of severe burn. The first phase was in the subclinical period, and effective treatment should therefore be performed as quickly as possible in order to prevent deterioration of post-burn cerebral oedema. The second phase (6-18 PBH), with pathological characteristics of cytotoxic cerebral oedema, was in the apoptosis period. The third stage (18-24 PBH) was the danger period of cerebral oedema. Intracranial pressure increased rapidly owing to the limitation of the cranial cavity. As a result, cerebral hernia could easily occur. An S-shape curve in the pathological process of cerebral oedema occurred in the early post-burn stage following severe burn.

  7. Rotationally acquired four-dimensional optical coherence tomography of embryonic chick hearts using retrospective gating on the common central A-scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Happel, Christoph M.; Thommes, Jan; Thrane, Lars; Männer, Jörg; Ortmaier, Tobias; Heimann, Bodo; Yelbuz, Talat Mesud

    2011-09-01

    We introduce a new method of rotational image acquisition for four-dimensional (4D) optical coherence tomography (OCT) of beating embryonic chick hearts. The rotational axis and the central A-scan of the OCT are identical. An out-of-phase image sequence covering multiple heartbeats is acquired at every angle of an incremental rotation of the deflection mirrors of the OCT system. Image acquisition is accomplished after a rotation of 180°. Comparison of a displayed live M-mode of the central A-scan with a reference M-mode allows instant detection of translational movements of the embryo. For calculation of 4D data sets, we apply an image-based retrospective gating algorithm using the phase information of the common central A-scan present in all acquired images. This leads to cylindrical three-dimensional data sets for every time step of the cardiac cycle that can be used for 4D visualization. We demonstrate this approach and provide a video of a beating Hamburger and Hamilton stage 16 embryonic chick heart generated from a 4D OCT data set using rotational image acquisition.

  8. NOTE: Four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging for the determination of tumour movement and its evaluation using a dynamic porcine lung phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remmert, G.; Biederer, J.; Lohberger, F.; Fabel, M.; Hartmann, G. H.

    2007-09-01

    A method of four-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been implemented and evaluated. It consists of retrospective sorting and slice stacking of two-dimensional (2D) images using an external signal for motion monitoring of the object to be imaged. The presented method aims to determine the tumour trajectories based on a signal that is appropriate for monitoring the movement of the target volume during radiotherapy such that the radiation delivery can be adapted to the movement. For evaluation of the 4D-MRI method, it has been applied to a dynamic lung phantom, which exhibits periodic respiratory movement of a porcine heart-lung explant with artificial pulmonary nodules. Anatomic changes of the lung phantom caused by respiratory motion have been quantified, revealing hysteresis. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the presented method of 4D-MRI. In particular, it enables the determination of trajectories of periodically moving objects with an uncertainty in the order of 1 mm.

  9. Dissociative adsorption of H2 on Cu(100): A four-dimensional study of the effect of rotational motion on the reaction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mowrey, R. C.; Kroes, G. J.; Wiesenekker, G.; Baerends, E. J.

    1997-03-01

    The reaction of H2 on Cu(100) is investigated using a four-dimensional (4D) quantum dynamical fixed-site model to assess the influence of molecular rotation on dissociation over the most reactive (the bridge) site. The potential energy surface (PES) is a fit to the results of density functional calculations performed using a generalized gradient approximation treating a Cu slab with a periodic overlayer of H2. Dissociation probabilities for molecules with "helicoptering'' (mj=j) and "cartwheeling'' (mj=0) rotational motions are here found to be comparable because of the strong corrugation in the azimuthal coordinate. The calculations indicate that reaction is accompanied by significant rotationally inelastic scattering. Surprisingly, vibrational excitation is also found to be an efficient process in collisions with the reactive bridge site. In these collisions, the molecular axis is tilted away from the orientation parallel from the surface. Considering the approximate nature of the 4D model used, the calculated reaction probabilities are in good agreement with experiment, indicating that the PES that was used is accurate.

  10. Comparison of Respiratory-Gated and Respiratory-Ungated Planning in Scattered Carbon Ion Beam Treatment of the Pancreas Using Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Shinichiro; Yanagi, Takeshi; Hara, Ryusuke; Sharp, Gregory C.; Asakura, Hiroshi; Kumagai, Motoki; Kishimoto, Riwa; Yamada, Shigeru; Kato, Hirotoshi; Kandatsu, Susumu; Kamada, Tadashi

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: We compared respiratory-gated and respiratory-ungated treatment strategies using four-dimensional (4D) scattered carbon ion beam distribution in pancreatic 4D computed tomography (CT) datasets. Methods and Materials: Seven inpatients with pancreatic tumors underwent 4DCT scanning under free-breathing conditions using a rapidly rotating cone-beam CT, which was integrated with a 256-slice detector, in cine mode. Two types of bolus for gated and ungated treatment were designed to cover the planning target volume (PTV) using 4DCT datasets in a 30% duty cycle around exhalation and a single respiratory cycle, respectively. Carbon ion beam distribution for each strategy was calculated as a function of respiratory phase by applying the compensating bolus to 4DCT at the respective phases. Smearing was not applied to the bolus, but consideration was given to drill diameter. The accumulated dose distributions were calculated by applying deformable registration and calculating the dose-volume histogram. Results: Doses to normal tissues in gated treatment were minimized mainly on the inferior aspect, which thereby minimized excessive doses to normal tissues. Over 95% of the dose, however, was delivered to the clinical target volume at all phases for both treatment strategies. Maximum doses to the duodenum and pancreas averaged across all patients were 43.1/43.1 GyE (ungated/gated) and 43.2/43.2 GyE (ungated/gated), respectively. Conclusions: Although gated treatment minimized excessive dosing to normal tissue, the difference between treatment strategies was small. Respiratory gating may not always be required in pancreatic treatment as long as dose distribution is assessed. Any application of our results to clinical use should be undertaken only after discussion with oncologists, particularly with regard to radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy.

  11. A computerized framework for monitoring four-dimensional dose distributions during stereotactic body radiation therapy using a portal dose image-based 2D/3D registration approach.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Takahiro; Arimura, Hidetaka; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Asumi; Hirose, Taka-Aki; Honda, Hiroshi; Umezu, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Hirata, Hideki

    2015-03-01

    A computerized framework for monitoring four-dimensional (4D) dose distributions during stereotactic body radiation therapy based on a portal dose image (PDI)-based 2D/3D registration approach has been proposed in this study. Using the PDI-based registration approach, simulated 4D "treatment" CT images were derived from the deformation of 3D planning CT images so that a 2D planning PDI could be similar to a 2D dynamic clinical PDI at a breathing phase. The planning PDI was calculated by applying a dose calculation algorithm (a pencil beam convolution algorithm) to the geometry of the planning CT image and a virtual water equivalent phantom. The dynamic clinical PDIs were estimated from electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dynamic images including breathing phase data obtained during a treatment. The parameters of the affine transformation matrix were optimized based on an objective function and a gamma pass rate using a Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm. The proposed framework was applied to the EPID dynamic images of ten lung cancer patients, which included 183 frames (mean: 18.3 per patient). The 4D dose distributions during the treatment time were successfully obtained by applying the dose calculation algorithm to the simulated 4D "treatment" CT images. The mean±standard deviation (SD) of the percentage errors between the prescribed dose and the estimated dose at an isocenter for all cases was 3.25±4.43%. The maximum error for the ten cases was 14.67% (prescribed dose: 1.50Gy, estimated dose: 1.72Gy), and the minimum error was 0.00%. The proposed framework could be feasible for monitoring the 4D dose distribution and dose errors within a patient's body during treatment.

  12. Dosimetric Advantages of Four-Dimensional Adaptive Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Lung Tumors Using Online Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Harsolia, Asif; Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Kestin, Larry L. Grills, Inga S.; Yan Di

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: This study compares multiple planning techniques designed to improve accuracy while allowing reduced planning target volume (PTV) margins though image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with four-dimensional (4D) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Free-breathing planning and 4D-CBCT scans were obtained in 8 patients with lung tumors. Four plans were generated for each patient: 3D-conformal, 4D-union, 4D-offline adaptive with a single correction (offline ART), and 4D-online adaptive with daily correction (online ART). For the 4D-union plan, the union of gross tumor volumes from all phases of the 4D-CBCT was created with a 5-mm expansion applied for setup uncertainty. For offline and online ART, the gross tumor volume was delineated at the mean position of tumor motion from the 4D-CBCT. The PTV margins were calculated from the random components of tumor motion and setup uncertainty. Results: Adaptive IGRT techniques provided better PTV coverage with less irradiated normal tissues. Compared with 3D plans, mean relative decreases in PTV volumes were 15%, 39%, and 44% using 4D-union, offline ART, and online ART planning techniques, respectively. This resulted in mean lung volume receiving {>=} 20Gy (V20) relative decreases of 21%, 23%, and 31% and mean lung dose relative decreases of 16%, 26%, and 31% for the 4D-union, 4D-offline ART, and 4D-online ART, respectively. Conclusions: Adaptive IGRT using CBCT is feasible for the treatment of patients with lung tumors and significantly decreases PTV volume and dose to normal tissues, allowing for the possibility of dose escalation. All analyzed 4D planning strategies resulted in improvements over 3D plans, with 4D-online ART appearing optimal.

  13. Mid-Ventilation Concept for Mobile Pulmonary Tumors: Internal Tumor Trajectory Versus Selective Reconstruction of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Frames Based on External Breathing Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenberger, Matthias Wilbert, Juergen; Krieger, Thomas; Richter, Anne; Baier, Kurt; Flentje, Michael

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of direct reconstruction of mid-ventilation and peak-phase four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) frames based on the external breathing signal. Methods and Materials: For 11 patients with 15 pulmonary targets, a respiration-correlated CT study (4D CT) was acquired for treatment planning. After retrospective time-based sorting of raw projection data and reconstruction of eight CT frames equally distributed over the breathing cycle, mean tumor position (P{sub mean}), mid-ventilation frame, and breathing motion were evaluated based on the internal tumor trajectory. Analysis of the external breathing signal (pressure sensor around abdomen) with amplitude-based sorting of projections was performed for direct reconstruction of the mid-ventilation frame and frames at peak phases of the breathing cycle. Results: On the basis of the eight 4D CT frames equally spaced in time, tumor motion was largest in the craniocaudal direction, with 12 {+-} 7 mm on average. Tumor motion between the two frames reconstructed at peak phases was not different in the craniocaudal and anterior-posterior directions but was systematically smaller in the left-right direction by 1 mm on average. The 3-dimensional distance between P{sub mean} and the tumor position in the mid-ventilation frame based on the internal tumor trajectory was 1.2 {+-} 1 mm. Reconstruction of the mid-ventilation frame at the mean amplitude position of the external breathing signal resulted in tumor positions 2.0 {+-} 1.1 mm distant from P{sub mean}. Breathing-induced motion artifacts in mid-ventilation frames caused negligible changes in tumor volume and shape. Conclusions: Direct reconstruction of the mid-ventilation frame and frames at peak phases based on the external breathing signal was reliable. This makes the reconstruction of only three 4D CT frames sufficient for application of the mid-ventilation technique in clinical practice.

  14. SU-D-18A-01: Tumor Motion Tracking with a Regional Deformable Registration Model for Four Dimensional Radiation Treatment of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, M; Lo, Y; Yuan, Y; Sheu, R; Rosenzweig, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a tumor motion model from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) of thoracic patients and demonstrate its impact on 4D radiation therapy simulation. Methods: A regional deformable image registration algorithm was introduced to extract tumor motion out of patient's breathing cycle. The gross target volume (GTV) was manually delineated on a selected phase of 4DCT and a subregion with 10mm margin supplemented to the GTV was created on the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Together with 4DCT the structures were exported into an inhouse research platform. A free form B-Spline deformable registration was carried out to map the subregion to other respiratory phases. The displacement vector fields were employed to propagate GTV contours with which the center of mass (CoM) of the GTV was computed for each breathing phase of 4DCT. The resultant GTV motion and its volumetric shape are utilized to facilitate 4D treatment planning. Five lung cancer patients undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy were enrolled and their 4DCT sets were included in the study. Results: Application of the algorithm to five thoracic patients indicates that clinically satisfactory outcomes were achievable with a spatial accuracy better than 2mm for GTV contour propagation between adjacent phases, and 3mm between opposite phases. The GTV CoM was found to be in the range of 2.0mm through 2.5cm, depending upon the tumor location. Compared to the traditional whole image based registration, the computation of the regional model was found to be an order of magnitude more efficient. Conclusion: A regional deformable registration model was implemented to extract tumor motion. It will have widespread application in 4D radiation treatment planning in the future to maximally utilize the available spatial-tempo information.

  15. Evaluation of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography-Based Intensity-Modulated and Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy Techniques for Pancreatic Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Geld, Ylanga G. van der; Triest, Baukelien van; Verbakel, Wilko; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van; Senan, Suresh; Slotman, Ben J.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To compare conformal radiotherapy (CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and respiration-gated radiotherapy (RGRT) planning techniques for pancreatic cancer. All target volumes were determined using four-dimensional computed tomography scans (4D CT). Methods and Materials: The pancreatic tumor and enlarged regional lymph nodes were contoured on all 10 phases of a planning 4D CT scan for 10 patients, and the planning target volumes (PTV{sub allphases}) were generated. Three consecutive respiratory phases for RGRT delivery in both inspiration and expiration were identified, and the corresponding PTVs (PTV{sub inspiration} and PTV{sub expiration}) and organ at risk volumes created. Treatment plans using CRT and IMRT, with and without RGRT, were created for each PTV. Results: Compared with the CRT plans, IMRT significantly reduced the mean volume of right kidney exposed to 20 Gy from 27.7% {+-} 17.7% to 16.0% {+-} 18.2% (standard deviation) (p < 0.01), but this was not achieved for the left kidney (11.1% {+-} 14.2% to 5.7% {+-} 6.5%; p = 0.1). The IMRT plans also reduced the mean gastric, hepatic, and small bowel doses (p < 0.01). No additional reductions in the dose to the kidneys or other organs at risk were seen when RGRT plans were combined with either CRT or IMRT, and the findings for RGRT in end-expiration and end-inspiration were similar. Conclusion: 4D CT-based IMRT plans for pancreatic tumors significantly reduced the radiation doses to the right kidney, liver, stomach, and small bowel compared with CRT plans. The additional dosimetric benefits from RGRT appear limited in this setting.

  16. Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography-Based Treatment Planning for Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Proton Therapy for Distal Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaodong; Zhao Kuaile; Guerrero, Thomas M.; Mcguire, Sean E.; Yaremko, Brian; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Hui Zhouguang; Li Yupeng; Newhauser, Wayne D.; Mohan, Radhe; Liao Zhongxing

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To compare three-dimensional (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT)-based treatment plans for proton therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for esophageal cancer in terms of doses to the lung, heart, and spinal cord and variations in target coverage and normal tissue sparing. Methods and Materials: The IMRT and proton plans for 15 patients with distal esophageal cancer were designed from the 3D average CT scans and then recalculated on 10 4D CT data sets. Dosimetric data were compared for tumor coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: Compared with IMRT, median lung volumes exposed to 5, 10, and 20 Gy and mean lung dose were reduced by 35.6%, 20.5%, 5.8%, and 5.1 Gy for a two-beam proton plan and by 17.4%, 8.4%, 5%, and 2.9 Gy for a three-beam proton plan. The greater lung sparing in the two-beam proton plan was achieved at the expense of less conformity to the target (conformity index [CI], 1.99) and greater irradiation of the heart (heart-V40, 41.8%) compared with the IMRT plan(CI, 1.55, heart-V40, 35.7%) or the three-beam proton plan (CI, 1.46, heart-V40, 27.7%). Target coverage differed by more than 2% between the 3D and 4D plans for patients with substantial diaphragm motion in the three-beam proton and IMRT plans. The difference in spinal cord maximum dose between 3D and 4D plans could exceed 5 Gy for the proton plans partly owing to variations in stomach gas filling. Conclusions: Proton therapy provided significantly better sparing of lung than did IMRT. Diaphragm motion and stomach gas-filling must be considered in evaluating target coverage and cord doses.

  17. Four-Dimensional Lung Treatment Planning in Layer-Stacking Carbon Ion Beam Treatment: Comparison of Layer-Stacking and Conventional Ungated/Gated Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Shinichiro; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Asakura, Hiroshi; Sharp, Gregory C.; Kumagai, Motoki; Dobashi, Suguru; Nakajima, Mio; Yamamoto, Naoyoshi; Kandatsu, Susumu; Baba, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: We compared four-dimensional (4D) layer-stacking and conventional carbon ion beam distribution in the treatment of lung cancer between ungated and gated respiratory strategies using 4DCT data sets. Methods and Materials: Twenty lung patients underwent 4DCT imaging under free-breathing conditions. Using planning target volumes (PTVs) at respective respiratory phases, two types of compensating bolus were designed, a full single respiratory cycle for the ungated strategy and an approximately 30% duty cycle for the exhalation-gated strategy. Beams were delivered to the PTVs for the ungated and gated strategies, PTV(ungated) and PTV(gated), respectively, which were calculated by combining the respective PTV(Tn)s by layer-stacking and conventional irradiation. Carbon ion beam dose distribution was calculated as a function of respiratory phase by applying a compensating bolus to 4DCT. Accumulated dose distributions were calculated by applying deformable registration. Results: With the ungated strategy, accumulated dose distributions were satisfactorily provided to the PTV, with D95 values for layer-stacking and conventional irradiation of 94.0% and 96.2%, respectively. V20 for the lung and Dmax for the spinal cord were lower with layer-stacking than with conventional irradiation, whereas Dmax for the skin (14.1 GyE) was significantly lower (21.9 GyE). In addition, dose conformation to the GTV/PTV with layer-stacking irradiation was better with the gated than with the ungated strategy. Conclusions: Gated layer-stacking irradiation allows the delivery of a carbon ion beam to a moving target without significant degradation of dose conformity or the development of hot spots.

  18. Inferring Positions of Tumor and Nodes in Stage III Lung Cancer From Multiple Anatomical Surrogates Using Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowski, Kathleen T.; Pantarotto, Jason R.; Senan, Suresh

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of modeling Stage III lung cancer tumor and node positions from anatomical surrogates. Methods and Materials: To localize their centroids, the primary tumor and lymph nodes from 16 Stage III lung cancer patients were contoured in 10 equal-phase planning four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) image sets. The centroids of anatomical respiratory surrogates (carina, xyphoid, nipples, mid-sternum) in each image set were also localized. The correlations between target and surrogate positions were determined, and ordinary least-squares (OLS) and partial least-squares (PLS) regression models based on a subset of respiratory phases (three to eight randomly selected) were created to predict the target positions in the remaining images. The three-phase image sets that provided the best predictive information were used to create models based on either the carina alone or all surrogates. Results: The surrogate most correlated with target motion varied widely. Depending on the number of phases used to build the models, mean OLS and PLS errors were 1.0 to 1.4 mm and 0.8 to 1.0 mm, respectively. Models trained on the 0%, 40%, and 80% respiration phases had mean ({+-} standard deviation) PLS errors of 0.8 {+-} 0.5 mm and 1.1 {+-} 1.1 mm for models based on all surrogates and carina alone, respectively. For target coordinates with motion >5 mm, the mean three-phase PLS error based on all surrogates was 1.1 mm. Conclusions: Our results establish the feasibility of inferring primary tumor and nodal motion from anatomical surrogates in 4D CT scans of Stage III lung cancer. Using inferential modeling to decrease the processing time of 4D CT scans may facilitate incorporation of patient-specific treatment margins.

  19. Four-Dimensional Measurement of the Displacement of Internal Fiducial and Skin Markers During 320-Multislice Computed Tomography Scanning of Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Okuma, Kae; Tada, Keiichiro; Shiraishi, Kenshiro; Takahashi, Wataru; Shibata-Mobayashi, Shino; Sakumi, Akira; Saotome, Naoya; Haga, Akihiro; Onoe, Tsuyoshi; Ino, Kenji; Akahane, Masaaki; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To study the three-dimensional movement of internal tumor bed fiducial and breast skin markers, using 320-multislice computed tomography (CT); and to analyze intrafractional errors for breast cancer patients undergoing breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: This study examined 280 markers on the skin of the breast (200 markers) and on the primary tumor bed (80 markers) of 20 patients treated by external-beam photon radiotherapy. Motion assessment was analyzed in 41 respiratory phases during 20 s of cine CT in the radiotherapy position. To assess intrafractional errors resulting from respiratory motion, four-dimensional CT scans were acquired for 20 patients. Results: Motion in the anterior-posterior (A/P) and superior-inferior (S/I) directions showed a strong correlation (|r| > 0.7) with the respiratory curve for most markers (79% and 70%, respectively). The average marker displacements between maximum and minimum value during 20 s for the 200 breast skin metal markers were 1.1 {+-} 0.3 mm, 2.1 {+-} 0.6 mm, and 1.6 {+-} 0.4 mm in the left-right, A/P, and S/I directions, respectively. For the 80 tumor bed clips, displacements were 0.9 {+-} 0.2 mm in left-right, 1.7 {+-} 0.5 mm in A/P, and 1.1 {+-} 0.3 mm in S/I. There was no significant difference in the motion between breast quadrant regions or between the primary site and the other regions. Conclusions: Motion in primary breast tumors was evaluated with 320-multislice CT. Very little change was detected during individual radiation treatment fractions.

  20. Four-dimensional noise reduction using the time series of medical computed tomography datasets with short interval times: a static-phantom study

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Atsushi K.; Tani, Wakiko; Suehiro, Erina; Negi, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Satoru; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds. This study examines the hypothesis that four-dimensional noise reduction (4DNR) with short interval times reduces noise in cardiac computed tomography (CCT) using “padding” phases. Furthermore, the capability of reducing the reduction dose in CCT using this post-processing technique was assessed. Methods. Using base and quarter radiation doses for CCT (456 and 114 mAs/rot with 120 kVp), a static phantom was scanned ten times with retrospective electrocardiogram gating, and 4DNR with short interval times (50 ms) was performed using a post-processing technique. Differences in the computed tomography (CT) attenuation, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution with modulation transfer function in each dose image obtained with and without 4DNR were assessed by conducting a Tukey–Kramer’s test and non-inferiority test. Results. For the base dose, by using 4DNR, the CNR was improved from 1.18 ± 0.15 to 2.08 ± 0.20 (P = 0.001), while the CT attenuation and spatial resolution of the image of 4DNR did not were significantly inferior to those of reference image (P < 0.001). CNRs of the quarter-dose image in 4DNR also improved to 1.28 ± 0.11, and were not inferior to those of the non-4DNR images of the base dose (P < 0.001). Conclusions. 4DNR with short interval times significantly reduced noise. Furthermore, applying this method to CCT would have the potential of reducing the radiation dose by 75%, while maintaining a similar image noise level. PMID:26893966

  1. Optimizing geometric accuracy of four-dimensional CT scans acquired using the wall- and couch-mounted Varian® Real-time Position Management™ camera systems

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, D M; Cole, A J; Hanna, G G; McGarry, C K

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to identify sources of anatomical misrepresentation owing to the location of camera mounting, tumour motion velocity and image processing artefacts in order to optimize the four-dimensional CT (4DCT) scan protocol and improve geometrical–temporal accuracy. Methods: A phantom with an imaging insert was driven with a sinusoidal superior–inferior motion of varying amplitude and period for 4DCT scanning. The length of a high-density cube within the insert was measured using treatment planning software to determine the accuracy of its spatial representation. Scan parameters were varied, including the tube rotation period and the cine time between reconstructed images. A CT image quality phantom was used to measure various image quality signatures under the scan parameters tested. Results: No significant difference in spatial accuracy was found for 4DCT scans carried out using the wall- or couch-mounted camera for sinusoidal target motion. Greater spatial accuracy was found for 4DCT scans carried out using a tube rotation speed of 0.5 s rather than 1.0 s. The reduction in image quality when using a faster rotation speed was not enough to require an increase in patient dose. Conclusion: The 4DCT accuracy may be increased by optimizing scan parameters, including choosing faster tube rotation speeds. Peak misidentification in the recorded breathing trace may lead to spatial artefacts, and this risk can be reduced by using a couch-mounted infrared camera. Advances in knowledge: This study explicitly shows that 4DCT scan accuracy is improved by scanning with a faster CT tube rotation speed. PMID:25470359

  2. Usefulness of target delineation based on the two extreme phases of a four-dimensional computed tomography scan in stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Seong Soon; Huh, Gil Ja; Park, Suk Young; Yang, Po Song; Cho, EunYoun

    2015-01-01

    Background An evaluation of the usefulness of target delineation based only on the two extreme phases of a four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) scan in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods Seventeen patients treated with SBRT via 4D CT scans for lung cancer were retrospectively enrolled. Volumetric and geometric analyses were performed for the internal target volumes (ITVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) generated using different respiratory phases (all phases and 2 extreme phases) and setup margins (3 mm and 5 mm). Results As the setup margins were added to the ITVs, the overlap percentage between the PTVs based on all phases and the two extreme phases increased (85.1% for ITVs, 89.8% for PTVs_3 mm, and 91.3% for PTVs_5 mm), and there were no differences according to the tumor parameters, such as the gross tumor volume and 3D mobility. The missing-volume differences for ITVs derived from cone-beam CT images also decreased, with values of 5.3% between ITVs, 0.5% between PTVs_3 mm, and 0.2% between PTVs_5 mm. Compared with the plan based on all phases and a 3 mm margin, the average lung-dose differences found for the PTV based on the two extreme phases and a 5 mm margin were 0.41 Gy for the mean lung dose and 0.93% for V20. Conclusions Regardless of tumor characteristics, PTV construction based only on the two extreme phases and a 5 mm setup margin may be a useful tool for reducing the clinical workload involved in target delineation in SBRT for lung cancer. PMID:26273368

  3. Real-time respiration monitoring using the radiotherapy treatment beam and four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT)--a conceptual study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weiguo; Ruchala, Kenneth J; Chen, Ming-Li; Chen, Quan; Olivera, Gustavo H

    2006-09-21

    Real-time knowledge of intra-fraction motion, such as respiration, is essential for four-dimensional (4D) radiotherapy. Surrogate-based and internal-fiducial-based methods may suffer from one or many drawbacks such as false correlation, being invasive, delivering extra patient radiation, and requiring complicated hardware and software development and implementation. In this paper we develop a simple non-surrogate, non-invasive method to monitor respiratory motion during radiotherapy treatments in real time. This method directly utilizes the treatment beam and thus imposes no additional radiation to the patient. The method requires a pre-treatment 4DCT and a real-time detector system. The method combines off-line processes with on-line processes. The off-line processes include 4DCT imaging and pre-calculating detector signals at each phase of the 4DCT based on the planned fluence map and the detector response function. The on-line processes include measuring detector signal from the treatment beam, and correlating the measured detector signal with the pre-calculated signals. The respiration phase is determined as the position of peak correlation. We tested our method with extensive simulations based on a TomoTherapy machine and a 4DCT of a lung cancer patient. Three types of simulations were implemented to mimic the clinical situations. Each type of simulation used three different TomoTherapy delivery sinograms, each with 800 to 1000 projections, as input fluences. Three arbitrary breathing patterns were simulated and two dose levels, 2 Gy/fraction and 2 cGy/fraction, were used for simulations to study the robustness of this method against detector quantum noise. The algorithm was used to determine the breathing phases and this result was compared with the simulated breathing patterns. For the 2 Gy/fraction simulations, the respiration phases were accurately determined within one phase error in real time for most projections of the treatment, except for a few

  4. Four-dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging with 3D Radial Sampling and Self-gating based K-space Sorting: Early Clinical Experience on Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wensha; Fan, Zhaoyang; Tuli, Richard; Deng, Zixin; Pang, Jianing; Wachsman, Ashley; Reznik, Robert; Sandler, Howard; Li, Debiao; Fraass, Benedick A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to characterize internal organ motion but real time acquisition is typically limited to 2 dimensions. Methods have been developed to reconstruct four dimensional MRI (4D-MRI) based on time-stamped 2D images or 2D K-space data. These methods suffer from anisotropic resolution and rebinning artifacts. We applied a novel self-gating K-space sorted 4D-MRI (SG-KS-4D-MRI) method to overcome these limitations and to monitor pancreatic tumor motion. Methods and Material Ten patients were imaged using 4D-CT, cine 2D-MRI and the SG-KS-4D-MRI, which is a spoiled gradient recalled echo (GRE) sequence with 3D radial-sampling K-space projections and 1D projection-based self-gating. Tumor volumes were defined on all phases in both 4D-MRI and 4D-CT and then compared. Results An isotropic resolution of 1.56 mm was achieved in the SG-KS-4D-MRI images, which showed superior soft tissue contrast to 4D-CT and appeared to be free of visible rebinning artifacts. The tumor motion trajectory cross-correlations between SG-KS-4D-MRI and cine 2D-MRI in SI, AP and ML directions were 0.93±0.03, 0.83±0.10 and 0.74±0.18, respectively. The tumor motion trajectories cross-correlations between SG-KS-4D-MRI and 4D-CT in SI, AP and ML directions were 0.91±0.06, 0.72±0.16 and 0.44±0.24, respectively. The average standard deviation of GTV volume (GTV_σ) calculated from the ten breathing phases were 0.81 cc and 1.02 cc for SG-KS-4D-MRI and 4D-CT (p=0.012). Conclusions A novel SG-KS-4D-MRI acquisition method capable of reconstructing rebinning artifact free high resolution 4D-MRI images was used to quantify pancreas tumor motion. The resultant pancreatic tumor motion trajectories agreed well with 2D-cine-MRI and 4D-CT. The pancreatic tumor volumes shown in the different phases for the SG-KS-4D-MRI were statistically significantly more consistent than those in the 4D-CT. PMID:26452571

  5. SU-E-T-520: Four-Dimensional Dose Calculation Algorithm Considering Variations in Dose Distribution Induced by Sinusoidal One-Dimensional Motion Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Taguenang, J; Algan, O; Ahmad, S; Ali, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate quantitatively the variations in dose-distributions induced by motion by measurements and modeling. A four-dimensional (4D) motion model of dose distributions that accounts for different motion parameters was developed. Methods: Variations in dose distributions induced by sinusoidal phantom motion were measured using a multiple-diode-array-detector (MapCheck2). MapCheck2 was mounted on a mobile platform that moves with adjustable calibrated motion patterns in the superior-inferior direction. Various plans including open and intensity-modulated fields were used to irradiate MapCheck2. A motion model was developed to predict spatial and temporal variations in the dose-distributions and dependence on the motion parameters using pencil-beam spread-out superposition function. This model used the superposition of pencil-beams weighted with a probability function extracted from the motion trajectory. The model was verified with measured dose-distributions obtained from MapCheck2. Results: Dose-distribution varied considerably with motion where in the regions between isocenter and 50% isodose-line, dose decreased with increase of the motion amplitude. Dose levels increased with increase in the motion amplitude in the region beyond 50% isodose-line. When the range of motion (ROM=twice amplitude) was smaller than the field length both central axis dose and the 50% isodose-line did not change with variation of motion amplitude and remained equal to the dose of stationary phantom. As ROM became larger than the field length, the dose level decreased at central axis dose and 50% isodose-line. Motion frequency and phase did not affect the dose distributions which were delivered over an extended time longer than few motion cycles, however, they played an important role for doses delivered with high-dose-rates within one motion cycle . Conclusion: A 4D-dose motion model was developed to predict and correct variations in dose distributions induced by one

  6. WE-D-BRA-03: Four-Dimensional Dose Reconstruction Through Retrospective Phase Determination Using Cine Images of Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, J; Jung, J; Yi, B; Kim, J; Yeo, I

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To test a method to reconstruct a four-dimensional (4D) dose distribution using the correlation of pre-calculated 4D electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images and measured cine-EPID images. Methods: 1. A phantom designed to simulate a tumor in lung (a polystyrene block with 3.0 cm diameter embedded in cork) was placed on a sinusoidally moving platform with 2 cm amplitude and 4 sec/cycle. Ten-phase 4D CT images were acquired for treatment planning and dose reconstruction. A 6MV photon beam was irradiated on the phantom with static (field size=5×8.5 cm{sup 2}) and dynamic fields (sliding windows, 10×10 cm{sup 2}, X1 MLC closing in parallel with the tumor movement). 2. 4D and 3D doses were calculated forwardly on PTV (1 cm margin). 3. Dose images on EPID under the fields were calculated for 10 phases. 4. Cine EPID images were acquired during irradiation. 5. Their acquisition times were correlated to the phases of the phantom at which irradiation occurred by inter-comparing calculated “reference” EPID images with measured images (2D gamma comparison). For the dynamic beam, the tumor was hidden under MLCs during a portion of irradiation time; the correlation performed when the tumor was visible was extrapolated. 6. Dose for each phase was reconstructed on the 4D CT images and summed over all phases. The summation was compared with forwardly calculated 4D and 3D dose distributions. Monte Carlo methods were used for all calculations. Results: For the open and dynamic beams, the 4D reconstructed doses showed the pass rates of 92.7 % and 100 %, respectively, at the isocenter plane given 3% / 3 mm criteria. The better agreement of the dynamic beam was from its dose gradient which blurred the otherwise sharp difference between forward and reconstructed doses. This also contributed slightly better agreement in DVH of PTV. Conclusion: The feasibility of 4D reconstruction was demonstrated.

  7. Development of an ultrasmall C-band linear accelerator guide for a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Yuichiro; Miura, Sadao; Kokubo, Masaki; Yamashita, Ichiro; Hirai, Etsuro; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2007-05-01

    We are developing a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head. It is capable of pursuing irradiation and delivering irradiation precisely with the help of an agile moving x-ray head on the gimbals. Requirements for the accelerator guide were established, system design was developed, and detailed design was conducted. An accelerator guide was manufactured and basic beam performance and leakage radiation from the accelerator guide were evaluated at a low pulse repetition rate. The accelerator guide including the electron gun is 38 cm long and weighs about 10 kg. The length of the accelerating structure is 24.4 cm. The accelerating structure is a standing wave type and is composed of the axial-coupled injector section and the side-coupled acceleration cavity section. The injector section is composed of one prebuncher cavity, one buncher cavity, one side-coupled half cavity, and two axial coupling cavities. The acceleration cavity section is composed of eight side-coupled nose reentrant cavities and eight coupling cavities. The electron gun is a diode-type gun with a cerium hexaboride (CeB6) direct heating cathode. The accelerator guide can be operated without any magnetic focusing device. Output beam current was 75 mA with a transmission efficiency of 58%, and the average energy was 5.24 MeV. Beam energy was distributed from 4.95 to 5.6 MeV. The beam profile, measured 88 mm from the beam output hole on the axis of the accelerator guide, was 0.7 mm X 0.9 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) width. The beam loading line was 5.925 (MeV)-Ib (mA) X 0.00808 (MeV/mA), where Ib is output beam current. The maximum radiation leakage of the accelerator guide at 100 cm from the axis of the accelerator guide was calculated as 0.33 cGy/min at the rated x-ray output of 500 cGy/min from the measured value. This leakage requires no radiation shielding for the accelerator guide itself per IEC 60601-2-1.

  8. TU-F-17A-09: Four-Dimensional Cone Beam CT Ventilation Imaging Can Detect Interfraction Lung Function Variations for Locally Advanced Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kipritidis, J; Keall, P; Hugo, G; Weiss, E; Williamson, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging (4D-CBCT VI) is a novel functional lung imaging modality requiring validation. We hypothesize that 4D-CBCT VI satisfies a necessary condition for validity: that intrafraction variations (e.g. due to poor 4D-CBCT image quality) are substantially different to interfraction variations (e.g. due to changes in underlying function). We perform the first comparison of intrafraction (pre/post fraction) and interfraction (week-to-week) 4D-CBCT VIs for locally advanced non small cell lung cancer (LA NSCLC) patients undergoing radiation therapy. Methods: A total of 215 4D-CBCT scans were acquired for 19 LA NSCLC patients over 4-6 weeks of radiation therapy, including 75 pairs of pre-/post-fraction scans on the same day. 4D-CBCT VIs were obtained by applying state-of-the-art, B-spline deformable image registration to obtain the Jacobian determinant of deformation between the end-exhale and end-inhale phases. All VIs were deformably registered to the corresponding first day scan, normalized between the 10th and 90th percentile values and cropped to the ipsilateral lung only. Intrafraction variations were assessed by computing the mean and standard deviation of voxel-wise differences between all same-day pairs of pre-/post-fraction VIs. Interfraction differences were computed between first-day VIs and treatment weeks 2, 4 and 6 for all 19 patients. We tested the hypothesis by comparing cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of intrafraction and interfraction ventilation differences using two-sided Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit tests. Results: The (mean ± std. dev.) of intrafraction differences was (−0.007 ± 0.079). Interfraction differences for weeks 2, 4 and 6 were (−0.035 ± 0.103), (−0.006 ± 0.094) and (−0.019 ± 0.127) respectively. For week 2, the changes in CDFs for intrafraction and interfraction differences approached statistical significance (p=0.099). Conclusion: We have shown that 4D-CBCT VI

  9. SU-E-J-110: Dosimetric Analysis of Respiratory Motion Based On Four-Dimensional Dose Accumulation in Liver Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S; Kim, D; Kim, T; Kim, K; Cho, M; Shin, D; Suh, T; Kim, S; Park, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Respiratory motion in thoracic and abdominal region could lead to significant underdosing of target and increased dose to healthy tissues. The aim of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric effect of respiratory motion in conventional 3D dose by comparing 4D deformable dose in liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: Five patients who had previously treated liver SBRT were included in this study. Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images with 10 phases for all patients were acquired on multi-slice CT scanner (Siemens, Somatom definition). Conventional 3D planning was performed using the average intensity projection (AIP) images. 4D dose accumulation was calculated by summation of dose distribution for all phase images of 4DCT using deformable image registration (DIR) . The target volume and normal organs dose were evaluated with the 4D dose and compared with those from 3D dose. And also, Index of achievement (IOA) which assesses the consistency between planned dose and prescription dose was used to compare target dose distribution between 3D and 4D dose. Results: Although the 3D dose calculation considered the moving target coverage, significant differences of various dosimetric parameters between 4D and 3D dose were observed in normal organs and PTV. The conventional 3D dose overestimated dose to PTV, however, there was no significant difference for GTV. The average difference of IOA which become ‘1’ in an ideal case was 3.2% in PTV. The average difference of liver and duodenum was 5% and 16% respectively. Conclusion: 4D dose accumulation which can provide dosimetric effect of respiratory motion has a possibility to predict the more accurate delivered dose to target and normal organs and improve treatment accuracy. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2013M2A2A7043498) and the Mid-career Researcher Program (2014R1A2A1A10050270) through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the

  10. SU-F-207-13: Comparison of Four Dimensional Computed Tomography (4D CT) Versus Breath Hold Images to Determine Pulmonary Nodule Elasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Negahdar, M; Loo, B; Maxim, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Elasticity may distinguish malignant from benign pulmonary nodules. To compare determining of malignant pulmonary nodule (MPN) elasticity from four dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) images versus inhale/exhale breath-hold CT images. Methods: We analyzed phase 00 and 50 of 4D CT and deep inhale and natural exhale of breath-hold CT images of 30 MPN treated with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). The radius of the smallest MPN was 0.3 cm while the biggest one was 2.1 cm. An intensity based deformable image registration (DIR) workflow was applied to the 4D CT and breath-hold images to determine the volumes of the MPNs and a 1 cm ring of surrounding lung tissue (ring) in each state. Next, an elasticity parameter was derived by calculating the ratio of the volume changes of MPN (exhale:inhale or phase50:phase00) to that of a 1 cm ring of lung tissue surrounding the MPN. The proposed formulation of elasticity enables us to compare volume changes of two different MPN in two different locations of lung. Results: The calculated volume ratio of MPNs from 4D CT (phase50:phase00) and breath-hold images (exhale:inhale) was 1.00±0.23 and 0.95±0.11, respectively. It shows the stiffness of MPN and comparably bigger volume changes of MPN in breath-hold images because of the deeper degree of inhalation. The calculated elasticity of MPNs from 4D CT and breath-hold images was 1.12±0.22 and 1.23±0.26, respectively. For five patients who have had two MPN in their lung, calculated elasticity of tumor A and tumor B follows same trend in both 4D CT and breath-hold images. Conclusion: We showed that 4D CT and breath-hold images are comparable in the ability to calculate the elasticity of MPN. This study has been supported by Department of Defense LCRP 2011 #W81XWH-12-1-0286.

  11. The effect of irregular breathing patterns on internal target volumes in four-dimensional CT and cone-beam CT images in the context of stereotactic lung radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, N.; Kron, T.; Roxby, P.; Franich, R.; Dunn, L.; Aarons, Y.; Chesson, B.; Siva, S.; Duplan, D.; Ball, D.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic lung radiotherapy is complicated by tumor motion from patient respiration. Four-dimensional CT (4DCT) imaging is a motion compensation method used in treatment planning to generate a maximum intensity projection (MIP) internal target volume (ITV). Image guided radiotherapy during treatment may involve acquiring a volumetric cone-beam CT (CBCT) image and visually aligning the tumor to the planning 4DCT MIP ITV contour. Moving targets imaged with CBCT can appear blurred and currently there are no studies reporting on the effect that irregular breathing patterns have on CBCT volumes and their alignment to 4DCT MIP ITV contours. The objective of this work was therefore to image a phantom moving with irregular breathing patterns to determine whether any configurations resulted in errors in volume contouring or alignment. Methods: A Perspex thorax phantom was used to simulate a patient. Three wooden 'lung' inserts with embedded Perspex 'lesions' were moved up to 4 cm with computer-generated motion patterns, and up to 1 cm with patient-specific breathing patterns. The phantom was imaged on 4DCT and CBCT with the same acquisition settings used for stereotactic lung patients in the clinic and the volumes on all phantom images were contoured. This project assessed the volumes for qualitative and quantitative changes including volume, length of the volume, and errors in alignment between CBCT volumes and 4DCT MIP ITV contours. Results: When motion was introduced 4DCT and CBCT volumes were reduced by up to 20% and 30% and shortened by up to 7 and 11 mm, respectively, indicating that volume was being under-represented at the extremes of motion. Banding artifacts were present in 4DCT MIP images, while CBCT volumes were largely reduced in contrast. When variable amplitudes from patient traces were used and CBCT ITVs were compared to 4DCT MIP ITVs there was a distinct trend in reduced ITV with increasing amplitude that was not seen when compared to true ITVs

  12. Cerebral Hemodynamics in Patients with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Assessed by Susceptibility Weighted Imaging and Four-Dimensional Non-Contrast MR Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Forkert, Nils Daniel; Schmitt, Peter; Dohrmann, Torsten; Schroeder, Maria; Magnus, Tim; Kluge, Stefan; Weiler-Normann, Christina; Bi, Xiaoming; Fiehler, Jens; Sedlacik, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and neurological symptoms performed during an epidemic outbreak of Escherichia coli O104:H4 in Northern Europe has previously shown pathological changes in only approximately 50% of patients. In contrast, susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) revealed a loss of venous contrast in a large number of patients. We hypothesized that this observation may be due to an increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and aimed to identify a plausible cause. Materials and Methods Baseline 1.5T MRI scans of 36 patients (female, 26; male, 10; mean age, 38.2±19.3 years) were evaluated. Venous contrast was rated on standard SWI minimum intensity projections. A prototype four-dimensional (time resolved) magnetic resonance angiography (4D MRA) assessed cerebral hemodynamics by global time-to-peak (TTP), as a surrogate marker for CBF. Clinical parameters studied were hemoglobin, hematocrit, creatinine, urea levels, blood pressure, heart rate, and end-tidal CO2. Results SWI venous contrast was abnormally low in 33 of 36 patients. TTP ranged from 3.7 to 10.2 frames (mean, 7.9 ± 1.4). Hemoglobin at the time of MRI (n = 35) was decreased in all patients (range, 5.0 to 12.6 g/dL; mean, 8.2 ± 1.4); hematocrit (n = 33) was abnormally low in all but a single patient (range, 14.3 to 37.2%; mean, 23.7 ± 4.2). Creatinine was abnormally high in 30 of 36 patients (83%) (range, 0.8 to 9.7; mean, 3.7 ± 2.2). SWI venous contrast correlated significantly with hemoglobin (r = 0.52, P = 0.0015), hematocrit (r = 0.65, P < 0.001), and TTP (r = 0.35, P = 0.036). No correlation of SWI with blood pressure, heart rate, end-tidal CO2, creatinine, and urea level was observed. Findings suggest that the loss of venous contrast is related to an increase in CBF secondary to severe anemia related to HUS. SWI contrast of patients with pathological conventional MRI findings was significantly lower

  13. SU-F-303-13: Initial Evaluation of Four Dimensional Diffusion- Weighted MRI (4D-DWI) and Its Effect On Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y; Yin, F; Czito, B; Bashir, M; Palta, M; Cai, J; Zhong, X; Dale, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Diffusion-weighted imaging(DWI) has been shown to have superior tumor-to-tissue contrast for cancer detection.This study aims at developing and evaluating a four dimensional DWI(4D-DWI) technique using retrospective sorting method for imaging respiratory motion for radiotherapy planning,and evaluate its effect on Apparent Diffusion Coefficient(ADC) measurement. Materials/Methods: Image acquisition was performed by repeatedly imaging a volume of interest using a multi-slice single-shot 2D-DWI sequence in the axial planes and cine MRI(served as reference) using FIESTA sequence.Each 2D-DWI image were acquired in xyz-diffusion-directions with a high b-value(b=500s/mm2).The respiratory motion was simultaneously recorded using bellows.Retrospective sorting was applied in each direction to reconstruct 4D-DWI.The technique was evaluated using a computer simulated 4D-digital human phantom(XCAT),a motion phantom and a healthy volunteer under an IRB-approved study.Motion trajectories of regions-of-interests(ROI) were extracted from 4D-DWI and compared with reference.The mean motion trajectory amplitude differences(D) between the two was calculated.To quantitatively analyze the motion artifacts,XCAT were controlled to simulate regular motion and the motions of 10 liver cancer patients.4D-DWI,free-breathing DWI(FB- DWI) were reconstructed.Tumor volume difference(VD) of each phase of 4D-DWI and FB-DWI from the input static tumor were calculated.Furthermore, ADC was measured for each phase of 4D-DWI and FB-DWI data,and mean tumor ADC values(M-ADC) were calculated.Mean M-ADC over all 4D-DWI phases was compared with M-ADC calculated from FB-DWI. Results: 4D-DWI of XCAT,the motion phantom and the healthy volunteer demonstrated the respiratory motion clearly.ROI D values were 1.9mm,1.7mm and 2.0mm,respectively.For motion artifacts analysis,XCAT 4D-DWI images show much less motion artifacts compare to FB-DWI.Mean VD for 4D-WDI and FB-DWI were 8.5±1.4% and 108±15

  14. State-selected dynamics of the complex-forming bimolecular reaction Cl-+CH3Cl'-->ClCH3+Cl'-: A four-dimensional quantum scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Carsten; Schmatz, Stefan

    2004-07-01

    Time-independent quantum scattering calculations have been carried out on the Walden inversion SN2 reaction Cl-+CH3Cl'(v1,v2,v3)→ClCH3(v1',v2',v3')+Cl'-. The two C-Cl stretching modes (quantum numbers v3 and v3') and the totally symmetric internal modes of the methyl group (C-H stretching vibration, v1 and v1', and inversion bending vibration, v2 and v2') are treated explicitly. A four-dimensional coupled cluster potential energy surface is employed. The scattering problem is formulated in hyperspherical coordinates using the exact Hamiltonian and exploiting the full symmetry of the problem. Converged state-selected reaction probabilities and product distributions have been calculated up to 6100 cm-1 above the vibrational ground state of CH3Cl, i.e., up to initial vibrational excitation (2,0,0). In order to extract all scattering resonances, the energetic grid was chosen to be very fine, partly down to a resolution of 10-12 cm-1. Up to 2500 cm-1 translational energy, initial excitation of the umbrella bending vibration, (0,1,0), is more efficient for reaction than exciting the C-Cl stretching mode, (0,0,1). The combined excitation of both vibrations results in a synergic effect, i.e., a considerably higher reaction probability than expected from the sum of both independent excitations, even higher than (0,0,2) up to 1500 cm-1 translational energy. Product distributions show that the umbrella mode is strongly coupled to the C-Cl stretching mode and cannot be treated as a spectator mode. The reaction probability rises almost linearly with increasing initial excitation of the umbrella bending mode. The effect with respect to the C-Cl stretch is five times larger for more than two quanta in this mode, and in agreement with previous work saturation is found. Exciting the high-frequency C-H stretching mode, (1,0,0), yields a large increase for small energies [more than two orders of magnitude larger than (0,0,0)], while for translational energies higher than 2000 cm-1

  15. Quantum motion on a torus as a submanifold problem in a generalized Dirac’s theory of second-class constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Xun, D.M.; Liu, Q.H.; Zhu, X.M.

    2013-11-15

    A generalization of Dirac’s canonical quantization scheme for a system with second-class constraints is proposed, in which the fundamental commutation relations are constituted by all commutators between positions, momenta and Hamiltonian, so they are simultaneously quantized in a self-consistent manner, rather than by those between merely positions and momenta which leads to ambiguous forms of the Hamiltonian and the momenta. The application of the generalized scheme to the quantum motion on a torus leads to a remarkable result: the quantum theory is inconsistent if built up in an intrinsic geometric manner, whereas it becomes consistent within an extrinsic examination of the torus as a submanifold in three dimensional flat space with the use of the Cartesian coordinate system. The geometric momentum and potential are then reasonably reproduced. -- Highlights: •A generalization of Dirac’s canonical quantization is proposed for a system with second-class constraints. •Quantum motion on torus surface is explicitly treated to show how Schrödinger formalism is complementary to the Dirac one. •The embedding effect in quantum mechanics is originated from the quantization.

  16. A four-dimensional potential energy surface and predicted infrared spectra for the Ne-D2O van der Waals complex in the ν2 bending region of D2O molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shanshan; Chen, Dong; Li, Ya; Feng, Eryin; Huang, Wuying

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a four-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) for the Ne-D2O complex is constructed theoretically. The calculations are carried out at CCSD(T) level with large basis sets augmented with mid-bond functions. The PES includes explicit dependence on the ν2 symmetric bending coordinate Q2 of the D2O molecule. Two vibrationally averaged potentials in the ground and first excited bending states are obtained respectively. Using these two potentials we calculate the bound states of the complexes. The theoretical rovibrational transition frequencies for three bands: П(111,ν2 = 1)←Σ000, Σ(111,ν2 = 1)←Σ000 and n = 1, Σ(000,ν2 = 1)←Σ000 are predicted and generally in good agreement with the experimental observed values.

  17. Multidirectional four-dimensional shape measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenar, Janusz; Sitnik, Robert; Witkowski, Marcin

    2012-03-01

    Currently, a lot of different scanning techniques are used for 3D imaging of human body. Most of existing systems are based on static registration of internal structures using MRI or CT techniques as well as 3D scanning of outer surface of human body by laser triangulation or structured light methods. On the other hand there is an existing mature 4D method based on tracking in time the position of retro-reflective markers attached to human body. There are two main drawbacks of this solution: markers are attached to skin (no real skeleton movement is registered) and it gives (x, y, z, t) coordinates only in those points (not for the whole surface). In this paper we present a novel multidirectional structured light measurement system that is capable of measuring 3D shape of human body surface with frequency reaching 60Hz. The developed system consists of two spectrally separated and hardware-synchronized 4D measurement heads. The principle of the measurement is based on single frame analysis. Projected frame is composed from sine-modulated intensity pattern and a special stripe allowing absolute phase measurement. Several different geometrical set-ups will be proposed depending on type of movements that are to be registered.

  18. Four-dimensional analysis of stomatognathic function.

    PubMed

    Terajima, Masahiko; Endo, Mizuki; Aoki, Yoshimitsu; Yuuda, Kyouko; Hayasaki, Haruaki; Goto, Tazuko K; Tokumori, Kenji; Nakasima, Akihiko

    2008-08-01

    Many researchers have attempted to clarify the complex relationships between stomatognathic function and craniofacial morphology. Most studies investigated the trajectories of incisal or condylar points and measured temporomandibular morphology projected onto 2-dimensional radiographic films. Although these methods provided valuable information, their diagnostic capabilities were limited. We introduce a new 4-dimensional (4D) analysis of stomatognathic function that combines the 3-dimensional (3D) computed tomography of the cranium and mandible, dental surface imaging with a noncontact 3D laser scanner, and mandibular movement data recorded with a 6 degrees of freedom jaw-movement analyzer. This method performs dynamic and precise simulations that can analyze and display condyle to fossa distances and occlusal contacts during mandibular function. These comprehensive relationships can be analyzed and displayed not only at intercuspal position, but also at any mandibular position during functional movements. We believe that our 4D analyzing system will be useful for diagnosing temporomandibular disorders of patients with jaw deformities and other malocclusions.

  19. Four-Dimensional Spatial Reasoning in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aflalo, T. N.; Graziano, M. S. A.

    2008-01-01

    Human subjects practiced navigation in a virtual, computer-generated maze that contained 4 spatial dimensions rather than the usual 3. The subjects were able to learn the spatial geometry of the 4-dimensional maze as measured by their ability to perform path integration, a standard test of spatial ability. They were able to travel down a winding…

  20. Four-dimensional spatial reasoning in humans.

    PubMed

    Aflalo, T N; Graziano, M S A

    2008-10-01

    Human subjects practiced navigation in a virtual, computer-generated maze that contained 4 spatial dimensions rather than the usual 3. The subjects were able to learn the spatial geometry of the 4-dimensional maze as measured by their ability to perform path integration, a standard test of spatial ability. They were able to travel down a winding corridor to its end and then point back accurately toward the occluded origin. One interpretation is that the brain substrate for spatial navigation is not a built-in map of the 3-dimensional world. Instead it may be better described as a set of general rules for manipulating spatial information that can be applied with practice to a diversity of spatial frameworks.

  1. The Effect of the Number of Simulations on the Exponents Obtained by Finite-Size Scaling Relations of the Order Parameter and the Magnetic Susceptibility for the Four-Dimensional Ising Model on the Creutz Cellular Automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merdan, Z.; Güzelsoy, E.

    2012-05-01

    The four-dimensional Ising model is simulated on the Creutz cellular automaton using finite-size lattices with linear dimension 4≤ L≤8. The exponents in the finite-size scaling relations for the order parameter and the magnetic susceptibility at the finite-lattice critical temperature are computed to be β=0.49(7), β=0.49(5), β=0.50(1) and γ=1.04(4), γ=1.03(4), γ=1.02(4) for 7, 14, and 21 independent simulations, respectively. As the number of independent simulations increases, the obtained results are consistent with the renormalization group predictions of β=0.5 and γ=1. The values for the critical temperature of the infinite lattice T c (∞)=6.6788(65), T c (∞)=6.6798(69), T c (∞)=6.6802(70) are obtained from the straight-line fit of the magnetic susceptibility maxima using 4≤ L≤8 for 7, 14, and 21 independent simulations, respectively. As the number of independent simulations increases, the obtained results are in very good agreement with the series expansion results of T c (∞)=6.6817(15), T c (∞)=6.6802(2), the dynamic Monte Carlo result of T c (∞)=6.6803(1), the cluster Monte Carlo result of T c (∞)=6.680(1) and the Monte Carlo using Metropolis and Wolff-cluster algorithm result of T c (∞)=6.6802632±5×10-5.

  2. A four-dimensional petroleum systems model for the San Joaquin Basin Province, California: Chapter 12 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Kenneth E.; Magoon, Leslie B.; Lampe, Carolyn; Scheirer, Allegra Hosford; Lillis, Paul G.; Gautier, Donald L.

    2008-01-01

    A calibrated numerical model depicts the geometry and three-dimensional (3-D) evolution of petroleum systems through time (4-D) in a 249 x 309 km (155 x 192 mi) area covering all of the San Joaquin Basin Province of California. Model input includes 3-D structural and stratigraphic data for key horizons and maps of unit thickness, lithology, paleobathymetry, heat flow, original total organic carbon, and original Rock-Eval pyrolysis hydrogen index for each source rock. The four principal petroleum source rocks in the basin are the Miocene Antelope shale of Graham and Williams (1985; hereafter referred to as Antelope shale), the Eocene Kreyenhagen Formation, the Eocene Tumey formation of Atwill (1935; hereafter referred to as Tumey formation), and the Cretaceous to Paleocene Moreno Formation. Due to limited Rock-Eval/total organic carbon data, the Tumey formation was modeled using constant values of original total organic carbon and original hydrogen index. Maps of original total organic carbon and original hydrogen index were created for the other three source rocks. The Antelope shale was modeled using Type IIS kerogen kinetics, whereas Type II kinetics were used for the other source rocks. Four-dimensional modeling and geologic field evidence indicate that maximum burial of the three principal Cenozoic source rocks occurred in latest Pliocene to Holocene time. For example, a 1-D extraction of burial history from the 4-D model in the Tejon depocenter shows that the bottom of the Antelope shale source rock began expulsion (10 percent transformation ratio) about 4.6 Ma and reached peak expulsion (50 percent transformation ratio) about 3.6 Ma. Except on the west flank of the basin, where steep dips in outcrop and seismic data indicate substantial uplift, little or no section has been eroded. Most petroleum migration occurred during late Cenozoic time in distinct stratigraphic intervals along east-west pathways from pods of active petroleum source rock in the Tejon and

  3. Four-dimensional evaluation of regional air quality models

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present highlights of the results obtained in the third phase of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII3). Activities in AQMEII3 were focused on evaluating the performance of global, hemispheric and regional modeling systems over Europe and North Ame...

  4. Photon gating in four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohammed T.; Liu, Haihua; Baskin, John Spencer; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) is a pivotal tool for imaging of nanoscale structural dynamics with subparticle resolution on the time scale of atomic motion. Photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM), a key UEM technique, involves the detection of electrons that have gained energy from a femtosecond optical pulse via photon–electron coupling on nanostructures. PINEM has been applied in various fields of study, from materials science to biological imaging, exploiting the unique spatial, energy, and temporal characteristics of the PINEM electrons gained by interaction with a “single” light pulse. The further potential of photon-gated PINEM electrons in probing ultrafast dynamics of matter and the optical gating of electrons by invoking a “second” optical pulse has previously been proposed and examined theoretically in our group. Here, we experimentally demonstrate this photon-gating technique, and, through diffraction, visualize the phase transition dynamics in vanadium dioxide nanoparticles. With optical gating of PINEM electrons, imaging temporal resolution was improved by a factor of 3 or better, being limited only by the optical pulse widths. This work enables the combination of the high spatial resolution of electron microscopy and the ultrafast temporal response of the optical pulses, which provides a promising approach to attain the resolution of few femtoseconds and attoseconds in UEM. PMID:26438835

  5. New four-dimensional integrals by Mellin-Barnes transform

    SciTech Connect

    Allendes, Pedro; Guerrero, Natanael; Kondrashuk, Igor; Notte Cuello, Eduardo A.

    2010-05-15

    This paper is devoted to the calculation of a special class of integrals by Mellin-Barnes transform. It contains double integrals in the position space in d=4-2{epsilon} dimensions, where {epsilon} is parameter of dimensional regularization. These integrals contribute to the effective action of the N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. The integrand is a fraction in which the numerator is the logarithm of the ratio of space-time intervals, and the denominator is the product of powers of space-time intervals. According to the method developed in the previous papers, in order to make use of the uniqueness technique for one of two integrations, we shift exponents in powers in the denominator of integrands by some multiples of {epsilon}. As the next step, the second integration in the position space is done by Mellin-Barnes transform. For normalizing procedure, we reproduce first the known result obtained earlier by Gegenbauer polynomial technique. Then, we make another shift of exponents in powers in the denominator to create the logarithm in the numerator as the derivative with respect to the shift parameter {delta}. We show that the technique of work with the contour of the integral modified in this way by using Mellin-Barnes transform repeats the technique of work with the contour of the integral without such a modification. In particular, all the operations with a shift of contour of integration over complex variables of twofold Mellin-Barnes transform are the same as before the {delta} modification of indices, and even the poles of residues coincide. This confirms the observation made in the previous papers that in the position space all the Green's function of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory can be expressed in terms of Usyukina-Davydychev functions.

  6. Four-dimensional MR cardiovascular imaging: method and applications.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, Anthony G; Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Haosen; Ho, Chien; Liang, Zhi-Pei

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been recognized as a powerful tool for cardiovascular imaging because of its unique potential to measure blood flow, cardiac wall motion and tissue properties jointly. However, many clinical applications of cardiac MRI have been limited by low imaging speed. Three-dimensional cardiovascular MRI in real-time, or 4D cardiovascular MRI without cardiac and respiratory gating or triggering, remains an important technological goal of the MR cardiovascular research community. In this paper, we present a novel technique to achieve 4D cardiovascular MR imaging in unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution. This breakthrough is made possible through a creative use of sparse sampling theory and parallel imaging with phased array coils and a novel implementation of data acquisition and image reconstruction. We have successfully used the technique to perform 4D cardiovascular imaging on rats, achieving 0.65 mm × 0.65 mm × 0.31 mm spatial resolution with a frame rate of 67 fps. This capability enables simultaneous imaging of cardiac motion, respiratory motion, and first-pass myocardial perfusion. This in turn allows multiple cardiac assessments including measurement of ejection fraction, cardiac output, and myocardial blood flow in a single experiment. We believe that the proposed technique can open up many important applications of cardiovascular imaging and have significant impact on the field.

  7. Four-dimensional worldwide atmospheric models: ANYPT and ANYRG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D.; Brown, C.; Spiegler, D.; Fowler, M.

    1975-01-01

    Computer programs read magnetic-tape data bases and computer meteorological profiles for any position, time, and height (from zero to 25 km). System assists in analyses of distortion of information obtained from aircraft-mounted or spacecraft-mounted electromagnetic sensors.

  8. Observational Needs for Four-Dimensional Air Quality Characterization

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface-based monitoring programs provide the foundation for associating air pollution and causal effects in human health studies, and they support the development of air quality standards and the preparation of emission reduction strategies. While surface oriented networks remai...

  9. Four dimensional reconstruction and analysis of plume images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhawan, Atam P.; Disimile, Peter J.; Peck, Charles, III

    Results of a time-history based three-dimensional reconstruction of cross-sectional images corresponding to a specific planar location of the jet structure are reported. The experimental set-up is described, and three-dimensional displays of time-history based reconstruction of the jet structure are presented. Future developments in image analysis, quantification and interpretation, and flow visualization of rocket engine plume images are expected to provide a tool for correlating engine diagnostic features with visible flow structures.

  10. Philosophy of Gravity: Intuitions of Four-Dimensional Curved Spacetime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Marthe

    1994-01-01

    Argues people have forgotten how much of an idealization the Newtonian world view actually is. For this reason, people have come to believe that we can only "see" the world in three spatial dimensions. Describes an alternative idealization, or set of pictures, that would lead to find the claim that the universe is a four-dimensional…

  11. Four-Dimensional Entropy from Three-Dimensional Gravity.

    PubMed

    Carlip, S

    2015-08-14

    At the horizon of a black hole, the action of (3+1)-dimensional loop quantum gravity acquires a boundary term that is formally identical to an action for three-dimensional gravity. I show how to use this correspondence to obtain the entropy of the (3+1)-dimensional black hole from well-understood conformal field theory computations of the entropy in (2+1)-dimensional de Sitter space.

  12. Four-dimensional Localization and the Iterative Ensemble Kalman Smoother

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocquet, M.

    2015-12-01

    The iterative ensemble Kalman smoother (IEnKS) is a data assimilation method meant for efficiently tracking the state ofnonlinear geophysical models. It combines an ensemble of model states to estimate the errors similarly to the ensemblesquare root Kalman filter, with a 4D-variational analysis performed within the ensemble space. As such it belongs tothe class of ensemble variational methods. Recently introduced 4DEnVar or the 4D-LETKF can be seen as particular casesof the scheme. The IEnKS was shown to outperform 4D-Var, the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and smoother, with low-ordermodels in all investigated dynamical regimes. Like any ensemble method, it could require the use of localization of theanalysis when the state space dimension is high. However, localization for the IEnKS is not as straightforward as forthe EnKF. Indeed, localization needs to be defined across time, and it needs to be as much as possible consistent withthe dynamical flow within the data assimilation variational window. We show that a Liouville equation governs the timeevolution of the localization operator, which is linked to the evolution of the error correlations. It is argued thatits time integration strongly depends on the forecast dynamics. Using either covariance localization or domainlocalization, we propose and test several localization strategies meant to address the issue: (i) a constant and uniformlocalization, (ii) the propagation through the window of a restricted set of dominant modes of the error covariancematrix, (iii) the approximate propagation of the localization operator using model covariant local domains. Theseschemes are illustrated on the one-dimensional Lorenz 40-variable model.

  13. Feasibility of four-dimensional conformal planning for robotic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Schlaefer, A.; Fisseler, J.; Dieterich, S.; Shiomi, H.; Cleary, K.; Schweikard, A.

    2005-12-15

    Organ motion can have a severe impact on the dose delivered by radiation therapy, and different procedures have been developed to address its effects. Conventional techniques include breath hold methods and gating. A different approach is the compensation for target motion by moving the treatment beams synchronously. Practical results have been reported for robot based radiosurgery, where a linear accelerator mounted on a robotic arm delivers the dose. However, not all organs move in the same way, which results in a relative motion of the beams with respect to the body and the tissues in the proximity of the tumor. This relative motion can severely effect the dose delivered to critical structures. We propose a method to incorporate motion in the treatment planning for robotic radiosurgery to avoid potential overdosing of organs surrounding the target. The method takes into account the motion of all considered volumes, which is discretized for dose calculations. Similarly, the beam motion is taken into account and the aggregated dose coefficient over all discrete steps is used for planning. We simulated the treatment of a moving target with three different planning methods. First, we computed beam weights based on a 3D planning situation and simulated treatment with organ motion and the beams moving synchronously to the target. Second, beam weights were computed by the 4D planning method incorporating the organ and beam motion and treatment was simulated for beams moving synchronously to the target. Third, the beam weights were determined by the 4D planning method with the beams fixed during planning and simulation. For comparison we also give results for the 3D treatment plan if there was no organ motion and when the plan is delivered by fixed beams in the presence of organ motion. The results indicate that the new 4D method is preferable and can further improve the overall conformality of motion compensated robotic radiosurgery.

  14. Four-dimensional Lorentzian Holst action with topological terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezende, Danilo Jimenez; Perez, Alejandro

    2009-03-01

    We study the Hamiltonian formulation of the general first order action of general relativity compatible with local Lorentz invariance and background independence. The most general simplectic structure (compatible with diffeomorphism invariance and local Lorentz transformations) is obtained by adding to the Holst action the Pontriagin, Euler, and Nieh-Yan invariants with independent coupling constants. We perform a detailed canonical analysis of this general formulation (in the time gauge) exploring the structure of the phase space in terms of connection variables. We explain the relationship of these topological terms and the effect of large SU(2) gauge transformations in quantum theories of gravity defined in terms of the Ashtekar-Barbero connection.

  15. Electro-Anatomical Four-Dimensional Mapping of Ventricular Tachycardia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    pulmonary vein (PV) region reported ulterior stenosis . Anatomic reconstruction by CT has helped understand the frequency of occurrence and effects of PV... stenosis [1]. Our group presented that the bi-atrial activation sequence became well understood when cardiac activity data and anatomic information...through the Aortic Valve, and of deploying the ICE catheter into the LV transseptally via the IVC, through the Fossa Ovalis and through the Mitral

  16. Route planning in a four-dimensional environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, M. G.; Miller, D. P.

    1987-01-01

    Robots must be able to function in the real world. The real world involves processes and agents that move independently of the actions of the robot, sometimes in an unpredictable manner. A real-time integrated route planning and spatial representation system for planning routes through dynamic domains is presented. The system will find the safest most efficient route through space-time as described by a set of user defined evaluation functions. Because the route planning algorthims is highly parallel and can run on an SIMD machine in O(p) time (p is the length of a path), the system will find real-time paths through unpredictable domains when used in an incremental mode. Spatial representation, an SIMD algorithm for route planning in a dynamic domain, and results from an implementation on a traditional computer architecture are discussed.

  17. Mass formulae of four-dimensional dilaton black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okai, Tadashi

    1994-02-01

    Integral and differential mass formulae of 4-dimensional stationary and axisymmetric Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton systems are derived. The total mass (energy) of these systems are expressed in terms of other physical quantities such as electric charge of the black hole suitably modified due to the existence of the dilaton field. It is shown that when we vary slightly the fields (metric of the spacetime $g_{\\mu\

  18. Four-dimensional imaging of moisture dynamics during landslide reactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlemann, Sebastian; Chambers, Jonathan; Wilkinson, Paul; Maurer, Hansruedi; Merritt, Andrew; Meldrum, Philip; Kuras, Oliver; Gunn, David; Smith, Alister; Dijkstra, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Landslides pose significant risks to communities and infrastructure, and mitigating these risks relies on understanding landslide causes and triggering processes. It has been shown that geophysical surveys can significantly contribute to the characterization of unstable slopes. However, hydrological processes can be temporally and spatially heterogeneous, requiring their related properties to be monitored over time. Geoelectrical monitoring can provide temporal and volumetric distributions of electrical resistivity, which are directly related to moisture content. To date, studies demonstrating this capability have been restricted to 2-D sections, which are insufficient to capture the full degree of spatial heterogeneity. This study is the first to employ 4-D (i.e., 3-D time lapse) resistivity imaging on an active landslide, providing long-term data (3 years) highlighting the evolution of moisture content prior to landslide reactivation and showing its decline post reactivation. Crucially, the time-lapse inversion methodology employed here incorporates movements of the electrodes on the unstable surface. Although seasonal characteristics dominate the shallow moisture dynamics during the first 2 years with surficial drying in summer and wetting in winter, in the months preceding reactivation, moisture content increased by more than 45% throughout the slope. This is in agreement with independent data showing a significant rise in piezometric heads and shallow soil moisture contents as a result of prolonged and intense rainfall. Based on these results, remediation measures could be designed and early-warning systems implemented. Thus, resistivity monitoring that can allow for moving electrodes provides a new means for the effective mitigation of landslide risk.

  19. From the Hensen net toward four-dimensional biological oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Peter H.; Benfield, Mark C.

    2003-01-01

    The development of quantitative zooplankton collecting systems began with Hensen (1887 Berichte der Kommssion wissenschaftlichen Untersuchung der deutschen Meere in Kiel5, 1-107; 1895 Ergebnisse der Plankton-Expedition der Humbolt-Stiftung. Kiel and Leipzig: Lipsius and Tischer ). Non-opening closing nets, opening closing nets (mostly messenger based), high-speed samplers, and planktobenthos net systems all had their start in his era - the late 1800s and early 1900s. This was also an era in which many of the fundamental questions about the structure and dynamics of the plankton in the worlds oceans were first posed. Fewer new systems were introduced between 1912 and 1950 apparently due in part to the two World Wars. The continuous plankton recorder stands out as a truly innovative device developed during this period ( Hardy 1926b Nature, London118, 630 ). Resurgence in development of mechanically-based instruments occurred during the 1950s and 1960s. A new lineage of high-speed samplers, the Gulf series, began in the 1950s and a number of variants were developed in the 1960s and 1970s. Net systems specifically designed to collect neuston first appeared in the late 1950s. During the 1960s, many focused field and experimental tank experiments were carried out to investigate the hydrodynamics of nets, and much of our knowledge concerning net design and construction criteria was developed. The advent of reliable electrical conducting cables and electrically-based control systems during this same period gave rise first to a variety of cod-end samplers and then to the precursors of the acoustically and electronically-controlled multi-net systems and environmental sensors, which appeared in the 1970s. The decade of the 1970s saw a succession of multi-net systems based both on the Bé multiple plankton sampler and on the Tucker trawl. The advent of the micro-computer stimulated and enabled the development of sophisticated control and data logging electronics for these systems in the 1980s. In the 1990s, acoustic and optical technologies gave rise to sensor systems that either complement multiple net systems or are deployed without nets. Multi-sensor systems with high data telemetry rates through electro-optical cable are now being deployed in towed bodies and on remotely operated vehicles. In the offing are new molecular technologies to identify species in situ, and realtime data analysis, image processing, and 3D/4D display. In the near future, it is likely that the use of multi-sensor systems deployed on autonomous vehicles will yield world wide coverage of the distribution and abundance of zooplankton.

  20. Topology of four-dimensional lattice gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiotakopoulos, C.

    1985-08-01

    An extremely careful implementation of Woit's definition of the topological charge for SU(2) lattice gauge fields reveals a scaling violation by the topological susceptibility in the region 2.1<=β<=2.3. The result leaves open the possibility that Woit's charge approaches Luscher's charge at weak enough coupling.

  1. NOTE: An algorithm for automatic determination of the respiratory phases in four-dimensional computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleshneva, T.; Muzik, J.; Alber, M.

    2006-08-01

    Recently, several techniques have been developed to improve the quality of computed tomography (CT) images of the thoracic and abdominal region that are degraded by the interference of the scanning process and respiration. Several devices for respiratory-correlated CT are available for clinical usage. They are based on the synchronization of the acquired CT image data with the respiratory motion using a signal from an external respiratory monitoring system. In this work, some practical aspects of clinical implementation of the multi-slice 4D CT scanner Somatom Sensation Open (Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) equipped with a respiratory gating system (RGS) AZ-733V (Anzai Medical, Tokyo, Japan) are discussed. A new algorithm developed for automatic respiratory phase determination needed for the reconstruction of the 4D CT images is presented.

  2. Four-dimensional black holes with scalar hair in nonlinear electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrientos, José; González, P. A.; Vásquez, Yerko

    2016-12-01

    We consider a gravitating system consisting of a scalar field minimally coupled to gravity with a self-interacting potential and a U(1) nonlinear electromagnetic field. Solving analytically and numerically the coupled system for both power-law and Born-Infeld type electrodynamics, we find charged hairy black hole solutions. Then we study the thermodynamics of these solutions and we find that at a low temperature the topological charged black hole with scalar hair is thermodynamically preferred, whereas the topological charged black hole without scalar hair is thermodynamically preferred at a high temperature for power-law electrodynamics. Interestingly enough, these phase transitions occur at a fixed critical temperature and do not depend on the exponent p of the nonlinear electrodynamics.

  3. Application of four dimensional matrix for thermal analysis of Slovak transit gas pipeline by program FENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Széplaky, Dávid; Varga, Augustín

    2016-06-01

    The contribution describes the principle of the FENIX program operation, which was designed to determine the temperature field of the transit pipeline for the transportation of natural gas. The program itself consists of several modules which are reciprocally linked. The basis of the program is the elementary balance method by means of which the unsteady heat transfer is assigned in several layers in different directions. The first step was to assess both the pressure and temperature of the natural gas mode, the second step is to determine the heat transfer through the walls of the pipes, and the last one is to determine the distribution of the temperature field in the surroundings of the pipeline.

  4. SU-E-T-437: Four-Dimensional Treatment Planning for Lung VMAT-SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, M; Takashina, M; Koizumi, M; Oohira, S; Ueda, Y; Miyazaki, M; Isono, M; Masaoka, A; Teshima, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess optimal treatment planning approach of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (VMAT-SBRT). Methods: Subjects were 10 patients with lung cancer who had undergone 4DCT. The internal target volume (ITV) volume ranged from 2.6 to 16.5cm{sup 3} and the tumor motion ranged from 0 to 2cm. From 4DCT, which was binned into 10 respiratory phases, 4 image data sets were created; maximum intensity projection (MIP), average intensity projection (AIP), AIP with the ITV replaced by 0HU (RITV-AIP) and RITV-AIP with the planning target volume (PTV) minus the internal target volume was set to −200 HU (HR-AIP). VMAT-SBRT plans were generated on each image set for a patient. 48Gy was prescribed to 95% of PTV. The plans were recalculated on all phase images of 4DCT and the dose distributions were accumulated using a deformable image registration software MIM Maestro™ as the 4D calculated dose to the gross tumor volume (GTV). The planned dose to the ITV and 4D calculated dose to the GTV were compared. Results: In AIP plan, 10 patients average of all dose parameters (D1%, D-mean, and D99%) discrepancy were 1Gy or smaller. MIP and RITV-AIP plans resulted in having common tendency and larger discrepancy than AIP plan. The 4D dose was lower than the planned dose, and 10 patients average of all dose parameters discrepancy were in range 1.3 to 2.6Gy. HR-AIP plan had the largest discrepancy in our trials. 4D calculated D1%, D-mean, and D99% were resulted in 3.0, 4.1, and 6.1Gy lower than the expected in plan, respectively. Conclusion: For all patients, the dose parameters expected in AIP plan approximated to 4D calculated. Using AIP image set seems optimal treatment planning approach of VMAT-SBRT for a mobile tumor. Funding Support: This work was supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Core-to-Core program (No. 23003)

  5. Four-dimensional visualization of a small-scale flame based on deflection tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Liu, Zhigang; Zhao, Minmin

    2016-11-01

    Optical computed tomography is an important technique in the visualization and diagnosis of various flow fields. A small-scale diffusion flame was visualized using deflection tomography. A projection sampling system was proposed for deflection tomography to obtain deflectograms with a pair of gratings. Wave-front retrieval was employed for processing the deflectograms to obtain the deflection angles of the rays. This two-dimensional data extraction method expanded the application of deflection tomography and was suitable for the projection extraction of small-scale combustion. Deflection angle revision reconstruction algorithm was used to reconstruct the temperature distributions in 10 cross sections for each deflectogram in different instants. The flow structure was reconstructed using a visualization toolkit equipped with the marching cube and ray casting algorithms. The performed experiments demonstrated the three-dimensional dynamic visualization of temperature distributions and the flame structures of small-scale diffusion combustion.

  6. Comparisons among a new soil index and other two- and four-dimensional vegetation indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Richardson, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    The 2-D difference vegetation index (DVI) and perpendicular vegetation index (PVI), and the 4-D green vegetation index (GVI) are compared in Landsat MSS data from grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor, L. Moench) fields for the years 1973 to 1977. PVI and DVI were more closely related to LAI than was GVI. A new 2-D soil line index (SLI), the vector distance from the soil line origin to the point of intersection of PVI with the soil line, is defined and compared with the 4-D soil brightness index, SBI. SLI (based on MSS and MSS7) and SL16 (based on MSS5 and MSS6) were smaller in magnitude than SBI but contained similar information about the soil background. These findings indicate that vegetation and soil indices calculated from the single visible and reflective infrared band sensor systems, such as the AVHRR of the TIROS-N polar orbiting series of satellites, will be meaningful for synoptic monitoring of renewable vegetation. Previously announced in STAR as N83-14567

  7. Comparisons among a new soil index and other two- and four-dimensional vegetation indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Richardson, A. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The 2-D difference vegetation index (DVI) and perpendicular vegetation index (PVI), and the 4-D green vegetation index (GVI) are compared in LANDSAT MSS data from grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor, L. Moench) fields for the years 1973 to 1977. PVI and DVI were more closely related to LAI than was GVI. A new 2-D soil line index (SLI), the vector distance from the soil line origin to the point of intersection of PVI with the soil line, is defined and compared with the 4-D soil brightness index, SBI. SLI (based on MSS and MSS7) and SL16 (based on MSS 5 and MSS 6) were smaller in magnitude than SBI but contained similar information about the soil background. These findings indicate that vegetation and soil indices calculated from the single visible and reflective infrared band sensor systems, such as the AVHRR of the TIROS-N polar orbiting series of satellites, will be meaningful for synoptic monitoring of renewable vegetation.

  8. Four-dimensional terrain model for tracking floristic changes induced by climate warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morain, Stanley A.; Neville, Paul R.; Budge, Thomas K.; Morrison, S. C.; Helfrich, D. A.

    1993-10-01

    Elevational and latitudinal shifts will occur in the flora and vegetation of the Rocky Mountains due to climate warming. If we are to specify which species are successfully migrating in tune with these changes, and which are being adversely impacted, a 4-dimensional image-based GIS is required to visualize and animate new ecological regimes imposed by changing temperature and precipitation patterns. Research at TAC aims to develop a new algorithm for a terrain model that includes the spatial, spectral, and temporal domains. It is designed to visualize changes in the Rocky Mountain flora, and to specify the predicted community compositions at any future time. The strategy is to assign unique hue, intensity, and saturation values for each of the nearly 6000 species comprising the flora of the Rockies. Hue is assigned on the basis of elevational zone; intensity on the basis of slope and aspect; and saturation, on the basis of abundance. Polygons for an associated GIS are delineated as landform facets that are expected to be stable in ecological time (i.e., over the next few thousand years). The analysis then assesses the gradual progression of species as they migrate upslope and poleward through these polygons. At any future year over the next several thousand, the modeling process can be stopped to assess both the rate and directions of change, as well as the species composition of each plant community occupying a specific polygon.

  9. Stationary axisymmetric four dimensional space-time endowed with Einstein metric

    SciTech Connect

    Hasanuddin; Azwar, A.; Gunara, B. E.

    2015-04-16

    In this paper, we construct Ernst equation from vacuum Einstein field equation for both zero and non-zero cosmological constant. In particular, we consider the case where the space-time admits axisymmetric using Boyer-Lindquist coordinates. This is called Kerr-Einstein solution describing a spinning black hole. Finally, we give a short discussion about the dynamics of photons on Kerr-Einstein space-time.

  10. Four-dimensional in vivo X-ray microscopy with projection-guided gating

    PubMed Central

    Mokso, Rajmund; Schwyn, Daniel A.; Walker, Simon M.; Doube, Michael; Wicklein, Martina; Müller, Tonya; Stampanoni, Marco; Taylor, Graham K.; Krapp, Holger G.

    2015-01-01

    Visualizing fast micrometer scale internal movements of small animals is a key challenge for functional anatomy, physiology and biomechanics. We combine phase contrast tomographic microscopy (down to 3.3 μm voxel size) with retrospective, projection-based gating (in the order of hundreds of microseconds) to improve the spatiotemporal resolution by an order of magnitude over previous studies. We demonstrate our method by visualizing 20 three-dimensional snapshots through the 150 Hz oscillations of the blowfly flight motor. PMID:25762080

  11. Review of the Current Status of Four-Dimensional Ionospheric Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    USA Navy Navigational Satellite System (NNSS) and the Russian CICADA satellites. Satellites in the NNSS configuration are in near-circular polar...orbits at around 1100 km altitude. They transmit phase coherent signals at approximately 150 and 400 MHz. The Russian CICADA satellites are in an orbit

  12. Four-Dimensional Oceanic and Atmosperic Data Assimilation with Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takano, Kenji

    1996-01-01

    An oceanic data assimilation system which allows to utilize the forthcoming Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data has been developed and applied to the Pacific Ocean to produce the velocity field. The assimilated data will be indispensable to examine the effects of rainfall and its variability on the structure and circulation of the tropical oceans and to assess the impact of global warming due to the increase of carbon dioxide on the ocean circulation system and the marine pollution caused by oil spill and ocean damping of radionuclide. The data will also provide the verification for the oceanic and ocean-atmosphere coupled General Circulation Models (GCM's). The system consists of oceanic GCM, analysis scheme and data. In the system the flow field has been determined to be physically consistent with the observed density field and the sea surface winds derived from the Special Sensor Microwave Imagery (SSM/I) data which drive the ocean current. The time integration has been performed for five years until the flow field near the surface attained the steady state starting from the rest ocean with observed temperature and salinity fields, and the SSM/I surface wind velocity. The resultant flow field showed high producibility of the system. Especially the flow near the ocean surface agreed well with available observed data. The system, for the first time, succeeded to produce the eastward subtropical current which has been discovered in the joint investigation on Kuroshio current (CSK) in the 1960s. To verify the quality of the flow field a trajectory analysis has been carried out and compared with the Algos buoy data. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DATA ASSIMILATION SYSTEM ## Oceanic GCM and analysis scheme--The basic equations are much the same as used for the GCM's, except for the Newtonian damping terms introduced into the prediction equations for the potential temperature and salinity to maintain these fields as observed. The C grid of 2'lat. by 2'long. in horizontal and the 11 vertical levels are applied to the entire Pacific Ocean. At the east and west ocean boundaries the periodic boundary conditions are applied creating fictitious ocean there. The SMAC Method is used to increase the accuracy of mass conservation. * Data--The JODC temperature and salinity data obtained from 1906 to 1988 are used in the system between Long.100'E. and 60'W. The surface wind data are derived from the SSM/I data by Dr-R. Atlas of NASA/GSFC. The data set contains every 6 hours data from July 1987 to June 1989 on the grid of 2'lat. by 2.5'long. The averaged for the whole period and then interpolated into the 2'lat. by 2'long. grid data are used to force the system. The sea bottom topography data was based on the General Bathymetric Chart of the Ocean (GEBCO) supplied by the Canadian Hydrographic Service under contract with the International Hydrographic Organization and International Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO.

  13. A four-dimensional compound-model morphed potential for the OC:HBr complex.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Rivera, Luis A; Lucchese, Robert R; Bevan, John W

    2010-07-14

    A parameterized compound-model morphed intermolecular potential energy surface has been generated for the dimer OC:HBr. This morphed potential is determined by fitting experimentally available gas phase spectroscopic data and found to have a global minimum with a well depth of 564(5) cm(-1) and linear (16)O(12)C-H(79)Br geometry having center of mass to center of mass distance R = 4.525(7) A. The linear isomers (12)C(16)O-H(79)Br and (16)O(12)C-(79)BrH are determined with a corresponding well depth of 273(7) and 269(2) cm(-1) having R = 4.35(4) and 4.24(3) A, respectively. This results in a DeltaE of 293(9) cm(-1) between the global potential energy minimum and the minima in the two higher energy isomers. The generated potential is compared with the corresponding OC:HCl morphed potential. Differences in the morphing parameters are attributed to different contributions to the interaction energy. It is found that the counterpoise method successfully corrected the basis set superposition error in OC:HCl, but was under corrected by 16(7)% in OC:HBr.

  14. Statistics on the heterotic landscape: Gauge groups and cosmological constants of four-dimensional heterotic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dienes, Keith R.

    2006-05-01

    Recent developments in string theory have reinforced the notion that the space of stable supersymmetric and nonsupersymmetric string vacua fills out a landscape whose features are largely unknown. It is then hoped that progress in extracting phenomenological predictions from string theory—such as correlations between gauge groups, matter representations, potential values of the cosmological constant, and so forth—can be achieved through statistical studies of these vacua. To date, most of the efforts in these directions have focused on type I vacua. In this note, we present the first results of a statistical study of the heterotic landscape, focusing on more than 105 explicit nonsupersymmetric tachyon-free heterotic string vacua and their associated gauge groups and one-loop cosmological constants. Although this study has several important limitations, we find a number of intriguing features which may be relevant for the heterotic landscape as a whole. These features include different probabilities and correlations for different possible gauge groups as functions of the number of orbifold twists. We also find a vast degeneracy amongst nonsupersymmetric string models, leading to a severe reduction in the number of realizable values of the cosmological constant as compared with naïve expectations. Finally, we find strong correlations between cosmological constants and gauge groups which suggest that heterotic string models with extremely small cosmological constants are overwhelmingly more likely to exhibit the standard model gauge group at the string scale than any of its grand-unified extensions. In all cases, heterotic world sheet symmetries such as modular invariance provide important constraints that do not appear in corresponding studies of type I vacua.

  15. Four-dimensional MRI using an internal respiratory surrogate derived by dimensionality reduction.

    PubMed

    Uh, Jinsoo; Ayaz Khan, M; Hua, Chiaho

    2016-11-07

    This study aimed to develop a practical and accurate 4-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method using a non-navigator, image-based internal respiratory surrogate derived by dimensionality reduction (DR). The use of DR has been previously suggested but not implemented for reconstructing 4D MRI, despite its practical advantages. We compared multiple image-acquisition schemes and refined a retrospective-sorting process to optimally implement a DR-derived surrogate. The comparison included an unconventional scheme that acquires paired slices alternately to mitigate the internal surrogate's dependency on a specific slice location. We introduced 'target-oriented sorting', as opposed to conventional binning, to quantify the coherence in retrospectively sorted images, thereby determining the minimal scan time needed for sufficient coherence. This study focused on evaluating the proposed method using digital phantoms which provided unequivocal gold standard. The evaluation indicated that the DR-based respiratory surrogate is highly accurate: the error in amplitude percentile of the surrogate signal was less than 5% with the optimal scheme. Acquiring alternating paired slices was superior to the conventional scheme of acquiring individual slices; the advantage of the unconventional scheme was more pronounced when a substantial phase shift occurred across slice locations. The analysis of coherence across sorted images confirmed the advantage of higher sampling efficiencies in non-navigator respiratory surrogates. We determined that a scan time of 20 s per imaging slice was sufficient to achieve a mean coherence error of less than 1% for the tested respiratory patterns. The clinical applicability of the proposed 4D MRI has been demonstrated with volunteers and patients. The diaphragm motion in 4D MRI was consistent with that in dynamic 2D imaging which was regarded as the gold standard (difference within 1.8 mm on average).

  16. POD/DEIM reduced-order strategies for efficient four dimensional variational data assimilation

    SciTech Connect

    Ştefănescu, R.; Sandu, A.; Navon, I.M.

    2015-08-15

    This work studies reduced order modeling (ROM) approaches to speed up the solution of variational data assimilation problems with large scale nonlinear dynamical models. It is shown that a key requirement for a successful reduced order solution is that reduced order Karush–Kuhn–Tucker conditions accurately represent their full order counterparts. In particular, accurate reduced order approximations are needed for the forward and adjoint dynamical models, as well as for the reduced gradient. New strategies to construct reduced order based are developed for proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) ROM data assimilation using both Galerkin and Petrov–Galerkin projections. For the first time POD, tensorial POD, and discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM) are employed to develop reduced data assimilation systems for a geophysical flow model, namely, the two dimensional shallow water equations. Numerical experiments confirm the theoretical framework for Galerkin projection. In the case of Petrov–Galerkin projection, stabilization strategies must be considered for the reduced order models. The new reduced order shallow water data assimilation system provides analyses similar to those produced by the full resolution data assimilation system in one tenth of the computational time.

  17. POD/DEIM reduced-order strategies for efficient four dimensional variational data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ştefănescu, R.; Sandu, A.; Navon, I. M.

    2015-08-01

    This work studies reduced order modeling (ROM) approaches to speed up the solution of variational data assimilation problems with large scale nonlinear dynamical models. It is shown that a key requirement for a successful reduced order solution is that reduced order Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions accurately represent their full order counterparts. In particular, accurate reduced order approximations are needed for the forward and adjoint dynamical models, as well as for the reduced gradient. New strategies to construct reduced order based are developed for proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) ROM data assimilation using both Galerkin and Petrov-Galerkin projections. For the first time POD, tensorial POD, and discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM) are employed to develop reduced data assimilation systems for a geophysical flow model, namely, the two dimensional shallow water equations. Numerical experiments confirm the theoretical framework for Galerkin projection. In the case of Petrov-Galerkin projection, stabilization strategies must be considered for the reduced order models. The new reduced order shallow water data assimilation system provides analyses similar to those produced by the full resolution data assimilation system in one tenth of the computational time.

  18. Extension of four-dimensional atmospheric models. [and cloud cover data bank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, M. G.; Lisa, A. S.; Tung, S. L.

    1975-01-01

    The cloud data bank, the 4-D atmospheric model, and a set of computer programs designed to simulate meteorological conditions for any location above the earth are described in turns of space vehicle design and simulation of vehicle reentry trajectories. Topics discussed include: the relationship between satellite and surface observed cloud cover using LANDSAT 1 photographs and including the effects of cloud shadows; extension of the 4-D model to the altitude of 52 km; and addition of the u and v wind components to the 4-D model of means and variances at 1 km levels from the surface to 25 km. Results of the cloud cover analysis are presented along with the stratospheric model and the tropospheric wind profiles.

  19. Four-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Axial Body Area as Respiratory Surrogate: Initial Patient Results

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Juan; Cai, Jing; Wang, Hongjun; Chang, Zheng; Czito, Brian G.; Bashir, Mustafa R.; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of a retrospective binning technique for 4-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) using body area (BA) as a respiratory surrogate. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (4 of 7) or liver metastases (3 of 7) were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective study. All patients were simulated with both computed tomography (CT) and MRI to acquire 3-dimensinal and 4D images for treatment planning. Multiple-slice multiple-phase cine-MR images were acquired in the axial plane for 4D-MRI reconstruction. Image acquisition time per slice was set to 10-15 seconds. Single-slice 2-dimensinal cine-MR images were also acquired across the center of the tumor in orthogonal planes. Tumor motion trajectories from 4D-MRI, cine-MRI, and 4D-CT were analyzed in the superior–inferior (SI), anterior–posterior (AP), and medial–lateral (ML) directions, respectively. Their correlation coefficients (CC) and differences in tumor motion amplitude were determined. Tumor-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was measured and compared between 4D-CT, 4D-MRI, and conventional T2-weighted fast spin echo MRI. Results: The means (±standard deviations) of CC comparing 4D-MRI with cine-MRI were 0.97 ± 0.03, 0.97 ± 0.02, and 0.99 ± 0.04 in SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean differences were 0.61 ± 0.17 mm, 0.32 ± 0.17 mm, and 0.14 ± 0.06 mm in SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The means of CC comparing 4D-MRI and 4D-CT were 0.95 ± 0.02, 0.94 ± 0.02, and 0.96 ± 0.02 in SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean differences were 0.74 ± 0.02 mm, 0.33 ± 0.13 mm, and 0.18 ± 0.07 mm in SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean tumor-to-tissue CNRs were 2.94 ± 1.51, 19.44 ± 14.63, and 39.47 ± 20.81 in 4D-CT, 4D-MRI, and T2-weighted MRI, respectively. Conclusions: The preliminary evaluation of our 4D-MRI technique results in oncologic patients demonstrates its potential usefulness to accurately measure tumor respiratory motion with improved tumor CNR compared with 4D-CT.

  20. Efficient cross-modality cardiac four-dimensional active appearance model construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Honghai; Abiose, Ademola K.; Buettner, Elisabeth J.; Birrer, Emily K.; Sonka, Milan; Martins, James B.; Wahle, Andreas

    2009-02-01

    The efficiency of constructing an active appearance model (AAM) is limited by establishing the independent standard via time-consuming and tedious manual tracing. It is more challenging for 3D and 4D (3D+time) datasets as the smoothness of shape and motion is essential. In this paper, a three-stage pipeline is designed for efficient cross-modality model construction. It utilizes existing AAM and active shape model (ASM) of the left ventricle (LV) for magnetic resonance (MR) datasets to build 4D AAM of the LV for real-time 3D echocardiography (RT3DE) datasets. The first AAM fitting stage uses AAM for MR to fit valid shapes onto the intensity-transformed RT3DE data that resemble low-quality MR data. The fitting is implemented in a 3D phase-by-phase fashion to prevent introducing bias due to different motion patterns related to the two modalities and patient groups. The second global-scale editing stage adjusts fitted shapes by tuning modes of ASM for MR data. The third local-scale editing stage adjusts the fitted volumes at small local regions and produces the final accurate independent standard. By visual inspection, the AAM fitting stage successfully produces results that capture the LV motion - especially its base movement - within the cardiac cycle on 29 of the 32 RT3DE datasets tested. This multi-stage approach can reduce the human effort of the manual tracing by at least 50%. With the model built for a modality A available, this approach is generalizable to constructing the model of the same organ for any other modality B.

  1. Flight investigation of a four-dimensional terminal area guidance system for STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, F.; Hardy, G. H.

    1981-01-01

    A series of flight tests and fast-time simulations were conducted, using the augmentor wing jet STOL research aircraft and the STOLAND 4D-RNAV system to add to the growing data base of 4D-RNAV system performance capabilities. To obtain statistically meaningful data a limited amount of flight data were supplemented by a statistically significant amount of data obtained from fast-time simulation. The results of these tests are reported. Included are comparisons of the 4D-RNAV estimated winds with actual winds encountered in flight, as well as data on along-track navigation and guidance errors, and time-of-arrival errors at the final approach waypoint. In addition, a slight improvement of the STOLAND 4D-RNAV system is proposed and demonstrated, using the fast-time simulation.

  2. Arthropod Distribution in a Tropical Rainforest: Tackling a Four Dimensional Puzzle.

    PubMed

    Basset, Yves; Cizek, Lukas; Cuénoud, Philippe; Didham, Raphael K; Novotny, Vojtech; Ødegaard, Frode; Roslin, Tomas; Tishechkin, Alexey K; Schmidl, Jürgen; Winchester, Neville N; Roubik, David W; Aberlenc, Henri-Pierre; Bail, Johannes; Barrios, Héctor; Bridle, Jonathan R; Castaño-Meneses, Gabriela; Corbara, Bruno; Curletti, Gianfranco; Duarte da Rocha, Wesley; De Bakker, Domir; Delabie, Jacques H C; Dejean, Alain; Fagan, Laura L; Floren, Andreas; Kitching, Roger L; Medianero, Enrique; Gama de Oliveira, Evandro; Orivel, Jérôme; Pollet, Marc; Rapp, Mathieu; Ribeiro, Sérvio P; Roisin, Yves; Schmidt, Jesper B; Sørensen, Line; Lewinsohn, Thomas M; Leponce, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the spatio-temporal distribution of arthropods in tropical rainforests represents a first step towards scrutinizing the global distribution of biodiversity on Earth. To date most studies have focused on narrow taxonomic groups or lack a design that allows partitioning of the components of diversity. Here, we consider an exceptionally large dataset (113,952 individuals representing 5,858 species), obtained from the San Lorenzo forest in Panama, where the phylogenetic breadth of arthropod taxa was surveyed using 14 protocols targeting the soil, litter, understory, lower and upper canopy habitats, replicated across seasons in 2003 and 2004. This dataset is used to explore the relative influence of horizontal, vertical and seasonal drivers of arthropod distribution in this forest. We considered arthropod abundance, observed and estimated species richness, additive decomposition of species richness, multiplicative partitioning of species diversity, variation in species composition, species turnover and guild structure as components of diversity. At the scale of our study (2 km of distance, 40 m in height and 400 days), the effects related to the vertical and seasonal dimensions were most important. Most adult arthropods were collected from the soil/litter or the upper canopy and species richness was highest in the canopy. We compared the distribution of arthropods and trees within our study system. Effects related to the seasonal dimension were stronger for arthropods than for trees. We conclude that: (1) models of beta diversity developed for tropical trees are unlikely to be applicable to tropical arthropods; (2) it is imperative that estimates of global biodiversity derived from mass collecting of arthropods in tropical rainforests embrace the strong vertical and seasonal partitioning observed here; and (3) given the high species turnover observed between seasons, global climate change may have severe consequences for rainforest arthropods.

  3. Geoarchaeology, the four dimensional (4D) fluvial matrix and climatic causality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, A. G.

    2008-10-01

    Geoarchaeology is the application of geological and geomorphological techniques to archaeology and the study of the interactions of hominins with the natural environment at a variety of temporal and spatial scales. Geoarchaeology in the UK over the last twenty years has flourished largely because it has gone beyond technological and scientific applications. Over the same period our ability to reconstruct the 3-dimensional stratigraphy of fluvial deposits and the matrix of fluvial sites has increased dramatically because of a number of technological advances. These have included the use of LiDAR (laser imaging) and radar to produce high-resolution digital surface models, the use of geophysics, particularly ground penetrating radar and electrical resistivity, to produce sediment depth models, and the use of GIS and data visualisation techniques to manipulate and display the data. These techniques along with more systematic and detailed sedimentological recording of exposed sections have allowed the construction of more precise 3-dimensional (volumetric) models of the matrix of artefacts within fluvial deposits. Additionally a revolution in dating techniques, particularly direct sediment dating by luminescence methods, has enabled the creation of 4-dimensional models of the creation and preservation of these sites. These 4-dimensional models have the ability to provide far more information about the processes of site creation, preservation and even destruction, and also allow the integration of these processes with independent data sources concerning cultural evolution and climatic change. All improvements in the precision of dating fluvial deposits have archaeological importance in our need to translate events from a sequential or geological timeframe to human timescales. This allows geoarchaeology to make a more direct contribution to cultural history through the recognition of agency at the individual or group level. This data can then form a component of biocomplexity or agent-based modelling which is becoming increasingly used in the natural sciences, particularly ecology and geomorphology and which can be used to test scenarios including the impact on, and response of, hominins to abrupt or catastrophic environmental change. Whilst catastrophic events clearly represent the atypical they can be illuminating in revealing cognitive processes resulting in abandonment, coping, mitigation and innovation. These points are exemplified using two in-depth case studies: one from the Holocene geoarchaeological record of the River Trent in Central England and the other from the Palaeolithic record from rivers in South West Britain. In the former the interaction between climate change and human activity is illustrated at the year to century timescale whilst in the other the timescale is millennial. These case studies have deliberately been chosen to be as different as possible in temporal and spatial scale with the aim of examining the applicability of methodological and theoretical aspects of geoarchaeology. Lastly the paper considers the problem of scale in geoarchaeology and concludes it is process-dependency, which ultimately affects the questions we can ask, and that questions of human response to climate change are fundamentally a product of materiality and cognitive processes. This demands an in-depth contextual approach to such questions rather than database-driven assertions of causality.

  4. Four dimensional optoacoustic imaging of perfusion in preclinical breast tumor model in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís.; Ermolayev, Vladimir; Mandal, Subhamoy; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Imaging plays an increasingly important role in clinical management and preclinical studies of cancer. Application of optical molecular imaging technologies, in combination with highly specific contrast agent approaches, eminently contributed to understanding of functional and histological properties of tumors and anticancer therapies. Yet, optical imaging exhibits deterioration in spatial resolution and other performance metrics due to light scattering in deep living tissues. High resolution molecular imaging at the whole-organ or whole-body scale may therefore bring additional understanding of vascular networks, blood perfusion and microenvironment gradients of malignancies. In this work, we constructed a volumetric multispectral optoacoustic tomography (vMSOT) scanner for cancer imaging in preclinical models and explored its capacity for real-time 3D intravital imaging of whole breast cancer allografts in mice. Intrinsic tissue properties, such as blood oxygenation gradients, along with the distribution of externally administered liposomes carrying clinically-approved indocyanine green dye (lipo-ICG) were visualized in order to study vascularization, probe penetration and extravasation kinetics in different regions of interest within solid tumors. The use of v-MSOT along with the application of volumetric image analysis and perfusion tracking tools for studies of pathophysiological processes within microenvironment gradients of solid tumors demonstrated superior volumetric imaging system performance with sustained competitive resolution and imaging depth suitable for investigations in preclinical cancer models.

  5. Systematic estimation of forecast and observation error covariances in four-dimensional data assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dee, D. P.; Cohn, S. E.; Ghil, M.

    1985-01-01

    A two-part algorithm is presented for reliably computing weather forecast model and observational error covariances during data assimilation. Data errors arise from instrumental inaccuracies and sub-grid scale variability, whereas forecast errors occur because of modeling errors and the propagation of previous analysis errors. A Kalman filter is defined as the primary algorithm for estimating the forecast and analysis error convariance matrices. A second algorithm is described for quantifying the noise covariance matrices of any degree to obtain accurate values for the observational error covariances. Numerical results are provided from a linearized one-dimensional shallow-water model. The results cover observational noise covariances, initial instrumental errors and erroneous model values.

  6. The eleven-dimensional uplift of four-dimensional supersymmetric RG flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Changhyun

    2012-06-01

    The squashed and stretched 7-dimensional internal metric preserving U(1)×U(1)×U(1)R symmetry possesses an Einstein-Kahler 2-fold which is a base manifold of 5-dimensional Sasaki-Einstein L space. The r(transverse to the domain wall)-dependence of the two 4-dimensional supergravity fields, that play the role of geometric parameters for squashing and stretching, makes the 11-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell equations consistent not only at the two critical points but also along the whole N=2 supersymmetric RG flow connecting them. The Ricci tensor of the solution has a common feature with the previous three 11-dimensional solutions. The 4-forms preserve only U(1)R symmetry for other generic parameters of the metric. We find an exact solution to the 11-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell equations corresponding to the lift of the 4-dimensional supersymmetric RG flow.

  7. Arthropod Distribution in a Tropical Rainforest: Tackling a Four Dimensional Puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Basset, Yves; Cizek, Lukas; Cuénoud, Philippe; Didham, Raphael K.; Novotny, Vojtech; Ødegaard, Frode; Roslin, Tomas; Tishechkin, Alexey K.; Schmidl, Jürgen; Winchester, Neville N.; Roubik, David W.; Aberlenc, Henri-Pierre; Bail, Johannes; Barrios, Héctor; Bridle, Jonathan R.; Castaño-Meneses, Gabriela; Corbara, Bruno; Curletti, Gianfranco; Duarte da Rocha, Wesley; De Bakker, Domir; Delabie, Jacques H. C.; Dejean, Alain; Fagan, Laura L.; Floren, Andreas; Kitching, Roger L.; Medianero, Enrique; Gama de Oliveira, Evandro; Orivel, Jérôme; Pollet, Marc; Rapp, Mathieu; Ribeiro, Sérvio P.; Roisin, Yves; Schmidt, Jesper B.; Sørensen, Line; Lewinsohn, Thomas M.; Leponce, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the spatio-temporal distribution of arthropods in tropical rainforests represents a first step towards scrutinizing the global distribution of biodiversity on Earth. To date most studies have focused on narrow taxonomic groups or lack a design that allows partitioning of the components of diversity. Here, we consider an exceptionally large dataset (113,952 individuals representing 5,858 species), obtained from the San Lorenzo forest in Panama, where the phylogenetic breadth of arthropod taxa was surveyed using 14 protocols targeting the soil, litter, understory, lower and upper canopy habitats, replicated across seasons in 2003 and 2004. This dataset is used to explore the relative influence of horizontal, vertical and seasonal drivers of arthropod distribution in this forest. We considered arthropod abundance, observed and estimated species richness, additive decomposition of species richness, multiplicative partitioning of species diversity, variation in species composition, species turnover and guild structure as components of diversity. At the scale of our study (2km of distance, 40m in height and 400 days), the effects related to the vertical and seasonal dimensions were most important. Most adult arthropods were collected from the soil/litter or the upper canopy and species richness was highest in the canopy. We compared the distribution of arthropods and trees within our study system. Effects related to the seasonal dimension were stronger for arthropods than for trees. We conclude that: (1) models of beta diversity developed for tropical trees are unlikely to be applicable to tropical arthropods; (2) it is imperative that estimates of global biodiversity derived from mass collecting of arthropods in tropical rainforests embrace the strong vertical and seasonal partitioning observed here; and (3) given the high species turnover observed between seasons, global climate change may have severe consequences for rainforest arthropods. PMID:26633187

  8. Four-dimensional imaging of cytoskeletal dynamics in Xenopus oocytes and eggs.

    PubMed

    Bement, William M; Sokac, Anna M; Mandato, Craig A

    2003-12-01

    The Xenopus laevis (African clawed frog) system has long been popular for studies of both developmental and cell biology, based on a variety of its intrinsic features including the large size of Xenopus oocytes, eggs, and embryos, and the relative ease of manipulation. Unfortunately, the large size has also been considered a serious impediment for high-resolution light microscopy, as has the heavy pigmentation. However, the recent development and exploitation of 4D imaging approaches, and the fact that much of what is of most interest to cell and developmental biologists takes place near the cell surface, indicates that such concerns are no longer valid. Consequently, the Xenopus system in many respects is now as good as other model systems considered to be ideal for microscopy-based studies. Here, 4D imaging and its recent applications to cytoskeletal imaging in Xenopus oocytes and eggs are discussed.

  9. Management and display of four-dimensional environmental data sets using McIDAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, William L.; Santek, David; Suomi, Verner E.

    1990-01-01

    Over the past four years, great strides have been made in the areas of data management and display of 4-D meteorological data sets. A survey was conducted of available and planned 4-D meteorological data sources. The data types were evaluated for their impact on the data management and display system. The requirements were analyzed for data base management generated by the 4-D data display system. The suitability of the existing data base management procedures and file structure were evaluated in light of the new requirements. Where needed, new data base management tools and file procedures were designed and implemented. The quality of the basic 4-D data sets was assured. The interpolation and extrapolation techniques of the 4-D data were investigated. The 4-D data from various sources were combined to make a uniform and consistent data set for display purposes. Data display software was designed to create abstract line graphic 3-D displays. Realistic shaded 3-D displays were created. Animation routines for these displays were developed in order to produce a dynamic 4-D presentation. A prototype dynamic color stereo workstation was implemented. A computer functional design specification was produced based on interactive studies and user feedback.

  10. Interactive access and management for four-dimensional environmental data sets using McIDAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, William L.; Tripoli, Gregory J.

    1993-01-01

    Significant accomplishments in the past year are presented and include the following: (1) enhancements to VIS-5D; (2) Implementation of the VIS AD System; and (3) numerical modeling applications. Focus of current research and plans for next year in the following areas are briefly discussed: (1) continued development and application of the VIS-AD system; (2) further enhancements to VIS-5D; and (3) plans for modeling applications.

  11. Measuring hemodynamics in the developing heart tube with four-dimensional gated Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Michael W.; Peterson, Lindsy; Gu, Shi; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Wilson, David L.; Watanabe, Michiko; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2010-11-01

    Hemodynamics is thought to play a major role in heart development, yet tools to quantitatively assess hemodynamics in the embryo are sorely lacking. The especially challenging analysis of hemodynamics in the early embryo requires new technology. Small changes in blood flow could indicate when anomalies are initiated even before structural changes can be detected. Furthermore, small changes in the early embryo that affect blood flow could lead to profound abnormalities at later stages. We present a demonstration of 4-D Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of structure and flow, and present several new hemodynamic measurements on embryonic avian hearts at early stages prior to the formation of the four chambers. Using 4-D data, pulsed Doppler measurements could accurately be attained in the inflow and outflow of the heart tube. Also, by employing an en-face slice from the 4-D Doppler image set, measurements of stroke volume and cardiac output are obtained without the need to determine absolute velocity. Finally, an image plane orthogonal to the blood flow is used to determine shear stress by calculating the velocity gradient normal to the endocardium. Hemodynamic measurements will be crucial to identifying genetic and environmental factors that lead to congenital heart defects.

  12. Reservoir depletion at The Geysers geothermal area, California, shown by four-dimensional seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gunasekera, R.C.; Foulger, G.R.; Julian, B.R.

    2003-01-01

    Intensive geothermal exploitation at The Geysers geothermal area, California, induces myriads of small-magnitude earthquakes that are monitored by a dense, permanent, local seismometer network. Using this network, tomographic inversions were performed for the three-dimensional Vp and Vp/Vs structure of the reservoir for April 1991, February 1993, December 1994, October 1996, and August 1998. The extensive low-Vp/Vs anomaly that occupies the reservoir grew in strength from a maximum of 9% to a maximum of 13.4% during the 7-year study period. This is attributed to depletion of pore liquid water in the reservoir and replacement with steam. This decreases Vp by increasing compressibility, and increases Vs because of reduction in pore pressure and the drying of argillaceous minerals, e.g., illite, which increase the shear modulus. These effects serendipitously combine to lower Vp/Vs, resulting in a strong overall effect that provides a convenient tool for monitoring reservoir depletion. Variations in the Vp and Vs fields indicate that water depletion is the dominant process in the central part of the exploited reservoir, and pressure reduction and mineral drying in the northwest and southeast parts of the reservoir. The rate at which the Vp/Vs anomaly grew in strength in the period 1991-1998 suggests most of the original anomaly was caused by exploitation. Continuous monitoring of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs is an effective geothermal reservoir depletion monitoring tool and can potentially provide information about depletion in parts of the reservoir that have not been drilled.

  13. Utilizing Four Dimensional Lightning and Dual-Polarization Radar to Develop Lightning Initiation Forecast Guidance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    challenge faced by Air Force’s 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS), which provides weather support to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center (KSC...Roeder at 45th Weather Squadron. Finally, I’d like to thank my classmates, particularly Dave and Brandon who faced the AFIT struggles and challenges...16 2.5 Weather Radar

  14. Four-dimensional modeling of recent vertical movements in the area of the southern California uplift

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vanicek, Petr; Elliot, Michael R.; Castle, Robert O.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes an analytical technique that utilizes scattered geodetic relevelings and tide-gauge records to portray Recent vertical crustal movements that may have been characterized by spasmodic changes in velocity. The technique is based on the fitting of a time-varying algebraic surface of prescribed degree to the geodetic data treated as tilt elements and to tide-gauge readings treated as point movements. Desired variations in time can be selected as any combination of powers of vertical movement velocity and episodic events. The state of the modeled vertical displacement can be shown for any number of dates for visual display. Statistical confidence limits of the modeled displacements, derived from the density of measurements in both space and time, line length, and accuracy of input data, are also provided. The capabilities of the technique are demonstrated on selected data from the region of the southern California uplift. 

  15. Ultrashort electron pulses as a four-dimensional diagnosis of plasma dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, P F; Zhang, Z C; Chen, L; Li, R Z; Li, J J; Wang, X; Cao, J M; Sheng, Z M; Zhang, J

    2010-10-01

    We report an ultrafast electron imaging system for real-time examination of ultrafast plasma dynamics in four dimensions. It consists of a femtosecond pulsed electron gun and a two-dimensional single electron detector. The device has an unprecedented capability of acquiring a high-quality shadowgraph image with a single ultrashort electron pulse, thus permitting the measurement of irreversible processes using a single-shot scheme. In a prototype experiment of laser-induced plasma of a metal target under moderate pump intensity, we demonstrated its unique capability of acquiring high-quality shadowgraph images on a micron scale with a-few-picosecond time resolution.

  16. Classical and quantum analysis of repulsive singularities in four-dimensional extended supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaida, I.; Hollmann, H. R.; Stewart, J. M.

    1999-07-01

    Non-minimal repulsive singularities (`repulsons') in extended supergravity theories are investigated. The short-distance antigravity properties of the repulsons are tested at the classical and the quantum level by a scalar test-particle. Using a partial wave expansion it is shown that the particle is totally reflected at the origin. A high-frequency incoming particle undergoes a phase shift of icons/Journals/Common/pi" ALT="pi" ALIGN="TOP"/>/2. However, the phase shift for a low-frequency particle depends upon the physical data of the repulson. The curvature singularity at a finite distance rh turns out to be transparent for the scalar test-particle and the coordinate singularity at the origin serves as the repulsive barrier to bounce back the particles.

  17. [Three- and four-dimensional (3D/4D) ultrasound in obstetric practice: review].

    PubMed

    Pavlova, E; Ivanov, St

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound is following the natural development of the imaging technology. This review of the technical applications and clinical aspects of the three-dimensional ultrasound is focused on vizualiztion of the fetal anatomy and the possibilities of this new technology and to increase awareness of its present clinical usefulness. Consulting specialists understand fetal pathology better and can better plan postnatal interventions. 3D ultrasound is a promising imaging method to image the fetus. Here are presented the methods for visualization in obstetrics, and the place of the ultrasound imaging in prenatal diagnosis. The role and value of this method will be in the focus of further studies.

  18. Four-dimensional phase contrast magnetic resonance angiography: potential clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Frydrychowicz, Alex; François, Christopher J; Turski, Patrick A

    2011-10-01

    Unlike other magnetic resonance angiographic techniques, phase contrast imaging (PC-MRI) offers co-registered morphologic images and velocity data within a single acquisition. While the basic principle of PC-MRI dates back almost 3 decades, novel time-resolved three-dimensional PC-MRI (4D PC-MRI) approaches have become increasingly researched over the past years. So-called 4D PC-MRI includes three-directional velocity encoding in a three-dimensional imaging volume over time, thereby providing the opportunity to comprehensively analyze human hemodynamics in vivo. Moreover, its large volume coverage offers the option to study systemic hemodynamic effects. Additionally, this offers the possibility to re-visit flow in any location of interest without being limited to predetermined two-dimensional slices. The attention received for hemodynamic research is partially based on flow-based theories of atherogenesis and arterial remodeling. 4D PC-MRI can be used to calculate flow-related vessel wall parameters and may hence serve as a diagnostic tool in preemptive medicine. Furthermore, technical improvements including the availability of sufficient computing power, data storage capabilities, and optimized acceleration schemes for data acquisition as well as comprehensive image processing algorithms have largely facilitated recent research progresses. We will present an overview of the potential of this relatively young imaging paradigm. After acquisition and processing the data in morphological and phase difference images, various visualization strategies permit the qualitative analysis of hemodynamics. A multitude of quantitative parameters such as pulse wave velocities and estimates of wall shear stress which might serve as future biomarkers can be extracted. Thereby, exciting new opportunities for vascular imaging and diagnosis are available.

  19. Validation of four-dimensional ultrasound for targeting in minimally-invasive beating-heart surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Danielle F.; Wiles, Andrew D.; Moore, John; Wedlake, Chris; Gobbi, David G.; Peters, Terry M.

    2009-02-01

    Ultrasound is garnering significant interest as an imaging modality for surgical guidance, due to its affordability, real-time temporal resolution and ease of integration into the operating room. Minimally-invasive intracardiac surgery performed on the beating-heart prevents direct vision of the surgical target, and procedures such as mitral valve replacement and atrial septal defect closure would benefit from intraoperative ultrasound imaging. We propose that placing 4D ultrasound within an augmented reality environment, along with a patient-specific cardiac model and virtual representations of tracked surgical tools, will create a visually intuitive platform with sufficient image information to safely and accurately repair tissue within the beating heart. However, the quality of the imaging parameters, spatial calibration, temporal calibration and ECG-gating must be well characterized before any 4D ultrasound system can be used clinically to guide the treatment of moving structures. In this paper, we describe a comprehensive accuracy assessment framework that can be used to evaluate the performance of 4D ultrasound systems while imaging moving targets. We image a dynamic phantom that is comprised of a simple robot and a tracked phantom to which point-source, distance and spherical objects of known construction can be attached. We also follow our protocol to evaluate 4D ultrasound images generated in real-time by reconstructing ECG-gated 2D ultrasound images acquired from a tracked multiplanar transesophageal probe. Likewise, our evaluation framework allows any type of 4D ultrasound to be quantitatively assessed.

  20. Systematic evaluation of four-dimensional hybrid depth scanning for carbon-ion lung therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Shinichiro; Furukawa, Takuji; Inaniwa, Taku; Zenklusen, Silvan; Nakao, Minoru; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Irradiation of a moving target with a scanning beam requires a comprehensive understanding of organ motion as well as a robust dose error mitigation technique. The authors studied the effects of intrafractional respiratory motion for carbon-ion pencil beam scanning with phase-controlled rescanning on dose distributions for lung tumors. To address density variations, they used 4DCT data. Methods: Dose distributions for various rescanning methods, such as simple layer rescanning (LR), volumetric rescanning, and phase-controlled rescanning (PCR), were calculated for a lung phantom and a lung patient studies. To ensure realism, they set the scanning parameters such as scanning velocity and energy variation time to be similar to those used at our institution. Evaluation metrics were determined with regard to clinical relevance, and consisted of (i) phase-controlled rescanning, (ii) sweep direction, (iii) target motion (direction and amplitude), (iv) respiratory cycle, and (v) prescribed dose. Spot weight maps were calculated by using a beam field-specific target volume, which takes account of range variations for respective respiratory phases. To emphasize the impact of intrafractional motion on the dose distribution, respiratory gating was not used. The accumulated dose was calculated by applying a B-spline-based deformable image registration, and the results for phase-controlled layered rescanning (PCR{sub L}) and phase-controlled volumetric rescanning (PCR{sub V}) were compared. Results: For the phantom study, simple LR was unable to improve the dose distributions for an increased number of rescannings. The phase-controlled technique without rescanning (1 Multiplication-Sign PCR{sub L} and 1 Multiplication-Sign PCR{sub V}) degraded dose conformity significantly due to a reduced scan velocity. In contrast, 4 Multiplication-Sign PCR{sub L} or more significantly and consistently improved dose distribution. PCR{sub V} showed interference effects, but in general also improved dose homogeneity with higher numbers of rescannings. Dose distributions with single PCR{sub L}/PCR{sub V} with a sweep direction perpendicular to motion direction showed large hot/cold spots; however, this effect vanished with higher numbers of rescannings for both methods. Similar observations were obtained for the other dose metrics, such as target motion (SI/AP), amplitude (6-22 mm peak-to-peak) and respiratory period (3.0-5.0 s). For four or more rescannings, both methods showed significantly better results, albeit that volumetric PCR was more affected by interference effects, which lead to severe degradation of a few dose distributions. The clinical example showed the same tendencies as the phantom study. Dose assessment metrics (D95, Dmax/Dmin, homogeneity index) were improved with an increasing number of PCR{sub L}/PCR{sub V}, but with PCR{sub L} being more robust. Conclusions: PCR{sub L} requires a longer treatment time than PCR{sub V} for high numbers of rescannings in the NIRS scanning system but is more robust. Although four or more rescans provided good dose homogeneity and conformity, the authors prefer to use more rescannings for clinical cases to further minimize dose degradation effects due to organ motion.

  1. A Four Dimensional Spatio-Temporal Analysis of an Agricultural Dataset

    PubMed Central

    Donald, Margaret R.; Mengersen, Kerrie L.; Young, Rick R.

    2015-01-01

    While a variety of statistical models now exist for the spatio-temporal analysis of two-dimensional (surface) data collected over time, there are few published examples of analogous models for the spatial analysis of data taken over four dimensions: latitude, longitude, height or depth, and time. When taking account of the autocorrelation of data within and between dimensions, the notion of closeness often differs for each of the dimensions. Here, we consider a number of approaches to the analysis of such a dataset, which arises from an agricultural experiment exploring the impact of different cropping systems on soil moisture. The proposed models vary in their representation of the spatial correlation in the data, the assumed temporal pattern and choice of conditional autoregressive (CAR) and other priors. In terms of the substantive question, we find that response cropping is generally more effective than long fallow cropping in reducing soil moisture at the depths considered (100 cm to 220 cm). Thus, if we wish to reduce the possibility of deep drainage and increased groundwater salinity, the recommended cropping system is response cropping. PMID:26513746

  2. Four-dimensional guidance algorithms for aircraft in an air traffic control environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pecsvaradi, T.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical development and computer implementation of three guidance algorithms are presented. From a small set of input parameters the algorithms generate the ground track, altitude profile, and speed profile required to implement an experimental 4-D guidance system. Given a sequence of waypoints that define a nominal flight path, the first algorithm generates a realistic, flyable ground track consisting of a sequence of straight line segments and circular arcs. Each circular turn is constrained by the minimum turning radius of the aircraft. The ground track and the specified waypoint altitudes are used as inputs to the second algorithm which generates the altitude profile. The altitude profile consists of piecewise constant flight path angle segments, each segment lying within specified upper and lower bounds. The third algorithm generates a feasible speed profile subject to constraints on the rate of change in speed, permissible speed ranges, and effects of wind. Flight path parameters are then combined into a chronological sequence to form the 4-D guidance vectors. These vectors can be used to drive the autopilot/autothrottle of the aircraft so that a 4-D flight path could be tracked completely automatically; or these vectors may be used to drive the flight director and other cockpit displays, thereby enabling the pilot to track a 4-D flight path manually.

  3. Four-Dimensional Respiratory Motion-Resolved Whole Heart Coronary MR Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Piccini, Davide; Feng, Li; Bonanno, Gabriele; Coppo, Simone; Yerly, Jérôme; Lim, Ruth P.; Schwitter, Juerg; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Otazo, Ricardo; Stuber, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Free-breathing whole-heart coronary MR angiography (MRA) commonly uses navigators to gate respiratory motion, resulting in lengthy and unpredictable acquisition times. Conversely, self-navigation has 100% scan efficiency, but requires motion correction over a broad range of respiratory displacements, which may introduce image artifacts. We propose replacing navigators and self-navigation with a respiratory motion-resolved reconstruction approach. Methods Using a respiratory signal extracted directly from the imaging data, individual signal-readouts are binned according to their respiratory states. The resultant series of undersampled images are reconstructed using an extradimensional golden-angle radial sparse parallel imaging (XD-GRASP) algorithm, which exploits sparsity along the respiratory dimension. Whole-heart coronary MRA was performed in 11 volunteers and four patients with the proposed methodology. Image quality was compared with that obtained with one-dimensional respiratory self-navigation. Results Respiratory-resolved reconstruction effectively suppressed respiratory motion artifacts. The quality score for XD-GRASP reconstructions was greater than or equal to self-navigation in 80/88 coronary segments, reaching diagnostic quality in 61/88 segments versus 41/88. Coronary sharpness and length were always superior for the respiratory-resolved datasets, reaching statistical significance (P < 0.05) in most cases. Conclusion XD-GRASP represents an attractive alternative for handling respiratory motion in free-breathing whole heart MRI and provides an effective alternative to self-navigation. PMID:27052418

  4. Three- and four-dimensional mapping of speech and language in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Yasuo; Jeong, Jeong-Won; Brown, Erik C; Rothermel, Robert; Kojima, Katsuaki; Kambara, Toshimune; Shah, Aashit; Mittal, Sandeep; Sood, Sandeep; Asano, Eishi

    2017-03-16

    We have provided 3-D and 4D mapping of speech and language function based upon the results of direct cortical stimulation and event-related modulation of electrocorticography signals. Patients estimated to have right-hemispheric language dominance were excluded. Thus, 100 patients who underwent two-stage epilepsy surgery with chronic electrocorticography recording were studied. An older group consisted of 84 patients at least 10 years of age (7367 artefact-free non-epileptic electrodes), whereas a younger group included 16 children younger than age 10 (1438 electrodes). The probability of symptoms transiently induced by electrical stimulation was delineated on a 3D average surface image. The electrocorticography amplitude changes of high-gamma (70-110 Hz) and beta (15-30 Hz) activities during an auditory-naming task were animated on the average surface image in a 4D manner. Thereby, high-gamma augmentation and beta attenuation were treated as summary measures of cortical activation. Stimulation data indicated the causal relationship between (i) superior-temporal gyrus of either hemisphere and auditory hallucination; (ii) left superior-/middle-temporal gyri and receptive aphasia; (iii) widespread temporal/frontal lobe regions of the left hemisphere and expressive aphasia; and (iv) bilateral precentral/left posterior superior-frontal regions and speech arrest. On electrocorticography analysis, high-gamma augmentation involved the bilateral superior-temporal and precentral gyri immediately following question onset; at the same time, high-gamma activity was attenuated in the left orbitofrontal gyrus. High-gamma activity was augmented in the left temporal/frontal lobe regions, as well as left inferior-parietal and cingulate regions, maximally around question offset, with high-gamma augmentation in the left pars orbitalis inferior-frontal, middle-frontal, and inferior-parietal regions preceded by high-gamma attenuation in the contralateral homotopic regions. Immediately before verbal response, high-gamma augmentation involved the posterior superior-frontal and pre/postcentral regions, bilaterally. Beta-attenuation was spatially and temporally correlated with high-gamma augmentation in general but with exceptions. The younger and older groups shared similar spatial-temporal profiles of high-gamma and beta modulation; except, the younger group failed to show left-dominant activation in the rostral middle-frontal and pars orbitalis inferior-frontal regions around stimulus offset. The human brain may rapidly and alternately activate and deactivate cortical areas advantageous or obtrusive to function directed toward speech and language at a given moment. Increased left-dominant activation in the anterior frontal structures in the older age group may reflect developmental consolidation of the language system. The results of our functional mapping may be useful in predicting, across not only space but also time and patient age, sites specific to language function for presurgical evaluation of focal epilepsy.awx051media15361817553001.

  5. Four-dimensional visualization and quantitative analysis of meiotic spindle movements in live mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Tian, N; Zhang, L; Liu, B; Wang, P; Li, Y; Ma, W

    2012-09-01

    This paper made a different attempt of real-time observation of the meiotic spindle movements in living mouse oocyte using a convenient method. This method was based on an experimental phenomenon discovered in our work. In living mouse oocytes, a high concentration of calcium ions (Ca(2+)) was observed throughout the region occupied by the initial meiotic spindle. After Ca(2+) labelling with Fura-2, a weakly fluorescent area (WFA) appeared on each side of the chromosomes. The activities of the WFAs changed during spindle development. By real-time tracking of WFAs, we were able to indirectly observe the meiotic spindle movements. Occasionally, it was observed that the first meiotic spindle rotated from an orientation parallel to the cortex to become perpendicular, instead of migrating from the oocyte centre to the cortex along its axis. Moreover, we analysed this uncommon rotation of the first meiotic spindle and found that the whole rotation process can be divided into two phases: the early slow-speed rotation and the subsequent rapid-speed rotation. We further characterized this rotation with respect to rotational speed and acceleration at all the stages of development. By using a two-photon laser-scanning microscope in combination with Fura-2 dye that is nondamaging to oocytes, we provide a convenient method for indirect visualization and quantitative analysis of spindle movements by real-time tracking of WFAs. This method is easy to operate and master, and economical with time and effort.

  6. Four-dimensional in vivo X-ray microscopy with projection-guided gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokso, Rajmund; Schwyn, Daniel A.; Walker, Simon M.; Doube, Michael; Wicklein, Martina; Müller, Tonya; Stampanoni, Marco; Taylor, Graham K.; Krapp, Holger G.

    2015-03-01

    Visualizing fast micrometer scale internal movements of small animals is a key challenge for functional anatomy, physiology and biomechanics. We combine phase contrast tomographic microscopy (down to 3.3 μm voxel size) with retrospective, projection-based gating (in the order of hundreds of microseconds) to improve the spatiotemporal resolution by an order of magnitude over previous studies. We demonstrate our method by visualizing 20 three-dimensional snapshots through the 150 Hz oscillations of the blowfly flight motor.

  7. Four-dimensional MRI using an internal respiratory surrogate derived by dimensionality reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uh, Jinsoo; Ayaz Khan, M.; Hua, Chiaho

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to develop a practical and accurate 4-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method using a non-navigator, image-based internal respiratory surrogate derived by dimensionality reduction (DR). The use of DR has been previously suggested but not implemented for reconstructing 4D MRI, despite its practical advantages. We compared multiple image-acquisition schemes and refined a retrospective-sorting process to optimally implement a DR-derived surrogate. The comparison included an unconventional scheme that acquires paired slices alternately to mitigate the internal surrogate’s dependency on a specific slice location. We introduced ‘target-oriented sorting’, as opposed to conventional binning, to quantify the coherence in retrospectively sorted images, thereby determining the minimal scan time needed for sufficient coherence. This study focused on evaluating the proposed method using digital phantoms which provided unequivocal gold standard. The evaluation indicated that the DR-based respiratory surrogate is highly accurate: the error in amplitude percentile of the surrogate signal was less than 5% with the optimal scheme. Acquiring alternating paired slices was superior to the conventional scheme of acquiring individual slices; the advantage of the unconventional scheme was more pronounced when a substantial phase shift occurred across slice locations. The analysis of coherence across sorted images confirmed the advantage of higher sampling efficiencies in non-navigator respiratory surrogates. We determined that a scan time of 20 s per imaging slice was sufficient to achieve a mean coherence error of less than 1% for the tested respiratory patterns. The clinical applicability of the proposed 4D MRI has been demonstrated with volunteers and patients. The diaphragm motion in 4D MRI was consistent with that in dynamic 2D imaging which was regarded as the gold standard (difference within 1.8 mm on average).

  8. Four-dimensional inversion of resistivity monitoring data through Lp norm minimizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Ho; Supper, Robert; Tsourlos, Panagiotis; Yi, Myeong-Jong

    2013-12-01

    A new 4-D inversion algorithm is developed so that any data misfits and model roughness in the space and time domains can be selectively minimized, in terms of either the L1 norm or the L2 norm. This study is motivated by the experience that a 4-D inversion adopting full L2 norm minimization may sometimes result in a model that is too smoothly varying with time. It is further encouraged by the realization that a particular criterion of either L1 or L2 norm cannot be universally optimal for accurately reconstructing the subsurface condition. In addition, we try to overcome difficulties of jointly choosing two optimal regularization parameters in space and time domains. To achieve this, we devise automatic determination methods, not only of the Lagrangian multipliers for the space-domain smoothness constraint, but also of the regularization parameter for penalizing the model roughness along the time axis. Both kinds of regularization parameters are actively updated at each iteration, according to variations in data misfit and model roughness. We conducted inversion experiments using synthetic and field monitoring data to test the proposed algorithms, and further to compare the performance of L1 and L2 norm minimizations. Both the synthetic and field data experiments demonstrated that the proposed automatic determination method produced ground changes that were more similar to the true changes than those of approaches using pre-determined parameter values. Inversion experiments showed that L1 norm minimization of the time-domain roughness could reduce the problem of overly smooth model changes when the subsurface changes are locally confined, but that the L2 norm approach would be more reasonable when the changes are expected to be widespread.

  9. A simplified method of four-dimensional dose accumulation using the mean patient density representation

    SciTech Connect

    Glide-Hurst, Carri K.; Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Liang Jian; Yan Di

    2008-12-15

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate, both in phantom and patient, the feasibility of using an average 4DCT image set (AVG-CT) for 4D cumulative dose estimation. A series of 4DCT numerical phantoms and corresponding AVG-CTs were generated. For full 4D dose summation, static dose was calculated on each phase and cumulative dose was determined by combining each phase's static dose distribution with known tumor displacement. The AVG-CT cumulative dose was calculated similarly, although the same AVG-CT static dose distribution was used for all phases (i.e., tumor displacements). Four lung cancer cases were also evaluated for stereotactic body radiotherapy and conformal treatments; however, deformable image registration of the 4DCTs was used to generate the displacement vector fields (DVFs) describing patient-specific motion. Dose discrepancy between full 4D summation and AVG-CT approach was calculated and compared. For all phantoms, AVG-CT approximation yielded slightly higher cumulative doses compared to full 4D summation, with dose discrepancy increasing with increased tumor excursion. In vivo, using the AVG-CT coupled with deformable registration yielded clinically insignificant differences for all GTV parameters including the minimum, mean, maximum, dose to 99% of target, and dose to 1% of target. Furthermore, analysis of the spinal cord, esophagus, and heart revealed negligible differences in major dosimetric indices and dose coverage between the two dose calculation techniques. Simplifying 4D dose accumulation via the AVG-CT, while fully accounting for tumor deformation due to respiratory motion, has been validated, thereby, introducing the potential to streamline the use of 4D dose calculations in clinical practice, particularly for adaptive planning purposes.

  10. High Performance Input/Output Systems for High Performance Computing and Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Geoffrey C.; Ou, Chao-Wei

    1997-01-01

    The approach of this task was to apply leading parallel computing research to a number of existing techniques for assimilation, and extract parameters indicating where and how input/output limits computational performance. The following was used for detailed knowledge of the application problems: 1. Developing a parallel input/output system specifically for this application 2. Extracting the important input/output characteristics of data assimilation problems; and 3. Building these characteristics s parameters into our runtime library (Fortran D/High Performance Fortran) for parallel input/output support.

  11. Volumetric limiting spatial resolution analysis of four dimensional digital subtraction angiography (4D-DSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Brian; Oberstar, Erick; Royalty, Kevin; Schafer, Sebastian; Strother, Charles; Mistretta, Charles

    2015-03-01

    Static C-Arm CT 3D FDK baseline reconstructions (3D-DSA) are unable to provide temporal information to radiologists. 4D-DSA provides a time series of 3D volumes implementing a constrained image, thresholded 3D-DSA, reconstruction utilizing temporal dynamics in the 2D projections. Volumetric limiting spatial resolution (VLSR) of 4DDSA is quantified and compared to a 3D-DSA reconstruction using the same 3D-DSA parameters. Investigated were the effects of varying over significant ranges the 4D-DSA parameters of 2D blurring kernel size applied to the projection and threshold applied to the 3D-DSA when generating the constraining image of a scanned phantom (SPH) and an electronic phantom (EPH). The SPH consisted of a 76 micron tungsten wire encased in a 47 mm O.D. plastic radially concentric thin walled support structure. An 8-second/248-frame/198° scan protocol acquired the raw projection data. VLSR was determined from averaged MTF curves generated from each 2D transverse slice of every (248) 4D temporal frame (3D). 4D results for SPH and EPH were compared to the 3D-DSA. Analysis of the 3D-DSA resulted in a VLSR of 2.28 and 1.69 lp/mm for the EPH and SPH respectively. Kernel (2D) sizes of either 10x10 or 20x20 pixels with a threshold of 10% of the 3D-DSA as a constraining image provided 4D-DSA VLSR nearest to the 3D-DSA. 4D-DSA algorithms yielded 2.21 and 1.67 lp/mm with a percent error of 3.1% and 1.2% for the EPH and SPH respectively as compared to the 3D-DSA. This research indicates 4D-DSA is capable of retaining the resolution of the 3D-DSA.

  12. Universal features of four-dimensional superconformal field theory on conic space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yang

    2015-08-01

    Following the set up in arXiv:1408.3393, we study 4 d superconformal field theories on conic spaces. We show that the universal part of supersymmetric Rényi entropy S q across a spherical entangling surface in the limit q → 0 is proportional to a linear combination of central charges, 3 c - 2 a. This is equivalent to a similar statement about the free energy of SCFTs on conic space or hyperbolic space in the corresponding limit. We first derive the asymptotic formula by the free field computation in the presence of a U (1) R-symmetry background and then provide an independent derivation by studying theories on with a particular scaling , which thus confirms the validity of the formula for general interacting SCFTs. Finally we revisit the supersymmetric Rényi entropy of generel SCFTs and find a simple formula for it in terms of central charges a and c.

  13. R3 Index for Four-Dimensional N =2 Field Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Moore, Gregory W.; Neitzke, Andrew; Pioline, Boris

    2015-03-01

    In theories with N =2 supersymmetry on R3 ,1, supersymmetric bound states can decay across walls of marginal stability in the space of Coulomb branch parameters, leading to discontinuities in the BPS indices Ω (γ ,u ) . We consider a supersymmetric index I which receives contributions from 1 /2 -BPS states, generalizing the familiar Witten index Tr (-1 )Fe-β H . We expect I to be smooth away from loci where massless particles appear, thanks to contributions from the continuum of multiparticle states. Taking inspiration from a similar phenomenon in the hypermultiplet moduli space of N =2 string vacua, we conjecture a formula expressing I in terms of the BPS indices Ω (γ ,u ), which is continuous across the walls and exhibits the expected contributions from single particle states at large β . This gives a universal prediction for the contributions of multiparticle states to the index I . This index is naturally a function on the moduli space after reduction on a circle, closely related to the canonical hyperkähler metric and hyperholomorphic connection on this space.

  14. Multi-objective four-dimensional vehicle motion planning in large dynamic environments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Paul P-Y; Campbell, Duncan; Merz, Torsten

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents Multi-Step A∗ (MSA∗), a search algorithm based on A∗ for multi-objective 4-D vehicle motion planning (three spatial and one time dimensions). The research is principally motivated by the need for offline and online motion planning for autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). For UAVs operating in large dynamic uncertain 4-D environments, the motion plan consists of a sequence of connected linear tracks (or trajectory segments). The track angle and velocity are important parameters that are often restricted by assumptions and a grid geometry in conventional motion planners. Many existing planners also fail to incorporate multiple decision criteria and constraints such as wind, fuel, dynamic obstacles, and the rules of the air. It is shown that MSA∗ finds a cost optimal solution using variable length, angle, and velocity trajectory segments. These segments are approximated with a grid-based cell sequence that provides an inherent tolerance to uncertainty. The computational efficiency is achieved by using variable successor operators to create a multiresolution memory-efficient lattice sampling structure. The simulation studies on the UAV flight planning problem show that MSA∗ meets the time constraints of online replanning and finds paths of equivalent cost but in a quarter of the time (on average) of a vector neighborhood-based A∗.

  15. Medical applications of three-dimensional and four-dimensional laser scanning of facial morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Lewis L.; Chen, Xiaoming; Figueroa, Alvaro A.; Aduss, Howard

    1991-04-01

    Two-degrees offreedom laser scanning devices offer the advantage ofspeed in data acquisition over three-degrees offreedom devices. Data acquisition on patients especially children requires speed in data gathering instantaneous verification ofdata integrity and more than two degrees offreedom to adequately describe morphology. A technique to generate a pseudo-third degree of freedom scan will be presented. An additional benefit of the technique is the ability to compare data acquired at different times.

  16. Four Dimensional Analysis of Free Electron Lasers in the Amplifier Configuration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    1 A. HISTORY OF THE LASER ...............................1 B. HISTORY OF A FREE ELECTRON LASER ...................2 C. ADVANTAGES...Rosa, for her understanding and help during the time I spent in this work. xiv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 1 I. INTRODUCTION A. HISTORY ...emits nearly monochromatic light in a narrow coherent beam. The laser was proposed as a variation of the maser (“Microwave amplification by the

  17. Four-Dimensional Spatial Nanometry of Single Particles in Living Cells Using Polarized Quantum Rods

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Fujii, Fumihiko; Jin, Takashi; Umemoto, Eiji; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Fujita, Hideaki; Yanagida, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Single particle tracking is widely used to study protein movement with high spatiotemporal resolution both in vitro and in cells. Quantum dots, which are semiconductor nanoparticles, have recently been employed in single particle tracking because of their intense and stable fluorescence. Although single particles inside cells have been tracked in three spatial dimensions (X, Y, Z), measurement of the angular orientation of a molecule being tracked would significantly enhance our understanding of the molecule’s function. In this study, we synthesized highly polarized, rod-shaped quantum dots (Qrods) and developed a coating method that optimizes the Qrods for biological imaging. We describe a Qrod-based single particle tracking technique that blends optical nanometry with nanomaterial science to simultaneously measure the three-dimensional and angular movements of molecules. Using Qrods, we spatially tracked a membrane receptor in living cells in four dimensions with precision close to the single-digit range in nanometers and degrees. PMID:23931303

  18. Four-dimensional Monte Carlo investigation of organ motion in radiotherapy for lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Emily

    A limitation of current dose calculation algorithms employed in radiotherapy treatment planning is the assumption that the patient's anatomy is static throughout the imaging, planning and delivery. 4D dose calculation methods employ non-linear image registration to determine the cumulative dose received in a deforming anatomy. In this work, we developed a 4D Monte Carlo dose calculation code, designated defDOSXYZ, which determines the dose received in a deforming voxel grid. Voxel deformations were determined from deformation vectors resulting from non-linear image registration between images of the reference and target states. The ANIMAL non-linear image registration algorithm was implemented for registration of thoracic 4D CT images. Modifications were performed to ANIMAL to minimize deformation vector discontinuities. A method for correcting artifacts in 4D CT images was developed which uses non-linear image registration to interpolate voxel intensities from temporally adjacent artifact-free images. Dose calculations in deforming phantoms and 4D CT patient data using defDOSXYZ were compared to conventional center-of-mass (COM) and trilinear (TL) dose remapping methods. defDOSXYZ calculations were determined to be accurate to within 1% by comparison with DOSXYZ calculations and internal consistency checks. Conventional dose remapping methods were found to underestimate the dose by 29% and 8%, on average, when remapping dose from Exhale to Inhale within simple deforming phantoms with voxel sizes of 1 cm and 0.5 cm, respectively. These discrepancies were reduced to 0.2% for voxel sizes of 0.25 cm and smaller, however dose errors of 20-30% still existed in regions of steep dose gradients. The accuracy of non-linear image registration between inhale and exhale images for 5 lung patients was found to be within 2 mm which was deemed acceptable for clinical dose calculations. Temporal interpolation using ANIMAL was demonstrated to improve image quality in 4D data sets containing motion artifacts. Comparison of dose remapping from Inhale to Exhale in an anatomical breathing phantom revealed that interpolation methods underestimate the dose in the penumbra and near the surface. defDOSXYZ calculations were also compared with two dose remapping methods in 4D CT patient data. Systematic offsets between the dose calculation methods were noted which were attributed to inconsistent handling of voxel mass conservation in the image registration and dose calculations. A mass-consistent comparison of defDOSXYZ calculations and remapping calculations for clinically relevant planning scenarios and dose grid sizes revealed discrepancies in regions of steep gradients which was consistent with the phantom studies. No clinically significant differences in planning volume doses were noted between all three dose calculation methods, although conventional dose remapping failed to predict certain details of the cumulative dose distribution which may be important for 4D conformal treatment planning.

  19. Effective Doses in Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography for Lung Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Shinichiro Ko, Susumu; Ishii, Takayoshi; Nishizawa, Kanae

    2009-04-01

    The recent broad adoption of 4-D computed tomography (4DCT) scanning in radiotherapy has allowed the accurate determination of the target volume of tumors by minimizing image degradation caused by respiratory motion. Although the radiation exposure of the treatment beam is significantly greater than that of CT scans used for treatment planning, it is important to recognize and optimize the radiation exposure in 4DCT from the radiological protection point of view. Here, radiation exposure in 4DCT was measured with a 16 multidetector CT. Organ doses were measured using thermoluminescence radiation dosimeter chips inserted at respective anatomical sites of an anthropomorphic phantom. Results were compared with those with the helical CT scan mode. The effective dose measured for 4DCT was 24.7 mSv, approximately four times higher than that for helical CT. However, the increase in treatment accuracy afforded by 4DCT means its use in radiotherapy is inevitable. The patient exposure in the 4DCT could be of value by clarifying the advantage of the treatment planning using 4DCT.

  20. Airborne Four-Dimensional Flight Management in a Time-based Air Traffic Control Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David H.; Green, Steven M.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced Air Traffic Control (ATC) systems are being developed which contain time-based (4D) trajectory predictions of aircraft. Airborne flight management systems (FMS) exist or are being developed with similar 4D trajectory generation capabilities. Differences between the ATC generated profiles and those generated by the airborne 4D FMS may introduce system problems. A simulation experiment was conducted to explore integration of a 4D equipped aircraft into a 4D ATC system. The NASA Langley Transport Systems Research Vehicle cockpit simulator was linked in real time to the NASA Ames Descent Advisor ATC simulation for this effort. Candidate procedures for handling 4D equipped aircraft were devised and traffic scenarios established which required time delays absorbed through speed control alone or in combination with path stretching. Dissimilarities in 4D speed strategies between airborne and ATC generated trajectories were tested in these scenarios. The 4D procedures and FMS operation were well received by airline pilot test subjects, who achieved an arrival accuracy at the metering fix of 2.9 seconds standard deviation time error. The amount and nature of the information transmitted during a time clearance were found to be somewhat of a problem using the voice radio communication channel. Dissimilarities between airborne and ATC-generated speed strategies were found to be a problem when the traffic remained on established routes. It was more efficient for 4D equipped aircraft to fly trajectories with similar, though less fuel efficient, speeds which conform to the ATC strategy. Heavy traffic conditions, where time delays forced off-route path stretching, were found to produce a potential operational benefit of the airborne 4D FMS.

  1. A Four Dimensional Spatio-Temporal Analysis of an Agricultural Dataset.

    PubMed

    Donald, Margaret R; Mengersen, Kerrie L; Young, Rick R

    2015-01-01

    While a variety of statistical models now exist for the spatio-temporal analysis of two-dimensional (surface) data collected over time, there are few published examples of analogous models for the spatial analysis of data taken over four dimensions: latitude, longitude, height or depth, and time. When taking account of the autocorrelation of data within and between dimensions, the notion of closeness often differs for each of the dimensions. Here, we consider a number of approaches to the analysis of such a dataset, which arises from an agricultural experiment exploring the impact of different cropping systems on soil moisture. The proposed models vary in their representation of the spatial correlation in the data, the assumed temporal pattern and choice of conditional autoregressive (CAR) and other priors. In terms of the substantive question, we find that response cropping is generally more effective than long fallow cropping in reducing soil moisture at the depths considered (100 cm to 220 cm). Thus, if we wish to reduce the possibility of deep drainage and increased groundwater salinity, the recommended cropping system is response cropping.

  2. Simulation-based validation for four- dimensional multi-channel ultrasound current source density imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaohui; Witte, Russell S

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI), which has application to the heart and brain, exploits the acoustoelectric (AE) effect and Ohm's law to detect and map an electrical current distribution. In this study, we describe 4-D UCSDI simulations of a dipole field for comparison and validation with bench-top experiments. The simulations consider the properties of the ultrasound pulse as it passes through a conductive medium, the electric field of the injected dipole, and the lead field of the detectors. In the simulation, the lead fields of detectors and electric field of the dipole were calculated by the finite element (FE) method, and the convolution and correlation in the computation of the detected AE voltage signal were accelerated using 3-D fast Fourier transforms. In the bench-top experiment, an electric dipole was produced in a bath of 0.9% NaCl solution containing two electrodes, which injected an ac pulse (200 Hz, 3 cycles) ranging from 0 to 140 mA. Stimulating and recording electrodes were placed in a custom electrode chamber made on a rapid prototype printer. Each electrode could be positioned anywhere on an x-y grid (5 mm spacing) and individually adjusted in the depth direction for precise control of the geometry of the current sources and detecting electrodes. A 1-MHz ultrasound beam was pulsed and focused through a plastic film to modulate the current distribution inside the saline-filled tank. AE signals were simultaneously detected at a sampling frequency of 15 MHz on multiple recording electrodes. A single recording electrode is sufficient to form volume images of the current flow and electric potentials. The AE potential is sensitive to the distance from the dipole, but is less sensitive to the angle between the detector and the dipole. Multi-channel UCSDI potentially improves 4-D mapping of bioelectric sources in the body at high spatial resolution, which is especially important for diagnosing and guiding treatment of cardiac and neurologic disorders, including arrhythmia and epilepsy.

  3. Interactive access and management for four-dimensional environmental data sets using McIDAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, William L.; Tripoli, Gregory J.

    1995-01-01

    This grant has fundamentally changed the way that meteorologists look at the output of their atmospheric models, through the development and wide distribution of the Vis5D system. The Vis5D system is also gaining acceptance among oceanographers and atmospheric chemists. Vis5D gives these scientists an interactive three-dimensional movie of their very large data sets that they can use to understand physical mechanisms and to trace problems to their sources. This grant has also helped to define the future direction of scientific visualization through the development of the VisAD system and its lattice data model. The VisAD system can be used to interactively steer and visualize scientific computations. A key element of this capability is the flexibility of the system's data model to adapt to a wide variety of scientific data, including the integration of several forms of scientific metadata.

  4. Four-Dimensional Weather Functional Requirements for NextGen Air Traffic Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-18

    1-3 1.1.2 SME Cost-Benefit Analysis...6 SME ESTIMATED ROM COSTS............................................................................... 6-1 7 RISKS...ASSIMILATED INTO DECISIONMAKING DRAFT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ES-2 The JPDO requested that subject matter experts ( SME ) representing government

  5. Four-dimensional soil moisture response during an extreme rainfall event at the Landscape Evolution Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troch, Peter A.; Niu, Guo-Yue; Gevaert, Anouk; Teuling, Adriaan; Uijlenhoet, Remko; Pasetto, Damiano; Paniconi, Claudio; Putti, Mario

    2014-05-01

    The Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) at Biosphere 2-The University of Arizona consists of three identical, sloping, 333 m2 convergent landscapes inside a 5,000 m2 environmentally controlled facility. These engineered landscapes contain 1-meter depth of basaltic tephra, ground to homogenous loamy sand. Each landscape contains a spatially dense sensor and sampler network capable of resolving meter-scale lateral heterogeneity and sub-meter scale vertical heterogeneity in moisture, energy and carbon states and fluxes. The density of sensors and frequency at which they can be polled allows for data collection at spatial and temporal scales that are impossible in natural field settings. Each ~600 metric ton landscape has load cells embedded into the structure to measure changes in total system mass with 0.05% full-scale repeatability (equivalent to less than 1 cm of precipitation). This facilitates the real time accounting of hydrological partitioning at the hillslope scale. Each hillslope is equipped with an engineered rain system capable of raining at rates between 3 and 45 mm/hr in a range of spatial patterns. We observed the spatial and temporal evolution of the soil moisture content at 496 5-TM Decagon sensors distributed over 5 different depths during a low-intensity long-duration rainfall experiment in February 2013. This presentation will focus on our modeling efforts to reveal subsurface hydraulic heterogeneity required to explain observed rainfall-runoff dynamics at the hillslope scale.

  6. Synthetic dimensions in integrated photonics: From optical isolation to four-dimensional quantum Hall physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Tomoki; Price, Hannah M.; Goldman, Nathan; Zilberberg, Oded; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2016-04-01

    Recent technological advances in integrated photonics have spurred on the study of topological phenomena in engineered bosonic systems. Indeed, the controllability of silicon ring-resonator arrays has opened up new perspectives for building lattices for photons with topologically nontrivial bands and integrating them into photonic devices for practical applications. Here, we push these developments even further by exploiting the different modes of a silicon ring resonator as an extra dimension for photons. Tunneling along this synthetic dimension is implemented via an external time-dependent modulation that allows for the generation of engineered gauge fields. We show how this approach can be used to generate a variety of exciting topological phenomena in integrated photonics, ranging from a topologically-robust optical isolator in a spatially one-dimensional (1D) ring-resonator chain to a driven-dissipative analog of the 4D quantum Hall effect in a spatially 3D resonator lattice. Our proposal paves the way towards the use of topological effects in the design of novel photonic lattices supporting many frequency channels and displaying higher connectivities.

  7. Four-Dimensional Visualization of the Simultaneous Activity of Alternative Adeno-Associated Virus Replication Origins†

    PubMed Central

    Glauser, Daniel L.; Saydam, Okay; Balsiger, N. Alexander; Heid, Irma; Linden, R. Michael; Ackermann, Mathias; Fraefel, Cornel

    2005-01-01

    The adeno-associated virus (AAV) inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) contain the AAV Rep protein-binding site (RBS) and the terminal resolution site (TRS), which together act as a minimal origin of DNA replication. The AAV p5 promoter also contains an RBS, which is involved in Rep-mediated regulation of promoter activity, as well as a functional TRS, and origin activity of these signals has in fact been demonstrated previously in the presence of adenovirus helper functions. Here, we show that in the presence of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and AAV Rep protein, p5 promoter-bearing plasmids are efficiently amplified to form large head-to-tail concatemers, which are readily packaged in HSV-1 virions if an HSV-1 DNA-packaging/cleavage signal is provided in cis. We also demonstrate simultaneous and independent replication from the two alternative AAV replication origins, p5 and ITR, on the single-cell level using multicolor-fluorescence live imaging, a finding which raises the possibility that both origins may contribute to the AAV life cycle. Furthermore, we assess the differential affinities of Rep for the two different replication origins, p5 and ITR, both in vitro and in live cells and identify this as a potential mechanism to control the replicative and promoter activities of p5. PMID:16160148

  8. Four-dimensional visualization of the simultaneous activity of alternative adeno-associated virus replication origins.

    PubMed

    Glauser, Daniel L; Saydam, Okay; Balsiger, N Alexander; Heid, Irma; Linden, R Michael; Ackermann, Mathias; Fraefel, Cornel

    2005-10-01

    The adeno-associated virus (AAV) inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) contain the AAV Rep protein-binding site (RBS) and the terminal resolution site (TRS), which together act as a minimal origin of DNA replication. The AAV p5 promoter also contains an RBS, which is involved in Rep-mediated regulation of promoter activity, as well as a functional TRS, and origin activity of these signals has in fact been demonstrated previously in the presence of adenovirus helper functions. Here, we show that in the presence of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and AAV Rep protein, p5 promoter-bearing plasmids are efficiently amplified to form large head-to-tail concatemers, which are readily packaged in HSV-1 virions if an HSV-1 DNA-packaging/cleavage signal is provided in cis. We also demonstrate simultaneous and independent replication from the two alternative AAV replication origins, p5 and ITR, on the single-cell level using multicolor-fluorescence live imaging, a finding which raises the possibility that both origins may contribute to the AAV life cycle. Furthermore, we assess the differential affinities of Rep for the two different replication origins, p5 and ITR, both in vitro and in live cells and identify this as a potential mechanism to control the replicative and promoter activities of p5.

  9. A Four-Dimensional, Mesoscale, Non-Gaussian Multispectral Smoke Model. Phase 1. Feasibility Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    and the effect of the "lid" itself as a boundary that limits the vertical scale of motion. 2.2.3.1 Convective boundary layer (Hojstrup, 1982) nSu(n...particles correctly; we must also account for their size-dependent removal rates and determine cost effective ways to assess local particle... effective scatterers in the far infrared (IR) (for example, particle diameter d - wavelength 1 = 100 u) can settle out with deposition velocities of order

  10. Four-Dimensional Characterization of Paper Web at the Wet End

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, JS

    2001-02-28

    This report presents a detailed description of a vision system whose purpose is to detect and to localize the nonuniformities that appear on the paper slurry (wood fiber and water mixture) at the wet end of a paper machine. Specifically, the system is capable of monitoring the paper slurry upon its exit from the headbox and alerting the operators of any event (e.g., streaks) that disrupts the otherwise homogeneous background. Such events are thought to affect crucial product properties such as formation, which if poor, results in thick and thin spots on the sheet and impacts its strength and printability. This report describes the vision system in terms of its hardware modules, as well as the image processing algorithms that it utilizes to perform its function. Basically, the system acquires both intensity and topographic information from the scene and uses texture-based features for the detection, and facet-based descriptors for the localization of the nonuniformities. In addition to being tested in a laboratory environment, a prototype of this system was constructed and deployed to a paper mill, where its performance was evaluated under realistic conditions. Installed on a fourdrinier paper machine, running at 480 m/min and producing linerboard material, the vision system was able to monitor an approximately 1-meter-wide area and to successfully detect and localize slurry streaks.

  11. Assimilation of Satellite Altimeter Data With a Four Dimensional Model of the Japan Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirose, Naoki; Ichiro, Fukumori; Jong-Hwan, Yoon

    1999-01-01

    A data assimilation is carried out to detect the variability of the Japan Sea circulation in the range from a few days to several years and from eddy to basin scale. The model applied in this study is the same 1/6 degree GFDL MOM1 as Kim and Yoon (1999) but is driven by ECMWF daily wind stress, heat and fresh water fluxes. The satellite altimeter data of TOPEX/POSEIDON, ERS-1 (phase C and G) and -2 are assimilated by an approximate Kalman filter (Fukumori and M.Rizzoli, 1995). The approximation is made by seeking an asymptotic steady error covariance matrix (Fukumori et al., 1993) and by introducing a coarser grid model for the innovation (data-model misfit). The coarse grid model is defined on 1/2 degree horizontal resolution and consists of the barotropic stream function, first baroclinic displacement and velocity amplitudes. The assimilated estimates explain about 6cm sea level variability of the data (approximately 12cm in the southern part), which is much larger than the previous reduced-gravity model and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter data assimilation (Hirose et al., 1999). The impacts of the T/P and ERS data on the filtered estimates are comparable. The result also shows high correlation to subsurface water temperatures measured by CTD. Many of the mesoscale eddies/disturbances travel east-northeastward with the advection speed of 1-3cm/s though most of them generated in the western region can not pass over the Oki Spur. The quasi-biennial variability found by Hirose and Ostrovskii (1999) did not show clear propagation pattern. The shallow Oki Spur may work as a "western boundary" to this signal. This is more plausible estimation than by the R-G model which has no bottom topography.

  12. Linear interpolation of four-dimensional tabulated data for computers with single subscripted variable capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    Using only a one-dimensional subscripted variable, a FORTRAN computer subprogram was developed to linearly interpolate tabulated data of functions of four or less variables. The primary motivation was for faster computation.

  13. Time-symmetric initial data sets in four-dimensional dilaton gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortín, Tomás

    1995-09-01

    I study the time-symmetric initial-data problem in theories with a massless scalar field (dilaton), free or coupled to a Maxwell field in the stringy way, finding different initial-data sets describing an arbitrary number of black holes with arbitrary masses, charges, and asymptotic value of the dilaton. The presence of the scalar field gives rise to a number of interesting effects. The mass and charges of a single black hole are different in its two asymptotically flat regions across the Einstein-Rosen bridge. The same happens to the value of the dilaton at infinity. This forbids the identification of these asymptotic regions in order to build (Misner) wormholes in the most naive way. Using different techniques, I find regular initial data for stringy wormholes. The price paid is the existence singularities in the dilaton field. The presence of a single-valued scalar seems to constrain strongly the allowed topologies of the initial spacelike surface. Other kinds of scalar fields (taking values on a circle or being defined up to an additive constant) are also briefly considered.

  14. Development of the L-1011 four-dimensional flight management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. P.; Leffler, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    The development of 4-D guidance and control algorithms for the L-1011 Flight Management System is described. Four-D Flight Management is a concept by which an aircraft's flight is optimized along the 3-D path within the constraints of today's ATC environment, while its arrival time is controlled to fit into the air traffic flow without incurring or causing delays. The methods developed herein were designed to be compatible with the time-based en route metering techniques that were recently developed by the Dallas/Fort Worth and Denver Air Route Traffic Control Centers. The ensuing development of the 4-D guidance algorithms, the necessary control laws and the operational procedures are discussed. Results of computer simulation evaluation of the guidance algorithms and control laws are presented, along with a description of the software development procedures utilized.

  15. Four-Dimensional Weakly Self-avoiding Walk with Contact Self-attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauerschmidt, Roland; Slade, Gordon; Wallace, Benjamin C.

    2017-03-01

    We consider the critical behaviour of the continuous-time weakly self-avoiding walk with contact self-attraction on Z^4 , for sufficiently small attraction. We prove that the susceptibility and correlation length of order p (for any p>0 ) have logarithmic corrections to mean field scaling, and that the critical two-point function is asymptotic to a multiple of |x|^{-2} . This shows that small contact self-attraction results in the same critical behaviour as no contact self-attraction; a collapse transition is predicted for larger self-attraction. The proof uses a supersymmetric representation of the two-point function, and is based on a rigorous renormalisation group method that has been used to prove the same results for the weakly self-avoiding walk, without self-attraction.

  16. Proper projective symmetry in the most general non-static spherically symmetric four-dimensional Lorentzian manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabbir, Ghulam; Mahomed, F. M.; Qureshi, M. A.

    2016-11-01

    A study of proper projective symmetry in the most general form of non-static spherically symmetric space-time is given using direct integration and algebraic techniques. In this study, we show that when the above space-time admits proper projective symmetry it becomes a very special class of static spherically symmetric space-times.

  17. Development of a four-dimensional variational analysis system using the adjoint method at GLA. I - Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Winston C.; Chang, Lang-Ping

    1992-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of data assimilation have pointed to variational analysis (essentially least-squares fitting of a model solution to observed data) using the adjoint method as a new direction that holds the potential of major improvements over the current optimal interpolation method. This paper describes the initial effort in the development of a 4D variational analysis system. Although the development is based on the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres General Circulation Model (GCM), the methods and procedures described in this paper can be applied to any model. The adjoint code that computes the gradients needed in the analysis can be written directly from the GCM code. An easy error-detection technique was devised in the construction of the adjoint model. Also, a method of determining the weights and the preconditioning scales for the cases where model-generated data, which are error free, are used as observation is proposed. Two test experiments show that the dynamics part of the system has been successfully completed.

  18. Is the Gambling Motives Questionnaire really three-dimensional? A proposition of a four-dimensional Gambling Motives Questionnaire - Revised.

    PubMed

    Myrseth, Helga; Notelaers, Guy

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to improve the weaknesses of the three-dimensional Gambling Motives Questionnaire and to examine the psychometric properties and factor structure of the Gambling Motives Questionnaire-Revised. The Gambling Motives Questionnaire was administered to a sample of 418 gamblers (92% men, mean age 19.5years). Participants completed the Gambling Motives Questionnaire and an additional item tapping boredom, as well as a variety of measures of gambling behavior and gambling problems as criterion measures. Results showed that the Gambling Motives Questionnaire-Revised is better represented as a four-factor structure tapping the following four gambling motives factors; enhancement, coping, social, and self-gratification, Δχ(2) Δ(df)=24.76 (3), p<0.001. Removing two problematic items from the Gambling Motives Questionnaire and adding an extra item tapping boredom also improved the fit of the Gambling Motives Questionnaire-Revised. The subscales enhancement, social, and coping were all significant predictors of variety of gambling behaviors (p<0.05), whereas enhancement, coping, and self-gratification predicted frequency of gambling behaviors (p<0.01). Coping and self-gratification predicted loss of control (p<0.01), whereas self-gratification predicted gambling problems (p<0.001). The Gambling Motives Questionnaire - Revised, consisting of the four dimensions enhancement motives, social motives, coping motives and self-gratification motives, is a reliable and valid instrument to measuring gambling motives.

  19. Four dimensional observations of clouds from geosynchronous orbit using stereo display and measurement techniques on an interactive information processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.; Desjardins, M.; Shenk, W. E.

    1979-01-01

    Simultaneous Geosynchronous Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) 1 km resolution visible image pairs can provide quantitative three dimensional measurements of clouds. These data have great potential for severe storms research and as a basic parameter measurement source for other areas of meteorology (e.g. climate). These stereo cloud height measurements are not subject to the errors and ambiguities caused by unknown cloud emissivity and temperature profiles that are associated with infrared techniques. This effort describes the display and measurement of stereo data using digital processing techniques.

  20. High-frame rate four dimensional optoacoustic tomography enables visualization of cardiovascular dynamics and mouse heart perfusion.

    PubMed

    Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís; Ford, Steven James; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Functional imaging of mouse models of cardiac health and disease provides a major contribution to our fundamental understanding of the mammalian heart. However, imaging murine hearts presents significant challenges due to their small size and rapid heart rate. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of high-frame-rate, noninvasive optoacoustic imaging of the murine heart. The temporal resolution of 50 three-dimensional frames per second provides functional information at important phases of the cardiac cycle without the use of gating or other motion-reduction methods. Differentiation of the blood oxygenation state in the heart chambers was enabled by exploiting the wavelength dependence of optoacoustic signals. Real-time volumetric tracking of blood perfusion in the cardiac chambers was also evaluated using indocyanine green. Taken together, the newly-discovered capacities offer a unique tool set for in-vivo structural and functional imaging of the whole heart with high spatio-temporal resolution in all three dimensions.

  1. TH-E-17A-07: Improved Cine Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4D CT) Acquisition and Processing Method

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, S; Castillo, R; Castillo, E; Pan, T; Ibbott, G; Balter, P; Hobbs, B; Dai, J; Guerrero, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Artifacts arising from the 4D CT acquisition and post-processing methods add systematic uncertainty to the treatment planning process. We propose an alternate cine 4D CT acquisition and post-processing method to consistently reduce artifacts, and explore patient parameters indicative of image quality. Methods: In an IRB-approved protocol, 18 patients with primary thoracic malignancies received a standard cine 4D CT acquisition followed by an oversampling 4D CT that doubled the number of images acquired. A second cohort of 10 patients received the clinical 4D CT plus 3 oversampling scans for intra-fraction reproducibility. The clinical acquisitions were processed by the standard phase sorting method. The oversampling acquisitions were processed using Dijkstras algorithm to optimize an artifact metric over available image data. Image quality was evaluated with a one-way mixed ANOVA model using a correlation-based artifact metric calculated from the final 4D CT image sets. Spearman correlations and a linear mixed model tested the association between breathing parameters, patient characteristics, and image quality. Results: The oversampling 4D CT scans reduced artifact presence significantly by 27% and 28%, for the first cohort and second cohort respectively. From cohort 2, the inter-replicate deviation for the oversampling method was within approximately 13% of the cross scan average at the 0.05 significance level. Artifact presence for both clinical and oversampling methods was significantly correlated with breathing period (ρ=0.407, p-value<0.032 clinical, ρ=0.296, p-value<0.041 oversampling). Artifact presence in the oversampling method was significantly correlated with amount of data acquired, (ρ=-0.335, p-value<0.02) indicating decreased artifact presence with increased breathing cycles per scan location. Conclusion: The 4D CT oversampling acquisition with optimized sorting reduced artifact presence significantly and reproducibly compared to the phase-sorted clinical acquisition.

  2. Artifacts in Conventional Computed Tomography (CT) and Free Breathing Four-Dimensional CT Induce Uncertainty in Gross Tumor Volume Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Fredberg Persson, Gitte; Nygaard, Ditte Eklund; Munch af Rosenschoeld, Per; Richter Vogelius, Ivan; Josipovic, Mirjana; Specht, Lena; Korreman, Stine Sofia

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Artifacts impacting the imaged tumor volume can be seen in conventional three-dimensional CT (3DCT) scans for planning of lung cancer radiotherapy but can be reduced with the use of respiration-correlated imaging, i.e., 4DCT or breathhold CT (BHCT) scans. The aim of this study was to compare delineated gross tumor volume (GTV) sizes in 3DCT, 4DCT, and BHCT scans of patients with lung tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 36 patients with 46 tumors referred for stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumors were included. All patients underwent positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, 4DCT, and BHCT scans. GTVs in all CT scans of individual patients were delineated during one session by a single physician to minimize systematic delineation uncertainty. The GTV size from the BHCT was considered the closest to true tumor volume and was chosen as the reference. The reference GTV size was compared to GTV sizes in 3DCT, at midventilation (MidV), at end-inspiration (Insp), and at end-expiration (Exp) bins from the 4DCT scan. Results: The median BHCT GTV size was 4.9 cm{sup 3} (0.1-53.3 cm{sup 3}). Median deviation between 3DCT and BHCT GTV size was 0.3 cm{sup 3} (-3.3 to 30.0 cm{sup 3}), between MidV and BHCT size was 0.2 cm{sup 3} (-5.7 to 19.7 cm{sup 3}), between Insp and BHCT size was 0.3 cm{sup 3} (-4.7 to 24.8 cm{sup 3}), and between Exp and BHCT size was 0.3 cm{sup 3} (-4.8 to 25.5 cm{sup 3}). The 3DCT, MidV, Insp, and Exp median GTV sizes were all significantly larger than the BHCT median GTV size. Conclusions: In the present study, the choice of CT method significantly influenced the delineated GTV size, on average, leading to an increase in GTV size compared to the reference BHCT. The uncertainty caused by artifacts is estimated to be in the same magnitude as delineation uncertainty and should be considered in the design of margins for radiotherapy.

  3. Estimating Water and Heat Fluxes with a Four-dimensional Weak-constraint Variational Data Assimilation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateni, S. M.; Xu, T.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate estimation of water and heat fluxes is required for irrigation scheduling, weather prediction, and water resources planning and management. A weak-constraint variational data assimilation (WC-VDA) scheme is developed to estimate water and heat fluxes by assimilating sequences of land surface temperature (LST) observations. The commonly used strong-constraint VDA systems adversely affect the accuracy of water and heat flux estimates as they assume the model is perfect. The WC-VDA approach accounts for structural and model errors and generates more accurate results via adding a model error term into the surface energy balance equation. The two key unknown parameters of the WC-VDA system (i.e., CHN, the bulk heat transfer coefficient and EF, evaporative fraction) and the model error term are optimized by minimizing the cost function. The WC-VDA model was tested at two sites with contrasting hydrological and vegetative conditions: the Daman site (a wet site located in an oasis area and covered by seeded corn) and the Huazhaizi site (a dry site located in a desert area and covered by sparse grass) in middle stream of Heihe river basin, northwest China. Compared to the strong-constraint VDA system, the WC-VDA method generates more accurate estimates of water and energy fluxes over the desert and oasis sites with dry and wet conditions.

  4. The pedagogical value of the four-dimensional picture: II. Another way of looking at the electromagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosyakov, B. P.

    2014-03-01

    A definition of the electromagnetic field can be neatly formulated by recognizing that the simplest form of the four-force is indeed feasible. We show that Maxwell’s equations almost entirely stem from the properties of spacetime, notably from the fact that our world has dimension d = 4. Their complete reconstruction requires three additional assumptions that are seemingly divorced from spacetime properties but which may, in fact, have much to do with their geometry.

  5. Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation of Gale Data Using a Multivariate Analysis Scheme and a Mesoscale Model with Diabatic Initialization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Dewey Elvin

    1992-01-01

    A method of assimilating 3-hourly sounding data is developed and successfully tested in this study. First, the successive corrections scheme of Bratseth (1986), which converges to optimum interpolation, is applied for the numerical analysis of data collected during the Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment (GALE). Univariate analyses of the mass and wind field are produced. The coupling of the mass and wind field is achieved by further iterations of the geopotential utilizing improving estimates of the geostrophic wind to extrapolate the geopotential to the grid points. The univariate wind analysis is then corrected for the new geostrophic wind. Next, diabatic forcing is incorporated into a vertical mode initialization scheme to provide more realistic initial conditions and to shorten the spinup time of the Naval Research Laboratory/North Carolina State University (NRL/NCSU) mesoscale model. Latent-heating profiles are computed from 'spun-up' model-generated and observed rainfall. The latent heating is distributed in the vertical according to the cumulus convective parameterization scheme (Kuo scheme) of the model. Compatibility between the specified heating during initialization and the heating during early model integration is retained by merging the model integrated rainfall and heating rates with those rates from the initialization. Finally, the multivariate, successive correction analysis scheme and the diabatic initialization procedure are combined with the NRL/NCSU model to form an intermittent data-assimilation system. Assimilations of the GALE data over a 2{1over2}-day period were performed with differing update cycles of 3, 6, and 12 h. Twelve-hour NMC hemispheric analyses served as the "no assimilation" control case for comparison. The assimilation of 3-hourly GALE data led to large decreases in background forecast rms errors and smaller decreases in analysis rms error. Better consistency in time was achieved between forecasts and analyses in the assimilation experiments. Rainfall prognoses from the assimilated states verified reasonably well with the observed rainfall and showed much more rapid spinup and better overall patterns than did the "no assimilation" precipitation forecasts.

  6. Four dimensional hybrid ultrasound and optoacoustic imaging via passive element optical excitation in a hand-held probe

    SciTech Connect

    Fehm, Thomas Felix; Razansky, Daniel; Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís

    2014-10-27

    Ultrasonography and optoacoustic imaging share powerful advantages related to the natural aptitude for real-time image rendering with high resolution, the hand-held operation, and lack of ionizing radiation. The two methods also possess very different yet highly complementary advantages of the mechanical and optical contrast in living tissues. Nonetheless, efficient integration of these modalities remains challenging owing to the fundamental differences in the underlying physical contrast, optimal signal acquisition, and image reconstruction approaches. We report on a method for hybrid acquisition and reconstruction of three-dimensional pulse-echo ultrasound and optoacoustic images in real time based on passive ultrasound generation with an optical absorber, thus avoiding the hardware complexity of active ultrasound generation. In this way, complete hybrid datasets are generated with a single laser interrogation pulse, resulting in simultaneous rendering of ultrasound and optoacoustic images at an unprecedented rate of 10 volumetric frames per second. Performance is subsequently showcased in phantom experiments and in-vivo measurements from a healthy human volunteer, confirming general clinical applicability of the method.

  7. Using the 320-Multidetector Computed Tomography scanner for four-dimensional functional assessment of the elbow joint.

    PubMed

    Goh, Yin Peng; Lau, Kenneth K

    2012-02-01

    As described in this case report, the use of the 320-Multidetector Computed Tomography scanner (Aquilion One, Toshiba Medical Systems, Japan) to produce continuous 3-dimensional images in real time, over a distance of 16 cm in the z-axis, proved to aid in the diagnosis of a patient's restrictive elbow joint. This state-of-the-art scanner allows fast and noninvasive dynamic-kinematic functional evaluation of the elbow joint in vivo. It will also be applicable to kinematic studies of other joints.

  8. One- to four-dimensional kernels for virtual screening and the prediction of physical, chemical, and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Ksikes, Alexandre; Swamidass, S Joshua; Chen, Jonathan H; Ralaivola, Liva; Baldi, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Many chemoinformatics applications, including high-throughput virtual screening, benefit from being able to rapidly predict the physical, chemical, and biological properties of small molecules to screen large repositories and identify suitable candidates. When training sets are available, machine learning methods provide an effective alternative to ab initio methods for these predictions. Here, we leverage rich molecular representations including 1D SMILES strings, 2D graphs of bonds, and 3D coordinates to derive efficient machine learning kernels to address regression problems. We further expand the library of available spectral kernels for small molecules developed for classification problems to include 2.5D surface and 3D kernels using Delaunay tetrahedrization and other techniques from computational geometry, 3D pharmacophore kernels, and 3.5D or 4D kernels capable of taking into account multiple molecular configurations, such as conformers. The kernels are comprehensively tested using cross-validation and redundancy-reduction methods on regression problems using several available data sets to predict boiling points, melting points, aqueous solubility, octanol/water partition coefficients, and biological activity with state-of-the art results. When sufficient training data are available, 2D spectral kernels in general tend to yield the best and most robust results, better than state-of-the art. On data sets containing thousands of molecules, the kernels achieve a squared correlation coefficient of 0.91 for aqueous solubility prediction and 0.94 for octanol/water partition coefficient prediction. Averaging over conformations improves the performance of kernels based on the three-dimensional structure of molecules, especially on challenging data sets. Kernel predictors for aqueous solubility (kSOL), LogP (kLOGP), and melting point (kMELT) are available over the Web through: http://cdb.ics.uci.edu.

  9. Complete classification of four-dimensional black hole and membrane solutions in IR-modified Hořava gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argüelles, Carlos; Grandi, Nicolás; Park, Mu-In

    2015-10-01

    Hořava gravity has been proposed as a renormalizable, higher-derivative gravity without ghost problems, by considering different scaling dimensions for space and time. In the non-relativistic higher-derivative generalization of Einstein gravity, the meaning and physical properties of black hole and membrane space-times are quite different from the conventional ones. Here, we study the singularity and horizon structures of such geometries in IR-modified Hořava gravity, where the so-called "detailed balance" condition is softly broken in IR. We classify all the viable static solutions without naked singularities and study its close connection to non-singular cosmology solutions. We find that, in addition to the usual point-like singularity at r = 0, there exists a "surface-like" curvature singularity at finite r = r S whichisthecuttingedgeofthereal-valuedspace-time. Thedegreeofdivergenceof such singularities is milder than those of general relativity, and the Hawking temperature of the horizons diverges when they coincide with the singularities. As a byproduct we find that, in addition to the usual "asymptotic limit", a consistent flow of coupling constants, that we called "GR flow limit", is needed in order to recover general relativity in the IR.

  10. Hough transform relative to a four-dimensional parameter space for the detection of constant velocity target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jing; Zhang, Tianxu

    2010-12-01

    We present a novel Hough transform method for moving point target detection by using a 4-D parameter space. A new representation, which uses four parameters (the distance variable ρ, the angle variable θ, the velocity variable v, and the distance variable S), is proposed for constant velocity target in the 3-D observation space X-Y-T. By estimating velocity, a target trajectory can be transformed into a 4-D parameter space with a limited range of projection options. Our simulation and analysis show that the new algorithm can produce positive results in suppressing noise points with less computational cost.

  11. Analysis of Environmental and General Science Teaching Efficacy among Instructors with Contrasting Class Ethnicity Distributions: A Four-Dimensional Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine; Taylor, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    The context and nature of teacher efficacy beliefs provide a method upon which to explore science teachers' perceptions of their teaching effectiveness and student achievement as a function of ethnicity. Promotion of a more in-depth knowledge of science teaching efficacy requires cross-sectional and longitudinal investigations. In this study, a…

  12. High complexity of aquatic irradiance may have driven the evolution of four-dimensional colour vision in shallow-water fish.

    PubMed

    Sabbah, Shai; Troje, Nikolaus F; Gray, Suzanne M; Hawryshyn, Craig W

    2013-05-01

    Humans use three cone photoreceptor classes for colour vision, yet many birds, reptiles and shallow-water fish are tetrachromatic and use four cone classes. Screening pigments, which narrow the spectrum of photoreceptors in birds and diurnal reptiles, render visual systems with four cone classes more efficient. To date, however, the question of tetrachromacy in shallow-water fish that, like humans, lack screening pigments, is still unsolved. We raise the possibility that tetrachromacy in fish has evolved in response to higher spectral complexity of underwater light. We compared the dimensionality of colour vision in humans and fish by examining the spectral complexity of the colour signal reflected from objects into their eyes. We show that fish require four to six cone classes to reconstruct the colour signal of aquatic objects at the accuracy level achieved by humans viewing terrestrial objects. This is because environmental light, which alters the colour signals, is more complex and contains more spectral fluctuations underwater than on land. We further show that fish cones are better suited than human cones to detect these spectral fluctuations, suggesting that the capability of fish cones to detect high-frequency fluctuations in the colour signal confers an advantage. Taken together, we propose that tetrachromacy in fish has evolved to enhance the reconstruction of complex colour signals in shallow aquatic environments. Of course, shallow-water fish might possess fewer than four cone classes; however, this would come with the inevitable loss in accuracy of signal reconstruction.

  13. Design and testing of a simulation framework for dosimetric motion studies integrating an anthropomorphic computational phantom into four-dimensional Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Riboldi, M; Chen, G T Y; Baroni, G; Paganetti, H; Seco, J

    2008-12-01

    We have designed a simulation framework for motion studies in radiation therapy by integrating the anthropomorphic NCAT phantom into a 4D Monte Carlo dose calculation engine based on DPM. Representing an artifact-free environment, the system can be used to identify class solutions as a function of geometric and dosimetric parameters. A pilot dynamic conformal study for three lesions ( approximately 2.0 cm) in the right lung was performed (70 Gy prescription dose). Tumor motion changed as a function of tumor location, according to the anthropomorphic deformable motion model. Conformal plans were simulated with 0 to 2 cm margin for the aperture, with additional 0.5 cm for beam penumbra. The dosimetric effects of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conformal treatments were compared in a static case. Results show that the Monte Carlo simulation framework can model tumor tracking in deformable anatomy with high accuracy, providing absolute doses for IMRT and conformal radiation therapy. A target underdosage of up to 3.67 Gy (lower lung) was highlighted in the composite dose distribution mapped at exhale. Such effects depend on tumor location and treatment margin and are affected by lung deformation and ribcage motion. In summary, the complexity in the irradiation of moving targets has been reduced to a controlled simulation environment, where several treatment options can be accurately modeled and quantified The implemented tools will be utilized for extensive motion study in lung/liver irradiation.

  14. Four-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations demonstrating how the extent of intensity-modulation impacts motion effects in proton therapy lung treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Dowdell, Stephen; Paganetti, Harald; Grassberger, Clemens

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To compare motion effects in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) lung treatments with different levels of intensity modulation.Methods: Spot scanning IMPT treatment plans were generated for ten lung cancer patients for 2.5Gy(RBE) and 12Gy(RBE) fractions and two distinct energy-dependent spot sizes (σ∼8–17 mm and ∼2–4 mm). IMPT plans were generated with the target homogeneity of each individual field restricted to <20% (IMPT{sub 20%}). These plans were compared to full IMPT (IMPT{sub full}), which had no restriction on the single field homogeneity. 4D Monte Carlo simulations were performed upon the patient 4DCT geometry, including deformable image registration and incorporating the detailed timing structure of the proton delivery system. Motion effects were quantified via comparison of the results of the 4D simulations (4D-IMPT{sub 20%}, 4D-IMPT{sub full}) with those of a 3D Monte Carlo simulation (3D-IMPT{sub 20%}, 3D-IMPT{sub full}) upon the planning CT using the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), V{sub 95} and D{sub 1}-D{sub 99}. The effects in normal lung were quantified using mean lung dose (MLD) and V{sub 90%}.Results: For 2.5Gy(RBE), the mean EUD for the large spot size is 99.9%± 2.8% for 4D-IMPT{sub 20%} compared to 100.1%± 2.9% for 4D-IMPT{sub full}. The corresponding values are 88.6%± 8.7% (4D-IMPT{sub 20%}) and 91.0%± 9.3% (4D-IMPT{sub full}) for the smaller spot size. The EUD value is higher in 69.7% of the considered deliveries for 4D-IMPT{sub full}. The V{sub 95} is also higher in 74.7% of the plans for 4D-IMPT{sub full}, implying that IMPT{sub full} plans experience less underdose compared to IMPT{sub 20%}. However, the target dose homogeneity is improved in the majority (67.8%) of plans for 4D-IMPT{sub 20%}. The higher EUD and V{sub 95} suggests that the degraded homogeneity in IMPT{sub full} is actually due to the introduction of hot spots in the target volume, perhaps resulting from the sharper in-target dose gradients. The greatest variations between the IMPT{sub 20%} and IMPT{sub full} deliveries are observed for patients with the largest motion amplitudes. These patients would likely be treated using gating or another motion mitigation technique, which was not the focus of this study.Conclusions: For the treatment parameters considered in this study, the differences between IMPT{sub full} and IMPT{sub 20%} are only likely to be clinically significant for patients with large (>20 mm) motion amplitudes.

  15. SU-E-J-167: Improvement of Time-Ordered Four Dimensional Cone-Beam CT; Image Mosaicing with Real and Virtual Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, M; Kida, S; Masutani, Y; Shiraki, T; Yamamoto, K; Shiraishi, K; Nakagawa, K; Haga, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In the previous study, we developed time-ordered fourdimensional (4D) cone-beam CT (CBCT) technique to visualize nonperiodic organ motion, such as peristaltic motion of gastrointestinal organs and adjacent area, using half-scan reconstruction method. One important obstacle was that truncation of projection was caused by asymmetric location of flat-panel detector (FPD) in order to cover whole abdomen or pelvis in one rotation. In this study, we propose image mosaicing to extend projection data to make possible to reconstruct full field-of-view (FOV) image using half-scan reconstruction. Methods: The projections of prostate cancer patients were acquired using the X-ray Volume Imaging system (XVI, version 4.5) on Synergy linear accelerator system (Elekta, UK). The XVI system has three options of FOV, S, M and L, and M FOV was chosen for pelvic CBCT acquisition, with a FPD panel 11.5 cm offset. The method to produce extended projections consists of three main steps: First, normal three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction which contains whole pelvis was implemented using real projections. Second, virtual projections were produced by reprojection process of the reconstructed 3D image. Third, real and virtual projections in each angle were combined into one extended mosaic projection. Then, 4D CBCT images were reconstructed using our inhouse reconstruction software based on Feldkamp, Davis and Kress algorithm. The angular range of each reconstruction phase in the 4D reconstruction was 180 degrees, and the range moved as time progressed. Results: Projection data were successfully extended without discontinuous boundary between real and virtual projections. Using mosaic projections, 4D CBCT image sets were reconstructed without artifacts caused by the truncation, and thus, whole pelvis was clearly visible. Conclusion: The present method provides extended projections which contain whole pelvis. The presented reconstruction method also enables time-ordered 4D CBCT reconstruction of organs with non-periodic motion with full FOV without projection-truncation artifacts. This work was partly supported by the JSPS Core-to-Core Program(No. 23003). This work was partly supported by JSPS KAKENHI 24234567.

  16. Four-dimensional electrical conductivity monitoring of stage-driven river water intrusion: Accounting for water table effects using a transient mesh boundary and conditional inversion constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Tim; Versteeg, Roelof; Thomle, Jon; Hammond, Glenn; Chen, Xingyuan; Zachara, John

    2015-08-01

    Our paper describes and demonstrates two methods of providing a priori information to the surface-based time-lapse three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) problem for monitoring stage-driven or tide-driven surface water intrusion into aquifers. First, a mesh boundary is implemented that conforms to the known location of the water table through time, thereby enabling the inversion to place a sharp bulk conductivity contrast at that boundary without penalty. Moreover, a nonlinear inequality constraint is used to allow only positive or negative transient changes in EC to occur within the saturated zone, dependent on the relative contrast in fluid electrical conductivity between surface water and groundwater. A 3-D field experiment demonstrates that time-lapse imaging results using traditional smoothness constraints are unable to delineate river water intrusion. The water table and inequality constraints provide the inversion with the additional information necessary to resolve the spatial extent of river water intrusion through time.

  17. Four-dimensional characterization of inflow to and wakes from a multi-MW turbine: overview of the Turbine Wake and Inflow Characterization Study (TWICS2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, J. K.; Banta, R. M.; Pichugina, Y.; Brewer, A.; Alvarez, R. J.; Sandberg, S. P.; Kelley, N. D.; Aitken, M.; Clifton, A.; Mirocha, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    To support substantial deployment of renewably-generated electricity from the wind, critical information about the variability of wind turbine wakes in the real atmosphere from multi-MW turbines is required. The assessment of the velocity deficit and turbulence associated with industrial-scale turbines is a major issue for wind farm design, particularly with respect to the optimization of the spacing between turbines. The significant velocity deficit and turbulence generated by upstream turbines can reduce the power production and produce harmful vibrations in downstream turbines, which can lead to excess maintenance costs. The complexity of wake effects depends on many factors arising from both hardware (turbine size, rotor speed, and blade geometry, etc.) and from meteorological considerations such as wind velocity, gradients of wind across the turbine rotor disk, atmospheric stability, and atmospheric turbulence. To characterize the relationships between the meteorological inflow and turbine wakes, a collaborative field campaign was designed and carried out at the Department of Energy's National Wind Technology Center (NREL/NWTC) in south Boulder, Colorado, in spring 2011. This site often experiences channeled flow with a consistent wind direction, enabling robust statistics of wake velocity deficits and turbulence enhancements. Using both in situ and remote sensing instrumentation, measurements upwind and downwind of multi-megawatt wind turbine in complex terrain quantified the variability of wind turbine inflow and wakes from an industrial-scale turbine. The turbine of interest has a rated power of 2.3 MW, a rotor diameter of 100m, and a hub height of 80m. In addition to several meteorological towers, one extending to hub height (80m) and another extending above the top of the rotor disk (135m), a Triton mini-sodar and a Windcube lidar characterized the inflow to the turbine and the variability across the site. The centerpiece instrument of the TWICS campaign was the NOAA High Resolution Doppler lidar (HRDL), a scanning lidar which captured three-dimensional images of the turbine inflow and wake. Over several weeks, 48+ hours of HRDL observations during a variety of wind speed and atmospheric stability conditions were collected using three scanning strategies. Wake features such as lofting, meandering, intersection with the ground, and expansion factors are identified and discussed. Observations of a remarkably long-distance wake are presented and compared with existing wake models.

  18. Four-dimensional key design in amplitude, phase, polarization and distance for optical encryption based on polarization digital holography and QR code.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao; Shen, Xueju; Li, Baochen

    2014-08-25

    We demonstrate that all parameters of optical lightwave can be simultaneously designed as keys in security system. This multi-dimensional property of key can significantly enlarge the key space and further enhance the security level of the system. The single-shot off-axis digital holography with orthogonal polarized reference waves is employed to perform polarization state recording on object wave. Two pieces of polarization holograms are calculated and fabricated to be arranged in reference arms to generate random amplitude and phase distribution respectively. When reconstruction, original information which is represented with QR code can be retrieved using Fresnel diffraction with decryption keys and read out noise-free. Numerical simulation results for this cryptosystem are presented. An analysis on the key sensitivity and fault tolerance properties are also provided.

  19. Predicting aqueous solubility of environmentally relevant compounds from molecular features: a simple but highly effective four-dimensional model based on Project to Latent Structures.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Feng; Gulliver, John S; Simcik, Matt F

    2013-09-15

    The aqueous solubility (log S) of xenobiotic chemicals has been identified as a key characteristic in determining their bioaccessibility/bioavailability and their fate and transport in aquatic environments. We here explore and evaluate the use of a state-of-the-art data analysis technique (Project to Latent Structures, PLS) to estimate log S of environmentally relevant chemicals. A large number (n = 624) of molecular descriptors was computed for over 1400 organic chemicals, and then refined by a feature selection technique. Candidate predictor descriptors were fitted to data by means of PLS, which was optimized by an internal leave-one-out cross-validation technique and validated by an external data set. The final (best) PLS model with only four variables (AlogP, X1sol, Mv, and E) exhibited noteworthy stability and good predictive power. It was able to explain 91% of the data (n = 1400) variance with an average absolute error of 0.5 log units through the solubilities span over 12 orders of magnitude. The newly proposed model is transparent, easily portable from one user to another, and robust enough to accurately estimate log S of a wide range of emerging contaminants.

  20. Performance evaluation of an automatic anatomy segmentation algorithm on repeat or four-dimensional CT images using a deformable image registration method

    PubMed Central

    Wang, He; Garden, Adam S.; Zhang, Lifei; Wei, Xiong; Ahamad, Anesa; Kuban, Deborah A.; Komaki, Ritsuko; O’Daniel, Jennifer; Zhang, Yongbin; Mohan, Radhe; Dong, Lei

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Auto-propagation of anatomical region-of-interests (ROIs) from the planning CT to daily CT is an essential step in image-guided adaptive radiotherapy. The goal of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the performance of the algorithm in typical clinical applications. Method and Materials We previously adopted an image intensity-based deformable registration algorithm to find the correspondence between two images. In this study, the ROIs delineated on the planning CT image were mapped onto daily CT or four-dimentional (4D) CT images using the same transformation. Post-processing methods, such as boundary smoothing and modification, were used to enhance the robustness of the algorithm. Auto-propagated contours for eight head-and-neck patients with a total of 100 repeat CTs, one prostate patient with 24 repeat CTs, and nine lung cancer patients with a total of 90 4D-CT images were evaluated against physician-drawn contours and physician-modified deformed contours using the volume-overlap-index (VOI) and mean absolute surface-to-surface distance (ASSD). Results The deformed contours were reasonably well matched with daily anatomy on repeat CT images. The VOI and mean ASSD were 83% and 1.3 mm when compared to the independently drawn contours. A better agreement (greater than 97% and less than 0.4 mm) was achieved if the physician was only asked to correct the deformed contours. The algorithm was robust in the presence of random noise in the image. Conclusion The deformable algorithm may be an effective method to propagate the planning ROIs to subsequent CT images of changed anatomy, although a final review by physicians is highly recommended. PMID:18722272

  1. Holographic Screening Length on Parallel Motion of Quark-Antiquark Pair in Four Dimensional Strongly Coupled = 4 super-Yang-Mills plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nata Atmaja, Ardian

    2014-10-01

    We study the screening length of a quark-antiquark pair moving in a strongly coupled hot plasma of = 4 super-Yang-Mills using AdS/CFT correspondence where the background metric is five dimensional AdS black hole. We take the string solution as such the separation length L of quark-antiquark pair is parallel to the string velocity v. The screening length and the bound energy are computed numerically using Mathematica. We find that the plots are bounded from below by some functions that are related to the momentum flow of the drag force configuration Pc. We compare the result by computing the screening length in the quark-antiquark reference frame by boosting the AdS black hole.

  2. Four-dimensional electrical conductivity monitoring of stage-driven river water intrusion: Accounting for water table effects using a transient mesh boundary and conditional inversion constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Versteeg, Roelof; Thomle, Jonathan N.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Chen, Xingyuan; Zachara, John M.

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes and demonstrates two methods of providing a-priori information to a surface-based time-lapse three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) problem for monitoring stage-driven river bank storage along the Columbia River in the state of Washington, USA. First, a transient warping mesh boundary is implemented that conforms to the known location of the water table boundary through time, thereby enabling the inversion to place a sharp bulk-conductivity contrast at that boundary without penalty. Second, because river water specific conductance is less than groundwater specific conductance, a non-linear inequality constraint is used to allow only negative transient changes in bulk conductivity to occur within the saturated zone during periods of elevated river stage with respect to baseline conditions. Whereas time-lapse imaging results using traditional smoothness constraints are unable to delineate river bank storage, the water table and inequality constraints provide the inversion with the additional information necessary to resolve the spatial extent of river water intrusion through time. A surface based ERT array of 352 electrodes was used to autonomously produce four images per day of changes in bulk conductivity associated with river water intrusion over an area of approximately 300 m2 from April through October of 2013. Results are validated by comparing changes in bulk conductivity time series with corresponding changes in fluid specific conductance at several inland monitoring wells.

  3. Four-dimensional electrical conductivity monitoring of stage-driven river water intrusion: Accounting for water table effects using a transient mesh boundary and conditional inversion constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Tim; Versteeg, Roelof; Thomle, Jon; Hammond, Glenn; Chen, Xingyuan; Zachara, John

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes and demonstrates two methods of providing a priori information to the surface-based time-lapse three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) problem for monitoring stage-driven or tide-driven surface water intrusion into aquifers. First, a mesh boundary is implemented that conforms to the known location of the water table through time, thereby enabling the inversion to place a sharp bulk conductivity contrast at that boundary without penalty. Second, a nonlinear inequality constraint is used to allow only positive or negative transient changes in EC to occur within the saturated zone, dependent on the relative contrast in fluid electrical conductivity between surface water and groundwater. A 3-D field experiment demonstrates that time-lapse imaging results using traditional smoothness constraints are unable to delineate river water intrusion. The water table and inequality constraints provide the inversion with the additional information necessary to resolve the spatial extent of river water intrusion through time.

  4. Validation Test Report for the Navy Coastal Ocean Model Four-Dimensional Variational Assimilation (NCOM 4DVAR) System Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-14

    RE>vte-N. DO RICO Sc1 urit1 123 1 A. A ._,.:x-~ p._,._ ~)~j,< " Puohc~t:Jon Data Entry Lcg~l COlMl"cl 1008 3 -~ .rfi,J .- Public Mfairs Uncla...instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information...Center, MS Unclassified Unlimited Unclassified Unlimited Unclassified Unlimited Unclassified Unlimited 115 Scott Smith (228) 688-4630 4DVAR Data

  5. The susceptibility of IMRT dose distributions to intrafraction organ motion: An investigation into smoothing filters derived from four dimensional computed tomography data

    SciTech Connect

    Coolens, Catherine; Evans, Phil M.; Seco, Joao; Webb, Steve; Blackall, Jane M.; Rietzel, Eike; Chen, George T. Y.

    2006-08-15

    This study investigated the sensitivity of static planning of intensity-modulated beams (IMBs) to intrafraction deformable organ motion and assessed whether smoothing of the IMBs at the treatment-planning stage can reduce this sensitivity. The study was performed with a 4D computed tomography (CT) data set for an IMRT treatment of a patient with liver cancer. Fluence profiles obtained from inverse-planning calculations on a standard reference CT scan were redelivered on a CT scan from the 4D data set at a different part of the breathing cycle. The use of a nonrigid registration model on the 4D data set additionally enabled detailed analysis of the overall intrafraction motion effects on the IMRT delivery during free breathing. Smoothing filters were then applied to the beam profiles within the optimization process to investigate whether this could reduce the sensitivity of IMBs to intrafraction organ motion. In addition, optimal fluence profiles from calculations on each individual phase of the breathing cycle were averaged to mimic the convolution of a static dose distribution with a motion probability kernel and assess its usefulness. Results from nonrigid registrations of the CT scan data showed a maximum liver motion of 7 mm in superior-inferior direction for this patient. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) comparison indicated a systematic shift when planning treatment on a motion-frozen, standard CT scan but delivering over a full breathing cycle. The ratio of the dose to 50% of the normal liver to 50% of the planning target volume (PTV) changed up to 28% between different phases. Smoothing beam profiles with a median-window filter did not overcome the substantial shift in dose due to a difference in breathing phase between planning and delivery of treatment. Averaging of optimal beam profiles at different phases of the breathing cycle mainly resulted in an increase in dose to the organs at risk (OAR) and did not seem beneficial to compensate for organ motion compared with using a large margin. Additionally, the results emphasized the need for 4D CT scans when aiming to reduce the internal margin (IM). Using only a single planning scan introduces a systematic shift in the dose distribution during delivery. Smoothing beam profiles either based on a single scan or over the different breathing phases was not beneficial for reducing this shift.

  6. Learning as Immersive Experiences: Using the Four-Dimensional Framework for Designing and Evaluating Immersive Learning Experiences in a Virtual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Freitas, Sara; Rebolledo-Mendez, Genaro; Liarokapis, Fotis; Magoulas, George; Poulovassilis, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Traditional approaches to learning have often focused upon knowledge transfer strategies that have centred on textually-based engagements with learners, and dialogic methods of interaction with tutors. The use of virtual worlds, with text-based, voice-based and a feeling of "presence" naturally is allowing for more complex social interactions and…

  7. The fetal cardiovascular response to increased placental vascular impedance to flow determined with four-dimensional ultrasound using spatiotemporal image correlation and virtual organ computer-aided analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hamill, Neil; Romero, Roberto; Hassan, Sonia; Lee, Wesley; Myers, Stephen A.; Mittal, Pooja; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Balasubramaniam, Mamtha; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Vaisbuch, Edi; Espinoza, Jimmy; Gotsch, Francesca; Goncalves, Luis F.; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Erez, Offer; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Yeo, Lami

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if increased placental vascular impedance to flow is associated with changes in fetal cardiac function using spatiotemporal image correlation (STIC) and Virtual Organ Computer-aided AnaLysis (VOCAL). Study Design A cross-sectional study was performed in fetuses with an umbilical artery pulsatility index > 95th percentile (ABN). Ventricular volume (end-systole, end-diastole), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), adjusted CO, and ejection fraction (EF) were compared to those of 184 normal fetuses (NL). Results 1) 34 fetuses were evaluated at a median gestational age of 28.3 (range 20.6 – 36.9) weeks; 2) mean ventricular volumes were lower for ABN than NL (end-systole, end-diastole) with a proportionally greater decrease for left ventricular volume (vs. right); 3) mean left and right SV, CO, and adjusted CO were lower for ABN (vs. NL); 4) right ventricular volume, SV, CO, and adjusted CO exceeded the left in ABN fetuses; 5) mean EF was greater for ABN than NL; and 6) median left EF was greater (vs. right) in ABN fetuses. Conclusion Increased placental vascular impedance to flow is associated with changes in fetal cardiac function. PMID:23220270

  8. Visualization of pulsatile CSF motion separated by membrane-like structure based on four-dimensional phase-contrast (4D-PC) velocity mapping.

    PubMed

    Yatsushiro, Satoshi; Hirayama, Akihiro; Matsumae, Mitsunori; Kuroda, Kagayaki

    2013-01-01

    This work was performed to indicate the usefulness of magnetic resonance (MR) 4-dimentional phase contrast (4D-PC) technique in assessing CerebroSpinal Fluid (CSF) motion in comparison with the time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse (Time-SLIP) technique. 4D-velocity vector, their curl, and, pressure gradient were evaluated in both flow phantom, and normal volunteers and a patient with hydrocepharus. The velocity and pressure gradient fields obtained by the 4D-PC technique were useful to visualize the CSF dynamics under the presence of a membrane-like structure, unlike the Time-SLIP in which the spin travel was visualized. Quantitative property was another advantage of the 4D-PC. The curl and the pressure gradient fields obtained with actual units should help clinicians to classify the conditions of the patients with CSF disorders.

  9. Steady accretion of an elastic body on a hard spherical surface and the notion of a four-dimensional reference space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassetti, Giuseppe; Cohen, Tal; Abeyaratne, Rohan

    2016-11-01

    Taking the cue from experiments on actin growth on spherical beads, we formulate and solve a model problem describing the accretion of an incompressible elastic solid on a rigid sphere due to attachment of diffusing free particles. One of the peculiar characteristics of this problem is that accretion takes place on the interior surface that separates the body from its support rather than on its exterior surface, and hence is responsible for stress accumulation. Simultaneously, ablation takes place at the outer surface where material is removed from the body. As the body grows, mechanical effects associated with the build-up of stress and strain energy slow down accretion and promote ablation. Eventually, the system reaches a point where internal accretion is balanced by external ablation. The present study is concerned with this stationary regime called "treadmilling". The principal ingredients of our model are: a nonstandard choice of the reference configuration, which allows us to cope with the continually evolving material structure; and a driving force and a kinetic law for accretion/ablation that involves the difference in chemical potential, strain energy and the radial stress. By combining these ingredients we arrive at an algebraic system which governs the stationary treadmilling state. We establish the conditions under which this system has a solution and we show that this solution is unique. Moreover, by an asymptotic analysis we show that for small beads the thickness of the solid is proportional to the radius of the support and is strongly affected by the stiffness of the solid, whereas for large beads the stiffness of the solid is essentially irrelevant, the thickness being proportional to a characteristic length that depends on the parameters that govern diffusion and accretion kinetics.

  10. Salt Tectonics of the Abenaki Graben and Central Sable Subbasin: Insights from Regional Seismic Interpretation and Four-Dimensional Scaled Physical Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Clarke

    The tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Abenaki graben and central Sable Subbasin of the north-central Scotian margin has been highly influenced by salt deformation. Shimeld (2004) has identified five salt subprovinces defined by varying salt structural styles across the margin. Although it has been hypothesized these varying structural styles are the result of complex salt basin morphologies and variable Mesozoic post-rift sedimentation patterns, there is still a lack of understanding of how these first order controlling factors specifically controlled the tectono-stratigraphic evolution across the margin. Disappointing petroleum exploration results from the last round of deepwater drilling supports the further need to investigate how variable salt basin morphologies, and depositional rates and patterns controlled salt deformation as well as the evolution of the margin. The purpose of this project is to integrate regional 2D seismic reflection data including the ION-GXT NovaSPAN dataset, with 4D scaled physical experiments to better understand the tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Abenaki Graben and central Sable Subbasin. The study area is located in Shimeld's salt Subprovince III that comprises an extensive salt tongue-canopy system that has spread upwards of 80 km on the secondary detachment level. Seismic interpretation indicates an original salt basin characterized by a landward tapering wedge representing the Abenaki Graben, an intermediate high referred to as the North Sable High (NSH), and a symmetric graben with basin step representing the Sable Subbasin. The geometry of the salt basin floor is composed of rifted basement blocks and syn-rift fill that was originally been infilled with upwards of 2 km of Argo salt. Scaled 4D physical experiments simulating the study area indicate the presence of 4 kinematic domains from the shelf to slope including a: (1) Salt Weld and Pillow, (2) Normal Fault and Reactive Diapir, (3) Passive Diapir and Expulsion Rollover, and (4) Contractional Salt and Allochthonous Salt-Tongue Canopy domain. Experiment results indicate early deposition focused in the Abenaki Graben, later shifting across the NSH into the Sable sub-basin as increased sediment supply and progradation occurred from the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous. Experiment evolutions replicated diapir and canopy evolutions with early-inflated salt complexes in the downdip contractional domain focused at changes in the basin-floor and original salt thickness. The inflated salt complexes later evolved into passive diapirs and eventual extensive salt tongue-canopy systems during subsequent sediment progradation. Derived kinematic concepts from the physical experiments successfully explain the regional structural and related depocentre evolution of the margin form the early post-rift stage to the modern margin. Understanding the tectono-stratigraphic evolution, from early salt mobilization to late stage salt tongue-canopy formation, aids in developing new concepts for reservoir distribution and trap formation for the Abenaki Graben and Sable Subbasin area.

  11. Towards in silico oncology: adapting a four dimensional nephroblastoma treatment model to a clinical trial case based on multi-method sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Georgiadi, Eleni Ch; Dionysiou, Dimitra D; Graf, Norbert; Stamatakos, Georgios S

    2012-11-01

    In the past decades a great progress in cancer research has been made although medical treatment is still widely based on empirically established protocols which have many limitations. Computational models address such limitations by providing insight into the complex biological mechanisms of tumor progression. A set of clinically-oriented, multiscale models of solid tumor dynamics has been developed by the In Silico Oncology Group (ISOG), Institute of Communication and Computer Systems (ICCS)-National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) to study cancer growth and response to treatment. Within this context using certain representative parameter values, tumor growth and response have been modeled under a cancer preoperative chemotherapy protocol in the framework of the SIOP 2001/GPOH clinical trial. A thorough cross-method sensitivity analysis of the model has been performed. Based on the sensitivity analysis results, a reasonable adaptation of the values of the model parameters to a real clinical case of bilateral nephroblastomatosis has been achieved. The analysis presented supports the potential of the model for the study and eventually the future design of personalized treatment schemes and/or schedules using the data obtained from in vitro experiments and clinical studies.

  12. Assimilation of HF Radar Observations in the Chesapeake-Delaware Bay Region Using the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) and the Four-Dimensional Variational (4DVAR) Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    With the exception of the first cycle , the back- ground (i.e., the solution that the assimilation is trying to correct) for each cycle is the...forecast obtained by running the nonl inear with the final condition from the anal- ysis in the previous cycle . In order to assess the fit to the...as a result of fitti ng the observations in previous cycles . The results of this assimilation experiment show that the NCOM-4DVAR is capable of

  13. Investigating the role of background and observation error correlations in improving a model forecast of forest carbon balance using four dimensional variational data assimilation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnington, Ewan; Casella, Eric; Dance, Sarah; Lawless, Amos; Morison, James; Nichols, Nancy; Wilkinson, Matthew; Quaife, Tristan

    2016-04-01

    Forest ecosystems play an important role in sequestering human emitted carbon-dioxide from the atmosphere and therefore greatly reduce the effect of anthropogenic induced climate change. For that reason understanding their response to climate change is of great importance. Efforts to implement variational data assimilation routines with functional ecology models and land surface models have been limited, with sequential and Markov chain Monte Carlo data assimilation methods being prevalent. When data assimilation has been used with models of carbon balance, background "prior" errors and observation errors have largely been treated as independent and uncorrelated. Correlations between background errors have long been known to be a key aspect of data assimilation in numerical weather prediction. More recently, it has been shown that accounting for correlated observation errors in the assimilation algorithm can considerably improve data assimilation results and forecasts. In this paper we implement a 4D-Var scheme with a simple model of forest carbon balance, for joint parameter and state estimation and assimilate daily observations of Net Ecosystem CO2 Exchange (NEE) taken at the Alice Holt forest CO2 flux site in Hampshire, UK. We then investigate the effect of specifying correlations between parameter and state variables in background error statistics and the effect of specifying correlations in time between observation error statistics. The idea of including these correlations in time is new and has not been previously explored in carbon balance model data assimilation. In data assimilation, background and observation error statistics are often described by the background error covariance matrix and the observation error covariance matrix. We outline novel methods for creating correlated versions of these matrices, using a set of previously postulated dynamical constraints to include correlations in the background error statistics and a Gaussian correlation function to include time correlations in the observation error statistics. The methods used in this paper will allow the inclusion of time correlations between many different observation types in the assimilation algorithm, meaning that previously neglected information can be accounted for. In our experiments we compared the results using our new correlated background and observation error covariance matrices and those using diagonal covariance matrices. We found that using the new correlated matrices reduced the root mean square error in the 14 year forecast of daily NEE by 44 % decreasing from 4.22 g C m-2 day-1 to 2.38 g C m-2 day-1.

  14. SU-E-P-13: Quantifying the Geometric Error Due to Irregular Motion in Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Sawant, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Respiratory correlated 4DCT images are generated under the assumption of a regular breathing cycle. This study evaluates the error in 4DCT-based target position estimation in the presence of irregular respiratory motion. Methods: A custom-made programmable externally-and internally-deformable lung motion phantom was placed inside the CT bore. An abdominal pressure belt was placed around the phantom to mimic clinical 4DCT acquisitio and the motion platform was programmed with a sinusoidal (±10mm, 10 cycles per minute) motion trace and 7 motion traces recorded from lung cancer patients. The same setup and motion trajectories were repeated in the linac room and kV fluoroscopic images were acquired using the on-board imager. Positions of 4 internal markers segmented from the 4DCT volumes were overlaid upon the motion trajectories derived from the fluoroscopic time series to calculate the difference between estimated (4DCT) and “actual” (kV fluoro) positions. Results: With a sinusoidal trace, absolute errors of the 4DCT estimated markers positions vary between 0.78mm and 5.4mm and RMS errors are between 0.38mm to 1.7mm. With irregular patient traces, absolute errors of the 4DCT estimated markers positions increased significantly by 100 to 200 percent, while the corresponding RMS error values have much smaller changes. Significant mismatches were frequently found at peak-inhale or peak-exhale phase. Conclusion: As expected, under conditions of well-behaved, periodic sinusoidal motion, the 4DCT yielded much better estimation of marker positions. When an actual patient trace is used 4DCT-derived positions showed significant mismatches with the fluoroscopic trajectories, indicating the potential for geometric and therefore dosimetric errors in the presence of cycle-to-cycle respiratory variations.

  15. How could (should) we make contact between string/M-theory and our four-dimensional world, and associated LHC predictions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Gordon

    2015-12-01

    String/M-theory is an exciting framework within which we try to understand our universe and its properties. Compactified string/M-theories address and offer solutions to almost every important question and issue in particle physics and particle cosmology. But earlier goals of finding a top-down “vacuum selection” principle and deriving the 4D theory have not yet been realized. Does that mean we should stop trying, as nearly all string theorists have? Or can we proceed in the historical way to make a few generic, robust assumptions not closely related to observables, and follow where they lead to testable predictions and explanations? Making only very generic assumptions is a significant issue. I discuss how to try to proceed with this approach, particularly in M-theory compactified on a 7D manifold of G2 holonomy. One goal is to understand our universe as a string/M-theory vacuum for its own sake, in the long tradition of trying to understand our world, and what that implies. In addition, understanding our vacuum may be a prelude to understanding its connection to the multiverse.

  16. Four-dimensional electrical conductivity monitoring of stage-driven river water intrusion: Accounting for water table effects using a transient mesh boundary and conditional inversion constraints

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Tim; Versteeg, Roelof; Thomle, Jon; ...

    2015-08-01

    Our paper describes and demonstrates two methods of providing a priori information to the surface-based time-lapse three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) problem for monitoring stage-driven or tide-driven surface water intrusion into aquifers. First, a mesh boundary is implemented that conforms to the known location of the water table through time, thereby enabling the inversion to place a sharp bulk conductivity contrast at that boundary without penalty. Moreover, a nonlinear inequality constraint is used to allow only positive or negative transient changes in EC to occur within the saturated zone, dependent on the relative contrast in fluid electrical conductivity between surfacemore » water and groundwater. A 3-D field experiment demonstrates that time-lapse imaging results using traditional smoothness constraints are unable to delineate river water intrusion. The water table and inequality constraints provide the inversion with the additional information necessary to resolve the spatial extent of river water intrusion through time.« less

  17. McLean's second variation formula revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lê, Hông Vân; Vanžura, Jiří

    2017-03-01

    We revisit McLean's second variation formulas for calibrated submanifolds in exceptional geometries, and correct his formulas concerning associative submanifolds and Cayley submanifolds, using a unified treatment based on the (relative) calibration method and Harvey-Lawson's identities.

  18. World-volume effective theory for higher-dimensional black holes.

    PubMed

    Emparan, Roberto; Harmark, Troels; Niarchos, Vasilis; Obers, Niels A

    2009-05-15

    We argue that the main feature behind novel properties of higher-dimensional black holes, compared to four-dimensional ones, is that their horizons can have two characteristic lengths of very different size. We develop a long-distance world-volume effective theory that captures the black hole dynamics at scales much larger than the short scale. In this limit the black hole is regarded as a blackfold: a black brane (possibly boosted locally) whose world volume spans a curved submanifold of the spacetime. This approach reveals black objects with novel horizon geometries and topologies more complex than the black ring, but more generally it provides a new organizing framework for the dynamics of higher-dimensional black holes.

  19. Quantum dynamics of spinless particles on a brane coupled to a bulk gauge field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, F. T.; Sánchez-Monroy, J. A.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the effective dynamics for spinless charged particles, in the presence of Abelian gauge field, constrained to an m-dimensional curved pseudo-Riemannian submanifold (brane) of an n-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian manifold (bulk). We employ the confining potential approach and a perturbative expansion for the Klein–Gordon and Schrödinger equations is derived. This allows us to obtain the effective Klein–Gordon and Schrödinger equations on a brane, in terms of the extrinsic curvatures, the intrinsic curvature and the extrinsic torsion. We show that the presence of a bulk gauge field induces a Zeeman coupling whenever the codimension is greater than one, even if the brane and the bulk are flat. The effect of a non-minimal coupling with the Ricci scalar curvature of the bulk is also considered. The results presented here can be applied in at least two physical scenarios: brane gravity, when the brane is four-dimensional, and condensed matter, when the bulk is a four-dimensional flat manifold and the brane is three- or two-dimensional.

  20. Four-dimensional visualization of thoracic blood flow by magnetic resonance imaging in a patient following correction of transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA) and uncorrected aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Ley-Zaporozhan, J; Unterhinninghofen, R; Rengier, F; Markl, M; Eichhorn, J; von Tengg-Kobligk, H; Ley, S

    2009-10-01

    Recent advances in flow-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and data analysis allow for comprehensive noninvasive three-dimensional (3D) visualization of complex blood flow. Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated three-directional (3dir) flow measurements were employed to assess and visualize time-resolved 3D blood flow in the pulmonary arteries (PA) and thoracic aorta. We present findings in a juvenile patient with surgically corrected transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA) and aortic coarctation. For the first time, the complex flow patterns in the PA following d-TGA were visualized. Morphologically, a slight asymmetry of the PA was found, with considerable impact on vascular hemodynamics, resulting in diastolic retrograde flow in the larger vessel and diastolic filling of the smaller PA. Additionally, increased flow to the supraaortic vessels was found due to aortic coarctation.

  1. Final Technical Report for SBIR entitled Four-Dimensional Finite-Orbit-Width Fokker-Planck Code with Sources, for Neoclassical/Anomalous Transport Simulation of Ion and Electron Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R. W.; Petrov, Yu. V.

    2013-12-03

    Within the US Department of Energy/Office of Fusion Energy magnetic fusion research program, there is an important whole-plasma-modeling need for a radio-frequency/neutral-beam-injection (RF/NBI) transport-oriented finite-difference Fokker-Planck (FP) code with combined capabilities for 4D (2R2V) geometry near the fusion plasma periphery, and computationally less demanding 3D (1R2V) bounce-averaged capabilities for plasma in the core of fusion devices. Demonstration of proof-of-principle achievement of this goal has been carried out in research carried out under Phase I of the SBIR award. Two DOE-sponsored codes, the CQL3D bounce-average Fokker-Planck code in which CompX has specialized, and the COGENT 4D, plasma edge-oriented Fokker-Planck code which has been constructed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory scientists, where coupled. Coupling was achieved by using CQL3D calculated velocity distributions including an energetic tail resulting from NBI, as boundary conditions for the COGENT code over the two-dimensional velocity space on a spatial interface (flux) surface at a given radius near the plasma periphery. The finite-orbit-width fast ions from the CQL3D distributions penetrated into the peripheral plasma modeled by the COGENT code. This combined code demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed 3D/4D code. By combining these codes, the greatest computational efficiency is achieved subject to present modeling needs in toroidally symmetric magnetic fusion devices. The more efficient 3D code can be used in its regions of applicability, coupled to the more computationally demanding 4D code in higher collisionality edge plasma regions where that extended capability is necessary for accurate representation of the plasma. More efficient code leads to greater use and utility of the model. An ancillary aim of the project is to make the combined 3D/4D code user friendly. Achievement of full-coupling of these two Fokker-Planck codes will advance computational modeling of plasma devices important to the USDOE magnetic fusion energy program, in particular the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics, San Diego, the NSTX spherical tokamak at Princeton, New Jersey, and the MST reversed-field-pinch Madison, Wisconsin. The validation studies of the code against the experiments will improve understanding of physics important for magnetic fusion, and will increase our design capabilities for achieving the goals of the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) project in which the US is a participant and which seeks to demonstrate at least a factor of five in fusion power production divided by input power.

  2. An algorithm to extract three-dimensional motion by marker tracking in the kV projections from an on-board imager: four-dimensional cone-beam CT and tumor tracking implications.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imad; Alsbou, Nesreen; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to extract three-dimensional (3D) motion trajectories of internal implanted and external skin-attached markers from kV cone-beam projections and reduce image artifact from patient motion in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) from on-board imager. Cone beam radiographic projections were acquired for a mobile phantom and liver patients with internal implanted and external skin-attached markers. An algorithm was developed to automatically find the positions of the markers in the projections. It uses normalized cross-correlation between a template image of a metal seed marker and the projections to find the marker position. From these positions and time-tagged angular views, the marker 3D motion trajectory was obtained over a time interval of nearly one minute, which is the time required for scanning. This marker trajectory was used to remap the pixels of the projections to eliminate motion. Then, the motion-corrected projections were used to reconstruct CBCT. An algorithm was developed to extract 3D motion trajectories of internal and external markers from cone-beam projections using a kV monoscopic on-board imager. This algorithm was tested and validated using a mobile phantom and patients with liver masses that had radio-markers implanted in the tumor and attached to the skin. The extracted motion trajectories were used to investigate motion correlation between internal and external markers in liver patients. Image artifacts from respiratory motion were reduced in CBCT reconstructed from cone-beam projections that were preprocessed to remove motion shifts obtained from marker tracking. With this method, motion-related image artifacts such as blurring and spatial distortion were reduced, and contrast and position resolutions were improved significantly in CBCT reconstructed from motion-corrected projections. Furthermore, correlated internal and external marker 3D-motion tracks obtained from the kV projections might be useful for 4DCBCT, beam gating and tumor motion monitoring or tracking.

  3. SU-E-J-150: Four-Dimensional Cone-Beam CT Algorithm by Extraction of Physical and Motion Parameter of Mobile Targets Retrospective to Image Reconstruction with Motion Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, I; Ahmad, S; Alsbou, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop 4D-cone-beam CT (CBCT) algorithm by motion modeling that extracts actual length, CT numbers level and motion amplitude of a mobile target retrospective to image reconstruction by motion modeling. Methods: The algorithm used three measurable parameters: apparent length and blurred CT number distribution of a mobile target obtained from CBCT images to determine actual length, CT-number value of the stationary target, and motion amplitude. The predictions of this algorithm were tested with mobile targets that with different well-known sizes made from tissue-equivalent gel which was inserted into a thorax phantom. The phantom moved sinusoidally in one-direction to simulate respiratory motion using eight amplitudes ranging 0–20mm. Results: Using this 4D-CBCT algorithm, three unknown parameters were extracted that include: length of the target, CT number level, speed or motion amplitude for the mobile targets retrospective to image reconstruction. The motion algorithms solved for the three unknown parameters using measurable apparent length, CT number level and gradient for a well-defined mobile target obtained from CBCT images. The motion model agreed with measured apparent lengths which were dependent on the actual target length and motion amplitude. The gradient of the CT number distribution of the mobile target is dependent on the stationary CT number level, actual target length and motion amplitude. Motion frequency and phase did not affect the elongation and CT number distribution of the mobile target and could not be determined. Conclusion: A 4D-CBCT motion algorithm was developed to extract three parameters that include actual length, CT number level and motion amplitude or speed of mobile targets directly from reconstructed CBCT images without prior knowledge of the stationary target parameters. This algorithm provides alternative to 4D-CBCT without requirement to motion tracking and sorting of the images into different breathing phases which has potential applications in diagnostic CT imaging and radiotherapy.

  4. Fetal cardiac ventricular volume, cardiac output, and ejection fraction determined with four-dimensional ultrasound using Spatio-Temporal Image Correlation (STIC) and Virtual Organ Computed-aided AnaLysis (VOCAL™)

    PubMed Central

    Hamill, Neil; Yeo, Lami; Romero, Roberto; Hassan, Sonia S.; Myers, Stephen A.; Mittal, Pooja; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Balasubramaniam, Mamtha; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Vaisbuch, Edi; Espinoza, Jimmy; Gotsch, Francesca; Goncalves, Luis F.; Lee, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    Objective To quantify fetal cardiovascular parameters with Spatio-Temporal Image Correlation (STIC) and Virtual Organ Computed-aided AnaLysis (VOCAL™) utilizing the sub-feature: “Contour Finder: Trace”. Study Design A cross-sectional study was designed consisting of patients with normal pregnancies between 19 and 40 weeks of gestation. After STIC datasets were acquired, analysis was performed offline (4DView) and the following cardiovascular parameters were evaluated: ventricular volume in end systole and end diastole, stroke volume, cardiac output, and ejection fraction. To account for fetal size, cardiac output was also expressed as a function of head circumference, abdominal circumference, or femoral diaphysis length. Regression models were fitted for each cardiovascular parameter to assess the effect of gestational age and paired comparisons were made between the left and right ventricles. Results 1) Two hundred and seventeen patients were retrospectively identified, of whom 184 had adequate STIC datasets (85% acceptance); 2) ventricular volume, stroke volume, cardiac output, and adjusted cardiac output increased with gestational age; whereas, the ejection fraction decreased as gestation advanced; 3) the right ventricle was larger than the left in both systole (Right: 0.50 ml, IQR: 0.2 – 0.9; vs. Left: 0.27 ml, IQR: 0.1 – 0.5; p<0.001) and diastole (Right: 1.20 ml, IQR: 0.7 – 2.2; vs. Left: 1.03 ml, IQR: 0.5 – 1.7; p<0.001); 4) there were no differences between the left and right ventricle with respect to stroke volume, cardiac output, or adjusted cardiac output; and 5) the left ventricular ejection fraction was greater than the right (Left: 72.2%, IQR: 64 – 78; vs. Right: 62.4%, IQR: 56 – 69; p<0.001). Conclusion Fetal echocardiography, utilizing STIC and VOCAL™ with the sub-feature: “Contour Finder: Trace”, allows assessment of fetal cardiovascular parameters. Normal fetal cardiovascular physiology is characterized by ventricular volumes that are larger on the right and ejection fractions that are greater for the left ventricle resulting in similar left and right ventricular stroke volume and cardiac output. PMID:21531373

  5. Four-dimensional dose distributions of step-and-shoot IMRT delivered with real-time tumor tracking for patients with irregular breathing: Constant dose rate vs dose rate regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xiaocheng; Han-Oh, Sarah; Gui Minzhi; Niu Ying; Yu, Cedric X.; Yi Byongyong

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Dose-rate-regulated tracking (DRRT) is a tumor tracking strategy that programs the MLC to track the tumor under regular breathing and adapts to breathing irregularities during delivery using dose rate regulation. Constant-dose-rate tracking (CDRT) is a strategy that dynamically repositions the beam to account for intrafractional 3D target motion according to real-time information of target location obtained from an independent position monitoring system. The purpose of this study is to illustrate the differences in the effectiveness and delivery accuracy between these two tracking methods in the presence of breathing irregularities. Methods: Step-and-shoot IMRT plans optimized at a reference phase were extended to remaining phases to generate 10-phased 4D-IMRT plans using segment aperture morphing (SAM) algorithm, where both tumor displacement and deformation were considered. A SAM-based 4D plan has been demonstrated to provide better plan quality than plans not considering target deformation. However, delivering such a plan requires preprogramming of the MLC aperture sequence. Deliveries of the 4D plans using DRRT and CDRT tracking approaches were simulated assuming the breathing period is either shorter or longer than the planning day, for 4 IMRT cases: two lung and two pancreatic cases with maximum GTV centroid motion greater than 1 cm were selected. In DRRT, dose rate was regulated to speed up or slow down delivery as needed such that each planned segment is delivered at the planned breathing phase. In CDRT, MLC is separately controlled to follow the tumor motion, but dose rate was kept constant. In addition to breathing period change, effect of breathing amplitude variation on target and critical tissue dose distribution is also evaluated. Results: Delivery of preprogrammed 4D plans by the CDRT method resulted in an average of 5% increase in target dose and noticeable increase in organs at risk (OAR) dose when patient breathing is either 10% faster or slower than the planning day. In contrast, DRRT method showed less than 1% reduction in target dose and no noticeable change in OAR dose under the same breathing period irregularities. When {+-}20% variation of target motion amplitude was present as breathing irregularity, the two delivery methods show compatible plan quality if the dose distribution of CDRT delivery is renormalized. Conclusions: Delivery of 4D-IMRT treatment plans, stemmed from 3D step-and-shoot IMRT and preprogrammed using SAM algorithm, is simulated for two dynamic MLC-based real-time tumor tracking strategies: with and without dose-rate regulation. Comparison of cumulative dose distribution indicates that the preprogrammed 4D plan is more accurately and efficiently conformed using the DRRT strategy, as it compensates the interplay between patient breathing irregularity and tracking delivery without compromising the segment-weight modulation.

  6. Instantons, black holes, and harmonic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaupt, Thomas; Waite, Kirk

    2009-10-01

    We find a class of five-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell type Lagrangians which contains the bosonic Lagrangians of vector multiplets as a subclass, and preserves some features of supersymmetry, namely the existence of multi-centered black hole solutions and of attractor equations. Solutions can be expressed in terms of harmonic functions through a set of algebraic equations. The geometry underlying these Lagrangians is characterised by the existence of a Hesse potential and generalizes the very special real geometry of vector multiplets. Our construction proceeds by first obtaining instanton solutions for a class of four-dimensional Euclidean sigma models, which includes those occuring for four-dimensional Euclidean N = 2 vector multiplets as a subclass. For solutions taking values in a completely isotropic submanifold of the target space, we show that the solution can be expressed in terms of harmonic functions if an integrability condition is met. This condition can either be solved by imposing that the solution depends on a single coordinate, or by imposing that the target space is a para-Kähler manifold which can be obtained from a real Hessian manifold by a generalized r-map. In the latter case one obtains multi-centered solutions. Moreover, if the integrability condition is met, the second order equations of motion can always be reduced to first order equations, which become gradient flow equations if the solution is further required to depend on one coordinate only. The dualization of axions into tensor fields and the lifting of four-dimensional instantons to five-dimensional solitons are used to motivate the addition of a boundary term to the action, which accounts for the instanton action. If the sigma model is coupled to gravity, and if the Hesse potential is of a suitable form which we specify, then the four-dimensional Euclidean Lagrangian can be lifted consistently to a five-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell type Lagrangian. Instanton solutions lift to

  7. Universal BPS structure of stationary supergravity solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossard, Guillaume; Nicolai, Hermann; Stelle, K. S.

    2009-07-01

    We study asymptotically flat stationary solutions of four-dimensional supergravity theories via the associated fraktur G/fraktur H* pseudo-Riemannian non-linear sigma models in three spatial dimensions. The Noether charge Script C associated to fraktur G is shown to satisfy a characteristic equation that determines it as a function of the four-dimensional conserved charges. The matrix Script C is nilpotent for non-rotating extremal solutions. The nilpotency degree of Script C is directly related to the BPS degree of the corresponding solution when they are BPS. Equivalently, the charges can be described in terms of a Weyl spinor |Script Crangle of Spin*(2Script N), and then the characteristic equation becomes equivalent to a generalisation of the Cartan pure spinor constraint on |Script Crangle. The invariance of a given solution with respect to supersymmetry is determined by an algebraic `Dirac equation' on the Weyl spinor |Script Crangle. We explicitly solve this equation for all pure supergravity theories and we characterise the stratified structure of the moduli space of asymptotically Taub-NUT black holes with respect to their BPS degree. The analysis is valid for any asymptotically flat stationary solutions for which the singularities are protected by horizons. The fraktur H*-orbits of extremal solutions are identified as Lagrangian submanifolds of nilpotent orbits of fraktur G, and so the moduli space of extremal spherically symmetric black holes is identified as a Lagrangian subvariety of the variety of nilpotent elements of fraktur g. We also generalise the notion of active duality transformations to an `almost action' of the three-dimensional duality group fraktur G on asymptotically flat stationary solutions.

  8. Self-adjointness of the Fourier expansion of quantized interaction field Lagrangians

    PubMed Central

    Paneitz, S. M.; Segal, I. E.

    1983-01-01

    Regularity properties significantly stronger than were previously known are developed for four-dimensional non-linear conformally invariant quantized fields. The Fourier coefficients of the interaction Lagrangian in the interaction representation—i.e., evaluated after substitution of the associated quantized free field—is a densely defined operator on the associated free field Hilbert space K. These Fourier coefficients are with respect to a natural basis in the universal cosmos ˜M, to which such fields canonically and maximally extend from Minkowski space-time M0, which is covariantly a submanifold of ˜M. However, conformally invariant free fields over M0 and ˜M are canonically identifiable. The kth Fourier coefficient of the interaction Lagrangian has domain inclusive of all vectors in K to which arbitrary powers of the free hamiltonian in ˜M are applicable. Its adjoint in the rigorous Hilbert space sense is a-k in the case of a hermitian Lagrangian. In particular (k = 0) the leading term in the perturbative expansion of the S-matrix for a conformally invariant quantized field in M0 is a self-adjoint operator. Thus, e.g., if ϕ(x) denotes the free massless neutral scalar field in M0, then ∫M0:ϕ(x)4:d4x is a self-adjoint operator. No coupling constant renormalization is involved here. PMID:16593346

  9. High speed infrared imaging system and method

    DOEpatents

    Zehnder, Alan T.; Rosakis, Ares J.; Ravichandran, G.

    2001-01-01

    A system and method for radiation detection with an increased frame rate. A semi-parallel processing configuration is used to process a row or column of pixels in a focal-plane array in parallel to achieve a processing rate up to and greater than 1 million frames per second.

  10. Distance Functions and Geodesics on Points Clouds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    An algorithm for computing intrinsic distance functions and geodesics on sub-manifolds vector r(sup d) given by point clouds is introduced in this...and geodesics on point clouds while skipping the manifold reconstruction step. The case of point clouds representing noisy samples of a sub-manifold of...boundaries, and obtain also for the case of intrinsic distance functions on sub-manifolds of vector r(sup d), a computationally optimal approach. For point

  11. A short recollection on the paper entitled "A common sense approach to peak picking in two-, three-, and four-dimensional spectra using automatic computer analysis of contour diagrams" by D.S. Garrett, R. Powers, A.M. Gronenborn, and G.M. Clore [J. Magn. Reson. 95 (1991) 214-220

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Daniel S.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Marius Clore, G.

    2011-12-01

    The Contour Approach to Peak Picking was developed to aid in the analysis and interpretation and of multidimensional NMR spectra of large biomolecules. In essence, it comprises an interactive graphics software tool to computationally select resonance positions in heteronuclear, 3- and 4D spectra.

  12. A short recollection on the paper entitled "A common sense approach to peak picking in two-, three-, and four-dimensional spectra using automatic computer analysis of contour diagrams" by D.S. Garrett, R. Powers, A.M. Gronenborn, and G.M. Clore [J. Magn. Reson. 95 (1991) 214-220].

    PubMed

    Garrett, Daniel S; Gronenborn, Angela M; Clore, G Marius

    2011-12-01

    The Contour Approach to Peak Picking was developed to aid in the analysis and interpretation and of multidimensional NMR spectra of large biomolecules. In essence, it comprises an interactive graphics software tool to computationally select resonance positions in heteronuclear, 3- and 4D spectra.

  13. A new cohomological formula for helicity in R2 reveals the effect of a diffeomorphism on helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantarella, Jason; Parsley, Jason

    2010-09-01

    The helicity of a vector field is a measure of the average linking of pairs of integral curves of the field. Computed by a six-dimensional integral, it is widely useful in the physics of fluids. For a divergence-free field tangent to the boundary of a domain in 3-space, helicity is known to be invariant under volume-preserving diffeomorphisms of the domain that are homotopic to the identity. We give a new construction of helicity for closed (k+1)-forms on a domain in (2k+1)-space that vanish when pulled back to the boundary of the domain. Our construction expresses helicity in terms of a cohomology class represented by the form when pulled back to the compactified configuration space of pairs of points in the domain. We show that our definition is equivalent to the standard one. We use our construction to give a new formula for computing helicity by a four-dimensional integral. We provide a Biot-Savart operator that computes a primitive for such forms; utilizing it, we obtain another formula for helicity. As a main result, we find a general formula for how much the value of helicity changes when the form is pushed forward by a diffeomorphism of the domain; it relies upon understanding the effect of the diffeomorphism on the homology of the domain and the de Rham cohomology class represented by the form. Our formula allows us to classify the helicity-preserving diffeomorphisms on a given domain, finding new helicity-preserving diffeomorphisms on the two-holed solid torus and proving that there are no new helicity-preserving diffeomorphisms on the standard solid torus. We conclude by defining helicities for forms on submanifolds of Euclidean space. In addition, we provide a detailed exposition of some standard 'folk' theorems about the cohomology of the boundary of domains in R.

  14. Design of a Low-Light-Level Image Sensor with On-Chip Sigma-Delta Analog-to- Digital Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, Sunetra K.; Pain, Bedabrata; Nixon, Robert H.; Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    The design and projected performance of a low-light-level active-pixel-sensor (APS) chip with semi-parallel analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion is presented. The individual elements have been fabricated and tested using MOSIS* 2 micrometer CMOS technology, although the integrated system has not yet been fabricated. The imager consists of a 128 x 128 array of active pixels at a 50 micrometer pitch. Each column of pixels shares a 10-bit A/D converter based on first-order oversampled sigma-delta (Sigma-Delta) modulation. The 10-bit outputs of each converter are multiplexed and read out through a single set of outputs. A semi-parallel architecture is chosen to achieve 30 frames/second operation even at low light levels. The sensor is designed for less than 12 e^- rms noise performance.

  15. Geometric aspects of uncertainty and correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abe, Sumiyoshi

    1993-01-01

    The fact that the metric induced on the quantum evolution submanifold of the protective Hilbert space describes the uncertainties and correlations of the operators generating the quantum-state evolution and exhibits the inherently-quantized geometry is discussed.

  16. A note on quasi-generalized CR-lightlike geometry in indefinite nearly μ-Sasakian manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massamba, Fortuné; Ssekajja, Samuel

    The concept of quasi-generalized CR-lightlike was first introduced by the authors in [Quasi generalized CR-lightlike submanifolds of indefinite nearly Sasakian manifolds, Arab. J. Math. 5 (2016) 87-101]. In this paper, we focus on ascreen and co-screen quasi-generalized CR-lightlike submanifolds of indefinite nearly μ-Sasakian manifold. We prove an existence theorem for minimal ascreen quasi-generalized CR-lightlike submanifolds admitting a metric connection. Classification theorems on nearly parallel and auto-parallel distributions on a co-screen quasi-generalized CR-lightlike submanifold are also given. Several examples are also constructed, where necessary, to illustrate the main ideas.

  17. Persistent homology analysis of phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Donato, Irene; Gori, Matteo; Pettini, Marco; Petri, Giovanni; De Nigris, Sarah; Franzosi, Roberto; Vaccarino, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    Persistent homology analysis, a recently developed computational method in algebraic topology, is applied to the study of the phase transitions undergone by the so-called mean-field XY model and by the ϕ^{4} lattice model, respectively. For both models the relationship between phase transitions and the topological properties of certain submanifolds of configuration space are exactly known. It turns out that these a priori known facts are clearly retrieved by persistent homology analysis of dynamically sampled submanifolds of configuration space.

  18. Extendability of parallel sections in vector bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, Tim

    2016-01-01

    I address the following question: Given a differentiable manifold M, what are the open subsets U of M such that, for all vector bundles E over M and all linear connections ∇ on E, any ∇-parallel section in E defined on U extends to a ∇-parallel section in E defined on M? For simply connected manifolds M (among others) I describe the entirety of all such sets U which are, in addition, the complement of a C1 submanifold, boundary allowed, of M. This delivers a partial positive answer to a problem posed by Antonio J. Di Scala and Gianni Manno (2014). Furthermore, in case M is an open submanifold of Rn, n ≥ 2, I prove that the complement of U in M, not required to be a submanifold now, can have arbitrarily large n-dimensional Lebesgue measure.

  19. On higher rank coisotropic A-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, Manfred

    2012-02-01

    This article is devoted to a world sheet analysis of A-type D-branes in N=(2,2) supersymmetric non-linear sigma models. In addition to the familiar Lagrangian submanifolds with flat connection we reproduce the rank one A-branes of Kapustin and Orlov, which are supported on coisotropic submanifolds. The main focus is however on gauge fields of higher rank and on tachyon profiles on brane-antibrane pairs. This will lead to the notion of a complex of coisotropic A-branes. A particular role is played by the noncommutative geometry on the brane world volume. It ensures that brane-antibrane pairs localize again on coisotropic submanifolds.

  20. Contact geometric descriptions of vector fields on dually flat spaces and their applications in electric circuit models and nonequilibrium statistical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Shin-itiro

    2016-10-01

    Contact geometry has been applied to various mathematical sciences, and it has been proposed that a contact manifold and a strictly convex function induce a dually flat space that is used in information geometry. Here, such a dually flat space is related to a Legendre submanifold in a contact manifold. In this paper, contact geometric descriptions of vector fields on dually flat spaces are proposed on the basis of the theory of contact Hamiltonian vector fields. Based on these descriptions, two ways of lifting vector fields on Legendre submanifolds to contact manifolds are given. For some classes of these lifted vector fields, invariant measures in contact manifolds and stability analysis around Legendre submanifolds are explicitly given. Throughout this paper, Legendre duality is explicitly stated. In addition, to show how to apply these general methodologies to applied mathematical disciplines, electric circuit models and some examples taken from nonequilibrium statistical mechanics are analyzed.

  1. A possible symplectic framework for Radon-type transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahen, Michel; Grouy, Thibaut; Gutt, Simone

    2016-07-01

    Our project is to define Radon-type transforms in symplectic geometry. The chosen framework consists of symplectic symmetric spaces whose canonical connection is of Ricci-type. They can be considered as symplectic analogues of the spaces of constant holomorphic curvature in Kählerian Geometry. They are characterized amongst a class of symplectic manifolds by the existence of many totally geodesic symplectic submanifolds. We present a particular class of Radon type transforms, associating to a smooth compactly supported function on a homogeneous manifold M, a function on a homogeneous space N of totally geodesic submanifolds of M, and vice versa. We describe some spaces M and N in such Radon-type duality with M a model of symplectic symmetric space with Ricci-type canonical connection and N an orbit of totally geodesic symplectic submanifolds.

  2. Gerbes on G2 manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Goncalo

    2017-04-01

    On a projective complex manifold, the Abelian group of divisors maps surjectively onto that of holomorphic line bundles (the Picard group). On a G2-manifold we use coassociative submanifolds to define an analogue of the divisors, and a gauge theoretical equation for a connection on a gerbe to define an analogue of the Picard group. Then, we construct a map from the former to the later. We also prove that the canonical map from our analogue of the Picard group to the third cohomology group with integer coefficients is surjective. As a side remark we make an observation relating the topological type of coassociative submanifolds and the cohomology classes they represent.

  3. Curvature and geometric modules of noncommutative spheres and tori

    SciTech Connect

    Arnlind, Joakim

    2014-04-15

    When considered as submanifolds of Euclidean space, the Riemannian geometry of the round sphere and the Clifford torus may be formulated in terms of Poisson algebraic expressions involving the embedding coordinates, and a central object is the projection operator, projecting tangent vectors in the ambient space onto the tangent space of the submanifold. In this note, we point out that there exist noncommutative analogues of these projection operators, which implies a very natural definition of noncommutative tangent spaces as particular projective modules. These modules carry an induced connection from Euclidean space, and we compute its scalar curvature.

  4. Exact result on topology and phase transitions at any finite N.

    PubMed

    Casetti, Lapo; Cohen, E G D; Pettini, Marco

    2002-03-01

    We study analytically the topology of a family of submanifolds of the configuration space of the mean-field XY model, computing also a topological invariant (the Euler characteristic). We prove that a particular topological change of these submanifolds is connected to the phase transition of this system, and exists also at finite N. The present result is the first analytic proof that a phase transition has a topological origin and provides a key to a possible better understanding of the origin of phase transitions at their deepest level, as well as to a possible definition of phase transitions at finite N.

  5. Hamiltonian dynamics and constrained variational calculus: continuous and discrete settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de León, Manuel; Jiménez, Fernando; Martín de Diego, David

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the relationship between Hamiltonian dynamics and constrained variational calculus. We describe both using the notion of Lagrangian submanifolds of convenient symplectic manifolds and using the so-called Tulczyjew triples. The results are also extended to the case of discrete dynamics and nonholonomic mechanics. Interesting applications to the geometrical integration of Hamiltonian systems are obtained.

  6. Nonmaximality of known extremal metrics on torus and Klein bottle

    SciTech Connect

    Karpukhin, M A

    2013-12-31

    The El Soufi-Ilias theorem establishes a connection between minimal submanifolds of spheres and extremal metrics for eigenvalues of the Laplace-Beltrami operator. Recently, this connection was used to provide several explicit examples of extremal metrics. We investigate the properties of these metrics and prove that none of them is maximal. Bibliography: 24 titles.

  7. Lagrangian tetragons and instabilities in Hamiltonian dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entov, Michael; Polterovich, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    We present a new existence mechanism, based on symplectic topology, for orbits of Hamiltonian flows connecting a pair of disjoint subsets in the phase space. The method involves function theory on symplectic manifolds combined with rigidity of Lagrangian submanifolds. Applications include superconductivity channels in nearly integrable systems and dynamics near a perturbed unstable equilibrium.

  8. Emergent gravity in spaces of constant curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Orlando; Haddad, Matthew

    2017-03-01

    In physical theories where the energy (action) is localized near a submanifold of a constant curvature space, there is a universal expression for the energy (or the action). We derive a multipole expansion for the energy that has a finite number of terms, and depends on intrinsic geometric invariants of the submanifold and extrinsic invariants of the embedding of the submanifold. This is the second of a pair of articles in which we try to develop a theory of emergent gravity arising from the embedding of a submanifold into an ambient space equipped with a quantum field theory. Our theoretical method requires a generalization of a formula due to by Hermann Weyl. While the first paper discussed the framework in Euclidean (Minkowski) space, here we discuss how this framework generalizes to spaces of constant sectional curvature. We focus primarily on anti de Sitter space. We then discuss how such a theory can give rise to a cosmological constant and Planck mass that are within reasonable bounds of the experimental values.

  9. UNIFORM ESTIMATES FOR SOLUTIONS OF THE \\overline{\\partial}-EQUATION IN PSEUDOCONVEX POLYHEDRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, A. G.; Henkin, G. M.

    1981-04-01

    It is proved that the nonhomogeneous Cauchy-Riemann equation on an analytic submanifold "in general position" in a Cartesian product of strictly convex domains admits a solution with a uniform estimate. The possibility of weakening the requirement of general position in this result is investigated. Bibliography: 46 titles.

  10. The relativistic invariance of 4D-shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calosi, Claudio

    2015-05-01

    A recent debate in the metaphysics of physics focuses on the invariance and intrinsicality of four-dimensional shapes in the Special Theory of Relativity. Davidson (2014) argues that four-dimensional shapes cannot be intrinsic properties of persisting objects because they have to be relativized to reference frames. Balashov (2014a) criticizes such an argument in that it mistakes four-dimensional shapes with their three-dimensional projections on the axes of those frames. This paper adds to that debate. Rather than criticizing an argument against the relativistic invariance of four-dimensional shapes, as Balashov did, it offers a direct argument in favor of such an invariance.

  11. Active-Pixel Image Sensor With Analog-To-Digital Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Mendis, Sunetra K.; Pain, Bedabrata; Nixon, Robert H.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed single-chip integrated-circuit image sensor contains 128 x 128 array of active pixel sensors at 50-micrometer pitch. Output terminals of all pixels in each given column connected to analog-to-digital (A/D) converter located at bottom of column. Pixels scanned in semiparallel fashion, one row at time; during time allocated to scanning row, outputs of all active pixel sensors in row fed to respective A/D converters. Design of chip based on complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, and individual circuit elements fabricated according to 2-micrometer CMOS design rules. Active pixel sensors designed to operate at video rate of 30 frames/second, even at low light levels. A/D scheme based on first-order Sigma-Delta modulation.

  12. Testing for Factorial Invariance of the Modified Leadership Scale for Sports: Using a Japanese Version

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Hyungil Harry; Pyun, Do Young; Han, Siwan; Ogasawara, Etsuko

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to provide empirical evidence to support psychometric properties of a modified four-dimensional model of the Leadership Scale for Sports (LSS). The study tested invariance of all parameters (i.e., factor loadings, error variances, and factor variances-covariances) in the four-dimensional measurement model between…

  13. Description of a highly symmetric polytope observed in Thomson's problem of charges on a hypersphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, J.

    2007-10-01

    In a recent paper, Altschuler and Pérez-Garrido [Phys. Rev. E 76, 016705 (2007)] have presented a four-dimensional polytope with 80 vertices. We demonstrate how this polytope can be derived from the regular four-dimensional 600-cell with 120 vertices if two orthogonal positive disclinations are created. Some related polytopes are also described.

  14. Exact moduli space metrics for hyperbolic vortex polygons

    SciTech Connect

    Krusch, S.; Speight, J. M.

    2010-02-15

    Exact metrics on some totally geodesic submanifolds of the moduli space of static hyperbolic N-vortices are derived. These submanifolds, denoted as {sigma}{sub n,m}, are spaces of C{sub n}-invariant vortex configurations with n single vortices at the vertices of a regular polygon and m=N-n coincident vortices at the polygon's center. The geometric properties of {sigma}{sub n,m} are investigated, and it is found that {sigma}{sub n,n-1} is isometric to the hyperbolic plane of curvature -(3{pi}n){sup -1}. The geodesic flow on {sigma}{sub n,m} and a geometrically natural variant of geodesic flow recently proposed by Collie and Tong ['The dynamics of Chern-Simons vortices', Phys. Rev. D Part. Fields Gravit. Cosmol. 78, 065013 (2008);e-print arXiv:hep-th/0805.0602] are analyzed in detail.

  15. First integrals of non-holonomic systems and their generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giachetta, Giovanni

    2000-08-01

    We discuss various aspects of mechanical systems with general (nonlinear) non-holonomic constraints from the perspective of presymplectic geometry. We begin by introducing a 2-form on the evolution space of a system having the property, among others, of modelling the unconstrained dynamics. Using this 2-form we then characterize a unique second-order dynamics on the constraint submanifold through a simple geometrical implementation of Chetaev's concept of virtual work. We also give necessary and sufficient conditions in order for the reduced dynamics to admit a non-holonomic Lagrangian formulation. Finally, we study the structure of a set of vector fields on the constraint submanifold which generates all first integrals of a constrained system. The relationships with a previously proposed set of vector fields in non-conservative holonomic mechanics and with known generalizations of Noether's theorem for non-holonomic systems are analysed.

  16. Multiply-warped product metrics and reduction of Einstein equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Fateme; Darabi, Farhad; Haji-Badali, Ali

    It is shown that for every multidimensional metric in the multiply-warped product form M¯ = K ×f1M1 ×f2M2 with warp functions f1, f2, associated to the submanifolds M1, M2 of dimensions n1, n2 respectively, one can find the corresponding Einstein equations ḠAB = -Λ¯ḡAB, with cosmological constant Λ¯, which are reducible to the Einstein equations Gαβ = -Λ1gαβ and Gij = -Λ2hij on the submanifolds M1, M2, with cosmological constants Λ1 and Λ2, respectively, where Λ¯, Λ1 and Λ2 are functions of f1, f2 and n1, n2.

  17. Generalized complex geometry, generalized branes and the Hitchin sigma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchini, Roberto

    2005-03-01

    Hitchin's generalized complex geometry has been shown to be relevant in compactifications of superstring theory with fluxes and is expected to lead to a deeper understanding of mirror symmetry. Gualtieri's notion of generalized complex submanifold seems to be a natural candidate for the description of branes in this context. Recently, we introduced a Batalin-Vilkovisky field theoretic realization of generalized complex geometry, the Hitchin sigma model, extending the well known Poisson sigma model. In this paper, exploiting Gualtieri's formalism, we incorporate branes into the model. A detailed study of the boundary conditions obeyed by the world sheet fields is provided. Finally, it is found that, when branes are present, the classical Batalin-Vilkovisky cohomology contains an extra sector that is related non trivially to a novel cohomology associated with the branes as generalized complex submanifolds.

  18. Domain structure of black hole space-times

    SciTech Connect

    Harmark, Troels

    2009-07-15

    We introduce the domain structure for stationary black hole space-times. The domain structure lives on the submanifold of fixed points of the Killing vector fields. Depending on which Killing vector field has fixed points the submanifold is naturally divided into domains. The domain structure provides invariants of the space-time, both topological and continuous. It is defined for any space-time dimension and any number of Killing vector fields. We examine the domain structure for asymptotically flat space-times and find a canonical form for the metric of such space-times. The domain structure generalizes the rod structure introduced for space-times with D-2 commuting Killing vector fields. We analyze in detail the domain structure for Minkowski space, the Schwarzschild-Tangherlini black hole and the Myers-Perry black hole in six and seven dimensions. Finally, we consider the possible domain structures for asymptotically flat black holes in six and seven dimensio0008.

  19. Functional methods underlying classical mechanics, relativity and quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, A.

    2013-04-01

    The paper investigates the physical content of a recently proposed mathematical framework that unifies the standard formalisms of classical mechanics, relativity and quantum theory. In the framework states of a classical particle are identified with Dirac delta functions. The classical space is "made" of these functions and becomes a submanifold in a Hilbert space of states of the particle. The resulting embedding of the classical space into the space of states is highly non-trivial and accounts for numerous deep relations between classical and quantum physics and relativity. One of the most striking results is the proof that the normal probability distribution of position of a macroscopic particle (equivalently, position of the corresponding delta state within the classical space submanifold) yields the Born rule for transitions between arbitrary quantum states.

  20. A Geometric Treatment of Implicit Differential-Algebraic Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabier, P. J.; Rheinboldt, W. C.

    A differential-geometric approach for proving the existence and uniqueness of implicit differential-algebraic equations is presented. It provides for a significant improvement of an earlier theory developed by the authors as well as for a completely intrinsic definition of the index of such problems. The differential-algebraic equation is transformed into an explicit ordinary differential equation by a reduction process that can be abstractly defined for specific submanifolds of tangent bundles here called reducible π-submanifolds. Local existence and uniqueness results for differential-algebraic equations then follow directly from the final stage of this reduction by means of an application of the standard theory of ordinary differential equations.

  1. Invariants from classical field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Rafael; Leal, Lorenzo

    2008-06-15

    We introduce a method that generates invariant functions from perturbative classical field theories depending on external parameters. By applying our methods to several field theories such as Abelian BF, Chern-Simons, and two-dimensional Yang-Mills theory, we obtain, respectively, the linking number for embedded submanifolds in compact varieties, the Gauss' and the second Milnor's invariant for links in S{sup 3}, and invariants under area-preserving diffeomorphisms for configurations of immersed planar curves.

  2. Perturbative approach for non local and high order derivative theories

    SciTech Connect

    Avilez, Ana A.; Vergara, J. David

    2009-04-20

    We propose a reduction method of classical phase space of high order derivative theories in singular and non singular cases. The mechanism is to reduce the high order phase space by imposing suplementary constraints, such that the evolution takes place in a submanifold where high order degrees of freedom are absent. The reduced theory is ordinary and is cured of the usual high order theories diseases, it approaches well low energy dynamics.

  3. Internal or shape coordinates in the {ital n}-body problem

    SciTech Connect

    Littlejohn, R.G.; Reinsch, M.

    1995-09-01

    The construction of global shape coordinates for the {ital n}-body problem is considered. Special attention is given to the three- and four-body problems. Quantities, including candidates for coordinates, are organized according to their transformation properties under so-called democracy transformations (orthogonal transformations of Jacobi vectors). Important submanifolds of shape space are identified and their topology studied, including the manifolds upon which shapes are coplanar or collinear, and the manifolds upon which the moment of inertia tensor is degenerate.

  4. Geometry of warped product immersions of Kenmotsu space forms and its applications to slant immersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Akram; Laurian-Ioan, Pişcoran

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, some relations among the second fundamental form which is an extrinsic invariant, Laplacian of the warping function and constant sectional curvature of a warped product semi-slant submanifold of a Kenmotsu space form and its totally geodesic and totally umbilical submanifolds are described from the exploitation of the Gauss equation instead of the Codazzi equation in the sense of Chen's studies in (2003). These relations provide us an approach to the classifications of equalities by the following case studied of Hasegawa and Mihai (2003). These are exemplified by the classifications of the totally geodesic and totally umbilical submanifolds. Moreover, we provide some applications of the inequality case by using the harmonicity of the smooth warping functions. In particular, we prove the triviality of connected, compact warped product semi-slant manifolds isometrically immersed into a Kenmotsu space form using Hamiltonian, Hessian, and the Kinetic energy of the warped function. Further, we generalize some results for contact CR-warped products in a Kenmotsu space form.

  5. Open G2 strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Jan; de Medeiros, Paul; El-Showk, Sheer; Sinkovics, Annamaria

    2008-02-01

    We consider an open string version of the topological twist previously proposed for sigma-models with G2 target spaces. We determine the cohomology of open strings states and relate these to geometric deformations of calibrated submanifolds and to flat or anti-self-dual connections on such submanifolds. On associative three-cycles we show that the worldvolume theory is a gauge-fixed Chern-Simons theory coupled to normal deformations of the cycle. For coassociative four-cycles we find a functional that extremizes on anti-self-dual gauge fields. A brane wrapping the whole G2 induces a seven-dimensional associative Chern-Simons theory on the manifold. This theory has already been proposed by Donaldson and Thomas as the higher-dimensional generalization of real Chern-Simons theory. When the G2 manifold has the structure of a Calabi-Yau times a circle, these theories reduce to a combination of the open A-model on special Lagrangians and the open B + B-bar-model on holomorphic submanifolds. We also comment on possible applications of our results.

  6. Static and non-static black holes with the Liouville mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalets, T. M.; Nurmagambetov, A. J.

    2017-03-01

    We present a new class of static and non-static quasi-spherical black hole solutions in four-dimensional Minkowski and Anti-de Sitter spaces and briefly discuss its employing in the Gauge/Gravity duality.

  7. Multivariate Global Ocean Assimilation Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-30

    representations of the four dimensional circulation of the ocean using data assimilation methods . We intend these representations to be applied in a variety of military, academic, as well as commercial applications.

  8. Diffraction and pulse slippage in the Boeing 1 kW FEL oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, J.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    A four-dimensional simulation in x, y, z, and t, including betatron motion of the electrons, is used to study the combined effects of diffraction, pulse slippage and desynchronism in the Boeing 1 kW FEL oscillator.

  9. Relativistic version of the Feynman-Dyson-Hughes derivation of the Lorentz force law and Maxwell's homogeneous equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essén, Hanno; Nordmark, Arne B.

    2016-09-01

    The canonical Poisson bracket algebra of four-dimensional relativistic mechanics is used to derive the equation of motion for a charged particle, with the Lorentz force, and the homogeneous Maxwell equations.

  10. Escape to a New Dimension: A Journey through Space with a Square, a Cube, and a Tesseract

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Dane R.

    2006-01-01

    This article, a play designed around an imaginary conversation between geometric objects, summarizes various approaches to visualizing a tesseract (a.k.a. hypercube--a four-dimensional analog of a cube).

  11. Progress in Paralysis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... work involving four-dimensional imaging of the cardiovascular system using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). His current research focuses on integrated imaging and predictive biomechanical modeling of coronary atherosclerotic ...

  12. Extension of Loop Quantum Gravity to f(R) Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangdong; Ma, Yongge

    2011-04-01

    The four-dimensional metric f(R) theories of gravity are cast into connection-dynamical formalism with real su(2) connections as configuration variables. Through this formalism, the classical metric f(R) theories are quantized by extending the loop quantization scheme of general relativity. Our results imply that the nonperturbative quantization procedure of loop quantum gravity is valid not only for general relativity but also for a rather general class of four-dimensional metric theories of gravity.

  13. A Lorentz covariant holoraumy-induced "gadget" from minimal off-shell 4D, N=1 supermultiplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, S. James; Grover, Tyler; Miller-Dickson, Miles David; Mondal, Benedict A.; Oskoui, Amir; Regmi, Shirash; Ross, Ethan; Shetty, Rajath

    2015-11-01

    Starting from three minimal off-shell 4D, N=1 supermultiplets, using constructions solely defined within the confines of the four dimensional field theory we show the existence of a "gadget" — a member of a class of metrics on the representation space of the supermultiplets — whose values directly and completely correspond to the values of a metric defined on the 1d, N = 4 adinkra networks adjacency matrices corresponding to the projections of the four dimensional supermultiplets.

  14. Extension of loop quantum gravity to f(R) theories.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangdong; Ma, Yongge

    2011-04-29

    The four-dimensional metric f(R) theories of gravity are cast into connection-dynamical formalism with real su(2) connections as configuration variables. Through this formalism, the classical metric f(R) theories are quantized by extending the loop quantization scheme of general relativity. Our results imply that the nonperturbative quantization procedure of loop quantum gravity is valid not only for general relativity but also for a rather general class of four-dimensional metric theories of gravity.

  15. Feasibility Study for Integrated Flight Trajectory Control (Fighter).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    ntamber) Flight Trajectory C.ntrol Control Law Development Profile Synthesis Tactical Situation Display Four -Dimensional Navigation Vertical Situation...realtime trajectory generation was developed as a vital part of the total solution. This trajectory, generator operates in four dimensions, X, Y...FLIGHT PROFILE SYNTHESIS 5-1 5.1 Four -Dimensional Trajectory Generator 5-1 5.1.1 Waypoint Parameters 5-1 5.1.2 Threat Avoidance 5-2 5.1.3 Horizontal Path

  16. Geology of the undeveloped oil and gas fields of Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, J.D. ); Edwards, E.B. ); Heck, R.G. )

    1996-01-01

    Two prominent subsurface structural features of the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin are the Hosgri fault system and the associated anticlinal fold trend. Exploratory drilling and 3D seismic mapping have delineated a series of oil and gas fields along this trend which underlie four federal units and one non-unitized lease. The units are named after local geography and are called the Lion Rock, Point Sal, Purisima Point and Santa Maria Units. The individual lease, OCS P-0409, overlies the San Miguel field. The Hosgri fault system trends northwest-southeast and effectively forms the eastern boundary of the oil and gas province. Lying semi-parallel with the fault are several anticlinal culminations which have trapped large volumes of oil and gas in the fractured Montery Formation. The Monterey is both source and reservoir rock, averaging 300 meters n thickness throughout the Central Basin. Development of the Monterey Formation as a reservoir rock was through diagensis and tectonism with resulting porosities-from 15 to 20% and permeability up to one Darcy. These parameters coupled with a high geothermal gradient facilitate the inflow rates of the viscous Monterey oil. Some 24 exploration and delineation wells have been drilled in this area and tested at rates ranging from a few hundred to several thousand barrels per day. Estimated oil reserves in the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin total approximately 1 billion barrels.

  17. Geology of the undeveloped oil and gas fields of Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, J.D.; Edwards, E.B.; Heck, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    Two prominent subsurface structural features of the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin are the Hosgri fault system and the associated anticlinal fold trend. Exploratory drilling and 3D seismic mapping have delineated a series of oil and gas fields along this trend which underlie four federal units and one non-unitized lease. The units are named after local geography and are called the Lion Rock, Point Sal, Purisima Point and Santa Maria Units. The individual lease, OCS P-0409, overlies the San Miguel field. The Hosgri fault system trends northwest-southeast and effectively forms the eastern boundary of the oil and gas province. Lying semi-parallel with the fault are several anticlinal culminations which have trapped large volumes of oil and gas in the fractured Montery Formation. The Monterey is both source and reservoir rock, averaging 300 meters n thickness throughout the Central Basin. Development of the Monterey Formation as a reservoir rock was through diagensis and tectonism with resulting porosities-from 15 to 20% and permeability up to one Darcy. These parameters coupled with a high geothermal gradient facilitate the inflow rates of the viscous Monterey oil. Some 24 exploration and delineation wells have been drilled in this area and tested at rates ranging from a few hundred to several thousand barrels per day. Estimated oil reserves in the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin total approximately 1 billion barrels.

  18. Digital-Analog-Hybrid Neural Simulator: A Design-Aid For Custom-VLSI Neurochips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moopenn, Alexander W.; Thakoor, Anilkumar P.; Duong, Tuan A.

    1989-05-01

    A high speed neural network simulator and its use for the dynamics and performance analysis of feedback neural architectures are described. The simulator is based on a semi-parallel, analog-digital hybrid architecture which utilizes digital memories to store synaptic weights and analog hardware for high speed computation. A breadboard system with 8-bit gray scale synapses, designed and built at JPL, is successfully serving as a valuable design test-bed for the development of fully parallel, analog, custom VLSI neurochips, currently underway at JPL. The breadboard hybrid simulator indeed allows a detailed evaluation of hardware potential and limitations in implementing full analog operations in such chips. As an example, the paper presents an analysis of the stability and convergence behavior of a feedback neural network applied to the "Concentrator Assignment Problem" in combinatorial optimization, as studied on the analog-digital hybrid simulator. This has already resulted in a VLSI custom design of a fully parallel, analog neuroprocessor with a powerful "analog prompting" feature, for the high-speed, multiparameter optimization function.

  19. Communication library for run-time visualization of distributed, asynchronous data

    SciTech Connect

    Rowlan, J.; Wightman, B.T.

    1994-04-01

    In this paper we present a method for collecting and visualizing data generated by a parallel computational simulation during run time. Data distributed across multiple processes is sent across parallel communication lines to a remote workstation, which sorts and queues the data for visualization. We have implemented our method in a set of tools called PORTAL (for Parallel aRchitecture data-TrAnsfer Library). The tools comprise generic routines for sending data from a parallel program (callable from either C or FORTRAN), a semi-parallel communication scheme currently built upon Unix Sockets, and a real-time connection to the scientific visualization program AVS. Our method is most valuable when used to examine large datasets that can be efficiently generated and do not need to be stored on disk. The PORTAL source libraries, detailed documentation, and a working example can be obtained by anonymous ftp from info.mcs.anl.gov from the file portal.tar.Z from the directory pub/portal.

  20. Irradiation deformation near different atomic grain boundaries in α-Zr: An investigation of thermodynamics and kinetics of point defects

    PubMed Central

    Arjhangmehr, A.; Feghhi, S. A. H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding radiation performance of nanocrystalline Zr-based alloys is essential to develop internal components and external cladding materials with self-healing capabilities for longer and safer life cycles in harsh reactor environments. However, the precise role of interfaces in modifying defect production and evolution in α-Zr is not yet determined. Using atomistic simulation methods, we investigate the influence of different atomic grain boundaries (GBs) in thermodynamic and kinetic properties of defects on short timescales. We observe that the sink efficiency and sink strength of interfaces vary significantly with the boundary structures, with a preference to absorb interstitials (vacancies) when the GBs are semi-parallel (semi-perpendicular) relative to the basal planes. Further, we identify three distinct primary cascade geometries, and find that the residual defect clustering in grain interiors depends on how the atomic GBs modify the spatial distribution of defects within the crystal structure. Finally, we explain and discuss the dynamic results in terms of energetic and kinetic behaviors of defects near the pristine and damaged boundaries. Eventually, these will provide a microscopic reference for further improving the radiation response of Zr by using fine grains or by introducing a high density of dispersoids in material metallurgy. PMID:27004606

  1. Parallel perception of vernier offsets, curvature, and chevrons in humans.

    PubMed

    Fahle, M

    1991-01-01

    A vernier offset is detected at once among straight lines, and reaction times are almost independent of the number of simultaneously presented stimuli (distractors), even if absolute orientation cues are masked by varied orientation of the verniers. This result implies that the human visual system processes vernier offsets in parallel. Reaction times for identifying one straight target among offset verniers, on the other hand, increase with the number of stimuli. The same is true for the identification of a vernier offset to one side among verniers offset to the opposite side, if absolute orientation cues are masked. These tasks require serial or semi-parallel processing. Chevrons and curved targets show the same pattern of results. Even deviations below a photoreceptor diameter can be detected at once. The visual system thus attains positional accuracy below the photoreceptor diameter simultaneously at different positions. I conclude that deviation from straightness, or change of orientation, is detected in parallel over the visual field. Discontinuities or gradients in orientation may represent an elementary feature of vision.

  2. Reservoir sandstone bodies in lower Silurian Clinton sandstone interval, eastern Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Coogan, A.H.

    1987-09-01

    The stratigraphic relationships of the sandstones, shales, limestones, dolomites, and related beds of the Lower Silurian Clinton sandstone interval in Ohio have been examined using several thousand well logs from Medina County to Coshocton County in eastern Ohio. This north-south band of counties lies semiparallel to the north-northeast-trending depositional edge of the Clinton lower deltaic and coastal plain. Continuous and discontinuous bar sandstones with patterns similar to barrier island deposits are found at the edge of the deltaic plain. The thicker sandstone reservoirs in these deposits have been prolific oil and gas pools. The discontinuous bar sands are more common, however, and where drilling is sparse or where only the cleaner sandstones are mapped, these bar sands appear as isolated, thick, porous sandstone bodies. Examples exist in Holmes and Wayne Counties, Ohio. Elongate, nearly straight, narrow sandstone bodies occur on the lower deltaic plain, and were deposited in channels that were fluvial or partly estuarine. The channel sandstones are less than 1000 ft wide, extend for distances up to 10 mi and can be seen in Coshocton, Summit, and Medina Counties. The reservoirs in these sandstones are prolific oil and gas producers, but they are not easy to locate. At the seaward end of the elongate channel, sandstones are thick, localized sand bodies that fit in the sedimentological picture as river mouth bars. An example from Medina County illustrates this reservoir geometry at the site of excellent oil production from the Clinton interval.

  3. Irradiation deformation near different atomic grain boundaries in α-Zr: An investigation of thermodynamics and kinetics of point defects.

    PubMed

    Arjhangmehr, A; Feghhi, S A H

    2016-03-23

    Understanding radiation performance of nanocrystalline Zr-based alloys is essential to develop internal components and external cladding materials with self-healing capabilities for longer and safer life cycles in harsh reactor environments. However, the precise role of interfaces in modifying defect production and evolution in α-Zr is not yet determined. Using atomistic simulation methods, we investigate the influence of different atomic grain boundaries (GBs) in thermodynamic and kinetic properties of defects on short timescales. We observe that the sink efficiency and sink strength of interfaces vary significantly with the boundary structures, with a preference to absorb interstitials (vacancies) when the GBs are semi-parallel (semi-perpendicular) relative to the basal planes. Further, we identify three distinct primary cascade geometries, and find that the residual defect clustering in grain interiors depends on how the atomic GBs modify the spatial distribution of defects within the crystal structure. Finally, we explain and discuss the dynamic results in terms of energetic and kinetic behaviors of defects near the pristine and damaged boundaries. Eventually, these will provide a microscopic reference for further improving the radiation response of Zr by using fine grains or by introducing a high density of dispersoids in material metallurgy.

  4. Gauge Drift in Numerical Integrations of the Lagrange Planetary Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murison, M. A.; Efroimsky, M.

    2003-08-01

    Efroimsky (2002) and Newman & Efroimsky (2003) recognized that the Lagrange and Delaunay planetary equations of celestial mechanics may be generalized to allow transformations analogous to the familiar gauge transformations in electrodynamics. As usually presented, the Lagrange equations, which are derived by the method of variation of parameters (invented by Euler and Lagrange for this very purpose), assume the Lagrange constraint, whereby a certain combination of parameter time derivatives is arbitrarily equated to zero. This particular constraint ensures an osculating orbit that is unique. The transformation of the description, as given by the (time-varying) osculating elements, into that given by the Cartesian coordinates and velocities is invertible. Relaxing the constraint enables one to substitute instead an arbitrary gauge function. This breaks the uniqueness and invertibility between the orbit instantaneously described by the orbital elements and the position and velocity components (i.e., many different orbits, precessing at different rates, can at a given instant share the same physical position and physical velocity through space). However, the orbit described by the (varying) orbital elements obeying a different gauge is no longer osculating. In numerical calculations that integrate the traditional Lagrange and Delaunay equations, even starting off in a certain (say, Lagrange's) gauge, some fraction of the numerical errors will, nevertheless, diffuse into violation of the chosen constraint. This results in an unintended ``gauge drift''. Geometrically, numerical errors cause the trajectory in phase space to leave the gauge-defined submanifold to which the motion was constrained, so that it is then moving on a different submanifold. The method of Lagrange multipliers can be utilized to return the motion to the original submanifold (e.g., Nacozy 1971, Murison 1989). Alternatively, the accumulated gauge drift may be compensated by a gauge transformation

  5. Geometric Properties of Dynamic Nonlinear Networks: Transversality, Local-Solvability and Eventual Passivity,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-17

    space to be a tions which lie at the very foundation of nonlinear circuit submanifold. Main result of the paper state% that a network is locagls... circuit of Fig. 1(a). wherc A, (DF) 1R 1 DF j , 11 *1 is described by q-g.( ) as in Fig. I(b). Then ’ C) isa DF I [ 8DF , II BR .’ proper tree. BR( I and R...is locally (r,. ,q.," corresponds to open- circuiting branches of voltage (resp. current) controlled. Then there is a perturba- (’ and short

  6. A numerical method for finding sign-changing solutions of superlinear Dirichlet problems

    SciTech Connect

    Neuberger, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    In a recent result it was shown via a variational argument that a class of superlinear elliptic boundary value problems has at least three nontrivial solutions, a pair of one sign and one which sign changes exactly once. These three and all other nontrivial solutions are saddle points of an action functional, and are characterized as local minima of that functional restricted to a codimension one submanifold of the Hilbert space H-0-1-2, or an appropriate higher codimension subset of that manifold. In this paper, we present a numerical Sobolev steepest descent algorithm for finding these three solutions.

  7. Dynamics, integrability and topology for some classes of Kolmogorov Hamiltonian systems in R+4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llibre, Jaume; Xiao, Dongmei

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we first give the sufficient and necessary conditions in order that two classes of polynomial Kolmogorov systems in R+4 are Hamiltonian systems. Then we study the integrability of these Hamiltonian systems in the Liouville sense. Finally, we investigate the global dynamics of the completely integrable Lotka-Volterra Hamiltonian systems in R+4. As an application of the invariant subsets of these systems, we obtain topological classifications of the 3-submanifolds in R+4 defined by the hypersurfaces axy + bzw + cx2 y + dxy2 + ez2 w + fzw2 = h, where a , b , c , d , e , f , w and h are real constants.

  8. Anomalies and graded coisotropic branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi

    2006-03-01

    We compute the anomaly of the axial U(1) current in the A-model on a Calabi-Yau manifold, in the presence of coisotropic branes discovered by Kapustin and Orlov. Our results relate the anomaly-free condition to a recently proposed definition of graded coisotropic branes in Calabi-Yau manifolds. More specifically, we find that a coisotropic brane is anomaly-free if and only if it is gradable. We also comment on a different grading for coisotropic submanifolds introduced recently by Oh.

  9. Extrinsic geometric properties of the Rozendorn surface, an isometric immersion of the Lobachevskii plane in E{sup 5}

    SciTech Connect

    Aminov, Yurii A

    2009-12-31

    The lengths of the normal curvature vectors on the Rozendorn surface F{sup 2} are shown to be uniformly bounded above on the whole of the surface. A regular three-dimensional submanifold F{sup 3}, F{sup 2} subset of F{sup 3} subset of E{sup 5}, is constructed in the form of a regular leaf whose sectional curvatures in the two-dimensional directions tangent to F{sup 2} are strictly negative and bounded away from zero. Bibliography: 9 titles.

  10. Integrable systems on semidirect product Lie groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capriotti, S.; Montani, H.

    2014-05-01

    We study integrable systems on the semidirect product of a Lie group and its Lie algebra as the representation space of the adjoint action. Regarding the tangent bundle of a Lie group as phase space endowed with this semidirect product Lie group structure, we construct a class of symplectic submanifolds equipped with a Dirac bracket on which integrable systems (in the Adler-Kostant-Symes sense) are naturally built through collective dynamics. In doing so, we address other issues such as factorization, Poisson-Lie structures and dressing actions. We show that the procedure becomes recursive for some particular Hamilton functions, giving rise to a tower of nested integrable systems.

  11. Riemannian manifolds as Lie-Rinehart algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessers, Victor; van der Veken, Joeri

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we show how Lie-Rinehart algebras can be applied to unify and generalize the elementary theory of Riemannian geometry. We will first review some necessary theory on a.o. modules, bilinear forms and derivations. We will then translate some classical theory on Riemannian geometry to the setting of Rinehart spaces, a special kind of Lie-Rinehart algebras. Some generalized versions of classical results will be obtained, such as the existence of a unique Levi-Civita connection, inducing a Levi-Civita connection on a submanifold, and the construction of spaces with constant sectional curvature.

  12. Mode analysis and Ward identities for perturbative quantum gravity in de Sitter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamis, N. C.; Woodard, R. P.

    1992-10-01

    We study linearized gravitons on the D-dimensional open submanifold spanned by de Sitter conformal coordinates. The physical modes are found in the same way as for flat space by imposing exact gauge conditions on the invariant field equations and then exploiting the residual gauge freedom of solutions. The resulting polatization tensors have vanishing zero components and are transverse and traceless, just as in flat space. We also show that vacua exist such that the ghost and graviton propagators obey the Ward identity relating them.

  13. Mode analysis and Ward identities for perturbative quantum gravity in de Sitter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamis, N. C.; Woodard, R. P.

    1992-06-01

    We study linearized gravitons on the D-dimensional open submanifold spanned by de Sitter conformal coordinates. The physical modes are found in the same way as for flat space by imposing exact gauge conditions on the invariant field equations and then exploiting the residual gauge freedom of solutions. The resulting polarization tensors have vanishing zero components and are transverse and traceless, just as in flat space. We also show that vacua exist such that the ghost and graviton propagators obey the Ward identity relating them.

  14. Novel approach to lung stereotactic body radiation therapy plan evaluation and delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkovic, Ines-Ana

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy is currently being used as an efficient treatment for Stage I/II medically inoperable and surgically unrespectable non small cell and metastatic lung cancer. Hypofractional dose and dose escalation used in stereotactic body radiation therapy have the potential of increasing the likelihood of the tumor control and the long term progression free survival. Currently available commercial treatment planning systems are capable of calculating accurate dose distributions for static case, where the tumor and surrounding healthy tissues are not moving during the dose delivery. However, respiratory induced organ motion can result in significant movement of the lesion leading to the discrepancies between the dose delivered and the dose planned. The precision and conformity of the stereotactic body radiation therapy makes it very susceptible to motion, i.e. patient respiration can lead to significant dose delivery errors. Conventional stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans use free breathing three-dimensional computed tomography images where margins are added to delineated gross tumor volume to create planning tumor volume and avoid geometrical misses of the target. The specific hypothesis of the study is that the true four-dimensional delivery of the four-dimensional plans will allow for more accurate radiation therapy treatment and critical organ sparing along with radiobiological evaluation of the dose distributions. The specific aims are designed to provide in depth understanding of the radiation therapy treatments and influence of the four-dimensional planning and delivery, heterogeneity corrections and various radiobiological factors on the outcome. The primary focus of the Specific Aim 1 was the evaluation of the tumor volume based on the four-dimensional computed tomography scan data through its motion, volume and computed tomography number. The results indicated that tumor motion parameters will exceed the typical

  15. Gravity, two times, tractors, Weyl invariance, and six-dimensional quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonezzi, R.; Latini, E.; Waldron, A.

    2010-09-01

    Fefferman and Graham showed some time ago that four-dimensional conformal geometries could be analyzed in terms of six-dimensional, ambient, Riemannian geometries admitting a closed homothety. Recently, it was shown how conformal geometry provides a description of physics manifestly invariant under local choices of unit systems. Strikingly, Einstein’s equations are then equivalent to the existence of a parallel scale tractor (a six-component vector subject to a certain first order covariant constancy condition at every point in four-dimensional spacetime). These results suggest a six-dimensional description of four-dimensional physics, a viewpoint promulgated by the 2 times physics program of Bars. The Fefferman-Graham construction relies on a triplet of operators corresponding, respectively, to a curved six-dimensional light cone, the dilation generator and the Laplacian. These form an sp(2) algebra which Bars employs as a first class algebra of constraints in a six-dimensional gauge theory. In this article four-dimensional gravity is recast in terms of six-dimensional quantum mechanics by melding the 2 times and tractor approaches. This parent formulation of gravity is built from an infinite set of six-dimensional fields. Successively integrating out these fields yields various novel descriptions of gravity including a new four-dimensional one built from a scalar doublet, a tractor-vector multiplet and a conformal class of metrics.

  16. Spectrum of quantum transfer matrices via classical many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorsky, A.; Zabrodin, A.; Zotov, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we clarify the relationship between inhomogeneous quantum spin chains and classical integrable many-body systems. It provides an alternative (to the nested Bethe ansatz) method for computation of spectra of the spin chains. Namely, the spectrum of the quantum transfer matrix for the inhomogeneous n -invariant XXX spin chain on N sites with twisted boundary conditions can be found in terms of velocities of particles in the rational N -body Ruijsenaars-Schneider model. The possible values of the velocities are to be found from intersection points of two Lagrangian submanifolds in the phase space of the classical model. One of them is the Lagrangian hyperplane corresponding to fixed coordinates of all N particles and the other one is an N -dimensional Lagrangian submanifold obtained by fixing levels of N classical Hamiltonians in involution. The latter are determined by eigenvalues of the twist matrix. To support this picture, we give a direct proof that the eigenvalues of the Lax matrix for the classical Ruijsenaars-Schneider model, where velocities of particles are substituted by eigenvalues of the spin chain Hamiltonians, calculated through the Bethe equations, coincide with eigenvalues of the twist matrix, with certain multiplicities. We also prove a similar statement for the n Gaudin model with N marked points (on the quantum side) and the Calogero-Moser system with N particles (on the classical side). The realization of the results obtained in terms of branes and supersymmetric gauge theories is also discussed.

  17. Multi-stream portrait of the Cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandra, Nesar; Shandarin, Sergei

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of the first study of the multi-stream environment of dark matter haloes in cosmological N-body simulations in the ΛCDM cosmology. The full dynamical state of dark matter can be described as a three-dimensional sub-manifold in six-dimensional phase space - the dark matter sheet. In our study we use a Lagrangian sub-manifold x = x (q , t) (where x and q are co-moving Eulerian and Lagrangian coordinates respectively), which is dynamically equivalent to the dark matter sheet but is more convenient for numerical analysis. Our major results can be summarized as follows. At the resolution of the simulation, the cosmic web represents a hierarchical structure: each halo is embedded in the filamentary framework of the web predominantly at the filament crossings, and each filament is embedded in the wall like fabric of the web at the wall crossings. Locally, each halo or sub-halo is a peak in the number of streams field. The number of streams in the neighbouring filaments is higher than in the neighbouring walls. The walls are regions where number of streams is equal to three or a few. Voids are uniquely defined by the local condition requiring to be a single-stream flow region.

  18. In-out intermittency in partial differential equation and ordinary differential equation models.

    PubMed

    Covas, Eurico; Tavakol, Reza; Ashwin, Peter; Tworkowski, Andrew; Brooke, John M.

    2001-06-01

    We find concrete evidence for a recently discovered form of intermittency, referred to as in-out intermittency, in both partial differential equation (PDE) and ordinary differential equation (ODE) models of mean field dynamos. This type of intermittency [introduced in P. Ashwin, E. Covas, and R. Tavakol, Nonlinearity 9, 563 (1999)] occurs in systems with invariant submanifolds and, as opposed to on-off intermittency which can also occur in skew product systems, it requires an absence of skew product structure. By this we mean that the dynamics on the attractor intermittent to the invariant manifold cannot be expressed simply as the dynamics on the invariant subspace forcing the transverse dynamics; the transverse dynamics will alter that tangential to the invariant subspace when one is far enough away from the invariant manifold. Since general systems with invariant submanifolds are not likely to have skew product structure, this type of behavior may be of physical relevance in a variety of dynamical settings. The models employed here to demonstrate in-out intermittency are axisymmetric mean-field dynamo models which are often used to study the observed large-scale magnetic variability in the Sun and solar-type stars. The occurrence of this type of intermittency in such models may be of interest in understanding some aspects of such variabilities. (c) 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  19. A proof of the Kontsevich-Soibel'man conjecture

    SciTech Connect

    Efimov, Aleksander I

    2011-04-30

    It is well known that the 'Fukaya category' is actually an A{sub {infinity}-}precategory in the sense of Kontsevich and Soibel'man. This is related to the fact that, generally speaking, the morphism spaces are defined only for transversal pairs of Lagrangian submanifolds, and higher multiplications are defined only for transversal sequences of Lagrangian submanifolds. Kontsevich and Soibel'man made the following conjecture: for any graded commutative ring k, the quasi-equivalence classes of A{sub {infinity}-}precategories over k are in bijection with the quasi-equivalence classes of A{sub {infinity}-}categories over k with strict (or weak) identity morphisms. In this paper this conjecture is proved for essentially small A{sub {infinity}-}(pre)categories when k is a field. In particular, this implies that the Fukaya A{sub {infinity}-}precategory can be replaced with a quasi-equivalent actual A{sub {infinity}-}category. Furthermore, a natural construction of the pretriangulated envelope for A{sub {infinity}-}precategories is presented and it is proved that it is invariant under quasi-equivalences. Bibliography: 8 titles.

  20. A cut-off tubular geometry of loop space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha

    Motivated by the computation of loop space quantum mechanics as indicated in [14], here we seek a better understanding of the tubular geometry of loop space ℒℳ corresponding to a Riemannian manifold ℳ around the submanifold of vanishing loops. Our approach is to first compute the tubular metric of (ℳ2N+1) C around the diagonal submanifold, where (ℳN) C is the Cartesian product of N copies of ℳ with a cyclic ordering. This gives an infinite sequence of tubular metrics such that the one relevant to ℒℳ can be obtained by taking the limit N →∞. Such metrics are computed by adopting an indirect method where the general tubular expansion theorem of [21] is crucially used. We discuss how the complete reparametrization isometry of loop space arises in the large-N limit and verify that the corresponding Killing equation is satisfied to all orders in tubular expansion. These tubular metrics can alternatively be interpreted as some natural Riemannian metrics on certain bundles of tangent spaces of ℳ which, for ℳ×ℳ, is the tangent bundle Tℳ.

  1. Human pose tracking from monocular video by traversing an image motion mapped body pose manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Saurav; Poulin, Joshua; Acton, Scott T.

    2010-01-01

    Tracking human pose from monocular video sequences is a challenging problem due to the large number of independent parameters affecting image appearance and nonlinear relationships between generating parameters and the resultant images. Unlike the current practice of fitting interpolation functions to point correspondences between underlying pose parameters and image appearance, we exploit the relationship between pose parameters and image motion flow vectors in a physically meaningful way. Change in image appearance due to pose change is realized as navigating a low dimensional submanifold of the infinite dimensional Lie group of diffeomorphisms of the two dimensional sphere S2. For small changes in pose, image motion flow vectors lie on the tangent space of the submanifold. Any observed image motion flow vector field is decomposed into the basis motion vector flow fields on the tangent space and combination weights are used to update corresponding pose changes in the different dimensions of the pose parameter space. Image motion flow vectors are largely invariant to style changes in experiments with synthetic and real data where the subjects exhibit variation in appearance and clothing. The experiments demonstrate the robustness of our method (within +/-4° of ground truth) to style variance.

  2. Dirac structures in vakonomic mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Fernando; Yoshimura, Hiroaki

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we explore dynamics of the nonholonomic system called vakonomic mechanics in the context of Lagrange-Dirac dynamical systems using a Dirac structure and its associated Hamilton-Pontryagin variational principle. We first show the link between vakonomic mechanics and nonholonomic mechanics from the viewpoints of Dirac structures as well as Lagrangian submanifolds. Namely, we clarify that Lagrangian submanifold theory cannot represent nonholonomic mechanics properly, but vakonomic mechanics instead. Second, in order to represent vakonomic mechanics, we employ the space TQ ×V∗, where a vakonomic Lagrangian is defined from a given Lagrangian (possibly degenerate) subject to nonholonomic constraints. Then, we show how implicit vakonomic Euler-Lagrange equations can be formulated by the Hamilton-Pontryagin variational principle for the vakonomic Lagrangian on the extended Pontryagin bundle (TQ ⊕T∗ Q) ×V∗. Associated with this variational principle, we establish a Dirac structure on (TQ ⊕T∗ Q) ×V∗ in order to define an intrinsic vakonomic Lagrange-Dirac system. Furthermore, we also establish another construction for the vakonomic Lagrange-Dirac system using a Dirac structure on T∗ Q ×V∗, where we introduce a vakonomic Dirac differential. Finally, we illustrate our theory of vakonomic Lagrange-Dirac systems by some examples such as the vakonomic skate and the vertical rolling coin.

  3. Ricci solitons on low-dimensional generalized symmetric spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvaruso, Giovanni; Rosado, Eugenia

    2017-02-01

    We consider three- and four-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian generalized symmetric spaces, whose invariant metrics were explicitly described in Černý and Kowalski (1982). While four-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian generalized symmetric spaces of types A, C and D are algebraic Ricci solitons, the ones of type B are not so. The Ricci soliton equation for their metrics yields a system of partial differential equations. Solving such system, we prove that almost all the four-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian generalized symmetric spaces of type B are Ricci solitons. These examples show some deep differences arising for the Ricci soliton equation between the Riemannian and the pseudo-Riemannian cases, as any homogeneous Riemannian Ricci soliton is algebraic Jablonski (2015). We also investigate three-dimensional generalized symmetric spaces of any signature and prove that they are Ricci solitons.

  4. Solution of a braneworld big crunch/big bang cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, Paul L.; Turok, Neil; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2007-11-15

    We solve for the cosmological perturbations in a five-dimensional background consisting of two separating or colliding boundary branes, as an expansion in the collision speed V divided by the speed of light c. Our solution permits a detailed check of the validity of four-dimensional effective theory in the vicinity of the event corresponding to the big crunch/big bang singularity. We show that the four-dimensional description fails at the first nontrivial order in (V/c){sup 2}. At this order, there is nontrivial mixing of the two relevant four-dimensional perturbation modes (the growing and decaying modes) as the boundary branes move from the narrowly separated limit described by Kaluza-Klein theory to the well-separated limit where gravity is confined to the positive-tension brane. We comment on the cosmological significance of the result and compute other quantities of interest in five-dimensional cosmological scenarios.

  5. Beta Functions in Chirally Deformed Supersymmetric Sigma Models in Two Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, Arkady

    We study two-dimensional sigma models where the chiral deformation diminished the original 𝒩 =(2, 2) supersymmetry to the chiral one, 𝒩 =(0, 2). Such heterotic models were discovered previously on the world sheet of non-Abelian stringy solitons supported by certain four-dimensional 𝒩 = 1 theories. We study geometric aspects and holomorphic properties of these models, and derive a number of exact expressions for the β functions in terms of the anomalous dimensions analogous to the NSVZ β function in four-dimensional Yang-Mills. Instanton calculus provides a straightforward method for the derivation.

  6. The edge of supersymmetry: Stability walls in heterotic theory

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson, Lara B.; Gray, James; Lukas, Andre; ...

    2009-05-15

    We explicitly describe, in the language of four-dimensional N = 1 supersymmetric field theory, what happens when the moduli of a heterotic Calabi-Yau compactification change so as to make the internal non-Abelian gauge fields non-supersymmetric. At the edge of the region in Kähler moduli space where supersymmetry can be preserved, an additional anomalous U(1) gauge symmetry appears in the four-dimensional theory. The D-term contribution to the scalar potential associated to this U(1) attempts to force the system back into a supersymmetric configuration and provides a consistent low-energy description of gauge bundle stability.

  7. Beta functions in Chirally deformed supersymmetric sigma models in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, Arkady

    2016-10-01

    We study two-dimensional sigma models where the chiral deformation diminished the original 𝒩 = (2, 2) supersymmetry to the chiral one, 𝒩 = (0, 2). Such heterotic models were discovered previously on the world sheet of non-Abelian stringy solitons supported by certain four-dimensional 𝒩 = 1 theories. We study geometric aspects and holomorphic properties of these models, and derive a number of exact expressions for the β functions in terms of the anomalous dimensions analogous to the NSVZ β function in four-dimensional Yang-Mills. Instanton calculus provides a straightforward method for the derivation.

  8. Abelian tensor hierarchy in 4D, N = 1 superspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Katrin; Becker, Melanie; Linch, William D.; Robbins, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    With the goal of constructing the supersymmetric action for all fields, massless and massive, obtained by Kaluza-Klein compactification from type II theory or M-theory in a closed form, we embed the (Abelian) tensor hierarchy of p-forms in four-dimensional, N =1superspaceandconstructitsChern-Simons-likeinvariants. Whenspecializedtothe case in which the tensors arise from a higher-dimensional theory, the invariants may be interpreted as higher-dimensional Chern-Simons forms reduced to four dimensions. As an application of the formalism, we construct the eleven-dimensional Chern-Simons form in terms of four-dimensional, N = 1 superfields.

  9. Continuum strong-coupling expansion of Yang-Mills theory: quark confinement and infra-red slavery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Paul

    1994-04-01

    We solve Schrödinger's equation for the ground-state of four-dimensional Yang-Mills theory as an expansion in inverse powers of the coupling. Expectation values computed with the leading-order approximation are reduced to a calculation in two-dimensional Yang-Mills theory which is known to confine. Consequently the Wilson loop in the four-dimensional theory obeys an area law to leading order and the coupling becomes infinite as the mass scale goes to zero.

  10. Exploring Tripartite Quantum Correlations: Entanglement Witness and Quantum Discord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarizadeh, M. A.; Karimi, N.; Heshmati, A.; Amidi, D.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we explore the tripartite quantum correlations by employing the quantum relative entropy as a distance measure. First, we evaluate the explicit expression for nonlinear entanglement witness (EW) of tripartite systems in the four dimensional space that lends itself to a straightforward algorithm for finding closest separable state (CSS) to the generic state. Then using nonlinear EW with specific feasible regions (FRs), quantum discord is derived analytically for the three-qubit and tripartite systems in the four dimensional space. Furthermore, we explicitly figure out the additivity relation of quantum correlations in tripartite systems.

  11. Gigavolt Bound free Transitions Driven by Extreme Light

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-12

    is the four dimensional wavevector of the ra- diation, and xµ is the spacetime coordinate. Without loss of generality, let k1 = k2 = 0. Then Υ ≡ u0...nota- tion, the LL formula is extremely unwieldy, and even in four dimensional form, it appears to require expensive evaulations of all spacetime ...s 4 , ∆s 2 ) u(0) (21) u(2) = Λ ( s+ 3∆s 4 , ∆s 2 ) u(1) (22) This requires field evaluations at only two spacetime points. Now, in the absence of

  12. Gravity and antigravity in a brane world with metastable gravitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, R.; Rubakov, V. A.; Sibiryakov, S. M.

    2000-09-01

    In the framework of a five-dimensional three-brane model with quasi-localized gravitons we evaluate metric perturbations induced on the positive tension brane by matter residing thereon. We find that at intermediate distances, the effective four-dimensional theory coincides, up to small corrections, with General Relativity. This is in accord with Csaki, Erlich and Hollowood and in contrast to Dvali, Gabadadze and Porrati. We show, however, that at ultra-large distances this effective four-dimensional theory becomes dramatically different: conventional tensor gravity changes into scalar anti-gravity.

  13. Does σ-model conformal invariance imply a Robertson-Walker universe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamandis, G. A.; Georgalas, B. C.; Lahanas, A. B.

    1992-08-01

    Starting from the σ-model conformal invariance conditions we find all four dimensional metrics when the dilaton field satisfies the condition ▿μ▿νφ=0. Such configurations have been previously employed in a flat D dimensional target space and naturally come out as solutions consistent with conformal invariance of the supersymmetric σ-model beyond the two loop order. The four dimensional metrics emerging out are either of the Robertson-Walker type or a special kind of a generalized pp-wave metric. Of these solutions only the Robertson-Walker metric can be related to a noncritical string theory.

  14. D-dimensional torus as compact manifold and Kaluza-Klein cosmological model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, S. K.

    1992-09-01

    Singularity-free solutions of higher-dimensional Einstein field equations are obtained in the background of M4×TD manifold (M4 is a usual four-dimensional Friedmann- Robertson-Walker model and TD is a D-dimensional torus). Moreover, through dimensional reduction and one-loop quantum correction to scalar field, time-dependent cosmological constant Λ, effective gravitational constant Geff, and a fine-structure constant e/4π are derived in the effective four-dimensional theory using solutions of Einstein's equations. It is found that at late times Λ ≍ 0.

  15. Exploring Tripartite Quantum Correlations: Entanglement Witness and Quantum Discord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarizadeh, M. A.; Karimi, N.; Heshmati, A.; Amidi, D.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we explore the tripartite quantum correlations by employing the quantum relative entropy as a distance measure. First, we evaluate the explicit expression for nonlinear entanglement witness (EW) of tripartite systems in the four dimensional space that lends itself to a straightforward algorithm for finding closest separable state (CSS) to the generic state. Then using nonlinear EW with specific feasible regions (FRs), quantum discord is derived analytically for the three-qubit and tripartite systems in the four dimensional space. Furthermore, we explicitly figure out the additivity relation of quantum correlations in tripartite systems.

  16. General N=1 supersymmetric flux vacua of massive type IIA string theory.

    PubMed

    Behrndt, Klaus; Cvetic, Mirjam

    2005-07-08

    We derive conditions for the existence of four-dimensional N=1 supersymmetric flux vacua of massive type IIA string theory with general supergravity fluxes turned on. For an SU(3) singlet Killing spinor, we show that such flux vacua exist when the internal geometry is nearly Kähler. The geometry is not warped, all the allowed fluxes are proportional to the mass parameter, and the dilaton is fixed by a ratio of (quantized) fluxes. The four-dimensional cosmological constant, while negative, becomes small in the vacuum with the weak string coupling.

  17. Entropy of 4D extremal black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Clifford V.; Khuri, Ramzi R.; Myers, Robert C.

    1996-02-01

    We derive the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy formula for four-dimensional Reissner-Nordström extremal black holes in type II string theory. The derivation is performed in two separate (T-dual) weak coupling pictures. One uses a type IIB bound state problem of D5- and D1-branes, while the other uses a bound state problem of D0- and D4-branes with macroscopic fundamental type IIA strings. In both cases, the D-brane systems are also bound to a Kaluza-Klein monopole, which then yields the four-dimensional black hole at strong coupling.

  18. Gauge-invariant functional measure for gauge fields on CP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, V. P.

    2013-11-01

    We introduce a general parametrization for non-Abelian gauge fields on the four-dimensional space CP2. The volume element for the gauge-orbit space or the space of physical configurations is then investigated. The leading divergence in this volume element is obtained in terms of a higher dimensional Wess-Zumino-Witten action, which has previously been studied in the context of Kähler-Chern-Simons theories. This term, it is argued, implies that one needs to introduce a dimensional parameter to specify the integration measure, a step which is a nonperturbative version of the well-known dimensional transmutation in four-dimensional gauge theories.

  19. Flocking-based Document Clustering on the Graphics Processing Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Potok, Thomas E; Patton, Robert M; ST Charles, Jesse Lee

    2008-01-01

    Abstract?Analyzing and grouping documents by content is a complex problem. One explored method of solving this problem borrows from nature, imitating the flocking behavior of birds. Each bird represents a single document and flies toward other documents that are similar to it. One limitation of this method of document clustering is its complexity O(n2). As the number of documents grows, it becomes increasingly difficult to receive results in a reasonable amount of time. However, flocking behavior, along with most naturally inspired algorithms such as ant colony optimization and particle swarm optimization, are highly parallel and have found increased performance on expensive cluster computers. In the last few years, the graphics processing unit (GPU) has received attention for its ability to solve highly-parallel and semi-parallel problems much faster than the traditional sequential processor. Some applications see a huge increase in performance on this new platform. The cost of these high-performance devices is also marginal when compared with the price of cluster machines. In this paper, we have conducted research to exploit this architecture and apply its strengths to the document flocking problem. Our results highlight the potential benefit the GPU brings to all naturally inspired algorithms. Using the CUDA platform from NIVIDA? we developed a document flocking implementation to be run on the NIVIDA?GEFORCE 8800. Additionally, we developed a similar but sequential implementation of the same algorithm to be run on a desktop CPU. We tested the performance of each on groups of news articles ranging in size from 200 to 3000 documents. The results of these tests were very significant. Performance gains ranged from three to nearly five times improvement of the GPU over the CPU implementation. This dramatic improvement in runtime makes the GPU a potentially revolutionary platform for document clustering algorithms.

  20. STUDY OF TWO SUCCESSIVE THREE-RIBBON SOLAR FLARES ON 2012 JULY 6

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haimin; Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju; Zeng, Zhicheng; Cao, Wenda

    2014-01-20

    This Letter reports two rarely observed three-ribbon flares (M1.9 and C9.2) on 2012 July 6 in NOAA AR 11515, which we found using Hα observations of 0.''1 resolution from the New Solar Telescope and Ca II H images from Hinode. The flaring site is characterized by an intriguing ''fish-bone-like'' morphology evidenced by both Hα images and a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation, where two semi-parallel rows of low-lying, sheared loops connect an elongated, parasitic negative field with the sandwiching positive fields. The NLFFF model also shows that the two rows of loops are asymmetric in height and have opposite twists, and are enveloped by large-scale field lines including open fields. The two flares occurred in succession within half an hour and are located at the two ends of the flaring region. The three ribbons of each flare run parallel to the magnetic polarity inversion line, with the outer two lying in the positive field and the central one in the negative field. Both flares show surge-like flows in Hα apparently toward the remote region, while the C9.2 flare is also accompanied by EUV jets possibly along the open field lines. Interestingly, the 12-25 keV hard X-ray sources of the C9.2 flare first line up with the central ribbon then shift to concentrate on the top of the higher branch of loops. These results are discussed in favor of reconnection along the coronal null line, producing the three flare ribbons and the associated ejections.